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Sample records for adult retinal pigment

  1. A Method for the Isolation and Culture of Adult Rat Retinal Pigment Epithelial (RPE) Cells to Study Retinal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Heller, Janosch P.; Kwok, Jessica C. F.; Vecino, Elena; Martin, Keith R.; Fawcett, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD) affect the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and lead to the death of the epithelial cells and ultimately blindness. RPE transplantation is currently a major focus of eye research and clinical trials using human stem cell-derived RPE cells are ongoing. However, it remains to be established to which extent the source of RPE cells for transplantation affects their therapeutic efficacy and this needs to be explored in animal models. Autotransplantation of RPE cells has attractions as a therapy, but existing protocols to isolate adult RPE cells from rodents are technically difficult, time-consuming, have a low yield and are not optimized for long-term cell culturing. Here, we report a newly devised protocol which facilitates reliable and simple isolation and culture of RPE cells from adult rats. Incubation of a whole rat eyeball in 20 U/ml papain solution for 50 min yielded 4 × 104 viable RPE cells. These cells were hexagonal and pigmented upon culture. Using immunostaining, we demonstrated that the cells expressed RPE cell-specific marker proteins including cytokeratin 18 and RPE65, similar to RPE cells in vivo. Additionally, the cells were able to produce and secrete Bruch’s membrane matrix components similar to in vivo situation. Similarly, the cultured RPE cells adhered to isolated Bruch’s membrane as has previously been reported. Therefore, the protocol described in this article provides an efficient method for the rapid and easy isolation of high quantities of adult rat RPE cells. This provides a reliable platform for studying the therapeutic targets, testing the effects of drugs in a preclinical setup and to perform in vitro and in vivo transplantation experiments to study retinal diseases. PMID:26635529

  2. Low Power Laser Irradiation Stimulates the Proliferation of Adult Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells in Culture

    PubMed Central

    Song, Qing; Uygun, Basak; Banerjee, Ipsita; Nahmias, Yaakov; Zhang, Quan; Berthiaume, François; Latina, Mark; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects of low power laser irradiation on the proliferation of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. Adult human RPE cells were artificially pigmented by preincubation with sepia melanin, and exposed to a single sublethal laser pulse (590 nm, 1 µs, <200 mJ/cm2). DNA synthesis, cell number, and growth factor activity in irradiated RPE cells were subsequently monitored. The effect of sublethal laser irradiation on the “wound” healing response of an RPE monolayer in an in vitro scratch assay was also investigated. Single pulsed laser irradiation increased DNA synthesis in pigmented RPE cells measured 6 h post-treatment. In the scratch assay, laser irradiation increased the rates of cell proliferation and wound closure. Conditioned medium, collected 48 h following laser treatment, increased cell proliferation of unirradiated cells. Irradiation increased RPE cell secretion of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-B chain, and increased mRNA levels of several growth factors and their receptors, including PDGF, transforming growth factor-β1, basic fibroblast growth factor, epidermal growth factor, insulin-like growth factor, as well as heat shock proteins. This demonstrates, for the first time, that low power single pulsed laser irradiation stimulates the proliferation of RPE cells, and upregulates growth factors that are mitogenic for RPE cells. PMID:26740823

  3. Differential expression of TYRP1 in adult human retinal pigment epithelium and uveal melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    QIU, CHUN; LI, PENG; BI, JIANJUN; WU, QING; LU, LINNA; QIAN, GUANXIANG; JIA, RENBING; JIA, RONG

    2016-01-01

    Uveal melanoma (UM) is the most frequently occurring primary intraocular malignancy in adults. Tyrosinase (TYR) is a copper-containing enzyme and a type I membrane protein that is involved in the generation of melanin, the main pigment in vertebrates. TYR-related protein 1 (TYRP1) is regarded to have a crucial role in the immunotherapy of melanoma. As biomarkers, the TYR-related proteins, TYRP1 and TYRP2, exhibit specific expression in melanocytes, while also contributing to melanin synthesis within melanosomes. In the present study, the differential expression of TYRP1 was investigated at the mRNA, protein and morphological levels in four human UM cell lines (SP6.5, OM431, OCM1 and OCM290) and the human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cell line, using polymerase chain reaction, western blotting, immunocytochemistry and immunofluorescence staining. It was found that SP6.5 cells expressed the highest level of TYRP1, in comparison to SP6.5 OCM1 and OM431 cells, which produced less TYRP1, and OCM290 cells, which produced almost no TYRP1. No TYRP1 protein expression was identified in the RPE cell line. These findings indicate the potential use of TYRP1 in the development of therapy for UM. PMID:27073483

  4. Retinal pigment epithelial hamartoma--unusual manifestations.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, P. R.; Walsh, J. B.

    1984-01-01

    Hamartoma of the retinal pigment epithelium is an uncommon tumour of young adults. We have seen 2 patients with this clinical diagnosis, both with unusual manifestations. In one patient growth of the tumour was observed over a 5-year period. In the second patient arterial-arterial anastomoses were detected at a site distal to the tumour. Images PMID:6722077

  5. Expression of Two Classes of Pax6 Transcripts in Reprogramming Retinal Pigment Epithelium Cells of the Adult Newt.

    PubMed

    Inami, Wataru; Islam, Md Rafiqul; Nakamura, Kenta; Yoshikawa, Taro; Yasumuro, Hirofumi; Casco-Robles, Martin Miguel; Toyama, Fubito; Maruo, Fumiaki; Chiba, Chikafumi

    2016-02-01

    The adult newt has the remarkable ability to regenerate a functional retina from retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells, even when the neural retina (NR) is completely lost from the eye. In this system, RPE cells are reprogrammed into a unique state of multipotent cells, named RPESCs, in an early phase of retinal regeneration. However, the signals that trigger reprogramming remain unknown. Here, to approach this issue we focused on Pax6, a transcription factor known to be expressed in RPESCs. We first identified four classes (v1, v2, v3 and v4) of Pax6 variants in the eye of adult newt, Cynops pyrrhogaster. These variants were expressed in most tissues of the intact eye in different combinations but not in the RPE, choroid or sclera. On the basis of this information, we investigated the expression of Pax6 in RPE cells after the NR was removed from the eye by surgery (retinectomy), and found that two classes (v1 and v2) of Pax6 variants were newly expressed in RPE cells 10 days after retinectomy, both in vivo and in vitro (RLEC system). In the RLEC system, we found that Pax6 expression is mediated through a pathway separate from the MEK-ERK pathway, which is required for cell cycle re-entry of RPE cells. These results predict the existence of a pathway that may be of fundamental importance to a better understanding of the reprogramming of RPE cells in vivo. PMID:26853865

  6. Retinal pigment epithelium in incontinentia pigmenti.

    PubMed

    Mensheha-Manhart, O; Rodrigues, M M; Shields, J A; Shannon, G M; Mirabelli, R P

    1975-04-01

    An 18-month-old white girl with incontinentia pigmenti presented clinically with leukokoria of the right eye. B-scan ultrasound demonstrated a retrolental mass consistent with a detached retina. Histologic examination of the skin revealed changes compatible with the intermediate verrucous phase of the disease. Microscopic examination of the right eye showed retinal detachment and nodular proliferation of the retinal pigment epithelium. The nodules contained macrophages laden with melanin and lipofuscin. An unusually large amount of lipofuscin was present for a child of this age. The basic pigmentary abnormality may affect the retinal pigment epithelium, resulting in changes in the overlying neurosensory retina that may lead to the retinal dysplasia or retinal detachemnt often associated with this condition. PMID:1119517

  7. Retinal pigment epithelial change and partial lipodystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, T. M.; Holdright, D. R.; Schulenberg, W. E.; Turner, R. C.; Joplin, G. F.

    1988-01-01

    Cuticular drusen and retinal pigment epithelial changes were found incidentally in a 27 year old Lebanese woman during assessment of partial lipodystrophy. Her vision was normal despite involvement of both maculae. The patient had hypocomplementaemia, but serum C3 nephritic factor was absent and renal function was normal. She had impaired glucose tolerance and a continuous infusion of glucose with model assessment (CIGMA) test revealed low normal tissue insulin sensitivity and high normal pancreatic beta cell function. Mild fasting hypertriglyceridaemia (2.0 mmol/l) may have been secondary to impaired insulin sensitivity. Endocrine function was otherwise normal apart from a completely absent growth hormone response to adequate hypoglycaemia. The simultaneous occurrence of partial lipodystrophy and retinal pigmentary epithelial and basement membrane changes appears to be a newly recognized syndrome. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:3255937

  8. Human Adult Retinal Pigment Epithelial Stem Cell–Derived RPE Monolayers Exhibit Key Physiological Characteristics of Native Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Blenkinsop, Timothy A.; Saini, Janmeet S.; Maminishkis, Arvydas; Bharti, Kapil; Wan, Qin; Banzon, Tina; Lotfi, Mostafa; Davis, Janine; Singh, Deepti; Rizzolo, Lawrence J.; Miller, Sheldon; Temple, Sally; Stern, Jeffrey H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We tested what native features have been preserved with a new culture protocol for adult human RPE. Methods We cultured RPE from adult human eyes. Standard protocols for immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy, electrophysiology, fluid transport, and ELISA were used. Results Confluent monolayers of adult human RPE cultures exhibit characteristics of native RPE. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated polarized expression of RPE markers. Electron microscopy illustrated characteristics of native RPE. The mean transepithelial potential (TEP) was 1.19 ± 0.24 mV (mean ± SEM, n = 31), apical positive, and the mean transepithelial resistance (RT) was 178.7 ± 9.9 Ω·cm2 (mean ± SEM, n = 31). Application of 100 μM adenosine triphosphate (ATP) apically increased net fluid absorption (Jv) by 6.11 ± 0.53 μL·cm2·h−1 (mean ± SEM, n = 6) and TEP by 0.33 ± 0.048 mV (mean ± SEM, n = 25). Gene expression of cultured RPE was comparable to native adult RPE (n = 5); however, native RPE RNA was harvested between 24 and 40 hours after death and, therefore, may not accurately reflect healthy native RPE. Vascular endothelial growth factor secreted preferentially basally 2582 ± 146 pg/mL/d, compared to an apical secretion of 1548 ± 162 pg/mL/d (n = 14, P < 0.01), while PEDF preferentially secreted apically 1487 ± 280 ng/mL/d compared to a basolateral secretion of 864 ± 132 ng/mL/d (n = 14, P < 0.01). Conclusions The new culture model preserves native RPE morphology, electrophysiology, and gene and protein expression patterns, and may be a useful model to study RPE physiology, disease, and transplantation. PMID:26540654

  9. Glucose metabolism in rat retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Coffe, Víctor; Carbajal, Raymundo C; Salceda, Rocío

    2006-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is the major transport pathway for exchange of metabolites and ions between choroidal blood supply and the neural retina. To gain insight into the mechanisms controlling glucose metabolism in RPE and its possible relationship to retinopathy, we studied the influence of different glucose concentrations on glycogen and lactate levels and CO(2) production in RPE from normal and streptozotocin-treated diabetic rats. Incubation of normal RPE in the absence of glucose caused a decrease in lactate production and glycogen content. In normal RPE, increasing glucose concentrations from 5.6 mM to 30 mM caused a four-fold increase in glucose accumulation and CO(2) yield, as well as reduction in lactate and glycogen production. In RPE from diabetic rats glucose accumulation did not increase in the presence of high glucose substrate, but it showed a four- and a seven-fold increase in CO(2) production through the mitochondrial and pentose phosphate pathways, respectively. We found high glycogen levels in RPE which can be used as an energy reserve for RPE itself and/or neural retina. Findings further show that the RPE possesses a high oxidative capacity. The large increase in glucose shunting to the pentose phosphate pathway in diabetic retina exposed to high glucose suggests a need for reducing capacity, consistent with increased oxidative stress. PMID:16475003

  10. Zinc Deficiency Leads to Lipofuscin Accumulation in the Retinal Pigment Epithelium of Pigmented Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kokkinou, Despina; Eibl, Oliver; Schraermeyer, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    Background Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is associated with lipofuscin accumulation whereas the content of melanosomes decreases. Melanosomes are the main storage of zinc in the pigmented tissues. Since the elderly population, as the most affected group for AMD, is prone to zinc deficit, we investigated the chemical and ultrastructural effects of zinc deficiency in pigmented rat eyes after a six-month zinc penury diet. Methodology/Principal Findings Adult Long Evans (LE) rats were investigated. The control animals were fed with a normal alimentation whereas the zinc-deficiency rats (ZD-LE) were fed with a zinc deficient diet for six months. Quantitative Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) microanalysis yielded the zinc mole fractions of melanosomes in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). The lateral resolution of the analysis was 100 nm. The zinc mole fractions of melanosomes were significantly smaller in the RPE of ZD-LE rats as compared to the LE control rats. Light, fluorescence and electron microscopy, as well as immunohistochemistry were performed. The numbers of lipofuscin granules in the RPE and of infiltrated cells (Ø>3 µm) found in the choroid were quantified. The number of lipofuscin granules significantly increased in ZD-LE as compared to control rats. Infiltrated cells bigger than 3 µm were only detected in the choroid of ZD-LE animals. Moreover, the thickness of the Bruch's membrane of ZD-LE rats varied between 0.4–3 µm and thin, rangy ED1 positive macrophages were found attached at these sites of Bruch's membrane or even inside it. Conclusions/Significance In pigmented rats, zinc deficiency yielded an accumulation of lipofuscin in the RPE and of large pigmented macrophages in the choroids as well as the appearance of thin, rangy macrophages at Bruch's membrane. Moreover, we showed that a zinc diet reduced the zinc mole fraction of melanosomes in the RPE and modulated the thickness of the Bruch's membrane. PMID:22216222

  11. Rapid Retinal Release from a Cone Visual Pigment Following Photoactivation*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Min-Hsuan; Kuemmel, Colleen; Birge, Robert R.; Knox, Barry E.

    2012-01-01

    As part of the visual cycle, the retinal chromophore in both rod and cone visual pigments undergoes reversible Schiff base hydrolysis and dissociation following photobleaching. We characterized light-activated retinal release from a short-wavelength sensitive cone pigment (VCOP) in 0.1% dodecyl maltoside using fluorescence spectroscopy. The half-time (t1/2) of retinal release from VCOP was 7.1 s, 250-fold faster than rhodopsin. VCOP exhibited pH-dependent release kinetics, with the t1/2 decreasing from 23 s to 4 s with pH 4.1 to 8, respectively. However, the Arrhenius activation energy (Ea) for VCOP derived from kinetic measurements between 4° and 20°C was 17.4 kcal/mol, similar to 18.5 kcal/mol for rhodopsin. There was a small kinetic isotope (D2O) effect in VCOP, but less than that observed in rhodopsin. Mutation of the primary Schiff base counterion (VCOPD108A) produced a pigment with an unprotonated chromophore (⌊max = 360 nm) and dramatically slowed (t1/2 ~ 6.8 min) light-dependent retinal release. Using homology modeling, a VCOP mutant with two substitutions (S85D/ D108A) was designed to move the counterion one alpha helical turn into the transmembrane region from the native position. This double mutant had a UV-visible absorption spectrum consistent with a protonated Schiff base (⌊max = 420 nm). Moreover, VCOPS85D/D108A mutant had retinal release kinetics (t1/2 = 7 s) and Ea (18 kcal/mol) similar to the native pigment exhibiting no pH-dependence. By contrast, the single mutant VCOPS85D had a ~3-fold decrease in retinal release rate compared to the native pigment. Photoactivated VCOPD108A had kinetics comparable to a rhodopsin counterion mutant, RhoE113Q, both requiring hydroxylamine to fully release retinal. These results demonstrate that the primary counterion of cone visual pigments is necessary for efficient Schiff base hydrolysis. We discuss how the large differences in retinal release rates between rod and cone visual pigments arise, not from

  12. Transcriptome analysis and molecular signature of human retinal pigment epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Strunnikova, N.V.; Maminishkis, A.; Barb, J.J.; Wang, F.; Zhi, C.; Sergeev, Y.; Chen, W.; Edwards, A.O.; Stambolian, D.; Abecasis, G.; Swaroop, A.; Munson, P.J.; Miller, S.S.

    2010-01-01

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a polarized cell layer critical for photoreceptor function and survival. The unique physiology and relationship to the photoreceptors make the RPE a critical determinant of human vision. Therefore, we performed a global expression profiling of native and cultured human fetal and adult RPE and determined a set of highly expressed ‘signature’ genes by comparing the observed RPE gene profiles to the Novartis expression database (SymAtlas: http://wombat.gnf.org/index.html) of 78 tissues. Using stringent selection criteria of at least 10-fold higher expression in three distinct preparations, we identified 154 RPE signature genes, which were validated by qRT-PCR analysis in RPE and in an independent set of 11 tissues. Several of the highly expressed signature genes encode proteins involved in visual cycle, melanogenesis and cell adhesion and Gene ontology analysis enabled the assignment of RPE signature genes to epithelial channels and transporters (ClCN4, BEST1, SLCA20) or matrix remodeling (TIMP3, COL8A2). Fifteen RPE signature genes were associated with known ophthalmic diseases, and 25 others were mapped to regions of disease loci. An evaluation of the RPE signature genes in a recently completed AMD genomewide association (GWA) data set revealed that TIMP3, GRAMD3, PITPNA and CHRNA3 signature genes may have potential roles in AMD pathogenesis and deserve further examination. We propose that RPE signature genes are excellent candidates for retinal diseases and for physiological investigations (e.g. dopachrome tautomerase in melanogenesis). The RPE signature gene set should allow the validation of RPE-like cells derived from human embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells for cell-based therapies of degenerative retinal diseases. PMID:20360305

  13. Methods for culturing retinal pigment epithelial cells: a review of current protocols and future recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Fronk, Aaron H; Vargis, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium is an important part of the vertebrate eye, particularly in studying the causes and possible treatment of age-related macular degeneration. The retinal pigment epithelium is difficult to access in vivo due to its location at the back of the eye, making experimentation with age-related macular degeneration treatments problematic. An alternative to in vivo experimentation is cultivating the retinal pigment epithelium in vitro, a practice that has been going on since the 1970s, providing a wide range of retinal pigment epithelial culture protocols, each producing cells and tissue of varying degrees of similarity to natural retinal pigment epithelium. The purpose of this review is to provide researchers with a ready list of retinal pigment epithelial protocols, their effects on cultured tissue, and their specific possible applications. Protocols using human and animal retinal pigment epithelium cells, derived from tissue or cell lines, are discussed, and recommendations for future researchers included. PMID:27493715

  14. Methods for culturing retinal pigment epithelial cells: a review of current protocols and future recommendations.

    PubMed

    Fronk, Aaron H; Vargis, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium is an important part of the vertebrate eye, particularly in studying the causes and possible treatment of age-related macular degeneration. The retinal pigment epithelium is difficult to access in vivo due to its location at the back of the eye, making experimentation with age-related macular degeneration treatments problematic. An alternative to in vivo experimentation is cultivating the retinal pigment epithelium in vitro, a practice that has been going on since the 1970s, providing a wide range of retinal pigment epithelial culture protocols, each producing cells and tissue of varying degrees of similarity to natural retinal pigment epithelium. The purpose of this review is to provide researchers with a ready list of retinal pigment epithelial protocols, their effects on cultured tissue, and their specific possible applications. Protocols using human and animal retinal pigment epithelium cells, derived from tissue or cell lines, are discussed, and recommendations for future researchers included. PMID:27493715

  15. Kinetics of Lipofuscin Formation in Aging Retinal Pigment Epithelium Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Family, Fereydoon; Mazzitello, K. I.; Arizmendi, C. M.; Grossniklaus, Hans E.

    2010-03-01

    Lipofuscin is a deposit that is formed over time by aggregation and clustering of incompletely degraded membrane material in various types of cells. Lipofuscin is made of free-radical-damaged protein and fat and is known to be present in age- related macular dgeneration (AMD), Alzheimer disease, and Parkinson disease. AMD is the leading cause of blindness in adults. The degradation of retinal pigment epithelium cells (RPE) through accumulation of lipsofuscin is considered a significant pathogenic factor in the development of AMD. We will present the results of a study of the kinetics of lipofuscin growth in RPE cells using Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations and scaling theory on a cluster aggregation model. The model captures the essential physics of lipofuscin growth in the cells. A remarkable feature is that small particles may be removed from the cells while the larger ones become fixed and grow by aggregation. We compare our results with the number of lipofuscin granules in eyes with early age-related degeneration.

  16. [Competence factors of retinal pigment epithelium cells for reprogramming in the neuronal direction during retinal regeneration in newts].

    PubMed

    Grigorian, E N

    2015-01-01

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells that have the unique ability to reprogram retinal cells @in vivo@ were analyzed in the adult newt. Our own data and that available in the literature on the peculiarities of the biology of these cells (from morphology to molecular profile, which can be associated with the capability of phenotype change) were summarized: It was established that the molecular traits of specialized and poorly differentiated cells are combined in RPE of the adult newt. It was registered that persistent (at a low level) proliferation and rapid change of specific cytoskeleton proteins can contribute to the success of RPE cell reprogramming in the neuronal direction. Each of the considered factors of competence for reprogramming can be found for animal RPE, whose cells are not able @in vivo@ to change the phenotype to a neuronal one; however, their totality (supported by the epigenetic state permissive for conversion) is probably an internal property of only newt RPE. PMID:25872395

  17. Zinc uptake in vitro by human retinal pigment epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Newsome, D.A.; Rothman, R.J.

    1987-11-01

    Zinc, an essential trace element, is present in unusually high concentrations in the chorioretinal complex relative to most other tissues. Because little has been known about the interactions between the retinal pigment epithelium and free or protein-associated zinc, we studied /sup 65/Zn uptake by human retinal pigment epithelium in vitro. When monolayers were exposed to differing concentrations from 0 to 30 microM /sup 65/Zn in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium with 5.4 gm/l glucose at 37 degrees C and 4 degrees C, we observed a temperature-dependent saturable accumulation of the radiolabel. With 15 microM /sup 65/Zn, we saw a biphasic pattern of uptake with a rapid first phase and a slower second phase over 120 min. Uptake of /sup 65/Zn was inhibited by iodacetate and cold, and reduced approximately 50% by the addition of 2% albumin to the labelling medium. Neither ouabain nor 2-deoxyglucose inhibited uptake. Cells previously exposed to /sup 65/Zn retained approximately 70% of accumulated /sup 65/Zn 60 min after being changed to radiolabel-free medium. Following removal of cells from the extracellular matrix adherent to the dish bottom, a variable amount of nonspecific binding of /sup 65/Zn to the residual matrix was demonstrated. These observations are consistent with a facilitated type of transport and demonstrate the ability of human retinal pigment epithelium in vitro to accumulate and retain zinc.

  18. Optical modulation of transgene expression in retinal pigment epithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanker, D.; Lavinsky, D.; Chalberg, T.; Mandel, Y.; Huie, P.; Dalal, R.; Marmor, M.

    2013-03-01

    Over a million people in US alone are visually impaired due to the neovascular form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The current treatment is monthly intravitreal injections of a protein which inhibits Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor, thereby slowing progression of the disease. The immense financial and logistical burden of millions of intravitreal injections signifies an urgent need to develop more long-lasting and cost-effective treatments for this and other retinal diseases. Viral transfection of ocular cells allows creation of a "biofactory" that secretes therapeutic proteins. This technique has been proven successful in non-human primates, and is now being evaluated in clinical trials for wet AMD. However, there is a critical need to down-regulate gene expression in the case of total resolution of retinal condition, or if patient has adverse reaction to the trans-gene products. The site for genetic therapy of AMD and many other retinal diseases is the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). We developed and tested in pigmented rabbits, an optical method to down-regulate transgene expression in RPE following vector delivery, without retinal damage. Microsecond exposures produced by a rapidly scanning laser vaporize melanosomes and destroy a predetermined fraction of the RPE cells selectively. RPE continuity is restored within days by migration and proliferation of adjacent RPE, but since the transgene is not integrated into the nucleus it is not replicated. Thus, the decrease in transgene expression can be precisely determined by the laser pattern density and further reduced by repeated treatment without affecting retinal structure and function.

  19. Force dependence of phagosome trafficking in retinal pigment epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, Rebekah; Koll, Andrew T.; Altman, David

    2014-09-01

    Retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells play an integral role in the renewal of photoreceptor disk membranes. As rod and cone cells shed their outer segments, they are phagocytosed and degraded by the RPE, and a failure in this process can result in retinal degeneration. We have studied the role of myosin VI in nonspecific phagocytosis in a human RPE primary cell line (ARPE-19), testing the hypothesis that this motor generates the forces required to traffic phagosomes in these cells. Experiments were conducted in the presence of forces through the use of in vivo optical trapping. Our results support a role for myosin VI in phagosome trafficking and demonstrate that applied forces modulate rates of phagosome trafficking.

  20. The genomic response of the retinal pigment epithelium to light damage and retinal detachment

    PubMed Central

    Rattner, Amir; Toulabi, Leila; Williams, John; Yu, Huimin; Nathans, Jeremy

    2008-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) plays an essential role in maintaining the health of the retina. The RPE is also the site of pathologic processes in a wide variety of retinal disorders including monogenic retinal dystrophies, age-related macular degeneration, and retinal detachment. Despite intense interest in the RPE, little is known about its molecular response to ocular damage or disease. We have conducted a comprehensive analysis of changes in transcript abundance (the “genomic response”) in the murine RPE following light damage. Several dozen transcripts, many related to cell-cell signaling, show significant increases in abundance in response to bright light; transcripts encoding visual cycle proteins show a decrease in abundance. Similar changes are induced by retinal detachment. Environmental and genetic perturbations that modulate the RPE response to bright light suggest that this response is controlled by the retina. In contrast to the response to bright light, the RPE response to retinal detachment over-rides these modulatory affects. PMID:18815272

  1. Drug Delivery Nanoparticles: Toxicity Comparison in Retinal Pigment Epithelium and Retinal Vascular Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Haijiang; Yue, Yueran; Maidana, Daniel E; Bouzika, Peggy; Atik, Alp; Matsumoto, Hidetaka; Miller, Joan W; Vavvas, Demetrios G

    2016-01-01

    Multiple synthetic polymer nanoparticles (NPs) have been widely used as drug delivery systems. However, their toxicity to the retinal pigment epithelium and retinal endothelium remains unclear. In this study, we analyze the cytotoxic effects of three different kinds of NPs, made of poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA), polycaprolactone (PCL), and PEGylated PLGA (PEG-PLGA), in a retinal pigment epithelium cell line (ARPE-19) and in primary human retinal vascular endothelial cells (RVEC). PEG-PLGA NPs presented the lowest cytotoxicity on ARPE-19 cells and RVEC as assessed by MTT viability assay. While PLGA and PCL exhibited variable amounts of toxicity, no significant toxicity was observed when incubating cells with high PEG-PLGA concentrations (100 µg/ml), for up to 6 days. On both transmission electron microscopy and confocal microscopy, Rhodamine 6G-loaded PEG-PLGA NPs were observed intracellularly in multiple subcellular organelles. PEG-PLGA NPs are a potentially viable option for the treatment of eye diseases. PMID:26959123

  2. Yap and Taz regulate retinal pigment epithelial cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Miesfeld, Joel B.; Gestri, Gaia; Clark, Brian S.; Flinn, Michael A.; Poole, Richard J.; Bader, Jason R.; Besharse, Joseph C.; Wilson, Stephen W.; Link, Brian A.

    2015-01-01

    The optic vesicle comprises a pool of bi-potential progenitor cells from which the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and neural retina fates segregate during ocular morphogenesis. Several transcription factors and signaling pathways have been shown to be important for RPE maintenance and differentiation, but an understanding of the initial fate specification and determination of this ocular cell type is lacking. We show that Yap/Taz-Tead activity is necessary and sufficient for optic vesicle progenitors to adopt RPE identity in zebrafish. A Tead-responsive transgene is expressed within the domain of the optic cup from which RPE arises, and Yap immunoreactivity localizes to the nuclei of prospective RPE cells. yap (yap1) mutants lack a subset of RPE cells and/or exhibit coloboma. Loss of RPE in yap mutants is exacerbated in combination with taz (wwtr1) mutant alleles such that, when Yap and Taz are both absent, optic vesicle progenitor cells completely lose their ability to form RPE. The mechanism of Yap-dependent RPE cell type determination is reliant on both nuclear localization of Yap and interaction with a Tead co-factor. In contrast to loss of Yap and Taz, overexpression of either protein within optic vesicle progenitors leads to ectopic pigmentation in a dosage-dependent manner. Overall, this study identifies Yap and Taz as key early regulators of RPE genesis and provides a mechanistic framework for understanding the congenital ocular defects of Sveinsson's chorioretinal atrophy and congenital retinal coloboma. PMID:26209646

  3. Molecular mechanism of spontaneous pigment activation in retinal cones.

    PubMed

    Sampath, Alapakkam P; Baylor, Denis A

    2002-07-01

    Spontaneous current and voltage fluctuations (dark noise) in the photoreceptor cells of the retina limit the ability of the visual system to detect dim light. We recorded the dark current noise of individual salamander L cones. Previous work showed that the dark noise in these cells arises from thermal activation of the visual pigment. From the temperature dependence of the rate of occurrence of elementary noise events, we found an Arrhenius activation energy E(a) of 25 +/- 7 kcal/mol (mean +/- SD). This E(a) is similar to that reported for the thermal isomerization of 11-cis retinal in solution, suggesting that the cone pigment noise results from isomerization of the retinal chromophore. E(a) for the cone noise is similar to that previously reported for the "photon-like" noise of rods, but the preexponential factor is five orders of magnitude higher. To test the hypothesis that thermal isomerization can only occur in molecules whose Schiff base linkage is unprotonated, we changed the pH of the solution bathing the cone outer segment. This had little effect on the rate of occurrence of elementary noise events. The rate was also unchanged when the cone was exposed to Ringer solution made up from heavy water, whose solvent isotope effect should reduce the probability, that the Schiff base nitrogen is naked. PMID:12080111

  4. Mesd extrinsically promotes phagocytosis by retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiuping; Guo, Feiye; LeBlanc, Michelle E; Ding, Ying; Zhang, Chenming; Shakya, Akhalesh; Li, Wei

    2016-08-01

    Phagocytosis is a critical process to maintain tissue homeostasis. In the retina, photoreceptor cells renew their photoexcitability by shedding photoreceptor outer segments (POSs) in a diurnal rhythm. Shed POSs are phagocytosed by retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells to prevent debris accumulation, retinal degeneration, and blindness. Phagocytosis ligands are the key to understanding how RPE recognizes shed POSs. Here, we characterized mesoderm development candidate 2 (Mesd or Mesdc2), an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperon for low-density lipoprotein receptor-related proteins (LRPs), to extrinsically promote RPE phagocytosis. The results showed that Mesd stimulated phagocytosis of fluorescence-labeled POS vesicles by D407 RPE cells. Ingested POSs were partially degraded within 3 h in some RPE cells to dispense undegradable fluorophore throughout the cytoplasm. Internalized POSs were colocalized with phagosome biomarker Rab7, suggesting that Mesd-mediated engulfment is involved in a phagocytosis pathway. Mesd also facilitated phagocytosis of POSs by primary RPE cells. Mesd bound to unknown phagocytic receptor(s) on RPE cells. Mesd was detected in the cytoplasm, but not nuclei, of different retinal layers and is predominantly expressed in the ER-free cellular compartment of POSs. Mesd was not secreted into medium from healthy cells but passively released from apoptotic cells with increased membrane permeability. Released Mesd selectively bound to the surface of POS vesicles and apoptotic cells, but not healthy cells. These results suggest that Mesd may be released from and bind to shed POSs to facilitate their phagocytic clearance. PMID:27184668

  5. Retinal pigment epithelium transplantation: concepts, challenges, and future prospects

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, P; Thomson, H A J; Luff, A J; Lotery, A J

    2015-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a single layer of cells that supports the light-sensitive photoreceptor cells that are essential for retinal function. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of visual impairment, and the primary pathogenic mechanism is thought to arise in the RPE layer. RPE cell structure and function are well understood, the cells are readily sustainable in laboratory culture and, unlike other cell types within the retina, RPE cells do not require synaptic connections to perform their role. These factors, together with the relative ease of outer retinal imaging, make RPE cells an attractive target for cell transplantation compared with other cell types in the retina or central nervous system. Seminal experiments in rats with an inherited RPE dystrophy have demonstrated that RPE transplantation can prevent photoreceptor loss and maintain visual function. This review provides an update on the progress made so far on RPE transplantation in human eyes, outlines potential sources of donor cells, and describes the technical and surgical challenges faced by the transplanting surgeon. Recent advances in the understanding of pluripotent stem cells, combined with novel surgical instrumentation, hold considerable promise, and support the concept of RPE transplantation as a regenerative strategy in AMD. PMID:26043704

  6. Retinal pigment epithelium transplantation: concepts, challenges, and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Alexander, P; Thomson, H A J; Luff, A J; Lotery, A J

    2015-08-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a single layer of cells that supports the light-sensitive photoreceptor cells that are essential for retinal function. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of visual impairment, and the primary pathogenic mechanism is thought to arise in the RPE layer. RPE cell structure and function are well understood, the cells are readily sustainable in laboratory culture and, unlike other cell types within the retina, RPE cells do not require synaptic connections to perform their role. These factors, together with the relative ease of outer retinal imaging, make RPE cells an attractive target for cell transplantation compared with other cell types in the retina or central nervous system. Seminal experiments in rats with an inherited RPE dystrophy have demonstrated that RPE transplantation can prevent photoreceptor loss and maintain visual function. This review provides an update on the progress made so far on RPE transplantation in human eyes, outlines potential sources of donor cells, and describes the technical and surgical challenges faced by the transplanting surgeon. Recent advances in the understanding of pluripotent stem cells, combined with novel surgical instrumentation, hold considerable promise, and support the concept of RPE transplantation as a regenerative strategy in AMD. PMID:26043704

  7. Mutations in CTNNA1 cause butterfly-shaped pigment dystrophy and perturbed retinal pigment epithelium integrity.

    PubMed

    Saksens, Nicole T M; Krebs, Mark P; Schoenmaker-Koller, Frederieke E; Hicks, Wanda; Yu, Minzhong; Shi, Lanying; Rowe, Lucy; Collin, Gayle B; Charette, Jeremy R; Letteboer, Stef J; Neveling, Kornelia; van Moorsel, Tamara W; Abu-Ltaif, Sleiman; De Baere, Elfride; Walraedt, Sophie; Banfi, Sandro; Simonelli, Francesca; Cremers, Frans P M; Boon, Camiel J F; Roepman, Ronald; Leroy, Bart P; Peachey, Neal S; Hoyng, Carel B; Nishina, Patsy M; den Hollander, Anneke I

    2016-02-01

    Butterfly-shaped pigment dystrophy is an eye disease characterized by lesions in the macula that can resemble the wings of a butterfly. Here we report the identification of heterozygous missense mutations in the CTNNA1 gene (encoding α-catenin 1) in three families with butterfly-shaped pigment dystrophy. In addition, we identified a Ctnna1 missense mutation in a chemically induced mouse mutant, tvrm5. Parallel clinical phenotypes were observed in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) of individuals with butterfly-shaped pigment dystrophy and in tvrm5 mice, including pigmentary abnormalities, focal thickening and elevated lesions, and decreased light-activated responses. Morphological studies in tvrm5 mice demonstrated increased cell shedding and the presence of large multinucleated RPE cells, suggesting defects in intercellular adhesion and cytokinesis. This study identifies CTNNA1 gene variants as a cause of macular dystrophy, indicates that CTNNA1 is involved in maintaining RPE integrity and suggests that other components that participate in intercellular adhesion may be implicated in macular disease. PMID:26691986

  8. Mutations in CTNNA1 cause butterfly-shaped pigment dystrophy and perturbed retinal pigment epithelium integrity

    PubMed Central

    Saksens, Nicole T.M.; Krebs, Mark P.; Schoenmaker-Koller, Frederieke E.; Hicks, Wanda; Yu, Minzhong; Shi, Lanying; Rowe, Lucy; Collin, Gayle B.; Charette, Jeremy R.; Letteboer, Stef J.; Neveling, Kornelia; van Moorsel, Tamara W.; Abu-Ltaif, Sleiman; De Baere, Elfride; Walraedt, Sophie; Banfi, Sandro; Simonelli, Francesca; Cremers, Frans P.M.; Boon, Camiel J.F.; Roepman, Ronald; Leroy, Bart P.; Peachey, Neal S.; Hoyng, Carel B.; Nishina, Patsy M.; den Hollander, Anneke I.

    2015-01-01

    Butterfly-shaped pigment dystrophy is an eye disease characterized by lesions in the macula that can resemble the wings of a butterfly. Here, we report the identification of heterozygous missense mutations in the α-catenin 1 (CTNNA1) gene in three families with butterfly-shaped pigment dystrophy. In addition, we identified a Ctnna1 missense mutation in a chemically induced mouse mutant, tvrm5. Parallel clinical phenotypes were observed in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) of individuals with butterfly-shaped pigment dystrophy and in tvrm5 mice, including pigmentary abnormalities, focal thickening and elevated lesions, and decreased light-activated responses. Morphological studies in tvrm5 mice revealed increased cell shedding and large multinucleated RPE cells, suggesting defects in intercellular adhesion and cytokinesis. This study identifies CTNNA1 gene variants as a cause of macular dystrophy, suggests that CTNNA1 is involved in maintaining RPE integrity, and suggests that other components that participate in intercellular adhesion may be implicated in macular disease. PMID:26691986

  9. Mouse Slc9a8 Mutants Exhibit Retinal Defects Due to Retinal Pigmented Epithelium Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Jadeja, Shalini; Barnard, Alun R.; McKie, Lisa; Cross, Sally H.; White, Jacqueline K.; Robertson, Morag; Budd, Peter S.; MacLaren, Robert E.; Jackson, Ian J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. As part of a large scale systematic screen to determine the effects of gene knockout mutations in mice, a retinal phenotype was found in mice lacking the Slc9a8 gene, encoding the sodium/hydrogen ion exchange protein NHE8. We aimed to characterize the mutant phenotype and the role of sodium/hydrogen ion exchange in retinal function. Methods. Detailed histology characterized the pathological consequences of Slc9a8 mutation, and retinal function was assessed by electroretinography (ERG). A conditional allele was used to identify the cells in which NHE8 function is critical for retinal function, and mutant cells analyzed for the effect of the mutation on endosomes. Results. Histology of mutant retinas reveals a separation of photoreceptors from the RPE and infiltration by macrophages. There is a small reduction in photoreceptor length and a mislocalization of visual pigments. The ERG testing reveals a deficit in rod and cone pathway function. The RPE shows abnormal morphology, and mutation of Slc9a8 in only RPE cells recapitulates the mutant phenotype. The NHE8 protein localizes to endosomes, and mutant cells have much smaller recycling endosomes. Conclusions. The NHE8 protein is required in the RPE to maintain correct regulation of endosomal volume and/or pH which is essential for the cellular integrity and subsequent function of RPE. PMID:25736793

  10. Retinal pigment epithelium engineering using synthetic biodegradable polymers.

    PubMed

    Lu, L; Yaszemski, M J; Mikos, A G

    2001-12-01

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) plays a key role in the maintenance of the normal functions of the retina, especially photoreceptors. Alteration in RPE structure and function is implicated in a variety of ocular disorders. Tissue engineering strategies using synthetic biodegradable polymers as temporary substrates for RPE cell culture and subsequent transplantation may provide a promising new therapy. In this review article, the manufacture of thin biodegradable poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) films and their degradation behavior in vitro are discussed. RPE cell proliferation and differentiation on these PLGA films are reviewed. The fabrication of model substrates with desired chemical micropatterns in the micrometer scale is discussed and the effects of surface patterning on RPE morphology and function are assessed. Finally. the preparation of biodegradable micropatterns with adhesive PLGA and non-adhesive poly(ethylene glycol)/PLA domains to modulate RPE cell adhesion is presented. PMID:11700807

  11. Regulatory volume decrease in frog retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Adorante, J S

    1995-01-01

    To measure changes in cell water during cell volume regulation, retinal pigment epithelial cells were loaded with tetramethylammonium (TMA). Regulatory volume decrease (RVD) in TMA-loaded retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells was measured using double-barreled K(+)-specific microelectrodes. Hyposmotic removal of 12.5 mM NaCl from the apical bath caused bullfrog RPE cells to rapidly swell by approximately 10% and to recover to control level within 10-15 min. Hyposmotic RVD was inhibited by 5 mM basal but not apical BaCl2. Raising K+ in the basal bath from 2 to 12 mM also inhibited RVD. Hyposmotic swelling was accompanied by an increase in the ratio of apical to basolateral membrane resistance (Ra/Rb). The swelling-induced increase in Ra/Rb was inhibited by 5 mM BaCl2. Together, the above findings suggest that hyposmotic swelling enhances basolateral K+ conductance such that K+ and presumably anion efflux mediate net solute and water loss during RVD. RPE cells can also regulate their volume when swollen in isosmotic Ringer solution under certain conditions. When urea or apical HCO3- was used to induce cell swelling, RPE cells underwent an RVD. In contrast, isosmotic elevation of apical K+ from 2 to 5 mM resulted in an increase in RPE cell volume with no subsequent RVD. Thus the method used to swell RPE cells is an important determinant of RVD. Because changes in RPE cell volume in vivo may alter the volume and composition of the extracellular (subretinal) space surrounding the photoreceptors, isosmotic volume regulation may play an important physiological role in maintaining the integrity and health of the neural retina under normal and pathophysiological conditions. PMID:7840164

  12. Chloroquine and Hydroxychloroquine Increase Retinal Pigment Epithelial Layer Permeability.

    PubMed

    Korthagen, Nicoline M; Bastiaans, Jeroen; van Meurs, Jan C; van Bilsen, Kiki; van Hagen, P Martin; Dik, Willem A

    2015-07-01

    Antimalarials chloroquine (CQ) and hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) are widely used as antiinflammatory drugs, but side effects include retinopathy and vision loss. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of CQ and HCQ on the barrier integrity of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell monolayers in vitro. Permeability of ARPE-19 cell monolayers was determined using Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled dextran. The influence of CQ and HCQ on cell death and the expression tight junction molecules was examined. CQ and HCQ significantly increased ARPE-19 monolayer permeability after 3 and 18 h, respectively, and enhanced mRNA levels for claudin-1 and occludin. Cytotoxicity was only observed after 18 h exposure. Thus, CQ and HCQ rapidly enhance RPE barrier permeability in vitro, independent of cytotoxicity or loss of zonula occludens-1, claudin-1, and occludin expression. Our findings suggest that CQ/HCQ-induced permeability of the RPE layer may contribute to blood-retinal barrier breakdown in case of CQ/HCQ-induced retinopathy. PMID:25752684

  13. ABCF1 extrinsically regulates retinal pigment epithelial cell phagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Feiye; Ding, Ying; Caberoy, Nora; Alvarado, Gabriela; Wang, Feng; Chen, Rui; Li, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Phagocytosis of shed photoreceptor outer segments (POSs) by retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells is critical to retinal homeostasis and shares many conserved signaling pathways with other phagocytes, including extrinsic regulations. Phagocytotic ligands are the key to cargo recognition, engulfment initiation, and activity regulation. In this study, we identified intracellular protein ATP-binding cassette subfamily F member 1 (ABCF1) as a novel RPE phagocytotic ligand by a new approach of functional screening. ABCF1 was independently verified to extrinsically promote phagocytosis of shed POSs by D407 RPE cells. This finding was further corroborated with primary RPE cells and RPE explants. Internalized POS vesicles were colocalized with a phagosome marker, suggesting that ABCF1-mediated engulfment is through a phagocytic pathway. ABCF1 was released from apoptotic cells and selectively bound to shed POS vesicles and apoptotic cells, possibly via externalized phosphatidylserine. ABCF1 is predominantly expressed in POSs and colocalized with the POS marker rhodopsin, providing geographical convenience for regulation of RPE phagocytosis. Collectively these results suggest that ABCF1 is released from and binds to shed POSs in an autocrine manner to facilitate RPE phagocytosis through a conserved pathway. Furthermore, the new approach is broadly applicable to many other phagocytes and will enable systematic elucidation of their ligands to understand extrinsic regulation and cargo recognition. PMID:25904329

  14. Displaced retinal ganglion cells in albino and pigmented rats

    PubMed Central

    Nadal-Nicolás, Francisco M.; Salinas-Navarro, Manuel; Jiménez-López, Manuel; Sobrado-Calvo, Paloma; Villegas-Pérez, María P.; Vidal-Sanz, Manuel; Agudo-Barriuso, Marta

    2014-01-01

    We have studied in parallel the population of displaced retinal ganglion cells (dRGCs) and normally placed (orthotopic RGCs, oRGCs) in albino and pigmented rats. Using retrograde tracing from the optic nerve, from both superior colliculi (SC) or from the ipsilateral SC in conjunction with Brn3 and melanopsin immunodetection, we report for the first time their total number and topography as well as the number and distribution of those dRGCs and oRGCs that project ipsi- or contralaterally and/or that express any of the three Brn3 isoforms or melanopsin. The total number of RGCs (oRGCs+dRGCs) is 84,706 ± 1249 in albino and 90,440 ± 2236 in pigmented, out of which 2383 and 2428 are melanopsin positive (m-RGCs), respectively. Regarding dRGCs: i/ albino rats have a significantly lower number of dRGCs than pigmented animals (0.5% of the total number of RGCs vs. 2.5%, respectively), ii/ dRGCs project massively to the contralateral SC, iii/ the percentage of ipsilaterality is higher for dRGCs than for oRGCs, iv/ a higher proportion of ipsilateral dRGCs is observed in albino than pigmented animals, v/ dRGC topography is very specific, they predominate in the equatorial temporal retina, being densest where the oRGCs are densest, vi/ Brn3a detects all dRGCs except half of the ipsilateral ones and those that express melanopsin, vii/ the proportion of dRGCs that express Brn3b or Brn3c is slightly lower than in the oRGC population, viii/ a higher percentage of dRGCs (13% albino, 9% pigmented) than oRGCs (2.6%) express melanopsin, ix/ few m-RGCs (displaced and orthotopic) project to the ipsilateral SC, x/ the topography of m-dRGCs does not resemble the general distribution of dRGCs, xi/ The soma size in m-oRGCs ranges from 10 to 21 μm and in m-dRGCs from 8 to 15 μm, xii/ oRGCs and dRGCs have the same susceptibility to axonal injury and ocular hypertension. Although the role of mammalian dRGCs remains to be determined, our data suggest that they are not misplaced by an

  15. Proteomic Profiling of Cigarette Smoke Induced Changes in Retinal Pigment Epithelium Cells.

    PubMed

    Merl-Pham, Juliane; Gruhn, Fabian; Hauck, Stefanie M

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a medical condition usually affecting older adults and resulting in a loss of vision in the macula, the center of the visual field. The dry form of this disease presents with atrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium, resulting in the detachment of the retina and loss of photoreceptors. Cigarette smoke is one main risk factor for dry AMD and increases the risk of developing the disease by three times. In order to understand the influence of cigarette smoke on retinal pigment epithelial cells, cultured human ARPE-19 cells were treated with cigarette smoke extract for 24 h. Using quantitative mass spectrometry more than 3000 proteins were identified and their respective abundances were compared between cigarette smoke-treated and untreated cells. Altogether 1932 proteins were quantified with at least two unique peptides, with 686 proteins found to be significantly differentially abundant with p > 0.05. Of these proteins the abundance of 64 proteins was at least 2-fold down-regulated after cigarette smoke treatment while 120 proteins were 2-fold up-regulated. The analysis of associated biological processes revealed an alteration of proteins involved in RNA processing and transport as well as extracellular matrix remodelling in response to cigarette smoke treatment. PMID:26427490

  16. Macular pigment optical density is related to serum lutein in retinitis pigmentosa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Purpose: To determine whether macular pigment optical density (MPOD) is related to the degree of cystoid macular edema (CME) in patients with retinitis pigmentosa. Methods: We measured MPOD with heterochromatic flicker photometry and central foveal retinal thickness with optical coherence tomography...

  17. Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cell Line Suppression of Phagolysosome Activation

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, AW; Dixit, S; Yu, J

    2015-01-01

    The eye is an immune privileged tissue with multiple mechanisms of immunosuppression to protect the light gathering tissues from the damage of inflammation. One of theses mechanisms involves retinal pigment epithelial cell suppression of phagosome activation in macrophages. The objective of this work is to determine if the human RPE cell line ARPE-19 is capable of suppressing the activation of the phagolysosome in macrophages in a manner similar to primary RPE. The conditioned media of RPE eyecups, sub-confluent, just confluent cultures, or established confluent cultures of human ARPE-19 cells were generated. These condition media were used to treat macrophages phagocytizing pHrodo bioparticles. After 24 hours incubation the macrophages were imaged by fluorescent microscopy, and fluorescence was measured. The fluorescent intensity is proportional to the amount of bioparticles phagocytized and are in an activated phagolysosome. The conditioned media of in situ mouse RPE eyecups significantly suppressed the activation of phagolysosome. The conditioned media from cultures of human ARPE-19 cells, grown to sub-confluence (50%) or grown to confluence had no effect on phagolysosome activation. In contrast, the conditioned media from established confluent cultures significantly suppressed phagolysosome activation. The neuropeptides alpha-MSH and NPY were depleted from the conditioned media of established confluent ARPE-19 cell cultures. This depleted conditioned media had diminished suppression of phagolysosome activation while promoting macrophage cell death. In addition, the condition media from cultures of ARPE-19 monolayers wounded with a bisecting scrape was diminished in suppressing phagolysosome activation. This technical report suggests that like primary RPE monolayers, established confluent cultures of ARPE-19 cells produce soluble factors that suppress the activation of macrophages, and can be used to study the molecular mechanisms of retinal immunobiology. In

  18. Nanoparticle-mediated gene transfer specific to retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Koirala, Adarsha; Makkia, Rasha S; Cooper, Mark J; Naash, Muna I

    2011-12-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that CK30PEG10k-compacted DNA nanoparticles (NPs) efficiently target photoreceptor cells and improve visual function in a retinitis pigmentosa model. Here, we test the ability of these NPs in driving transgene expression in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), using an RPE-specific reporter vector (VMD2-eGFP). NPs, uncompacted plasmid, or saline were subretinally delivered to adult BALB/c mice. NP-based expression was specific to RPE cells and caused no deleterious effects on retinal structure and function. eGFP expression levels in NP-injected eyes peaked at post-injection day 2 (PI-2), stabilized at levels ~3-fold higher than in naked DNA-injected eyes, and remained elevated at the latest time-point examined (PI-30). Unlike naked DNA, which only transfected cells at the site of injection, NPs were able to transfect cells throughout the RPE. Subretinal injections of rhodamine labeled NPs and naked DNA showed comparable initial uptake into RPE cells. However, at PI-7 and -30 days significantly more fluorescence was detected inside the RPE of NP-injected eyes compared to naked DNA, suggesting NPs are stable inside the cell which could possibly lead to higher and sustained expression. Overall, our results demonstrate that NPs can efficiently deliver genes to the RPE and hold great potential for the treatment of RPE-associated diseases. PMID:21885113

  19. Protective responses to sublytic complement in the retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Tan, Li Xuan; Toops, Kimberly A; Lakkaraju, Aparna

    2016-08-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a key site of injury in inherited and age-related macular degenerations. Abnormal activation of the complement system is a feature of these blinding diseases, yet how the RPE combats complement attack is poorly understood. The complement cascade terminates in the cell-surface assembly of membrane attack complexes (MACs), which promote inflammation by causing aberrant signal transduction. Here, we investigated mechanisms crucial for limiting MAC assembly and preserving cellular integrity in the RPE and asked how these are compromised in models of macular degeneration. Using polarized primary RPE and the pigmented Abca4(-/-) Stargardt disease mouse model, we provide evidence for two protective responses occurring within minutes of complement attack, which are essential for maintaining mitochondrial health in the RPE. First, accelerated recycling of the membrane-bound complement regulator CD59 to the RPE cell surface inhibits MAC formation. Second, fusion of lysosomes with the RPE plasma membrane immediately after complement attack limits sustained elevations in intracellular calcium and prevents mitochondrial injury. Cholesterol accumulation in the RPE, induced by vitamin A dimers or oxidized LDL, inhibits these defense mechanisms by activating acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase), which increases tubulin acetylation and derails organelle traffic. Defective CD59 recycling and lysosome exocytosis after complement attack lead to mitochondrial fragmentation and oxidative stress in the RPE. Drugs that stimulate cholesterol efflux or inhibit ASMase restore both these critical safeguards in the RPE and avert complement-induced mitochondrial injury in vitro and in Abca4(-/-) mice, indicating that they could be effective therapeutic approaches for macular degenerations. PMID:27432952

  20. Lyar Is a New Ligand for Retinal Pigment Epithelial Phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Feiye; Ding, Ying; Caberoy, Nora B; Alvarado, Gabriela; Liu, Robert; Shen, Chen; Yu, Jisu; Zhou, Yixiong; Salero, Enrique; LeBlanc, Michelle E; Wang, Weiwen; Li, Wei

    2015-10-01

    Phagocytosis is critical to tissue homeostasis, as highlighted by phagocytosis defect of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells with debris accumulation, photoreceptor degeneration and blindness. Phagocytosis ligands are the key to delineating molecular mechanisms and functional roles of phagocytes, but are traditionally identified in individual cases with technical challenges. We recently developed open reading frame phage display (OPD) for phagocytosis-based functional cloning (PFC) to identify unknown ligands. One of the identified ligands was Ly-1 antibody reactive clone (Lyar) with functions poorly defined. Herein, we characterized Lyar as a new ligand to stimulate RPE phagocytosis. In contrast to its reported nucleolar expression, immunohistochemistry showed that Lyar was highly expressed in photoreceptor outer segments (POSs) of the retina. Cytoplasmic Lyar was released from apoptotic cells, and selectively bound to shed POSs and apoptotic cells, but not healthy cells. POS vesicles engulfed through Lyar-dependent pathway were targeted to phagosomes and colocalized with phagosome marker Rab7. These results suggest that Lyar is a genuine RPE phagocytosis ligand, which in turn supports the validity of OPD/PFC as the only available approach for unbiased identification of phagocytosis ligands with broad applicability to various phagocytes. PMID:25735755

  1. Retinal pigment epithelial cell necroptosis in response to sodium iodate

    PubMed Central

    Hanus, J; Anderson, C; Sarraf, D; Ma, J; Wang, S

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a degenerative disease of the retina and the leading cause of blindness in the elderly in developed countries. The late stage of dry AMD, or geographic atrophy (GA), is characterized by extensive retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) degeneration. The underlying molecular mechanism for RPE cell death in GA remains unclear. Our previous study has established that RPE cells die predominantly from necroptosis in response to oxidative stress in vitro. Here, we extend our study and aim to characterize the nature of RPE cell death in response to sodium iodate (NaIO3) in vitro and in a NaIO3-induced retina degeneration mouse model. We found that NaIO3 induces RPE necroptosis in vitro by using a combination of molecular hallmarks. By using TUNEL assays, active caspase-3 and HMGB1 immunostaining, we confirmed that photoreceptor cells die mainly from apoptosis and RPE cells die mainly from necroptosis in response to NaIO3 in vivo. RPE necroptosis in this model is also supported by use of the RIPK1 inhibitor, Necrostatin-1. Furthermore, using novel RIPK3-GFP transgenic mouse lines, we detected RIPK3 aggregation, a hallmark of necroptosis, in the RPE cells in vivo after NaIO3 injection. Our findings suggest the necessity of re-evaluating RPE cell death mechanism in AMD models and have the potential to influence therapeutic development for dry AMD, especially GA. PMID:27551542

  2. Effect of curcumin on aging retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Wu, Yan; Meng, Yi-Fang; Wang, Jin-Yu; Xu, Ming; Tao, Jian-Jun; Lu, Jiong

    2015-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is now one of the leading causes of blindness in the elderly population. The antioxidative effects of curcumin on aging retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells are still unclear. We conducted an in vitro study to investigate the effects of curcumin on aging RPE cells. A pulsed H2O2 exposure aging model was adopted. Aging RPE cells were treated with curcumin 20 µM, 40 µM, and 80 µM. Apoptosis of RPE cells was analyzed by flow cytometry. The intracellular reactive oxygen species concentration was detected using a specific probe and apoptosis-associated proteins were detected by Western blot. Expression of oxidative biomarkers, including superoxide dismutase, maleic dialdehyde, and glutathione, was detected commercially available assay kits. Compared with normal cells, lower cell viability, higher apoptosis rates, and more severe oxidation status were identified in the aging RPE cell model. Curcumin improved cell viability and decreased apoptosis and oxidative stress. Further, curcumin had a significant influence on expression of apoptosis-associated proteins and oxidative stress biomarkers. In conclusion, treatment with curcumin was able to regulate proliferation, oxidative stress, and apoptosis in aging RPE cells. Accordingly, application of curcumin may be a novel strategy to protect against age-related change in AMD. PMID:26445530

  3. Retinal pigment epithelial cell necroptosis in response to sodium iodate.

    PubMed

    Hanus, J; Anderson, C; Sarraf, D; Ma, J; Wang, S

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a degenerative disease of the retina and the leading cause of blindness in the elderly in developed countries. The late stage of dry AMD, or geographic atrophy (GA), is characterized by extensive retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) degeneration. The underlying molecular mechanism for RPE cell death in GA remains unclear. Our previous study has established that RPE cells die predominantly from necroptosis in response to oxidative stress in vitro. Here, we extend our study and aim to characterize the nature of RPE cell death in response to sodium iodate (NaIO3) in vitro and in a NaIO3-induced retina degeneration mouse model. We found that NaIO3 induces RPE necroptosis in vitro by using a combination of molecular hallmarks. By using TUNEL assays, active caspase-3 and HMGB1 immunostaining, we confirmed that photoreceptor cells die mainly from apoptosis and RPE cells die mainly from necroptosis in response to NaIO3 in vivo. RPE necroptosis in this model is also supported by use of the RIPK1 inhibitor, Necrostatin-1. Furthermore, using novel RIPK3-GFP transgenic mouse lines, we detected RIPK3 aggregation, a hallmark of necroptosis, in the RPE cells in vivo after NaIO3 injection. Our findings suggest the necessity of re-evaluating RPE cell death mechanism in AMD models and have the potential to influence therapeutic development for dry AMD, especially GA. PMID:27551542

  4. Phototoxicity of chlorpromazine on retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Persad, S; Menon, I A; Basu, P K; Carre, F

    1988-01-01

    As it is known that chlorpromazine (CPZ) can bind to melanins as well as cause ocular phototoxicity, we investigated the cytotoxic effects of UV-visible irradiation of melanotic and amelanotic retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in the presence of CPZ. At low concentrations (5 micrograms/ml) of CPZ a photosensitization reaction took place which lysed the cells as measured by the release of 51Cr from cells labelled with chromium. At concentrations of CPZ less than 5 micrograms/ml, no significant cell lysis occurred when the cells were incubated at 37 degrees C in the dark. As the concentration of CPZ was increased to 25 micrograms/ml or more, high percentages of cells were lysed. When the melanotic RPE cells were exposed to different concentrations of CPZ and grown in culture, the cell growth (multiplication) diminished drastically with low concentrations (less than 2 micrograms/ml CPZ). Vitamin E decreased the cell lysis both in the dark and upon irradiation. Oxygen radical scavengers such as glutathione, B-carotene, mannitol, D-penicillamine as well as superoxide dismutase and catalase did not decrease cell lysis. The phototoxic effects of CPZ was found not to be due to stable photoproducts formed during irradiation of CPZ. PMID:3359800

  5. Histone Deacetylase Inhibition Restores Retinal Pigment Epithelium Function in Hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Desjardins, Danielle; Liu, Yueying; Crosson, Craig E; Ablonczy, Zsolt

    2016-01-01

    In diabetic individuals, macular edema is a major cause of vision loss. This condition is refractory to insulin therapy and has been attributed to metabolic memory. The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is central to maintaining fluid balance in the retina, and this function is compromised by the activation of advanced glycation end-product receptors (RAGE). Here we provide evidence that acute administration of the RAGE agonist, glycated-albumin (gAlb) or vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), increased histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity in RPE cells. The administration of the class I/II HDAC inhibitor, trichostatin-A (TSA), suppressed gAlb-induced reductions in RPE transepithelial resistance (in vitro) and fluid transport (in vivo). Systemic TSA also restored normal RPE fluid transport in rats with subchronic hyperglycemia. Both gAlb and VEGF increased HDAC activity and reduced acetyl-α-tubulin levels. Tubastatin-A, a relatively specific antagonist of HDAC6, inhibited gAlb-induced changes in RPE cell resistance. These data are consistent with the idea that RPE dysfunction following exposure to gAlb, VEGF, or hyperglycemia is associated with increased HDAC6 activity and decreased acetyl-α-tubulin. Therefore, we propose inhibiting HDAC6 in the RPE as a potential therapy for preserving normal fluid homeostasis in the hyperglycemic retina. PMID:27617745

  6. Retinal pigment epithelial detachments and tears, and progressive retinal degeneration in light chain deposition disease

    PubMed Central

    Spielberg, Leigh H; Heckenlively, John R; Leys, Anita M

    2013-01-01

    Background/purpose Light-chain deposition disease (LCDD) is a rare condition characterised by deposition of monoclonal immunoglobulin light chains (LCs) in tissues, resulting in varying degrees of organ dysfunction. This study reports the characteristic clinical ocular findings seen in advanced LCDD upon development of ocular fundus changes. This is the first report to describe this entity in vivo in a series of patients. Methods A case series of ocular fundus changes in three patients with kidney biopsy-proven LCDD. All patients underwent best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) exam, perimetry, colour fundus photography and fluorescein angiography; two patients underwent indocyanine green angiography, optical coherence tomography, ultrasound and electroretinography; and one patient underwent fundus autofluorescence. Results Three patients, 53–60 years old at initial presentation, were studied. All three presented with night blindness, poor dark adaptation, metamorphopsia and visual loss. Examination revealed serous and serohaemorrhagic detachments, multiple retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) tears, diffuse RPE degeneration and progressive fibrotic changes. Neither choroidal neovascularisation nor other vascular abnormalities were present. Final best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) ranged from 20/40 to 20/300. Conclusions Progressive LC deposition in the fundus seems to damage RPE pump function with flow disturbance between choroid and retina. This pathogenesis can explain the evolution to RPE detachments and subsequent rips and progressive retinal malfunction. PMID:23385633

  7. Effect of cadmium chloride on the distal retinal pigment cells of the fiddler crab, Uca pugilator

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, P.S.; Fingerman, M.; Nguyen, L.K.; Obih, P.

    1997-03-01

    Crustaceans have two sets of pigmentary effectors, chromatophores and retinal pigment cells. Retinal pigments control the amount of light striking the rhabdom, the photosensitive portion of each ommatidium, screening the rhabdom in bright light and uncovering it in darkness or dim light. Migration of the distal pigment in the fiddler crab, Uca pugilalor, is regulated by a light-adapting hormone and a dark-adapting hormone. The black chromatophores of this crab are also controlled by a pair of hormones. Both pigmentary effectors exhibit circadian rhythms. The effects of some organic and inorganic pollutants on the ability of Uca pugilator to change color have been described. Exposure of this crab to naphthalene or cadmium results in decreased ability to disperse the pigment in their black chromatophores, the exposed crabs becoming paler than the unexposed crabs. Norepinephrine triggers release of both the black pigment-dispersing hormone and the light-adapting hormone. In view of the facts that (a) these hormones which regulate the black chromatophores and distal pigment are synthesized in and released from the eyestalk neuroendocrine complex, (b) the black pigment-dispersing hormone and the light-adapting hormone may actually be the same hormone. having two different activities and (c) release of both the black pigment-dispersing hormone and the light-adapting hormone is triggered by norepinephrine, the present investigation was carried out to determine the effect of cadmium on distal pigment migration in Uca pugilator. More specifically, for comparison with the previously reported effect of cadmium on pigment migration in the black chromatophores, we wished to determine whether the distal pigment of fiddler crabs exposed to cadmium chloride is capable of as wide a range of movement as in unexposed crabs, and if not what might be the explanation. This is the first report of the effect of a pollutant on a retinal pigment of any crustacean. 12 refs., 3 tabs.

  8. Intrachoroidal Neovascularization in Transgenic Mice Overexpressing Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in the Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Schwesinger, Catherine; Yee, Charles; Rohan, Richard M.; Joussen, Antonia M.; Fernandez, Antonio; Meyer, Tobias N.; Poulaki, Vassiliki; Ma, Joseph J. K.; Redmond, T. Michael; Liu, Suyan; Adamis, Anthony P.; D’Amato, Robert J.

    2001-01-01

    Choroidal neovascularization in age-related macular degeneration is a frequent and poorly treatable cause of vision loss in elderly Caucasians. This choroidal neovascularization has been associated with the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). In current animal models choroidal neovascularization is induced by subretinal injection of growth factors or vectors encoding growth factors such as VEGF, or by disruption of the Bruch’s membrane/retinal pigment epithelium complex with laser treatment. We wished to establish a transgenic murine model of age-related macular degeneration, in which the overexpression of VEGF by the retinal pigment epithelium induces choroidal neovascularization. A construct consisting of a tissue-specific murine retinal pigment epithelium promoter (RPE65 promoter) coupled to murine VEGF164 cDNA with a rabbit β-globin-3′ UTR was introduced into the genome of albino mice. Transgene mRNA was expressed in the retinal pigment epithelium at all ages peaking at 4 months. The expression of VEGF protein was increased in both the retinal pigment epithelium and choroid. An increase of intravascular adherent leukocytes and vessel leakage was observed. Histopathology revealed intrachoroidal neovascularization that did not penetrate through an intact Bruch’s membrane. These results support the hypothesis that additional insults to the integrity of Bruch’s membrane are required to induce growth of choroidal vessels into the subretinal space as seen in age-related macular degeneration. This model may be useful to screen for inhibitors of choroidal vessel growth. PMID:11238064

  9. Photosensitivity of 10-substituted visual pigment analogues: detection of a specific secondary opsin-retinal interaction.

    PubMed

    Liu, R S; Crescitelli, F; Denny, M; Matsumoto, H; Asato, A E

    1986-11-01

    The photosensitivities of the bovine rhodopsin and gecko pigment 521 analogues regenerated from C-10-substituted analogues of 11-cis- and 9-cis-retinals were determined by two different methods. A similar reactivity trend was noted for both pigment systems as revealed in the photosensitivity of the gecko pigments and relative quantum yields of the bovine analogues. The 10-fluoro-11-cis photopigments had a photosensitivity less than, but approaching, that of the native (11-cis) visual pigment while the 10-fluoro-9-cis photopigments had a much lower photosensitivity than the parent 9-cis regenerated pigment. The results are interpreted in terms of recently described models of rhodopsin architecture and of the primary molecular reaction of visual pigments to light. The unusually low photoreactivity of the 10-fluoro-9-cis pigment molecule is viewed as the result of a regiospecific hydrogen-bonding interaction of the electronegative fluorine atom to the opsin. PMID:2948555

  10. Cholesterol-mediated activation of acid sphingomyelinase disrupts autophagy in the retinal pigment epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Toops, Kimberly A.; Tan, Li Xuan; Jiang, Zhichun; Radu, Roxana A.; Lakkaraju, Aparna

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is an essential mechanism for clearing damaged organelles and proteins within the cell. As with neurodegenerative diseases, dysfunctional autophagy could contribute to blinding diseases such as macular degeneration. However, precisely how inefficient autophagy promotes retinal damage is unclear. In this study, we investigate innate mechanisms that modulate autophagy in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), a key site of insult in macular degeneration. High-speed live imaging of polarized adult primary RPE cells and data from a mouse model of early-onset macular degeneration identify a mechanism by which lipofuscin bisretinoids, visual cycle metabolites that progressively accumulate in the RPE, disrupt autophagy. We demonstrate that bisretinoids trap cholesterol and bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate, an acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) cofactor, within the RPE. ASMase activation increases cellular ceramide, which promotes tubulin acetylation on stabilized microtubules. Live-imaging data show that autophagosome traffic and autophagic flux are inhibited in RPE with acetylated microtubules. Drugs that remove excess cholesterol or inhibit ASMase reverse this cascade of events and restore autophagosome motility and autophagic flux in the RPE. Because accumulation of lipofuscin bisretinoids and abnormal cholesterol homeostasis are implicated in macular degeneration, our studies suggest that ASMase could be a potential therapeutic target to ensure the efficient autophagy that maintains RPE health. PMID:25378587

  11. NLRP3 Upregulation in Retinal Pigment Epithelium in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yujuan; Hanus, Jakub W.; Abu-Asab, Mones S.; Shen, Defen; Ogilvy, Alexander; Ou, Jingxing; Chu, Xi K.; Shi, Guangpu; Li, Wei; Wang, Shusheng; Chan, Chi-Chao

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress are involved in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and possibly associated with an activation of neuronal apoptosis inhibitor protein/class II transcription activator of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC)/heterokaryon incompatibility/telomerase-associated protein 1, leucine-rich repeat or nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich repeat-containing family, and pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome. In the present study, we used a translational approach to address this hypothesis. In patients with AMD, we observed increased mRNA levels of NLRP3, pro-interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and pro-IL-18 in AMD lesions of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and photoreceptor. In vitro, a similar increase was evoked by oxidative stress or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation in the adult retinal pigment epithelium (ARPE-19) cell line, and the increase was reduced in siRNA transfected cells to knockdown NLRP3. Ultrastructural studies of ARPE-19 cells showed a swelling of the cytoplasm, mitochondrial damage, and occurrence of autophagosome-like structures. NLRP3 positive dots were detected within autophagosome-like structures or in the extracellular space. Next, we used a mouse model of AMD, Ccl2/Cx3cr1 double knockout on rd8 background (DKO rd8) to ascertain the in vivo relevance. Ultrastructural studies of the RPE of these mice showed damaged mitochondria, autophagosome-like structures, and cytoplasmic vacuoles, which are reminiscent of the pathology seen in stressed ARPE-19 cells. The data suggest that the NLRP3 inflammasome may contribute in AMD pathogenesis. PMID:26760997

  12. NLRP3 Upregulation in Retinal Pigment Epithelium in Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yujuan; Hanus, Jakub W; Abu-Asab, Mones S; Shen, Defen; Ogilvy, Alexander; Ou, Jingxing; Chu, Xi K; Shi, Guangpu; Li, Wei; Wang, Shusheng; Chan, Chi-Chao

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress are involved in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and possibly associated with an activation of neuronal apoptosis inhibitor protein/class II transcription activator of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC)/heterokaryon incompatibility/telomerase-associated protein 1, leucine-rich repeat or nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich repeat-containing family, and pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome. In the present study, we used a translational approach to address this hypothesis. In patients with AMD, we observed increased mRNA levels of NLRP3, pro-interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and pro-IL-18 in AMD lesions of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and photoreceptor. In vitro, a similar increase was evoked by oxidative stress or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation in the adult retinal pigment epithelium (ARPE-19) cell line, and the increase was reduced in siRNA transfected cells to knockdown NLRP3. Ultrastructural studies of ARPE-19 cells showed a swelling of the cytoplasm, mitochondrial damage, and occurrence of autophagosome-like structures. NLRP3 positive dots were detected within autophagosome-like structures or in the extracellular space. Next, we used a mouse model of AMD, Ccl2/Cx3cr1 double knockout on rd8 background (DKO rd8) to ascertain the in vivo relevance. Ultrastructural studies of the RPE of these mice showed damaged mitochondria, autophagosome-like structures, and cytoplasmic vacuoles, which are reminiscent of the pathology seen in stressed ARPE-19 cells. The data suggest that the NLRP3 inflammasome may contribute in AMD pathogenesis. PMID:26760997

  13. In vivo response of the rat's retinal pigment epithelium to azide: changes induced by light damage.

    PubMed

    Ando, H; Noell, W K

    1993-01-01

    Functional changes in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) associated with light-induced retinal damage were studied by measuring transocular potential changes evoked by injections of azide and thiocyanate (SCN-). The retinal damage by light in the rat is classified into two types: Type 1, rod cell death associated with RPE deterioration; Type 2, the loss of rod cells without RPE deterioration. To study the type 1 damage, littermate pairs of long-term dark-adapted adult albino rats were tested at 1 h and 10 d after the exposure to green light of 1,200 lx for 1/2 to 24 h. Time course of the damage progress was also followed for 12 h. We found that 1) RPE was affected rapidly by the damaging light, 2) the exposure length determined the ultimate degree of RPE damage, 3) damaging effects on RPE proceeded slower and weaker after exposure than during continuous light, 4) progress of the damage in RPE was two-phasic; during the first phase, the SCN- response was enhanced and the azide response was reduced; both responses were decreased rapidly in the second phase. The first phase was assumed to indicate a depolarization of the basolateral membrane of RPE, and the second phase to manifest the structural deterioration of RPE. The type 2 damage was studied in young rats with exposure to weak light for 28 d. At 30 d after the exposure, a-wave of the ERG and number of rod cells were substantially reduced but azide and SCN- responses were affected slightly. PMID:8230851

  14. The endogenous chromophore of retinal G protein-coupled receptor opsin from the pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Hao, W; Fong, H K

    1999-03-01

    The recent identification of nonvisual opsins has revealed an expanding family of vertebrate opsin genes. The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and Müller cells contain a blue and UV light-absorbing opsin, the RPE retinal G protein-coupled receptor (RGR, or RGR opsin). The spectral properties of RGR purified from bovine RPE suggest that RGR is conjugated in vivo to a retinal chromophore through a covalent Schiff base bond. In this study, the isomeric structure of the endogenous chromophore of RGR was identified by the hydroxylamine derivatization method. The retinaloximes derived from RGR in the dark consisted predominantly of the all-trans isomer. Irradiation of RGR with 470-nm monochromatic or near-UV light resulted in stereospecific isomerization of the bound all-trans-retinal to an 11-cis configuration. The stereospecificity of photoisomerization of the all-trans-retinal chromophore of RGR was lost by denaturation of the protein in SDS. Under the in vitro conditions, the photosensitivity of RGR is at least 34% that of bovine rhodopsin. These results provide evidence that RGR is bound in vivo primarily to all-trans-retinal and is capable of operating as a stereospecific photoisomerase that generates 11-cis-retinal in the pigment epithelium. PMID:10037690

  15. Altered melanocyte differentiation and retinal pigmented epithelium transdifferentiation induced by Mash1 expression in pigment cell precursors.

    PubMed

    Lanning, Jessica L; Wallace, Jaclyn S; Zhang, Deming; Diwakar, Ganesh; Jiao, Zhongxian; Hornyak, Thomas J

    2005-10-01

    Transcription factor genes governing pigment cell development that are associated with spotting mutations in mice include members of several structural transcription factor classes but not members of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) class, important for neurogenesis and myogenesis. To determine the effects of bHLH factor expression on pigment cell development, the neurogenic bHLH factor Mash1 was expressed early in pigment cell development in transgenic mice from the dopachrome tautomerase (Dct) promoter. Dct:Mash1 transgenic founders exhibit variable microphthalmia and patchy coat color hypopigmentation. Transgenic F1 mice exhibit microphthalmia with complete coat color dilution. Marker analysis demonstrates that Mash1 expression in the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) initiates neurogenesis in this cell layer, whereas expression in remaining neural crest-derived melanocytes alters their differentiation, in part by profoundly downregulating expression of the p (pink-eyed dilution) gene, while maintaining their cell fate. The effects of transcriptional perturbation of pigment cell precursors by Mash1 further highlight differences between pigment cells of distinct developmental origins, and suggest a mechanism for the alteration of melanogenesis to result in marked coat color dilution. PMID:16185282

  16. ADENOCARCINOMA OF THE RETINAL PIGMENT EPITHELIUM IN THE GUPPY POECILIA RETICULATA PETERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A single case of adenocarcinoma of the retinal pigment epithelium occurred in a guppy, Poecilia reticulata Peters. his is the first such tumor reported from fishes. he left eye of the affected fish was severely exophthalmic because of a large intraocular tumor mass. he tumor, whi...

  17. Proteasome-dependent regulation of signal transduction in retinal pigment epithelial cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As in many other types of cells, retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells have an active ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP). However, the function of the UPP in RPE remains to be elucidated. The objective of this study is to determine the role of the UPP in controlling the levels and activities of tra...

  18. Generation of retinal pigment epithelial cells from human embryonic stem cell-derived spherical neural masses.

    PubMed

    Cho, Myung Soo; Kim, Sang Jin; Ku, Seung-Yup; Park, Jung Hyun; Lee, Haksup; Yoo, Dae Hoon; Park, Un Chul; Song, Seul Ae; Choi, Young Min; Yu, Hyeong Gon

    2012-09-01

    Dysfunction and loss of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) are major pathologic changes observed in various retinal degenerative diseases such as aged-related macular degeneration. RPE generated from human pluripotent stem cells can be a good candidate for RPE replacement therapy. Here, we show the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) toward RPE with the generation of spherical neural masses (SNMs), which are pure masses of hESCs-derived neural precursors. During the early passaging of SNMs, cystic structures arising from opened neural tube-like structures showed pigmented epithelial morphology. These pigmented cells were differentiated into functional RPE by neuroectodermal induction and mechanical purification. Most of the differentiated cells showed typical RPE morphologies, such as a polygonal-shaped epithelial monolayer, and transmission electron microscopy revealed apical microvilli, pigment granules, and tight junctions. These cells also expressed molecular markers of RPE, including Mitf, ZO-1, RPE65, CRALBP, and bestrophin. The generated RPE also showed phagocytosis of isolated bovine photoreceptor outer segment and secreting pigment epithelium-derived factor and vascular endothelial growth factor. Functional RPE could be generated from SNM in our method. Because SNMs have several advantages, including the capability of expansion for long periods without loss of differentiation capability, easy storage and thawing, and no need for feeder cells, our method for RPE differentiation may be used as an efficient strategy for generating functional RPE cells for retinal regeneration therapy. PMID:22683799

  19. [Lamellar Inclusion Bodies in the Retinal Pigment Epithelium of Diurnal Rodents].

    PubMed

    Samosudova, N V; Orlov, O U; Golyshev, S A

    2015-01-01

    The ultrastructure of the retinal pigment epithelium of a diurnal rodent (Brandt's vole) was described taking into account 1) the functions of the pigment epithelium as a participant in the renewal of photoreceptor outer segment and. 2) digestion of outer segment membranes into phagosomes of the retinal pigment epithelium. The myeloid bodies were observed after exposure of the pigment epithelium to light (200 lux, 4 hours) and darkness (0,1 lux, 1,5-hour). In the cytoplasm of the pigment epithelium of the vole no myeloid bodies were observed. Instead of it small lamellar bodies, which have the spiral form and size (from - 200 to 400 nm) were found. The structure of these lamellar bodies was described. Furthermore, the structures, which were presumably responsible for the transport of the digested material, were revealed. The evidence of it is the presence of 1) dense precipitate in the apical domain of the pigment epithelium and 2) microtubules which participate in transport of this precipitate. PMID:26591606

  20. Retinal photoreceptors and visual pigments in Boa constrictor imperator.

    PubMed

    Sillman, A J; Johnson, J L; Loew, E R

    2001-09-01

    The photoreceptors of Boa constrictor, a boid snake of the subfamily Boinae, were examined with scanning electron microscopy and microspectrophotometry. The retina of B. constrictor is duplex but highly dominated by rods, cones comprising 11% of the photoreceptor population. The rather tightly packed rods have relatively long outer segments with proximal ends that are somewhat tapered. There are two morphologically distinct, single cones. The most common cone by far has a large inner segment and a relatively stout outer segment. The second cone, seen only infrequently, has a substantially smaller inner segment and a finer outer segment. The visual pigments of B. constrictor are virtually identical to those of the pythonine boid, Python regius. Three different visual pigments are present, all based on vitamin A(1.) The visual pigment of the rods has a wavelength of peak absorbance (lambda(max)) at 495 +/- 2 nm. The visual pigment of the more common, large cone has a lambda(max) at 549 +/- 1 nm. The small, rare cone contains a visual pigment with lambda(max) at 357 +/- 2 nm, providing the snake with sensitivity in the ultraviolet. We suggest that B. constrictor might employ UV sensitivity to locate conspecifics and/or to improve hunting efficiency. The data indicate that wavelength discrimination above 430 nm would not be possible without some input from the rods. PMID:11550183

  1. Guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins in retinal pigment epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Meisheng; Tran, V.T.; Fong, H.K.W. ); Pandey, S. )

    1991-05-01

    The expression of GTP-binding regulatory proteins (G proteins) in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells was analyzed by RNA blot hybridization and cDNA amplification. Both adult and fetal human RPE cells contain mRNA for multiple G protein {alpha} subunits (G{alpha}) including G{sub s}{alpha}, G{sub i-1}{alpha}, G{sub i-2}{alpha}, G{sub i-3}{alpha}, and G{sub z}{alpha} (or G{sub x}{alpha}), where G{sub s} and G{sub i} are proteins that stimulate or inhibit adenylyl cyclase, respectively, and G{sub z} is a protein that may mediate pertussis toxin-insensitive events. Other G{alpha}-related mRNA transcripts were detected in fetal RPE cells by low-stringency hybridization to G{sub i-2}{alpha} and G{sub s}{alpha} protein-coding cDNA probes. The diversity of G proteins in RPE cells was further studied by cDNA amplification with reverse transcriptase and the polymerase chain reaction. This approach revealed that, besides the above mentioned members of the G{alpha} gene family, at least two other G{alpha} subunits are expressed in RPE cells. Human retinal cDNA clones that encode one of the additional G{alpha} subunits were isolated and characterized. The results indicate that this G{alpha} subunit belongs to a separate subfamily of G proteins that may be insensitive to inhibition by pertussis toxin.

  2. Subretinal transplantation of putative retinal pigment epithelial cells derived from human embryonic stem cells in rat retinal degeneration model

    PubMed Central

    Park, Un Chul; Cho, Myung Soo; Park, Jung Hyun; Kim, Sang Jin; Ku, Seung-Yup; Choi, Young Min; Moon, Shin Yong

    2011-01-01

    Objective To differentiate the human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) into the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) in the defined culture condition and determine its therapeutic potential for the treatment of retinal degenerative diseases. Methods The embryoid bodies were formed from hESCs and attached on the matrigel coated culture dishes. The neural structures consisting neural precursors were selected and expanded to form rosette structures. The mechanically isolated neural rosettes were differentiated into pigmented cells in the media comprised of N2 and B27. Expression profiles of markers related to RPE development were analyzed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunostaining. Dissociated putative RPE cells (105 cells/5 µL) were transplanted into the subretinal space of rat retinal degeneration model induced by intravenous sodium iodate injection. Animals were sacrificed at 1, 2, and 4 weeks after transplantation, and immnohistochemistry study was performed to verify the survival of the transplanted cells. Results The putative RPE cells derived from hESC showed characteristics of the human RPE cells morphologically and expressed molecular markers and associated with RPE fate. Grafted RPE cells were found to survive in the subretinal space up to 4 weeks after transplantation, and the expression of RPE markers was confirmed with immunohistochemistry. Conclusion Transplanted RPE cells derived from hESC in the defined culture condition successfully survived and migrated within subretinal space of rat retinal degeneration model. These results support the feasibility of the hESC derived RPE cells for cell-based therapies for retinal degenerative disease. PMID:22384445

  3. A new, albino-beige mouse: giant granules in retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Robison, W G; Kuwabara, T

    1978-04-01

    Albino-beige mice were produced in order to combine two experimentally useful characteristics, albinism and lysosomal dysfunction, in the same animal. The retinal pigment epithelium of albino-beige mice formed giant intracellular granules. Exposure of albino-beige mice to white light of 150 foot-candles for 3 to 10 hr induced marked phagocytosis of rod outer segment fragments by the retinal pigment epithelium, resulting in intracellular accumulations of undigested disk membranes within the giant granules. Additional, incompletely processed membranes accumulated as the mice aged or were exposed to 150 foot-candle light for longer periods. Such accumulations of ingested membranes were not observed in the pigment epithelium of exposed or aging albino mice heterozygous for the beige gene. Because of its altered processing of ingested outer segment membranes, this new albino mouse should be useful for studying the possible roles of the retinal pigment epithelium in the maintenance of photoreceptor cells and in their recovery from light damage and other insults. PMID:640784

  4. In vivo response of the rat's retinal pigment epithelium to azide at advanced stages of hereditary retinal dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Ando, H; Noell, W K

    1993-01-01

    Electrophysiological properties of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) were studied in the rat with hereditary retinal dystrophy (rdy). Transocular potential changes evoked by intravenous bolus injections of azide and thiocyanate (SCN-) are the only available indication of RPE state when degeneration of rods is in progress. Also determined were age-dependent decrease in retinal DNA content and in counts of cones that survive after degeneration of rods. The azide response in the pigmented and albino rdy rat was already reduced at the earliest age tested (60 d) and continued to decrease till the age of 2 years. The SCN-response was similarly affected but seemed to decline faster than the azide response. The azide/SCN- response ratio was significantly increased in albino mutants, especially around the age of 400 d. At the age of 10 months and later, the azide and SCN- responses became slower than those of normals. A prolonged exposure of 1,200 1x light to dystrophic rats older than 110 did not affect the azide and SCN- responses whereas the same exposure abolishes the responses of normal rats and of the dystrophic rats at early stages. In rdy rats, the electrophysiological changes were considered to correlate with structural changes of the junctional RPE complex and with abnormal membrane enzyme distribution discovered by others. These RPE changes may contribute to the decreasing cone cell number after rod cell disappearance. PMID:8230852

  5. Morphogenesis and cytodifferentiation of the avian retinal pigmented epithelium require downregulation of Group B1 Sox genes

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Yasuo; Weinberg, Kerry; Oda-Ishii, Izumi; Coughlin, Laura; Mikawa, Takashi

    2009-01-01

    Summary The optic vesicle is a multipotential primordium of the retina, which becomes subdivided into the neural retina and retinal pigmented epithelium domains. Although the roles of several paracrine factors in patterning the optic vesicle have been studied extensively, little is known about cell-autonomous mechanisms that regulate coordinated cell morphogenesis and cytodifferentiation of the retinal pigmented epithelium. Here we demonstrate that members of the SoxB1 gene family, Sox1, Sox2 and Sox3, are all downregulated in the presumptive retinal pigmented epithelium. Constitutive maintenance of SoxB1 expression in the presumptive retinal pigmented epithelium both in vivo and in vitro resulted in the absence of cuboidal morphology and pigmentation, and in concomitant induction of neural differentiation markers. We also demonstrate that exogenous Fgf4 inhibits downregulation all SoxB1 family members in the presumptive retinal pigment epithelium. These results suggest that retinal pigment epithelium morphogenesis and cytodifferentiation requires SoxB1 downregulation, which depends on the absence of exposure to an FGF-like signal. PMID:19570849

  6. Altered Cytoskeleton as a Mitochondrial Decay Signature in the Retinal Pigment Epithelium.

    PubMed

    Sripathi, Srinivas R; He, Weilue; Sylvester, O'Donnell; Neksumi, Musa; Um, Ji-Yeon; Dluya, Thagriki; Bernstein, Paul S; Jahng, Wan Jin

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondria mediate energy metabolism, apoptosis, and aging, while mitochondrial disruption leads to age-related diseases that include age-related macular degeneration. Descriptions of mitochondrial morphology have been non-systematic and qualitative, due to lack of knowledge on the molecular mechanism of mitochondrial dynamics. The current study analyzed mitochondrial size, shape, and position quantitatively in retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE) using a systematic computational model to suggest mitochondrial trafficking under oxidative environment. Our previous proteomic study suggested that prohibitin is a mitochondrial decay biomarker in the RPE. The current study examined the prohibitin interactome map using immunoprecipitation data to determine the indirect signaling on cytoskeletal changes and transcriptional regulation by prohibitin. Immunocytochemistry and immunoprecipitation demonstrated that there is a positive correlation between mitochondrial changes and altered filaments as well as prohibitin interactions with kinesin and unknown proteins in the RPE. Specific cytoskeletal and nuclear protein-binding mechanisms may exist to regulate prohibitin-mediated reactions as key elements, including vimentin and p53, to control apoptosis in mitochondria and the nucleus. Prohibitin may regulate mitochondrial trafficking through unknown proteins that include 110 kDa protein with myosin head domain and 88 kDa protein with cadherin repeat domain. Altered cytoskeleton may represent a mitochondrial decay signature in the RPE. The current study suggests that mitochondrial dynamics and cytoskeletal changes are critical for controlling mitochondrial distribution and function. Further, imbalance of retrograde versus anterograde mitochondrial trafficking may initiate the pathogenic reaction in adult-onset neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27029380

  7. Rod Photopigment Kinetics After Photodisruption of the Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Masella, Benjamin D.; Hunter, Jennifer J.; Williams, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Advances in retinal imaging have led to the discovery of long-lasting retinal changes caused by light exposures below published safety limits, including disruption of the RPE. To investigate the functional consequences of RPE disruption, we combined adaptive optics ophthalmoscopy with retinal densitometry. Methods. A modified adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) measured the apparent density and regeneration rate of rhodopsin in two macaques before and after four different 568-nm retinal radiant exposures (RREs; 400–3200 J/cm2). Optical coherence tomography (OCT) was used to measure the optical path length through the photoreceptor outer segments before and after RPE disruption. Results. All tested RREs caused visible RPE disruption. Apparent rhodopsin density was significantly reduced following 1600 (P = 0.01) and 3200 J/cm2 (P = 0.007) exposures. No significant change in apparent density was observed in response to 800 J/cm2. Surprisingly, exposure to 400 J/cm2 showed a significant increase in apparent density (P = 0.047). Rhodopsin recovery rate was not significantly affected by these RREs. Optical coherence tomography measurements showed a significant decrease in the optical path length through the photoreceptor outer segments for RREs above 800 J/cm2 (P < 0.001). Conclusions. At higher RREs, optical path length through the outer segments was reduced. However, the rate of photopigment regeneration was unchanged. While some ambiguity remains as to the correlation between measured reflectivity and absolute rhodopsin density; at the lowest RREs, RPE disruption appears not to be accompanied by a loss of apparent rhodopsin density, which would have been indicative of functional loss. PMID:25316724

  8. Phloroglucinol protects retinal pigment epithelium and photoreceptor against all-trans-retinal-induced toxicity and inhibits A2E formation.

    PubMed

    Cia, David; Cubizolle, Aurélie; Crauste, Céline; Jacquemot, Nathalie; Guillou, Laurent; Vigor, Claire; Angebault, Claire; Hamel, Christian P; Vercauteren, Joseph; Brabet, Philippe

    2016-09-01

    Among retinal macular diseases, the juvenile recessive Stargardt disease and the age-related degenerative disease arise from carbonyl and oxidative stresses (COS). Both stresses originate from an accumulation of all-trans-retinal (atRAL) and are involved in bisretinoid formation by condensation of atRAL with phosphatidylethanolamine (carbonyl stress) in the photoreceptor and its transformation into lipofuscin bisretinoids (oxidative stress) in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). As atRAL and bisretinoid accumulation contribute to RPE and photoreceptor cell death, our goal is to select powerful chemical inhibitors of COS. Here, we describe that phloroglucinol, a natural phenolic compound having anti-COS properties, protects both rat RPE and mouse photoreceptor primary cultures from atRAL-induced cell death and reduces hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 )-induced damage in RPE in a dose-dependent manner. Mechanistic analyses demonstrate that the protective effect encompasses decrease in atRAL-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species and free atRAL levels. Moreover, we show that phloroglucinol reacts with atRAL to form a chromene adduct which prevents bisretinoid A2E synthesis in vitro. Taken together, these data show that the protective effect of phloroglucinol correlates with its ability to trap atRAL and to prevent its further transformation into deleterious bisretinoids. Phloroglucinol might be a good basis to develop efficient therapeutic derivatives in the treatment of retinal macular diseases. PMID:27072643

  9. Pseudotumoral and Multiple Retinal Pigment Epithelium Proliferation in Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada Disease.

    PubMed

    Yepez, Juan B; Murati, Felipe; Petitto, Michele; Arevalo, J Fernando

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of pseudotumoral retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) proliferation in Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada (VKH) disease, in a 50-year-old female who presented with a juxtapapillary and peripheral subretinal hyperpigmented lesions in the left eye and "sunset glow fundus," hyperpigmented striae, and multiple atrophic chorioretinal spots in the periphery. The darkly pigmented exuberant larger subretinal mass extended to the periphery with associated subretinal fibrosis. This patient demonstrated the entire clinical presentation of VKH disease, which tends to course with a chronic, bilateral, granulomatous panuveitis and exudative retinal detachment associated with poliosis, vitiligo, alopecia, and central nervous system and auditory signs. Our case is unique for the presence of exuberant, pseudotumoral RPE proliferation at the juxtapapillary region and peripheral area. Although this complication has rarely been reported, a high index of suspicion is warranted for early diagnosis and avoids unnecessary treatments of a pseudotumor. PMID:26509089

  10. Pseudotumoral and Multiple Retinal Pigment Epithelium Proliferation in Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yepez, Juan B.; Murati, Felipe; Petitto, Michele; Arevalo, J. Fernando

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of pseudotumoral retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) proliferation in Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada (VKH) disease, in a 50-year-old female who presented with a juxtapapillary and peripheral subretinal hyperpigmented lesions in the left eye and “sunset glow fundus,” hyperpigmented striae, and multiple atrophic chorioretinal spots in the periphery. The darkly pigmented exuberant larger subretinal mass extended to the periphery with associated subretinal fibrosis. This patient demonstrated the entire clinical presentation of VKH disease, which tends to course with a chronic, bilateral, granulomatous panuveitis and exudative retinal detachment associated with poliosis, vitiligo, alopecia, and central nervous system and auditory signs. Our case is unique for the presence of exuberant, pseudotumoral RPE proliferation at the juxtapapillary region and peripheral area. Although this complication has rarely been reported, a high index of suspicion is warranted for early diagnosis and avoids unnecessary treatments of a pseudotumor. PMID:26509089

  11. Altered aldose reductase gene regulation in cultured human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Henry, D N; Del Monte, M; Greene, D A; Killen, P D

    1993-01-01

    Aldose reductase (AR2), a putative "hypertonicity stress protein" whose gene is induced by hyperosmolarity, protects renal medullary cells against the interstitial hyperosmolarity of antidiuresis by catalyzing the synthesis of millimolar concentrations of intracellular sorbitol from glucose. Although AR2 gene induction has been noted in a variety of renal and nonrenal cells subjected to hypertonic stress in vitro, the functional significance of AR2 gene expression in cells not normally exposed to a hyperosmolar milieu is not fully understood. The physiological impact of basal AR2 expression in such cells may be limited to hyperglycemic states in which AR2 promotes pathological polyol accumulation, a mechanism invoked in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. Since AR2 overexpression in the retinal pigment epithelium has been associated with diabetic retinopathy, the regulation of AR2 gene expression and associated changes in sorbitol and myo-inositol were studied in human retinal pigment epithelial cells in culture. The relative abundance of aldehyde reductase (AR1) and AR2 mRNA was quantitated by filter hybridization of RNA from several human retinal pigment epithelial cell lines exposed to hyperglycemic and hyperosmolar conditions in vitro. AR2 but not AR1 mRNA was significantly increased some 11- to 18-fold by hyperosmolarity in several retinal pigment epithelial cell lines. A single cell line with a 15-fold higher basal level of AR2 mRNA than other cell lines tested demonstrated no significant increase in AR2 mRNA in response to hypertonic stress. This cell line demonstrated accelerated and exaggerated production of sorbitol and depletion of myo-inositol upon exposure to 20 mM glucose. Therefore, abnormal AR2 expression may enhance the sensitivity of cells to the biochemical consequences of hyperglycemia potentiating the development of diabetic complications. Images PMID:8349800

  12. Familial bilateral combined hamartoma of retina and retinal pigment epithelium associated with neurofibromatosis 1.

    PubMed

    Yassin, Sanaa A; Al-Tamimi, Elham R

    2012-04-01

    We report a family of three siblings followed between 2005 and 2011 with bilateral combined hamartoma of the retina and retinal pigment epithelium, with the age of diagnosis ranging from 7 to 13 years. The main reason for consultation was reduction of vision and squint. The diagnosis was determined based on the clinical findings on fundus examination: increased pigmentation at the macula with slightly elevated, gray-white macular lesion, tortuosity of perimacular blood vessels and glial epiretinal membrane. The elder brother was found to have left posterior subcapsular cataract. He was also confirmed to have neurofibromatosis type 1, the youngest sister fit in the diagnostic criteria for neurofibromatosis type 1, while the middle sister was presumed to have neurofibromatosis type 1. Follow-up showed stability of the retinal lesion in the three cases, with the progression to develop right posterior subcapsular cataract in the elder sister. This report is aimed to demonstrate that the occurrence of bilateral combined hamartoma of the retina and retinal pigment epithelium could raise the possibility of associated neurofibromatosis. PMID:23960997

  13. Expression of pigment epithelium‐derived factor and thrombospondin‐1 regulate proliferation and migration of retinal pigment epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Farnoodian, Mitra; Kinter, James B.; Yadranji Aghdam, Saeed; Zaitoun, Ismail; Sorenson, Christine M.; Sheibani, Nader

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Age‐related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss among elderly. Although the pathogenesis of AMD is associated with retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) dysfunction and abnormal neovascularization the detailed mechanisms remain unresolved. RPE is a specialized monolayer of epithelial cells with important functions in ocular homeostasis. Pathological RPE damage contributes to major ocular conditions including retinal degeneration and irreversible loss of vision in AMD. RPE cells also assist in the maintenance of the ocular angiogenic balance by production of positive and negative regulatory factors including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), thrombospondin‐1 (TSP1), and pigment epithelium‐derived factor (PEDF). The altered production of PEDF and TSP1, as endogenous inhibitors of angiogenesis and inflammation, by RPE cells have been linked to pathogenesis of AMD and choroidal and retinal neovascularization. However, lack of simple methods for isolation and culture of mouse RPE cells has resulted in limited knowledge regarding the cell autonomous role of TSP1 and PEDF in RPE cell function. Here, we describe a method for routine isolation and propagation of RPE cells from wild‐type, TSP1, and PEDF‐deficient mice, and have investigated their impact on RPE cell function. We showed that expression of TSP1 and PEDF significantly impacted RPE cell proliferation, migration, adhesion, oxidative state, and phagocytic activity with minimal effect on their basal rate of apoptosis. Together, our results indicated that the expression of PEDF and TSP1 by RPE cells play crucial roles not only in regulation of ocular vascular homeostasis but also have significant impact on their cellular function. PMID:25602019

  14. Relative permeability of retina and retinal pigment epithelium to the diffusion of tritiated water from vitreous to choroid

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, G.; Goodnight, R.; Lean, J.S.

    1986-11-01

    The movement of intravitreally injected tritiated water from the vitreous to the choroid was accelerated by the removal of intervening retina. Both rate of transfer and peak choroidal levels of the tracer were increased, but the proportion of the intravitreal dose recovered was unaltered. In contrast, the movement of tritiated water after diffuse damage to the retinal pigment epithelium by sodium iodate was similar to that of control eyes. The main resistance to the diffusion of this tracer from the vitreous to the choroid is the retina. The differential permeability of the retina and the retinal pigment epithelium may have a role in normal retinal adhesion.

  15. Histochemical study of retinal photoreceptors development during pre- and postnatal period and their association with retinal pigment epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, Vahid; Vojoudi, Elham; Fazel, Alireza; Ebrahimzadeh-bideskan, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): The aim of this study was to evaluate distribution and changes of glycoconjugates of retinal photoreceptors during both pre- and postnatal development. Materials and Methods: Tissue sections from days 15 to 20 of Wistar rat embryos and 1 to 12 postnatal days of rat newborns including developing eye were prepared for lectinhistochemistry technique. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-labeled lectins including Vicia villosa (VVA), peanut agglutinin (PNA), Maclura pomifera (MPA) and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA-ІІ) were used. Alcian blue (pH 2.5) was used for counterstaining. Results: Interphotoreceptor matrix (IPM) plays a crucial role in photoreceptors differentiation and acts as a mediator in interactions between photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Specific cell surface glycoconjugates secreted from cone cells could help us to distinguish these cells from rod photoreceptors. Our results for the first time revealed the strong reaction of cone photoreceptors with the cone-specific lectin (PNA) at postnatal day 12 (P12). Postnatal day 12 can be determined as the final differentiation of cone photoreceptors. Conclusion: According to our findings, we suggest that the generation of the eye photoreceptors begins from pre- natal period and their final differentiations will continue to postnatal period. Glycoconjugates including (β-D-Gal [1-3]-D-GalNac) and (β-D-Gal) terminal sugars play a critical role in the pre- and postnatal development and differentiation of retinal photoreceptors. PMID:25429338

  16. Effect of bevacizumab (Avastin™) on mitochondrial function of in vitro retinal pigment epithelial, neurosensory retinal and microvascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Luthra, Saurabh; Sharma, Ashish; Dong, Joyce; Neekhra, Aneesh; Gramajo, Ana L; Seigel, Gail M; Kenney, M Cristina; Kuppermann, Baruch D

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of bevacizumab on the mitochondrial function of human retinal pigment epithelial (ARPE-19), rat neurosensory retinal (R28) and human microvascular endothelial (HMVEC) cells in culture. Materials and Methods: ARPE-19 and R28 cells were treated with 0.125, 0.25, 0.50 and 1 mg/ml of bevacizumab. The HMVEC cultures were treated with 0.125, 0.25, 0.50 and 1 mg/ml of bevacizumab or 1 mg/ml of immunoglobulin G (control). Mitochondrial function assessed by mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity (MDA) was determined using the WST-1 assay. Results: Bevacizumab doses of 0.125 to 1 mg/ml for 5 days did not significantly affect the MDA of ARPE-19 cells. Bevacizumab treatment at 0.125 and 0.25 mg/ml (clinical dose) did not significantly affect the MDA of R28 cells; however, 0.50 and 1 mg/ml doses significantly reduced the R28 cell mitochondrial function. All doses of bevacizumab significantly reduced the MDA of proliferating and non-proliferating HMVEC. Conclusion: Bevacizumab exposure for 5 days was safe at clinical doses in both ARPE-19 and R28 retinal neurosensory cells in culture. By contrast, bevacizumab exposure at all doses show a significant dose-dependent decrease in mitochondrial activity in both the proliferating and non-proliferating HMVEC in vitro. This suggests a selective action of bevacizumab on endothelial cells at clinical doses. PMID:24413824

  17. Aliskiren inhibits the renin-angiotensin system in retinal pigment epithelium cells.

    PubMed

    Simão, Sónia; Santos, Daniela F; Silva, Gabriela A

    2016-09-20

    Observations of increased angiotensin II levels and activation of the (pro)renin receptor in retinopathies support the role of ocular renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in the development of retinal diseases. While targeting RAS presents significant therapeutic potential, current RAS-based therapies are ineffective halting the progression of these diseases. A new class of drugs, the direct renin inhibitors such as aliskiren, is a potential therapeutic alternative. However, it is unclear how aliskiren acts in the retina, in particular in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), the structure responsible for the maintenance of retinal homeostasis whose role is deeply compromised in retinal diseases. We firstly analyzed the expression and activity of the main RAS components in RPE cells. Time- and concentration-dependent treatments with aliskiren were performed to modulate different pathways of the RAS in RPE cells. Our data demonstrate that RPE cells express the main RAS constituents. Exposure of RPE cells to aliskiren inhibited the activity of renin and consequently decreased the levels of angiotensin II. Additionally, aliskiren reduced the translocation of the (pro)renin receptor to the cellular membrane of RPE cells preventing the activation of ERK1/2. Our findings of the RPE well-defined RAS, together with the demonstration that aliskiren effectively blocks this system at different steps of the cascade, suggest that aliskiren might be an alternative and successful drug in preventing the deleterious effects derived from the overactivation of the RAS, known to contribute to the pathogenesis of different retinal diseases. PMID:27343695

  18. Overexpression of Snail in retinal pigment epithelial triggered epithelial–mesenchymal transition

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hui; Li, Min; Xu, Ding; Zhao, Chun; Liu, Guodong; Wang, Fang

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • First reported overexpression of Snail in RPE cells could directly trigger EMT. • Further confirmed the regulator role of Snail in RPE cells EMT in vitro. • Snail may be a potential therapeutic target to prevent the fibrosis of PVR. - Abstract: Snail transcription factor has been implicated as an important regulator in epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) during tumourigenesis and fibrogenesis. Our previous work showed that Snail transcription factor was activated in transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) induced EMT in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and may contribute to the development of retinal fibrotic disease such as proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR). However, whether Snail alone has a direct role on retinal pigment epithelial–mesenchymal transition has not been investigated. Here, we analyzed the capacity of Snail to drive EMT in human RPE cells. A vector encoding Snail gene or an empty vector were transfected into human RPE cell lines ARPE-19 respectively. Snail overexpression in ARPE-19 cells resulted in EMT, which was characterized by the expected phenotypic transition from a typical epithelial morphology to mesenchymal spindle-shaped. The expression of epithelial markers E-cadherin and Zona occludin-1 (ZO-1) were down-regulated, whereas mesenchymal markers a-smooth muscle actin (a-SMA) and fibronectin were up-regulated in Snail expression vector transfected cells. In addition, ectopic expression of Snail significantly enhanced ARPE-19 cell motility and migration. The present data suggest that overexpression of Snail in ARPE-19 cells could directly trigger EMT. These results may provide novel insight into understanding the regulator role of Snail in the development of retinal pigment epithelial–mesenchymal transition.

  19. Origins of adult pigmentation: diversity in pigment stem cell lineages and implications for pattern evolution

    PubMed Central

    Spiewak, Jessica E.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Teleosts comprise about half of all vertebrate species and exhibit an extraordinary diversity of adult pigment patterns that function in shoaling, camouflage and mate choice and have played important roles in speciation. Here, we review recent studies that have identified several distinct neural crest lineages, with distinct genetic requirements, that give rise to adult pigment cells in fishes. These lineages include post-embryonic, peripheral nerve associated stem cells that generate black melanophores and iridescent iridophores, cells derived directly from embryonic neural crest cells that generate yellow-orange xanthophores, and bipotent stem cells that generate both melanophores and xanthophores. This complexity in adult chromatophore lineages has implications for our understanding of adult traits, melanoma, and the evolutionary diversification of pigment cell lineages and patterns. PMID:25421288

  20. MicroRNA Expression Profiles of Human iPS Cells, Retinal Pigment Epithelium Derived From iPS, and Fetal Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Whitney A.; Muñiz, Alberto.; Plamper, Mark L.; Kaini, Ramesh R.; Wang, Heuy-Ching

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this report is to describe the protocols for comparing the microRNA (miRNA) profiles of human induced-pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) derived from human iPS cells (iPS-RPE), and fetal RPE. The protocols include collection of RNA for analysis by microarray, and the analysis of microarray data to identify miRNAs that are differentially expressed among three cell types. The methods for culture of iPS cells and fetal RPE are explained. The protocol used for differentiation of RPE from human iPS is also described. The RNA extraction technique we describe was selected to allow maximal recovery of very small RNA for use in a miRNA microarray. Finally, cellular pathway and network analysis of microarray data is explained. These techniques will facilitate the comparison of the miRNA profiles of three different cell types. PMID:24999033

  1. Structure and Conformation of the Carotenoids in Human Retinal Macular Pigment.

    PubMed

    Arteni, Ana-Andreea; Fradot, Mathias; Galzerano, Denise; Mendes-Pinto, Maria M; Sahel, José-Alain; Picaud, Serge; Robert, Bruno; Pascal, Andrew A

    2015-01-01

    Human retinal macular pigment (MP) is formed by the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin (including the isomer meso-zeaxanthin). MP has several functions in improving visual performance and protecting against the damaging effects of light, and MP levels are used as a proxy for macular health-specifically, to predict the likelihood of developing age-related macular degeneration. While the roles of these carotenoids in retinal health have been the object of intense study in recent years, precise mechanistic details of their protective action remain elusive. We have measured the Raman signals originating from MP carotenoids in ex vivo human retinal tissue, in order to assess their structure and conformation. We show that it is possible to distinguish between lutein and zeaxanthin, by their excitation profile (related to their absorption spectra) and the position of their ν1 Raman mode. In addition, analysis of the ν4 Raman band indicates that these carotenoids are present in a specific, constrained conformation in situ, consistent with their binding to specific proteins as postulated in the literature. We discuss how these conclusions relate to the function of these pigments in macular protection. We also address the possibilities for a more accurate, consistent measurement of MP levels by Raman spectroscopy. PMID:26313550

  2. Structure and Conformation of the Carotenoids in Human Retinal Macular Pigment

    PubMed Central

    Arteni, Ana-Andreea; Fradot, Mathias; Galzerano, Denise; Mendes-Pinto, Maria M.; Sahel, José-Alain; Picaud, Serge; Robert, Bruno; Pascal, Andrew A.

    2015-01-01

    Human retinal macular pigment (MP) is formed by the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin (including the isomer meso-zeaxanthin). MP has several functions in improving visual performance and protecting against the damaging effects of light, and MP levels are used as a proxy for macular health–specifically, to predict the likelihood of developing age-related macular degeneration. While the roles of these carotenoids in retinal health have been the object of intense study in recent years, precise mechanistic details of their protective action remain elusive. We have measured the Raman signals originating from MP carotenoids in ex vivo human retinal tissue, in order to assess their structure and conformation. We show that it is possible to distinguish between lutein and zeaxanthin, by their excitation profile (related to their absorption spectra) and the position of their ν1 Raman mode. In addition, analysis of the ν4 Raman band indicates that these carotenoids are present in a specific, constrained conformation in situ, consistent with their binding to specific proteins as postulated in the literature. We discuss how these conclusions relate to the function of these pigments in macular protection. We also address the possibilities for a more accurate, consistent measurement of MP levels by Raman spectroscopy. PMID:26313550

  3. Reprogramming of adult rod photoreceptors prevents retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Montana, Cynthia L.; Kolesnikov, Alexander V.; Shen, Susan Q.; Myers, Connie A.; Kefalov, Vladimir J.; Corbo, Joseph C.

    2013-01-01

    A prime goal of regenerative medicine is to direct cell fates in a therapeutically useful manner. Retinitis pigmentosa is one of the most common degenerative diseases of the eye and is associated with early rod photoreceptor death followed by secondary cone degeneration. We hypothesized that converting adult rods into cones, via knockdown of the rod photoreceptor determinant Nrl, could make the cells resistant to the effects of mutations in rod-specific genes, thereby preventing secondary cone loss. To test this idea, we engineered a tamoxifen-inducible allele of Nrl to acutely inactivate the gene in adult rods. This manipulation resulted in reprogramming of rods into cells with a variety of cone-like molecular, histologic, and functional properties. Moreover, reprogramming of adult rods achieved cellular and functional rescue of retinal degeneration in a mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa. These findings suggest that elimination of Nrl in adult rods may represent a unique therapy for retinal degeneration. PMID:23319618

  4. Pigmented epithelium induces complete retinal reconstitution from dispersed embryonic chick retinae in reaggregation culture.

    PubMed Central

    Rothermel, A; Willbold, E; Degrip, W J; Layer, P G

    1997-01-01

    Reaggregation of dispersed retinal cells of the chick embryo leads to histotypic retinospheroids in which the laminar organization remains incomplete: photoreceptors form rosettes which are surrounded by constituents of the other retinal layers. Here, for the first time, a complete arrangement of layers is achieved in cellular spheres (stratoids), provided that fully dispersed retinal cells are younger than embryonic day E6, and are reaggregated in the presence of a monolayer of retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE). A remarkable mechanism of stratoid formation from 1 to 15 days in vitro is revealed by the establishment of a radial Müller glia scaffold and of photoreceptors. During the first two days of reaggregation on RPE, rosettes are still observed. At this stage immunostaining with vimentin and F11 antibodies for radial Müller glia reveal a disorganized pattern. Subsequently, radial glia processes organize into long parallel fibre bundles which are arranged like spokes to stabilize the surface and centre of the stratoid. The opsin-specific antibody CERN 901 detects photoreceptors as they gradually build up an outer nuclear layer at the surface. These findings assign to the RPE a decisive role for the genesis and regeneration of a vertebrate retina. PMID:9332014

  5. Planar Microdevices Enhance Transport of Large Molecular Weight Molecules Across Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wade, Jennifer S.; Desai, Tejal A.

    2014-01-01

    Large molecular weight drug delivery to the posterior eye is challenging due to cellular barriers that hinder drug transport. Understanding how to enhance transport across the retinal barrier is important for the design of new drug delivery systems. A novel mechanism to enhance drug transport is the use of geometric properties, which has not been extensively explored in the retina. Planar SU-8/ Poly(ethyleneglycol)dimethacrylate microdevices were constructed using photolithography to deliver FITC dextran across an in vitro retinal model. The model consists of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells grown to confluence on transwell inserts, which provides an environment to investigate the influence of geometry on paracellular and transcellular delivery of encapsulated large molecules. Planar microdevices enhanced transport of large molecular weight dextrans across different models of RPE in a size dependent fashion. Increased drug permeation across the RPE was observed with the addition of microdevices as compared to a traditional bolus of FITC dextran. This phenomena was initiated by a non-toxic interaction between the microdevices and the retinal tight junction proteins. Suggesting that increased drug transport occurs via a paracellular pathway. These experiments provide evidence to support the future use of planar unidirectional microdevices for delivery of biologics in ocular applications. PMID:24789225

  6. Monte Carlo investigation on quantifying the retinal pigment epithelium melanin concentration by photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Xiao; Liu, Wenzhong; Zhang, Hao F.

    2015-10-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) melanin plays an important role in maintaining normal visual functions. A decrease in the RPE melanin concentration with aging is believed to be associated with several blinding diseases, including age-related macular degeneration. Quantifying the RPE melanin noninvasively is therefore important in evaluating the retinal health and aging conditions. Photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy (PAOM), as an optical absorption-based imaging technology, can potentially be applied to measure variations in the RPE melanin if the relationship between the detected photoacoustic (PA) signal amplitudes and the RPE melanin concentrations can be established. In this work, we tested the feasibility of using PA signals from retinal blood vessels as references to measure RPE melanin variation using Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. The influences from PAOM axial resolution, the depth and diameter of the retinal blood vessel, and the RPE thickness were examined. We proposed a calibration scheme by relating detected PA signals to the RPE melanin concentrations, and we found that the scheme is robust to these tested parameters. This study suggests that PAOM has the capability of quantitatively measuring the RPE melanin in vivo.

  7. Delayed near-infrared analysis permits visualization of rodent retinal pigment epithelium layer in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankova, Natalie; Zhao, Xu; Liang, Huiyuan; Baek, David Sung Hyeon; Wang, Hai; Boyd, Shelley

    2014-07-01

    Patches of atrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) have not been described in rodent models of retinal degeneration, as they have the clinical setting using fundus autofluorescence. We hypothesize that prelabeling the RPE would increase contrast and allow for improved visualization of RPE loss in vivo. Here, we demonstrate a new technique termed "delayed near-infrared analysis (DNIRA)" that permits ready detection of rat RPE, using optical imaging in the near-infrared (IR) spectrum with aid of indocyanine green (ICG) dye. Using DNIRA, we demonstrate a fluorescent RPE signal that is detected using confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy up to 28 days following ICG injection. This signal is apparent only after ICG injection, is dose dependent, requires the presence of the ICG filters (795/810 nm excitation/emission), does not appear in the IR reflectance channel, and is eliminated in the presence of sodium iodate, a toxin that causes RPE loss. Rat RPE explants confirm internalization of ICG dye. Together with normal retinal electrophysiology, these findings demonstrate that DNIRA is a new and safe noninvasive optical imaging technique for in vivo visualization of the RPE in models of retinal disease.

  8. Massive Retinal Pigment Epithelial Detachment Following Acute Hypokalemic Quadriparesis in Dengue Fever

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Neha; Bhambhwani, Vishaal; Jain, Pooja; Ghosh, Basudeb

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To describe an unusual retinal manifestation of dengue fever in an endemic region. Case Report: A 35 year old male presenting with acute onset decreased vision in his right eye, was found to have a massive retinal pigment epithelial detachment (PED) extending up to the vascular arcades. He had been diagnosed with acute hypokalemic quadriparesis in dengue fever in the preceding week, which had resolved following treatment. The patient was managed conservatively. At three months follow up, there was spontaneous flattening of the PEDs with improvement in visual acuity. Conclusion: Dengue fever complicated by acute hypokalemic quadriparesis can be associated with PED, which can be large. The condition resolves spontaneously and bears a good prognosis.

  9. Differentiation of cones in cultured rabbit retina: effects of retinal pigment epithelial cell-conditioned medium.

    PubMed

    Mack, Andreas F; Uhlmann, Daniela; Germer, Angela; Szél, Agoston; Enzmann, Volker; Reichenbach, Andreas

    2003-04-24

    This study was aimed at investigating the postnatal differentiation of cone photoreceptors in the rabbit retina in an organotypic explant culture system. Both short wavelength (S) and middle wavelength (M) cone opsins were expressed in culture but M cones appeared only in retinal explants from the dorsal half of the eye. Stimulating the explants with retinal pigment epithelial cell (RPE) conditioned medium resulted in a suppression of opsin expression despite of an increase of the number of presumptive peanut agglutinin-labeled cones. These results suggest that at birth the immature cones are largely undetermined in terms of their final cone identity although some positional information ('dorsal' vs. 'ventral' retina) is present. Furthermore, factors from RPE may inhibit as well as stimulate different steps of cone cell differentiation. PMID:12676342

  10. MECHANISMS FOR COUNTERING OXIDATIVE STRESS AND DAMAGE IN RETINAL PIGMENT EPITHELIUM

    PubMed Central

    Plafker, Scott M.; O’Mealey, Gary B.; Szweda, Luke I.

    2013-01-01

    Clinical and experimental evidence supports that chronic oxidative stress is a primary contributing factor to numerous retinal degenerative diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Eyes obtained postmortem from AMD patients have extensive free radical damage to the proteins, lipids, DNA, and mitochondria of their retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. In addition, several mouse models of chronic oxidative stress develop many of the pathological hallmarks of AMD. However, the extent to which oxidative stress is an etiologic component versus its involvement in disease progression remains a major unanswered question. Further, whether the primary target of oxidative stress and damage is photoreceptors or RPE cells, or both, is still unclear. In this review, we discuss the major functions of RPE cells with an emphasis on the oxidative challenges these cells encounter and the endogenous antioxidant mechanisms employed to neutralize the deleterious effects that such stresses can elicit if left unchecked. PMID:22878106

  11. Regulation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated transcription in human retinal pigmented epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hong Lan; Jeong, Kwang Won

    2016-04-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor with pleiotropic effects in normal physiology or vascular development, xenobiotic metabolism, and cancer. A previous study has reported that BRG1, a component of the SWI/SNF complex, is a coactivator for AHR and is recruited to the promoter region of the CYP1A1 gene in mouse hepatocytes. Recent data suggest that AHR is also expressed in human retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19), which play a crucial role in retinal physiology and the visual cycle. Multiple studies have shown that the AHR plays an important role in the pathogenesis of retinal diseases including age-related macular degeneration. However, the mechanism of AHR transcriptional activation in retinal pigment cells has not been reported. Here, we demonstrate that the AHR signaling pathway is active in ARPE-19 cells, as in hepatocytes, but with different target gene specificity. We also found that chromatin remodeling by the BRG1-containing SWI/SNF complex is required for the AHR-mediated expression of target genes in ARPE-19 cells. We identified a novel enhancer region (-12 kb) of the CYP1A1 gene in ARPE-19 cells, to which both AHR and BRG1 are recruited in a ligand-dependent manner. BRG1 is associated with the AHR in ARPE-19 cells, and the C-terminal activation domain of the AHR directly interacts with BRG1. Furthermore, depletion of BRG1 caused a reduction in chromatin accessibility at the CYP1A1 enhancer. These results suggest that ARPE-19 cells possess an AHR-mediated transcription pathway with different target gene specificity, and that BRG1 is required for AHR-mediated transcription in ARPE-19 cells. PMID:26966070

  12. Distribution of melanosomes across the retinal pigment epithelium of a hooded rat: implications for light damage

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, W.L.; Rapp, L.M.; Williams, T.P.

    1982-02-01

    Distribution of melanosomes across the retinal pigment epithelium of hooded rats (Long-Evans) is studied at the light microscopic and electron microscopic levels. This distribution is shown to be nonuniform: more melanosomes exist in the periphery than elsewhere and, importantly, there are very few melanosomes in a restricted area of the central portion of the superior hemisphere compared with the corresponding part of the inferior hemisphere. The region with fewest melanosomes is precisely the one that is highly susceptible to light damage. Because this region is the same in both pigmented and albino eyes, the paucity of melanin in this region is not the cause of its great sensitivity to light damage. Nor does light cause the nonuniform distribution of melanin. A possible explanation, involving a proposed vestigial tapetum, is given in order to explain the correlation of melanosome counts and sensitivity to light damage.

  13. Light-Induced Retinal Changes Observed with High-Resolution Autofluorescence Imaging of the Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Jessica I. W.; Hunter, Jennifer J.; Masella, Benjamin; Wolfe, Robert; Gray, Daniel C.; Merigan, William H.; Delori, François C.; Williams, David R.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Autofluorescence fundus imaging using an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) allows for imaging of individual retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in vivo. In this study, the potential of retinal damage was investigated by using radiant exposure levels that are 2 to 150 times those used for routine imaging. Methods Macaque retinas were imaged in vivo with a fluorescence AOSLO. The retina was exposed to 568- or 830-nm light for 15 minutes at various intensities over a square ½° per side. Pre-and immediate postexposure images of the photoreceptors and RPE cells were taken over a 2° field. Long-term AOSLO imaging was performed intermittently from 5 to 165 days after exposure. Exposures delivered over a uniform field were also investigated. Results Exposures to 568-nm light caused an immediate decrease in autofluorescence of RPE cells. Follow-up imaging revealed either full recovery of autofluorescence or long-term damage in the RPE cells at the exposure. The outcomes of AOSLO exposures and uniform field exposures of equal average power were not significantly different. No effects from 830-nm exposures were observed. Conclusions The study revealed a novel change in RPE autofluorescence induced by 568-nm light exposure. Retinal damage occurred as a direct result of total average power, independent of the light-delivery method. Because the exposures were near or below permissible levels in laser safety standards, these results suggest that caution should be used with exposure of the retina to visible light and that the safety standards should be re-evaluated for these exposure conditions. PMID:18408191

  14. Gene Expression Analysis of Zebrafish Melanocytes, Iridophores, and Retinal Pigmented Epithelium Reveals Indicators of Biological Function and Developmental Origin

    PubMed Central

    Higdon, Charles W.; Mitra, Robi D.; Johnson, Stephen L.

    2013-01-01

    In order to facilitate understanding of pigment cell biology, we developed a method to concomitantly purify melanocytes, iridophores, and retinal pigmented epithelium from zebrafish, and analyzed their transcriptomes. Comparing expression data from these cell types and whole embryos allowed us to reveal gene expression co-enrichment in melanocytes and retinal pigmented epithelium, as well as in melanocytes and iridophores. We found 214 genes co-enriched in melanocytes and retinal pigmented epithelium, indicating the shared functions of melanin-producing cells. We found 62 genes significantly co-enriched in melanocytes and iridophores, illustrative of their shared developmental origins from the neural crest. This is also the first analysis of the iridophore transcriptome. Gene expression analysis for iridophores revealed extensive enrichment of specific enzymes to coordinate production of their guanine-based reflective pigment. We speculate the coordinated upregulation of specific enzymes from several metabolic pathways recycles the rate-limiting substrate for purine synthesis, phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate, thus constituting a guanine cycle. The purification procedure and expression analysis described here, along with the accompanying transcriptome-wide expression data, provide the first mRNA sequencing data for multiple purified zebrafish pigment cell types, and will be a useful resource for further studies of pigment cell biology. PMID:23874447

  15. A Regulatory Loop Involving PAX6, MITF, and WNT Signaling Controls Retinal Pigment Epithelium Development

    PubMed Central

    Bharti, Kapil; Gasper, Melanie; Ou, Jingxing; Brucato, Martha; Clore-Gronenborn, Katharina; Pickel, James; Arnheiter, Heinz

    2012-01-01

    The separation of the optic neuroepithelium into future retina and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a critical event in early eye development in vertebrates. Here we show in mice that the transcription factor PAX6, well-known for its retina-promoting activity, also plays a crucial role in early pigment epithelium development. This role is seen, however, only in a background genetically sensitized by mutations in the pigment cell transcription factor MITF. In fact, a reduction in Pax6 gene dose exacerbates the RPE-to-retina transdifferentiation seen in embryos homozygous for an Mitf null allele, and it induces such a transdifferentiation in embryos that are either heterozygous for the Mitf null allele or homozygous for an RPE–specific hypomorphic Mitf allele generated by targeted mutation. Conversely, an increase in Pax6 gene dose interferes with transdifferentiation even in homozygous Mitf null embryos. Gene expression analyses show that, together with MITF or its paralog TFEC, PAX6 suppresses the expression of Fgf15 and Dkk3. Explant culture experiments indicate that a combination of FGF and DKK3 promote retina formation by inhibiting canonical WNT signaling and stimulating the expression of retinogenic genes, including Six6 and Vsx2. Our results demonstrate that in conjunction with Mitf/Tfec Pax6 acts as an anti-retinogenic factor, whereas in conjunction with retinogenic genes it acts as a pro-retinogenic factor. The results suggest that careful manipulation of the Pax6 regulatory circuit may facilitate the generation of retinal and pigment epithelium cells from embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells. PMID:22792072

  16. Diacylglycerol O-Acyltransferase Type-1 Synthesizes Retinyl Esters in the Retina and Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Kaylor, Joanna J.; Radu, Roxana A.; Bischoff, Nicholas; Makshanoff, Jacob; Hu, Jane; Lloyd, Marcia; Eddington, Shannan; Bianconi, Tran; Bok, Dean; Travis, Gabriel H.

    2015-01-01

    Retinyl esters represent an insoluble storage form of vitamin A and are substrates for the retinoid isomerase (Rpe65) in cells of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). The major retinyl-ester synthase in RPE cells is lecithin:retinol acyl-transferase (LRAT). A second palmitoyl coenzyme A-dependent retinyl-ester synthase activity has been observed in RPE homogenates but the protein responsible has not been identified. Here we show that diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase-1 (DGAT1) is expressed in multiple cells of the retina including RPE and Müller glial cells. DGAT1 catalyzes the synthesis of retinyl esters from multiple retinol isomers with similar catalytic efficiencies. Loss of DGAT1 in dgat1 -/- mice has no effect on retinal anatomy or the ultrastructure of photoreceptor outer-segments (OS) and RPE cells. Levels of visual chromophore in dgat1 -/- mice were also normal. However, the normal build-up of all-trans-retinyl esters (all-trans-RE’s) in the RPE during the first hour after a deep photobleach of visual pigments in the retina was not seen in dgat1 -/- mice. Further, total retinyl-ester synthase activity was reduced in both dgat1 -/- retina and RPE. PMID:25974161

  17. Magnetic Nanoparticles as Intraocular Drug Delivery System to Target Retinal Pigmented Epithelium (RPE)

    PubMed Central

    Giannaccini, Martina; Giannini, Marianna; Calatayud, M. Pilar; Goya, Gerardo F.; Cuschieri, Alfred; Dente, Luciana; Raffa, Vittoria

    2014-01-01

    One of the most challenging efforts in drug delivery is the targeting of the eye. The eye structure and barriers render this organ poorly permeable to drugs. Quite recently the entrance of nanoscience in ocular drug delivery has improved the penetration and half-life of drugs, especially in the anterior eye chamber, while targeting the posterior chamber is still an open issue. The retina and the retinal pigment epithelium/choroid tissues, located in the posterior eye chamber, are responsible for the majority of blindness both in childhood and adulthood. In the present study, we used magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) as a nanotool for ocular drug delivery that is capable of specific localization in the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) layer. We demonstrate that, following intraocular injection in Xenopus embryos, MNPs localize specifically in RPE where they are retained for several days. The specificity of the localization did not depend on particle size and surface properties of the MNPs used in this work. Moreover, through similar experiments in zebrafish, we demonstrated that the targeting of RPE by the nanoparticles is not specific for the Xenopus species. PMID:24451140

  18. Dissection of a Mouse Eye for a Whole Mount of the Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Claybon, Alison; Bishop, Alexander J. R.

    2011-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) lies at the back of the mammalian eye, just under the neural retina, which contains the photoreceptors (rods and cones). The RPE is a monolayer of pigmented cuboidal cells and associates closely with the neural retina just above it. This association makes the RPE of great interest to researchers studying retinal diseases. The RPE is also the site of an in vivo assay of homology-directed DNA repair, the pun assay. The mouse eye is particularly difficult to dissect due to its small size (about 3.5mm in diameter) and its spherical shape. This article demonstrates in detail a procedure for dissection of the eye resulting in a whole mount of the RPE. In this procedure, we show how to work with, rather than against, the spherical structure of the eye. Briefly, the connective tissue, muscle, and optic nerve are removed from the back of the eye. Then, the cornea and lens are removed. Next, strategic cuts are made that result in significant flattening of the remaining tissue. Finally, the neural retina is gently lifted off, revealing an intact RPE, which is still attached to the underlying choroid and sclera. This whole mount can be used to perform the punassay or for immunohistochemistry or immunofluorescent assessment of the RPE tissue. PMID:21403630

  19. N-Ethylmaleimide–Sensitive Factor b (nsfb) Is Required for Normal Pigmentation of the Zebrafish Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Hanovice, Nicholas J.; Daly, Christina M. S.; Gross, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Despite the number of albinism-causing mutations identified in human patients and animal models, there remain a significant number of cases for which no mutation has been identified, suggesting that our understanding of melanogenesis is incomplete. Previously, we identified two oculocutaneous albinism mutations in zebrafish, au13 and au18. Here, we sought to identify the mutated loci and determine how the affected proteins contribute to normal pigmentation of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Methods Complementation analyses revealed that au13 and au18 belonged to a single complementation group, suggesting that they affected the same locus. Whole-genome sequencing and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis was performed to identify putative mutations, which were confirmed by cDNA sequencing and mRNA rescue. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and image quantification were used to identify the cellular basis of hypopigmentation. Results Whole-genome sequencing and SNP mapping identified a nonsense mutation in the N-ethylmaleimide–sensitive factor b (nsfb) gene in au18 mutants. Complementary DNA sequencing confirmed the presence of the mutation (C893T), which truncates the nsfb protein by roughly two-thirds (Y297X). No coding sequence mutations were identified in au13, but quantitative PCR revealed a significant decrease in nsfb expression, and nsfb mRNA injection rescued the hypopigmentation phenotype, suggesting a regulatory mutation. In situ hybridization revealed that nsfb is broadly expressed during embryonic development, including in the RPE. Transmission electron microscopy analyses indicated that average melanosome density and maturity were significantly decreased in nsfb mutants. Conclusions au18 and au13 contain mutations in nsfb, which encodes a protein that is required for the maturation of melanosomes in zebrafish RPE. PMID:26618645

  20. Quantitative Autofluorescence and Cell Density Maps of the Human Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Ach, Thomas; Huisingh, Carrie; McGwin, Gerald; Messinger, Jeffrey D.; Zhang, Tianjiao; Bentley, Mark J.; Gutierrez, Danielle B.; Ablonczy, Zsolt; Smith, R. Theodore; Sloan, Kenneth R.; Curcio, Christine A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Lipofuscin (LF) accumulation within RPE cells is considered pathogenic in AMD. To test whether LF contributes to RPE cell loss in aging and to provide a cellular basis for fundus autofluorescence (AF) we created maps of human RPE cell number and histologic AF. Methods. Retinal pigment epithelium–Bruch's membrane flat mounts were prepared from 20 donor eyes (10 ≤ 51 and 10 > 80 years; postmortem: ≤4.2 hours; no retinal pathologies), preserving foveal position. Phalloidin-binding RPE cytoskeleton and LF-AF (488-nm excitation) were imaged at up to 90 predefined positions. Maps were assembled from 83,330 cells in 1470 locations. From Voronoi regions representing each cell, the number of neighbors, cell area, and total AF intensity normalized to an AF standard was determined. Results. Highly variable between individuals, RPE-AF increases significantly with age. A perifoveal ring of high AF mirrors rod photoreceptor topography and fundus-AF. Retinal pigment epithelium cell density peaks at the fovea, independent of age, yet no net RPE cell loss is detectable. The RPE monolayer undergoes considerable lifelong re-modeling. The relationship of cell size and AF, a surrogate for LF concentration, is orderly and linear in both groups. Autofluorescence topography differs distinctly from the topography of age-related rod loss. Conclusions. Digital maps of quantitative AF, cell density, and packing geometry provide metrics for cellular-resolution clinical imaging and model systems. The uncoupling of RPE LF content, cell number, and photoreceptor topography in aging challenges LF's role in AMD. PMID:25034602

  1. Evidence for Baseline Retinal Pigment Epithelium Pathology in the Trp1-Cre Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Thanos, Aristomenis; Morizane, Yuki; Murakami, Yusuke; Giani, Andrea; Mantopoulos, Dimosthenis; Kayama, Maki; Roh, Mi In; Michaud, Norman; Pawlyk, Basil; Sandberg, Michael; Young, Lucy H.; Miller, Joan W.; Vavvas, Demetrios G.

    2012-01-01

    The increasing popularity of the Cre/loxP recombination system has led to the generation of numerous transgenic mouse lines in which Cre recombinase is expressed under the control of organ- or cell-specific promoters. Alterations in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), a multifunctional cell monolayer that separates the retinal photoreceptors from the choroid, are prevalent in the pathogenesis of a number of ocular disorders, including age-related macular degeneration. To date, six transgenic mouse lines have been developed that target Cre to the RPE under the control of various gene promoters. However, multiple lines of evidence indicate that high levels of Cre expression can be toxic to mammalian cells. In this study, we report that in the Trp1-Cre mouse, a commonly used transgenic Cre strain for RPE gene function studies, Cre recombinase expression alone leads to RPE dysfunction and concomitant disorganization of RPE layer morphology, large areas of RPE atrophy, retinal photoreceptor dysfunction, and microglial cell activation in the affected areas. The phenotype described herein is similar to previously published reports of conditional gene knockouts that used the Trp1-Cre mouse, suggesting that Cre toxicity alone could account for some of the reported phenotypes and highlighting the importance of the inclusion of Cre-expressing mice as controls in conditional gene targeting studies. PMID:22429967

  2. Resveratrol inhibits epithelial-mesenchymal transition of retinal pigment epithelium and development of proliferative vitreoretinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Keijiro; He, Shikun; Terasaki, Hiroto; Nazari, Hossein; Zhang, Huiming; Spee, Christine; Kannan, Ram; Hinton, David R

    2015-01-01

    Proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) is a serious complication of retinal detachment and ocular trauma, and its recurrence may lead to irreversible vision loss. Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells is a critical step in the pathogenesis of PVR, which is characterized by fibrotic membrane formation and traction retinal detachment. In this study, we investigated the potential impact of resveratrol (RESV) on EMT and the fibrotic process in cultured RPE cells and further examined the preventive effect of RESV on PVR development using a rabbit model of PVR. We found that RESV induces mesenchymal to epithelial transition (MET) and inhibits transforming growth factor-β2(TGF-β2)-induced EMT of RPE cells by deacetylating SMAD4. The effect of RESV on MET was dependent on sirtuin1 activation. RESV suppressed proliferation, migration and fibronectin synthesis induced by platelet-derived growth factor-BB or TGF-β2. In vivo, RESV inhibited the progression of experimental PVR in rabbit eyes. Histological findings showed that RESV reduced fibrotic membrane formation and decreased α-SMA expression in the epiretinal membranes. These results suggest the potential use of RESV as a therapeutic agent to prevent the development of PVR by targeting EMT of RPE. PMID:26552368

  3. Role of retinal pigment epithelial cell β-catenin signaling in experimental proliferative vitreoretinopathy.

    PubMed

    Umazume, Kazuhiko; Tsukahara, Rintaro; Liu, Lanhsin; Fernandez de Castro, Juan P; McDonald, Kevin; Kaplan, Henry J; Tamiya, Shigeo

    2014-05-01

    Proliferative vitreoretinopathy is caused by the contraction of fibrotic membranes on the epiretinal surface of the neurosensory retina, resulting in a traction retinal detachment and loss of visual acuity. Retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells play an important role in formation of such fibrotic, contractile membranes. We investigated the role of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, a pathway implicated in several fibrotic diseases, in RPE cells in proliferative vitreoretinopathy. In vitro culture of swine RPE sheets resulted in nuclear translocation of β-catenin in dedifferentiated RPE cells. FH535, a specific inhibitor of β-catenin signaling, reduced the outgrowth of cultured RPE sheets and prevented dedifferentiated RPE cell proliferation and migration. It also inhibited formation of contractile membranes by dedifferentiated RPE cells on collagen I matrices. Expression and function of the β-catenin signaling target connexin-43 were down-regulated by FH535, and functional blockade of connexins with carbenoxolone also prevented the in vitro formation of fibrotic, contractile membranes. Intravitreal injection of FH535 in swine also inhibited formation of dense, contractile membranes on the epiretinal surface and prevented development of traction retinal detachment. These findings demonstrate that β-catenin signaling is involved in formation of contractile membranes by dedifferentiated RPE cells and suggest that adjunctive treatment targeting this pathway could be useful in preventing proliferative vitreoretinopathy. PMID:24656918

  4. Regenerating Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells to Cure Blindness: A Road Towards Personalized Artificial Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Balendu Shekhar

    2015-01-01

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a polarized monolayer tissue that functions to support the health and integrity of retinal photoreceptors (PRs). RPE atrophy has been linked to pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of blindness in elderly in the USA. RPE atrophy in AMD leads to the PR cell death and vision loss. It is thought that replacing diseased RPE with healthy RPE tissue can prevent PR cell death. Retinal surgical innovations have provided proof-of-principle data that autologous RPE tissue can replace diseased macular RPE and provide visual rescue in AMD patients. Current efforts are focused on developing an in vitro tissue using natural and synthetic scaffolds to generate a polarized functional RPE monolayer. In the future, these tissue-engineering approaches combined with pluripotent stem cell technology will lead to the development of personalized and “off-the-shelf” cell therapies for AMD patients. This review summarizes the historical development and ongoing efforts in surgical and in vitro tissue engineering techniques to develop a three-dimensional therapeutic native RPE tissue substitute. PMID:26146605

  5. Beta cyclodextrins bind, stabilize, and remove lipofuscin bisretinoids from retinal pigment epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Nociari, Marcelo M.; Lehmann, Guillermo L.; Perez Bay, Andres E.; Radu, Roxana A.; Jiang, Zhichun; Goicochea, Shelby; Schreiner, Ryan; Warren, J. David; Shan, Jufang; Adam de Beaumais, Ségolène; Ménand, Mickaël; Sollogoub, Matthieu; Maxfield, Frederick R.; Rodriguez-Boulan, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation of lipofuscin bisretinoids (LBs) in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is the alleged cause of retinal degeneration in genetic blinding diseases (e.g., Stargardt) and a possible etiological agent for age-related macular degeneration. Currently, there are no approved treatments for these diseases; hence, agents that efficiently remove LBs from RPE would be valuable therapeutic candidates. Here, we show that beta cyclodextrins (β-CDs) bind LBs and protect them against oxidation. Computer modeling and biochemical data are consistent with the encapsulation of the retinoid arms of LBs within the hydrophobic cavity of β-CD. Importantly, β-CD treatment reduced by 73% and 48% the LB content of RPE cell cultures and of eyecups obtained from Abca4-Rdh8 double knock-out (DKO) mice, respectively. Furthermore, intravitreal administration of β-CDs reduced significantly the content of bisretinoids in the RPE of DKO animals. Thus, our results demonstrate the effectiveness of β-CDs to complex and remove LB deposits from RPE cells and provide crucial data to develop novel prophylactic approaches for retinal disorders elicited by LBs. PMID:24706818

  6. Effect of Toxoplasma gondii infection on the junctional complex of retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Alanderson R; Leve, Fernanda; Morgado-Diaz, José; Tedesco, Roberto Carlos; Pereira, Mirian Claudia S

    2016-04-01

    Ocular toxoplasmosis is the most frequent cause of uveitis, leading to partial or total loss of vision, with the retina the main affected structure. The cells of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) play an important role in the physiology of the retina and formation of the blood-retinal barrier. Several pathogens induce barrier dysfunction by altering tight junction (TJ) integrity. Here, we analysed the effect of infection by Toxoplasma gondii on TJ integrity in ARPE-19 cells. Loss of TJ integrity was demonstrated in T. gondii-infected ARPE-19 cells, causing increase in paracellular permeability and disturbance of the barrier function of the RPE. Confocal microscopy also revealed alteration in the TJ protein occludin induced by T. gondii infection. Disruption of junctional complex was also evidenced by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Cell-cell contact loss was noticed in the early stages of infection by T. gondii with the visualization of small to moderate intercellular spaces. Large gaps were mostly observed with the progression of the infection. Thus, our data suggest that the alterations induced by T. gondii in the structural organization of the RPE may contribute to retinal injury evidenced by ocular toxoplasmosis. PMID:26928468

  7. Applying photoacoustics to quantification of melanin concentration in retinal pigment epithelium (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Xiao; Zhang, Hao F.; Liu, Wenzhong

    2016-03-01

    The melanin in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) protects retina and other ocular tissues by photo-screening and acting as antioxidant and free radical scavenger. It helps maintain normal visual functions since human eye is subjected to lifelong high oxygen stress and photon exposure. Loss of the RPE melanin weakens the protection mechanism and jeopardizes ocular health. Local decrease in the RPE melanin concentration is believed to be both a cause and a sign of early-stage age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading blinding disease in developed world. Current technology cannot quantitatively measure the RPE melanin concentration which might be a promising marker in early AMD screening. Photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy (PAOM), as an emerging optical absorption-based imaging technology, can potentially be applied to measure the RPE melanin concentration if the dependence of the detectable photoacoustic (PA) signal amplitudes on the RPE melanin concentrations is verified. In this study, we tested the feasibility of using PA signal ratio from RPE melanin and the nearby retinal blood vessels as an indicator of the RPE melanin variation. A novel whole eye optical model was designed and Monte Carlo modeling of light (MCML) was employed. We examined the influences on quantification from PAOM axial resolution, the depth and diameter of the retinal blood vessel, and the RPE thickness. The results show that the scheme is robust to individual histological and illumination variations. This study suggests that PAOM is capable of quantitatively measuring the RPE melanin concentration in vivo.

  8. UVA-induced oxidative damage in retinal pigment epithelial cells after H2O2 or sparfloxacin exposure.

    PubMed

    Verna, L K; Holman, S A; Lee, V C; Hoh, J

    2000-01-01

    Retinal impairment is one of the leading causes of visual loss in an aging human population. To explore a possible cause for retinal damage in the human population, we have monitored DNA oxidation in human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells after exposure to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or the quinolone antibacterial sparfloxacin. When H2O2- or sparfloxacin-exposed cells were further exposed to ultraviolet A (UVA) irradiation, oxidative damage to the DNA of these cells was greatly increased over baseline values. This RPE+pharmaceutical-UVA cell system was developed to mimic in vivo retinal degeneration, seen in mouse studies using quinolone and UVA exposure. DNA damage produced by sparfloxacin and UVA in RPE cells could be remedied by the use of antioxidants, indicating a possible in vivo method for prevention or minimization of retinal damage in humans PMID:11201054

  9. In vivo assessment of retinal carotenoids: macular pigment detection techniques and their impact on monitoring pigment status.

    PubMed

    Curran Celentano, Joanne; Burke, Joanne D; Hammond, Billy R

    2002-03-01

    Of the many carotenoids found within human tissue, only the carotenoids within the human retina can be assessed noninvasively at present. Such assessment should eventually provide a more complete understanding of the functional role of retinal lutein (L) and zeaxanthin (Z) (termed macular pigment, MP) in human vision. The emerging data allow for some initial observations. For example, there appears to be wide variation (>factor of 10) in the concentration of MP. Although MP levels have been recorded from nondetectable to 1.20 OD (optical density), the "average" levels, relative to what is possible, appear low. This may be due in part to the low average dietary intake of L and Z in the typical U.S. diet. Nonetheless, individual differences in MP may also be influenced by nondietary factors such as genetics, demographics and lifestyle characteristics. Some evidence indicates that the MP carotenoids may protect the retina and lens, and could improve vision through some optical mechanisms. Consequently, efforts to determine typical MP levels and the factors that influence individual differences in MP density should be continued. PMID:11880588

  10. Photoaging of retinal pigment epithelial melanosomes: The effect of photobleaching on morphology and reactivity of the pigment granules.

    PubMed

    Zadlo, Andrzej; Szewczyk, Grzegorz; Sarna, Michal; Kozinska, Anna; Pilat, Anna; Kaczara, Patrycja; Sarna, Tadeusz

    2016-08-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of age-related changes in antioxidant and photoprotective properties of human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) melanosomes, the effect of in vitro photoaging of bovine RPE melanosomes was examined employing an array of complementary spectroscopic and analytical methods. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, saturation recovery EPR, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) were used to determine melanin content of control and photobleached melanosomes, and to monitor changes in their morphology. Methylene blue (MB), TEMPO choline, dysprosium(III) ions and singlet oxygen were employed as molecular probes to characterize the efficiency of control and photobleached melanosomes to interact with different reagents. EPR oximetry, UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, iodometric assay of lipid hydroperoxides and time-resolved singlet oxygen phosphorescence were used to analyze the efficiency of photobleached and untreated melanosomes to inhibit MB-photosensitized oxidation of liposomal lipids. The obtained results revealed that, compared to untreated melanosomes, moderately photobleached melanosomes protected unsaturated lipids less efficiently against photosensitized peroxidiation, while weakly photobleached melanosomes were actually better antioxidant and photoprotective agents. The observed changes could be attributed to two effects - modification of the melanosome morphology and oxidative degradation of the melanin functional groups induced by different degree of photobleaching. While the former increases the accessibility of melanin nanoaggregates to reagents, the latter reduces the efficiency of melanin to interact with chemical and physical agents. PMID:27338854

  11. Isolation and characterization of a spontaneously immortalized bovine retinal pigmented epithelial cell line

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The Retinal Pigmented Epithelium (RPE) is juxtaposed with the photoreceptor outer segments of the eye. The proximity of the photoreceptor cells is a prerequisite for their survival, as they depend on the RPE to remove the outer segments and are also influenced by RPE cell paracrine factors. RPE cell death can cause a progressive loss of photoreceptor function, which can diminish vision and, over time, blindness ensues. Degeneration of the retina has been shown to induce a variety of retinopathies, such as Stargardt's disease, Cone-Rod Dystrophy (CRD), Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP), Fundus Flavimaculatus (FFM), Best's disease and Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD). We have cultured primary bovine RPE cells to gain a further understanding of the mechanisms of RPE cell death. One of the cultures, named tRPE, surpassed senescence and was further characterized to determine its viability as a model for retinal diseases. Results The tRPE cell line has been passaged up to 150 population doublings and was shown to be morphologically similar to primary cells. They have been characterized to be of RPE origin by reverse transcriptase PCR and immunocytochemistry using the RPE-specific genes RPE65 and CRALBP and RPE-specific proteins RPE65 and Bestrophin. The tRPE cells are also immunoreactive to vimentin, cytokeratin and zonula occludens-1 antibodies. Chromosome analysis indicates a normal diploid number. The tRPE cells do not grow in suspension or in soft agar. After 3H thymidine incorporation, the cells do not appear to divide appreciably after confluency. Conclusion The tRPE cells are immortal, but still exhibit contact inhibition, serum dependence, monolayer growth and secrete an extra-cellular matrix. They retain the in-vivo morphology, gene expression and cell polarity. Additionally, the cells endocytose exogenous melanin, A2E and purified lipofuscin granules. This cell line may be a useful in-vitro research model for retinal maculopathies. PMID:19413901

  12. Uptake of 3H-cAMP by retinal pigment epithelium isolated from bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus)

    PubMed Central

    Keith, Thomas A; Radhakrishnan, Varsha; Moredock, Steve; García, Dana M

    2006-01-01

    Background In bluegill sunfish, the melanin-containing pigment granules of the retinal pigment epithelium undergo cyclic movements in response both to ambient lighting and circadian cues. Pigment granules aggregate into the cell body at night (in the dark), and disperse into apical processes during the day (in the light). Regulation of pigment granule aggregation in a number of fishes depends on modulating the intracellular levels of cyclic adenosine monophosphate. Results Here we show isolated RPE takes up cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) in a saturable manner, exogenously applied cAMP induces pigment granule aggregation in retinal pigment epithelium isolated from bluegill, and aggregation induced in this manner is inhibited by treatment with probenecid, an organic anion transport inhibitor. Conclusion Our results raise the possibility that cAMP functions as a messenger secreted from the neural retina to signal darkness to the RPE, which takes it up. It further suggests that organic anion transport systems are the route by which cAMP crosses RPE cell membranes since probenecid inhibits extracellular cAMP from causing pigment granule aggregation. PMID:17196104

  13. Hydroxyl PAMAM dendrimer-based gene vectors for transgene delivery to human retinal pigment epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastorakos, Panagiotis; Kambhampati, Siva P.; Mishra, Manoj K.; Wu, Tony; Song, Eric; Hanes, Justin; Kannan, Rangaramanujam M.

    2015-02-01

    Ocular gene therapy holds promise for the treatment of numerous blinding disorders. Despite the significant progress in the field of viral and non-viral gene delivery to the eye, significant obstacles remain in the way of achieving high-level transgene expression without adverse effects. The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is involved in the pathogenesis of retinal diseases and is a key target for a number of gene-based therapeutics. In this study, we addressed the inherent drawbacks of non-viral gene vectors and combined different approaches to design an efficient and safe dendrimer-based gene-delivery platform for delivery to human RPE cells. We used hydroxyl-terminated polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers functionalized with various amounts of amine groups to achieve effective plasmid compaction. We further used triamcinolone acetonide (TA) as a nuclear localization enhancer for the dendrimer-gene complex and achieved significant improvement in cell uptake and transfection of hard-to-transfect human RPE cells. To improve colloidal stability, we further shielded the gene vector surface through incorporation of PEGylated dendrimer along with dendrimer-TA for DNA complexation. The resultant complexes showed improved stability while minimally affecting transgene delivery, thus improving the translational relevance of this platform.Ocular gene therapy holds promise for the treatment of numerous blinding disorders. Despite the significant progress in the field of viral and non-viral gene delivery to the eye, significant obstacles remain in the way of achieving high-level transgene expression without adverse effects. The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is involved in the pathogenesis of retinal diseases and is a key target for a number of gene-based therapeutics. In this study, we addressed the inherent drawbacks of non-viral gene vectors and combined different approaches to design an efficient and safe dendrimer-based gene-delivery platform for delivery to human RPE

  14. A clinically challenging diagnosis of adenoma of the retinal pigment epithelium presenting with clinical features of choroidal hemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Sohei; Hikita, Naofumi; Yamakawa, Ryoji; Moriya, Fukuko; Yano, Hirohisa; Furusato, Emiko; Cameron, J Douglas; Rushing, Elisabeth J

    2012-01-01

    Background Adenoma of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a rare intraocular tumor that can simulate other pigmented tumors such as choroidal melanoma. We report a case of non-pigmented adenoma of the RPE initially diagnosed as choroidal hemangioma. Case report A 42-year-old woman presented to Kurume University Hospital in November 1992 with an orange-yellow tumor nasal to the optic disc in the left fundus. The tumor was 9.0 × 9.0 mm in diameter, 6.0 mm thick, and was characterized by high intensity on T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), low intensity on T2-weighted MRI, and enhancement on gadolinium MRI. Fluorescein angiography revealed early hypofluorescence and late hyperfluorescence of the tumor and retinal feeder vessels. By April 1996, exudate had developed around the tumor margins. The patient was treated with external beam radiation therapy (20 Gy) in July 1996, but the tumor did not diminish in size. Subsequently, she developed extensive loss of vision due to total retinal detachment. Accordingly, her left eye was enucleated in June 2005 because of severe ocular pain due to absolute glaucoma. Histopathological examination indicated that the tumor was contiguous with the normal surrounding RPE and was composed of cords and tubules of mostly non-pigmented spindle-shaped cells with round to oval nuclei and a small amount of cytoplasm containing melanin granules. The tumor cells were immunoreactive for vimentin, S-100 protein, and cytokeratin 18. The final diagnosis was adenoma of the RPE. Conclusion Adenoma of the retinal pigment epithelium may be associated with incompetent vessels leading to serous retinal detachment and extensive visual loss, and may exhibit clinical characteristics similar to choroidal hemangioma. PMID:22536043

  15. A dominant mutation in MAPKAPK3, an actor of p38 signaling pathway, causes a new retinal dystrophy involving Bruch's membrane and retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Isabelle; Lenaers, Guy; Bocquet, Béatrice; Baudoin, Corinne; Piro-Megy, Camille; Cubizolle, Aurélie; Quilès, Mélanie; Jean-Charles, Albert; Cohen, Salomon Yves; Merle, Harold; Gaudric, Alain; Labesse, Gilles; Manes, Gaël; Péquignot, Marie; Cazevieille, Chantal; Dhaenens, Claire-Marie; Fichard, Agnès; Ronkina, Natalia; Arthur, Simon J; Gaestel, Matthias; Hamel, Christian P

    2016-03-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies are clinically and genetically heterogeneous with significant number of cases remaining genetically unresolved. We studied a large family from the West Indies islands with a peculiar retinal disease, the Martinique crinkled retinal pigment epitheliopathy that begins around the age of 30 with retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and Bruch's membrane changes resembling a dry desert land and ends with a retinitis pigmentosa. Whole-exome sequencing identified a heterozygous c.518T>C (p.Leu173Pro) mutation in MAPKAPK3 that segregates with the disease in 14 affected and 28 unaffected siblings from three generations. This unknown variant is predicted to be damaging by bioinformatic predictive tools and the mutated protein to be non-functional by crystal structure analysis. MAPKAPK3 is a serine/threonine protein kinase of the p38 signaling pathway that is activated by a variety of stress stimuli and is implicated in cellular responses and gene regulation. In contrast to other tissues, MAPKAPK3 is highly expressed in the RPE, suggesting a crucial role for retinal physiology. Expression of the mutated allele in HEK cells revealed a mislocalization of the protein in the cytoplasm, leading to cytoskeleton alteration and cytodieresis inhibition. In Mapkapk3-/- mice, Bruch's membrane is irregular with both abnormal thickened and thinned portions. In conclusion, we identified the first pathogenic mutation in MAPKAPK3 associated with a retinal disease. These findings shed new lights on Bruch's membrane/RPE pathophysiology and will open studies of this signaling pathway in diseases with RPE and Bruch's membrane alterations, such as age-related macular degeneration. PMID:26744326

  16. Photoinduced changes in subcellular structures of the retinal pigment epithelium from the Japanese quail Coturnix japonica.

    PubMed

    Zak, P P; Serezhnikova, N B; Pogodina, L S; Trofimova, N N; Gur'eva, T S; Dadasheva, O A

    2015-06-01

    Fifteen-week-old sexually mature female Japanese quails (Coturnix japonica) grown under various lighting conditions were used in the study. It was found that the number of mitochondria and phagosomes was increased by 1.5-fold in the retinal pigment epithelium from birds reared for 95 days under blue light (440-470 nm) vs. reduced blue light component conditions. Also, it was found that egg production was increased by 15% in birds reared under blue light compared to other lightning conditions. Thus, we concluded that blue light conditions resulted in elevating metabolic activity and accelerating pace of life in Japanese quails. It is assumed that the blue light-induced effects are probably due to inhibition of melatonin synthesis. PMID:26531024

  17. Two-photon excited autofluorescence imaging of human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Meng; Bindewald-Wittich, Almut; Holz, Frank G; Giese, Guenter; Niemz, Markolf H; Snyder, Sarah; Sun, Hui; Yu, Jiayi; Agopov, Michael; La Schiazza, Olivier; Bille, Josef F

    2006-01-01

    Degeneration of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells severely impairs the visual function of retina photoreceptors. However, little is known about the events that trigger the death of RPE cells at the subcellular level. Two-photon excited autofluorescence (TPEF) imaging of RPE cells proves to be well suited to investigate both the morphological and the spectral characteristics of the human RPE cells. The dominant fluorophores of autofluorescence derive from lipofuscin (LF) granules that accumulate in the cytoplasm of the RPE cells with increasing age. Spectral TPEF imaging reveals the existence of abnormal LF granules with blue shifted autofluorescence in RPE cells of aging patients and brings new insights into the complicated composition of the LF granules. Based on a proposed two-photon laser scanning ophthalmoscope, TPEF imaging of the living retina may be valuable for diagnostic and pathological studies of age related eye diseases. PMID:16526877

  18. Prohibitin as the Molecular Binding Switch in the Retinal Pigment Epithelium.

    PubMed

    Sripathi, Srinivas R; Sylvester, O'Donnell; He, Weilue; Moser, Trevor; Um, Ji-Yeon; Lamoke, Folami; Ramakrishna, Wusirika; Bernstein, Paul S; Bartoli, Manuela; Jahng, Wan Jin

    2016-02-01

    Previously, our molecular binding study showed that prohibitin interacts with phospholipids, including phosphatidylinositide and cardiolipin. Under stress conditions, prohibitin interacts with cardiolipin as a retrograde response to activate mitochondrial proliferation. The lipid-binding switch mechanism of prohibitin with phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-triphosphate and cardiolipin may suggest the role of prohibitin effects on energy metabolism and age-related diseases. The current study examined the region-specific expressions of prohibitin with respect to the retina and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). A detailed understanding of prohibitin binding with lipids, nucleotides, and proteins shown in the current study may suggest how molecular interactions control apoptosis and how we can intervene against the apoptotic pathway in AMD. Our data imply that decreased prohibitin in the peripheral RPE is a significant step leading to mitochondrial dysfunction that may promote AMD progression. PMID:26661103

  19. Cell Models to Study Regulation of Cell Transformation in Pathologies of Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsova, Alla V.; Aleksandrova, Maria A.

    2014-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) plays a key role in the development of many eye diseases leading to visual impairment and even blindness. Cell culture models of pathological changes in the RPE make it possible to study factors responsible for these changes and signaling pathways coordinating cellular and molecular mechanisms of cell interactions under pathological conditions. Moreover, they give an opportunity to reveal target cells and develop effective specific treatment for degenerative and dystrophic diseases of the retina. In this review, data are presented on RPE cell sources for culture models, approaches to RPE cell culturing, phenotypic changes of RPE cells in vitro, the role of signal pathways, and possibilities for their regulation in pathological processes. PMID:25177495

  20. Visual Advantage in Deaf Adults Linked to Retinal Changes

    PubMed Central

    Codina, Charlotte; Pascalis, Olivier; Mody, Chris; Toomey, Peter; Rose, Jill; Gummer, Laura; Buckley, David

    2011-01-01

    The altered sensory experience of profound early onset deafness provokes sometimes large scale neural reorganisations. In particular, auditory-visual cross-modal plasticity occurs, wherein redundant auditory cortex becomes recruited to vision. However, the effect of human deafness on neural structures involved in visual processing prior to the visual cortex has never been investigated, either in humans or animals. We investigated neural changes at the retina and optic nerve head in profoundly deaf (N = 14) and hearing (N = 15) adults using Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), an in-vivo light interference method of quantifying retinal micro-structure. We compared retinal changes with behavioural results from the same deaf and hearing adults, measuring sensitivity in the peripheral visual field using Goldmann perimetry. Deaf adults had significantly larger neural rim areas, within the optic nerve head in comparison to hearing controls suggesting greater retinal ganglion cell number. Deaf adults also demonstrated significantly larger visual field areas (indicating greater peripheral sensitivity) than controls. Furthermore, neural rim area was significantly correlated with visual field area in both deaf and hearing adults. Deaf adults also showed a significantly different pattern of retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) distribution compared to controls. Significant correlations between the depth of the RNFL at the inferior-nasal peripapillary retina and the corresponding far temporal and superior temporal visual field areas (sensitivity) were found. Our results show that cross-modal plasticity after early onset deafness may not be limited to the sensory cortices, noting specific retinal adaptations in early onset deaf adults which are significantly correlated with peripheral vision sensitivity. PMID:21673805

  1. Personalized Medicine: Cell and Gene Therapy Based on Patient-Specific iPSC-Derived Retinal Pigment Epithelium Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yao; Chan, Lawrence; Nguyen, Huy V; Tsang, Stephen H

    2016-01-01

    Interest in generating human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells for stem cell modeling of diseases has overtaken that of patient-specific human embryonic stem cells due to the ethical, technical, and political concerns associated with the latter. In ophthalmology, researchers are currently using iPS cells to explore various applications, including: (1) modeling of retinal diseases using patient-specific iPS cells; (2) autologous transplantation of differentiated retinal cells that undergo gene correction at the iPS cell stage via gene editing tools (e.g., CRISPR/Cas9, TALENs and ZFNs); and (3) autologous transplantation of patient-specific iPS-derived retinal cells treated with gene therapy. In this review, we will discuss the uses of patient-specific iPS cells for differentiating into retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells, uncovering disease pathophysiology, and developing new treatments such as gene therapy and cell replacement therapy via autologous transplantation. PMID:26427458

  2. The retinal pigment epithelium as a gateway for monocyte trafficking into the eye.

    PubMed

    Benhar, Inbal; Reemst, Kitty; Kalchenko, Vyacheslav; Schwartz, Michal

    2016-06-01

    The choroid plexus epithelium within the brain ventricles orchestrates blood-derived monocyte entry to the central nervous system under injurious conditions, including when the primary injury site is remote from the brain. Here, we hypothesized that the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) serves a parallel role, as a gateway for monocyte trafficking to the retina following direct or remote injury. We found elevated expression of genes encoding leukocyte trafficking determinants in mouse RPE as a consequence of retinal glutamate intoxication or optic nerve crush (ONC). Blocking VCAM-1 after ONC interfered with monocyte infiltration into the retina and resulted in a local pro-inflammatory cytokine bias. Live imaging of the injured eye showed monocyte accumulation first in the RPE, and subsequently in the retina, and peripheral leukocytes formed close contact with the RPE Our findings further implied that the ocular milieu can confer monocytes a phenotype advantageous for neuroprotection. These results suggest that the eye utilizes a mechanism of crosstalk with the immune system similar to that of the brain, whereby epithelial barriers serve as gateways for leukocyte entry. PMID:27107049

  3. Intracellular delivery of dendrimer triamcinolone acetonide conjugates into microglial and human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kambhampati, Siva P; Mishra, Manoj K; Mastorakos, Panagiotis; Oh, Yumin; Lutty, Gerard A; Kannan, Rangaramanujam M

    2015-09-01

    Triamcinolone acetonide (TA) is a potent, intermediate-acting, steroid that has anti-inflammatory and anti-angiogenic activity. Intravitreal administration of TA has been used for diabetic macular edema, proliferative diabetic retinopathy and exudative age-related macular degeneration (AMD). However, the hydrophobicity, lack of solubility, and the side effects limit its effectiveness in the treatment of retinal diseases. In this study, we explore a PAMAM dendrimer-TA conjugate (D-TA) as a potential strategy to improve intracellular delivery and efficacy of TA to target cells. The conjugates were prepared with a high drug payload (∼ 21%) and were readily soluble in saline. Compared to free TA, D-TA demonstrated a significantly improved toxicity profile in two important target [microglial and human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)] cells. The D-TA was ∼ 100-fold more effective than free TA in its anti-inflammatory activity (measured in microglia), and in suppressing VEGF production (in hypoxic RPE cells). Dendrimer-based delivery may improve the efficacy of TA towards both its key targets of inflammation and VEGF production, with significant clinical implications. PMID:25701805

  4. The effect of retinal pigment epithelial cell patch size on growth factor expression

    SciTech Connect

    Vargis, Elizabeth A.; Peterson, Cristen B.; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L.; Retterer, Scott T.; Collier, Charles Patrick

    2014-01-30

    The spatial organization of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells grown in culture was controlled using micropatterning techniques in order to examine the effect of patch size on cell health and differentiation. Understanding this effect is a critical step in the development of multiplexed high throughput fluidic assays and provides a model for replicating disease states associated with the deterioration of retinal tissue during age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Microcontact printing of fibronectin on polystyrene and glass substrates was used to promote cell attachment, forming RPE patches of controlled size and shape. These colonies mimic the effect of atrophy and loss-of-function that occurs in the retina during degenerative diseases such as AMD. After 72 hours of cell growth, levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), an important biomarker of AMD, were measured. Cells were counted and morphological indicators of cell viability and tight junction formation were assessed via fluorescence microscopy. As a result, up to a twofold increase of VEGF expression per cell was measured as colony size decreased, suggesting that the local microenvironment of, and connections between, RPE cells influences growth factor expression leading to the initiation and progression of diseases such as AMD.

  5. The effect of retinal pigment epithelial cell patch size on growth factor expression

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Vargis, Elizabeth A.; Peterson, Cristen B.; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L.; Retterer, Scott T.; Collier, Charles Patrick

    2014-01-30

    The spatial organization of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells grown in culture was controlled using micropatterning techniques in order to examine the effect of patch size on cell health and differentiation. Understanding this effect is a critical step in the development of multiplexed high throughput fluidic assays and provides a model for replicating disease states associated with the deterioration of retinal tissue during age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Microcontact printing of fibronectin on polystyrene and glass substrates was used to promote cell attachment, forming RPE patches of controlled size and shape. These colonies mimic the effect of atrophy and loss-of-function thatmore » occurs in the retina during degenerative diseases such as AMD. After 72 hours of cell growth, levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), an important biomarker of AMD, were measured. Cells were counted and morphological indicators of cell viability and tight junction formation were assessed via fluorescence microscopy. As a result, up to a twofold increase of VEGF expression per cell was measured as colony size decreased, suggesting that the local microenvironment of, and connections between, RPE cells influences growth factor expression leading to the initiation and progression of diseases such as AMD.« less

  6. Downregulation of p22phox in Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells Inhibits Choroidal Neovascularization in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiuhong; Dinculescu, Astra; Shan, Zhiying; Miller, Rehae; Pang, Jijing; Lewin, Alfred S; Raizada, Mohan K; Hauswirth, William W

    2016-01-01

    Choroidal neovascularization (CNV) occurs in a variety of chorioretinal diseases including age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and is the major cause of severe visual loss in patients with AMD. Oxidative stress has been thought to play an important role in the development of CNV. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase is one of the major intracellular sources of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the vascular system. In this study, we examined the expression of p22phox, an integral subunit in the NADPH oxidase complex, in the mouse eye. We determined that p22phox is expressed in the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and inner retinal neurons. A small-interfering RNA (siRNA) designed against p22phox efficiently reduced the expression of the protein in the eye when delivered by means of recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector. Vector treatment inhibited CNV in the mouse when delivered into the subretinal space where RPE cells were transduced. These results suggest that NADPH oxidase–mediated ROS production in RPE cells may play an important role in the pathogenesis of neovascular AMD, and that this pathway may represent a new target for therapeutic intervention in AMD. PMID:18665154

  7. Different death stimuli evoke apoptosis via multiple pathways in retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ferrington, Deborah A; Tran, Tina N; Lew, Kathleen L; Van Remmen, Holly; Gregerson, Dale S

    2006-09-01

    Loss of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells via apoptosis plays a prominent role in several retinal degenerative diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration, and with light damage. Strategies for preservation of vision that would interrupt the apoptotic cascade require understanding the molecular events associated with apoptosis. This study investigated the susceptibility of RPE to caspase-dependent and -independent apoptotic pathways when challenged with different stimuli, including oxidants, anti-Fas antibody, and activated cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). These experiments used novel RPE cell lines developed from wildtype and heterozygous mice with reduced levels of either Mn superoxide dismutatse (SOD) or CuZnSOD. Peroxide and 4-hydroxynonenal induced apoptosis through both caspase-independent and -dependent pathways, respectively. With both oxidants, translocation of apoptosis inducing factor into the nucleus was observed. Cells containing reduced levels of CuZnSOD were the most susceptible to oxidant-induced cell death. Targeted killing by CTLs and activation of the Fas death receptor induced caspase-dependent apoptosis. These results show stimulus-specific activation of either the caspase-dependent or -independent pathway. Since cultured RPE express the protein components required for different apoptotic pathways, they provide a good model system for studying molecular events associated with multiple signals that lead to cell death. PMID:16682026

  8. Iron prochelator BSIH protects retinal pigment epithelial cells against cell death induced by hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Charkoudian, Louise K; Dentchev, Tzvete; Lukinova, Nina; Wolkow, Natalie; Dunaief, Joshua L; Franz, Katherine J

    2008-12-01

    Dysregulation of localized iron homeostasis is implicated in several degenerative diseases, including Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and age-related macular degeneration, wherein iron-mediated oxidative stress is hypothesized to contribute to cell death. Inhibiting toxic iron without altering normal metal-dependent processes presents significant challenges for standard small molecule chelating agents. We previously introduced BSIH (isonicotinic acid [2-(4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-[1,3,2]dioxaborolan-2-yl)-benzylidene]-hydrazide) prochelators that are converted by hydrogen peroxide into SIH (salicylaldehyde isonicotinoyl hydrazone) chelating agents that inhibit iron-catalyzed hydroxyl radical generation. Here, we show that BSIH protects a cultured cell model for retinal pigment epithelium against cell death induced by hydrogen peroxide. BSIH is more stable than SIH in cell culture medium and is more protective during long-term experiments. Repetitive exposure of cells to BSIH is nontoxic, whereas SIH and desferrioxamine induce cell death after repeated exposure. Combined, our results indicate that cell protection by BSIH involves iron sequestration that occurs only when the cells are stressed by hydrogen peroxide. These findings suggest that prochelators discriminate toxic iron from healthy iron and are promising candidates for neuro- and retinal protection. PMID:18835041

  9. Phagosome maturation during endosome interaction revealed by partial rhodopsin processing in retinal pigment epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Wavre-Shapton, Silène T.; Meschede, Ingrid P.; Seabra, Miguel C.; Futter, Clare E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Defects in phagocytosis and degradation of photoreceptor outer segments (POS) by the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) are associated with aging and retinal disease. The daily burst of rod outer segment (ROS) phagocytosis by the RPE provides a unique opportunity to analyse phagosome processing in vivo. In mouse retinae, phagosomes containing stacked rhodopsin-rich discs were identified by immuno-electron microscopy. Early apical phagosomes stained with antibodies against both cytoplasmic and intradiscal domains of rhodopsin. During phagosome maturation, a remarkably synchronised loss of the cytoplasmic epitope coincided with movement to the cell body and preceded phagosome–lysosome fusion and disc degradation. Loss of the intradiscal rhodopsin epitope and disc digestion occurred upon fusion with cathepsin-D-positive lysosomes. The same sequential stages of phagosome maturation were identified in cultured RPE and macrophages challenged with isolated POS. Loss of the cytoplasmic rhodopsin epitope was insensitive to pH but sensitive to protease inhibition and coincided with the interaction of phagosomes with endosomes. Thus, during pre-lysosomal maturation of ROS-containing phagosomes, limited rhodopsin processing occurs upon interaction with endosomes. This potentially provides a sensitive readout of phagosome–endosome interactions that is applicable to multiple phagocytes. PMID:25074813

  10. A2E and lipofuscin distributions in macaque retinal pigment epithelium are similar to human.

    PubMed

    Pallitto, Patrick; Ablonczy, Zsolt; Jones, E Ellen; Drake, Richard R; Koutalos, Yiannis; Crouch, Rosalie K; Donello, John; Herrmann, Julia

    2015-10-01

    The accumulation of lipofuscin, an autofluorescent aging marker, in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) has been implicated in the development of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Lipofuscin contains several visual cycle byproducts, most notably the bisretinoid N-retinylidene-N-retinylethanolamine (A2E). Previous studies with human donor eyes have shown a significant mismatch between lipofuscin autofluorescence (AF) and A2E distributions. The goal of the current project was to examine this relationship in a primate model with a retinal anatomy similar to that of humans. Ophthalmologically naive young (<10 years., N = 3) and old (>10 years., N = 4) Macaca fascicularis (macaque) eyes, were enucleated, dissected to yield RPE/choroid tissue, and flat-mounted on indium-tin-oxide-coated conductive slides. To compare the spatial distributions of lipofuscin and A2E, fluorescence and mass spectrometric imaging were carried out sequentially on the same samples. The distribution of lipofuscin fluorescence in the primate RPE reflected previously obtained human results, having the highest intensities in a perifoveal ring. Contrarily, A2E levels were consistently highest in the periphery, confirming a lack of correlation between the distributions of lipofuscin and A2E previously described in human donor eyes. We conclude that the mismatch between lipofuscin AF and A2E distributions is related to anatomical features specific to primates, such as the macula, and that this primate model has the potential to fill an important gap in current AMD research. PMID:26223373

  11. Bestrophin 1 is indispensable for volume regulation in human retinal pigment epithelium cells.

    PubMed

    Milenkovic, Andrea; Brandl, Caroline; Milenkovic, Vladimir M; Jendryke, Thomas; Sirianant, Lalida; Wanitchakool, Potchanart; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Reiff, Charlotte M; Horling, Franziska; Schrewe, Heinrich; Schreiber, Rainer; Kunzelmann, Karl; Wetzel, Christian H; Weber, Bernhard H F

    2015-05-19

    In response to cell swelling, volume-regulated anion channels (VRACs) participate in a process known as regulatory volume decrease (RVD). Only recently, first insight into the molecular identity of mammalian VRACs was obtained by the discovery of the leucine-rich repeats containing 8A (LRRC8A) gene. Here, we show that bestrophin 1 (BEST1) but not LRRC8A is crucial for volume regulation in human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in RPE derived from human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) exhibit an outwardly rectifying chloride current with characteristic functional properties of VRACs. This current is severely reduced in hiPSC-RPE cells derived from macular dystrophy patients with pathologic BEST1 mutations. Disruption of the orthologous mouse gene (Best1(-/-)) does not result in obvious retinal pathology but leads to a severe subfertility phenotype in agreement with minor endogenous expression of Best1 in murine RPE but highly abundant expression in mouse testis. Sperm from Best1(-/-) mice showed reduced motility and abnormal sperm morphology, indicating an inability in RVD. Together, our data suggest that the molecular identity of VRACs is more complex--that is, instead of a single ubiquitous channel, VRACs could be formed by cell type- or tissue-specific subunit composition. Our findings provide the basis to further examine VRAC diversity in normal and diseased cell physiology, which is key to exploring novel therapeutic approaches in VRAC-associated pathologies. PMID:25941382

  12. Effects of vegetable oils on biochemical and biophysical properties of membrane retinal pigment epithelium cells.

    PubMed

    Said, Toihiri; Tremblay-Mercier, Jennifer; Berrougui, Hicham; Rat, Patrice; Khalil, Abdelouahed

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of vegetable oil enrichment of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells on their biochemical and biophysical properties. For this, RPE cells were incubated with 4 different vegetables oils (olive oil, corn oil, argan oil, and camelina oil). The cytotoxicity of these vegetable oils was assessed in vivo on 8-week-old mice and in vitro by using the neutral red and YO-PRO-1 tests. Membrane fluidity was evaluated by fluorescence anisotropy using the fluorescent probe diphenylhexatriene, and membrane fatty acid composition was assessed by gas chromatography. None of the oils tested displayed cytotoxic effects. In vitro, omega-3 rich oils improved membrane fluidity by 47% compared with the control cells. The omega-3 PUFA content within membranes decreased by 38% to 55% when cells were incubated separately with olive oil, corn oil, or argan oil, and increased when cells were incubated with a mixture of those oils, or with camelina oil alone (50% and 103% increase, respectively). Our results show that the fatty acids in vegetable oil incorporate into retinal cells and increase the plasma membrane fluidity. PMID:24144052

  13. Pathological Consequences of Long-Term Mitochondrial Oxidative Stress in the Mouse Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Soo-jung; Krebs, Mark P.; Mao, Haoyu; Jones, Kyle; Conners, Mandy; Lewin, Alfred S.

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is hypothesized to be a major contributor to the development of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Mitochondrial manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) is a critical antioxidant protein that scavenges the highly reactive superoxide radical. We speculated that specific reduction of MnSOD in the RPE will increase the level of reactive oxygen species in the retina/RPE/choroid complex leading to pathogenesis similar to geographic atrophy. To test this hypothesis, an Sod2-specific hammerhead ribozyme (Rz), delivered by AAV2/1 and driven by the human VMD2 promoter was injected subretinally into C57BL/6J mice. Dark-adapted full field electroretinogram (ERG) detected a decrease in the response to light. We investigated the age-dependent phenotypic and morphological changes of the outer retina digital fundus imaging and SD-OCT measurement of ONL thickness. Fundus microscopy revealed pigmentary abnormalities in the retina and these corresponded to sub-retinal and sub-RPE deposits seen in SD-OCT B-scans. Light and electron microscopy documented the localization of apical deposits and thickening of the RPE. In RPE flat-mounts we observed abnormally displaced nuclei and regions of apparent fibrosis in the central retina of the oldest mice. This region was surrounded by enlarged and irregular RPE cells that have been observed in eyes donated by AMD patients and in other mouse models of AMD. PMID:22687918

  14. Intracellular delivery of dendrimer triamcinolone acetonide conjugates into microglial and human retinal pigment epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Kambhampati, Siva P.; Mishra, Manoj K.; Mastorakos, Panagiotis; Oh, Yumin; Lutty, Gerard A.; Kannan, Rangaramanujam M.

    2016-01-01

    Triamcinolone acetonide (TA) is a potent, intermediate-acting, steroid that has anti-inflammatory and anti-angiogenic activity. Intravitreal administration of TA has been used for diabetic macular edema, proliferative diabetic retinopathy and exudative age-related macular degeneration (AMD). However, the hydrophobicity, lack of solubility, and the side effects limit its effectiveness in the treatment of retinal diseases. In this study, we explore a PAMAM dendrimer-TA conjugate (D-TA) as a potential strategy to improve intracellular delivery and efficacy of TA to target cells. The conjugates were prepared with a high drug payload (~21%) and were readily soluble in saline. Compared to free TA, D-TA demonstrated a significantly improved toxicity profile in two important target [microglial and human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)] cells. The D-TA was ~100-fold more effective than free TA in its anti-inflammatory activity (measured in microglia), and in suppressing VEGF production (in hypoxic RPE cells). Dendrimer-based delivery may improve the efficacy of TA towards both its key targets of inflammation and VEGF production, with significant clinical implications. PMID:25701805

  15. Hydroxyl PAMAM dendrimer-based gene vectors for transgene delivery to human retinal pigment epithelial cells†

    PubMed Central

    Mastorakos, Panagiotis; Kambhampati, Siva P.; Mishra, Manoj K.; Wu, Tony; Song, Eric; Hanes, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Ocular gene therapy holds promise for the treatment of numerous blinding disorders. Despite the significant progress in the field of viral and non-viral gene delivery to the eye, significant obstacles remain in the way of achieving high-level transgene expression without adverse effects. The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is involved in the pathogenesis of retinal diseases and is a key target for a number of gene-based therapeutics. In this study, we addressed the inherent drawbacks of non-viral gene vectors and combined different approaches to design an efficient and safe dendrimer-based gene-delivery platform for delivery to human RPE cells. We used hydroxyl-terminated polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers functionalized with various amounts of amine groups to achieve effective plasmid compaction. We further used triamcinolone acetonide (TA) as a nuclear localization enhancer for the dendrimer-gene complex and achieved significant improvement in cell uptake and transfection of hard-to-transfect human RPE cells. To improve colloidal stability, we further shielded the gene vector surface through incorporation of PEGylated dendrimer along with dendrimer-TA for DNA complexation. The resultant complexes showed improved stability while minimally affecting transgene delivery, thus improving the translational relevance of this platform. PMID:25213606

  16. Controlling Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cell Patch Size Influences Growth Factor Expression

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Vargis, Elizabeth A; Peterson, Cristen B; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; Retterer, Scott T; Collier, Pat

    2014-01-01

    The spatial organization of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells grown in culture was controlled using micropatterning techniques in order to examine the effect of patch size on cell health and differentiation. Understanding this effect is a critical step in the development of multiplexed high throughput fluidic assays and provides a model for replicating disease states associated with the deterioration of retinal tissue during age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Microcontact printing of fibronectin on polystyrene and glass substrates was used to promote cell attachment, forming RPE patches of controlled size and shape. These colonies mimic the effect of atrophy and loss-of-function thatmore » occurs in the retina during degenerative diseases such as AMD. After 72 hours of cell growth, levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), an important biomarker of AMD, were measured. Cells were counted and morphological indicators of cell viability and tight junction formation were assessed via fluorescence microscopy. Up to a twofold increase of VEGF expression per cell was measured as colony size decreased, suggesting that the local microenvironment of, and connections between, RPE cells influences growth factor expression leading to the initiation and progression of diseases such as AMD.« less

  17. Inhibitory Effect of Bone Morphogenetic Protein 4 in Retinal Pigment Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Haipei; Li, Hui; Yang, Shuai; Li, Min; Zhao, Chun; Zhang, Jingfa; Xu, Guotong; Wang, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR), a serious vision-threatening complication of retinal detachment (RD), is characterized by the formation of contractile fibrotic membranes, in which epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a major event. Recent studies suggest an important role of bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) in the suppression of fibrosis. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role of BMP4 in the pathological process of PVR, particularly in the EMT of RPE cells. We found that BMP4 and its receptors were co-labelled with cytokeratin and α-SMA positive cells within the PVR membrane. Moreover, the mRNA and protein expression levels of BMP4 were decreased whereas BMP4 receptors ALK2, ALK3 and ALK6 were increased during TGF-β-induced EMT in primary RPE cells. Exogenous BMP4 inhibited TGF-β-induced epithelial marker down-regulation, as well as mesenchymal marker up-regulation at both the mRNA and protein levels in RPE cells. In addition, BMP4 treatment attenuated the TGF-β-induced gel contraction, cell migration and Smad2/3 phosphorylation. However, knockdown of endogenous BMP4 stimulated changes in EMT markers. Our results confirm the hypothesis that BMP4 might inhibit TGF-β-mediated EMT in RPE cells via the Smad2/3 pathway and suppress contraction. This might represent a potential treatment for PVR. PMID:27586653

  18. Transfection efficiency of chitosan and thiolated chitosan in retinal pigment epithelium cells: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Ana V.; Silva, Andreia P.; Bitoque, Diogo B.; Silva, Gabriela A.; Rosa da Costa, Ana M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Gene therapy relies on efficient vector for a therapeutic effect. Efficient non-viral vectors are sought as an alternative to viral vectors. Chitosan, a cationic polymer, has been studied for its gene delivery potential. In this work, disulfide bond containing groups were covalently added to chitosan to improve the transfection efficiency. These bonds can be cleaved by cytoplasmic glutathione, thus, releasing the DNA load more efficiently. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Chitosan and thiolated chitosan nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared in order to obtain a NH3+:PO4− ratio of 5:1 and characterized for plasmid DNA complexation and release efficiency. Cytotoxicity and gene delivery studies were carried out on retinal pigment epithelial cells. RESULTS: In this work, we show that chitosan was effectively modified to incorporate a disulfide bond. The transfection efficiency of chitosan and thiolated chitosan varied according to the cell line used, however, thiolation did not seem to significantly improve transfection efficiency. CONCLUSION: The apparent lack of improvement in transfection efficiency of the thiolated chitosan NPs is most likely due to its size increase and charge inversion relatively to chitosan. Therefore, for retinal cells, thiolated chitosan does not seem to constitute an efficient strategy for gene delivery. PMID:23833516

  19. Inhibitory Effect of Bone Morphogenetic Protein 4 in Retinal Pigment Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition.

    PubMed

    Yao, Haipei; Li, Hui; Yang, Shuai; Li, Min; Zhao, Chun; Zhang, Jingfa; Xu, Guotong; Wang, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR), a serious vision-threatening complication of retinal detachment (RD), is characterized by the formation of contractile fibrotic membranes, in which epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a major event. Recent studies suggest an important role of bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) in the suppression of fibrosis. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role of BMP4 in the pathological process of PVR, particularly in the EMT of RPE cells. We found that BMP4 and its receptors were co-labelled with cytokeratin and α-SMA positive cells within the PVR membrane. Moreover, the mRNA and protein expression levels of BMP4 were decreased whereas BMP4 receptors ALK2, ALK3 and ALK6 were increased during TGF-β-induced EMT in primary RPE cells. Exogenous BMP4 inhibited TGF-β-induced epithelial marker down-regulation, as well as mesenchymal marker up-regulation at both the mRNA and protein levels in RPE cells. In addition, BMP4 treatment attenuated the TGF-β-induced gel contraction, cell migration and Smad2/3 phosphorylation. However, knockdown of endogenous BMP4 stimulated changes in EMT markers. Our results confirm the hypothesis that BMP4 might inhibit TGF-β-mediated EMT in RPE cells via the Smad2/3 pathway and suppress contraction. This might represent a potential treatment for PVR. PMID:27586653

  20. EFFICIENT GENE TRANSFER TO RETINAL PIGMENT EPITHELIUM CELLS WITH LONG-TERM EXPRESSION

    PubMed Central

    CHENG, LINGYUN; TOYOGUCHI, MITSUKO; LOONEY, DAVID J.; LEE, JEFFERY; DAVIDSON, MARIE C.; FREEMAN, WILLIAM R.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the safety and efficiency of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) vectors for gene delivery into the mammalian retina. Methods A first-generation FIV vector was constructed and administered into rabbit eyes at two different concentrations by intravitreal or subretinal routes. A second-generation FIV vector was also constructed and administered subretinally into both rabbit and rat eyes at the same concentration. After vector administration, eyes were monitored using slit-lamp biomicroscopy, indirect ophthalmoscopy, fundus photography, and electroretinogram. After the rabbits were killed, eye tissues were processed for light microscopy and immunohistochemical analysis. Results Administration of both first- and second-generation FIV vectors produced transient vitritis and/or papillitis in rabbits, without other pathologic abnormalities. Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells were the predominant cell type transduced in rabbit eyes, but ganglion cells and Müller cells were also transduced. Transduction was confined to the retinal bleb area. The second-generation FIV vector transduced RPE cells much more efficiently than the first-generation vector (95% vs. 4.5%, respectively; P = 0.0015) in rabbit eyes. In contrast, no toxicity was evident over a 24- to 25-month follow-up period after injection of the second-generation FIV vector into rat eyes. Tropism in the rat eye was similar, including RPE and ganglion cells, and the RPE transduction rate was also high (50%). Transgene expression was persistent in both species over the duration of the experiment. Conclusion Second-generation FIV vectors can efficiently transfer genes into RPE cells with resulting long-term expression, properties potentially valuable to gene therapy approaches to some retinal diseases. PMID:15689811

  1. AGEs Promote Oxidative Stress and Induce Apoptosis in Retinal Pigmented Epithelium Cells RAGE-dependently.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-Ling; Yu, Tao; Yan, Qi-Chang; Wang, Wei; Meng, Nan; Li, Xue-Jiao; Luo, Ya-Hong

    2015-06-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are extremely accumulated in diabetes mellitus, particularly in retinal vascular and epithelium cells, and are confirmed to contribute to diabetic retinopathy (DR). In the present study, we determined the promotion by AGEs to the oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in retinal pigmented epithelium ARPE-19 cells and investigated the influence by the knockdown or the overexpression of receptor for AGEs (RAGE) on the AGE-promoted oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Furthermore, we determined the induction by AGEs to the cell apoptosis and to the activation of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) families in the AGE-BSA-induced apoptosis, and examined the RAGE-dependence in such induction. Results demonstrated that AGE-BSA upregulated the hydrogen peroxide production and induced mitochondrial dysfunction in ARPE-19 cells, dose-dependently. And the further investigation indicated that the AGE-RAGE interaction was required for the induction of oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Moreover, the AGE-BSA treatment promoted a significantly high level of apoptotic cells, and the Bcl-2 family was implicated in the AGE-BSA-induced apoptosis, there was a significant high level of Cyt c release, Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) induction, Bcl-2 reduction, and caspase 9 activation in the AGE-BSA-treated cells. In conclusion, the present study recognized the apoptosis induction by AGE-BSAs in the retinal epithelium ARPE-19 cells, RAGE-dependently. The mitochondrial dysfunction was induced, and the Bcl-2 family was deregulated during the AGE-BSA-induced ARPE-19 cell apoptosis. PMID:25682235

  2. Phototoxicity and cytotoxicity of fullerol in human retinal pigment epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wielgus, Albert R.; Zhao, Baozhong; Chignell, Colin F.; Hu, Dan-Ning; Roberts, Joan E.

    2010-01-01

    The water-soluble nanoparticle hydroxylated fullerene [fullerol, nano-C{sub 60}(OH){sub 22-26}] has several clinical applications including use as a drug carrier to bypass the blood ocular barriers. We have previously found that fullerol is both cytotoxic and phototoxic to human lens epithelial cells (HLE B-3) and that the endogenous antioxidant lutein blocked some of this phototoxicity. In the present study we have found that fullerol induces cytotoxic and phototoxic damage to human retinal pigment epithelial cells. Accumulation of nano-C{sub 60}(OH){sub 22-26} in the cells was confirmed spectrophotometrically at 405 nm, and cell viability, cell metabolism and membrane permeability were estimated using trypan blue, MTS and LDH assays, respectively. Fullerol was cytotoxic toward hRPE cells maintained in the dark at concentrations higher than 10 muM. Exposure to an 8.5 J.cm{sup -2} dose of visible light in the presence of > 5 muM fullerol induced TBARS formation and early apoptosis, indicating phototoxic damage in the form of lipid peroxidation. Pretreatment with 10 and 20 muM lutein offered some protection against fullerol photodamage. Using time resolved photophysical techniques, we have now confirmed that fullerol produces singlet oxygen with a quantum yield of PHI = 0.05 in D{sub 2}O and with a range of 0.002-0.139 in various solvents. As our previous studies have shown that fullerol also produces superoxide in the presence of light, retinal phototoxic damage may occur through both type I (free radical) and type II (singlet oxygen) mechanisms. In conclusion, ocular exposure to fullerol, particularly in the presence of sunlight, may lead to retinal damage.

  3. Isolation of Intact and Functional Melanosomes from the Retinal Pigment Epithelium.

    PubMed

    Pelkonen, Laura; Reinisalo, Mika; Morin-Picardat, Emmanuelle; Kidron, Heidi; Urtti, Arto

    2016-01-01

    Melanosomes of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) have many vision supporting functions. Melanosome research would benefit from a method to isolate pure and characterized melanosomes. Sucrose gradient centrifugation is the most commonly used method for isolation of RPE melanosomes, but the isolated products are insufficiently characterized and their quality is unclear. Here we introduce a new gentle method for fractionation of porcine RPE that produces intact functional melanosomes with minimal cross-contamination from other cell organelles. The characterization of isolated organelles was conducted with several methods confirming the purity of the isolated melanosomal fraction (transmission electron microscopy, immunoblotting) and presence of the melanosomal membrane (fluorescence staining of melanosomal membrane, zeta potential measurement). We demonstrate that our isolation method produces RPE melanosomes with the ability to generate free phosphate (Pi) from ATP thereby proving that many membrane proteins remain functional after isolation. The isolated porcine RPE melanosomes represented V-type H+ATPase activity that was demonstrated with bafilomycin A1, a specific V-ATPase inhibitor. We anticipate that the isolation method described here can easily be optimized for the isolation of stage IV melanosomes from other pigmented cell types and tissues. PMID:27551967

  4. Alterations of retinal pigment epithelium cause AMD-like retinopathy in senescence-accelerated OXYS rats

    PubMed Central

    Markovets, Anton M.; Saprunova, Valeriya B.; Zhdankina, Anna A.; Fursova, Anzhella Zh.; Bakeeva, Lora E.; Kolosova, Natalia G.

    2011-01-01

    Pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of blindness in the world, remains poorly understood. This makes it necessary to create animal models for studying AMD pathogenesis and to design new therapeutic approaches. Here we showed that retinopathy in OXYS rats is similar to human AMD according to clinical signs, morphology, and vascular endothelium growth factor (VEGF) and pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) genes expression. Clinical signs of retinopathy OXYS rats manifest by the age 3 months against the background of significantly reduced expression level of VEGF and PEDF genes due to the decline of the amount of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells and alteration of choroidal microcirculation. The disruption in OXYS rats' retina starts at the age of 20 days and appears as reduce the area of RPE cells but does not affect their ultrastructure. Ultrastructural pathological alterations of RPE as well as develop forms of retinopathy are observed in OXYS rats from age 12 months and manifested as excessive accumulation of lipofuscin in RPE regions adjacent to the rod cells, whirling extentions of the basement membrane into the cytoplasm. These data suggest that primary cellular degenerative alterations in the RPE cells secondarily lead to choriocapillaris atrophy and results in complete loss of photoreceptor cells in the OXYS rats' retina by the age of 24 months. PMID:21191149

  5. Isolation of Intact and Functional Melanosomes from the Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Pelkonen, Laura; Reinisalo, Mika; Morin-Picardat, Emmanuelle; Kidron, Heidi; Urtti, Arto

    2016-01-01

    Melanosomes of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) have many vision supporting functions. Melanosome research would benefit from a method to isolate pure and characterized melanosomes. Sucrose gradient centrifugation is the most commonly used method for isolation of RPE melanosomes, but the isolated products are insufficiently characterized and their quality is unclear. Here we introduce a new gentle method for fractionation of porcine RPE that produces intact functional melanosomes with minimal cross-contamination from other cell organelles. The characterization of isolated organelles was conducted with several methods confirming the purity of the isolated melanosomal fraction (transmission electron microscopy, immunoblotting) and presence of the melanosomal membrane (fluorescence staining of melanosomal membrane, zeta potential measurement). We demonstrate that our isolation method produces RPE melanosomes with the ability to generate free phosphate (Pi) from ATP thereby proving that many membrane proteins remain functional after isolation. The isolated porcine RPE melanosomes represented V-type H+ATPase activity that was demonstrated with bafilomycin A1, a specific V-ATPase inhibitor. We anticipate that the isolation method described here can easily be optimized for the isolation of stage IV melanosomes from other pigmented cell types and tissues. PMID:27551967

  6. Retinal pigment epithelium, age-related macular degeneration and neurotrophic keratouveitis.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Enrica; Scarinci, Fabio; Ripandelli, Guido; Feher, Janos; Pacella, Elena; Magliulo, Giuseppe; Gabrieli, Corrado Balacco; Plateroti, Rocco; Plateroti, Pasquale; Mignini, Fiorenzo; Artico, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of impaired vision and blindness in the aging population. The aims of our studies were to identify qualitative and quantitative alterations in mitochondria in human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) from AMD patients and controls and to test the protective effects of pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), a known neurotrophic and antiangiogenic substance, against neurotrophic keratouveitis. Histopathological alterations were studied by means of morphometry, light and electron microscopy. Unexpectedly, morphometric data showed that the RPE alterations noted in AMD may also develop in normal aging, 10-15 years later than appearing in AMD patients. Reduced tear secretion, corneal ulceration and leukocytic infiltration were found in capsaicin (CAP)-treated rats, but this effect was significantly attenuated by PEDF. These findings suggest that PEDF accelerated the recovery of tear secretion and also prevented neurotrophic keratouveitis and vitreoretinal inflammation. PEDF may have a clinical application in inflammatory and neovascular diseases of the eye. PMID:23128960

  7. Effect of Storage Temperature on Key Functions of Cultured Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pasovic, Lara; Eidet, Jon Roger; Brusletto, Berit S.; Lyberg, Torstein; Utheim, Tor P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Replacement of the diseased retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) with cells capable of performing the specialized functions of the RPE is the aim of cell replacement therapy for treatment of macular degenerative diseases. A storage method for RPE is likely to become a prerequisite for the establishment of such treatment. Herein, we analyze the effect of storage temperature on key functions of cultured RPE cells. Methods. Cultured ARPE-19 cells were stored in Minimum Essential Medium at 4°C, 16°C, and 37°C for seven days. Total RNA was isolated and the gene expression profile was determined using DNA microarrays. Comparison of the microarray expression values with qRT-PCR analysis of selected genes validated the results. Results. Expression levels of several key genes involved in phagocytosis, pigment synthesis, the visual cycle, adherens, and tight junctions, and glucose and ion transport were maintained close to control levels in cultures stored at 4°C and 16°C. Cultures stored at 37°C displayed regulational changes in a larger subset of genes related to phagocytosis, adherens, and tight junctions. Conclusion. RPE cultures stored at 4°C and 16°C for one week are capable of maintaining the expression levels of genes important for key RPE functions close to control levels. PMID:26448872

  8. Photochemistry and photocytotoxicity of alkaloids from Goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis L.) 3: effect on human lens and retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chignell, Colin F; Sik, Robert H; Watson, Mary A; Wielgus, Albert R

    2007-01-01

    The dried root or rhizome of Goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis L.) contains several alkaloids including berberine, hydrastine, palmatine and lesser amounts of canadine and hydrastinine. Preparations derived from Goldenseal have been used to treat skin and eye ailments. Berberine, the major alkaloid in Goldenseal root powder, has been used in eye drops to treat trachoma, a disease characterized by keratoconjunctivitis. Berberine and palmatine are also present in extracts from Berberis amurensis Ruprecht (Berberidaceae) which are used to treat ocular disorders. We have previously shown that Goldenseal alkaloids are phototoxic to keratinocytes (Chem Res Toxicol. 14, 1529, 2001; ibid 19, 739, 2006) and now report their effect on human lens and retinal pigment epithelial cells. Human lens epithelial cells (HLE-B3) were severely damaged when incubated with berberine (25 microM) and exposed to UVA (5 J cm(-2)). Under the same conditions, palmatine was less phototoxic and hydrastine, canadine and hydrastinine were inactive. Moderate protection against berberine phototoxicity was afforded by the antioxidants ascorbate (2 mM) and N-acetylcysteine (5 mM). When exposed to UVA (5 J cm(-2)) both berberine (10 microM) and palmatine (10 microM) caused mild DNA damage as determined by the alkaline comet assay which measures single strand breaks. Berberine and palmatine are the only Goldenseal alkaloids with appreciable absorption above 400 nm. Because light at wavelengths below 400 nm is cut off by the anterior portion of the adult human eye only berberine and palmatine were tested for phototoxicity to human retinal pigment epithelial (hRPE) cells. Although berberine did damage hRPE cells when irradiated with visible light (lambda > 400 nm) approximately 10 times higher concentrations were required to produce the same amount of damage as seen in lens cells. Palmatine was not phototoxic to hRPE cells. Neither berberine nor palmatine photodamaged DNA in hRPE. Infusions of Goldenseal

  9. Retbindin Is an Extracellular Riboflavin-binding Protein Found at the Photoreceptor/Retinal Pigment Epithelium Interface*

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Ryan A.; Al-Ubaidi, Muayyad R.; Naash, Muna I.

    2015-01-01

    Retbindin is a novel retina-specific protein of unknown function. In this study, we have used various approaches to evaluate protein expression, localization, biochemical properties, and function. We find that retbindin is secreted by the rod photoreceptors into the inter-photoreceptor matrix where it is maintained via electrostatic forces. Retbindin is predominantly localized at the interface between photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium microvilli, a region critical for retinal function and homeostasis. Interestingly, although it is associated with photoreceptor outer segments, retbindin's expression is not dependent on their presence. In vitro, retbindin is capable of binding riboflavin, thus implicating the protein as a metabolite carrier between the retina and the retinal pigment epithelium. Altogether, our data show that retbindin is a novel photoreceptor-specific protein with a unique localization and function. We hypothesize that retbindin is an excellent candidate for binding retinal flavins and possibly participating in their transport from the extracellular space to the photoreceptors. Further investigations are warranted to determine the exact function of retbindin in retinal homeostasis and disease. PMID:25542898

  10. Efficiency of Membrane Protein Expression Following Infection with Recombinant Adenovirus of Polarized Non-Transformed Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Müller, Claudia; Blenkinsop, Timothy A; Stern, Jeffrey H; Finnemann, Silvia C

    2016-01-01

    Transient expression of exogenous proteins facilitates studies of molecular mechanisms and utility for transplantation of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in culture. Here, we compared expression of the membrane protein β5 integrin-GFP (β5-GFP) in two recently established models of differentiated human RPE, adult RPE stem cell-derived RPE and primary fetal RPE, upon infection with recombinant adenovirus or transfection with DNA in liposomes. We varied viral titer and duration of virus incubation and examined β5-GFP and the tight junction marker ZO-1 in manipulated cells by confocal microscopy. Fewer than 5 % of cells expressed β5-GFP after liposome-mediated transfection. The percentage of cells with detectable β5-GFP exceeded 90 % after adenovirus infection for as little as 1 h. Decreasing virus titer two-fold did not alter the fraction of cells expressing β5-GFP but increased variability of β5-GFP level among cells. In cells with low expression levels, β5-GFP localized mostly to the apical plasma membrane like endogenous αvβ5 integrin. In cells with high expression levels, β5-GFP localized to the cytoplasm in addition to the apical surface suggesting accumulation in trafficking compartments. Altogether, adenovirus delivery yields efficient exogenous membrane protein expression of correct polarity in differentiated human RPE cells in culture. PMID:26427482

  11. Conditional Ablation of Retinol Dehydrogenase 10 in the Retinal Pigmented Epithelium Causes Delayed Dark Adaption in Mice.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Bhubanananda; Sun, Wenyu; Perusek, Lindsay; Parmar, Vipulkumar; Le, Yun-Zheng; Griswold, Michael D; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Maeda, Akiko

    2015-11-01

    Regeneration of the visual chromophore, 11-cis-retinal, is a crucial step in the visual cycle required to sustain vision. This cycle consists of sequential biochemical reactions that occur in photoreceptor cells and the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE). Oxidation of 11-cis-retinol to 11-cis-retinal is accomplished by a family of enzymes termed 11-cis-retinol dehydrogenases, including RDH5 and RDH11. Double deletion of Rdh5 and Rdh11 does not limit the production of 11-cis-retinal in mice. Here we describe a third retinol dehydrogenase in the RPE, RDH10, which can produce 11-cis-retinal. Mice with a conditional knock-out of Rdh10 in RPE cells (Rdh10 cKO) displayed delayed 11-cis-retinal regeneration and dark adaption after bright light illumination. Retinal function measured by electroretinogram after light exposure was also delayed in Rdh10 cKO mice as compared with controls. Double deletion of Rdh5 and Rdh10 (cDKO) in mice caused elevated 11/13-cis-retinyl ester content also seen in Rdh5(-/-)Rdh11(-/-) mice as compared with Rdh5(-/-) mice. Normal retinal morphology was observed in 6-month-old Rdh10 cKO and cDKO mice, suggesting that loss of Rdh10 in the RPE does not negatively affect the health of the retina. Compensatory expression of other retinol dehydrogenases was observed in both Rdh5(-/-) and Rdh10 cKO mice. These results indicate that RDH10 acts in cooperation with other RDH isoforms to produce the 11-cis-retinal chromophore needed for vision. PMID:26391396

  12. Phototoxic Action Spectrum on a Retinal Pigment Epithelium Model of Age-Related Macular Degeneration Exposed to Sunlight Normalized Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Arnault, Emilie; Barrau, Coralie; Nanteau, Céline; Gondouin, Pauline; Bigot, Karine; Viénot, Françoise; Gutman, Emmanuel; Fontaine, Valérie; Villette, Thierry; Cohen-Tannoudji, Denis; Sahel, José-Alain; Picaud, Serge

    2013-01-01

    Among the identified risk factors of age-related macular degeneration, sunlight is known to induce cumulative damage to the retina. A photosensitive derivative of the visual pigment, N-retinylidene-N-retinylethanolamine (A2E), may be involved in this phototoxicity. The high energy visible light between 380 nm and 500 nm (blue light) is incriminated. Our aim was to define the most toxic wavelengths in the blue-green range on an in vitro model of the disease. Primary cultures of porcine retinal pigment epithelium cells were incubated for 6 hours with different A2E concentrations and exposed for 18 hours to 10 nm illumination bands centered from 380 to 520 nm in 10 nm increments. Light irradiances were normalized with respect to the natural sunlight reaching the retina. Six hours after light exposure, cell viability, necrosis and apoptosis were assessed using the Apotox-Glo Triplex™ assay. Retinal pigment epithelium cells incubated with A2E displayed fluorescent bodies within the cytoplasm. Their absorption and emission spectra were similar to those of A2E. Exposure to 10 nm illumination bands induced a loss in cell viability with a dose dependence upon A2E concentrations. Irrespective of A2E concentration, the loss of cell viability was maximal for wavelengths from 415 to 455 nm. Cell viability decrease was correlated to an increase in cell apoptosis indicated by caspase-3/7 activities in the same spectral range. No light-elicited necrosis was measured as compared to control cells maintained in darkness. Our results defined the precise spectrum of light retinal toxicity in physiological irradiance conditions on an in vitro model of age-related macular degeneration. Surprisingly, a narrow bandwidth in blue light generated the greatest phototoxic risk to retinal pigment epithelium cells. This phototoxic spectrum may be advantageously valued in designing selective photoprotection ophthalmic filters, without disrupting essential visual and non-visual functions of the

  13. Changes in spectral properties and composition of lipofuscin fluorophores from human-retinal-pigment epithelium with age and pathology.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Tatiana B; Yakovleva, Marina A; Arbukhanova, Patimat M; Borzenok, Sergey A; Kononikhin, Alexey S; Popov, Igor A; Nikolaev, Evgeny N; Ostrovsky, Mikhail A

    2015-02-01

    Fundus autofluorescence mostly originates from bisretinoid fluorophores in lipofuscin granules, which accumulate in retinal-pigment-epithelium cells with age. The dynamics of accumulation, photo-oxidation, and photodegradation of bisretinoids during aging or in the presence of pathology have been insufficiently investigated. Changes in spectral properties and composition of human lipofuscin-granule fluorophores with age and pathology have now been investigated by a high-performance liquid chromatography method using spectrophotometric and fluorescent detectors connected in series. It was found that: (i) N-retinylidene-N-retinylethanolamine (A2E) fluorescence intensity is not predominant in the chloroform extract of human-cadaver-eye retinal pigment epithelium studied; bisretinoid photo-oxidation and photodegradation products have much higher fluorescent properties; (ii) the relative emission maximum in the fluorescence spectrum of suspended retinal-pigment-epithelium cells obtained from an individual human-cadaver eye without pathology is irrespective of donor age and falls within the range 575 ± 15 nm; in two cadaver eyes with signs of age-related macular degeneration, emission maxima were shifted by 23-36 nm towards the shortwave region; and (iii) the ratio of bisretinoid photo-oxidation and photodegradation products to unoxidized bisretinoids in the chloroform extract of cadaver-eye retinal pigment epithelium increases with donor age, from 0.69 ± 0.03 to 1.32 ± 0.04. The differences in fluorescence properties between chloroform extracts obtained from cadaver eyes with and without signs of age-related macular degeneration could be used to increase the potential of fundus autofluorescence imaging as a noninvasive diagnostic method. PMID:25471291

  14. Upregulation of GADD45α in light-damaged retinal pigment epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Gao, M-L; Deng, W-L; Huang, N; Wang, Y-Y; Lei, X-L; Xu, Z-Q; Hu, D-N; Cai, J-Q; Lu, F; Jin, Z-B

    2016-01-01

    To better understand the molecular mechanisms responsible for light-induced damage in retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells, we developed an automated device to recapitulate intense light exposure. When compared with human fibroblasts, ARPE-19 cells that had been exposed to blue-rich light-emitting diode-light of 10 000 Lux at 37 °C for 9 h displayed dramatic cellular apoptosis. Collectively, gene expression profiling and qPCR demonstrated that growth arrest and DNA damage-45α (GADD45α) expression was markedly upregulated. Transient knockdown of GADD45α partially attenuated light-damage-induced apoptosis in ARPE-19 cells, whereas GADD45α overexpression dramatically increased it. These results demonstrate the critical function of GADD45α in light-induced RPE cellular apoptosis. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR and western blotting revealed that the upregulation of GADD45α was under direct control of p53. Moreover, treatment with Ly294002, an inhibitor of AKT phosphorylation, further promoted GADD45α gene transcription in both non-light and light-damaged ARPE-19 cells. Treatment also exacerbated RPE cellular apoptosis after light exposure, confirming that inhibition of Akt phosphorylation increases GADD45α expression. Collectively, our findings reveal that light irrigation induces human RPE cellular apoptosis through upregulation of GADD45α expression mediated through both the p53 and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-AKT signaling pathways. These results provide new insights into human retinal diseases elicited by light damage and open a new avenue for disease prevention and treatment. PMID:27551507

  15. Deletion of autophagy inducer RB1CC1 results in degeneration of the retinal pigment epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jingyu; Jia, Lin; Khan, Naheed; Lin, Chengmao; Mitter, Sayak K; Boulton, Michael E; Dunaief, Joshua L; Klionsky, Daniel J; Guan, Jun-Lin; Thompson, Debra A; Zacks, David N

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy regulates cellular homeostasis and response to environmental stress. Within the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) of the eye, the level of autophagy can change with both age and disease. The purpose of this study is to determine the relationship between reduced autophagy and age-related degeneration of the RPE. The gene encoding RB1CC1/FIP200 (RB1-inducible coiled-coil 1), a protein essential for induction of autophagy, was selectively knocked out in the RPE by crossing Best1-Cre mice with mice in which the Rb1cc1 gene was flanked with Lox-P sites (Rb1cc1flox/flox). Ex vivo and in vivo analyses, including western blot, immunohistochemistry, transmission electron microscopy, fundus photography, optical coherence tomography, fluorescein angiography, and electroretinography were performed to assess the structure and function of the retina as a function of age. Deletion of Rb1cc1 resulted in multiple autophagy defects within the RPE including decreased conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II, accumulation of autophagy-targeted precursors, and increased numbers of mitochondria. Age-dependent degeneration of the RPE occurred, with formation of atrophic patches, subretinal migration of activated microglial cells, subRPE deposition of inflammatory and oxidatively damaged proteins, subretinal drusenoid deposits, and occasional foci of choroidal neovascularization. There was secondary loss of photoreceptors overlying the degenerated RPE and reduction in the electroretinogram. These observations are consistent with a critical role of autophagy in the maintenance of normal homeostasis in the aging RPE, and indicate that disruption of autophagy leads to retinal phenotypes associated with age-related degeneration. PMID:26075877

  16. Protection of photoreceptor cells from phototoxicity by transplanted retinal pigment epithelial cells expressing different neurotrophic factors.

    PubMed

    Abe, Toshiaki; Saigo, Yoko; Hojo, Masayoshi; Kano, Tetsuya; Wakusawa, Ryosuke; Tokita, Yumi; Tamai, Makoto

    2005-01-01

    Transplantation of cells or tissues and the intravitreal injection of neurotrophic factors are two methods that have been used to treat retinal diseases. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of combining both methods: the transplantation of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells expressing different neurotrophic factors. The neutrophic factors were Axokine, brain derived-neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). The enhanced green fluorescence protein (eGFP) gene was used as a reporter gene. These genes were transduced into RPE cells by lipofection, selected by antibiotics, and transplanted into the subretinal space of 108 rats. The rats were examined at 1 week and 3 months after the transplantation to determine whether the transduced cells were present, were expressing the protein, and were able to protect photoreceptors against phototoxicity. The survival of the transplanted cells was monitored by the presence of eGFP. The degree of protection was determined by the thickness of the outer nuclear layer. Our results showed that the degree of photoreceptor protection was different for the different types of neurotrophic factors at 1 week. After 3 months, the number of surviving transplanted cell was markedly reduced, and protection was observed only with the BDNF-transduced RPE cells. A significant degree of rescue was also observed by BDNF-transduced RPE cells in the nontransplanted area of the retina at both the early and late times. Lymphocytic infiltration was not detected in the vitreous, retina, and choroid at any time. We conclude that the transplantation of BDNF-transduced RPE cells can reduce the photoreceptor damage induced by phototoxicity in the transplanted area and weakly in the nontransplanted area. PMID:16454354

  17. Trichostatin A Inhibits Retinal Pigmented Epithelium Activation in an In Vitro Model of Proliferative Vitreoretinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Whitney A.; Burke, Teresa A.; Wang, Heuy-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) is a blinding disorder that develops after a retinal tear or detachment. Activation of the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) is implicated in PVR; however, the mechanisms leading to enhanced RPE proliferation, migration, and contraction remain largely unknown. This study utilized an in vitro model of PVR to investigate the role of acetylation in RPE activation and its contribution to the progression of this disease. Methods: ARPE-19 cells, primary cultures of porcine RPE, and induced pluripotent stem cell-derived RPE (iPS-RPE) were utilized for cellular and molecular analyses. Cells treated with transforming growth factor beta 2 (TGFβ2; 10 ng/mL) alone or in the presence of the broad-spectrum histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, trichostatin A (TSA; 0.1 μM), were assessed for contraction and migration through collagen contraction and scratch assays, respectively. Western blotting and immunofluorescence analysis were performed to assess α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and β-catenin expression after TGFβ2 treatment alone or in combination with TSA. Results: TGFβ2 significantly increased RPE cell contraction in collagen matrix and this effect was inhibited in the presence of TSA (0.1 μM). In agreement with these data, immunofluorescence analysis of TSA-treated iPS-RPE wounded monolayers revealed decreased α-SMA as compared with control. Scratch assays to assess wound healing revealed TSA inhibited TGFβ2-mediated iPS-RPE cell migration. Conclusions: Our findings indicate a role of acetylation in RPE activation. Specifically, the HDAC inhibitor TSA decreased RPE cell proliferation and TGFβ2-mediated cell contraction and migration. Further investigation of pharmacological compounds that modulate acetylation may hold promise as therapeutic agents for PVR. PMID:27494828

  18. Imaging human retinal pigment epithelium cells using adaptive optics optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhuolin; Kocaoglu, Omer P.; Turner, Timothy L.; Miller, Donald T.

    2016-03-01

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells are vital to health of the outer retina, but are often compromised in ageing and major ocular diseases that lead to blindness. Early manifestation of RPE disruption occurs at the cellular level, and while biomarkers at this scale hold considerable promise, RPE cells have proven extremely challenging to image in the living human eye. We present a novel method based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) equipped with adaptive optics (AO) that overcomes the associated technical obstacles. The method takes advantage of the 3D resolution of AO-OCT, but more critically sub-cellular segmentation and registration that permit organelle motility to be used as a novel contrast mechanism. With this method, we successfully visualized RPE cells and characterized their 3D reflectance profile in every subject and retinal location (3° and 7° temporal to the fovea) imaged to date. We have quantified RPE packing geometry in terms of cell density, cone-to-RPE ratio, and number of nearest neighbors using Voronoi and power spectra analyses. RPE cell density (cells/mm2) showed no significant difference between 3° (4,892+/-691) and 7° (4,780+/-354). In contrast, cone-to- RPE ratio was significantly higher at 3° (3.88+/-0.52:1) than 7° (2.31+/- 0.23:1). Voronoi analysis also showed most RPE cells have six nearest neighbors, which was significantly larger than the next two most prevalent associations: five and seven. Averaged across the five subjects, prevalence of cells with six neighbors was 51.4+/-3.58% at 3°, and 54.58+/-3.01% at 7°. These results are consistent with histology and in vivo studies using other imaging modalities.

  19. Transport of thiol-conjugates of inorganic mercury in human retinal pigment epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bridges, Christy C. . E-mail: bridges_cc@mercer.edu; Battle, Jamie R.; Zalups, Rudolfs K.

    2007-06-01

    Inorganic mercury (Hg{sup 2+}) is a prevalent environmental contaminant to which exposure to can damage rod photoreceptor cells and compromise scotopic vision. The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) likely plays a role in the ocular toxicity associated with Hg{sup 2+} exposure in that it mediates transport of substances to the photoreceptor cells. In order for Hg{sup 2+} to access photoreceptor cells, it must first be taken up by the RPE, possibly by mechanisms involving transporters of essential nutrients. In other epithelia, Hg{sup 2+}, when conjugated to cysteine (Cys) or homocysteine (Hcy), gains access to the intracellular compartment of the target cells via amino acid and organic anion transporters. Accordingly, the purpose of the current study was to test the hypothesis that Cys and Hcy S-conjugates of Hg{sup 2+} utilize amino acid transporters to gain access into RPE cells. Time- and temperature-dependence, saturation kinetics, and substrate-specificity of the transport of Hg{sup 2+}, was assessed in ARPE-19 cells exposed to the following S-conjugates of Hg{sup 2+}: Cys (Cys-S-Hg-S-Cys), Hcy (Hcy-S-Hg-S-Hcy), N-acetylcysteine (NAC-S-Hg-S-NAC) or glutathione (GSH-S-Hg-S-GSH). We discovered that only Cys-S-Hg-S-Cys and Hcy-S-Hg-S-Hcy were taken up by these cells. This transport was Na{sup +}-dependent and was inhibited by neutral and cationic amino acids. RT-PCR analyses identified systems B{sup 0,+} and ASC in ARPE-19 cells. Overall, our data suggest that Cys-S-Hg-S-Cys and Hcy-S-Hg-S-Hcy are taken up into ARPE-19 cells by Na-dependent amino acid transporters, possibly systems B{sup 0,+} and ASC. These amino acid transporters may play a role in the retinal toxicity observed following exposure to mercury.

  20. Upregulation of GADD45α in light-damaged retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, M-L; Deng, W-L; Huang, N; Wang, Y-Y; Lei, X-L; Xu, Z-Q; Hu, D-N; Cai, J-Q; Lu, F; Jin, Z-B

    2016-01-01

    To better understand the molecular mechanisms responsible for light-induced damage in retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells, we developed an automated device to recapitulate intense light exposure. When compared with human fibroblasts, ARPE-19 cells that had been exposed to blue-rich light-emitting diode-light of 10 000 Lux at 37 °C for 9 h displayed dramatic cellular apoptosis. Collectively, gene expression profiling and qPCR demonstrated that growth arrest and DNA damage-45α (GADD45α) expression was markedly upregulated. Transient knockdown of GADD45α partially attenuated light-damage-induced apoptosis in ARPE-19 cells, whereas GADD45α overexpression dramatically increased it. These results demonstrate the critical function of GADD45α in light-induced RPE cellular apoptosis. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR and western blotting revealed that the upregulation of GADD45α was under direct control of p53. Moreover, treatment with Ly294002, an inhibitor of AKT phosphorylation, further promoted GADD45α gene transcription in both non-light and light-damaged ARPE-19 cells. Treatment also exacerbated RPE cellular apoptosis after light exposure, confirming that inhibition of Akt phosphorylation increases GADD45α expression. Collectively, our findings reveal that light irrigation induces human RPE cellular apoptosis through upregulation of GADD45α expression mediated through both the p53 and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-AKT signaling pathways. These results provide new insights into human retinal diseases elicited by light damage and open a new avenue for disease prevention and treatment. PMID:27551507

  1. Absence of phosphoglucose isomerase-1 in retinal photoreceptor, pigment epithelium and Muller cells.

    PubMed

    Archer, Simon N; Ahuja, Poonam; Caffé, Romeo; Mikol, Catherine; Foster, Russell G; van Veen, Theo; von Schantz, Malcolm

    2004-06-01

    Macroarray analysis was used to compare equal amounts of cDNA from wild-type and rd/rd (retinal degeneration) mice, collected at P90 when photoreceptor degeneration is virtually complete. A stronger signal for the glycolytic enzyme phosphoglucose isomerase (Gpi1) was observed in the rd/rd sample. Extracellularly, Gpi1 may act as a cytokine, independently described as neuroleukin and autocrine motility factor. Retinal Gpi1 expression was investigated by Northern and Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. Double-labelling was performed with antibodies against Gpi1 and calbindin-D, glutamine synthetase, RPE65, calretinin and ultraviolet opsin in order to provide positive cell type identification. Northern and Western blots showed double expression levels per microgram of RNA and protein, respectively, in the rd/rd retina compared with wild-type. However, the total amount of Gpi1 protein per retina was indistinguishable. Gpi1 immunoreactivity was found in ganglion, amacrine, horizontal and bipolar cells, but not in rods, cones, pigment epithelium and Muller cells. This distribution explains why the absolute amounts of Gpi1 protein were not appreciably different between wild-type and the rd/rd phenotype, where rods and cones are absent, whilst the relative contribution of Gpi1 to the total protein and RNA pools differed. Some extracellular immunoreactivity was observed in the photoreceptor matrix around cones in freshly fixed tissue only, which could possibly reflect a role as a cytokine. We propose that glycolysis in Gpi1-negative cells proceeds entirely through the pentose phosphate pathway, creating NADPH at the cost of organic carbon. We hypothesize that the unique metabolic needs of photoreceptors justify this trade-off. PMID:15182299

  2. Recognition of mannose 6-phosphate ligands by dystrophic rat retinal pigment epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Tarnowski, B.; Shepherd, V.; McLaughlin, B.

    1986-05-01

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) phagocytize discarded rod outer segments (ROS) during normal eye function. In the dystrophic rat, an animal model for retinitis pigmentosa in humans, ROS phagocytosis is defective. Dystrophic RPE can phagocytize particles other than ROS, suggesting that the defect may be in the RPE phagocytic recognition. They are currently investigating the recognition markers on RPE in dystrophic rats. In studies using ligand-coated latex beads, no uptake of mannose-coated beads was found in dystrophic rat RPE. They found that dystrophic RPE could specifically phagocytize phosphomannan-coated beads. Studies were begun to examine the presence and function of a phosphomannan receptor (PMR) on dystrophic RPE. ..cap alpha..-Mannosidase, isolated from D. discoideum has been shown to be an efficient ligand for the PMR in fibroblasts and macrophages. It is also recognized by the macrophage mannose receptor. Dystrophic rat RPE and retina explants were placed in culture dishes (5-7/well). /sup 125/I-Labelled ..cap alpha..-mannosidase was added to each well in the presence or absence of 10 mM mannose 6-phosphate (M6P) or yeast mannan (lmg/ml). Explants were incubated at 37/sup 0/ for 2 hr., washed and bound /sup 125/I-mannosidase quantitated. Approximately 2-3% of total counts added were bound to the RPE via a M6P-inhibitable recognition process. The binding to RPE was not blocked by mannan. No mannan or M6P-specific binding was found in retina explants. These results support the findings of specific uptake of phosphomannan-coated beads and demonstrate the presence of a specific PMR on dystrophic RPE phagocytic membranes.

  3. Bestrophin 1 is indispensable for volume regulation in human retinal pigment epithelium cells

    PubMed Central

    Milenkovic, Andrea; Brandl, Caroline; Milenkovic, Vladimir M.; Jendryke, Thomas; Sirianant, Lalida; Wanitchakool, Potchanart; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Reiff, Charlotte M.; Horling, Franziska; Schrewe, Heinrich; Schreiber, Rainer; Kunzelmann, Karl; Wetzel, Christian H.; Weber, Bernhard H. F.

    2015-01-01

    In response to cell swelling, volume-regulated anion channels (VRACs) participate in a process known as regulatory volume decrease (RVD). Only recently, first insight into the molecular identity of mammalian VRACs was obtained by the discovery of the leucine-rich repeats containing 8A (LRRC8A) gene. Here, we show that bestrophin 1 (BEST1) but not LRRC8A is crucial for volume regulation in human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in RPE derived from human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) exhibit an outwardly rectifying chloride current with characteristic functional properties of VRACs. This current is severely reduced in hiPSC-RPE cells derived from macular dystrophy patients with pathologic BEST1 mutations. Disruption of the orthologous mouse gene (Best1−/−) does not result in obvious retinal pathology but leads to a severe subfertility phenotype in agreement with minor endogenous expression of Best1 in murine RPE but highly abundant expression in mouse testis. Sperm from Best1−/− mice showed reduced motility and abnormal sperm morphology, indicating an inability in RVD. Together, our data suggest that the molecular identity of VRACs is more complex—that is, instead of a single ubiquitous channel, VRACs could be formed by cell type- or tissue-specific subunit composition. Our findings provide the basis to further examine VRAC diversity in normal and diseased cell physiology, which is key to exploring novel therapeutic approaches in VRAC-associated pathologies. PMID:25941382

  4. Effect of cytokeratin 17 on retinal pigment epithelium degeneration and choroidal neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yi; Zhuang, Pei; Xiao, Tao; Chiou, George CY

    2016-01-01

    AIM To study the effects of cytokeratin 17 (CK17) on sodium iodate (NaIO3) induced rat retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) degeneration, laser induced rat choroidal neovascularization (CNV), and oxidative stress of human retinal pigment epithelium cells (ARPE-19) and human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC). METHODS Thirty 8-week-old male Brown Norway rats were randomly divided into 3 groups, 10 rats in control group treated with solvent alone; 10 rats in NaIO3 group treated with solvent and 35 mg/kg NaIO3 injection through hypoglossal vein and 10 rats in CK17+NaIO3 group treated with 1% CK17 eye drop 3 times a day for 1wk before and 4wk after NaIO3 injection. RPE function was measured with c-wave of electroretinogram (ERG). Another 20 rats were randomly divided into 2 groups. Of them 10 rats in CK17 group were anesthetized to receive Nd:YAG laser and given 1% CK17 eye drop before same as above; 10 rats in control were received Nd:YAG and treated with solvent. The development of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) was determined by fundus fluorescein angiography (FFA) performed on 4wk after laser. Methylthiazoly tetrazolium (MTT) assay was used to study effect of CK17 on various oxidants induced injury in ARPE-19 and HUVEC in vitro. RESULTS Four weeks after NaIO3 injection, the c-wave amplitude of ERG was 0.393±0.02 V in the control group, 0.184±0.018 V in NaIO3 group and 0.3±0.01 V in CK17+NaIO3 group. There was a significant reversal of the c-wave by CK17 as compared to NaIO3 group (P<0.01). Four weeks after laser, the size of the CNV lesion was 2.57±0.27 mm2 in control group and 1.64±0.08 mm2 in CK17 group. The lesion size significantly diminished in CK17 group (P<0.01). The in vitro results showed CK17 also reversed the various oxidants induced injuries in ARPE-19 at the dose of 100 µg/mL and enhanced the injury in HUVECs at different concentrations. CONCLUSION CK17 can significantly protect RPE from NaIO3 induced degeneration in vivo and in vitro and

  5. Photobiomodulation with 670 nm light increased phagocytosis in human retinal pigment epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Fuma, Shinichiro; Murase, Hiromi; Kuse, Yoshiki; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Shimazawa, Masamitsu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Photobiomodulation is the treatment with light in the far-red to near-infrared region of the spectrum and has been reported to have beneficial effects in various animal models of disease, including an age-related macular degeneration (AMD) mouse model. Previous reports have suggested that phagocytosis is reduced by age-related increased oxidative stress in AMD. Therefore, we investigated whether photobiomodulation improves phagocytosis caused by oxidative stress in the human retinal pigment epithelial (ARPE-19) cell line. Methods ARPE-19 cells and human primary retinal pigment epithelium (hRPE) cells were incubated and irradiated with near-infrared light (670 nm LED light, 2,500 lx, twice a day, 250 s/per time) for 4 d. Next, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and photoreceptor outer segments (POS) labeled using a pH-sensitive fluorescent dye were added to the cell culture, and phagocytosis was evaluated by measuring the fluorescence intensity. Furthermore, cell death was observed by double staining with Hoechst33342 and propidium iodide after photobiomodulation. CM-H2DCFDA, JC-1 dye, and CCK-8 were added to the cell culture to investigate the reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, mitochondrial membrane potential, and cell viability, respectively. We also investigated the expression of phagocytosis-related proteins, such as focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and Mer tyrosine kinase (MerTK). Results Oxidative stress inhibited phagocytosis, and photobiomodulation increased the oxidative stress-induced hypoactivity of phagocytosis in ARPE-19 cells and hRPE cells. Furthermore, H2O2 and photobiomodulation did not affect cell death in this experimental condition. Photobiomodulation reduced ROS production but did not affect cell viability or mitochondrial membrane potential. The expression of phosphorylated MerTK increased, but phosphorylated FAK was not affected by photobiomodulation. Conclusions These findings indicate that near-infrared light photobiomodulation (670 nm) may

  6. Anthocyanins Protect Against A2E Photooxidation and Membrane Permeabilization in Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells¶

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Young P.; Zhou, Jilin; Nakanishi, Koji; Sparrow, Janet R.

    2005-01-01

    The pyridinium bisretinoid A2E, an autofluorescent pigment that accumulates in retinal pigment epithelial cells with age and in some retinal disorders, can mediate a detergent-like perturbation of cell membranes and light-induced damage to the cell. The photodynamic events initiated by the sensitization of A2E include the generation of singlet oxygen and the oxidation of A2E at carbon–carbon double bonds. To assess the ability of plant-derived anthocyanins to modulate adverse effects of A2E accumulation on retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells, these flavylium salts were isolated from extracts of bilberry. Nine anthocyanin fractions reflecting monoglycosides of delphinidin, cyanidin, petunidin and malvidin were obtained and all were shown to suppress the photooxidation of A2E at least in part by quenching singlet oxygen. The anthocyanins tested exhibited antioxidant activity of variable efficiency. The structural characteristics relevant to this variability likely included the ability to form a stable quinonoidal anhydro base at neutral pH, a conjugated diene structure in the C (pyrane) ring, the presence of hydroxyl groups on the B (benzene) ring and the relative hydrophobicity conferred by the arrangement of substituents on the B ring. Cells that had taken up anthocyanins also exhibited a resistance to the membrane permeabilization that occurs as a result of the detergent-like action of A2E. PMID:15745429

  7. Foxg1-Cre Mediated Lrp2 Inactivation in the Developing Mouse Neural Retina, Ciliary and Retinal Pigment Epithelia Models Congenital High Myopia

    PubMed Central

    Obry, Antoine; Santin, Mathieu D.; Ben-Yacoub, Sirine; Pâques, Michel; Amsellem-Levera, Sabine; Bribian, Ana; Simonutti, Manuel; Augustin, Sébastien; Debeir, Thomas; Sahel, José Alain; Christ, Annabel; de Castro, Fernando; Lehéricy, Stéphane; Cosette, Pascal; Kozyraki, Renata

    2015-01-01

    Myopia is a common ocular disorder generally due to increased axial length of the eye-globe. Its extreme form high myopia (HM) is a multifactorial disease leading to retinal and scleral damage, visual impairment or loss and is an important health issue. Mutations in the endocytic receptor LRP2 gene result in Donnai-Barrow (DBS) and Stickler syndromes, both characterized by HM. To clearly establish the link between Lrp2 and congenital HM we inactivated Lrp2 in the mouse forebrain including the neural retina and the retinal and ciliary pigment epithelia. High resolution in vivo MRI imaging and ophthalmological analyses showed that the adult Lrp2-deficient eyes were 40% longer than the control ones mainly due to an excessive elongation of the vitreal chamber. They had an apparently normal intraocular pressure and developed chorioretinal atrophy and posterior scleral staphyloma features reminiscent of human myopic retinopathy. Immunomorphological and ultrastructural analyses showed that increased eye lengthening was first observed by post-natal day 5 (P5) and that it was accompanied by a rapid decrease of the bipolar, photoreceptor and retinal ganglion cells, and eventually the optic nerve axons. It was followed by scleral thinning and collagen fiber disorganization, essentially in the posterior pole. We conclude that the function of LRP2 in the ocular tissues is necessary for normal eye growth and that the Lrp2-deficient eyes provide a unique tool to further study human HM. PMID:26107939

  8. Optical coherence tomographic imaging of sub-retinal pigment epithelium lipid.

    PubMed

    Mukkamala, Sri Krishna; Costa, Rogerio A; Fung, Adrian; Sarraf, David; Gallego-Pinazo, Roberto; Freund, K Bailey

    2012-12-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe an optical coherence tomographic finding of layered hyperreflective bands beneath the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), the so-called onion sign believed to represent lipid within a vascularized pigment epithelial detachment. METHODS This retrospective observational case series involved reviewing clinical histories of patients with the onion sign. Imaging studies analyzed included spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, color and red-free photographs, near infrared reflectance, fundus autofluorescence, and blue-light fundus autofluorescence. RESULTS A total of 22 eyes of 20 patients with sub-RPE hyperreflective bands were identified. There were 15 women and 5 men with a mean patient age of 76 years (range, 60-92 years). Snellen best-corrected visual acuities ranged from 20/25 to counting fingers, with a median of 20/80. Two patients had bilateral involvement, and 3 of 17 eyes had multifocal onion signs in the same eye. All eyes had neovascular age-related macular degeneration, with type 1 (sub-RPE) neovascularization. In all patients, the onion sign correlated with areas of yellow-gray exudates seen clinically that appeared bright on red-free and near infrared reflectance imaging. No specific fundus autofluorescence or blue-light fundus autofluorescence pattern was identified. CONCLUSIONS The onion sign refers to layered hyperreflective bands in the sub-RPE space usually associated with chronic exudation from type 1 neovascularization in patients with age-related macular degeneration. With an associated bright near infrared reflectance, these bands may correspond to lipid, collagen, or fibrin. Because the onion sign colocalizes to areas of exudation that are known to consist of lipoprotein, we propose that this finding may represent layers of precipitated lipid in the sub-RPE space. To our knowledge, this is the first report of lipid detected in the sub-RPE space on clinical examination. PMID:22892986

  9. Regulation of tyrosinase expression and activity in cultured human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Abul-Hassan, K; Walmsley, R; Tombran-Tink, J; Boulton, M

    2000-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the regulation of tyrosinase gene expression and activity in cultured human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. The tyrosinase promoter (Ty.prom) region (400 bp) was PCR amplified and cloned into a modified mammalian expression vector (pcDNA3.1) upstream of a firefly luciferase (Luc) cDNA and was designated 'pcDNA3.1-Ty.prom.Luc'. The plasmid was co-transfected into RPE cells with a second mammalian expression plasmid (pRL-TK) containing a herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase promoter region upstream of Renilla Luc in a protocol designated the 'dual luciferase assay' (DLA). After co-transfection, cells were treated with a range of potential melanogenic agents; basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), methyl methane sulphonate, alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone, verapamil, phorbol myristate acetate, cholera toxin (CT), pigment epithelium derived factor (PEDF), and L-tyrosine. The expression of tyrosinase promoter and enzymatic activities were determined 48 hr post-transfection using the DLA and DOPA oxidase assays, respectively. Tyrosinase activity could not be detected in RPE cells with any of the treatments. Tyrosinase promoter activity was significantly up-regulated in RPE cells treated with bFGF, PEDF, verapamil, CT and tyrosine compared with control cells. In conclusion, the tyrosinase gene is not only expressed but can be regulated in response to different chemicals in cultured human RPE cells. However, it appears that RPE cells in culture lack a post-transcriptional and/or translational modification point(s), which are necessary for tyrosinase enzymic activity. PMID:11153695

  10. Protective Effect of Total Flavones from Hippophae rhamnoides L. against Visible Light-Induced Retinal Degeneration in Pigmented Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Huang, Fenghong; Zhao, Liang; Zhang, Di; Wang, Ou; Guo, Xiaoxuan; Lu, Feng; Yang, Xue; Ji, Baoping; Deng, Qianchun

    2016-01-13

    Sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.) flavones have been used as candidate functional food ingredients because of their bioactivities, such as treating cardiovascular disorders, lowering plasma cholesterol level, and regulating immune function. However, the protective effects of sea buckthorn flavones against retinal degeneration remain unclear to date. This study investigated the protective effects of total flavones from H. rhamnoides (TFH) against visible light-induced retinal damage and explored the related mechanisms in pigmented rabbits. Rabbits were treated with TFH (250 and 500 mg/kg) for 2 weeks pre-illumination and 1 week post-illumination until sacrifice. Retinal function was quantified by performing electroretinography 1 day before and 1, 3, and 7 days after light exposure (18000 lx for 2 h). Retinal degeneration was evaluated by measuring the thickness of the outer nuclear layer (ONL) and performing the TUNEL assay 7 days after light exposure. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Western blot analysis, and immunohistochemistry were used to explore the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-apoptotic mechanisms of TFH during visible light-induced retinal degeneration. Light exposure produced a degenerative effect primarily on the ONL, inner nuclear layer (INL), and ganglion cell layer (GCL). TFH significantly attenuated the destruction of electroretinograms caused by light damage, maintained ONL thickness, and decreased the number of TUNEL-positive cells in the INL and GCL. TFH ameliorated the retinal oxidative stress (GSH-Px, CAT, T-AOC, and MDA), inflammation (IL-1β and IL-6), angiogenesis (VEGF), and apoptosis (Bax, Bcl2, and caspase-3) induced by light exposure. Therefore, TFH exhibited protective effects against light-induced retinal degeneration by increasing the antioxidant defense mechanisms, suppressing pro-inflammatory and angiogenic cytokines, and inhibiting retinal cell apoptosis. PMID:26653970

  11. Spatial and Spectral Characterization of Human Retinal Pigment Epithelium Fluorophore Families by Ex Vivo Hyperspectral Autofluorescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ben Ami, Tal; Tong, Yuehong; Bhuiyan, Alauddin; Huisingh, Carrie; Ablonczy, Zsolt; Ach, Thomas; Curcio, Christine A.; Smith, R. Theodore

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Discovery of candidate spectra for abundant fluorophore families in human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) by ex vivo hyperspectral imaging. Methods Hyperspectral autofluorescence emission images were captured between 420 and 720 nm (10-nm intervals), at two excitation bands (436–460, 480–510 nm), from three locations (fovea, perifovea, near-periphery) in 20 normal RPE/Bruch's membrane (BrM) flatmounts. Mathematical factorization extracted a BrM spectrum (S0) and abundant lipofuscin/melanolipofuscin (LF/ML) spectra of RPE origin (S1, S2, S3) from each tissue. Results Smooth spectra S1 to S3, with perinuclear localization consistent with LF/ML at all three retinal locations and both excitations in 14 eyes (84 datasets), were included in the analysis. The mean peak emissions of S0, S1, and S2 at λex 436 nm were, respectively, 495 ± 14, 535 ± 17, and 576 ± 20 nm. S3 was generally trimodal, with peaks at either 580, 620, or 650 nm (peak mode, 650 nm). At λex 480 nm, S0, S1, and S2 were red-shifted to 526 ± 9, 553 ± 10, and 588 ± 23 nm, and S3 was again trimodal (peak mode, 620 nm). S1 often split into two spectra, S1A and S1B. S3 strongly colocalized with melanin. There were no significant differences across age, sex, or retinal location. Conclusions There appear to be at least three families of abundant RPE fluorophores that are ubiquitous across age, retinal location, and sex in this sample of healthy eyes. Further molecular characterization by imaging mass spectrometry and localization via super-resolution microscopy should elucidate normal and abnormal RPE physiology involving fluorophores. Translational Relevance Our results help establish hyperspectral autofluorescence imaging of the human retinal pigment epithelium as a useful tool for investigating retinal health and disease. PMID:27226929

  12. CRB2 completes a fully expressed Crumbs complex in the Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Paniagua, Antonio E.; Herranz-Martín, Saúl; Jimeno, David; Jimeno, Ángela M.; López-Benito, Saray; Carlos Arévalo, Juan; Velasco, Almudena; Aijón, José; Lillo, Concepción

    2015-01-01

    The CRB proteins CRB1, CRB2 and CRB3 are members of the cell polarity complex Crumbs in mammals that together with Scribble and Par complexes stablish the polarity of a variety of cell types. Although many members of the Crumbs complex proteins are expressed in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), and even though the mRNA of CRB2 has been detected in ARPE-19 cells and in the RPE/Choroid, to date no CRB protein has yet been found in this tissue. To investigate this possibility, we generated an antibody that specifically recognize the mouse CRB2 protein, and we demonstrate the expression of CRB2 in mouse RPE. Confocal analysis shows that CRB2 is restricted to the apicolateral membrane of RPE cells, and more precisely, in the tight junctions. Our study identified CRB2 as the member of the CRB protein family that is present together with the rest of the components of the Crumbs complex in the RPE apico-lateral cell membrane. Considering that the functions of CRB proteins are decisive in the establishment and maintenance of cell-cell junctions in several epithelial-derived cell types, we believe that these findings are a relevant starting point for unraveling the functions that CRB2 might perform in the RPE. PMID:26404741

  13. Biocompatibility of the vital dye Acid Violet-17 on retinal pigment epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Tura, Ayşegül; Alt, Aizhan; Lüke, Julia; Grisanti, Salvatore; Haritoglou, Christos; Meyer, Carsten H; Nassar, Khaled; Lüke, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To examine the viability and differentiation of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells after exposure to the vital dye Acid Violet-17 (AV-17). Methods Bovine RPE cells were incubated with AV-17 (0.0625–0.5 mg/mL) for 30 seconds or 5 minutes. Viability was determined by live/dead staining, cleaved CASP3 immunostainings, and MTT test. Actin cytoskeleton was visualized by Alexa 488-phalloidin. Immunocytochemistry was performed to determine the levels of ZO-1, CTNNB1, and KRT19. Results Exposure to AV-17 at the concentrations of 0.25–0.5 mg/mL resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in viability, the loss of ZO-1 from tight junctions, translocation of CTNNB1 into the cytoplasm and nucleus, disarrangement of the actin cytoskeleton, and a slight increase in KRT19. Conclusion AV-17 at a concentration <0.125 mg/mL is likely to be well tolerated by the RPE cells, whereas the concentrations from 0.25 mg/mL onward can reduce viability and induce dedifferentiation particularly after long-term exposure. PMID:27536056

  14. Retinal Development and Ommin Pigment in the Cranchiid Squid Teuthowenia pellucida (Cephalopoda: Oegopsida)

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Aaron B.; Acosta, Monica L.; Bolstad, Kathrin S.

    2015-01-01

    The cranchiid Teuthowenia pellucida, like many deep-sea squid species, possesses large eyes that maximise light sensitivity in a nearly aphotic environment. To assess ontogenetic changes in the visual system, we conducted morphometric and histological analyses of the eyes using specimens from New Zealand collections. While the ratio between eye diameter and mantle length maintained a linear relationship throughout development, histological sections of the retina revealed that the outer photoreceptor layer became proportionally longer as the animal aged, coincident with a habitat shift into deeper, darker ocean strata. Other retinal layers maintained the same absolute thickness as was observed in paralarvae. Granules of the pigment ommin, normally located in the screening layer positioned at the base of the photoreceptors, were also observed at the outer end of the photoreceptor segments throughout the retina in young and mid-sized specimens. Early developmental stages of this species, dwelling in shallow waters, may therefore rely on migratory ommin to help shield photoreceptors from excess light and prevent over-stimulation. The oldest, deeper-dwelling specimens of T. pellucida examined had longer photoreceptors, and little or no migrated ommin was observed; we suggest therefore that short-term adaptive mechanisms for bright light conditions may be used primarily during epipelagic, early life stages in this species. PMID:25970484

  15. Escin activates AKT-Nrf2 signaling to protect retinal pigment epithelium cells from oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kaijun; Jiang, Yiqian; Wang, Wei; Ma, Jian; Chen, Min

    2015-12-25

    Here we explored the anti-oxidative and cytoprotective potentials of escin, a natural triterpene-saponin, against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells. We showed that escin remarkably attenuated H2O2-induced death and apoptosis of established (ARPE-19) and primary murine RPE cells. Meanwhile, ROS production and lipid peroxidation by H2O2 were remarkably inhibited by escin. Escin treatment in RPE cells resulted in NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) signaling activation, evidenced by transcription of anti-oxidant-responsive element (ARE)-regulated genes, including HO-1, NQO-1 and SRXN-1. Knockdown of Nrf2 through targeted shRNAs/siRNAs alleviated escin-mediated ARE gene transcription, and almost abolished escin-mediated anti-oxidant activity and RPE cytoprotection against H2O2. Reversely, escin was more potent against H2O2 damages in Nrf2-over-expressed ARPE-19 cells. Further studies showed that escin-induced Nrf2 activation in RPE cells required AKT signaling. AKT inhibitors (LY294002 and perifosine) blocked escin-induced AKT activation, and dramatically inhibited Nrf2 phosphorylation, its cytosol accumulation and nuclear translocation in RPE cells. Escin-induced RPE cytoprotection against H2O2 was also alleviated by the AKT inhibitors. Together, these results demonstrate that escin protects RPE cells from oxidative stress possibly through activating AKT-Nrf2 signaling. PMID:26505797

  16. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of bacterial magnetosomes against human retinal pigment epithelium cells

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Lei; Lv, Xiujuan; Zhang, Tongwei; Jia, Peina; Yan, Ruiying; Li, Shuli; Zou, Ruitao; Xue, Yuhua; Dai, Liming

    2016-01-01

    A variety of nanomaterials have been developed for ocular diseases. The ability of these nanomaterials to pass through the blood-ocular barrier and their biocompatibility are essential characteristics that must be considered. Bacterial magnetosomes (BMs) are a type of biogenic magnetic nanomaterials synthesized by magnetotactic bacteria. Due to their unique biomolecular membrane shell and narrow size distribution of approximately 30 nm, BMs can pass through the blood-brain barrier. The similarity of the blood-ocular barrier to the blood-brain barrier suggests that BMs have great potential as treatments for ocular diseases. In this work, BMs were isolated from magnetotactic bacteria and evaluated in various cytotoxicity and genotoxicity studies in human retinal pigment epithelium (ARPE-19) cells. The BMs entered ARPE-19 cells by endocytosis after a 6-h incubation and displayed much lower cytotoxicity than chemically synthesized magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). MNPs exhibited significantly higher genotoxicity than BMs and promoted the expression of Bax (the programmed cell death acceleration protein) and the induction of greater cell necrosis. In BM-treated cells, apoptosis tended to be suppressed via increased expression of the Bcl-2 protein. In conclusion, BMs display excellent biocompatibility and potential for use in the treatment of ocular diseases. PMID:27246808

  17. Melissa Officinalis L. Extracts Protect Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells against Oxidative Stress-Induced Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Jeung, In Cheul; Jee, Donghyun; Rho, Chang-Rae; Kang, Seungbum

    2016-01-01

    Background: We evaluated the protective effect of ALS-L1023, an extract of Melissa officinalis L. (Labiatae; lemon balm) against oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in human retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19 cells). Methods: ARPE-19 cells were incubated with ALS-L1023 for 24 h and then treated with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Oxidative stress-induced apoptosis and intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were assessed by flow cytometry. Caspase-3/7 activation and cleaved poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) were measured to investigate the protective role of ALS-L1023 against apoptosis. The protective effect of ALS-L1023 against oxidative stress through activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K/Akt) was evaluated by Western blot analysis. Results: ALS-L1023 clearly reduced H2O2-induced cell apoptosis and intracellular production of ROS. H2O2-induced oxidative stress increased caspase-3/7 activity and apoptotic PARP cleavage, which were significantly inhibited by ALS-L1023. Activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway was associated with the protective effect of ALS-L1023 on ARPE-19 cells. Conclusions: ALS-L1023 protected human RPE cells against oxidative damage. This suggests that ALS-L1023 has therapeutic potential for the prevention of dry age-related macular degeneration. PMID:26941573

  18. Small-molecule-directed, efficient generation of retinal pigment epithelium from human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Maruotti, Julien; Sripathi, Srinivas R; Bharti, Kapil; Fuller, John; Wahlin, Karl J; Ranganathan, Vinod; Sluch, Valentin M; Berlinicke, Cynthia A; Davis, Janine; Kim, Catherine; Zhao, Lijun; Wan, Jun; Qian, Jiang; Corneo, Barbara; Temple, Sally; Dubey, Ramin; Olenyuk, Bogdan Z; Bhutto, Imran; Lutty, Gerard A; Zack, Donald J

    2015-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is associated with dysfunction and death of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. Cell-based approaches using RPE-like cells derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) are being developed for AMD treatment. However, most efficient RPE differentiation protocols rely on complex, stepwise treatments and addition of growth factors, whereas small-molecule-only approaches developed to date display reduced yields. To identify new compounds that promote RPE differentiation, we developed and performed a high-throughput quantitative PCR screen complemented by a novel orthogonal human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-based RPE reporter assay. Chetomin, an inhibitor of hypoxia-inducible factors, was found to strongly increase RPE differentiation; combination with nicotinamide resulted in conversion of over one-half of the differentiating cells into RPE. Single passage of the whole culture yielded a highly pure hPSC-RPE cell population that displayed many of the morphological, molecular, and functional characteristics of native RPE. PMID:26269569

  19. Apr3 accelerates the senescence of human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Song; Lu, Qingjun; Wang, Ningli

    2016-04-01

    Senescence of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells is a major contributor to age‑related macular degeneration (AMD). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying RPE dysfunction are not well understood. Apoptosis related protein 3 (Apr3) was originally cloned from HL‑60 cells induced by all‑trans retinoic acid (ATRA). Preliminary data revealed elevated Apr3 expression in the tissues of aged mice, suggesting that it is involved in the aging process. The present study demonstrated that Apr3 mRNA and protein levels were markedly increased in aged mouse RPE cells. Elevated Apr3 expression was also observed during premature senescence induced by oxidative stress (H2O2 and tert‑BHP) in ARPE‑19 cells. Moreover, Apr3 overexpression promoted cellular senescence in ARPE‑19 cells, as characterized by enhanced senescence‑associated β‑galactosidase activity, reduced cell proliferation and increased expression of the senescence markers p53 and p21. In addition, it was demonstrated that overexpression of Apr3‑N, a truncated counterpart of Apr3, abrogated Apr3‑induced phenotypes. It was concluded that Apr3 expression was induced in replicative and premature senescence of RPE cells and its overexpression accelerated senescence of ARPE‑19 cells, which provides important insights into the function of Apr3 in senescence‑associated diseases. PMID:26934949

  20. Receptor mediated disruption of retinal pigment epithelium function in acute glycated-albumin exposure.

    PubMed

    Dahrouj, Mohammad; Desjardins, Danielle M; Liu, Yueying; Crosson, Craig E; Ablonczy, Zsolt

    2015-08-01

    Diabetic macular edema (DME) is a major cause of visual impairment. Although DME is generally believed to be a microvascular disease, dysfunction of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) can also contribute to its development. Advanced glycation end-products (AGE) are thought to be one of the key factors involved in the pathogenesis of diabetes in the eye, and we have previously demonstrated a rapid breakdown of RPE function following glycated-albumin (Glyc-alb, a common AGE mimetic) administration in monolayer cultures of fetal human RPE cells. Here we present new evidence that this response is attributed to apically oriented AGE receptors (RAGE). Moreover, time-lapse optical coherence tomography in Dutch-belted rabbits 48 h post intravitreal Glyc-alb injections demonstrated a significant decrease in RPE-mediated fluid resorption in vivo. In both the animal and tissue culture models, the response to Glyc-alb was blocked by the relatively selective RAGE antagonist, FPS-ZM1 and was also inhibited by ZM323881, a relatively selective vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGF-R2) antagonist. Our data establish that the Glyc-alb-induced breakdown of RPE function is mediated via specific RAGE and VEGF-R2 signaling both in vitro and in vivo. These results are consistent with the notion that the RPE is a key player in the pathogenesis of DME. PMID:26070987

  1. 4-Hydroxynonenal induces p53-mediated apoptosis in retinal pigment epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Abha; Sharma, Rajendra; Chaudhary, Pankaj; Vatsyayan, Rit; Pearce, Virginia; Jeyabal, Prince V.S.; Zimniak, Piotr; Awasthi, Sanjay; Awasthi, Yogesh C.

    2009-01-01

    4-Hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) has been suggested to be involved in stress-induced signaling for apoptosis. In present studies, we have examined the effects of 4-HNE on the intrinsic apoptotic pathway associated with p53 in human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE and ARPE-19) cells. Our results show that 4-HNE causes induction, phosphorylation, and nuclear accumulation of p53 which is accompanied with down regulation of MDM2, activation of the pro-apoptotic p53 target genes viz. p21 and Bax, JNK, caspase3, and onset of apoptosis in treated RPE cells. Reduced expression of p53 by an efficient silencing of the p53 gene resulted in a significant resistance of these cells to 4-HNE-induced cell death. The effects of 4-HNE on the expression and functions of p53 are blocked in GSTA4-4 over expressing cells indicating that 4-HNE-induced, p53-mediated signaling for apoptosis is regulated by GSTs. Our results also show that the induction of p53 in tissues of mGsta4 (-/-) mice correlate with elevated levels of 4-HNE due to its impaired metabolism. Together, these studies suggest that 4-HNE is involved in p53-mediated signaling in in vitro cell cultures as well as in vivo that can be regulated by GSTs. PMID:18930016

  2. Effects of light-emitting diode radiations on human retinal pigment epithelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chamorro, Eva; Bonnin-Arias, Cristina; Pérez-Carrasco, María Jesús; Muñoz de Luna, Javier; Vázquez, Daniel; Sánchez-Ramos, Celia

    2013-01-01

    Human visual system is exposed to high levels of natural and artificial lights of different spectra and intensities along lifetime. Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are the basic lighting components in screens of PCs, phones and TV sets; hence it is so important to know the implications of LED radiations on the human visual system. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of LEDs radiations on human retinal pigment epithelial cells (HRPEpiC). They were exposed to three light-darkness (12 h/12 h) cycles, using blue-468 nm, green-525 nm, red-616 nm and white light. Cellular viability of HRPEpiC was evaluated by labeling all nuclei with DAPI; Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was determined by H2DCFDA staining; mitochondrial membrane potential was quantified by TMRM staining; DNA damage was determined by H2AX histone activation, and apoptosis was evaluated by caspases-3,-7 activation. It is shown that LED radiations decrease 75-99% cellular viability, and increase 66-89% cellular apoptosis. They also increase ROS production and DNA damage. Fluorescence intensity of apoptosis was 3.7% in nonirradiated cells and 88.8%, 86.1%, 83.9% and 65.5% in cells exposed to white, blue, green or red light, respectively. This study indicates three light-darkness (12 h/12 h) cycles of exposure to LED lighting affect in vitro HRPEpiC. PMID:22989198

  3. A novel Bruch's membrane-mimetic electrospun substrate scaffold for human retinal pigment epithelium cells.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Ping; Wu, Kun-Chao; Zhu, Ying; Xiang, Lue; Li, Chong; Chen, Deng-Long; Chen, Feng; Xu, Guotong; Wang, Aijun; Li, Min; Jin, Zi-Bing

    2014-12-01

    Various artificial membranes have been used as scaffolds for retinal pigment epithelium cells (RPE) for monolayer reconstruction, however, long-term cell viability and functionality are still largely unknown. This study aimed to construct an ultrathin porous nanofibrous film to mimic Bruch's membrane, and in particular to investigate human RPE cell responses to the resultant substrates. An ultrathin porous nanofibrous membrane was fabricated by using regenerated wild Antheraea pernyi silk fibroin (RWSF), polycaprolactone (PCL) and gelatin (Gt) and displayed a thickness of 3-5 μm, with a high porosity and an average fiber diameter of 166 ± 85 nm. Human RPE cells seeded on the RWSF/PCL/Gt membranes showed a higher cell growth rate (p < 0.05), and a typical expression pattern of RPE signature genes, with reduced expression of inflammatory mediators. With long-term cultivation on the substrates, RPE cells exhibited characteristic polygonal morphology and development of apical microvilli. Immunocytochemisty demonstrated RPE-specific expression profiles in cells after 12-weeks of co-culture on RWSF/PCL/Gt membranes. Interestingly, the cells on the RWSF/PCL/Gt membranes functionally secreted polarized PEDF and phagocytosed labeled porcine POS. Furthermore, RWSF/PCL/Gt membranes transplanted subsclerally exhibited excellent biocompatibility without any evidence of inflammation or rejection. In conclusion, we established a novel RWSF-based substrate for growth of RPE cells with excellent cytocompatibility in vitro and biocompatibility in vivo for potential use as a prosthetic Bruch's membrane for RPE transplantation. PMID:25220295

  4. RAGE mediated intracellular Aβ uptake contributes to the breakdown of tight junction in retinal pigment epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung Wook; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Park, Sang Min; Moon, Minho; Lee, Kihwang; Park, Kyu Hyung; Park, Woo Jin; Kim, Jeong Hun

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular amyloid beta (Aβ) has been implicated in neuronal cell death in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Intracellular Aβ also contributes to tight junction breakdown of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Although Aβ is predominantly secreted from neuronal cells, the mechanism of Aβ transport into RPE remains to be fully elucidated. In this study, we demonstrated that intracellular Aβ was found concomitantly with the breakdown of tight junction in RPE after subretinal injection of Aβ into the mouse eye. We also presented evidence that receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) contributed to endocytosis of Aβ in RPE. siRNA-mediated knockdown of RAGE prevented intracellular Aβ accumulation as well as subsequent tight junction breakdown in RPE. In addition, we found that RAGE-mediated p38 MAPK signaling contributed to endocytosis of Aβ. Blockade of RAGE/p38 MAPK signaling inhibited Aβ endocytosis, thereby preventing tight junction breakdown in RPE. These results implicate that intracellular Aβ contributes to the breakdown of tight junction in RPE via the RAGE/p38 MAPK-mediated endocytosis. Thus, we suggest that RAGE could be a potential therapeutic target for intracellular Aβ induced outer BRB breakdown in AMD. PMID:26431165

  5. Impairing autophagy in retinal pigment epithelium leads to inflammasome activation and enhanced macrophage-mediated angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian; Copland, David A.; Theodoropoulou, Sofia; Chiu, Hsi An Amy; Barba, Miriam Durazo; Mak, Ka Wang; Mack, Matthias; Nicholson, Lindsay B.; Dick, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    Age-related decreases in autophagy contribute to the progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). We have now studied the interaction between autophagy impaired in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and the responses of macrophages. We find that dying RPE cells can activate the macrophage inflammasome and promote angiogenesis. In vitro, inhibiting rotenone-induced autophagy in RPE cells elicits caspase-3 mediated cell death. Co-culture of damaged RPE with macrophages leads to the secretion of IL-1β, IL-6 and nitrite oxide. Exogenous IL-6 protects the dysfunctional RPE but IL-1β causes enhanced cell death. Furthermore, IL-1β toxicity is more pronounced in dysfunctional RPE cells showing reduced IRAK3 gene expression. Co-culture of macrophages with damaged RPE also elicits elevated levels of pro-angiogenic proteins that promote ex vivo choroidal vessel sprouting. In vivo, impaired autophagy in the eye promotes photoreceptor and RPE degeneration and recruitment of inflammasome-activated macrophages. The degenerative tissue environment drives an enhanced pro-angiogenic response, demonstrated by increased size of laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV) lesions. The contribution of macrophages was confirmed by depletion of CCR2+ monocytes, which attenuates CNV in the presence of RPE degeneration. Our results suggest that the interplay between perturbed RPE homeostasis and activated macrophages influences key features of AMD development. PMID:26847702

  6. The embryology of the retinal pigmented epithelium in dwarf geckos (Gekkota: Sphaerodactylinae): a unique developmental pattern

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) is a rounded shaped structure in almost all lizards. In the New World dwarf geckos, this structure shows an unusual morphology. In addition to this ocular character, we describe notable differences in the development of these geckos in comparison with available developmental staging tables for other geckos and squamate reptiles. Results We identified two main patterns of development of the RPE for squamates. These patterns were mapped onto a metatree of concordant hypotheses of squamates based on molecular data. During post-ovopositional stages the representative species of sphaerodactyls exhibit a RPE layer that transforms gradually from an ovoid form into the generalized spherical form. Sphaerodactyls are the only group of squamates in which this pattern is known. Conclusions This transition might be circumstantial evidence that the accessory RPE plays a role in providing additional protection for their apomorphic concaviclivate temporal fovea. We also report the presence of conjunctival papillae in a developmental stage prior to the formation of scleral ossicles. This developmental progression is similar to that of birds and turtles. PMID:24974837

  7. Limbal Approach-Subretinal Injection of Viral Vectors for Gene Therapy in Mice Retinal Pigment Epithelium.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung Wook; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Park, Woo Jin; Kim, Jeong Hun

    2015-01-01

    The eye is a small and enclosed organ which makes it an ideal target for gene therapy. Recently various strategies have been applied to gene therapy in retinopathies using non-viral and viral gene delivery to the retina and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Subretinal injection is the best approach to deliver viral vectors directly to RPE cells. Before the clinical trial of a gene therapy, it is inevitable to validate the efficacy of the therapy in animal models of various retinopathies. Thus, subretinal injection in mice becomes a fundamental technique for an ocular gene therapy. In this protocol, we provide the easy and replicable technique for subretinal injection of viral vectors to experimental mice. This technique is modified from the intravitreal injection, which is widely used technique in ophthalmology clinics. The representative results of RPE/choroid/scleral complex flat-mount will help to understand the efficacy of this technique and adjust the volume and titer of viral vectors for the extent of gene transduction. PMID:26274541

  8. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of bacterial magnetosomes against human retinal pigment epithelium cells.

    PubMed

    Qi, Lei; Lv, Xiujuan; Zhang, Tongwei; Jia, Peina; Yan, Ruiying; Li, Shuli; Zou, Ruitao; Xue, Yuhua; Dai, Liming

    2016-01-01

    A variety of nanomaterials have been developed for ocular diseases. The ability of these nanomaterials to pass through the blood-ocular barrier and their biocompatibility are essential characteristics that must be considered. Bacterial magnetosomes (BMs) are a type of biogenic magnetic nanomaterials synthesized by magnetotactic bacteria. Due to their unique biomolecular membrane shell and narrow size distribution of approximately 30 nm, BMs can pass through the blood-brain barrier. The similarity of the blood-ocular barrier to the blood-brain barrier suggests that BMs have great potential as treatments for ocular diseases. In this work, BMs were isolated from magnetotactic bacteria and evaluated in various cytotoxicity and genotoxicity studies in human retinal pigment epithelium (ARPE-19) cells. The BMs entered ARPE-19 cells by endocytosis after a 6-h incubation and displayed much lower cytotoxicity than chemically synthesized magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). MNPs exhibited significantly higher genotoxicity than BMs and promoted the expression of Bax (the programmed cell death acceleration protein) and the induction of greater cell necrosis. In BM-treated cells, apoptosis tended to be suppressed via increased expression of the Bcl-2 protein. In conclusion, BMs display excellent biocompatibility and potential for use in the treatment of ocular diseases. PMID:27246808

  9. Oxidative stress in retinal pigment epithelium cells increases exosome secretion and promotes angiogenesis in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Atienzar-Aroca, Sandra; Flores-Bellver, Miguel; Serrano-Heras, Gemma; Martinez-Gil, Natalia; Barcia, Jorge M; Aparicio, Silvia; Perez-Cremades, Daniel; Garcia-Verdugo, Jose M; Diaz-Llopis, Manuel; Romero, Francisco J; Sancho-Pelluz, Javier

    2016-08-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), a monolayer located between the photoreceptors and the choroid, is constantly damaged by oxidative stress, particularly because of reactive oxygen species (ROS). As the RPE, because of its physiological functions, is essential for the survival of the retina, any sustained damage may consequently lead to loss of vision. Exosomes are small membranous vesicles released into the extracellular medium by numerous cell types, including RPE cells. Their cargo includes genetic material and proteins, making these vesicles essential for cell-to-cell communication. Exosomes may fuse with neighbouring cells influencing their fate. It has been observed that RPE cells release higher amounts of exosomes when they are under oxidative stress. Exosomes derived from cultured RPE cells were isolated by ultracentrifugation and quantified by flow cytometry. VEGF receptors (VEGFR) were analysed by both flow cytometry and Western blot. RT-PCR and qPCR were conducted to assess mRNA content of VEGFRs in exosomes. Neovascularization assays were performed after applying RPE exosomes into endothelial cell cultures. Our results showed that stressed RPE cells released a higher amount of exosomes than controls, with a higher expression of VEGFR in the membrane, and enclosed an extra cargo of VEGFR mRNA. Angiogenesis assays confirmed that endothelial cells increased their tube formation capacity when exposed to stressed RPE exosomes. PMID:26999719

  10. Hypoxia-induced metabolic stress in retinal pigment epithelial cells is sufficient to induce photoreceptor degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kurihara, Toshihide; Westenskow, Peter D; Gantner, Marin L; Usui, Yoshihiko; Schultz, Andrew; Bravo, Stephen; Aguilar, Edith; Wittgrove, Carli; Friedlander, Mollie SH; Paris, Liliana P; Chew, Emily; Siuzdak, Gary; Friedlander, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Photoreceptors are the most numerous and metabolically demanding cells in the retina. Their primary nutrient source is the choriocapillaris, and both the choriocapillaris and photoreceptors require trophic and functional support from retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells. Defects in RPE, photoreceptors, and the choriocapillaris are characteristic of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a common vision-threatening disease. RPE dysfunction or death is a primary event in AMD, but the combination(s) of cellular stresses that affect the function and survival of RPE are incompletely understood. Here, using mouse models in which hypoxia can be genetically triggered in RPE, we show that hypoxia-induced metabolic stress alone leads to photoreceptor atrophy. Glucose and lipid metabolism are radically altered in hypoxic RPE cells; these changes impact nutrient availability for the sensory retina and promote progressive photoreceptor degeneration. Understanding the molecular pathways that control these responses may provide important clues about AMD pathogenesis and inform future therapies. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14319.001 PMID:26978795

  11. Defining the proteome of human iris, ciliary body, retinal pigment epithelium, and choroid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pingbo; Kirby, David; Dufresne, Craig; Chen, Yan; Turner, Randi; Ferri, Sara; Edward, Deepak P; Van Eyk, Jennifer E; Semba, Richard D

    2016-04-01

    The iris is a fine structure that controls the amount of light that enters the eye. The ciliary body controls the shape of the lens and produces aqueous humor. The retinal pigment epithelium and choroid (RPE/choroid) are essential in supporting the retina and absorbing light energy that enters the eye. Proteins were extracted from iris, ciliary body, and RPE/choroid tissues of eyes from five individuals and fractionated using SDS-PAGE. After in-gel digestion, peptides were analyzed using LC-MS/MS on an Orbitrap Elite mass spectrometer. In iris, ciliary body, and RPE/choroid, we identified 2959, 2867, and 2755 nonredundant proteins with peptide and protein false-positive rates of <0.1% and <1%, respectively. Forty-three unambiguous protein isoforms were identified in iris, ciliary body, and RPE/choroid. Four "missing proteins" were identified in ciliary body based on ≥2 proteotypic peptides. The mass spectrometric proteome database of the human iris, ciliary body, and RPE/choroid may serve as a valuable resource for future investigations of the eye in health and disease. The MS proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifiers PXD001424 and PXD002194. PMID:26834087

  12. Hyperhomocysteinemia disrupts retinal pigment epithelial structure and function with features of age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Ahmed S.; Mander, Suchreet; Hussein, Khaled A.; Elsherbiny, Nehal M.; Smith, Sylvia B.; Al-Shabrawey, Mohamed; Tawfik, Amany

    2016-01-01

    The disruption of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) function and the degeneration of photoreceptors are cardinal features of age related macular degeneration (AMD); however there are still gaps in our understanding of underlying biological processes. Excess homocysteine (Hcy) has been reported to be elevated in plasma of patients with AMD. This study aimed to evaluate the direct effect of hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) on structure and function of RPE. Initial studies in a mouse model of HHcy, in which cystathionine-β-synthase (cbs) was deficient, revealed abnormal RPE cell morphology with features similar to that of AMD upon optical coherence tomography (OCT), fluorescein angiography (FA), histological, and electron microscopic examinations. These features include atrophy, vacuolization, hypopigmentation, thickened basal laminar membrane, hyporeflective lucency, choroidal neovascularization (CNV), and disturbed RPE–photoreceptor relationship. Furthermore, intravitreal injection of Hcy per se in normal wild type (WT) mice resulted in diffuse hyper-fluorescence, albumin leakage, and CNV in the area of RPE. In vitro experiments on ARPE-19 showed that Hcy dose-dependently reduced tight junction protein expression, increased FITC dextran leakage, decreased transcellular electrical resistance, and impaired phagocytic activity. Collectively, our results demonstrated unreported effects of excess Hcy levels on RPE structure and function that lead to the development of AMD-like features. PMID:26885895

  13. Bacterial cellulose as a support for the growth of retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Sara; Padrão, Jorge; Rodrigues, Inês Patrício; Silva, João Pedro; Sencadas, Vítor; Lanceros-Mendez, Senentxu; Girão, Henrique; Dourado, Fernando; Rodrigues, Lígia R

    2015-04-13

    The feasibility of bacterial cellulose (BC) as a novel substrate for retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) culture was evaluated. Thin (41.6 ± 2.2 μm of average thickness) and heat-dried BC substrates were surface-modified via acetylation and polysaccharide adsorption, using chitosan and carboxymethyl cellulose. All substrates were characterized according to their surface chemistry, wettability, energy, topography, and also regarding their permeability, dimensional stability, mechanical properties, and endotoxin content. Then, their ability to promote RPE cell adhesion and proliferation in vitro was assessed. All surface-modified BC substrates presented similar permeation coefficients with solutes of up to 300 kDa. Acetylation of BC decreased it's swelling and the amount of endotoxins. Surface modification of BC greatly enhanced the adhesion and proliferation of RPE cells. All samples showed similar stress-strain behavior; BC and acetylated BC showed the highest elastic modulus, but the latter exhibited a slightly smaller tensile strength and elongation at break as compared to pristine BC. Although similar proliferation rates were observed among the modified substrates, the acetylated ones showed higher initial cell adhesion. This difference may be mainly due to the moderately hydrophilic surface obtained after acetylation. PMID:25748276

  14. Pirfenidone inhibits migration, differentiation, and proliferation of human retinal pigment epithelial cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Yang, Yangfan; Xu, Jiangang; Lin, Xianchai; Wu, Kaili

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effects of pirfenidone (PFD) on the migration, differentiation, and proliferation of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and demonstrate whether the drug induces cytotoxicity. Methods Human RPE cells (line D407) were treated with various concentrations of PFD. Cell migration was measured with scratch assay. The protein levels of fibronectin (FN), connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), transforming growth factor beta (TGFβS), and Smads were assessed with western blot analyses. Levels of mRNA of TGFβS, FN, and Snail1 were analyzed using reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction. Cell apoptosis was detected with flow cytometry using the Annexin V/PI apoptosis kit, and the percentages of cells labeled in different apoptotic stage were compared. A Trypan Blue assay was used to assess cell viability. Results PFD inhibited RPE cell migration. Western blot analyses showed that PFD inhibited the expression of FN, α-SMA, CTGF, TGFβ1, TGFβ2, Smad2/3, and Smad4. Similarly, PFD also downregulated mRNA levels of Snail1, FN, TGFβ1, and TGFβ2. No significant differences in cell apoptosis or viability were observed between the control and PFD-treated groups. Conclusions PFD inhibited RPE cell migration, differentiation, and proliferation in vitro and caused no significant cytotoxicity. PMID:24415895

  15. A review of therapeutic prospects of non-viral gene therapy in the retinal pigment epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Koirala, Adarsha; Conley, Shannon M.; Naash, Muna I.

    2013-01-01

    Ocular gene therapy has been extensively explored in recent years as a therapeutic avenue to target diseases of the cornea, retina and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene therapy has shown promise in several RPE clinical trials but AAVs have limited payload capacity and potential immunogenicity. Traditionally however, non-viral alternatives have been plagued by low transfection efficiency, short-term expression and low expression levels. Recently, these drawbacks have begun to be overcome by the use of specialty carriers such as polylysine, liposomes, or polyethyleneimines, and by inclusion of suitable DNA elements to enhance gene expression and longevity. Recent advancements in the field have yielded non-viral vectors that have favorable safety profiles, lack immunogenicity, exhibit long-term elevated gene expression, and show efficient transfection in the retina and RPE, making them poised to transition to clinical applications. Here we discuss the advancements in nanotechnology and vector engineering that have improved the prospects for clinical application of non-viral gene therapy in the RPE. PMID:23796578

  16. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of bacterial magnetosomes against human retinal pigment epithelium cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Lei; Lv, Xiujuan; Zhang, Tongwei; Jia, Peina; Yan, Ruiying; Li, Shuli; Zou, Ruitao; Xue, Yuhua; Dai, Liming

    2016-06-01

    A variety of nanomaterials have been developed for ocular diseases. The ability of these nanomaterials to pass through the blood-ocular barrier and their biocompatibility are essential characteristics that must be considered. Bacterial magnetosomes (BMs) are a type of biogenic magnetic nanomaterials synthesized by magnetotactic bacteria. Due to their unique biomolecular membrane shell and narrow size distribution of approximately 30 nm, BMs can pass through the blood-brain barrier. The similarity of the blood-ocular barrier to the blood-brain barrier suggests that BMs have great potential as treatments for ocular diseases. In this work, BMs were isolated from magnetotactic bacteria and evaluated in various cytotoxicity and genotoxicity studies in human retinal pigment epithelium (ARPE-19) cells. The BMs entered ARPE-19 cells by endocytosis after a 6-h incubation and displayed much lower cytotoxicity than chemically synthesized magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). MNPs exhibited significantly higher genotoxicity than BMs and promoted the expression of Bax (the programmed cell death acceleration protein) and the induction of greater cell necrosis. In BM-treated cells, apoptosis tended to be suppressed via increased expression of the Bcl-2 protein. In conclusion, BMs display excellent biocompatibility and potential for use in the treatment of ocular diseases.

  17. Electrical responses of the rat's retinal pigment epithelium to azide and thiocyanate.

    PubMed

    Ando, H; Noell, W K

    1993-01-01

    In the rat under urethane anesthesia, a fast intravenous injection of a bolus of sodium azide elicited a transient cornea-positive change in transocular potential (azide response). A bolus injection of sodium thiocyanate (NaSCN) produced a cornea-negative response (SCN- response) with a similar rising phase as the azide response, but with a faster return from the peak. The peak amplitude depended on bolus volume, concentration, animal strain, and age. For more than 24 h, the azide and SCN- responses could be recorded repeatedly from a single rat with little variation in peak amplitudes. Following an administration of iodate, known to degenerate the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), the transocular d.c. potential decreased; the azide response became smaller and then was inverted in polarity, whereas the SCN- response became larger. Azide and SCN- are assumed to depolarize and hyperpolarize the basal membrane of RPE, respectively. The equilibrium potential of ions passing through the putative azide-sensitive channels is assumed less negative than resting potential of RPE cells. The SCN- response probably represents a diffusion potential of SCN- permeating through anionic channels at a higher rate than Cl-. Results demonstrate the feasibility of in vivo electrophysiological measurement of the functional state and the structural integrity of RPE under pathological conditions. PMID:8230850

  18. Retinal Development and Ommin Pigment in the Cranchiid Squid Teuthowenia pellucida (Cephalopoda: Oegopsida).

    PubMed

    Evans, Aaron B; Acosta, Monica L; Bolstad, Kathrin S

    2015-01-01

    The cranchiid Teuthowenia pellucida, like many deep-sea squid species, possesses large eyes that maximise light sensitivity in a nearly aphotic environment. To assess ontogenetic changes in the visual system, we conducted morphometric and histological analyses of the eyes using specimens from New Zealand collections. While the ratio between eye diameter and mantle length maintained a linear relationship throughout development, histological sections of the retina revealed that the outer photoreceptor layer became proportionally longer as the animal aged, coincident with a habitat shift into deeper, darker ocean strata. Other retinal layers maintained the same absolute thickness as was observed in paralarvae. Granules of the pigment ommin, normally located in the screening layer positioned at the base of the photoreceptors, were also observed at the outer end of the photoreceptor segments throughout the retina in young and mid-sized specimens. Early developmental stages of this species, dwelling in shallow waters, may therefore rely on migratory ommin to help shield photoreceptors from excess light and prevent over-stimulation. The oldest, deeper-dwelling specimens of T. pellucida examined had longer photoreceptors, and little or no migrated ommin was observed; we suggest therefore that short-term adaptive mechanisms for bright light conditions may be used primarily during epipelagic, early life stages in this species. PMID:25970484

  19. Nanofiber Scaffold-Based Tissue-Engineered Retinal Pigment Epithelium to Treat Degenerative Eye Diseases.

    PubMed

    Hotaling, Nathan A; Khristov, Vladimir; Wan, Qin; Sharma, Ruchi; Jha, Balendu Shekhar; Lotfi, Mostafa; Maminishkis, Arvydas; Simon, Carl G; Bharti, Kapil

    2016-06-01

    Clinical-grade manufacturing of a functional retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) monolayer requires reproducing, as closely as possible, the natural environment in which RPE grows. In vitro, this can be achieved by a tissue engineering approach, in which the RPE is grown on a nanofibrous biological or synthetic scaffold. Recent research has shown that nanofiber scaffolds perform better for cell growth and transplantability compared with their membrane counterparts and that the success of the scaffold in promoting cell growth/function is not heavily material dependent. With these strides, the field has advanced enough to begin to consider implementation of one, or a combination, of the tissue engineering strategies discussed herein. In this study, we review the current state of tissue engineering research for in vitro culture of RPE/scaffolds and the parameters for optimal scaffold design that have been uncovered during this research. Next, we discuss production methods and manufacturers that are capable of producing the nanofiber scaffolds in such a way that would be biologically, regulatory, clinically, and commercially viable. Then, a discussion of how the scaffolds could be characterized, both morphologically and mechanically, to develop a testing process that is viable for regulatory screening is performed. Finally, an example of a tissue-engineered RPE/scaffold construct is given to provide the reader a framework for understanding how these pieces could fit together to develop a tissue-engineered RPE/scaffold construct that could pass regulatory scrutiny and can be commercially successful. PMID:27110730

  20. High Concentration of Zinc in Sub-retinal Pigment Epithelial Deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Lengyel,I.; Flinn, J.; Peto, T.; Linkous, D.; Cano, K.; Bird, A.; Lanzirotti, A.; Frederickson, C.; van Kuijk, F.

    2007-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of blindness in the elderly in Western societies, is the accumulation of sub-retinal pigment epithelial deposits (sub-RPE deposits), including drusen and basal laminar deposits, in Bruch's membrane (BM). The nature and the underlying mechanisms of this deposit formation are not fully understood. Because we know that zinc contributes to deposit formation in neurodegenerative diseases, we tested the hypothesis that zinc might be involved in deposit formation in AMD. Using zinc specific fluorescent probes and microprobe synchrotron X-ray fluorescence we showed that sub-RPE deposits in post-mortem human tissues contain unexpectedly high concentrations of zinc, including abundant bio-available (ionic and/or loosely protein bound) ions. Zinc accumulation was especially high in the maculae of eyes with AMD. Internal deposit structures are especially enriched in bio-available zinc. Based on the evidence provided here we suggest that zinc plays a role in sub-RPE deposit formation in the aging human eye and possibly also in the development and/or progression of AMD.

  1. A strategy to ensure safety of stem cell-derived retinal pigment epithelium cells.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Parul; Whiting, Paul John

    2016-01-01

    Cell replacement and regenerative therapy using embryonic stem cell-derived material holds promise for the treatment of several pathologies. However, the safety of this approach is of prime importance given the teratogenic potential of residual stem cells, if present in the differentiated cell product. Using the example of embryonic stem cell-derived retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) for the treatment of age-related macular degeneration, we present a novel strategy for ensuring the absence of stem cells in the RPE population. Based on an unbiased screening approach, we identify and validate the expression of CD59, a cell surface marker expressed on RPE but absent on stem cells. We further demonstrate that flow sorting on the basis of CD59 expression can effectively purify RPE and deplete stem cells, resulting in a population free from stem cell impurity. This purification helps to ensure removal of stem cells and hence increases the safety of cells that may be used for clinical transplantation. This strategy can potentially be applied to other pluripotent stem cell-derived material and help mitigate concerns of using such cells for therapy. PMID:27590276

  2. Concurrent expression of heme oxygenase-1 and p53 in human retinal pigment epithelial cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang Yull; Jo, Hong Jae; Kim, Kang Mi; Song, Ju Dong; Chung, Hun Taeg; Park, Young Chul

    2008-01-25

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a stress-responsive protein that is known to regulate cellular functions such as cell proliferation, inflammation, and apoptosis. Here, we investigated the effects of HO activity on the expression of p53 in the human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cell line ARPE-19. Cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP) induced the expression of both HO-1 and p53 without significant toxicity to the cells. In addition, the blockage of HO activity with the iron chelator DFO or with HO-1 siRNA inhibited the CoPP-induced expression of p53. Similarly, zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP), an inhibitor of HO, suppressed p53 expression in ARPE-19 cells, although ZnPP increased the level of HO-1 protein while inhibiting HO activity. Also, CoPP-induced p53 expression was not affected by the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Based on these results, we conclude that HO activity is involved in the regulation of p53 expression in a ROS-independent mechanism, and also suggest that the expression of p53 in ARPE-19 cells is associated with heme metabolites such as biliverdin/bilirubin, carbon monoxide, and iron produced by the activity of HO.

  3. Cotransport of H+, lactate and H2O by membrane proteins in retinal pigment epithelium of bullfrog.

    PubMed

    Zeuthen, T; Hamann, S; la Cour, M

    1996-11-15

    1. The interaction between H+, lactate and H2O fluxes in the retinal membrane of the pigment epithelium from bullfrog Rana catesbiana was studied by means of ion-selective micro-electrodes. 2. Changes in intracellular pH and cell volume were recorded in response to abrupt changes in retinal solution concentration and/or osmolarity. 3. Two parallel pathways for water transport were identified across the retinal membrane, an osmotic one with a hydraulic water permeability of 3.2 x 10(-4) cm s-1 (osmol l-1)-1 and one which depended on the presence of lactate. 4. Addition of sodium lactate to the retinal solution caused cell shrinkages that were small compared with those produced by mannitol. The reflection coefficient for sodium lactate was 0.25. 5. Isosmotic replacement of Cl- with lactate caused an influx of water. Simultaneous acidification of the retinal solution from pH 7.4 to 6.4 enhanced the effect. The influx of water could proceed against osmotic gradients elicited by mannitol. 6. The interdependence of the fluxes of H+, lactate and H2O can be described as cotransport: the fluxes had a fixed ratio of about 109 mmol of lactic acid per litre of water, the flux of one species was able to energize the flux of the other two, and the fluxes exhibited saturation for increasing driving forces. 7. The Gibbs equation gives an accurate quantitative description of these coupled fluxes. PMID:8951707

  4. Lipofuscin and N-Retinylidene-N-Retinylethanolamine (A2E) Accumulate in Retinal Pigment Epithelium in Absence of Light Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Nicholas P.; Higbee, Daniel; Currin, Mark B.; Blakeley, Lorie R.; Chen, Chunhe; Ablonczy, Zsolt; Crouch, Rosalie K.; Koutalos, Yiannis

    2012-01-01

    The age-dependent accumulation of lipofuscin in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) has been associated with the development of retinal diseases, particularly age-related macular degeneration and Stargardt disease. A major component of lipofuscin is the bis-retinoid N-retinylidene-N-retinylethanolamine (A2E). The current model for the formation of A2E requires photoactivation of rhodopsin and subsequent release of all-trans-retinal. To understand the role of light exposure in the accumulation of lipofuscin and A2E, we analyzed RPEs and isolated rod photoreceptors from mice of different ages and strains, reared either in darkness or cyclic light. Lipofuscin levels were determined by fluorescence imaging, whereas A2E levels were quantified by HPLC and UV-visible absorption spectroscopy. The identity of A2E was confirmed by tandem mass spectrometry. Lipofuscin and A2E levels in the RPE increased with age and more so in the Stargardt model Abca4−/− than in the wild type strains 129/sv and C57Bl/6. For each strain, the levels of lipofuscin precursor fluorophores in dark-adapted rods and the levels and rates of increase of RPE lipofuscin and A2E were not different between dark-reared and cyclic light-reared animals. Both 11-cis- and all-trans-retinal generated lipofuscin-like fluorophores when added to metabolically compromised rod outer segments; however, it was only 11-cis-retinal that generated such fluorophores when added to metabolically intact rods. The results suggest that lipofuscin originates from the free 11-cis-retinal that is continuously supplied to the rod for rhodopsin regeneration and outer segment renewal. The physiological role of Abca4 may include the translocation of 11-cis-retinal complexes across the disk membrane. PMID:22570475

  5. Retinoprotective Effects of Bilberry Anthocyanins via Antioxidant, Anti-Inflammatory, and Anti-Apoptotic Mechanisms in a Visible Light-Induced Retinal Degeneration Model in Pigmented Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Zhao, Liang; Lu, Feng; Yang, Xue; Deng, Qianchun; Ji, Baoping; Huang, Fenghong

    2015-01-01

    Excessive visible light exposure can induce damage to retinal cells and contribute to the development or progression of age-related macular degeneration. In this study we created a model of phototoxicity in pigmented rabbits. Furthermore, we investigated the protective effect of bilberry anthocyanin extract (BAE, Table A1) and explored the possible mechanisms of action in this model. The model of light-induced retinal damage was established by the pigmented rabbits exposed to light at 18,000 lx for 2 h, and they were sacrificed on day 7. After administration of BAE at dosages of 250 and 500 mg/kg/day, retinal dysfunction was significantly inhibited in terms of electroretinograms, and the decreased thicknesses of retinal outer nuclear layer and lengths of the outer segments of the photoreceptor cells were suppressed in rabbits with retinal degeneration. BAE attenuated the changes caused by light to certain apoptotic proteins (Bax, Bcl-2, and caspase-3). The extract increased the levels of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase, as well as the total antioxidant capacity, but decreased the malondialdehyde level in the retinal cells. BAE inhibited the light-induced elevation in the levels of proinflammatory cytokines and angiogenic parameters (IL-1β and VEGF). Results showed that visible light-induced retinal degeneration model in pigmented rabbits was successfully established and BAE exhibited protective effects by increasing the antioxidant defense mechanisms, suppressing lipid peroxidation and proinflammatory cytokines, and inhibiting retinal cells apoptosis. PMID:26694327

  6. PHAGOCYTOSIS BY RETINAL PIGMENT EPITHELIAL CELLS IN VITRO IS AFFECTED BY EXPOSURE TO PESTICIDES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Purpose:Agricultural and occupational exposures to the fungicides benomyl and captan and the insecticide fenthion have been associated with retinal degeneration. Exposure to insecticides has also been associated with pigmentary changes of the retina. Because retinal degeneration ...

  7. Bestrophin-1 influences transepithelial electrical properties and Ca2+ signaling in human retinal pigment epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Kinnick, Tyson R.; Stanton, J. Brett; Johnson, Adiv A.; Lynch, Ronald M.; Marmorstein, Lihua Y.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Mutations in BEST1, encoding Bestrophin-1 (Best1), cause Best vitelliform macular dystrophy (BVMD) and other inherited retinal degenerative diseases. Best1 is an integral membrane protein localized to the basolateral plasma membrane of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Data from numerous in vitro and in vivo models have demonstrated that Best1 regulates intracellular Ca2+ levels. Although it is known from in vitro and crystal structure data that Best1 is also a calcium-activated anion channel, evidence for Best1 functioning as a channel in human RPE is lacking. To assess Best1-associated channel activity in the RPE, we examined the transepithelial electrical properties of fetal human RPE (fhRPE) cells, which express endogenous Best1. Methods Using adenovirus-mediated gene transfer, we overexpressed Best1 and the BVMD mutant Best1W93C in fhRPE cells and assessed resting transepithelial potential (TEP), transepithelial resistance, short circuit current (Isc), and intracellular Ca2+ levels. Cl- currents were directly measured in transfected HEK293 cells using whole-cell patch clamp. Results Best1W93C showed ablated Cl- currents and, when co-expressed, suppressed the channel activity of Best1 in HEK293 cells. In fhRPE, overexpression of Best1 increased TEP and Isc, while Best1W93C diminished TEP and Isc. Substitution of Cl- in the bath media resulted in a significant reduction of Isc in monolayers overexpressing Best1, but no significant Isc change in monolayers expressing Best1W93C. We removed Ca2+ as a limit on transepithelial electrical properties by treating cells with ionomycin, and found that changes in Isc and TEP for monolayers expressing Best1 were absent in monolayers expressing Best1W93C. Similarly, inhibition of calcium-activated anion channels with niflumic acid reduced both Isc and TEP of control and Best1 monolayers, but did not notably affect Best1W93C monolayers. Stimulation with extracellular ATP induced an increase in TEP in control

  8. Subretinal delivery and electroporation in pigmented and nonpigmented adult mouse eyes

    PubMed Central

    Nickerson, John M.; Goodman, Penny; Chrenek, Micah A.; Johnson, Christiana J.; Berglin, Lennart; Redmond, T. Michael.; Boatright, Jeffrey H.

    2013-01-01

    Subretinal injection offers one of the best ways to deliver many classes of drugs, reagents, cells and treatments to the photoreceptor, Müller, and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells of the retina. Agents delivered to this space are placed within microns of the intended target cell, accumulating to high concentrations because there is no dilution due to transport processes or diffusion. Dilution in the interphotoreceptor space (IPS) is minimal because the IPS volume is only 10-20 microliters in the human eye and less than 1 microliter in the mouse eye. For gene delivery purposes, we wished to transfect the cells adjacent to the IPS in adult mouse eyes. Others transfect these cells in neonatal rats to study the development of the retina. In both neonates and adults, electroporation is found to be effective Here we describe the optimization of electroporation conditions for RPE cells in the adult mouse eye with naked plasmids. However, both techniques, subretinal injection and electroporation, present some technical challenges that require skill on the part of the surgeon to prevent untoward damage to the eye. Here we describe methods that we have used for the past ten years (1). PMID:22688698

  9. Autophagy and mitochondrial alterations in human retinal pigment epithelial cells induced by ethanol: implications of 4-hydroxy-nonenal

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Bellver, M; Bonet-Ponce, L; Barcia, J M; Garcia-Verdugo, J M; Martinez-Gil, N; Saez-Atienzar, S; Sancho-Pelluz, J; Jordan, J; Galindo, M F; Romero, F J

    2014-01-01

    Retinal pigment epithelium has a crucial role in the physiology and pathophysiology of the retina due to its location and metabolism. Oxidative damage has been demonstrated as a pathogenic mechanism in several retinal diseases, and reactive oxygen species are certainly important by-products of ethanol (EtOH) metabolism. Autophagy has been shown to exert a protective effect in different cellular and animal models. Thus, in our model, EtOH treatment increases autophagy flux, in a concentration-dependent manner. Mitochondrial morphology seems to be clearly altered under EtOH exposure, leading to an apparent increase in mitochondrial fission. An increase in 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein fluorescence and accumulation of lipid peroxidation products, such as 4-hydroxy-nonenal (4-HNE), among others were confirmed. The characterization of these structures confirmed their nature as aggresomes. Hence, autophagy seems to have a cytoprotective role in ARPE-19 cells under EtOH damage, by degrading fragmented mitochondria and 4-HNE aggresomes. Herein, we describe the central implication of autophagy in human retinal pigment epithelial cells upon oxidative stress induced by EtOH, with possible implications for other conditions and diseases. PMID:25032851

  10. Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor regulates the visual cycle genes Rlbp1 and Rdh5 in the retinal pigment epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Bin; Li, Shuang; Li, Huirong; Chen, Yu; Ma, Xiaoyin; Wang, Jing; Lu, Fan; Qu, Jia; Hou, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Regeneration of the visual pigment by cells of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is fundamental to vision. Here we show that the microphthalmia-associated transcription factor, MITF, which plays a central role in the development and function of RPE cells, regulates the expression of two visual cycle genes, Rlbp1 which encodes retinaldehyde binding protein-1 (RLBP1), and Rdh5, which encodes retinol dehydrogenase-5 (RDH5). First, we found that Rlbp1 and Rdh5 are downregulated in optic cups and presumptive RPEs of Mitf-deficient mouse embryos. Second, experimental manipulation of MITF levels in human RPE cells in culture leads to corresponding modulations of the endogenous levels of RLBP1 and RDH5. Third, the retinal degeneration associated with the disruption of the visual cycle in Mitf-deficient mice can be partially corrected both structurally and functionally by an exogenous supply of 9-cis-retinal. We conclude that the expression of Rlbp1 and Rdh5 critically depends on functional Mitf in the RPE and suggest that MITF has an important role in controlling retinoid processing in the RPE. PMID:26876013

  11. Honeycomb porous films as permeable scaffold materials for human embryonic stem cell-derived retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Calejo, Maria Teresa; Ilmarinen, Tanja; Jongprasitkul, Hatai; Skottman, Heli; Kellomäki, Minna

    2016-07-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of blindness in developed countries, characterised by the degeneration of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), a pigmented cell monolayer that closely interacts with the photoreceptors. RPE transplantation is thus considered a very promising therapeutic option to treat this disease. In this work, porous honeycomb-like films are for the first time investigated as scaffold materials for human embryonic stem cell-derived retinal pigment epithelium (hESC-RPE). By changing the conditions during film preparation, it was possible to produce films with homogeneous pore distribution and adequate pore size (∼3-5 µm), that is large enough to ensure high permeability but small enough to enable cell adherence and spreading. A brief dip-coating procedure with collagen type IV enabled the homogeneous adsorption of the protein to the walls and bottom of pores, increasing the hydrophilicity of the surface. hESC-RPE adhered and proliferated on all the collagen-coated materials, regardless of small differences in pore size. The differentiation of hESC-RPE was confirmed by the detection of specific RPE protein markers. These results suggest that the porous honeycomb films can be promising candidates for hESC-RPE tissue engineering, importantly enabling the free flow of ions and molecules across the material. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1646-1656, 2016. PMID:26914698

  12. Progression of Retinal Pigment Epithelial Atrophy in Antiangiogenic Therapy of Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Schütze, Christopher; Wedl, Manuela; Baumann, Bernhard; Pircher, Michael; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To monitor retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) atrophy progression during antiangiogenic therapy of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) over 2 years using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (OCT). Design Prospective interventional case series. Methods setting: Clinical practice. study population: Thirty patients (31 eyes) with treatment-naïve neovascular AMD. observation procedures: Standard intravitreal therapy (0.5 mg ranibizumab) was administered monthly during the first year and pro re nata (PRN; as-needed) during the second year. Spectral-domain (SD) OCT and polarization-sensitive OCT (selectively imaging the RPE) examinations were performed at baseline and at 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months using a standardized protocol. RPE-related changes were evaluated using a semi-automated polarization-sensitive OCT segmentation algorithm and correlated with SD OCT and fundus autofluorescence (FAF) findings. main outcome measures: RPE response, geographic atrophy (GA) progression. Results Atrophic RPE changes included RPE thinning, RPE porosity, focal RPE atrophy, and development of GA. Early RPE loss (ie, RPE porosity, focal atrophy) increased progressively during initial monthly treatment and remained stable during subsequent PRN-based therapy. GA developed in 61% of eyes at month 24. Mean GA area increased from 0.77 mm2 at 12 months to 1.10 mm2 (standard deviation = 1.09 mm2) at 24 months. Reactive accumulation of RPE-related material at the lesion borders increased until month 3 and subsequently decreased. Conclusions Progressive RPE atrophy and GA developed in the majority of eyes. RPE migration signifies certain RPE plasticity. Polarization-sensitive OCT specifically images RPE-related changes in neovascular AMD, contrary to conventional imaging methods. Polarization-sensitive OCT allows for precisely monitoring the sequence of RPE-related morphologic changes. PMID:25769245

  13. Metabolism of 4-Hydroxy-7-oxo-5-heptenoic Acid (HOHA) Lactone by Retinal Pigmented Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Linetsky, Mikhail; Guo, Junhong; Yu, Annabelle O; Salomon, Robert G

    2016-07-18

    4-Hydroxy-7-oxo-5-heptenic acid (HOHA)-lactone is a biologically active oxidative truncation product released (t1/2 = 30 min at 37 °C) by nonenzymatic transesterification/deacylation from docosahexaenoate lipids. We now report that HOHA-lactone readily diffuses into retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells where it is metabolized. A reduced glutathione (GSH) Michael adduct of HOHA-lactone is the most prominent metabolite detected by LC-MS in both the extracellular medium and cell lysates. This molecule appeared inside of ARPE-19 cells within seconds after exposure to HOHA-lactone. The intracellular level reached a maximum concentration at 30 min and then decreased with concomitant increases in its level in the extracellular medium, thus revealing a unidirectional export of the reduced GSH-HOHA-lactone adduct from the cytosol to extracellular medium. This metabolism is likely to modulate the involvement of HOHA-lactone in the pathogenesis of human diseases. HOHA-lactone is biologically active, e.g., low concentrations (0.1-1 μM) induce secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) from ARPE-19 cells. HOHA-lactone is also a precursor of 2-(ω-carboxyethyl)pyrrole (CEP) derivatives of primary amino groups in proteins and ethanolamine phospholipids that have significant pathological and physiological relevance to age-related macular degeneration (AMD), cancer, and wound healing. Both HOHA-lactone and the derived CEP can contribute to the angiogenesis that defines the neovascular "wet" form of AMD and that promotes the growth of tumors. While GSH depletion can increase the lethality of radiotherapy, because it will impair the metabolism of HOHA-lactone, the present study suggests that GSH depletion will also increase levels of HOHA-lactone and CEP that may promote recurrence of tumor growth. PMID:27355557

  14. Performing Subretinal Injections in Rodents to Deliver Retinal Pigment Epithelium Cells in Suspension

    PubMed Central

    Westenskow, Peter D.; Kurihara, Toshihide; Bravo, Stephen; Feitelberg, Daniel; Sedillo, Zack A.; Aguilar, Edith; Friedlander, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The conversion of light into electrical impulses occurs in the outer retina and is accomplished largely by rod and cone photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells. RPE provide critical support for photoreceptors and death or dysfunction of RPE cells is characteristic of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of permanent vision loss in people age 55 and older. While no cure for AMD has been identified, implantation of healthy RPE in diseased eyes may prove to be an effective treatment, and large numbers of RPE cells can be readily generated from pluripotent stem cells. Several interesting questions regarding the safety and efficacy of RPE cell delivery can still be examined in animal models, and well-accepted protocols used to inject RPE have been developed. The technique described here has been used by multiple groups in various studies and involves first creating a hole in the eye with a sharp needle. Then a syringe with a blunt needle loaded with cells is inserted through the hole and passed through the vitreous until it gently touches the RPE. Using this injection method, which is relatively simple and requires minimal equipment, we achieve consistent and efficient integration of stem cell-derived RPE cells in between the host RPE that prevents significant amount of photoreceptor degeneration in animal models. While not part of the actual protocol, we also describe how to determine the extent of the trauma induced by the injection, and how to verify that the cells were injected into the subretinal space using in vivo imaging modalities. Finally, the use of this protocol is not limited to RPE cells; it may be used to inject any compound or cell into the subretinal space. PMID:25651341

  15. Effects of DIDS on the chick retinal pigment epithelium. I. Membrane potentials, apparent resistances, and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Gallemore, R P; Steinberg, R H

    1989-06-01

    While little is known about the transport properties of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) basal membrane, mechanisms for anion movement across the basal membrane appear to be present (Miller and Steinberg, 1977; Hughes et al., 1984; Miller and Farber, 1984). This work examines the electrophysiological effects of the anion conductance blocker, 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonate (DIDS) on the basal membrane of an in vitro preparation of chick retina-RPE-choroid. DIDS (10-125 microM), added to the choroidal bath, decreased the transtissue potential by decreasing the potential across the RPE. Intracellular RPE recordings showed that DIDS affected the membrane potential in 2 phases, initially hyperpolarizing the basal membrane and then, after prolonged exposure, depolarizing the apical membrane. Resistance assessment by transtissue current pulses and intracellular c-wave recordings suggested that DIDS increased basal membrane resistance (Rba) during the first phase and increased apical membrane resistance (Rap) during the second phase. Measurements of intracellular Cl- activity (aiCl) showed that Cl- was actively accumulated by the chick RPE since it was distributed above equilibrium across both the apical and basal membranes. Perfusion of the basal membrane with 50 microM DIDS significantly increased aiCl-. The DIDS-induced basal membrane hyperpolarization, apparent increase in Rba, and increase in aiCl- are all consistent with Cl- -conductance blockade. During the second phase, apical membrane responsiveness to the light-evoked decrease in subretinal [K+]o (Oakley, 1977) was reduced an average of 58%. This finding, given the second-phase apical membrane depolarization and apparent increase in Rap, is consistent with a decrease in apical membrane K+ conductance.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2723761

  16. Absence of collagen XVIII in mice causes age-related insufficiency in retinal pigment epithelium proteostasis.

    PubMed

    Kivinen, Niko; Felszeghy, Szabolcs; Kinnunen, Aino I; Setälä, Niko; Aikio, Mari; Kinnunen, Kati; Sironen, Reijo; Pihlajaniemi, Taina; Kauppinen, Anu; Kaarniranta, Kai

    2016-08-01

    Collagen XVIII has the structural properties of both collagen and proteoglycan. It has been found at the basement membrane/stromal interface where it is thought to mediate their attachment. Endostatin, a proteolytic fragment from collagen XVIII C-terminal end has been reported to possess anti-angiogenic properties. Age-related vision loss in collagen XVIII mutant mice has been accompanied with a pathological accumulation of deposits under the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). We have recently demonstrated that impaired proteasomal and autophagy clearance are associated with the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration. This study examined the staining levels of proteasomal and autophagy markers in the RPE of different ages of the Col18a1 (-/-) mice. Eyes from 3, 6-7, 10-13 and 18 months old mice were enucleated and embedded in paraffin according to the routine protocol. Sequential 5 μm-thick parasagittal samples were immunostained for proteasome and autophagy markers ubiquitin (ub), SQSTM1/p62 and beclin-1. The levels of immunopositivity in the RPE cells were evaluated by confocal microscopy. Collagen XVIII knock-out mice had undergone age-related RPE degeneration accompanied by an accumulation of drusen-like deposits. Ub protein conjugate staining was prominent in both RPE cytoplasm and extracellular space whereas SQSTM1/p62 and beclin-1 stainings were clearly present in the basal part of RPE cell cytoplasm in the Col18a1 (-/-) mice. SQSTM1/p62 displayed mild extracellular space staining. Disturbed proteostasis regulated by collagen XVIII might be responsible for the RPE degeneration, increased protein aggregation, ultimately leading to choroidal neovascularization. PMID:27125427

  17. In vitro ultraviolet–induced damage in human corneal, lens, and retinal pigment epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Youn, Hyun-Yi; Sivak, Jacob G.; Jones, Lyndon W.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The purpose was to develop suitable in vitro methods to detect ocular epithelial cell damage when exposed to UV radiation, in an effort to evaluate UV-absorbing ophthalmic biomaterials. Methods Human corneal epithelial cells (HCEC), lens epithelial cells (HLEC), and retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19) were cultured and Ultraviolet A/Ultraviolet B (UVA/UVB) blocking filters and UVB-only blocking filters were placed between the cells and a UV light source. Cells were irradiated with UV radiations at various energy levels with and without filter protections. Cell viability after exposure was determined using the metabolic dye alamarBlue and by evaluating for changes in the nuclei, mitochondria, membrane permeability, and cell membranes of the cells using the fluorescent dyes Hoechst 33342, rhodamine 123, calcein AM, ethidium homodimer-1, and annexin V. High-resolution images of the cells were taken with a Zeiss 510 confocal laser scanning microscope. Results The alamarBlue assay results of UV-exposed cells without filters showed energy level-dependent decreases in cellular viability. However, UV treated cells with 400 nm LP filter protection showed the equivalent viability to untreated control cells at all energy levels. Also, UV irradiated cells with 320 nm LP filter showed lower cell viability than the unexposed control cells, yet higher viability than UV-exposed cells without filters in an energy level-dependent manner. The confocal microscopy results also showed that UV radiation can cause significant dose-dependent degradations of nuclei and mitochondria in ocular cells. The annexin V staining also showed an increased number of apoptotic cells after UV irradiation. Conclusions The findings suggest that UV-induced HCEC, HLEC, and ARPE-19 cell damage can be evaluated by bioassays that measure changes in the cell nuclei, mitochondria, cell membranes, and cell metabolism, and these assay methods provide a valuable in vitro model for evaluating the

  18. Cell-Deposited Matrix Improves Retinal Pigment Epithelium Survival on Aged Submacular Human Bruch's Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Sugino, Ilene K.; Gullapalli, Vamsi K.; Sun, Qian; Wang, Jianqiu; Nunes, Celia F.; Cheewatrakoolpong, Noounanong; Johnson, Adam C.; Degner, Benjamin C.; Hua, Jianyuan; Liu, Tong; Chen, Wei; Li, Hong

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To determine whether resurfacing submacular human Bruch's membrane with a cell-deposited extracellular matrix (ECM) improves retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) survival. Methods. Bovine corneal endothelial (BCE) cells were seeded onto the inner collagenous layer of submacular Bruch's membrane explants of human donor eyes to allow ECM deposition. Control explants from fellow eyes were cultured in medium only. The deposited ECM was exposed by removing BCE. Fetal RPE cells were then cultured on these explants for 1, 14, or 21 days. The explants were analyzed quantitatively by light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Surviving RPE cells from explants cultured for 21 days were harvested to compare bestrophin and RPE65 mRNA expression. Mass spectroscopy was performed on BCE-ECM to examine the protein composition. Results. The BCE-treated explants showed significantly higher RPE nuclear density than did the control explants at all time points. RPE expressed more differentiated features on BCE-treated explants than on untreated explants, but expressed very little mRNA for bestrophin or RPE65. The untreated young (<50 years) and African American submacular Bruch's membrane explants supported significantly higher RPE nuclear densities (NDs) than did the Caucasian explants. These differences were reduced or nonexistent in the BCE-ECM-treated explants. Proteins identified in the BCE-ECM included ECM proteins, ECM-associated proteins, cell membrane proteins, and intracellular proteins. Conclusions. Increased RPE survival can be achieved on aged submacular human Bruch's membrane by resurfacing the latter with a cell-deposited ECM. Caucasian eyes seem to benefit the most, as cell survival is the worst on submacular Bruch's membrane in these eyes. PMID:21398292

  19. Detection of oxidative stress biomarker-induced assembly of gold nanoparticles in retinal pigment epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasmin, Z.; Lee, Y.; Maswadi, S.; Glickman, R.; Nash, K. L.

    2013-02-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) is increasingly implicated as an underlying pathogenic mechanism in a wide range of diseases, resulting from an imbalance between the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the system's ability to detoxify the reactive intermediates or repair the resulting damage. ROS can be difficult to detect directly; however, they can be detected indirectly from the effects on oxidative stress biomarkers (OSB), such as glutathione (GSH), 3-nitrotyrosine, homocysteine, and cysteine. Moreover the reaction of transition metals with thiol-containing amino acids (for example GSH) oxidized by ROS can yield reactive products that accumulate with time and contribute to aging and diseases. The study of the interaction between OSB using functionalized nanoparticles (fNPs) has attracted interest because of potential applications in bio-sensors and biomedical diagnostics. A goal of the present work is to use fNPs to detect and ultimately quantitate OS in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells subjected to external stressors, e.g. nonionizing (light) and ionizing (gamma) radiation. Specifically, we are investigating the assembly of gold fNPs mediated by the oxidation of GSH in irradiated RPE cells. The dynamic interparticle interactions had been characterized in previously reported work by monitoring the evolution of the surface plasmon resonance band using spectroscopic analysis (UV-VIS absorption). Here we are comparing the dynamic evolution of fNP assembly using photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS). We expect that PAS will provide a more sensitive measure allowing these fNP sensors to measure OS in cell-based models without the artifacts limiting the use of current methods, such as fluorescent indicators.

  20. Micellar delivery of dasatinib for the inhibition of pathologic cellular processes of the retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingqing; Lai, Ka Lun; Chan, Pui Shan; Leung, Sui Chu; Li, Ho Yin; Fang, Yuan; To, Kenneth K W; Choi, Chung Hang J; Gao, Qian Ying; Lee, Thomas W Y

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to fabricate dasatinib-loaded nanoparticles and evaluate their efficacy in inhibiting cellular processes of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) related to proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR), for which there are no approved pharmacological approaches. We successfully encapsulated dasatinib, a poorly soluble multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor which has great potential for the treatment of PVR, into nanoparticles prepared from micellation of PEG-b-PCL. The size of the nanomicelles was approximately 55nm with a narrow distribution. They increased the solubility of dasatinib by 475× and provided a sustained drug release. ARPE-19, an immortal RPE cell line, was used to assess the in vitro efficacy of micellar dasatinib because the RPE is believed to play a key role in the pathogenesis of PVR. Three cell-based assays, namely, proliferation, adhesion and migration, which represent three important PVR-related cellular changes of the RPE, were conducted and the cytotoxicity of micelles was also evaluated. Both blank and dasatinib-loaded micelles were non-cytotoxic towards ARPE-19 cells. Micellar dasatinib significantly inhibited cell proliferation, adhesion and migration compared to the free drug; this might be attributable to enhanced solubility. PEG-b-PCL micelles were taken up into the ARPE-19 cells by an energy-dependent clatharin and caveolae-mediated endocytosis. Our results indicated that cellular uptake and the anti-proliferation effect of drugloaded micelles were linearly correlated. Drug loading appears to be a critical parameter for cellular uptake which in turn impacts the in vitro bioactivities of polymeric micelles. Our results clearly demonstrated that dasatinib-encapsulated micelles offer considerable promise in the management of PVR. PMID:26764115

  1. Regulation of Phagolysosomal Digestion by Caveolin-1 of the Retinal Pigment Epithelium Is Essential for Vision.

    PubMed

    Sethna, Saumil; Chamakkala, Tess; Gu, Xiaowu; Thompson, Timothy C; Cao, Guangwen; Elliott, Michael H; Finnemann, Silvia C

    2016-03-18

    Caveolin-1 associates with the endo/lysosomal machinery of cells in culture, suggesting that it functions at these organelles independently of its contribution to cell surface caveolae. Here we explored mice lacking caveolin-1 specifically in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). The RPE supports neighboring photoreceptors via diurnal phagocytosis of spent photoreceptor outer segment fragments. Like mice lacking caveolin-1 globally, (RPE)CAV1(-/-) mice developed a normal RPE and neural retina but showed reduced rod photoreceptor light responses, indicating that lack of caveolin-1 affects photoreceptor function in a non-cell-autonomous manner. (RPE)CAV1(-/-) RPE in situ showed normal particle engulfment but delayed phagosome clearance and reversed diurnal profiles of levels and activities of lysosomal enzymes. Therefore, eliminating caveolin-1 specifically impairs phagolysosomal degradation by the RPE in vivo. Endogenous caveolin-1 was recruited to maturing phagolysosomes in RPE cells in culture. Consistent with these in vivo data, a moderate increase (to ∼ 2.5-fold) or decrease (by half) of caveolin-1 protein levels in RPE cells in culture was sufficient to accelerate or impair phagolysosomal digestion, respectively. A mutant form of caveolin-1 that fails to reach the cell surface augmented degradation like wild-type caveolin-1. Acidic lysosomal pH and increased protease activity are essential for digestion. We show that halving caveolin-1 protein levels significantly alkalinized lysosomal pH and decreased lysosomal enzyme activities. Taken together, our results reveal a novel role for intracellular caveolin-1 in modulating phagolysosomal function. Moreover, they show, for the first time, that organellar caveolin-1 significantly affects tissue functionality in vivo. PMID:26814131

  2. Photodisruption increases the free-radical reactivity of melanosomes isolated from retinal pigment epithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glickman, Randolph D.; Jacques, Steven L.; Schwartz, Jon A.; Rodriguez, Tom; Lam, Kwok-Wai; Buhr, Gwen

    1996-05-01

    Melanin in vivo is usually packaged in melanosomes with protein coats that restrict direct interaction of the melanin with the surrounding medium. We found that disruption of the melanosomes by exposure to a pulsed laser increased the ability of the melanin radicals to oxidize NADPH in a photochemical reaction. Retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) melanosomes were prepared from fresh bovine eyes in 0.25 M sucrose. A reaction mixture of 7 mM NADPH, approximately 7500 RPE melanosomes, and 80 mM Tris buffer, pH 7.2, was prepared in a volume of 60 (mu) l. Of the two 25-(mu) l aliquots taken from this mixture, one was pre-exposed to the 2nd-harmonic output of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (532 nm, 1800 10-nsec pulses at 10 Hz), and then was exposed to an Argon ion continuous wave (CW) laser (488.1 and 514.5 nm) for five minutes. The other aliquot was exposed only to the Argon laser. The CW exposure excited the melanin radicals to a reactive state that oxidized NADPH, as assayed by the loss of absorbance at 340 nm. Native melanosomes oxidized less NADPH during Ar+ laser pumping than did melanosomes pre-exposed to the YAG laser. The YAG laser's stimulatory effect on melanosomes reactivity increased as the total energy it delivered rose above 3.5 J (0.14 J/cm2/pulse X 1800 pulses), up to a maximum NADPH oxidation at about 20 J (0.2 J/cm2/pulse X 1800 pulses, beam broadened at higher pulse energy). Electron microscopic analysis of the melanosomes confirmed the progressive physical disruption of melanosomes as the YAG pulse energy increased.

  3. Propofol Decreases Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress–Mediated Apoptosis in Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yue; Zhang, Ting; Zhang, Shaochong

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the major cause of loss of sight globally. There is currently no effective treatment available. Retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells are an important part of the outer blood-retina barrier and their death is a determinant of AMD. Propofol, a common clinically used intravenous anesthetic agent, has been shown to act as an efficacious neuroprotective agent with antioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties in vivo and in vitro. However, little is known about its effects on RPE cells. The purpose of our research was to investigate whether propofol could protect RPE cells from apoptosis through endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress–dependent pathways. To this end, prior to stimulation with thapsigargin (TG), ARPE-19 cells were pretreated with varying concentrations of propofol. A protective effect of propofol in TG-treated ARPE-9 was apparent, TUNEL and flow cytometric assays showed decreased apoptosis. We further demonstrated that propofol pretreatment attenuated or inhibited the effects caused by TG, such as upregulation of Bax, BiP, C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), active caspase 12, and cleaved caspase 3, and downregulation of Bcl2. It also decreased the TG-induced levels of ER stress–related molecules such as p-PERK, p-eIF2α, and ATF4. Furthermore, it downregulated the expression of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB). This study elucidated novel propofol-induced cellular mechanisms for antiapoptotic activities in RPE cells undergoing ER stress and demonstrated the potential value of using propofol in the treatment of AMD. PMID:27311010

  4. Expression and Functional Roles of Caspase-5 in Inflammatory Responses of Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Zong-Mei; Elner, Susan G.; Khanna, Hemant; Murga-Zamalloa, Carlos A.; Patil, Suresh

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the expression, activation, and functional involvement of caspase-5 in human retinal pigment epithelial (hRPE) cells. Methods. Expression and activation of caspase-5 in primary cultured hRPE cells, telomerase-immortalized hTERT-RPE1 cells (hTERT-RPE1), or both, were measured after stimulation with proinflammatory agents IL-1β, TNF-α, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), interferon-γ, monocyte coculture, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), or endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress inducers. Immunomodulating agents dexamethasone (Dex), IL-10, and triamcinolone acetonide (TA) were used to antagonize proinflammatory stimulation. Cell death ELISA and TUNEL staining assays were used to assess apoptosis. Results. Caspase-5 mRNA expression and protein activation were induced by LPS and monocyte-hRPE coculture. Caspase-5 activation appeared as early as 2 hours after challenge by LPS and consistently increased to 24 hours. Meanwhile, caspase-1 expression and protein activation were induced by LPS. Activation of caspase-5 was blocked or reduced by Dex, IL-10, and TA. Activation of caspase-5 and -1 was also enhanced by ATP and ER stress inducers. Expression and activation of caspase-5 were inhibited by a caspase-1–specific inhibitor. Caspase-5 knockdown reduced caspase-1 protein expression and activation and inhibited TNF-α–induced IL-8 and MCP-1. In contrast to caspase-4, the contribution of caspase-5 to stress-induced apoptosis was moderate. Conclusions. Caspase-5 mRNA synthesis, protein expression, and catalytic activation were highly regulated in response to various proinflammatory stimuli, ATP, and ER stress inducers. Mutual activation between caspase-5 and -1 suggests caspase-5 may work predominantly in concert with caspase-1 in modulating hRPE inflammatory responses. PMID:21969293

  5. The small tellurium-based compound SAS suppresses inflammation in human retinal pigment epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Livnat, Tami; Halpert, Gilad; Jawad, Shayma; Nisgav, Yael; Azar-Avivi, Shirley; Liu, Baoying; Nussenblatt, Robert B.; Weinberger, Dov; Sredni, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Pathological angiogenesis and chronic inflammation greatly contribute to the development of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in chorioretinal diseases involving abnormal contact between retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) and endothelial cells (ECs), associated with Bruch’s membrane rupture. We explored the ability of the small organotellurium compound octa-O-bis-(R,R)-tartarate ditellurane (SAS) to mitigate inflammatory processes in human RPE cells. Methods Cell adhesion assays and analyses of gene and protein expression were used to examine the effect of SAS on ARPE-19 cells or primary human RPE cells that were grown alone or in an RPE-EC co-culture. Results Adhesion assays showed that SAS inhibited αv integrins expressed on RPE cells. Co-cultures of RPE cells with ECs significantly reduced the gene expression of PEDF, as compared to RPE cells cultured alone. Both SAS and the anti-αvβ3 antibody LM609 significantly enhanced the production of PEDF at both mRNA and protein levels in RPE cells. RPE cells co-cultured with EC exhibited increased gene expression of CXCL5, COX1, MMP2, IGF1, and IL8, all of which are involved in both angiogenesis and inflammation. The enhanced expression of these genes was greatly suppressed by SAS, but interestingly, remained unaffected by LM609. Zymography assay showed that SAS reduced the level of MMP-2 activity in RPE cells. We also found that SAS significantly suppressed IL-1β-induced IL-6 expression and secretion from RPE cells by reducing the protein levels of phospho-IkappaBalpha (pIκBα). Conclusions Our results suggest that SAS is a promising anti-inflammatory agent in RPE cells, and may be an effective therapeutic approach for controlling chorioretinal diseases. PMID:27293373

  6. Osmotic Induction of Angiogenic Growth Factor Expression in Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Reichenbach, Andreas; Wiedemann, Peter; Kohen, Leon; Bringmann, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background Although systemic hypertension is a risk factor of age-related macular degeneration, antihypertensive medications do not affect the risk of the disease. One condition that induces hypertension is high intake of dietary salt resulting in increased blood osmolarity. In order to prove the assumption that, in addition to hypertension, high osmolarity may aggravate neovascular retinal diseases, we determined the effect of extracellular hyperosmolarity on the expression of angiogenic cytokines in cultured human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. Methodology/Principal Findings Hyperosmolarity was induced by the addition of 100 mM NaCl or sucrose to the culture medium. Hypoxia and oxidative stress were induced by the addition of the hypoxia mimetic CoCl2 and H2O2, respectively. Alterations in gene expression were determined with real-time RT-PCR. Secretion of bFGF was evaluated by ELISA. Cell viability was determined by trypan blue exclusion. Nuclear factor of activated T cell 5 (NFAT5) expression was knocked down with siRNA. Hyperosmolarity induced transcriptional activation of bFGF, HB-EGF, and VEGF genes, while the expression of other cytokines such as EGF, PDGF-A, TGF-β1, HGF, and PEDF was not or moderately altered. Hypoxia induced increased expression of the HB-EGF, EGF, PDGF-A, TGF-β1, and VEGF genes, but not of the bFGF gene. Oxidative stress induced gene expression of HB-EGF, but not of bFGF. The hyperosmotic expression of the bFGF gene was dependent on the activation of p38α/β MAPK, JNK, PI3K, and the transcriptional activity of NFAT5. The hyperosmotic expression of the HB-EGF gene was dependent on the activation of p38α/β MAPK, ERK1/2, and JNK. The hyperosmotic expression of bFGF, HB-EGF, and VEGF genes was reduced by inhibitors of TGF-β1 superfamily activin receptor-like kinase receptors and the FGF receptor kinase, respectively. Hyperosmolarity induced secretion of bFGF that was reduced by inhibition of autocrine/paracrine TGF-β1

  7. Apical and basal membrane ion transport mechanisms in bovine retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Joseph, D P; Miller, S S

    1991-04-01

    1. Intracellular voltage recordings using conventional and double-barrelled chloride-selective microelectrodes have been used to identify several transport mechanisms at the apical and basolateral membranes of the isolated bovine retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)-choroid preparation. Intracellular recordings were obtained from two cell populations, melanotic (pigmented) and amelanotic (non-pigmented). The electrical properties of these two populations are practically identical. For melanotic cells the average apical resting membrane potential (VA) is -61 +/- 2 mV (mean +/- S.E.M., n = 49 cells, thirty-three eyes). For these cells the ratio of apical to basolateral membrane resistance (a) was 0.22 +/- 0.02. The mean transepithelial voltage and resistance were 6 +/- 1 mV and 138 +/- 7 omega cm2, respectively. 2. The apical membrane, which faces the distal retina, contains a Ba(2+)-inhibitable K+ conductance and a ouabain-inhibitable, electrogenic Na(+)-K+ pump. In addition it contains a bumetanide-sensitive mechanism, the putative Na(+)-K(+)-Cl- cotransporter. The basolateral membrane contains a DIDS (4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid)-inhibitable chloride channel. The relative conductances of the apical and basolateral membranes to K+ and Cl- are TK approximately 0.9 and TCl approximately 0.7, respectively. 3. The ouabain-induced fast phase of apical membrane depolarization (0-30 s) was used to calculate the equivalent resistances of the apical (RA) and basolateral (RB) cell membranes, as well as the paracellular or shunt resistance (RS). They are: 3190 +/- 400, 17920 +/- 2730 and 2550 +/- 200 omega (mean +/- S.E.M., n = 9 tissues), respectively. From these data the equivalent electromotive forces (EMF) at the apical (EA) and basolateral (EB) membranes were also calculated. They are: -69 +/- 5.0 and -24 +/- 5.0 mV, respectively. 4. Intracellular Cl- activity (aiCl) was measured using double-barreled ion-selective microelectrodes. In the steady state

  8. Cytokine regulation of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) production by human retinal pigment epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Crane, I J; Kuppner, M C; Mckillop-Smith, S; Wallace, C A; Forrester, J V

    1999-01-01

    GM-CSF is an important regulator of macrophage, granulocyte and dendritic cell behaviour and function. These cell types have been implicated in the retinal damage characteristic of endogenous posterior uveitis. Dendritic cells in the choroid have access to retinal antigens processed by the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells of the blood–retinal barrier and are thought to be candidates for the presentation of antigen in uveoretinitis. We therefore investigated the production of GM-CSF and its regulation in human RPE cells. IL-1β, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) all stimulated GM-CSF production by RPE cells and a combination of these cytokines increased GM-CSF production over five-fold compared with that with the individual cytokines alone. Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) rapidly down-regulated these responses. IFN-γ did not appear to be acting directly on IL-1β or via the synthesis of another protein. GM-CSF mRNA expression showed the same pattern of response to these cytokines, indicating transcriptional or pre-transcriptional regulation, and there was no evidence that IFN-γ was acting by destabilizing GM-CSF mRNA. These results are generally important in understanding the ways in which cytokine regulation differs between different cell types and also more specifically for determining ways in which a cytokine with a significant role in the development of autoimmune uveoretinitis may be manipulated. PMID:9933455

  9. Effects of PACAP on intracellular signaling pathways in human retinal pigment epithelial cells exposed to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Fabian, E; Reglodi, D; Mester, L; Szabo, A; Szabadfi, K; Tamas, A; Toth, G; Kovacs, K

    2012-11-01

    The integrity of retinal pigment epithelial cells is critical for photoreceptor survival and vision. Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) exerts retinoprotective effects against several types of injuries in vivo, including optic nerve transection, retinal ischemia, excitotoxic injuries, UVA-induced lesion, and diabetic retinopathy. In a recent study, we have proven that PACAP is also protective in oxidative stress-induced injury in human pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19 cells). The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible mechanisms of this protection. ARPE cells were exposed to a 24-h hydrogen peroxide treatment. Expressions of kinases and apoptotic markers were studied by complex array kits and Western blot. Oxidative stress induced the activation of several apoptotic markers, including Bad, Bax, HIF-1α, several heat shock proteins, TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand, and Fas-associated protein with death domain, while PACAP treatment decreased them. The changes in the expression of MAP kinases showed that PACAP activated the protective ERK1/2 and downstream CREB, and decreased the activation of the pro-apoptotic p38MAPK and c-Jun N-terminal kinase, an effect opposite to that observed with only oxidative stress. Furthermore, PACAP increased the activation of the protective Akt pathway. In addition, the effects of oxidative stress on several other signaling molecules were counteracted by PACAP treatment (Chk2, Yes, Lyn, paxillin, p53, PLC, STAT4, RSK). These play a role in cell death, cell cycle, inflammation, adhesion, differentiation and proliferation. In summary, PACAP, acting at several levels, influences the balance between pro- and anti-apoptotic factors in favor of anti-apoptosis, thereby providing protection in oxidative stress-induced injury of human retinal pigment epithelial cells. PMID:22644900

  10. The Project MACULA Retinal Pigment Epithelium Grading System for Histology and Optical Coherence Tomography in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zanzottera, Emma C.; Messinger, Jeffrey D.; Ach, Thomas; Smith, R. Theodore; Freund, K. Bailey; Curcio, Christine A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To seek pathways of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) fate in age-related macular degeneration via a morphology grading system; provide nomenclature, visualization targets, and metrics for clinical imaging and model systems. Methods. Donor eyes with geographic atrophy (GA) or choroidal neovascularization (CNV) and one GA eye with previous clinical spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT) imaging were processed for histology, photodocumented, and annotated at predefined locations. Retinal pigment epithelial cells contained spindle-shaped melanosomes, apposed a basal lamina or basal laminar deposit (BLamD), and exhibited recognizable morphologies. Thicknesses and unbiased estimates of frequencies were obtained. Results. In 13 GA eyes (449 locations), ‘Shedding,’ ‘Sloughed,’ and ‘Dissociated’ morphologies were abundant; 22.2% of atrophic locations had ‘Dissociated’ RPE. In 39 CNV eyes (1363 locations), 37.3% of locations with fibrovascular/fibrocellular scar had ‘Entombed’ RPE; ‘Sloughed,’ ‘Dissociated,’ and ‘Bilaminar’ morphologies were abundant. Of abnormal RPE, CNV and GA both had ∼35% ‘Sloughed’/‘Intraretinal,’ with more Intraretinal in CNV (9.5% vs. 1.8%). ‘Shedding’ cells associated with granule aggregations in BLamD. The RPE layer did not thin, and BLamD remained thick, with progression. Granule-containing material consistent with three morphologies correlated to SDOCT hyperreflective foci in the previously examined GA patient. Conclusions. Retinal pigment epithelium morphology indicates multiple pathways in GA and CNV. Atrophic/scarred areas have numerous cells capable of transcribing genes and generating imaging signals. Shed granule aggregates, possibly apoptotic, are visible in SDOCT, as are ‘Dissociated’ and ‘Sloughed’ cells. The significance of RPE phenotypes is addressable in longitudinal, high-resolution imaging in clinic populations. Data can motivate future molecular phenotyping

  11. Whole-cell K+ currents in fresh and cultured cells of the human and monkey retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Wen, R; Lui, G M; Steinberg, R H

    1993-01-01

    1. Whole-cell potassium currents of freshly isolated human (adult and fetal) and monkey (adult) retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, as well as cultured human and monkey RPE cells were studied using the patch-clamp technique. 2. In freshly isolated adult cells of both species, two currents were observed in the voltage range from -150 to +50 mV: an outwardly rectifying current and an inwardly rectifying current. These currents were also found in cultured cells of both species. 3. The outwardly rectifying current in freshly isolated adult human and monkey cells and some cultured cells was evoked by depolarizing voltage pulses more positive that -30 mV. The current activated with a sigmoidal time course after a brief delay, and was virtually non-inactivating. The conductance associated with the current was half-maximal at -16.4 mV for fresh human cells and -13.5 mV for fresh monkey cells, but was shifted 16.0 and 17.7 mV in the positive direction in cultured human and monkey cells, respectively. The reversal potential of the current in both human and monkey cells matched the potassium equilibrium potential (EK) over a wide range of external potassium concentrations. This current was blocked by 20 mM tetraethylammonium. 4. A membrane current that exhibited inward rectification was observed with hyperpolarizing voltage pulses. The zero-current potential of this current was close to EK. This current was blocked by 2 mM Ba2+ and 2 mM Cs+. In cultured human and monkey cells, but not in fresh cells, this current exhibited an inactivation when voltage pulses were more negative than -120 mV. External Na+ was responsible for the inactivation, as the inactivation was removed in a Na(+)-free solution. 5. Membrane currents in freshly isolated fetal human RPE cells were remarkably different from those in adult cells. A transient outward current resembling the A-type potassium current was observed as the dominant membrane current in freshly isolated fetal human cells. This

  12. Simultaneous decomposition of multiple hyperspectral data sets: signal recovery of unknown fluorophores in the retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Smith, R Theodore; Post, Robert; Johri, Ansh; Lee, Michele D; Ablonczy, Zsolt; Curcio, Christine A; Ach, Thomas; Sajda, Paul

    2014-12-01

    Upon excitation with different wavelengths of light, biological tissues emit distinct but related autofluorescence signals. We used non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) to simultaneously decompose co-registered hyperspectral emission data from human retinal pigment epithelium/Bruch's membrane specimens illuminated with 436 and 480 nm light. NMF analysis was initialized with Gaussian mixture model fits and constrained to provide identical abundance images for the two excitation wavelengths. Spectra recovered this way were smoother than those obtained separately; fluorophore abundances more clearly localized within tissue compartments. These studies provide evidence that leveraging multiple co-registered hyperspectral emission data sets is preferential for identifying biologically relevant fluorophore information. PMID:25574430

  13. Early LPS-induced ERK activation in retinal pigment epithelium cells is dependent on PIP 2 -PLC.

    PubMed

    Mateos, Melina V; Kamerbeek, Constanza B; Giusto, Norma M; Salvador, Gabriela A

    2016-06-01

    This article presents additional data regarding the study "The phospholipase D pathway mediates the inflammatory response of the retinal pigment epithelium" [1]. The new data presented here show that short exposure of RPE cells to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces an early and transient activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2). This early ERK1/2 activation is dependent on phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate-phospholipase C (PIP2-PLC). On the contrary, neither the phospholipase D 1 (PLD1) nor the PLD2 inhibition is able to modulate the early ERK1/2 activation induced by LPS in RPE cells. PMID:27006973

  14. Retinal Pigment Epithelium Atrophy 1 (rpea1): A New Mouse Model With Retinal Detachment Caused by a Disruption of Protein Kinase C, θ

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Xiaojie; Liu, Ye; Hurd, Ron; Wang, Jieping; Fitzmaurice, Bernie; Nishina, Patsy M.; Chang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Retinal detachments (RDs), a separation of the light-sensitive tissue of the retina from its supporting layers in the posterior eye, isolate retinal cells from their normal supply of nourishment and can lead to their deterioration and death. We identified a new, spontaneous murine model of exudative retinal detachment, nm3342 (new mutant 3342, also referred to as rpea1: retinal pigment epithelium atrophy 1), which we characterize herein. Methods The chromosomal position for the recessive nm3342 mutation was determined by DNA pooling, and the causative mutation was discovered by comparison of whole exome sequences of mutant and wild-type controls. The effects of the mutation were examined in longitudinal studies by clinical evaluation, electroretinography (ERG), light microscopy, and marker and Western blot analyses. Results New mutant 3342, nm3342, also referred to as rpea1, causes an early-onset, complete RD on the ABJ/LeJ strain background, and central exudative RD and late-onset RPE atrophy on the C57BL/6J background. The ERG responses were normal at 2 months of age but deteriorate as mice age, concomitant with progressive pan-retinal photoreceptor loss. Genetic analysis localized rpea1 to mouse chromosome 2. By high-throughput sequencing of a whole exome capture library of an rpea1/rpea1 mutant and subsequent sequence analysis, a splice donor site mutation in the Prkcq (protein kinase C, θ) gene, was identified, leading to a skipping of exon 6, frame shift and premature termination. Homozygotes with a Prkcq-targeted null allele (Prkcqtm1Litt) have similar retinal phenotypes as homozygous rpea1 mice. We determined that the PKCθ protein is abundant in the lateral surfaces of RPE cells and colocalizes with both tight and adherens junction proteins. Phalloidin-stained RPE whole mounts showed abnormal RPE cell morphology with aberrant actin ring formation. Conclusions The homozygous Prkcqrpea1 and the null Prkcqtm1Litt mutants are reliable novel mouse

  15. Inhibition of Nuclear Translocation of Apoptosis-Inducing Factor Is an Essential Mechanism of the Neuroprotective Activity of Pigment Epithelium-Derived Factor in a Rat Model of Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Yusuke; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Yonemitsu, Yoshikazu; Onimaru, Mitsuho; Nakagawa, Kazunori; Kohno, Ri-ichiro; Miyazaki, Masanori; Hisatomi, Toshio; Nakamura, Makoto; Yabe, Takeshi; Hasegawa, Mamoru; Ishibashi, Tatsuro; Sueishi, Katsuo

    2008-01-01

    Photoreceptor apoptosis is a critical process of retinal degeneration in retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a group of retinal degenerative diseases that result from rod and cone photoreceptor cell death and represent a major cause of adult blindness. We previously demonstrated the efficient prevention of photoreceptor apoptosis by intraocular gene transfer of pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) in animal models of RP; however, the underlying mechanism of the neuroprotective activity of PEDF remains elusive. In this study, we show that an apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF)-related pathway is an essential target of PEDF-mediated neuroprotection. PEDF rescued serum starvation-induced apoptosis, which is mediated by AIF but not by caspases, of R28 cells derived from the rat retina by preventing translocation of AIF into the nucleus. Nuclear translocation of AIF was also observed in the apoptotic photoreceptors of Royal College of Surgeons rats, a well-known animal model of RP that carries a mutation of the Mertk gene. Lentivirus-mediated retinal gene transfer of PEDF prevented the nuclear translocation of AIF in vivo, resulting in the inhibition of the apoptotic loss of their photoreceptors in association with up-regulated Bcl-2 expression, which mediates the mitochondrial release of AIF. These findings clearly demonstrate that AIF is an essential executioner of photoreceptor apoptosis in inherited retinal degeneration and provide a therapeutic rationale for PEDF-mediated neuroprotective gene therapy for individuals with RP. PMID:18845835

  16. Purinergic regulation of cation conductances and intracellular Ca2+ in cultured rat retinal pigment epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Jennifer S; Baldridge, William H; Kelly, Melanie E M

    1999-01-01

    We used whole-cell patch clamp and fluorescent calcium imaging techniques to investigate the effects of adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) on membrane currents and intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i)in rat retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. In 62 % of RPE cells, application of 100 μM ATP elicited a fast inward current at negative membrane potentials. In 38 % of RPE cells recorded, a biphasic response to ATP was observed in which activation of the fast inward current was followed by activation of a delayed outward current. The ATP-activated inward current was a non-selective cation (NSC) current that showed inward rectification, reversed at −1.5 ± 1 mV and was permeable to monovalent cations. The NSC current was insensitive to the P2 purinoceptor antagonists, suramin or PPADS but was activated by the purinoceptor agonists UTP, ADP and 2MeSATP. The outward current activated by ATP reversed at −68 ± 3 mV (equilibrium potential for potassium (EK) = −84 mV) and was blocked by Ba2+ ions, consistent with the activation of a K+ conductance. The outward K+ conductance was also reduced by the maxi-KCa channel blocker iberiotoxin (IbTX; 10 nM), suggesting that ATP activated an outward Ca2+-activated K+ channel in rat RPE cells. The Ca2+-activated K+ current (IK(Ca)) was also activated by the purinoceptor agonists UTP, ADP and 2MeSATP. In fluo-3 or fluo-4 loaded RPE cells, ATP and the pyrimidine agonist UTP elevated [Ca2+]i. The increase in Ca2+ was not dependent on extracellular Ca2+ influx, but was sensitive to the Ca2+-ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin, confirming the involvement of intracellular Ca2+ stores release. These results suggest that rat RPE cells express both P2X purinoceptors that gate activation of a non-selective cation conductance and G protein-coupled P2Y purinoceptors that mediate Ca2+ release from intracellular stores and activation of a calcium-activated K+ current. PMID:10545141

  17. Histologic Basis of Variations in Retinal Pigment Epithelium Autofluorescence in Eyes with Geographic Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Rudolf, Martin; Vogt, Susan D.; Curcio, Christine A.; Huisingh, Carrie; McGwin, Gerald; Wagner, Anna; Grisanti, Salvatore; Read, Russell W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Lipofuscin contained in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is the main source of fundus auto-fluorescence (FAF), the target of an imaging method useful for estimating the progression of geographic atrophy (GA) in clinical trials. To establish a cellular basis for hyperfluorescent GA border zones, histologic autofluorescence (HAF) was measured at defined stages of RPE pathologic progression. Design Experimental study. Participants and Controls Ten GA donor eyes (mean age ± standard deviation, 87.1±4.0 years) and 3 age-matched control eyes (mean age ± standard deviation, 84.0±7.2 years) without GA. Methods Ten–micrometer-thick sections were divided into zones of RPE morphologic features according to an 8-point scale. Any HAF excited by 488 nm light was imaged by laser confocal microscopy. The HAF intensity summed along vertical lines perpendicular to Bruch’s membrane at 0.2-μm intervals served as a surrogate for FAF. Intensity profiles in 151 zones were normalized to grade 0 at a standard reference location in each eye. Cross-sectional area, mean, and sum autofluorescence for individual RPE cells were measured (cellular autofluorescence [CAF]). Main Outcome Measures Statistically significant differences in intensity and localization of HAF and CAF at defined stages of RPE morphologic progression for GA and control eyes. Results The RPE morphologic features were most abnormal (cell rounding, sloughing, and layering; grade 2) and HAF intensity profiles were highest and most variable immediately adjacent to atrophic areas. Peaks in HAF intensity frequently were associated with vertically superimposed cells. The HAF value that optimally separated reactive RPE was 0.66 standard deviations more than the mean for uninvolved RPE and was associated with a sensitivity of 75.8% and a specificity of 76.3%. When variable cell area was accounted for, neither mean nor sum CAF differed significantly among the RPE pathologic grades. Conclusions Areas with advanced

  18. Purinergic regulation of cation conductances and intracellular Ca2+ in cultured rat retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ryan, J S; Baldridge, W H; Kelly, M E

    1999-11-01

    1. We used whole-cell patch clamp and fluorescent calcium imaging techniques to investigate the effects of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) on membrane currents and intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i)in rat retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. In 62 % of RPE cells, application of 100 microM ATP elicited a fast inward current at negative membrane potentials. In 38 % of RPE cells recorded, a biphasic response to ATP was observed in which activation of the fast inward current was followed by activation of a delayed outward current. 2. The ATP-activated inward current was a non-selective cation (NSC) current that showed inward rectification, reversed at -1.5 +/- 1 mV and was permeable to monovalent cations. The NSC current was insensitive to the P2 purinoceptor antagonists, suramin or PPADS but was activated by the purinoceptor agonists UTP, ADP and 2MeSATP. 3. The outward current activated by ATP reversed at -68 +/- 3 mV (equilibrium potential for potassium (EK) = -84 mV) and was blocked by Ba2+ ions, consistent with the activation of a K+ conductance. The outward K+ conductance was also reduced by the maxi-KCa channel blocker iberiotoxin (IbTX; 10 nM), suggesting that ATP activated an outward Ca2+-activated K+ channel in rat RPE cells. The Ca2+-activated K+ current (IK(Ca)) was also activated by the purinoceptor agonists UTP, ADP and 2MeSATP. 4. In fluo-3 or fluo-4 loaded RPE cells, ATP and the pyrimidine agonist UTP elevated [Ca2+]i. The increase in Ca2+ was not dependent on extracellular Ca2+ influx, but was sensitive to the Ca2+-ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin, confirming the involvement of intracellular Ca2+ stores release. 5. These results suggest that rat RPE cells express both P2X purinoceptors that gate activation of a non-selective cation conductance and G protein-coupled P2Y purinoceptors that mediate Ca2+ release from intracellular stores and activation of a calcium-activated K+ current. PMID:10545141

  19. Properties of the inwardly rectifying K+ conductance in the toad retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Segawa, Y; Hughes, B A

    1994-01-01

    An inwardly rectifying K+ current was analysed in isolated toad retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells using the perforated-patch clamp technique. The zero-current potential (Vo) of RPE cells averaged -71 mV when the extracellular K+ concentration ([K+]o) was 2 mM. Increasing [K+]o from 0.5 to 5 mM shifted V0 by +43 mV, indicating a relative K+ conductance (TK) of 0.74. At [K+]o greater than 5 mM, TK decreased to 0.53. Currents were larger in response to hyperpolarizing voltage pulses than depolarizing pulses, indicating an inwardly rectifying conductance. Currents were time independent except in response to voltage pulses to potentials positive to 0 mV, where the outward current decayed with an exponential time course. Both the inwardly rectifying current and the transient outward current were eliminated by the addition of 0.5 mM Ba2+, 5 mM Cs+ or 2 mM Rb+ to the extracellular solution. The current blocked by these ions reversed near the K+ equilibrium potential (EK) over a wide range of [K+]o, indicating a highly selective K+ channel. The current-voltage relationship of the isolated K+ current exhibited mild inward rectification at voltages negative to -20 mV and a negative slope conductance at voltages positive to -20 mV. The Cs(+)- and Ba(2+)-induced blocks of the K+ current were concentration dependent but voltage independent. The apparent dissociation constants were 0.8 mM for Cs+ and 40 microM for Ba2+. The K+ conductance decreased when extracellular Na+ was removed. Increasing [K+]o decreased the K+ chord conductance (gK) at negative membrane potentials. In the physiological voltage range, increasing [K+]o from 2 to 5 mM caused gK to decrease by approximately 25%. We conclude that the inwardly rectifying K+ conductance represents the resting K+ conductance of the toad RPE apical membrane. The unusual properties of this conductance may enhance the ability of the RPE to buffer [K+]o changes that take place in the subretinal space at the transition between

  20. Differentiation/Purification Protocol for Retinal Pigment Epithelium from Mouse Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells as a Research Tool

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Yuko; Sugita, Sunao; Mandai, Michiko; Yonemura, Shigenobu; Onishi, Akishi; Ito, Shin-ichiro; Mochizuki, Manabu; Ohno-Matsui, Kyoko; Takahashi, Masayo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To establish a novel protocol for differentiation of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) with high purity from mouse induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC). Methods Retinal progenitor cells were differentiated from mouse iPSC, and RPE differentiation was then enhanced by activation of the Wnt signaling pathway, inhibition of the fibroblast growth factor signaling pathway, and inhibition of the Rho-associated, coiled-coil containing protein kinase signaling pathway. Expanded pigmented cells were purified by plate adhesion after Accutase® treatment. Enriched cells were cultured until they developed a cobblestone appearance with cuboidal shape. The characteristics of iPS-RPE were confirmed by gene expression, immunocytochemistry, and electron microscopy. Functions and immunologic features of the iPS-RPE were also evaluated. Results We obtained iPS-RPE at high purity (approximately 98%). The iPS-RPE showed apical-basal polarity and cellular structure characteristic of RPE. Expression levels of several RPE markers were lower than those of freshly isolated mouse RPE but comparable to those of primary cultured RPE. The iPS-RPE could form tight junctions, phagocytose photoreceptor outer segments, express immune antigens, and suppress lymphocyte proliferation. Conclusion We successfully developed a differentiation/purification protocol to obtain mouse iPS-RPE. The mouse iPS-RPE can serve as an attractive tool for functional and morphological studies of RPE. PMID:27385038

  1. Defined Medium Conditions for the Induction and Expansion of Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Retinal Pigment Epithelium.

    PubMed

    Lidgerwood, Grace E; Lim, Shiang Y; Crombie, Duncan E; Ali, Ray; Gill, Katherine P; Hernández, Damián; Kie, Josh; Conquest, Alison; Waugh, Hayley S; Wong, Raymond C B; Liang, Helena H; Hewitt, Alex W; Davidson, Kathryn C; Pébay, Alice

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate that a combination of Noggin, Dickkopf-1, Insulin Growth Factor 1 and basic Fibroblast Growth Factor, promotes the differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells into retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells. We describe an efficient one-step approach that allows the generation of RPE cells from both human embryonic stem cells and human induced pluripotent stem cells within 40-60 days without the need for manual excision, floating aggregates or imbedded cysts. Compared to methods that rely on spontaneous differentiation, our protocol results in faster differentiation into RPE cells. This pro-retinal culture medium promotes the growth of functional RPE cells that exhibit key characteristics of the RPE including pigmentation, polygonal morphology, expression of mature RPE markers, electrophysiological membrane potential and the ability to phagocytose photoreceptor outer segments. This protocol can be adapted for feeder, feeder-free and serum-free conditions. This method thereby provides a rapid and simplified production of RPE cells for downstream applications such as disease modelling and drug screening. PMID:26589197

  2. High glucose promotes the migration of retinal pigment epithelial cells through increased oxidative stress and PEDF expression.

    PubMed

    Farnoodian, Mitra; Halbach, Caroline; Slinger, Cassidy; Pattnaik, Bikash R; Sorenson, Christine M; Sheibani, Nader

    2016-09-01

    Defects in the outer blood-retinal barrier have significant impact on the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy and macular edema. However, the detailed mechanisms involved remain largely unknown. This is, in part, attributed to the lack of suitable animal and cell culture models, including those of mouse origin. We recently reported a method for the culture of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells from wild-type and transgenic mice. The RPE cells are responsible for maintaining the integrity of the outer blood-retinal barrier whose dysfunction during diabetes has a significant impact on vision. Here we determined the impact of high glucose on the function of RPE cells. We showed that high glucose conditions resulted in enhanced migration and increased the level of oxidative stress in RPE cells, but minimally impacted their rate of proliferation and apoptosis. High glucose also minimally affected the cell-matrix and cell-cell interactions of RPE cells. However, the expression of integrins and extracellular matrix proteins including pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) were altered under high glucose conditions. Incubation of RPE cells with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine under high glucose conditions restored normal migration and PEDF expression. These cells also exhibited increased nuclear localization of the antioxidant transcription factor Nrf2 and ZO-1, reduced levels of β-catenin and phagocytic activity, and minimal effect on production of vascular endothelial growth factor, inflammatory cytokines, and Akt, MAPK, and Src signaling pathways. Thus high glucose conditions promote RPE cell migration through increased oxidative stress and expression of PEDF without a significant effect on the rate of proliferation and apoptosis. PMID:27440660

  3. Ultrathin Polyimide Membrane as Cell Carrier for Subretinal Transplantation of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Derived Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Ilmarinen, Tanja; Hiidenmaa, Hanna; Kööbi, Peeter; Nymark, Soile; Sorkio, Anni; Wang, Jing-Huan; Stanzel, Boris V.; Thieltges, Fabian; Alajuuma, Päivi; Oksala, Olli; Kataja, Marko; Uusitalo, Hannu; Skottman, Heli

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the suitability of ultrathin and porous polyimide (PI) membrane as a carrier for subretinal transplantation of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) -derived retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in rabbits. The in vivo effects of hESC-RPE cells were analyzed by subretinal suspension injection into Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats. Rat eyes were analyzed with electroretinography (ERG) and histology. After analyzing the surface and permeability properties of PI, subretinal PI membrane transplantations with and without hESC-RPE were performed in rabbits. The rabbits were followed for three months and eyes analyzed with fundus photography, ERG, optical coherence tomography (OCT), and histology. Animals were immunosuppressed with cyclosporine the entire follow-up time. In dystrophic RCS rats, ERG and outer nuclear layer (ONL) thickness showed some rescue after hESC-RPE injection. Cells positive for human antigen were found in clusters under the retina 41 days post-injection but not anymore after 105 days. In rabbits, OCT showed good placement of the PI. However, there was loss of pigmentation on the hESC-RPE-PI over time. In the eyes with PI alone, no obvious signs of inflammation or retinal atrophy were observed. In the presence of hESC-RPE, mononuclear cell infiltration and retinal atrophy were observed around the membranes. The porous ultrathin PI membrane was well-tolerated in the subretinal space and is a promising scaffold for RPE transplantation. However, the rejection of the transplanted cells seems to be a major problem and the given immunosuppression was insufficient for reduction of xenograft induced inflammation. PMID:26606532

  4. Retinal pigment epithelial cell expression of active Rap 1a by scAAV2 inhibits choroidal neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haibo; Han, Xiaokun; Bretz, Colin A; Becker, Silke; Gambhir, Deeksha; Smith, George W; Samulski, R Jude; Wittchen, Erika S; Quilliam, Lawrence A; Chrzanowska-Wodnicka, Magdalena; Hartnett, M Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that increased Rap1a activity specifically in retinal pigment epithelial cells resists choroidal neovascularization (CNV), self-complementary adeno-associated virus 2 (scAAV2) with RPE65-promoter-driven GFP vectors were generated and introduced subretinally into Rap1b-deficient mice. Six-week-old mice that received subretinal control (scAAV2-Con) or constitutively active Rap1a (scAAV2-CARap1a) showed strong GFP at the 5 × 108 viral particle/µl dose 5 weeks later without altering retinal morphology or function. Compared to scAAV2-Con- or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)-injected, eyes injected with scAAV2-CARap1a had increased Rap1 in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE)/choroidal lysates and a significant reduction in CNV volume 7 days after laser, comparable to eyes that received intravitreal anti-VEGF versus IgG control. scAAV2-CARap1a-, but not anti-VEGF-, injected eyes had increased pan-cadherin in RPE/choroids. In cultured RPE cells, increased active Rap1a inhibited TNFα-induced disassociation of junctional pan-cadherin/β-catenin complexes, increased transepithelial electrical resistance through an interaction of β-catenin with phosphorylated scaffold protein, IQGAP1, and inhibited choroidal endothelial cell (CEC) transmigration of an RPE monolayer. This evidence shows that increased Rap1a activity specifically in RPE cells is sufficient to reduce CEC transmigration and CNV and involves IQGAP1-mediated protection of RPE junctional complexes. PMID:27606349

  5. Retinal pigment epithelial cell expression of active Rap 1a by scAAV2 inhibits choroidal neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haibo; Han, Xiaokun; Bretz, Colin A; Becker, Silke; Gambhir, Deeksha; Smith, George W; Samulski, R Jude; Wittchen, Erika S; Quilliam, Lawrence A; Chrzanowska-Wodnicka, Magdalena; Hartnett, M Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that increased Rap1a activity specifically in retinal pigment epithelial cells resists choroidal neovascularization (CNV), self-complementary adeno-associated virus 2 (scAAV2) with RPE65-promoter-driven GFP vectors were generated and introduced subretinally into Rap1b-deficient mice. Six-week-old mice that received subretinal control (scAAV2-Con) or constitutively active Rap1a (scAAV2-CARap1a) showed strong GFP at the 5 × 10(8) viral particle/µl dose 5 weeks later without altering retinal morphology or function. Compared to scAAV2-Con- or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)-injected, eyes injected with scAAV2-CARap1a had increased Rap1 in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE)/choroidal lysates and a significant reduction in CNV volume 7 days after laser, comparable to eyes that received intravitreal anti-VEGF versus IgG control. scAAV2-CARap1a-, but not anti-VEGF-, injected eyes had increased pan-cadherin in RPE/choroids. In cultured RPE cells, increased active Rap1a inhibited TNFα-induced disassociation of junctional pan-cadherin/β-catenin complexes, increased transepithelial electrical resistance through an interaction of β-catenin with phosphorylated scaffold protein, IQGAP1, and inhibited choroidal endothelial cell (CEC) transmigration of an RPE monolayer. This evidence shows that increased Rap1a activity specifically in RPE cells is sufficient to reduce CEC transmigration and CNV and involves IQGAP1-mediated protection of RPE junctional complexes. PMID:27606349

  6. Three-Dimensional Neuroepithelial Culture from Human Embryonic Stem Cells and Its Use for Quantitative Conversion to Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yu; Carido, Madalena; Meinhardt, Andrea; Kurth, Thomas; Karl, Mike O.; Ader, Marius; Tanaka, Elly M.

    2013-01-01

    A goal in human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research is the faithful differentiation to given cell types such as neural lineages. During embryonic development, a basement membrane surrounds the neural plate that forms a tight, apico-basolaterally polarized epithelium before closing to form a neural tube with a single lumen. Here we show that the three-dimensional epithelial cyst culture of hESCs in Matrigel combined with neural induction results in a quantitative conversion into neuroepithelial cysts containing a single lumen. Cells attain a defined neuroepithelial identity by 5 days. The neuroepithelial cysts naturally generate retinal epithelium, in part due to IGF-1/insulin signaling. We demonstrate the utility of this epithelial culture approach by achieving a quantitative production of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells from hESCs within 30 days. Direct transplantation of this RPE into a rat model of retinal degeneration without any selection or expansion of the cells results in the formation of a donor-derived RPE monolayer that rescues photoreceptor cells. The cyst method for neuroepithelial differentiation of pluripotent stem cells is not only of importance for RPE generation but will also be relevant to the production of other neuronal cell types and for reconstituting complex patterning events from three-dimensional neuroepithelia. PMID:23358448

  7. Regulation of angiogenin expression and epithelial-mesenchymal transition by HIF-1α signaling in hypoxic retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lai, Kairan; Luo, Chenqi; Zhang, Xiaobo; Ye, Panpan; Zhang, Yidong; He, Jiliang; Yao, Ke

    2016-09-01

    Choroidal neovascularization (CNV) is a major cause of vision loss in many retinal diseases. Hypoxia is determined to be a key inducer of CNV and hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is an important transcription factor. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and the synthesis of proangiogenic cytokines make great contributions to the development of CNV. In the present study, the role of HIF-1α signaling in the regulation of angiogenin (ANG) expression and EMT in hypoxic retinal pigment epithelial cells was investigated. A significant elevation expression of ANG expression level in a mouse model of laser-induced CNV was demonstrated. In a hypoxic model of ARPE-19, an increased expression level of ANG and induction of EMT accompanied with stabilization and nucleus translocation of HIF-1α. Blockage of HIF-1α signaling resulted in inhibition of high expression of ANG and EMT features. The direct interaction between HIF-1α and ANG promoter region was identified by ChIP-qPCR. The association of RNase 4 mRNA level with HIF-1α signaling was also clarified in APRE-19. Moreover, the exogenous ANG translocated into the nucleus, enhanced 45S rRNA transcription, promoted cell proliferation and tube formation in human retinal microvascular endothelial cells. In conclusion, the hypoxic conditions regulate the expression of ANG and EMT via an activation of HIF-1α signaling. It provides molecular evidence for potential therapy strategies of treating CNV. PMID:27259982

  8. G-quartet oligonucleotide mediated delivery of proteins into photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium via intravitreal injection.

    PubMed

    Leaderer, Derek; Cashman, Siobhan M; Kumar-Singh, Rajendra

    2016-04-01

    There is currently no available method to efficiently deliver proteins across the plasma membrane of photoreceptor or retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells in vivo. Thus, current clinical application of recombinant proteins in ophthalmology is limited to the use of proteins that perform their biological function extracellularly. The ability to traverse biological membranes would enable the mobilization of a significantly larger number of proteins with previously well characterized properties. Nucleolin is abundantly present on the surface of rapidly dividing cells including cancer cells. Surprisingly, nucleolin is also present on the surface of photoreceptor cell bodies. Here we investigated whether nucleolin can be utilized as a gateway for the delivery of proteins into retinal cells following intravitreal injection. AS1411 is a G-quartet aptamer capable of targeting nucleolin. Subsequent to intravitreal injection, fluorescently labeled AS1411 localized to various retinal cell types including the photoreceptors and RPE. AS1411 linked to streptavidin (a ∼50 kDa protein) via a biotin bridge enabled the uptake of Streptavidin into photoreceptors and RPE. AS1411-Streptavidin conjugate applied topically to the cornea allowed for uptake of the conjugate into the nucleus and cytoplasm of corneal endothelial cells. Clinical relevance of AS1411 as a delivery vehicle was strongly indicated by demonstration of the presence of cell surface nucleolin on the photoreceptors, inner neurons and ganglion cells of human retina. These data support exploration of AS1411 as a means of delivering therapeutic proteins to diseased retina. PMID:26923800

  9. Hyperplastic neuroretinopathy and disorder of pigment epithelial cells precede accelerated retinal degeneration in the SJL/N mouse.

    PubMed

    Caffé, A R; Szél, A; Juliusson, B; Hawkins, R; van Veen, T

    1993-02-01

    We have found a complex eye disease in the SJL/N mouse. This animal is closely related to the SJL/J mouse, which is homozygous for retinal degeneration (rd) and which also suffers from extraocular reticulum cell sarcomas at around 200 days of age. In the SJL/N animal, a high incidence of subretinal tumor is present at 9 days after birth. Furthermore, we have observed an extensive neuroretinal hyperplasia, a phenomenon that is termed "hyperplastic neuroretinopathy", and that is probably the consequence of elevated levels of cytokines in the animals. In addition to these anomalies, the SJL/N mouse shows progressive dystrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) from day 4 onwards, and accelerated photoreceptor cell degeneration is completed by day 16. The early RPE dystrophy appears to be a secondary autoimmune disease, since cells in this structure and in the choroid develop MHC class II antigens, whereas we suspect that the accelerated photoreceptor cell loss is induced by a soluble toxic agent. The F1 progeny derived from cross-breeding the SJL/N and Balb/c +/+ strains also shows a high incidence of subretinal tumor and hyperplastic neuroretinopathy, but neither the RPE dystrophy nor retinal degeneration. PMID:8384083

  10. Retinal Image Quality during Accommodation in Adult Myopic Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Sreenivasan, Vidhyapriya; Aslakson, Emily; Kornaus, Andrew; Thibos, Larry N.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Reduced retinal image contrast produced by accommodative lag is implicated with myopia development. Here, we measure accommodative error and retinal image quality from wavefront aberrations in myopes and emmetropes when they perform visually demanding and naturalistic tasks. Methods Wavefront aberrations were measured in 10 emmetropic and 11 myopic adults at three distances (100, 40, and 20 cm) while performing four tasks (monocular acuity, binocular acuity, reading, and movie watching). For the acuity tasks, measurements of wavefront error were obtained near the end point of the acuity experiment. Refractive state was defined as the target vergence that optimizes image quality using a visual contrast metric (VSMTF) computed from wavefront errors. Results Accommodation was most accurate (and image quality best) during binocular acuity whereas accommodation was least accurate (and image quality worst) while watching a movie. When viewing distance was reduced, accommodative lag increased and image quality (as quantified by VSMTF) declined for all tasks in both refractive groups. For any given viewing distance, computed image quality was consistently worse in myopes than in emmetropes, more so for the acuity than for reading/movie watching. Although myopes showed greater lags and worse image quality for the acuity experiments compared to emmetropes, acuity was not measurably worse in myopes compared to emmetropes. Conclusions Retinal image quality present when performing a visually demanding task (e.g., during clinical examination) is likely to be greater than for less demanding tasks (e.g., reading/movie watching). Although reductions in image quality lead to reductions in acuity, the image quality metric VSMTF is not necessarily an absolute indicator of visual performance because myopes achieved slightly better acuity than emmetropes despite showing greater lags and worse image quality. Reduced visual contrast in myopes compared to emmetropes is consistent

  11. Identification of an Alternative Splicing Product of the Otx2 Gene Expressed in the Neural Retina and Retinal Pigmented Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kole, Christo; Berdugo, Naomi; Da Silva, Corinne; Aït-Ali, Najate; Millet-Puel, Géraldine; Pagan, Delphine; Blond, Frédéric; Poidevin, Laetitia; Ripp, Raymond; Fontaine, Valérie; Wincker, Patrick; Zack, Donald J.; Sahel, José-Alain; Poch, Olivier; Léveillard, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the complexity of alternative splicing in the retina, we sequenced and analyzed a total of 115,706 clones from normalized cDNA libraries from mouse neural retina (66,217) and rat retinal pigmented epithelium (49,489). Based upon clustering the cDNAs and mapping them with their respective genomes, the estimated numbers of genes were 9,134 for the mouse neural retina and 12,050 for the rat retinal pigmented epithelium libraries. This unique collection of retinal of messenger RNAs is maintained and accessible through a web-base server to the whole community of retinal biologists for further functional characterization. The analysis revealed 3,248 and 3,202 alternative splice events for mouse neural retina and rat retinal pigmented epithelium, respectively. We focused on transcription factors involved in vision. Among the six candidates suitable for functional analysis, we selected Otx2S, a novel variant of the Otx2 gene with a deletion within the homeodomain sequence. Otx2S is expressed in both the neural retina and retinal pigmented epithelium, and encodes a protein that is targeted to the nucleus. OTX2S exerts transdominant activity on the tyrosinase promoter when tested in the physiological environment of primary RPE cells. By overexpressing OTX2S in primary RPE cells using an adeno associated viral vector, we identified 10 genes whose expression is positively regulated by OTX2S. We find that OTX2S is able to bind to the chromatin at the promoter of the retinal dehydrogenase 10 (RDH10) gene. PMID:26985665

  12. Identification of an Alternative Splicing Product of the Otx2 Gene Expressed in the Neural Retina and Retinal Pigmented Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Kole, Christo; Berdugo, Naomi; Da Silva, Corinne; Aït-Ali, Najate; Millet-Puel, Géraldine; Pagan, Delphine; Blond, Frédéric; Poidevin, Laetitia; Ripp, Raymond; Fontaine, Valérie; Wincker, Patrick; Zack, Donald J; Sahel, José-Alain; Poch, Olivier; Léveillard, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the complexity of alternative splicing in the retina, we sequenced and analyzed a total of 115,706 clones from normalized cDNA libraries from mouse neural retina (66,217) and rat retinal pigmented epithelium (49,489). Based upon clustering the cDNAs and mapping them with their respective genomes, the estimated numbers of genes were 9,134 for the mouse neural retina and 12,050 for the rat retinal pigmented epithelium libraries. This unique collection of retinal of messenger RNAs is maintained and accessible through a web-base server to the whole community of retinal biologists for further functional characterization. The analysis revealed 3,248 and 3,202 alternative splice events for mouse neural retina and rat retinal pigmented epithelium, respectively. We focused on transcription factors involved in vision. Among the six candidates suitable for functional analysis, we selected Otx2S, a novel variant of the Otx2 gene with a deletion within the homeodomain sequence. Otx2S is expressed in both the neural retina and retinal pigmented epithelium, and encodes a protein that is targeted to the nucleus. OTX2S exerts transdominant activity on the tyrosinase promoter when tested in the physiological environment of primary RPE cells. By overexpressing OTX2S in primary RPE cells using an adeno associated viral vector, we identified 10 genes whose expression is positively regulated by OTX2S. We find that OTX2S is able to bind to the chromatin at the promoter of the retinal dehydrogenase 10 (RDH10) gene. PMID:26985665

  13. 9-cis-retinoic acid in combination with retinal pigment epithelium induces apoptosis in cultured retinal explants only during early postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Söderpalm, A K; Karlsson, J; Caffé, A R; vanVeen, T

    1999-12-10

    Retinoic acid is one of the active metabolites of vitamin A and has profound effects on the development of the CNS including retina. Previously, we have shown that rod-specific apoptosis is induced in retinal explants from neonatal mice by exposure to 9-cis-retinoic acid (9CRA) when the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is present. In explants lacking RPE, it instead has a differentiation-promoting effect seen as an accelerated opsin expression on postnatal day 3. To investigate the long-term effect of 9CRA exposure, we have explanted retinas from neonatal C3H mice with or without RPE attached and placed in organ culture. After 19 or 48 h in culture or 7, 8 or 13 days in culture, the explants were either fixed for histochemical examination or frozen for assay of DEVDase activity. We found that long-term exposure to 9CRA caused a decrease in the number of cell layers in the outer nuclear layer (ONL) only in explants with the RPE attached. When explants with RPE attached were exposed to 9CRA only during the second postnatal week, neither an increase in DEVDase activity, TUNEL-positive cells, nor a decrease in cell layers of the ONL could be demonstrated, indicating that the retina was insensitive to the apoptosis-inducing effect of 9CRA after the first postnatal week. The absence of RPE in control explants resulted in a higher number of rosettes and the extrusion of cells into the subretinal space. PMID:10611516

  14. Surface Modified Biodegradable Electrospun Membranes as a Carrier for Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Sorkio, Anni; Porter, Patrick J; Juuti-Uusitalo, Kati; Meenan, Brian J; Skottman, Heli; Burke, George A

    2015-09-01

    Human embryonic stem cell-derived retinal pigment epithelial (hESC-RPE) cells are currently undergoing clinical trials to treat retinal degenerative diseases. Transplantation of hESC-RPE cells in conjuction with a supportive biomaterial carrier holds great potential as a future treatment for retinal degeneration. However, there has been no such biodegradable material that could support the growth and maturation of hESC-RPE cells so far. The primary aim of this work was to create a thin porous poly (L-lactide-co-caprolactone) (PLCL) membrane that could promote attachment, proliferation, and maturation of the hESC-RPE cells in serum-free culture conditions. The PLCL membranes were modified by atmospheric pressure plasma processing and coated with collagen IV to enhance cell growth and maturation. Permeability of the membranes was analyzed with an Ussing chamber system. Analysis with scanning electron microscopy, contact angle measurement, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrated that plasma surface treatment augments the surface properties of the membrane, which enhances the binding and conformation of the protein. Cell proliferation assays, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, indirect immunofluoresence staining, trans-epithelial electrical resistance measurements, and in vitro phagocytosis assay clearly demonstrated that the plasma treated PLCL membranes supported the adherence, proliferation, maturation and functionality of hESC-RPE cells in serum-free culture conditions. Here, we report for the first time, how PLCL membranes can be modified with atmospheric pressure plasma processing to enable the formation of a functional hESC-RPE monolayer on a porous biodegradable substrate, which have a potential as a tissue-engineered construct for regenerative retinal repair applications. PMID:25946229

  15. Eye drop delivery of pigment epithelium-derived factor-34 promotes retinal ganglion cell neuroprotection and axon regeneration.

    PubMed

    Vigneswara, Vasanthy; Esmaeili, Maryam; Deer, Louise; Berry, Martin; Logan, Ann; Ahmed, Zubair

    2015-09-01

    Axotomised retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) die rapidly by apoptosis and fail to regenerate because of the limited availability of neurotrophic factors and a lack of axogenic stimuli. However, we have recently showed that pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) promotes RGC survival and axon regeneration after optic nerve crush injury. PEDF has multiple fragments of the native peptide that are neuroprotective, anti-angiogenic and anti-inflammatory. Here we investigated the neuroprotective and axogenic properties of a fragment of PEDF, PEDF-34, in retinal neurons in vitro and when delivered by intravitreal injection and eye drops in vivo. We found that PEDF-34 was 43% more neuroprotective and 52% more neuritogenic than PEDF-44 in vitro. Moreover, in vivo, intravitreal delivery of 1.88nM PEDF-34 was 71% RGC neuroprotective at 21days after optic nerve crush compared to intact controls, whilst daily eye drops containing 1.88nM PEDF-34 promoted 87% RGC survival. After topical eye drop delivery, PEDF-34 was detected in the vitreous body within 30min and attained physiologically relevant concentrations in the retina by 4h peaking at 1.4±0.05nM by 14days. In eye drop- compared to intravitreal-treated PEDF-34 animals, 55% more RGC axons regenerated 250μm beyond the optic nerve lesion. We conclude that daily topical eye drop application of PEDF-34 is superior to weekly intravitreal injections in promoting RGC survival and axon regeneration through both direct effects on retinal neurons and indirect effects on other retinal cells. PMID:26260110

  16. Eye drop delivery of pigment epithelium-derived factor-34 promotes retinal ganglion cell neuroprotection and axon regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Vigneswara, Vasanthy; Esmaeili, Maryam; Deer, Louise; Berry, Martin; Logan, Ann; Ahmed, Zubair

    2015-01-01

    Axotomised retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) die rapidly by apoptosis and fail to regenerate because of the limited availability of neurotrophic factors and a lack of axogenic stimuli. However, we have recently showed that pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) promotes RGC survival and axon regeneration after optic nerve crush injury. PEDF has multiple fragments of the native peptide that are neuroprotective, anti-angiogenic and anti-inflammatory. Here we investigated the neuroprotective and axogenic properties of a fragment of PEDF, PEDF-34, in retinal neurons in vitro and when delivered by intravitreal injection and eye drops in vivo. We found that PEDF-34 was 43% more neuroprotective and 52% more neuritogenic than PEDF-44 in vitro. Moreover, in vivo, intravitreal delivery of 1.88 nM PEDF-34 was 71% RGC neuroprotective at 21 days after optic nerve crush compared to intact controls, whilst daily eye drops containing 1.88 nM PEDF-34 promoted 87% RGC survival. After topical eye drop delivery, PEDF-34 was detected in the vitreous body within 30 min and attained physiologically relevant concentrations in the retina by 4 h peaking at 1.4 ± 0.05 nM by 14 days. In eye drop- compared to intravitreal-treated PEDF-34 animals, 55% more RGC axons regenerated 250 μm beyond the optic nerve lesion. We conclude that daily topical eye drop application of PEDF-34 is superior to weekly intravitreal injections in promoting RGC survival and axon regeneration through both direct effects on retinal neurons and indirect effects on other retinal cells. PMID:26260110

  17. Conditional knockdown of DNA methyltransferase 1 reveals a key role of retinal pigment epithelium integrity in photoreceptor outer segment morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nasonkin, Igor O.; Merbs, Shannath L.; Lazo, Kevin; Oliver, Verity F.; Brooks, Matthew; Patel, Krushangi; Enke, Raymond A.; Nellissery, Jacob; Jamrich, Milan; Le, Yun Z.; Bharti, Kapil; Fariss, Robert N.; Rachel, Rivka A.; Zack, Donald J.; Rodriguez-Boulan, Enrique J.; Swaroop, Anand

    2013-01-01

    Dysfunction or death of photoreceptors is the primary cause of vision loss in retinal and macular degenerative diseases. As photoreceptors have an intimate relationship with the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) for exchange of macromolecules, removal of shed membrane discs and retinoid recycling, an improved understanding of the development of the photoreceptor-RPE complex will allow better design of gene- and cell-based therapies. To explore the epigenetic contribution to retinal development we generated conditional knockout alleles of DNA methyltransferase 1 (Dnmt1) in mice. Conditional Dnmt1 knockdown in early eye development mediated by Rx-Cre did not produce lamination or cell fate defects, except in cones; however, the photoreceptors completely lacked outer segments despite near normal expression of phototransduction and cilia genes. We also identified disruption of RPE morphology and polarization as early as E15.5. Defects in outer segment biogenesis were evident with Dnmt1 exon excision only in RPE, but not when excision was directed exclusively to photoreceptors. We detected a reduction in DNA methylation of LINE1 elements (a measure of global DNA methylation) in developing mutant RPE as compared with neural retina, and of Tuba3a, which exhibited dramatically increased expression in mutant retina. These results demonstrate a unique function of DNMT1-mediated DNA methylation in controlling RPE apicobasal polarity and neural retina differentiation. We also establish a model to study the epigenetic mechanisms and signaling pathways that guide the modulation of photoreceptor outer segment morphogenesis by RPE during retinal development and disease. PMID:23406904

  18. Conditional knockdown of DNA methyltransferase 1 reveals a key role of retinal pigment epithelium integrity in photoreceptor outer segment morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nasonkin, Igor O; Merbs, Shannath L; Lazo, Kevin; Oliver, Verity F; Brooks, Matthew; Patel, Krushangi; Enke, Raymond A; Nellissery, Jacob; Jamrich, Milan; Le, Yun Z; Bharti, Kapil; Fariss, Robert N; Rachel, Rivka A; Zack, Donald J; Rodriguez-Boulan, Enrique J; Swaroop, Anand

    2013-03-01

    Dysfunction or death of photoreceptors is the primary cause of vision loss in retinal and macular degenerative diseases. As photoreceptors have an intimate relationship with the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) for exchange of macromolecules, removal of shed membrane discs and retinoid recycling, an improved understanding of the development of the photoreceptor-RPE complex will allow better design of gene- and cell-based therapies. To explore the epigenetic contribution to retinal development we generated conditional knockout alleles of DNA methyltransferase 1 (Dnmt1) in mice. Conditional Dnmt1 knockdown in early eye development mediated by Rx-Cre did not produce lamination or cell fate defects, except in cones; however, the photoreceptors completely lacked outer segments despite near normal expression of phototransduction and cilia genes. We also identified disruption of RPE morphology and polarization as early as E15.5. Defects in outer segment biogenesis were evident with Dnmt1 exon excision only in RPE, but not when excision was directed exclusively to photoreceptors. We detected a reduction in DNA methylation of LINE1 elements (a measure of global DNA methylation) in developing mutant RPE as compared with neural retina, and of Tuba3a, which exhibited dramatically increased expression in mutant retina. These results demonstrate a unique function of DNMT1-mediated DNA methylation in controlling RPE apicobasal polarity and neural retina differentiation. We also establish a model to study the epigenetic mechanisms and signaling pathways that guide the modulation of photoreceptor outer segment morphogenesis by RPE during retinal development and disease. PMID:23406904

  19. Retinal pigment epithelial cell multinucleation in the aging eye - a mechanism to repair damage and maintain homoeostasis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei; Rajapakse, Dinusha; Fraczek, Monika; Luo, Chang; Forrester, John V; Xu, Heping

    2016-06-01

    Retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells are central to retinal health and homoeostasis. Dysfunction or death of RPE cells underlies many age-related retinal degenerative disorders particularly age-related macular degeneration. During aging RPE cells decline in number, suggesting an age-dependent cell loss. RPE cells are considered to be postmitotic, and how they repair damage during aging remains poorly defined. We show that RPE cells increase in size and become multinucleate during aging in C57BL/6J mice. Multinucleation appeared not to be due to cell fusion, but to incomplete cell division, that is failure of cytokinesis. Interestingly, the phagocytic activity of multinucleate RPE cells was not different from that of mononuclear RPE cells. Furthermore, exposure of RPE cells in vitro to photoreceptor outer segment (POS), particularly oxidized POS, dose-dependently promoted multinucleation and suppressed cell proliferation. Both failure of cytokinesis and suppression of proliferation required contact with POS. Exposure to POS also induced reactive oxygen species and DNA oxidation in RPE cells. We propose that RPE cells have the potential to proliferate in vivo and to repair defects in the monolayer. We further propose that the conventionally accepted 'postmitotic' status of RPE cells is due to a modified form of contact inhibition mediated by POS and that RPE cells are released from this state when contact with POS is lost. This is seen in long-standing rhegmatogenous retinal detachment as overtly proliferating RPE cells (proliferative vitreoretinopathy) and more subtly as multinucleation during normal aging. Age-related oxidative stress may promote failure of cytokinesis and multinucleation in RPE cells. PMID:26875723

  20. Up-Regulation of ENO1 by HIF-1α in Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells after Hypoxic Challenge Is Not Involved in the Regulation of VEGF Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Feihui; Jang, Wai-Chi; Fung, Frederic K. C.; Lo, Amy C. Y.; Wong, Ian Y. H.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Alpha-enolase (ENO1), a major glycolytic enzyme, is reported to be over-expressed in various cancer tissues. It has been demonstrated to be regulated by the Hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α (HIF-1α), a crucial transcriptional factor implicated in tumor progression and cancer angiogenesis. Choroidal neovascularization (CNV), which is a leading cause of severe vision loss caused by newly formed blood vessels in the choroid, is also engendered by hypoxic stress. In this report, we investigated the expression of ENO1 and the effects of its down-regulation upon cobalt (II) chloride-induced hypoxia in retinal pigment epithelial cells, identified as the primary source of ocular angiogenic factors. Methods HIF-1α-diminished retinal pigment epithelial cells were generated by small interfering RNA (siRNA) technology in ARPE-19 cells, a human retinal pigment epithelial cell line. Both normal and HIF-1α-diminished ARPE-19 cells were then subjected to hypoxic challenge using cobalt (II) chloride (CoCl2) or anaerobic chamber. The relation between ENO1 expression and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secretion by retinal pigment epithelial cells were examined. Protein levels of HIF-1α and ENO1 were analyzed using Western Blot, while VEGF secretion was essayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Cytotoxicity after hypoxia was detected by Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH) Assay. Results Upon 24 hr of CoCl2-induced hypoxia, the expression levels of ENO1 and VEGF were increased along with HIF-1α in ARPE-19 cells, both of which can in turn be down-regulated by HIF-1α siRNA application. However, knockdown of ENO1 alone or together with HIF-1α did not help suppress VEGF secretion in hypoxic ARPE-19 cells. Conclusion ENO1 was demonstrated to be up-regulated by HIF-1α in retinal pigment epithelial cells in response to hypoxia, without influencing VEGF secretion. PMID:26882120

  1. Semi-automated discrimination of retinal pigmented epithelial cells in two-photon fluorescence images of mouse retinas.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Nathan S; Palczewska, Grazyna; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2015-08-01

    Automated image segmentation is a critical step toward achieving a quantitative evaluation of disease states with imaging techniques. Two-photon fluorescence microscopy (TPM) has been employed to visualize the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) and provide images indicating the health of the retina. However, segmentation of RPE cells within TPM images is difficult due to small differences in fluorescence intensity between cell borders and cell bodies. Here we present a semi-automated method for segmenting RPE cells that relies upon multiple weak features that differentiate cell borders from the remaining image. These features were scored by a search optimization procedure that built up the cell border in segments around a nucleus of interest. With six images used as a test, our method correctly identified cell borders for 69% of nuclei on average. Performance was strongly dependent upon increasing retinosome content in the RPE. TPM image analysis has the potential of providing improved early quantitative assessments of diseases affecting the RPE. PMID:26309765

  2. Involvement of protein kinase C in phagocytosis of human retinal pigment epithelial cells and induction of matrix metalloproteinase secretion.

    PubMed

    Irschick, Eveline U; Haas, Gertrud; Troger, Josef; Ueberall, Florian; Huemer, Hartwig P

    2009-10-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) is involved in cell activation. We investigated PKC-mediated pathways and secretion of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in phagocytosis by human retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE). We used time-resolved fluorometry for europium-labeled microsphere uptake and gel zymography to assay the influence of PKC modulators. PKC inhibitors blocked phagocytosis by RPE. ARPE-19, a human RPE-cell line, showed reduced secretion of MMP-2, although MMP-9 secretion by PKC activation was conserved in both cell types, namely in the primary RPEs and in the RPE-cell line. Particle uptake by RPE cells requires activation of PKC; the use of PKC inhibitors as new anticancer drugs may possibly cause ocular side-effects. PMID:18641922

  3. Autophagy and heterophagy dysregulation leads to retinal pigment epithelium dysfunction and development of age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Debasish; Blasiak, Janusz; Kauppinen, Anu; Veréb, Zoltán; Salminen, Antero; Boulton, Michael E.; Petrovski, Goran

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a complex, degenerative and progressive eye disease that usually does not lead to complete blindness, but can result in severe loss of central vision. Risk factors for AMD include age, genetics, diet, smoking, oxidative stress and many cardiovascular-associated risk factors. Autophagy is a cellular housekeeping process that removes damaged organelles and protein aggregates, whereas heterophagy, in the case of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), is the phagocytosis of exogenous photoreceptor outer segments. Numerous studies have demonstrated that both autophagy and heterophagy are highly active in the RPE. To date, there is increasing evidence that constant oxidative stress impairs autophagy and heterophagy, as well as increases protein aggregation and causes inflammasome activation leading to the pathological phenotype of AMD. This review ties together these crucial pathological topics and reflects upon autophagy as a potential therapeutic target in AMD. PMID:23590900

  4. Novel Compstatin Family Peptides Inhibit Complement Activation by Drusen-Like Deposits in Human Retinal Pigmented Epithelial Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Gorham, Ronald D.; Forest, David L.; Tamamis, Phanourios; de Victoria, Aliana López; Kraszni, Márta; Kieslich, Chris A.; Banna, Christopher D.; Bellows-Peterson, Meghan L.; Larive, Cynthia K.; Floudas, Christodoulos A.; Archontis, Georgios; Johnson, Lincoln V.; Morikis, Dimitrios

    2013-01-01

    We have used a novel human retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cell-based model that mimics drusen biogenesis and the pathobiology of age-related macular degeneration to evaluate the efficacy of newly designed peptide inhibitors of the complement system. The peptides belong to the compstatin family and, compared to existing compstatin analogs, have been optimized to promote binding to their target, complement protein C3, and to enhance solubility by improving their polarity/hydrophobicity ratios. Based on analysis of molecular dynamics simulation data of peptide-C3 complexes, novel binding features were designed by introducing intermolecular salt bridge-forming arginines at the N-terminus and at position -1 of N-terminal dipeptide extensions. Our study demonstrates that the RPE cell assay has discriminatory capability for measuring the efficacy and potency of inhibitory peptides in a macular disease environment. PMID:23954241

  5. Lipofuscin Redistribution and Loss Accompanied by Cytoskeletal Stress in Retinal Pigment Epithelium of Eyes With Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ach, Thomas; Tolstik, Elen; Messinger, Jeffrey D.; Zarubina, Anna V.; Heintzmann, Rainer; Curcio, Christine A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Lipofuscin (LF) and melanolipofuscin (MLF) of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) are the principal sources of autofluorescence (AF) signals in clinical fundus–AF imaging. Few details about the subcellular distribution of AF organelles in AMD are available. We describe the impact of aging and AMD on RPE morphology revealed by the distribution of AF LF/MLF granules and actin cytoskeleton in human tissues. Methods. Thirty-five RPE-Bruch's membrane flatmounts from 35 donors were prepared (postmortem: ≤4 hours). Ex vivo fundus examination at the time of accession revealed either absence of chorioretinal pathologies (10 tissues; mean age: 83.0 ± 2.6 years) or stages of AMD (25 tissues; 85.0 ± 5.8 years): early AMD, geographic atrophy, and late exudative AMD. Retinal pigment epithelium cytoskeleton was labeled with AlexaFluor647-Phalloidin. Tissues were imaged on a spinning-disk fluorescence microscope and a high-resolution structured illumination microscope. Results. Age-related macular degeneration impacts individual RPE cells by (1) lipofuscin redistribution by (i) degranulation (granule-by-granule loss) and/or (ii) aggregation and apparent shedding into the extracellular space; (2) enlarged RPE cell area and conversion from convex to irregular and sometimes concave polygons; and (3) cytoskeleton derangement including separations and breaks around subretinal deposits, thickening, and stress fibers. Conclusions. We report an extensive and systematic en face analysis of LF/MLF-AF in AMD eyes. Redistribution and loss of AF granules are among the earliest AMD changes and could reduce fundus AF signal attributable to RPE at these locations. Data can enhance the interpretation of clinical fundus–AF and provide a basis for future quantitative studies. PMID:25758814

  6. N-Acetylcysteine Amide Protects Against Oxidative Stress–Induced Microparticle Release From Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Carver, Kyle A.; Yang, Dongli

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Oxidative stress is a major factor involved in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) apoptosis that underlies AMD. Drusen, extracellular lipid- and protein-containing deposits, are strongly associated with the development of AMD. Cell-derived microparticles (MPs) are small membrane-bound vesicles shed from cells. The purpose of this study was to determine if oxidative stress drives MP release from RPE cells, to assess whether these MPs carry membrane complement regulatory proteins (mCRPs: CD46, CD55, and CD59), and to evaluate the effects of a thiol antioxidant on oxidative stress–induced MP release. Methods Retinal pigment epithelium cells isolated from human donor eyes were cultured and treated with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to induce oxidative stress. Isolated MPs were fixed for transmission electron microscopy or processed for component analysis by flow cytometry, Western blot analysis, and confocal microscopy. Results Transmission electron microscopy showed that MPs ranged in diameter from 100 to 1000 nm. H2O2 treatment led to time- and dose-dependent elevations in MPs with externalized phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine, known markers of MPs. These increases were strongly correlated to RPE apoptosis. Oxidative stress significantly increased the release of mCRP-positive MPs, which were prevented by a thiol antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine amide (NACA). Conclusions This is the first evidence that oxidative stress induces cultured human RPE cells to release MPs that carry mCRPs on their surface. The levels of released MPs are strongly correlated with RPE apoptosis. N-acetylcysteine amide prevents oxidative stress–induced effects. Our findings indicate that oxidative stress reduces mCRPs on the RPE surface through releasing MPs. PMID:26842754

  7. Lecithin-Bound Iodine Prevents Disruption of Tight Junctions of Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells under Hypoxic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, Masahiko; Kondo, Mineo

    2016-01-01

    Aim. We investigated whether lecithin-bound iodine (LBI) can protect the integrity of tight junctions of retinal pigment epithelial cells from hypoxia. Method. Cultured human retinal pigment epithelial (ARPE-19) cells were pretreated with LBI. To mimic hypoxic conditions, cells were incubated with CoCl2. We compared the integrity of the tight junctions (TJs) of control to cells with either LBI alone, CoCl2 alone, or LBI + CoCl2. The levels of cytokines in the conditioned media were also determined. Results. Significant decrease in the zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) intensity in the CoCl2 group compared to the control (5787.7 ± 4126.4 in CoCl2 group versus 29244.6 ± 2981.2 in control; average ± standard deviation). But the decrease was not significant in the LBI + CoCl2 (27189.0 ± 11231.1). The levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and Chemokine (C-C Motif) Ligand 11 (CCL-11) were significantly higher in the CoCl2 than in the control (340.8 ± 43.3 versus 279.7 ± 68.3 pg/mL for MCP-1, and 15.2 ± 12.9 versus 12.5 ± 6.1 pg/mL for CCL-11. With LBI pretreatment, the levels of both cytokines were decreased to 182.6 ± 23.8 (MCP-1) and 5.46 ± 1.9 pg/mL for CCL-11). Blockade of MCP-1 or CCL-11 also shows similar result representing TJ protection from hypoxic stress. Conclusions. LBI results in a protective action from hypoxia. PMID:27340563

  8. Features specific to retinal pigment epithelium cells derived from three-dimensional human embryonic stem cell cultures — a new donor for cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhengya; Li, Qiyou; Xu, Haiwei; Yin, Zheng Qin

    2016-01-01

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) transplantation is a particularly promising treatment of retinal degenerative diseases affecting RPE-photoreceptor complex. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) provide an abundant donor source for RPE transplantation. Herein, we studied the time-course characteristics of RPE cells derived from three-dimensional human ESCs cultures (3D-RPE). We showed that 3D-RPE cells possessed morphology, ultrastructure, gene expression profile, and functions of authentic RPE. As differentiation proceeded, 3D-RPE cells could mature gradually with decreasing proliferation but increasing functions. Besides, 3D-RPE cells could form polarized monolayer with functional tight junction and gap junction. When grafted into the subretinal space of Royal College of Surgeons rats, 3D-RPE cells were safe and efficient to rescue retinal degeneration. This study showed that 3D-RPE cells were a new donor for cell therapy of retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:27009841

  9. In Vivo Imaging of the Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Mosaic Using Adaptive Optics Enhanced Indocyanine Green Ophthalmoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Johnny; Liu, Jianfei; Dubra, Alfredo; Fariss, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to establish that retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells take up indocyanine green (ICG) dye following systemic injection and that adaptive optics enhanced indocyanine green ophthalmoscopy (AO-ICG) enables direct visualization of the RPE mosaic in the living human eye. Methods A customized adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) was used to acquire high-resolution retinal fluorescence images of residual ICG dye in human subjects after intravenous injection at the standard clinical dose. Simultaneously, multimodal AOSLO images were also acquired, which included confocal reflectance, nonconfocal split detection, and darkfield. Imaging was performed in 6 eyes of three healthy subjects with no history of ocular or systemic diseases. In addition, histologic studies in mice were carried out. Results The AO-ICG channel successfully resolved individual RPE cells in human subjects at various time points, including 20 minutes and 2 hours after dye administration. Adaptive optics-ICG images of RPE revealed detail which could be correlated with AO dark-field images of the same cells. Interestingly, there was a marked heterogeneity in the fluorescence of individual RPE cells. Confirmatory histologic studies in mice corroborated the specific uptake of ICG by the RPE layer at a late time point after systemic ICG injection. Conclusions Adaptive optics-enhanced imaging of ICG dye provides a novel way to visualize and assess the RPE mosaic in the living human eye alongside images of the overlying photoreceptors and other cells. PMID:27564519

  10. Photoisomerization mechanism of the rhodopsin chromophore: picosecond photolysis of pigment containing 11-cis-locked eight-membered ring retinal.

    PubMed Central

    Mizukami, T; Kandori, H; Shichida, Y; Chen, A H; Derguini, F; Caldwell, C G; Biffe, C F; Nakanishi, K; Yoshizawa, T

    1993-01-01

    The primary photochemical event in rhodopsin is an 11-cis to 11-trans photoisomerization of its retinylidene chromophore to form the primary intermediate photorhodopsin. Earlier picosecond studies have shown that no intermediate is formed when the retinal 11-ene is fixed through a bridging five-membered ring, whereas a photorhodopsin-like intermediate is formed when it is fixed through a flexible seven-membered ring. Results from a rhodopsin analog formed from a retinal with locked 11-ene structure through the more flexible eight-membered ring (Ret8) are described. Incubation of bovine opsin with Ret8 formed two pigments absorbing at 425 nm (P425) and 500 nm (P500). P425, however, is an artifact because it formed from thermally denatured opsin or other proteins and Ret8. Excitation of P500 with a picosecond green pulse led to formation of two intermediates corresponding to photo- and bathorhodopsins. These results demonstrate that an appearance of early intermediates is dependent on the flexibility of the 11-ene and that the photoisomerization of P500 proceeds by stepwise changes of chromophore-protein interaction, which in turn leads to a relaxation of the highly twisted all-trans-retinylidene chromophore in photorhodopsin. PMID:8483923

  11. Tetraspanin 3c requirement for pigment cell interactions and boundary formation in zebrafish adult pigment stripes

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Shinya; Kondo, Shigeru; Parichy, David M.; Watanabe, Masakatsu

    2014-01-01

    Summary Skin pigment pattern formation in zebrafish requires pigment-cell autonomous interactions between melanophores and xanthophores, yet the molecular bases for these interactions remain largely unknown. Here, we examined the dali mutant that exhibits stripes in which melanophores are intermingled abnormally with xanthophores. By in vitro cell culture, we found that melanophores of dali mutants have a defect in motility and that interactions between melanophores and xanthophores are defective as well. Positional cloning and rescue identified dali as tetraspanin 3c (tspan3c), encoding a transmembrane scaffolding protein expressed by melanophores and xanthophores. We further showed that dali mutant Tspan3c expressed in HeLa cell exhibits a defect in N-glycosylation and is retained inappropriately in the endoplasmic reticulum. Our results are the first to identify roles for a tetraspanin superfamily protein in skin pigment pattern formation and suggest new mechanisms for the establishment and maintenance of zebrafish stripe boundaries. PMID:24734316

  12. Expression and regulation of enzymes in the ceramide metabolic pathway in human retinal pigment epithelial cells and their relevance to retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, DanHong; Sreekumar, Parameswaran G.; Hinton, David R.; Kannan, Ram

    2009-01-01

    Ceramide and its metabolic derivatives are important modulators of cellular apoptosis and proliferation. Dysregulation or imbalance of their metabolic pathways may promote the development of retinal degeneration. The aim of this study was to identify the expression and regulation of key enzymes of the ceramide pathway in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. RT-PCR was used to screen the enzymes involved in ceramide metabolism that are expressed in RPE. Over-expression of neutral sphingomyelinase-2 (SMPD3) or sphingosine kinase 1 (Sphk1) in ARPE-19 cells was achieved by transient transfection of SMPD3 or Sphk1 cDNA subcloned into an expression vector. The number of apoptotic or proliferating cells was determined using TUNEL and BrdU assays respectively. Neutral sphingomyelinase-1, neutral sphingomyelinase-2, acidic ceramidase, ceramide kinase, SphK1 and Sphk2 were expressed in both ARPE-19 and early passage human fetal RPE (fRPE) cells, while alkaline ceramidase 2 was only expressed in fRPE cells. Over-expression of SMPD3 decreased RPE cell proliferation and increased cell apoptosis. The percentage of apoptotic cells increased proportionally with the amount of transfected SMPD3 DNA. Over-expression of SphK1 promoted cell proliferation and protected ARPE-19 cells from ceramide-induced apoptosis. The effect of C2 ceramide on induction of apoptosis was evaluated in polarized vs. non-polarized RPE cultures; polarization of RPE was associated with much reduced apoptosis in response to ceramide. In conclusion, RPE cells possess the synthetic machinery for the production of ceramide, sphingosine, ceramide-1-phosphate (C1P), and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). Overexpression of SMPD3 may increase cellular ceramide levels, leading to enhanced cell death and arrested cell proliferation. The selective induction of apoptosis in non-polarized RPE cultures by C2 ceramide suggests that increased ceramide levels will preferentially affect non-polarized RPE, as are found in late

  13. Gene delivery and expression in human retinal pigment epithelial cells: effects of synthetic carriers, serum, extracellular matrix and viral promoters.

    PubMed

    Urtti, A; Polansky, J; Lui, G M; Szoka, F C

    2000-01-01

    Non-viral gene therapy is a potential treatment to many incurable retinal diseases. To fulfill this promise, plasmid DNA must be delivered to the retinal target cells. We evaluated the efficacy of synthetic DNA complexing compounds in transfecting primary human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in vitro. Fetal human RPE cells were cultured with or without extracellular matrix (ECM), produced using calf corneal endothelial cells. Plasmids encoding nuclear localizing beta galactosidase or luciferase (pRSVLuc, pCLuc4, pSV2Luc) were complexed in water at various +/- charge ratios using cationic lipids (Lipofectin, DOTAP, DOGS), polyethylene imines (25 and 750 kDa), and with degraded 6th generation starburst polyamidoamine dendrimers. Luciferase was quantified using a luminometric assay and beta galactosidase with X-gal staining. Toxicities of transfections were evaluated with the MTT-assay. Using beta galactosidase as the reporter gene naked DNA did not transfect RPE cells at measurable levels whereas 1-5% of the cells expressed histochemically detectable amounts of the gene after transfection with cationic lipid DNA complexes. In RPE cells, Rous sarcoma virus and cytomegalovirus (CMV) were more efficient promoters than SV40 in driving luciferase expression, and CMV was chosen for further experiments. At optimal complex charge ratios, expression levels of luciferase were > 10(9) light units/mg protein after transfection using dendrimers and PEI25, while transfection mediated with the other carriers resulted in luciferase expression levels of 10(7)-10(9) light units/mg protein or less. In general, dendrimers and large molecular weight PEI were less toxic than cationic lipids or PEI25 to RPE cells. Serum and ECM decreased gene expression to the RPE cells with all carriers. Despite low percentage of transfected cells the transgene expression per RPE cell is high, important feature in the retinal tissue with small dimensions, in particular in the case of secreted gene

  14. The Silk-protein Sericin Induces Rapid Melanization of Cultured Primary Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells by Activating the NF-κB Pathway.

    PubMed

    Eidet, J R; Reppe, S; Pasovic, L; Olstad, O K; Lyberg, T; Khan, A Z; Fostad, I G; Chen, D F; Utheim, T P

    2016-01-01

    Restoration of the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells to prevent further loss of vision in patients with age-related macular degeneration represents a promising novel treatment modality. Development of RPE transplants, however, requires up to 3 months of cell differentiation. We explored whether the silk protein sericin can induce maturation of primary human retinal pigment epithelial (hRPE) cells. Microarray analysis demonstrated that sericin up-regulated RPE-associated transcripts (RPE65 and CRALBP). Upstream analysis identified the NF-κB pathway as one of the top sericin-induced regulators. ELISA confirmed that sericin stimulates the main NF-κB pathway. Increased levels of RPE-associated proteins (RPE65 and the pigment melanin) in the sericin-supplemented cultures were confirmed by western blot, spectrophotometry and transmission electron microscopy. Sericin also increased cell density and reduced cell death following serum starvation in culture. Inclusion of NF-κB agonists and antagonists in the culture medium showed that activation of the NF-κB pathway appears to be necessary, but not sufficient, for sericin-induced RPE pigmentation. We conclude that sericin promotes pigmentation of cultured primary hRPE cells by activating the main NF-κB pathway. Sericin's potential role in culture protocols for rapid differentiation of hRPE cells derived from embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells should be investigated. PMID:26940175

  15. The Silk-protein Sericin Induces Rapid Melanization of Cultured Primary Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells by Activating the NF-κB Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Eidet, J. R.; Reppe, S.; Pasovic, L.; Olstad, O. K.; Lyberg, T.; Khan, A. Z.; Fostad, I. G.; Chen, D. F.; Utheim, T. P.

    2016-01-01

    Restoration of the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells to prevent further loss of vision in patients with age-related macular degeneration represents a promising novel treatment modality. Development of RPE transplants, however, requires up to 3 months of cell differentiation. We explored whether the silk protein sericin can induce maturation of primary human retinal pigment epithelial (hRPE) cells. Microarray analysis demonstrated that sericin up-regulated RPE-associated transcripts (RPE65 and CRALBP). Upstream analysis identified the NF-κB pathway as one of the top sericin-induced regulators. ELISA confirmed that sericin stimulates the main NF-κB pathway. Increased levels of RPE-associated proteins (RPE65 and the pigment melanin) in the sericin-supplemented cultures were confirmed by western blot, spectrophotometry and transmission electron microscopy. Sericin also increased cell density and reduced cell death following serum starvation in culture. Inclusion of NF-κB agonists and antagonists in the culture medium showed that activation of the NF-κB pathway appears to be necessary, but not sufficient, for sericin-induced RPE pigmentation. We conclude that sericin promotes pigmentation of cultured primary hRPE cells by activating the main NF-κB pathway. Sericin’s potential role in culture protocols for rapid differentiation of hRPE cells derived from embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells should be investigated. PMID:26940175

  16. [Tear in retinal pigment epithelium under anti-VEGF therapy for exudative age-related macular degeneration : function recovery under intensive therapy].

    PubMed

    Bartels, S; Barrelmann, A; Book, B; Heimes, B; Gutfleisch, M; Spital, G; Pauleikhoff, D; Lommatzsch, A

    2014-05-01

    This article reports the case of a 72-year-old woman with pigment epithelial detachment with occult choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in exudative age-related macular degeneration (AMD) which developed under anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) therapy of a tear in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). In the area of free RPE autofluorescence was completely absent and the microperimetry in this area showed an absolute scotoma. The visual acuity was 0.1. After continuation of anti-VEGF therapy because of persistent subretinal and intraretinal fluid over 3 years an increased autofluorescence was observed and the microperimetry showed an increase in central retinal sensitivity. The central visual acuity improved to 0.5 and in this area a whitish subretinal tissue formed morphologically. In the spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) image this structure was hyperreflective which might suggest a certain regeneration process of the RPE under anti-VEGF-therapy. PMID:24046170

  17. Action spectrum for photochemical retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) disruption in an in vivo monkey model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Sabarinathan, Ranjani; Bubel, Tracy; Williams, David R.; Hunter, Jennifer J.

    2016-03-01

    Observations of RPE disruption and autofluorescence (AF) photobleaching at light levels below the ANSI photochemical maximum permissible exposure (MPE) (Morgan et al., 2008) indicates a demand to modify future light safety standards to protect the retina from harm. To establish safe light exposures, we measured the visible light action spectrum for RPE disruption in an in vivo monkey model with fluorescence adaptive optics retinal imaging. Using this high resolution imaging modality can provide insight into the consequences of light on a cellular level and allow for longitudinal monitoring of retinal changes. The threshold retinal radiant exposures (RRE) for RPE disruption were determined for 4 wavelengths (460, 488, 544, and 594 nm). The anaesthetized macaque retina was exposed to a uniform 0.5° × 0.5° field of view (FOV). Imaging within a 2° × 2° FOV was performed before, immediately after and at 2 week intervals for 10 weeks. At each wavelength, multiple RREs were tested with 4 repetitions each to determine the threshold for RPE disruption. For qualitative analysis, RPE disruption is defined as any detectable change from the pre exposure condition in the cell mosaic in the exposed region relative to the corresponding mosaic in the immediately surrounding area. We have tested several metrics to evaluate the RPE images obtained before and after exposure. The measured action spectrum for photochemical RPE disruption has a shallower slope than the current ANSI photochemical MPE for the same conditions and suggests that longer wavelength light is more hazardous than other measurements would suggest.

  18. LYTAK1, a TAK1 inhibitor, suppresses proliferation and epithelial‑mesenchymal transition in retinal pigment epithelium cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhen; Mei, Yan; Lei, Huo; Tian, Run; Ni, Ninghua; Han, Fang; Gan, Shengwei; Sun, Shanquan

    2016-07-01

    The proliferation of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells following epithelial‑mesenchymal transition (EMT) is critical in proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR), which results in retinal detachment and the loss of vision. The current study was conducted to examine the importance of transforming growth factor β‑1 (TGF‑β1)‑activated kinase 1 (TAK1) inhibitor (LYTAK1) in regulating EMT and the proliferation of RPE cells. RPE cells were pre-treated with increasing concentrations of LYTAK1 prior to treatment with TGF‑β1 for 24 h. The effect of LYTAK1 on RPE cell proliferation was examined using a Cell Counting kit‑8 assay. The expression levels of TAK1, smooth muscle actin, fibronectin, p-Smad2, p-Smad3, nuclear factor (NF)-κB p65 and IκB kinase α were detected by western blotting. LYTAK1 suppressed the proliferation and migration of RPE cells. Additionally, LYTAK1 significantly prevented TGF‑β1‑induced EMT by decreasing the levels of fibronectin and α‑smooth muscle actin. It was demonstrated that the effects of LYTAK1 were via the Smad signaling pathway. The present study also determined, that the underlying mechanism of the effects of LYTAK1 on EMT in RPE cells involves downregulation of the NF‑κB signaling pathway. In conclusion, TAK1 transcription factor was shown to be important in TGF‑β1‑induced EMT in human RPE cells. Thus, the results of this study aid in elucidating the pathogenesis of human PVR. In addition, this study suggests that specific inhibition by LYTAK1 may provide a novel approach for the treatment and prevention of PVR. PMID:27175834

  19. LYTAK1, a TAK1 inhibitor, suppresses proliferation and epithelial-mesenchymal transition in retinal pigment epithelium cells

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, ZHEN; MEI, YAN; LEI, HUO; TIAN, RUN; NI, NINGHUA; HAN, FANG; GAN, SHENGWEI; SUN, SHANQUAN

    2016-01-01

    The proliferation of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells following epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is critical in proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR), which results in retinal detachment and the loss of vision. The current study was conducted to examine the importance of transforming growth factor β-1 (TGF-β1)-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) inhibitor (LYTAK1) in regulating EMT and the proliferation of RPE cells. RPE cells were pre-treated with increasing concentrations of LYTAK1 prior to treatment with TGF-β1 for 24 h. The effect of LYTAK1 on RPE cell proliferation was examined using a Cell Counting kit-8 assay. The expression levels of TAK1, smooth muscle actin, fibronectin, p-Smad2, p-Smad3, nuclear factor (NF)-κB p65 and IκB kinase α were detected by western blotting. LYTAK1 suppressed the proliferation and migration of RPE cells. Additionally, LYTAK1 significantly prevented TGF-β1-induced EMT by decreasing the levels of fibronectin and α-smooth muscle actin. It was demonstrated that the effects of LYTAK1 were via the Smad signaling pathway. The present study also determined, that the underlying mechanism of the effects of LYTAK1 on EMT in RPE cells involves downregulation of the NF-κB signaling pathway. In conclusion, TAK1 transcription factor was shown to be important in TGF-β1-induced EMT in human RPE cells. Thus, the results of this study aid in elucidating the pathogenesis of human PVR. In addition, this study suggests that specific inhibition by LYTAK1 may provide a novel approach for the treatment and prevention of PVR. PMID:27175834

  20. Stimulation of Aquaporin-Mediated Fluid Transport by Cyclic GMP in Human Retinal Pigment Epithelium In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Baetz, Nicholas W.; Stamer, W. Daniel; Yool, Andrea J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) expresses aquaporin-1 (AQP1) and components of the natriuretic peptide signaling pathway. We hypothesized that stimulation of the natriuretic signaling pathway in RPE with atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and with membrane-permeable analogs of cGMP would induce a net apical-to-basal transport of fluid. Methods The hypothesis was tested using human RPE cultures that retain properties seen in vivo. Confluent monolayers were treated with ANP or membrane-permeable cGMP analogs in the presence of anantin, H-8, and an AQP1 inhibitor, AqB013. Fluid movement from the apical to basal chambers was measured by weight and used to calculate net fluid transport. Results Our results demonstrated a 40% increase in net apical-to-basal fluid transport by ANP (5 μM) that was inhibited completely by the ANP receptor antagonist anantin and a 60% increase in net apical-to-basal fluid transport in response to the extracellularly applied membrane-permeable cGMP analog pCPT-cGMP (50 μM), which was not affected by the protein kinase G inhibitor H-8. The aquaporin antagonist AqB013 (20 μM) inhibited the cGMP-stimulated RPE fluid flux. Conclusions The effect of cGMP is consistent with an enhancement of the net fluid flux in RPE mediated by AQP1 channels. Pharmacologic activation of cGMP signaling and concomitant stimulation of fluid uptake from the subretinal space could offer insights into a new approach to treating or reducing the risk of retinal detachment. PMID:22427546

  1. Multi-nucleate retinal pigment epithelium cells of the human macula exhibit a characteristic and highly specific distribution

    PubMed Central

    Starnes, Austin C; Huisingh, Carrie; McGwin, Gerald; Sloan, Kenneth R; Ablonczy, Zsolt; Smith, R. Theodore; Curcio, Christine A; Ach, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Background The human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is reportedly 3% bi-nucleated. The importance to human vision of multi-nucleated (MN)-RPE cells could be clarified with more data about their distribution in central retina. Methods Nineteen human RPE-flatmounts (9≤51years, 10>80 years) were imaged at 12 locations: 3 eccentricities (fovea, perifovea, near periphery) in 4 quadrants (superior, inferior, temporal, nasal). Image stacks of lipofuscin-attributable autofluorescence and phalloidin labeled F-actin cytoskeleton were obtained using a confocal fluorescence microscope. Nuclei were devoid of autofluorescence and were marked using morphometric software. Cell areas were approximated by Voronoi regions. Mean number of nuclei per cell among eccentricity/quadrant groups and by age were compared using Poisson and binominal regression models. Results A total of 11403 RPE cells at 200 locations were analyzed: 94.66 % mono-, 5.31% bi-, 0.02% tri-nucleate, and 0.01% with 5 nuclei. Age had no effect on number of nuclei. There were significant regional differences: highest frequencies of MN-cells were found at the perifovea (9.9%) and near periphery (6.8%). The fovea lacked MN-cells almost entirely. The nasal quadrant had significantly more MN-cells compared to other quadrants, at all eccentricities. Conclusion This study demonstrates MN-RPE cells in human macula. MN-cells may arise due to endoreplication, cell fusion, or incomplete cell division. The topography of MN-RPE cells follows the topography of photoreceptors; with near-absence at the fovea (cones only) and high frequency at perifovea (highest rod density). This distribution might reflect specific requirements of retinal metabolism or other mechanisms addressable in further studies. PMID:26923500

  2. Activation of Rap1 inhibits NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS generation in retinal pigment epithelium and reduces choroidal neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haibo; Jiang, Yanchao; Shi, Dallas; Quilliam, Lawrence A.; Chrzanowska-Wodnicka, Magdalena; Wittchen, Erika S.; Li, Dean Y.; Hartnett, M. Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Activation of Rap1 GTPase can improve the integrity of the barrier of the retina pigment epithelium (RPE) and reduce choroidal neovascularization (CNV). Inhibition of NADPH oxidase activation also reduces CNV. We hypothesize that Rap1 inhibits NADPH oxidase-generated ROS and thereby reduces CNV formation. Using a murine model of laser-induced CNV, we determined that reduced Rap1 activity in RPE/choroid occurred with CNV formation and that activation of Rap1 by 2′-O-Me-cAMP (8CPT)-reduced laser-induced CNV via inhibiting NADPH oxidase-generated ROS. In RPE, inhibition of Rap1 by Rap1 GTPase-activating protein (Rap1GAP) increased ROS generation, whereas activation of Rap1 by 8CPT reduced ROS by interfering with the assembly of NADPH oxidase membrane subunit p22phox with NOX4 or cytoplasmic subunit p47phox. Activation of NADPH oxidase with Rap1GAP reduced RPE barrier integrity via cadherin phosphorylation and facilitated choroidal EC migration across the RPE monolayer. Rap1GAP-induced ROS generation was inhibited by active Rap1a, but not Rap1b, and activation of Rap1a by 8CPT in Rap1b−/− mice reduced laser-induced CNV, in correlation with decreased ROS generation in RPE/choroid. These findings provide evidence that active Rap1 reduces CNV by interfering with the assembly of NADPH oxidase subunits and increasing the integrity of the RPE barrier.—Wang, H., Jiang, Y., Shi, D., Quilliam, L. A., Chrzanowska-Wodnicka, M., Wittchen, E. S., Li, D. Y., Hartnett, M. E. Activation of Rap1 inhibits NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS generation in retinal pigment epithelium and reduces choroidal neovascularization. PMID:24043260

  3. MicroRNAs are essential for differentiation of the retinal pigmented epithelium and maturation of adjacent photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Ohana, Reut; Weiman-Kelman, Benjamin; Raviv, Shaul; Tamm, Ernst R; Pasmanik-Chor, Metsada; Rinon, Ariel; Netanely, Dvir; Shamir, Ron; Solomon, Arie S; Ashery-Padan, Ruth

    2015-07-15

    Dysfunction of the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) results in degeneration of photoreceptors and vision loss and is correlated with common blinding disorders in humans. Although many protein-coding genes are known to be expressed in RPE and are important for its development and maintenance, virtually nothing is known about the in vivo roles of non-coding transcripts. The expression patterns of microRNAs (miRNAs) have been analyzed in a variety of ocular tissues, and a few were implicated to play role in RPE based on studies in cell lines. Here, through RPE-specific conditional mutagenesis of Dicer1 or Dgcr8 in mice, the importance of miRNAs for RPE differentiation was uncovered. miRNAs were found to be dispensable for maintaining RPE fate and survival, and yet they are essential for the acquisition of important RPE properties such as the expression of genes involved in the visual cycle pathway, pigmentation and cell adhesion. Importantly, miRNAs of the RPE are required for maturation of adjacent photoreceptors, specifically for the morphogenesis of the outer segments. The alterations in the miRNA and mRNA profiles in the Dicer1-deficient RPE point to a key role of miR-204 in regulation of the RPE differentiation program in vivo and uncover the importance of additional novel RPE miRNAs. This study reveals the combined regulatory activity of miRNAs that is required for RPE differentiation and for the development of the adjacent neuroretina. PMID:26062936

  4. Acute posterior multifocal placoid pigment epitheliopathy-retinal "white dot syndrome".

    PubMed

    Grković, Desanka; Oros, Ana; Bedov, Tatjana; Karadžić, Jelena; Gvozdenović, Ljiljana; Jovanović, Sandra

    2013-02-01

    Acute posterior multifocal placoid pigment epitheliopathy- APMPPE is an acquired idiopathic inflammatory disease of the chorioretina. This case report presents a typical clinical manifestation of a very rare condition: a twenty ive-year old female complained of a sudden bilateral decrease of vision. She reported lu-like symptoms and taking antibiotics therapy. Fundus examination revealed numerous discrete yellow-white lesions at posterior pole involving the macula. After a period of 7 days oral prednisone treatment she was completely recovered. Usage of steroids is recommended for treating APMPPE in cases where macula is involved and in recurrent cases. PMID:23348193

  5. Gene expression regulation in retinal pigment epithelial cells induced by viral RNA and viral/bacterial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Brosig, Anton; Kuhrt, Heidrun; Wiedemann, Peter; Kohen, Leon; Bringmann, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is associated with systemic and local inflammation. Various studies suggested that viral or bacterial infection may aggravate retinal inflammation in the aged retina. We compared the effects of synthetic viral RNA (poly(I:C)) and viral/bacterial DNA (CpG-ODN) on the expression of genes known to be involved in the development of AMD in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. Methods Cultured human RPE cells were stimulated with poly(I:C; 500 µg/ml) or CpG-ODN (500 nM). Alterations in gene expression and protein secretion were determined with real-time RT–PCR and ELISA, respectively. Phosphorylation of signal transduction molecules was revealed by western blotting. Results Poly(I:C) induced gene expression of the pattern recognition receptor TLR3, transcription factors (HIF-1α, p65/NF-κB), the angiogenic factor bFGF, inflammatory factors (IL-1β, IL-6, TNFα, MCP-1, MIP-2), and complement factors (C5, C9, CFB). Poly(I:C) also induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK proteins, and the secretion of bFGF and TNFα from the cells. CpG-ODN induced moderate gene expression of transcription factors (p65/NF-κB, NFAT5) and complement factors (C5, C9), while it had no effect on the expression of various TLR, angiogenic factor, and inflammatory factor genes. The activities of various signal transduction pathways and transcription factors were differentially involved in mediating the poly(I:C)-induced transcriptional activation of distinct genes. Conclusions The widespread effects of viral RNA, and the restricted effects of viral/bacterial DNA, on the gene expression pattern of RPE cells may suggest that viral RNA rather than viral/bacterial DNA induces physiologic alterations of RPE cells, which may aggravate inflammation in the aged retina. The data also suggest that selective inhibition of distinct signal transduction pathways or individual transcription factors may not be effective to inhibit

  6. Involvement of TonEBP/NFAT5 in osmoadaptative response of human retinal pigmented epithelial cells to hyperosmolar stress

    PubMed Central

    Libert, Sarah; Willermain, François; Weber, Célia; Bryla, Angélic; Salik, Dany; Gregoire, Françoise; Bolaky, Nargis; Caspers, Laure; Perret, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Macular edema, a frequently encountered complication of diabetic retinopathy (DR), results from alterations of the blood retinal barrier (BRB) and leads to modifications of the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) functions. Osmolar changes of the surrounding medium could be responsible for modifications of the RPE functions leading to disturbance of retinal homeostasis. The expression, activation and function of the key hyperosmolar response factor Tonicity Enhancer Binding Protein (TonEBP also called nuclear factor of activated T-cell 5 - NFTA5) was investigated in ARPE-19 cells, derived from human RPE, in response to hyperosmolar stimulation. Methods: ARPE-19 cells were exposed to hyperosmolar medium. TonEBP mRNA and protein levels were quantified by qRT-PCR and semi-quantitative Western blot. TonEBP nuclear translocation was investigated by immunofluorescence. TonEBP transactivation activity was measured using a reported plasmid containing TonEBP binding sites. Results: In response to hyperosmolar stimulation of ARPE-19 cells, a dose-dependent increase in TonEBP mRNA and protein levels, as well as TonEBP nuclear translocation were observed. TonEBP transactivation activity was further demonstrated using a reporter plasmid containing TonEBP binding sites. A dominant negative form of TonEBP abolished NaCl-induced increase in TonEBP transactivation activity, and inhibited the increase of the target genes aldose reductase and sodium-dependent taurine transporter mRNA levels. SB203580, an inhibitor of two of the p38 protein kinase’s isoforms (p38α and p38β) inhibited the TonEBP nuclear translocation and transactivation activity in ARPE-19 cells exposed to hyperosmolar stimulation. Conclusions: Our data demonstrates the involvement of TonEBP in the mechanisms responsible for osmoadaptation to hyperosmolar stress in RPE cells. Given the emerging role of TonEBP in different pathological pathways, these data open new perspectives for the analysis of the

  7. Molecular characterization of retinal stem cells and their niches in adult zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Pamela A; Barthel, Linda K; Bernardos, Rebecca L; Perkowski, John J

    2006-01-01

    Background The persistence in adult teleost fish of retinal stem cells that exhibit all of the features of true 'adult stem cells' – self-renewal, multipotency, and the capacity to respond to injury by mitotic activation with the ability to regenerate differentiated tissues – has been known for several decades. However, the specialized cellular and molecular characteristics of these adult retinal stem cells and the microenvironmental niches that support their maintenance in the differentiated retina and regulate their activity during growth and regeneration have not yet been elucidated. Results Our data show that the zebrafish retina has two kinds of specialized niches that sustain retinal stem cells: 1) a neuroepithelial germinal zone at the interface between neural retina and ciliary epithelium, called the ciliary marginal zone (CMZ), a continuous annulus around the retinal circumference, and 2) the microenvironment around some Müller glia in the differentiated retina. In the uninjured retina, scattered Müller glia (more frequently those in peripheral retina) are associated with clusters of proliferating retinal progenitors that are restricted to the rod photoreceptor lineage, but following injury, the Müller-associated retinal progenitors can function as multipotent retinal stem cells to regenerate other types of retinal neurons. The CMZ has several features in common with the neurogenic niches in the adult mammalian brain, including access to the apical epithelial surface and a close association with blood vessels. Müller glia in the teleost retina have a complex response to local injury that includes some features of reactive gliosis (up-regulation of glial fibrillary acidic protein, GFAP, and re-entry into the cell cycle) together with dedifferentiation and re-acquisition of phenotypic and molecular characteristics of multipotent retinal progenitors in the CMZ (diffuse distribution of N-cadherin, activation of Notch-Delta signaling, and expression of

  8. Epigallocatechin-gallate (EGCG) regulates autophagy in human retinal pigment epithelial cells: A potential role for reducing UVB light-induced retinal damage

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Chao-Peng; Yao, Jin; Tao, Zhi-Fu; Li, Xiu-Miao; Jiang, Qin Yan, Biao

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •UVB irradiation induces RPE autophagy. •EGCG treatment represses UVB-mediated autophagy. •EGCG regulates UVB-mediated autophagy through mTOR signaling pathway. •EGCG sensitizes RPE cells to UVB-induced damage in an autophagy-dependent manner. -- Abstract: Autophagy is an intracellular catabolic process involved in protein and organelle degradation via the lysosomal pathway that has been linked in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). UVB irradiation-mediated degeneration of the macular retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells is an important hallmark of AMD, which is along with the change in RPE autophagy. Thus, pharmacological manipulation of RPE autophagy may offer an alternative therapeutic target in AMD. Here, we found that epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a polyphenolic compound from green tea, plays a regulatory role in UVB irradiation-induced autophagy in RPE cells. UVB irradiation results in a marked increase in the amount of LC3-II protein in a dose-dependent manner. EGCG administration leads to a significant reduction in the formation of LC3-II and autophagosomes. mTOR signaling activation is required for EGCG-induced LC3-II formation, as evidenced by the fact that EGCG-induced LC3-II formation is significantly impaired by rapamycin administration. Moreover, EGCG significantly alleviates the toxic effects of UVB irradiation on RPE cells in an autophagy-dependent manner. Collectively, our study reveals a novel role of EGCG in RPE autophagy. EGCG may be exploited as a potential therapeutic reagent for the treatment of pathological conditions associated with abnormal autophagy.

  9. Fucoidan reduces secretion and expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in the retinal pigment epithelium and reduces angiogenesis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Dithmer, Michaela; Fuchs, Sabine; Shi, Yang; Schmidt, Harald; Richert, Elisabeth; Roider, Johann; Klettner, Alexa

    2014-01-01

    Fucoidan is a polysaccharide isolated from brown algae which is of current interest for anti-tumor therapy. In this study, we investigated the effect of fucoidan on the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), looking at physiology, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secretion, and angiogenesis, thus investigating a potential use of fucoidan for the treatment of exudative age-related macular degeneration. For this study, human RPE cell line ARPE-19 and primary porcine RPE cells were used, as well as RPE/choroid perfusion organ cultures. The effect of fucoidan on RPE cells was investigated with methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium--assay, trypan blue exclusion assay, phagocytosis assay and a wound healing assay. VEGF expression was evaluated in immunocytochemistry and Western blot, VEGF secretion was evaluated in ELISA. The effect of fucoidan on angiogenesis was tested in a Matrigel assay using calcein-AM vital staining, evaluated by confocal laser scanning microcopy and quantitative image analysis. Fucoidan displays no toxicity and does not diminish proliferation or phagocytosis, but reduces wound healing in RPE cells. Fucoidan decreases VEGF secretion in RPE/choroid explants and RPE cells. Furthermore, it diminishes VEGF expression in RPE cells even when co-applied with bevacizumab. Furthermore, fucoidan reduces RPE-supernatant- and VEGF-induced angiogenesis of peripheral endothelial cells. In conclusion, fucoidan is a non-toxic agent that reduces VEGF expression and angiogenesis in vitro and may be of interest for further studies as a potential therapy against exudative age-related macular degeneration. PMID:24558482

  10. Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells Mitigate the Effects of Complement Attack by Endocytosis of C5b-9

    PubMed Central

    Georgiannakis, Apostolos; Burgoyne, Tom; Lueck, Katharina; Futter, Clare; Greenwood, John

    2015-01-01

    Retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell death is a hallmark of age-related macular degeneration. The alternative pathway of complement activation is strongly implicated in RPE cell dysfunction and loss in age-related macular degeneration; therefore, it is critical that RPE cells use molecular strategies to mitigate the potentially harmful effects of complement attack. We show that the terminal complement complex C5b-9 assembles rapidly on the basal surface of cultured primary porcine RPE cells but disappears over 48 h without any discernable adverse effects on the cells. However, in the presence of the dynamin inhibitor dynasore, C5b-9 was almost completely retained at the cell surface, suggesting that, under normal circumstances, it is eliminated via the endocytic pathway. In support of this idea, we observed that C5b-9 colocalizes with the early endosome marker EEA1 and that, in the presence of protease inhibitors, it can be detected in lysosomes. Preventing the endocytosis of C5b-9 by RPE cells led to structural defects in mitochondrial morphology consistent with cell stress. We conclude that RPE cells use the endocytic pathway to prevent the accumulation of C5b-9 on the cell surface and that processing and destruction of C5b-9 by this route are essential for RPE cell survival. PMID:26324770

  11. Methionine Sulfoxide Reductase B2 is Highly Expressed in the Retina and Protects Retinal Pigmented Epithelium Cells from Oxidative Damage

    PubMed Central

    Pascual, Iranzu; Larrayoz, Ignacio M.; Campos, Maria M.; Rodriguez, Ignacio R.

    2010-01-01

    Methionine sulfoxide reductase B2 (MSRB2) is a mitochondrial enzyme that converts methionine sulfoxide (R) enantiomer back to methionine. This enzyme is suspected of functioning to protect mitochondrial proteins from oxidative damage. In this study we report that the retina is one of the human tissues with highest levels of MSRB2 mRNA expression. Other tissues with high expression were heart, kidney and skeletal muscle. Over-expression of a MSRB2-GFP fusion protein increased the MSR enzymatic activity three-fold in stably transfected cultured RPE cells. This overexpression augmented the resistance of these cells to the toxicity induced by 7-ketocholesterol, tert-butyl hydroperoxide and all-trans retinoic acid. By contrast, knockdown of MSRB2 by a miRNA in stably transfected cells did not convey increased sensitivity to the oxidative stress. In the monkey retina MSRB2 localized to the ganglion cell layer (GLC), the outer plexiform layer (OPL) and the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). MSRB2 expression is most pronounced in the OPL of the macula and foveal regions suggesting an association with the cone synaptic mitochondria. Our data suggests that MSRB2 plays an important function in protecting cones from multiple type of oxidative stress and may be critical in preserving central vision. PMID:20026324

  12. Light-induced damage and its diagnosis in two-photon excited autofluorescence imaging of retinal pigment epithelium cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Danni; Qu, Junle; Xu, Gaixia; Zhao, Lingling; Niu, Hanben

    2007-05-01

    In this paper, a novel method for the differentiation of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells after light-induced damage by two-photon excitation is presented. Fresh samples of RPE cells of pig eyes are obtained from local slaughterhouse. Light-induced damage is produced by the output from Ti: sapphire laser which is focused onto the RPE layer. We study the change of the autofluorescence properties of RPE after two-photon excitation with the same wavelength. Preliminary results show that after two-photon excitation, there are two clear changes in the emission spectrum. The first change is the blue-shift of the emission peak. The emission peak of the intact RPE is located at 592nm, and after excitation, it shifts to 540nm. It is supposed that the excitation has led to the increased autofluorescence of flavin whose emission peak is located at 540nm. The second change is the increased intensity of the emission peak, which might be caused by the accelerated aging because the autofluorescence of RPE would increase during aging process. Experimental results indicate that two-photon excitation could not only lead to the damage of the RPE cells in multiphoton RPE imaging, but also provide an evaluation of the light-induced damage.

  13. Allicin attenuates H₂O₂-induced cytotoxicity in retinal pigmented epithelial cells by regulating the levels of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Tu, Gerile; Zhang, Yu-Feng; Wei, Wei; Li, Langen; Zhang, Yanmei; Yang, Jia; Xing, Yiqiao

    2016-03-01

    Retinal pigmented epithelial cell (RPE) oxidative stress is known to have a vital role in the etiology of age‑related macular degeneration (AMD). The present study aimed to investigate whether allicin, a natural product with antioxidant activity, was able to protect RPEs (ARPE‑19) from hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)‑induced damage, and to determine the underlying mechanisms. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5‑diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay was used to determine cellular viability, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) were detected using a ROS Assay kit. The results demonstrated that allicin was able to protect ARPE‑19 cells from H2O2‑induced damage in a dose‑dependent manner. In addition, allicin attenuated oxidative stress by reducing the levels of intracellular ROS and malondialdehyde (MDA), and enhancing the glutathione/glutathione disulfide (GSSG) ratio. With regards to the underlying mechanism, allicin was able to markedly modulate the expression levels of ROS‑associated enzymes, including superoxide dismutase, NADPH oxidase 4 and NAD(P)H dehydrogenase quinone 1, and elevate the activity of nuclear factor erythroid 2‑related factor 2 in the H2O2‑stimulated ARPE‑19 cells. These results suggested that allicin may exert protective effects against H2O2‑induced cytotoxicity in RPEs via ROS regulation. PMID:26781848

  14. Malondialdehyde induces autophagy dysfunction and VEGF secretion in the retinal pigment epithelium in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Ye, Fuxiang; Kaneko, Hiroki; Hayashi, Yumi; Takayama, Kei; Hwang, Shiang-Jyi; Nishizawa, Yuji; Kimoto, Reona; Nagasaka, Yosuke; Tsunekawa, Taichi; Matsuura, Toshiyuki; Yasukawa, Tsutomu; Kondo, Takaaki; Terasaki, Hiroko

    2016-05-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of blindness in developed countries and is closely related to oxidative stress, which leads to lipid peroxidation. Malondialdehyde (MDA) is a major byproduct of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) peroxidation. Increased levels of MDA have been reported in eyes of AMD patients. However, little is known about the direct relationship between MDA and AMD. Here we show the biological importance of MDA in AMD pathogenesis. We first confirmed that MDA levels were significantly increased in eyes of AMD patients. In ARPE-19 cells, a human retinal pigment epithelial cell line, MDA treatment induced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression alternation, cell junction disruption, and autophagy dysfunction that was also observed in eyes of AMD patients. The MDA-induced VEGF increase was inhibited by autophagy-lysosomal inhibitors. Intravitreal MDA injection in mice increased laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (laser-CNV) volumes. In a mouse model fed a high-linoleic acid diet for 3 months, we found a significant increase in MDA levels, autophagic activity, and laser-CNV volumes. Our study revealed an important role of MDA, which acts not only as a marker but also as a causative factor of AMD pathogenesis-related autophagy dysfunction. Furthermore, higher dietary intake of linoleic acid promoted CNV progression in mice with increased MDA levels. PMID:26923802

  15. Treatment of macular degeneration using embryonic stem cell-derived retinal pigment epithelium: preliminary results in Asian patients.

    PubMed

    Song, Won Kyung; Park, Kyung-Mi; Kim, Hyun-Ju; Lee, Jae Ho; Choi, Jinjung; Chong, So Young; Shim, Sung Han; Del Priore, Lucian V; Lanza, Robert

    2015-05-12

    Embryonic stem cells hold great promise for various diseases because of their unlimited capacity for self-renewal and ability to differentiate into any cell type in the body. However, despite over 3 decades of research, there have been no reports on the safety and potential efficacy of pluripotent stem cell progeny in Asian patients with any disease. Here, we report the safety and tolerability of subretinal transplantation of human embryonic-stem-cell (hESC)-derived retinal pigment epithelium in four Asian patients: two with dry age-related macular degeneration and two with Stargardt macular dystrophy. They were followed for 1 year. There was no evidence of adverse proliferation, tumorigenicity, ectopic tissue formation, or other serious safety issues related to the transplanted cells. Visual acuity improved 9-19 letters in three patients and remained stable (+1 letter) in one patient. The results confirmed that hESC-derived cells could serve as a potentially safe new source for regenerative medicine. PMID:25937371

  16. Ca2+ channels in retinal pigment epithelial cells regulate vascular endothelial growth factor secretion rates in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Rita; Heimann, Heinrich; Agostini, Hansjürgen; Martin, Gottfried; Hansen, Lutz Lothar

    2007-01-01

    Purpose Choroidal neovascularization (CNV) is the most severe complication in age-related macular degeneration. The major angiogenic factor involved is vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secreted by the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Since RPE cells express neuroendocrine L-type Ca2+ channels we investigated their involvement in VEGF secretion in normal RPE cells and RPE cells from patients with CNV. Methods Freshly isolated and cultured RPE cells were studied using the patch-clamp technique and ELISA-based secretion assays. Results Both freshly isolated and cultured cells showed whole-cell Ba2+ currents with properties of L-type Ca2+ currents: high activation threshold, sensitivity to dihydropyridines (10 μM nifedipine) and slow inactivation. VEGF-A secretion was elevated by BayK8644 (10 μM) or basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF, 10 ng/ml), both of which are able to activate L-type channels. Cells from CNV tissue also showed nifedipine-sensitive Ba2+ currents, which displayed a voltage-dependent activation at more negative potentials, faster inactivation and changed regulation by tyrosine kinase pp60c-src. The CNV RPE cells showed higher VEGF secretion rates which were reduced by nifedipine. Conclusions Thus, L-type Ca2+ channels in normal RPE cells regulate the secretion of VEGF. RPE cells from eyes with CNV maintain a VEGF secretion regulated by nifedipine-sensitve Ca2+ channels which might be of importance for the development of CNV. PMID:17417605

  17. Fisetin and luteolin protect human retinal pigment epithelial cells from oxidative stress-induced cell death and regulate inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hytti, Maria; Piippo, Niina; Korhonen, Eveliina; Honkakoski, Paavo; Kaarniranta, Kai; Kauppinen, Anu

    2015-01-01

    Degeneration of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells is a clinical hallmark of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of blindness among aged people in the Western world. Both inflammation and oxidative stress are known to play vital roles in the development of this disease. Here, we assess the ability of fisetin and luteolin, to protect ARPE-19 cells from oxidative stress-induced cell death and to decrease intracellular inflammation. We also compare the growth and reactivity of human ARPE-19 cells in serum-free and serum-containing conditions. The absence of serum in the culture medium did not prevent ARPE-19 cells from reaching full confluency but caused an increased sensitivity to oxidative stress-induced cell death. Both fisetin and luteolin protected ARPE-19 cells from oxidative stress-induced cell death. They also significantly decreased the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines into the culture medium. The decrease in inflammation was associated with reduced activation of MAPKs and CREB, but was not linked to NF- κB or SIRT1. The ability of fisetin and luteolin to protect and repair stressed RPE cells even after the oxidative insult make them attractive in the search for treatments for AMD. PMID:26619957

  18. Regulation of melanosome number, shape and movement in the zebrafish retinal pigment epithelium by OA1 and PMEL.

    PubMed

    Burgoyne, Thomas; O'Connor, Marie N; Seabra, Miguel C; Cutler, Daniel F; Futter, Clare E

    2015-04-01

    Analysis of melanosome biogenesis in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is challenging because it occurs predominantly in a short embryonic time window. Here, we show that the zebrafish provides an ideal model system for studying this process because in the RPE the timing of melanosome biogenesis facilitates molecular manipulation using morpholinos. Morpholino-mediated knockdown of OA1 (also known as GPR143), mutations in the human homologue of which cause the most common form of human ocular albinism, induces a major reduction in melanosome number, recapitulating a key feature of the mammalian disease where reduced melanosome numbers precede macromelanosome formation. We further show that PMEL, a key component of mammalian melanosome biogenesis, is required for the generation of cylindrical melanosomes in zebrafish, which in turn is required for melanosome movement into the apical processes and maintenance of photoreceptor integrity. Spherical and cylindrical melanosomes containing similar melanin volumes co-exist in the cell body but only cylindrical melanosomes enter the apical processes. Taken together, our findings indicate that melanosome number and shape are independently regulated and that melanosome shape controls a function in the RPE that depends on localisation in the apical processes. PMID:25690007

  19. Characterization of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived retinal pigment epithelium cell sheets aiming for clinical application.

    PubMed

    Kamao, Hiroyuki; Mandai, Michiko; Okamoto, Satoshi; Sakai, Noriko; Suga, Akiko; Sugita, Sunao; Kiryu, Junichi; Takahashi, Masayo

    2014-02-11

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) causes severe visual impairment due in part to age-dependent impairment of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). It has been suggested that autologous human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) may represent a useful cell source for the generation of graft RPE. We generated hiPSC-derived RPE (hiPSC-RPE) cell sheets optimized to meet clinical use requirements, including quality, quantity, consistency, and safety. These cell sheets are generated as a monolayer of cells without any artificial scaffolds, express typical RPE markers, form tight junctions that exhibit polarized secretion of growth factors, and show phagocytotic ability and gene-expression patterns similar to those of native RPE. Additionally, upon transplantation, autologous nonhuman primate iPSC-RPE cell sheets showed no immune rejection or tumor formation. These results suggest that autologous hiPSC-RPE cell sheets may serve as a useful form of graft for use in tissue replacement therapy for AMD. PMID:24527394

  20. Pathological Effects of Mutant C1QTNF5 (S163R) Expression in Murine Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Dinculescu, Astra; Min, Seok-Hong; Dyka, Frank M.; Deng, Wen-Tao; Stupay, Rachel M.; Chiodo, Vince; Smith, W. Clay; Hauswirth, William W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The mutation S163R in complement C1q tumor necrosis factor–related protein-5 (C1QTNF5) causes an autosomal dominant disorder known as late-onset retinal degeneration (L-ORD). In this study, our goal is to evaluate the consequences of mutant S163R C1QTNF5 expression in mouse RPE following its delivery using an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector. Methods We generated AAV vectors containing either human wild-type C1QTNF5 or mutant S163R C1QTNF5 driven by an RPE-specific BEST1 promoter, and delivered them subretinally into one eye of adult C57BL/6 mice. Transgene expression was detected by immunohistochemistry. Retinal function was assessed by full-field ERG. Pathological changes were further examined by digital fundus imaging and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Results We show that the AAV-expressed mutant S163R leads to pathological effects similar to some of those found in patients with advanced L-ORD, including RPE thinning, RPE cell loss, and retinal degeneration. In addition, we provide in vivo evidence that mutant S163R C1QTNF5 can form large, transparent, spherical intracellular aggregates throughout the RPE, which are detectable by light microscopy. In contrast to AAV-expressed wild-type C1QTNF5, which is secreted apically from the RPE toward the photoreceptor cells and the outer limiting membrane, the S163R mutant is primarily routed toward the basal side of RPE, where it forms thick, extracellular deposits over time. Conclusions Adeno-associated viral–targeted expression of mutant S163R in the RPE represents a useful approach for quickly generating animal models that mimic pathological features of L-ORD and offers the potential to understand disease mechanisms and develop therapeutic strategies. PMID:26513502

  1. Associations between Depression and Anxiety Symptoms with Retinal Vessel Caliber in Adolescents and Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Madeline H.; Gillespie, Nathan A.; Hansell, Narelle K.; Hewitt, Alex W.; Hickie, Ian B.; Lu, Yi; MacGregor, Stuart; Medland, Sarah E.; Sun, Cong; Wong, Tien Y.; Wright, Margie; Zhu, Gu; Martin, Nicholas G.; Mackey, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Previous longitudinal studies suggest that depression and anxiety are associated with risk for cardiovascular disease. The aim of the present study was to test whether an association between depression and anxiety symptoms and retinal vessel caliber, an indicator of subclinical cardiovascular risk, is apparent as early as adolescence and young adulthood. Methods Participants were 865 adolescents and young adults who participated in the Brisbane Longitudinal Twin Study and the Twin Eye Study in Tasmania. Participants completed the Somatic and Psychological Health Report (SPHERE), including assessments of depression/anxiety and somatic symptom subscales, when they were M=16.5 years, and they underwent retinal imaging M=2.5 years later (range=2 years before to 7 years after the depression/anxiety assessment). Retinal vessel caliber was assessed using computer software. Results: Depression and anxiety symptoms were associated with wider retinal arteriolar caliber in this sample of adolescents and young adults (β=0.09, p=.016), even after adjusting for other cardiovascular risk factors (β=0.08, p=.025). Multiple regression analyses revealed that affective symptoms of depression/anxiety were associated with retinal vessel caliber independently of somatic symptoms. Conclusions Depression and anxiety symptoms are associated with measurable signs in the retinal microvasculature in early life, suggesting that pathological microvascular mechanisms may be operative in the association between depression and anxiety with cardiovascular disease starting as early as adolescence. PMID:25373892

  2. Effects of mechanical stress and vitreous samples in retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Eri; Fukushima, Ayako; Haga, Akira; Inomata, Yasuya; Ito, Yasuhiro; Fukushima, Mikiko; Tanihara, Hidenobu

    2016-02-12

    In rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD), scattered RPE cells from the basement membrane into the vitreous cavity undergo an epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) and form the intraocular fibrous membrane in response to vitreous fluid. We investigated whether exposure to vitreous samples was associated with EMT-associated signals and mesenchymal characters. Human vitreous samples were collected from patients with RRD, epiretinal membrane (ERM), or macular hole (MH). We evaluated the effects of vitreous on ARPE-19 cells in suspension cultures using poly 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-coated dishes and three-dimensional (3D) Matrigel cultures. We found that exposure to vitreous samples did not induce morphological changes or accelerate wound closure in monolayers. Several samples showed increased phosphorylation of Smad2 and nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-κB. Mechanical stress triggered an elevation of phosphorylation levels in Smad2. In addition, exposure to vitreous fluid increased the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase in cell suspension cultures after mechanical stress. Moreover, ARPE-19 cells showed a stellate invasive phenotype in 3D Matrigel cultures with vitreous samples. In this study, we demonstrated that mechanical stress and vitreous were associated with EMT-associated signals and invasive phenotypes in 3D cultures but not in monolayers. These results have important implications for the role of vitreous humor in the induction of EMT and intraocular fibrosis. PMID:26802464

  3. Inhibition of the Expression of the Small Heat Shock Protein αB-Crystallin Inhibits Exosome Secretion in Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells in Culture.

    PubMed

    Gangalum, Rajendra K; Bhat, Ankur M; Kohan, Sirus A; Bhat, Suraj P

    2016-06-17

    Exosomes carry cell type-specific molecular cargo to extracellular destinations and therefore act as lateral vectors of intercellular communication and transfer of genetic information from one cell to the other. We have shown previously that the small heat shock protein αB-crystallin (αB) is exported out of the adult human retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE19) packaged in exosomes. Here, we demonstrate that inhibition of the expression of αB via shRNA inhibits exosome secretion from ARPE19 cells indicating that exosomal cargo may have a role in exosome biogenesis (synthesis and/or secretion). Sucrose density gradient fractionation of the culture medium and cellular extracts suggests continued synthesis of exosomes but an inhibition of exosome secretion. In cells where αB expression was inhibited, the distribution of CD63 (LAMP3), an exosome marker, is markedly altered from the normal dispersed pattern to a stacked perinuclear presence. Interestingly, the total anti-CD63(LAMP3) immunofluorescence in the native and αB-inhibited cells remains unchanged suggesting continued exosome synthesis under conditions of impaired exosome secretion. Importantly, inhibition of the expression of αB results in a phenotype of the RPE cell that contains an increased number of vacuoles and enlarged (fused) vesicles that show increased presence of CD63(LAMP3) and LAMP1 indicating enhancement of the endolysosomal compartment. This is further corroborated by increased Rab7 labeling of this compartment (RabGTPase 7 is known to be associated with late endosome maturation). These data collectively point to a regulatory role for αB in exosome biogenesis possibly via its involvement at a branch point in the endocytic pathway that facilitates secretion of exosomes. PMID:27129211

  4. Pigmented-MDCK (P-MDCK) cell line with tunable melanin expression: an in vitro model for the outer blood-retinal barrier.

    PubMed

    Kadam, Rajendra S; Scheinman, Robert I; Kompella, Uday B

    2012-11-01

    Retinal pigment epithelium, which forms the outer blood-retinal barrier, is a critical barrier for transport of drugs to the retina. The purpose of this study was to develop a pigmented MDCK (P-MDCK) cell line as a rapidly established in vitro model for the outer blood-retinal barrier to assess the influence of melanin pigment on solute permeability. A melanin synthesizing P-MDCK cell line was developed by lentiviral transduction of human tyrosinase and p-protein genes in MDCK (NBL-2) cells. Melanin content, tyrosinase activity (conversion of L-dopa to dopachrome), and transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) were measured. Expression of tyrosinase protein and p-protein in P-MDCK cells was confirmed by confocal microscopy. Effect of l-tyrosine (0 to 2 mM) in culture medium on melanin synthesis in P-MDCK cells was evaluated. Cell uptake and transepithelial transport of pigment-binding chloroquine (Log D = 1.59) and a negative control salicylic acid (Log D = -1.14) were investigated. P-MDCK cells expressed tyrosinase and p-protein. Tyrosinase activity was 4.5-fold higher in P-MDCK cells compared to wild type MDCK cells. The transepithelial electrical resistance stabilized by day 4 in both cell types, with the TEER being 958 ± 33 and 964 ± 58 Ω·cm(2) for P-MDCK and wild type cells, respectively. Melanin content in P-MDCK cells depended on the concentration of l-tyrosine in culture medium, and increased from 3 to 54 μg/mg protein with an increase in l-tyrosine content from 0 to 2 mM. When the cells were grown in 2 mM l-tyrosine, uptake of chloroquine was 2.3-fold higher and the transepithelial transport was 2.2-fold lower in P-MDCK cells when compared to wild type MDCK cells. No significant difference was observed for both cell uptake and transport of salicylic acid. We developed a P-MDCK cell line with tunable melanin synthesis as a rapidly developing surrogate for retinal pigment epithelium. PMID:23003570

  5. A novel fluorescence-based assay for measuring A2E removal from human retinal pigment epithelial cells to screen for age-related macular degeneration inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hong Lan; Lee, Sung-Chan; Kwon, Yong Sam; Choung, Se-Young; Jeong, Kwang Won

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common retinal disease that leads to irreversible central vision loss in the elderly population. Recent studies have identified many factors related to the development of dry AMD, such as aging, cigarette smoking, genetic predispositions, and oxidative stress, eventually inducing the accumulation of lipofuscin, which is one of the most critical risk factors. One of the major lipofuscins in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells is N-retinylidene-N-retinylethanolamine (also known as A2E), a pyridinium bis-retinoid. Currently there is a lack of effective therapy to prevent or restore vision loss caused by dry AMD. Recent studies have shown that 430 nm blue light induces the oxidation of A2E and the activation of caspase-3 to subsequently cause the death of RPE cells, suggesting that removal of A2E from retinal pigment cells might be critical for preventing AMD. Here, we developed a fluorescence-labeled A2E analog (A2E-BDP) that functions similar to A2E in RPE cells, but is more sensitive to detection than A2E. A2E-BDP-based tracing of intracellular A2E will be helpful, not only for studying the accumulation and removal of A2E in human RPE cells but also for identifying possible inhibitors of AMD. PMID:26604166

  6. Pigment Epithelium-derived Factor (PEDF) Prevents Retinal Cell Death via PEDF Receptor (PEDF-R)

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Preeti; Locatelli-Hoops, Silvia; Kenealey, Jason; DesJardin, Jacqueline; Notari, Luigi; Becerra, S. Patricia

    2013-01-01

    The extracellular pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) displays retina survival activity by interacting with receptor proteins on cell surfaces. We have previously reported that PEDF binds and stimulates PEDF receptor (PEDF-R), a transmembrane phospholipase. However, the PEDF binding site of PEDF-R and its involvement in survival activity have not been identified. The purpose of this work is to identify a biologically relevant ligand-binding site on PEDF-R. PEDF bound the PEDF-R ectodomain L4 (Leu159–Met325) with affinity similar to the full-length PEDF-R (Met1–Leu504). Binding assays using synthetic peptides spanning L4 showed that PEDF selectively bound E5b (Ile193–Leu232) and P1 (Thr210–Leu249) peptides. Recombinant C-terminal truncated PEDF-R4 (Met1–Leu232) and internally truncated PEDF-R and PEDF-R4 (ΔHis203–Leu232) retained phospholipase activity of the full-length PEDF-R. However, PEDF-R polypeptides without the His203–Leu232 region lost the PEDF affinity that stimulated their enzymatic activity. Cell surface labeling showed that PEDF-R is present in the plasma membranes of retina cells. Using siRNA to selectively knock down PEDF-R in retina cells, we demonstrated that PEDF-R is essential for PEDF-mediated cell survival and antiapoptotic activities. Furthermore, preincubation of PEDF with P1 and E5b peptides blocked the PEDF·PEDF-R-mediated retina cell survival activity, implying that peptide binding to PEDF excluded ligand-receptor interactions on the cell surface. Our findings establish that PEDF-R is required for the survival and antiapoptotic effects of PEDF on retina cells and has determinants for PEDF binding within its L4 ectodomain that are critical for enzymatic stimulation. PMID:23818523

  7. In Situ Microspectrophotometric Studies on the Pigments of Single Retinal Rods

    PubMed Central

    Liebman, Paul A.

    1962-01-01

    Three spectral entities have been observed in single intact frog rod outer segments at 506 mμ, 480 mμ and 380 mμ. It is likely that the peak of 506 mμ was somewhat altered by bleaching reactions and originated at about 510 mμ. This is identified with the 502 mμ frog rhodopsin of digitonin extracts. Spectra in polarized light have the same maximum, identifying the dichroism of rods with rhodopsin. The dichroic ratio is around 6, giving the outer segment an axial density of 0.09/5μ or 0.9 OD total, with a pigment concentration of 2 to 3 mM. The dichroism data are used to compute the angle separating the rhodopsin molecular absorption vectors in rods from perfect restriction to a plane. This angle is 16° or 23° depending on which of two assumptions one chooses for the type of molecular ordering. The spectral peaks at 480 mμ and 380 mμ are thought to correspond respectively to metarhodopsin and retinene. Disappearance of the former is accompanied by accumulation of the latter. This reaction seems to occur more slowly in the intact outer segment than the corresponding reaction in solution. Spread of bleaching spectra from illuminated to dark areas of the same rod did not occur over distances of 2 μ or greater. Spectra were similar from rod to rod and from point to point on the same rod showing that frog rods are spectrally homogeneous both individually and collectively. PMID:14465191

  8. Nitrite Modification of Extracellular Matrix Alters CD46 Expression and VEGF Release in Human Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Fields, Mark A.; Cai, Hui; Bowrey, Hannah E.; Moreira, Ernesto F.; Beck Gooz, Monika; Kunchithapautham, Kannan; Gong, Jie; Vought, Emma; Del Priore, Lucian V.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Loss of CD46 has recently been implicated in choroidal neovascularization in mice. Herein we investigated the effect of nitrite modification of the extracellular matrix (ECM) as an in vitro model of “aging” and its effect on CD46 expression and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) release in cocultured human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Methods ARPE-19 cells were plated onto RPE-derived ECM conditions (untreated; nitrite modified; nitrite modified followed by washing with Triton X-100; or nitrite modified followed by washing with Triton X-100 and coated with extracellular matrix ligands). Cells were cultured for 7 days and CD46 expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Additionally, CD46 short interfering RNA (siRNA) was transfected into ARPE-19 cells, and VEGF levels were determined by ELISA. Finally, in the same ECM conditions, ARPE-19 cells were challenged with normal human serum and VEGF levels determined by ELISA. Results CD46 is expressed on the basolateral surface of ARPE-19 cells on RPE-derived ECM. Nitrite modification of ECM reduced the expression of CD46 on ARPE-19 cells by 0.5-fold (P = 0.003) and increased VEGF release in ARPE-19 cells by 1.7-fold (P < 0.001). CD46 knockdown also increased release of VEGF on the apical and basal sides of ARPE-19 cells in culture by 1.3- (P = 0.012) and 1.2-fold (P = 0.017), respectively. Conclusions Nitrite modification of the ECM decreased CD46 expression and increased the release of VEGF from ARPE-19 cells. Changes in CD46 expression may lead to changes in VEGF and play a pathologic role in the development of age-related macular degeneration. PMID:26161984

  9. Osmotic induction of placental growth factor in retinal pigment epithelial cells in vitro: contribution of NFAT5 activity.

    PubMed

    Hollborn, Margrit; Reichmuth, Konrad; Prager, Philipp; Wiedemann, Peter; Bringmann, Andreas; Kohen, Leon

    2016-08-01

    One risk factor of neovascular age-related macular degeneration is systemic hypertension; hypertension is mainly caused by extracellular hyperosmolarity after consumption of dietary salt. In retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, high extracellular osmolarity induces vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A (Hollborn et al. in Mol Vis 21:360-377, 2015). The aim of the present study was to determine whether extracellular hyperosmolarity and chemical hypoxia trigger the expression of further VEGF family members including placental growth factor (PlGF) in human RPE cells. Hyperosmotic media were made up by addition of 100 mM NaCl or sucrose. Chemical hypoxia was induced by CoCl2. Gene expression was quantified by real-time RT-PCR, and secretion of PlGF-2 was investigated with ELISA. Nuclear factor of activated T cell 5 (NFAT5) was depleted using siRNA. Extracellular hyperosmolarity triggered expression of VEGF-A, VEGF-D, and PlGF genes, and secretion of PlGF-2. Hypoosmolarity decreased PlGF gene expression. Hypoxia induced expression of VEGF-A, VEGF-B, VEGF-D, and PlGF genes. Extracellular hyperosmolarity and hypoxia produced additive PlGF gene expression. Both hyperosmolarity and hypoxia induced expression of KDR and FLT-4 receptor genes, while hyperosmolarity caused neuropilin-2 and hypoxia neuropilin-1 gene expression. The hyperosmotic, but not the hypoxic, PlGF gene expression was in part mediated by NFAT5. The expression of PlGF in RPE cells depends on the extracellular osmolarity. The data suggest that high consumption of dietary salt may exacerbate the angiogenic response of RPE cells in the hypoxic retina via transcriptional activation of various VEGF family member genes. PMID:27230578

  10. Role of ZnS Nanoparticles on Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-mediated Apoptosis in Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, Bose; Arun, Arumugaperumal; Harini, Lakshminarasimhan; Sundar, Krishnan; Kathiresan, Thandavarayan

    2016-04-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause for irreversible visual impairment affecting 30-50 million individuals every year. Oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress have been identified as crucial factors for the pathogenesis of AMD. Current treatments do not focus on underlying stimuli responsible for the disease like AMD. Zinc is an important trace metal in retina and its deficiency leads to AMD. Recent studies on zinc sulphide nanoparticles (ZnS-NPs) are gaining attention in the field of physical and biological research. In this present study, in investigating the role of ZnS-NPs on hydrogen peroxide and thapsigargin-treated primary mice retinal pigment epithelial (MRPE) cells, we synthesized ZnS-NPs and characterized using atomic force microscope (AFM) and SEM-EDX. The ZnS-NPs abrogate the primary MRPE cell death through inhibition of oxidative stress-induced reactive oxygen species production and cell permeability. Oxidant molecules hydrogen peroxide and thapsigargin alter unfolded protein response such as glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) and C/EBP homology protein (CHOP) expressions, whereas ZnS-NPs-pre-treated primary MRPE cells downregulated the overexpression of such proteins. The expressions of apoptotic proteins caspase 12 and cleaved caspase 9 and caspase 3 were also significantly controlled in ZnS-NPs-treated primary MRPE cells when comparing with thapsigargin- and hydrogen peroxide-treated cells. From these results, ZnS-NPs stabilize reactive oxygen species elevation, when subjected to hydrogen peroxide- and thapsigargin-mediated oxidant injury and helps in maintaining normal homeostasis through regulating endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response proteins which is the lead cause for apoptosis-mediated pathogenesis of AMD. PMID:26329999

  11. Comparison of Mouse and Human Retinal Pigment Epithelium Gene Expression Profiles: Potential Implications for Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Bennis, Anna; Gorgels, Theo G. M. F.; ten Brink, Jacoline B.; van der Spek, Peter J.; Bossers, Koen; Heine, Vivi M.; Bergen, Arthur A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of age related macular degeneration (AMD). AMD is the leading cause of blindness worldwide. There is currently no effective treatment available. Preclinical studies in AMD mouse models are essential to develop new therapeutics. This requires further in-depth knowledge of the similarities and differences between mouse and human RPE. Methods We performed a microarray study to identify and functionally annotate RPE specific gene expression in mouse and human RPE. We used a meticulous method to determine C57BL/6J mouse RPE signature genes, correcting for possible RNA contamination from its adjacent layers: the choroid and the photoreceptors. We compared the signature genes, gene expression profiles and functional annotations of the mouse and human RPE. Results We defined sets of mouse (64), human (171) and mouse–human interspecies (22) RPE signature genes. Not unexpectedly, our gene expression analysis and comparative functional annotation suggested that, in general, the mouse and human RPE are very similar. For example, we found similarities for general features, like “organ development” and “disorders related to neurological tissue”. However, detailed analysis of the molecular pathways and networks associated with RPE functions, suggested also multiple species-specific differences, some of which may be relevant for the development of AMD. For example, CFHR1, most likely the main complement regulator in AMD pathogenesis was highly expressed in human RPE, but almost absent in mouse RPE. Furthermore, functions assigned to mouse and human RPE expression profiles indicate (patho-) biological differences related to AMD, such as oxidative stress, Bruch’s membrane, immune-regulation and outer blood retina barrier. Conclusion These differences may be important for the development of new therapeutic strategies and translational studies in age-related macular

  12. Effects of Bevacizumab on Bcl-2 Expression and Apoptosis in Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells under Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sukjin; Kim, Young Jun; Kim, Na Rae

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effects of bevacizumab on expression of B-cell leukemia/lymphoma (Bcl)-2 and apoptosis in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells under oxidative stress conditions. Methods RPE cells were treated with H2O2 (0, 100, 200, 300, and 400 µM) and bevacizumab at or above the doses normally used in clinical practice (0, 0.33, 0.67, 1.33, and 2.67 mg/mL). Cell apoptosis was measured using flow cytometry with annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate. The expression of Bcl-2 mRNA was determined using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Results Under low oxidative stress conditions (H2O2 100 µM), cell apoptosis was not significantly different at any concentration of bevacizumab, but Bcl-2 mRNA expression decreased with increasing concentration of bevacizumab (0.33, 0.67, 1.33, and 2.67 mg/mL). Under moderate oxidative stress conditions (H2O2 200 µM), Bcl-2 mRNA expression decreased with increasing concentration of bevacizumab (0.33, 0.67, 1.33, and 2.67 mg/mL), but cell apoptosis increased only at 2.67 mg/mL of bevacizumab. Under high oxidative stress (300 µM) conditions, cell apoptosis increased at high concentrations of bevacizumab (1.33 and 2.67 mg/mL), but it did not correlate with Bcl-2 expression. Conclusions Withdrawal of vascular endothelial growth factor can lead to RPE cell apoptosis and influences the expression of anti-apoptotic genes such as Bcl-2 under oxidative stress conditions. Since oxidative stress levels of each patient are unknown, repeated injections of intravitreal bevacizumab, as in eyes with age-related macular degeneration, might influence RPE cell survival. PMID:26635460

  13. MicroRNA-29 regulates high-glucose-induced apoptosis in human retinal pigment epithelial cells through PTEN.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaohui; Zhou, Xiyuan; Liu, Danning; Yun, Lixia; Zhang, Lina; Chen, Xiaohai; Chai, Qinghe; Li, Langen

    2016-04-01

    Hyperglycemia or high-glucose (HG)-induced apoptosis in human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells is a characteristic process in diabetic retinopathy. In our study, we examined whether microRNA-29 (miR-29) may regulate HG-induced RPE cell apoptosis. Human RPE cell line, ARPE-19 cells, was treated with various high concentration of glucose in vitro. HG-induced RPE cell apoptosis was examined by terminal deoxynucleotide transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay and miR-29 gene expression by quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR). miR-29 was then downregulated in RPE cells, and its effect on HG-induced apoptosis was examined by TUNEL assay and western blot assay on caspase-7 protein. Association of miR-29 on its downstream target, PTEN, in HG-induced RPE cell apoptosis was evaluated by dual-luciferase assay and qRT-PCR. PTEN was silenced in RPE cells. The effects of PTEN downregulation on miR-29-mediated HG-induced RPE cell apoptosis were also examined by TUNEL and western blot assays. HG induced significant apoptosis in RPE cells in a dose-dependent manner. miR-29 was upregulated by HG in RPE cells. miR-29 downregulation protected HG-induced apoptosis and reduced the production of caspase-7 protein in RPE cells. PTEN was shown to be directly downregulated by HG and then upregulated by miR-29 downregulation in RPE cells. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated PTEN downregulation reversed the protective effect of miR-29 downregulation on HG-induced RPE cell apoptosis. This study demonstrates that miR-29, through inverse association of PTEN, plays an important role in the process of HG-induced apoptosis in RPE cells. PMID:26822433

  14. Formation of lipofuscin in cultured retinal pigment epithelial cells exposed to pre-oxidized photoreceptor outer segments.

    PubMed

    Wihlmark, U; Wrigstad, A; Roberg, K; Brunk, U T; Nilsson, S E

    1996-04-01

    Accumulation of lipofuscin in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) with increasing age may affect essential supportive functions for the photoreceptors. Earlier, we described a model system for the study of lipofuscinogenesis in RPE cell cultures and showed that mild oxidative stress enhances lipofuscin formation from phagocytized photoreceptor outer segments (POS). In the present study, bovine POS were photo-oxidized, and turned into a lipofuscin-like material, by irradiation with UV light. Transmission electron microscopy of irradiated POS showed loss of the normal stacks of the disk membranes with conversion into an amorphous osmiophilic electron-dense mass. The formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), estimated during the irradiation process, indicated lipid peroxidation. Irradiated POS also showed a strong granular yellow autofluorescence. RPE cell cultures, kept at 21% ambient oxygen, were fed daily for 3, 5 or 7 days with either (i) UV-peroxidized POS, (ii) native POS or (iii) culture medium only. RPE cells fed irradiated POS showed significantly higher levels of lipofuscin-specific autofluorescence compared to cells exposed to native POS after 3 days (p = 0.0056), 5 days (p = 0.0037) and 7 days (p = 0.0020), and to the non-exposed control cells (3 days: p = 0.005, 5 days: p = 0.0037, 7 days: p = 0.0094). The lipofuscin content of cells exposed to irradiated POS increased significantly between days 3 and 7 (p = 0.0335). Ultrastructural studies showed much more numerous and larger lipofuscin-like inclusions in RPE cells fed irradiated POS compared to cells exposed to native POS. In the control cells, lipofuscin-like granules were small and sparse. It appears that exposing RPE cells to previously peroxidized POS, thus artificially converted to lipofuscin and obviously not digestible by the lysosomal enzymes, accelerates the formation of severely lipofuscin-loaded cells. The results will be useful for further studies of possible harmful

  15. Smoke Exposure Causes Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Lipid Accumulation in Retinal Pigment Epithelium through Oxidative Stress and Complement Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Kunchithapautham, Kannan; Atkinson, Carl; Rohrer, Bärbel

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a complex disease caused by genetic and environmental factors, including genetic variants in complement components and smoking. Smoke exposure leads to oxidative stress, complement activation, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and lipid dysregulation, which have all been proposed to be associated with AMD pathogenesis. Here we examine the effects of smoke exposure on the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Mice were exposed to cigarette smoke or filtered air for 6 months. RPE cells grown as stable monolayers were exposed to 5% cigarette smoke extract (CSE). Effects of smoke were determined by biochemical, molecular, and histological measures. Effects of the alternative pathway (AP) of complement and complement C3a anaphylatoxin receptor signaling were analyzed using knock-out mice or specific inhibitors. ER stress markers were elevated after smoke exposure in RPE of intact mice, which was eliminated in AP-deficient mice. To examine this relationship further, RPE monolayers were exposed to CSE. Short term smoke exposure resulted in production and release of complement C3, the generation of C3a, oxidative stress, complement activation on the cell membrane, and ER stress. Long term exposure to CSE resulted in lipid accumulation, and secretion. All measures were reversed by blocking C3a complement receptor (C3aR), alternative complement pathway signaling, and antioxidant therapy. Taken together, our results provide clear evidence that smoke exposure results in oxidative stress and complement activation via the AP, resulting in ER stress-mediated lipid accumulation, and further suggesting that oxidative stress and complement act synergistically in the pathogenesis of AMD. PMID:24711457

  16. αvβ5 Integrin/FAK/PGC-1α Pathway Confers Protective Effects on Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Roggia, Murilo F.; Ueta, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To elucidate the mechanism of the induction of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) by photoreceptor outer segments (POS) and its effects on retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Methods PGC-1α upregulation by POS was confirmed in ARPE-19 cells and in RPE ex vivo. To elucidate the mechanism, siRNAs against β5 integrin, CD36, Mer tyrosine kinase (MerTK), and Atg5, blocking antibodies against CD36 and MerTK, and a specific inhibitor for focal adhesion kinase (FAK) were used. We examined the effect of POS-induced PGC-1α upregulation on the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial biogenesis, senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) after H2O2 treatment, and lysosomal activity. Lysosomal activity was evaluated through transcriptional factor EB and its target genes, and the activity of cathepsin D. Lipid metabolism after POS treatment was assessed using Oil Red O and BODIPY C11. RPE phenotypes of PGC-1α-deficient mice were examined. Results POS-induced PGC-1α upregulation was suppressed by siRNA against β5 integrin and a FAK inhibitor. siRNAs and blocking antibodies against CD36 and MerTK enhanced the effect of POS on PGC-1α. The upregulation of PGC-1α increased the levels of mRNA for antioxidant enzymes and stimulated mitochondrial biogenesis, decreased ROS levels, and reduced SA-β-gal staining in H2O2-treated ARPE-19 cells. PGC-1α was critical for lysosomal activity and lipid metabolism after POS treatment. PGC-1α-deficient mice demonstrated an accumulation of type 2 lysosomes in RPE, thickening of Bruch’s membrane, and poor choriocapillaris vasculature. Conclusions The binding, but not the internalization of POS confers protective effects on RPE cells through the αvβ5 integrin/FAK/PGC-1α pathway. PMID:26244551

  17. Bisretinoid-mediated Complement Activation on Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells Is Dependent on Complement Factor H Haplotype*

    PubMed Central

    Radu, Roxana A.; Hu, Jane; Jiang, Zhichun; Bok, Dean

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common central blinding disease of the elderly. Homozygosity for a sequence variant causing Y402H and I62V substitutions in the gene for complement factor H (CFH) is strongly associated with risk of AMD. CFH, secreted by many cell types, including those of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), is a regulatory protein that inhibits complement activation. Recessive Stargardt maculopathy is another central blinding disease caused by mutations in the gene for ABCA4, a transporter in photoreceptor outer segments (OS) that clears retinaldehyde and prevents formation of toxic bisretinoids. Photoreceptors daily shed their distal OS, which are phagocytosed by the RPE cells. Here, we investigated the relationship between the CFH haplotype of human RPE (hRPE) cells, exposure to OS containing bisretinoids, and complement activation. We show that hRPE cells of the AMD-predisposing CFH haplotype (HH402/VV62) are attacked by complement following exposure to bisretinoid-containing Abca4−/− OS. This activation was dependent on factor B, indicating involvement of the alternative pathway. In contrast, hRPE cells of the AMD-protective CFH haplotype (YY402/II62) showed no complement activation following exposure to either Abca4−/− or wild-type OS. The AMD-protective YY402/II62 hRPE cells were more resistant to the membrane attack complex, whereas HH402/VV62 hRPE cells showed significant membrane attack complex deposition following ingestion of Abca4−/− OS. These results suggest that bisretinoid accumulation in hRPE cells stimulates activation and dysregulation of complement. Cells with an intact complement negative regulatory system are protected from complement attack, whereas cells with reduced CFH synthesis because of the Y402H and I62V substitutions are vulnerable to disease. PMID:24550392

  18. Early changes in gene expression induced by blue light irradiation of A2E-laden retinal pigment epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    van der Burght, Barbro W.; Hansen, Morten; Olsen, Jørgen; Zhou, Jilin; Wu, Yalin; Nissen, Mogens H.; Sparrow, Janet R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Accumulation of bisretinoids as lipofuscin in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells is implicated in the pathogenesis of some blinding diseases including age-related macular degeneration (AMD). To identify genes whose expression may change under conditions of bisretinoid accumulation, we investigated the differential gene expression in RPE cells that had accumulated the lipofuscin fluorophore A2E and were exposed to blue light (430 nm). Methods A2E-laden RPE cells were exposed to blue light (A2E/430 nm) at various time intervals. Cell death was quantified using Dead Red staining, and RNA levels for the entire genome was determined using DNA microarrays (Affymetrix GeneChip Human Genome 2.0 Plus). Array results for selected genes were confirmed by real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Results Principal component analysis revealed that the A2E-laden RPE cells irradiated with blue light were clearly distinguishable from the control samples. We found differential regulation of genes belonging to the following functional groups: transcription factors, stress response, apoptosis and immune response. Among the last mentioned were downregulation of four genes that coded for proteins that have an inhibitory effect on the complement cascade: (complement factor H, complement factor H-related 1, complement factor I and vitronectin) and of two belonging to the classical pathway (complement component 1, s subcomponent and complement component 1, r subcomponent). Conclusion This study demonstrates that blue light irradiation of A2E-laden RPE cells can alter the transcription of genes belonging to different functional pathways including stress response, apoptosis and the immune response. We suggest that these molecules may be associated to the pathogenesis of AMD and can potentially serve as future therapeutic targets. PMID:23742627

  19. Calcium overload is associated with lipofuscin formation in human retinal pigment epithelial cells fed with photoreceptor outer segments

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, L; Hui, Y-N; Wang, Y-S; Ma, J-X; Wang, J-B; Ma, L-N

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the role of Ca2+ in lipofuscin formation in human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells that phagocytize bovine photoreceptor outer segments (POSs). Methods Cultured human RPE cells fed with 2 × 107 per l bovine POS were treated with flunarizine, an antagonist of Ca2+ channel, or/and centrophenoxine, a lipofuscin scavenger. The Ca2+ changes and lipofuscin formation were measured with fluoresence dye Fluo-3/AM ester, laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) and flow cytometry (FCM). The activity of RPE cells was measured by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay and argyrophilic nucleolar organizer regions (AgNORs) assay. Results The Ca2+ fluorescence intensity (CFI) of RPE cells fed with POS was significantly increased compared with the controls (165.36±29.92 U). It reached a peak with 777.33±63.86 U (P<0.01) at 12 h, and then decreased but still maintained a high level of 316.90±36.07 U (P<0.01) for 4 days. Flunarizine and centrophenoxine significantly decreased the Ca2+ overload to 227.18±14.00 U at 12 h and 211.06±20.45 U at 4 days. FCM confirmed these changes. The drugs also showed an inhibitory effect on the lipofuscin formation. The proliferation rate of the cells fed with POS increased significantly. Both drugs had inhibitory effects on the activity of the cultured cells. This tendency was confirmed by AgNORs assay. Conclusions The Ca2+ inflow initiated lipofuscin accumulation in RPE cells fed with POS. Flunarizine and centrophenoxine can decrease Ca2+ overload and lipofuscin formation in RPE cells, accompanied by maintaining cellular vitality. PMID:21311572

  20. Effects of KCNQ channel modulators on the M-type potassium current in primate retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Pattnaik, Bikash R; Hughes, Bret A

    2012-03-01

    Recently, we demonstrated the expression of KCNQ1, KCNQ4, and KCNQ5 transcripts in monkey retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and showed that the M-type current in RPE cells is blocked by the specific KCNQ channel blocker XE991. Using patch-clamp electrophysiology, we investigated the pharmacological sensitivity of the M-type current in isolated monkey RPE cells to elucidate the subunit composition of the channel. Most RPE cells exhibited an M-type current with a voltage for half-maximal activation of approximately -35 mV. The M-type current activation followed a double-exponential time course and was essentially complete within 1 s. The M-type current was inhibited by micromolar concentrations of the nonselective KCNQ channel blockers linopirdine and XE991 but was relatively insensitive to block by 10 μM chromanol 293B or 135 mM tetraethylammonium (TEA), two KCNQ1 channel blockers. The M-type current was activated by 1) 10 μM retigabine, an opener of all KCNQ channels except KCNQ1, 2) 10 μM zinc pyrithione, which augments all KCNQ channels except KCNQ3, and 3) 50 μM N-ethylmaleimide, which activates KCNQ2, KCNQ4, and KCNQ5, but not KCNQ1 or KCNQ3, channels. Application of cAMP, which activates KCNQ1 and KCNQ4 channels, had no significant effect on the M-type current. Finally, diclofenac, which activates KCNQ2/3 and KCNQ4 channels but inhibits KCNQ5 channels, inhibited the M-type current in the majority of RPE cells but activated it in others. The results indicate that the M-type current in monkey RPE is likely mediated by channels encoded by KCNQ4 and KCNQ5 subunits. PMID:22135213

  1. Profiling the microRNA Expression in Human iPS and iPS-derived Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Heuy-Ching; Greene, Whitney A; Kaini, Ramesh R; Shen-Gunther, Jane; Chen, Hung-I H; Cai, Hong; Wang, Yufeng

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the microRNA (miRNA) expression profiles of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS-RPE). MiRNAs have been demonstrated to play critical roles in both maintaining pluripotency and facilitating differentiation. Gene expression networks accountable for maintenance and induction of pluripotency are linked and share components with those networks implicated in oncogenesis. Therefore, we hypothesize that miRNA expression profiling will distinguish iPS cells from their iPS-RPE progeny. To identify and analyze differentially expressed miRNAs, RPE was derived from iPS using a spontaneous differentiation method. MiRNA microarray analysis identified 155 probes that were statistically differentially expressed between iPS and iPS-RPE cells. Up-regulated miRNAs including miR-181c and miR-129–5p may play a role in promoting differentiation, while down-regulated miRNAs such as miR-367, miR-18b, and miR-20b are implicated in cell proliferation. Subsequent miRNA–target and network analysis revealed that these miRNAs are involved in cellular development, cell cycle progression, cell death, and survival. A systematic interrogation of temporal and spatial expression of iPS-RPE miRNAs and their associated target mRNAs will provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms of carcinogenesis, eye differentiation and development. PMID:25392691

  2. Ultraviolet vision in lacertid lizards: evidence from retinal structure, eye transmittance, SWS1 visual pigment genes and behaviour.

    PubMed

    Pérez i de Lanuza, Guillem; Font, Enrique

    2014-08-15

    Ultraviolet (UV) vision and UV colour patches have been reported in a wide range of taxa and are increasingly appreciated as an integral part of vertebrate visual perception and communication systems. Previous studies with Lacertidae, a lizard family with diverse and complex coloration, have revealed the existence of UV-reflecting patches that may function as social signals. However, confirmation of the signalling role of UV coloration requires demonstrating that the lizards are capable of vision in the UV waveband. Here we use a multidisciplinary approach to characterize the visual sensitivity of a diverse sample of lacertid species. Spectral transmission measurements of the ocular media show that wavelengths down to 300 nm are transmitted in all the species sampled. Four retinal oil droplet types can be identified in the lacertid retina. Two types are pigmented and two are colourless. Fluorescence microscopy reveals that a type of colourless droplet is UV-transmitting and may thus be associated with UV-sensitive cones. DNA sequencing shows that lacertids have a functional SWS1 opsin, very similar at 13 critical sites to that in the presumed ancestral vertebrate (which was UV sensitive) and other UV-sensitive lizards. Finally, males of Podarcis muralis are capable of discriminating between two views of the same stimulus that differ only in the presence/absence of UV radiance. Taken together, these results provide convergent evidence of UV vision in lacertids, very likely by means of an independent photopigment. Moreover, the presence of four oil droplet types suggests that lacertids have a four-cone colour vision system. PMID:24902749

  3. The Self-Concept of Spanish Young Adults with Retinitis Pigmentosa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez-Justicia, Maria Dolores; Cordoba, Inmaculada Nieto

    2006-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a degenerative disease of the retina that causes the severe impairment of visual functioning similar to low vision, leading, in many cases, to blindness. Because the construct of self-concept plays a key role in personality, this study was designed to measure self-concept in a group of young adults with RP. The…

  4. Monte Carlo simulation of retinal light absorption by infants.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ya; Tan, Jinglu

    2015-02-01

    Retinal damage can occur in normal ambient lighting conditions. Infants are particularly vulnerable to retinal damage, and thousands of preterm infants sustain vision damage each year. The size of the ocular fundus affects retinal light absorption, but there is a lack of understanding of this effect for infants. In this work, retinal light absorption is simulated for different ocular fundus sizes, wavelengths, and pigment concentrations by using the Monte Carlo method. The results indicate that the neural retina light absorption per volume for infants can be two or more times that for adults. PMID:26366599

  5. Texture Descriptors Ensembles Enable Image-Based Classification of Maturation of Human Stem Cell-Derived Retinal Pigmented Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Caetano dos Santos, Florentino Luciano; Skottman, Heli; Juuti-Uusitalo, Kati; Hyttinen, Jari

    2016-01-01

    Aims A fast, non-invasive and observer-independent method to analyze the homogeneity and maturity of human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) derived retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells is warranted to assess the suitability of hPSC-RPE cells for implantation or in vitro use. The aim of this work was to develop and validate methods to create ensembles of state-of-the-art texture descriptors and to provide a robust classification tool to separate three different maturation stages of RPE cells by using phase contrast microscopy images. The same methods were also validated on a wide variety of biological image classification problems, such as histological or virus image classification. Methods For image classification we used different texture descriptors, descriptor ensembles and preprocessing techniques. Also, three new methods were tested. The first approach was an ensemble of preprocessing methods, to create an additional set of images. The second was the region-based approach, where saliency detection and wavelet decomposition divide each image in two different regions, from which features were extracted through different descriptors. The third method was an ensemble of Binarized Statistical Image Features, based on different sizes and thresholds. A Support Vector Machine (SVM) was trained for each descriptor histogram and the set of SVMs combined by sum rule. The accuracy of the computer vision tool was verified in classifying the hPSC-RPE cell maturation level. Dataset and Results The RPE dataset contains 1862 subwindows from 195 phase contrast images. The final descriptor ensemble outperformed the most recent stand-alone texture descriptors, obtaining, for the RPE dataset, an area under ROC curve (AUC) of 86.49% with the 10-fold cross validation and 91.98% with the leave-one-image-out protocol. The generality of the three proposed approaches was ascertained with 10 more biological image datasets, obtaining an average AUC greater than 97%. Conclusions Here we

  6. Retinal pigment epithelial expression of complement regulator CD46 is altered early in the course of geographic atrophy.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Susan D; Curcio, Christine A; Wang, Lan; Li, Chuan-Ming; McGwin, Gerald; Medeiros, Nancy E; Philp, Nancy J; Kimble, James A; Read, Russell W

    2011-10-01

    In geographic atrophy (GA), the non-neovascular end stage of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the macular retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) progressively degenerates. Membrane cofactor protein (MCP, CD46) is the only membrane-bound regulator of complement expressed on the human RPE basolateral surface. Based on evidence of the role of complement in AMD, we hypothesized that altered CD46 expression on the RPE would be associated with GA development and/or progression. Here we report the timeline of CD46 protein expression changes across the GA transition zone, relative to control eyes, and relative to events in other chorioretinal layers. Eleven donor eyes (mean age 87.0 ± 4.1 yr) with GA and 5 control eyes (mean age 84.0 ± 8.9 yr) without GA were evaluated. Macular cryosections were stained with PASH for basal deposits, von Kossa for calcium, and for CD46 immunoreactivity. Internal controls for protein expression were provided by an independent basolateral protein, monocarboxylate transporter 3 (MCT3) and an apical protein, ezrin. Within zones defined by 8 different semi-quantitative grades of RPE morphology, we determined the location and intensity of immunoreactivity, outer segment length, and Bruch's membrane calcification. Differences between GA and control eyes and between milder and more severe RPE stages in GA eyes were assessed statistically. Increasing grades of RPE degeneration were associated with progressive loss of polarity and loss of intensity of staining of CD46, beginning with the stages that are considered normal aging (grades 0-1). Those GA stages with affected CD46 immunoreactivity exhibited basal laminar deposit, still-normal photoreceptors, and concomitant changes in control protein expression. Activated or anteriorly migrated RPE (grades 2-3) exhibited greatly diminished CD46. Changes in RPE CD46 expression thus occur early in GA, before there is evidence of morphological RPE change. At later stages of degeneration, CD46

  7. Vitreous-induced cytoskeletal rearrangements via the Rac1 GTPase-dependent signaling pathway in human retinal pigment epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xionggao; Wei, Yantao; Ma, Haizhi; Zhang, Shaochong

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Vitreous induces morphological changes and cytoskeletal rearrangements in RPE cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rac1 is activated in vitreous-transformed RPE cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rac inhibition prevents morphological changes in vitreous-transformed RPE cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rac inhibition suppresses cytoskeletal rearrangements in vitreous-transformed RPE cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The vitreous-induced effects are mediated by a Rac1 GTPase/LIMK1/cofilin pathway. -- Abstract: Proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) is mainly caused by retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell migration, invasion, proliferation and transformation into fibroblast-like cells that produce the extracellular matrix (ECM). The vitreous humor is known to play an important role in PVR. An epithelial-to-mesenchymal transdifferentiation (EMT) of human RPE cells induced by 25% vitreous treatment has been linked to stimulation of the mesenchymal phenotype, migration and invasion. Here, we characterized the effects of the vitreous on the cell morphology and cytoskeleton in human RPE cells. The signaling pathway that mediates these effects was investigated. Serum-starved RPE cells were incubated with 25% vitreous, and the morphological changes were examined by phase-contrast microscopy. Filamentous actin (F-actin) was examined by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. Protein phosphorylation of AKT, ERK1/2, Smad2/3, LIM kinase (LIMK) 1 and cofilin was analyzed by Western blot analysis. Vitreous treatment induced cytoskeletal rearrangements, activated Rac1 and enhanced the phosphorylation of AKT, ERK1/2 and Smad2/3. When the cells were treated with a Rac activation-specific inhibitor, the cytoskeletal rearrangements were prevented, and the phosphorylation of Smad2/3 was blocked. Vitreous treatment also enhanced the phosphorylation of LIMK1 and cofilin and the Rac inhibitor blocked this effect. We propose that vitreous

  8. Fenofibrate inhibits the expression of VEGFC and VEGFR-3 in retinal pigmental epithelial cells exposed to hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, JIANFENG; GENG, YU; HUA, HAIRONG; CUN, BIYUN; CHEN, QIANBO; XI, XIAOTING; YANG, LIUSHU; LI, YAN

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the mechanisms through which fenofibrate inhibits the ability of human retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE cells) exposed to hypoxia to stimulate the proliferation and migration of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). For this purpose, RPE cells and HUVECs were divided into the following groups: RPE-normoxia, RPE + fenofibrate, RPE-hypoxia, RPE hypoxia + fenofibrate; HUVECs normal culture and HUVECs + RPE-hypoxia culture supernatant. RPE cell hypoxia was induced by cobalt(II) chloride (CoCl2). A superoxide anion probe was used to measure the production of superoxide anion, which is indicative of hypoxic conditions. Cell proliferation was assessed by MTT assay, and the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor C (VEGFC) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3 (VEGFR-3) in the RPE cell culture supernatant was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The migration ability of the HUVECs was determined by scratch-wound assay, and the angiogenic ability of the HUVECs was examined by measuring cell lumen formation. The mRNA and protein expression levels of VEGFC and VEGFR-3 in the RPE cells were measured by RT-qPCR and western blot analysis, respectively. Our results revealed that fenofibrate inhibited the increase in the expression and release of VEGFC and VEGFR-3 into the RPE cell culture supernatant induced by exposure to hypoxia. The culture of HUVECs in medium supernatant of RPE cells epxosed to hypoxia enhanced the viability and migration ability of the HUVECs and promoted lumen formation; these effects were inhibited by fenofibrate. In conclusion, our data demonstrated that the exposure of RPE cells to hypoxia induced the expression and release of VEGFC and VEGFR-3 into the cell culture supernatant. The culture of HUVECs in conditioned medium from RPE cells exposed to hypoxia increased VEGFC and VEGFR-3 expression, and promoted the proliferation and migration of the HUVECs, as

  9. THE ORGANOPHOSPHOROUS INSECTICIDE FENTHION DOES NOT AFFECT PHAGOCYTOSIS OF ROD OUTER SEGMENTS BY RETINAL PIGMENT EPITHELIUM CELLS IN CULTURE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    :
    Exposure to the organophosphorous insecticide fenthion has been associated with retinal degeneration in occupational studies. It has also been associated with pigmentary changes of the retina. Because retinal degeneration and pigmentary changes may be due to dysfunction of t...

  10. Combined Hamartoma of the Retina and Retinal Pigment Epithelium in a Patient with Gorlin Syndrome: Spontaneous Partial Resolution of Traction Caused by Epiretinal Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Vicente, José L.; Rueda, Trinidad; Rodríguez de la Rúa-Franch, Enrique; Molina-Socola, Fredy E.; Vital-Berral, Cristina; Alfaro-Juárez, Asunción; López-Herrero, Fernando; Muñoz-Morales, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To describe the case of spontaneous resolution of epiretinal membrane in a patient with Combined Hamartoma of the Retina and Retinal Pigment Epithelium (CHR-RPE), in the clinical context of Gorlin Syndrome (GS). Methods. Observational case report of a 12-year-old female patient is presented. The diagnosis of CHRRPE was made by OCT and fundus examination, which showed a mound of disorganized tissue originating from retina and retinal pigment epithelium. Epiretinal membrane (EM) was also detected. Genetic study was performed to confirm the diagnosis of GS. Results. The patient was observed for 39 months, showing spontaneous resolution of the traction caused by the EM and improvement in visual acuity (VA), which was 20/80 at initial presentation, rising to 20/40 after follow-up period. Conclusions. The presence of EM in CHR-REP is a cause of reduction of visual acuity. Management of this condition is controversial; however, we would like to highlight that spontaneous resolution of the traction caused by EM is possible, resulting in recovery of VA. PMID:27595027

  11. Combined Hamartoma of the Retina and Retinal Pigment Epithelium in a Patient with Gorlin Syndrome: Spontaneous Partial Resolution of Traction Caused by Epiretinal Membrane.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Vicente, José L; Contreras-Díaz, Miguel; Rueda, Trinidad; Rodríguez de la Rúa-Franch, Enrique; Molina-Socola, Fredy E; Vital-Berral, Cristina; Alfaro-Juárez, Asunción; López-Herrero, Fernando; Muñoz-Morales, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To describe the case of spontaneous resolution of epiretinal membrane in a patient with Combined Hamartoma of the Retina and Retinal Pigment Epithelium (CHR-RPE), in the clinical context of Gorlin Syndrome (GS). Methods. Observational case report of a 12-year-old female patient is presented. The diagnosis of CHRRPE was made by OCT and fundus examination, which showed a mound of disorganized tissue originating from retina and retinal pigment epithelium. Epiretinal membrane (EM) was also detected. Genetic study was performed to confirm the diagnosis of GS. Results. The patient was observed for 39 months, showing spontaneous resolution of the traction caused by the EM and improvement in visual acuity (VA), which was 20/80 at initial presentation, rising to 20/40 after follow-up period. Conclusions. The presence of EM in CHR-REP is a cause of reduction of visual acuity. Management of this condition is controversial; however, we would like to highlight that spontaneous resolution of the traction caused by EM is possible, resulting in recovery of VA. PMID:27595027

  12. Cd59a deficiency in mice leads to preferential innate immune activation in the retinal pigment epithelium-choroid with age.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Philipp; Cowing, Jill A; Cristante, Enrico; Liyanage, Sidath E; Ribeiro, Joana; Duran, Yanai; Abelleira Hervas, Laura; Carvalho, Livia S; Bainbridge, James W B; Luhmann, Ulrich F O; Ali, Robin R

    2015-09-01

    Dysregulation of the complement system has been implicated in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration. To investigate consequences of altered complement regulation in the eye with age, we examined Cd59a complement regulator deficient (Cd59a(-/-)) mice between 4 and 15 months. In vivo imaging revealed an increased age-related accumulation of autofluorescent spots in Cd59a(-/-) mice, a feature that reflects accumulation of subretinal macrophages and/or microglia. Despite this activation of myeloid cells in the eye, Cd59a(-/-) mice showed normal retinal histology and function as well as normal choroidal microvasculature. With age, they revealed increased expression of activators of the alternative complement pathway (C3, Cfb, Cfd), in particular in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)-choroid but less in the retina. This molecular response was not altered by moderately-enhanced light exposure. Cd59a deficiency therefore leads to a preferential age-related dysregulation of the complement system in the RPE-choroid, that alone or in combination with light as a trigger, is not sufficient to cause choroidal vascular changes or retinal degeneration and dysfunction. This data emphasizes the particular vulnerability of the RPE-choroidal complex to dysregulation of the alternative complement pathway during aging. PMID:26234657

  13. Temsirolimus inhibits proliferation and migration in retinal pigment epithelial and endothelial cells via mTOR inhibition and decreases VEGF and PDGF expression.

    PubMed

    Liegl, Raffael; Koenig, Susanna; Siedlecki, Jakob; Haritoglou, Christos; Kampik, Anselm; Kernt, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Due to their high prevalence, retinal vascular diseases including age related macular degeneration (AMD), retinal vein occlusions (RVO), diabetic retinopathy (DR) and diabetic macular edema have been major therapeutic targets over the last years. The pathogenesis of these diseases is complex and yet not fully understood. However, increased proliferation, migration and angiogenesis are characteristic cellular features in almost every retinal vascular disease. The introduction of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) binding intravitreal treatment strategies has led to great advances in the therapy of these diseases. While the predominant part of affected patients benefits from the specific binding of VEGF by administering an anti-VEGF antibody into the vitreous cavity, a small number of non-responders exist and alternative or additional therapeutic strategies should therefore be evaluated. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a central signaling pathway that eventually triggers up-regulation of cellular proliferation, migration and survival and has been identified to play a key role in angiogenesis. In the present study we were able to show that both retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells as wells as human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) are inhibited in proliferating and migrating after treatment with temsirolimus in non-toxic concentrations. Previous studies suggest that the production of VEGF, platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) and other important cytokines is not only triggered by hypoxia but also by mTOR itself. Our results indicate that temsirolimus decreases VEGF and PDGF expression on RNA and protein levels significantly. We therefore believe that the mTOR inhibitor temsirolimus might be a promising drug in the future and it seems worthwhile to evaluate complementary therapeutic effects with anti-VEGF drugs for patients not profiting from mono anti-VEGF therapy alone. PMID:24586308

  14. TNF-α Mediates PKCδ/JNK1/2/c-Jun-Dependent Monocyte Adhesion via ICAM-1 Induction in Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, I-Ta; Liu, Shiau-Wen; Chi, Pei-Ling; Lin, Chih-Chung; Hsiao, Li-Der; Yang, Chuen-Mao

    2015-01-01

    Retinal inflammatory diseases induced by cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) are associated with an up-regulation of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in the retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPECs). Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a monolayer of epithelial cells that forms the outer blood-retinal barrier in the posterior segment of the eye, and is also implicated in the pathology of, such as neovascularization in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). However, the detailed mechanisms of TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 expression are largely unclear in human RPECs. We demonstrated that in RPECs, TNF-α could induce ICAM-1 protein and mRNA expression and promoter activity, and monocyte adhesion. TNF-α-mediated responses were attenuated by pretreatment with the inhibitor of PKCs (Ro318220), PKCδ (Rottlerin), MEK1/2 (U0126), JNK1/2 (SP600125), or AP-1 (Tanshinone IIA) and transfection with siRNA of TNFR1, TRAF2, JNK2, p42, or c-Jun. We showed that TNF-α could stimulate the TNFR1 and TRAF2 complex formation. TNF-α-stimulated JNK1/2 was also reduced by Rottlerin or SP600125. However, Rottlerin had no effect on TNF-α-induced p42/p44 MAPK phosphorylation. We observed that TNF-α induced c-Jun phosphorylation which was inhibited by Rottlerin or SP600125. On the other hand, TNF-α-stimulated ICAM-1 promoter activity was prominently lost in RPECs transfected with the point-mutated AP-1 ICAM-1 promoter plasmid. These results suggest that TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 expression and monocyte adhesion is mediated through a TNFR1/TRAF2/PKCδ/JNK1/2/c-Jun pathway in RPECs. These findings concerning TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 expression in RPECs imply that TNF-α might play an important role in ocular inflammation and diseases. PMID:25675437

  15. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor prevents dendritic retraction of adult mouse retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Binley, Kate E; Ng, Wai S; Barde, Yves-Alain; Song, Bing; Morgan, James E

    2016-08-01

    We used cultured adult mouse retinae as a model system to follow and quantify the retraction of dendrites using diolistic labelling of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) following explantation. Cell death was monitored in parallel by nuclear staining as 'labelling' with RGC and apoptotic markers was inconsistent and exceedingly difficult to quantify reliably. Nuclear staining allowed us to delineate a lengthy time window during which dendrite retraction can be monitored in the absence of RGC death. The addition of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) produced a marked reduction in dendritic degeneration, even when application was delayed for 3 days after retinal explantation. These results suggest that the delayed addition of trophic factors may be functionally beneficial before the loss of cell bodies in the course of conditions such as glaucoma. PMID:27285957

  16. The marine n-3 PUFA DHA evokes cytoprotection against oxidative stress and protein misfolding by inducing autophagy and NFE2L2 in human retinal pigment epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Ida; Monsen, Vivi Talstad; Pettersen, Kristine; Mildenberger, Jennifer; Misund, Kristine; Kaarniranta, Kai; Schønberg, Svanhild; Bjørkøy, Geir

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation and aggregation of misfolded proteins is a hallmark of several diseases collectively known as proteinopathies. Autophagy has a cytoprotective role in diseases associated with protein aggregates. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common neurodegenerative eye disease that evokes blindness in elderly. AMD is characterized by degeneration of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and leads to loss of photoreceptor cells and central vision. The initial phase associates with accumulation of intracellular lipofuscin and extracellular deposits called drusen. Epidemiological studies have suggested an inverse correlation between dietary intake of marine n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and the risk of developing neurodegenerative diseases, including AMD. However, the disease-preventive mechanism(s) mobilized by n-3 PUFAs is not completely understood. In human retinal pigment epithelial cells we find that physiologically relevant doses of the n-3 PUFA docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) induce a transient increase in cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels that activates the oxidative stress response regulator NFE2L2/NRF2 (nuclear factor, erythroid derived 2, like 2). Simultaneously, there is a transient increase in intracellular protein aggregates containing SQSTM1/p62 (sequestosome 1) and an increase in autophagy. Pretreatment with DHA rescues the cells from cell cycle arrest induced by misfolded proteins or oxidative stress. Cells with a downregulated oxidative stress response, or autophagy, respond with reduced cell growth and survival after DHA supplementation. These results suggest that DHA both induces endogenous antioxidants and mobilizes selective autophagy of misfolded proteins. Both mechanisms could be relevant to reduce the risk of developing aggregate-associate diseases such as AMD. PMID:26237736

  17. Three dimensional distribution of the vitelliform lesion, photoreceptors, and retinal pigment epithelium in the macula of patients with Best vitelliform macular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kay, Christine N.; Abramoff, Michael D.; Mullins, Robert F.; Kinnick, Tyson R.; Lee, Kyuongmoo; Eyestone, Mari E.; Chung, Mina M.; Sohn, Elliott H.; Stone, Edwin M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the anatomical phenotypes of Best vitelliform macular dystrophy (BVMD) with spectraldomain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) in a large series of patients with confirmed mutations in the BEST1 gene. Methods In our retrospective observational case series, we assessed 15 patients (30 eyes) with a clinical diagnosis of vitelliform macular dystrophy who were found to have mutations in the BEST1 gene. Color fundus photographs and SD-OCT images were evaluated and compared with those of 15 age-matched controls (30 eyes). Using a validated 3-dimensional SD-OCT segmentation algorithm, we calculated the equivalent thickness of photoreceptors and the equivalent thickness of the retinal pigment epithelium for each patient. The photoreceptor equivalent thickness and the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) equivalent thickness were compared in all patients, in a region of the macula outside the central lesion for patients with BVMD and outside the fovea in control patients. Paired t tests were used for statistical analysis. Results The SD-OCT findings revealed that the vitelliform lesion consists of material above the RPE and below the outer segment tips. Additionally, drusen-like deposition of sub-RPE material was notable, and several patients exhibited a sub-RPE fibrotic nodule. Patients with BVMD had a mean photoreceptor equivalent thickness of 28.3 μm, and control patients had a mean photoreceptor equivalent thickness of 21.8 μm, a mean difference of 6.5 μm (P < .01), whereas the mean RPE equivalent thickness was not statistically different between patients with BVMD and control patients (P=.53). Conclusions The SD-OCT findings suggest that vitelliform material is located in the subretinal space and that BVMD is associated with diffuse photoreceptor outer segment abnormalities overlying a structurally normal RPE. Clinical Relevance: These findings provide new insight into the pathophysiology of BVMD and thus have implications for the development of

  18. Safety profiles of anti-VEGF drugs: bevacizumab, ranibizumab, aflibercept and ziv-aflibercept on human retinal pigment epithelium cells in culture

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Deepika; Tarek, Mohamed; Caceres del Carpio, Javier; Ramirez, Claudio; Boyer, David; Kenney, M Cristina; Kuppermann, Baruch D

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To compare the safety profiles of antivascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) drugs ranibizumab, bevacizumab, aflibercept and ziv-aflibercept on retinal pigment epithelium cells in culture. Methods Human retinal pigment epithelium cells (ARPE-19) were exposed for 24 h to four anti-VEGF drugs at 1/2×, 1×, 2× and 10× clinical concentrations. Cell viability and mitochondrial membrane potential assay were performed to evaluate early apoptotic changes and rate of overall cell death. Results Cell viability decreased at 10× concentrations in bevacizumab (82.38%, p=0.0001), aflibercept (82.68%, p=0.0002) and ziv-aflibercept (77.25%, p<0.0001), but not at lower concentrations. However, no changes were seen in cell viability in ranibizumab-treated cells at all concentrations including 10×. Mitochondrial membrane potential was slightly decreased in 10× ranibizumab-treated cells (89.61%, p=0.0006) and 2× and 10× aflibercept-treated cells (88.76%, 81.46%; p<0.01, respectively). A larger reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential was seen at 1×, 2× and 10× concentrations of bevacizumab (86.53%, 74.38%, 66.67%; p<0.01) and ziv-aflibercept (73.50%, 64.83% and 49.65% p<0.01) suggestive of early apoptosis at lower doses, including the clinical doses. Conclusions At clinical doses, neither ranibizumab nor aflibercept produced evidence of mitochondrial toxicity or cell death. However, bevacizumab and ziv-aflibercept showed mild mitochondrial toxicity at clinically relevant doses. PMID:24836865

  19. Synergistic protective effects of escin and low‑dose glucocorticoids against vascular endothelial growth factor‑induced blood‑retinal barrier breakdown in retinal pigment epithelial and umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fenglan; Man, Xuejing; Yu, Huajun; Liu, Limei; Li, Yuanbin

    2015-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that escin possesses glucocorticoid (GC)‑like anti‑edematous and anti‑inflammatory effects. The present study was designed to investigate whether escin exhibits synergistic protective effects against blood‑retinal barrier (BRB) breakdown when combined with GC in an in vitro monolayer BRB model, based on retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The results showed that low concentrations of escin and triamcinolone acetonide (TA) administered separately did not affect BRB trans‑endothelial (epithelium) resistance (TEER). However, when administered together, escin and TA significantly inhibited reduced BRB TEER following treatment with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Furthermore, low‑concentrations of escin and TA administered together significantly increased the expression levels of occludin and ZO‑1. This demonstrates that escin and GC have synergistic protective effects against BRB breakdown, and the molecular mechanisms may be related to the upregulation of occludin and ZO‑1 expression. The combination of escin with GC indicates a potential beneficial strategy for the treatment of breakdown of the BRB. PMID:25370688

  20. Proof of concept for AAV2/5-mediated gene therapy in iPSC-derived retinal pigment epithelium of a choroideremia patient

    PubMed Central

    Cereso, Nicolas; Pequignot, Marie O; Robert, Lorenne; Becker, Fabienne; De Luca, Valerie; Nabholz, Nicolas; Rigau, Valerie; De Vos, John; Hamel, Christian P; Kalatzis, Vasiliki

    2014-01-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies (IRDs) comprise a large group of genetically and clinically heterogeneous diseases that lead to progressive vision loss, for which a paucity of disease-mimicking animal models renders preclinical studies difficult. We sought to develop pertinent human cellular IRD models, beginning with choroideremia, caused by mutations in the CHM gene encoding Rab escort protein 1 (REP1). We reprogrammed REP1-deficient fibroblasts from a CHM-/y patient into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), which we differentiated into retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). This iPSC-derived RPE is a polarized monolayer with a classic morphology, expresses characteristic markers, is functional for fluid transport and phagocytosis, and mimics the biochemical phenotype of patients. We assayed a panel of adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector serotypes and showed that AAV2/5 is the most efficient at transducing the iPSC-derived RPE and that CHM gene transfer normalizes the biochemical phenotype. The high, and unmatched, in vitro transduction efficiency is likely aided by phagocytosis and mimics the scenario that an AAV vector encounters in vivo in the subretinal space. We demonstrate the superiority of AAV2/5 in the human RPE and address the potential of patient iPSC–derived RPE to provide a proof-of-concept model for gene replacement in the absence of an appropriate animal model. PMID:26015956

  1. The role of helper lipids in the intracellular disposition and transfection efficiency of niosome formulations for gene delivery to retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ojeda, Edilberto; Puras, Gustavo; Agirre, Mireia; Zarate, Jon; Grijalvo, Santiago; Eritja, Ramon; DiGiacomo, Luca; Caracciolo, Giulio; Pedraz, Jose-Luis

    2016-04-30

    In this work, we carried out a comparative study of four different niosome formulations based on the same cationic lipid and non-ionic tensoactive. The niosomes prepared by oil-in-water emulsion technique (o/w) only differed in the helper lipid composition: squalene, cholesterol, squalane or no helper lipid. Niosomes and nioplexes elaborated upon the addition of pCMS-EGFP reporter plasmid were characterized in terms of size, zeta potential and polydispersity index. The capacity of the niosomes to condense, release and protect the DNA against enzymatic degradation was evaluated by agarose gel electrophoresis. In vitro experiments were carried out to evaluate transfection efficiency and cell viability in retinal pigment epithelial cells. Moreover, uptake and intracellular trafficking studies were performed to further understand the role of the helper lipids in the transfection process. Interestingly, among all tested formulations, niosomes elaborated with squalene as helper lipid were the most efficient transfecting cells. Such transfection efficiency could be attributed to their higher cellular uptake and the particular entry pathways used, where macropinocytosis pathway and lysosomal release played an important role. Therefore, these results suggest that helper lipid composition is a crucial step to be considered in the design of niosome formulation for retinal gene delivery applications since clearly modulates the cellular uptake, internalization mechanism and consequently, the final transfection efficiency. PMID:26956159

  2. Lycopene inhibits PDGF-BB-induced retinal pigment epithelial cell migration by suppression of PI3K/Akt and MAPK pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Chi-Ming; Fang, Jia-You; Lin, Hsin-Huang; Yang, Chi-Yea; Hung, Chi-Feng

    2009-10-09

    Retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells play a dominant role in the development of proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR), which is the leading cause of failure in retinal reattachment surgery. Several studies have shown that platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) exhibits chemotaxis and proliferation effects on RPE cells in PVR. In this study, the inhibitory effect of lycopene on PDGF-BB-induced ARPE19 cell migration is examined. In electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) and Transwell migration assays, significant suppression of PDGF-BB-induced ARPE19 cell migration by lycopene is observed. Cell viability assays show no cytotoxicity of lycopene on RPE cells. Lycopene shows no effect on ARPE19 cell adhesion and is found to inhibit PDGF-BB-induced tyrosine phosphorylation and the underlying signaling pathways of PI3K, Akt, ERK and p38 activation. However, PDGF-BB and lycopene show no effects on JNK activation. Taken together, our results demonstrate that lycopene inhibits PDGF-BB-induced ARPE19 cell migration through inhibition of PI3K/Akt, ERK and p38 activation.

  3. LEDGF1-326 Decreases P23H and Wild Type Rhodopsin Aggregates and P23H Rhodopsin Mediated Cell Damage in Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Baid, Rinku; Scheinman, Robert I.; Shinohara, Toshimichi; Singh, Dhirendra P.; Kompella, Uday B.

    2011-01-01

    Background P23H rhodopsin, a mutant rhodopsin, is known to aggregate and cause retinal degeneration. However, its effects on retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells are unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of P23H rhodopsin in RPE cells and further assess whether LEDGF1-326, a protein devoid of heat shock elements of LEDGF, a cell survival factor, reduces P23H rhodopsin aggregates and any associated cellular damage. Methods ARPE-19 cells were transiently transfected/cotransfected with pLEDGF1-326 and/or pWT-Rho (wild type)/pP23H-Rho. Rhodopsin mediated cellular damage and rescue by LEDGF1-326 was assessed using cell viability, cell proliferation, and confocal microscopy assays. Rhodopsin monomers, oligomers, and their reduction in the presence of LEDGF1-326 were quantified by western blot analysis. P23H rhodopsin mRNA levels in the presence and absence of LEDGF1-326 was determined by real time quantitative PCR. Principal Findings P23H rhodopsin reduced RPE cell viability and cell proliferation in a dose dependent manner, and disrupted the nuclear material. LEDGF1-326 did not alter P23H rhodopsin mRNA levels, reduced its oligomers, and significantly increased RPE cell viability as well as proliferation, while reducing nuclear damage. WT rhodopsin formed oligomers, although to a smaller extent than P23H rhodopsin. Further, LEDGF1-326 decreased WT rhodopsin aggregates. Conclusions P23H rhodopsin as well as WT rhodopsin form aggregates in RPE cells and LEDGF1-326 decreases these aggregates. Further, LEDGF1-326 reduces the RPE cell damage caused by P23H rhodopsin. LEDGF1-326 might be useful in treating cellular damage associated with protein aggregation diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa. PMID:21915354

  4. Photoreceptor phagosome processing defects and disturbed autophagy in retinal pigment epithelium of Cln3Δex1-6 mice modelling juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (Batten disease).

    PubMed

    Wavre-Shapton, Silène T; Calvi, Alessandra A; Turmaine, Mark; Seabra, Miguel C; Cutler, Daniel F; Futter, Clare E; Mitchison, Hannah M

    2015-12-15

    Retinal degeneration and visual impairment are the first signs of juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis caused by CLN3 mutations, followed by inevitable progression to blindness. We investigated retinal degeneration in Cln3(Δex1-6) null mice, revealing classic 'fingerprint' lysosomal storage in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), replicating the human disease. The lysosomes contain mitochondrial F0-ATP synthase subunit c along with undigested membranes, indicating a reduced degradative capacity. Mature autophagosomes and basal phagolysosomes, the terminal degradative compartments of autophagy and phagocytosis, are also increased in Cln3(Δex1) (-6) RPE, reflecting disruption to these key pathways that underpin the daily phagocytic turnover of photoreceptor outer segments (POS) required for maintenance of vision. The accumulated autophagosomes have post-lysosome fusion morphology, with undigested internal contents visible, while accumulated phagosomes are frequently docked to cathepsin D-positive lysosomes, without mixing of phagosomal and lysosomal contents. This suggests lysosome-processing defects affect both autophagy and phagocytosis, supported by evidence that phagosomes induced in Cln3(Δex1) (-) (6)-derived mouse embryonic fibroblasts have visibly disorganized membranes, unprocessed internal vesicles and membrane contents, in addition to reduced LAMP1 membrane recruitment. We propose that defective lysosomes in Cln3(Δex1) (-) (6) RPE have a reduced degradative capacity that impairs the final steps of the intimately connected autophagic and phagocytic pathways that are responsible for degradation of POS. A build-up of degradative organellar by-products and decreased recycling of cellular materials is likely to disrupt processes vital to maintenance of vision by the RPE. PMID:26450516

  5. Photoreceptor phagosome processing defects and disturbed autophagy in retinal pigment epithelium of Cln3Δex1-6 mice modelling juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (Batten disease)

    PubMed Central

    Wavre-Shapton, Silène T.; Calvi, Alessandra A.; Turmaine, Mark; Seabra, Miguel C.; Cutler, Daniel F.; Futter, Clare E.; Mitchison, Hannah M.

    2015-01-01

    Retinal degeneration and visual impairment are the first signs of juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis caused by CLN3 mutations, followed by inevitable progression to blindness. We investigated retinal degeneration in Cln3Δex1-6 null mice, revealing classic ‘fingerprint’ lysosomal storage in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), replicating the human disease. The lysosomes contain mitochondrial F0-ATP synthase subunit c along with undigested membranes, indicating a reduced degradative capacity. Mature autophagosomes and basal phagolysosomes, the terminal degradative compartments of autophagy and phagocytosis, are also increased in Cln3Δex1-6 RPE, reflecting disruption to these key pathways that underpin the daily phagocytic turnover of photoreceptor outer segments (POS) required for maintenance of vision. The accumulated autophagosomes have post-lysosome fusion morphology, with undigested internal contents visible, while accumulated phagosomes are frequently docked to cathepsin D-positive lysosomes, without mixing of phagosomal and lysosomal contents. This suggests lysosome-processing defects affect both autophagy and phagocytosis, supported by evidence that phagosomes induced in Cln3Δex1-6-derived mouse embryonic fibroblasts have visibly disorganized membranes, unprocessed internal vesicles and membrane contents, in addition to reduced LAMP1 membrane recruitment. We propose that defective lysosomes in Cln3Δex1-6 RPE have a reduced degradative capacity that impairs the final steps of the intimately connected autophagic and phagocytic pathways that are responsible for degradation of POS. A build-up of degradative organellar by-products and decreased recycling of cellular materials is likely to disrupt processes vital to maintenance of vision by the RPE. PMID:26450516

  6. Efficient delivery and functional expression of transfected modified mRNA in human embryonic stem cell-derived retinal pigmented epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Magnus L; Albert, Silvia; González Somermeyer, Louisa; Peco, Rubén; Mejía-Ramírez, Eva; Montserrat, Núria; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos

    2015-02-27

    Gene- and cell-based therapies are promising strategies for the treatment of degenerative retinal diseases such as age-related macular degeneration, Stargardt disease, and retinitis pigmentosa. Cellular engineering before transplantation may allow the delivery of cellular factors that can promote functional improvements, such as increased engraftment or survival of transplanted cells. A current challenge in traditional DNA-based vector transfection is to find a delivery system that is both safe and efficient, but using mRNA as an alternative to DNA can circumvent these major roadblocks. In this study, we show that both unmodified and modified mRNA can be delivered to retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells with a high efficiency compared with conventional plasmid delivery systems. On the other hand, administration of unmodified mRNA induced a strong innate immune response that was almost absent when using modified mRNA. Importantly, transfection of mRNA encoding a key regulator of RPE gene expression, microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF), confirmed the functionality of the delivered mRNA. Immunostaining showed that transfection with either type of mRNA led to the expression of roughly equal levels of MITF, primarily localized in the nucleus. Despite these findings, quantitative RT-PCR analyses showed that the activation of the expression of MITF target genes was higher following transfection with modified mRNA compared with unmodified mRNA. Our findings, therefore, show that modified mRNA transfection can be applied to human embryonic stem cell-derived RPE cells and that the method is safe, efficient, and functional. PMID:25555917

  7. Xeno-Free and Defined Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells Functionally Integrate in a Large-Eyed Preclinical Model

    PubMed Central

    Plaza Reyes, Alvaro; Petrus-Reurer, Sandra; Antonsson, Liselotte; Stenfelt, Sonya; Bartuma, Hammurabi; Panula, Sarita; Mader, Theresa; Douagi, Iyadh; André, Helder; Hovatta, Outi; Lanner, Fredrik; Kvanta, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Summary Human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells could replace lost tissue in geographic atrophy (GA) but efficacy has yet to be demonstrated in a large-eyed model. Also, production of hESC-RPE has not yet been achieved in a xeno-free and defined manner, which is critical for clinical compliance and reduced immunogenicity. Here we describe an effective differentiation methodology using human laminin-521 matrix with xeno-free and defined medium. Differentiated cells exhibited characteristics of native RPE including morphology, pigmentation, marker expression, monolayer integrity, and polarization together with phagocytic activity. Furthermore, we established a large-eyed GA model that allowed in vivo imaging of hESC-RPE and host retina. Cells transplanted in suspension showed long-term integration and formed polarized monolayers exhibiting phagocytic and photoreceptor rescue capacity. We have developed a xeno-free and defined hESC-RPE differentiation method and present evidence of functional integration of clinically compliant hESC-RPE in a large-eyed disease model. PMID:26724907

  8. Xeno-Free and Defined Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells Functionally Integrate in a Large-Eyed Preclinical Model.

    PubMed

    Plaza Reyes, Alvaro; Petrus-Reurer, Sandra; Antonsson, Liselotte; Stenfelt, Sonya; Bartuma, Hammurabi; Panula, Sarita; Mader, Theresa; Douagi, Iyadh; André, Helder; Hovatta, Outi; Lanner, Fredrik; Kvanta, Anders

    2016-01-12

    Human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells could replace lost tissue in geographic atrophy (GA) but efficacy has yet to be demonstrated in a large-eyed model. Also, production of hESC-RPE has not yet been achieved in a xeno-free and defined manner, which is critical for clinical compliance and reduced immunogenicity. Here we describe an effective differentiation methodology using human laminin-521 matrix with xeno-free and defined medium. Differentiated cells exhibited characteristics of native RPE including morphology, pigmentation, marker expression, monolayer integrity, and polarization together with phagocytic activity. Furthermore, we established a large-eyed GA model that allowed in vivo imaging of hESC-RPE and host retina. Cells transplanted in suspension showed long-term integration and formed polarized monolayers exhibiting phagocytic and photoreceptor rescue capacity. We have developed a xeno-free and defined hESC-RPE differentiation method and present evidence of functional integration of clinically compliant hESC-RPE in a large-eyed disease model. PMID:26724907

  9. Synthesis and migration of /sup 3/H-fucose-labeled glycoproteins in the retinal pigment epithelium of albino rats, as visualized by radioautography

    SciTech Connect

    Haddad, A.; Bennett, G.

    1987-03-01

    /sup 3/H-fucose was injected into the vitreous body of the eye(s) of 250-gm rats, which were then killed by means of an intracardiac perfusion with glutaraldehyde after intervals of 10 min, 1 and 4 hr, and 1 and 7 days. The eyes were removed and further fixed, and pieces of retina were processed for light and electron microscope radioautography. Light microscope radioautography showed that the pigment epithelial cells actively incorporated /sup 3/H-fucose label. The intensity of reaction peaked at 4 hr after injection of the label and then slowly declined. Quantitative electron microscope radioautography revealed that, at 10 min after /sup 3/H-fucose injection, over 70% of the label was localized to the Golgi apparatus, indicating that fucose residues are added to newly synthesized glycoproteins principally at this site. With time the proportion of label associated with the Golgi apparatus decreased, but that assigned to the infolded basal plasma membrane, the apical microvilli, and various apical lysosomes increased. These results indicate that in retinal pigment epithelial cells newly synthesized glycoproteins continuously migrate from the Golgi apparatus to lysosomes and to various regions of the plasma membrane. In this case, the membrane glycoproteins may play specific roles in receptor functions of the basal plasma membrane or phagocytic activities at the apical surface. Very little label migrated to Bruch's membrane, indicating either a very slow turnover or a paucity of fucose-containing glycoproteins at this site.

  10. Lycium barbarum polysaccharides promotes in vivo proliferation of adult rat retinal progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hua; Lau, Benson Wui-Man; Wang, Ning-li; Wang, Si-ying; Lu, Qing-jun; Chang, Raymond Chuen-Chung; So, Kwok-fai

    2015-01-01

    Lycium barbarum is a widely used Chinese herbal medicine prescription for protection of optic nerve. However, it remains unclear regarding the effects of Lycium barbarum polysaccharides, the main component of Lycium barbarum, on in vivo proliferation of adult ciliary body cells. In this study, adult rats were intragastrically administered low- and high-dose Lycium barbarum polysaccharides (1 and 10 mg/kg) for 35 days and those intragastrically administered phosphate buffered saline served as controls. The number of Ki-67-positive cells in rat ciliary body in the Lycium barbarum polysaccharides groups, in particular low-dose Lycium barbarum polysaccharides group, was significantly greater than that in the phosphate buffered saline group. Ki-67-positive rat ciliary body cells expressed nestin but they did not express glial fibrillary acidic protein. These findings suggest that Lycium barbarum polysaccharides can promote the proliferation of adult rat retinal progenitor cells and the proliferated cells present with neuronal phenotype. PMID:26889185

  11. Expression of ADAMTS metalloproteinases in the retinal pigment epithelium derived cell line ARPE-19: transcriptional regulation by TNFalpha.

    PubMed

    Bevitt, Debra J; Mohamed, Jeseem; Catterall, Jon B; Li, Zheng; Arris, Christine E; Hiscott, Paul; Sheridan, Carl; Langton, Kevin P; Barker, Michael D; Clarke, Michael P; McKie, Norman

    2003-04-15

    ADAMTS (A Disintegrin-like And Metalloprotease domain with ThromboSpondin type I motifs) are multidomain proteins with demonstrated metalloproteinase functionality and have potential roles in embryonic development, angiogenesis and cartilage degradation. We present here investigations of ADAMTS expression in an ocular cell type, ARPE-19, with a view to implicating them in retinal matrix turnover. Expression analysis was undertaken using a combination of reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Northern blotting experiments, which together detected the expression of mRNAs for several ADAMTS proteins, all of which have active site motifs characteristic of matrix metalloproteases (MMPs). These included ADAMTS1, ADAMTS2, ADAMTS3, ADAMTS5, ADAMTS6, ADAMTS7 and ADAMTS9. The expression of mRNA isoforms for ADAMTS7 and ADAMTS9 were also detected. Following stimulation with TNFalpha, ADAMTS1, ADAMTS6 and both ADAMTS9 transcripts expressed in ARPE-19 cells showed a potent upregulation. The expression of ADAMTS genes in ARPE-19 cells and the transcriptional stimulation of some family members by TNFalpha may implicate them in inflammatory eye disease and the compromise of retinal matrix structure, which is evident in age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) and other retinal pathologies. PMID:12697333

  12. Effects of low-level laser therapy, electroacupuncture, and radiofrequency on the pigmentation and skin tone of adult women.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-Kyoung; Min, Kyoung-Ok; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Kim, Soon-Hee

    2016-05-01

    [Purpose] In this study, the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT), electroacupuncture (EA), and radiofrequency (RF), which are used in physical therapy, on the pigmentation and skin tone of adult women's faces were investigated to provide basic data for skin interventions. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty adult females were assigned to either an LLLT group (n=10), an EA group (n=10), or an RF group (n=10). The intervention was performed in two 15-minute sessions per week for six weeks. Subjects' skin tone and pigmentation were observed before and after the intervention. [Results] The EA group showed significant reductions in pigmentation in the left and right eye rims, as well as in the left cheek. The RF group showed significant post-intervention reductions in pigmentation under the left eye, as well as in the left and right eye rims and the left cheek. The LLLT group showed significant increases in skin tone in the forehead and both eye rims. The RF group showed significant increases in skin tone under both eyes. [Conclusion] The application of LLLT, EA, and RF had positive effects on pigmentation and skin tone of adult women's faces. PMID:27313340

  13. Effects of low-level laser therapy, electroacupuncture, and radiofrequency on the pigmentation and skin tone of adult women

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee-Kyoung; Min, Kyoung-Ok; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Kim, Soon-Hee

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] In this study, the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT), electroacupuncture (EA), and radiofrequency (RF), which are used in physical therapy, on the pigmentation and skin tone of adult women’s faces were investigated to provide basic data for skin interventions. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty adult females were assigned to either an LLLT group (n=10), an EA group (n=10), or an RF group (n=10). The intervention was performed in two 15-minute sessions per week for six weeks. Subjects’ skin tone and pigmentation were observed before and after the intervention. [Results] The EA group showed significant reductions in pigmentation in the left and right eye rims, as well as in the left cheek. The RF group showed significant post-intervention reductions in pigmentation under the left eye, as well as in the left and right eye rims and the left cheek. The LLLT group showed significant increases in skin tone in the forehead and both eye rims. The RF group showed significant increases in skin tone under both eyes. [Conclusion] The application of LLLT, EA, and RF had positive effects on pigmentation and skin tone of adult women’s faces. PMID:27313340

  14. Recent Advances towards the Clinical Application of Stem Cells for Retinal Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Silke; Jayaram, Hari; Limb, G. Astrid

    2012-01-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases constitute a major cause of irreversible blindness in the world. Stem cell-based therapies offer hope for these patients at risk of or suffering from blindness due to the deterioration of the neural retina. Various sources of stem cells are currently being investigated, ranging from human embryonic stem cells to adult-derived induced pluripotent stem cells as well as human Müller stem cells, with the first clinical trials to investigate the safety and tolerability of human embryonic stem cell-derived retinal pigment epithelium cells having recently commenced. This review aims to summarize the latest advances in the development of stem cell strategies for the replacement of retinal neurons and their supportive cells, the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) affected by retinal degenerative conditions. Particular emphasis will be given to the advances in stem cell transplantation and the challenges associated with their translation into clinical practice. PMID:24710533

  15. Retinal Microvasculature Is Associated With Long-Term Survival in the General Adult Dutch Population.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Unal; Ikram, M Kamran; Wolters, Frank J; Hofman, Albert; Klaver, Caroline C W; Ikram, M Arfan

    2016-02-01

    Retinal vascular diameters are associated with (sub)clinical cardiovascular disease and short-term cardiovascular mortality, but their association with long-term mortality is uncertain. We studied the association of retinal vascular diameters with cause-specific mortality in the general adult Dutch population during 25 years of follow-up. From 1990 to 1993, arteriolar and venular diameters were measured semiautomatically on digitized images in 5674 persons (mean age 68.0 years, 59% women) from the population-based Rotterdam study. Follow-up for mortality was complete till March 2015. Associations between vascular diameters and mortality were examined using Cox proportional hazards models, adjusting for age, sex, cardiovascular risk factors, and the fellow vessel diameter. During 85 770 person-years (mean±SD: 15.1±6.67), 3794 (66.8%) persons died, of whom 1034 due to cardiovascular causes. We found that narrower arterioles and wider venules were associated with higher risk of mortality (adjusted hazard ratio [95% confidence interval] per SD decrease 1.04 [1.00-1.08] and increase 1.07 [1.03-1.12], respectively). For arterioles, these associations were strongest for cardiovascular mortality, whereas venules showed consistent associations for cardiovascular and noncardiovascular mortality. Importantly, these associations remained unchanged after excluding the first 10 years of follow-up as immortal person-time. We found evidence for effect modification with stronger associations in persons <70 years (venules only) and smokers (P value for interaction<0.01). We replicated our findings in another independent cohort from the Rotterdam Study of 3106 persons with 19 880 person-years of follow-up and 144 deaths (hazard ratio for venules 1.22 [1.00-1.49]). Markers of retinal microvasculature are associated with long-term mortality in the general adult Dutch population. PMID:26628677

  16. Gestational lead exposure selectively decreases retinal dopamine amacrine cells and dopamine content in adult mice

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, Donald A.; Hamilton, W. Ryan; Johnson, Jerry E.; Xiao, Weimin; Chaney, Shawntay; Mukherjee, Shradha; Miller, Diane B.; O'Callaghan, James P.

    2011-11-15

    Gestational lead exposure (GLE) produces supernormal scotopic electroretinograms (ERG) in children, monkeys and rats, and a novel retinal phenotype characterized by an increased number of rod photoreceptors and bipolar cells in adult mice and rats. Since the loss of dopaminergic amacrine cells (DA ACs) in GLE monkeys and rats contributes to supernormal ERGs, the retinal DA system was analyzed in mice following GLE. C57BL/6 female mice were exposed to low (27 ppm), moderate (55 ppm) or high (109 ppm) lead throughout gestation and until postnatal day 10 (PN10). Blood [Pb] in control, low-, moderate- and high-dose GLE was {<=} 1, {<=} 10, {approx} 25 and {approx} 40 {mu}g/dL, respectively, on PN10 and by PN30 all were {<=} 1 {mu}g/dL. At PN60, confocal-stereology studies used vertical sections and wholemounts to characterize tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression and the number of DA and other ACs. GLE dose-dependently and selectively decreased the number of TH-immunoreactive (IR) DA ACs and their synaptic plexus without affecting GABAergic, glycinergic or cholinergic ACs. Immunoblots and confocal revealed dose-dependent decreases in retinal TH protein expression and content, although monoamine oxidase-A protein and gene expression were unchanged. High-pressure liquid chromatography showed that GLE dose-dependently decreased retinal DA content, its metabolites and DA utilization/release. The mechanism of DA selective vulnerability is unknown. However, a GLE-induced loss/dysfunction of DA ACs during development could increase the number of rods and bipolar cells since DA helps regulate neuronal proliferation, whereas during adulthood it could produce ERG supernormality as well as altered circadian rhythms, dark/light adaptation and spatial contrast sensitivity. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Peak [BPb] in control, low-, moderate- and high-dose newborn mice with gestational lead exposure: {<=} 1, {<=} 10, 25 and 40 {mu}g/dL Black

  17. Synergistic effects of gamma interferon on inflammatory mediators that induce interleukin-6 gene expression and secretion by human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Nagineni, C N; Detrick, B; Hooks, J J

    1994-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell is a potent regulatory cell within the retina. It helps to maintain normal retinal activity, and following gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) exposure, it may express major histocompatibility complex class II molecules and function as an antigen-presenting cell. Since interleukin-1 (IL-1) and IL-6 are potent cytokines observed in ocular inflammatory processes, we initiated studies to evaluate conditions which enable RPE cells to produce these cytokines. Cultures of human RPE cells from two eye donors were established and characterized, and enzyme immunoassays were employed to screen for IL-1 and IL-6 production. Treatment of RPE cells with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or recombinant tumor necrosis factor alpha, IL-1, or IFN-gamma resulted in a significant level of secretion of IL-6. In contrast, treatment with recombinant epidermal growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor, or transforming growth factor alpha, or LPS can dramatically augment the secretion of IL-6 by RPE cells. Thus, these inflammatory mediators can act alone or synergistically with IFN-gamma to activate RPE cells and dramatically increase the expression and secretion of IL-6. In contrast, IL-1 was not detected following stimulation with any of the above-mentioned cytokines or LPS. Characterization of IL-6 protein production by RPE cells revealed that 98% of the protein is promptly secreted by the cell, its induction is dependent upon the time and concentration of the stimulant, and the continuous presence of the stimulant is required for IL-6 production. Moreover, Western blot (immunoblot) analysis of secreted proteins revealed that IL-6 was produced in multiple molecular forms.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:8556503

  18. Understanding age-related macular degeneration (AMD): Relationships between the photoreceptor/retinal pigment epithelium/Bruch’s membrane/choriocapillaris complex

    PubMed Central

    Bhutto, Imran; Lutty, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    There is a mutualistic symbiotic relationship between the components of the photoreceptor/retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)/Bruch’s membrane (BrMb)/choriocapillaris (CC) complex that is lost in AMD. Which component in the photoreceptor/RPE/BrMb/CC complex is affected first appears to depend on the type of AMD. In atrophic AMD (~85–90% of cases), it appears that large confluent drusen formation and hyperpigmentation (presumably dysfunction in RPE) are the initial insult and the resorption of these drusen and loss of RPE (hypopigmentation) can be predictive for progression of geographic atrophy (GA). The death and dysfunction of photoreceptors and CC appear to be secondary events to loss in RPE. In neovascular AMD (~10–15% of cases), the loss of choroidal vasculature may be the initial insult to the complex. Loss of CC with an intact RPE monolayer in wet AMD has been observed. This may be due to reduction in blood supply because of large vessel stenosis. Furthermore, the environment of the CC, basement membrane and intercapillary septa, is a proinflammatory milieu with accumulation of complement components as well as proinflammatory molecules like CRP during AMD. In this toxic milieu, CC die or become dysfunction making adjacent RPE hypoxic. These hypoxic cells then produce angiogenic substances like VEGF that stimulate growth of new vessels from CC, resulting in choroidal neovascularization (CNV). The loss of CC might also be a stimulus for drusen formation since the disposal system for retinal debris and exocytosed material from RPE would be limited. Ultimately, the photoreceptors die of lack of nutrients, leakage of serum components from the neovascularization, and scar formation. Therefore, the mutualistic symbiotic relationship within the photoreceptor/RPE/BrMb/CC complex is lost in both forms of AMD. Loss of this functionally integrated relationship results in death and dysfunction of all of the components in the complex. PMID:22542780

  19. Imposed Optical Defocus Induces Isoform-Specific Up-Regulation of TGFβ Gene Expression in Chick Retinal Pigment Epithelium and Choroid but Not Neural Retina

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Raychaudhuri, Suravi; Wildsoet, Christine F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study investigated the gene expression of TGFβ isoforms and their receptors in chick retina, retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), and choroid and the effects of short-term imposed optical defocus. Methods The expression of TGFβ isoforms (TGF-β1, 2, 3) and TGFβ receptors (TGFBR1, 2, 3) was examined in the retina, RPE, and choroid of young White-Leghorn untreated chicks (19 days-old). The effects on the expression of the same genes of monocular +10 and -10 D defocusing lenses, worn for either 2 or 48 h by age-matched chicks, were also examined by comparing expression in treated and untreated fellow eyes. RNA was purified, characterized and then reverse transcribed to cDNA. Differential gene expression was quantified using real-time PCR. Results All 3 isoforms of TGFβ and all 3 receptor subtypes were found to be expressed in all 3 ocular tissues, with apparent tissue-dependent differences in expression profiles. Data are reported as mean normalized expression relative to GAPDH. Sign-dependent optical defocus effects were also observed. Optical defocus did not affect retinal gene expression but in the RPE, TGF-β2 expression was significantly up-regulated with +10 D lenses, worn for either 2 h (349% increase ± 88%, p < 0.01) or 48 h (752% increase ± 166%, p < 0.001), and in the choroid, the expression of TGF-β3 was up-regulated with -10 D lenses, worn for 48 h (147% increase ± 9%, p < 0.01). Conclusions The effects of short term exposure to optical defocus on TGFβ gene expression in the RPE and choroid, which were sign-dependent and isoform specific, provide further supporting evidence for important roles of members of the TGFβ family and these two tissues in local signal cascades regulating ocular growth. PMID:27214233

  20. Illumination from light-emitting diodes (LEDs) disrupts pathological cytokines expression and activates relevant signal pathways in primary human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ye; Xie, Chen; Gu, Yangshun; Li, Xiuyi; Tong, Jianping

    2016-04-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the aged people. The latest systemic review of epidemiological investigations revealed that excessive light exposure increases the risk of AMD. With the drastically increasing use of high-energy light-emitting diodes (LEDs) light in our domestic environment nowadays, it is supposed to pose a potential oxidative threat to ocular health. Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is the major ocular source of pathological cytokines, which regulate local inflammation and angiogenesis. We hypothesized that high-energy LED light might disrupt the pathological cytokine expression of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), contributing to the pathogenesis of AMD. Primary human RPE cells were isolated from eyecups of normal eye donors and seeded into plate wells for growing to confluence. Two widely used multichromatic white light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with correlated color temperatures (CCTs) of 2954 and 7378 K were used in this experiment. The confluent primary RPE cells were under white LEDs light exposure until 24 h. VEGF-A, IL-6, IL-8 and MCP-1 proteins and mRNAs were measured using an ELISA kit and RT-PCR, respectively. Activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), Akt, Janus kinase (JAK)2 and Nuclear factor (NF)-κB signal pathways after LEDs illumination were evaluated by western blotting analysis. The level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) using chloromethyl- 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate. Inhibitors of relevant signal pathways and anti-oxidants were added to the primary RPE cells before LEDs illumination to evaluate their biological functions. We found that 7378 K light, but not 2954 K upregulated the VEGF-A, IL-6, IL-8 and downregulated MCP-1 proteins and mRNAs levels in a time-dependent manner. In parallel, initial activation of MAPKs and NF-κB signal pathways were also observed after 7378 K light exposure. Mechanistically, antioxidants for eliminating reactive oxygen

  1. Defined culture of human embryonic stem cells and xeno-free derivation of retinal pigmented epithelial cells on a novel, synthetic substrate.

    PubMed

    Pennington, Britney O; Clegg, Dennis O; Melkoumian, Zara K; Hikita, Sherry T

    2015-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of blindness, is characterized by the death of the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE), which is a monolayer posterior to the retina that supports the photoreceptors. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) can generate an unlimited source of RPE for cellular therapies, and clinical trials have been initiated. However, protocols for RPE derivation using defined conditions free of nonhuman derivatives (xeno-free) are preferred for clinical translation. This avoids exposing AMD patients to animal-derived products, which could incite an immune response. In this study, we investigated the maintenance of hESCs and their differentiation into RPE using Synthemax II-SC, which is a novel, synthetic animal-derived component-free, RGD peptide-containing copolymer compliant with good manufacturing practices designed for xeno-free stem cell culture. Cells on Synthemax II-SC were compared with cultures grown with xenogeneic and xeno-free control substrates. This report demonstrates that Synthemax II-SC supports long-term culture of H9 and H14 hESC lines and permits efficient differentiation of hESCs into functional RPE. Expression of RPE-specific markers was assessed by flow cytometry, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and immunocytochemistry, and RPE function was determined by phagocytosis of rod outer segments and secretion of pigment epithelium-derived factor. Both hESCs and hESC-RPE maintained normal karyotypes after long-term culture on Synthemax II-SC. Furthermore, RPE generated on Synthemax II-SC are functional when seeded onto parylene-C scaffolds designed for clinical use. These experiments suggest that Synthemax II-SC is a suitable, defined substrate for hESC culture and the xeno-free derivation of RPE for cellular therapies. PMID:25593208

  2. Effects of low level laser treatment on the survival of axotomized retinal ganglion cells in adult Hamsters.

    PubMed

    So, Kwok-Fai; Leung, Mason Chin Pang; Cui, Qi

    2014-11-01

    Injury to axons close to the neuronal bodies in the mammalian central nervous system causes a large proportion of parenting neurons to degenerate. It is known that optic nerve transection close to the eye in rodents leads to a loss of about half of retinal ganglion cells in 1 week and about 90% in 2 weeks. Using low level laser treatment in the present study, we demonstrated that treatment with helium-neon (660 nm) laser with 15 mW power could delay retinal ganglion cell death after optic nerve axotomy in adult hamsters. The effect was most apparent in the first week with a short period of treatment time (5 minutes) in which 65-66% of retinal ganglion cells survived the optic nerve axotomy whereas 45-47% of retinal ganglion cells did so in optic nerve axotomy controls. We also found that single dose and early commencement of laser irradiation were important in protecting retinal ganglion cells following optic nerve axotomy. These findings thus convincingly show that appropriate laser treatment may be neuroprotective to retinal ganglion cells. PMID:25558230

  3. Effects of low level laser treatment on the survival of axotomized retinal ganglion cells in adult Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    So, Kwok-Fai; Leung, Mason Chin Pang; Cui, Qi

    2014-01-01

    Injury to axons close to the neuronal bodies in the mammalian central nervous system causes a large proportion of parenting neurons to degenerate. It is known that optic nerve transection close to the eye in rodents leads to a loss of about half of retinal ganglion cells in 1 week and about 90% in 2 weeks. Using low level laser treatment in the present study, we demonstrated that treatment with helium-neon (660 nm) laser with 15 mW power could delay retinal ganglion cell death after optic nerve axotomy in adult hamsters. The effect was most apparent in the first week with a short period of treatment time (5 minutes) in which 65–66% of retinal ganglion cells survived the optic nerve axotomy whereas 45–47% of retinal ganglion cells did so in optic nerve axotomy controls. We also found that single dose and early commencement of laser irradiation were important in protecting retinal ganglion cells following optic nerve axotomy. These findings thus convincingly show that appropriate laser treatment may be neuroprotective to retinal ganglion cells. PMID:25558230

  4. The molecular basis for UV vision in birds: spectral characteristics, cDNA sequence and retinal localization of the UV-sensitive visual pigment of the budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus).

    PubMed Central

    Wilkie, S E; Vissers, P M; Das, D; Degrip, W J; Bowmaker, J K; Hunt, D M

    1998-01-01

    Microspectrophotometric (msp) studies have shown that the colour-vision system of many bird species is based on four pigments with absorption peaks in the red, green, blue and UV regions of the spectrum. The existence of a fourth pigment (UV) is the major difference between the trichromacy of humans and the tetrachromacy of such birds, and recent studies have shown that it may play a determining role in such diverse aspects of behaviour as mate selection and detection of food. Avian visual pigments are composed of an opsin protein covalently bound via a Schiff-base linkage to the chromophore 11-cis-retinal. Here we report the cDNA sequence of a UV opsin isolated from an avian species, Melopsittacus undulatus (budgerigar or small parakeet). This sequence has been expressed using the recombinant baculovirus system; the pigment generated from the expressed protein on addition of 11-cis-retinal yielded an absorption spectrum typical of a UV photopigment, with lambdamax 365+/-3 nm. This is the first UV opsin from an avian species to be sequenced and expressed in a heterologous system. In situ hybridization of this sequence to budgerigar retinas selectively labelled a sub-set of UV cones, representing approx. 9% of the total cone population, that are distributed in a semi-regular pattern across the entire retina. PMID:9461554

  5. Inhibition of DNA methyltransferase or histone deacetylase protects retinal pigment epithelial cells from DNA damage induced by oxidative stress by the stimulation of antioxidant enzymes.

    PubMed

    Tokarz, Paulina; Kaarniranta, Kai; Blasiak, Janusz

    2016-04-01

    Epigenetic modifications influence DNA damage response (DDR). In this study we explored the role of DNA methylation and histone acetylation in DDR in cells challenged with acute or chronic oxidative stress. We used retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19), which natively are exposed to oxidative stress due to permanent exposure to light and high blood flow. We employed a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor - RG108 (RG), or a histone deacetylase inhibitor - valproic acid (VA). ARPE-19 cells were exposed to tert-butyl hydroperoxide, an acute oxidative stress inducer, or glucose oxidase, which slowly liberates low-doses of hydrogen peroxide in the presence of glucose, creating chronic conditions. VA and RG reduced level of intracellular reactive oxygen species and DNA damage in ARPE-19 cells in normal condition and in oxidative stress. This protective effect of VA and RG was associated with the up-regulated expression of antioxidant enzyme genes: CAT, GPx1, GPx4, SOD1 and SOD2. RG decreased the number of cells in G2/M checkpoint in response to chronic oxidative stress. Neither RG nor VA changed the DNA repair or apoptosis induced by oxidative stress. Therefore, certain epigenetic manipulations may protect ARPE-19 cells from detrimental effects of oxidative stress by modulation of antioxidative enzyme gene expression, which may be further explored in pharmacological studies on oxidative stress-related eye diseases. PMID:26899469

  6. Clearance of autophagy-associated dying retinal pigment epithelial cells - a possible source for inflammation in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Szatmári-Tóth, M; Kristóf, E; Veréb, Z; Akhtar, S; Facskó, A; Fésüs, L; Kauppinen, A; Kaarniranta, K; Petrovski, G

    2016-01-01

    Retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells can undergo different forms of cell death, including autophagy-associated cell death during age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Failure of macrophages or dendritic cells (DCs) to engulf the different dying cells in the retina may result in the accumulation of debris and progression of AMD. ARPE-19 and primary human RPE cells undergo autophagy-associated cell death upon serum depletion and oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Autophagy was revealed by elevated light-chain-3 II (LC3-II) expression and electron microscopy, while autophagic flux was confirmed by blocking the autophago-lysosomal fusion using chloroquine (CQ) in these cells. The autophagy-associated dying RPE cells were engulfed by human macrophages, DCs and living RPE cells in an increasing and time-dependent manner. Inhibition of autophagy by 3-methyladenine (3-MA) decreased the engulfment of the autophagy-associated dying cells by macrophages, whereas sorting out the GFP-LC3-positive/autophagic cell population or treatment by the glucocorticoid triamcinolone (TC) enhanced it. Increased amounts of IL-6 and IL-8 were released when autophagy-associated dying RPEs were engulfed by macrophages. Our data suggest that cells undergoing autophagy-associated cell death engage in clearance mechanisms guided by professional and non-professional phagocytes, which is accompanied by inflammation as part of an in vitro modeling of AMD pathogenesis. PMID:27607582

  7. High glucose induces mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis in human retinal pigment epithelium cells via promoting SOCS1 and Fas/FasL signaling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Min; Wang, Wei; Ma, Jian; Ye, Panpan; Wang, Kaijun

    2016-02-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is one of the most serious complications of diabetes mellitus (DM), however, the contribution of high glucose (HG) or hyperglycemia to DR is far from fully understanding. In the present study, we examined the expression of Fas/FasL signaling and suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS)1 and 3 in HG-induced human retinal pigment epithelium cells (ARPE-19 cells). And then we investigated the regulatory role of both Fas and SOCS1 in HG-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis. Results demonstrated that HG with more than 40mM induced mitochondrial dysfunction via reducing mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and via inhibiting the Bcl-2 level, which is the upstream signaling of mitochondria in ARPE-19 cells. HG also upreuglated the Fas signaling and SOCS levels probably via promoting JAK/STAT signaling in ARPE-19 cells. Moreover, the exogenous Fas or entogenous overexpressed SOCS1 accentuated the HG-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis, whereas the knockdown of either Fas or SOCS1 reduced the HG-induced mitochondria dysfunction and apoptosis. Thus, the present study confirmed that both Fas/FasL signaling and SOCS1 promoted the HG-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis. These results implies the key regulatory role of Fas signaling and SOCS in DR. PMID:26700587

  8. Function of all-trans retinoic acid observation on similar myopia changes in cultivated rabbit retinal pigment epithelium and relation with myopia relevant factors.

    PubMed

    Xing, Bin

    2016-03-01

    To observe the role of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) during the similar myopia changes of cultured rabbit retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells, as well as the variation changes and relationships with myopic correlation factors such as hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and matrix metalloprateinase-2 (MMP-2). Rabbit RPE cells of primary generation were selected and cultured to fifth generation by subculture. Then the morphology of RPE cells were observed and cell vitality was analyzed by using the Trypan blue reject test. The expressions of HGF and MMP-2 in RPE cells were tested by using an immunobistochemistry method. The HGF concentration in RPE cell culture fluid was detected by applying enzyme-linked immunosorbnent assay (ELISA). As the ATRA concentration enhanced and action time prolonged, the survival rate of RPE cells was reduced, but the expressions of HGF and MMP-2 increased, so did the secretion of HGF. ATRA concentration with no less than 5 nM/ml was able to induce the growth inhibition of RPE cells and the decrease in survival rate, which was similar to the changes in RPE cells in myopia. With the actin of ATRA, the expressions of HGF and MMP-2 increased in RPE cells, with more distinct in HGF increase. PMID:27113312

  9. Bestrophin, the product of the Best vitelliform macular dystrophy gene (VMD2), localizes to the basolateral plasma membrane of the retinal pigment epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Marmorstein, Alan D.; Marmorstein, Lihua Y.; Rayborn, Mary; Wang, Xinxing; Hollyfield, Joe G.; Petrukhin, Konstantin

    2000-01-01

    Best vitelliform macular dystrophy is a dominantly inherited, early onset, macular degenerative disease that exhibits some histopathologic similarities to age-related macular degeneration. Although the vitelliform lesion is common in the fundus of individuals with Best disease, diagnosis is based on a reduced ratio of the light peak to dark trough in the electrooculogram. Recently, the VMD2 gene on chromosome 11q13, encoding the protein bestrophin, was identified. The function of bestrophin is unknown. To facilitate studies of bestrophin, we produced both rabbit polyclonal and mouse monoclonal antibodies that proved useful for Western blotting, immunoprecipitation, and immunocytochemistry. To characterize bestrophin, we initially probed the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)-derived cell lines ARPE-19, D407, and RPE-J. All of the cell lines expressed bestrophin mRNA by reverse transcription-PCR, but not on Western blots. Bestrophin in human RPE partitioned in the detergent phase during Triton X-114 extraction and could be modified by biotin in intact cells, indicative of a plasma membrane localization. Immunocytochemical staining of macaque and porcine eyes indicated that bestrophin is localized at the basolateral plasma membrane of RPE cells. When expressed in RPE-J cells by adenovirus-mediated gene transfer, bestrophin again was determined by confocal microscopy and cell surface biotinylation to be a basolateral plasma membrane protein. The basolateral plasma membrane localization of bestrophin suggests the possibility that bestrophin plays a role in generating the altered electrooculogram of individuals with Best disease. PMID:11050159

  10. Bestrophin, the product of the Best vitelliform macular dystrophy gene (VMD2), localizes to the basolateral plasma membrane of the retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Marmorstein, A D; Marmorstein, L Y; Rayborn, M; Wang, X; Hollyfield, J G; Petrukhin, K

    2000-11-01

    Best vitelliform macular dystrophy is a dominantly inherited, early onset, macular degenerative disease that exhibits some histopathologic similarities to age-related macular degeneration. Although the vitelliform lesion is common in the fundus of individuals with Best disease, diagnosis is based on a reduced ratio of the light peak to dark trough in the electrooculogram. Recently, the VMD2 gene on chromosome 11q13, encoding the protein bestrophin, was identified. The function of bestrophin is unknown. To facilitate studies of bestrophin, we produced both rabbit polyclonal and mouse monoclonal antibodies that proved useful for Western blotting, immunoprecipitation, and immunocytochemistry. To characterize bestrophin, we initially probed the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)-derived cell lines ARPE-19, D407, and RPE-J. All of the cell lines expressed bestrophin mRNA by reverse transcription-PCR, but not on Western blots. Bestrophin in human RPE partitioned in the detergent phase during Triton X-114 extraction and could be modified by biotin in intact cells, indicative of a plasma membrane localization. Immunocytochemical staining of macaque and porcine eyes indicated that bestrophin is localized at the basolateral plasma membrane of RPE cells. When expressed in RPE-J cells by adenovirus-mediated gene transfer, bestrophin again was determined by confocal microscopy and cell surface biotinylation to be a basolateral plasma membrane protein. The basolateral plasma membrane localization of bestrophin suggests the possibility that bestrophin plays a role in generating the altered electrooculogram of individuals with Best disease. PMID:11050159

  11. Ultraviolet (UV) and Hydrogen Peroxide Activate Ceramide-ER Stress-AMPK Signaling Axis to Promote Retinal Pigment Epithelium (RPE) Cell Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jin; Bi, Hui-E; Sheng, Yi; Cheng, Li-Bo; Wendu, Ri-Le; Wang, Cheng-Hu; Cao, Guo-Fan; Jiang, Qin

    2013-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) impair the physiological functions of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells by inducing cell apoptosis, which is the main cause of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The mechanism by which UV/ROS induces RPE cell death is not fully addressed. Here, we observed the activation of a ceramide-endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling axis in UV and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-treated RPE cells. UV and H2O2 induced an early ceramide production, profound ER stress and AMPK activation. Pharmacological inhibitors against ER stress (salubrinal), ceramide production (fumonisin B1) and AMPK activation (compound C) suppressed UV- and H2O2-induced RPE cell apoptosis. Conversely, cell permeable short-chain C6 ceramide and AMPK activator AICAR (5-amino-1-β-D-ribofuranosyl-imidazole-4-carboxamide) mimicked UV and H2O2’s effects and promoted RPE cell apoptosis. Together, these results suggest that UV/H2O2 activates the ceramide-ER stress-AMPK signaling axis to promote RPE cell apoptosis. PMID:23685869

  12. PRMT1 and PRMT4 Regulate Oxidative Stress-Induced Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cell Damage in SIRT1-Dependent and SIRT1-Independent Manners

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Il; Park, Min-Jung; Choi, Joo-Hee; Kim, In-Seon; Han, Ho-Jae; Yoon, Kyung-Chul; Park, Sang-Woo; Lee, Min-Young; Oh, Ki-Seok; Park, Soo-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress-induced retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell damage is involved in the progression of diabetic retinopathy. Arginine methylation catalyzed by protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) has emerged as an important histone modification involved in diverse diseases. Sirtuin (SIRT1) is a protein deacetylase implicated in the onset of metabolic diseases. Therefore, we examined the roles of type I PRMTs and their relationship with SIRT1 in human RPE cells under H2O2-induced oxidative stress. H2O2 treatment increased PRMT1 and PRMT4 expression but decreased SIRT1 expression. Similar to H2O2 treatment, PRMT1 or PRMT4 overexpression increased RPE cell damage. Moreover, the H2O2-induced RPE cell damage was attenuated by PRMT1 or PRMT4 knockdown and SIRT1 overexpression. In this study, we revealed that SIRT1 expression was regulated by PRMT1 but not by PRMT4. Finally, we found that PRMT1 and PRMT4 expression is increased in the RPE layer of streptozotocin-treated rats. Taken together, we demonstrated that oxidative stress induces apoptosis both via PRMT1 in a SIRT1-dependent manner and via PRMT4 in a SIRT1-independent manner. The inhibition of the expression of type I PRMTs, especially PRMT1 and PRMT4, and increased SIRT1 could be therapeutic approaches for diabetic retinopathy. PMID:26583059

  13. Selective blockade of phosphodiesterase types 2, 5 and 9 results in cyclic 3′5′ guanosine monophosphate accumulation in retinal pigment epithelium cells

    PubMed Central

    Diederen, R M H; Heij, E C La; Ittersum, M Markerink‐van; Kijlstra, A; Hendrikse, F; de Vente, J

    2007-01-01

    Aim To investigate which phosphodiesterase (PDE) is involved in regulating cyclic 3′5′ guanosine monophosphate breakdown in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells. Methods cGMP content in the cultured RPE cells (D407 cell line) was evaluated by immunocytochemistry in the presence of non‐selective or isoform‐selective PDE inhibitors in combination with the particulate guanylyl cyclase stimulator atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) or the soluble guanylyl cyclase stimulator sodium nitroprusside (SNP). mRNA expression of PDE2, PDE5 and PDE9 was studied in cultured human RPE cells and rat RPE cell layers using non‐radioactive in situ hybridisation. Results In the absence of PDE inhibitors, cGMP levels in cultured RPE cells are very low. cGMP accumulation was readily detected in cultured human RPE cells after incubation with Bay60–7550 as a selective PDE2 inhibitor, sildenafil as a selective PDE5 inhibitor or Sch51866 as a selective PDE9 inhibitor. In the presence of PDE inhibition, cGMP content increased markedly after stimulation of the particulate guanylyl cyclase. mRNA of PDE2,PDE5 and PDE9 was detected in all cultured human RPE cells and also in rat RPE cell layers. Conclusions PDE2, PDE5 and PDE9 have a role in cGMP metabolism in RPE cells. PMID:16943225

  14. Squamosamide derivative FLZ protects retinal pigment epithelium cells from oxidative stress through activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-AKT signaling.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Li-Bo; Chen, Chun-Ming; Zhong, Hong; Zhu, Li-Juan

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cell apoptosis is attributed to age-related macular degeneration (AMD) pathogenesis. FLZ, a novel synthetic squamosamide derivative from a Chinese herb, Annona glabra, has displayed significant cyto-protective activity. In the current study, we explored the pro-survival effect of FLZ in oxidative stressed-RPE cells and studied the underlying signaling mechanisms. Our results showed that FLZ attenuated hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced viability decrease and apoptosis in the RPE cell line (ARPE-19 cells) and in primary mouse RPE cells. Western blotting results showed that FLZ activated AKT signaling in RPE cells. The AKT-specific inhibitor, MK-2206, the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pan inhibitor, wortmannin, and AKT1-shRNA (short hairpin RNA) depletion almost abolished FLZ-mediated pro-survival/anti-apoptosis activity. We discovered that epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) trans-activation mediated FLZ-induced AKT activation and the pro-survival effect in RPE cells, and the anti-apoptosis effect of FLZ against H2O2 was inhibited by the EGFR inhibitor, PD153035, or by EGFR shRNA-knockdown. In conclusion, FLZ protects RPE cells from oxidative stress through activation of EGFR-AKT signaling, and our results suggest that FLZ might have therapeutic values for AMD. PMID:25329617

  15. Biomimetic collagen I and IV double layer Langmuir-Schaefer films as microenvironment for human pluripotent stem cell derived retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sorkio, Anni E; Vuorimaa-Laukkanen, Elina P; Hakola, Hanna M; Liang, Huamin; Ujula, Tiina A; Valle-Delgado, Juan José; Österberg, Monika; Yliperttula, Marjo L; Skottman, Heli

    2015-05-01

    The environmental cues received by the cells from synthetic substrates in vitro are very different from those they receive in vivo. In this study, we applied the Langmuir-Schaefer (LS) deposition, a variant of Langmuir-Blodgett technique, to fabricate a biomimetic microenvironment mimicking the structure and organization of native Bruch's membrane for the production of the functional human embryonic stem cell derived retinal pigment epithelial (hESC-RPE) cells. Surface pressure-area isotherms were measured simultaneously with Brewster angle microscopy to investigate the self-assembly of human collagens type I and IV on air-subphase interface. Furthermore, the structure of the prepared collagen LS films was characterized with scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, surface plasmon resonance measurements and immunofluorescent staining. The integrity of hESC-RPE on double layer LS films was investigated by measuring transepithelial resistance and permeability of small molecular weight substance. Maturation and functionality of hESC-RPE cells on double layer collagen LS films was further assessed by RPE-specific gene and protein expression, growth factor secretion, and phagocytic activity. Here, we demonstrated that the prepared collagen LS films have layered structure with oriented fibers corresponding to architecture of the uppermost layers of Bruch's membrane and result in increased barrier properties and functionality of hESC-RPE cells as compared to the commonly used dip-coated controls. PMID:25771016

  16. Improved cell metabolism prolongs photoreceptor survival upon retinal-pigmented epithelium loss in the sodium iodate induced model of geographic atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Zieger, Marina; Punzo, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is characterized by malfunction and loss of retinal-pigmented epithelium (RPE) cells. Because the RPE transfers nutrients from the choriocapillaris to photoreceptor (PR), PRs are affected as well. Geographic atrophy (GA) is an advanced form of AMD characterized by severe vision impairment due to RPE loss over large areas. Currently there is no treatment to delay the degeneration of nutrient deprived PRs once RPE cells die. Here we show that cell-autonomous activation of the key regulator of cell metabolism, the kinase mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), delays PR death in the sodium iodate induced model of RPE atrophy. Consistent with this finding loss of mTORC1 in cones accelerates cone death as cones fail to balance demand with supply. Interestingly, promoting rod survival does not promote cone survival in this model of RPE atrophy as both, rods and cones suffer from a sick and dying RPE. The findings suggest that activation of metabolic genes downstream of mTORC1 can serve as a strategy to prolong PR survival when RPE cells malfunction or die. PMID:26883199

  17. MERTK signaling in the retinal pigment epithelium regulates the tyrosine phosphorylation of GDP dissociation inhibitor alpha from the GDI/CHM family of RAB GTPase effectors.

    PubMed

    Shelby, Shameka J; Feathers, Kecia L; Ganios, Anna M; Jia, Lin; Miller, Jason M; Thompson, Debra A

    2015-11-01

    Photoreceptor outer segments (OS) in the vertebrate retina undergo a process of continual renewal involving shedding of disc membranes that are cleared by phagocytic uptake into the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). In dystrophic Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats, OS phagocytosis is blocked by a mutation in the gene encoding the receptor tyrosine kinase MERTK. To identify proteins tyrosine-phosphorylated downstream of MERTK in the RPE, MALDI-mass spectrometry with peptide-mass fingerprinting was used in comparative studies of RCS congenic and dystrophic rats. At times corresponding to peak phagocytic activity, the RAB GTPase effector GDP dissociation inhibitor alpha (GDI1) was found to undergo tyrosine phosphorylation only in congenic rats. In cryosections of native RPE/choroid, GDI1 colocalized with MERTK and the intracellular tyrosine-kinase SRC. In cultured RPE-J cells, and in transfected heterologous cells, MERTK stimulated SRC-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of GDI1. In OS-fed RPE-J cells, GDI1 colocalized with MERTK and SRC on apparent phagosomes located near the apical membrane. In addition, both GDI1 and RAB5, a regulator of vesicular transport, colocalized with ingested OS. Taken together, these findings identify a novel role of MERTK signaling in membrane trafficking in the RPE that is likely to subserve mechanisms of phagosome formation. PMID:26283020

  18. MEK/ERK pathway mediates UVB-induced AQP1 downregulation and water permeability impairment in human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qin; Cao, Cong; Lu, Shan; Kivlin, Rebecca; Wallin, Brittany; Chu, Wenming; Bi, Zhigang; Wang, Xinru; Wan, Yinsheng

    2009-06-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are a family of 13 small ( approximately 30 kDa/monomer), hydrophobic, integral membrane proteins. AQPs are expressed in various epithelial and endothelial cells involved in fluid transport. Here, we demonstrated for the first time that AQP1 is expressed in cultured human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells (ARPE-19 cell line). Ultraviolet radiation (UVB) and H2O2, two major factors causing RPE cell damage, induced AQP1 downregulation which was mediated by MEK/ERK activation. UV and H2O2 as well as AQP1-specific siRNA knockdown impaired water permeability of ARPE-19 cells. Notably, pretreatment with all-trans retinoic acid attenuated UV- and H2O2-induced AQP1 downregulation and water permeability impairment. Considering that water permeability is involved in multiple functions of RPE cells such as cellular junction formation, fluid or protein exchange and barrier formation, our data elucidated a novel mechanism through which UV radiation and oxidative stress induce eye cell damage. Our results further support the notion that all-trans retinoic acid might be useful for protection against UV or oxidative stress-induced eye cell damage. PMID:19424603

  19. Transplantation of human retinal pigment epithelial cells in the nucleus accumbens of cocaine self-administering rats provides protection from seeking.

    PubMed

    Venkiteswaran, Kala; Alexander, Danielle N; Puhl, Matthew D; Rao, Anand; Piquet, Amanda L; Nyland, Jennifer E; Subramanian, Megha P; Iyer, Puja; Boisvert, Matthew M; Handly, Erin; Subramanian, Thyagarajan; Grigson, Patricia Sue

    2016-05-01

    Chronic exposure to drugs and alcohol leads to damage to dopaminergic neurons and their projections in the 'reward pathway' that originate in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and terminate in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). This damage is thought to contribute to the signature symptom of addiction: chronic relapse. In this study we show that bilateral transplants of human retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPECs), a cell mediated dopaminergic and trophic neuromodulator, into the medial shell of the NAc, rescue rats with a history of high rates of cocaine self-administration from drug-seeking when returned, after 2 weeks of abstinence, to the drug-associated chamber under extinction conditions (i.e., with no drug available). Excellent survival was noted for the transplant of RPECs in the shell and/or the core of the NAc bilaterally in all rats that showed behavioral recovery from cocaine seeking. Design based unbiased stereology of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) positive cell bodies in the VTA showed better preservation (p<0.035) in transplanted animals compared to control animals. This experiment shows that the RPEC graft provides beneficial effects to prevent drug seeking in drug addiction via its effects directly on the NAc and its neural network with the VTA. PMID:26562520

  20. Silencing heme oxygenase-1 gene expression in retinal pigment epithelial cells inhibits proliferation, migration and tube formation of cocultured endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wenjie; Zhang, Xiaomei; Lu, Hong; Matsukura, Makoto; Zhao, Jien; Shinohara, Makoto

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: •HO-1 is highly induced in RPE cells by hypoxia. •Inhibition of HO-1 activity and knockdown of HO-1 expression inhibit VEGF expression in RPE cells under hypoxia. •Knockdown of HO-1 in RPE cells inhibits angiogenesis of endothelial cells in vitro. -- Abstract: Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) plays an important role in the vasculature and in the angiogenesis of tumors, wounds and other environments. Retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and choroidal endothelial cells (CECs) are the main cells involved in choroidal neovascularization (CNV), a process in which hypoxia plays an important role. Our aim was to evaluate the role of human RPE-cell HO-1 in the angiogenic activities of cocultured endothelial cells under hypoxia. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) for HO-1 was transfected into human RPE cell line ARPE-19, and zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) was used to inhibit HO-1 activity. Knockdown of HO-1 expression and inhibition of HO-1 activity resulted in potent reduction of the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) under hypoxia. Furthermore, knockdown of HO-1 suppressed the proliferation, migration and tube formation of cocultured endothelial cells. These findings indicated that HO-1 might have an angiogenic effect in CNV through modulation of VEGF expression and might be a potential target for treating CNV.

  1. Retinal Vasculature of Adult Zebrafish: In Vivo Imaging Using Confocal Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Brent A.; Xie, Jing; Yuan, Alex; Kaul, Charles; Hollyfield, Joe G.; Anand-Apte, Bela

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 3 decades the zebrafish (Danio rerio) has become an important biomedical research species. As their use continues to grow additional techniques and tools will be required to keep pace with ongoing research using this species. In this paper we describe a novel method for in vivo imaging of the retinal vasculature in adult animals using a commercially available confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO). With this instrumentation, we demonstrate the ability to distinguish diverse vascular phenotypes in different transgenic GFP lines. In addition this technology allows repeated visualization of the vasculature in individual zebrafish over time to document vascular leakage progression and recovery induced by intraocular delivery of proteins that induce vascular permeability. SLO of the retinal vasculature was found to be highly informative, providing images of high contrast and resolution that were capable of resolving individual vascular endothelial cells. Finally, the procedures required to acquire SLO images from zebrafish are non-invasive, simple to perform and can be achieved with low animal mortality, allowing repeated imaging of individual fish. PMID:25447564

  2. Inhibition of Adult Rat Retinal Ganglion Cells by D1-type Dopamine Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Hayashida, Yuki; Rodríguez, Carolina Varela; Ogata, Genki; Partida, Gloria J.; Oi, Hanako; Stradleigh, Tyler W.; Lee, Sherwin C.; Colado, Anselmo Felipe; Ishida, Andrew T.

    2011-01-01

    The spike output of neural pathways can be regulated by modulating output neuron excitability and/or their synaptic inputs. Dopaminergic interneurons synapse onto cells that route signals to mammalian retinal ganglion cells, but it is unknown whether dopamine can activate receptors in these ganglion cells and, if it does, how this affects their excitability. Here, we show D1a-receptor-like immunoreactivity in ganglion cells identified in adult rats by retrogradely transported dextran, and that dopamine, D1-type receptor agonists, and cAMP analogs inhibit spiking in ganglion cells dissociated from adult rats. These ligands curtailed repetitive spiking during constant current injections, and reduced the number and rate of rise of spikes elicited by fluctuating current injections without significantly altering the timing of the remaining spikes. Consistent with mediation by D1-type receptors, SCH-23390 reversed the effects of dopamine on spikes. Contrary to a recent report, spike inhibition by dopamine was not precluded by blocking Ih. Consistent with the reduced rate of spike rise, dopamine reduced voltage-gated Na+ current (INa) amplitude and tetrodotoxin, at doses that reduced INa as moderately as dopamine, also inhibited spiking. These results provide the first direct evidence that D1-type dopamine receptor activation can alter mammalian retinal ganglion cell excitability, and demonstrate that dopamine can modulate spikes in these cells by a mechanism different from the pre- and postsynaptic means proposed by previous studies. To our knowledge, our results also provide the first evidence that dopamine receptor activation can reduce excitability without altering the temporal precision of spike firing. PMID:19940196

  3. Retinal Thickness and the Structure/Function Relationship in the Eyes of Older Adults with Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Honjo, Megumi; Omodaka, Kazuko; Ishizaki, Tatsuro; Ohkubo, Shinji; Araie, Makoto; Nakazawa, Toru

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is common and shows high prevalence in older adults. However, there are few studies on the structure/function relationship in older adults with glaucoma. This prospective, cross-sectional study (conducted between February and August 2014), enrolled 102 eyes of 102 subjects aged over 75 years, including 57 eyes with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG), 15 eyes with pseudoexfoliation glaucoma (PXG), and 30 healthy eyes. Multiple regression analysis was used to determine the correlation of circumpapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (cpRNFLT) and macular parameters to mean deviation (MD) to and standard automated perimetry (SAP)-measured sensitivity, assessed with the 30–2 and 10–2 programs. In each 10–2 SAP test point, Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient was used to compare macular retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (mRNFLT), macular ganglion cell-inner plexiform layer thickness (GCIPLT), and mRNFL+GCIPL thickness (GCCT) with sensitivity after adjusting for retinal ganglion cell (RGC) displacement. In eyes with POAG and PXG, cpRNFLT was significantly correlated with 30–2 MD and 30–2 sensitivity. Multiple regression analysis revealed that the POAG had significantly lower cpRNFLT, mRNFLT, GCIPLT, and GCCT according to the severity of disease than control eyes after adjusting for sensitivity, age, sex, and axial length. The PXG eyes had significantly lower cpRNFLT, mRNFLT, and GCCT when compared with the early to moderate POAG eyes. GCCT was significantly correlated with 10–2 sensitivity, except in one juxtafoveal point, (r = 0.338–0.778) in the POAG eyes. The periphery of the central 10° area showed a good correlation between sensitivity and mRNFLT, while the central 5.8° showed a good correlation between sensitivity and GCIPLT. The correlation between structure and function was significant, and objective and quantitative method with OCT assessing glaucoma that does not require patient ability could be a possible parameter to

  4. Correspondence between retinal reflectometry and a flicker-based technique in the measurement of macular pigment spatial profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Veen, Rob L. P.; Berendschot, Tos T. J. M.; Makridaki, Maria; Hendrikse, Fred; Carden, David; Murray, Ian J.

    2009-11-01

    A comparison of macular pigment optical density (MPOD) spatial profiles determined by an optical and a psychophysical technique is presented. We measured the right eyes of 19 healthy individuals, using fundus reflectometry at 0, 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 deg eccentricity; and heterochromatic flicker photometry (HFP) at 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 deg, and a reference point at 8 deg eccentricity. We found a strong correlation between the two techniques. However, the absolute estimates obtained by fundus reflectometry data were higher than by HFP. These differences could partly be explained by the fact that at 8 deg eccentricity the MPOD is not zero, as assumed in HFP. Furthermore, when performing HFP for eccentricities of <1 deg, we had to assume that subjects set flicker thresholds at 0.4 deg horizontal translation when using a 1-deg stimulus. MPOD profiles are very similar for both techniques if, on average, 0.05 DU is added to the HFP data at all eccentricities. An additional correction factor, dependent on the steepness of the MPOD spatial distribution, is required for 0 deg.

  5. Osmolarity and spectrophotometric property of brilliant blue green define the degree of toxicity on retinal pigment epithelial cells exposed to surgical endoilluminator

    PubMed Central

    Balaiya, Sankarathi; Sambhav, Kumar; Cook, William B; Chalam, Kakarla V

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of varying concentrations of brilliant blue green (BBG) and their different biochemical characteristics on retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells under xenon light source illumination at varying distances to identify safe parameters for intraoperative use. Methods Human retinal RPE cells (ARPE-19) were exposed to two concentrations (0.25 and 0.50 mg/mL) of BBG and illuminated with a xenon surgical illuminator at varying distances (10 and 25 mm), intensity levels, and time intervals (1, 5, and 15 minutes). Additionally, the effect of osmolarity was examined by diluting BBG in different concentrations of glucose. Cytotoxicity of BBG and osmolarity effects on cell viability were evaluated using a WST-1 assay. Light absorption and emission characteristic of BBG in different solvents were measured using a plate reader at different wavelengths. Lastly, the activity of caspase-3 was also studied. Results Cell viability of ARPE-19 cells was 77.4%±12.7%, 78.7%±17.0%, and 65.0%±19.7% at 1, 5, and 15 minutes to exposure of high illumination xenon light at 10 mm (P<0.05) compared to controls. At both distances of illumination (10 and 25 mm), similar cell viabilities were seen between 1 and 5 minutes of exposure. However, there was a decline in viability when the illumination was carried out to 15 minutes in all groups (P<0.05). There was no significant reduction in cell viability in presence or absence of xenon light in different osmolar solutions concentrations of glucose (P>0.05). Maximal light absorption of BBG was noted between 540 and 680 nm. Activated caspase-3 level was not significant in both the concentrations of BBG (P>0.05). Conclusion Our findings suggest that BBG at 0.25 mg/mL during vitreoretinal surgery is safe and not toxic to RPE cells up to 5 minutes under focal high illumination (10 mm) and up to 15 minutes under medium diffuse illumination (25 mm). BBG was safe to be mixed with isotonic glucose solution at the

  6. Protective Effects of Human iPS-Derived Retinal Pigmented Epithelial Cells in Comparison with Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells and Human Neural Stem Cells on the Degenerating Retina in rd1 mice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jianan; Mandai, Michiko; Kamao, Hiroyuki; Hashiguchi, Tomoyo; Shikamura, Masayuki; Kawamata, Shin; Sugita, Sunao; Takahashi, Masayo

    2015-05-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of visual impairments characterized by progressive rod photoreceptor cell loss due to a genetic background. Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) predominantly secreted by the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) has been reported to protect photoreceptors in retinal degeneration models, including rd1. In addition, clinical trials are currently underway outside Japan using human mesenchymal stromal cells and human neural stem cells to protect photoreceptors in RP and dry age-related macular degeneration, respectively. Thus, this study aimed to investigate the rescue effects of induced pluripotent stem (iPS)-RPE cells in comparison with those types of cells used in clinical trials on photoreceptor degeneration in rd1 mice. Cells were injected into the subretinal space of immune-suppressed 2-week-old rd1 mice. The results demonstrated that human iPS-RPE cells significantly attenuated photoreceptor degeneration on postoperative days (PODs) 14 and 21 and survived longer up to at least 12 weeks after operation than the other two types of graft cells with less immune responses and apoptosis. The mean PEDF concentration in the intraocular fluid in RPE-transplanted eyes was more than 1 µg/ml at PODs 14 and 21, and this may have contributed to the protective effect of RPE transplantation. Our findings suggest that iPS-RPE cells serve as a competent source to delay photoreceptor degeneration through stable survival in degenerating ocular environment and by releasing neuroprotective factors such as PEDF. PMID:25728228

  7. Multiphoton absorption is probably not the primary threshold damage mechanism for femtosecond laser pulse exposures in the retinal pigment epithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glickman, Randolph D.; Johnson, Thomas E.

    2004-07-01

    Laser induced breakdown has the lowest energy threshold in the femtosecond domain, and is responsible for production of threshold ocular lesions. It has been proposed that multiphoton absorption may also contribute to ultrashort-pulse tissue damage, based on the observation that 33 fs, 810 nm pulse laser exposures caused more DNA breakage in cultured, primary RPE cells, compared to CW laser exposures delivering the same average power. Subsequent studies, demonstrating two-photon excitation of fluorescence in isolated RPE melanosomes, appeared to support the role of multiphoton absorption, but mainly at suprathreshold irradiance. Additional experiments have not found a consistent difference in the DNA strand breakage produced by ultrashort and CW threshold exposures. DNA damage appears to be dependent on the amount of melanin pigmentation in the cells, rather than the pulsewidth of the laser; current studies have found that, at threshold, CW and ultrashort pulse laser exposures produce almost identical amounts of DNA breakage. A theoretical analysis suggest that the number of photons delivered to the RPE melanosome during a single 33-fsec pulse at the ED50 irradiance is insufficient to produce multiphoton excitation. This result appears to exclude the melanosome as a locus for two- or three-photon excitation; however, a structure with a larger effective absorption cross-section than the melanosome may interact with the laser pulses. One possibility is that the nuclear chromatin acts as a unit absorber of photons resulting in DNA damage, but this does not explain the near equivalence of ultrashort and CW exposures in the comet assay model. This equivalence indicated that multiphoton absorption is not a major contributor to the ultrashort pulse laser damage threshold in the near infrared.

  8. Bioavailability of plant pigment phytochemicals in Angelica keiskei in older adults: A pilot absorption kinetic study

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Camila R; Chen, C-Y. Oliver; Aldini, Giancarlo; Rasmussen, Helen; Ronchi, Carlos F; Berchieri-Ronchi, Carolina; Cho, Soo-Muk; Blumberg, Jeffrey B

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Angelica keiskei is a green leafy vegetable rich in plant pigment phytochemicals such as flavonoids and carotenoids. This study examined bioavailability of flavonoids and carotenoids in Angelica keiskei and the alteration of the antioxidant performance in vivo. SUBJECTS AND MATERIALS Absorption kinetics of phytochemicals in Angelica keiskei were determined in healthy older adults (> 60 y, n = 5) and subjects with metabolic syndrome (n = 5). Subjects consumed 5 g dry Angelica keiskei powder encapsulated in gelatin capsules with a low flavonoid and carotenoid liquid meal. Plasma samples were collected at baseline, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 h. Samples were analyzed for flavonoids and carotenoids using HPLC systems with electrochemical and UV detection, respectively, and for total antioxidant performance by fluorometry. RESULTS After ingestion of Angelica keiskei increases in plasma quercetin concentrations were observed at 1-3 and 6-8 hr in the healthy group and at all time points in the metabolic syndrome group compared to baseline (P < 0.05). Plasma lutein concentrations were significantly elevated in both the healthy and metabolic syndrome groups at 8 hr (P < 0.05). Significant increases in total antioxidant performance were also observed in both the healthy and the metabolic syndrome groups compared to baseline (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS Findings of this study clearly demonstrate the bioavailability of phytonutrients of Angelica keiskei and their ability to increase antioxidant status in humans. PMID:25324936

  9. Mitochondrial "movement" and lens optics following oxidative stress from UV-B irradiation: cultured bovine lenses and human retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19) as examples.

    PubMed

    Bantseev, Vladimir; Youn, Hyun-Yi

    2006-12-01

    Mitochondria provide energy generated by oxidative phosphorylation and at the same time play a central role in apoptosis and aging. As a byproduct of respiration, the electron transport chain is known to be the major intracellular site for the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Exposure to solar and occupational ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and thus production of ROS and subsequent cell death, has been implicated in a large spectrum of skin and ocular pathologies, including cataract. Retinal pigment epithelial cell apoptosis generates photoreceptor dysfunction and ultimately visual impairment. The purpose of this article was to characterize in vitro changes following oxidative stress with UV-B radiation in (a) ocular lens optics and cellular function in terms of mitochondrial dynamics of bovine lens epithelium and superficial cortical fiber cells and (b) human retinal pigment epithelial (ARPE-19) cells. Cultured bovine lenses and confluent cultures of ARPE-19 cells were irradiated with broadband UV-B radiation at energy levels of 0.5 and 1.0 J/cm(2). Lens optical function (spherical aberration) was monitored daily up to 14 days using an automated laser scanning system that was developed at the University of Waterloo. This system consists of a single collimated scanning helium-neon laser source that projects a thin (0.05 mm) laser beam onto a plain mirror mounted at 45 degrees on a carriage assembly. This mirror reflects the laser beam directly up through the scanner table surface and through the lens under examination. A digital camera captures the actual position and slope of the laser beam at each step. When all steps have been made, the captured data for each step position is used to calculate the back vertex distance for each position and the difference in that measurement between beams. To investigate mitochondrial movement, the mitochondria-specific fluorescent dye Rhodamine 123 was used. Time series were acquired with a Zeiss 510 (configuration Meta

  10. Iron-induced Local Complement Component 3 (C3) Up-regulation via Non-canonical Transforming Growth Factor (TGF)-β Signaling in the Retinal Pigment Epithelium*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yafeng; Song, Delu; Song, Ying; Zhao, Liangliang; Wolkow, Natalie; Tobias, John W.; Song, Wenchao; Dunaief, Joshua L.

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulation of iron homeostasis may be a pathogenic factor in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Meanwhile, the formation of complement-containing deposits under the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell layer is a pathognomonic feature of AMD. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which complement component 3 (C3), a central protein in the complement cascade, is up-regulated by iron in RPE cells. Modulation of TGF-β signaling, involving ERK1/2, SMAD3, and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-δ, is responsible for iron-induced C3 expression. The differential effects of spatially distinct SMAD3 phosphorylation sites at the linker region and at the C terminus determined the up-regulation of C3. Pharmacologic inhibition of either ERK1/2 or SMAD3 phosphorylation decreased iron-induced C3 expression levels. Knockdown of SMAD3 blocked the iron-induced up-regulation and nuclear accumulation of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-δ, a transcription factor that has been shown previously to bind the basic leucine zipper 1 domain in the C3 promoter. We show herein that mutation of this domain reduced iron-induced C3 promoter activity. In vivo studies support our in vitro finding of iron-induced C3 up-regulation. Mice with a mosaic pattern of RPE-specific iron overload demonstrated co-localization of iron-induced ferritin and C3d deposits. Humans with aceruloplasminemia causing RPE iron overload had increased RPE C3d deposition. The molecular events in the iron-C3 pathway represent therapeutic targets for AMD or other diseases exacerbated by iron-induced local complement dysregulation. PMID:25802332

  11. Inflammasome priming increases retinal pigment epithelial cell susceptibility to lipofuscin phototoxicity by changing the cell death mechanism from apoptosis to pyroptosis.

    PubMed

    Brandstetter, Carolina; Patt, Joshua; Holz, Frank G; Krohne, Tim U

    2016-08-01

    Progressive death of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells is a hallmark of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of blindness in all developed countries. Photooxidative damage and activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome have been suggested as contributing factors to this process. We investigated the effects of inflammasome activation on oxidative damage-induced RPE cell death. In primary human RPE cells and ARPE-19 cells, lipofuscin accumulated following incubation with oxidatively modified photoreceptor outer segments. Oxidative stress was induced by blue light irradiation (dominant wavelength: 448nm, irradiance: 0.8mW/cm(2), duration: 3 to 6h) of lipofuscin-loaded cells and resulted in cell death by apoptosis. Prior inflammasome priming by IL-1α or complement activation product C5a altered the cell death mechanism to pyroptosis and resulted in a significant increase of the phototoxic effect. Following IL-1α priming, viability 24h after irradiation was reduced in primary RPE cells and ARPE-19 cells from 65.3% and 56.7% to 22.6% (p=0.003) and 5.1% (p=0.0002), respectively. Inflammasome-mediated IL-1β release occurred only in association with pyroptotic cell lysis. Inflammasome priming by conditioned media of pyroptotic cells likewise increased cell death. Suppression of inflammasome activation by inhibition of caspase-1 or cathepsins B and L significantly reduced cell death in primed cells. In summary, inflammasome priming by IL-1α, C5a, or conditioned media of pyroptotic cells increases RPE cell susceptibility to photooxidative damage-mediated cell death and changes the mechanism of induced cell death from apoptosis to pyroptosis. This process may contribute to RPE degeneration in AMD and provide new targets for intervention. PMID:27240191

  12. Polarized Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cell Monolayers Have Higher Resistance to Oxidative Stress-Induced Cell Death Than Nonpolarized Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Hsiung, Jamie; Zhu, Danhong

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress-mediated injury to the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a major factor involved in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. Human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived RPE cells are currently being evaluated for their potential for cell therapy in AMD patients through subretinal injection of cells in suspension and subretinal placement as a polarized monolayer. To gain an understanding of how transplanted RPE cells will respond to the highly oxidatively stressed environment of an AMD patient eye, we compared the survival of polarized and nonpolarized RPE cultures following oxidative stress treatment. Polarized, nonpolarized/confluent, nonpolarized/subconfluent hESC-RPE cells were treated with H2O2. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling stains revealed the highest amount of cell death in subconfluent hESC-RPE cells and little cell death in polarized hESC-RPE cells with H2O2 treatment. There were higher levels of proapoptotic factors (phosphorylated p38, phosphorylated c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase, Bax, and cleaved caspase 3 fragments) in treated nonpolarized RPE—particularly subconfluent cells—relative to polarized cells. On the other hand, polarized RPE cells had constitutively higher levels of cell survival and antiapoptotic signaling factors such as p-Akt and Bcl-2, as well as antioxidants superoxide dismutase 1 and catalase relative to nonpolarized cells, that possibly contributed to polarized cells’ higher tolerance to oxidative stress compared with nonpolarized RPE cells. Subconfluent cells were particularly sensitive to oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. These results suggest that implantation of polarized hESC-RPE monolayers for treating AMD patients with geographic atrophy should have better survival than injections of hESC-RPE cells in suspension. PMID:25411476

  13. TNF-{alpha} promotes human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell migration by inducing matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP-9) expression through activation of Akt/mTORC1 signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Cheng-hu; Cao, Guo-Fan; Jiang, Qin; Yao, Jin

    2012-08-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TNF-{alpha} induces MMP-9 expression and secretion to promote RPE cell migration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MAPK activation is not critical for TNF-{alpha}-induced MMP-9 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Akt and mTORC1 signaling mediate TNF-{alpha}-induced MMP-9 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIN1 knockdown showed no significant effect on MMP-9 expression by TNF-{alpha}. -- Abstract: Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-{alpha}) promotes in vitro retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell migration to initiate proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR). Here we report that TNF-{alpha} promotes human RPE cell migration by inducing matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP-9) expression. Inhibition of MMP-9 by its inhibitor or its neutralizing antibody inhibited TNF-{alpha}-induced in vitro RPE cell migration. Reversely, exogenously-added active MMP-9 promoted RPE cell migration. Suppression Akt/mTOR complex 1(mTORC1) activation by LY 294002 and rapamycin inhibited TNF-{alpha}-mediated MMP-9 expression. To introduce a constitutively active Akt (CA-Akt) in cultured RPE cells increased MMP-9 expression, and to block mTORC1 activation by rapamycin inhibited its effect. RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated silencing of SIN1, a key component of mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2), had no effect on MMP-9 expression or secretion. In conclusion, this study suggest that TNF-{alpha} promotes RPE cell migration by inducing MMP-9 expression through activation of Akt/ mTORC1, but not mTORC2 signaling.

  14. Inhibition of APE1/Ref-1 redox activity rescues human retinal pigment epithelial cells from oxidative stress and reduces choroidal neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Li, Y.; Liu, X.; Zhou, T.; Kelley, M.R.; Edwards, P.; Gao, H.; Qiao, X.

    2014-01-01

    The effectiveness of current treatment for age related macular degeneration (AMD) by targeting one molecule is limited due to its multifactorial nature and heterogeneous pathologies. Treatment strategy to target multiple signaling pathways or pathological components in AMD pathogenesis is under investigation for better clinical outcome. Inhibition of the redox function of apurinic endonuclease 1/redox factor-1 (APE1) was found to suppress endothelial angiogenesis and promote neuronal cell recovery, thereby may serve as a potential treatment for AMD. In the current study, we for the first time have found that a specific inhibitor of APE1 redox function by a small molecule compound E3330 regulates retinal pigment epithelium (RPEs) cell response to oxidative stress. E3330 significantly blocked sub-lethal doses of oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) induced proliferation decline and senescence advancement of RPEs. At the same time, E3330 remarkably decreased the accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and down-regulated the productions of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), as well as attenuated the level of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65 in RPEs. A panel of stress and toxicity responsive transcription factors that were significantly upregulated by oxLDL was restored by E3330, including Nrf2/Nrf1, p53, NF-κB, HIF1, CBF/NF-Y/YY1, and MTF-1. Further, a single intravitreal injection of E3330 effectively reduced the progression of laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in mouse eyes. These data revealed that E3330 effectively rescued RPEs from oxidative stress induced senescence and dysfunctions in multiple aspects in vitro, and attenuated laser-induced damages to RPE–Bruch׳s membrane complex in vivo. Together with its previously established anti-angiogenic and neuroprotection benefits, E3330 is implicated for potential use for AMD treatment. PMID:24624338

  15. A novel polysaccharide compound derived from algae extracts protects retinal pigment epithelial cells from high glucose-induced oxidative damage in vitro.

    PubMed

    Xie, Peiyu; Fujii, Isao; Zhao, Ji'en; Shinohara, Makoto; Matsukura, Makoto

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a common complication of diabetes mellitus (DM). The oxidative damage inflicted on retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells by high glucose closely approximates the molecular basis for the loss of vision associated with this disease. We investigate a novel algae-derived polysaccharide compound for its role in protecting ARPE-19 cells from high glucose-induced oxidative damage. ARPE-19 cells were cultured for 4 d with normal concentration of D-glucose, and exposed to either normal or high concentrations of D-glucose in the presence or absence of the polysaccharide compound at variety of concentrations for another 48 h. Taurine was used as a positive control. Activity of super oxide dismutase (SOD) and concentration of glutathione (GSH) were measured as well as cytotoxicity of high glucose and the polysaccharide compound. To analyse cellular damage by high glucose, activation of Annexin V and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) were examined. Our results showed that a significant cellular damage on ARPE-19 cells after 48 h treatment with high glucose, accompanied by a decrease in SOD activity and GSH concentration; high glucose also caused ARPE-19 cell apoptosis and activation of p38MAPK and ERK. As the non-toxic polysaccharide compound protected ARPE-19 cells from high glucose-induced cellular damage, the compound recovered SOD activity and concentration of GSH in the cells. The compound also abrogated the cell apoptosis and activation of p38MAPK and ERK. Therefore, the polysaccharide compound derived from algae extracts could be unique candidate for a new class of anti-DM and anti-oxidative damage. PMID:22975494

  16. In vivo gene transfer as a means to study the physiology and morphogenesis of the retinal pigment epithelium in the rat.

    PubMed

    Marmorstein, Alan D; Peachey, Neal S; Csaky, Karl G

    2003-07-01

    Our understanding of the morphogenesis of epithelial phenotypes has been greatly advanced by the use of in vitro cell culture systems. However, cell cultures often do not faithfully reconstitute many of the differentiated properties of the cell from which they are derived and cannot be used to examine complex physiologic interactions between adjacent tissues. This is particularly true of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Many plasma membrane proteins, in vivo, exhibit a reversed polarity with respect to other epithelia, and RPE-derived cell lines seldom exhibit these same polarity properties. Furthermore, the interaction between the RPE cell and the neuorsensory retina, or the underlying blood supply, the choroid, is absent in cell culture. Most epithelia are difficult to isolate and study in vivo. The RPE is an exception to this. We have explored several aspects of RPE protein transport properties, vision-related physiology, and disease-related pathophysiology in the eye using in vivo gene transfer and electrophysiologic techniques. By injecting replication-defective adenoviruses into the subretinal space of rat eyes, we have been able to easily direct the expression of a test protein and follow its sorting and physiologic effects on RPE cells and adjacent tissues. Due to binding and internalization of adenoviral vectors to integrins found on the RPE apical plasma membrane, expression in a healthy eye is essentially confined to the RPE cell, even under control of a cytomegalovirus promotor. The use of varying amounts of adenoviral vector allows for determination of dose-responsive effects and the comparison of multiple mutants of a protein. In addition, there are substantial savings with respect to time and money in comparison to standard transgenic approaches. PMID:12798142

  17. Systemically transferred hematopoietic stem cells home to the subretinal space and express RPE-65 in a mouse model of retinal pigment epithelium damage.

    PubMed

    Atmaca-Sonmez, Pelin; Li, Yang; Yamauchi, Yasuyuki; Schanie, Carrie L; Ildstad, Suzanne T; Kaplan, Henry J; Enzmann, Volker

    2006-11-01

    Stem cell regeneration of damaged tissue has recently been reported in many different organs. Since the loss of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) in the eye is associated with a major cause of visual loss - specifically, age-related macular degeneration - we investigated whether hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) given systemically can home to the damaged subretinal space and express markers of RPE lineage. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) cells of bone marrow origin were used in a sodium iodate (NaIO(3)) model of RPE damage in the mouse. The optimal time for adoptive transfer of bone marrow-derived stem cells relative to the time of injury and the optimal cell type [whole bone marrow, mobilized peripheral blood, HSC, facilitating cells (FC)] were determined by counting the number of GFP(+) cells in whole eye flat mounts. Immunocytochemistry was performed to identify the bone marrow origin of the cells in the RPE using antibodies for CD45, Sca-1, and c-kit, as well as the expression of the RPE-specific marker, RPE-65. The time at which bone marrow-derived cells were adoptively transferred relative to the time of NaIO(3) injection did not significantly influence the number of cells that homed to the subretinal space. At both one and two weeks after intravenous (i.v.) injection, GFP(+) cells of bone marrow origin were observed in the damaged subretinal space, at sites of RPE loss, but not in the normal subretinal space. The combined transplantation of HSC+FC cells appeared to favor the survival of the homed stem cells at two weeks, and RPE-65 was expressed by adoptively transferred HSC by four weeks. We have shown that systemically injected HSC homed to the subretinal space in the presence of RPE damage and that FC promoted survival of these cells. Furthermore, the RPE-specific marker RPE-65 was expressed on adoptively transferred HSC in the denuded areas. PMID:16949576

  18. Change of retinal pigment epithelial atrophy after anti-vascular endothelial growth factor treatment in exudative age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Moosang; Kim, Eung Suk; Seo, Kyung Hoon; Yu, Seung-Young; Kwak, Hyung-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The study aimed to investigate the quantitative changes of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) atrophy during a 24-month follow-up period of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) for exudative age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study. Sixty-five eyes of 62 consecutive patients with naïve exudative AMD who had received treatment with anti-VEGF therapy and followed for more 24 months were enrolled. All patients received three initial monthly injections of anti-VEGF (ranibizumab or bevacizumab), followed by pro re nata or treat-and-extend protocol. Color fundus image, optical coherence tomography, and fundus autofluorescence were evaluated for RPE atrophy. Multiple regression analysis was performed to investigate the predictive factors found during univariate analysis to identify an association with increased RPE atrophic areas. Results: The mean number of anti-VEGF treatments was 9.18. RPE atrophic area was 1.293 ± 1.298 mm2 at baseline and enlarged to 2.394 ± 1.940 mm2 after 24 months, which differed significantly (P = 0.001). Multiple regression analysis revealed that larger areas of RPE atrophy at month 4 and larger numbers of anti-VEGF treatments were associated with increased RPE atrophic areas. Conclusions: RPE atrophy progresses in eyes with exudative AMD during anti-VEGF treatment. Larger areas of RPE atrophy at month 4 and larger numbers of anti-VEGF injections were associated with an increased risk of progression of RPE atrophy the following treatment. These findings may be useful to clinicians using intravitreal anti-VEGF for the treatment of exudative AMD, both for selecting an appropriate treatment plan and for predicting the progression of RPE atrophy. PMID:27488150

  19. Iron-induced Local Complement Component 3 (C3) Up-regulation via Non-canonical Transforming Growth Factor (TGF)-β Signaling in the Retinal Pigment Epithelium.

    PubMed

    Li, Yafeng; Song, Delu; Song, Ying; Zhao, Liangliang; Wolkow, Natalie; Tobias, John W; Song, Wenchao; Dunaief, Joshua L

    2015-05-01

    Dysregulation of iron homeostasis may be a pathogenic factor in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Meanwhile, the formation of complement-containing deposits under the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell layer is a pathognomonic feature of AMD. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which complement component 3 (C3), a central protein in the complement cascade, is up-regulated by iron in RPE cells. Modulation of TGF-β signaling, involving ERK1/2, SMAD3, and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-δ, is responsible for iron-induced C3 expression. The differential effects of spatially distinct SMAD3 phosphorylation sites at the linker region and at the C terminus determined the up-regulation of C3. Pharmacologic inhibition of either ERK1/2 or SMAD3 phosphorylation decreased iron-induced C3 expression levels. Knockdown of SMAD3 blocked the iron-induced up-regulation and nuclear accumulation of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-δ, a transcription factor that has been shown previously to bind the basic leucine zipper 1 domain in the C3 promoter. We show herein that mutation of this domain reduced iron-induced C3 promoter activity. In vivo studies support our in vitro finding of iron-induced C3 up-regulation. Mice with a mosaic pattern of RPE-specific iron overload demonstrated co-localization of iron-induced ferritin and C3d deposits. Humans with aceruloplasminemia causing RPE iron overload had increased RPE C3d deposition. The molecular events in the iron-C3 pathway represent therapeutic targets for AMD or other diseases exacerbated by iron-induced local complement dysregulation. PMID:25802332

  20. Equine infectious anemia viral vector-mediated codelivery of endostatin and angiostatin driven by retinal pigmented epithelium-specific VMD2 promoter inhibits choroidal neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Kachi, Shu; Binley, Katie; Yokoi, Katsutoshi; Umeda, Naoyasu; Akiyama, Hideo; Muramatu, Daisuke; Iqball, Sharifah; Kan, On; Naylor, Stuart; Campochiaro, Peter A

    2009-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) is a nonprimate lentivirus that does not cause human disease. Subretinal injection into mice of a recombinant EIAV lentiviral vector in which lacZ is driven by a CMV promoter (EIAV CMV LacZ) resulted in rapid and strong expression of LacZ in retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells and some other cells including ganglion cells, resulting in the presence of 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside within the optic nerve. Substitution of the RPE-specific promoter from the vitelliform macular dystrophy (VMD2) gene for the CMV promoter resulted in prolonged (at least 1 year) expression of LacZ that was restricted to RPE cells, albeit reduced 6- to 10-fold compared with the CMV promoter. Similarly, the amount of FLAG-tagged endostatin detected in eyes injected with the EIAV VMD2 Endo(FLAG) vector was similar to that seen in eyes injected with a vector that expressed both endostatin and angiostatin [EIAV VMD2 Endo(FLAG)/Angio]; expression was approximately 6-fold lower than with identical vectors in which the CMV promoter drove expression. Compared with murine eyes treated with a control EIAV vector, subretinal injection of EIAV vectors expressing murine endostatin alone or in combination with angiostatin driven by either the CMV or VMD2 promoter caused significant suppression of choroidal neovascularization (NV) at laser-induced rupture sites in Bruch's membrane. These data support proceeding toward clinical studies with EIAV-based gene therapy for choroidal NV, using the VMD2 promoter to selectively drive expression of a combination of endostatin and angiostatin in RPE cells. PMID:20377369

  1. Complement Factor H Expressed by Retinal Pigment Epithelium Cells Can Suppress Neovascularization of Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells: An in vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Huang, Qing; Tang, Min; Zhang, Junjun; Fan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Complement factor H (CFH) is one of the most important soluble complement regulatory proteins and is closely associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of irreversible central vision loss in the elderly population in developed countries. Our study searches to investigate whether CFH expression is changed in oxidative damaged retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells and the role of CFH in the in vitro neovascularization. First, it was confirmed by immunofluorescence staining that CFH was expressed by ARPE-19 cells. CFH mRNA and protein in oxidative (H2O2) damaged ARPE-19 cells were both reduced, as determined by Real-time PCR and Western blotting analysis. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) also showed that ARPE-19 cells treated with H2O2 caused an increase in C3a content, which indicates complement activation. Then, wound assays were performed to show that CFH expression suppression promoted human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVECs) migration. Thereafter, ARPE-19 cells were transfected with CFH-specific siRNA and CFH knockdown was confirmed with the aid of Real-time PCR, immunofluorescence staining and Western blotting. The ELISA results showed that specific CFH knockdown in ARPE-19 cells activated the complement system. Finally, in vitro matrigel tube formation assay was performed to determine whether change of CFH expression in RPE would affect tube formation by HUVECs. More tubes were formed by HUVECs co-cultured with ARPE-19 cells transfected with CFH specific-siRNA when compared with controls. Our results suggested that RPE cells might be the local CFH source, and RPE cell injuries (such as oxidative stress) may cause CFH expression suppression, which in turn may lead to complement activation and promotion of tube formation by HUVECs. This finding is of importance in elucidating the role of complement in the pathogenesis of ocular neovascularization including choroidal neovascularization. PMID:26091360

  2. Oxidative stress sensitizes retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells to complement-mediated injury in a natural antibody-, lectin pathway-, and phospholipid epitope-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Kusumam; Kulik, Liudmila; Coughlin, Beth; Kunchithapautham, Kannan; Bandyopadhyay, Mausumi; Thiel, Steffen; Thielens, Nicole M; Holers, V Michael; Rohrer, Bärbel

    2013-05-01

    Uncontrolled activation of the alternative complement pathway (AP) is thought to be associated with age-related macular degeneration. Previously, we have shown that in retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) monolayers, oxidative stress reduced complement inhibition on the cell surface, resulting in sublytic complement activation and loss of transepithelial resistance (TER), but the potential ligand and pathway involved are unknown. ARPE-19 cells were grown as monolayers on transwell plates, and sublytic complement activation was induced with H2O2 and normal human serum. TER deteriorated rapidly in H2O2-exposed monolayers upon adding normal human serum. Although the effect required AP activation, AP was not sufficient, because elimination of MASP, but not C1q, prevented TER reduction. Reconstitution experiments to unravel essential components of the lectin pathway (LP) showed that both ficolin and mannan-binding lectin can activate the LP through natural IgM antibodies (IgM-C2) that recognize phospholipid cell surface modifications on oxidatively stressed RPE cells. The same epitopes were found on human primary embryonic RPE monolayers. Likewise, mouse laser-induced choroidal neovascularization, an injury that involves LP activation, could be increased in antibody-deficient rag1(-/-) mice using the phospholipid-specific IgM-C2. In summary, using a combination of depletion and reconstitution strategies, we have shown that the LP is required to initiate the complement cascade following natural antibody recognition of neoepitopes, which is then further amplified by the AP. LP activation is triggered by IgM bound to phospholipids. Taken together, we have defined novel mechanisms of complement activation in oxidatively stressed RPE, linking molecular events involved in age-related macular degeneration, including the presence of natural antibodies and neoepitopes. PMID:23493397

  3. TGF-{beta}-stimulated aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin via the ERK signaling pathway in cultured retinal pigment epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Eun Jee; Chun, Ji Na; Jung, Sun-Ah; Cho, Jin Won; Lee, Joon H.

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGF-{beta} induces aberrant expression of {beta}III in RPE cells via the ERK pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGF-{beta} increases O-GlcNAc modification of {beta}III in RPE cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mature RPE cells have the capacity to express a neuron-associated gene by TGF-{beta}. -- Abstract: The class III {beta}-tubulin isotype ({beta}{sub III}) is expressed exclusively by neurons within the normal human retina and is not present in normal retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in situ or in the early phase of primary cultures. However, aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin has been observed in passaged RPE cells and RPE cells with dedifferentiated morphology in pathologic epiretinal membranes from idiopathic macular pucker, proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). Transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF-{beta}) has been implicated in dedifferentiation of RPE cells and has a critical role in the development of proliferative vitreoretinal diseases. Here, we investigated the potential effects of TGF-{beta} on the aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin and the intracellular signaling pathway mediating these changes. TGF-{beta}-induced aberrant expression and O-linked-{beta}-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNac) modification of class III {beta}-tubulin in cultured RPE cells as determined using Western blotting, RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry. TGF-{beta} also stimulated phosphorylation of ERK. TGF-{beta}-induced aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin was significantly reduced by pretreatment with U0126, an inhibitor of ERK phosphorylation. Our findings indicate that TGF-{beta} stimulated aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin via activation of the ERK signaling pathway. These data demonstrate that mature RPE cells have the capacity to express a neuron-associated gene in response to TGF-{beta} stimulation and provide useful information

  4. Increased Oxidative and Nitrative Stress Accelerates Aging of the Retinal Vasculature in the Diabetic Retina

    PubMed Central

    Lamoke, Folami; Shaw, Sean; Yuan, Jianghe; Ananth, Sudha; Duncan, Michael; Martin, Pamela; Bartoli, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    Hyperglycemia-induced retinal oxidative and nitrative stress can accelerate vascular cell aging, which may lead to vascular dysfunction as seen in diabetes. There is no information on whether this may contribute to the progression of diabetic retinopathy (DR). In this study, we have assessed the occurrence of senescence-associated markers in retinas of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats at 8 and 12 weeks of hyperglycemia as compared to normoglycemic aging (12 and 14 months) and adult (4.5 months) rat retinas. We have found that in the diabetic retinas there was an up-regulation of senescence-associated markers SA-β-Gal, p16INK4a and miR34a, which correlated with decreased expression of SIRT1, a target of miR34a. Expression of senescence-associated factors primarily found in retinal microvasculature of diabetic rats exceeded levels measured in adult and aging rat retinas. In aging rats, retinal expression of senescence associated-factors was mainly localized at the level of the retinal pigmented epithelium and only minimally in the retinal microvasculature. The expression of oxidative/nitrative stress markers such as 4-hydroxynonenal and nitrotyrosine was more pronounced in the retinal vasculature of diabetic rats as compared to normoglycemic aging and adult rat retinas. Treatments of STZ-rats with the anti-nitrating drug FeTPPS (10mg/Kg/day) significantly reduced the appearance of senescence markers in the retinal microvasculature. Our results demonstrate that hyperglycemia accelerates retinal microvascular cell aging whereas physiological aging affects primarily cells of the retinal pigmented epithelium. In conclusion, hyperglycemia-induced retinal vessel dysfunction and DR progression involve vascular cell senescence due to increased oxidative/nitrative stress. PMID:26466127

  5. Adult mice transplanted with embryonic retinal progenitor cells: New approach for repairing damaged optic nerves

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jang-Hyeon; Mao, Chai-An

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death and optic nerve degeneration are complex processes whose underlying molecular mechanisms are only vaguely understood. Treatments commonly used for optic nerve degeneration have little long-term value and only prolong degeneration. Recent advances in stem cell replacement therapy offer new ways to overcome RGC loss by transferring healthy cells into eyes of afflicted individuals. However, studies on stem cell replacement for optic nerve degeneration are hampered by limitations of the available animal models, especially genetic models. We have developed a mouse model in which RGCs are genetically ablated in adult mice with subsequent degeneration of the optic nerve. In the study reported here, we used this model to determine whether embryonic retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) removed from donor retinas when RPCs are committing to an RGC fate could restore lost RGCs. Methods We used the RGC-depleted model as a host for transplanting donor green fluorescent protein (GFP)–labeled RPCs from embryonic retinas that are maximally expressing Atoh7, a basic helix–loop–helix gene essential for RGC specification. Dissociated GFP-labeled RPCs were characterized in situ by immunolabeling with antibodies against proteins known to be expressed in RPCs at embryonic day (E)14.5. Dissociated retinal cells were injected into the vitreous of one eye of RGC-depleted mice at two to six months of age. The injected and non-injected retinas were analyzed for gene expression using immunolabeling, and the morphology of optic nerves was assessed visually and with histological staining at different times up to four months after injection. Results We demonstrate the successful transfer of embryonic GFP-labeled RPCs into the eyes of RGC-depleted mice. Many transplanted RPCs invaded the ganglion cell layer, but the efficiency of the invasion was low. GFP-labeled cells within the ganglion cell layer expressed genes associated with early and late stages

  6. Effect of high mobility group box 1 on the human retinal pigment epithelial cell in high-glucose condition

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Desheng; Tian, Xiaofeng

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) remains a prevalent complication of diabetes and one of the leading causes of blindness among working-age adults. However, the detailed molecular mechanism of the development of DR was still unclear by now. HMGB1 is a non-histone DNA-binding protein and serves as a structural component to facilitate the assembly of nucleoprotein complexes in the nucleus. In the present study, we examined the serum level of HMGB1 and VEGFA in the DR patients. Besides, we also detect the association between HMGB1 and VEGFA level. In the advanced in-vitro study, we detect the protective effect of HMGB1 on the RPE cells in high glucose condition. In this study, we demonstrated that HMGB1 and VEGFA expressions were upregulated in serum samples of DR patients. Advanced analysis showed that HMGB1 and VEGFA level was positively associated. In the in-vitro study, it was found that up-regulation of HMGB1 inhibited the RPE cell viability and induce the apoptosis. Besides, HMGB1 treatment would up-regulate the expression of VEGFA in the RPE cells in high glucose condition. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that HMGB1 and VEGFA are key players in the ability to suppress cell viability and induce apoptosis. The result of this current experiments shed light into the mechanism by which HMGB1 works. Besides, we also present the data of case control study data, our results showed that HMGB1 might be used as biomarkers of DR. PMID:26770371

  7. Lutein and zeaxanthin supplementation reduces photo-oxidative damage and modulates the expression of inflammation-related genes in retinal pigment epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Qingning; Gao, Shasha; Zhou, Jilin; Qin, Jian; Taylor, Allen; Johnson, Elizabeth J.; Tang, Guangwen; Sparrow, Janet R.; Gierhart, Dennis; Shang, Fu

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative damage and inflammation are related to the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Epidemiologic studies suggest that insufficient dietary lutein and zeaxanthin intake or lower serum zeaxanthin levels are associated with increased risk for AMD. The objective of this work is to test the protective effects of lutein and zeaxanthin against photo-oxidative damage to retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE) and oxidation-induced changes in expression of inflammation-related genes. To mimic lipofuscin-mediated photo-oxidation in vivo, we used ARPE-19 cells that accumulated A2E, a lipofuscin fluorophore and photosensitizer, as a model system to investigate the effects of lutein and zeaxanthin supplementation. The data show that supplementation with lutein or zeaxanthin in the medium resulted in accumulation of lutein or zeaxanthin in the RPE cells. The concentrations of lutein and zeaxanthin in the cells were 2–14-fold of that detected in the medium, indicating that ARPE-19 cells actively take up lutein or zeaxanthin. As compared with untreated cells, exposure of A2E-containing RPE to blue light resulted in a 40–60% decrease in proteasome activity, a 50–80% decrease in expression of CFH and MCP-1, and an ~ 20-fold increase in expression of IL-8. The photo-oxidation-induced changes in expression of MCP-1, IL-8 and CFH were similar to those caused by chemical inhibition of the proteasome, suggesting that inactivation of the proteasome is involved in the photo-oxidation-induced alteration in expression of these inflammation-related genes. Incubation of the A2E-containing RPE with lutein or zeaxanthin prior to blue light exposure significantly attenuated the photo-oxidation-induced inactivation of the proteasome and photo-oxidation induced changes in expression of MCP-1, IL-8, and CFH. Together, these data indicate that lutein or zeaxanthin modulates inflammatory responses in cultured RPE in response to photo-oxidation. Protecting the proteasome

  8. Protective effect of autophagy on human retinal pigment epithelial cells against lipofuscin fluorophore A2E: implications for age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, J; Bai, Y; Huang, L; Qi, Y; Zhang, Q; Li, S; Wu, Y; Li, X

    2015-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of central vision loss in the elderly. Degeneration of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells is a crucial causative factor responsible for the onset and progression of AMD. A2E, a major component of toxic lipofuscin implicated in AMD, is deposited in RPE cells with age. However, the mechanism whereby A2E may contribute to the pathogenesis of AMD remains unclear. We demonstrated that A2E was a danger signal of RPE cells, which induced autophagy and decreased cell viability in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Within 15 min after the treatment of RPE with 25 μM A2E, the induction of autophagosome was detected by transmission electron microscopy. After continuous incubating RPE cells with A2E, intense punctate staining of LC3 and increased expression of LC3-II and Beclin-1 were identified. Meanwhile, the levels of intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM), interleukin (IL)1β, IL2, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17A, IL-22, macrophage cationic peptide (MCP)-1, stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1, and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) were elevated. The autophagic inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA) and activator rapamycin were also used to verify the effect of autophagy on RPE cells against A2E. Our results revealed that 3-MA decreased the autophagosomes and LC3 puncta induced by A2E, increased inflammation-associated protein expression including ICAM, IL1β, IL2, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17A, IL-22, and SDF-1, and upregulated VEGFA expression. Whereas rapamycin augmented the A2E-mediated autophagy, attenuated protein expression of inflammation-associated and angiogenic factors, and blocked the Akt/mTOR pathway. Taken together, A2E induces autophagy in RPE cells at the early stage of incubation, and this autophagic response can be inhibited by 3-MA or augmented by rapamycin via the mTOR pathway. The enhancement of autophagy has a protective role in RPE cells against the adverse effects of A2E by reducing the

  9. Protective effect of autophagy on human retinal pigment epithelial cells against lipofuscin fluorophore A2E: implications for age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Bai, Y; Huang, L; Qi, Y; Zhang, Q; Li, S; Wu, Y; Li, X

    2015-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of central vision loss in the elderly. Degeneration of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells is a crucial causative factor responsible for the onset and progression of AMD. A2E, a major component of toxic lipofuscin implicated in AMD, is deposited in RPE cells with age. However, the mechanism whereby A2E may contribute to the pathogenesis of AMD remains unclear. We demonstrated that A2E was a danger signal of RPE cells, which induced autophagy and decreased cell viability in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Within 15 min after the treatment of RPE with 25 μM A2E, the induction of autophagosome was detected by transmission electron microscopy. After continuous incubating RPE cells with A2E, intense punctate staining of LC3 and increased expression of LC3-II and Beclin-1 were identified. Meanwhile, the levels of intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM), interleukin (IL)1β, IL2, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17A, IL-22, macrophage cationic peptide (MCP)-1, stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1, and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) were elevated. The autophagic inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA) and activator rapamycin were also used to verify the effect of autophagy on RPE cells against A2E. Our results revealed that 3-MA decreased the autophagosomes and LC3 puncta induced by A2E, increased inflammation-associated protein expression including ICAM, IL1β, IL2, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17A, IL-22, and SDF-1, and upregulated VEGFA expression. Whereas rapamycin augmented the A2E-mediated autophagy, attenuated protein expression of inflammation-associated and angiogenic factors, and blocked the Akt/mTOR pathway. Taken together, A2E induces autophagy in RPE cells at the early stage of incubation, and this autophagic response can be inhibited by 3-MA or augmented by rapamycin via the mTOR pathway. The enhancement of autophagy has a protective role in RPE cells against the adverse effects of A2E by reducing the

  10. Matrigel and Activin A promote cell-cell contact and anti-apoptotic activity in cultured human retinal pigment epithelium cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoling; Zhu, Deliang; Lian, Ruiling; Han, Yuting; Guo, Yonglong; Li, Zhijie; Tang, Shibo; Chen, Jiansu

    2016-06-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of blindness among the aging population. Currently, replacement of diseased retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells with transplanted healthy RPE cells could be a feasible approach for AMD therapy. However, maintaining cell-cell contact and good viability of RPE cells cultured in vitro is difficult and fundamentally determines the success of RPE cell transplantation. This study was conducted to examine the role of Matrigel and Activin A (MA) in regulating cell-cell contact and anti-apoptotic activity in human RPE (hRPE) cells, as assessed by atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), immunofluorescence staining, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis, Annexin V/propidium iodide (PI) analysis, mitochondrial membrane potential (△Ψ m) assays, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) assays and Western blotting. hRPE cells cultured in vitro could maintain their epithelioid morphology after MA treatment over at least 4 passages. The contact of N-cadherin to the lateral cell border was promoted in hRPE cells at P2 by MA. MA treatment also enhanced the expression of tight junction-associated genes and proteins, such as Claudin-1, Claudin-3, Occludin and ZO-1, as well as polarized ZO-1 protein distribution and barrier function, in cultured hRPE cells. Moreover, MA treatment decreased apoptotic cells, ROS and Bax and increased △Ψ m and Bcl2 in hRPE cells under serum withdrawal-induced apoptosis. In addition, MA treatment elevated the protein expression levels of β-catenin and its target proteins, including Cyclin D1, c-Myc and Survivin, as well as the gene expression levels of ZO-1, β-catenin, Survivin and TCF-4, all of which could be down-regulated by the Wnt/β-catenin pathway inhibitor XAV-939. Taken together, MA treatment could effectively promote cell-cell contact and anti-apoptotic activity in hRPE cells, partly involving the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. This study

  11. Efficient delivery of NF-κB siRNA to human retinal pigment epithelial cells with hyperbranched cationic polysaccharide derivative-based nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhenzhen; Gong, Haijun; Zeng, Rui; Liang, Xuan; Zhang, Li-Ming; Yang, Liqun; Lan, Yuqing

    2015-01-01

    A hyperbranched cationic polysaccharide derivative-mediated small interfering (si)RNA interference strategy was proposed to inhibit nuclear transcription factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation in human retinal pigment epithelial (hRPE) cells for the gene therapy of diabetic retinopathy. Two hyperbranched cationic polysaccharide derivatives containing the same amount of cationic residues, but with different branching structures and molecular weights, including 3-(dimethylamino)-1-propylamine-conjugated glycogen (DMAPA-Glyp) and amylopectin (DMAPA-Amp) derivatives, were developed for the efficient delivery of NF-κB siRNA into hRPE cells. The DMAPA-Glyp derivative showed lower toxicity against hRPE cells. Furthermore, the DMAPA-Glyp derivative more readily condensed siRNA and then formed the nanoparticles attributed to its higher branching architecture when compared to the DMAPA-Amp derivative. Both DMAPA-Glyp/siRNA and DMAPA-Amp/siRNA nanoparticles were able to protect siRNA from degradation by nuclease in 25% fetal bovine serum. The particle sizes of the DMAPA-Glyp/siRNA nanoparticles (70–120 nm) were smaller than those of the DMAPA-Amp/siRNA nanoparticles (130–180 nm) due to the higher branching architecture and lower molecular weight of the DMAPA-Glyp derivative. In addition, the zeta potentials of the DMAPA-Glyp/siRNA nanoparticles were higher than those of the DMAPA-Glyp/siRNA nanoparticles. As a result, siRNA was much more efficiently transferred into hRPE cells using the DMAPA-Glyp/siRNA nanoparticles rather than the DMAPA-Amp/siRNA nanoparticles. This led to significantly high levels of suppression on the expression levels of NF-κB p65 messenger RNA and protein in the cells transfected with DMAPA-Glyp/siRNA nanoparticles. This work provides a potential approach to promote hyperbranched polysaccharide derivatives as nonviral siRNA vectors for the inhibition of NF-κB activation in hRPE cells. PMID:25897219

  12. A Constitutively Active Gαi3 Protein Corrects the Abnormal Retinal Pigment Epithelium Phenotype of Oa1−/− mice

    PubMed Central

    Young, Alejandra; Wang, Ying; Ahmedli, Novruz B.; Jiang, Meisheng; Farber, Debora B.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Ocular Albinism type 1 (OA1) is a disease caused by mutations in the OA1 gene and characterized by the presence of macromelanosomes in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) as well as abnormal crossing of the optic axons at the optic chiasm. We showed in our previous studies in mice that Oa1 activates specifically Gαi3 in its signaling pathway and thus, hypothesized that a constitutively active Gαi3 in the RPE of Oa1−/− mice might keep on the Oa1 signaling cascade and prevent the formation of macromelanosomes. To test this hypothesis, we have generated transgenic mice that carry the constitutively active Gαi3 (Q204L) protein in the RPE of Oa1−/− mice and are now reporting the effects that the transgene produced on the Oa1−/− RPE phenotype. Methods Transgenic mice carrying RPE-specific expression of the constitutively active Gαi3 (Q204L) were generated by injecting fertilized eggs of Oa1−/− females with a lentivirus containing the Gαi3 (Q204L) cDNA. PCR, Southern blots, Western blots and confocal microscopy were used to confirm the presence of the transgene in the RPE of positive transgenic mice. Morphometrical analyses were performed using electron microscopy to compare the size and number of melanosomes per RPE area in putative Oa1−/−, Gαi3 (Q204L) transgenic mice with those of wild-type NCrl and Oa1−/− mice. Results We found a correlation between the presence of the constitutively active Gαi3 (Q204L) transgene and the rescue of the normal phenotype of RPE melanosomes in Oa1−/−, Gαi3 (Q204L) mice. These mice have higher density of melanosomes per RPE area and a larger number of small melanosomes than Oa1−/− mice, and their RPE phenotype is similar to that of wild-type mice. Conclusions Our results show that a constitutively active Gαi3 protein can by-pass the lack of Oa1 protein in Oa1−/− mice and consequently rescue the RPE melanosomal phenotype. PMID:24098784

  13. Cholesterol enhances amyloid {beta} deposition in mouse retina by modulating the activities of A{beta}-regulating enzymes in retinal pigment epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jiying; Ohno-Matsui, Kyoko; Morita, Ikuo

    2012-08-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cholesterol-treated RPE produces more A{beta} than non-treated RPE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neprilysin expression and activity decreased in cholesterol-treated RPE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {alpha}-Secretase expression and activity decreased in cholesterol-treated RPE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cholesterol-enriched diet induced subRPE deposits in aged mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A{beta} were present in cholesterol-enriched-diet-induced subRPE deposits in aged mice. -- Abstract: Subretinally-deposited amyloid {beta} (A{beta}) is a main contributor of developing age-related macular degeneration (AMD). However, the mechanism causing A{beta} deposition in AMD eyes is unknown. Hypercholesterolemia is a significant risk for developing AMD. Thus, we investigated the effects of cholesterol on A{beta} production in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in vitro and in the mouse retina in vivo. RPE cells isolated from senescent (12-month-old) C57BL/6 mice were treated with 10 {mu}g/ml cholesterol for 48 h. A{beta} amounts in culture supernatants were measured by ELISA. Activity and expression of enzymes and proteins that regulate A{beta} production were examined by activity assay and real time PCR. The retina of mice fed cholesterol-enriched diet was examined by transmission electron microscopy. Cholesterol significantly increased A{beta} production in cultured RPE cells. Activities of A{beta} degradation enzyme; neprilysin (NEP) and anti-amyloidogenic secretase; {alpha}-secretase were significantly decreased in cell lysates of cholesterol-treated RPE cells compared to non-treated cells, but there was no change in the activities of {beta}- or {gamma}-secretase. mRNA levels of NEP and {alpha}-secretase (ADAM10 and ADAM17) were significantly lower in cholesterol-treated RPE cells than non-treated cells. Senescent (12-month-old) mice fed cholesterol-enriched chow developed subRPE deposits containing A{beta}, whereas

  14. Functional and Molecular Characterization of Rod-like Cells from Retinal Stem Cells Derived from the Adult Ciliary Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Demontis, Gian Carlo; Aruta, Claudia; Comitato, Antonella; De Marzo, Anna; Marigo, Valeria

    2012-01-01

    In vitro generation of photoreceptors from stem cells is of great interest for the development of regenerative medicine approaches for patients affected by retinal degeneration and for high throughput drug screens for these diseases. In this study, we show unprecedented high percentages of rod-fated cells from retinal stem cells of the adult ciliary epithelium. Molecular characterization of rod-like cells demonstrates that they lose ciliary epithelial characteristics but acquire photoreceptor features. Rod maturation was evaluated at two levels: gene expression and electrophysiological functionality. Here we present a strong correlation between phototransduction protein expression and functionality of the cells in vitro. We demonstrate that in vitro generated rod-like cells express cGMP-gated channels that are gated by endogenous cGMP. We also identified voltage-gated channels necessary for rod maturation and viability. This level of analysis for the first time provides evidence that adult retinal stem cells can generate highly homogeneous rod-fated cells. PMID:22432014

  15. Retinitis Pigmentosa

    MedlinePlus

    ... Action You are here Home › Retinal Diseases Listen Retinitis Pigmentosa What is retinitis pigmentosa? What are the symptoms? ... available? Are there any related diseases? What is retinitis pigmentosa? Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) refers to a group of ...

  16. Adult ciliary epithelial stem cells generate functional neurons and differentiate into both early and late born retinal neurons under non-cell autonomous influences

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The neural stem cells discovered in the adult ciliary epithelium (CE) in higher vertebrates have emerged as an accessible source of retinal progenitors; these cells can self-renew and possess retinal potential. However, recent studies have cast doubt as to whether these cells could generate functional neurons and differentiate along the retinal lineage. Here, we have systematically examined the pan neural and retinal potential of CE stem cells. Results Molecular and cellular analysis was carried out to examine the plasticity of CE stem cells, obtained from mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the influence of the promoter of the rod photoreceptor-specific gene, Nrl, using the neurospheres assay. Differentiation was induced by specific culture conditions and evaluated by both transcripts and protein levels of lineage-specific regulators and markers. Temporal pattern of their levels were examined to determine the expression of genes and proteins underlying the regulatory hierarchy of cells specific differentiation in vitro. Functional attributes of differentiation were examined by the presence of current profiles and pharmacological mobilization of intracellular calcium using whole cell recordings and Fura-based calcium imaging, respectively. We demonstrate that stem cells in adult CE not only have the capacity to generate functional neurons, acquiring the expression of sodium and potassium channels, but also respond to specific cues in culture and preferentially differentiate along the lineages of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and rod photoreceptors, the early and late born retinal neurons, respectively. The retinal differentiation of CE stem cells was characterized by the temporal acquisition of the expression of the regulators of RGCs and rod photoreceptors, followed by the display of cell type-specific mature markers and mobilization of intracellular calcium. Conclusions Our study demonstrates the bonafide retinal potential of adult CE

  17. Fatp1 Deficiency Affects Retinal Light Response and Dark Adaptation, and Induces Age-Related Alterations

    PubMed Central

    Chekroud, Karim; Guillou, Laurent; Grégoire, Stephane; Ducharme, Gilles; Brun, Emilie; Cazevieille, Chantal; Bretillon, Lionel; Hamel, Christian P.

    2012-01-01

    FATP1 is involved in lipid transport into cells and in intracellular lipid metabolism. We showed previously that this protein interacts with and inhibits the limiting-step isomerase of the visual cycle RPE65. Here, we aimed to analyze the effect of Fatp1-deficiency in vivo on the visual cycle, structure and function, and on retinal aging. Among the Fatp family members, we observed that only Fatp1 and 4 are expressed in the control retina, in both the neuroretina and the retinal pigment epithelium. In the neuroretina, Fatp1 is mostly expressed in photoreceptors. In young adult Fatp1−/− mice, Fatp4 expression was unchanged in retinal pigment epithelium and reduced two-fold in the neuroretina as compared to Fatp1+/+ mice. The Fatp1−/− mice had a preserved retinal structure but a decreased electroretinogram response to light. These mice also displayed a delayed recovery of the b-wave amplitude after bleaching, however, visual cycle speed was unchanged, and both retinal pigment epithelium and photoreceptors presented the same fatty acid pattern compared to controls. In 2 year-old Fatp1−/− mice, transmission electron microscopy studies showed specific abnormalities in the retinas comprising choroid vascularization anomalies and thickening of the Bruch membrane with material deposits, and sometimes local disorganization of the photoreceptor outer segments. These anomalies lead us to speculate that the absence of FATP1 accelerates the aging process. PMID:23166839

  18. Membrane-bound and soluble Fas ligands have opposite functions in photoreceptor cell death following separation from the retinal pigment epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, H; Murakami, Y; Kataoka, K; Notomi, S; Mantopoulos, D; Trichonas, G; Miller, J W; Gregory, M S; Ksander, B R; Marshak-Rothstein, A; Vavvas, D G

    2015-01-01

    Fas ligand (FasL) triggers apoptosis of Fas-positive cells, and previous reports described FasL-induced cell death of Fas-positive photoreceptors following a retinal detachment. However, as FasL exists in membrane-bound (mFasL) and soluble (sFasL) forms, and is expressed on resident microglia and infiltrating monocyte/macrophages, the current study examined the relative contribution of mFasL and sFasL to photoreceptor cell death after induction of experimental retinal detachment in wild-type, knockout (FasL−/−), and mFasL-only knock-in (ΔCS) mice. Retinal detachment in FasL−/− mice resulted in a significant reduction of photoreceptor cell death. In contrast, ΔCS mice displayed significantly more apoptotic photoreceptor cell death. Photoreceptor loss in ΔCS mice was inhibited by a subretinal injection of recombinant sFasL. Thus, Fas/FasL-triggered cell death accounts for a significant amount of photoreceptor cell loss following the retinal detachment. The function of FasL was dependent upon the form of FasL expressed: mFasL triggered photoreceptor cell death, whereas sFasL protected the retina, indicating that enzyme-mediated cleavage of FasL determines, in part, the extent of vision loss following the retinal detachment. Moreover, it also indicates that treatment with sFasL could significantly reduce photoreceptor cell loss in patients with retinal detachment. PMID:26583327

  19. Tyrosinase-Cre-Mediated Deletion of the Autophagy Gene Atg7 Leads to Accumulation of the RPE65 Variant M450 in the Retinal Pigment Epithelium of C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sukseree, Supawadee; Chen, Ying-Ting; Laggner, Maria; Gruber, Florian; Petit, Valérie; Nagelreiter, Ionela-Mariana; Mlitz, Veronika; Rossiter, Heidemarie; Pollreisz, Andreas; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula; Larue, Lionel; Tschachler, Erwin

    2016-01-01

    Targeted gene knockout mouse models have helped to identify roles of autophagy in many tissues. Here, we investigated the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) of Atg7f/f Tyr-Cre mice (on a C57BL/6 background), in which Cre recombinase is expressed under the control of the tyrosinase promoter to delete the autophagy gene Atg7. In line with pigment cell-directed blockade of autophagy, the RPE and the melanocytes of the choroid showed strong accumulation of the autophagy adaptor and substrate, sequestosome 1 (Sqstm1)/p62, relative to the levels in control mice. Immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis demonstrated that the RPE, but not the choroid melanocytes, of Atg7f/f Tyr-Cre mice also had strongly increased levels of retinoid isomerohydrolase RPE65, a pivotal enzyme for the maintenance of visual perception. In contrast to Sqstm1, genes involved in retinal regeneration, i.e. Lrat, Rdh5, Rgr, and Rpe65, were expressed at higher mRNA levels. Sequencing of the Rpe65 gene showed that Atg7f/f and Atg7f/f Tyr-Cre mice carry a point mutation (L450M) that is characteristic for the C57BL/6 mouse strain and reportedly causes enhanced degradation of the RPE65 protein by an as-yet unknown mechanism. These results suggest that the increased abundance of RPE65 M450 in the RPE of Atg7f/f Tyr-Cre mice is, at least partly, mediated by upregulation of Rpe65 transcription; however, our data are also compatible with the hypothesis that the RPE65 M450 protein is degraded by Atg7-dependent autophagy in Atg7f/f mice. Further studies in mice of different genetic backgrounds are necessary to determine the relative contributions of these mechanisms. PMID:27537685

  20. Reduction in Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness in Young Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emberti Gialloreti, Leonardo; Pardini, Matteo; Benassi, Francesca; Marciano, Sara; Amore, Mario; Mutolo, Maria Giulia; Porfirio, Maria Cristina; Curatolo, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Recent years have seen an increase in the use of retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) evaluation as an easy-to-use, reproducible, proxy-measure of brain structural abnormalities. Here, we evaluated RNFL thickness in a group of subjects with high functioning autism (HFA) or with Asperger Syndrome (AS) to its potential as a tool to study autism…

  1. Genetics Home Reference: adult-onset leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia

    MedlinePlus

    ... it causes a severe decline in thinking and reasoning abilities (dementia). Over time, motor skills are affected, ... Schmahmann JD. Adult onset leukodystrophy with neuroaxonal spheroids: clinical, neuroimaging and neuropathologic observations. Brain Pathol. 2009 Jan; ...

  2. Di-retinoid-pyridinium-ethanolamine (A2E) Accumulation and the Maintenance of the Visual Cycle Are Independent of Atg7-mediated Autophagy in the Retinal Pigmented Epithelium.

    PubMed

    Perusek, Lindsay; Sahu, Bhubanananda; Parmar, Tanu; Maeno, Hiroshi; Arai, Eisuke; Le, Yun-Zheng; Subauste, Carlos S; Chen, Yu; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Maeda, Akiko

    2015-11-27

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved catabolic mechanism that relieves cellular stress by removing/recycling damaged organelles and debris through the action of lysosomes. Compromised autophagy has been implicated in many neurodegenerative diseases, including retinal degeneration. Here we examined retinal phenotypes resulting from RPE-specific deletion of the autophagy regulatory gene Atg7 by generating Atg7(flox/flox);VMD2-rtTA-cre+ mice to determine whether autophagy is essential for RPE functions including retinoid recycling. Atg7-deficient RPE displayed abnormal morphology with increased RPE thickness, cellular debris and vacuole formation indicating that autophagy is important in maintaining RPE homeostasis. In contrast, 11-cis-retinal content, ERGs and retinal histology were normal in mice with Atg7-deficient RPE in both fasted and fed states. Because A2E accumulation in the RPE is associated with pathogenesis of both Stargardt disease and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in humans, deletion of Abca4 was introduced into Atg7(flox/flox);VMD2-rtTA-cre+ mice to investigate the role of autophagy during A2E accumulation. Comparable A2E concentrations were detected in the eyes of 6-month-old mice with and without Atg7 from both Abca4(-/-) and Abca4(+/+) backgrounds. To identify other autophagy-related molecules involved in A2E accumulation, we performed gene expression array analysis on A2E-treated human RPE cells and found up-regulation of four autophagy related genes; DRAM1, NPC1, CASP3, and EIF2AK3/PERK. These observations indicate that Atg7-mediated autophagy is dispensable for retinoid recycling and A2E deposition; however, autophagy plays a role in coping with stress caused by A2E accumulation. PMID:26468292

  3. Recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 4 mediates unique and exclusive long-term transduction of retinal pigmented epithelium in rat, dog, and nonhuman primate after subretinal delivery.

    PubMed

    Weber, Michel; Rabinowitz, Joseph; Provost, Nathalie; Conrath, Hervé; Folliot, Sébastien; Briot, Delphine; Chérel, Yan; Chenuaud, Pierre; Samulski, Jude; Moullier, Philippe; Rolling, Fabienne

    2003-06-01

    We previously described chimeric recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors 2/4 and 2/5 as the most efficient vectors in rat retina. We now characterize these two vectors carrying the CMV.gfp genome following subretinal injection in the Wistar rat, beagle dog, and cynomolgus macaque. Both serotypes displayed stable GFP expression for the duration of the experiment (6 months) in all three animal models. Similar to the AAV-2 serotype, AAV-2/5 transduced both RPE and photoreceptor cells, with higher level of transduction in photoreceptors, whereas rAAV-2/4 transduction was unambiguously restricted to RPE cells. This unique specificity found conserved among all three species makes AAV-2/4-derived vectors attractive for retinal diseases originating in RPE such as Leber congenital amaurosis (RPE65) or retinitis pigmentosa due to a mutated mertk gene. To provide further important preclinical data, vector shedding was monitored by PCR in various biological fluids for 2 months post-rAAV administration. Following rAAV-2/4 and -5 subretinal delivery in dogs (n = 6) and in nonhuman primates (n = 2), vector genome was found in lacrymal and nasal fluids for up to 3-4 days and in the serum for up to 15-20 days. Overall, these findings will have a practical impact on the development of future gene therapy trials of retinal diseases. PMID:12788651

  4. Skin Pigment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professional Version Pigment Disorders Overview of Skin Pigment Albinism Vitiligo Hyperpigmentation Melasma Melanin is the brown pigment ... dark-skinned people produce the most. People with albinism have little or no melanin and thus their ...

  5. Safety and Proof-of-Concept Study of Oral QLT091001 in Retinitis Pigmentosa Due to Inherited Deficiencies of Retinal Pigment Epithelial 65 Protein (RPE65) or Lecithin:Retinol Acyltransferase (LRAT)

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Yuquan; Fishman, Gerald A.; van den Born, L. Ingeborgh; Bittner, Ava; Bowles, Kristen; Fletcher, Emily C.; Collison, Frederick T.; Dagnelie, Gislin; Degli Eposti, Simona; Michaelides, Michel; Saperstein, David A.; Schuchard, Ronald A.; Barnes, Claire; Zein, Wadih; Zobor, Ditta; Birch, David G.; Mendola, Janine D.; Zrenner, Eberhart

    2015-01-01

    Restoring vision in inherited retinal degenerations remains an unmet medical need. In mice exhibiting a genetically engineered block of the visual cycle, vision was recently successfully restored by oral administration of 9-cis-retinyl acetate (QLT091001). Safety and visual outcomes of a once-daily oral dose of 40 mg/m2/day QLT091001 for 7 consecutive days was investigated in an international, multi-center, open-label, proof-of-concept study in 18 patients with RPE65- or LRAT-related retinitis pigmentosa. Eight of 18 patients (44%) showed a ≥20% increase and 4 of 18 (22%) showed a ≥40% increase in functional retinal area determined from Goldmann visual fields; 12 (67%) and 5 (28%) of 18 patients showed a ≥5 and ≥10 ETDRS letter score increase of visual acuity, respectively, in one or both eyes at two or more visits within 2 months of treatment. In two patients who underwent fMRI, a significant positive response was measured to stimuli of medium contrast, moving, pattern targets in both left and right hemispheres of the occipital cortex. There were no serious adverse events. Treatment-related adverse events were transient and the most common included headache, photophobia, nausea, vomiting, and minor biochemical abnormalities. Measuring the outer segment length of the photoreceptor layer with high-definition optical coherence tomography was highly predictive of treatment responses with responders having a significantly larger baseline outer segment thickness (11.7 ± 4.8 μm, mean ± 95% CI) than non-responders (3.5 ± 1.2 μm). This structure-function relationship suggests that treatment with QLT091001 is more likely to be efficacious if there is sufficient photoreceptor integrity. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01014052 PMID:26656277

  6. Using patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells to interrogate the pathogenicity of a novel retinal pigment epithelium-specific 65 kDa cryptic splice site mutation and confirm eligibility for enrollment into a clinical gene augmentation trial.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Budd A; Cranston, Cathryn M; Anfinson, Kristin A; Shrestha, Suruchi; Streb, Luan M; Leon, Alejandro; Mullins, Robert F; Stone, Edwin M

    2015-12-01

    Retinal pigment epithelium-specific 65 kDa (RPE65)-associated Leber congenital amaurosis is an autosomal recessive disease that results in reduced visual acuity and night blindness beginning at birth. It is one of the few retinal degenerative disorders for which promising clinical gene transfer trials are currently underway. However, the ability to enroll patients in a gene augmentation trial is dependent on the identification of 2 bona fide disease-causing mutations, and there are some patients with the phenotype of RPE65-associated disease who might benefit from gene transfer but are ineligible because 2 disease-causing genetic variations have not yet been identified. Some such patients have novel mutations in RPE65 for which pathogenicity is difficult to confirm. The goal of this study was to determine if an intronic mutation identified in a 2-year-old patient with presumed RPE65-associated disease was truly pathogenic and grounds for inclusion in a clinical gene augmentation trial. Sequencing of the RPE65 gene revealed 2 mutations: (1) a previously identified disease-causing exonic leucine-to-proline mutation (L408P) and (2) a novel single point mutation in intron 3 (IVS3-11) resulting in an A>G change. RT-PCR analysis using RNA extracted from control human donor eye-derived primary RPE, control iPSC-RPE cells, and proband iPSC-RPE cells revealed that the identified IVS3-11 variation caused a splicing defect that resulted in a frameshift and insertion of a premature stop codon. In this study, we demonstrate how patient-specific iPSCs can be used to confirm pathogenicity of unknown mutations, which can enable positive clinical outcomes. PMID:26364624

  7. Epithelia-mesenchyme interaction plays an essential role in transdifferentiation of retinal pigment epithelium of silver mutant quail: localization of FGF and related molecules and aberrant migration pattern of neural crest cells during eye rudiment formation.

    PubMed

    Araki, Masasuke; Takano, Takako; Uemonsa, Tomoko; Nakane, Yoshifumi; Tsudzuki, Masaoki; Kaneko, Tomoko

    2002-04-15

    Homozygotes of the quail silver mutation, which have plumage color changes, also display a unique phenotype in the eye: during early embryonic development, the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) spontaneously transdifferentiates into neural retinal tissue. Mitf is considered to be the responsible gene and to function similarly to the mouse microphthalmia mutation, and tissue interaction between RPE and surrounding mesenchymal tissue in organ culture has been shown to be essential for the initiation of the transdifferentiation process in which fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling is involved. The immunohistochemical results of the present study show that laminin and heparan sulfate proteoglycan, both acting as cofactors for FGF binding, are localized in the area of transdifferentiation of silver embryos much more abundantly than in wild-type embryos. More intense immunohistochemical staining with FGF-1 antibody, but not with FGF-2 antibody, is also found in the neural retina, RPE, and choroidal tissue of silver embryos than in wild-type embryos. HNK-1 immunohistochemistry revealed that clusters of HNK-1-positive cells (presumptive migrating neural crest cells) are frequently located around the developing eyes and in the posterior region of the silver embryonic eye. Finally, chick-quail chimerical eyes were made by grafting silver quail optic vesicles to chicken host embryos: in most cases, no transdifferentiation occurs in the silver RPE, but in a few cases, transdifferentiation occurs where silver quail cells predominate in the choroid tissue. These observations together with our previous in vitro study indicate that the silver mutation affects not only RPE cells but also cephalic neural crest cells, which migrate to the eye rudiment, and that these crest cells play an essential role in the transdifferentiation of RPE, possibly by modifying the FGF signaling pathway. The precise molecular mechanism involved in RPE-neural crest cell interaction is still unknown

  8. 3H-1,2-dithiole-3-thione protects retinal pigment epithelium cells against Ultra-violet radiation via activation of Akt-mTORC1-dependent Nrf2-HO-1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Ke-Ran; Yang, Su-Qing; Gong, Yi-Qing; Yang, Hong; Li, Xiu-Miao; Zhao, Yu-Xia; Yao, Jin; Jiang, Qin; Cao, Cong

    2016-01-01

    Excessive UV radiation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) cause retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cell injuries. Nrf2 regulates transcriptional activation of many anti-oxidant genes. Here, we tested the potential role of 3H-1,2-dithiole-3-thione (D3T) against UV or ROS damages in cultured RPE cells (both primary cells and ARPE-19 line). We showed that D3T significantly inhibited UV-/H2O2-induced RPE cell death and apoptosis. UV-stimulated ROS production was dramatically inhibited by D3T pretreatment. D3T induced Nrf2 phosphorylation in cultured RPE cells, causing Nrf2 disassociation with KEAP1 and its subsequent nuclear accumulation. This led to expression of antioxidant response elements (ARE)-dependent gene heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Nrf2-HO-1 activation was required for D3T-mediated cytoprotective effect. Nrf2 shRNA knockdown or S40T dominant negative mutation as well as the HO-1 inhibitor Zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) largely inhibited D3T's RPE cytoprotective effects against UV radiation. Yet, exogenous overexpression Nrf2 enhanced D3T's activity in RPE cells. Further studies showed that D3T activated Akt/mTORC1 in cultured RPE cells. Akt-mTORC1 inhibitors, or Akt1 knockdown by shRNA, not only inhibited D3T-induced Nrf2-HO-1 activation, but also abolished the RPE cytoprotective effects. In vivo, D3T intravitreal injection protected from light-induced retinal dysfunctions in mice. Thus, D3T protects RPE cells from UV-induced damages via activation of Akt-mTORC1-Nrf2-HO-1 signaling axis. PMID:27151674

  9. 3H-1,2-dithiole-3-thione protects retinal pigment epithelium cells against Ultra-violet radiation via activation of Akt-mTORC1-dependent Nrf2-HO-1 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ke-ran; Yang, Su-qing; Gong, Yi-qing; Yang, Hong; Li, Xiu-miao; Zhao, Yu-xia; Yao, Jin; Jiang, Qin; Cao, Cong

    2016-01-01

    Excessive UV radiation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) cause retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cell injuries. Nrf2 regulates transcriptional activation of many anti-oxidant genes. Here, we tested the potential role of 3H-1,2-dithiole-3-thione (D3T) against UV or ROS damages in cultured RPE cells (both primary cells and ARPE-19 line). We showed that D3T significantly inhibited UV-/H2O2-induced RPE cell death and apoptosis. UV-stimulated ROS production was dramatically inhibited by D3T pretreatment. D3T induced Nrf2 phosphorylation in cultured RPE cells, causing Nrf2 disassociation with KEAP1 and its subsequent nuclear accumulation. This led to expression of antioxidant response elements (ARE)-dependent gene heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Nrf2-HO-1 activation was required for D3T-mediated cytoprotective effect. Nrf2 shRNA knockdown or S40T dominant negative mutation as well as the HO-1 inhibitor Zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) largely inhibited D3T’s RPE cytoprotective effects against UV radiation. Yet, exogenous overexpression Nrf2 enhanced D3T’s activity in RPE cells. Further studies showed that D3T activated Akt/mTORC1 in cultured RPE cells. Akt-mTORC1 inhibitors, or Akt1 knockdown by shRNA, not only inhibited D3T-induced Nrf2-HO-1 activation, but also abolished the RPE cytoprotective effects. In vivo, D3T intravitreal injection protected from light-induced retinal dysfunctions in mice. Thus, D3T protects RPE cells from UV-induced damages via activation of Akt-mTORC1-Nrf2-HO-1 signaling axis. PMID:27151674

  10. Neural Stem Cell-based Intraocular Administration of Pigment Epithelium-derived Factor Promotes Retinal Ganglion Cell Survival and Axon Regeneration after Optic Nerve Crush Injury in Rat: An Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei-Min; Zhang, Zhi-Ren; Zhang, Yong-Gang; Gao, Yan-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) is regarded as a multifunctional protein possessing neurotrophic and neuroprotective properties. PEDF has a very short half-life, and it would require multiple injections to maintain a therapeutically relevant level without a delivery system. However, multiple injections are prone to cause local damage or infection. To overcome this, we chose a cell-based system that provided sustained delivery of PEDF and compared the effect of weekly injections of PEDF and neural stem cell (NSC)-based intraocular administration of PEDF on retinal ganglion cell (RGC) survival and axon regeneration after optic nerve injury. Methods: Seventy-two rats were randomly assigned to 3 groups: group with injections of phosphate buffered saline (PBS) (n=24), group with weekly injections of PEDF (n=24), and group with NSC-based administration of PEDF (n=24). Western blot was used to analyze the PEDF protein level 2 weeks after injection. Retinal flat mounts and immunohistochemistry were employed to analyze RGC survival and axon regeneration 2 weeks and 4 weeks after injection. The data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA in SPSS (version 19.0). A P<0.05 was considered significant. Results: The PEDF protein level in the group with NSC-based administration of PEDF increased compared with that in the groups with injections of PEDF and PBS (P<0.05). The PEDF-modified NSCs differentiated into GFAP-positive astrocytes andβ-tubulin-III-positive neurons. NSC-based administration of PEDF effectively increased RGC survival and improved the axon regeneration of the optic nerve compared with weekly injections of PEDF. Conclusion: Subretinal space transplantation of PEDF-secreting NSCs sustained high concentrations of PEDF, differentiated into neurons and astrocytes, and significantly promoted RGC survival and axon regeneration after optic nerve injury. PMID:27582587

  11. The generation of induced pluripotent stem cells for macular degeneration as a drug screening platform: identification of curcumin as a protective agent for retinal pigment epithelial cells against oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yun-Ching; Chang, Wei-Chao; Hung, Kuo-Hsuan; Yang, Der-Ming; Cheng, Yung-Hsin; Liao, Yi-Wen; Woung, Lin-Chung; Tsai, Ching-Yao; Hsu, Chih-Chien; Lin, Tai-Chi; Liu, Jorn-Hon; Chiou, Shih-Hwa; Peng, Chi-Hsien; Chen, Shih-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is one retinal aging process that may lead to irreversible vision loss in the elderly. Its pathogenesis remains unclear, but oxidative stress inducing retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells damage is perhaps responsible for the aging sequence of retina and may play an important role in macular degeneration. In this study, we have reprogrammed T cells from patients with dry type AMD into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) via integration-free episomal vectors and differentiated them into RPE cells that were used as an expandable platform for investigating pathogenesis of the AMD and in-vitro drug screening. These patient-derived RPEs with the AMD-associated background (AMD-RPEs) exhibited reduced antioxidant ability, compared with normal RPE cells. Among several screened candidate drugs, curcumin caused most significant reduction of ROS in AMD-RPEs. Pre-treatment of curcumin protected these AMD-RPEs from H2O2-induced cell death and also increased the cytoprotective effect against the oxidative stress of H2O2 through the reduction of ROS levels. In addition, curcumin with its versatile activities modulated the expression of many oxidative stress-regulating genes such as PDGF, VEGF, IGFBP-2, HO1, SOD2, and GPX1. Our findings indicated that the RPE cells derived from AMD patients have decreased antioxidative defense, making RPE cells more susceptible to oxidative damage and thereby leading to AMD formation. Curcumin represented an ideal drug that can effectively restore the neuronal functions in AMD patient-derived RPE cells, rendering this drug an effective option for macular degeneration therapy and an agent against aging-associated oxidative stress. PMID:25136316

  12. Lysosomal-mediated waste clearance in retinal pigment epithelial cells is regulated by CRYBA1/βA3/A1-crystallin via V-ATPase-MTORC1 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Valapala, Mallika; Wilson, Christine; Hose, Stacey; Bhutto, Imran A; Grebe, Rhonda; Dong, Aling; Greenbaum, Seth; Gu, Limin; Sengupta, Samhita; Cano, Marisol; Hackett, Sean; Xu, Guotong; Lutty, Gerard A; Dong, Lijin; Sergeev, Yuri; Handa, James T; Campochiaro, Peter; Wawrousek, Eric; Zigler, Jr, J Samuel; Sinha, Debasish

    2014-01-01

    In phagocytic cells, including the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), acidic compartments of the endolysosomal system are regulators of both phagocytosis and autophagy, thereby helping to maintain cellular homeostasis. The acidification of the endolysosomal system is modulated by a proton pump, the V-ATPase, but the mechanisms that direct the activity of the V-ATPase remain elusive. We found that in RPE cells, CRYBA1/βA3/A1-crystallin, a lens protein also expressed in RPE, is localized to lysosomes, where it regulates endolysosomal acidification by modulating the V-ATPase, thereby controlling both phagocytosis and autophagy. We demonstrated that CRYBA1 coimmunoprecipitates with the ATP6V0A1/V0-ATPase a1 subunit. Interestingly, in mice when Cryba1 (the gene encoding both the βA3- and βA1-crystallin forms) is knocked out specifically in RPE, V-ATPase activity is decreased and lysosomal pH is elevated, while cathepsin D (CTSD) activity is decreased. Fundus photographs of these Cryba1 conditional knockout (cKO) mice showed scattered lesions by 4 months of age that increased in older mice, with accumulation of lipid-droplets as determined by immunohistochemistry. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of cryba1 cKO mice revealed vacuole-like structures with partially degraded cellular organelles, undigested photoreceptor outer segments and accumulation of autophagosomes. Further, following autophagy induction both in vivo and in vitro, phospho-AKT and phospho-RPTOR/Raptor decrease, while pMTOR increases in RPE cells, inhibiting autophagy and AKT-MTORC1 signaling. Impaired lysosomal clearance in the RPE of the cryba1 cKO mice also resulted in abnormalities in retinal function that increased with age, as demonstrated by electroretinography. Our findings suggest that loss of CRYBA1 causes lysosomal dysregulation leading to the impairment of both autophagy and phagocytosis. PMID:24468901

  13. Lysosomal-mediated waste clearance in retinal pigment epithelial cells is regulated by CRYBA1/βA3/A1-crystallin via V-ATPase-MTORC1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Valapala, Mallika; Wilson, Christine; Hose, Stacey; Bhutto, Imran A; Grebe, Rhonda; Dong, Aling; Greenbaum, Seth; Gu, Limin; Sengupta, Samhita; Cano, Marisol; Hackett, Sean; Xu, Guotong; Lutty, Gerard A; Dong, Lijin; Sergeev, Yuri; Handa, James T; Campochiaro, Peter; Wawrousek, Eric; Zigler, J Samuel; Sinha, Debasish

    2014-03-01

    In phagocytic cells, including the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), acidic compartments of the endolysosomal system are regulators of both phagocytosis and autophagy, thereby helping to maintain cellular homeostasis. The acidification of the endolysosomal system is modulated by a proton pump, the V-ATPase, but the mechanisms that direct the activity of the V-ATPase remain elusive. We found that in RPE cells, CRYBA1/βA3/A1-crystallin, a lens protein also expressed in RPE, is localized to lysosomes, where it regulates endolysosomal acidification by modulating the V-ATPase, thereby controlling both phagocytosis and autophagy. We demonstrated that CRYBA1 coimmunoprecipitates with the ATP6V0A1/V0-ATPase a1 subunit. Interestingly, in mice when Cryba1 (the gene encoding both the βA3- and βA1-crystallin forms) is knocked out specifically in RPE, V-ATPase activity is decreased and lysosomal pH is elevated, while cathepsin D (CTSD) activity is decreased. Fundus photographs of these Cryba1 conditional knockout (cKO) mice showed scattered lesions by 4 months of age that increased in older mice, with accumulation of lipid-droplets as determined by immunohistochemistry. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of cryba1 cKO mice revealed vacuole-like structures with partially degraded cellular organelles, undigested photoreceptor outer segments and accumulation of autophagosomes. Further, following autophagy induction both in vivo and in vitro, phospho-AKT and phospho-RPTOR/Raptor decrease, while pMTOR increases in RPE cells, inhibiting autophagy and AKT-MTORC1 signaling. Impaired lysosomal clearance in the RPE of the cryba1 cKO mice also resulted in abnormalities in retinal function that increased with age, as demonstrated by electroretinography. Our findings suggest that loss of CRYBA1 causes lysosomal dysregulation leading to the impairment of both autophagy and phagocytosis. PMID:24468901

  14. LONG-TERM SD-OCT/SLO IMAGING OF NEURORETINA AND RETINAL PIGMENT EPITHELIUM AFTER SUB-THRESHOLD INFRARED LASER TREATMENT OF DRUSEN

    PubMed Central

    MOJANA, FRANCESCA; BRAR, MANPREET; CHENG, LINGYUN; BARTSCH, DIRK-UWE G.; FREEMAN, WILLIAM R.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE To determine the long-term effect of sub-threshold diode laser treatment for drusen in patients with non-exudative age-related macular degeneration (AMD) with spectral domain optical coherence tomography combined with simultaneous scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SD-OCT/SLO). METHODS 8 eyes of 4 consecutive AMD patients with bilateral drusen previously treated with sub-threshold diode laser were imaged with SD-OCT/SLO. Abnormalities in the outer retina layers reflectivity as seen with SD-OCT/SLO were retrospectively analyzed and compared with color fundus pictures and autofluorescence images (AF) acquired immediately before and after the laser treatment. RESULTS A focal discrete disruptions in the reflectivity of the outer retinal layers was noted in 29% of the laser lesions. The junction in between the inner and outer segment of the photoreceptor was more frequently affected, with associated focal damage of the outer nuclear layer. Defects of the RPE were occasionally detected. These changes did not correspond to threshold burns on color fundus photography, but corresponded to focal areas of increased AF in the majority of the cases. CONCLUSIONS Sub-threshold diode laser treatment causes long-term disruption of the retinal photoreceptor layer as analyzed by SD-OCT/SLO. The concept that sub-threshold laser treatment can achieve a selected RPE effect without damage to rods and cones may be flawed. PMID:21157398

  15. Elk3 deficiency causes transient impairment in post-natal retinal vascular development and formation of tortuous arteries in adult murine retinae.

    PubMed

    Weinl, Christine; Wasylyk, Christine; Garcia Garrido, Marina; Sothilingam, Vithiyanjali; Beck, Susanne C; Riehle, Heidemarie; Stritt, Christine; Roux, Michel J; Seeliger, Mathias W; Wasylyk, Bohdan; Nordheim, Alfred

    2014-01-01

    Serum Response Factor (SRF) fulfills essential roles in post-natal retinal angiogenesis and adult neovascularization. These functions have been attributed to the recruitment by SRF of the cofactors Myocardin-Related Transcription Factors MRTF-A and -B, but not the Ternary Complex Factors (TCFs) Elk1 and Elk4. The role of the third TCF, Elk3, remained unknown. We generated a new Elk3 knockout mouse line and showed that Elk3 had specific, non-redundant functions in the retinal vasculature. In Elk3(-/-) mice, post-natal retinal angiogenesis was transiently delayed until P8, after which it proceeded normally. Interestingly, tortuous arteries developed in Elk3(-/-) mice from the age of four weeks, and persisted into late adulthood. Tortuous vessels have been observed in human pathologies, e.g. in ROP and FEVR. These human disorders were linked to altered activities of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the affected eyes. However, in Elk3(-/-) mice, we did not observe any changes in VEGF or several other potential confounding factors, including mural cell coverage and blood pressure. Instead, concurrent with the post-natal transient delay of radial outgrowth and the formation of adult tortuous arteries, Elk3-dependent effects on the expression of Angiopoietin/Tie-signalling components were observed. Moreover, in vitro microvessel sprouting and microtube formation from P10 and adult aortic ring explants were reduced. Collectively, these results indicate that Elk3 has distinct roles in maintaining retinal artery integrity. The Elk3 knockout mouse is presented as a new animal model to study retinal artery tortuousity in mice and human patients. PMID:25203538

  16. Elk3 Deficiency Causes Transient Impairment in Post-Natal Retinal Vascular Development and Formation of Tortuous Arteries in Adult Murine Retinae

    PubMed Central

    Weinl, Christine; Wasylyk, Christine; Garcia Garrido, Marina; Sothilingam, Vithiyanjali; Beck, Susanne C.; Riehle, Heidemarie; Stritt, Christine; Roux, Michel J.; Seeliger, Mathias W.; Wasylyk, Bohdan; Nordheim, Alfred

    2014-01-01

    Serum Response Factor (SRF) fulfills essential roles in post-natal retinal angiogenesis and adult neovascularization. These functions have been attributed to the recruitment by SRF of the cofactors Myocardin-Related Transcription Factors MRTF-A and -B, but not the Ternary Complex Factors (TCFs) Elk1 and Elk4. The role of the third TCF, Elk3, remained unknown. We generated a new Elk3 knockout mouse line and showed that Elk3 had specific, non-redundant functions in the retinal vasculature. In Elk3(−/−) mice, post-natal retinal angiogenesis was transiently delayed until P8, after which it proceeded normally. Interestingly, tortuous arteries developed in Elk3(−/−) mice from the age of four weeks, and persisted into late adulthood. Tortuous vessels have been observed in human pathologies, e.g. in ROP and FEVR. These human disorders were linked to altered activities of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the affected eyes. However, in Elk3(−/−) mice, we did not observe any changes in VEGF or several other potential confounding factors, including mural cell coverage and blood pressure. Instead, concurrent with the post-natal transient delay of radial outgrowth and the formation of adult tortuous arteries, Elk3-dependent effects on the expression of Angiopoietin/Tie-signalling components were observed. Moreover, in vitro microvessel sprouting and microtube formation from P10 and adult aortic ring explants were reduced. Collectively, these results indicate that Elk3 has distinct roles in maintaining retinal artery integrity. The Elk3 knockout mouse is presented as a new animal model to study retinal artery tortuousity in mice and human patients. PMID:25203538

  17. Current understanding of genetics and genetic testing and information needs and preferences of adults with inherited retinal disease.

    PubMed

    McKibbin, Martin; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Allsop, Matthew J; Downey, Louise; Gale, Richard; Grant, Hilary Louise; Potrata, Barbara; Willis, Thomas A; Hewison, Jenny

    2014-09-01

    Advances in sequencing technology and the movement of genetic testing into all areas of medicine will increase opportunities for molecular confirmation of a clinical diagnosis. For health-care professionals without formal genetics training, there is a need to know what patients understand about genetics and genetic testing and their information needs and preferences for the disclosure of genetic testing results. These topics were explored during face-to-face interviews with 50 adults with inherited retinal disease, selected in order to provide a diversity of opinions. Participants had variable understanding of genetics and genetic testing, including basic concepts such as inheritance patterns and the risk to dependents, and many did not understand the term 'genetic counselling'. Most were keen for extra information on the risk to others, the process for genetic testing and how to share the information with other family members. Participants were divided as to whether genetic testing should be offered at the time of the initial diagnosis or later. Many would prefer the results to be given by face-to-face consultation, supplemented by further information in a format accessible to those with visual impairment. Health-care professionals and either leaflets or websites of trusted agencies were the preferred sources of information. Permission should be sought for disclosure of genetic information to other family members. The information needs of many patients with inherited