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Sample records for adult primary cholangiocellular

  1. Brain tumor - primary - adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma) - adults; Meningioma - adults; Cancer - brain tumor (adults) ... Primary brain tumors include any tumor that starts in the brain. Primary brain tumors can start from brain cells, ...

  2. Acquired myasthenia gravis and cholangiocellular carcinoma in a dog.

    PubMed

    Krotje, L J; Fix, A S; Potthoff, A D

    1990-08-15

    Acquired myasthenia gravis and cholangiocellular carcinoma were diagnosed in a 7-year-old English Setter referred because of forelimb lameness, exercise-induced weakness, and fever. Three months earlier, the dog had had a pleuropulmonary infection caused by a Fusobacterium sp. The concurrent development of myasthenia gravis and cholangiocellular carcinoma in this dog may be explained by a paraneoplastic syndrome, although it is unproven. The cholangiocellular carcinoma may have possessed an acetylcholine receptor-like antigen on the tumor surface, which induced autoantibodies to cross-react with acetylcholine receptors at the neuromuscular junction.

  3. [Trans-Arterial Chemoembolization Therapy for Giant Cholangiocellular Carcinoma - A Single Case Report].

    PubMed

    Yamashiro, Keita; Hori, Astushi; Yuki, Takeo; Ohira, Ryosuke; Hori, Shinichi

    2016-11-01

    Here, we report a case of cholangiocellular carcinoma that was successfully treated with chemotherapy using a selective intra-arterial infusion technique. A 65-year-old man presented to our hospital to obtain a second opinion regarding his disease. The patient was diagnosed with cholangiocellular carcinoma. The giant tumor was located in the porta hepatis. Some small nodules that were considered to be metastatic lesions were also observed in the surroundingarea. The tumor was judged by the primary physician to be too large for surgical treatment. Consequently, it was decided to treat the patient with trans-arterial chemoembolization(TACE)by selectingintra -arterial infusion of 5-FU, epirubicin(EPI), and mitomycin C prior to EPI-loaded HepaSphere(super-absorbent polymer microsphere)embolization, combined with concurrent systemic gemcitabine chemotherapy. After 5 sessions of the above treatment, the primary lesion reduced dramatically in size. In addition, the levels of CEA and CA19-9 decreased from 34.2 to 2.6 ng/mL and 1,540 to 149 U/mL, respectively. Although the patient's initial life expectancy was only 3 to 6 months, his life expectancy was extended to as longas 26 months followingthe initiation of TACE. This case suggests that treatment with TACE together with systemic chemotherapy can be a powerful therapeutic option for patients with inoperable cholangiocellular carcinoma.

  4. Treatment Options for Adult Primary Liver Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Prevention Liver Cancer Screening Research Adult Primary Liver Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Primary Liver Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  5. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Primary Liver Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Prevention Liver Cancer Screening Research Adult Primary Liver Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Primary Liver Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  6. Stages of Adult Primary Liver Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Prevention Liver Cancer Screening Research Adult Primary Liver Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Primary Liver Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  7. General Information about Adult Primary Liver Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Prevention Liver Cancer Screening Research Adult Primary Liver Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Primary Liver Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  8. Primary brain tumours in adults.

    PubMed

    Ricard, Damien; Idbaih, Ahmed; Ducray, François; Lahutte, Marion; Hoang-Xuan, Khê; Delattre, Jean-Yves

    2012-05-26

    Important advances have been made in the understanding and management of adult gliomas and primary CNS lymphomas--the two most common primary brain tumours. Progress in imaging has led to a better analysis of the nature and grade of these tumours. Findings from large phase 3 studies have yielded some standard treatments for gliomas, and have confirmed the prognostic value of specific molecular alterations. High-throughput methods that enable genome-wide analysis of tumours have improved the knowledge of tumour biology, which should lead to a better classification of gliomas and pave the way for so-called targeted therapy trials. Primary CNS lymphomas are a group of rare non-Hodgkin lymphomas. High-dose methotrexate-based regimens increase survival, but the standards of care and the place of whole-brain radiotherapy remain unclear, and are likely to depend on the age of the patient. The focus now is on the development of new polychemotherapy regimens to reduce or defer whole-brain radiotherapy and its delayed complications.

  9. A new human cholangiocellular carcinoma cell line (HuCC-T1) producing carbohydrate antigen 19/9 in serum-free medium.

    PubMed

    Miyagiwa, M; Ichida, T; Tokiwa, T; Sato, J; Sasaki, H

    1989-06-01

    A human cholangiocellular carcinoma cell line, HuCC-T1, was established in vitro from the malignant cells of ascites of a 56-yr-old patient. Histologic findings of the primary liver tumor revealed a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma. Tumor cells from the ascites have been cultured with RPMI 1640 medium containing 0.2% lactalbumin hydrolysate and the cultured cells grew as monolayers with a population doubling time of 74 h during exponential growth at Passage 25. They had an epithelial-like morphology and were positive for mucine staining. Ultrastructural studies revealed the presence of microvilli on the cell surface and poorly developed organelles in the cytoplasm. The HuCC-T1 cell was tumorigenic in nude mice. The number of chromosomes in HuCC-T1 ranged from 61 to 80. These human cholangiocellular carcinoma cells in serum-free medium secreted several tumor markers, including carbohydrate antigen 19/9, carbohydrate antigen 125, carcinoembryonic antigen, and tissue polypeptide antigen. The carbohydrate antigen 19/9 secretion level of HuCC-T1 cells cultured in RPMI 1640 medium with 1% fetal bovine serum was sixfold higher than that with 0.2% lactalbumin hydrolysate. These findings suggest that HuCC-T1 will provide useful information to clarify the mechanism of tumor marker secretion and tumor cell growth in the human cholangiocellular carcinoma.

  10. Primary care of adults with developmental disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, William F.; Berg, Joseph M.; Bradley, Elspeth; Cheetham, Tom; Denton, Richard; Heng, John; Hennen, Brian; Joyce, David; Kelly, Maureen; Korossy, Marika; Lunsky, Yona; McMillan, Shirley

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To update the 2006 Canadian guidelines for primary care of adults with developmental disabilities (DD) and to make practical recommendations based on current knowledge to address the particular health issues of adults with DD. Quality of evidence Knowledgeable health care providers participating in a colloquium and a subsequent working group discussed and agreed on revisions to the 2006 guidelines based on a comprehensive review of publications, feedback gained from users of the guidelines, and personal clinical experiences. Most of the available evidence in this area of care is from expert opinion or published consensus statements (level III). Main message Adults with DD have complex health issues, many of them differing from those of the general population. Good primary care identifies the particular health issues faced by adults with DD to improve their quality of life, to improve their access to health care, and to prevent suffering, morbidity, and premature death. These guidelines synthesize general, physical, behavioural, and mental health issues of adults with DD that primary care providers should be aware of, and they present recommendations for screening and management based on current knowledge that practitioners can apply. Because of interacting biologic, psychoaffective, and social factors that contribute to the health and well-being of adults with DD, these guidelines emphasize involving caregivers, adapting procedures when appropriate, and seeking input from a range of health professionals when available. Ethical care is also emphasized. The guidelines are formulated within an ethical framework that pays attention to issues such as informed consent and the assessment of health benefits in relation to risks of harm. Conclusion Implementation of the guidelines proposed here would improve the health of adults with DD and would minimize disparities in health and health care between adults with DD and those in the general population

  11. Identification of Novel Biomarker Candidates for the Immunohistochemical Diagnosis of Cholangiocellular Carcinoma*

    PubMed Central

    Padden, Juliet; Megger, Dominik A.; Bracht, Thilo; Reis, Henning; Ahrens, Maike; Kohl, Michael; Eisenacher, Martin; Schlaak, Jörg F.; Canbay, Ali E.; Weber, Frank; Hoffmann, Andreas-Claudius; Kuhlmann, Katja; Meyer, Helmut E.; Baba, Hideo A.; Sitek, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was the identification of novel biomarker candidates for the diagnosis of cholangiocellular carcinoma (CCC) and its immunohistochemical differentiation from benign liver and bile duct cells. CCC is a primary cancer that arises from the epithelial cells of bile ducts and is characterized by high mortality rates due to its late clinical presentation and limited treatment options. Tumorous tissue and adjacent non-tumorous liver tissue from eight CCC patients were analyzed by means of two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis and mass-spectrometry-based label-free proteomics. After data analysis and statistical evaluation of the proteins found to be differentially regulated between the two experimental groups (fold change ≥ 1.5; p value ≤ 0.05), 14 candidate proteins were chosen for determination of the cell-type-specific expression profile via immunohistochemistry in a cohort of 14 patients. This confirmed the significant up-regulation of serpin H1, 14-3-3 protein sigma, and stress-induced phosphoprotein 1 in tumorous cholangiocytes relative to normal hepatocytes and non-tumorous cholangiocytes, whereas some proteins were detectable specifically in hepatocytes. Because stress-induced phosphoprotein 1 exhibited both sensitivity and specificity of 100%, an immunohistochemical verification examining tissue sections of 60 CCC patients was performed. This resulted in a specificity of 98% and a sensitivity of 64%. We therefore conclude that this protein should be considered as a potential diagnostic biomarker for CCC in an immunohistochemical application, possibly in combination with other candidates from this study in the form of a biomarker panel. This could improve the differential diagnosis of CCC and benign bile duct diseases, as well as metastatic malignancies in the liver. PMID:25034945

  12. Nab-paclitaxel as alternative treatment regimen in advanced cholangiocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Unseld, Matthias; Scheithauer, Werner; Weigl, Roman; Kornek, Gabriela; Stranzl, Nadja; Bianconi, Daniela; Brunauer, Georg; Steger, Guenther; Zielinski, Christoph C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Advanced cholangiocellular carcinoma has a poor prognosis with limited therapeutic options. Nab-paclitaxel has recently been described to be beneficial in metastatic pancreatic cancer improving overall and progression free survival (PFS). The potential antitumor activity of nab-paclitaxel in cholangiocellular carcinoma is hitherto unknown. Methods We retrospectively analyzed an institutional cholangiocellular carcinoma registry to determine the potential biological activity of nab-paclitaxel in advanced intrahepatic cholangiocellular carcinoma. Disease control rate (DCR), PFS and overall survival (OS) upon nab-paclitaxel based treatment, after failure of platinum-containing first-line combination chemotherapy, was assessed. Results Twelve patients were identified. Five of 12 patients (42%) received nab-paclitaxel as second line, and 7 patients (56%) as third-line treatment. The objective DCR with nab-paclitaxel was 83% (10/12 patients). One patient had a complete remission (CR), two patients had a partial remission (PR) and 7 patients had stable disease (SD). Disease was rated progressive in two patients. In all 12 patients receiving nab-paclitaxel the median time to progression was 6 months (range, 2.1–19.5 months). Median OS after initiation of nab-paclitaxel treatment was 9 months (2.1–28.4 months). The median time of survival after diagnosis of advanced disease was 21.5 months, whereby 3 patients were alive at the date of censoring (04/01/2015). Conclusions This is the first report suggesting substantial antitumor activity of nab-paclitaxel in advanced cholangiocellular carcinoma. In this small series, nab-paclitaxel based salvage chemotherapy appears to have a biological activity by controlling the disease and positively affecting survival. Randomized trials in this disease entity and subgroup of patients are urged. PMID:27563449

  13. Primary carnitine deficiency in a male adult.

    PubMed

    Karmaniolas, Konstantinos; Ioannidis, Panagiotis; Liatis, Stavros; Dalamanga, Maria; Papalambros, Theoharis; Migdalis, Ilias

    2002-01-01

    The case is described of a 36 year-old man who presented with progressive proximal muscle weakness and weight loss. His serum creatine phosphokinase (CPK) levels were markedly elevated. The muscle biopsy showed lipid storage myopathy. The muscle carnitine concentration was extremely low (5.6% of normal levels), establishing the diagnosis of myopathic carnitine deficiency. The disorder was considered as primary because there were no indications of any other identifiable condition which could result in a secondary carnitine deficiency. The patient was treated with oral L-carnitine (2 g per day) and showed rapid improvement. Primary myopathic carnitine deficiency is a curable disorder and therefore it should always be considered as a potential diagnosis in cases of myopathy in young adults.

  14. Case of cholangiocellular carcinoma in a patient with glycogen storage disease type Ia.

    PubMed

    Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Nakade, Yukiomi; Yamamoto, Takaya; Kobayashi, Yuji; Sato, Ken; Ito, Kiyoaki; Ohashi, Tomohiko; Nakao, Noiku; Ishii, Norimitsu; Takahashi, Emiko; Yokoi, Toyoharu; Nakao, Haruhisa; Kurokawa, Tsuyoshi; Yamaguchi, Chikara; Yoneda, Masashi

    2015-04-01

    Glycogen storage disease (GSD) type Ia is caused by a deficiency in glucose-6-phosphatase. Long-term complications, including renal disease, gout, osteoporosis and pulmonary hypertension, develop in patients with GSD type Ia. In the second or third decade, 22-75% of GSD type Ia patients develop hepatocellular adenoma (HCA). In some of these patients, the HCA evolves into hepatocellular carcinoma. However, little is known about GSD type Ia patients with HCA who develop cholangiocellular carcinoma (CCC). Here, we report for the first time, a patient with GSD type Ia with HCA, in whom intrahepatic CCC was developed.

  15. Immunohistochemical Markers Distinguishing Cholangiocellular Carcinoma (CCC) from Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (PDAC) Discovered by Proteomic Analysis of Microdissected Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Padden, Juliet; Ahrens, Maike; Kälsch, Julia; Bertram, Stefanie; Megger, Dominik A.; Bracht, Thilo; Eisenacher, Martin; Kocabayoglu, Peri; Meyer, Helmut E.; Sipos, Bence; Baba, Hideo A.; Sitek, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Cholangiocellular carcinoma (CCC) and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) are two highly aggressive cancer types that arise from epithelial cells of the pancreatobiliary system. Owing to their histological and morphological similarity, differential diagnosis between CCC and metastasis of PDAC located in the liver frequently proves an unsolvable issue for pathologists. The detection of biomarkers with high specificity and sensitivity for the differentiation of these tumor types would therefore be a valuable tool. Here, we address this problem by comparing microdissected CCC and PDAC tumor cells from nine and eleven cancer patients, respectively, in a label-free proteomics approach. The novel biomarker candidates were subsequently verified by immunohistochemical staining of 73 CCC, 78 primary, and 18 metastatic PDAC tissue sections. In the proteome analysis, we found 180 proteins with a significantly differential expression between CCC and PDAC cells (p value < 0.05, absolute fold change > 2). Nine candidate proteins were chosen for an immunohistochemical verification out of which three showed very promising results. These were the annexins ANXA1, ANXA10, and ANXA13. For the correct classification of PDAC, ANXA1 showed a sensitivity of 84% and a specificity of 85% and ANXA10 a sensitivity of 90% at a specificity of 66%. ANXA13 was higher abundant in CCC. It presented a sensitivity of 84% at a specificity of 55%. In metastatic PDAC tissue ANXA1 and ANXA10 showed similar staining behavior as in the primary PDAC tumors (13/18 and 17/18 positive, respectively). ANXA13, however, presented positive staining in eight out of eighteen secondary PDAC tumors and was therefore not suitable for the differentiation of these from CCC. We conclude that ANXA1 and ANXA10 are promising biomarker candidates with high diagnostic values for the differential diagnosis of intrahepatic CCC and metastatic liver tumors deriving from PDAC. PMID:26644413

  16. Primary Care Providers' HIV Prevention Practices Among Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Tracy; Teaster, Pamela B.; Thornton, Alice; Watkins, John F.; Alexander, Linda; Zanjani, Faika

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To explore primary care providers' HIV prevention practices for older adults. Primary care providers' perceptions and awareness were explored to understand factors that affect their provision of HIV prevention materials and HIV screening for older adults. Design and Method Data were collected through 24 semistructured interviews with primary care providers (i.e., physicians, physician assistants, and nurse practitioners) who see patients older than 50 years. Results Results reveal facilitators and barriers of HIV prevention for older adults among primary care providers and understanding of providers' HIV prevention practices and behaviors. Individual, patient, institutional, and societal factors influenced HIV prevention practices among participants, for example, provider training and work experience, lack of time, discomfort in discussing HIV/AIDS with older adults, stigma, and ageism were contributing factors. Furthermore, factors specific to primary and secondary HIV prevention were identified, for instance, the presence of sexually transmitted infections influenced providers' secondary prevention practices. Implications HIV disease, while preventable, is increasing among older adults. These findings inform future research and interventions aimed at increasing HIV prevention practices in primary care settings for patients older than 50. PMID:25736425

  17. Impact of Rhenium-188, Gemcitabine, and 5-Fluorouracil on Cholangiocellular Carcinoma Cells: An In Vitro Study

    SciTech Connect

    Wiesinger, Benjamin Farkas, Emese; Kehlbach, Rainer; Bantleon, Ruediger; Werner, Matthias; Wiskirchen, Jakub

    2009-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to compare the beneficial effects of radioactive stents and radioactive stents plus additional chemotherapy in the palliative treatment of cholangiocellular carcinomas. Cholangiocellular carcinoma cells (TFK-1 cells) were treated either with 8 Gy (RTB group) or 16 Gy (RTA group) {sup 188}Re or with {sup 188}Re irradiation (8 Gy) combined with either gemcitabine (8 Gy/Gem) or 5-fluorouracil (8 Gy/5-FU) at a dosage of 20 {mu}g/ml medium for 4 days and subsequently compared with an untreated control group. Proliferation kinetics were assessed on days 4, 7, 11, 18, 25, and 32. Colony formation assays were performed on days 7, 18, and 32 and cell cycle distribution was examined on days 4, 7, 11, 15, 25, and 39. Cell proliferation kinetics showed the lowest cell numbers in the 8 Gy/5-FU group (control, 15,390,000; RTA group, 8,394,000; RTB group, 5,609,000; 8 Gy/Gem group, 423,000; and 8 Gy/5-FU group, 297,667). In contrast, clonogenic activity on day 32 was lower in the 8 Gy/Gem group (control, 29.3 colonies; RTB group, 23.1 colonies; 8 Gy/5-FU group, 21.5 colonies; 8 Gy/Gem, 3.3 colonies; and even augmented in the RTA group, with 37.7 colonies). Cell cycle distribution showed similar curves for all groups on slightly different levels except for the 8 Gy/5-FU group, which showed a relatively augmented percentage of cells on day 7 in the G2 M cycle phase and on day 4 in the S phase. In conclusion, irradiation (8 Gy) with {sup 188}Re administered, e.g., via coated stents, combined with Gem could be a valid option for the treatment of CCCs.

  18. Treatment of Adult Primary Alveolar Proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Portal, José Antonio

    2015-07-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare disease characterized by the accumulation of surfactant-like lipoproteinaceous material in the distal air spaces and terminal bronchi, which may lead to impaired gas exchange. This accumulation of surfactant is due to decreased clearance by the alveolar macrophages. Its primary, most common form, is currently considered an autoimmune disease. Better knowledge of the causes of PAP have led to the emergence of alternatives to whole lung lavage, although this is still considered the treatment of choice. Most studies are case series, often with limited patient numbers, so the level of evidence is low. Since the severity of presentation and clinical course are variable, not all patients will require treatment. Due to the low level of evidence, some objective criteria based on expert opinion have been arbitrarily proposed in an attempt to define in which patients it is best to initiate treatment.

  19. Refractory Adult Primary Autoimmune Neutropenia that Responded to Alemtuzumab.

    PubMed

    Neerukonda, Anu R; Lan, Fengshuo; Gabig, Theodore; Saraya, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Primary autoimmune neutropenia (P-AIN) is an extremely rare disease. The most effective treatment for primary P-AIN is a granulocyte colony-stimulating factor; however, no curative treatment has been reported. We herein report a case of an adult P-AIN patient with a relatively mild medical history (irrespective of the severe neutropenia) who showed a sustained hematological response over seventeen months after the initiation of treatment with subcutaneous Alemtuzumab.

  20. Primary care for adults on the autism spectrum.

    PubMed

    Nicolaidis, Christina; Kripke, Clarissa Calliope; Raymaker, Dora

    2014-09-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is defined by differences in social communication and restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior, interests, or activities. Skills and challenges can change depending on environmental stimuli, supports, and stressors. Quality of life can be improved by the use of accommodations, assistive technologies, therapies to improve adaptive function or communication, caregiver training, acceptance, access, and inclusion. This article focuses on the identification of ASD in adults, referrals for services, the recognition of associated conditions, strategies and accommodations to facilitate effective primary care services, and ethical issues related to caring for autistic adults.

  1. Cross-modal synaptic plasticity in adult primary sensory cortices.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hey-Kyoung; Whitt, Jessica L

    2015-12-01

    Sensory loss leads to widespread adaptation of brain circuits to allow an organism to navigate its environment with its remaining senses, which is broadly referred to as cross-modal plasticity. Such adaptation can be observed even in the primary sensory cortices, and falls into two distinct categories: recruitment of the deprived sensory cortex for processing the remaining senses, which we term 'cross-modal recruitment', and experience-dependent refinement of the spared sensory cortices referred to as 'compensatory plasticity.' Here we will review recent studies demonstrating that cortical adaptation to sensory loss involves LTP/LTD and homeostatic synaptic plasticity. Cross-modal synaptic plasticity is observed in adults, hence cross-modal sensory deprivation may be an effective way to promote plasticity in adult primary sensory cortices.

  2. Mechanism of gemcitabine-induced suppression of human cholangiocellular carcinoma cell growth.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Yuka; Iwama, Hisakazu; Kato, Kiyohito; Tani, Joji; Katsura, Akiko; Miyata, Miwa; Fujiwara, Shintaro; Fujita, Koji; Sakamoto, Teppei; Fujimori, Takayuki; Okura, Ryoichi; Kobayashi, Kiyoyuki; Tadokoro, Tomoko; Mimura, Shima; Nomura, Takako; Miyoshi, Hisaaki; Morishita, Asahiro; Kamada, Hideki; Yoneyama, Hirohito; Okano, Keiichi; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2015-10-01

    Although gemcitabine (2',2'-difluorocytidine monohydrochloride) is a common anticancer agent of cholangiocellular carcinoma (CCC), its growth inhibitory effects and gemcitabine resistance in CCC cells are poorly understood. Our aims were to uncover the mechanism underlying the antitumor effect of gemcitabine and to analyze the mechanism regulating in vitro CCC cell gemcitabine resistance. In addition, we sought to identify miRNAs associated with the antitumor effects of gemcitabine in CCCs. Using a cell proliferation assay and flow cytometry, we examined the ability of gemcitabine to inhibit cell proliferation in three types of human CCC cell lines (HuCCT-1, Huh28, TKKK). We also employed western blotting to investigate the effects of gemcitabine on cell cycle-related molecules in CCC cells. In addition, we used array chips to assess gemcitabine-mediated changes in angiogenic molecules and activated tyrosine kinase receptors in CCC cells. We used miRNA array chips to comprehensively analyze gemcitabine-induced miRNAs and examined clusters of differentially expressed miRNAs in cells with and without gemcitabine treatment. Gemcitabine inhibited cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner in HuCCT-1 cells, whereas cell proliferation was unchanged in Huh28 and TKKK cells. Gemcitabine inhibited cell cycle progression in HuCCT-1 cells from G0/G1 to S phase, resulting in G1 cell cycle arrest due to the reduction of cyclin D1 expression. In addition, gemcitabine upregulated the angiogenic molecules IL-6, IL-8, ENA-78 and MCP-1. In TKKK cells, by contrast, gemcitabine did not arrest the cell cycle or modify angiogenic molecules. Furthermore, in gemcitabine-sensitive HuCCT-1 cells, gemcitabine markedly altered miRNA expression. The miRNAs and angiogenic molecules altered by gemcitabine contribute to the inhibition of tumor growth in vitro.

  3. Intermedilysin induces EGR-1 expression through calcineurin/NFAT pathway in human cholangiocellular carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Susilowati, Heni; Okamura, Hirohiko; Hirota, Katsuhiko; Shono, Masayuki; Yoshida, Kaya; Murakami, Keiji; Tabata, Atsushi; Nagamune, Hideaki; Haneji, Tatsuji; Miyake, Yoichiro

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} ILY leads to the accumulation of [Ca{sup 2+}]i in the nucleus in HuCCT1 cells. {yields} ILY induced activation of NFAT1 through a calcineurin-dependent pathway. {yields} Calcineuri/NFAT pathway is involved in EGR-1 expression in response to ILY treatment. -- Abstract: Intermedilysin (ILY) is a cholesterol-dependent cytolysin produced by Streptococcus intermedius, which is associated with human brain and liver abscesses. Although intrahepatic bile duct cells play a valuable role in the pathogenesis of liver abscess, the molecular mechanism of ILY-treated intrahepatic bile duct cells remains unknown. In this study, we report that ILY induced a nuclear accumulation of intracellular calcium ([Ca{sup 2+}]i) in human cholangiocellular cells HuCCT1. We also demonstrate that 10 ng/ml ILY induced NFAT1 dephosphorylation and its nuclear translocation in HuCCT1 cells. In contrast to the result that ILY induced NF-{kappa}B translocation in human hepatic HepG2 cells, ILY did not affect NF-{kappa}B localization in HuCCT1 cells. Dephosphorylation and nuclear translocation of NFAT1 caused by ILY were prevented by [Ca{sup 2+}]i calcium chelator, BAPTA/AM, and calcineurin inhibitors, cyclosporine A and tacrolimus. ILY induced early growth response-1 (EGR-1) expression and it was inhibited by the pre-treatment with cyclosporine A, indicating that the calcineurin/NFAT pathway was involved in EGR-1 expression in response to ILY. ILY-induced calcineurin/NFAT1 activation and sequential EGR-1 expression might be related to the pathogenesis of S. intermedius in human bile duct cells.

  4. Primary Colonic Eosinophilia and Eosinophilic Colitis in Adults.

    PubMed

    Turner, Kevin O; Sinkre, Richa A; Neumann, William L; Genta, Robert M

    2017-02-01

    The normal content of eosinophils in the adult colon and the criteria for the histopathologic diagnosis of eosinophilic colitis remain undefined. This study aimed at: (1) establishing the numbers of eosinophils in the normal adult colon; and (2) proposing a clinicopathologic framework for the diagnosis of primary colonic eosinophilia and eosinophilic colitis. To accomplish these goals, we counted the eosinophils in the right, transverse, and left colon of 159 adults with normal colonic histology. Using a database of 1.2 million patients with colonic biopsies, we extracted all adults with a diagnosis of colonic eosinophilia. We reviewed the slides from all cases and captured demographic, clinical, and pathologic data, including information about eosinophilia in other organs. We then compared the clinical manifestations of the study patients (those with no identifiable cause of eosinophilia) to those of patients with other types of colitis. The normal eosinophil counts (per mm) were 55.7±23.4 in the right, 41.0±18.6 in the transverse, and 28.6±17.2 in the left colon. Of the 194 study patients (eosinophil counts 166-5050/mm), 63 were asymptomatic and had a normal colonoscopy. Diarrhea and abdominal pain were the commonest indications for colonoscopy (38% and 27%, respectively) among the 131 patients who had symptoms, endoscopic abnormalities, or both. Neither clinical manifestations nor endoscopic appearance were sufficiently characteristic to elicit the suspicion of colonic eosinophilia. In conclusion, primary colonic eosinophilia was extremely rare in this series (<1 in 6000 patients); one third of these patients were asymptomatic. Their clinical manifestations were not distinctive and could not have led clinicians to suspect this condition; one third of the patients were asymptomatic. We suggest that regularly reporting high colonic eosinophilia may result in increased opportunities for clinicopathologic studies that might lead to a better definition of this

  5. Laparoscopic Nephroureterectomy for Adult Patient with Primary Obstructive Megaureter

    PubMed Central

    Makiyama, Kazuhide; Ohtake, Shinji; Yamanaka, Hiroyuki; Sano, Futoshi; Nakaigawa, Noboru; Kubota, Yoshinobu

    2013-01-01

    A 29-year-old female with a complaint of abdominal distension was referred to our hospital. She had a history of being treated for pyelonephritis three times. By computed tomography and retrograde pyelography, she was diagnosed with adult left primary megaureter. Her left renal function was severely deteriorated. She hoped for surgical intervention before becoming pregnant. Laparoscopic nephroureterectomy for megaureters seems to be difficult due to the large size. By sucking urine from an inserted ureteral catheter and setting trocar positions, we successfully performed laparoscopic nephroureterectomy for megaureter. PMID:24455395

  6. The evaluation of saphenofemoral insufficiency in primary adult varicocele.

    PubMed

    Koyuncu, Hakan; Ergenoglu, Mehmet; Yencilek, Faruk; Gulcan, Nilay; Tasdelen, Neslihan; Yencilek, Esin; Sarica, Kemal

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible relationship between varicocele and saphenofemoral insufficiency in patients diagnosed with primary varicocele. A total of 70 patients with the primary diagnosis of varicocele were included into the study. A total of 30 age-matched healthy adults were also included in the study as a control group. Varicocele was diagnosed by palpation and observation of each spermatic cord in standing position before and during a valsalva maneuver. Additionally, scrotal Doppler and lower extremity venous Doppler ultrasonography were performed. Patients who were with spermatic varicose vein larger than 3.0 mm were included in the study group as a varicocele patient. At the lower extremity venous Doppler ultrasonography, a retrograde flow lasting longer than 0.5 seconds during normal breathing or at the valsalva maneuver was considered to be meaningful for saphenofemoral junction insufficiency. Thirty-six (51.35%) patients had insufficiency in saphenofemoral junction in the study group (6 [8.5%] bilateral, 30 [42.85%] unilateral) whereas 8 (26.6%) had insufficiency in the control group (2 [6.6%] bilateral, 6 [20%] unilateral insufficiency). The patients with primary varicocele had a statistically significant (P = .02) higher rate of venous insufficiency in their saphenofemoral junctions when compared with the control group. In the present study, the rate of saphenofemoral insufficiency has been found to be statistically higher in patients with primary varicocele compared with healthy men. Depending on the common presence of valvular insufficiency, we believe that the presence of varicocele should be investigated in the young population suffering from saphenofemoral junction insufficiency.

  7. Degradable Starch Microspheres Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization (DSM-TACE) in Intrahepatic Cholangiocellular Carcinoma (ICC): Results from a National Multi-Center Study on Safety and Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Schicho, Andreas; Pereira, Philippe L; Pützler, Manfred; Michalik, Katharina; Albrecht, Thomas; Nolte-Ernsting, Claus; Stroszczynski, Christian; Wiggermann, Philipp

    2017-02-13

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of DSM (degradable starch microspheres) as an embolic agent in transarterial chemoembolization in the treatment of intrahepatic cholangiocellular carcinoma (ICC). MATERIAL AND METHODS This was a national, multi-center observational cohort study on the safety and efficacy of DSM-TACE using mitomycin, gemcitabine, cisplatin, doxorubicin, and carboplatin in palliative treatment of ICC. Recruitment period for the study was from January 2010 to June 2014. Primary endpoints were toxicity, safety, and response according to mRECIST criteria. RESULTS Twenty-five DSM-TACE procedures in cases of advanced ICC were performed in seven patients. Nausea and vomiting occurred as adverse event (AE) in eight out of 25 treatments (32%), with seven of eight events (87.5%) associated with the use of gemcitabine. In 11 out of 25 treatments (44%) moderate, transient epigastric pain was registered as an adverse event (AE) within 24 hours of DSM-TACE. One case (1/25) of severe AE (4%) with thrombocytopenia led to discontinuation of the DSM-TACE-treatment. A total of 25 DSM-TACE procedures with complete clinical and imaging follow-up over a two-year-period were analyzed: objective response (OR) was achieved in three of 25 treatments (12%) Disease control (DC) was achieved in 44% (11/25) of treatments; progress was registered in 4% (1/25). CONCLUSIONS The use of DSM as an embolic agent for TACE is safe in the treatment of ICC. A standardized anti-emetic medication should be established, especially when using gemcitabine. Further prospective studies need to be conducted to find the most suitable, standardized DSM-TACE treatment regime.

  8. Degradable Starch Microspheres Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization (DSM-TACE) in Intrahepatic Cholangiocellular Carcinoma (ICC): Results from a National Multi-Center Study on Safety and Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Schicho, Andreas; Pereira, Philippe L.; Pützler, Manfred; Michalik, Katharina; Albrecht, Thomas; Nolte-Ernsting, Claus; Stroszczynski, Christian; Wiggermann, Philipp

    2017-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of DSM (degradable starch microspheres) as an embolic agent in transarterial chemoembolization in the treatment of intrahepatic cholangiocellular carcinoma (ICC). Material/Methods This was a national, multi-center observational cohort study on the safety and efficacy of DSM-TACE using mitomycin, gemcitabine, cisplatin, doxorubicin, and carboplatin in palliative treatment of ICC. Recruitment period for the study was from January 2010 to June 2014. Primary endpoints were toxicity, safety, and response according to mRECIST criteria. Results Twenty-five DSM-TACE procedures in cases of advanced ICC were performed in seven patients. Nausea and vomiting occurred as adverse event (AE) in eight out of 25 treatments (32%), with seven of eight events (87.5%) associated with the use of gemcitabine. In 11 out of 25 treatments (44%) moderate, transient epigastric pain was registered as an adverse event (AE) within 24 hours of DSM-TACE. One case (1/25) of severe AE (4%) with thrombocytopenia led to discontinuation of the DSM-TACE-treatment. A total of 25 DSM-TACE procedures with complete clinical and imaging follow-up over a two-year-period were analyzed: objective response (OR) was achieved in three of 25 treatments (12%) Disease control (DC) was achieved in 44% (11/25) of treatments; progress was registered in 4% (1/25). Conclusions The use of DSM as an embolic agent for TACE is safe in the treatment of ICC. A standardized anti-emetic medication should be established, especially when using gemcitabine. Further prospective studies need to be conducted to find the most suitable, standardized DSM-TACE treatment regime. PMID:28192388

  9. Prevalence and predictors of change in adult-child primary caregivers.

    PubMed

    Szinovacz, Maximiliane E; Davey, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Family caregiving research is increasingly contextual and dynamic, but few studies have examined prevalence and predictors of change in primary caregivers, those with the most frequent contact with healthcare professionals. We identified prevalence and predictors of 2-year change in primary adult-child caregivers. Data pooled from the 1992-2000 waves of the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) represent 1,068 parent-level care occasions and 3,616 child-level occasions. There is considerable 2-year stability in primary adult-child caregivers. Parents are more prone to experience a change in adult-child primary caregivers if they live by themselves and if they have more sons and daughters. As far as the adult children are concerned, daughters and children living closer to parents are more likely to remain primary caregivers. Results suggest that change in primary caregivers is more strongly associated with available alternatives and gender norms than burden and competing obligations.

  10. Priorities for young adults when accessing UK primary care: literature review.

    PubMed

    Davey, Antoinette; Carter, Mary; Campbell, John L

    2013-10-01

    This literature review focuses on what matters to young adults when they access primary care services in the United Kingdom. Patients' access to and experience of primary care services differs across age groups. Existing research has largely focused on the needs and experiences of children, adolescents, and adults. There is some evidence to suggest the views of young adults (aged 18-25 years) that may differ from the views of other age groups, and research has not previously reported specifically on the views of this group of the population. The literature was reviewed to identify the views and priorities of young UK adults regarding primary healthcare provision, and furthermore, to identify those related topics that would benefit from further research. Relevant academic publications and grey literature published from 2000 onwards was reviewed and synthesised. We identified and reported emerging themes that were of importance to young adults in respect of the UK primary care provision. A total of 19 papers met our inclusion criteria. Young adults access primary care services less frequently than other age groups; this may be because of their experience of primary care throughout childhood and adolescence. Five aspects of primary care provision emerged as being of importance to young adults--the accessibility and availability of services, the confidentiality of health-related information, issues relating to communication with healthcare professionals, continuity of care, and behaviours and attitudes expressed towards young adults by healthcare professionals. There is a lack of focus of current research on the expectations, needs, and primary healthcare experiences of young adults. Young adults may hold views that are distinct from other age groups. Further research is needed to better understand the needs of a young adult population as their needs may impact the future use of services.

  11. Nurse Practitioner Primary Care Competencies in Specialty Areas: Adult, Family, Gerontological, Pediatric, and Women's Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crabtree, M. Katherine; Stanley, Joan; Werner, Kathryn E.; Schmid, Emily

    This document presents the nurse practitioner primary care competencies that a national panel of representatives of nine national organizations of the five primary care nurse practitioner specialties--adult, family, gerontological, pediatric, and women's health--identified as necessary for entry-level primary care nurse practitioners. Section 1…

  12. Enhancing Primary Health Care Services for Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melville, C. A.; Finlayson, J.; Cooper, S.-A.; Allan, L.; Robinson, N.; Burns, E.; Martin, G.; Morrison, J.

    2005-01-01

    Primary health care teams have an important part to play in addressing the health inequalities and high levels of unmet health needs experienced by people with intellectual disabilities (ID). Practice nurses have an expanding role within primary health care teams. However, no previous studies have measured their attitudes, knowledge, training…

  13. Risk and prognosis of adult primary immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Frederiksen, Henrik; Christiansen, Christian Fynbo; Nørgaard, Mette

    2012-04-01

    Adult immune thrombocytopenia was previously considered a benign disease affecting young people and with a low risk of severe bleeding. This view was challenged by studies published during the past decade, as the median age of adult immune thrombocytopenia patients has been found to be 55-60 years and the incidence increases with age. Recent studies reported that mortality and morbidity are increased compared with the general population. In this review, we describe patient-specific factors associated with the outcome of disease, the clinical course of immune thrombocytopenia including the potential adverse impact of some treatments and finally the overall prognosis.

  14. Primary Care for Adults with Down Syndrome: Adherence to Preventive Healthcare Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, K. M.; Taylor, L. C.; Davis, M. M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Due to significant medical improvements, persons with Down syndrome now live well into adulthood. Consequently, primary care for adults with Down syndrome needs to incorporate routine care with screening for condition-specific comorbidities. This study seeks to evaluate the adherence of primary care physicians to age- and…

  15. Guideline for primary care management of headache in adults

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Werner J.; Findlay, Ted; Moga, Carmen; Scott, N. Ann; Harstall, Christa; Taenzer, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To increase the use of evidence-informed approaches to diagnosis, investigation, and treatment of headache for patients in primary care. Quality of evidence A comprehensive search was conducted for relevant guidelines and systematic reviews published between January 2000 and May 2011. The guidelines were critically appraised using the AGREE (Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation) tool, and the 6 highest-quality guidelines were used as seed guidelines for the guideline adaptation process. Main message A multidisciplinary guideline development group of primary care providers and other specialists crafted 91 specific recommendations using a consensus process. The recommendations cover diagnosis, investigation, and management of migraine, tension-type, medication-overuse, and cluster headache. Conclusion A clinical practice guideline for the Canadian health care context was created using a guideline adaptation process to assist multidisciplinary primary care practitioners in providing evidence-informed care for patients with headache. PMID:26273080

  16. Primary Afferent Synapses on Developing and Adult Renshaw Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mentis, George Z.; Siembab, Valerie C.; Zerda, Ricardo; O’Donovan, Michael J.; Alvarez, Francisco J.

    2010-01-01

    The mechanisms that diversify adult interneurons from a few pools of embryonic neurons are unknown. Renshaw cells, Ia inhibitory interneurons (IaINs), and possibly other types of mammalian spinal interneurons have common embryonic origins within the V1 group. However, in contrast to IaINs and other V1-derived interneurons, adult Renshaw cells receive motor axon synapses and lack proprioceptive inputs. Here, we investigated how this specific pattern of connectivity emerges during the development of Renshaw cells. Tract tracing and immunocytochemical markers [parvalbumin and vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (VGLUT1)] showed that most embryonic (embryonic day 18) Renshaw cells lack dorsal root inputs, but more than half received dorsal root synapses by postnatal day 0 (P0) and this input spread to all Renshaw cells by P10–P15. Electrophysiological recordings in neonates indicated that this input is functional and evokes Renshaw cell firing. VGLUT1-IR bouton density on Renshaw cells increased until P15 but thereafter decreased because of limited synapse proliferation coupled with the enlargement of Renshaw cell dendrites. In parallel, Renshaw cell postsynaptic densities apposed to VGLUT1-IR synapses became smaller in adult compared with P15. In contrast, vesicular acetylcholine transporter-IR motor axon synapses contact embryonic Renshaw cells and proliferate postnatally matching Renshaw cell growth. Like other V1 neurons, Renshaw cells are thus competent to receive sensory synapses. However, after P15, these sensory inputs appear deselected through arrested proliferation and synapse weakening. Thus, Renshaw cells shift from integrating sensory and motor inputs in neonates to predominantly motor inputs in adult. Similar synaptic weight shifts on interneurons may be involved in the maturation of motor reflexes and locomotor circuitry. PMID:17182780

  17. Primary afferent synapses on developing and adult Renshaw cells.

    PubMed

    Mentis, George Z; Siembab, Valerie C; Zerda, Ricardo; O'Donovan, Michael J; Alvarez, Francisco J

    2006-12-20

    The mechanisms that diversify adult interneurons from a few pools of embryonic neurons are unknown. Renshaw cells, Ia inhibitory interneurons (IaINs), and possibly other types of mammalian spinal interneurons have common embryonic origins within the V1 group. However, in contrast to IaINs and other V1-derived interneurons, adult Renshaw cells receive motor axon synapses and lack proprioceptive inputs. Here, we investigated how this specific pattern of connectivity emerges during the development of Renshaw cells. Tract tracing and immunocytochemical markers [parvalbumin and vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (VGLUT1)] showed that most embryonic (embryonic day 18) Renshaw cells lack dorsal root inputs, but more than half received dorsal root synapses by postnatal day 0 (P0) and this input spread to all Renshaw cells by P10-P15. Electrophysiological recordings in neonates indicated that this input is functional and evokes Renshaw cell firing. VGLUT1-IR bouton density on Renshaw cells increased until P15 but thereafter decreased because of limited synapse proliferation coupled with the enlargement of Renshaw cell dendrites. In parallel, Renshaw cell postsynaptic densities apposed to VGLUT1-IR synapses became smaller in adult compared with P15. In contrast, vesicular acetylcholine transporter-IR motor axon synapses contact embryonic Renshaw cells and proliferate postnatally matching Renshaw cell growth. Like other V1 neurons, Renshaw cells are thus competent to receive sensory synapses. However, after P15, these sensory inputs appear deselected through arrested proliferation and synapse weakening. Thus, Renshaw cells shift from integrating sensory and motor inputs in neonates to predominantly motor inputs in adult. Similar synaptic weight shifts on interneurons may be involved in the maturation of motor reflexes and locomotor circuitry.

  18. Improving nutritional support for adults in primary and secondary care.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Andrea

    There has been serious concern about the nutritional care provided in some secondary and primary care settings. As a result, best practice, benchmarking initiatives and nutritional guidance have been issued by government and non-government agencies. This article helps nurses to synthesise these initiatives and improve their knowledge of nutritional care.

  19. Primary primitive neuroectodermal tumour of the kidney in adults.

    PubMed

    Verma, Ritu; Singhal, Mitali; Pandey, Rakesh

    2013-03-04

    Primitive neuroectodermal tumour (PNET) is a neural crest tumour derived from neuroectoderm. Renal PNET is a very rare tumour occurring during childhood or adolescence. We report two cases of PNET involving kidney in adults. Presenting signs and symptoms include abdominal/flank pain and/or haematuria. Microscopy reveals the tumour consisted of small round cells with round nuclei and scant cytoplasm. Diagnosis was confirmed by immunohistochemistry with diffuse membranous positivity of tumour cells with CD99. As these tumours have an aggressive clinical course with rapid death in many reported cases, it is important to differentiate them from other small round-cell tumours.

  20. Environmental factors associated with primary care access among urban older adults.

    PubMed

    Ryvicker, Miriam; Gallo, William T; Fahs, Marianne C

    2012-09-01

    Disparities in primary care access and quality impede optimal chronic illness prevention and management for older adults. Although research has shown associations between neighborhood attributes and health, little is known about how these factors - in particular, the primary care infrastructure - inform older adults' primary care use. Using geographic data on primary care physician supply and surveys from 1260 senior center attendees in New York City, we examined factors that facilitate and hinder primary care use for individuals living in service areas with different supply levels. Supply quartiles varied in primary care use (visit within the past 12 months), racial and socio-economic composition, and perceived neighborhood safety and social cohesion. Primary care use did not differ significantly after controlling for compositional factors. Individuals who used a community clinic or hospital outpatient department for most of their care were less likely to have had a primary care visit than those who used a private doctor's office. Stratified multivariate models showed that within the lowest-supply quartile, public transit users had a higher odds of primary care use than non-transit users. Moreover, a higher score on the perceived neighborhood social cohesion scale was associated with a higher odds of primary care use. Within the second-lowest quartile, nonwhites had a lower odds of primary care use compared to whites. Different patterns of disadvantage in primary care access exist that may be associated with - but not fully explained by - local primary care supply. In lower-supply areas, racial disparities and inadequate primary care infrastructure hinder access to care. However, accessibility and elder-friendliness of public transit, as well as efforts to improve social cohesion and support, may facilitate primary care access for individuals living in low-supply areas.

  1. Highly efficient transduction of primary adult CNS and PNS neurons

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Evgeny; Diekmann, Heike; Fischer, Dietmar

    2016-01-01

    Delivery and expression of recombinant genes, a key methodology for many applications in biological research, remains a challenge especially for mature neurons. Here, we report easy, highly efficient and well tolerated transduction of adult peripheral and central neuronal populations of diverse species in culture using VSV-G pseudo-typed, recombinant baculovirus (BacMam). Transduction rates of up to 80% were reliably achieved at high multiplicity of infection without apparent neuro-cytopathic effects. Neurons could be transduced either shortly after plating or after several days in culture. Co-incubation with two different baculoviruses attained near complete co-localization of fluorescent protein expression, indicating multigene delivery. Finally, evidence for functional protein expression is provided by means of cre-mediated genetic recombination and neurite outgrowth assays. Recombinant protein was already detected within hours after transduction, thereby enabling functional readouts even in relatively short-lived neuronal cultures. Altogether, these results substantiate the usefulness of baculovirus-mediated transduction of mature neurons for future research in neuroscience. PMID:27958330

  2. Transformation of adult rat cardiac myocytes in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Banyasz, Tamas; Lozinskiy, Ilya; Payne, Charles E; Edelmann, Stephanie; Norton, Byron; Chen, Biyi; Chen-Izu, Ye; Izu, Leighton T; Balke, C William

    2008-03-01

    We characterized the morphological, electrical and mechanical alterations of cardiomyocytes in long-term cell culture. Morphometric parameters, sarcomere length, T-tubule density, cell capacitance, L-type calcium current (I(Ca,L)), inward rectifier potassium current (I(K1)), cytosolic calcium transients, action potential and contractile parameters of adult rat ventricular myocytes were determined on each day of 5 days in culture. We also analysed the health of the myocytes using an apoptotic/necrotic viability assay. The data show that myocytes undergo profound morphological and functional changes during culture. We observed a progressive reduction in the cell area (from 2502 +/- 70 microm(2) on day 0 to 1432 +/- 50 microm(2) on day 5), T-tubule density, systolic shortening (from 0.11 +/- 0.02 to 0.05 +/- 0.01 microm) and amplitude of calcium transients (from 1.54 +/- 0.19 to 0.67 +/- 0.19) over 5 days of culture. The negative force-frequency relationship, characteristic of rat myocardium, was maintained during the first 2 days but diminished thereafter. Cell capacitance (from 156 +/- 8 to 105 +/- 11 pF) and membrane currents were also reduced (I(Ca,L), from 3.98 +/- 0.39 to 2.12 +/- 0.37 pA pF; and I(K1), from 34.34p +/- 2.31 to 18.00 +/- 5.97 pA pF(-1)). We observed progressive depolarization of the resting membrane potential during culture (from 77.3 +/- 2.5 to 34.2 +/- 5.9 mV) and, consequently, action potential morphology was profoundly altered as well. The results of the viability assays indicate that these alterations could not be attributed to either apoptosis or necrosis but are rather an adaptation to the culture conditions over time.

  3. Primary cutaneous smoldering adult T-cell leukemia/ lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Gittler, Julia; Martires, Kathryn; Terushkin, Vitaly; Brinster, Nooshin; Ramsay, David

    2016-12-15

    HTLV-1 is a virus that is endemic in southwesternJapan and the Caribbean and has been implicatedin the development of ATLL. ATLL, which is anuncommon malignant condition of peripheralT-lymphocytes, is characterized by four clinicalsubtypes, which include acute, lymphomatous,chronic, and smoldering types, that are based onLDH levels, calcium levels, and extent of organinvolvement. We present a 52-year- old woman withpruritic patches with scale on the buttocks and withtender, hyperpigmented macules and papules oftwo-years duration. Histopathologic examinationwas suggestive of mycosis fungoides, laboratoryresults showed HTLV-I and II, and the patient wasdiagnosed with primary cutaneous ATLL. We reviewthe literature on HTLV-1 and ATLL and specifically theprognosis of cutaneous ATLL. The literature suggeststhat a diagnosis of ATLL should be considered amongpatients of Caribbean origin or other endemicareas with skin lesions that suggest a cutaneousT-cell lymphoma, with clinicopathologic features ofmycosis fungoides. Differentiation between ATLLand cutaneous T-cell lymphoma is imperative as theyhave different prognoses and treatment approaches.

  4. A Comparison of Intralesional Triamcinolone Acetonide Injection for Primary Chalazion in Children and Adults

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jacky W. Y.; Yau, Gordon S. K.; Wong, Michelle Y. Y.; Yuen, Can Y. F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate outcome differences of intralesional triamcinolone acetonide (TA) injection for primary chalazia in children versus adults. Methods. A retrospective review of consecutive subjects with primary chalazion who received intralesional TA injection was conducted. A single investigator injected 0.05–0.15 mL of TA (40 mg/mL) intralesionally. Patients were stratified into the pediatric (<18 years old) and adult (≥18 years old) group. In both groups, the correlation of resolution time with chalazion size and TA dose was performed. Results. 17 children and 24 adults were enrolled, with a mean age of 7.4 ± 5.5 and 39.3 ± 16.7 years, respectively. Both groups had statistically similar baseline characteristics. There was no significant difference between the resolution time in the pediatric (18.2 ± 11.4 days) and adult (16.5 ± 11.0 days) group (P = 0.7). There were no significant complications from the TA injection. There was no significant correlation of resolution time to chalazion size (P = 0.7) nor TA dose (P = 0.3) in both groups. Conclusion. TA for the treatment of primary chalazion was equally effective in children and adults, without any significant complications, and the rate of clinical response did not appear to be dose-dependent. PMID:25386597

  5. Campylobacter fetus bacteremia with purulent pleurisy in a young adult with primary hypogammaglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Yamagami, Keiko; Miyashita, Tomoko; Nakamura, Tomoyuki; Shirano, Michinori; Nakamura, Tadahiro; Kameda, Kazuaki; Nishijima, Masayoshi; Imanishi, Masahiro; Yang, Xi; Kanegane, Hirokazu

    2014-01-01

    A 24-year-old man presented with fever and pleural effusion predominantly containing lymphocytes. Cultures of the pleural effusion and blood revealed Campylobacter fetus, and laboratory studies showed a low serum level of immunoglobulin. The patient was diagnosed with C. fetus pleuritis, bacteremia and primary hypogammaglobulinemia, and subsequent treatment with meropenem and immunoglobulin improved his condition. Although the underlying cause of the primary hypogammaglobulinemia remains unclear, the patient's status improved under immunoglobulin replacement therapy. C. fetus pleuritis is a rare infectious disease usually observed in immunocompromised hosts. We herein describe the first report of C. fetus pleuritis in a young adult with primary hypogammaglobulinemia.

  6. Adult Antisocial Behavior and Affect Regulation among Primary Crack/Cocaine-Using Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litt, Lisa Caren; Hien, Denise A.; Levin, Deborah

    2003-01-01

    The relationship between deficits in affect regulation and Adult Antisocial Behavior (ASB) in primary crack/cocaine-using women was explored in a sample of 80 inner-city women. Narrative early memories were coded for two components of affect regulation, Affect Tolerance and Affect Expression, using the Epigenetic Assessment Rating Scale (EARS;…

  7. A Meta-Analysis of Adult-Rated Child Personality and Academic Performance in Primary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poropat, Arthur E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Personality is reliably associated with academic performance, but personality measurement in primary education can be problematic. Young children find it difficult to accurately self-rate personality, and dominant models of adult personality may be inappropriate for children. Aims: This meta-analysis was conducted to determine the…

  8. Physician Perspectives on Providing Primary Medical Care to Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warfield, Marji Erickson; Crossman, Morgan K.; Delahaye, Jennifer; Der Weerd, Emma; Kuhlthau, Karen A.

    2015-01-01

    We conducted in-depth case studies of 10 health care professionals who actively provide primary medical care to adults with autism spectrum disorders. The study sought to understand their experiences in providing this care, the training they had received, the training they lack and their suggestions for encouraging more physicians to provide this…

  9. Prevalence of Epilepsy in Adults with Mental Retardation and Related Disabilities in Primary Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDermott, Suzanne; Moran, Robert; Platt, Tan; Wood, Hope; Isaac, Terri; Dasari, Srikanth

    2005-01-01

    Two primary care practices were used to recruit adults with and without disability. Disability groups included autism, Down syndrome, cerebral palsy, and mental retardation. The patients without disability had an epilepsy prevalence rate of 1%. The prevalence of epilepsy within the disability groups was 13% for cerebral palsy, 13.6% for Down…

  10. Urolithiasis in an Adult with Primary Obstructive Megaureter: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Al-Marhoon, Mohammed S.; Venkiteswaran, Khrishna P.; Shareef, Omar W.

    2013-01-01

    This is a rare case of adult primary obstructive megaureter complicated by combined uric acid-oxalate lithiasis of the ureter and renal stones. A 24-year-old male patient presented with frank hematuria on exercise of 4 years duration. The patient had an open surgery in the form of excision of stenotic segment of ureter and left ureteric re-implantation with removal of ureteric and renal stones. Congenital megaureter is a diagnosis that urologists and radiologists need to consider in the setting of isolated distal ureteral dilation, as the diagnosis of adult megaureter may require more involved surgical measures to prevent recurrence of adverse symptoms. PMID:24044065

  11. [Autoimmune hepatitis/primary sclerosing cholangitis overlap syndrome in adults: report of three cases].

    PubMed

    Santos, Oscar Mauricio; Muñoz Ortiz, Edison; Pérez, Camilo; Restrepo, Juan Carlos

    2012-04-01

    Overlap syndromes are cases of liver diseases that share clinical, serological, histological and radiological criteria of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) or primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). No definitions have been fully established and therefore there is no solid evidence on the diagnosis and treatment. This article presents the cases of three adult patients with overlapping features of AIH and PSC. Orthotopic liver transplantation was considered the best therapeutic alternative due to advanced disease progression in one patient, while medical treatment was provided in the remaining two patients.

  12. A Rare Case of Primary Anterior Mediastinal Yolk Sac Tumor in an Elderly Adult Male

    PubMed Central

    Nakhla, Sammy G.; Sundararajan, Srinath

    2016-01-01

    Mediastinal germ cell tumors are extragonadal germ cell tumors (EGGCTs) commonly seen in children and young adults. They are more common in men. Clinically they are classified as teratomas, seminomas, and nonseminomatous germ cell tumors. Primary mediastinal yolk sac neoplasm is an extremely rare tumor. We present here a very rare case of primary yolk sac tumor of the anterior mediastinum in a 73-year-old male. Mediastinal germ cell tumors have a worse prognosis than gonadal germ cell tumors. Chemotherapy followed by adjuvant surgery improves overall response in EGGCTs. However, comorbidities can render treatment with chemotherapy and surgery challenging in elderly patients. PMID:27144043

  13. Initial manifestation of primary hyperoxaluria type I in adults-- recognition, diagnosis, and management.

    PubMed Central

    Kuiper, J J

    1996-01-01

    Primary hyperoxaluria type I may initially manifest as urolithiasis, renal insufficiency, or symptoms of systemic oxalosis. This hereditary disorder was fatal until effective therapies evolved during the past two decades. Difficulty in recognizing and diagnosing this disorder in adults is illustrated in a report of a patient eventually restored to good health by high-flux dialysis and combined renal and hepatic transplantation. I explore the molecular processes of the genetic defect and discuss clinical indicators of primary hyperoxaluria type I, manifestations of oxalosis, the pathogenesis of chronic oxalate nephropathy, and the diagnosis and management of this disease. Images Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. PMID:8779202

  14. Mapping a gene for adult-onset primary open-angle glaucoma to chromosome 3q

    SciTech Connect

    Wirtz, M.K.; Samples, J.R.; Kramer, P.L.

    1997-02-01

    Glaucoma is the third-leading cause of blindness in the world, affecting >13.5 million people. Adult-on-set primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) is the most common form of glaucoma in the United States. We present a family in which adult-onset POAG is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. Twelve affected family members were identified from 44 at-risk individuals. The disease-causing gene was mapped to chromosome 3q21-24, with analysis of recombinant haplotypes suggesting a total inclusion region of 11.1 cM between markers D3S3637 and D3S1744. This is the first report of mapping of an adult-onset POAG gene to chromosome 3q, gene symbol GLC1C. 57 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Mapping a gene for adult-onset primary open-angle glaucoma to chromosome 3q.

    PubMed Central

    Wirtz, M K; Samples, J R; Kramer, P L; Rust, K; Topinka, J R; Yount, J; Koler, R D; Acott, T S

    1997-01-01

    Glaucoma is the third-leading cause of blindness in the world, affecting >13.5 million people. Adult-onset primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) is the most common form of glaucoma in the United States. We present a family in which adult-onset POAG is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. Twelve affected family members were identified from 44 at-risk individuals. The disease-causing gene was mapped to chromosome 3q21-24, with analysis of recombinant haplotypes suggesting a total inclusion region of 11.1 cM between markers D3S3637 and D3S1744. This is the first report of mapping of an adult-onset POAG gene to chromosome 3q, gene symbol GLC1C. PMID:9012402

  16. BMS-247550 in Treating Patients With Liver or Gallbladder Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-13

    Adult Primary Cholangiocellular Carcinoma; Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Extrahepatic Bile Duct; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Localized Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Localized Gallbladder Cancer; Localized Resectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  17. [Screening for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in adult patients in primary care].

    PubMed

    Aragonès, Enric; Cañisá, Anna; Caballero, Antònia; Piñol-Moreso, Josep Lluís

    2013-05-01

    AIMS. To estimate the proportion of adult patients in primary care with a positive screening test for attention deficit hyper-activity disorder (ADHD) and to analyse their characteristics. PATIENTS AND METHODS. A cross-sectional descriptive study was performed in nine primary care clinics in the province of Tarragona. The sample consisted of 432 consecutive patients in primary care who visited for any reason, with ages ranging from 18 to 55 years. Screening for ADHD was carried out by means of the Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS). Data about functional impact (Sheehan Disability Inventory) were obtained and a review of the patient records provided data concerning psychiatric comorbidity and the consumption of psychopharmaceuticals. RESULTS. The percentage of positive results in the screening tests was 19.9% (95% CI = 16.4-23.9%). Taking into account the sensitivity and specificity of the ASRS, the 'real' prevalence was estimated to be 12.5% (95% CI = 8.2-16.8%). None of these patients were diagnosed or treated for ADHD. Positive screening tests are associated with occupational, social and familial dysfunction, and greater perceived stress. There is also a higher level of comorbidity with affective disorders and substance abuse, as well as greater use of psychopharmaceuticals. CONCLUSIONS. Screening for ADHD in adult patients in primary care gives rise to a notably high proportion of positive screening test results, which suggests that there could be a significant prevalence of patients with ADHD. These data contrast with the absence of this diagnosis in the patient records. Further research is needed to determine the usefulness of the diagnosis of ADHD and the possible role that must be played by primary care.

  18. Clinical, histopathologic, and genetic features of pediatric primary myelofibrosis--an entity different from adults.

    PubMed

    DeLario, Melissa R; Sheehan, Andrea M; Ataya, Ramona; Bertuch, Alison A; Vega, Carlos; Webb, C Renee; Lopez-Terrada, Dolores; Venkateswaran, Lakshmi

    2012-05-01

    Primary myelofibrosis is a chronic myeloproliferative neoplasm characterized by cytopenias, leukoerythroblastosis, extramedullary hematopoiesis, hepatosplenomegaly and bone marrow fibrosis. Primary myelofibrosis is a rare disorder in adults; children are even less commonly affected by this entity, with the largest pediatric case series reporting on three patients. Most literature suggests spontaneous resolution of myelofibrosis without long term complications in the majority of affected children. We describe the clinical, pathologic, and molecular characteristics and outcomes of nineteen children with primary myelofibrosis treated in our center from 1984 to 2011. Most patients had cytopenia significant enough to require supportive therapy. No child developed malignant transformation and only five of the 19 children (26%) had spontaneous resolution of disease. Sequence analyses for JAK2V617F and MPLW515L mutations were performed on bone marrow samples from 17 and six patients, respectively, and the results were negative. In conclusion, analysis of this large series of pediatric patients with primary myelofibrosis demonstrates distinct clinical, hematologic, bone marrow, and molecular features from adult patients.

  19. The distinction between juvenile and adult-onset primary open-angle glaucoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wiggs, J.L.; Haines, J.L.; Damji, K.F.

    1996-01-01

    Because of the significant differences between the juvenile and adult forms of open-angle glaucoma, especially with regard to inheritance, prevalence, severity, and age of onset, we read with interest the recent publication by Morissette et al., describing a pedigree with a phenotype that overlaps the distinctive features of juvenile-onset open-angle glaucoma (JOAG) and adult-onset primary open-angle glaucoma (usually abbreviated as POAG or COAG). These authors conclude that a gene mapped to human chromosome 1q21-q31 (GLC1A) can be responsible for both juvenile and adult forms of open-angle glaucoma. The implications of such a result could be extremely important, in light of the high prevalence of the adult form of the disease. However, while the data presented in this report suggest that variable expressivity of the GLC1A gene may lead to a broader range of onset for this form of juvenile glaucoma, these data do not identify the GLC1A gene as an important cause of POAG. To prevent misleading interpretations of this and similar studies, we wish to clarify the distinction between the juvenile and adult forms of open-angle glaucoma. 8 refs.

  20. Genus Distichopora (Cnidaria, Hydrozoa): from primary cyclosystem to adult pore organisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puce, S.; Pica, D.; Brun, F.; Mancini, L.; Bavestrello, G.

    2012-09-01

    This investigation provides the first detailed description of the growth stages of two Distichopora species showing the formation of a primary cyclosystem and explaining the growth process leading from primary cyclosystem to adult pore organisation. The earliest observed stage is an oval calcareous disc from which, at a later stage, a primary cyclosystem raises up. Then, the addition of new gastropores and dactylopores leads to the pore rows typical of the genus. Using X-ray computed microtomography, we are able to visualise the dense canal network that permeates the coenosteum and envelops the gastropores and the dactylopores in all the observed growth stages. In both species, the thin canals surrounding the gastropores are responsible for the formation of the new gastropores that originate between the old ones, while the thin canals placed on the external side of the dactylopore rows produce the new dactylopores.

  1. Arthroscopic Treatment for Primary Septic Arthritis of the Hip in Adults

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Primary septic arthritis is a rare differential diagnosis of acute hip pain in adults. Inspired by the success of all-arthroscopic treatment in pediatric patients, we developed a diagnostic and surgical pathway for our adult patients. Methods. Seven patients, average age 44 ± 13.7 years with acute hip pain since 4.4 ± 2.9 days in the average, were included. Septic arthritis was confirmed by joint aspiration and dissemination was excluded by MRI and standard radiographs. Surgical treatment consisted of immediate arthroscopic lavage using 4 portals for debridement, high-volume irrigation, partial synovectomy, and drainage. Results. Patients were treated in hospital for 12.4 ± 3.1 days (range 7–16 days). WBC and CRP returned to physiological levels. During the mean follow-up of 26.4 ± 19.4 months (range 13–66 months) no patient showed recurrence of infection. The 5 patients with an unimpaired hip joint prior to the infection had a mean modified Harris Hip Score of 94 ± 5.6 points (range 91–100) at final follow-up. Conclusions. Arthroscopic therapy using a minimally invasive approach with low perioperative morbidity for the treatment of primary septic arthritis of the adult hip is able to restore normal hip function in acute cases without dissemination of the infection. Level of Evidence. IV. PMID:27800188

  2. Adult depression screening in Saudi primary care: prevalence, instrument and cost

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background By the year 2020 depression would be the second major cause of disability adjusted life years lost, as reported by the World Health Organization. Depression is a mental illness which causes persistent low mood, a sense of despair, and has multiple risk factors. Its prevalence in primary care varies between 15.3-22%, with global prevalence up to 13% and between 17-46% in Saudi Arabia. Despite several studies that have shown benefit of early diagnosis and cost-savings of up to 80%, physicians in primary care setting continue to miss out on 30-50% of depressed patients in their practices. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted at three large primary care centers in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia aiming at estimating point prevalence of depression and screening cost among primary care adult patients, and comparing Patient Health Questionnaires PHQ-2 with PHQ-9. Adult individuals were screened using Arabic version of PHQ-2 and PHQ-9. PHQ-2 scores were correlated with PHQ-9 scores using linear regression. A limited cost-analysis and cost saving estimates of depression screening was done using the Human Capital approach. Results Patients included in the survey analysis were 477, of whom 66.2% were females, 77.4% were married, and nearly 20% were illiterate. Patients exhibiting depressive symptoms on the basis of PHQ9 were 49.9%, of which 31% were mild, 13.4% moderate, 4.4% moderate-severe and 1.0% severe cases. Depression scores were significantly associated with female gender (p-value 0.049), and higher educational level (p-value 0.002). Regression analysis showed that PHQ-2 & PHQ-9 were strongly correlated R = 0.79, and R2 = 0.62. The cost-analysis showed savings of up to 500 SAR ($133) per adult patient screened once a year. Conclusion The point prevalence of screened depression is high in primary care visitors in Saudi Arabia. Gender and higher level of education were found to be significantly associated with screened depression. Majority of cases were mild to

  3. Associations between adult attachment characteristics, medical burden, and life satisfaction among older primary care patients.

    PubMed

    Kirchmann, Helmut; Nolte, Tobias; Runkewitz, Kristin; Bayerle, Lisa; Becker, Simone; Blasczyk, Verena; Lindloh, Julia; Strauss, Bernhard

    2013-12-01

    We investigated whether attachment security, measured by the Adult Attachment Prototype Rating (AAPR), was correlated with life satisfaction, independent of sociodemographic characteristics, medical burden, and age-related coping strategies in a sample of 81 patients (69-73 years) recruited from the register of a general primary care practice. Furthermore, we examined whether patients classified as AAPR-secure reported better adjustment to medical burden in terms of higher life satisfaction than did insecure patients. Attachment security was independently related to life satisfaction. Moreover, the association between medical burden and lower life satisfaction was significantly stronger for insecure than for secure participants. Our findings indicate that interventions to improve attachment security or coping processes related to attachment could help older adults retain life satisfaction.

  4. Adult onset primary focal dystonia of the foot: an orthopaedic intervention.

    PubMed

    Logan, Loretta; Resseque, Barbara; Dontamsetti, Monica Sakshi

    2016-03-30

    A 54-year-old woman presented to a foot centre with a chief symptom of cramping in her toes, which, she believed, was of a secondary cause originating from a bunion. She was treated conservatively; however, she returned a month later as the symptoms had progressed to painful cramping of toes, toe-curling and instability while walking, due to involuntary movement of her toes. It was believed that the patient presented with a rare case of primary adult onset focal foot dystonia. This case report explains dystonia further in detail and delves into the different treatment and management options available today, including the unique orthopaedic intervention provided for this patient.

  5. Changes in the contralateral eye in uncomplicated persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous in adults.

    PubMed

    Awan, K J; Humayun, M

    1985-02-15

    In two adults (a 62-year-old man and a 71-year-old woman) uncomplicated full-blown unilateral persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous was diagnosed on the basis of characteristic clinical features and ultrasonography. In the contralateral uninvolved eyes, we found open-angle glaucoma, anomalous blood vessels along the entire circumference of the anterior chamber angle, band keratopathy, and heterochromia iridis. The axial length of one involved eye was about 0.85 mm larger than that of the uninvolved eye.

  6. Splenomegaly as a Primary Manifestation of Gaucher Disease in a Young Adult Woman

    PubMed Central

    Merra, Giuseppe; Lago, Antonio Dal; Ricci, Roberta; Antuzzi, Daniela; Gasbarrini, Giovanni; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Ghirlanda, Giovanni

    2008-01-01

    Gaucher disease is the most common lysosomal storage disease. It is caused by the defective activity of acid β-glucosidase, which results in the accumulation of lipid glucocerebroside in macrophages throughout the body. In this case report we describe the case of a young adult woman with splenomegaly as the primary manifestation of this pathology. This is a case of type 1 Gaucher disease because there is a lack of primary neurological involvement but we have, instead, an age-independent involvement of the visceral organs. It is very important to classify or characterize these patients in a precise manner and to make a complete diagnosis with the help of the many diagnostic resources now at our disposal, especially with genetics, radiology and new techniques of advanced microscopy, also because Gaucher disease requires a long and complex management from early life to adulthood. PMID:21897802

  7. Origin of germ cells and formation of new primary follicles in adult human ovaries

    PubMed Central

    Bukovsky, Antonin; Caudle, Michael R; Svetlikova, Marta; Upadhyaya, Nirmala B

    2004-01-01

    sophisticated adaptive mechanism created during the evolution of female reproduction. Our data indicate that the pool of primary follicles in adult human ovaries does not represent a static but a dynamic population of differentiating and regressing structures. An essential mission of such follicular turnover might be elimination of spontaneous or environmentally induced genetic alterations of oocytes in resting primary follicles. PMID:15115550

  8. Raising awareness of bronchiectasis in primary care: overview of diagnosis and management strategies in adults.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, James D; Sethi, Sanjay

    2017-12-01

    Bronchiectasis is a chronic lung disease characterised by recurrent infection, inflammation, persistent cough and sputum production. The disease is increasing in prevalence, requiring a greater awareness of the disease across primary and secondary care. Mild and moderate cases of bronchiectasis in adults can often be managed by primary care clinicians. Initial assessments and long-term treatment plans that include both pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments, however, should be undertaken in collaboration with a secondary care team that includes physiotherapists and specialists in respiratory medicine. Bronchiectasis is often identified in patients with other lung diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, and in a lesser but not insignificant number of patients with other inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease. Overall goals of therapy are to prevent exacerbations, improve symptoms, improve quality of life and preserve lung function. Prompt treatment of exacerbations with antibiotic therapy is important to limit the impact of exacerbations on quality of life and lung function decline. Patient education and cooperation with health-care providers to implement treatment plans are key to successful disease management. It is important for the primary care provider to work with secondary care providers to develop an individualised treatment plan to optimise care with the goal to delay disease progression. Here, we review the diagnosis and treatment of bronchiectasis with a focus on practical considerations that will be useful to primary care.

  9. The effect of increased primary schooling on adult women's HIV status in Malawi and Uganda: Universal Primary Education as a natural experiment.

    PubMed

    Behrman, Julia Andrea

    2015-02-01

    This paper explores the causal relationship between primary schooling and adult HIV status in Malawi and Uganda, two East African countries with some of the highest HIV infection rates in the world. Using data from the 2010 Malawi Demographic Health Survey and the 2011 Uganda AIDS Indicator Survey, the paper takes advantage of a natural experiment, the implementation of Universal Primary Education policies in the mid 1990s. An instrumented regression discontinuity approach is used to model the relationship between increased primary schooling and adult women's HIV status. Results indicate that a one-year increase in schooling decreases the probability of an adult woman testing positive for HIV by 0.06 (p < 0.01) in Malawi and by 0.03 (p < 0.05) in Uganda. These results are robust to a variety of model specifications. In a series of supplementary analyses a number of potential pathways through which such effects may occur are explored. Findings indicate increased primary schooling positively affects women's literacy and spousal schooling attainment in Malawi and age of marriage and current household wealth in Uganda. However primary schooling has no effect on recent (adult) sexual behavior.

  10. Primary and Specialty Medical Care Among Ethnically Diverse, Older Rural Adults With Type 2 Diabetes: The ELDER Diabetes Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Ronny A.; Quandt, Sara A.; Arcury, Thomas A.; Snively, Beverly M.; Stafford, Jeanette M.; Smith, Shannon L.; Skelly, Anne H.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Residents in rural communities in the United States, especially ethnic minority group members, have limited access to primary and specialty health care that is critical for diabetes management. This study examines primary and specialty medical care utilization among a rural, ethnically diverse, older adult population with diabetes.…

  11. Primary and Specialty Medical Care among Ethnically Diverse, Older Rural Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: The ELDER Diabetes Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Ronny A.; Quandt, Sara A.; Arcury, Thomas A.; Snively, Beverly M.; Stafford, Jeanette M.; Smith, Shannon L.; Skelly, Anne H.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Residents in rural communities in the United States, especially ethnic minority group members, have limited access to primary and specialty health care that is critical for diabetes management. This study examines primary and specialty medical care utilization among a rural, ethnically diverse, older adult population with diabetes.…

  12. Primary afferent plasticity following deafferentation of the trigeminal brainstem nuclei in the adult rat.

    PubMed

    De Riu, Pier Luigi; Russo, Antonella; Pellitteri, Rosalia; Stanzani, Stefania; Tringali, Giovanni; Roccazzello, Anna Maria; De Riu, Giacomo; Marongiu, Patrizia; Mameli, Ombretta

    2008-09-01

    Alpha-tyrosinated tubulin is a cytoskeletal protein that is involved in axonal growth and is considered a marker of neuronal plasticity in adult mammals. In adult rats, unilateral ablation of the left facial sensorimotor cortical areas induces degeneration of corticotrigeminal projections and marked denervation of the contralateral sensory trigeminal nuclei. Western blotting and real-time-PCR of homogenates of the contralateral trigeminal ganglion (TG) revealed consistent overexpression of growth proteins 15 days after left decortication in comparison with the ipsilateral side. Immunohistochemical analyses indicated marked overexpression of alpha-tyrosinated tubulin in the cells of the ganglion on the right side. Cytoskeletal changes were primarily observed in the small ganglionic neurons. Application of HRP-CT, WGA-HRP, and HRP to infraorbital nerves on both sides 15 days after left decortication showed a significant degree of terminal sprouting and neosynaptogenesis from right primary afferents at the level of the right caudalis and interpolaris trigeminal subnuclei. These observations suggest that the adaptive response of TG neurons to central deafferentation, leading to overcrowding and rearrangement of the trigeminal primary afferent terminals on V spinal subnuclei neurons, could represent the anatomical basis for distortion of facial modalities, perceived as allodynia and hyperalgesia, despite nerve integrity.

  13. Isolation and cultivation of adult primary bovine hepatocytes from abattoir derived liver

    PubMed Central

    Ehrhardt, Sonja; Schmicke, Marion

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to establish a cell culture of adult primary bovine hepatocytes obtained from liver following slaughter and to cultivate the cells in a sandwich culture. Cells and medium samples were taken after separation of cells (day 0), during monolayer (days 1, 2 and 3) and during sandwich culture (days 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 10 and 14). The mRNA expression of BAX, BCL2L, FAS, IGF-1 and GHR1A was measured as well as urea and LDH. Hepatocytes were obtained by using a two-step collagenase perfusion and were purified thereafter by density gradient centrifugation. The viability was 68.2 ± 9.5 %. In sandwich culture, cells have a typical polygonal hepatocyte-like shape, build cell-cell contacts, and show irregularity of cell borders suggesting bile canaliculi generation. The BAX mRNA expression increased on day 1 as well but decreased steadily until day 3 and remained constant for 14 days. Urea- and LDH-concentrations increased from day 4 to day 7. In conclusion, we found that it is possible to gather viable primary hepatocytes from adult bovine liver after slaughter, and that cells gathered this way show typical morphologies, urea-production and low LDH-leakage especially at day 4 in a sandwich system. PMID:28275320

  14. Erlotinib in Treating Patients With Unresectable Liver, Bile Duct, or Gallbladder Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Adult Primary Cholangiocellular Carcinoma; Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Extrahepatic Bile Duct; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  15. Coping, quality of life, and hope in adults with primary antibody deficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Sigstad, Hanne Marie Høybråten; Stray-Pedersen, Asbjørg; Frøland, Stig S

    2005-01-01

    Background Living with a chronic disease, such as primary antibody deficiency, will often have consequences for quality of life. Previous quality-of-life studies in primary antibody deficiency patients have been limited to different treatment methods. We wanted to study how adults with primary antibody deficiencies manage their conditions and to identify factors that are conducive to coping, good quality of life and hope. Methods Questionnaires were sent to all patients ≥20 years of age with primary antibody deficiencies who were served by Rikshospitalet University Hospital. The questionnaires consisted of several standardized scales: Ferrans and Powers Quality of Life Index (QLI), Short Form-36 (SF-36), Jalowiec Coping Scale (JCS), Nowotny Hope Scale (NHS), and one scale we devised with questions about resources and pressures in the past. Of a total of 91, 55 patients (aged 23–76 years) answered the questionnaires. The questionnaire study were supplemented with selected interviews of ten extreme cases, five with low and five with high quality of life scores. Results Among the 55 patients, low quality of life scores were related to unemployment, infections in more than four organs, more than two additional diseases, or more than two specific occurrences of stress in the last 2–3 months. Persons with selective IgA deficiency had significantly higher QLI scores than those with other antibody deficiencies. An optimistic coping style was most frequent used, and hope values were moderately high. Based on the interviews, the patients could be divided into three groups: 1) low QLI scores, low hope values, and reduced coping, 2) low QLI scores, moderate hope values, and good coping, and 3) high QLI scores, moderate to strong hope values, and good coping. Coping was related to the patients' sense of closeness and competence. Conclusion Low quality of life scores in adults with primary antibody deficiencies were linked to unemployment and disease-related strains

  16. Incidence of diabetes mellitus type 2 complications among Saudi adult patients at primary health care center

    PubMed Central

    Alsenany, Samira; Al Saif, Amer

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study analyzed type 2 diabetes and its role in complications among adult Saudi patients. [Subjects] Patients attending four primary health care centers in Jeddah were enrolled. [Methods] A cross-sectional design study among Saudi patients attending Ministry of Health primary health care centers in Jeddah was selected for use by the Primary Health Care administration. Patients were interviewed with structured questionnaires to determine the presence of diabetes and risk factors using questions about the history of any disease. [Results] Diabetes mellitus was present in 234 subjects during the data collection period (March–June 2014). Mean patient age was 58 years; diabetes prevalence was 42% in males and 58% in females. The mean age for diabetes onset in males and females was 34 and 39 years, respectively. There was a higher incidence of obesity (75%) associated with a sedentary lifestyle (body mass index ≥25) in females (N= 96; 40%) compared with males (N= 87; 36%). In this study, >44% of individuals aged 55 or older had severe to uncontrolled diabetes with long-term complications. The age-adjusted incidence of hypertension and coronary heart disease was 38% and 24%, respectively, showing a clear incidence of diabetes associated with cardiovascular disease in Saudi Arabia. [Conclusion] This study found that a multifactorial approach to managing diabetes complication risks is needed. PMID:26180307

  17. Protein-engineered scaffolds for in vitro 3D culture of primary adult intestinal organoids.

    PubMed

    DiMarco, Rebecca L; Dewi, Ruby E; Bernal, Gabriela; Kuo, Calvin; Heilshorn, Sarah C

    2015-10-15

    Though in vitro culture of primary intestinal organoids has gained significant momentum in recent years, little has been done to investigate the impact of microenvironmental cues provided by the encapsulating matrix on the growth and development of these fragile cultures. In this work, the impact of various in vitro culture parameters on primary adult murine organoid formation and growth are analyzed with a focus on matrix properties and geometric culture configuration. The air-liquid interface culture configuration was found to result in enhanced organoid formation relative to a traditional submerged configuration. Additionally, through use of a recombinantly engineered extracellular matrix (eECM), the effects of biochemical and biomechanical cues were independently studied. Decreasing mechanical stiffness and increasing cell adhesivity were found to increase organoid yield. Tuning of eECM properties was used to obtain organoid formation efficiency values identical to those observed in naturally harvested collagen I matrices but within a stiffer construct with improved ease of physical manipulation. Increased ability to remodel the surrounding matrix through mechanical or enzymatic means was also shown to enhance organoid formation. As the engineering and tunability of recombinant matrices is essentially limitless, continued property optimization may result in further improved matrix performance and may help to identify additional microenvironmental cues that directly impact organoid formation, development, differentiation, and functional behavior. Continued culture of primary organoids in recombinant matrices could therefore prove to be largely advantageous in the field of intestinal tissue engineering for applications in regenerative medicine and in vitro tissue mimics.

  18. Impact of Patient Portal Secure Messages and Electronic Visits on Adult Primary Care Office Visits

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Sarah J.; Chaudhry, Rajeev; Ebbert, Jon O.; Ytterberg, Karen; Tulledge-Scheitel, Sidna M.; Stroebel, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Secure messages and electronic visits (“e-visits”) through patient portals provide patients with alternatives to face-to-face appointments, telephone contact, letters, and e-mails. Limited information exists on how portal messaging impacts face-to-face visits in primary care. Materials and Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 2,357 primary care patients who used electronic messaging (both secure messages and e-visits) on a patient portal. Face-to-face appointment frequencies (visits/year) of each patient were calculated before and after the first message in a matched-pairs analysis. We analyzed visit frequencies with and without adjustments for a first message surge in visits, and we examined subgroups of high message utilizers and long-term users. Results: Primary care patients who sent at least one message (secure message or e-visit) had a mean of 2.43 (standard deviation [SD] 2.3) annual face-to-face visits before the first message and 2.47 (SD 2.8) after, a nonsignificant difference (p=0.45). After adjustment for a first message surge in visits, no significant visit frequency differences were observed (mean, 2.35 annual visits per patient both before and after first message; p=0.93). Subgroup analysis also showed no significant change in visit frequency for patients with higher message utilization or for those who had used the messaging feature longer. Conclusions: No significant change in face-to-face visit frequency was observed following implementation of portal messaging. Secure messaging and e-visits through a patient portal may not result in a change of adult primary care face-to-face visits. PMID:24350803

  19. In-hospital Mobility Variations across Primary Diagnoses among Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Valiani, Vincenzo; Gao, Shiyao; Chen, Zhiguo; Swami, Sunil; Harle, Christopher A.; Lipori, Gigi; Sourdet, Sandrine; Wu, Samuel; Nayfield, Susan G.; Sabbá, Carlo; Pahor, Marco; Manini, Todd M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine the relationship between primary diagnoses and mobility impairment and recovery among hospitalized older adults. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting UF Health Shands Hospital, an 852-bed level I trauma center located in Gainesville, Florida. Participants 18,551 older adults (≥65 years) with 29,148 hospitalizations between 1/2009 and 4/2014. Measurements Incident and discharge mobility impairment and recovery were assessed using the Braden activity subscale score that was recorded by the nursing staff at every shift change–approximately three times per day. Primary diagnosis ICD-9 codes were used as predictors and re-categorized by using the Agency for Health Care Research and Quality Clinical Classification Software. Results Out of the 15,498 hospital records where the patient was initially observed to “walk frequently”, 3,186 (20.6%) developed incident mobility impairment (chair-fast or bedfast). Primary diagnoses with a surgical or invasive procedure were the most prevalent (77.2 %) among the hospital observations with incident mobility impairment; otherwise primary diagnoses without surgery were much more associated with discharge mobility impairment (59%). The highest incidence of mobility impairment occurred in patients with heart valve disorders and aortic and peripheral/visceral artery aneurysms (6.24 and 6.05 events per 30 person-days, respectively); septicemia showed the highest incidence rate for mobility limitation at discharge (0.94 events per 30 person-days). Mobility impairment was observed in 13,650 (46.8% of total) records at admission and 5,930 (43.44%) were observed to recover to a state of walking occasionally or frequently. Osteoarthritis and cancer of gastrointestinal organs/peritoneum had the highest incidence rate for mobility recovery (7.68 and 5.63 events per 30 person-days respectively). Conclusions Approximately 1 out of 5 patients who were mobile at admission became significantly impaired during

  20. Assessing the Quality of a Nonrandomized Pragmatic Trial for Primary Prevention of Falls among Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Steven M.; Edelstein, Offer; King, Jennifer; Flatt, Jason; Lin, Chyongchiou J.; Boudreau, Robert; Newman, Anne B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Current approaches to falls prevention mostly rely on secondary and tertiary prevention and target individuals at high risk of falls. An alternative is primary prevention, in which all seniors are screened, referred as appropriate, and educated regarding falls risk. Little information is available on research designs that allow investigation of this approach in the setting of aging services delivery, where randomization may not be possible. Methods Healthy Steps for Older Adults, a statewide program of the Pennsylvania (PA) Department of Aging, involves a combination of education about falls and screening for balance problems, with referral to personal physicians and home safety assessments. We developed a nonrandomized statewide trial, Falls Free PA, to assess its effectiveness in reducing falls incidence over 12 months. We recruited 814 seniors who completed the program (503 first time participants, 311 people repeating the program) and 1020 who did not participate in the program, from the same sites. We assessed the quality of this nonrandomized design by examining recruitment, follow-up across study groups, and comparability at baseline. Results Of older adults approached in senior centers, 90.5% (n=2219) signed informed consent, and 1834 (82.4%) completed baseline assessments and were eligible for follow-up. Attrition in the three groups over 12 months was low and non-differential (<10% for withdrawal and <2% for other loss to follow-up). Median follow-up, which involved standardized monthly assessment of falls, was 10 months in all study groups. At baseline the groups did not differ in measures of health or falls risk factors. Conclusions Comparable status at baseline, recruitment from common sites, and similar experience with retention suggest that the nonrandomized design will be effective for assessment of this approach to primary prevention of falls. PMID:24488533

  1. Activity, Inhibition, and Induction of Cytochrome P450 2J2 in Adult Human Primary Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Evangelista, Eric A.; Kaspera, Rüdiger; Mokadam, Nahush A.; Jones, J. P.

    2013-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 2J2 plays a significant role in the epoxidation of arachidonic acid to signaling molecules important in cardiovascular events. CYP2J2 also contributes to drug metabolism and is responsible for the intestinal clearance of ebastine. However, the interaction between arachidonic acid metabolism and drug metabolism in cardiac tissue, the main expression site of CYP2J2, has not been examined. Here we investigate an adult-derived human primary cardiac cell line as a suitable model to study metabolic drug interactions (inhibition and induction) of CYP2J2 in cardiac tissue. The primary human cardiomyocyte cell line demonstrated similar mRNA-expression profiles of P450 enzymes to adult human ventricular tissue. CYP2J2 was the dominant isozyme with minor contributions from CYP2D6 and CYP2E1. Both terfenadine and astemizole oxidation were observed in this cell line, whereas midazolam was not metabolized suggesting lack of CYP3A activity. Compared with recombinant CYP2J2, terfenadine was hydroxylated in cardiomyocytes at a similar Km value of 1.5 μM. The Vmax of terfenadine hydroxylation in recombinant enzyme was found to be 29.4 pmol/pmol P450 per minute and in the cells 6.0 pmol/pmol P450 per minute. CYP2J2 activity in the cell line was inhibited by danazol, astemizole, and ketoconazole in submicromolar range, but also by xenobiotics known to cause cardiac adverse effects. Of the 14 compounds tested for CYP2J2 induction, only rosiglitazone increased mRNA expression, by 1.8-fold. This cell model can be a useful in vitro model to investigate the role of CYP2J2-mediated drug metabolism, arachidonic acid metabolism, and their association to drug induced cardiotoxicity. PMID:24021950

  2. Occupational and environmental risk factors of adult primary brain cancers: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Gomes, J; Al Zayadi, A; Guzman, A

    2011-04-01

    The incidence of brain neoplasm has been progressively increasing in recent years in the industrialized countries. One of the reasons for this increased incidence could be better access to health care and improved diagnosis in the industrialized countries. It also appears that Caucasians have a higher incidence than blacks or Hispanics or Asians. A number of risk factors have been identified and described including the genetic, ethnic and age-based factors. Certain occupational and environmental factors are also believed to influence the risk of primary adult brain tumors. Potential occupational and environmental factors include exposure to diagnostic and therapeutic radiations, electromagnetic radiation from cellular phones and other wireless devices, infectious agents, air pollution and residence near landfills and high-voltage power lines and jobs as firefighters, farmers, physician, chemists and jobs in industries such as petrochemical, power generation, synthetic rubber manufacturing, agricultural chemicals manufacturing. The purpose of this systematic review is to examine occupational and environmental risk factors of brain neoplasm. A range of occupational and environmental exposures are evaluated for significance of their relationship with adult primary brain tumors. On the basis of this review we suggest a concurrent evaluation of multiple risk factors both within and beyond occupational and environmental domains. The concurrent approach needs to consider better exposure assessment techniques, lifetime occupational exposures, genotypic and phenotypic characteristics and lifestyle and dietary habits. This approach needs to be interdisciplinary with contributions from neurologists, oncologists, epidemiologists and molecular biologists. Conclusive evidence that has eluded multitude of studies with single focus and single exposure needs to multifaceted and multidisciplinary.

  3. Compound heterozygote mutations in SPG7 in a family with adult-onset primary lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Lynch, David R.; Lukas, Thomas; Ahmeti, Kreshnik; Sleiman, Patrick M.A.; Ryan, Eanna; Schadt, Kimberly A.; Newman, Jordan H.; Deng, Han-Xiang; Siddique, Nailah

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify the genetic defect for adult-onset primary lateral sclerosis (PLS) in a family with 5 patients. Methods: Whole-exome sequencing was performed to identify the shared genetic variants in 3 affected members in a PLS family with 5 affected individuals. Sanger sequencing was used for validation of the variants and for cosegregation analysis. Mitochondrial activity for both patients and unaffected siblings was measured using a SeaHorse metabolic analyzer. Results: Whole-exome sequencing and subsequent cosegregation analysis demonstrated that compound heterozygous missense variants L695P and I743T in SPG7 were the only mutations cosegregating with the disease in an autosomal recessive fashion in this family. The parents and siblings are genetically heterozygous and clinically unaffected. Functional studies suggested that the PLS-associated SPG7 mutants affect mitochondrial function when glucose is reduced. Conclusions: Compound heterozygote mutations in SPG7 are associated with adult-onset PLS, extending the spectrum of SPG7-linked neurologic diseases. Patients with the PLS phenotype should have genetic testing for paraplegin, especially when the condition is familial. PMID:27123479

  4. A quality-of-life measure for adults with primary ciliary dyskinesia: QOL–PCD

    PubMed Central

    Behan, Laura; Dunn Galvin, Audrey; Alpern, Adrianne; Morris, Anjana M.; Carroll, Mary P.; Knowles, Michael R.; Leigh, Margaret W.; Quittner, Alexandra L.

    2015-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is characterised by chronic suppurative lung disease, rhino-sinusitis, hearing impairment and sub-fertility. We have developed the first multidimensional measure to assess health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in adults with PCD (QOL–PCD). Following a literature review and expert panel meeting, open-ended interviews with patients investigated the impact of PCD on HRQoL in the UK and North America (n=21). Transcripts were content analysed to derive saturation matrices. Items were rated for relevance by patients (n=49). Saturation matrices, relevance scores, literature review, evaluation of existing measures, and expert opinion contributed to development of a preliminary questionnaire. The questionnaire was refined following cognitive interviews (n=18). Open-ended interviews identified a spectrum of issues unique to adults with PCD. Saturation matrices confirmed comprehensive coverage of content. QOL–PCD includes 48 items covering the following seven domains: Physical Functioning, Emotional Functioning, Treatment Burden, Respiratory and Sinus Symptoms, Ears and Hearing, Social Functioning, and Vitality and Health Perceptions. Cognitive testing confirmed that content was comprehensive and the items were well-understood by respondents. Content validity and cognitive testing supported the items and structure. QOL–PCD has been translated into other languages and is awaiting psychometric testing. PMID:25976687

  5. Voluntary physical exercise promotes ocular dominance plasticity in adult mouse primary visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Kalogeraki, Evgenia; Greifzu, Franziska; Haack, Franziska; Löwel, Siegrid

    2014-11-12

    Ocular dominance (OD) plasticity in the mouse primary visual cortex (V1) declines during aging and is absent beyond postnatal day (P) 110 when mice are raised in standard cages (SCs; Lehmann and Löwel, 2008). In contrast, raising mice in an enriched environment (EE) preserved a juvenile-like OD plasticity into late adulthood (Greifzu et al., 2014). EE raising provides the mice with more social interactions, voluntary physical exercise, and cognitive stimulation compared with SC, raising the question whether all components are needed or whether one of them is already sufficient to prolong plasticity. To test whether voluntary physical exercise alone already prolongs the sensitive phase for OD plasticity, we raised mice from 7 d before birth to adulthood in slightly larger than normal SCs with or without a running wheel (RW). When the mice were older than P135, we visualized V1 activity before and after monocular deprivation (MD) using intrinsic signal optical imaging. Adult RW-raised mice continued to show an OD shift toward the open eye after 7 d of MD, while age-matched SC mice without a RW did not show OD plasticity. Notably, running just during the 7 d MD period restored OD plasticity in adult SC-raised mice. In addition, the OD shift of the RW mice was mediated by a decrease of deprived-eye responses in V1, a signature of "juvenile-like" plasticity. We conclude that voluntary physical exercise alone is sufficient to promote plasticity in adult mouse V1.

  6. Most Uninsured Adults Could Schedule Primary Care Appointments Before The ACA, But Average Price Was $160.

    PubMed

    Saloner, Brendan; Polsky, Daniel; Kenney, Genevieve M; Hempstead, Katherine; Rhodes, Karin V

    2015-05-01

    Provisions of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) allow millions more Americans to obtain health insurance. However, a sizable number of people remain uninsured because they live in states that have not expanded Medicaid coverage or because they feel that Marketplace coverage is not affordable. Using data from a ten-state telephone survey in which callers posed as patients, we examined prices for primary care visits offered by physician offices to new uninsured patients in 2012-13, prior to ACA insurance expansions. Patients were quoted a mean price of $160. Significantly lower prices for the uninsured were offered by family practice offices compared to general internists, in offices participating in Medicaid managed care plans, and in federally qualified health centers. Prices were also lower for offices in ZIP codes with higher poverty rates. Only 18 percent of uninsured callers were told that they could bring less than the full amount to the visit and arrange to pay the rest later. ACA insurance expansions could greatly decrease out-of-pocket spending for low-income adults seeking primary care. However, benefits of health reform are likely to be greater in states expanding Medicaid eligibility.

  7. Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma: a case report of primary cutaneous tumoral type

    PubMed Central

    Lyra-da-Silva, Julia Ocampo; de Mello Gonzaga, Yung Bruno; de Melo Espíndola, Otávio; de Andrada-Serpa, Maria José; Dib, Cassio; Jeunon, Thiago

    2012-01-01

    Background: Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is a distinctive peripheral T- lymphocytic malignancy associated with human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1). It may closely resemble other skin lymphomas, particularly mycosis fungoides (MF). Case report: A 38-year-old woman presented some ellipsoid scaling patches lasting 18 months and developed a large tumoral lesion in the abdomen, which were previously diagnosed as MF. Although histopathologic and immunohistochemistry findings were in consonance with this diagnosis, the fast progression of the disease raised the suspicion that it could represent another type of T-cell lymphoma. The work-up revealed a positive anti-HTLV-1 serology and molecular studies confirmed the monoclonal integration of HTLV-1 provirus into neoplastic cells of the skin, but not into circulating lymphocytes. Extensive investigations were unable to demonstrate any systemic involvement. The final diagnosis was of primary cutaneous type of ATLL. The patient was submitted to a chemotherapy regimen with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone, later to conjugated dexamethasone and surgical cytoreduction and then to a second line treatment with gemcitabine, resulting in partial response. A bone marrow heterologous transplantation was performed, but failed to achieve a sustained remission. Discussion: ATLL is a rare lymphoid malignancy in non-endemic HTLV-1 areas, the diagnosis of which could be missed if not highly suspected. In addition to the four subtypes of Shimoyama classification (acute, lymphomatous, chronic and smoldering), a fifth one denominated primary cutaneous and characterized by presence of lesions only in the skin had been proposed and is herein exemplified. PMID:23785591

  8. Blood transcriptomic biomarkers in adult primary care patients with major depressive disorder undergoing cognitive behavioral therapy.

    PubMed

    Redei, E E; Andrus, B M; Kwasny, M J; Seok, J; Cai, X; Ho, J; Mohr, D C

    2014-09-16

    An objective, laboratory-based diagnostic tool could increase the diagnostic accuracy of major depressive disorders (MDDs), identify factors that characterize patients and promote individualized therapy. The goal of this study was to assess a blood-based biomarker panel, which showed promise in adolescents with MDD, in adult primary care patients with MDD and age-, gender- and race-matched nondepressed (ND) controls. Patients with MDD received cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and clinical assessment using self-reported depression with the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9). The measures, including blood RNA collection, were obtained before and after 18 weeks of CBT. Blood transcript levels of nine markers of ADCY3, DGKA, FAM46A, IGSF4A/CADM1, KIAA1539, MARCKS, PSME1, RAPH1 and TLR7, differed significantly between participants with MDD (N=32) and ND controls (N=32) at baseline (q< 0.05). Abundance of the DGKA, KIAA1539 and RAPH1 transcripts remained significantly different between subjects with MDD and ND controls even after post-CBT remission (defined as PHQ-9 <5). The ROC area under the curve for these transcripts demonstrated high discriminative ability between MDD and ND participants, regardless of their current clinical status. Before CBT, significant co-expression network of specific transcripts existed in MDD subjects who subsequently remitted in response to CBT, but not in those who remained depressed. Thus, blood levels of different transcript panels may identify the depressed from the nondepressed among primary care patients, during a depressive episode or in remission, or follow and predict response to CBT in depressed individuals.

  9. Insulin Resistance in Adult Primary Care Patients With a Surrogate Index, Guadalajara, Mexico, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Espinel-Bermúdez, María Claudia; Robles-Cervantes, José Antonio; del Sagrario Villarreal-Hernández, Liliana; Villaseñor-Romero, Juan Pablo; Hernández-González, Sandra Ofelia; González-Ortiz, Manuel; Martínez-Abundis, Esperanza; Pérez-Rubio, Karina Griselda

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Insulin resistance (IR) is a key molecular disorder related with diabetes mellitus, obesity, and cardiovascular disease. The objective of this study was to determine IR in adult primary care patients using the triglyceride/glucose (TyG) index [(Ln TG (mg/dL) × FG (mg/dL))/2]. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional secondary analysis and identified IR subjects according to the TyG index. Results There were 1500 patients included. Significant differences were found between the IR group versus the insulin-sensitive group, respectively: age (in years), 46.4 ± 9.34 versus 40.24 ± 11.27 (P < 0.001); fasting glucose (mg/dL), 99.87 ± 11.95 versus 84.62 ± 6.59 (P < 0.001); total cholesterol (mg/dL), 203.21 ± 37.38 versus 173.91 ± 33.99 (P < 0.001); triglycerides (mg/dL), 226.40 ± 96.66 versus 111.27 ± 23.44 (P < 0.001); uric acid (mg/dL), 6.09 ± 1.59 versus 4.77 ± 1.40 (P < 0.001); and TyG index, 4.96 ± 0.21 versus 4.48 ± 0.13 (P < 0.001). The cutoff of the TyG index for IR was 4.68 or greater. Conclusions The TyG index allows for early diagnosis of IR in primary health care. PMID:25503090

  10. Sleep time and pattern of adult individuals in primary care in an Asian urbanized community

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Ngiap Chuan; Tan, Mui Suan; Hwang, Siew Wai; Teo, Chia Chia; Lee, Zhi Kang Niccol; Soh, Jing Yao Jonathan; Koh, Yi Ling Eileen; How, Choon How

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Sleep norms vary between individuals, being affected by personal, communal, and socioeconomic factors. Individuals with sleep time which deviate from the population norm are at risks of adverse mental, cardiovascular, and metabolic health. Sleep-related issues are common agenda for consultation in primary care. This study aimed to determine the sleep time, pattern, and behavior of multiethnic Asian individuals who attended public primary care clinics in an urban metropolitan city-state. Standardized questionnaires were assistant-administered to adult Asian individuals who visited 2 local public primary care clinics in north-eastern and southern regions of Singapore. The questionnaire included questions on demographic characteristics, self-reported sleep time, patterns, and behavior and those originated from the American National Sleep Foundation Sleep Diary. The data were collated, audited, rectified, and anonymized before being analyzed by the biostatistician. Individuals with 7 h sleep time or longer were deemed getting adequate sleep. Chi-squared or Fisher exact test was used to test the association between the demographic and behavioral variables and sleep time. Next, regression analysis was performed to identify key factors associated with their sleep time. A total of 350 individuals were recruited, with higher proportion of those of Chinese ethnicity reporting adequate sleep. Almost half (48.1%) of those who slept <7 h on weekdays tended to sleep ≥7 h on weekends. More individuals who reported no difficulty falling asleep, had regular sleep hours and awakening time, tended to sleep adequately. Those who slept with children, studied, read leisurely, used computer or laptops in their bedrooms, drank caffeinated beverages or smoked had inadequate sleep. Those who perceived sufficient sleep and considered 8 h as adequate sleep time had weekday and weekend sleep adequacy. Sleep time varied according to ethnicity, employment status, personal

  11. Mental ability performance among adults with type 2 diabetes in primary care.

    PubMed

    Mount, David L; Lambert, Michael C

    2009-06-01

    Aim and method The present university-based outpatient clinic, cross-sectional study assessed cognitive performance in a sample of 137 adults, with the primary objective of determining differences in cognitive performance as a function of gender and hypertension status in a type 2 diabetes cohort.Results Approximately 64% of the sample was 65 years old and younger, and 50 subjects had > 13 years of education. Global mental ability scores were relatively similar by age grouping, and higher-ordered cognitive functioning and reading literacy were strongly correlated, r (98) = 0.62, P < 0.01. Approximately 30% of the sample posted global mental ability scores in the slow learner range on tasks measuring attention, immediate memory and verbal reasoning. Males achieved higher cognitive functioning scores compared to females on multiple mental ability tasks. The presence of hypertension was associated with significantly worse cognitive performance compared to those subjects without hypertension, t = 2.11, P = 0.03. Approximately 57% of the hypertension group was classified as mild cognitive impaired.Conclusion While approximately half of the general population can be expected to demonstrate an average range of performance on cognitive ability measures, such an expectation could be inappropriately generalised to persons diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, even among those who were high school educated.

  12. Mental ability performance among adults with type 2 diabetes in primary care

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Aim and method The present university-based outpatient clinic, cross-sectional study assessed cognitive performance in a sample of 137 adults, with the primary objective of determining differences in cognitive performance as a function of gender and hypertension status in a type 2 diabetes cohort. Results Approximately 64% of the sample was 65 years old and younger, and 50 subjects had > 13 years of education. Global mental ability scores were relatively similar by age grouping, and higher-ordered cognitive functioning and reading literacy were strongly correlated, r (98) = 0.62, P < 0.01. Approximately 30% of the sample posted global mental ability scores in the slow learner range on tasks measuring attention, immediate memory and verbal reasoning. Males achieved higher cognitive functioning scores compared to females on multiple mental ability tasks. The presence of hypertension was associated with significantly worse cognitive performance compared to those subjects without hypertension, t = 2.11, P = 0.03. Approximately 57% of the hypertension group was classified as mild cognitive impaired. Conclusion While approximately half of the general population can be expected to demonstrate an average range of performance on cognitive ability measures, such an expectation could be inappropriately generalised to persons diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, even among those who were high school educated. PMID:22477898

  13. Misdiagnosis of primary pleomorphic rhabdomyosarcoma of the right thigh in a young adult: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaolong; Yang, Yong; Zhang, Bin; Liu, Hucheng; Guo, Runsheng; Dai, Min

    2016-01-01

    Pleomorphic rhabdomyosarcoma (PRMS) is a rare type of soft tissue tumor accounting for <2% of all adult sarcomas. The present study describes a case of a 28-year-old male patient with primary PRMS of the right thigh. The patient was initially diagnosed with a schwannoma and underwent conservative therapy at a local hospital. At the 6-month follow-up, the patient reported a marked increase in the size of the mass. Finally, the patient underwent fine-needle aspiration and total tumor resection. The tumor measured 11×9×5 cm3 in size and was located in the vastus intermedius muscle. According to histological and immunohistochemical findings, a diagnosis of PRMS was confirmed by an expert pathology consultant. Postoperative follow-up at 3 months revealed no evidence of recurrent disease or residual side effects from therapy. However, it is imperative that such cases are closely monitored following surgery, in order to evaluate the long-term efficacy of the procedure, since misdiagnosis may increase the risk of recurrence and metastasis. The present case is noteworthy due to the misdiagnosis of PRMS, the large size of the mass and the young age of the patient. PMID:27588141

  14. A search for the primary abnormality in adult-onset type II citrullinemia

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Keiko; Shaheen, Nazma; Saheki, Takeyori ); Kumashiro, Ryukichi; Tanikawa, Kyuichi ); O'Brien, W.E.; Beaudet, A.L. )

    1993-11-01

    Deficiency of argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) causes citrullinemia in human beings. Type II citrullinemia is found in most patients with adult-onset citrullinemia in Japan, and ASS deficiency is found specifically in the liver. Previous studies have shown that the decrease of hepatic ASS activity is caused by a decrease in enzyme protein with normal kinetic properties and that there were no apparent abnormalities in the amount, translational activity, and gross structure of hepatic ASS mRNA. In the present work, the authors show by sequencing analysis that there was no mutation in the ASS mRNA from two patients with type II citrullinemia. The authors also report RFLP analysis of a consanguineous family with type II citrullinemia, by using three DNA polymorphisms located within the ASS gene locus. In spite of having consanguineous parents, the patient was not a homozygous haplotype for the ASS gene. The RFLP analysis of 16 affected patients from consanguineous parents showed that 5 of 16 patients had the heterozygous pattern for one of the three DNA probes and that the frequency of the heterozygous haplotype was not different from the control frequency. These results suggest that the primary defect of type II citrullinemia is not within the ASS gene locus. 29 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  15. Secondary malignant neoplasms following radiotherapy for primary cancer in children and young adults.

    PubMed

    Harbron, Richard W; Feltbower, Richard G; Glaser, Adam; Lilley, John; Pearce, Mark S

    2014-04-01

    A study was conducted to investigate secondary malignant neoplasm (SMN) occurrence following radiotherapy (RT) for cancer in children and young adults, to examine the spatial distribution of SMNs in relation to the irradiated field, and to evaluate a possible role of bystander effects in SMN distribution. Forty-two SMNs were identified among 7257 subjects diagnosed with cancer while living in Yorkshire, UK. Thirty-two of these occurred in patients receiving RT. Distances between SMN locations and RT field edge were estimated along with dose at SMN site. Expected radiation-induced SMN frequency in remote tissues receiving less than 0.1 Gy was predicted using risk estimates based on atomic bombing data. After a median follow-up period of 7.58 years, patients treated with RT were at a nearly five-fold increased risk of developing a subsequent primary neoplasm than the general population in the 0-29 years age range. The most common type of secondary malignancy associated with RT was of the central nervous system (28%), followed by sarcoma (25%) and leukemia (19%). Considering only solid SMNs developing 5 years or more from treatment, the spatial distribution showed a strong pattern of proximity to the irradiated field, with 68% occurring in-field or within 8 cm of the field edge. The SMN frequency in distant tissues receiving doses of less than 0.1 Gy was low but compatible with local absorbed dose.

  16. [Primary immune thrombocytopenia in adults in Mexico: national characteristics and the relation to international literature].

    PubMed

    Meillón-García, Luis Antonio; García-Chávez, Jaime; Gómez-Almaguer, David; Gutiérrez-Espíndola, Guillermo R; Martínez-Murillo, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    In order to identify the clinical approach of a sample of Mexican hematologists for primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) in adults in Mexico, we applied an electronic survey via the internet to identify common practices for the diagnosis and treatment of ITP and draw a comparison between the information from these hematologists with international guidelines or the international literature. The results were analyzed using measures of central tendency. The sample was 21 medical hematologists, predominantly from Mexico City (average age: 51.4 years). A total of 66.7% of the surveyed physicians use international guidelines to make therapeutic decisions, and 43% defined ITP including the numerical concept (< 100 x 10(9)/l). We found some differences between requested clinical exams and tests indicated by the guidelines. In first-line treatment (except emergency), 91% of the participants start with prednisone and 24% use dexamethasone. Danazol is used in persistent ITP by most (41%) of the specialists. In second-line treatment, 67% would indicate splenectomy. Some differences were found between clinical practice of the hematologists in Mexico versus guidelines recommendations.

  17. A Nation-Wide Epidemiological Study of Newly Diagnosed Primary Spine Tumor in the Adult Korean Population, 2009–2011

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Seil; Kim, Jinhee; Chung, Chun Kee; Lee, Na Rae; Sohn, Moon Jun; Kim, Sung Hwan

    2017-01-01

    Objective This 2009–2011 nation-wide study of adult Koreans was aimed to provide characteristics, medical utilization states, and survival rates for newly diagnosed patients with primary nonmalignant and malignant spine tumors. Methods Data for patients with primary spine tumors were selected from the Korean Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service database. The data included their age, sex, health insurance type, co-morbidities, medical cost, and hospital stay duration. Hospital stay duration and medical costs per person occurring in one calendar year were used. In addition, survival rates of patients with primary malignant spine tumors were evaluated. Results The incidence rate of a primary spine tumor increased with age, and the year of diagnosis (p≤0.0001). Average annual medical costs ranged from 1627 USD (pelvis & sacrum & coccyx tumors) to 6601 USD (spinal cord tumor) for primary nonmalignant spine tumor and from 12137 USD (spinal meningomas) to 20825 USD (pelvis & sacrum & coccyx tumors) for a primary malignant spine tumor. Overall survival rates for those with a primary malignant spine tumor were 87.0%, 75.3%, and 70.6% at 3, 12, and 24 months, respectively. The Cox regression model results showed that male sex, medicare insurance were significantly positive factors affecting survival after a diagnosis of primary malignant spine tumor. Conclusion Our study provides a detailed view of the characteristics, medical utilization states, and survival rates of patients newly diagnosed with primary spine tumors in Korea. PMID:28264240

  18. Adults with ADHD: use and misuse of stimulant medication as reported by patients and their primary care physicians.

    PubMed

    Lensing, Michael B; Zeiner, Pål; Sandvik, Leiv; Opjordsmoen, Stein

    2013-12-01

    This study investigated the agreement on treatment for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) between adults with ADHD and the primary care physicians responsible for their treatment. Adults with ADHD and the primary care physicians responsible for their ADHD treatment completed a survey. The κ-statistic assessed physician-patient agreement on ADHD treatment variables. The eligible sample consisted of 274 patients with confirmed current or previous psychopharmacological treatment for ADHD and the physicians responsible for their treatment. We received 159 questionnaires (58.0 %) with sufficient information from both sources. There were no significant differences between participants and nonparticipants (N = 115) on ADHD sample characteristics. Participants' mean age was 37.6 years, and 75 (47.2 %) were females. There was high agreement for current pharmacological treatment for ADHD, current and last ADHD drug prescription, treatment for substance use, and misuse of stimulant medication. Agreement for nonpharmacological treatment for ADHD and treatment termination because of the side effects was low. A minority of participants from both sources reported misuse of stimulant medication. There was a moderate correlation between the physicians' clinical judgment and patients' self-report on current functioning. The study showed that primary care physicians and their patients agreed on the pharmacological but not the nonpharmacological, treatments given. They also agreed on patients' current functioning. Physicians and patients reported low levels of misuse of stimulant medication. The results show that pharmacological treatment for adults with ADHD can be safely undertaken by primary care physicians.

  19. Identifying adults at risk of COPD who need confirmatory spirometry in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Kylie; Hodder, Richard; Blouin, Maria; Heels-Ansdell, Diane; Guyatt, Gordon; Goldstein, Roger

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To examine the usefulness of a symptom-based case-finding questionnaire (CFQ) and the Medical Research Council (MRC) dyspnea scale in identifying which individuals with known risk factors for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) require targeted spirometry in primary care. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Three community primary care practices in Ontario. Participants Men and women 40 years of age and older with a smoking history of 20 pack-years or more. Main outcome measures We administered a CFQ for the presence of cough, sputum, wheeze, dyspnea, and recurrent respiratory infections (possible range of scores from 0 to 5) and applied the MRC dyspnea scale to assess the severity of COPD (possible range of scores from 1 to 5). Spirometric measures of forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC) were collected, with COPD defined as a postbronchodilator FEV1/FVC of less than 0.7 and FEV1 of less than 80% of the predicted value. Using spirometric data to confirm the diagnosis of COPD, likelihood ratios, pretest and posttest probabilities, and area under a receiver operating characteristic curve were calculated for the total CFQ and MRC scores. Results Scores for the CFQ and MRC dyspnea scale were available for 996 and 829 participants, respectively. The likelihood ratios for a total CFQ score of 3 or higher and an MRC dyspnea score of 4 or 5 were 1.82 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.48 to 2.22) and 4.22 (95% CI 2.08 to 8.56), respectively. The likelihood ratios for a total CFQ score of 2 or less and an MRC dyspnea score of 1 were 0.75 (95% CI 0.66 to 0.85) and 0.50 (95% CI 0.39 to 0.65), respectively. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.62 (95% CI 0.58 to 0.67; P < .001) for the total CFQ scores and 0.64 (95% CI 0.60 to 068; P < .001) for the MRC dyspnea scores. Conclusion In adults with known risk factors, the likelihood of having moderate to severe COPD is increased in those who

  20. Economic burden to primary informal caregivers of hospitalized older adults in Mexico: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The burden of out of pocket spending for the Mexican population is high compared to other countries. Even patients insured by social security institutions have to face the cost of health goods, services or nonmedical expenses related to their illness. Primary caregivers, in addition, experience losses in productivity by taking up responsibilities in care giving activities. This situation represents a mayor economic burden in an acute care setting for elderly population. There is evidence that specialized geriatric services could represent lower overall costs in these circumstances and could help reduce these burdens. The aim of this study was to investigate economic burden differences in caregivers of elderly patients comparing two acute care services (Geriatric and Internal Medicine). Specifically, economic costs associated with hospitalization of older adults in these two settings by evaluating health care related out of pocket expenditures (OOPE), non-medical OOPE and indirect costs. Methods A comparative analysis of direct and indirect costs in hospitalised elderly patients (60-year or older) and their primary informal caregivers in two health care settings, using a prospective cohort was performed. Economic burden was measured by out of pocket expenses and indirect costs (productivity lost) due to care giving activities. The analysis included a two-part model, the first one allowing the estimation of the probability of observing any health care related and non-medical OOPE; and the second one, the positive observations or expenditures. Results A total of 210 subjects were followed during their hospital stay. Of the total number of subjects 95% reported at least one non-medical OOPE, being daily transportation the most common expense. Regarding medical OOPE, medicines were the most common expense, and the mean numbers of days without income were 4.12 days. Both OOPE and indirect costs were significantly different between type of services, with less

  1. Exploring knowledge, attitudes, and practices toward older adults with hypertension in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Chotisiri, Luckwirun; Yamarat, Khemika; Taneepanichskul, Surasak

    2016-01-01

    Purpose High blood pressure increases the risk of cardiovascular and kidney diseases. The purpose of this study was to explore a baseline of hypertension knowledge, attitudes, and practices among older adults with hypertension at a sub-district Health Promoting Hospital in the Pathum Thani province of Thailand. Patients and methods A cross-sectional study was conducted at the outpatient clinic of the sub-district Health Promoting Hospital, one of the primary care sectors, between January and March 2015, and a total of 144 cases were recruited. All clinical parameters were collected and a structured questionnaire was used. Data were analyzed by means of descriptive statistics and chi-square tests. Results Most of the participants (74.3%) were females, and their mean age was 66.1 years. Two-thirds (66.7%) were married, unemployed/retired (67.4%), and had completed elementary education (79.2%). The screenings showed that their mean blood pressure was 136.4 (±14.4)/79.2 (±10.1) mmHg, the group’s mean body mass index was 24.9 kg/m2 (± 3.6 kg/m2), and their mean waist circumference was 88.6 cm (±7.1 cm) for males and 85.7 cm (±6.8 cm) for females. In addition, their mean score of hypertension knowledge was high, and most of the participants had a neutral attitude toward hypertension; their practices in terms of dietary and exercise habits for controlling blood pressure were low in nature. Conclusion This study indicated that increasing patients’ practices would be useful for promoting their healthy behaviors to achieve blood pressure control. PMID:27822057

  2. Primary mature cystıc teratoma mimickıng an adrenal mass in an adult male patient.

    PubMed

    Okulu, Emrah; Ener, Kemal; Aldemir, Mustafa; Isik, Evren; Irkkan, Cigdem; Kayigil, Onder

    2014-02-01

    Teratomas are bizarre neoplasms derived from embryonic tissues that are typically found only in the gonadal and sacrococcygeal regions of adults. Primary retroperitoneal teratomas are rare and present challenging management options. We report a case of a unilateral primary retroperitoneal mature cystic teratoma mimicking an adrenal mass in a 54-year-old male patient. Complete resection of the adrenal mass was performed by the flank approach by using the 11th rib resection. Because of the risk of malignancy, follow-up radiographic studies were performed to ensure the oncologic efficacy of resection. The patient has been free of recurrence for longer than 12 months.

  3. Research in the Integration of Behavioral Health for Adolescents and Young Adults in Primary Care Settings: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Laura P; McCarty, Carolyn A; Radovic, Ana; Suleiman, Ahna Ballonoff

    2017-03-01

    Despite the recognition that behavioral and medical health conditions are frequently intertwined, the existing health care system divides management for these issues into separate settings. This separation results in increased barriers to receipt of care and contributes to problems of underdetection, inappropriate diagnosis, and lack of treatment engagement. Adolescents and young adults with mental health conditions have some of the lowest rates of treatment for their conditions of all age groups. Integration of behavioral health into primary care settings has the potential to address these barriers and improve outcomes for adolescents and young adults. In this paper, we review the current research literature for behavioral health integration in the adolescent and young adult population and make recommendations for needed research to move the field forward.

  4. Adult Visual Experience Promotes Recovery of Primary Visual Cortex from Long-Term Monocular Deprivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Quentin S.; Aleem, Salman; Zhou, Hongyi; Pham, Tony A.

    2007-01-01

    Prolonged visual deprivation from early childhood to maturity is believed to cause permanent visual impairment. However, there have been case reports of substantial improvement of binocular vision in human adults following lifelong visual impairment or deprivation. These observations, together with recent findings of adult ocular dominance…

  5. An Update of the Mayo Clinic Cohort of Patients With Adult Primary Central Nervous System Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Salvarani, Carlo; Brown, Robert D.; Christianson, Teresa; Miller, Dylan V.; Giannini, Caterina; Huston, John; Hunder, Gene G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Primary central nervous system vasculitis (PCNSV) is an uncommon condition in which lesions are limited to vessels of the brain and spinal cord. Because the clinical manifestations are not specific, the diagnosis is often difficult, and permanent disability and death are frequent outcomes. This study is based on a cohort of 163 consecutive patients with PCNSV who were examined at the Mayo Clinic over a 29-year period from 1983 to 2011. The aim of the study was to define the characteristics of these patients, which represents the largest series in adults reported to date. A total of 105 patients were diagnosed by angiographic findings and 58 by biopsy results. The patients diagnosed by biopsy more frequently had at presentation cognitive dysfunction, greater cerebrospinal fluid total protein concentrations, less frequent cerebral infarcts, and more frequent leptomeningeal gadolinium-enhanced lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), along with less mortality and disability at last follow-up. The patients diagnosed by angiograms more frequently had at presentation hemiparesis or a persistent neurologic deficit or stroke, more frequent infarcts on MRI and an increased mortality. These differences were mainly related to the different size of the vessels involved in the 2 groups. Although most patients responded to therapy with glucocorticoids alone or in conjunction with cyclophosphamide and tended to improve during the follow-up period, an overall increased mortality rate was observed. Relapses occurred in one-quarter of the patients and were less frequent in patients treated with prednisone and cyclophosphamide compared with those treated with prednisone alone. The mortality rate and degree of disability at last follow-up were greater in those with increasing age, cerebral infarctions on MRI, angiographic large vessel involvement, and diagnosis made by angiography alone, but were lower in those with gadolinium-enhanced lesions on MRI and in those with

  6. Anti-Neurotrophic Effects from Autoantibodies in Adult Diabetes Having Primary Open Angle Glaucoma or Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Zimering, Mark B.; Moritz, Thomas E.; Donnelly, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To test for anti-endothelial and anti-neurotrophic effects from autoantibodies in subsets of diabetes having open-angle glaucoma, dementia, or control subjects. Methods: Protein-A eluates from plasma of 20 diabetic subjects having glaucoma or suspects and 34 age-matched controls were tested for effects on neurite outgrowth in rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells or endothelial cell survival. The mechanism of the diabetic glaucoma autoantibodies’ neurite-inhibitory effect was investigated in co-incubations with the selective Rho kinase inhibitor Y27632 or the sulfated proteoglycan synthesis inhibitor sodium chlorate. Stored protein-A eluates from certain diabetic glaucoma or dementia subjects which contained long-lasting, highly stable cell inhibitory substances were characterized using mass spectrometry and amino acid sequencing. Results: Diabetic primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) or suspects (n = 20) or diabetic dementia (n = 3) autoantibodies caused significantly greater mean inhibition of neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells (p < 0.0001) compared to autoantibodies in control diabetic (n = 24) or non-diabetic (n = 10) subjects without glaucoma (p < 0.01). Neurite inhibition by the diabetic glaucoma autoantibodies was completely abolished by 10 μM concentrations of Y27632 (n = 4). It was substantially reduced by 30 mM concentrations of sodium chlorate (n = 4). Peak, long-lasting activity survived storage ×5 years at 0–4°C and was associated with a restricted subtype of Ig kappa light chain. Diabetic glaucoma or dementia autoantibodies (n = 5) caused contraction and process retraction in quiescent cerebral cortical astrocytes effects which were blocked by 5 μM concentrations of Y27632. Conclusion: These data suggest that autoantibodies in subsets of adult diabetes having POAG (glaucoma suspects) and/or dementia inhibit neurite outgrowth and promote a reactive astrocyte morphology by a mechanism which may involve

  7. Molecular and immunocytochemical characterization of primary neuronal cultures from adult rat brain: Differential expression of neuronal and glial protein markers.

    PubMed

    Ray, Balmiki; Bailey, Jason A; Sarkar, Sumit; Lahiri, Debomoy K

    2009-11-15

    Neurobiological studies using primary neuronal cultures commonly employ fetal-derived neurons, but much less often adult brain-derived neurons. Our goal is to perform morphological and molecular characterization of primary neuronal cultures from adult rat brain, including the relative expression of neuronal and glial cell markers at different time points. We tested the hypothesis that long-term neuronal viability is compatible with glial proliferation in adult neuron culture. We examined neuron culture from adult rat brain, which was maintained at steady state up to 24 days, and characterized them on the basis of cellular, molecular and biochemical properties at different time points of the culture. We identified neuronal and glial cells by both immunocytochemical and western immunoblotting techniques using NSE and Tau as neuronal markers and GFAP as glial protein marker, which revealed the presence of predominantly neuronal cells in the initial phase of the culture and a rise in glial cells from day 12 onwards. Notably, neuronal cells were preserved in the culture along with the glial cells even at day 24. Transfection of the cultured cells with a GFP expression vector and plasmids containing a luciferase reporter gene under the control of two different gene promoters demonstrated DNA transfectability. Taken together, these results suggest a differential expression of neuronal and glial cells at different time points and long-term neuronal viability in the presence of glial proliferation. Such adult neurons serve as a suitable system for the application of neurodegeneration models and for drug target discovery in various brain disorders including Alzheimer's disease.

  8. Comorbidity and its impact in adult patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: a primary care perspective.

    PubMed

    Babcock, Thomas; Ornstein, Craig S

    2009-05-01

    The objective of this manuscript was to review the literature relevant to the primary care practitioner concerning comorbidity and its impact on diagnosis and treatment efficacy in adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). A MEDLINE literature review was performed using the keywords: attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder; psychiatric comorbidity; bipolar disorder; major depressive disorder; oppositional defiant disorder; conduct disorder; and substance use disorder. The authors assessed and summarized literature identified as relevant to primary care practitioners. Results demonstrated high rates of psychiatric comorbidity in patients with ADHD. These comorbid disorders, coupled with the differing characteristics of ADHD symptoms in adults versus children, may complicate accurate diagnosis and treatment of ADHD. Controlled clinical trials indicate that the presence of comorbidity does not substantially alter the safety and efficacy of ADHD pharmacotherapy and that treatment of ADHD can sometimes improve symptoms of the comorbid disorder. Although rates of psychiatric comorbidity are high in adults with ADHD, available data suggest that the benefits of pharmacotherapy for ADHD are not compromised by the presence of psychiatric comorbidity.

  9. Sleep paralysis and trauma, psychiatric symptoms and disorders in an adult African American population attending primary medical care.

    PubMed

    Mellman, Thomas A; Aigbogun, Notalelomwan; Graves, Ruth Elaine; Lawson, William B; Alim, Tanya N

    2008-01-01

    The occurrence of sleep paralysis (SP) absent narcolepsy appears to not be uncommon in African Americans and probably other non-European groups. Prior research has linked SP to trauma and psychiatric disorders and suggested a specific relationship to panic disorder in African Americans. The objective of our study was to evaluate relationships of SP with trauma, concurrent psychiatric symptoms and lifetime psychiatric diagnoses in an adult African American population recruited from primary care. Cross sectional study with surveys and diagnostic interviews; Patients attending primary care clinics filled out a survey that determined the 6 month prevalence and associated features of SP, a panic disorder screen, the self-rated Hamilton Depression Scale, and an inventory of trauma exposure. A subset of trauma-exposed participants (N = 142) received comprehensive diagnostic interviews that incorporated the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV and the Clinician Assessed PTSD Scale. Four hundred and forty-one adults participated (mean age-40.0 SD = 13.3, 68% female, 95% African American). Fourteen percent endorsed recent SP. In approximately 1/3 of those with SP, episodes also featured panic symptoms. SP was strongly associated with trauma history, and concurrent anxiety and mood symptoms. SP was not associated with specific psychiatric disorders other than lifetime (but not current) alcohol or substance use disorders. Our findings suggest that SP is not uncommon in adult African Americans and is associated with trauma and concurrent distress but not with a specific psychiatric diagnosis.

  10. Radiation therapy in cholangiocellular carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Thomas B; Seufferlein, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma can arise in all parts of the biliary tract and this has implications for therapy. Surgery is the mainstay of therapy however local relapse is a major problem. Therefore, adjuvant treatment with chemoradiotherapy was tested in trials. The SWOG-S0809 trial regimen of chemoradiotherapy which was tested in extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and in gallbladder cancer can currently be regarded as highest level of evidence for this indication. In contrast to adjuvant therapy where only conventionally fractionated radiotherapy plays a role, stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) today has become a powerful alternative to chemoradiotherapy for definitive treatment due to the ability to administer higher doses of radiotherapy to improve local control. Sequential combinations with chemotherapy are also frequently employed. Nevertheless, in general cholangiocarcinoma is an orphan disease and future clinical trials will have to improve the available level of evidence.

  11. FDG-PET/CT Imaging Predicts Histopathologic Treatment Responses after Neoadjuvant Therapy in Adult Primary Bone Sarcomas

    DOE PAGES

    Benz, Matthias R.; Czernin, Johannes; Tap, William D.; ...

    2010-01-01

    Purpose . Tmore » he aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate whether FDG-PET allows an accurate assessment of histopathologic response to neoadjuvant treatment in adult patients with primary bone sarcomas. Methods . Twelve consecutive patients with resectable, primary high grade bone sarcomas were enrolled prospectively. FDG-PET/CT imaging was performed prior to the initiation and after completion of neoadjuvant treatment. Imaging findings were correlated with histopathologic response. Results . Histopathologic responders showed significantly more pronounced decreases in tumor FDG-SUVmax from baseline to late follow up than non-responders ( 64 ± 19 % versus 29 ± 30 %, resp.; P = .03 ). Using a 60% decrease in tumor FDG-uptake as a threshold for metabolic response correctly classified 3 of 4 histopathologic responders and 7 of 8 histopathologic non-responders as metabolic responders and non-responders, respectively (sensitivity, 75%; specificity, 88%). Conclusion . These results suggest that changes in FDG-SUVmax at the end of neoadjuvant treatment can identify histopathologic responders and non-responders in adult primary bone sarcoma patients.« less

  12. Study origin of germ cells and formation of new primary follicles in adult human and rat ovaries.

    PubMed

    Bukovsky, Antonin; Gupta, Satish K; Virant-Klun, Irma; Upadhyaya, Nirmala B; Copas, Pleas; Van Meter, Stuart E; Svetlikova, Marta; Ayala, Maria E; Dominguez, Roberto

    2008-01-01

    The central thesis regarding the human ovaries is that, although primordial germ cells in embryonal ovaries are of extraovarian origin, those generated during the fetal period and in postnatal life are derived from the ovarian surface epithelium (OSE) bipotent cells. With the assistance of immune system-related cells, secondary germ cells and primitive granulosa cells originate from OSE stem cells in the fetal and adult human gonads. Fetal primary follicles are formed during the second trimester of intrauterine life, prior to the end of immune adaptation, possibly to be recognized as self-structures and renewed later. With the onset of menarche, a periodical oocyte and follicular renewal emerges to replace aging primary follicles and ensure that fresh eggs for healthy babies are always available during the prime reproductive period. The periodical follicular renewal ceases between 35 and 40 yr of age, and the remaining primary follicles are utilized during the premenopausal period until exhausted. However, the persisting oocytes accumulate genetic alterations and may become unsuitable for ovulation and fertilization. The human OSE stem cells preserve the character of embryonic stem cells, and they may produce distinct cell types, including new eggs in vitro, particularly when derived from patients with premature ovarian failure or aging and postmenopausal ovaries. Our observations also indicate that there are substantial differences in follicular renewal between adult human and rat ovaries. As part of this chapter, we present in detail protocols utilized to analyze oogenesis in humans and to study interspecies differences when compared to the ovaries of rat females.

  13. A review of primary care interventions to improve health outcomes in adult survivors of adverse childhood experiences.

    PubMed

    Korotana, Laurel M; Dobson, Keith S; Pusch, Dennis; Josephson, Trevor

    2016-06-01

    Research has consistently demonstrated a link between the experience of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and adult health conditions, including mental and physical health problems. While a focus on the prevention or mitigation of adversity in childhood is an important direction of many programs, many individuals do not access support services until adulthood, when health problems may be fairly engrained. It is not clear which interventions have the strongest evidence base to support the many adults who present to services with a history of ACEs. The current review examines the evidence base for psychosocial interventions for adults with a history of ACEs. The review focuses on interventions that may be provided in primary care, as that is the setting where most patients will first present and are most likely to receive treatment. A systematic review of the literature was completed using PsycInfo and PubMed databases, with 99 studies identified that met inclusion and exclusion criteria. These studies evaluated a range of interventions with varying levels of supportive evidence. Overall, cognitive-behavioral therapies (CBT) have the most evidence for improving health problems - in particular, improving mental health and reducing health-risk behaviors - in adults with a history of ACEs. Expressive writing and mindfulness-based therapies also show promise, whereas other treatments have less supportive evidence. Limitations of the current literature base are discussed and research directions for the field are provided.

  14. Frequency-change in DPOAE evoked by 1 s/octave sweeping primaries in newborns and adults.

    PubMed

    AlMakadma, Hammam A; Henin, Simon; Prieve, Beth A; Dyab, Walid M; Long, Glenis R

    2015-10-01

    Distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) in newborns and adults were evoked by sweeping primaries up and down in frequency at 1 s/octave. Sweeping up and down in frequency resulted in changes in the amplitude vs. frequency functions of the composite DPOAE and its two major components. In addition, DPOAE component phases differed slightly between the up- and down-swept conditions. The changes in amplitude vs. frequency functions were quantified using a covariate correlation technique, yielding single-valued estimates of the magnitude of the frequency changes. Separate analyses were performed for the entire DPOAE frequency range and split into low and high frequency ranges. There were consistent changes in newborn and adult composite DPOAEs and reflection components, but not generator components. Adults had significant frequency changes in the composite DPOAE for all frequency ranges and in the reflection component for the entire frequency range. Newborns had significant frequency change in the reflection component for all frequency ranges. Differences in frequency change between adults and newborns may stem from developmental changes in cochlear processing. Alignment of the component phase differences between the up- and down-swept conditions resulted in elimination of frequency-change in reconstructed composite DPOAEs.

  15. The effect of pharmacist-led interventions in optimising prescribing in older adults in primary care: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Riordan, David O; Walsh, Kieran A; Galvin, Rose; Sinnott, Carol; Kearney, Patricia M; Byrne, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate studies of pharmacist-led interventions on potentially inappropriate prescribing among community-dwelling older adults receiving primary care to identify the components of a successful intervention. Data sources: An electronic search of the literature was conducted using the following databases from inception to December 2015: PubMed, Embase, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, MEDLINE (through Ovid), Trip, Centre for Reviews and Dissemination databases, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, ISI Web of Science, ScienceDirect, ClinicalTrials.gov, metaRegister of Controlled Trials, ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Database (Theses in Great Britain, Ireland and North America). Review methods: Studies were included if they were randomised controlled trials or quasi-randomised studies involving a pharmacist-led intervention compared to usual/routine care which aimed to reduce potentially inappropriate prescribing in older adults in primary care. Methodological quality of the included studies was independently assessed. Results: A comprehensive literature search was conducted which identified 2193 studies following removal of duplicates. Five studies met the inclusion criteria. Four studies involved a pharmacist conducting a medication review and providing feedback to patients or their family physician. One randomised controlled trial evaluated the effect of a computerised tool that alerted pharmacists when elderly patients were newly prescribed potentially inappropriate medications. Four studies were associated with an improvement in prescribing appropriateness. Conclusion: Overall, this review demonstrates that pharmacist-led interventions may improve prescribing appropriateness in community-dwelling older adults. However, the quality of evidence is low. The role of a pharmacist working as part of a multidisciplinary primary care team requires further investigation to optimise prescribing in this group of patients. PMID

  16. The Role of National Adult Education Centre in Curriculum Development in Somalia in Selected Government Primary Adult Schools of Mogadisho. African Studies in Curriculum Development and Evaluation, No. 109.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahar, Ismail F. S.

    A study of curriculum development in Somalia focused on the role of the National Adult Education Centre (NAEC) and involvement of teachers and inspectors. The sample consisted of 80 Mogadisho primary adult school teachers. Information sources were related literature, teacher questionnaires, and unstructured interviews with school inspectors,…

  17. Microscopy, culture, and sensitive management of uncomplicated urinary tract infections in adults in the primary care setting.

    PubMed

    Sivathasan, Niroshan; Rakowski, Krzysztof R

    2011-06-01

    The high prevalence of urinary tract infections (UTIs) places a significant burden on healthcare systems. Clinicians may over-manage the issue, and there is great variability in practice, with economic- and resource- implications. Up to 40% of patients with a suspected UTI do not have an infection. Using PubMed (Medline) to shortlist relevant papers in English from the last 30 years, and further sub-selection to include only uncomplicated UTIs in adults in primary care, we reviewed the literature pertaining to uncomplicated UTIs, and how it should be managed efficiently in the primary care setting. In general practice, there is no advantage to routinely request microscopy and culture of urine samples in the presence of an appropriate history and urinalysis reagent-strip testing. If antibiotics are required, then a 3-day course shall suffice. Larger epidemiological studies focusing on more susceptible sub-populations may provide better guidance for discriminatory factors to produce an algorithm for treatment.

  18. Preparation and Culture of Myogenic Precursor Cells/Primary Myoblasts from Skeletal Muscle of Adult and Aged Humans.

    PubMed

    Soriano-Arroquia, Ana; Clegg, Peter D; Molloy, Andrew P; Goljanek-Whysall, Katarzyna

    2017-02-16

    Skeletal muscle homeostasis depends on muscle growth (hypertrophy), atrophy and regeneration. During ageing and in several diseases, muscle wasting occurs. Loss of muscle mass and function is associated with muscle fiber type atrophy, fiber type switching, defective muscle regeneration associated with dysfunction of satellite cells, muscle stem cells, and other pathophysiological processes. These changes are associated with changes in intracellular as well as local and systemic niches. In addition to most commonly used rodent models of muscle ageing, there is a need to study muscle homeostasis and wasting using human models, which due to ethical implications, consist predominantly of in vitro cultures. Despite the wide use of human Myogenic Progenitor Cells (MPCs) and primary myoblasts in myogenesis, there is limited data on using human primary myoblast and myotube cultures to study molecular mechanisms regulating different aspects of age-associated muscle wasting, aiding in the validation of mechanisms of ageing proposed in rodent muscle. The use of human MPCs, primary myoblasts and myotubes isolated from adult and aged people, provides a physiologically relevant model of molecular mechanisms of processes associated with muscle growth, atrophy and regeneration. Here we describe in detail a robust, inexpensive, reproducible and efficient protocol for the isolation and maintenance of human MPCs and their progeny - myoblasts and myotubes from human muscle samples using enzymatic digestion. Furthermore, we have determined the passage number at which primary myoblasts from adult and aged people undergo senescence in an in vitro culture. Finally, we show the ability to transfect these myoblasts and the ability to characterize their proliferative and differentiation capacity and propose their suitability for performing functional studies of molecular mechanisms of myogenesis and muscle wasting in vitro.

  19. Humoral Immunity to Primary Smallpox Vaccination: Impact of Childhood versus Adult Immunization on Vaccinia Vector Vaccine Development in Military Populations.

    PubMed

    Slike, Bonnie M; Creegan, Matthew; Marovich, Mary; Ngauy, Viseth

    2017-01-01

    Modified Vaccinia virus has been shown to be a safe and immunogenic vector platform for delivery of HIV vaccines. Use of this vector is of particular importance to the military, with the implementation of a large scale smallpox vaccination campaign in 2002 in active duty and key civilian personnel in response to potential bioterrorist activities. Humoral immunity to smallpox vaccination was previously shown to be long lasting (up to 75 years) and protective. However, using vaccinia-vectored vaccine delivery for other diseases on a background of anti-vector antibodies (i.e. pre-existing immunity) may limit their use as a vaccine platform, especially in the military. In this pilot study, we examined the durability of vaccinia antibody responses in adult primary vaccinees in a healthy military population using a standard ELISA assay and a novel dendritic cell neutralization assay. We found binding and neutralizing antibody (NAb) responses to vaccinia waned after 5-10 years in a group of 475 active duty military, born after 1972, who were vaccinated as adults with Dryvax®. These responses decreased from a geometric mean titer (GMT) of 250 to baseline (<20) after 10-20 years post vaccination. This contrasted with a comparator group of adults, ages 35-49, who were vaccinated with Dryvax® as children. In the childhood vaccinees, titers persisted for >30 years with a GMT of 210 (range 112-3234). This data suggests limited durability of antibody responses in adult vaccinees compared to those vaccinated in childhood and further that adult vaccinia recipients may benefit similarly from receipt of a vaccinia based vaccine as those who are vaccinia naïve. Our findings may have implications for the smallpox vaccination schedule and support the ongoing development of this promising viral vector in a military vaccination program.

  20. Humoral Immunity to Primary Smallpox Vaccination: Impact of Childhood versus Adult Immunization on Vaccinia Vector Vaccine Development in Military Populations

    PubMed Central

    Slike, Bonnie M.; Creegan, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    Modified Vaccinia virus has been shown to be a safe and immunogenic vector platform for delivery of HIV vaccines. Use of this vector is of particular importance to the military, with the implementation of a large scale smallpox vaccination campaign in 2002 in active duty and key civilian personnel in response to potential bioterrorist activities. Humoral immunity to smallpox vaccination was previously shown to be long lasting (up to 75 years) and protective. However, using vaccinia-vectored vaccine delivery for other diseases on a background of anti-vector antibodies (i.e. pre-existing immunity) may limit their use as a vaccine platform, especially in the military. In this pilot study, we examined the durability of vaccinia antibody responses in adult primary vaccinees in a healthy military population using a standard ELISA assay and a novel dendritic cell neutralization assay. We found binding and neutralizing antibody (NAb) responses to vaccinia waned after 5–10 years in a group of 475 active duty military, born after 1972, who were vaccinated as adults with Dryvax®. These responses decreased from a geometric mean titer (GMT) of 250 to baseline (<20) after 10–20 years post vaccination. This contrasted with a comparator group of adults, ages 35–49, who were vaccinated with Dryvax® as children. In the childhood vaccinees, titers persisted for >30 years with a GMT of 210 (range 112–3234). This data suggests limited durability of antibody responses in adult vaccinees compared to those vaccinated in childhood and further that adult vaccinia recipients may benefit similarly from receipt of a vaccinia based vaccine as those who are vaccinia naïve. Our findings may have implications for the smallpox vaccination schedule and support the ongoing development of this promising viral vector in a military vaccination program. PMID:28046039

  1. The Impact of Checking the Health of Adults with Intellectual Disabilities on Primary Care Consultation Rates, Health Promotion and Contact with Specialists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felce, David; Baxter, Helen; Lowe, Kathy; Dunstan, Frank; Houston, Helen; Jones, Glyn; Grey, Jill; Felce, Janet; Kerr, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Background: Studies have found that health checking in primary care led to the identification of previously unrecognized morbidity among adults with intellectual disabilities. The aim here was to evaluate whether health checking stimulated increased consultation with the general practitioner or another member of the primary care team, increased…

  2. Adult Primary Spinal Epidural Extraosseous Ewing's Sarcoma: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Cheddhi; Modrek, Aram S.; Bayin, N. Sumru; Snuderl, Matija; Schiff, Peter B.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in the spinal epidural space is a rare malignancy, especially in adults. Case Presentation. A 40-year-old male presented with back pain and urinary hesitancy. MRI revealed a thoracic extradural mass with no osseous involvement. He underwent surgery for gross total resection of the mass, which was diagnosed as Ewing's sarcoma. He was subsequently treated with chemoradiotherapy. He remains disease-free 1 year after surgery. Review of the literature indicated only 45 previously reported cases of spinal epidural extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in adults. Conclusions. Extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in the spinal epidural space is a rare clinical entity that should be included in the differential for spinal epidural masses. Its treatment is multidisciplinary but frequently requires surgical intervention due to compressive neurologic symptoms. Gross total resection appears to correlate with improved outcomes. PMID:27610254

  3. Comparison of primary repair and patch plasty procedure on the P wave in adult atrial septal defect closure

    PubMed Central

    Ucak, Alper; Temizkan, Veysel; Ugur, Murat; Selcuk, Arif; Yilmaz, Ahmet Turan; Yedekci, Ahmet Erturk; Uz, Omer

    2016-01-01

    Summary Introduction: In this study we compared the effects of two different surgical procedures for closure of adult atrial septal defect (ASD) on postoperative P-wave changes. Methods: Patients who underwent cardiac surgery for secundum type ASD closure were evaluated retrospectively. Seventy-two patients with primary repair of ASD and 29 patients with pericardial patch plasty repair were compared according to Pmax, Pmin and P-wave dispersions (Pd). Results: In each group, the increases in postoperative maximum P-wave duration (Pmax) and minimum P-wave duration (Pmin) were statistically significant. There was no statistically significant difference between post- and pre-operative Pd values. In the comparison between group 1 and group 2 in terms of postoperative P-wave changes (Pmax, Pmin, Pd) there was no statistically significant difference. Conclusion: Comparing patch plasty and primary repair for the surgical closure of ASD in the early to mid-postoperative period, no difference was found and both surgical procedures can be performed in adult ASDs. PMID:27149297

  4. Comparative effects of contraction and angiotensin II on growth of adult feline cardiocytes in primary culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wada, H.; Zile, M. R.; Ivester, C. T.; Cooper, G. 4th; McDermott, P. J.

    1996-01-01

    The purposes of this study were 1) to determine whether angiotensin II causes growth of adult feline cardiocytes in long-term culture, 2) to compare the growth effects of angiotensin II with those resulting from electrically stimulated contraction, and 3) to determine whether the anabolic effects of contraction are exerted via the angiotensin type 1 receptor. Adult feline cardiocytes were cultured on laminin-coated trays in a serum-free medium. Cardiocytes were either electrically stimulated to contract (1 Hz, 5-ms pulse duration, alternating polarity) or were nonstimulated and quiescent. Quiescent cells were studied as controls and after treatment with angiotensin II (10(-8) M), losartan (10(-6) M; an angiotensin type 1-receptor antagonist), or angiotensin II plus losartan. Contracting cells were studied in the presence and absence of angiotensin II or losartan. In quiescent cardiocytes, angiotensin II treatment on day 7 significantly increased protein synthesis rates by 22% and protein content per cell by 17%. The effects of angiotensin II were completely blocked by losartan. Electrically stimulated contraction on days 4 and 7 in culture significantly increased protein synthesis rate by 18 and 38% and protein content per cell by 19 and 46%, respectively. Angiotensin II treatment did not further increase protein synthesis rate or protein content in contracting cardiocytes. Furthermore, losartan did not block the anabolic effects of contraction on protein synthesis rates or protein content. In conclusion, angiotensin II can exert a modest anabolic effect on adult feline cardiocytes in culture. In contracting feline cardiocytes, angiotensin II has no effect on growth. Growth caused by electrically stimulated contraction occurs more rapidly and is greater in magnitude than that caused by angiotensin II. Growth of contracting adult feline cardiocytes is not dependent on activation of the angiotensin receptor.

  5. Care of Older Adults: Role of Primary Care Physicians in the Treatment of Cataracts and Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Marra, Kyle V; Wagley, Sushant; Kuperwaser, Mark C; Campo, Rafael; Arroyo, Jorge G

    2016-02-01

    This article aims to facilitate optimal management of cataracts and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) by providing information on indications, risk factors, referral guidelines, and treatments and to describe techniques to maximize quality of life (QOL) for people with irreversible vision loss. A review of PubMed and other online databases was performed for peer-reviewed English-language articles from 1980 through August 2012 on visual impairment in elderly adults. Search terms included vision loss, visual impairment, blind, low vision, QOL combined with age-related, elderly, and aging. Articles were selected that discussed vision loss in elderly adults, effects of vision impairment on QOL, and care strategies to manage vision loss in older adults. The ability of primary care physicians (PCPs) to identify early signs of cataracts and AMD in individuals at risk of vision loss is critical to early diagnosis and management of these common age-related eye diseases. PCPs can help preserve vision by issuing aptly timed referrals and encouraging behavioral modifications that reduce risk factors. With knowledge of referral guidelines for soliciting low-vision rehabilitation services, visual aids, and community support resources, PCPs can considerably increase the QOL of individuals with uncorrectable vision loss. By offering appropriately timed referrals, promoting behavioral modifications, and allocating low-vision care resources, PCPs may play a critical role in preserving visual health and enhancing the QOL for the elderly population.

  6. A Systematic Review of Depression Treatments in Primary Care for Latino Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cabassa, Leopoldo J.; Hansen, Marissa C.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: A systematic literature review of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) assessing depression treatments in primary care for Latinos is conducted. The authors rate the methodological quality of studies, examine cultural and linguistic adaptations, summarize clinical outcomes and cost-effectiveness findings, and draw conclusions for improving…

  7. Real-life management of primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) in adult patients and adherence to practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Lozano, María Luisa; Revilla, N; Gonzalez-Lopez, T J; Novelli, S; González-Porras, J R; Sánchez-Gonzalez, B; Bermejo, N; Pérez, S; Lucas, F J; Álvarez, M T; Arilla, M J; Perera, M; do Nascimento, J; Campos, R M; Casado, L F; Vicente, V

    2016-06-01

    Very few data exist on the management of adult patients diagnosed with primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). The objectives of this study were to describe the diagnostic and treatment patterns for ITP and to compare the findings to recent ITP guidelines. We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of adult ITP patients diagnosed with primary ITP between January 2011 and June 2012 and examined whether management strategies were consistent or not with eight recent guideline-recommended practices. Overall, median age at the diagnosis of the disease (n = 101) was 58 years and median platelet count 12 × 10(9)/L with 75.2 % of patients having symptoms of ITP. The study perceived two major shortcomings in the diagnostic approach: (1) failure to perform peripheral blood film examination in 22.8 % of patients, a test that is mandatory by all guidelines, and (2) ordinary bone marrow assessment in more than half of the patients at diagnosis (50.5 %), a test not routinely recommended by guidelines. Low appropriateness in therapeutic management of patients included (1) unjustified use of intravenous immunoglobulin in the absence of bleeding in 54.8 % of patients and (2) splenectomy not being deferred until 6-12 months from diagnosis (median 161 days). Data also reflect a trend towards the early use of thrombopoietin receptor agonists in the treatment of patients who are refractory to any first-line therapy. We have recognized important areas of inapropriateness in the diagnostic and therapeutic management of adult ITP patients. Compliance with established guidelines should be encouraged in order to improve patient outcomes.

  8. Effect of culture conditions on microRNA expression in primary adult control and COPD lung fibroblasts in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ikari, Jun; Smith, Lynette M; Nelson, Amy J; Iwasawa, Shunichiro; Gunji, Yoko; Farid, Maha; Wang, Xingqi; Basma, Hesham; Feghali-Bostwick, Carol; Liu, Xiangde; DeMeo, Dawn L; Rennard, Stephen I

    2015-04-01

    In vitro cell cultures, including lung fibroblasts, have been used to identify microRNAs (miRNAs) associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) pathogenesis. However, culture conditions may affect miRNA expression. We examined whether miRNA expression in primary adult lung fibroblasts varies with cell density or passage in vitro and whether culture conditions confound the identification of altered miRNA expression in COPD lung fibroblasts. Primary adult control and COPD lung fibroblasts were cultured until passage 3 or 8, after which cells were further cultured for 3 or 7 d (low vs. high density). Then, cells at low density were cultured with serum-free media, and those at high density were cultured with serum-free media in the absence or presence of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) for 24 h. RNA was extracted to perform miRNA microarray from which 1.25-fold differential expression and 10% false discovery rate were applied to identify "invariant" and "variant" miRNA for the various culture conditions. Of the 2226 miRNAs evaluated, 39.0% for cell density, 40.7% for cell passage, and 29.4% for both conditions were identified as "invariant" miRNAs. Furthermore, 38.1% of the evaluated miRNAs were "invariant" for cell passage with IL-1β and TNF-α. Differentially expressed miRNAs between control and COPD lung fibroblasts were identified with and without IL-1β and TNF-α, and of these, 32 out of the 34 top-ranked miRNAs exceeded the differences due to culture conditions. Thus, culture conditions may affect miRNA expression of adult human lung fibroblasts. Nevertheless, in vitro cultures can be used to assess differential miRNA expression in COPD lung fibroblasts.

  9. Corticosteroid Risk Function of Severe Infection in Primary Immune Thrombocytopenia Adults. A Nationwide Nested Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Moulis, Guillaume; Palmaro, Aurore; Sailler, Laurent; Lapeyre-Mestre, Maryse

    2015-01-01

    Corticosteroid (CS)-related infection risk in immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the adjusted CS risk function of severe infection in persistent or chronic primary ITP adults. We designed a nested case-control study in the FAITH cohort. This cohort is built through the French national health insurance database named SNIIRAM and includes all treated incident persistent or chronic primary ITP adults in France (ENCePP n°4574). Patients who entered the FAITH cohort between 2009 and 2012 were eligible (n = 1805). Cases were patients with infection as primary diagnosis code during hospitalization. Index date was the date of first hospitalization for infection. A 2:1 matching was performed on age and entry date in the cohort. Various CS exposure time-windows were defined: current user, exposure during the 1/3/6 months preceding index date and from the entry date. CS doses were converted in prednisone equivalent (PEQ). The cumulative CS doses were averaged in each time-window to obtain daily PEQ dosages. Each CS exposure definition was assessed using multivariate conditional regression models. During the study period, 161 cases (9 opportunistic) occurred. The model with the best goodness of fit was CS exposure during the month before the index date (OR: 2.48, 95% CI: 1.61-3.83). The dose-effect relation showed that the risk existed from averaged daily doses ≥5 mg PEQ (vs. <5 mg: 2.09, 95% CI: 1.17-3.71). The risk of infection was mainly supported by current or recent exposure to CS, even with low doses.

  10. 'SIMPLES': a structured primary care approach to adults with difficult asthma.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Dermot; Murphy, Anna; Ställberg, Björn; Baxter, Noel; Heaney, Liam G

    2013-09-01

    The substantial majority of patients with asthma can expect minimal breakthrough symptoms on standard doses of inhaled corticosteroids with or without additional add-on therapies. SIMPLES is a structured primary care approach to the review of a person with uncontrolled asthma which encompasses patient education monitoring, lifestyle and pharmacological management and addressing support needs which will achieve control in most patients. The small group of patients presenting with persistent asthma symptoms despite being prescribed high levels of treatment are often referred to as having 'difficult asthma'. Some will have difficult, 'therapy resistant' asthma, some will have psychosocial problems which make it difficult for them to achieve asthma control and some may prove to have an alternative diagnosis driving their symptoms. A few patients will benefit from referral to a 'difficult asthma' clinic. The SIMPLES approach, aligned with close co-operation between primary and specialist care, can identify this patient group, avoid inappropriate escalation of treatment, and streamline clinical assessment and management.

  11. Predictors of treatment satisfaction among older adults with anxiety in a primary care psychology program.

    PubMed

    Hundt, Natalie E; Armento, Maria E A; Porter, Bennett; Cully, Jeffrey A; Kunik, Mark E; Stanley, Melinda

    2013-04-01

    Increasing numbers of patients are treated in integrated primary care mental health programs. The current study examined predictors of satisfaction with treatment in patients from a randomized clinical trial of late-life generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) in primary care. Higher treatment satisfaction was associated with receiving CBT rather than enhanced usual care. Treatment credibility, treatment expectancies, social support, and improvements in depression and anxiety symptoms predicted higher treatment satisfaction in the total sample. In the CBT group, only credibility and adherence with treatment predicted satisfaction. This suggests that older patients receiving CBT who believe more strongly in the treatment rationale and follow the therapist's recommendations more closely are likely to report satisfaction at the end of treatment. In addition, this study found that adherence mediated the relationship between treatment credibility and treatment satisfaction. In other words, patients' perceptions that the treatment made sense for them led to greater treatment adherence which then increased their satisfaction with treatment.

  12. Office-Based Case Finding for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in Older Adults in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Background. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is underdiagnosed in primary care. Aim. To explore the utility of proactive identification of COPD in patients 75 years of age and older in a Canadian primary care setting. Methods. Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS) screening questions were administered to patients with a smoking history of 20 pack-years or more; those with a positive screen were referred for postbronchodilator spirometry. Results. A total of 107 patients (21%), of 499 screened, had a 20-pack-year smoking history; 105 patients completed the CTS screening. Forty-four (42%) patients were positive on one or more questions on the screening; significantly more patients with a previous diagnosis of COPD (64%) were positive on the CTS compared to those without a previous diagnosis of COPD (30%). Of those who were not previously diagnosed with COPD (N = 11), four (36%) were newly diagnosed with COPD. Conclusion. A systematic two-stage method of screening for COPD, using CTS screening questions followed by spirometric confirmation, is feasible in the context of a busy primary care setting. More research is needed to assess the value of restricting screening to patients with a smoking history of 20 pack-years and on the sensitivity and specificity of these measures. PMID:27445513

  13. Primary Care Opportunities to Prevent Unintentional Home Injuries: A Focus on Children and Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Eileen M.; Mack, Karin; Shields, Wendy C.; Lee, Robin P.; Gielen, Andrea C.

    2016-01-01

    Unintentional injuries are a persistent public health problem in the United States. A new health care landscape has the potential to create a clinical environment that fosters greater involvement by health care providers in injury prevention. The aim of this article is to provide evidence supporting the need for engagement by primary care providers in unintentional home injury prevention along with examples of how this could be accomplished. We know a great deal about what population groups are at risk for certain types of injuries. We also know that many injuries can be prevented through policies, programs, and resources that ensure safe environments and promote safe behaviors. For example, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s STEADI (Stopping Elderly Accidents, Deaths, and Injuries) initiative comprises clinical decision support tools and educational materials for health care providers. Two effective interventions that have demonstrated a reduction in falls among children are the redesign of baby walkers (engineering) and the mandated use of window guards (enforcement). Primary care clinicians can play a key role in promoting their patient’s safety. Taken collectively, a focused attention on preventing unintentional home injuries by primary care providers can contribute to the reduction of injuries and result in optimal health for all. PMID:27141210

  14. Violence victimization after HIV infection in a US probability sample of adult patients in primary care.

    PubMed Central

    Zierler, S; Cunningham, W E; Andersen, R; Shapiro, M F; Nakazono, T; Morton, S; Crystal, S; Stein, M; Turner, B; St Clair, P; Bozzette, S A

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study estimated the proportion of HIV-infected adults who have been assaulted by a partner or someone important to them since their HIV diagnosis and the extent to which they reported HIV-seropositive status as a cause of the violence. METHODS: Study participants were from a nationally representative probability sample of 2864 HIV-infected adults who were receiving medical care and were enrolled in the HIV Costs and Service Utilization Study. All interviews (91% in person, 9% by telephone) were conducted with computer-assisted personal interviewing instruments. Interviews began in January 1996 and ended 15 months later. RESULTS: Overall, 20.5% of the women, 11.5% of the men who reported having sex with men, and 7.5% of the heterosexual men reported physical harm since diagnosis, of whom nearly half reported HIV-seropositive status as a cause of violent episodes. CONCLUSIONS: HIV-related care is an appropriate setting for routine assessment of violence. Programs to cross-train staff in antiviolence agencies and HIV care facilities need to be developed for men and women with HIV infection. PMID:10667181

  15. Adult-onset nemaline myopathy in a dog presenting with persistent atrial standstill and primary hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, R K; Russell, N J; Shelton, G D

    2012-06-01

    A nine-year-old neutered female mixed breed dog presented for evaluation following a five-day history of lethargy, inappetence, weakness, abdominal distension and generalised muscle atrophy. Persistent vatrial standstill with a junctional rhythm was identified on electrocardiogram. Echocardiogram identified moderate dilation of all cardiac chambers and mild thickening of the mitral and tricuspid valves. Serology was negative for Neospora caninum and Toxoplasma gondii. Permanent pacemaker implantation was performed in addition to endomyocardial and skeletal muscle biopsies. Cryosections from the biceps femoris muscle showed numerous nemaline rod bodies while endomyocardial biopsies were possibly consistent with end-stage myocarditis. Rod bodies have rarely been reported in the veterinary literature. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of adult-onset nemaline rod myopathy and hypothyroidism with concurrent cardiac disease in a dog.

  16. Lipid-mediated transfection of normal adult human hepatocytes in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Ourlin, J C; Vilarem, M J; Daujat, M; Harricane, M C; Domergue, J; Joyeux, H; Baulieux, J; Maurel, P

    1997-04-05

    The aim of this work was to develop a procedure for the lipid-mediated transfection of DNA into normal adult human hepatocytes in culture. Cells were plated in a serum-free culture medium at various cell densities, on plastic or collagen-coated dishes, both in the absence and in the presence of epidermal growth factor (EGF). The cells were incubated for various periods of time with mixtures of DNA-lipofectin or DNA-3 beta[N-(N',N'-dimethylaminoethane)-carbamoyl] cholesterol (DC-chol) liposomes, and the efficiency of transfection was assessed by measuring the activity of reporter genes, beta-galactosidase or chloramphenicol acetyl-transferase (CAT). For comparison, similar experiments were carried out with human cell lines including HepG2, Caco-2, and WRL68. The efficiency of transfection (in percentage of cells) was not significantly different after transfection with lipofectin or DC-chol and comprised between 0.04 and 1.7% (extreme values) for different cultures. The efficiency of transfection decreased as the age or density of the culture increased and increased in cultures treated with EGF. Direct measurement of the rate of DNA synthesis suggested that the efficiency of transfection was related to the number of cells entering the S phase. Under the same conditions, the efficiency of transfection was one to two orders of magnitude greater in the three cell lines. A plasmid harboring 660 bp of the 5'-flanking region of CYP1A1 (containing two xenobiotic enhancer elements) fused upstream of the promoter of thymidine kinase and the CAT reporter gene was constructed. When this plasmid was transfected in human hepatocytes, CAT activity was induced as expected. We conclude that normal adult human hepatocytes can be transfected with exogenous DNA and that the transfected construct is regulated in the manner expected from in vivo studies.

  17. Primary and rescue immune tolerance induction in children and adults: a multicentre international study with a VWF-containing plasma-derived FVIII concentrate.

    PubMed

    Oldenburg, J; Jiménez-Yuste, V; Peiró-Jordán, R; Aledort, L M; Santagostino, E

    2014-01-01

    Most studies on immune tolerance induction (ITI) therapy in haemophilia A patients are focused on primary ITI in children. Here we report on the ITI outcome in a large retrospective cohort, including adults and patients with rescue ITI, treated with a pdFVIII/VWF concentrate. Retrospective data from haemophilic patients (FVIII< 2%) with inhibitors from 22 centres in Spain, Italy and Germany, who underwent primary or rescue ITI with pdFVIII/VWF concentrate, were collected. Complete success (CS), partial success (PS) and failure were defined based on the criteria of the consensus recommendations of the 2006 International ITI Workshop. A total of 41 cases of primary ITI (32 children and 9 adults) and 19 cases of rescue ITI (17 children and 2 adults) were evaluated. Success (CS+PS) rate of 87% was achieved in primary ITI and 74% in the higher risk profile of rescue ITI. Eight of nine (85%) patients with poorest prognosis (three or more of the known risk factors of poor response to ITI) achieved success (CS+PS). CS of 100% was observed in eight primary ITI patients with titre at start of ITI ≤2.5 BU and inhibitor peak ≤25 BU. The favourable response rates in primary and rescue ITI in children and in adult patients, even in the presence of poor prognostic factors, should be encouraged for broadening the indication of immune tolerance therapy in haemophilia A patients with inhibitors.

  18. Global cardiovascular risk assessment in the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease in adults: systematic review of systematic reviews

    PubMed Central

    Tompson, Alice C; Onakpoya, Igho J; Roberts, Nia; Ward, Alison M; Heneghan, Carl J

    2017-01-01

    Objective To identify, critically appraise and summarise existing systematic reviews on the impact of global cardiovascular risk assessment in the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in adults. Design Systematic review of systematic reviews published between January 2005 and October 2016 in The Cochrane Library, EMBASE, MEDLINE or CINAHL databases, and post hoc analysis of primary trials. Participants, interventions, outcomes Systematic reviews of interventions involving global cardiovascular risk assessment relative to no formal risk assessment in adults with no history of CVD. The primary outcomes of interest were CVD-related morbidity and mortality and all-cause mortality; secondary outcomes were systolic blood pressure (SBP), cholesterol and smoking. Results We identified six systematic reviews of variable but generally of low quality (mean Assessing the Methodological Quality of Systematic Reviews 4.2/11, range 0/11 to 7/11). No studies identified by the systematic reviews reported CVD-related morbidity or mortality or all-cause mortality. Meta-analysis of reported randomised controlled trials (RCTs) showed small reductions in SBP (mean difference (MD) −2.22 mm Hg (95% CI −3.49 to −0.95); I2=66%; n=9; GRADE: very low), total cholesterol (MD −0.11 mmol/L (95% CI −0.20 to −0.02); I2=72%; n=5; GRADE: very low), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (MD −0.15 mmol/L (95% CI −0.26 to −0.05), I2=47%; n=4; GRADE: very low) and smoking cessation (RR 1.62 (95% CI 1.08 to 2.43); I2=17%; n=7; GRADE: low). The median follow-up time of reported RCTs was 12 months (range 2–36 months). Conclusions The quality of existing systematic reviews was generally poor and there is currently no evidence reported in these reviews that the prospective use of global cardiovascular risk assessment translates to reductions in CVD morbidity or mortality. There are reductions in SBP, cholesterol and smoking but they may not be clinically

  19. Adoption of Evidence-Based Fall Prevention Practices in Primary Care for Older Adults with a History of Falls

    PubMed Central

    Phelan, Elizabeth A.; Aerts, Sally; Dowler, David; Eckstrom, Elizabeth; Casey, Colleen M.

    2016-01-01

    A multifactorial approach to assess and manage modifiable risk factors is recommended for older adults with a history of falls. Limited research suggests that this approach does not routinely occur in clinical practice, but most related studies are based on provider self-report, with the last chart audit of United States practice published over a decade ago. We conducted a retrospective chart review to assess the extent to which patients aged 65+ years with a history of repeated falls or fall-related health-care use received multifactorial risk assessment and interventions. The setting was an academic primary care clinic in the Pacific Northwest. Among the 116 patients meeting our inclusion criteria, 48% had some type of documented assessment. Their mean age was 79 ± 8 years; 68% were female, and 10% were non-white. They averaged six primary care visits over a 12-month period subsequent to their index fall. Frequency of assessment of fall-risk factors varied from 24% (for home safety) to 78% (for vitamin D). An evidence-based intervention was recommended for identified risk factors 73% of the time, on average. Two risk factors were addressed infrequently: medications (21%) and home safety (24%). Use of a structured visit note template independently predicted assessment of fall-risk factors (p = 0.003). Geriatrics specialists were more likely to use a structured note template (p = 0.04) and perform more fall-risk factor assessments (4.6 vs. 3.6, p = 0.007) than general internists. These results suggest opportunities for improving multifactorial fall-risk assessment and management of older adults at high fall risk in primary care. A structured visit note template facilitates assessment. Given that high-risk medications have been found to be independent risk factors for falls, increasing attention to medications should become a key focus of both public health educational efforts and fall prevention in primary care practice. PMID:27660753

  20. General Practitioners’ Decision Making about Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease in Older Adults: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Jesse; Bonner, Carissa; Irwig, Les; Doust, Jenny; Glasziou, Paul; Bell, Katy; Naganathan, Vasi; McCaffery, Kirsten

    2017-01-01

    Background Primary cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention in older people is challenging as they are a diverse group with varying needs, frequent presence of comorbidities, and are more susceptible to treatment harms. Moreover the potential benefits and harms of preventive medication for older people are uncertain. We explored GPs’ decision making about primary CVD prevention in patients aged 75 years and older. Method 25 GPs participated in semi-structured interviews in New South Wales, Australia. Transcribed audio-recordings were thematically coded and Framework Analysis was used. Results Analysis identified factors that are likely to contribute to variation in the management of CVD risk in older people. Some GPs based CVD prevention on guidelines regardless of patient age. Others tailored management based on factors such as perceptions of prevention in older age, knowledge of limited evidence, comorbidities, polypharmacy, frailty, and life expectancy. GPs were more confident about: 1) medication and lifestyle change for fit/healthy older patients, and 2) stopping or avoiding medication for frail/nursing home patients. Decision making for older patients outside of these categories was less clear. Conclusion Older patients receive different care depending on their GP’s perceptions of ageing and CVD prevention, and their knowledge of available evidence. GPs consider CVD prevention for older patients challenging and would welcome more guidance in this area. PMID:28085944

  1. Cognitive behavioral treatment for older adults with generalized anxiety disorder. A therapist manual for primary care settings.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Melinda A; Diefenbach, Gretchen J; Hopko, Derek R

    2004-01-01

    At least four academic clinical trials have demonstrated the utility of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for older adults with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). These data may not generalize, however, to more heterogeneous and functionally impaired patients and the medical settings in which they typically receive care. A recent pilot project suggested the potential benefits of a new version of CBT for GAD among older patients in primary care. The manual developed and tested in this pilot project is presented here. Treatment components include motivation and education, relaxation skills, cognitive therapy, problem-solving-skills training, exposure exercises, and sleep-management-skills training. Procedures are designed to be administered flexibly to maximize attention to individual patient needs. Examples of session summaries, patient handouts, and homework forms are provided.

  2. Primary sleep disorders and paroxysmal nocturnal nonepileptic events in adults with epilepsy from the perspective of sleep specialists.

    PubMed

    Grigg-Damberger, Madeleine; Ralls, Frank

    2011-04-01

    Sleep specialists are frequently referred adults with epilepsy to evaluate their sleep/wake complaints, sometimes to determine whether their paroxysmal nocturnal behaviors are epileptic or not. Many patients with epilepsy have at least one parasomnia (some more than one), and the sleep specialists are often asked to differentiate and treat these. Sleep specialists review which primary sleep disorders are more common in adults with epilepsy and how to evaluate and best treat these. The authors summarize (1) how to evaluate and differentiate parasomnias using video-polysomnography; (2) the value of sleep deprivation and loud auditory stimuli to increase the likelihood of provoking a non-rapid eye movement arousal parasomnia with a single night of video-polysomnography; and (3) how to score excessive muscle activity during rapid eye movement sleep to confirm a diagnosis of rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder. The clinical semiology and video-polysomnography features of simple and complex sleep-related movement disorders and parasomnias are reviewed.

  3. HEALTH LITERACY, MEDICATION ADHERENCE, AND BLOOD PRESSURE LEVEL AMONG HYPERTENSIVE OLDER ADULTS TREATED AT PRIMARY HEALTH CARE CENTERS.

    PubMed

    Wannasirikul, Phitchayaphat; Termsirikulchai, Lakkhana; Sujirarat, Dusit; Benjakul, Sarunya; Tanasugarn, Chanuantong

    2016-01-01

    We conducted this study to explore the causal relationships between health literacy, individual characteristics, literacy, culture and society, cognitive ability, medication adherence, and the blood pressure levels of hypertensive older adults receiving health care services at Primary Health Care Centers in Sa Kaeo Province, Thailand. Six hundred hypertensive older adults had their blood pressure level recorded and were interviewed using questionnaires. Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) was used to determine the effect size, both direct and indirect, among factors. Almost half (48.7%) of studied subjects had inadequate health literacy, 98.3% had good medication adherence, and 80% had good blood pressure levels. The highest effect size on health literacy was literacy, followed by cognitive ability, and culture and society. Medication adherence was affected directly and indirectly by cognitive ability, literacy, and culture and society. Health literacy had not only a direct effect on medication adherence but was also the mediator. Finally, the highest effect size on blood pressure level was critical and communicative health literacy. These findings suggest that health literacy should be considered in the Health Literacy Program of the National Public Health Policy and Plan, Ministry of Public Health.

  4. Adult primary pulmonary primitive neuroectodermal tumor: molecular features and translational opportunities.

    PubMed

    Andrei, Mirela; Cramer, Stewart F; Kramer, Zachary B; Zeidan, Amer; Faltas, Bishoy

    2013-02-01

    Primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNET) arising directly from the lung are very rare but particularly aggressive neoplasms. We report a case of a 31-y-old man with primary pulmonary neuroectodermal tumor. We review the clinical as well as pathological features. As typical for these tumors, the diagnosis was initially delayed in our patient and prognosis was poor despite aggressive surgical resection, postoperative chemotherapy and local irradiation. Recent biological insights have revealed unique chromosomal translocations crucial to the pathogenesis of these tumors, most notably the EWS-FLI-1 translocation. We provide an overview of the molecular features of the Ewing Sarcoma Family of Tumors (ESFT) including PNET and their potential implications for therapeutic targeting.

  5. Pain measurement as part of primary healthcare of adult patients with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Signorelli, Andreza Aparecida Felix; Ribeiro, Sonia Beatriz Felix; Moraes-Souza, Helio; de Oliveira, Lucas Felix; Ribeiro, João Batista; da Silva, Sheron Hellen; de Oliveira, Daniel Fachinelli Felix; Ribeiro, Matheus Fernando Felix

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aim of this exploratory, cross-sectional study was to evaluate pain in sickle cell disease patients and aspects related to primary healthcare. Methods Data were obtained through home interviews. The assessment instruments (body diagram, Numerical Pain Scale, McGill Pain Questionnaire) collected information on the underlying disease and on pain. Data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences program for Windows. Associations between the subgroups of sickle cell disease patients (hemoglobin SS, hemoglobin SC, sickle β-thalassemia and others) and pain were analyzed using contingency tables and non-parametric tests of association (classic chi-square, Fisher's and Kruskal-Wallis) with a level of 5% (p-value < 0.05) being set for the rejection of the null hypothesis. Results Forty-seven over 18-year-old patients with sickle cell disease were evaluated. Most were black (78.7%) and female (59.6%) and the mean age was 30.1 years. The average number of bouts of pain annually was 7.02; pain was predominantly reported by individuals with sickle cell anemia (hemoglobin SS). The intensity of pain (Numeric Pain Scale) was 5.5 and the quantitative index (McGill) was 35.9. This study also shows that patients presented a high frequency of moderately painful crises in their own homes. Conclusion According to these facts, it is essential that pain related to sickle cell disease is properly identified, quantified, characterized and treated at the three levels of healthcare. In primary healthcare, accurate measurement of pain combined with better care may decrease acute painful episodes and consequently minimize tissue damage, thus improving the patient's overall health. PMID:24106446

  6. Primary-to-secondary care referral experience of suspected colorectal malignancy in young adults

    PubMed Central

    Patel, K; Doulias, T; Hoad, T; Lee, C; Alberts, JC

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Colorectal cancer in patients younger than 50 years of age is increasing steadily in the UK with limited guidelines available indicating need for secondary care referral. The aims of this study were to report the cancer incidence in those aged under 50 years referred to secondary care with suspected colorectal malignancy and also to analyse the quality of those referrals. Methods A total of 197 primary care referrals made between 2008 and 2014 to a UK district general hospital for suspected colorectal malignancy were analysed. All confirmed cancers were further evaluated regarding presenting symptoms, tumour characteristics and clinical outcomes. Each referral was given a referral performance score (out of 9) dependant on relevant information documented. Results The overall malignancy rate was 9.1% (11 male and 7 female patients). The median age in this cohort was 41.5 years (interquartile range [IQR]: 37–49 years). Abdominal pain was the only presenting symptom to differ significantly when comparing malignant with non-malignant patients (44.4% vs 21.8% respectively, p=0.042). The median time period between referral date and colorectal specialist consultation was 11 days (IQR: 7–13 days) and the median referral performance score was 5 (range: 3–9). Conclusions Malignancy is prevalent in patients under 50 years of age who are referred to secondary care for suspected colorectal cancer. Those referred with abdominal pain in the presence of other high risk lower gastrointestinal symptoms are at significant risk of having a malignancy. Major deficiencies are apparent in urgent primary care referrals, highlighting the need for further national guidance to aid early diagnosis of colorectal cancer in the young. PMID:27023637

  7. Medication regimen complexity in adults and the elderly in a primary healthcare setting: determination of high and low complexities

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Juliana M.; Galato, Dayani; Melo, Angelita C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The complexity of a medication regimen is related to the multiple characteristics of the prescribed regimen and can negatively influence the health outcomes of patients. Objective: To propose cut-off points in the complexity of pharmacotherapy to distinguish between patients with low and high complexities seen in a primary health care (PHC) setting to enable prioritization of patient management. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study, which included 517 adult and elderly patients, analyzing different cut-off points to define the strata of low and high pharmacotherapy complexities based on percentiles of the population evaluated. Data collection began with the solicitation of prescriptions, followed by a questionnaire that was administered by an interviewer. The complexity of a medication regimen was estimated from the Medication Regimen Complexity Index (MRCI). High complexity pharmacotherapy scores were analyzed from patient profiles, the use of health services, and pharmacotherapy. The criteria for subject inclusion in the sample population were as follows: inhabitant of the area covered by the municipality, 18 years or older, and being prescribed at least one drug during the collection period. Exclusion criteria at the time of collection were the use of any medication whose prescription was not available. All medications were accessed through the Primary Healthcare Service (PHS). Results: The median total pharmacotherapy complexity score was 8.5. High MRCI scores were correlated with age, medications taken with in the Brazilian PHS, having at least one potential drug-related problem, receiving up to eight years of schooling, number of medications and polypharmacy (five or more medicines), number of medical conditions, number of medical appointments, and number of cardiovascular diseases and endocrine metabolic diseases. We suggest different complexity tracks according to age (e.g., adult or elderly) that consider the pharmacotherapy and population

  8. Sexual violence against adult women primary care attenders in east London.

    PubMed Central

    Coid, Jeremy; Petruckevitch, Ann; Chung, Wai-Shan; Richardson, Jo; Moorey, Stirling; Cotter, Sarah; Feder, Gene S

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sexual violence against women is common. The prevalence appears to be higher in north America than Europe. However, not all surveys have differentiated the experience of forced sex by a current or former partner. Few women are thought to report these experiences to their general practitioner (GP). AIM: To measure the prevalence of rape, sexual assault, and forced sexual intercourse by a partner among women attending general practices, to test the association between these experiences of sexual violence and demographic factors, and to assess the acceptability to women of screening for sexual violence by GPs. DESIGN OF STUDY: Cross-sectional survey. METHOD: A self-administered questionnaire survey of 1207 women aged over 15 years was carried out in 13 general practices in Hackney, east London. RESULTS: Eight per cent (95% confidence interval [CI] = 6.2 to 9.6) of women have experienced rape, 9% (95% CI = 7.0 to 10.6) another type of sexual assault, and 16% (95% CI = 13.6 to 18.1) forced sex by a partner in adulthood: 24% (95% CI = 21.2 to 26.5) have experienced one or more of these types of sexual violence. Experiences of sexual violence demonstrated high levels of lifetime co-occurrence. Women forced to have sex by partners experienced the most severe forms of domestic violence. One in five women would object to routine questioning about being raped and/or sexually assaulted, and one in nine about being forced to have sex by a partner. CONCLUSION: Experiences of sexual violence are common in the lives of adult women in east London, and they represent a significant public health problem. Those women who have one experience appear to be at risk of being victims again. A substantial minority object to routine questions about sexual violence. PMID:14702905

  9. Prevalence of undifferentiated fever in adults of Rawalpindi having primary dengue fever.

    PubMed

    Zafar, Humaira; Hayyat, Abbas; Akhtar, Naeem; Rizwan, Syeda Fatima

    2013-06-01

    The objectives of the study were to highlight early subclinical presentation of dengue viral infection (DVI) as an undifferentiated febrile illness. The descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out at Microbiology Department, Rawalpindi Medical College from March to September 2009. Stratified random sampling was used to select subjects from various urban and rural areas of Rawalpindi, and Serum IgG anti-dengue antibodies were detected by using 3rd generation enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Out of the total 240 subjects, 69 (28.75%) were found to be positive for anti-dengue IgG antibodies. Of the positive cases, 41 (59.4%) - comprising 31 (44.9%) urban residents - and 10 (14.4%) rural residents presented with a previous history of undifferentiated fever (p<0.05). It was concluded that primary DVI can present as subclinical form in healthy population residing in rural and urban areas of Rawalpindi, which is an alarming situation indicating the spread of disease in the study area.

  10. Primary central nervous system ALK-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma in an adult

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xiaoqin; Li, Jun; Huo, Na; Wang, Yan; Wu, Zhao; Lin, Xiaohong; Zhao, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is an aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma. It mostly invades lymph nodes with extranodal involvement observed in the soft tissue, bone, and skin. Patient concerns: We report a 34-year-old Chinese male patient who presented with headache, diplopia, and vomit. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis via lumbar puncture showed elevated CSF pressure, elevated CSF protein concentrations, decreased CSF glucose and chloride concentration significantly, and pleocytosis of 68 to 350 × 106/L, in which lymphocytes and monocytes were predominant. These changes could be suggestive of tuberculous (TB) meningitis. Enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of spinal cord delineated multiple enhancing nodules in spinal cord, cauda equina, and cristae membrane, and multiple abnormal enhancing lesions in bilateral lumbar intervertebral foramen. Diagnoses: Spinal dura mater biopsy and paraffin pathology examination revealed anaplastic lymphoma kinase positive ALCL. Interventions: High-dose methotrexate, cytosine arabinoside craniospinal, and radiotherapy. Outcomes: Last follow-up on September 22, 2015 showed no evidence of tumor recurrence and the lower extremity muscle strength recovered to 4/5. Lessons: ALCL of primary central nervous system is an exceedingly rare tumor, which is usually misdiagnosed as meningitis (especially TB meningitis) according to clinical manifestation and laboratory examination. Thus closely monitoring patient's conditions and timely adjusting therapeutic regimen during treatment are necessary. PMID:27930548

  11. Echocardiographic dimensions and function in adults with primary growth hormone resistance (Laron syndrome).

    PubMed

    Feinberg, M S; Scheinowitz, M; Laron, Z

    2000-01-15

    Patients with primary growth hormone (GH) resistance-Laron Syndrome (LS)-have no GH signal transmission, and thus, no generation of circulating insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), and should serve as a unique model to explore the controversies concerning the longterm effect of GH/IGF-I deficiency on cardiac dimension and function. We assessed 8 patients with LS (4 men, 4 women) with a mean (+/- SD) age of 38+/-7 years (range 22 to 45), and 8 aged-matched controls (4 men, 4 women) with a mean age of 38+/-9 years (range 18 to 47) by echocardiography at rest, following exercise, and during dobutamine administration. Left ventricular (LV) septum, posterior wall, and end-diastolic diameter were significantly reduced in untreated patients with LS compared with the control group (p<0.05 for all). Systolic Doppler-derived parameters, including LV stroke volume, stroke index, cardiac output, and cardiac index, were significantly lower (p<0.05 for all) than in the control subjects, whereas LV diastolic Doppler parameters, including mitral valve waves E, A, E/A ratio, and E deceleration time, were similar in both groups. LV ejection fraction at rest as well as the stress-induced increment of the LV ejection fraction were similar in both groups. Our results show that untreated patients with long-term IGF-I deficiency have reduced cardiac dimensions and output but normal LV ejection fraction at rest and LV contractile reserve following stress.

  12. Acute primary canine herpesvirus-1 dendritic ulcerative keratitis in an adult dog.

    PubMed

    Gervais, Kristen J; Pirie, Christopher G; Ledbetter, Eric C; Pizzirani, Stefano

    2012-03-01

    We present a report of dendritic ulcerative keratitis in a 4-year old locally immunosuppressed dog suspected to result from acute primary canine herpesvirus-1 (CHV-1) infection. The dog was presented for evaluation of mild blepharospasm and conjunctival hyperemia in the right eye (OD) shortly after attending a public boarding facility. For approximately 3 months, the dog had been receiving topical prednisolone acetate 1.0% and tacrolimus 0.02% in both eyes (OU) q12h for treatment of follicular conjunctivitis. Ophthalmic examination revealed three regions of corneal fluorescein retention OD. The lesions had a dendritic pattern, were approximately 2-3 mm in length, and were located at the dorsomedial, lateral, and ventromedial aspects of the cornea. No additional abnormalities were noted on complete ophthalmic and physical examinations. CHV-1 was identified in conjunctival samples OD by polymerase chain reaction, and paired CHV-1 serum virus neutralization antibody titers were positive and consistent with acute infection. Topical prednisolone acetate and tacrolimus were discontinued. The dog was treated with cidofovir 0.5% OU q12h for a period of 4 weeks, with resolution of corneal disease noted within 1 week of treatment. In conjunction with previous studies, this case report supports a central role for alterations in host immune status in the pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of CHV-1 ocular disease in dogs.

  13. Primary Gliosarcoma of the Optic Nerve: A Unique Adult Optic Pathway Glioma.

    PubMed

    Cimino, Patrick J; Sychev, Yevgeniy V; Gonzalez-Cuyar, Luis F; Mudumbai, Raghu C; Keene, C Dirk

    2016-10-11

    A 90-year-old woman presented with 1-year history of right-sided progressive proptosis, neovascular glaucoma, blindness, and worsening ocular pain. No funduscopic examination was possible because of a corneal opacity. Head CT scan without contrast demonstrated a heterogeneous 4.1 cm (anterior-posterior) by 1.7 cm (transverse) cylindrical mass arising in the right optic nerve and extending from the retrobulbar globe to the optic canal. She underwent palliative enucleation with subtotal resection of the orbital optic nerve and tumor. Pathological examination showed effacement of the optic nerve by an infiltrative high-grade glial neoplasm with biphasic sarcomeric differentiation. Invasion into the uvea and retina was present. The neoplasm was negative for melan-A, HMB45, tyrosinase, synaptophysin, smooth muscle actin, and epithelial membrane antigen. The glioma had strongly intense, but patchy immunopositivity for glial fibrillary acidic protein. Multiple foci of neoplastic cells had pericellular reticulin staining. The overall features were diagnostic of a gliosarcoma (World Health Organization grade IV) of the optic nerve. Postoperative MRI demonstrated postsurgical changes and residual gliosarcoma with extension into the optic chiasm. The patient died 2 and a half months after her enucleation surgery at her nursing home. Autopsy was unavailable due to the caregiver wishes, making a definitive cause of death unknown. Gliosarcoma is a rare variant of glioblastoma, and this is the first documented case presenting as a primary neoplasm of the optic nerve.

  14. Lead decreases cell survival, proliferation, and neuronal differentiation of primary cultured adult neural precursor cells through activation of the JNK and p38 MAP kinases

    PubMed Central

    Engstrom, Anna; Wang, Hao; Xia, Zhengui

    2015-01-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is the process whereby adult neural precursor cells (aNPCs) in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the dentate gyrus (DG) generate adult-born, functional neurons in the hippocampus. This process is modulated by various extracellular and intracellular stimuli, and the adult-born neurons have been implicated in hippocampus-dependent learning and memory. However, studies on how neurotoxic agents affect this process and the underlying mechanisms are limited. The goal of this study was to determine whether lead, a heavy metal, directly impairs critical processes in adult neurogenesis and to characterize the underlying signaling pathways using primary cultured SGZ-aNPCs isolated from adult mice. We report here that lead significantly increases apoptosis and inhibits proliferation in SGZ-aNPCs. In addition, lead significantly impairs spontaneous neuronal differentiation and maturation. Furthermore, we found that activation of the c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase signaling pathways are important for lead cytotoxicity. Our data suggest that lead can directly act on adult neural stem cells and impair critical processes in adult hippocampal neurogenesis, which may contribute to its neurotoxicity and adverse effects on cognition in adults. PMID:25967738

  15. Neurotrophic Factors NGF, GDNF and NTN Selectively Modulate HSV1 and HSV2 Lytic Infection and Reactivation in Primary Adult Sensory and Autonomic Neurons.

    PubMed

    Yanez, Andy A; Harrell, Telvin; Sriranganathan, Heather J; Ives, Angela M; Bertke, Andrea S

    2017-02-07

    Herpes simplex viruses (HSV1 and HSV2) establish latency in peripheral ganglia after ocular or genital infection, and can reactivate to produce different patterns and frequencies of recurrent disease. Previous studies showed that nerve growth factor (NGF) maintains HSV1 latency in embryonic sympathetic and sensory neurons. However, adult sensory neurons are no longer dependent on NGF for survival, some populations cease expression of NGF receptors postnatally, and the viruses preferentially establish latency in different populations of sensory neurons responsive to other neurotrophic factors (NTFs). Thus, NGF may not maintain latency in adult sensory neurons. To identify NTFs important for maintaining HSV1 and HSV2 latency in adult neurons, we investigated acute and latently-infected primary adult sensory trigeminal (TG) and sympathetic superior cervical ganglia (SCG) after NTF removal. NGF and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) deprivation induced HSV1 reactivation in adult sympathetic neurons. In adult sensory neurons, however, neurturin (NTN) and GDNF deprivation induced HSV1 and HSV2 reactivation, respectively, while NGF deprivation had no effects. Furthermore, HSV1 and HSV2 preferentially reactivated from neurons expressing GFRα2 and GFRα1, the high affinity receptors for NTN and GDNF, respectively. Thus, NTN and GDNF play a critical role in selective maintenance of HSV1 and HSV2 latency in primary adult sensory neurons.

  16. Neurotrophic Factors NGF, GDNF and NTN Selectively Modulate HSV1 and HSV2 Lytic Infection and Reactivation in Primary Adult Sensory and Autonomic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Yanez, Andy A.; Harrell, Telvin; Sriranganathan, Heather J.; Ives, Angela M.; Bertke, Andrea S.

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex viruses (HSV1 and HSV2) establish latency in peripheral ganglia after ocular or genital infection, and can reactivate to produce different patterns and frequencies of recurrent disease. Previous studies showed that nerve growth factor (NGF) maintains HSV1 latency in embryonic sympathetic and sensory neurons. However, adult sensory neurons are no longer dependent on NGF for survival, some populations cease expression of NGF receptors postnatally, and the viruses preferentially establish latency in different populations of sensory neurons responsive to other neurotrophic factors (NTFs). Thus, NGF may not maintain latency in adult sensory neurons. To identify NTFs important for maintaining HSV1 and HSV2 latency in adult neurons, we investigated acute and latently-infected primary adult sensory trigeminal (TG) and sympathetic superior cervical ganglia (SCG) after NTF removal. NGF and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) deprivation induced HSV1 reactivation in adult sympathetic neurons. In adult sensory neurons, however, neurturin (NTN) and GDNF deprivation induced HSV1 and HSV2 reactivation, respectively, while NGF deprivation had no effects. Furthermore, HSV1 and HSV2 preferentially reactivated from neurons expressing GFRα2 and GFRα1, the high affinity receptors for NTN and GDNF, respectively. Thus, NTN and GDNF play a critical role in selective maintenance of HSV1 and HSV2 latency in primary adult sensory neurons. PMID:28178213

  17. A retrospective clinical study of 98 adult idiopathic primary intraventricular hemorrhage cases

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Rui; Ma, Lu; Shrestha, Bal Krishna; Yu, Zhiyuan; Li, Hao; You, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study is to define the clinical features, risk factors, treatment and prognosis of idiopathic primary intraventricular hemorrhage (IPIVH). We retrospectively collected the data of consecutively admitted patients who were diagnosed and treated for IPIVH in our hospital from January 2010 to December 2014. The clinical information, treatment, and prognosis at the 6-month follow-up were analyzed. Among the 3798 cases of spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage (ICH), 98 IPIVH (2.58%) patients were recruited for the study. The study population consisted of 60 males and 38 females, with an average age (± standard deviation, SD) of 51.20 ± 15.48 years. The initial symptoms were headache (75 cases) and impaired consciousness (23 cases). The surgical treatments included hematoma evacuation under a microscope or an endoscope in 8 cases (8.16%), external ventricular drainage (EVD) in 11 cases (11.22%), lumbar drainage (LD) in 10 cases (10.20%), and a combination of EVD and LD in 11 cases (11.22%). In total, 4 patients died in the hospital (4.08%). At the 6-month follow-up, 73 patients (74.49%) had an improved outcome (modified Rankin scale [mRS] < 3), and 21 patients (21.43%) had a poor outcome (mRS ≥ 3 points) at the end of the 6-month follow-up. IPIVH is rare in clinical practice, and hypertension is the most common risk factor. Furthermore, the treatment of IPIVH is still controversial. Hematoma evacuation under a microscope or an endoscope, EVD, LD and a combination of EVD and LD could be surgical options for the treatment of IPIVH patients. The outcomes for IPIVH patients could be relatively favorable with individualized treatment. PMID:27759637

  18. Effectiveness of multicomponent interventions in primary healthcare settings to promote continuous smoking cessation in adults: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Martín Cantera, Carlos; Puigdomènech, Elisa; Ballvé, Jose Luis; Arias, Olga Lucía; Clemente, Lourdes; Casas, Ramon; Roig, Lydia; Pérez-Tortosa, Santiago; Díaz-Gete, Laura; Granollers, Sílvia

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of the present review is to evaluate multicomponent/complex primary care (PC) interventions for their effectiveness in continuous smoking abstinence by adult smokers. Design A systematic review of randomised and non-randomised controlled trials was undertaken. Eligibility criteria for included studies Selected studies met the following criteria: evaluated effects of a multicomponent/complex intervention (with 2 or more intervention components) in achieving at least 6-month abstinence in adult smokers who visited a PC, biochemical confirmation of abstinence, intention-to-treat analysis and results published in English/Spanish. Methods We followed PRISMA statement to report the review. We searched the following data sources: MEDLINE, Web of Science, Scopus (from inception to February 2014), 3 key journals and a tobacco research bulletin. The Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network checklists were used to evaluate methodological quality. Data selection, evaluation and extraction were done independently, using a paired review approach. Owing to the heterogeneity of interventions in the studies included, a meta-analysis was not conducted. Results Of 1147 references identified, 9 studies were selected (10 204 participants, up to 48 months of follow-up, acceptable methodological quality). Methodologies used were mainly individual or group sessions, telephone conversations, brochures or quit-smoking kits, medications and economic incentives for doctors and no-cost medications for smokers. Complex interventions achieved long-term continuous abstinence ranging from 7% to 40%. Behavioural interventions were effective and had a dose–response effect. Both nicotine replacement and bupropion therapy were safe and effective, with no observed differences. Conclusions Multicomponent/complex interventions in PC are effective and safe, appearing to achieve greater long-term continuous smoking cessation than usual care and counselling alone. Selected

  19. Public Stigma towards Older Adults with Depression: Findings from the São Paulo-Manaus Elderly in Primary Care Study

    PubMed Central

    Kester, Rachel; Braga, Patrícia Emília; Peluso, Érica T. P.; Blay, Sérgio L.; R. Menezes, Paulo; E. Ribeiro, Euler

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates three domains of public stigma (perceived negative reactions, perceived discrimination, and dangerousness) against older adults with depression. The sample comprised of older adults registered with primary care clinics (n = 1,291) and primary health care professionals (n = 469) from São Paulo and Manaus, Brazil. Participants read a vignette describing a 70-year-old individual (Mary or John) with a depressive disorder and answered questions measuring stigma. The prevalence of the three stigma domains was between 30.2 and 37.6% among older participants from São Paulo and between 27.6 and 35.4% among older participants from Manaus. Older adults from both cities reported similar prevalence of perceived stigma. Key factors associated with stigmatizing beliefs among older participants were reporting depressive symptoms, having physical limitations, and identifying the case of the vignette as a case of mental disorder. Among health professionals, the prevalence of the three stigma domains was between 19.8 and 34.8% in São Paulo and 30.2 and 44.6% in Manaus. The key factor associated with stigma among primary health care professionals was city, with consistently higher risk in Manaus than in São Paulo. Findings confirm that public stigma against older adults in Brazil is common. It is important to educate the public and primary health care providers in Brazil on stigma related to mental illness in order to reduce barriers to adequate mental health treatment. PMID:27352293

  20. Public Stigma towards Older Adults with Depression: Findings from the São Paulo-Manaus Elderly in Primary Care Study.

    PubMed

    Scazufca, Marcia; P de Paula Couto, Maria Clara; Huang, Hsiang; Kester, Rachel; Braga, Patrícia Emília; Peluso, Érica T P; Blay, Sérgio L; R Menezes, Paulo; E Ribeiro, Euler

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates three domains of public stigma (perceived negative reactions, perceived discrimination, and dangerousness) against older adults with depression. The sample comprised of older adults registered with primary care clinics (n = 1,291) and primary health care professionals (n = 469) from São Paulo and Manaus, Brazil. Participants read a vignette describing a 70-year-old individual (Mary or John) with a depressive disorder and answered questions measuring stigma. The prevalence of the three stigma domains was between 30.2 and 37.6% among older participants from São Paulo and between 27.6 and 35.4% among older participants from Manaus. Older adults from both cities reported similar prevalence of perceived stigma. Key factors associated with stigmatizing beliefs among older participants were reporting depressive symptoms, having physical limitations, and identifying the case of the vignette as a case of mental disorder. Among health professionals, the prevalence of the three stigma domains was between 19.8 and 34.8% in São Paulo and 30.2 and 44.6% in Manaus. The key factor associated with stigma among primary health care professionals was city, with consistently higher risk in Manaus than in São Paulo. Findings confirm that public stigma against older adults in Brazil is common. It is important to educate the public and primary health care providers in Brazil on stigma related to mental illness in order to reduce barriers to adequate mental health treatment.

  1. Cardiovascular exercise intervention improves the primary antibody response to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) in previously sedentary older adults.

    PubMed

    Grant, R W; Mariani, R A; Vieira, V J; Fleshner, M; Smith, T P; Keylock, K T; Lowder, T W; McAuley, E; Hu, L; Chapman-Novakofski, K; Woods, J A

    2008-08-01

    Based upon a prior cross-sectional study, we hypothesized that an aerobic exercise intervention in sedentary older adults would improve a primary T cell-dependent immune response. Participants were a subset of older subjects from a large, ongoing exercise intervention study who were randomly assigned to either an aerobic exercise (Cardio, n=30, 68.9+0.8 years) or flexibility/balance (Flex, n=20, 69.9+1.2 years) intervention. The intervention consisted of either three aerobic sessions for 30-60 min at 55-70% VO(2 max) or two 60 min flexibility/balance sessions weekly for 10 months. Eight months into the intervention, samples were collected before intramuscular administration of KLH (125 microg), followed by sampling at 2, 3, and 6 weeks post-KLH. Serum anti-KLH IgM, IgG1, and IgG2 was measured by ELISA. Physiological and psychosocial measures were also assessed pre- and post-intervention. While there was no difference in the anti-KLH IgG2 response between groups, Cardio displayed significantly (p<0.05) higher anti-KLH IgG1 (at weeks 2, 3, and 6 post) and IgM responses when compared to Flex. Despite cardiovascular intervention-induced improvement in physical fitness (approximately 11% vs. 1% change in VO(2 peak) in Cardio vs. Flex, respectively), we found no relationship between improved fitness and enhanced anti-KLH antibody responses. Optimism, perceived stress, and affect were all associated with enhanced immune response. We have shown for the first time that cardiovascular training in previously sedentary elderly results in significantly higher primary IgG1 and IgM antibody responses, while having no effect on IgG2 production.

  2. Development of The Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing Adult/Geriatric Primary Care Nurse Practitioner Program in HIV Prevention, Treatment, and Care.

    PubMed

    Farley, Jason E; Stewart, Jennifer; Kub, Joan; Cumpsty-Fowler, Carolyn; Lowensen, Kelly; Becker, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    In response to the call to create an AIDS Education and Training Center for Nurse Practitioner Education by the Health Resources and Services Administration, The Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing embarked on a transformative curriculum overhaul to integrate HIV prevention, treatment, and care into the Adult/Geriatric Nurse Practitioner Program. A six-step process outlined in the Curriculum Development for Medical Education was followed. A pilot cohort of Adult/Geriatric Nurse Practitioner students were enrolled, including 50% primary care setting and 50% HIV-focused primary care through a 12-month HIV continuity clinic experience. Through this pilot, substantive changes to the program were adopted. Programmatic outcomes were not compromised with the modification in clinical hours. The model of a 12-month HIV continuity clinical experience reduced the number of required preceptors. This model has important implications for the HIV workforce by demonstrating successful integration of HIV and primary care training for nurse practitioners.

  3. Selumetinib and Akt Inhibitor MK-2206 in Treating Patients With Refractory or Advanced Gallbladder or Bile Duct Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-08

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Adenocarcinoma With Squamous Metaplasia of the Gallbladder; Adult Primary Cholangiocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Extrahepatic Bile Duct; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Stage II Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IIIA Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IIIB Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IVA Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IVB Gallbladder Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer

  4. [Physical inactivity among adults and elderly living in areas covered by primary healthcare units with and without the Family Health Program in Pernambuco State, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Alves, João Guilherme Bezerra; Siqueira, Fernando Vinholes; Figueiroa, José Natal; Facchini, Luiz Augusto; Silveira, Denise Silva da; Piccini, Roberto Xavier; Tomasi, Elaine; Thumé, Elaine; Hallal, Pedro C

    2010-03-01

    The epidemiological transition in Brazil has been explained partially by the low levels of physical activity. However, few studies have explored physical inactivity in low-income population groups. Within this context, primary healthcare units gain strategic importance. This article describes the prevalence of sedentary lifestyle and associated factors in a cross-sectional study, including 1,018 adults and 1,010 elderly adults in 10 cities in Pernambuco State. Prevalence of sedentary lifestyle was 37.8% (95%CI: 34.0-40.2) in adults and 68.3% (95%CI: 65.3-71.3) in the elderly. Identification of physical activity as the most important factor for good health was associated with sedentary lifestyle in elderly adults. A lower proportion of sedentary lifestyle among non-elderly adults was associated with good self-reported health status. We concluded that sedentary lifestyle prevalence is high in elderly and non-elderly people covered by primary healthcare units in Pernambuco State as compared to the South of Brazil.

  5. Meeting the needs? Perceived support of a nurse-led lifestyle programme for young adults with mental illness in a primary health-care setting.

    PubMed

    Rönngren, Ylva; Björk, Annette; Kristiansen, Lisbeth; Haage, David; Enmarker, Ingela; Audulv, Åsa

    2017-04-04

    Being a young adult with mental illness challenges all aspects of health, including an increased risk for developing lifestyle-related diseases. There is a lack of lifestyle programmes in primary health care that target physical, mental, and social needs for young adults with mental illness. The aim of the present study was to describe the experiences of young adults with mental illness receiving support from a nurse-led lifestyle programme, and how this support was related to their life context, including challenges and coping strategies. Two focus groups and six individual interviews were performed with 13 young adults (16-25 years), and analysed using a qualitative content analysis. The findings showed that the young adults experienced challenges in their daily lives, including psychiatric symptoms, lack of social understanding, and loneliness. The study indicated that the programme could support lifestyle habits with its components of supportive interpersonal relationships, awareness of coping strategies, understanding of health and illness, and cognitive support (e.g. schedules and reminders). However, the programme could not meet everyone's needs for new social relationships or more comprehensive support. Even so, this nurse-led programme provides health information-management strategies that could easily be integrated in a primary health-care setting.

  6. The Population Impact and Cost-Effectiveness of Statins for Primary Prevention in Adults 75 and Older in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Odden, Michelle C.; Pletcher, Mark J.; Coxson, Pamela G.; Thekkethala, Divya; Guzman, David; Heller, David; Goldman, Lee; Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Over 40% of adults 75 and older are taking statins, yet there is little evidence to guide primary prevention in this population. OBJECTIVE To project the population impact and cost-effectiveness of statin therapy in adults aged 75 years and older. DESIGN Forecasting study using the Cardiovascular Disease Policy Model, a Markov model. DATA SOURCE Trial, cohort, and nationally-representative data sources. TARGET POPULATION U.S. adults aged 75–94 years. TIME HORIZON 10 years. PERSPECTIVE Health care system. INTERVENTION Statins for primary prevention based on: 1) Low density lipoprotein cholesterol ≥4.91 mmol/L (190 mg/dL), 2) ≥4.14 mmol/L (160 mg/dL), 3) ≥3.36 mmol/L (130 mg/dL), 4) diabetes, 5) 10-year risk score ≥7.5% (treat all). OUTCOME MEASURES Myocardial infarction (MI), coronary heart disease (CHD) death, disability adjusted life years, costs RESULT OF BASE-CASE ANALYSIS All adults aged 75 and older in NHANES have a 10-year risk score >7.5%. If statins have no effect on functional limitation or cognitive impairment, all primary prevention strategies would prevent MIs and CHD deaths and be cost effective. The broadest strategy, treatment of all adults aged 75–94 years would result in 8 million additional users, and prevent 105,000 (4.3%) incident MIs and 68,000 (2.3%) CHD deaths at an incremental cost per disability adjusted life year of $25,200. RESULT OF SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS An increased relative risk of functional limitation or mild cognitive impairment in the range of 1.10 to 1.30 could offset the cardiovascular benefits. LIMITATIONS Limited trial evidence targeting primary prevention in adults 75 and older. CONCLUSIONS At effectiveness similar to trial findings, statins are projected to be cost-effective for primary prevention in adults age 75–94 years; however, even a small increase in geriatric specific side effects could offset the cardiovascular benefit. Improved data on the potential benefits and harms of statins are needed to

  7. Primary intracranial soft tissue sarcomas in children, adolescents, and young adults: single institution experience and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Maher, Ossama M; Khatua, Soumen; Mukherjee, Devashis; Olar, Adriana; Lazar, Alexander; Luthra, Raja; Liu, Diane; Wu, Jimin; Ketonen, Leena; Zaky, Wafik

    2016-03-01

    There is a paucity of literature reporting the outcome of intracranial sarcomas (IS) in children, adolescents, and young adults (CAYA). A multimodal therapeutic approach is commonly used, with no well-established treatment consensus. We conducted a retrospective review of CAYA with IS, treated at our institution, to determine their clinical findings, treatments, and outcomes. Immunohistochemistry (PDGFRA and EGFR) and DNA sequencing were performed on 5 tumor samples. A literature review of IS was also conducted. We reviewed 13 patients (median age, 7 years) with a primary diagnosis of IS between 1990 and 2015. Diagnoses included unclassified sarcoma (n = 9), chondrosarcoma (n = 2), and rhabdomyosarcoma (n = 2). Five patients underwent upfront gross total resection (GTR) of the tumor. The 5-drug regimen (vincristine, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, etoposide, and ifosfamide) was the most common treatment used. Nine patients died due to progression or recurrence (n = 8) or secondary malignancy (n = 1). The median follow-up period of the 4 surviving patients was 1.69 years (range 1.44-5.17 years). The 5-year progression-free survival and overall survival rates were 21 and 44 %, respectively. BRAF, TP53, KRAS, KIT, ERBB2, MET, RET, ATM, and EGFR mutations were detected in 4 of the 5 tissue samples. All 5 samples were immunopositive for PDGFRA, and only 2 were positive for EGFR. IS remain a therapeutic challenge due to high progression and recurrence rates. Collaborative multi-institutional studies are warranted to delineate a treatment consensus and investigate tumor biology to improve the disease outcome.

  8. A common gene for juvenile and adult-onset primary open-angle glaucomas confined on chromosome 1q

    SciTech Connect

    Morissette, J.; Plante, M.; Raymond, V.

    1995-06-01

    Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG), which causes progressive loss of the visual fields, was subdivided into two groups according to age at onset: (1) chronic open-angle glaucoma (COAG) diagnosed after 40 years and (2) juvenile open-angle glaucoma (JOAG) diagnosed between 3 years of age and early adulthood. A JOAG gene (GLC1A) was recently mapped to chromosome 1q. We studied 142 members of a huge multigenerational French Canadian family affected with autosomal dominant POAG. Either JOAG or COAG was diagnosed with ocular hypertension (OHT), which may lead to POAG. To localize a common disease gene that might be responsible for both glaucoma subsets, we performed linkage analysis considering JOAG and COAG under the same phenotypic category. JOAG/COAG was tightly linked to seven microsatellite markers on chromosome 1q23-q25; a maximum lod score of 6.62 was obtained with AF-M278ye5. To refine the disease locus, we exploited a recombination mapping strategy based on a unique founder effect. The same characteristic haplotype, composed of 14 markers spanning 12 cM between loci D1S196 and D1S212, was recognized in all persons affected by JOAG, COAG, or OHT, but it did not occur in unaffected spouses and in normal family members >35 years of age, except for three obligatory carriers. Key combination events confined the disease region within a 9-cM interval between loci D1S445 and D1S416/D1S480. These observations demonstrate that the GLC1A gene is responsible for both adult-onset and juvenile glaucomas and suggest that the JOAG and COAG categories within this family may be part of a clinical continuum artificially divided at age 40 years. 49 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Developing the Botswana Primary Care Guideline: an integrated, symptom-based primary care guideline for the adult patient in a resource-limited setting

    PubMed Central

    Tsima, Billy M; Setlhare, Vincent; Nkomazana, Oathokwa

    2016-01-01

    Background Botswana’s health care system is based on a primary care model. Various national guidelines exist for specific diseases. However, most of the guidelines address management at a tertiary level and often appear nonapplicable for the limited resources in primary care facilities. An integrated symptom-based guideline was developed so as to translate the Botswana national guidelines to those applicable in primary care. The Botswana Primary Care Guideline (BPCG) integrates the care of communicable diseases, including HIV/AIDS and noncommunicable diseases, by frontline primary health care workers. Methods The Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Botswana, together with guideline developers from the Knowledge Translation Unit (University of Cape Town) collaborated with the Ministry of Health to develop the guideline. Stakeholder groups were set up to review specific content of the guideline to ensure compliance with Botswana government policy and the essential drug list. Results Participants included clinicians, academics, patient advocacy groups, and policymakers from different disciplines, both private and public. Drug-related issues were identified as necessary for implementing recommendations of the guideline. There was consensus by working groups for updating the essential drug list for primary care and expansion of prescribing rights of trained nurse prescribers in primary care within their scope of practice. An integrated guideline incorporating common symptoms of diseases seen in the Botswana primary care setting was developed. Conclusion The development of the BPCG took a broad consultative approach with buy in from relevant stakeholders. It is anticipated that implementation of the BPCG will translate into better patient outcomes as similar projects elsewhere have done. PMID:27570457

  10. Integrated care as a means to improve primary care delivery for adults and adolescents in the developing world: a critical analysis of Integrated Management of Adolescent and Adult Illness (IMAI)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background More than three decades after the 1978 Declaration of Alma-Ata enshrined the goal of ‘health for all’, high-quality primary care services remain undelivered to the great majority of the world’s poor. This failure to effectively reach the most vulnerable populations has been, in part, a failure to develop and implement appropriate and effective primary care delivery models. This paper examines a root cause of these failures, namely that the inability to achieve clear and practical consensus around the scope and aims of primary care may be contributing to ongoing operational inertia. The present work also examines integrated models of care as a strategy to move beyond conceptual dissonance in primary care and toward implementation. Finally, this paper examines the strengths and weaknesses of a particular model, the World Health Organization’s Integrated Management of Adolescent and Adult Illness (IMAI), and its potential as a guidepost toward improving the quality of primary care delivery in poor settings. Discussion Integration and integrated care may be an important approach in establishing a new paradigm of primary care delivery, though overall, current evidence is mixed. However, a number of successful specific examples illustrate the potential for clinical and service integration to positively impact patient care in primary care settings. One example deserving of further examination is the IMAI, developed by the World Health Organization as an operational model that integrates discrete vertical interventions into a comprehensive delivery system encompassing triage and screening, basic acute and chronic disease care, basic prevention and treatment services, and follow-up and referral guidelines. IMAI is an integrated model delivered at a single point-of-care using a standard approach to each patient based on the universal patient history and physical examination. The evidence base on IMAI is currently weak, but whether or not IMAI itself

  11. Tactile impoverishment and sensorimotor restriction deteriorate the forepaw cutaneous map in the primary somatosensory cortex of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Coq, J O; Xerri, C

    1999-12-01

    We investigated the effects of sensory deprivation on the forepaw representation in the primary somatosensory cortex (SI) in the adult rat. Cortical maps were constructed from high-resolution multiunit recordings of the response of layer IV neurons to somatosensory stimuli. The main features of the forepaw representation were described in terms of areal extent and topography of the cortical map, and sensory submodality, size, and location of the receptive field (RF) of small clusters of the cortical neurons. After being weaned, two groups of Long-Evans rats were housed in a standard (SE) or impoverished (IE) environment for 65-115 days. A third group of SE rats was subjected to severe sensorimotor restriction (SR) of one forepaw for 7 days or 14 days, by using a one-sleeved cast. A concomitant effect of unilateral forelimb immobilization was a forced use of the nonrestricted forelimb in postural balance. The maps of both forepaws were derived 24 h after the cast was removed and the animal was allowed normal limb use. In a fourth group, SE rats experienced a 7-day immobilization followed by symmetrical limb use for 7 days before we mapped the hemisphere contralateral to the casted limb. For the SE and IE rats, the total areal extent of the cutaneous forepaw representation was similar, but IE rats exhibited a significant expansion of cortical islets serving high-threshold, presumably noncutaneous inputs, which were included in the cutaneous maps. In addition, SI neurons of IE rats had greatly enlarged glabrous, but not hairy, skin RFs. For the SR rats, the areal extent of the cutaneous map of the casted forepaw decreased by about 50%, after both 7- and 14-day forelimb immobilization. Large cortical sectors presumed to be formerly activated by cutaneous inputs were driven by high-threshold inputs that disrupted the somatotopic representation of the forepaw skin surfaces. These "emergent" representational sectors were topographically organized. By contrast, the areal

  12. Kinetics of antibody responses after primary immunization with meningococcal serogroup C conjugate vaccine or secondary immunization with either conjugate or polysaccharide vaccine in adults.

    PubMed

    de Voer, Richarda M; van der Klis, Fiona R M; Engels, Carla W A M; Schepp, Rutger M; van de Kassteele, Jan; Sanders, Elisabeth A M; Rijkers, Ger T; Berbers, Guy A M

    2009-11-23

    In the Netherlands the meningococcal serogroup C conjugate (MenCC) vaccine is administered as a single dose at 14 months. We evaluated the kinetics of isotype-specific antibodies in adults (n=21) after primary immunization with MenCC or secondary immunization with MenCC or plain MenC polysaccharide vaccine. Blood samples were collected prior to immunization and at 6 additional time points, from 3 to 25 days post-immunization. Secondary immunization resulted in 5-10-fold higher IgG titers compared to the primary immunization group, 25 days post-immunization. Prior to the secondary immunization, but 5 years after the first immunization, protective bactericidal antibodies and levels of MenC-specific IgG and IgM were still present. Furthermore, IgG antibodies present before secondary immunization were of higher avidity compared to antibodies produced one month after primary immunization. In addition, secondary immunization with nonconjugated MenC polysaccharide seemed to induce a higher IgG2 response compared to MenCC immunization. The kinetics of the observed secondary immune responses were not really faster than the observed primary responses. However, the rate of increase in antibodies seemed faster than the primary responses, representing a booster response. As the course of infection by Neisseria meningitidis can be very rapid, these data support the idea that sustainment of high antibody levels induced by MenCC are important for immediate protection.

  13. Environmental enrichment alters organizational features of the forepaw representation in the primary somatosensory cortex of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Coq, J O; Xerri, C

    1998-07-01

    The cortical forepaw area of young adult rats was mapped by recording the response properties of small clusters of neurons in layer IV of the primary somatosensory (SI) cortex. First we quantitatively analyzed the somatotopic organizational features of the cortical forepaw representation in terms of areal extent and topography, receptive field (RF) sensory modality, size, and location. We also assessed the influence of environmental enrichment, known to induce structural alterations in cortical connectivity, on the representational characteristics of the forepaw maps. Long-Evans rats were housed in environments (standard, SE; enriched, EE) promoting differential tactile experience for 71-113 days from weaning. Within the SI, we found a single and complete topographic map of the cutaneous surfaces of the forepaw consisting of a rostrolateral-caudomedial sequence of digit and pad representational zones. Small islets of noncutaneous responses (NCR; high-threshold, deep-receptor input) within the boundaries of the cutaneous maps were a conspicuous feature of the forepaw map for SE rats. These islets created discontinuities in the representation of contiguous skin territories. In the SE rats, about 79% of the cortical sites activated by light tactile stimulation had a single cutaneous RF, whereas about 21% exhibited multiple RFs. Most single-digit RFs we delineated in the SE rats extended across two or three phalanges. As a result, the representations of the phalangeal skin surfaces were not segregated but formed an overlapping continuum. Moreover, within these regions, as the electrode was displaced in regular steps across the mediolateral axis, RFs did not shift across the digit skin surface in an orderly manner, suggesting a lack of internal topography in the finger representation zones. Tactile experience promoted by environmental enrichment induced alterations in the representational features of the SI cutaneous map of the forepaw. In EE rats, the areal extent of

  14. Esthetic restoration of infra-occluded retained primary mandibular incisors with all-ceramic crowns in adult dentition.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Kuang-Wei; Shen, Yu-Fu

    2004-12-01

    The prevalence of hypodontia is reported to be between 1.5% to 10% in the permanent dentition. In the anterior teeth, maxillary lateral incisors and mandibular central incisors are the most frequently involved teeth. This causes esthetic problems for the patient. Several reports have focused on restoration of retained maxillary primary anterior teeth, but none have described restoration of retained mandibular primary incisors. This clinical report describes the restoration of infra-occluded retained primary mandibular central incisors of a 17 year-old girl diagnosed with hypodontia. All-ceramic crowns made with computer-aided design/ computer-aided manufacturing technology were used to restore the teeth incisally and interproximally. Due to a relatively short root length and inadequate crown-root ratio, the primary mandibular central incisors were splinted and adjusted to distribute the protrusive force evenly across the maxillary and mandibular incisors. Functional and esthetic results were achieved.

  15. National Use of Safety-Net Clinics for Primary Care among Adults with Non-Medicaid Insurance in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Oanh Kieu; Makam, Anil N.; Halm, Ethan A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe the prevalence, characteristics, and predictors of safety-net use for primary care among non-Medicaid insured adults (i.e., those with private insurance or Medicare). Methods Cross-sectional analysis using the 2006–2010 National Ambulatory Medical Care Surveys, annual probability samples of outpatient visits in the U.S. We estimated national prevalence of safety-net visits using weighted percentages to account for the complex survey design. We conducted bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses to examine characteristics associated with safety-net clinic use. Results More than one-third (35.0%) of all primary care safety-net clinic visits were among adults with non-Medicaid primary insurance, representing 6,642,000 annual visits nationally. The strongest predictors of safety-net use among non-Medicaid insured adults were: being from a high-poverty neighborhood (AOR 9.53, 95% CI 4.65–19.53), being dually eligible for Medicare and Medicaid (AOR 2.13, 95% CI 1.38–3.30), and being black (AOR 1.97, 95% CI 1.06–3.66) or Hispanic (AOR 2.28, 95% CI 1.32–3.93). Compared to non-safety-net users, non-Medicaid insured adults who used safety-net clinics had a higher prevalence of diabetes (23.5% vs. 15.0%, p<0.001), hypertension (49.4% vs. 36.0%, p<0.001), multimorbidity (≥2 chronic conditions; 53.5% vs. 40.9%, p<0.001) and polypharmacy (≥4 medications; 48.8% vs. 34.0%, p<0.001). Nearly one-third (28.9%) of Medicare beneficiaries in the safety-net were dual eligibles, compared to only 6.8% of Medicare beneficiaries in non-safety-net clinics (p<0.001). Conclusions Safety net clinics are important primary care delivery sites for non-Medicaid insured minority and low-income populations with a high burden of chronic illness. The critical role of safety-net clinics in care delivery is likely to persist despite expanded insurance coverage under the Affordable Care Act. PMID:27027617

  16. Health benefits of primary care social work for adults with complex health and social needs: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Jules; Mercer, Stewart W; Harris, Fiona M

    2016-04-05

    The prevalence of complex health and social needs in primary care patients is growing. Furthermore, recent research suggests that the impact of psychosocial distress on the significantly poorer health outcomes in this population may have been underestimated. The potential of social work in primary care settings has been extensively discussed in both health and social work literature and there is evidence that social work interventions in other settings are particularly effective in addressing psychosocial needs. However, the evidence base for specific improved health outcomes related to primary care social work is minimal. This review aimed to identify and synthesise the available evidence on the health benefits of social work interventions in primary care settings. Nine electronic databases were searched from 1990 to 2015 and seven primary research studies were retrieved. Due to the heterogeneity of studies, a narrative synthesis was conducted. Although there is no definitive evidence for effectiveness, results suggest a promising role for primary care social work interventions in improving health outcomes. These include subjective health measures and self-management of long-term conditions, reducing psychosocial morbidity and barriers to treatment and health maintenance. Although few rigorous study designs were found, the contextual detail and clinical settings of studies provide evidence of the practice applicability of social work intervention. Emerging policy on the integration of health and social care may provide an opportunity to develop this model of care.

  17. Cognitive Behavioral Treatment for Older Adults with Generalized Anxiety Disorder: A Therapist Manual for Primary Care Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanley, Melinda A.; Diefenbach, Gretchen J.; Hopko, Derek R.

    2004-01-01

    At least four academic clinical trials have demonstrated the utility of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for older adults with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). These data may not generalize, however, to more heterogeneous and functionally impaired patients and the medical settings in which they typically receive care. A recent pilot project…

  18. Medication Use among Australian Adults with Intellectual Disability in Primary Healthcare Settings: A Cross-Sectional Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doan, Tan N.; Lennox, Nicholas G.; Taylor-Gomez, Miriam; Ware, Robert S.

    2013-01-01

    Background: There is concern about widespread medication use by people with intellectual disability (ID), especially psychotropic and anticonvulsant agents. However, there is sparse information on prescribing patterns in Australia. Method: This cross-sectional study was conducted between 2000 and 2002 among adults with ID who live in the community…

  19. A Survey of Primary Care Provider Attitudes and Behaviors Regarding Treatment of Adult Depression: What Changes After a Collaborative Care Intervention?

    PubMed Central

    Upshur, Carole; Weinreb, Linda

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To assess primary care provider (PCP) attitudes and self-reported behavior with regard to identifying and managing depression in adult patients before and after a chronic disease/collaborative care intervention. Method: A self-administered cross-sectional survey was conducted in 6 targeted practices among 39 family practice physicians, family nurse practitioners, and residents before and after implementation of a depression in primary care project. In this project, the sites received tools and training in depression screening and guideline-concordant treatment, facilitated referral services for patients to access mental health providers, psychiatric phone consultation, patient education materials, and services of a depression care manager. The project was conducted from June 2003 through June 2006. Results: Comparison of responses prior to and after the intervention showed that significantly or nearly significantly larger proportions of PCPs endorsed the importance of depression as a patient presenting problem (p = .000), increased provision of supportive counseling (p = .13), more often identified counseling or therapy as effective (p = .07), and more often referred patients to mental health services (p = .001). PCPs also reduced their perception that treating depression is time consuming (p = .000). Conclusions: After a chronic disease/collaborative care approach to depression treatment in primary care was implemented, PCP attitudes and behaviors about depression treatment were significantly modified. More guideline-concordant care, and increased collaboration with mental health services, was reported. Implications for future primary care depression intervention activities and research are discussed. PMID:18615167

  20. PET-CT in Determining the Radioembolization Dose Delivered to Patients With Liver Metastasis, Primary Liver Cancer, or Biliary Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-24

    Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Stage D Adult Primary Liver Cancer (BCLC); Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  1. Combination of cytogenetic classification and MRD status correlates with outcome of autologous versus allogeneic stem cell transplantation in adults with primary acute myeloid leukemia in first remission.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jianfeng; Zhang, Guixin; Liang, Chen; Li, Gang; Chen, Xin; Ma, Qiaoling; Zhai, Weihua; Yang, Donglin; He, Yi; Jiang, Erlie; Feng, Sizhou; Han, Mingzhe

    2017-04-01

    Both autologous and allogeneic stem cell transplantation (auto- and allo-SCT) are treatment choice for adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) after complete remission (CR). However, the decision-making remains controversial in some situations. To figure out the treatment choice, we retrospectively investigated 172 consecutive patients with primary AML who received auto- (n=46) or allo-SCT (n=126) from a single transplant center. Auto- and allo-SCT group demonstrated comparable overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) (P=0.616, P=0.559, respectively). Cytogenetic classification and minimal residual disease (MRD) after one course of consolidation were identified as independent risk factors for DFS (hazard ratio (HR), 1.800; 95% CI, 1.172-2.763; P=0.007; HR, 2.042; 95%CI, 1.003-4.154; P=0.049; respectively). We subsequently found that auto- and allo-SCT offered comparable DFS to patients with favorable or intermediate risk and were tested MRD(neg) after one course of consolidation (P=0.270) otherwise auto-SCT were inferior due to increased risk of leukemia relapse. Our study indicated that the combination of cytogenetic classification and MRD monitoring correlated with outcome of auto- versus allo-SCT and might help the choice between the two types of SCT for adults with primary AML, which is of significance for patients with expected intermediate prognosis in the current scenario.

  2. The Impact of Adult Mortality on Primary School Enrollment in Northwestern Tanzania. Africa Region Human Development Working Paper Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ainsworth, Martha; Beegle, Kathleen; Koda, Godlike

    The AIDS epidemic is making orphans out of many African children and threatens to reverse hard-won gains in raising school enrollments. The average gross primary enrollment ration (GPER) the number of children enrolled as a percent of the total number of children of school age was only 77% for Sub-Saharan Africa in 1996. The countries are hard-hit…

  3. Connexin36 identified at morphologically mixed chemical/electrical synapses on trigeminal motoneurons and at primary afferent terminals on spinal cord neurons in adult mouse and rat.

    PubMed

    Bautista, W; McCrea, D A; Nagy, J I

    2014-03-28

    Morphologically mixed chemical/electrical synapses at axon terminals, with the electrical component formed by gap junctions, is common in the CNS of lower vertebrates. In mammalian CNS, evidence for morphologically mixed synapses has been obtained in only a few locations. Here, we used immunofluorescence approaches to examine the localization of the neuronally expressed gap junction forming protein connexin36 (Cx36) in relation to the axon terminal marker vesicular glutamate transporter-1 (vglut1) in the spinal cord and the trigeminal motor nucleus (Mo5) of rat and mouse. In adult rodents, immunolabeling for Cx36 appeared exclusively as Cx36-puncta, and was widely distributed at all rostro-caudal levels in most spinal cord laminae and in the Mo5. A high proportion of Cx36-puncta was co-localized with vglut1, forming morphologically mixed synapses on motoneurons, in intermediate spinal cord lamina, and in regions of medial lamina VII, where vglut1-containing terminals associated with Cx36 converged on neurons adjacent to the central canal. Unilateral transection of lumbar dorsal roots reduced immunolabeling of both vglut1 and Cx36 in intermediate laminae and lamina IX. Further, vglut1-terminals displaying Cx36-puncta were contacted by terminals labeled for glutamic acid decarboxylase65, which is known to be contained in presynaptic terminals on large-diameter primary afferents. Developmentally, mixed synapses begin to emerge in the spinal cord only after the second to third postnatal week and thereafter increase to adult levels. Our findings demonstrate that axon terminals of primary afferent origin form morphologically mixed synapses containing Cx36 in broadly distributed areas of adult rodent spinal cord and Mo5.

  4. How can we build resilience in primary school aged children? The importance of social support from adults and peers in family, school and community settings.

    PubMed

    Stewart, D; Sun, J

    2004-01-01

    This study examines the association between firstly, student resiliency and their perceptions of social support from parents/caregivers, teachers, and peers, and secondly, between student's perception of their general health status and their social support. A cross-sectional research project was designed and conducted in 2003 in an urban and remote area of Queensland, Australia. The study population comprised of 2580 students (Years three, five, and seven) across 20 primary schools. The main outcome measures were self-reported health status and resiliency behaviours. Independent variables included student perceptions of support from parents/caregivers, teachers, school peers, and prosocial groups. Students who perceived parents, teachers, and peers as supportive were more likely to have higher resiliency behaviour in communication and cooperation, self-esteem, empathy, help-seeking, goals and aspirations. Students who considered that their parents, peers at school and prosocial groups were supportive, were more likely to feel healthy. Findings suggest that providing adult and peer support to students at primary school age is a vital strategy in promoting student resiliency and general health for children of primary school age.

  5. Tailored weight loss intervention in obese adults within primary care practice: rationale, design, and methods of Choose to Lose.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Sheri J; Risica, Patricia M; Gans, Kim M; Marcus, Bess H; Eaton, Charles B

    2014-07-01

    Although there are efficacious weight loss interventions that can improve health and delay onset of diabetes and hypertension, these interventions have not been translated into clinical practice. The primary objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness and cost effectiveness of a tailored lifestyle intervention in primary care patients. Patients were recruited by their primary care physicians and eligible participants were randomized to an enhanced intervention or standard intervention. All participants met with a lifestyle counselor to set calorie and physical activity goals and to discuss behavioral strategies at baseline, 6 and 12 months. During the first year, enhanced intervention participants receive monthly counseling phone calls to assist in attaining and maintaining their goals. Enhanced intervention participants also receive weekly mailings consisting of tailored and non-tailored print materials and videos focusing on weight loss, physical activity promotion and healthy eating. The second year focuses on maintenance with enhanced intervention participants receiving tailored and non-tailored print materials and videos regularly throughout the year. Standard intervention participants receive five informational handouts on weight loss across the two years. This enhanced intervention that consists of multiple modalities of print, telephone, and video with limited face-to-face counseling holds promise for being effective for encouraging weight loss, increasing physical activity and healthy eating, and also for being cost effective and generalizable for wide clinical use. This study will fill an important gap in our knowledge regarding the translation and dissemination of research from efficacy studies to best practices in clinical settings.

  6. Secondary Psychopathy, but not Primary Psychopathy, is Associated with Risky Decision-Making in Noninstitutionalized Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Dean, Andy C; Altstein, Lily L; Berman, Mitchell E; Constans, Joseph I; Sugar, Catherine A; McCloskey, Michael S

    2013-01-01

    Although risky decision-making has been posited to contribute to the maladaptive behavior of individuals with psychopathic tendencies, the performance of psychopathic groups on a common task of risky decision-making, the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT; Bechara, Damasio, Damasio, & Anderson, 1994), has been equivocal. Different aspects of psychopathy (personality traits, antisocial deviance) and/or moderating variables may help to explain these inconsistent findings. In a sample of college students (N = 129, age 18 to 27), we examined the relationship between primary and secondary psychopathic features and IGT performance. A measure of impulsivity was included to investigate its potential as a moderator. In a joint model including main effects and interactions between primary psychopathy, secondary psychopathy and impulsivity, only secondary psychopathy was significantly related to risky IGT performance, and this effect was not moderated by the other variables. This finding supports the growing literature suggesting that secondary psychopathy is a better predictor of decision-making problems than the primary psychopathic personality traits of lack of empathy and remorselessness.

  7. Differential effects of long-term exposure to Aroclor 1254 on lipid secretion by primary cultures of adult rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Mendoza-Figueroa, T.; Hernandez, A.; Lopez, L.

    1992-06-01

    PCBs produce hepatic triglyceride (TG) accumulation (fatty liver) in experimental animals and humans exposed accidentally and occupationally. It has been suggested that this effect could be due to a block in TG secretion. On the other hand, increased levels of plasmatic TG and cholesterol have been described in rats after dietary exposure to Aroclor 1254 (Aro) and other PCBs; hypertriglyceridemia and hypertension have been also described in humans exposed for long periods to low concentrations of PCBs. Since the study of hepatic lipid metabolism and its alteration by toxic chemicals is complicated in the whole animal, short term cultures of adult rat hepatocytes have been used. We have described a system for the long term culture of adult rat hepatocytes which for several weeks maintain differentiated functions, like fatty acid and TG synthesis and their export to the culture medium. In this paper we used this culture system to study the effect of long-term exposure to micromolar concentrations of Aro on the secretion of lipids by cultured hepatocytes. 27 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Tailored weight loss intervention in obese adults within primary care practice: Rationale, design, and methods of Choose to Lose

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Sheri J.; Risica, Patricia M.; Gans, Kim M.; Marcus, Bess H.; Eaton, Charles B.

    2014-01-01

    Although there are efficacious weight loss interventions that can improve health and delay onset of diabetes and hypertension, these interventions have not been translated into clinical practice. The primary objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness and cost effectiveness of a tailored lifestyle intervention in primary care patients. Patients were recruited by their primary care physicians and eligible participants were randomized to an enhanced intervention or augmented usual care. All participants met with a lifestyle counselor to set calorie and physical activity goals and to discuss behavioral strategies at baseline, 6 and 12 months. During the first year, enhanced intervention participants receive monthly counseling phone calls to assist in attaining and maintaining their goals. Enhanced intervention participants also receive weekly mailings consisting of tailored and non-tailored print materials and videos focusing on weight loss, physical activity promotion and healthy eating. The second year focuses on maintenance with enhanced intervention participants receiving tailored and non-tailored print materials and videos regularly throughout the year. Augmented usual care participants receive five informational handouts on weight loss across the two years. This enhanced intervention that consists of multiple modalities of print, telephone, and video with limited face-to-face counseling holds promise for being effective for encouraging weight loss, increasing physical activity and healthy eating, and also for being cost effective and generalizable for wide clinical use. This study will fill an important gap in our knowledge regarding the translation and dissemination of research from efficacy studies to best practices in clinical settings. PMID:24937016

  9. Incidence of adult Huntington's disease in the UK: a UK-based primary care study and a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Wexler, Nancy S; Collett, Laura; Wexler, Alice R; Rawlins, Michael D; Tabrizi, Sarah J; Douglas, Ian; Smeeth, Liam; Evans, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The prevalence of Huntington's disease (HD) recorded in the UK primary care records has increased twofold between 1990 and 2010. This investigation was undertaken to assess whether this might be due to an increased incidence. We have also undertaken a systematic review of published estimates of the incidence of HD. Setting Incident patients with a new diagnosis of HD were identified from the primary care records of the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD). The systematic review included all published estimates of the incidence of HD in defined populations. Participants A total of 393 incident cases of HD were identified from the CPRD database between 1990 and 2010 from a total population of 9 282 126 persons. Primary and secondary outcome measures The incidence of HD per million person-years was estimated. From the systematic review, the extent of heterogeneity of published estimates of the incidence of HD was examined using the I2 statistic. Results The data showed that the incidence of HD has remained constant between 1990 and 2010 with an overall rate of 7.2 (95% CI 6.5 to 7.9) per million person-years. The systematic review identified 14 independent estimates of incidence with substantial heterogeneity and consistently lower rates reported in studies from East Asia compared with those from Australia, North America and some—though not all—those from Europe. Differences in incidence estimates did not appear to be explained solely by differences in case ascertainment or diagnostic methods. Conclusions The rise in the prevalence of diagnosed HD in the UK, between 1990 and 2010, cannot be attributed to an increase in incidence. Globally, estimates of the incidence of HD show evidence of substantial heterogeneity with consistently lower rates in East Asia and parts of Europe. Modifiers may play an important role in determining the vulnerability of different populations to expansions of the HD allele. PMID:26908513

  10. Cardiac arrhythmias as the initial manifestation of adult primary Sjögren's syndrome: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Liang, Minrui; Bao, Liwen; Xiong, Nanqing; Jin, Bo; Ni, Huanchun; Zhang, Jinjin; Zou, Hejian; Luo, Xinping; Li, Jian

    2015-09-01

    Two middle-aged female patients presenting with heart palpitation and electrocardiogram revealed complex cardiac arrhythmias. A review of systems was positive for dry mouth and transient arthralgia, while laboratory and instrumental tests enabled us to make the diagnosis of primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS). Cardiac electrophysiology revealed atrioventricular node dysfunction and impaired intraventricular conduction. Prednisone therapy induced a significant improvement in symptoms and electrocardiographic readings. The diagnosis of pSS should be considered in a patient presenting with complex cardiac arrhythmias.

  11. Correlates of Opioid Use in Adults with Self-Reported Drug Use Recruited from Public Safety-Net Primary Care Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Ries, Richard; Krupski, Antoinette; West, Imara I.; Maynard, Charles; Bumgardner, Kristin; Donovan, Dennis; Dunn, Chris; Roy-Byrne, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to compare demographic, clinical, and survival characteristics of drug-using safety-net primary care patients who used or did not use opioids, and to examine treatment implications of our findings. Methods The sample consisted of 868 adults who reported illicit drug use in the 90 days prior to study enrollment, 396 (45.6%) of whom were opioid users. Results Multiple measures indicated that, as a group, opioid users were less physically and psychiatrically healthy than drug users who did not endorse using opioids, and were heavy users of medical services (e.g., emergency departments, inpatient hospitals, outpatient medical) at considerable public expense. After adjusting for age, they were 2.61 (CI, 1.48-4.61) times more likely to die in the 1 to 5 years after study enrollment and more likely to die from accidental poisoning than non-opioid users. Subgroup analyses suggested patients using any non-prescribed opioids had more serious drug problems including more intravenous drug use and greater HIV risk than patients using opioids only as prescribed. Conclusions Use of opioids adds a dimension of severity over and above illicit drug use as it presents in the primary care setting. Opioid users may benefit from psychiatric and addiction care integrated into their primary care setting, naloxone overdose prevention kits, and prevention efforts such as clean needle exchanges. Addiction or primary care providers are in a key position to facilitate change among such patients, especially the third or more opioid users having a goal of abstinence from drugs. PMID:26428361

  12. Progressive adult primary glioblastoma in the medulla oblongata with an unmethylated MGMT promoter and without an IDH mutation.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Akifumi; Nakada, Mitsutoshi; Watanabe, Takuya; Hayashi, Yutaka; Sabit, Hemragul; Kato, Yukinari; Suzuki, Shioto; Ooi, Akishi; Sato, Hiroshi; Hamada, Jun-ichiro

    2013-07-01

    A 63-year-old woman presented with dizziness followed by gait disturbance and loss of appetite. Magnetic resonance image (MRI) showed that a lesion located in the medulla oblongata, appearing as hyperintense on T2-weighted image and with slight enhancement area, appeared in the ventral aspect of the mass on T1-weighted MR imaging with gadolinium. It was diagnosed as high-grade brain-stem glioma and the patient underwent chemoradiotherapy. However, she died 18 days after treatment, and autopsy was performed. The pathological diagnosis was glioblastoma (GBM) with unmethylated O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase promoter and wild isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 gene. We report an extremely short clinical course of adult GBM in medulla oblongata with genetic analysis and present a review of the literature.

  13. Obeticholic acid for the treatment of primary biliary cholangitis in adult patients: clinical utility and patient selection

    PubMed Central

    Bowlus, Christopher L

    2016-01-01

    Primary biliary cholangitis (PBC), previously known as primary biliary “cirrhosis”, is a rare autoimmune liver disease characterized by the hallmark autoantibodies to mitochondrial antigens and immune-mediated destruction of small bile duct epithelial cells leading to cholestasis and cirrhosis. Surprisingly, while immune modulators have not been effective in the treatment of PBC, supplementation with the hydrophilic bile acid (BA) ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) has been demonstrated to slow the disease progression. However, a significant minority of PBC patients do not have a complete response to UDCA and remain at risk of continued disease progression. Although the mechanisms of action are not well understood, UDCA provided proof of concept for BA therapy in PBC. Obeticholic acid (OCA), a novel derivative of the human BA chenodeoxycholic acid, is a potent agonist of the nuclear hormone receptor farnesoid X receptor, which regulates BA synthesis and transport. A series of clinical trials of OCA in PBC, primarily in combination with UDCA, have established that OCA leads to significant reductions in serum alkaline phosphatase that are predicted to lead to improved clinical outcomes, while dose-dependent pruritus has been the most common adverse effect. On the basis of these studies, OCA was given conditional approval by the US Food and Drug Administration with plans to establish the long-term clinical efficacy of OCA in patients with advanced PBC. PMID:27621676

  14. Primary hyperoxaluria in an adult presenting with end-stage renal failure together with hypercalcemia and hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Karadag, Serhat; Gursu, Meltem; Aydin, Zeki; Uzun, Sami; Dogan, Oner; Ozturk, Savas; Kazancioglu, Rumeyza

    2011-10-01

    Primary hyperoxaluria (PH) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by overproduction of oxalate due to specific enzyme deficiencies in glyoxylate metabolism. The primary clinical presentation is in the form of recurrent urolithiasis, progressive nephrocalcinosis, end-stage renal disease, and systemic oxalosis. Herein, we present a case of PH who was diagnosed at 47 years of age after 6 years on hemodialysis. He presented with fatigue, anorexia, weight loss, and was found to have cachexia, diffuse edema, hepatomegaly, ascites, hypercalcemia, hyperphosphatemia, hypoalbuminemia, low parathyroid hormone levels, lytic and resorptive areas in the vertebrae, diffusely increased echogenity of the liver, multiple renal stones, and bilateral nephrocalcinosis. Bone marrow biopsy showed calcium oxalate crystals and crystal granulomas. The liver biopsy could not be performed. The absence of an identifiable reason for secondary forms, the severity of the clinical presentation, and pathological findings led to the diagnosis of PH2. He died while waiting for a potential liver and kidney donor. The presented case is consistent with the literature as he had renal stone disease in the third decade and end-stage renal disease in the fifth decade. Hypercalcemia was thought to be due to osteoclast-stimulating activity of macrophages constituting the granuloma. Erythropoietin-resistant anemia and hypothyroidism were thought to be due to accumulation of oxalate in the bone marrow and thyroid gland, respectively. It is very important to keep in mind the possibility of PH when faced with a patient with nephrocalcinosis and oxalate stone disease.

  15. A Comparative Study of Intravenous Immunoglobulin and Subcutaneous Immunoglobulin in Adult Patients with Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Shabaninejad, Hosein; Asgharzadeh, Asra; Rezaei, Nima; Rezapoor, Aziz

    2016-01-01

    Subcutaneous immunoglobulin (SCIG) is a new therapeutic procedure for patients with primary immunodeficiency (PI). This research is a systematic review of studies on the efficacy and safety of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and SCIG in adult patients with PI. This study includes a systematic review of cohorts and randomized clinical trials (24 articles) from 5 databases with no time limits. Random effects meta-analysis was performed for outcomes such as efficacy and safety. Standard mean difference (SMD) of serum immunoglobulin level was equal to 0.336 (P <0.01; 0.205-0.467) and the odds ratio (OR) of side effects was 0.497 (P=0.1; 0.180-1.371). The results indicate that SCIG leads to a higher level of immunoglobulin and a reduction in side effects but shows the same infection rate as IVIG. Our analysis shows that shifting from IVIG to SCIG therapy can have clinical benefits for PI patients.

  16. Evaluating the Implementation of Health Checks for Adults With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities in Primary Care: The Importance of Organizational Context.

    PubMed

    Durbin, Janet; Selick, Avra; Casson, Ian; Green, Laurie; Spassiani, Natasha; Perry, Andrea; Lunsky, Yona

    2016-04-01

    Compared to other adults, those with intellectual and developmental disabilities have more health issues, yet are less likely to receive preventative care. One strategy that has shown success in increasing prevention activities and early detection of illness is the periodic comprehensive health assessment (the health check). Effectively moving evidence into practice is a complex process that often receives inadequate attention. This qualitative study evaluates the implementation of the health check at two primary-care clinics in Ontario, Canada, and the influence of the clinic context on implementation decisions. Each clinic implemented the same core components; however, due to contextual differences, some components were operationalized differently. Adapting to the setting context is important to ensuring successful and sustainable implementation.

  17. The Influence of Primary Care and Hospital Supply on Ambulatory Care–Sensitive Hospitalizations Among Adults in Brazil, 1999–2007

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Veneza B.; Turci, Maria A.; Guanais, Frederico C.; Bonolo, Palmira F.; Lima-Costa, Maria F.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. We assessed the influence of changes in primary care and hospital supply on rates of ambulatory care–sensitive (ACS) hospitalizations among adults in Brazil. Methods. We aggregated data on nearly 60 million public sector hospitalizations between 1999 and 2007 to Brazil's 558 microregions. We modeled adult ACS hospitalization rates as a function of area-level socioeconomic factors, health services supply, Family Health Program (FHP) availability, and health needs by using dynamic panel estimation techniques to control for endogenous explanatory variables. Results. The ACS hospitalization rates declined by more than 5% annually. When we controlled for other factors, FHP availability was associated with lower ACS hospitalization rates, whereas private or nonprofit hospital beds were associated with higher rates. Areas with highest predicted ACS hospitalization rates were those with the highest private or nonprofit hospital bed supply and with low (< 25%) FHP coverage. The lowest predicted rates were seen for areas with high (> 75%) FHP coverage and very few private or nonprofit hospital beds. Conclusions. These results highlight the contribution of the FHP to improved health system performance and reflect the complexity of the health reform processes under way in Brazil. PMID:21330584

  18. Necrotizing Fasciitis Secondary to a Primary Suture for Anoperineal Trauma by Motorcycle Accident in a Healthy Adult

    PubMed Central

    Saigusa, Susumu; Ohi, Masaki; Imaoka, Hiroki; Uratani, Ryo; Kobayashi, Minako; Inoue, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    A 41-year-old man experienced a swollen scrotum three days after a motorcycle accident and presented to our hospital. He had had a primary suture repair for anoperineal trauma in an outside hospital at the time of the injury. He presented to us with general fatigue, low grade fevers, and perineal pain. Abdominal computed tomography showed subcutaneous emphysema from the scrotum to the left chest. The sutured wound had foul-smelling discharge and white exudate. We made the diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis and immediately opened the sutured wound and performed initial debridement and lavage with copious irrigation. We continued antibiotics and lavage of the wound until the infection was controlled. Fortunately, the necrotizing fasciitis did not worsen and he was discharged after 15 days. Our experience indicates that anoperineal injuries should not be closed without careful and intensive follow-up due to the potential of developing necrotizing fasciitis. PMID:26347831

  19. Risk of second primary malignancies in a population-based study of adult patients with essential thrombocythemia

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Rajesh; Giri, Smith; Pathak, Ranjan; Bhatt, Vijaya Raj

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the risk of second primary malignancy (SPM) and survival of patients with essential thrombocythemia (ET). METHODS We identified all patients with ET diagnosed during 2001 to 2011 from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) 18 database. Actuarial and relative survival methods were used to calculate the survival statistics. We utilized the SEER 13 database to calculate SPM. We used multiple primary standardized incidence ratio (SIR) session of the SEER*Stat software (version 8.1.5) to calculate SIR and excess risk of SPM for ET patients. RESULTS Age standardized five-year cause-specific survival was greater for patients < 50 years vs those ≥ 50 years (99.4% vs 93.5%, P < 0.01). Five-year cause-specific survival was lower for men vs women (70.2% vs 79.7%). A total of 201 patients (2.46%) developed SPM at a median age of 75 years. SPMs occurred at an observed/expected (O/E) ratio of 1.26 (95%CI: 1.09-1.45, P = 0.002) with an absolute excess risk (AER) of 37.44 per 10000 population. A significantly higher risk was noted for leukemia (O/E 3.78; 95%CI: 2.20-6.05, P < 0.001; AER 11.28/10000). CONCLUSION ET patients have an excellent cause-specific five-year survival but are at an increased risk of SPM, particularly leukemia, which may contribute to excess deaths. PMID:27579252

  20. Processing of positive-causal and negative-causal coherence relations in primary school children and adults: a test of the cumulative cognitive complexity approach in German.

    PubMed

    Knoepke, Julia; Richter, Tobias; Isberner, Maj-Britt; Naumann, Johannes; Neeb, Yvonne; Weinert, Sabine

    2017-03-01

    Establishing local coherence relations is central to text comprehension. Positive-causal coherence relations link a cause and its consequence, whereas negative-causal coherence relations add a contrastive meaning (negation) to the causal link. According to the cumulative cognitive complexity approach, negative-causal coherence relations are cognitively more complex than positive-causal ones. Therefore, they require greater cognitive effort during text comprehension and are acquired later in language development. The present cross-sectional study tested these predictions for German primary school children from Grades 1 to 4 and adults in reading and listening comprehension. Accuracy data in a semantic verification task support the predictions of the cumulative cognitive complexity approach. Negative-causal coherence relations are cognitively more demanding than positive-causal ones. Moreover, our findings indicate that children's comprehension of negative-causal coherence relations continues to develop throughout the course of primary school. Findings are discussed with respect to the generalizability of the cumulative cognitive complexity approach to German.

  1. Efficacy and safety of ClairYg®, a ready-to-use intravenous immunoglobulin, in adult patients with primary immune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Slama, Borhane; Fain, Olivier; Maisonneuve, Hervé; Jourdan, Eric; Viallard, Jean-François; Ouaja, Rabye; Alfa-Cissé, Ousmane; Godeau, Bertrand

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The present study was designed to assess the efficacy and safety of IGNG that is a new liquid, saccharose and maltose-free highly purified ready-to-use 5% intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg), in primary immune thrombocytopenic patients with severe thrombocytopenia. Methods: Nineteen adults with a platelet count ≤ 25 × 109/L received a single dose of IGNG (1 g/kg) on Day 1, with a second identical dose on Day 3 if needed. Patients were followed for 30 days. Primary endpoint was the response rate, defined as the proportion of patients with a platelet count ≥ 50 × 109/L within 96 hours after the first IGNG dose. Results: All but one of the 17 evaluable patients for efficacy responded with an overall response rate of 94.1% (95% CI 71.3%-99.9%). Response was observed after only one infusion (1 g/kg boby weight) in 11 patients (59%) and the others required a second dose. Mean time to response was 2.2 days. Maximum platelet count was reached within 1 week after the first dose and lasted for approximately 2 weeks. Patients requiring a second dose had lower platelet counts at baseline than patients requiring a single dose. In the 19 evaluable patients for safety, IGNG demonstrated good safety, good hepatic and renal tolerance, and did not induce hemolysis. This trial was registered at the French Medical Agency (AFSSAPS) as #DI n°060735. PMID:28203488

  2. Response properties of whisker-associated primary afferent neurons following infraorbital nerve transection with microsurgical repair in adult rats

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Bo; Zanoun, Rami R.; Carvell, George E.; Washington, Kia M.

    2016-01-01

    The rodent whisker/trigeminal system, characterized by high spatial and temporal resolution, provides an experimental model for developing new therapies for improving sensory functions of damaged peripheral nerves. Here, we use controlled whisker stimulation and single-unit recordings of trigeminal ganglion cells to examine in detail the nature and time course of functional recovery of mechanoreceptive afferents following nerve transection with microsurgical repair of the infraorbital nerve (ION) branch of the trigeminal nerve in adult rats. Response measures include rapid vs. slow adaptation, firing rate, interspike intervals, latency, and angular (directional) tuning. Whisker-evoked responses, readily observable by 3 wk post-transection, recover progressively for at least the next 5 wk. All cells in transected animals, as in control cases, responded to deflections of single whiskers only, but topography within the ganglion was clearly disrupted. The time course and extent of recovery of quantitative response measures were receptor dependent. Cells displaying slowly adapting (SA) properties recovered more quickly than rapidly adapting (RA) populations, and for some response measures—notably evoked firing rates—closely approached or attained control levels by 8 wk post-transection. Angular tuning of RA cells was slightly better than control units, whereas SA tuning did not differ from control values. Nerve conduction times and refractory periods, examined separately using electrical stimulation of the ION, were slower than normal in all transected animals and poorly reflected recovery of whisker-evoked response latencies and interspike intervals. Results underscore the need for multiple therapeutic strategies that target different aspects of functional restitution following peripheral nerve injury. PMID:26792886

  3. Potential prescription patterns and errors in elderly adult patients attending public primary health care centers in Mexico City

    PubMed Central

    Corona-Rojo, José Antonio; Altagracia-Martínez, Marina; Kravzov-Jinich, Jaime; Vázquez-Cervantes, Laura; Pérez-Montoya, Edilberto; Rubio-Poo, Consuelo

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Six out of every 10 elderly persons live in developing countries. Objective To analyze and assess the drug prescription patterns and errors in elderly outpatients attending public health care centers in Mexico City, Mexico. Materials and methods A descriptive and retrospective study was conducted in 2007. Fourteen hundred prescriptions were analyzed. Prescriptions of ambulatory adults aged >70 years who were residents of Mexico City for at least two years were included. Prescription errors were divided into two groups: (1) administrative and legal, and (2) pharmacotherapeutic. In group 2, we analyzed drug dose strength, administration route, frequency of drug administration, treatment length, potential drug–drug interactions, and contraindications. Variables were classified as correct or incorrect based on clinical literature. Variables for each drug were dichotomized as correct (0) or incorrect (1). A Prescription Index (PI) was calculated by considering each drug on the prescription. SPSS statistical software was used to process the collected data (95% confidence interval; p <0.05). Results The drug prescription pattern in elderly outpatients shows that 12 drugs account for 70.72% (2880) of prescribed drugs. The most prescribed drugs presented potential pharmacotherapeutic errors (as defined in the present study). Acetylsalicylic acid–captopril was the most common potential interaction (not clinically assessed). Potential prescription error was high (53% of total prescriptions). Most of the prescription errors were due to omissions of dosage, administration route, and length of treatment and may potentially cause harm to the elderly outpatients. Conclusions A high number of potential prescription errors were found, mainly due to omissions. The drug prescription pattern of the study population is mainly constituted by 12 drugs. The results indicate that prescription quality depends on the number of prescribed drugs per prescription (p < 0

  4. Effect of alendronate on bone mineral density in adult patients with Laron syndrome (primary growth hormone insensitivity).

    PubMed

    Eshed, Varda; Benbassat, Carlos A; Laron, Zvi

    2006-04-01

    Severe short stature resulting from a deficiency in insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) is a prominent feature of Laron syndrome (LS). Whether patients with LS are osteopenic or not, and whether they need treatment with bisphosphonates, remains uncertain. The aim of this study was to investigate the action of alendronate on the IGF-I-deficient bones of adult patients with LS and osteoporosis, as determined by dual X-ray absorptiometry . Seven patients (5 women and 2 men) of mean age 40.8+/-7.6 years and mean bone mass density (BMD) 0.843+/-0.06 g/cm2 (T score -2.9+/-0.5) at the lumbar spine and 0.734+/-0.11 g/cm2 (T score -2.2+/-0.9) at the femoral neck were treated with alendronate 70 mg once/weekly over a 12-month period. Treatment led to an increase of 5.3% in BMD (p=0.038) at the femoral neck. There was a similar trend at the lumbar spine, but the difference was not statistically significant (2.3%, p=0.34). Mean total alkaline phosphatase decreased by 14% from normal range at baseline (p=0.007). Urinary deoxypyridinoline levels, which were elevated at baseline (10+/-2.3 nM/mMcre), showed a nonsignificant change during treatment. Our study suggests that treatment with alendronate may have positive effects in patients with LS and low BMD on dual X-ray absorptiometry.

  5. Seizure characteristics and outcomes in 508 Chinese adult patients undergoing primary resection of low-grade gliomas: a clinicopathological study.

    PubMed

    You, Gan; Sha, Zhi-Yi; Yan, Wei; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Yong-Zhi; Li, Shao-Wu; Sang, Lin; Wang, Zi; Li, Gui-Lin; Li, Shou-Wei; Song, Yi-Jun; Kang, Chun-Sheng; Jiang, Tao

    2012-02-01

    Seizure is a common presenting manifestation and plays an important role in the clinical presentation and quality of life for patients with low-grade gliomas (LGGs). The authors set out to identify factors that influence preoperative seizure characteristics and postoperative seizure control. Cases involving adult patients who had undergone initial surgery for LGGs in a single institution between 2005 and 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to identify factors associated with preoperative seizures and postoperative seizure control. Of the 508 patients in the series, 350 (68.9%) presented with seizures. Age less than 38 years and cortical involvement of tumor were more likely to be associated with seizures (P = .003 and .001, respectively, multivariate logistic analysis). For the cohort of 350 patients with seizures, Engel classification was used to evaluate 6- and 12-month outcome after surgery: completely seizure free (Engel class I), 65.3% and 62.5%; not seizure free (Engel classes II, III, IV), 34.7% and 37.5%. After multivariate logistic analysis, favorable seizure prognosis was more common in patients with secondary generalized seizure (P = .006) and with calcification on MRI (.031). With respect to treatment-related variables, patients achieved much better seizure control after gross total resection than after subtotal resection (P < .0001). Ki67 was an independent molecular marker predicting poor seizure control in the patients with a history of seizure if overexpressed but was not a predictor for those without preoperative seizures. These factors may provide insight into developing effective treatment strategies aimed at prolonging patients' survival.

  6. Laboratory Measures as Proxies for Primary Care Encounters: Implications for Quantifying Clinical Retention Among HIV-Infected Adults in North America.

    PubMed

    Rebeiro, Peter F; Althoff, Keri N; Lau, Bryan; Gill, John; Abraham, Alison G; Horberg, Michael A; Kitahata, Mari M; Yehia, Baligh R; Samji, Hasina; Brooks, John T; Buchacz, Kate; Napravnik, Sonia; Silverberg, Michael J; Rachlis, Anita; Gebo, Kelly A; Sterling, Timothy R; Moore, Richard D; Gange, Stephen J

    2015-12-01

    Because of limitations in the availability of data on primary care encounters, patient retention in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) care is often estimated using laboratory measurement dates as proxies for clinical encounters, leading to possible outcome misclassification. This study included 83,041 HIV-infected adults from 14 clinical cohorts in the North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration on Research and Design (NA-ACCORD) who had ≥1 HIV primary care encounters during 2000-2010, contributing 468,816 person-years of follow-up. Encounter-based retention (REB) was defined as ≥2 encounters in a calendar year, ≥90 days apart. Laboratory-based retention (RLB) was defined similarly, using the dates of CD4-positive cell counts or HIV-1 RNA measurements. Percentage of agreement and the κ statistic were used to characterize agreement between RLB and REB. Logistic regression with generalized estimating equations and stabilized inverse-probability-of-selection weights was used to elucidate temporal trends and the discriminatory power of RLB as a predictor of REB, accounting for age, sex, race/ethnicity, primary HIV risk factor, and cohort site as potential confounders. Both REB and RLB increased from 2000 to 2010 (from 67% to 78% and from 65% to 77%, respectively), though REB was higher than RLB throughout (P < 0.01). RLB agreed well with REB (80%-86% agreement; κ = 0.55-0.62, P < 0.01) and had a strong, imperfect ability to discriminate between persons retained and not retained in care by REB (C statistic: C = 0.81, P < 0.05). As a proxy for REB, RLB had a sensitivity and specificity of 84% and 77%, respectively, with misclassification error of 18%.

  7. Laboratory Measures as Proxies for Primary Care Encounters: Implications for Quantifying Clinical Retention Among HIV-Infected Adults in North America

    PubMed Central

    Rebeiro, Peter F.; Althoff, Keri N.; Lau, Bryan; Gill, John; Abraham, Alison G.; Horberg, Michael A.; Kitahata, Mari M.; Yehia, Baligh R.; Samji, Hasina; Brooks, John T.; Buchacz, Kate; Napravnik, Sonia; Silverberg, Michael J.; Rachlis, Anita; Gebo, Kelly A.; Sterling, Timothy R.; Moore, Richard D.; Gange, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Because of limitations in the availability of data on primary care encounters, patient retention in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) care is often estimated using laboratory measurement dates as proxies for clinical encounters, leading to possible outcome misclassification. This study included 83,041 HIV-infected adults from 14 clinical cohorts in the North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration on Research and Design (NA-ACCORD) who had ≥1 HIV primary care encounters during 2000–2010, contributing 468,816 person-years of follow-up. Encounter-based retention (REB) was defined as ≥2 encounters in a calendar year, ≥90 days apart. Laboratory-based retention (RLB) was defined similarly, using the dates of CD4-positive cell counts or HIV-1 RNA measurements. Percentage of agreement and the κ statistic were used to characterize agreement between RLB and REB. Logistic regression with generalized estimating equations and stabilized inverse-probability-of-selection weights was used to elucidate temporal trends and the discriminatory power of RLB as a predictor of REB, accounting for age, sex, race/ethnicity, primary HIV risk factor, and cohort site as potential confounders. Both REB and RLB increased from 2000 to 2010 (from 67% to 78% and from 65% to 77%, respectively), though REB was higher than RLB throughout (P < 0.01). RLB agreed well with REB (80%–86% agreement; κ = 0.55–0.62, P < 0.01) and had a strong, imperfect ability to discriminate between persons retained and not retained in care by REB (C statistic: C = 0.81, P < 0.05). As a proxy for REB, RLB had a sensitivity and specificity of 84% and 77%, respectively, with misclassification error of 18%. PMID:26578717

  8. Integrated breathing and relaxation training (the Papworth method) for adults with asthma in primary care: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Holloway, Elizabeth A; West, Robert J

    2007-01-01

    Background An integrated breathing and relaxation technique known as the Papworth method has been implemented by physiotherapists since the 1960s for patients with asthma and dysfunctional breathing, but no controlled trials have been reported. This study evaluated the effectiveness of the Papworth method in a randomised controlled trial. Methods Eighty‐five patients (36 men) were individually randomised to the control group (n = 46) or to the intervention group receiving five sessions of treatment by the Papworth method (n = 39). Both groups received usual medical care. Assessments were undertaken at baseline, post‐treatment (6 months after baseline) and at 12 months. The primary outcome measure was the St George's Respiratory Symptoms Questionnaire (SGRQ). Secondary outcome measures included the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), the Nijmegen dysfunctional breathing questionnaire and objective measures of respiratory function. Results Post‐treatment and 12 month data were available for 78 and 72 patients, respectively. At the post‐treatment assessment the mean (SD) score on the SGRQ Symptom subscale was 21.8 (18.1) in the intervention group and 32.8 (20.1) in the control group (p = 0.001 for the difference). At the 12 month follow‐up the corresponding figures were 24.9 (17.9) and 33.5 (15.9) (p = 0.007 for the difference). SGRQ Total scores and HADS and Nijmegen scores were similarly significantly lower in the intervention group than in the control group. The groups did not differ significantly following the treatment on objective measures of respiratory function except for relaxed breathing rate. Conclusions The Papworth method appears to ameliorate respiratory symptoms, dysfunctional breathing and adverse mood compared with usual care. Further controlled trials are warranted to confirm this finding, assess the effect in other patient groups and determine whether there is some effect on objective measures of

  9. A Small Motor Cortex Lesion Abolished Ocular Dominance Plasticity in the Adult Mouse Primary Visual Cortex and Impaired Experience-Dependent Visual Improvements.

    PubMed

    Pielecka-Fortuna, Justyna; Kalogeraki, Evgenia; Greifzu, Franziska; Löwel, Siegrid

    2015-01-01

    It was previously shown that a small lesion in the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) prevented both cortical plasticity and sensory learning in the adult mouse visual system: While 3-month-old control mice continued to show ocular dominance (OD) plasticity in their primary visual cortex (V1) after monocular deprivation (MD), age-matched mice with a small photothrombotically induced (PT) stroke lesion in S1, positioned at least 1 mm anterior to the anterior border of V1, no longer expressed OD-plasticity. In addition, in the S1-lesioned mice, neither the experience-dependent increase of the spatial frequency threshold ("visual acuity") nor of the contrast threshold ("contrast sensitivity") of the optomotor reflex through the open eye was present. To assess whether these plasticity impairments can also occur if a lesion is placed more distant from V1, we tested the effect of a PT-lesion in the secondary motor cortex (M2). We observed that mice with a small M2-lesion restricted to the superficial cortical layers no longer expressed an OD-shift towards the open eye after 7 days of MD in V1 of the lesioned hemisphere. Consistent with previous findings about the consequences of an S1-lesion, OD-plasticity in V1 of the nonlesioned hemisphere of the M2-lesioned mice was still present. In addition, the experience-dependent improvements of both visual acuity and contrast sensitivity of the open eye were severely reduced. In contrast, sham-lesioned mice displayed both an OD-shift and improvements of visual capabilities of their open eye. To summarize, our data indicate that even a very small lesion restricted to the superficial cortical layers and more than 3mm anterior to the anterior border of V1 compromised V1-plasticity and impaired learning-induced visual improvements in adult mice. Thus both plasticity phenomena cannot only depend on modality-specific and local nerve cell networks but are clearly influenced by long-range interactions even from distant brain regions.

  10. A Small Motor Cortex Lesion Abolished Ocular Dominance Plasticity in the Adult Mouse Primary Visual Cortex and Impaired Experience-Dependent Visual Improvements

    PubMed Central

    Pielecka-Fortuna, Justyna; Kalogeraki, Evgenia; Greifzu, Franziska; Löwel, Siegrid

    2015-01-01

    It was previously shown that a small lesion in the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) prevented both cortical plasticity and sensory learning in the adult mouse visual system: While 3-month-old control mice continued to show ocular dominance (OD) plasticity in their primary visual cortex (V1) after monocular deprivation (MD), age-matched mice with a small photothrombotically induced (PT) stroke lesion in S1, positioned at least 1 mm anterior to the anterior border of V1, no longer expressed OD-plasticity. In addition, in the S1-lesioned mice, neither the experience-dependent increase of the spatial frequency threshold (“visual acuity”) nor of the contrast threshold (“contrast sensitivity”) of the optomotor reflex through the open eye was present. To assess whether these plasticity impairments can also occur if a lesion is placed more distant from V1, we tested the effect of a PT-lesion in the secondary motor cortex (M2). We observed that mice with a small M2-lesion restricted to the superficial cortical layers no longer expressed an OD-shift towards the open eye after 7 days of MD in V1 of the lesioned hemisphere. Consistent with previous findings about the consequences of an S1-lesion, OD-plasticity in V1 of the nonlesioned hemisphere of the M2-lesioned mice was still present. In addition, the experience-dependent improvements of both visual acuity and contrast sensitivity of the open eye were severely reduced. In contrast, sham-lesioned mice displayed both an OD-shift and improvements of visual capabilities of their open eye. To summarize, our data indicate that even a very small lesion restricted to the superficial cortical layers and more than 3mm anterior to the anterior border of V1 compromised V1-plasticity and impaired learning-induced visual improvements in adult mice. Thus both plasticity phenomena cannot only depend on modality-specific and local nerve cell networks but are clearly influenced by long-range interactions even from distant brain

  11. Prevalence and factors associated with the presence of non alcoholic fatty liver disease in an apparently healthy adult population in primary care units

    PubMed Central

    Caballería, Llorenç; Auladell, Ma Antonia; Torán, Pere; Miranda, Dolores; Aznar, Jesús; Pera, Guillem; Gil, Dolors; Muñoz, Laura; Planas, Jaume; Canut, Santiago; Bernad, Jesús; Aubà, Josep; Pizarro, Gregorio; Aizpurua, Miren Maite; Altaba, Anna; Tibau, Albert

    2007-01-01

    Background Fatty liver disease is characterized by the accumulation of fat vacuoles inside of the hepatocytes. Non alcoholic fatty liver is associated with obesity, type 2 diabetes, dyslipemia, the intake of certain drugs and with the so-called metabolic syndrome. However, there is little information on the clinical relevance of this disorder as a healthcare problem in the general population, since the studies published generally include a limited number of patients and the diagnosis is established on the basis of clear biochemical alterations and liver biopsy. Methods/Design The aim of the study is the prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in a general adult population by hepatic ultrasonography. A population-based, descriptive, transversal, multicentre study. Eighteen primary care centres of the north of Barcelona and the Maresme Areas of Healthcare Management attending an urban and semi-urban population of 360.000 inhabitants. A randomized sample of 786 subjects of 15 years or older were selected from the population and assigned to the participating centres according to the Primary Care Information System (SIAP): This population is practically the same as the general population of the area. The following determinations will be carried out in all the participants: hepatic ultrasonography to detect fatty liver, a questionnaire concerning liver diseases, alcohol intake, smoking and drug use, physical examination including abdominal perimeter and body mass index and biochemical analysis including liver function tests and parameters related to the metabolic syndrome and the HAIR score. Ultrasonographic diagnosis of fatty liver will be made according to established criteria (American Gastroenterology Association) and diagnosis of metabolic syndrome according to the criteria of the European Group for the Study of Insulin Resistance. Discussion This study will attempt to determine the prevalence of non alcoholic fatty liver disease, as well as, the factors

  12. TRPA1-expressing primary afferents synapse with a morphologically identified subclass of substantia gelatinosa neurons in the adult rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Uta, Daisuke; Furue, Hidemasa; Pickering, Anthony E; Rashid, Md Harunor; Mizuguchi-Takase, Hiroko; Katafuchi, Toshihiko; Imoto, Keiji; Yoshimura, Megumu

    2010-06-01

    The TRPA1 channel has been proposed to be a molecular transducer of cold and inflammatory nociceptive signals. It is expressed on a subset of small primary afferent neurons both in the peripheral terminals, where it serves as a sensor, and on the central nerve endings in the dorsal horn. The substantia gelatinosa (SG) of the spinal cord is a key site for integration of noxious inputs. The SG neurons are morphologically and functionally heterogeneous and the precise synaptic circuits of the SG are poorly understood. We examined how activation of TRPA1 channels affects synaptic transmission onto SG neurons using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings and morphological analyses in adult rat spinal cord slices. Cinnamaldehyde (TRPA1 agonist) elicited a barrage of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) in a subset of the SG neurons that responded to allyl isothiocyanate (less specific TRPA1 agonist) and capsaicin (TRPV1 agonist). Cinnamaldehyde evoked EPSCs in vertical and radial but not islet or central SG cells. Notably, cinnamaldehyde produced no change in inhibitory postsynaptic currents and nor did it produce direct postsynaptic effects. In the presence of tetrodotoxin, cinnamaldehyde increased the frequency but not amplitude of miniature EPSCs. Intriguingly, cinnamaldehyde had a selective inhibitory action on monosynaptic C- (but not Adelta-) fiber-evoked EPSCs. These results indicate that activation of spinal TRPA1 presynaptically facilitates miniature excitatory synaptic transmission from primary afferents onto vertical and radial cells to initiate action potentials. The presence of TRPA1 channels on the central terminals raises the possibility of bidirectional modulatory action in morphologically identified subclasses of SG neurons.

  13. Localization of a locus (GLC1B) for adult-onset primary open angle glaucoma to the 2cen-q13 region

    SciTech Connect

    Stoilova, D.; Trifan, O.C.; Sarfarazi, M.

    1996-08-15

    Primary open angle glaucoma (GLC1) is a common ocular disorder with a characteristic degeneration of the optic nerve and visual field defects that is often associated with an elevated intraocular pressure. The severe but rare juvenile-onset type has previously been mapped to 1q21-q31, and its genetic heterogeneity has been established. Herein, we present a new locus (GLC1B) for one form of GLC1 on chromosome 2cen-q13 with a clinical presentation of low to moderate intraocular pressure, onset in late 40s, and a good response to medical treatment. Two-point and haplotype analyses of affected and unaffected meioses in six families provided maximum linkage information with D2S417, GATA112EO3, D2S113, D2S373, and D2S274 (lod scores ranging from 3.11 to 6.48) within a region of 8.5 cM that is flanked by D2S2161 and D2S2264. Analysis of affected meioses alone revealed no recombination with an additional two markers (D2S2264 and D2S135) in a region of 11.2 cM that is flanked by D2S2161 and D2S176. Analysis of unaffected meioses identified only one healthy 86-year-old male who has inherited the entire affected haplotype and, hence, is a gene carrier for this condition. Eight additional families with similar and/or different clinical presentation did not show any linkage to this region and, therefore, provided evidence for genetic heterogeneity of adult-onset primary open angle glaucoma. 63 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Signal Transduction Mechanism for Serotonin 5-HT2B Receptor-Mediated DNA Synthesis and Proliferation in Primary Cultures of Adult Rat Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Naito, Kota; Tanaka, Chizuru; Mitsuhashi, Manami; Moteki, Hajime; Kimura, Mitsutoshi; Natsume, Hideshi; Ogihara, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    The involvement of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) and the 5-HT2 receptor subtypes in the induction of DNA synthesis and proliferation was investigated in primary cultures of adult rat hepatocytes to elucidate the intracellular signal transduction mechanisms. Hepatocyte parenchymal cells maintained in a serum-free, defined medium, synthesized DNA and proliferated in the presence of 5-HT or a selective 5-HT2B receptor agonist, BW723C86, but not in the presence of 5-HT2A, or 5-HT2C receptor agonists (TCB-2 and CP809101, respectively), in a time- and dose-dependent manner. A selective 5-HT2B receptor antagonist, LY272015 (10(-7) M), and a specific phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor, U-73122 (10(-6) M), as well as specific inhibitors of growth-related signal transducers-including AG1478, LY294002, PD98059, and rapamycin-completely inhibited 5-HT (10(-6) M)- or BW723C86 (10(-6) M)-induced hepatocyte DNA synthesis and proliferation. Both 5-HT and BW723C86 were shown to significantly stimulate the phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor (EGF)/transforming growth factor (TGF)-α receptor tyrosine kinase (p175 kDa) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 2 on Western blot analysis. These results suggest that the proliferative mechanism of activating 5-HT is mediated mainly through 5-HT2B receptor-stimulated Gq/PLC and EGF/TGF-α-receptor/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/ERK2/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathways in primary cultured hepatocytes.

  15. Analysis of subsets of B cells, Breg, CD4Treg and CD8Treg cells in adult patients with primary selective IgM deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Louis, Ankmalika Gupta; Agrawal, Sudhanshu; Gupta, Sudhir

    2016-01-01

    Primary selective IgM deficiency (SIGMD) is a rare and recently IUIS-recognized primary immunodeficiency disease with increased susceptibility to infections, allergy, and autoimmune diseases. The pathogenesis of selective IgM remains unclear. The objective of the study was to understand the pathogenesis of selective IgM deficiency via a comprehensive analysis of subsets of B cells, naïve and memory subsets of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, and Breg, CD4Treg, and CD8Treg cells. Twenty adult patients with SIGMD (serum IgM 4 mg/dl-32 mg/dl) and age-and gender-matched healthy controls were studied. Naïve B cells, transitional B cells, marginal zone B cells, germinal center B cells, IgM memory B cells, switched memory B cells, plasmablasts, CD21low B cells, B1 cells, CXCR3+ naive and memory B cells; naïve, central memory, and effector memory subsets of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, and CD4Treg, CD8Treg and Breg were phenotypically analyzed using multicolor flow cytometry. A significant increase in CD21low, IgM memory B cells, Breg and CD8Treg, and a significant decreased in germinal center B cells, and CXCR3+ naïve and memory B cells were observed in SIGMD. These alterations in subsets of B cells, and Breg and CD8Treg cells may play a role in the pathogenesis of SIGMD. PMID:27168952

  16. Improving the diagnostic criteria for primary liver graft non-function in adults utilizing standard and transportable laboratory parameters. An outcome based analysis.

    PubMed

    Al-Freah, Mohammad A B; McPhail, Mark J W; Dionigi, Elena; Foxton, Matthew R; Auzinger, Georg; Rela, Mohamed; Wendon, Julia A; O'Grady, John G; Heneghan, Michael A; Heaton, Nigel D; Bernal, William

    2017-02-15

    Current diagnostic criteria for primary non-function (PNF) of liver grafts are based on clinical experience rather than statistical methods. A retrospective, single centre study was conducted of all adults (n=1,286) who underwent primary liver transplant 2000-2008 in our centre. Laboratory variable during the first post-liver transplant week were analysed. Forty two patients (3.7%) had 2-week graft failure. Transplant albumin, day-1 AST, day-1 lactate, day-3 bilirubin, day-3 INR and day-7 AST were independently associated with PNF on multivariate logistic regression. PNF score =(0.000280*D1AST)+(0.361*D1 Lactate)+(0.00884*D3 Bilirubin)+(0.940*D 3 INR)+(0.00153*D7 AST)-(0.0972*TxAlbumin)-4.5503. ROC analysis showed the model AUROC of 0.912 (0.889 -0.932) was superior to the current United Kingdom (UK) PNF criteria of 0.669 (0.634-0.704, p<0.0001). When applied to a validation cohort (n=386, 34.4% patients) the model had AUROC of 0.831 (0.789 -0.867) compared to the UK EGD criteria of 0.674 (0.624-0.721). The new model performed well after exclusion of patients with marginal grafts and when modified to include variables from the first three post-LT days only (AUROC of 0.818, 0.776-0.856, p=0.001). This model is superior to the current UK PNF criteria and is based on statistical methods. The model is also applicable to recipients of all types of grafts (marginal and non-marginal). This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. A study on knowledge, attitude, and practice towards premarital carrier screening among adults attending primary healthcare centers in a region in Oman

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite that hereditary diseases are widespread among the Arab population due to high rates of consanguineous marriages, research regarding community awareness towards premarital carrier screening in some countries such as Oman, is extremely scarce. This study aimed to investigate knowledge and attitude towards premarital carrier screening (PMCS) in Oman. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted using a self-administered questionnaire which was distributed to 400 Omani adults aged 20–35 who attended primary healthcare institutions at the South Batinah Governorate in Oman. Results The majority of the participants (84.5%) believed that PMCS was necessary, and about half of them (49.5%) supported the view of making PMCS compulsory. On the contrary, approximately one third (30.5%) of the participants reported that they were not in favor of taking the blood screening test. Overall, unwillingness to perform pre-marital testing was associated with female gender, younger age, being single, less education, and increased income. Conclusion Despite the relatively high level of knowledge, about one third of the participants were still reluctant to carry out premarital testing. Such attitude calls for immediate need for community-based campaigns to encourage the public to do premarital testing. PMID:24742222

  18. Adult nutrition, but not inbreeding, affects male primary sexual traits in the leaf-footed cactus bug Narnia femorata (Hemiptera: Coreidae).

    PubMed

    Joseph, Paul N; Sasson, Daniel A; Allen, Pablo E; Somjee, Ummat; Miller, Christine W

    2016-07-01

    Adverse conditions may be the norm rather than the exception in natural populations. Many populations experience poor nutrition on a seasonal basis. Further, brief interludes of inbreeding can be common as population density fluctuates and because of habitat fragmentation. Here, we investigated the effects of poor nutrition and inbreeding on traits that can be very important to reproductive success and fitness in males: testes mass, sperm concentration, and sperm viability. Our study species was Narnia femorata, a species introduced to north-central Florida in the 1950s. This species encounters regular, seasonal changes in diet that can have profound phenotypic effects on morphology and behavior. We generated inbred and outbred individuals through a single generation of full-sibling mating or outcrossing, respectively. All juveniles were provided a natural, high-quality diet of Opuntia humifusa cactus cladode with fruit until they reached adulthood. New adult males were put on a high- or low-quality diet for at least 21 days before measurements were taken. As expected, the low-quality diet led to significantly decreased testes mass in both inbred and outbred males, although there were surprisingly no detectable effects on sperm traits. We did not find evidence that inbreeding affected testes mass, sperm concentration, and sperm viability. Our results highlight the immediate and overwhelming effects of nutrition on testes mass, while suggesting that a single generation of inbreeding might not be detrimental for primary sexual traits in this particular population.

  19. Lower rates of symptom recurrence and surgical revision after primary compared with secondary endoscopic third ventriculostomy for obstructive hydrocephalus secondary to aqueductal stenosis in adults.

    PubMed

    Sankey, Eric W; Goodwin, C Rory; Jusué-Torres, Ignacio; Elder, Benjamin D; Hoffberger, Jamie; Lu, Jennifer; Blitz, Ari M; Rigamonti, Daniele

    2016-05-01

    OBJECT Endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) is the treatment of choice for obstructive hydrocephalus; however, the success of ETV in patients who have previously undergone shunt placement remains unclear. The present study analyzed 103 adult patients with aqueductal stenosis who underwent ETV for obstructive hydrocephalus and evaluated the effect of previous shunt placement on post-ETV outcomes. METHODS This study was a retrospective review of 151 consecutive patients who were treated between 2007 and 2013 with ETV for hydrocephalus. One hundred three (68.2%) patients with aqueductal stenosis causing obstructive hydrocephalus were included in the analysis. Postoperative ETV patency and aqueductal and cisternal flow were assessed by high-resolution, gradient-echo MRI. Post-ETV Mini-Mental State Examination, Timed Up and Go, and Tinetti scores were compared with preoperative values. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed comparing the post-ETV outcomes in patients who underwent a primary (no previous shunt) ETV (n = 64) versus secondary (previous shunt) ETV (n = 39). RESULTS The majority of patients showed significant improvement in symptoms after ETV; however, no significant differences were seen in any of the quantitative tests performed during follow-up. Symptom recurrence occurred in 29 (28.2%) patients after ETV, after a median of 3.0 (interquartile range 0.8-8.0) months post-ETV failure. Twenty-seven (26.2%) patients required surgical revision after their initial ETV. Patients who received a secondary ETV had higher rates of symptom recurrence (p = 0.003) and surgical revision (p = 0.003), particularly in regard to additional shunt placement/revision post-ETV (p = 0.005). These differences remained significant after multivariate analysis for both symptom recurrence (p = 0.030) and surgical revision (p = 0.043). CONCLUSIONS Patients with obstructive hydrocephalus due to aqueductal stenosis exhibit symptomatic improvement after ETV, with a

  20. A PROSPECTIVE RANDOMIZED TRIAL OF TACROLIMUS AND PREDNISONE VERSUS TACROLIMUS, PREDNISONE AND MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL IN PRIMARY ADULT LIVER TRANSPLANTATION: A SINGLE CENTER REPORT1

    PubMed Central

    Jain, A.; Kashyap, R.; Dodson, F.; Kramer, D.; Hamad, I.; Khan, A.; Eghestad, B.; Starzl, T.E.; Fung, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Tacrolimus (TAC) and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) are currently approved immunosuppressants for prevention of rejection in liver transplantation (LTx). They have different modes of action and toxicity profiles, but the efficacy and safety of MMF in primary liver transplantation with TAC has not been determined. Methods An Institutional Review Board-approved, open-label, single-center, prospective randomized trial was initiated to study the efficacy and toxicity of TAC and steroids (double-drug therapy (D)) versus TAC, steroids, and MMF (triple-drug therapy (T)) in primary adult LTx recipients. Both groups of patients were started on the same doses of TAC and steroids. Patients randomized to T also received 1 gm MMF twice a day. Results Between August 1995 and May 1998, 350 patients were enrolled at a single center-175 in the D and 175 in the T groups. All patients were followed until May 1998, with a mean follow-up of 33.8±9.1 months. Using an intention-to-treat analysis, the 1-, 2-, 3-, and 4-year patient survival was 85.1%, 81.6%, 78.6%, and 75.8%, respectively, for D and 87.4%, 85.4%, 81.3%, and 79.9%, respectively, for T. The 4-year graft survival was 70% for D and 72.1% for T. Although the rate of acute rejection in the first 3 months was significantly lower for T than for D (28% for triple vs. 38.9% for double, P=0.03), the overall rate of rejection for T at the end of 1 year was not significantly lower than for the D (38.9% triple vs. 45.2% double). The median time to the first episode of rejection was 14 days for D versus 24 days for T (P=0.008). During the study period, 38 of 175 patients in D received MMF to control ongoing acute rejection, nephrotoxicity, and/or neurotoxicity. On the other hand, 103 patients in the T discontinued MMF for infection, myelosuppression, and/or gastrointestinal disturbances. The need for corticosteroids was less after 6 months for T and the perioperative need for dialysis was lower with use of MMF. Conclusion This

  1. Selective Internal Radiation Therapy (SIRT) as Conversion Therapy for Unresectable Primary Liver Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Cucchetti, Alessandro; Cappelli, Alberta; Ercolani, Giorgio; Mosconi, Cristina; Cescon, Matteo; Golfieri, Rita; Pinna, Antonio Daniele

    2016-01-01

    Background Many patients with primary liver cancers are not candidates for surgery, and systemic therapies are seldom effective. Selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) has been shown to obtain partial and even complete response in unresectable primary tumors. As a “side effect”, SIRT can induce contra-lateral liver hypertrophy. Tumor response to SIRT can be sufficient to allow disengagement from normal vital structures whose involvement is the cause of the initial unresectability. The contra-lateral hypertrophy can thereby increase the future liver remnant (FLR) volume to over the safe threshold so that extended hepatectomy can be performed. Summary A review of the available literature was performed to assess the tumor response and liver hypertrophy that can be expected after SIRT, in order to delineate whether SIRTcan play a role in conversion therapy for resectability of primary liver malignancies. Key Message Available data suggest that SIRT in unresectable hepatocellular and cholangiocellular carcinomas can provide a considerable down-sizing of the tumors to possibly allow resection. Hypertrophy of the contra-lateral lobe represents a favorable collateral effect that can help in achieving safer subsequent major hepatectomy. In patients whose FLR volume represents the only surgical concern, portal vein embolization remains the treatment of choice. PMID:27781202

  2. Modelo Pedagogico de Educacion Primaria para Adultos: Manual para la Vinculacion y Funcionamiento de los Comites de Educacion para Adultos (A Teaching Model for Adult Primary Education: Manual for the Continuation and Operation of Adult Education Committees).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instituto Nacional para la Educacion de los Adultos, Mexico City (Mexico).

    This manual is part of a Mexican series of instructional materials designed for Spanish speaking adults who are in the process of becoming literate or have recently become literate in their native language. This document describes the concept of a model for community adult education for the purpose of supporting local educational committees…

  3. Age-Related Prognostic Impact of Different Types of DNMT3A Mutations in Adults With Primary Cytogenetically Normal Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Marcucci, Guido; Metzeler, Klaus H.; Schwind, Sebastian; Becker, Heiko; Maharry, Kati; Mrózek, Krzysztof; Radmacher, Michael D.; Kohlschmidt, Jessica; Nicolet, Deedra; Whitman, Susan P.; Wu, Yue-Zhong; Powell, Bayard L.; Carter, Thomas H.; Kolitz, Jonathan E.; Wetzler, Meir; Carroll, Andrew J.; Baer, Maria R.; Moore, Joseph O.; Caligiuri, Michael A.; Larson, Richard A.; Bloomfield, Clara D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To determine the frequency of DNMT3A mutations, their associations with clinical and molecular characteristics and outcome, and the associated gene- and microRNA-expression signatures in primary cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML). Patients and Methods Four hundred fifteen previously untreated adults were analyzed for DNMT3A mutations and established prognostic gene mutations and expression markers. Gene- and microRNA-expression profiles were derived using microarrays. Results Younger (< 60 years; n = 181) and older (≥ 60 years; n = 234) patients had similar frequencies of DNMT3A mutations (35.3% v 33.3%). Missense mutations affecting arginine codon 882 (R882-DNMT3A) were more common (n = 92; 62%) than those affecting other codons (non–R882-DNMT3A). DNMT3A-mutated patients did not differ regarding complete remission rate, but had shorter disease-free survival (DFS; P = .03) and, by trend, overall survival (OS; P = .07) than DNMT3A–wild-type patients. In multivariable analyses, DNMT3A mutations remained associated with shorter DFS (P = .01), but not with shorter OS. When analyzed separately, the two DNMT3A mutation types had different significance by age group. Younger patients with non–R882-DNMT3A mutations had shorter DFS (P = .002) and OS (P = .02), whereas older patients with R882-DNMT3A mutations had shorter DFS (P = .005) and OS (P = .002) after adjustment for other clinical and molecular prognosticators. Gene- and microRNA-expression signatures did not accurately predict DNMT3A mutational status. Conclusion DNMT3A mutations are frequent in CN-AML, and their clinical significance seems to be age dependent. DNMT3A-R882 mutations are associated with adverse prognosis in older patients, and non–R882-DNMT3A mutations are associated with adverse prognosis in younger patients. Low accuracy of gene- and microRNA-expression signatures in predicting DNMT3A mutation status suggested that the role of these mutations in AML remains to

  4. Localization of the fourth locus (GLC1E) for adult-onset primary open-angle glaucoma to the 10p15-p14 region.

    PubMed Central

    Sarfarazi, M; Child, A; Stoilova, D; Brice, G; Desai, T; Trifan, O C; Poinoosawmy, D; Crick, R P

    1998-01-01

    One of the major causes of blindness is primary open-angle glaucoma, which affects millions of elderly people worldwide. Genetic studies have so far mapped three loci for the adult-onset form of this condition to the 2cen-q13, 3q21-q24, and 8q23 regions. Herein, we report the localization of a fourth locus, to the 10p15-p14 region, in one large British family with a classical form of normal-tension open-angle glaucoma. Of the 42 meioses genotyped in this pedigree, 39 subjects (16 affected) inherited a haplotype compatible with their prior clinical designation, whereas the remaining 3 were classified as unknown. Although a maximum LOD score of 10.00 at a recombination fraction of straight theta=.00 was obtained with D10S1216, 21 other markers provided significant values, varying between 3.77 and 9.70. When only the affected meioses of this kindred were analyzed, LOD scores remained statistically significant, ranging from 3.16 (D10S527) to 3.57 (D10S506). Two critical recombinational events in the affected subjects positioned this new locus to a region of approximately 21 cM, flanked by D10S1729 and D10S1664. However, an additional recombination in a 59-year-old unaffected female suggests that this locus resides between D10S585 (or D10S1172) and D10S1664, within a genetic distance of 5-11 cM. However, the latter minimum region must be taken cautiously, because the incomplete penetrance has previously been documented for this group of eye conditions. A partial list of genes that positionally are considered as candidates includes NET1, PRKCT, ITIH2, IL2RA, IL15RA, IT1H2, hGATA3, the mRNA for open reading frame KIAA0019, and the gene for D123 protein. PMID:9497264

  5. IQuaD dental trial; improving the quality of dentistry: a multicentre randomised controlled trial comparing oral hygiene advice and periodontal instrumentation for the prevention and management of periodontal disease in dentate adults attending dental primary care

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Periodontal disease is the most common oral disease affecting adults, and although it is largely preventable it remains the major cause of poor oral health worldwide. Accumulation of microbial dental plaque is the primary aetiological factor for both periodontal disease and caries. Effective self-care (tooth brushing and interdental aids) for plaque control and removal of risk factors such as calculus, which can only be removed by periodontal instrumentation (PI), are considered necessary to prevent and treat periodontal disease thereby maintaining periodontal health. Despite evidence of an association between sustained, good oral hygiene and a low incidence of periodontal disease and caries in adults there is a lack of strong and reliable evidence to inform clinicians of the relative effectiveness (if any) of different types of Oral Hygiene Advice (OHA). The evidence to inform clinicians of the effectiveness and optimal frequency of PI is also mixed. There is therefore an urgent need to assess the relative effectiveness of OHA and PI in a robust, sufficiently powered randomised controlled trial (RCT) in primary dental care. Methods/Design This is a 5 year multi-centre, randomised, open trial with blinded outcome evaluation based in dental primary care in Scotland and the North East of England. Practitioners will recruit 1860 adult patients, with periodontal health, gingivitis or moderate periodontitis (Basic Periodontal Examination Score 0–3). Dental practices will be cluster randomised to provide routine OHA or Personalised OHA. To test the effects of PI each individual patient participant will be randomised to one of three groups: no PI, 6 monthly PI (current practice), or 12 monthly PI. Baseline measures and outcome data (during a three year follow-up) will be assessed through clinical examination, patient questionnaires and NHS databases. The primary outcome measures at 3 year follow up are gingival inflammation/bleeding on probing at the

  6. Family Violence Among Older Adult Patients Consulting in Primary Care Clinics: Results From the ESA (Enquête sur la santé des aînés) Services Study on Mental Health and Aging

    PubMed Central

    Préville, Michel; Mechakra-Tahiri, Samia Djemaa; Vasiliadis, Helen-Maria; Mathieu, Véronique; Quesnel, Louise; Gontijo-Guerra, Samantha; Lamoureux-Lamarche, Catherine; Berbiche, Djamal

    2014-01-01

    Objective To document the reliability and construct validity of the Family Violence Scale (FVS) in the older adult population aged 65 years and older. Method: Data came from a cross-sectional survey, the Enquête sur la santé des aînés et l’utilisation des services de santé (ESA Services Study), conducted in 2011–2013 using a probabilistic sample of older adults waiting for medical services in primary care clinics (n = 1765). Family violence was defined as a latent variable, coming from a spouse and from children. Results: A model with 2 indicators of violence; that is, psychological and financial violence, and physical violence, adequately fitted the observed data. The reliability of the FVS was 0.95. According to our results, 16% of older adults reported experiencing some form of family violence in the past 12 months of their interview, and 3% reported a high level of family violence (FVS > 0.36). Our results showed that the victim’s sex was not associated with the degree of violence (β = 0.02). However, the victim’s age was associated with family violence (β = −0.12). Older adults, aged 75 years and older, reported less violence than those aged between 65 and 74 years. Conclusion: Our results lead us to conclude that family violence against older adults is common and warrants greater public health and political attention. General practitioners could play an active role in the detection of violence among older adults. PMID:25161067

  7. Modelo Pedagogico de Educacion Primaria para Adultos: Guia General de Apoyo para el Estudiante de Primaria (Pedagogical Model for Adult Primary Education: General Guide for the Student).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instituto Nacional para la Educacion de los Adultos, Mexico City (Mexico).

    This book, part of a Mexican series of instructional materials, is directed toward people over the age of 15 who are interested in beginning, continuing or finishing their basic education. It explains the pedagogical model developed for adult education in Mexico based on the following features: (1) the content of the textbooks must be useful for…

  8. Primary hepatic extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue type

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Shuilin; Chen, Lin; Chen, Yifa; Chen, Xiaoping

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Primary hepatic mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma is an extremely rare disease. To the best of our knowledge, only 67 cases had been reported in 39 English literatures to date. The aim of this study was to add a new case of this disease to the literature and to review the current literature. Patient concerns: A 50-year-old man was incidentally identified with a solitary mass of 5 cm in diameter in the left lobe of the liver. Diagnoses: Based on the results of imaging studies, intrahepatic cholangiocellular carcinoma was suspected, and then surgery was performed. Microscopic findings showed that the tumor was a hepatic MALT lymphoma, and immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the lymphoma cells were CD20+, CD79a+, BCL-2+, CD3−, and CD5−. Interventions: The patient received rituximab after surgery. Outcomes: He was free of disease for 13 months at the time of this report. Lessons: Since previously published case reports and our case described nonspecific clinical features of this rare disease, it was usually misdiagnosed before histological confirmation and surgery resection may be a good choice for both diagnosis and local therapy. PMID:28353562

  9. Effectiveness of regular reporting of spirometric results combined with a smoking cessation advice by a primary care physician on smoking quit rate in adult smokers: a randomized controlled trial. ESPIROTAB study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Undiagnosed airflow limitation is common in the general population and is associated with impaired health and functional status. Smoking is the most important risk factor for this condition. Although primary care practitioners see most adult smokers, few currently have spirometers or regularly order spirometry tests in these patients. Brief medical advice has shown to be effective in modifying smoking habits in a large number of smokers but only a small proportion remain abstinent after one year. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of regular reporting of spirometric results combined with a smoking cessation advice by a primary care physician on smoking quit rate in adult smokers. Methods/design Intervention study with a randomized two arms in 5 primary care centres. A total of 485 smokers over the age of 18 years consulting their primary care physician will be recruited. On the selection visit all participants will undergo a spirometry, peak expiratory flow rate, test of smoking dependence, test of motivation for giving up smoking and a questionnaire on socio-demographic data. Thereafter an appointment will be made to give the participants brief structured advice to give up smoking combined with a detailed discussion on the results of the spirometry. After this, the patients will be randomised and given appointment for follow up visits at 3, 6, 12 and 24 months. Both arms will receive brief structured advice and a detailed discussion of the spirometry results at visit 0. The control group will only be given brief structured advice about giving up smoking on the follow up. Cessation of smoking will be tested with the carbon monoxide test. Discussion Early identification of functional pulmonary abnormalities in asymptomatic patients or in those with little respiratory symptomatology may provide "ideal educational opportunities". These opportunities may increase the success of efforts to give up smoking and may improve the opportunities

  10. Analysis of DAX1 (NR0B1) and steroidogenic factor-1 (SF1/Ad4BP, NR5A1) in children and adults with primary adrenal failure: ten years' experience

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lin; Gu, Wen-Xia; Ozisik, Gokhan; To, Wing S.; Owen, Catherine J.; Jameson, J. Larry; Achermann, John C.

    2007-01-01

    Context Primary adrenal failure is a life-threatening condition that can be caused by a range of etiologies, including autoimmune, metabolic, and developmental disorders. The nuclear receptors DAX1 (NR0B1) and steroidogenic factor-1 (SF1/Ad4BP, NR5A1) play an important role in adrenal development and function, and mutations in these transcription factors have been found in patients with adrenal hypoplasia. Objective To investigate the prevalence of DAX1 and SF1 mutations in children and adults with primary adrenal failure of unknown etiology (i.e., not caused by congenital adrenal hyperplasia, adrenoleukodystrophy, autoimmune disease). Patients One-hundred and seventeen patients were included. Eighty-eight individuals presented in infancy or childhood with adrenal hypoplasia or primary adrenal failure of unknown etiology (n=64, 46,XY phenotypic males; n=17, 46,XY gonadal dysgenesis/impaired androgenization; n=7, 46,XX females). Twenty-nine individuals presented in adulthood with “Addison disease” of unknown etiology. Methods Mutational analysis of DAX1 (NR0B1) (including exon 2α/1A) and SF1 (NR5A1) by direct sequencing. Results DAX1 mutations were found in 58% (37/64) of 46,XY phenotypic boys referred with adrenal hypoplasia, and in all boys (8/8) with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and a family history suggestive of adrenal failure in males. SF1 mutations causing adrenal failure were found only in two patients with 46,XY gonadal dysgenesis. No DAX1 or SF1 mutations were identified in the adult-onset group. Conclusions DAX1 mutations are a relatively frequent cause of adrenal failure in this group of boys. SF1 mutations causing adrenal failure in humans are rare and are more likely to be associated with significant underandrogenization and gonadal dysfunction in 46,XY individuals. PMID:16684822

  11. Magnesium Elevation Promotes Neuronal Differentiation While Suppressing Glial Differentiation of Primary Cultured Adult Mouse Neural Progenitor Cells through ERK/CREB Activation

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Wang; Jiang, Mujun; Li, Mei; Jin, Congli; Xiao, Songhua; Fan, Shengnuo; Fang, Wenli; Zheng, Yuqiu; Liu, Jun

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the influence of magnesium elevation on fate determination of adult neural progenitor cells (aNPCs) and the underlying mechanism in vitro. Adult neurogenesis, which is the generation of functional neurons from neural precursors, occurs throughout life in restricted anatomical regions in mammals. Magnesium is the fourth most abundant ion in mammals, and its elevation in the brain has been shown to enhance memory and synaptic plasticity in vivo. However, the effects of magnesium on fate determination of aNPCs, which are vital processes in neurogenesis, remain unknown. NPCs isolated from the dentate gyrus of adult C57/BL6 mice were induced to differentiate in a medium with varying magnesium concentrations (0.6, 0.8, and 1.0 mM) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) inhibitor PD0325901. The proportion of cells that differentiated into neurons and glial cells was evaluated using immunofluorescence. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot methods were used to determine the expression of β-III tubulin (Tuj1) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). The activation of ERK and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) was examined by Western blot to reveal the underlying mechanism. Magnesium elevation increased the proportion of Tju1-positive cells and decreased the proportion of GFAP-positive cells. Also, the expression of Tuj1 was upregulated, whereas the expression of GFAP was downregulated. Moreover, magnesium elevation enhanced the activation of both ERK and CREB. Treatment with PD0325901 reversed these effects in a dose-dependent manner. Magnesium elevation promoted neural differentiation while suppressing glial cell differentiation, possibly via ERK-induced CREB activation. PMID:28280456

  12. Myopericarditis during a primary Epstein-Barr virus infection in an otherwise healthy young adult. An unusual and insidious complication. Case report and a 60-year literature review.

    PubMed

    Sabbatani, Sergio; Manfredi, Roberto; Ortolani, Paolo; Trapani, Fabio Filippo; Viale, Pierluigi

    2012-06-01

    An otherwise healthy young man had infectious mononucleosis detected after an atypical clinical onset, including myocarditis and pericarditis. Our patient slowly but completely recovered from his cardiac complications after the course of his primary Epstein-Barr infection, as shown by periodical electrocardiographic and ultrasonographic studies, and a simple treatment with aspirin alone. Our case report is briefly reported, and discussed with regard to the existing literature, which has recorded such complications since the mid 1940s.

  13. Fine mapping of juvenile primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) on 1q21-q31 and exculsion of adult-POAG from the respective region

    SciTech Connect

    Child, A.; Sarfarazi, M.; Crick, R.P.

    1994-09-01

    Juvenile POAG is an autosomal dominant eye disorder which has recently been mapped to 1q21-q24, in a region of 14-23 cM. We report here linkage analysis of 9 microsatellite repeat markers spanning this region in families from England, Scotland and Sardinia. We have observed no recombinants with D1S433 (Z=2.86) and obtained looser linkage with D1S196 ({theta}=0.03; Z=6.38), D1S431 ({theta}=0.14; Z=2.74), D1S210 ({theta}=0.06; Z=1.32), D1S452 ({theta}=0.18; Z=0.729) and D1S242 ({theta}=0.08; Z=2.29). In one family, a critical recombinant in an affected individual localizes the J-POAG locus between D1S452 and D1S242 in a 3 cM region. However, other recombinants in two normal individuals from different families suggests that J-POAG may be localized in a 1 cM distance between D1S433 and D1S431. These unaffected individuals have well passed the age-of-onset in their respective pedigrees. This result suggests that either these two recombinant individuals are gene carriers (i.e., non-penetrants) or there are more than one gene in this region causing the same disease. The possibility of the latter is less likely, since in addition to a total of 4 non-penetrant individuals in our panel, other such cases have also been reported previously. This in turn suggests that the precentage of non-penetrant cases in J-POAG may be considerably higher than it was previously appreciated. Study of 14 families with adult-onset POAG revealed no segregation with the above-mentioned linked microsatellite markers. Our findings confirm, for the first time, that adult-POAG is genetically distinct from the J-POAG. Genetic linkage study of adult families with additional STRPs is currently in progress.

  14. Evaluation of a multidisciplinary Tier 3 weight management service for adults with morbid obesity, or obesity and comorbidities, based in primary care.

    PubMed

    Jennings, A; Hughes, C A; Kumaravel, B; Bachmann, M O; Steel, N; Capehorn, M; Cheema, K

    2014-10-01

    A multidisciplinary Tier 3 weight management service in primary care recruited patients with a body mass index ≥40 kg·m(-2) , or 30 kg·m(-2) with obesity-related co-morbidity to a 1-year programme. A cohort of 230 participants was recruited and evaluated using the National Obesity Observatory Standard Evaluation Framework. The primary outcome was weight loss of at least 5% of baseline weight at 12 months. Diet was assessed using the two-item food frequency questionnaire, activity using the General Practice Physical Activity questionnaire and quality of life using the EuroQol-5D-5L questionnaire. A focus group explored the participants' experiences. Baseline mean weight was 124.4 kg and mean body mass index was 44.1 kg·m(-2) . A total of 102 participants achieved 5% weight loss at 12 months. The mean weight loss was 10.2 kg among the 117 participants who completed the 12-month programme. Baseline observation carried forward analysis gave a mean weight loss of 5.9 kg at 12 months. Fruit and vegetable intake, activity level and quality of life all improved. The dropout rate was 14.3% at 6 months and 45.1% at 1 year. Focus group participants described high levels of satisfaction. It was possible to deliver a Tier 3 weight management service for obese patients with complex co-morbidity in a primary care setting with a full multidisciplinary team, which obtained good health outcomes compared with existing services.

  15. Evaluation of a multidisciplinary Tier 3 weight management service for adults with morbid obesity, or obesity and comorbidities, based in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, A; Hughes, C A; Kumaravel, B; Bachmann, M O; Steel, N; Capehorn, M; Cheema, K

    2014-01-01

    A multidisciplinary Tier 3 weight management service in primary care recruited patients with a body mass index ≥40 kg·m−2, or 30 kg·m−2 with obesity-related co-morbidity to a 1-year programme. A cohort of 230 participants was recruited and evaluated using the National Obesity Observatory Standard Evaluation Framework. The primary outcome was weight loss of at least 5% of baseline weight at 12 months. Diet was assessed using the two-item food frequency questionnaire, activity using the General Practice Physical Activity questionnaire and quality of life using the EuroQol-5D-5L questionnaire. A focus group explored the participants' experiences. Baseline mean weight was 124.4 kg and mean body mass index was 44.1 kg·m−2. A total of 102 participants achieved 5% weight loss at 12 months. The mean weight loss was 10.2 kg among the 117 participants who completed the 12-month programme. Baseline observation carried forward analysis gave a mean weight loss of 5.9 kg at 12 months. Fruit and vegetable intake, activity level and quality of life all improved. The dropout rate was 14.3% at 6 months and 45.1% at 1 year. Focus group participants described high levels of satisfaction. It was possible to deliver a Tier 3 weight management service for obese patients with complex co-morbidity in a primary care setting with a full multidisciplinary team, which obtained good health outcomes compared with existing services. PMID:25825858

  16. A Study of the Infant Nasal Microbiome Development over the First Year of Life and in Relation to Their Primary Adult Caregivers Using cpn60 Universal Target (UT) as a Phylogenetic Marker.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Shelley W; Knox, Natalie C; Golding, George R; Tyler, Shaun D; Tyler, Andrea D; Mabon, Philip; Embree, Joanne E; Fleming, Fiona; Fanella, Sergio; Van Domselaar, Gary; Mulvey, Michael R; Graham, Morag R

    2016-01-01

    Whereas the infant gut microbiome is the subject of intense study, relatively little is known regarding the nares microbiome in newborns and during early life. This study aimed to survey the typical composition and diversity of human anterior nare microflora for developing infants over time, and to explore how these correlate to their primary caregivers. Single nare swabs were collected at five time points over a one-year period for each subject from infant-caregiver pairs. Our study comprised of 50 infants (recruited at 2 weeks, post delivery) and their 50 primary caregivers. Applying the chaperonin-60 (cpn60) universal target (UT) amplicon as our molecular barcoding marker to census survey the microbial communities, we longitudinally surveyed infant nares microbiota at 5 time points over the course of the first year of life. The inter- and intra-subject diversity was catalogued and compared, both longitudinally and relative to their adult primary caregivers. Although within-subject variability over time and inter-subject variability were both observed, the assessment detected only one or two predominant genera for individual infant samples, belonging mainly to phyla Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, and Proteobacteria. Consistent with previously observed microbial population dynamics in other body sites, the diversity of nares microflora increased over the first year of life and infants showed differential operational taxonomic units (OTUs) relative to their matched primary caregiver. The collected evidence also support that both temporal and seasonal changes occur with respect to carriage of potentially pathogenic bacteria (PPBs), which may influence host predisposition to infection. This pilot study surveying paired infant/caregiver nare microbiomes provides novel longitudinal diversity information that is pertinent to better understanding nare microbiome development in infants.

  17. Primary Prevention of Sudden Cardiac Death in Adults with Transposition of the Great Arteries: A Review of Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Placement

    PubMed Central

    Cedars, Ari M.

    2015-01-01

    Transposition of the great arteries encompasses a set of structural congenital cardiac lesions that has in common ventriculoarterial discordance. Primarily because of advances in medical and surgical care, an increasing number of children born with this anomaly are surviving into adulthood. Depending upon the subtype of lesion or the particular corrective surgery that the patient might have undergone, this group of adult congenital heart disease patients constitutes a relatively new population with unique medical sequelae. Among the more common and difficult to manage are cardiac arrhythmias and other sequelae that can lead to sudden cardiac death. To date, the question of whether implantable cardioverter-defibrillators should be placed in this cohort as a preventive measure to abort sudden death has largely gone unanswered. Therefore, we review the available literature surrounding this issue. PMID:26413012

  18. Short-term effects of unilateral lesion of the primary motor cortex (M1) on ipsilesional hand dexterity in adult macaque monkeys.

    PubMed

    Bashir, Shahid; Kaeser, Mélanie; Wyss, Alexander; Hamadjida, Adjia; Liu, Yu; Bloch, Jocelyne; Brunet, Jean-François; Belhaj-Saif, Abderraouf; Rouiller, Eric M

    2012-01-01

    Although the arrangement of the corticospinal projection in primates is consistent with a more prominent role of the ipsilateral motor cortex on proximal muscles, rather than on distal muscles involved in manual dexterity, the role played by the primary motor cortex on the control of manual dexterity for the ipsilateral hand remains a matter a debate, either in the normal function or after a lesion. We, therefore, tested the impact of permanent unilateral motor cortex lesion on the manual dexterity of the ipsilateral hand in 11 macaque monkeys, within a time window of 60 days post-lesion. For comparison, unilateral reversible pharmacological inactivation of the motor cortex was produced in an additional monkey. Manual dexterity was assessed quantitatively based on three motor parameters derived from two reach and grasp manual tasks. In contrast to the expected dramatic, complete deficit of manual dexterity of the contralesional hand that persists for several weeks, the impact on the manual dexterity of the ipsilesional hand was generally moderate (but statistically significant) and, when present, lasted less than 20 days. Out of the 11 monkeys, only 3 showed a deficit of the ipsilesional hand for 2 of the 3 motor parameters, and 4 animals had a deficit for only one motor parameter. Four monkeys did not show any deficit. The reversible inactivation experiment yielded results consistent with the permanent lesion data. In conclusion, the primary motor cortex exerts a modest role on ipsilateral manual dexterity, most likely in the form of indirect hand postural control.

  19. Management of the clinical issue of constipation with abdominal complaints in adults. A national survey of Primary Care physicians and gastroenterologists.

    PubMed

    Rey Díaz-Rubio, Enrique; Mascort Roca, Juan José; Peña Forcada, Enrique; Cañones Garzón, Pedro; Tenias Burillo, Jose María; Júdez Gutiérrez, Francisco Javier

    2016-06-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome and functional constipation represent a relevant and common health issue. However, real-world clinical practice includes patients with constipation who may or may not have other abdominal complaints (pain, bloating, abdominal discomfort) with variable frequency. The goal of the present study was to obtain information on the workload entailed by patients with constipation and associated abdominal complaints, predominant clinical behaviors, education needs, and potential daily practice aids both in Primary Care and gastroenterology settings. The clinical behavior of doctors is generally similar at both levels, despite differences in healthcare approach: use of empiric therapies and clinically guided diagnostic tests, with some differences in colonoscopy use (not always directly accessible from Primary Care). Regarding perceptions, general support and osmotic laxatives are most valued by PC doctors, whereas osmotic laxatives, combined laxatives, and linaclotide are most valued by GE specialists. Furthermore, over half of respondents considered differentiating both diagnoses as challenging. Finally, considerable education needs are self-acknowledged at both levels, as is a demand for guidelines and protocols to help in managing this issue in clinical practice. A strength of this study is its providing a joint photograph of the medical approach and the perceptions of constipation with abdominal discomfort from a medical standpoint. Weaknesses include self-declaration (no formal validation) and a response rate potentially biased by professional motivation.

  20. Can primary care team-based transition to insulin improve outcomes in adults with type 2 diabetes: the stepping up to insulin cluster randomized controlled trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Type 2 diabetes (T2D) brings significant human and healthcare costs. Its progressive nature means achieving normoglycaemia is increasingly difficult, yet critical to avoiding long term vascular complications. Nearly one-half of people with T2D have glycaemic levels out of target. Insulin is effective in achieving glycaemic targets, yet initiation of insulin is often delayed, particularly in primary care. Given limited access to specialist resources and the size of the diabetes epidemic, primary care is where insulin initiation must become part of routine practice. This would also support integrated holistic care for people with diabetes. Our Stepping Up Program is based on a general practitioner (GP) and practice nurse (PN) model of care supported appropriately by endocrinologists and credentialed diabetes educator-registered nurses. Pilot work suggests the model facilitates integration of the technical work of insulin initiation within ongoing generalist care. Methods This protocol is for a cluster randomized controlled trial to examine the effectiveness of the Stepping Up Program to enhance the role of the GP-PN team in initiating insulin and improving glycaemic outcomes for people with T2D. 224 patients between the ages of 18 and 80 years with T2D, on two or more oral hypoglycaemic agents and with an HbA1c ≥7.5% in the last six months will be recruited from 74 general practices. The unit of randomization is the practice. Primary outcome is change in glycated haemoglobin HbA1c (measured as a continuous variable). We hypothesize that the intervention arm will achieve an absolute HbA1c mean difference of 0.5% lower than control group at 12 months follow up. Secondary outcomes include the number of participants who successfully transfer to insulin and the proportion who achieve HbA1c measurement of <7.0%. We will also collect data on patient psychosocial outcomes and healthcare utilization and costs. Discussion The study is a pragmatic translational

  1. IT-36PHASE 1/2 STUDY OF THE COMBINATION OF INDOXIMOD AND TEMOZOLOMIDE FOR ADULT PATIENTS WITH TEMOZOLOMIDE-REFRACTORY PRIMARY MALIGNANT BRAIN TUMORS

    PubMed Central

    Zakharia, Yousef; Johnson, Theodore; Colman, Howard; Vahanian, Nicholas; Link, Charles; Kennedy, Eugene; Sadek, Ramses; Kong, Feng-Ming; Vender, John; Munn, David; Rixe, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase (IDO) is a key immune-modulatory enzyme that inhibits CD8+ T cells and enhances the suppressor activity of Tregs. IDO is expressed in 50 to 90% of glioblastoma (GBM) and is correlated with poor prognosis. IDO pathway inhibitors such as indoximod (1-Methyl-D-tryptophan) can improve anti-tumor T cell response slowing the tumor growth in vivo. We have demonstrated a synergistic effect of indoximod when combined with temozolomide (TMZ) and radiation in a syngeneic orthotopic brain tumor model. This phase 1 study is designed to determine maximal tolerated dose (MTD) of indoximod in combination with TMZ in GBM followed by an expansion phase 2 testing the preliminary activity of the combination in relevant situations with the addition of bevacizumab or stereotactic radiosurgery. METHODS: After progression to standard front line-therapy, patients with GBM are enrolled in a dose escalation study of indoximod (600, 1000 or 1200 mg twice daily given orally) with a standard fixed dose of TMZ. In the phase 2 part, patients are separated into 3 cohorts: cohort 2a: indoximod with TMZ, cohort 2b: indoximod with TMZ and bevacizumab (for patients who are currently on bevacizumab), cohort 2c: indoximod with TMZ and stereotactic radiosurgery. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: The study uses a 3 + 3 dose escalation design, until reaching the MTD or the maximal specified dose. Sample size in phase 2 is based on the primary endpoint of 6 months progression free survival (PFS). CORRELATIVE STUDIES: Assessment of primary tumor samples for IDO expression, evaluation of serum for potential biomarkers of IDO pathway activity (kynurenine and tryptophan) and a pharmacokinetic analysis will be performed. RESULTS: Study is ongoing. Updates are to be presented at the meeting.

  2. Amenorrhea - primary

    MedlinePlus

    ... of periods - primary Images Primary amenorrhea Normal uterine anatomy (cut section) Absence of menstruation (amenorrhea) References Bulun SE. The physiology and pathology of the female reproductive axis. In: ...

  3. Schistosoma mansoni infection of Syrian golden hamsters: the host humoral immune response in relation to the adult worm burdens after primary infection.

    PubMed

    Yong, W K; Das, P K; Dachlan, Y P

    1983-01-01

    Seven-week-old female Syrian golden hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) showed different degrees of susceptibility to Schistosoma mansoni, as assessed by the percentage of cercariae recovered as adult worms 6 weeks after infection. Plasma of the low (A), medium (B) and high (C) susceptibility groups were tested immunochemically. No differences were observed in the concentrations of albumin, alpha 1-, alpha 2-, beta- and gamma-globulins as measured by cellulose acetate electrophoresis. However, a significantly higher percentage of animals in groups A and B than in group C had an S. mansoni specific "beforked" IgG precipitin band and specific antibodies against a worm tegumental antigen preparation (AWT). Conversely, more animals in group C made antibodies against a "denuded" worm-body antigen preparation (AWB) than in groups A and B. However, by using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, no significant differences in antibody titres against AWT, AWB and a total worm antigen (AVA) were observed in the animals in groups A, B and C. Upon consideration of the immunochemical data in relation to the distribution pattern of susceptibility to infection, we propose that the intensity of S. mansoni infection in the hamster is a polygene-controlled phenomenon and depends upon the presentation of differing parasite antigenic component(s) to the host.

  4. Low Birth Weight Is Associated with a Decreased Overall Adult Health Status and Reproductive Capability – Results of a Cross-Sectional Study in Primary Infertile Patients

    PubMed Central

    Boeri, Luca; Ventimiglia, Eugenio; Capogrosso, Paolo; Ippolito, Silvia; Pecoraro, Angela; Paciotti, Marco; Scano, Roberta; Galdini, Alessandro; Valsecchi, Luca; Papaleo, Enrico; Montorsi, Francesco; Salonia, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Individuals born with low birth weight (LBW) risk cardiometabolic complications later in life. However the impact of LBW on general health status and male reproductive function has been scantly analysed. We investigated the clinical and seminal impact of different birth weights (BW) in white-European men presenting for primary couple’s infertility. Demographic, clinical, and laboratory data from 827 primary infertile men were compared with those of 373 consecutive fertile men. Patients with BW ≤2500, 2500–4200, and ≥4200gr were classified as having LBW, normal (NBW), and high BW (HBW), respectively. Health-significant comorbidities were scored with the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI). Testicular volume was assessed with a Prader orchidometer. Semen analysis values were assessed based on 2010 WHO reference criteria. Descriptive statistics and regression models tested associations between semen parameters, clinical characteristics and BW categories. LBW, NBW and HBW were found in 71 (8.6%), 651 (78.7%) and 105 (12.7%) infertile men, respectively. LBW was more frequent in infertile patients than fertile men (p = 0.002). Infertile patients with LBW had a higher rate of comorbidities (p = 0.003), lower mean testicular volume (p = 0.007), higher FSH (p = 0.02) and lower tT levels (p = 0.04) compared to other BW groups. Higher rates of asthenozoospermia (p = 0.02) and teratozoospermia (p = 0.03) were also found in LBW men. At logistic regression models, LBW was univariably associated with pathologic progressive motility (p≤0.02) and pathologic sperm morphology (p<0.005). At multivariable logistic regression analysis, LBW achieved independent predictor status for both lower sperm motility and pathologic sperm morphology (all p≤0.04). Only LBW independently predicted higher CCI values (p<0.001). In conclusion, we found that LBW was more frequent in infertile than in fertile men. Infertile individuals with LBW showed a higher rate of comorbidities and

  5. Combinatorial analysis of calcium-binding proteins in larval and adult zebrafish primary olfactory system identifies differential olfactory bulb glomerular projection fields.

    PubMed

    Kress, Sigrid; Biechl, Daniela; Wullimann, Mario F

    2015-07-01

    In the zebrafish (Danio rerio) olfactory epithelium, the calcium-binding proteins (CBPs) calretinin and S100/S100-like protein are mainly expressed in ciliated or crypt olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), respectively. In contrast parvalbumin and calbindin1 have not been investigated. We present a combinatorial immunohistological analysis of all four CBPs, including their expression in OSNs and their axonal projections to the olfactory bulb in larval and adult zebrafish. A major expression of calretinin and S100 in ciliated and crypt cells, respectively, with some expression of S100 in microvillous cells is confirmed. Parvalbumin and calbindin1 are strongly expressed in ciliated and microvillous cells, but not in crypt cells. Moreover, detailed combinatorial double-label experiments indicate that there are eight subpopulations of zebrafish OSNs: S100-positive crypt cells (negative for all other three CBPs), parvalbumin only, S100 and parvalbumin, parvalbumin and calbindin1, and parvalbumin and calbindin1 and calretinin-positive microvillous OSNs, as well as a major parvalbumin and calbindin1 and calretinin, and minor parvalbumin and calbindin1 and calretinin-only-positive ciliated OSN populations. CBP-positive projections to olfactory bulb are consistent with previous reports of ciliated OSNs projecting to dorsal and ventromedial glomerular fields and microvillous OSNs to ventrolateral glomerular fields. We newly describe parvalbumin-positive fibers to the mediodorsal field which is calretinin free, with its anterior part showing additionally calbindin1-positive fibers, but absence thereof in the posterior part, indicating an origin from microvillous OSNs in both parts. One singular glomerulus (mdG2) exhibits S100 and parvalbumin-positive fibers, apparently originating from all crypt cells plus some microvillous OSNs. Arguments for various olfactory labeled lines are discussed.

  6. A feasibility study of a telephone-supported self-care intervention for depression among adults with a comorbid chronic physical illness in primary care

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Objective We assessed the feasibility and acceptability to patients of a telephone-supported self-care intervention for depression among adults aged 40 years or over with one of six targeted chronic physical illnesses and comorbid depressive symptoms in family practice settings. Methods An open, uncontrolled trial (feasibility study) was conducted among patients treated in Montreal family practices. Eligible patients were aged 40 years or over, had one or more of the targeted chronic physical illnesses for at least 6 months (arthritis, hypertension, diabetes, heart disease, asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) and were evaluated as having at least mild depressive symptoms (a score of ≥ 5 on the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire, PHQ-9). Participants received a package of six self-care tools (information booklet, video, Internet programme, action plan, workbook and mood-monitoring tool) with telephone support by a lay coach for up to 6 months. Results In total, 63 eligible patients provided written consent and completed the baseline interview; 57 (90%) and 55 (87%) patients completed 2-month and 6-month follow-up interviews, respectively. The mean number of telephone calls made by coaches to participants was 10.5 (SD 4.0), and the average length of these calls was 10.6 minutes. At the 6-month follow-up, 83.6% of the participants reported that one or more of the tools were helpful. Clinically significant improvements were seen in depressive symptoms (as assessed by the PHQ-9) at 6 months, with an effect size of 0.88 (95% CI, 0.55, 1.14). Conclusion A telephone-supported self-care intervention for depression was feasible, was acceptable to patients, and was associated with a significant 6-month improvement in depressive symptoms. A randomised trial of this intervention is justified. PMID:24294301

  7. Pravastatin reduces the risk for cardiovascular disease in Japanese hypercholesterolemic patients with impaired fasting glucose or diabetes: diabetes subanalysis of the Management of Elevated Cholesterol in the Primary Prevention Group of Adult Japanese (MEGA) Study.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Naoko; Kurata, Hideaki; Nakaya, Noriaki; Mizuno, Kyoichi; Ohashi, Yasuo; Kushiro, Toshio; Teramoto, Tamio; Uchiyama, Shinichiro; Nakamura, Haruo

    2008-08-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients with no history of CVD. Evidence for the effect of statins on CVD in the diabetic population in low-risk populations (e.g., Japanese) is limited. We evaluated the effect of pravastatin on risk reduction of CVD related to baseline glucose status in a primary prevention setting. The Management of Elevated Cholesterol in the Primary Prevention Group of Adult Japanese (MEGA) Study, in patients with mild-to-moderate hypercholesterolemia (220-270 mg/dL), showed that low-dose pravastatin significantly reduced the risk for CVD by 26%. This exploratory subanalyses examined the efficacy of diet plus pravastatin on CVD in 2210 patients with abnormal fasting glucose (AFG, including 1746 patients with DM and 464 patients with impaired fasting glucose (IFG) at 5 years in the MEGA Study. CVD was threefold higher in AFG patients (threefold higher in DM, and twofold higher in IFG) compared with normal fasting glucose (NFG) patients in the diet group. Diet plus pravastatin treatment significantly reduced the risk of CVD by 32% (hazard ratio 0.68, 95% CI 0.48-0.96, number needed to treat, 42) in the AFG group compared with the diet alone group, and no significant interaction between AFG and NFG (interaction P=0.85) was found. Safety problems were not observed during long-term treatment with pravastatin. In conclusion, pravastatin reduces the risk of CVD in subjects with hypercholesterolemia and abnormal fasting glucose in the primary prevention setting in Japan.

  8. Development and evaluation of information resources for patients, families, and healthcare providers addressing behavioral and cognitive sequelae among adults with a primary brain tumor.

    PubMed

    Wright, Kylie M; Simpson, Grahame K; Koh, Eng-Siew; Whiting, Diane L; Gillett, Lauren; Simpson, Teresa; Firth, Rochelle

    2015-06-01

    Behavioral and cognitive changes in patients with primary brain tumor (PBT) are common and may be distressing to patients and their family members. Healthcare professionals report a strong need for information, practical strategies, and training to assist consumers and better address management issues. A literature review by the current project found that 53% of the information resources currently available to consumers and health professionals contained minimal or no information about cognitive/behavioral changes after PBT, and 71% of the resources contained minimal or no information on associated strategies to manage these changes. This project aimed to develop an information resource for patients, carers, and health professionals addressing the behavioral and cognitive sequelae of PBT, including strategies to minimize the disabling impact of such behaviors. In consultation with staff and patient groups, 16 key information topics were identified covering cognitive and communication changes and challenging behaviors including executive impairment, behavioral disturbance, and social/emotional dysfunction. Sixteen fact sheets and 11 additional resource sheets were developed and evaluated according to established consumer communication guidelines. Preliminary data show that these resources have been positively received and well utilized. These sheets are the first of their kind addressing challenging behaviors in the neuro-oncology patient group and are a practical and useful information resource for health professionals working with these patients and their families. The new resource assists in reinforcing interventions provided to individual patients and their relatives who are experiencing difficulties in managing challenging behaviors after PBT.

  9. Body-mass index and risk of advanced chronic kidney disease: Prospective analyses from a primary care cohort of 1.4 million adults in England

    PubMed Central

    Bankhead, Clare; Matsushita, Kunihiro; Stevens, Sarah; Holt, Tim; Hobbs, F. D. Richard; Coresh, Josef; Woodward, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Background It is uncertain whether being overweight, but not obese, is associated with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) and how the size and shape of associations between body-mass index (BMI) and advanced CKD differs among different types of people. Methods We used Clinical Practice Research Datalink records (2000–2014) with linkage to English secondary care and mortality data to identify a prospective cohort with at least one BMI measure. Cox models adjusted for age, sex, smoking and social deprivation and subgroup analyses by diabetes, hypertension and prior cardiovascular disease assessed relationships between BMI and CKD stages 4–5 and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Findings 1,405,016 adults aged 20–79 with mean BMI 27.4kg/m2 (SD 5.6) were followed for 7.5 years. Compared to a BMI of 20 to <25kg/m2, higher BMI was associated with a progressively increased risk of CKD stages 4–5 (hazard ratio 1.34, 95% CI 1.30–1.38 for BMI 25 to <30kg/m2; 1.94, 1.87–2.01 for BMI 30 to <35kg/m2; and 3.10, 2.95–3.25 for BMI ≥35kg/m2). The association between BMI and ESRD was shallower and reversed at low BMI. Current smoking, prior diabetes, hypertension or cardiovascular disease all increased risk of CKD, but the relative strength and shape of BMI-CKD associations, which were generally log-linear above a BMI of 25kg/m2, were similar among those with and without these risk factors. There was direct evidence that being overweight was associated with increased risk of CKD stages 4–5 in these subgroups. Assuming causality, since 2000 an estimated 39% (36–42%) of advanced CKD in women and 26% (22–30%) in men aged 40–79 resulted from being overweight or obese. Conclusions This study provides direct evidence that being overweight increases risk of advanced CKD, that being obese substantially increases such risk, and that this remains true for those with and without diabetes, hypertension or cardiovascular disease. Strategies to reduce weight among those

  10. Association between Modified Shuttle Walk Test and cardiorespiratory fitness in overweight/obese adults with primary hypertension: EXERDIET-HTA study.

    PubMed

    Jurio-Iriarte, Borja; Gorostegi-Anduaga, Ilargi; Aispuru, G Rodrigo; Pérez-Asenjo, Javier; Brubaker, Peter H; Maldonado-Martín, Sara

    2017-02-07

    The aims of the study were to evaluate the relationship between Modified Shuttle Walk Test (MSWT) with peak oxygen uptake (V˙O2peak) in overweight/obese people with primary hypertension (HTN) and to develop an equation for the MSWT to predict V˙O2peak. Participants (N = 256, 53.9 ± 8.1 years old) with HTN and overweight/obesity performed a cardiorespiratory exercise test to peak exertion on an upright bicycle ergometer using an incremental ramp protocol and the 15-level MSWT. The formula of Singh et al was used as a template to predict V˙O2peak, and a new equation was generated from the measured V˙O2peak-MSWT relationship in this investigation. The correlation between measured and predicted V˙O2peak for Singh et al equation was moderate (r = 0.60, P < .001) with a standard error of the estimate (SEE) of 4.92 mL·kg(-1) minute(-1), SEE% = 21%. The correlation between MSWT and measured V˙O2peak as well as for the new equation was strong (r = 0.72, P < .001) with a SEE of 4.35 mL·kg(-1) minute(-1), SEE% = 19%. These results indicate that MSWT does not accurately predict functional capacity in overweight/obese people with HTN and questions the validity of using this test to evaluate exercise intolerance. A more accurate determination from a new equation in the current study incorporating more variables from MSWT to estimate V˙O2peak has been performed but still results in substantial error.

  11. Therapeutic Assessment of Chloroquine-Primaquine Combined Regimen in Adult Cohort of Plasmodium vivax Malaria from Primary Care Centres in Southwestern India

    PubMed Central

    Saravu, Kavitha; Kumar, Rishikesh; Ashok, Herikudru; Kundapura, Premananda; Kamath, Veena; Kamath, Asha; Mukhopadhyay, Chiranjay

    2016-01-01

    Background Several reports of chloroquine treatment failure and resistance in Plasmodium vivax malaria from Southeast Asian countries have been published. Present study was undertaken to assess the efficacy of chloroquine-primaquine (CQ-PQ) combined regimen for the treatment of P. vivax malaria patients who were catered by the selected primary health centres (PHCs) of Udupi taluk, Udupi district, Karnataka, India. Method Five PHCs were selected within Udupi taluk based on probability proportional to size. In-vivo therapeutic efficacy assessment of CQ (1500 mg over three days) plus PQ (210 mg over 14 days) regimen was carried out in accordance with the World Health Organization’s protocol of 28 days follow-up among microscopically diagnosed monoinfection P. vivax cohort. Results In total, 161 participants were recruited in the study of which, 155 (96.3%) participants completed till day 28 follow-up, fully complied with the treatment regimen and showed adequate clinical and parasitological response. Loss to follow up was noted with 5 (3.1%) participants and non-compliance with treatment regimen occurred with one participant (0.6%). Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PDd, <30% of normal mean activity) was noted among 5 (3.1%) participants and one of them did develop PQ induced dark-brown urination which subsided after PQ discontinuation. G6PDd patients were treated with PQ 45 mg/week for eight weeks while PQ was discontinued in one case with G6PD 1.4 U/g Hb due to complaint of reddish-brown coloured urine by 48 hours of PQ initiation. Nested polymerase chain reaction test revealed 45 (28%) cases as mixed (vivax and falciparum) malaria. Conclusions The CQ-PQ combined regimen remains outstandingly effective to treat uncomplicated P. vivax malaria in Udupi taluk and thus it should continue as first line regimen. For all P. vivax cases, G6PD screening before PQ administration must be mandatory and made available in all PHCs. PMID:27315280

  12. Association between socio-economic status and hemoglobin A1c levels in a Canadian primary care adult population without diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hgb A1c levels may be higher in persons without diabetes of lower socio-economic status (SES) but evidence about this association is limited; there is therefore uncertainty about the inclusion of SES in clinical decision support tools informing the provision and frequency of Hgb A1c tests to screen for diabetes. We studied the association between neighborhood-level SES and Hgb A1c in a primary care population without diabetes. Methods This is a retrospective study using data routinely collected in the electronic medical records (EMRs) of forty six community-based family physicians in Toronto, Ontario. We analysed records from 4,870 patients without diabetes, age 45 and over, with at least one clinical encounter between January 1st 2009 and December 31st 2011 and one or more Hgb A1c report present in their chart during that time interval. Residential postal codes were used to assign neighborhood deprivation indices and income levels by quintiles. Covariates included elements known to be associated with an increase in the risk of incident diabetes: age, gender, family history of diabetes, body mass index, blood pressure, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, and fasting blood glucose. Results The difference in mean Hgb A1c between highest and lowest income quintiles was -0.04% (p = 0.005, 95% CI -0.07% to -0.01%), and between least deprived and most deprived was -0.05% (p = 0.003, 95% CI -0.09% to -0.02%) for material deprivation and 0.02% (p = 0.2, 95% CI -0.06% to 0.01%) for social deprivation. After adjustment for covariates, a marginally statistically significant difference in Hgb A1c between highest and lowest SES quintile (p = 0.04) remained in the material deprivation model, but not in the other models. Conclusions We found a small inverse relationship between Hgb A1c and the material aspects of SES; this was largely attenuated once we adjusted for diabetes risk factors, indicating that an independent contribution of SES

  13. Weight loss referrals for adults in primary care (WRAP): protocol for a multi-centre randomised controlled trial comparing the clinical and cost-effectiveness of primary care referral to a commercial weight loss provider for 12 weeks, referral for 52 weeks, and a brief self-help intervention [ISRCTN82857232

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent trials demonstrate the acceptability and short term efficacy of primary care referral to a commercial weight loss provider for weight management. Commissioners now need information on the optimal duration of intervention and the longer term outcomes and cost effectiveness of such treatment to give best value for money. Methods/Design This multicentre, randomised controlled trial with a parallel design will recruit 1200 overweight adults (BMI ≥28 kg/m2) through their primary care provider. They will be randomised in a 2:5:5 allocation to: Brief Intervention, Commercial Programme for 12 weeks, or Commercial Programme for 52 weeks. Participants will be followed up for two years, with assessments at 0, 3, 12 and 24 months. The sequential primary research questions are whether the CP interventions achieve significantly greater weight loss from baseline to 12 months than BI, and whether CP52 achieves significantly greater weight loss from baseline to 12 months than CP12. The primary outcomes will be an intention to treat analysis of between treatment differences in body weight at 12 months. Clinical effectiveness will be also be assessed by measures of weight, fat mass, and blood pressure at each time point and biochemical risk factors at 12 months. Self-report questionnaires will collect data on psychosocial factors associated with adherence, weight-loss and weight-loss maintenance. A within-trial and long-term cost-effectiveness analysis will be conducted from an NHS perspective. Qualitative methods will be used to examine the participant experience. Discussion The current trial compares the clinical and cost effectiveness of referral to a commercial provider with a brief intervention. This trial will specifically examine whether providing longer weight-loss treatment without altering content or intensity (12 months commercial referral vs. 12 weeks) leads to greater weight loss at one year and is sustained at 2 years. It will also

  14. Primary Hyperparathyroidism

    MedlinePlus

    ... What is PRIMARY HYPERPARATH YROIDIS M? The body’s parathyroid glands—four pea-sized glands in the neck—produce parathyroid hormone (PTH). Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is a condition ...

  15. Primary thrombocythemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... as myeloproliferative disorders. Others include: Chronic myelogenous leukemia Polycythemia vera Primary myelofibrosis This disorder is most common ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:chap 68. Tefferi A. Polycythemia vera, essential thrombocytoemia, and primary myelofibrosis. In: Goldman ...

  16. Primary Aldosteronism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Endocrinology Find an Endocrinologist Value of an Endocrinologist Learn About Clinical Trials Keep Your Body in Balance › Primary Aldosteronism Fact Sheet Primary Aldosteronism March 2012 Download PDFs English Espanol Editors Paul Stewart, MD, FRCP William Young, ...

  17. Autologous Tax-specific CTL therapy in a primary adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma cell-bearing NOD/Shi-scid, IL-2Rγnull mouse model.

    PubMed

    Masaki, Ayako; Ishida, Takashi; Suzuki, Susumu; Ito, Asahi; Mori, Fumiko; Sato, Fumihiko; Narita, Tomoko; Yamada, Tomiko; Ri, Masaki; Kusumoto, Shigeru; Komatsu, Hirokazu; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Niimi, Akio; Inagaki, Hiroshi; Iida, Shinsuke; Ueda, Ryuzo

    2013-07-01

    We expanded human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 Tax-specific CTL in vitro from PBMC of three individual adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) patients and assessed their therapeutic potential in an in vivo model using NOG mice bearing primary ATL cells from the respective three patients (ATL/NOG). In these mice established with cells from a chronic-type patient, treatment by i.p. injection of autologous Tax-CTL resulted in greater infiltration of CD8-positive T cells into each ATL lesion. This was associated with a significant decrease of ATL cell infiltration into blood, spleen, and liver. Tax-CTL treatment also significantly decreased human soluble IL-2R concentrations in the sera. In another group of ATL/NOG mice, Tax-CTL treatment led to a significant prolongation of survival time. These findings show that Tax-CTL can infiltrate the tumor site, recognize, and kill autologous ATL cells in mice in vivo. In ATL/NOG mice with cells from an acute-type patient, whose postchemotherapeutic remission continued for >18 mo, antitumor efficacy of adoptive Tax-CTL therapy was also observed. However, in ATL/NOG mice from a different acute-type patient, whose ATL relapsed after 6 mo of remission, no efficacy was observed. Thus, although the therapeutic effects were different for different ATL patients, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that adoptive therapy with Ag-specific CTL expanded from a cancer patient confers antitumor effects, leading to significant survival benefit for autologous primary cancer cell-bearing mice in vivo. The present study contributes to research on adoptive CTL therapy, which should be applicable to several types of cancer.

  18. Differences among Adolescent, Young Adult, and Adult Callers of Suicide Help Lines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Anda, Diane; Smith, Melanie A.

    1993-01-01

    Examined data on 165 adolescents, 65 young adults, and 175 adults who called 2 suicide help lines. Adults and young adults reported depression as primary reason for contemplating suicide; adolescents reported interpersonal problems. Although callers reported suicide ideation, very small percentage fell into high-risk categories with regard to…

  19. Primary Hyperparathyroidism

    MedlinePlus

    ... D blood test. This test is recommended because vitamin D deficiency is common in people with primary hyperparathyroidism. How ... bone density measurements every 1 to 2 years. Vitamin D deficiency should be corrected if present. Patients who are ...

  20. 50 CFR 14.131 - Primary enclosures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... of care when freedom of movement would constitute a danger to the animal or to handlers or other... same primary enclosure with an adult marine mammal other than its mother. Socially dependent animals...

  1. Role of CYP1B1, MYOC, OPTN and OPTC genes in adult-onset primary open-angle glaucoma: predominance of CYP1B1 mutations in Indian patients

    PubMed Central

    Basavaraj, Manjunath G.; Gupta, Santosh K.; Qamar, Imteyaz; Ali, Abdullah Mahmood; Bajaj, Vineeta; Ramesh, T.K.; Prakash, D. Ravi; Shetty, Jyoti S.; Dorairaj, Syril K.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose Mutations in the CYP1B1, MYOC, OPTN, and WDR36 genes result in glaucoma. Given its expression in the optic nerve, it is likely a mutation in the OPTC gene is also involved in initiating glaucoma. This study was designed to evaluate the involvement of the CYP1B1, MYOC, OPTN, and OPTC genes in the etiology of adult-onset primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) found in 251 Indian patients. Methods Blood samples were obtained from individuals for DNA isolation. A combination of polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism, allele-specific PCR, and DNA sequencing techniques were used to detect mutations in four genes. Four microsatellite markers from the CYP1B1 candidate region and three intragenic CYP1B1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were used to determine the origin of the most common CYP1B1 mutations. Results Three previously known mutations (Pro193Leu, Glu229Lys, and Arg368His) and one novel (Met292Lys) mutation were found in the CYP1B1 gene. Frequencies of the most common mutations, Glu229Lys and Arg368His, in patients were 5.12% and 3.98%, respectively. The Glu229Lys and Arg368His mutations were also found in normal controls at frequencies of 5% and 2%, respectively, suggesting that these mutations might be polymorphic variants in our population. The absence of allele sharing for D2S177, D2S1346, D2S2974, and D2S2331 markers and three intragenic CYP1B1 SNPs in patients suggested multiple origins for the Glu229Lys and Arg368His variants. Two of 251 (0.8%) patients had the Gln48His mutation in MYOC. There was no difference in the frequency of a MYOC -83G>A promoter polymorphism between patients and controls. A novel OPTN mutation, Thr202Arg, was detected in one of 251 (0.4%) patients. The OPTN variant Met98Lys was detected in similar frequencies in patients and controls. No mutation was detected in OPTC. Taken together, 3.59% (9/251) of our POAG patients had mutations in the CYP1B1, MYOC, and OPTN genes. Conclusions This is the

  2. [Basics of primary immunodeficiencies].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Martínez, Claudia; Espinosa-Rosales, Francisco; Espinosa-Padilla, Sara Elva; Hernández-Martínez, Ana Rosa; Blancas-Galicia, Lizbeth

    2016-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies (PID) are a heterogeneous group of inherited disorders, the etiology are the defects in the development or function of the immune system. The principal PID manifestations are the infections in early age, malignancy and diseases of immune dysregulation as autoimmunity and allergy. PIDs are genetics disorders and most of them are inherited as autosomal recessive, also this group of diseases is more prevalent in males and in childhood. The antibody immunodeficiency is the PID more common in adults. The more frequent disorders are the infections in the respiratory tract, abscesses, candidiasis, diarrhea, BCGosis etc. Initial approach included a complete blood count and quantification of immunoglobulins. The delay in diagnosis could be explained due to a perception that the recurrent infections are normal process or think that they are exclusively of childhood. The early diagnosis of PID by primary care physicians is important to opportune treatment and better prognosis.

  3. Primary hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Madkhali, Tarıq; Alhefdhi, Amal; Chen, Herbert; Elfenbein, Dawn

    2016-01-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism is a common endocrine disorder caused by overactivation of parathyroid glands resulting in excessive release of parathyroid hormone. The resultant hypercalcemia leads to a myriad of symptoms. Primary hyperparathyroidism may increase a patient’s morbidity and even mortality if left untreated. During the last few decades, disease presentation has shifted from the classic presentation of severe bone and kidney manifestations to most patients now being diagnosed on routine labs. Although surgery is the only curative therapy, many advances have been made over the past decades in the diagnosis and the surgical management of primary hyperparathyroidism. The aim of this review is to summarize the characteristics of the disease, the work up, and the treatment options. PMID:26985167

  4. Polymyositis - adult

    MedlinePlus

    ... rash is a sign of a similar condition, dermatomyositis . Common symptoms include: Muscle weakness in the shoulders ... in the treatment of refractory adult and juvenile dermatomyositis and adult polymyositis: a randomized, placebo-phase trial. ...

  5. Secondary hypertension in adults

    PubMed Central

    Puar, Troy Hai Kiat; Mok, Yingjuan; Debajyoti, Roy; Khoo, Joan; How, Choon How; Ng, Alvin Kok Heong

    2016-01-01

    Secondary hypertension occurs in a significant proportion of adult patients (~10%). In young patients, renal causes (glomerulonephritis) and coarctation of the aorta should be considered. In older patients, primary aldosteronism, obstructive sleep apnoea and renal artery stenosis are more prevalent than previously thought. Primary aldosteronism can be screened by taking morning aldosterone and renin levels, and should be considered in patients with severe, resistant or hypokalaemia-associated hypertension. Symptoms of obstructive sleep apnoea should be sought. Worsening of renal function after starting an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor suggests the possibility of renal artery stenosis. Recognition, diagnosis and treatment of secondary causes of hypertension lead to good clinical outcomes and the possible reversal of end-organ damage, in addition to blood pressure control. As most patients with hypertension are managed at the primary care level, it is important for primary care physicians to recognise these conditions and refer patients appropriately. PMID:27211205

  6. [Primary hyperoxaluria].

    PubMed

    Cochat, Pierre; Fargue, Sonia; Bacchetta, Justine; Bertholet-Thomas, Aurélia; Sabot, Jean-François; Harambat, Jérôme

    2011-07-01

    Primary hyperoxalurias are rare recessive inherited inborn errors of glyoxylate metabolism. They are responsible for progressive renal involvement, which further lead to systemic oxalate deposition, which can even occur in infants. Primary hyperoxaluria type 1 is the most common form in Europe and is due to alanine-glyoxylate aminostransferase deficiency, a hepatic peroxisomal pyridoxin-dependent enzyme. Therefore primary hyperoxaluria type 1 is responsible for hyperoxaluria leading to aggressive stone formation and nephrocalcinosis. As glomerular filtration rate decreases, systemic oxalate storage occurs throughout all the body, and mainly in the skeleton. The diagnosis is first based on urine oxalate measurement, then on genotyping, which may also allow prenatal diagnosis to be proposed. Conservative measures - including hydration, crystallization inhibitors and pyridoxine - are safe and may allow long lasting renal survival, provided it is given as soon as the diagnosis has been even suspected. No dialysis procedure can remove enough oxalate to compensate oxalate overproduction from the sick liver, therefore a combined liver and kidney transplantation should be planned before advanced renal disease has occurred, in order to limit/avoid systemic oxalate deposition. In the future, primary hyperoxaluria type 1 may benefit from hepatocyte transplantation, chaperone molecules, etc.

  7. Primary hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Govett, G; White, J

    1989-07-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism is a pathological entity due to excessive secretion of parathormone from a single or multiple parathyroid glands. The biochemical hallmark of this disorder is an elevated serum calcium. The relationship of the parathyroid glands with the thymus gland in fetal development accounts for the occasional aberrant location of the parathyroids. By utilizing computed tomography or nuclear scanning or both preoperatively, the surgeon can isolate the hyperfunctioning adenoma and resect it, thus minimizing potential complications.

  8. Reading Their World: The Young Adult Novel in the Classroom. Second Edition. Young Adult Literature Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monseau, Virginia R., Ed.; Salvner, Gary M., Ed.

    This book was born of a desire to provide students, teachers, and all interested readers with a collection of essays that address issues of selection, pedagogy, and worth of the young adult novel. A primary purpose of the book is to enter the world of young adult readers through a literary form they know well, the modern young adult novel. Another…

  9. Adult onset retinoblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Sabyasachi; Pan, Utsab; Khetan, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB) is the most common primary malignant intraocular tumor of childhood presenting usually before 5 years of age. RB in adults older than 20 years is extremely rare. A literature search using PubMed/PubMed Central, Scopus, Google Scholar, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases revealed only 45 cases till date. Over the past decade, there has been a significant increase in the number of such reports, indicating heightened level of suspicion among ophthalmologists. Compared to its pediatric counterpart, adult onset RB poses unique challenges in diagnosis and treatment. This article summarizes available literature on adult onset RB and its clinical and pathologic profile, genetics, association with retinocytoma, diagnostics, treatment, and outcomes. PMID:27609158

  10. Primary stabbing headache.

    PubMed

    Pareja, Juan A; Sjaastad, Ottar

    2010-01-01

    Primary stabbing headache is characterized by transient, cephalic ultrashort stabs of pain. It is a frequent complaint with a prevalence of 35.2%, a female preponderance, and a mean age of onset of 28 years (Vågå study). Attacks are generally characterized by moderate to severe, jabbing or stabbing pain, lasting from a fraction of a second to 3s. Attack frequency is generally low, with one or a few attacks per day. The paroxysms generally occur spontaneously, during daytime. Most patients exhibit a sporadic pattern, with an erratic, unpredictable alternation between symptomatic and non-symptomatic periods. Paroxysms are almost invariably unilateral. Temporal and fronto-ocular areas are most frequently affected. Attacks tend to move from one area to another, in either the same or the opposite hemicranium. Jabs may be accompanied by a shock-like feeling and even by head movement - "jolts" -or vocalization. On rare occasions, conjunctival hemorrhage and monocular vision loss have been described as associated features. Primary stabbing headache may concur, synchronously or independently, with other primary headaches. In contrast to what is the case in adults, in childhood it is not usually associated with other headaches. Treatment is rarely necessary. Indomethacin, 75-150 mg daily, may seem to be of some avail. Celecoxib, nifedipine, melatonin, and gabapentin have been reported to be effective in isolated cases and small series of patients. The drug studies need corroboration.

  11. [Primary aldosteronism].

    PubMed

    Amar, Laurence

    2015-06-01

    Primary aldosteronism affects 6% of hypertensive patients. The diagnosis should be suspected in any patient with severe or resistant hypertension or hypertension associated with hypokalemia. The screening test consists on the assessment of the aldosterone to renin ratio. In case of an elevated ratio, the diagnosis of primary aldosteronism is confirmed by either elevated concentrations of basal plasma and/or urinary aldosterone or absence of suppression of aldosterone during dynamic test (including the saline infusion test). CT aims to ensure the absence of adrenal carcinoma and to study the morphology of the adrenals. The unilateral or bilateral type of aldosterone secretion is based on the realization of an adrenal venous sampling. When the hypersecretion is unilateral, the treatment consists of adrenalectomy leading to cure of hypertension in 42% of cases, improvement in 40% of cases. For patient with bilateral disease or who don't want to undergo surgery, treatment is based on spironolactone usually at doses of 25 or 50 mg in combination with other antihypertensives drugs such as diuretics or calcium channel blockers.

  12. Primary tumors of the liver.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, B. B.; Ukah, F.; Tette, A.; Villaflor, S. G.; Koh, D.; Seton, P.

    1992-01-01

    Primary tumors of the liver that are of clinical significance are rare. Ninety-five percent of such lesions when encountered will be malignant and only 5% will be benign. Malignant primary hepatic lesions represent 2% to 3% of primary cancers encountered in the United States. Hepatocellular carcinoma constitutes 90% of malignant liver primaries in the adult. Seventy-five percent of cases are associated with cirrhosis of the liver and patients with hepatitis B infection have a 33- to 200-fold excess risk for this malignancy. Cholangiocarcinoma represents 5% to 10% of hepatic primary malignancies while hepatoblastoma is distinctly uncommon in adults. Treatment is primarily surgical, and resectability is limited by the presence of cirrhosis and spread of the tumor within and outside of the liver. Of the benign liver tumors, the liver cell adenoma seem to be associated with oral contraception and have a proclivity for intraperitoneal hemorrhage, especially during pregnancy. Focal nodular hyperplasia is a tumor-like condition that also may be associated with oral contraception. This article describes five cases, two of which had quite unique presentations. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:1602511

  13. Modelo Pedagogico de Educacion Primaria para Adultos: Manual para el Asesor de Estudiantes Libres. Primera Parte (A Pedagogical Model for Adult Primary Education: Manual for the Student Advisor. Part One).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instituto Nacional para la Educacion de los Adultos, Mexico City (Mexico).

    This guide, part of a Mexican series of instructional materials, is intended for advisors of students participating in an adult education program offered through public and private organizations in communities in Mexico. The first part of the program comprises Spanish and math; the second, education for family life, education for community life,…

  14. Primary hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Bilezikian, John P; Cusano, Natalie E.; Khan, Aliya A.; Liu, Jian-Min; Marcocci, Claudio; Bandeira, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is a common disorder in which parathyroid hormone (PTH) is excessively secreted from one or more of the four parathyroid glands. A single benign parathyroid adenoma is the cause in most people. However, multiglandular disease is not rare and is typically seen in familial PHPT syndromes. The genetics of PHPT is usually monoclonal when a single gland is involved and polyclonal when multiglandular disease is present. The genes that have been implicated in PHPT include proto-oncogenes and tumour-suppressor genes. Hypercalcaemia is the biochemical hallmark of PHPT. Usually, the concentration of PTH is frankly increased but can remain within the normal range, which is abnormal in the setting of hypercalcaemia. Normocalcaemic PHPT, a variant in which the serum calcium level is persistently normal but PTH levels are increased in the absence of an obvious inciting stimulus, is now recognized. The clinical presentation of PHPT varies from asymptomatic disease (seen in countries where biochemical screening is routine) to classic symptomatic disease in which renal and/or skeletal complications are observed. Management guidelines have recently been revised to help the clinician to decide on the merits of a parathyroidectomy or a non-surgical course. This Primer covers these areas with particular attention to the epidemiology, clinical presentations, genetics, evaluation and guidelines for the management of PHPT. PMID:27194212

  15. Primary Hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Bandeira, Leonardo; Bilezikian, John

    2016-01-01

    Over the past several generations, primary hyperparathyroidism (PHTP) has undergone a change in its clinical presentation in many countries from a symptomatic disease to an asymptomatic one. The reasons for this change in clinical presentation are related to the widespread use of biochemical screening tests, to the measurement of PTH more routinely in the evaluation of metabolic bone disease and to the status of vitamin D sufficiency in the population. Along with recognition of a broader clinical spectrum of disease, including a more recently recognized normocalcemic variant, has come an appreciation that the evaluation of classic target organs that can be affected in PHPT, such as the skeleton and the kidneys, require more advanced imaging technology for complete evaluation. It is clear that even in asymptomatic patients, evidence for microstructural disease in the skeleton and calcifications in the kidneys can be demonstrated often. Potential non-classical manifestations of PHPT related to neurocognition and the cardiovascular system continue to be of interest. As a result of these advances, revised guidelines for the management of asymptomatic PHPT have been recently published to help the clinician determine whether surgery is appropriate or whether a more conservative approach is acceptable. PMID:27508075

  16. Serum insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) levels during long-term IGF-I treatment of children and adults with primary GH resistance (Laron syndrome).

    PubMed

    Laron, Z; Klinger, B; Silbergeld, A

    1999-01-01

    Serum IGF-I levels were measured in 14 patients (9 children and 5 adults) with Laron syndrome (LS) during long-term treatment by IGF-I. Recombinant IGF-I (FK-780, Fujisawa Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd., Japan) was administered once daily subcutaneously before breakfast for 3-5 years to the children and for 9 months to the adults. The initial daily dose was 150 micrograms/kg for children and 120 micrograms/kg for adults. Before initiation of treatment the mean overnight fasting levels of serum IGF-I in the children was 3.2 +/- 0.8 nmol/l (mean +/- SEM), rising to 10 +/- 1.7 nmol/l during long-term treatment even on a dose of 120 micrograms/kg/day. The serum IGF-I levels 4 hours after injection rose from 31.2 +/- 3.5 to 48 +/- 2 nmol/l. In the adult patients, the initial basal IGF-I was 4.1 +/- 0.7 nmol/l, rising to 16.1 +/- 3.84 nmol/l after 8-9 months treatment. Serum IGF-I levels at 4 hours after injection rose in the adult patients from 24.1 +/- 5.8 up to 66.8 +/- 15.4 nmol/l. A progressively increasing half-life during long term exogenous administration of IGF-I to patients with Laron syndrome was demonstrated by following serum IGF-I dynamics after injection. Based on the fact that no antibodies to IGF-I were detected and on findings in previous studies, it is speculated that the increasing serum IGF-I levels during long-term IGF-I treatment are caused by an increase in serum IGFBP-3 induced by chronic IGF-I administration. It is concluded that treatment with IGF-I necessitates regular monitoring of serum IGF-I levels; in patients in whom the age adjusted maximal levels are exceeded, a reduction of the daily IGF-I dose is indicated to avoid undesirable effects.

  17. Primary immunodeficiencies underlying fungal infections

    PubMed Central

    Lanternier, Fanny; Cypowyj, Sophie; Picard, Capucine; Bustamante, Jacinta; Lortholary, Olivier; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Puel, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review We review the primary immunodeficiencies underlying an increasing variety of superficial and invasive fungal infections. We also stress that the occurrence of such fungal infections should lead physicians to search for the corresponding single-gene inborn errors of immunity. Finally, we suggest that other fungal infections may also result from hitherto unknown inborn errors of immunity, at least in some patients with no known risk factors. Recent findings An increasing number of primary immunodeficiencies are being shown to underlie fungal infectious diseases in children and young adults. Inborn errors of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase complex (chronic granulomatous disease), severe congenital neutropenia and leukocyte adhesion deficiency type I confer a predisposition to invasive aspergillosis and candidiasis. More rarely, inborn errors of IFN-γ immunity underlie endemic mycoses. Inborn errors of IL-17 immunity have recently been shown to underlie chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, whereas inborn errors of CARD9 immunity underlie deep dermatophytosis and invasive candidiasis. Summary Chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, invasive candidiasis, invasive aspergillosis, deep dermatophytosis, pneumocystosis, and endemic mycoses can all be caused by primary immunodeficiencies. Each type of infection is highly suggestive of a specific type of primary immunodeficiency. In the absence of overt risk factors, single-gene inborn errors of immunity should be sought in children and young adults with these and other fungal diseases. PMID:24240293

  18. CPR: Adult

    MedlinePlus

    Refresher Center Home FIRST AID, CPR and AED LIFEGUARDING Refresher Putting It All Together: CPR—Adult (2:03) Refresher videos only utilize this player QUICK LINKS Home RedCross.org Purchase Course ...

  19. Proportional Reasoning of Quasi-Illiterate Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alatorre, Silvia; Figueras, Olimpia

    2004-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to describe the answers given by adults without primary schooling to different ratio-and rate-comparison tasks. The framework and the analysed data are part of an ongoing research, in which the responses of subjects of different ages and schoolings are studied. The behaviour of quasi-illiterate adults could throw…

  20. Primary hyperoxaluria.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, Víctor; Torres, Armando; Salido, Eduardo

    2014-05-21

    Primary hyperoxaluria (PH) occurs due to an autosomal recessive hereditary disorder of the metabolism of glyoxylate, which causes excessive oxalate production. The most frequent and serious disorder is due to enzyme deficit of alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase (PH type I) specific to hepatic peroxisome. As oxalate is not metabolised in humans and is excreted through the kidneys, the kidney is the first organ affected, causing recurrent lithiasis, nephrocalcinosis and early renal failure. With advance of renal failure, particularly in patients on haemodialysis (HD), calcium oxalate is massively deposited in tissues, which is known as oxalosis. Diagnosis is based on family history, the presence of urolithiasis and/or nephrocalcinosis, hyperoxaluria, oxalate deposits in tissue forming granulomas, molecular analysis of DNA and enzyme analysis if applicable. High diagnostic suspicion is required; therefore, unfortunately, in many cases it is diagnosed after its recurrence following kidney transplantation. Conservative management of this disease (high liquid intake, pyridoxine and crystallisation inhibitors) needs to be adopted early in order to delay kidney damage. Treatment by dialysis is ineffective in treating excess oxalate. After the kidney transplant, we normally observe a rapid appearance of oxalate deposits in the graft and the results of this technique are discouraging, with very few exceptions. Pre-emptive liver transplantation, or simultaneous liver and kidney transplants when there is already irreversible damage to the kidney, is the treatment of choice to treat the underlying disease and suppress oxalate overproduction. Given its condition as a rare disease and its genetic and clinical heterogeneity, it is not possible to gain evidence through randomised clinical trials. As a result, the recommendations are established by groups of experts based on publications of renowned scientific rigour. In this regard, a group of European experts (OxalEurope) has

  1. NGO Perspectives on Adult Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, David

    2004-01-01

    Since 2000, the only serious attempt to mobilise new resources for education has been the World Bank's co-ordinated "Fast Track Initiative (FTI)." However, the FTI only raises funds for achieving universal completion of primary school and it does not address early childhood education or adult literacy. To date the Global Campaign for Education has…

  2. [Primary lipodystrophies].

    PubMed

    Capeau, J; Magré, J; Lascols, O; Caron, M; Béréziat, V; Vigouroux, C

    2007-02-01

    Primary lipodystrophies represent a heterogeneous group of very rare diseases with a prevalence of less than 1 case for 100.000, inherited or acquired, caracterized by a loss of body fat either generalized or localized (lipoatrophy). In some forms, lipoatrophy is associated with a selective hypertrophy of other fat depots. Clinical signs of insulin resistance are often present: acanthosis nigricans, signs of hyperandrogenism. All lipodystrophies are associated with dysmetabolic alterations with insulin resistance, altered glucose tolerance or diabetes and hypertriglyceridemia leading to a risk of acute pancreatitis. Chronic complications are those resulting from diabetes involving the retina, kidney and nerves, cardiovascular complications and steatotic liver lesions that could result in cirrhosis. Genetic forms of generalized lipodystrophy (or Berardinelli-Seip syndrome) result, in most cases, from recessive mutations in one of two genes: either BSCL2 coding seipin or BSCL1 coding AGPAT2, an acyl-transferase involved in triglyceride synthesis. Acquired generalized lipodystrophy (Lawrence syndrome) is of unknown origin but is sometimes associated with signs of autoimmunity. Partial lipodystrophies can be familial with dominant transmission. Heterozygous mutations have been identified in the LMNA gene encoding nuclear lamin A/C belonging to the nuclear lamina, or in PPARG encoding the adipogenic transcription factor PPARgamma. Some less typical lipodystrophies, associated with signs of premature aging, have been linked to mutations in LMNA or in the ZMPSTE24 gene encoding the protease responsible for the maturation of prelamin A into lamin A. Acquired partial lipodystrophy (Barraquer-Simons syndrome) is characterized by cephalothoracic fat loss. Its aetiology is unknown but mutations in LMNB2, encoding the lamina protein lamin B2, could represent susceptibility factors. Highly active antiretroviral treatments for HIV infection are currently the most frequent cause

  3. Primary song by a juvenile willow flycatcher

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sogge, M.K.

    1997-01-01

    The timing of song development in suboscines, in which song appears not to be learned from other adults is poorly known. The Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii) is a suboscine with a primary song typically referred to as fitz-bew. I report here an instance of very early singing by a 6-8-wk-old Willow Flycatcher, which sang in an aggressive context in response to a recording of adult flycatcher song. This is exceptionally early development of primary song, even among suboscines. Early song development may assist in the defense of winter territories.

  4. Adult Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bischof, Ledford J.

    This volume comprehensively reviews the research on the psychology of the middle aged (ages 40-65). Topics include the concept of maturity and maturation models, the measurement and influences of adult self image; marriage and sexual patterns; intergenerational relationships between and children; vocations and avocations (work, retirement, play,…

  5. Learing Disabilities and the Primary Care Physician

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, William J.

    1989-01-01

    Approximately 10% of the population has learning disabilities (LD). Although the main manifestations occur in childhood, many of the primary and secondary manifestations of LD can continue into adult life. The high prevalence of LD and the current economic climate in Canada imply that the primary care physician must have a role in the identification, diagnosis, and management services for persons with LD. Information about the specific aspects of a particular person's LD should be incorporated into the evaluation and management of other health matters with which the primary care physician deals. PMID:21248890

  6. ADULT EDUCATION OF MIGRANT ADULTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BEAL, CATHERINE; AND OTHERS

    UNITS ON MIGRANT ADULT EDUCATION, AND A UNIT ON ORGANIZING INFORMAL GROUPS OF MIGRANT WOMEN TO DISCUSS MAINTAINING AND IMPROVING THEIR TEMPORARY HOMES, ARE PRESENTED. THE GOALS OF THE UNIT ON EDUCATION FOR MIGRANT MEN ARE ECONOMIC INDEPENDENCE, BETTER HEALTH AND WELL-BEING, AND BETTER HANDLING OF RESPONSIBILITIES. THE MAIN DIVISIONS OF THE…

  7. Primary Progressive Aphasia

    MedlinePlus

    Primary progressive aphasia Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Primary progressive aphasia (uh-FAY-zhuh) is a rare nervous system (neurological) syndrome ... your ability to communicate. People with primary progressive aphasia can have trouble expressing their thoughts and understanding ...

  8. The occ1 gene is preferentially expressed in the primary visual cortex in an activity-dependent manner: a pattern of gene expression related to the cytoarchitectonic area in adult macaque neocortex.

    PubMed

    Tochitani, S; Liang, F; Watakabe, A; Hashikawa, T; Yamamori, T

    2001-01-01

    Marker molecules to visualize specific subsets of neurons are useful for studying the functional organization of the neocortex. One approach to identify such molecular markers is to examine the differences in molecular properties among morphologically and physiologically distinct neuronal cell types. We used differential display to compare mRNA expression in the anatomically and functionally distinct areas of the adult macaque neocortex. We found that a gene, designated occ1, was preferentially transcribed in the posterior region of the neocortex, especially in area 17. Complete sequence analysis revealed that occ1 encodes a macaque homolog of a secretable protein, TSC-36/follistatin-related protein (FRP). In situ hybridization histochemistry confirmed the characteristic neocortical expression pattern of occ1 and showed that occ1 transcription is high in layers II, III, IVA and IVC of area 17. In addition, occ1 transcription was observed selectively in cells of the magnocellular layers in the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN). Dual labeling immunohistochemistry showed that the occ1-positive neurons in area 17 include both gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-positive aspiny inhibitory cells and the alpha-subunit of type II calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMKII alpha)-positive spiny excitatory cells. With brief periods of monocular deprivation, the occ1 mRNA level decreased markedly in deprived ocular dominance columns of area 17. From this we conclude that the expression of occ1 mRNA is present in a subset of neurons that are preferentially localized in particular laminae of area 17 and consist of various morphological and physiological neuronal types, and, furthermore, occ1 transcription is subject to visually driven activity-dependent regulation.

  9. Panic Disorder among Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder ... Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder ...

  10. Obstructive sleep apnea - adults

    MedlinePlus

    Sleep apnea - obstructive - adults; Apnea - obstructive sleep apnea syndrome - adults; Sleep-disordered breathing - adults; OSA - adults ... When you sleep, all of the muscles in your body become more relaxed. This includes the muscles that help keep your ...

  11. Employment of adult mammalian primary cells in toxicology: In vivo and in vitro genotoxic effects of environmentally significant N-nitrosodialkylamines in cells of the liver, lung, and kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Pool, B.L.; Brendler, S.Y.; Liegibel, U.M.; Schmezer, P. ); Tompa, A. )

    1990-01-01

    This report focuses on the use of freshly isolated primary mammalian cells from different tissues and organs of the rat for the rapid and efficient analysis of toxic and genotoxic chemicals. The cells are either treated in vitro or they are isolated from treated animals. Viability by trypan blue exclusion and DNA damage as single-strand breaks are monitored in either case. Therefore, it is possible to compare in vitro and in vivo results directly. N-nitrosamines with unique organ-specific modes in carcinogenesis were studied in vitro using hepatocytes derived from three species (rat, hamster, and pig) and in rat lung and kidney cells. The sensitive detection of all carcinogenic nitrosamines was achieved, although a pattern of cell-specific activation was not observable. The new modification of the in vivo approach allowed the sensitive detection of NDMA genotoxicity in hepatic and in extrahepatic tissues. It is important to point out that the method is an efficient tool for toxicokinetic studies with genotoxic carcinogens in vivo.

  12. Doctoral Clinical Geropsychology Training in a Primary Care Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zweig, Richard A.; Siegel, Lawrence; Hahn, Steven; Kuslansky, Gail; Byrne, Kathy; Fyffe, Denise; Passman, Vicki; Stewart, Douglas; Hinrichsen, Gregory

    2005-01-01

    Most older adults diagnosed with a mental disorder receive treatment in primary care settings that lack personnel skilled in geropsychological diagnosis and treatment. The Ferkauf Older Adult Program of Yeshiva University endeavors to bridge this gap by providing training in geriatric psychology, through coursework and diverse clinical practica,…

  13. STEMS pilot trial: a pilot cluster randomised controlled trial to investigate the addition of patient direct access to physiotherapy to usual GP-led primary care for adults with musculoskeletal pain

    PubMed Central

    Ogollah, Reuben O; Jowett, Sue; Kigozi, Jesse; Tooth, Stephanie; Protheroe, Joanne; Hay, Elaine M; Salisbury, Chris; Foster, Nadine E

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Around 17% of general practitioner (GP) consultations are for musculoskeletal conditions, which will rise as the population ages. Patient direct access to physiotherapy provides one solution, yet adoption in the National Health Service (NHS) has been slow. Setting A pilot, pragmatic, non-inferiority, cluster randomised controlled trial (RCT) in general practice and physiotherapy services in the UK. Objectives Investigate feasibility of a main RCT. Participants Adult patients registered in participating practices and consulting with a musculoskeletal problem. Interventions 4 general practices (clusters) randomised to provide GP-led care as usual or the addition of a patient direct access to physiotherapy pathway. Outcomes Process outcomes and exploratory analyses of clinical and cost outcomes. Data collection Participant-level data were collected via questionnaires at identification, 2, 6 and 12 months and through medical records. Blinding The study statistician and research nurses were blinded to practice allocation. Results Of 2696 patients invited to complete study questionnaires, 978 participated (intervention group n=425, control arm n=553) and were analysed. Participant recruitment was completed in 6 months. Follow-up rates were 78% (6 months) and 71% (12 months). No evidence of selection bias was observed. The direct access pathway was used by 90% of patients in intervention practices needing physiotherapy. Some increase in referrals to physiotherapy occurred from one practice, although waiting times for physiotherapy did not increase (28 days before, 26 days after introduction of direct access). No safety issues were identified. Clinical and cost outcomes were similar in both groups. Exploratory estimates of between group effect (using 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) Physical Component Summary (PCS)) at 6 months was −0.28 (95% CI −1.35 to 0.79) and at 12 months 0.12 (95% CI −1.27 to 1.51). Conclusions A full RCT is

  14. A Dose-Escalation Study to Evaluate the Safety, Tolerability, Pharmacokinetics, and Efficacy of 2 and 4 Weeks of Twice-Daily Ocular Trabodenoson in Adults with Ocular Hypertension or Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Sall, Kenneth N.; DuBiner, Harvey; Slomowitz, Natanya; McVicar, William; Rich, Cadmus C.; Baumgartner, Rudolf A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: To evaluate the safety and ocular hypotensive efficacy of 4 trabodenoson doses administered twice daily over 14 or 28 days in subjects with ocular hypertension or primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). Methods: In this multicenter, randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled, dose-escalation Phase 2 study, patients received unilateral topical twice-daily trabodenoson (50, 100, or 200 mcg) or placebo for 14 days, or 500 mcg trabodenoson or placebo for 28 days. Ocular and systemic safety and tolerability were assessed by examinations, clinical and laboratory studies. Intraocular pressure (IOP) was assessed using Goldmann tonometry. Results: Trabodenoson was well tolerated; no clinically meaningful ocular or systemic side effects were identified. Trabodenoson produced a dose-dependent IOP reduction. IOP reductions in the 500 mcg group were significantly greater than placebo at all time points at Day 28. Mean IOP reductions from diurnal baseline ranged from −3.5 to −5.0 mmHg with a mean change of −4.1 mmHg in the 500 mcg group compared −1.0 to −2.5 mmHg with a mean change of −1.6 mmHg for the placebo group, and the Day 28 drop was significantly greater than at Day 14 (P = 0.0163) indicating improvement in IOP lowering with longer treatment time. IOP remained significantly reduced 24 h after the final 500 mcg dose (P = 0.048). Conclusion: Twice-daily ocular doses of trabodenoson, from 50 to 500 mcg, were well tolerated and showed a dose-related decrease in IOP that was statistically significant and clinically relevant at 500 mcg in patients with ocular hypertension or POAG. PMID:27002298

  15. Adult Development and Learning of Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberson, Donald N., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    This summary of adult development covers a wide range of authors. Adult development is one way of understanding how the internal and external changes in our lives have an impact on learning. Of particular importance in this work are the developmental issues of older adults. I present various theories of adult development such as linear and…

  16. Primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma. A clinicopathologic study of 141 cases compared with 916 nonmediastinal large B-cell lymphomas, a GELA ("Groupe d'Etude des Lymphomes de l'Adulte") study.

    PubMed

    Cazals-Hatem, D; Lepage, E; Brice, P; Ferrant, A; d'Agay, M F; Baumelou, E; Brière, J; Blanc, M; Gaulard, P; Biron, P; Schlaifer, D; Diebold, J; Audouin, J

    1996-07-01

    Among non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma (PMLCL) has been considered a separate entity that has specific clinical and histological aspects and a poor prognosis. In this study, we reexamined the clinicopathologic features and the response to current treatment of 141 PMLCL and compare them with 916 nonmediastinal large B-cell lymphomas (NMLCL) recorded in the same period and treated with similar combined chemotherapy. The clinical features of PMLCL at diagnosis were largely homogeneous and distinct from NMLCL, with a predilection for young women (59% with a mean age of 37 years versus 42% with a mean age of 54 years), bulky tumor (77% versus 7%, p < 10(4)), high serum lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) level 76% versus 51%, p < 10(4)), and frequent intrathoracic extension to adjacent organs such as pleura, pericardium, and lung. By contrast, extrathoracic or hematologic dissemination was uncommon (2% of bone marrow involvement versus 17%). All patients had diffuse large B-cell nonimmunoblastic, nonanaplastic lymphomas. Histological analysis of the 141 PMLCL evaluated two common patterns: the presence of large cells with clear cytoplasm (found in 38% of cases) and the presence of fibrosis (marked in 25% of cases). The presence of clear cells or intense fibrosis did not constitute prognostic indicators. Immunologic and molecular analysis assessed the profile of bcl-2 expression and the presence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in PMLCL: 30% expressed a high level of bcl-2 protein; EBER RNAs were detected by in situ hybridization in only two of the 41 cases tested. Monotypic light chain restriction could be demonstrated in seven of the 41 PMLCL tested on fixed-section. Treated with polychemotherapy regimens without radiotherapy, 79% of PMLCL patients achieved a complete remission compared with 68% in the NMLCL patient group (p = 0.01). Overall, 3-year survival rates were estimated at 66 and 61%, respectively (p = 0.05), and disease-free survival rates

  17. Transdiagnostic Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Versus Treatment as Usual in Adult Patients With Emotional Disorders in the Primary Care Setting (PsicAP Study): Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Navarro, Roger; Wood, Cristina Mae; Limonero, Joaquín T; Medrano, Leonardo Adrián; Ruiz-Rodríguez, Paloma; Gracia-Gracia, Irene; Dongil-Collado, Esperanza; Iruarrizaga, Iciar; Chacón, Fernando; Santolaya, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Background Demand for primary care (PC) services in Spain exceeds available resources. Part of this strong demand is due to the high prevalence of emotional disorders (EDs)—anxiety, depression, and somatic symptom disorders—and related comorbidities such as pain or chronic illnesses. EDs are often under- or misdiagnosed by general practitioners (GPs) and, consequently, treatment is frequently inadequate. Objective We aim to compare the short- and long-term effectiveness of group-delivered transdiagnostic cognitive behavioral therapy (TD-CBT) versus treatment as usual (TAU) in the treatment of EDs in the PC setting in Spain. We also aim to compare the effect of these treatments on disability, quality of life, cognitive-emotional factors, and treatment satisfaction. Methods Here we present the study design of a two-arm, single-blind, randomized controlled trial (N=1126) to compare TAU to TD-CBT for EDs. TAU will consist primarily of pharmacological treatment and practical advice from the GP while TD-CBT will be administered in seven 90-minute group sessions held over a period ranging from 12 to 14 weeks. Psychological assessments are carried out at baseline (ie, pretreatment); posttreatment; and at 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-up. The study is conducted in approximately 26 PC centers from the National Health System in Spain. Results This study was initiated in December 2013 and will remain open to new participants until recruitment and follow-up has been completed. We expect all posttreatment evaluations to be completed by December 2017, and follow-up will end in December 2018. Conclusions We expect the TD-CBT group to have better results compared to TAU on all posttreatment measures and that this improvement will be maintained during follow-up. This project could serve as a model for use in other areas or services of the National Health System in Spain and even in other countries. ClinicalTrial International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Number (ISRCTN

  18. [Vesicoureteral reflux in adults].

    PubMed

    Rollino, Cristiana; D'Urso, Leonardo; Beltrame, Giulietta; Ferro, Michela; Quattrocchio, Giacomo; Quarello, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) may be congenital or acquired. The most frequent form of congenital VUR is primary VUR. Its prevalence in adults is not exactly known, but it is higher in women, whose greater propensity for urinary tract infections increases the likelihood of an instrumental examination leading to the diagnosis of less severe cases. In men, even severe VUR may go undiagnosed for a long time. Primary VUR is due to a defect in the valve mechanism of the ureterovesical junction. In physiological conditions, the terminal ureter enters the bladder wall obliquely and bladder contraction leads to compression of this intravesical portion. Abnormal length of the intravesical portion of the ureter due to a genetic mutation (whose location is yet to be established) leads to VUR. In its less severe forms VUR may be asymptomatic, but in 50-70% of cases it manifests with recurrent cystitis or pyelonephritis. The manifestations leading to a diagnosis of VUR in adults, besides urinary tract infections, are proteinuria, renal failure and hypertension. The gold-standard diagnostic examination is a micturating cystourethrogram. Reflux nephropathy develops as a result of a pathogenetic mechanism unrelated to high cavity pressure or urinary tract infections but due to reduced formation of the normal renal parenchyma (hypoplasia or dysplasia). Abnormal renal parenchyma development is attributable to the same genes that control the development of the ureters and ureterovesical junction. VUR is considered only a marker of this abnormal development, playing no role in scar formation. There is no conclusive evidence regarding the indications for VUR correction. However, the risk that VUR leads to recurrent pyelonephritis and reflux nephropathy must be kept in mind. VUR certainly has to be corrected in women who contemplate pregnancy.

  19. The adult scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Aebi, Max

    2005-12-01

    Adult scoliosis is defined as a spinal deformity in a skeletally mature patient with a Cobb angle of more than 10 degrees in the coronal plain. Adult scoliosis can be separated into four major groups: Type 1: Primary degenerative scoliosis, mostly on the basis of a disc and/or facet joint arthritis, affecting those structures asymmetrically with predominantly back pain symptoms, often accompanied either by signs of spinal stenosis (central as well as lateral stenosis) or without. These curves are often classified as "de novo" scoliosis. Type 2: Idiopathic adolescent scoliosis of the thoracic and/or lumbar spine which progresses in adult life and is usually combined with secondary degeneration and/or imbalance. Some patients had either no surgical treatment or a surgical correction and fusion in adolescence in either the thoracic or thoracolumbar spine. Those patients may develop secondary degeneration and progression of the adjacent curve; in this case those curves belong to the type 3a. Type 3: Secondary adult curves: (a) In the context of an oblique pelvis, for instance, due to a leg length discrepancy or hip pathology or as a secondary curve in idiopathic, neuromuscular and congenital scoliosis, or asymmetrical anomalies at the lumbosacral junction; (b) In the context of a metabolic bone disease (mostly osteoporosis) combined with asymmetric arthritic disease and/or vertebral fractures. Sometimes it is difficult to decide, what exactly the primary cause of the curve was, once it has significantly progressed. However, once an asymmetric load or degeneration occurs, the pathomorphology and pathomechanism in adult scoliosis predominantly located in the lumbar or thoracolumbar spine is quite predictable. Asymmetric degeneration leads to increased asymmetric load and therefore to a progression of the degeneration and deformity, as either scoliosis and/or kyphosis. The progression of a curve is further supported by osteoporosis, particularly in post-menopausal female

  20. Preparing Educators of Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grabowski, Stanley M.; And Others

    Model programs are described for two areas of adult education--the preparation of adult educators and the training conducted by adult educators. In Chapter One, Phyllis Caldwell reviews the literature concerning the preservice training of adult educators, concentrating on the competencies of adult education administrators and teachers. In Chapter…

  1. Primary renal carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Kanodia, K V; Vanikar, A V; Patel, R D; Suthar, K S; Kute, V B; Modi, P R; Trivedi, H L

    2013-09-01

    Primary renal carcinoid tumor is extremely rare and, therefore, its pathogenesis and prognosis is not well known. We report a primary renal carcinoid in a 26-year-old man treated by radical nephrectomy.

  2. Bulimia Nervosa: A Primary Care Review

    PubMed Central

    Rushing, Jona M.; Jones, Laura E.; Carney, Caroline P.

    2003-01-01

    Bulimia nervosa is a psychiatric condition that affects many adolescent and young adult women. The disorder is characterized by bingeing and purging behavior and can lead to medical complications. Thus, patients with bulimia nervosa commonly present in the primary care setting. Physical and laboratory examinations reveal markers of bulimia nervosa that are useful in making the diagnosis. Treatment is beneficial, and outcomes of early intervention are good. This article discusses the history, presentation, and tools needed for recognizing and treating bulimia nervosa in primary care. PMID:15213788

  3. Primary enzyme quantitation

    DOEpatents

    Saunders, G.C.

    1982-03-04

    The disclosure relates to the quantitation of a primary enzyme concentration by utilizing a substrate for the primary enzyme labeled with a second enzyme which is an indicator enzyme. Enzyme catalysis of the substrate occurs and results in release of the indicator enzyme in an amount directly proportional to the amount of primary enzyme present. By quantifying the free indicator enzyme one determines the amount of primary enzyme present.

  4. Adults Need Vaccines, Too!

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn JavaScript on. Feature: Adult Vaccinations Adults Need Vaccines, Too! Past Issues / Summer 2015 Table of Contents ... of the millions of adults not receiving the vaccines you need? What vaccines do you need? All ...

  5. Adult Day Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Page Resize Text Printer Friendly Online Chat Adult Day Care Adult Day Care Centers are designed to provide care and ... adults who need assistance or supervision during the day. Programs offer relief to family members and caregivers, ...

  6. Adult Still's disease

    MedlinePlus

    Still's disease - adult; AOSD ... than 1 out of 100,000 people develop adult-onset Still's disease each year. It affects women more often than men. The cause of adult Still's disease is unknown. No risk factors for ...

  7. Investigating Primary Source Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, Joanne; Hanlon, Ann M.; Levine, Jennie A.

    2009-01-01

    Primary source research requires students to acquire specialized research skills. This paper presents results from a user study testing the effectiveness of a Web guide designed to convey the concepts behind "primary source literacy". The study also evaluated students' strengths and weaknesses when conducting primary source research. (Contains 3…

  8. Primary Care's Dim Prognosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alper, Philip R.

    2010-01-01

    Given the chorus of approval for primary care emanating from every party to the health reform debate, one might suppose that the future for primary physicians is bright. Yet this is far from certain. And when one looks to history and recognizes that primary care medicine has failed virtually every conceivable market test in recent years, its…

  9. Pedagogy and Politics: Adult Education in Latin America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, D'Arcy

    1983-01-01

    Adult education has drawn relatively small amounts of money and skill away from the Latin American government's obsessive concern with primary schooling. But its share of educational resources is increasing rapidly, particularly in literacy and agricultural extension. (SSH)

  10. Mobility adaptations of older adults: a secondary analysis.

    PubMed

    Rush, Kathy L; Watts, Wilda E; Stanbury, Janice

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this secondary study was to describe the mobility adaptations of community-living older adults. The primary study, designed to understand weakness and aging from the perspective of older adults, revealed that older adults viewed weakness as a progression from inability to an end point of 'giving up,' which prompted the use of adaptation strategies to preserve mobility and to counter a self-identity of being weak. A qualitative descriptive design guided the primary study of 15 community-living older adults, who participated in in-depth interviews. A systematic secondary analysis using Baltes and Baltes' theory of Selective Optimization with Compensation (SOC) showed that older adults used selection, optimization, and compensation adaptations across a range of mobility behaviors. The SOC model offered a framework for profiling older adults' agency and motivations in meeting mobility challenges as they age and provided the basis for targeted interventions to maximize mobility with aging.

  11. Systematic Search for Primary Immunodeficiency in Adults With Infections

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-23

    Complement Deficiency; Antibody Deficiency; Chronic Sinus Infection; Meningitis, Bacterial; Pneumonia, Bacterial; Otitis Media; Streptococcal Infection; Neisseria Infections; Haemophilus Influenza; Pneumococcal Infections

  12. [Special Report: Adult Education and Primary Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vijayendra, T.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    A series of five case studies examines (1) literacy, health, and conscientization in the Mandar region of India; (2) the training of community health workers in Indonesia; (3) the Chinese strategy combining health, political will, and participation; (4) British community-based health education programs, and (5) participatory methodology for…

  13. Changes in Adult Child Caregiver Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szinovacz, Maximiliane E.; Davey, Adam

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Caregiving research has typically relied on cross-sectional data that focus on the primary caregiver. This approach neglects the dynamic and systemic character of caregiver networks. Our analyses addressed changes in adult child care networks over a 2-year period. Design and Methods: The study relied on pooled data from Waves 1 through 5…

  14. Personal Assistance Providers' Mistreatment of Disabled Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oktay, Julianne S.; Tompkins, Catherine J.

    2004-01-01

    This article describes a survey of 84 adults with disabilities who received personal assistance with activities of daily living from family members, informal providers, or agency personnel. Results showed that 30 percent reported mistreatment from their primary provider, and 61 percent reported mistreatment by another provider. Verbal abuse,…

  15. Basal Ganglia Germinoma in an Adult.

    PubMed

    Vialatte de Pémille, Clément; Bielle, Franck; Mokhtari, Karima; Kerboua, Esma; Alapetite, Claire; Idbaih, Ahmed

    2016-08-01

    Intracranial germinoma is a rare primary brain cancer, usually located within the midline and mainly affecting Asian pediatric patients. Interestingly, we report here the peculiar case of a young North-African adult patient suffering from a basal ganglia germinoma without the classical ipsilateral cerebral hemiatrophy associated with this location.

  16. Quality of Life in Adults Who Stutter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koedoot, Caroline; Bouwmans, Clazien; Franken, Marie-Christine; Stolk, Elly

    2011-01-01

    Although persistent developmental stuttering is known to affect daily living, just how great the impact is remains unclear. Furthermore, little is known about the underlying mechanisms which lead to a diminished quality of life (QoL). The primary objective of this study is to explore to what extent QoL is impaired in adults who stutter (AWS). In…

  17. An Adult Manpower Training Program. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Opportunities Industrialization Center, Inc., Little Rock, AR.

    The goals of the OIC organization in Little Rock include providing hope for impoverished and hard-core unemployed in the form of job preparation by providing adult education, pre-vocational training, skills training, counseling, job development, placement and followup. Another primary goal of OIC is providing and emphasizing minority group…

  18. Depression in older adults: screening and referral.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Edgar Ramos; Brown, Ellen; Raue, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Depression is related to disability and affects rehabilitation participation, outcomes, and compliance with treatment. Improving older adult depression detection and referral requires knowledge, skills, supportive organizational policies, and access to mental health experts. This review provides a selected overview of evidence-based approaches for screening of suspected cases of depression in older adults by physical therapists and other non-mental health professionals and discusses procedures to refer suspected cases to primary care providers and/or mental health specialists for evaluation, including resources and a tool to assist in communicating depression-related information to the primary care provider or mental health specialist. We hope that this review will promote the incorporation of evidence-based screening and referral of suspected cases of depression in older adults into routine practice.

  19. Adult Recruitment Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Juliet, Ed.; And Others

    Findings of an American College Testing Program 1981 survey on college recruitment of adult students are summarized, and 12 articles on adult recruitment are presented. Titles and authors are as follows: "Adult Recruitment Practices: A Report of a National Survey" (Patricia Spratt, Juliet Kaufmann, Lee Noel); "Three Programs for Adults in Shopping…

  20. Primary Intraosseous Meningioma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Thomas C

    2016-04-01

    Primary intraosseous meningiomas are a subtype of primary extradural meningiomas. They represent approximately two-thirds of extradural meningiomas and fewer than 2% of meningiomas overall. These tumors originate within the bones of the skull and can have a clinical presentation and radiographic differential diagnosis different from those for intradural meningiomas. Primary intraosseous meningiomas are classified based on location and histopathologic characteristics. Treatment is primarily surgical resection with wide margins if possible. Sparse literature exists regarding the use of adjuvant therapies. The literature regarding primary intraosseous meningiomas consists primarily of clinical case reports and case series. This literature is reviewed and summarized in this article.

  1. Childhood and adult cancers: contrasts and commonalities.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Michael F G; Bithell, John F; Stiller, Charles A; Kendall, Gerald M; O'Neill, Kate A

    2013-09-01

    Tumours occurring in children differ considerably from those occurring at older ages but exhibit common features. Those occurring in the teenage/young adult (TYA) years represent a transitional mixture of child and adult tumours and pose a considerable challenge for optimal clinical management and service provision. Nevertheless the fundamental processes of malignant change, arising from genetic/epigenetic interaction with environmental exposures, seem to operate across all ages and the entire tumour spectrum. We focus here on the ways in which genotype (and epigenetic modification), growth processes (particularly in utero), and exposure to ionising radiation (in conjunction with genetic susceptibility) affect cancer risk from childhood to adulthood, whether as a primary occurrence, or a second primary tumour following earlier primary occurrence and treatment.

  2. Utilising Secondary Schools Facilities for Adult Learning Programmes in Tanzania: A Veracity of Trances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Machumu, Haruni J.; Kalimasi, Perpetua J.; Msabila, Dominick T.; Zhu, Chang; Almasi, Mustapha

    2015-01-01

    The majority of Tanzanians acquire primary education, which is actually not enough for manpower production purposes. With this kind of graduates, the country may not be in a position to develop fast unless adult education takes part fully to rescue the situation because primary education offers insufficient required life skills. Adult education…

  3. Screening for ADHD in an Adult Social Phobia Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mortberg, Ewa; Tilfors, Kerstin; Bejerot, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Recent studies have suggested a link between a primary anxiety disorder and ADHD. Method: A total of 39 participants with a primary diagnosis of social phobia were compared with 178 patients with ADHD and 88 patients with other psychiatric disorders on measures for childhood and adult ADHD (the Wender Utah Rating Scale and the Adult…

  4. Young adult palliative care: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Clark, Jennifer K; Fasciano, Karen

    2015-02-01

    Young adulthood is a time of immense growth and possibilities. As a result, it is also a time when serious illness can have profound effects. This review examines the current data pertinent to young adult palliative care and discusses the challenges and opportunities where palliative medicine can enhance the care provided to this growing and vulnerable population. From the data, 2 primary themes emerged (1) ongoing young adult development not only generates unique biologic disease burdens and clinical treatment options but also requires frequent assessment and promotion and (2) binary health care systems often leave young adults without access to developmentally appropriate health care. Given its interdisciplinary approach, palliative care is uniquely poised to address the challenges known to caring for the seriously ill young adult.

  5. EMR Curriculum Guide: Primary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruschmeier, Veronica M., Ed.; Rockwell, Linda, Ed.

    Presented is a curriculum guide for educable mentally retarded children in primary and intermediate grades which specifies behavioral and interim objectives in the areas of basic verbal and arithmetic skills, vocational competencies, social competencies, and physical skills. Objectives such as the following are identified at the primary level:…

  6. Using Primary Source Documents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mintz, Steven

    2003-01-01

    Explores the use of primary sources when teaching about U.S. slavery. Includes primary sources from the Gilder Lehrman Documents Collection (New York Historical Society) to teach about the role of slaves in the Revolutionary War, such as a proclamation from Lord Dunmore offering freedom to slaves who joined his army. (CMK)

  7. Medics in Primary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Press, Colin

    2003-01-01

    Some time ago a flyer on "Medics in Primary School" came the author's way. It described a programme for making placements in primary schools available to medical students. The benefits of the program to medical students and participating schools were highlighted, including opportunities to develop communication skills and demystify…

  8. Transforming Primary Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Askew, Mike

    2011-01-01

    What is good mathematics teaching? What is mathematics teaching good for? Who is mathematics teaching for? These are just some of the questions addressed in "Transforming Primary Mathematics", a highly timely new resource for teachers which accessibly sets out the key theories and latest research in primary maths today. Under-pinned by findings…

  9. [The primary healthcare centres].

    PubMed

    Brambilla, Antonio; Maciocco, Gavino

    2014-04-01

    The central attributes of primary care are: first contact (accessibility), longitudinality (person- focused preventive and curative care overtime), patient-oriented comprehensiveness and coordination (including navigation towards secondary and tertiary care). Besides taking care of the needs of the individuals, primary health care teams are also looking at the community, especially when addressing social determinants of health. The rationale for the benefits for primary care for health has been found in: 1) greater access to needed services; 2) better quality of care; 3) a greater focus on prevention; 4) early management of health problems; 5) organizing and delivering high quality care for chronic non-communicable diseases. This paper describes the role of primary healthcare centres in strengthening community primary services and in reducing health inequalities. Furthemore, the experiences of Regional Health Services from Tuscany and Emilia-Romagna are discussed, with a brief overview of the literature.

  10. Primary Intraocular Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Faia, Lisa J.; Chan, Chi-Chao

    2009-01-01

    Primary intraocular lymphoma, recently suggested to be renamed primary retinal lymphoma, is a subset of primary central nervous system lymphoma and is usually an aggressive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Between 56% and 85% of patients who initially present with primary intraocular lymphoma alone will develop cerebral lesions. Patients typically complain of decreased vision and floaters, most likely secondary to the chronic vitritis and subretinal lesions. The diagnosis of primary intraocular lymphoma can be difficult to make and requires tissue for diagnosis. The atypical lymphoid cells are large and display a high nuclear to cytoplasmic ratio, prominent nucleoli, and basophilic cytoplasm. Flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry, cytokine analysis, and gene rearrangements also aid in the diagnosis. Local and systemic treatments, such as chemotherapy and radiation, are employed, although the relapse rate remains high. PMID:19653715

  11. Territory of Guam Adult Education Programs. Performance Report. Fiscal Year 1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guam Community Coll., Agana. Office of the State Agency for Vocational and Adult Education.

    The 1992 activities in support of the goals described in the Guam State Plan for Adult Education focused on curriculum development and evaluation. Three major programs offered 48 daytime and 101 evening classes for students at 6 sites. The primary components of the adult education instructional programs were adult high school, General Educational…

  12. A Semi-Persistent Adult Ocular Dominance Plasticity in Visual Cortex Is Stabilized by Activated CREB

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barco, Angel; Kandel, Eric R.; Gordon, Barbara; Lickey, Marvin E.; Suzuki, Seigo; Pham, Tony A.; Graham, Sarah J.

    2004-01-01

    The adult cerebral cortex can adapt to environmental change. Using monocular deprivation as a paradigm, we find that rapid experience-dependent plasticity exists even in the mature primary visual cortex. However, adult cortical plasticity differs from developmental plasticity in two important ways. First, the effect of adult, but not juvenile…

  13. Adult 4-H Volunteer Empowerment in 4-H Youth Development Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsen, Pamela

    2009-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to determine which factors related to adult 4-H volunteer empowerment in 4-H youth development settings. This study examined the relationship of adult 4-H volunteers' perceived leadership styles of Oregon 4-H Youth Development Educators (YDE) to the adult 4-H volunteer sense of empowerment. In addition,…

  14. Why Applied Baccalaureates Appeal to Working Adults: From National Results to Promising Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bragg, Debra; Ruud, Collin

    2012-01-01

    Looking beyond institutional strategies, the National Commission on Adult Literacy (2008) called for legislation that would make workforce preparation the primary goal of adult education, including addressing education for unemployed and lower-skilled workers, and other adult groups historically underserved by higher education. Further, state…

  15. Host nutritive quality and host plant choice in two grass miners: primary roles for primary compounds?

    PubMed

    Scheirs, Jan; De Bruyn, Luc; Verhagen, Ron

    2003-06-01

    The relationship between host plant choice and plant nutritional quality was investigated in two oligophagous grass miners Chromatomyia milii and C. nigra (Diptera, Agromyzidae). We tested whether host choice is determined by chemically mediated host suitability for offspring performance and/or adult performance. A second goal was to relate the observed variation among the different fitness parameters to quantitative and qualitative variation in foliar food quality. Choice experiments illustrated that both miners discriminated among grass species, and that C. milii has a smaller host range than C. nigra, as observed under natural conditions. Oviposition preference was correlated with adult feeding preference and related adult performance (longevity and fecundity) for both miners. Offspring performance measures (survival and pupal size) of at least C. nigra were more weakly related to host preference. Nearly all variation in adult performance of both miners was explained by foliar protein content, which had a positive effect on adult longevity and fecundity. Pupal size of both miners was positively related to foliar water and amino acid content and negatively related to lignin content. No clear relationship between host chemistry and offspring survival was observed. These observations show that fitness parameters are differentially related to host chemistry. Secondly, they suggest that chemically mediated host suitability for adult performance is an important determinant of host choice in this species. Finally, the results suggest a primary role for foliar protein content in host choice of the study species in general and in shaping the host range of C. milii in particular.

  16. Primary Care of the Solid Organ Transplant Recipient.

    PubMed

    Wong, Christopher J; Pagalilauan, Genevieve

    2015-09-01

    Solid organ transplantation (SOT) is one of the major advances in medicine. Care of the SOT recipient is complex and continued partnership with the transplant specialist is essential to manage and treat complications and maintain health. The increased longevity of SOT recipients will lead to their being an evolving part of primary care practice, with ever more opportunities for care, education, and research of this rewarding patient population. This review discusses the overall primary care management of adult SOT recipients.

  17. Visualizing renal primary cilia.

    PubMed

    Deane, James A; Verghese, Elizabeth; Martelotto, Luciano G; Cain, Jason E; Galtseva, Alya; Rosenblum, Norman D; Watkins, D Neil; Ricardo, Sharon D

    2013-03-01

    Renal primary cilia are microscopic sensory organelles found on the apical surface of epithelial cells of the nephron and collecting duct. They are based upon a microtubular cytoskeleton, bounded by a specialized membrane, and contain an array of proteins that facilitate their assembly, maintenance and function. Cilium-based signalling is important for the control of epithelial differentiation and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of various cystic kidney diseases and in renal repair. As such, visualizing renal primary cilia and understanding their composition has become an essential component of many studies of inherited kidney disease and mechanisms of epithelial regeneration. Primary cilia were initially identified in the kidney using electron microscopy and this remains a useful technique for the high resolution examination of these organelles. New reagents and techniques now also allow the structure and composition of primary cilia to be analysed in detail using fluorescence microscopy. Primary cilia can be imaged in situ in sections of kidney, and many renal-derived cell lines produce primary cilia in culture providing a simplified and accessible system in which to investigate these organelles. Here we outline microscopy-based techniques commonly used for studying renal primary cilia.

  18. Clueless? Adult Mysteries with Young Adult Appeal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles, John; Morrison, Joanna

    1997-01-01

    Presents a list of adult mystery titles for young adult readers. Includes first titles in a series (for reading in order); new and lesser-known mystery authors' works are the focus. Annotations include plot summary. The rest of each annotation is for professional use (includes date and name of award bestowed). (AEF)

  19. Young Adult Literature for Young Adult Males.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gill, Sam D.

    1999-01-01

    Argues that young adult literature can play a significant role in the emotional and mental health of an adolescent as well as help young males become more literate. Offers a 19-item annotated list of young adult novels with male protagonists, sorted by themes: nature and adventure stories, sports stories, genre stories, historical stories, and…

  20. Sociological aspects of cleft palate adults: IV. Social integration.

    PubMed

    Peter, J P; Chinsky, R R; Fisher, M J

    1975-07-01

    The patterns of social integration of adults with primary and secondary groups were evaluated for 196 adult cleft subjects, their 190 siblings and 209 random controls. Results indicated that cleft adults tended to rely on the extended family for mutual aid and social activities. They also participated less frequently in voluntary associations and relied on a few one-to-one friendships. Social activities tended to be that of informal visiting patterns. While it would be inaccurate to characterize the cleft adult family as grossly different from other American families, they are a definable population experiencing some degree of limitation associated with having a cleft.

  1. Revisiting Adult Learning Theory through the Lens of an Adult Learner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Londell D.

    2009-01-01

    In reading the last section of their primary text, "Learning in Adulthood: A Comprehensive Guide" by Merriam, Caffarella, and Baumgartner (2007) in his Adult Learning and Development class, the author continued to feel as though he was being self-assured of his previous learning experiences once again. The final section of the text focused on…

  2. Depression in Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stickle, Fred; Onedera, Jill D.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to address selected aspects of depression in older adults. Specifically, symptoms, risk factors, diagnosis, and interventions for depression in older adults are reviewed.

  3. Immunization Schedules for Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACIP Vaccination Recommendations Why Immunize? Vaccines: The Basics Immunization Schedules for Adults in Easy-to-read Formats ... previous immunizations. View or Print a Schedule Recommended Immunizations for Adults (19 Years and Older) by Age ...

  4. Adult Education Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Clyde W.

    1975-01-01

    Summarized are speeches dealing with adult education's stiff-necked adherence to middle-class values; the need for upgraded management skills; and a report of a study of adult education in area vocational schools in Georgia. (Author/AJ)

  5. Primary vascular access.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, C P

    2006-05-01

    Primary vascular access is usually achievable by a distal autogenous arterio-venous fistula (AVF). This article describes the approach to vascular access planning, the usual surgical options and the factors affecting patency.

  6. Primary infertility (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Primary infertility is a term used to describe a couple that has never been able to conceive a pregnancy ... to do so through unprotected intercourse. Causes of infertility include a wide range of physical as well ...

  7. Parenthood after Primary Infertility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frances-Fischer, Jana E.; Lightsey, Owen Richard, Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Reviews the literature on the experience of parenting after primary infertility and describes construction and initial testing of an instrument for assessing characteristics of this understudied population. (Contains 52 references and 4 tables.) (GCP)

  8. Primary Nurse - Role Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mundinger, Mary O'Neil

    1973-01-01

    Primary nursing means that each patient has an individual nurse who is responsible for assessing his nursing needs and planning and evaluating his nursing care. The article describes the advantages and problems connected with this approach to patient care. (AG)

  9. Inside the Primary Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Brian

    1980-01-01

    Presents some of the findings of the ORACLE research program (Observational Research and Classroom Learning Evaluation), a detailed observational study of teacher-student interaction, teaching styles, and management methods within a sample of primary classrooms. (Editor/SJL)

  10. Primary aldosteronism and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Morton, Adam

    2015-10-01

    Primary aldosteronism is the most common cause of secondary hypertension. Less than 50 cases of pregnancy in women with primary aldosteronism have been reported, suggesting the disorder is significantly underdiagnosed in confinement. Accurate diagnosis is complicated by physiological changes in the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone axis in pregnancy, leading to a risk of false negative results on screening tests. The course of primary aldosteronism during pregnancy is highly variable, although overall it is associated with a very high risk of fetal and maternal morbidity and mortality. The optimal management of primary aldosteronism during pregnancy is unclear, with uncertainty regarding the safety of mineralocorticoid antagonists and amiloride, their relative efficacy compared with the antihypertensive medications commonly used during pregnancy, and as to whether prognosis is improved by laparoscopic adrenalectomy where an adrenal adenoma can be demonstrated.

  11. Primary biliary cirrhosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000282.htm Primary biliary cirrhosis To use the sharing features on this page, ... and leads to scarring of the liver called cirrhosis. This is called biliary cirrhosis. Causes The cause ...

  12. Primary actinomycosis of hand

    PubMed Central

    Padhi, Sanghamitra; Dash, Muktikesh; Turuk, Jyotirmayee; Sahu, Rani; Panda, Pritilata

    2014-01-01

    Actinomycosis is a chronic granulomatous suppurative disease having the propensity for extension to the contagious tissue with the formation of multiple discharging sinus tracts. Primary actinomycosis of extremity is a very uncommon clinical entity and is commonly considered as a soft-tissue infection. We report here, a case of primary actinomycosis of the upper extremity in a 24-year-old male who was treated successfully with surgical excision and extended period of antimicrobial treatment. PMID:25538911

  13. Primary headache disorders.

    PubMed

    Benoliel, Rafael; Eliav, Eli

    2013-07-01

    Primary headache disorders include migraine, tension-type headaches, and the trigeminal autonomic cephalgias (TACs). "Primary" refers to a lack of clear underlying causative pathology, trauma, or systemic disease. The TACs include cluster headache, paroxysmal hemicrania, and short-lasting neuralgiform headache attacks with conjunctival injection and tearing; hemicrania continua, although classified separately by the International Headache Society, shares many features of both migraine and the TACs. This article describes the features and treatment of these disorders.

  14. Primary vitreoretinal lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Mulay, Kaustubh; Narula, Ritesh; Honavar, Santosh G

    2015-01-01

    Primary vitreoretinal lymphoma (PVRL) is an uncommon, but potentially fatal intraocular malignancy, which may occur with or without primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL). Considered to be a subset of PCNSL, it is mostly of diffuse large B-cell type. The diagnosis of PVRL poses a challenge not only to the clinician, but also to the pathologist. Despite aggressive treatment with chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy, relapses or CNS involvement are common. PMID:25971162

  15. Primary care research ethics.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, R; Murphy, E; Crosland, A

    1995-01-01

    Research activity in primary care is increasing rapidly, and raises a range of specific ethical issues. Many of these relate to the involvement of individuals in the community who are not seeking medical care and to the impact of research participation on relationships between general practitioners and their patients. The ethical issues pertinent to a range of quantitative and qualitative research methodologies in primary care are identified and considered. PMID:8554844

  16. Adult Education in Sweden.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Harry; And Others

    Folk high schools, study circles, labor market training, union education, and municipal adult schools are the major providers of adult education in Sweden. For the most part, these programs are financed by the government and are tuition free. Folk high schools, which are the oldest type, were founded to provide young adults with a general civic…

  17. The Adult Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belsky, Janet

    The 14 chapters of this textbook chronicle adult development from youth through old age, emphasizing both research and interviews with adults at various stages in their lives. Topics covered include the following: (1) the academic field of adult development; (2) theories and research methods; (3) aging and disease prevention; (4) sexuality and…

  18. Adult Survival Skills Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsko, Gregory M.

    The purpose of this instrument is to supplement data from the Adult Basic Learning Examination in assessing the functional level of adults in daily situations. It may also be used as a teaching tool for adults requesting tutoring in specific concepts and skills presented in the instrument. This instrument is an informal assessment instrument and…

  19. Kids Who Outwit Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seita, John R.; Brendtro, Larry K.

    Kids who distrust adults are highly skilled at hiding their real nature and resisting change. Most adults shun such youths or get mired in conflict with them. Punitive get tough practices as well as traditional flaw-fixing treatment are reactive strategies that often drive these youths further from adult bonds and reinforce oppositional and…

  20. Urbanization and Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Short, W. Fisher

    1974-01-01

    The impact of urbanization, the main tasks facing the adult educator in an urban context, identifying the casualties of urbanization, recognizing and dealing with social deprivation, and the various agencies involved in adult education are relevant considerations for adult educators. (MW)

  1. Dimensions of Adult Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foley, Griff, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    This broad introduction to adult and postcompulsory education offers an overview of the field for students, adult educators and workplace trainers. The book establishes an analytical framework to emphasize the nature of learning and agency of learners; examines the core knowledge and skills that adult educators need; discusses policy, research and…

  2. Adult Learning: A Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Peter, Ed.

    This book on adult learning is divided into six sections. Section 1, Cognitive Processes, includes the following chapters: "Cognitive Processes: Contemporary Paradigms of Learning" (Jack Mezirow); "Information Processing, Memory, Age and Adult Learning" (Gillian Boulton-Lewis); "Adult Learners' Metacognitive Behaviour in Higher Education" (Barry…

  3. Adult Education in Israel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirmayer, Paul, Ed.; And Others

    This volume contains 13 articles that reflect the development of adult education in Israel during recent years. The material relates to the principal areas with which the Division of Adult Education deals: formal and nonformal education for adults, language and cultural absorption of new immigrants, and training of facilitators for parental…

  4. Adults Role in Bullying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Notar, Charles E.; Padgett, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    Do adults play a role in bullying? Do parents, teachers, school staff, and community adult leaders influence bullying behavior in children and teenagers? This article will focus on research regarding all adults who have almost daily contact with children and teens and their part in how bullying is identified, addressed, and prevented. This article…

  5. Adult Education in Greece

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kokkos, Alexios

    2008-01-01

    The central aim of this article is to analyse the current situation of adult education in Greece. The article focuses on the following points: (a) the degree of participation in programmes of continuing professional training and general adult education courses, (b) the quality and the outcomes of the adult education provision in Greece, and (c)…

  6. Adult Competency Education Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Occupational and Adult Education (DHEW/OE), Washington, DC. Div. of Adult Education.

    A compilation of abstracts of 120 current Adult Performance Level (APL) and Adult Competency Education (ACE) federally supported projects being conducted in 34 States and the District of Columbia, this project profile was developed for adult and secondary education administrators, teachers, and program developers who are beginning or are currently…

  7. Adult Competency Education Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Occupational and Adult Education (DHEW/OE), Washington, DC. Div. of Adult Education.

    A compilation of brief descriptions of 20 current resources for Adult Performance Level (APL) and Adult Competency Education (ACE) programs, this guide was developed for adult and secondary education administrators, teachers, and program developers who are beginning or are already involved with APL/ACE programs. Each citation contains information…

  8. Adult Academy Volunteer Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cora, Marie T., Ed.; Wood, Nicole R., Ed.

    This handbook was written specifically for volunteer tutors but is appropriate for teachers, student interns, coordinators, and others working with Adult Basic Education (ABE) and English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) adult learners. It presents an overview of adult and non-traditional education models, some principles of reading and writing, a…

  9. Canadian Adult Basic Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooke, W. Michael, Comp.

    "Trends," a publication of the Canadian Association for Adult Education, is a collection of abstracts on selected subjects affecting adult education; this issue is on adult basic education (ABE). It covers teachers and teacher training, psychological factors relating to the ABE teacher and students, manuals for teachers, instructional…

  10. Young Adult Services Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boegen, Anne, Ed.

    Designed to offer guidelines, ideas and help to those who provide library service to young adults, this manual includes information about the provision of young adult (YA) services in six sections. The first section, which addresses planning and administration, includes a definition of a young adult and a checklist for determining community needs…

  11. Adult Educators' Core Competences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahlgren, Bjarne

    2016-01-01

    Which competences do professional adult educators need? This research note discusses the topic from a comparative perspective, finding that adult educators' required competences are wide-ranging, heterogeneous and complex. They are subject to context in terms of national and cultural environment as well as the kind of adult education concerned…

  12. An Adult ESL Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina Literacy Resource Center, Columbia.

    This curriculum framework for adult literacy was written by 21 South Carolina adult English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) instructors, as submitted to the South Carolina Literacy Resource Center. It is based on current theories in the fields of adult education and second language acquisition and is designed to be flexible so that it may be adapted to…

  13. Primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Carey, Elizabeth J; Ali, Ahmad H; Lindor, Keith D

    2015-10-17

    Primary biliary cirrhosis is a chronic cholestatic liver disease characterised by destruction of small intrahepatic bile ducts, leading to fibrosis and potential cirrhosis through resulting complications. The serological hallmark of primary biliary cirrhosis is the antimitochondrial antibody, a highly disease-specific antibody identified in about 95% of patients with primary biliary cirrhosis. These patients usually have fatigue and pruritus, both of which occur independently of disease severity. The typical course of primary biliary cirrhosis has changed substantially with the introduöction of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA). Several randomised placebo-controlled studies have shown that UDCA improves transplant-free survival in primary biliary cirrhosis. However, about 40% of patients do not have a biochemical response to UDCA and would benefit from new therapies. Liver transplantation is a life-saving surgery with excellent outcomes for those with decompensated cirrhosis. Meanwhile, research on nuclear receptor hormones has led to the development of exciting new potential treatments. This Seminar will review the current understanding of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and natural history of primary biliary cirrhosis, discuss management of the disease and its sequelae, and introduce research on new therapeutic options.

  14. Primary cerebral malignant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Kai; Kong, Xiangyi; Mao, Gengsheng; Qiu, Ming; Zhu, Haibo; Zhou, Lei; Nie, Qingbin; Xu, Yi; Du, Shiwei

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Primary intracranial melanomas are uncommon and constitute approximately 1% of all melanoma cases and 0.07% of all brain tumors. In nature, these primary melanomas are very aggressive and can spread to other organs. We report an uncommon case of primary cerebral malignant melanoma—a challenging diagnosis guided by clinical presentations, radiological features, and surgical biopsy results, aiming to emphasize the importance of considering primary melanoma when making differential diagnoses of intracranial lesions. We present a rare case of a primary cerebral melanoma in the left temporal lobe. The mass appeared iso-hypodense on brain computed tomography (CT), short signal on T1-weighted magnetic resonance images (T1WI) and long signal on T2WI. It was not easy to make an accurate diagnosis before surgery. We showed the patient's disease course and reviewed related literatures, for readers’ reference. Written informed consent was obtained from the patient for publication of this case report and any accompanying images. Because of this, there is no need to conduct special ethic review and the ethical approval is not necessary. After surgery, the pathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of melanoma. The patient was discharged without any complications and went on to receive adjuvant radiochemotherapy. It is difficult to diagnose primary cerebral melanoma in the absence of any cutaneous melanosis. A high index of clinical suspicion along with good pathology reporting is the key in diagnosing these extremely rare tumors. PMID:28121927

  15. Strokes in young adults: epidemiology and prevention.

    PubMed

    Smajlović, Dževdet

    2015-01-01

    Strokes in young adults are reported as being uncommon, comprising 10%-15% of all stroke patients. However, compared with stroke in older adults, stroke in the young has a disproportionately large economic impact by leaving victims disabled before their most productive years. Recent publications report an increased incidence of stroke in young adults. This is important given the fact that younger stroke patients have a clearly increased risk of death compared with the general population. The prevalence of standard modifiable vascular risk factors in young stroke patients is different from that in older patients. Modifiable risk factors for stroke, such as dyslipidemia, smoking, and hypertension, are highly prevalent in the young stroke population, with no significant difference in geographic, climatic, nutritional, lifestyle, or genetic diversity. The list of potential stroke etiologies among young adults is extensive. Strokes of undetermined and of other determined etiology are the most common types among young patients according to TOAST (Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment) criteria. Prevention is the primary treatment strategy aimed at reducing morbidity and mortality related to stroke. Therefore, primary prevention is very important with regard to stroke in young adults, and aggressive treatment of risk factors for stroke, such as hypertension, smoking, and dyslipidemia, is essential. The best form of secondary stroke prevention is directed toward stroke etiology as well as treatment of additional risk factors. However, there is a lack of specific recommendations and guidelines for stroke management in young adults. In conclusion, strokes in young adults are a major public health problem and further research, with standardized methodology, is needed in order to give us more precise epidemiologic data. Given the increasing incidence of stroke in the young, there is an objective need for more research in order to reduce this burden.

  16. Screening for Suicide Risk in Adolescents, Adults, and Older Adults in Primary Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... a mental health disorder, such as depression, schizophrenia, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), or drug or alcohol abuse. Other risk factors for suicide include: childhood trauma; a family history of suicide; ...

  17. Obsessive Compulsive Disorder among Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder ... Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder ...

  18. Other primary headaches

    PubMed Central

    Bahra, Anish

    2012-01-01

    The ‘Other Primary Headaches’ include eight recognised benign headache disorders. Primary stabbing headache is a generally benign disorder which often co-exists with other primary headache disorders such as migraine and cluster headache. Primary cough headache is headache precipitated by valsalva; secondary cough has been reported particularly in association with posterior fossa pathology. Primary exertional headache can occur with sudden or gradual onset during, or immediately after, exercise. Similarly headache associated with sexual activity can occur with gradual evolution or sudden onset. Secondary headache is more likely with both exertional and sexual headache of sudden onset. Sudden onset headache, with maximum intensity reached within a minute, is termed thunderclap headache. A benign form of thunderclap headache exists. However, isolated primary and secondary thunderclap headache cannot be clinically differentiated. Therefore all headache of thunderclap onset should be investigated. The primary forms of the aforementioned paroxysmal headaches appear to be Indomethacin sensitive disorders. Hypnic headache is a rare disorder which is termed ‘alarm clock headache’, exclusively waking patients from sleep. The disorder can be Indomethacin responsive, but can also respond to Lithium and caffeine. New daily persistent headache is a rare and often intractable headache which starts one day and persists daily thereafter for at least 3 months. The clinical syndrome more often has migrainous features or is otherwise has a chronic tension-type headache phenotype. Management is that of the clinical syndrome. Hemicrania continua straddles the disorders of migraine and the trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias and is not dealt with in this review. PMID:23024566

  19. Primary group interaction of residents in a retirement hotel.

    PubMed

    Hampe, G D; Blevins, A L

    1975-01-01

    The interaction patterns of sixty-three residents age 55 and over living in a retirement hotel for three types of primary groups-kin, friends, and neighbors-were studied. Almost all residents voiced high housing satisfaction and were involved to various degrees in their primary group network. The relative with whom visited the most, usually the adult child, influences the primary group interaction the most, but at the same time may contribute to feelings of uselessness on the part of the retired residents of the apartment complex.

  20. Taking Play Seriously in the Pre-Primary English Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mourão, Sandie

    2014-01-01

    Drawing on experience and the emerging results of a research project, this article examines the role of play, in particular child-initiated play, when learning languages in pre-primary settings. It begins by characterizing play and highlights the importance of a balanced relationship between adult-led and child-initiated play activities. It…

  1. Pertussis Prevalence in Korean Adolescents and Adults with Persistent Cough.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo Young; Han, Seung Beom; Kang, Jin Han; Kim, Ju Sang

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the prevalence of pertussis in Korean adolescents and adults with persistent cough. Study population was adolescents (aged 11-20 yr) and adults (≥ 21 yr old) who showed persistent cough of 1-8 weeks' duration. Pertussis was diagnosed by culture, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and serology. A total of 310 subjects participated in this study, and 76 cases (24.5%) met the criteria for laboratory-confirmed pertussis. The majority of the pertussis cases (66/76) were confirmed by serology, while 3 cases (1.0%) were diagnosed with culture, and 10 cases (3.2%) were detected with PCR. Of the 76 subjects diagnosed with pertussis, 20/86 cases were adolescents and 56/224 cases were adults. Neither adolescents nor adults received adolescent-adult booster against pertussis within the previous 5 yr. Pertussis can be a primary cause of persistent cough in Korean adolescents and adults.

  2. Understanding inherited genetic risk of adult glioma – a review

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Terri; Lachance, Daniel H.; Molinaro, Annette M.; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E.; Walsh, Kyle M.; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill; Ostrom, Quinn T.; Francis, Stephen S.; Wiemels, Joseph; Jenkins, Robert B.; Wiencke, John K.; Wrensch, Margaret R.

    2016-01-01

    During the past six years, researchers have made major progress identifying common inherited genetic variation that increases risk for primary adult glioma. This paper summarizes knowledge about rare familial cancer syndromes that include adult glioma and reviews the available literature on the more recently discovered common inherited variation. Ten independent inherited variants in eight chromosomal regions have been convincingly associated with increased risk for adult glioma. Most of these variants increase relative risk of primary adult glioma by 20% to 40%, but the TP53 variant rs78378222 confers a two-fold relative risk (ie, 200%), and rs557505857 on chromosome 8 confers a six-fold relative risk of IDH-mutated astrocytomas and oligodendroglial tumors (ie, 600%). Even with a six-fold relative risk, the overall risk of developing adult glioma is too low for screening for the high-risk variant on chromosome 8. Future studies will help clarify which inherited adult glioma risk variants are associated with subtypes defined by histology and/or acquired tumor mutations. This review also provides an information sheet for primary adult glioma patients and their families. PMID:26941959

  3. Understanding inherited genetic risk of adult glioma - a review.

    PubMed

    Rice, Terri; Lachance, Daniel H; Molinaro, Annette M; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E; Walsh, Kyle M; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill; Ostrom, Quinn T; Francis, Stephen S; Wiemels, Joseph; Jenkins, Robert B; Wiencke, John K; Wrensch, Margaret R

    2016-03-01

    During the past six years, researchers have made major progress identifying common inherited genetic variation that increases risk for primary adult glioma. This paper summarizes knowledge about rare familial cancer syndromes that include adult glioma and reviews the available literature on the more recently discovered common inherited variation. Ten independent inherited variants in eight chromosomal regions have been convincingly associated with increased risk for adult glioma. Most of these variants increase relative risk of primary adult glioma by 20% to 40%, but the TP53 variant rs78378222 confers a two-fold relative risk (ie, 200%), and rs557505857 on chromosome 8 confers a six-fold relative risk of IDH-mutated astrocytomas and oligodendroglial tumors (ie, 600%). Even with a six-fold relative risk, the overall risk of developing adult glioma is too low for screening for the high-risk variant on chromosome 8. Future studies will help clarify which inherited adult glioma risk variants are associated with subtypes defined by histology and/or acquired tumor mutations. This review also provides an information sheet for primary adult glioma patients and their families.

  4. Primary torsion of the greater omentum.

    PubMed

    Gul, Y A; Jabbar, M F; Moissinac, K

    2001-01-01

    Primary or idiopathic greater omental torsion remains a rare cause of acute surgical abdomen in adults and children. The aetiology is as yet unknown and the treatment of choice, once diagnosis is established, is resection of the torted omentum. We report our experience with three such cases encountered over the last five years, two of which were diagnosed and subsequently managed laparoscopically. The performance of diagnostic laparoscopy for acute abdominal pain of an undetermined origin may lead to an increased detection of this condition and subsequent therapeutic intervention.

  5. Primary care development zones.

    PubMed

    Beardshaw, V; Gordon, P; Plamping, D

    1993-01-30

    Most commentators on the Tomlinson report have agreed with its emphasis on improving primary and community care. The three elements of such a strategy are a remedial programme to bring primary care up to national standards, a programme to provide such services to people with non-standard needs such as mobile Londoners, ethnic minorities, and homeless people, and the development of an expanded model of primary care. No one model will be appropriate across all of London. The process should start with an audit of existing resources and services within each community, together with an analysis of needs. From this would develop a local programme with specific plans for investment in premises, staffing, training, and management. New contractual mechanisms may be needed to attract practitioners, improve their premises, secure out of hours services, and provide medical cover for community beds. There should also be incentives for closer working between primary and secondary services. No developments on the scale needed for London have been carried out in primary care within the lifetime of the NHS--but their success will be critical to the calibre of health services for Londoners into the next century.

  6. Primary nasal tuberculosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Nayar, Ravi C; Al Kaabi, Juma; Ghorpade, Kanchanmala

    2004-03-01

    During the past 2 decades, tuberculosis--both pulmonary and extrapulmonary--has re-emerged as a major health problem worldwide. Nasal tuberculosis--either primary or secondary to pulmonary tuberculosis or facial lupus--is rare, but it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of nasal granulomas. We describe a case of primary nasal tuberculosis in an adult male who presented with a polypoid lesion in one nasal cavity. The diagnosis was based on histopathology and the patient's successful response to antituberculous drug treatment. Given the rising incidence of tuberculosis, it is prudent that otolaryngologists remain cognizant of this infection as a potential cause of unusual lesions in the head and neck.

  7. [Primary hepatic infantile hemangioendothelioma (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Pollice, L; Pagliarulo, G

    1975-01-01

    Primary hepatic infantile hemangioendothelioma is a rare tumor, characterized by its appearance in early infancy as well as by the frequent association with various malformations and with similar angiomatous tumors of other tissues and organs. It may be single or multinodular and it is often complicated by severe peritoneal hemorrhage. Tow histologic types of this tumor are known: tipe 1 is sharply circumscribed and is considered similar to so called capillary hypertrophic hemangioma, while type 2, by showing aggressive, infiltrative and anaplastic features, is rather close to angiosarcoma. Clinical and pathological data concerning two cases of type 2 primary hepatic infantile hemangioendothelioma are reported. On the basis of experimental results and epidemiological data on hepatic angiosarcoma of adults, a possible etiopathogenetic relationship with maternal exposure during pregnancy to dangerous environmental factors is postulated.

  8. Primary lymphoma of the brain

    MedlinePlus

    Brain lymphoma; Cerebral lymphoma; Primary lymphoma of the central nervous system; Lymphoma - brain ... The cause of primary brain lymphoma is not known. People with a weakened immune system are at high risk for primary lymphoma of the brain. ...

  9. Primary hepatic carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jinbo; Hu, Zhijian; Wu, Junwei; Bai, Lishan; Chai, Xinqun

    2011-11-19

    Primary hepatic carcinoid tumor is rare and poses a challenge for diagnosis and management. We presented a case of primary hepatic carcinoid tumor in a 53-year-old female with a complaint of right upper abdominal pain. Computer tomography scans revealed a hypervascular mass in segment 4 of the liver. An ultrasonography-guided biopsy showed a carcinoid tumor. No other lesions were found by the radiological investigations. Surgery resection was performed and histopathological examination revealed a primary hepatic carcinoid tumor. Three years later, recurrence was found and transcatheter arterial chemoembolization was performed. After transcatheter arterial chemoembolization, the patient has been free of symptom and had no radiological disease progression for over 6 months. Surgical resection combination with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization is effective to offer excellent palliation.

  10. Plume primary smoke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chastenet, J. C.

    1993-06-01

    The exhaust from a solid propellant rocket motor usually contains condensed species. These particles, also called 'Primary Smoke', are often prejudicial to missile detectability and to the guidance system. To avoid operational problems it is necessary to know and quantify the effects of particles on all aspects of missile deployment. A brief description of the origin of the primary smoke is given. It continues with details of the interaction between particles and light as function of both particles and light properties (nature, size, wavelength, etc). The effects of particles on plume visibility, attenuation of an optical beam propagated through the plume and the contribution of particles on optical signatures of the plume are also described. Finally, various methods used in NATO countries to quantify the primary smoke effects are discussed.

  11. [Primary care in Ireland].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sagrado, T

    2017-03-27

    Spanish doctors are still leaving the country to look for quality work. Ireland is not a country with many Spanish professionals but it is interesting to know its particular Health care system. Ireland is one of the countries with a national health care system, although it has a mixture of private health care insurance schemes. People have a right to health care if they have been living in Ireland at least for a year. Access to the primary care health system depends on age and income: free of charge for Category 1 and co-payments for the rest. This division generates great inequalities among the population. Primary Care doctors are self-employed, and they work independently. However, since 2001 they have tended to work in multidisciplinary teams in order to strengthen the Primary Care practice. Salary is gained from a combination of public and private incomes which are not differentiated. The role of the General Practitioner consists in the treatment of acute and chronic diseases, minor surgery, child care, etc. There is no coordination between Primary and Secondary care. Access to specialised medicine is regulated by the price of consultation. Primary Care doctors are not gatekeepers. To be able to work here, doctors must have three years of training after medical school. After that, Continuing Medical Education is compulsory, and the college of general practitioners monitors it annually. The Irish health care system does not fit into the European model. Lack of a clear separation between public and private health care generates great inequalities. The non-existence of coordination between primary and specialised care leads to inefficiencies, which Ireland cannot allow itself after a decade of economic crisis.

  12. Primary appendiceal mucinous adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Behera, Prativa Kumari; Rath, Pramod Kumar; Panda, Rabiratna; Satpathi, Sanghamitra; Behera, Rajan

    2011-04-01

    Primary Adenocarcinomas of the appendix are extremely rare tumor. We report a case of primary mucinous adenocarcinoma in a 40 year old lady misdiagnosed as having acute appendicitis. All the routine investigations were within normal limit. USG of abdomen showed dilated appendix with little fluid collection adjacent to it and no other abnormality was seen which suggested acute appendicitis. Appendicectomy was done and excised appendix was sent for histopathological examination. Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the appendix was confirmed after histopathological examination. Right hemicolectomy was done as a second stage procedure. As some cases are incidentally discovered, this case emphasizes that histological examination of all appendicectomy specimens is mandatory.

  13. Does primary fibromyalgia exist?

    PubMed

    Forslind, K; Fredriksson, E; Nived, O

    1990-10-01

    Twenty-one of 25 consecutive primary fibromyalgia or fibrositis patients, identified during a 5-year period in a tertiary care day-ward for pain syndromes, were re-examined. Fifteen fulfilled criteria for fibromyalgia but unexpectedly, all cases had either psychiatric disturbance or thyroid dysfunction. Of the four patients not seen at follow-up, two had developed neurological diseases, another rheumatoid arthritis and one other hypothyroidism. Thus, after 5 years no patient fulfilled the criteria for primary fibromyalgia. Women occupied as manual workers were over-represented. Most patients reported beneficial effects of physiotherapy. None of the patients has been able to return to full time work.

  14. Fibrositis and primary hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Carette, S; Lefrançois, L

    1988-09-01

    The prevalence of fibrositis was determined in 100 patients with subclinical or biochemical primary hypothyroidism. Nineteen patients reported symptoms of joint and/or muscle pain with stiffness. Five of these patients presented 7 or more tender points on examination, thus allowing a diagnosis of fibrositis to be made in only 5% of the total group. Symptomatic improvement after thyroid hormone replacement occurred in 10 of the 19 patients, including 3 of those with fibrositis. There were no significant changes in tender points. Our data indicate that fibrositis is uncommon in patients with primary hypothyroidism despite the frequent occurrence of symptoms suggestive of this syndrome.

  15. Melatonin for primary insomnia?

    PubMed

    2009-07-01

    Melatonin, a hormone produced by the pineal gland, has a key role in regulating circadian rhythms, most importantly, the sleep-wake cycle. Melatonin's action has led to its being tried as a treatment for a wide range of sleep disorders, such as jet lag, primary insomnia, sleep-wake cycle disruption and sleep problems in children with neuro-developmental disorders. Until recently, it had not been licensed in the UK for any indication. Prolonged-release melatonin (Circadin - Lundbeck) has now been licensed as a treatment for primary insomnia. Here we consider whether this product has a place in the management of people with this condition.

  16. Parkinson disease in the elderly adult.

    PubMed

    Willis, Allison W

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson disease is the second most neurodegenerative disease, after Alzheimer disease, that affects up to two million Americans, the overwhelming majority of whom are aged 60 and older. The changing demographics of the country place more Americans at risk for Parkinson disease (PD) than ever before. Primary care physicians treat the majority of PD patients in the United States. Here I review diagnosis and treatment strategies for idiopathic Parkinson disease in the elderly adult.

  17. BDNF control of adult SVZ neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bath, Kevin G; Akins, Michael R; Lee, Francis S

    2012-09-01

    The sensory processing of odorants is a dynamic process that requires plasticity at multiple levels. In the olfactory bulb (OB), inhibitory interneurons undergo lifelong replacement through a process known as adult neurogenesis. These newly born cells are incorporated in a learning-dependent fashion, a process which has led some to suggest this as a primary mechanism through which the OB retains a high degree of plasticity throughout life. A continued focus of researchers in this field has been to understand the molecular mechanisms controlling adult subventricular zone (SVZ) neurogenesis and the innate functional role of these cells. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been identified as a strong candidate molecule regulating adult OB neurogenesis. We review what is known regarding the functional role of newly born cells, highlight the role of BDNF in this process, and describe preliminary findings from our lab implicating BDNF in the process of selecting of newly born cells for survival.

  18. Primary mental expression: freud, klein, and beyond.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Michael

    2008-03-01

    Freud formulated the primary process model, describing mental activity that creates the illusion of an actual experience in lieu of reflective thought, at the very start of his career. In this, his initial formulation of unconscious mental activity, he was attempting to account for the nature of dreaming, by inference for the mind of infancy and, more speculatively, for adult psychosis. He never revised the model in light of his later formulations of the structural model and the death instinct, nor did he elaborate on his speculation that it could serve as a model for psychosis, and there has been little subsequent effort to employ the model outside the context of dreaming. A small number of analysts, including Klein, Bion, and Matte-Blanco, have constructed theories of psychosis in idiosyncratic conceptual languages that seem to be describing phenomena similar to those from which Freud constructed his model. Although Klein's model of positions, which has become the most widely accepted theory of psychosis, is generally considered a fundamental departure from Freud, both accounts have remarkable similarity and both tend to confuse primary mental expression with mature thought and normal infancy with psychosis. Contributions by cognitive-developmental psychologists including Werner and Piaget suggest ways to clarify some of the confusion and to supplement and amplify Freud's and Klein's description of some of the salient features of primary mental expression. Findings from neuroimaging studies of dreaming and of schizophrenia support the proposition that primary mental activity is a qualitatively distinctive form of mental expression.

  19. Primary Creative Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wooten, Vida Jo

    1968-01-01

    Children will enjoy creative writing in the primary grades if they are given inspiration, time to write, and the opportunity to share their work with classmates. A second-grade class began a creative writing project by listening to poetry and selecting poems to memorize and recite. This stimulated and encouraged them to evaluate and to write…

  20. Healthcare is primary.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Raman

    2015-01-01

    India is undergoing a rapid transformation in terms of governance, administrative reforms, newer policy develoment, and social movements. India is also considered one of the most vibrant economies in the world. The current discourse in public space is dominated by issues such as economic development, security, corruption free governance, gender equity, and women safety. Healthcare though remains a pressing need of population; seems to have taken a backseat. In the era of decreasing subsidies and cautious investment in social sectors, the 2(nd) National Conference on Family Medicine and Primary Care 2015 (FMPC) brought a focus on "healthcare" in India. The theme of this conference was "Healthcare is Primary." The conference participants discussed on the theme of why healthcare should be a national priority and why strong primary care should remain at the center of healthcare delivery system. The experts recommended that India needs to strengthen the "general health system" instead of focusing on disease based vertical programs. Public health system should have capacity and skill pool to be able to deliver person centered comprehensive health services to the community. Proactive implementation of policies towards human resource in health is the need of the hour. As the draft National Health Policy 2015 is being debated, "family medicine" (academic primary care), the unfinished agenda of National Health Policy 2002, remains a priority area of implementation.

  1. Beginning Primary Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacklin, Angela; Griffiths, Vivienne; Robinson, Carol

    2006-01-01

    This book supports primary teachers' early professional development and learning, tackling key questions and concerns that new teachers might face in their early careers, such as: How will I get through the first term? When will I feel like a "real" teacher? What can I expect from my first years in teaching? Drawing on the experiences of beginning…

  2. New Primary School Syllabus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministry of Education and Culture (Trinidad and Tobago).

    This official syllabus of Trinidad and Tobago's primary schools gives detailed guidelines on the teaching objectives of each curriculum area and how these can best be realized, as well as descriptions of the subject matter. The curriculum is divided into three levels: Level I (5- to 7-year-olds), Level II (7- to 9-year-olds) and Level III (10+- to…

  3. Primary diffuse leptomeningeal gliosarcomatosis.

    PubMed

    Moon, Ju Hyung; Kim, Se Hoon; Kim, Eui Hyun; Kang, Seok-Gu; Chang, Jong Hee

    2015-04-01

    Primary diffuse leptomeningeal gliomatosis (PDLG) is a rare condition with a fatal outcome, characterized by diffuse infiltration of the leptomeninges by neoplastic glial cells without evidence of primary tumor in the brain or spinal cord parenchyma. In particular, PDLG histologically diagnosed as gliosarcoma is extremely rare, with only 2 cases reported to date. We report a case of primary diffuse leptomeningeal gliosarcomatosis. A 68-year-old man presented with fever, chilling, headache, and a brief episode of mental deterioration. Initial T1-weighted post-contrast brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed diffuse leptomeningeal enhancement without a definite intraparenchymal lesion. Based on clinical and imaging findings, antiviral treatment was initiated. Despite the treatment, the patient's neurologic symptoms and mental status progressively deteriorated and follow-up MRI showed rapid progression of the disease. A meningeal biopsy revealed gliosarcoma and was conclusive for the diagnosis of primary diffuse leptomeningeal gliosarcomatosis. We suggest the inclusion of PDLG in the potential differential diagnosis of patients who present with nonspecific neurologic symptoms in the presence of leptomeningeal involvement on MRI.

  4. Pediatric primary gastric lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Harris, G J; Laszewski, M J

    1992-04-01

    Primary gastric lymphoma in the pediatric population is rare. We have described a case of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (Burkitt's type) manifested as a gastric mass. Despite its rarity in children, this tumor should be treated aggressively, since long-term survival has been reported.

  5. Primary Biliary Cirrhosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... of liver cancer every 6 to 12 months. Health care providers use blood tests, ultrasound, or both to check for signs of ... make the diagnosis of primary biliary cirrhosis. A health care provider uses the test selectively when he or she is concerned that ...

  6. Primary Standards Laboratory report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-01

    Sandia National Laboratories operates the Primary Standards Laboratory (PSL) for the Department of Energy, Albuquerque Operations Office (DOE/AL). This report summarizes metrology activities that received emphasis in the first half of 1990 and provides information pertinent to the operation of the DOE/AL system-wide Standards and Calibration Program.

  7. Primary Premier for Belfast

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAlister, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The author talks about the Association for Science Education (ASE) Primary Science Committee's (PSC) March 2009 meeting which was held in Belfast as guests of ASE Northern Ireland. To mark the auspicious occasion of a body that usually meets four times a year in the Hatfield HQ crossing the Irish Sea to be hosted by its Celtic cousins, a Lord…

  8. From Primary to Secondary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Lyn

    2011-01-01

    This author discusses her decision to move to secondary school to teach mathematics, after having taught and been a mathematics manager in primary schools for six years. She states that this was a valuable experience and sparked her interest in the transition experiences of students, particularly in mathematics. Research (Evangelou et al, 2008,…

  9. Primary Art Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newton Unified School District 373, KS.

    GRADES OR AGES: Primary Grades. SUBJECT MATTER: Art. ORGANIZATION AND PHYSICAL APPEARANCE: The guide begins with a list of topics for art expression. The main body of the guide contains 15 color-coded sections on the following subjects: 1) mobiles and folded paper; 2) collage and photo montage; 3) square paper and mosaics; 4) wax paper and…

  10. Primary ectopic frontotemporal craniopharyngioma

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Porcayo, Luis Alberto; Ponce-Gómez, Juan Antonio; Martínez-Moreno, Mauricio; Portocarrero-Ortíz, Lesly; Tena-Suck, Martha Lilia; Gómez-Amador, Juan Luis

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Primary ectopic craniopharyngiomas have only rarely been reported. Craniopharyngiomas involve usually the sellar and suprasellar region, but can be originated from cell remnants of the obliterated craniopharyngeal duct or metaplastic change of andenohypophyseal cells. We present the first case of a primary ectopic frontotemporal craniopharyngioma. Presentation of case A 35-year old woman presented with a one-year history of headache and diplopia. MRI showed a large frontotemporal cystic lesion. Tumor resection was performed with a keyhole endoscopic frontal lateral approach. The pathological features showed an adamantinomatous craniopharyngioma with a cholesterol granuloma reaction. Discussion There have been reported different localizations for primary ectopic craniopharyngioma. Our case presented a lobulated frontotemporal cystic mass formed by a dense eosinophilic proteinaceous material dystrophic calcifications and cholesterol crystals, with epithelial remnants. No tumor regrowth was observed in the magnetic resonance image 27 months postoperatively. Conclusion Primary ectopic craniopharyngioma is a rare entity with a pathogenesis that remains uncertain. This is an unusual anatomic location associated with unique clinical findings. PMID:25725331

  11. Philosophy in Primary Schools?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, John

    2012-01-01

    The article is a critical discussion of the aims behind the teaching of philosophy in British primary schools. It begins by reviewing the recent Special Issue of the "Journal of Philosophy of Education" Vol 45 Issue 2 2011 on "Philosophy for Children in Transition", so as to see what light this might throw on the topic just…

  12. Multiple Primary Cancer Monograph

    Cancer.gov

    To identify groups of cancer survivors that are at increased risk for multiple primary cancers, investigators led an effort to provide the first comprehensive population-based analysis of the risk of subsequent cancer in the U.S., resulting in a monograph.

  13. Restoring primary anterior teeth.

    PubMed

    Waggoner, William F

    2002-01-01

    A variety of esthetic restorative materials are available for restoring primary incisors. Knowledge of the specific strengths, weakness, and properties of each material will enhance the clinician's ability to make the best choice of selection for each individual situation. Intracoronal restorations of primary teeth may utilize resin composites, glass ionomer cements, resin-modified ionomers, or polyacid-modified resins. Each has distinct advantages and disadvantages and the clinical conditions of placement may be a strong determining factor as to which material is utilized. Full coronal restoration of primary incisors may be indicated for a number of reasons. Crowns available for restoration of primary incisors include those that are directly bonded onto the tooth, which generally are a resin material, and those crowns that are luted onto the tooth and are some type of stainless steel crown. However, due to lack of supporting clinical data, none of the crowns can be said to be superior to the others under all circumstances. Though caries in the mandibular region is rare, restorative solutions for mandibular incisors are needed. Neither stainless steel crowns nor celluloid crown forms are made specifically for mandibular incisors. Many options exist to repair carious primary incisors, but there is insufficient controlled, clinical data to suggest that one type of restoration is superior to another. This does not discount the fact that dentists have been using many of these crowns for years with much success. Operator preferences, esthetic demands by parents, the child's behavior, and moisture and hemorrhage control are all variables which affect the decision and ultimate outcome of whatever restorative treatment is chosen.

  14. Primary gastrointestinal lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Aledavood, Amir; Nasiri, Mohammad Reza Ghavam; Memar, Bahram; Shahidsales, Soodabeh; Raziee, Hamid Reza; Ghafarzadegan, Kamran; Mohtashami, Samira

    2012-01-01

    Background: Extranodal lymphoma may arise anywhere outside lymph nodes mostly in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract as non-Hodgkin's disease. We reviewed the clinicopathological features and treatment results of patients with primary GI lymphoma. Materials and Methods: A total number of 30 cases with primary GI lymphoma were included in this study. Patients referred to the Radiation Oncology Department of Omid Hospital (Mashhad, Iran) during a 5-year period (2006-11). Clinical, paraclinical, and radiological data was collected from medical records of the patients. Results: Out of the 30 patients with primary GI lymphoma in the study, 12 were female (40%) and 18 were male (60%) (male to female ratio: 3/2). B symptoms were present in 27 patients (90%). Antidiuretic hormone (LDH) levels were elevated in 9 patients (32.1%). The most common primary site was stomach in 14 cases (46.7%). Other common sites included small intestine and colon each in 8 patients (26.7%). All patients had histopathologically proven non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The most common histologic subtype was diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBL) in 16 patients (53.3%). In addition, 28 patients (93.3%) received chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, prednisolone (CHOP regimen). The median course of chemotherapy was 6 cources. Moreover, 8 patients (26.7%) received radiotherapy with cobalt 60. The median follow-up time was 26 months. The overall 5-year survival rate was 53% and the median survival time was 60 months. Conclusion: Primary GI lymphoma is commonly seen in stomach and small intestine and mostly is DLBCL or mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. PMID:23626617

  15. Brief interventions for depression in primary care

    PubMed Central

    McNaughton, Jennifer L.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE To assess existing, brief nonpharmacologic interventions that are available for primary care physicians with minimal training in psychotherapy to use in managing depression in adult patients. DATA SOURCES MEDLINE was searched from 1996 to 2007, EMBASE was searched from 1980 to 2007, and EBM Reviews was searched from 1999 to 2007. STUDY SELECTION Several randomized controlled trials were selected using specified criteria. Selected articles were subsequently appraised and qualitatively analyzed. SYNTHESIS Significant improvements on depression scales were found in 6 out of 8 studies (P < .05) using various brief interventions and formal control groups. Successful interventions included bibliotherapy, websites based on cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT), and CBT-based computer programs. Completion rates were highest when interventions were shorter, more structured, and included frequent contact or reminders from study staff. Validity limitations included small sample sizes, non-blinding of studies, and an uncertain degree of generalizability. CONCLUSION Bibliotherapy, CBT-based websites, and CBT-based computer programs might be effective in assisting primary care physicians who have minimal training in psychotherapy in treating adult patients with depression. Health care personnel contact with patients undergoing these interventions might result in increased effectiveness. Future research is warranted in this area, and despite several limitations, findings from this study could help guide efforts in the development and evaluation of such research. PMID:19675262

  16. Investigating Language Learner Strategies among Lower Primary School Pupils in Singapore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gu, Peter Yongqi; Hu, Guangwei; Zhang, Lawrence Jun

    2005-01-01

    To date, very few empirical studies can be found on primary, especially lower primary school pupils' use of language learner strategies. The few studies that exist often employ research techniques such as questionnaires and think-aloud protocols as studies on adults do. However, we know very little about whether the research methods commonly used…

  17. Patterns in Primary Health Care Utilization among Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities in Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Allyson; Wood, David; Hou, Tao; Zhang, Jianyi

    2007-01-01

    Individuals living with intellectual and developmental disabilities face complex medical problems. Primary care physicians tend to provide basic medical care, serving as a base through which other forms of care can be accessed. In this study we describe patterns of primary care utilization among adults enrolled on the Florida Medicaid's Home and…

  18. Spirometry in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Coates, Allan L; Graham, Brian L; McFadden, Robin G; McParland, Colm; Moosa, Dilshad; Provencher, Steeve; Road, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS) clinical guidelines for asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) specify that spirometry should be used to diagnose these diseases. Given the burden of asthma and COPD, most people with these diseases will be diagnosed in the primary care setting. The present CTS position statement was developed to provide guidance on key factors affecting the quality of spirometry testing in the primary care setting. The present statement may also be used to inform and guide the accreditation process for spirometry in each province. Although many of the principles discussed are equally applicable to pulmonary function laboratories and interpretation of tests by respirologists, they are held to a higher standard and are outside the scope of the present statement. PMID:23457669

  19. Primary pulmonary artery sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Jin, Tao; Zhang, Chong; Feng, Zhiying; Ni, Yiming

    2008-08-01

    Primary pulmonary artery sarcoma is an uncommon tumor. We report a case of a 73-year-old male patient with a two-week history of palpitations and shortness of breath, aggravated for two days and was believed to be pulmonary hypertension. Emergency heart ultrasound after admission presented a massive pulmonary embolism in the pulmonary artery. The patient's condition was successfully managed with urgent pulmonary artery embolectomy. The patient demonstrated improvement in hemodynamics after the operation. Histologic and immunohistochemical assays were performed and a diagnosis was made as primary pulmonary artery sarcoma arising from the left pulmonary artery. Resection of the tumor is recommended for the treatment of this rare malignant tumor. The corresponding chemotherapy, follow-up and prognosis are described as well in this case report.

  20. Primary hyperparathyroidism and nephrolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Vestergaard, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Calcifications in the kidneys may occur in the parenchyma (nephrocalcinosis), pelvis renis (nephrolithiasis) or ureters (ureterolithiasis). Several factors may protect against stone formation or promote precipitation of stones. Most stones contain calcium, and the hypercalciuria seen in primary hyperparathyroidism is a contributing factor to stone formation in the kidneys and urinary tract. In early case series, renal stone formation was frequent, whereas the proportion of patients with symptomatic renal stones has declined in recent years. However, a substantial proportion of patients presents with asymptomatic nephrocalcinosis or nephrolithiasis. Before diagnosis and treatment of primary hyperparathyroidism, renal stone events are more frequent than in the general population. However, even after surgical cure, an increased rate of renal stone events may be seen. This may to some extent be the result of stones or calcifications already present at the time of diagnosis or sequelae to prior stones such as infections or ureter strictures.

  1. Urinary tract infections in adults.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chee Wei; Chlebicki, Maciej Piotr

    2016-09-01

    A urinary tract infection (UTI) is a collective term for infections that involve any part of the urinary tract. It is one of the most common infections in local primary care. The incidence of UTIs in adult males aged under 50 years is low, with adult women being 30 times more likely than men to develop a UTI. Appropriate classification of UTI into simple or complicated forms guides its management and the ORENUC classification can be used. Diagnosis of a UTI is based on a focused history, with appropriate investigations depending on individual risk factors. Simple uncomplicated cystitis responds very well to oral antibiotics, but complicated UTIs may require early imaging, and referral to the emergency department or hospitalisation to prevent urosepsis may be warranted. Escherichia coli remains the predominant uropathogen in acute community-acquired uncomplicated UTIs and amoxicillin-clavulanate is useful as a first-line antibiotic. Family physicians are capable of managing most UTIs if guided by appropriate history, investigations and appropriate antibiotics to achieve good outcomes and minimise antibiotic resistance.

  2. Urinary tract infections in adults

    PubMed Central

    Wei Tan, Chee; Chlebicki, Maciej Piotr

    2016-01-01

    A urinary tract infection (UTI) is a collective term for infections that involve any part of the urinary tract. It is one of the most common infections in local primary care. The incidence of UTIs in adult males aged under 50 years is low, with adult women being 30 times more likely than men to develop a UTI. Appropriate classification of UTI into simple or complicated forms guides its management and the ORENUC classification can be used. Diagnosis of a UTI is based on a focused history, with appropriate investigations depending on individual risk factors. Simple uncomplicated cystitis responds very well to oral antibiotics, but complicated UTIs may require early imaging, and referral to the emergency department or hospitalisation to prevent urosepsis may be warranted. Escherichia coli remains the predominant uropathogen in acute community-acquired uncomplicated UTIs and amoxicillin-clavulanate is useful as a first-line antibiotic. Family physicians are capable of managing most UTIs if guided by appropriate history, investigations and appropriate antibiotics to achieve good outcomes and minimise antibiotic resistance. PMID:27662890

  3. Vision Loss in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, Allen L; Rojas-Roldan, Ledy; Coffin, Janis

    2016-08-01

    Vision loss affects 37 million Americans older than 50 years and one in four who are older than 80 years. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force concludes that current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for impaired visual acuity in adults older than 65 years. However, family physicians play a critical role in identifying persons who are at risk of vision loss, counseling patients, and referring patients for disease-specific treatment. The conditions that cause most cases of vision loss in older patients are age-related macular degeneration, glaucoma, ocular complications of diabetes mellitus, and age-related cataracts. Vitamin supplements can delay the progression of age-related macular degeneration. Intravitreal injection of a vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitor can preserve vision in the neovascular form of macular degeneration. Medicated eye drops reduce intraocular pressure and can delay the progression of vision loss in patients with glaucoma, but adherence to treatment is poor. Laser trabeculoplasty also lowers intraocular pressure and preserves vision in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma, but long-term studies are needed to identify who is most likely to benefit from surgery. Tight glycemic control in adults with diabetes slows the progression of diabetic retinopathy, but must be balanced against the risks of hypoglycemia and death in older adults. Fenofibrate also slows progression of diabetic retinopathy. Panretinal photocoagulation is the mainstay of treatment for diabetic retinopathy, whereas vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors slow vision loss resulting from diabetic macular edema. Preoperative testing before cataract surgery does not improve outcomes and is not recommended.

  4. [Primary orthostatic tremor].

    PubMed

    Bottin, P; Sadzot, B; Hotermans, C

    2005-02-01

    Primary orthostatic tremor is a particular tremor exclusively present when a subject is standing. Patients experience a severe disabling sense of unsteadiness. Walking, sitting and lying down are unaffected Neurological examination and cerebral imagery are normal most of the time. Electromyography in standing position confirms the diagnosis in showing a regular rapid tremor with a frequency of 12 to 18 Hz. Its physiopathology is partially unknown. A few symptomatic therapies can be proposed.

  5. [Primary care in France].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sagrado, T

    2016-01-01

    The poor planning of health care professionals in Spain has led to an exodus of doctors leaving the country. France is one of the chosen countries for Spanish doctors to develop their professional career. The French health care system belongs to the Bismarck model. In this model, health care system is financed jointly by workers and employers through payroll deduction. The right to health care is linked to the job, and provision of services is done by sickness-funds controlled by the Government. Primary care in France is quite different from Spanish primary care. General practitioners are independent workers who have the right to set up a practice anywhere in France. This lack of regulation has generated a great problem of "medical desertification" with problems of health care access and inequalities in health. French doctors do not want to work in rural areas or outside cities because "they are not value for money". Medical salary is linked to professional activity. The role of doctors is to give punctual care. Team work team does not exist, and coordination between primary and secondary care is lacking. Access to diagnostic tests, hospitals and specialists is unlimited. Duplicity of services, adverse events and inefficiencies are the norm. Patients can freely choose their doctor, and they have a co-payment for visits and hospital care settings. Two years training is required to become a general practitioner. After that, continuing medical education is compulsory, but it is not regulated. Although the French medical Health System was named by the WHO in 2000 as the best health care system in the world, is it not that good. While primary care in Spain has room for improvement, there is a long way for France to be like Spain.

  6. [Multiple primary pulmonary carcinomas].

    PubMed

    Guitart, A C; Gómez, G; Estrada, G; Rodríguez, C; León, C; Cornudella, R

    1991-02-01

    Three cases of multiple simultaneous primary lung carcinomas are presented, in which diagnosis was established by post-surgery pathological exam. In all three cases, chest X-ray showed pulmonary masses suggestive or clinical malignancy, and pre-surgery pathological diagnosis or squamous lung carcinoma. During thoracotomy or in the resected segment, a second lesion we confirmed which made resection necessary being this second lesion classified as lung adenocarcinoma.

  7. [Primary care in Sweden].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sagrado, T

    2016-09-01

    Sweden was one of the first European Union countries that saw the opportunity in the free movement of professionals. First offers for jobs were managed in 2000. Since then, a large number of professionals have taken the opportunity of a decent job and have moved from Spain to Sweden. The Swedish health care model belongs to the group of national health systems. The right to health care is linked to legal citizenship. Health is financed through regional taxes, but there is a compulsory co-payment regardless of the financial situation of the patient. The provision of health care is decentralised at a regional level, and there is a mixture of private and public medical centres. Primary care is similar to that in Spain. Health professionals work as a team with a division of tasks. Like in Spain, waiting lists and coordination between primary and specialised care are a great problem. Patients may register with any public or private primary care centre and hospital provider within their region. Access to diagnostic tests and specialists are restricted to those selected by specialists. Doctors are salaried and their job and salary depend on their experience, professional abilities and regional needs. Medicine is curative. General practitioners are the gateway to the system, but they do not act as gatekeeper. Hospitals offer a number of training post, and the access is through an interview. Continuing medical education is encouraged and financed by the health centre in order to increase its revenues.

  8. Primary gastric lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Al-Akwaa, Ahmad M; Siddiqui, Neelam; Al-Mofleh, Ibrahim A

    2004-01-01

    AIM: The purpose of this review is to describe the various aspects of primary gastric lymphoma and the treatment options currently available. METHODS: After a systematic search of Pubmed, Medscape and MDconsult, we reviewed and retrieved literature regarding gastric lymphoma. RESULTS: Primary gastric lymphoma is rare however, the incidence of this malignancy is increasing. Chronic gastritis secondary to Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection has been considered a major predisposing factor for MALT lymphoma. Immune histochemical marker studies and molecular biology utilizing polymerase chain reaction have facilitated appropriate diagnosis and abolished the need for diagnostic surgical resection. Advances in imaging techniques including Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Endoscopic Ultrasonography (EUS) have helped evaluation of tumor extension and invasion. The clinical course and prognosis of this disease is dependent on histopathological sub-type and stage at the time of diagnosis. Controversy remains regarding the best treatment for early stages of this disease. Chemotherapy, surgery and combination have been studied and shared almost comparable results with survival rate of 70%-90%. However, chemotherapy possesses the advantage of preserving gastric anatomy. Radiotherapy alone has been tried and showed good results. Stage IIIE, IVE disease treatment is solely by chemotherapy and surgical resection has been a remote consideration. CONCLUSION: We conclude that methods of diagnosis and staging of the primary gastric lymphoma have dramatically improved. The modalities of treatment are many and probably chemotherapy is superior because of high success rate, preservation of stomach and tolerable complications. PMID:14695759

  9. [Primary renal angiosarcoma].

    PubMed

    Costero-Barrios, Cesáreo B; Oros-Ovalle, Cuauhtémoc

    2004-01-01

    The twenty-fourth case of primary renal angiosarcoma is described, according to the available international literature, this present in a 71-year-old male, a mechanic by trade, without carcinogenic antecedents. Hematuria, pain in flank, and left-side tumoral mass of approximately 20 cm in diameter located in kidney by computerized axial tomography (CT) constituted manifestations. A left nefrectomy was performed. No metastasis was found. The tumor replaced 4/5 of the organ and weighed 1145 g. It showed angiomatous structure with atypical proliferation of endothelial cells in a sinusoldal trauma and anastomosatic vascular channels that invaded neighboring parenchymal and capsule. Tymorous cells were positive for CD31 and CD34 and negative for cytokeratins, S100 and HMB 45 proteins. The patient was subjected to treatment with chemotherapy and radiotherapy (lineal accelerator), but 12 months after surgery he presented retroperitonal tumoral relapse and hepatic metastasis. Diagnostic differentiation with benign vascular tumors is pointed out, as well as carcinomas and sarcomas that showed an outstanding angiomatous component, both primary and/or secondary. Primary renal angiosarcoma exposes the multiplicity of localizations that it is capable of with a tumor of this type, as well as renal parenquimatous capacity to be the seat of a great variety of neoplasias.

  10. Addressing the primary care workforce: a study of nurse practitioner students' plans after graduation.

    PubMed

    Budd, Geraldine M; Wolf, Andrea; Haas, Richard Eric

    2015-03-01

    Primary care is a growing area, and nurse practitioners (NPs) hold promise for meeting the need for additional providers. This article reports on the future plans of more than 300 primary care NP students in family, adult, and adult gerontology programs. The sample was obtained through NP faculty, and data were collected via an online survey. Results indicated that although these students chose primary care, only 48% anticipated working in primary care; 26% planned to practice in rural areas, and 16% planned to work in an inner city. Reasons cited as important for pursuing a primary care position included the long-term patient relationship, faculty and preceptor mentors from the NP program, and clinical experiences as a student. Implications include providing more intensive faculty mentoring to increase the number of individuals seeking primary care positions after graduation and help with future career planning to meet personal career and nursing profession needs.

  11. Adult Education Regional Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Community Colleges, Chancellor's Office, 2015

    2015-01-01

    For more than one hundred and fifty years, until 2008, California was an undisputed national leader in its commitment to adult education. The state's investment in adult learners topped $750 million, a sum greater than the combined total of every other state in the nation. However, for the past several years recession and fiscal crisis have left…

  12. Young Adult Library Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    The Bookmark, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Eight articles in this Spring 1985 issue of The Bookmark focus on young adult library services. In addition to these thematic articles, an introduction and three reports are presented. The issue contains: (1) "In Perspective" (E. J. Josey); (2) "Young Adult Literature in the 1980's--Awesome!" (Ellin Chu); (3) "Young Adult…

  13. Toward Transpersonal Adult Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boucouvalas, Marcie

    2016-01-01

    As a foundation for discussing transpersonal adult development, the author traces her trajectory, involvement in, and contribution to the modern transpersonal movement and her introduction of it to the adult learning literature, beginning during the early 1980s. Highlighted are the transpersonal domain and a differentiation between transpersonal…

  14. Adult Day Services

    MedlinePlus

    A Smart Choice Adult Day Services Comparison At-a-Glance 1 Adult Day Services Assisted Living Home Care Nursing Homes Live at home with family ... supervision Nursing care available as needed during the day Flexibility to receive care only on days when ...

  15. Adult Tech Prep.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaad, Donna

    For over 2 years, Blak Hawk College (Illinois) has provided high school equivalency (GED) candidates and recipients, older returning students, and underprepared high school graduates with a Tech Prep curriculum to give them the skills to make the transition from adult basic education to college or work. The Adult Tech Prep (ATP) core curriculum…

  16. Authenticity in Adult Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashton, Sam

    2010-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the relationship between authenticity and adult learning and prompted by some studies in which adult "authentic learning" is a central concept. The implication revealed by them is that real-worldness of learning contexts, learning content and learning tasks is perceived as conferring authenticity on learning. Here,…

  17. Adult Learning and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubenson, Kjell, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    As individuals and societies try to respond to fundamental economic and social transformation, the field of adult learning and education is rapidly getting increased attention and new topics for research on adult learning have emerged. This collection of articles from the International Encyclopedia of Education 3e offers practitioners and…

  18. Today's Adult Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Who are the adult students in career and technical education (CTE) today? There is not one simple answer to that question. Some are young with little life experience, while others are returning to the workforce and learning new skills to reinvent themselves. Whatever the case, educating adult students is an integral part of ACTE's mission, and the…

  19. Adult Literacy in Zanzibar.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saadat, Ahmed H.

    The philosophy behind adult literacy in Zanzibar is that adult literacy is a process whereby the illiterate is empowered to become aware of his or her potential. Literacy activities emphasize a relation to work, sometimes known as functional literacy. Specific objectives of literacy programs are to improve living conditions, impart self-reliant…

  20. Adult Vocational Trajectory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riverin-Simard, Danielle

    1990-01-01

    Proposes a "spatial-temporal" model conceiving adult vocational development as a complex and constant readjustment in always changing perception of personal space-time, based on interviews of 786 adults. Presents two propositions of this model: the continuous alternation between states of instability and interaction of influences.…

  1. Counseling Adult Adoptees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corder, Kate

    2012-01-01

    This review presents various resources about working with adult adoptees in order to inform counselors in their practice. Topics covered include basics of adoption, including types of adoption and adoption statistics; possible issues adult adoptees may face; and suggestions and implications for counselors. The article addresses some of the serious…

  2. Alternative Programming for Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flint, Thomas A.; Frey, Ruth

    2003-01-01

    The Council for Adult and Experiential Learning is currently cataloguing alternative programming features that are most effective with adult students in a best practices inventory organized around a framework of high-level descriptive principles of effectiveness. This chapter identifies a few interesting features from a quick survey of this…

  3. Adult Education and Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinzen, Heribert, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This document contains 19 papers on adult education and development worldwide. The following papers are included: "Editorial" (Heribert Hinzen); "Lifelong Learning in Europe: Moving towards EFA (Dakar Framework for Action on Education for All) Goals and the CONFINTEA V Agenda" (Sofia Conference on Adult Education);…

  4. Adult Education in Finland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szekely, Radu

    2006-01-01

    Ever since the first ideas of national independence appeared in Finland, adult education has played an essential role in shaping the destiny of the Finns. With a history of almost 130 years, during which it has continuously increased in quality and quantity, the Finnish adult education system has ensured that Finland stays among the most…

  5. Financing of Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, David

    2007-01-01

    The 2008 EFA Global Monitoring Report recognises adult literacy as the most neglected of the EFA goals. It is neglected most obviously in respect of the financial allocations made by governments and donors. This shortage of financing creates a dangerous situation in which adult educators seek to convince politicians to invest, based on false…

  6. Genotype-guided Dosing of mFOLFIRINOX Chemotherapy in Patients With Previously Untreated Advanced Gastrointestinal Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-20

    Acinar Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Adenocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Adenocarcinoma of Unknown Primary; Adult Primary Cholangiocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Extrahepatic Bile Duct; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Duct Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Carcinoma of Unknown Primary; Metastatic Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Newly Diagnosed Carcinoma of Unknown Primary; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer

  7. Achieving Value in Primary Care: The Primary Care Value Model.

    PubMed

    Rollow, William; Cucchiara, Peter

    2016-03-01

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model provides a compelling vision for primary care transformation, but studies of its impact have used insufficiently patient-centered metrics with inconsistent results. We propose a framework for defining patient-centered value and a new model for value-based primary care transformation: the primary care value model (PCVM). We advocate for use of patient-centered value when measuring the impact of primary care transformation, recognition, and performance-based payment; for financial support and research and development to better define primary care value-creating activities and their implementation; and for use of the model to support primary care organizations in transformation.

  8. Primary and revision cleft lip repairs using octyl-2-cyanoacrylate.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Joshua M; Paige, Keith T

    2006-03-01

    The purpose of our retrospective review is to examine our method and outcomes for the application of octyl-2-cyanoacrylate for the repair of primary and revision cleft lips in both pediatric and adult patients. Records and photographs were reviewed and analyzed for patient age, type of cleft, revision or primary repair, complications, length of follow-up, and aesthetic outcomes. Eighteen patients, both children and adults, who underwent cleft lip repairs using tissue adhesive performed by a single surgeon between 1999 and 2003 were included. Twelve patients underwent primary repair and 6 patients underwent revision repair. Repairs were performed using the Millard rotation advancement technique and the Mohler variant. The lateral advancement flap was kept long and redundant in its transverse dimension to create a pressure fit everting the skin edges with minimal sutures to set up the closure for application of the tissue adhesive. Seventeen of eighteen patients had excellent cosmetic outcomes. One patient had minor necrosis of the tip of the advancement flap. No allergic reactions, wound infections, or dehiscences occurred. The use of octyl-2-cyanoacrylate for the skin closure of primary and revision cleft lip repairs in both children and adults results in excellent cosmetic outcomes. Employing our pressure-fit technique for skin eversion prior to application of the tissue adhesive may be advantageous. The lack of suture removal in the pediatric population and decreased operative time are additional benefits.

  9. Gender Dysphoria in Adults.

    PubMed

    Zucker, Kenneth J; Lawrence, Anne A; Kreukels, Baudewijntje P C

    2016-01-01

    Gender dysphoria (GD), a term that denotes persistent discomfort with one's biologic sex or assigned gender, replaced the diagnosis of gender identity disorder in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders in 2013. Subtypes of GD in adults, defined by sexual orientation and age of onset, have been described; these display different developmental trajectories and prognoses. Prevalence studies conclude that fewer than 1 in 10,000 adult natal males and 1 in 30,000 adult natal females experience GD, but such estimates vary widely. GD in adults is associated with an elevated prevalence of comorbid psychopathology, especially mood disorders, anxiety disorders, and suicidality. Causal mechanisms in GD are incompletely understood, but genetic, neurodevelopmental, and psychosocial factors probably all contribute. Treatment of GD in adults, although largely standardized, is likely to evolve in response to the increasing diversity of persons seeking treatment, demands for greater client autonomy, and improved understanding of the benefits and limitations of current treatment modalities.

  10. Alcohol and adult hippocampal neurogenesis: promiscuous drug, wanton effects.

    PubMed

    Geil, Chelsea R; Hayes, Dayna M; McClain, Justin A; Liput, Daniel J; Marshall, S Alex; Chen, Kevin Y; Nixon, Kimberly

    2014-10-03

    Adult neurogenesis is now widely accepted as an important contributor to hippocampal integrity and function but also dysfunction when adult neurogenesis is affected in neuropsychiatric diseases such as alcohol use disorders. Excessive alcohol consumption, the defining characteristic of alcohol use disorders, results in a variety of cognitive and behavioral impairments related wholly or in part to hippocampal structure and function. Recent preclinical work has shown that adult neurogenesis may be one route by which alcohol produces hippocampal neuropathology. Alcohol is a pharmacologically promiscuous drug capable of interfering with adult neurogenesis through multiple mechanisms. This review will discuss the primary mechanisms underlying alcohol-induced changes in adult hippocampal neurogenesis including alcohol's effects on neurotransmitters, CREB and its downstream effectors, and the neurogenic niche.

  11. LEVELS OF 2,4-DICHLOROPHENOXYACETIC ACID IN THE HOMES AND URINE OF 135 PRESCHOOL CHILDREN AND THEIR ADULT CAREGIVERS IN NORTH CAROLINA AND OHIO

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study investigated the aggregate exposures of preschool children and their primary adult caregivers to chemicals commonly found in their everyday environments. One primary objective of this study was to identify the important sources and pathways of the participant's exposur...

  12. Primary cilia disappear in rat podocytes during glomerular development.

    PubMed

    Ichimura, Koichiro; Kurihara, Hidetake; Sakai, Tatsuo

    2010-07-01

    Most tubular epithelial cell types express primary cilia, and mutations of primary-cilium-associated proteins are well known to cause several kinds of cystic renal disease. However, until now, it has been unclear whether mammalian podocytes express primary cilia in vivo. In this study, we determined whether primary cilia are present in the podocytes of rat immature and mature glomeruli by means of transmission electron microscopy of serial ultrathin sections. In immature glomeruli of fetal rats, podocytes express the primary cilia with high percentages at the S-shaped body (88 +/- 5%, n = 3), capillary loop (95 +/- 4%, n = 4), and maturing glomerulus (76 +/- 13%, n = 5) stages. The percentage of ciliated podocytes was significantly lower at the maturing glomerulus stage than at the former two stages. In mature glomeruli of adult rats, ciliated podocytes were not found at all (0 +/- 0%, n = 11). These findings indicate that the primary cilia gradually disappear in rat podocytes during glomerular development. Since glomerular filtration rate increases during development, the primary cilia on the podocytes are subjected to a stronger bending force. Thus, the disappearance of the primary cilia presumably prevents the entry of excessive calcium-ions via the cilium-associated polycystin complexes and the disturbance of intracellular signaling cascades in mature podocytes.

  13. Treatment of Primary Hyperoxaluria

    PubMed Central

    Dent, C. E.; Stamp, T. C. B.

    1970-01-01

    Nine patients with primary hyperoxaluria have been followed regularly for 1 to 11 years, and their treatment and progress are discussed in relation to the known natural history of the disease. 6 of them probably have the usual form of primary hyperoxaluria associated with increased glycollic acid excretion, while 3 who are sibs have the recently described variant associated with L-glyceric aciduria and normal glycollic acid excretion. All 9 patients have been on regimens designed to increase the urinary solubility of calcium oxalate, with or without the simultaneous lowering of urinary calcium and raising of urinary phosphate excretions. 8 patients have been treated for 1½-7½ years (average duration 4 years) with oral magnesium hydroxide, and 2 patients have been treated with sodium phosphate. One of the latter was changed after 3½ years to magnesium hydroxide and the other has been on sodium phosphate combined with a low calcium diet and cellulose phosphate continuously for 5½ years. 2, not at first diagnosed as hyperoxalurics, were first given sodium bicarbonate for their presumably secondary renal tubular acidosis. The over-all progress of the whole group is felt to have been better than could be expected from the known natural history of primary hyperoxaluria. They average 4¼ years on treatment during 5 years of our observation and all remain clinically well after an average of 9½ years since the onset of their first symptoms. Results warrant the recommendation that, until reliable means are available to decrease oxalate over-production, affected patients should be treated continuously with magnesium hydroxide. A more final opinion must await many more years of follow-up. The failure of several attempts to lower urinary oxalate excretion in these patients is also reported. ImagesFIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5 PMID:5491877

  14. Epigenetics and primary care.

    PubMed

    Wright, Robert; Saul, Robert A

    2013-12-01

    Epigenetics, the study of functionally relevant chemical modifications to DNA that do not involve a change in the DNA nucleotide sequence, is at the interface between research and clinical medicine. Research on epigenetic marks, which regulate gene expression independently of the underlying genetic code, has dramatically changed our understanding of the interplay between genes and the environment. This interplay alters human biology and developmental trajectories, and can lead to programmed human disease years after the environmental exposure. In addition, epigenetic marks are potentially heritable. In this article, we discuss the underlying concepts of epigenetics and address its current and potential applicability for primary care providers.

  15. Primary leptomeningeal melanoma.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhao-Yu; Hsieh, Kevin Li-Chun; Tsang, Yuk-Ming; Cheung, Wing-Keung; Hsieh, Chen-Hsi

    2014-06-01

    Primary melanoma of the central nervous system is a rare melanocytic tumor typically located in the leptomeninges. We report a 57-year-old woman with an intracranial leptomeningeal melanoma who presented with myoclonic seizures. Brain CT scan and MRI revealed a hemorrhagic intracranial tumor. The tumor was completely removed and leptomeningeal melanoma was proven pathologically. Follow-up imaging studies up to 19 months showed no recurrence of the disease. Here we present radiological, gross, and pathological images of leptomeningeal melanoma, discuss its characteristics, and review the relevant literature.

  16. Primary amoebic (Naegleria) meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Lam, A H; de Silva, M; Procopis, P; Kan, A

    1982-06-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) appearance of a case of primary meningoencephalitis due to the free living amoeba Naegleria fowleri is presented. The cisterns around and above the midbrain and the subarachnoid spaces were obliterated on precontrast CT. Marked enhancement in these regions was seen after intravenous contrast medium administration. The sulci and adjacent grey matter were also strongly enhanced. The ventricular size was normal. Pathological findings were those of arachnoiditis and invasion of the leptomeninges and brain substance by amoebae, especially at the base of the brain and cerebellum.

  17. Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Knowles, Michael R; Zariwala, Maimoona; Leigh, Margaret

    2016-09-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a recessive genetically heterogeneous disorder of motile cilia with chronic otosinopulmonary disease and organ laterality defects in ∼50% of cases. The prevalence of PCD is difficult to determine. Recent diagnostic advances through measurement of nasal nitric oxide and genetic testing has allowed rigorous diagnoses and determination of a robust clinical phenotype, which includes neonatal respiratory distress, daily nasal congestion, and wet cough starting early in life, along with organ laterality defects. There is early onset of lung disease in PCD with abnormal airflow mechanics and radiographic abnormalities detected in infancy and early childhood.

  18. [Primary pancreatic plasmacytoma].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Acevedo, Z; Pomares Rey, B; Alpera Tenza, M R; Andrada Becerra, E

    2014-01-01

    Extramedullary plasmacytomas are uncommon malignant plasma cell tumors that present outside the bone marrow; 80% of extramedullary plasmacytomas are located in the upper respiratory tract, and gastrointestinal plasmacytomas are rare. We present the case of an asymptomatic 65-year-old man in whom a pancreatic mass was found incidentally. The lesion was determined to be a pancreatic plasmacytoma after fine-needle aspiration cytology and surgical resection. No clinical, laboratory, or imaging findings indicative of multiple myeloma or association with other plasmacytomas were found, so the tumor was considered to be a primary pancreatic plasmacytoma.

  19. [Primary esophageal lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Ximenes, Manoel; Piauilino, Marcos Amorim; Oliveira, Humberto Alves; Vaz Neto, Jorge Pinto

    2012-01-01

    We describe the case of a 54 year old woman seen with an esophageal mass diagnosed as a primary esophageal lymphoma. The main symptom was dysphagia of seven months duration. The treatment consisted in resection of the tumor, and reconstruction of the defect with a reversed pleural flap, followed by a chemotherapy regimen that consisted of five drugs, cyclophosphamid, prednisone, doxorubicin, rituximab and vincristine (R-CHOP). The patient developed an esophageal pleural fistula treated with pleural drainage and irrigation that closed in 45 days. Two and one half years later she is doing well and disease free.

  20. Depression in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Fiske, Amy; Wetherell, Julie Loebach; Gatz, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    Depression is less prevalent among older adults than among younger adults but can have serious consequences. Over half of cases represent a first onset in later life. Although suicide rates in the elderly are declining, they are still higher than in younger adults and more closely associated with depression. Depressed older adults are less likely to endorse affective symptoms and more likely to display cognitive changes, somatic symptoms, and loss of interest than are younger adults. Risk factors leading to the development of late life depression likely comprise complex interactions among genetic vulnerabilities, cognitive diathesis, age-associated neurobiological changes, and stressful events. Insomnia is an often overlooked risk factor for late life depression. We suggest that a common pathway to depression in older adults, regardless of which predisposing risks are most prominent, may be curtailment of daily activities. Accompanying self-critical thinking may exacerbate and maintain a depressed state. Offsetting the increasing prevalence of certain risk factors in late life are age-related increases in psychological resilience. Other protective factors include higher education and socioeconomic status, engagement in valued activities, and religious or spiritual involvement. Treatments including behavioral therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, cognitive bibliotherapy, problem-solving therapy, brief psychodynamic therapy, and life review/reminiscence therapy are effective but too infrequently used with older adults. Preventive interventions including education for individuals with chronic illness, behavioral activation, cognitive restructuring, problem-solving skills training, group support, and life review have also received support. PMID:19327033

  1. Primary testicular lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Vural, Filiz; Cagirgan, Seckin; Saydam, Guray; Hekimgil, Mine; Soyer, Nur Akad; Tombuloglu, Murat

    2007-01-01

    We evaluated clinical features, management and survival of 12 patients with primary testicular non-Hodgkin's lymphoma presented to our hematology unit between January 1992 and July 2006, retrospectively. The median age of patients was 47 years at presentation (range 29-78 years) and > 80% of them were < 50 years old. In the majority of cases, orchidectomy was performed as diagnostic and first-line therapeutic procedures. Dominant histological subtype was diffuse large B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Seven patients out of 12 (58%) were Ann Arbor stages I and II, and the remaining five patients (42%) were stages III and IV. All the patients received doxorubicin-based chemotherapy and achieved complete remission. The addition of rituximab and central nervous system prophylaxis with intrathecal combined chemotherapy containing methotrexate, cytarabine and dexametasone were applied to three patients who were recently admitted. The rate of relapse was 8% and progression-free survival (PFS) at 10 years was 88%. Median duration of response was 84 months (range 14-173 months), median 97.5 months of follow-up. All patients are alive and in case remission. Because of the spreading nature and relapse probability at different sites, including central nervous system and contralateral testis, systemic treatment with doxorubicin-based chemotherapy with or without prophylaxis for contralateral testis and the central nervous system seems to improve the outcome of primary testicular lymphoma. PMID:18020104

  2. Update on primary hypobetalipoproteinemia.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Amanda J; Burnett, John R

    2014-07-01

    "Primary hypobetalipoproteinemia" refers to an eclectic group of inherited lipoprotein disorders characterized by low concentrations of or absence of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and apolipoprotein B in plasma. Abetalipoproteinemia and homozygous familial hypobetalipoproteinemia, although caused by mutations in different genes, are clinically indistinguishable. A framework for the clinical follow-up and management of these two disorders has been proposed recently, focusing on monitoring of growth in children and preventing complications by providing specialized dietary advice and fat-soluble vitamin therapeutic regimens. Other recent publications on familial combined hypolipidemia suggest that although a reduction of angiopoietin-like 3 activity may improve insulin sensitivity, complete deficiency also reduces serum cholesterol efflux capacity and increases the risk of early vascular atherosclerotic changes, despite low low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Specialist laboratories offer exon-by-exon sequence analysis for the molecular diagnosis of primary hypobetalipoproteinemia. In the future, massively parallel sequencing of panels of genes involved in dyslipidemia may play a greater role in the diagnosis of these conditions.

  3. Primary pulmonary choriocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Snoj, Ziga; Kocijancic, Igor

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of the study was to establish whether there are different clinical entities of primary pulmonary choriocarcinoma (PPC) that deserve different diagnostic approach and the most optimal treatment. Patients and methods A systematic review with PubMed search was conducted to identify studies that reported cases of PPC. The eligibility criteria were histological diagnosis of pulmonary choriocarcinoma and thorough examination of the reproductive organs to exclude potential primary choriocarcinoma in the gonads. Furthermore, to illustrate the review we additionally present a patient referred at our institution. Results 55 cases (17 men) were included in the review with a median age of 34 years. Women with the history of gestational event showed better survival outcome than women without the history of gestational event. Patients treated with combined modality treatment (surgery and chemotherapy) survived longer than the patients without combined modality treatment. Furthermore, multivariate analysis of prognostic factors showed that the combined modality treatment had independent prognostic significance. Size of the tumour showed significant prognostic influence in univariate and multivariate analysis. Conclusions PPC is an extreme rarity with variable clinical characteristics and outcome. It is important to capture and treat patients in the early stages of the disease. Women with the history of gestational event may show better survival, therefore genetic examination could help us to predict patient’s prognosis. Surgery followed by adjuvant chemotherapy appears to represent the best treatment for PPC. PMID:28265226

  4. [Normocalcemic primary hyperparathyroidism].

    PubMed

    Spivacow, Francisco R; Sapag Durán, Ana; Zanchetta, María B

    2014-01-01

    This report shows our conclusions on the clinical, biochemical and densitometry characteristics of 35 normocalcemic primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) patients. This condition is defined by a high level of intact parathyroid hormone (iPTHI) with persistently normal serum and ionized calcium in the absence of secondary hyperparathyroidism. Our selection consisted of 30 women (90%) and 5 men (10%). The control group of 55 hypercalcemic patients with primary hyperparathyroidism included 51 women (93%) and 4 men (7%). The average age at diagnosis of normocalcemic PHPT was 61.4 ± 11.7 years and 56.4 ± 11.3 years in hypercalcemic PHPT. Besides the expected differences in serum calcium, ionized calcium, phosphorus and 24 h urinary calcium, we found no significant changes in other biochemical variables, and no differences in densitometry evaluations such as the presence of osteopenia or osteoporosis and the number of fractures in the two types of PHPT. But there was a significant difference in the presence of renal lithiasis between normocalcemic PHPT (11.4%) and clasic PHPT (49.1%) p < 0.0005, to some extent associated to the presence of hypercalciuria in classic PHPT. Two of the 35 patients with normocalcemic PHPT became classic hypercalcemic PHPT over a 4 year follow-up period. Our findings support the hypothesis that the normocalcemic PHPT could be an early stage of the classic PHPT, both having similar clinical effects to metabolic renal and bone levels.

  5. Primary colonic lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Quintín H; Heslin, Martin J; Dávila-Cervantes, Andrea; Alvarez-Tostado, Javier; de los Monteros, Antonio Espinosa; Shore, Gregg; Vickers, Selwyn M

    2008-03-01

    Surgical resection of primary colonic lymphoma can be an important therapeutic tool. We performed a nonrandomized retrospective descriptive study at the University hospital tertiary care center. From January 1990 to June 2002, a total of 15 patients with primary colonic lymphoma were identified from the tumor registry at University of Alabama at Birmingham and retrospectively reviewed under Institutional Review Board approved protocol. Demographic data, clinical features, treatment method (surgery and/or chemotherapy), recurrence rate, and survival were analyzed. The results are presented as mean +/- standard deviation or median and range. Differences in survival were evaluated by the log-rank test and the interval of disease-free survival was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. A P value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Main outcome measures included surgical results, morbidity, mortality, and recurrence rate. Mean age was 51.5 years (standard deviation 16.4), 33 per cent were male and 67 per cent were female. Presenting symptoms were diarrhea (53.5%), lower gastrointestinal bleeding (13.3%), and nausea and vomiting (46.7%) secondary to low-grade obstruction. Concomitant colorectal disease was present in one patient with ulcerative colitis. Preoperative diagnosis of lymphoma was made in 13 patients (87%) with colonoscopy and biopsy. CT scan was performed in all patients; and none had radiographic evidence of systemic extension. Only one patient had a history of lymphoproliferative disease and exposure to radiation. The most common disease location was the cecum (60%), followed by the right colon (27%), and the sigmoid colon (13%). The mean lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) value was 214.9 u/L (range 129-309). Thirty-three per cent of the patients had an LDH value that was above the upper normal limit. LDH returned to normal after treatment in all patients. Operations performed consisted of right hemicolectomy (13), total proctocolectomy with ileal

  6. Community health workers and primary health care in Honduras.

    PubMed

    Quillian, J P

    1993-01-01

    Community participation and utilization of community health workers (CHWs) are essential components of the primary health care model. The success of CHWs is dependent on their training and subsequent community support. Community-prepared nurses are ideal CHW educators. A training program for CHWs was implemented in Honduras emphasizing the principles of adult learning and problem-based learning. Following a 4-month program of training a primary health care clinic was opened and managed by CHWs for a population over 10,000. Approximately 80% of local health problems were managed by the CHWs proving that well-trained CHWs can have a significant impact on the delivery of health care.

  7. Primary and secondary stabbing headache.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Matthew S; Evans, Randolph W

    2015-04-01

    Eight out of the 33 cases of primary stabbing headache seen in a general neurology clinic (40% have headache as their chief complaint) in the last 3.5 years are presented. The epidemiology, association with other primary headache disorders, secondary associations, testing, and treatment of primary stabbing headache are reviewed.

  8. Primary malignant melanoma of prostate.

    PubMed

    Doublali, M; Chouaib, A; Khallouk, A; Tazi, M F; El Fassi, M J; Farih, My H; Elfatmi, H; Bendahou, M; Benlemlih, A; Lamarti, O

    2010-05-01

    Primary genitourinary melanoma accounts for less than one per cent of all cases of melanoma. Most cases attributed to the prostate actually originate from the prostatic urethra. Due to its infrequency, primary malignant melanoma of the genitourinary tract presents a difficult diagnostic and management challenge. We report a case of primary malignant melanoma of the prostate found during transurethral resection of the prostate.

  9. Professional Issues for Primary Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browne, Ann, Ed.; Haylock, Derek, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    This book is intended to be a contribution to raising the awareness of primary teachers and trainee teachers as to what is involved in all the different professional dimensions of their work in schools. The book deals with the key professional issues in primary teaching that are addressed in primary teacher training courses. The book aims to…

  10. Primary care: the next renaissance.

    PubMed

    Showstack, Jonathan; Lurie, Nicole; Larson, Eric B; Rothman, Arlyss Anderson; Hassmiller, Susan

    2003-02-04

    Three decades ago, a renaissance helped create the foundations of primary care as we know it today. In recent years, however, new challenges have confronted primary care. We believe that the current challenges can be overcome and may, in fact, present an opportunity for a new renaissance of primary care to address the needs of our population. In this paper, we suggest seven core principles and a set of actions that will support a renaissance in, and a positive future for, primary care. The seven principles are 1) Health care must be organized to serve the needs of patients; 2) the goal of primary care systems should be the delivery of the highest-quality care as documented by measurable outcomes; 3) information and information systems are the backbone of the primary care process; 4) current health care systems must be reconstructed; 5) the health care financing system must support excellent primary care practice; 6) primary care education must be revitalized, with an emphasis on new delivery models and training in sites that deliver excellent primary care; and 7) the value of primary care practice must be continually improved, documented, and communicated. At the start of the 21st century, a vital, patient-centered primary care system has much to offer a rapidly changing population with increasingly diverse needs and expectations. If we keep the needs of persons and patients clearly in sight and design systems to meet those needs, primary care will thrive and our patients will be well served.

  11. Primary Teacher Education in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ching, Chin Phoi; Yee, Chin Peng

    2012-01-01

    In Malaysia the training of primary school teachers is solely carried out by teacher training institutes which offer the Bachelor of Teaching with Honors (Primary education) program and was first launched in 2007. This program prepares primary school teachers specializing in various subjects or major and is carried out in 27 teacher training…

  12. MAPE - Micros and Primary Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, R.

    1982-01-01

    The nature of the organization, Micros and Primary Education (MAPE) is detailed, and its history and development are noted. The primary purpose of MAPE is to promote and develop awareness and effective use of microelectronics as an integral part of the philosophy and practice of Primary Education. (MP)

  13. Primary Aluminum Plants Worldwide - 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1999-01-01

    The 1990 U.S. Bureau of Mines publication, Primary Aluminum Plants Worldwide, has been updated and is now available. The 1998 USGS edition of Primary Aluminum Plants Worldwide is published in two parts. Part I—Detail contains information on individual primary smelter capacity, location, ownership, sources of energy, and other miscellaneous information. Part II—Summary summarizes the capacity data by country

  14. Mosquito, adult (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This illustration shows an adult southern house mosquito. This mosquito feeds on blood and is the carrier of many diseases, such as encephalitis, West Nile, dengue fever, yellow fever, and others. ( ...

  15. Older Adults and Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alcohol Exposure Support & Treatment Alcohol Policy Special Populations & Co-occurring Disorders Publications & Multimedia Brochures & Fact Sheets NIAAA ... are here Home » Alcohol & Your Health » Special Populations & Co-occurring Disorders » Older Adults In this Section Underage ...

  16. Speech impairment (adult)

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003204.htm Speech impairment (adult) To use the sharing features on ... 2017, A.D.A.M., Inc. Duplication for commercial use must be authorized in writing by ADAM ...

  17. Motivation and Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veeraraghavan, J.

    1974-01-01

    The paper examines the role of adult education and the contribution it can make to the solution of current problems in developing countries, particularly the problems of economic under-development and over-population. (Author/AG)

  18. Motivation and Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, J. Rodney

    1982-01-01

    The author reviews theories of human motivation: Lewin's force field analysis, Skinner's operant reinforcement theory, and Maslow's hierarchy of needs. He then extracts the implications of these theories for adult learning. SK)

  19. Older Adults and Depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... find more information? Reprints Share Older Adults and Depression Download PDF Download ePub Order a free hardcopy ... depression need treatment to feel better. Types of Depression There are several types of depression. The most ...

  20. Young Adult Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Connie C.

    1987-01-01

    Considers the similarities between science fiction writing and young adult literature, and points out that several well-known authors, such as Robert Heinlein and Jane Yolen, write in both genres. (NKA)

  1. [Antibiotics in primary care].

    PubMed

    Steciwko, Andrzej; Lubieniecka, Małgorzata; Muszyńska, Agnieszka

    2011-05-01

    Discovered in the forties of the twentieth century antimicrobial agents have changed the world. Currently, due to their overuse, we are threatened by the increasing resistance of bacteria to antibiotics, and soon we may face a threat of inability to fight these pathogens. For that reason, the world, European and national organizations introduce antibiotics protection programs. In Poland since 2004, the National Program of Protection of Antibiotics is being held. The concept of rational antibiotic therapy is associated not only with the appropriate choice of therapy or antimicrobial dosage but also with a reduction in costs associated with a refund of medicines. Antibiotics are prescribed mostly by primary care physicians (GP), and about one fifth of visits to family doctor's office ends with prescribing antimicrobial drug. These trends are probably related to both the difficulty in applying the differential diagnosis of viral and bacterial infection in a primary care doctor's office, as well as patient's conviction about the effectiveness of antibiotic therapy in viral infections. However, although patients often want to influence the therapeutic decisions and ask their doctor for prescribing antimicrobial drug, the right conversation with a doctor alone is the critical component in satisfaction with medical care. Many countries have established standards to clarify the indications for use of antibiotics and thereby reduce their consumption. The next step is to monitor the prescribing and use of these drugs and to assess the rise of drug resistance in the area. In Poland, the recommendations regarding outpatient respiratory tract infections treatment were published and usage of antimicrobial agents monitoring has begun. However, lack of publications covering a broad analysis of antibiotic therapy and drug resistance on Polish territory is still a problem. Modem medicine has yet another tool in the fight against bacteria--they are bacteriophages. Phage therapy is

  2. Evaluation of a Peer-Led, Low-Intensity Physical Activity Program for Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Werner, Danilea; Teufel, James; Brown, Stephen L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Physical inactivity is a primary contributor to decreasing functional physical fitness and increasing chronic disease in older adults. Purpose: This study assessed the health-related benefits of ExerStart for Lay Leaders, a 20-week, community based, peer-led, low-impact exercise program for older adults. ExerStart focuses on aerobic…

  3. Figuring Out Function: Children's and Adults' Use of Ownership Information in Judgments of Artifact Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banerjee, Konika; Kominsky, Jonathan F.; Fernando, Madhawee; Keil, Frank C.

    2015-01-01

    Across 3 experiments, we found evidence that information about who owns an artifact influenced 5- to 10-year-old children's and adults' judgments about that artifact's primary function. Children's and adults' use of ownership information was underpinned by their inference that owners are typically familiar with owned artifacts and are therefore…

  4. The Effect of Emotional Intelligence on Program Completion among Adult Basic Education Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batiste, Mildred M.

    2014-01-01

    Program completion among adult learners attending adult basic education programs has been found to be an area of struggle. Cognitive ability has always been the primary factor for determining an individual's ability. However, non-cognitive ability has been proposed as a significant factor in academic success. Many attrition models have been…

  5. Methylphenidate Transdermal System in Adults with Past Stimulant Misuse: An Open-Label Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McRae-Clark, Aimee L.; Brady, Kathleen T.; Hartwell, Karen J.; White, Kathleen; Carter, Rickey E.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This 8-week, open-label trial assessed the efficacy of methylphenidate transdermal system (MTS) in 14 adult individuals diagnosed with ADHD and with a history of stimulant misuse, abuse, or dependence. Method: The primary efficacy endpoint was the Wender-Reimherr Adult ADHD Scale (WRAADS), and secondary efficacy endpoints included the…

  6. Health Literacy and Social Capital: What Role for Adult Literacy Partnerships and Pedagogy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Stephen; Balatti, Jo; Falk, Ian

    2013-01-01

    This paper makes the case for adult literacy (including numeracy) practitioners to play a greater role in health literacy initiatives in Australia. The paper draws on data from a national research project that investigated adult literacy partnerships and pedagogy viewed from a social capital perspective. The primary purpose of the project was to…

  7. The Role of Adolescent Physical Abuse in Adult Intimate Partner Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sunday, Suzanne; Kline, Myriam; Labruna, Victor; Pelcovitz, David; Salzinger, Suzanne; Kaplan, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    This study's primary aims were to examine whether a sample of young adults, aged 23 to 31, who had been documented as physically abused by their parent(s) during adolescence would be more likely to aggress, both physically and verbally, against their intimate partners compared with nonabused young adults and whether abuse history was (along with…

  8. Physical Mobility Limitations in Adults with Intellectual Disabilities: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleaver, S.; Hunter, D.; Ouellette-Kuntz, H.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Mobility limitations increase with age in the general population. Despite a growing population of older adults with intellectual disabilities (ID), mobility is rarely studied in the ID literature. The specific aim of this study was to identify and summarise primary literature investigating mobility limitations in adults with ID.…

  9. Chronic Disease Risks in Young Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Forewarned Is Forearmed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyler, Carl V.; Schramm, Sarah C.; Karafa, Matthew; Tang, Anne S.; Jain, Anil K.

    2011-01-01

    An emerging, cost-effective method to examine prevalent and future health risks of persons with disabilities is electronic health record (EHR) analysis. As an example, a case-control EHR analysis of adults with autism spectrum disorder receiving primary care through the Cleveland Clinic from 2005 to 2008 identified 108 adults with autism spectrum…

  10. Practicing What We Teach: Learning from Experience to Improve Adult Program Administration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jass, Lori K.

    2012-01-01

    Bethel University in St. Paul, Minnesota, comprises three primary units that each serve a distinct population: the College of Arts and Sciences (CAS) is a residential college for roughly 2,800 traditional-age undergraduates; the College of Adult and Professional Studies and Graduate School (CAPS/GS) serves roughly 2,200 adult learners at both the…

  11. Cardiac imaging in adults

    SciTech Connect

    Jaffe, C.C.

    1987-01-01

    This book approaches adult cardiac disease from the correlative imaging perspective. It includes chest X-rays and angiographs, 2-dimensional echocardiograms with explanatory diagrams for clarity, plus details on digital radiology, nuclear medicine techniques, CT and MRI. It also covers the normal heart, valvular heart disease, myocardial disease, pericardial disease, bacterial endocarditis, aortic aneurysm, cardiac tumors, and congenital heart disease of the adult. It points out those aspects where one imaging technique has significant superiority.

  12. Management of Patients with Subclinical Hypothyroidism in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, E; Russell, A; Kearney, P M

    2016-01-01

    Subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) is defined as a raised serum thyroid stimulating hormone level with normal thyroxine. Despite a prevalence of up to 9% of the adult population there is widespread uncertainty on how to manage it. The aim of this study was to assess how older adults with SCH are managed in primary care. A retrospective case-note review was carried out on patients attending Mallow Primary Healthcare Centre. This study identified patients 65 years and over meeting the criteria for SCH in one year. The prevalence of SCH in this study was calculated as 2.9%. 22.2% of patients were treated with thyroxine. 6.1% of untreated patients progressed to clinical hypothyroidism within the study period while 18.2% spontaneously reverted to normal TSH levels.

  13. Significant Adults in the Teacher-Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Harry

    1972-01-01

    A primary goal of schooling is to create a teaching-learning atmosphere that facilitates growth and development. As significant adults in the lives of children, we should strive to be facilitators of learning rather than omnipotent persons who have all the knowledge that should be imparted to learners. (Author)

  14. Future HIV Vaccine Acceptability among Young Adults in South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sayles, Jennifer N.; Macphail, Catherine L.; Newman, Peter A.; Cunningham, William E.

    2010-01-01

    Developing and disseminating a preventive HIV vaccine is a primary scientific and public health objective. However, little is known about HIV vaccine acceptability in the high-prevalence setting of South Africa--where young adults are likely to be targeted in early dissemination efforts. This study reports on six focus groups (n = 42) conducted in…

  15. Engagement with Young Adult Literature: Outcomes and Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivey, Gay; Johnston, Peter H.

    2013-01-01

    This study examines students' perceptions of the outcomes and processes of engaged reading in classrooms prioritizing engagement through self-selected, self-paced reading of compelling young adult literature. The primary data were 71 end-of-year student interviews, supported by end-of-year teacher interviews, biweekly observational data,…

  16. Adult Education in Development. Methods and Approaches from Changing Societies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGivney, Veronica; Murray, Frances

    The case studies described in this book provide examples of initiatives illustrating the role of adult education in development and its contribution to the process of change in developing countries. The book is organized in five sections. Case studies in Part 1, "Health Education," illustrate the links between primary health care and…

  17. Audiovisual Integration in Noise by Children and Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barutchu, Ayla; Danaher, Jaclyn; Crewther, Sheila G.; Innes-Brown, Hamish; Shivdasani, Mohit N.; Paolini, Antonio G.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the development of multisensory facilitation in primary school-age children under conditions of auditory noise. Motor reaction times and accuracy were recorded from 8-year-olds, 10-year-olds, and adults during auditory, visual, and audiovisual detection tasks. Auditory signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of 30-,…

  18. When Governments Get Creative: Adult Literacy in Senegal. Education Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordtvelt, Bjorn Harald

    2004-01-01

    The Education for All (EFA) goal of increasing adult literacy by 50 percent reflects two simple facts: first, primary school attendance has positive effects, including better family health and increased productivity; and second, when parents learn to read, more children go to school. So why haven't more countries and donors supported adult…

  19. EFA 2000 Thematic Study on Literacy and Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Daniel A.

    A global thematic study on literacy and adult education considered trends and innovations particularly salient during the World Conference on Education for All (WCEFA) decade. According to the most recent UNESCO statistics, world illiteracy rates dropped over the last 20-30 years because of increased primary school enrollments, yet the actual…

  20. Adult Day Care for Alzheimer's Patients and Their Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sands, Dan; Suzuki, Thelma

    1983-01-01

    Harbor Area Adult Day Care Center has operated for two years with a primary purpose of providing respite care to families caring for a relative with Alzheimer's disease or related disorders. The rationale, history, program, staffing, funding, and experience for the first two years of the project are provided. (Author/RC)