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Sample records for adult rat skeletal

  1. Maternal protein restriction impairs the transcriptional metabolic flexibility of skeletal muscle in adult rat offspring.

    PubMed

    da Silva Aragão, Raquel; Guzmán-Quevedo, Omar; Pérez-García, Georgina; Manhães-de-Castro, Raul; Bolaños-Jiménez, Francisco

    2014-08-14

    Skeletal muscle exhibits a remarkable flexibility in the usage of fuel in response to the nutrient intake and energy demands of the organism. In fact, increased physical activity and fasting trigger a transcriptional programme in skeletal muscle cells leading to a switch from carbohydrate to lipid oxidation. Impaired metabolic flexibility has been reported to be associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes, but it is not known whether the disability to adapt to metabolic demands is a cause or a consequence of these pathological conditions. Inasmuch as a poor nutritional environment during early life is a predisposing factor for the development of metabolic diseases in adulthood, in the present study, we aimed to determine the long-term effects of maternal malnutrition on the metabolic flexibility of offspring skeletal muscle. To this end, the transcriptional responses of the soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles to fasting were evaluated in adult rats born to dams fed a control (17 % protein) or a low-protein (8 % protein, protein restricted (PR)) diet throughout pregnancy and lactation. With the exception of reduced body weight and reduced plasma concentrations of TAG, PR rats exhibited a metabolic profile that was the same as that of the control rats. In the fed state, PR rats exhibited an enhanced expression of key regulatory genes of fatty acid oxidation including CPT1a, PGC-1α, UCP3 and PPARα and an impaired expression of genes that increase the capacity for fat oxidation in response to fasting. These results suggest that impaired metabolic inflexibility precedes and may contribute to the development of metabolic disorders associated with early malnutrition. PMID:24823946

  2. Myogenic regulatory factors during regeneration of skeletal muscle in young, adult, and old rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, D. R.; Criswell, D. S.; Carson, J. A.; Booth, F. W.

    1997-01-01

    Myogenic factor mRNA expression was examined during muscle regeneration after bupivacaine injection in Fischer 344/Brown Norway F1 rats aged 3, 18, and 31 mo of age (young, adult, and old, respectively). Mass of the tibialis anterior muscle in the young rats had recovered to control values by 21 days postbupivacaine injection but in adult and old rats remained 40% less than that of contralateral controls at 21 and 28 days of recovery. During muscle regeneration, myogenin mRNA was significantly increased in muscles of young, adult, and old rats 5 days after bupivacaine injection. Subsequently, myogenin mRNA levels in young rat muscle decreased to postinjection control values by day 21 but did not return to control values in 28-day regenerating muscles of adult and old rats. The expression of MyoD mRNA was also increased in muscles at day 5 of regeneration in young, adult, and old rats, decreased to control levels by day 14 in young and adult rats, and remained elevated in the old rats for 28 days. In summary, either a diminished ability to downregulate myogenin and MyoD mRNAs in regenerating muscle occurs in old rat muscles, or the continuing myogenic effort includes elevated expression of these mRNAs.

  3. Expression of developmental myosin and morphological characteristics in adult rat skeletal muscle following exercise-induced injury.

    PubMed

    Smith, H K; Plyley, M J; Rodgers, C D; McKee, N H

    1999-07-01

    The extent and stability of the expression of developmental isoforms of myosin heavy chain (MHCd), and their association with cellular morphology, were determined in adult rat skeletal muscle fibres following injury induced by eccentrically-biased exercise. Adult female Wistar rats [274 (10) g] were either assigned as non-exercised controls or subjected to 30 min of treadmill exercise (grade, -16 degrees; speed, 15 m x min(-1)), and then sacrificed following 1, 2, 4, 7, or 12 days of recovery (n = 5-6 per group). Histologically and immunohistologically stained serial, transverse cryosections of the soleus (S), vastus intermedius (VI), and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles were examined using light microscopy and digital imaging. Fibres staining positively for MHCd (MHCd+) were seldom detected in the TA. In the VI and S, higher proportions of MHCd+ fibres (0.8% and 2.5%, respectively) were observed in rats at 4 and 7 days post-exercise, in comparison to all other groups combined (0.2%, 1.2%; P < or = 0.01). In S, MHCd+ fibres were observed less frequently by 12 days (0.7%) than at 7 days (2.6%) following exercise. The majority (85.1%) of the MHCd+ fibres had morphological characteristics indicative of either damage, degeneration, repair or regeneration. Most of the MHCd+ fibres also expressed adult slow, and/or fast myosin heavy chain. Quantitatively, the MHCd+ fibres were smaller (< 2500 microm2) and more angular than fibres not expressing MHCd. Thus, there was a transient increase in a small, but distinct population of MHCd+ fibres following unaccustomed, functional exercise in adult rat S and VI muscles. The observed close coupling of MHCd expression with morphological changes within muscle fibres suggests that these characteristics have a common, initial exercise-induced injury-related stimulus.

  4. A comprehensive study of long-term skeletal changes after spinal cord injury in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tiao; Tong, Wei; Chandra, Abhishek; Hsu, Shao-Yun; Jia, Haoruo; Zhu, Ji; Tseng, Wei-Ju; Levine, Michael A; Zhang, Yejia; Yan, Shi-Gui; Liu, X Sherry; Sun, Dongming; Young, Wise; Qin, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI)-induced bone loss represents the most severe osteoporosis with no effective treatment. Past animal studies have focused primarily on long bones at the acute stage using adolescent rodents. To mimic chronic SCI in human patients, we performed a comprehensive analysis of long-term structural and mechanical changes in axial and appendicular bones in adult rats after SCI. In this experiment, 4-month-old Fischer 344 male rats received a clinically relevant T13 contusion injury. Sixteen weeks later, sublesional femurs, tibiae, and L4 vertebrae, supralesional humeri, and blood were collected from these rats and additional non-surgery rats for micro-computed tomography (µCT), micro-finite element, histology, and serum biochemical analyses. At trabecular sites, extreme losses of bone structure and mechanical competence were detected in the metaphysis of sublesional long bones after SCI, while the subchondral part of the same bones showed much milder damage. Marked reductions in bone mass and strength were also observed in sublesional L4 vertebrae but not in supralesional humeri. At cortical sites, SCI induced structural and strength damage in both sub- and supralesional long bones. These changes were accompanied by diminished osteoblast number and activity and increased osteoclast number and activity. Taken together, our study revealed site-specific effects of SCI on bone and demonstrated sustained inhibition of bone formation and elevation of bone resorption at the chronic stage of SCI. PMID:26528401

  5. A comprehensive study of long-term skeletal changes after spinal cord injury in adult rats

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tiao; Tong, Wei; Chandra, Abhishek; Hsu, Shao-Yun; Jia, Haoruo; Zhu, Ji; Tseng, Wei-Ju; Levine, Michael A; Zhang, Yejia; Yan, Shi-Gui; Liu, X Sherry; Sun, Dongming; Young, Wise; Qin, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI)-induced bone loss represents the most severe osteoporosis with no effective treatment. Past animal studies have focused primarily on long bones at the acute stage using adolescent rodents. To mimic chronic SCI in human patients, we performed a comprehensive analysis of long-term structural and mechanical changes in axial and appendicular bones in adult rats after SCI. In this experiment, 4-month-old Fischer 344 male rats received a clinically relevant T13 contusion injury. Sixteen weeks later, sublesional femurs, tibiae, and L4 vertebrae, supralesional humeri, and blood were collected from these rats and additional non-surgery rats for micro-computed tomography (µCT), micro-finite element, histology, and serum biochemical analyses. At trabecular sites, extreme losses of bone structure and mechanical competence were detected in the metaphysis of sublesional long bones after SCI, while the subchondral part of the same bones showed much milder damage. Marked reductions in bone mass and strength were also observed in sublesional L4 vertebrae but not in supralesional humeri. At cortical sites, SCI induced structural and strength damage in both sub- and supralesional long bones. These changes were accompanied by diminished osteoblast number and activity and increased osteoclast number and activity. Taken together, our study revealed site-specific effects of SCI on bone and demonstrated sustained inhibition of bone formation and elevation of bone resorption at the chronic stage of SCI. PMID:26528401

  6. Characterization of ion channels on the surface membrane of adult rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Chua, M; Betz, W J

    1991-01-01

    The channels present on the surface membrane of isolated rat flexor digitorum brevis muscle fibers were surveyed using the patch clamp technique. 85 out of 139 fibers had a novel channel which excluded the anions chloride, sulfate, and isethionate with a permeability ratio of chloride to sodium of less than 0.05. The selectivity sequence for cations was Na+ = K+ = Cs+ greater than Ca++ = Mg++ greater than N-Methyl-D-Glucamine. The channel remained closed for long periods, and had a large conductance of approximately 320 pS with several subconductance states at approximately 34 pS levels. Channel activity was not voltage dependent and the reversal potential for cations in muscle fibers of approximately 0 mV results in the channel's behaving as a physiological leakage conductance. Voltage activated potassium channels were present in 65 of the cell attached patches and had conductances of mostly 6, 12, and 25 pS. The voltage sensitivity of the potassium channels was consistent with that of the delayed rectifier current. Only three patches contained chloride channels. The scarcity of chloride channels despite the known high chloride conductance of skeletal muscle suggests that most of the chloride channels must be located in the transverse tubular system. PMID:1714780

  7. Maternal conjugated linoleic acid supplementation reverses high-fat diet-induced skeletal muscle atrophy and inflammation in adult male rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Pileggi, C A; Segovia, S A; Markworth, J F; Gray, C; Zhang, X D; Milan, A M; Mitchell, C J; Barnett, M P G; Roy, N C; Vickers, M H; Reynolds, C M; Cameron-Smith, D

    2016-03-01

    A high-saturated-fat diet (HFD) during pregnancy and lactation leads to metabolic disorders in offspring concomitant with increased adiposity and a proinflammatory phenotype in later life. During the fetal period, the impact of maternal diet on skeletal muscle development is poorly described, despite this tissue exerting a major influence on life-long metabolic health. This study investigated the effect of a maternal HFD on skeletal muscle anabolic, catabolic, and inflammatory signaling in adult rat offspring. Furthermore, the actions of maternal-supplemented conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) on these measures of muscle phenotype were investigated. A purified control diet (CD; 10% kcal fat), a CD supplemented with CLA (CLA; 10% kcal fat, 1% total fat as CLA), a high-fat (HFD; 45% kcal fat from lard), or a HFD supplemented with CLA (HFCLA; 45% kcal fat from lard, 1% total fat as CLA) was fed ad libitum to female Sprague-Dawley rats for 10 days before mating and throughout gestation and lactation. Male offspring received a standard chow diet from weaning, and the gastrocnemius was collected for analysis at day 150. Offspring from HF and HFCLA mothers displayed lower muscular protein content accompanied by elevated monocyte chemotactic protein-1, IL-6, and IL-1β concentrations. Phosphorylation of NF-κBp65 (Ser(536)) and expression of the catabolic E3 ligase muscle ring finger 1 (MuRF1) were increased in HF offspring, an effect reversed by maternal CLA supplementation. The present study demonstrates the importance of early life interventions to ameliorate the negative effects of poor maternal diet on offspring skeletal muscle development. PMID:26632603

  8. Age-related changes in expression of the neural cell adhesion molecule in skeletal muscle: a comparative study of newborn, adult and aged rats.

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, A M; Olsen, M; Zhernosekov, D; Gaardsvoll, H; Krog, L; Linnemann, D; Bock, E

    1993-01-01

    Neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) is expressed by muscle and involved in muscle-neuron and muscle-muscle cell interactions. The expression in muscle is regulated during myogenesis and by the state of innervation. In aged muscle, both neurogenic and myogenic degenerative processes occur. We here report quantitative and qualitative changes in NCAM protein and mRNA forms during aging in normal rat skeletal muscle. Determination of the amount of NCAM by e.l.i.s.a. showed that the level decreased from perinatal to adult age, followed by a considerable increase in 24-month-old rat muscle. Thus NCAM concentration in aged muscle was sixfold higher than in young adult muscle. In contrast with previous reports, NCAM polypeptides of 200, 145, 125 and 120 kDa were observed by immunoblotting throughout postnatal development and aging, the relative proportions of the individual NCAM polypeptides remaining virtually unchanged at all ages examined. However, changes in the extent of sialylation of NCAM were demonstrated. Even though the relative amounts of the various NCAM polypeptides were unchanged during aging, distinct changes in NCAM mRNA classes were observed. Three NCAM mRNA classes of 6.7, 5.2 and 2.9 kb were present in perinatal and young adult skeletal muscle, whereas only the 5.2 and 2.9 kb mRNA classes could be demonstrated in aged muscle. This indicates that metabolism of the various NCAM polypeptides is individually regulated during aging. Alternative splicing of NCAM mRNA in skeletal muscle was studied by Northern blotting using DNA oligonucleotide probes specifically hybridizing to selected exons or exon combinations. Exon VASE, which has previously been shown to be present in both brain and heart NCAM mRNA, was virtually absent from skeletal muscle at all ages studied. In contrast, the majority of NCAM mRNA in postnatal skeletal muscle was shown to contain extra exons inserted between exons 12 and 13. Of the various possible exon combinations at this splice site

  9. The Effects of Partial Mechanical Loading and Ibandronate on Skeletal Tissues in the Adult Rat Hindquarter Suspension Model for Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultheis, Lester W.

    1999-01-01

    We report initial data from a suspended rat model that quantitatively relates chronic partial weightbearing to bone loss. Chronic partial weightbearing is our simulation of the effect of limited artificial gravity aboard spacecraft or reduced planetary gravity. Preliminary analysis of bone by PQCT, histomorphometry, mechanical testing and biochemistry suggest that chronic exposure to half of Earth gravity is insufficient to prevent severe bone loss. The effect of episodic full weightbearing activity (Earth Gravity) on rats otherwise at 50% weightbearing was also explored. This has similarity to treatment by an Earth G-rated centrifuge on a spacecraft that normally maintained artificial gravity at half of Earth G. Our preliminary evidence, using the above techniques to analyze bone, indicate that 2 hours daily of full weightbearing was insufficient to prevent the bone loss observed in 50% weightbearing animals. The effectiveness of partial weightbearing and episodic full weightbearing as potential countermeasures to bone loss in spaceflight was compared with treatment by ibandronate. Ibandronate, a long-acting potent bisphosphonate proved more effective in preventing bone loss and associated functionality based upon structure than our first efforts at mechanical countermeasures. The effectiveness of ibandronate was notable by each of the testing methods we used to study bone from gross structure and strength to tissue and biochemistry. These results appear to be independent of generalized systemic stress imposed by the suspension paradigm. Preliminary evidence does not suggest that blood levels of vitamin D were affected by our countermeasures. Despite the modest theraputic benefit of mechanical countermeasures of partial weightbearing and episodic full weightbearing, we know that some appropriate mechanical signal maintains bone mass in Earth gravity. Moreover, the only mechanism that correctly assigns bone mass and strength to oppose regionally specific force

  10. The Effects of Partial Mechanical Loading and Ibandronate on Skeletal Tissues in the Adult Rat Hindquarter Suspension Model for Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultheis, Lester W.

    1999-01-01

    We report initial data from a suspended rat model that quantitatively relates chronic partial weightbearing to bone loss. Chronic partial weightbearing is our simulation of the effect of limited artificial gravity aboard spacecraft or reduced planetary gravity. Preliminary analysis of bone by PQCT, histomorphometry, mechanical testing and biochemistry suggest that chronic exposure to half of Earth gravity is insufficient to prevent severe bone loss. The effect of episodic full weightbearing activity (Earth Gravity) on rats otherwise at 50% weightbearing was also explored. This has similarity to treatment by an Earth G-rated centrifuge on a spacecraft that normally maintained artificial gravity at half of Earth G. Our preliminary evidence, using the above techniques to analyze bone, indicate that 2 hours daily of full weightbearing was insufficient to prevent the bone loss observed in 50% weightbearing animals. The effectiveness of partial weightbearing and episodic full weightbearing as potential countermeasures to bone loss in spaceflight was compared with treatment by ibandronate. Ibandronate, a long-acting potent bisphosphonate proved more effective in preventing bone loss and associated functionality based upon structure than our first efforts at mechanical countermeasures. The effectiveness of ibandronate was notable by each of the testing methods we used to study bone from gross structure and strength to tissue and biochemistry. These results appear to be independent of generalized systemic stress imposed by the suspension paradigm. Preliminary evidence does not suggest that blood levels of vitamin D were affected by our countermeasures. Despite the modest theraputic benefit of mechanical countermeasures of partial weightbearing and episodic full weightbearing, we know that some appropriate mechanical signal maintains bone mass in Earth gravity. Moreover, the only mechanism that correctly assigns bone mass and strength to oppose regionally specific force

  11. Slow myosin in developing rat skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Through S1 nuclease mapping using a specific cDNA probe, we demonstrate that the slow myosin heavy-chain (MHC) gene, characteristic of adult soleus, is expressed in bulk hind limb muscle obtained from the 18-d rat fetus. We support these results by use of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) which is highly specific to the adult slow MHC. Immunoblots of MHC peptide maps show the same peptides, uniquely recognized by this antibody in adult soleus, are also identified in 18-d fetal limb muscle. Thus synthesis of slow myosin is an early event in skeletal myogenesis and is expressed concurrently with embryonic myosin. By immunofluorescence we demonstrate that in the 16-d fetus all primary myotubes in future fast and future slow muscles homogeneously express slow as well as embryonic myosin. Fiber heterogeneity arises owing to a developmentally regulated inhibition of slow MHC accumulation as muscles are progressively assembled from successive orders of cells. Assembly involves addition of new, superficial areas of the anterior tibial muscle (AT) and extensor digitorum longus muscle (EDL) in which primary cells initially stain weakly or are unstained with the slow mAb. In the developing AT and EDL, expression of slow myosin is unstable and is progressively restricted as these muscles specialize more and more towards the fast phenotype. Slow fibers persisting in deep portions of the adult EDL and AT are interpreted as vestiges of the original muscle primordium. A comparable inhibition of slow MHC accumulation occurs in the developing soleus but involves secondary, not primary, cells. Our results show that the fate of secondary cells is flexible and is spatially determined. By RIA we show that the relative proportions of slow MHC are fivefold greater in the soleus than in the EDL or AT at birth. After neonatal denervation, concentrations of slow MHC in the soleus rapidly decline, and we hypothesize that, in this muscle, the nerve protects and amplifies initial programs of slow MHC

  12. Distribution patterns of the glucose transporters GLUT4 and GLUT1 in skeletal muscles of rats (Rattus norvegicus), pigs (Sus scrofa), cows (Bos taurus), adult goats, goat kids (Capra hircus), and camels (Camelus dromedarius).

    PubMed

    Duehlmeier, R; Sammet, K; Widdel, A; von Engelhardt, W; Wernery, U; Kinne, J; Sallmann, H-P

    2007-02-01

    Earlier studies demonstrated that forestomach herbivores are less insulin sensitive than monogastric omnivores. The present study was carried out to determine if different distribution patterns of the glucose transporters GLUT1 and GLUT4 may contribute to these different insulin sensitivities. Western blotting was used to measure GLUT1 and GLUT4 protein contents in oxidative (masseter, diaphragm) and glycolytic (longissimus lumborum, semitendinosus) skeletal muscle membranes of monogastric omnivores (rats and pigs), and of forestomach herbivores (cows, adult goats, goat kids, and camels). Muscles were characterized biochemically. Comparing red and white muscles, the isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH) activity was 1.5-15-times higher in oxidative muscles of all species, whereas lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity was 1.4-4.4-times higher in glycolytic muscles except in adult goats. GLUT4 levels were 1.5-6.3-times higher in oxidative muscles. GLUT1 levels were 2.2-8.3-times higher in glycolytic muscles in forestomach herbivores but not in monogastric animals. We conclude that GLUT1 may be the predominant glucose transporter in glycolytic muscles of ruminating animals. The GLUT1 distribution patterns were identical in adult and pre-ruminant goats, indicating that GLUT1 expression among these muscles is determined genetically. The high blood glucose levels of camels cited in literature may be due to an "NIDDM-like" impaired GLUT4 activity in skeletal muscle.

  13. Endurance training increases the efficiency of rat skeletal muscle mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Zoladz, Jerzy A; Koziel, Agnieszka; Woyda-Ploszczyca, Andrzej; Celichowski, Jan; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa

    2016-10-01

    Endurance training enhances mitochondrial oxidative capacity, but its effect on mitochondria functioning is poorly understood. In the present study, the influence of an 8-week endurance training on the bioenergetic functioning of rat skeletal muscle mitochondria under different assay temperatures (25, 35, and 42 °C) was investigated. The study was performed on 24 adult 4-month-old male Wistar rats, which were randomly assigned to either a treadmill training group (n = 12) or a sedentary control group (n = 12). In skeletal muscles, endurance training stimulated mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative capacity. In isolated mitochondria, endurance training increased the phosphorylation rate and elevated levels of coenzyme Q. Moreover, a decrease in mitochondrial uncoupling, including uncoupling protein-mediated proton leak, was observed after training, which could explain the increased reactive oxygen species production (in nonphosphorylating mitochondria) and enhanced oxidative phosphorylation efficiency. At all studied temperatures, endurance training significantly augmented H2O2 production (and coenzyme Q reduction level) in nonphosphorylating mitochondria and decreased H2O2 production (and coenzyme Q reduction level) in phosphorylating mitochondria. Endurance training magnified the hyperthermia-induced increase in oxidative capacity and attenuated the hyperthermia-induced decline in oxidative phosphorylation efficiency and reactive oxygen species formation of nonphosphorylating mitochondria via proton leak enhancement. Thus, endurance training induces both quantitative and qualitative changes in muscle mitochondria that are important for cell signaling as well as for maintaining muscle energy homeostasis, especially at high temperatures. PMID:27568192

  14. Thalidomide affects the skeletal system of ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Kaczmarczyk-Sedlak, Ilona; Folwarczna, Joanna; Trzeciak, Henryk I

    2009-01-01

    Apart from having written an inglorious chapter in the history of medicine, thalidomide is currently being intensely studied because of its multidimensional activity. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of thalidomide on the skeletal system in ovariectomized and non-ovariectomized rats. The experiments were carried out with female Wistar rats, divided into eight groups: sham-operated control rats; sham-operated rats receiving thalidomide at doses of 15, 30 or 60 mg/kg, po; ovariectomized control rats; ovariectomized rats receiving thalidomide at doses of 15, 30 or 60 mg/kg, po. The drug was administered for 4 weeks. Body mass gain and the mass of the uterus, liver, spleen and thymus were studied. Macrometric parameters and content of mineral substances, calcium and phosphorus in the femur, tibia and L-4 vertebra and histomorphometric parameters of the femur and tibia were examined. In the femur, the mechanical properties of the whole bone and of the femoral neck were examined. Thalidomide did not affect the skeletal system of the non-ovariectomized rats. Bilateral ovariectomy induced osteoporotic skeletal changes in mature female rats. The effects of thalidomide on the skeletal system of ovariectomized rats depended on the dose used. With a dose of 15 mg/kg, po, thalidomide counteracted some osteoporotic changes induced by estrogen deficiency. With a dose of 60 mg/kg, po, thalidomide intensified the destructive effects of estrogen deficiency on the rat skeletal system.

  15. Characterization of diverse forms of myosin heavy chain expressed in adult human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Saez, L; Leinwand, L A

    1986-01-01

    In an attempt to define myosin heavy chain (MHC) gene organization and expression in adult human skeletal muscle, we have isolated and characterized genomic sequences corresponding to different human sarcomeric MHC genes (1). In this report, we present the complete DNA sequence of two different adult human skeletal muscle MHC cDNA clones, one of which encodes the entire light meromyosin (LMM) segment of MHC and represents the longest described MHC cDNA sequence. Additionally, both clones provide new sequence data from a 228 amino acid segment of the MHC tail for which no protein or DNA sequence has been previously available. One clone encodes a "fast" form of skeletal muscle MHC while the other clone most closely resembles a MHC form described in rat cardiac ventricles. We show that the 3' untranslated region of skeletal MHC cDNAs are homologous from widely separated species as are cardiac MHC cDNAs. However, there is no homology between the 3' untranslated region of cardiac and skeletal muscle MHCs. Isotype-specific preservation of MHC 3' untranslated sequences during evolution suggests a functional role for these regions. Images PMID:2421254

  16. GLP-1(7-36)amide binding in skeletal muscle membranes from streptozotocin diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Villanueva-Peñacarrillo, M L; Delgado, E; Vicent, D; Mérida, E; Alcántara, A I; Valverde, I

    1995-09-01

    A higher specific binding of GLP-1(7-36)amide is found in skeletal muscle plasma membranes from adult streptozotocin (STZ)-treated rats (insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus model) and from neonatal STZ-treated rats (non insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus model), as compared to that in normal controls; no apparent change in the affinity was observed, that indicating the presence in both diabetic models of an increased number of high affinity binding sites for the peptide. The maximal specific GLP-1(7-16)amide binding in the non insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus model was found to be significantly higher than that in the insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus model. As GLP-1(7-36)amide exerts a glycogenic effect in the rat skeletal muscle, the present data suggest that the action of the peptide in the muscle glucose metabolism may be increased in states of insulin deficiency accompanied or not by insulin resistance.

  17. Skeletal effects of cyclosporin A are gender related in rats.

    PubMed

    Erben, Reinhold G; Brunner, Katrin S; Breig, Bianca; Eberle, Johannes; Goldberg, Michel; Hofbauer, Lorenz C

    2003-01-01

    The immunosuppressive drug cyclosporin A (CsA) is thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of posttransplantation osteoporosis. To evaluate further the skeletal effects of CsA, we treated aged male and female sham-operated and gonadectomized rats with low doses of CsA for 4 months. Here, we show that CsA is antiresorptive and bone-sparing in aged female rats but increases bone resorption and reduces bone mass in aged male rats. However, even in male rats, CsA treatment, at clinically relevant doses, increased bone resorption only transiently and did not result in pronounced long-term cancellous bone loss. The gender-specific skeletal effects of CsA were not modulated by sex hormones or gonadectomy. CsA did not influence sex steroid metabolism in male or female rats. However, endogenous estradiol in sham-operated female rats (and especially, exogenous administration of 17beta-estradiol in ovariectomized rats) markedly diminished blood levels of CsA, probably by increasing hepatic CsA metabolism. Although the mechanism for the gender-specific skeletal effects of CsA is still obscure, our findings may have important implications for clinical therapy with CsA.

  18. Aging and regenerative capacity of skeletal muscle in rats.

    PubMed

    Kaasik, Priit; Aru, Maire; Alev, Karin; Seene, Teet

    2012-07-01

    The objective of the study was to examine skeletal muscle regeneration capacity of young and very old rats during autotransplantation. In 3.5 and 30 month-old Wistar rats, gastrocnemius muscle was removed and grafted back to its original bed. Incorporation of 3H leucine into myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic protein fractions, their relative contents in autografts and synthesis rate of MyHC and actin were recorded. The relative muscle mass of old rats was about 67% of that of young rats; the absolute mass of autografted muscle was 61% intact in the young rat group and 51% in the old rat group. Content of myofibrillar protein in the autografts of young rats was 46% of the intact muscle content, and 39% in the old rat group. In conclusion, the difference in skeletal muscle regeneration capacity of young and very old rats is about ten percent. In the autografts of both young and old rats, the regeneration of the contractile apparatus is less effective in comparison with the sarcoplasmic compartment.

  19. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidant preserves contractile properties and mitochondrial function of skeletal muscle in aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Javadov, Sabzali; Jang, Sehwan; Rodriguez-Reyes, Natividad; Rodriguez-Zayas, Ana E.; Hernandez, Jessica Soto; Krainz, Tanja; Wipf, Peter; Frontera, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction plays a central role in the pathogenesis of sarcopenia associated with a loss of mass and activity of skeletal muscle. In addition to energy deprivation, increased mitochondrial ROS damage proteins and lipids in aged skeletal muscle. Therefore, prevention of mitochondrial ROS is important for potential therapeutic strategies to delay sarcopenia. This study elucidates the pharmacological efficiency of the new developed mitochondria-targeted ROS and electron scavenger, XJB-5-131 (XJB) to restore muscle contractility and mitochondrial function in aged skeletal muscle. Male adult (5-month old) and aged (29-month old) Fischer Brown Norway (F344/BN) rats were treated with XJB for four weeks and contractile properties of single skeletal muscle fibres and activity of mitochondrial ETC complexes were determined at the end of the treatment period. XJB-treated old rats showed higher muscle contractility associated with prevention of protein oxidation in both muscle homogenate and mitochondria compared with untreated counterparts. XJB-treated animals demonstrated a high activity of the respiratory complexes I, III, and IV with no changes in citrate synthase activity. These data demonstrate that mitochondrial ROS play a causal role in muscle weakness, and that a ROS scavenger specifically targeted to mitochondria can reverse age-related alterations of mitochondrial function and improve contractile properties in skeletal muscle. PMID:26415224

  20. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidant preserves contractile properties and mitochondrial function of skeletal muscle in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Javadov, Sabzali; Jang, Sehwan; Rodriguez-Reyes, Natividad; Rodriguez-Zayas, Ana E; Soto Hernandez, Jessica; Krainz, Tanja; Wipf, Peter; Frontera, Walter

    2015-11-24

    Mitochondrial dysfunction plays a central role in the pathogenesis of sarcopenia associated with a loss of mass and activity of skeletal muscle. In addition to energy deprivation, increased mitochondrial ROS damage proteins and lipids in aged skeletal muscle. Therefore, prevention of mitochondrial ROS is important for potential therapeutic strategies to delay sarcopenia. This study elucidates the pharmacological efficiency of the new developed mitochondria-targeted ROS and electron scavenger, XJB-5-131 (XJB) to restore muscle contractility and mitochondrial function in aged skeletal muscle. Male adult (5-month old) and aged (29-month old) Fischer Brown Norway (F344/BN) rats were treated with XJB for four weeks and contractile properties of single skeletal muscle fibres and activity of mitochondrial ETC complexes were determined at the end of the treatment period. XJB-treated old rats showed higher muscle contractility associated with prevention of protein oxidation in both muscle homogenate and mitochondria compared with untreated counterparts. XJB-treated animals demonstrated a high activity of the respiratory complexes I, III, and IV with no changes in citrate synthase activity. These data demonstrate that mitochondrial ROS play a causal role in muscle weakness, and that a ROS scavenger specifically targeted to mitochondria can reverse age-related alterations of mitochondrial function and improve contractile properties in skeletal muscle.

  1. Establishment of bipotent progenitor cell clone from rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Yousuke; Yada, Erica; Nakano, Shin-ichi; Miyagoe-Suzuki, Yuko; Hosoyama, Tohru; Matsuwaki, Takashi; Yamanouchi, Keitaro; Nishihara, Masugi

    2011-12-01

    The present study describes the isolation, cloning and characterization of adipogenic progenitor cells from rat skeletal muscle. Among the obtained 10 clones, the most highly adipogenic progenitor, 2G11 cells, were further characterized. In addition to their adipogenicity, 2G11 cells retain myogenic potential as revealed by formation of multinucleated myotubes when co-cultured with myoblasts. 2G11 cells were resistant to an inhibitory effect of basic fibroblast growth factor on adipogenesis, while adipogenesis of widely used preadipogenic cell line, 3T3-L1 cells, was suppressed almost completely by the same treatment. In vivo transplantation experiments revealed that 2G11 cells are able to possess both adipogenicity and myogenicity in vivo. These results indicate the presence of bipotent progenitor cells in rat skeletal muscle, and suggest that such cells may contribute to ectopic fat formation in skeletal muscle.

  2. Age dependence of myosin heavy chain transitions induced by creatine depletion in rat skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Gregory R.; Baldwin, Kenneth M.

    1995-01-01

    This study was designed to test the hypothesis that myosin heavy chain (MHC) plasticity resulting from creatine depletion is an age-dependent process. At weaning (age 28 days), rat pups were placed on either standard rat chow (normal diet juvenile group) or the same chow supplemented with 1% wt/wt of the creatine analogue beta-guanidinopropionic acid (creatine depletion juvenile (CDJ) group). Two groups of adult rats (age approximately 8 wk) were placed on the same diet regimens (normal diet adult and creatine depletion adult (CDA) groups). After 40 days (CDJ and normal diet juvenile groups) and 60 days (CDA and normal diet adult groups), animals were killed and several skeletal muscles were removed for analysis of creatine content or MHC ditribution. In the CDJ group, creatine depletion (78%) was accompanied by significant shifts toward expression of slower MHC isoforms in two slow and three fast skeletal muscles. In contrast, creatine depletion in adult animals did not result in similar shifts toward slow MHC isoform expression in either muscle type. The results of this study indicate that there is a differential effect of creatine depletion on MHC tranitions that appears to be age dependent. These results strongly suggest that investigators contemplating experimental designs involving the use of the creatine analogue beta-guanidinopropionic acid should consider the age of the animals to be used.

  3. Satellite cell proliferation in adult skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, Frank W. (Inventor); Thomason, Donald B. (Inventor); Morrison, Paul R. (Inventor); Stancel, George M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Novel methods of retroviral-mediated gene transfer for the in vivo corporation and stable expression of eukaryotic or prokaryotic foreign genes in tissues of living animals is described. More specifically, methods of incorporating foreign genes into mitotically active cells are disclosed. The constitutive and stable expression of E. coli .beta.-galactosidase gene under the promoter control of the Moloney murine leukemia virus long terminal repeat is employed as a particularly preferred embodiment, by way of example, establishes the model upon which the incorporation of a foreign gene into a mitotically-active living eukaryotic tissue is based. Use of the described methods in therapeutic treatments for genetic diseases, such as those muscular degenerative diseases, is also presented. In muscle tissue, the described processes result in genetically-altered satellite cells which proliferate daughter myoblasts which preferentially fuse to form a single undamaged muscle fiber replacing damaged muscle tissue in a treated animal. The retroviral vector, by way of example, includes a dystrophin gene construct for use in treating muscular dystrophy. The present invention also comprises an experimental model utilizable in the study of the physiological regulation of skeletal muscle gene expression in intact animals.

  4. Dissemination of Walker 256 carcinoma cells to rat skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Ueoka, H.; Hayashi, K.; Namba, T.; Grob, D.

    1986-03-05

    After injection of 10/sup 6/ Walker 256 carcinoma cells labelled with /sup 125/I-5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine into the tail vein, peak concentration in skeletal muscle was 46 cells/g at 60 minutes, which was lower than 169202, 1665, 555, 198 and 133 cells/g, respectively, at 30 or 60 minutes in lung, liver, spleen, kidney and heart. Because skeletal muscle constitutes 37.4% of body weight, the total number of tumor cells was 2323 cells, which was much greater than in spleen, kidney and heart with 238, 271, and 85 cells, respectively, and only less than in lung and liver, at 222857 and 11700 cells, respectively. The total number in skeletal muscle became greater than in liver at 4 hours and than in lung at 24 hours. Ten minutes after injection of 7.5 x 10/sup 6/ Walker 256 carcinoma cells into the abdominal aorta of rats, a mean of 31 colony-forming cells were recovered from the gastrocnemius, while 106 cells were recovered from the lung after injection into the tail vein. These results indicate that a large number of viable tumor cells can be arrested in skeletal muscle through circulation. The rare remote metastasis of malignancies into skeletal muscle despite constantly circulating tumor cells does not appear to be due to poor dissemination of tumor cells into muscle but due to unhospitable environment of skeletal muscle.

  5. Skeletal abnormalities in rats induced by simulated weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wronski, T. J.; Morey, E. R.

    1982-01-01

    A hypokinetic model has been developed which attempts to simulate the weightlessness experienced during space flight. Male rats were suspended from the model with a head-down tilt for a two-week period. Total mechanical unloading of the hind limbs and partial unloading of the fore limbs occurred. In comparison to pair-fed control rats, the skeletal alterations in the proximal tibial and humeral metaphyses of suspended rats were determined to be a diminished rate of longitudinal bone growth, a reduced mass of mineralized tissue, and an accumulation of marrow fat. Also, suspended rats exhibited decreased numbers of osteoblasts and increased numbers of osteoclasts immediately adjacent to the growth plate-metaphyseal junction at both skeletal sites. Although the reduction in mineralized tissue and the fat accumulation were more marked in the tibia, the skeletal changes in the proximal tibial and humeral metaphyses were generally comparable. The observed abnormalities may be due to mechanical unloading and/or a hypersecretion of corticosteroids.

  6. Skeletal muscle metabolism in hypokinetic rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Muscle growth, protein metabolism, and amino acid metabolism were studied in various groups of rats. Certain groups were adrenaliectomized; some rats were suspended while others (the controls) were weight bearing. Results show that: (1) metabolic changes in the extensor digitorum longus muscle of suspended rats are due primarily to increased circulating glucocorticoids; (2) metabolic changes in the soleus muscle due to higher steroid levels are probably potentiated by greater numbers of steroid receptors; and (3) not all metabolic responses of the soleus muscle to unloading are due to the elevated levels of glucocorticoids or the increased sensitivity of this muscle to these hormones.

  7. Effects of curcumin on the skeletal system in rats.

    PubMed

    Folwarczna, Joanna; Zych, Maria; Trzeciak, Henryk I

    2010-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the discovery of natural compounds that could favorably affect the skeletal system. Curcumin is a constituent of turmeric, a plant which has been used for centuries as a dietary spice and a traditional Indian medicine. Curcumin has been reported to affect differentiation, activity and the lifespan of osteoblasts and osteoclasts in vitro. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of curcumin on the skeletal system of rats in vivo. Curcumin (10 mg/kg, po daily) was administered for four weeks to normal (non-ovariectomized) and bilaterally ovariectomized (estrogen-deficient) three-month-old female Wistar Cmd:(WI)WU rats. Ovariectomy was performed seven days before the start of curcumin administration. Bone mass, mineral and calcium content, macrometric and histomorphometric parameters, as well as the mechanical properties of the bone, were examined. Serum total cholesterol and estradiol levels were also determined. In rats with normal estrogen levels, curcumin decreased serum estradiol level and slightly increased cancellous bone formation, along with decreased mineralization. Estrogen deficiency induced osteoporotic changes in the skeletal system of the ovariectomized control rats. In ovariectomized rats, curcumin decreased body mass gain and serum total cholesterol level, slightly improved some bone histomorphometric parameters impaired by estrogen deficiency, but did not improve bone mineralization or mechanical properties. In conclusion, the results of the present in vivo study in rats did not support the hypothesis that curcumin, at doses that are readily achievable through dietary intake, could be useful for the prevention or treatment of osteoporosis.

  8. Ultrastructural alterations in skeletal muscle fibers of rats after exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akuzawa, M.; Hataya, M.

    1982-01-01

    Ultrastructural alterations in skeletal muscle fibers were electron microscopically studied in rats forced to run on the treadmill until all-out. When they were mild and limited to relatively small areas, the reconstruction of filaments ensued within 10 days without infiltration of cells. When they were severe and extensive, phagocytes infiltrated in the lesions and removed degenerative sacroplasmic debris from muscle fibers. A little later, myoblasts appeared and regeneration was accomplished in 30 days in much the same manner as in myogenesis.

  9. cap alpha. -skeletal and. cap alpha. -cardiac actin genes are coexpressed in adult human skeletal muscle and heart

    SciTech Connect

    Gunning, P.; Ponte, P.; Blau, H.; Kedes, L.

    1983-11-01

    The authors determined the actin isotypes encoded by 30 actin cDNA clones previously isolated from an adult human muscle cDNA library. Using 3' untranslated region probes, derived from ..cap alpha.. skeletal, ..beta..- and ..gamma..-actin cDNAs and from an ..cap alpha..-cardiac actin genomic clone, they showed that 28 of the cDNAs correspond to ..cap alpha..-skeletal actin transcripts. Unexpectedly, however, the remaining two cDNA clones proved to derive from ..cap alpha..-cardiac actin mRNA. Sequence analysis confirmed that the two skeletal muscle ..cap alpha..-cardiac actin cDNAs are derived from transcripts of the cloned ..cap alpha..-cardiac actin gene. Comparison of total actin mRNA levels in adult skeletal muscle and adult heart revealed that the steady-state levels in skeletal muscle are about twofold greater, per microgram of total cellular RNA, than those in heart. Thus, in skeletal muscle and in heart, both of the sarcomeric actin mRNA isotypes are quite abundant transcripts. They conclude that ..cap alpha..-skeletal and ..cap alpha..-cardiac actin genes are coexpressed as an actin pair in human adult striated muscles. Since the smooth-muscle actins (aortic and stomach) and the cytoplasmic actins (..beta.. and ..gamma..) are known to be coexpressed in smooth muscle and nonmuscle cells, respectively, they postulate that coexpression of actin pairs may be a common feature of mammalian actin gene expression in all tissues.

  10. Dietary nitrate supplementation: impact on skeletal muscle vascular control in exercising rats with chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Scott K; Holdsworth, Clark T; Colburn, Trenton D; Wright, Jennifer L; Craig, Jesse C; Fees, Alex; Jones, Andrew M; Allen, Jason D; Musch, Timothy I; Poole, David C

    2016-09-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) results in central and peripheral derangements that ultimately reduce skeletal muscle O2 delivery and impair exercise tolerance. Dietary nitrate (NO3 (-)) supplementation improves skeletal muscle vascular function and tolerance to exercise. We tested the hypothesis that NO3 (-) supplementation would elevate exercising skeletal muscle blood flow (BF) and vascular conductance (VC) in CHF rats. Myocardial infarction (MI) was induced (coronary artery ligation) in young adult male rats. After 21 days of recovery, rats randomly received 5 days of NO3 (-)-rich beetroot juice (CHF + BR, n = 10) or a placebo (CHF, n = 10). Mean arterial pressure (carotid artery catheter) and skeletal muscle BF (radiolabeled microspheres) were measured during treadmill exercise (20 m/min, 5% grade). CHF-induced dysfunction, as determined by myocardial infarction size (29 ± 3% and 33 ± 4% in CHF and CHF + BR, respectively) and left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (18 ± 2 and 18 ± 2 mmHg in CHF and CHF + BR, respectively), and exercising mean arterial pressure (131 ± 3 and 128 ± 4 mmHg in CHF and CHF + BR, respectively) were not different (P > 0.05) between groups. Total exercising hindlimb skeletal muscle BF (95 ± 5 and 116 ± 9 ml·min(-1)·100 g(-1) in CHF and CHF + BR, respectively) and VC (0.75 ± 0.05 and 0.90 ± 0.05 ml·min(-1)·100 g(-1)·mmHg(-1) in CHF and CHF + BR, respectively) were 22% and 20% greater in BR-supplemented rats, respectively (P < 0.05). During exercise, BF in 9 and VC in 10 hindlimb muscles and muscle portions were significantly greater in the CHF + BR group. These results provide strong evidence that dietary NO3 (-) supplementation improves skeletal muscle vascular function during exercise in rats with CHF and, thus, support the use of BR as a novel therapeutic modality for the treatment of CHF.

  11. Influence of spaceflight on rat skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Thomas P.; Edgerton, V. Reggie; Grindeland, Richard E.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of a 7-day spaceflight (aboard NASA's SL-3) on the size and the metabolism of single fibers from several rat muscles was investigated along with the specificity of these responses as related to the muscle type and the size of fibers. It was found that the loss of mass after flight was varied from 36 percent in the soleus to 15 percent in the extensor digitorum longus. Results of histochemical analyses showed that the succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity in muscles of flight-exposed rats was maintained at the control levels, whereas the alpha-glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD) activity was either maintained or increased. The analyses of the metabolic profiles of ATPase, SDH, and GPD indicated that, in some muscles, there was an increase in the poportion of fast oxidative-glycolytic fibers.

  12. Atrophy of rat skeletal muscles in simulated weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feller, D. D.; Ginoza, H. S.; Morey, E. R.

    1982-01-01

    A hypokinetic rat model was used for elucidation of the mechanism of skeletal muscle wasting which occurs in weightlessness. Rats were suspended from a back-harness with the head tilted downward and the hind limbs totally unloaded. A progressive decrease in the size of the soleus muscle from suspended rats was observed as a function of time. The rate of protein degradation of the homogenates from the soleus muscles of suspended and control animals was not significantly different. The rate of cell-free protein synthesis was severely repressed in the atrophied muscle. An initial rise in the levels of plasma glucose and corticosterone was observed on the second day of suspension, but they subsequently returned to normal values.

  13. Leucine supplementation improves regeneration of skeletal muscles from old rats.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Marcelo G; Silva, Meiricris T; da Cunha, Fernanda M; Moriscot, Anselmo S; Aoki, Marcelo S; Miyabara, Elen H

    2015-12-01

    The decreased regenerative capacity of old skeletal muscles involves disrupted turnover of proteins. This study investigated whether leucine supplementation in old rats could improve muscle regenerative capacity. Young and old male Wistar rats were supplemented with leucine; then, the muscles were cryolesioned and examined after 3 and 10 days. Leucine supplementation attenuated the decrease in the expression of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) in young and old muscles on day 3 post-injury and promoted an increase in the cross-sectional area of regenerating myofibers from both young and old soleus muscles on day 10 post-injury. This supplementation decreased the levels of ubiquitinated proteins and increased the proteasome activity in young regenerating muscles, but the opposite effect was observed in old regenerating muscles. Moreover, leucine decreased the inflammation area and induced an increase in the number of proliferating satellite cells in both young and old muscles. Our results suggest that leucine supplementation improves the regeneration of skeletal muscles from old rats, through the preservation of certain biological responses upon leucine supplementation. Such responses comprise the decrease in the inflammation area, increase in the number of proliferating satellite cells and size of regenerating myofibers, combined with the modulation of components of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt-protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/Akt/mTOR) pathway and ubiquitin-proteasome system.

  14. Skeletal muscle metabolism in hypokinetic rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, Marc E.

    1993-01-01

    This grant focused on the mechanisms of metabolic changes associated with unweighting atrophy and reduced growth of hind limb muscles of juvenile rats. Metabolic studies included a number of different areas. Amino acid metabolic studies placed particular emphasis on glutamine and branched-chain amino acid metabolism. These studies were an outgrowth of understanding stress effects and the role of glucocorticoids in these animals. Investigations on protein metabolism were largely concerned with selective loss of myofibrillar proteins and the role of muscle proteolysis. These investigations lead to finding important differences from denervation and atrophy and to define the roles of cytosolic versus lysosomal proteolysis in these atrophy models. A major outgrowth of these studies was demonstrating an ability to prevent atrophy of the unweighted muscle for at least 24 hours. A large amount of work concentrated on carbohydrate metabolism and its regulation by insulin and catecholamines. Measurements focused on glucose transport, glycogen metabolism, and glucose oxidation. The grant was used to develop an important new in situ approach for studying protein metabolism, glucose transport, and hormonal effects which involves intramuscular injection of various agents for up to 24 hours. Another important consequence of this project was the development and flight of Physiological-Anatomical Rodent Experiment-1 (PARE-1), which was launched aboard Space Shuttle Discovery in September 1991. Detailed descriptions of these studies can be found in the 30 peer-reviewed publications, 15 non-reviewed publications, 4 reviews and 33 abstracts (total 82 publications) which were or are scheduled to be published as a result of this project. A listing of these publications grouped by area (i.e. amino acid metabolism, protein metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism, and space flight studies) are included.

  15. Immunomodulatory effects of massage on nonperturbed skeletal muscle in rats

    PubMed Central

    Waters-Banker, Christine; Dupont-Versteegden, Esther E.

    2013-01-01

    Massage is an ancient manual therapy widely utilized by individuals seeking relief from various musculoskeletal maladies. Despite its popularity, the majority of evidence associated with massage benefits is anecdotal. Recent investigations have uncovered physiological evidence supporting its beneficial use following muscle injury; however, the effects of massage on healthy, unperturbed skeletal muscle are unknown. Utilizing a custom-fabricated massage mimetic device, the purpose of this investigation was to elucidate the effects of various loading magnitudes on healthy skeletal muscle with particular interest in the gene expression profile and modulation of key immune cells involved in the inflammatory response. Twenty-four male Wistar rats (200 g) were subjected to cyclic compressive loading (CCL) over the right tibialis anterior muscle for 30 min, once a day, for 4 consecutive days using four loading conditions: control (0N), low load (1.4N), moderate load (4.5N), and high load (11N). Microarray analysis showed that genes involved with the immune response were the most significantly affected by application of CCL. Load-dependent changes in cellular abundance were seen in the CCL limb for CD68+ cells, CD163+ cells, and CD43+cells. Surprisingly, load-independent changes were also discovered in the non-CCL contralateral limb, suggesting a systemic response. These results show that massage in the form of CCL exerts an immunomodulatory response to uninjured skeletal muscle, which is dependent upon the applied load. PMID:24201707

  16. The change in thyroid hormone signaling by altered training intensity in male rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Lesmana, Ronny; Iwasaki, Toshiharu; Iizuka, Yuki; Amano, Izuki; Shimokawa, Noriaki; Koibuchi, Noriyuki

    2016-08-31

    Aerobic (sub lactate threshold; sub-LT) exercise training facilitates oxidative phosphorylation and glycolysis of skeletal muscle. Thyroid hormone (TH) also facilitates such metabolic events. Thus, we studied whether TH signaling pathway is activated by treadmill training. Male adult rats received 30 min/day treadmill training with different exercise intensity for 12 days. Then plasma lactate and thyrotropin (TSH) levels were measured. By lactate levels, rats were divided into stationary control (SC, 0 m/min), sub-LT (15 m/min) and supra lactate threshold (supra-LT; 25 m/min) training groups. Immediately after the last training, the soleus muscles were dissected out to measure TH receptor (TR) mRNA and protein expressions. Other rats received intraperitoneal injection of T3, 24 h after the last training and sacrificed 6 h after the injection to measure TH target gene expression. TSH level was suppressed in both sub-LT and supra-LT groups during the exercise. TRβ1 mRNA and protein levels were increased in sub-LT group. Sensitivity to T3 was altered in several TH-target genes by training. Particularly, induction of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase β1 expression by T3 was significantly augmented in sub-LT group. These results indicate that sub-LT training alters TH signaling at least in part by increasing TRβ1 expression. Such TH signaling alteration may contribute metabolic adaptation in skeletal muscle during physical training.

  17. Glucagon-like peptide-1 binding to rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Delgado, E; Luque, M A; Alcántara, A; Trapote, M A; Clemente, F; Galera, C; Valverde, I; Villanueva-Peñacarrillo, M L

    1995-01-01

    We have found [125I]glucagon-like peptide-1(7-36)-amide-specific binding activity in rat skeletal muscle plasma membranes, with an estimated M(r) of 63,000 by cross-linking and SDS-PAGE. The specific binding was time and membrane protein concentration dependent, and displaceable by unlabeled GLP-1(7-36)-amide with an ID50 of 3 x 10(-9) M of the peptide; GLP-1(1-36)-amide also competed, whereas glucagon and insulin did not. GLP-1(7-36)-amide did not modify the basal adenylate cyclase activity in skeletal muscle plasma membranes. These data, together with our previous finding of a potent glycogenic effect of GLP-1(7-36)-amide in rat soleus muscle, and also in isolated hepatocytes, which was not accompanied by a rise in the cell cyclic AMP content, lead use to believe that the insulin-like effects of this peptide on glucose metabolism in the muscle could be mediated by a type of receptor somehow different to that described for GLP-1 in pancreatic B cells, where GLP-1 action is mediated by the cyclic AMP-adenylate cyclase system.

  18. Age-associated disruption of molecular clock expression in skeletal muscle of the spontaneously hypertensive rat.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Mitsunori; Schroder, Elizabeth; Edelmann, Stephanie E; Hughes, Michael E; Kornacker, Karl; Balke, C William; Esser, Karyn A

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) develop muscle pathologies with hypertension and heart failure, though the mechanism remains poorly understood. Woon et al. (2007) linked the circadian clock gene Bmal1 to hypertension and metabolic dysfunction in the SHR. Building on these findings, we compared the expression pattern of several core-clock genes in the gastrocnemius muscle of aged SHR (80 weeks; overt heart failure) compared to aged-matched control WKY strain. Heart failure was associated with marked effects on the expression of Bmal1, Clock and Rora in addition to several non-circadian genes important in regulating skeletal muscle phenotype including Mck, Ttn and Mef2c. We next performed circadian time-course collections at a young age (8 weeks; pre-hypertensive) and adult age (22 weeks; hypertensive) to determine if clock gene expression was disrupted in gastrocnemius, heart and liver tissues prior to or after the rats became hypertensive. We found that hypertensive/hypertrophic SHR showed a dampening of peak Bmal1 and Rev-erb expression in the liver, and the clock-controlled gene Pgc1α in the gastrocnemius. In addition, the core-clock gene Clock and the muscle-specific, clock-controlled gene Myod1, no longer maintained a circadian pattern of expression in gastrocnemius from the hypertensive SHR. These findings provide a framework to suggest a mechanism whereby chronic heart failure leads to skeletal muscle pathologies; prolonged dysregulation of the molecular clock in skeletal muscle results in altered Clock, Pgc1α and Myod1 expression which in turn leads to the mis-regulation of target genes important for mechanical and metabolic function of skeletal muscle.

  19. Metabolomic profiling reveals severe skeletal muscle group-specific perturbations of metabolism in aged FBN rats.

    PubMed

    Garvey, Sean M; Dugle, Janis E; Kennedy, Adam D; McDunn, Jonathan E; Kline, William; Guo, Lining; Guttridge, Denis C; Pereira, Suzette L; Edens, Neile K

    2014-06-01

    Mammalian skeletal muscles exhibit age-related adaptive and pathological remodeling. Several muscles in particular undergo progressive atrophy and degeneration beyond median lifespan. To better understand myocellular responses to aging, we used semi-quantitative global metabolomic profiling to characterize trends in metabolic changes between 15-month-old adult and 32-month-old aged Fischer 344 × Brown Norway (FBN) male rats. The FBN rat gastrocnemius muscle exhibits age-dependent atrophy, whereas the soleus muscle, up until 32 months, exhibits markedly fewer signs of atrophy. Both gastrocnemius and soleus muscles were analyzed, as well as plasma and urine. Compared to adult gastrocnemius, aged gastrocnemius showed evidence of reduced glycolytic metabolism, including accumulation of glycolytic, glycogenolytic, and pentose phosphate pathway intermediates. Pyruvate was elevated with age, yet levels of citrate and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide were reduced, consistent with mitochondrial abnormalities. Indicative of muscle atrophy, 3-methylhistidine and free amino acids were elevated in aged gastrocnemius. The monounsaturated fatty acids oleate, cis-vaccenate, and palmitoleate also increased in aged gastrocnemius, suggesting altered lipid metabolism. Compared to gastrocnemius, aged soleus exhibited far fewer changes in carbohydrate metabolism, but did show reductions in several glycolytic intermediates, fumarate, malate, and flavin adenine dinucleotide. Plasma biochemicals showing the largest age-related increases included glycocholate, heme, 1,5-anhydroglucitol, 1-palmitoleoyl-glycerophosphocholine, palmitoleate, and creatine. These changes suggest reduced insulin sensitivity in aged FBN rats. Altogether, these data highlight skeletal muscle group-specific perturbations of glucose and lipid metabolism consistent with mitochondrial dysfunction in aged FBN rats. PMID:24652515

  20. Effects of ethanol on rat heart and skeletal muscles

    SciTech Connect

    Pagala, M.; Ravindran, K.; Namba, T.; Grob, D. State Univ. of New York, Brooklyn )

    1991-03-11

    Chronic alcoholism causes myopathy of both cardiac and skeletal muscles. In order to evaluate acute effects, the authors infused ethanol intravenously in anesthetized rats, and, 10 min later, monitored the electrocardiogram, and the compound action potential and isometric tension of the anterior tibialis evoked by sciatic nerve stimulation. Ethanol at 0.1, 0.2 and 0.5 g/kg decreased the heart rate by 12%, 22% and 69%, increased the P-R interval by 5%, 25%, and 116%, and reduced the QRS amplitude by 1% , 2% and 10%, respectively. Within 5 min after infusing 0.5 g/kg ethanol, breathing was stopped. Ethanol increased the amplitude of the compound action potential and tension of the anterior tibialis by 25% at 0.1 and 0.2 g/kg, while it decreased the compound action potential by 5% and tension by 35% at 0.5 g/kg. At this dose, ethanol caused 70% decrement in amplitude of the compound action potentials and 50% fade of tetanic tensions evoked by a train of nerve stimulations at 100 Hz for 0.5 sec. When ethanol was injected intraperitoneally, about 10 times greater doses were required to produce effects equivalent to intravenous administration. These results indicate that ethanol reduces cardiac output dose-dependently, and potentiates skeletal muscle function at subintoxication doses and reduces it at higher doses.

  1. Calcium regulation of oxidative phosphorylation in rat skeletal muscle mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Kavanagh, N I; Ainscow, E K; Brand, M D

    2000-02-24

    Activation of oxidative phosphorylation by physiological levels of calcium in mitochondria from rat skeletal muscle was analysed using top-down elasticity and regulation analysis. Oxidative phosphorylation was conceptually divided into three subsystems (substrate oxidation, proton leak and phosphorylation) connected by the membrane potential or the protonmotive force. Calcium directly activated the phosphorylation subsystem and (with sub-saturating 2-oxoglutarate) the substrate oxidation subsystem but had no effect on the proton leak kinetics. The response of mitochondria respiring on 2-oxoglutarate at two physiological concentrations of free calcium was quantified using control and regulation analysis. The partial integrated response coefficients showed that direct stimulation of substrate oxidation contributed 86% of the effect of calcium on state 3 oxygen consumption, and direct activation of the phosphorylation reactions caused 37% of the increase in phosphorylation flux. Calcium directly activated phosphorylation more strongly than substrate oxidation (78% compared to 45%) to achieve homeostasis of mitochondrial membrane potential during large increases in flux.

  2. Motor activity affects adult skeletal muscle re-innervation acting via tyrosine kinase receptors.

    PubMed

    Sartini, Stefano; Bartolini, Fanny; Ambrogini, Patrizia; Betti, Michele; Ciuffoli, Stefano; Lattanzi, Davide; Di Palma, Michael; Cuppini, Riccardo

    2013-05-01

    Recently, muscle expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA and protein under activity control has been reported. BDNF is a neurotrophin known to be involved in axon sprouting in the CNS. Hence, we set out to study the effect of chronic treadmill mid-intensity running on adult rat muscle re-innervation, and to explore the involvement of BDNF and tropomyosin-related kinase (Trk) receptors. After nerve crush, muscle re-innervation was evaluated using intracellular recordings, tension recordings, immunostaining and Western blot analyses. An enhanced muscle multiple innervation was found in running rats that was fully reversed to control values blocking Trk receptors or interrupting the running activity. An increase in muscle multiple innervation was also found in sedentary rats treated with a selective TrkB receptor agonist. The expression of TrkB receptors by intramuscular axons was demonstrated, and increased muscle expression of BDNF was found in running animals. The increase in muscle multiple innervation was consistent with the faster muscle re-innervation that we found in running animals. We conclude that, when regenerating axons contact muscle cells, muscle activity progressively increases modulating BDNF and possibly other growth factors, which in turn, acting via Trk receptors, induce axon sprouting to re-innervate skeletal muscle.

  3. Uranium skeletal dosimetry and distribution in young adult beagles: A guide for calculating uranium skeletal doses in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, R.D.; Taylor, G.N.; Miller, S.C.

    1996-03-01

    Uranium isotopes were given via single intravenous injection into 22 young adult beagle dogs of both sexes to determine the metabolism of this element. Animals were given either {sup 232}U, {sup 233}U, {sup 238}U, or a combination of {sup 232+233}U. Calculations to assign a value of skeletal dose for each dog were performed using published radioactive properties of each uranium isotope and the metabolic data (including measured retention and skeletal distribution) derived from this study during a period of up to 2 y after injection. We believe that the procedures illustrated in this communication can serve as a useful pattern for estimating skeletal radiation doses to humans contaminated with {sup 232}U, {sup 233}U, or {sup 238}U. 13 refs., 2 tabs.

  4. Dexamethasone regulates glutamine synthetase expression in rat skeletal muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Max, Stephen R.; Konagaya, Masaaki; Konagaya, Yoko; Thomas, John W.; Banner, Carl; Vitkovic, Ljubisa

    1986-01-01

    The regulation of glutamine synthetase by glucocorticoids in rat skeletal muscles was studied. Administration of dexamethasone strikingly enhanced glutamine synthetase activity in plantaris and soleus muscles. The dexamethasone-mediated induction of glutamine synthetase activity was blocked to a significant extent by orally administered RU38486, a glucocorticoid antagonist, indicating the involvement of intracellular glucocorticoid receptors in the induction. Northern blot analysis revealed that dexamethasone-mediated enhancement of glutamine synthetase activity involves dramatically increased levels of glutamine synthetase mRNA. The induction of glutamine synthetase was selective in that glutaminase activity of soleus and plantaris muscles was not increased by dexamethasone. Furthermore, dexamethasone treatment resulted in only a small increase in glutamine synthetase activity in the heart. Accordingly, there was only a slight change in glutamine synthetase mRNA level in this tissue. Thus, glucocorticoids regulate glutamine synthetase gene expression in rat muscles at the transcriptional level via interaction with intracellular glutamine production by muscle and to mechanisms underlying glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy.

  5. Preservation of rat skeletal muscle energy metabolism by illumination.

    PubMed

    Lindgård, Ann; Lundberg, Jonas; Rakotonirainy, Olivier; Elander, Anna; Soussi, Bassam

    2003-04-25

    Skeletal muscle viability is crucially dependent on the tissue levels of its high energy phosphates. In this study we investigated the effect of the preservation medium Perfadex and illumination with Singlet Oxygen Energy (SOE). Singlet oxygen can be produced photochemically by energy transfer from an excited photosensitizer. The energy emitted from singlet oxygen upon relaxation to its triplet state is captured as photons at 634 nm and is here referred to as SOE. Rat hind limb rectus femoris muscles were preserved for five hours at 22 degrees C in Perfadex, saline, SOE illuminated Perfadex or SOE illuminated saline. Extracts of the muscles were analysed by 31P NMR. Data were analysed using two-way analysis of variance and are given as mean values micromol/g dry weight) +/- SEM. The ATP concentration was higher (p = 0.006) in saline groups (4.52) compared with Perfadex groups (2.82). There was no statistically significant difference in PCr between the saline groups (1.25) and Perfadex groups (0.82). However, there were higher (p = 0.003) ATP in the SOE illuminated groups (4.61) compared with the non-illuminated groups (2.73). The PCr was also higher (p < 0.0001) in the SOE illuminated groups (1.89) compared with the non-illuminated groups (0.18). In conclusion, Perfadex in this experimental model was incapable of preserving the high energy phosphates in skeletal muscle during 5 hours of ischemia. Illumination with SOE at 634 nm improved the preservation potential, in terms of a positive effect on the energy status of the muscle cell.

  6. Leucine supplementation improves skeletal muscle regeneration after cryolesion in rats.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Marcelo G; Baptista, Igor L; Carlassara, Eduardo O C; Moriscot, Anselmo S; Aoki, Marcelo S; Miyabara, Elen H

    2014-01-01

    This study was undertaken in order to provide further insight into the role of leucine supplementation in the skeletal muscle regeneration process, focusing on myofiber size and strength recovery. Young (2-month-old) rats were subjected or not to leucine supplementation (1.35 g/kg per day) started 3 days prior to cryolesion. Then, soleus muscles were cryolesioned and continued receiving leucine supplementation until 1, 3 and 10 days later. Soleus muscles from leucine-supplemented animals displayed an increase in myofiber size and a reduction in collagen type III expression on post-cryolesion day 10. Leucine was also effective in reducing FOXO3a activation and ubiquitinated protein accumulation in muscles at post-cryolesion days 3 and 10. In addition, leucine supplementation minimized the cryolesion-induced decrease in tetanic strength and increase in fatigue in regenerating muscles at post-cryolesion day 10. These beneficial effects of leucine were not accompanied by activation of any elements of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt/mechanistic target of rapamycin signalling pathway in the regenerating muscles. Our results show that leucine improves myofiber size gain and strength recovery in regenerating soleus muscles through attenuation of protein ubiquitination. In addition, leucine might have therapeutic effects for muscle recovery following injury and in some muscle diseases.

  7. Skeletal muscle atrogene expression and insulin resistance in a rat model of polytrauma.

    PubMed

    Akscyn, Robert M; Franklin, John L; Gavrikova, Tatyana A; Messina, Joseph L

    2016-02-01

    Polytrauma is a combination of injuries to more than one body part or organ system. Polytrauma is common in warfare, and in automobile and industrial accidents. The combination of injuries can include burn, fracture, hemorrhage, and trauma to the extremities or specific organ systems. Resistance to anabolic hormones, loss of muscle mass, and metabolic dysfunction can occur following injury. To investigate the effects of combined injuries, we have developed a highly reproducible rodent model of polytrauma. This model combines burn injury, soft tissue trauma, and penetrating injury to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Adult, male Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized with pentobarbital and subjected to a 15-20% total body surface area scald burn, or laparotomy and a single puncture of the cecum with a G30 needle, or the combination of both injuries (polytrauma). In the current studies, the inflammatory response to polytrauma was examined in skeletal muscle. Changes in skeletal muscle mRNA levels of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 were observed following single injuries and polytrauma. Increased expression of the E3 ubiquitin ligases Atrogin-1/FBX032 and TRIM63/MuRF-1 were measured following injury, as was skeletal muscle insulin resistance, as evidenced by decreased insulin-inducible insulin receptor (IR) and AKT/PKB (Protein Kinase B) phosphorylation. Changes in the abundance of IR and insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) were observed at the protein and mRNA levels. Additionally, increased TRIB3 mRNA levels were observed 24 h following polytrauma, the same time when insulin resistance was observed. This may suggest a role for TRIB3 in the development of acute insulin resistance following injury. PMID:26818585

  8. Skeletal muscle atrogene expression and insulin resistance in a rat model of polytrauma.

    PubMed

    Akscyn, Robert M; Franklin, John L; Gavrikova, Tatyana A; Messina, Joseph L

    2016-02-01

    Polytrauma is a combination of injuries to more than one body part or organ system. Polytrauma is common in warfare, and in automobile and industrial accidents. The combination of injuries can include burn, fracture, hemorrhage, and trauma to the extremities or specific organ systems. Resistance to anabolic hormones, loss of muscle mass, and metabolic dysfunction can occur following injury. To investigate the effects of combined injuries, we have developed a highly reproducible rodent model of polytrauma. This model combines burn injury, soft tissue trauma, and penetrating injury to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Adult, male Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized with pentobarbital and subjected to a 15-20% total body surface area scald burn, or laparotomy and a single puncture of the cecum with a G30 needle, or the combination of both injuries (polytrauma). In the current studies, the inflammatory response to polytrauma was examined in skeletal muscle. Changes in skeletal muscle mRNA levels of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 were observed following single injuries and polytrauma. Increased expression of the E3 ubiquitin ligases Atrogin-1/FBX032 and TRIM63/MuRF-1 were measured following injury, as was skeletal muscle insulin resistance, as evidenced by decreased insulin-inducible insulin receptor (IR) and AKT/PKB (Protein Kinase B) phosphorylation. Changes in the abundance of IR and insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) were observed at the protein and mRNA levels. Additionally, increased TRIB3 mRNA levels were observed 24 h following polytrauma, the same time when insulin resistance was observed. This may suggest a role for TRIB3 in the development of acute insulin resistance following injury.

  9. A single-fibre study of the relationship between MHC and TnC isoform composition in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Brett; Nguyen, Long T; Stephenson, Gabriela M M

    2004-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the possibility that MHC (myosin heavy chain) and TnC (troponin C) isoforms exist in specific combinations in rat-skeletal-muscle fibres. Single fibres (numbering 245) from soleus (predominantly slow-twitch) and sternomastoid (predominantly fast-twitch) muscles of adult rats were analysed for MHC and TnC isoform composition, using alanine-SDS/PAGE for separating MHC isoforms, and a novel method (based on the previously reported influence of Ca2+ on the mobility of Ca2+-binding proteins in SDS gels) for unequivocal identification of TnC isoforms in single-fibre segments. In this study, all fibres that contained only one MHC isoform (slow or fast) contained only the matching TnC isoform and all fibres that contained multiple fast MHC isoforms contained only the fast TnC isoform. Fibres expressing both slow and fast MHC isoforms displayed either both TnC isoforms or only one TnC isoform of a type depending on the relative proportion of fast/slow MHC present. Our results suggest a close relationship between MHC and TnC isoform composition in non-transforming skeletal muscles of adult rat. PMID:14572306

  10. Calsequestrins in skeletal and cardiac muscle from adult Danio rerio.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Sandra; Mosole, Simone; Murgia, Marta; Nagaraj, Nagarjuna; Argenton, Francesco; Volpe, Pompeo; Nori, Alessandra

    2016-04-01

    Calsequestrin (Casq) is a high capacity, low affinity Ca(2+)-binding protein, critical for Ca(2+)-buffering in cardiac and skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum. All vertebrates have multiple genes encoding for different Casq isoforms. Increasing interest has been focused on mammalian and human Casq genes since mutations of both cardiac (Casq2) and skeletal muscle (Casq1) isoforms cause different, and sometime severe, human pathologies. Danio rerio (zebrafish) is a powerful model for studying function and mutations of human proteins. In this work, expression, biochemical properties cellular and sub-cellular localization of D. rerio native Casq isoforms are investigated. By quantitative PCR, three mRNAs were detected in skeletal muscle and heart with different abundances. Three zebrafish Casqs: Casq1a, Casq1b and Casq2 were identified by mass spectrometry (Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002455). Skeletal and cardiac zebrafish calsequestrins share properties with mammalian Casq1 and Casq2. Skeletal Casqs were found primarily, but not exclusively, at the sarcomere Z-line level where terminal cisternae of sarcoplasmic reticulum are located. PMID:26585961

  11. The skeletal muscle vascular supply closely correlates with the muscle fiber surface area in the rat.

    PubMed

    Ichinose, Emiko; Kurose, Tomoyuki; Daitoku, Daisuke; Kawamata, Seiichi

    2008-05-01

    The skeletal muscle capillary supply (capillarity) dynamically changes in response to muscle conditions such as growth, atrophy, and hypertrophy. The capillary number-to-fiber ratio is reported to correlate closely with the muscle fiber cross sectional area. However, little information is available regarding the capillarity of neonatal and very young skeletal muscles. In this study, the vascular endothelium was reliably stained with an anti-PECAM-1 antibody, and relationships between the capillarity and muscle fiber parameters were analyzed. For assessment of the capillarity, we used the capillary length-to-fiber ratio, due to the presence of transversely running vessels. In young and adult rats, the capillary length-to-fiber ratio was proportional to both the muscle fiber cross sectional area and muscle fiber radius. However, when these data were analyzed together with data from neonatal and very young rats, the capillary length-to-fiber ratio correlated more closely with the muscle fiber radius than the muscle fiber cross sectional area in the tibialis anterior muscle. The capillary number-to-fiber ratio demonstrated results very similar to the capillary length-to-fiber ratio. During muscle atrophy after denervation, the number of capillaries was decreased in a non-apoptotic manner as revealed by electron microscopy, maintaining the close relationship between the parameters described above. In conclusion, capillarity was closely correlated with the muscle fiber radius (which represents the perimeter) during growth and atrophy. This indicates that the capillarity is linked to the muscle fiber surface area (which is determined by perimeter and section thickness), in agreement with the essential role of the cell membrane in the transport of materials by simple diffusion or active transport.

  12. Alterations in Skeletal Muscle Microcirculation of Head-Down Tilted Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musacchia, X. J.; Stepke, Bernhard; Fleming, John T.; Joshua, Irving G.

    1992-01-01

    In this study we assessed the function of microscopic blood vessels in skeletal muscle (cremaster muscle) for alterations which may contribute to the observed elevation of blood pressure associated with head-down tilted whole body suspension (HDT/WBS), a model of weightlessness. Arteriolar baseline diameters, vasoconstrictor responses to norepinephrine (NE) and vasodilation to nitroprusside (NP) were assessed in control rats, rats suspended for 7 or 14 day HDT/WBS rats, and rats allowed to recover for 1 day after 7 days HDT/WBS. Neither baseline diameters nor ability to dilate were influenced by HDT/WBS. Maximum vasoconstriction to norepinephrine was significantly greater in arterioles of hypertensive 14 day HDT/WBS rats. This first study of the intact microvasculature in skeletal muscle indicates that an elevated contractility of arterioles to norepinephrine in suspended rats, and suggests an elevated peripheral resistance in striated muscle may contribute to the increase in blood pressures among animals subjected to HDT/WBS.

  13. IP(3)-dependent, post-tetanic calcium transients induced by electrostimulation of adult skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Casas, Mariana; Figueroa, Reinaldo; Jorquera, Gonzalo; Escobar, Matías; Molgó, Jordi; Jaimovich, Enrique

    2010-10-01

    Tetanic electrical stimulation induces two separate calcium signals in rat skeletal myotubes, a fast one, dependent on Cav 1.1 or dihydropyridine receptors (DHPRs) and ryanodine receptors and related to contraction, and a slow signal, dependent on DHPR and inositol trisphosphate receptors (IP(3)Rs) and related to transcriptional events. We searched for slow calcium signals in adult muscle fibers using isolated adult flexor digitorum brevis fibers from 5-7-wk-old mice, loaded with fluo-3. When stimulated with trains of 0.3-ms pulses at various frequencies, cells responded with a fast calcium signal associated with muscle contraction, followed by a slower signal similar to one previously described in cultured myotubes. Nifedipine inhibited the slow signal more effectively than the fast one, suggesting a role for DHPR in its onset. The IP(3)R inhibitors Xestospongin B or C (5 µM) also inhibited it. The amplitude of post-tetanic calcium transients depends on both tetanus frequency and duration, having a maximum at 10-20 Hz. At this stimulation frequency, an increase of the slow isoform of troponin I mRNA was detected, while the fast isoform of this gene was inhibited. All three IP(3)R isoforms were present in adult muscle. IP(3)R-1 was differentially expressed in different types of muscle fibers, being higher in a subset of fast-type fibers. Interestingly, isolated fibers from the slow soleus muscle did not reveal the slow calcium signal induced by electrical stimulus. These results support the idea that IP(3)R-dependent slow calcium signals may be characteristic of distinct types of muscle fibers and may participate in the activation of specific transcriptional programs of slow and fast phenotype. PMID:20837675

  14. IP3-dependent, post-tetanic calcium transients induced by electrostimulation of adult skeletal muscle fibers

    PubMed Central

    Casas, Mariana; Figueroa, Reinaldo; Jorquera, Gonzalo; Escobar, Matías; Molgó, Jordi

    2010-01-01

    Tetanic electrical stimulation induces two separate calcium signals in rat skeletal myotubes, a fast one, dependent on Cav 1.1 or dihydropyridine receptors (DHPRs) and ryanodine receptors and related to contraction, and a slow signal, dependent on DHPR and inositol trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) and related to transcriptional events. We searched for slow calcium signals in adult muscle fibers using isolated adult flexor digitorum brevis fibers from 5–7-wk-old mice, loaded with fluo-3. When stimulated with trains of 0.3-ms pulses at various frequencies, cells responded with a fast calcium signal associated with muscle contraction, followed by a slower signal similar to one previously described in cultured myotubes. Nifedipine inhibited the slow signal more effectively than the fast one, suggesting a role for DHPR in its onset. The IP3R inhibitors Xestospongin B or C (5 µM) also inhibited it. The amplitude of post-tetanic calcium transients depends on both tetanus frequency and duration, having a maximum at 10–20 Hz. At this stimulation frequency, an increase of the slow isoform of troponin I mRNA was detected, while the fast isoform of this gene was inhibited. All three IP3R isoforms were present in adult muscle. IP3R-1 was differentially expressed in different types of muscle fibers, being higher in a subset of fast-type fibers. Interestingly, isolated fibers from the slow soleus muscle did not reveal the slow calcium signal induced by electrical stimulus. These results support the idea that IP3R-dependent slow calcium signals may be characteristic of distinct types of muscle fibers and may participate in the activation of specific transcriptional programs of slow and fast phenotype. PMID:20837675

  15. Alendronate increases skeletal mass of growing rats during unloading by inhibiting resorption of calcified cartilage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bikle, D. D.; Morey-Holton, E. R.; Doty, S. B.; Currier, P. A.; Tanner, S. J.; Halloran, B. P.

    1994-01-01

    Loss of bone mass during periods of skeletal unloading remains an important clinical problem. To determine the extent to which resorption contributes to the relative loss of bone during skeletal unloading of the growing rat and to explore potential means of preventing such bone loss, 0.1 mg P/kg alendronate was administered to rats before unloading of the hindquarters. Skeletal unloading markedly reduced the normal increase in tibial mass and calcium content during the 9 day period of observation, primarily by decreasing bone formation, although bone resorption was also modestly stimulated. Alendronate not only prevented the relative loss of skeletal mass during unloading but led to a dramatic increase in calcified tissue in the proximal tibia compared with the vehicle-treated unloaded or normally loaded controls. Bone formation, however, assessed both by tetracycline labeling and by [3H]proline and 45Ca incorporation, was suppressed by alendronate treatment and further decreased by skeletal unloading. Total osteoclast number increased in alendronate-treated animals, but values were similar to those in controls when corrected for the increased bone area. However, the osteoclasts had poorly developed brush borders and appeared not to engage the bone surface when examined at the ultrastructural level. We conclude that alendronate prevents the relative loss of mineralized tissue in growing rats subjected to skeletal unloading, but it does so primarily by inhibiting the resorption of the primary and secondary spongiosa, leading to altered bone modeling in the metaphysis.

  16. Increased skeletal muscle mitochondrial efficiency in rats with fructose-induced alteration in glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Crescenzo, Raffaella; Bianco, Francesca; Coppola, Paola; Mazzoli, Arianna; Cigliano, Luisa; Liverini, Giovanna; Iossa, Susanna

    2013-12-14

    In the present study, the effect of long-term fructose feeding on skeletal muscle mitochondrial energetics was investigated. Measurements in isolated tissue were coupled with the determination of whole-body energy expenditure and insulin sensitivity. A significant increase in plasma NEFA, as well as in skeletal muscle TAG and ceramide, was found in fructose-fed rats compared with the controls, together with a significantly higher plasma insulin response to a glucose load, while no significant variation in plasma glucose levels was found. Significantly lower RMR values were found in fructose-fed rats starting from week 4 of the dietary treatment. Skeletal muscle mitochondrial mass and degree of coupling were found to be significantly higher in fructose-fed rats compared with the controls. Significantly higher lipid peroxidation was found in fructose-fed rats, together with a significant decrease in superoxide dismutase activity. Phosphorylated Akt levels normalised to plasma insulin levels were significantly lower in fructose-fed rats compared with the controls. In conclusion, a fructose-rich diet has a deep impact on a metabolically relevant tissue such as skeletal muscle. In this tissue, the consequences of high fructose feeding are altered glucose tolerance, elevated mitochondrial biogenesis and increased mitochondrial coupling. This latter modification could have a detrimental metabolic effect by causing oxidative stress and energy sparing that contribute to the high metabolic efficiency of fructose-fed rats.

  17. Antidiabetic effect of taurine in cultured rat skeletal l6 myotubes.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Sun Hee; Chang, Kyung Ja

    2013-01-01

    Taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid), a sulfur-containing β-amino acid, is found in all animal cells at millimolar concentrations and has been reported to show various health promoting activities including antidiabetic properties. The beneficial effects of taurine in diabetes mellitus have been known. However, the exact mechanism of hypoglycemic action of taurine is not properly defined. In this study, we investigated antidiabetic effect of taurine in the cell culture system using rat skeletal muscle cells. In cultured rat skeletal L6 myotubes, we studied the effect of taurine (0-100 μM) on glucose uptake to plasma membrane from the aspects of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling. Taurine stimulated glucose uptake in a dose-dependent manner by activating AMPK signaling. From these results, it may suggest that taurine show antidiabetic effect by stimulating insulin-independent glucose uptake in rat skeletal muscle.

  18. Morphofunctional responses to anaemia in rat skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Esteva, Santiago; Panisello, Pere; Casas, Mireia; Torrella, Joan Ramon; Pagés, Teresa; Viscor, Ginés

    2008-01-01

    Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to two groups: control and anaemic. Anaemia was induced by periodical blood withdrawal. Extensor digitorum longus and soleus muscles were excised under pentobarbital sodium total anaesthesia and processed for transmission electron microscopy, histochemical and biochemical analyses. Mitochondrial volume was determined by transmission electron microscopy in three different regions of each muscle fibre: pericapillary, sarcolemmal and sarcoplasmatic. Muscle samples sections were also stained with histochemical methods (SDH and m-ATPase) to reveal the oxidative capacity and shortening velocity of each muscle fibre. Determinations of fibre and capillary densities and fibre type composition were made from micrographs of different fixed fields selected in the equatorial region of each rat muscle. Determination of metabolites (ATP, inorganic phosphate, creatine, creatine phosphate and lactate) was done using established enzymatic methods and spectrophotometric detection. Significant differences in mitochondrial volumes were found between pericapillary, sarcolemmal and sarcoplasmic regions when data from animal groups were tested independently. Moreover, it was verified that anaemic rats had significantly lower values than control animals in all the sampled regions of both muscles. These changes were associated with a significantly higher proportion of fast fibres in anaemic rat soleus muscles (slow oxidative group = 63.8%; fast glycolytic group = 8.2%; fast oxidative glycolytic group = 27.4%) than in the controls (slow oxidative group = 79.0%; fast glycolytic group = 3.9%; fast oxidative glycolytic group = 17.1%). No significant changes were detected in the extensor digitorum longus muscle. A significant increase was found in metabolite concentration in both the extensor digitorum longus and soleus muscles of the anaemic animals as compared to the control group. In conclusion, hypoxaemic hypoxia causes a reduction in

  19. High- versus moderate-intensity aerobic exercise training effects on skeletal muscle of infarcted rats.

    PubMed

    Moreira, José B N; Bechara, Luiz R G; Bozi, Luiz H M; Jannig, Paulo R; Monteiro, Alex W A; Dourado, Paulo M; Wisløff, Ulrik; Brum, Patricia C

    2013-04-01

    Poor skeletal muscle performance was shown to strongly predict mortality and long-term prognosis in a variety of diseases, including heart failure (HF). Despite the known benefits of aerobic exercise training (AET) in improving the skeletal muscle phenotype in HF, the optimal exercise intensity to elicit maximal outcomes is still under debate. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to compare the effects of high-intensity AET with those of a moderate-intensity protocol on skeletal muscle of infarcted rats. Wistar rats underwent myocardial infarction (MI) or sham surgery. MI groups were submitted either to an untrained (MI-UNT); moderate-intensity (MI-CMT, 60% Vo(2)(max)); or matched volume, high-intensity AET (MI-HIT, intervals at 85% Vo(2)(max)) protocol. High-intensity AET (HIT) was superior to moderate-intensity AET (CMT) in improving aerobic capacity, assessed by treadmill running tests. Cardiac contractile function, measured by echocardiography, was equally improved by both AET protocols. CMT and HIT prevented the MI-induced decay of skeletal muscle citrate synthase and hexokinase maximal activities, and increased glycogen content, without significant differences between protocols. Similar improvements in skeletal muscle redox balance and deactivation of the ubiquitin-proteasome system were also observed after CMT and HIT. Such intracellular findings were accompanied by prevented skeletal muscle atrophy in both MI-CMT and MI-HIT groups, whereas no major differences were observed between protocols. Taken together, our data suggest that despite superior effects of HIT in improving functional capacity, skeletal muscle adaptations were remarkably similar among protocols, leading to the conclusion that skeletal myopathy in infarcted rats was equally prevented by either moderate-intensity or high-intensity AET.

  20. Expression of somatostatin receptor genes and acetylcholine receptor development in rat skeletal muscle during postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Peng, M; Conforti, L; Millhorn, D E

    1998-05-01

    Our laboratory reported previously that somatostatin (SST) is transiently expressed in rat motoneurons during the first 14 days after birth. We investigated the possibility that the SST receptor (SSTR) is expressed in skeletal muscle. We found that two of the five subtypes of SSTR (SSTR3 and SSTR4) are expressed in skeletal muscle with a time course that correlates with the transient expression of SST in motoneurons. In addition, SSTR2A is expressed from birth to adulthood in skeletal muscle. Both SSTR2A and SSTR4 are also expressed in L6 cells, a skeletal muscle cell line. Somatostatin acting through its receptors has been shown to stimulate tyrosine phosphatase activity in a number of different tissues. We found that several proteins (50, 65, 90, 140, 180 and 200 kDa) exhibited a reduced degree of tyrosine phosphorylation following SST treatment. Inhibition of tyrosine phosphatase activity with sodium orthovanadate increased expression of the nicotinic acetyl-choline receptor (nAChR) epsilon subunit mRNA by three fold. Somatostatin reversed the elevated epsilon mRNA following orthovanadate treatment. These findings show that SSTR is expressed in skeletal muscle and that SST acting via the SSTR regulates tyrosine phosphorylation and expression of the epsilon subunit of the AChR in the rat skeletal muscle. PMID:9852305

  1. Sex differences in steroidogenesis in skeletal muscle following a single bout of exercise in rats.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Katsuji; Iemitsu, Motoyuki; Otsuki, Takeshi; Maeda, Seiji; Miyauchi, Takashi; Mesaki, Noboru

    2008-01-01

    Sex steroid hormones, such as testosterone and estradiol, play important roles in developing both strength and mass of skeletal muscle. Recently, we demonstrated that skeletal muscle can synthesize sex steroid hormones. Whether there are sex differences in basal steroidogenesis or acute exercise-induced alterations of steroidogenesis in the skeletal muscle is unknown. We examined sex differences in the levels of testosterone, estradiol, and steroidogenesis-related enzymes, such as 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD), 3beta-HSD, and aromatase cytochrome P-450 (P450arom), in the skeletal muscle at rest and after exercise. We studied the gastrocnemius muscles of resting rats (10 wk old) and exercised rats (10 wk old, treadmill running, 30 m/min, 30 min). Basal muscular testosterone levels were higher in males than females, whereas estradiol did not differ between sexes. Additionally, 17beta-HSD, 3beta-HSD, and P450arom transcript and protein expression were greater in females. After acute exercise, testosterone levels and 17beta-HSD expression increased in muscle in both sexes. By comparison, muscular estradiol levels increased in males following exercise but were unchanged in females. Expression of P450arom, which regulates estrogen synthesis, increased after acute exercise in males but decreased after exercise in females. Thus a single bout of exercise can influence the steroidogenic system in skeletal muscle, and these alterations differ between sexes. The acute exercise-induced alteration of steroidogenic enzymes may enhance the local steroidogenesis in the skeletal muscle in both sexes.

  2. Metabolic effects of ethanol on primary cell cultures of rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Garriga, Judit; Fernández-Solá, Joaquim; Adanero, Ester; Urbano-Márquez, Alvaro; Cussó, Roser

    2005-01-01

    Individuals who have consumed alcohol chronically accumulate glycogen in their skeletal muscles. Changes in the energy balance caused by alcohol consumption might lead to alcoholic myopathy. Experimental models used in the past, such as with skeletal muscle biopsy samples of alcohol-dependent individuals or in animal models, do not distinguish between direct effects and indirect effects (i.e., alterations to the nervous or endocrine system) of alcohol. In the current study, we evaluated the direct effect of ethanol on skeletal muscle glycogen concentrations and related glycolytic pathways. We measured the changes in metabolite concentrations and enzyme activities of carbohydrate metabolism in primary cell cultures of rat skeletal muscle exposed to ethanol for two periods. The concentrations of glycolytic metabolites and the activities of several enzymes that regulate glucose and glycogen metabolism were measured. After a short exposure to ethanol (6 h), glucose metabolism slowed. After 48 h of exposure, glycogen accumulation was observed.

  3. Skeletal muscle choristoma in the lung of a female Sprague-Dawley rat: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wijnands, Marcel; van Esch, Eric

    2012-03-01

    In this report we describe a choristoma in the lung of a female placebo rat. The lesion was observed microscopically in the central part of the left lung lobe and was characterized by a nodule consisting of well-differentiated skeletal muscle cells. The muscle fibers were haphazardly organized giving the nodule a poorly demarcated border. Choristoma is a very rare lesion.

  4. Effect of exercise on glutamine synthesis and transport in skeletal muscle from rats.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Ronaldo V T; Caperuto, Erico C; de Mello, Marco T; Batista, Miguel L; Rosa, Luis F B P C

    2009-08-01

    1. Reductions in plasma glutamine are observed after prolonged exercise. Three hypotheses can explain such a decrease: (i) high demand by the liver and kidney; (ii) impaired release from muscles; and (iii) decreased synthesis in skeletal muscle. The present study investigated the effects of exercise on glutamine synthesis and transport in rat skeletal muscle. 2. Rats were divided into three groups: (i) sedentary (SED; n = 12); (ii) rats killed 1 h after the last exercise bout (EX-1; n = 15); and (iii) rats killed 24 h after the last exercise bout (EX-24; n = 15). Rats in the trained groups swam 1 h/day, 5 days/week for 6 weeks with a load equivalent to 5.5% of their bodyweight. 3. Plasma glutamine and insulin were lower and corticosterone was higher in EX-1 compared with SED rats (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively). Twenty-four hours after exercise (EX-24), plasma glutamine was restored to levels seen in SED rats, whereas insulin levels were higher (P < 0.001) and corticosterone levels were lower (P < 0.01) than in EX-1. In the soleus, ammonia levels were lower in EX-1 than in SED rats (P < 0.001). After 24 h, glutamine, glutamate and ammonia levels were lower in EX-24 than in SED and EX-1 rats (P < 0.001). Soleus glutamine synthetase (GS) activity was increased in EX-1 and was decreased in EX-24 compared with SED rats (both P < 0.001). 4. The decrease in plasma glutamine concentration in EX-1 is not mediated by GS or glutamine transport in skeletal muscle. However, 24 h after exercise, lower GS may contribute to the decrease in glutamine concentration in muscle. PMID:19207717

  5. Effects of increased matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression on skeletal muscle fibrosis in prolonged alcoholic myopathies of rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianfeng; Liu, Yanli; Zhang, Li; Ji, Jun; Wang, Bing; Jin, Wei; Zhang, Chenghong; Chu, Haiying

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) on injured gastrocnemius, soleus and plantaris muscles, induced by alcohol in rats. A total of 60 male Sprague-Dawley rats (2.5 months old, 200 ± 20 g) were divided into 6 groups: i) untreated skeletal muscle and analyzed 2 weeks later (A1 group, 5 rats); ii) untreated skeletal muscle and analyzed 6 weeks later (A2 group, 5 rats); iii) untreated skeletal muscle and analyzed 12 weeks later (A3 group, 5 rats); iv) injured skeletal muscle and analyzed 2 weeks later (B1 group, 15 rats); v) injured skeletal muscle and analyzed 6 weeks later (B2 group, 15 rats); and vi) injured skeletal muscle and analyzed 12 weeks later (B3 group, 15 rats). The injured and uninjured muscles were observed by light microscopy and polarization microscopy. The MMP activity was evaluated through zymography, and messenger RNA (mRNA) of MMP-9 and of MMP-2 were assessed by RT-PCR. The expression of MMP-9 was assessed by Western blot analysis. The plantaris and gastrocnemius muscles in the rats subjected to alcohol ingestion were found to have a high expression of MMP-9, but not of MMP-2. Picrosirius red staining was used to assess whether increased fibrosis in the skeletal muscle was associated with alcohol exposure in rats. The study indicated that alcohol may be involved in the skeletal muscle interstitial fibrosis in our model of alcohol-exposed rats through increased MMP-9 expression, and that this increased expression may aggravate the development of prolonged alcohol muscle injury.

  6. A New Surgical Model of Skeletal Muscle Injuries in Rats Reproduces Human Sports Lesions.

    PubMed

    Contreras-Muñoz, P; Fernández-Martín, A; Torrella, R; Serres, X; De la Varga, M; Viscor, G; Järvinen, T A H; Martínez-Ibáñez, V; Peiró, J L; Rodas, G; Marotta, M

    2016-03-01

    Skeletal muscle injuries are the most common sports-related injuries in sports medicine. In this work, we have generated a new surgically-induced skeletal muscle injury in rats, by using a biopsy needle, which could be easily reproduced and highly mimics skeletal muscle lesions detected in human athletes. By means of histology, immunofluorescence and MRI imaging, we corroborated that our model reproduced the necrosis, inflammation and regeneration processes observed in dystrophic mdx-mice, a model of spontaneous muscle injury, and realistically mimicked the muscle lesions observed in professional athletes. Surgically-injured rat skeletal muscles demonstrated the longitudinal process of muscle regeneration and fibrogenesis as stated by Myosin Heavy Chain developmental (MHCd) and collagen-I protein expression. MRI imaging analysis demonstrated that our muscle injury model reproduces the grade I-II type lesions detected in professional soccer players, including edema around the central tendon and the typically high signal feather shape along muscle fibers. A significant reduction of 30% in maximum tetanus force was also registered after 2 weeks of muscle injury. This new model represents an excellent approach to the study of the mechanisms of muscle injury and repair, and could open new avenues for developing innovative therapeutic approaches to skeletal muscle regeneration in sports medicine.

  7. Dependence of normal development of skeletal muscle in neonatal rats on load bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohira, Y.; Tanaka, T.; Yoshinaga, T.; Kawano, F.; Nomura, T.; Nonaka, I.; Allen, D. L.; Roy, R. R.; Edgerton, V. R.

    2000-01-01

    Antigravity function plays an important role in determining the morphological and physiological properties of the neuromuscular system. Inhibition of the normal development of the neuromuscular system is induced by hindlimb unloading during the neonatal period in rats. However, the role of gravitational loading on the development of skeletal muscle in rats is not well understood. It could be hypothesized that during the early postnatal period, i.e. when minimal weight-supporting activity occurs, the activity imposed by gravity would be of little consequence in directing the normal development of the skeletal musculature. We have addressed this issue by limiting the amount of postnatal weight-support activity of the hindlimbs of rats during the lactation period. We have focused on the development of three characteristics of the muscle fibers, i.e. size, myonuclear number and myosin heavy chain expression.

  8. Biochemical and histochemical adaptations of skeletal muscle to rat suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Templeton, G. H.

    1984-01-01

    The influence of rat suspension on soleus disuse and atrophy was investigated to measure changes in fiber area and number and to determine if suspension elicited changes in lysosomal protease activity and rate of calcium uptake by the sarcoplasmic reticulum. The infuence of rat suspension on myosin light chain phosphorylation and succinate dehydrogenase activity are determined.

  9. Electromyographic studies regarding denervation potentials in skeletal muscles at sites near and distant from the burn in rats.

    PubMed

    Sajadi, Simin; Mansoori, Korosh; Forogh, Bijan; Fatemi, Mohammad Javad; Ahadi, Tannaz; Chahardoli Razji, Mahnaz

    2016-04-01

    Changes in membrane AChRs in skeletal muscles located near or distant from burn injury similar to denervated muscles may make electrodiagnostic features indistinguishable from true neuropathic changes. The aim of this study was to examine electrodiagnostic changes of muscles at sites local and distant from the burn after thermal injuries due to neuromuscular junction dysfunction. A total of 40 adult male rats were randomly allocated to four groups. Rats in group 1 received thermal burn injury over gastrocnemius muscle of one leg and sham burn on the other leg. A 20-25% and 30-35% surface body area burn and also 30-35% surface body area sham burn were produced at distant site from gastrocnemius muscle in group 2, 3 and 4, respectively. To explore any fibrillation potential, the rats underwent serial electromyographic studies of bilateral gastrocnemius muscles over 5 weeks after burn injury. There were no denervation potentials either in muscles at sites distant from 20-25% and 30-35% of total body surface area burns or in muscles beneath the burn. In the present study on rats, thermal burn injury could not make fibrillation potentials in the electrodiagnostic study of muscles located near and distant from the burn site.

  10. Enhanced skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity in year-old rats adapted to hypergravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mondon, C. E.; Dolkas, C. B.; Oyama, J.

    1981-01-01

    Rats induced into a hypermetabolic state by exposure to chronic (7 mo) centrifugation at 4.15 g exhibited increased glucose uptake at lower plasma insulin levels than weight-matched control animals following oral glucose administration. In order to determine the insulin sensitivity of specific tissues, the effect of exogenous insulin on glucose uptake by isolated perfused livers and hindlim skeletal muscle from rats adapted to chronic centrifugation for one year was compared with perfused tissue from 2.5 mo-old noncentrifuged control animals of equal body weight. Metabolic glucose clearance by skeletal muscle from hypergravic rats did not prove significantly greater than control muscle when perfused in the absence of insulin (10.6 vs 8.1 microliters/min-g-muscle), but was twice as fast (23.0 vs 9.5) at perfusate insulin levels of 35 micro-U/ml. Conversely, glucose uptake by hypergravic livers was significantly decreased (P is less than 0.001) compared with control livers (10.3 vs 27.8) at perfusate insulin levels of 40 micro-U/ml. Results suggest that skeletal muscle rather than liver is primarily responsible for the enhanced sensitivity to insulin and the increased energy expenditure observed in rats subjected to hypergravity.

  11. Effects of natural phenolic acids on the skeletal system of ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Folwarczna, Joanna; Zych, Maria; Burczyk, Jan; Trzeciak, Hanna; Trzeciak, Henryk I

    2009-12-01

    Recent reports indicate the possibility of antiresorptive and/or bone formation increasing activity of natural phenolic acids, commonly present in plants which are normally consumed in the diet. The effects of 4 natural phenolic acids (ferulic, caffeic, P-coumaric or chlorogenic, 10 mg/kg P. O. daily for 4 weeks) on the skeletal system of ovariectomized (estrogen-deficient) rats were investigated. Bone mass, mineral and calcium content, macrometric and histomorphometric parameters, and mechanical properties were examined. Phenolic acids differentially affected the skeletal system of rats with osteoporotic changes induced by the ovariectomy. Caffeic acid decreased bone mass, whereas P-coumaric acid increased the bone mass/body mass ratio and bone mineral mass/body mass ratio in the long bones, in comparison with the ovariectomized control rats. The phenolic acids improved some bone histomorphometric parameters, impaired by estrogen deficiency. However, they did not increase the ratio of bone mineral mass to bone mass, decreased by estrogen deficiency, and did not significantly affect bone mechanical properties. In conclusion, different natural phenolic acids exert differential effects on the skeletal system of ovariectomized rats, both favourable and deleterious.

  12. Skeletal-muscle glycogen synthesis during the starved-to-fed transition in the rat.

    PubMed

    Holness, M J; Schuster-Bruce, M J; Sugden, M C

    1988-09-15

    The pattern of glycogen deposition in skeletal muscles of varying fibre composition was examined in rats during the starved-to-fed transition. In all the muscles studied, glycogen concentrations steadily increased during the first 8 h after chow re-feeding, and the fed value was exceeded. Rates of glycogen deposition varied, not with muscle fibre composition, but with the extent of glycogen depletion during starvation. There was no evidence for skeletal-muscle glycogen breakdown during the period of hepatic glycogenesis, making it unlikely that recycling of carbon from muscle glycogen to lactate is quantitatively important for the provision of glycogenic precursors to the liver, but moderate glycogen loss was observed from 8 to 24 h after re-feeding, when the liver is in the lipogenic mode. The factors influencing glucose disposal by skeletal muscle after re-feeding are discussed.

  13. Craniofacial skeletal defects of adult zebrafish glypican 4 (knypek) mutants

    PubMed Central

    LeClair, Elizabeth E.; Mui, Stephanie R.; Huang, Angela; Topczewska, Jolanta M.; Topczewski, Jacek

    2010-01-01

    The heparan sulfate proteoglycan Glypican 4 (Gpc4) is part of the Wnt/planar cell polarity pathway, which is required for convergence and extension during zebrafish gastrulation. To observe Glypican 4-deficient phenotypes at later stages, we rescued gpc4−/− (knypek) homozygotes and raised them for more than one year. Adult mutants showed diverse cranial malformations of both dermal and endochondral bones, ranging from shortening of the rostral-most skull to loss of the symplectic. Additionally, the adult palatoquadrate cartilage was disorganized, with abnormal chondrocyte orientation. To understand how the palatoquadrate cartilage normally develops, we examined a juvenile series of wild type and mutant specimens. This identified two novel domains of elongated chondrocytes in the larval palatoquadrate, which normally form prior to endochondral ossification. In contrast, gpc4−/− larvae never form these domains, suggesting a failure of chondrocyte orientation, though not differentiation. Our findings implicate Gpc4 in the regulation of zebrafish cartilage and bone morphogenesis. PMID:19777561

  14. Receptor Expression in Rat Skeletal Muscle Cell Cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Ronald B.

    1996-01-01

    One on the most persistent problems with long-term space flight is atrophy of skeletal muscles. Skeletal muscle is unique as a tissue in the body in that its ability to undergo atrophy or hypertrophy is controlled exclusively by cues from the extracellular environment. The mechanism of communication between muscle cells and their environment is through a group of membrane-bound and soluble receptors, each of which carries out unique, but often interrelated, functions. The primary receptors include acetyl choline receptors, beta-adrenergic receptors, glucocorticoid receptors, insulin receptors, growth hormone (i.e., somatotropin) receptors, insulin-like growth factor receptors, and steroid receptors. This project has been initiated to develop an integrated approach toward muscle atrophy and hypertrophy that takes into account information on the populations of the entire group of receptors (and their respective hormone concentrations), and it is hypothesized that this information can form the basis for a predictive computer model for muscle atrophy and hypertrophy. The conceptual basis for this project is illustrated in the figure below. The individual receptors are shown as membrane-bound, with the exception of the glucocorticoid receptor which is a soluble intracellular receptor. Each of these receptors has an extracellular signalling component (e.g., innervation, glucocorticoids, epinephrine, etc.), and following the interaction of the extracellular component with the receptor itself, an intracellular signal is generated. Each of these intracellular signals is unique in its own way; however, they are often interrelated.

  15. Biphasic regulation of development of the high-affinity saxitoxin receptor by innervation in rat skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, S.J.; Catterall, W.A.

    1982-11-01

    Specific binding of /sup 3/H-saxitoxin (STX) was used to quantitate the density of voltage-sensitive sodium channels in developing rat skeletal muscle. In adult triceps surae, a single class of sites with a KD . 2.9 nM and a density of 21 fmol/mg wet wt was detected. The density of these high-affinity sites increased from 2.0 fmol/mg wet wt to the adult value in linear fashion during days 2-25 after birth. Denervation of the triceps surae at day 11 or 17 reduced final saxitoxin receptor site density to 10.4 or 9.2 fmol/mg wet wt, respectively, without changing KD. Denervation of the triceps surae at day 5 did not alter the subsequent development of saxitoxin receptor sites during days 5-9 and accelerated the increase of saxitoxin receptor sites during days 9-13. After day 13, saxitoxin receptor development abruptly ceased and the density of saxitoxin receptor sites declined to 11 fmol/wg wet wt. These results show that the regulation of high-affinity saxitoxin receptor site density by innervation is biphasic. During the first phase, which is independent of continuing innervation, the saxitoxin receptor density increases to 47-57% of the adult level. After day 11, the second phase of development, which is dependent on continuing innervation, gives rise to the adult density of saxitoxin receptors.

  16. Contractile properties of rat fast-twitch skeletal muscle during reinnervation - Effects of testosterone and castration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeagle, S. P.; Mayer, R. F.; Max, S. R.

    1983-01-01

    The peroneal nerve of subject rats were crushed 1 cm from the muscle in order to examine the isometric contractile properties of skeletal muscle in the recovery sequency during reinnervation of normal, castrated, and testosterone-treated rats. The particular muscle studied was the extensor digitorum longus, with functional reinnervation first observed 8-9 days after nerve crush. No evidence was found that either castration or testosterone injections altered the process of reinnervation after the nerve crush, with the conclusion being valid at the 0.05 p level. The most reliable index of reinnervation was found to be the twitch:tetanus ratio, a factor of use in future studies of the reinnervation of skeletal muscle.

  17. Neurolytic celiac plexus block enhances skeletal muscle insulin signaling and attenuates insulin resistance in GK rats

    PubMed Central

    LI, JUN; CHEN, TAO; LI, KUN; YAN, HONGTAO; LI, XIAOWEI; YANG, YUN; ZHANG, YULAN; SU, BINGYIN; LI, FUXIANG

    2016-01-01

    Non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) is associated with chronic inflammatory activity and disrupted insulin signaling, leading to insulin resistance (IR). The present study investigated the benefits of neurolytic celiac plexus block (NCPB) on IR in a rat NIDDM model. Goto-Kakizaki rats fed a high-fat, high-glucose diet to induce signs of NIDDM were randomly divided into NCPB and control groups; these received daily bilateral 0.5% lidocaine or 0.9% saline injections into the celiac plexus, respectively. Following 14 and 28 daily injections, rats were subject to oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs) or sacrificed for the analysis of serum free fatty acids (FFAs), serum inflammatory cytokines and skeletal muscle insulin signaling. Compared with controls, rats in the NCPB group demonstrated significantly (P<0.05) lower baseline, 60-min and 120-min OGTT values, lower 120-min serum insulin, lower IR [higher insulin sensitivity index (ISI1) and lower ISI2) and lower serum FFAs, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6. Conversely, NCPB rats exhibited higher basal and insulin-stimulated skeletal muscle glucose uptake and higher skeletal muscle insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) and glucose transporter type 4 expression. There were no differences between the groups in insulin receptor β (Rβ) or Akt expression; however Rβ-Y1162/Y1163 and Akt-S473 phosphorylation levels were higher and IRS-1-S307 phosphorylation were lower in NCPB rats than in the controls. These results indicate that NCPB improved insulin signaling and reduced IR, possibly by inhibiting inflammatory cytokine release. PMID:27168847

  18. Evaluation of the response of rat skeletal muscle to a model of weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Templeton, G. H.; Padalino, M.; Glasberg, M.; Manton, J.; Silver, P.; Sutko, J.

    1982-01-01

    Suspension of rats in a head-down tilt position such that their hind limbs are non-load bearing has been proposed as a model for weightlessness. Changes observed in metabolism, bone formation (Morey et al., 1979), and muscle catabolism (Mussachia et al., 1980) support the validity of the model. To further document this model, the effects of suspension on the mechanical, biochemical and histochemical characteristics of two hind limb skeletal muscles, the gastrocnemius and the soleus, are investigated.

  19. Altered expression of genes regulating skeletal muscle mass in the portacaval anastomosis rat.

    PubMed

    Dasarathy, Srinivasan; Muc, Sean; Hisamuddin, Kola; Edmison, John M; Dodig, Milan; McCullough, Arthur J; Kalhan, Satish C

    2007-04-01

    We examined the temporal relationship between portacaval anastomosis (PCA), weight gain, changes in skeletal muscle mass and molecular markers of protein synthesis, protein breakdown, and satellite cell proliferation and differentiation. Male Sprague-Dawley rats with end to side PCA (n=24) were compared with sham-operated pair-fed rats (n=24). Whole body weight, lean body mass, and forelimb grip strength were determined at weekly intervals. The skeletal muscle expression of the ubiquitin proteasome system, myostatin, its receptor (the activin 2B receptor) and its signal, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (CDKI) p21, insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I and its receptor (IGF-I receptor-alpha), and markers of satellite cell proliferation and differentiation were quantified. PCA rats did not gain body weight and had lower lean body mass, forelimb grip strength, and gastrocnemius muscle weight. The skeletal muscle expression of the mRNA of ubiquitin proteasome components was higher in PCA rats in the first 2 wk followed by a lower expression in the subsequent 2 wk (P<0.01). The mRNA and protein of myostatin, activin 2B receptor, and CDKI p21 were higher, whereas IGF-I and its receptor as well as markers of satellite cell function (proliferating nuclear cell antigen, myoD, myf5, and myogenin) were lower at weeks 3 and 4 following PCA (P < 0.05). We conclude that PCA resulted in uninhibited proteolysis in the initial 2 wk. This was followed by an adaptive response in the later 2 wk consisting of an increased expression of myostatin that may have contributed to reduced muscle protein synthesis, impaired satellite cell function, and lower skeletal muscle mass.

  20. Functional Myotube Formation from Adult Rat Satellite Cells in a Defined Serum-free System

    PubMed Central

    McAleer, Christopher W.; Rumsey, John W.; Stancescu, Maria; Hickman, James J.

    2016-01-01

    This manuscript describes the development of a culture system whereby mature contracting myotubes were formed from adult rat derived satellite cells. Satellite cells, extracted from the Tibialis Anterior (TA) of adult rats, were grown in defined serum-free growth and differentiation media, on a non-biological substrate, N-1[3-trimethoxysilyl propyl] diethylenetriamine. Myotubes were evaluated morphologically and immunocytochemically, using MyHC specific antibodies, as well as functionally using patch clamp electrophysiology to measure ion channel activity. Results indicated the establishment of the rapid expression of adult myosin isoforms that contrasts to their slow development in embryonic cultures. This culture system has applications in the understanding and treatment of age related muscle myopathy, muscular dystrophy, and for skeletal muscle engineering by providing a more relevant phenotype for both in vitro and in vivo applications. PMID:25683642

  1. The small-molecule fast skeletal troponin activator, CK-2127107, improves exercise tolerance in a rat model of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Hwee, Darren T; Kennedy, Adam R; Hartman, James J; Ryans, Julie; Durham, Nickie; Malik, Fady I; Jasper, Jeffrey R

    2015-04-01

    Heart failure-mediated skeletal myopathy, which is characterized by muscle atrophy and muscle metabolism dysfunction, often manifests as dyspnea and limb muscle fatigue. We have previously demonstrated that increasing Ca(2+) sensitivity of the sarcomere by a small-molecule fast skeletal troponin activator improves skeletal muscle force and exercise performance in healthy rats and models of neuromuscular disease. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of a novel fast skeletal troponin activator, CK-2127107 (2-aminoalkyl-5-N-heteroarylpyrimidine), on skeletal muscle function and exercise performance in rats exhibiting heart failure-mediated skeletal myopathy. Rats underwent a left anterior descending coronary artery ligation, resulting in myocardial infarction and a progressive decline in cardiac function [left anterior descending coronary artery heart failure (LAD-HF)]. Compared with sham-operated control rats, LAD-HF rat hindlimb and diaphragm muscles exhibited significant muscle atrophy. Fatigability was increased during repeated in situ isokinetic plantar flexor muscle contractions. CK-2127107 produced a leftward shift in the force-Ca(2+) relationship of skinned, single diaphragm, and extensor digitorum longus fibers. Exercise performance, which was assessed by rotarod running, was lower in vehicle-treated LAD-HF rats than in sham controls (116 ± 22 versus 193 ± 31 seconds, respectively; mean ± S.E.M.; P = 0.04). In the LAD-HF rats, a single oral dose of CK-2127107 (10 mg/kg p.o.) increased running time compared with vehicle treatment (283 ± 47 versus 116 ± 22 seconds; P = 0.0004). In summary, CK-2127107 substantially increases exercise performance in this heart failure model, suggesting that modulation of skeletal muscle function by a fast skeletal troponin activator may be a useful therapeutic in heart failure-associated exercise intolerance. PMID:25678535

  2. The small-molecule fast skeletal troponin activator, CK-2127107, improves exercise tolerance in a rat model of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Hwee, Darren T; Kennedy, Adam R; Hartman, James J; Ryans, Julie; Durham, Nickie; Malik, Fady I; Jasper, Jeffrey R

    2015-04-01

    Heart failure-mediated skeletal myopathy, which is characterized by muscle atrophy and muscle metabolism dysfunction, often manifests as dyspnea and limb muscle fatigue. We have previously demonstrated that increasing Ca(2+) sensitivity of the sarcomere by a small-molecule fast skeletal troponin activator improves skeletal muscle force and exercise performance in healthy rats and models of neuromuscular disease. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of a novel fast skeletal troponin activator, CK-2127107 (2-aminoalkyl-5-N-heteroarylpyrimidine), on skeletal muscle function and exercise performance in rats exhibiting heart failure-mediated skeletal myopathy. Rats underwent a left anterior descending coronary artery ligation, resulting in myocardial infarction and a progressive decline in cardiac function [left anterior descending coronary artery heart failure (LAD-HF)]. Compared with sham-operated control rats, LAD-HF rat hindlimb and diaphragm muscles exhibited significant muscle atrophy. Fatigability was increased during repeated in situ isokinetic plantar flexor muscle contractions. CK-2127107 produced a leftward shift in the force-Ca(2+) relationship of skinned, single diaphragm, and extensor digitorum longus fibers. Exercise performance, which was assessed by rotarod running, was lower in vehicle-treated LAD-HF rats than in sham controls (116 ± 22 versus 193 ± 31 seconds, respectively; mean ± S.E.M.; P = 0.04). In the LAD-HF rats, a single oral dose of CK-2127107 (10 mg/kg p.o.) increased running time compared with vehicle treatment (283 ± 47 versus 116 ± 22 seconds; P = 0.0004). In summary, CK-2127107 substantially increases exercise performance in this heart failure model, suggesting that modulation of skeletal muscle function by a fast skeletal troponin activator may be a useful therapeutic in heart failure-associated exercise intolerance.

  3. Effect of seven days of spaceflight on hindlimb muscle protein, RNA and DNA in adult rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, J. M.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1985-01-01

    Effects of seven days of spaceflight on skeletal muscle (soleus, gastrocnemius, EDL) content of protein, RNA and DNA were determined in adult rats. Whereas total protein contents were reduced in parallel with muscle weights, myofibrillar protein appeared to be more affected. There were no significant changes in absolute DNA contents, but a significant (P less than 0.05) increase in DNA concentration (microgram/milligram) in soleus muscles from flight rats. Absolute RNA contents were significantly (P less than 0.025) decreased in the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles of flight rats, with RNA concentrations reduced 15-30 percent. These results agree with previous ground-based observations on the suspended rat with unloaded hindlimbs and support continued use of this model.

  4. Impairment of Electron Transfer Chain Induced by Acute Carnosine Administration in Skeletal Muscle of Young Rats

    PubMed Central

    Macarini, José Roberto; Maravai, Soliany Grassi; Cararo, José Henrique; Dimer, Nádia Webber; Gonçalves, Cinara Ludvig; Kist, Luiza Wilges; Bogo, Mauricio Reis; Schuck, Patrícia Fernanda; Streck, Emilio Luiz; Ferreira, Gustavo Costa

    2014-01-01

    Serum carnosinase deficiency is an inherited disorder that leads to an accumulation of carnosine in the brain tissue, cerebrospinal fluid, skeletal muscle, and other tissues of affected patients. Considering that high levels of carnosine are associated with neurological dysfunction and that the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in serum carnosinase deficiency remain poorly understood, we investigated the in vivo effects of carnosine on bioenergetics parameters, namely, respiratory chain complexes (I–III, II, and II-III), malate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase, and creatine kinase activities and the expression of mitochondrial-specific transcription factors (NRF-1, PGC-1α, and TFAM) in skeletal muscle of young Wistar rats. We observed a significant decrease of complexes I–III and II activities in animals receiving carnosine acutely, as compared to control group. However, no significant alterations in respiratory chain complexes, citric acid cycle enzymes, and creatine kinase activities were found between rats receiving carnosine chronically and control group animals. As compared to control group, mRNA levels of NRF-1, PGC-1α, and TFAM were unchanged. The present findings indicate that electron transfer through the respiratory chain is impaired in skeletal muscle of rats receiving carnosine acutely. In case these findings are confirmed by further studies and ATP depletion is also observed, impairment of bioenergetics could be considered a putative mechanism responsible for the muscle damage observed in serum carnosinase-deficient patients. PMID:24877122

  5. Impairment of electron transfer chain induced by acute carnosine administration in skeletal muscle of young rats.

    PubMed

    Macarini, José Roberto; Maravai, Soliany Grassi; Cararo, José Henrique; Dimer, Nádia Webber; Gonçalves, Cinara Ludvig; Kist, Luiza Wilges; Bogo, Mauricio Reis; Schuck, Patrícia Fernanda; Streck, Emilio Luiz; Ferreira, Gustavo Costa

    2014-01-01

    Serum carnosinase deficiency is an inherited disorder that leads to an accumulation of carnosine in the brain tissue, cerebrospinal fluid, skeletal muscle, and other tissues of affected patients. Considering that high levels of carnosine are associated with neurological dysfunction and that the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in serum carnosinase deficiency remain poorly understood, we investigated the in vivo effects of carnosine on bioenergetics parameters, namely, respiratory chain complexes (I-III, II, and II-III), malate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase, and creatine kinase activities and the expression of mitochondrial-specific transcription factors (NRF-1, PGC-1α , and TFAM) in skeletal muscle of young Wistar rats. We observed a significant decrease of complexes I-III and II activities in animals receiving carnosine acutely, as compared to control group. However, no significant alterations in respiratory chain complexes, citric acid cycle enzymes, and creatine kinase activities were found between rats receiving carnosine chronically and control group animals. As compared to control group, mRNA levels of NRF-1, PGC-1α , and TFAM were unchanged. The present findings indicate that electron transfer through the respiratory chain is impaired in skeletal muscle of rats receiving carnosine acutely. In case these findings are confirmed by further studies and ATP depletion is also observed, impairment of bioenergetics could be considered a putative mechanism responsible for the muscle damage observed in serum carnosinase-deficient patients. PMID:24877122

  6. Regional alterations of type I collagen in rat tibia induced by skeletal unloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiiba, Masashi; Arnaud, Sara B.; Tanzawa, Hideki; Kitamura, Eiji; Yamauchi, Mitsuo

    2002-01-01

    Skeletal unloading induces loss of mineral density in weight-bearing bones that leads to inferior bone mechanical strength. This appears to be caused by a failure of bone formation; however, its mechanisms still are not well understood. The objective of this study was to characterize collagen, the predominant matrix protein in bone, in various regions of tibia of rats that were subjected to skeletal unloading by 4 weeks tail suspension. Sixteen male Sprague-Dawley rats (4 months old) were divided into tail suspension and ambulatory controls (eight rats each). After the tail suspension, tibias from each animal were collected and divided into five regions and collagen was analyzed. The collagen cross-linking and the extent of lysine (Lys) hydroxylation in unloaded bones were significantly altered in proximal epiphysis, diaphysis, and, in particular, proximal metaphysis but not in distal regions. The pool of immature/nonmineralized collagen measured by its extractability with a chaotropic solvent was significantly increased in proximal metaphysis. These results suggest that skeletal unloading induced an accumulation of post-translationally altered nonmineralized collagen and that these changes are bone region specific. These alterations might be caused by impaired osteoblastic function/differentiation resulting in a mineralization defect.

  7. Cholesterol removal from adult skeletal muscle impairs excitation-contraction coupling and aging reduces caveolin-3 and alters the expression of other triadic proteins.

    PubMed

    Barrientos, Genaro; Llanos, Paola; Hidalgo, Jorge; Bolaños, Pura; Caputo, Carlo; Riquelme, Alexander; Sánchez, Gina; Quest, Andrew F G; Hidalgo, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol and caveolin are integral membrane components that modulate the function/location of many cellular proteins. Skeletal muscle fibers, which have unusually high cholesterol levels in transverse tubules, express the caveolin-3 isoform but its association with transverse tubules remains contentious. Cholesterol removal impairs excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling in amphibian and mammalian fetal skeletal muscle fibers. Here, we show that treating single muscle fibers from adult mice with the cholesterol removing agent methyl-β-cyclodextrin decreased fiber cholesterol by 26%, altered the location pattern of caveolin-3 and of the voltage dependent calcium channel Cav1.1, and suppressed or reduced electrically evoked Ca(2+) transients without affecting membrane integrity or causing sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium depletion. We found that transverse tubules from adult muscle and triad fractions that contain ~10% attached transverse tubules, but not SR membranes, contained caveolin-3 and Cav1.1; both proteins partitioned into detergent-resistant membrane fractions highly enriched in cholesterol. Aging entails significant deterioration of skeletal muscle function. We found that triad fractions from aged rats had similar cholesterol and RyR1 protein levels compared to triads from young rats, but had lower caveolin-3 and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase and increased Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase protein levels. Both triad fractions had comparable NADPH oxidase (NOX) activity and protein content of NOX2 subunits (p47(phox) and gp91(phox)), implying that NOX activity does not increase during aging. These findings show that partial cholesterol removal impairs E-C coupling and alters caveolin-3 and Cav1.1 location pattern, and that aging reduces caveolin-3 protein content and modifies the expression of other triadic proteins. We discuss the possible implications of these findings for skeletal muscle function in young and aged animals.

  8. Anesthesia with propofol induces insulin resistance systemically in skeletal and cardiac muscles and liver of rats

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuda, Yoshikazu; Fukushima, Yuji; Kaneki, Masao; Martyn, J.A. Jeevendra

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: ► Propofol, as a model anesthetic drug, induced whole body insulin resistance. ► Propofol anesthesia decreased glucose infusion rate to maintain euglycemia. ► Propofol decreased insulin-mediated glucose uptake in skeletal and cardiac muscles. ► Propofol increased hepatic glucose output confirming hepatic insulin resistance. -- Abstract: Hyperglycemia together with hepatic and muscle insulin resistance are common features in critically ill patients, and these changes are associated with enhanced inflammatory response, increased susceptibility to infection, muscle wasting, and worsened prognosis. Tight blood glucose control by intensive insulin treatment may reduce the morbidity and mortality in intensive care units. Although some anesthetics have been shown to cause insulin resistance, it remains unknown how and in which tissues insulin resistance is induced by anesthetics. Moreover, the effects of propofol, a clinically relevant intravenous anesthetic, also used in the intensive care unit for sedation, on insulin sensitivity have not yet been investigated. Euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp study was performed in rats anesthetized with propofol and conscious unrestrained rats. To evaluate glucose uptake in tissues and hepatic glucose output [{sup 3}H]glucose and 2-deoxy[{sup 14}C]glucose were infused during the clamp study. Anesthesia with propofol induced a marked whole-body insulin resistance compared with conscious rats, as reflected by significantly decreased glucose infusion rate to maintain euglycemia. Insulin-stimulated tissue glucose uptake was decreased in skeletal muscle and heart, and hepatic glucose output was increased in propofol anesthetized rats. Anesthesia with propofol induces systemic insulin resistance along with decreases in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal and heart muscle and attenuation of the insulin-mediated suppression of hepatic glucose output in rats.

  9. Effects of aging on vasoconstrictor and mechanical properties of rat skeletal muscle arterioles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller-Delp, Judy; Spier, Scott A.; Ramsey, Michael W.; Lesniewski, Lisa A.; Papadopoulos, Anthony; Humphrey, J. D.; Delp, Michael D.

    2002-01-01

    Exercise capacity and skeletal muscle blood flow during exercise are reduced with advancing age. This reduction in blood flow capacity may be related to increased reactivity of skeletal muscle resistance vessels to vasoconstrictor stimuli. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that aging results in increased vasoconstrictor responses of skeletal muscle resistance arterioles. First-order (1A) arterioles (90-220 microm) from the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles of young (4 mo) and aged (24 mo) Fischer-344 rats were isolated, cannulated, and pressurized via hydrostatic reservoirs. Vasoconstriction in response to increases in norepinephrine (NE; 1 x 10(-9)-1 x 10(-4) M) and KCl (20-100 mM) concentrations and increases in intraluminal pressure (10-130 cmH(2)O) were evaluated in the absence of flow. Responses to NE and KCl were similar in both soleus and gastrocnemius muscle arterioles from young and aged rats. In contrast, active myogenic responses to changes in intraluminal pressure were diminished in soleus and gastrocnemius arterioles from aged rats. To assess whether alterations in the mechanical properties of resistance arterioles underlie altered myogenic responsiveness, passive diameter responses to pressure and mechanical stiffness were evaluated. There was no effect of age on the structural behavior (passive pressure-diameter relationship) or stiffness of arterioles from either the soleus or gastrocnemius muscles. These results suggest that aging does not result in a nonspecific decrease in vasoconstrictor responsiveness of skeletal muscle arterioles. Rather, aging-induced adaptations of vasoreactivity of resistance arterioles appear to be limited to mechanisms that are uniquely involved in the signaling of the myogenic response.

  10. Skeletal muscle afferent regulation of bioassayable growth hormone in the rat pituitary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosselink, K. L.; Grindeland, R. E.; Roy, R. R.; Zhong, H.; Bigbee, A. J.; Grossman, E. J.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1998-01-01

    There are forms of growth hormone (GH) in the plasma and pituitary of the rat and in the plasma of humans that are undetected by presently available immunoassays (iGH) but can be measured by bioassay (bGH). Although the regulation of iGH release is well documented, the mechanism(s) of bGH release is unclear. On the basis of changes in bGH and iGH secretion in rats that had been exposed to microgravity conditions, we hypothesized that neural afferents play a role in regulating the release of these hormones. To examine whether bGH secretion can be modulated by afferent input from skeletal muscle, the proximal or distal ends of severed hindlimb fast muscle nerves were stimulated ( approximately 2 times threshold) in anesthetized rats. Plasma bGH increased approximately 250%, and pituitary bGH decreased approximately 60% after proximal nerve trunk stimulation. The bGH response was independent of muscle mass or whether the muscles were flexors or extensors. Distal nerve stimulation had little or no effect on plasma or pituitary bGH. Plasma iGH concentrations were unchanged after proximal nerve stimulation. Although there may be multiple regulatory mechanisms of bGH, the present results demonstrate that the activation of low-threshold afferents from fast skeletal muscles can play a regulatory role in the release of bGH, but not iGH, from the pituitary in anesthetized rats.

  11. Skeletal dosimetry in a voxel-based rat phantom for internal exposures to photons and electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Xie Tianwu; Han Dao; Liu Yang; Sun Wenjuan; Liu Qian

    2010-05-15

    Purpose: The skeleton makes a significant contribution to the whole body absorbed dose evaluation of rats, since the bone marrow and bone surface in the skeleton express high radiosensitivity and are considered to be important dose-limiting tissues. The bone marrow can be categorized as red bone marrow (RBM) and yellow bone marrow (YBM). It is important to investigate the bone marrow in skeletal dosimetry. Methods: Cryosectional color images of the skeleton of a 156 g rat were segmented into mineral bone (including cortical bone and trabecular bone), RBM, and YBM. These three tissue types were identified at 40 different bone sites and integrated into a previously developed voxel-based rat computational phantom. Photon and electron skeletal absorbed fractions were then calculated using the MCNPX Monte Carlo code. Results: Absorbed fraction (AF) and specific absorbed fraction (SAF) for mineral bone, RBM, and YBM at the 40 different bone sites were established for monoenergetic photon and electron sources placed in 18 organs and seven bone sites. Discrete photon energy was varied from 0.01 to 5.0 MeV in 21 discrete steps, while 21 discrete electron energies were studied, from 0.1 to 10.0 MeV. The trends and values found were consistent with the results of other researchers [M. G. Stabin, T. E. Peterson, G. E. Holburn, and M. A. Emmons, ''Voxel-based mouse and rat models for internal dose calculations,'' J. Nucl. Med. 47, 655-659 (2006)]. S-factors for the radionuclides {sup 169}Er, {sup 143}Pr, {sup 89}Sr, {sup 32}P, and {sup 90}Y, located in 18 organs and seven bone sites for the skeleton, were calculated and are provided in detail. Conclusions: For internal dose calculations, the AF data reveal that the mineral bone in the rat skeletal system is responsible for significant attenuation of gamma rays, especially at low energies. The photon SAF curves of RBM show that, for photon energies greater than 0.6 MeV, there is an increase in secondary photons emitted from the

  12. Glutathione depletion and acute exercise increase O-GlcNAc protein modification in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Peternelj, Tina Tinkara; Marsh, Susan A; Strobel, Natalie A; Matsumoto, Aya; Briskey, David; Dalbo, Vincent J; Tucker, Patrick S; Coombes, Jeff S

    2015-02-01

    Post-translational modification of intracellular proteins with O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) profoundly affects protein structure, function, and metabolism. Although many skeletal muscle proteins are O-GlcNAcylated, the modification has not been extensively studied in this tissue, especially in the context of exercise. This study investigated the effects of glutathione depletion and acute exercise on O-GlcNAc protein modification in rat skeletal muscle. Diethyl maleate (DEM) was used to deplete intracellular glutathione and rats were subjected to a treadmill run. White gastrocnemius and soleus muscles were analyzed for glutathione status, O-GlcNAc and O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) protein levels, and mRNA expression of OGT, O-GlcNAcase and glutamine:fructose-6-phosphate amidotransferase. DEM and exercise both reduced intracellular glutathione and increased O-GlcNAc. DEM upregulated OGT protein expression. The effects of the interventions were significant 4 h after exercise (P < 0.05). The changes in the mRNA levels of O-GlcNAc enzymes were different in the two muscles, potentially resulting from different rates of oxidative stress and metabolic demands between the muscle types. These findings indicate that oxidative environment promotes O-GlcNAcylation in skeletal muscle and suggest an interrelationship between cellular redox state and O-GlcNAc protein modification. This could represent one mechanism underlying cellular adaptation to oxidative stress and health benefits of exercise. PMID:25416863

  13. Enzyme activities and adenine nucleotide content in aorta, heart muscle and skeletal muscle from uraemic rats.

    PubMed Central

    Krog, M.; Ejerblad, S.; Agren, A.

    1986-01-01

    A prominent feature of arterial and myocardial lesions in uraemia is necrosis of the smooth muscle cells. In this study the possibility of detecting metabolic disturbances before necroses appear was investigated. The investigation was made on rats with moderate uraemia (mean serum creatinine 165 mumol/l) of 12 weeks duration. Enzyme activities and concentrations of adenine nucleotides were measured in aorta, heart and skeletal muscles. Histological examination disclosed no changes in these organs. Hexokinase, an important glycolytic enzyme, showed decreased activity in the skeletal muscle and aorta, whereas the hexosemonophosphate shunt enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase remained unchanged. The aspartate aminotransferase was increased in the skeletal muscle. Fat metabolism was not disturbed as reflected by unchanged activity of hydroxyacyl-CoA-dehydrogenase. Adenylatekinase which is important for the energy supply showed markedly increased activities in all tissues examined from the uraemic rats. Decreased ATP levels were found in the heart muscle and the aorta of the uraemic animals, whereas the total pool of adenosine phosphates remained unchanged in all tissues. The animal model described offers a useful means of detecting early changes in uraemia and should be useful for studying the effects of different treatments of uraemic complications. PMID:3718844

  14. Carnosine Content in Skeletal Muscle Is Dependent on Vitamin B6 Status in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Suidasari, Sofya; Stautemas, Jan; Uragami, Shinji; Yanaka, Noriyuki; Derave, Wim; Kato, Norihisa

    2016-01-01

    Carnosine, a histidine-containing dipeptide, is well known to be associated with skeletal muscle performance. However, there is limited information on the effect of dietary micronutrients on muscle carnosine level. Pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP), the active form of vitamin B6, is involved in amino acid metabolisms in the body as a cofactor. We hypothesized that enzymes involved in β-alanine biosynthesis, the rate-limiting precursor of carnosine, may also be PLP dependent. Thus, we examined the effects of dietary vitamin B6 on the muscle carnosine content of rats. Male and female rats were fed a diet containing 1, 7, or 35 mg pyridoxine (PN) HCl/kg for 6 weeks. Carnosine in skeletal muscles was quantified by ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. In the gastrocnemius muscle of male rats, carnosine concentration was significantly higher in the 7 and 35 mg groups (+70 and +61%, respectively) than in the 1 mg PN HCl/kg group, whereas that in the soleus muscle of male rats was significantly higher only in the 7 mg group (+43%) than in the 1 mg PN HCl/kg group (P < 0.05). In both muscles of female rats, carnosine concentration was significantly higher in the 7 and 35 mg groups (+32 to +226%) than in the 1 mg PN HCl/kg group (P < 0.05). We also found that, compared to the 1 mg group, β-alanine concentrations in the 7 and 35 mg groups were markedly elevated in gastrocnemius muscles of male (+153 and +148%, respectively, P < 0.05) and female (+381 and +437%, respectively, P < 0.05) rats. Noteworthy, the concentrations of ornithine in the 7 and 35 mg groups were decreased in gastrocnemius muscles of male rats (−46 and −54%, respectively, P < 0.05), which strongly inversely correlated with β-alanine concentration (r = −0.84, P < 0.01). In humans, 19% lower muscle carnosine content was found in soleus muscle of women of the lower plasma PLP tertile, but this was not observed in

  15. Colchicine protects rat skeletal muscle from ischemia/reperfusion injury by suppressing oxidative stress and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liangrong; Shan, Yuanlu; Chen, Lei; Lin, Bi; Xiong, Xiangqing; Lin, Lina; Jin, Lida

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Neutrophils play an important role in ischemia/reperfusion (IR) induced skeletal muscle injury. Microtubules are required for neutrophil activation in response to various stimuli. This study aimed to investigate the effects of colchicine, a microtubule-disrupting agent, on skeletal muscle IR injury in a rat hindlimb ischemia model. Materials and Methods: Twenty-one Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly allocated into three groups IR group, colchicine treated-IR (CO) group and sham operation (SM) group. Rats of both the IR and CO groups were subjected to 3 hr of ischemia by clamping the right femoral artery followed by 2 hr of reperfusion. Colchicine (1 mg/kg) was administrated intraperitoneally prior to hindlimb ischemia in the CO group. After 2 hr of reperfusion, we measured superoxide dismutase (SOD) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activities, and malondialdehyde (MDA), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-1β levels in the muscle samples. Plasma creatinine kinase (CK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels were measured. We also evaluated the histological damage score and wet/dry weight (W/D) ratio. Results: The histological damage score, W/D ratio, MPO activity, MDA, TNF-α and IL-1β levels in muscle tissues were significantly increased, SOD activity was decreased, and plasma CK and LDH levels were remarkably elevated in both the IR and CO groups compared to the SM group (P<0.05). Colchicine treatment significantly reduced muscle damage and edema, oxidative stress and levels of the inflammatory parameters in the CO group compared to the IR group (P<0.05). Conclusion: Colchicine attenuates IR-induced skeletal muscle injury in rats. PMID:27482349

  16. Muscle contractile activity regulates Sirt3 protein expression in rat skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Hokari, Fumi; Kawasaki, Emi; Sakai, Atsushi; Koshinaka, Keiichi; Sakuma, Kunihiro; Kawanaka, Kentaro

    2010-08-01

    Sirt3, a member of the sirtuin family, is known to control cellular mitochondrial function. Furthermore, because sirtuins require NAD for their deacetylase activity, nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt), which is a rate-limiting enzyme in the intracellular NAD biosynthetic pathway, influences their activity. We examined the effects of exercise training and normal postural contractile activity on Sirt3 and Nampt protein expression in rat skeletal muscles. Male rats were trained by treadmill running at 20 m/min, 60 min/day, 7 days/wk for 4 wk. This treadmill training program increased the Sirt3 protein expression in the soleus and plantaris muscles by 49% and 41%, respectively (P < 0.05). Moreover, a 4-wk voluntary wheel-running program also induced 66% and 95% increases in Sirt3 protein in the plantaris and triceps muscles of rats, respectively (P < 0.05). Treadmill-running and voluntary running training induced no significant changes in Nampt protein expression in skeletal muscles. In resting rats, the soleus muscle, which is recruited during normal postural activity, possessed the greatest expression levels of the Sirt3 and Nampt proteins, followed by the plantaris and triceps muscles. Furthermore, the Sirt3, but not Nampt, protein level was reduced in the soleus muscles from immobilized hindlimbs compared with that shown in the contralateral control muscle. These results demonstrated that 1) Sirt3 protein expression is upregulated by exercise training in skeletal muscles and 2) local postural contractile activity plays an important role in maintaining a high level of Sirt3 protein expression in postural muscle.

  17. Impaired Exercise Performance and Skeletal Muscle Mitochondrial Function in Rats with Secondary Carnitine Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Bouitbir, Jamal; Haegler, Patrizia; Singh, François; Joerin, Lorenz; Felser, Andrea; Duthaler, Urs; Krähenbühl, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The effects of carnitine depletion upon exercise performance and skeletal muscle mitochondrial function remain largely unexplored. We therefore investigated the effect of N-trimethyl-hydrazine-3-propionate (THP), a carnitine analog inhibiting carnitine biosynthesis and renal carnitine reabsorption, on physical performance and skeletal muscle mitochondrial function in rats. Methods: Male Sprague Dawley rats were treated daily with water (control rats; n = 12) or with 20 mg/100 g body weight THP (n = 12) via oral gavage for 3 weeks. Following treatment, half of the animals of each group performed an exercise test until exhaustion. Results: Distance covered and exercise performance were lower in THP-treated compared to control rats. In the oxidative soleus muscle, carnitine depletion caused atrophy (–24%) and impaired function of complex II and IV of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. The free radical leak (ROS production relative to oxygen consumption) was increased and the cellular glutathione pool decreased. Moreover, mRNA expression of markers of mitochondrial biogenesis and mitochondrial DNA were decreased in THP-treated compared to control rats. In comparison, in the glycolytic gastrocnemius muscle, carnitine depletion was associated with impaired function of complex IV and increased free radical leak, whilst muscle weight and cellular glutathione pool were maintained. Markers of mitochondrial proliferation and mitochondrial DNA were unaffected. Conclusions: Carnitine deficiency is associated with impaired exercise capacity in rats treated with THP. THP-induced carnitine deficiency is associated with impaired function of the electron transport chain in oxidative and glycolytic muscle as well as with atrophy and decreased mitochondrial DNA in oxidative muscle. PMID:27559315

  18. Muscle mechanical properties of adult and older rats submitted to exercise after immobilization

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, Fábio Yoshikazu; Camargo, Regina Celi Trindade; Job, Aldo Eloizo; Ozaki, Guilherme Akio Tamura; Koike, Tatiana Emy; Camargo Filho, José Carlos Silva

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To describe the effects of immobilization, free remobilization and remobilization by physical exercise about mechanical properties of skeletal muscle of rats of two age groups. Methods 56 Wistar rats divided into two groups according to age, an adult group (five months) and an older group (15 months). These groups were subdivided in: control, immobilized, free remobilized and remobilized by physical exercise. The pelvic limb of rats was immobilized for seven days. The exercise protocol consisted of five swimming sessions, once per day and 25 minutes per session. The gastrocnemius muscle was subjected to tensile tests, and evaluated the properties: load at the maximum limit, stretching at the maximum limit and stiffness. Results The immobilization reduced the values of load at the maximum limit and the remobilization protocols were not sufficient to restore control levels in adult group and older rats. The stretching at the maximum limit differs only in the older group. Conclusions The immobilization reduces the muscle's ability to bear loads and exercise protocol tends to restore the default at control values in adult and older rats. The age factor only interfered in the stretching at the maximum limit, inducing a reduction of this property in the post-immobilization. Level of Evidence II, Investigating the Results of Treatment. PMID:24453606

  19. Acid phosphatase and protease activities in immobilized rat skeletal muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witzmann, F. A.; Troup, J. P.; Fitts, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of hind-limb immobilization on selected Iysosomal enzyme activities was studied in rat hing-limb muscles composed primarily of type 1. 2A, or 2B fibers. Following immobilization, acid protease and acid phosphatase both exhibited signifcant increases in their activity per unit weight in all three fiber types. Acid phosphatase activity increased at day 14 of immobilization in the three muscles and returned to control levels by day 21. Acid protease activity also changed biphasically, displaying a higher and earlier rise than acid phosphatase. The pattern of change in acid protease, but not acid phosphatase, closely parallels observed muscle wasting. The present data therefore demonstrate enhanced proteolytic capacity of all three fiber types early during muscular atrophy. In addition, the data suggest a dependence of basal hydrolytic and proteolytic activities and their adaptive response to immobilization on muscle fiber composition.

  20. Effects of microgravity on myogenic factor expressions during postnatal development of rat skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inobe, Manabu; Inobe, Ikuko; Adams, Gregory R.; Baldwin, Kenneth M.; Takeda, Shin'Ichi

    2002-01-01

    To clarify the role of gravity in the postnatal development of skeletal muscle, we exposed neonatal rats at 7 days of age to microgravity. After 16 days of spaceflight, tibialis anterior, plantaris, medial gastrocnemius, and soleus muscles were removed from the hindlimb musculature and examined for the expression of MyoD-family transcription factors such as MyoD, myogenin, and MRF4. For this purpose, we established a unique semiquantitative method, based on RT-PCR, using specific primers tagged with infrared fluorescence. The relative expression of MyoD in the tibialis anterior and plantaris muscles and that of myogenin in the plantaris and soleus muscles were significantly reduced (P < 0.001) in the flight animals. In contrast, MRF4 expression was not changed in any muscle. These results suggest that MyoD and myogenin, but not MRF4, are sensitive to gravity-related stimuli in some skeletal muscles during postnatal development.

  1. Caffeine-induced fetal rat over-exposure to maternal glucocorticoid and histone methylation of liver IGF-1 might cause skeletal growth retardation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yang; Liu, Jin; Deng, Yu; Cao, Hong; Xu, Dan; Cu, Fenglong; Lei, Youying; Magdalou, Jacques; Wu, Min; Chen, Liaobin; Wang, Hui

    2012-11-15

    Several epidemiological investigations, including previous work by our laboratory, indicate that maternal caffeine consumption is associated with intrauterine growth retardation and impaired fetal length growth. Skeletal development is critical for length growth. In the present study, our goals were to determine the effects of prenatal caffeine exposures on fetal skeletal growth and to investigate the mechanisms associated with such effects. Pregnant Wistar rats were injected intragastrically with 120mg/kg of caffeine intragastrically each day from gestational days 11-20. Maternal prenatal caffeine exposure was associated with decreased fetal femur lengths and inhibited of synthesis of extracellular matrices in fetal growth plates Moreover, caffeine exposure significantly increased the levels of fetal blood corticosterone and decreased IGF-1mRNA expression levels in the liver and growth plate. The expression levels of IGF-1 signaling pathway components (IGF-1R, IRS-1, AKT1/2 and Col2A1) were also reduced. In addition, the results of chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that caffeine exposure down-regulated histone methylation of fetal IGF-1 in the liver. These results suggest that prenatal caffeine exposure may inhibit fetal skeletal growth through a mechanism that is associated with increased fetal exposure to maternal glucocorticoids and results in lower IGF-1 signaling pathway activity. Taken together, these results raise important concerns regarding the skeletal growth toxicity of caffeine and potentially indicate the intrauterine origins of adult osteoporosis and osteoarthritis.

  2. Effect of diosgenin, a steroidal sapogenin, on the rat skeletal system.

    PubMed

    Folwarczna, Joanna; Zych, Maria; Nowińska, Barbara; Pytlik, Maria; Bialik, Magdalena; Jagusiak, Anna; Lipecka-Karcz, Maria; Matysiak, Michał

    2016-01-01

    Diosgenin is a steroidal sapogenin present in fenugreek and Dioscorea spp. as glycosides (saponins). Diosgenin has already been reported to inhibit osteoclastogenesis and to stimulate osteogenic activity of osteoblastic cells in vitro, and to exert some antiosteoporotic effects in rats in vivo. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of diosgenin administration on the skeletal system of rats with normal estrogen level and with estrogen deficiency induced by bilateral ovariectomy. The experiments were carried out on 3-month-old non-ovariectomized and ovariectomized Wistar rats, divided into control rats and rats receiving diosgenin (50 mg/kg p.o. daily) for 4 weeks. Serum bone turnover markers, bone mass and mineralization, histomorphometric parameters and mechanical properties were studied. Diosgenin improved some investigated parameters in both non-ovariectomized and ovariectomized rats, in which estrogen deficiency induced osteoporotic changes. Diosgenin increased compact bone formation and probably inhibited cancellous bone resorption, which led to improvement of mechanical properties of compact and cancellous bone. In conclusion, this in vivo study demonstrated that diosgenin may be one of sparse compounds increasing bone formation. PMID:27119728

  3. BIOCHANIN A SHOWS NO EFFECT ON SKELETAL SYSTEM IN OVARIECTOMIZED RATS, WHEN ADMINISTERED IN MODERATE DOSE.

    PubMed

    Kaczmarczyk-Sedlak, Ilona; Zych, Maria; Wojnar, Weronika; Ozimina-Kamińska, Ewa; Dudek, Sławomir; Chadała, Natalia; Kachel, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    Biochanin A is a naturally occurring isoflavone. Its main sources are clover species such as Trifolium pretense, Trifolium subterraneum or Trifolium incarnatum. Phytoestrogens, including isoflavones, are plant-derived substances, which exhibit estrogen-like properties, thus they may be used as an alternative for hormonal replacement therapies and prevent postmenopausal osteoporosis. Therefore, the aim of the presented study, was to investigate the effect of biochanin A on chemistry and mechanical properties of skeletal system in rats with ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis. The animals were divided into 4 groups--(I) sham-operated rats, (II) ovariectomized rats, (III) ovariectomized rats receiving estradiol at a dose of 0.2 mg/kg p.o., which were a positive control, and (IV) ovariectomized rats receiving biochanin A at a dose of 5 mg/kg p.o. for four weeks. The administered dose of biochanin A is considered as moderate for human, which can be received in the dietary supplements, and was established using ten-fold conversion rate resulting from faster metabolism in rats. Obtained results showed that ovariectomy induced harmful changes in bone tissue, causing worsening in both chemistry and mechanical parameters in bones. Administration of biochanin A to ovariectomized rats did not affect any changes in bone tissue in comparison to the bones of untreated ovariectomized rats. There was neither improvement nor deterioration noted in chemical composition and mechanical properties in all analyzed bones. Basing on the results, it could be concluded, that biochanin A administered in a moderate dose shows no influence on bone tissue of rats with ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis.

  4. Skeletal unloading inhibits the in vitro proliferation and differentiation of rat osteoprogenitor cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostenuik, P. J.; Halloran, B. P.; Morey-Holton, E. R.; Bikle, D. D.

    1997-01-01

    Loss of weight bearing in the growing rat decreases bone formation, osteoblast numbers, and bone maturation in unloaded bones. These responses suggest an impairment of osteoblast proliferation and differentiation. To test this assumption, we assessed the effects of skeletal unloading using an in vitro model of osteoprogenitor cell differentiation. Rats were hindlimb elevated for 0 (control), 2, or 5 days, after which their tibial bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) were harvested and cultured. Five days of hindlimb elevation led to significant decreases in proliferation, alkaline phosphatase (AP) enzyme activity, and mineralization of BMSC cultures. Differentiation of BMSCs was analyzed by quantitative competitive polymerase chain reaction of cDNA after 10, 15, 20, and 28 days of culture. cDNA pools were analyzed for the expression of c-fos (an index of proliferation), AP (an index of early osteoblast differentiation), and osteocalcin (a marker of late differentiation). BMSCs from 5-day unloaded rats expressed 50% less c-fos, 61% more AP, and 35% less osteocalcin mRNA compared with controls. These data demonstrate that cultured osteoprogenitor cells retain a memory of their in vivo loading history and indicate that skeletal unloading inhibits proliferation and differentiation of osteoprogenitor cells in vitro.

  5. Cardiolipin linoleic acid content and mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase activity are associated in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Fajardo, Val Andrew; McMeekin, Lauren; Saint, Caitlin; LeBlanc, Paul J

    2015-04-01

    Cardiolipin (CL) is an inner-mitochondrial membrane phospholipid that is important for optimal mitochondrial function. Specifically, CL and CL linoleic (18:2ω6) content are known to be positively associated with cytochrome c oxidase (COX) activity. However, this association has not been examined in skeletal muscle. In this study, rats were fed high-fat diets with a naturally occurring gradient in linoleic acid (coconut oil [CO], 5.8%; flaxseed oil [FO], 13.2%; safflower oil [SO], 75.1%) in an attempt to alter both mitochondrial CL fatty acyl composition and COX activity in rat mixed hind-limb muscle. In general, mitochondrial membrane lipid composition was fairly resistant to dietary treatments as only modest changes in fatty acyl composition were detected in CL and other major mitochondrial phospholipids such as phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE). As a result of this resistance, CL 18:2ω6 content was not different between the dietary groups. Consistent with the lack of changes in CL 18:2ω6 content, mitochondrial COX activity was also not different between the dietary groups. However, correlational analysis using data obtained from rats across the dietary groups showed a significant relationship (p = 0.009, R(2) = 0.21). Specifically, our results suggest that CL 18:2ω6 content may positively influence mitochondrial COX activity thereby making this lipid molecule a potential factor related to mitochondrial health and function in skeletal muscle.

  6. [Effect of weightlessness on the skeletal development of the rat fetus].

    PubMed

    Denisova, L A

    1986-01-01

    The size of the ossified areas of skeletal bones of fetuses of white rats flown onboard Cosmos-1514 during their pregnancy days 13 to 18 was compared with that of synchronous and vivarium controls. The effect of zero-g on the pregnant animals in the course of an active formation of fetal bones involved a distinct (13-17%) arrest of the development of nearly every area of the fetal skeleton. The signs of the arrest development were more manifest in less mature skeletal structures. Since the Ca2 content was identical in the flight and control rats, it can be concluded that the inhibited ossification of the flight fetuses was produced by the impairment of mechanisms controlling Ca2+ incorporation into the growing skeleton. The ossified areas in the skeleton of the flight newborns were significantly larger than those of the synchronous and vivarium controls. This means that during the readaptation period (pregnancy days 18 to 23) the inhibited ossification of the fetal skeleton was completely compensated and that the flight newborns (i. e. the rats whose prenatal development occurred in part in zero-g) were ahead of the controls with respect to the ossification rate.

  7. Citrulline malate supplementation increases muscle efficiency in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Giannesini, Benoît; Le Fur, Yann; Cozzone, Patrick J; Verleye, Marc; Le Guern, Marie-Emmanuelle; Bendahan, David

    2011-09-30

    Citrulline malate (CM; CAS 54940-97-5, Stimol®) is known to limit the deleterious effect of asthenic state on muscle function, but its effect under healthy condition remains poorly documented. The aim of this longitudinal double-blind study was to investigate the effect of oral ingestion of CM on muscle mechanical performance and bioenergetics in normal rat. Gastrocnemius muscle function was investigated strictly non-invasively using nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. A standardized rest-stimulation- (5.7 min of repeated isometric contractions electrically induced by transcutaneous stimulation at a frequency of 3.3 Hz) recovery-protocol was performed twice, i.e., before (t(0)-24 h) and after (t(0)+48 h) CM (3 g/kg/day) or vehicle treatment. CM supplementation did not affect PCr/ATP ratio, [PCr], [Pi], [ATP] and intracellular pH at rest. During the stimulation period, it lead to a 23% enhancement of specific force production that was associated to significant decrease in both PCr (28%) and oxidative (32%) costs of contraction, but had no effect on the time-courses of phosphorylated compounds and intracellular pH. Furthermore, both the rate of PCr resynthesis during the post-stimulation period (VPCr(rec)) and the oxidative ATP synthesis capacity (Q(max)) remained unaffected by CM treatment. These data demonstrate that CM supplementation under healthy condition has an ergogenic effect associated to an improvement of muscular contraction efficiency. PMID:21664351

  8. BQ123 Stimulates Skeletal Muscle Antioxidant Defense via Nrf2 Activation in LPS-Treated Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jeleń, Agnieszka; Żebrowska, Marta; Balcerczak, Ewa; Gorąca, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Little is understood of skeletal muscle tissue in terms of oxidative stress and inflammation. Endothelin-1 is an endogenous, vasoconstrictive peptide which can induce overproduction of reactive oxygen species and proinflammatory cytokines. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether BQ123, an endothelin-A receptor antagonist, influences the level of TNF-α, IL-6, SOD-1, HO-1, Nrf2 mRNA, and NF-κB subunit RelA/p65 mRNA in the femoral muscle obtained from endotoxemic rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups (n = 6) and received iv (1) saline (control), (2) LPS (15 mg/kg), (3) BQ123 (1 mg/kg), (4) BQ123 (1 mg/kg), and LPS (15 mg/kg, resp.) 30 min later. Injection of LPS led to significant increase in levels of RelA/p65 mRNA, TNF-α, and IL-6, while content of SOD-1, HO-1, and Nrf2 mRNA was unchanged. Administration of BQ123 prior to LPS challenge resulted in a significant reduction in RelA/p65 mRNA, TNF-α, and IL-6 levels, as well as markedly elevated concentrations of SOD-1, HO-1, and Nrf2 mRNA. BQ123 appears to enhance antioxidant defense and prevent production of TNF-α and IL-6 in skeletal muscle of LPS-treated rat. In conclusion, endothelin-A receptor antagonism exerts significant impact on the skeletal muscle favouring anti-inflammatory effects and protection against oxidative stress. PMID:26823945

  9. Regrowth after skeletal muscle atrophy is impaired in aged rats, despite similar responses in signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    White, Jena R.; Confides, Amy L.; Moore-Reed, Stephanie; Hoch, Johanna M.; Dupont-Versteegden, Esther E.

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle regrowth after atrophy is impaired in the aged and in this study we hypothesized that this can be explained by a blunted response of signaling pathways and cellular processes during reloading after hind limb suspension in muscles from old rats. Male Brown Norway Fisher 344 rats at 6 (young) and 32 (old) months of age were subjected to normal ambulatory conditions (amb), hind limb suspension for 14 days (HS), and HS followed by reloading through normal ambulation for 14 days (RE); soleus muscles were used for analysis of intracellular signaling pathways and cellular processes. Soleus muscle regrowth was blunted in old compared to young rats which coincided with a recovery of serum IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 levels in young but not old. However, the response to reloading for p-Akt, p-p70s6k and p-GSK3β protein abundance was similar between muscles from young and old rats, even though main effects for age indicate an increase in activation of this protein synthesis pathway in the aged. Similarly, MAFbx mRNA levels in soleus muscle from old rats recovered to the same extent as in the young, while Murf-1 was unchanged. mRNA abundance of autophagy markers Atg5 and Atg7 showed an identical response in muscle from old compared to young rats, but beclin did not. Autophagic flux was not changed at either age at the measured time point. Apoptosis was elevated in soleus muscle from old rats particularly with HS, but recovered in HSRE and these changes were not associated with differences in caspase-3, -8 or-9 activity in any group. Protein abundance of apoptosis repressor with caspase-recruitment domain (ARC), cytosolic EndoG, as well as cytosolic and nuclear apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) were lower in muscle from old rats, and there was no age-related difference in the response to atrophy or regrowth. Soleus muscles from old rats had a higher number of ED2 positive macrophages in all groups and these decreased with HS, but recovered in HSRE in the old, while no

  10. [Insulin promotes proliferation of skeletal myoblast cells through PI3K/Akt and MEK/ERK pathways in rats].

    PubMed

    Yu, Huan; Zhang, Min; Zhao, Yong; Wu, Ping; Chen, Pei-Liang; Li, Wei-Dong

    2013-02-25

    The present study was to explore the effects of insulin on proliferation of skeletal myoblast cells in rats. Separated and cultured primary skeletal myoblast cells from rats were treated by insulin. By means of the incorporation of (3)H-TdR, BrdU assay and MTT assay, the proliferation of skeletal myoblast cells was detected. Western blot was used to check the phosphorylation of Akt and ERK of myoblast cells. The results showed that insulin significantly promoted the incorporation of (3)H-TdR into cultured skeletal myoblast cells in a dose-dependent manner. MTT assay and BrdU assay also showed insulin promoted the proliferation of skeletal myoblast cells. The promotion of skeletal myoblast cells proliferation by insulin was inhibited by PI3K inhibitor wortmannin or MEK inhibitor U0126, and the same phenomenon was shown in L6 and C2C12 cells. Also, insulin increased the phosphorylation of Akt and ERK in myoblast cells. These results suggest that insulin may promote proliferation of skeletal myoblast cells through PI3K/Akt and MEK/ERK pathways.

  11. Effect of insulin-like factors on glucose transport activity in unweighted rat skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henriksen, Erik J.; Ritter, Leslie S.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of 3 or 6 days of unweighting on glucose transport activity, as assessed by 2-deoxyglucose uptake, in soleus strips stimulated by maximally effective concentrations of insulin, IGF-I, vanadate, or phospholipase C (PLC) is examined. Progressively increased responses to maximally effective doses of insulin or insulin-like growth factor were observed after 3 and 6 days of unweighting compared with weight matched control strips. Enhanced maximal responses to vanadate (6 days only) and PLC (3 and 6 days) were also observed. The data provide support for the existance of postreceptor binding mechanisms for the increased action of insulin on the glucose transport system in unweighted rat skeletal muscle.

  12. (-)-Epicatechin administration and exercising skeletal muscle vascular control and microvascular oxygenation in healthy rats.

    PubMed

    Copp, Steven W; Inagaki, Tadakatsu; White, Michael J; Hirai, Daniel M; Ferguson, Scott K; Holdsworth, Clark T; Sims, Gabrielle E; Poole, David C; Musch, Timothy I

    2013-01-15

    Consumption of the dietary flavanol (-)-epicatechin (EPI) is associated with enhanced endothelial function and augmented skeletal muscle capillarity and mitochondrial volume density. The potential for EPI to improve peripheral vascular function and muscle oxygenation during exercise is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that EPI administration in healthy rats would improve treadmill exercise performance secondary to elevated skeletal muscle blood flow and vascular conductance [VC, blood flow/mean arterial pressure (MAP)] and improved skeletal muscle microvascular oxygenation. Rats received water (control, n = 12) or 4 mg/kg EPI (n = 12) via oral gavage daily for 24 days. Exercise endurance capacity and peak O(2) uptake (Vo(2) peak) were measured via treadmill runs to exhaustion. MAP (arterial catheter) and blood flow (radiolabeled microspheres) were measured and VC was calculated during submaximal treadmill exercise (25 m/min, 5% grade). Spinotrapezius muscle microvascular O(2) pressure (Po(2mv)) was measured (phosphorescence quenching) during electrically induced twitch (1 Hz) contractions. In conscious rats, EPI administration resulted in lower (↓~5%) resting (P = 0.03) and exercising (P = 0.04) MAP. There were no differences in exercise endurance capacity, Vo(2) peak, total exercising hindlimb blood flow (control, 154 ± 13; and EPI, 159 ± 8 ml·min(-1)·100 g(-1), P = 0.68), or VC (control, 1.13 ± 0.10; and EPI, 1.24 ± 0.08 ml·min(-1)·100 g(-1)·mmHg(-1), P = 0.21) between groups. Following anesthesia, EPI resulted in lower MAP (↓~16%) but did not impact resting Po(2mv) or any kinetics parameters (P > 0.05 for all) during muscle contractions compared with control. EPI administration (4 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) improved modestly cardiovascular function (i.e., ↓MAP) with no impact on exercise performance, total exercising skeletal muscle blood flow and VC, or contracting muscle microvascular oxygenation in healthy rats.

  13. Niacin in pharmacological doses alters microRNA expression in skeletal muscle of obese Zucker rats.

    PubMed

    Couturier, Aline; Keller, Janine; Most, Erika; Ringseis, Robert; Eder, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Administration of pharmacological niacin doses was recently reported to have pronounced effects on skeletal muscle gene expression and phenotype in obese Zucker rats, with the molecular mechanisms underlying the alteration of gene expression being completely unknown. Since miRNAs have been shown to play a critical role for gene expression through inducing miRNA-mRNA interactions which results in the degradation of specific mRNAs or the repression of protein translation, we herein aimed to investigate the influence of niacin at pharmacological doses on the miRNA expression profile in skeletal muscle of obese Zucker rats fed either a control diet with 30 mg supplemented niacin/kg diet or a high-niacin diet with 780 mg supplemented niacin/kg diet for 4 wk. miRNA microarray analysis revealed that 42 out of a total of 259 miRNAs were differentially expressed (adjusted P-value <0.05), 20 being down-regulated and 22 being up-regulated, between the niacin group and the control group. Using a biostatistics approach, we could demonstrate that the most strongly up-regulated (log2 ratio ≥0.5) and down-regulated (log2 ratio ≤-0.5) miRNAs target approximately 1,800 mRNAs. Gene-term enrichment analysis showed that many of the predicted target mRNAs from the most strongly regulated miRNAs were involved in molecular processes dealing with gene transcription such as DNA binding, transcription regulator activity, transcription factor binding and in important regulatory pathways such as Wnt signaling and MAPK signaling. In conclusion, the present study shows for the first time that pharmacological niacin doses alter the expression of miRNAs in skeletal muscle of obese Zucker rats and that the niacin-regulated miRNAs target a large set of genes and pathways which are involved in gene regulatory activity indicating that at least some of the recently reported effects of niacin on skeletal muscle gene expression and phenotype in obese Zucker rats are mediated through mi

  14. Interactions between respiratory oscillators in adult rats

    PubMed Central

    Huckstepp, Robert TR; Henderson, Lauren E; Cardoza, Kathryn P; Feldman, Jack L

    2016-01-01

    Breathing in mammals is hypothesized to result from the interaction of two distinct oscillators: the preBötzinger Complex (preBötC) driving inspiration and the lateral parafacial region (pFL) driving active expiration. To understand the interactions between these oscillators, we independently altered their excitability in spontaneously breathing vagotomized urethane-anesthetized adult rats. Hyperpolarizing preBötC neurons decreased inspiratory activity and initiated active expiration, ultimately progressing to apnea, i.e., cessation of both inspiration and active expiration. Depolarizing pFL neurons produced active expiration at rest, but not when inspiratory activity was suppressed by hyperpolarizing preBötC neurons. We conclude that in anesthetized adult rats active expiration is driven by the pFL but requires an additional form of network excitation, i.e., ongoing rhythmic preBötC activity sufficient to drive inspiratory motor output or increased chemosensory drive. The organization of this coupled oscillator system, which is essential for life, may have implications for other neural networks that contain multiple rhythm/pattern generators. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14203.001 PMID:27300271

  15. High-phosphorus diet maximizes and low-dose calcitriol attenuates skeletal muscle changes in long-term uremic rats.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Luz M; López, Ignacio; Peralta-Ramírez, Alan; Pineda, Carmen; Chamizo, Verónica E; Rodríguez, Mariano; Aguilera-Tejero, Escolástico; Rivero, José-Luis L

    2016-05-01

    Although disorders of mineral metabolism and skeletal muscle are common in chronic kidney disease (CKD), their potential relationship remains unexplored. Elevations in plasma phosphate, parathyroid hormone, and fibroblastic growth factor 23 together with decreased calcitriol levels are common features of CKD. High-phosphate intake is a major contributor to progression of CKD. This study was primarily aimed to determine the influence of high-phosphate intake on muscle and to investigate whether calcitriol supplementation counteracts negative skeletal muscle changes associated with long-term uremia. Proportions and metabolic and morphological features of myosin-based muscle fiber types were assessed in the slow-twitch soleus and the fast-twitch tibialis cranialis muscles of uremic rats (5/6 nephrectomy, Nx) and compared with sham-operated (So) controls. Three groups of Nx rats received either a standard diet (0.6% phosphorus, Nx-Sd), or a high-phosphorus diet (0.9% phosphorus, Nx-Pho), or a high-phosphorus diet plus calcitriol (10 ng/kg 3 day/wk ip, Nx-Pho + Cal) for 12 wk. Two groups of So rats received either a standard diet or a high-phosphorus diet (So-Pho) over the same period. A multivariate analysis encompassing all fiber-type characteristics indicated that Nx-Pho + Cal rats displayed skeletal muscle phenotypes intermediate between Nx-Pho and So-Pho rats and that uremia-induced skeletal muscle changes were of greater magnitude in Nx-Pho than in Nx-Sd rats. In uremic rats, treatment with calcitriol preserved fiber-type composition, cross-sectional size, myonuclear domain size, oxidative capacity, and capillarity of muscle fibers. These data demonstrate that a high-phosphorus diet potentiates and low-dose calcitriol attenuates adverse skeletal muscle changes in long-term uremic rats.

  16. High-phosphorus diet maximizes and low-dose calcitriol attenuates skeletal muscle changes in long-term uremic rats.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Luz M; López, Ignacio; Peralta-Ramírez, Alan; Pineda, Carmen; Chamizo, Verónica E; Rodríguez, Mariano; Aguilera-Tejero, Escolástico; Rivero, José-Luis L

    2016-05-01

    Although disorders of mineral metabolism and skeletal muscle are common in chronic kidney disease (CKD), their potential relationship remains unexplored. Elevations in plasma phosphate, parathyroid hormone, and fibroblastic growth factor 23 together with decreased calcitriol levels are common features of CKD. High-phosphate intake is a major contributor to progression of CKD. This study was primarily aimed to determine the influence of high-phosphate intake on muscle and to investigate whether calcitriol supplementation counteracts negative skeletal muscle changes associated with long-term uremia. Proportions and metabolic and morphological features of myosin-based muscle fiber types were assessed in the slow-twitch soleus and the fast-twitch tibialis cranialis muscles of uremic rats (5/6 nephrectomy, Nx) and compared with sham-operated (So) controls. Three groups of Nx rats received either a standard diet (0.6% phosphorus, Nx-Sd), or a high-phosphorus diet (0.9% phosphorus, Nx-Pho), or a high-phosphorus diet plus calcitriol (10 ng/kg 3 day/wk ip, Nx-Pho + Cal) for 12 wk. Two groups of So rats received either a standard diet or a high-phosphorus diet (So-Pho) over the same period. A multivariate analysis encompassing all fiber-type characteristics indicated that Nx-Pho + Cal rats displayed skeletal muscle phenotypes intermediate between Nx-Pho and So-Pho rats and that uremia-induced skeletal muscle changes were of greater magnitude in Nx-Pho than in Nx-Sd rats. In uremic rats, treatment with calcitriol preserved fiber-type composition, cross-sectional size, myonuclear domain size, oxidative capacity, and capillarity of muscle fibers. These data demonstrate that a high-phosphorus diet potentiates and low-dose calcitriol attenuates adverse skeletal muscle changes in long-term uremic rats. PMID:26869708

  17. Favism: effect of divicine on rat erythrocyte sulfhydryl status, hexose monophosphate shunt activity, morphology, and membrane skeletal proteins.

    PubMed

    McMillan, D C; Bolchoz, L J; Jollow, D J

    2001-08-01

    Favism is an acute anemic crisis that can occur in susceptible individuals who ingest fava beans. The fava bean pyrimidine aglycone divicine has been identified as a hemotoxic constituent; however, its mechanism of toxicity remains unknown. We have shown recently that divicine can induce a favic-like response in rats and that divicine is directly toxic to rat red cells. In the present study, we have examined the effect of hemotoxic concentrations of divicine on rat erythrocyte sulfhydryl status, hexose monophosphate (HMP) shunt activity, morphology, and membrane skeletal proteins. In vitro exposure of rat red cells to divicine markedly stimulated HMP shunt activity and resulted in depletion of reduced glutathione with concomitant formation of glutathione-protein mixed-disulfides. Examination of divicine-treated red cells by scanning electron microscopy revealed transformation of the cells to an extreme echinocytic morphology. SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting analysis of the membrane skeletal proteins indicated that hemotoxicity was associated with the apparent loss of skeletal protein bands 2.1, 3, and 4.2, and the appearance of membrane-bound hemoglobin. Treatment of divicine-damaged red cells with dithiothreitol reversed the protein changes, which indicated that the observed alterations were due primarily to the formation of disulfide-linked hemoglobin-skeletal protein adducts. The data suggest that oxidative modification of hemoglobin and membrane skeletal proteins by divicine may be key events in the mechanism underlying favism. PMID:11452148

  18. Malignant Lymphoma with Severe Infiltrative Growth into Skeletal Muscles in WBN/Kob Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sano, Tomoya; Ozaki, Kiyokazu; Kodama, Yasushi; Matsuura, Tetsuro; Narama, Isao

    2009-01-01

    Although spontaneously occurring neoplasms have been reported repeatedly in F344, SD and Wistar rats, which are commonly used strains for routine toxicologic and carcinogenicity studies, there are only a few reports of malignant lymphoma or lymphatic leukemia except for large granular lymphocytic leukemia (LGL) in F344 rats. Malignant lymphoma (lymphosarcoma) is thought to be uncommon in F344 rats. The authors encountered malignant lymphomas of the non-LGL leukemia type with characteristic pathologic features in WBN/Kob rats. The mean age at onset of the disease in all 13 affected rats (8 males and 5 females) was about 60 weeks. Common and characteristic clinical signs were abnormal gait with hind limb paralysis. Macroscopically, the enlargement of the lymph nodes, spleen and liver was slight to moderate. Scattered multiple white-to-gray nodules encompassed the aorta and assumed a bead-like appearance near the thoracic and lumbar vertebrae. Histopathologically, neoplastic proliferative changes were predominant in the bone marrow tissue of the entire body, and many tumor cells infiltrated the spleen and several lymph nodes. The most striking histological features were constant and severe infiltration of tumor cells in the adipose tissue and skeletal muscle adjacent the thoracic and lumber vertebrae. Immunohistochemically, all tumor cells were positive for B-cell markers (PAX-5, CD79a and CD45) and negative for CD3. From the results of immunohistochemistry and morphological examination, these tumors were diagnosed as malignant B-cell lymphomas. PMID:22271991

  19. Burn injury induces skeletal muscle degeneration, inflammatory host response, and oxidative stress in wistar rats.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Nathalia Trasmonte; Quintana, Hananiah Tardivo; Bortolin, Jeferson André; Ribeiro, Daniel Araki; de Oliveira, Flavia

    2015-01-01

    Burn injuries (BIs) result in both local and systemic responses distant from the site of thermal injury, such as skeletal muscle. The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) as a result of inflammation and reactive oxygen species production, respectively. A total of 16 male rats were distributed into two groups: control (C) and submitted to BI. The medial part of gastrocnemius muscle formed the specimens, which were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and were evaluated. COX-2 and 8-OHdG expressions were assessed by immunohistochemistry, and cell profile area and density of muscle fibers (number of fibers per square millimeter) were evaluated by morphometric methods. The results revealed inflammatory infiltrate associated with COX-2 immunoexpression in BI-gastrocnemius muscle. Furthermore, a substantial decrease in the muscle cell profile area of BI group was noticed when compared with the control group, whereas the density of muscle fibers was higher in the BI group. 8-OHdG expression in numerous skeletal muscle nuclei was detected in the BI group. In conclusion, the BI group is able to induce skeletal muscle degeneration as a result of systemic host response closely related to reactive oxygen species production and inflammatory process.

  20. Aerobic training in rats increases skeletal muscle sphingomyelinase and serine palmitoyltransferase activity, while decreasing ceramidase activity.

    PubMed

    Błachnio-Zabielska, Agnieszka; Zabielski, Piotr; Baranowski, Marcin; Gorski, Jan

    2011-03-01

    Sphingolipids are important components of cell membranes that may also serve as cell signaling molecules; ceramide plays a central role in sphingolipid metabolism. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of 5 weeks of aerobic training on key enzymes and intermediates of ceramide metabolism in skeletal muscles. The experiments were carried out on rats divided into two groups: (1) sedentary and (2) trained for 5 weeks (on a treadmill). The activity of serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT), neutral and acid sphingomyelinase (nSMase and aSMase), neutral and alkaline ceramidases (nCDase and alCDase) and the content of sphingolipids was determined in three types of skeletal muscle. We also measured the fasting plasma insulin and glucose concentration for calculating HOMA-IR (homeostasis model assessment) for estimating insulin resistance. We found that the activities of aSMase and SPT increase in muscle in the trained group. These changes were followed by elevation in the content of sphinganine. The activities of both isoforms of ceramidase were reduced in muscle in the trained group. Although the activities of SPT and SMases increased and the activity of CDases decreased, the ceramide content did not change in any of the studied muscle. Although ceramide level did not change, we noticed increased insulin sensitivity in trained animals. It is concluded that training affects the activity of key enzymes of ceramide metabolism but also activates other metabolic pathways which affect ceramide metabolism in skeletal muscles.

  1. Nonproliferative and Proliferative Lesions of the Rat and Mouse Skeletal Tissues (Bones, Joints, and Teeth).

    PubMed

    Fossey, Stacey; Vahle, John; Long, Philip; Schelling, Scott; Ernst, Heinrich; Boyce, Rogely Waite; Jolette, Jacquelin; Bolon, Brad; Bendele, Alison; Rinke, Matthias; Healy, Laura; High, Wanda; Roth, Daniel Robert; Boyle, Michael; Leininger, Joel

    2016-01-01

    The INHAND (International Harmonization of Nomenclature and Diagnostic Criteria for Lesions in Rats and Mice) Project (www.toxpath.org/inhand.asp) is an initiative of the Societies of Toxicological Pathology from Europe (ESTP), Great Britain (BSTP), Japan (JSTP) and North America (STP) to develop an internationally accepted nomenclature for proliferative and nonproliferative lesions in laboratory animals. The purpose of this publication is to provide a standardized nomenclature for classifying microscopic lesions observed in the skeletal tissues and teeth of laboratory rats and mice, with color photomicrographs illustrating examples of many common lesions. The standardized nomenclature presented in this document is also available on the internet (http://www.goreni.org/). Sources of material were databases from government, academic and industrial laboratories throughout the world.

  2. Nonproliferative and Proliferative Lesions of the Rat and Mouse Skeletal Tissues (Bones, Joints, and Teeth)

    PubMed Central

    Fossey, Stacey; Vahle, John; Long, Philip; Schelling, Scott; Ernst, Heinrich; Boyce, Rogely Waite; Jolette, Jacquelin; Bolon, Brad; Bendele, Alison; Rinke, Matthias; Healy, Laura; High, Wanda; Roth, Daniel Robert; Boyle, Michael; Leininger, Joel

    2016-01-01

    The INHAND (International Harmonization of Nomenclature and Diagnostic Criteria for Lesions in Rats and Mice) Project (www.toxpath.org/inhand.asp) is an initiative of the Societies of Toxicological Pathology from Europe (ESTP), Great Britain (BSTP), Japan (JSTP) and North America (STP) to develop an internationally accepted nomenclature for proliferative and nonproliferative lesions in laboratory animals. The purpose of this publication is to provide a standardized nomenclature for classifying microscopic lesions observed in the skeletal tissues and teeth of laboratory rats and mice, with color photomicrographs illustrating examples of many common lesions. The standardized nomenclature presented in this document is also available on the internet (http://www.goreni.org/). Sources of material were databases from government, academic and industrial laboratories throughout the world.

  3. Nonproliferative and Proliferative Lesions of the Rat and Mouse Skeletal Tissues (Bones, Joints, and Teeth).

    PubMed

    Fossey, Stacey; Vahle, John; Long, Philip; Schelling, Scott; Ernst, Heinrich; Boyce, Rogely Waite; Jolette, Jacquelin; Bolon, Brad; Bendele, Alison; Rinke, Matthias; Healy, Laura; High, Wanda; Roth, Daniel Robert; Boyle, Michael; Leininger, Joel

    2016-01-01

    The INHAND (International Harmonization of Nomenclature and Diagnostic Criteria for Lesions in Rats and Mice) Project (www.toxpath.org/inhand.asp) is an initiative of the Societies of Toxicological Pathology from Europe (ESTP), Great Britain (BSTP), Japan (JSTP) and North America (STP) to develop an internationally accepted nomenclature for proliferative and nonproliferative lesions in laboratory animals. The purpose of this publication is to provide a standardized nomenclature for classifying microscopic lesions observed in the skeletal tissues and teeth of laboratory rats and mice, with color photomicrographs illustrating examples of many common lesions. The standardized nomenclature presented in this document is also available on the internet (http://www.goreni.org/). Sources of material were databases from government, academic and industrial laboratories throughout the world. PMID:27621538

  4. Nonproliferative and Proliferative Lesions of the Rat and Mouse Skeletal Tissues (Bones, Joints, and Teeth)

    PubMed Central

    Fossey, Stacey; Vahle, John; Long, Philip; Schelling, Scott; Ernst, Heinrich; Boyce, Rogely Waite; Jolette, Jacquelin; Bolon, Brad; Bendele, Alison; Rinke, Matthias; Healy, Laura; High, Wanda; Roth, Daniel Robert; Boyle, Michael; Leininger, Joel

    2016-01-01

    The INHAND (International Harmonization of Nomenclature and Diagnostic Criteria for Lesions in Rats and Mice) Project (www.toxpath.org/inhand.asp) is an initiative of the Societies of Toxicological Pathology from Europe (ESTP), Great Britain (BSTP), Japan (JSTP) and North America (STP) to develop an internationally accepted nomenclature for proliferative and nonproliferative lesions in laboratory animals. The purpose of this publication is to provide a standardized nomenclature for classifying microscopic lesions observed in the skeletal tissues and teeth of laboratory rats and mice, with color photomicrographs illustrating examples of many common lesions. The standardized nomenclature presented in this document is also available on the internet (http://www.goreni.org/). Sources of material were databases from government, academic and industrial laboratories throughout the world. PMID:27621538

  5. Ageing diminishes endothelium-dependent vasodilatation and tetrahydrobiopterin content in rat skeletal muscle arterioles.

    PubMed

    Delp, Michael D; Behnke, Bradley J; Spier, Scott A; Wu, Guoyao; Muller-Delp, Judy M

    2008-02-15

    Ageing reduces endothelium-dependent vasodilatation through an endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS) signalling pathway. The purpose of this study was to determine whether arginase activity diminishes endothelium-dependent vasodilatation in skeletal muscle arterioles from old rats, and whether NOS substrate (L-arginine) and cofactor (tetrahydrobiopterin; BH(4)) concentrations are reduced. First-order arterioles were isolated from the soleus muscle of young (6 months old) and old (24 months old) male Fischer 344 rats. In vitro changes in luminal diameter in response to stepwise increases in flow were determined in the presence of the NOS inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME, 10(-5) mol l(-1)), the arginase inhibitor N(omega)-hydroxy-nor-L-arginine (NOHA, 5 x 10(-4) mol l(-1)), exogenous L-arginine (3 x 10(-3) mol l(-1)) or the precursor for BH(4) synthesis sepiapterin (1 micromol l(-1)). Arteriolar L-arginine and BH(4) content were determined via HPLC. Ageing decreased flow-mediated vasodilatation by 52%, and this difference was abolished with NOS inhibition. Neither inhibition of arginase activity nor addition of exogenous L-arginine had any effect on flow-mediated vasodilatation; arteriolar l-arginine content was also not different between age groups. BH(4) content was lower in arterioles from old rats (94 +/- 8 fmol (mg tissue)(-1)) relative to controls (234 +/- 21 fmol (mg tissue)(-1)), and sepiapterin elevated flow-mediated vasodilatation in arterioles from old rats. These results demonstrate that the impairment of endothelium-dependent vasodilatation induced by old age is due to an altered nitric oxide signalling mechanism in skeletal muscle arterioles, but is not the result of increased arginase activity and limited L-arginine substrate. Rather, the age-related deficit in flow-mediated vasodilatation appears to be the result, in part, of limited BH(4) bioavailability.

  6. Preconditioning with ethyl 3,4-dihydroxybenzoate augments aerobic respiration in rat skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Nimker, Charu; Singh, Deependra Pratap; Saraswat, Deepika; Bansal, Anju

    2016-01-01

    Muscle respiratory capacity decides the amount of exertion one’s skeletal muscle can undergo, and endurance exercise is believed to increase it. There are also certain preconditioning methods by which muscle respiratory and exercise performance can be enhanced. In this study, preconditioning with ethyl 3,4-dihydroxybenzoate (EDHB), a prolyl hydroxylase domain enzyme inhibitor, has been investigated to determine its effect on aerobic metabolism and bioenergetics in skeletal muscle, thus facilitating boost in physical performance in a rat model. We observed that EDHB supplementation increases aerobic metabolism via upregulation of HIF-mediated GLUT1 and GLUT4, thus enhancing glucose uptake in muscles. There was also a twofold rise in the activity of enzymes of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and glycolysis, ie, hexokinase and phosphofructokinase. There was an increase in citrate synthase and succinate dehydrogenase activity, resulting in the rise in the levels of ATP due to enhanced Krebs cycle activity as substantiated by enhanced acetyl-CoA levels in EDHB-treated rats as compared to control group. Increased lactate dehydrogenase activity, reduced expression of monocarboxylate transporter 1, and increase in monocarboxylate transporter 4 suggest transport of lactate from muscle to blood. There was a concomitant decrease in plasma lactate, which might be due to enhanced transport of lactate from blood to the liver. This was further supported by the rise in liver pyruvate levels and liver glycogen levels in EDHB-supplemented rats as compared to control rats. These results suggest that EDHB supplementation leads to improved physical performance due to the escalation of aerobic respiration quotient, ie, enhanced muscle respiratory capacity. PMID:27800513

  7. Effect of short-term cold exposure on skeletal muscle protein breakdown in rats.

    PubMed

    Manfredi, L H; Zanon, N M; Garófalo, M A; Navegantes, L C C; Kettelhut, I C

    2013-11-01

    Although it is well established that carbohydrate and lipid metabolism are profoundly altered by cold stress, the effects of short-term cold exposure on protein metabolism in skeletal muscle are still poorly understood. Because cold acclimation requires that an organism adjust its metabolic flux, and muscle amino acids may be an important energy source for heat production, we hypothesize that muscle proteolysis is increased and protein synthesis is decreased under such a stress condition. Herein, cold exposure for 24 h decreased rates of protein synthesis and increased overall proteolysis in both soleus and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles, but it did not affect muscle weight. An increase in proteolysis was accompanied by hyperactivity of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) in both soleus and EDL, and Ca(2+)-dependent proteolysis in EDL. Furthermore, muscles of rats exposed to cold showed increased mRNA and protein levels of atrogin-1 and muscle RING finger enzyme-1 (MuRF1). Additionally, cold stress reduced phosphorylation of Akt and Forkhead box class O1 (FoxO1), a well-known effect that increases FoxO translocation to the nucleus and leads to activation of proteolysis. Plasma insulin levels were lower, whereas catecholamines, corticosterone, and thyroid hormones were higher in cold-exposed rats compared with control rats. The present data provide the first direct evidence that short-term cold exposure for 24 h decreases rates of protein synthesis and increases the UPS and Ca(2+)-dependent proteolytic processes, and increases expression of atrogin-1 and MuRF1 in skeletal muscles of young rats. The activation of atrophy induced by acute cold stress seems to be mediated at least in part through the inactivation of Akt/FoxO signaling and activation of AMP-activated protein kinase.

  8. Transcriptome-wide RNA sequencing analysis of rat skeletal muscle feed arteries. I. Impact of obesity.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Nathan T; Padilla, Jaume; Thorne, Pamela K; Martin, Jeffrey S; Rector, R Scott; Davis, J Wade; Laughlin, M Harold

    2014-04-15

    We employed next-generation RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) technology to determine the influence of obesity on global gene expression in skeletal muscle feed arteries. Transcriptional profiles of the gastrocnemius and soleus muscle feed arteries (GFA and SFA, respectively) and aortic endothelial cell-enriched samples from obese Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) and lean Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO) rats were examined. Obesity produced 282 upregulated and 133 downregulated genes in SFA and 163 upregulated and 77 downregulated genes in GFA [false discovery rate (FDR) < 10%] with an overlap of 93 genes between the arteries. In LETO rats, there were 89 upregulated and 114 downregulated genes in the GFA compared with the SFA. There were 244 upregulated and 275 downregulated genes in OLETF rats (FDR < 10%) in the GFA compared with the SFA, with an overlap of 76 differentially expressed genes common to both LETO and OLETF rats in both the GFA and SFA. A total of 396 transcripts were found to be differentially expressed between LETO and OLETF in aortic endothelial cell-enriched samples. Overall, we found 1) the existence of heterogeneity in the transcriptional profile of the SFA and GFA within healthy LETO rats, 2) that this between-vessel heterogeneity was markedly exacerbated in the hyperphagic, obese OLETF rat, and 3) a greater number of genes whose expression was altered by obesity in the SFA compared with the GFA. Also, results indicate that in OLETF rats the GFA takes on a relatively more proatherogenic phenotype compared with the SFA.

  9. Rat Whisker Movement after Facial Nerve Lesion: Evidence for Autonomic Contraction of Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Heaton, James T.; Sheu, Shu-Hsien; Hohman, Marc H.; Knox, Christopher J.; Weinberg, Julie S.; Kleiss, Ingrid J.; Hadlock, Tessa A.

    2014-01-01

    Vibrissal whisking is often employed to track facial nerve regeneration in rats; however, we have observed similar degrees of whisking recovery after facial nerve transection with or without repair. We hypothesized that the source of non-facial nerve-mediated whisker movement after chronic denervation was from autonomic, cholinergic axons traveling within the infraorbital branch of the trigeminal nerve (ION). Rats underwent unilateral facial nerve transection with repair (N=7) or resection without repair (N=11). Post-operative whisking amplitude was measured weekly across 10 weeks, and during intraoperative stimulation of the ION and facial nerves at ≥18 weeks. Whisking was also measured after subsequent ION transection (N=6) or pharmacologic blocking of the autonomic ganglia using hexamethonium (N=3), and after snout cooling intended to elicit a vasodilation reflex (N=3). Whisking recovered more quickly and with greater amplitude in rats that underwent facial nerve repair compared to resection (P<0.05), but individual rats overlapped in whisking amplitude across both groups. In the resected rats, non-facial-nerve mediated whisking was elicited by electrical stimulation of the ION, temporarily diminished following hexamethonium injection, abolished by transection of the ION, and rapidly and significantly (P<0.05) increased by snout cooling. Moreover, fibrillation-related whisker movements decreased in all rats during the initial recovery period (indicative of reinnervation), but re-appeared in the resected rats after undergoing ION transection (indicative of motor denervation). Cholinergic, parasympathetic axons traveling within the ION innervate whisker pad vasculature, and immunohistochemistry for vasoactive intestinal peptide revealed these axons branching extensively over whisker pad muscles and contacting neuromuscular junctions after facial nerve resection. This study provides the first behavioral and anatomical evidence of spontaneous autonomic innervation

  10. Training differentially regulates elastin level and proteolysis in skeletal and heart muscles and aorta in healthy rats

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Anna; Wyczalkowska-Tomasik, Aleksandra; Zendzian-Piotrowska, Malgorzata; Czarkowska-Paczek, Bozena

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Exercise induces changes in muscle fibers and the extracellular matrix that may depend on elastin content and the activity of proteolytic enzymes. We investigated the influence of endurance training on the gene expression and protein content and/or activity of elastin, elastase, cathepsin K, and plasmin in skeletal and heart muscles and in the aorta. Healthy rats were randomly divided into untrained (n=10) and trained (n=10; 6 weeks of endurance training with increasing load) groups. Gene expression was evaluated via qRT-PCR. Elastin content was measured via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and enzyme activity was measured fluorometrically. Elastin content was significantly higher in skeletal (P=0.0014) and heart muscle (P=0.000022) from trained rats versus untrained rats, but not in the aorta. Although mRNA levels in skeletal muscle did not differ between groups, the activities of elastase (P=0.0434), cathepsin K (P=0.0343) and plasmin (P=0.000046) were higher in trained rats. The levels of cathepsin K (P=0.0288) and plasminogen (P=0.0005) mRNA were higher in heart muscle from trained rats, but enzyme activity was not. Enzyme activity in the aorta did not differ between groups. Increased elastin content in muscles may result in better adaption to exercise, as may remodeling of the extracellular matrix in skeletal muscle. PMID:27069251

  11. Glycaemia regulates the glucose transporter number in the plasma membrane of rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrakoudis, D; Ramlal, T; Rastogi, S; Vranic, M; Klip, A

    1992-01-01

    The number of glucose transporters was measured in isolated membranes from diabetic-rat skeletal muscle to determine the role of circulating blood glucose levels in the control of glucose uptake into skeletal muscle. Three experimental groups of animals were investigated in the post-absorptive state: normoglycaemic/normoinsulinaemic, hyperglycaemic/normoinsulinaemic and hyperglycaemic/normoinsulinaemic made normoglycaemic/normoinsulinaemic by phlorizin treatment. Hyperglycaemia caused a reversible decrease in total transporter number, as measured by cytochalasin B binding, in both plasma membranes and internal membranes of skeletal muscle. Changes in GLUT4 glucose transporter protein mirrored changes in cytochalasin B binding in plasma membranes. However, there was no recovery of GLUT4 levels in intracellular membranes with correction of glycaemia. GLUT4 mRNA levels decreased with hyperglycaemia and recovered only partially with correction of glycaemia. Conversely, GLUT1 glucose transporters were only detectable in the plasma membranes; the levels of this protein varied directly with glycaemia, i.e. in the opposite direction to GLUT4 glucose transporters. This study demonstrates that hyperglycaemia, in the absence of hypoinsulinaemia, is capable of down-regulating the glucose transport system in skeletal muscle, the major site of peripheral resistance to insulin-stimulated glucose transport in diabetes. Furthermore, correction of hyperglycaemia causes a complete restoration of the transport system in the basal state (determined by the transporter number in the plasma membrane), but possibly only an incomplete recovery of the transport system's ability to respond to insulin (since there is no recovery of GLUT4 levels in the intracellular membrane insulin-responsive transporter pool). Finally, the effect of hyperglycaemia is specific for glucose transporter isoforms, with GLUT1 and GLUT4 proteins varying respectively in parallel and opposite directions to levels of

  12. Dietary docosahexaenoic acid supplementation reduces SERCA Ca2+ transport efficiency in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Fajardo, Val Andrew; Bombardier, Eric; Irvine, Thomas; Metherel, Adam H; Stark, Ken D; Duhamel, Todd; Rush, James W E; Green, Howard J; Tupling, A Russell

    2015-04-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) can reduce the efficiency and increase the energy consumption of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase pump and mitochondrial electron transport chain by promoting Na(+) and H(+) membrane permeability, respectively. In skeletal muscle, the sarco(endo) plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) pumps are major contributors to resting metabolic rate. Whether DHA can affect SERCA efficiency remains unknown. Here, we examined the hypothesis that dietary supplementation with DHA would reduce Ca(2+) transport efficiency of the SERCA pumps in skeletal muscle. Total lipids were extracted from enriched sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) membranes that were isolated from red vastus lateralis skeletal muscles of rats that were either fed a standard chow diet supplemented with soybean oil or supplemented with DHA for 8 weeks. The fatty acid composition of total SR membrane lipids and the major phospholipid species were determined using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). After 8 weeks of DHA supplementation, total SR DHA content was significantly elevated (control, 4.1 ± 1.0% vs. DHA, 9.9 ± 1.7%; weight percent of total fatty acids) while total arachidonic acid was reduced (control, 13.5 ± 0.4% vs. DHA-fed, 9.4 ± 0.2). Similar changes in these fatty acids were observed in phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, and phosphatidylinositol, altogether indicating successful incorporation of DHA into the SR membranes post-diet. As hypothesized, DHA supplementation reduced SERCA Ca(2+) transport efficiency (control, 0.018 ± 0.0002 vs. DHA-fed, 0.014 ± 0.0009) possibly through enhanced SR Ca(2+) permeability (ionophore ratio: control, 2.8 ± 0.2 vs. DHA-fed, 2.2 ± 0.3). Collectively, our results suggest that DHA may promote skeletal muscle-based metabolism and thermogenesis through its influence on SERCA.

  13. Myofibril ATPase activity of cardiac and skeletal muscle of exhaustively exercised rats.

    PubMed

    Belcastro, A N; Turcotte, R; Rossiter, M; Secord, D; Maybank, P E

    1984-01-01

    The activation characteristics of Mg-ATP and Ca2+ on cardiac and skeletal muscle myofibril ATPase activity were studied in rats following a run to exhaustion. In addition, the effect of varying ionic strength was determined on skeletal muscle from exhausted animals. The exhausted group (E) ran at a speed of 25 m min-1 with an 8% incline. Myofibril ATPase activities for control (C) and E were determined with 1, 3 and 5 mM Mg-ATP and 1 and 10 microM Ca2+ at pH 7.0 and 30 degrees C. For control skeletal muscle, at 1 and 10 microM Ca2+, there was an increase in ATPase activity from 1 to 5 mM Mg-ATP (P less than 0.05). For E animals the myofibril ATPase activities at 10 microM Ca2+ and all Mg-ATP concentrations were similar to C (P greater than 0.05). At 1.0 microM Ca2+ and all Mg-ATP concentrations were similar to C (P greater than 0.05). At 1.0 microM Ca2+ the activities at 3 and 5 mM Mg-ATP were greater for the E animals (P less than 0.05). Increasing KCl concentrations resulted in greater inhibition for E animals. With cardiac muscle, the myofibril ATPase activities at 1.0 microM free Ca2+ were lower for E at all Mg-ATP levels (P less than 0.05). In contrast, at 10 microM Ca2+, the E group exhibited an elevated myofibril ATPase activity. The results indicate that Mg-ATP and Ca2+ activation of cardiac and skeletal muscle myofibril ATPase is altered with exhaustive exercise. PMID:6230276

  14. Induction of amino acid transporters expression by endurance exercise in rat skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Taro Yoshinaga, Mariko

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •Regulation of amino acid transporter expression in working muscle remains unclear. •Expression of amino acid transporters for leucine were induced by a bout of exercise. •Requirement of leucine in muscle cells might regulate expression of its transporters. •This information is beneficial for understanding the muscle remodeling by exercise. -- Abstract: We here investigated whether an acute bout of endurance exercise would induce the expression of amino acid transporters that regulate leucine transport across plasma and lysosomal membranes in rat skeletal muscle. Rats ran on a motor-driven treadmill at a speed of 28 m/min for 90 min. Immediately after the exercise, we observed that expression of mRNAs encoding L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1) and CD98 was induced in the gastrocnemius, soleus, and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles. Sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporter 2 (SNAT2) mRNA was also induced by the exercise in those three muscles. Expression of proton-assisted amino acid transporter 1 (PAT1) mRNA was slightly but not significantly induced by a single bout of exercise in soleus and EDL muscles. Exercise-induced mRNA expression of these amino acid transporters appeared to be attenuated by repeated bouts of the exercise. These results suggested that the expression of amino acid transporters for leucine may be induced in response to an increase in the requirement for this amino acid in the cells of working skeletal muscles.

  15. Regulator of insulin receptor affinity in rat skeletal muscle sarcolemmal vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Whitson, R.H.; Barnard, K.J.; Kaplan, S.A.; Itakura, K.

    1986-05-01

    Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) affinity purification of detergent solubilized insulin receptors (IR) from rat skeletal muscle sarcolemmal vesicles resulted in an apparent increase in total insulin binding activity of greater than 5-fold, suggesting that an inhibitory component had been removed. This was verified when the flow-through fraction from the WGA column was dialyzed and added back to the partially purified receptor. The addition of a 100-fold dilution of the inhibitor preparation caused a 50% reduction in binding to trace amounts of /sup 125/I-insulin. Scatchard analysis revealed that the effect of the inhibitor was to decrease the affinity of the muscle IR. The inhibitor appeared to be tissue specific, inasmuch as the I/sub 50/'s for WGA-purified IR from rat fat and liver were 10 times the I/sub 50/ for muscle IR. The I/sub 50/ for insulin binding to intact IM-9 cells was 30 times the value for muscle IR. The inhibitor eluted in the void volume of Sephadex G-50 columns. Its activity was not destroyed by heating at 90/sup 0/C for 10 minutes, or by prolonged incubation with trypsin or dithiothreitol. The inhibitor described here may have a role in modulating insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle.

  16. Vertical Trabeculae are Thinned More Than Horizontal Trabeculae in Skeletal-Unloaded Rats.

    PubMed

    Vegger, Jens Bay; Brüel, Annemarie; Thomsen, Jesper Skovhus

    2015-11-01

    Skeletal unloading results in a rapid thinning of the trabecular bone network, but it is unknown whether vertical and horizontal trabeculae are equally affected. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to investigate whether horizontal and vertical trabeculae were thinned similarly during skeletal unloading in rats. Fifty-seven 16-week-old female Wistar rats were randomized into six groups: baseline; control 4 weeks; botulinum toxin A (BTX) 4 weeks; control 8 weeks; BTX 8 weeks; and two BTX injections 8 weeks (BTX + BTX8). The BTX animals were injected in the right hind limb with 4 IU BTX at the start of the study, while the BTX + BTX8 were also injected with 2 IU BTX after 4 weeks. The animals were killed after 0, 4, or 8 weeks. The distal femoral metaphyses were μCT scanned, and the strengths of the femoral necks, mid-diaphyses, and distal femoral metaphyses were ascertained. Disuse resulted in a significant loss of BV/TV, thinning of the trabeculae, and decrease in the degree of anisotropy, and in a significant reduced bone strength after both 4 and 8 weeks. The ratio of horizontal to vertical trabecular thickness (Tb.Th.horz/Tb.Th.vert) and the ratio of horizontal to vertical bone volume (BV.horz/BV.vert) were significantly higher in BTX animals than in control animals. In addition, the horizontal and vertical trabecular thickness probability density functions were more similar in BTX animals than in control animals. In conclusion, skeletal unloading decreased BV/TV, Tb.Th, the degree of anisotropy, and mechanical strength, while BV.horz/BV.vert and Tb.Th.horz/Tb.Th.vert were increased. This indicates that the more loaded vertical trabeculae are pronouncedly more thinned than the less loaded supporting horizontal trabeculae during unloading.

  17. Skeletal myofiber VEGF regulates contraction-induced perfusion and exercise capacity but not muscle capillarity in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Amy E; Goldberg, Daniel; Delavar, Hamid; Trisko, Breanna M; Tang, Kechun; Hogan, Michael C; Wagner, Peter D; Breen, Ellen C

    2016-07-01

    A single bout of exhaustive exercise signals expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the exercising muscle. Previous studies have reported that mice with life-long deletion of skeletal myofiber VEGF have fewer capillaries and a severe reduction in endurance exercise. However, in adult mice, VEGF gene deletion conditionally targeted to skeletal myofibers limits exercise capacity without evidence of capillary regression. To explain this, we hypothesized that adult skeletal myofiber VEGF acutely regulates skeletal muscle perfusion during muscle contraction. A tamoxifen-inducible skeletal myofiber-specific VEGF gene deletion mouse (skmVEGF-/-) was used to reduce skeletal muscle VEGF protein by 90% in adult mice. Three weeks after inducing deletion of the skeletal myofiber VEGF gene, skmVEGF-/- mice exhibited diminished maximum running speed (-10%, P < 0.05) and endurance capacity (-47%; P < 0.05), which did not persist after 8 wk. In skmVEGF-/- mice, gastrocnemius complex time to fatigue measured in situ was 71% lower than control mice. Contraction-induced perfusion measured by optical imaging during a period of electrically stimulated muscle contraction was 85% lower in skmVEGF-/- than control mice. No evidence of capillary rarefication was detected in the soleus, gastrocnemius, and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) up to 8 wk after tamoxifen-induced VEGF ablation, and contractility and fatigue resistance of the soleus measured ex vivo were also unchanged. The force-frequency of the EDL showed a small right shift, but fatigue resistance did not differ between EDL from control and skmVEGF-/- mice. These data suggest myofiber VEGF is required for regulating perfusion during periods of contraction and may in this manner affect endurance capacity.

  18. Skeletal myofiber VEGF regulates contraction-induced perfusion and exercise capacity but not muscle capillarity in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Amy E; Goldberg, Daniel; Delavar, Hamid; Trisko, Breanna M; Tang, Kechun; Hogan, Michael C; Wagner, Peter D; Breen, Ellen C

    2016-07-01

    A single bout of exhaustive exercise signals expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the exercising muscle. Previous studies have reported that mice with life-long deletion of skeletal myofiber VEGF have fewer capillaries and a severe reduction in endurance exercise. However, in adult mice, VEGF gene deletion conditionally targeted to skeletal myofibers limits exercise capacity without evidence of capillary regression. To explain this, we hypothesized that adult skeletal myofiber VEGF acutely regulates skeletal muscle perfusion during muscle contraction. A tamoxifen-inducible skeletal myofiber-specific VEGF gene deletion mouse (skmVEGF-/-) was used to reduce skeletal muscle VEGF protein by 90% in adult mice. Three weeks after inducing deletion of the skeletal myofiber VEGF gene, skmVEGF-/- mice exhibited diminished maximum running speed (-10%, P < 0.05) and endurance capacity (-47%; P < 0.05), which did not persist after 8 wk. In skmVEGF-/- mice, gastrocnemius complex time to fatigue measured in situ was 71% lower than control mice. Contraction-induced perfusion measured by optical imaging during a period of electrically stimulated muscle contraction was 85% lower in skmVEGF-/- than control mice. No evidence of capillary rarefication was detected in the soleus, gastrocnemius, and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) up to 8 wk after tamoxifen-induced VEGF ablation, and contractility and fatigue resistance of the soleus measured ex vivo were also unchanged. The force-frequency of the EDL showed a small right shift, but fatigue resistance did not differ between EDL from control and skmVEGF-/- mice. These data suggest myofiber VEGF is required for regulating perfusion during periods of contraction and may in this manner affect endurance capacity. PMID:27225953

  19. Testosterone represses ubiquitin ligases atrogin-1 and Murf-1 expression in an androgen-sensitive rat skeletal muscle in vivo.

    PubMed

    Pires-Oliveira, Marcelo; Maragno, Ana Leticia G C; Parreiras-e-Silva, Lucas T; Chiavegatti, Tiago; Gomes, Marcelo D; Godinho, Rosely O

    2010-02-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy induced by denervation and metabolic diseases has been associated with increased ubiquitin ligase expression. In the present study, we evaluate the influence of androgens on muscle ubiquitin ligases atrogin-1/MAFbx/FBXO32 and Murf-1/Trim63 expression and its correlation with maintenance of muscle mass by using the testosterone-dependent fast-twitch levator ani muscle (LA) from normal or castrated adult male Wistar rats. Gene expression was determined by qRT-PCR and/or immunoblotting. Castration induced progressive loss of LA mass (30% of control, 90 days) and an exponential decrease of LA cytoplasm-to-nucleus ratio (nuclear domain; 22% of control after 60 days). Testosterone deprivation induced a 31-fold increase in LA atrogin-1 mRNA and an 18-fold increase in Murf-1 mRNA detected after 2 and 7 days of castration, respectively. Acute (24 h) testosterone administration fully repressed atrogin-1 and Murf-1 mRNA expression to control levels. Atrogin-1 protein was also increased by castration up to 170% after 30 days. Testosterone administration for 7 days restored atrogin-1 protein to control levels. In addition to the well known stimulus of protein synthesis, our results show that testosterone maintains muscle mass by repressing ubiquitin ligases, indicating that inhibition of ubiquitin-proteasome catabolic system is critical for trophic action of androgens in skeletal muscle. Besides, since neither castration nor androgen treatment had any effect on weight or ubiquitin ligases mRNA levels of extensor digitorum longus muscle, a fast-twitch muscle with low androgen sensitivity, our study shows that perineal muscle LA is a suitable in vivo model to evaluate regulation of muscle proteolysis, closely resembling human muscle responsiveness to androgens.

  20. Skeletal and Dentoalveolar Cephalometric Features of Anterior Open Bite among Yemeni Adults.

    PubMed

    Daer, Ammar Abdulkareem; Abuaffan, Amal Hussein

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study is to determine the cephalometric features for a sample of Yemeni adults with anterior open bite. Material and Methods. Lateral cephalometric radiographs were taken for 65 Yemeni university students (46 males and 19 females), 18-25 years old, with clinical anterior open bite (vertical overbite ≤ 0 mm) and no previous orthodontic treatment. The radiographs were manually traced; twelve angular, five linear measurements, and facial index were assessed, analyzed statistically, and compared to 194 Yemeni norms (89 males and 105 females) as well as cephalometric features of open bite subjects in previous studies. Results. Statistically significant differences were observed in skeletal and dental cephalometric values of Yemeni patients with anterior open bite when compared to Yemeni norms; mainly in the anteroposterior relation, the open bite individuals had higher significant value in SNA, SNB, and SNPg angles. In addition, a higher statistical significant difference was recorded in all variables of vertical relation when compared with norms. In contrast, NL-NSL angle revealed higher value among normal individuals. Dental variables among open bite individuals showed a greater degree of dental proclination, higher statistically significant value in [Formula: see text]-NA°, [Formula: see text]-NA mm and I-NB mm, and a lower significant value in U1-L1 in open bite group. Conclusion. Open bite Yemeni individual's skeletal and dentoalveolar variables significantly differ from Yemeni norms in the extent of the anteroposterior, vertical developmental pattern and dental relations. PMID:27190680

  1. Protein Considerations for Optimising Skeletal Muscle Mass in Healthy Young and Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Witard, Oliver C.; Wardle, Sophie L.; Macnaughton, Lindsay S.; Hodgson, Adrian B.; Tipton, Kevin D.

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is critical for human health. Protein feeding, alongside resistance exercise, is a potent stimulus for muscle protein synthesis (MPS) and is a key factor that regulates skeletal muscle mass (SMM). The main purpose of this narrative review was to evaluate the latest evidence for optimising the amino acid or protein source, dose, timing, pattern and macronutrient coingestion for increasing or preserving SMM in healthy young and healthy older adults. We used a systematic search strategy of PubMed and Web of Science to retrieve all articles related to this review objective. In summary, our findings support the notion that protein guidelines for increasing or preserving SMM are more complex than simply recommending a total daily amount of protein. Instead, multifactorial interactions between protein source, dose, timing, pattern and macronutrient coingestion, alongside exercise, influence the stimulation of MPS, and thus should be considered in the context of protein recommendations for regulating SMM. To conclude, on the basis of currently available scientific literature, protein recommendations for optimising SMM should be tailored to the population or context of interest, with consideration given to age and resting/post resistance exercise conditions. PMID:27023595

  2. Skeletal and Dentoalveolar Cephalometric Features of Anterior Open Bite among Yemeni Adults

    PubMed Central

    Daer, Ammar Abdulkareem; Abuaffan, Amal Hussein

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study is to determine the cephalometric features for a sample of Yemeni adults with anterior open bite. Material and Methods. Lateral cephalometric radiographs were taken for 65 Yemeni university students (46 males and 19 females), 18–25 years old, with clinical anterior open bite (vertical overbite ≤ 0 mm) and no previous orthodontic treatment. The radiographs were manually traced; twelve angular, five linear measurements, and facial index were assessed, analyzed statistically, and compared to 194 Yemeni norms (89 males and 105 females) as well as cephalometric features of open bite subjects in previous studies. Results. Statistically significant differences were observed in skeletal and dental cephalometric values of Yemeni patients with anterior open bite when compared to Yemeni norms; mainly in the anteroposterior relation, the open bite individuals had higher significant value in SNA, SNB, and SNPg angles. In addition, a higher statistical significant difference was recorded in all variables of vertical relation when compared with norms. In contrast, NL-NSL angle revealed higher value among normal individuals. Dental variables among open bite individuals showed a greater degree of dental proclination, higher statistically significant value in I_-NA°, I_-NA mm and I-NB mm, and a lower significant value in U1-L1 in open bite group. Conclusion. Open bite Yemeni individual's skeletal and dentoalveolar variables significantly differ from Yemeni norms in the extent of the anteroposterior, vertical developmental pattern and dental relations. PMID:27190680

  3. Differences between brainstem gliomas in juvenile and adult rats

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YU; TIAN, YONGJI; WAN, HONG; LI, DEZHI; WU, WENHAO; YIN, LUXIN; JIANG, JIAN; WAN, WEIQING; ZHANG, LIWEI

    2013-01-01

    Clinical studies have shown that gliomas of the brainstem behave differently in children and adults. The aim of the present study was to compare and analyze the differences between these gliomas in juvenile and adult rats with regard to tumor growth, survival, pathology and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A total of 25 juvenile and 25 adult Wistar rats were divided into groups A (15 juvenile rats), B (10 juvenile rats), C (15 adult rats) and D (10 adult rats). The rats of groups A and C (experimental) were injected with glioma cells, while groups B and D (control) were injected with a physiological saline solution. Rat neurological signs, survival time, tumor size, hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining and immunohistochemical staining for MMP-2, MMP-9 and β-catenin were compared. The survival time of group A was 19.47±2.232 days, whereas that of group C was 21.47±2.232 days (P<0.05). The tumor sizes were 4.55 and 4.62 mm (P>0.05) in groups A and C, respectively. HE and immunohistochemical staining revealed no differences between the groups. The results suggest that the growth patterns and invasiveness of brainstem gliomas may vary in children compared with adults due to the varied biological behaviors of the tumor cells. PMID:23946812

  4. Alteration of gene expression profiles in skeletal muscle of rats exposed to microgravity during a spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Wayne E.; Bhasin, Shalender; Lalani, Rukhsana; Datta, Anuj; Gonzalez-Cadavid, Nestor F.

    2002-01-01

    To clarify the mechanism of skeletal muscle wasting during spaceflights, we investigated whether intramuscular gene expression profiles are affected, by using DNA microarray methods. Male rats sent on the 17-day NASA STS-90 Neurolab spaceflight were sacrificed 24 hours after return to earth (MG group). Ground control rats were maintained for 17 days in flight-simulated cages (CS group). Spaceflight induced a 19% and 23% loss of tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius muscle mass, respectively, as compared to ground controls. Muscle RNA was analyzed by the Clontech Atlas DNA expression array in four rats, with two MG/ CS pairs for the tibialis anterior, and one pair for the gastrocnemius. Alterations in gene expression were verified for selected genes by reverse-transcription PCR. In both muscles of MG rats, mRNAs for 12 genes were up-regulated by over 2-fold, and 38 were down-regulated compared to controls. There was inhibition of genes for cell proliferation and growth factor cascades, including cell cycle genes and signal transduction proteins, such as p21 Cip1, retinoblastoma (Rb), cyclins G1/S, -E and -D3, MAP kinase 3, MAD3, and ras related protein RAB2. These data indicate that following exposure to microgravity, there is downregulation of genes involved in regulation of muscle satellite cell replication.

  5. Heat stress attenuates skeletal muscle atrophy of extensor digitorum longus in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, K; Une, S; Akiyama, J

    2015-09-01

    To investigate whether heat stress attenuates skeletal muscle atrophy of the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, 12-week-old male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to four groups (n = 6 per group): control (Con), heat stress (HS), diabetes mellitus (DM), and diabetes mellitus/heat stress (DM + HS). Diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg). Heat stress was induced in the HS and DM + HS groups by immersion of the lower half of the body in hot water at 42 °C for 30 min; it was initiated 7 days after injection of streptozotocin, and was performed once a day, five times a week for 3 weeks. The muscle fiber cross-sectional area of EDL muscles from diabetic and non-diabetic rats was determined; heat stress protein (HSP) 72 and HSP25 expression levels were also analyzed by western blotting. Diabetes-induced muscle fiber atrophy was attenuated upon heat stress treatment in diabetic rats. HSP72 and HSP25 expression was upregulated in the DM + HS group compared with the DM group. Our findings suggest that heat stress attenuates atrophy of the EDL muscle by upregulating HSP72 and HSP25 expression. PMID:26551745

  6. Fractal dimension analysis of weight-bearing bones of rats during skeletal unloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pornprasertsuk, S.; Ludlow, J. B.; Webber, R. L.; Tyndall, D. A.; Sanhueza, A. I.; Yamauchi, M.

    2001-01-01

    Fractal analysis was used to quantify changes in trabecular bone induced through the use of a rat tail-suspension model to simulate microgravity-induced osteopenia. Fractal dimensions were estimated from digitized radiographs obtained from tail-suspended and ambulatory rats. Fifty 4-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into groups of 24 ambulatory (control) and 26 suspended (test) animals. Rats of both groups were killed after periods of 1, 4, and 8 weeks. Femurs and tibiae were removed and radiographed with standard intraoral films and digitized using a flatbed scanner. Square regions of interest were cropped at proximal, middle, and distal areas of each bone. Fractal dimensions were estimated from slopes of regression lines fitted to circularly averaged plots of log power vs. log spatial frequency. The results showed that the computed fractal dimensions were significantly greater for images of trabecular bones from tail-suspended groups than for ambulatory groups (p < 0.01) at 1 week. Periods between 1 and 4 weeks likewise yielded significantly different estimates (p < 0.05), consistent with an increase in bone loss. In the tibiae, the proximal regions of the suspended group produced significantly greater fractal dimensions than other regions (p < 0.05), which suggests they were more susceptible to unloading. The data are consistent with other studies demonstrating osteopenia in microgravity environments and the regional response to skeletal unloading. Thus, fractal analysis could be a useful technique to evaluate the structural changes of bone.

  7. Effect of ethanol on function of the rat heart and skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Pagala, M; Ravindran, K; Amaladevi, B; Namba, T; Grob, D

    1995-06-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the acute effects of ethanol on responses of the rat heart and skeletal muscles both in vivo and in vitro. In the anesthetized rat, intravenous infusion of ethanol at 0.1-0.5 g/kg body weight (33-167 mM) decreased the breathing rate by 8-83%, heart rate by 4-52%, and QRS amplitude by 5-27%, and increased the P-R interval by 1-49%. In the anterior tibialis muscle subjected to repetitive nerve stimulation at 100 Hz for 0.5 sec, ethanol at 0.1 g/kg increased the amplitude of the muscle action potential (AP) by 7%, whereas at 0.5 g/kg it decreased the muscle AP by 32%. The nerve-evoked tetanic tension was reduced by 7-34% at 0.1-0.5 g/kg ethanol. In the isolated rat heart, perfusion of ethanol at 0.1-3.0% (22-651 mM) decreased the heart rate by 8-48% and QRS amplitude by 10-39%, and increased the P-R interval by 5-61%. Left ventricular pressure was increased by 10% at 0.1% ethanol, and decreased by 80% at 3.0% ethanol. In the isolated rat phrenic nerve-diaphragm muscle preparation subjected to repetitive nerve stimulation at 100 Hz for 0.5 sec, 0.1-3.0% ethanol decreased the amplitude of the nerve AP by 5-89%, nerve-evoked muscle AP by 2-96%, and peak tetanic tension by 1-87%. On repetitive direct muscle stimulation at 100 Hz for 0.5 sec, 0.1-3.0% ethanol decreased the amplitude of the muscle-evoked muscle AP by 8-65%, and muscle-evoked tetanic tension by 2-65%. These studies indicate that ethanol causes smaller reduction in responses of the heart and skeletal muscles at clinical concentrations, but marked reduction in these responses at higher concentrations due to direct action on excitability of these tissues. At higher concentrations, ethanol causes greater reduction in excitability of the skeletal muscle than of the heart. PMID:7573793

  8. Hindlimb unloading of growing rats: a model for predicting skeletal changes during space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morey-Holton, E. R.; Globus, R. K.

    1998-01-01

    A model that uses hindlimb unloading of rats was developed to study the consequences of skeletal unloading and reloading as occurs during and following space flight. Studies using the model were initiated two decades ago and further developed at National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)-Ames Research Center. The model mimics some aspects of exposure to microgravity by removing weightbearing loads from the hindquarters and producing a cephalic fluid shift. Unlike space flight, the forelimbs remain loaded in the model, providing a useful internal control to distinguish between the local and systemic effects of hindlimb unloading. Rats that are hindlimb unloaded by tail traction gain weight at the same rate as pairfed controls, and glucocorticoid levels are not different from controls, suggesting that systemic stress is minimal. Unloaded bones display reductions in cancellous osteoblast number, cancellous mineral apposition rate, trabecular bone volume, cortical periosteal mineralization rate, total bone mass, calcium content, and maturation of bone mineral relative to controls. Subsequent studies reveal that these changes also occur in rats exposed to space flight. In hindlimb unloaded rats, bone formation rates and masses of unloaded bones decline relative to controls, while loaded bones do not change despite a transient reduction in serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25D) concentrations. Studies using the model to evaluate potential countermeasures show that 1,25D, growth hormone, dietary calcium, alendronate, and muscle stimulation modify, but do not completely correct, the suppression of bone growth caused by unloading, whereas continuous infusion of transforming growth factor-beta2 or insulin-like growth factor-1 appears to protect against some of the bone changes caused by unloading. These results emphasize the importance of local as opposed to systemic factors in the skeletal response to unloading, and reveal the pivotal role that osteoblasts play in

  9. Mitofusion-2-mediated alleviation of insulin resistance in rats through reduction in lipid intermediate accumulation in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Increased lipid accumulation and mitochondrial dysfunction within skeletal muscle have been shown to be strongly associated with insulin resistance. However, the role of mitofusion-2 (MFN2), a key factor in mitochondrial function and energy metabolism, in skeletal muscle lipid intermediate accumulation remains to be elucidated. Results A high-fat diet resulted in insulin resistance as well as accumulation of cytosolic lipid intermediates and down-regulation of MFN2 and CPT1 in skeletal muscle in rats, while MFN2 overexpression improved insulin sensitivity and reduced lipid intermediates in muscle, possibly by upregulation of CPT1 expression. Conclusions MFN2 overexpression can rescue insulin resistance, possibly by upregulating CPT1 expression leading to reduction in the accumulation of lipid intermediates in skeletal muscle. These observations contribute to the investigations of new diabetes therapies. PMID:23815800

  10. The Link between Dietary Protein Intake, Skeletal Muscle Function and Health in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Baum, Jamie I.; Wolfe, Robert R.

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle mass and function are progressively lost with age, a condition referred to as sarcopenia. By the age of 60, many older adults begin to be affected by muscle loss. There is a link between decreased muscle mass and strength and adverse health outcomes such as obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Data suggest that increasing dietary protein intake at meals may counterbalance muscle loss in older individuals due to the increased availability of amino acids, which stimulate muscle protein synthesis by activating the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTORC1). Increased muscle protein synthesis can lead to increased muscle mass, strength and function over time. This review aims to address the current recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for protein and whether or not this value meets the needs for older adults based upon current scientific evidence. The current RDA for protein is 0.8 g/kg body weight/day. However, literature suggests that consuming protein in amounts greater than the RDA can improve muscle mass, strength and function in older adults. PMID:27417778

  11. Cav1.1 controls frequency-dependent events regulating adult skeletal muscle plasticity.

    PubMed

    Jorquera, Gonzalo; Altamirano, Francisco; Contreras-Ferrat, Ariel; Almarza, Gonzalo; Buvinic, Sonja; Jacquemond, Vincent; Jaimovich, Enrique; Casas, Mariana

    2013-03-01

    An important pending question in neuromuscular biology is how skeletal muscle cells decipher the stimulation pattern coming from motoneurons to define their phenotype as slow or fast twitch muscle fibers. We have previously shown that voltage-gated L-type calcium channel (Cav1.1) acts as a voltage sensor for activation of inositol (1,4,5)-trisphosphate [Ins(1,4,5)P₃]-dependent Ca(2+) signals that regulates gene expression. ATP released by muscle cells after electrical stimulation through pannexin-1 channels plays a key role in this process. We show now that stimulation frequency determines both ATP release and Ins(1,4,5)P₃ production in adult skeletal muscle and that Cav1.1 and pannexin-1 colocalize in the transverse tubules. Both ATP release and increased Ins(1,4,5)P₃ was seen in flexor digitorum brevis fibers stimulated with 270 pulses at 20 Hz, but not at 90 Hz. 20 Hz stimulation induced transcriptional changes related to fast-to-slow muscle fiber phenotype transition that required ATP release. Addition of 30 µM ATP to fibers induced the same transcriptional changes observed after 20 Hz stimulation. Myotubes lacking the Cav1.1-α1 subunit released almost no ATP after electrical stimulation, showing that Cav1.1 has a central role in this process. In adult muscle fibers, ATP release and the transcriptional changes produced by 20 Hz stimulation were blocked by both the Cav1.1 antagonist nifedipine (25 µM) and by the Cav1.1 agonist (-)S-BayK 8644 (10 µM). We propose a new role for Cav1.1, independent of its calcium channel activity, in the activation of signaling pathways allowing muscle fibers to decipher the frequency of electrical stimulation and to activate specific transcriptional programs that define their phenotype.

  12. Cav1.1 controls frequency-dependent events regulating adult skeletal muscle plasticity.

    PubMed

    Jorquera, Gonzalo; Altamirano, Francisco; Contreras-Ferrat, Ariel; Almarza, Gonzalo; Buvinic, Sonja; Jacquemond, Vincent; Jaimovich, Enrique; Casas, Mariana

    2013-03-01

    An important pending question in neuromuscular biology is how skeletal muscle cells decipher the stimulation pattern coming from motoneurons to define their phenotype as slow or fast twitch muscle fibers. We have previously shown that voltage-gated L-type calcium channel (Cav1.1) acts as a voltage sensor for activation of inositol (1,4,5)-trisphosphate [Ins(1,4,5)P₃]-dependent Ca(2+) signals that regulates gene expression. ATP released by muscle cells after electrical stimulation through pannexin-1 channels plays a key role in this process. We show now that stimulation frequency determines both ATP release and Ins(1,4,5)P₃ production in adult skeletal muscle and that Cav1.1 and pannexin-1 colocalize in the transverse tubules. Both ATP release and increased Ins(1,4,5)P₃ was seen in flexor digitorum brevis fibers stimulated with 270 pulses at 20 Hz, but not at 90 Hz. 20 Hz stimulation induced transcriptional changes related to fast-to-slow muscle fiber phenotype transition that required ATP release. Addition of 30 µM ATP to fibers induced the same transcriptional changes observed after 20 Hz stimulation. Myotubes lacking the Cav1.1-α1 subunit released almost no ATP after electrical stimulation, showing that Cav1.1 has a central role in this process. In adult muscle fibers, ATP release and the transcriptional changes produced by 20 Hz stimulation were blocked by both the Cav1.1 antagonist nifedipine (25 µM) and by the Cav1.1 agonist (-)S-BayK 8644 (10 µM). We propose a new role for Cav1.1, independent of its calcium channel activity, in the activation of signaling pathways allowing muscle fibers to decipher the frequency of electrical stimulation and to activate specific transcriptional programs that define their phenotype. PMID:23321639

  13. MuSK levels differ between adult skeletal muscles and influence postsynaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Punga, Anna R; Maj, Marcin; Lin, Shuo; Meinen, Sarina; Rüegg, Markus A

    2011-03-01

    Muscle-specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK) is involved in the formation and maintenance of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ), and is necessary for NMJ integrity. As muscle involvement is strikingly selective in pathological conditions in which MuSK is targeted, including congenital myasthenic syndrome with MuSK mutation and MuSK antibody-seropositive myasthenia gravis, we hypothesized that the postsynaptic response to MuSK-agrin signalling differs between adult muscles. Transcript levels of postsynaptic proteins were compared between different muscles in wild-type adult mice. MuSK expression was high in the soleus and sternomastoid muscles and low in the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and omohyoid muscles. The acetylcholine receptor (AChR) α subunit followed a similar expression pattern, whereas expression of Dok-7, Lrp4 and rapsyn was comparable between the muscles. We subsequently examined muscles in mice that overexpressed a miniaturized form of neural agrin or MuSK. In these transgenic mice, the soleus and sternomastoid muscles responded with formation of ectopic AChR clusters, whereas such clusters were almost absent in the EDL and omohyoid muscles. Electroporation of Dok-7 revealed its important role as an activator of MuSK in AChR cluster formation in adult muscles. Together, our findings indicate for the first time that adult skeletal muscles harbour different endogenous levels of MuSK and that these levels determine the ability to form ectopic AChR clusters upon overexpression of agrin or MuSK. We believe that these findings are important for our understanding of adult muscle plasticity and the selective muscle involvement in neuromuscular disorders in which MuSK is diminished. PMID:21255125

  14. Effect of Intermittent Hypoxia and Rimonabant on Glucose Metabolism in Rats: Involvement of Expression of GLUT4 in Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoya; Yu, Qin; Yue, Hongmei; Zeng, Shuang; Cui, Fenfen

    2015-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and its main feature, chronic intermittent hypoxia (IH) during sleep, is closely associated with insulin resistance (IR) and diabetes. Rimonabant can regulate glucose metabolism and improve IR. The present study aimed to assess the effect of IH and rimonabant on glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity, and to explore the possible mechanisms. Material/Methods Thirty-two rats were randomly assigned into 4 groups: Control group, subjected to intermittent air only; IH group, subjected to IH only; IH+NS group, subjected to IH and treated with normal saline; and IH+Rim group, subjected to IH and treated with 10 mg/kg/day of rimonabant. All rats were killed after 28 days of exposure. Then, the blood and skeletal muscle were collected. We measured fasting blood glucose levels, fasting blood insulin levels, and the expression of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) in both mRNA and protein levels in skeletal muscle. Results IH can slow weight gain, increase serum insulin level, and reduce insulin sensitivity in rats. The expressions of GLUT4 mRNA, total GLUT4, and plasma membrane protein of GLUT4 (PM GLUT4) in skeletal muscle were decreased. Rimonabant treatment was demonstrated to improve weight gain and insulin sensitivity of the rats induced by IH. Rimonabant significantly upregulated the expression of GLUT4 mRNA, PM GLUT4, and total GLUT4 in skeletal muscle. Conclusions The present study demonstrates that IH can cause IR and reduced expression of GLUT4 in both mRNA and protein levels in skeletal muscle of rats. Rimonabant treatment can improve IH – induced IR, and the upregulation of GLUT4 expression may be involved in this process. PMID:26503060

  15. Bone and hormonal changes induced by skeletal unloading in the mature male rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dehority, W.; Halloran, B. P.; Bikle, D. D.; Curren, T.; Kostenuik, P. J.; Wronski, T. J.; Shen, Y.; Rabkin, B.; Bouraoui, A.; Morey-Holton, E.

    1999-01-01

    To determine whether the rat hindlimb elevation model can be used to study the effects of spaceflight and loss of gravitational loading on bone in the adult animal, and to examine the effects of age on bone responsiveness to mechanical loading, we studied 6-mo-old rats subjected to hindlimb elevation for up to 5 wk. Loss of weight bearing in the adult induced a mild hypercalcemia, diminished serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, decreased vertebral bone mass, and blunted the otherwise normal increase in femoral mass associated with bone maturation. Unloading decreased osteoblast numbers and reduced periosteal and cancellous bone formation but had no effect on bone resorption. Mineralizing surface, mineral apposition rate, and bone formation rate decreased during unloading. Our results demonstrate the utility of the adult rat hindlimb elevation model as a means of simulating the loss of gravitational loading on the skeleton, and they show that the effects of nonweight bearing are prolonged and have a greater relative effect on bone formation in the adult than in the young growing animal.

  16. The Influence of Electromagnetic Radiation Generated by a Mobile Phone on the Skeletal System of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sieroń-Stołtny, Karolina; Teister, Łukasz; Cieślar, Grzegorz; Sieroń, Dominik; Śliwinski, Zbigniew; Sieroń, Aleksander

    2015-01-01

    The study was focused on the influence of electromagnetic field generated by mobile phone on the skeletal system of rats, assessed by measuring the macrometric parameters of bones, mechanical properties of long bones, calcium and phosphorus content in bones, and the concentration of osteogenesis (osteocalcin) and bone resorption (NTX, pyridinoline) markers in blood serum. The study was carried out on male rats divided into two groups: experimental group subjected to 28-day cycle of exposures in electromagnetic field of 900 MHz frequency generated by mobile phone and a control, sham-exposed one. The mobile phone-generated electromagnetic field did not influence the macrometric parameters of long bones and L4 vertebra, it altered mechanical properties of bones (stress and energy at maximum bending force, stress at fracture), it decreased the content of calcium in long bones and L4 vertebra, and it altered the concentration of osteogenesis and bone resorption markers in rats. On the basis of obtained results, it was concluded that electromagnetic field generated by 900 MHz mobile phone does not have a direct impact on macrometric parameters of bones; however, it alters the processes of bone mineralization and the intensity of bone turnover processes and thus influences the mechanical strength of bones. PMID:25705697

  17. The influence of electromagnetic radiation generated by a mobile phone on the skeletal system of rats.

    PubMed

    Sieroń-Stołtny, Karolina; Teister, Łukasz; Cieślar, Grzegorz; Sieroń, Dominik; Śliwinski, Zbigniew; Kucharzewski, Marek; Sieroń, Aleksander

    2015-01-01

    The study was focused on the influence of electromagnetic field generated by mobile phone on the skeletal system of rats, assessed by measuring the macrometric parameters of bones, mechanical properties of long bones, calcium and phosphorus content in bones, and the concentration of osteogenesis (osteocalcin) and bone resorption (NTX, pyridinoline) markers in blood serum. The study was carried out on male rats divided into two groups: experimental group subjected to 28-day cycle of exposures in electromagnetic field of 900 MHz frequency generated by mobile phone and a control, sham-exposed one. The mobile phone-generated electromagnetic field did not influence the macrometric parameters of long bones and L4 vertebra, it altered mechanical properties of bones (stress and energy at maximum bending force, stress at fracture), it decreased the content of calcium in long bones and L4 vertebra, and it altered the concentration of osteogenesis and bone resorption markers in rats. On the basis of obtained results, it was concluded that electromagnetic field generated by 900 MHz mobile phone does not have a direct impact on macrometric parameters of bones; however, it alters the processes of bone mineralization and the intensity of bone turnover processes and thus influences the mechanical strength of bones.

  18. The influence of electromagnetic radiation generated by a mobile phone on the skeletal system of rats.

    PubMed

    Sieroń-Stołtny, Karolina; Teister, Łukasz; Cieślar, Grzegorz; Sieroń, Dominik; Śliwinski, Zbigniew; Kucharzewski, Marek; Sieroń, Aleksander

    2015-01-01

    The study was focused on the influence of electromagnetic field generated by mobile phone on the skeletal system of rats, assessed by measuring the macrometric parameters of bones, mechanical properties of long bones, calcium and phosphorus content in bones, and the concentration of osteogenesis (osteocalcin) and bone resorption (NTX, pyridinoline) markers in blood serum. The study was carried out on male rats divided into two groups: experimental group subjected to 28-day cycle of exposures in electromagnetic field of 900 MHz frequency generated by mobile phone and a control, sham-exposed one. The mobile phone-generated electromagnetic field did not influence the macrometric parameters of long bones and L4 vertebra, it altered mechanical properties of bones (stress and energy at maximum bending force, stress at fracture), it decreased the content of calcium in long bones and L4 vertebra, and it altered the concentration of osteogenesis and bone resorption markers in rats. On the basis of obtained results, it was concluded that electromagnetic field generated by 900 MHz mobile phone does not have a direct impact on macrometric parameters of bones; however, it alters the processes of bone mineralization and the intensity of bone turnover processes and thus influences the mechanical strength of bones. PMID:25705697

  19. Skeletal unloading and dietary copper depletion are detrimental to bone quality of mature rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Brenda J.; King, Jarrod B.; Lucas, Edralin A.; Akhter, Mohammed P.; Arjmandi, Bahram H.; Stoecker, Barbara J.

    2002-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the skeletal response to copper depletion and mechanical unloading in mature animals. In a 2 x 2 experimental design, 5.5-mo-old male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 36) consumed either the control (AIN-93M) or Cu-depletion ((-)Cu) diet beginning 21 d before suspension and throughout the remainder of the study. Half of the rats in each dietary treatment group were either tail-suspended (TS) or kept ambulatory (AMB) for 28 d. Lower bone mineral densities (BMD) of 5th lumbar vertebra (L5) (P < 0.05) and femur were observed with (-)Cu and TS, but no differences were noted in the BMD of the humerus. Mechanical strength in the femur and vertebra decreased in response to TS, but were unaffected by copper depletion. Urinary deoxypyridinoline, an index of bone resorption, was significantly greater in TS rats, but unaltered by (-)Cu. No changes in serum or bone alkaline phosphatase activity, an indicator of bone formation, were observed. Our findings suggest that TS and (-)Cu decreased BMD in unloaded femur and vertebra but had no effect on normally loaded humerus. Bone loss with TS appeared to be related to accelerated bone resorption. Alterations in bone metabolism and bone mechanical properties in the mature skeleton resulting from (-)Cu warrant further investigation.

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Graded Skeletal Muscle Injury in Live Rats

    PubMed Central

    Cutlip, Robert G; Hollander, Melinda S; Johnson, G Allan; Johnson, Brice W; Friend, Sherri A; Baker, Brent A

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Increasing number of stretch–shortening contractions (SSCs) results in increased muscle injury. METHODS Fischer Hybrid rats were acutely exposed to an increasing number of SSCs in vivo using a custom-designed dynamometer. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) imaging was conducted 72 hours after exposure when rats were infused with Prohance and imaged using a 7T rodent MRI system (GE Epic 12.0). Images were acquired in the transverse plane with typically 60 total slices acquired covering the entire length of the hind legs. Rats were euthanized after MRI, the lower limbs removed, and tibialis anterior muscles were prepared for histology and quantified stereology. RESULTS Stereological analyses showed myofiber degeneration, and cellular infiltrates significantly increased following 70 and 150 SSC exposure compared to controls. MRI images revealed that the percent affected area significantly increased with exposure in all SSC groups in a graded fashion. Signal intensity also significantly increased with increasing SSC repetitions. DISCUSSION These results suggest that contrast-enhanced MRI has the sensitivity to differentiate specific degrees of skeletal muscle strain injury, and imaging data are specifically representative of cellular histopathology quantified via stereological analyses. PMID:25525369

  1. Effect of endurance training on glucose transport capacity and glucose transporter expression in rat skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Ploug, T.; Stallknecht, B.M.; Pedersen, O.; Kahn, B.B.; Ohkuwa, T.; Vinten, J.; Galbo, H. )

    1990-12-01

    The effect of 10 wk endurance swim training on 3-O-methylglucose (3-MG) uptake (at 40 mM 3-MG) in skeletal muscle was studied in the perfused rat hindquarter. Training resulted in an increase of approximately 33% for maximum insulin-stimulated 3-MG transport in fast-twitch red fibers and an increase of approximately 33% for contraction-stimulated transport in slow-twitch red fibers compared with nonexercised sedentary muscle. A fully additive effect of insulin and contractions was observed both in trained and untrained muscle. Compared with transport in control rats subjected to an almost exhaustive single exercise session the day before experiment both maximum insulin- and contraction-stimulated transport rates were increased in all muscle types in trained rats. Accordingly, the increased glucose transport capacity in trained muscle was not due to a residual effect of the last training session. Half-times for reversal of contraction-induced glucose transport were similar in trained and untrained muscles. The concentrations of mRNA for GLUT-1 (the erythrocyte-brain-Hep G2 glucose transporter) and GLUT-4 (the adipocyte-muscle glucose transporter) were increased approximately twofold by training in fast-twitch red muscle fibers. In parallel to this, Western blot demonstrated a approximately 47% increase in GLUT-1 protein and a approximately 31% increase in GLUT-4 protein. This indicates that the increases in maximum velocity for 3-MG transport in trained muscle is due to an increased number of glucose transporters.

  2. Effect of laser therapy on skeletal muscle repair process in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    França, Cristiane Miranda; de Loura Santana, Cristiano; Takahashi, Camila Borin; Alves, Agnelo Neves; De Souza Mernick, Ana Paula; Fernandes, Kristianne Porta Santos; de Fátima Teixeira da Silva, Daniela; Bussadori, Sandra Kalil; Mesquita-Ferrari, Raquel Agnelli

    2013-09-01

    Skeletal muscle myopathy is a common source of disability in diabetic patients. This study evaluated whether low-level laser therapy (LLLT) influences the healing morphology of injured skeletal muscle. Sixty-five male Wistar rats were divided as follows: (1) sham; (2) control; (3) diabetic; (4) diabetic sham; (5) nondiabetic cryoinjured submitted to LLLT (LLLT); (6) diabetic cryoinjured submitted to LLLT (D-LLLT); and (7) diabetic cryoinjured non-treated (D). Diabetes was induced with streptozotocin. Anterior tibialis muscle was cryoinjured and received LLLT daily (780 nm, 5 J/cm(2), 10 s per point; 0.2 J; total treatment, 1.6 J). Euthanasia occurred on day 1 in groups 1, 2, 3, and 4 and on days 1, 7, and 14 in groups 5, 6, and 7. Muscle samples were processed for H&E and Picrosirius Red and photographed. Leukocytes, myonecrosis, fibrosis, and immature fibers were manually quantified using the ImageJ software. On day 1, all cryoinjured groups were in the inflammatory phase. The D group exhibited more myonecrosis than LLLT group (p < 0.05). On day 14, the LLLT group was in the remodeling phase; the D group was still in the proliferative phase, with fibrosis, chronic inflammation, and granulation tissue; and the D-LLLT group was in an intermediary state in relation to the two previous groups. Under polarized light, on day 14, the LLLT and D-LLLT groups had organized collagen bundles in the perimysium, whereas the diabetic groups exhibited fibrosis. LLLT can have a positive effect on the morphology of skeletal muscle during the tissue repair process by enhancing the reorganization of myofibers and the perimysium, reducing fibrosis.

  3. Oxidative stress exaggerates skeletal muscle contraction-evoked reflex sympathoexcitation in rats with hypertension induced by angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Koba, Satoshi; Watanabe, Ryosuke; Kano, Naoko; Watanabe, Tatsuo

    2013-01-01

    Muscle contraction stimulates thin fiber muscle afferents and evokes reflex sympathoexcitation. In hypertension, this reflex is exaggerated. ANG II, which is elevated in hypertension, has been reported to trigger the production of superoxide and other reactive oxygen species. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that increased ANG II in hypertension exaggerates skeletal muscle contraction-evoked reflex sympathoexcitation by inducing oxidative stress in the muscle. In rats, subcutaneous infusion of ANG II at 450 ng·kg(-1)·min(-1) for 14 days significantly (P < 0.05) elevated blood pressure compared with sham-operated (sham) rats. Electrically induced 30-s hindlimb muscle contraction in decerebrate rats with hypertension evoked larger renal sympathoexcitatory and pressor responses [+1,173 ± 212 arbitrary units (AU) and +35 ± 5 mmHg, n = 10] compared with sham normotensive rats (+419 ± 103 AU and +13 ± 2 mmHg, n = 11). Tempol, a SOD mimetic, injected intra-arterially into the hindlimb circulation significantly reduced responses in hypertensive rats, whereas this compound had no effect on responses in sham rats. Tiron, another SOD mimetic, also significantly reduced reflex renal sympathetic and pressor responses in a subset of hypertensive rats (n = 10). Generation of muscle superoxide, as evaluated by dihydroethidium staining, was increased in hypertensive rats. RT-PCR and immunoblot experiments showed that mRNA and protein for gp91(phox), a NADPH oxidase subunit, in skeletal muscle tissue were upregulated in hypertensive rats. Taken together, hese results suggest that increased ANG II in hypertension induces oxidative stress in skeletal muscle, thereby exaggerating the muscle reflex.

  4. Effects of the Infusion of 4% or 20% Human Serum Albumin on the Skeletal Muscle Microcirculation in Endotoxemic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Damiani, Elisa; Ince, Can; Orlando, Fiorenza; Pierpaoli, Elisa; Cirioni, Oscar; Giacometti, Andrea; Mocchegiani, Federico; Pelaia, Paolo; Provinciali, Mauro; Donati, Abele

    2016-01-01

    Background Sepsis-induced microcirculatory alterations contribute to tissue hypoxia and organ dysfunction. In addition to its plasma volume expanding activity, human serum albumin (HSA) has anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and may have a protective role in the microcirculation during sepsis. The concentration of HSA infused may influence these effects. We compared the microcirculatory effects of the infusion of 4% and 20% HSA in an experimental model of sepsis. Methods Adult male Wistar rats were equipped with arterial and venous catheters and received an intravenous infusion of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, serotype O127:B8, 10 mg/kg over 30 minutes) or vehicle (SHAM, n = 6). Two hours later, endotoxemic animals were randomized to receive 10 mL/kg of either 4% HSA (LPS+4%HSA, n = 6), 20% HSA (LPS+20%HSA, n = 6) or 0.9% NaCl (LPS+0.9%NaCl, n = 6). No fluids were given to an additional 6 animals (LPS). Vessel density and perfusion were assessed in the skeletal muscle microcirculation with sidestream dark field videomicroscopy at baseline (t0), 2 hours after LPS injection (t1), after HSA infusion (t2) and 1 hour later (t3). The mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate were recorded. Serum endothelin-1 was measured at t2. Results MAP was stable over time in all groups. The microcirculatory parameters were significantly altered in endotoxemic animals at t1. The infusion of both 4% and 20% HSA similarly increased the perfused vessel density and blood flow velocity and decreased the flow heterogeneity to control values. Microvascular perfusion was preserved in the LPS+20%HSA group at t3, whereas alterations reappeared in the LPS+4%HSA group. Conclusions In a rat model of normotensive endotoxemia, the infusion of 4% or 20% HSA produced a similar acute improvement in the microvascular perfusion in otherwise unresuscitated animals. PMID:26942605

  5. Regulation of skeletal muscle protein degradation and synthesis by oral administration of lysine in rats.

    PubMed

    Sato, Tomonori; Ito, Yoshiaki; Nagasawa, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Several catabolic diseases and unloading induce muscle mass wasting, which causes severe pathological progression in various diseases and aging. Leucine is known to attenuate muscle loss via stimulation of protein synthesis and suppression of protein degradation in skeletal muscle. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of lysine intake on protein degradation and synthesis in skeletal muscle. Fasted rats were administered 22.8-570 mg Lys/100 g body weight and the rates of myofibrillar protein degradation were assessed for 0-6 h after Lys administration. The rates of myofibrillar protein degradation evaluated by MeHis release from the isolated muscles were markedly suppressed after administration of 114 mg Lys/100 g body weight and of 570 mg Lys/100 g body weight. LC3-II, a marker of the autophagic-lysosomal pathway, tended to decrease (p=0.05, 0.08) after Lys intake (114 mg/100 g body weight). However, expression of ubiquitin ligase E3 atrogin-1 mRNA and levels of ubiquitinated proteins were not suppressed by Lys intake. Phosphorylation levels of mTOR, S6K1 and 4E-BP1 in the gastrocnemius muscle were not altered after Lys intake. These results suggest that Lys is able to suppress myofibrillar protein degradation at least partially through the autophagic-lysosomal pathway, not the ubiquitin-proteasomal pathway, whereas Lys might be unable to stimulate protein synthesis within this time frame. PMID:24418875

  6. Regulation of skeletal muscle protein degradation and synthesis by oral administration of lysine in rats.

    PubMed

    Sato, Tomonori; Ito, Yoshiaki; Nagasawa, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Several catabolic diseases and unloading induce muscle mass wasting, which causes severe pathological progression in various diseases and aging. Leucine is known to attenuate muscle loss via stimulation of protein synthesis and suppression of protein degradation in skeletal muscle. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of lysine intake on protein degradation and synthesis in skeletal muscle. Fasted rats were administered 22.8-570 mg Lys/100 g body weight and the rates of myofibrillar protein degradation were assessed for 0-6 h after Lys administration. The rates of myofibrillar protein degradation evaluated by MeHis release from the isolated muscles were markedly suppressed after administration of 114 mg Lys/100 g body weight and of 570 mg Lys/100 g body weight. LC3-II, a marker of the autophagic-lysosomal pathway, tended to decrease (p=0.05, 0.08) after Lys intake (114 mg/100 g body weight). However, expression of ubiquitin ligase E3 atrogin-1 mRNA and levels of ubiquitinated proteins were not suppressed by Lys intake. Phosphorylation levels of mTOR, S6K1 and 4E-BP1 in the gastrocnemius muscle were not altered after Lys intake. These results suggest that Lys is able to suppress myofibrillar protein degradation at least partially through the autophagic-lysosomal pathway, not the ubiquitin-proteasomal pathway, whereas Lys might be unable to stimulate protein synthesis within this time frame.

  7. Skeletal muscle fiber, nerve, and blood vessel breakdown in space-flown rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, D. A.; Ilyina-Kakueva, E. I.; Ellis, S.; Bain, J. L.; Slocum, G. R.; Sedlak, F. R.

    1990-01-01

    Histochemical and ultrastructural analyses were performed postflight on hind limb skeletal muscles of rats orbited for 12.5 days aboard the unmanned Cosmos 1887 biosatellite and returned to Earth 2 days before sacrifice. The antigravity adductor longus (AL), soleus, and plantaris muscles atrophied more than the non-weight-bearing extensor digitorum longus, and slow muscle fibers were more atrophic than fast fibers. Muscle fiber segmental necrosis occurred selectively in the AL and soleus muscles; primarily, macrophages and neutrophils infiltrated and phagocytosed cellular debris. Granule-rich mast cells were diminished in flight AL muscles compared with controls, indicating the mast cell secretion contributed to interstitial tissue edema. Increased ubiquitination of disrupted myofibrils implicated ubiquitin in myofilament degradation. Mitochondrial content and succinic dehydrogenase activity were normal, except for subsarcolemmal decreases. Myofibrillar ATPase activity of flight AL muscle fibers shifted toward the fast type. Absence of capillaries and extravasation of red blood cells indicated failed microcirculation. Muscle fiber regeneration from activated satellite cells was detected. About 17% of the flight AL end plates exhibited total or partial denervation. Thus, skeletal muscle weakness associated with spaceflight can result from muscle fiber atrophy and segmental necrosis, partial motor denervation, and disruption of the microcirculation.

  8. Cationic distribution in vessels, heart, skeletal muscle, and blood of normotensive (NWR) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR).

    PubMed

    Boeckh-Haebisch, E M

    1989-01-01

    Electrolytic analysis carried out with the atomic absorption spectrophotometer permitted to compare the cationic (Ca2+, Mg2+, Zn2+, K+ and Na+) tissue content of spontaneously hypertensive male rats (SHR) and normotensive male Wistar rats (NWR). In all SHR-tissues, Zn2+ is augmented, but mainly in the atria (left atrium), inferior vena cava, left ventricle, and skeletal muscle. The inferior cava vein and the right atrium have a similar, accentuated high bivalent (Ca2+, Mg2+, and Zn2+) cation content; Ca2+ and Mg2+ is present in a minor content in the right ventricle and type II "pale" skeletal muscle while only Mg2+ was also reduced in the left atrium, aorta, and the whole blood. A higher K+ concentration is seen in the right atrium, aorta, and type I "red" skeletal muscle. In the aortic wall and the whole blood a higher Na+- tissue content is found, confirming earlier observations. There is a discret water retention in the tissues from the left ventricle and skeletal muscle, simultaneously with a small depletion in the whole blood. We have concluded, that there is a specific cationic profile in SHR structural and functional different cardiovascular tissues, including skeletal muscle. The cationic tissue distribution is related to underlying genetic and adaptative factors and may be involved into specific drug effects. PMID:2628142

  9. Synergist Ablation as a Rodent Model to Study Satellite Cell Dynamics in Adult Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Tyler J; McCarthy, John J; Peterson, Charlotte A; Fry, Christopher S

    2016-01-01

    In adult skeletal muscles, satellite cells are the primary myogenic stem cells involved in myogenesis. Normally, they remain in a quiescent state until activated by a stimulus, after which they proliferate, differentiate, and fuse into an existing myofiber or form a de novo myofiber. To study satellite cell dynamics in adult murine models, most studies utilize regeneration models in which the muscle is severely damaged and requires the participation from satellite cells in order to repair. Here, we describe a model to study satellite cell behavior in muscle hypertrophy that is independent of muscle regeneration.Synergist ablation surgery involves the surgical removal of the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles resulting in functional overload of the remaining plantaris muscle. This functional overload results in myofiber hypertrophy, as well as the activation, proliferation, and fusion of satellite cells into the myofibers. Within 2 weeks of functional overload, satellite cell content increases approximately 275 %, an increase that is accompanied with a ~60 % increase in the number of myonuclei. Therefore, this can be used as an alternative model to study satellite cell behavior in adulthood that is different from regeneration, and capable of revealing new satellite cell functions in regulating muscle adaptation. PMID:27492164

  10. MRF4 negatively regulates adult skeletal muscle growth by repressing MEF2 activity.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Irene; Ciciliot, Stefano; Dyar, Kenneth A; Abraham, Reimar; Murgia, Marta; Agatea, Lisa; Akimoto, Takayuki; Bicciato, Silvio; Forcato, Mattia; Pierre, Philippe; Uhlenhaut, N Henriette; Rigby, Peter W J; Carvajal, Jaime J; Blaauw, Bert; Calabria, Elisa; Schiaffino, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The myogenic regulatory factor MRF4 is highly expressed in adult skeletal muscle but its function is unknown. Here we show that Mrf4 knockdown in adult muscle induces hypertrophy and prevents denervation-induced atrophy. This effect is accompanied by increased protein synthesis and widespread activation of muscle-specific genes, many of which are targets of MEF2 transcription factors. MEF2-dependent genes represent the top-ranking gene set enriched after Mrf4 RNAi and a MEF2 reporter is inhibited by co-transfected MRF4 and activated by Mrf4 RNAi. The Mrf4 RNAi-dependent increase in fibre size is prevented by dominant negative MEF2, while constitutively active MEF2 is able to induce myofibre hypertrophy. The nuclear localization of the MEF2 corepressor HDAC4 is impaired by Mrf4 knockdown, suggesting that MRF4 acts by stabilizing a repressor complex that controls MEF2 activity. These findings open new perspectives in the search for therapeutic targets to prevent muscle wasting, in particular sarcopenia and cachexia. PMID:27484840

  11. Synergist Ablation as a Rodent Model to Study Satellite Cell Dynamics in Adult Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Tyler J; McCarthy, John J; Peterson, Charlotte A; Fry, Christopher S

    2016-01-01

    In adult skeletal muscles, satellite cells are the primary myogenic stem cells involved in myogenesis. Normally, they remain in a quiescent state until activated by a stimulus, after which they proliferate, differentiate, and fuse into an existing myofiber or form a de novo myofiber. To study satellite cell dynamics in adult murine models, most studies utilize regeneration models in which the muscle is severely damaged and requires the participation from satellite cells in order to repair. Here, we describe a model to study satellite cell behavior in muscle hypertrophy that is independent of muscle regeneration.Synergist ablation surgery involves the surgical removal of the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles resulting in functional overload of the remaining plantaris muscle. This functional overload results in myofiber hypertrophy, as well as the activation, proliferation, and fusion of satellite cells into the myofibers. Within 2 weeks of functional overload, satellite cell content increases approximately 275 %, an increase that is accompanied with a ~60 % increase in the number of myonuclei. Therefore, this can be used as an alternative model to study satellite cell behavior in adulthood that is different from regeneration, and capable of revealing new satellite cell functions in regulating muscle adaptation.

  12. MRF4 negatively regulates adult skeletal muscle growth by repressing MEF2 activity

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, Irene; Ciciliot, Stefano; Dyar, Kenneth A.; Abraham, Reimar; Murgia, Marta; Agatea, Lisa; Akimoto, Takayuki; Bicciato, Silvio; Forcato, Mattia; Pierre, Philippe; Uhlenhaut, N. Henriette; Rigby, Peter W. J.; Carvajal, Jaime J.; Blaauw, Bert; Calabria, Elisa; Schiaffino, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The myogenic regulatory factor MRF4 is highly expressed in adult skeletal muscle but its function is unknown. Here we show that Mrf4 knockdown in adult muscle induces hypertrophy and prevents denervation-induced atrophy. This effect is accompanied by increased protein synthesis and widespread activation of muscle-specific genes, many of which are targets of MEF2 transcription factors. MEF2-dependent genes represent the top-ranking gene set enriched after Mrf4 RNAi and a MEF2 reporter is inhibited by co-transfected MRF4 and activated by Mrf4 RNAi. The Mrf4 RNAi-dependent increase in fibre size is prevented by dominant negative MEF2, while constitutively active MEF2 is able to induce myofibre hypertrophy. The nuclear localization of the MEF2 corepressor HDAC4 is impaired by Mrf4 knockdown, suggesting that MRF4 acts by stabilizing a repressor complex that controls MEF2 activity. These findings open new perspectives in the search for therapeutic targets to prevent muscle wasting, in particular sarcopenia and cachexia. PMID:27484840

  13. Characteristics of sarcoplasmic reticulum from normal and denervated rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Palexas, G N; Savage, N; Isaacs, H

    1981-01-01

    Denervation of rat skeletal muscle produces after 14 days a decrease in Ca2+ uptake of a heterogeneous population of sarcoplasmic-reticulum vesicles, when measured in the presence of oxalate. The Mg2+-dependent ATPase (Ca2+-independent) activity increased after the same period and the Ca2+ + Mg2+-dependent ATPase activity decreased. Concomitant with these changes, there was an increase in vesicle size and calcium content. The observations are discussed in terms of changes in altered membrane structure, manifested in the shift of the equilibrium of the ATPase from an enzyme involved in calcium transport to a phosphoenzyme giving rise to an increase in the Mg2+-dependent ATPase activity. PMID:6120692

  14. Temperature controls oxidative phosphorylation and reactive oxygen species production through uncoupling in rat skeletal muscle mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa; Woyda-Ploszczyca, Andrzej; Koziel, Agnieszka; Majerczak, Joanna; Zoladz, Jerzy A

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory and phosphorylation activities, mitochondrial uncoupling, and hydrogen peroxide formation were studied in isolated rat skeletal muscle mitochondria during experimentally induced hypothermia (25 °C) and hyperthermia (42 °C) compared to the physiological temperature of resting muscle (35 °C). For nonphosphorylating mitochondria, increasing the temperature from 25 to 42 °C led to a decrease in membrane potential, hydrogen peroxide production, and quinone reduction levels. For phosphorylating mitochondria, no temperature-dependent changes in these mitochondrial functions were observed. However, the efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation decreased, whereas the oxidation and phosphorylation rates and oxidative capacities of the mitochondria increased, with increasing assay temperature. An increase in proton leak, including uncoupling protein-mediated proton leak, was observed with increasing assay temperature, which could explain the reduced oxidative phosphorylation efficiency and reactive oxygen species production.

  15. Proteomic and bioinformatic analyses of spinal cord injury-induced skeletal muscle atrophy in rats

    PubMed Central

    WEI, ZHI-JIAN; ZHOU, XIAN-HU; FAN, BAO-YOU; LIN, WEI; REN, YI-MING; FENG, SHI-QING

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) may result in skeletal muscle atrophy. Identifying diagnostic biomarkers and effective targets for treatment is an important challenge in clinical work. The aim of the present study is to elucidate potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets for SCI-induced muscle atrophy (SIMA) using proteomic and bioinformatic analyses. The protein samples from rat soleus muscle were collected at different time points following SCI injury and separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and compared with the sham group. The identities of these protein spots were analyzed by mass spectrometry (MS). MS demonstrated that 20 proteins associated with muscle atrophy were differentially expressed. Bioinformatic analyses indicated that SIMA changed the expression of proteins associated with cellular, developmental, immune system and metabolic processes, biological adhesion and localization. The results of the present study may be beneficial in understanding the molecular mechanisms of SIMA and elucidating potential biomarkers and targets for the treatment of muscle atrophy. PMID:27177391

  16. Leucocyte responses to fighting in the adult male bandicoot rat.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, P R; Sahu, A; Maiti, B R

    1983-01-01

    The effect of fighting stress on blood leucocyte count was studied in the adult male bandicoot rat. Exposure to fighting stress for 3 h induced neutrophilia, eosinopenia, lymphopenia and monocytopenia. The changes were more significant in the subordinate rat than in the dominant animal. It is suggested that leucocyte responses to fighting are perhaps mediated by the adrenal gland in these animals.

  17. Effects of magnesium and nucleotides on the proton conductance of rat skeletal-muscle mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    Cadenas, S; Brand, M D

    2000-01-01

    During oxidative phosphorylation most of the protons pumped out to the cytosol across the mitochondrial inner membrane return to the matrix through the ATP synthase, driving ATP synthesis. However, some of them leak back to the matrix through a proton-conductance pathway in the membrane. When the ATP synthase is inhibited with oligomycin and ATP is not being synthesized, all of the respiration is used to drive the proton leak. We report here that Mg(2+) inhibits the proton conductance in rat skeletal-muscle mitochondria. Addition of Mg(2+) inhibited both oligomycin-inhibited respiration and the proton conductance, while removal of Mg(2+) using EDTA activated these processes. The proton conductance was inhibited by more than 80% as free Mg(2+) was raised from 25 nM to 220 microM. Half-maximal inhibition occurred at about 1 microM free Mg(2+), which is close to the contaminating free Mg(2+) concentration in our incubations in the absence of added magnesium chelators. ATP, GTP, CTP, TTP or UTP at a concentration of 1 mM increased the oligomycin-inhibited respiration rate by about 50%. However, these NTP effects were abolished by addition of 2 mM Mg(2+) and any NTP-stimulated proton conductance was explained completely by chelation of endogenous free Mg(2+). The corresponding nucleoside diphosphates (ADP, GDP, CDP, TDP or UDP) at 1 mM had no effect on oligomycin-inhibited respiration. We conclude that proton conductance in rat skeletal-muscle mitochondria is very sensitive to free Mg(2+) concentration but is insensitive to NTPs or NDPs at 1 mM. PMID:10794733

  18. Total-body creatine pool size and skeletal muscle mass determination by creatine-(methyl-D3) dilution in rats.

    PubMed

    Stimpson, Stephen A; Turner, Scott M; Clifton, Lisa G; Poole, James C; Mohammed, Hussein A; Shearer, Todd W; Waitt, Greg M; Hagerty, Laura L; Remlinger, Katja S; Hellerstein, Marc K; Evans, William J

    2012-06-01

    There is currently no direct, facile method to determine total-body skeletal muscle mass for the diagnosis and treatment of skeletal muscle wasting conditions such as sarcopenia, cachexia, and disuse. We tested in rats the hypothesis that the enrichment of creatinine-(methyl-d(3)) (D(3)-creatinine) in urine after a defined oral tracer dose of D(3)-creatine can be used to determine creatine pool size and skeletal muscle mass. We determined 1) an oral tracer dose of D(3)-creatine that was completely bioavailable with minimal urinary spillage and sufficient enrichment in the body creatine pool for detection of D(3)-creatine in muscle and D(3)-creatinine in urine, and 2) the time to isotopic steady state. We used cross-sectional studies to compare total creatine pool size determined by the D(3)-creatine dilution method to lean body mass determined by independent methods. The tracer dose of D(3)-creatine (<1 mg/rat) was >99% bioavailable with 0.2-1.2% urinary spillage. Isotopic steady state was achieved within 24-48 h. Creatine pool size calculated from urinary D(3)-creatinine enrichment at 72 h significantly increased with muscle accrual in rat growth, significantly decreased with dexamethasone-induced skeletal muscle atrophy, was correlated with lean body mass (r = 0.9590; P < 0.0001), and corresponded to predicted total muscle mass. Total-body creatine pool size and skeletal muscle mass can thus be accurately and precisely determined by an orally delivered dose of D(3)-creatine followed by the measurement of D(3)-creatinine enrichment in a single urine sample and is promising as a noninvasive tool for the clinical determination of skeletal muscle mass. PMID:22422801

  19. Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Attenuate Diet Induced Obesity and Insulin Resistance, Modulating Mitochondrial Respiratory Uncoupling in Rat Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Bergamo, Paolo; De Filippo, Chiara; Mattace Raso, Giuseppina; Gifuni, Giorgio; Putti, Rosalba; Moni, Bottu Heleena; Canani, Roberto Berni; Meli, Rosaria; Mollica, Maria Pina

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Omega (ω)-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are dietary compounds able to attenuate insulin resistance. Anyway, the precise actions of ω-3PUFAs in skeletal muscle are overlooked. We hypothesized that PUFAs, modulating mitochondrial function and efficiency, would ameliorate pro-inflammatory and pro-oxidant signs of nutritionally induced obesity. Study Design To this aim, rats were fed a control diet (CD) or isocaloric high fat diets containing either ω-3 PUFA (FD) or lard (LD) for 6 weeks. Results FD rats showed lower weight, lipid gain and energy efficiency compared to LD-fed animals, showing higher energy expenditure and O2 consumption/CO2 production. Serum lipid profile and pro-inflammatory parameters in FD-fed animals were reduced compared to LD. Accordingly, FD rats exhibited a higher glucose tolerance revealed by an improved glucose and insulin tolerance tests compared to LD, accompanied by a restoration of insulin signalling in skeletal muscle. PUFAs increased lipid oxidation and reduced energy efficiency in subsarcolemmal mitochondria, and increase AMPK activation, reducing both endoplasmic reticulum and oxidative stress. Increased mitochondrial respiration was related to an increased mitochondriogenesis in FD skeletal muscle, as shown by the increase in PGC1-α and -β. Conclusions our data strengthened the association of high dietary ω3-PUFA intake with reduced mitochondrial energy efficiency in the skeletal muscle. PMID:26901315

  20. Changes in skeletal muscle biochemistry and histology relative to fiber type in rats with heart failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delp, M. D.; Duan, C.; Mattson, J. P.; Musch, T. I.

    1997-01-01

    One of the primary consequences of left ventricular dysfunction (LVD) after myocardial infarction is a decrement in exercise capacity. Several factors have been hypothesized to account for this decrement, including alterations in skeletal muscle metabolism and aerobic capacity. The purpose of this study was to determine whether LVD-induced alterations in skeletal muscle enzyme activities, fiber composition, and fiber size are 1) generalized in muscles or specific to muscles composed primarily of a given fiber type and 2) related to the severity of the LVD. Female Wistar rats were divided into three groups: sham-operated controls (n = 13) and rats with moderate (n = 10) and severe (n = 7) LVD. LVD was surgically induced by ligating the left main coronary artery and resulted in elevations (P < 0.05) in left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (sham, 5 +/- 1 mmHg; moderate LVD, 11 +/- 1 mmHg; severe LVD, 25 +/- 1 mmHg). Moderate LVD decreased the activities of phosphofructokinase (PFK) and citrate synthase in one muscle composed of type IIB fibers but did not modify fiber composition or size of any muscle studied. However, severe LVD diminished the activity of enzymes involved in terminal and beta-oxidation in muscles composed primarily of type I fibers, type IIA fibers, and type IIB fibers. In addition, severe LVD induced a reduction in the activity of PFK in type IIB muscle, a 10% reduction in the percentage of type IID/X fibers, and a corresponding increase in the portion of type IIB fibers. Atrophy of type I fibers, type IIA fibers, and/or type IIB fibers occurred in soleus and plantaris muscles of rats with severe LVD. These data indicate that rats with severe LVD after myocardial infarction exhibit 1) decrements in mitochondrial enzyme activities independent of muscle fiber composition, 2) a reduction in PFK activity in type IIB muscle, 3) transformation of type IID/X to type IIB fibers, and 4) atrophy of type I, IIA, and IIB fibers.

  1. Differential dose response of mTOR signaling to oral administration of leucine in skeletal muscle and liver of rats.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, Fumiaki; Mochizuki, Shinji; Sugahara, Kunio

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) and 70-kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase (S6K1) in the rat liver increased in proportion to the amount of leucine administered, ranging from 0.169 to 1.35 g/kg of body weight. In the skeletal muscle, phosphorylation of these factors reached a plateau at 0.675 g/kg of body weight. The sensitivity of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling to leucine in the skeletal muscle appeared to be higher than that in the liver.

  2. Effects of Trigonelline, an Alkaloid Present in Coffee, on Diabetes-Induced Disorders in the Rat Skeletal System

    PubMed Central

    Folwarczna, Joanna; Janas, Aleksandra; Pytlik, Maria; Cegieła, Urszula; Śliwiński, Leszek; Krivošíková, Zora; Štefíková, Kornélia; Gajdoš, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes increases bone fracture risk. Trigonelline, an alkaloid with potential antidiabetic activity, is present in considerable amounts in coffee. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of trigonelline on experimental diabetes-induced disorders in the rat skeletal system. Effects of trigonelline (50 mg/kg p.o. daily for four weeks) were investigated in three-month-old female Wistar rats, which, two weeks before the start of trigonelline administration, received streptozotocin (60 mg/kg i.p.) or streptozotocin after nicotinamide (230 mg/kg i.p.). Serum bone turnover markers, bone mineralization, and mechanical properties were studied. Streptozotocin induced diabetes, with significant worsening of bone mineralization and bone mechanical properties. Streptozotocin after nicotinamide induced slight glycemia increases in first days of experiment only, however worsening of cancellous bone mechanical properties and decreased vertebral bone mineral density (BMD) were demonstrated. Trigonelline decreased bone mineralization and tended to worsen bone mechanical properties in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. In nicotinamide/streptozotocin-treated rats, trigonelline significantly increased BMD and tended to improve cancellous bone strength. Trigonelline differentially affected the skeletal system of rats with streptozotocin-induced metabolic disorders, intensifying the osteoporotic changes in streptozotocin-treated rats and favorably affecting bones in the non-hyperglycemic (nicotinamide/streptozotocin-treated) rats. The results indicate that, in certain conditions, trigonelline may damage bone. PMID:26950142

  3. Inhibitory Effect of Epinephrine on Insulin-stimulated Glucose Uptake by Rat Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Chiasson, Jean-Louis; Shikama, Hisataka; Chu, David T. W.; Exton, John H.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of epinephrine on basal and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in perfused hindlimbs of fed rats was studied. Insulin increased glucose uptake in a dose-dependent manner from a basal value of 1.5±0.3 up to a maximum value of 5.3±0.9 μmol/min per 100 g with 6 nM (1 m U/ml). Epinephrine at 10 nM and 0.1 μM also increased glucose uptake to 2.6±0.1 and 3.1±0.1 μmol/min per 100 g, respectively. These same concentrations of epinephrine, however, suppressed the insulin-stimulated glucose uptake to 3.2±0.3 μmol/min per 100 g. Both the stimulatory and inhibitory effects of epinephrine on glucose uptake were completely reversed by propranolol, but were not significantly altered by phentolamine. Uptake of 3-O-methylglucose and 2-deoxyglucose into thigh muscles of the perfused hindlimbs was stimulated fivefold by insulin, but was unaffected by epinephrine. Epinephrine also did not inhibit the stimulation of uptake by insulin. Epinephrine decreased the phosphorylation of 2-deoxyglucose, however, and caused the intracellular accumulation of free glucose. These last two effects were more prominent in the presence of insulin. Whereas epinephrine caused large rises in glucose-6-P and fructose-6-P, insulin did not alter the concentration of these metabolites either in the absence or presence of epinephrine. These data indicate that: (a) epinephrine has a stimulatory effect on glucose uptake by perfused rat hindlimbs that does not appear to be exerted on skeletal muscle; (b) epinephrine does not affect hexose transport in skeletal muscle; (c) epinephrine inhibits insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle by inhibiting glucose phosphorylation. It is hypothesized that the inhibition of glucose phosphorylation is due to the stimulation of glycogenolysis, which leads to the accumulation of hexose phosphates, which inhibit hexokinase. PMID:6115864

  4. Effect of static magnetic field and/or cadmium in the antioxidant enzymes activity in rat heart and skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Amara, Salem; Garrel, Catherine; Favier, Alain; Ben Rhouma, Khémais; Sakly, Mohsen; Abdelmelek, Hafedh

    2009-12-01

    Currently, environmental and industrial pollution along with increase and causes multiple stress conditions, the combined exposure to magnetic field and other toxic agents is recognised as an important research area, with a view to better protecting human health against their probable unfavourable effects. In the present study, we investigated the effect of co-exposure to static magnetic field (SMF) and cadmium (Cd) on the antioxidant enzymes activity and the malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration in rat skeletal and cardiac muscles. The exposure of rats to SMF (128 mT, 1 h/day during 30 consecutive days) decreased the activities of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and the superoxide dismutase (CuZn-SOD) in heart muscle. Sub-chronic exposure to SMF increased the MDA concentration in rat cardiac muscle. Cd treatment (CdCl2, 40 mg/l, per os) during 4 weeks decreased the activities of catalase (CAT) in skeletal muscle and the CuZn-SOD in the heart. Moreover, Cd administration increased MDA concentration in the both structures. The combined effect of SMF (128 mT, 1 h/day during 30 consecutive days) and Cd (40 mg/l, per os) disrupt the antioxidant enzymes activity in rat skeletal and cardiac muscles. Moreover, we noted a huge increase in MDA concentration in the heart and skeletal muscle compared to control group. Thus it is possible that the SMF- and/or Cd-induced depletion of antioxidant enzymes activity in muscle tissues might, like the enhanced lipid peroxidation, importantly contribute to oxidative damage. The combined effect of SMF and Cd altered significantly the antioxidant enzymatic capacity and induced lipid peroxidation in both skeletal and cardiac muscle.

  5. Overload-induced skeletal muscle hypertrophy is not impaired in STZ-diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Fortes, Marco Aurélio S; Pinheiro, Carlos Hermano J; Guimarães-Ferreira, Lucas; Vitzel, Kaio F; Vasconcelos, Diogo A A; Curi, Rui

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of overload-induced hypertrophy on extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus muscles of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. The overload-induced hypertrophy and absolute tetanic and twitch forces increases in EDL and soleus muscles were not different between diabetic and control rats. Phospho-Akt and rpS6 contents were increased in EDL muscle after 7 days of overload and returned to the pre-overload values after 30 days. In the soleus muscle, the contents of total and phospho-Akt and total rpS6 were increased in both groups after 7 days. The contents of total Akt in controls and total rpS6 and phospho-Akt in the diabetic rats remained increased after 30 days. mRNA expression after 7 days of overload in the EDL muscle of control and diabetic animals showed an increase in MGF and follistatin and a decrease in myostatin and Axin2. The expression of FAK was increased and of MuRF-1 and atrogin-1 decreased only in the control group, whereas Ankrd2 expression was enhanced only in diabetic rats. In the soleus muscle caused similar changes in both groups: increase in FAK and MGF and decrease in Wnt7a, MuRF-1, atrogin-1, and myostatin. Differences between groups were observed only in the increased expression of follistatin in diabetic animals and decreased Ankrd2 expression in the control group. So, insulin deficiency does not impair the overload-induced hypertrophic response in soleus and EDL muscles. However, different mechanisms seem to be involved in the comparable hypertrophic responses of skeletal muscle in control and diabetic animals. PMID:26197932

  6. Craniofacial morphological characteristics of Chinese adults with normal occlusion and different skeletal divergence.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Danna; Gao, Hui; Ren, Yijin

    2011-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the craniofacial morphologic characteristics of different vertical dysplasias in a population of Chinese adults with normal occlusion. Sixty-nine subjects (39 males and 30 females) were selected from 800 healthy students between 18 and 24 years of age. Lateral cephalograms were obtained and 27 hard and 10 soft tissue measurements were analysed. The subjects were then divided into three groups: high angle, low angle, or control according to the value of FH-MP. Intraclass correlation coefficient was determined for the repeated measurements. One-way analysis of variance was used to determine the differences between the groups. The results showed that the low-angle group had a larger cranial basis angle (N-S-Ar) and the high-angle group had a shorter maxilla (Ans-Ptm; P < 0.01). The high-angle group displayed vertical hyperdivergency with increased PP-OP, OP-MP, gonial, and lower gonial angles, whereas the low-angle group showed significant hypodivergence with decreased values for all variables (P < 0.01). The low-angle group displayed a more protrusive chin and the high-angle group a more retrusive chin (P < 0.01). Differences in dentoalveolar measurements in the divergent groups were mainly in the anterior region. Moreover, the low-angle group had a thicker and the high-angle group a thinner lower dentoalveolus (P < 0.01). For face height measurements, the main differences in the divergent groups were at the anterior lower third (P < 0.01). Soft tissue deviations were less obvious in the high-angle group and in general less significant than those of the hard tissues in both divergent groups. Significantly different morphological characteristics exist in Chinese adults with vertical dysplasia but normal occlusion. Major skeletal cephalometric changes were found for the lower facial third. The soft tissues showed a well-adapting mechanism of soft tissue coverage for the skeletal dysplasia.

  7. Resistance exercise training and in vitro skeletal muscle oxidative capacity in older adults.

    PubMed

    Flack, Kyle D; Davy, Brenda M; DeBerardinis, Martin; Boutagy, Nabil E; McMillan, Ryan P; Hulver, Matthew W; Frisard, Madlyn I; Anderson, Angela S; Savla, Jyoti; Davy, Kevin P

    2016-07-01

    Whether resistance exercise training (RET) improves skeletal muscle substrate oxidative capacity and reduces mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species in older adults remains unclear. To address this, 19 older males (≥60 years) were randomized to a RET (n = 11) or to a waitlist control group (n = 8) that remained sedentary for 12 weeks. RET was comprised of three upper body and four lower body movements on resistance machines. One set of 8-12 repetitions to failure of each movement was performed on three nonconsecutive days/week. Improvements in chest press and leg press strength were assessed using a three-repetition maximum (3 RM). Body composition was assessed via dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis muscle at baseline and at both 3 weeks and 12 weeks. Palmitate and pyruvate oxidation rates were measured from the (14)CO2 produced from [1-(14)C] palmitic acid and [U-(14)C] pyruvate, respectively, during incubation of muscle homogenates. PGC-1α, TFAM, and PPARδ levels were quantified using qRT-PCR Citrate synthase (CS) and β-HAD activities were determined spectrophotometrically. Mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were assessed using the Amplex Red Hydrogen Peroxide/Peroxidase assay. There were no significant changes in body weight or body composition following the intervention. Chest press and leg press strength (3RM) increased ~34% (both P < 0.01) with RET There were no significant changes in pyruvate or fatty acid oxidation or in the expression of target genes with the intervention. There was a modest increase (P < 0.05) in βHAD activity with RET at 12 weeks but the change in CS enzyme activity was not significant. In addition, there were no significant changes in ROS production in either group following RET Taken together, the findings of this study suggest that 12 weeks of low volume RET does not increase skeletal muscle oxidative capacity or reduce ROS

  8. Beneficial effects of citrulline malate on skeletal muscle function in endotoxemic rat.

    PubMed

    Giannesini, Benoît; Izquierdo, Marguerite; Le Fur, Yann; Cozzone, Patrick J; Verleye, Marc; Le Guern, Marie-Emmanuelle; Gillardin, Jean-Marie; Bendahan, David

    2009-01-01

    Although citrulline malate (CM; CAS 54940-97-5, Stimol) is used against fatigue states, its anti-asthenic effect remains poorly documented. The objective of this double-blind study was to evaluate the effect of oral ingestion of CM on a rat model of asthenia, using in situ (31)Phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((31)P-MRS). Muscle weakness was induced by intraperitoneal injections of Klebsiella pneumoniae endotoxin (lipopolysaccharides at 3 mg/kg) at t(0) and t(0)+24 h. For each animal, muscle function was investigated strictly non-invasively before (t(0)-24 h) and during (t(0)+48 h) endotoxemia, through a standardized rest-stimulation-recovery protocol. The transcutaneous electrical stimulation protocol consisted of 5.7 min of repeated isometric contractions at a frequency of 3.3 Hz, and force production was measured with an ergometer. CM supplementation in endotoxemic animals prevented the basal phosphocreatine/ATP ratio reduction and normalized the intracellular pH (pH(i)) time-course during muscular activity as a sign of an effect at the muscle energetics level. In addition, CM treatment avoided the endotoxemia-induced decline in developed force. These results demonstrate the efficiency of CM for limiting skeletal muscle dysfunction in rats treated with bacterial endotoxin. PMID:19036344

  9. Effects of alfacalcidol on circulating cytokines and growth factors in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Testerink, Janwillem; Jaspers, Richard T; Rittweger, Jörn; de Haan, Arnold; Degens, Hans

    2011-11-01

    Supra-physiological levels of vitamin D induce skeletal muscle atrophy, which may be particularly detrimental in already sarcopaenic elderly. Neither the cause nor whether the atrophy is fibre type specific are known. To obtain supraphysiological levels of circulating vitamin D (1,25(OH)(2)D(3)) 27.5-month-old female Fischer(344) × Brown Norway F1 rats were orally treated for 6 weeks with vehicle or the vitamin D analogue alfacalcidol. Alfacalcidol treatment induced a 22% decrease in body mass and 17% muscle atrophy. Fibre atrophy was restricted to type IIb fibres in the low-oxidative part of the gastrocnemius medialis only (-22%; P < 0.05). There was a concomitant 1.6-fold increase in mRNA expression of the ubiquitin ligase MuRF-1 (P < 0.001), whereas those of insulin-like growth factor 1 and myostatin were not affected. Circulating IL-6 was unaltered, but leptin and adiponectin were decreased (-39%) and increased (64%), respectively. The treated rats also exhibited a reduced food intake. In conclusion, supraphysiological levels of circulating 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) cause preferential atrophy of type IIb fibres, which is associated with an increased expression of MuRF-1 without evidence of systemic inflammation. The atrophy and loss of body mass in the presence of supra-physiological levels of vitamin D are primarily due to a reduced food intake. PMID:21909988

  10. Nutrient Excess and AMPK Downregulation in Incubated Skeletal Muscle and Muscle of Glucose Infused Rats

    PubMed Central

    Valentine, Rudy J.; Petrocelli, Robert; Schultz, Vera; Brandon, Amanda; Cooney, Gregory J.; Kraegen, Edward W.; Ruderman, Neil B.; Saha, Asish K.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that incubation for 1h with excess glucose or leucine causes insulin resistance in rat extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle by inhibiting AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). To examine the events that precede and follow these changes, studies were performed in rat EDL incubated with elevated levels of glucose or leucine for 30min-2h. Incubation in high glucose (25mM) or leucine (100μM) significantly diminished AMPK activity by 50% within 30min, with further decreases occurring at 1 and 2h. The initial decrease in activity at 30min coincided with a significant increase in muscle glycogen. The subsequent decreases at 1h were accompanied by phosphorylation of αAMPK at Ser485/491, and at 2h by decreased SIRT1 expression and increased PP2A activity, all of which have previously been shown to diminish AMPK activity. Glucose infusion in vivo, which caused several fold increases in plasma glucose and insulin, produced similar changes but with different timing. Thus, the initial decrease in AMPK activity observed at 3h was associated with changes in Ser485/491 phosphorylation and SIRT1 expression and increased PP2A activity was a later event. These findings suggest that both ex vivo and in vivo, multiple factors contribute to fuel-induced decreases in AMPK activity in skeletal muscle and the insulin resistance that accompanies it. PMID:25996822

  11. Metabolomic Response of Skeletal Muscle to Aerobic Exercise Training in Insulin Resistant Type 1 Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Dotzert, Michelle S.; Murray, Michael R.; McDonald, Matthew W.; Olver, T. Dylan; Velenosi, Thomas J.; Hennop, Anzel; Noble, Earl G.; Urquhart, Brad L.; Melling, C. W. James

    2016-01-01

    The etiology of insulin resistance in Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) is unknown, however it affects approximately 20% of T1D patients. Intramyocellular lipids (IMCL) have been identified as a mechanism of insulin resistance. We examined skeletal muscle of T1D rats to determine if alterations in lipid metabolism were evident and whether aerobic exercise training improves IMCL and insulin resistance. To do so, 48 male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into control (C), sedentary diabetes (D) and diabetes exercise (DX) groups. Following multiple low-dose Streptozotocin (STZ) injections (20 mg/kg), glycemia (9–15 mM) was maintained using insulin treatment. DX were treadmill trained at high intensity (~75% V02max; 5days/week) for 10 weeks. The results demonstrate that D exhibited insulin resistance compared with C and DX, indicated by decreased glucose infusion rate during a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp (p < 0.05). There were no differences between C and DX, suggesting that exercise improved insulin resistance (p < 0.05). Metabolomics analysis revealed a significant shift in lipid metabolism whereby notable fatty acid metabolites (arachidonic acid, palmitic acid and several polyunsaturated fatty acids) were significantly elevated in D compared to C and DX. Based on the intermediates observed, insulin resistance in T1D is characterized by an insulin-desensitizing intramyocellular fatty acid metabolite profile that is ameliorated with exercise training. PMID:27197730

  12. Proteomic identification of age-dependent protein nitration in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Kanski, Jaroslaw; Alterman, Michail A; Schöneich, Christian

    2003-11-15

    Age-related protein nitration was studied in skeletal muscle of Fisher 344 and Fisher 344/Brown Norway (BN) F1 rats by a proteomic approach. Proteins from young (4 months) and old (24 months) Fisher 344 rats and young (6 months) and old (34 months) Fisher 344/BN F1 animals were separated by 2-D gel electrophoresis. Western blot showed an age-related increase in the nitration of a few specific proteins, which were identified by MALDI-TOF MS and ESI-MS/MS. We identified age-dependent apparent nitration of beta-enolase, alpha-fructose aldolase, and creatine kinase, which perform important functions in muscle energy metabolism, suggesting that the nitration of such key proteins can be, in part, responsible for the decline of muscle motor function of the muscle. Furthermore, we have identified the apparent nitration of succinate dehydrogenase, rab GDP dissociation inhibitor beta (GdI-2), triosephosphate isomerase, troponin I, alpha-crystallin, and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH).

  13. Histological image data of limb skeletal tissue from larval and adult Ambystoma mexicanum.

    PubMed

    McCusker, Catherine D; Diaz-Castillo, Carlos; Sosnik, Julian; Phan, Anne; Gardiner, David M

    2016-09-01

    The data presented in this article are related to the article entitled "Cartilage and bone cells do not participate in skeletal regeneration in Ambystoma mexicanum limbs" [1]. Here we present image data of the post-embryonic development of the forelimb skeletal tissue of Ambystoma Mexicanum. Histological staining was performed on sections from the intact limbs of young (6.5 cm) and old (25 cm) animals, and on dissected skeletal tissues (cartilage, bone, and periosteum) from these animals.

  14. Adult stem cells for cardiac repair: a choice between skeletal myoblasts and bone marrow stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lei; Haider, Husnain Kh; Sim, Eugene K W

    2006-01-01

    The real promise of a stem cell-based approach for cardiac regeneration and repair lies in the promotion of myogenesis and angiogenesis at the site of the cell graft to achieve both structural and functional benefits. Despite all of the progress and promise in this field, many unanswered questions remain; the answers to these questions will provide the much-needed breakthrough to harness the real benefits of cell therapy for the heart in the clinical perspective. One of the major issues is the choice of donor cell type for transplantation. Multiple cell types with varying potentials have been assessed for their ability to repopulate the infarcted myocardium; however, only the adult stem cells, that is, skeletal myoblasts (SkM) and bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMC), have been translated from the laboratory bench to clinical use. Which of these two cell types will provide the best option for clinical application in heart cell therapy remains arguable. With results pouring in from the long-term follow-ups of previously conducted phase I clinical studies, and with the onset of phase II clinical trials involving larger population of patients, transplantation of stem cells as a sole therapy without an adjunct conventional revascularization procedure will provide a deeper insight into the effectiveness of this approach. The present article discusses the pros and cons of using SkM and BMC individually or in combination for cardiac repair, and critically analyzes the progress made with each cell type.

  15. Native myosin from adult rabbit skeletal muscle: isoenzymes and states of aggregation.

    PubMed

    Morel, J E; D'hahan, N; Taouil, K; Francin, M; Aguilar, A; Dalbiez, J P; Merah, Z; Grussaute, H; Hilbert, B; Ollagnon, F; Selva, G; Piot, F

    1998-04-21

    The globular heads of skeletal muscle myosin have been shown to exist as isoenzymes S1 (A1) and S1 (A2), and there are also isoforms of the heavy chains. Using capillary electrophoresis, we found two dominant isoenzymes of the whole native myosin molecule, in agreement with what has previously been found by various techniques for native and nondenatured myosin from adult rabbits. Findings about possible states of aggregation of myosin and its heads are contradictory. By analytical ultracentrifugation, we confirmed the existence of a tail-tail dimer. By laser light scattering, we found a head-head dimer in the presence of MgATP. Capillary electrophoresis coupled with analytical ultracentrifugation and laser light scattering led us to refine these results. We found tail-tail dimers in a conventional buffer. We found tail-tail and head-head dimers in the presence of 0.5 mM MgATP and pure head-head dimers in the presence of 6 mM MgATP. All the dimers were homodimers. Naming the dominant isoenzymes of myosin a and b, we observed tail-tail dimers with isoenzyme a (TaTa) and with isoenzyme b (TbTb) and also head-head dimers with isoenzyme a (HaHa) and with isoenzyme b (HbHb).

  16. Development of skeletal system for mesh-type ICRP reference adult phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeom, Yeon Soo; Wang, Zhao Jun; Tat Nguyen, Thang; Kim, Han Sung; Choi, Chansoo; Han, Min Cheol; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Lee, Jai Ki; Chung, Beom Sun; Zankl, Maria; Petoussi-Henss, Nina; Bolch, Wesley E.; Lee, Choonsik

    2016-10-01

    The reference adult computational phantoms of the international commission on radiological protection (ICRP) described in Publication 110 are voxel-type computational phantoms based on whole-body computed tomography (CT) images of adult male and female patients. The voxel resolutions of these phantoms are in the order of a few millimeters and smaller tissues such as the eye lens, the skin, and the walls of some organs cannot be properly defined in the phantoms, resulting in limitations in dose coefficient calculations for weakly penetrating radiations. In order to address the limitations of the ICRP-110 phantoms, an ICRP Task Group has been recently formulated and the voxel phantoms are now being converted to a high-quality mesh format. As a part of the conversion project, in the present study, the skeleton models, one of the most important and complex organs of the body, were constructed. The constructed skeleton models were then tested by calculating red bone marrow (RBM) and endosteum dose coefficients (DCs) for broad parallel beams of photons and electrons and comparing the calculated values with those of the original ICRP-110 phantoms. The results show that for the photon exposures, there is a generally good agreement in the DCs between the mesh-type phantoms and the original voxel-type ICRP-110 phantoms; that is, the dose discrepancies were less than 7% in all cases except for the 0.03 MeV cases, for which the maximum difference was 14%. On the other hand, for the electron exposures (⩽4 MeV), the DCs of the mesh-type phantoms deviate from those of the ICRP-110 phantoms by up to ~1600 times at 0.03 MeV, which is indeed due to the improvement of the skeletal anatomy of the developed skeleton mesh models.

  17. Protective effect of quercetin on skeletal and neural tube teratogenicity induced by cyclophosphamide in rat fetuses.

    PubMed

    Khaksary Mahabady, Mahmood; Gholami, Mohammad Reza; Najafzadeh Varzi, Hossein; Zendedel, Abolfazl; Doostizadeh, Mona

    2016-01-01

    Cyclophosphamide (CP) is a drug commonly used to treat neoplastic disease and some autoimmune diseases. It is also a well-known and well-studied teratogen causing a variety of birth defects in fetuses of pregnant women treated with the drug. There are many reports that show the adverse effects of CP can be decreased by use of antioxidant drugs. It appears that, quercetin has antioxidant effect. The aim of this study was prevention or decrease of teratogenicity of CP in fetuses of rats by quercetin. This study was performed on 35 pregnant rats divided into six groups. Control group was received normal saline (5 mL kg(-1), intraperitoneally) and 2-6 groups received a single dose of CP (15 mg kg(-1)), a single dose of quercetin (75 or 200 mg kg(-1)), CP plus quercetin (75 or 200 mg kg(-1)) intraperitoneally at 9(th) day of gestation, respectively. Fetuses were collected at 20(th) day of gestation and after determination of weight and crown rump length were stained by alizarin red - alcian blue method and skeletal system were examined by stereomicroscope. The results showed that the cleft palate, exencephaly, spina bifida and omphalocele incidence were 55.56%, 27.77%, 33.34% and 11.11%, in fetuses of rat that received only CP, respectively. However, it decreased to 16.00%, 16.00%, 16.00% and 8.00% by quercetin (75 mg kg(-1)) and so to 12.90%, 12.90%, 6.45% and 3.28% by quercetin (200 mg kg(-1)), respectively. On the basis of results, quercetin significantly can decrease teratogenicity induced by CP. PMID:27482358

  18. Protective effect of quercetin on skeletal and neural tube teratogenicity induced by cyclophosphamide in rat fetuses

    PubMed Central

    Khaksary Mahabady, Mahmood; Gholami, Mohammad Reza; Najafzadeh Varzi, Hossein; Zendedel, Abolfazl; Doostizadeh, Mona

    2016-01-01

    Cyclophosphamide (CP) is a drug commonly used to treat neoplastic disease and some autoimmune diseases. It is also a well-known and well-studied teratogen causing a variety of birth defects in fetuses of pregnant women treated with the drug. There are many reports that show the adverse effects of CP can be decreased by use of antioxidant drugs. It appears that, quercetin has antioxidant effect. The aim of this study was prevention or decrease of teratogenicity of CP in fetuses of rats by quercetin. This study was performed on 35 pregnant rats divided into six groups. Control group was received normal saline (5 mL kg-1, intraperitoneally) and 2-6 groups received a single dose of CP (15 mg kg-1), a single dose of quercetin (75 or 200 mg kg-1), CP plus quercetin (75 or 200 mg kg-1) intraperitoneally at 9th day of gestation, respectively. Fetuses were collected at 20th day of gestation and after determination of weight and crown rump length were stained by alizarin red – alcian blue method and skeletal system were examined by stereomicroscope. The results showed that the cleft palate, exencephaly, spina bifida and omphalocele incidence were 55.56%, 27.77%, 33.34% and 11.11%, in fetuses of rat that received only CP, respectively. However, it decreased to 16.00%, 16.00%, 16.00% and 8.00% by quercetin (75 mg kg-1) and so to 12.90%, 12.90%, 6.45% and 3.28% by quercetin (200 mg kg-1), respectively. On the basis of results, quercetin significantly can decrease teratogenicity induced by CP. PMID:27482358

  19. Effects of fluvastatin and coenzyme Q10 on skeletal muscle in normo- and hypercholesterolaemic rats.

    PubMed

    Vincze, J; Jenes, Á; Füzi, M; Almássy, J; Németh, R; Szigeti, G; Dienes, B; Gaál, Z; Szentesi, P; Jóna, I; Kertai, P; Paragh, G; Csernoch, L

    2015-06-01

    Myalgia and muscle weakness may appreciably contribute to the poor adherence to statin therapy. Although the pathomechanism of statin-induced myopathy is not completely understood, changes in calcium homeostasis and reduced coenzyme Q10 levels are hypothesized to play important roles. In our experiments, fluvastatin and/or coenzyme Q10 was administered chronically to normocholesterolaemic or hypercholaestherolaemic rats, and the modifications of the calcium homeostasis and the strength of their muscles were investigated. While hypercholesterolaemia did not change the frequency of sparks, fluvastatin increased it on muscles both from normocholesterolaemic and from hypercholesterolaemic rats. This effect, however, was not mediated by a chronic modification of the ryanodine receptor as shown by the unchanged ryanodine binding in the latter group. While coenzyme Q10 supplementation significantly reduced the frequency of the spontaneous calcium release events, it did not affect their amplitude and spatial spread in muscles from fluvastatin-treated rats. This indicates that coenzyme Q10 supplementation prevented the spark frequency increasing effect of fluvastatin without having a major effect on the amount of calcium released during individual sparks. In conclusion, we have found that fluvastatin, independently of the cholesterol level in the blood, consistently and specifically increased the frequency of calcium sparks in skeletal muscle cells, an effect which could be prevented by the addition of coenzyme Q10 to the diet. These results support theories favouring the role of calcium handling in the pathophysiology of statin-induced myopathy and provide a possible pathway for the protective effect of coenzyme Q10 in statin treated patients symptomatic of this condition.

  20. Respiratory muscle injury, fatigue and serum skeletal troponin I in rat

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Jeremy A; Van Eyk, Jennifer; Iscoe, Steve

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate injury to respiratory muscles of rats breathing against an inspiratory resistive load, we measured the release into blood of a myofilament protein, skeletal troponin I (sTnI), and related this release to the time course of changes in arterial blood gases, respiratory drive (phrenic activity), and pressure generation. After ∼1.5 h of loading, hypercapnic ventilatory failure occurred, coincident with a decrease in the ratio of transdiaphragmatic pressure to integrated phrenic activity (Pdi/∫Phr) during sighs. This was followed at ∼1.9 h by a decrease in the Pdi/∫Phr ratio during normal loaded breaths (diaphragmatic fatigue). Loading was terminated at pump failure (a decline of Pdi to half of steady-state loaded values), ∼2.4 h after load onset. During 30 s occlusions post loading, rats generated pressure profiles similar to those during occlusions before loading, with comparable blood gases, but at a higher neural drive. In a second series of rats, we tested for sTnI release using Western blot–direct serum analysis of blood samples taken before and during loading to pump failure. We detected only the fast isoform of sTnI, release beginning midway through loading. Differential detection with various monoclonal antibodies indicated the presence of modified forms of fast sTnI. The release of fast sTnI is consistent with load-induced injury of fast glycolytic fibres of inspiratory muscles, probably the diaphragm. Characterization of released fast sTnI may provide insights into the molecular basis of respiratory muscle dysfunction; fast sTnI may also prove useful as a marker of impending respiratory muscle fatigue. PMID:14673191

  1. Differential effects of insulin and dietary amino acids on muscle protein synthesis in adult and old rats

    PubMed Central

    Prod'homme, Magali; Balage, Michèle; Debras, Elisabeth; Farges, Marie-Chantal; Kimball, Scott; Jefferson, Leonard; Grizard, Jean

    2005-01-01

    The potential roles of insulin and dietary amino acids in the regulation of skeletal muscle protein synthesis were examined in adult and old rats. Animals were fed over 1 h with either a 25% or a 0% amino acid/protein meal. In each nutritional condition, postprandial insulin secretion was either maintained or blocked with diazoxide injections. Protein synthesis in gastrocnemius and soleus muscles was assessed in vivo using the flooding dose method. Insulin suppression decreased protein synthesis in both muscles irrespective of the nutritional condition and age of the rats. Moreover, reduced insulinaemia was associated with 4E-BP1 dephosphorylation, enhanced assembly of the 4E-BP1−eIF4E inactive complex and hypophosphorylation of eIF4E, p70S6k and protein kinase B, key intermediates in the regulation of translation initiation and protein synthesis. Old rats did not differ from adult rats. The lack of amino acids in the meal of insulin-suppressed rats did not result in any additional decrease in protein synthesis. In the presence of insulin secretion, dietary amino acid suppression significantly decreased gastrocnemius protein synthesis in adult but not in old rats. Amino acid suppression was associated with reduced phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 and p70S6k in adults. Along with protein synthesis, only the inhibition of p70S6k phosphorylation was abolished in old rats. We concluded that insulin is required for the regulation of muscle protein synthesis irrespective of age and that the effect of dietary amino acids is blunted in old rats. PMID:15513948

  2. Effects of alprostadil and iloprost on renal, lung, and skeletal muscle injury following hindlimb ischemia–reperfusion injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Erer, Dilek; Özer, Abdullah; Demirtaş, Hüseyin; Gönül, İpek Işık; Kara, Halil; Arpacı, Hande; Çomu, Faruk Metin; Oktar, Gürsel Levent; Arslan, Mustafa; Küçük, Ayşegül

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the effects of alprostadil (prostaglandin [PGE1] analog) and iloprost (prostacyclin [PGI2] analog) on renal, lung, and skeletal muscle tissues after ischemia reperfusion (I/R) injury in an experimental rat model. Materials and methods Wistar albino rats underwent 2 hours of ischemia via infrarenal aorta clamping with subsequent 2 hours of reperfusion. Alprostadil and iloprost were given starting simultaneously with the reperfusion period. Effects of agents on renal, lung, and skeletal muscle (gastrocnemius) tissue specimens were examined. Results Renal medullary congestion, cytoplasmic swelling, and mean tubular dilatation scores were significantly lower in the alprostadil-treated group than those found in the I/R-only group (P<0.0001, P=0.015, and P<0.01, respectively). Polymorphonuclear leukocyte infiltration, pulmonary partial destruction, consolidation, alveolar edema, and hemorrhage scores were significantly lower in alprostadil- and iloprost-treated groups (P=0.017 and P=0.001; P<0.01 and P<0.0001). Polymorphonuclear leukocyte infiltration scores in skeletal muscle tissue were significantly lower in the iloprost-treated group than the scores found in the nontreated I/R group (P<0.0001). Conclusion Alprostadil and iloprost significantly reduce lung tissue I/R injury. Alprostadil has more prominent protective effects against renal I/R injury, while iloprost is superior in terms of protecting the skeletal muscle tissue against I/R injury.

  3. Prostaglandin synthetase and prostacyclin synthetase in mature rat skeletal muscles: immunohistochemical localisation to arterioles, tendons and connective tissues.

    PubMed Central

    McLennan, I S; Macdonald, R E

    1991-01-01

    Mature skeletal muscles produce appreciable quantities of prostacyclin (PGI2) and smaller amounts of PGF2 alpha and PGE2, but the sources of these prostaglandins within skeletal muscle are unknown. Monoclonal antibodies to prostaglandin synthetase and prostacyclin synthetase were used to determine which muscle cells produce prostaglandins. The antibody to prostacyclin synthetase stained the tendon, fascia, epimysium and the arteries leading to the muscles. The endothelia of arterioles were also stained in the tibialis anterior and cremaster but not in the soleus muscles. Only trace levels of immunoreactivity were observed with the antibody to prostaglandin synthetase in normal muscles. However, immunoreactivity was observed in the muscles of rats that had been pretreated with aspirin, a drug that inhibits and stabilises prostaglandin synthetase. In muscles of the aspirin-treated rats, all cell types that were stained by the antiprostacyclin synthetase also reacted weakly with the antibody to prostaglandin synthetase. In addition, some cells in the endomysium were strongly stained with the antiprostaglandin synthetase but not with the antiprostacyclin synthetase. We conclude that (1) at least one aspect of the regulation of blood flow in the microcirculation of slow muscles is different from that of fast muscles, (2) that the tendon and connective tissue is the major source of PGI2 in mature skeletal muscles, and (3) that the prostaglandin-dependent effects of insulin and some other stimuli on skeletal muscle may be mediated by the muscle's arterioles or connective tissue. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:1810931

  4. Effects of alprostadil and iloprost on renal, lung, and skeletal muscle injury following hindlimb ischemia–reperfusion injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Erer, Dilek; Özer, Abdullah; Demirtaş, Hüseyin; Gönül, İpek Işık; Kara, Halil; Arpacı, Hande; Çomu, Faruk Metin; Oktar, Gürsel Levent; Arslan, Mustafa; Küçük, Ayşegül

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the effects of alprostadil (prostaglandin [PGE1] analog) and iloprost (prostacyclin [PGI2] analog) on renal, lung, and skeletal muscle tissues after ischemia reperfusion (I/R) injury in an experimental rat model. Materials and methods Wistar albino rats underwent 2 hours of ischemia via infrarenal aorta clamping with subsequent 2 hours of reperfusion. Alprostadil and iloprost were given starting simultaneously with the reperfusion period. Effects of agents on renal, lung, and skeletal muscle (gastrocnemius) tissue specimens were examined. Results Renal medullary congestion, cytoplasmic swelling, and mean tubular dilatation scores were significantly lower in the alprostadil-treated group than those found in the I/R-only group (P<0.0001, P=0.015, and P<0.01, respectively). Polymorphonuclear leukocyte infiltration, pulmonary partial destruction, consolidation, alveolar edema, and hemorrhage scores were significantly lower in alprostadil- and iloprost-treated groups (P=0.017 and P=0.001; P<0.01 and P<0.0001). Polymorphonuclear leukocyte infiltration scores in skeletal muscle tissue were significantly lower in the iloprost-treated group than the scores found in the nontreated I/R group (P<0.0001). Conclusion Alprostadil and iloprost significantly reduce lung tissue I/R injury. Alprostadil has more prominent protective effects against renal I/R injury, while iloprost is superior in terms of protecting the skeletal muscle tissue against I/R injury. PMID:27601882

  5. Type 2 iodothyronine deiodinase is upregulated in rat slow- and fast-twitch skeletal muscle during cold exposure.

    PubMed

    Louzada, Ruy A; Santos, Maria C S; Cavalcanti-de-Albuquerque, João Paulo A; Rangel, Igor F; Ferreira, Andrea C F; Galina, Antonio; Werneck-de-Castro, Joao Pedro S; Carvalho, Denise P

    2014-12-01

    During cold acclimation, shivering is progressively replaced by nonshivering thermogenesis. Brown adipose tissue (BAT) and skeletal muscle are relevant for nonshivering thermogenesis, which depends largely on thyroid hormone. Since the skeletal muscle fibers progressively adapt to cold exposure through poorly defined mechanisms, our intent was to determine whether skeletal muscle type 2 deiodinase (D2) induction could be implicated in the long-term skeletal muscle cold acclimation. We demonstrate that in the red oxidative soleus muscle, D2 activity increased 2.3-fold after 3 days at 4°C together with the brown adipose tissue D2 activity, which increased 10-fold. Soleus muscle and BAT D2 activities returned to the control levels after 10 days of cold exposure, when an increase of 2.8-fold in D2 activity was detected in white glycolytic gastrocnemius but not in red oxidative gastrocnemius fibers. Propranolol did not prevent muscle D2 induction, but it impaired the decrease of D2 in BAT and soleus after 10 days at 4°C. Cold exposure is accompanied by increased oxygen consumption, UCP3, and PGC-1α genes expression in skeletal muscles, which were partialy prevented by propranolol in soleus and gastrocnemius. Serum total and free T3 is increased during cold exposure in rats, even after 10 days, when BAT D2 is already normalized, suggesting that skeletal muscle D2 activity contributes significantly to circulating T3 under this adaptive condition. In conclusion, cold exposure is accompanied by concerted changes in the metabolism of BAT and oxidative and glycolytic skeletal muscles that are paralleled by type 2 deiodinase activation.

  6. Type 2 iodothyronine deiodinase is upregulated in rat slow- and fast-twitch skeletal muscle during cold exposure.

    PubMed

    Louzada, Ruy A; Santos, Maria C S; Cavalcanti-de-Albuquerque, João Paulo A; Rangel, Igor F; Ferreira, Andrea C F; Galina, Antonio; Werneck-de-Castro, Joao Pedro S; Carvalho, Denise P

    2014-12-01

    During cold acclimation, shivering is progressively replaced by nonshivering thermogenesis. Brown adipose tissue (BAT) and skeletal muscle are relevant for nonshivering thermogenesis, which depends largely on thyroid hormone. Since the skeletal muscle fibers progressively adapt to cold exposure through poorly defined mechanisms, our intent was to determine whether skeletal muscle type 2 deiodinase (D2) induction could be implicated in the long-term skeletal muscle cold acclimation. We demonstrate that in the red oxidative soleus muscle, D2 activity increased 2.3-fold after 3 days at 4°C together with the brown adipose tissue D2 activity, which increased 10-fold. Soleus muscle and BAT D2 activities returned to the control levels after 10 days of cold exposure, when an increase of 2.8-fold in D2 activity was detected in white glycolytic gastrocnemius but not in red oxidative gastrocnemius fibers. Propranolol did not prevent muscle D2 induction, but it impaired the decrease of D2 in BAT and soleus after 10 days at 4°C. Cold exposure is accompanied by increased oxygen consumption, UCP3, and PGC-1α genes expression in skeletal muscles, which were partialy prevented by propranolol in soleus and gastrocnemius. Serum total and free T3 is increased during cold exposure in rats, even after 10 days, when BAT D2 is already normalized, suggesting that skeletal muscle D2 activity contributes significantly to circulating T3 under this adaptive condition. In conclusion, cold exposure is accompanied by concerted changes in the metabolism of BAT and oxidative and glycolytic skeletal muscles that are paralleled by type 2 deiodinase activation. PMID:25294216

  7. Urocortin 3 activates AMPK and AKT pathways and enhances glucose disposal in rat skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Roustit, Manon M; Vaughan, Joan M; Jamieson, Pauline M; Cleasby, Mark E

    2014-01-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) in skeletal muscle is an important component of both type 2 diabetes and the syndrome of sarcopaenic obesity, for which there are no effective therapies. Urocortins (UCNs) are not only well established as neuropeptides but also have their roles in metabolism in peripheral tissues. We have shown recently that global overexpression of UCN3 resulted in muscular hypertrophy and resistance to the adverse metabolic effects of a high-fat diet. Herein, we aimed to establish whether short-term local UCN3 expression could enhance glucose disposal and insulin signalling in skeletal muscle. UCN3 was found to be expressed in right tibialis cranialis and extensor digitorum longus muscles of rats by in vivo electrotransfer and the effects studied vs the contralateral muscles after 1 week. No increase in muscle mass was detected, but test muscles showed 19% larger muscle fibre diameter (P=0.030), associated with increased IGF1 and IGF1 receptor mRNA and increased SER256 phosphorylation of forkhead transcription factor. Glucose clearance into the test muscles after an intraperitoneal glucose load was increased by 23% (P=0.018) per unit mass, associated with increased GLUT1 (34% increase; P=0.026) and GLUT4 (48% increase; P=0.0009) proteins, and significantly increased phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1, AKT, AKT substrate of 160 kDa, glycogen synthase kinase-3β, AMP-activated protein kinase and its substrate acetyl coA carboxylase. Thus, UCN3 expression enhances glucose disposal and signalling in muscle by an autocrine/paracrine mechanism that is separate from its pro-hypertrophic effects, implying that such a manipulation may have promised for the treatment of IR syndromes including sarcopaenic obesity. PMID:25122003

  8. Localized infusion of IGF-I results in skeletal muscle hypertrophy in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, G. R.; McCue, S. A.

    1998-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) peptide levels have been shown to increase in overloaded skeletal muscles (G. R. Adams and F. Haddad. J. Appl. Physiol. 81: 2509-2516, 1996). In that study, the increase in IGF-I was found to precede measurable increases in muscle protein and was correlated with an increase in muscle DNA content. The present study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that direct IGF-I infusion would result in an increase in muscle DNA as well as in various measurements of muscle size. Either 0.9% saline or nonsystemic doses of IGF-I were infused directly into a non-weight-bearing muscle of rats, the tibialis anterior (TA), via a fenestrated catheter attached to a subcutaneous miniosmotic pump. Saline infusion had no effect on the mass, protein content, or DNA content of TA muscles. Local IGF-I infusion had no effect on body or heart weight. The absolute weight of the infused TA muscles was approximately 9% greater (P < 0.05) than that of the contralateral TA muscles. IGF-I infusion resulted in significant increases in the total protein and DNA content of TA muscles (P < 0.05). As a result of these coordinated changes, the DNA-to-protein ratio of the hypertrophied TA was similar to that of the contralateral muscles. These results suggest that IGF-I may be acting to directly stimulate processes such as protein synthesis and satellite cell proliferation, which result in skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

  9. A Transgenic Rat for Specifically Inhibiting Adult Neurogenesis123

    PubMed Central

    Grigereit, Laura; Pickel, James

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The growth of research on adult neurogenesis and the development of new models and tools have greatly advanced our understanding of the function of newborn neurons in recent years. However, there are still significant limitations in the ability to identify the functions of adult neurogenesis in available models. Here we report a transgenic rat (TK rat) that expresses herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase in GFAP+ cells. Upon treating TK rats with the antiviral drug valganciclovir, granule cell neurogenesis can be completely inhibited in adulthood, in both the hippocampus and olfactory bulb. Interestingly, neurogenesis in the glomerular and external plexiform layers of the olfactory bulb was only partially inhibited, suggesting that some adult-born neurons in these regions derive from a distinct precursor population that does not express GFAP. Within the hippocampus, blockade of neurogenesis was rapid and nearly complete within 1 week of starting treatment. Preliminary behavioral analyses indicate that general anxiety levels and patterns of exploration are generally unaffected in neurogenesis-deficient rats. However, neurogenesis-deficient TK rats showed reduced sucrose preference, suggesting deficits in reward-related behaviors. We expect that TK rats will facilitate structural, physiological, and behavioral studies that complement those possible in existing models, broadly enhancing understanding of the function of adult neurogenesis. PMID:27257630

  10. Stereoselective effects of mexiletine enantiomers on sodium currents and excitability characteristics of adult skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    De Luca, A; Natuzzi, F; Lentini, G; Franchini, C; Tortorella, V; Conte Camerino, D

    1995-12-01

    drugs on adult skeletal muscle sodium channels. The constant eudismic ratios between the enantiomers during both tonic and use-dependent block suggest that the increase in the apparent affinity of the receptor during state-dependent conformational changes of the channel does not enhance its stereospecificity. The decrease in effective concentration upon high frequency stimulation supports the potential usefulness of low doses of R-(-) mexiletine in the treatment of the abnormal hyperexcitability of the myotonic muscles, with a likely reduction of unwanted side effects.

  11. [Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymatic makeup of the skeletal muscles of rats after a flight on the Kosmos-690 biosatellite].

    PubMed

    Petrova, N V

    1978-01-01

    The isoenzyme composition of lactate dehydrogenase in the soleus and plantaris muscles of rats which had flown for 20.5 days onboard the biosatellite Cosmos-690 equipped with a radiation source was studied. Difference in the isoenzyme composition of lactate dehydrogenase in flight and synchronous rats disappeared 27 days after the experiments; however, some changes persisted as compared with vivarium controls. The data obtained give evidence that irradiation-induced effects in skeletal muscles manifested themselves at a far later stage than weightlessness-induced changes.

  12. Differential regulation of oxytocin receptor in various adipose tissue depots and skeletal muscle types in obese Zucker rats.

    PubMed

    Gajdosechova, L; Krskova, K; Olszanecki, R; Zorad, S

    2015-07-01

    Multifunctional peptide oxytocin currently undergoes intensive research due to its proposed anti-obesity properties. Until now, little is known about regulation of oxytocin receptor in metabolically active tissues in obesity. The aim of the present study was to measure expression of oxytocin receptor upon obese phenotype with respect to the variety among adipose tissue and skeletal muscles with distinct anatomical localisation. Total homogenates were prepared from epididymal, retroperitoneal and inguinal adipose tissues as well as quadriceps and soleus muscle from lean and obese Zucker rats. Oxytocin receptor protein was determined by immunoblot. Interestingly, elevated oxytocin receptor was observed in epididymal adipose tissue of obese rats in contrast to its downregulation in subcutaneous and no change in retroperitoneal fat. In lean animals, oxytocin receptor protein was expressed at similar levels in all adipose depots. This uniformity was not observed in the case of skeletal muscle in which fibre type composition seems to be determinant of oxytocin receptor expression. Quadriceps muscle with the predominance of glycolytic fibres exhibits higher oxytocin receptor expression than almost exclusively oxidative soleus muscle. Oxytocin receptor protein levels were decreased in both skeletal muscles analysed upon obese phenotype. The present work demonstrates that even under identical endocrine circumstances, oxytocin receptor is differentially regulated in adipose tissue of obese rats depending on fat depot localisation. These results also imply which tissues may be preferentially targeted by oxytocin treatment in metabolic disease.

  13. Metformin Selectively Attenuates Mitochondrial H2O2 Emission without Affecting Respiratory Capacity in Skeletal Muscle of Obese Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kane, Daniel A.; Anderson, Ethan J.; Price, Jesse W.; Woodlief, Tracey L.; Lin, Chien-Te; Bikman, Benjamin T.; Cortright, Ronald N.; Neufer, P. Darrell

    2010-01-01

    Metformin is a widely prescribed drug for treatment of type 2 diabetes, although no cellular mechanism of action has been established. To determine whether in vivo metformin treatment alters mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle, respiratory O2 flux and H2O2 emission were measured in saponin-permeabilized myofibers from lean and obese (fa/fa) Zucker rats treated for 4 wks with metformin. Succinate- and palmitoyl-carnitine- supported respiration generated >2-fold higher rates of H2O2 emission in myofibers from untreated obese versus lean rats, indicative of an obesity-associated increased mitochondrial oxidant emitting potential. In conjunction with improved glycemic control, metformin treatment reduced H2O2 emission in muscle from obese rats to rates near or below those observed in lean rats during both succinate- and palmitoyl-carnitine- supported respiration. Surprisingly, metformin treatment did not affect basal or maximal rates of O2 consumption in muscle from obese or lean rats. Ex vivo dose-response experiments revealed that metformin inhibits complex I-linked H2O2 emission at a concentration ∼2 orders of magnitude lower than that required to inhibit respiratory O2 flux. These findings suggest that therapeutic concentrations of metformin normalize mitochondrial H2O2 emission by blocking reverse electron flow without affecting forward electron flow or respiratory O2 flux in skeletal muscle. PMID:20600832

  14. Metformin selectively attenuates mitochondrial H2O2 emission without affecting respiratory capacity in skeletal muscle of obese rats.

    PubMed

    Kane, Daniel A; Anderson, Ethan J; Price, Jesse W; Woodlief, Tracey L; Lin, Chien-Te; Bikman, Benjamin T; Cortright, Ronald N; Neufer, P Darrell

    2010-09-15

    Metformin is a widely prescribed drug for treatment of type 2 diabetes, although no cellular mechanism of action has been established. To determine whether in vivo metformin treatment alters mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle, respiratory O(2) flux and H(2)O(2) emission were measured in saponin-permeabilized myofibers from lean and obese (fa/fa) Zucker rats treated for 4 weeks with metformin. Succinate- and palmitoylcarnitine-supported respiration generated greater than twofold higher rates of H(2)O(2) emission in myofibers from untreated obese versus lean rats, indicative of an obesity-associated increased mitochondrial oxidant emitting potential. In conjunction with improved glycemic control, metformin treatment reduced H(2)O(2) emission in muscle from obese rats to rates near or below those observed in lean rats during both succinate- and palmitoylcarnitine-supported respiration. Surprisingly, metformin treatment did not affect basal or maximal rates of O(2) consumption in muscle from obese or lean rats. Ex vivo dose-response experiments revealed that metformin inhibits complex I-linked H(2)O(2) emission at a concentration approximately 2 orders of magnitude lower than that required to inhibit respiratory O(2) flux. These findings suggest that therapeutic concentrations of metformin normalize mitochondrial H(2)O(2) emission by blocking reverse electron flow without affecting forward electron flow or respiratory O(2) flux in skeletal muscle.

  15. Chromium picolinate enhances skeletal muscle cellular insulin signaling in vivo in obese, insulin-resistant JCR:LA-cp rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhong Q; Zhang, Xian H; Russell, James C; Hulver, Matthew; Cefalu, William T

    2006-02-01

    Chromium is one of the few trace minerals for which a specific cellular mechanism of action has not been identified. Recent in vitro studies suggest that chromium supplementation may improve insulin sensitivity by enhancing insulin receptor signaling, but this has not been demonstrated in vivo. We investigated the effect of chromium supplementation on insulin receptor signaling in an insulin-resistant rat model, the JCR:LA-corpulent rat. Male JCR:LA-cp rats (4 mo of age) were randomly assigned to receive chromium picolinate (CrPic) (obese n=6, lean n=5) or vehicle (obese n=5, lean n=5) for 3 mo. The CrPic was provided in the water, and based on calculated water intake, rats randomized to CrPic received 80 microg/(kg.d). At the end of the study, skeletal muscle (vastus lateralis) biopsies were obtained at baseline and at 5, 15, and 30 min postinsulin stimulation to assess insulin signaling. Obese rats treated with CrPic had significantly improved glucose disposal rates and demonstrated a significant increase in insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 and phosphatidylinositol (PI)-3 kinase activity in skeletal muscle compared with obese controls. The increase in cellular signaling was not associated with increased protein levels of the IRS proteins, PI-3 kinase or Akt. However, protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) levels were significantly lower in obese rats administered CrPic than obese controls. When corrected for protein content, PTP1B activity was also significantly lower in obese rats administered CrPic than obese controls. Our data suggest that chromium supplementation of obese, insulin-resistant rats may improve insulin action by enhancing intracellular signaling.

  16. Chronic skeletal muscle ischemia preserves coronary flow in the ischemic rat heart.

    PubMed

    Varnavas, Varnavas C; Kontaras, Konstantinos; Glava, Chryssoula; Maniotis, Christos D; Koutouzis, Michael; Baltogiannis, Giannis G; Papalois, Apostolos; Kolettis, Theofilos M; Kyriakides, Zenon S

    2011-10-01

    Chronic skeletal muscle ischemia confers cytoprotection to the ventricular myocardium during infarction, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Although neovascularization in the left ventricular myocardium has been proposed as a possible mechanism, the functional capacity of such vessels has not been studied. We examined the effects of chronic limb ischemia on infarct size, coronary blood flow, and left ventricular function after ischemia-reperfusion. Hindlimb ischemia was induced in 65 Wistar rats by excision of the left femoral artery, whereas 65 rats were sham operated. After 4 wk, myocardial infarction was generated by permanent coronary artery ligation. Infarct size was measured 24 h postligation. Left ventricular function was evaluated in isolated hearts after ischemia-reperfusion, 4 wk after limb ischemia. Neovascularization was assessed by immunohistochemistry, and coronary flow was measured under maximum vasodilatation at different perfusion pressures before and after coronary ligation. Infarct size was smaller after limb ischemia compared with controls (24.4 ± 8.1% vs. 46.2 ± 9.5% of the ventricle and 47.6 ± 8.7% vs. 80.1 ± 9.3% of the ischemic area, respectively). Indexes of left ventricular function at the end of reperfusion (divided by baseline values) were improved after limb ischemia (developed pressure: 0.68 ± 0.06 vs. 0.59 ± 0.05, P = 0.008; maximum +dP/dt: 0.70 ± 0.08 vs. 0.59 ± 0.04, P = 0.004; and maximum -dP/dt: 0.86 ± 0.14 vs. 0.72 ± 0.10, P = 0.041). Coronary vessel density was markedly higher (P = 0.00021) in limb ischemic rats. In contrast to controls (F = 5.65, P = 0.00182), where coronary flow decreased, it remained unchanged (F = 1.36, P = 0.28) after ligation in limb ischemic rats. In conclusion, chronic hindlimb ischemia decreases infarct size and attenuates left ventricular dysfunction by increasing coronary collateral vessel density and blood flow.

  17. Effect of leucine uptake on hepatic and skeletal muscle gene expression in rats: a microarray analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Wookwang

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was performed to explore the physiological functions of leucine by exploring genes with leucine-dependent variability using DNA microarray. [Methods] Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 20) were separated into a HPD (30% High Protein Diet, n = 10) group and a NPD (0% Non Protein Diet, n = 10) group and fed a protein diet for 2 weeks. At the end of the 2-week period, the rats were fasted for 12-16 hours, further separated into subgroups within the HPD (Saline, n = 5, Leucine, n = 5) and NPD (Saline, n = 5, Leucine, n = 5) groups and administered with a leucine solution. The liver and muscles were harvested after 2 hours for RNA extraction. RNA purification from the isolated muscles and target gene identification using DNA chip were performed. The target gene was determined based on the results of the DNA chip experiment, and mRNA expression of the target gene was analyzed using Real-Time PCR. [Results] In the skeletal muscle, 27 genes were upregulated while 52 genes were down regulated after leucine administration in the NPD group. In the liver, 160 genes were up-regulated while 126 were down-regulated. The per2 gene was one of the genes with leucine-dependent induction in muscles and liver. [Conclusion] This study was performed to explore the physiological functions of leucine, however, a large number of genes showed variability. Therefore, it was difficult to definitively identify the genes linked with a particular physiological function. Various nutritional effects of leucine were observed. High variability in cytokines, receptors, and various membrane proteins were observed, which suggests that leucine functions as more than a nutrient. The interpretation may depend on investigators’ perspectives, therefore, discussion with relevant experts and the BCAA (Branched-Chain Amino Acids) society may be needed for effective utilization of this data. PMID:26244133

  18. Physiological responses during whole body suspension of adult rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, J. M.; Fell, R. D.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1987-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize responses of adult rats to one and two weeks of whole body suspension. Body weights and food and water intakes were initially reduced during suspension, but, while intake of food and water returned to presuspension levels, body weight remained depressed. Diuresis was evident, but only during week two. Hindlimb muscle responses were differential, with the soleus exhibiting the greatest atrophy and the EDL a relative hypertrophy. These findings suggest that adult rats respond qualitatively in a manner similar to juveniles during suspension.

  19. Early changes of type 2B fibers after denervation of rat EDL skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Germinario, Elena; Esposito, Alessandra; Megighian, Aram; Midrio, Menotti; Biral, Donatella; Betto, Romeo; Danieli-Betto, Daniela

    2002-05-01

    Skeletal muscle type 2B fibers normally receive a moderate level of motoneuron discharge. As a consequence, we hypothesize that type 2B fiber properties should be less sensitive to the absence of the nerve. Therefore, we have investigated the response of sarcoplasmic reticulum and myofibrillar proteins of type 2B fibers isolated from rat extensor digitorum longus muscle after denervation (2 and 7 days). Single fibers were identified by SDS-PAGE of myosin heavy chain isoforms. Electrophysiological and isometric contractile properties of the whole muscle were also analyzed. The pCa-tension relationship of type 2B single fibers was shifted to the left at 2 days and to right at 7 days after denervation, with significant differences in the Hill coefficients and pCa threshold values in 2- vs. 7-day-denervated fibers. The sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ uptake capacity and rate significantly decreased after 2 days of denervation, whereas both increased at 7 days. Caffeine sensitivity of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release was transitory and markedly increased in 2-day-denervated fibers. Our results indicate that type 2B fiber functional properties are highly sensitive to the interruption of nerve supply. Moreover, most of 2-day-denervated changes were reverted at 7 days. PMID:11960956

  20. AMP deaminase histochemical activity and immunofluorescent isozyme localization in rat skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, J. L.; Sabina, R. L.; Ogasawara, N.; Riley, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    The cellular distribution of AMP deaminase (AMPda) isozymes was documented for rat soleus and plantaris muscles, utilizing immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoprecipitation methods. AMPda is a ubiquitous enzyme existing as three distinct isozymes, A, B and C, which were initially purified from skeletal muscle, liver (and kidney), and heart, respectively. AMPda-A is primarily concentrated subsarcolemmally and intermyofibrillarly within muscle cells, while isozymes B and C are concentrated within non-myofiber elements of muscle tissue. AMPda-B is principally associated with connective tissues surrounding neural elements and the muscle spindle capsule, and AMPda-C is predominantly associated with circulatory elements, such as arterial and venous walls, capillary endothelium, and red blood cells. These specific localizations, combined with documented differences in kinetic properties, suggest multiple functional roles for the AMPda isozymes or temporal segregation of similar AMPda functions. Linkage of the AMPda substrate with adenosine production pathways at the AMP level and the localization of isozyme-C in vascular tissue suggest a regulatory role in the microcirculation.

  1. Lesions of rat skeletal muscle after local block of acetylcholinesterase and neuromuscular stimulation.

    PubMed

    Mense, S; Simons, D G; Hoheisel, U; Quenzer, B

    2003-06-01

    In skeletal muscle, a local increase of acetylcholine (ACh) in a few end plates has been hypothesized to cause the formation of contraction knots that can be found in myofascial trigger points. To test this hypothesis in rats, small amounts of an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor [diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP)] were injected into the proximal half of the gastrocnemius muscle, and the muscle nerve was electrically stimulated for 30-60 min for induction of muscle twitches. The distal half of the muscle, which performed the same contractions, served as a control to assess the effects of the twitches without DFP. Sections of the muscle were evaluated for morphological changes in relation to the location of blocked end plates. Compared with the distal half of the muscle, the DFP-injected proximal half exhibited significantly higher numbers of abnormally contracted fibers (local contractures), torn fibers, and longitudinal stripes. DFP-injected animals in which the muscle nerve was not stimulated and that were allowed to survive for 24 h exhibited the same lesions but in smaller numbers. The data indicate that an increased concentration of ACh in a few end plates causes damage to muscle fibers. The results support the assumption that a dysfunctional end plate exhibiting increased release of ACh may be the starting point for regional abnormal contractions, which are thought to be essential for the formation of myofascial trigger points.

  2. A comparison of rat myosin from fast and slow skeletal muscle and the effect of disuse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unsworth, B. R.; Witzmann, F. A.; Fitts, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    Certain enzymatic and structural features of myosin, purified from rat skeletal muscles representative of the fast twitch glycolytic (type IIb), the fast twitch oxidative (type IIa), and the slow twitch oxidative (type I) fiber, were determined and the results were compared with the measured contractile properties. Good correlation was found between the shortening velocities and Ca(2+)-activated ATPase activity for each fiber type. Short term hind limb immobilization caused prolongation of contraction time and one-half relaxation time in the fast twitch muscles and a reduction of these contractile properties in slow twitch soleus. Furthermore, the increased maximum shortening velocity in the immobilized soleus could be correlated with increased Ca(2+)-ATPase, but no change was observed in the enzymatic activity of the fast twitch muscles. No alteration in light chain distribution with disuse was observed in any of the fiber types. The myosin from slow twitch soleus could be distinguished from fast twitch myosins on the basis of the pattern of peptides generated by proteolysis of the heavy chains. Six weeks of hind limb immobilization resulted in both an increased ATPase activity and an altered heavy chain primary structure in the slow twitch soleus muscle.

  3. Increased intrinsic mitochondrial respiratory capacity in skeletal muscle from rats with streptozotocin-induced hyperglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Steen; Scheede-Bergdahl, Celena; Whitesell, Thomas; Boushel, Robert; Bergdahl, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Type I diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is a chronic disorder, characterized by an almost or complete insulin deficiency. Widespread tissue dysfunction and deleterious diabetes-complications are associated with long-term elevations of blood glucose. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of type I diabetes, as induced by streptozotocin, on the mitochondria in skeletal muscles that predominantly consist of either slow or fast twitch fibers. Soleus (primarily slow twitch fiber type) and the plantaris muscle (mainly fast twitch fiber type) were removed in order to measure mitochondrial protein expression and integrated mitochondrial respiratory function. Mitochondrial capacity for oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) was found to be higher in the slow (more oxidative) soleus muscle from STZ rats when evaluating lipid and complex I linked OXPHOS capacity, whereas no difference was detected between the groups when evaluating the more physiological complex I and II linked OXPHOS capacity. These findings indicate that chronic hyperglycemia results in an elevated intrinsic mitochondrial respiratory capacity in both soleus and, at varying degree, plantaris muscle, findings that are consistent with human T1DM patients. PMID:26197936

  4. Regulation of the sodium-potassium pump in cultured rat skeletal myotubes by intracellular sodium ions

    SciTech Connect

    Brodie, C.; Sampson, S.R.

    1989-07-01

    The properties of the Na-K pump and some of the factors controlling its amount and function were studied in rat myotubes in culture. The number of Na-K pump sites was quantified by measuring the amount of (/sup 3/H)ouabain bound to whole-cell preparations. Activity of the pump was determined by measurement of ouabain-sensitive /sup 86/Rb-uptake and component of membrane potential. Chronic treatment of myotubes with tetrodotoxin (TTX), which lowers (Na)i, decreased the number of Na-K pumps, the ouabain-sensitive 86Rb uptake, and the size of the electrogenic pump component of Em. In contrast, chronic treatment with either ouabain or veratridine, which increases (Na+)i, resulted in an elevated level of Na-K pump sites. This effect was blocked by inhibitors of protein synthesis. Neither rates of degradation nor affinity of pump sites in cells treated with TTX, veratridine, or ouabain differred from those in control cells. The number and activity of Na-K pump sites were unaffected by chronic elevation in (Ca)i or chronic depolarization. We conclude that alterations in the level in intracellular Na ions play the major role in regulation of Na-K pump synthesis in cultured mammalian skeletal muscle.

  5. The monoacylglycerol lipase inhibitor JZL184 decreases inflammatory response in skeletal muscle contusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shu-Kun; Zhang, Miao; Tian, Zhi-Ling; Wang, Meng; Zhao, Rui; Wang, Lin-Lin; Li, Shan-Shan; Liu, Min; Li, Jiao-Yong; Zhang, Meng-Zhou; Guan, Da-Wei

    2015-08-15

    Muscle wound healing process is a typical inflammation-evoked event. The monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) inhibitor (4-nitrophenyl)4-[bis(1,3-benzodioxol -5-yl)-hydroxymethyl]piperidine-1-carboxylate (JZL184) has been previously reported to reduce inflammation in colitis and acute lung injury in mice, which provide a new strategy for primary care of skeletal muscle injury. We investigated the effect of JZL184 on inflammation in rat muscle contusion model, and found decreased neutrophil and macrophage infiltration and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. With extension of post-traumatic interval, myofiber regeneration was significantly hindered with increased collagen types I and ІІІ mRNAfibroblast infiltration as well as promoted fibrosis. Furthermore, 1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-4-methyl-N-morpholin-4-ylpyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM281, a selective cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist) and [6-iodo-2-methyl-1-(2-morpholin-4-ylethyl)indol-3-yl]-(4-methoxyphenyl)methanone (AM630, a selective cannabinoid CB2 receptor antagonist) treatment alleviated the anti-inflammatory effect of JZL184. Our findings demonstrate that JZL184 is able to inhibit the inflammatory response and interfere with contused muscle healing, in which the anti-inflammatory action may be mediated through cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors.

  6. The monoacylglycerol lipase inhibitor JZL184 decreases inflammatory response in skeletal muscle contusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shu-Kun; Zhang, Miao; Tian, Zhi-Ling; Wang, Meng; Zhao, Rui; Wang, Lin-Lin; Li, Shan-Shan; Liu, Min; Li, Jiao-Yong; Zhang, Meng-Zhou; Guan, Da-Wei

    2015-08-15

    Muscle wound healing process is a typical inflammation-evoked event. The monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) inhibitor (4-nitrophenyl)4-[bis(1,3-benzodioxol -5-yl)-hydroxymethyl]piperidine-1-carboxylate (JZL184) has been previously reported to reduce inflammation in colitis and acute lung injury in mice, which provide a new strategy for primary care of skeletal muscle injury. We investigated the effect of JZL184 on inflammation in rat muscle contusion model, and found decreased neutrophil and macrophage infiltration and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. With extension of post-traumatic interval, myofiber regeneration was significantly hindered with increased collagen types I and ІІІ mRNAfibroblast infiltration as well as promoted fibrosis. Furthermore, 1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-4-methyl-N-morpholin-4-ylpyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM281, a selective cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist) and [6-iodo-2-methyl-1-(2-morpholin-4-ylethyl)indol-3-yl]-(4-methoxyphenyl)methanone (AM630, a selective cannabinoid CB2 receptor antagonist) treatment alleviated the anti-inflammatory effect of JZL184. Our findings demonstrate that JZL184 is able to inhibit the inflammatory response and interfere with contused muscle healing, in which the anti-inflammatory action may be mediated through cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors. PMID:25912803

  7. Vanilloid receptor expressed in the sarcoplasmic reticulum of rat skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Xin Hong; Tanaka, Hideyuki; Yamaguchi, Maki; Takemori, Shigeru; Nakamura, Akio; Kohama, Kazuhiro . E-mail: kohamak@med.gunma-u.ac.jp

    2005-07-08

    Vanilloid receptor subtype 1 (VR1) was cloned as a capsaicin receptor from neuronal cells of dorsal root ganglia. VR1 was subsequently found in a few non-neuronal tissues, including skeletal muscle [Onozawa et al., Tissue distribution of capsaicin receptor in the various organs of rats, Proc. Jpn. Acad. Ser. B 76 (2000) 68-72]. We confirmed the expression of VR1 in muscle cells using the RT-PCR method and Western blot analysis. Immunostaining studies with a confocal microscope and an electron microscope indicated that VR1 was present in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), a store of Ca{sup 2+}. The SR releases Ca{sup 2+} to cause a contraction when a muscle is excited. However, SR still releases a small amount of Ca{sup 2+} under relaxed conditions. We found that this leakage was enhanced by capsaicin and was antagonized by capsazepine, a capsaicin blocker, indicating that leakage of Ca{sup 2+} occurs through a channel composed of VR1.

  8. Histological image data of limb skeletal tissue from larval and adult Ambystoma mexicanum.

    PubMed

    McCusker, Catherine D; Diaz-Castillo, Carlos; Sosnik, Julian; Phan, Anne; Gardiner, David M

    2016-09-01

    The data presented in this article are related to the article entitled "Cartilage and bone cells do not participate in skeletal regeneration in Ambystoma mexicanum limbs" [1]. Here we present image data of the post-embryonic development of the forelimb skeletal tissue of Ambystoma Mexicanum. Histological staining was performed on sections from the intact limbs of young (6.5 cm) and old (25 cm) animals, and on dissected skeletal tissues (cartilage, bone, and periosteum) from these animals. PMID:27547798

  9. The relationship between facial skeletal class and expert-rated interpersonal skill: an epidemiological survey on young Italian adults

    PubMed Central

    Senna, Andrea; Abbenante, Domenico; Tremolizzo, Lucio; Campus, Guglielmo; Strohmenger, Laura

    2006-01-01

    Background The facial region plays a major role in determining physical attractiveness, so we assessed the hypothesis that the capability of successfully managing interpersonal relationships in young adults might be related to the facial skeletal class. Methods 1,014 young subjects applying to the Military Academy of Pozzuoli, Italy, were enrolled and the cephalometric evaluation was performed by calculating the angular relationships between skeletal points localized by the lateral cephalogram of the face, sorting the subjects in three groups corresponding to each major facial skeletal class. Concurrently, the subjects were evaluated by a team of psychiatrists administering the MMPI-2 test followed by a brief colloquium with each candidate, in order to identify those subjects characterized by low skills for managing interpersonal relationships. Results According to the psychiatric evaluation about 20% of the subjects were considered potentially unable to manage successfully interpersonal relationships (NS). Males displayed an about two-fold increased risk of being NS. No differences were shown in the distribution of the NS male subjects among the three different facial skeletal classes. On the other hand, NS females displayed a different distribution among the three facial skeletal classes, with a trend of about two-fold and four-fold, respectively, for those subjects belonging to classes II and III, respect to those belonging to class I. Conclusion Females may be more sensitive to physical factors determining beauty, such as the facial morphology certainly is. This finding appears to be interesting especially when thinking about possible orthodontic interventions, although further study is certainly needed to confirm these results. PMID:17032444

  10. Acute inhibition of ATP-sensitive K+ channels impairs skeletal muscle vascular control in rats during treadmill exercise

    PubMed Central

    Copp, Steven W.; Ferguson, Scott K.; Sims, Gabrielle E.; Poole, David C.; Musch, Timothy I.

    2015-01-01

    The ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channel is part of a class of inward rectifier K+ channels that can link local O2 availability to vasomotor tone across exercise-induced metabolic transients. The present investigation tested the hypothesis that if KATP channels are crucial to exercise hyperemia, then inhibition via glibenclamide (GLI) would lower hindlimb skeletal muscle blood flow (BF) and vascular conductance during treadmill exercise. In 27 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats, mean arterial pressure, blood lactate concentration, and hindlimb muscle BF (radiolabeled microspheres) were determined at rest (n = 6) and during exercise (n = 6–8, 20, 40, and 60 m/min, 5% incline, i.e., ∼60–100% maximal O2 uptake) under control and GLI conditions (5 mg/kg intra-arterial). At rest and during exercise, mean arterial pressure was higher (rest: 17 ± 3%, 20 m/min: 5 ± 1%, 40 m/min: 5 ± 2%, and 60 m/min: 5 ± 1%, P < 0.05) with GLI. Hindlimb muscle BF (20 m/min: 16 ± 7%, 40 m/min: 30 ± 9%, and 60 m/min: 20 ± 8%) and vascular conductance (20 m/min: 20 ± 7%, 40 m/min: 33 ± 8%, and 60 m/min: 24 ± 8%) were lower with GLI during exercise at 20, 40, and 60 m/min, respectively (P < 0.05 for all) but not at rest. Within locomotory muscles, there was a greater fractional reduction present in muscles comprised predominantly of type I and type IIa fibers at all exercise speeds (P < 0.05). Additionally, blood lactate concentration was 106 ± 29% and 44 ± 15% higher during exercise with GLI at 20 and 40 m/min, respectively (P < 0.05). That KATP channel inhibition reduces hindlimb muscle BF during exercise in rats supports the obligatory contribution of KATP channels in large muscle mass exercise-induced hyperemia. PMID:25820394

  11. Acute inhibition of ATP-sensitive K+ channels impairs skeletal muscle vascular control in rats during treadmill exercise.

    PubMed

    Holdsworth, Clark T; Copp, Steven W; Ferguson, Scott K; Sims, Gabrielle E; Poole, David C; Musch, Timothy I

    2015-06-01

    The ATP-sensitive K(+) (KATP) channel is part of a class of inward rectifier K(+) channels that can link local O2 availability to vasomotor tone across exercise-induced metabolic transients. The present investigation tested the hypothesis that if KATP channels are crucial to exercise hyperemia, then inhibition via glibenclamide (GLI) would lower hindlimb skeletal muscle blood flow (BF) and vascular conductance during treadmill exercise. In 27 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats, mean arterial pressure, blood lactate concentration, and hindlimb muscle BF (radiolabeled microspheres) were determined at rest (n = 6) and during exercise (n = 6-8, 20, 40, and 60 m/min, 5% incline, i.e., ~60-100% maximal O2 uptake) under control and GLI conditions (5 mg/kg intra-arterial). At rest and during exercise, mean arterial pressure was higher (rest: 17 ± 3%, 20 m/min: 5 ± 1%, 40 m/min: 5 ± 2%, and 60 m/min: 5 ± 1%, P < 0.05) with GLI. Hindlimb muscle BF (20 m/min: 16 ± 7%, 40 m/min: 30 ± 9%, and 60 m/min: 20 ± 8%) and vascular conductance (20 m/min: 20 ± 7%, 40 m/min: 33 ± 8%, and 60 m/min: 24 ± 8%) were lower with GLI during exercise at 20, 40, and 60 m/min, respectively (P < 0.05 for all) but not at rest. Within locomotory muscles, there was a greater fractional reduction present in muscles comprised predominantly of type I and type IIa fibers at all exercise speeds (P < 0.05). Additionally, blood lactate concentration was 106 ± 29% and 44 ± 15% higher during exercise with GLI at 20 and 40 m/min, respectively (P < 0.05). That KATP channel inhibition reduces hindlimb muscle BF during exercise in rats supports the obligatory contribution of KATP channels in large muscle mass exercise-induced hyperemia. PMID:25820394

  12. Effect of resistance exercise training on expression of Hsp70 and inflammatory cytokines in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue of STZ-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Molanouri Shamsi, M; Mahdavi, M; Quinn, L S; Gharakhanlou, R; Isanegad, A

    2016-09-01

    Impairment of adipose tissue and skeletal muscles accrued following type 1 diabetes is associated with protein misfolding and loss of adipose mass and skeletal muscle atrophy. Resistance training can maintain muscle mass by changing both inflammatory cytokines and stress factors in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a 5-week ladder climbing resistance training program on the expression of Hsp70 and inflammatory cytokines in adipose tissue and fast-twitch flexor hallucis longus (FHL) and slow-twitch soleus muscles in healthy and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Induction of diabetes reduced body mass, while resistance training preserved FHL muscle weight in diabetic rats without any changes in body mass. Diabetes increased Hsp70 protein content in skeletal muscles, adipose tissue, and serum. Hsp70 protein levels were decreased in normal and diabetic rats by resistance training in the FHL, but not soleus muscle. Furthermore, resistance training decreased inflammatory cytokines in FHL skeletal muscle. On the other hand, Hsp70 and inflammatory cytokine protein levels were increased by training in adipose tissue. Also, significant positive correlations between inflammatory cytokines in adipose tissue and skeletal muscles with Hsp70 protein levels were observed. In conclusion, we found that in diabetic rats, resistance training decreased inflammatory cytokines and Hsp70 protein levels in fast skeletal muscle, increased adipose tissue inflammatory cytokines and Hsp70, and preserved FHL muscle mass. These results suggest that resistance training can maintain skeletal muscle mass in diabetes by changing inflammatory cytokines and stress factors such as Hsp70 in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. PMID:27245165

  13. Effect of resistance exercise training on expression of Hsp70 and inflammatory cytokines in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue of STZ-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Molanouri Shamsi, M; Mahdavi, M; Quinn, L S; Gharakhanlou, R; Isanegad, A

    2016-09-01

    Impairment of adipose tissue and skeletal muscles accrued following type 1 diabetes is associated with protein misfolding and loss of adipose mass and skeletal muscle atrophy. Resistance training can maintain muscle mass by changing both inflammatory cytokines and stress factors in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a 5-week ladder climbing resistance training program on the expression of Hsp70 and inflammatory cytokines in adipose tissue and fast-twitch flexor hallucis longus (FHL) and slow-twitch soleus muscles in healthy and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Induction of diabetes reduced body mass, while resistance training preserved FHL muscle weight in diabetic rats without any changes in body mass. Diabetes increased Hsp70 protein content in skeletal muscles, adipose tissue, and serum. Hsp70 protein levels were decreased in normal and diabetic rats by resistance training in the FHL, but not soleus muscle. Furthermore, resistance training decreased inflammatory cytokines in FHL skeletal muscle. On the other hand, Hsp70 and inflammatory cytokine protein levels were increased by training in adipose tissue. Also, significant positive correlations between inflammatory cytokines in adipose tissue and skeletal muscles with Hsp70 protein levels were observed. In conclusion, we found that in diabetic rats, resistance training decreased inflammatory cytokines and Hsp70 protein levels in fast skeletal muscle, increased adipose tissue inflammatory cytokines and Hsp70, and preserved FHL muscle mass. These results suggest that resistance training can maintain skeletal muscle mass in diabetes by changing inflammatory cytokines and stress factors such as Hsp70 in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue.

  14. Site- and compartment-specific changes in bone with hindlimb unloading in mature adult rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomfield, S. A.; Allen, M. R.; Hogan, H. A.; Delp, M. D.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine site- and compartment-specific changes in bone induced by hindlimb unloading (HU) in the mature adult male rat (6 months old). Tibiae, femora, and humeri were removed after 14, 21, and 28 days of HU for determination of bone mineral density (BMD) and geometry by peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT), mechanical properties, and bone formation rate (BFR), and compared with baseline (0 day) and aging (28 day) controls. HU resulted in 20%-21% declines in cancellous BMD at the proximal tibia and femoral neck after 28 day HU vs. 0 day controls (CON). Cortical shell BMD at these sites was greater (by 4%-6%) in both 28 day HU and 28 day CON vs. 0 day CON animals, and nearly identical to that gain seen in the weight-bearing humerus. Mechanical properties at the proximal tibia exhibited a nonsignificant decline after HU vs. those of 0 day CON rats. At the femoral neck, a 10% decrement was noted in ultimate load in 28 day HU rats vs. 28 day CON animals. Middiaphyseal tibial bone increased slightly in density and area during HU; no differences in structural and material properties between 28 day HU and 28 day CON rats were noted. BFR at the tibial midshaft was significantly lower (by 90%) after 21 day HU vs. 0 day CON; this decline was maintained throughout 28 day HU. These results suggest there are compartment-specific differences in the mature adult skeletal response to hindlimb unloading, and that the major impact over 28 days of unloading is on cancellous bone sites. Given the sharp decline in BFR for midshaft cortical bone, it appears likely that deficits in BMD, area, or mechanical properties would develop with longer duration unloading.

  15. What is the Optimal Amount of Protein to Support Post-Exercise Skeletal Muscle Reconditioning in the Older Adult?

    PubMed

    Churchward-Venne, Tyler A; Holwerda, Andrew M; Phillips, Stuart M; van Loon, Luc J C

    2016-09-01

    Hyperaminoacidemia following protein ingestion enhances the anabolic effect of resistance-type exercise by increasing the stimulation of muscle protein synthesis and attenuating the exercise-mediated increase in muscle protein breakdown rates. Although factors such as the source of protein ingested and the timing of intake relative to exercise can impact post-exercise muscle protein synthesis rates, the amount of protein ingested after exercise appears to be the key nutritional factor dictating the magnitude of the muscle protein synthetic response during post-exercise recovery. In younger adults, muscle protein synthesis rates after resistance-type exercise respond in a dose-dependent manner to ingested protein and are maximally stimulated following ingestion of ~20 g of protein. In contrast to younger adults, older adults are less sensitive to smaller doses of ingested protein (less than ~20 g) after exercise, as evidenced by an attenuated increase in muscle protein synthesis rates during post-exercise recovery. However, older muscle appears to retain the capacity to display a robust stimulation of muscle protein synthesis in response to the ingestion of greater doses of protein (~40 g), and such an amount may be required for older adults to achieve a robust stimulation of muscle protein synthesis during post-exercise recovery. The aim of this article is to discuss the current state of evidence regarding the dose-dependent relationship between dietary protein ingestion and changes in skeletal muscle protein synthesis during recovery from resistance-type exercise in older adults. We provide recommendations on the amount of protein that may be required to maximize skeletal muscle reconditioning in response to resistance-type exercise in older adults. PMID:26894275

  16. MicroRNAs overexpressed in growth-restricted rat skeletal muscles regulate the glucose transport in cell culture targeting central TGF-β factor SMAD4.

    PubMed

    Raychaudhuri, Santanu

    2012-01-01

    The micro-array profiling of micro-RNA has been performed in rat skeletal muscle tissues, isolated from male adult offspring of intrauterine plus postnatal growth restricted model (IPGR). Apparently, the GLUT4 mRNA expression in male sk. muscle was found to be unaltered in contrast to females. The over-expression of miR-29a and miR-23a in the experimental group of SMSP (Starved Mother Starved Pups) have been found to regulate the glucose transport activity with respect to their control counterparts CMCP (Control Mother Control Pups) as confirmed in rat L6 myoblast-myocyte cell culture system. The ex-vivo experimentation demonstrates an aberration in insulin signaling pathway in male sk. muscle that leads to the localization of the membrane-bound Glut4 protein. We have identified through a series of experiments one important protein factor SMAD4, a co-SMAD critical to the TGF-beta signaling pathway. This factor is targeted by miR-29a, as identified in an in vitro reporter-assay system in cell-culture experiment. The other micro-RNA, miR-23a, targets SMAD4 indirectly that seems to be critical in regulating insulin-dependent glucose transport activity. MicroRNA mimics, inhibitors and siRNA studies indicate the role of SMAD4 as inhibitory for glucose transport activities in normal physiological condition. The data demonstrate for the first time a critical function of microRNAs in fine-tuning the regulation of glucose transport in skeletal muscle. Chronic starved conditions (IPGR) in sk. muscle up-regulates microRNA changing the target protein expression patterns, such as SMAD4, to alter the glucose transport pathways for the survival. The innovative outcome of this paper identifies a critical pathway (TGF-beta) that may act negatively for the mammalian glucose transport machinery.

  17. Transgenerational inheritance of the insulin-resistant phenotype in embryo-transferred intrauterine growth-restricted adult female rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Thamotharan, Manikkavasagar; Garg, Meena; Oak, Shilpa; Rogers, Lisa M; Pan, Gerald; Sangiorgi, Frank; Lee, Paul W N; Devaskar, Sherin U

    2007-05-01

    To determine mechanisms underlying the transgenerational presence of metabolic perturbations in the intrauterine growth-restricted second-generation adult females (F2 IUGR) despite normalizing the in utero metabolic environment, we examined in vivo glucose kinetics and in vitro skeletal muscle postinsulin receptor signaling after embryo transfer of first generation (F1 IUGR) to control maternal environment. Female F2 rats, procreated by F1 pre- and postnatally nutrient- and growth-restricted (IUGR) mothers but embryo transferred to gestate in control mothers, were compared with similarly gestating age- and sex-matched control (CON) F2 progeny. Although there were no differences in birth weight or postnatal growth patterns, the F2 IUGR had increased hepatic weight, fasting hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and unsuppressed hepatic glucose production, with no change in glucose futile cycling or clearance, compared with F2 CON. These hormonal and metabolic aberrations were associated with increased skeletal muscle total GLUT4 and pAkt concentrations but decreased plasma membrane-associated GLUT4, total pPKCzeta, and PKCzeta enzyme activity, with no change in total SHP2 and PTP1B concentrations in IUGR F2 compared with F2 CON. We conclude that transgenerational presence of aberrant glucose/insulin metabolism and skeletal muscle insulin signaling of the adult F2 IUGR female offspring is independent of the immediate intrauterine environment, supporting nutritionally induced heritable mechanisms contributing to the epidemic of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  18. Isolation and characterization of a novel gene sfig in rat skeletal muscle up-regulated by spaceflight (STS-90)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kano, Mihoko; Kitano, Takako; Ikemoto, Madoka; Hirasaka, Katsuya; Asanoma, Yuki; Ogawa, Takayuki; Takeda, Shinichi; Nonaka, Ikuya; Adams, Gregory R.; Baldwin, Kenneth M.; Oarada, Motoko; Kishi, Kyoichi; Nikawa, Takeshi

    2003-01-01

    We obtained the skeletal muscle of rats exposed to weightless conditions during a 16-day-spaceflight (STS-90). By using a differential display technique, we identified 6 up-regulated and 3 down-regulated genes in the gastrocnemius muscle of the spaceflight rats, as compared to the ground control. The up-regulated genes included those coding Casitas B-lineage lymphoma-b, insulin growth factor binding protein-1, titin and mitochondrial gene 16 S rRNA and two novel genes (function unknown). The down-regulated genes included those encoding RNA polymerase II elongation factor-like protein, NADH dehydrogenase and one novel gene (function unknown). In the present study, we isolated and characterized one of two novel muscle genes that were remarkably up-regulated by spaceflight. The deduced amino acid sequence of the spaceflight-induced gene (sfig) comprises 86 amino acid residues and is well conserved from Drosophila to Homo sapiens. A putative leucine-zipper structure located at the N-terminal region of sfig suggests that this gene may encode a transcription factor. The up-regulated expression of this gene, confirmed by Northern blot analysis, was observed not only in the muscles of spaceflight rats but also in the muscles of tail-suspended rats, especially in the early stage of tail-suspension when gastrocnemius muscle atrophy initiated. The gene was predominantly expressed in the kidney, liver, small intestine and heart. When rat myoblastic L6 cells were grown to 100% confluence in the cell culture system, the expression of sfig was detected regardless of the cell differentiation state. These results suggest that spaceflight has many genetic effects on rat skeletal muscle.

  19. Effects of running wheel training on adult obese rats programmed by maternal prolactin inhibition.

    PubMed

    Boaventura, G; Casimiro-Lopes, G; Pazos-Moura, C C; Oliveira, E; Lisboa, P C; Moura, E G

    2013-10-01

    The inhibition of maternal prolactin production in late lactation leads to metabolic syndrome and hypothyroidism in adult offspring. Physical training is a therapeutic strategy that could prevent or reverse this condition. We evaluated the effects of a short-duration low-intensity running wheel training program on the metabolic and hormonal alterations in rats. Lactating Wistar rats were treated with bromocriptine (Bro, 1 mg twice a day) or saline on days 19, 20, and 21 of lactation, and the training of offspring began at 35 days of age. Offspring were divided into sedentary and trained controls (C-Sed and C-Ex) and sedentary and trained Bro-treated rats (Bro-Sed and Bro-Ex). Chronic exercise delayed the onset of weight gain in Bro-Ex offspring, and the food intake did not change during the experimental period. At 180 days, visceral fat mass was higher (+46%) in the Bro-Sed offspring than in C-Sed and Bro-Ex rats. As expected, running capacity was higher in trained animals. Most parameters observed in the Bro-Sed offspring were consistent with hypothyroidism and metabolic syndrome and were reversed in the Bro-Ex group. Chronic exercise did not influence the muscle glycogen in the C-Ex group; however, liver glycogen was higher (+30%) in C-Ex group and was unchanged in both Bro offspring groups. Bro-Ex animals had higher plasma lactate dehydrogenase levels, indicating skeletal muscle damage and intolerance of the training program. Low-intensity chronic training is able to normalize many clinical aspects in Bro animals; however, these animals might have had a lower threshold for exercise adaptation than the control rats. PMID:23863192

  20. Calcitonin gene-related peptide inhibits autophagic-lysosomal proteolysis through cAMP/PKA signaling in rat skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Machado, Juliano; Manfredi, Leandro H; Silveira, Wilian A; Gonçalves, Dawit A P; Lustrino, Danilo; Zanon, Neusa M; Kettelhut, Isis C; Navegantes, Luiz C

    2016-03-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a neuropeptide released by motor neuron in skeletal muscle and modulates the neuromuscular transmission by induction of synthesis and insertion of acetylcholine receptor on postsynaptic muscle membrane; however, its role in skeletal muscle protein metabolism remains unclear. We examined the in vitro and in vivo effects of CGRP on protein breakdown and signaling pathways in control skeletal muscles and muscles following denervation (DEN) in rats. In isolated muscles, CGRP (10(-10) to 10(-6)M) reduced basal and DEN-induced activation of overall proteolysis in a concentration-dependent manner. The in vitro anti-proteolytic effect of CGRP was completely abolished by CGRP8-37, a CGRP receptor antagonist. CGRP down-regulated the lysosomal proteolysis, the mRNA levels of LC3b, Gabarapl1 and cathepsin L and the protein content of LC3-II in control and denervated muscles. In parallel, CGRP elevated cAMP levels, stimulated PKA/CREB signaling and increased Foxo1 phosphorylation in both conditions. In denervated muscles and starved C2C12 cells, Rp-8-Br-cAMPs or PKI, two PKA inhibitors, completely abolished the inhibitory effect of CGRP on Foxo1, 3 and 4 and LC3 lipidation. A single injection of CGRP (100 μg kg(-1)) in denervated rats increased the phosphorylation levels of CREB and Akt, inhibited Foxo transcriptional activity, the LC3 lipidation as well as the mRNA levels of LC3b and cathepsin L, two bona fide targets of Foxo. This study shows for the first time that CGRP exerts a direct inhibitory action on autophagic-lysosomal proteolysis in control and denervated skeletal muscle by recruiting cAMP/PKA signaling, effects that are related to inhibition of Foxo activity and LC3 lipidation. PMID:26718975

  1. Exposure to environmentally persistent free radicals during gestation lowers energy expenditure and impairs skeletal muscle mitochondrial function in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Erin J; Ragauskas, Alyse; Jaligama, Sridhar; Redd, JeAnna R; Parvathareddy, Jyothi; Peloquin, Matthew J; Saravia, Jordy; Han, Joan C; Cormier, Stephania A; Bridges, Dave

    2016-06-01

    We have investigated the effects of in utero exposure to environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFRs) on growth, metabolism, energy utilization, and skeletal muscle mitochondria in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity. Pregnant mice were treated with laboratory-generated, combustion-derived particular matter (MCP230). The adult offspring were placed on a high-fat diet for 12 wk, after which we observed a 9.8% increase in their body weight. The increase in body size observed in the MCP230-exposed mice was not associated with increases in food intake but was associated with a reduction in physical activity and lower energy expenditure. The reduced energy expenditure in mice indirectly exposed to MCP230 was associated with reductions in skeletal muscle mitochondrial DNA copy number, lower mRNA levels of electron transport genes, and reduced citrate synthase activity. Upregulation of key genes involved in ameliorating oxidative stress was also observed in the muscle of MCP230-exposed mice. These findings suggest that gestational exposure to MCP230 leads to a reduction in energy expenditure at least in part through alterations to mitochondrial metabolism in the skeletal muscle.

  2. Facial and occlusal esthetic improvements of an adult skeletal Class III malocclusion using surgical, orthodontic, and implant treatment

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida Cardoso, Mauricio; de Avila, Erica Dorigatti; Guedes, Fabio Pinto; Battilani Filho, Valter Antonio Ban; Capelozza Filho, Leopoldino; Correa, Marcio Aurelio; Nary Filho, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this clinical report is to describe the complex treatment of an adult Class III malocclusion patient who was disappointed with the outcome of a previous oral rehabilitation. Interdisciplinary treatment planning was performed with a primary indication for implant removal because of marginal bone loss and gingival recession, followed by orthodontic and surgical procedures to correct the esthetics and skeletal malocclusion. The comprehensive treatment approach included: (1) implant removal in the area of the central incisors; (2) combined orthodontic decompensation with mesial displacement and forced extrusion of the lateral incisors; (3) extraction of the lateral incisors and placement of new implants corresponding to the central incisors, which received provisional crowns; (4) orthognathic surgery for maxillary advancement to improve occlusal and facial relationships; and finally, (5) orthodontic refinement followed by definitive prosthetic rehabilitation of the maxillary central incisors and reshaping of the adjacent teeth. At the three-year follow-up, clinical and radiographic examinations showed successful replacement of the central incisors and improved skeletal and esthetic appearances. Moreover, a Class II molar relationship was obtained with an ideal overbite, overjet, and intercuspation. In conclusion, we report the successful esthetic anterior rehabilitation of a complex case in which interdisciplinary treatment planning improved facial harmony, provided gingival architecture with sufficient width and thickness, and improved smile esthetics, resulting in enhanced patient comfort and satisfaction. This clinical case report might be useful to improve facial esthetics and occlusion in patients with dentoalveolar and skeletal defects. PMID:26877982

  3. Release of calcitonin gene-related peptide from nerve terminals in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Sakaguchi, M; Inaishi, Y; Kashihara, Y; Kuno, M

    1991-01-01

    1. The amount of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) released from the isolated rat soleus muscle was measured by enzyme immunoassay. 2. When the soleus muscle was exposed to a solution containing high K+ (20-100 mM) in the presence of tetrodotoxin, the amount of CGRP released into the bathing medium increased with an increase in the K+ concentration. 3. The exposure to 100 mM-K+ did not increase CGRP release from chronically denervated soleus muscles or from pieces of the soleus nerve separated from the muscle. 4. The amount of CGRP released from the isolated muscle by 100 mM-K+ depended on the external Ca2+ concentration. The slope of the relation between the amount of CGRP release and the Ca2+ concentration was less than one on double logarithmic co-ordinates. 5. Following chronic section of the lumbar ventral roots, the mean amount of CGRP released from the soleus muscle by 100 mM-K+ was reduced by 28%, compared with that observed in normal muscle. 6. Antidromic stimulation of the lumbar dorsal roots at an intensity three times the threshold for most excitable sensory fibres failed to induce CGRP release from the soleus muscle, whereas stimulation at intensities 50-100 times the threshold increased significantly the amount of CGRP release from the muscle. 7. Stimulation of the muscle nerve at an intensity sufficient to activate the alpha-motor fibres did not release CGRP from the soleus muscle or from the diaphragm. 8. It is concluded that the major source of CGRP released from skeletal muscle is A delta- and/or C sensory terminals and that the Ca2+ dependence of CGRP release is less steep than that reported for acetylcholine release at neuromuscular junctions. PMID:2023119

  4. Exercise-induced differential changes in gene expression among arterioles of skeletal muscles of obese rats

    PubMed Central

    Padilla, Jaume; Jenkins, Nathan T.; Thorne, Pamela K.; Martin, Jeffrey S.; Rector, R. Scott; Akter, Sadia; Davis, J. Wade

    2015-01-01

    Using next-generation, transcriptome-wide RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) technology we assessed the effects of exercise training on transcriptional profiles in skeletal muscle arterioles isolated from the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles of Otsuka Long Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats that underwent an endurance exercise training program (EX; n = 13), interval sprint training program (SPRINT; n = 14), or remained sedentary (Sed; n = 12). We hypothesized that the greatest effects of exercise would be in the gastrocnemius arterioles. Results show that EX caused the largest number of changes in gene expression in the soleus and white gastrocnemius 2a arterioles with little to no changes in the feed arteries. In contrast, SPRINT caused substantial changes in gene expression in the feed arteries. IPA canonical pathway analysis revealed 18 pathways with significant changes in gene expression when analyzed across vessels and revealed that EX induces increased expression of the following genes in all arterioles examined: Shc1, desert hedgehog protein (Dhh), adenylate cyclase 4 (Adcy4), G protein binding protein, alpha (Gnat1), and Bcl2l1 and decreased expression of ubiquitin D (Ubd) and cAMP response element modulator (Crem). EX increased expression of endothelin converting enzyme (Ece1), Hsp90b, Fkbp5, and Cdcl4b in four of five arterioles. SPRINT had effects on expression of Crem, Dhh, Bcl2l1, and Ubd that were similar to EX. SPRINT also increased expression of Nfkbia, Hspa5, Tubb 2a and Tubb 2b, and Fkbp5 in all five arterioles and increased expression of Gnat1 in all but the soleus second-order arterioles. Many contractile and/or structural protein genes were increased by SPRINT in the gastrocnemius feed artery, but the same genes exhibited decreased expression in red gastrocnemius arterioles. We conclude that training-induced changes in arteriolar gene expression patterns differ by muscle fiber type composition and along the arteriolar tree. PMID:26183477

  5. Changes in contractile activation characteristics of rat fast and slow skeletal muscle fibres during regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gregorevic, Paul; Plant, David R; Stupka, Nicole; Lynch, Gordon S

    2004-01-01

    Damaged skeletal muscle fibres are replaced with new contractile units via muscle regeneration. Regenerating muscle fibres synthesize functionally distinct isoforms of contractile and regulatory proteins but little is known of their functional properties during the regeneration process. An advantage of utilizing single muscle fibre preparations is that assessment of their function is based on the overall characteristics of the contractile apparatus and regulatory system and as such, these preparations are sensitive in revealing not only coarse, but also subtle functional differences between muscle fibres. We examined the Ca2+- and Sr2+-activated contractile characteristics of permeabilized fibres from rat fast-twitch (extensor digitorum longus) and slow-twitch (soleus) muscles at 7, 14 and 21 days following myotoxic injury, to test the hypothesis that fibres from regenerating fast and slow muscles have different functional characteristics to fibres from uninjured muscles. Regenerating muscle fibres had ∼10% of the maximal force producing capacity (Po) of control (uninjured) fibres, and an altered sensitivity to Ca2+ and Sr2+ at 7 days post-injury. Increased force production and a shift in Ca2+ sensitivity consistent with fibre maturation were observed during regeneration such that Po was restored to 36–45% of that in control fibres by 21 days, and sensitivity to Ca2+ and Sr2+ was similar to that of control (uninjured) fibres. The findings support the hypothesis that regenerating muscle fibres have different contractile activation characteristics compared with mature fibres, and that they adopt properties of mature fast- or slow-twitch muscle fibres in a progressive manner as the regeneration process is completed. PMID:15181161

  6. Effect of increasing the level of omega-3 fatty acids on rat skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Stubbs, C D; Kisielewski, A E

    1990-09-01

    The effect of dietary supplementation with fish oil as compared to corn oil on the lipid dynamics and calcium ATPase activity of rat skeletal sarcoplasmic reticulum was examined. After four-week supplementation with fish oil, the levels of eicosapentaenoic (20:5 omega 3), docosapentaenoic (22:5 omega 3) and docosahexaenoic (22:6 omega 3) acids in the total lipids were 5.3, 5.5 and 28.1% of the total fatty acids, respectively. In contrast, with corn oil only 22:6 was found (8.9%). The level of these fatty acids in phosphatidylethanolamine from the membranes of animals fed fish oil was 4.2 (20:5), 5.4 (22:5) and 49.1% (22:6); and for phosphatidylcholine it was 5.4 (20:5), 4.6 (22:5) and 17.4% (22:6). Again, in corn oil fed animals, only 22:6 was found in appreciable amounts, namely 28.3% in phosphatidylethanolamine and 1.8% in phosphatidylcholine. The steady state fluorescence anisotropy of 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) was used to assess lipid order and was found to be only slightly less for membranes from animals supplemented with fish oil (0.120) as compared to those supplemented with corn oil (0.124). The calcium ATPase was found to be unaffected by supplementation consistent with the observed modest changes in lipid order as well as with suggestions that the enzyme is relatively insensitive to the level of unsaturation. It could be argued that if large increases in fatty acyl polyunsaturation in mammalian cell membranes would lead to marked alterations in bulk membrane lipid motional properties, this may not be in the interest of preserving physiological function.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Altered mandibular function and prevention of skeletal asymmetries after unilateral condylectomy in rats.

    PubMed

    Spyropoulos, M N; Tsolakis, A I

    1997-04-01

    comparing the right and left mandibular sides in group B, no significant growth differences were found. These findings support the hypothesis that altered mandibular function in a protruded position can compensate for the effects of unilateral condylectomy and prevent the appearance of skeletal mandibular asymmetries in growing rats. PMID:9183071

  8. Calcium currents in a fast-twitch skeletal muscle of the rat

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    obscured by nonlinear charge movement. Nonetheless, at physiological temperatures, the rate of calcium channel activation in rat skeletal muscle is about five times faster than activation of calcium channels in frog muscle. This pathway may be an important source of calcium entry in mammalian muscle. PMID:6315856

  9. Leptin inhibits testosterone secretion from adult rat testis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tena-Sempere, M; Pinilla, L; González, L C; Diéguez, C; Casanueva, F F; Aguilar, E

    1999-05-01

    Leptin, the product of the ob gene, has emerged recently as a pivotal signal in the regulation of fertility. Although the actions of leptin in the control of reproductive function are thought to be exerted mainly at the hypothalamic level, the potential direct effects of leptin at the pituitary and gonadal level have been poorly characterised. In the present study, we first assessed the ability of leptin to regulate testicular testosterone secretion in vitro. Secondly, we aimed to evaluate whether leptin can modulate basal gonadotrophin and prolactin (PRL) release by incubated hemi-pituitaries from fasted male rats. To attain the first goal, testicular slices from prepubertal and adult rats were incubated with increasing concentrations (10(-9)-10(-7) M) of recombinant leptin. Assuming that in vitro testicular responsiveness to leptin may be dependent on the background leptin levels, testicular tissue from both food-deprived and normally-fed animals was used. Furthermore, leptin modulation of stimulated testosterone secretion was evaluated by incubation of testicular samples with different doses of leptin in the presence of 10 IU human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG). In addition, analysis of leptin actions on pituitary function was carried out using hemi-pituitaries from fasted adult male rats incubated in the presence of increasing concentrations (10(-9)-10(-7) M) of recombinant leptin. Serum testosterone levels, and basal and hCG-stimulated testosterone secretion by incubated testicular tissue were significantly decreased by fasting in prepubertal and adult male rats. However, a significant reduction in circulating LH levels was only evident in adult fasted rats. Doses of 10(-9)-10(-7) M leptin had no effect on basal or hCG-stimulated testosterone secretion by testes from prepubertal rats, regardless of the nutritional state of the donor animal. In contrast, leptin significantly decreased basal and hCG-induced testosterone secretion by testes from fasted and fed

  10. Leptin inhibits testosterone secretion from adult rat testis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tena-Sempere, M; Pinilla, L; González, L C; Diéguez, C; Casanueva, F F; Aguilar, E

    1999-05-01

    Leptin, the product of the ob gene, has emerged recently as a pivotal signal in the regulation of fertility. Although the actions of leptin in the control of reproductive function are thought to be exerted mainly at the hypothalamic level, the potential direct effects of leptin at the pituitary and gonadal level have been poorly characterised. In the present study, we first assessed the ability of leptin to regulate testicular testosterone secretion in vitro. Secondly, we aimed to evaluate whether leptin can modulate basal gonadotrophin and prolactin (PRL) release by incubated hemi-pituitaries from fasted male rats. To attain the first goal, testicular slices from prepubertal and adult rats were incubated with increasing concentrations (10(-9)-10(-7) M) of recombinant leptin. Assuming that in vitro testicular responsiveness to leptin may be dependent on the background leptin levels, testicular tissue from both food-deprived and normally-fed animals was used. Furthermore, leptin modulation of stimulated testosterone secretion was evaluated by incubation of testicular samples with different doses of leptin in the presence of 10 IU human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG). In addition, analysis of leptin actions on pituitary function was carried out using hemi-pituitaries from fasted adult male rats incubated in the presence of increasing concentrations (10(-9)-10(-7) M) of recombinant leptin. Serum testosterone levels, and basal and hCG-stimulated testosterone secretion by incubated testicular tissue were significantly decreased by fasting in prepubertal and adult male rats. However, a significant reduction in circulating LH levels was only evident in adult fasted rats. Doses of 10(-9)-10(-7) M leptin had no effect on basal or hCG-stimulated testosterone secretion by testes from prepubertal rats, regardless of the nutritional state of the donor animal. In contrast, leptin significantly decreased basal and hCG-induced testosterone secretion by testes from fasted and fed

  11. Low-magnitude whole-body vibration does not enhance the anabolic skeletal effects of intermittent PTH in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Michelle A; Brodt, Michael D; Stephens, Abby L; Civitelli, Roberto; Silva, Matthew J

    2011-04-01

    Whole-body vibration (WBV) is a low-magnitude mechanical stimulus that may be anabolic for bone, yet we recently found that WBV did not improve bone properties in adult mice. Because intermittent parathyroid hormone (PTH) enhances the anabolic effects of high-magnitude skeletal loading, we sought to determine the skeletal effects of WBV in combination with PTH. Seven-month-old male BALB/c mice were assigned to six groups (n = 13-14/group) based on magnitude of applied acceleration (0 or 0.3 G) and PTH dose (0, 10, or 40 µg/kg/day). Mice were exposed to WBV (0.3 G, 90 Hz, sine wave) or sham loading (0 G) for 15 min/day, 5 days/week for 8 weeks. Vehicle or hPTH (1-34) was administered prior to each WBV session. Whole-body bone mineral content increased by ~ 5% from 0 to 8 weeks in the 40 µg/kg PTH group only, independent of WBV loading. Similarly, PTH treatment increased tibial cortical bone volume by ~5% from 0 to 8 weeks, independent of WBV loading. Neither PTH nor WBV stimulated trabecular bone formation. Consistent with the cortical bone effect, tibias from the 40 µg/kg PTH group had significantly greater ultimate force and energy to failure than tibias in the 0 and 10 µg/kg PTH groups, independent of WBV treatment. In summary, 8 weeks of intermittent PTH treatment increased cortical bone volume and strength in adult male BALB/c mice. Daily exposure to low-magnitude WBV by itself did not improve skeletal properties and did not enhance the PTH effect. No WBV-PTH synergy was found in this preclinical study.

  12. A test of a recently devised method of estimating skeletal age at death using features of the adult acetabulum.

    PubMed

    Mays, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Estimation of age at death from adult skeletal remains is highly problematic, due in great part to interpopulation variability in skeletal age changes. Thorough testing of aging methods is therefore of key importance. A method recently devised by Calce (Am J Phys Anthropol 148 (2012): 11-23) for placing adult skeletons into three broad age at death classes (17-39, 40-64, 65+ years) on the basis of acetabular morphology is tested on a collection of 18-19th century AD skeletons (N = 185) of documented age at death from London. Results showed that 45% were correctly assigned to age class using this method. This compares with 81% reported by Calce on 20th century North American material. This indicates significant interpopulation differences in the relationship between the Calce acetabular variables and age, even between populations of European ancestry. Until the sources of this variation are better understood, caution should be used before applying this method to estimate age in unknown skeletons.

  13. Role of Growth Factors in Modulation of the Microvasculature in Adult Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Smythe, Gayle

    2016-01-01

    Post-natal skeletal muscle is a highly plastic tissue that has the capacity to regenerate rapidly following injury, and to undergo significant modification in tissue mass (i.e. atrophy/hypertrophy) in response to global metabolic changes. These processes are reliant largely on soluble factors that directly modulate muscle regeneration and mass. However, skeletal muscle function also depends on an adequate blood supply. Thus muscle regeneration and changes in muscle mass, particularly hypertrophy, also demand rapid changes in the microvasculature. Recent evidence clearly demonstrates a critical role for soluble growth factors in the tight regulation of angiogenic expansion of the muscle microvasculature. Furthermore, exogenous modulation of these factors has the capacity to impact directly on angiogenesis and thus, indirectly, on muscle regeneration, growth and performance. This chapter reviews recent developments in understanding the role of growth factors in modulating the skeletal muscle microvasculature, and the potential therapeutic applications of exogenous angiogenic and anti-angiogenic mediators in promoting effective growth and regeneration, and ameliorating certain diseases, of skeletal muscle. PMID:27003400

  14. Islet transplantation under the kidney capsule fully corrects the impaired skeletal muscle glucose transport system of streptozocin diabetic rats.

    PubMed Central

    Napoli, R; Davalli, A M; Hirshman, M F; Weitgasser, R; Weir, G C; Horton, E S

    1996-01-01

    Chronic insulin therapy improves but does not restore impaired insulin-mediated muscle glucose uptake in human diabetes or muscle glucose uptake, transport, and transporter translocation in streptozocin diabetic rats. To determine whether this inability is due to inadequate insulin replacement, we studied fasted streptozocin-induced diabetic Lewis rats either untreated or after islet transplantation under the kidney capsule. Plasma glucose was increased in untreated diabetics and normalized by the islet transplantation (110 +/- 5, 452 +/- 9, and 102 +/- 3 mg/dl in controls, untreated diabetics, and transplanted diabetics, respectively). Plasma membrane and intracellular microsomal membrane vesicles were prepared from hindlimb skeletal muscle of basal and maximally insulin-stimulated rats. Islet transplantation normalized plasma membrane carrier-mediated glucose transport Vmax, plasma membrane glucose transporter content, and insulin-induced transporter translocation. There were no differences in transporter intrinsic activity (Vmax/Ro) among the three groups. Microsomal membrane GLUT4 content was reduced by 30% in untreated diabetic rats and normal in transplanted diabetics, whereas the insulin-induced changes in microsomal membrane GLUT4 content were quantitatively similar in the three groups. There were no differences in plasma membrane GLUT1 among the groups and between basal and insulin stimulated states. Microsomal membrane GLUT1 content was increased 60% in untreated diabetics and normalized by the transplantation. In conclusion, an adequate insulin delivery in the peripheral circulation, obtained by islet transplantation, fully restores the muscle glucose transport system to normal in streptozocin diabetic rats. PMID:8617870

  15. Erythropoietin Does Not Enhance Skeletal Muscle Protein Synthesis Following Exercise in Young and Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Lamon, Séverine; Zacharewicz, Evelyn; Arentson-Lantz, Emily; Gatta, Paul A. Della; Ghobrial, Lobna; Gerlinger-Romero, Frederico; Garnham, Andrew; Paddon-Jones, Douglas; Russell, Aaron P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Erythropoietin (EPO) is a renal cytokine that is primarily involved in hematopoiesis while also playing a role in non-hematopoietic tissues expressing the EPO-receptor (EPOR). The EPOR is present in human skeletal muscle. In mouse skeletal muscle, EPO stimulation can activate the AKT serine/threonine kinase 1 (AKT) signaling pathway, the main positive regulator of muscle protein synthesis. We hypothesized that a single intravenous EPO injection combined with acute resistance exercise would have a synergistic effect on skeletal muscle protein synthesis via activation of the AKT pathway. Methods: Ten young (24.2 ± 0.9 years) and 10 older (66.6 ± 1.1 years) healthy subjects received a primed, constant infusion of [ring-13C6] L-phenylalanine and a single injection of 10,000 IU epoetin-beta or placebo in a double-blind randomized, cross-over design. 2 h after the injection, the subjects completed an acute bout of leg extension resistance exercise to stimulate skeletal muscle protein synthesis. Results: Significant interaction effects in the phosphorylation levels of the members of the AKT signaling pathway indicated a differential activation of protein synthesis signaling in older subjects when compared to young subjects. However, EPO offered no synergistic effect on vastus lateralis mixed muscle protein synthesis rate in young or older subjects. Conclusions: Despite its ability to activate the AKT pathway in skeletal muscle, an acute EPO injection had no additive or synergistic effect on the exercise-induced activation of muscle protein synthesis or muscle protein synthesis signaling pathways. PMID:27458387

  16. Rab-small GTPases are involved in fluvastatin and pravastatin-induced vacuolation in rat skeletal myofibers.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Kazuho; Honda, Takashi; Yokoya, Sachihiko; Waguri, Satoshi; Kimura, Junko

    2007-12-01

    Three-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors, known as statins, induce skeletal muscle injury including myalgia, myositis, and rhabdomyolysis. The mechanism of this myotoxicity remains unknown. This study examined the effect of statins on single skeletal myofibers enzymatically isolated from the rat flexor digitorum brevis muscles. Fluvastatin and pravastatin induced the formation of numerous vacuoles in the myofibers after 72 h of treatment. This effect progressed in a time- and concentration-dependent manner and, consequently, cell death occurred after 120 h. Electron micrographs revealed craters along the sarcolemma and swelling of the sarcoplasmic reticula and mitochondria, in addition to intracellular vacuoles. When caffeine was added after 72 h of fluvastatin treatment, contractile shortening of statin-treated myofibers was significantly attenuated and blebs formed on the surface of the myofibers. The coapplication of geranylgeranylpyrophosphate (GGPP) with fluvastatin prevented the morphological changes, while that of farnesylpyrophosphate (FPP) was ineffective. Furthermore, perillyl alcohol, an inhibitor of Rab geranylgeranyl transferase and geranylgeranyl transferase-I (GGTase-I), mimicked the effect of statins, while a specific GGTase-I inhibitor (GGTI-298) or a farnesyl transferase inhibitor (FTI-277) failed to do so. These results suggest that the inactivation of Rab GTPase, which involved in intracellular membrane transport, is a crucial factor in statin-induced-morphological abnormality in skeletal muscle fibers. PMID:17634390

  17. Imaging mass spectrometry reveals fiber-specific distribution of acetylcarnitine and contraction-induced carnitine dynamics in rat skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Furuichi, Yasuro; Goto-Inoue, Naoko; Manabe, Yasuko; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Masuda, Kazumi; Fujii, Nobuharu L

    2014-10-01

    Carnitine is well recognized as a key regulator of long-chain fatty acyl group translocation into the mitochondria. In addition, carnitine, as acetylcarnitine, acts as an acceptor of excess acetyl-CoA, a potent inhibitor of pyruvate dehydrogenase. Here, we provide a new methodology for accurate quantification of acetylcarnitine content and determination of its localization in skeletal muscles. We used matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-IMS) to visualize acetylcarnitine distribution in rat skeletal muscles. MALDI-IMS and immunohistochemistry of serial cross-sections showed that acetylcarnitine was enriched in the slow-type muscle fibers. The concentration of ATP was lower in muscle regions with abundant acetylcarnitine, suggesting a relationship between acetylcarnitine and metabolic activity. Using our novel method, we detected an increase in acetylcarnitine content after muscle contraction. Importantly, this increase was not detected using traditional biochemical assays of homogenized muscles. We also demonstrated that acetylation of carnitine during muscle contraction was concomitant with glycogen depletion. Our methodology would be useful for the quantification of acetylcarnitine and its contraction-induced kinetics in skeletal muscles.

  18. Increased Skeletal Muscle Capillarization After Aerobic Exercise Training and Weight Loss Improves Insulin Sensitivity in Adults With IGT

    PubMed Central

    Prior, Steven J.; Blumenthal, Jacob B.; Katzel, Leslie I.; Goldberg, Andrew P.; Ryan, Alice S.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Transcapillary transport of insulin is one determinant of glucose uptake by skeletal muscle; thus, a reduction in capillary density (CD) may worsen insulin sensitivity. Skeletal muscle CD is lower in older adults with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) compared with those with normal glucose tolerance and may be modifiable through aerobic exercise training and weight loss (AEX+WL). We tested the hypothesis that 6-month AEX+WL would increase CD to improve insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in older adults with IGT. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Sixteen sedentary, overweight-obese (BMI 27–35 kg/m2), older (63 ± 2 years) men and women with IGT underwent hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps to measure insulin sensitivity, oral glucose tolerance tests, exercise and body composition testing, and vastus lateralis muscle biopsies to determine CD before and after 6-month AEX+WL. RESULTS Insulin sensitivity (M) and 120-min postprandial glucose (G120) correlated with CD at baseline (r = 0.58 and r = −0.60, respectively, P < 0.05). AEX+WL increased maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) 18% (P = 0.02) and reduced weight and fat mass 8% (P < 0.02). CD increased 15% (264 ± 11 vs. 304 ± 14 capillaries/mm2, P = 0.01), M increased 21% (42.4 ± 4.0 vs. 51.4 ± 4.3 µmol/kg FFM/min, P < 0.05), and G120 decreased 16% (9.35 ± 0.5 vs. 7.85 ± 0.5 mmol/L, P = 0.008) after AEX+WL. Regression analyses showed that the AEX+WL-induced increase in CD independently predicted the increase in M (r = 0.74, P < 0.01) as well as the decrease in G120 (r = −0.55, P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS Six-month AEX+WL increases skeletal muscle CD in older adults with IGT. This represents one mechanism by which AEX+WL improves insulin sensitivity in older adults with IGT. PMID:24595633

  19. Chronic caffeine intake reverses age-induced insulin resistance in the rat: effect on skeletal muscle Glut4 transporters and AMPK activity.

    PubMed

    Guarino, Maria P; Ribeiro, Maria J; Sacramento, Joana F; Conde, Sílvia V

    2013-10-01

    The role of caffeine consumption on insulin action is still under debate. The hypothesis that chronic caffeine intake reverses aging-induced insulin resistance in the rat was tested in this work. The mechanism by which caffeine restores insulin sensitivity was also investigated. Six groups of rats were used: 3 months old (3 M), 3 months old caffeine-treated (3MCaf), 12 months old (12 M), 12 months old caffeine-treated (12MCaf), 24 months old (24 M), and 24 months old caffeine-treated (24MCaf). Caffeine was administered in drinking water (1 g/l) during 15 days. Insulin sensitivity was assessed by means of the insulin tolerance test. Blood pressure, body weight, visceral and total fat, fasting glycemia and insulinemia, plasma nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), cortisol, nitric oxide, and catecholamines were monitored. Skeletal muscle Glut4 and 5'-AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) protein expression and activity were also assessed. Aged rats exhibited diminished insulin sensitivity accompanied by hyperinsulinemia and normoglycemia, increased visceral and total fat, decreased TAC and plasma catecholamines, and also decreased skeletal muscle Glut4 and AMPK protein expression. Chronic caffeine intake restored insulin sensitivity and regularized circulating insulin and NEFA in both aging models. Caffeine neither modified skeletal muscle AMPK expression nor activity in aged rats; however, it decreased visceral and total fat in 12 M rats and it restored skeletal muscle Glut4 expression to control values in 24 M rats. We concluded that chronic caffeine intake reverses aging-induced insulin resistance in rats by decreasing NEFA production and also by increasing Glut4 expression in skeletal muscle.

  20. Reproductive toxicity of DDT in adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Ben Rhouma, K; Tébourbi, O; Krichah, R; Sakly, M

    2001-08-01

    The reproductive toxicity of DDT was investigated in adult male rats exposed to 50 and 100 mg/kg body weight (b.wt) day(-1) for 10 successive days. Compared with control animals, administration of DDT led to a dose-dependent reduction of testicular weight and the number as well as the percentage of motile spermatozoa in the epididymis. Testicular histological observations revealed also a marked loss of gametes in the lumen of seminiferous tubules. In DDT-treated rats, the seminal vesicles weights dropped significantly, resulting from a decrease of testosterone production by testes, whereas serum LH and FSH increased after pesticide exposure. This increase of gonadotrophin levels may be related to an impairment of the negative feedback exerted by the steroid on the hypothalamic--pituitary axis. It is concluded that DDT induced adverse effects on male rat fertility by acting directly on the testes and altering the neuroendocrine function.

  1. Toxicity of zinc oxide nanoparticles on adult male Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Abbasalipourkabir, Roghayeh; Moradi, Hemen; Zarei, Sadegh; Asadi, Soheila; Salehzadeh, Aref; Ghafourikhosroshahi, Abolfazl; Mortazavi, Motahareh; Ziamajidi, Nasrin

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles (nZnO) on adult male Wistar rats. Thirty male Wistar rats divided into five groups of six animals each were used for this study. For ten days, Groups one to four continuously received 50, 100, 150 and 200 mg/kg nZnO, respectively. Group five served as the control group. At the end of the study, the rats were sacrificed and histopathological study of the liver and renal tissue, sperm analysis, serum oxidative stress parameters and some liver enzymes were done. The results of this study showed that nZnO at concentration more than 50 mg/kg lead to significant changes in liver enzymes, oxidative stress, liver and renal tissue and sperm quality and quantity. In conclusion, the toxicity of nZnO is more significant when the concentration is increased; however, the use of low doses requires further investigation.

  2. A leucine-supplemented diet restores the defective postprandial inhibition of proteasome-dependent proteolysis in aged rat skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Combaret, Lydie; Dardevet, Dominique; Rieu, Isabelle; Pouch, Marie-Noëlle; Béchet, Daniel; Taillandier, Daniel; Grizard, Jean; Attaix, Didier

    2005-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that skeletal muscle ubiquitin–proteasome-dependent proteolysis is dysregulated in ageing in response to feeding. In Experiment 1 we measured rates of proteasome-dependent proteolysis in incubated muscles from 8- and 22-month-old rats, proteasome activities, and rates of ubiquitination, in the postprandial and postabsorptive states. Peptidase activities of the proteasome decreased in the postabsorptive state in 22-month-old rats compared with 8-month-old animals, while the rate of ubiquitination was not altered. Furthermore, the down-regulation of in vitro proteasome-dependent proteolysis that prevailed in the postprandial state in 8-month-old rats was defective in 22-month-old rats. Next, we tested the hypothesis that the ingestion of a 5% leucine-supplemented diet may correct this defect. Leucine supplementation restored the postprandial inhibition of in vitro proteasome-dependent proteolysis in 22-month-old animals, by down-regulating both rates of ubiquitination and proteasome activities. In Experiment 2, we verified that dietary leucine supplementation had long-lasting effects by comparing 8- and 22-month-old rats that were fed either a leucine-supplemented diet or an alanine-supplemented diet for 10 days. The inhibited in vitro proteolysis was maintained in the postprandial state in the 22-month-old rats fed the leucine-supplemented diet. Moreover, elevated mRNA levels for ubiquitin, 14-kDa ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2, and C2 and X subunits of the 20S proteasome that were characteristic of aged muscle were totally suppressed in 22-month-old animals chronically fed the leucine-supplemented diet, demonstrating an in vivo effect. Thus the defective postprandial down-regulation of in vitro proteasome-dependent proteolysis in 22-month-old rats was restored in animals chronically fed a leucine-supplemented diet. PMID:16195315

  3. Proliferative and Non-Proliferative Lesions of the Rat and Mouse Soft Tissue, Skeletal Muscle and Mesothelium

    PubMed Central

    Greaves, Peter; Chouinard, Luc; Ernst, Heinrich; Mecklenburg, Lars; Pruimboom-brees, Ingrid M.; Rinke, Matthias; Rittinghausen, Susanne; Thibault, Stéphane; Von erichsen, Jasmin; Yoshida, Toshinori

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The INHAND Project (International Harmonization of Nomenclature and Diagnostic Criteria for Lesions in Rats and Mice) is a joint initiative of the Societies of Toxicologic Pathology from Europe (ESTP), Great Britain (BSTP), Japan (JSTP), and North America (STP) to develop an internationally accepted nomenclature for proliferative and nonproliferative lesions in laboratory animals. The purpose of this publication is to provide a standardized nomenclature for classifying lesions observed in the soft tissues including skeletal muscle as well as the mesothelium of rats and mice. The standardized nomenclature of lesions presented in this document is also available electronically on the Internet (http://www.goreni.org/). Sources of material included histopathology databases from government, academia, and industrial laboratories throughout the world. Content includes spontaneous developmental and aging lesions as well as those induced by exposure to test materials. A widely accepted and utilized international harmonization of nomenclature for lesions in soft tissues, skeletal muscle and mesothelium in laboratory animals will decrease confusion among regulatory and scientific research organizations in different countries and provide a common language to increase and enrich international exchanges of information among toxicologists and pathologists. (DOI: 10.1293/tox.26.1S; J Toxicol Pathol 2013; 26: 1S–26S) PMID:25035576

  4. Effect of low-level laser therapy (808 nm) on skeletal muscle after endurance exercise training in rats

    PubMed Central

    Assis, Livia; Yamashita, Fernanda; Magri, Angela M. P.; Fernandes, Kelly R.; Yamauchi, Liria; Renno, Ana C. M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been demonstrated to be effective in optimizing skeletal muscle performance in animal experiments and in clinical trials. However, little is known about the effects of LLLT on muscle recovery after endurance training. OBJECTIVE: This study evaluates the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) applied after an endurance training protocol on biochemical markers and morphology of skeletal muscle in rats. METHOD: Wistar rats were divided into control group (CG), trained group (TG), and trained and laser irradiated group (TLG). The endurance training was performed on a treadmill, 1 h/day, 5 days/wk, for 8 wk at 60% of the maximal speed reached during the maximal effort test (Tmax) and laser irradiation was applied after training. RESULTS: Both trained groups showed significant increase in speed compared to the CG. The TLG demonstrated a significantly reduced lactate level, increased tibialis anterior (TA) fiber cross-section area, and decreased TA fiber density. Myogenin expression was higher in soleus and TA muscles in both trained groups. In addition, LLLT produced myogenin downregulation in the TA muscle of trained animals. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that LLLT could be an effective therapeutic approach for stimulating recovery during an endurance exercise protocol. PMID:26647747

  5. Effect of pulsed and continuous therapeutic ultrasound on healthy skeletal muscle in rats.

    PubMed

    Vásquez, Bélgica; Navarrete, Javiera; Farfán, Emilio; Cantín, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound therapy is used to treat injuries in joints, nerves and tendons. Part of the radiation generated is absorbed by nearby undamaged tissues, such as muscles. The aim was to evaluate histomorphological changes in the healthy gastrocnemius muscle in rats irradiated with continuous ultrasound (CUS) and pulsed ultrasound (PUS). Healthy adult rats were used, separated into two groups: CUS and PUS. Both were irradiated in the gastrocnemius muscle for 10 days: the CUS group in continuous mode (3 MHz, 1.0 W/cm(2), 1 min/session) and the PUS group in pulsed mode (3 MHz, 1.0 W/cm(2), 100 Hz, 50% duty cycle, 1 min/session). The contralateral muscles were used as a control. Their histological characteristics were analyzed, and the area and perimeter of the muscle fibers were measured. The connective tissue showed no histological changes. The area of muscle fibers of the irradiated groups was significantly greater (CUS 1325.2 ± 182.1 μm(2), p=0.0278 and PUS 1019.4 ± 125.3 μm(2), p=0.0398) than the control, and the CUS area was greater than the PUS (p=0.0383). The perimeter of muscle fibers showed significant differences between the irradiated groups (CUS 148 ± 11.12 μm, p=0.0178 and PUS 129.3 ± 8.83 μm, p=0.0236) compared to the control, as well as differences between CUS and PUS (p=0.0319). The application of ultrasound on healthy muscle produces hypertrophy of the muscle fibers, greater when continuous mode is used. It is advisable to apply pulsed, focused ultrasound therapies with sound heads sufficient for the tissue or zone to be treated, thereby reducing the risk of altering the adjacent healthy tissue.

  6. Effect of pulsed and continuous therapeutic ultrasound on healthy skeletal muscle in rats

    PubMed Central

    Vásquez, Bélgica; Navarrete, Javiera; Farfán, Emilio; Cantín, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound therapy is used to treat injuries in joints, nerves and tendons. Part of the radiation generated is absorbed by nearby undamaged tissues, such as muscles. The aim was to evaluate histomorphological changes in the healthy gastrocnemius muscle in rats irradiated with continuous ultrasound (CUS) and pulsed ultrasound (PUS). Healthy adult rats were used, separated into two groups: CUS and PUS. Both were irradiated in the gastrocnemius muscle for 10 days: the CUS group in continuous mode (3 MHz, 1.0 W/cm2, 1 min/session) and the PUS group in pulsed mode (3 MHz, 1.0 W/cm2, 100 Hz, 50% duty cycle, 1 min/session). The contralateral muscles were used as a control. Their histological characteristics were analyzed, and the area and perimeter of the muscle fibers were measured. The connective tissue showed no histological changes. The area of muscle fibers of the irradiated groups was significantly greater (CUS 1325.2±182.1 μm2, p=0.0278 and PUS 1019.4±125.3 μm2, p=0.0398) than the control, and the CUS area was greater than the PUS (p=0.0383). The perimeter of muscle fibers showed significant differences between the irradiated groups (CUS 148±11.12 μm, p=0.0178 and PUS 129.3±8.83 μm, p=0.0236) compared to the control, as well as differences between CUS and PUS (p=0.0319). The application of ultrasound on healthy muscle produces hypertrophy of the muscle fibers, greater when continuous mode is used. It is advisable to apply pulsed, focused ultrasound therapies with sound heads sufficient for the tissue or zone to be treated, thereby reducing the risk of altering the adjacent healthy tissue. PMID:24551303

  7. Expression of heat shock protein 72 in atrophied rat skeletal muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oishi, Y.; Ishihara, A.; Talmadge, R. J.; Ohira, Y.; Taniguchi, K.; Matsumoto, H.; Roy, R. R.; Edgerton, V. R.

    2001-01-01

    Changes in the expression of heat shock protein 72 (HSP72) in response to atrophic-inducing perturbations of muscle involving chronic mechanical unloading and denervation were determined. Adult male Wistar rats were assigned randomly to a sedentary cage control (CON), hind limb unloading (HU, via tail suspension), HU plus tenotomy (HU + TEN), HU plus denervation (HU + DEN), or HU + TEN + DEN group. Tenotomy and DEN involved cutting the Achilles tendon and removing a segment of the sciatic nerve, respectively. After 5 days, HSP72 levels in the soleus of the HU + DEN and HU + TEN + DEN groups were 42 (P < 0.05) and 53% (P < 0.01) less than CON, respectively. Soleus weight decreased in both groups. Heat shock protein 72 levels in the plantaris of the HU + TEN, HU + DEN, and HU + TEN + DEN groups were 31, 25, and 30% lower than CON, respectively (P < 0.05). Plantaris weight decreased in the HU + DEN and HU + TEN + DEN, but not in the HU + TEN group. Hind limb unloading alone had little effect on the HSP72 level in either muscle. Reduced levels of HSP72 were associated with a decreased soleus (r=0.62, P < 0.01) and plantaris (r=0.78, P < 0.001) weight. These results indicate that the levels of HSP72 in both a slow and a fast rat plantarflexor are responsive to a chronic decrease in the levels of loading and/or activation and suggest that the neuromuscular activity level and the presence of innervation of a muscle are important factors that induce HSP72 expression.

  8. Rosiglitazone ameliorates abnormal expression and activity of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B in the skeletal muscle of fat-fed, streptozotocin-treated diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yong; Ouyang, Jing Ping; Wu, Ke; Wang, Shi Shun; Wen, Chong Yuan; Xia, Zheng Yuan

    2005-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) acts as a physiological negative regulator of insulin signaling by dephosphorylating the activated insulin receptor (IR). Here we examine the role of PTP1B in the insulin-sensitizing action of rosiglitazone (RSG) in skeletal muscle and liver. Fat-fed, streptozotocin-treated rats (10-week-old), an animal model of type II diabetes, and age-matched, nondiabetic controls were treated with RSG (10 μmol kg−1 day−1) for 2 weeks. After RSG treatment, the diabetic rats showed a significant decrease in blood glucose and improved insulin sensitivity. Diabetic rats showed significantly increased levels and activities of PTP1B in the skeletal muscle (1.6- and 2-fold, respectively) and liver (1.7- and 1.8-fold, respectively), thus diminishing insulin signaling in the target tissues. We found that the decreases in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake (55%), tyrosine phosphorylation of IRβ-subunits (48%), and IR substrate-1 (IRS-1) (39%) in muscles of diabetic rats were normalized after RSG treatment. These effects were associated with 34 and 30% decreases in increased PTP1B levels and activities, respectively, in skeletal muscles of diabetic rats. In contrast, RSG did not affect the increased PTP1B levels and activities or the already reduced insulin-stimulated glycogen synthesis and tyrosine phosphorylation of IRβ-subunits and IRS-2 in livers of diabetic rats. RSG treatment in normal rats did not significantly change PTP1B activities and levels or protein levels of IRβ, IRS-1, and -2 in diabetic rats. These data suggest that RSG enhances insulin activity in skeletal muscle of diabetic rats possibly by ameliorating abnormal levels and activities of PTP1B. PMID:15997237

  9. Patterns of global gene expression in rat skeletal muscle during unloading and low-intensity ambulatory activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bey, Lionel; Akunuri, Nagabhavani; Zhao, Po; Hoffman, Eric P.; Hamilton, Deborah G.; Hamilton, Marc T.

    2003-01-01

    Physical inactivity and unloading lead to diverse skeletal muscle alterations. Our goal was to identify the genes in skeletal muscle whose expression is most sensitive to periods of unloading/reduced physical activity and that may be involved in triggering initial responses before phenotypic changes are evident. The ability of short periods of physical activity/loading as an effective countermeasure against changes in gene expression mediated by inactivity was also tested. Affymetrix microarrays were used to compare mRNA levels in the soleus muscle under three experimental treatments (n = 20-29 rats each): 12-h hindlimb unloading (HU), 12-h HU followed by 4 h of intermittent low-intensity ambulatory and postural activity (4-h reloading), and control (with ambulatory and postural activity). Using a combination of criteria, we identified a small set of genes (approximately 1% of 8,738 genes on the array or 4% of significant expressed genes) with the most reproducible and largest responses to altered activity. Analysis revealed a coordinated regulation of transcription for a large number of key signaling proteins and transcription factors involved in protein synthesis/degradation and energy metabolism. Most (21 of 25) of the gene expression changes that were downregulated during HU returned at least to control levels during the reloading. In surprising contrast, 27 of 38 of the genes upregulated during HU remained significantly above control, but most showed trends toward reversal. This introduces a new concept that, in general, genes that are upregulated during unloading/inactivity will be more resistant to periodic reloading than those genes that are downregulated. This study reveals genes that are the most sensitive to loading/activity in rat skeletal muscle and indicates new targets that may initiate muscle alterations during inactivity.

  10. High-fat feeding does not induce an autophagic or apoptotic phenotype in female rat skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Troy L; Mitchell, Andrew S; McMillan, Elliott M; Bloemberg, Darin; Pavlov, Dmytro; Messa, Isabelle; Mielke, John G

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis and autophagy are critical in normal skeletal muscle homeostasis; however, dysregulation can lead to muscle atrophy and dysfunction. Lipotoxicity and/or lipid accumulation may promote apoptosis, as well as directly or indirectly influence autophagic signaling. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a 16-week high-fat diet on morphological, apoptotic, and autophagic indices in oxidative and glycolytic skeletal muscle of female rats. High-fat feeding resulted in increased fat pad mass, altered glucose tolerance, and lower muscle pAKT levels, as well as lipid accumulation and reactive oxygen species generation in soleus muscle; however, muscle weights, fiber type-specific cross-sectional area, and fiber type distribution were not affected. Moreover, DNA fragmentation and LC3 lipidation as well as several apoptotic (ARC, Bax, Bid, tBid, Hsp70, pBcl-2) and autophagic (ATG7, ATG4B, Beclin 1, BNIP3, p70 s6k, cathepsin activity) indices were not altered in soleus or plantaris following high-fat diet. Interestingly, soleus muscle displayed small increases in caspase-3, caspase-8, and caspase-9 activity, as well as higher ATG12-5 and p62 protein, while both soleus and plantaris muscle showed dramatically reduced Bcl-2 and X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) levels. In conclusion, this work demonstrates that 16 weeks of high-fat feeding does not affect tissue morphology or induce a global autophagic or apoptotic phenotype in skeletal muscle of female rats. However, high-fat feeding selectively influenced a number of apoptotic and autophagic indices which could have implications during periods of enhanced muscle stress. PMID:25361772

  11. Thyroid thermogenesis. Relationships between Na+-dependent respiration and Na+ + K+-adenosine triphosphatase activity in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Asano, Y; Liberman, U A; Edelman, I S

    1976-01-01

    The effect of thyroid status on QO2, QO2 (t) and NaK-ATPase activity was examined in rat skeletal muscle. QO2(t) (i.e. Na+-transport-dependent respiration) was estimated with ouabain or Na+-free media supplemented with K+. In contrast to the effects of ouabain on ion composition, intracellular K+ was maintained at about 125 meq/liter, and intracellular Na+ was almost nil in the Na+-free media. The estimates of QO2(t) were independent of the considerable differences in tissue ion concentrations. The increase in QO2(t) account for 47% of the increase in QO2 in the transition from the hypothyroid to the euthyroid state and 84% of the increase in the transition from the euthyroid to the hyperthyroid state. Surgical thyroidectomy lowered NaK-ATPase activity of the microsomal fraction (expressed per milligram protein) 32%; injections of triodothyronine (T3) increased this activity 75% in initially hypothyroid rats and 26% in initially euthyroid rats. Thyroidectomy was attended by significant falls in serum Ca and Pi concentrations. Administration of T3 resulted in further declines in serum Ca and marked increases in serum Ps concentrations. Similar effects were seen in 131I-treated rats, but the magnitude of the declines in serum Ca were less. The effects of T3 on QO2, QO2(t), and NaK-ATPase activity of skeletal muscle were indistinguishable in the 131I-ablated and surgically thyroidectomized rats. In thyroidectomized or euthyroid rats given repeated doses of T3, QO2(t) and NaA-ATPase activity increased proportionately. In thyroidectomized rats injected with single doses of T3, either 10, 50, or 250 mug/100 g body wt, QO2(t) increased linearly with NaK-ATPase activity. The kinetics of the NaK-ATPase activity was assessed with an ATP-generating system. T3 elicited a significant increase in Vmax with no change in Km for ATP. PMID:130385

  12. Ketone-body utilization by homogenates of adult rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes-Cardozo, M.; Klein, W.

    1982-06-01

    The regulation of ketone-body metabolism and the quantitative importance of ketone bodies as lipid precursors in adult rat brain has been studied in vitro. Utilization of ketone bodies and of pyruvate by homogenates of adult rat brain was measured and the distribution of /sup 14/C from (3-/sup 14/C)ketone bodies among the metabolic products was analysed. The rate of ketone-body utilization was maximal in the presence of added Krebs-cycle intermediates and uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation. The consumption of acetoacetate was faster than that of D-3-hydroxybutyrate, whereas, pyruvate produced twice as much acetyl-CoA as acetoacetate under optimal conditions. Millimolar concentrations of ATP in the presence of uncoupler lowered the consumption of ketone bodies but not of pyruvate. Indirect evidence is presented suggesting that ATP interferes specifically with the mitochondrial uptake of ketone bodies. Interconversion of ketone bodies and the accumulation of acid-soluble intermediates (mainly citrate and glutamate) accounted for the major part of ketone-body utilization, whereas only a small part was oxidized to CO/sub 2/. Ketone bodies were not incorporated into lipids or protein. We conclude that adult rat-brain homogenates use ketone bodies exclusively for oxidative purposes.

  13. Single molecular image of cytosolic free Ca2+ of skeletal muscle cells in rats pre- and post-exercise-induced fatigue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi; Zhang, Heming; Zhao, Yanping; Liu, Zhiming

    2009-08-01

    A growing body of literature indicated the cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration of skeletal muscle cells changes significantly during exercise-induced fatigue. But it is confusing whether cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration increase or decrease. Furthermore, current researches mainly adopt muscle tissue homogenate as experiment material, but the studies based on cellular and subcellular level is seldom. This study is aimed to establish rat skeletal muscle cell model of exercise-induced fatigue, and confirm the change of cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration of skeletal muscle cells in rats preand post- exercise-induced fatigue. In this research, six male Wistar rats were randomly divided into two groups: control group (n=3) and exercise-induced fatigue group (n=3). The former group were allowed to freely move and the latter were forced to loaded swimming to exhaustive. Three days later, all the rats were sacrificed, the muscle tissue from the same site of skeletal muscle were taken out and digested to cells. After primary culture of the two kinds of skeletal muscle cells from tissue, a fluorescent dye-Fluo-3 AM was used to label the cytosolic free Ca2+. The fluorescent of Ca2+ was recorded by confocal laser scanning microscopy. The results indicated that, the Ca2+ fluorescence intensity of cells from the rat of exercise-induced fatigue group was significantly higher than those in control group. In conclusion, cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration of skeletal muscle cells has a close relation with exercise-induced fatigue, and the increase of cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration may be one of the important factors of exercise-induced fatigue.

  14. Perm1 enhances mitochondrial biogenesis, oxidative capacity, and fatigue resistance in adult skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yoshitake; Hazen, Bethany C; Gandra, Paulo G; Ward, Samuel R; Schenk, Simon; Russell, Aaron P; Kralli, Anastasia

    2016-02-01

    Skeletal muscle mitochondrial content and oxidative capacity are important determinants of muscle function and whole-body health. Mitochondrial content and function are enhanced by endurance exercise and impaired in states or diseases where muscle function is compromised, such as myopathies, muscular dystrophies, neuromuscular diseases, and age-related muscle atrophy. Hence, elucidating the mechanisms that control muscle mitochondrial content and oxidative function can provide new insights into states and diseases that affect muscle health. In past studies, we identified Perm1 (PPARGC1- and ESRR-induced regulator, muscle 1) as a gene induced by endurance exercise in skeletal muscle, and regulating mitochondrial oxidative function in cultured myotubes. The capacity of Perm1 to regulate muscle mitochondrial content and function in vivo is not yet known. In this study, we use adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors to increase Perm1 expression in skeletal muscles of 4-wk-old mice. Compared to control vector, AAV1-Perm1 leads to significant increases in mitochondrial content and oxidative capacity (by 40-80%). Moreover, AAV1-Perm1-transduced muscles show increased capillary density and resistance to fatigue (by 33 and 31%, respectively), without prominent changes in fiber-type composition. These findings suggest that Perm1 selectively regulates mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative function, and implicate Perm1 in muscle adaptations that also occur in response to endurance exercise. PMID:26481306

  15. Prenatal and early postnatal stress exposure influences long bone length in adult rat offspring

    PubMed Central

    Dancause, Kelsey Needham; Cao, Xiu Jing; Veru, Franz; Xu, Susan; Long, Hong; Yu, Chunbo; Laplante, David P.; Walker, Claire Dominique; King, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    Stress during the prenatal and early postnatal periods (perinatal stress, PS) is known to impact offspring cognitive, behavioral, and physical development, but effects on skeletal growth are not clear. Our objective was to analyze effects of variable, mild, daily PS exposure on adult offspring long bone length. Twelve pregnant rat dams were randomly assigned to receive variable stress from gestational days 14-21 (Prenatal group), postpartum days 2-9 (Postnatal), both periods (Pre-Post), or no stress (Control). Differences in adult offspring tibia and femur length were analyzed among treatment groups. Mean tibia length differed among groups for males (p=0.016) and females (p=0.009), and differences for femur length approached significance for males (p=0.051). Long bone length was shorter among PS-exposed offspring, especially those exposed to postnatal stress (Postnatal and Pre-Post groups). Results persisted when controlling for nose-tail length. These differences might reflect early stunting that is maintained in adulthood, or delayed growth among PS-exposed offspring. This study suggests that PS results in shorter long bones in adulthood, independently of effects on overall body size. Stunting and growth retardation are major global health burdens. Our study adds to a growing body of evidence suggesting that PS is a risk factor for poor linear growth. PMID:22826037

  16. The Role of Lumbar Sympathetic Nerves in Regulation of Blood Flow to Skeletal Muscle during Anaphylactic Hypotension in Anesthetized Rats.

    PubMed

    Song, Jie; Tanida, Mamoru; Shibamoto, Toshishige; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Mofei; Kuda, Yuhichi; Kurata, Yasutaka

    2016-01-01

    During hypovolemic shock, skeletal muscle blood flow could be redistributed to vital organs via vasoconstriction in part evoked by activation of the innervating sympathetic nerve activity. However, it is not well known whether this mechanism operates during anaphylactic shock. We determined the femoral artery blood flow (FBF) and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity (LSNA) mainly regulating the hindquater muscle blood flow during anaphylactic hypotension in anesthetized rats. Anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly allocated to the following groups (n = 7/group): (1) non-sensitized, (2) anaphylaxis, (3) anaphylaxis-lumbar sympathectomy (LS) and (4) anaphylaxis-sinoaortic denervation (SAD) groups. Anaphylaxis was induced by an intravenous injection of the ovalbumin antigen to the sensitized rats. The systemic arterial pressure (SAP), heart rate (HR), central venous pressure (CVP), FBF and LSNA were continuously measured. In the anaphylaxis group, LSNA and HR increased, while SAP and FBF decreased after antigen injection. In the anaphylaxis-SAD group, LSNA did not significantly change during the early phase, but the responses of SAP and FBF were similar to those in the anaphylaxis group. In the anaphylaxis-LS group, both FBF and SAP decreased similarly to the anaphylaxis group during anaphylactic hypotension. These results indicated that LSNA increased via baroreceptor reflex, but this sympathoexcitation or LS did not affect antigen-induced decreases in FBF or SAP. Lumbar sympathetic nerves are not involved in regulation of the blood flow to the hindlimb or systemic blood pressure during anaphylactic hypotension in anesthetized rats. PMID:26998924

  17. Glucocorticoid regulation of insulin receptor and substrate IRS-1 tyrosine phosphorylation in rat skeletal muscle in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Giorgino, F; Almahfouz, A; Goodyear, L J; Smith, R J

    1993-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that glucocorticoid-induced insulin resistance might originate from abnormalities in insulin receptor signaling, we investigated the effects of glucocorticoids on in vivo tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor and the insulin receptor substrate IRS-1 in rat skeletal muscle. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with cortisone (100 mg/kg for 5 d) and compared to pair-fed controls. Cortisone treatment of rats resulted in both hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia. Anesthetized animals were injected with 10 U/kg insulin via cardiac puncture and, after 2 min, hindlimb muscles were removed, snap-frozen, and homogenized in SDS. Protein tyrosine phosphorylation was studied by immunoblotting with phosphotyrosine antibody. Insulin receptors and substrate IRS-1 were identified and quantified with specific antibodies. Cortisone treatment increased the amount of insulin receptor protein by 36%, but decreased the total level of receptor tyrosine phosphorylation (69 +/- 4% of control, P < 0.05). The decreased level of receptor phosphorylation was explained by a reduced number of receptors containing phosphorylated tyrosine residues (64.6 +/- 5% of control, P < 0.05). Glucocorticoid excess decreased skeletal muscle IRS-1 content by 50%, but did not significantly alter the total level of IRS-1 tyrosine phosphorylation. The apparent M(r) of IRS-1 was reduced by approximately 10 kD. Treatment with protein phosphatase-2A reduced IRS-1 M(r) in control but not in glucocorticoid-treated muscle indicating that the lower M(r) likely results from lower phosphoserine and/or phosphothreonine content. To investigate the role of hyperinsulinemia in the glucocorticoid response, rats were made insulin-deficient with streptozotocin (100 mg/kg, i.p.). Subsequent treatment with cortisone for 5 d had no effects on insulin levels, tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptors or IRS-1, or the M(r) of IRS-1. In conclusion, glucocorticoid-treated skeletal muscle is

  18. Ex Vivo Gene Therapy Using Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Deliver Growth Factors in the Skeletal Muscle of a Familial ALS Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Masatoshi; Svendsen, Clive N

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic protein and molecule delivery to target sites by transplanted human stem cells holds great promise for ex vivo gene therapy. Our group has demonstrated the therapeutic benefits of ex vivo gene therapy targeting the skeletal muscles in a transgenic rat model of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We used human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and genetically modified them to release neuroprotective growth factors such as glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Intramuscular growth factor delivery via hMSCs can enhance neuromuscular innervation and motor neuron survival in a rat model of ALS (SOD1(G93A) transgenic rats). Here, we describe the protocol of ex vivo delivery of growth factors via lentiviral vector-mediated genetic modification of hMSCs and hMSC transplantation into the skeletal muscle of a familial ALS rat model.

  19. Contextual fear conditioning differs for infant, adolescent, and adult rats.

    PubMed

    Esmorís-Arranz, Francisco J; Méndez, Cástor; Spear, Norman E

    2008-07-01

    Contextual fear conditioning was tested in infant, adolescent, and adult rats in terms of Pavlovian-conditioned suppression. When a discrete auditory-conditioned stimulus (CS) was paired with footshock (unconditioned stimulus, US) within the largely olfactory context, infants and adolescents conditioned to the context with substantial effectiveness, but adult rats did not. When unpaired presentations of the CS and US occurred within the context, contextual fear conditioning was strong for adults, weak for infants, but about as strong for adolescents as when pairings of CS and US occurred in the context. Nonreinforced presentations of either the CS or context markedly reduced contextual fear conditioning in infants, but, in adolescents, CS extinction had no effect on contextual fear conditioning, although context extinction significantly reduced it. Neither CS extinction nor context extinction affected responding to the CS-context compound in infants, suggesting striking discrimination between the compound and its components. Female adolescents showed the same lack of effect of component extinction on response to the compound as infants, but CS extinction reduced responding to the compound in adolescent males, a sex difference seen also in adults. Theoretical implications are discussed for the development of perceptual-cognitive processing and hippocampus role.

  20. Intestinal absorption of aspartame decomposition products in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Lipton, W E; Li, Y N; Younoszai, M K; Stegink, L D

    1991-12-01

    The dipeptide sweetener aspartame (N-L-alpha-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine, 1-methyl ester; alpha-APM) is relatively stable in dry powder form. However, when exposed to elevated temperature, extremes of pH and/or moisture, alpha-APM is converted into a variety of products. In aqueous solution alpha-APM decomposes to yield methanol, two isomeric forms of L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine (Asp-Phe) [alpha-Asp-Phe and beta-Asp-Phe], and APM's diketopiperazine cyclo-Asp-Phe. Depending on beverage storage conditions, individuals drinking alpha-APM-sweetened beverages may consume small quantities of these three compounds. Relatively little has been published about the metabolism of beta-Asp-Phe and cyclo-Asp-Phe. We compared the absorption and metabolism of alpha-Asp-Phe, beta-Asp-Phe, and cyclo-Asp-Phe with that of L-phenylalanine (Phe) in adult rats. Steady-state perfusion studies of rat jejunum indicated rapid carrier-assisted uptake of Phe and alpha-Asp-Phe, but only slow passive diffusion of beta-Asp-Phe and cyclo-Asp-Phe from the lumen. Homogenates of rat intestinal mucosa, liver, and cecal contents, as well as homogenates of pure cultures of Escherichia coli B, catalyzed the hydrolysis of alpha-Asp-Phe, but not cyclo-Asp-Phe. Homogenates of E coli and rat cecal contents, but not homogenates of rat liver or intestinal mucosa catalyzed the hydrolysis of beta-Asp-Phe.

  1. Plexin a4 expression in adult rat cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Gutekunst, Claire-Anne; Gross, Robert E

    2014-11-01

    PlexinsA1-A4 participate in class 3 semaphorin signaling as co-receptors to neuropilin 1 and 2. PlexinA4 is the latest member of the PlexinA subfamily to be identified. In previous studies, we described the expression of PlexinA4 in the brain and spinal cord of the adult rat. Here, antibodies to PlexinA4 were used to reveal immunolabeling in most of the cranial nerve surveyed. Labeling was found in the olfactory, optic, oculomotor, trochlear, trigeminal, abducens, facial, vestibulocochlear, glossopharyngeal, vagus, and hypoglossal nerves. This is the first detailed description of the cellular and subcellular distribution of PlexinA4 in the adult cranial nerves. The findings will set the basis for future studies on the potential role of PlexinA4 in regeneration and repair of the adult central and peripheral nervous system.

  2. Acute administration of 3,5-diiodo-L-thyronine to hypothyroid rats affects bioenergetic parameters in rat skeletal muscle mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Assunta; Lanni, Antonia; de Lange, Pieter; Silvestri, Elena; Grasso, Paola; Senese, Rosalba; Goglia, Fernando; Moreno, Maria

    2007-12-22

    We investigated the mechanism by which 3,5-diiodo-l-thyronine (T2) affects skeletal muscle mitochondrial bioenergetic parameters following its acute administration to hypothyroid rats. One hour after injection, T2 increased both coupled and uncoupled respiration rates by +27% and +42%, respectively. Top-down elasticity analysis revealed that these effects were the result of increases in the substrate oxidation and mitochondrial uncoupling. Discriminating between proton-leak and redox-slip processes, we identified an increased mitochondrial proton conductance as the "pathway" underlying the effect of T2 on mitochondrial uncoupling. As a whole, these results may provide a mechanism by which T2 rapidly affects energy metabolism in hypothyroid rats.

  3. The Effect of Pueraria Lobata/Rehmannia Glutinosa and Exercise on Fatty Acid Transporters Expression in Ovariectomized Rats Skeletal Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye Jin; Yoon, Hae Min; Kwon, Oran; Lee, Won Jun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Pueraria lobata/rehmannia glutinosa (PR) and exercise have been receiving a lot of attention from postmenopausal women, as a result of the side effects of estrogen replacement therapy. However, the effects of PR and exercise on fatty acid transporters (FATPs), which play essential role in fatty acid transport, have not been studied. In this study, we evaluated the effects of PR and aerobic exercise on FATP1, FABPpm and FAT/CD36 expression in ovariectomized rat skeletal muscles. [Methods] Sixty rats were randomly divided into 6 groups: (1)HSV; high fat diet (HFD)+sedentary+vehicle, (2)HSP; HFD+sedentary+PR, (3)HSH; HFD+sedentary+17β-estradiol, (4)HEV; HFD+exercise+vehicle, (5) HEP; HFD+exercise+PR, (6)HEH; HFD+exercise+17β-estradiol. Exercise consisted of treadmill exercise (1-4th week: 15 m/min for 30 min, 5-8th week: 18 m/min for 40 min, 5 times/week). [Results] Exercise does not alter FATP1 and FAT/CD36 gene levels in soleus and plantaris muscles. In contrast, exercise had main effect on up-regulation of FABPpm mRNA expression in both muscles. However, FABPpm level was not increased by exercise combined with treatments, indicative of no additive effects of PR or hormone on FABPpm gene expression. On the other hand, immunohistochemistry result showed that translocation of FATPs proteins to plasma membrane were higher in PR, exercise groups, and exercise combined with PR groups in both muscles. [Conclusion] These result showed that aerobic exercise and PR may help increase fat-oxidation through the induction of FABPpm, a muscle specific transporter, in OVX rat skeletal muscles. In addition, FABPpm expression is possibly regulated post-transcriptionally in exercise, or pre-translationally in PR. PMID:27757385

  4. Adult Rats Treated with Risperidone during Development Are Hyperactive

    PubMed Central

    Bardgett, Mark E.; Franks-Henry, Julie M.; Colemire, Kristin R.; Juneau, Kathleen R.; Stevens, Rachel M.; Marczinski, Cecile A.; Griffith, Molly S.

    2014-01-01

    Risperidone is an antipsychotic drug approved for use in children, but little is known about the long-term effects of early-life risperidone treatment. In animals, prolonged risperidone administration during development increases forebrain dopamine receptor expression immediately upon the cessation of treatment. A series of experiments was performed to ascertain whether early-life risperidone administration altered locomotor activity, a behavior sensitive to dopamine receptor function, in adult rats. One additional behavior modulated by forebrain dopamine function, spatial reversal learning, was also measured during adulthood. In each study, Long-Evans rats received daily subcutaneous injections of vehicle or one of two doses of risperidone (1.0 and 3.0 mg/kg per day) from postnatal days 14 – 42. Weight gain during development was slightly yet significantly reduced in risperidone-treated rats. In the first two experiments, early-life risperidone administration was associated with increased locomotor activity at one week post-administration through approximately nine months of age, independent of changes in weight gain. In a separate experiment, it was found that the enhancing effect of early-life risperidone on locomotor activity occurred in males and female rats. A final experiment indicated that spatial reversal learning was unaffected in adult rats administered risperidone early in life. These results indicate that locomotor activity during adulthood is permanently modified by early-life risperidone treatment. The findings suggest that chronic antipsychotic drug use in pediatric populations (e.g., treatment for the symptoms of autism) could modify brain development and alter neural set-points for specific behaviors during adulthood. PMID:23750695

  5. Involvement of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator in the acidosis-induced efflux of ATP from rat skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Jie; Le, Gengyun; Ballard, Heather J

    2010-01-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the effect of acidosis on the efflux of ATP from skeletal muscle. Infusion of lactic acid to the perfused hindlimb muscles of anaesthetised rats produced dose-dependent decreases in pH and increases in the interstitial ATP of extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle: 10 mm lactic acid reduced the venous pH from 7.22 ± 0.04 to 6.97 ± 0.02 and increased interstitial ATP from 38 ± 8 to 67 ± 11 nm. The increase in interstitial ATP was well-correlated with the decrease in pH (r2 = 0.93; P < 0.05). Blockade of cellular uptake of lactic acid using α-cyano-hydroxycinnamic acid abolished the lactic acid-induced ATP release, whilst infusion of sodium lactate failed to depress pH or increase interstitial ATP, suggesting that intracellular pH depression, rather than lactate, stimulated the ATP efflux. Incubation of cultured skeletal myoblasts with 10 mm lactic acid significantly increased the accumulation of ATP in the bathing medium from 0.46 ± 0.06 to 0.76 ± 0.08 μm, confirming the skeletal muscle cells as the source of the released ATP. Acidosis-induced ATP efflux from the perfused muscle was abolished by CFTRinh-172, a specific inhibitor of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), or glibenclamide, an inhibitor of both KATP channels and CFTR, but it was not affected by atractyloside, an inhibitor of the mitochondrial ATP transporter. Silencing of the CFTR gene using an siRNA abolished the acidosis-induced increase in ATP release from cultured myoblasts. CFTR expression on skeletal muscle cells was confirmed using immunostaining in the intact muscle and Western blotting in the cultured cells. These data suggest that depression of the intracellular pH of skeletal muscle cells stimulates ATP efflux, and that CFTR plays an important role in the release mechanism. PMID:20819945

  6. Prenatal Ethanol Exposure Increases Brain Cholesterol Content in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Barceló-Coblijn, Gwendolyn; Wold, Loren E.; Ren, Jun; Murphy, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    Fetal alcohol syndrome is the most severe expression of the fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). Although alterations in fetal and neonate brain fatty acid composition and cholesterol content is known to change in animal models of FASD, the persistence of these alterations into adulthood is unknown. To address this question, we determined the effect of prenatal ethanol exposure on individual phospholipid class fatty acid composition, individual phospholipid class mass, and cholesterol mass in brains from 25-week-old rats that were exposed to ethanol during gestation beginning at gestational day 2. While total phospholipid mass was unaffected, phosphatidylinositol and cardiolipin mass was decreased 14 and 43%, respectively. Exposure to prenatal ethanol modestly altered brain phospholipid fatty acid composition, and the most consistent change was a significant 1.1-fold increase in total PUFA, in the n-3/n-6 ratio, and in the 22:6 n-3 content in ethanolamine glycerophospholipids and in phosphatidylserine. In contrast, prenatal ethanol consumption significantly increased brain cholesterol mass 1.4-fold and the phospholipid to cholesterol ratio was significantly increased 1.3-fold. These results indicate that brain cholesterol mass was significantly increased in adult rats exposed prenatally to ethanol, but changes in phospholipid mass and phospholipid fatty acid composition were extremely limited. Importantly, suppression of post-natal ethanol consumption was not sufficient to reverse the large increase in cholesterol observed in the adult rats. PMID:23996454

  7. Microvascular oxygen partial pressure during hyperbaric oxygen in diabetic rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Yamakoshi, Kohei; Yagishita, Kazuyoshi; Tsuchimochi, Hirotsugu; Inagaki, Tadakatsu; Shirai, Mikiyasu; Poole, David C; Kano, Yutaka

    2015-12-15

    Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) is a major therapeutic treatment for ischemic ulcerations that perforate skin and underlying muscle in diabetic patients. These lesions do not heal effectively, in part, because of the hypoxic microvascular O2 partial pressures (PmvO2 ) resulting from diabetes-induced cardiovascular dysfunction, which alters the dynamic balance between O2 delivery (Q̇o2) and utilization (V̇o2) rates. We tested the hypothesis that HBO in diabetic muscle would exacerbate the hyperoxic PmvO2 dynamics due, in part, to a reduction or slowing of the cardiovascular, sympathetic nervous, and respiratory system responses to acute HBO exposure. Adult male Wistar rats were divided randomly into diabetic (DIA: streptozotocin ip) and healthy (control) groups. A small animal hyperbaric chamber was pressurized with oxygen (100% O2) to 3.0 atmospheres absolute (ATA) at 0.2 ATA/min. Phosphorescence quenching techniques were used to measure PmvO2 in tibialis anterior muscle of anesthetized rats during HBO. Lumbar sympathetic nerve activity (LSNA), heart rate (HR), and respiratory rate (RR) were measured electrophysiologically. During the normobaric hyperoxia and HBO, DIA tibialis anterior PmvO2 increased faster (mean response time, CONT 78 ± 8, DIA 55 ± 8 s, P < 0.05) than CONT. Subsequently, PmvO2 remained elevated at similar levels in CONT and DIA muscles until normobaric normoxic recovery where the DIA PmvO2 retained its hyperoxic level longer than CONT. Sympathetic nervous system and cardiac and respiratory responses to HBO were slower in DIA vs. CONT. Specifically the mean response times for RR (CONT: 6 ± 1 s, DIA: 29 ± 4 s, P < 0.05), HR (CONT: 16 ± 1 s, DIA: 45 ± 5 s, P < 0.05), and LSNA (CONT: 140 ± 16 s, DIA: 247 ± 34 s, P < 0.05) were greater following HBO onset in DIA than CONT. HBO treatment increases tibialis anterior muscle PmvO2 more rapidly and for a longer duration in DIA than CONT, but not to a greater level. Whereas respiratory, cardiovascular

  8. Increases in skeletal muscle ATGL and its inhibitor G0S2 following 8 weeks of endurance training in metabolically different rat skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, Patrick C; Longo, Amanda B; Ramos, Sofhia V; Roy, Brian D; Ward, Wendy E; Peters, Sandra J

    2016-01-15

    Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) catalyzes the rate-limiting removal of the first fatty acid from a triglyceride. ATGL is activated by comparative gene identification-58 and inhibited by G(0)/G(1) switch gene-2 protein (G0S2). Research in other tissues and cell culture indicates that inhibition is dependent on relative G0S2-to-ATGL protein content. G0S2 may also have several roles within mitochondria; however, this has yet to be observed in skeletal muscle. The purpose of this study was to determine if muscle G0S2 relative to ATGL content would decrease to facilitate intramuscular lipolysis following endurance training. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 10; age 51-53 days old) were progressively treadmill trained at a 10% incline for 8 wk ending with 25 m/min for 1 h compared with control. Sciatic nerve stimulation for hind-limb muscle contraction (and lipolysis) was administered for 30 min to one leg, leaving the opposing leg as a resting control. Soleus (SOL), red gastrocnemius (RG), and white gastrocnemius were excised from both legs following stimulation or control. ATGL protein increased in all trained muscles. Unexpectedly, G0S2 protein was greater in the trained SOL and RG. In RG-isolated mitochondria, G0S2 also increased with training, yet mitochondrial G0S2 content was unaltered with acute contraction; therefore, any role of G0S2 in the mitochondria does not appear to be acutely mediated by content alone. In summary, G0S2 increased with training in oxidative muscles and mitochondria but not following acute contraction, suggesting that inhibition is not through relative G0S2-to-ATGL content but through more complicated intracellular mechanisms.

  9. Effects of Chronic Heavy Alcohol Consumption and Endurance Exercise on Cancellous and Cortical Bone Microarchitecture in Adult Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Teresa L.; Gaddini, Gino; Branscum, Adam J.; Olson, Dawn A.; Caroline-Westerlind, Kim; Turner, Russell T.; Iwaniec, Urszula T.

    2014-01-01

    Background Bone health is influenced by numerous lifestyle factors, including diet and exercise. Alcohol is a major non-essential constituent of diet and has dose and context-dependent effects on bone. Endurance exercise is associated with increased risk for stress fractures. The purpose of this study was to determine the long-term independent and combined effects of chronic heavy alcohol consumption and endurance exercise (treadmill running) on bone mass and microarchitecture in young adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Methods Six-month-old male rats were randomized into 4 groups (9–13 rats/group): sedentary+control diet, sedentary+ethanol diet, exercise+control diet, or exercise+ethanol diet. Ethanol-fed rats consumed a liquid diet (ethanol comprised 35% of caloric intake) ad libitum. Control rats were pair-fed the same diet with isocaloric substitution of ethanol with maltose-dextran. Exercise was conducted on a motorized treadmill (15% grade for 30 min) 5 days/week for 16 weeks. Femur and 12th thoracic vertebra were analyzed for bone mineral content (BMC) and density (BMD) using densitometry and cortical and cancellous bone architecture using microcomputed tomography. Results Ethanol consumption resulted in lower femur length, BMC, and BMD, and lower midshaft femur cortical volume, cortical thickness, and polar moment of inertia. In addition, trabecular thickness was lower in vertebra of ethanol-fed rats. Endurance exercise had no independent effect on any endpoints evaluated. A significant interaction between endurance exercise and ethanol was detected for several cancellous endpoints in the distal femur metaphysis. Ethanol-consuming rats that exercised had lower distal femur metaphysis bone volume/tissue volume, trabecular connectivity density, and trabecular thickness compared to exercising rats that consumed control diet. Conclusions The results obtained in this model suggest that chronic heavy alcohol consumption may reduce skeletal integrity by reducing

  10. Effects of Adolescent Ethanol Exposure on Sleep in Adults Rats

    PubMed Central

    Criado, José R.; Wills, Derek N.; Walker, Brendan M.; Ehlers, Cindy L.

    2010-01-01

    Although adolescent ethanol (EtOH) exposure has been associated with long-lasting changes in brain function, little is known as to whether EtOH exposure during adolescence alters sleep and cortical arousal. This study examined protracted alterations in sleep in adult rats exposed to EtOH during adolescence. Adolescent male Wistar rats were exposed to EtOH vapor for 12 hr/day for five weeks. Cortical electroencephalograms (EEGs) were obtained during 4-hr recording sessions after five weeks of withdrawal from EtOH. Adolescent EtOH exposure significantly reduced the mean duration of slow-wave sleep (SWS) episodes and the total amount of time spent in SWS in EtOH-exposed rats, compared to controls. Spectral analysis revealed that adolescent EtOH exposure significantly increased cortical peak frequencies during SWS in the 2-4 Hz, 4-6 Hz and 6-8 Hz bands. Taken together, our findings suggest that chronic EtOH exposure in adolescent rats reduces measures of SWS, an effect also seen as part of normal aging. Although the cellular and molecular mechanisms mediating the consequences of EtOH exposure on the aging process are not known, the similarities between adolescent EtOH exposure and aging merits further investigation. PMID:18922666

  11. Preproglucagon mRNA expression in adult rat submandibular glands.

    PubMed

    Egéa, J C; Hirtz, C; Deville de Périère, D

    2003-04-01

    Salivary glands of various animal species have been reported to contain and suggested to produce glucagon or glucagon-like material, but the origin and the nature of this salivary peptide are still doubtful. The present study was undertaken to ascertain whether the glucagon gene is expressed in rat submandibular glands and in an immortalized murine cell line derived from salivary glands (SCA-9 cell line). For this purpose, total RNA was isolated from submandibular glands or cultured cells and submitted to reverse transcription. The cDNAs obtained were amplified by a nested polymerase chain reaction using preproglucagon primers. The results showed that the preproglucagon mRNA was expressed in adult rat submandibular glands but not in the SCA-9 cell line. Determination of cyclic DNA (cDNA) sequence established identity with the coding regions of rat pancreatic pre-proglucagon gene. In conclusion, these results strongly support the idea that rat submandibular glands could represent a source of extrapancreatic glucagon or of its precursor's peptide.

  12. Maternal hyperthyroidism in rats impairs stress coping of adult offspring.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Limei; Hernández, Vito S; Medina-Pizarro, Mauricio; Valle-Leija, Pablo; Vega-González, Arturo; Morales, Teresa

    2008-05-01

    Given the evidence that maternal hyperthyroidism (MH) compromises expression of neuronal cytoskeletal proteins in the late fetal brain by accelerated neuronal differentiation, we investigated possible consequences of MH for the emotional and cognitive functions of adult offspring during acute and subchronic stress coping. Experimental groups consisted of male rat offspring from mothers implanted with osmotic minipumps infusing either thyroxine (MH) or vehicle (Ctrl) during pregnancy. Body weight and T4 level were monitored during the first 3 postnatal months, and no differences were found with the controls. We analyzed hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons and dentate granular cell morphology during several postnatal stages and found increased dendritic arborization. On postnatal day 90 a modified subchronic mild stress (SCMS) protocol was applied to experimental subjects for 10 days. The Morris water maze was used before, during, and after application of the SCMS protocol to measure spatial learning. The tail suspension test (TST) and forced-swimming test (FST) were used to evaluate behavioral despair. The MH rats displayed normal locomotor activity and spatial memory prior to SCMS, but impaired spatial learning after acute and chronic stress. In both the FST and TST we found that MH rats spent significantly more time immobile than did controls. Serum corticosterone level was found to increase after 30 min of restraint stress, and corticotropin-releasing factor immunoreactivity was found to be increased in the central nucleus of the amygdala. Our results suggest that MH in rats leads to the offspring being more vulnerable to stress in adulthood.

  13. Disclosing caffeine action on insulin sensitivity: effects on rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Sacramento, Joana F; Ribeiro, Maria J; Yubero, Sara; Melo, Bernardete F; Obeso, Ana; Guarino, Maria P; Gonzalez, Constancio; Conde, Silvia V

    2015-04-01

    Caffeine, a non-selective adenosine antagonist, has distinct effects on insulin sensitivity when applied acutely or chronically. Herein, we investigated the involvement of adenosine receptors on insulin resistance induced by single-dose caffeine administration. Additionally, the mechanism behind adenosine receptor-mediated caffeine effects in skeletal muscle was assessed. The effect of the administration of caffeine, 8-cycle-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX, A1 antagonist), 2-(2-Furanyl)-7-(2-phenylethyl)-7H-pyrazolo[4,3-e][1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidin-5-amine (SCH58261, A2A antagonist) and 8-(4-{[(4-cyanophenyl)carbamoylmethyl]-oxy}phenyl)-1,3-di(n-propyl)xanthine (MRS1754, A2B antagonist) on whole-body insulin sensitivity was tested. Skeletal muscle Glut4,5'-AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) and adenosine receptor protein expression were also assessed. The effect of A1 and A2B adenosine agonists on skeletal muscle glucose uptake was evaluated in vitro. Sodium nitroprussiate (SNP, 10nM), a nitric oxide (NO) donor, was used to evaluate the effect of NO on insulin resistance induced by adenosine antagonists. Acute caffeine decreased insulin sensitivity in a concentration dependent manner (Emax=55.54±5.37%, IC50=11.61nM), an effect that was mediated by A1 and A2B adenosine receptors. Additionally, acute caffeine administration significantly decreased Glut4, but not AMPK expression, in skeletal muscle. We found that A1, but not A2B agonists increased glucose uptake in skeletal muscle. SNP partially reversed DPCPX and MRS1754 induced-insulin resistance. Our results suggest that insulin resistance induced by acute caffeine administration is mediated by A1 and A2B adenosine receptors. Both Glut4 and NO seem to be downstream effectors involved in insulin resistance induced by acute caffeine.

  14. Disclosing caffeine action on insulin sensitivity: effects on rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Sacramento, Joana F; Ribeiro, Maria J; Yubero, Sara; Melo, Bernardete F; Obeso, Ana; Guarino, Maria P; Gonzalez, Constancio; Conde, Silvia V

    2015-04-01

    Caffeine, a non-selective adenosine antagonist, has distinct effects on insulin sensitivity when applied acutely or chronically. Herein, we investigated the involvement of adenosine receptors on insulin resistance induced by single-dose caffeine administration. Additionally, the mechanism behind adenosine receptor-mediated caffeine effects in skeletal muscle was assessed. The effect of the administration of caffeine, 8-cycle-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX, A1 antagonist), 2-(2-Furanyl)-7-(2-phenylethyl)-7H-pyrazolo[4,3-e][1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidin-5-amine (SCH58261, A2A antagonist) and 8-(4-{[(4-cyanophenyl)carbamoylmethyl]-oxy}phenyl)-1,3-di(n-propyl)xanthine (MRS1754, A2B antagonist) on whole-body insulin sensitivity was tested. Skeletal muscle Glut4,5'-AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) and adenosine receptor protein expression were also assessed. The effect of A1 and A2B adenosine agonists on skeletal muscle glucose uptake was evaluated in vitro. Sodium nitroprussiate (SNP, 10nM), a nitric oxide (NO) donor, was used to evaluate the effect of NO on insulin resistance induced by adenosine antagonists. Acute caffeine decreased insulin sensitivity in a concentration dependent manner (Emax=55.54±5.37%, IC50=11.61nM), an effect that was mediated by A1 and A2B adenosine receptors. Additionally, acute caffeine administration significantly decreased Glut4, but not AMPK expression, in skeletal muscle. We found that A1, but not A2B agonists increased glucose uptake in skeletal muscle. SNP partially reversed DPCPX and MRS1754 induced-insulin resistance. Our results suggest that insulin resistance induced by acute caffeine administration is mediated by A1 and A2B adenosine receptors. Both Glut4 and NO seem to be downstream effectors involved in insulin resistance induced by acute caffeine. PMID:25661425

  15. Impact of treadmill locomotor training on skeletal muscle IGF1 and myogenic regulatory factors in spinal cord injured rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Min; Stevens-Lapsley, Jennifer E; Jayaraman, Arun; Ye, Fan; Conover, Christine; Walter, Glenn A; Bose, Prodip; Thompson, Floyd J; Borst, Stephen E; Vandenborne, Krista

    2010-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the impact of treadmill locomotor training on the expression of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF1) and changes in myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) in rat soleus muscle following spinal cord injury (SCI). Moderate, midthoracic (T(8)) contusion SCIs were produced using a NYU (New York University) impactor. Animals were randomly assigned to treadmill training or untrained groups. Rats in the training group were trained starting at 1 week after SCI, for either 3 bouts of 20 min over 1.5 days or 10 bouts over 5 days. Five days of treadmill training completely prevented the decrease in soleus fiber size resulting from SCI. In addition, treadmill training triggered increases in IGF1, MGF and IGFBP4 mRNA expression, and a concurrent reduction of IGFBP5 mRNA in skeletal muscle. Locomotor training also caused an increase in markers of muscle regeneration, including small muscle fibers expressing embryonic myosin and Pax7 positive nuclei and increased expression of the MRFs, myogenin and MyoD. We concluded that treadmill locomotor training ameliorated muscle atrophy in moderate contusion SCI rats. Training-induced muscle regeneration and fiber hypertrophy following SCI was associated with an increase in IGF1, an increase in Pax7 positive nuclei, and upregulation of MRFs.

  16. D-TRP(8)-γMSH Prevents the Effects of Endotoxin in Rat Skeletal Muscle Cells through TNFα/NF-KB Signalling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-SanMiguel, Ana Belén; Villanúa, María Ángeles; Martín, Ana Isabel; López-Calderón, Asunción

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis induces anorexia and muscle wasting secondary to an increase in muscle proteolysis. Melanocyte stimulating hormones (MSH) is a family of peptides that have potent anti-inflammatory effects. Melanocortin receptor-3 (MC3-R) has been reported as the predominant anti-inflammatory receptor for melanocortins. The aim of this work was to analyse whether activation of MC3-R, by administration of its agonist D-Trp(8)-γMSH, is able to modify the response of skeletal muscle to inflammation induced by lipopolysaccharide endotoxin (LPS) or TNFα. Adult male rats were injected with 250 μg/kg LPS and/or 500 μg/kg D-Trp(8)-γMSH 17:00 h and at 8:00 h the following day, and euthanized 4 hours afterwards. D-Trp(8)-γMSH decreased LPS-induced anorexia and prevented the stimulatory effect of LPS on hypothalamic IL-1β, COX-2 and CRH as well as on serum ACTH and corticosterone. Serum IGF-I and its expression in liver and gastrocnemius were decreased in rats injected with LPS, but not in those that also received D-Trp(8)-γMSH. However, D-Trp(8)-γMSH was unable to modify the effect of LPS on IGFBP-3. In the gastrocnemius D-Trp(8)-γMSH blocked LPS-induced decrease in pAkt, pmTOR, MHC I and MCH II, as well as the increase in pNF-κB(p65), FoxO1, FoxO3, LC3b, Bnip-3, Gabarap1, atrogin-1, MuRF1 and in LC3a/b lipidation. In L6 myotube cultures, D-Trp(8)-γMSH was able to prevent TNFα-induced increase of NF-κB(p65) phosphorylation and decrease of Akt phosphorylation as well as of IGF-I and MHC I expression. These data suggest that MC3-R activation prevents the effect of endotoxin on skeletal wasting by modifying inflammation, corticosterone and IGF-I responses and also by directly acting on muscle cells through the TNFα/NF-κB(p65) pathway. PMID:27177152

  17. [Average values of electrocardiograph parameters in healthy, adult Wistar rats].

    PubMed

    Zaciragić, Asija; Nakas-ićindić, Emina; Hadzović, Almira; Avdagić, Nesina

    2004-01-01

    Average values of heart rate (HR) and the average duration of electrocardiograph parameters were investigated (RR interval, P wave, PQ interval, QRS complex and QT interval) in healthy, adult Wistar rats of both sexes (n=86). Electrocardiogram (ECG) was recorded by Shiller Resting ECG, and for analysis of recordings SEMA-200 Vet computer program was used. Prior to registration animals were exposed to light ether anesthesia. Mean value of HR was 203.03+/-3.09 beats/min in whole sample. Observed differences in mean values of heart rate and duration of followed ECG parameters between sexes were not statistically significant. Results gathered in our study could serve as standard values for electrocardiograph parameters in future research where will be used Wistar rats in conditions of registration and analysis of ECG that are described in our paper.

  18. Continued Expression of Neonatal Myosin Heavy Chain in Adult Dystrophic Skeletal Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandman, Everett

    1985-02-01

    The expression of myosin heavy chain isoforms was examined in normal and dystrophic chicken muscle with a monoclonal antibody specific for neonatal myosin. Adult dystrophic muscle continued to contain neonatal myosin long after it disappeared from adult normal muscle. A new technique involving western blotting and peptide mapping demonstrated that the immunoreactive myosin in adult dystrophic muscle was identical to that found in neonatal normal muscle. Immunocytochemistry revealed that all fibers in the dystrophic muscle failed to repress neonatal myosin heavy chain. These studies suggest that muscular dystrophy inhibits the myosin gene switching that normally occurs during muscle maturation.

  19. Role of estrogen on skeletal muscle mitochondrial function in ovariectomized rats: a time course study in different fiber types.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti-de-Albuquerque, J P A; Salvador, I C; Martins, Eduarda Lopes; Jardim-Messeder, D; Werneck-de-Castro, J P S; Galina, A; Carvalho, D P

    2014-04-01

    Postmenopausal women are prone to develop obesity and insulin resistance, which might be related to skeletal muscle mitochondrial dysfunction. In a rat model of ovariectomy (OVX), skeletal muscle mitochondrial function was examined at short- and long-term periods after castration. Mitochondrial parameters in the soleus and white gastrocnemius muscle fibers were analyzed. Three weeks after surgery, there were no differences in coupled mitochondrial respiration (ATP synthesis) with pyruvate, malate, and succinate; proton leak respiration; or mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production. However, after 3 wk of OVX, the soleus and white gastrocnemius muscles of the OVX animals showed a lower use of palmitoyl-carnitine and glycerol-phosphate substrates, respectively, and decreased peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α expression. Estrogen replacement reverted all of these phenotypes. Eight weeks after OVX, ATP synthesis was lower in the soleus and white gastrocnemius muscles of the OVX animals than in the sham-operated and estrogen-treated animals; however, when normalized by citrate synthase activity, these differences disappeared, indicating a lower muscle mitochondria content. No differences were observed in the proton leak parameter. Mitochondrial alterations did not impair the treadmill exercise capacity of the OVX animals. However, blood lactate levels in the OVX animals were higher after the physical test, indicating a compensatory extramitochondrial ATP synthesis system, but this phenotype was reverted by estrogen replacement. These results suggest early mitochondrial dysfunction related to lipid substrate use, which could be associated with the development of the overweight phenotype of ovariectomized animals.

  20. Effect of electrical stimulation-induced resistance exercise on mitochondrial fission and fusion proteins in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Kitaoka, Yu; Ogasawara, Riki; Tamura, Yuki; Fujita, Satoshi; Hatta, Hideo

    2015-11-01

    It is well known that resistance exercise increases muscle protein synthesis and muscle strength. However, little is known about the effect of resistance exercise on mitochondrial dynamics, which is coupled with mitochondrial function. In skeletal muscle, mitochondria exist as dynamic networks that are continuously remodeling through fusion and fission. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of acute and chronic resistance exercise, which induces muscle hypertrophy, on the expression of proteins related to mitochondrial dynamics in rat skeletal muscle. Resistance exercise consisted of maximum isometric contraction, which was induced by percutaneous electrical stimulation of the gastrocnemius muscle. Our results revealed no change in levels of proteins that regulate mitochondrial fission (Fis1 and Drp1) or fusion (Opa1, Mfn1, and Mfn2) over the 24-h period following acute resistance exercise. Phosphorylation of Drp1 at Ser616 was increased immediately after exercise (P < 0.01). Four weeks of resistance training (3 times/week) increased Mfn1 (P < 0.01), Mfn2 (P < 0.05), and Opa1 (P < 0.01) protein levels without altering mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation proteins. These observations suggest that resistance exercise has little effect on mitochondrial biogenesis but alters the expression of proteins involved in mitochondrial fusion and fission, which may contribute to mitochondrial quality control and improved mitochondrial function.

  1. Reduction-oxidation state and protein degradation in skeletal muscle of fasted and refed rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fagan, Julie M.; Tischler, Marc E.

    1986-01-01

    Redox state and protein degradation were measured in isolated muscles of fasted (up to 10 d) and refed (up to 4 d) 7- to 14-wk-old rats. Protein degradation in the extensor digitorum longus muscle, but not in the soleus muscle, was greater in the fasted rats than in weight-matched muscle from fed rats. The NAD couple was more oxidized in incubated and fresh extensor digitorum longus muscles and in some incubated soleus muscles of fasted rats than in weight-matched muscle from fed rats. In the extensor digitorum longus muscle of refed or prolonged fasted rats, protein degradation was slower and the NAD couple was more reduced than in the fed state. Therefore, oxidation of the NAD couple was associated with increased muscle breakdown during fasting, whereas reduction of the NAD couple was associated with muscle conservation and deposition.

  2. Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Adults: The Role of Upper Airway and Facial Skeletal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Garg, Ravi K; Afifi, Ahmed M; Sanchez, Ruston; King, Timothy W

    2016-10-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea represents a large burden of disease to the general population and may compromise patient quality of life; workplace and automotive safety; and metabolic, cardiovascular, and neurocognitive health. The disease is characterized by repetitive cycles of upper airway collapse resulting from a lack of pharyngeal airway structural support and loss of muscle tone among upper airway dilators. Polysomnography serves as the gold standard for diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea and the apnea-hypopnea index is the most commonly used metric for quantifying disease severity. Conservative treatments include lifestyle modification, continuous positive airway pressure treatment, and dental appliance therapy. Surgical treatment options include pharyngeal and facial skeletal surgery. Maxillomandibular advancement has been shown to be the most effective surgical approach for multilevel expansion of the upper airway and may significantly reduce an obstructive sleep apnea patient's apnea-hypopnea index. Patient age, obesity, and the degree of maxillary advancement may be key factors contributing to treatment success. PMID:27673521

  3. Mechanically induced orientation of adult rat cardiac myocytes in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samuel, J.-L.; Vandenburgh, H. H.

    1990-01-01

    The present study describes the spatial orientation of a population of freshly isolated adult rat cardiac myocytes using a computerized mechanical cell stimulator device for tissue cultured cells. A continuous unidirectional stretch of the substratum at 60 to 400 microns/min for 120 to 30 min, respectively, during the cell attachment period in a serum-free medium was found to induce a significant threefold increase in the number of rod-shaped myocytes oriented parallel to the direction of movement. The myocytes orient less well with unidirectional substratum stretching after their adhesion to the substratum. Adult myocytes plated onto a substratum undergoing continuous 10-percent stretch-relaxation cycling show no significant change in the myocyte orientation or cytoskeletal organization. In addition to the type of mechanical activity, orientation of rod-shaped myocytes is dependent on the speed of the substratum, the final stretch amplitude, and the timing between initiation of substratum stretching and adhesion of myocytes to the substratum.

  4. Fiber type effects on contraction-stimulated glucose uptake and GLUT4 abundance in single fibers from rat skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Castorena, Carlos M.; Arias, Edward B.; Sharma, Naveen; Bogan, Jonathan S.

    2014-01-01

    To fully understand skeletal muscle at the cellular level, it is essential to evaluate single muscle fibers. Accordingly, the major goals of this study were to determine if there are fiber type-related differences in single fibers from rat skeletal muscle for: 1) contraction-stimulated glucose uptake and/or 2) the abundance of GLUT4 and other metabolically relevant proteins. Paired epitrochlearis muscles isolated from Wistar rats were either electrically stimulated to contract (E-Stim) or remained resting (No E-Stim). Single fibers isolated from muscles incubated with 2-deoxy-d-[3H]glucose (2-DG) were used to determine fiber type [myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform protein expression], 2-DG uptake, and abundance of metabolically relevant proteins, including the GLUT4 glucose transporter. E-Stim, relative to No E-Stim, fibers had greater (P < 0.05) 2-DG uptake for each of the isolated fiber types (MHC-IIa, MHC-IIax, MHC-IIx, MHC-IIxb, and MHC-IIb). However, 2-DG uptake for E-Stim fibers was not significantly different among these five fiber types. GLUT4, tethering protein containing a UBX domain for GLUT4 (TUG), cytochrome c oxidase IV (COX IV), and filamin C protein levels were significantly greater (P < 0.05) in MHC-IIa vs. MHC-IIx, MHC-IIxb, or MHC-IIb fibers. TUG and COX IV in either MHC-IIax or MHC-IIx fibers exceeded values for MHC-IIxb or MHC-IIb fibers. GLUT4 levels for MHC-IIax fibers exceeded MHC-IIxb fibers. GLUT4, COX IV, filamin C, and TUG abundance in single fibers was significantly (P < 0.05) correlated with each other. Differences in GLUT4 abundance among the fiber types were not accompanied by significant differences in contraction-stimulated glucose uptake. PMID:25491725

  5. Hydrolyzed protein supplementation improves protein content and peroxidation of skeletal muscle by adjusting the plasma amino acid spectrums in rats after exhaustive swimming exercise: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study was designed to evaluate the effects of hydrolyzed protein supplementation upon skeletal muscle total protein and peroxidation in rats following exhaustive swimming exercise. Methods Twenty-four rats were randomized to 4 experimental groups (n = 6 per group): control group fed standard diet without exercise (SD), exercise (EX), exercise plus standard diet for 72 hours (EX + SD), and exercise plus standard diet supplemented with hydrolyzed protein (2 g/kg/d) for 72 hours (EX + HP). Immediately following exercise, the EX group was euthanized for collecting plasma and skeletal muscle samples. The EX + SD and EX + HP groups were fed their respective diets for 72 hour still plasma and skeletal muscle collection. Skeletal muscle samples were used to measure levels of total protein (TP), malondialdehyde (MDA), and protein carbonyl (PC). Plasma samples were used to analyze the amino acids spectrum. Results Compared with the EX + SD, EX + HP presented the significantly increased TP (P = 0.02) and decreased MDA and PC levels (P = 0.035). MDA was negatively correlated with the methionine levels. Moreover, EX + HP maintained higher levels of plasmaleucine, isoleucine, and methionine than EX + SD, which may be associated with the increased skeletal muscle TP levels observed (P < 0.05). Conclusions These results collectively suggest that hydrolyzed protein supplementation can improve skeletal muscle TP and ameliorate peroxidation damage in rats subjected to exhaustive exercise stress, which may be, at least in part, related with the maintenance of plasma leucine, isoleucine, and methionine levels. PMID:24565110

  6. Effect of electrical stimulation on beta-adrenergic receptor population and cyclic amp production in chicken and rat skeletal muscle cell cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, R. B.; Bridge, K. Y.; Strietzel, C. J.

    2000-01-01

    Expression of the beta-adrenergic receptor (betaAR) and its coupling to cyclic AMP (cAMP) synthesis are important components of the signaling system that controls muscle atrophy and hypertrophy, and the goal of this study was to determine if electrical stimulation in a pattern simulating slow muscle contraction would alter the betaAR response in primary cultures of avian and mammalian skeletal muscle cells. Specifically, chicken skeletal muscle cells and rat skeletal muscle cells that had been grown for 7 d in culture were subjected to electrical stimulation for an additional 2 d at a pulse frequency of 0.5 pulses/sec and a pulse duration of 200 msec. In chicken skeletal muscle cells, the betaAR population was not significantly affected by electrical stimulation; however, the ability of these cells to synthesize cyclic AMP was reduced by approximately one-half. In contrast, the betaAR population in rat muscle cells was increased slightly but not significantly by electrical stimulation, and the ability of these cells to synthesize cyclic AMP was increased by almost twofold. The basal levels of intracellular cyclic AMP in neither rat muscle cells nor chicken muscle cells were affected by electrical stimulation.

  7. Effect of Electrical Stimulation on Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Population and Cyclic AMP Production in Chicken and Rat Skeletal Muscle Cell Cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Ronald B.; Bridge, Kristin Y.; Strietzel, Catherine J.

    2000-01-01

    Expression of the beta-adrenergic receptor (PAR) and its coupling to Adenosine 3'5' Cyclic Monophosphate (cAMP) synthesis are important components of the signaling system that controls muscle atrophy and hypertrophy and the goal of this study was to determine if electrical stimulation in a pattern simulating slow muscle contraction would alter the PAR response in primary cultures of avian and mammalian skeletal muscle cells. Specifically chicken skeletal muscle cells and rat skeletal muscle cells that had been grown for 7 d in culture, were subjected to electrical stimulation for an additional 2 d at a pulse frequency of 0.5 pulses/sec and a pulse duration of 200 msec. In chicken skeletal muscle cells, the PAR population was not significantly affected by electrical stimulation; however, the ability, of these cells to synthesize cyclic AMP was reduced by approximately one-half. In contrast, the PAR population in rat muscle cells was increased slightly but not significantly by electrical stimulation, and the ability of these cells to synthesize cyclic AMP was increased by almost twofold. The basal levels of intracellular cyclic AMP in neither rat muscle cells nor chicken muscle cells were affected by electrical stimulation.

  8. Dietary combination of sucrose and linoleic acid causes skeletal muscle metabolic abnormalities in Zucker fatty rats through specific modification of fatty acid composition

    PubMed Central

    Ohminami, Hirokazu; Amo, Kikuko; Taketani, Yutaka; Sato, Kazusa; Fukaya, Makiko; Uebanso, Takashi; Arai, Hidekazu; Koganei, Megumi; Sasaki, Hajime; Yamanaka-Okumura, Hisami; Yamamoto, Hironori; Takeda, Eiji

    2014-01-01

    A dietary combination of sucrose and linoleic acid strongly contributes to the development of metabolic disorders in Zucker fatty rats. However, the underlying mechanisms of the metabolic disorders are poorly understood. We hypothesized that the metabolic disorders were triggered at a stage earlier than the 8 weeks we had previously reported. In this study, we investigated early molecular events induced by the sucrose and linoleic acid diet in Zucker fatty rats by comparison with other combinations of carbohydrate (sucrose or palatinose) and fat (linoleic acid or oleic acid). Skeletal muscle arachidonic acid levels were significantly increased in the sucrose and linoleic acid group compared to the other dietary groups at 4 weeks, while there were no obvious differences in the metabolic phenotype between the groups. Expression of genes related to arachidonic acid synthesis was induced in skeletal muscle but not in liver and adipose tissue in sucrose and linoleic acid group rats. In addition, the sucrose and linoleic acid group exhibited a rapid induction in endoplasmic reticulum stress and abnormal lipid metabolism in skeletal muscle. We concluded that the dietary combination of sucrose and linoleic acid primarily induces metabolic disorders in skeletal muscle through increases in arachidonic acid and endoplasmic reticulum stress, in advance of systemic metabolic disorders. PMID:25147427

  9. Chronic disuse and skeletal muscle structure in older adults: sex-specific differences and relationships to contractile function

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, Damien M.; Tourville, Timothy W.; Miller, Mark S.; Hackett, Sarah B.; Sharma, Himani; Cruickshank, Nicholas C.; Slauterbeck, James R.; Savage, Patrick D.; Ades, Philip A.; Maughan, David W.; Beynnon, Bruce D.

    2015-01-01

    In older adults, we examined the effect of chronic muscle disuse on skeletal muscle structure at the tissue, cellular, organellar, and molecular levels and its relationship to muscle function. Volunteers with advanced-stage knee osteoarthritis (OA, n = 16) were recruited to reflect the effects of chronic lower extremity muscle disuse and compared with recreationally active controls (n = 15) without knee OA but similar in age, sex, and health status. In the OA group, quadriceps muscle and single-fiber cross-sectional area were reduced, with the largest reduction in myosin heavy chain IIA fibers. Myosin heavy chain IIAX fibers were more prevalent in the OA group, and their atrophy was sex-specific: men showed a reduction in cross-sectional area, and women showed no differences. Myofibrillar ultrastructure, myonuclear content, and mitochondrial content and morphology generally did not differ between groups, with the exception of sex-specific adaptations in subsarcolemmal (SS) mitochondria, which were driven by lower values in OA women. SS mitochondrial content was also differently related to cellular and molecular functional parameters by sex: greater SS mitochondrial content was associated with improved contractility in women but reduced function in men. Collectively, these results demonstrate sex-specific structural phenotypes at the cellular and organellar levels with chronic disuse in older adults, with novel associations between energetic and contractile systems. PMID:25810256

  10. Alcohol exposure in utero perturbs retinoid homeostasis in adult rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youn-Kyung; Zuccaro, Michael V.; Zhang, Changqing; Sarkar, Dipak

    2015-01-01

    Background Maternal alcohol exposure and adult alcohol intake have been shown to perturb the metabolism of various micro- and macro-nutrients, including vitamin A and its derivatives (retinoids). Therefore, it has been hypothesized that the well-known detrimental consequences of alcohol consumption may be due to deregulations of the metabolism of such nutrients rather than to a direct effect of alcohol. Alcohol exposure in utero also has long-term harmful consequences on the health of the offspring with mechanisms that have not been fully clarified. Disruption of tissue retinoid homeostasis has been linked not only to abnormal embryonic development, but also to various adult pathological conditions, including cancer, metabolic disorders and abnormal lung function. We hypothesized that prenatal alcohol exposure may permanently perturb tissue retinoid metabolism, predisposing the offspring to adult chronic diseases. Methods Serum and tissues (liver, lung and prostate from males; liver and lung from females) were collected from 60-75 day-old sprague dawley rats born from dams that were: (I) fed a liquid diet containing 6.7% alcohol between gestational day 7 and 21; or (II) pair-fed with isocaloric liquid diet during the same gestational window; or (III) fed ad libitum with regular rat chow diet throughout pregnancy. Serum and tissue retinoid levels were analyzed by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Serum retinol-binding protein (RBP) levels were measured by western blot analysis, and liver, lung and prostate mRNA levels of lecithin-retinol acyltransferase (LRAT) were measured by qPCR. Results Retinyl ester levels were significantly reduced in the lung of both males and females, as well as in the liver and ventral prostate of males born from alcohol-fed dams. Tissue LRAT mRNA levels remained unchanged upon maternal alcohol treatment. Conclusions Prenatal alcohol exposure in rats affects retinoid metabolism in adult life, in a tissue- and sex

  11. Glycogen content regulates peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-∂ (PPAR-∂) activity in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Philp, Andrew; MacKenzie, Matthew G; Belew, Micah Y; Towler, Mhairi C; Corstorphine, Alan; Papalamprou, Angela; Hardie, D Grahame; Baar, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Performing exercise in a glycogen depleted state increases skeletal muscle lipid utilization and the transcription of genes regulating mitochondrial β-oxidation. Potential candidates for glycogen-mediated metabolic adaptation are the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) and the transcription factor/nuclear receptor PPAR-∂. It was therefore the aim of the present study to examine whether acute exercise with or without glycogen manipulation affects PGC-1α and PPAR-∂ function in rodent skeletal muscle. Twenty female Wistar rats were randomly assigned to 5 experimental groups (n = 4): control [CON]; normal glycogen control [NG-C]; normal glycogen exercise [NG-E]; low glycogen control [LG-C]; and low glycogen exercise [LG-E]). Gastrocnemius (GTN) muscles were collected immediately following exercise and analyzed for glycogen content, PPAR-∂ activity via chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays, AMPK α1/α2 kinase activity, and the localization of AMPK and PGC-1α. Exercise reduced muscle glycogen by 47 and 75% relative to CON in the NG-E and LG-E groups, respectively. Exercise that started with low glycogen (LG-E) finished with higher AMPK-α2 activity (147%, p<0.05), nuclear AMPK-α2 and PGC-1α, but no difference in AMPK-α1 activity compared to CON. In addition, PPAR-∂ binding to the CPT1 promoter was significantly increased only in the LG-E group. Finally, cell reporter studies in contracting C2C12 myotubes indicated that PPAR-∂ activity following contraction is sensitive to glucose availability, providing mechanistic insight into the association between PPAR-∂ and glycogen content/substrate availability. The present study is the first to examine PPAR-∂ activity in skeletal muscle in response to an acute bout of endurance exercise. Our data would suggest that a factor associated with muscle contraction and/or glycogen depletion activates PPAR-∂ and initiates AMPK translocation in skeletal muscle in

  12. Simultaneous subchronic exposure to selenium and diazinon as possible risk factor for osteoporosis in adult male rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Osteoporosis and its main health outcome, fragility fractures, are large and escalating health problems. Skeletal damage may be the critical result of low-level prolonged exposure to several xenobiotics in the general population, but the mechanisms of their adverse effects are not clearly understood. The current study was aimed to investigate the possible ability of simultaneous subchronic peroral administration of selenium (Se) and diazinon (DZN) to induce changes in bone of adult male rats. In our study, twenty 1-month-old male Wistar rats were randomly divided into two experimental groups. In the first group, young males were exposed to 5 mg Na2SeO3/L and 40 mg of DZN/L in drinking water, for 90 days. Ten 1-month-old males without Se and DZN intoxication served as a control group. At the end of the experiment, macroscopic and microscopic structures of the femurs were analysed using analytical scales, sliding instrument, and polarized light microscopy. Results The body weight, femoral length and cortical bone thickness were significantly decreased in rats simultaneously exposed to Se and DZN (P < 0.05). These rats also displayed different microstructure in the middle part of the compact bone where vascular canals expanded into central area of substantia compacta. The canals occurred only near endosteal surfaces in rats from the control group. Additionally, a smaller number of primary and secondary osteons, as well as a few resorption lacunae were observed near endosteal surfaces in rats simultaneously administered to Se and DZN. The resorption lacunae as typical structures of bone resorption manifestation are connected with an early stage of osteoporosis. Histomorphometric analysis revealed that area, perimeter, maximum and minimum diameters of primary osteons’ vascular canals were significantly increased (P < 0.05) in the Se-DZN-exposed rats. On the other hand, all measured variables of Haversian canals and secondary osteons were

  13. Expression of interleukin-15 and inflammatory cytokines in skeletal muscles of STZ-induced diabetic rats: effect of resistance exercise training.

    PubMed

    Molanouri Shamsi, M; Hassan, Z H; Gharakhanlou, R; Quinn, L S; Azadmanesh, K; Baghersad, L; Isanejad, A; Mahdavi, M

    2014-05-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy is associated with type-1 diabetes. Skeletal muscle is the source of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines that can mediate muscle hypertrophy and atrophy, while resistance exercise can modulate both muscle mass and muscle cytokine expression. This study determined the effects of a 5-week resistance exercise training regimen on the expression of muscle cytokines in healthy and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, with special emphasis on interleukin-15 (IL-15), a muscle-derived cytokine proposed to be involved in muscle hypertrophy or responses to stress. Induction of diabetes reduced muscle weight in both the fast flexor hallucis longus (FHL) and slow soleus muscles, while resistance training preserved FHL muscle weight in diabetic rats. IL-15 protein content was increased by training in both FHL and soleus muscles, as well as serum, in normal and diabetic rats. With regard to proinflammatory cytokines, muscle IL-6 levels were increased in diabetic rats, while training decreased muscle IL-6 levels in diabetic rats; training had no effect on FHL muscle IL-6 levels in healthy rats. Also, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and IL-1β levels were increased by diabetes, but not changed by training. In conclusion, we found that in diabetic rats, resistance training increased muscle and serum IL-15 levels, decreased muscle IL-6 levels, and preserved FHL muscle mass.

  14. Molecular and metabolomic effects of voluntary running wheel activity on skeletal muscle in late middle-aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Garvey, Sean M; Russ, David W; Skelding, Mary B; Dugle, Janis E; Edens, Neile K

    2015-01-01

    We examined the molecular and metabolomic effects of voluntary running wheel activity in late middle-aged male Sprague Dawley rats (16–17 months). Rats were assigned either continuous voluntary running wheel access for 8 weeks (RW+) or cage-matched without running wheel access (RW−). The 9 RW+ rats averaged 83 m/day (range: 8–163 m), yet exhibited both 84% reduced individual body weight gain (4.3 g vs. 26.3 g, P = 0.02) and 6.5% reduced individual average daily food intake (20.6 g vs. 22.0 g, P = 0.09) over the 8 weeks. Hindlimb muscles were harvested following an overnight fast. Muscle weights and myofiber cross-sectional area showed no difference between groups. Western blots of gastrocnemius muscle lysates with a panel of antibodies suggest that running wheel activity improved oxidative metabolism (53% increase in PGC1α, P = 0.03), increased autophagy (36% increase in LC3B-II/-I ratio, P = 0.03), and modulated growth signaling (26% increase in myostatin, P = 0.04). RW+ muscle also showed 43% increased glycogen phosphorylase expression (P = 0.04) and 45% increased glycogen content (P = 0.04). Metabolomic profiling of plantaris and soleus muscles indicated that even low-volume voluntary running wheel activity is associated with decreases in many long-chain fatty acids (e.g., palmitoleate, myristoleate, and eicosatrienoate) relative to RW− rats. Relative increases in acylcarnitines and acyl glycerophospholipids were also observed in RW+ plantaris. These data establish that even modest amounts of physical activity during late middle-age promote extensive metabolic remodeling of skeletal muscle. PMID:25716928

  15. Molecular and metabolomic effects of voluntary running wheel activity on skeletal muscle in late middle-aged rats.

    PubMed

    Garvey, Sean M; Russ, David W; Skelding, Mary B; Dugle, Janis E; Edens, Neile K

    2015-02-01

    We examined the molecular and metabolomic effects of voluntary running wheel activity in late middle-aged male Sprague Dawley rats (16-17 months). Rats were assigned either continuous voluntary running wheel access for 8 weeks (RW+) or cage-matched without running wheel access (RW-). The 9 RW+ rats averaged 83 m/day (range: 8-163 m), yet exhibited both 84% reduced individual body weight gain (4.3 g vs. 26.3 g, P = 0.02) and 6.5% reduced individual average daily food intake (20.6 g vs. 22.0 g, P = 0.09) over the 8 weeks. Hindlimb muscles were harvested following an overnight fast. Muscle weights and myofiber cross-sectional area showed no difference between groups. Western blots of gastrocnemius muscle lysates with a panel of antibodies suggest that running wheel activity improved oxidative metabolism (53% increase in PGC1α, P = 0.03), increased autophagy (36% increase in LC3B-II/-I ratio, P = 0.03), and modulated growth signaling (26% increase in myostatin, P = 0.04). RW+ muscle also showed 43% increased glycogen phosphorylase expression (P = 0.04) and 45% increased glycogen content (P = 0.04). Metabolomic profiling of plantaris and soleus muscles indicated that even low-volume voluntary running wheel activity is associated with decreases in many long-chain fatty acids (e.g., palmitoleate, myristoleate, and eicosatrienoate) relative to RW- rats. Relative increases in acylcarnitines and acyl glycerophospholipids were also observed in RW+ plantaris. These data establish that even modest amounts of physical activity during late middle-age promote extensive metabolic remodeling of skeletal muscle.

  16. Effect of Exercise Training on Skeletal Muscle SIRT1 and PGC-1α Expression Levels in Rats of Different Age

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chi-Chang; Wang, Ting; Tung, Yu-Tang; Lin, Wan-Teng

    2016-01-01

    The protein deacetylase sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) and activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) pathway drives the muscular fiber-type switching, and can directly regulate the biophysiological functions of skeletal muscle. To investigate whether 12-week swimming exercise training modulates the SIRT1/PGC-1α pathway associated proteins expression in rats of different age. Male 3-month-old (3M), 12-month-old (12M) and 18-month-old (18M) Sprague-Dawley rats were used and assigned to sedentary control (C) or 12-week swimming exercise training (E) and divided into six groups: 3MC (n = 8), 12MC (n = 6), 18MC (n = 8), 3ME (n = 8), 12ME (n = 5) and 18ME (n = 6). Body weight, muscle weight, epididymal fat mass and muscle morphology were performed at the end of the experiment. The protein levels of SIRT1, PGC-1α, AMPK and FOXO3a in the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles were examined. The SIRT1, PGC-1α and AMPK levels in the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles were up-regulated in the three exercise training groups than three control groups. The FOXO3a level in the 12ME group significantly increased in the gastrocnemius muscles than 12MC group, but significantly decreased in the soleus muscles. In 3-, 12- and 18-month-old rats with and without exercise, there was a significant main effect of exercise on PGC-1α, AMPK and FOXO3a in the gastrocnemius muscles, and SIRT1, PGC-1α and AMPK in the soleus muscles. Our result suggests that swimming training can regulate the SIRT1/PGC-1α, AMPK and FOXO3a proteins expression of the soleus muscles in aged rats. PMID:27076782

  17. Effect of Exercise Training on Skeletal Muscle SIRT1 and PGC-1α Expression Levels in Rats of Different Age.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chi-Chang; Wang, Ting; Tung, Yu-Tang; Lin, Wan-Teng

    2016-01-01

    The protein deacetylase sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) and activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) pathway drives the muscular fiber-type switching, and can directly regulate the biophysiological functions of skeletal muscle. To investigate whether 12-week swimming exercise training modulates the SIRT1/PGC-1α pathway associated proteins expression in rats of different age. Male 3-month-old (3M), 12-month-old (12M) and 18-month-old (18M) Sprague-Dawley rats were used and assigned to sedentary control (C) or 12-week swimming exercise training (E) and divided into six groups: 3MC (n = 8), 12MC (n = 6), 18MC (n = 8), 3ME (n = 8), 12ME (n = 5) and 18ME (n = 6). Body weight, muscle weight, epididymal fat mass and muscle morphology were performed at the end of the experiment. The protein levels of SIRT1, PGC-1α, AMPK and FOXO3a in the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles were examined. The SIRT1, PGC-1α and AMPK levels in the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles were up-regulated in the three exercise training groups than three control groups. The FOXO3a level in the 12ME group significantly increased in the gastrocnemius muscles than 12MC group, but significantly decreased in the soleus muscles. In 3-, 12- and 18-month-old rats with and without exercise, there was a significant main effect of exercise on PGC-1α, AMPK and FOXO3a in the gastrocnemius muscles, and SIRT1, PGC-1α and AMPK in the soleus muscles. Our result suggests that swimming training can regulate the SIRT1/PGC-1α, AMPK and FOXO3a proteins expression of the soleus muscles in aged rats. PMID:27076782

  18. Effects of intravenous neuropeptide Y on insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle in normal rats.

    PubMed

    Vettor, R; Pagano, C; Granzotto, M; Englaro, P; Angeli, P; Blum, W F; Federspil, G; Rohner-Jeanrenaud, F; Jeanrenaud, B

    1998-11-01

    Intracerebroventricular administration of neuropeptide Y to normal rats induces a syndrome characterised by obesity, hyperinsulinaemia, insulin resistance and over expression of the adipose tissue ob gene. Little is known about the effect of circulating neuropeptide Y on glucose metabolism, insulin secretion and leptin. We therefore aimed to evaluate the effect of an intravenous infusion of neuropeptide Y on glucose disposal, endogenous glucose production, whole body glycolytic flux, and glucose storage as assessed during euglycaemic hyperinsulinaemic clamp. In addition, the insulin-stimulated glucose utilisation index in individual tissues was measured by the 2-deoxy-[1-3H]-glucose technique. The effect of neuropeptide Y on insulin secretion was evaluated by hyperglycaemic clamp. Infusion did not induce any change in endogenous glucose production during basal conditions or at the end of the clamp. Glucose disposal was significantly increased in the rats given neuropeptide Y compared with controls (27.8 +/- 1.3 vs 24.3 +/- 1.6 mg x min(-1) x kg(-1); p < 0.05) as was the glycolytic flux (18.9 +/- 1.6 vs 14.4 +/- 0.8 mg x min(-1) x kg(-1); p < 0.05), while glucose storage was comparable in the two groups. In skeletal muscle, the glucose utilisation index was increased significantly in rats given neuropeptide Y. The glucose utilisation index in subcutaneous and epididimal adipose tissue was not significantly different between the two groups. Plasma leptin was significantly increased by hyperinsulinaemia, but was not affected by neuropeptide Y infusion. Both the early and late phase of the insulin response to hyperglycaemia were significantly reduced by neuropeptide Y. In conclusion neuropeptide Y infusion may increase insulin-induced glucose disposal in normal rats, accelerating its utilisation through the glycolytic pathway. Neuropeptide Y reduces both phases of the insulin response to hyperglycaemia.

  19. Pterostilbene improves glycaemic control in rats fed an obesogenic diet: Involvement of skeletal muscle and liver

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study aimed to determine whether pterostilbene improved glycaemic control in rats showing insulin resistance induced by an obesogenic diet. Rats were divided into 3 groups: control group and two groups treated with either 15 mg/kg/d (PT15) or 30 mg/kg/d of pterostilbene (PT30). HOMA-IR was decr...

  20. Skeletal response to corticosteroid deficiency and excess in growing male rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, M.; Shen, Y.; Halloran, B. P.; Baumann, B. D.; Miller, K.; Wronski, T. J.

    1996-01-01

    The study was designed to investigate bone histomorphometric changes induced by corticosteroid deficiency and supplementation at different dose levels in the rat skeleton. Male rats were adrenalectomized (ADX) or sham-operated and divided into six groups. At 2 days after surgery, sham-operated control rats (CON + PLA) and one group of ADX rats (ADX + PLA) were implanted subcutaneously (s.c.) with placebo pellets. ADX rats in the remaining four groups (ADX + C25, ADX + C50, ADX + C100, and ADX + C300) were implanted sc with corticosterone pellets designed to release 25, 50, 100, or 300 mg of the hormone over a 60 day period. Each ADX rat was also implanted sc with an aldosterone pellet (2.5 mg) similarly designed to release its contents over the same time period. All rats were killed at 3 weeks after implantation of pellets. Terminal blood samples were collected for serum biochemistry and the proximal tibial metaphyses (PTM), tibial diaphyses, and first lumbar vertebrae (LV) were processed undecalcified for quantitative bone histomorphometry. A dose-dependent increase in serum corticosterone concentration was observed in ADX rats implanted with hormone pellets. In comparison to CON + PLA rats, ADX + PLA rats had lower cancellous bone volume associated with a stimulation in longitudinal bone growth, an increase in mineral apposition rate, and a trend for increased osteoclast and osteoblast surfaces in PTM. In contrast, cancellous bone of ADX + C25 rats was preserved at nearly the CON + PLA level. However, the higher doses of corticosterone increased cancellous bone mass, but decreased longitudinal bone growth and all indices of bone resorption and formation in a dose-dependent manner in PTM. Similar cancellous bone changes were observed in the LV of corticosterone-treated rats, with the exception of a lack of an hormonal effect on cancellous bone mass. In the tibial diaphysis, corticosterone inhibited periosteal bone formation in a dose-dependent manner, but did not

  1. pH buffering of single rat skeletal muscle fibers in the in vivo environment.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yoshinori; Inagaki, Tadakatsu; Poole, David C; Kano, Yutaka

    2016-05-15

    Homeostasis of intracellular pH (pHi) has a crucial role for the maintenance of cellular function. Several membrane transporters such as lactate/H(+) cotransporter (MCT), Na(+)/H(+) exchange transporter (NHE), and Na(+)/HCO3 (-) cotransporter (NBC) are thought to contribute to pHi regulation. However, the relative importance of each of these membrane transporters to the in vivo recovery from the low pHi condition is unknown. Using an in vivo bioimaging model, we pharmacologically inhibited each transporter separately and all transporters together and then evaluated the pHi recovery profiles following imposition of a discrete H(+) challenge loaded into single muscle fibers by microinjection. The intact spinotrapezius muscle of adult male Wistar rats (n = 72) was exteriorized and loaded with the fluorescent probe 2',7'-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein-acetoxymethyl ester (10 μM). A single muscle fiber was then loaded with low-pH solution [piperazine-N,N'-bis(2-ethanesulfonic acid) buffer, pH 6.5, ∼2.33 × 10(-3) μl] by microinjection over 3 s. The rats were divided into groups for the following treatments: 1) no inhibitor (CONT), 2) MCT inhibition (by α-Cyano-4-hydroxyciannamic acid; 4 mM), 3) NHE inhibition (by ethylisopropyl amiloride; 0.5 mM), 4) NBC inhibition (by DIDS; 1 mM), and 5) MCT, NHE, and NBC inhibition (All blockade). The fluorescence ratio (F500 nm/F445 nm) was determined from images captured during 1 min (60 images/min) and at 5, 10, 15, and 20 min after injection. The pHi at 1-2 s after injection significantly decreased from resting pHi (ΔpHi = -0.73 ± 0.03) in CONT. The recovery response profile was biphasic, with an initial rapid and close-to-exponential pHi increase (time constant, τ: 60.0 ± 7.9 s). This initial rapid profile was not affected by any pharmacological blockade but was significantly delayed by carbonic anhydrase inhibition. In contrast, the secondary, more gradual, return toward baseline that restored CONT pHi to

  2. Developmental Vitamin D3 deficiency alters the adult rat brain.

    PubMed

    Féron, F; Burne, T H J; Brown, J; Smith, E; McGrath, J J; Mackay-Sim, A; Eyles, D W

    2005-03-15

    There is growing evidence that Vitamin D(3) (1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3)) is involved in brain development. We have recently shown that the brains of newborn rats from Vitamin D(3) deficient dams were larger than controls, had increased cell proliferation, larger lateral ventricles, and reduced cortical thickness. Brains from these animals also had reduced expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor. The aim of the current study was to examine if there were any permanent outcomes into adulthood when the offspring of Vitamin D(3) deficient dams were restored to a normal diet. The brains of adult rats were examined at 10 weeks of age after Vitamin D(3) deficiency until birth or weaning. Compared to controls animals that were exposed to transient early Vitamin D(3) deficiency had larger lateral ventricles, reduced NGF protein content, and reduced expression of a number genes involved in neuronal structure, i.e. neurofilament or MAP-2 or neurotransmission, i.e. GABA-A(alpha4). We conclude that transient early life hypovitaminosis D(3) not only disrupts brain development but leads to persistent changes in the adult brain. In light of the high incidence of hypovitaminosis D(3) in women of child-bearing age, the public health implications of these findings warrant attention. PMID:15763180

  3. Decline of taste sensitivity in protein deficient adult rats.

    PubMed

    Ohara, I; Tabuchi, R; Kimura, M; Itokawa, Y

    1995-05-01

    The influence of dietary protein levels on taste sensitivity was studied in adult rats. Low protein diets of 0.0, 2.5, or 5.0% purified egg protein (PEP) were fed to animals for 28 days. Two bottle choice preference tests between aqueous solutions of either 2, 9, 17, or 86 mM sodium chloride and deionized water were conducted in an ascending order on days 14, 16, 18, and 20. Urine samples were collected for zinc and creatinine analysis. Blood samples were also collected for measuring serum zinc and creatinine concentrations. Scanning electron microscopy was performed to observe rats' tongue epithelia. Protein free diet group showed significantly lower taste sensitivity and renal reabsorption rate than other protein containing diet groups, while serum zinc and creatinine concentrations, and creatinine clearance were not affected by dietary protein level. Degeneration of filiform papillae and imperforation of taste pore of fungiform papillae were observed in protein free diet group. This experiment implies at least 2.5% dietary protein is required to manifest normal taste function in the adult. PMID:7610145

  4. Decline of taste sensitivity in protein deficient adult rats.

    PubMed

    Ohara, I; Tabuchi, R; Kimura, M; Itokawa, Y

    1995-05-01

    The influence of dietary protein levels on taste sensitivity was studied in adult rats. Low protein diets of 0.0, 2.5, or 5.0% purified egg protein (PEP) were fed to animals for 28 days. Two bottle choice preference tests between aqueous solutions of either 2, 9, 17, or 86 mM sodium chloride and deionized water were conducted in an ascending order on days 14, 16, 18, and 20. Urine samples were collected for zinc and creatinine analysis. Blood samples were also collected for measuring serum zinc and creatinine concentrations. Scanning electron microscopy was performed to observe rats' tongue epithelia. Protein free diet group showed significantly lower taste sensitivity and renal reabsorption rate than other protein containing diet groups, while serum zinc and creatinine concentrations, and creatinine clearance were not affected by dietary protein level. Degeneration of filiform papillae and imperforation of taste pore of fungiform papillae were observed in protein free diet group. This experiment implies at least 2.5% dietary protein is required to manifest normal taste function in the adult.

  5. Acute behavioral toxicity of carbaryl and propoxur in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Ruppert, P H; Cook, L L; Dean, K F; Reiter, L W

    1983-04-01

    Motor activity and neuromotor function were examined in adult CD rats exposed to either carbaryl or propoxur, and behavioral effects were compared with the time course of cholinesterase inhibition. Rats received an IP injection of either 0, 2, 4, 6 or 8 mg/kg propoxur or 0, 4, 8, 16 or 28 mg/kg carbaryl in corn oil 20 min before testing. All doses of propoxur reduced 2 hr activity in a figure-eight maze, and crossovers and rears in an open field. For carbaryl, dosages of 8, 16 and 28 mg/kg decreased maze activity whereas 16 and 28 mg/kg reduced open field activity. In order to determine the time course of effects, rats received a single IP injection of either corn oil, 2 mg/kg propoxur or 16 mg/kg carbaryl, and were tested for 5 min in a figure-eight maze either 15, 30, 60, 120 or 240 min post-injection. Immediately after testing, animals were sacrificed and total cholinesterase was measured. Maximum effects of propoxur and carbaryl on blood and brain cholinesterase and motor activity were seen within 15 min. Maze activity had returned to control levels within 30 and 60 min whereas cholinesterase levels remained depressed for 120 and 240 min for propoxur and carbaryl, respectively. These results indicate that both carbamates decrease motor activity, but behavioral recovery occurs prior to that of cholinesterase following acute exposure.

  6. Effect of exposure to diazinon on adult rat's brain.

    PubMed

    Rashedinia, Marzieh; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein; Imenshahidi, Mohsen; Lari, Parisa; Razavi, Bibi Marjan; Abnous, Khalil

    2016-04-01

    Diazinon (DZN), a commonly used agricultural organophosphate insecticide, is one of the major concerns for human health. This study was planned to investigate neurotoxic effects of subacute exposure to DZN in adult male Wistar rats. Animals received corn oil as control and 15 and 30 mg/kg DZN orally by gastric gavage for 4 weeks. The cerebrum malondialdehyde and glutathione (GSH) contents were assessed as biomarkers of lipid peroxidation and nonenzyme antioxidants, respectively. Moreover, activated forms of caspase 3, -9, and Bax/Bcl-2 ratios were evaluated as key apoptotic proteins. Results of this study suggested that chronic administration of DZN did not change lipid peroxidation and GSH levels significantly in comparison with control. Also, the active forms of caspase 3 and caspase 9 were not significantly altered in DZN-treated rat groups. Moreover, no significant changes were observed in Bax and Bcl-2 ratios. This study indicated that generation of reactive oxygen species was probably modulated by intracellular antioxidant system. In conclusion, subacute oral administration of DZN did not alter lipid peroxidation. Moreover, apoptosis induction was not observed in rat brain.

  7. Intrinsic Ability of Adult Stem Cell in Skeletal Muscle: An Effective and Replenishable Resource to the Establishment of Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fujimaki, Shin; Machida, Masanao; Hidaka, Ryo; Asashima, Makoto; Takemasa, Tohru; Kuwabara, Tomoko

    2013-01-01

    Adult stem cells play an essential role in mammalian organ maintenance and repair throughout adulthood since they ensure that organs retain their ability to regenerate. The choice of cell fate by adult stem cells for cellular proliferation, self-renewal, and differentiation into multiple lineages is critically important for the homeostasis and biological function of individual organs. Responses of stem cells to stress, injury, or environmental change are precisely regulated by intercellular and intracellular signaling networks, and these molecular events cooperatively define the ability of stem cell throughout life. Skeletal muscle tissue represents an abundant, accessible, and replenishable source of adult stem cells. Skeletal muscle contains myogenic satellite cells and muscle-derived stem cells that retain multipotent differentiation abilities. These stem cell populations have the capacity for long-term proliferation and high self-renewal. The molecular mechanisms associated with deficits in skeletal muscle and stem cell function have been extensively studied. Muscle-derived stem cells are an obvious, readily available cell resource that offers promise for cell-based therapy and various applications in the field of tissue engineering. This review describes the strategies commonly used to identify and functionally characterize adult stem cells, focusing especially on satellite cells, and discusses their potential applications. PMID:23818907

  8. Skeletal muscle power: a critical determinant of physical functioning in older adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Muscle power declines earlier and more precipitously with advancing age compared to muscle strength. Peak muscle power has also emerged as an important predictor of functional limitations in older adults. Our current working hypothesis is focused on examining lower extremity muscle power as a more d...

  9. Effect of MPEP in Morris water maze in adult and old rats.

    PubMed

    Car, Halina; Stefaniuk, Radosław; Wiśniewska, Róza J

    2007-01-01

    The present investigation assessed the effects of 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)-pyridine (MPEP) on acquisition and reference memory in the Morris water maze in young adult rats aged 3-month and old rats aged 26-month. MPEP reduced the swim speed of the young adult rats during acquisition, shortened the distance they covered and reduced their swim speed in the probe trial. The untreated old rats had impaired acquisition of spatial learning, shortened distance and a lower swim speed in the probe trial in comparison with young rats. MPEP did not influence the activity of the old rats in the water maze. In summary, MPEP did not influence acquisition of spatial learning and reference memory in the young adult and old rats.

  10. Resistance Training Enhances Skeletal Muscle Innervation Without Modifying the Number of Satellite Cells or their Myofiber Association in Obese Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Messi, María Laura; Li, Tao; Wang, Zhong-Min; Marsh, Anthony P; Nicklas, Barbara; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2016-10-01

    Studies in humans and animal models provide compelling evidence for age-related skeletal muscle denervation, which may contribute to muscle fiber atrophy and loss. Skeletal muscle denervation seems relentless; however, long-term, high-intensity physical activity appears to promote muscle reinnervation. Whether 5-month resistance training (RT) enhances skeletal muscle innervation in obese older adults is unknown. This study found that neural cell-adhesion molecule, NCAM+ muscle area decreased with RT and was inversely correlated with muscle strength. NCAM1 and RUNX1 gene transcripts significantly decreased with the intervention. Type I and type II fiber grouping in the vastus lateralis did not change significantly but increases in leg press and knee extensor strength inversely correlated with type I, but not with type II, fiber grouping. RT did not modify the total number of satellite cells, their number per area, or the number associated with specific fiber subtypes or innervated/denervated fibers. Our results suggest that RT has a beneficial impact on skeletal innervation, even when started late in life by sedentary obese older adults. PMID:26447161

  11. Resistance Training Enhances Skeletal Muscle Innervation Without Modifying the Number of Satellite Cells or their Myofiber Association in Obese Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Messi, María Laura; Li, Tao; Wang, Zhong-Min; Marsh, Anthony P; Nicklas, Barbara; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2016-10-01

    Studies in humans and animal models provide compelling evidence for age-related skeletal muscle denervation, which may contribute to muscle fiber atrophy and loss. Skeletal muscle denervation seems relentless; however, long-term, high-intensity physical activity appears to promote muscle reinnervation. Whether 5-month resistance training (RT) enhances skeletal muscle innervation in obese older adults is unknown. This study found that neural cell-adhesion molecule, NCAM+ muscle area decreased with RT and was inversely correlated with muscle strength. NCAM1 and RUNX1 gene transcripts significantly decreased with the intervention. Type I and type II fiber grouping in the vastus lateralis did not change significantly but increases in leg press and knee extensor strength inversely correlated with type I, but not with type II, fiber grouping. RT did not modify the total number of satellite cells, their number per area, or the number associated with specific fiber subtypes or innervated/denervated fibers. Our results suggest that RT has a beneficial impact on skeletal innervation, even when started late in life by sedentary obese older adults.

  12. The effect of exercises on the content and reception of the steroid hormones in rat skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Tchaikovsky, V S; Astratenkova, J V; Basharina, O B

    1986-01-01

    Two peaks of hormone concentration in blood and skeletal muscles (SM) were found, immediately after intensive physical exercises (PE) and the late period of rest. Immediately after PE testosterone (T) and estradiol (E2) concentration in SM increased on 36 and 430%, returning to the initial level in 2 h. E2 and androstenedione content in SM increased from 33 +/- 7 to 89 +/- 3 and from 563 +/- 58 to 767 +/- 38 pg/g tissue accordingly in 48 h, returning to the initial level in 72 h. T content increased in blood 3.7-fold in SM 2.2-fold in 72 h after PE. Androgen receptor (AR) contents in SM cytosol increased (on 28%) in 2 h, then returned to the control level and increased again in 72 h (from 0.6 +/- 0.4 to 1.2 +/- 0.2 fmol/mg protein) after PE. Kd did not change significantly and were 0.33 +/- 0.03 nM. The experiments on female rats showed the same tendency, but T increasing was more marked compared to male rats. The obtained results showed that the hormonal regulation of metabolic processes in SM has a cyclic character and is connected with the changing of hormonal content and hormonal SM receptors.

  13. Effect of chronic excess of tumour necrosis factor-alpha on contractile proteins in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Cheema, I R; Hermann, C; Postell, S; Barnes, P

    2000-01-01

    The effect of chronic tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) treatment on the synthesis of specific myofibrillar proteins such as heavy chain myosin, light chain myosin and G-actin in rat diaphragm were evaluated. Muscles (diaphragm) from control and experimental groups (TNF-alpha i.v. at 50 microg/kg body wt for 5 days) were incubated in the presence of 35S-methionine for 2 h. Myofibrillar protein extracts were prepared and protein was electrophoresed on sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gels. Heavy chain myosin, light chain myosin and G-actin were identified by Western blot analysis using specific monoclonal antibodies. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) followed by Western blot analysis revealed two types of heavy chain myosin (206 and 212 kD), all four types of light chain myosin (15, 16.5, 18 and 20 kD) and a single type of G-actin (42 kD). Chronic TNF-alpha treatment produced a significant decline in the synthesis of all types of myofibrillar proteins, namely heavy chain myosin, light chain myosin and G-actin. TNF-alpha impaired peptide-chain initiation in diaphragm muscle which was reversed by the branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) therapy of TNF-alpha treated rats. These findings indicate a significant role for TNF-alpha in the translational regulation of protein synthesis in skeletal muscle.

  14. Indoxyl sulfate exacerbates low bone turnover induced by parathyroidectomy in young adult rats.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Junya; Hirai, Kazuya; Asai, Hirobumi; Matsumoto, Chiho; Inada, Masaki; Miyaura, Chisato; Yamato, Hideyuki; Watanabe-Akanuma, Mie

    2015-10-01

    Low-turnover bone disease is one of the bone abnormalities observed in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is recognized to be associated with low serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) level and skeletal resistance to PTH. Indoxyl sulfate (IS) is a representative uremic toxin that accumulates in the blood as renal dysfunction progresses in CKD patients. A recent in vitro study using an osteoblastic cell culture system suggests that IS has an important role in the pathogenesis of low bone turnover through induction of skeletal resistance to PTH. However, the effects of IS on the progression of low bone turnover have not been elucidated. In the present study, we produced rats with low bone turnover by performing parathyroidectomy (PTX) and fed these rats a diet containing indole, a precursor of IS, to elevate blood IS level from indole metabolism. Bone metabolism was evaluated by measuring histomorphometric parameters of secondary spongiosa of the femur. Histomorphometric analyses revealed significant decreases in both bone formation-related parameters and bone resorption-related parameters in PTX rats. In indole-treated PTX rats, further decreases in bone formation-related parameters were observed. In addition, serum alkaline phosphatase activity, a bone formation marker, and bone mineral density of the tibia tended to decrease in indole-treated PTX rats. These findings strongly suggest that IS exacerbates low bone turnover through inhibition of bone formation by mechanisms unrelated to skeletal resistance to PTH. PMID:26112820

  15. Purification and culture of adult rat dorsal root ganglia neurons.

    PubMed

    Delree, P; Leprince, P; Schoenen, J; Moonen, G

    1989-06-01

    To study the trophic requirements of adult rat dorsal root ganglia neurons (DRG) in vitro, we developed a purification procedure that yields highly enriched neuronal cultures. Forty to fifty ganglia are dissected from the spinal column of an adult rat. After enzymatic and mechanical dissociation of the ganglia, myelin debris are eliminated by centrifugation on a Percoll gradient. The resulting cell suspension is layered onto a nylon mesh with a pore size of 10 microns. Most of the neurons, the diameter of which ranged from 17 microns to greater than 100 microns, are retained on the upper surface of the sieve; most of the non-neuronal cells with a caliber of less than 10 microns after trypsinization go through it. Recovery of neurons is achieved by reversing the mesh onto a Petri dish containing culture medium. Neurons to non-neurons ratio is 1 to 10 in the initial cell suspension and 1 to 1 after separation. When these purified neurons are seeded at a density of 3,000 neurons/cm2 in 6 mm polyornithine-laminin (PORN-LAM) coated wells, neuronal survival (assessed by the ability to extend neurites), measured after 48 hr of culture, is very low (from 0 to 16%). Addition of nerve growth factor (NGF) does not improve neuronal survival. However, when neurons are cultured in the presence of medium conditioned (CM) by astrocytes or Schwann cells, 60-80% of the seeded, dye-excluding neurons survive. So, purified adult DRG neurons require for their short-term survival and regeneration in culture, a trophic support that is present in conditioned medium from PNS or CNS glia.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Immature rat Leydig cells are intrinsically less sensitive than adult Leydig cells to ethane dimethanesulfonate.

    PubMed

    Kelce, W R; Zirkin, B R; Ewing, L L

    1991-11-01

    Leydig cells from immature rat testes appear to be insensitive to doses of ethane-1,2-dimethanesulfonate (EDS) which eliminate Leydig cells from adult rat testes. We sought to determine whether this differential response to EDS is intrinsic to the Leydig cell or mediated by other intra- or extratesticular differences between adult and immature rats. To differentiate among these possibilities, Leydig cells were exposed to EDS (1) in vivo, (2) through in vitro testicular perfusion, or (3) in highly purified Leydig cell primary cultures. Four days after ip injections of 85 mg EDS/kg body wt Leydig cells were eliminated from testes of adult, but not immature rats. Total androgen production by testes perfused in vitro with 94 micrograms EDS/ml was dramatically reduced in adult, but not immature rats. Highly purified adult, but not immature, rat Leydig cells were far more sensitive to the effects of EDS on luteinizing hormone-stimulated androgen production (functional effects; apparent EC50 = 94 for adult and 407 micrograms/ml for immature rat Leydig cells) and on [35S]methionine incorporation (cytotoxic effects; apparent EC50 = 140 for adult and 1000 micrograms/ml for immature rat Leydig cells). Finally, the in vitro effects of EDS were both cell type and chemical specific. Since the differential response of adult and immature rat Leydig cells to EDS was manifest in vivo, during in vitro testicular perfusion, and in highly purified Leydig cell primary cultures, we conclude that immature rat Leydig cells are intrinsically less sensitive to the specific cytotoxic effects of EDS than adult rat Leydig cells.

  17. Corticotropin-releasing factor: an inhibitor of vascular leakage in rat skeletal muscle and brain cortex after injury.

    PubMed

    Wei, E T; Gao, G C

    1991-04-25

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and other peptides of the corticoliberin superfamily inhibit development of edema in skin and mucosa after noxious stimuli. Here, the breadth of CRFs protective activity on small blood vessels was examined after injury to skeletal muscle or to brain cortex. Male rats (243 +/- 15 g) were anesthetized with sodium pentobarbital 60 mg/kg i.p. and Monastral blue 60 mg/kg i.v. was injected 3 min before mechanical injury to muscle produced by a 4 cm midline surgical incision in the rectus abdominis or before freeze injury to the cortex produced by applying a cold probe (-50 degrees C) to the skull for 4 min. Vascular leakage, measured as area of dye staining multiplied by its light intensity, was quantified with an image-analysis system. CRF, having the human/rat sequence, 30 micrograms/kg s.c., injected once (30 min) or twice (30 min and 10 min) before injury to muscle or to brain, inhibited the lesion size by 58% and 55%, respectively (tissues taken at 0.5 and 1 h). Microscopy showed that CRF inhibited Monastral blue labeling of small blood vessels. The ED50 (95% C.L.) of CRF for reducing vascular leakage in muscle after celiotomy was 24 (9 to 64) micrograms/kg s.c. h/rCRF injected 30 micrograms/kg s.c. 2 h before celiotomy inhibited vascular leakage after celiotomy in adrenalectomized rats and this effect was not obtained with dexamethasone phosphate, 1 mg/kg s.c. alpha-Helical CRF (9-41), a CRF receptor antagonist, attenuated the actions of CRF on celiotomy. Laser-Doppler flowmeter measurements of skeletal muscle showed that the anti-inflammatory effects of CRF occurred when there were no significant concurrent changes in blood flow. From these results, we surmise that CRF has a versatile protective effect on small blood vessels when it inhibits leakage within different vascular beds. PMID:1882088

  18. Increased Skeletal Muscle Capillarization Independently Enhances Insulin Sensitivity in Older Adults After Exercise Training and Detraining.

    PubMed

    Prior, Steven J; Goldberg, Andrew P; Ortmeyer, Heidi K; Chin, Eva R; Chen, Dapeng; Blumenthal, Jacob B; Ryan, Alice S

    2015-10-01

    Intramuscular signaling and glucose transport mechanisms contribute to improvements in insulin sensitivity after aerobic exercise training. This study tested the hypothesis that increases in skeletal muscle capillary density (CD) also contribute to exercise-induced improvements in whole-body insulin sensitivity (insulin-stimulated glucose uptake per unit plasma insulin [M/I]) independent of other mechanisms. The study design included a 6-month aerobic exercise training period followed by a 2-week detraining period to eliminate short-term effects of exercise on intramuscular signaling and glucose transport. Before and after exercise training and detraining, 12 previously sedentary older (65 ± 3 years) men and women underwent research tests, including hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps and vastus lateralis biopsies. Exercise training increased Vo2max (2.2 ± 0.2 vs. 2.5 ± 0.2 L/min), CD (313 ± 13 vs. 349 ± 18 capillaries/mm(2)), and M/I (0.041 ± 0.005 vs. 0.051 ± 0.007 μmol/kg fat-free mass/min) (P < 0.05 for all). Exercise training also increased the insulin activation of glycogen synthase by 60%, GLUT4 expression by 16%, and 5' AMPK-α1 expression by 21%, but these reverted to baseline levels after detraining. Conversely, CD and M/I remained 15% and 18% higher after detraining, respectively (P < 0.05), and the changes in M/I (detraining minus baseline) correlated directly with changes in CD in regression analysis (partial r = 0.70; P = 0.02). These results suggest that an increase in CD is one mechanism contributing to sustained improvements in glucose metabolism after aerobic exercise training. PMID:26068543

  19. Increased Skeletal Muscle Capillarization Independently Enhances Insulin Sensitivity in Older Adults After Exercise Training and Detraining

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Andrew P.; Ortmeyer, Heidi K.; Chin, Eva R.; Chen, Dapeng; Blumenthal, Jacob B.; Ryan, Alice S.

    2015-01-01

    Intramuscular signaling and glucose transport mechanisms contribute to improvements in insulin sensitivity after aerobic exercise training. This study tested the hypothesis that increases in skeletal muscle capillary density (CD) also contribute to exercise-induced improvements in whole-body insulin sensitivity (insulin-stimulated glucose uptake per unit plasma insulin [M/I]) independent of other mechanisms. The study design included a 6-month aerobic exercise training period followed by a 2-week detraining period to eliminate short-term effects of exercise on intramuscular signaling and glucose transport. Before and after exercise training and detraining, 12 previously sedentary older (65 ± 3 years) men and women underwent research tests, including hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps and vastus lateralis biopsies. Exercise training increased Vo2max (2.2 ± 0.2 vs. 2.5 ± 0.2 L/min), CD (313 ± 13 vs. 349 ± 18 capillaries/mm2), and M/I (0.041 ± 0.005 vs. 0.051 ± 0.007 μmol/kg fat-free mass/min) (P < 0.05 for all). Exercise training also increased the insulin activation of glycogen synthase by 60%, GLUT4 expression by 16%, and 5′ AMPK-α1 expression by 21%, but these reverted to baseline levels after detraining. Conversely, CD and M/I remained 15% and 18% higher after detraining, respectively (P < 0.05), and the changes in M/I (detraining minus baseline) correlated directly with changes in CD in regression analysis (partial r = 0.70; P = 0.02). These results suggest that an increase in CD is one mechanism contributing to sustained improvements in glucose metabolism after aerobic exercise training. PMID:26068543

  20. Correlation Between Dental Arch Width and Sagittal Dento-Skeletal Morphology in Untreated Adults

    PubMed Central

    Shahroudi, Atefe Saffar; Etezadi, Tahura

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Dental arch form is one of the most important characteristics of dentition. However, this dimension usually receives less attention in diagnosis or treatment planning and orthodontic patients are traditionally classified with regard to their sagittal characteristics. The objectives of this study were to investigate if a relationship exists between the dental arch width (transverse dimension) and sagittal skeletal and dental parameters in orthodontic patients. Materials and Methods: Dental casts and lateral cephalograms of 108 consecutive untreated Iranian patients (47 males and 61 females) between 16 and 31 years of age were evaluated. Arch width (AW) parameters including upper and lower inter-molar width (UIMW and LIMW) and upper and lower inter-canine width (UICW and LICW) were measured by a digital caliper. Sagittal parameters included SNA and SNB angle and Wits’ appraisal obtained from lateral cephalograms in addition to upper and lower arch length (UAL and LAL) obtained from dental casts. The correlation between the aforementioned parameters was evaluated applying Pearson correlation coefficients. Molar and canine relationship according to Angle’s classification was also recorded and the means of all parameters were compared between three occlusal relationship classes and two gender groups by means of two-way ANOVA. Results: According to statistical analysis a significant positive correlation between sagittal parameters and arch width measures exists between SNA and UICW and between LICW and LAL. Upper and lower ICW were significantly correlated, the relationship between upper and lower IMW and between UAL and LAL were significant. Among sagittal measures, both UAL and LAL were correlated with the ANB angle. The means of arch width parameters in three occlusal classes were not significantly different. Conclusion: The only significant correlation between arch width and sagittal parameters existed between UICW and SNA angle and between LICW and

  1. Myogenin Regulates Exercise Capacity but Is Dispensable for Skeletal Muscle Regeneration in Adult mdx Mice

    PubMed Central

    Klein, William H.

    2011-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most prevalent inherited childhood muscle disorder in humans. mdx mice exhibit a similar pathophysiology to the human disorder allowing for an in-depth investigation of DMD. Myogenin, a myogenic regulatory factor, is best known for its role in embryonic myogenesis, but its role in adult muscle maintenance and regeneration is still poorly understood. Here, we generated an mdx:Myogflox/flox mouse harboring a tamoxifen-inducible Cre recombinase transgene, which was used to conditionally delete Myog during adult life. After tamoxifen treatment, three groups of mice were created to study the effects of Myog deletion: mdx:Myogflox/flox mice (mdx), Myogflox/flox mice (wild-type), and mdx:MyogfloxΔ/floxΔ:Cre-ER mice (mdx:Myog-deleted). mdx:Myog-deleted mice exhibited no adverse phenotype and behaved normally. When run to exhaustion, mdx:Myog-deleted mice demonstrated an enhanced capacity for exercise compared to mdx mice, running nearly as far as wild-type mice. Moreover, these mice showed the same signature characteristics of muscle regeneration as mdx mice. Unexpectedly, we found that myogenin was dispensable for muscle regeneration. Factors associated with muscle fatigue, metabolism, and proteolysis were significantly altered in mdx:Myog-deleted mice, and this might contribute to their increased exercise capacity. Our results reveal novel functions for myogenin in adult muscle and suggest that reducing Myog expression in other muscle disease models may partially restore muscle function. PMID:21264243

  2. A reference skeletal dosimetry model for an adult male radionuclide therapy patient based on three-dimensional imaging and paired-image radiation transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Amish P.

    The need for improved patient-specificity of skeletal dose estimates is widely recognized in radionuclide therapy. Current clinical models for marrow dose are based on skeletal mass estimates from a variety of sources and linear chord-length distributions that do not account for particle escape into cortical bone. To predict marrow dose, these clinical models use a scheme that requires separate calculations of cumulated activity and radionuclide S values. Selection of an appropriate S value is generally limited to one of only three sources, all of which use as input the trabecular microstructure of an individual measured 25 years ago, and the tissue mass derived from different individuals measured 75 years ago. Our study proposed a new modeling approach to marrow dosimetry---the Paired Image Radiation Transport (PIRT) model---that properly accounts for both the trabecular microstructure and the cortical macrostructure of each skeletal site in a reference male radionuclide patient. The PIRT model, as applied within EGSnrc, requires two sets of input geometry: (1) an infinite voxel array of segmented microimages of the spongiosa acquired via microCT; and (2) a segmented ex-vivo CT image of the bone site macrostructure defining both the spongiosa (marrow, endosteum, and trabeculae) and the cortical bone cortex. Our study also proposed revising reference skeletal dosimetry models for the adult male cancer patient. Skeletal site-specific radionuclide S values were obtained for a 66-year-old male reference patient. The derivation for total skeletal S values were unique in that the necessary skeletal mass and electron dosimetry calculations were formulated from the same source bone site over the entire skeleton. We conclude that paired-image radiation-transport techniques provide an adoptable method by which the intricate, anisotropic trabecular microstructure of the skeletal site; and the physical size and shape of the bone can be handled together, for improved

  3. In vivo Ca2+ buffering capacity and microvascular oxygen pressures following muscle contractions in diabetic rat skeletal muscles: fiber-type specific effects.

    PubMed

    Eshima, Hiroaki; Poole, David C; Kano, Yutaka

    2015-07-15

    In Type 1 diabetes, skeletal muscle resting intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) homeostasis is impaired following muscle contractions. It is unclear to what degree this behavior is contingent upon fiber type and muscle oxygenation conditions. We tested the hypotheses that: 1) the rise in resting [Ca(2+)]i evident in diabetic rat slow-twitch (type I) muscle would be exacerbated in fast-twitch (type II) muscle following contraction; and 2) these elevated [Ca(2+)]i levels would relate to derangement of microvascular partial pressure of oxygen (PmvO2 ) rather than sarcoplasmic reticulum dysfunction per se. Adult male Wistar rats were divided randomly into diabetic (DIA: streptozotocin ip) and healthy (CONT) groups. Four weeks later extensor digitorum longus (EDL, predominately type II fibers) and soleus (SOL, predominately type I fibers) muscle contractions were elicited by continuous electrical stimulation (120 s, 100 Hz). Ca(2+) imaging was achieved using fura 2-AM in vivo (i.e., circulation intact). DIA increased fatigability in EDL (P < 0.05) but not SOL. In recovery, SOL [Ca(2+)]i either returned to its resting baseline within 150 s (CONT 1.00 ± 0.02 at 600 s) or was not elevated in recovery at all (DIA 1.03 ± 0.02 at 600 s, P > 0.05). In recovery, EDL CONT [Ca(2+)]i also decreased to values not different from baseline (1.06 ± 0.01, P > 0.05) at 600 s. In marked contrast, EDL DIA [Ca(2+)]i remained elevated for the entire recovery period (i.e., 1.23 ± 0.03 at 600 s, P < 0.05). The inability of [Ca(2+)]i to return to baseline in EDL DIA was not associated with any reduction of SR Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) 1 or SERCA2 protein levels (both increased 30-40%, P < 0.05). However, Pmv(O2) recovery kinetics were markedly slowed in EDL such that mean Pmv(O2) was substantially depressed (CONT 27.9 ± 2.0 vs. DIA 18.4 ± 2.0 Torr, P < 0.05), and this behavior was associated with the elevated [Ca(2+)]i. In contrast, this was not the case for SOL (P > 0.05) in that

  4. Expression of Lymphatic Markers in the Adult Rat Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Kaser-Eichberger, Alexandra; Schroedl, Falk; Bieler, Lara; Trost, Andrea; Bogner, Barbara; Runge, Christian; Tempfer, Herbert; Zaunmair, Pia; Kreutzer, Christina; Traweger, Andreas; Reitsamer, Herbert A.; Couillard-Despres, Sebastien

    2016-01-01

    Under physiological conditions, lymphatic vessels are thought to be absent from the central nervous system (CNS), although they are widely distributed within the rest of the body. Recent work in the eye, i.e., another organ regarded as alymphatic, revealed numerous cells expressing lymphatic markers. As the latter can be involved in the response to pathological conditions, we addressed the presence of cells expressing lymphatic markers within the spinal cord by immunohistochemistry. Spinal cord of young adult Fisher rats was scrutinized for the co-expression of the lymphatic markers PROX1 and LYVE-1 with the cell type markers Iba1, CD68, PGP9.5, OLIG2. Rat skin served as positive control for the lymphatic markers. PROX1-immunoreactivity was detected in many nuclei throughout the spinal cord white and gray matter. These nuclei showed no association with LYVE-1. Expression of LYVE-1 could only be detected in cells at the spinal cord surface and in cells closely associated with blood vessels. These cells were found to co-express Iba1, a macrophage and microglia marker. Further, double labeling experiments using CD68, another marker found in microglia and macrophages, also displayed co-localization in the Iba1+ cells located at the spinal cord surface and those apposed to blood vessels. On the other hand, PROX1-expressing cells found in the parenchyma were lacking Iba1 or PGP9.5, but a significant fraction of those cells showed co-expression of the oligodendrocyte lineage marker OLIG2. Intriguingly, following spinal cord injury, LYVE-1-expressing cells assembled and reorganized into putative pre-vessel structures. As expected, the rat skin used as positive controls revealed classical lymphatic vessels, displaying PROX1+ nuclei surrounded by LYVE-1-immunoreactivity. Classical lymphatics were not detected in adult rat spinal cord. Nevertheless, numerous cells expressing either LYVE-1 or PROX1 were identified. Based on their localization and overlapping expression with

  5. Expression of Lymphatic Markers in the Adult Rat Spinal Cord.

    PubMed

    Kaser-Eichberger, Alexandra; Schroedl, Falk; Bieler, Lara; Trost, Andrea; Bogner, Barbara; Runge, Christian; Tempfer, Herbert; Zaunmair, Pia; Kreutzer, Christina; Traweger, Andreas; Reitsamer, Herbert A; Couillard-Despres, Sebastien

    2016-01-01

    Under physiological conditions, lymphatic vessels are thought to be absent from the central nervous system (CNS), although they are widely distributed within the rest of the body. Recent work in the eye, i.e., another organ regarded as alymphatic, revealed numerous cells expressing lymphatic markers. As the latter can be involved in the response to pathological conditions, we addressed the presence of cells expressing lymphatic markers within the spinal cord by immunohistochemistry. Spinal cord of young adult Fisher rats was scrutinized for the co-expression of the lymphatic markers PROX1 and LYVE-1 with the cell type markers Iba1, CD68, PGP9.5, OLIG2. Rat skin served as positive control for the lymphatic markers. PROX1-immunoreactivity was detected in many nuclei throughout the spinal cord white and gray matter. These nuclei showed no association with LYVE-1. Expression of LYVE-1 could only be detected in cells at the spinal cord surface and in cells closely associated with blood vessels. These cells were found to co-express Iba1, a macrophage and microglia marker. Further, double labeling experiments using CD68, another marker found in microglia and macrophages, also displayed co-localization in the Iba1+ cells located at the spinal cord surface and those apposed to blood vessels. On the other hand, PROX1-expressing cells found in the parenchyma were lacking Iba1 or PGP9.5, but a significant fraction of those cells showed co-expression of the oligodendrocyte lineage marker OLIG2. Intriguingly, following spinal cord injury, LYVE-1-expressing cells assembled and reorganized into putative pre-vessel structures. As expected, the rat skin used as positive controls revealed classical lymphatic vessels, displaying PROX1+ nuclei surrounded by LYVE-1-immunoreactivity. Classical lymphatics were not detected in adult rat spinal cord. Nevertheless, numerous cells expressing either LYVE-1 or PROX1 were identified. Based on their localization and overlapping expression with

  6. Recovery of skeletal muscle after 3 mo of hindlimb immobilization in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, F. W.; Seider, M. J.

    1979-01-01

    During immobilization, skeletal muscle undergoes decreases in size and strength with concomitant atrophic and degenerative changes in slow-twitch muscle fibers. Currently there are no objective data in slow-twitch muscle demonstrating recovery of biochemical or physiological indices following termination of immobilization. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the soleus, a slow-twitch muscle, could recover normal biochemical or physiological levels following termination of immobilization. Adenosine triphosphate, glycogen, and protein concentration (mg/g wet wt) all significantly decreased following 90 days of hindlimb immobilization, but these three values returned to control levels by the 60th recovery day. Similarly, soleus muscle wet weight and protein content (mg protein/muscle) returned to control levels by the 14th recovery day. In contrast, maximal isometric tension did not return to normal until the 120th day. These results indicate that following muscular atrophy, which was achieved through 90 days of hindlimb immobilization, several biochemical and physiological values in skeletal muscle are recovered at various times after the end of immobilization.

  7. Dietary L-Lysine Suppresses Autophagic Proteolysis and Stimulates Akt/mTOR Signaling in the Skeletal Muscle of Rats Fed a Low-Protein Diet.

    PubMed

    Sato, Tomonori; Ito, Yoshiaki; Nagasawa, Takashi

    2015-09-23

    Amino acids, especially L-leucine, regulate protein turnover in skeletal muscle and have attracted attention as a means of increasing muscle mass in people suffering from malnutrition, aging (sarcopenia), or a bedridden state. We previously showed that oral administration of L-lysine (Lys) by gavage suppressed proteolysis in skeletal muscles of fasted rats. However, the intake of Lys in the absence of other dietary components is unlikely in a non-experimental setting, and other dietary components may interfere with the suppressive effect of Lys on proteolysis. We supplemented Lys to a 10% casein diet and investigated the effect of Lys on proteolysis and autophagy, a major proteolytic system, in the skeletal muscle of rats. The rate of proteolysis was evaluated from 3-methylhisitidine (MeHis) released from isolated muscles, in plasma, and excreted in urine. Supplementing lysine with the 10% casein diet decreased the rate of proteolysis induced by intake of a low-protein diet. The upregulated autophagy activity [light chain 3 (LC3)-II/total LC3] caused by a low-protein diet was reduced, and the Akt/mTOR signaling pathway was activated by Lys. Importantly, continuous feeding of a Lys-rich 10% casein diet for 15 days increased the masses of the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles. Taken together, supplementation of Lys to a low-protein diet suppresses autophagic proteolysis through the Akt/mTOR signaling pathway, and continuous feeding of a Lys-rich diet may increase skeletal muscle mass.

  8. In utero glucocorticoid exposure reduces fetal skeletal muscle mass in rats independent of effects on maternal nutrition.

    PubMed

    Gokulakrishnan, Ganga; Estrada, Irma J; Sosa, Horacio A; Fiorotto, Marta L

    2012-05-15

    Maternal stress and undernutrition can occur together and expose the fetus to high glucocorticoid (GLC) levels during this vulnerable period. To determine the consequences of GLC exposure on fetal skeletal muscle independently of maternal food intake, groups of timed-pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 7/group) were studied: ad libitum food intake (control, CON); ad libitum food intake with 1 mg dexamethasone/l drinking water from embryonic day (ED)13 to ED21 (DEX); pair-fed (PF) to DEX from ED13 to ED21. On ED22, dams were injected with [(3)H]phenylalanine for measurements of fetal leg muscle and diaphragm fractional protein synthesis rates (FSR). Fetal muscles were analyzed for protein and RNA contents, [(3)H]phenylalanine incorporation, and MuRF1 and atrogin-1 (MAFbx) mRNA expression. Fetal liver tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) expression was quantified to assess fetal exposure to GLCs. DEX treatment reduced maternal food intake by 13% (P < 0.001) and significantly reduced placental mass relative to CON and PF dams. Liver TAT expression was elevated only in DEX fetuses (P < 0.01). DEX muscle protein masses were 56% and 70% than those of CON (P < 0.01) and PF (P < 0.05) fetuses, respectively; PF muscles were 80% of CON (P < 0.01). Muscle FSR decreased by 35% in DEX fetuses (P < 0.001) but were not different between PF and CON. Only atrogin-1 expression was increased in DEX fetus muscles. We conclude that high maternal GLC levels and inadequate maternal food intake impair fetal skeletal muscle growth, most likely through different mechanisms. When combined, the effects of decreased maternal intake and maternal GLC intake on fetal muscle growth are additive.

  9. Effects of streptozotocin-induced diabetes and elevation of plasma FFA on ceramide metabolism in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Błachnio-Zabielska, A; Zabielski, P; Baranowski, M; Gorski, J

    2010-01-01

    Ceramide is likely to mediate in induction of insulin resistance. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of streptozotocin-diabetes and treatment with heparin on ceramide metabolism in skeletal muscles. The experiments were performed on Wistar rats divided into three groups: 1) control, 2) treated with streptozotocin, and 3) treated with heparin. Assays were carried out on three types of muscle: slow-twitch oxidative (soleus), fast-twitch oxidative-glycolytic, and fast-twitch glycolytic (red and white section of the gastrocnemius, respectively). The activity of serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT), neutral and acid sphingomyelinase (nSMase and aSMase), and neutral and alkaline ceramidase (nCDase and alCDase) was examined. The content of ceramide, sphinganine, sphingosine, and sphingosine-1-phosphate was also measured. Both streptozotocin-diabetes and treatment with heparin increased the activity of SPT in each type of muscle. Heparin inhibits the activity of aSMase and concomitantly induces the activity of nSMase in each studied muscle. Streptozotocin decreased aSMase activity in each muscle and increased nSMase activity in the soleus and red section of the gastrocnemius. Heparin induced, whereas streptozotocin inhibited the activity of n-CDase in the soleus and the red section of the gastrocnemius. Heparin increased the activity of alCDase in the red gastrocnemius. In the soleus and the white gastrocnemius the activity of alCDase decreased. Streptozotocin significantly increased the content of ceramide in each muscle studied and heparin did it only in the soleus. It is concluded that insulin deficiency is accompanied by alterations in ceramide metabolism in skeletal muscles. Increased concentration of the plasma free fatty acids may mediate certain effects of insulin deficiency.

  10. Adaptations to exercise training within skeletal muscle in adults with type 2 diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Simar, David; Fiatarone Singh, Maria A

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to review morphological and metabolic adaptations within skeletal muscle to exercise training in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). A comprehensive, systematic database search for manuscripts was performed from 1966 to March 2008 using computerized databases, including Medline, Premedline, CINAHL, AMED, EMBASE and SportDiscus. Three reviewers independently assessed studies for potential inclusion (exposure to exercise training, T2DM or IGT, muscle biopsy performed). A total of 18 exercise training studies were reviewed. All morphological and metabolic outcomes from muscle biopsies were collected. The metabolic outcomes were divided into six domains: glycogen, glucose facilitated transporter 4 (GLUT4) and insulin signalling, enzymes, markers of inflammation, lipids metabolism and so on. Beneficial adaptations to exercise were seen primarily in muscle fiber area and capillary density, glycogen, glycogen synthase and GLUT4 protein expressions. Few randomized controlled trials including muscle biopsy data existed, with a small number of subjects involved. More trials, especially robustly designed exercise training studies, are needed in this field. Future research should focus on the insulin signalling pathway to better understand the mechanism of the improvements in insulin sensitivity and glucose homeostasis in response to various modalities and doses of exercise in this cohort.

  11. New three-dimensional cephalometric analyses among adults with a skeletal Class I pattern and normal occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Bayome, Mohamed; Park, Jae Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to assess new three-dimensional (3D) cephalometric variables, and to evaluate the relationships among skeletal and dentoalveolar variables through 3D cephalometric analysis. Methods Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans were acquired from 38 young adults (18 men and 20 women; 22.6 ± 3.2 years) with normal occlusion. Thirty-five landmarks were digitized on the 3D-rendered views. Several measurements were obtained for selected landmarks. Correlations among different variables were calculated by means of Pearson's correlation coefficient values. Results The body of the mandible had a longer curve length in men (102.3 ± 4.4 mm) than in women (94.5 ± 4.7 mm) (p < 0.001), but there was no significant difference in the maxillary basal curve length. Men had significantly larger facial dimensions, whereas women had a larger gonial angle (117.0 ± 4.0 vs. 113.8 ± 3.3; p < 0.001). Strong-to-moderate correlation values were found among the vertical and transverse variables (r = 0.71 to 0.51). Conclusions The normative values of new 3D cephalometric parameters, including the maxillary and mandibular curve length, were obtained. Strong-to-moderate correlation values were found among several vertical and transverse variables through 3D cephalometric analysis. This method of cephalometric analyses can be useful in diagnosis and treatment planning for patients with dentofacial deformities. PMID:23671831

  12. Space flight effects on skeletal bones of rats (light and electron microscopic examination).

    PubMed

    Yagodovsky, V S; Triftanidi, L A; Gorokhova, G P

    1976-07-01

    In the light and electron microscopes, long tubular bones of Wistar rats that were flown for 22 d onboard the Cosmos-605 biosatellite and were exposed to a ground-based simulation experiment were examined. About half of the flight rats showed osteoporosis of metaphyses which was usually combined with a decrease of the mass of the primary spongiosa in the vicinity of the epiphyseal cartilaginous plate. This gives evidence that the growth of the bones could have been inhibited in flight. The light and electron microscopy of bones of flight rats revealed wide osteocyte lacunae which could have been produced by perilacunar osteolysis. In the simulation experiment, reduction in the metaphyseal spongiosa occurred only in one-third of the rats and was less pronounced than in flight rats; no decrease of the mass of the primary spongiosa near the cartilaginous plate was noted. Histological investigation of bones 27 d postflight demonstrated that that time period was not enough to eliminate all the changes in the bones tested.

  13. Skeletal muscle response to spaceflight, whole body suspension, and recovery in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musacchia, X. J.; Steffen, J. M.; Fell, R. D.; Dombrowski, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of a 7-day spaceflight (SF), 7- and 14-day-long whole body suspension (WBS), and 7-day-long recovery on the muscle weight and the morphology of the soleus and the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) of rats were investigated. It was found that the effect of 7-day-long SF and WBS were highly comparable for both the soleus and the EDL, although the soleus muscle from SF rats showed greater cross-sectional area reduction than that from WBS rats. With a longer duration of WBS, there was a continued reduction in cross-sectional fast-twitch fiber area. Muscle plasticity, in terms of fiber and capillary responses, showed differences in responses of the two types of muscles, indicating that antigravity posture muscles are highly susceptible to unloading.

  14. Polygonal networks, "geodomes", of adult rat hepatocytes in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Y; Furukawa, K; Mitaka, T; Yokoi, T; Kodama, T

    1988-01-01

    Polygonal networks, "geodomes", in cultured hepatocytes of adult rats were examined by both light and electron microscopy. On light microscopical examinations of specimens stained with Coomassie blue after the treatment with Triton X-100, the networks were detected 5 days after culture, which consisted of triangles arranged mainly in hexagonal patterns. They surrounded main cell body, looking like a headband, or were occasionally situated over nuclei, looking like a geodesic dome. Scanning electron microscopical observations after Triton treatment revealed that these structures were located underneath surface membrane. Transmission electron microscopical investigations revealed that the connecting fibers of networks consisted of microfilaments which radiated in a compact bundle from electron-dense vertices. PMID:3396075

  15. Cysteamine reduces serum gonadotropin concentrations in adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Badger, T M; Sagar, S M; Millard, W J; Martin, J B; Rosenblum, P

    1982-01-18

    We have examined the effects of cysteamine on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis of the adult male rat. A single subcutaneous injection of cysteamine (300 mg/kg) reduces significantly (p less than or equal to 0.05 serum concentrations of LH, FSH and T. Cysteamine blocked LH secretion induced by castration and administration of naloxone and LHRH. Neither acute nor chronic treatment (7 days) altered the hypothalamic LHRH content. These results suggest that cysteamine acts to reduce pituitary responsiveness to LHRH, resulting in lower mean serum gonadotropin and testosterone concentrations. It is possible, however, that cysteamine acts also at the hypothalamus to reduce LHRH secretion and/or at the testes to reduce testosterone release.

  16. CuZnSOD gene deletion targeted to skeletal muscle leads to loss of contractile force but does not cause muscle atrophy in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiqiang; Davis, Carol; Sakellariou, George K.; Shi, Yun; Kayani, Anna C.; Pulliam, Daniel; Bhattacharya, Arunabh; Richardson, Arlan; Jackson, Malcolm J.; McArdle, Anne; Brooks, Susan V.; Van Remmen, Holly

    2013-01-01

    We have previously shown that deletion of CuZnSOD in mice (Sod1−/− mice) leads to accelerated loss of muscle mass and contractile force during aging. To dissect the relative roles of skeletal muscle and motor neurons in this process, we used a Cre-Lox targeted approach to establish a skeletal muscle-specific Sod1-knockout (mKO) mouse to determine whether muscle-specific CuZnSOD deletion is sufficient to cause muscle atrophy. Surprisingly, mKO mice maintain muscle masses at or above those of wild-type control mice up to 18 mo of age. In contrast, maximum isometric specific force measured in gastrocnemius muscle is significantly reduced in the mKO mice. We found no detectable increases in global measures of oxidative stress or ROS production, no reduction in mitochondrial ATP production, and no induction of adaptive stress responses in muscle from mKO mice. However, Akt-mTOR signaling is elevated and the number of muscle fibers with centrally located nuclei is increased in skeletal muscle from mKO mice, which suggests elevated regenerative pathways. Our data demonstrate that lack of CuZnSOD restricted to skeletal muscle does not lead to muscle atrophy but does cause muscle weakness in adult mice and suggest loss of CuZnSOD may potentiate muscle regenerative pathways.—Zhang, Y., Davis, C., Sakellariou, G.K., Shi, Y., Kayani, A.C., Pulliam, D., Bhattacharya, A., Richardson, A., Jackson, M.J., McArdle, A., Brooks, S.V., Van Remmen, H. CuZnSOD gene deletion targeted to skeletal muscle leads to loss of contractile force but does not cause muscle atrophy in adult mice. PMID:23729587

  17. Respiratory autoresuscitation following severe acute hypoxemia in anesthetized adult rats.

    PubMed

    Krause, A; Nowak, Z; Srbu, R; Bell, H J

    2016-10-01

    In the present study we investigated the pattern and efficacy of respiratory autoresuscitation in spontaneously breathing adult male rats across three separate anesthetic backgrounds. Each animal was administered one of three injectable anesthetics to achieve a surgical plane of anesthesia: ketamine-xylazine (KET, n=10), pentobarbital (PEN, n=10), or urethane (URE, n=10). Animals were tracheostomized and equipped with a femoral artery catheter to record airflow and arterial pressures. In response to a bout of breathing anoxic air, none of the 10 URE animals were able to mount a successful autoresuscitation response. In contrast, all KET and PEN animals survived all four consecutive anoxic exposures, restoring eupneic breathing in all cases. Moreover, only 4/10 URE animals expressed gasping breaths following the onset of respiratory arrest, and these were temporally delayed (p<0.001) and much smaller in volume (P≤0.012) compared to KET and PEN animals. URE animals showed no clear aberrations in their cardiovascular responses to anoxia, with the exception of lower arterial pulse pressures compared to either KET or PEN animals at specific points following RA. Ketamine-xylazine and pentobarbital anesthesia can be reliably and effectively used to create models for the study of autoresuscitation in adult rats. In contrast, urethane causes catastrophic failure of respiratory autoresuscitation, by delaying or outright preventing the elaboration of gasping breaths following anoxia-induced respiratory arrest. The neuronal and synaptic alterations accompanying urethane anesthesia may therefore provide a means of understanding potential pathological alterations in rhythm generation that can predispose the respiratory control system to failed autoresuscitation following an episode of acute severe hypoxemia. PMID:27378495

  18. Importance of serotonin (5-HT) and its precursor l-tryptophan for homeostasis and function of skeletal muscle in rats. A morphological and endocrinological study.

    PubMed

    Musumeci, Giuseppe; Imbesi, Rosa; Trovato, Francesca Maria; Szychlinska, Marta Anna; Aiello, Flavia Concetta; Buffa, Pietro; Castrogiovanni, Paola

    2015-04-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) is a neurotransmitter, synthesized in serotonergic neurons of the central nervous system and in enterochromaffin cells of the gastrointestinal tract, which is involved in the regulation of several body functions, including muscle tissue development and growth and its contractile response. l-Tryptophan (l-Trp) is an essential amino acid and precursor of 5-HT. The aim of the present study was to better understand the mechanisms that govern neuroendocrine homeostasis of muscle tissue and emphasize the importance of a diet, complete in all its elements, referring specifically to the essential amino acids such as l-Trp, crucial in several neuroendocrine functions.We analyzed the possible consequences of l-Trp-free diet on 5-HT production and on skeletal muscle morphology and function in young female rats. We also evaluated the eventual alterations of hormone production such as growth hormone (GH), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and thyroid hormones (T3 and T4) that control and regulate growth, metabolism and efficiency of the skeletal muscle. Our results showed a strong decrease of 5-HT, GH, TSH, T3 and T4 levels associated to a clear difference in body weight between experimental and control rats. Moreover, the muscle samples of experimental rats showed histological and ultrastructural alterations. These findings thus supported a strong link between l-Trp, serotonergic system, hormone secretion and morphology of skeletal muscle tissue and thus, the importance of a balanced daily diet.

  19. Metabolic effects of the iodothyronine functional analogue TRC150094 on the liver and skeletal muscle of high-fat diet fed overweight rats: an integrated proteomic study.

    PubMed

    Silvestri, Elena; Glinni, Daniela; Cioffi, Federica; Moreno, Maria; Lombardi, Assunta; de Lange, Pieter; Senese, Rosalba; Ceccarelli, Michele; Salzano, Anna Maria; Scaloni, Andrea; Lanni, Antonia; Goglia, Fernando

    2012-07-01

    A novel functional iodothyronine analogue, TRC150094, which has a much lower potency toward thyroid hormone receptor (α1/β1) activation than triiodothyronine, has been shown to be effective at reducing adiposity in rats simultaneously receiving a high-fat diet (HFD). Here, by combining metabolic, functional and proteomic analysis, we studied how the hepatic and skeletal muscle phenotypes might respond to TRC150094 treatment in HFD-fed overweight rats. Drug treatment increased both the liver and skeletal muscle mitochondrial oxidative capacities without altering mitochondrial efficiency. Coherently, in terms of individual respiratory in-gel activity, blue-native analysis revealed an increased activity of complex V in the liver and of complexes II and V in tibialis muscle in TCR150094-treated animals. Subsequently, the identification of differentially expressed proteins and the analysis of their interrelations gave an integrated view of the phenotypic/metabolic adaptations occurring in the liver and muscle proteomes during drug treatment. TRC150094 significantly altered the expression of several proteins involved in key liver metabolic pathways, including amino acid and nitrogen metabolism, and fructose and mannose metabolism. The canonical pathways most strongly influenced by TRC150094 in tibialis muscle included glycolysis and gluconeogenesis, amino acid, fructose and mannose metabolism, and cell signaling. The phenotypic/metabolic influence of TRC150094 on the liver and skeletal muscle of HFD-fed overweight rats suggests the potential clinical application of this iodothyronine analogue in ameliorating metabolic risk parameters altered by diet regimens.

  20. Astaxanthin reduces ischemic brain injury in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hui; Kuo, Chi-Chung; Chou, Jenny; Delvolve, Alice; Jackson, Shelley N; Post, Jeremy; Woods, Amina S; Hoffer, Barry J; Wang, Yun; Harvey, Brandon K

    2009-06-01

    Astaxanthin (ATX) is a dietary carotenoid of crustaceans and fish that contributes to their coloration. Dietary ATX is important for development and survival of salmonids and crustaceans and has been shown to reduce cardiac ischemic injury in rodents. The purpose of this study was to examine whether ATX can protect against ischemic injury in the mammalian brain. Adult rats were injected intracerebroventricularly with ATX or vehicle prior to a 60-min middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). ATX was present in the infarction area at 70-75 min after onset of MCAo. Treatment with ATX, compared to vehicle, increased locomotor activity in stroke rats and reduced cerebral infarction at 2 d after MCAo. To evaluate the protective mechanisms of ATX against stroke, brain tissues were assayed for free radical damage, apoptosis, and excitoxicity. ATX antagonized ischemia-mediated loss of aconitase activity and reduced glutamate release, lipid peroxidation, translocation of cytochrome c, and TUNEL labeling in the ischemic cortex. ATX did not alter physiological parameters, such as body temperature, brain temperature, cerebral blood flow, blood gases, blood pressure, and pH. Collectively, our data suggest that ATX can reduce ischemia-related injury in brain tissue through the inhibition of oxidative stress, reduction of glutamate release, and antiapoptosis. ATX may be clinically useful for patients vulnerable or prone to ischemic events. PMID:19218497

  1. Astaxanthin reduces ischemic brain injury in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hui; Kuo, Chi-Chung; Chou, Jenny; Delvolve, Alice; Jackson, Shelley N; Post, Jeremy; Woods, Amina S; Hoffer, Barry J; Wang, Yun; Harvey, Brandon K

    2009-06-01

    Astaxanthin (ATX) is a dietary carotenoid of crustaceans and fish that contributes to their coloration. Dietary ATX is important for development and survival of salmonids and crustaceans and has been shown to reduce cardiac ischemic injury in rodents. The purpose of this study was to examine whether ATX can protect against ischemic injury in the mammalian brain. Adult rats were injected intracerebroventricularly with ATX or vehicle prior to a 60-min middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). ATX was present in the infarction area at 70-75 min after onset of MCAo. Treatment with ATX, compared to vehicle, increased locomotor activity in stroke rats and reduced cerebral infarction at 2 d after MCAo. To evaluate the protective mechanisms of ATX against stroke, brain tissues were assayed for free radical damage, apoptosis, and excitoxicity. ATX antagonized ischemia-mediated loss of aconitase activity and reduced glutamate release, lipid peroxidation, translocation of cytochrome c, and TUNEL labeling in the ischemic cortex. ATX did not alter physiological parameters, such as body temperature, brain temperature, cerebral blood flow, blood gases, blood pressure, and pH. Collectively, our data suggest that ATX can reduce ischemia-related injury in brain tissue through the inhibition of oxidative stress, reduction of glutamate release, and antiapoptosis. ATX may be clinically useful for patients vulnerable or prone to ischemic events.

  2. No evidence for inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-dependent Ca2+ release in isolated fibers of adult mouse skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Blaauw, Bert; Del Piccolo, Paola; Rodriguez, Laura; Hernandez Gonzalez, Victor-Hugo; Agatea, Lisa; Solagna, Francesca; Mammano, Fabio; Pozzan, Tullio; Schiaffino, Stefano

    2012-08-01

    The presence and role of functional inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3)) receptors (IP(3)Rs) in adult skeletal muscle are controversial. The current consensus is that, in adult striated muscle, the relative amount of IP(3)Rs is too low and the kinetics of Ca(2+) release from IP(3)R is too slow compared with ryanodine receptors to contribute to the Ca(2+) transient during excitation-contraction coupling. However, it has been suggested that IP(3)-dependent Ca(2+) release may be involved in signaling cascades leading to regulation of muscle gene expression. We have reinvestigated IP(3)-dependent Ca(2+) release in isolated flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) muscle fibers from adult mice. Although Ca(2+) transients were readily induced in cultured C2C12 muscle cells by (a) UTP stimulation, (b) direct injection of IP(3), or (c) photolysis of membrane-permeant caged IP(3), no statistically significant change in calcium signal was detected in adult FDB fibers. We conclude that the IP(3)-IP(3)R system does not appear to affect global calcium levels in adult mouse skeletal muscle.

  3. Comparison of electroretinographic responses between two different age groups of adult Dark Agouti rats

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Lin; Lo, Amy Cheuk Yin; Lai, Jimmy Shiu Ming; Shih, Kendrick Co

    2015-01-01

    AIM To describe and compare the differences in electroretinographic responses between two different age groups of adult Dark Agouti (DA) rats and to better understand the effect of age on retinal histology and function. METHODS The electroretinographic responses of two different age groups of adult DA rats were compared. Animals were divided into younger adult DA rats 10-12wk (n=8) and older adult DA rats 17-19wk (n=8). Full field electroretinography (ERG) was recorded simultaneously from both eyes after dark adaption and light adaption and parameters including the positive scotopic threshold response (pSTR), negative scotopic threshold response (nSTR), scotopic a-wave, b-wave, photopic a-wave, b-wave and photopic negative response (PhNR) were compared between groups. RESULTS The older adult rats displayed lower stimulation thresholds of the STRs (pSTR and nSTR) and higher amplitudes of pSTR, scotopic a-wave and b-wave, photopic b-wave and PhNR amplitudes, with shorter implicit times. Photopic a-wave amplitudes were however higher in the younger adult rats. CONCLUSION In summary, for the rod system, photoreceptor, bipolar cell and RGC activity was enhanced in the older adult rats. For the cone system, RGC and bipolar cell activity was enhanced, while photoreceptor activity was depressed in the older adult rats. Such age-related selective modification of retinal cell function needs to be considered when conducting ophthalmic research in adult rats. PMID:26558198

  4. Supplementing obese Zucker rats with niacin induces the transition of glycolytic to oxidative skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Ringseis, Robert; Rosenbaum, Susann; Gessner, Denise K; Herges, Lea; Kubens, Johanna F; Mooren, Frank-Christoph; Krüger, Karsten; Eder, Klaus

    2013-02-01

    In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that niacin increases the oxidative capacity of muscle by increasing the oxidative type I muscle fiber content. Twenty-four obese Zucker rats were assigned to 2 groups of 12 rats that were fed either a control diet (O group) or a diet supplemented with 750 mg/kg diet niacin (O+N group) for 4 wk. In addition, one group of lean rats (L group) was included in the experiment and fed the control diet for 4 wk. Plasma and liver concentrations of TG were markedly greater in obese groups than in the L group but markedly lower in the O+N group than in the O group (P < 0.05). Rats of the O+N group had a higher percentage of oxidative type I fibers and higher mRNA levels of genes encoding regulators of muscle fiber composition (Ppard, Ppargc1a, Ppargc1b), angiogenic factors (Vegfa, Vegfb), and genes involved in fatty acid utilization (Cpt1b, Slc25a20, Slc22a4, Slc22a5, Slc27a1) and oxidative phosphorylation (Cox4i1, Cox6a2) and a higher activity of the mitochondrial oxidative enzyme succinate dehydrogenase in muscle than rats of the O and L groups (P < 0.05). These niacin-induced changes in muscle metabolic phenotype are indicative of an increased capacity of muscle for oxidative utilization of fatty acids and are likely mediated by the upregulation of Ppard, Ppargc1a, and Ppargc1b, which are key regulators of muscle fiber composition, mitochondrial biogenesis, angiogenesis, and genes involved in fatty acid catabolism and oxidative phosphorylation. The increased utilization of fatty acids by muscle might contribute to the strong TG-lowering effect of niacin treatment.

  5. Neonatal injections of methoxychlor decrease adult rat female reproductive behavior.

    PubMed

    Bertolasio, Jennifer; Fyfe, Susanne; Snyder, Ben W; Davis, Aline M

    2011-12-01

    Methoxychlor (MXC), a commonly used pesticide, has been labeled as an endocrine disruptor. To evaluate the impact of neonatal exposure to MXC on female reproduction, female Sprague-Dawley rats were given subcutaneous injections on postnatal days 1, 3, and 5. The injections contained 1.0mg MXC, 2.0mg MXC, 10 μg 17β-estradiol benzoate (positive control), or sesame oil (vehicle). The injections of MXC had no effect on anogenital distance or day of vaginal opening. Treatment with either 2.0mg MXC or estradiol significantly increased the total number of days with vaginal keratinization. Treatment with MXC had no effect on ability to exhibit a mating response as an adult female, although the high dose MXC (2.0) and the positive control (estradiol) animals demonstrated a decrease in degree of receptivity, a decrease in proceptive behavior and an increase in rejection behavior. These data suggest that higher doses of MXC given directly to pups during the neonatal period can act as an estrogen and alter aspects of the nervous system, impacting adult reproductive characteristics.

  6. Control levels of acetylcholinesterase expression in the mammalian skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Grubic, Z; Zajc-Kreft, K; Brank, M; Mars, T; Komel, R; Miranda, A F

    1999-05-14

    Protein expression can be controled at different levels. Understanding acetylcholinesterase (EC. 3.1.1.7, AChE) expression in the living organisms therefore necessitates: (1) determination and mapping of control levels of AChE metabolism; (2) identification of the regulatory factors acting at these levels; and (3) detailed insight into the mechanisms of action of these factors. Here we summarize the results of our studies on the regulation of AChE expression in the mammalian skeletal muscle. Three experimental models were employed: in vitro innervated human muscle, mechanically denervated adult fast rat muscle, and the glucocorticoid treated fast rat muscle. In situ hybridization of AChE mRNA, combined with AChE histochemistry, revealed that different distribution patterns of AChE, observed during in vitro ontogenesis and synaptogenesis of human skeletal muscle, reflect alterations in the distribution of AChE mRNA (Z. Grubic, R. Komel, W.F. Walker, A.F. Miranda, Myoblast fusion and innervation with rat motor nerve alter the distribution of acetylcholinesterase and its mRNA in human muscle cultures, Neuron 14 (1995) 317-327). To study the mechanisms of AChE mRNA loss in denervated adult rat skeletal muscle, we exposed deproteinated AChE mRNA to various subcellular fractions in vitro. Fractions were isolated from the normal and denervated rat sternomastoideus muscle. We found significantly increased, but non-specific AChE mRNA degradation capacities in the three fractions studied, suggesting that increased susceptibility of muscle mRNA to degradation might be at least partly responsible for the decreased AChE mRNA observed under such conditions (K. Zajc-Kreft, S. Kreft, Z. Grubic, Degradation of AChE mRNA in the normal and denervated rat skeletal muscle, Book of Abstracts, The Sixth International Meeting on Cholinesterases, La Jolla, CA, March 20-24, 1998, p. A3.). In adult fast rat muscle, treated chronically with glucocorticoids, we found the fraction of early

  7. Celastrol attenuates oxidative stress in the skeletal muscle of diabetic rats by regulating the AMPK-PGC1α-SIRT3 signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    GUAN, YUE; CUI, ZI-JIAN; SUN, BEI; HAN, LI-PING; LI, CHUN-JUN; CHEN, LI-MING

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a key role in the pathogenesis of diabetic myopathy. Celastrol provides a wide range of health benefits, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antitumor effects. We hypothesized that celastrol may exert an antioxidant effect in the skeletal muscle of diabetic rats. In the present study, MnSOD activity was determined by spectrophotometry. The protein levels were evaluated by western blot analysis and mRNA content was quantified by RT-qPCR. We firstly found that the levels of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor coactivator 1α (PGC1α), silent mating-type information regulation 2 homolog 3 (SIRT3) and manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) were all decreased in the skeletal muscle of diabetic patients. Male rats with diabetes were also treated with the vehicle or with celastrol at 1, 3 and 6 mg/kg/day for 8 weeks. The administration of celastrol at 3 and 6 mg/kg attenuated the deterioration of skeletal muscle, as shown by histological analysis, decreased the malondialdehyde (MDA) level and increased the glutathione (GSH) level assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. It also enhanced the enzyme activity and increased the expression of MnSOD, and increased the AMPK phosphorylation level, as well as PGC1α and Sirt3 expression. The findings of our study suggest that the expression of AMPK, PGC1α, SIRT3 and MnSOD are decreased in the skeletal muscle of diabetic patients. Celastrol exerted antioxidant effects on skeletal muscle partly by regulating the AMPK-PGC1α-SIRT3 signaling pathway. PMID:27049825

  8. Transcriptome-wide RNA sequencing analysis of rat skeletal muscle feed arteries. II. Impact of exercise training in obesity.

    PubMed

    Padilla, Jaume; Jenkins, Nathan T; Thorne, Pamela K; Martin, Jeffrey S; Rector, R Scott; Davis, J Wade; Laughlin, M Harold

    2014-04-15

    We employed next-generation RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) technology to determine the extent to which exercise training alters global gene expression in skeletal muscle feed arteries and aortic endothelial cells of obese Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats. Transcriptional profiles of the soleus and gastrocnemius muscle feed arteries (SFA and GFA, respectively) and aortic endothelial cell-enriched samples from rats that underwent an endurance exercise training program (EndEx; n = 12) or a interval sprint training program (IST; n = 12) or remained sedentary (Sed; n = 12) were examined. In response to EndEx, there were 39 upregulated (e.g., MANF) and 20 downregulated (e.g., ALOX15) genes in SFA and 1 upregulated (i.e., Wisp2) and 1 downregulated (i.e., Crem) gene in GFA [false discovery rate (FDR) < 10%]. In response to IST, there were 305 upregulated (e.g., MANF, HSPA12B) and 324 downregulated genes in SFA and 101 upregulated and 66 downregulated genes in GFA, with an overlap of 32 genes between arteries. Furthermore, in aortic endothelial cells, there were 183 upregulated (e.g., eNOS, SOD-3) and 141 downregulated (e.g., ATF3, Clec1b, npy, leptin) genes with EndEx and 71 upregulated and 69 downregulated genes with IST, with an overlap of 35 between exercise programs. Expression of only two genes (Tubb2b and Slc9a3r2) was altered (i.e., increased) by exercise in all three arteries. The finding that both EndEx and IST produced greater transcriptional changes in the SFA compared with the GFA is intriguing when considering the fact that treadmill bouts of exercise are associated with greater relative increases in blood flow to the gastrocnemius muscle compared with the soleus muscle.

  9. Effect of MDMA (ecstasy) on activity and cocaine conditioned place preference in adult and adolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Aberg, Maria; Wade, Dean; Wall, Erin; Izenwasser, Sari

    2007-01-01

    MDMA (ecstasy) is a drug commonly used in adolescence, and many users of MDMA also use other illicit drugs. It is not known whether MDMA during adolescence alters subsequent responses to cocaine differently than in adults. This study examined the effects of MDMA in adolescent and adult rats on cocaine conditioned reward. At the start of these experiments, adolescent rats were at postnatal day (PND) 33 and adult rats at PND 60. Each rat was treated for 7 days with MDMA (2 or 5 mg/kg/day or vehicle) and locomotor activity was measured. Five days later cocaine conditioned place preference (CPP) was begun. Rats were trained for 3 days, in the morning with saline and in the afternoon with 10 mg/kg cocaine in 30 min sessions, and tested on the fourth day. MDMA stimulated activity in both age groups, but with a greater effect in the adult rats. Sensitization to the locomotor-stimulant effects of the lower dose of MDMA occurred in adult rats and in both groups to the higher dose. Cocaine did not produce a CPP in vehicle-treated adolescent rats, but a significant CPP was observed subsequent to treatment with MDMA. In contrast, cocaine-induced CPP was diminished after MDMA in adult rats. These effects were still evident 2 weeks later upon retest. Thus, under the present conditions, MDMA increased cocaine conditioned reward in adolescent and decreased it in adult rats. These findings suggest that exposure to MDMA during this critical developmental period may carry a greater risk than during adulthood and that male adolescents may be particularly vulnerable to the risk of stimulant abuse after use of MDMA.

  10. Skeletal muscle electrical stimulation improves baroreflex sensitivity and heart rate variability in heart failure rats.

    PubMed

    Lazzarotto Rucatti, Ananda; Jaenisch, Rodrigo Boemo; Rossato, Douglas Dalcin; Bonetto, Jéssica Hellen Poletto; Ferreira, Janaína; Xavier, Leder Leal; Sonza, Anelise; Dal Lago, Pedro

    2015-12-01

    The goal of the current study was to evaluate the effects of electrical stimulation (ES) on the arterial baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) and cardiovascular autonomic control in rats with chronic heart failure (CHF). Male Wistar rats were designated to one of four groups: placebo sham (P-Sham, n=9), ES sham (ES-Sham, n=9), placebo CHF (P-CHF, n=9) or ES CHF (ES-CHF, n=9). The ES was adjusted at a low frequency (30 Hz), duration of 250 μs, with hold and rest time of 8s (4 weeks, 30 min/day, 5 times/week). It was applied on the gastrocnemius muscle with intensity to produce a visible muscle contraction. The rats assigned to the placebo groups performed the same procedures with the equipment turned off. The two-way ANOVA and the post hoc Student-Newman-Keuls tests (P<0.05) were used to data comparison. The BRS was higher in ES-Sham group compared to the P-Sham group and the ES-CHF group compared to the P-CHF group. ES was able to decrease heart rate sympatho-vagal modulation and peripheral sympathetic modulation in ES-CHF compared to P-CHF group. Interestingly, heart rate sympatho-vagal modulation was similar between ES-CHF and P-Sham groups. Thus, ES enhances heart rate parasympathetic modulation on heart failure (ES-CHF) compared to placebo (P-CHF), with consequent decrease of sympatho-vagal balance in the ES-CHF group compared to the P-CHF. The results show that a 4 week ES protocol in CHF rats enhances arterial BRS and cardiovascular autonomic control.

  11. Effects of skeletal unloading on the vasomotor properties of the rat femur principal nutrient artery

    PubMed Central

    Prisby, Rhonda D.; Behnke, Bradley J.; Allen, Matthew R.

    2015-01-01

    Spaceflight and prolonged bed rest induce deconditioning of the cardiovascular system and bone loss. Previous research has shown declines in femoral bone and marrow perfusion during unloading and with subsequent reloading in hindlimb-unloaded (HU) rats, an animal model of chronic disuse. We hypothesized that the attenuated bone and marrow perfusion may result from altered vasomotor properties of the bone resistance vasculature. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the effects of unloading on the vasoconstrictor and vasodilator properties of the femoral principal nutrient artery (PNA), the main conduit for blood flow to the femur, in 2 wk HU and control (CON) rats. Vasoconstriction of the femoral PNA was assessed in vitro using norepinephrine, phenylephrine, clonidine, KCl, endothelin-1, arginine vasopressin, and myogenic responsiveness. Vasodilation through endothelium-dependent [acetylcholine, bradykinin, and flow-mediated dilation (FMD)] and endothelium-independent mechanisms [sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and adenosine] were also determined. Vasoconstrictor responsiveness of the PNA from HU rats was not enhanced through any of the mechanisms tested. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation to acetylcholine (CON, 86 ± 3%; HU, 48 ± 7% vasodilation) and FMD (CON, 61 ± 9%; HU, 11 ± 11% vasodilation) were attenuated in PNAs from HU rats, while responses to bradykinin were not different between groups. Endothelium-independent vasodilation to SNP and adenosine were not different between groups. These data indicate that unloading-induced decrements in bone and marrow perfusion and increases in vascular resistance are not the result of enhanced vasoconstrictor responsiveness of the bone resistance arteries but are associated with reductions in endothelium-dependent vasodilation. PMID:25635000

  12. Chronic intake of proanthocyanidins and docosahexaenoic acid improves skeletal muscle oxidative capacity in diet-obese rats.

    PubMed

    Casanova, Ester; Baselga-Escudero, Laura; Ribas-Latre, Aleix; Cedó, Lídia; Arola-Arnal, Anna; Pinent, Montserrat; Bladé, Cinta; Arola, Lluís; Salvadó, M Josepa

    2014-10-01

    Obesity has become a worldwide epidemic. The cafeteria diet (CD) induces obesity and oxidative-stress-associated insulin resistance. Polyunsaturated fatty acids and polyphenols are dietary compounds that are intensively studied as products that can reduce the health complications related to obesity. We evaluate the effects of 21 days of supplementation with grape seed proanthocyanidins extract (GSPE), docosahexaenoic-rich oil (DHA-OR) or both compounds (GSPE+DHA-OR) on skeletal muscle metabolism in diet-obese rats. The supplementation with different treatments did not reduce body weight, although all groups used more fat as fuel, particularly when both products were coadministered; muscle β-oxidation was activated, the mitochondrial functionality and oxidative capacity were higher, and fatty acid uptake gene expressions were up-regulated. In addition to these outcomes shared by all treatments, GSPE reduced insulin resistance and improved muscle status. Both treatments increased 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation, which was consistent with higher plasma adiponectin levels. Moreover, AMPK activation by DHA-OR was also correlated with an up-regulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (Pparα). GSPE+DHA-OR, in addition to activating AMPK and enhancing fatty acid oxidation, increased the muscle gene expression of uncoupling protein 2 (Ucp2). In conclusion, GSPE+DHA-OR induced modifications that improved muscle status and could counterbalance the deleterious effects of obesity, and such modifications are mediated, at least in part, through the AMPK signaling pathway.

  13. Ca2+-binding properties of a unique ATPase inhibitor protein isolated from mitochondria of bovine heart and rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Yamada, E W; Huzel, N J

    1985-12-01

    Previous studies showed that Ca2+ induced monomer to active dimer interconversion of a mitochondrial ATPase inhibitor protein from bovine heart or rat skeletal muscle (Yamada, E.W., Huzel, N.J. and Dickison, J.C. (1981) J. Biol. Chem. 256, 10203-10207). Initial equilibrium dialysis measurements of Ca2+ binding showed that this unique protein possesses three binding sites of high affinity with a maximum of one mol of Ca2+ bound/mol of protein monomer. Magnesium (1 mM) did not affect the first association constant but increased the second and third by about 1.2 and 1.5 fold, respectively. That the apparent association constants varied with concentration of protein monomer was in agreement with the self-associating nature of the protein. Scatchard plots at three concentrations of protein intersected at a molar ratio of about 0.5 (Ca2+/monomer). Ka1 and Ka2 values of 4.2 microM and 12.1 microM, respectively, were estimated by extra-polation of apparent constants to infinite dilution of protein. Ka3 (51.3 microM) was estimated by extrapolation of double reciprocal plots of apparent constants versus protein concentration to infinite levels of protein. A model for Ca2+ binding by this self-associating protein is described. Trifluoperazine had no effect on the activity of the inhibitor protein from either tissue.

  14. The effects of Securidaca longepedunculata root extract on ionic currents and contraction of cultured rat skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Mouzou, A P; Bulteau, L; Raymond, G

    1999-05-01

    The effects of the primary extract roots of Securidaca longepedunculata were tested on sodium, calcium and potassium currents in rat skeletal muscle cells developed in culture. In addition, they were tested on depolarisation-induced contraction and resting intracellular calcium levels. S. longepedunculata extract (10(-6) g/l) increases sodium current at all potentials. No clear effect was observed on calcium current except for a slight increase at negative potentials (-30, -10 mV) revealing a 5 mV shift towards negative potentials of the I(Ca)/V curve, as with potassium current. In contrast, at the same concentration, S. longepedunculata enhanced the contractile response elicited by durable depolarisation. This was not attributable to the slight increase in resting intracellular free calcium concentration which did not change during and following S. longepedunculata application. These results strongly suggest that S. longepedunculata root extract contains one or more components acting on the voltage-sensor of excitation-contraction coupling (dihydropyridine receptors), regardless of its implication as a calcium channel. PMID:10465656

  15. Resistance training inhibits the elevation of skeletal muscle derived-BDNF level concomitant with improvement of muscle strength in zucker diabetic rat

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee-Jae; So, Byunghun; Son, Jun Seok; Song, Han Sol; Oh, Seung Lyul; Seong, Je Kyung; Lee, Hoyoung; Song, Wook

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] In the present study, we investigated the effects of 8 weeks of progressive resistance training on the level of skeletal muscle derived BDNF as well as glucose intolerance in Zucker diabetic rats. [Methods] Six week-old male Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) and Zucker lean control (ZLC) rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: sedentary ZLC (ZLC-Con), sedentary ZDF (ZDF-Con), and exercised ZDF (ZDF-Ex). Progressive resistance training using a ladder and tail weights was performed for 8 weeks (3 days/week). [Results] After 8 weeks of resistance training, substantial reduction in body weight was observed in ZDF-Ex compared to ZDF-Con. Though the skeletal muscle volume did not change, grip strength grip strength was significantly higher in ZDF-Ex compared to ZDF-Con. In the soleus, the level of BDNF was increased in ZDF-Con, but was significantly decreased (p<0.05) in ZDF-Ex, showing a training effect. Moreover, we found that there was a negative correlation (r=-0.657; p=0.004) between grip strength and BDNF level whereas there was a positive correlation (r=0.612; p=0.008) between plasma glucose level and BDNF level in skeletal muscle. [Conclusion] Based upon our results, we demonstrated that resistance training inhibited the elevation of skeletal muscle derived-BDNF expression concomitant with the improvement of muscle strength in zucker diabetic rats. In addition, muscle-derived BDNF might be a potential mediator for the preventive effect of resistance training on the progress of type 2 diabetes. PMID:27274460

  16. The effects of the in utero glucocorticoid (GLC) exposure on fetal skeletal muscle growth in rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Data from epidemiological studies suggest that adult muscle strength and lean body mass are related to birth weight and therefore, are influenced by the intra-uterine environment. The degree to which the effects on the musculature result from a nutrient deficit or its consequent exposure to above no...

  17. Effects of Hyperbaric Oxygen at 1.25 Atmospheres Absolute with Normal Air on Macrophage Number and Infiltration during Rat Skeletal Muscle Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Naoto; Ono, Miharu; Tomioka, Tomoka; Deie, Masataka

    2014-01-01

    Use of mild hyperbaric oxygen less than 2 atmospheres absolute (2026.54 hPa) with normal air is emerging as a common complementary treatment for severe muscle injury. Although hyperbaric oxygen at over 2 atmospheres absolute with 100% O2 promotes healing of skeletal muscle injury, it is not clear whether mild hyperbaric oxygen is equally effective. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the impact of hyperbaric oxygen at 1.25 atmospheres absolute (1266.59 hPa) with normal air on muscle regeneration. The tibialis anterior muscle of male Wistar rats was injured by injection of bupivacaine hydrochloride, and rats were randomly assigned to a hyperbaric oxygen experimental group or to a non-hyperbaric oxygen control group. Immediately after the injection, rats were exposed to hyperbaric oxygen, and the treatment was continued for 28 days. The cross-sectional area of centrally nucleated muscle fibers was significantly larger in rats exposed to hyperbaric oxygen than in controls 5 and 7 days after injury. The number of CD68- or CD68- and CD206-positive cells was significantly higher in rats exposed to hyperbaric oxygen than in controls 24 h after injury. Additionally, tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-10 mRNA expression levels were significantly higher in rats exposed to hyperbaric oxygen than in controls 24 h after injury. The number of Pax7- and MyoD- or MyoD- and myogenin-positive nuclei per mm2 and the expression levels of these proteins were significantly higher in rats exposed to hyperbaric oxygen than in controls 5 days after injury. These results suggest that mild hyperbaric oxygen promotes skeletal muscle regeneration in the early phase after injury, possibly due to reduced hypoxic conditions leading to accelerated macrophage infiltration and phenotype transition. In conclusion, mild hyperbaric oxygen less than 2 atmospheres absolute with normal air is an appropriate support therapy for severe muscle injuries. PMID:25531909

  18. Effects of hyperbaric oxygen at 1.25 atmospheres absolute with normal air on macrophage number and infiltration during rat skeletal muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Naoto; Ono, Miharu; Tomioka, Tomoka; Deie, Masataka

    2014-01-01

    Use of mild hyperbaric oxygen less than 2 atmospheres absolute (2026.54 hPa) with normal air is emerging as a common complementary treatment for severe muscle injury. Although hyperbaric oxygen at over 2 atmospheres absolute with 100% O2 promotes healing of skeletal muscle injury, it is not clear whether mild hyperbaric oxygen is equally effective. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the impact of hyperbaric oxygen at 1.25 atmospheres absolute (1266.59 hPa) with normal air on muscle regeneration. The tibialis anterior muscle of male Wistar rats was injured by injection of bupivacaine hydrochloride, and rats were randomly assigned to a hyperbaric oxygen experimental group or to a non-hyperbaric oxygen control group. Immediately after the injection, rats were exposed to hyperbaric oxygen, and the treatment was continued for 28 days. The cross-sectional area of centrally nucleated muscle fibers was significantly larger in rats exposed to hyperbaric oxygen than in controls 5 and 7 days after injury. The number of CD68- or CD68- and CD206-positive cells was significantly higher in rats exposed to hyperbaric oxygen than in controls 24 h after injury. Additionally, tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-10 mRNA expression levels were significantly higher in rats exposed to hyperbaric oxygen than in controls 24 h after injury. The number of Pax7- and MyoD- or MyoD- and myogenin-positive nuclei per mm2 and the expression levels of these proteins were significantly higher in rats exposed to hyperbaric oxygen than in controls 5 days after injury. These results suggest that mild hyperbaric oxygen promotes skeletal muscle regeneration in the early phase after injury, possibly due to reduced hypoxic conditions leading to accelerated macrophage infiltration and phenotype transition. In conclusion, mild hyperbaric oxygen less than 2 atmospheres absolute with normal air is an appropriate support therapy for severe muscle injuries.

  19. Molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of cyclosporin A and sirolimus on glucose and lipid metabolism in liver, skeletal muscle and adipose tissue in an in vivo rat model.

    PubMed

    Fuhrmann, A; Lopes, Pc; Sereno, J; Pedro, J; Espinoza, D O; Pereira, M J; Reis, F; Eriksson, J W; Carvalho, E

    2014-03-15

    Cyclosporin A (CsA) and sirolimus (SRL) are immunosuppressive agents (IAs) associated with dyslipidemia, insulin resistance and new onset diabetes after transplantation (NODAT). However, the molecular mechanisms involved are not fully understood. We investigated the effects of six-week treatment of either CsA or SRL on glucose and lipid metabolism in Wistar rats. The results show that, compared with vehicle-treated rats, SRL-treated rats were significantly lighter starting at week 5. CsA or SRL caused glucose intolerance, increased storage of lipids in the liver and skeletal muscle, and decreased the insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in isolated adipocytes. Furthermore, these agents significantly decreased genes involved in insulin action and glucose uptake, such as, IRS-1, Glut4 and Glut1, and increased genes and/or proteins involved in hepatic lipogenesis and gluconeogenesis, while decreasing them in adipose tissue. After either treatment PGC1α gene expression was down regulated in skeletal muscle, an important player in fatty acid oxidation. Moreover, there was an increase in IL-6 gene expression in adipose tissue in the SRL-treated rats, suggesting stimulation of lipolysis. The results of the present study suggest that CsA and SRL lead to metabolic alterations in liver, muscle and adipose tissue, which may contribute to the development of dyslipidemia and insulin resistance associated with immunosuppressive therapy. PMID:24462915

  20. The β2-adrenoceptor agonist formoterol improves structural and functional regenerative capacity of skeletal muscles from aged rat at the early stages of postinjury.

    PubMed

    Conte, Talita C; Silva, Lucila H; Silva, Meiricris T; Hirabara, Sandro M; Oliveira, Antonio C; Curi, Rui; Moriscot, Anselmo S; Aoki, Marcelo S; Miyabara, Elen H

    2012-05-01

    Skeletal muscles from old rats fail to completely regenerate following injury. This study investigated whether pharmacological stimulation of β2-adrenoceptors in aged muscles following injury could improve their regenerative capacity, focusing on myofiber size recovery. Young and aged rats were treated with a subcutaneous injection of β2-adrenergic agonist formoterol (2 μg/kg/d) up to 10 and 21 days after soleus muscle injury. Formoterol-treated muscles from old rats evaluated at 10 and 21 days postinjury showed reduced inflammation and connective tissue but a similar number of regenerating myofibers of greater caliber when compared with their injured controls. Formoterol minimized the decrease in tetanic force and increased protein synthesis and mammalian target of rapamycin phosphorylation in old muscles at 10 days postinjury. Our results suggest that formoterol improves structural and functional regenerative capacity of regenerating skeletal muscles from aged rats by increasing protein synthesis via mammalian target of rapamycin activation. Furthermore, formoterol may have therapeutic benefits in recovery following muscle damage in senescent individuals.

  1. Mineral and Skeletal Homeostasis Influence the Manner of Bone Loss in Metabolic Osteoporosis due to Calcium-Deprived Diet in Different Sites of Rat Vertebra and Femur

    PubMed Central

    Cavani, Francesco; Smargiassi, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Rats fed calcium-deprived diet develop osteoporosis due to enhanced bone resorption, secondary to parathyroid overactivity resulting from nutritional hypocalcemia. Therefore, rats provide a good experimental animal model for studying bone modelling alterations during biochemical osteoporosis. Three-month-old Sprague-Dawley male rats were divided into 4 groups: (1) baseline, (2) normal diet for 4 weeks, (3) calcium-deprived diet for 4 weeks, and (4) calcium-deprived diet for 4 weeks and concomitant administration of PTH (1-34) 40 µg/Kg/day. Histomorphometrical analyses were made on cortical and trabecular bone of lumbar vertebral body as well as of mid-diaphysis and distal metaphysis of femur. In all rats fed calcium-deprived diet, despite the reduction of trabecular number (due to the maintenance of mineral homeostasis), an intense activity of bone deposition occurs on the surface of the few remaining trabeculae (in answering to mechanical stresses and, consequently, to maintain the skeletal homeostasis). Different responses were detected in different sites of cortical bone, depending on their main function in answering mineral or skeletal homeostasis. This study represents the starting point for work-in-progress researches, with the aim of defining in detail timing and manners of evolution and recovery of biochemical osteoporosis. PMID:26064895

  2. Effect of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition on skeletal muscle oxidative function and exercise capacity in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Rouyer, Olivier; Zoll, Joffrey; Daussin, Frederic; Damgé, Christiane; Helms, Pauline; Talha, Sami; Rasseneur, Laurence; Piquard, Francois; Geny, Bernard

    2007-11-01

    Since exercise capacity is related to the mitochondrial respiration rate in skeletal muscle and both parameters are potentially modulated by the onset of diabetes and by inhibition of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), we investigated whether skeletal muscle oxidative functions and exercise capacities are impaired in chronic streptozotocin-induced diabetic (STZ) rats and whether ACE inhibition could reverse such abnormalities. The ACE inhibitor perindopril (2 mg kg(-1) day(-1)) was given for a period of 5 weeks to 7-month-old STZ rats (DIA-PE, n = 8) whose haemodynamic function, skeletal muscle mitochondrial function and exercise capacity were compared with those of untreated diabetic (DIA, n = 8) and control rats (CONT, n = 8). Increased arterial blood pressure (157 +/- 12 versus 130 +/- 6 mmHg, P < 0.05) and reduced exercise capacity (29 +/- 2 versus 91 +/- 2 min, respectively, P < 0.01) were observed in DIA compared with CONT. The oxidative capacity of the gastrocnemius muscle was significantly reduced in DIA compared with CONT rats (5.4 +/- 0.5 versus 10.6 +/- 0.7 micromol O(2) min(-1)(g dry weight)(-1), respectively, P < 0.001). Moreover, the coupling between oxidation and phosphorylation was significantly impaired in DIA (-52%, P < 0.001). Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition (ACEi) normalized blood pressure without improving mitochondrial function (4.3 +/- 0.8 micromol O(2) min(-1) (g dry weight)(-1) in DIA-PE rats) but reduced exercise capacity to even lower levels (10 +/- 1 min, P < 0.01). Exercise capacity correlated positively with blood pressure in DIA-PE (r = 0.79, P < 0.05). In experimental type 1 diabetic rats, both skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiration and exercise capacity are impaired. The ACEi failed to restore the muscular function and worsened exercise capacity. Further studies will be useful to determine whether an inadequate muscular blood flow secondary to the reduction in mean systemic blood pressure can explain these results.

  3. Macrophage-mediated inflammation and glial response in the skeletal muscle of a rat model of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

    PubMed

    Van Dyke, Jonathan M; Smit-Oistad, Ivy M; Macrander, Corey; Krakora, Dan; Meyer, Michael G; Suzuki, Masatoshi

    2016-03-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive motor dysfunction and loss of large motor neurons in the spinal cord and brain stem. While much research has focused on mechanisms of motor neuron cell death in the spinal cord, degenerative processes in skeletal muscle and neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) are also observed early in disease development. Although recent studies support the potential therapeutic benefits of targeting the skeletal muscle in ALS, relatively little is known about inflammation and glial responses in skeletal muscle and near NMJs, or how these responses contribute to motor neuron survival, neuromuscular innervation, or motor dysfunction in ALS. We recently showed that human mesenchymal stem cells modified to release glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (hMSC-GDNF) extend survival and protect NMJs and motor neurons in SOD1(G93A) rats when delivered to limb muscles. In this study, we evaluate inflammatory and glial responses near NMJs in the limb muscle collected from a rat model of familial ALS (SOD1(G93A) transgenic rats) during disease progression and following hMSC-GDNF transplantation. Muscle samples were collected from pre-symptomatic, symptomatic, and end-stage animals. A significant increase in the expression of microglial inflammatory markers (CD11b and CD68) occurred in the skeletal muscle of symptomatic and end-stage SOD1(G93A) rats. Inflammation was confirmed by ELISA for inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1 β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in muscle homogenates of SOD1(G93A) rats. Next, we observed active glial responses in the muscle of SOD1(G93A) rats, specifically near intramuscular axons and NMJs. Interestingly, strong expression of activated glial markers, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and nestin, was observed in the areas adjacent to NMJs. Finally, we determined whether ex vivo trophic factor delivery influences inflammation and terminal

  4. Regional blood flow and skeletal muscle energy status in endotoxemic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Jepson, M.M.; Cox, M.; Bates, P.C.; Rothwell, N.J.; Stock, M.J.; Cady, E.B.; Millward, D.J.

    1987-05-01

    Endotoxins induce muscle wasting in part as a result of depressed protein synthesis. To investigate whether these changes reflect impaired energy transduction, blood flow, O/sub 2/ extraction, and high-energy phosphates in muscle and whole-body O/sub 2/ consumption (Vo/sub 2/) have been measured. Vo/sub 2/ was measured for 6 h after an initial sublethal dose of endotoxin (Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide 0.3 mg/100 g body wt sc) or saline and during 6 h after a second dose 24 h later. In fed or fasted rats, Vo/sub 2/ was either increased or better maintained after endotoxin. In anesthetized fed rats 3-4 h after the second dose of endotoxin Vo/sub 2/ was increased, and this was accompanied by increased blood flow measured by /sup 57/Co-labelled microspheres to liver (hepatic arterial supply), kidney, and perirenal brown adipose tissue and a 57 and 64% decrease in flow to back and hindlimb muscle, respectively, with no change in any other organ. Hindlimb arteriovenous O/sub 2/ was unchanged, indicating markedly decreased aerobic metabolism in muscle, and the contribution of the hindlimb to whole-body Vo/sub 2/ decreased by 46%. Adenosine 5'-triphosphate levels in muscle were unchanged in endotoxin-treated rats, and this was confirmed by topical nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, which also showed muscle pH to be unchanged. These results show that, although there is decreased blood flow and aerobic oxidation in muscle, adenosine 5'-triphosphate availability does not appear to be compromised so that the endotoxin-induced muscle catabolism and decreased protein synthesis must reflex some other mechanism.

  5. Ovarian hormone status and skeletal muscle inflammation during recovery from disuse in rats.

    PubMed

    McClung, J M; Davis, J M; Carson, J A

    2007-01-01

    Resumption of normal muscle loading after a period of disuse initiates cellular processes related to mass accretion. The renewed loading also induces a significant amount of muscle damage and subsequent inflammation. Ovarian hormone depletion delays atrophied myofibre mass recovery. Ovarian hormones are also global regulators of immune system function. The purpose of this study was to determine whether ovarian hormone depletion-induced deficits in myofibre regrowth after disuse atrophy are related to the induction of muscle damage and the associated inflammatory response. We hypothesized that soleus muscle immune cell infiltration and inflammatory gene expression would be both accentuated and prolonged in ovarian hormone-depleted rats during the first week of recovery from disuse atrophy. Intact and ovariectomized (OVX) female rats were subjected to hindlimb suspension for 10 days and then returned to normal ambulation for a recovery period, the rats were killed and the soleus muscle removed for analysis. Although reloading increased both circulating creatine kinase and myofibre membrane disruption, there was no effect of ovarian hormones on these processes during recovery. Muscle neutrophil concentration was increased above baseline regardless of hormone status at days 1 and 3 of recovery; however, this increase was 43% greater at day 3 in the OVX group. Muscle ED1+ and ED2+ macrophage concentrations were increased during recovery in both groups. However, macropage concentrations remained elevated at day 7 of recovery in the OVX group, whereas they returned to control levels in the intact group. Cyclo-oxygenase-2, interleukin-6 and interleukin-1beta muscle mRNA expression increased similarly during recovery, regardless of ovarian hormone status. These results demonstrate that the initial myofibre damage and inflammatory gene expression induced during muscle recovery from disuse atrophy are independent of ovarian hormone status.

  6. Osmotic properties of the sealed tubular system of toad and rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Launikonis, Bradley S; Stephenson, D George

    2004-03-01

    A method was developed that allows conversion of changes in maximum Ca(2+)-dependent fluorescence of a fixed amount of fluo-3 into volume changes of the fluo-3-containing solution. This method was then applied to investigate by confocal microscopy the osmotic properties of the sealed tubular (t-) system of toad and rat mechanically skinned fibers in which a certain amount of fluo-3 was trapped. When the osmolality of the myoplasmic environment was altered by simple dilution or addition of sucrose within the range 190-638 mosmol kg(-1), the sealed t-system of toad fibers behaved almost like an ideal osmometer, changing its volume inverse proportionally to osmolality. However, increasing the osmolality above 638 to 2,550 mosmol kg(-1) caused hardly any change in t-system volume. In myoplasmic solutions made hypotonic to 128 mosmol kg(-1), a loss of Ca(2+) from the sealed t-system of toad fibers occurred, presumably through either stretch-activated cationic channels or store-operated Ca(2+) channels. In contrast to the behavior of the t-system in toad fibers, the volume of the sealed t-system of rat fibers changed little (by <20%) when the osmolality of the myoplasmic environment changed between 210 and 2,800 mosmol kg(-1). Results were also validated with calcein. Clear differences between rat and toad fibers were also found with respect to the t-system permeability for glycerol. Thus, glycerol equilibrated across the rat t-system within seconds to minutes, but was not equilibrated across the t-system of toad fibers even after 20 min. These results have broad implications for understanding osmotic properties of the t-system and reversible vacuolation in muscle fibers. Furthermore, we observed for the first time in mammalian fibers an orderly lateral shift of the t-system networks whereby t-tubule networks to the left of the Z-line crossover to become t-tubule networks to the right of the Z-line in the adjacent sarcomere (and vice versa). This orderly rearrangement

  7. WE-E-BRE-01: An Image-Based Skeletal Dosimetry Model for the ICRP Reference Adult Female - Internal Electron Sources

    SciTech Connect

    O'Reilly, S; Maynard, M; Marshall, E; Bolch, W; Sinclair, L; Rajon, D; Wayson, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Limitations seen in previous skeletal dosimetry models, which are still employed in commonly used software today, include the lack of consideration of electron escape and cross-fire from cortical bone, the modeling of infinite spongiosa, the disregard of the effect of varying cellularity on active marrow self-irradiation, and the lack of use of the more recent ICRP definition of a 50 micron surrogate tissue region for the osteoprogenitor cells - shallow marrow. These limitations were addressed in the present dosimetry model. Methods: Electron transport was completed to determine specific absorbed fractions to active marrow and shallow marrow of the skeletal regions of the adult female. The bone macrostructure was obtained from the whole-body hybrid computational phantom of the UF series of reference phantoms, while the bone microstructure was derived from microCT images of skeletal region samples taken from a 45 year-old female cadaver. The target tissue regions were active marrow and shallow marrow. The source tissues were active marrow, inactive marrow, trabecular bone volume, trabecular bone surfaces, cortical bone volume and cortical bone surfaces. The marrow cellularity was varied from 10 to 100 percent for active marrow self-irradiation. A total of 33 discrete electron energies, ranging from 1 keV to 10 MeV, were either simulated or modeled analytically. Results: The method of combining macro- and microstructure absorbed fractions calculated using MCNPX electron transport was found to yield results similar to those determined with the PIRT model for the UF adult male in the Hough et al. study. Conclusion: The calculated skeletal averaged absorbed fractions for each source-target combination were found to follow similar trends of more recent dosimetry models (image-based models) and did not follow current models used in nuclear medicine dosimetry at high energies (due to that models use of an infinite expanse of trabecular spongiosa)

  8. Expression profile of mitrogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling genes in the skeletal muscle & liver of rat with type 2 diabetes: Role in disease pathology

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiaoli; Deng, Libin; Xiong, Huangui; Li, Guilin; Lin, Jiari; Liu, Shuangmei; Xie, Jinyan; Liu, Jun; Kong, Fanjun; Tu, Guihua; Peng, Haiying; Liang, Shangdong

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is characterized as hyperglycaemia caused by defects in insulin secretion, and it affects target tissues, such as skeletal muscle, liver and adipose tissue. Therefore, analyzing the changes of gene expression profiles in these tissues is important to elucidate the pathogenesis of T2D. We, therefore, measured the gene transcript alterations in liver and skeletal muscle of rat with induced T2D, to detect differentially expressed genes in liver and skeletal muscle and perform gene-annotation enrichment analysis. Methods: In the present study, skeletal muscle and liver tissue from 10 streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats and 10 control rats were analyzed using gene expression microarrays. KEGG pathways enriched by differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified by WebGestalt Expander and GATHER software. DEGs were validated by the method of real-time PCR and western blot. Results: From the 9,929 expressed genes across the genome, 1,305 and 997 differentially expressed genes (DEGs, P<0.01) were identified in comparisons of skeletal muscle and liver, respectively. Large numbers of DEGs (200) were common in both comparisons, which was clearly more than the predicted number (131 genes, P<0.001). For further interpretation of the gene expression data, three over-representation analysis softwares (WebGestalt, Expander and GATHER) were used. All the tools detected one KEGG pathway (MAPK signaling) and two GO (gene ontology) biological processes (response to stress and cell death), with enrichment of DEGs in both tissues. In addition, PPI (protein-protein interaction) networks constructed using human homologues not only revealed the tendency of DEGs to form a highly connected module, but also suggested a “hub” role of p38-MAPK-related genes (such as MAPK14) in the pathogenesis of T2D. Interpretation & conclusions: Our results indicated the considerably aberrant MAPK signaling in both insulin-sensitive tissues of T2D rat

  9. A robust neuromuscular system protects rat and human skeletal muscle from sarcopenia

    PubMed Central

    Pannérec, Alice; Ireland, Alex; Piasecki, Mathew; Karaz, Sonia; Jacot, Guillaume; Métairon, Sylviane; Danenberg, Esther; Raymond, Frédéric; Descombes, Patrick; McPhee, Jamie S.; Feige, Jerome N.

    2016-01-01

    Declining muscle mass and function is one of the main drivers of loss of independence in the elderly. Sarcopenia is associated with numerous cellular and endocrine perturbations, and it remains challenging to identify those changes that play a causal role and could serve as targets for therapeutic intervention. In this study, we uncovered a remarkable differential susceptibility of certain muscles to age-related decline. Aging rats specifically lose muscle mass and function in the hindlimbs, but not in the forelimbs. By performing a comprehensive comparative analysis of these muscles, we demonstrate that regional susceptibility to sarcopenia is dependent on neuromuscular junction fragmentation, loss of motoneuron innervation, and reduced excitability. Remarkably, muscle loss in elderly humans also differs in vastus lateralis and tibialis anterior muscles in direct relation to neuromuscular dysfunction. By comparing gene expression in susceptible and non-susceptible muscles, we identified a specific transcriptomic signature of neuromuscular impairment. Importantly, differential molecular profiling of the associated peripheral nerves revealed fundamental changes in cholesterol biosynthetic pathways. Altogether our results provide compelling evidence that susceptibility to sarcopenia is tightly linked to neuromuscular decline in rats and humans, and identify dysregulation of sterol metabolism in the peripheral nervous system as an early event in this process. PMID:27019136

  10. Changes in the cholinergic system of rat sciatic nerve and skeletal muscle following suspension induced disuse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, R. C.; Misulis, K. E.; Dettbarn, W. D.

    1984-01-01

    Muscle disused induced changes in the cholinergic system of sciatic nerve, slow twitch soleus (SOL) and fast twitch extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle were studied in rats. Rats with hindlimbs suspended for 2 to 3 weeks showed marked elevation in the activity of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) in sciatic nerve (38%), in SOL (108%) and in EDL (67%). Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in SOL increased by 163% without changing the molecular forms pattern of 4S, 10S, 12S, and 16S. No significant changes in activity and molecular forms pattern of AChE were seen in EDL or in AChE activity of sciatic nerve. Nicotinic receptor binding of 3H-acetylcholine was increased in both muscles. When measured after 3 weeks of hindlimb suspension the normal distribution of type 1 fibers in SOL was reduced and a corresponding increase in type IIa and IIb fibers is seen. In EDL no significant change in fiber proportion is observed. Muscle activity, such as loadbearing, appears to have a greater controlling influence on the characteristics of the slow twitch SOL muscle than upon the fast twitch EDL muscle.

  11. Effects of thyroid hormones on calcium contents and 45Ca exchange in rat skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Everts, M.E.; Clausen, T.

    1986-09-01

    In 4-wk-old rats, pretreatment with L-triiodothyronine (T3) increased calcium content by 100% and the 30-min /sup 45/Ca uptake by 64% in the soleus, whereas the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle showed no significant change. The stimulation of /sup 45/Ca uptake was resistant to dantrolene and methoxyverapamil (D600) and could not be attributed to altered permeability of the plasma membrane to calcium, but appears to reflect increased net accumulation of calcium in intracellular pools. The stimulating effect of high K0 (20 mM) on /sup 45/Ca uptake was more pronounced in soleus than in EDL and could be suppressed by dantrolene and D600. The results indicate that the effects of T3 on calcium content and /sup 45/Ca exchange are primarily exerted on muscles containing a large proportion of slow-twitch, oxidative fibers. In soleus muscle from hyperthyroid rats the stimulating effects of high K0 on /sup 45/Ca uptake and lactate production were, respectively, 3.4 and 4.5 times larger than in those obtained from controls. These observations further support the earlier proposed idea (C. van Hardeveld and T. Clausen. Am. J. Physiol. 247 (Endocrinol. Metab. 10): E421-E430, 1984) that the metabolic effects of thyroid hormone depend on the availability of cellular as well as extracellular calcium.

  12. Exercise training, glucose transporters, and glucose transport in rat skeletal muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodnick, K. J.; Henriksen, E. J.; James, D. E.; Holloszy, J. O.

    1992-01-01

    It was previously found that voluntary wheel running induces an increase in the insulin-sensitive glucose transporter, i.e., the GLUT4 isoform, in rat plantaris muscle (K. J. Rodnick, J. O. Holloszy, C. E. Mondon, and D. E. James. Diabetes 39: 1425-1429, 1990). The present study was undertaken to determine whether 1) the increase in muscle GLUT4 protein is associated with an increase in maximally stimulated glucose transport activity, 2) a conversion of type IIb to type IIa or type I muscle fibers plays a role in the increase in GLUT4 protein, and 3) an increase in the GLUT1 isoform is a component of the adaptation of muscle to endurance exercise. Five weeks of voluntary wheel running that resulted in a 33% increase in citrate synthase activity induced a 50% increase in GLUT4 protein in epitrochlearis muscles of female Sprague-Dawley rats. The rate of 2-deoxy-glucose transport maximally stimulated with insulin or insulin plus contractions was increased approximately 40% (P less than 0.05). There was no change in muscle fiber type composition, evaluated by myosin ATPase staining, in the epitrochlearis. There was also no change in GLUT1 protein concentration. We conclude that an increase in GLUT4, but not of GLUT1 protein, is a component of the adaptive response of muscle to endurance exercise and that the increase in GLUT4 protein is associated with an increased capacity for glucose transport.

  13. Activation of GPR30 improves exercise capacity and skeletal muscle strength in senescent female Fischer344 × Brown Norway rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Alencar, Allan; Lin, Marina; Sun, Xuming; Sudo, Roberto T; Zapata-Sudo, Gisele; Lowe, Dawn A; Groban, Leanne

    2016-06-17

    The molecular mechanisms of muscle weakness and sarcopenia in postmenopausal women are largely unknown. To determine the effect of a new estrogen receptor, GPR30, in the maintenance of exercise capacity and skeletal muscle function in females, the selective GPR30 agonist, G1 (100 μg/kg/day), or vehicle (V, soybean oil) was administered subcutaneously daily (n = 7 per group) to ovariectomized (OVX) 27-month-old Fischer 344 × Brown Norway (F344BN) female rats. Following 8 weeks of treatment, the exercise capacity (treadmill walk time to exhaustion) was reduced in OVX vs. sham rats (5.1 ± 1.4 vs. 11.0 ± 0.9 min, P < 0.05), and chronic G1 restored exercise capacity (12.9 ± 1.2 min; P < 0.05 vs. OVX-V). Similarly, the peak twitch of electrically stimulated soleus muscles was decreased by 22% in OVX vs. sham rats (P < 0.05), and G1 attenuated this decline (P < 0.05). Western blot analysis showed that chronic G1 treatment attenuated OVX-associated decreases in heat shock protein (HSP) 90, HSP70, and HSP27 expressions. In vitro studies using the L6 myoblast cell line demonstrated that G1 increased mRNA levels of HSPs in cultured cells. Collectively, these data demonstrate that the activation of GPR30 mitigates the adverse effects of estrogen loss on exercise capacity and skeletal muscle contractile function in old F344BN rats. The protective effects of GPR30 might be through its upregulation of heat shock proteins in skeletal muscle.

  14. Chlorambucil-induced postclosure exencephaly and axial skeletal abnormalities in rat fetuses.

    PubMed

    Padmanabhan, R; Samad, P A

    1999-01-01

    Open neural tube defects (NTD) are reported to arise from failure of the embryonic neural folds to close or rupture of a previously closed neural tube. The critical period for dysmorphogenesis of the neural tube by either mechanism is of clinical importance. We had previously reported that single doses of cyclophosphamide (CPA), administered to pregnant rats resulted in reopening of the closed neural tube. The objective of the present study was to determine if other antineoplastic drugs also had similar ability to cause rupture of the closed neural tube. Therefore, single doses of chlorambucil dissolved in bicarbonate buffer were administered to Wistar rats on one of gestation days (GD) 11 through 14 (i.e., well after closure of the neural tube) and fetuses were examined on GD 20. It was observed that the window of susceptibility extended from GD 11 through 14 and that a single dose of 10 mg/kg of the drug was most effective. The affected fetuses had the prosencephalon and mesencephalon parts of the brain protruding through a wide opening of the cranial roof. The exposed brain tissue was hemorrhagic and covered by a thin, transparent and often porous membrane. The cranial vault was missing. Numerous malformations of the axial skeleton and of several nonneural organs were found to accompany the brain defect. Electron microscopic and light microscopic studies revealed extensive cell death, fragmentation, and phagocytosis of dead cells and vacuolization of the neuroepithelium (NE) within 12 h of the drug treatment. Cell death per se was not pronounced in the cranial mesenchyme (ME). The vacuoles in the NE coalesced into small cavities. The ME failed to proliferate adequately and organize itself into the cranial vault primordium. Hemorrhage and disorganization of the NE was progressive. The fluid that escaped into the interstitium seemed to extend into the cysts that developed in the ME externally and into the ventricular system internally. The edema of the ME thus

  15. Nocturnal food-related hyperdipsia in the adult spontaneously hypertensive rat.

    PubMed

    Kraly, F S; Moore, A F; Miller, L A; Drexler, A

    1982-05-01

    Male adult spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) ate the same but drank more and had a higher water to food ratio (W:F) than did Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats in 24-hr when they had continuous access to standard laboratory pellets and tap water. When rats ate in the day phase of a 12:12 light/dark cycle after 24-hr food deprivation, SHR rats ate and drank the same ad did WKY rats in a 60-min test. When the same rats ate at night after 24-hr food deprivation, however, SHR rats were hyperdipsic: They ate the same as did WKY rats, but SHR rats drank more and had a higher W:F. This relative hyperdipsia reflected the increased ability of ingestion of food to stimulate drinking in SHR, because when food was absent for a 60-min test at night SHR drank the same as did WKY rats. Three dipsogens which are candidate components for eating-elicited drinking in the rat, cellular dehydration, histamine and angiotensin II, elicited drinking differentially in SHR and WKY rats: SHR drank more than did WKY rats in response to (1) cellular dehydration produced by IP hypertonic saline, (2) large doses of SC histamine, and (3) SC angiotensin II. These results demonstrate that SHR exhibit a nocturnal food-related hyperdipsia which may reflect differential sensitivity to stimuli important for eating-elicited drinking such as increased osmolality and endogenous histamine or angiotensin.

  16. Bone scanning in assessing viability of vascularized skeletal tissue transplants. [Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Lipson, R.A.; Dief, H.; Greyson, N.D.; Kawano, H.; Gross, A.E.; Langer, F.; Halloran, P.F.

    1981-01-01

    One hundred and eight bone scans using /sup 99m/Technetium methylene diphosphonate (MDP) were performed in rats undergoing vascularized and nonvascularized syngeneic and allogeneic transplants of the hind limb, and in control animals. A six-level system of grading the radionuclide uptake in the graft was used to evaluate healing or complications of the transplantation. Bone scanning was superior to other modalities in assessing viability of the graft. Bone scans were able to: (1) immediately confirm vascular patency, thus obviating angiography; (2) demonstrate differences in the rate of repair in syngeneic and allogeneic nonvascularized grafts; (3) sequentially assess vascularized allograft rejection; and (4) document long-term effects, such as bone atrophy due to disuse and early epiphyseal maturity.

  17. Hydroxyl radical formation in skeletal muscle of rats with glucocorticoid-induced myopathy.

    PubMed

    Konno, Shingo

    2005-05-01

    Steroid myopathy is a well-known adverse effect of glucocorticoids that causes muscle weakness and atrophy; however, its pathogenic mechanism is still unclear. Recently, oxidative stress was reported to contribute to steroid myopathy, but there is no report that actually attempts to measure hydroxyl radical. I developed an animal model of steroid myopathy in rat with dexamethasone (9-Fluoro-11beta,17, 21-trihydroxy-16alpha-methylpregna-1,4-diene-3,20-dione), and measured hydroxyl radical using the salicylate trapping method. There was significant dose-dependent relation between both 2,5- and 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acids and dexamethasone in the treated group, compared to the control group. These results suggest that hydroxyl radical plays a role in the pathogenesis of steroid myopathy.

  18. Heat treatment inhibits skeletal muscle atrophy of glucocorticoid-induced myopathy in rats.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Y; Kondo, Y; Kataoka, H; Honda, Y; Kozu, R; Sakamoto, J; Nakano, J; Origuchi, T; Yoshimura, T; Okita, M

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of heat treatment on glucocorticoid (GC)-induced myopathy. Eight-week-old Wistar rats were randomly assigned to the control, Dex, and Dex + Heat groups. Dexamethasone (2 mg/kg) was injected subcutaneously 6 days per week for 2 weeks in the Dex and Dex + Heat group. In the Dex + Heat group, heat treatment was performed by immersing hindlimbs in water at 42 °C for 60 min, once every 3 days for 2 weeks. The extensor digitorum longus muscle was extracted following 2 weeks of experimentation. In the Dex + Heat group, muscle fiber diameter, capillary/muscle fiber ratio, and level of heat shock protein 72 were significantly higher and atrogene expression levels were significantly lower than in the Dex group. Our results suggest that heat treatment inhibits the development of GC-induced myopathy by decreasing atrogene expression and increasing angiogenesis.

  19. Differences in Response Initiation and Behavioral Flexibility Between Adolescent and Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Nicholas W.; Gregory, Timothy A.; Wood, Jesse; Moghaddam, Bita

    2014-01-01

    Adolescence is a period of increased vulnerability to psychiatric illnesses such as addiction, mood disorders, and schizophrenia. Rats provide a useful animal model for investigating the differences in behavior and biology between adults and adolescents that stem from ongoing brain development. We developed the Cued Response Inhibition Task, or CRIT, to assess response inhibition and initiation processes by measuring the ability of rodents to withhold a response during an inhibitory cue and then to respond promptly after cue termination. We found no difference between adult and adolescent rats in the ability to appropriately inhibit a response during cue presentation. Adolescents, however, were unable to initiate a response as quickly as adults after cue termination. Further, we observed that this difference in responding was abolished after adolescent rats aged to adulthood with no additional training. In a separate experiment, adult and adolescent rats were trained in CRIT and then trained in another protocol in which the response inhibitory cue from CRIT was used as a Pavlovian cue predictive of reward. Adolescents demonstrated more reward-seeking behavior during the previously inhibitory Pavlovian cue than adults, indicative of greater behavioral flexibility. Taken together, these data suggest that, compared with adults, adolescent rats (a) are less able to initiate a response after response inhibition, (b) equally inhibit behavioral responses, and (c) are more adept at flexibly switching behavioral patterns. Furthermore, this study characterizes a task that is well suited for future pharmacological and electrophysiological investigations for assessing neuronal processing differences between adolescents and adults. PMID:23398439

  20. Accumulation of glycogen in axotomized adult rat facial motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Takezawa, Yosuke; Baba, Otto; Kohsaka, Shinichi; Nakajima, Kazuyuki

    2015-06-01

    This study biochemically determined glycogen content in the axotomized facial nucleus of adult rats up to 35 days postinsult. The amounts of glycogen in the transected facial nucleus were significantly increased at 5 days postinsult, peaked at 7 days postinsult, and declined to the control levels at 21-35 days postinsult. Immunohistochemical analysis with antiglycogen antibody revealed that the quantity of glycogen granules in the axotomized facial nucleus was greater than that in the control nucleus at 7 days postinjury. Dual staining methods with antiglycogen antibody and a motoneuron marker clarified that the glycogen was localized mainly in motoneurons. Immunoblotting and quantification analysis revealed that the ratio of inactive glycogen synthase (GS) to total GS was significantly decreased in the injured nucleus at about 1-3 days postinsult and significantly increased from 7 to 14 days postinsult, suggesting that glycogen is actively synthesized in the early period postinjury but suppressed after 7 days postinsult. The enhanced glycogen at about 5-7 days postinsult is suggested to be responsible for the decrease in inactive GS levels, and the decrease of glycogen after 7 days postinsult is considered to be caused by increased inactive GS levels and possibly the increase in active glycogen phosphorylase.

  1. Treatment outcome and long-term stability of skeletal changes following maxillary distraction in adult subjects of cleft lip and palate

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Satinder Pal; Jena, Ashok Kumar; Rattan, Vidya; Utreja, Ashok Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the treatment outcome and long-term stability of skeletal changes following maxillary advancement with distraction osteogenesis in adult subjects of cleft lip and palate. Materials and Methods: Total 12 North Indian adult patients in the age range of 17-34 years with cleft lip and palate underwent advancement of maxilla by distraction osteogenesis. Lateral cephalograms recorded prior to distraction, at the end of distraction, 6 months after distraction, and at least 24 months (mean 25.5 ± 1.94 months) after distraction osteogenesis were used for the evaluation of treatment outcome and long-term stability of the skeletal changes. Descriptive analysis, ANOVA, and post-hoc test were used, and P-value 0.05 was considered as a statistically significant level. Results: Maxillary distraction resulted in significant advancement of maxilla (P<0.001). Counterclockwise rotation of the palatal plane took place after maxillary distraction. The position of the mandible and facial heights were stable during distraction. During the first 6 months of the post-distraction period, the maxilla showed relapse of approximately 30%. However, after 6 months post distraction, the relapse was very negligible. Conclusions: Successful advancement of maxilla was achieved by distraction osteogenesis in adult subjects with cleft lip and palate. Most of the relapse occurred during the first 6 months of post-distraction period, and after that the outcomes were stable. PMID:22919221

  2. Fourteen days of bed rest induces a decline in satellite cell content and robust atrophy of skeletal muscle fibers in middle-aged adults.

    PubMed

    Arentson-Lantz, Emily J; English, Kirk L; Paddon-Jones, Douglas; Fry, Christopher S

    2016-04-15

    Bed rest, a ground-based spaceflight analog, induces robust atrophy of skeletal muscle, an effect that is exacerbated with increasing age. We examined the effect of 14 days of bed rest on skeletal muscle satellite cell content and fiber type atrophy in middle-aged adults, an understudied age demographic with few overt signs of muscle aging that is representative of astronauts who perform long-duration spaceflight. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis of healthy middle-aged adults [n= 7 (4 male, 3 female); age: 51 ± 1 yr] before (Pre-BR) and after (Post-BR) 14 days of bed rest. Immunohistochemical analyses were used to quantify myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoform expression, cross-sectional area (CSA), satellite cell and myonuclear content, and capillary density. Peak oxygen consumption, knee extensor strength, and body composition were also measured Pre-BR and Post-BR. Post-BR MyHC type 2a fiber percentage was reduced, and mean CSA decreased in all fiber types (-24 ± 5%;P< 0.05). Satellite cell content was also reduced Post-BR (-39 ± 9%;P< 0.05), and the change in satellite cell content was significantly correlated with the change in mean fiber CSA (r(2)= 0.60;P< 0.05). A decline in capillary density was observed Post-BR (-23 ± 6%;P< 0.05), and Post-BR capillary content was significantly associated with Post-BR peak aerobic capacity (r(2)= 0.59;P< 0.05). A subtle decline in myonuclear content occurred during bed rest (-5 ± 1%;P< 0.05). The rapid maladaptation of skeletal muscle to 14 days of mechanical unloading in middle-aged adults emphasizes the need for robust countermeasures to preserve muscle function in astronauts. PMID:26796754

  3. The Oropharyngeal Airway in Young Adults with Skeletal Class II and Class III Deformities: A 3-D Morphometric Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jayaratne, Yasas Shri Nalaka; Zwahlen, Roger Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Objectives 1) To determine the accuracy and reliability of an automated anthropometric measurement software for the oropharyngeal airway and 2) To compare the anthropometric dimensions of the oropharyngeal airway in skeletal class II and III deformity patients. Methods Cone-beam CT (CBCT) scans of 62 patients with skeletal class II or III deformities were used for this study. Volumetric, linear and surface area measurements retroglossal (RG) and retropalatal (RP) compartments of the oropharyngeal airway was measured with the 3dMDVultus software. Accuracy of automated anthropometric pharyngeal airway measurements was assessed using an airway phantom. Results The software was found to be reasonably accurate for measuring dimensions of air passages. The total oropharyngeal volume was significantly greater in the skeletal class III deformity group (16.7 ± 9.04 mm3) compared with class II subjects (11.87 ± 4.01 mm3). The average surface area of both the RG and RP compartments were significantly larger in the class III deformity group. The most constricted area in the RG and RP airway was significantly larger in individuals with skeletal class III deformity. The anterior-posterior (AP) length of this constriction was significantly greater in skeletal class III individuals in both compartments, whereas the width of the constriction was not significantly different between the two groups in both compartments. The RP compartment was larger but less uniform than the RG compartment in both skeletal deformities. Conclusion Significant differences were observed in morphological characteristics of the oropharyngeal airway in individuals with skeletal class II and III deformities. This information may be valuable for surgeons in orthognathic treatment planning, especially for mandibular setback surgery that might compromise the oropharyngeal patency. PMID:26901313

  4. In utero glucocorticoid (GLC) exposure and maternal undernutrition reduce fetal skeletal muscle mass by different mechanisms in rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Both maternal undernutrition and exposure of the fetus to above normal levels of GLC impair skeletal muscle growth. The degree to which the effects of maternal undernutrition on fetal skeletal muscle growth are a direct result of nutrient deficit or secondary to the presence of above normal GLC leve...

  5. Phosphorylation of inhibitor-2 and activation of MgATP-dependent protein phosphatase by rat skeletal muscle glycogen synthase kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Hegazy, M.G.; Reimann, E.M.; Thysseril, T.J.; Schlender, K.K.

    1986-05-01

    Rat skeletal muscle contains a glycogen synthase kinase (GSK-M) which is not stimulated by Ca/sup 2 +/ or cAMP. This kinase has an apparent Mr of 62,000 and uses ATP but not GTP as a phosphoryl donor. GSK-M phosphorylated glycogen synthase at sites 2 and 3. It phosphorylated ATP-citrate lyase and activated MgATP-dependent phosphatase in the presence of ATP but not GTP. As expected, the kinase also phosphorylated phosphatase inhibitor 2 (I-2). Phosphatase incorporation reached approximately 0.3 mol/mol of I-2. Phosphopeptide maps were obtained by digesting /sup 32/P-labeled I-2 with trypsin and separating the peptides by reversed phase HPLC. Two partially separated /sup 32/P-labeled peaks were obtained when I-2 was phosphorylated with either GSK-M or glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) and these peptides were different from those obtained when I-2 was phosphorylated with the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (CSU) or casein kinase II (CK-II). When I-2 was phosphorylated with GSK-M or GSK-3 and cleaved by CNBr, a single radioactive peak was obtained. Phosphoamino acid analysis showed that I-2 was phosphorylated by GSK-M or GSK-3 predominately in Thr whereas CSU and CK-II phosphorylated I-2 exclusively in Ser. These results indicate that GSK-M is similar to GSK-3 and to ATP-citrate lyase kinase. However, it appears to differ in Mr from ATP-citrate lyase kinase and it differs from GSK-3 in that it phosphorylates glycogen synthase at site 2 and it does not use GTP as a phosphoryl donor.

  6. Palmitate-induced changes in energy demand cause reallocation of ATP supply in rat and human skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Nisr, Raid B; Affourtit, Charles

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been associated with obesity-related muscle insulin resistance, but the causality of this association is controversial. The notion that mitochondrial oxidative capacity may be insufficient to deal appropriately with excessive nutrient loads is for example disputed. Effective mitochondrial capacity is indirectly, but largely determined by ATP-consuming processes because skeletal muscle energy metabolism is mostly controlled by ATP demand. Probing the bioenergetics of rat and human myoblasts in real time we show here that the saturated fatty acid palmitate lowers the rate and coupling efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation under conditions it causes insulin resistance. Stearate affects the bioenergetic parameters similarly, whereas oleate and linoleate tend to decrease the rate but not the efficiency of ATP synthesis. Importantly, we reveal that palmitate influences how oxidative ATP supply is used to fuel ATP-consuming processes. Direct measurement of newly made protein demonstrates that palmitate lowers the rate of de novo protein synthesis by more than 30%. The anticipated decrease of energy demand linked to protein synthesis is confirmed by attenuated cycloheximide-sensitivity of mitochondrial respiratory activity used to make ATP. This indirect measure of ATP turnover indicates that palmitate lowers ATP supply reserved for protein synthesis by at least 40%. This decrease is also provoked by stearate, oleate and linoleate, albeit to a lesser extent. Moreover, palmitate lowers ATP supply for sodium pump activity by 60-70% and, in human cells, decreases ATP supply for DNA/RNA synthesis by almost three-quarters. These novel fatty acid effects on energy expenditure inform the 'mitochondrial insufficiency' debate. PMID:27154056

  7. Palmitate-induced changes in energy demand cause reallocation of ATP supply in rat and human skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Nisr, Raid B; Affourtit, Charles

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been associated with obesity-related muscle insulin resistance, but the causality of this association is controversial. The notion that mitochondrial oxidative capacity may be insufficient to deal appropriately with excessive nutrient loads is for example disputed. Effective mitochondrial capacity is indirectly, but largely determined by ATP-consuming processes because skeletal muscle energy metabolism is mostly controlled by ATP demand. Probing the bioenergetics of rat and human myoblasts in real time we show here that the saturated fatty acid palmitate lowers the rate and coupling efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation under conditions it causes insulin resistance. Stearate affects the bioenergetic parameters similarly, whereas oleate and linoleate tend to decrease the rate but not the efficiency of ATP synthesis. Importantly, we reveal that palmitate influences how oxidative ATP supply is used to fuel ATP-consuming processes. Direct measurement of newly made protein demonstrates that palmitate lowers the rate of de novo protein synthesis by more than 30%. The anticipated decrease of energy demand linked to protein synthesis is confirmed by attenuated cycloheximide-sensitivity of mitochondrial respiratory activity used to make ATP. This indirect measure of ATP turnover indicates that palmitate lowers ATP supply reserved for protein synthesis by at least 40%. This decrease is also provoked by stearate, oleate and linoleate, albeit to a lesser extent. Moreover, palmitate lowers ATP supply for sodium pump activity by 60-70% and, in human cells, decreases ATP supply for DNA/RNA synthesis by almost three-quarters. These novel fatty acid effects on energy expenditure inform the 'mitochondrial insufficiency' debate.

  8. Expression of collagen and related growth factors in rat tendon and skeletal muscle in response to specific contraction types.

    PubMed

    Heinemeier, K M; Olesen, J L; Haddad, F; Langberg, H; Kjaer, M; Baldwin, K M; Schjerling, P

    2007-08-01

    Acute exercise induces collagen synthesis in both tendon and muscle, indicating an adaptive response in the connective tissue of the muscle-tendon unit. However, the mechanisms of this adaptation, potentially involving collagen-inducing growth factors (such as transforming growth factor-beta-1 (TGF-beta-1)), as well as enzymes related to collagen processing, are not clear. Furthermore, possible differential effects of specific contraction types on collagen regulation have not been investigated. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 4 days of concentric, eccentric or isometric training (n = 7-9 per group) of the medial gastrocnemius, by stimulation of the sciatic nerve. RNA was extracted from medial gastrocnemius and Achilles tendon tissue 24 h after the last training bout, and mRNA levels for collagens I and III, TGF-beta-1, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), lysyl oxidase (LOX), metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and -9) and their inhibitors (TIMP-1 and 2) were measured by Northern blotting and/or real-time PCR. In tendon, expression of TGF-beta-1 and collagens I and III (but not CTGF) increased in response to all types of training. Similarly, enzymes/factors involved in collagen processing were induced in tendon, especially LOX (up to 37-fold), which could indicate a loading-induced increase in cross-linking of tendon collagen. In skeletal muscle, a similar regulation of gene expression was observed, but in contrast to the tendon response, the effect of eccentric training was significantly greater than the effect of concentric training on the expression of several transcripts. In conclusion, the study supports an involvement of TGF-beta-1 in loading-induced collagen synthesis in the muscle-tendon unit and importantly, it indicates that muscle tissue is more sensitive than tendon to the specific mechanical stimulus.

  9. Leucine minimizes denervation-induced skeletal muscle atrophy of rats through akt/mtor signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Carolina B.; Christofoletti, Daiane C.; Pezolato, Vitor A.; de Cássia Marqueti Durigan, Rita; Prestes, Jonato; Tibana, Ramires A.; Pereira, Elaine C. L.; de Sousa Neto, Ivo V.; Durigan, João L. Q.; da Silva, Carlos A.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of leucine treatment (0.30 mM) on muscle weight and signaling of myoproteins related to synthesis and degradation pathways of soleus muscle following seven days of complete sciatic nerve lesion. Wistar rats (n = 24) of 3–4 months of age (192 ± 23 g) were used. The animals were randomly distributed into four experimental groups (n = 6/group): control, treated with leucine (L), denervated (D) and denervated treated with leucine (DL). Dependent measures were proteins levels of AKT, AMPK, mTOR, and ACC performed by Western blot. Leucine induced a reduction in the phosphorylation of AMPK (p < 0.05) by 16% in the L and by 68% in the DL groups as compared with control group. Denervation increased AMPK by 24% in the D group as compared with the control group (p < 0.05). AKT was also modulated by denervation and leucine treatment, highlighted by the elevation of AKT phosphorylation in the D (65%), L (98%) and DL (146%) groups as compared with the control group (p < 0.05). AKT phosphorylation was 49% higher in the D group as compared with the DL group. Furthermore, denervation decreased mTOR phosphorylation by 29% in the D group as compared with the control group. However, leucine treatment induced an increase of 49% in the phosphorylation of mTOR in the L group as compared with the control group, and an increase of 154% in the DL as compared with the D group (p < 0.05). ACC phosphorylation was 20% greater in the D group than the control group. Furthermore, ACC in the soleus was 22% lower in the in the L group and 50% lower in the DL group than the respective control group (p < 0.05). In conclusion, leucine treatment minimized the deleterious effects of denervation on rat soleus muscle by increasing anabolic (AKT and mTOR) and decreasing catabolic (AMPK) pathways. These results may be interesting for muscle recovery following acute denervation, which may contribute to musculoskeletal rehabilitation after denervation

  10. Influence of icing on muscle regeneration after crush injury to skeletal muscles in rats.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Ryo; Fujita, Naoto; Arakawa, Takamitsu; Kawada, Shigeo; Ishii, Naokata; Miki, Akinori

    2011-02-01

    The influence of icing on muscle regeneration after crush injury was examined in the rat extensor digitorum longus. After the injury, animals were randomly divided into nonicing and icing groups. In the latter, ice packs were applied for 20 min. Due to the icing, degeneration of the necrotic muscle fibers and differentiation of satellite cells at early stages of regeneration were retarded by ∼1 day. In the icing group, the ratio of regenerating fibers showing central nucleus at 14 days after the injury was higher, and cross-sectional area of the muscle fibers at 28 days was evidently smaller than in the nonicing group. Besides, the ratio of collagen fibers area at 14 and 28 days after the injury in the icing group was higher than in the nonicing group. These findings suggest that icing applied soon after the injury not only considerably retarded muscle regeneration but also induced impairment of muscle regeneration along with excessive collagen deposition. Macrophages were immunohistochemically demonstrated at the injury site during degeneration and early stages of regeneration. Due to icing, chronological changes in the number of macrophages and immunohistochemical expression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and IGF-I were also retarded by 1 to 2 days. Since it has been said that macrophages play important roles not only for degeneration, but also for muscle regeneration, the influence of icing on macrophage activities might be closely related to a delay in muscle regeneration, impairment of muscle regeneration, and redundant collagen synthesis. PMID:21164157

  11. Endurance training facilitates myoglobin desaturation during muscle contraction in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Takakura, Hisashi; Furuichi, Yasuro; Yamada, Tatsuya; Jue, Thomas; Ojino, Minoru; Hashimoto, Takeshi; Iwase, Satoshi; Hojo, Tatsuya; Izawa, Tetsuya; Masuda, Kazumi

    2015-03-24

    At onset of muscle contraction, myoglobin (Mb) immediately releases its bound O2 to the mitochondria. Accordingly, intracellular O2 tension (PmbO2) markedly declines in order to increase muscle O2 uptake (mVO2). However, whether the change in PmbO2 during muscle contraction modulates mVO2 and whether the O2 release rate from Mb increases in endurance-trained muscles remain unclear. The purpose of this study was, therefore, to determine the effect of endurance training on O2 saturation of Mb (SmbO2) and PmbO2 kinetics during muscle contraction. Male Wistar rats were subjected to a 4-week swimming training (Tr group; 6 days per week, 30 min × 4 sets per day) with a weight load of 2% body mass. After the training period, deoxygenated Mb kinetics during muscle contraction were measured using near-infrared spectroscopy under hemoglobin-free medium perfusion. In the Tr group, the VmO2peak significantly increased by 32%. Although the PmbO2 during muscle contraction did not affect the increased mVO2 in endurance-trained muscle, the O2 release rate from Mb increased because of the increased Mb concentration and faster decremental rate in SmbO2 at the maximal twitch tension. These results suggest that the Mb dynamics during muscle contraction are contributing factors to faster VO2 kinetics in endurance-trained muscle.

  12. Endurance training facilitates myoglobin desaturation during muscle contraction in rat skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Takakura, Hisashi; Furuichi, Yasuro; Yamada, Tatsuya; Jue, Thomas; Ojino, Minoru; Hashimoto, Takeshi; Iwase, Satoshi; Hojo, Tatsuya; Izawa, Tetsuya; Masuda, Kazumi

    2015-01-01

    At onset of muscle contraction, myoglobin (Mb) immediately releases its bound O2 to the mitochondria. Accordingly, intracellular O2 tension (PmbO2) markedly declines in order to increase muscle O2 uptake (mO2). However, whether the change in PmbO2 during muscle contraction modulates mO2 and whether the O2 release rate from Mb increases in endurance-trained muscles remain unclear. The purpose of this study was, therefore, to determine the effect of endurance training on O2 saturation of Mb (SmbO2) and PmbO2 kinetics during muscle contraction. Male Wistar rats were subjected to a 4-week swimming training (Tr group; 6 days per week, 30 min × 4 sets per day) with a weight load of 2% body mass. After the training period, deoxygenated Mb kinetics during muscle contraction were measured using near-infrared spectroscopy under hemoglobin-free medium perfusion. In the Tr group, the mO2peak significantly increased by 32%. Although the PmbO2 during muscle contraction did not affect the increased mO2 in endurance-trained muscle, the O2 release rate from Mb increased because of the increased Mb concentration and faster decremental rate in SmbO2 at the maximal twitch tension. These results suggest that the Mb dynamics during muscle contraction are contributing factors to faster O2 kinetics in endurance-trained muscle. PMID:25801957

  13. Adolescent and adult male spontaneous hyperactive rats (SHR) respond differently to acute and chronic methylphenidate (Ritalin).

    PubMed

    Barron, Elyssa; Yang, Pamela B; Swann, Alan C; Dafny, Nachum

    2009-01-01

    Eight groups of male adolescent and adult spontaneous hyperactive rats (SHR) were used in a dose response (saline, 0.6, 2.5, and 10 mg/kg) experiment of methylphenidate (MPD). Four different locomotor indices were recorded for 2 hours postinjection using a computerized monitoring system. Acutely, the 0.6 mg/kg dose of MPD did not elicit an increase in locomotor activity in either the adolescent or in the adult male SHR. The 2.5 and the 10.0 mg/kg doses increased activity in the adolescent and the adult rats. Chronically, MPD treatment when comparing adolescent and adult gave the following results: the 0.6 mg/kg dose of MPD failed to cause sensitization in the adolescent group but caused sensitization in the adult group, while the 2.5 and 10 mg/kg both caused sensitization in the adolescent and adult groups.

  14. Lycium barbarum polysaccharides promotes in vivo proliferation of adult rat retinal progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hua; Lau, Benson Wui-Man; Wang, Ning-li; Wang, Si-ying; Lu, Qing-jun; Chang, Raymond Chuen-Chung; So, Kwok-fai

    2015-01-01

    Lycium barbarum is a widely used Chinese herbal medicine prescription for protection of optic nerve. However, it remains unclear regarding the effects of Lycium barbarum polysaccharides, the main component of Lycium barbarum, on in vivo proliferation of adult ciliary body cells. In this study, adult rats were intragastrically administered low- and high-dose Lycium barbarum polysaccharides (1 and 10 mg/kg) for 35 days and those intragastrically administered phosphate buffered saline served as controls. The number of Ki-67-positive cells in rat ciliary body in the Lycium barbarum polysaccharides groups, in particular low-dose Lycium barbarum polysaccharides group, was significantly greater than that in the phosphate buffered saline group. Ki-67-positive rat ciliary body cells expressed nestin but they did not express glial fibrillary acidic protein. These findings suggest that Lycium barbarum polysaccharides can promote the proliferation of adult rat retinal progenitor cells and the proliferated cells present with neuronal phenotype. PMID:26889185

  15. Prenatal Testosterone Exposure Leads to Gonadal Hormone-Dependent Hyperinsulinemia and Gonadal Hormone-Independent Glucose Intolerance in Adult Male Rat Offspring.

    PubMed

    More, Amar S; Mishra, Jay S; Gopalakrishnan, Kathirvel; Blesson, Chellakkan S; Hankins, Gary D; Sathishkumar, Kunju

    2016-01-01

    Elevated testosterone levels during prenatal life lead to hyperandrogenism and insulin resistance in adult females. This study evaluated whether prenatal testosterone exposure leads to the development of insulin resistance in adult male rats in order to assess the influence of gonadal hormones on glucose homeostasis in these animals. Male offspring of pregnant rats treated with testosterone propionate or its vehicle (control) were examined. A subset of male offspring was orchiectomized at 7 wk of age and reared to adulthood. At 24 wk of age, fat weights, plasma testosterone, glucose homeostasis, pancreas morphology, and gastrocnemius insulin receptor (IR) beta levels were examined. The pups born to testosterone-treated mothers were smaller at birth and remained smaller through adult life, with levels of fat deposition relatively similar to those in controls. Testosterone exposure during prenatal life induced hyperinsulinemia paralleled by an increased HOMA-IR index in a fasting state and glucose intolerance and exaggerated insulin responses following a glucose tolerance test. Prenatal androgen-exposed males had more circulating testosterone during adult life. Gonadectomy prevented hyperandrogenism, reversed hyperinsulinemia, and attenuated glucose-induced insulin responses but did not alter glucose intolerance in these rats. Prenatal androgen-exposed males had decreased pancreatic islet numbers, size, and beta-cell area along with decreased expression of IR in gastrocnemius muscles. Gonadectomy restored pancreatic islet numbers, size, and beta-cell area but did not normalize IRbeta expression. This study shows that prenatal testosterone exposure leads to a defective pancreas and skeletal muscle function in male offspring. Hyperinsulinemia during adult life is gonad-dependent, but glucose intolerance appears to be independent of postnatal testosterone levels. PMID:26586841

  16. Responses of skeletal muscle lipid metabolism in rat gastrocnemius to hypothyroidism and iodothyronine administration: a putative role for FAT/CD36.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Assunta; De Matteis, Rita; Moreno, Maria; Napolitano, Laura; Busiello, Rosa Anna; Senese, Rosalba; de Lange, Pieter; Lanni, Antonia; Goglia, Fernando

    2012-11-15

    Iodothyronines such as triiodothyronine (T(3)) and 3,5-diiodothyronine (T(2)) influence energy expenditure and lipid metabolism. Skeletal muscle contributes significantly to energy homeostasis, and the above iodothyronines are known to act on this tissue. However, little is known about the cellular/molecular events underlying the effects of T(3) and T(2) on skeletal muscle lipid handling. Since FAT/CD36 is involved in the utilization of free fatty acids by skeletal muscle, specifically in their import into that tissue and presumably their oxidation at the mitochondrial level, we hypothesized that related changes in lipid handling and in FAT/CD36 expression and subcellular redistribution would occur due to hypothyroidism and to T(3) or T(2) administration to hypothyroid rats. In gastrocnemius muscles isolated from hypothyroid rats, FAT/CD36 was upregulated (mRNA levels and total tissue, sarcolemmal, and mitochondrial protein levels). Administration of either T(3) or T(2) to hypothyroid rats resulted in 1) little or no change in FAT/CD36 mRNA level, 2) a decreased total FAT/CD36 protein level, and 3) further increases in FAT/CD36 protein level in sarcolemma and mitochondria. Thus, the main effect of each iodothyronine seemed to be exerted at the level of FAT/CD36 cellular distribution. The effect of further increases in FAT/CD36 protein level in sarcolemma and mitochondria was already evident at 1 h after iodothyronine administration. Each iodothyronine increased the mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation rate. However, the mechanisms underlying their rapid effects seem to differ; T(2) and T(3) each induce FAT/CD36 translocation to mitochondria, but only T(2) induces increases in carnitine palmitoyl transferase system activity and in the mitochondrial substrate oxidation rate.

  17. The effects of orbital spaceflight on bone histomorphometry and messenger ribonucleic acid levels for bone matrix proteins and skeletal signaling peptides in ovariectomized growing rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavolina, J. M.; Evans, G. L.; Harris, S. A.; Zhang, M.; Westerlind, K. C.; Turner, R. T.

    1997-01-01

    A 14-day orbital spaceflight was performed using ovariectomized Fisher 344 rats to determine the combined effects of estrogen deficiency and near weightlessness on tibia radial bone growth and cancellous bone turnover. Twelve ovariectomized rats with established cancellous osteopenia were flown aboard the space shuttle Columbia (STS-62). Thirty ovariectomized rats were housed on earth as ground controls: 12 in animal enclosure modules, 12 in vivarium cages, and 6 killed the day of launch for baseline measurements. An additional 18 ovary-intact rats were housed in vivarium cages as ground controls: 8 rats were killed as baseline controls and the remaining 10 rats were killed 14 days later. Ovariectomy increased periosteal bone formation at the tibia-fibula synostosis; cancellous bone resorption and formation in the secondary spongiosa of the proximal tibial metaphysis; and messenger RNA (mRNA) levels for the prepro-alpha2(1) subunit of type 1 collagen, osteocalcin, transforming growth factor-beta, and insulin-like growth factor I in the contralateral proximal tibial metaphysis and for the collagen subunit in periosteum pooled from tibiae and femora and decreased cancellous bone area. Compared to ovariectomized weight-bearing rats, the flight group experienced decreases in periosteal bone formation, collagen subunit mRNA levels, and cancellous bone area. The flight rats had a small decrease in the cancellous mineral apposition rate, but no change in the calculated bone formation rate. Also, spaceflight had no effect on cancellous osteoblast and osteoclast perimeters or on mRNA levels for bone matrix proteins and signaling peptides. On the other hand, spaceflight resulted in an increase in bone resorption, as ascertained from the diminished retention of a preflight fluorochrome label. This latter finding suggests that osteoclast activity was increased. In a follow-up ground-based experiment, unilateral sciatic neurotomy of ovariectomized rats resulted in cancellous

  18. Effects of long-term resistance exercise training on autophagy in rat skeletal muscle of chloroquine-induced sporadic inclusion body myositis

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Insu; Lee, Youngil; Cosio-Lima, Ludmila M.; Cho, Joon-Yong; Yeom, Dong-Chul

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We examined whether resistance exercise training restores impaired autophagy functions caused by Chloroquine (CQ)-induced Sporadic Inclusion Body Myositis (sIBM) in rat skeletal muscle. Methods Male wistar rats were randomly assigned into three groups: Sham (n = 6), CQ (n = 6), and CQ + Exercise (CE, n = 6). To create a rat model of sIBM, rats in the CQ and CE group were intraperitoneally injected with CQ 5 days a week for 16 weeks. Rats in the CE group performed resistance exercise training 3 times a week for 8 weeks in conjunction with CQ starting from week 9 to week 16. During the training period, maximal carrying load, body weight, muscle weight, and relative muscle weight were measured. Autophagy responses were examined by measuring specific markers. Results While maximal carrying capacity for resistance exercise training was dramatically increased in the CE group, no significant changes occurred in the skeletal muscle weight as well as in the relative muscle weight of CE compared to the other groups. CQ treatment caused significant increases in the levels of Beclin-1 and p62, and decreases in the levels of LAMP-2 proteins. Interestingly, no significant differences in the LC3-II/I ratio or the LC3-II protein levels were observed. Although CQ-treatment groups suppressed the levels of the potent autophagy inducer, BNIP3, p62 levels were decreased in only the CE group. Conclusion Our findings demonstrate that sIBM induced by CQ treatment results in muscle degeneration via impaired autophagy and that resistance exercise training improves movable loading activity. Finally, regular exercise training may provide protection against sIBM by enhancing the autophagy flux through p62 protein. PMID:26525066

  19. Effects of long-term methylphenidate treatment in adolescent and adult rats on hippocampal shape, functional connectivity and adult neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    van der Marel, K; Bouet, V; Meerhoff, G F; Freret, T; Boulouard, M; Dauphin, F; Klomp, A; Lucassen, P J; Homberg, J R; Dijkhuizen, R M; Reneman, L

    2015-11-19

    Methylphenidate (MPH) is a widely prescribed stimulant drug for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adolescents. Its use in this age group raises concerns regarding the potential interference with ongoing neurodevelopmental processes. Particularly the hippocampus is a highly plastic brain region that continues to develop postnatally and is involved in cognition and emotional behavior, functions known to be affected by MPH. In this study, we assessed whether hippocampal structure and function were affected by chronic oral MPH treatment and whether its effects were different in adolescent or adult rats. Using behavioral testing, resting-state functional MRI, post-mortem structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and immunohistochemistry, we assessed MPH's effects on recognition memory, depressive-like behavior, topological features of functional connectivity networks, hippocampal shape and markers for hippocampal neurogenesis and proliferation. Object recognition memory was transiently impaired in adolescent treated rats, while in animals treated during adulthood, increased depressive-like behavior was observed. Neurogenesis was increased in adolescent treated rats, whereas cell proliferation was decreased following adult treatment. Adolescent treated rats showed inward shape deformations adjacent to ventral parahippocampal regions known to be involved in recognition memory, whereas such deformations were not observed in adult treated animals. Irrespective of the age of treatment, MPH affected topological features of ventral hippocampal functional networks. Thus, chronic oral treatment with a therapeutically relevant dose of MPH preferentially affected the ventral part of the hippocampus and induced contrasting effects in adolescent and adult rats. The differences in behavior were paralleled by opposite effects on adult neurogenesis and granule cell proliferation.

  20. Effect of indomethacin on capillary growth and microvasculature in chronically stimulated rat skeletal muscles

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Steven C; Hudlická, Olga; Brown, Margaret D

    2000-01-01

    Capillary proliferation and microvessel diameters were studied in rat ankle flexors subjected to chronic electrical stimulation by implanted electrodes (10 Hz, 0.3 ms pulse width, up to 6 V, 8 h day−1) for 2 or 7 days with or without concurrent indomethacin treatment (≈2 mg day−1 in drinking water) to study the role of prostaglandins in the microcirculation in relation to capillary growth.Diameters of terminal arterioles, capillaries and confluent venules were measured in epi-illuminated muscles, together with capillary red cell velocity, to evaluate whether changes in capillary pressure and/or shear stress participate in capillary growth via release of prostaglandins.Cell proliferation was detected following bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation and immuno-staining of frozen sections. Labelling was assessed as the percentage of all interstitial nuclei (Haematoxylin-stained) that were BrdU positive. By comparison with serial sections stained for alkaline phosphatase, from which the capillary-to-fibre ratio (C:F) was obtained, labelling was derived for nuclei colocalised either to capillaries or to other non-capillary interstitial cells.C:F increased to 1.89 ± 0.06 from 1.47 ± 0.04 in controls only after 7 days stimulation; indomethacin reduced this to 1.55 ± 0.07. Capillary labelling increased from 2.9 ± 0.5 % in controls to 11.3 ± 2.2 % after 2 days stimulation and 10.6 ± 0.8 % after 7 days. The increase was attenuated by indomethacin at both time points (to 5.8 ± 1.6 % and 4.2 ± 0.5 %, respectively).Non-capillary interstitial labelling (2.0 ± 0.4 % in controls) increased to 9.5 ± 2.7 % after 2 days stimulation and was back to normal after 7 days (3.2 ± 0.7 %). Indomethacin depressed the increase at 2 days to 4.0 ± 1.3 % and had no effect at 7 days (2.9 ± 0.13 %). Labelling in sham-operated rats with or without indomethacin or in vehicle-treated animals was no different from controls.Arteriolar and venular diameters were increased by 2 days of

  1. GLP-1 increases microvascular recruitment but not glucose uptake in human and rat skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Sjøberg, Kim A.; Holst, Jens J.; Rattigan, Stephen; Richter, Erik A.

    2013-01-01

    The insulinotropic gut hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) has been proposed to have effects on vascular function and glucose disposal. However, whether GLP-1 is able to increase microvascular recruitment (MVR) in humans has not been investigated. GLP-1 was infused in the femoral artery in overnight-fasted, healthy young men. Microvascular recruitment was measured with real-time contrast-enhanced ultrasound and leg glucose uptake by the leg balance technique with and without inhibition of the insulinotropic response of GLP-1 by coinfusion of octreotide. As a positive control, MVR and leg glucose uptake were measured during a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. Infusion of GLP-1 caused a rapid increase (P < 0.05) of 20 ± 12% (mean ± SE) in MVR in the vastus lateralis muscle of the infused leg after 5 min, and MVR further increased to 60 ± 8% above preinfusion levels by 60 min infusion. The effect was slightly slower but similar in magnitude in the noninfused contralateral leg, in which GLP-1 concentration was within the physiological range. Octreotide infusion did not prevent the GLP-1-induced increase in MVR. GLP-1 infusion did not increase leg glucose uptake with or without octreotide coinfusion. GLP-1 infusion in rats increased MVR by 28% (P < 0.05) but did not increase muscle glucose uptake. During the hyperinsulinemic clamp, MVR increased ∼40%, and leg glucose uptake increased 35-fold. It is concluded that GLP-1 in physiological concentrations causes a rapid insulin-independent increase in muscle MVR but does not affect muscle glucose uptake. PMID:24302010

  2. Characteristics of L-glutamine transport in perfused rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Hundal, H S; Rennie, M J; Watt, P W

    1987-01-01

    1. We have investigated glutamine transport in the perfused rat hindlimb using the paired-tracer isotope dilution technique. 2. Uptake of L-glutamine was stereospecific, saturable, sodium dependent, insulin sensitive and pH insensitive in the physiological range. The maximum capacity of transport (Vmax) under normal perfusate conditions at 37 degrees C, 145 mM-Na+ and in the absence of insulin was 1156 +/- 193 nmol min-1 g-1 with transport being half-maximal at a perfusate glutamine concentration of 9.25 +/- 1.15 mM. 3. The kinetics of Na+ dependence strongly suggested co-transport of Na+ and glutamine with a stoichiometry of 1:1; furthermore, Na+ activated the carrier without any change in the concentration of glutamine at which transport was half-maximal, i.e. a 'Vmax effect' rather than a 'Km effect'. 4. The characteristics of glutamine transport, especially its substrate specificity and the pattern of competitive and non-competitive inhibition of glutamine transport by other amino acids, suggest that it is mediated by a carrier or carriers for which asparagine and histidine are also suitable substrates. 5. The characteristics of muscle glutamine transport are related but distinct from those of system N identified in hepatocytes; we suggest that they are sufficiently distinct to justify the identification of a new variant of mammalian amino acid transport systems which may be identified by the symbol Nm. 6. The kinetic characteristics of system Nm are such that glutamine is likely to be the most rapidly exchanging amino acid across the muscle membrane at physiological intra- and extracellular glutamine concentrations. Its hormone and ion sensitivities are likely to be important in the physiological modulation of whole-body glutamine metabolism and also during derangements observed in disease and after injury. PMID:3328779

  3. Three Intermittent Sessions of Cryotherapy Reduce the Secondary Muscle Injury in Skeletal Muscle of Rat

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Nuno M. L.; Rainero, Elaine P.; Salvini, Tania F.

    2006-01-01

    Although cryotherapy associated to compression is recommended as immediate treatment after muscle injury, the effect of intermittent sessions of these procedures in the area of secondary muscle injury is not established. This study examined the effect of three sessions of cryotherapy (30 min of ice pack each 2h) and muscle compression (sand pack) in the muscle-injured area. Twenty-four Wistar rats (312 ± 20g) were evaluated. In three groups, the middle belly of tibialis anterior (TA) muscle was injured by a frozen iron bar and received one of the following treatments: a) three sessions of cryotherapy; b) three sessions of compression; c) not treated. An uninjured group received sessions of cryotherapy. Frozen muscles were cross- sectioned (10 µm) and stained for the measurement of injured and uninjured muscle area. Injured muscles submitted to cryotherapy showed the smallest injured area (29.83 ± 6.6%), compared to compressed (39.2 ± 2.8%, p= 0.003) and untreated muscles (41.74 ± 4.0%, p = 0.0008). No difference was found between injured compressed and injured untreated muscles. In conclusion, three intermittent sessions of cryotherapy applied immediately after muscle damage was able to reduce the secondary muscle injury, while only the muscle compression did not provide the same effectiveness. Key Points Three sessions of cryotherapy (30 min each 2 hours) applied immediately after muscle damage reduce the secondary muscle injury. Sessions of compression applied after muscle damage are not able to reduce the secondary muscle injury. PMID:24259995

  4. [Thyroxine caused modulation of dexamethasone effects on the skeletal muscle of white rats].

    PubMed

    Trush, V V; Soboliev, V I

    2014-01-01

    Experiments in situ on mature white female rats performed with the use of electrophysiological methods allowed to investigate the modulatory influence of thyroxin at the dose which does not cause the signs of hyperthyroidism (10 mkg/ kg), upon the manifestation of the dexamethasone effects on the functional state of the anterior tibial muscle. It has been established that the chronic isolated application of dexamethasone was accompanied by reduction of the amplitude ofmuscle contraction (by 29.7-59.3 per cent after 10-50 days of the drug injection) and the weight of anterior tibial muscle (by 22.4-12.7 per cent after 10-60 days of the drug injection). Combination of thyroxin with dexamethasone smoothed the negative effects of the synthetic glucocorticoid upon the muscle contraction amplitude and even caused its increase (by 41.2-62.1 per cent after 20-60 days of injection of the pair of preparations), as well as prevented the reduction of the muscle weight. The isolated application ofdexamethasone after the first 20 days of injections caused the decrease of the muscle speed that was confirmed through a lengthened control of the muscle active state duration (by 20.5 per cent) and the reduction of its single contraction development speed (by 45.3 per cent), as well as the decrease of frequency of muscle tetanization (to 12-20 imp/s against 26-28 imp/s in control). The application of thyroxine with dexamethasone shortened the active state of the muscle (by 19.3 per cent) and increased the speed of single contraction development (by 72.4), which remained throughout whole further period the preparations were injected. These observations favor for improvement of high-speed characteristics of the muscle under the influence of thyroxine. At the same time, during chronic injection of dexamethasone either alone or in combination with thyroxin, an increased muscle fatigue during the first 10-20 days has been observed.

  5. The trophic influence of tetrodotoxin-inactive nerves on normal and reinnervated rat skeletal muscles.

    PubMed Central

    Bray, J J; Hubbard, J I; Mills, R G

    1979-01-01

    1. Nerve impulses in the rat sciatic nerve were blocked for long periods by tetrodotoxin (TTX) released from capillary implants. The TTX capillaries did not block axonal transport, nor did they cause any sign of nerve degeneration. 2. A comparison of the effects of TTX paralysis and denervation was made on both extensor digitorium longus (e.d.l.) and soleus muscles over 21 days, a time when the products of nerve degeneration were unlikely to contribute to the changes associated with denervation. The resting membrane potential of TTX-paralysed muscles was significantly different (P less than 0.005) from that of the denervated muscles at all periods and at 21 days the decrease that can be attributed to inactivity was 61% (e.d.l.) and 49% (soleus) of that which follows denervation. This disparity was even more pronounced for the ACh receptor density where the increase in receptors due to inactivity was only 34% (e.d.l.) and 21% (soleus) of that due to denervation. 3. A similar comparison was made on muscles which had been reinnervated by TTX-inactive nerves. These muscles were found to have a significantly higher resting membrane potential and lower ACh receptor density than the denervated muscles (P less than 0.05). 4. The experiments on reinnervated muscles preclude the possibility that nerve degeneration products are solely responsible for the difference between the TTX-paralysed and denervated muscles and suggest that the difference can be attributed to the trophic influence of the nerve. 5. An observed increase in the m.e.p.p. frequency of the TTX-paralysed muscles indicated that nerve action potentials play a role in regulating the spontaneous release from nerve terminals. PMID:94092

  6. Differential Effects of Acute Alcohol on EEG and Sedative Responses in Adolescent and Adult Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pian, Jerry P.; Criado, Jose R.; Walker, Brendan M.; Ehlers, Cindy L.

    2008-01-01

    Age-related developmental differences in sensitivity to the acute effects of alcohol may play an important role in the development of alcoholism. The present study was designed to evaluate the acute effects of alcohol on cortical electroencephalogram (EEG) in adolescent (P36) and adult (P78) Wistar rats. Five minutes of EEG was recorded after administration of 0, 0.75 or 1.5 g/kg alcohol. The righting reflex was performed to measure the sedative effects of alcohol (3.5 g/kg) and total sleeping time for each rat. Our results showed that alcohol (1.5 g/kg) increased power in the 1–2 Hz band and decreased the power in the 32–50 Hz band in the parietal cortical region of adolescent rats. Alcohol (1.5 g/kg) also increased stability of the EEG power in the slow-wave frequency bands (2–4 Hz, 4–6 Hz, and 6–8 Hz) of adolescent rats. In the frontal cortex of adult rats, but not in adolescent rats, alcohol (1.5 or 0.75 g/kg) decreased the power in the 16–32 Hz frequency band. Alcohol (1.5 g/kg) differentially increased power in a multiple of slow-wave frequency bands (2–4 Hz and 4–6 Hz) in the parietal cortex of adult rats as compared to adolescent rats. Adolescent rats were shown significantly shorter sleeping time and higher blood alcohol levels after regaining reflex than adult rats. Our results provide additional evidence of age-related differences in the effects of acute alcohol on cortical EEG, sedation and tolerance. PMID:18191821

  7. Daily patterns of ethanol drinking in peri-adolescent and adult alcohol-preferring (P) rats.

    PubMed

    Bell, Richard L; Rodd, Zachary A; Sable, Helen J K; Schultz, Jonathon A; Hsu, Cathleen C; Lumeng, Lawrence; Murphy, James M; McBride, William J

    2006-01-01

    Alcohol abuse among adolescents continues to be a major health problem for our society. Our laboratory has used the peri-adolescent alcohol-preferring, P, rat as an animal model of adolescent alcohol abuse. Even though peri-adolescent P rats consume more alcohol (g/kg/day) than their adult counterparts, it is uncertain whether their drinking is sufficiently aggregated to result in measurable blood ethanol concentrations (BECs). The objectives of this study were to examine daily alcohol drinking patterns of adolescent and adult, male and female P rats, and to determine whether alcohol drinking episodes were sufficiently aggregated to result in meaningful BECs. Male and female P rats were given 30 days of 24 h free-choice access to alcohol (15%, v/v) and water, with ad lib access to food, starting at the beginning of adolescence (PND 30) or adulthood (PND 90). Water and alcohol drinking patterns were monitored 22 h/day with a "lickometer" set-up. The results indicated that (a) peri-adolescent P rats consumed more water and total fluids than adult P rats, (b) female P rats consumed more water and total fluids than male P rats, (c) there were differences in alcohol, and water, licking patterns between peri-adolescent and adult and female and male P rats, (d) individual licking patterns revealed that alcohol was consumed in bouts often exceeding the amount required to self-administer 1 g/kg of alcohol, and (e) BECs at the end of the dark cycle, on the 30th day of alcohol access, averaged 50 mg%, with alcohol intakes during the last 1 to 2 h averaging 1.2 g/kg. Overall, these findings indicate that alcohol drinking patterns differ across the age and sex of P rats. This suggests that the effectiveness of treatments for reducing excessive alcohol intake may vary depending upon the age and/or sex of the subjects being tested.

  8. Effects of acute exercise on lipid content and dietary lipid uptake in liver and skeletal muscle of lean and diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Janssens, Sharon; Jonkers, Richard A M; Groen, Albert K; Nicolay, Klaas; van Loon, Luc J C; Prompers, Jeanine J

    2015-11-15

    Insulin resistance is associated with ectopic lipid accumulation. Physical activity improves insulin sensitivity, but the impact of exercise on lipid handling in insulin-resistant tissues remains to be elucidated. The present study characterizes the effects of acute exercise on lipid content and dietary lipid partitioning in liver and skeletal muscle of lean and diabetic rats by use of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). After baseline measurements, rats were randomized to exercise or no-exercise groups. A subset of animals was subjected to MRS directly after 1 h of treadmill running for measurement of total intrahepatocellular lipid (IHCL) and intramyocellular lipid (IMCL) content (n=7 lean and diabetic rats). The other animals were administered 13C-labeled lipids orally after treadmill visit (with or without exercise) followed by MRS measurements after 4 and 24 h to determine the 13C enrichment of IHCL and IMCL (n=8 per group). Total IHCL and IMCL content were fivefold higher in diabetic vs. lean rats (P<0.001). Exercise did not significantly affect IHCL content but reduced IMCL by 25±7 and 33±4% in lean and diabetic rats (P<0.05), respectively. Uptake of dietary lipids in liver and muscle was 2.3-fold greater in diabetic vs. lean rats (P<0.05). Prior exercise did not significantly modulate dietary lipid uptake into muscle, but in liver of both lean and diabetic rats, lipid uptake was 44% reduced after acute exercise (P<0.05). In conclusion, IMCL but not IHCL represents a viable substrate source during exercise in both lean and diabetic rats, and exercise differentially affects dietary lipid uptake in muscle and liver. PMID:26419590

  9. Oral chromium picolinate improves carbohydrate and lipid metabolism and enhances skeletal muscle Glut-4 translocation in obese, hyperinsulinemic (JCR-LA corpulent) rats.

    PubMed

    Cefalu, William T; Wang, Zhong Q; Zhang, Xian H; Baldor, Linda C; Russell, James C

    2002-06-01

    Human studies suggest that chromium picolinate (CrPic) decreases insulin levels and improves glucose disposal in obese and type 2 diabetic populations. To evaluate whether CrPic may aid in treatment of the insulin resistance syndrome, we assessed its effects in JCR:LA-corpulent rats, a model of this syndrome. Male lean and obese hyperinsulinemic rats were randomly assigned to receive oral CrPic [80 microg/(kg. d); n = 5 or 6, respectively) in water or to control conditions (water, n = 5). After 3 mo, a 120-min intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT) and a 30-min insulin tolerance test were performed. Obese rats administered CrPic had significantly lower fasting insulin levels (1848 +/- 102 vs. 2688 +/- 234 pmol/L; P < 0.001; mean +/- SEM) and significantly improved glucose disappearance (P < 0.001) compared with obese controls. Glucose and insulin areas under the curve for IPGTT were significantly less for obese CrPic-treated rats than in obese controls (P < 0.001). Obese CrPic-treated rats had lower plasma total cholesterol (3.57 +/- 0.28 vs. 4.11 +/- 0.47 mmol/L, P < 0.05) and higher HDL cholesterol levels (1.92 +/- 0.09 vs. 1.37 +/- 0.36 mmol/L, P < 0.01) than obese controls. CrPic did not alter plasma glucose or cholesterol levels in lean rats. Total skeletal muscle glucose transporter (Glut)-4 did not differ among groups; however, CrPic significantly enhanced membrane-associated Glut-4 in obese rats after insulin stimulation. Thus, CrPic supplementation enhances insulin sensitivity and glucose disappearance, and improves lipids in male obese hyperinsulinemic JCR:LA-corpulent rats.

  10. Effects of acute exercise on lipid content and dietary lipid uptake in liver and skeletal muscle of lean and diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Janssens, Sharon; Jonkers, Richard A M; Groen, Albert K; Nicolay, Klaas; van Loon, Luc J C; Prompers, Jeanine J

    2015-11-15

    Insulin resistance is associated with ectopic lipid accumulation. Physical activity improves insulin sensitivity, but the impact of exercise on lipid handling in insulin-resistant tissues remains to be elucidated. The present study characterizes the effects of acute exercise on lipid content and dietary lipid partitioning in liver and skeletal muscle of lean and diabetic rats by use of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). After baseline measurements, rats were randomized to exercise or no-exercise groups. A subset of animals was subjected to MRS directly after 1 h of treadmill running for measurement of total intrahepatocellular lipid (IHCL) and intramyocellular lipid (IMCL) content (n=7 lean and diabetic rats). The other animals were administered 13C-labeled lipids orally after treadmill visit (with or without exercise) followed by MRS measurements after 4 and 24 h to determine the 13C enrichment of IHCL and IMCL (n=8 per group). Total IHCL and IMCL content were fivefold higher in diabetic vs. lean rats (P<0.001). Exercise did not significantly affect IHCL content but reduced IMCL by 25±7 and 33±4% in lean and diabetic rats (P<0.05), respectively. Uptake of dietary lipids in liver and muscle was 2.3-fold greater in diabetic vs. lean rats (P<0.05). Prior exercise did not significantly modulate dietary lipid uptake into muscle, but in liver of both lean and diabetic rats, lipid uptake was 44% reduced after acute exercise (P<0.05). In conclusion, IMCL but not IHCL represents a viable substrate source during exercise in both lean and diabetic rats, and exercise differentially affects dietary lipid uptake in muscle and liver.

  11. Exercise-Induced Changes in Caveolin-1, Depletion of Mitochondrial Cholesterol, and the Inhibition of Mitochondrial Swelling in Rat Skeletal Muscle but Not in the Liver.

    PubMed

    Flis, Damian Jozef; Olek, Robert Antoni; Kaczor, Jan Jacek; Rodziewicz, Ewa; Halon, Malgorzata; Antosiewicz, Jedrzej; Wozniak, Michal; Gabbianelli, Rosita; Ziolkowski, Wieslaw

    2016-01-01

    The reduction in cholesterol in mitochondria, observed after exercise, is related to the inhibition of mitochondrial swelling. Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) plays an essential role in the regulation of cellular cholesterol metabolism and is required by various signalling pathways. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of prolonged swimming on the mitochondrial Cav-1 concentration; additionally, we identified the results of these changes as they relate to the induction of changes in the mitochondrial swelling and cholesterol in rat skeletal muscle and liver. Male Wistar rats were divided into a sedentary control group and an exercise group. The exercised rats swam for 3 hours and were burdened with an additional 3% of their body weight. After the cessation of exercise, their quadriceps femoris muscles and livers were immediately removed for experimentation. The exercise protocol caused an increase in the Cav-1 concentration in crude muscle mitochondria; this was related to a reduction in the cholesterol level and an inhibition of mitochondrial swelling. There were no changes in rat livers, with the exception of increased markers of oxidative stress in mitochondria. These data indicate the possible role of Cav-1 in the adaptive change in the rat muscle mitochondria following exercise. PMID:26839631

  12. The effects of acute alcohol on motor impairments in adolescent, adult, and aged rats.

    PubMed

    Ornelas, Laura C; Novier, Adelle; Van Skike, Candice E; Diaz-Granados, Jaime L; Matthews, Douglas B

    2015-03-01

    Acute alcohol exposure has been shown to produce differential motor impairments between aged and adult rats and between adolescent and adult rats. However, the effects of acute alcohol exposure among adolescent, adult, and aged rats have yet to be systematically investigated within the same project using a dose-dependent analysis. We sought to determine the age- and dose-dependent effects of acute alcohol exposure on gross and coordinated motor performance across the rodent lifespan. Adolescent (PD 30), adult (PD 70), and aged (approximately 18 months) male Sprague-Dawley rats were tested on 3 separate motor tasks: aerial righting reflex (ARR), accelerating rotarod (RR), and loss of righting reflex (LORR). In a separate group of animals, blood ethanol concentrations (BEC) were determined at multiple time points following a 3.0 g/kg ethanol injection. Behavioral tests were conducted with a Latin square repeated-measures design in which all animals received the following doses: 1.0 g/kg or 2.0 g/kg alcohol or saline over 3 separate sessions via intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection. During testing, motor impairments were assessed on the RR 10 min post-injection and on ARR 20 min post-injection. Aged animals spent significantly less time on the RR when administered 1.0 g/kg alcohol compared to adult rats. In addition, motor performance impairments significantly increased with age after 2.0 g/kg alcohol administration. On the ARR test, aged rats were more sensitive to the effects of 1.0 g/kg and 2.0 g/kg alcohol compared to adolescents and adults. Seven days after the last testing session, animals were given 3.0 g/kg alcohol and LORR was examined. During LORR, aged animals slept longer compared to adult and adolescent rats. This effect cannot be explained solely by BEC levels in aged rats. The present study suggests that acute alcohol exposure produces greater motor impairments in older rats when compared to adolescent and adult rats and begins to establish a

  13. The effects of chronic alcohol consumption and exercise on the skeleton of adult male rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Adam H.; McCarty, Heidi L.; Evans, Glenda L.; Turner, Russell T.; Westerlind, Kim C.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lifestyle factors are known to affect skeletal development and integrity. Specifically, running has been reported to increase risk of fatigue fractures, whereas chronic alcohol consumption has been shown to reduce bone formation and bone mass. The combined effect of exercise and alcohol on the skeleton has yet to be explored, although alcohol consumption is common among certain physically active populations (e.g., military recruits, college athletes). It was hypothesized that chronic alcohol consumption would accentuate the inherent risk associated with endurance running exercise. METHODS: Six-month-old male Sprague Dawley rats were assigned to one of five groups: baseline, exercise-alcohol diet, exercise-normal diet, sham-alcohol diet, and sham-normal diet. Alcohol-fed rats (35% caloric intake) received a liquid diet ad libitum. Normal animals were pair-fed the identical diet with a maltose dextrin caloric substitute. Exercise was conducted on a motorized treadmill 5 days/wk for 16 weeks. Sham rats were placed on a stationary treadmill for matching time periods. Fluorochrome labels were administered 3 days before baseline and at 10 and 2 days before animals were killed. Heart, soleus, and rectus femoris muscles were wet weighed to assess the effects of training. Tibiae were collected for static and dynamic histomorphometric measurements on cancellous and cortical bone. RESULTS: Muscle weights were larger in the exercised rats versus the sham rats. Alcohol had no significant effect on skeletal muscle weight but did result in larger heart weights in both alcohol-treated groups. Cancellous and periosteal bone formation rates were significantly decreased in the alcohol-fed rats versus rats on the normal diet and were associated with a significant reduction in trabecular thickness in the tibial metaphysis. Cortical and cross-sectional areas were also significantly lower in the alcohol-fed groups compared with the non-alcohol-fed groups. Exercise had no

  14. Rate equation for creatine kinase predicts the in vivo reaction velocity: /sup 31/P NMR surface coil studies in brain, heart, and skeletal muscle of the living rat

    SciTech Connect

    Bittl, J.A.; DeLayre, J.; Ingwall, J.S.

    1987-09-22

    Brain, heart, and skeletal muscle contain four different creatine kinase isozymes and various concentrations of substrates for the creatine kinase reaction. To identify if the velocity of the creatine kinase reaction under cellular conditions is regulated by enzyme activity and substrate concentrations as predicted by the rate equation, the authors used /sup 31/P NMR and spectrophotometric techniques to measure reaction velocity, enzyme content, isozyme distribution, and concentrations of substrates in brain, heart, and skeletal muscle of living rat under basal or resting conditions. The total tissue activity of creatine kinase in the direction of MgATP synthesis provided an estimate for V/sub max/ and exceeded the NMR-determined in vivo reaction velocities by an order of magnitude. The isozyme composition varied among the three tissues: >99% BB for brain; 14% MB, 61% MM, and 25% mitochondrial for heart; and 98% MM and 2% mitochondrial for skeletal muscle. The NMR-determined reaction velocities agreed with predicted values from the creatine kinase rate equation. The concentrations of free creatine and cytosolic MgADP, being less than or equal to the dissociation constants for each isozyme, were dominant terms in the creatine kinase rate equation for predicting the in vivo reaction velocity. Thus, they observed that the velocity of the creatine kinase reaction is regulated by total tissue enzyme activity and by the concentrations of creatine and MgADP in a manner that is independent of isozyme distribution.

  15. Testosterone differentially alters cocaine-induced ambulatory and rearing behavioral responses in adult and adolescent rats

    PubMed Central

    Minerly, AnaChristina E.; Wu, Hui Bing K.; Weierstall, Karen M.; Niyomchai, Tipyamol; Kemen, Lynne; Jenab, Shirzad; Quinones-Jenab, Vanya

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the physiological and behavioral effects of testosterone when co-administered with cocaine during adolescence. The present study aimed to determine whether exogenous testosterone administration differentially alters psychomotor responses to cocaine in adolescent and adult male rats. To this end, intact adolescent (30-days-old) and adult (60-day-old) male Fisher rats were pretreated with vehicle (sesame oil) or testosterone (5 or 10 mg/kg) 45 minutes prior to saline or cocaine (20 mg/kg) administration. Behavioral responses were monitored 1 hour after drug treatment, and serum testosterone levels were determined. Serum testosterone levels were affected by age: saline- and cocaine-treated adults in the vehicle groups had higher serum testosterone levels than adolescents rats, but after co-administration of testosterone the adolescent rats had