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Sample records for adult periodontitis patients

  1. Patient compliance and supportive periodontal therapy: Study among young adults of Namakkal district

    PubMed Central

    Gokulanathan, Subramanium; Balan, Natarajan; Aravind, Ramaraj Jayabalan; Thangavelu, Kavin

    2014-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study is to assess the patient compliance to supportive and maintenance periodontal therapy and to determine the reason for noncompliance among young adult patients of Namakkal district, India. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study conducted on 400 patients who underwent periodontal therapy and subsequently recalled for supportive and maintenance periodontal treatment in the Department of Periodontics, Vivekanandha Dental College for Women, Namakkal. Patients age group 25-35 years and of both gender were equally selected and grouped by occupation and socioeconomic status. According to their compliance with appointments, they are categorized as complete compliance, partially compliance and insufficient or noncompliance. Noncompliance and partially compliance patients were contacted and asked to rate their experience and reason for noncompliance. Results: In this study, 80% of patients showed complete compliance and were regular for supportive periodontal therapy appointments. Women were more regular in maintaining recall appointments than men. Salaried employers showed 84.3% complete compliance, while self-employed personals showed 77% complete compliance and 75% of nonworking personals were regular to the appointment schedule. Noncompliance person has quoted lack of time and forgetting the appointment date as a major reason for missed appointments. Conclusions: This study recommends the need for improvement in communication skills of practitioners and weekend appointment for patient undergoing periodontal maintenance therapy. PMID:25210365

  2. The effects of phenytoin and sodium valproate on the periodontal health of adult epileptic patients.

    PubMed

    Seymour, R A; Smith, D G; Turnbull, D N

    1985-07-01

    The periodontal health of 30 adult epileptic patients treated with either sodium valproate or phenytoin was compared with a control group (n = 15) of otherwise healthy patients. The 3 groups were matched for age and sex. Patients on phenytoin therapy showed significantly higher plaque scores (P less than 0.05), gingival index (P less than 0.05) and pocketing (P less than 0.05) than patients in the control group. The % of gingival hyperplasia was significantly higher (P less than 0.05) in the phenytoin-treated patients than those on sodium valproate or in the control group. However, patients on phenytoin therapy had significantly less bone loss than those on sodium valproate (P less than 0.05) or in the control group (P less than 0.01). No significant differences were observed between the sodium valproate group and the control group on any of the parameters assessed. The results from this study would suggest that sodium valproate has no unwanted effects on periodontal health and may be considered a safe alternative, regarding the periodontal aspects, to phenytoin for the treatment of adult onset epilepsy.

  3. A six-month clinical comparison of the efficacy of the Sonicare and the Braun Oral-B electric toothbrushes on improving periodontal health in adult periodontitis patients.

    PubMed

    Robinson, P J; Maddalozzo, D; Breslin, S

    1997-01-01

    A sonic electric toothbrush (Sonicare) and an oscillating/rotating electric brush (Braun Oral-B) were compared for efficacy in removing supragingival plaque, reducing gingival inflammation, reducing probing pocket depth (Pd) and improving probing attachment levels (PAL) in a 6-month, single-blind clinical trial. Sixty-six adults with early-moderate periodontitis (5-7 mm Pd in at least two quadrants) entered the study, and 54 completed the entire study. The Sonicare and Braun groups were equally matched for plaque scores, and balanced for age, race and gender. Plaque was scored using the Turesky, Gilmore and Glickman Index. Gingival inflammation was determined by the Papillary Bleeding Score (PBS) of Loesche. Probing depths and attachment levels were determined using a manual North Carolina probe. All measurements were recorded at baseline, 2, 4 and 6 months. The mean overall plaque scores improved in both the Sonicare and the Braun groups at each of the follow-up visits. Interproximal plaque scores also improved in both groups with time, and the mean differential Sonicare post-brushing score was significantly better than the Braun at the 6-month visit (t-test; p = 0.039). Gingival inflammation also decreased in both groups over the 6-month period, but the Sonicare group showed significantly superior PBS scores at 4 months (t-test; p = 0.002) and 6 months (p = 0.005). The percentage reduction in inflammation from baseline at 6 months was 31.9% for Sonicare and 18.1% for Braun. Probing depth scores followed a similar pattern, with the Sonicare showing a mean reduction of 0.84 mm (15.8%) from baseline at 6 months, and Braun showing a 0.39 mm (7.2%) reduction (p = 0.002). In the Sonicare group probing attachment levels improved by 8.6% (MANOVA; p = 0.01), but no PAL improvement was seen in the Braun group. Overall, this study demonstrates that long-term use of these two electric toothbrushes improves periodontal health in adult periodontitis patients, and that the

  4. Cytological analysis of the periodontal pocket in patients with aggressive periodontitis and chronic periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Cecilia, E. Castro; Myriam, A. Koss; María, E. López

    2014-01-01

    Background: Oral exfoliative cytology includes the study and interpretation of the features cells exfoliated from the oral mucosa. The aim of this study was to analyze cytological changes in the periodontal pocket of patients with different clinical stages of aggressive periodontitis (AP) and chronic periodontitis (CP). Materials and Methods: Patients aged 24–54 years, of whom 41 were diagnosed with AP, 40 with CP, sub-classified as mild, moderate and severe periodontitis, and 40 healthy individuals who were the control group. Samples of the epithelium of the periodontal pocket were taken for the cytological study. Results: Superficial and intermediate cell values were significantly greater in patients with AP than in patients with CP or the control group. Histiocyte number was higher in patients with CP than in those with AP, and differed significantly in both types of periodontitis compared to the control group. There were significant differences in polymorphonuclear neutrophil leukocytes when both types of periodontitis were compared to the control group. Microbial flora was statistically higher in patients with CP, and there were differences between patients with periodontitis and the control group. Conclusions: The cytological study demonstrated that patients with AP had greater tissue damage, shown by the increase in intermediate and superficial cells of the epithelium of the periodontal pocket compared to the group of healthy subjects and to a lesser extent, to patients with CP. Only superficial cells made it possible to differentiate the sub-stages of the disease. PMID:25395766

  5. Occurrence of periodontal pathogens among patients with chronic periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Farias, B.C.; Souza, P.R.E.; Ferreira, B.; Melo, R.S.A.; Machado, F.B.; Gusmão, E.S.; Cimões, R.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the presence of the periodontal pathogens that form the red complex (Tannerella forsythia, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Treponema denticola) and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in patients with chronic periodontitis. The sample consisted of 29 patients with a clinical and radiographic diagnosis of chronic periodontitis based on the criteria of the American Academy of Periodontology (3). Samples for microbiological analysis were collected from the four sites of greatest probing depth in each patient, totaling 116 samples. These samples were processed using conventional polymerase chain reaction, which achieved the following positive results: 46.6% for P. gingivalis, 41.4% for T. forsythia, 33.6% for T. denticola and 27.6% for A. actinomycetemcomitans. P. gingivalis and T. forsythia were more prevalent (p < 0.05) in periodontal pockets ≥ 8 mm. The combinations T. forsythia + P. gingivalis (23.2%) and T. forsythia + P. gingivalis + T. denticola (20.0%) were more frequent in sites with a probing depth ≥ 8 mm. Associations with the simultaneous presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans + P. gingivalis, A. actinomycetemcomitans + T. forsythia, P. gingivalis + T. forsythia and T. forsythia + T. denticola were statistically significant (p < 0.05). It was concluded that the red complex pathogens are related to chronic periodontitis, presenting a higher occurrence in deep periodontal pockets. Moreover, the simultaneous presence of these bacteria in deep sites suggests a symbiotic relationship between these virulent species, favoring, in this way, a further progression of periodontal disease. PMID:24031906

  6. Association between Periodontopathogens and CRP Levels in Patients with Periodontitis in Serbia

    PubMed Central

    Pejcic, Ana; Kesic, Ljiljana; Milasin, Jelena

    2011-01-01

    Background and aims Recent epidemiological studies have shown that individuals with periodontitis have a significantly higher risk of developing coronary heart disease, which might be attributed to the complex microbiota in the dental plaque. Periodontopathogens have been reported as risk factors for cardiovascular disease. This study evaluated association of chronic periodontitis and periodontopathogens with CRP in systemically healthy Serbian adults. Materials and methods Serum C-reactive protein levels were measured in 24 patients with moderate periodontitis, 26 patients with severe periodontitis, and 25 periodontally healthy subjects. Periodontal health indicators included gingival bleeding on probing and periodontal disease status. Patients with moderate periodontitis had low attachment loss and pocket depths of <4 mm. Patients with severe periodontitis had high AL and pocket depth of >5 mm. The control group with healthy gingiva had gingival sulcus of <2 mm and no attachment loss. Presence of periodontopathogens in subgingival plaque samples was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction. Results The periodontal parameters and CRP levels were significantly higher in the patients with periodontitis. Patients who had both severe and moderate periodontitis had higher mean CRP levels. The percentage of subjects with elevated CRP leves of >5 mol/L was greater in the higher clinical AL group compared to the group with less attachment loss. Presence of periodontopathogens was also associated with elevated CRP levels and poor periodontal status. Conclusion PD and subgingival periodontopathogens are associated with increased CRP levels. These findings suggest that periodontal infection may contribute to systemic inflammatory burden in otherwise healthy individuals. PMID:23019501

  7. Multidisciplinary management including periodontics, orthodontics, implants, and prosthetics for an adult.

    PubMed

    Pinho, Teresa; Neves, Manuel; Alves, Célia

    2012-08-01

    This article describes the complex dental treatment of an adult patient with multiple missing teeth, mild chronic periodontitis, and a malocclusion with a cant of the occlusal plane. After periodontal treatment, titanium implants and a miniscrew were placed to correct the occlusal plane canting with orthodontic treatment. Prosthodontic treatment was completed by using osseointegrated implants to replace the missing teeth. PMID:22858334

  8. Periodontal implications of orthodontic treatment in adults with reduced or normal periodontal tissues versus those of adolescents.

    PubMed

    Boyd, R L; Leggott, P J; Quinn, R S; Eakle, W S; Chambers, D

    1989-09-01

    This longitudinal study monitored periodontal status in 20 adults and 20 adolescents undergoing fixed orthodontic treatment. Ten adults had generalized periodontitis and received periodontal treatment, including periodontal surgery, before orthodontic treatment. They also received periodontal maintenance at 3-month intervals during orthodontic treatment. The other 10 adults had normal periodontal tissues. Neither these latter adults nor the adolescents received periodontal maintenance during orthodontic treatment. Periodontal status was determined (1) at six standard sites before fixed appliances were placed (baseline), (2) at 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, and 18 months after appliances had been placed, and (3) 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after appliances had been removed. At each of these visits, these sites were assessed for plaque index, gingival index, bleeding tendency, and pocket depth. Loss of attachment between baseline and 3 months after appliances were removed and tooth loss were also determined. Complete data were obtained for 15 adolescents and 14 adults. During orthodontic treatment the adolescent group showed significantly more (p less than 0.05) periodontal inflammation and supragingival plaque than the adults; after appliances were removed, this pattern was no longer statistically significant. For loss of attachment, there were no significant differences among adolescents, adults with normal periodontal tissues, or adults with reduced but healthy periodontal tissues who had undergone treatment for periodontal disease. For tooth loss, three nonstudy site teeth with pockets deeper than 6 mm and/or furcation involvements were lost because of periodontal abscesses in the adult group treated for periodontal disease. PMID:2773862

  9. Effects of Periodontal Therapy on Metabolic Control in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Periodontal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tze-Fang; Jen, I-An; Chou, Chyuan; Lei, Yen-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Epidemiologic studies have reported increased incidence, prevalence and acuity of periodontitis in adults with diabetes and some have also suggested that treating periodontal disease may improve glycemic control in diabetic patients. This meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the effects of different periodontal therapies on metabolic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and periodontal disease. We searched the Medline, EMBASE and Cochrane Library (Central) databases up to January 2014 for relevant studies pertaining to periodontal treatments and glycemic control in adults with T2DM. The search terms were periodontal treatment/periodontal therapy, diabetes/diabetes mellitus, periodontitis/periodontal and glycemic control. The primary outcome measure taken from the included studies was glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). We compared differences in patients’ pre- and post-intervention HbA1c results between a treatment group receiving scaling and root planing (SRP) combined with administration of oral doxycycline (n = 71) and controls receiving SRP alone or SRP plus placebo (n = 72). Meta-analysis was performed using Comprehensive Meta Analysis software. Nineteen randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were identified. Four trials involving a total of 143 patients with T2DM and periodontal disease were determined to be eligible for analysis. Data of 1 study were not retained for meta-analysis because HbA1c results were recorded as median with IQR. Meta-analysis of the included 3 studies revealed no significant differences in HbA1c results between the periodontal treatment group (n = 71) and control group (n = 72) (HbA1c SMD = −0.238, 95% CI = −0.616 to 0.140; P = 0.217). Systemic doxycycline added to SRP does not significantly improve metabolic control in patients with T2DM and chronic periodontitis. Current evidence is insufficient to support a significant association between periodontal therapy and metabolic

  10. Association of Periodontitis With Urinary Albumin Excretion in Korean Adults With Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Han, Kyungdo; Nam, Ga Eun; Kim, Do Hoon; Park, Jun-Beom; Ko, Youngkyung; Roh, Yong Kyun; Cho, Kyung Hwan; Park, Yong Gyu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Albuminuria and periodontitis are both commonly associated with systemic inflammation. However, the association between urinary albumin excretion (UAE) and periodontitis in patients with type 2 diabetes has not been fully investigated. This study aimed to investigate the association between UAE and periodontitis in Korean adults with type 2 diabetes. This study performed a cross-sectional analysis and used hierarchical multivariable logistic regression analysis models. Data from the 2012 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were analyzed. A total of 547 patients, with type 2 diabetes without renal impairment, were included in this study. UAE was assessed using the urinary albumin to creatinine ratio (UACR). A community periodontal index greater than or equal to code 3 was used to define periodontitis. The risk of periodontitis tended to increase as UACR increased even after adjustment for potential confounders (P for trend in the odds ratios = 0.05 in model 1; 0.02 in model 2; and 0.01 in model 3). In a subgroup analysis, the prevalence of periodontitis was significantly higher in the patients with albuminuria (UACR >30 mg/g) than in those without albuminuria among patients younger than 65 years (P = 0.03), those with newly diagnosed diabetes (P = 0.04), or those without obesity (P = .04). UAE was positively associated with the risk of periodontitis in Korean adults with type 2 diabetes. In the patients who were younger, were newly diagnosed with diabetes, or had normal body mass index, individuals with albuminuria were more likely to have a higher prevalence of periodontitis. Early identification of periodontitis may be helpful in Korean diabetic adults with increased UAE. PMID:26496329

  11. Disparities in periodontitis prevalence among chronic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Ioannidou, E; Swede, H

    2011-06-01

    Because of adverse effects of uremia in the innate and adaptive immune systems, we hypothesized that chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients would have higher prevalence of moderate periodontitis compared with individuals without CKD. We examined this hypothesis using the NHANES III dataset, including 12,081 adults stratified by Race-Ethnicity. We followed the American Academy of Periodontology/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention definition for moderate periodontitis. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was calculated based on calibrated serum creatinine levels according to the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease Study formula. Analyses incorporated NHANES sampling weights. Overall, 14.6% of individuals with CKD were classified as having moderate periodontitis, compared with 8.7% in the non-CKD group (p = 0.001). A significant dose-response association (p = 0.001) was observed between prevalence of moderate periodontitis and CKD stages among non-Hispanic Blacks and Mexican-Americans, but not so for non-Hispanic Whites. Prevalence of periodontitis among participants with CKD was substantially higher among non-Hispanic Blacks (38.9%) and Mexican-Americans (37.3%) compared with non-Hispanic Whites (12.9%). Multivariate logistic regression models showed that Mexican-Americans and non-Hispanic Blacks with CKD were approximately 30% to 60% more likely to have moderate periodontitis compared with those without CKD, after adjustment for diabetes status and other potential confounders.

  12. Radiologic Assessment of the Periodontal Patient.

    PubMed

    Korostoff, Jonathan; Aratsu, Ali; Kasten, Brian; Mupparapu, Mel

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal examination involves evaluation of soft and hard tissue parameters to gauge gingival inflammatory changes and quantify attachment loss. Conventional radiographs are vital components of this process and can be used to assess the presence of calculus and other local factors to establish a diagnosis, prognosis, and periodontal treatment plan. The 2-dimensional nature of these images limits their utility. The advent of high-resolution cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) offers 3-dimensional images that might overcome these limitations. We discuss the use of conventional radiographic techniques as well as CBCT for evaluating, diagnosing, and treatment planning patients presenting for periodontal and/or implant therapy. PMID:26614950

  13. Evaluation of serum ceruloplasmin in aggressive and chronic periodontitis patients

    PubMed Central

    Harshavardhana, B.; Rath, S. K.; Mukherjee, Manish

    2013-01-01

    Background: Pro-inflammatory markers are seen to increase in inflammatory diseases like periodontitis. Detecting an increase in these markers is one of the diagnostic modality. One such marker, which can be detected, is the ceruloplasmin. Ceruloplasmin induces hypoxia and generates oxygen radicals at the site of aggressive periodontitis. It also causes a state of hypoferremia leading to increase in the natural resistance of the body. The aim of this study was to evaluate the serum levels of cerruloplasmin in both aggressive and chronic periodontitis patients. Materials and Methods: Blood samples were collected from aggressive periodontitis patients (n = 20), chronic periodontitis patients (n = 20) and periodontally healthy patients (n = 20). The serum was extracted from all the blood samples and ceruloplasmin levels were spectroscopically evaluated through a new kinetic method, which used a norfloxacin based reagent. Results: Serum ceruloplasmin levels were found to be significantly higher in aggressive periodontitis patients (P > 0.05) than in chronic periodontitis patients (P > 0.05) even though increase in the level of ceruloplasmin was found in chronic periodontitis. Periodontally healthy patients did not show increase in the levels of serum ceruloplasmin. The levels of serum ceruloplasmin also increased with the disease severity whose manifestations were increased bleeding on probing, increased pocket depth and increased attachment loss. Conclusion: Serum ceruloplasmin levels increased in both aggressive and chronic periodontitis patients, but more in aggressive periodontitis patients making it a potential marker for diagnosis of periodontitis. PMID:24049334

  14. Effect of non-surgical periodontal treatment on transferrin serum levels in patients with chronic periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Shirmohamadi, Adileh; Chitsazi, Mohamad Taghi; Faramarzi, Masoumeh; Salari, Ashkan; Naser Alavi, Fereshteh; Pashazadeh, Nazila

    2016-01-01

    Background. Transferrin is a negative acute phase protein, which decreases during inflammation and infection. The aim of the present investigation was to evaluate changes in the transferrin serum levels subsequent to non-surgical treatment of chronic periodontal disease. Methods. Twenty patients with chronic periodontitis and 20 systemically healthy subjects without periodontal disease, who had referred to Tabriz Faculty of Dentistry, were selected. Transferrin serum levels and clinical periodontal parameters (pocket depth, clinical attachment level, gingival index, bleeding index and plaque index) were measured at baseline and 3 months after non-surgical periodontal treatment. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistical methods (means ± standard deviations). Independent samples t-test was used to compare transferrin serum levels and clinical variables between the test and control groups. Paired samples t-test was used in the test group for comparisons before and after treatment. Statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. Results. The mean transferrin serum level in patients with chronic periodontitis (213.1 ± 9.2 mg/dL) was significantly less than that in periodontally healthy subjects (307.8 ± 11.7 mg/dL). Three months after periodontal treatment, the transferrin serum level increased significantly (298.3 ± 7.6 mg/dL) and approached the levels in periodontally healthy subjects (P < 0.05). Conclusion. The decrease and increase in transferrin serum levels with periodontal disease and periodontal treatment, respectively, indicated an inverse relationship between transferrin serum levels and chronic periodontitis.

  15. Patterns of Salivary Analytes Provide Diagnostic Capacity for Distinguishing Chronic Adult Periodontitis from Health

    PubMed Central

    Ebersole, Jeffrey L.; Schuster, Julie L.; Stevens, Jason; Dawson, Dolph; Kryscio, Richard; Lin, Yushin; Thomas, Mark V.; Miller, Craig S.

    2013-01-01

    Salivary biomarker discovery requires identification of analytes with high discriminatory capacity to distinguish disease from health, including day-to-day variations that occur in analyte levels. In this study, seven biomarkers associated with inflammatory and tissue destructive processes of periodontal disease were investigated. In a prospective cohort study design, analyte expression levels were determined in unstimulated whole saliva samples collected on multiple occasions from 30 healthy adults (i.e., orally and systemically) and 50 chronic adult periodontitis patients. Salivary levels of IL-1β, IL-6, MMP-8, and albumin were significantly elevated (5.4 to 12.6×) and levels of IFNα were consistently lower (8.7×) in periodontitis patients compared with the daily variation observed in healthy adults. ROC analyses of IL-1β, IL-6 and MMP-8 yielded areas under the curves of 0.963-0.984 for discriminating periodontitis from health. These results demonstrate that levels of salivary bioanalytes of patients who have periodontitis are uniquely different from normal levels found in healthy subjects, and a panel consisting of IL-1β, MMP-8 and IL-6 shows particular diagnostic potential. PMID:22926406

  16. Oral Chlamydia trachomatis in Patients with Established Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Susan G.; Lopatin, Dennis E.; Foxman, Betsy; Burt, Brian A.

    2009-01-01

    Periodontitis is considered a consequence of a pathogenic microbial infection at the periodontal site and host susceptibility factors. Periodontal research supports the association of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, and Bacteroides forsythus, and periodontitis; however causality has not been demonstrated. In pursuit of the etiology of periodontitis, we hypothesized that the intracellular bacteria, Chlamydia trachomatis, may play a role. As a first step, a cross-sectional study of dental school clinic patients with established periodontitis were assessed for the presence of C. trachomatis in the oral cavity, and in particular from the lining epithelium of periodontal sites. C. trachomatis was detected using a direct fluorescent monoclonal antibody (DFA) in oral specimens from 7% (6/87) of the patients. Four patients tested positive in specimens from the lining epithelium of diseased periodontal sites, one patient tested positive in healthy periodontal sites, and one patient tested positive in the general mucosal specimen. In conclusion, this study provides preliminary evidence of C. trachomatis in the periodontal sites. Planned studies include the use of a more precise periodontal epithelial cell collection device, the newer nucleic acid amplification techniques to detect C. trachomatis, and additional populations to determine the association of C. trachomatis and periodontitis. PMID:11218493

  17. Periodontal Regenerative Therapy in Patient with Chronic Periodontitis and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Seshima, Fumi; Nishina, Makiko; Namba, Takashi; Saito, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of generalized chronic periodontitis and type 2 diabetes mellitus requiring periodontal treatment including regenerative therapy. The patient was a 66-year-old man who presented with the chief complaint of gingival inflammation and mobile teeth in the molar region. He had been being treated for type 2 diabetes mellitus since 1999. His glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level was 7.8%. An initial examination revealed sites with a probing depth of ≥7 mm in the molar region, and radiography revealed angular bone defects in this area. Based on a clinical diagnosis of generalized chronic periodontitis, the patient underwent initial periodontal therapy. An improvement was observed in periodontal conditions on reevaluation, and his HbA1c level showed a reduction to 6.9%. Periodontal regenerative therapy with enamel matrix derivative was then performed on #16, 26, and 27. Following another reevaluation, a removable partial denture was fabricated for #47 and the patient placed on supportive periodontal therapy (SPT). To date, periodontal conditions have remained stable and the patient's HbA1c level has increased to 7.5% during SPT. The results show the importance of collaboration between dentist and physician in managing periodontal and diabetic conditions in such patients.

  18. [Microcirculation impairment in periodontal tissues in patients with chronic generalized periodontitis combined with metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Krechina, E K; Zorina, O A; Molchanov, A M; Shilov, A M

    2016-01-01

    Using the method of laser Doppler flowmetry the study of microcirculation in periodontal tissues in patients with moderate chronic generalized periodontitis and metabolic syndrome was carried out. The analysis of microcirculation values proved not only the reduction of blood flow intensity but also the decreased vasoactivity of microvessels essential to maintain normal microcirculation in periodontal tissues, as it provides active modulation of tissue blood flow and its adaptation to local metabolic needs. PMID:26925562

  19. The prevalence of periodontal diseases among adult population in Georgia.

    PubMed

    Tsitaishvili, L; Margvelashvili, M; Kalandadze, M; Margvelashvili, V

    2014-09-01

    The present research was conducted to estimate the prevalence of periodontal diseases in the adult population of Georgia, to study the peculiarity of their distribution within population in different regions of the country. The survey was carried out based on cluster- stratified method derived by WHO. 2370 adults including 1289 women and 1081 men distributed in 4 age groups: I - 20-34, II - 35-44, III - 45-64, IV - 65+ the residents of the city, town and village in 9 regions of Georgia and the capital Tbilisi were examined. The assessment of periodontal status and oral hygiene was based on WHO-'s recommendation. (WHO 1997 '˜Oral Health Assessment Form') Examination was done under good natural light using a mouth mirror and a periodontal index (CPI) probe for measurements of periodontal pockets depth. Questionnaires comprised questions for revealing the following risk factors: social status and family income, existence of common diseases, people'S attitude towards oral hygiene(tooth brushing, using dental floss, mouth rinsing) acceptability of dental service, sugar consumption rate, tobacco use, consumption of dairy products. The reliable statistical data received from the study relieved high prevalence of periodontal diseases in all regions: in Achara - 71.7, Mtskheta-Mtianeti - 70.8%, Imereti - 64.9%, Qvemo Qartli - 61.6%, Tbilisi - 61.8% and Shida Qartli - 60.5%, Guria - 55.9%, Samtskhe-Javakheti - 56.0%, Kakheti - 59.1%, Samegrelo - 55.2%. Despite the variability of risk factors high prevalence of inflammatory periodontal diseases in regions of Georgia was related to more extent to the low educational medical background, less dental acceptability due to not very positive attitude towards dental service and oral hygiene skills though financial problems also played substantial role. The study confirmed that periodontal diseases represent an actual problem in Georgia and need caring out serious preventive measures to enhance peoples' referral to dental service and

  20. The prevalence of periodontal diseases among adult population in Georgia.

    PubMed

    Tsitaishvili, L; Margvelashvili, M; Kalandadze, M; Margvelashvili, V

    2014-09-01

    The present research was conducted to estimate the prevalence of periodontal diseases in the adult population of Georgia, to study the peculiarity of their distribution within population in different regions of the country. The survey was carried out based on cluster- stratified method derived by WHO. 2370 adults including 1289 women and 1081 men distributed in 4 age groups: I - 20-34, II - 35-44, III - 45-64, IV - 65+ the residents of the city, town and village in 9 regions of Georgia and the capital Tbilisi were examined. The assessment of periodontal status and oral hygiene was based on WHO-'s recommendation. (WHO 1997 '˜Oral Health Assessment Form') Examination was done under good natural light using a mouth mirror and a periodontal index (CPI) probe for measurements of periodontal pockets depth. Questionnaires comprised questions for revealing the following risk factors: social status and family income, existence of common diseases, people'S attitude towards oral hygiene(tooth brushing, using dental floss, mouth rinsing) acceptability of dental service, sugar consumption rate, tobacco use, consumption of dairy products. The reliable statistical data received from the study relieved high prevalence of periodontal diseases in all regions: in Achara - 71.7, Mtskheta-Mtianeti - 70.8%, Imereti - 64.9%, Qvemo Qartli - 61.6%, Tbilisi - 61.8% and Shida Qartli - 60.5%, Guria - 55.9%, Samtskhe-Javakheti - 56.0%, Kakheti - 59.1%, Samegrelo - 55.2%. Despite the variability of risk factors high prevalence of inflammatory periodontal diseases in regions of Georgia was related to more extent to the low educational medical background, less dental acceptability due to not very positive attitude towards dental service and oral hygiene skills though financial problems also played substantial role. The study confirmed that periodontal diseases represent an actual problem in Georgia and need caring out serious preventive measures to enhance peoples' referral to dental service and

  1. Periodontal Management of a Patient Undergoing Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Clozza, Emanuele; Segelnick, Stuart L; Sigal, Samuel H; Rovner, Deborah N; Weinberg, Mea A

    2016-01-01

    This case report describes the periodontal management of a patient with end-stage liver disease undergoing liver transplantation. In the first part of this article, all medical and dental findings are reported to elaborate adequate diagnoses. A patient-specific treatment plan was structured given the challenging periodontal and systemic scenarios. The second part describes the periodontal therapy delivered in close interaction with the referring physicians. Last, the article reviews current principles and protocols in managing these patients. PMID:26901304

  2. Effect of non-surgical periodontal treatment on transferrin serum levels in patients with chronic periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Shirmohamadi, Adileh; Chitsazi, Mohamad Taghi; Faramarzi, Masoumeh; Salari, Ashkan; Naser Alavi, Fereshteh; Pashazadeh, Nazila

    2016-01-01

    Background. Transferrin is a negative acute phase protein, which decreases during inflammation and infection. The aim of the present investigation was to evaluate changes in the transferrin serum levels subsequent to non-surgical treatment of chronic periodontal disease. Methods. Twenty patients with chronic periodontitis and 20 systemically healthy subjects without periodontal disease, who had referred to Tabriz Faculty of Dentistry, were selected. Transferrin serum levels and clinical periodontal parameters (pocket depth, clinical attachment level, gingival index, bleeding index and plaque index) were measured at baseline and 3 months after non-surgical periodontal treatment. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistical methods (means ± standard deviations). Independent samples t-test was used to compare transferrin serum levels and clinical variables between the test and control groups. Paired samples t-test was used in the test group for comparisons before and after treatment. Statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. Results. The mean transferrin serum level in patients with chronic periodontitis (213.1 ± 9.2 mg/dL) was significantly less than that in periodontally healthy subjects (307.8 ± 11.7 mg/dL). Three months after periodontal treatment, the transferrin serum level increased significantly (298.3 ± 7.6 mg/dL) and approached the levels in periodontally healthy subjects (P < 0.05). Conclusion. The decrease and increase in transferrin serum levels with periodontal disease and periodontal treatment, respectively, indicated an inverse relationship between transferrin serum levels and chronic periodontitis. PMID:27651883

  3. Effect of non-surgical periodontal treatment on transferrin serum levels in patients with chronic periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Shirmohamadi, Adileh; Chitsazi, Mohamad Taghi; Faramarzi, Masoumeh; Salari, Ashkan; Naser Alavi, Fereshteh; Pashazadeh, Nazila

    2016-01-01

    Background. Transferrin is a negative acute phase protein, which decreases during inflammation and infection. The aim of the present investigation was to evaluate changes in the transferrin serum levels subsequent to non-surgical treatment of chronic periodontal disease. Methods. Twenty patients with chronic periodontitis and 20 systemically healthy subjects without periodontal disease, who had referred to Tabriz Faculty of Dentistry, were selected. Transferrin serum levels and clinical periodontal parameters (pocket depth, clinical attachment level, gingival index, bleeding index and plaque index) were measured at baseline and 3 months after non-surgical periodontal treatment. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistical methods (means ± standard deviations). Independent samples t-test was used to compare transferrin serum levels and clinical variables between the test and control groups. Paired samples t-test was used in the test group for comparisons before and after treatment. Statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. Results. The mean transferrin serum level in patients with chronic periodontitis (213.1 ± 9.2 mg/dL) was significantly less than that in periodontally healthy subjects (307.8 ± 11.7 mg/dL). Three months after periodontal treatment, the transferrin serum level increased significantly (298.3 ± 7.6 mg/dL) and approached the levels in periodontally healthy subjects (P < 0.05). Conclusion. The decrease and increase in transferrin serum levels with periodontal disease and periodontal treatment, respectively, indicated an inverse relationship between transferrin serum levels and chronic periodontitis. PMID:27651883

  4. Supportive periodontal therapy and periodontal biotype as prognostic factors in implants placed in patients with a history of periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Vallejo-Aisa, Francisco J.; Estefanía-Fresco, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate bone loss around implants placed in patients with a history of treated chronic periodontitis and who did or did not attend supportive periodontal therapy, after one year in function. Furthermore, the influence of periodontal biotype and level of plaque was also evaluated. Material and Methods: Forty-nine patients participated voluntarily in the study. All subjects had a history of chronic periodontitis, which had been previously treated. After the active treatment, 27 patients attended supportive periodontal therapy (SPT) and the rest did not (No SPT). The O’Leary plaque index and periodontal biotype were recorded for each subject and 246 Astra Tech® OsseospeedTM implants were radiographically analysed (123 placed in SPT patients and 123 in No SPT patients) at the time of loading and one year later, measuring marginal bone loss with the program Dental Studio NX 6.0®. The statistical analysis was performed with Windows SPSS, applying Pearson’s correlation index and the Kruskal-Wallis and U-Mann Whitney non-parametric tests. Results: Six patients were found to have periimplantitis and sixteen mucositis. The survival rate was 99.59% (100% SPT and 99.18% No SPT). Mean bone loss was 0.39 mm (range [-0.71 - 8.05]). Among SPT patients, 95% of the implants had losses less than or equal to the mean (mean bone loss of 0.16 mm) compared to 53.7% for the No SPT group (mean bone loss of 0.62 mm). A statistically significant relationship was demonstrated between bone loss around the implant and the patient’s periodontal biotype and plaque index. Conclusions: The marginal bone loss around implants in patients with treated chronic periodontitis is minimal if they are in a controlled SPT programme and there is individual control of plaque index. Moreover, the presence of a thin periodontal biotype represents a risk factor for additional bone loss. Key words:Peri-implantitis, chronic periodontitis, bacterial plaque, periodontal biotype. PMID:23722147

  5. Cytoskeletal disease: a role in the etiology of adult periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Binderman, I; Gadban, N; Yaffe, A

    2014-01-01

    All cells and organisms across the evolutionary spectrum, from the most primitive to the most complex, are mechanosensitive. As the cytoskeleton is a key in controlling the normal basal prestress of cells and therefore is involved in virtually all physiological cellular processes, abnormalities in this essential cellular characteristic may result in diseases. Indeed, many diseases have now been associated with abnormalities in cytoskeletal and nucleoskeletal proteins. We propose that adult periodontitis is, at least in part, such a cytoskeletal disease. It is well established that adult periodontitis starts by bacterial invasion at the interface between the tooth surface and marginal gingiva that induces a local inflammatory response. The inflammatory cells release metalloproteinases which degrade gingival collagenous fibrous tissue and loss of local tissue integrity that reduces the normal prestressed cell-extracellular matrix network. This is a major signaling trigger that induces a local and rapid release of ATP, which then activates P2X receptors and stimulates a calcium influx, further activating osteoclastic resorption of the alveolar bone. As periodontitis is a chronic disease, it seems reasonable to suggest that agents that maintain cytoskeletal tensegrity, for example, inhibitors of ATP receptors, may diminish the bone loss and may have a role in future periodontal therapy. PMID:23679579

  6. Assignment of Dental School Patients Using Periodontal Treatment Need Indices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mubarak, Ala

    1990-01-01

    The validity of the Periodontal Treatment Need System and the Community Periodontal Index for Treatment Need as screening tests for allocation of patients to dental students was assessed and compared. Sixty-one patients reporting to the Department of Periodontology at the University of Oslo were studied. (MLW)

  7. Restorative and periodontal challenges in adults with dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Puliyel, Divya; Chiu, Ching Hsiu Ketty; Habibian, Mina

    2014-05-01

    Oral manifestations of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB) include blistering of the oral mucosa, scarring, limited mouth opening, decreased mobility of the tongue, restrictions in oral functions and a high incidence of caries. Adult oral health management is challenging and requires unique strategies, which have not been well described in the published literature. We present a case of DEB focusing on the obstacles encountered during restorative and periodontal care and recommendations for appropriate treatment. PMID:25087349

  8. Utility of Periodontal exploration in patients with Fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Santos-García, Rocío; Sánchez-Domínguez, Benito; Cordero, Mario D.; Rios-Santos, José V.; Jaramillo-Santos, María R.; Climent, Mariano H.

    2012-01-01

    Objetive: Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic pain syndrome with unknown etiology, which affects predominantly women. Mitochondrial alteration could have a role in the pathophysilogical mechanisms of inflammatory conditions as FM and periodontitis. The aim of the present study was assay the relationship between both diseases and mitochondrial dysfunction. Patient and Methods: We study the presence of periodontitis in twelve patients diagnosed of FM and mitochondrial dysfunction described. The diagnosis of FM was established according to ACR criteria and clinical symptoms were evaluated using the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Results: Only one patients of twelve included and agreed to participate in the study were diagnosed with periodontitis. Conclusions: Pending studies with larger numbers of patients, we can conclude that mitochondrial dysfunction in FM is a itself event not related with periodontitis. Periodontitis could be considered a exclusion criterion in all studies about mitochondrial dysfunction in patients. Key words:Peridontitis, fibromyalgia, mitocondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress. PMID:24558523

  9. Profile of periodontal conditions in selected West Malaysian adults.

    PubMed

    Rahimah, A K

    1994-01-01

    To obtain the profile of periodontal conditions in West Malaysian adults, five small scale surveys were carried out on selected occupational adult groups, 20-54 years old, between 1987 to 1990. Periodontal assessment was made using the CPITN index. In all, 779 subjects were examined. Results indicated that only 16% of the adults examined had healthy gingivae. Bleeding of the gingivae was limited to the younger (20-24 years) age group. Calculus is highly prevalent in at least 65.5% of all the subjects examined. Periodontal pockets were limited to mostly shallow pockets and the risk of developing pockets increased with increasing age. Both navy personnel and factory workers showed a higher number of healthy sextants across all ages as compared to the other three occupational groups; viz., rubber tappers, villagers and government workers. The rubber tappers were the only group with deep pockets, with the prevalence ranging between 8 to 25%. Implications of the findings to the Malaysian dental delivery system are discussed.

  10. Effect of nonsurgical periodontal treatment in patients with periodontitis and rheumatoid arthritis: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Silvestre-Rangil, Javier; Bagan, Leticia; Bagan, Jose V.

    2016-01-01

    Background Periodontitis has been regarded as a potential risk factor for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A systematic review is made to determine whether nonsurgical periodontal treatment in patients with RA offers benefits in terms of the clinical activity and inflammatory markers of the disease. Material and Methods A search was made of the Medline-PubMed, Cochrane, Embase and Scopus databases to identify studies on the relationship between the two disease processes, and especially on the effects of nonsurgical treatment in patients of this kind. The search was based on the following keywords: rheumatoid arthritis AND periodontitis (MeSH), rheumatoid arthritis AND periodontal treatment. Results Eight articles on the nonsurgical treatment of patients with periodontitis and RA were finally included in the study. All of them evaluated clinical (DAS28) and laboratory test activity (ESR, CRP, IL-6, TNFα) before and after treatment. A clear decrease in DAS28 score and ESR was recorded, while other parameters such as CRP, IL-6 and TNFα showed a non significant tendency to decrease as a result of treatment. Conclusions Nonsurgical treatment improved the periodontal condition of patients with periodontitis and RA, with beneficial effects upon the clinical and laboratory test parameters (DAS28 and ESR), while other inflammatory markers showed a marked tendency to decrease. However, all the studies included in the review involved small samples sizes and follow-up periods of no more than 6 months. Larger and particularly longitudinal studies are therefore needed to more firmly establish possible significant relations between the two disease processes. Key words:Periodontitis, rheumatoid arthritis, periodontal treatment. PMID:26946202

  11. A comparative study of combined periodontal and orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances and clear aligners in patients with periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purpose With the increasing prevalence of orthodontic treatment in adults, clear aligner treatments are becoming more popular. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of orthodontic treatment on periodontal tissue and to compare orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances (FA) to clear aligner treatment (CAT) in periodontitis patients. Methods A total of 35 patients who underwent orthodontic treatment in the Department of Periodontology were included in this study. After periodontal treatment with meticulous oral hygiene education, patients underwent treatment with FA or CAT, and this study analyzed patient outcomes depending on the treatment strategy. Clinical parameters were assessed at baseline and after orthodontic treatment, and the duration of treatment was compared between these two groups. Results The overall plaque index, the gingival index, and probing depth improved after orthodontic treatment (P<0.01). The overall bone level also improved (P=0.045). However, the bone level changes in the FA and CAT groups were not significantly different. Significant differences were found between the FA and CAT groups in probing depth, change in probing depth, and duration of treatment (P<0.05). However, no significant differences were found between the FA and CAT groups regarding the plaque index, changes in the plaque index, the gingival index, changes in the gingival index, or changes in the alveolar bone level. The percentage of females in the CAT group (88%) was significantly greater than in the FA group (37%) (P<0.01). Conclusions After orthodontic treatment, clinical parameters were improved in the FA and CAT groups with meticulous oral hygiene education and plaque control. Regarding plaque index and gingival index, no significant differences were found between these two groups. We suggest that combined periodontal and orthodontic treatment can improve patients’ periodontal health irrespective of orthodontic techniques. PMID:26734489

  12. [Markers of periodontal diseases and sensitivity to taromentine in patients with aggressive periodontitis].

    PubMed

    Iverieli, M V; Abashidze, N O; Gogishvili, Kh B

    2009-04-01

    The aim of the research was to study sensitivity of specific microorganisms from the periodontal pockets of patients with rapidly progressive periodontal disease to Taromentine. 95 patients aged 21 to 35 years (50 women (52,6+/-33,62) and 45 men (47,36+/-3,62)) with rapidly progressive form of periodontal desease were observed. Porphiromonas gingivalis was identifide in 83 out of 95 patients (87,36+/-2,06). Prevotella intermedia - in 31 patients (32,6+/-2,750); Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans - in 23 patients (24,2+/-2,050); Bacteroides forsythus - in 19 patients (20,0+/-2,360); Treponema denticola - in 16 patients (16,84+/-2,190); Candida - in 11 patients (11,57+/-1,80). The sensitivity of all cultures to Taromentine was investigated: 134 (77,9+/-1,89) out of 183 identified markers demonstrated sensitivity to Taromentine. Demostrated sensitivity to Taromentine: 64 (37,2+/-1,06) out of 83 identified cultures of Porphiromonas gingivalis, 24 (13,95+/-1,85) out of 31 identified cultures of Prevotela intermedia, 18 (10,47+/-1,05) out of 23 identified cultures of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, 15 (8,7+/-1,86) out of 19 identified cultures of Bacteroides forsythus, and 13 (7,84+/-1,09) out of 16 identified cultures of Treponema denticola. Totally 38 (22,1+/-1,59) out of 172 identified periodontal markers demonstrated resistence to Taromentine. The results of analysis showed that Taromentine could be recommended in complex treatment of periodontal diseases. PMID:19430039

  13. Efect of periodontal disease and non surgical periodontal treatment on C-reactive protein. Evaluation of type 1 diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Llambés, Fernando; Hernández-Mijares, Antonio; Guiha, Rami; Bautista, Daniel; Caffesse, Raúl

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to analyze how anti-infectious periodontal treatment affects C reactive protein (CRP) values in patients with type 1 diabetes, and correlate baseline CRP levels with periodontal disease severity. Study Design: A cohort of fifty three subjects with type 1 diabetes and moderate to severe periodontitis were recruited. Periodontal parameters were measured, and blood samples were obtained to evaluate high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP). Group 1 was treated with scaling, root planning, and systemic administration of doxycycline. Group 2 received only scaling and root planning. Results: Hs-CRP was reduced after periodontal treatment in group 1 (-0.22 mg/l) and 2 (-0.21 mg/l ) but this reduction was not statistically significant, even in the patients with the best response to periodontal treatment. However, significant correlation appeared between hs-CRP and mean probing pocket depth (PPD) (p=0, 01) and mean clinical attachment level (CAL) (p=0,03). Conclusions: Non-surgical periodontal treatment couldn’t reduce hs-CRP values, however, it was found an association between advanced periodontitis and elevated blood hs-CRP levels in patients with type 1 diabetes. It can be speculated that periodontal disease increases production of pro-inflammatory mediators in patients with type 1 diabetes, but other producing sources of these pro-inflammatory substances may exist. Key words:Periodontal disease, periodontitis, diabetes mellitus type 1, periodontal therapy, C reactive protein. PMID:22322513

  14. Histopathologic and histomorphometric studies and determination of IL-8 in patients with periodontal disease

    PubMed Central

    Koss, Myriam A.; Castro, Cecilia E.; Carino, Silvia; López, Maria E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease characterized by connective tissue breakdown and alveolar bone resorption. Objective: The aim of this study was to make a quantitative evaluation of the gingival tissue components in biopsies from patients with different clinical states of periodontal disease and to determine the relationship between the presence of interleukin-8 and the tissue destruction. Materials and Methods: The study group consisted of 33 biopsies from adult subjects. A total of 25 periodontal patients were sub-classified on the basis of the clinical and radiographic criteria in mild, moderate and advanced periodontitis. Gingival samples were obtained from patients in the course of basic periodontal surgeries as a muco-periostic collate. Data were analyzed by the SPSS system. Results: Collagen fibres decreased as non-specific chronic states increased. A lymphocyte inflammatory infiltrate changed to a lymphoplasmocytary form. Reactivity to interleukin-8 was detected with the severity of the histopathologic diagnoses; however there was no association with the clinical diagnoses. Conclusions: Histopathology and histomorphometry of gingival tissue changed with the degree of inflammation. No evidence of interleukin-8 as a biomarker for clinical diagnoses of periodontitis was obtained. PMID:24872619

  15. Periodontal conditions in patients requesting dental implant treatment.

    PubMed

    Ito, Taichi; Yasuda, Masaaki; Norizuki, Yoshie; Sasaki, Hodaka; Honma, Shinya; Furuya, Yoshitaka; Kato, Tetsuo; Yajima, Yasutomo

    2011-01-01

    Periodontal disease is considered a risk factor in dental implant treatment. The purpose of this study was to investigate the periodontal conditions in patients requesting dental implant therapy. A total of 169 patients visiting Department of Oral and Maxillo-Facial Implantology at Tokyo Dental College Chiba Hospital were targeted. The following intraoral parameters were measured in each patient: Community Periodontal Index (CPI) score, probing pocket depth (PPD), clinical attachment level (CAL) and bleeding on probing (BOP). Prevalence of patients with periodontal pockets was high: 38% and 28% of patients had a CPI score of code 3 and 4, respectively. Prevalence of teeth with one or more sites with PPD≥4mm was 27%. Moreover, clinical signs suggestive of periodontitis (PPD, CAL≥4mm) were found in 10-15% of tooth sites. Prevalence rates at sites with severe periodontal breakdown (PPD, CAL≥7mm) were 2-5%. These results further emphasize the importance of thorough periodontal assessment in patients prior to dental implant treatment.

  16. [Effectiveness of treating periodontitis in patients with thyroid dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Moskvina, T S

    2001-01-01

    Efficiency of some drugs in the treatment of periodontitis in combination with corrective treatment of thyroid function was evaluated in 70 patients with hypo- and hyperthyrosis with different initial level of nonspecific resistance. The therapeutic complex including drugs commonly used in the treatment of periodontitis and irrigation of the periodontium with lithium chloride and chlorohexidine solutions was highly effective in patients with thyroid dysfunction and relatively favorable status of nonspecific resistance of the organism. In patients with hypo- and hyperthyrosis with poor nonspecific resistance the best effect in the treatment of periodontitis was attained with potassium orotate as an immunomodulator and lithium chloride. PMID:11236145

  17. Relationship between the Pathogenic Representatives of Periodontal Pockets Microbiocenosis in Patients with Periodontitis with Varying Degrees of Severity

    PubMed Central

    Zorina, O.A.; Kulakov, A.A.; Boriskina, O.A.; Rebrikov, D.V.

    2011-01-01

    Periodontitis is a common disease that is considered to be a manifestation of the distortion of the ratio between the normal and conditionally pathogenic microflora of periodontal pockets. In this study, the ratio between the six most important periodontal pathogens and the total microflora of the periodontal pocket in healthy individuals and patients with varying severity of periodontitis was ascertained by quantitative real-time PCR. It was ascertained that the relative content ofPorphyromonas gingivalis,Prevotella intermedia, andTannerella forsythensis(Bacteroides forsythus) persistently develops in the total microflora of the periodontal pocket upon progressing periodontitis; this value is higher than that in the control group by more than two orders of magnitude upon a severe degree of chronic generalized periodontitis. PMID:22649688

  18. Microbial Signature Profiles of Periodontally Healthy and Diseased Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lourenço, Talita Gomes Baêta; Heller, Débora; da Silva-Boghossian, Carina Maciel; Cotton, Sean L.; Paster, Bruce J.; Colombo, Ana Paula Vieira

    2014-01-01

    Aim To determine microbial profiles that discriminate periodontal health from different forms of periodontal diseases. Methods Subgingival biofilm was obtained from patients with periodontal health (27), gingivitis (11), chronic periodontitis (35) and aggressive periodontitis (24), and analyzed for the presence of >250 species/phylotypes using HOMIM. Microbial differences among groups were examined by Mann-Whitney. Regression analyses were performed to determine microbial risk indicators of disease. Results Putative and potential new periodontal pathogens were more prevalent in subjects with periodontal diseases than periodontal health. Detection of Porphyromonas endodontalis/Porphyromonas spp. (OR 9.5 [1.2–73.1]) and Tannerella forsythia (OR 38.2 [3.2–450.6]), and absence of Neisseria polysaccharea (OR 0.004 [0–0.15]) and Prevotella denticola (OR 0.014 [0–0.49], p<0.05) were risk indicators of periodontal disease. Presence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (OR 29.4 [3.4–176.5]), Cardiobacterium hominis (OR 14.9 [2.3–98.7]), Peptostreptococcaceae sp. (OR 35.9 [2.7–483.9]), P. alactolyticus (OR 31.3 [2.1–477.2]), and absence of Fretibacterium spp. (OR 0.024 [0.002–0.357]), Fusobacterium naviforme/Fusobacterium nucleatum ss vincentii (OR 0.015 [0.001–0.223]), Granulicatella adiacens/Granulicatella elegans (OR 0.013 [0.001–0.233], p<0.05) were associated with aggressive periodontitis. Conclusion There were specific microbial signatures of the subgingival biofilm that were able to distinguish between microbiomes of periodontal health and diseases. Such profiles may be used to establish risk of disease. PMID:25139407

  19. The impact of lifestyles on the periodontal health of adults in Udupi district: A cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Nishu; Acharya, Shashidhar; Prabhakar, Ramprasad Vasthare; Chakravarthy, Kalyana; Singhal, Deepak; Singla, Ritesh

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: (1) To assess the impact of different lifestyle factors on periodontal health of adults. (2) To assess the impact of overall/combined lifestyle variable (calculated by health practice index [HPI]) on periodontal health of adults. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study consisting of a structured questionnaire on HPI, oral health-related behavior, and personal habits as well as sociodemographic variables was conducted on 800 subjects aged 20–50 years attending dental outreach set-ups of Manipal College of Dental Sciences, Manipal. Clinical examination for periodontal status was done by recording loss of attachment scores using community periodontal index (FDI/WHO-1982). Statistical analysis was done by bivariate analysis using Chi-square followed by multivariate analysis to obtain adjusted odds ratio with 95% confidence interval. Results: After adjusting for all the confounding variables in multivariate logistic regression analysis, the variables that showed an independent association with periodontitis were age, location, marital status, smoking, hours of sleep per night, physical activity, and overall poor lifestyles. Conclusion: Our results support studying a combined approach using various lifestyle behaviors for controlling chronic periodontitis. Necessary public health action on conditions which determine unhealthy lifestyle behaviors across population is needed which is possible by patient's involvement in self-care by promoting healthy lifestyles. PMID:27563209

  20. Application of transtheoretical model to assess the compliance of chronic periodontitis patients to periodontal therapy

    PubMed Central

    Emani, Shilpa; Thomas, Raison; Shah, Rucha; Mehta, Dhoom Singh

    2016-01-01

    Background: The present cross-sectional survey study was conducted to assess whether the transtheoretical model for oral hygiene behavior was interrelated in theoretically consistent directions in chronic periodontitis patients and its applicability to assess the compliance of the chronic periodontitis patients to the treatment suggested. Materials and Methods: A total of 150 chronic periodontitis patients were selected for the proposed study. The selected patients were given four questionnaires that were constructed based on transtheoretical model (TTM), and the patients were divided subsequently into five different groups (precontemplation, contemplation, preparation, action, and maintenance groups) based on their answers to the questionnaires. Then, each patient was given four appointments for their periodontal treatment spaced with a time gap of 10 days. The patients visit for each appointments scheduled to them was documented. The results obtained were assessed using TTM. Results: Higher mean pro scores of decisional balance, self-efficacy, and process of change scores was recorded in maintenance group followed by action group, preparation group, contemplation group, and precontemplation group, respectively, whereas higher mean cons score was recorded in precontemplation group followed by contemplation group, preparation group, action group, and maintenance group, respectively. The difference scores of TTM constructs were statistically highly significant between all the five groups. Furthermore, the number of appointment attended in were significantly more than maintenance group followed by action group, preparation group, contemplation group, and precontemplation group. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that transtheoretical model can be successfully applied to chronic periodontitis patients to assess their compliance to the suggested periodontal treatment. PMID:27307663

  1. Periodontal parameters following orthodontic treatment in patients with aggressive periodontitis: A before-after clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Khorsand, Afshin; Paknejad, Mojgan; Yaghobee, Siamak; Ghahroudi, Amir Alireza Rasouli; Bashizadefakhar, Hourieh; Khatami, Masoomeh; Shirazi, Mohsen

    2013-01-01

    Background: The success of combined periodontal and orthodontic approach in the treatment of aggressive periodontitis patients with the pathologic extruded anterior teeth is a main concern and stability of the treatment results is an important factor to evaluate the treatment. The present study investigated the periodontal parameters at the end of the orthodontic treatment in patients with the aggressive periodontitis. Materials and Methods: Eight patients with an aggressive periodontal disease, extruded maxillary incisors, infrabony defects and probing depth of ≥5 mm were enrolled in this clinical trial (before, after). After periodontal therapy, orthodontic treatment was carried out for intrusion and alignment of teeth. Plaque index (PI), probing pocket depth (PPD), distance between incisal edge and interdental papilla, root length (RL), and defect dimensions (depth and width) were examined at the end of treatment and three as well as 6 months afterward. The data were subjected to repeated measure ANOVA test. P < 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: There was statistically significant decrease in PPD, PI, and depth of the defects during T0, T3 and T6 (P < 0.05). No significant differences were observed in the RL and distance between incisal edge and interdental papilla (P = 0.95). Furthermore, width of the defects demonstrated significant decrease up to T3 (P = 0.042) while no significant changes from 3 months to 6 months were noted (P = 0.59). Conclusion: The results showed that combined periodontal and orthodontic approach would be a successful treatment with acceptable stability in the case of regular follow-up visits and controlled oral hygiene habits. PMID:24379862

  2. Prevalence and risk factors of periodontitis among adults with or without diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Mihee; Kim, Hee Yeon; Seok, Hannah; Yeo, Chang Dong; Kim, Young Soo; Song, Jae Yen; Lee, Young Bok; Lee, Dong-Hee; Lee, Jae-Im; Lee, Tae-Kyu; Ahn, Hyo-Suk; Ko, Yoon Ho; Jeong, Seong Cheol; Chae, Hiun Suk; Sohn, Tae Seo

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: This study examined prevalence and risk factors of periodontitis in representative samples of Korean adults, with and without diabetes mellitus (DM). Methods: Data from the 2012 Korean National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey were analyzed. A total of 4,477 adults (≥ 30 years old) were selected from 8,057 individuals who completed a nutrition survey, a self-reported general health behavior questionnaire, an oral examination, an oral hygiene behaviors survey, and laboratory tests. DM was defined as a fasting plasma glucose ≥ 126 mg/dL, or self-reported diagnosed diabetes, or current use of oral hypoglycemic agents and/or insulin. The community periodontal index was used to assess periodontitis status and comparisons between the periodontitis and the non-periodontitis group, were performed, according to the presence of DM. Risk factors for periodontitis in adults with DM and without DM were evaluated by multiple logistic regression analysis. Results: The prevalence of periodontitis was significantly higher in adults with DM (43.7%) than in those without DM (25%, p < 0.001). In adults without DM, risk factors for periodontitis were older age, male, urban habitation, waist circumference, smoking, oral pain, and less frequent tooth brushing. Significant risk factors for periodontitis in adults with DM were the smoking, oral pain, and not-using an oral hygiene product. Conclusions: Adults with DM have an increased risk of periodontitis than those without DM. Current smoking and oral pain increase this risk. Using an oral hygiene product can reduce risk of periodontal disease in adults with DM. PMID:27604799

  3. Prevalence of Periodontitis in Patients with Established Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Swedish Population Based Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Kaja; Nise, Lena; Kats, Anna; Luttropp, Elin; Catrina, Anca Irinel; Askling, Johan; Jansson, Leif; Alfredsson, Lars; Klareskog, Lars; Lundberg, Karin; Yucel-Lindberg, Tülay

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The possible hypothesis of a link between periodontitis and rheumatoid arthritis (RA), specifically anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA) positive RA, prompted us to investigate the prevalence of periodontitis in the Swedish Epidemiological Investigation of RA (EIRA), a well-characterised population-based RA case-control cohort. Methods Periodontal status of 2,740 RA cases and 3,942 matched controls was retrieved through linking EIRA with the National Dental Health Registry (DHR), where dental diagnostic- and treatment codes on the adult Swedish population have been registered. Dental records from 100 cases and controls were reviewed to validate the periodontal diagnostic codes in DHR. Results The reviewed dental records confirmed 90% of the periodontitis diagnoses in DHR among RA cases, and 88% among controls. We found the positive predictive value of periodontitis diagnoses in the DHR to be 89% (95% CI 78 to 95%) with a sensitivity of 77% (95% CI: 65 to 86%). In total, 86% of EIRA participants were identified in DHR. The risk for periodontitis increased by age and current smoking status in both cases as well as controls. No significant differences in prevalence of periodontal disease in terms of gingivitis, periodontitis, peri-implantitis or increased risk for periodontitis or peri-implantitis were observed between RA cases and controls. In addition, there was no difference on the basis of seropositivity, ACPA or rheumatoid factor (RF), among patients with RA. Conclusions Our data verify that smoking and ageing are risk factors for periodontitis, both in RA and controls. We found no evidence of an increased prevalence of periodontitis in patients with established RA compared to healthy controls, and no differences based on ACPA or RF status among RA subjects. PMID:27203435

  4. Association of Periodontitis With Urinary Albumin Excretion in Korean Adults With Diabetes: The 2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    PubMed

    Han, Kyungdo; Nam, Ga Eun; Kim, Do Hoon; Park, Jun-Beom; Ko, Youngkyung; Roh, Yong Kyun; Cho, Kyung Hwan; Park, Yong Gyu

    2015-10-01

    Albuminuria and periodontitis are both commonly associated with systemic inflammation. However, the association between urinary albumin excretion (UAE) and periodontitis in patients with type 2 diabetes has not been fully investigated. This study aimed to investigate the association between UAE and periodontitis in Korean adults with type 2 diabetes.This study performed a cross-sectional analysis and used hierarchical multivariable logistic regression analysis models. Data from the 2012 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were analyzed. A total of 547 patients, with type 2 diabetes without renal impairment, were included in this study. UAE was assessed using the urinary albumin to creatinine ratio (UACR). A community periodontal index greater than or equal to code 3 was used to define periodontitis.The risk of periodontitis tended to increase as UACR increased even after adjustment for potential confounders (P for trend in the odds ratios = 0.05 in model 1; 0.02 in model 2; and 0.01 in model 3). In a subgroup analysis, the prevalence of periodontitis was significantly higher in the patients with albuminuria (UACR >30 mg/g) than in those without albuminuria among patients younger than 65 years (P = 0.03), those with newly diagnosed diabetes (P = 0.04), or those without obesity (P = .04).UAE was positively associated with the risk of periodontitis in Korean adults with type 2 diabetes. In the patients who were younger, were newly diagnosed with diabetes, or had normal body mass index, individuals with albuminuria were more likely to have a higher prevalence of periodontitis. Early identification of periodontitis may be helpful in Korean diabetic adults with increased UAE.

  5. [Clinical and microbiological study of adult periodontal disease].

    PubMed

    Nogueira Moreira, A; Fernández Canigia, L; Furman, C; Chiappe, V; Marcantoni, M; Bianchini, H

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to carry out a microbiological evaluation of sites with and without clinical evidence of moderate and severe periodontitis and their correlation with clinical parameters. A total of 52 disease sites and 10 healthy sites were selected according to clinical criteria. The following clinical indexes were measured for all the sites: plaque index, gingival index, blood on probing, depth on probing and insertion level. Samples of subgingival plaque were collected for culture and for differential counts of microbial morphotypes. In disease sites the most frequently isolated were: Prevotella intermedia/nigrescens (65%), Porphyromonas gingivalis (23%), Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (23%), Fusobacterium nucleatum (10%) and Peptostreptococcus sp. (31%). The aerobic gram-positive microflora was predominant in healthy sites. Significant differences were observed in microbial morphotypes between healthy and disease sites: cocci 18.71% and 78.90%, motile rods 46.12% and 16.70%, total spirochetes 26.48% and 2.80%, respectively. The presence of motile rods, spirochetes and P. intermedia/nigrescens were the parameters with most sensitivity to suspect periodontal disease. There were significant differences in the subgingival microflora between healthy and disease sites in patients with moderate and severe periodontitis. PMID:11594003

  6. [Clinical and microbiological study of adult periodontal disease].

    PubMed

    Nogueira Moreira, A; Fernández Canigia, L; Furman, C; Chiappe, V; Marcantoni, M; Bianchini, H

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to carry out a microbiological evaluation of sites with and without clinical evidence of moderate and severe periodontitis and their correlation with clinical parameters. A total of 52 disease sites and 10 healthy sites were selected according to clinical criteria. The following clinical indexes were measured for all the sites: plaque index, gingival index, blood on probing, depth on probing and insertion level. Samples of subgingival plaque were collected for culture and for differential counts of microbial morphotypes. In disease sites the most frequently isolated were: Prevotella intermedia/nigrescens (65%), Porphyromonas gingivalis (23%), Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (23%), Fusobacterium nucleatum (10%) and Peptostreptococcus sp. (31%). The aerobic gram-positive microflora was predominant in healthy sites. Significant differences were observed in microbial morphotypes between healthy and disease sites: cocci 18.71% and 78.90%, motile rods 46.12% and 16.70%, total spirochetes 26.48% and 2.80%, respectively. The presence of motile rods, spirochetes and P. intermedia/nigrescens were the parameters with most sensitivity to suspect periodontal disease. There were significant differences in the subgingival microflora between healthy and disease sites in patients with moderate and severe periodontitis.

  7. Cementogenesis in Patients with Localized Aggressive Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Paknejad, Mojgan; Khorsand, Afshin; Yaghobee, Siamak; Motahhari, Pooriya; Etebarian, Arghavan; Mehrfard, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the cementum thickness in the first molars of patients with localized aggressive periodontitis (LAP) compared to healthy individuals. Materials and Methods: This case-control study compared eight first molar teeth affected by LAP with eight third molar teeth of healthy individuals. The teeth were disinfected by immersion in 10% buffered formalin solution for three days and were then sectioned. External mesial root surfaces (middle one-third) were evaluated under a stereomicroscope by a blinded pathologist to determine the mean thickness of cementum. SPSS software (version 16.0) and t-test were used for statistical analysis. Results: Histological examination revealed a significant difference between the two groups in terms of the amount of cementogenesis (P<0.001) .The thickness of cementum was higher in the control group (105.16±11.5 μm) than in LAP patients (86.44±7.3 μm). Conclusion: This study demonstrated the presence of cementum hypoplasia in mesial root surfaces of first molars affected by LAP. PMID:26877730

  8. Guidelines for periodontal care and follow-up during orthodontic treatment in adolescents and young adults

    PubMed Central

    LEVIN, Liran; EINY, Shmuel; ZIGDON, Hadar; AIZENBUD, Dror; MACHTEI, Eli E.

    2012-01-01

    Aggressive periodontitis is characterized by non-contributory medical history, rapid attachment loss and bone destruction and familial aggregation of cases. Aggressive periodontitis (both localized and generalized) is usually diagnosed in a young population. This is frequently the age that an orthodontic care is provided to this population. The aim of the present paper is to draw guidelines for periodontal evaluation and monitoring prior to and during active orthodontic treatment. Strict adherence to these guidelines as a routine protocol for periodontal examination prior, during and following orthodontic treatment may dramatically decrease the severity and improve the prognosis of patients with aggressive periodontitis in orthodontic clinics. PMID:23032199

  9. Update on Prevalence of Periodontitis in Adults in the United States: NHANES 2009 – 2012

    PubMed Central

    Eke, Paul I.; Dye, Bruce A.; Wei, Liang; Slade, Gary D.; Thornton-Evans, Gina O.; Borgnakke, Wenche S.; Taylor, George W.; Page, Roy C.; Beck, James D.; Genco, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    This report describes prevalence, severity, and extent of periodontitis in the US adult population using combined data from the 2009–2010 and 2011–2012 cycles of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Methods Estimates were derived for dentate adults 30 years and older from the civilian non-institutionalized population. Periodontitis was defined by combinations of clinical attachment loss (CAL) and periodontal probing depth (PPD) from six sites per tooth on all teeth, except third molars, using standard surveillance case definitions. For the first time in NHANES history, sufficient numbers of Non-Hispanic Asians were sampled in 2011–2012 to provide reliable estimates of their periodontitis prevalence. Results In 2009–2012, 46% of US adults representing 64.7 million people had periodontitis, with 8.9% having severe periodontitis. Overall, 3.8% of all periodontal sites (10.6% of all teeth) had PPD≥4 mm and 19.3% of sites (37.4% teeth) had CAL≥3 mm. Periodontitis prevalence was positively associated with increasing age and was higher among males. Periodontitis prevalence was highest in Hispanics (63.5%) and Non-Hispanic blacks (59.1%), followed by Non-Hispanic Asian Americans (50.0%), and lowest in Non-Hispanic whites (40.8%). Prevalence varied two-fold between the lowest and highest levels of socioeconomic status, whether defined by poverty or education. Conclusion(s) This study confirms a high prevalence of periodontitis in US adults aged 30 years and older. Prevalence was greater in Non-Hispanic Asians than Non-Hispanic whites, although lower than other minorities. The distribution provides valuable information for population-based action to prevent periodontitis in US adults. PMID:25688694

  10. Periodontitis

    MedlinePlus

    Pyorrhea - gum disease; Inflammation of gums - involving bone ... Periodontitis occurs when inflammation or infection of the gums ( gingivitis ) occurs and is not treated. Infection and inflammation spreads from the gums (gingiva) ...

  11. Relationship between overall and abdominal obesity and periodontal disease among young adults.

    PubMed

    Amin, H El-Sayed

    2010-04-01

    To assess overall and abdominal obesity and their relation to periodontal disease among young adults, body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) were measured and clinical attachment loss (CAL), gingival index (GI) and Community Periodontal Index (CPI) were estimated. The sample comprised 380 adults (170 males and 210 females) aged 20-26 years. There was a significant correlation between both BMI and WC and CAL, GI and CPI in females. In males, a significant correlation was only recorded between WC and GI and CPI. Overall and abdominal obesity in young adult females and abdominal obesity in males were significantly associated with periodontal disease. PMID:20795429

  12. Prevalence and Risk Factors of CKD in Chinese Patients with Periodontal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Liang, Mengjun; Luo, Wei; Wu, Xianfeng; Ruan, Yiping; Wang, Jie; Xu, Ricong; Zhan, Xiaojiang; Yu, Jianwen; Tan, Jiaqing; Dong, Xiuqing; Zhang, Jincai; Yu, Xueqing

    2013-01-01

    Background Periodontal disease is common among adults and is associated with an increasing risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD). We aimed to investigate the prevalence and risk factors of CKD in patients with periodontal disease in China. Methods In the current cross-sectional study, patients with periodontal disease were included from Guangdong Provincial Stomatological Hospital between March 2011 and August 2011. CKD was defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <60 mL/min/1.73 m2, the presence of albuminuria, or hematuria. All patients with periodontal disease underwent a periodontal examination, including periodontal probing pocket depth, gingival recession, and clinical attachment level by Florida Probe. They completed a questionnaire and had blood and urine samples taken. The adjusted prevalence of indicators of kidney damage was calculated and risk factors associated with CKD were analyzed. Results A total of 1392 patients with periodontal disease were invited to participate this study and 1268 completed the survey and examination. After adjusting for age and sex, the prevalence of reduced eGFR, albuminuria, and hematuria was 2.7% (95% CI 1.7–3.7), 6.7% (95% CI 5.5–8.1) and 10.9% (95% CI 9.2–12.5), respectively. The adjusted prevalence of CKD was 18.2% (95% CI 16.2–20.3). Age, male, diabetes, hypertension, history of CKD, hyperuricemia, and interleukin-6 levels (≥7.54 ng/L) were independent risk factors for reduced eGFR. Female, diabetes, hypertension, history of CKD, hyperuricemia, high level of cholesterol, and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) (≥1.03 mg/L) and TNF-α levels (≥1.12 ng/L) were independently associated with an increased risk of albuminuria. Female, lower education (patients with periodontal disease have proteinuria, hematuria, or reduced eGFR, indicating the presence of kidney damage. Whether

  13. PDT in periodontal disease of HAART resistance patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovani, Elcio M.; Noro-Filho, Gilberto A.; Caputo, Bruno V.; Casarin, Renato; Costa, Claudio; Salgado, Daniela; Santos, Camila C.

    2016-03-01

    HIV/Aids patients present a change of microbiota associated with host immunodeficiency. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) showed as a promising and viable alternative in reducing microbiota. Present study evaluate effectiveness of photodynamic therapy in periodontal disease of AIDS patients with highly activity antiretroviral therapy (HAART) failure, measuring the clinical periodontal parameters and periodontal microbiota. Twelve patients with HARRT resistance (R group) divided into two groups (control and PDT) and 12 patients with no HAART resistance (NR group) divided into two groups (control and PDT). The results show the difference in baseline of CD4 cells count, NR group 640.0 +/- 176.2 cells/mm3 R group and 333.3 +/- 205.8 cells / mm3 (p<0.05), and in 8.3% detectable viral load in NR group and 75% detectable (p <0.001) in R group. As clinical periodontal parameters (PD and CAL), PDT was more effective than the control group only in the NR group (p <0.05%), moreover, there was no difference in the evaluation of clinical periodontal parameters between the both R groups (p>0.05%). Microbiological evaluation in R group presents a general reduction in the Aa at 3 and 6 months. Furthermore, demonstrated a reduction of Pg in all groups at 6 months and in R group at 3 months. The impact assessment of photodynamic therapy in patients with different levels of immunosuppression determined that the combination of mechanical periodontal treatment with photodynamic therapy in patients with HAART failure did not cause additional benefits. Therefore, PDT in this study could not been indicated in HAART resistance patients.

  14. IQuaD dental trial; improving the quality of dentistry: a multicentre randomised controlled trial comparing oral hygiene advice and periodontal instrumentation for the prevention and management of periodontal disease in dentate adults attending dental primary care

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Periodontal disease is the most common oral disease affecting adults, and although it is largely preventable it remains the major cause of poor oral health worldwide. Accumulation of microbial dental plaque is the primary aetiological factor for both periodontal disease and caries. Effective self-care (tooth brushing and interdental aids) for plaque control and removal of risk factors such as calculus, which can only be removed by periodontal instrumentation (PI), are considered necessary to prevent and treat periodontal disease thereby maintaining periodontal health. Despite evidence of an association between sustained, good oral hygiene and a low incidence of periodontal disease and caries in adults there is a lack of strong and reliable evidence to inform clinicians of the relative effectiveness (if any) of different types of Oral Hygiene Advice (OHA). The evidence to inform clinicians of the effectiveness and optimal frequency of PI is also mixed. There is therefore an urgent need to assess the relative effectiveness of OHA and PI in a robust, sufficiently powered randomised controlled trial (RCT) in primary dental care. Methods/Design This is a 5 year multi-centre, randomised, open trial with blinded outcome evaluation based in dental primary care in Scotland and the North East of England. Practitioners will recruit 1860 adult patients, with periodontal health, gingivitis or moderate periodontitis (Basic Periodontal Examination Score 0–3). Dental practices will be cluster randomised to provide routine OHA or Personalised OHA. To test the effects of PI each individual patient participant will be randomised to one of three groups: no PI, 6 monthly PI (current practice), or 12 monthly PI. Baseline measures and outcome data (during a three year follow-up) will be assessed through clinical examination, patient questionnaires and NHS databases. The primary outcome measures at 3 year follow up are gingival inflammation/bleeding on probing at the

  15. Prevalence of Actinomyces spp. in patients with chronic periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Vielkind, Paul; Jentsch, Holger; Eschrich, Klaus; Rodloff, Arne C; Stingu, Catalina-Suzana

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the prevalence of Actinomyces spp. in shallow, deep and very deep pockets of patients with chronic periodontitis compared to healthy controls and correlated the results with clinical status. Twenty patients with chronic periodontitis and 15 healthy subjects were enrolled in this study. Clinical indices were recorded in a six-point measurement per tooth. From each patient samples of supra and subgingival plaque were taken separately from teeth with shallow, deep and very deep pockets. Samples of supragingival plaque and sulcular microflora were collected from the healthy subjects. All the samples were cultivated on different media at 37̊C in an anaerobic atmosphere for 7 days. All the suspect colonies were identified using a rapid ID 32 A system (bioMèrieux) and MALDI-TOF-MS analysis using an Autoflex II Instrument (Bruker Daltonics) together with in house developed identification software and a reference spectra database. A total of 977 strains were identified as Actinomyces. Actinomyces naeslundii/oris/johnsonii (430 isolates) was the most prevalent species and was found in all patients and in almost all of the healthy subjects. Significant differences (p=0.003) between the groups were found for Actinomyces odontolyticus/meyeri and Actinomyces israelii which were associated with periodontitis patients. Actinomyces dentalis was found in higher percentage (p=0.015) in the periodontitis group. Actinomyces gerencseriae and Actinomyces massiliensis were significantly more often found supragingivally than subgingivally (p=0.004, p=0.022, respectively) in the periodontitis group. Whether some Actinomyces species, definitely important plaque formers, are actively involved in the pathogenicity of chronic periodontitis needs further investigation.

  16. Prevalence of Actinomyces spp. in patients with chronic periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Vielkind, Paul; Jentsch, Holger; Eschrich, Klaus; Rodloff, Arne C; Stingu, Catalina-Suzana

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the prevalence of Actinomyces spp. in shallow, deep and very deep pockets of patients with chronic periodontitis compared to healthy controls and correlated the results with clinical status. Twenty patients with chronic periodontitis and 15 healthy subjects were enrolled in this study. Clinical indices were recorded in a six-point measurement per tooth. From each patient samples of supra and subgingival plaque were taken separately from teeth with shallow, deep and very deep pockets. Samples of supragingival plaque and sulcular microflora were collected from the healthy subjects. All the samples were cultivated on different media at 37̊C in an anaerobic atmosphere for 7 days. All the suspect colonies were identified using a rapid ID 32 A system (bioMèrieux) and MALDI-TOF-MS analysis using an Autoflex II Instrument (Bruker Daltonics) together with in house developed identification software and a reference spectra database. A total of 977 strains were identified as Actinomyces. Actinomyces naeslundii/oris/johnsonii (430 isolates) was the most prevalent species and was found in all patients and in almost all of the healthy subjects. Significant differences (p=0.003) between the groups were found for Actinomyces odontolyticus/meyeri and Actinomyces israelii which were associated with periodontitis patients. Actinomyces dentalis was found in higher percentage (p=0.015) in the periodontitis group. Actinomyces gerencseriae and Actinomyces massiliensis were significantly more often found supragingivally than subgingivally (p=0.004, p=0.022, respectively) in the periodontitis group. Whether some Actinomyces species, definitely important plaque formers, are actively involved in the pathogenicity of chronic periodontitis needs further investigation. PMID:26324012

  17. Investigation of saliva of patients with periodontal disease using NAA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamboni, C. B.; Metairon, S.; Medeiros, I. M. M. A.; Lewgoy, H. R.

    2013-05-01

    In this study the non-stimulated whole saliva of 26 healthy subjects (mean age 33.9 ± 11.0 years, range: 26 to 49 years) and 11 patients with periodontal disease (mean age 41.7 ± 11.5 years; range 29 to 55 years) was investigated using Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) technique. The samples were obtained from donors at São Paulo city (Brazil). The analyses were performed in the nuclear reactor IEA-R1 (3.5-4.5MW, pool type) at IPEN/CNEN-SP (Brazil). Considerable changes in Ca and S saliva's level were identified in patients with periodontal disease suggesting they can be used as monitors of periodontal diseases.

  18. Investigation of saliva of patients with periodontal disease using NAA

    SciTech Connect

    Zamboni, C. B.; Metairon, S.; Medeiros, I. M. M. A.

    2013-05-06

    In this study the non-stimulated whole saliva of 26 healthy subjects (mean age 33.9 {+-} 11.0 years, range: 26 to 49 years) and 11 patients with periodontal disease (mean age 41.7 {+-} 11.5 years; range 29 to 55 years) was investigated using Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) technique. The samples were obtained from donors at Sao Paulo city (Brazil). The analyses were performed in the nuclear reactor IEA-R1 (3.5-4.5MW, pool type) at IPEN/CNEN-SP (Brazil). Considerable changes in Ca and S saliva's level were identified in patients with periodontal disease suggesting they can be used as monitors of periodontal diseases.

  19. Excessive Consumption of Green Tea as a Risk Factor for Periodontal Disease among Korean Adults

    PubMed Central

    Han, Kyungdo; Hwang, Eunkyung; Park, Jun-Beom

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to assess the relationship between the amount of green tea that is consumed and periodontitis. It is based on data obtained from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, conducted between 2008 and 2010. A community periodontal index equal to code 3 was defined as moderate periodontitis, and code 4 was defined as severe periodontitis (n = 16,726). Consumption of green tea less than one cup per day was associated with a decreased prevalence of periodontal disease among Korean adults. The association between the consumption of green tea and periodontal disease was independent of various potential confounding factors, such as age, sex, body mass index, smoking, drinking, exercise, metabolic syndrome, frequency of tooth brushing per day, use of secondary oral products, the number of dental examination per year, diabetes, hypertension, and white blood cell count. Adjusted odds ratio and 95% confidence interval of no consumption was 1.360 (1.156, 1.601) when participants with consumption of two times per week ≤ x < 7 times per week was considered as a reference. However, consumption of one or more cups per day increased the prevalence of moderate and severe periodontitis. In conclusion, excessive consumption of green tea may be considered as a risk factor for periodontal disease among Korean adults. PMID:27384581

  20. Excessive Consumption of Green Tea as a Risk Factor for Periodontal Disease among Korean Adults.

    PubMed

    Han, Kyungdo; Hwang, Eunkyung; Park, Jun-Beom

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to assess the relationship between the amount of green tea that is consumed and periodontitis. It is based on data obtained from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, conducted between 2008 and 2010. A community periodontal index equal to code 3 was defined as moderate periodontitis, and code 4 was defined as severe periodontitis (n = 16,726). Consumption of green tea less than one cup per day was associated with a decreased prevalence of periodontal disease among Korean adults. The association between the consumption of green tea and periodontal disease was independent of various potential confounding factors, such as age, sex, body mass index, smoking, drinking, exercise, metabolic syndrome, frequency of tooth brushing per day, use of secondary oral products, the number of dental examination per year, diabetes, hypertension, and white blood cell count. Adjusted odds ratio and 95% confidence interval of no consumption was 1.360 (1.156, 1.601) when participants with consumption of two times per week ≤ x < 7 times per week was considered as a reference. However, consumption of one or more cups per day increased the prevalence of moderate and severe periodontitis. In conclusion, excessive consumption of green tea may be considered as a risk factor for periodontal disease among Korean adults. PMID:27384581

  1. The Effect of Nonsurgical Periodontal Therapy on Trichomonas Tenax and Entamoeba Gingivalis in Patients with Chronic Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Rashidi Maybodi, Fahimeh; Haerian Ardakani, Ahmad; Fattahi Bafghi, Ali; Haerian Ardakani, Alireza; Zafarbakhsh, Akram

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Trichomonas tenax and Entamoeba gingivalis are commensal protozoa which inhabit the human oral cavity. These parasites are found in patients with poor oral hygiene and might be a reason for progressive periodontal diseases. Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of nonsurgical periodontal treatment on the frequency of these protozoa in saliva and plaque samples. Materials and Method In this clinical trial, samples of saliva and dental plaque were collected from 46 patients with moderate to severe chronic periodontitis before and after periodontal therapy. The samples were assessed for the frequency of parasites. Results The frequency of Entamoeba gingivalis was reduced in saliva (p= 0.007) and plaque (p= 0.027) three weeks after the treatment. Likewise, the frequency of Trichomonas tenax reduced in saliva (p= 0.030); however, the decrease was not significant in plaque (p= 0.913). Trichomonas tenax frequency in dental plaque directly related to the severity of periodontitis (r= 0.565, p≤ 0.000). In contrast, the number of Entamoeba gingivalis in both saliva (r= -0.405, p≤ 0.005) and plaque (r= -0.304, p= 0.040) was inversely related with the severity of the periodontal disease. Conclusion Nonsurgical periodontal treatment could reduce the number of Trichomonas Tenax and Entamoeba gingivalis in the oral environment of patients with chronic periodontitis. PMID:27602391

  2. The Effect of Nonsurgical Periodontal Therapy on Trichomonas Tenax and Entamoeba Gingivalis in Patients with Chronic Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Rashidi Maybodi, Fahimeh; Haerian Ardakani, Ahmad; Fattahi Bafghi, Ali; Haerian Ardakani, Alireza; Zafarbakhsh, Akram

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Trichomonas tenax and Entamoeba gingivalis are commensal protozoa which inhabit the human oral cavity. These parasites are found in patients with poor oral hygiene and might be a reason for progressive periodontal diseases. Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of nonsurgical periodontal treatment on the frequency of these protozoa in saliva and plaque samples. Materials and Method In this clinical trial, samples of saliva and dental plaque were collected from 46 patients with moderate to severe chronic periodontitis before and after periodontal therapy. The samples were assessed for the frequency of parasites. Results The frequency of Entamoeba gingivalis was reduced in saliva (p= 0.007) and plaque (p= 0.027) three weeks after the treatment. Likewise, the frequency of Trichomonas tenax reduced in saliva (p= 0.030); however, the decrease was not significant in plaque (p= 0.913). Trichomonas tenax frequency in dental plaque directly related to the severity of periodontitis (r= 0.565, p≤ 0.000). In contrast, the number of Entamoeba gingivalis in both saliva (r= -0.405, p≤ 0.005) and plaque (r= -0.304, p= 0.040) was inversely related with the severity of the periodontal disease. Conclusion Nonsurgical periodontal treatment could reduce the number of Trichomonas Tenax and Entamoeba gingivalis in the oral environment of patients with chronic periodontitis.

  3. Quantification of Porphyromonas gingivalis in chronic periodontitis patients associated with diabetes mellitus using real-time polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Padmalatha, GV; Bavle, Radhika M; Satyakiran, Gadavalli Vera Venkata; Paremala, K; Sudhakara, M; Makarla, Soumya

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Periodontal diseases, if left untreated, can lead to tooth loss and affect at least one tooth in 80% of adults worldwide, with the main cause being a bacterial plaque. Among subgingival plaque bacterial species, Porphyromonas gingivalis has been implicated as a major etiological agent causing tooth loss. Diabetics and smokers are two patient groups at high risk for periodontal disease. The increase in the number of this organism with the coexistence of other pathogenic microbes leads to rapid destruction of the periodontium, premature loss of teeth and also because of its virulence has implications in systemic pathology. Our aim was to observe the involvement of P. gingivalis in diabetes mellitus (DM) patients associated with periodontitis with and without tobacco-associated habits and to compare them with periodontitis patients having no other systemic pathologies. Materials and Methods: Subgingival plaque samples from a total of seventy subjects were included in the study. DNA was isolated from the collected sample and was quantified using spectrophotometer for standardizing the polymerase chain reaction. The quantity of the isolated DNA was checked in a ultraviolet-visible spectrophotomer. Statistics: One-way ANOVA and Tukey's multiple post hoc procedures were carried out. Results: The maximum score of P. gingivalis was seen in periodontitis patients having DM, whereas the least score was seen in periodontitis patients having DM with tobacco smoking habit compared to the other groups. Conclusion: P. gingivalis count is significantly reduced in periodontitis patients having DM with smoking habit; it is concluded that P. gingivalis might not be a key causative organism responsible for the periodontal destruction in case of smokers despite the DM condition. The decrease in counts may be attributed to change in the local environment like chemical (tobacco nitrosamines) and physical changes preventing the growth of P. gingivalis. PMID:27721606

  4. Quantification of key periodontal pathogens in insulin-dependent type 2 diabetic and non-diabetic patients with generalized chronic periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Aemaimanan, Piyamas; Amimanan, Piyawan; Taweechaisupapong, Suwimol

    2013-08-01

    Periodontitis is a common problem in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), however, differences in the putative periodontal pathogens in subjects with DM compared to non-DM subjects are still inconclusive. The red complex, which includes Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, and Tannerella forsythia, encompasses the most important pathogens in adult periodontal disease. The aim of the present study was to compare cell numbers of P. gingivalis, T. denticola, T. forsythia and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in gingival sulcus of healthy, gingivitis and periodontitis sites of non-diabetes mellitus (NDM), controlled and poorly controlled insulin-dependent DM (CDM and PDM) patients with generalized chronic periodontitis. Subgingival plaque samples were collected from 19 CDM, 19 PDM and 19 NDM patients. Taqman real time-PCR was used to determine bacterial cell number. At subject level, the quantity of red complex bacteria was significantly higher in PDM than those of NDM and positively correlated with HbA1c. At site level (total 342 sites), cell numbers of T. denticola and T. forsythia in healthy sites of CDM and PDM were significantly higher than those of NDM. In gingivitis sites, the numbers of P. gingivalis in CDM and PDM and T. forsythia in PDM were significantly higher than those of NDM while in periodontitis sites, higher quantity of P. gingivalis in PDM was observed. Our study indicated that poor glycemic control is associated with increasing cell numbers of red complex bacteria in subgingival biofilm. PMID:23827459

  5. 16S rRNA based microarray analysis of ten periodontal bacteria in patients with different forms of periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Topcuoglu, Nursen; Kulekci, Guven

    2015-10-01

    DNA microarray analysis is a computer based technology, that a reverse capture, which targets 10 periodontal bacteria (ParoCheck) is available for rapid semi-quantitative determination. The aim of this three-year retrospective study was to display the microarray analysis results for the subgingival biofilm samples taken from patient cases diagnosed with different forms of periodontitis. A total of 84 patients with generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAP,n:29), generalized chronic periodontitis (GCP, n:25), peri-implantitis (PI,n:14), localized aggressive periodontitis (LAP,n:8) and refractory chronic periodontitis (RP,n:8) were consecutively selected from the archives of the Oral Microbiological Diagnostic Laboratory. The subgingival biofilm samples were analyzed by the microarray-based identification of 10 selected species. All the tested species were detected in the samples. The red complex bacteria were the most prevalent with very high levels in all groups. Fusobacterium nucleatum was detected in all samples at high levels. The green and blue complex bacteria were less prevalent compared with red and orange complex, except Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitas was detected in all LAP group. Positive correlations were found within all the red complex bacteria and between red and orange complex bacteria especially in GCP and GAP groups. Parocheck enables to monitoring of periodontal pathogens in all forms of periodontal disease and can be alternative to other guiding and reliable microbiologic tests.

  6. Xerostomy, dental caries and periodontal disease in HIV+ patients.

    PubMed

    Cavasin Filho, Julio César; Giovani, Elcio Magdalena

    2009-02-01

    We studied xerostomy and its correlation with periodontal and dental cavity diseases in HIV patients, through measurement of salivary flow and through variables such as saliva buffer capacity, salivary pH, periodontal index, MDF index, dental carie risk and risk of periodontal disease. One hundred patients were analyzed. They were distributed into two groups: Group I (test) - 50 patients evidently HIV+, from whom information was collected and analyzed regarding age, gender, skin color, habits, general and oral diseases, levels of T-CD4 lymphocytes, viral load and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART); and Group II - (control) 50 HIV- patients, from whom information was collected and analyzed regarding age, gender, skin color, habits, general and oral diseases. In both groups, measurement of salivary flow, pH and buffer capacity was made. Group I presented high MDF, bacteria plaque and bleeding, with a greater susceptibility to the risks of oral cavities and periodontal disease. The salivary flow and the buffering capacity of the saliva were low, indicating a high level of xerostomy. Two important modifying factors influence these pathologies in an incisive way: one is immunossuppression and the other is HAART therapy. The control exhibited results that are closer to normality; it had better oral-health conditions.

  7. Porphyromonas gingivalis causing brain abscess in patient with recurrent periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Rae Yoo, Jeong; Taek Heo, Sang; Kim, Miyeon; Lee, Chang Sub; Kim, Young Ree

    2016-06-01

    We report an extremely rare case of Porphyromonas gingivalis causing brain abscess in a patient with recurrent periodontitis. The patient presented with right-sided homonymous hemianopsia and right hemiparesis. Emergent surgical drainage was performed and antibiotics were administered. P. gingivalis was identified from the anaerobic culture of the abscess. The clinical course of the patient improved with full recovery of the neurologic deficit. PMID:27085200

  8. Social determinants of health and periodontal disease in Brazilian adults: a cross- sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Recently, increasing importance has been placed on the social determinants of health and disease. The present study aimed to determine the prevalence of periodontal disease in Brazilian adults and identify possible relationships with social determinants. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed using a sample of 743 adults (aged 35–49 years) living in an urban area of a large city in southeastern Brazil. The condition of the periodontium was assessed using the Community Periodontal Index (CPI) according to the diagnostic criteria established by the World Health Organization (WHO). The variables related to social determinants were collected using a structured questionnaire. A descriptive analysis of all study variables was performed. Multiple correspondence analysis was subsequently performed to identify relationships between periodontal disease and the social determinants of health. Results The periodontal exams showed that 36.5% of adults had a healthy periodontium, 2.0% had gingival bleeding, 47.1% had calculus and 9.5% had periodontal pockets of 4–5 mm. Periodontal pockets of 6 mm or more were the worst periodontal condition found (affecting only 2.1% of the participants). The correspondence analysis enabled us to form three groups with different profiles. The first group was distinguished by the presence of bleeding (gingivitis) or a healthy periodontium. The members of this group were typically aged 35 to 39 years and had 9–12 years or more than 12 years of education. The second group consisted of subjects with calculus and periodontal pockets of 4–5 mm. The members of this group were typically white men aged 40–44 years with incomes greater than $ 300.00. The third group was distinguished by the presence of periodontal pockets of 6 mm or more. The members of this group were typically adult females, black and mixed individuals who had 8 years or less of schooling, individuals with incomes ≤ $ 300.00 and widowers

  9. Microbial ecology of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Eikenella corrodens and Capnocytophaga spp. in adult periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Müller, H P; Heinecke, A; Borneff, M; Knopf, A; Kiencke, C; Pohl, S

    1997-08-01

    Information on intraoral distribution of putative periodontal pathogens might be essential for controlling different forms of periodontal disease. Colonization may be either promoted or impeded by other bacteria competing in the subgingival ecosystem. In recent investigations microbial associations between dental organisms have been determined in a multitude of subgingival plaque samples within multiple patients and described by odds ratios, in most circumstances without taking into account the correlated structure of the observations within a single individual. The present investigation had 3 major objectives: (i) to describe the intraoral distribution of some facultatively anaerobic, Gram-negative rods, i.e. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Eikenella corrodens-like organisms and Capnocytophaga spp., in a multitude of subgingival and extracrevicular samples of 10 adult subjects with A. actinomycetemcomitans-associated periodontitis; (ii) to analyse possible inconsistencies of microbial associations between these periodontal organisms; and (iii) to determine factors increasing the likelihood of isolating these bacteria in a given subgingival site by employing Generalized Estimation Equation (GEE) methods. Clinical examinations were carried out at 6 sites of every tooth present. In each subject, 13 extracrevicular (2 cheek mucosa, 3 tongue, 4 gingival, 2 tonsillar samples, 1 palatinal, 1 saliva sample) and between 22 and 44 subgingival samples from deepest sites of every tooth present (n = 296) were selectively cultivated for A. actinomycetemcomitans, E. corrodens and Capnocytophaga spp. In extracrevicular material, A. actinomycetemcomitans, Capnocytophaga spp. and E. corrodens were isolated in 9, 10 and 6 patients, and from 65, 82 and 15% samples, respectively. The organisms were recovered from 51, 62 and 27% subgingival plaque samples, respectively. Heterogeneity tests did not reveal significant inconsistencies of microbial associations between bacteria in

  10. Clinical assessment of periodontal conditions in patients treated with nifedipine.

    PubMed

    Neumann, C; Willershausen-Zönnchen, B; Klug, C; Darius, H

    1996-03-19

    Calcium antagonists are widely used in treating acute and chronic coronary insufficiency disorders. A major side effect of long-term treatment is gingival hyperplasia. In the present study, 70 patients taking nifedipine for at least six months and 70 controls similar in age, gender, approximal hygiene and systemic disease with at least 6 anterior teeth in upper and lower arches were examined. Their periodontal conditions were determined by modified Sulcus-Bleeding-Index (mSBI), modified Approximal-Plaque-Index (mAPI), Community Periodontal Index of Treatment Needs (CPITN), a hyperplasia index quantifying the extent of gingival overgrowth, probing depths, clinical attachment loss and the modified Phenytoin-Gingival-Inflammation-Index (mPGI). A mild to moderate gingival hyperplasia was diagnosed in 21 of 70 patients resulting in a prevalence of 30% compared to 8.5% in controls. The hyperplastic changes were situated mainly in the anterior region of the dentition. Significant differences between both groups could be found comparing the severity of the gingival hyperplasia, the CPITN, mSBI, probing depths and the part of mPGI evaluating colour and turgor of the gingiva (p < 0.05). The severity of gingival overgrowth was strongly correlated with the inflammatory gingival changes, probing depths, the periodontal treatment need and the approximal hygiene of the patients. No statistically significant correlation could be found between the severity of gingival hyperplasia and the age and gender of the patient, or the dose or duration of nifedipine therapy. Gingival changes seemed to be more pronounced in patients with cardiovascular disorders than in patients under hemodialysis. The high incidence of gingival hyperplasia in patients receiving nifedipine on a long-term basis emphasises the role of the dentist and general practitioner in the early detection and prophylaxis of gingival changes and requires a thorough information to the patient concerning periodontal side

  11. Effect of Non-surgical Periodontal Therapy on Serum and Salivary Concentrations of Visfatin in Patients with Chronic Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Abolfazli, Nader; Jabali, Sahar; Saleh Saber, Fariba; Babaloo, Zohreh; Shirmohammadi, Adileh

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Visfatin, mainly secreted by visceral adipose tissue, especially by macrophages, plays an important role in regulating the defense and immune functions, and functions as a growth factor, a cytokine, an enzyme and more importantly as a proinflammatory mediator. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of non-surgical periodontal treatment on serum and salivary levels of visfatin in patients with generalized moderate-to-severe chronic periodontitis. Materials and methods. Eighteen patients with generalized moderate-to-severe chronic periodontitis were selected based on periodontal parameters of gingival index (GI), probing pocket depth (PPD), clinical attachment level (CAL) and radiographic parameters. Serum and salivary samples were collected at baseline and one month following non-surgical periodontal therapy (scaling and root planing ([SRP]). Visfatin levels were measured using an ELISA kit. Data were analyzed by SPSS 15, using paired t-test and Pearson's correlation coefficient. Results. Mean salivary and serum levels of visfatin significantly decreased after non-surgical periodontal treatment (P<0.05). Changes in salivary visfatin levels were more prominent. Conclusion. According to the findings of this study it seems that there is a direct relationship between periodontal tissue inflammation and disease activity with salivary and serum visfatin levels. PMID:25973148

  12. Periodontal treatment to improve glycaemic control in diabetic patients: study protocol of the randomized, controlled DIAPERIO trial

    PubMed Central

    Vergnes, Jean-Noel; Arrivé, Elise; Gourdy, Pierre; Hanaire, Hélène; Rigalleau, Vincent; Gin, Henri; Sédarat, Cyril; Dorignac, Georges; Bou, Christophe; Sixou, Michel; Nabet, Cathy

    2009-01-01

    Background Periodontitis is a common, chronic inflammatory disease caused by gram-negative bacteria leading to destruction of tissues supporting the teeth. Epidemiological studies have consistently shown increased frequency, extent and severity of periodontitis among diabetic adults. More recently, some controlled clinical trials have also suggested that periodontal treatment could improve glycaemic control in diabetic patients. However current evidence does not provide sufficient information on which to confidently base any clinical recommendations. The main objective of this clinical trial is to assess whether periodontal treatment could lead to a decrease in glycated haemoglobin levels in metabolically unbalanced diabetic patients suffering from chronic periodontitis. Methods The DIAPERIO trial is an open-label, 13-week follow-up, randomized, controlled trial. The total target sample size is planned at 150 participants, with a balanced (1:1) treatment allocation (immediate treatment vs delayed treatment). Periodontal treatment will include full mouth non-surgical scaling and root planing, systemic antibiotherapy, local antiseptics (chlorhexidine 0.12%) and oral health instructions. The primary outcome will be the difference in change of HbA1c between the two groups after the 13-weeks' follow-up. Secondary outcomes will be the difference in change of fructosamine levels and quality of life between the two groups. Discussion The DIAPERIO trial will provide insight into the question of whether periodontal treatment could lead to an improvement in glycaemic control in metabolically unbalanced diabetic patients suffering from periodontitis. The results of this trial will help to provide evidence-based recommendations for clinicians and a draft framework for designing national health policies. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN15334496 PMID:19646281

  13. Gingival, Plasma and Salivary Levels of Melatonin in Periodontally Healthy Individuals and Chronic Periodontitis Patients: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Balaji, Thodur Madapusi; Vasanthi, Hannah Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Periodontal disease is an inflammatory condition affecting tooth supporting structures in which dysregulated immune response and oxidative stress mediate tissue destruction. Melatonin, the pineal gland hormone is a regulator of circadian rhythm, an antioxidant and an immunomodulator. Previous studies have shown lowered melatonin levels in saliva, plasma and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) of patients with periodontal disease. Till date no study has assessed the melatonin levels in gingival tissues. Materials and Methods: Five healthy individuals and 15 chronic periodontitis patients were recruited for this pilot study. 5ml of whole saliva, 2 ml peripheral blood and gingival tissue samples were obtained from each individual at 8.00 am in fasting state. Melatonin assay was performed with a commercially available ELISA kit. Statistical analysis was done to assess the difference in mean melatonin levels among the groups. Results: No statistically significant difference was found in mean melatonin levels between healthy individuals and chronic periodontitis patients in saliva (p=.266) and plasma (p=.933) samples, whereas in gingival tissue samples (p=.015), the melatonin levels were significantly lowered in chronic periodontitis patients compared to healthy individuals. Conclusion: This study demonstrates the presence of melatonin in gingival tissue. Furthermore, melatonin levels are lowered in gingival tissues of chronic periodontitis patients. PMID:25954699

  14. Periodontal conditions and associated factors among adults and the elderly: findings from the first National Oral Health Survey in Uruguay.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, Susana M; Alvarez, Ramón; Andrade, Ernesto; Piccardo, Virginia; Francia, Alejandro; Massa, Fernando; Correa, Marcos Britto; Peres, Marco Aurélio

    2015-11-01

    The aims of this study were to assess the prevalence of periodontal conditions in the Uruguayan adult and elderly population and its association with socioeconomic and behavioral characteristics. Data from adults (35-44, n = 358) and elderly (65-74, n = 411) who participated in the first National Oral Health Survey, Uruguay, 2011, were used. The survey included a household questionnaire addressing socioeconomic characteristics, and tobacco use. Bleeding on probing (BOP), periodontal pockets (CPI) and clinical attachment loss (CAL) were measured by clinical examination. A multivariable analysis was carried out. Considering both age groups, the prevalence of mild/severe periodontal disease was 21.8% and 9.12% for severe periodontal disease. Adjusted analyses revealed an association between high education and all outcomes. Attendance at dental services was negatively associated with BOP and mild to severe periodontitis. Periodontal outcomes were higher in disadvantaged socioeconomic groups. Tobacco consumption has a strong association with periodontal disease in the elderly. PMID:26840821

  15. Periodontal conditions and associated factors among adults and the elderly: findings from the first National Oral Health Survey in Uruguay.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, Susana M; Alvarez, Ramón; Andrade, Ernesto; Piccardo, Virginia; Francia, Alejandro; Massa, Fernando; Correa, Marcos Britto; Peres, Marco Aurélio

    2015-11-01

    The aims of this study were to assess the prevalence of periodontal conditions in the Uruguayan adult and elderly population and its association with socioeconomic and behavioral characteristics. Data from adults (35-44, n = 358) and elderly (65-74, n = 411) who participated in the first National Oral Health Survey, Uruguay, 2011, were used. The survey included a household questionnaire addressing socioeconomic characteristics, and tobacco use. Bleeding on probing (BOP), periodontal pockets (CPI) and clinical attachment loss (CAL) were measured by clinical examination. A multivariable analysis was carried out. Considering both age groups, the prevalence of mild/severe periodontal disease was 21.8% and 9.12% for severe periodontal disease. Adjusted analyses revealed an association between high education and all outcomes. Attendance at dental services was negatively associated with BOP and mild to severe periodontitis. Periodontal outcomes were higher in disadvantaged socioeconomic groups. Tobacco consumption has a strong association with periodontal disease in the elderly.

  16. Treatment of a Periodontic-Endodontic Lesion in a Patient with Aggressive Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Case Description. This case report describes the successful management of a left mandibular first molar with a combined periodontic-endodontic lesion in a 35-year-old Caucasian woman with aggressive periodontitis using a concerted approach including endodontic treatment, periodontal therapy, and a periodontal regenerative procedure using an enamel matrix derivate. In spite of anticipated poor prognosis, the tooth lesion healed. This case report also discusses the rationale behind different treatment interventions. Practical Implication. Periodontic-endodontic lesions can be successfully treated if dental professionals follow a concerted treatment protocol that integrates endodontic and periodontic specialties. General dentists can be the gatekeepers in managing these cases. PMID:27418983

  17. Bacterial load of periodontal pathogens among italian patients with chronic periodontitis: a comparative study of three different areas.

    PubMed

    Lauritano, D; Martinelli, M; Mucchi, D; Palmieri, A; Lo Muzio, L; Carinci, F

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the mean bacterial load of some periodontal pathogenic bacteria in Italian patients affected by chronic periodontitis. The sample consisted of 1,762 patients with a clinical diagnosis of chronic periodontitis based on the criteria of the American Academy of Periodontology sampled in the period 2013-2015; 1,323 patients were from Northern Italy, 317 from Central Italy and 122 from Southern Italy. Samples for microbiological analysis were collected from the four sites of the greatest probing depth in each patient and then processed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Periodontal pathogens have the following percentage respect to total bacteria load: Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans 0.1%, Campylobacter rectus 2%, Fusobacterium nucleatum 8%, Porphyromonas gingivalis 6%, Treponema denticola 2% and Tannerella forsythia 1.5%. There are significant differences in bacterial load among the different geographical areas both for the total bacterial and for the single species. The results of our study in this Italian population showed that a different geographic distribution exists among periodontal pathogens. We hypothesize that these differences in bacterial load could be related to genetic and environmental factors. Additional studies are necessary to confirm these data and to get more insight on additional factors, which may play a role in periodontal pathogens in different geographic areas. PMID:27469562

  18. Periodontal and prosthetic treatment of a cleft lip and palate patient: a case report.

    PubMed

    Santi, E; Weinberg, M A; Abitbol, T E

    1995-07-01

    Although cleft lip and palate patients are usually treated by a multidisciplinary team involving physicians and dentists, their periodontal condition may be over-looked. Crowded or malpositioned teeth, hypertrophic gingiva, orthodontic appliances, and prosthetic replacements can impede proper plaque removal and thus perpetuate periodontal disease. It is important to incorporate periodontal treatment into the comprehensive treatment as early as possible. This case report discusses the periodontal surgical procedures involved in eliminating a residual ridge defect and the fitting of the final prosthetic reconstruction. Also, the importance of the identification and management of periodontal conditions characteristic of cleft lip and palate patients before and after surgical, orthodontic, and prosthetic rehabilitation will be emphasized.

  19. The Prevalence and Associated Factors of Periodontitis According to Fasting Plasma Glucose in the Korean Adults

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jae Won; Noh, Jung Hyun; Kim, Dong-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although the relationship between diabetes and periodontitis is well established, the association between periodontitis and prediabetes has been investigated less extensively. Furthermore, there has been little research on the prevalence of periodontitis among individuals with prediabetes and diabetes as well as in the overall population using nationally representative data. Among 12,406 adults (≥19 years’ old) who participated in the 2012–2013 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, a total of 9977 subjects completed oral and laboratory examinations and were included in this analysis. Periodontitis was defined as a community periodontal index score of ≥3 according to the World Health Organization criteria. The fasting plasma glucose level was categorized into the following 5 groups: normal fasting glucose (NFG) 1 (<90 mg/dL), NFG 2 (90–99 mg/dL), impaired fasting glucose (IFG) 1 (100–110 mg/dL), IFG 2 (111–125 mg/dL), and diabetes (≥126 mg/dL). Overall, the weighted prevalence of periodontitis among the Korean adult population was 24.8% (23.3–26.4%) (weight n = 8,455,952/34,086,014). The unadjusted weighted prevalences of periodontitis were 16.7%, 22.8%, 29.6%, 40.7%, and 46.7% in the NFG 1, NFG 2, IFG 1, IFG 2, and diabetes groups, respectively (P < 0.001). After adjusting for age, sex, smoking history, heavy alcohol drinking, college graduation, household income, waist circumference, serum triglyceride level, serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level, and the presence of hypertension, the adjusted weighted prevalence of periodontitis increased to 29.7% in the IFG 2 group (P = 0.045) and 32.5% in the diabetes group (P < 0.001), compared with the NFG 1 group (24%). The odds ratios for periodontitis with the above-mentioned variables as covariates were 1.42 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.14–1.77, P = 0.002) in the diabetes group and 1.33 (95% CI 1.01–1.75, P = 0.044) in the IFG

  20. Reduction of Melatonin Level in Patients with Type II Diabetes and Periodontal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Abdolsamadi, Hamidreza; Goodarzi, Mohammad Taghi; Ahmadi Motemayel, Fatemeh; Jazaeri, Mina; Feradmal, Javad; Zarabadi, Mahdiyeh; Hoseyni, Mostafa; Torkzaban, Parviz

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Melatonin is a circulating hormone that is mainly released from the pineal gland. It possesses antioxidant, free-radical scavenging, and immune-enhancing properties. A growing number of studies reveal a complex role for melatonin in influencing various diseases, including diabetes and periodontal diseases. The aim of this study was to examine the possible links between salivary melatonin levels and type II diabetes and periodontal diseases. Materials and methods. A total of 30 type II diabetic patients, 30 patients with periodontal diseases, 30 type II diabetic patients with periodontal disease and 30 age- and BMI-matched controls were studied. The periodontal status was evaluated by the Community Periodontal Index (CPI). Salivary melatonin levels were determined by a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit. Results. The mean of salivary melatonin level was significantly lower in patients with either periodontitis or diabetes compared to healthy subjects (P < 0.05). Salivary melatonin concentration decreased in type II diabetic patients and periodontitis patients, and then decreased reaching the lowest levels in type II diabetic patients with periodontal disease. Conclusion. Based on the results of this study, it can probably be concluded that salivary level of melatonin has an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetes and periodontal diseases. It is also worth noting that this factor could probably be used as a pivotal biological marker in the diagnosis and possible treatment of these diseases, although further research is required to validate this hypothesis. PMID:25346835

  1. Reduction of Melatonin Level in Patients with Type II Diabetes and Periodontal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Abdolsamadi, Hamidreza; Goodarzi, Mohammad Taghi; Ahmadi Motemayel, Fatemeh; Jazaeri, Mina; Feradmal, Javad; Zarabadi, Mahdiyeh; Hoseyni, Mostafa; Torkzaban, Parviz

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Melatonin is a circulating hormone that is mainly released from the pineal gland. It possesses antioxidant, free-radical scavenging, and immune-enhancing properties. A growing number of studies reveal a complex role for melatonin in influencing various diseases, including diabetes and periodontal diseases. The aim of this study was to examine the possible links between salivary melatonin levels and type II diabetes and periodontal diseases. Materials and methods. A total of 30 type II diabetic patients, 30 patients with periodontal diseases, 30 type II diabetic patients with periodontal disease and 30 age- and BMI-matched controls were studied. The periodontal status was evaluated by the Community Periodontal Index (CPI). Salivary melatonin levels were determined by a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit. Results. The mean of salivary melatonin level was significantly lower in patients with either periodontitis or diabetes compared to healthy subjects (P < 0.05). Salivary melatonin concentration decreased in type II diabetic patients and periodontitis patients, and then decreased reaching the lowest levels in type II diabetic patients with periodontal disease. Conclusion. Based on the results of this study, it can probably be concluded that salivary level of melatonin has an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetes and periodontal diseases. It is also worth noting that this factor could probably be used as a pivotal biological marker in the diagnosis and possible treatment of these diseases, although further research is required to validate this hypothesis. PMID:25346835

  2. Periodontitis prevalence in adults ≥ 65 years of age, in the USA.

    PubMed

    Eke, Paul I; Wei, Liang; Borgnakke, Wenche S; Thornton-Evans, Gina; Zhang, Xingyou; Lu, Hua; McGuire, Lisa C; Genco, Robert J

    2016-10-01

    The older adult population is growing rapidly in the USA and it is expected that by 2040 the number of adults ≥ 65 years of age will have increased by about 50%. With the growth of this subpopulation, oral health status, and periodontal status in particular, becomes important in the quest to maintain an adequate quality of life. Poor oral health can have a major impact, leading to tooth loss, pain and discomfort, and may prevent older adults from chewing food properly, often leading to poor nutrition. Periodontitis is monitored in the USA at the national level as part of the Healthy People 2020 initiative. In this report, we provide estimates of the overall burden of periodontitis among adults ≥ 65 years of age and after stratification according to sociodemographic factors, modifiable risk factors (such as smoking status), the presence of other systemic conditions (such as diabetes) and access to dental care. We also estimated the burden of periodontitis within this age group at the state and local levels. Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2009/2010 and 2011/2012 cycles were analyzed. Periodontal measures from both survey cycles were based on a full-mouth periodontal examination. Nineteen per cent of adults in this subpopulation were edentulous. The mean age was 73 years, 7% were current smokers, 8% lived below the 100% Federal Poverty Level and < 40% had seen a dentist in the past year. Almost two-thirds (62.3%) had one or more sites with ≥ 5 mm of clinical attachment loss and almost half had at least one site with probing pocket depth of ≥ 4 mm. We estimated the lowest prevalence of periodontitis in Utah (62.3%) and New Hampshire (62.6%) and the highest in New Mexico, Hawaii, and the District of Columbia each with a prevalence of higher than 70%. Overall, periodontitis is highly prevalent in this subpopulation, with two-thirds of dentate older adults affected at any geographic level. These findings provide an

  3. Serum monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 is a biomarker in patients with diabetes and periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishnan, Preethi; Srikanth, Padma; Seshadri, Krishna G.; Barani, Ramya; Samanta, Maitreya

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The role of serum Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 (MCP-1) as a biomarker of periodontitis is well documented; however, its role in diabetic patients with periodontitis is unknown. Aim: This study was conducted to determine the presence and concentration of serum MCP-1 in diabetic patients with and without periodontitis and correlate it glycemic status with periodontitis. Materials and Methods: Adult diabetic patients were enrolled and grouped into group I, II, and III based on their glycemic status and serum MCP-1 estimated by ELISA. Linear regression and correlation tests were performed using R statistical software, Medcalc software to observe correlation between the serum MCP-1 and glycated hemoglobin level among different groups. Results: Serum samples obtained from 37 patients tested positive for MCP-1. Mean serum MCP-1 concentration was highest (482.3 pg/ml) in group III, lowest (149.3 pg/ml) in group I, and intermediate 398.8 pg/ml in group II. Correlation and regression analysis was done between HbA1c and serum MCP-1. A significant positive correlation (P < 0.001) was observed. Serum MCP-1 increased by 37.278 pg/ml for every 1% rise in HbA1c, and the levels were raised in group II and group III than in group I irrespective of their glycemic status. With an HbA1c range of 6.5-6.9% (group II), the serum MCP-1 values cluster around 380-410 pg/ml. Elevated levels of serum MCP-1 (>500 pg/ml) in three subjects corresponded to HbA1c values more than 12.2% (group III). Conclusion: To our knowledge, this is the first study to document serum MCP-1 levels in diabetic patients with periodontitis. Glycemic status influences serum MCP-1, and lack of glycemic control contributes to increased serum MCP-1 levels. Serum MCP-1 may thus serve as a biomarker of inflammation and disease progression in diabetes with periodontitis. PMID:25143907

  4. [Prevention and Information for Patients Undergoing Periodontal Treatment: Potentials for Improvement from the Patients' Perspective].

    PubMed

    Klingenberg, A; Walther, W; Dörfer, C E; Szecsenyi, J

    2016-05-01

    2 334 patients from 29 dental practices took part in a written survey on their experiences with dental treatment in general as well as treatment of periodontal disease (response rate 80.8%). 72.6% of all participating patients fully agreed that they could recommend their dentist to their friends. 63.6% of patients undergoing treatment of periodontitis (N=328) rated this treatment as "excellent". However, for important aspects (prevention, patient information, treatment) potentials for improvement became obvious. 43.7% of patients treated for periodontitis were not completely satisfied with information on how this disease develops; 40.7% saw potentials for better information on preventive care (dental-hygiene, nutrition). An even higher percentage of patients actually not treated for periodontitis was interested in more information on prevention (51.4%). The results of the survey show that dentists should offer information and exercise on how to prevent periodontal desease more actively. There is a lack of research on the present state of affairs and potentials for improvement concerning treatment and prevention of periodontitis including the patients' perspective. PMID:26086539

  5. Common Perceptions of Periodontal Health and Illness among Adults: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Gholami, M.; Pakdaman, A.; Virtanen, J. I.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. Our aim was to explore perceptions of periodontal health and illness and to examine attitudes and beliefs regarding prevention of gum diseases among Iranian adults. Methods. Our qualitative approach included focus-group discussions among adults aged 18 and above based on convenient and purposive sampling in Tehran. Transcripts of the four focus-group discussions were analyzed by two independent reviewers using a content analysis method. Results. Two major themes in the analyses emerged: the common perception of periodontal health and illness and the attitude towards prevention. The study demonstrated the subjects' good understanding of prevention of periodontal disease, but their lack of knowledge of the aetiology of the diseases, and an inability to differentiate aetiology, symptoms, and prevention of dental caries and periodontal disease. Conclusion. This study revealed a need for oral health education among Iranian adults to improve their knowledge and change their attitudes to achieve deeper understanding of the aetiology and prevention of periodontal disease. Health promotion programs should address misconceptions about prevention of gum disease. PMID:23029620

  6. Expression Profile of IL-35 mRNA in Gingiva of Chronic Periodontitis and Aggressive Periodontitis Patients: A Semiquantitative RT-PCR Study

    PubMed Central

    Kalburgi, Nagaraj B.; Muley, Akshay; Shivaprasad, B. M.; Koregol, Arati C.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines play a key role in the pathogenesis of periodontal diseases. Secretion of bioactive IL-35 has been described by T regulatory cells (Tregs) and is required for their maximal suppressive activity. Tregs are involved in the modulation of local immune response in chronic periodontitis patients. Objective. Hence, the present study was aimed to investigate the expression of IL-35 mRNA in chronic periodontitis and aggressive periodontitis patients. Materials and Methods. The present study was carried out in 60 subjects, which included 20 chronic periodontitis patients, 20 aggressive periodontitis patients, and 20 periodontally healthy controls. IL-35 mRNA expression in gingival tissue samples of all subjects was semiquantitatively analyzed using Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR). Results. The present study demonstrated the expression of IL-35 mRNA in gingival tissues of all the three groups. IL-35 mRNA expression was highest in chronic periodontitis subjects (6.87 ± 2.32) as compared to the aggressive periodontitis group (4.71 ± 1.43) and least seen in healthy patients (3.03 ± 1.91). Conclusion. The increased expression of IL-35 in chronic and aggressive periodontitis suggests its possible role in pathogenesis of periodontitis. Future studies done on large samples with intervention will strengthen our result. PMID:24376289

  7. Orthodontic treatment in the severely compromised periodontal patient.

    PubMed

    Feu, Daniela; Menezes, Fernanda Catharino; Augusto Mendes Miguel, José; Cardoso Abdo Quintão, Catia

    2012-12-01

    We describe the diagnosis and treatment of a class II division 1 malocclusion complicated by severe periodontal disease, tooth loss, dentoalveolar protrusion associated with tipping and extrusion of the maxillary incisors, and a traumatic occlusion. Treatment involved the use of a modified palatal arch to intrude and retract the maxillary incisors and high-pull headgear to enhance anchorage and correct the Class II relationship. After active treatment for 19 months, a good anterior occlusion was achieved, with 17° of lingual retroclination and 3 mm of intrusion at the apex of the maxillary incisors. An acceptable occlusion and periodontal status was maintained over a retention period of 2 years. With the patient's cooperation, a successful outcome was achieved with this approach.

  8. DKK1 rescues osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells isolated from periodontal ligaments of patients with diabetes mellitus induced periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qi; Hu, Cheng-Hu; Zhou, Cui-Hong; Cui, Xiao-Xia; Yang, Kun; Deng, Chao; Xia, Jia-Jia; Wu, Yan; Liu, Lu-Chuan; Jin, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Multiple studies have shown that diabetes mellitus is an established risk factor for periodontitis. Recently mesenchymal stem cells derived from periodontal ligament (PDLSCs) have been utilized to reconstruct tissues destroyed by chronic inflammation. However, impact of periodontitis with diabetes mellitus on PDLSCs and mechanisms mediating effects of complex microenvironments remain poorly understood. In this study, we found multiple differentiation potential of PDLSCs from chronic periodontitis with diabetes mellitus donors (D-PDLSCs) was damaged significantly. Inhibition of NF-κB signaling could rescue osteogenic potential of PDLSCs from simple chronic periodontitis patients (P-PDLSCs), whereas did not promote D-PDLSCs osteogenesis. In addition, we found expression of DKK1 in D-PDLSCs did not respond to osteogenic signal and decreased osteogenic potential of D-PDLSCs treated with DKK1 could be reversed. To further elucidate different character between P-PDLSCs and D-PDLSCs, we treated PDLSCs with TNF-α and advanced glycation end products (AGEs), and find out AGEs which enhance effect of TNF-α in PDLSCs might mediate special personality of D-PDLSCs. The adverse effect of AGEs in PDLSCs could be reversed when PDLSCs were treated with DKK1. These results suggested DKK1 mediating WNT signaling might be a therapy target to rescue potential of PDLSCs in periodontitis with diabetes mellitus. PMID:26278788

  9. DKK1 rescues osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells isolated from periodontal ligaments of patients with diabetes mellitus induced periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qi; Hu, Cheng-Hu; Zhou, Cui-Hong; Cui, Xiao-Xia; Yang, Kun; Deng, Chao; Xia, Jia-Jia; Wu, Yan; Liu, Lu-Chuan; Jin, Yan

    2015-08-17

    Multiple studies have shown that diabetes mellitus is an established risk factor for periodontitis. Recently mesenchymal stem cells derived from periodontal ligament (PDLSCs) have been utilized to reconstruct tissues destroyed by chronic inflammation. However, impact of periodontitis with diabetes mellitus on PDLSCs and mechanisms mediating effects of complex microenvironments remain poorly understood. In this study, we found multiple differentiation potential of PDLSCs from chronic periodontitis with diabetes mellitus donors (D-PDLSCs) was damaged significantly. Inhibition of NF-κB signaling could rescue osteogenic potential of PDLSCs from simple chronic periodontitis patients (P-PDLSCs), whereas did not promote D-PDLSCs osteogenesis. In addition, we found expression of DKK1 in D-PDLSCs did not respond to osteogenic signal and decreased osteogenic potential of D-PDLSCs treated with DKK1 could be reversed. To further elucidate different character between P-PDLSCs and D-PDLSCs, we treated PDLSCs with TNF-α and advanced glycation end products (AGEs), and find out AGEs which enhance effect of TNF-α in PDLSCs might mediate special personality of D-PDLSCs. The adverse effect of AGEs in PDLSCs could be reversed when PDLSCs were treated with DKK1. These results suggested DKK1 mediating WNT signaling might be a therapy target to rescue potential of PDLSCs in periodontitis with diabetes mellitus.

  10. Periodontal disease, hypertension and blood pressure among older adults in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Rivas-Tumanyan, Sona; Campos, Maribel; Zevallos, Juan C.; Joshipura, Kaumudi J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Current scientific evidence addressing the relation between periodontitis and hypertension is limited to a few studies producing inconsistent results. Methods All participants of an on-going representative cohort of Puerto Rican elderly who were 70 years and older and residing in San Juan metropolitan area were invited to this cross-sectional study. Periodontal probing depth (PD) and attachment loss (AL) were summarized using CDC-AAP definition for severe periodontitis (≥2 teeth with AL ≥6mm and ≥1 tooth with PD ≥5mm). We averaged three repeated blood pressure (BP) measurements taken using a standardized auscultatory method. Information on hypertension history, use of anti-hypertensive medications and potential confounders (age, gender, smoking, heavy and binge drinking, diabetes, utilization of preventive dental services, flossing, body mass index, fruit and vegetable, whole wheat bread and high-fiber cereal consumption) was collected during in-person interviews. High BP was defined as average systolic BP ≥140 mmHg or diastolic ≥90 mmHg. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to study the relation between severe periodontitis, hypertension history and high BP. Results The study population comprised 182 adults. In multivariate analysis, there was no association between severe periodontitis and hypertension history (OR=0.99, 95% CI: 0.40–2.48). Severe periodontitis was associated with high BP, with OR of 2.93 (95% CI: 1.25–6.84), after adjusting for age, gender, smoking, and binge drinking. This association was stronger when restricted to those with hypertension or taking anti-hypertensive medications: OR=4.20 (95% CI: 1.28–13.80). Conclusion Our results suggest that periodontitis may contribute to poor blood pressure control among older adults. PMID:22548584

  11. Periodontal considerations in the use of bonds or bands on molars in adolescents and adults.

    PubMed

    Boyd, R L; Baumrind, S

    1992-01-01

    This longitudinal study compared the periodontal status of bonded and banded molars in 20 adult and 40 adolescent patients before, during and after treatment with fixed orthodontic appliances. Plaque accumulation (measured by the Plaque Index), gingival inflammation (measured by the Gingival Index and the bleeding tendency), and pocket depth were assessed by one examiner at sites along the mesio-buccal line angle of the maxillary right first molar and the mandibular left first molar. Assessments were made immediately prior to the placement of fixed appliances (pretreatment), at 1, 3, 6, 9, 12 and 18 months after appliances were placed; and 3 months after appliances were removed (posttreatment). Loss of attachment between the pretreatment and posttreatment visits also was determined. At pretreatment, no significant differences were found in gingival inflammation between maxillary and mandibular banded and bonded molars. During treatment, both maxillary and mandibular banded molars showed significantly (p less than 0.05) greater gingival inflammation and plaque accumulation than did bonded molars. Three months after appliance removal, the maxillary molars that had been banded continued to show significantly more gingival inflammation and loss of attachment than did the maxillary molars that had been bonded. When all banded and bonded teeth were grouped by patient age, mean values for plaque accumulation and gingival inflammation in the maxillary molar regions were significantly greater for adolescents than for adults.

  12. Comparison of bone mineral density in the jaws of patients with and without chronic periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Öztürk Tonguç, M; Ş Büyükkaplan, U; Fentoğlu, Ö; A Gümüş, B; S Çerçi, S; Y Kırzıoğlu, F

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Although several studies have addressed the relationship between systemic bone mineral status and the severity of periodontitis, there is little knowledge of the relationship between periodontal disease and locally detected bone mineral density. The aim of this study was to compare the mandibular bone mineral density of patients with chronic periodontitis with that of periodontally healthy subjects. Methods 48 systemically healthy subjects were included in the study and underwent a periodontal examination to determine their status. 24 subjects were periodontally healthy and the other 24 had moderate or severe chronic periodontitis. The mandibular bone mineral density of the subjects was determined by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. The region of interest on the body of the mandible was independently determined on the dual energy absorptiometry radiographs, and a computer calculated the bone mineral density of these regions. Results The mandibular bone mineral density of the subjects with periodontitis was significantly lower than that of the periodontally healthy subjects (p < 0.01). There were significant negative correlations between the mandibular bone mineral density values and parameters related to the amount of periodontal destruction. Conclusions Low bone mineral density in the jaw may be associated with chronic periodontitis. PMID:22241867

  13. [Clinical and microbiological rationale for laser removal of infected epithelia in patients with periodontitis].

    PubMed

    Razina, I N; Chesnokova, M G; Nedoseko, V B

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to identify clinical microbiological criteria for the necessity of removal of infected epithelium in the periodontal pocket in patients with periodontitis. A total of 90 patients diagnosed with periodontal disease of varying severity were assessed. Clinical examination of the patients was performed, including the definition of index numbers and microbiological diagnosis of the content of periodontal pocket and periodontal tissues by biopsy culture seeding. Epithelial integration of lactobacilli and bifidobacteria was established, indicating the need for a differentiated approach to the removal of gingival epithelium. Diagnostic criteria for deepitalization was identified: marked inflammatory response of periodontal tissues, characterized by performance indexes PMA > 50%, Mulleman > 1.5, Svrakov > 2.7, correlated with the degree of contamination biopsy 4IgKOE/ml and Candida spp. 2IgKOE/ml. PMID:26953423

  14. Serum leveis of inflammatory markers in type 2 diabetes patients with chronic periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    LONGO, Priscila Larcher; ARTESE, Hilana Paula Carillo; RABELO, Marianade Sousa; KAWAMOTO, Dione; FOZ, Adriana Moura; ROMITO, Giuseppe Alexandre; DIB, Sérgio Atala; MAYER, Marcia Pinto Alves

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes has been associated with periodontitis, but the mechanisms through which periodontal diseases affect the metabolic control remain unclear. Objective This study aimed to evaluate serum leveis of inflammatory markers, IL-8, IL-6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), in type 2 diabetic patients in the presence of chronic periodontitis. Material and Methods Forty two individuals were enrolled in this study and assigned to one of five groups: diabetes mellitus with inadequate glycemic control and periodontitis (DMI+P, n = 10), diabetes mellitus with adequate glycemic control and periodontitis (DMA+P, n = 10), diabetes mellitus without periodontitis (DM, n = 10), periodontitis without diabetes (P, n=6), and neither diabetes nor periodontitis (H, n = 6). Periodontal clinical examination included visible plaque index (PL), gingival bleeding index (GB), probing depth (PD), attachment level (AL) and bleeding on probing (BP). Glycemic control was evaluated by serum concentration of glycated hemoglobin (HbAlc). Inflammatory serum markers IL-8, IL-6 and (MCP-1) were measured by ELISA. Results DMI+P and DMA+P groups presented higher PD (p=0.025) and AL (p=0.003) values when compared to the P group. There were no significant differences among groups for IL-6, IL-8 and MCP-1 serum levels. Conclusions Although periodontitis was more severe in diabetic patients, the serum levels of the investigated inflammatory markers did not differ among the groups. PMID:24676580

  15. [Periodontal diseases in adults. Immunohistochemical study of inflammatory cells and of collagen].

    PubMed

    Chomette, G; Auriol, M; Armbruster, D; Szpirglas, H; Vaillant, J M

    1987-01-01

    An immunohistochemical study was performed on 9 gingival biopsy specimens from patients suffering of a periodontal disease comparatively to 7 control specimens from patients with inflammatory gingival hyperplasia of various causes and from healthy gums. We used mono or polyclonal antibodies as markers of the different types of inflammatory cells (T-1 lymphocytes and their subsets, B-lymphocytes, macrophages, plasma cells). In patients with periodontal disease, the high percentage of transformed T-lymphocytes with a majority of helpers was obvious. In controls, the inflammatory cells were principally B-lymphocytes, macrophages and plasma cells. The characterization of different types of collagen produced by periodontal fibroblasts was performed by specific antibodies (anti I, III, V collagen sera). The respective ratio and the topographic distribution of those collagen substances were different in patients with periodontal disease and controls. In the first eventuality, one could find quite exclusively type I collagen. In the other group, type I collagen was associated with type III sub epithelial and type IV perivasor ar collagen. By means of these findings, the pathogenesis of the periodontal disease was discussed and its immune mechanism was suggested.

  16. Comparison of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C) levels in patients with chronic periodontitis and healthy controls

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Padma; Nera, Mahipal; Pavalura, Aravind Kumar; Medandrao, Nagasree; Kumar, S Chetan

    2013-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to determine if glycosylated hemoglobin is elevated in patients with chronic periodontitis who have not been diagnosed with diabetes and also to compare the HbA1c levels that were obtained with lab and chairside test kit. Materials and Methods: A Case control study was designed. Glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) was assessed using a chairside kit and laboratory method in 70 subjects without diabetes but with chronic periodontitis [having at least 10 teeth (at least one site around each tooth) with probing depth (PD) ≥ 5 mm, bleeding on probing (BOP) ≥15% and clinical attachment level (CAL) ≥ 1 mm] and 70 healthy controls (PD ≤ 4 mm and BOP ≤ 15%). Groups were compared using the t-test and multiple linear regression model analysis. Karl Pearson's correlation coefficient was used to compare the relationship between different variables. Results: In this case control study HbA1c (Lab and Kit) were slightly higher and statistically significant in chronic periodontitis cases than in healthy controls. Conclusion: Chronic periodontitis is associated with a slight elevation in glycosylated hemoglobin (lab and chair side kit) and that the clinical significance of this difference remains to be determined. This preliminary finding is consistent with earlier reports that chronic periodontitis is associated with elevated blood glucose in adults without diabetes and may increase one's risk for type-2 diabetes. PMID:24019810

  17. Virulence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans serotypes and DGGE subtypes isolated from chronic adult periodontitis in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Pahumunto, Nuntiya; Ruangsri, Praphansri; Wongsuwanlert, Mutita; Piwat, Supatcharin; Dahlen, Gunnar; Teanpaisan, Rawee

    2015-12-01

    A high proportion of non-serotypeable isolates of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans among Thai periodontitis cases has been previously reported. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of leukotoxin and toxicity, cytolethal distending toxin (Cdts), and internalization and the killing effect on fibroblasts by A. actinomycetemcomitans subtypes from Thai chronic periodontitis cases. A total of 96 A. actinomycetemcomitans strains from 37 periodontitis cases, previously serotyped with PCR and subtyped with DGGE, were examined for the presence of the ltx gene and cdt genes (cdtBC), and tested for leukotoxin expression, leukotoxicity, internalization, and apoptosis of fibroblast cells. The ltx gene was present in all isolates, while 84.4% showed the cdtBC gene. Two strains with a JP2-like ltx gene with a deletion of 530 bp in the promoter region, serotyped as c, showed virulence of similar magnitude to the JP2 strain. Furthermore, a higher virulence was found in the two non-serotypeable DGGE subtypes, NS1 and NS2, compared with the serotypeable strains (serotype a-f, serotype b and d were absent). Generally, the virulence of strains obtained from deep periodontal pockets was higher than those isolated from shallow non-bleeding pockets. A. actinomycetemcomitans subtypes isolated from adult Thais with chronic periodontitis showed a highly variable virulence, leukotoxin expression, leukotoxicity, internalization and apoptosis of fibroblast, and are regulated both genetically and environmentally. PMID:26529053

  18. Intake of dairy products in relation to periodontitis in older Danish adults.

    PubMed

    Adegboye, Amanda R A; Christensen, Lisa B; Holm-Pedersen, Poul; Avlund, Kirsten; Boucher, Barbara J; Heitmann, Berit L

    2012-09-01

    This cross-sectional study investigates whether calcium intakes from dairy and non-dairy sources, and absolute intakes of various dairy products, are associated with periodontitis. The calcium intake (mg/day) of 135 older Danish adults was estimated by a diet history interview and divided into dairy and non-dairy calcium. Dairy food intake (g/day) was classified into four groups: milk, cheese, fermented foods and other foods. Periodontitis was defined as the number of teeth with attachment loss ≥3 mm. Intakes of total dairy calcium (Incidence-rate ratio (IRR) = 0.97; p = 0.021), calcium from milk (IRR = 0.97; p = 0.025) and fermented foods (IRR = 0.96; p = 0.03) were inversely and significantly associated with periodontitis after adjustment for age, gender, education, sucrose intake, alcohol consumption, smoking, physical activity, vitamin D intake, heart disease, visits to the dentist, use of dental floss and bleeding on probing, but non-dairy calcium, calcium from cheese and other types of dairy food intakes were not. Total dairy foods (IRR = 0.96; p = 0.003), milk (IRR = 0.96; p = 0.028) and fermented foods intakes (IRR = 0.97; p = 0.029) were associated with reduced risk of periodontitis, but cheese and other dairy foods intakes were not. These results suggest that dairy calcium, particularly from milk and fermented products, may protect against periodontitis. Prospective studies are required to confirm these findings.

  19. Implants and all-ceramic restorations in a patient treated for aggressive periodontitis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jin-Sun; Yeo, In-Sung; Kim, Sung-Hun; Lee, Jai-Bong; Han, Jung-Suk

    2010-01-01

    A 23-year-old female with aggressive periodontitis was treated using dental implants and LAVA system. The severely compromised teeth were extracted irrespective of initial conservative periodontal treatment. An implant-supported overdenture with 4 implants was fabricated for the maxilla and all-ceramic restorations for the mandible. Esthetic and functional goals were achieved with team approach involving periodontists and prosthodontists. This case report describes a treatment procedure for a generalized aggressive periodontitis patient with severe bone resorption. PMID:21165277

  20. [Clinical and clinico-histological markers in chronic destructive adult periodontitis].

    PubMed

    Hernández Vallejo, G; García Rodríguez, M D; Tejerina Lobo, J M; López Sánchez, A F; De la Roca, C

    1989-05-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the significance and interrelationship of clinical parameters and their association with histologic changes in advanced destructive periodontitis. 158 patients with PDI greater than 4 (Ramfjord) were selected, evaluating the size, contouring, bleeding, consistency, colour and gingival pain. Epithelial ulceration of soft periodontal pockets were also evaluated. The results showed a statistically significant association between purplish colour and gingival fibrosis and advanced stage of the disease. Gingival bleeding on probing was the most important clinical parameter in advanced phases of the disease, either alone or in association with other parameters such as the presence of epithelial ulcerations. The Periodontal Disease Index (Ramfjord) has proven effective in the evaluation of generalized patterns of disease. PMID:2637055

  1. [Clinical and clinico-histological markers in chronic destructive adult periodontitis].

    PubMed

    Hernández Vallejo, G; García Rodríguez, M D; Tejerina Lobo, J M; López Sánchez, A F; De la Roca, C

    1989-05-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the significance and interrelationship of clinical parameters and their association with histologic changes in advanced destructive periodontitis. 158 patients with PDI greater than 4 (Ramfjord) were selected, evaluating the size, contouring, bleeding, consistency, colour and gingival pain. Epithelial ulceration of soft periodontal pockets were also evaluated. The results showed a statistically significant association between purplish colour and gingival fibrosis and advanced stage of the disease. Gingival bleeding on probing was the most important clinical parameter in advanced phases of the disease, either alone or in association with other parameters such as the presence of epithelial ulcerations. The Periodontal Disease Index (Ramfjord) has proven effective in the evaluation of generalized patterns of disease.

  2. Influence of Type 2 Diabetes on Prevalence of Key Periodontal Pathogens, Salivary Matrix Metalloproteinases, and Bone Remodeling Markers in Sudanese Adults with and without Chronic Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Hasaan Gassim; Idris, Shaza Bushra; Mustafa, Manal; Ahmed, Mutaz Faisal; Åstrøm, Anne Nordrehaug; Mustafa, Kamal; Ibrahim, Salah Osman

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the influence of type 2 diabetes on the occurrence of six periodontal pathogens in plaque samples of patients with and without chronic periodontitis. Levels of salivary MMP-8, MMP-9, RANKL, and OPG were also investigated. The study enrolled 31 patients with type 2 diabetes and chronic periodontitis (DM + CP), 29 with chronic periodontitis (CP), and 20 with type 2 diabetes (DM). Questionnaire-guided interviews were conducted and plaque index, bleeding on probing, and pocket depth were recorded. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was utilized to determine the prevalence of the bacteria. The levels of salivary molecules were determined by enzyme immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The CP group had the highest prevalence of P. gingivalis (81.5%), followed by the DM + CP (59.3%) and DM (55.0%) groups (P > 0.05). Similar trends were observed for P. intermedia and T. denticola. The prevalence of T. forsythia was 100% in both periodontitis groups compared to 90% in the DM group. There were no significant differences between the groups regarding the concentrations of MMP-8, MMP-9, or OPG. RANKL concentrations were below the detection limit. Our data show that type 2 diabetes has no significant influence on the prevalence of the investigated periodontal pathogens, or the levels of salivary MMP-8, MMP-9, and OPG. PMID:26989414

  3. Influence of Type 2 Diabetes on Prevalence of Key Periodontal Pathogens, Salivary Matrix Metalloproteinases, and Bone Remodeling Markers in Sudanese Adults with and without Chronic Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Hasaan Gassim; Idris, Shaza Bushra; Mustafa, Manal; Ahmed, Mutaz Faisal; Åstrøm, Anne Nordrehaug; Mustafa, Kamal; Ibrahim, Salah Osman

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the influence of type 2 diabetes on the occurrence of six periodontal pathogens in plaque samples of patients with and without chronic periodontitis. Levels of salivary MMP-8, MMP-9, RANKL, and OPG were also investigated. The study enrolled 31 patients with type 2 diabetes and chronic periodontitis (DM + CP), 29 with chronic periodontitis (CP), and 20 with type 2 diabetes (DM). Questionnaire-guided interviews were conducted and plaque index, bleeding on probing, and pocket depth were recorded. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was utilized to determine the prevalence of the bacteria. The levels of salivary molecules were determined by enzyme immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The CP group had the highest prevalence of P. gingivalis (81.5%), followed by the DM + CP (59.3%) and DM (55.0%) groups (P > 0.05). Similar trends were observed for P. intermedia and T. denticola. The prevalence of T. forsythia was 100% in both periodontitis groups compared to 90% in the DM group. There were no significant differences between the groups regarding the concentrations of MMP-8, MMP-9, or OPG. RANKL concentrations were below the detection limit. Our data show that type 2 diabetes has no significant influence on the prevalence of the investigated periodontal pathogens, or the levels of salivary MMP-8, MMP-9, and OPG. PMID:26989414

  4. Total Antioxidant Capacity and Total Oxidant Status in Saliva of Periodontitis Patients in Relation to Bacterial Load

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Taowen; Andrukhov, Oleh; Haririan, Hady; Müller-Kern, Michael; Liu, Shutai; Liu, Zhonghao; Rausch-Fan, Xiaohui

    2016-01-01

    The detection of salivary biomarkers has a potential application in early diagnosis and monitoring of periodontal inflammation. However, searching sensitive salivary biomarkers for periodontitis is still ongoing. Oxidative stress is supposed to play an important role in periodontitis progression and tissue destruction. In this cross-sectional study, we investigated total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and total oxidant status (TOS) in saliva of periodontitis patients compared to healthy controls and their relationship with periodontopathic bacteria and periodontal disease severity. Unstimulated saliva was collected from 45 patients with generalized severe periodontitis and 37 healthy individuals and the TAC/TOS were measured. In addition, salivary levels of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, Treponema denticola, and Fusobacterium nucleatum in saliva were measured. Salivary TAC was lower in periodontitis patients compared to healthy controls. Moreover, a significant negative correlation of salivary TAC with clinical attachment loss was observed in periodontitis patients. No significant difference in the salivary TOS was observed between periodontitis patients and healthy controls. Bacterial load was enhanced in periodontitis patients and exhibited correlation with periodontal disease severity but not with salivary TAC/TOS. Our data suggest that changes in antioxidant capacity in periodontitis patients are not associated with increased bacterial load and are probably due to a dysregulated immune response. PMID:26779448

  5. Total Antioxidant Capacity and Total Oxidant Status in Saliva of Periodontitis Patients in Relation to Bacterial Load.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Taowen; Andrukhov, Oleh; Haririan, Hady; Müller-Kern, Michael; Liu, Shutai; Liu, Zhonghao; Rausch-Fan, Xiaohui

    2015-01-01

    The detection of salivary biomarkers has a potential application in early diagnosis and monitoring of periodontal inflammation. However, searching sensitive salivary biomarkers for periodontitis is still ongoing. Oxidative stress is supposed to play an important role in periodontitis progression and tissue destruction. In this cross-sectional study, we investigated total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and total oxidant status (TOS) in saliva of periodontitis patients compared to healthy controls and their relationship with periodontopathic bacteria and periodontal disease severity. Unstimulated saliva was collected from 45 patients with generalized severe periodontitis and 37 healthy individuals and the TAC/TOS were measured. In addition, salivary levels of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, Treponema denticola, and Fusobacterium nucleatum in saliva were measured. Salivary TAC was lower in periodontitis patients compared to healthy controls. Moreover, a significant negative correlation of salivary TAC with clinical attachment loss was observed in periodontitis patients. No significant difference in the salivary TOS was observed between periodontitis patients and healthy controls. Bacterial load was enhanced in periodontitis patients and exhibited correlation with periodontal disease severity but not with salivary TAC/TOS. Our data suggest that changes in antioxidant capacity in periodontitis patients are not associated with increased bacterial load and are probably due to a dysregulated immune response.

  6. Qualitative assessment of red blood cell parameters for signs of anemia in patients with chronic periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Nubesh S.; Luke, Roji; Soman, Rino Roopak; Krishna, Praveen M.; Safar, Iqbal P.; Swaminathan, Senthil Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Anemia of chronic disease is defined as anemia occurring in chronic infections and inflammatory conditions that is not caused by marrow deficiencies or other diseases and in the presence of adequate iron stores and vitamins. The present case control study was aimed to assess the red blood cell parameters for signs of anemia in patients with mild, moderate, and severe chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods: A simple random sampling method was used to select 80 healthy male patients, who were divided into four groups based on full mouth periodontal examination as follows: group I patients comprised the control group (n = 20), which included patients with a clinically healthy periodontium, group II patients (n = 20) were diagnosed with mild chronic periodontitis, group III (n = 20) included moderate chronic periodontitis patients, and patients with severe chronic periodontitis formed group IV (n = 20). Laboratory blood investigations included total number of erythrocytes, hemoglobin concentration, packed cell volume, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration. Results: Data analysis showed a statistically significant decrease in red blood cell parameters with increase in different grades of periodontitis. Conclusion: Results of the present study show a substantial decrease in red blood cell parameters with increase in the severity of periodontal destruction. PMID:26759801

  7. Effect of an enzymatic rinse on salivary levels of Streptococcus mutans and lactobacilli in periodontally treated patients.

    PubMed

    Lehane, R J; Murray, P A; Deasy, M J

    1997-01-01

    Root surface caries is prevalent in patients with both treated and untreated periodontal disease. The major etiologic factor has been identified as microbial plaque. In periodontally treated patients, significantly higher root caries prevalence and incidence have been found in patients with high levels of Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacilli in saliva. Reducing the levels of S. mutans and Lactobacilli in saliva may lower the risk of root caries development. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effect of an oral enzymatic rinse on the salivary counts of S. mutans and Lactobacilli in periodontally treated patients. Fifteen adult subjects participated in a double-blind, cross-over designed clinical trial. Each subject had previously undergone comprehensive periodontal therapy and had been maintained on a regular program of supportive periodontal therapy. Paraffin-stimulated whole saliva was collected from each participant. Each subject was then randomly given either the enzymatic rinse product or a control rinse and instructed to rinse with one tablespoonful twice a day for 2 weeks, after which saliva samples were taken. After a washout period, salivary samples were again taken, and the subjects received the alternate rinse product. Two weeks later, final salivary samples were taken. The salivary samples were serially diluted and incubated aerobically on selective culture media. S. mutans and Lactobacilli were counted on the basis of colonial morphology. Pretreatment and posttreatment salivary counts of S. mutans and Lactobacilli were analyzed using the Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-rank test at the 5% level of significance. Analysis of data revealed that neither the test nor the control rinse significantly lowered salivary counts of either species in the sample population.

  8. Are cardiac transplant patients more likely to have periodontitis? A case record study.

    PubMed

    Lessem, Jan; Drisko, Connie; Greenwell, Henry; Persson, Rutger; Newman, Hubert; Smart, Graham; Hopkins, Lydia; Parameshwar, Jayan; Fishbein, Daniel; Partridge, C; Bhat, G; Goldsmith, J

    2002-07-01

    In several large epidemiological studies chronic periodontitis has been implicated as an additional risk factor, independent of other risk factors, for the development of ischaemic heart disease. The underlying mechanism is thought to be a localised infection giving rise to an inflammatory host response, and some experimental data agree with this hypothesis. Recently, however, some studies have questioned the post dated relationship between the two diseases. The current case-record study was undertaken to evaluate the prevalence of chronic periodontitis and the severity of such periodontal disease in a heart transplant population, assuming the latter represented a relatively severely compromised cardiovascular patient population. The study demonstrated that 76% of the patients had various degrees of periodontal disease prior to undergoing a heart transplant. Thus, it is possible that a relationship between cardiovascular disease and periodontal disease exists, but further, large intervention studies will be needed to confirm such a conclusion.

  9. Prevention and Periodontal Treatment in Down Syndrome Patients: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Greghi, Sebastião Luiz Aguiar; de Resende, Maria Lúcia Rubo; Sant’Ana, Adriana Campos Passanezi; Damante, Carla Andreotti

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this systematic literature review was to evaluate which type of periodontal preventive and therapeutic approaches presents superior outcomes in patients with Down syndrome (DS). Studies reporting different methods of periodontal care from DS patients were considered eligible. Included clinical studies should indicate at least two periodontal parameters in different periods of assessment. Screening of the articles, data extraction and quality assessment were conducted independently and in duplicate. Electronic search according to the PICO search, with both Key-words and MESH terms were conducted in MEDLINE, EMBASE and CENTRAL databases until March 2016. Manual search was conducted in four journals, namely Journal of Periodontology, Journal of Clinical Periodontology, Journal of Periodontal Research and Special Care in Dentistry and their electronic databases were searched. Electronic and manual search resulted in 763 papers, and of them 744 were excluded after title/abstract assessment. The full text of 19 potentially eligible publications was screened and 9 studies met inclusion criteria. The results demonstrated the importance to introduce youngest DS patients in preventive programs, as well as participation of parents, caregivers or institutional attendants in supervising/performing oral hygiene. In studies with higher frequency of attendance, all age groups presented superior preventive and therapeutic results, irrespective of the therapeutic approach used (surgical/nonsurgical/periodontal care program). The important factors for reducing periodontal parameters were the frequency of the appointments and association with chlorhexidine/plaque disclosing agents as adjuvant treatment. This systematic review demonstrated that early introduction in periodontal care, participation of parents/caregivers/institutional attendants, frequency of attendance and association with chemical adjuvants (independently of the periodontal treatment adopted) seems to

  10. Periowave demonstrates bactericidal activity against periopathogens and leads to improved clinical outcomes in the treatment of adult periodontitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Street, Cale N.; Andersen, Roger; Loebel, Nicolas G.

    2009-02-01

    Periodontitis affects half of the U.S. population over 50, and is the leading cause of tooth loss after 35. It is believed to be caused by growth of complex bacterial biofilms on the tooth surface below the gumline. Photodynamic therapy, a technology used commonly in antitumor applications, has more recently been shown to exhibit antimicrobial efficacy. We have demonstrated eradication of the periopathogens Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in vitro using PeriowaveTM; a commercial photodisinfection system. In addition, several clinical studies have now demonstrated the efficacy of this treatment. A pilot study in the U.S. showed that 68% of patients treated with PeriowaveTM adjunctively to scaling and root planing (SRP) showed clinical attachment level increase of >1 mm, as opposed to 30% with SRP alone. In a subsequent larger study, a second PeriowaveTM treatment 6 weeks after initial treatment led to pocket depth improvements of >1.5 mm in 89% of patients. Finally, in the most recent multicenter, randomized, examiner-blinded study conducted on 121 subjects in Canada, PeriowaveTM treatment produced highly significant gains in attachment level (0.88 mm vs. 0.57 mm; p=0.003) and pocket depth (0.87 mm vs. 0.63 mm; p=0.01) as compared to SRP alone. In summary, PeriowaveTM demonstrated strong bactericidal activity against known periopathogens, and treatment of periodontitis using this system produced significantly better clinical outcomes than SRP alone. This, along with the absence of any adverse events in patients treated to date demonstrates that PDT is a safe and effective treatment for adult chronic periodontitis.

  11. An Evaluation of Non-Surgical Periodontal Therapy in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Roman-Torres, Caio V.G; Neto, José S; Souza, Marcio A; Schwartz-Filho, Humberto O; Brandt, William C; Diniz, Ricardo E.A.S

    2015-01-01

    aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of periodontal scaling and oral hygiene instruction for patients with mild chronic periodontitis and rheumatoid arthritis through clinical periodontal parameters and laboratory tests for CRP (C- reactive protein) and ESR (erythrocyte sedimentation rate). Twelve individuals with rheumatoid arthritis and 12 healthy individuals were evaluated, with a mean age of 45.38 and 46.75 respectively, all female and with mild, chronic periodontitis. The participants were evaluated clinically and periapical radiographs were taken (T1), after which periodontal treatment was instituted. After ninety days (T2), new clinical and laboratory data were obtained. Probing depth, bleeding index, and plaque indexes were observed in both groups, and the results demonstrated reductions but no statistical differences. Laboratory tests for CRP and ESR produced higher values for the rheumatoid arthritis group with T1- T2 reductions on the average, but the values were still higher than in the health group. We conclude that periodontal therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and mild chronic periodontitis showed a improvement in the periodontal clinical parameters and laboratory tests that were evaluated. PMID:26140059

  12. Salivary Proteins Associated with Periodontitis in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Hang Haw; Rahim, Zubaidah H. A.; Jessie, Kala; Hashim, Onn H.; Taiyeb-Ali, Tara B.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the salivary proteins that are associated with periodontitis in patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Volunteers for the study were patients from the Diabetic Unit, University of Malaya Medical Centre, whose periodontal status was determined. The diabetic volunteers were divided into two groups, i.e., patients with periodontitis and those who were periodontally healthy. Saliva samples were collected and treated with 10% TCA/acetone/20 mM DTT to precipitate the proteins, which were then separated using two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Gel images were scanned using the GS-800TM Calibrated Densitometer. The protein spots were analyzed and expressed in percentage volumes. The percentage volume of each protein spot was subjected to Mann-Whitney statistical analysis using SPSS software and false discovery rate correction. When the expression of the salivary proteins was compared between the T2DM patients with periodontitis with those who were periodontally healthy, seven proteins, including polymeric immunoglobulin receptor, plastin-2, actin related protein 3, leukocyte elastase inhibitor, carbonic anhydrases 6, immunoglobulin J and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist, were found to be differentially expressed (p < 0.01304). This implies that the proteins may have the potential to be used as biomarkers for the prediction of T2DM patients who may be prone to periodontitis. PMID:22606001

  13. The effect of conventional mechanical periodontal treatment on red complex microorganisms and clinical parameters in Down syndrome periodontitis patients: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, M H; Rodrigues, T O; Finoti, L S; Teixeira, S R L; Mayer, M P A; Scarel-Caminaga, R M; Giro, E M A

    2015-03-01

    Periodontal disease (PD) is induced by a complex microbiota, such as Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola (together called the red complex), which triggers intense inflammatory reaction. Down syndrome (DS) individuals demonstrate a high prevalence of PD compared with those who are otherwise chromosomally normal (euploids). This pilot study aimed to evaluate the effect of non-surgical periodontal treatment in DS chronic periodontitis patients on clinical and microbiological parameters. Patients with chronic periodontitis, 23 DS and 12 euploids (control group), were submitted to non-surgical mechanical periodontal treatment, followed by maintenance for 45 days. Clinical parameters after periodontal treatment were similar in diseased and healthy sites, independent of the genetic background. Diseased sites of DS and control patients harbored similar levels of P. gingivalis and T. forsythia at baseline, but significantly higher levels of T. denticola were found in DS patients. Increased levels of P. gingivalis at healthy sites were found in DS individuals. Non-surgical periodontal therapy decreased the levels of red complex microorganisms and improved the tested clinical parameters of diseased sites in both groups. However, the levels of red complex bacteria were higher in diseased sites of DS patients after the periodontal treatment. We conclude in this pilot study that, although the mechanical periodontal treatment seemed to be effective in DS subjects over a short-term period, the red complex bacteria levels did not decrease significantly in diseased sites, as occurred in controls. Therefore, for DS patients, it seems that the conventional non-surgical periodontal therapy should be improved by utilizing adjuvants to reduce the presence of periodontopathogens.

  14. Effect of Periodontal Surgery on Osteoprotegerin Levels in Gingival Crevicular Fluid, Saliva, and Gingival Tissues of Chronic Periodontitis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Sandy H. S.; El-Refai, Mahmoud I.; Ghallab, Noha A.; Kasem, Rehab Fawzy; Shaker, Olfat G.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. This study was undertaken to investigate the OPG profiles in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF), saliva, and gingival tissues of chronic periodontitis (CP) patients in response to open flap debridement (OFD). Subjects and Methods. The study included 30 subjects divided into 2 groups: 20 CP patients and 10 periodontally healthy subjects. Plaque index, gingival index, pocket depth, and clinical attachment level measurements were recorded for all subjects. GCF, salivary, and gingival samples were collected from all 30 subjects at baseline and 3 and 6 month after OFD from the 20 CP patients. GCF and salivary OPG levels were assessed by ELISA assay, while OPG expression in gingival tissues was examined by immunohistochemistry. Results. GCF, salivary and gingival OPG profiles were significantly higher in control subjects compared to CP patients at baseline (P < 0.001). Within CP group, OPG levels in GCF, saliva, and gingival samples showed a significant increase at 3 and 6 months after OFD (P < 0.001) compared to baseline. Although OPG values increased significantly in gingival samples and insignificantly in saliva after 3 months compared to 6 months, yet GCF levels were significantly decreased. Conclusions. OPG might be considered as a diagnostic and prognostic biomarker of periodontal bone destruction. This trial is registered with NCT02160613. PMID:25814780

  15. Arterial stiffness in periodontitis patients and controls. A case–control and pilot intervention study.

    PubMed

    Houcken, W; Teeuw, W J; Bizzarro, S; Alvarez Rodriguez, E; Mulders, T A; van den Born, B-Jh; Loos, B G

    2016-01-01

    Increased arterial stiffness (AS) is an important indicator for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ACVD). Epidemiologically, periodontitis and ACVD are associated. Therefore, we aimed to investigate AS in periodontitis patients and controls. In addition, we explored the effect of periodontal therapy on AS in a sub-group of cases. Pulse-wave velocity (PWV), a non-invasive chair-side function test for AS, was measured in periodontitis patients (n=57; mean age 46.6 years) and compared with a reference group (n=48; mean age 45.5 years). In addition, 45 cases (mean age 46.9 years) were 6 months followed after periodontal treatment, to explore a possible effect on arterial function. Periodontitis patients showed a significantly increased PWV compared with the reference group (8.01±0.20 vs. 7.36±0.22 m s(-1) respectively; P=0.029) and this remained significant after adjustments for ACVD risk factors (P=0.019). After periodontal therapy, no significant reduction in PWV was seen (8.00±1.8 to 7.82±1.6 m s(-1); P=0.13), but systolic blood pressure (SBP) was significantly reduced (119.8±14.6 to 116.9±15.1 mm Hg; P=0.040). It can be concluded that periodontitis is associated with increased AS. This confirms with a new parameter the association of periodontitis with ACVD. Although periodontal treatment did not lower AS significantly, a modest reduction of SBP after 6 months was observed.

  16. Arterial stiffness in periodontitis patients and controls. A case–control and pilot intervention study.

    PubMed

    Houcken, W; Teeuw, W J; Bizzarro, S; Alvarez Rodriguez, E; Mulders, T A; van den Born, B-Jh; Loos, B G

    2016-01-01

    Increased arterial stiffness (AS) is an important indicator for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ACVD). Epidemiologically, periodontitis and ACVD are associated. Therefore, we aimed to investigate AS in periodontitis patients and controls. In addition, we explored the effect of periodontal therapy on AS in a sub-group of cases. Pulse-wave velocity (PWV), a non-invasive chair-side function test for AS, was measured in periodontitis patients (n=57; mean age 46.6 years) and compared with a reference group (n=48; mean age 45.5 years). In addition, 45 cases (mean age 46.9 years) were 6 months followed after periodontal treatment, to explore a possible effect on arterial function. Periodontitis patients showed a significantly increased PWV compared with the reference group (8.01±0.20 vs. 7.36±0.22 m s(-1) respectively; P=0.029) and this remained significant after adjustments for ACVD risk factors (P=0.019). After periodontal therapy, no significant reduction in PWV was seen (8.00±1.8 to 7.82±1.6 m s(-1); P=0.13), but systolic blood pressure (SBP) was significantly reduced (119.8±14.6 to 116.9±15.1 mm Hg; P=0.040). It can be concluded that periodontitis is associated with increased AS. This confirms with a new parameter the association of periodontitis with ACVD. Although periodontal treatment did not lower AS significantly, a modest reduction of SBP after 6 months was observed. PMID:25972093

  17. Access to Interdental Brushing in Periodontal Healthy Young Adults: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Santamaria, Julie; Bravo, Manuel; Bourgeois, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Interdental diameter space is largely undefined in adults, which compromises the decision support for daily interdental cleaning during routine practice in individual oral prophylaxis. This study assesses the distribution of diameter access of interdental spaces in an 18- to 25-year-old adult population free of periodontal disease. Methods In March-April 2015, a cross-sectional study using random sampling was performed at the University Lyon 1, France. The interproximal dental spaces of 99 individuals were examined using a colorimetric calibrated probe associated with the corresponding calibrated interdental brush (IDB). Results Of the 2,408 out of 2,608 sites, the overall accessibility prevalence of any interdental brushing was 92.3%. In total, 80.6% of the sites required interdental brushes with smaller diameters (0.6–0.7 mm). In anterior sites, the diameter of the interdental brushes used was smaller (55.8% of IDB with 0.6 mm) than the diameter of the interdental brushes used in posterior sites (26.1% of IDB with 0.6 mm) (p < 0.01). The adjusted ORs indicate a significant association with the location of the sites (approximately doubling the risk of bleeding, i.e., OR = 1.9, in posterior sites). Conclusions Most interdental sites can be cleaned using interdental brushes. Even in healthy people, interdental hygiene requirements are very high. Strengthening the oral hygiene capacity by specifically using interdental brushes can have an effect on the health of the entire population. Screening of the accessibility of the interdental space should be a component of a routine examination for all patients. PMID:27192409

  18. Periodontal Treatment Reduces Risk of Adverse Respiratory Events in Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Te-Chun; Chang, Pei-Ying; Lin, Cheng-Li; Chen, Chia-Hung; Tu, Chih-Yen; Hsia, Te-Chun; Shih, Chuen-Ming; Hsu, Wu-Huei; Sung, Fung-Chang; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Treatment of periodontal diseases has been associated with benefit outcomes for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, no population-based cohort study has been conducted. We evaluated this relationship by retrospective cohort study using a large population data. Using the National Health Insurance claims data of Taiwan, we identified 5562 COPD patients with periodontal diseases who had received periodontal treatment as the treatment group. The comparison group was selected at a 1:1 ratio matched by the propensity score estimated with age, sex, date of COPD diagnosis and periodontal treatment, and comorbidities. Both groups were followed up for 5 years to compare risks of acute exacerbation, pneumonia, and acute respiratory failure. The incidence rates of adverse respiratory events were significantly lower in the treatment group than in the comparison group: 3.79 versus 4.21 per 100 person-years for emergency room visits, 2.75 versus 3.65 per 100 person-years for hospitalizations, and 0.66 versus 0.75 per 100 person-years for intensive care unit admissions. The treatment group also had a 37% reduced risk of deaths (1.81 vs 2.87 per 100 person-years), with an adjusted hazard ratio of 0.57 (95% confidence interval 0.52–0.62). Periodontal treatment for COPD patients could reduce the risk of adverse respiratory events and mortality. The adequate periodontal health care is important for COPD patients with periodontal diseases. PMID:27196497

  19. Detection and diagnosis of periodontal conditions amenable to prevention

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Gingivitis and chronic periodontitis are highly prevalent chronic inflammatory diseases. Gingivitis affects the majority of people, and advanced periodontitis is estimated to affect 5-15% of adults. The detection and diagnosis of these common diseases is a fundamentally important component of oral health care. All patients should undergo periodontal assessment as part of routine oral examination. Periodontal screening using methods such as the Basic Periodontal Examination/Community Periodontal Index or Periodontal Screening Record should be performed for all new patients, and also on a regular basis as part of ongoing oral health care. If periodontitis is identified, full periodontal assessment is required, involving recording of full mouth probing and bleeding data, together with assessment of other relevant parameters such as plaque levels, furcation involvement, recession and tooth mobility. Radiographic assessment of alveolar bone levels is driven by the clinical situation, and is required to assess bone destruction in patients with periodontitis. Risk assessment (such as assessing diabetes status and smoking) and risk management (such as promoting smoking cessation) should form a central component of periodontal therapy. This article provides guidance to the oral health care team regarding methods and frequencies of appropriate clinical and radiographic examinations to assess periodontal status, to enable appropriate detection and diagnosis of periodontal conditions. PMID:26390822

  20. Detection and diagnosis of periodontal conditions amenable to prevention.

    PubMed

    Preshaw, Philip M

    2015-01-01

    Gingivitis and chronic periodontitis are highly prevalent chronic inflammatory diseases. Gingivitis affects the majority of people, and advanced periodontitis is estimated to affect 5-15% of adults. The detection and diagnosis of these common diseases is a fundamentally important component of oral health care. All patients should undergo periodontal assessment as part of routine oral examination. Periodontal screening using methods such as the Basic Periodontal Examination/Community Periodontal Index or Periodontal Screening Record should be performed for all new patients, and also on a regular basis as part of ongoing oral health care. If periodontitis is identified, full periodontal assessment is required, involving recording of full mouth probing and bleeding data, together with assessment of other relevant parameters such as plaque levels, furcation involvement, recession and tooth mobility. Radiographic assessment of alveolar bone levels is driven by the clinical situation, and is required to assess bone destruction in patients with periodontitis. Risk assessment (such as assessing diabetes status and smoking) and risk management (such as promoting smoking cessation) should form a central component of periodontal therapy. This article provides guidance to the oral health care team regarding methods and frequencies of appropriate clinical and radiographic examinations to assess periodontal status, to enable appropriate detection and diagnosis of periodontal conditions. PMID:26390822

  1. [Clinical aspects of the evolution of dental caries and periodontal disease in patients treated with corticosteroids].

    PubMed

    Lăcătuşu, St; Ghiorghe, Angela

    2004-01-01

    Patients treated with adrenal glucocorticoids may run a higher risk of dental caries, both as a result of their medical condition and of the physical and physiological effects of their pharmacotherapy. Our clinical study reports about patients treated with glucocorticoids who were also having an odonto-periodontal condition. They were examined and we found rampant caries and periodontal diseases. The slow evolution of asymptomatic periodontal disease encouraged destruction of teeth in root caries. The rampant caries were correlated with immunodeficiency and treatment of these caries must take into account the general treatment.

  2. Long noncoding RNA related to periodontitis interacts with miR-182 to upregulate osteogenic differentiation in periodontal mesenchymal stem cells of periodontitis patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Wu, F; Song, Y; Li, X; Wu, Q; Duan, Y; Jin, Z

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis impairs the osteogenic differentiation of human periodontal mesenchymal stem cells (hPDLSCs), but the underlying molecular mechanisms are still poorly understood. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been demonstrated to have significant roles under both physiologic and pathological conditions. In this study, we performed comprehensive lncRNA profiling by lncRNA microarray analysis and identified a novel lncRNA, osteogenesis impairment-related lncRNA of PDLSCs from periodontitis patients (lncRNA-POIR), the expression of which was significantly decreased in PDLSCs from periodontitis patients (pPDLSCs) and was upregulated by osteogenic induction. To study the functions of lncRNA-POIR, we prepared cells with overexpression and knockdown of lncRNA-POIR and found that lncRNA-POIR positively regulated osteogenic differentiation of hPDLSCs and pPDLSCs both in vitro and in vivo. Using quantitative real-time PCRs (qPCRs) and luciferase reporter assays, we demonstrated that lncRNA-POIR may act as a competing endogenous RNA (ceRNA) for miR-182, leading to derepression of its target gene, FoxO1. In this process, lncRNA-POIR and miR-182 suppress each other and form a network to regulate FoxO1. FoxO1 increased bone formation of pPDLSCs by competing with TCF-4 for β-catenin and inhibiting the canonical Wnt pathway. Finally, inflammation increases miR-182 expression through the nuclear factor-κB pathway, and the miR-182 overexpression in the inflammatory microenvironment resulted in an imbalance in the lncRNA-POIR-miR-182 regulatory network. In conclusion, our results provide novel evidence that this lncRNA-miRNA (microRNA) regulatory network has a significant role in osteogenic differentiation of pPDLSCs and that it has potential as a therapeutic target in mesenchymal stem cells during inflammation. PMID:27512949

  3. Pilot study of dietary fatty acid supplementation in the treatment of adult periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Rosenstein, Elliot D; Kushner, Laura J; Kramer, Neil; Kazandjian, Gregory

    2003-03-01

    The anti-inflammatory effects of both n-3 and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) have been demonstrated in vitro and in many disease states, in particular in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. The benefit of n-3 PUFA supplementation has been documented in animal models of periodontal inflammation and a trend towards reduced inflammation has been seen in human experimental gingivitis. The purpose of this study was to examine the potential anti-inflammatory effects of PUFA supplementation, by administration of fish oil as a source of the n-3 PUFA, eicosapentaenoic acid, and borage oil as a source of the n-6 PUFA, gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), to adults with periodontitis. Thirty adult human subjects with periodontitis were administered either fish oil 3000 mg daily; borage oil 3000 mg daily; fish oil 1500 and borage oil 1500 mg daily, or placebo. The modified gingival index, the plaque index (PI), periodontal probing depths and beta-glucuronidase levels in gingival crevicular fluid were measured at baseline and after 12 weeks of treatment. Improvement in gingival inflammation was observed in subjects treated with borage oil (P<0.016), with a trend apparent in subjects treated with fish oil or a combination of PUFA. There was no statistically significant improvement in PI, although a trend was apparent in those receiving borage oil. Improvement in probing depth was seen in those subjects treated with either fish oil alone or borage oil alone, but statistical significance was only seen for the comparison of borage oil and placebo (P<0.044). No change was seen in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) beta-glucuronidase levels. The use of borage oil supplementation, a source of the n-6 PUFA, GLA, can have beneficial effects on periodontal inflammation. n-6 PUFA supplementation seemed to offer more impressive results than either n-3 PUFA supplementation or the combination of lower doses of the two supplements. Additional studies will be necessary to more fully assess the

  4. Effects of non-surgical periodontal therapy on serum lipids and C-reactive protein among hyperlipidemic patients with chronic periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Tawfig, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the effect of non-surgical periodontal therapy on plasma lipid levels in hyperlipidemic patients with chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods: After considering the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 30 hyperlipidemic patients with chronic periodontitis in the age group of 30–70 years, undergoing treatment in Ahmed Gasim Cardiac and Renal transplant Centre in north Sudan were recruited for the study. Patients were randomly assigned to the study and control groups. The study group received non-surgical periodontal therapy – oral hygiene instructions, scaling and root planing. The control group participants received only oral hygiene instructions. Lipid profile [total cholesterol (TC), low density lipoprotein (LDL), high density lipoprotein (HDL), triglycerides (TG)], C-reactive protein (CRP), and periodontal parameters [Plaque index (PI), Gingival index (GI), probing pocket depth (PD), and attachment loss (ATL)] were measured and compared at baseline and after 3 months of the respective intervention. Between-groups analysis was done using independent “t” test and within-group analysis was done using dependent “t” test. Results: At baseline, groups were comparable based on lipid profile and periodontal parameters. After 3 months, the control group showed significant decrease in the PI and GI scores while there was no significant change in the other parameters. However, the study group showed significant decrease in the LDL and CRP levels along with a significant decrease in PD, ATL, PI, and GI scores, compared to the baseline values. Conclusion: Local non-surgical periodontal therapy resulted in improved periodontal health, with significant decrease in the LDL and CRP levels in hyperlipidemic patients with chronic periodontitis. Hence, local non-surgical periodontal therapy may be considered as an adjunct in the control of hyperlipidemia, along with standard care. PMID:25984468

  5. Effect of periodontal treatment on the clinical parameters of patients with rheumatoid arthritis: study protocol of the randomized, controlled ESPERA trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disorder that leads to joint damage, deformity, and pain. It affects approximately 1% of adults in developed countries. Periodontitis is a chronic oral infection, caused by inflammatory reactions to gram-negative anaerobic bacteria, and affecting about 35 to 50% of adults. If left untreated, periodontitis can lead to tooth loss. A significant association has been shown to exist between periodontitis and RA in observational studies. Some intervention studies have suggested that periodontal treatment can reduce serum inflammatory biomarkers such as C-reactive protein, or erythrocyte sedimentation rate. We hypothesize that periodontitis could be an aggravating factor in patients with RA, and that its treatment would improve RA outcomes. The aim of this clinical trial is to assess the effect of periodontal treatment on the biological and clinical parameters of patients with RA. Methods/design The ESPERA (Experimental Study of Periodontitis and Rheumatoid Arthritis) study is an open-label, randomized, controlled trial. Subjects with both RA and periodontitis will be recruited at two university hospitals in southwestern France. In total, 40 subjects will be randomized into two arms (intervention and control groups), and will be followed up for 3 months. Intervention will consist of full-mouth supra-gingival and sub-gingival non-surgical scaling and root planing, followed by systemic antibiotic therapy, local antiseptics, and oral hygiene instructions. After the 3-month follow-up period, the same intervention will be applied to the subjects randomized to the control group. The primary outcome will be change of in Disease Activity Score in 28 Joints (DAS28) at the end of the follow-up period. Secondary outcomes will be the percentages of subjects with 20%, 50%, and 70% improvement in disease according to the American College of Rheumatology criteria. Health-related quality of life assessments (the Health

  6. Relationship of Clinical and Microbiological Variables in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus and Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Sakalauskiene, Jurgina; Kubilius, Ricardas; Gleiznys, Alvydas; Vitkauskiene, Astra; Ivanauskiene, Egle; Šaferis, Viktoras

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to analyze how metabolic control of type 1 diabetes is related to clinical and microbiological periodontal parameters. Material/Methods The study involved 56 subjects aged from 19 to 50 years divided into 2 groups: healthy subjects (the H group), and diabetic (type 1 diabetes) patients with chronic untreated generalized periodontitis (the DM group). The glycosylated hemoglobin value (HbA1c) was determined using the UniCel DxC 800 SYNCHRON System (Beckman Coulter, USA), and the concentration in blood was measured by the turbidimetric immunoinhibition method. A molecular genetic assay (Micro-IDent plus, Germany) was used to detect periodontopathogenic bacteria in plaque samples. Periodontitis was confirmed by clinical and radiological examination. Results Fusobacterium nucleatum, Capnocytophaga species, and Eikenella corrodens were the most frequently found bacteria in dental plaque samples (77.8%, 66.7%, and 33.4%, respectively), whereas Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans was identified 40.7% less frequently in the DM group than in the H group. The strongest relationship was observed between the presence of 2 periodontal pathogens – F. nucleatum and Capnocytophaga spp. – and poorer metabolic control in type 1 diabetes patients (HbA1c) and all clinical parameters of periodontal pathology. Conclusions Periodontal disease was more evident in type 1 diabetic patients, and the prevalence of periodontitis was greatly increased in subjects with poorer metabolic control. PMID:25294115

  7. Relationship between the concentration of volatile sulphur compound and periodontal disease severity in Nigerian young adults

    PubMed Central

    Ehizele, Adebola O.; Ojehanon, Patrick I.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the concentration of volatile sulphur compounds (VSC) in mouth air and the severity of periodontal diseases in young adults. Materials and Methods: A total of 400 subjects were studied. Estimation of periodontal disease severity was done using the basic periodontal examination (BPE) and the baseline measurement of the concentration of VSC in the mouth air of the subjects was done objectively using the Halimeter®. Result: The mean concentration of VSC for the group with BPE code 0 was 91.0 ± 5.9 parts per billion (ppb), 156.4 ± 9.4 ppb for BPE code 1, 275.2 ± 38.5 ppb for BPE code 2, 353.5 ± 72.3 ppb for BPE code 3, and 587.0 ± 2.1 ppb for BPE code 4 (P = 0.001). Majority (79.0%) of the subjects with BPE code 0 had concentration of VSC <181 ppb. Sixty-two (54.9%) with BPE code 1 had concentration of VSC <181 ppb, 34% with BPE code 2 had concentration of VSC <181 ppb and 42.9% with BPE code 3 had concentration of VSC <181 ppb. Only 6.5% of the subjects with BPE code 0 had VSC concentration >250 ppb, whereas all (100%) of those with BPE code 4 had VSC concentration >250 ppb (P = 0.001). Conclusion: It was concluded that a relationship exists between the periodontal pocket depth and the concentration of VCS in mouth air of young adults. PMID:23901175

  8. Low-Level Lasers as an Adjunct in Periodontal Therapy in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Kesić, Ljiljana; Mihailović, Dragan; Jovanović, Goran; Antić, Slobodan; Brkić, Zlata

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Diabetes mellitus (DM) increases the risk of periodontitis, and severe periodontitis often coexists with severe DM. The proposed dual pathway of tissue destruction suggests that control of chronic periodontal infection and gingival inflammation is essential for achieving long-term control of DM. The purpose this study is to evaluate the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) by exfoliative cytology in patients with DM and gingival inflammation. Subjects and Methods Three hundred patients were divided in three equal groups: Group 1 consisted of patients with periodontitis and type 1 DM, Group 2 of patients with periodontitis and type 2 DM, and Group 3 of patients with periodontitis (control group). After oral examination, smears were taken from gingival tissue, and afterward all of the patients received oral hygiene instructions, removal of dental plaque, and full-mouth scaling and root planing. A split-mouth design was applied; on the right side of jaws GaAlAs LLLT (670 nm, 5 mW, 14 min/day) (model Mils 94; Optica Laser, Sofia, Bulgaria) was applied for five consecutive days. After the therapy was completed, smears from both sides of jaws were taken. The morphometric analysis was done using the National Institutes of Health Image software program and a model NU2 microscope (Carl Zeiss, Jena, Germany). Results Investigated parameters were significantly lower after therapy compared with values before therapy. After therapy on the side subjected to LLLT, there was no significantly difference between patients with DM and the control group. Conclusions It can be concluded that LLLT as an adjunct in periodontal therapy reduces gingival inflammation in patients with DM and periodontitis. PMID:22928615

  9. Patient-Specific Variations in Biomarkers across Gingivitis and Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Radhakrishnan; Miller, Craig S; Dawson, Dolph; Al-Sabbagh, Mohanad; Ebersole, Jeffrey L

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the use of saliva, as an emerging diagnostic fluid in conjunction with classification techniques to discern biological heterogeneity in clinically labelled gingivitis and periodontitis subjects (80 subjects; 40/group) A battery of classification techniques were investigated as traditional single classifier systems as well as within a novel selective voting ensemble classification approach (SVA) framework. Unlike traditional single classifiers, SVA is shown to reveal patient-specific variations within disease groups, which may be important for identifying proclivity to disease progression or disease stability. Salivary expression profiles of IL-1ß, IL-6, MMP-8, and MIP-1α from 80 patients were analyzed using four classification algorithms (LDA: Linear Discriminant Analysis [LDA], Quadratic Discriminant Analysis [QDA], Naïve Bayes Classifier [NBC] and Support Vector Machines [SVM]) as traditional single classifiers and within the SVA framework (SVA-LDA, SVA-QDA, SVA-NB and SVA-SVM). Our findings demonstrate that performance measures (sensitivity, specificity and accuracy) of traditional classification as single classifier were comparable to that of the SVA counterparts using clinical labels of the samples as ground truth. However, unlike traditional single classifier approaches, the normalized ensemble vote-counts from SVA revealed varying proclivity of the subjects for each of the disease groups. More importantly, the SVA identified a subset of gingivitis and periodontitis samples that demonstrated a biological proclivity commensurate with the other clinical group. This subset was confirmed across SVA-LDA, SVA-QDA, SVA-NB and SVA-SVM. Heatmap visualization of their ensemble sets revealed lack of consensus between these subsets and the rest of the samples within the respective disease groups indicating the unique nature of the patients in these subsets. While the source of variation is not known, the results presented clearly elucidate the

  10. Patient-Specific Variations in Biomarkers across Gingivitis and Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Radhakrishnan; Miller, Craig S.; Dawson, Dolph; Al-Sabbagh, Mohanad; Ebersole, Jeffrey L.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the use of saliva, as an emerging diagnostic fluid in conjunction with classification techniques to discern biological heterogeneity in clinically labelled gingivitis and periodontitis subjects (80 subjects; 40/group) A battery of classification techniques were investigated as traditional single classifier systems as well as within a novel selective voting ensemble classification approach (SVA) framework. Unlike traditional single classifiers, SVA is shown to reveal patient-specific variations within disease groups, which may be important for identifying proclivity to disease progression or disease stability. Salivary expression profiles of IL-1ß, IL-6, MMP-8, and MIP-1α from 80 patients were analyzed using four classification algorithms (LDA: Linear Discriminant Analysis [LDA], Quadratic Discriminant Analysis [QDA], Naïve Bayes Classifier [NBC] and Support Vector Machines [SVM]) as traditional single classifiers and within the SVA framework (SVA-LDA, SVA-QDA, SVA-NB and SVA-SVM). Our findings demonstrate that performance measures (sensitivity, specificity and accuracy) of traditional classification as single classifier were comparable to that of the SVA counterparts using clinical labels of the samples as ground truth. However, unlike traditional single classifier approaches, the normalized ensemble vote-counts from SVA revealed varying proclivity of the subjects for each of the disease groups. More importantly, the SVA identified a subset of gingivitis and periodontitis samples that demonstrated a biological proclivity commensurate with the other clinical group. This subset was confirmed across SVA-LDA, SVA-QDA, SVA-NB and SVA-SVM. Heatmap visualization of their ensemble sets revealed lack of consensus between these subsets and the rest of the samples within the respective disease groups indicating the unique nature of the patients in these subsets. While the source of variation is not known, the results presented clearly elucidate the

  11. Evaluation of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 Gene Polymorphisms in Patients with Periodontal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Li, Xiao-Hong; Ning, Wan-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Background We aimed to investigate the potential genetic relationships between the polymorphisms of gene rs5498 ICAM-1 and rs1041163 VCAM-1 and chronic periodontitis in a Chinese population within Heilongjiang. Material/Methods Genomic DNA was extracted from oral mucosa cells of 584 periodontal patients and 182 healthy individuals. Genotyping of the rs5498 ICAM-1 and rs1041163 VCAM-1 gene polymorphisms was performed with the Multiplex SNaPshot technique. Results Statistically significant associations were identified between the chronic periodontal patients and the controls in the gene polymorphisms of rs5498 ICAM-1 (P=0.007) and rs1041163 VCAM-1 (P=0.029). The distribution of rs5498 (P=0.029) and rs1041163 (P=0.049) differed significantly across the mild, moderate, and severe groups of periodontitis. Conclusions Our findings indicate that ICAM-1 rs5498 and VCAM-1 rs1041163 polymorphisms contribute to chronic periodontitis, and ICAM-1 rs5498 and VCAM-1 rs1041163 gene polymorphisms might be associated with periodontitis severity in the Heilongjiang Chinese population. Further studies should be conducted to determine whether these polymorphisms could be used as biomarkers of periodontitis. PMID:27391418

  12. Evaluation of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 Gene Polymorphisms in Patients with Periodontal Disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Li, Xiao-Hong; Ning, Wan-Chen

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND We aimed to investigate the potential genetic relationships between the polymorphisms of gene rs5498 ICAM-1 and rs1041163 VCAM-1 and chronic periodontitis in a Chinese population within Heilongjiang. MATERIAL AND METHODS Genomic DNA was extracted from oral mucosa cells of 584 periodontal patients and 182 healthy individuals. Genotyping of the rs5498 ICAM-1 and rs1041163 VCAM-1 gene polymorphisms was performed with the Multiplex SNaPshot technique. RESULTS Statistically significant associations were identified between the chronic periodontal patients and the controls in the gene polymorphisms of rs5498 ICAM-1 (P=0.007) and rs1041163 VCAM-1 (P=0.029). The distribution of rs5498 (P=0.029) and rs1041163 (P=0.049) differed significantly across the mild, moderate, and severe groups of periodontitis. CONCLUSIONS Our findings indicate that ICAM-1 rs5498 and VCAM-1 rs1041163 polymorphisms contribute to chronic periodontitis, and ICAM-1 rs5498 and VCAM-1 rs1041163 gene polymorphisms might be associated with periodontitis severity in the Heilongjiang Chinese population. Further studies should be conducted to determine whether these polymorphisms could be used as biomarkers of periodontitis. PMID:27391418

  13. A histological evaluation of a low-level laser therapy as an adjunct to periodontal therapy in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Obradović, Radmila; Kesić, Ljiljana; Mihailović, Dragan; Antić, Slobodan; Jovanović, Goran; Petrović, Aleksandar; Peševska, Snežana

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) and chronic periodontitis are common chronic diseases in adults in the world population. DM has a strong influence on the oral cavity and represents a risk factor for gingivitis and periodontitis. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has proven effective in the reduction of inflammation and swelling. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of LLLT in diabetic periodontitis through histological analysis. A total of 300 diabetics with chronic periodontal disease and teeth indicated for extraction were assigned into six equal groups. In the groups 1 and 4, indicated teeth were extracted before treatment, and in the rest of the groups upon completion of the entire treatment. All patients received oral hygiene instructions and full-mouth conservative periodontal treatment. In groups 3 and 6, LLLT was applied (670 nm, 5 mW, 2 J/cm(2), 16 min, 5 days). Histologic findings of gingival tissue treated with LLLT showed expressed healing, as is evident by the absence of inflammatory cells. Tissue edema could not be seen, and the number of blood vessels was reduced. In the gingival lamina, propria pronounced collagenization and homogenization were present. It can be concluded that LLLT has shown efficacy in the treatment of periodontitis in diabetics. Because of more pronounced alterations of periodontium in diabetics, the use of LLLT is of particular importance.

  14. A histological evaluation of a low-level laser therapy as an adjunct to periodontal therapy in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Obradović, Radmila; Kesić, Ljiljana; Mihailović, Dragan; Antić, Slobodan; Jovanović, Goran; Petrović, Aleksandar; Peševska, Snežana

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) and chronic periodontitis are common chronic diseases in adults in the world population. DM has a strong influence on the oral cavity and represents a risk factor for gingivitis and periodontitis. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has proven effective in the reduction of inflammation and swelling. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of LLLT in diabetic periodontitis through histological analysis. A total of 300 diabetics with chronic periodontal disease and teeth indicated for extraction were assigned into six equal groups. In the groups 1 and 4, indicated teeth were extracted before treatment, and in the rest of the groups upon completion of the entire treatment. All patients received oral hygiene instructions and full-mouth conservative periodontal treatment. In groups 3 and 6, LLLT was applied (670 nm, 5 mW, 2 J/cm(2), 16 min, 5 days). Histologic findings of gingival tissue treated with LLLT showed expressed healing, as is evident by the absence of inflammatory cells. Tissue edema could not be seen, and the number of blood vessels was reduced. In the gingival lamina, propria pronounced collagenization and homogenization were present. It can be concluded that LLLT has shown efficacy in the treatment of periodontitis in diabetics. Because of more pronounced alterations of periodontium in diabetics, the use of LLLT is of particular importance. PMID:22311659

  15. Evaluation of Salivary Leptin Levels in Healthy Subjects and Patients with Advanced Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Khorsand, Afshin; Bayani, Mojtaba; Torabi, Sepehr; Kharrazifard, Mohammad Javad; Mohammadnejhad, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Leptin is a hormone-like protein produced by the adipose tissue. It plays an important role in protection of host against inflammation and infection. Some studies have reported changes in leptin levels in the gingival crevicular fluid (GCF), saliva and blood serum of patients with periodontal disease compared to healthy individuals. The aim of the present study was to compare the salivary leptin levels in patients with advanced periodontitis and healthy individuals. Materials and Methods: In this case-control study, the salivary samples of healthy individuals and patients with advanced periodontitis with clinical attachment loss >5mm were obtained using a standardized method and the leptin levels were measured in the salivary samples by means of ELISA. The effects of the periodontal status and sex on the salivary leptin levels of both groups were statistically analyzed by two-way ANOVA. Results: The means ± standard deviation (SD) of salivary leptin levels in healthy subjects and patients with advanced periodontitis were 34.27±6.88 and 17.87±5.89 pg/mL, respectively. Statistical analysis showed that the effect of sex on the salivary leptin levels was not significant (P=0.91), while the effect of advanced periodontitis on the salivary leptin levels was significant compared to healthy individuals (P<0.0001). Conclusions: In patients with advanced periodontitis, the salivary leptin levels were significantly lower compared to healthy individuals. Thus, assessment of salivary leptin can be done as a non-invasive and simple method to determine the susceptibility of patients to advanced periodontitis. PMID:27536322

  16. [Complete dental care of patients suffering from localized aggressive periodontitis. Case report].

    PubMed

    Nagy, Zsolt; Nemes, Júlia; Nyárasdy, Ida

    2015-12-01

    A 34 years old male patient was referred to our clinic for restorative dental treatment. During detailed consultation and dental examination a relatively rare form of periodontal disease had been diagnosed. Intraoral examination included recording of dental and periodontal status. Based on patient's dental history, measurements of probing pocket depths (PPD), clinical attachment level (CAL), and also the X-ray findings, Localized Aggressive Periodontitis (LAP) unknown by the patient was diagnosed. After patient's consent the comprehensive treatment plan covered the dental prevention, periodontal non-surgical and surgical therapy and rehabilitation. The treatment started with oral hygienic instruction, motivation then supra- and subgingival scaling and rootplaning. Later extraction and elective root canal treatment were performed, followed by open flap periodontal surgery combined with hemisection of two molars. After a full mouth conservative restorative therapy, function and esthetics were restored by fix dental prostheses. This case is a good example to underline the importance of periodontal examination during the dental screening and dental status recording for each patients showing up at dental clinics. Otherwise in many cases this asympthomatic disease can remain undetected. PMID:26863818

  17. Effects of 980 diode laser treatment combined with scaling and root planing on periodontal pockets in chronic periodontitis patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallah, Alireza

    2010-02-01

    Objective: This study compared the effect of 980 Diode laser + scaling and root planing (SRP) versus SRP alone in the treatment of chronic periodontitis. Method: 21 healthy patients with moderate periodontitis with a probing depth of at least 5mm were included in the study. A total of 42 sites were treated during 6weeks with a combination of 980 Diode laser and SRP (21 sites) or SRP alone (21 sites). The gingival index (GI), probing pocket depth (PPD) and bleeding on probing (BOP) were examined at the baseline and after 6 weeks after the start of treatment. Results: Both groups showed statistically significant improvements in GI, BOP and PPD after treatment. The results also showed significant improvement from laser+ SRP group to SRP alone group. Conclusion: The present data suggest that treatment of chronic periodontitis with either 980 Diode laser + SRP or SRP alone results in statistically significant improvements in the clinical parameters. The combination of 980 Diode laser irradiation in the gingival sulcus and SRP, was significantly better as compared to SRP alone.

  18. Salivary Myeloperoxidase, Assessed by 3,3'-Diaminobenzidine Colorimetry, Can Differentiate Periodontal Patients from Nonperiodontal Subjects.

    PubMed

    Klangprapan, Supaporn; Chaiyarit, Ponlatham; Hormdee, Doosadee; Kampichai, Amonrujee; Khampitak, Tueanjit; Daduang, Jureerut; Tavichakorntrakool, Ratree; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Boonsiri, Patcharee

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal diseases, which result from inflammation of tooth supporting tissues, are highly prevalent worldwide. Myeloperoxidase (MPO), from certain white blood cells in saliva, is a biomarker for inflammation. We report our study on the salivary MPO activity and its association with severity of periodontal diseases among Thai patients. Periodontally healthy subjects (n = 11) and gingivitis (n = 32) and periodontitis patients (n = 19) were enrolled. Assessments of clinically periodontal parameters were reported as percentages for gingival bleeding index (GI) and bleeding on probing (BOP), whereas pocket depth (PD) and clinical attachment loss (CAL) were measured in millimeters and then made to index scores. Salivary MPO activity was measured by colorimetry using 3,3'-diaminobenzidine as substrate. The results showed that salivary MPO activity in periodontitis patients was significantly higher than in healthy subjects (p = 0.003) and higher than in gingivitis patients (p = 0.059). No difference was found between gingivitis and healthy groups (p = 0.181). Significant correlations were observed (p < 0.01) between salivary MPO activity and GI (r = 0.632, p < 0.001), BOP (r = 0.599, p < 0.001), PD (r = 0.179, p = 0.164), and CAL (r = 0.357, p = 0.004) index scores. Sensitivity (94.12%), specificity (54.55%), and positive (90.57%) and negative (66.67%) predictive values indicate that salivary MPO activity has potential use as a screening marker for oral health of the Thai community. PMID:27274868

  19. Quantitative Molecular Detection of 19 Major Pathogens in the Interdental Biofilm of Periodontally Healthy Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Carrouel, Florence; Viennot, Stéphane; Santamaria, Julie; Veber, Philippe; Bourgeois, Denis

    2016-01-01

    In oral health, the interdental spaces are a real ecological niche for which the body has few or no alternative defenses and where the traditional daily methods for control by disrupting biofilm are not adequate. The interdental spaces are the source of many hypotheses regarding their potential associations with and/or causes of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, chronic kidney disease, degenerative disease, and depression. This PCR study is the first to describe the interdental microbiota in healthy adults aged 18–35 years-old with reference to the Socransky complexes. The complexes tended to reflect microbial succession events in developing dental biofilms. Early colonizers included members of the yellow, green, and purple complexes. The orange complex bacteria generally appear after the early colonizers and include many putative periodontal pathogens, such as Fusobacterium nucleatum. The red complex (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola) was considered the climax community and is on the list of putative periodontal pathogens. The 19 major periodontal pathogens tested were expressed at various levels. F. nucleatum was the most abundant species, and the least abundant were Actinomyces viscosus, P. gingivalis, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. The genome counts for Eikenella corrodens, Campylobacter concisus, Campylobacter rectus, T. denticola, and Tannerella forsythensis increased significantly with subject age. The study highlights the observation that bacteria from the yellow complex (Streptococcus spp., S. mitis), the green complex (E. corrodens, Campylobacter gracilis, Capnocytophaga ochracea, Capnocytophaga sputigena, A. actinomycetemcomitans), the purple complex (Veillonella parvula, Actinomyces odontolyticus) and the blue complex (A. viscosus) are correlated. Concerning the orange complex, F. nucleatum is the most abundant species in interdental biofilm. The red complex, which is recognized as the most important

  20. Quantitative Molecular Detection of 19 Major Pathogens in the Interdental Biofilm of Periodontally Healthy Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Carrouel, Florence; Viennot, Stéphane; Santamaria, Julie; Veber, Philippe; Bourgeois, Denis

    2016-01-01

    In oral health, the interdental spaces are a real ecological niche for which the body has few or no alternative defenses and where the traditional daily methods for control by disrupting biofilm are not adequate. The interdental spaces are the source of many hypotheses regarding their potential associations with and/or causes of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, chronic kidney disease, degenerative disease, and depression. This PCR study is the first to describe the interdental microbiota in healthy adults aged 18-35 years-old with reference to the Socransky complexes. The complexes tended to reflect microbial succession events in developing dental biofilms. Early colonizers included members of the yellow, green, and purple complexes. The orange complex bacteria generally appear after the early colonizers and include many putative periodontal pathogens, such as Fusobacterium nucleatum. The red complex (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola) was considered the climax community and is on the list of putative periodontal pathogens. The 19 major periodontal pathogens tested were expressed at various levels. F. nucleatum was the most abundant species, and the least abundant were Actinomyces viscosus, P. gingivalis, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. The genome counts for Eikenella corrodens, Campylobacter concisus, Campylobacter rectus, T. denticola, and Tannerella forsythensis increased significantly with subject age. The study highlights the observation that bacteria from the yellow complex (Streptococcus spp., S. mitis), the green complex (E. corrodens, Campylobacter gracilis, Capnocytophaga ochracea, Capnocytophaga sputigena, A. actinomycetemcomitans), the purple complex (Veillonella parvula, Actinomyces odontolyticus) and the blue complex (A. viscosus) are correlated. Concerning the orange complex, F. nucleatum is the most abundant species in interdental biofilm. The red complex, which is recognized as the most important

  1. Effects of cytokines and periodontopathic bacteria on the leukocyte function-associated antigen 1/intercellular adhesion molecule 1 pathway in gingival fibroblasts in adult periodontitis.

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, J; Saito, I; Ishikawa, I; Miyasaka, N

    1994-01-01

    We investigated the effects of inflammatory cytokines and periodontopathic bacteria on expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, and E-selectin (endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule 1) in cultured human gingival fibroblasts (HGF). Cell surface ICAM-1 was upregulated on HGF under transcriptional control by exposure not only to interleukin-1 beta, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and gamma interferon but also to sonic extracts prepared from Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia (nigrescens) and lipopolysaccharides from Escherichia coli. However, these stimuli induced only minimal expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 and E-selectin on HGF. Binding assays using HGF and Molt 4, the human T-cell leukemia cell line, showed induced ICAM-1 to be functional, and the increased binding was blocked by a combination of monoclonal antibodies against ICAM-1 and leukocyte function-associated antigen 1. Furthermore, gingival tissues from adult periodontitis patients showed increased mRNA expression of ICAM-1 compared with that in tissues from normal healthy donors. In immunohistological analysis, we also observed in vivo that the expression of ICAM-1 on fibroblasts in adult periodontitis tissues was greater than that in normal gingiva. Thus, the overexpression of ICAM-1 on gingival fibroblasts induced by cytokines and periodontopathic bacteria is speculated to be deeply involved in the accumulation and retention of leukocyte function-associated antigen 1-bearing leukocytes in adult periodontitis lesions. Images PMID:7525481

  2. Effects of cytokines and periodontopathic bacteria on the leukocyte function-associated antigen 1/intercellular adhesion molecule 1 pathway in gingival fibroblasts in adult periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, J; Saito, I; Ishikawa, I; Miyasaka, N

    1994-12-01

    We investigated the effects of inflammatory cytokines and periodontopathic bacteria on expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, and E-selectin (endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule 1) in cultured human gingival fibroblasts (HGF). Cell surface ICAM-1 was upregulated on HGF under transcriptional control by exposure not only to interleukin-1 beta, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and gamma interferon but also to sonic extracts prepared from Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia (nigrescens) and lipopolysaccharides from Escherichia coli. However, these stimuli induced only minimal expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 and E-selectin on HGF. Binding assays using HGF and Molt 4, the human T-cell leukemia cell line, showed induced ICAM-1 to be functional, and the increased binding was blocked by a combination of monoclonal antibodies against ICAM-1 and leukocyte function-associated antigen 1. Furthermore, gingival tissues from adult periodontitis patients showed increased mRNA expression of ICAM-1 compared with that in tissues from normal healthy donors. In immunohistological analysis, we also observed in vivo that the expression of ICAM-1 on fibroblasts in adult periodontitis tissues was greater than that in normal gingiva. Thus, the overexpression of ICAM-1 on gingival fibroblasts induced by cytokines and periodontopathic bacteria is speculated to be deeply involved in the accumulation and retention of leukocyte function-associated antigen 1-bearing leukocytes in adult periodontitis lesions. PMID:7525481

  3. Defective neutrophil chemotaxis in juvenile periodontitis.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, R A; Page, R C; Wilde, G

    1977-01-01

    Neutrophil chemotaxis was evaluated in nine patients with juvenile periodontitis, with normal subjects and patients with the adult form of periodontitis as controls. Defective chemotactic responses were observed in neutrophils from seven of nine juvenile patients, and a reduced level of complement-derived chemotactic activity was demonstrated in serum from four patients. These determinations were normal in all the patients with adult periodontitis. Serum from five of the juvenile patients contained a heat-stable, non-dialyzable factor that markedly inhibited the chemotaxis of normal neutrophils. Thus the characteristic tissue destruction seen in juvenile periodontitis may be, at least in part, a consequence of a failure of host defense mechanisms. PMID:591063

  4. Periodontal Health Status among Patients with Behçet's Disease.

    PubMed

    Habibagahi, Zahra; Khorshidi, Hooman; Hekmati, Shahrzad

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the relationship of individual periodontal parameters with the severity of Behçet's disease (BD) and attempt to find the correlation between chronic periodontitis and BD. In this study, 74 registered subjects attending Behçet's clinic with BD symptoms were recruited. The diagnosis was based on the criteria presented by the international study group for BD (ISG) and the total clinical severity score was determined for each patient. All individuals underwent clinical examination to assess oral and periodontal status and presence of oral ulcers. Periodontal clinical parameters of bleeding on probing (BOP), probing depth (PD), and clinical attachment level (CAL) and also hygiene index (HI) and decayed, missing, and filled (DMF) teeth were noted and analyzed to assess the correlation with severity of BD. There was no significant correlation between DMF and severity of BD. The strong association was found between periodontal parameters (BOP, PD, and CAL) and the severity of BD (P < 0.001). It seems that relation of BD to oral health is higher up in severe forms of BD and periodontal diseases. Clinical association between the diseases might be due to a common underlying etiopathogenesis of periodontitis and BD. PMID:27034903

  5. Periodontal Health Status among Patients with Behçet's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Habibagahi, Zahra; Khorshidi, Hooman; Hekmati, Shahrzad

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the relationship of individual periodontal parameters with the severity of Behçet's disease (BD) and attempt to find the correlation between chronic periodontitis and BD. In this study, 74 registered subjects attending Behçet's clinic with BD symptoms were recruited. The diagnosis was based on the criteria presented by the international study group for BD (ISG) and the total clinical severity score was determined for each patient. All individuals underwent clinical examination to assess oral and periodontal status and presence of oral ulcers. Periodontal clinical parameters of bleeding on probing (BOP), probing depth (PD), and clinical attachment level (CAL) and also hygiene index (HI) and decayed, missing, and filled (DMF) teeth were noted and analyzed to assess the correlation with severity of BD. There was no significant correlation between DMF and severity of BD. The strong association was found between periodontal parameters (BOP, PD, and CAL) and the severity of BD (P < 0.001). It seems that relation of BD to oral health is higher up in severe forms of BD and periodontal diseases. Clinical association between the diseases might be due to a common underlying etiopathogenesis of periodontitis and BD. PMID:27034903

  6. Immediate, Early, and Conventional Implant Placement in a Patient with History of Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Lanza, Alessandro; Scognamiglio, Fabio; Femiano, Felice; Lanza, Michele

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe a case of implant-prosthetic rehabilitation in a patient with periodontitis, focusing on the different timing of implant placement. After initial periodontal treatment, teeth with advanced mobility degree and severe bone resorption were extracted. At different healing time oral implants were placed in a prosthetic-guided position. After osseointegration period the implants were loaded and the results at one year of follow-up are presented. PMID:25949833

  7. Immediate, early, and conventional implant placement in a patient with history of periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Lanza, Alessandro; Scognamiglio, Fabio; Femiano, Felice; Lanza, Michele

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe a case of implant-prosthetic rehabilitation in a patient with periodontitis, focusing on the different timing of implant placement. After initial periodontal treatment, teeth with advanced mobility degree and severe bone resorption were extracted. At different healing time oral implants were placed in a prosthetic-guided position. After osseointegration period the implants were loaded and the results at one year of follow-up are presented. PMID:25949833

  8. Photodynamic therapy as adjunct to non-surgical periodontal treatment in patients on periodontal maintenance: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Chondros, Panos; Nikolidakis, Dimitris; Christodoulides, Nicos; Rössler, Ralf; Gutknecht, Norbert; Sculean, Anton

    2009-09-01

    Recent preclinical and clinical data have suggested the potential benefit of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in the treatment of periodontitis. However, currently, there are very limited data from controlled clinical trials evaluating the effect of PDT in the treatment of periodontitis. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical and microbiological effects of the adjunctive use of PDT in non-surgical periodontal treatment in patients receiving supportive periodontal therapy. Twenty-four patients receiving regularly supportive periodontal therapy were randomly treated with either subgingival scaling and root planing followed by a single episode of PDT (test) or subgingival scaling and root planing alone (control). The following parameters were evaluated at baseline and at 3 months and 6 months after therapy: full mouth plaque score (FMPS), full mouth bleeding score (FMBS), bleeding on probing (BOP) at experimental sites, probing pocket depth (PPD), gingival recession (REC), and clinical attachment level (CAL). Primary outcome variables were changes in PPD and CAL. Microbiological evaluation of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (A.a.), Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.g.), Prevotella intermedia (P.i.), Tannerella forsythensis (T.f.), Treponema denticola (T.d.), Peptostreptococcus micros (P.m.), Fusobacterium nucleatum (F.n.), Campylobacter rectus (C.r.), Eubacterium nodatum (E.n.), Eikenella corrodens (E.c.), and Capnocytophaga species (C.s.) was also performed at baseline and at 3 months and 6 months after therapy, using a commercially available polymerase chain reaction test. No differences in any of the investigated parameters were observed at baseline between the two groups. At 3 months and 6 months after treatment, there were no statistically significant differences between the groups in terms of PPD, CAL and FMPS. At 3 months and 6 months, a statistically significantly higher improvement of BOP was found in the test group. At 3 months after therapy

  9. High incidence and severity of periodontitis in patients with Marfan syndrome in Japan.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Jun-Ichi; Imai, Yasushi; Aoki, Mieko; Fujita, Daishi; Aoyama, Norio; Tada, Yuko; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Izumi, Yuichi; Isobe, Mitsuaki; Komuro, Issei; Nagai, Ryozo; Hirata, Yasunobu

    2015-09-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a systemic connective tissue disorder caused by mutations in the extracellular matrix protein fibrillin-1. While it is known that patients with MFS are at high risk of dental disorders and cardiovascular diseases, little information has been provided to date. To clarify the prevalence of periodontitis in patients with MFS, their oral condition and cardiovascular complications were evaluated. The subjects were patients with MFS (n = 40) who attended the University of Tokyo hospital; age- and gender-matched healthy individuals (n = 14) constituted a control group. Cardiovascular complications and full-mouth clinical measurements, including number of teeth, probing of pocket depth (PD), bleeding on probing (BOP), and community periodontal index (CPI) were recorded. MFS patients had more frequent cardiovascular complications (95 %) compared with the controls (0 %). MFS patients had periodontitis (CPI 3 and 4) more frequently (87.5 %) than the age- and gender-matched control subjects (35.7 %). Furthermore, MFS patients had significantly more severe periodontitis (CPI 2.90 ± 0.12 vs 1.64 ± 0.32) and fewer remaining teeth (26.7 ± 0.4 vs 28.4 ± 0.4) compared with the controls. However, PD and BOP were comparable between MFS patients and the control group. A high incidence of periodontitis and cardiovascular complications was observed in Japanese MFS patients.

  10. Periodontal healing after impacted lower third molar surgery in adolescents and adults. A prospective study.

    PubMed

    Kugelberg, C F; Ahlström, U; Ericson, S; Hugoson, A; Kvint, S

    1991-02-01

    The effects of impacted lower 3rd molar surgery on periodontal tissues in the adjacent 2nd molar area have been investigated in a prospective study comprising 176 cases from 2 age groups: less than or equal to 20 years (n = 93) and greater than or equal to 30 years (n = 83), respectively. The preoperative and 1-year postoperative examinations included both clinical and radiographic variables. All patients were subjected to a standardized surgical procedure and optimal plaque control pre-, intra- and postoperatively. Early removal of impacted lower 3rd molars with large angulation and close positional relationship to the adjacent 2nd molar proved to have a beneficial effect on periodontal health. PMID:2019777

  11. C-Reactive Protein in Peripheral Blood of Patients with Chronic and Aggressive Periodontitis, Gingivitis, and Gingival Recessions.

    PubMed

    Podzimek, Stepan; Mysak, Jaroslav; Janatova, Tatjana; Duskova, Jana

    2015-01-01

    CRP is a plasma protein that reflects a measure of the acute phase response to inflammation and is one of the markers of choice in monitoring this response. CRP can be used for the prediction and early detection of periodontal disease. The aim of this study was to compare and evaluate the systemic levels of CRP in the peripheral blood samples of patients with chronic and aggressive periodontitis, gingivitis, and gingival recessions and compare them with periodontal clinical parameters. All patients (N = 158) were examined prior to the initiation of periodontal treatment. Patients were divided into four groups. Group A consisted of 26 patients with aggressive periodontitis, Group B consisted of 111 patients with chronic periodontitis, Group C consisted of 13 patients with gingivitis, and Group D consisted of 8 patients with gingival recessions. Our study results indicate that CRP levels increase subsequently with the severity of the periodontal disease and that the bleeding on probing index showed much better positive correlation with the CRP levels compared to the pocket depth index in both periodontitis patients groups, especially in aggressive periodontitis patients.

  12. C-Reactive Protein in Peripheral Blood of Patients with Chronic and Aggressive Periodontitis, Gingivitis, and Gingival Recessions

    PubMed Central

    Podzimek, Stepan; Mysak, Jaroslav; Janatova, Tatjana; Duskova, Jana

    2015-01-01

    CRP is a plasma protein that reflects a measure of the acute phase response to inflammation and is one of the markers of choice in monitoring this response. CRP can be used for the prediction and early detection of periodontal disease. The aim of this study was to compare and evaluate the systemic levels of CRP in the peripheral blood samples of patients with chronic and aggressive periodontitis, gingivitis, and gingival recessions and compare them with periodontal clinical parameters. All patients (N = 158) were examined prior to the initiation of periodontal treatment. Patients were divided into four groups. Group A consisted of 26 patients with aggressive periodontitis, Group B consisted of 111 patients with chronic periodontitis, Group C consisted of 13 patients with gingivitis, and Group D consisted of 8 patients with gingival recessions. Our study results indicate that CRP levels increase subsequently with the severity of the periodontal disease and that the bleeding on probing index showed much better positive correlation with the CRP levels compared to the pocket depth index in both periodontitis patients groups, especially in aggressive periodontitis patients. PMID:26346216

  13. Distribution of biotypes and leukotoxic activity of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans isolated from Brazilian patients with chronic periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Gaetti-Jardim Jr., Elerson; Wahasugui, Thais Cristiane; Tomazinho, Paulo Henrique; Marques, Márcia Martins; Nakano, Viviane; Avila-Campos, Mario Julio

    2008-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an important etiologic agent of the periodontitis and is associated with extra-oral infections. In this study, the detection of the ltxA gene as well as the ltx promoter region from leukotoxic A. actinomycetemcomitans isolated from 50 Brazilian patients with periodontitis and 50 healthy subjects was performed. The leukotoxic activity on HL-60 cells was also evaluated. Leukotoxic activity was determined using a trypan blue exclusion method. The 530 bp deletion in the promoter region was evaluated by PCR using a PRO primer pair. A. actinomycetemcomitans was detected by culture and directly from crude subgingival biofilm by PCR using specific primers. By culture, A. actinomycetemcomitans was detected in nine (18%) of the periodontal patients and one (2%) healthy subject. However, by PCR, this organism was detected in 44% of the periodontal patients and in 16% of the healthy subjects. It was verified a great discrepancy between PCR detection of the ltx operon promoter directly from crude subgingival biofilm and from bacterial DNA. Only one periodontal sample harbored highly leukotoxic A. actinomycetemcomitans. Moreover, biotype II was the most prevalent and no correlation between biotypes and leukotoxic activity was observed. The diversity of leukotoxin expression by A. actinomycetemcomitans suggests a role of this toxin in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease and other infectious diseases. PMID:24031284

  14. Management of localized advance loss of periodontal support associated Grade II furcation and intrabony defect in chronic periodontitis patient through amalgamation of platelet-rich fibrin and hydroxyapatite bioactive glass composite granules

    PubMed Central

    Salaria, Sanjeev Kumar; Ghuman, Simrat Kaur; Kumar, Saurabh; Sharma, Garima

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal disease is infectious, complex, multifactorial, chronic inflammatory disease of supporting periodontal tissues that not only alters the bone morphology but also leads to the reduction in bone height. Different types of bony deformities such as horizontal, vertical, craters, and furcation result from periodontal disease, but vertical and Grade II furcation defects are more amenable to regenerative periodontal therapy. The present case report describes the current concept of periodontal diagnosis and the clinical radiographical efficiency of platelet-rich fibrin and hydroxyapatite bioactive glass composite granules graft combination in the management of localized advance osseous defects with respect to tooth number 36 in chronic periodontitis patient at 1 year postoperatively. PMID:27630511

  15. Management of localized advance loss of periodontal support associated Grade II furcation and intrabony defect in chronic periodontitis patient through amalgamation of platelet-rich fibrin and hydroxyapatite bioactive glass composite granules

    PubMed Central

    Salaria, Sanjeev Kumar; Ghuman, Simrat Kaur; Kumar, Saurabh; Sharma, Garima

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal disease is infectious, complex, multifactorial, chronic inflammatory disease of supporting periodontal tissues that not only alters the bone morphology but also leads to the reduction in bone height. Different types of bony deformities such as horizontal, vertical, craters, and furcation result from periodontal disease, but vertical and Grade II furcation defects are more amenable to regenerative periodontal therapy. The present case report describes the current concept of periodontal diagnosis and the clinical radiographical efficiency of platelet-rich fibrin and hydroxyapatite bioactive glass composite granules graft combination in the management of localized advance osseous defects with respect to tooth number 36 in chronic periodontitis patient at 1 year postoperatively.

  16. Management of localized advance loss of periodontal support associated Grade II furcation and intrabony defect in chronic periodontitis patient through amalgamation of platelet-rich fibrin and hydroxyapatite bioactive glass composite granules.

    PubMed

    Salaria, Sanjeev Kumar; Ghuman, Simrat Kaur; Kumar, Saurabh; Sharma, Garima

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal disease is infectious, complex, multifactorial, chronic inflammatory disease of supporting periodontal tissues that not only alters the bone morphology but also leads to the reduction in bone height. Different types of bony deformities such as horizontal, vertical, craters, and furcation result from periodontal disease, but vertical and Grade II furcation defects are more amenable to regenerative periodontal therapy. The present case report describes the current concept of periodontal diagnosis and the clinical radiographical efficiency of platelet-rich fibrin and hydroxyapatite bioactive glass composite granules graft combination in the management of localized advance osseous defects with respect to tooth number 36 in chronic periodontitis patient at 1 year postoperatively. PMID:27630511

  17. Periodontal disease status and associated risk factors in patients attending a Dental Teaching Hospital in Rawalpindi, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Bokhari, Syed Akhtar Hussain; Suhail, Agha Mohammad; Malik, Abdul Razzaq; Imran, Mian Farrukh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Investigators have identified an association of socio-demographic and medical factors with periodontal risk. This study observed status and association of periodontal disease and associated risk factors/indictors. Materials and Methods: All patients attending a dental teaching hospital were interviewed for socio-demographic and medical information through a structured questionnaire. Participants were examined for periodontal status using the community periodontal index (CPI), by a single examiner during September to November 2012. An association of age, gender, smoking habit, systemic conditions, and oral hygiene measures with periodontal status ([periodontitis CPI score ≥3]/nonperiodontitis [CPI score ≤2]) was analyzed by applying Chi-square test and forward selection stepwise regression analysis. Results: One thousand nine hundred and eighteen patients were examined during the study period. The findings revealed that 63.5% of the subjects had CPI score ≤2 (nonperiodontitis), while 34.5% were found with CPI score ≥3 (periodontitis). Age, gender, occupation, smoking, diabetes, arthritis, cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, stress, medications, and oral hygiene habits of using tooth powder or tooth brushing were significantly (P ≤ 0.037) associated with periodontal status. Regression analysis showed a significant association of age, occupation, and smoking with periodontitis. Conclusion: This study observed prevalence of periodontitis in one-fourth of study sample. The study confirmed various socio-demographic risk factors/indictors associated with increased risk of periodontitis. PMID:26941520

  18. Autophagy in periodontitis patients and gingival fibroblasts: unraveling the link between chronic diseases and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Periodontitis, the most prevalent chronic inflammatory disease, has been related to cardiovascular diseases. Autophagy provides a mechanism for the turnover of cellular organelles and proteins through a lysosome-dependent degradation pathway. The aim of this research was to study the role of autophagy in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with periodontitis and gingival fibroblasts treated with a lipopolysaccharide of Porphyromonas gingivalis. Autophagy-dependent mechanisms have been proposed in the pathogenesis of inflammatory disorders and in other diseases related to periodontitis, such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Thus it is important to study the role of autophagy in the pathophysiology of periodontitis. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with periodontitis (n = 38) and without periodontitis (n = 20) were used to study autophagy. To investigate the mechanism of autophagy, we evaluated the influence of a lipopolysaccharide from P. gingivalis in human gingival fibroblasts, and autophagy was monitored morphologically and biochemically. Autophagosomes were observed by immunofluorescence and electron microscopy. Results We found increased levels of autophagy gene expression and high levels of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with periodontitis compared with controls. A significantly positive correlation between both was observed. In human gingival fibroblasts treated with lipopolysaccharide from P. gingivalis, there was an increase of protein and transcript of autophagy-related protein 12 (ATG12) and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 alpha LC3. A reduction of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species induced a decrease in autophagy whereas inhibition of autophagy in infected cells increased apoptosis, showing the protective role of autophagy. Conclusion Results from the present study suggest that autophagy is an important and shared

  19. Severe Generalized Periodontitis in a Patient with an Aplastic Anemia: a 5 Year Follow-up Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Božić, Darko; Žabarović, Domagoj; Jelušić, Damir; Plančak, Darije

    2015-01-01

    Aplastic anemia is a hematological disorder characterized by pancytopenia. This case report presents a young patient with untreated periodontitis associated with hematological disorders, and cyclosporine therapy. During 2 consecutive days, periodontal therapy which consisted of nonsurgical therapy supplemented with an antibiotic treatment and antifibrinolytic therapy was performed. Commercial microbiological PCR tests and periodontitis IL-1 polymorphism risk test were performed. Following the periodontal therapy, the inflammation was resolved and the patient's occlusion was restored by means of removable partial dentures. After the 5 year follow-up, the patient still remained with shallow probing depths although there was inadequate compliance during the maintenance phase. Aplastic anemia increases the risk of onset of severe forms of periodontitis that can be additionally complicated with cyclosporine therapy. In such patients, periodontal therapy must be supplemented with antibiotics. PMID:27688398

  20. Severe Generalized Periodontitis in a Patient with an Aplastic Anemia: a 5 Year Follow-up Case Report.

    PubMed

    Puhar, Ivan; Božić, Darko; Žabarović, Domagoj; Jelušić, Damir; Plančak, Darije

    2015-06-01

    Aplastic anemia is a hematological disorder characterized by pancytopenia. This case report presents a young patient with untreated periodontitis associated with hematological disorders, and cyclosporine therapy. During 2 consecutive days, periodontal therapy which consisted of nonsurgical therapy supplemented with an antibiotic treatment and antifibrinolytic therapy was performed. Commercial microbiological PCR tests and periodontitis IL-1 polymorphism risk test were performed. Following the periodontal therapy, the inflammation was resolved and the patient's occlusion was restored by means of removable partial dentures. After the 5 year follow-up, the patient still remained with shallow probing depths although there was inadequate compliance during the maintenance phase. Aplastic anemia increases the risk of onset of severe forms of periodontitis that can be additionally complicated with cyclosporine therapy. In such patients, periodontal therapy must be supplemented with antibiotics.

  1. Severe Generalized Periodontitis in a Patient with an Aplastic Anemia: a 5 Year Follow-up Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Božić, Darko; Žabarović, Domagoj; Jelušić, Damir; Plančak, Darije

    2015-01-01

    Aplastic anemia is a hematological disorder characterized by pancytopenia. This case report presents a young patient with untreated periodontitis associated with hematological disorders, and cyclosporine therapy. During 2 consecutive days, periodontal therapy which consisted of nonsurgical therapy supplemented with an antibiotic treatment and antifibrinolytic therapy was performed. Commercial microbiological PCR tests and periodontitis IL-1 polymorphism risk test were performed. Following the periodontal therapy, the inflammation was resolved and the patient's occlusion was restored by means of removable partial dentures. After the 5 year follow-up, the patient still remained with shallow probing depths although there was inadequate compliance during the maintenance phase. Aplastic anemia increases the risk of onset of severe forms of periodontitis that can be additionally complicated with cyclosporine therapy. In such patients, periodontal therapy must be supplemented with antibiotics.

  2. Periodontitis is associated with rheumatoid arthritis: a study with longstanding rheumatoid arthritis patients in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Choi, In Ah; Kim, Jin-Hee; Kim, Yong Mi; Lee, Joo Youn; Kim, Kyung Hwa; Lee, Eun Young; Lee, Eun Bong; Lee, Yong-Moo; Song, Yeong Wook

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: A cross-sectional study was undertaken to investigate the association between severity of periodontitis and clinical manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods: Two hundred sixty-four RA patients and 88 age- and sex-matched controls underwent dental exam. Additionally, clinical manifestations including disease activity and anti-citrullinated protein antibodies were evaluated in RA patients. Results: The prevalence of moderate or severe periodontitis was higher in RA patients compared to controls (63.6% vs 34.1%, p < 0.001). In markers of periodontal inflammation, bleeding on probing was correlated with disease activity score 28 (r = 0.128, p = 0.041), RA disease duration (r = 0.211, p = 0.001), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR; r = 0.141, p = 0.023), anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody (r = 0.183, p = 0.009), and anti-citrullinated α-enolase peptide-1 antibody (r = 0.143, p = 0.025). Gingival index was correlated with RA duration (r = 0.262, p < 0.001), ESR (r = 0.162, p = 0.009), anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody (r = 0.203, p = 0.004) and anti-citrullinated α-enolase peptide-1 antibody (r = 0.225, p < 0.001). Periodontal structural damage represented by probing pocket depth and clinical attachment level were less in RA patients with human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DRB1 shared epitope compared than those without shared epitope (p = 0.005 and p =0.006, respectively). Conclusions: The prevalence of moderate or severe periodontitis was increased in RA patients compared to controls. Periodontal inflammation was correlated with RA disease duration, ESR, and anti-citrullinated protein antibodies. Periodontal structural damage was less in RA patients with HLA-DRB1 shared epitope. PMID:27017391

  3. Measurement of the nonlinear optical response of low-density lipoprotein solutions from patients with periodontitis before and after periodontal treatment: evaluation of cardiovascular risk markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, Andréa M.; Jardini, Maria A. N.; Giampaoli, Viviana; Alves, Sarah; Figueiredo Neto, Antônio M.; Gidlund, Magnus

    2012-11-01

    The Z-Scan (ZS) technique in the thermal regime has been used to measure the nonlinear optical response of low-density lipoprotein (LDL). The ZS technique is carried out in LDL from 40 patients with chronic periodontitis before and after three, six, and 12 months of periodontal treatment. Clinical parameters such as probing depths, bleeding on probing, total and differential white blood cells counts, lipid profiles, cytokine levels, and antibodies against oxidized LDL are also determined and compared over time. Before the treatment, the ZS experimental results reveal that the LDL particles of these patients are heavily modified. Only after 12 months of the periodontal treatment, the ZS results obtained reveal behavioral characteristics of healthy particles. This conclusion is also supported by complementary laboratorial analysis showing that the periodontal treatment induces systemic changes in several inflammatory markers.

  4. [Polymorphism of IL1α and IL1β genes and bacterial invasion in patients with chronic generalized periodontitis].

    PubMed

    Tsarev, V N; Nikolaeva, E N

    2010-01-01

    Researchers studied polymorphism of IL-1α and IL-1β genes among patients of different ages with severe chronic generalized periodontitis and people with healthy periodontium. The study demonstrated a correlation between high frequency of genetic polymorphism in IL-1α -899 and IL-1β +3953 loci and development of severe periodontitis among patients less than 35 years of age, as well as markers of P. intermedia, T. denticola, HSV1 and EBV in periodontal pocket.

  5. Risk factors for development of chronic periodontitis in Bulgarian patients (pilot research)

    PubMed Central

    Stoykova, Maria; Musurlieva, Nina; Boyadzhiev, Doychin

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the risks and analyse the risk factors for development of chronic periodontitis in Bulgarian patients. The quality of life was investigated in a cohort of 228 patients with chronic periodontitis. Within the frame of this study, pilot research (a case-control study) was conducted among 80 patients (20 cases and 60 control patients without periodontitis) to evaluate the risk for development of chronic periodontitis. The minimum sample size of patients was determined based on power analysis for sample-size calculation. The mean age of participants in the control group was 31.33 ± 9.38 years and in the case group, 33.00 ± 11.52. Data were accumulated by clinical and sociological methods. Descriptive statistics and multi-factor logistic regression analysis (Backward Conditional procedure) were used. One-factor dispersion analysis showed that, of the 12 studied risk factors, the following variables were significant: stress, diabetes, presence of calculus, overlapping and misaligned teeth (P < 0.05). Multiple logistic regressions were applied to evaluate the association between the variables. Three predictors were selected in the final logistic regression equation: diabetes (B = 4.195; P = 0.001), crooked and overlapping teeth (B = 3.022; P = 0.010) and stress (B = 2.882; P = 0.014). The logistic risk assessment model for development of periodontitis has a predictive value of 93.80% (χ2 = 63.91; P = 0.000). Our results confirmed some proven risk factors for periodontal disease. In the studied population, diabetes was the single, most important predictor for development of periodontitis. PMID:26019602

  6. Lack of association between IL-10 -1082G/A polymorphism and chronic periodontal disease in adults.

    PubMed

    Hannum, R; Godoy, F R; da Cruz, A S; Vieira, T C; Minasi, L B; de M E Silva, D; da Silva, C C; da Cruz, A D

    2015-01-01

    Because of the complex interaction between periodontal pathogens and the host defense system, periodontitis is considered an inflammatory disorder of bacterial etiology that results in periodontal tissue damage. Genetic mechanisms may interfere with the gene expression of important inflammation mediators, modulating the immunologic response of an individual. In this study, we evaluated the single nucleotide polymorphism -1082G/A in the promoter region of interleukin-10 gene and its relationship with periodontal disease in Central Brazil. We included 36 cases classified according to disease severity (mild, moderate, or severe) and 30 controls. The allelic distribution of the cases was 16 (44%) AG, followed by 13 (36%) GG and 7 (20%) with the genotype AA. In the control group, 13 (43%) presented the genotype AG, 12 (40%) GG and 5 (17%) were classified as AA. The populations examined were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Analysis of allelic and genotypic frequencies revealed no casual relationship with the presence of genotype G or A and the development of periodontal disease in adults. The single nucleotide polymorphism -1082G/A of the interleukin-10 gene was not predictive of periodontal disease. PMID:26782428

  7. Detection and comparison of Selenomonas sputigena in subgingival biofilms in chronic and aggressive periodontitis patients

    PubMed Central

    Nagpal, Disha; Prakash, Shobha; Bhat, Kishore Gajanan; Singh, Gagandeep

    2016-01-01

    Background: With the advent of DNA-based culture-independent techniques, a constantly growing number of Selenomonas phylotypes have been detected in patients with destructive periodontal diseases. However, the prevalence levels that have been determined in different studies vary considerably. Aim: The present study was undertaken to detect and compare the presence of Selenomonas sputigena in the subgingival plaque samples from generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAP), chronic generalized periodontitis, and periodontally healthy patients using conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. Materials and Methods: A total of 90 patients were categorized as periodontally healthy individuals (Group I, n = 30), chronic generalized periodontitis (Group II, n = 30), and GAP (Group III, n = 30). The clinical parameters were recorded and subgingival plaque samples were collected. These were then subjected to conventional PCR analysis. Statistical Analysis Used: Kruskal–Wallis ANOVA test was used for multiple group comparisons followed by Mann–Whitney U-test for pairwise comparison. Results: On comparison between three groups, all the clinical parameters were found to be statistically highly significant. Comparing Groups I-II and I-III, the difference in detection was found to be statistically highly significant whereas in Groups II-III, it was statistically nonsignificant. On comparison of S. sputigena detected and undetected patients to clinical parameters in various study groups, the difference was found to be nonsignificant. Conclusion: S. sputigena was found to be significantly associated with chronic and aggressive periodontitis. Although the difference in its detection frequency in both groups was statistically nonsignificant when compared clinically, S. sputigena was more closely associated with the GAP. PMID:27563202

  8. Evaluation of Periodontal Parameters in Patients with Early Stage Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Božić, Darko; Rinčić, Goran; Gaćina, Petar; Plančak, Darije

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess periodontal conditions in patients with early stage CLL and to compare it with the periodontal status of age matched healthy controls and to analyze the relationship between periodontal and hematological parameters in CLL patients. Materials and Methods 60 subjects were examined: 30 patients with CLL Rai 0 (test group) and 30 age-matching healthy individuals (control group). The exclusion criteria were: presence of other systemic disease or condition (e.g. diabetes), history of treatment for periodontitis, use of antibiotics during the last 3 months, use of medications. Socio-demographic data were obtained by means of a questionnaire. Participants with at least 8 teeth underwent a full mouth examination assessing API, PBI, PPD, REC and CAL. Medical data for CLL patients were collected from the patients’ records, while hematological data were obtained from the hemogram. Results Difference between groups was statistically significant for age, number of teeth and frequency of dental checkups (p<0.05). Patients with CLL had significantly higher average values of periodontal indices (API 0.81±0.18; PBI 2.72±0.68; PPD 3.40±0.53; REC 1.95±0.87, CAL 4.37±0.80) compared to the control group (API 0.69±0.15; PBI 1.91±0.45; PPD 2.51±0.40; REC 0.99±0.54; CAL 3.00±0.58). The correlation coefficients between age and periodontal indices showed statistically significance between age and REC (r=0.357; p<0.01), and age and CAL (r=0.295; p<0.05). Age was not statistically significant covariate for CAL (F=2.205; p>0.05), only for REC (F=4.601; p<0.05). After the removal of the statistical effect of age, the difference in REC between CLL and control group remained statistically significant (F=19.732; p<0.01; eta2=0.287). Statistically significant association between periodontal and hematological parameters in CLL patients was not found (p>0.05). Conclusion The results of this study showed that patients with CLL had worse periodontal status compared to

  9. Evaluation of Periodontal Parameters in Patients with Early Stage Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Božić, Darko; Rinčić, Goran; Gaćina, Petar; Plančak, Darije

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess periodontal conditions in patients with early stage CLL and to compare it with the periodontal status of age matched healthy controls and to analyze the relationship between periodontal and hematological parameters in CLL patients. Materials and Methods 60 subjects were examined: 30 patients with CLL Rai 0 (test group) and 30 age-matching healthy individuals (control group). The exclusion criteria were: presence of other systemic disease or condition (e.g. diabetes), history of treatment for periodontitis, use of antibiotics during the last 3 months, use of medications. Socio-demographic data were obtained by means of a questionnaire. Participants with at least 8 teeth underwent a full mouth examination assessing API, PBI, PPD, REC and CAL. Medical data for CLL patients were collected from the patients’ records, while hematological data were obtained from the hemogram. Results Difference between groups was statistically significant for age, number of teeth and frequency of dental checkups (p<0.05). Patients with CLL had significantly higher average values of periodontal indices (API 0.81±0.18; PBI 2.72±0.68; PPD 3.40±0.53; REC 1.95±0.87, CAL 4.37±0.80) compared to the control group (API 0.69±0.15; PBI 1.91±0.45; PPD 2.51±0.40; REC 0.99±0.54; CAL 3.00±0.58). The correlation coefficients between age and periodontal indices showed statistically significance between age and REC (r=0.357; p<0.01), and age and CAL (r=0.295; p<0.05). Age was not statistically significant covariate for CAL (F=2.205; p>0.05), only for REC (F=4.601; p<0.05). After the removal of the statistical effect of age, the difference in REC between CLL and control group remained statistically significant (F=19.732; p<0.01; eta2=0.287). Statistically significant association between periodontal and hematological parameters in CLL patients was not found (p>0.05). Conclusion The results of this study showed that patients with CLL had worse periodontal status compared to

  10. Periodontal Health among Non-Hospitalized Chronic Psychiatric Patients in Mangaluru City-India

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rashmi; Kota, Keshava Pai

    2016-01-01

    Introduction A substantial section of society constituting the mentally ill and psychiatric patients deserve special attention. Evidence has suggested that psychological factors have contributed to an increase in the susceptibility to periodontal disease. Aim The aim of the study was to evaluate the gingival and periodontal health of chronically non-hospitalized psychiatric patients in Mangaluru city, India. Materials and Methods Forty one psychiatric patients having chronic psychiatric illness and on neuroleptic medications for a minimum of 2 years were included in the study. The control group consisted of 41 healthy dental patients who were selected to match the study group by age and gender, and for both groups 20 teeth excluding the third molars should be present. Demographic characteristics, dental examination including gingival index and periodontal health according to the community periodontal index were recorded for each patient in both the groups. Results In the psychiatric patient group (Group A) 47.1% subjects were suffering from schizophrenia and 17.6% subjects were having mood disorder. Gingivitis varied from mild to severe among the patients of both the groups. Bleeding on probing (CPI 1) was recorded in 23.5% in Group A and 14.6% in Group B. Dental calculus (CPI 2) in 38.2% in Group A and 58.5% in Group B of the subjects, 20.6% with at least one 4mm to 5mm pocket (CPI 3), and 17.6% with at least one 6mm pocket (CPI 4). Conclusion The present study underlines a considerable need for prevention and treatment of periodontal disease among chronic psychiatric patients in Mangaluru city. Every effort should be made to increase the awareness of this cohort regarding the importance of oral hygiene practices and on the early diagnosis of periodontal problems. PMID:27656561

  11. Identification of Microbial Pathogens in Periodontal disease and Diabetic patients of South Indian Population

    PubMed Central

    Chiranjeevi, Tikka; Prasad, Osuru Hari; Prasad, Uppu Venkateswara; Kumar, Avula Kishor; Chakravarthi, Veeraraghavulu Praveen; Rao, Paramala Balaji; Sarma, Potuguchi Venkata Gurunadha Krishna; Reddy, Nagi reddy Raveendra; Bhaskar, Matcha

    2014-01-01

    Periodontitis have been referred to as the sixth complication of diabetes found in high prevalence among diabetic patients than among healthy controls. The aim of the present study was to examine the periodontal disease status among collected dental plaque samples. Chromosomal DNA was isolated and amplified by universal primers. The DNA was sequenced for bacterial confirmation and phylogenetic analysis performed for the evolutionary relationship with other known pathogens. No amplification products were observed in groups labeled non periodontal and non Diabetes (NP&ND) and non Periodontal and Diabetes (NP&D). But in the case of Periodontal and non Diabetes (P&ND) groups 22 amplified products were observed. In case of Periodontal and Diabetes (P&D), 32 amplified products were positive for microbes. Among the four microbial groups, Treponemadenticola, and Tannerella forsythia were found to be prevalent in P&D. The phylogenetic analysis of 16s rRNA of Treponemadenticola showed the relationship with other Treponema oral pathogen species and with the Spirochaetazuelaera. Tannerella forsythia shows its evolutionary relationship only with four oral pathogens (Macellibacteroidesfermentans, Porphyromadaceae bacterium, Parabacteroidesmeredae and Bacillus fosythus). Prevotellaintermedia also showed its evolutionary relationship only with Prevotella Spcs while Fusobacterium revealed close evolutionary relationship only with Porpiromonasgingivalis. PMID:24966528

  12. Use of dietary supplements in patients seeking treatment at a periodontal clinic.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Bryan D; Fritz, Peter C; Ward, Wendy E

    2013-04-02

    Dietary supplement use may modify the risk of periodontal disease but effects on wound healing after periodontal procedures are less clear. This study characterized dietary supplement use by male and female patients (n = 376) attending a periodontal clinic-information that is essential for evidence-based intervention studies that may improve patient outcomes after periodontal procedures. Calcium, vitamin D, multivitamin and vitamin C were most commonly used. A greater (p ≤ 0.05) number of males took no supplements compared to females, and more (p ≤ 0.05) females than males took ≥ four supplements. Females took more (p ≤ 0.05) calcium, vitamin D, fish oil, green tea, magnesium, omega 3,6,9 and B vitamin complex. Younger patients (31-50 years) had the highest (p ≤ 0.05) frequency of no supplement use compared to older age groups. Patients over age 50 had a higher (p ≤ 0.05) frequency of using ≥ four supplements including calcium and vitamin D. Supplement use was lower (p ≤ 0.05) in smokers, particularly for calcium, fish oil, green tea and vitamin D. In conclusion, females, older individuals and non-smokers have higher supplement use. Future dietary intervention studies can focus on supplements with known biological activities-anti-inflammatory, antioxidant or osteogenic activity-that may enhance wound healing after reconstructive periodontal procedures.

  13. Use of Dietary Supplements in Patients Seeking Treatment at a Periodontal Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Bryan D.; Fritz, Peter C.; Ward, Wendy E.

    2013-01-01

    Dietary supplement use may modify the risk of periodontal disease but effects on wound healing after periodontal procedures are less clear. This study characterized dietary supplement use by male and female patients (n = 376) attending a periodontal clinic—information that is essential for evidence-based intervention studies that may improve patient outcomes after periodontal procedures. Calcium, vitamin D, multivitamin and vitamin C were most commonly used. A greater (p ≤ 0.05) number of males took no supplements compared to females, and more (p ≤ 0.05) females than males took ≥ four supplements. Females took more (p ≤ 0.05) calcium, vitamin D, fish oil, green tea, magnesium, omega 3,6,9 and B vitamin complex. Younger patients (31–50 years) had the highest (p ≤ 0.05) frequency of no supplement use compared to older age groups. Patients over age 50 had a higher (p ≤ 0.05) frequency of using ≥ four supplements including calcium and vitamin D. Supplement use was lower (p ≤ 0.05) in smokers, particularly for calcium, fish oil, green tea and vitamin D. In conclusion, females, older individuals and non-smokers have higher supplement use. Future dietary intervention studies can focus on supplements with known biological activities—anti-inflammatory, antioxidant or osteogenic activity—that may enhance wound healing after reconstructive periodontal procedures. PMID:23549330

  14. Inhibition of peripheral blood neutrophil oxidative burst in periodontitis patients with a homeopathic medication Traumeel S

    PubMed Central

    žilinskas, Juozas; žekonis, Jonas; žekonis, Gediminas; Šadzevičienė, Renata; Sapragonienė, Marija; Navickaitė, Justina; Barzdžiukaitė, Ingrida

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background The anti-inflammatory effects of a homeopathic remedy, Traumeel S, have been observed in experimental and clinical studies; however, its antioxidant properties have not been elucidated. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antioxidant effects of Traumeel S on peripheral blood neutrophils in patients with periodontitis. Material/Methods The study was performed using venous blood of 22 individuals with chronic periodontitis and 21 healthy subjects. The antioxidant effects of Traumeel S on the production of reactive oxygen species by unstimulated and stimulated with unopsonized E. coli neutrophils were investigated using luminol- and lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence (CL). Results Polymorphonuclear leukocytes of periodontitis patients produced higher levels (p<0.01) of light output of lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence and significantly reduced (p<0.01) light output of luminol-dependent chemiluminescence than analogous cells of healthy subjects. Highly diluted (10−4 of the stem solution) Traumeel S significantly (by approximately 50%) reduced superoxide-induced oxidation of lucigenin by unstimulated and stimulated with unopsonized E. coli polymorphonuclear leukocytes of periodontitis patients and had a tendency to intensify luminol-dependent chemiluminescence. Preincubation of the unstimulated and stimulated with unopsonized E. coli polymorphonuclear leukocytes of healthy subjects with Traumeel S exerts no inhibitory action on the luminol- and lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence of the above-mentioned cells. Conclusions This study indicates that Traumeel S may significantly reduce production of superoxide anion by unstimulated and stimulated peripheral blood polymorphonuclear neutrophils of periodontitis patients. PMID:21525811

  15. Estimate of CRP and TNF-alpha level before and after periodontal therapy in cardiovascular disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Koppolu, Pradeep; Durvasula, Satyanarayana; Palaparthy, Rajababu; Rao, Mukhesh; Sagar, Vidya; Reddy, Sunil Kumar; Lingam, Swapna

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Epidemiological studies show that individuals with periodontitis have a radically amplified threat to develop cardiovascular disease. CRP& TNF-α, are acute phase proteins monitored as a marker of inflammatory status, which have been identified as a major risk factor for atherosclerotic complications. Elevated CRP & TNF-α level in periodontitis patients have been reported by several groups. The present study was performed to determine whether presence of periodontitis and periodontal therapy could influence the serum levels of CRP & TNF-α in cardiovascular disease patients. Methods Forty cardiovascular disease subjects participated in the study. They were classified into two groups. Group A (Control) where no periodontal treatment was given, Group B (Test) where periodontal treatment (scaling & root planing) was performed. Periodontal clinical parameters like OHI-S, probing pocket depth, were evaluated together with serum CRP, TNF-α, at baseline and reassessed after 8 weeks for all the subjects in both the groups. Results The CRP & TNF-α levels in both the groups decreased but the decrease in the Group A was minimal and was not statistically significant (P > 0.05); whereas in Group B where periodontal therapy was performed, there was statistically significant decrease. Conclusion It can be concluded from the study that there can be a possible causal relationship between pathogenesis of periodontal disease and CVD as inferred from the statistical significant outcome in the form of decreased inflammatory biomarkers after the periodontal treatment. PMID:24198887

  16. Association of interleukin-1 α (–889) gene polymorphism in patients with generalized aggressive and chronic periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Komal; Chhokra, Mehak; Dodwad, Vidya; Puri, Nikhil

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is a strong evidence that genetic as well as environmental factors affect the age of onset, severity and lifetime risk of developing periodontitis. The objective of the present study was to compare and to evaluate the association between interleukin (IL)-1α(-889) and gene polymorphisms in patients with generalized aggressive periodontitis, chronic periodontitis and healthy controls. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 Indian patients, with 20 aggressive periodontitis, 20 chronic periodontitis and 20 healthy controls were recruited for this study. From each patient, a volume of 2 ml of blood was collected by venipuncture in the ante-cubital fossa and was stored in sodium EDTA vacutainers and was used for genotyping assays with the polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism technique. Clinical parameters such as oral hygiene index, gingival index and clinical attachment loss (CAL) were evaluated for each patient. Genotype distribution between different groups were analyzed using Chi-square test. A P = 0.05 or less was set for significance. Results: The mean oral hygiene index was 3.7 ± 0.86 and 3.25 ± 0.30 for chronic and aggressive periodontitis cases respectively. The CAL was 4.29 ± 0.63 mm for chronic periodontitis and 6.44 ± 0.57 mm for aggressive periodontitis. Homozygous genotype 2,2 was more predominant in cases of aggressive periodontitis whereas in chronic periodontitis, heterozygous genotype 1,2 was more predominant when compared with others (P < 0.001). Odds ratio for aggressive versus chronic periodontitis was calculated as 6.2 (95% confidence interval 6.019-7.892). Conclusion: The results of the present study support a positive association between aggressive periodontitis and the presence of the IL-1α-889, allele 2 polymorphism in Indian patients. PMID:25709679

  17. Inflammation Biomarkers of Advanced Disease in Nongingival Tissues of Chronic Periodontitis Patients

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Thiago Alvares; Silva, Marcelo José Barbosa; Alves, Polyanna Miranda; Chica, Javier Emílio Lazo; Barcelos, Emilio Zorzo; Giani, Max Antonio Alves; Garlet, Gustavo Pompermaier; da Silva, João Santana; Rodrigues Júnior, Virmondes; Rodrigues, Denise Bertulucci Rocha; Cardoso, Cristina Ribeiro de Barros

    2015-01-01

    Chronic periodontitis is a multifactorial inflammatory disease that affects supporting structures of the teeth. Although the gingival response is largely described, little is known about the immune changes in the alveolar bone and neighboring tissues that could indicate periodontal disease (PD) activity. Then, in this study we identified the ongoing inflammatory changes and novel biomarkers for periodontitis in the tissues directly affected by the destructive disease in PD patients. Samples were collected by osteotomy in 17 control subjects during extraction of third molars and 18 patients with advanced PD, in which alveoloplasty was necessary after extraction of teeth with previous extensive periodontal damage. Patients presented mononuclear cells infiltration in the connective tissue next to the bone and higher fibrosis area, along with increased accumulation of IL-17+ and TRAP+ cells. The levels of TNF-α and MMP-2 mRNA were also elevated compared to controls and a positive and significant correlation was observed between TNF-α and MMP-2 mRNA expression, considering all samples evaluated. In conclusion, nongingival tissues neighboring large periodontal pockets present inflammatory markers that could predict ongoing bone resorption and disease spreading. Therefore, we suggested that the detailed evaluation of these regions could be of great importance to the assessment of disease progression. PMID:26063981

  18. Elastase and metalloproteinase-9 concentrations in saliva in patients with chronic periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Kostrzewa-Janicka, Jolanta; Górska, Renata

    2014-01-01

    Elastase and metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) are two of numerous proteolytic enzymes released by neutrophilic granulocytes in the course of periodontitis. The aim of the study was to determine the concentrations of elastase and MMP-9 in saliva in patients with chronic periodontitis compared to healthy individuals. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method was employed to determine the concentrations of elastase and MMP-9 in saliva in patients with chronic periodontitis and with pocket depth (PD) ≥ 6 mm and PD < 6 mm, as well as in saliva of healthy individuals. Significantly higher concentrations of elastase and MMP-9 were observed in patients with periodontitis compared to healthy individuals (p < 0.01). Also a significant difference in elastase concentration in saliva was observed between the PD ≥ 4 mm and PD < 6 mm groups and between the PD ≥ 6 mm and control groups, and statistically significant differences in MMP-9 concentrations between the PD ≥ 6 mm and control groups. No statistically significant differences were observed between the PD < 6 mm and control groups for elastase concentrations in saliva as well as between the PD ≥ 6 mm and PD < 6 mm groups, and also between the PD < 6 mm and control groups for MMP-9 concentrations in saliva. Elastase and MMP-9 concentrations in saliva can be considered as biochemical indicators of severity of periodontitis. PMID:26155148

  19. Isolation and Characterization of Human Adult Epithelial Stem Cells from the Periodontal Ligament.

    PubMed

    Athanassiou-Papaefthymiou, M; Papagerakis, P; Papagerakis, S

    2015-11-01

    We report a novel method for the isolation of adult human epithelial stem cells (hEpiSCs) from the epithelial component of the periodontal ligament-the human epithelial cell rests of Malassez (hERM). hEpiSC-rich integrin-α6(+ve) hERM cells derived by fluorometry can be clonally expanded, can grow organoids, and express the markers of pluripotency (OCT4, NANOG, SOX2), polycomb protein RING1B, and the hEpiSC supermarker LGR5. They maintain the growth profile of their originating hERM in vitro. Subcutaneous cotransplantation with mesenchymal stem cells from the dental pulp on poly-l-lactic acid scaffolds in nude mice gave rise to perfect heterotopic ossicles in vivo with ultrastructure of dentin, enamel, cementum, and bone. These remarkable fully mineralized ossicles underscore the importance of epithelial-mesenchymal crosstalk in tissue regeneration using human progenitor stem cells, which may have already committed to lineage despite maintaining hallmarks of pluripotency. In addition, we report the clonal expansion and isolation of human LGR5(+ve) cells from the hERM in xeno-free culture conditions. The genetic profile of LGR5(+ve) cells includes both markers of pluripotency and genes important for secretory epithelial and dental epithelial cell differentiation, giving us a first insight into periodontal ligament-derived hEpiSCs. PMID:26392003

  20. A clinical study on the effectiveness of implant supported dental restoration in patients with chronic periodontal diseases.

    PubMed

    Jiang, B Q; Lan, J; Huang, H Y; Liang, J; Ma, X N; Huo, L D; Xu, X

    2013-02-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of implant supported dental restorations in patients with chronic periodontal diseases at various stages within 2 years of completing treatment. 30 patients with periodontal diseases and 30 patients without periodontal diseases were studied. Total counts of 276 implant bodies were divided into group A (patients with periodontal diseases; a total of 149 implants) and group B (patients with healthy periodontium; a total of 127 implants). In group A subjects, periodontitis was treated prior to implant placement. The study focused on patients' modified sulcus bleeding index, modified plaque index, implant mobility index, periodontal probing depth and implant success rate 12 and 24 months after the completion of the treatment. The result show: there were no significant differences in implant success rate between groups A and B; modified sulcus bleeding index scores showed differences between the groups 24 months after treatment; there were no significant differences in other clinical indexes during the study between the groups; there were no significant differences in periodontal probing depth between the groups; modified plaque index and modified sulcus bleeding index were positively correlated in implant supported dental restoration patients with chronic periodontal diseases.

  1. Periodontal conditions in patients with Marfan syndrome – a multicenter case control study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a disorder of the connective tissues. Alterations of the elastic fibers may manifest in different tissues especially in the skeletal, cardiovascular and ocular system. Oral manifestations like orthodontic or skeletal anomalies and fragility of the temporomandibular joint have been well described by various authors. However, no data are available regarding a possible periodontal involvement of MFS. Hence, the aim of the present study was to investigate for the first time if MFS may increase the susceptibility to periodontitis. Methods A comprehensive periodontal examination including documentation of probing pocket depth, gingival recession, clinical attachment level, and bleeding on probing was conducted in all patients. In addition, dental conditions were assessed by determining the Index for Decayed, Missing and Filled Teeth (DMFT) and a self-administered questionnaire was filled out by patients. For statistical analysis, the unpaired t-Test was applied (level of significance: p < 0.05). Both groups were matched concerning well known periodontal risk factors like age, gender and smoking habits. Results 82 participants, 51 patients with MFS (30 female and 21 male, mean age: 40.20 ± 15.35 years) and 31 sound controls (17 female and 14 male, mean age: 40.29 ± 13.94 years), were examined. All assessed periodontal and dental parameters were not significantly different between groups. Conclusions Based on our data, patients with MFS did not reveal a higher prevalence of periodontitis compared to the control group. However, Marfan patients showed a tendency to more inflammation signs, which can be explained by the crowded teeth. Therefore, a regular professional cleaning of the teeth is recommendable (i.e., 6 months intervals) in order to reduce the bacterial biofilm in the oral cavity and thus resulting in a decreased risk of systemic diseases, specifically endocarditis. PMID:24165013

  2. [USE OF THE REAL-TIME PCR FOR STUDY OF THE PERIODONTAL MICROBIOME IN PATIENTS WITH COMBINED PATHOLOGY OF GASTRODUODENAL ZONE AND CHRONIC PERIODONTITIS].

    PubMed

    Shibaeva, A V; Ayvazova, R A; Rebrikov, D V; Trubnikova, E V; Kudykina, Yu K; Belyakova, A V; Zaripova, R S; Shevelev, A B

    2016-01-01

    The total of 54 patients with chronic periodontitis of different severity was tested using real-time PCR (Dentoflor kit). The group included 38 patients with chronic gastritis. For the first time, a higher prevalence of Treponema denticola in periodontium of males in comparison with females was demonstrated. The patients with chronic gastritis had more human genome DNA at their periodontium than healthy individuals. Non-parametric statistical analysis demonstrated high association of periodontium colonization with. T. forsythensis and T. denticola (but not Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Prevotella intermedia) with the severity of the chronic periodontitis. PMID:27183718

  3. Levels of common salivary protein 1 in healthy subjects and periodontal patients

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Human saliva, as a vital part of the immune defense system, contains a number of distinct proteins and peptides. Recently human common salivary protein 1 (CSP1) has been identified as an abundant salivary protein and may play a role in promoting the binding of cariogenic bacteria to salivary pellicles. However, nothing else is known regarding the role of CSP1 in periodontology. The aim of this study was to quantify and compare CSP1 levels between healthy subjects and periodontal patients. Methods This controlled clinical study was conducted in periodontally healthy individuals and patients with chronic periodontitis Chonbuk National University Hospital, with Institutional Review Board approval. Whole saliva samples were collected from 36 healthy subjects and 33 chronic periodontitis patients and analyzed. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immune blotting were conducted to ensure that anti-CSP1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) binds to CSP1 in human saliva. A sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) system was house-fabricated using mAb-hCSP1#14 and mAb-hCSP1#4 as a capture and a detector mAb, respectively. The CSP1 concentrations in saliva from 36 healthy subjects and 33 periodontal patients were quantified using the CSP1 sandwich ELISA system, and the results were analyzed using the Student’s t-test. Results Immunoblot analysis using mAb-hCSP1 as a probe confirmed that CSP1 in human saliva existed as a single band with a molecular weight of approximately 27-kDa. The quantification of CSP1 concentrations by CSP1 ELISA showed that the median values (25th to 75th percentiles) of periodontal patients and healthy subjects were 9,474 ng/mL (range, 8,434–10,139 ng/mL) and 8,598 ng/mL (range, 7,421–9,877 ng/mL), respectively. The Student’s t-test indicated the presence of a statistically significant difference between the 2 groups (P=0.024). Conclusions The presence of a significant difference in CSP1 levels between healthy

  4. A novel species of torque teno mini virus (TTMV) in gingival tissue from chronic periodontitis patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Li, Fei; Shan, Tong-Ling; Deng, Xutao; Delwart, Eric; Feng, Xi-Ping

    2016-01-01

    A new species of torque teno mini virus, named TTMV-222, was detected in gingival tissue from periodontitis patients using a viral metagenomics method. The 2803-nucleotide genome of TTMV-222 is closely related to TTMV1-CBD279, with 62.6% overall nucleotide similarity. Genetic analyses of the new virus genome revealed a classic genomic organization but a weak identity with known sequences. The prevalence of TTMV-222 in the periodontitis group (n = 150) was significantly higher than that in the healthy group (n = 150) (p = 0.032), suggesting that the new virus may be associated with inflammation in chronic periodontitis patients. However, this finding requires further investigation. PMID:27221159

  5. Prevalence of fimA genotypes of Porphyromonas gingivalis and other periodontal bacteria in a Spanish population with chronic periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Puig-Silla, Miriam; Dasí-Fernánde, Francisco; Montiel-Company, José-María

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of the different fimA genotypes of Porphyromonas gingivalis in adult Spanish patients with chronic periodontitis, patients with gingivitis and periodontally healthy subjects, and the relationship between these genotypes and other periodontopathogenic bacteria. Study design: Samples of subgingival plaque were taken from 86 patients (33 with chronic periodontitis, 16 with gingivitis, and 37 periodontally healthy) in the course of a full periodontal examination. PCR was employed to determine the presence of the 6 fimA genotypes of Porphyromonas gingivalis (I-V and Ib) and of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Tannerella forsythia and Treponema denticola. Results: Porphyromonas gingivalis fimA genotypes II and Ib were present in significantly higher percentages in periodontal patients (39.4% and 12.1% respectively) than in healthy or gingivitis subjects. The prevalence of Tannerella forsythia, Treponema denticola, and Porphyromonas gingivalis fimA genotype IV was significantly higher in the group that presented bleeding greater than 30%. A positive correlation was found between Porphyromonas gingivalis fimA genotype IV and Treponema denticola. Conclusions: A strong association between Porphyromonas gingivalis fimA genotypes II and Ib and chronic periodontitis exists in the Spanish population. The most prevalent genotype in periodontal patients is II. Key words:Periodontitis, Porphyromonas gingivalis, fimA genotype, periodontal bacteria, polymerase chain reaction. PMID:22549664

  6. Measurement of patient-derived utility values for periodontal health using a multi-attribute scale.

    PubMed

    Bellamy, C A; Brickley, M R; McAndrew, R

    1996-09-01

    Periodontal health states are difficult to quantify and no formal scale quantifying patients' utilities for periodontal health states exits. Multi-attribute utility (MAU) techniques were used to develop such a scale. The MAU scale may be used to quantify patients' assessment of their current periodontal health and that of possible treatment outcomes. Such data, combined with probability values in formal decision analysis techniques would result in improved rationality of treatment planning for periodontal disease. 20 patients attending for routine undergraduate care were interviewed. Data from these interviews were sorted into groups of common interest (domains). Intra-domain health statements were complied from the interview content. 21 patients ranked the intra-domain statements on a scale of 0-100. This same group of patients also performed an inter-domain weighting. Mean results showed that patients were 2X as concerned with how they felt and with the prognosis of possible outcomes, than with how they looked and what facts they knew about their oral health. However, the real value of utilities research lies in application of individual results to treatment planning as there is a wide range of opinion regarding outcome health states. PMID:8891929

  7. Increased frequencies of caries, periodontal disease and tooth loss in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Hanaoka, Ayumi; Kashihara, Kenichi

    2009-10-01

    We aimed to evaluate oral hygiene in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). The incidence of periodontal disease and numbers of caries and remaining teeth were checked in 89 consecutive 60 to 79-year-old patients with PD and compared with two other patient groups: 68 patients with mild neurological disease, and 60 with acute ischemic stroke. Patients with PD had fewer remaining teeth, more caries and a higher incidence of deep periodontal pockets. The frequency of patients with PD with untreated caries was high at Hoehn and Yahr stage II and above, and frequency tended to increase in patients who had low compared to high mini-mental state examination scores. Careful attention should be paid to the oral hygiene of patients with PD, even in the early stages of the disease.

  8. Effect of Supragingival Irrigation with Aerosolized 0.5% Hydrogen Peroxide on Clinical Periodontal Parameters, Markers of Systemic Inflammation, and Morphology of Gingival Tissues in Patients with Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Žekonis, Gediminas; Žekonis, Jonas; Gleiznys, Alvydas; Noreikienė, Viktorija; Balnytė, Ingrida; Šadzevičienė, Renata; Narbutaitė, Julija

    2016-01-01

    Background Various studies have shown that non-surgical periodontal treatment is correlated with reduction in clinical parameters and plasma levels of inflammatory markers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of long-term weekly supragingival irrigations with aerosolized 0.5% hydrogen peroxide as maintenance therapy followed by non-surgical periodontal treatment on clinical parameters, plasma levels of inflammatory markers, and morphological changes in gingival tissues of patients with periodontitis. Material/Methods In total, 43 patients with chronic periodontitis were randomly allocated to long-term maintenance therapy. The patients’ periodontal status was assessed using clinical parameters of approximal plaque index, modified gingival index, bleeding index, pocket probing depth, and plasma levels of inflammatory markers (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and white blood cell count) at baseline and after 1, 2, and 3 years. The morphological status of gingival tissues (immediately after supragingival irrigation) was assessed microscopically. Results Complete data were obtained on 34 patients. A highly statistically significant and consistent reduction was observed in all long-term clinical parameters and plasma levels of inflammatory markers. Morphological data showed abundant spherical bubbles in gingival tissues. Conclusions 1. The present study showed that non-surgical periodontal treatment with long-term weekly supragingival irrigations with aerosolized 0.5% hydrogen peroxide improved clinical periodontal status and plasma levels of inflammatory markers and may be a promising method in periodontology. 2. We found that supragingival irrigation with aerosolized 0.5% hydrogen peroxide created large numbers of spherical bubbles in gingival tissues. PMID:27743448

  9. Effect of nonsurgical periodontal treatment on glycosylated hemoglobin in diabetic patients: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Mauri-Obradors, Elisabet; Jané-Salas, Enric; Sabater-Recolons, Maria del Mar; Vinas, Miguel; López-López, José

    2015-09-01

    This review was designed to determine whether non-surgical periodontal treatment is able to reduce serum glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). Several previous reports showed that scaling and root planning (SRP) improve periodontal status in patients with DM, but whether it also improves metabolic control of the disease is unclear. A systematic review was conducted according to the recommendations of the Cochrane Collaboration and PRISMA. A literature search was conducted in October 2012 using three libraries (Cochrane, Web of Knowledge, and Scopus) and the keywords "periodontal disease" and "diabetes mellitus." Only 21 of the articles met the inclusion criteria for this review. A total of 1,454 patients were thus included in this study to evaluate whether periodontal treatment improved serum HbA1c levels. Both the methodological quality and the risk of bias of each study were taken into account using the Jadad scale. Only ten of the included studies had an acceptable-good score of 3-5. Fourteen of the studies reported a significant decrease in serum HbA1c levels (p < 0.05) after periodontal treatment. The remaining seven studies failed to find a significant decrease in serum HbA1c. The findings of this review suggest that the published literature is insufficient and inconclusive to clearly support periodontal treatment as a means to improve serum HbA1c levels in patients with type 1 DM. It also demonstrates the need for homogeneous studies, with larger samples and longer follow-up periods, to properly address this question.

  10. Betacellulin in Chronic Periodontitis Patients With and Without Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: An Immunohistochemical Study

    PubMed Central

    Kalburgi, Nagaraj B.; Bilichodmath, Shivaprasad; Warad, Shivaraj B.; Ugale, Mahesh S.; Koregol, Arati C.; Bijjargi, Shobha C.

    2015-01-01

    Background The host immune response to bacterial dental plaque determines periodontal disease susceptibility by increasing the secretion of inflammatory cytokines. The Epidermal Growth Factor family cytokines stimulate proliferation and keratinization of cells in dermis and oral epithelium. Epidermal Growth Factor family consists of Amphiregulin, Betacellulin, Epiregulin, Epigen, Heparin binding Epidermal Growth Factor like growth factor and transforming Growth Factor-alpha. Aim The current study aimed to investigate expression of Betacellulin in chronic periodontitis patients with and without type 2 diabetes mellitus and thereby assessing role of betacellulin in periodontal health and disease. Materials and Methods Present study comprised of 90 participants, age ranges from 18 to 60-year-old, for the period of March 2010 to May 2011. Participants were categorized into three groups based Gingival index (GI), probing depth (PD) and clinical attachment loss (CA Loss). Group 1 consisted 30 individuals with clinically healthy periodontium, Group-2 consisted 30 individuals with GI>1, PD≥5 mm, and CA Loss>3 mm. Group-3 (Chronic Periodontitis with type 2 diabetes mellitus) consisted 30 with GI >1, PD≥5 mm, and CA Loss>3 mm. Immunohistochemical localization and quantification of Betacellulin was done in gingival tissue samples from all groups. Results Data showed expression of Betacellulin were higher in chronic periodontitis as compared to healthy. A positive correlation found in Betacellulin expression and Probing Depth in chronic periodontitis. Conclusion This footmark study impacts the role of Betacellulin in pathogenesis and progression of periodontal disease which will help in exploration of novel immunotherapeutic strategies and immunological research activity in this field. PMID:26673371

  11. Periodontitis as a risk factor in patients with ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Luis-Delgado, Omaira; Echevarría-García, José Javier; Berini-Aytés, Leonardo; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2004-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease, and particularly ischemic heart disease (IHD), constitutes one of the principal causes of mortality in the western world. Interest has recently increased in the relationship between IHD and different infectious processes as triggering factors of the former, such as Chlamydia pneumoniae and Helicobacter pylori infection. Periodontitis has also been related to an increased risk of coronary disease, since both disorders share common characteristics such as patient age and sex, and a smoking habit, among other aspects. There are many similarities between vascular pathology induced by bacteria and the natural history of atherogenesis. The principal mechanism of action underlying periodontitis and IHD centers on the effect of bacteria and their endotoxins upon inflammatory reaction, hemostasia and lipid metabolic alterations. However, some authors are of the opinion that periodontitis constitutes an epiphenomenon, and that further studies are needed to clarify the cause-effect relation between these two multifactor pathologies.

  12. Periodontal Diseases among the Adult Population of Georgia and the Impact of Socio-behavioral Factors on Their Prevalence

    PubMed Central

    TSITAISHVILI, Lela; KALANDADZE, Manana; MARGVELASHVILI, Vladimer

    2015-01-01

    Background: Georgia is a country with a Human Development Index (HDI) score of 0.733. Significant deterioration in socio-economic conditions in the 1990s caused serious health problems in the population including oral health. Since then, there has not been an epidemiological survey of dental diseases among the adult population in Georgia. Methods: The pathfinder survey- cluster- stratified method derived by WHO was used for sampling. Overall, 2370 adults including 1289 women and 1081 men in nine regions of Georgia including the residents of a city, town and village in each region and the capital, Tbilisi, were examined. Four age groups were investigated including: I- (20–34), II-(35–44), III-(45–64), IV- (65–74). Results: Unhealthy periodontal tissues were observed in 66.9% of men and in 57.5% of women. Bleeding on probing occurred in 44.9% of men and 37.2% of women, with periodontal pockets in 46.8% of men and 40.6% of women. Inflammation was seen in 61.2% of men and 54.8% of women. Healthy periodontal tissues were most common (59.2%) in the first age group (20–34); periodontal pockets (0–3mm) were least common (9.8%) at this age. Pockets of ≥4–5mm depth were observed mostly in the 3rd (9.4%) and 4th (10%) age groups. Conclusion: The high prevalence of periodontal diseases in the adult population of Georgia is explained by a low socio-economic status and low medical education background with a negative attitude towards oral hygiene skills and low levels of dental service accessibility. PMID:25905053

  13. Genome-Wide Association Study of Periodontal Health Measured by Probing Depth in Adults Ages 18−49 years

    PubMed Central

    Shaffer, John R.; Polk, Deborah E.; Wang, Xiaojing; Feingold, Eleanor; Weeks, Daniel E.; Lee, Myoung-Keun; Cuenco, Karen T.; Weyant, Robert J.; Crout, Richard J.; McNeil, Daniel W.; Marazita, Mary L.

    2013-01-01

    The etiology of chronic periodontitis clearly includes a heritable component. Our purpose was to perform a small exploratory genome-wide association study in adults ages 18–49 years to nominate genes associated with periodontal disease−related phenotypes for future consideration. Full-mouth periodontal pocket depth probing was performed on participants (N = 673), with affected status defined as two or more sextants with probing depths of 5.5 mm or greater. Two variations of this phenotype that differed in how missing teeth were treated were used in analysis. More than 1.2 million genetic markers across the genome were genotyped or imputed and tested for genetic association. We identified ten suggestive loci (p-value ≤ 1E-5), including genes/loci that have been previously implicated in chronic periodontitis: LAMA2, HAS2, CDH2, ESR1, and the genomic region on chromosome 14q21-22 between SOS2 and NIN. Moreover, we nominated novel loci not previously implicated in chronic periodontitis or related pathways, including the regions 3p22 near OSBPL10 (a lipid receptor implicated in hyperlipidemia), 4p15 near HSP90AB2P (a heat shock pseudogene), 11p15 near GVINP1 (a GTPase pseudogene), 14q31 near SEL1L (an intracellular transporter), and 18q12 in FHOD3 (an actin cytoskeleton regulator). Replication of these results in additional samples is needed. This is one of the first research efforts to identify genetic polymorphisms associated with chronic periodontitis-related phenotypes by the genome-wide association study approach. Though small, efforts such this are needed in order to nominate novel genes and generate new hypotheses for exploration and testing in future studies. PMID:24347629

  14. Association of Periodontal Diseases and Liver Fibrosis in Patients With HCV and/or HBV infection

    PubMed Central

    Nagao, Yumiko; Kawahigashi, Yuji; Sata, Michio

    2014-01-01

    Background: Periodontal disease and systemic health are closely associated. However, there is no data supporting the association between periodontal disease and patients with liver diseases associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and/or hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between periodontitis and progression of liver diseases in patients with HCV and/or HBV infection. Patients and Methods: In this retrospective study, 351 patients with HCV- and/or HBV-related liver diseases underwent screening for periodontal disease using the Salivaster® salivary occult blood test from February 2010 to June 2014. Furthermore, we examined the prevalence of fimbrillin (fimA) genotype of Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) in 28 HCV-infected patients visited at our hospital between January 2013 and June 2014. P. gingivalis with fimA genotype with types I to V was further detected using a PCR method. Results: Of 351 patients, 76 patients (group 1) had a strong positive result for salivary occult blood test and 275 patients (group 2) had weak positive or negative test results. Significant factors between the groups were obesity, level of AST, ALT, LDH, ALP, Alb, D.Bil, T.cho, AFP, platelets (Plt), IRI, HOMA-IR, current interferon (IFN) treatment and the daily frequency of tooth brushing. Between-groups analysis indicated that total protein (T.pro) level and liver fibrosis were significant factors. According to multivariate analysis, five factors were associated with periodontal disease as Plt count below 80000, brushing teeth only once a day, current IFN treatment, aged 65 years or older and obesity. The adjusted odds ratios for these five factors were 5.80, 3.46, 2.87, 2.50 and 2.33, respectively, and each was statistically significant. Twenty-eight saliva specimens had positive results for P. gingivalis with fimA genotype types I to V. The prevalence of fimA genotype II was higher in 14 patients with liver

  15. Association between Smoking and Periodontal Disease in Korean Adults: The Fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2010 and 2012)

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Ah-Young; Lee, Jung-Kwon; Lee, Hae-Young

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to evaluate an association between smoking, smoking cessation, and periodontal disease in Korean adults. Methods The data were collected from 8,336 participants, aged between 20 and 64 years, who participated in the fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination (2010 and 2012). Smoking status was assessed using self-administered questionnaires. Periodontal disease was defined as a community periodontal index ≥3 points. Logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate an association between smoking, smoking cessation, and periodontal disease after adjusting for age, sex, education, monthly income, diabetes, obesity, alcohol intake, and frequency of tooth brushing. Results The risk of periodontal disease was higher among current smokers (odds ratio [OR], 1.49; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.21-1.83) than never smokers. Among current smokers, the risk of periodontal disease was increased in smokers of ≥10 cigarettes/d, ≥20 years duration, and >10 pack-years compared with never smokers (P<0.05). Among former smokers, the risk of periodontal disease after 10 years since cessation declined to 0.56 (95% CI, 0.42-0.75) compared with current smokers and was indistinguishable statistically from never smokers. Conclusion Periodontal disease is significantly associated with smoking status in Korean adults. PMID:27073611

  16. Systemic inflammatory responses in patients with type 2 diabetes with chronic periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Mesia, Ruben; Gholami, Fatemeh; Huang, Hong; Clare-Salzler, Michael; Aukhil, Ikramuddin; Wallet, Shannon M; Shaddox, Luciana M

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this case–control study was to quantify the immune responsiveness in individuals with type 2 diabetes (T2D) as compared with patients without diabetes (NT2D) diagnosed with periodontitis. Research Design and Methods Peripheral blood was collected from 20 patients with moderate-to-severe chronic periodontitis (10 T2D, 10 NT2D). Blood samples were stimulated with ultrapure Porphyromonas gingivalis and Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) for 24 hours. 14 cytokines/chemokines were quantified in culture supernatants using multiplex technology. Results T2D individuals demonstrated higher unstimulated levels of interleukin 6 (IL-6), IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor α, interferon γ, IL-10, IL-8, macrophage inflammatory protein 1α (MIP1α), and 1β (MIP1β), and higher stimulated levels of IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, MIP1α and MIP1β, along with lower unstimulated and stimulated levels of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) when compared with NT2D (p<0.05). Importantly, the LPS-induced levels of IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and MIP1α strongly correlated with severity of disease, measured by pocket depths (PD), within the T2D group (r2≥0.7, p<0.05), but not within NT2D. Conclusions Among patients with chronic periodontitis, patients with T2D seem to have an enhanced LPS-induced immune responsiveness than individuals without diabetes, which correlates with periodontal disease severity, concomitant with a less robust GM-CSF response. This data may in part explain the higher predisposition to periodontitis in this population. PMID:27651910

  17. Systemic inflammatory responses in patients with type 2 diabetes with chronic periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Mesia, Ruben; Gholami, Fatemeh; Huang, Hong; Clare-Salzler, Michael; Aukhil, Ikramuddin; Wallet, Shannon M; Shaddox, Luciana M

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this case–control study was to quantify the immune responsiveness in individuals with type 2 diabetes (T2D) as compared with patients without diabetes (NT2D) diagnosed with periodontitis. Research Design and Methods Peripheral blood was collected from 20 patients with moderate-to-severe chronic periodontitis (10 T2D, 10 NT2D). Blood samples were stimulated with ultrapure Porphyromonas gingivalis and Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) for 24 hours. 14 cytokines/chemokines were quantified in culture supernatants using multiplex technology. Results T2D individuals demonstrated higher unstimulated levels of interleukin 6 (IL-6), IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor α, interferon γ, IL-10, IL-8, macrophage inflammatory protein 1α (MIP1α), and 1β (MIP1β), and higher stimulated levels of IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, MIP1α and MIP1β, along with lower unstimulated and stimulated levels of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) when compared with NT2D (p<0.05). Importantly, the LPS-induced levels of IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and MIP1α strongly correlated with severity of disease, measured by pocket depths (PD), within the T2D group (r2≥0.7, p<0.05), but not within NT2D. Conclusions Among patients with chronic periodontitis, patients with T2D seem to have an enhanced LPS-induced immune responsiveness than individuals without diabetes, which correlates with periodontal disease severity, concomitant with a less robust GM-CSF response. This data may in part explain the higher predisposition to periodontitis in this population.

  18. The relationship between acute myocardial infarction and periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Khosravi Samani, Mahmoud; Jalali, Farzad; Seyyed Ahadi, Seyyed Masud; Hoseini, Seyyed Reza; Dabbagh Sattari, Farhad

    2013-01-01

    Background: Periodontitis is common in adults and cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are the most common cause of adult death in the world. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between CVD and periodontitis. Methods: Sixty patients with myocardial infarction (MI) as case and 63 subjects with periodontitis without MI as control were studied. Periodontitis was assessed according to Ramfjord periodontal diseases index and the number of missing teeth besides classic risk factors of MI were recorded. Results: The patients who lost more than 10 teeth were at more risk of myocardial infarction (OR=2.73). There was a significant relationship between mean attachment loss and MI (p=0.0001). There was also a relation between attachment loss more than 3 mm and MI with OR of 4. Significant difference between mean PDI (periodontal disease index) was seen in case and control groups (p=0.0001). Subjects with PDI>4 were at more risk of periodontal diseases (OR=7.87). Conclusion: The results show the presence of significant relation between periodontitis and MI which could serve as an alarm to treat periodontitis carefully. PMID:24009957

  19. National Economic Burden Associated with Management of Periodontitis in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Ayob, Rasidah; Abd Muttalib, Khairiyah

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of this study is to estimate the economic burden associated with the management of periodontitis in Malaysia from the societal perspective. Methods. We estimated the economic burden of periodontitis by combining the disease prevalence with its treatment costs. We estimated treatment costs (with 2012 value of Malaysian Ringgit) using the cost-of-illness approach and included both direct and indirect costs. We used the National Oral Health Survey for Adults (2010) data to estimate the prevalence of periodontitis and 2010 national census data to estimate the adult population at risk for periodontitis. Results. The economic burden of managing all cases of periodontitis at the national level from the societal perspective was approximately MYR 32.5 billion, accounting for 3.83% of the 2012 Gross Domestic Product of the country. It would cost the nation MYR 18.3 billion to treat patients with moderate periodontitis and MYR 13.7 billion to treat patients with severe periodontitis. Conclusion. The economic burden of periodontitis in Malaysia is substantial and comparable with that of other chronic diseases in the country. This is attributable to its high prevalence and high cost of treatment. Judicious application of promotive, preventive, and curative approaches to periodontitis management is decidedly warranted. PMID:27092180

  20. National Economic Burden Associated with Management of Periodontitis in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Mohd Dom, Tuti Ningseh; Ayob, Rasidah; Abd Muttalib, Khairiyah; Aljunid, Syed Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of this study is to estimate the economic burden associated with the management of periodontitis in Malaysia from the societal perspective. Methods. We estimated the economic burden of periodontitis by combining the disease prevalence with its treatment costs. We estimated treatment costs (with 2012 value of Malaysian Ringgit) using the cost-of-illness approach and included both direct and indirect costs. We used the National Oral Health Survey for Adults (2010) data to estimate the prevalence of periodontitis and 2010 national census data to estimate the adult population at risk for periodontitis. Results. The economic burden of managing all cases of periodontitis at the national level from the societal perspective was approximately MYR 32.5 billion, accounting for 3.83% of the 2012 Gross Domestic Product of the country. It would cost the nation MYR 18.3 billion to treat patients with moderate periodontitis and MYR 13.7 billion to treat patients with severe periodontitis. Conclusion. The economic burden of periodontitis in Malaysia is substantial and comparable with that of other chronic diseases in the country. This is attributable to its high prevalence and high cost of treatment. Judicious application of promotive, preventive, and curative approaches to periodontitis management is decidedly warranted. PMID:27092180

  1. National Economic Burden Associated with Management of Periodontitis in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Mohd Dom, Tuti Ningseh; Ayob, Rasidah; Abd Muttalib, Khairiyah; Aljunid, Syed Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of this study is to estimate the economic burden associated with the management of periodontitis in Malaysia from the societal perspective. Methods. We estimated the economic burden of periodontitis by combining the disease prevalence with its treatment costs. We estimated treatment costs (with 2012 value of Malaysian Ringgit) using the cost-of-illness approach and included both direct and indirect costs. We used the National Oral Health Survey for Adults (2010) data to estimate the prevalence of periodontitis and 2010 national census data to estimate the adult population at risk for periodontitis. Results. The economic burden of managing all cases of periodontitis at the national level from the societal perspective was approximately MYR 32.5 billion, accounting for 3.83% of the 2012 Gross Domestic Product of the country. It would cost the nation MYR 18.3 billion to treat patients with moderate periodontitis and MYR 13.7 billion to treat patients with severe periodontitis. Conclusion. The economic burden of periodontitis in Malaysia is substantial and comparable with that of other chronic diseases in the country. This is attributable to its high prevalence and high cost of treatment. Judicious application of promotive, preventive, and curative approaches to periodontitis management is decidedly warranted.

  2. A Fast Method for DEFB1 - 44C/G SNP Genotyping in Brazilian Patients with Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Cavalcanti de Siqueira, Rafael Rafael Amorim; Crovella, Sergio; Eleutério de Souza, Paulo Roberto; Donos, Nikos

    2014-01-01

    Aim Defensins are cationic antimicrobial peptides expressed in epithelial cells. Such peptides exhibit antibacterial, antifungal and antiviral properties, and are a component of the innate immune response. It has been suggested that they have a protective role in the oral cavity. This study evaluated the DEFB1 polymorphism in diabetic patients with or without periodontitis in comparison to healthy controls. Material and Methods We used Hairpin-Shaped Primer (HP) assay to study the distribution of the -44 C/G SNP (rs1800972) in 119 human DNAs obtained from diabetic patients and healthy control patients. Results The results indicate that there are no differences in distribution between groups and that in diabetic periodontitis patients the homozygous mutant could be found more frequently. Conclusion Further studies are necessary in order to investigate the role of DEFB1 polymorphisms in diabetic periodontitis patients and the influence of the peptide in periodontal pathogens.

  3. A survey on the effects of metabolic syndrome on the periodontal indices of hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Tavakoli, Mohammad; Izadi, Mozhgan; Yaghini, Jaber; Rastegari, Abdolah; Abed, Ahmad Moghareh

    2016-01-01

    Background: The metabolic syndrome and periodontitis coincide with systemic inflammation and glucose tolerance disorder, which indicate the common pathophysiologic pathway of these diseases. The main goal of this study was to determine the effects of the metabolic syndrome on the periodontal indices of hemodialysis (HD) patient. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive-analytical study, 75 persons were selected by the simple method, 50 of them were HD patients, and 25 of them were healthy people. They were divided into three groups each of which included 25 persons. The periodontal conditions of the selected persons were determined by radiography, gingival index, probing pocket depth, and bleeding index. Then, the periodontal indices of the patients suffering from metabolic syndrome and the persons not affected by metabolic syndrome were compared. At the end, the data were analyzed by SPSS software (version 20) using Mann–Whitney and Kruskal–Wallis tests at the meaningful level of α = 0.05. Since the condition of the unilateral variance test could not be provided for this study, the Kruskal–Wallis test was used. To complete the test, the Mann–Whitney test was used in the binary form among the groups being studied. Results: The obtained results showed a meaningful difference among the groups under study (P < 0.001). The results of the test showed a meaningful difference among the obtained indices of the groups being studied in the binary form (P < 0.001) too. Conclusion: The results of the present study revealed when the severity of chronic systemic disease increased the health of the periodontal tissues would decrease.

  4. A survey on the effects of metabolic syndrome on the periodontal indices of hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Tavakoli, Mohammad; Izadi, Mozhgan; Yaghini, Jaber; Rastegari, Abdolah; Abed, Ahmad Moghareh

    2016-01-01

    Background: The metabolic syndrome and periodontitis coincide with systemic inflammation and glucose tolerance disorder, which indicate the common pathophysiologic pathway of these diseases. The main goal of this study was to determine the effects of the metabolic syndrome on the periodontal indices of hemodialysis (HD) patient. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive-analytical study, 75 persons were selected by the simple method, 50 of them were HD patients, and 25 of them were healthy people. They were divided into three groups each of which included 25 persons. The periodontal conditions of the selected persons were determined by radiography, gingival index, probing pocket depth, and bleeding index. Then, the periodontal indices of the patients suffering from metabolic syndrome and the persons not affected by metabolic syndrome were compared. At the end, the data were analyzed by SPSS software (version 20) using Mann–Whitney and Kruskal–Wallis tests at the meaningful level of α = 0.05. Since the condition of the unilateral variance test could not be provided for this study, the Kruskal–Wallis test was used. To complete the test, the Mann–Whitney test was used in the binary form among the groups being studied. Results: The obtained results showed a meaningful difference among the groups under study (P < 0.001). The results of the test showed a meaningful difference among the obtained indices of the groups being studied in the binary form (P < 0.001) too. Conclusion: The results of the present study revealed when the severity of chronic systemic disease increased the health of the periodontal tissues would decrease. PMID:27605991

  5. Management of traumatic dental injury after periodontal surgery in patient with hereditary gingival fibromatosis: case report.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Koji; Kamei, Hidehiko; Mitani, Akio; Noguchi, Toshihide

    2014-06-01

    Traumatic Dental Injury (TDI) is often caused by a bruise from a sports-related incident or fall. In individuals with maxillary protrusion, the risk for TDI may be higher. We treated a patient with Hereditary Gingival Fibromatosis (HGF), a rare genetic disorder characterized by proliferative fibrous overgrowth of gingival tissue, who subsequently received a TDI after periodontal surgery. A 13-year-old Japanese boy was referred to the Division of Periodontics at Aichi Gakuin University Dental Hospital in March 2005 with the chief complaint of generalized severe gingival overgrowth involving the maxillary and mandibular arches covering nearly all teeth. Prior to orthodontic treatment, periodontal surgery was performed under general anesthesia in consideration of mastication, dental esthetics, and development. However, soon thereafter in August 2007, the protruded maxillary anterior teeth received an injury while he was playing basketball and the maxillary central incisors showed extrusive luxation. Two weeks after being reset, the maxillary anterior teeth were splinted with wire and adhesive resin cement, and then the splint was removed following evaluations of clinical and radiographic showing signs of normal periodontium. The marginal bone height corresponded to that seen in radiographic findings after the reset and orthodontic treatment was started 1 year later. At the 6-year follow-up examination, the teeth remained asymptomatic, pulpal response to sensitivity tests was normal, and healing was shown in radiographic images. In the present HGF case, we speculated that removal of thick gingiva around the teeth, which might have functioned as a mouth guard, increased the risk for TDI while playing sports. TDI is more likely to occur in patients with exposed protruded misaligned teeth after periodontal surgery. Therefore, it is important for HGF patients with such protruded maxillary anterior teeth to use a mouth guard when participating in sports following

  6. Comparison of Gingival Crevicular Fluid Sampling Methods in Patients with Severe Chronic Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Guentsch, Arndt; Kramesberger, Martin; Sroka, Aneta; Pfister, Wolfgang; Potempa, Jan; Eick, Sigrun

    2011-01-01

    Background Analysis of samplings from periodontal pockets is important in diagnosis and therapy control of periodontitis. In this study, three different sampling techniques were compared to determine if one method can yield samples suitable for reproducible and simultaneous determination of bacterial load, cytokines, neutrophil elastase, and Arg-specific gingipains. R-gingipains are an important virulence factor of Porphyromonas gingivalis, the exact concentration of which in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) has not yet been quantified. Methods GCF was sampled from four sites per patient (each two sites one method) in 36 chronic periodontitis patients. One week later, the procedure was repeated with alternative methods. The variables that had been determined were: loads of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis, levels of interleukin-6 and interleukin-8, activity of neutrophil elastase and level of R-gingipains. Results The detected cytokine levels were higher using paper strips compared to paper points. Bacteria were found in similar loads from the paper strips and paper points. R-gingipains were detectable in high quantities only by washing of the periodontal pocket. The level of R-gingipains correlated with the load of P. gingivalis. Conclusion The use of paper strips is suitable for simultaneous determination of microbial and immunological parameters. Obtaining GCF by washing can be useful for special purposes. Gingipain concentration in periodontal pockets was directly determined to be up to 1.5 μM. This value indicates that most of so far identified substrates of these proteases by in vitro assays can be easily degraded in P. gingivalis infected sites. PMID:21235330

  7. Use of quantitative PCR to evaluate methods of bacteria sampling in periodontal patients.

    PubMed

    Masunaga, Hiroshi; Tsutae, Wataru; Oh, Hyun; Shinozuka, Naoki; Kishimoto, Noriyoshi; Ogata, Yorimasa

    2010-12-01

    Periodontal disease is associated with specific periodontal pathogens and may persist as gingivitis or progress to more severe disease. The bacteria involved in disease initiation and progression have not been identified. We used quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to compare the levels of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola, and total bacteria detected by different sampling methods. On the basis of the results of clinical examinations, 57 patients were divided into 3 groups: healthy group (group A), gingivitis group (group B), and periodontitis group (group C). Bacterial samples were collected from saliva, mouthwash, and by paper-point sampling of gingival crevicular fluid (GCF), and the samples were analyzed with quantitative PCR targeting 16S rRNA. The numbers of total bacteria in samples of GCF, saliva, and mouthwash were 10⁵ to 10⁶, 10⁸, and 10⁷, respectively, per milliliter. The number of P. gingivalis in GCF samples was lower than 10 in group A; however, in groups B and C, the values were 10³ and 10⁴, respectively, indicating that the number of P. gingivalis increased with worsening clinical status. Findings were similar in the samples of saliva and mouthwash. The numbers of T. forsythia showed a pattern similar to that of P. gingivalis in all 3 samples. These results suggest that saliva and mouthwash samples are clinically useful for bacterial testing of periodontal diseases by quantitative PCR. In addition, mouthwash sampling is more feasible and straightforward than saliva sampling.

  8. Periodontal Health and Caries Prevalence Evaluation in Patients Affected by Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cicciù, Marco; Risitano, Giacomo; Lo Giudice, Giuseppe; Bramanti, Ennio

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder related to the loss or absence of dopaminergic neurons in the brain. These deficits result in slowness of movement, tremor, rigidity, and dysfunction of behaviour. These symptoms negatively influence the patient's capability to carry out the daily oral hygiene manoeuvres. The aim of this work is to record the oral health condition of PD patients evaluated at the IRCSS Bonino-Puleio in Messina. The oral health of 45 consecutive PD patients (study group) with neurologic diagnosis based on United Kingdom Brain Bank Criteria has been compared with that of another 45 no PD patients of the same age (control group). The evaluation of the general oral condition was recorded underlining tooth loss, active periodontal disease, and presence of untreated caries. The frequency of untreated caries, periodontal diseases, and missing teeth of the study group was significantly higher than in control group. Based on the data results, clinicians should direct high attention to the oral hygiene of patients with PD, above all at the early stages of the caries or periodontal disease, in order to prevent serious evolution of those pathologic dental conditions that may finally result in the tooth extraction event. PMID:23320249

  9. Longitudinal effects of clinical therapy and the edentulous state on the transformation of lymphocytes from patients with severe periodontitis.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, J J; Wright, W E; Chan, S P; Oppenheim, J J

    1978-01-01

    Twenty dentulous subjects undergoing clinical therapy for severe periodontitis were used to determine the longitudinal effects of bacterial plaque reduction in vitro lymphocyte transformation. The therapy consisted of either complete extractions or partial extractions and periodontal surgery combined with rigorous oral hygiene. Prior to therapy lymphocytes from these subjects responded significantly to Streptolysin O (SLO) but were not transformed significantly by solubilized dental plaque. However, after therapy lymphocytes from these same subjects responded significantly to both solubilized dental plaque and SLO. This indicates that the severe periodontitis patients were specifically unresponsive to solubilized dental plaque prior to therapy. The mechanism of the unresponsiveness is not clear, but probably does not involve serum factors because supplementation of the lymphocyte cultures with pooled homologous plasma from individuals with gingivitis or moderate periodontitis (instead of the patient's autologous plasma) did not significantly change the mean lymphocyte responses to solubilized dental plaque. In addition, lymphocytes from eleven long-term (5--18 yr) edentulous subjects, who were free of oral inflammation, were significantly transformed by solubilized dental plaque. The latter lymphocyte responses and those of the treated periodontitis patients could be due either to the presence of low levels of oral bacteria in the edentulous mouth or to the lymphocyte transformation assay being a measure of previous antigen sensitization rather than current disease status. In either case, lymphocyte transformation to solubilized dental plaque is not a useful diagnostic tool in periodontitis, but should continue to be a valuable research tool for investigating pathological mechanisms in periodontitis. PMID:737903

  10. Comparative evaluation of levels of C-reactive protein and PMN in periodontitis patients related to cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Anitha, G.; Nagaraj, M.; Jayashree, A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Numerous cross-sectional studies have suggested that chronic periodontitis is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. There is evidence that periodontitis and cardiovascular diseases are linked by inflammatory factors including C-reactive protein. The purpose of the study was to investigate the levels of CRP and PNM cells as a marker of inflammatory host response in the serum of chronic periodontitis patients and in patients with CVD. Materials and Methods: Study population included 75 patients; both male and female above 35 years were included for the study. The patients were divided into three groups of 25 each – Group I: Chronic periodontitis patients with CVD, Group II: Chronic periodontitis patients without CVD and Group III: Control subjects (without chronic periodontitis and CVD). Patients with chronic periodontitis had ≥8 teeth involved with probing depth (PD) ≥5 mm involved. The control group had PD ≤ 3 mm and no CVD. Venous blood was collected from the patients and C-reactive protein levels were analyzed by immunoturbidimetry. PMN was recorded by differential count method. Results: On comparison, OHI-S Index, GI, mean PD, CRP and PMN values showed significant difference from Group I to III. CRP level was highly significant in Group I when compared with Group II and Group III. PMN level was highly significant in Group I when compared with Group III PMN level which was not significant. Conclusion: This study indicated that periodontitis may add the inflammation burden of the individual and may result in increased levels of CVD based on serum CRP levels. Thus, controlled prospective trials with large sample size should be carried out to know the true nature of the relationship if indeed one exists. PMID:24049333

  11. Validity of Partial Protocols to Assess the Prevalence of Periodontal Outcomes and Associated Sociodemographic and Behavior Factors in Adolescents and Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Peres, Marco A.; Peres, Karen G.; Cascaes, Andreia M.; Correa, Marcos B.; Demarco, Flávio F.; Hallal, Pedro C.; Horta, Bernardo L.; Gigante, Denise P.; Menezes, Ana B.

    2012-01-01

    Background Most studies comparing prevalence of periodontal disease and risk factors by using partial protocols were performed in adult populations, with several studies being conducted in clinical settings. The aim of this study is to assess the accuracy of partial protocols in estimating the prevalence of periodontal outcomes in adolescents and young adults from two population-based birth cohorts from Pelotas, Brazil, and to assess differences in the estimation and strength of the effect measures when partial protocols are adopted compared to full-mouth examination. Methods Gingival bleeding at probing among adolescents (n = 339) and young adults (n = 720) and dental calculus and periodontal probing depth among young adults were assessed using full-mouth examinations and four partial protocols: Ramfjord teeth (RT), community periodontal index (CPI), and two random diagonal quadrants (1 and 3, 2 and 4). Socioeconomic, demographic, and periodontal health-related variables were also collected. Sensitivity, absolute and relative bias, and inflation factors were calculated. Prevalence ratio for each periodontal outcome for the risk factors was estimated. Results Two diagonal quadrants showed better accuracy; RT had the worst, whereas CPI presented an intermediate pattern when compared to full-mouth examination. For bleeding assessment in adolescence, RT and CPI underestimated by 18.4% and 16.2%, respectively, the true outcome prevalence, whereas among young adults, all partial protocols underestimated the prevalence. All partial protocols presented similar magnitude of association measures for all investigated periodontal potential risk factors. Conclusion Two diagonal quadrants protocol may be effective in identifying the risk factors for the most relevant periodontal outcomes in adolescence and in young adulthood. PMID:21859320

  12. Gender Differences in Periodontal Status and Oral Hygiene of Non-Diabetic and Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Schulze, Antina; Busse, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study investigated gender dependent differences by the comparison of periodontal status and oral hygiene between diabetic patients and non-diabetic subjects. Methods: 517 mostly obese subjects (171 non-diabetic, 205 type 2 diabetic with oral and 141 with insulin therapy; mean: 59 years) completed an oral hygiene questionnaire and had a clinical examination, including periodontal screening and recording (PSR), percentage of bleeding teeth (PBT), probing pocket depth (PD), gingivitis index (GI), and number of teeth (Tn). Main parameters were “periodontitis” and “oral hygiene behaviour”, each defined by 5 sub-parameters. For a comparison of all results, each sub-parameter was set 0.2. The “low performance index“ (LoP) was the sum of significantly worse sub-parameters in the compared groups (maximum of low performing = 1.0). Results: Gender comparison: In non-diabetic and diabetic patients with oral medication, males performed worse (LoP: periodontitis 0.6 - 0.8; oral hygiene 0.4 - 0.6). The male insulin group performed worse oral hygiene (LoP: 0.4) than females with insulin therapy, whereas the periodontal status showed no difference. Diabetic and non-diabetic groups: Females: Diabetic groups performed worse than non-diabetics (LoP: periodontitis 0.2 - 1.0; oral hygiene 0.4). Insulin patients had worse periodontal status and showed no difference in oral hygiene when compared to diabetic patients with oral medication (LoP: 0.2). Males: Diabetic group with oral medication had worse periodontal status than non-diabetics (LoP: 0.6). Conclusions: The periodontal status was mainly due to oral hygiene behaviour, which was worse in men. Apparently behaviour and not diabetes is the major determinant of periodontitis. Men apparently need much more advise than women. PMID:27347232

  13. Degenerative alterations of the cementum-periodontal ligament complex and early tooth loss in a young patient with periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Petruţiu, S A; Buiga, Petronela; Roman, Alexandra; Danciu, Theodora; Mihu, Carmen Mihaela; Mihu, D

    2012-01-01

    Premature exfoliation of primary or permanent teeth in children or adolescents is extremely rare and it can be a manifestation of an underlying systemic disease. This study aims to present the histological aspects associated with early tooth loss in a case of periodontal disease developed without local inflammation and with minimal periodontal pockets and attachment loss. The maxillary left second premolar was extracted together with a gingival collar attached to the root surface. The histological analysis recorded the resorption of the cementum in multiple areas of the entire root surface with the connective tissue of the desmodontium invading the lacunae defects. The connective tissue rich in cells occupied the periodontal ligamentar space and the resorptive areas. No inflammation was obvious in the periodontal ligament connective tissue. This report may warn clinicians about the possibility of the association of cemental abnormalities with early tooth loss.

  14. Comparison of full-mouth disinfection and quadrant-wise scaling in the treatment of adult chronic periodontitis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Fang, H; Han, M; Li, Q-L; Cao, C Y; Xia, R; Zhang, Z-H

    2016-08-01

    Scaling and root planing are widely considered as effective methods for treating chronic periodontitis. A meta-analysis published in 2008 showed no statistically significant differences between full-mouth disinfection (FMD) or full-mouth scaling and root planing (FMS) and quadrant scaling and root planing (Q-SRP). The FMD approach only resulted in modest additional improvements in several indices. Whether differences exist between these two approaches requires further validation. Accordingly, a study was conducted to further validate whether FMD with antiseptics or FMS without the use of antiseptics within 24 h provides greater clinical improvement than Q-SRP in patients with chronic periodontitis. Medline (via OVID), EMBASE (via OVID), PubMed and CENTRAL databases were searched up to 27 January 2015. Randomized controlled trials comparing FMD or FMS with Q-SRP after at least 3 mo were included. Meta-analysis was performed to obtain the weighted mean difference (WMD), together with the corresponding 95% confidence intervals. Thirteen articles were included in the meta-analysis. The WMD of probing pocket depth reduction was 0.25 mm (p < 0.05) for FMD vs. Q-SRP in single-rooted teeth with moderate pockets, and clinical attachment level gain in single- and multirooted teeth with moderate pockets was 0.33 mm (p < 0.05) for FMD vs. Q-SRP. Except for those, no statistically significant differences were found in the other subanalyses of FMD vs. Q-SRP, FMS vs. Q-SRP and FMD vs. FMS. Therefore, the meta-analysis results showed that FMD was better than Q-SRP for achieving probing pocket depth reduction and clinical attachment level gain in moderate pockets. Additionally, regardless of the treatment, no serious complications were observed. FMD, FMS and Q-SRP are all effective for the treatment of adult chronic periodontitis, and they do not lead to any obvious discomfort among patients. Moreover, FMD had modest additional clinical benefits over Q-SRP, so we prefer to

  15. [THE MOLECULAR TECHNIQUES OF DIAGNOSTIC OF GINGIVITIS AND PERIODONTITIS IN HIV-INFECTED PATIENTS].

    PubMed

    Tsarev, V N; Nikolaeva, E N; Iagodina, E V; Trefilova, Yu A; Ippolitov, E V

    2016-01-01

    The examination was carried out in the Moscow clinical infectious hospital No 2 concerning 102 patients with verified diagnosis "AIDS-infection" and seropositive according results of detection of anti-HIV-antibodies in blood serum. The study was organized to analyze rate ofcolonization of gums with virulent anaerobic bacteria in HIV-infected (polymerase chain reaction) and antibodies to HIV in gingival fluid (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay). It is established that in HIV-infected patients, in scrape from gingival sulcus dominate anaerobic bacteria P. gigngivalis and A. ctinomycetemcomitans and in case of periodontitis--P. gingivalis and T. forsythia. The received data permits recommending the test-system "Multident-5" for polymerase chain reaction diagnostic. The reagents kit "Calypte®HIV-1/2"--for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay gingival fluid. The results of polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay have no impact of concomitant stomatological (periodontitis, gingivitis) and somatic pathology.

  16. [THE MOLECULAR TECHNIQUES OF DIAGNOSTIC OF GINGIVITIS AND PERIODONTITIS IN HIV-INFECTED PATIENTS].

    PubMed

    Tsarev, V N; Nikolaeva, E N; Iagodina, E V; Trefilova, Yu A; Ippolitov, E V

    2016-01-01

    The examination was carried out in the Moscow clinical infectious hospital No 2 concerning 102 patients with verified diagnosis "AIDS-infection" and seropositive according results of detection of anti-HIV-antibodies in blood serum. The study was organized to analyze rate ofcolonization of gums with virulent anaerobic bacteria in HIV-infected (polymerase chain reaction) and antibodies to HIV in gingival fluid (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay). It is established that in HIV-infected patients, in scrape from gingival sulcus dominate anaerobic bacteria P. gigngivalis and A. ctinomycetemcomitans and in case of periodontitis--P. gingivalis and T. forsythia. The received data permits recommending the test-system "Multident-5" for polymerase chain reaction diagnostic. The reagents kit "Calypte®HIV-1/2"--for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay gingival fluid. The results of polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay have no impact of concomitant stomatological (periodontitis, gingivitis) and somatic pathology. PMID:27183732

  17. Effect of Non-Surgical Periodontal Therapy on the Concentration of Volatile Sulfur Compound in Mouth Air of a Group of Nigerian Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Ehizele, AO; Akhionbare, O

    2013-01-01

    Background: The major goal of non-surgical periodontal therapy is to reduce or eliminate the subgingival pathogenic microbial flora that is known to be associated with volatile sulfur compounds (VSC). Aim: The aim of this study was, therefore, to determine the effect of non-surgical periodontal therapy on the concentration of VSC in mouth air of young adults. Subjects and Methods: Four hundred subjects, grouped into two based on the absence or presence of periodontal diseases, were involved in this study. Basic periodontal examination was used for the grouping. The measurement of the concentration of the VSC in the mouth air of the subjects was done objectively, using the Halimeter, before and after the therapy, and at recall visits 2 weeks and 6 weeks after therapy. Chi-square and Paired t-test were used to find statistical significance. Results: The results revealed that at baseline, 78.7% (48/61) of the subjects who had VSC concentration more than 250 parts per billion (ppb) were from the group with periodontal disease. Immediately after non-surgical periodontal therapy, only 8.5% (17/200) of the subjects with periodontal disease had VSC concentration of more than 250 ppb while all the subjects with no periodontal disease had VSC concentration less than 181 ppb. The same pattern of reduction in the concentration of the VSC and improvement in oral hygiene was also obtained 2 weeks and 6 weeks after therapy. Conclusion: It can be concluded that non-surgical periodontal therapy brought about reduction in the concentration of volatile sulfur compounds in mouth air of young adults. PMID:24116328

  18. Periodontal disease and inflammatory blood cytokines in patients with stable coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    KAMPITS, Cassio; MONTENEGRO, Marlon M.; RIBEIRO, Ingrid W. J.; FURTADO, Mariana V.; POLANCZYK, Carisi A.; RÖSING, Cassiano K.; HAAS, Alex. N

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Periodontal disease has been associated with elevations of blood cytokines involved in atherosclerosis in systemically healthy individuals, but little is known about this association in stable cardiovascular patients. The aim of this study was to assess the association between periodontal disease (exposure) and blood cytokine levels (outcomes) in a target population of patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD). Material and Methods This cross-sectional study included 91 patients with stable CAD who had been under optimized cardiovascular care. Blood levels of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IFN-γ, and TNF-α were measured by Luminex technology. A full-mouth periodontal examination was conducted to record probing depth (PD) and clinical attachment (CA) loss. Multiple linear regression models, adjusting for gender, body mass index, oral hypoglycemic drugs, smoking, and occurre:nce of acute myocardial infarction were applied. Results CAD patients that experienced major events had higher concentrations of IFN-γ (median: 5.05 pg/mL vs. 3.01 pg/mL; p=0.01), IL-10 (median: 2.33 pg/mL vs. 1.01 pg/mL; p=0.03), and TNF-α (median: 9.17 pg/mL vs. 7.47 pg/mL; p=0.02). Higher numbers of teeth with at least 6 mm of CA loss (R2=0.07) and PD (R2=0.06) were significantly associated with higher IFN-γ log concentrations. Mean CA loss (R2=0.05) and PD (R2=0.06) were significantly related to IL-10 concentrations. Elevated concentrations of TNF-α were associated with higher mean CA loss (R2=0.07). Conclusion Periodontal disease is associated with increased systemic inflammation in stable cardiovascular patients. These findings provide additional evidence supporting the idea that periodontal disease can be a prognostic factor in cardiovascular patients. PMID:27556206

  19. Salivary Myeloperoxidase, Assessed by 3,3′-Diaminobenzidine Colorimetry, Can Differentiate Periodontal Patients from Nonperiodontal Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Klangprapan, Supaporn; Chaiyarit, Ponlatham; Hormdee, Doosadee; Kampichai, Amonrujee; Khampitak, Tueanjit; Daduang, Jureerut; Tavichakorntrakool, Ratree; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Boonsiri, Patcharee

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal diseases, which result from inflammation of tooth supporting tissues, are highly prevalent worldwide. Myeloperoxidase (MPO), from certain white blood cells in saliva, is a biomarker for inflammation. We report our study on the salivary MPO activity and its association with severity of periodontal diseases among Thai patients. Periodontally healthy subjects (n = 11) and gingivitis (n = 32) and periodontitis patients (n = 19) were enrolled. Assessments of clinically periodontal parameters were reported as percentages for gingival bleeding index (GI) and bleeding on probing (BOP), whereas pocket depth (PD) and clinical attachment loss (CAL) were measured in millimeters and then made to index scores. Salivary MPO activity was measured by colorimetry using 3,3′-diaminobenzidine as substrate. The results showed that salivary MPO activity in periodontitis patients was significantly higher than in healthy subjects (p = 0.003) and higher than in gingivitis patients (p = 0.059). No difference was found between gingivitis and healthy groups (p = 0.181). Significant correlations were observed (p < 0.01) between salivary MPO activity and GI (r = 0.632, p < 0.001), BOP (r = 0.599, p < 0.001), PD (r = 0.179, p = 0.164), and CAL (r = 0.357, p = 0.004) index scores. Sensitivity (94.12%), specificity (54.55%), and positive (90.57%) and negative (66.67%) predictive values indicate that salivary MPO activity has potential use as a screening marker for oral health of the Thai community. PMID:27274868

  20. Teaching the adult ostomy patient.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, H S

    2001-01-01

    Ostomy education is based on principles of adult learning, including assessment of the learners' readiness, ability, and need to learn. Such teaching incorporates specific strategies designed to promote cognitive, affective, and psychomotor learning and strategies to overcome potential cultural barriers. In addition, modifications may be included to meet the needs of aged or disabled patients who have cognitive deficits or low literacy skills. Finally, ostomy education must include an evaluation of its effectiveness. This article reviews general guidelines for planning, implementing, and evaluating patient education for adult patients with ostomies.

  1. Identification of the anatomical elements used in periodontal diagnosis on 40 MHz periodontal ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Chifor, Radu; Badea, Mîndra Eugenia; Hedeşiu, Mihaela; Chifor, Ioana

    2015-01-01

    Gingival inflammation is highly prevalent among adult populations in all regions of the world. High rates of chronic periodontitis have been reported worldwide. The methods for assessing the gingival inflammation and periodontal disease would need more precision and less user-dependence. The aim of this study consists in identifying the information for diagnosis and staging of periodontal disease using 40 MHz periodontal ultrasonography. Our in vivo study has been made on 49 teeth of 10 patients with marginal periodontal disease. Standard clinical and radiological periodontal examinations were performed. Afterwards the results were compared with the information obtained from images recorded with Ultrasonix SonoTouch used at 40 MHz. On the ultrasound images, were performed very accurate measurements between the cortical bone and the cement-enamel junction or the root wall compared with the measurements made on intraoral digital radiographs. Those measurements could be used to diagnose the bone resorption. In order to monitor the gingival inflammation could be recorded the width of the attached gingival mucosa and the height of the gingival margin on ultrasound images. 40 MHz periodontal ultrasonography is a reliable imagistic method for identifying the necessary anatomical elements in order to make an accurate periodontal diagnosis for the examined area.

  2. Periodontal Infection and Cardiorespiratory Fitness in Younger Adults: Results from Continuous National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999–2004

    PubMed Central

    Papapanou, Panos N.; Jacobs, David R.; Desvarieux, Moïse

    2014-01-01

    Objective Previous studies report associations between periodontal infection and cardiorespiratory fitness but no study has examined the association among younger adults. Our objective was to study the association between clinical measures of periodontal infection and cardiorespiratory fitness levels among a population-based sample of younger adults. Methods The Continuous National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999–2004 enrolled 2,863 participants (46% women) who received a partial-mouth periodontal examination and completed a submaximal treadmill test for the assessment of estimated VO2 max(eVO2 max ). Participants were mean±SD age 33±9 years (range = 20–49 years), 30% Hispanic, 48% White, 19% Black, and 3% other. Mean eVO2 max (mL/kg/minute) as well as eVO2 max≤32 mL/kg/minute (20th percentile) were regressed across quartiles of mean probing depth and mean attachment loss in multivariable linear and logistic regression models. Results After multivariable adjustment, mean eVO2 max levels±SE across quartiles of attachment loss were 39.72±0.37, 39.64±0.34, 39.59±0.36, and 39.85±0.39 (P = 0.99). Mean eVO2 max±SE across quartiles of probing depth were 39.57±0.32, 39.78±0.38, 39.19±0.25, and 40.37±0.53 (P = 0.28). Similarly, multivariable adjusted mean eVO2 max values were similar between healthy participants vs. those with moderate/severe periodontitis: 39.70±0.21 vs. 39.70±0.90 (P = 1.00). The odds ratio (OR) for low eVO2 max comparing highest vs. lowest quartile of attachment loss = 0.89[95% CI 0.64–1.24]. The OR for comparing highest vs. lowest probing depth quartile = 0.77[95% CI 0.51–1.15]. Conclusion Clinical measures of periodontal infection were not related to cardiorespiratory fitness in a sample of generally healthy younger adults. PMID:24663097

  3. Presence and antimicrobial profile of gram-negative facultative anaerobe rods in patients with chronic periodontitis and gingivitis.

    PubMed

    Gamboa, Fredy; García, Dabeiba-Adriana; Acosta, Adriana; Mizrahi, Deborah; Paz, Andreína; Martínez, Diana; Arévalo, Azucena; Aristizabal, Fabio; Abba, Martín

    2013-01-01

    Chronic periodontitis is a multifactorial infectious disease associated with Gram-negative anaerobes which are part of the subgingival microflora. In recent years, studies have been conducted to assess the presence of Gram-negative facultative anaerobes (Enterobacteriaceae) and their participation in the development and progression of chronic periodontitis. The aim of this study was to determine the presence of Enterobacteriaceae in patients with chronic periodontitis and gingivitis and to assess antimicrobial susceptibility of clinical isolates. A descriptive, observational study was performed including 64 patients with chronic periodontitis and 22 patients with gingivitis. Microbiological samples were taken from the gingival sulcus using paper points, which then were placed in thioglycollate broth. Samples were incubated for 4 hours at 37 degrees C and finally replated on MacConkey agar Bacteria were identified using the API-20E system (Biomerieux, France) and antimicrobial susceptibility was determined using the disk diffusion method. The evaluation of samples showed presence of 29 enterobacterial species distributed as follows: 7 in the group with gingivitis and 22 in the group with chronic periodontitis. In the chronic periodontitis group the most common species were: K. oxytoca n = 5, S. liquefaciens n = 4 and K. pneumoniae and E. coli with n = 3. The gingivitis group had the highest frequency of Erwinia sp. (n = 2). Clinical isolates showed very low sensitivity levels to beta-lactam ampicillin and amoxicillin/ clavulanic acid, 17.2% and 27.6% respectively, and higher sensitivity levels to ciprofloxacin (96.6%), amikacin (79.3%), gentamicin (68.9%) and ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, kanamycin and trimethoprimsulfa (65.5%). In conclusion, the existence of a high frequency of enterobacteria in patients with chronic periodontitis and gingivitis shows that periodontologists should pay greater attention to prevention protocols, and develop mechanical and antimicrobial

  4. Comparative evaluation of micronutrient status in the serum of diabetes mellitus patients and healthy individuals with periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Biju; Kumari, Suchetha; Ramitha, K.; Ashwini Kumari, M. B.

    2010-01-01

    samples were measured using spectrophotometric quantitation (dinitrophenyl hydrazine method) and zinc and copper levels were measured using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Results: The results showed that the levels of vitamin C and zinc decreased and copper levels increased in diabetic patients with periodontits compared to healthy individuals with periodontitis. Conclusion: It may be reasonable to suggest vitamin and/or mineral supplements for patients whose nutrition might be inadequate. Future research should focus on an evaluation of which nutrients may help to prevent the onset and progression of periodontal disease PMID:20922079

  5. Effects of Smoking and Genotype on the PSR Index of Periodontal Disease in Adults Aged 18–49

    PubMed Central

    Polk, Deborah E.; Wang, Xiaojing; Feingold, Eleanor; Shaffer, John R.; Weeks, Daniel E.; Weyant, Robert J.; Crout, Richard J.; McNeil, Daniel W.; Marazita, Mary L.

    2012-01-01

    Studies have found both genetic and environmental influences on chronic periodontitis. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships among previously identified genetic variants, smoking status, and two periodontal disease-related phenotypes (PSR1 and PSR2) in 625 Caucasian adults (aged 18–49 years). The PSR Index was used to classify participants as affected or unaffected under the PSR1 and PSR2 phenotype definitions. Using logistic regression, we found that the form of the relationship varied by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP): For rs10457525 and rs12630931, the effects of smoking and genotype on risk were additive; whereas for rs10457526 and rs733048, smoking was not independently associated with affected status once genotype was taken into consideration. In contrast, smoking moderated the relationships of rs3870371 and rs733048 with affected status such that former and never smokers with select genotypes were at increased genetic risk. Thus, for several groups, knowledge of genotype may refine the risk prediction over that which can be determined by knowledge of smoking status alone. Future studies should replicate these findings. These findings provide the foundation for the exploration of novel pathways by which periodontitis may occur. PMID:23066400

  6. Association between Dental Prosthesis and Periodontal Disease among Patients Visiting a Tertiary Dental Care Centre in Eastern Nepal.

    PubMed

    Mansuri, M; Shrestha, A

    2015-01-01

    Background Dental caries and Periodontal diseases are the most prevalent oral health problems present globally. The distribution and severity of such oral health problems varies in different parts of the world and even in different regions of the same country. Nepal is one of the country with higher prevalence rate of these problems. These problems arise in association with multiple factors. Objective This study was carried out to describe the periodontal status and to analyse the association of periodontal disease with the wearing of fixed or removable partial dentures in a Nepalese population reporting to the College of Dental Surgery, B P Koirala Institute of Health Sciences, Dharan, Nepal. Method This study comprised of a sample of 200 adult individuals. All data were collected by performing clinical examinations in accordance with the World Health Organization Oral Health Surveys Basic Methods Criteria. It included the Community Periodontal Index and dental prosthesis examination. Result A descriptive analysis was performed and odds ratio (1.048) and 95% confidence interval (1.001; 1.096) was found out. The mean age of the population participated in the study was 41.82 ± 14.80 years. A total of 93 (46.5%) males and 107 (53.5%) females participated in the study. Among these subjects, 100% presented some periodontal problems. The statistical analysis indicated that the probability of periodontal disease with regards to wearing partial dentures was not significant as suggested by the odds ratio (1.048). Conclusion There is no association of the wearing of dental prosthesis (RPD and/or FPD) with the periodontal disease and suggests a need for populations based oral health education programs, plaque control programs to reduce the incidence of periodontal disease. PMID:27180363

  7. The Prevalence and Associated Factors of Periodontitis According to Fasting Plasma Glucose in the Korean Adults: The 2012-2013 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jae Won; Noh, Jung Hyun; Kim, Dong-Jun

    2016-04-01

    Although the relationship between diabetes and periodontitis is well established, the association between periodontitis and prediabetes has been investigated less extensively. Furthermore, there has been little research on the prevalence of periodontitis among individuals with prediabetes and diabetes as well as in the overall population using nationally representative data.Among 12,406 adults (≥19 years' old) who participated in the 2012-2013 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, a total of 9977 subjects completed oral and laboratory examinations and were included in this analysis. Periodontitis was defined as a community periodontal index score of ≥ 3 according to the World Health Organization criteria. The fasting plasma glucose level was categorized into the following 5 groups: normal fasting glucose (NFG) 1 (<90  mg/dL), NFG 2 (90-99  mg/dL), impaired fasting glucose (IFG) 1 (100-110  mg/dL), IFG 2 (111-125  mg/dL), and diabetes (≥126  mg/dL).Overall, the weighted prevalence of periodontitis among the Korean adult population was 24.8% (23.3-26.4%) (weight n = 8,455,952/34,086,014). The unadjusted weighted prevalences of periodontitis were 16.7%, 22.8%, 29.6%, 40.7%, and 46.7% in the NFG 1, NFG 2, IFG 1, IFG 2, and diabetes groups, respectively (P < 0.001). After adjusting for age, sex, smoking history, heavy alcohol drinking, college graduation, household income, waist circumference, serum triglyceride level, serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level, and the presence of hypertension, the adjusted weighted prevalence of periodontitis increased to 29.7% in the IFG 2 group (P = 0.045) and 32.5% in the diabetes group (P < 0.001), compared with the NFG 1 group (24%). The odds ratios for periodontitis with the above-mentioned variables as covariates were 1.42 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.14-1.77, P = 0.002) in the diabetes group and 1.33 (95% CI 1.01-1.75, P = 0.044) in the IFG 2 group

  8. The Relationship between Body Mass Index and Periodontitis in Arab Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Awad, Manal; Rahman, Betul; Hasan, Haidar; Ali, Houssam

    2015-01-01

    Objective Our study sought to evaluate the association between periodontitis and body mass index (BMI) among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.  Methods In this cross-sectional case control study analysis of 186 diabetic patients, 112 patients had a body mass index ≥30kg/m2 and 74 control patients had BMI <30kg/m2. All participants underwent oral examinations including a full mouth recording of clinical attachment level (CAL). Information regarding HbA1c levels and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) were also gathered.  Results Over half (61%) of patients had a BMI ≥30. Of these 52% had CAL less than 2mm. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that there was no association between BMI and CAL. In addition, hs-CRP levels were significantly and positively associated with CAL (OR:1.06, 95% CI: 1.01, 1.12; p=0.007).  Conclusion Among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, there was no association between periodontitis and BMI. More studies are needed to further explore this relationship taking into consideration additional lifestyle factors. PMID:25829999

  9. The Influence of Interleukin 17A and IL17F Polymorphisms on Chronic Periodontitis Disease in Brazilian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zacarias, Joana Maira Valentini; Sippert, Emília Ângela; Tsuneto, Patrícia Yumeko; Visentainer, Jeane Eliete Laguila; Silva, Cléverson de Oliveira e; Sell, Ana Maria

    2015-01-01

    A case-control study was conducted on patients with chronic periodontitis (CP) and healthy controls with the aim of evaluating possible association between interleukin 17A (IL17A) G197A (rs2275913) and IL17F T7488C (rs763780) polymorphisms and periodontitis. Genotypes were determined by PCR-RFLP method. Statistical analyses were conducted using the OpenEpi and SNPStas software to calculate Chi-square with Yates correction or Fisher's exact tests, odds ratios (OR), and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). SNPStas software was used to calculate Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. IL17A AA genotype was more frequent in patients with chronic periodontitis (CP) in the codominant and recessive models (P = 0.09; OR = 2.53 and P = 0.03; OR = 2.46, resp.), the females with CP (P = 0.01, OR = 4.34), Caucasoid patients with CP (P = 0.01, OR = 3.45), and nonsmoking Caucasian patients with CP (P = 0.04, OR = 3.51). The IL17A A allele was also more frequent in Caucasians with CP (P = 0.04, OR = 1.59). IL17F T7488C polymorphism was not associated with chronic periodontitis. In these patients from Southern Brazil, the IL17A rs2275913 polymorphisms, IL17A AA genotype, and the A allele were associated with a susceptibility to chronic periodontitis. PMID:26339129

  10. A multilevel analysis of factors affecting pocket probing depth in patients responding differently to periodontal treatment.

    PubMed

    Axtelius, B; Söderfeldt, B; Attström, R

    1999-02-01

    3 distinct levels are involved in the periodontal inflammatory process: site, tooth, and individual. By focusing attention on the levels in the population, multilevel or hierarchical modelling (MLM) enables the researcher to understand where and how the effects at the levels involved are occurring. The aim of this paper is therefore to analyse the progression of periodontal disease using analytical models that consider the level hierarchy. 22 patients with periodontitis, in previous reports described as either non-responsive or responsive to periodontal treatment, were investigated. In the multilevel modelling method (MLM), the site pocket probing depth (PPD) is summarised in 3 parameters: the overall mean, the between-individual variance, and the within-individual, between-site variance. The model can readily be extended to include independent variables for sites, teeth and individuals. If these variables are important determinants of PPD, their inclusion in the model will lead to a reduction in residual variances between sites, teeth and individuals. The PPDs were used for construction of a PPD change variable (cPPD). This variable, together with the final registrations of PPD (fPPD) alone, were used as dependent variables in the MLM. Independent predictor variables, 12 on site-level, 3 on tooth-level, and 19 on individual-level, were constructed. The total number of sites assessed was 2236 distributed on 559 teeth in 22 subjects. Initially, a fixed, fully unconditional model (models A and E) was assessed, where no predictor variables were specified at any level. Different random-intercept models (B-D, F-H) were then calculated where the independent variables were inserted in blocks relating to each level. The variance components at all 3 levels were significantly larger than zero. This indicates that MLM is recommended for analysing the present data. The inserted predictors showed 100% sensitivity relating to the subject-level variance. Subsequent testing of the

  11. OCCURRENCE OF ACTINOBACILLUS ACTINOMYCETEMCOMITANS IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC PERIODONTITIS, AGGRESSIVE PERIODONTITIS, HEALTHY SUBJECTS AND CHILDREN WITH GINGIVITIS IN TWO CITIES OF THE STATE OF SÃO PAULO, BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    Jardim, Elerson Gaetti; Bosco, Joseane Maria Dias; Lopes, Angélica Marquezim; Landucci, Luís Fernando; Jardim, Ellen Cristina Gaetti; Carneiro, Sílvia Rosana Soares

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of isolation of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) in 100 patients with chronic periodontitis, 14 patients with aggressive periodontitis, 142 pre-school children with gingivitis and 134 periodontally healthy subjects. Samples of subgingival plaque were taken using sterilized paper points introduced into periodontal pockets or gingival crevice for 60 seconds and inoculated on TSBV agar, which was incubated under anaerobiosis at 37°C, for 4 days. Microbial identification was performed through biochemical methods and morphocellular and morphocolonial analysis. Aa was detected in 40.3% of healthy subjects, 68% of patients with chronic periodontitis, 92.86% of patients with aggressive periodontitis and 40.14% of children with gingivitis. The rate of recovery of Aa in the tested human groups proved to be higher than previously reported and in agreement with participation of this facultative anaerobe as a member of native microbiota of the periodontium and its relation with aggressive and chronic periodontitis in Brazil. PMID:19089064

  12. [Antioxidant Mexidol premedication of patients with periodontitis during antihomotoxic therapy].

    PubMed

    Larentsova, L I; Maksimovskiĭ, Iu M; Voronina, T A; Grigorian, K R

    2002-01-01

    The tranquilizing effect of antioxidant mexydol on 95 patients with chrconic generalized parodontitis against a background of various somatic diseases was evaluated. The anxiety and the efficiency of premedication were accessed according to Korach's and Spilberger's scales and according to the special psychological questionnaire. The quantitative characteristics of premedication were given baised on the psychological tests results. There was registered a definite improvement of health characteristics and of patient's mood in comparison to the initial input data as well as lower lever of their situational anxiety. This proves the tranquilizing effect of premedication with mexidol (5% amp.). The most evident dynamics of these changes can be observed among patients suffering from high initial anxiety level. The findings of the study are based on more than 2 year old history of treatment of 30 patients with traumel. 21 patients suffering from disfunction of the nervous system were given some comprehensive treatment (traumel locally orally and mexidol in injections). The clinical effect resulted in emotional stabilization of patients and reduced the time needed for their clinical treatment. The medicines were combined. No side effects were observed.

  13. Effectiveness of a diode laser in addition to non-surgical periodontal therapy: study of intervention

    PubMed Central

    Crispino, Antonio; Figliuzzi, Michele Mario; Iovane, Claudio; Del Giudice, Teresa; Lomanno, Simona; Pacifico, Delfina; Fortunato, Leonzio; Del Giudice, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Chronic periodontitis affects 47% of adult population over the age of 30. The first phase of periodontal treatment is always represented by scaling and root planning (SRP), that is a causal, non-surgical therapy that recognizes as primary aims the control of bacterial infection and the reduction of periodontal plaque-associated inflammation. Yet, another innovative causal therapy is represented by the irradiation of periodontal pockets with laser. Aim To evaluate the effect of a 940-nm diode laser as an adjunct to SRP in patients affected by periodontitis. Materials and methods Sixty-eight adult patients with moderate-to-severe periodontitis were sequentially enrolled and undergone to periodontal examination (V1) in order to detect gingival index (GI), plaque index (PI) and probing depth (PD). The patients were randomly divided into two groups: the first (n=34) received SRP treatment alone, the control group (n=34) received SRP and 940-nm diode laser therapy. Results Data were analyzed by Student’s t-test, with two tails; for all clinical parameters, both groups reported statistically significant differences compared to basal values (p<0.0001). Both procedures were effective in improving GI, PI and PD, but the use of diode laser was associated with more evident results. Conclusions Considered the better clinical outcomes, diode laser can be routinely associated with SRP in the treatment of periodontal pockets of patients with moderate-to-severe periodontitis. PMID:26161248

  14. Exploring salivary microbiota in AIDS patients with different periodontal statuses using 454 GS-FLX Titanium pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang; He, Shenghua; Jin, Jieqi; Dong, Guangyan; Wu, Hongkun

    2015-01-01

    Patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) are at high risk of opportunistic infections. Oral manifestations have been associated with the level of immunosuppression, these include periodontal diseases, and understanding the microbial populations in the oral cavity is crucial for clinical management. The aim of this study was to examine the salivary bacterial diversity in patients newly admitted to the AIDS ward of the Public Health Clinical Center (China). Saliva samples were collected from 15 patients with AIDS who were randomly recruited between December 2013 and March 2014. Extracted DNA was used as template to amplify bacterial 16S rRNA. Sequencing of the amplicon library was performed using a 454 GS-FLX Titanium sequencing platform. Reads were optimized and clustered into operational taxonomic units for further analysis. A total of 10 bacterial phyla (106 genera) were detected. Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and Proteobacteria were preponderant in the salivary microbiota in AIDS patients. The pathogen, Capnocytophaga sp., and others not considered pathogenic such as Neisseria elongata, Streptococcus mitis, and Mycoplasma salivarium but which may be opportunistic infective agents were detected. Dialister pneumosintes, Eubacterium infirmum, Rothia mucilaginosa, and Treponema parvum were preponderant in AIDS patients with periodontitis. Patients with necrotic periodontitis had a distinct salivary bacterial profile from those with chronic periodontitis. This is the first study using advanced sequencing techniques focused on hospitalized AIDS patients showing the diversity of their salivary microbiota. PMID:26191508

  15. Exploring salivary microbiota in AIDS patients with different periodontal statuses using 454 GS-FLX Titanium pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fang; He, Shenghua; Jin, Jieqi; Dong, Guangyan; Wu, Hongkun

    2015-01-01

    Patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) are at high risk of opportunistic infections. Oral manifestations have been associated with the level of immunosuppression, these include periodontal diseases, and understanding the microbial populations in the oral cavity is crucial for clinical management. The aim of this study was to examine the salivary bacterial diversity in patients newly admitted to the AIDS ward of the Public Health Clinical Center (China). Saliva samples were collected from 15 patients with AIDS who were randomly recruited between December 2013 and March 2014. Extracted DNA was used as template to amplify bacterial 16S rRNA. Sequencing of the amplicon library was performed using a 454 GS-FLX Titanium sequencing platform. Reads were optimized and clustered into operational taxonomic units for further analysis. A total of 10 bacterial phyla (106 genera) were detected. Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and Proteobacteria were preponderant in the salivary microbiota in AIDS patients. The pathogen, Capnocytophaga sp., and others not considered pathogenic such as Neisseria elongata, Streptococcus mitis, and Mycoplasma salivarium but which may be opportunistic infective agents were detected. Dialister pneumosintes, Eubacterium infirmum, Rothia mucilaginosa, and Treponema parvum were preponderant in AIDS patients with periodontitis. Patients with necrotic periodontitis had a distinct salivary bacterial profile from those with chronic periodontitis. This is the first study using advanced sequencing techniques focused on hospitalized AIDS patients showing the diversity of their salivary microbiota. PMID:26191508

  16. Periodontal manifestations and management of a patient with AV malformation.

    PubMed

    Narang, Sumit; Gupta, Ruby; Narang, Anu; Nema, Ram Narayan

    2012-04-01

    Arterio-venous malformation (AVM) is an abnormal communication between an artery and a vein. The incidence of its occurrence in oral and maxillofacial region is rare, and if present, the most common sign is gingival bleeding. A 12-year-old female patient presented with an extra oral swelling in relation with upper lip. Intra oral examination showed non tender gingival swelling with spontaneous bleeding associated with maxillary arch. On initiation of phase I therapy using hand instruments, spontaneous brisk bleeding was encountered which was difficult to control. Because of severe nature of hemorrhage encountered, some type of vascular abnormality was suspected. Ultrasonography followed by angiography confirmed AVM in relation with upper lip. Embolization of lesion was followed by gingivectomy procedure and no recurrence was reported during one year of follow-up. Thus, proper recognition and therapeutic intervention is essential to avoid serious complications and potentially tragic outcome in such situations.

  17. Production of immunoglobulins in gingival tissue explant cultures from juvenile periodontitis patients

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, E.R.; Falkler, W.A. Jr.; Suzuki, J.B. )

    1990-10-01

    B lymphocytes and plasma cells are histologically observed in granulomatous periodontal tissues of juvenile periodontitis (JP) patients. Local immune processes may participate in protective or immunopathologic roles in the pathogenesis of this disease. An in vitro explant culture system was utilized to demonstrate the production of immunoglobulins by diseased JP tissues. Immunodiffusion studies using goat anti-human gamma, alpha, or mu chain serum revealed IgG to be the major immunoglobulin present in 92% of the day 1 supernatant fluids (SF) of the 47 JP gingival tissue explant cultures. IgA was present in 15% of the SF; however, no IgM was detected. Staph Protein A isolated 14C-labeled IgG from the SF, when allowed to react with goat anti-human gamma chain serum, formed lines of precipitation. Positive autoradiographs confirmed the biosynthesis of IgG by the explant cultures. The in vitro gingival tissue explant culture system described provides a useful model for the study of localized immunoglobulins produced by diseased tissues of JP patients.

  18. Cytokine Profile in Chronic Periodontitis Patients with and without Obesity: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Abduljabbar, Tariq; Abu Hassan, Mohamed Ibrahim; Vohra, Fahim

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the cytokine profile as biomarkers in the gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) of chronic periodontitis (CP) patients with and without obesity, MEDLINE/PubMed, EMBASE, ScienceDirect, and SCOPUS databases were combined with handsearching of articles published from 1977 up to May 2016 using relevant MeSH terms. Meta-analyses were conducted separately for each of the cytokines: resistin, adiponectin, TNF-α, leptin, IL-6, IL-8, and IL-1β. Forest plots were produced reporting standardized mean difference of outcomes and 95% confidence intervals. Eleven studies were included. Three studies showed comparable levels of leptin among obese and nonobese patients with CP. Four studies reported comparable levels of interleukin- (IL-) 6 and resistin whereas five studies reported comparable levels of adiponectin. Two studies reported similar levels of CRP in patients with periodontitis with and without obesity. One study showed higher levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in obese patients with CP. One study showed higher levels of IL-1β and IL-8 in obese patients with CP. The level of localized periodontal inflammation may have a greater influence on the GCF proinflammatory biomarker levels as compared to systemic obesity. Whether patients having chronic periodontitis with obesity have elevated proinflammatory GCF biomarkers levels compared to nonobese individuals remains debatable. PMID:27795608

  19. Training of Dental Professionals in Motivational Interviewing can Heighten Interdental Cleaning Self-Efficacy in Periodontal Patients

    PubMed Central

    Woelber, Johan P.; Spann-Aloge, Narin; Hanna, Gilgamesh; Fabry, Goetz; Frick, Katrin; Brueck, Rigo; Jähne, Andreas; Vach, Kirstin; Ratka-Krüger, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Background: The success of periodontal therapy depends on the adherence of patients to professional recommendations. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of a workshop in motivational interviewing (MI) on non-surgical periodontal treatment performed by dental students. Materials and Methods: In the experimental group patients with periodontitis were treated by students trained in MI, while in the control group patients were treated by students who had not been trained in MI. Clinical oral parameters were assessed by a blinded periodontist in addition to the evaluation of psychological questionnaires given before and after the non-surgical periodontal treatment (6 months). Conversations between patients and students were recorded and rated with the Motivational Treatment Integrity Code (MITI-d) by a blinded psychologist. Results: There were 73 patients in the MI group and 99 patients in the control group. The MI group showed significantly higher scores in the MITI-d analysis. Regression analysis showed that there were no significant differences between groups with regard to plaque level, gingival bleeding, pocket depth reduction or bleeding upon probing. However, patients in the MI-group showed significantly higher interdental cleaning self-efficacy than patients in the control group (MI = 19.57 ± 4.7; control = 17.38 ± 6.01; p = 0.016). Conclusion: Teaching MI to dental students resulted in a significant improvement in the self-efficacy of interdental cleaning in patients compared to a control group of non-trained students, but no improvement in other aspects of non-surgical periodontal therapy. The study also showed that an 8-h workshop with supervision significantly improved the MI-compliant conversations of dental students without requiring more conversation time. PMID:26941698

  20. Heat-shock protein 60 kDa and atherogenic dyslipidemia in patients with untreated mild periodontitis: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Manfredi; Cappello, Francesco; Marfil, Rafael; Nibali, Luigi; Marino Gammazza, Antonella; Rappa, Francesca; Bonaventura, Giuseppe; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; O'Valle, Francisco; Zummo, Giovanni; Conway de Macario, Everly; Macario, Alberto J L; Mesa, Francisco

    2012-05-01

    Identification of predictors of cardiovascular risk can help in the prevention of pathologic episodes and the management of patients at all stages of illness. Here, we investigated the relationships between serum levels of Hsp60 and dyslipidemia in patients with periodontitis by performing a cross-sectional study of 22 patients with mild periodontitis without any prior treatment for it (i.e., drug naïve) and 22 healthy controls, matched for age and body mass index (BMI). All subjects were evaluated for periodontal status, gingival inflammation, and oral hygiene. Levels of circulating Hsp60, C-reactive protein (CRP), and plasma lipids were measured, and small, dense low-density lipoproteins (LDL) were indirectly assessed by determining the triglycerides/high-density lipoproteins (HDL) cholesterol ratio. We also assessed by immunohistochemistry Hsp60 levels in oral mucosa of patients and controls. No difference was found in CRP levels or plasma lipids between the two groups, but subjects with periodontitis showed, in comparison to controls, higher levels of small, dense LDL (p  = 0.0355) and circulating Hsp60 concentrations (p < 0.0001). However, levels of mucosal Hsp60 did not change significantly between groups. Correlation analysis revealed that circulating Hsp60 inversely correlated with HDL-cholesterol (r  = -0.589, p  = 0.0039), and positively with triglycerides (r  = +0.877, p < 0.0001), and small, dense LDL (r  = +0.925, p < 0.0001). Serum Hsp60 significantly correlated with the degree of periodontal disease (r  = +0.403, p  = 0.0434). In brief, untreated patients with mild periodontitis had increased small, dense LDL and serum Hsp60 concentrations, in comparison to age- and BMI-matched controls and both parameters showed a strong positive correlation. Our data indicate that atherogenic dyslipidemia and elevated circulating Hsp60 tend to be linked and associated to periodontal pathology. Thus, the road is open to

  1. The subgingival periodontal microbiota of the aging mouth.

    PubMed

    Feres, Magda; Teles, Flavia; Teles, Ricardo; Figueiredo, Luciene Cristina; Faveri, Marcelo

    2016-10-01

    Different mechanisms have been hypothesized to explain the increase in prevalence and severity of periodontitis in older adults, including shifts in the periodontal microbiota. However, the actual impact of aging on the composition of subgingival biofilms remains unclear. In the present article, we provide an overview of the composition of the subgingival biofilm in older adults and the potential effects of age on the oral microbiome. In particular, this review covers the following topics: (i) the oral microbiota of an aging mouth; (ii) the effects of age and time on the human oral microbiome; (iii) the potential impact of inflammaging and immunosenescence in the host-oral microbiota interactions; and (iv) the relationship of the aging oral microbiota and Alzheimer's disease. Finally, we present analyses of data compiled from large clinical studies that evaluated the subgingival microbiota of periodontally healthy subjects and patients with periodontitis from a wide age spectrum (20-83 years of age).

  2. [The effects of grape seed and coriander oil on biochemical parameters of oral fluid in patients with periodontitis].

    PubMed

    Nikolaishvili, M; Gogua, M; Franchuki, Q; Tufinashvili, T; Zurabashvili, D

    2014-10-01

    Biochemical changes that are taking place in patients with periodontitis 1 and 2 the quality of the individuals place in a laqtatdegidrogenazis, alkaline phosphatase activity increase and reduced activity amilazais. Therefore we can conclude that, there is an increase in superoxide substances, which causes an increase in the oral cavity patobakteriebis and quality of periodontitis. The grape seed and coriander oil is of vegetable origin and antioxidant drugs. Their action causes a statistically significant increase in the amilazis, alkaline phosphatase and laqtatdegidrogenazis reduction, while the latter leads pH - rate of return to oral fluid. It should be noted that the positive effect of coriander oil, but less effective.

  3. [The effects of grape seed and coriander oil on biochemical parameters of oral fluid in patients with periodontitis].

    PubMed

    Nikolaishvili, M; Gogua, M; Franchuki, Q; Tufinashvili, T; Zurabashvili, D

    2014-10-01

    Biochemical changes that are taking place in patients with periodontitis 1 and 2 the quality of the individuals place in a laqtatdegidrogenazis, alkaline phosphatase activity increase and reduced activity amilazais. Therefore we can conclude that, there is an increase in superoxide substances, which causes an increase in the oral cavity patobakteriebis and quality of periodontitis. The grape seed and coriander oil is of vegetable origin and antioxidant drugs. Their action causes a statistically significant increase in the amilazis, alkaline phosphatase and laqtatdegidrogenazis reduction, while the latter leads pH - rate of return to oral fluid. It should be noted that the positive effect of coriander oil, but less effective. PMID:25416221

  4. Detection Of Rankl Positive Cells in Gingival Tissue in Healthy & Chronic Periodontal Disease Patients-A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Gita, Bagavad; Chandrasekaran, S. C.

    2014-01-01

    Aim & Objective: The receptor activator of NF-kappa B ligand (RANKL) and its decoy receptor, osteoprotegerin (OPG), are the important proteins implicated in osteoclastogenesis. This study aimed to identify & quantify RANKL positive cells in gingival tissues in healthy & diseased patients & the study looks for immunohistochemical evidence of the expression of the protein in gingival tissue samples. Materials and Methods: Patients were randomly selected. Thirty subject each for (test & control). Age range of 25-55y, either sex was selected. Tissue samples were collected from Control – Healthy Gingiva & Test-Chronic Periodontitis Patients. Tissue sections were prepared. An Immunohistochemical analysis was done & cell counting was done for RANKL positive cells. Results: Immunohistochemical staining showed that RANKL-positive cells were significantly distributed in the inflammatory epithelium & connective tissue zone of diseased & non-diseased gingiva. RANKL, positive cells was increased significantly in patients with chronic periodontitis (p < 0.05). Conclusion: These findings imply that in this comparative study of gingival tissue for, RANKL positive cells, these cells were present in both healthy & chronic periodontitis samples, but number of positive cells present is significantly increased in chronic periodontitis. PMID:25584312

  5. Inverse Association of Plasma IgG Antibody to Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and High C-Reactive Protein Levels in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome and Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Thanakun, Supanee; Pornprasertsuk-Damrongsri, Suchaya; Gokyu, Misa; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Izumi, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    The association between clinically diagnosed periodontitis, a common chronic oral infection, and metabolic syndrome has been previously reported. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of plasma IgG levels against Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Prevotella intermedia, C-reactive protein, and periodontal status with metabolic syndrome. Plasma IgG levels and C-reactive protein were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and salivary levels of A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis were determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Among 127 individuals aged 35-76 years, 57 participants had metabolic syndrome and severe periodontitis, 25 had metabolic syndrome and an absence of severe periodontitis, 17 healthy individuals had severe periodontitis, and 28 healthy individuals were without severe periodontitis. Patients with metabolic syndrome had reduced humoral immune response to A. actinomycetemcomitans (p = 0.008), regardless of their salivary levels or periodontitis status compared with healthy participants. The IgG antibody response to P. gingivalis, regardless of their salivary levels or participants' health condition, was significantly higher in severe periodontitis patients (p<0.001). Plasma IgG titers for P. intermedia were inconsistent among metabolic syndrome or periodontal participants. Our results indicate that the presence of lower levels of IgG antibodies to A. actinomycetemcomitans (OR = 0.1; 95%CI 0.0-0.7), but not P. gingivalis, a severe periodontitis status (OR = 7.8; 95%CI 1.1-57.0), high C-reactive protein levels (OR = 9.4; 95%CI 1.0-88.2) and body mass index (OR = 3.0; 95%CI 1.7-5.2), are associated with the presence of metabolic syndrome. The role of the decreased IgG antibody response to A. actinomycetemcomitans, increased C-reactive protein levels on the association between periodontal disease and metabolic syndrome in a group of Thai patients is suggested. PMID

  6. Comparison of Frequency and Duration of Periodontal Disease With Progression of Coronary Artery Calcium in Patients With and Without Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Groves, Daniel W; Krantz, Mori J; Hokanson, John E; Johnson, Lonnie R; Eckel, Robert H; Kinney, Gregory L; Rewers, Marian; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K; Alman, Amy C

    2015-09-15

    People with type 1 diabetes mellitus manifest a greater burden of both periodontal disease and coronary artery disease (CAD); however, little is known about their interrelation. Coronary artery calcium (CAC) measures subclinical atherosclerosis and predicts major adverse coronary events. The relation between periodontal disease and CAC progression in individuals with type 1 diabetes has not been previously described. We determined the prevalence and progression of CAC in relation to self-reported periodontal disease. Multivariate logistic and tobit regression models were used to examine the relation between periodontal disease duration and CAC progression and whether this relation differs by diabetes status after controlling for age, gender, total and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, hypertension, smoking, body mass index (BMI), duration of diabetes, and baseline CAC. A total of 473 patients with type 1 diabetes and 548 without diabetes were followed for a mean of 6.1 years. At baseline, the prevalence and duration of periodontal disease did not differ between subjects with and without diabetes (14.5% vs 13.4%, p = 0.60; 6 vs 9 years, p = 0.18). Duration of periodontal disease was not significantly associated with baseline CAC prevalence. In patients with type 1 diabetes, periodontal disease duration was significantly related to CAC progression (p = 0.004) but not in subjects without diabetes (p = 0.63). In conclusion, this study suggests that periodontal disease is an independent predictor of long-term progression of CAC in patients with type 1 diabetes. PMID:26189036

  7. Interleukin-1 haplotype and periodontal disease progression following therapy.

    PubMed

    Ehmke, B; Kress, W; Karch, H; Grimm, T; Klaiber, B; Flemmig, T F

    1999-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the prognostic value of the IL-1 haplotype on the progression of periodontal disease following therapy. 48 adult patients with untreated periodontitis harboring Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and/or Porphyromonas gingivalis were randomly assigned to receive full-mouth scaling alone (control) or in combination with systemic metronidazole plus amoxicillin and supragingival irrigation with chlorhexidine digluconate (test). All patients received supportive periodontal therapy at 3 to 6 months intervals. In 33 patients, lymphocyte DNA was analyzed for polymorphism in the IL-1A gene at position -889 and IL-1B gene at position +3953. Overall, 16 of 33 patients (7 of 17 test and 9 of 16 control) carried the IL-1 haplotype. 2 years following initial periodontal therapy, no differences in the survival rates of sites or teeth not exhibiting probing attachment loss of 2 mm or more compared to baseline, were found between patients who tested positive (85% sites, 53% teeth) and patients who tested negative (89% sites, 56% teeth) for the IL-1 haplotype. The results indicated that the IL-1 haplotype may be of limited value for the prognosis of periodontal disease progression following non-surgical periodontal therapy.

  8. Comparison of the number of gingival blood vessels between type 2 diabetes mellitus and chronic periodontitis patients: An immunohistological study

    PubMed Central

    Penmetsa, Gautami Subhadra; Baddam, Satyanarayana; Manyam, Ravikanth; Dwarakanath, Chinni Doraswamy

    2015-01-01

    Background: The relationship between diabetes and periodontitis has been studied for more than 50 years and is generally agreed that the periodontal disease is more prevalent in diabetic patients compared to nondiabetics. Vascular changes like increased thickness of basement membrane in small vessels has been reported in diabetic patients, but the quantity of blood vessels in gingiva of diabetic patients has not been discussed much. The aim of this study was to compare the number of blood vessels in gingiva between chronic periodontitis (CP) patients, CP with diabetes (type 2), and normal healthy gingiva. Materials and Methods: The study included 75 patients, divided into three groups of 25 patients each-Group I with healthy periodontium (HP), Group II with CP, and Group III with CP with diabetes mellitus (CPDM). Gingival biopsies were obtained from the subjects undergoing crown lengthening procedure for Group I, and in patients with CP and in CPDM biopsies were collected from teeth undergoing extraction. Sections were prepared for immune histochemical staining with CD34. Results: Difference was observed in the average number of blood vessels when compared between HP, CP, and CPDM groups. Statistical significant difference was observed when the HP and CP groups and HP and CPDM groups were compared. Conclusion: The results of the study indicated that the number of blood vessels in gingival connective tissue is significantly higher in CP and CPDM patients. PMID:26015666

  9. Levels of vaspin and omentin-1 in gingival crevicular fluid as potential markers of inflammation in patients with chronic periodontitis and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt Doğan, Şeyma; Öngöz Dede, Figen; Ballı, Umut; Sertoğlu, Erdim

    2016-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to determine the levels of vaspin and omentin-1 in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) in patients with chronic periodontitis (CP) with and without type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and to evaluate GCF vaspin and omentin-1 levels after non-surgical periodontal therapy. The study included 60 subjects: 15 systemically and periodontally healthy individuals, 15 periodontally healthy patients with T2DM, 15 systemically healthy patients with CP, and 15 patients with both CP and T2DM. GCF and clinical periodontal parameters were examined at the baseline and 6 weeks after periodontal therapy. Levels of vaspin, omentin-1 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) were measured by ELISA, and their relative ratios were calculated. GCF vaspin and TNF-α levels were significantly higher in the CP groups than in the periodontally healthy groups (P < 0.008) and decreased after therapy in the former (P < 0.025). GCF omentin-1 levels were significantly lower in the CP groups than in the periodontally healthy groups (P < 0.008) and increased after therapy in the former (P < 0.05). Statistically significant positive correlations were found between the total amount of vaspin and TNF-α, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), clinical attachment level and gingival index, whereas the level of omentin-1 was negatively correlated with these parameters in all groups (P < 0.05). We found that non-surgical periodontal therapy influenced the GCF levels of both vaspin and omentin-1 in the CP groups. Our results suggest that the levels of vaspin and omentin-1 in GCF could have potential application as inflammatory markers of diabetes, periodontal disease and treatment outcome. (J Oral Sci 58, 379-389, 2016). PMID:27665978

  10. Rheumatoid factor (RF) distribution in periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Thé, J; Ebersole, J L

    1991-05-01

    This study investigated the occurrence of an autoantibody, IgM rheumatoid factor, that may result from the chronic inflammation noted in periodontal disease and rheumatoid arthritis. In order to detect IgM-RF, a biotin-avidin ELISA was developed. This assay was found to be sensitive and accurate by testing a rheumatoid arthritis population. The characteristics of this rheumatoid arthritis group were further determined, such that the total serum immunoglobulin concentrations were slightly elevated although within the normal range for IgM, IgG, and IgA; IgG antibody levels were elevated against oral microorganisms of the genus Capnocytophaga, while elevated IgM antibody levels were noted to Bacteroides species. In a population of 260 subjects of which 171 were periodontal disease patients, 16 of 171 (9.4%) were seropositive for IgM-RF, of which the predominant disease types were advanced destructive periodontitis and adult periodontitis. For comparison, a random population of seronegative periodontal disease patients was constructed that was matched for sex and approximate age to the seropositive group. The total immunoglobulin levels of the two groups were not significantly different and the means of both were slightly lower than the rheumatoid arthritis group. When the antibody profiles of the two periodontal disease populations were compared it became evident that the RF-positive group showed IgM and IgG antibody that was significantly elevated to Capnocytophaga species and F. nucleatum. Therefore, the chronic inflammation associated with periodontitis appears to increase significantly the formation of IgM-RF; however, there does appear to be a relationship between IgM-RF and elevated antibody to selected oral microorganisms. PMID:1890163

  11. A Novel Intra-Oral Diabetes Screening Approach in Periodontal Patients: Results of a Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, Shiela M.; Tuthill, Janet; Singh, Geetika; Rindskopf, David; Maggiore, Jack A.; Schoor, Robert; Brodsky, Anya; Einhorn, Adi; Hochstein, Amanda; Russell, Stefanie; Rosedale, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Background This pilot study examined whether a novel diabetes screening approach using gingival crevicular blood (GCB) could be used to test for hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) during the periodontal visit. Methods At a large periodontics clinic, finger stick blood (FSB) samples from 120 patients as well as GCB samples from those patients with adequate bleeding on probing were collected on special blood collection cards and were analyzed for HbA1c levels in a laboratory. The Pearson correlation coefficient was used to measure correlation between FSB and GCB HbA1c values for 75 paired FSB and GCB samples. A Receiver Operator Characteristic Curve (ROC) analysis was performed to determine an optimal GCB HbA1c criterion value for a positive diabetes screen. Results For the 75 paired samples, the Pearson correlation coefficient was .842. The ROC analysis identified a criterion value of 6.3% for the GCB HbA1c test with high sensitivity (.933) and high specificity (.900) corresponding to FSB HbA1c values of 6.5% or greater (in the diabetes range). Using this GCB HbA1c criterion value for 27 additional paired samples in which there was an unidentified component observed to co-elute within the elution window of GCB HbA1c in the laboratory, there was agreement between FSB and GCB values for 24 of the pairs according to whether they were both within, or both outside of the diabetes range. Conclusions Using a criterion value of 6.3%, GCB samples are acceptable for HbA1c testing to screen for diabetes in most persons with bleeding on probing at the GCB collection site. PMID:22087806

  12. PDT in non-surgical treatment of periodontitis in kidney transplanted patients: a split-mouth, randomized clinical trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinho, Kelly C. T.; Giovani, Elcio M.

    2016-03-01

    This study was to evaluate clinical and microbiological effectiveness of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in the treatment of periodontal disease in kidney-transplanted patients. Eight kidney transplanted patients treated at Paulista University were arranged in two groups: SRP performed scaling and root planning by ultrasound; SRP+PDT- in the same patient, which was held to PDT in the opposite quadrant, with 0.01% methylene blue and red laser gallium aluminum arsenide, wavelength 660 nm, power 100 mW. There was reduction in probing pocket depth after 45 days and 3 months regardless the group examined; plaque and bleeding index showed improvement over time, regardless the technique used, and bleeding index in the SRP+PDT group was lower when compared with the baseline the other times. There was no difference in the frequency of pathogens. Photodynamic therapy may be an option for treatment of periodontal disease in renal-transplanted patients and its effectiveness is similar to conventional therapy.

  13. Periodontitis in Chronic Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, Hanna; Herrmann, Kristina; Franke, Jennifer; Karimi, Alamara; Täger, Tobias; Cebola, Rita; Katus, Hugo A; Zugck, Christian; Frankenstein, Lutz

    2016-08-01

    Periodontal disease has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. The purpose of our study was to investigate whether a correlation between periodontitis and chronic heart failure exists, as well as the nature of the underlying cause. We enrolled 71 patients (mean age, 54 ± 13 yr; 56 men) who had stable chronic heart failure; all underwent complete cardiologic and dental evaluations. The periodontal screening index was used to quantify the degree of periodontal disease. We compared the findings to those in the general population with use of data from the 4th German Dental Health Survey. Gingivitis, moderate periodontitis, and severe periodontitis were present in 17 (24%), 17 (24%), and 37 (52%) patients, respectively. Severe periodontitis was more prevalent among chronic heart failure patients than in the general population. In contrast, moderate periodontitis was more prevalent in the general population (P <0.00001). The severity of periodontal disease was not associated with the cause of chronic heart failure or the severity of heart failure symptoms. Six-minute walking distance was the only independent predictor of severe periodontitis. Periodontal disease is highly prevalent in chronic heart failure patients regardless of the cause of heart failure. Prospective trials are warranted to clarify the causal relationship between both diseases. PMID:27547136

  14. Periodontitis in Chronic Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, Hanna; Herrmann, Kristina; Franke, Jennifer; Karimi, Alamara; Täger, Tobias; Cebola, Rita; Katus, Hugo A; Zugck, Christian; Frankenstein, Lutz

    2016-08-01

    Periodontal disease has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. The purpose of our study was to investigate whether a correlation between periodontitis and chronic heart failure exists, as well as the nature of the underlying cause. We enrolled 71 patients (mean age, 54 ± 13 yr; 56 men) who had stable chronic heart failure; all underwent complete cardiologic and dental evaluations. The periodontal screening index was used to quantify the degree of periodontal disease. We compared the findings to those in the general population with use of data from the 4th German Dental Health Survey. Gingivitis, moderate periodontitis, and severe periodontitis were present in 17 (24%), 17 (24%), and 37 (52%) patients, respectively. Severe periodontitis was more prevalent among chronic heart failure patients than in the general population. In contrast, moderate periodontitis was more prevalent in the general population (P <0.00001). The severity of periodontal disease was not associated with the cause of chronic heart failure or the severity of heart failure symptoms. Six-minute walking distance was the only independent predictor of severe periodontitis. Periodontal disease is highly prevalent in chronic heart failure patients regardless of the cause of heart failure. Prospective trials are warranted to clarify the causal relationship between both diseases.

  15. Periodontitis in Chronic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Fröhlich, Hanna; Herrmann, Kristina; Franke, Jennifer; Karimi, Alamara; Täger, Tobias; Cebola, Rita; Katus, Hugo A.; Zugck, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal disease has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. The purpose of our study was to investigate whether a correlation between periodontitis and chronic heart failure exists, as well as the nature of the underlying cause. We enrolled 71 patients (mean age, 54 ± 13 yr; 56 men) who had stable chronic heart failure; all underwent complete cardiologic and dental evaluations. The periodontal screening index was used to quantify the degree of periodontal disease. We compared the findings to those in the general population with use of data from the 4th German Dental Health Survey. Gingivitis, moderate periodontitis, and severe periodontitis were present in 17 (24%), 17 (24%), and 37 (52%) patients, respectively. Severe periodontitis was more prevalent among chronic heart failure patients than in the general population. In contrast, moderate periodontitis was more prevalent in the general population (P <0.00001). The severity of periodontal disease was not associated with the cause of chronic heart failure or the severity of heart failure symptoms. Six-minute walking distance was the only independent predictor of severe periodontitis. Periodontal disease is highly prevalent in chronic heart failure patients regardless of the cause of heart failure. Prospective trials are warranted to clarify the causal relationship between both diseases. PMID:27547136

  16. Efficacy of Adjunctive Er, Cr:YSGG Laser Application Following Scaling and Root Planing in Periodontally Diseased Patients.

    PubMed

    Magaz, Vanessa Ruiz; Alemany, Antonio Santos; Alfaro, Federico Hernández; Molina, José Nart

    2016-01-01

    The application of laser as a monotherapy has been shown to reduce probing pocket depths and increase clinical attachment levels after treatment of patients suffering from chronic periodontitis. Its controversial use as an adjunct to scaling and root planing (SRP) is discussed. The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of adjunctive Er, Cr:YSGG laser application following conventional SRP. A total of 30 patients with chronic periodontitis were enrolled in the study. The quadrants of each patient were allocated to either SRP or SRP + laser. A total of 3,654 sites with pocket depths ≥ 4 mm were treated and evaluated at 6 weeks and 6 months postoperatively with respect to attachment gain. Both therapies resulted in improved probing pocket depths and clinical attachment levels. The adjunctive application of Er, Cr:YSGG laser following SRP did not improve probing pocket depth or attachment level compared with SRP alone. PMID:27560676

  17. Effect of Tetracycline Hydrochloride and Spiramycin Sub Gingival Irrigation with Pulsated Jet Irrigator in Chronic Periodontitis Patients: A Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Ravishankar, P L; Venugopal, K; Nadkerny, Purnima

    2015-01-01

    Background: The present study is designed to evaluate the clinical effects of pulsated subgingival irrigation with tetracycline and spiramycin. Materials and Methods: Ten patient diagnosed chronic periodontitis were included in the present study. Each patient is assigned to be irrigated with saline (placebo) (Group A), tetracycline HCl at 0.5% concentration (Group B), and 0.5% spiramycin (Group C). Scaling and root planing (SC/RP) was recorded as Group D. Plaque index, gingival index, gingival bleeding index, probing pocket depth were assessed on pre-irrigation (day 0), and at days 7, 14, 21, 28, and 35 day. Results: The results showed that subgingival irrigation with 0.5% tetracycline and spiramycin produced a significant reduction in clinical parameters compared to the control, while SC/RP was showed better improvement. Conclusion: The result of this study suggested that subgingival irrigation of tetracycline and spiramycin play a beneficial role in the management of chronic periodontitis patients. PMID:26229381

  18. Single nucleotide polymorphism at −1087 locus of interleukin-10 gene promoter is associated with severe chronic periodontitis in nonsmoking patients

    PubMed Central

    Crena, Jasmine; Subramanian, Sangeetha; Victor, Dayanand John; Gnana, Prakash Ponnudurai Samuel; Ramanathan, Arvind

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the promoter region of interleukin (IL)-10 gene, which codes for the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10, have been associated with its level of production in chronic periodontitis. The prevalence of promoter SNP genotypes is known in other populations with chronic periodontitis, while its association in the Indian population is not known. Hence, the present study was designed to investigate the prevalence of IL-10 promoter polymorphism in a racially defined group of Indians with severe chronic periodontitis as the Indian population is known to be genetically diverse. Materials and Methods: Genomic deoxyribonucleic acid was extracted from 46 nonsmoking patients with severe chronic periodontitis and 45 subjects with healthy periodontium. A SNP locus at −1087 of IL-10 was chosen, as this locus has been frequently associated with chronic periodontitis in other population. Genotyping was carried out using allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (AS-PCR), and the frequencies of genotype were analyzed between the groups. Results: The distribution of genotype and allele frequencies showed significant differences between the study groups. The prevalence of genotype AA alleles at −1087 locus of IL-10 was significantly higher in severe chronic periodontitis patients compared to the healthy controls (P = 0.05). Conclusion: The study has identified a positive association between the occurrence of AA allele at −1087 locus of IL-10 gene and severe chronic periodontitis in nonsmoking patients. PMID:26430368

  19. Inflammatory markers in gingival crevicular fluid of periodontitis patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus according to glycemic control: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Priscila Larcher; Artese, Hilana Paula Carilo; Horliana, Anna Carolina Ratto Tempestini; Gomes, Giovane Hisse; Romito, Giuseppe Alexandre; Dib, Sergio Atala; Mayer, Marcia Pinto Alves

    2015-01-01

    Background: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and periodontitis are inflammatory conditions with a bidirectional association. This pilot study aimed to evaluate whether T2DM and glycemic control interfere in inflammatory markers profiles in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) in periodontitis patients. Materials and Methods: Fourteen diabetic periodontitis patients were enrolled in this study, seven with adequate glycemic control (glycated hemoglobin [HbA1c] <8.0%) (DMA + P) and seven with inadequate control (HbA1c ≥8.0%) (DMI + P). Seven chronic periodontitis patients without diabetes formed the control group (P). GCF was obtained from diseased sites (probing depth >6 mm) of an entirely hemiarch, pooled and cytokines levels determined using multiplex beads immunoassay. Clinical periodontal parameters were analyzed by Mann-Whitney test and levels of cytokines by Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's multiple comparison tests with confidence level of 95% (P < 0.05). Results: Cytokines profile of GCF obtained from deep periodontal pockets presented high levels of inflammatory cytokines, and there were no statistical differences between levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8 and tumor necrosis factor-α according to presence of diabetes or percentage of HbA1c among the groups, despite groups with T2DM and periodontitis exhibit higher levels of PD. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, inflammatory mediators in GCF are dependent to the local response and do not correlate with the diabetic status. PMID:26604959

  20. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Periodontal Pathogens in the Oral Cavity and Lungs of Cystic Fibrosis Patients: a Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Rivas Caldas, Rocio; Le Gall, Florence; Revert, Krista; Rault, Gilles; Virmaux, Michèle; Gouriou, Stephanie; Héry-Arnaud, Geneviève; Barbier, Georges; Boisramé, Sylvie

    2015-06-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most frequent lethal genetic disease in the Caucasian population. Lung destruction is the principal cause of death by chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization. There is a high prevalence of oropharyngeal anaerobic bacteria in sputum of CF patients. This study was carried out due to the lack of results comparing subgingival periodontal pathogenic bacteria between the oral cavity and lungs in patients with CF in relation with P. aeruginosa presence. Our first goal was to detect P. aeruginosa in oral and sputum samples by culture and molecular methods and to determine clonality of isolates. In addition, subgingival periodontal anaerobic bacteria were searched for in sputum. A cross-sectional pilot case-control study was conducted in the CF Reference Center in Roscoff, France. Ten CF patients with a ΔF508 homozygous mutation (5 chronically colonized [CC] and 5 not colonized [NC]) were enrolled. P. aeruginosa was detected in saliva, sputum, and subgingival plaque samples by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). Subsequently, periodontal bacteria were also detected and quantified in subgingival plaque and sputum samples by qPCR. In CC patients, P. aeruginosa was recovered in saliva and subgingival plaque samples. Sixteen P. aeruginosa strains were isolated in saliva and sputum from this group and compared by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Subgingival periodontal anaerobic bacteria were found in sputum samples. A lower diversity of these species was recovered in the CC patients than in the NC patients. The presence of the same P. aeruginosa clonal types in saliva and sputum samples underlines that the oral cavity is a possible reservoir for lung infection. PMID:25854483

  1. Evaluation of TLR2 and 4 in Chronic Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Mahalingam, Arulpari; Parthasarathy, Harinath; Katamreddy, Vineela; Subbareddy, Venkat

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Periodontal disease is the major cause of adult tooth loss and is commonly characterized by a chronic inflammation caused by infection due to oral bacteria. Members of Toll-Like Receptor (TLR) family recognize conserved microbial structures, such as bacterial lipopolysaccharides and activate signalling pathways that result in immune responses against microbial infections. Aim The aim of the present study was to assess the mRNA expression of Toll-Like Receptor 2 and 4 in tissues with or without chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods Gingival tissue samples were collected from controls (30 subjects with healthy periodontal tissues) and experimental group (30 subjects with chronic periodontitis). Total RNA was extracted and RT-PCR was done for evaluation of TLR-2 and TLR-4. Mann Whitney U-test, Pearson Chi-square Test was used for statistics. Results The results showed that there is a significant (p-value= 0.004) association between TLR-4 and the experimental group comprising of chronic periodontitis patients in comparison to the insignificant (p-value= 0.085) TLR-2 expression. Conclusion This study concludes that TLR-2 and TLR-4 expressed in the gingival tissues recognize different bacterial cell wall components thus helping us to associate its potential in diagnosing periodontal disease. Hence, in the future, these scientific findings can pave the way in using TLR as a diagnostic biomarker for periodontal disease. PMID:27504418

  2. Effect of Bisphosphonates on the Levels of Rankl and Opg in Gingival Crevicular Fluid of Patients With Periodontal Disease and Post-menopausal Osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Verde, María E; Bermejo, Daniela; Gruppi, Adriana; Grenón, Miriam

    2015-12-01

    The Receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B ligand (RANKL)/RANK/Osteoprotegerine (OPG) system has been proposed as essential for osteoclast biology and identified as key part in regulating the physiology and pathology of the skeletal system. The study of the RANKL/RANK/OPG system has increased the understanding of the mechanisms involved in the bone remodeling process, especially in postmenopausal osteoporosis and periodontal disease. Bisphosphonates have become the mainstay of the treatment and prevention of post-menopausal osteoporosis. They inhibit the formation and dissolution of calcium phosphate crystals in bone and also osteoclasts, thus reducing bone turnover.Current investigations relate osteoporosis with the appearance and progression of periodontal disease. Although the etiology of both is different, the bone loss present in both shares several characteristics. Thus, therapy used for osteoporosis can be considered of value in the treatment of periodontal disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the levels of RANKL, OPG and their relationship in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) in patients with periodontal disease and postmenopausal osteoporosis/ osteopenia in relation to consumption of bisphosphonates. We studied 66 periodontal active sites obtained from 17 post- menopausal women patients aged between 45-70 years old with osteoporosis/osteopenia and periodontal disease. GCF samples were collected using sterile filter paper strips. To determine the concentration of RANKL and OPG, a commercial ELISA assay was used. The values of RANKL, OPG and their ratio (RANKL/ OPG) were compared with Mann-Whitney U Test. The values of RANKL, OPG and their ratio obtained in patients with osteoporosis/osteopenia and periodontal disease with or without bisphosphonates treatment showed no differences. Bisphosphonates do not alter the concentration of RANKL and OPG and their ratio in the GCF of patients with osteoporosis/ osteopenia and periodontal disease

  3. [The importance of periodontal evaluation in orthodontics].

    PubMed

    Pré, P

    1998-01-01

    The orthodontist is in fact a periodontal-therapist since his aim is to move the teeth with and through the periodontal tissues. It is most important for the orthodontist to be able to determine at the initial clinical examination what are the various periodontal risk factors. When the pathology is obvious with inflammation, periodontal pockets, gingival hyperplasia, edema of the papillae, gingival recessions, the need for periodontal treatment is manifest. But many times, the periodontal evaluation is complicated by the presence of slight variations of the quality of the marginal tissue that represent a risk of developing periodontal defects during the orthodontic treatment. The aim of this presentation is to put forward the importance of the periodontal evaluation during the initial examination of the patient so that, if necessary, an adequate periodontal therapy can be initiated to stabilize the periodontal tissues and thus improves the esthetical outcome.

  4. Treatment of intrabony defects with anorganic bone matrix/p-15 or guided tissue regeneration in patients with aggressive periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, Adriana C; Nóbrega, Priscila Brasil da; Oliveira, Fabíola S; Novaes, Arthur B; Taba, Mário; Palioto, Daniela B; Grisi, Márcio F M; Souza, Sergio L S

    2013-01-01

    Intrabony periodontal defects present a particular treatment problem, especially in patients with generalized aggressive periodontitis (G-AgP). Regenerative procedures have been indicated for this clinical situation. The aim of this study was to compare treatment outcomes of intrabony periodontal defects with either anorganic bone matrix/cell binding peptide (ABM/P-15) or guided tissue regeneration (GTR) in patients with G-AgP. Fifteen patients, with two intrabony defects ≥3 mm deep, were selected. Patients were randomly allocated to be treated with ABM/P-15 or GTR. At baseline and at 3 and 6 months after surgery, clinical and radiographic parameters and IL-1β and IL-6 gingival fluid concentrations were recorded. There was a significant probing pocket depth reduction (p<0.001) for both groups (2.27 ± 0.96 mm for ABM/P-15 group and 2.57 ± 1.06 mm for GTR group). Clinical attachment level gain (1.87 ± 0.94 mm for ABM/P-15 group and 2.09 ± 0.88 mm for GTR group) was also observed. There were no statistically significant differences in clinical parameters between the groups. The radiographic bone fill was more expressive in ABM/P-15 group (2.49 mm) than in GTR group (0.73 mm). In subtraction radiographs, the areas representing gain in density were 93.16% of the baseline defect for ABM/P-15 group versus 62.03% in GRT group. There were no statistically significant differences in inter-group and intra-group comparisons with regards to IL-1β and IL-6 quantification. Treatment of intrabony periodontal defects in patients with G-AgP with ABM/P-15 and GTR improved significantly the clinical outcomes. The use of ABM/P-15 promoted a better radiographic bone fill. PMID:23969907

  5. A randomized clinical trial of salivary substitute as an adjunct to scaling and root planing for management of periodontal inflammation in mouth breathing patients.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Anu; Sharma, Rajinder K; Tewari, Shikha; Narula, Satish C

    2015-09-01

    We investigated the outcome of conventional periodontal treatment in mouth breathing patients with chronic periodontitis, and compared the efficacy of applying salivary substitute to the anterior sextants as an adjunct to conventional treatment in such patients. In this randomized, investigator-blind, clinical study involving parallel groups, 40 mouth breathing patients were divided into two groups: a control group (CG, n = 20) comprising patients who received scaling and root planing (SRP), and a test group (TG, n = 20) who received salivary substitute as an adjunct to SRP for treatment of chronic periodontitis. The patients were followed up at various time intervals, and improvement of the gingival index (GI) was examined as the primary outcome. Student's t-test, repeated-measures ANOVA and Mann-Whitney U test were applied for statistical analysis. Although periodontal parameters were improved in both groups after 8 weeks of follow-up, the test group showed better improvement in terms of GI and percentage bleeding on probing. Within the limits of this study, our results suggest that the use of salivary substitute has a beneficial adjunctive effect for improvement of periodontal parameters in mouth breathing patients with chronic periodontitis.

  6. [Characteristics of paradontal recesses microbiocenosis and immune homeostasis in patients of elderly and senile age with chronic generalized periodontitis].

    PubMed

    Iordanishvili, A K; Soldatov, S V; Moskalev, A V; Soldatova, L N; Ryzhak, G A

    2011-01-01

    The microbiocenosis of periodontal recesses was studied and an assessment of the innate immunity mechanisms, as well as profiles of inflammatory cytokines were carried out in 114 people of middle, elderly and senile age with chronic generalized periodontitis (CGP). It was found that periodontal recesses mikrobiocenosis of patients with CGP of various ages was mainly presented by conditionally pathogenic bacterial and fungal microflora. There were identified the inefficient mechanisms of immune inflammation in case of conditionally pathogenic microflora, the reduction of neutrophils functional properties, and the increasing part of destructed phagocytazing neutrophils in patients of elderly and senile age. The immunosuppression in patients of elderly and senile age appears in insufficient production of IL-1beta, IL-8, resulting in reduced activity of phagocytosis mechanisms and lymphoid cells functional activity. Thus, the differences in etiopatogenetic microflora, immune homeostasis status in patients with CGP in middle, elderly and senile age, complexity in the application of antibacterial drugs require the development of new criteria for the selection of antibacterial drugs. PMID:22550880

  7. Gene polymorphism and protein of human pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in Chinese healthy subjects and chronic periodontitis patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Periodontal disease is thought to arise from the interaction of various factors, including the susceptibility of the host, the presence of pathogenic organisms, and the absence of beneficial species. The genetic factors may play a significant role in the risk of periodontal diseases. Cytokines initiate, mediate and control immune and inflammatory responses. The aim of this study is to compare genotypes and soluble protein of pro and anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, IFN-γ, IL-10, TNF-α and IL-4) in subjects with or free of chronic periodontitis. Methods A total of 1,290 Chinese subjects were recruited to this clinical trial: 850 periodontally healthy controls and 440 periodontal patients. All subjects were free of systemic diseases. Oral examinations were performed, and the following parameters were recorded for each subject: supragingival/subgingival calculus, gingival recession, bleeding on probing (BOP), probing depth (PD), clinical attachment loss (CAL), gingival recession and tooth mobility. The peripheral blood samples were collected for genetic and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis. Restriction enzymes were used for digestion of amplified fragments of IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, IFN-γ, IL-10, TNF-α and IL-4. Results The protein expressions of patient and control samples for IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-10, and IL-4 measured by ELISA confirmed a statistically significant difference (p < 0.001). The digestion of fragments of various genes showed that the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1α and TNF-α, and the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-4 and IL-10 demonstrated a correlation with chronic inflammation in patients (X2: p < 0.001). The remaining genes investigated in patients and healthy subjects (IL-1β, IL-6, IFN-γ and IL-10) did not show any significant difference. Conclusions The cytokine gene polymorphisms may be used as a marker for periodontitis susceptibility, clinical behaviour and severity. This

  8. The non-surgical management of a patient with Kostmann syndrome-associated periodontitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Stephanie; Frydman, Alon

    2014-12-01

    Kostmann syndrome is a rare, congenital immunological disorder caused by a mutation of the hematopoietic cell-specific LYN substrate 1-associated protein X1. These patients pose a unique challenge to the dental practitioner due to the severe oral infections that are often seen in this population. The patient described in this report is a 16-year-old female with Kostmann syndrome-associated periodontitis. The treatment consisted of scaling and root planing performed in conjunction with subgingival irrigation with povidone-iodine solution. This report details how Kostmann syndrome-associated periodontitis can be successfully treated and maintained long-term, using non-surgical treatment modalities and local antimicrobial therapy. PMID:25500931

  9. C-reactive Protein as Predict of Increased Carotid Intima Media Thickness in Patients with Chronic Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Tapashetti, Roopali P; Guvva, Sowjanya; Patil, Sudhir R; Sharma, Sumit; Pushpalatha, H M

    2014-01-01

    Background: C-reactive protein (CRP) - a prototypic marker of inflammation has been shown to be elevated in chronic periodontitis (CP) and also been shown to predict cardiovascular events. Increased carotid intima media thickness (CIMT) has been recently recognized as surrogate marker for atherosclerosis. In this context, we studied to correlate between CIMT and CRP in CP and to know whether CRP predicts the cardiovascular risk in CP. Materials and Methods: The study consisted of 30 systemically healthy subjects aged over 40 years - 15 subjects with CP as cases and 15 subjects with no periodontitis as controls. All subjects were subjected to measurement of CRP levels and CIMT in addition to detailed periodontal evaluation. Quantitative determination of CRP was done by turbidimetric immunoassay. IMT of the common carotid arteries was estimated bilaterally using B-mode ultrasound at 6 sites. Positive CRP was defined as more than 10 mg/l. Results: Mean CRP levels were significantly higher in subjects with CP (19.58 ± 17.03), then in non CP (NCP) (5.54 ± 1.63, P < 0.004). Mean CIMT value was significantly higher in subjects with CP (1.09 ± 0.45) than in NCP (0.57 ± 0.06, P < 0.001) and all periodontal indices correlated well with CIMT. Further, there was significant correlation between CRP and increased CIMT in subjects with CP (r = 0.863, P < 0.001). Conclusions: The present study indicates CRP as a possible underlying pathway in the association between periodontal disease and the observed CIMT. CRP can be used as a risk predictor for atherosclerosis in patients with CP. PMID:25214732

  10. Bacteraemia caused by periodontal probing.

    PubMed

    Daly, C; Mitchell, D; Grossberg, D; Highfield, J; Stewart, D

    1997-04-01

    Bacteraemia of oral origin may result in infective endocarditis in susceptible individuals. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the occurrence of bacteraemia due to periodontal probing. Thirty patients (15 male, 15 female; mean age 42.7 years) with untreated periodontitis were investigated. All were free of significant medical disorders and none had taken antibiotics in the previous month. Prior to and immediately following periodontal probing, 20 mL of venous blood were obtained from each patient and inoculated into aerobic and anaerobic blood culture bottles and incubated. Negative bottles were monitored continuously for three weeks before being discarded. Periodontal probing consisted of measuring pockets at six points around each tooth and recording the presence or absence of bleeding. A positive bacteraemia was recorded for three of the patients prior to probing. One patient exhibited Prevotella species whilst two exhibited skin commensals. Following probing, 13 patients (43 per cent) exhibited bacteraemia of oral origin. Viridans streptococci were the most common isolates (45 per cent). No significant correlations were found between bacteraemia and the severity of periodontitis or extent of bleeding on probing. The results indicate that periodontal probing can cause bacteraemia in patients with periodontitis. It would be advisable for patients considered at risk of developing infective endocarditis to receive antibiotic prophylaxis for periodontal probing if they have radiographic evidence of periodontitis.

  11. Critical Discussion of Essentials of Diagnosis and Recording in Periodontics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellen, Richard P.

    1994-01-01

    Issues to be addressed before writing standards of care for the diagnosis of adult periodontal disease are discussed. These include considerations in screening and examination; arriving at diagnosis and prognosis, informing the patient, and referral; monitoring outcomes using diagnostic signs and tests; and new technology for and approaches to…

  12. [Treatment of periodontitis associated with cyclosporin-induced severe gingival hyperplasia with regular mechanical plaque removal in a patient with renal transplantation (Case report)].

    PubMed

    Keglevich, Tibor; Windisch, Péter; Gera, István

    2002-02-01

    A clinical case of a middle-aged kidney transplanted woman is presented. The woman has been taking Cyclosporin-A for over 13 years and has had advanced periodontitis and severe gingival swellings and gingival inflammation. The kidney transplant patient was treated and followed up for approx. four years. The treatment protocol included very thorough mechanical scaling and root planing, oral hygienic instructions and the regular professional maintenance program resulted in complete remission of the gingival overgrowth and stabilization of the periodontal condition. The gingival and periodontal conditions showed a continuing improvement over the time despite of the continuous CSA administration.

  13. Systemic Antibiotics in Periodontal Treatment of Diabetic Patients: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Caroline Moura Martins Lobo; Lira-Junior, Ronaldo; Fischer, Ricardo Guimarães; Santos, Ana Paula Pires; Oliveira, Branca Heloisa

    2015-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the effects of systemic antibiotics in combination with scaling and root planing (SRP) on periodontal parameters, tooth loss and oral health-related quality of life in diabetes patients. Materials and Methods Two independent reviewers screened for controlled clinical trials with at least 6-month follow-up in six electronic databases, registers of clinical trials, meeting abstracts and four major dental journals. After duplicates removal, electronic and hand searches yielded 1,878 records; 18 full-text articles were independently read by two reviewers. To evaluate the additional effect of antibiotic usage, pooled weighted mean differences and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using a fixed effects model. Results Five studies met the inclusion criteria, four of which were included in meta-analyses. The meta-analyses showed a significant effect favouring SRP plus antibiotic for reductions in mean probing depth (PD) (-0.22 mm [-0.34, -0.11]) and mean percentage of bleeding on probing (BoP) (4% [-7, -1]). There was no significant effect for clinical attachment level gain and plaque index reduction. No study reported on tooth loss and oral health-related quality of life. Conclusion Adjunctive systemic antibiotic use in diabetic patients provides a small additional benefit in terms of reductions in mean PD and mean percentage of BoP. Registration PROSPERO: CRD42013006389. PMID:26693909

  14. Periodontal Disease as a Specific, albeit Chronic, Infection: Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Loesche, Walter J.; Grossman, Natalie S.

    2001-01-01

    Periodontal disease is perhaps the most common chronic infection in adults. Evidence has been accumulating for the past 30 years which indicates that almost all forms of periodontal disease are chronic but specific bacterial infections due to the overgrowth in the dental plaque of a finite number of mostly anaerobic species such as Porphyromonas gingivalis, Bacteroides forsythus, and Treponema denticola. The success of traditional debridement procedures and/or antimicrobial agents in improving periodontal health can be associated with the reduction in levels of these anaerobes in the dental plaque. These findings suggest that patients and clinicians have a choice in the treatment of this overgrowth, either a debridement and surgery approach or a debridement and antimicrobial treatment approach. However, the antimicrobial approach, while supported by a wealth of scientific evidence, goes contrary to centuries of dental teaching that states that periodontal disease results from a “dirty mouth.” If periodontal disease is demonstrated to be a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and stroke, it will be a modifiable risk factor since periodontal disease can be prevented and treated. Since the antimicrobial approach may be as effective as a surgical approach in the restoration and maintenance of a periodontally healthy dentition, this would give a cardiac or stroke patient and his or her physician a choice in the implementation of treatment seeking to improve the patient's periodontal condition so as to reduce and/or delay future cardiovascular events. PMID:11585783

  15. Ascorbic acid: new role of an age-old micronutrient in the management of periodontal disease in older adults.

    PubMed

    Alagl, Adel S; Bhat, Subraya Giliyar

    2015-03-01

    To review the new role of an age-old micronutrient - ascorbic acid - in the management of periodontal disease. Articles pertaining to the topic were searched in PubMed and other search engines from year 1974 to April 2014 with the following key words: "ascorbic acid," "ascorbate," "vitamin C," "periodontal disease," "gingivitis," "periodontitis," "anti-oxidants" and "elderly." Balanced nutrition is an essential factor in the elderly. Modification of nutritional requirement is important to overcome the effect of an unbalanced diet in older individuals as a result of several external and internal host-associated factors. Micronutrient requirements as aging advances could change, and require due attention. Ascorbic acid and its relationship with periodontal disease are very well known. However, recent changes in the concept of understanding the pathogenicity has led to a new path of therapeutic intervention with ascorbic acid in many chronic diseases. Oxidative stress with its associated burden might alter the disease process. In the era of "periodontal medicine," the impact of remote tissue changes on systemic disease has to be taken into serious consideration. Deficiency of nutritional impact on the host, with micronutrient vitamin C detailed in this review with sources, absorption, interaction and its relationship with systemic disease, and thereby the impact on periodontal disease. Ascorbic acid plays an important role in the aging process, and in the maintenance of periodontal health in the elderly. PMID:25407241

  16. Ascorbic acid: new role of an age-old micronutrient in the management of periodontal disease in older adults.

    PubMed

    Alagl, Adel S; Bhat, Subraya Giliyar

    2015-03-01

    To review the new role of an age-old micronutrient - ascorbic acid - in the management of periodontal disease. Articles pertaining to the topic were searched in PubMed and other search engines from year 1974 to April 2014 with the following key words: "ascorbic acid," "ascorbate," "vitamin C," "periodontal disease," "gingivitis," "periodontitis," "anti-oxidants" and "elderly." Balanced nutrition is an essential factor in the elderly. Modification of nutritional requirement is important to overcome the effect of an unbalanced diet in older individuals as a result of several external and internal host-associated factors. Micronutrient requirements as aging advances could change, and require due attention. Ascorbic acid and its relationship with periodontal disease are very well known. However, recent changes in the concept of understanding the pathogenicity has led to a new path of therapeutic intervention with ascorbic acid in many chronic diseases. Oxidative stress with its associated burden might alter the disease process. In the era of "periodontal medicine," the impact of remote tissue changes on systemic disease has to be taken into serious consideration. Deficiency of nutritional impact on the host, with micronutrient vitamin C detailed in this review with sources, absorption, interaction and its relationship with systemic disease, and thereby the impact on periodontal disease. Ascorbic acid plays an important role in the aging process, and in the maintenance of periodontal health in the elderly.

  17. Treatment of an Erratic Extraction Socket for Implant Therapy in a Patient with Chronic Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, Srividya

    2016-01-01

    As implant therapy becomes more commonplace in daily practice, preservation and preparation of edentulous sites are key. Many times, however, implant therapy may not be considered at the time of tooth extraction and additional measures are not taken to conserve the edentulous site. While the healing process in extraction sockets has been well investigated and bone fill can be expected, there are cases where even when clinicians perform thorough debridement of the sockets, connective tissue infiltration into the socket can occur. This phenomenon, known as “erratic healing,” may be associated with factors that lead to peri-implant disease and should be appropriately managed and treated prior to surgical implant placement. This case report describes the successful management of an erratic healing extraction socket in a 62-year-old Caucasian male patient with chronic periodontitis and the outcomes of an evidence-based treatment protocol performed prior to implant therapy. Careful preoperative analysis and cone beam computed tomography imaging can help detect signs of impaired healing in future implant sites and prevent surgical complications. PMID:27807485

  18. An evaluation of tricalcium phosphate implants in human periodontal osseous defects of two patients.

    PubMed

    Baldock, W T; Hutchens, L H; McFall, W T; Simpson, D M

    1985-01-01

    This study evaluated the use of tricalcium phosphate (TCP) ceramic implant material in periodontal osseous defects. Thirteen defects in two patients were treated with mucoperiosteal flaps and placement of TCP. The defects were evaluated clinically and radiographically utilizing standardized probe placement and radiographic technique. Clinically, there was a mean probing pocket reduction of 4.5 mm as a result of a mean gain of clinical probing attachment level of 2.0 mm and a mean gingival recession of 2.5 mm. Radiographically, there was a mean "fill" of 1.8 mm. Six teeth were removed by block biopsy for histologic analysis, three at 3 months, one at 6 months and two a 9 months. The TCP particles were well tolerated and encapsulated by fibrous connective tissue, but the particles did not stimulate new bone growth. The junctional epithelium ended 1.62 mm coronal to the apical extent of a reference notch placed at the base of the defect. Although new cementum was observed, there was limited evidence of new attachment. PMID:3856005

  19. Herpesviruses 6, 7 and 8 in HIV- and non-HIV-associated periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Mardirossian, A; Contreras, A; Navazesh, M; Nowzari, H; Slots, J

    2000-10-01

    Human herpesviruses, especially cytomegalovirus and Epstein Barr virus type-1, occur with higher frequency in subgingival specimens from periodontitis lesions than from healthy/gingivitis sites. Little or no information is available on the relationship between herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6), herpesvirus 7 (HHV-7) and herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) and periodontal disease. This study determined the periodontal occurrence of HHV-6, HHV-7 and HHV-8 in 21 HIV-seropositive and 14 HIV-negative adults affected by periodontitis. Gingival biopsy specimens and paper-point samples of subgingival plaque were collected from sites showing 5 mm or more in probing depth. Nested polymerase chain reaction methodology was employed in herpesvirus identification. In the HIV-seropositive periodontitis group, 90% of gingival biopsies and 62% of subgingival plaque samples revealed at least one of the test viruses. HHV-6 occurred in 71%, HHV-7 in 67% and HHV-8 in 24% of gingival biopsies. In the HIV-negative adult periodontitis group, 43% of gingival biopsies showed at least 1 of the test viruses, with HHV-6 present in 21% and H HV-7 in 29% of gingival biopsies and with no detection of HHV-8. The combined occurrence of the 3 test herpesviruses was significantly higher in HIV-seropositive than in HIV-negative adult periodontitis patients (p = 0.008). The human periodontium might constitute a site of infection or reservoir for HHV-6, -7, -8.

  20. [Evaluation of changes in periodontal status of patients with diabetes mellitus type II in surgical in-patient department after using Parоdontax Extra Fresh toothpaste].

    PubMed

    Elovikova, T M; Belokonova, N A; Shurygina, E A; Eshchenko, Ia A; Raspopova, N N

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory periodontal disease in patients with type II diabetes mellitus are characterized by a more severe course. Properly organized oral hygiene can effectively prevent and treat inflammation of periodontal tissues. The choice of therapeutic-prophylactic toothpaste, as one of the main means of personal hygiene, is especially important in patients with diabetes in surgical in-patient department. The study revealed high need in dental care (90%) in 20 patients with diabetes mellitus type II admitted to purulent surgery unit. After a week of using toothpaste Parоdontax Extra Fresh oral hygiene index improved 1.8 times and BOP index reduced twice-folds. Decrease of tissue swelling and tartar formation was also seen. PMID:25588398

  1. Nonsurgical periodontal treatment.

    PubMed

    Aimetti, Mario

    2014-01-01

    The primary goal of nonsurgical periodontal therapy is to control microbial periodontal infection by removing bacterial biofilm, calculus, and toxins from periodontally involved root surfaces. A review of the scientific literature indicates that mechanical nonsurgical periodontal treatment predictably reduces the levels of inflammation and probing pocket depths, increases the clinical attachment level and results in an apical shift of the gingival margin. Another parameter to be considered, in spite of the lack of scientific evidence, is the reduction in the degree of tooth mobility, as clinically experienced. It is important to point out that nonsurgical periodontal treatment presents limitations such as the long-term maintainability of deep periodontal pockets, the risk of disease recurrence, and the skill of the operator. A high number of posttreatment residual pockets exhibiting bleeding on probing and > 5 mm deep are related to lower clinical stability. The successful treatment of plaque-induced periodontitis will restore periodontal health, but with reduced periodontium. In such cases, anatomical damage from previous periodontal disease will persist and inverse architecture of soft tissue may impair home plaque removal. The clinician can select one of the following therapeutic options according to the individual patient's needs: - Quadrant/sextant wise instrumentation (conventional staged debridement, CSD). - Instrumentation of all pockets within a 24-hour period with (full mouth disinfection [FMD]) or without (full mouth scaling and root planing [FMSRP]) local antiseptics. Both procedures can be associated with systemic antimicrobials. -CSD or FMD in combination with laser or photodynamic therapy. Patients with aggressive periodontitis constitute a challenge to the clinician. To date there are no established protocols for controlling the disease. However, data from the literature on the application of the FMD protocol combined with amoxicillin

  2. Inverse Association of Plasma IgG Antibody to Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and High C-Reactive Protein Levels in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome and Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Thanakun, Supanee; Pornprasertsuk-Damrongsri, Suchaya; Gokyu, Misa; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Izumi, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    The association between clinically diagnosed periodontitis, a common chronic oral infection, and metabolic syndrome has been previously reported. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of plasma IgG levels against Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Prevotella intermedia, C-reactive protein, and periodontal status with metabolic syndrome. Plasma IgG levels and C-reactive protein were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and salivary levels of A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis were determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Among 127 individuals aged 35–76 years, 57 participants had metabolic syndrome and severe periodontitis, 25 had metabolic syndrome and an absence of severe periodontitis, 17 healthy individuals had severe periodontitis, and 28 healthy individuals were without severe periodontitis. Patients with metabolic syndrome had reduced humoral immune response to A. actinomycetemcomitans (p = 0.008), regardless of their salivary levels or periodontitis status compared with healthy participants. The IgG antibody response to P. gingivalis, regardless of their salivary levels or participants’ health condition, was significantly higher in severe periodontitis patients (p<0.001). Plasma IgG titers for P. intermedia were inconsistent among metabolic syndrome or periodontal participants. Our results indicate that the presence of lower levels of IgG antibodies to A. actinomycetemcomitans (OR = 0.1; 95%CI 0.0–0.7), but not P. gingivalis, a severe periodontitis status (OR = 7.8; 95%CI 1.1–57.0), high C-reactive protein levels (OR = 9.4; 95%CI 1.0–88.2) and body mass index (OR = 3.0; 95%CI 1.7–5.2), are associated with the presence of metabolic syndrome. The role of the decreased IgG antibody response to A. actinomycetemcomitans, increased C-reactive protein levels on the association between periodontal disease and metabolic syndrome in a group of Thai patients is

  3. Association of dental and periodontal disease with chronic kidney disease in patients of a single, tertiary care centre in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Ausavarungnirun, R; Wisetsin, S; Rongkiettechakorn, N; Chaichalermsak, S; Udompol, U; Rattanasompattikul, M

    2016-01-01

    Background Several studies have shown an association between oral diseases and chronic kidney disease (CKD), and regular oral care may be an important strategy for reducing the burden of CKD. The objective of this study was therefore to evaluate the association between dental and periodontal diseases in Thai patients with various stages of CKD. Methods This was designed as a cross-sectional study and was performed between 2011 and 2012. The inclusion criteria were age >20 years and a diagnosis of CKD for at least 90 days. Data from medical records were collected, clinical oral examination was performed, and data were statistically analysed. Results A total of 129 patients with different stages of CKD were included. Ninety-eight (76%) were men. The age range was 30–86 years. The Decay, Missing and Filling Tooth Index and the number of missing teeth were higher in the group with moderate CKD than in the control group (21 vs 17.5, p=0.045, 13 vs 8 p=0.01, respectively). Serum albumin levels decreased when estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was in decline (γ=0.33; p=0.002). Severe periodontitis was significantly higher in the ‘more severe CKD group’ (eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m2) than in the ‘less severe CKD group’ (eGFR 60–90 mL/min/1.73 m2; 24% vs 9%, p=0.03). Severe periodontitis, eGFR <30 mL/min/1.73 m2 and brushing teeth more than once a day were associated with hypoalbuminaemia (defined as <3.8 g/dL) (OR (95% CI) 5.88 (1.64 to 21.11), 5.80 (1.58 to 21.35) and 0.16 (0.05 to 0.60), respectively). Conclusions Severe periodontal diseases were more prevalent in patients with more severe CKD than in those with less severe CKD. The novel association of serum albumin levels with periodontal status was demonstrated in progressive stages of CKD. Dental intervention may be beneficial from the early stages of CKD. PMID:27466240

  4. Clinical evaluation of topical application of perio-Q gel (Coenzyme Q10) in chronic periodontitis patients

    PubMed Central

    Hans, Mayank; Prakash, Shobha; Gupta, Subhash

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Coenzyme Q10 is a well studied antioxidant in medical literature, but studies regarding its efficacy in periodontal diseases are few. Hence, the aim of this study was to test the efficacy of coenzyme Q10 in the form of gel (Perio-Q) in patients with chronic gingivitis and periodontitis. Materials and Methods: A total of 12 patients were enrolled. A split mouth design was used for topical (extrasulcular) application, intra-pocket application alone, intra-pocket application combined with scaling and root planing (SRP) and SRP only in each quadrant, respectively. Clinical parameters such as plaque index, gingival index, gingival bleeding index, probing pocket depth, clinical attachment level were assessed at baseline, 3rd week, and 6th week. The results were subjected to statistical analysis, which were expressed as mean±SD and proportions as percentages. Intra group comparisons were made by paired t-test and one way analysis of variance (ANOVA) for inter-group comparisons. Categorical data was analyzed by Fisher's exact test. Results: The results showed on intra-group analysis significant reduction (P<0.01) of clinical parameters (plaque index (PI), gingival index (GI), gingival bleeding index (GBI), periodontal probing pocket depth (PPD), and clinical attachment level (CAL)) in all four treatment groups, whereas on inter-group analysis, intra-pocket gel application in combination with SRP showed significant reduction (P<0.05) for PI, GI, GBI, and CAL in comparison to intra-pocket gel alone. Interpretation and Conclusion: In the present study, in chronic periodontitis patients, sub-gingival mechanical debridement only and with Perio-Q gel showed almost similar clinical results without any statistically significant differences. Hence, it confirmed the primary role of basic mechanical approaches in periodontal therapy and did not provide enough clinical support for the superiority of adjunctive use of Perio-Q gel. However, it appears that

  5. Prevalence of cytomegalovirus, human herpesvirus-6, and Epstein-Barr virus in periodontitis patients and healthy subjects in the Thai population.

    PubMed

    Tantivanich, Surang; Laohapand, Penpan; Thaweeboon, Sroisiri; Desakorn, Varunee; Wuthinuntiwong, Preeda; Chalermtaranukul, Sompoj; Pansri, Potjamas; Amarapal, Pornsawan; Balachandra, Kruavan; Chantratita, Wasun; Dhepakson, Panadda

    2004-09-01

    Fifty periodontitis patients and 30 healthy patients with oral cavities were selected from the Faculty of Dentistry, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand, from March 2001 to November 2002. Their ages varied between 15 and 70 years. Among the periodontitis patients, specimens were collected from both disease and healthy sites. All samples were evaluated for the presence of CMV, HHV-6, and EBV-1 by nested PCR. Among the periodontitis patients, CMV was found in 34%, of which 8% were at the disease sites, 10% were at the healthy sites, and 16% were from both sites. EBV was not found in this group of the patients, while HHV-6 was found in 4%, at the disease sites only. CMV was found in one (3.3%) healthy control while HHV-6 and EBV-1 were not found. The depth of sample sites, various demographic and baseline characteristics eg sex, age, occupation and root planning were not associated with the presence of these viruses.

  6. Periodontal health status in patients treated with the Invisalign® system and fixed orthodontic appliances: A 3 months clinical and microbiological evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Levrini, Luca; Mangano, Alessandro; Montanari, Paola; Margherini, Silvia; Caprioglio, Alberto; Abbate, Gian Marco

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this prospective study was to compare the periodontal health and the microbiological changes via real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in patients treated with fixed orthodontic appliances and Invisalign® system (Align Technology, Santa Clara, California). Materials and Methods: Seventy-seven patients were enrolled in this study and divided into three groups (Invisalign® group, fixed orthodontic appliances group and control group). Plaque index, probing depth, bleeding on probing were assessed. Total biofilm mass and periodontal pathogens were analyzed and detected via real-time PCR. All these data were analyzed at the T0 (beginning of the treatment) T1 (1-month) and T2 (3 months); and statistically compared using the Mann–Whitney test for independent groups. Results: After 1-month and after 3 months of treatment there was only one sample with periodontopathic anaerobes found in patient treated using fixed orthodontic appliances. The Invisalign® group showed better results in terms of periodontal health and total biofilm mass compared to the fixed orthodontic appliance group. A statistical significant difference (P < 0.05) at the T2 in the total biofilm mass was found between the two groups. Conclusion: Patients undergoing orthodontic treatment with the Invisalign® System show a superior periodontal health in the short-term when compared to patients in treatment with fixed orthodontic appliances. Invisalign® should be considered as a first treatment option in patients with risk of developing periodontal disease. PMID:26430371

  7. Randomized controlled clinical trial of 2 types of hydroxyapatite-coated implants on moderate periodontitis patients

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to compare and analyze the peri-implant tissue conditions and prospective clinical outcomes associated with 2 types of hydroxyapatite (HA)-coated implants: (1) fully HA-coated implants and (2) partially HA-coated implants with resorbable blast medium on the coronal portion of the threads. Methods Forty-four partially edentulous patients were randomly assigned to undergo the placement of 62 HA-coated implants, and were classified as the control group (partially HA-coated, n=30) and the test group (fully HA-coated, n=32). All patients had chronic periodontitis with moderate crestal bone loss around the edentulous area. The stability and clinical outcomes of the implants were evaluated using the primary and secondary implant stability quotient (ISQ), as well as radiographic, mobility, and peri-implant soft tissue assessments around the implants. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test and the Mann-Whitney test were used to evaluate differences between and within the 2 groups, with P values <0.05 considered to indicate statistical significance. Results The fully HA-coated implants displayed good retention of crestal bone, and insignificant differences were found in annual marginal bone loss between the 2 types of HA-coated implants (P>0.05). No significant differences were found in the survival rate (group I, 100%; group II, 100%) or the success rate (group I, 93.3%; group II, 93.8%). The fully HA-coated implants also did not significantly increase the risk of peri-implantitis (P>0.05). Conclusions The fully HA-coated implants did not lead to an increased risk of peri-implantitis and showed good retention of the crestal bone, as well as good survival and success rates. Our study suggests that fully HA-coated implants could become a reliable treatment alternative for edentulous posterior sites and are capable of providing good retention of the crestal bone. PMID:27800216

  8. Diversity of cultivable and uncultivable oral spirochetes from a patient with severe destructive periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Choi, B K; Paster, B J; Dewhirst, F E; Göbel, U B

    1994-05-01

    To determine the genetic diversity of cultivable and uncultivable spirochetes in the gingival crevice of a patient with severe periodontitis, partial 16S rRNA genes were cloned from PCR-amplified products of DNA and RNA extracted from a subgingival plaque sample. Approximately 500 bp were amplified in PCRs by using universally conserved primers with polylinker tails. Purified PCR products were cloned into Escherichia coli by using the plasmid vector pUC19. The resultant clone library was screened by colony hybridization with a radiolabeled, treponeme-specific oligonucleotide probe. The 16S rRNA inserts of 81 spirochetal clones were then sequenced by standard procedures. Sequences were compared with 16S rRNA sequences of 35 spirochetes, including the four known cultivable oral treponeme species. The analysis revealed an unexpected diversity of oral treponemes from a single patient. When 98% or greater sequence similarity was used as the definition of a species-level cluster, the clone sequences were found to represent 23 species. When 92% similarity was used as the definition, the clones fell into eight major groups, only two of which contained named species, Treponema vincentii and Treponema denticola, while Treponema pectinovorum and Treponema socranskii were not represented in any cluster. Seven of the 81 spirochetal clones were found to contain chimeric 16S rRNA sequences. In situ fluorescence hybridization with a fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled oligonucleotide probe specific for one of the new species representing cluster 19 was used to identify cells of the target species directly in clinical samples.

  9. Diagnosis of Adult Patients with Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Nick, Jerry A; Nichols, David P

    2016-03-01

    The diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF) is being made with increasing frequency in adults. Patients with CF diagnosed in adulthood typically present with respiratory complaints, and often have recurrent or chronic airway infection. At the time of initial presentation individuals may appear to have clinical manifestation limited to a single organ, but with subclinical involvement of the respiratory tract. Adult-diagnosed patients have a good response to CF center care, and newly available cystic fibrosis transmembrane receptor-modulating therapies are promising for the treatment of residual function mutation, thus increasing the importance of the diagnosis in adults with unexplained bronchiectasis.

  10. Periodontitis and osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Straka, Michal; Straka-Trapezanlidis, Michaela; Deglovic, Juraj; Varga, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Today's knowledge and studies show a firm correlation between osteoporosis and periodontitis, particularly in postmenopausal women. This review study deals with epidemiological and etiopathogenetic association between chronic periodontitis and an osteoporosis. A special emphasis is put on explanation of possible relations between a premature tooth loss and decrease of length and density of jaw bones, particularly their alveolar prolongations. The second part of the paper deals with principles of treatment in patients suffering of osteoporosis. Osteoporosis reduces density of jaw bones and decreases a number of teeth in jaws, but it does not affect other clinical signs and markers of periodontitis such as inflammation, bleeding and the depth of periodontal pockets and microbial plaque.

  11. Body mass index as a predictive factor of periodontal therapy outcomes.

    PubMed

    Suvan, J; Petrie, A; Moles, D R; Nibali, L; Patel, K; Darbar, U; Donos, N; Tonetti, M; D'Aiuto, F

    2014-01-01

    Body mass index (BMI) and obesity are associated with the prevalence, extent, and severity of periodontitis. This study investigated the predictive role of overweight/obesity on clinical response following non-surgical periodontal therapy in patients with severe periodontitis. Two hundred sixty adults received an intensive course of non-surgical periodontal therapy. Periodontal status at baseline and 2 months was based upon probing pocket depths (PPD), clinical attachment levels (CAL), and whole-mouth gingival bleeding (FMBS) as assessed by two calibrated examiners. Generalized estimating equations (GEE) were used to estimate the impact of BMI and overweight/obesity on periodontal treatment response while controlling for baseline status, age, smoking status (smoker or non-smoker), and full-mouth dental plaque score. BMI (continuous variable) and obesity (vs. normal weight) were associated with worse mean PPD (p < .005), percentage of PPD > 4 mm (p = .01), but not with FMBS (p > .05) or CAL (p > .05) at 2 months, independent of age, smoking status, or dental plaque levels. The magnitude of this association was similar to that of smoking, which was also linked to a worse clinical periodontal outcome (p < .01). BMI and obesity appear to be independent predictors of poor response following non-surgical periodontal therapy. PMID:24165943

  12. Body Mass Index as a Predictive Factor of Periodontal Therapy Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Suvan, J.; Petrie, A.; Moles, D.R.; Nibali, L.; Patel, K.; Darbar, U.; Donos, N.; Tonetti, M.; D’Aiuto, F.

    2014-01-01

    Body mass index (BMI) and obesity are associated with the prevalence, extent, and severity of periodontitis. This study investigated the predictive role of overweight/obesity on clinical response following non-surgical periodontal therapy in patients with severe periodontitis. Two hundred sixty adults received an intensive course of non-surgical periodontal therapy. Periodontal status at baseline and 2 months was based upon probing pocket depths (PPD), clinical attachment levels (CAL), and whole-mouth gingival bleeding (FMBS) as assessed by two calibrated examiners. Generalized estimating equations (GEE) were used to estimate the impact of BMI and overweight/obesity on periodontal treatment response while controlling for baseline status, age, smoking status (smoker or non-smoker), and full-mouth dental plaque score. BMI (continuous variable) and obesity (vs. normal weight) were associated with worse mean PPD (p < .005), percentage of PPD > 4 mm (p = .01), but not with FMBS (p > .05) or CAL (p > .05) at 2 months, independent of age, smoking status, or dental plaque levels. The magnitude of this association was similar to that of smoking, which was also linked to a worse clinical periodontal outcome (p < .01). BMI and obesity appear to be independent predictors of poor response following non-surgical periodontal therapy. PMID:24165943

  13. [MORFOHISTOHIMICHNA EVALUATION OF REHABILITATION PATIENTS WITH GENERALIZED PERIODONTAL DISEASE AGAINST CORONARY HEART DISEASE].

    PubMed

    Yanishewskyy, K A

    2014-01-01

    Un the basis of morphological studies examined the effectiveness of complex pathogenetic treatment of generalized periodontal disease with the use of products based on natural ingredients: dental paste "Fitopasta-3K" and drug "plantain juice" for the local treatment and drugs "Granules quercetin" and "Energoton" for systemic treatment. Established that one of the important mechanisms of complex pathogenetic treatment is the effect on energy metabolism of periodontal tissues, including the reduction of tissue hypoxia, metabolic stabilization was observed structural changes navkolozubnyh tissues. It should be noted positive effects of integrated treatment on the whole body. PMID:26492784

  14. Analysis of IL-1α(−889) and IL-1B(+3953) Gene Polymorphism in Syrian Patients with Aggressive Periodontitis: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Shibani, Kenan; Shhab, Reem; Khattab, Razan

    2011-01-01

    Polymorphisms in IL-1 gene have been suggested to influence transcription of IL-1α and IL-1B and thereby the pathophysiology of periodontitis. Using genotyping IL-1 test, a pilot study was conducted on 32 Syrian patients with aggressive periodontitis (AgP) and 35 healthy controls to investigate the association between the IL-1α(−889), IL-1B(+3953) gene polymorphisms and AgP among schoolchildren. The results revealed a similar distribution of genotypes between patients and controls, and did not support an association between IL-1 gene polymorphisms and AgP, however, the association was significant in male patients only. To determine and confirm any susceptible or resistant genes for AgP, future studies should use many target genes and well-defined related periodontal outcomes. PMID:22203911

  15. Detection of fusobacterium nucleatum and fadA adhesin gene in patients with orthodontic gingivitis and non-orthodontic periodontal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; Liu, Yi; Wang, Jianning; Guo, Yang; Zhang, Yujie; Xiao, Shuiqing

    2014-01-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is one of the most abundant gram-negative bacilli colonizing the subgingival plaque and closely associated with periodontal disease. However it is unclear whether F. nucleatum is involved in gingival inflammation under orthodontic appliance. A novel adhesin, FadA, which is unique to oral Fusobacteria, is required for F. nucleatum binding and invasion to epithelial cells and thus may play an important role in colonization of Fusobacterium in the host. In this study, we evaluated the prevalence of F. nucleatum and its virulence factor FadA adhesion gene (fadA) in 169 subgingival biofilm samples from 55 cases of gingivitis patients with orthodontic appliances, 49 cases of gingivitis patients without orthodontic treatment, 35 cases of periodontitis patients and 30 cases of periodontally healthy people via PCR. The correlations between the F. nucleatum/fadA and gingivitis index(GI)was also analyzed. The detection rate of F. nucleatum/fadA in periodontitis group and non-orthodontic gingivitis group was higher than the other two groups (p<0.01) while it was higher in orthodontic gingivitis group than in health people (p<0.05). An obviously positive correlation was observed between the prevalence of F. nucleatum/fadA and GI. F. nucleatum carrying fadA may be more closely related to the development of gingivitis and periodontal disease compared with orthodontic gingivitis.

  16. Receptor activator of NF-kappaB ligand (RANKL) and CD 31 expressions in chronic periodontitis patients before and after surgery

    PubMed Central

    Friedmann, Anton; Bernimoulin, Jean-Pierre; Kleber, Bernd-Michael; Ayhan, Eylem; Aykan, Tuba; Gökmenoğlu, Ceren

    2014-01-01

    Aim of the study The present study investigated the hypothesis that upregulation of receptor activator of NF-kappaB ligand (RANKL) expression may be associated with upregulation of endothelial cell activitiy, which is common for periods of periodontal bone loss in chronic periodontitis. Material and methods RANKL expression of activated cells in soft tissue biopsies with CD 31 activity and the presence of RANKL and osteoprotegerin (OPG) in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) were assessed in chronic periodontitis patients. Biopsies from 17 patients and 10 healthy subjects were immunohistochemically analyzed. Clinical measurements [plaque index (PI), the gingival index (GI), probing pocket depth (PPD), clinical attachment level (CAL) and gingival bleeding index (GBI)] and GCF samples were obtained before and after periodontal therapy. Results CD31 staining did not support the assumption that endothelium-like cells were predominantly associated with RANKL expression. Conclusions RANKL-positive cells were widely distributed in periodontitis patients giving only partial support to the hypothesis that RANKL expression is restricted to T- and B-cell activation. PMID:26155171

  17. Detection of fusobacterium nucleatum and fadA adhesin gene in patients with orthodontic gingivitis and non-orthodontic periodontal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; Liu, Yi; Wang, Jianning; Guo, Yang; Zhang, Yujie; Xiao, Shuiqing

    2014-01-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is one of the most abundant gram-negative bacilli colonizing the subgingival plaque and closely associated with periodontal disease. However it is unclear whether F. nucleatum is involved in gingival inflammation under orthodontic appliance. A novel adhesin, FadA, which is unique to oral Fusobacteria, is required for F. nucleatum binding and invasion to epithelial cells and thus may play an important role in colonization of Fusobacterium in the host. In this study, we evaluated the prevalence of F. nucleatum and its virulence factor FadA adhesion gene (fadA) in 169 subgingival biofilm samples from 55 cases of gingivitis patients with orthodontic appliances, 49 cases of gingivitis patients without orthodontic treatment, 35 cases of periodontitis patients and 30 cases of periodontally healthy people via PCR. The correlations between the F. nucleatum/fadA and gingivitis index(GI)was also analyzed. The detection rate of F. nucleatum/fadA in periodontitis group and non-orthodontic gingivitis group was higher than the other two groups (p<0.01) while it was higher in orthodontic gingivitis group than in health people (p<0.05). An obviously positive correlation was observed between the prevalence of F. nucleatum/fadA and GI. F. nucleatum carrying fadA may be more closely related to the development of gingivitis and periodontal disease compared with orthodontic gingivitis. PMID:24416378

  18. Changes in Transforming Growth Factor-β1 in Gingival Crevicular Fluid of Patients with Chronic Periodontitis Following Periodontal Flap Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, T.; Anilkumar, K.; Ambalavanan, N.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of the study was to assess changes in Transforming Growth Factor– β1 (TGF-β1) levels in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) and examine correlation of TGF-β1 levels and periodontal parameters: probing pocket depth (PPD) and clinical attachment level (CAL) in sites with chronic periodontitis at various time intervals before and after periodontal surgery. Materials and Methods: The effects of non-surgical and surgical therapy on periodontal parameters and GCF TGF-β1 levels in 18 sites affected with chronic periodontitis were assessed upto 6 weeks post conventional flap surgery. GCF was collected and PPD, CAL recorded at Baseline. GCF was collected and PPD, CAL recorded at Pre-surgery and flap surgery performed. GCF was collected from all sites at Two Weeks Post-surgery. GCF was collected and PPD, CAL recorded at Six Weeks Post-surgery. The concentration of TGF-β1 in GCF was determined using a human TGF-β1 enzyme immunometric assay kit. Results: Mean TGF-β1 concentrations were significantly reduced at Pre-surgery, at Two Weeks Post-surgery and at Six Weeks Post-surgery (p<0.05) when compared to Baseline TGF-β1 values. There was a statistically significant reduction in PPD and gain in CAL following non-surgical and surgical therapy when compared to baseline (p<0.05). Conclusion: Results indicate that TGF-β1 may play a role in the pathogenesis and diagnosis of periodontal disease and could be considered as a disease predictive biomarker. PMID:25859517

  19. Occurrence of yeasts, enterococci and other enteric bacteria in subgingival biofilm of HIV-positive patients with chronic gingivitis and necrotizing periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Gaetti-Jardim Júnior, Elerson; Nakano, Viviane; Wahasugui, Thais C.; Cabral, Fátima C.; Gamba, Rosa; Avila-Campos, Mario Julio

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of enteric bacteria and yeasts in biofilm of 80 HIV-positive patients with plaque-associated gingivitis or necrotizing periodontitis. Patients were subjected to extra, intra oral and radiographic examinations. The oral hygiene, bleeding on probing, gingival conditions, and attachment loss were evaluated. Clinical specimens were collected from gingival crevices or periodontal pockets, transferred to VMGA III, diluted and transferred to Sabouraud Dextrose agar with 100 μg/ml of chloramphenicol, peptone water, EVA broth, EMB agar, SS agar, Bile esculin agar and Brilliant green agar. Isolation of yeasts was carried out at room temperature, for 3-7 days; and for the isolation of enteric microorganisms plates were incubated at 37°C, for 24-48 h. The yeasts identification was performed according to the carbon and nitrogen assimilation, fermentation of carbohydrates and germ tube formation. Bacteria were identified according to their colonial and cellular morphologies and biochemical tests. Yeasts were identified as Candida albicans and its occurrence was more common in patients with CD4+ below 200/mm3 and was affected by the extension of periodontal involvement (P = 0.0345). Enteric bacteria recovered from clinical specimens were identified as Enterobacter sakazakii, Enterobacter cloacae, Serratia liquefaciens, Klebsiella oxytoca and Enterococcus sp. Enterobacteriaceae and enterococci were detected in 32.5% of clinical samples from patients with necrotizing periodontitis. In conclusion, non-oral pathogenic bacteria and C. albicans were more prevalent in periodontal sites of HIV-positive patients with necrotizing periodontitis and chronic gingivitis. PMID:24031212

  20. Congenitally Missing Maxillary Lateral Incisors: Functional and Periodontal Aspects in Patients Treated with Implants or Space Closure and Tooth Re-Contouring

    PubMed Central

    Marchi, Luciana Manzotti De; Pini, Núbia Inocencya Pavesi; Hayacibara, Roberto Massayuki; Silva, Rafael Santos; Pascotto, Renata Corrêa

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate functional and periodontal aspects in patients with unilateral or bilateral congenitally missing maxillary lateral incisors, treated with either implants or space closure and tooth re-contouring. The sample consisted of 68 volunteers, divided into 3 groups: SCR - space closure and tooth re-contouring with composite resin (n = 26); SOI – implants placed in the area of agenesis (n = 20); and CG - control group (n = 22). A modified Helkimo questionnaire and the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders were used by a single, previously calibrated evaluator to assess signs and symptoms of temporomandibular joint disorder. The periodontal assessment involved the following aspects: plaque index, bleeding upon probing, pocket depth greater than 3 mm, gingival recession, abfraction, periodontal biotype and papilla index. The data were analyzed using Fisher's exact test and the nonparametric Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests (α=.05). No differences in periodontal status were found between treatments. None of the groups were associated with signs and symptoms of temporomandibular joint disorder. Both treatment alternatives for patients with congenitally missing maxillary lateral incisors were satisfactory and achieved functional and periodontal results similar to those of the control group. PMID:23346262

  1. Accuracy of NHANES periodontal examination protocols.

    PubMed

    Eke, P I; Thornton-Evans, G O; Wei, L; Borgnakke, W S; Dye, B A

    2010-11-01

    This study evaluates the accuracy of periodontitis prevalence determined by the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) partial-mouth periodontal examination protocols. True periodontitis prevalence was determined in a new convenience sample of 454 adults ≥ 35 years old, by a full-mouth "gold standard" periodontal examination. This actual prevalence was compared with prevalence resulting from analysis of the data according to the protocols of NHANES III and NHANES 2001-2004, respectively. Both NHANES protocols substantially underestimated the prevalence of periodontitis by 50% or more, depending on the periodontitis case definition used, and thus performed below threshold levels for moderate-to-high levels of validity for surveillance. Adding measurements from lingual or interproximal sites to the NHANES 2001-2004 protocol did not improve the accuracy sufficiently to reach acceptable sensitivity thresholds. These findings suggest that NHANES protocols produce high levels of misclassification of periodontitis cases and thus have low validity for surveillance and research.

  2. Comparative Evaluation of Ciprofloxacin Levels in GCF and Plasma of Chronic Periodontitis Patients: Quasi Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Denthumdas, Sunil Kumar; Wadgave, Umesh; Pharne, Pooja Mohan; Patil, Sandeep Jambukumar; Kondreddi, Sirisha; Deshpande, Pavan; Koppikar, Rajesh Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction For any antimicrobial approach to be successful in periodontal therapy, it is important that the antimicrobial agent targets the sub-gingival biofilm by attaining sufficient concentration at the sub-gingival site. Aim The purpose of the present study was to determine and compare the concentrations of ciprofloxacin present in Gingival Crevicular Fluid (GCF) and plasma after its systemic administration. Materials and Methods A total of 20 subjects, in the age group of 30-60 years satisfying the inclusion and exclusion criteria, were chosen from the outpatient Department of Periodontology, Government Dental College and Hospital, Hyderabad and consent was obtained. Subjects were put on oral ciprofloxacin therapy (Baycip, Bayer Corporation) of 500mg twice daily doses for five days to establish steady state tissue levels of the agent. GCF and serum samples were collected at the 72nd hour after the first dose of ciprofloxacin and were compared using unpaired t test. Results The mean gingival index value of the subjects was 1.8 ± 0.59 and the mean probing depth of the subjects taken in the study was 5.724 ± 0.47mm. The results of this study showed that ciprofloxacin concentrations were significantly higher (p<0.001) in GCF than in plasma. Conclusion Results from the present study and those from the earlier studies clearly indicate the ciprofloxacin’s ability to reach and concentrate in infected periodontal sites via GCF. This property of ciprofloxacin may be useful for eradication of periodontal pathogens, thus improving the outcome of periodontal therapy. PMID:27504410

  3. Intergenerational continuity in periodontal health: findings from the Dunedin Family History Study

    PubMed Central

    Shearer, Dara M; Thomson, W. Murray; Caspi, Avshalom; Moffitt, Terrie E; Broadbent, Jonathan M; Poulton, Richie

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine whether parental periodontal disease history is a risk factor for periodontal disease in adult offspring. Methods Proband periodontal examination (combined attachment loss (CAL) at age 32, and incidence of CAL from ages 26–32) and interview data were collected during the age-32 assessments in the Dunedin Study. Parental data were also collected. The sample was divided into two familial-risk groups for periodontal disease (high- and low-risk) based on parents’ self-reported periodontal disease. Results Periodontal risk analysis involved 625 proband-parent(s) groups. After controlling for confounding factors, the high-familial-risk periodontal group was more likely to have 1+ sites with 4+mm CAL (RR 1.45; 95% CI 1.11–1.88), 2+ sites with 4+mm CAL (RR 1.45; 95% CI 1.03–2.05), 1+ sites with 5+mm CAL (RR 1.60; 95% CI 1.02–2.50) and 1+ sites with 3+mm incident CAL (RR 1.64; 95% CI 1.01–2.66) than the low-familial-risk group. Predictive validity was enhanced when information was available from both parents. Conclusions Parents with poor periodontal health tend to have offspring with poor periodontal health. Family/parental history of oral health is a valid representation of the shared genetic and environmental factors that contribute to an individual’s periodontal status, and may help predict patient prognosis and preventive treatment need. PMID:21281332

  4. Gene expression analysis of the CD4+ T-cell clones derived from gingival tissues of periodontitis patients.

    PubMed

    Ito, H; Honda, T; Domon, H; Oda, T; Okui, T; Amanuma, R; Nakajima, T; Yamazaki, K

    2005-12-01

    The function of T cells infiltrating periodontitis lesions is complex and has not been fully elucidated. Here, we established T-cell clones from the gingival tissues of periodontitis patients and examined their gene expression. A total of 57 and 101 T-cell clones were established by means of immobilized anti-CD3 antibody and IL-2 from gingival tissues and peripheral blood, respectively. The gingival T-cell clones were derived from three patients, and the peripheral blood T-cell clones from two of these patients and a further patient whose gingival T-cell clones were not established. Gingival tissues were also obtained from a further 19 periodontitis patients. The expression of cytokines and molecules related to both regulatory function and tissue destruction were examined by means of reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. All the gingival T-cell clones expressed mRNA for TGF-beta1, CTLA-4, and CD25, and all the T-cell clones from peripheral blood expressed IFN-gamma and TGF-beta1 mRNAs. Most but not all the T-cell clones from gingival tissues and peripheral blood expressed mRNA for IFN-gamma and, CD25 and CTLA-4, respectively. The frequency of T-cell clones and gingival tissues expressing FOXP3, a possible master gene for mouse CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells, was very high (97%, 93%, and 100% for gingival T-cell clones, peripheral blood T-cell clones, and gingival tissues, respectively). Whereas the frequency of IL-4-expressing T-cell clones was lower for gingival T-cell clones (70% vs. 87%), the frequency of the gingival T-cell clones expressing IL-10 and IL-17 was higher than peripheral blood T-cell clones (75% vs. 62% for IL-10, 51% vs. 11% for IL-17). A similar expression profile was observed for gingival T-cell clones compared with gingival tissue samples with the exception of IL-4 expression, where the frequency of positive samples was lower in the gingival tissues (70% vs. 11%). These results suggest that the individual T cells infiltrating

  5. [Periodontitis and systemic diseases: from science to clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Thomas, R Z; Loos, B G; Teeuw, W; Kunnen, A; van Winkelhoff, A J; Abbas, F

    2015-10-01

    The evidence for an association between systemic diseases and periodontitis is strongest with diabetes mellitus type 2 and cardiovascular disease. There is a moderate association of periodontitis with adverse pregnancy outcomes and rheumatoid arthritis. Periodontal treatment has, on average, a positive effect on reducing systemic infection and improving the condition of the vascular system. For diabetes patients, periodontal treatment can also have a positive effect on metabolic regulation. There is insufficient evidence that periodontal treatment prevents adverse pregnancy outcomes and rheumatoid arthritis.

  6. Importance of Actinomyces and certain gram-negative anaerobic organisms in the transformation of lymphocytes from patients with periodontal disease.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, J J; Chan, S P; Socransky, S S; Oppenheim, J J; Mergenhagen, S E

    1976-01-01

    Dental plaque deposits are known to be potent stimulants of lymphocyte transformation in patients with periodontal disease but not in normal subjects. Since plaque deposits consist mainly of whole bacteria, the cell walls of the most commonly found organisms in plaque were tested for their capacity to induce lymphocyte transformation. There was a direct correlation between the severity of peridontal disease and the amount of transformation induced by the cell walls of oral bacteria and by solubilized dental plaque. Cord blood leukocytes and lymphocytes from clinically normal people did not respond, which indicates that these stimulants are antigens rather than mitogens. Of the eleven bacteria tested, four members of the family Actinomycetaceae (Actinomyces viscosus, A. israelii, A. naeslundii, and Arachnia propionica), the related Propionibacterium acnes, and an anaerobic gram-negative anaerobic rod (27N). The high prevalence of the former organisms in the mature dental plaque that forms around the gingival crevice area and the potent efficacy with which they stimulate lymphocytes indicates that Actinomyces and certain gram-negative anaerobes may be important etiological agents in chronic periodontal inflammation in man. PMID:1270144

  7. Response to Proximal Restorations Placed Either Subgingivally or Following Crown Lengthening in Patients with No History of Periodontal Disease.

    PubMed

    Oppermann, Rui Vicente; Gomes, Sabrina Carvalho; Cavagni, Juliano; Cayana, Ezymar Gomes; Conceição, Ewerton Nocchi

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the impact of resin restorations placed supragingivally or impinging periodontal biologic width (PBW). Ten patients (aged 19 to 35 years) with at least two contralateral teeth (premolars and molars) in need of proximal subgingival restorations participated. Test group (TG) (impingement of PBW with transsurgical restorations) and control croup (CG) (supragingival restorations after crown lengthening) were randomly assigned. Visible plaque (VP), bleeding on probing (BOP), periodontal probing depth (PPD), and clinical attachment loss (CAL) were evaluated at baseline and at 45, 90, and 180 days, and by transperiodontal probing at baseline and 180 days. Generalized estimating equations, Wald test, and t test were used (P ≤ .05). VP and BOP were reduced and maintained at low levels (less than 10% from day 45 on). PPD initially reduced in the TG. At day 180, no intra- or intergroup differences were observed (P > .05). CAL was higher in the CG after surgery (P < .05) and remained stable for both groups throughout the study. In conclusion, proximal bonded restorations infringing on the PBW may not require clinical crown lengthening.

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of "Candidatus Bacteroides periocalifornicus," a New Member of the Bacteriodetes Phylum Found within the Oral Microbiome of Periodontitis Patients.

    PubMed

    McLean, Jeffrey S; Liu, Quanhui; Thompson, John; Edlund, Anna; Kelley, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Here we present the draft genome of a distantly related member within the phylum Bacteriodetes, "Candidatus Bacteroides periocalifornicus." The draft genome sequence was assembled with metagenomic data from a patient with periodontitis. The closest relative has less than 68% average nucleic identity, supporting a novel family within Bacteriodetes.

  9. Surgical orthodontic treatment for a patient with advanced periodontal disease: evaluation with electromyography and 3-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Kan; Yamaguchi, Tetsutaro; Maki, Koutaro

    2009-09-01

    We report here the case of a woman with Class III malocclusion and advanced periodontal disease who was treated with surgical orthodontic correction. Functional recovery after orthodontic treatment is often monitored by serial electromyography of the masticatory muscles, whereas 3-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography can provide detailed structural information about, for example, periodontal bone defects. However, it is unclear whether the information obtained via these methods is sufficient to determine the treatment goal. It might be useful to address this issue for patients with advanced periodontal disease because of much variability between patients in the determination of treatment goals. We used detailed information obtained by 3-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography to identify periodontal bone defects and set appropriate treatment goals for inclination of the incisors and mandibular surgery. Results for this patient included stable occlusion and improved facial esthetics. This case report illustrates the benefits of establishing treatment goals acceptable to the patient, based on precise 3-dimensional assessment of dentoalveolar bone, and by using masticatory muscle activity to monitor the stability of occlusion.

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of "Candidatus Bacteroides periocalifornicus," a New Member of the Bacteriodetes Phylum Found within the Oral Microbiome of Periodontitis Patients.

    PubMed

    McLean, Jeffrey S; Liu, Quanhui; Thompson, John; Edlund, Anna; Kelley, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Here we present the draft genome of a distantly related member within the phylum Bacteriodetes, "Candidatus Bacteroides periocalifornicus." The draft genome sequence was assembled with metagenomic data from a patient with periodontitis. The closest relative has less than 68% average nucleic identity, supporting a novel family within Bacteriodetes. PMID:26701081

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of “Candidatus Bacteroides periocalifornicus,” a New Member of the Bacteriodetes Phylum Found within the Oral Microbiome of Periodontitis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Quanhui; Thompson, John; Edlund, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Here we present the draft genome of a distantly related member within the phylum Bacteriodetes, “Candidatus Bacteroides periocalifornicus.” The draft genome sequence was assembled with metagenomic data from a patient with periodontitis. The closest relative has less than 68% average nucleic identity, supporting a novel family within Bacteriodetes. PMID:26701081

  12. Polymorphisms in the interleukin-10 gene and chronic periodontitis in patients with atherosclerotic and aortic aneurysmal vascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Armingohar, Zahra; Jørgensen, Jørgen J.; Kristoffersen, Anne K.; Schenck, Karl; Dembic, Zlatko

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic periodontitis (CP), atherosclerotic and aortic aneurysmal vascular diseases (VD) are chronic inflammatory conditions with multifactorial etiologies, including involvement of predisposing genetic factors. In a previous study, polymorphisms in the gene for the anti-inflammatory interleukin-1 receptor antagonist were associated with CP in patients with VD. Objective This study investigates whether polymorphisms in the gene for the anti-inflammatory interleukin-10 (IL10) could be related to CP in the same manner. Methods Seventy-two patients with VD of whom 35 had CP were genotyped for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the IL10 −592 (rs1800872), −819 (rs1800871), and −1,082 (rs1800896) gene by Taqman rtPCR method and by DNA sequencing. Results The C alleles and C/C genotypes of IL10 −592 and IL10 −819 frequencies were significantly higher, while the frequencies of the IL10 −592 (C/A) and IL10 −819 (C/T) heterozygote genotypes were significantly lower in the VD group with CP compared to those without CP. The IL10 haplotype ATA frequency (−1,082, −819, −592) showed a trend to a significant difference between the two groups indicating protection against CP. Conclusions Taken together, our findings suggest an independent association of genetic polymorphisms in the IL-10 gene locus with CP in patients with VD. Development of CP and the implications on vascular disease emphasize the importance of early detection and adequate treatment of periodontitis among these patients. PMID:25700628

  13. A telescopic crown concept for the restoration of partially edentulous patients with aggressive generalized periodontitis: a 3-year prospective longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Mengel, Reiner; Kreuzer, Gerd; Lehmann, Klaus M; Flores-de-Jacoby, Lavin

    2007-06-01

    This prospective longitudinal 3-year study compared clinical parameters and implant success rates of removable superstructures supported by both teeth and implants in patients with treated generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAP) and of cemented, implant-retained fixed superstructures in periodontally healthy patients. A total of 17 partially edentulous patients with 54 implants took part in the study. Nine patients with treated GAP received removable superstructures according to the Marburg double crown system, and eight periodontally healthy patients received fixed superstructures. Teeth were examined 2 to 4 weeks before extraction of the nonretainable teeth (baseline) and 3 weeks after insertion of the definitive abutments. Every 3 months over a 3-year period, clinical parameters were recorded and the composition of the subgingival microflora was determined. Intraoral radiographs were obtained at baseline, just after insertion of the superstructure, and 1 and 3 years later. Both groups showed mean plaque and gingival indices below 0.43 at implants and teeth. Mean probing depths around implants increased by approximately 0.7 mm and remained virtually constant for the teeth. Mean attachment loss at implants was 0.9 mm in GAP patients and 0.5 mm in healthy patients. The morphologic distribution of microorganisms in both groups showed healthy conditions. Moderate bone loss at teeth and implants was registered. Implant success rates were 100% in the healthy patients and 97.6% in the GAP patients. No significant differences were seen in the results between the groups.

  14. Antimicrobial susceptibility and pathogenic genes of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from the oral cavity of patients with periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The goal of this study was to characterize the patterns of antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes in samples of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) isolated from periodontitis patients. Methods From July 2015 to August 2015, oral saliva was collected from a total of 112 patients diagnosed with periodontitis, including 80 outpatients in dental hospitals and 32 patients in dental clinics located in Seoul and Cheonan. The samples were subjected to a susceptibility test to evaluate the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance, and the pathogenic factors and antimicrobial resistance factors in the DNA of S. aureus were analyzed using polymerase chain reaction. Results A susceptibility test against 15 antimicrobial agents showed that 88% of cultures were resistant to ampicillin, 88% to penicillin, and 2% to oxacillin. Resistance to at least two drugs was observed in 90% of cultures, and the most common pattern of multidrug resistance was to ampicillin and penicillin. Enterotoxins were detected in 65.9% of samples. The cell hemolysin gene hld was detected in 100% of cultures and hla was detected in 97.6% of samples. All strains resistant to penicillin and ampicillin had the blaZ gene. The aph(3′)IIIa gene, which encodes an aminoglycoside modifying enzyme, was detected in 46.3% of samples. Conclusions In the treatment of oral S. aureus infections, it is important to identify the pathogenic genes and the extent of antimicrobial resistance. Furthermore, it is necessary to study patterns of antimicrobial resistance and cross-infection in the context of periodontological specialties in which antimicrobials are frequently used, such as maxillofacial surgery, where the frequency of antimicrobial use for minor procedures such as implant placement is increasing. PMID:26734493

  15. Periodontal disease among New England elders.

    PubMed

    Fox, C H; Jette, A M; McGuire, S M; Feldman, H A; Douglass, C W

    1994-07-01

    Much of the existing oral epidemiologic literature is limited by having inadequate numbers of the oldest-old in their sample, having used rudimentary periodontal measures, or not having examined probability samples of community-dwelling elders. The New England Elders Dental Study (NEEDS) is the first study that documents the periodontal disease status of a probability sample of 554 adults aged 70 to 96 living within an entire U.S. Public Health Service region. The NEEDS study revealed substantially higher estimates of periodontal destruction among older adults than previous national studies would suggest. These results are consistent with several papers in the literature that suggest that periodontal disease rates are on the increase in older adults. In the coming decades dentistry should be prepared to meet the increasing need and demand for periodontal services in the growing older population. PMID:7608844

  16. The Effects of Cigarette Smoke Condensate and Nicotine on Periodontal Tissue in a Periodontitis Model Mouse.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Mikiko; Yanagita, Manabu; Mori, Kenta; Hasegawa, Shiori; Yamashita, Motozo; Yamada, Satoru; Kitamura, Masahiro; Murakami, Shinya

    2016-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is a major lifestyle-related risk factor for periodontal diseases. However, the pathophysiological role of cigarette smoking in periodontal disease has yet to be fully elucidated. Here we report that the systemic administration of cigarette smoke condensate or nicotine, which is the major ingredient of cigarette smoke, augmented alveolar bone loss. Concomitantly, the number of osteoclasts in periodontal tissues increased and the expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand was upregulated at the ligated side in mice with periodontitis. Nicotine also attenuated alveolar bone repair after ligature removal. These observations highlight the destruction of periodontal tissue by smoking and the unfavorable clinical course of periodontal disease in patients with a cigarette smoking habit. The present study demonstrates that periodontal disease models are useful for elucidating the pathogenesis of cigarette smoking-related periodontal diseases. PMID:27203240

  17. The Effects of Cigarette Smoke Condensate and Nicotine on Periodontal Tissue in a Periodontitis Model Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Kenta; Hasegawa, Shiori; Yamashita, Motozo; Yamada, Satoru; Kitamura, Masahiro; Murakami, Shinya

    2016-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is a major lifestyle-related risk factor for periodontal diseases. However, the pathophysiological role of cigarette smoking in periodontal disease has yet to be fully elucidated. Here we report that the systemic administration of cigarette smoke condensate or nicotine, which is the major ingredient of cigarette smoke, augmented alveolar bone loss. Concomitantly, the number of osteoclasts in periodontal tissues increased and the expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand was upregulated at the ligated side in mice with periodontitis. Nicotine also attenuated alveolar bone repair after ligature removal. These observations highlight the destruction of periodontal tissue by smoking and the unfavorable clinical course of periodontal disease in patients with a cigarette smoking habit. The present study demonstrates that periodontal disease models are useful for elucidating the pathogenesis of cigarette smoking-related periodontal diseases. PMID:27203240

  18. Minimally invasive periodontal therapy for general practitioners.

    PubMed

    Ryder, Mark I; Armitage, Gary C

    2016-06-01

    There remains a high prevalence of mild-to-moderate forms of periodontal diseases in both developed and developing countries. Although many periodontal specialty practices currently place strong emphasis on implant surgery, periodontal plastic surgery and esthetics, general dentists and hygienists have often assumed more responsibility than periodontal specialty practices for the diagnosis, treatment, assessment and maintenance, and possible referral, of their patients. To address these current trends and challenges, this volume of Periodontology 2000 presents a series of topics on the basic biological principles of periodontal disease, as well as on approaches to diagnosis, treatment planning and treatment, in what is called 'conservative' or 'noninvasive' periodontal therapy. These topics include risk assessment of the periodontal condition; reduction, elimination and/or control of etiologies and risk factors, including mechanical, antimicrobial and host-modulation approaches; considerations for evaluation of clinical outcomes based on treatment approaches; and selected topics in laser therapy, halitosis and gingival recession. PMID:27045427

  19. Efficacy assessment of local doxycycline treatment in periodontal patients using multivariate chemometric approach.

    PubMed

    Bogdanovska, Liljana; Poceva Panovska, Ana; Nakov, Natalija; Zafirova, Marija; Popovska, Mirjana; Dimitrovska, Aneta; Petkovska, Rumenka

    2016-08-25

    The aim of our study was application of chemometric algorithms for multivariate data analysis in efficacy assessment of the local periodontal treatment with doxycycline (DOX). Treatment efficacy was evaluated by monitoring inflammatory biomarkers in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) samples and clinical indices before and after the local treatment as well as by determination of DOX concentration in GCF after the local treatment. The experimental values from these determinations were submitted to several chemometric algorithms: principal component analysis (PCA), partial least square discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) and orthogonal projection to latent structures-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA). The data structure and the mutual relations of the selected variables were thoroughly investigated by PCA. The PLS-DA model identified variables responsible for discrimination of classes of data, before and after DOX treatment. The OPLS-DA model compared the efficacy of the two commonly used medications in periodontal treatment, chlorhexidine (CHX) and DOX, at the same time providing insight in their mechanism of action. The obtained results indicate that application of multivariate chemometric algorithms can be used as a valuable approach for assessment of treatment efficacy. PMID:27283484

  20. Interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha gene polymorphisms in Turkish patients with localized aggressive periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Guzeldemir, Esra; Gunhan, Meral; Ozcelik, Onur; Tastan, Hakki

    2008-06-01

    Localized aggressive periodontitis (LAgP) is a complex multifactorial periodontal disease to which genetic factors are thought to predispose individuals. Interleukin-1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) are potent immunomodulators and proinflammatory cytokines that have been implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune and infectious diseases and proposed to be risk factors for LAgP. Our aim was to investigate IL-1 alpha (+4845), IL-1 beta (+3954), and TNF-alpha (-308) gene polymorphisms in Turkish LAgP patients. We genotyped 31 LAgP patients and 31 healthy controls for IL-1alpha(+4845), IL-1beta(+3954), and TNF-alpha(-308) using standard PCR amplification followed by restriction enzyme digestion and gel electrophoresis. Higher prevalence of heterozygosity for IL-1alpha(+4845) was found in cases (65%) when compared to controls (35%) (P < 0.05). While homozygous allele 1 of IL-1beta(+3954) was the most frequent genotype in cases (62%), no controls were homozygous for this allele (P < 0.001). Homozygous allele 1 was the most common TNF-alpha genotype in both groups, however no significant difference in TNF-alpha genotypes was found between groups. In conclusion, in this Turkish population, susceptibility to LAgP is increased by heterozygosity for allele 1 of IL-1alpha(+4845) or homozygosity for allele 1 of IL-1beta(R+3954). Moreover, IL-1 gene polymorphisms appear to have a role in susceptibility to LAgP, and the above-mentioned genotypes could be an important risk factor for LAgP in the Turkish population.

  1. A comparative evaluation of topical and intrasulcular application of coenzyme Q10 (Perio Q™) gel in chronic periodontitis patients: A clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Sale, Srinivasa Tenka; Parvez, Humera; Yeltiwar, Ramreddy Krushna Rao; Vivekanandan, Gopinath; Pundir, Aena Jain; Jain, Priya

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Coenzyme Q10 is a well-studied antioxidant in the medical literature, but studies regarding its efficacy in periodontal diseases are few. coenzymeoenzyme Q10 serves as an endogenous antioxidant and its increased concentration in the diseased gingiva effectively suppresses advanced periodontal inflammation. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of coenzyme Q10 (Perio Q™) as an adjunct to scaling and root planing in patients with chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods: A total of 18 patients were enrolled for the study. The selected subjects were treated in three different quadrants randomly. The control quadrant was treated by scaling and root planing only, while the other two test quadrants were treated by intra-pocket application of gel combined with scaling or root planing and topical applications combined with scaling and root planning, respectively. Clinical parameters such as plaque index, gingival index, gingival bleeding index and probing pocket depth were assessed at baseline and at the 2nd week and 4th weeks. The results were subjected to statistical analysis. Results: There was a significant improvement in all clinical parameters in the test sites seen at the end of the 4-week period. Sites with bleeding on probing were reduced more in the test group than in the control group. Conclusion: Coenzyme Q10 can be said to have a beneficial effect on periodontitis when used as an adjunct to scaling and root planing. PMID:25210260

  2. Effects of scaling and root planing on gingival crevicular fluid vascular endothelial growth factor level in chronic periodontitis patients with and without diabetes mellitus: A clinicobiochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Pannicker, Jayaraj Jishnu; Mehta, Dhoom Singh

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To estimate the gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) level of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in periodontally healthy controls and chronic periodontitis (CP) patients with and without diabetes mellitus (DM) and also to investigate the effect of scaling and root planing (SRP) on the GCF VEGF level. Materials and Methods: One hundred and five patients were divided into three groups: Healthy (Group 1), CP (Group 2), and CP with DM (Group 3). Group 2 and Group 3 patients underwent SRP planning, and the cases were followed for 6 weeks. Periodontal clinical parameters such as plaque index, gingival index, probing pocket depth, and clinical attachment level were recorded at baseline and 6-week posttherapy. GCF samples collected from each patient were quantified for VEGF level using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: The mean GCF VEGF level was increased in CP patients with and without DM compared to healthy patients and SRP therapy caused a statistically significant (P < 0.001) reduction in GCF VEGF level. Conclusion: VEGF is increased in GCF of CP patients with and without DM and that SRP substantially reduces its level in GCF. PMID:27563195

  3. Evaluation of clinical and metabolic changes after non surgical periodontal treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus patients: A clinico biochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Kudva, Praveen; Tabasum, Syeda Tawkhira; Garg, Nidhi

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the clinical and metabolic changes following nonsurgical periodontal therapy of type-2 diabetic patients and nondiabetic patients. Materials and Methods: Fifteen nondiabetics and fifteen type-2 diabetics with moderate to severe periodontitis were selected after meeting inclusion and exclusion criteria. Periodontal pocket probing was performed using a Williams graduated periodontal probe and comparisons of the clinical and biochemical parameters like plaque index, gingival index, probing depth, glycated hemoglobin, and lipid profile (total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein, low density lipoprotein, triglycerides and very low density lipoprotein) were done between and within two groups at baseline and 3 month. Results: A correlation was observed between clinical and biochemical parameters between and within two groups at baseline and 3 month. The P value of diabetic group was<0.001 in all clinical parameters (plaque index PI, Gingival index GI, and Probing Pocket Depth PPD) in diabetic and nondiabetic group, showed statistically highly significant difference in GI, PI, PPD, <.01 in Glycated Hemoglobulin (HbAlc1) in test group and<0.05 in control group showed statistically significant difference. The P value of test group was >0.05 in Lipid profile (total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein, high density lipoprotein, serum triglyceride, very low density lipoprotein) that showed no significant difference and in control group<0.05 in total Cholesterol, high density lipoprotein and <0.01 in Low density lipoprotein, Very Low Density Lipoprotein, and Serum Triglyceride, respectively, showed statistically significant in Total cholesterol, Low density lipoprotein, Very Low Density Lipoprotein, and Serum Triglyceride, not significant in high density lipoprotein. The P value >0.05 showed no statistical significance of correlation between the test and control groups. Conclusion: Both groups of patients showed an improvement in clinical and metabolic

  4. Metagenomic analysis of the peri-implant and periodontal microflora in patients with clinical signs of gingivitis or mucositis.

    PubMed

    Heuer, Wieland; Kettenring, Andreas; Stumpp, Sascha Nico; Eberhard, Jörg; Gellermann, Eva; Winkel, Andreas; Stiesch, Meike

    2012-06-01

    The long-term success of osseointegrated oral implants is endangered by inflammation of peri-implant hard and soft tissues caused by bacterial biofilms that may have been initiated by bacterial transmission from the adjacent dentition. The present study aimed to compare the bacterial communities at inflamed implant and tooth sites by broad-range PCR techniques to evaluate the etiological processes of peri-implant and periodontal diseases and potential future therapeutic strategies. Eighteen samples of peri-implant and periodontal microflora were collected from nine partially edentulous patients with implant-retained crowns or bridges revealing clinical signs of gingivitis or mucositis. The clinical parameters plaque index (PI), probing depth (PD), and bleeding on probing were recorded. Amplified fragments of bacterial 16S rRNA genes were separated by use of single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis, and sequences were determined to identify the predominant bacterial genera. The clinical parameters PI and PD were significantly different at implants (PI = 0.4 ± 0.7, PD = 3.1 ± 0.6 mm) compared with teeth (PI = 1.8 ± 0.8, PD = 2.5 ± 0.2 mm). A total of 20 different genera were found at the inflamed tooth and implant sites. The microbial diversity of the microflora surrounding the remaining dentition (12.0 ± 3.8) was significantly higher (p = 0.01) than the diversity of the peri-implant microflora at implant-retained crowns or bridges (6.3 ± 2.3). Within the limitations of the present study, the microbial diversity of the investigated implants and teeth with clinical signs of mucositis or gingivitis exhibits substantial differences, demonstrating that transmission of the complete bacterial microflora from teeth to implants could be excluded. Furthermore, broad-range molecular biological detection methods specify bacterial genera and species in the peri-implant and periodontal microflora which were not in the focus of research interests so far. PMID

  5. Distribution of 3-hydroxy iC17:0 in subgingival plaque and gingival tissue samples: relationship to adult periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Nichols, F C

    1994-09-01

    Gram-negative organisms incorporate hydroxy fatty acids into the lipid A moiety of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and in the case of some members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, hydroxy fatty acids are incorporated exclusively into lipid A. However, a limited number of Bacteroides species have been shown to incorporate several classes of 3-hydroxy fatty acids, particularly 3-hydroxy iC17:0, into constitutive lipids as well as LPS. The present study examined the distribution of hydroxy fatty acids in two periodontal pathogens, Prevotella intermedia and Porphyromonas gingivalis, by employing a phospholipid extraction procedure (E. G. Bligh and W. J. Dyer, Can. J. Biochem. Physiol. 37:911-917, 1959) which partitioned constitutive lipids into the organic solvent phase and LPS into the aqueous phase. The distribution of hydroxy fatty acids within organic solvent and aqueous extracts of these bacterial species was then compared with the distribution in subgingival plaque samples isolated from either gingivitis or severe periodontitis sites as well as the distribution in gingival tissue samples. The organic solvent and aqueous extracts were hydrolyzed under strong alkaline conditions, and the free fatty acids were treated to form pentafluorobenzyl-ester, trimethylsilyl-ether derivatives. Hydroxy fatty acid levels were quantified by using gas chromatography-negative-ion chemical ionization-mass spectrometry. By using this approach, the mean values of the 3-hydroxy iC17:0 recovered within organic solvent extracts of P. gingivalis strains ranged from 56 to 63% of total 3-hydroxy iC17:0. Substantially less 3-hydroxy iC17:0 (< 5%) was recovered in organic solvent extracts of P. intermedia. By comparison, 75% of the 3-hydroxy iC17:0 in periodontitis subgingival plaque samples was recovered in organic solvent extracts, while only 43% of the 3-hydroxy iC17:0 in gingivitis plaque samples from the same patients was recovered in organic solvent extracts. However, 3-hydroxy iC17:0 was

  6. Transcriptome analysis of periodontitis-associated fibroblasts by CAGE sequencing identified DLX5 and RUNX2 long variant as novel regulators involved in periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Horie, Masafumi; Yamaguchi, Yoko; Saito, Akira; Nagase, Takahide; Lizio, Marina; Itoh, Masayoshi; Kawaji, Hideya; Lassmann, Timo; Carninci, Piero; Forrest, Alistair R. R.; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Suzutani, Tatsuo; Kappert, Kai; Micke, Patrick; Ohshima, Mitsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is affecting over half of the adult population, and represents a major public health problem. Previously, we isolated a subset of gingival fibroblasts (GFs) from periodontitis patients, designated as periodontitis-associated fibroblasts (PAFs), which were highly capable of collagen degradation. To elucidate their molecular profiles, GFs isolated form healthy and periodontitis-affected gingival tissues were analyzed by CAGE-seq and integrated with the FANTOM5 atlas. GFs from healthy gingival tissues displayed distinctive patterns of CAGE profiles as compared to fibroblasts from other organ sites and characterized by specific expression of developmentally important transcription factors such as BARX1, PAX9, LHX8, and DLX5. In addition, a novel long non-coding RNA associated with LHX8 was described. Furthermore, we identified DLX5 regulating expression of the long variant of RUNX2 transcript, which was specifically active in GFs but not in their periodontitis-affected counterparts. Knockdown of these factors in GFs resulted in altered expression of extracellular matrix (ECM) components. These results indicate activation of DLX5 and RUNX2 via its distal promoter represents a unique feature of GFs, and is important for ECM regulation. Down-regulation of these transcription factors in PAFs could be associated with their property to degrade collagen, which may impact on the process of periodontitis. PMID:27645561

  7. Transcriptome analysis of periodontitis-associated fibroblasts by CAGE sequencing identified DLX5 and RUNX2 long variant as novel regulators involved in periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Horie, Masafumi; Yamaguchi, Yoko; Saito, Akira; Nagase, Takahide; Lizio, Marina; Itoh, Masayoshi; Kawaji, Hideya; Lassmann, Timo; Carninci, Piero; Forrest, Alistair R R; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Suzutani, Tatsuo; Kappert, Kai; Micke, Patrick; Ohshima, Mitsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is affecting over half of the adult population, and represents a major public health problem. Previously, we isolated a subset of gingival fibroblasts (GFs) from periodontitis patients, designated as periodontitis-associated fibroblasts (PAFs), which were highly capable of collagen degradation. To elucidate their molecular profiles, GFs isolated form healthy and periodontitis-affected gingival tissues were analyzed by CAGE-seq and integrated with the FANTOM5 atlas. GFs from healthy gingival tissues displayed distinctive patterns of CAGE profiles as compared to fibroblasts from other organ sites and characterized by specific expression of developmentally important transcription factors such as BARX1, PAX9, LHX8, and DLX5. In addition, a novel long non-coding RNA associated with LHX8 was described. Furthermore, we identified DLX5 regulating expression of the long variant of RUNX2 transcript, which was specifically active in GFs but not in their periodontitis-affected counterparts. Knockdown of these factors in GFs resulted in altered expression of extracellular matrix (ECM) components. These results indicate activation of DLX5 and RUNX2 via its distal promoter represents a unique feature of GFs, and is important for ECM regulation. Down-regulation of these transcription factors in PAFs could be associated with their property to degrade collagen, which may impact on the process of periodontitis. PMID:27645561

  8. Ab Interno Trabeculectomy in the Adult Patient

    PubMed Central

    SooHoo, Jeffrey R.; Seibold, Leonard K.; Kahook, Malik Y.

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is a potentially blinding disease that affects millions of people worldwide. The mainstay of treatment is lowering of intraocular pressure (IOP) through the use of medications, laser and/or incisional surgery. The trabecular meshwork (TM) is thought to be the site of significant resistance to aqueous outflow in open angle glaucoma. Theoretically, an incision through TM or TM removal should decrease this resistance and lead to a significant reduction in IOP. This approach, commonly referred to as goniotomy or trabeculotomy, has been validated in the pediatric population and has been associated with long-term IOP control. In adults, however, removal of TM tissue has been historically associated with more limited and short-lived success. More recent evidence, reveals that even adult patients may benefit significantly from removal of diseased TM tissue and can lead to a significant reduction in IOP that is long-lasting and safe. In this review, we discuss current evidence and techniques for ab interno trabeculectomy using various devices in the adult patient. PMID:25624670

  9. Ab interno trabeculectomy in the adult patient.

    PubMed

    SooHoo, Jeffrey R; Seibold, Leonard K; Kahook, Malik Y

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is a potentially blinding disease that affects millions of people worldwide. The mainstay of treatment is lowering of intraocular pressure (IOP) through the use of medications, laser and/or incisional surgery. The trabecular meshwork (TM) is thought to be the site of significant resistance to aqueous outflow in open angle glaucoma. Theoretically, an incision through TM or TM removal should decrease this resistance and lead to a significant reduction in IOP. This approach, commonly referred to as goniotomy or trabeculotomy, has been validated in the pediatric population and has been associated with long-term IOP control. In adults, however, removal of TM tissue has been historically associated with more limited and short-lived success. More recent evidence, reveals that even adult patients may benefit significantly from removal of diseased TM tissue and can lead to a significant reduction in IOP that is long-lasting and safe. In this review, we discuss current evidence and techniques for ab interno trabeculectomy using various devices in the adult patient.

  10. Periodontal Status Among Patients With Cleft Lip (CL), Cleft Palate (CP) and Cleft Lip, Alveolus and Palate (CLAP) In Chennai, India. A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    John, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Background: Long term health of the stomatognathic system as well as esthetic aspects is the therapeutic goals in patients with oro facial clefts. Aim: The aim of this study was to assess and compare the periodontal status of patients with cleft lip (CL), cleft palate (CP) and cleft lip, alveolus and palate (CLAP) reporting to a hospital in Chennai, India. Materials and Methods: The study group consisted of 80 cleft patients. Subjects were divided into three groups. Group 1: patients with cleft lip (CL), Group 2: subjects with cleft palate (CP) and Group 3: subjects with cleft lip alveolus and palate (CLAP). Community Periodontal Index for Treatment needs CPITN Index was recorded. Results: Among the 80 study subjects, 51 (63.8%) were males and 29 (36.2%) were females. Among the 26 study subjects with cleft lip, 10 (38.5%) had healthy periodontium, 4 (15.4%) had bleeding on probing and 12 (46.1%) had calculus. Mean number of sextants coded for healthy and bleeding was maximum among the subjects with cleft palate. Mean number of sextants coded for calculus was maximum among the subjects with cleft lip alveolus and palate. Prevalence of periodontal disease is high among patients with cleft lip, alveolus and palate (35%) than in Cleft lip (32.5%) and Cleft Palate (32.5%). Conclusion: Gingivitis and Calculus is predominantly high in patients with Cleft Palate and Cleft Lip respectively. PMID:25954706

  11. [A case of multiple liver abscesses associated with Streptococcus salivarius in a patient with chronic periodontitis].

    PubMed

    Kamachi, Saori; Otsuka, Taiga; Tsuji, Chika; Nakashita, Shunya; Ide, Yasushi; Mizuta, Toshihiko

    2014-08-01

    Streptococcus salivarius is an oral commensal bacterium that rarely causes disease in humans. Here, we report a case of liver abscess associated with S. salivarius in a 41-year-old woman who presented with continuous abdominal discomfort, fatigue, and fever. She was diagnosed with multiple liver abscesses; she underwent percutaneous transhepatic abscess drainage. Thereafter, S. salivarius was isolated in all bacterial cultures of the drained abscesses, and it was sensitive to penicillins. She made a good recovery after treatment. In the absence of an infective source other than chronic periodontitis, the cause of liver abscesses was attributed to oral S. salivarius. S. salivarius is a normal oral commensal, and oral commensals must be considered if the infective origin of liver abscess cannot be determined. PMID:25100350

  12. Periodontal Plastic Surgery to Improve Aesthetics in Patients with Altered Passive Eruption/Gummy Smile: A Case Series Study

    PubMed Central

    Cairo, Francesco; Graziani, Filippo; Franchi, Lorenzo; Defraia, Efisio; Pini Prato, Giovan Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Altered passive eruption/gummy smile is a common challenge in patients requiring aesthetic treatment. A specific surgical protocol was designed and tested in patients with altered passive eruption. Standardized preoperative X-rays were used to assess crown length at baseline and to place submarginal incisions. Osseous respective therapy was performed to achieve biological width. Clinical outcomes were recorded 6 months after surgery. Eleven patients with a total of 58 teeth were treated with flap surgery and osseous resective therapy at upper anterior natural teeth. At the last followup, a significant and stable improvement of crown length was obtained when compared to the baseline (P < 0.0001). All patients rated as satisfactory in the final outcomes (final VAS value = 86.6). In conclusion, this study showed that periodontal plastic surgery including osseous resection leads to predictable outcomes in the treatment of altered passive eruption/gummy smile: A careful preoperative planning avoids unpleasant complications and enhances postsurgical stability of the gingival margin. PMID:23056049

  13. A Cross-sectional Assessment of Biomarker Levels around Implants Versus Natural Teeth in Periodontal Maintenance Patients

    PubMed Central

    Recker, Erica N.; Avila-Ortiz, Gustavo; Fischer, Carol L.; Pagan-Rivera, Keyla; Brogden, Kim A.; Dawson, Deborah V.; Elangovan, Satheesh

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent studies point to the clinical utility of using peri-implant sulcular fluid (PISF) as a valuable diagnostic aid for monitoring peri-implant tissue health. The objectives of this study were to determine the levels of key biomarkers in PISF in periodontal maintenance participants and compare them to their corresponding levels in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) obtained from the same participants. Methods PISF and GCF were collected from an implant and a contralateral natural tooth, after the clinical examination of 73 participants. The levels of interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, IL-17A, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, C-reactive protein (CRP), osteoprotegerin (OPG), leptin, and adiponectin were determined using multiplex proteomic immunoassays. The correlation of biomarker concentrations between GCF versus PISF, within GCF or PISF, and with several covariates (age, brushing frequency, days since professional cleaning, probing depth and plaque index) were also determined. Results Significantly higher levels of IL-17A (p=0.02) and TNF-α (p=0.03) were noted in PISF, when compared to their levels in GCF. Significant positive correlations were noted between the concentrations of cytokines in PISF versus their levels in GCF. Among the covariates, significant positive correlation was noted between mean probing depths around implants and levels of IL-1β (p < 0.05) and IL-8 levels (p < 0.05) in PISF. Conclusions The results of this study point to the differential expression of specific biomarkers in GCF versus their levels in PISF in periodontal maintenance patients, which is critical information prior to establishing PISF as a diagnostic fluid to monitor peri-implant health. PMID:25269523

  14. Laser therapy for periodontitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efanov, O. I.

    2001-04-01

    An investigation was made of applying pulsed (lambda) equals 0.89 micrometers laser radiation in the treatment for early diagnosed periodontitis. The investigation was made on 65 patients (47 patients constituted the experimental group and 18 patients constituted a control group) affected by periodontitis. Clinical and functional tests revealed that laser therapy produced a string effect on the course of the illness. It reduced bleeding, inflammation, and pruritus. However, it did not produce an affect on electroexcitation. Biomicroscopic examinations and periodontium rheography revealed that the gingival blood flow became normal after the course of laser therapy. The capillary permeability and venous congestion decreased, which was confirmed by the increased time of vacuum tests, raised gingival temperature, reduced tissue clearance, and increased oxygen tension. Apart from that, laser therapy subsided fibrinolysis, proteolytic tissue activity, and decreased the exudative inflammation of periodontium.

  15. Do interleukin-1 polymorphisms predict the development of periodontitis or the success of dental implants?

    PubMed

    Rogers, Marina A; Figliomeni, Lisa; Baluchova, Katarina; Tan, Albert E S; Davies, Gareth; Henry, Patrick J; Price, Patricia

    2002-02-01

    Factors which increase the risk of severe adult periodontitis (AP) may also contribute to the success of dental implants. To determine which cytokines may be relevant, levels of interleukin-1alpha (IL-1alpha), interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) mRNA were quantitated in gingival tissue from periodontitis patients and healthy controls. Periodontitis significantly increased levels of IL-1alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6 and IFN-gamma mRNA relative to healthy tissues. IL-1 was selected for further study, as it has inflammatory and bone resorbing properties. We examined IL-1A(-889) and IL-1B(+3953) alleles in Caucasian patients with AP and early-onset periodontitis (EOP), patients with dental implants and healthy individuals. The IL-1B(+3953) polymorphism was associated with AP. This was evident from an increased homozygosity for allele 2 in patients with AP and a decreased heterozygosity in advanced AP patients. IL-1A(-889) and a composite genotype [IL-1A(-889)2 plus IL-1B(+3953)2] showed no association with the incidence of periodontitis, disease onset or disease severity. IL-1A(-889), IL-1B(+3953) and the composite genotype also showed no association with failure of dental implants. PMID:11858158

  16. Do interleukin-1 polymorphisms predict the development of periodontitis or the success of dental implants?

    PubMed

    Rogers, Marina A; Figliomeni, Lisa; Baluchova, Katarina; Tan, Albert E S; Davies, Gareth; Henry, Patrick J; Price, Patricia

    2002-02-01

    Factors which increase the risk of severe adult periodontitis (AP) may also contribute to the success of dental implants. To determine which cytokines may be relevant, levels of interleukin-1alpha (IL-1alpha), interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) mRNA were quantitated in gingival tissue from periodontitis patients and healthy controls. Periodontitis significantly increased levels of IL-1alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6 and IFN-gamma mRNA relative to healthy tissues. IL-1 was selected for further study, as it has inflammatory and bone resorbing properties. We examined IL-1A(-889) and IL-1B(+3953) alleles in Caucasian patients with AP and early-onset periodontitis (EOP), patients with dental implants and healthy individuals. The IL-1B(+3953) polymorphism was associated with AP. This was evident from an increased homozygosity for allele 2 in patients with AP and a decreased heterozygosity in advanced AP patients. IL-1A(-889) and a composite genotype [IL-1A(-889)2 plus IL-1B(+3953)2] showed no association with the incidence of periodontitis, disease onset or disease severity. IL-1A(-889), IL-1B(+3953) and the composite genotype also showed no association with failure of dental implants.

  17. Bacteria and bacterial DNA in atherosclerotic plaque and aneurysmal wall biopsies from patients with and without periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Armingohar, Zahra; Jørgensen, Jørgen J.; Kristoffersen, Anne Karin; Abesha-Belay, Emnet; Olsen, Ingar

    2014-01-01

    Background Several studies have reported an association between chronic periodontitis (CP) and cardiovascular diseases. Detection of periodontopathogens, including red complex bacteria (RCB), in vascular lesions has suggested these bacteria to be involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and abdominal aortic aneurysms. Objective In this study, we investigate bacteria and their DNA in vascular biopsies from patients with vascular diseases (VD; i.e. abdominal aortic aneurysms, atherosclerotic carotid, and common femoral arteries), with and without CP. Methods DNA was extracted from vascular biopsies selected from 40 VD patients: 30 with CP and 10 without CP. The V3-V5 region of the 16S rDNA (V3-V5) was polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified, and the amplicons were cloned into Escherichia coli, sequenced, and classified (GenBank and the Human Oral Microbiome database). Species-specific primers were used for the detection of Porphyromonas gingivalis. In addition, 10 randomly selected vascular biopsies from the CP group were subjected to scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for visualization of bacteria. Checkerboard DNA–DNA hybridization was performed to assess the presence of RCB in 10 randomly selected subgingival plaque samples from CP patients. Results A higher load and mean diversity of bacteria were detected in vascular biopsies from VD patients with CP compared to those without CP. Enterobacteriaceae were frequently detected in vascular biopsies together with cultivable, commensal oral, and not-yet-cultured bacterial species. While 70% of the subgingival plaque samples from CP patients showed presence of RCB, only P. gingivalis was detected in one vascular biopsy. Bacterial cells were seen in all 10 vascular biopsies examined by SEM. Conclusions A higher bacterial load and more diverse colonization were detected in VD lesions of CP patients as compared to patients without CP. This indicated that a multitude of bacterial species both from the gut and the

  18. Associations of Toll-Like Receptor and β-Defensin Polymorphisms with Measures of Periodontal Disease (PD) in HIV+ North American Adults: An Exploratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Catherine M.; Weinberg, Aaron; Zimmerman, Peter A.; Vernon, Lance T.

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphisms in toll-like receptor (TLR) and β-defensin (DEFB) genes have been recognized as potential genetic factors that can influence susceptibility to and severity of periodontal diseases (PD). However, data regarding associations between these polymorphisms and PD are still scarce in North American populations, and are not available in HIV+ North American populations. In this exploratory study, we analyzed samples from HIV+ adults (n = 115), who received primary HIV care at 3 local outpatient HIV clinics and were monitored for PD status. We genotyped a total of 41 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 8 TLR genes and copy number variation (CNV) in DEFB4/103A. We performed regression analyses for levels of 3 periodontopathogens in subgingival dental plaques (Porphyromonas gingivalis [Pg], Treponema denticola [Td], and Tannerella forsythia [Tf]) and 3 clinical measures of PD (periodontal probing depth [PPD], gingival recession [REC], and bleeding on probing [BOP]). In all subjects combined, 2 SNPs in TLR1 were significantly associated with Td, and one SNP in TLR2 was significantly associated with BOP. One of the 2 SNPs in TLR1 was significantly associated with Td in Caucasians. In addition, another SNP in TLR1 and a SNP in TLR6 were also significantly associated with Td and Pg, respectively, in Caucasians. All 3 periodontopathogen levels were significantly associated with PPD and BOP, but none was associated with REC. Instrumental variable analysis showed that 8 SNPs in 6 TLR genes were significantly associated with the 3 periodontopathogen levels. However, associations between the 3 periodontopathogen levels and PPD or BOP were not driven by associations with these identified SNPs. No association was found between DEFB4/103A CNV and any periodontopathogen level or clinical measure in all samples, Caucasians, or African Americans. Our exploratory study suggests a role of TLR polymorphisms, particularly TLR1 and TLR6 polymorphisms, in PD in HIV+ North

  19. Carboplatin dosing for adult Japanese patients.

    PubMed

    Ando, Yuichi; Shimokata, Tomoya; Yasuda, Yoshinari; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2014-02-01

    Carboplatin is a platinum-based anticancer drug that has been long used to treat many types of solid cancer. Because the clearance of carboplatin strongly correlates with the glomerular filtration rate (GFR), its dosage is calculated with the Calvert formula on the basis of the patient's GFR to achieve the target area under the plasma drug concentration-time curve (AUC) for each patient. However, many lines of evidence from previous clinical studies should be interpreted with caution because different methods were used to estimate drug clearance and derive the dosage of carboplatin. There is a particularly high risk of carboplatin overdosing when the dosage is determined on the basis of standardized serum creatinine values. When deciding the dose of carboplatin for adult Japanese patients, preferred methods to assess renal function instead of directly measuring GFR include (1) 24-h urinary collection-based creatinine clearance adjusted by adding 0.2 mg/dl to the serum creatinine concentration measured by standardized methods, and (2) equation-based GFR (eGFR) with a back calculation to units of ml/min per subject. Given the limitations of serum creatinine-based GFR estimations, the GFR or creatinine clearance should be directly measured in each patient whenever possible. To ensure patient safety and facilitate a medical-team approach, the single most appropriate method available at each institute or medical team should be consistently used to calculate the dose of carboplatin with the Calvert formula.

  20. Isolated cleft lip with generalized aggressive periodontitis: A rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Metgud, Renuka; Kumar, Ajay; Bhat, Kishore

    2015-01-01

    Oro-facial clefts are one of the most common birth defects and may be associated with other genetic anomalies. Aggressive periodontitis is a rare condition that progresses rapidly, but affects only a small percentage of the population. Most of the cases of aggressive periodontitis are familial. Even though, literature has documented the association of various genetic disorders with aggressive periodontitis, the aggressive periodontitis in patients with isolated cleft lip (CL) have never been addressed. Here, we report a rare case of isolated CL with generalized aggressive periodontitis. The concomitant presentation of isolated CL with aggressive periodontitis in an individual has clinical significance for multi-disciplinary care. PMID:25810600

  1. Effect of the use of snuff on the levels of interleukin-1 β and interleukin-8 in the gingival crevicular fluid of periodontitis patients

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Vijayendra; Salam, Sharib Abdus; Moda, Aman; Agarwal, Preeti; Nath, Sonia; Pulikkotil, Shaju Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Background: Use of smokeless tobacco in the form of moist snuff placed in the oral cavity is popular in rural India. The aim of the present cross-sectional study was to determine the effect of snuff on periodontitis by assessing interleukin (IL)-1 β and IL-8 levels in gingival crevicular fluid. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 subjects were selected for this study. 40 subjects presented with periodontitis, which included 20 snuff users (SP) and 20 nonsnuff users (NS). 20 periodontally healthy patients formed the controls (healthy control: HC). The clinical parameters recorded were gingival index (GI), plaque index, calculus index, bleeding on probing (BOP), probing depth (PD), recession (RC), and clinical attachment level (CAL). The IL-1 β and IL-8 levels were assessed through enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (Quantikine®). Analysis of variance (ANOVA), post-hoc Tukey's, Kruskal-Walli's ANOVA and Mann-Whitney test was used for comparison among groups and P > 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: No significant difference was seen in levels of IL-1 β and IL-8 between SP and NS groups (P = 0.16, 0.97). However, both the periodontitis groups (SP and NS) had increased IL-β levels when compared to HC group (P = 0.01, 0.001). The snuff users showed significant increase in GI, BOP, RC, and CAL when compared with NS (P = 0.002, 0.001, 0.012, 0.002) whereas NS group had significant increase in PD (P = 0.003). Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, use of snuff does not affect the host inflammatory response associated with periodontitis and leads to RC and increased CAL due to local irritant effect. PMID:26604961

  2. Atlantoaxial Rotatory Fixation in Adults Patient

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Sei Woong; Moon, Seung Myung; Choi, Sun Kil

    2009-01-01

    Atlantoaxial rotatory fixation (AARF) in adult is a rare disorder that occurs followed by a trauma. The patients were presented with painful torticollis and a typical 'cock robin' position of the head. The clinical diagnosis is generally difficult and often made in the late stage. In some cases, an irreducible or chronic fixation develops. We reported a case of AARF in adult patient which was treated by immobilization with conservative treatment. A 25-year-old female was presented with a posterior neck pain and limitation of motion of cervical spine after a traffic accident. She had no neurological deficit but suffered from severe defect on the scalp and multiple thoracic compression fractures. Plain radiographs demonstrated torticollis, lateral shift of odontoid process to one side and widening of one side of C1-C2 joint space. Immobilization with a Holter traction were performed and analgesics and muscle relaxants were given. Posterior neck pain and limitation of the cervical spine's motion were resolved. Plain cervical radiographs taken at one month after the injury showed that torticollis disappeared and the dens were in the midline position. The authors reported a case of type I post-traumatic AARF that was successfully treated by immobilization alone. PMID:19444353

  3. Localized Aggressive Periodontitis Treatment Response in Primary and Permanent Dentitions

    PubMed Central

    MERCHANT, SHERIN. N.; VOVK, ANDREA.; KALASH, DANNY.; HOVENCAMP, NICOLE; AUKHIL, IKRAMUDDIN.; HARRISON, PETER; ZAPERT, EDWARD; BIDWELL, JOHN; VARNADO, PHYLLIS; SHADDOX, LUCIANA. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The comparative treatment response of children and young adults with localized aggressive periodontitis (LAP) affecting primary and permanent dentition is unknown. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of non-surgical periodontal therapy with adjunctive systemic antibiotics on the clinical outcome of children/young adults with primary versus permanent dentition affected by LAP. Methods A cohort of 97 African-American participants between the ages of 5–21 (30M; 66F; 22 primary and 75 permanent dentition affected), diagnosed with LAP were included. Patients presented with no significant medical history. All patients underwent periodontal therapy, which consisted of full mouth mechanical debridement at baseline, 3, 6, and 12 month appointments. Additionally, all patients were prescribed a one-week regimen of systemic antibiotics at the initial appointment. Clinical parameters were analyzed, including probing depth (PD), clinical attachment levels (CAL), bleeding on probing (BOP) and percentage of visible plaque. Results Overall, periodontal therapy was found to be effective in improving the clinical outcomes of both primary and permanent dentitions. Although baseline CAL were similar between the groups, the reductions in mean CAL at 3, 6 and 12 months as well as reduction in % Plaque at 3 months were significantly greater in primary dentition as compared to permanent dentition. Conclusions Non-surgical therapy with systemic antibiotics is effective for LAP in both primary and permanent dentitions. A greater reduction in CAL in LAP of primary dentition may suggest that younger children may carry a greater propensity for positive treatment outcomes and healing potential as compared to children/young adults with permanent dentition. PMID:25186780

  4. Systemic antimicrobials in the treatment of chronic periodontal diseases: a dilemma.

    PubMed

    Addy, M; Martin, M V

    2003-01-01

    The use of systemic antimicrobials in the treatment of acute and chronic periodontal diseases must be viewed as a dilemma. On the one hand, the approach is attractive because of the microbial nature of periodontal diseases but, on the other hand, evidence of benefit of these agents is equivocal for the majority of periodontal diseases and antimicrobials have the potential to cause harm. The disadvantages of systemic antimicrobials can be grouped under the headings of allergic reactions, superinfection, toxicity, drug interactions, patient compliance and, perhaps of most widespread importance, bacterial resistance. Mechanical debridement methods, including drainage of pus for acute periodontal abscesses, should be considered the first line treatment for most periodontal diseases. Systemic antimicrobials should be considered as adjuncts to mechanical debridement methods and, in chronic disease, never used alone as they can predispose to abscess formation. Adjunctive systemic antimicrobials may be considered in acute disease where debridement or drainage of pus is difficult, where there is local spread or systemic upset. In chronic periodontal diseases, adjunctive antimicrobials should be considered in early onset or rapidly progressive disease or in advanced chronic adult disease where mechanical therapies have failed or surgery is not a preferred option. Inadequate oral hygiene and tobacco smoking are contraindications to the use of antimicrobials. The value of systemic antimicrobials, where other systemic risk factors co-exist, has still to be established. The role of microbial diagnosis and sensitivity testing for antimicrobial selection at this time must be questioned.

  5. Design of a protocol for obtaining genomic DNA from saliva using mouthwash: Samples taken from patients with periodontal disease

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, Ángel Chávez; Volante, Beatriz Buentello; Hernández, María Esther Ocharán; Mendoza, Claudia Camelia Calzada; Pliego, Arturo Flores; Baptista Gonzalez, Héctor A.; Juárez, Higinio Estrada

    2016-01-01

    Background Obtaining high quality genomic DNA safely and economically is vital for diverse studies of large populations aimed at evaluating the role of genetic factors in susceptibility to disease. Aim This study was to test a protocol for the extraction of high quality genomic DNA from saliva samples obtained with mouthwash and taken from patients with periodontal disease. Methods Saliva samples were taken from 60 patients and then stored at room temperature. DNA extraction was carried out at distinct post-sampling times (10, 20 and 30 days). Evaluation of genomic DNA was performed with spectrophotometry, electrophoresis, and PCR genotyping and sequencing. Results The greatest concentration of DNA obtained was 352 μg at 10 days post-sampling, followed by 121.025 μg and 19.59 μg at 20 and 30 days, respectively. When determining the purity of DNA with the spectrophotometric ratio of 260/230, the relations of 1.20, 1.40 and 0.781 were obtained for 10, 20 and 30 days, respectively. In all samples, it was possible to amplify the product of 485 bp and the sequence of the amplicons showed 95% similarity to the reference sequence. Conclusion The present protocol represents an easy, safe and economical technique for obtaining high quality genomic DNA. PMID:27195211

  6. Low levels of serum Vitamin D in chronic periodontitis patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: A hospital-based cross-sectional clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Rosamma; Nagrale, Amol Vijay; Joseraj, Manaloor George; Pradeep Kumar, Kotha Muttathu; Kaziyarakath, Jaishid Ahadal; Chandini, Radhakrishnan

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Vitamin D is associated with inflammatory diseases such as periodontal disease and diabetes mellitus (DM). The aim of our study was to find out the level of serum Vitamin D in chronic periodontitis patients (CHP) with and without type 2 DM. Materials and Methods: This study consists of 141 subjects, including 48 controls. Case groups consisted of 43 chronic periodontitis patients with type 2 DM (CHPDM) and 50 CHP. pocket depth (PD), clinical attachment loss (CAL), modified gingival index (MGI), plaque index (PI), and calculus index (CI) were taken. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH] D) level in ηg/ml was estimated by electrochemiluminescence immunoassay with Elecsys and cobase e immunoassay analysers(cobase e 411). Other laboratory investigations including fasting blood sugar (FBS) and serum calcium were measured in all subjects. Results: The mean serum 25(OH) D level was 22.32 ± 5.76 ηg/ml, 14.06 ± 4.57 ηg/ml and 16.94 ± 5.58 ηg/ml for control, CHPDM and CHP groups respectively. The difference was statistically significant (P < 0.05). The mean value of FBS was significantly high in CHPDM group as compared to CHP group. Periodontal parameters like MGI, PI, PD, and CI showed significant difference between groups (P < 0.05) and higher score was found in CHP group, while CAL and PI showed no statistically significant difference between CHP and CHPDM group (P > 0.05). Conclusions: This study observed a low level of serum Vitamin D level in patients with CHP and CHPDM. Low Vitamin D level was observed in case groups may be due to the diseases process rather than low Vitamin D acting as a cause for the disease. PMID:26644714

  7. Translating personality psychology to help personalize preventive medicine for young adult patients.

    PubMed

    Israel, Salomon; Moffitt, Terrie E; Belsky, Daniel W; Hancox, Robert J; Poulton, Richie; Roberts, Brent; Thomson, W Murray; Caspi, Avshalom

    2014-03-01

    The rising number of newly insured young adults brought on by health care reform will soon increase demands on primary care physicians. Physicians will face more young adult patients, which presents an opportunity for more prevention-oriented care. In the present study, we evaluated whether brief observer reports of young adults' personality traits could predict which individuals would be at greater risk for poor health as they entered midlife. Following the cohort of 1,000 individuals from the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study (Moffitt, Caspi, Rutter, & Silva, 2001), we show that very brief measures of young adults' personalities predicted their midlife physical health across multiple domains (metabolic abnormalities, cardiorespiratory fitness, pulmonary function, periodontal disease, and systemic inflammation). Individuals scoring low on the traits of Conscientiousness and Openness to Experience went on to develop poorer health even after accounting for preexisting differences in education, socioeconomic status, smoking, obesity, self-reported health, medical conditions, and family medical history. Moreover, personality ratings from peer informants who knew participants well, and from a nurse and receptionist who had just met participants for the first time, predicted health decline from young adulthood to midlife despite striking differences in level of acquaintance. Personality effect sizes were on par with other well-established health risk factors such as socioeconomic status, smoking, and self-reported health. We discuss the potential utility of personality measurement to function as an inexpensive and accessible tool for health care professionals to personalize preventive medicine. Adding personality information to existing health care electronic infrastructures could also advance personality theory by generating opportunities to examine how personality processes influence doctor-patient communication, health service use, and patient

  8. The use of desmopressin in the management of two patients with von Willebrand's disease undergoing periodontal surgery. 2 case reports.

    PubMed

    Petrover, M G; Cohen, C I

    1990-04-01

    Von Willebrand's disease is a genetic bleeding disorder characterized by either a reduced plasma concentration of von Willebrand's factor (vWF) or a qualitative deficiency in that vWF which is produced. Previous therapy consisted of injecting concentrates of vWF manufactured from the pooled plasma of multiple donors. With the increased incidence and risk of serum borne transmission of such diseases as hepatitis and AIDS, the advantages of an alternative mode of therapy was obvious. In the course of using 1-desamino-8-D-arginine (desmopressin or DDAVP, a synthetic analogue of 8-arginine vasopressin, a hormone secreted in the posterior pituitary gland) in the treatment of diabetes insipidus, it was discovered that this drug causes the release of bound vWF into the plasma. The elevation lasts for several hours and is effective in producing hemostasis in some types of mild to moderate von Willebrand's disease. In 1984, desmopressin was approved for this usage in the United States. This paper discusses the use of DDAVP in the management of von Willebrand's disease and present two case reports of patients with von Willebrand's disease and in need of periodontal surgery. PMID:2324924

  9. Effect of topical application of melatonin on serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes and periodontal disease

    PubMed Central

    Cutando, Antonio; Montero, Javier; Gómez-de Diego, Rafael; Ferrera, María-José

    2015-01-01

    Background The present clinical trial study was designed to assess the effect of topical application of melatonin on serum levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and C-reactive protein (CRP) in patients with diabetes and periodontal disease in comparison with healthy controls. Material and Methods Serum levels of TNF-α and IL-6 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and CRP by nephelometry by using the proper commercial kits in 30 patients with diabetes and periodontal disease, and also in a control group of 30 healthy subjects. Periodontograms were performed using the Florida Probe®. Patients with diabetes were treated with a topical application of melatonin (1% orabase cream formula) once daily for 20 days. Healthy subjects were treated with a placebo orabase cream. Results Patients with diabetes and periodontal disease had significantly higher mean levels of serum TNF-α, IL-6 and CRP than healthy subjects (P < 0.001). Following topical melatonin application, there was a statistically significant decrease in the gingival index and pocket depth (P < 0.001) as well as a significant decrease in IL-6 and CRP serum levels (P < 0.001). Local melatonin application in patients with diabetes and periodontal disease resulted in a significant decrease in CRP and IL-6 serum levels as well as an improvement in the gingival index and pocket depth. Patients with periodontal disease had significantly higher serum CRP, IL-6 and TNF-α values by comparison with healthy subjects. Conclusions We conclude that melatonin can modulate the inflammatory action of these molecules in periodontal patients. Key words:Melatonin, periodontal disease, diabetes mellitus, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, C-reactive protein, inflammatory markers. PMID:26644840

  10. Fibrinogen Degradation Products and Periodontitis: Deciphering the Connection

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Fibrinogen degradation products (e.g. D-dimer) arise from digested fibrin clots and fibrinogen. Elevated concentrations accompany activation of coagulation and fibrinolysis and indicate chronic inflammatory diseases. D-Dimer tests are a quick, noninvasive method to rule out abnormal clotting. Periodontitis strongly affects the haemostatic system and evokes a procoagulant state. Correlation of chronic periodontitis with early indicators of disease (biomarkers) might be useful. Aim The aim of the study was to examine whether the plasma D-dimer concentration reflects the progression of chronic periodontitis and the beneficial effect of periodontal therapy. Materials and Methods Forty randomly selected subjects were divided into four groups, Group I: 10 healthy subjects, Group II: 10 with mild periodontitis, Group III: 10 with moderate periodontitis, Group IV: 10 with severe periodontitis. After thorough dental and periodontal examination, 3 mL of venous blood was collected for measurement of fibrinogen degradation products. Results The patients with moderate and chronic periodontitis exhibited high concentrations of D-dimer (mean value 434.98–535.52 mcg/mL), whereas subjects with mild or no periodontitis exhibited values of 329.78–211.29 mcg/mL. Concentrations of D-dimer were significantly reduced after therapy of all classes of periodontitis. Conclusion Periodontal treatment can reduce amount of D-dimer in the plasma. A higher than normal concentration is observed in chronic periodontitis. PMID:26816985

  11. The Role of Nutrition in Periodontal Health: An Update.

    PubMed

    Najeeb, Shariq; Zafar, Muhammad Sohail; Khurshid, Zohaib; Zohaib, Sana; Almas, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal health is influenced by a number of factors such as oral hygiene, genetic and epigenetic factors, systemic health, and nutrition. Many studies have observed that a balanced diet has an essential role in maintaining periodontal health. Additionally, the influences of nutritional supplements and dietary components have been known to affect healing after periodontal surgery. Studies have attempted to find a correlation between tooth loss, periodontal health, and nutrition. Moreover, bone formation and periodontal regeneration are also affected by numerous vitamins, minerals, and trace elements. The aim of this review is to critically appraise the currently available data on diet and maintenance of periodontal health and periodontal healing. The effects of nutritional intervention studies to improve the quality of life and well-being of patients with periodontal disease have been discussed. PMID:27589794

  12. The Role of Nutrition in Periodontal Health: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Najeeb, Shariq; Zafar, Muhammad Sohail; Khurshid, Zohaib; Zohaib, Sana; Almas, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal health is influenced by a number of factors such as oral hygiene, genetic and epigenetic factors, systemic health, and nutrition. Many studies have observed that a balanced diet has an essential role in maintaining periodontal health. Additionally, the influences of nutritional supplements and dietary components have been known to affect healing after periodontal surgery. Studies have attempted to find a correlation between tooth loss, periodontal health, and nutrition. Moreover, bone formation and periodontal regeneration are also affected by numerous vitamins, minerals, and trace elements. The aim of this review is to critically appraise the currently available data on diet and maintenance of periodontal health and periodontal healing. The effects of nutritional intervention studies to improve the quality of life and well-being of patients with periodontal disease have been discussed. PMID:27589794

  13. Study of neutrophils isolated from peripheral blood of patients suffering from aggressive periodontitis at the cellular level: Receptors and cytoskeletal reorganization

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Saswati; Kundu, Debabrata

    2012-01-01

    Background: Aggressive periodontitis (AgP) has been associated with polymorphonuclear leukocyte's (PMNL) dysfunction and periodontal pathogens possess variety of virulence factors that can impair PMNL's function. This study investigated the possible association between defective neutrophil adhesion and β2 -integrin expression and defective neutrophil migration and actin polymerization level in the peripheral blood of neutrophils from the patients with AgP. Materials and Methods: A total of 30 individuals both male and female, age ranges between 13 – 48 years, were included in the study. Healthy controls (group I, n=10), chronic periodontitis (ChP) (group II, n=10), and AgP (group III, n=10), all without any systemic diseases and non-smokers, were recruited. Peripheral blood samples were taken and β2 -integrin expression and actin polymerization levels were estimated by using fluorescence activated cell sorter analysis. Results: In AgP cases, both average values (β2 -integrin and actin level) were significantly less than that of normal subjects (<0.001). But for ChP cases, only the average value of actin level is significantly lower than that of normal subjects (<0.025). Conclusion: Lower β2 -integrin expression in the AgP cases signifies lower neutrophil adhesion in AgP cases than normal, and the lower average value of actin polymerization for the AgP cases suggest lower migration capacity of neutrophils in AgP cases than normal. PMID:22628965

  14. Evaluation of thickness of cementum of periodontally diseased teeth of non-diabetic and type 2 diabetic patients: A scanning electron microscopy study

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Radhika; Galgali, Sushama R.; Bavle, Radhika M.; Chandavarkar, Vidya

    2013-01-01

    Background: It is suggested that diabetes plays an important role in tooth loss. The periodontal structure and alveolar bone architecture in diabetics have revealed alterations. However, changes in cementum of diabetics with periodontal disease have not been evaluated adequately. Thus, the aim of the study is to evaluate and compare the thickness of cementum in diseased and healthy areas of roots of teeth with chronic periodontitis from non-diabetic (group I) and type 2 diabetic patients (group II). Materials and Methods: Thirty incisors indicated for extraction as a result of chronic periodontitis from group I and group II were selected. Measurements of Probing Depth (PD) and Clinical Attachment Loss (CAL) were taken prior to extractions. Area of the root surface above the CAL (notch) was designated as diseased, while the area below the CAL (notch) was designated as healthy. The extracted tooth samples were sectioned longitudinally and were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Descriptive statistical analysis was performed. Results of continuous measurements were presented as Mean ± SD. Results: The results showed that in both groups the thickness of cementum in diseased areas was lower in comparison to the thickness in healthy areas. The mean thickness of cementum in both healthy and diseased areas was higher in group II compared to group I, though the differences in both were not statistically significant. Conclusion: Within the limits of the present study, group II showed greater mean thickness of cementum in both healthy and diseased areas compared to group I, though the differences were not statistically significant. PMID:24174751

  15. Evaluation of interleukin -1B (+3954) gene polymorphism in patients with chronic and aggressive periodontitis: A genetic association study

    PubMed Central

    Masamatti, Sujata S.; Kumar, Ashish; Baron, Tarun Kumar A.; Mehta, Dhoom S.; Bhat, Kishore

    2012-01-01

    Background: IL-1 cytokines have central roles in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. Polymorphism in the locus +3954 (C/T) of the human IL-1B gene has been shown to affect the levels of this cytokine. Aim: The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between the IL-1 B (+3954) gene polymorphism and the occurrence of different clinical forms of periodontitis. Materials and Methods: Genomic DNA was obtained from 90 individuals and amplified using the PCR with specific primers flanking the locus +3954 of IL-1B. PCR products were submitted to restriction endonuclease digestion and analyzed by gel electrophoresis, allowing for the determination of the genotypes and detection of the polymorphism. Statistical Analysis: Fisher's exact test was used for comparing the frequency of genotype distributions between groups. Results: The chronic periodontitis group displayed a higher percentage of T alleles (38%) when compared to the aggressive periodontitis group (20%) and to the control group (19%). Conclusion: Our study data states that polymorphism in the locus +3954 of IL-1B gene could be a risk factor for chronic periodontitis in a sample of Indian population of Karnataka state. PMID:22919211

  16. Impact of Chronic Periodontitis on Levels of Glucoregulatory Biomarkers in Gingival Crevicular Fluid of Adults with and without Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Hasaan G.; Idris, Shaza B.; Mustafa, Manal; Ahmed, Mutaz F.; Åstrøm, Anne N.; Mustafa, Kamal; Ibrahim, Salah O.

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between diabetes and periodontal disease is bidirectional, but information about the effect of chronic periodontitis on the levels of the glucoregulatory biomarkers locally in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) is limited. The aim of this study was to compare the levels of 10 glucoregulatory biomarkers in GCF, firstly in subjects with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) presenting with and without chronic periodontitis and secondly, in subjects without diabetes, with and without chronic periodontitis. The material comprised a total of 152 subjects, stratified as: 54 with T2DM and chronic periodontitis (G1), 24 with T2DM (G2), 30 with chronic periodontitis (G3) and 44 without T2DM or periodontitis (G4). The levels of the biomarkers were measured using multiplex biometric immunoassays. Periodontal pocket depths were recorded in mm. Subsets G1 and G2 and subsets G3 and G4 were compared independently. Among T2DM subjects, GIP, GLP-1 and glucagon were significantly up-regulated in G1 compared to G2. Moreover, there were no statistical differences between the two groups regarding C-peptide, insulin, ghrelin, leptin and PAI-1. Comparisons among individuals without T2DM revealed significantly lower amounts of C-peptide and ghrelin in G3 than in G4. The number of sites with pocket depth ≥ 4mm correlated negatively with C-peptide (Spearman’s correlation co-efficient: -0.240, P < 0.01) and positively with GIP and visfatin (Spearman’s correlation co-efficient: 0.255 and 0.241, respectively, P < 0.01). The results demonstrate that chronic periodontitis adversely influences the GCF levels of glucoregulatory biomarkers, as it is associated with disturbed levels of biomarkers related to the onset of T2DM and its medical complications. PMID:25993052

  17. Minimally invasive periodontal therapy.

    PubMed

    Dannan, Aous

    2011-10-01

    Minimally invasive dentistry is a concept that preserves dentition and supporting structures. However, minimally invasive procedures in periodontal treatment are supposed to be limited within periodontal surgery, the aim of which is to represent alternative approaches developed to allow less extensive manipulation of surrounding tissues than conventional procedures, while accomplishing the same objectives. In this review, the concept of minimally invasive periodontal surgery (MIPS) is firstly explained. An electronic search for all studies regarding efficacy and effectiveness of MIPS between 2001 and 2009 was conducted. For this purpose, suitable key words from Medical Subject Headings on PubMed were used to extract the required studies. All studies are demonstrated and important results are concluded. Preliminary data from case cohorts and from many studies reveal that the microsurgical access flap, in terms of MIPS, has a high potential to seal the healing wound from the contaminated oral environment by achieving and maintaining primary closure. Soft tissues are mostly preserved and minimal gingival recession is observed, an important feature to meet the demands of the patient and the clinician in the esthetic zone. However, although the potential efficacy of MIPS in the treatment of deep intrabony defects has been proved, larger studies are required to confirm and extend the reported positive preliminary outcomes.

  18. A randomized placebo-controlled trial to evaluate a novel noninjectable anesthetic gel with thermosetting agent during scaling and root planing in chronic periodontitis patients

    PubMed Central

    Dayakar, MM; Akbar, SM

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To study the efficacy of a noninjectable anesthetic gel with a thermosetting agent in the reduction of pain during scaling and root planing (SRP) in untreated chronic periodontitis patients. Materials and Methods: This study is a randomized, double-masked, split-mouth, placebo-controlled trial. Thirty patients were enrolled who underwent SRP in a split-mouth (right side/left side) manner. Before commencement of SRP, both quadrants on each side were isolated and had a randomized gel (either placebo or test gel) placed in the periodontal pockets for 30 s. The pain was measured using numerical rating scale (NRS) and verbal rating scale (VRS). Results: The median NRS pain score for the patients treated with the anesthetic test gel was 1 (range: 0-4) as opposed to 5 (range: 3-7) in the placebo treated patients. The mean rank of pain score using NRS in test gel was 16.18 as compared to 44.82 in placebo treated sites. Hence, significant reduction in pain was found in test gel as compared to placebo using NRS (P < 0.001). The VRS showed that the majority of patients reported no pain or mild pain with a median of 1 as compared to placebo treated sites with a median of 2 suggestive of moderate pain. Conclusions: The NRS and VRS pain scores showed that the side treated with anesthetic gel was statistically more effective than the placebo in reducing pain during SRP. PMID:27051372

  19. The histological investigation of gingiva from patients with chronic renal failure, renal transplants, and periodontitis: a light and electron microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Yamalik, N; Delilbasi, L; Gülay, H; Cağlayan, F; Haberal, M; Cağlayan, G

    1991-12-01

    The clinical and histological appearance of gingiva was evaluated in renal transplant recipients (RTR) receiving immunosuppressive drugs, in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) undergoing hemodialysis, and systemically healthy individuals with periodontitis. Although the amount of bacterial plaque accumulation was similar among the groups (P greater than 0.05), the gingival inflammation was significantly less in RTR when compared to the other 2 groups (P less than 0.05). In light microscopic investigation the overall appearance of the connective tissue was similar in all of the groups. A mononuclear cell infiltration was present in all of the specimens; however, the number of inflammatory cells in patients with periodontitis was significantly higher than the other 2 groups (P less than 0.05). Prominent epithelial changes in the superficial layers of the oral epithelium; i.e., areas showing desquamation-like appearance, were noticed in patients with CRF. In electron microscopic investigation, fibroblasts and plasma cells with well-developed granular endoplasmic reticulum were found in connective tissue in RTR patients. In patients with CRF, epithelial cells presented swollen granular endoplasmic reticulum cisternae resembling vacuoles, indicating the presence of degeneration. It was suggested that with the use of immunosuppressive drugs the response to bacterial plaque did not diminish completely. PMID:1765936

  20. [The effectiveness of the combined use of energomonitor antioxidant and cognitive psychotherapy in the treatment of generalized periodontitis in elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Ashour, A Z; Belov, V G; Parfyonov, U A; Parfyonov, S A; Ershov, E V; Tuchin, I A; Kovalenko, A L; Talikova, E V

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of combined use of Cytoflavin and cognitive therapy on the dynamics of psychosomatic status and effectiveness of the treatment of generalized periodontitis in elderly patients. The results of treatment of 103 patients aged 60 and older were analyzed. All patients received standard therapy for 10-14 days depending on the severity of the process. In addition, the patients of the main group (51 patients) received Cytoflavin: 2 tabs. 2 times a day with an interval between doses of 8-10 hours for 25 days, and cognitive therapy aimed at training alternative realistic way of life perception. Treatment results were monitored by PMA, Russell periodontal index (PI), Green-Vermillion hygienic index. Psychosomatic dynamics was assessed by means of Spielberger anxiety scale and SUN" methods of before and after a month of treatment. The inclusion in the treatment regimen of Cytoflavin and cognitive therapy had a positive impact: reduction of PMA by 61.8%, PI by 45.3% and Green-Vermillion index by 39.8%. The psychosomatic tests proved anxiety level decrease by 28.7% in terms of "reactive" anxiety and 31.5% in terms of "personal" anxiety, emotional status (21.2%), activity (21.7%) and mood (21.8%) improvement. PMID:27239991

  1. Evaluation of the effect of hydrogen peroxide as a mouthwash in comparison with chlorhexidine in chronic periodontitis patients: A clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Rashed, Hazem Tarek

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objective: This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as a mouthwash in comparison with chlorhexidine (CHX) in chronic periodontitis patients. Materials and Methods: A total of 45 patients suffering from localized mild to moderate chronic periodontitis were chosen. The subjects were divided equally into three groups. Group A patients were treated only with scaling and root planning (SRP). Group B were treated with SRP in combination with 0.2% CHX gluconate mouthwash twice daily for 10 days. Group C were treated with SRP in combination with 1.5% H2O2 mouthwash twice daily for 10 days. Gingival index, plaque index, pocket depth, and clinical attachment level were recorded for patients of all groups on day 0 (Baseline), 15, 30, and 90, respectively. Statistical analysis was done using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 22.0. Repeated measures analysis of variance was used to assess the differences in the abovementioned indices because of time and groups. Results: Both CHX gluconate and H2O2 mouthwashes significantly reduced the gingival index more than that observed in the control group, but similar to each other. There were no significant differences in the clinical attachment loss, plaque index, and pocket depth among the study groups, but improvement was seen within the CHX group participants. In participants with chronic periodontitis, SRP in combination with 0.2% CHX gluconate mouthwash was an effective treatment in reducing the gingival index and the pocket depth, as well as improving the clinical attachment level. Conclusion: The use of CHX gluconate was observed to be higher than H2O2 for the reduction in the gingival index and the pocket depth, as well as for the improvement of the clinical attachment level. PMID:27382535

  2. Relationship between Acute Phase of Chronic Periodontitis and Meteorological Factors in the Maintenance Phase of Periodontal Treatment: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Noriko; Ekuni, Daisuke; Tomofuji, Takaaki; Morita, Manabu

    2015-01-01

    The acute phase of chronic periodontitis may occur even in patients during supportive periodontal therapy. However, the details are not fully understood. Since the natural environment, including meteorology affects human health, we hypothesized that weather conditions may affect occurrence of acute phase of chronic periodontitis. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between weather conditions and acute phase of chronic periodontitis in patients under supportive periodontal therapy. Patients who were diagnosed with acute phase of chronic periodontitis under supportive periodontal therapy during 2011–2013 were selected for this study. We performed oral examinations and collected questionnaires and meteorological data. Of 369 patients who experienced acute phase of chronic periodontitis, 153 had acute phase of chronic periodontitis without direct-triggered episodes. When using the autoregressive integrated moving average model of time-series analysis, the independent covariant of maximum hourly range of barometric pressure, maximum hourly range of temperature, and maximum daily wind speed were significantly associated with occurrence of acute phase of chronic periodontitis (p < 0.05), and 3.1% of the variations in these occurrence over the study period were explained by these factors. Meteorological variables may predict occurrence of acute phase of chronic periodontitis. PMID:26251916

  3. Relationship between Acute Phase of Chronic Periodontitis and Meteorological Factors in the Maintenance Phase of Periodontal Treatment: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Noriko; Ekuni, Daisuke; Tomofuji, Takaaki; Morita, Manabu

    2015-08-01

    The acute phase of chronic periodontitis may occur even in patients during supportive periodontal therapy. However, the details are not fully understood. Since the natural environment, including meteorology affects human health, we hypothesized that weather conditions may affect occurrence of acute phase of chronic periodontitis. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between weather conditions and acute phase of chronic periodontitis in patients under supportive periodontal therapy. Patients who were diagnosed with acute phase of chronic periodontitis under supportive periodontal therapy during 2011-2013 were selected for this study. We performed oral examinations and collected questionnaires and meteorological data. Of 369 patients who experienced acute phase of chronic periodontitis, 153 had acute phase of chronic periodontitis without direct-triggered episodes. When using the autoregressive integrated moving average model of time-series analysis, the independent covariant of maximum hourly range of barometric pressure, maximum hourly range of temperature, and maximum daily wind speed were significantly associated with occurrence of acute phase of chronic periodontitis (p < 0.05), and 3.1% of the variations in these occurrence over the study period were explained by these factors. Meteorological variables may predict occurrence of acute phase of chronic periodontitis. PMID:26251916

  4. The bone resorbing activity released by gingival fibroblasts isolated from patients with periodontitis is independent of interleukin-1.

    PubMed

    Sjöström, S; Hänström, L; Lerner, U H

    2000-04-01

    Supernatants from gingival fibroblast cultures obtained from 14 patients with periodontal disease contained factor(s) capable of stimulating bone resorption in vitro, as assessed by the release of 45Ca from neonatal mouse calvariae. The possibility that the factor(s) was interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha), IL-1 beta or prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) was next investigated. The human fibroblast conditioned media (HFCM) stimulated PGE2 biosynthesis in bone. The stimulatory effect by HFCM on 45Ca release, however, was not affected by blocking prostaglandin biosynthesis with indomethacin. In contrast, 45Ca release induced by IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta, thrombin and bradykinin was significantly reduced by indomethacin, whereas the effects of PTH and PTHrP were unaffected by indomethacin. The concentration of PGE2 in HFCM was too low to be solely responsible for the 45Ca release response. In addition, the amount of bone resorbing activity produced by the gingival fibroblasts was unaffected by cyclo-oxygenase inhibitors. Similar to IL-1 alpha and IL-1 beta, the stimulatory effect of HFCM was inhibited by gamma-interferon. HFCM did not stimulate cyclic AMP formation in the mouse calvarial bones. Antisera which specifically blocked human IL-1 alpha or IL-1 beta induced 45Ca release, and the specific IL-1 receptor antagonistic protein, did not inhibit the stimulatory effect of HFCM. These data show that gingival fibroblasts secrete bone resorbing factor(s) which is not due to IL-1 and which stimulates bone resorption by a prostaglandin- and cyclic AMP-independent mechanism.

  5. [Bacterial parotitis in an immunocompromised patient in adult ICU].

    PubMed

    Vassal, O; Bernet, C; Wallet, F; Friggeri, A; Piriou, V

    2013-09-01

    Bacterial parotitis is a common childhood disease with a favorable outcome. Staphylococcus aureus is the most frequently involved pathogen. Clinical presentation in adult patients can be misleading, Onset occurs in patients with multiple comorbidities, making diagnosis difficult--particularly in ICU. Different pathogens are found in adults with worse outcomes observed. We report here the case of a critically ill patient and discuss diagnosis and management of bacterial parotitis.

  6. Relationships between periodontal disease and bacterial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Scannapieco, F A; Mylotte, J M

    1996-10-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is a prevalent and costly infection that is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in patients of all ages. The continuing emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria (e.g., penicillin-resistant pneumococci) suggests that bacterial pneumonia will assume increasing importance in the coming years. Thus, knowledge of the pathogenesis of, and risk factors for, bacterial pneumonia is critical to the development of strategies for prevention and treatment of these infections. Bacterial pneumonia in adults is the result of aspiration of oropharyngeal flora into the lower respiratory tract and failure of host defense mechanisms to eliminate the contaminating bacteria, which multiply in the lung and cause infection. It is recognized that community-acquired pneumonia and lung abscesses can be the result of infection by anaerobic bacteria; dental plaque would seem to be a logical source of these bacteria, especially in patients with periodontal disease. It is also possible that patients with high risk for pneumonia, such as hospitalized patients and nursing home residents, are likely to pay less attention to personal hygiene than healthy patients. One important dimension of this personal neglect may be diminished attention to oral hygiene. Poor oral hygiene and periodontal disease may promote oropharyngeal colonization by potential respiratory pathogens (PRPs) including Enterobacteriaceae (Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Enterobacter species, etc.), Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus. This paper provides the rationale for the development of this hypothesis especially as it pertains to mechanically ventilated intensive care unit patients and nursing home residents, two patient groups with a high risk for bacterial pneumonia. PMID:8910830

  7. [NONSURGICAL RECONSTRUCTION METHOD INTERDENTALLY PAPILLAE IN THE RESTATION OF APROXIMAL CAVITIES AS ONE OF THE STAGES OF REHABILITATION OF PATIENTS WITH GENERALIZAD PERIODONTITIS].

    PubMed

    Obolonskaya, A A

    2015-01-01

    Reconstruction of missing papilla--the basis of modern concepts of objective treatment of dental diseases. Interproximal spaces are important anatomical structures, as are bulky in the mouth and repeated many times. Violation of relations between different structural elements increases the risk of inflammation in periodontitis. Patients with approximal caries posteriors and generalized periodontitis studied anthropometric parameters of the structures of the interdental spaces and their impact on the volume papilla before and after restoration, carried out with move a contact point to the apex. The results showed that the relationship between anthropometric data interdental had certain patterns in all groups surveyed. Important was a clear relationship between anthropometric indicators of basic elements of interdental spaces. In the absence of the interproximal papilla length (IPL) was on average 7.2 mm, the distance from the gingival margin to the proximal contact--3.9 mm and the horizontal distance between the roots at the enamel--cement border (HDR) reached 3.2 mm. Following the restoration with move a contact point to the apex to an average of 4.5 mm IPL, there was a significant increase in the interdental papillae. In the case of patients prior to treatment was determined by a thin biotype, the small width of attached gingival significant HDR--volume papilla week after restorations movement of the contact point to the root apex contact point is not increased. The results obtained require long-term studies for the possibility of forecasting the success of the restoration or preservation of the interdental papillae in the restoration of approximal cavities on the stages of rehabilitation of patients with generalized periodontitis. PMID:27089727

  8. [NONSURGICAL RECONSTRUCTION METHOD INTERDENTALLY PAPILLAE IN THE RESTATION OF APROXIMAL CAVITIES AS ONE OF THE STAGES OF REHABILITATION OF PATIENTS WITH GENERALIZAD PERIODONTITIS].

    PubMed

    Obolonskaya, A A

    2015-01-01

    Reconstruction of missing papilla--the basis of modern concepts of objective treatment of dental diseases. Interproximal spaces are important anatomical structures, as are bulky in the mouth and repeated many times. Violation of relations between different structural elements increases the risk of inflammation in periodontitis. Patients with approximal caries posteriors and generalized periodontitis studied anthropometric parameters of the structures of the interdental spaces and their impact on the volume papilla before and after restoration, carried out with move a contact point to the apex. The results showed that the relationship between anthropometric data interdental had certain patterns in all groups surveyed. Important was a clear relationship between anthropometric indicators of basic elements of interdental spaces. In the absence of the interproximal papilla length (IPL) was on average 7.2 mm, the distance from the gingival margin to the proximal contact--3.9 mm and the horizontal distance between the roots at the enamel--cement border (HDR) reached 3.2 mm. Following the restoration with move a contact point to the apex to an average of 4.5 mm IPL, there was a significant increase in the interdental papillae. In the case of patients prior to treatment was determined by a thin biotype, the small width of attached gingival significant HDR--volume papilla week after restorations movement of the contact point to the root apex contact point is not increased. The results obtained require long-term studies for the possibility of forecasting the success of the restoration or preservation of the interdental papillae in the restoration of approximal cavities on the stages of rehabilitation of patients with generalized periodontitis.

  9. [Periodontitis and systemic diseases: from science to clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Thomas, R Z; Loos, B G; Teeuw, W; Kunnen, A; van Winkelhoff, A J; Abbas, F

    2015-10-01

    The evidence for an association between systemic diseases and periodontitis is strongest with diabetes mellitus type 2 and cardiovascular disease. There is a moderate association of periodontitis with adverse pregnancy outcomes and rheumatoid arthritis. Periodontal treatment has, on average, a positive effect on reducing systemic infection and improving the condition of the vascular system. For diabetes patients, periodontal treatment can also have a positive effect on metabolic regulation. There is insufficient evidence that periodontal treatment prevents adverse pregnancy outcomes and rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:26465017

  10. POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION TO EVALUATE THE EFFICACY OF SILICA DIOXIDE COLLOIDAL SOLUTIONS IN THE TREATMENT OF CHRONIC PERIODONTITIS: A CASE CONTROL STUDY.

    PubMed

    Lauritano, D; Cura, F; Gaudio, R M; Pezzetti, F; Andreasi Bassi, M; Carinci, F

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy of supportive periodontal therapy [i.e. scaling and rooth planing (SRP)] alone versus a chemical silica dioxide (SiO2) colloidal solution (SDCS) device used in association with SRP in the treatment of chronic periodontitis in adult patients. A total of 20 patients with a diagnosis of chronic periodontitis (40 localized chronic periodontitis sites) in the age group of 35 to 55 were selected. None of these patients had previously received any surgical or non-surgical periodontal therapy and had radiographic evidence of moderate bone loss. Two non-adjacent sites in separate quadrants were selected in each patient to monitorize treatment efficacy (split mouth design). Clinical pocket depth (PD) and microbial analysis (MA) were analyzed at baseline and on 15th day. SPSS program and paired simple statistic t-test were used to detect significant differences. Total bacteria loading, Tannerella forsitia and Treponema denticola loading were statistically reduced when SiO2 was locally delivered. SDCS gel is an adjuvant therapy which should be added to SRP in the management of moderate-to-severe chronic periodontitis. PMID:26511193

  11. Detection of hepatitis C virus RNA in saliva of patients with active infection not associated with periodontal or liver disease severity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is mainly transmitted by parenteral route, being blood transfusion and intravenous drug use the most frequent risk factors. However, it has been suggested that there are other routes of transmission. There are several studies where HCV RNA has been detected in saliva of patients infected with HCV, and epidemiological studies have proposed the dental treatments as possible risk factors for HCV transmission. The purpose of this study was to detect the presence of HCV RNA in saliva of patients with active infection and associating with periodontal or liver disease. Methods Patients with quantifiable HCV-RNA in serum were enrolled in the study. Periodontal disease was assessed using the modified gingival index (MGI). Presence of dental plaque was assessed with the use of disclosing tablets. Patients were clinically and laboratory evaluated to identify the stage of liver disease, the HCV RNA was determinate in saliva by nested RT-PCR. To determine associations between different parameters univariate and multivariate analysis were used. Results A total of 45 patients were included. Of these patients, 21 (46.6%) had hepatitis, 23 (51.1%) had cirrhosis and one patient (2.4%) presented hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Viral loads in serum ranged from 2.31–6.68 log IU/ml with a mean of 5.46 log IU/ml (95% CI 5.23–5.70). HCV RNA was positive in saliva of 29 patients (64.4%) and was not detected in 16 (35.6%). For univariate analysis three independent variables were associated with the detection of HCV-RNA in saliva: gender, viral load and dental plaque and multivariate analysis only one independent variable viral load >5.17 log IU/mL remained significantly associated with the detection of HCV in saliva (p = 0.0002). A statistical difference was observed when viral load was analyzed, log 5.85 IU/mL (95% CI 5.67–6.02) for patients with HCV in saliva vs. log 4.77 IU/mL (95% CI 4.35–5.19) for patients without HCV in saliva (p

  12. Uncovering the molecular networks in periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Trindade, Fábio; Oppenheim, Frank G.; Helmerhorst, Eva J.; Amado, Francisco; Gomes, Pedro S.; Vitorino, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is a complex immune-inflammatory disease that results from a preestablished infection in gingiva, mainly due to Gram-negative bacteria that colonize deeper in gingival sulcus and latter periodontal pocket. Host inflammatory and immune responses have both protective and destructive roles. Although cytokines, prostaglandins, and proteases struggle against microbial burden, these molecules promote connective tissue loss and alveolar bone resorption, leading to several histopathological changes, namely destruction of periodontal ligament, deepening of periodontal pocket, and bone loss, which can converge to attain tooth loss. Despite the efforts of genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics/peptidomics, and metabolomics, there is no available biomarker for periodontitis diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment evaluation, which could assist on the established clinical evaluation. Nevertheless, some genes, transcripts, proteins and metabolites have already shown a different expression in healthy subjects and in patients. Though, so far, ‘omics approaches only disclosed the host inflammatory response as a consequence of microbial invasion in periodontitis and the diagnosis in periodontitis still relies on clinical parameters, thus a molecular tool for assessing periodontitis lacks in current dental medicine paradigm. Saliva and gingival crevicular fluid have been attracting researchers due to their diagnostic potential, ease, and noninvasive nature of collection. Each one of these fluids has some advantages and disadvantages that are discussed in this review. PMID:24828325

  13. [Diabetes and periodontitis: A bidirectional relationship].

    PubMed

    Bascones-Martínez, Antonio; Muñoz-Corcuera, Marta; Bascones-Ilundain, Jaime

    2015-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic diseases characterized by hyperglycemia resulting from defects in insulin secretion, a defect in insulin action or a combination of both. Periodontitis is now considered a chronic localized infection of the oral cavity that can trigger inflammatory host immune responses at local and systemic levels, and can also be a source of bacteremia. It is now known that periodontitis has an influence on the pathogenesis of certain systemic diseases. The biological relationship between diabetes and periodontal disease is well documented. In the mid-90s sufficient scientific support for the association between diabetes and periodontitis was published, and periodontitis was designated as the sixth complication of diabetes. There have been studies that show an improvement in both clinical and immunological parameters of periodontitis and glycemic control in long-term diabetes after treatment of periodontal disease. In addition, scientific evidence confirms that poorer glycemic control contributes to a worse periodontal condition. The interplay between the 2 conditions highlights the importance of the need for a good communication between the internist and dentist about diabetic patients, considering always the possibility that the 2 diseases may be occurring simultaneously in order to ensure an early diagnosis of both.

  14. An update on periodontic-orthodontic interrelationships

    PubMed Central

    Dannan, Aous

    2010-01-01

    Talking about periodontic-orthodontic interrelationships is related primarily to the 1960s, where a generalized increase in salivary bacterial counts, especially Lactobacillus, had been shown after orthodontic band placement. The purpose of this article is to provide the dental practitioner with basic understanding of the interrelationship between periodontics and orthodontics by means of representing classical studies, and, to give an update on this topic by demonstrating the most recent opinions concerning periodontic-orthodontic interrelationships. Specific areas reviewed are the ability of orthodontic treatment to afford some degree of protection against periodontal breakdown, short-term and long-term effects of orthodontic treatment on the periodontium, and some mucogingival considerations. Topics considering orthodontic treatment in periodontally compromised patients were not included in this review. While past studies have shown that orthodontic treatment can positively affect the periodontal health, recent reviews indicate an absence of reliable evidence for the positive effects of orthodontic therapy on patients’ periodontal status. Periodontic-orthodontic interrelationships are still controversial issues. However, a standard language between the periodontist and the orthodontist must always be established to eliminate the existing communications barrier, and to improve the outcomes of the whole treatment. PMID:20922083

  15. Physical and psychosocial challenges in adult hemophilia patients with inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    duTreil, Sue

    2014-01-01

    Numerous challenges confront adult hemophilia patients with inhibitors, including difficulty in controlling bleeding episodes, deterioration of joints, arthritic pain, physical disability, emotional turmoil, and social issues. High-intensity treatment regimens often used in the treatment of patients with inhibitors also impose significant scheduling, economic, and emotional demands on patients and their families or primary caregivers. A comprehensive multidisciplinary assessment of the physical, emotional, and social status of adult hemophilia patients with inhibitors is essential for the development of treatment strategies that can be individualized to address the complex needs of these patients. PMID:25093002

  16. Periodontal considerations in veneer cases.

    PubMed

    Peto, David

    2015-04-01

    Porcelain veneers are a minimally invasive technique to enhance patients' smiles. A crucial component in these cases is the supporting periodontal apparatus and its interaction with the restorations. This article addresses basic concepts such as biologic width, altered eruption patterns, appropriate gingival contouring and smile design to give practitioners the tools to diagnose, evaluate and treat cases successfully and predictably.

  17. Clinical and radiographic evaluation of intra-bony defects in localized aggressive periodontitis patients with platelet rich plasma/hydroxyapatite graft: A comparative controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Geeti

    2014-01-01

    Background: Aggressive periodontitis is a characterized by rapid attachment loss, bone destruction and familial aggregation. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been proposed to promote regeneration of the lost periodontal tissues. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the efficacy of PRP combined with hydroxyapatite (HA) graft in the treatment of intra-bony defects in localized aggressive periodontitis (L-AgP) patients. Materials and Methods: Ten L-AgP patients having bilateral intra-bony defect ≥2 mm and probing depth (PD) ≥6 mm were randomly treated either with the PRP/HA graft or HA graft alone. The clinical (plaque control record, bleeding on probing index, PD, and relative attachment level [RAL]), and radiographic parameters (size of the bone defect) were recorded pre- and post-operatively at 3, 6, and 12 months. Results: After 12 months, for both maxillary and mandibular arches, the mean PD decrease was significantly more (P < 0.05) for the test group than the control group (3.2 mm vs. 1.9 mm and 3.6 mm vs. 1.9 mm, respectively). Furthermore, the mean RAL decrease in both maxillary and mandibular arches was significantly more (P < 0.05) for the test group than the control group (3.0 mm vs. 1.2 mm and 3.1 mm vs. 1.4 mm, respectively). Radiographically, the test group showed significantly more defect fill as compared with the control group. Conclusion: Both treatments provided significant improvements in clinical and radiographic parameters in a 12-month postoperative period. PRP/HA group presented superior results regarding PD reduction, clinical attachment gain and radiographic bone fill than HA group. PMID:25395757

  18. Smoking and periodontal disease severity.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Canut, P; Lorca, A; Magán, R

    1995-10-01

    This study was performed to assess the influence of smoking on periodontal disease severity. Data concerning periodontal status and smoking habits were collected from 889 periodontal patients: 340 male and 549 female, 21 to 76 years of age, 47.4% being non smokers and 52.6% smokers. Periodontal parameters, recorded by the same examiner (PMC), were: gingival recession (GR), Pocket depth (PD), Probing attachment level (PAL), and mobility (M). The influence of age, sex and tobacco consumption on these periodontal parameters was statistically evaluated using an analysis of variance (ANOVA) with covariates. A non-linear effect model was also fitted by taking the natural logarithms of the response variables (GR, PD, PAL) closer to biomedical phenomena. Mobility was analyzed by a chi2-test. The effect of smoking on periodontitis showed no association with age or with sex. Smoking, age and sex were shown to be statistically significant for periodontitis, by performing both univariate (t-test for equal means) and multivariate tests. p-values for smoking and periodontitis were: GR (p=0.000), PD (p=0.000), PAL (p=0.000) and M (P=0.015). Smoking one cigarette per day, up to 10, and up to 20, increased PAL by 0.5%, 5% and 10%, respectively. The impact of tobacco is comparable to the impact resulting from the factor of age in this sample, increasing PAL by 0.7% for each year of life. Comparison between smokers of less than 10 cigarettes per day (PAL mean 3.72 mm +/-0.86) and non-smokers (PAL mean 3.84 +/- 0.89) showed no differences in PAL (p=0.216), while comparison for smokers from 11 to 20 cigarettes (PAL mean 4.36 +/- 1.23) and for more than 20 cigarettes (PAL mean 4.50 +/- 1.04) demonstrated significant differences (p=0.000). These findings suggest that: (1) tobacco increases periodontal disease severity; (2) this effect is clinically evident above consumption of a certain quantity of tobacco.

  19. Approximate Quantification in Young, Healthy Older Adults', and Alzheimer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gandini, Delphine; Lemaire, Patrick; Michel, Bernard Francois

    2009-01-01

    Forty young adults, 40 healthy older adults, and 39 probable AD patients were asked to estimate small (e.g., 25) and large (e.g., 60) collections of dots in a choice condition and in two no-choice conditions. Participants could choose between benchmark and anchoring strategies on each collection of dots in the choice condition and were required to…

  20. Detection of putative periodontal pathogens in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and non-diabetes mellitus by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Yuan, K; Chang, C J; Hsu, P C; Sun, H S; Tseng, C C; Wang, J R

    2001-02-01

    It has been assumed that there is a relationship between periodontal diseases and diabetes mellitus, however the putative periodontal microorganisms in non-diabetes mellitus (non-DM) individuals and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) patients have not been well studied. In this study, the detection rates of 5 putative periodontal pathogens: Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Eikenella corrodens, Treponema denticola, and Candida albicans by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) between NIDDM and non-DM adults were compared. A total of 246 adults were randomly recruited and periodontal parameters including: plaque index (P1I), gingival index (GI), probing depth (PD) and attachment level (AL) were recorded. Subgingival plaque samples were collected by sterile curettes from the most diseased and healthy sites based on PD and AL. The differences in periodontal parameters and microbiological data in healthy and diseased sites between non-DM and NIDDM patients were compared by chi-square analysis. The results showed no significant differences in age, gender, GI, P1I, PD, and prevalence of the 5 microorganisms between the NIDDM and the non-diabetic groups. However, except for A. actinomycetemcomitans, the prevalence of the periodontal microorganisms tested was significantly higher (p <0.001) in diseased sites than in the healthy sites in both groups. The P1I, GI, PD and AL were significantly higher in T. denticola positive sites than in negative sites. The results suggested that P. gingivalis, T. denticola, E. corrodens and C. albicans may play important roles in the periodontitis of both NIDDM and non-DM individuals, however the etiology of periodontitis in both groups may not be different from each other.

  1. [Studies on oral hygiene and periodontal prophylaxis in patients with jaw fractures].

    PubMed

    Hörster, W; Korf, M

    1976-03-01

    Oral hygiene experiments with H2O2 and chlorhexidine rinsing were performed in 15 patients with dental splints for jaw fractures and intermaxillary wiring. To measure the various cleaning measures, Löe's plaque index (1967) was determined at the 7th, 21st, and 35th postoperative days. The 2% chlorhexidine gluconate was always by far superior to H2O2 as far as plaque inhibition was concerned. With chlorhexidine plaque reduction up to 69% and H202 reductions up to 22% were observed. After a test period of about 5 weeks, only slight side-effects were recorded, such as discolorations at the lingual side of the teeth and in few cases bad taste or dark coating of the tongue.

  2. Translating Personality Psychology to Help Personalize Preventive Medicine for Young-Adult Patients

    PubMed Central

    Israel, Salomon; Moffitt, Terrie E.; Belsky, Daniel W.; Hancox, Robert J.; Poulton, Richie; Roberts, Brent; Thomson, W. Murray; Caspi, Avshalom

    2014-01-01

    The rising number of newly insured young adults brought on by healthcare reform will soon increase demands on primary-care physicians. Physicians will face more young-adult patients which presents an opportunity for more prevention-oriented care. In the current study, we evaluated whether brief observer reports of young adults’ personality traits could predict which individuals would be at greater risk for poor health as they entered midlife. Following the Dunedin Study cohort of 1,000 individuals, we show that very brief measures of young adults’ personalities predicted their midlife physical health across multiple domains (metabolic abnormalities, cardiorespiratory fitness, pulmonary function, periodontal disease, and systemic inflammation). Individuals scoring low on the traits of Conscientiousness and Openness-to-Experience went on to develop poorer health even after accounting for preexisting differences in education, socioeconomic status, smoking, obesity, self-reported health, medical conditions, and family medical history. Moreover, personality ratings from peer informants who knew participants well, and from a nurse and receptionist who had just met participants for the first time, predicted health decline from young adulthood to midlife despite striking differences in level of acquaintance. Personality effect sizes were on par with other well-established health-risk factors such as socioeconomic status, smoking, and self-reported health. We discuss the potential utility of personality measurement to function as an inexpensive and accessible tool for healthcare professionals to personalize preventive medicine. Adding personality information to existing healthcare electronic infrastructures could also advance personality theory by generating opportunities to examine how personality processes influence doctor-patient communication, health service use, and patient outcomes. PMID:24588093

  3. Chair-Side Quantitative Oral-Microflora Screening for Assessing Familial Correlation of Periodontal Status and Caries Prevalence

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yung-Kai; Lee, Wei-Fang; Wang, Meng-Jiy; Chang, Yus-Han Sophie; Tchaou, Wen-Shiun; Chang, Wei-Jen; Lee, Sheng-Yang; Sheu, Joen-Rong; Teng, Nai-Chia

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Our goal was to investigate the relationship between clinical status and the presence of carious or periodontal pathogens among parent-child familial pairs. Clinical practices of risk assessment with consideration of familial pathogen interaction might reduce the need for therapy, improve patient outcomes, and ultimately reduce oral disease burden. Materials and Methods: In this study, we enrolled 30 parent-child pairs, with the children exhibiting complete deciduous dentition or mixed dentition with only permanent first molars. Clinical statuses were evaluated using caries and periodontal disease indicators, including the sum of decay and the number of missing or filled teeth (DMFT) for adults, decay, extraction caused by dental disease, and filled teeth (deft), for children, probing depth, and plaque control record (PCR). Supra- and sub-gingival bacteria were determined based on semi-quantitative measurements of microbial infection by using data from the Dentocult® SM test (caries-related organisms) and the PerioCheck® test (periodontal disease-related organisms). Results: No statistically significant relationship was detected between the prevalence of periodontal pathogens and that of cariogenic pathogens in the oral cavity. However, the clinical status of caries (DMFT) was negatively correlated with the clinical status of periodontal disease (pocket depth) in parents who were infected with dominant periodontal pathogens (r = −0.59, p<0.01). Parents’ DMFT scores were positively correlated with children’s deft and PCR scores. PCR and deft scores of children appeared to decrease significantly with the parent’s pocket depth. Conclusion: The study showed that the quantity of caries pathogens were not significant related to periodontal pathogens, but the caries clinical outcome is negative related with periodontal clinical outcome between familial pairs. PMID:24498022

  4. Periodontal Plastic Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dental Implants Dentures Direct Bonding Implants versus Bridges Orthodontics and Aligners Periodontal Plastic Surgery Porcelain Crowns Porcelain ... Dental Implants Dentures Direct Bonding Implants versus Bridges Orthodontics and Aligners Periodontal Plastic Surgery Porcelain Crowns Porcelain ...

  5. Gum (Periodontal) Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... forms of gum disease are gingivitis and periodontitis. Gingivitis and Periodontitis In gingivitis, the gums become red, swollen and can bleed easily. Gingivitis can usually be reversed with daily brushing and ...

  6. Multiple applications of flurbiprofen and chlorhexidine chips in patients with chronic periodontitis: a randomized, double blind, parallel, 2-arms clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Machtei, Eli E; Hirsh, Ilan; Falah, Maher; Shoshani, Eyal; Avramoff, Avi; Penhasi, Adel

    2011-01-01

    Aim The aim of the present randomized, double blind, parallel, 2-arm clinical study was to examine the safety and efficacy of frequent applications of chlorhexidine chip (CHX) and flurbiprofen chip (FBP) in patients with chronic periodontitis. Methods Sixty patients were randomized into CHX and FBP groups. Following OHI and scaling and root planing (SRP), baseline pocket depth (PD) measurements, gingival recession and bleeding on probing (BOP) were performed and repeated at week 4 and 8. The assigned chip was placed at weeks 0, 1, 2, 3, 5, 7. Results Mean PD reduction in the CHX group was 2.08 mm (7.17 to 5.09, p < 0.0001). Mean PD reduction in the FBP group was 2.27 mm (6.72 to 4.45, p < 0.0001). Ninety-seven percentage and 95% of these sites exhibited PD reduction ≥1 mm, while 38% and 34% of the sites exhibited PD ≥3 mm (FBP and CHX, respectively). Clinical attachment level gain (1.66 and 1.95 mm, respectively) was statistically significant (p < 0.0001). Baseline BOP dropped from 98% and 100% to 24% and 30% for the CHX and FBP groups, respectively (p < 0.0001). Conclusion Frequent applications of CHX and FBP chips resulted in a significant improvement in the periodontal condition in these sites. Furthermore studies will be required to compare this new treatment regimen to SRP or SRP with single chip application. PMID:22092475

  7. [Periodontal disease in pediatric rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Fabri, Gisele M C; Savioli, Cynthia; Siqueira, José T; Campos, Lucia M; Bonfá, Eloisa; Silva, Clovis A

    2014-01-01

    Gingivitis and periodontitis are immunoinflammatory periodontal diseases characterized by chronic localized infections usually associated with insidious inflammation This narrative review discusses periodontal diseases and mechanisms influencing the immune response and autoimmunity in pediatric rheumatic diseases (PRD), particularly juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (C-SLE) and juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM). Gingivitis was more frequently observed in these diseases compared to health controls, whereas periodontitis was a rare finding. In JIA patients, gingivitis and periodontitis were related to mechanical factors, chronic arthritis with functional disability, dysregulation of the immunoinflammatory response, diet and drugs, mainly corticosteroids and cyclosporine. In C-SLE, gingivitis was associated with longer disease period, high doses of corticosteroids, B-cell hyperactivation and immunoglobulin G elevation. There are scarce data on periodontal diseases in JDM population, and a unique gingival pattern, characterized by gingival erythema, capillary dilation and bush-loop formation, was observed in active patients. In conclusion, gingivitis was the most common periodontal disease in PRD. The observed association with disease activity reinforces the need for future studies to determine if resolution of this complication will influence disease course or severity.

  8. Association between interleukin-1 gene polymorphism and severity of chronic periodontitis in a south Indian population group

    PubMed Central

    Archana, P. M.; Salman, A. Arif; Kumar, T. S. S; Saraswathi, P. K.; Panishankar, K. H.; Kumarasamy, P.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Periodontitis is a bacterial disease modified by multiple factors. Interleukin-1 (IL-1) is a key regulator of the host response and a major modulator of extracellular matrix catabolism and bone resorption. It has been reported that variations in IL-1 gene are associated with increased susceptibility to periodontitis. The aims of the study were 1) to analyze the distribution of single nucleotide polymorphism of IL-1 (IL-1A-+4845 and IL-1B-+3954) and 2) to correlate the association of the composite genotype with the severity of chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods: Sixty patients aged above 35 years were selected. Following a periodontal examination, using the clinical parameters plaque index, gingival bleeding index, probing depth, and clinical attachment loss (CAL), the selected subjects were categorized into four groups of differing disease severity based on CAL. Five milliliters of venous blood was drawn. DNA was isolated by phenol chloroform method. Amplification of IL-1A+4845 and IL-1B+3954 was done by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Detection of genotype was done using restriction fragment length polymorphism using the enzymes FnU4HI for IL-1A and TaqI for IL-1B. The results obtained were analyzed statistically. Results: The frequencies of IL-1A-+4845 and IL-1B-+3954were significantly greater in severe periodontitis patients. The distribution of composite genotype (allele 2 of IL-1A+4845and allele 2 of IL-1B+3954) also correlated with the severity of periodontitis. Genotype-positive subjects had a higher mean bleeding index (%) when compared to genotype-negative patients. But no correlation was observed between mean plaque level among genotype-positive and -negative subjects. Conclusion: IL-1 gene polymorphism IL-1A+4845, IL-1B+3954 and composite genotype is an indicator of susceptibility to severe periodontitis in adults. PMID:23055581

  9. Adjunct Antimicrobial Therapy and Periodontal Surgery to Treat Generalized Aggressive Periodontitis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Irokawa, Daisuke; Makino-Oi, Asako; Fujita, Takahisa; Yamamoto, Shigeki; Tomita, Sachiyo; Saito, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Here we report a case of generalized aggressive periodontitis treated with periodontal therapy including adjunct antimicrobial therapy and periodontal surgery. The patient was a 22-year-old woman who presented with the chief complaint of gingival recession. Baseline examination revealed generalized plaque deposition and gingival inflammation. Thirty-nine percent of the sites had a probing depth (PD) of 4-6 mm and 2% a PD of ≥7 mm; 63% exhibited bleeding on probing (BOP). Radiographic examination revealed vertical bone loss in the molars and horizontal bone loss in other teeth. Microbiological examination of subgingival plaque revealed the presence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Tannerella forsythia. Oral health-related quality of life was assessed as a measure of patient-reported outcome. Based on a clinical diagnosis of generalized aggressive periodontitis, initial periodontal therapy and adjunct antimicrobial therapy were implemented. After reducing inflammation and subgingival bacteria, open flap debridement was performed for teeth with a PD of ≥4 mm. Reevaluation showed no sites with a PD of ≥5 mm, a minimal level of BOP, and a marked reduction in the level of the targeted periodontal pathogens. The patient's oral health-related quality of life was slightly worsened during supportive periodontal therapy (SPT). Implementation of adjunct antimicrobial therapy targeting periodontal pathogens and subsequent periodontal surgery resulted in improvement in periodontal and microbiological parameters. This improvement has been adequately maintained over a 2-year period. However, additional care is necessary to further improve the patient's oral health-related quality of life during SPT. PMID:27320300

  10. Association of yoga practice and serum cortisol levels in chronic periodontitis patients with stress-related anxiety and depression

    PubMed Central

    Katuri, Kishore Kumar; Dasari, Ankineedu Babu; Kurapati, Sruthi; Vinnakota, Narayana Rao; Bollepalli, Appaiah Chowdary; Dhulipalla, Ravindranath

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Reducing the psychosocial stress by various methods can improve overall health, and yoga is now considered as an easily available alternative method. The present cross-sectional pilot study was conducted mainly to find the association of yoga practice with periodontal disease by measuring serum cortisol levels. Materials and Methods: A total of 70 subjects with age range of 35–60 years suffering with chronic periodontitis were divided into group I (with stress), group II (without stress), and group III (practicing yoga). Psychological evaluation was carried out using Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A) and Zung Self-rating Depression Scale (ZSDS). Periodontal parameters like plaque index (PI), probing pocket depth (PPD), and clinical attachment level (CAL) at 5–8 mm and >8 mm were recorded. Blood samples were collected and serum cortisol levels were measured. Results: Mean age, plaque scores, and number of teeth with PPD and CAL at 5–8 mm and >8 mm were similar in all the groups, except between group I and group III where a multiple comparison with Tukey's post-hoc test showed significant difference in plaque index (P < 0.038) and the number of teeth with CAL 5–8 mm (P < 0.016). Serum cortisol levels and HAM-A scale and ZSDS scores showed highly significant value (P < 0.001) in group I subjects when compared with group II and group III subjects. Conclusion: Cross-sectional observation done among three groups showed that individuals practicing yoga regularly had low serum cortisol levels, HAM-A scale and ZSDS scores, and better periodontal health. PMID:27011926

  11. The antioxidant master glutathione and periodontal health

    PubMed Central

    Bains, Vivek Kumar; Bains, Rhythm

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione, considered to be the master antioxidant (AO), is the most-important redox regulator that controls inflammatory processes, and thus damage to the periodontium. Periodontitis patients have reduced total AO capacity in whole saliva, and lower concentrations of reduced glutathione (GSH) in serum and gingival crevicular fluid, and periodontal therapy restores the redox balance. Therapeutic considerations for the adjunctive use of glutathione in management of periodontitis, in limiting the tissue damage associated with oxidative stress, and enhancing wound healing cannot be underestimated, but need to be evaluated further through multi-centered randomized controlled trials. PMID:26604952

  12. [Oral findings in severely handicapped patients participating in the periodic dental check-up system for five years--dental caries, gingival recessions and hyperplasias, periodontal diseases].

    PubMed

    Ogasawara, T; Kasahara, H; Hosaka, K; Itou, A; Nohara, S; Hiraide, Y; Kawashima, S; Watanabe, T

    1990-01-01

    In March 1987, we investigated the quality of oral hygiene, and the incidence of dental caries and periodontal diseases in 140 severely handicapped patients who had been hospitalized in two national sanatorium. All of the patients had participated under the Matsumoto Dental College Hospital Periodic Dental Check-up System for five years. The results were as follows: 1. The teeth of all the subjects had been brushed by the sanatorium nursing staff twice per day. The prevailing brushing technique was the horizontal method. 2. 37.5% of the subjects showed complete adaptability to the tooth brushing by the nursing staff. However, 2.1% showed no adaptability whatsoever. 3. The mean value of the OHI-S was 1.53. The labial surfaces of the maxillary anterior teeth showed the lowest OHI-S value, while the mandibular left posterior teeth showed the highest. 4. The DMF-T was estimated to be 12.51 (DMFT ratio = 48.2%). The average D-T was 2.07 +/- 4.03, and the average F-T was 8.43 +/- 7.22. 5. 19.3% of the patients were diagnosed with gingival hyperplasia, and 10.7% had local gingival recessions. 1) Of the patients who had taken Phenytoin daily, 35.5% were diagnosed with hyperplasia. 2) Most local gingival recessions were found on the labial gingiva of the mandibular anterior teeth. A relationship was determined to exist the local recession and the horizontal brushing method. 6. 89.2% of the patients suffered from periodontal diseases.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Mediastinal Tuberculosis in an Adult Patient with Cystic Fibrosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Morand, Philippe C.; Burgel, Pierre-Régis; Carlotti, Agnès; Desmazes-Dufeu, Nadine; Farhi, David; Martin, Clémence; Kanaan, Reem; Mangialavori, Luigi; Palangié, Estelle; Dusser, Daniel; Poyart, Claire; Hubert, Dominique

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is rarely observed in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. We report the first case of mediastinal TB, associated with leg pain and skin rash, in an adult patient with CF, and discuss factors suggestive of TB in the course of CF. PMID:21106788

  14. Periodontitis and diabetes interrelationships: role of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Iacopino, A M

    2001-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a systemic disease with several major complications affecting both the quality and length of life. One of these complications is periodontal disease (periodontitis). Periodontitis is much more than a localized oral infection. Recent data indicate that periodontitis may cause changes in systemic physiology. The interrelationships between periodontitis and diabetes provide an example of systemic disease predisposing to oral infection, and once that infection is established, the oral infection exacerbates systemic disease. In this case, it may also be possible for the oral infection to predispose to systemic disease. In order to understand the cellular/molecular mechanisms responsible for such a cyclical association, one must identify common physiological changes associated with diabetes and periodontitis that produce a synergy when the conditions coexist. A potential mechanistic link involves the broad axis of inflammation, specifically immune cell phenotype, serum lipid levels, and tissue homeostasis. Diabetes-induced changes in immune cell function produce an inflammatory immune cell phenotype (upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines from monocytes/polymorphonuclear leukocytes and downregulation of growth factors from macrophages). This predisposes to chronic inflammation, progressive tissue breakdown, and diminished tissue repair capacity. Periodontal tissues frequently manifest these changes because they are constantly wounded by substances emanating from bacterial biofilms. Diabetic patients are prone to elevated low density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides (LDL/TRG) even when blood glucose levels are well controlled. This is significant, as recent studies demonstrate that hyperlipidemia may be one of the factors associated with diabetes-induced immune cell alterations. Recent human studies have established a relationship between high serum lipid levels and periodontitis. Some evidence now suggests that periodontitis itself may

  15. Ultrasonic device for measuring periodontal attachment levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, J. E.; Hinders, M. K.

    2002-07-01

    Periodontal disease is manifested clinically by a degradation of the ligament that attaches the tooth to the bone. The most widely used diagnostic tool for assessment of periodontal diseases, measurement of periodontal attachment loss with a manual probe, may overestimate attachment loss by as much as 2 mm in untreated sites, while underestimating attachment loss by an even greater margin following treatment. Manual probing is also invasive, which causes patient discomfort. This work describes the development and testing of an ultrasonographic periodontal probe designed to replace manual probing. It uses a thin stream of water to project an ultrasonic beam into the periodontal pocket, and then measures echoes off features within the pocket. To do so, the ultrasonic beam must be narrowed from 2 (the diameter of the transducer) to 0.5 mm (the approximate width of the periodontal pocket at the gingival margin). The proper choice of transducer frequency, the proper method for controlling water flow from the probe, and a model for interpreting these echoes are also addressed. Initial results indicate that the device measures echoes from the hard tissue of the tooth surface, and that the periodontal attachment level can be inferred from these echoes.

  16. [The relationship of periodontitis and diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Kasaj, Adrian; Gortan-Kasaj, Aristea; Willerhausen, Brita; Hoffmann, Oliver; Angelov, Nikola; Zafiropoulos, Gregory-George

    2007-09-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic, dental-plaque induced inflammatory disease of the tooth-supporting tissues, resulting in a gradual loss of connective tissue attachment and alveolar bone. The interrelationship between diabetes mellitus and periodontitis has been studied for many years. At,present, there is strong evidence to suggest that the incidence and severity of periodontitis is influenced by the presence or absence of diabetes mellitus as well as by the degree of diabetes control by patients. Elevated blood glucose levels in poorly controlled diabetics result in an increase of protein glycosylation leading to amplified formation of so-called Advanced Glycation End products (AGE). AGEs are glucose products that have the ability to attract and stimulate inflammatory cells to produce inflammatory cytokines, elevating the risk of periodontal attachment and/or alveolar bone loss. Gram-negative periodontal infection significantly decreases glucose tolerance and can lead, like other types of inflammation, to an increase in the severity of diabetes. Thus, diabetes and periodontal disease form a system in which periodontitis is aggravated and metabolic control of blood glucose levels becomes more difficult. This in turn leads to mutual aggravation that results in a self-enforcing catabolic process, a vicious circle of inflammation, tissue destruction and insulin resistance. PMID:18044471

  17. Periodontal and space maintenance considerations for primary teeth presenting with aggressive periodontitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hazan-Molina, Hagai; Zigdon, Hadar; Einy, Shmuel; Aizenbud, Dror

    2012-01-01

    Aggressive periodontitis is diagnosed mainly by clinical and radiographic examination. Diagnosis in the primary dentition indicates a choice between conservative and radical treatment that involves extractions, depending on the severity of the case. The purpose of this report was to present a case of aggressive periodontitis in a systemically healthy child and to discuss the periodontal and orthodontic aspects. A 7-year-old girl presented with bleeding on probing of approximately half of the dentition, deep periodontal pockets around all primary molars, and increased tooth mobility. An individual oral hygiene program was initiated. The primary maxillary right molar and all primary mandibular molars were extracted, and clear vacuum-formed removable retainers were fabricated and used as space maintainers. The patient was followed longitudinally for 2 years, and no space loss was recorded. Clear vacuum-formed removable retainers mainly involve occlusal crown attachment and, therefore, decrease the risk of plaque accumulation, gingival irritation, and aggressive periodontitis in the permanent dentition.

  18. Characterization of an antiproliferative surface-associated protein from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans which can be neutralized by sera from a proportion of patients with localized juvenile periodontitis.

    PubMed Central

    White, P A; Wilson, M; Nair, S P; Kirby, A C; Reddi, K; Henderson, B

    1995-01-01

    The gentle agitation of suspensions of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans serotype a, b, or c in saline resulted in the release of a proteinaceous surface-associated material (SAM) which produced a dose-dependent inhibition of tritiated thymidine incorporation by the osteoblast-like cell line MG63 in culture. This cell line was sensitive to low concentrations of SAM (50% inhibitory concentration, 200 ng/ml for serotype c). Immunoglobulin G antibodies to constituents of the SAM were found in the blood of patients with localized juvenile periodontitis (LJP). Sera from 9 of 16 patients with LJP significantly neutralized the antiproliferative activity of the SAM, while sera from 15 controls, with no evidence of periodontal disease, were unable to neutralize this activity. Neutralization was not directly related to the patient's antibody titer to the whole SAM. Characterization of the antiproliferative activity in the SAM demonstrated that it was not cytotoxic and was heat and trypsin sensitive. The active component separated in a well-defined peak in anion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) which, when further analyzed by size exclusion HPLC, revealed a single active peak, which had an apparent molecular mass of approximately 8 kDa. The lipopolysaccharide from A. actinomycetemcomitans was only weakly active. SAM from Porphyromonas gingivalis W50 and Eikenella corrodens NCTC 10596 did not exhibit any antiproliferative activity with this cell line, even at concentrations as high as 10 micrograms/ml. This study has shown that SAM from A. actinomycetemcomitans contains a potent antiproliferative protein whose activity can be neutralized by antibodies in the sera from some patients with LJP. PMID:7790076

  19. Estimation of volume density of interdental papilla components in patients with chronic periodontitis and interleukin-6 (-174G/C) gene polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Zahra; Mahmoudzadeh-Sagheb, Hamidreza; Hashemi, Mohammad; Ansarimoghaddam, Somayeh; Sheibak, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    Background: The association between interleukin-6 (IL-6) (-174G/C) gene polymorphisms and level of tissue breakdown and periodontal disease progression is unknown. The present study investigated quantitative parameters of interdental papilla in chronic periodontitis (CP) patients with IL-6 (-174G/C) gene polymorphisms. Materials and Methods: Sixty gingival samples were studied. After determination of IL-6 (-174G/C) gene polymorphisms using a tetra-primer amplification refractory mutation system-polymerase chain reaction (T-ARMS-PCR) technique, 45 gingival tissue samples of CP patients (GG and GC+CC genotypes) were considered as case groups. Fifteen control samples were also collected from healthy individuals. After tissue processing, interdental gingival tissues were exhaustively sectioned into 4 μm-thick sections. Ten to thirteen sections were sampled by systematic uniform random sampling and stained with Masson trichrome, and the volume density (Vv) of the gingival components was estimated using Cavalier's point counting method. Statistical analysis was performed by Student t-test to compare differences between groups. The significance level was set at P < 0.05. Results: There were statistically significant differences in the Vv of epithelium, connective tissue, collagenous and non-collagenous matrix, and blood vessels between the control and CP groups (P < 0.0001). There were no statistically significant differences in the Vv of epithelium, connective tissue of gingiva, collagenous and non-collagenous matrix, and blood vessels among GG, GC, and CC genotypes in CP patients (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Results of the current study showed that there was no association between IL-6 (-174G/C) gene polymorphisms and quantitative parameters of interdental papilla in CP patients. PMID:27076828

  20. Development of a Functional Biohybrid Implant Formed from Periodontal Tissue Utilizing Bioengineering Technology.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Kei; Oshima, Masamitsu; Yamamoto, Naomi; Tanaka, Chie; Koitabashi, Ryosuke; Inoue, Takashi; Tsuji, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    Current osseointegrated dental implants have been widely used for the rehabilitation of tooth loss. Although dental implants are considered an available treatment in the paradigm shift from traditional dental therapies, such as fixed dental bridges and removable dentures, the fundamental problems must be overcome before their clinical use in young patients who are still undergoing jawbone growth. Here, we show a novel bioengineering method for a functional biohybrid implant that is combined with adult-derived periodontal tissue and attached with bone tissue as a substitute for cementum. This biohybrid implant was successfully engrafted using the bioengineered periodontal ligament, and it restored physiological function, such as orthodontic movement through bone remodeling and appropriate responsiveness to noxious stimuli. Thus, this study represents the functional biohybrid implant's potential for clinical use as a next-generation dental implant using adult-derived tissues.

  1. Association between susceptible genotypes to periodontitis and clinical outcomes of periodontal regenerative therapy: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Koidou, Vasiliki-Petros

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this review is to systematically investigate the effect of a susceptible genotype to periodontitis with the clinical outcomes of periodontal regeneration. Material and Methods Based on a focused question, an electronic search identified 155 unique citations. Three journals (Journal of Periodontology, Journal of Clinical Periodontology and Journal of Periodontal Research), references of relevant studies and review articles were hand-searched. Two independent reviewers implementing eligibility inclusion criteria selected the studies. Results Of the 155, four studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. All studies were published between 2000 and 2004 and the samples’ size was 40 to 86 patients. Polymorphisms of Interleukin-1 (IL-1) gene were included in all. Three out of four studies failed to identify an association between susceptible genotypes to periodontitis and clinical outcomes of periodontal regeneration, while one found an association. The heterogeneity and small number of studies included prevented the conduct of a meta-analysis. No studies were identified evaluating the effect of other genotypes and as a result only IL-1 genotype studies were included. Conclusions Within the limits of the present review, no direct conclusion for the effect of a susceptible IL-1 genotype status to the clinical outcome after periodontal regeneration could be drawn. The need of more qualitative studies to explore a possible association emerges. Key words:Periodontitis, genotype, periodontal therapy, regeneration, susceptibility, systematic review. PMID:26946210

  2. [Lung pneumatocele in adult patient - case report].

    PubMed

    Dzian, A; Fúčela, I; Hamžík, J; Huťka, Z; Stiegler, P

    2012-12-01

    Lung pneumatoceles are characterized by a thin-walled air-filled cavity present in lung parenchyma. Mostly they are the result of acute bronchopneumonia after spontaneous drainage of altered lung parenchyma with subsequent development and progression of cavities due to ventile mechanism. This disease is more prevalent in infants and young children, it is rather rare in adults. In the present case report, videothoracoscopy resection of lung pneumatocele of the right lower lobe was performed a 43-years old man. The operation was indicated for the presence of chronic persisting and progressing pneumatocele as a preventive measure of pneumatocele complications. PMID:23448707

  3. Point-of-care diagnosis of periodontitis using saliva: technically feasible but still a challenge.

    PubMed

    Ji, Suk; Choi, Youngnim

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic inflammation of the periodontium caused by persistent bacterial infection that leads to the breakdown of connective tissue and bone. Because the ability to reconstruct the periodontium is limited after alveolar bone loss, early diagnosis and intervention should be the primary goals of periodontal treatment. However, periodontitis often progresses without noticeable symptoms, and many patients do not seek professional dental care until the periodontal destruction progresses to the point of no return. Furthermore, the current diagnosis of periodontitis depends on time-consuming clinical measurements. Therefore, there is an unmet need for near-patient testing to diagnose periodontitis. Saliva is an optimal biological fluid to serve as a near-patient diagnostic tool for periodontitis. Recent developments in point-of-care (POC) testing indicate that a diagnostic test for periodontitis using saliva is now technically feasible. A number of promising salivary biomarkers associated with periodontitis have been reported. A panel of optimal biomarkers must be carefully selected based on the pathogenesis of periodontitis. The biggest hurdle for the POC diagnosis of periodontitis using saliva may be the process of validation in a large, diverse patient population. Therefore, we propose the organization of an International Consortium for Biomarkers of Periodontitis, which will gather efforts to identify, select, and validate salivary biomarkers for the diagnosis of periodontitis.

  4. Nutritional Intake in Adult Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Susan; Snetselaar, Linda; Hall, Beth; Stone, Roslyn A.; Kim, Sunghee; Piraino, Beth; Sevick, Mary Ann

    2013-01-01

    Background Research pertaining to the nutritional intake of hemodialysis patients is limited. Purpose Describe the nutritional quality of foods consumed by hemodialysis patients and variation by day of the week. Methods Dietary recalls were obtained from 22 hemodialysis patients and analyzed using the Nutrition Data System for Research. Results Few statistically significant differences were found by day of the week, but several dietary deficits were noted. Conclusion The data suggest poor intake of calories, protein, and several vitamins and minerals, as well as excess sodium consumption, but little variation by day of the week. Additional research is needed. PMID:25104876

  5. Gingival Tissue Transcriptomes Identify Distinct Periodontitis Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Kebschull, M.; Demmer, R.T.; Grün, B.; Guarnieri, P.; Pavlidis, P.; Papapanou, P.N.

    2014-01-01

    The currently recognized principal forms of periodontitis—chronic and aggressive—lack an unequivocal, pathobiology-based foundation. We explored whether gingival tissue transcriptomes can serve as the basis for an alternative classification of periodontitis. We used cross-sectional whole-genome gene expression data from 241 gingival tissue biopsies obtained from sites with periodontal pathology in 120 systemically healthy nonsmokers with periodontitis, with available data on clinical periodontal status, subgingival microbial profiles, and serum IgG antibodies to periodontal microbiota. Adjusted model-based clustering of transcriptomic data using finite mixtures generated two distinct clusters of patients that did not align with the current classification of chronic and aggressive periodontitis. Differential expression profiles primarily related to cell proliferation in cluster 1 and to lymphocyte activation and unfolded protein responses in cluster 2. Patients in the two clusters did not differ with respect to age but presented with distinct phenotypes (statistically significantly different whole-mouth clinical measures of extent/severity, subgingival microbial burden by several species, and selected serum antibody responses). Patients in cluster 2 showed more extensive/severe disease and were more often male. The findings suggest that distinct gene expression signatures in pathologic gingival tissues translate into phenotypic differences and can provide a basis for a novel classification. PMID:24646639

  6. [Invasive candidiasis in critically ill adult patient].

    PubMed

    Tobar A, Eduardo; Silva O, Francisco; Olivares C, Roberto; Gaete G, Pablo; Luppi N, Mario

    2011-02-01

    Invasive infections by Candida strains are a relevant pathology in critically ill patients. Candida should be considered where a high risk of infection is present for a critical early diagnosis. Despite the incorporation of new drugs in the therapeutic armamentarium over the last decade, mortality remains high. The key in improving clinical outcomes of these patients are the use of early effective therapies that offer coverage against different strains of Candida: C. albicans and non-albicans. Recent international guidelines suggest empiric therapy with echinocandins in suspected invasive candidiasis in this patient population. This group of drugs adequately documented clinical efficacy and safe use in these patients. The emergence of new echinocandins could improve access to these drugs by reducing their cost.

  7. Aggressive and acute periodontal diseases.

    PubMed

    Albandar, Jasim M

    2014-06-01

    genetic profile, currently do not exist. Genetic markers have the potential to be implemented as screening tools to identify subjects at risk. This approach may significantly enhance treatment outcome through the early detection and treatment of affected subjects, as well as using future approaches based on gene therapy. At present, the treatment of this disease is directed toward elimination of the subgingival bacterial load and other local risk factors. Adjunctive use of appropriate systemic antibiotics is recommended and may contribute to a longer suppression of the microbial infection. Other aggressive forms of periodontal diseases occur in patients who are affected with certain systemic diseases, including the leukocyte adhesion deficiency syndrome, Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome, Chediak-Higashi syndrome and Down syndrome. Management of the periodontal component of these diseases is very challenging. Acute gingival and periodontal lesions include a group of disorders that range from nondestructive to destructive forms, and these lesions are usually associated with pain and are a common reason for emergency dental consultations. Some of these lesions may cause a rapid and severe destruction of the periodontal tissues and loss of teeth. Oral infections, particularly acute infections, can spread to extra-oral sites and cause serious medical complications, and even death. Hence, prompt diagnosis and treatment are paramount.

  8. Amoxicillin Plus Metronidazole Therapy for Patients with Periodontitis and Type 2 Diabetes: A 2-year Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Tamashiro, N S; Duarte, P M; Miranda, T S; Maciel, S S; Figueiredo, L C; Faveri, M; Feres, M

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the changes occurring in subgingival biofilm composition and in the periodontal clinical parameters of subjects with periodontitis and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) treated by means of scaling and root planing (SRP) only or combined with systemic metronidazole (MTZ) and amoxicillin (AMX). Fifty-eight subjects were randomly assigned to receive SRP only (n = 29) or with MTZ (400 mg/thrice a day [TID]) and AMX (500 mg/TID) (n = 29) for 14 d. Six subgingival plaque samples/subject were analyzed by checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization for 40 bacterial species at baseline and 3 mo, 1 y, and 2 y posttherapy. At 2 y posttherapy, the antibiotic-treated group harbored lower mean proportions (5.5%) of red complex pathogens than the control group (12.1%) (P < 0.05). The proportions of the Actinomyces species remained stable in the antibiotic group but showed a statistically significant reduction in the control group from 1 to 2 y in subjects achieving a low risk clinical profile for future disease progression (i.e., ≤4 sites with probing depth [PD] ≥5 mm). The test group also had a lower mean number of sites with PD ≥5 mm (3.5 ± 3.4) and a higher percentage of subjects reaching the low risk clinical profile (76%) than the control group (14.7 ± 13.1 and 22%, respectively) (P < 0.05) at 2 y posttreatment. MTZ + AMX intake was the only significant predictor of subjects achieving the low risk at 2 y (odds ratio, 20.9; P = 0.0000). In conclusion, the results of this study showed that the adjunctive use of MTZ + AMX improves the microbiological and clinical outcomes of SRP in the treatment of subjects with generalized chronic periodontitis and type 2 DM up to 2 y (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02135952). PMID:27013640

  9. Current status of clinical laser applications in periodontal therapy.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Akira; Mizutani, Koji; Takasaki, Aristeo Atsushi; Sasaki, Katia Miyuki; Nagai, Shigeyuki; Schwarz, Frank; Yoshida, Itaru; Eguro, Toru; Zeredo, Jorge Luis; Izumi, Yuichi

    2008-01-01

    Periodontal disease is a chronic inflammatory disorder caused by bacterial infection. Laser treatment demonstrates specific characteristics that may be valuable in managing periodontal disease. In addition, lasers reduce stress and uncomfortable conditions for patients during and after treatment compared to other conventional tools. This article reviews the literature to describe the current clinical applications of lasers for gingival tissue management-including esthetic treatment, non-surgical and surgical periodontal pocket therapy, osseous surgery, and implant therapy.

  10. Orosomucoid, a New Biomarker in the Association between Obesity and Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Rangé, Hélène; Poitou, Christine; Boillot, Adrien; Ciangura, Cécile; Katsahian, Sandrine; Lacorte, Jean-Marc; Czernichow, Sébastien; Meilhac, Olivier; Bouchard, Philippe; Chaussain, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological data indicate an association between periodontitis and obesity. The biological mechanisms of this relationship remain unclear. A cross-sectional study was conducted to evaluate the relationship between periodontitis and the common systemic inflammatory markers in 32 morbidly obese patients recruited in a Clinical Nutrition department. Periodontal condition was evaluated using pocket depth (PD) measurement, a classical clinical marker of ongoing periodontitis. Major periodontal risk factors were recorded (age, gender, diabetes and smoking status), as well as plasma levels of inflammatory markers (CRP, orosomucoid, IL-6) and adipokines (adiponectin, leptin). All patients included in the sample exhibited evidence of periodontitis, 16 of whom were diagnosed as having severe disease. Adjusted logistic regression analysis indicated that the severity of periodontitis was associated with the plasma level of orosomucoid (p<0.04) after adjustment for age, gender and smoking. Our study thus suggests that the severity of periodontitis, in morbidly obese patients, is associated with the increase of orosomucoid levels. PMID:23526947

  11. Practical fluoride and remineralization protocols for adult patients.

    PubMed

    Chan, Daniel C N; Wefel, James S; Caughman, W Frank

    2004-12-01

    There is a wealth of information on preventive measures and procedures that can be used to care for paediatric and adolescent patients. However, few studies have been conducted in adult or geriatric populations, and an understanding of preventive and non-surgical treatment regimens for these patients is lacking. Traditionally, caries incidence is high among risk groups of low income, low dental IQ and certain ethnic subgroups, but we are now witnessing a high incidence of caries among middle-income and healthy adult patients with an imbalance of protective factors and cariogenic factors. We will direct our attention to the adult population and attempt to address some of the most common questions. PMID:15736834

  12. Dreaming during anaesthesia in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Kate; Skrzypek, Hannah

    2007-09-01

    Dreaming during anaesthesia is defined as any recalled experience (excluding awareness) that occurred between induction of anaesthesia and the first moment of consciousness upon emergence. Dreaming is a commonly-reported side-effect of anaesthesia. The incidence is higher in patients who are interviewed immediately after anaesthesia (approximately 22%) than in those who are interviewed later (approximately 6%). A minority of dreams, which include sensory perceptions obtained during anaesthesia, provide evidence of near-miss awareness. These patients may have risk factors for awareness and this type of dreaming may be prevented by depth of anaesthesia monitoring. Most dreaming however, occurs in younger, fitter patients, who have high home dream recall, who receive propofol-based anaesthesia and who emerge rapidly from anaesthesia. Their dreams are usually short and pleasant, are related to work, family and recreation, are not related to inadequate anaesthesia and probably occur during recovery. Dreaming is a common, fascinating, usually pleasant and harmless phenomenon.

  13. Pyridoxine deficiency in adult patients with status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Dave, Hina N; Eugene Ramsay, Richard; Khan, Fawad; Sabharwal, Vivek; Irland, Megan

    2015-11-01

    An 8-year-old girl treated at our facility for superrefractory status epilepticus was found to have a low pyridoxine level at 5 μg/L. After starting pyridoxine supplementation, improvement in the EEG for a 24-hour period was seen. We decided to look at the pyridoxine levels in adult patients admitted with status epilepticus. We reviewed the records on patients admitted to the neurological ICU for status epilepticus (SE). Eighty-one adult patients were identified with documented pyridoxine levels. For comparison purposes, we looked at pyridoxine levels in outpatients with epilepsy (n=132). Reported normal pyridoxine range is >10 ng/mL. All but six patients admitted for SE had low normal or undetectable pyridoxine levels. A selective pyridoxine deficiency was seen in 94% of patients with status epilepticus (compared to 39.4% in the outpatients) which leads us to believe that there is a relationship between status epilepticus and pyridoxine levels.

  14. [Diabetes education in adult diabetic patients].

    PubMed

    Weitgasser, Raimund; Clodi, Martin; Kacerovsky-Bielesz, Gertrud; Grafinger, Peter; Lechleitner, Monika; Howorka, Kinga; Ludvik, Bernhard

    2012-12-01

    Diabetes education has gained a critical role in diabetes care. The empowerment of patients aims to actively influence the course of the disease by self-monitoring and treatment modification. Diabetes education has to be made accessible for all patients with the disease. To be able to provide a structured and validated education program adequate personal as well as space, organizational and financial background are required. Besides an increase in knowledge about the disease it has been shown that structured diabetes education is able to improve diabetes outcome measured by parameters like blood glucose, HbA1c, blood pressure and body weight in follow-up evaluations.

  15. [Diabetes education in adult diabetic patients].

    PubMed

    Weitgasser, Raimund; Clodi, Martin; Cvach, Sarah; Grafinger, Peter; Lechleitner, Monika; Howorka, Kinga; Ludvik, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    Diabetes education and self management has gained a critical role in diabetes care. Patient empowerment aims to actively influence the course of the disease by self-monitoring and treatment modification, as well as integration of diabetes in patients' daily life to achieve changes in lifestyle accordingly.Diabetes education has to be made accessible for all patients with the disease. To be able to provide a structured and validated education program adequate personal as well as space, organizational and financial background are required. Besides an increase in knowledge about the disease it has been shown that structured diabetes education is able to improve diabetes outcome measured by parameters like blood glucose, HbA1c, blood pressure and body weight in follow-up evaluations. Modern education programs emphasize the ability of patients to integrate diabetes in everyday life and stress physical activity besides healthy eating as a main component of lifestyle therapy and use interactive methods in order to increase the acceptance of personal responsibility.

  16. Clinical profile of patients with adult-onset eosinophilic asthma

    PubMed Central

    Storm, Huib; Amelink, Marijke; de Nijs, Selma B.; Eichhorn, Edwin; Reitsma, Bennie H.; Bel, Elisabeth H.D.; ten Brinke, Anneke

    2016-01-01

    Adult-onset eosinophilic asthma is increasingly recognised as a severe and difficult-to-treat subtype of asthma. In clinical practice, early recognition of patients with this asthma subtype is important because it may have treatment implications. Therefore, physicians need to know the distinct characteristics of this asthma phenotype. The objective of the present study was to determine the characteristic profile of patients with adult-onset eosinophilic asthma. 130 patients with adult-onset (>18 years of age) asthma and high blood eosinophil counts (≥0.3×109 L−1) were compared with 361 adult-onset asthma patients with low (<0.3×109 L−1) blood eosinophils. Measurements included a series of clinical, functional and imaging parameters. Patients with high blood eosinophils were more often male, had less well controlled asthma and higher exacerbation rates, despite the use of higher doses of inhaled corticosteroids. They had higher levels of total IgE without more sensitisation to common inhaled allergens. In addition, these patients had worse lung function, and more often showed fixed airflow limitation, air trapping, nasal polyposis and abnormalities on sinus computed tomography scanning. Chronic rhinosinusitis, air trapping and male sex were three independent factors associated with blood eosinophilia (adjusted OR 3.8 (95% CI 1.7–8.1), 3.0 (95% CI 1.1–8.1) and 2.4 (95% CI 1.3–4.4), respectively). Patients with adult-onset asthma with elevated blood eosinophils exhibit a distinct profile, which can readily be recognised in clinical practice. PMID:27730197

  17. One-year clinical results of Er,Cr:YSGG laser application in addition to scaling and root planing in patients with early to moderate periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Kelbauskiene, Solveiga; Baseviciene, Nomeda; Goharkhay, Kawe; Moritz, Andreas; Machiulskiene, Vita

    2011-07-01

    In 30 patients with periodontitis, a total of 278 teeth exhibiting bleeding on probing, subgingival calculus, and a probing depth between 3-6 mm were examined. For each participant, two treatment types were alternatively applied on the contralateral quadrants: scaling and root planing (SRP) as control, and SRP followed by Er,Cr:YSGG laser application (SRP+laser), as a test method. Five clinical parameters: plaque level, bleeding on probing, probing depth, gingival recession and clinical attachment level were examined at baseline and at 2, 3, 6, 12 months after treatment. Of the total of 1,668 sites examined in all patients, 1,088 sites were found with a probing depth of 3-6 mm. In these sites, differences in clinical parameters between SRP and SRP+laser-treated quadrants were analyzed, assuming the level of p < 0.05 as significant. After 2 months from baseline, the mean probing depth reduction and the clinical attachment level gain were significantly greater in SRP+laser than in SRP quadrants, and remained so throughout the study (p < 0.001). A marked reduction of the bleeding scores occurred in all examined sites, irrespective of the treatment method. However, after 12 months, significantly less teeth exhibited bleeding on probing in SRP+laser quadrants than in SRP quadrants (p < 0.001). The mean plaque and gingival recession levels did not differ between the SRP and SRP+laser quadrants neither before nor after the treatment. The periodontal procedures either using Er,Cr:YSGG laser after SRP or SRP alone, lead to significant improvements in all clinical parameters investigated. However, laser application, as an adjunct to SRP, appeared to be more advantageous.

  18. Ozone therapy in periodontics

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, G; Mansi, B

    2012-01-01

    Gingival and Periodontal diseases represent a major concern both in dentistry and medicine. The majority of the contributing factors and causes in the etiology of these diseases are reduced or treated with ozone in all its application forms (gas, water, oil). The beneficial biological effects of ozone, its anti-microbial activity, oxidation of bio-molecules precursors and microbial toxins implicated in periodontal diseases and its healing and tissue regeneration properties, make the use of ozone well indicated in all stages of gingival and periodontal diseases. The primary objective of this article is to provide a general review about the clinical applications of ozone in periodontics. The secondary objective is to summarize the available in vitro and in vivo studies in Periodontics in which ozone has been used. This objective would be of importance to future researchers in terms of what has been tried and what the potentials are for the clinical application of ozone in Periodontics. PMID:22574088

  19. Peculiarities of Anxiety Score Distribution in Adult Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Blank, Mikhail; Blank, Olga; Myasnikova, Ekaterina; Denisova, Daria

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the present research is to investigate and analyze possible peculiarities of the psychological state of cancer patients undergoing treatment. Scores characterizing the trait and state anxiety were acquired using the Integrative Anxiety Test from four groups: adults with no appreciable disease, pregnant women, cancer patients examined during the specific antitumor treatment, and cancer patients brought into lasting clinical remission. Statistical analysis of the testing results revealed the bimodal type of the distribution of scores. The only statistically significant exception was the distribution of the state anxiety scores in cancer patients undergoing treatment that was clearly unimodal. PMID:26176239

  20. Effect of a dedicated oral care program on periodontal status of medically compromised patients at the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute Dental Clinic.

    PubMed

    Schlosser, Robert; Hebbes, Trudy

    2016-01-01

    Medically compromised patients attending the dental clinic at the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute have considerable gingival inflammation and breath odor. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of toothbrushing on the periodontal status of these patients and to determine if there were any additional benefit in combining brushing with an application of an antibiotic rinse. During the first 7 days of the study, the teeth of 11 participants were brushed twice a day by a dental hygienist using a soft-bristle suction toothbrush without toothpaste. Soft interproximal brushes were used to clean interproximal surfaces from the facial aspect. During the second week, facial and interproximal cleaning were repeated in the same patients, but the toothbrush and interproximal brush were dipped in 10-mL of a solution consisting of water and 40 mg/mL of metronidazole with nystatin. Each patient underwent an oral examination and biofilm sampling at baseline, after brushing without toothpaste (week 1), and after brushing with antibiotic solution (week 2). After week 1, tissues improved substantially, and there was a notable change in the biofilm on the teeth. The addition of an antibiotic solution increased healing and resulted in a further decrease in oral biofilm. Medically compromised patients would benefit considerably from a treatment regimen of antibiotic solution to decrease oral infection followed by a daily oral care program of brushing and interdental cleaning to maintain healthy oral tissues. PMID:27367641

  1. Periodontal considerations for children.

    PubMed

    Song, H Jung

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews periodontal disease and gingival disease and also explores issues relating to mucogingival defects such as gingival hyperplasia, gingival recession, and exposure of impacted canines.

  2. Clinical and postextraction evaluation of periodontal disease indicators

    PubMed Central

    Kolte, Rajashri; Kolte, Abhay; Wattamwar, Pooja

    2016-01-01

    Background: Clinical attachment level is the most frequently used and acceptable parameter in monitoring periodontal status in diseased individual and denotes patterns of periodontal destruction. Awareness of root morphology and the condition of the periodontal tissues is essential for reliable periodontal pocket probing and for effective debridement of root surfaces. Clinically, it is challenging to observe exact nature of complex periodontal attachment loss. The aim of the present study was to evaluate patterns of periodontal destruction based on vertical and horizontal attachment loss. Materials and Methods: A total of 200 extracted teeth were obtained from chronic periodontitis patients. Prior to extraction, clinical measurements were recorded and after extraction, the teeth were stained with crystal violet. Root length, vertical and horizontal attachment loss were measured using digital caliper. Results: There was a significant difference between clinical attachment level and vertical attachment loss for both maxillary and mandibular teeth. Mean vertical attachment loss varied between 5.17 mm and 9.17 mm. Interproximal surfaces exhibited statistically significant vertical attachment loss in both maxillary and mandibular dentition. Results indicated that vertical attachment loss was more severe with teeth belonging to the anterior sextant whereas the horizontal attachment loss was more pronounced with posterior teeth. Conclusion: Both vertical and horizontal attachment loss were observed in all periodontally involved teeth. There was a difference in clinical measurements and actual periodontal status denoted by postextraction staining. These findings have an impact on determining the prognosis and appropriate treatment plan for patients. PMID:27143828

  3. Improvement with Duloxetine in an Adult ADHD Patient

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tourjman, Smadar Valerie; Bilodeau, Mathieu

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common and disabling disorder among adults and is treated with stimulant and non stimulant medication. Objective: To report the case of a patient with ADHD showing good clinical response to duloxetine, a selective serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SSNRI). Case…

  4. A Future for Adult Educators in Patient Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Jean E.

    2014-01-01

    Adult education in healthcare comes in several forms: degree and certificate programs aimed at preparing better academic and clinical educators; and community education programs aimed at wellness, rehabilitation, or learning to live with chronic diseases. Patient-centered healthcare, however, is part of something new: coordinated and transitional…

  5. Economics of periodontal care: market trends, competitive forces and incentives.

    PubMed

    Flemmig, Thomas F; Beikler, Thomas

    2013-06-01

    The adoption of new technologies for the treatment of periodontitis and the replacement of teeth has changed the delivery of periodontal care. The objective of this review was to conduct an economic analysis of a mature periodontal service market with a well-developed workforce, including general dentists, dental hygienists and periodontists. Publicly available information about the delivery of periodontal care in the USA was used. A strong trend toward increased utilization of nonsurgical therapy and decreased utilization of surgical periodontal therapy was observed. Although periodontal surgery remained the domain of periodontists, general dentists had taken over most of the nonsurgical periodontal care. The decline in surgical periodontal therapy was associated with an increased utilization of implant-supported prosthesis. Approximately equal numbers of implants were surgically placed by periodontists, oral and maxillofacial surgeons, and general dentists. Porter's framework of the forces driving industry competition was used to analyze the role of patients, dental insurances, general dentists, competitors, entrants, substitutes and suppliers in the periodontal service market. Estimates of out-of-pocket payments of self-pay and insured patients, reimbursement by dental insurances and providers' earnings for various periodontal procedures and alternative treatments were calculated. Economic incentives for providers may explain some of the observed shifts in the periodontal service market. Given the inherent uncertainty about treatment outcomes in dentistry, which makes clinical judgment critical, providers may yield to economic incentives without jeopardizing their ethical standards and professional norms. Although the economic analysis pertains to the USA, some considerations may also apply to other periodontal service markets.

  6. Neuropsychological profile of adult patients with nonsymptomatic occipital lobe epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Bilo, Leonilda; Santangelo, Gabriella; Improta, Ilaria; Vitale, Carmine; Meo, Roberta; Trojano, Luigi

    2013-02-01

    To explore the neuropsychological and neurobehavioral profile in adult patients affected by nonsymptomatic (cryptogenic and idiopathic) occipital lobe epilepsy (OLE), with normal intelligence, we enrolled 20 adult patients with nonsymptomatic OLE and 20 age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy subjects. All participants underwent neuropsychiatric assessment scales, and standardized neuropsychological tests tapping memory, executive functions, constructional, visuospatial and visuoperceptual skills. After Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons, patients performed significantly worse than controls on several tests tapping complex visuospatial skills and frontal lobe functions. The analysis of single patients' performance revealed that a significantly higher number of OLE patients achieved age- and education-adjusted pathological scores on three tests (Benton Judgment of Line Orientation Test, Freehand Copying of Drawings Test, color-word interference task of Stroop test) with respect to controls. Patients did not differ from control subjects on neuropsychiatric aspects. The direct comparison between OLE subtypes showed that cryptogenetic OLE patients tended to achieve lower scores than idiopathic OLE patients on most tests, but no difference between the two groups was fully significant. In summary, patients with nonsymptomatic OLE can be affected by clinically relevant impairments in selected neuropsychological domains: complex visuospatial skills and executive functions. It could be speculated that frontal and visuospatial cognitive deficits might be the result of epileptic activity spreading within a neural network that includes structures far beyond the occipital lobe.

  7. Food hypersensitivity among adult patients: epidemiological and clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Castillo, R; Delgado, J; Quiralte, J; Blanco, C; Carrillo, T

    1996-01-01

    Food hypersensitivity (FH) is lesser frequent among adult patients than in childhood. Foods implicated in hypersensitivity reactions vary with sociocultural and diet habits from a geographic place to other. We studied 142 adult patients sensitized to foods, among 7698 patients visited at our Outpatient Clinic. Hundred and twenty patients referred clinical symptoms after consumption of one or more foods consistently. From the latest, 107 patients (89.2%) were atopics (92 of them sensitizes to dust mites) and 54 (45%) referred atopic familiar background. Most frequent recorded symptoms were: urticaria/angioedema 84 cases (70%), oral syndrome 65 (54%), asthma 48 (37%) and anaphylaxis 33 patients (27.5%). Shellfish sensitization occurred in 50 patients, fresh fruits in 33 and nuts in 29 cases. Shrimp (48 patients), squid (33), kiwi (14), papaya (14), avocado (13) and banana (12 cases) were the most frequent causes of FH. Significant statistical association between foods and inhalants was observed for fresh fruits and latex (p < 0.001), fresh fruits and pollens (p < 0.01), and shellfish and Blatta germanica (p < 0.001). Prevalence of FH among patients at our Area is around 1.6%. Tropical fruits, as other kind of fruits, seem to share common IgE-epitopes to pollens. High prevalence of shellfish and cockroach hypersensitivity could be more easily developed by previous domestic mites sensitization.

  8. [THE MOLECULAR GENETIC CHARACTERISTIC OF SPECIES CONTENT OF SALIVA AND GINGIVAL RECESS UNDER PERIODONTITIS].

    PubMed

    Tamarova, E R; Baimiev, A Kh; Shvetz, K Yu; Mavzyutov, A R

    2015-12-01

    The examination was carried out of samplings of 110 patients with periodontitis (observation group) and 60 patients without pathology of periodont (comparison group). The polymerase chain reaction was used to analyze samples of saliva and contents of periodontal recesses for detecting species-specific DNA fragments of Porphymmonas gigngivalis, Streptococcus macacae, S. mutans, S. oralis, S. salivarius, S. sangis, S. sobrinus, Treponema denticola. In patients with periodontitis S. mutans, S. oralis S. sobrinus were reliably more often detected in the content of periodontal recesses and S. mutans, S. sobrinus i in saliva. In the observation group the rate of detection of association S. mutans--S. oralis--S. sangis--S. sobrinus was significantly exceeded (up to 15.6%, X2 = 9.1, p = 0.004). In ten days of effective treatment of periodontitis reliable decreastng of rate of detection of S. wasoralis, S. sobrinus was observed in contents of periodontal recesses but not in of saliva. The detection of S.sobrinus using technique of polymerase chain reaction in contents of periodontal recesses and/or saliva of patients with periodontitis has a diagnostic value. The detection of S.sobrinus in contents of periodontal recesses is significant both in monoculture and in association S. mutans--S. oralis--S. sangis--S.sobrinus. The absence of S. sobrinus in contents of periodontal recesses testifies effectiveness of treatment of main disease (periodontitis).

  9. Effects of periodontal therapy on white blood cell count and levels of transforming growth factor beta in serum of subjects with severe periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Leite, A C E; Carneiro, V M A; Morandini, A C; Ramos-Junior, E S; Guimarães, M C M

    2015-03-28

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of nonsurgical periodontal therapy on white blood cell (WBC) count and levels of transforming growth factor beta (TGF—β) in serum from subjects with severe periodontitis. Serum from 28 subjects with periodontitis (mean age: 34.36±6.24; 32% men) and 27 healthy controls (mean age: 33.18±6.42; 33% men) were collected prior to therapy. Blood samples were obtained from 23 subjects who completed therapy (9—12 months). A well—controlled periodontal treatment protocol was established in three stages: mechanical periodontal therapy (scaling and root planning), reinstrumentation of dental sites, and supportive periodontal therapy. Periodontal and systemic parameters such as the total number of WBCs and TGF—β levels, accessed by enzyme—linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), were included. After therapy, all clinical periodontal parameters decreased (p<0.0001). There were no statistical differences in WBC count between experimental and control groups before or after therapy. However, after therapy, the mean value of lymphocytes in patients with localized aggressive periodontitis (LAgP) was statistically higher than that of patients with generalized chronic periodontitis (GCP) (p<0.0357). Additionally, TGF—β levels in LAgP and GCP patients were higher compared to controls before therapy (p<0.05 and p<0.01, respectively). In LAgP patients, periodontal therapy was associated with increased number of lymphocytes.

  10. Patient-specific FDG dosimetry for adult males, adult females, and very low birth weight infants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niven, Erin

    Fluorodeoxyglucose is the most commonly used radiopharmaceutical in Positron Emission Tomography, with applications in neurology, cardiology, and oncology. Despite its routine use worldwide, the radiation absorbed dose estimates from FDG have been based primarily on data obtained from two dogs studied in 1977 and 11 adults (most likely males) studied in 1982. In addition, the dose estimates calculated for FDG have been centered on the adult male, with little or no mention of variations in the dose estimates due to sex, age, height, weight, nationality, diet, or pathological condition. Through an extensive investigation into the Medical Internal Radiation Dose schema for calculating absorbed doses, I have developed a simple patient-specific equation; this equation incorporates the parameters necessary for alterations to the mathematical values of the human model to produce an estimate more representative of the individual under consideration. I have used this method to determine the range of absorbed doses to FDG from the collection of a large quantity of biological data obtained in adult males, adult females, and very low birth weight infants. Therefore, a more accurate quantification of the dose to humans from FDG has been completed. My results show that per unit administered activity, the absorbed dose from FDG is higher for infants compared to adults, and the dose for adult women is higher than for adult men. Given an injected activity of approximately 3.7 MBq kg-1, the doses for adult men, adult women, and full-term newborns would be on the order of 5.5, 7.1, and 2.8 mSv, respectively. These absorbed doses are comparable to the doses received from other nuclear medicine procedures.

  11. Periodontal pathogens in erupting third molars of periodontally healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Rajasuo, A; Sihvonen, O J; Peltola, M; Meurman, J H

    2007-09-01

    The presence of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia and Tannerella forsythensis in bacteriologic samples of 5-7-mm deep mandibular third-molar pericoronal pockets was analysed by polymerase chain reaction, to test the hypothesis that these sites would harbour the bacteria. The patients were periodontally healthy 20-year-old Finnish male conscripts. Sixteen had acute pericoronitis, 28 chronic pericoronitis, and 15 were symptom-free controls. A. actinomycetemcomitans was detected in only 7% of the samples from chronic pericoronitis cases, whereas P. gingivalis was positive in 20% of the symptom-free versus 69% (P = 0.018) of the acute and 57% (P = 0.044) of the chronic cases. The percentages for P. intermedia were 93, 94 and 93%, and for T. forsythensis 47, 63 and 57%, respectively. These results confirm that, apart from A. actinomycetemcomitans, periodontopathogens are common in third-molar sites in periodontally healthy individuals.

  12. Biochemical markers of the periodontal ligament.

    PubMed

    Castro, Cecilia Estela; Koss, Myriam Adriana; López, María Elena

    2003-01-01

    For many years the diagnosis of Periodontal Disease has been based on clinical and radiographic methods. Other more recent methods have the objective of studying the inflammatory response of the host. That way, immunologic and biological methods determine the free mediators in the periodontal infection. The components of the gingivo-crevicular liquid or fluid are used to identify or to diagnose the active disease, to anticipate the risk of acquiring the disease and to determine its progress. For it to be clinically useful important changes should be registered the way a specific site turns active or that a previously disease affected site improves its conditions as a result of periodontal therapy. The response of the neutrophillic granulocytes play an important role in the detection of Periodontal Disease. The unspecific defense system in the gingivo-crevicular fluid can be determined through cytokines and/or interleukines that serve to identify sites at risk on the patient. In Periodontal Disease, the cytokines are not only defense mediators of the gingival sulcus fluid, but are also an indicator of tissue destruction. The liberation of high levels of lysosomal enzymes by neutrophils, proteolytic enzymes as the collagenases, or intercytoplasmatic enzymes as dehydrogenase lactate and aspartate amino transferase can equally help monitor the progress of the Periodontal Disease. PMID:14595256

  13. Biochemical markers of the periodontal ligament.

    PubMed

    Castro, Cecilia Estela; Koss, Myriam Adriana; López, María Elena

    2003-01-01

    For many years the diagnosis of Periodontal Disease has been based on clinical and radiographic methods. Other more recent methods have the objective of studying the inflammatory response of the host. That way, immunologic and biological methods determine the free mediators in the periodontal infection. The components of the gingivo-crevicular liquid or fluid are used to identify or to diagnose the active disease, to anticipate the risk of acquiring the disease and to determine its progress. For it to be clinically useful important changes should be registered the way a specific site turns active or that a previously disease affected site improves its conditions as a result of periodontal therapy. The response of the neutrophillic granulocytes play an important role in the detection of Periodontal Disease. The unspecific defense system in the gingivo-crevicular fluid can be determined through cytokines and/or interleukines that serve to identify sites at risk on the patient. In Periodontal Disease, the cytokines are not only defense mediators of the gingival sulcus fluid, but are also an indicator of tissue destruction. The liberation of high levels of lysosomal enzymes by neutrophils, proteolytic enzymes as the collagenases, or intercytoplasmatic enzymes as dehydrogenase lactate and aspartate amino transferase can equally help monitor the progress of the Periodontal Disease.

  14. Enamel Pearls Implications on Periodontal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zenóbio, Elton Gonçalves; Vieira, Thaís Ribeiral; Bustamante, Roberta Paula Colen; Gomes, Hayder Egg; Shibli, Jamil Awad; Soares, Rodrigo Villamarin

    2015-01-01

    Dental anatomy is quite complex and diverse factors must be taken into account in its analysis. Teeth with anatomical variations present an increase in the rate of severity periodontal tissue destruction and therefore a higher risk of developing periodontal disease. In this context, this paper reviews the literature regarding enamel pearls and their implications in the development of severe localized periodontal disease as well as in the prognosis of periodontal therapy. Radiographic examination of a patient complaining of pain in the right side of the mandible revealed the presence of a radiopaque structure around the cervical region of lower right first premolar. Periodontal examination revealed extensive bone loss since probing depths ranged from 7.0 mm to 9.0 mm and additionally intense bleeding and suppuration. Surgical exploration detected the presence of an enamel pearl, which was removed. Assessment of the remaining supporting tissues led to the extraction of tooth 44. Local factors such as enamel pearls can lead to inadequate removal of the subgingival biofilm, thus favoring the establishment and progression of periodontal diseases. PMID:26491574

  15. Enamel Pearls Implications on Periodontal Disease.

    PubMed

    Zenóbio, Elton Gonçalves; Vieira, Thaís Ribeiral; Bustamante, Roberta Paula Colen; Gomes, Hayder Egg; Shibli, Jamil Awad; Soares, Rodrigo Villamarin

    2015-01-01

    Dental anatomy is quite complex and diverse factors must be taken into account in its analysis. Teeth with anatomical variations present an increase in the rate of severity periodontal tissue destruction and therefore a higher risk of developing periodontal disease. In this context, this paper reviews the literature regarding enamel pearls and their implications in the development of severe localized periodontal disease as well as in the prognosis of periodontal therapy. Radiographic examination of a patient complaining of pain in the right side of the mandible revealed the presence of a radiopaque structure around the cervical region of lower right first premolar. Periodontal examination revealed extensive bone loss since probing depths ranged from 7.0 mm to 9.0 mm and additionally intense bleeding and suppuration. Surgical exploration detected the presence of an enamel pearl, which was removed. Assessment of the remaining supporting tissues led to the extraction of tooth 44. Local factors such as enamel pearls can lead to inadequate removal of the subgingival biofilm, thus favoring the establishment and progression of periodontal diseases.

  16. Intrusion of incisors in adult patients with marginal bone loss.

    PubMed

    Melsen, B; Agerbaek, N; Markenstam, G

    1989-09-01

    Elongated and spaced incisors are common problems in patients suffering from severe periodontal disease. Thirty patients characterized by marginal bone loss and deep overbite were treated by intrusion of incisors. Three different methods for intrusion were applied: (1) J hooks and extraoral high-pull headgear, (2) utility arches, (3) intrusion bent into a loop in a 0.17 x 0.25-inch wire, and (4) base arch as described by Burstone. The intrusion was evaluated from the displacement of the apex, incision, and the center of resistance of the most prominent or elongated central incisor. Change in the marginal bone level and the amount of root resorption were evaluated on standardized intraoral radiographs. The pockets were assessed by standardized probing and the clinical crown length was measured on study casts. The results showed that the true intrusion of the center of resistance varied from 0 to 3.5 mm and was most pronounced when intrusion was performed with a base arch. The clinical crown length was generally reduced by 0.5 to 1.0 mm. The marginal bone level approached the cementoenamel junction in all but six cases. All cases demonstrated root resorption varying from 1 to 3 mm. The total amount of alveolar support--that is, the calculated area of the alveolar wall--was unaltered or increased in 19 of the 30 cases. The dependency of the results on the oral hygiene, the force distribution, and the perioral function was evaluated in relation to the individual cases. It was obvious that intrusion was best performed when (1) forces were low (5 to 15 gm per tooth) with the line of action of the force passing through or close to the center of resistance, (2) the gingiva status was healthy, and (3) no interference with perioral function was present.

  17. Periodontal disease in three siblings with familial neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Kirstilä, V; Sewón, L; Laine, J

    1993-06-01

    The periodontal status and treatment of three teenagers in a Finnish family with familial neutropenia is described. The mother was also diagnosed with neutropenia. At initial examination, the 15-year-old male and the 10-year-old female had severe periodontitis, whereas the 13-year-old male had oral ulcerations but no significant periodontal disease. The two siblings with periodontitis were treated and followed approximately 5 years. It was concluded that periodontal therapy including scaling, surgery, and use of antimicrobial agents can be successful in patients with familial neutropenia, and that such patients are not necessarily candidates for full mouth extraction. The role of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in which was used in the treatment of these patients remains to be established.

  18. [Pathogenetic mechanisms in the treatment of periodontitis using xenogeneic peritoneum].

    PubMed

    Borovskiĭ, E V; Volozhin, A I; Lavrova, V S; Seksenova, L Sh

    1990-01-01

    Water-free cattle parietal peritoneum was used in surgical treatment of 62 patients with severe periodontitis. Use of xenoperitoneum in multiple-modality treatment of periodontitis was conducive to bone tissue regeneration in bone pockets, to a more rapid recovery of gingival temperature round incisors and molars. PMID:2389266

  19. The relationship between social network, social support and periodontal disease among older Americans

    PubMed Central

    Sabbah, Wael; Tsakos, Georgios; Chandola, Tarani; Newton, Tim; Kawachi, Ichiro; Sheiham, Aubrey; Marmot, Michael G; Watt, Richard G

    2011-01-01

    Aim The objectives of this study were to examine the relationship between social network, social support and periodontal disease among older American adults and to test whether social network and support mediates socioeconomic inequality in periodontal disease. Materials and Methods Data pertaining to participants aged 60 years and over from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2001-2004 was used. Periodontal disease variables were extent loss of periodontal attachment ≥ 3mm, and moderate periodontitis. Social support and networks were indicated by need for emotional support, number of close friends and marital status. Results Widowed and those with lowest number of friends had higher rates of the extent of loss of periodontal attachment (1.27,95%CI:1.03,1.58) and (1.22,95%CI:1.03,1.45), respectively. Marital status and number of friends were not significantly associated with moderate periodontitis after adjusting for behavioural factors. The need for more emotional support was not related to periodontal disease in this analysis. Social networks and support had no impact on socioeconomic inequality in periodontal disease. Conclusion Certain aspects of social network, namely being widowed and having fewer friends were linked to the extent of loss of periodontal attachment but not to the definition of moderate periodontitis, in older adults. PMID:21362014

  20. Optimal serum phenylalanine for adult patients with phenylketonuria.

    PubMed

    Okano, Yoshiyuki; Nagasaka, Hironori

    2013-12-01

    High serum phenylalanine in adult patients with phenylketonuria (PKU) causes neuropsychological and psychosocial problems that can be resolved by phenylalanine-restricted diet. Therefore, PKU patients must continue to adhere to phenylalanine-restricted diet for life, although the optimal serum phenylalanine level in later life has yet to be established. The purpose of this review was to establish the optimal serum phenylalanine level in later life of PKU patients. We evaluated oxidative stress status, nitric oxide metabolism, cholesterol-derived oxysterols, vitamin D and bone status, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in adult PKU patients according to serum phenylalanine level. Oxidative stress increased markedly at serum phenylalanine of 700-800 μmol/L. Serum phenylalanine higher than 700-850 μmol/L correlated with the disturbance of nitric oxide regulatory system. Adult PKU patients had poor vitamin D status and exhibited predominance of bone resorption over bone formation. In the brain, the levels of 24S-hydroxycholesterol, a marker of brain cholesterol elimination, were low at serum phenylalanine levels exceeding 650 μmol/L. MRI studies showed high signal intensity in deep white matter on T2-weighted and FLAIR images of PKU patients with serum phenylalanine greater than 500 μmol/L, with decreased apparent diffusion coefficients. Changes in most parameters covering the entire body organs in adult PKU were almost acceptable below 700-800 μmol/L of phenylalanine level. However, the optimal serum phenylalanine level should be 500 μmol/L or less in later life for the brain to be safe.

  1. Defining periodontal health

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of the periodontium has relied exclusively on a variety of physical measurements (e.g., attachment level, probing depth, bone loss, mobility, recession, degree of inflammation, etc.) in relation to various case definitions of periodontal disease. Periodontal health was often an afterthought and was simply defined as the absence of the signs and symptoms of a periodontal disease. Accordingly, these strict and sometimes disparate definitions of periodontal disease have resulted in an idealistic requirement of a pristine periodontium for periodontal health, which makes us all diseased in one way or another. Furthermore, the consequence of not having a realistic definition of health has resulted in potentially questionable recommendations. The aim of this manuscript was to assess the biological, environmental, sociological, economic, educational and psychological relationships that are germane to constructing a paradigm that defines periodontal health using a modified wellness model. The paradigm includes four cardinal characteristics, i.e., 1) a functional dentition, 2) the painless function of a dentition, 3) the stability of the periodontal attachment apparatus, and 4) the psychological and social well-being of the individual. Finally, strategies and policies that advocate periodontal health were appraised. I'm not sick but I'm not well, and it's a sin to live so well. Flagpole Sitta, Harvey Danger PMID:26390888

  2. Validation of self-reported periodontal disease: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Blicher, B; Joshipura, K; Eke, P

    2005-10-01

    Self-report is an efficient and accepted means of assessing many population characteristics, risk factors, and diseases, but has rarely been used for periodontal disease (chronic periodontitis). The availability of valid self-reported measures of periodontal disease would facilitate epidemiologic studies on a much larger scale, allow for integration of new studies of periodontal disease within large ongoing studies, and facilitate lower-cost population surveillance of periodontitis. Several studies have been conducted to validate self-reported measures for periodontal disease, but results have been inconsistent. In this report, we conducted a systematic review of the validation studies. We reviewed the 16 studies that assessed the validity of self-reported periodontal and gingivitis measures against clinical gold standards. Seven of the studies included self-reported measures specific to gingivitis, four included measures only for periodontitis, and five included both gingivitis and periodontal measures. Three of the studies used a self-assessment method where they provided the patient with a detailed manual for performing a self-exam