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Sample records for adult rhipicephalus sanguineus

  1. Acaricidal activity of ethanolic extract from aerial parts of Tagetes patula L. (Asteraceae) against larvae and engorged adult females of Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latreille, 1806)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The tick Rhipicephalus sanguineus is the species with the largest worldwide distribution and is proven to be involved in the transmission of pathogens such as Babesia canis, Ehrlichia canis, Coxiella burnetii, Rickettsia ricketsii, Rickettsia conorii, among others. Studies have demonstrated acquisition of resistance to some of the active principles used in commercial formulations of acaricides. Tagetes patula (Asteraceae) is a plant with highlighted economic and commercial importance due to the production of secondary metabolites with insecticide and acaricide potential, mainly flavonoids, thiophenes and terpenes. Methods The in vitro acaricide action of the ethanolic 70% extract from aerial parts of T. patula, obtained by percolation, was evaluated against larvae and engorged adult females of Rhipicephalus sanguineus by immersion test for 5 minutes. The chemical characterization of this extract was done by liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC-MS), using direct injection of sample. Results Despite T. patula not proving lethal to adults in any of the concentrations tested, at 50.0 mg/mL oviposition rate decreased by 21.5% and eliminated 99.78% of the larvae. Also it was determined that the best results were obtained with 5 minutes of immersion. From the chromatographic analysis twelve O-glycosylated flavonoids were identified. Conclusions This is the first report on the acaricidal activity of T. patula extract against Rh. sanguineus. If we consider the application of the product in the environment, we could completely eliminate the larval stage of development of the ixodid Rh. sanguineus. PMID:23244493

  2. Efficacy of deltamethrin (Butox® 7.5 pour on) against nymphs and adults of ticks (Ixodes ricinus, Rhipicephalus sanguineus) in treated hair of cattle and sheep.

    PubMed

    Mehlhorn, Heinz; Schumacher, Bärbel; Jatzlau, Antje; Abdel-Ghaffar, Fathy; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A S; Klimpel, Sven; Pohle, Herbert

    2011-04-01

    Ticks are known to be able to transmit a broad spectrum of agents of diseases in cattle or sheep. Therefore, measurements are needed to keep ticks away from the body of any ruminant belonging to the agricultural life stock. The present study dealt with investigations to measure the efficacy of the insecticide deltamethrin (Butox® 7.5 pour on) against specimens of two important species (Ixodes ricinus and Rhipicephalus sanguineus). Four sheep and four young cattle were treated lege arte along the vertebral column with 10 ml Butox® (deltamethrin) per sheep or 30 ml Butox® per cattle. Day 7, 14, 21, and 28 after the treatment, hair was shaved off from the head, ears, the back, belly, and the feet being collected in separate, suitable plastic bags, and transported to the institute, where these hair were brought into close contact with either adult and/or nymph stages of I. ricinus and R. sanguineus. As results, strong, acaricidal effects were seen, which varied according to the parasite species, the origin of the hair (e.g., head, leg, etc.) and according to the period after the treatment. In sheep, the acaricidal effect was noted for the whole period of 28 days along the whole body with respect to adults and nymphs of I. ricinus, while the acaricidal effects of deltamethrin were reduced for R. sanguineus stages beginning at day 21 after treatment. In cattle, the full acaricidal effect was seen for 21 days in I. ricinus stages and for 14 days in R. sanguineus, while the acaricidal efficacy became reduced after these periods of full action-beginning at the hair taken from the legs. Only R. sanguineus adults did not show any reaction on day 28 after treatment. Besides these acaricidal effects, repellent effects were also noted. Full repellency for both species was seen during the first 14 days in sheep and cattle against Ixodes and Rhipicephalus, while the repellency was later reduced, especially in contact with hair from the legs. As conclusion, deltamethrin, besides

  3. Morphology of the midgut of Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latreille, 1806) (Acari: Ixodidae) adult ticks in different feeding stages.

    PubMed

    Remedio, R N; Sampieri, B R; Vendramini, M C R; Souza, N M; Anholeto, L A; Denardo, T A G B; Camargo-Mathias, M I

    2013-01-01

    The intestinal epithelial cells of ticks are fundamental for their full feeding and reproductive success, besides being considered important sites for the development of pathogens. Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks are known for their great medical and veterinary importance, and for this reason, the knowledge of their intestinal morphology may provide relevant subsidies for the control of these animals, either by direct acaricidal action over these cells or by the production of vaccines. Therefore, this study aimed to describe the midgut morphology of male and female R. sanguineus ticks in different feeding stages, by means of histological analysis. Significant differences were observed between the genders, and such alterations may refer mainly to the distinct demands for nutrients, much higher in females, which need to develop and carry out the egg-laying process. In general, the midgut is coated by a thin muscle layer and presents a pseudostratified epithelium, in which two basic types of cells can be observed, connected to a basal membrane-generative or stem and digestive cells. The latter was classified as follows: residual, deriving from the phase anterior to ecdysis; pinocytic, with vesicles containing liquid or pre-digested components of blood; phagocytic, with entire cells or remnants of nuclear material inside cytoplasmic vesicles; and mature, free in the lumen. Digestion is presumably intracellular and asynchronous and corresponds to a process which starts with the differentiation of generative cells into pinocytic digestive cells, which subsequently start to phagocytize intact blood cells and finally detach from the epithelium, being eliminated with feces.

  4. Immunogenic potential of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus aquaporin 1 against Rhipicephalus sanguineus in domestic dogs.

    PubMed

    Évora, Patricia Martinez; Sanches, Gustavo Seron; Guerrero, Felix David; León, Adalberto Pérez de; Bechara, Gervásio Henrique

    2017-02-16

    This study evaluated a recombinant aquaporin 1 protein of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (RmAQP1) as antigen in a vaccine against R. sanguineus. Five dogs were immunized with RmAQP1 (10 µg) + adjuvant (Montanide) (G1), and five were inoculated with adjuvant only (G2), three times. Twenty-one days after the last immunization, animals of both groups were challenged with R. sanguineus larvae, nymphs and adults, and their biotic potential was compared. Blood samples were collected before each immunization and every 28 days after the last immunization for 10 weeks. Serum antibody titers (IgG) were assessed by ELISA. We observed that: engorgement period of adult females from G1 was 12% shorter than G2; larvae from G1 had 8.7% longer engorgement period than G2 and weighed 7.2% less; nymphs from G1 had 4.5% shorter engorgement period than G2 and weighed 3.6% less; although the antibody titers increased following the second immunization, they rapidly decreased after the third immunization. Results indicated low immunoprotection of RmAQP1 against adult R. sanguineus ticks, and possible efficacy on larvae and nymphs fed on immunized dogs. Further studies should be performed for a full evaluation of the immunoprotection of RmAQP1 against R. sanguineus infestations in dogs.

  5. Efficacy of the Bm86 antigen against immature instars and adults of the dog tick Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latreille, 1806) (Acari: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Perez-Perez, D; Bechara, G H; Machado, R Z; Andrade, G M; Del Vecchio, R E M; Pedroso, M S; Hernández, M V; Farnós, O

    2010-02-10

    The Bm86 antigen has been used to control ticks of the Boophilus genera in integrated programs that also include the use of acaricides. Because of recent phylogenetic studies have lead to the inclusion of all Boophilus species within the Rhipicephalus genera, we aimed to investigate the efficacy of the Bm86 antigen on the biotic potential of Rhipicephalus sanguineus. Domestic dogs were vaccinated with Bm86 and challenged with the three instars of R. sanguineus. Male and female mongrel dogs were divided into two groups of four animals each, comprising non-vaccinated and vaccinated animals. Immunized dogs were given two doses of an experimental formulation containing 50mug of recombinant Bm86, at 21 days interval while the other group was given placebo, consisting of the same preparation without Bm86. Each dog was challenged 21 days after the last dose with 250 larvae, 100 nymphs and 55 adults (25 females and 30 males) released inside feeding chambers (one per instar) glued to their shaved flank. The effect of the vaccination was evaluated by determining biological parameters of ticks including the yield rates of larvae, nymphs and adult females. Adult females engorged weight, egg mass weight, efficiency rate of conversion to eggs (ERCE) and hatchability. In addition, sera were collected from dogs at 0, 21, 36, 45 and 75 days after the vaccination and used for the detection of specific antibodies by ELISA. Collection rates of larvae, nymphs and adult females fed on vaccinated dogs were significantly (p<0.05) reduced by 38%, 29% and 31%, respectively, as compared with non-vaccinated controls. Significant reductions were also observed in weight of engorged females and egg mass, in ERCE, but not in the hatch rate of ticks fed on immunized dogs. ELISA data revealed a marked and significant increase in optical densities of sera from vaccinated animals after the second dose of Bm86. We concluded that the Bm86 antigen used as a vaccine for dogs reduced the viability and

  6. Chemical characterization and acaricide potential of essential oil from aerial parts of Tagetes patula L. (Asteraceae) against engorged adult females of Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latreille, 1806).

    PubMed

    Politi, Flávio Augusto Sanches; de Souza-Moreira, Tatiana Maria; Rodrigues, Edvânio Ramos; de Queiroz, Geisiany Maria; Figueira, Glyn Mara; Januário, Ana Helena; Berenger, Jean-Michel; Socolovschi, Cristina; Parola, Philippe; Pietro, Rosemeire Cristina Linhari Rodrigues

    2013-06-01

    Rhipicephalus sanguineus, commonly known as the brown dog tick, is one of the most widely distributed species of tick. In dogs, it can cause anemia and provide the transmission of pathogenic microorganisms such as Babesia canis, Ehrlichia canis, Hepatozoon canis, Anaplasma platys, and Mycoplasma haemocanis. To man, it can transmit the intracellular parasites Rickettsia rickettsii and Rickettsia conorii, the causative agents of the Rocky Mountain spotted fever in the Americas and Mediterranean and spotted fever in Europe and North Africa. Its control is performed by applying synthetic formulations composed of pyrethroids; however, continued use of these products results in environmental damage and acquisition of resistance. Alternatively, studies with botanical insecticides have been increasingly recurrent. Therefore, this study aimed to test the efficacy of essential oil of Tagetes patula, a ruderal species widely described in the literature for its insecticidal properties, in engorged females of R. sanguineus by the adults immersion test (AIT) and impregnated paper disk test (IPDT). The essential oil used, through gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry, revealed the presence of 55 compounds, being the 4-vinyl guaiacol and gamma terpinene the majority ones. The AIT compared to the IPDT was more efficient in inhibiting oviposition of tick; however, the eggs laid by the females submitted to saturated atmosphere with essential oil, from IPDT, not hatched, interrupted their development cycle. Besides being a pioneer work, the results presented here contributes to new researches, aiming the incorporation of essential oil in an acaricide for use in the environment.

  7. Rhipicephalus sanguineus and R. turanicus (Acari:Ixodidae): closely related species with different biological characteristics.

    PubMed

    Ioffe-Uspensky, I; Mumcuoglu, K Y; Uspensky, I; Galun, R

    1997-01-01

    Life cycle parameters of 2 closely related tick species, Rhipicephalus sanguineus Latreille and R. turanicus Pomerantsev, were studied under laboratory conditions. Both Rhipicephalus, which have small adults, demonstrated the same adaptations as large tick species inhabiting deserts and semideserts: high reproductive rate, decrease in egg size, and an increase in interstage growth to compensate for the smaller size at birth. Pronounced quantitative differences between both species were discerned in relation to these adaptations. Female R. turanicus produced twice as many eggs as R. sanguineus which was facilitated by the greater amount of blood engorged by females and by the smaller egg weight in R. turanicus as compared with R. sanguineus. In all developmental stages, the weight increase from unfed to fed ticks was greater in R. turanicus than in R. sanguineus (23% higher in larvae, 118% in nymphs, and 26% in females). The increase in weight in R. turanicus from the unfed larva (0.013 mg) to the unfed female (3.31 mg) was 254-fold, and in R. sanguineus it was 127-fold (from 0.021 to 2.54 mg). In nymphal R. turanicus, the higher density and the greater height of the dorsal epicuticular folds, as well as procuticular indentations found inside the folds allow this tick to stretch its alloscutum during blood engorgement to a greater extent than R. sanguineus. The rates of blood ingestion (for nymphs and females), egg maturation, and metamorphosis were 1.1-1.7 times greater in R. turanicus than in R. sanguineus. A life cycle strategy with both a higher reproductive rate and faster development in R turanicus may be explained by its greater dependence on environmental factors than that in R. sanguineus.

  8. "Candidatus Rickettsia asemboensis" in Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Dall'Agnol, Bruno; Souza, Ugo; Webster, Anelise; Weck, Bárbara; Stenzel, Bárbara; Labruna, Marcelo; Klafke, Guilherme; Martins, João Ricardo; Ferreira, Carlos Alexandre Sanchez; Reck, José

    2017-03-01

    "Candidatus Rickettsia asemboensis" is an obligate intracellular bacterium of the Rickettsiales order, genetically related to species belonging to the Rickettsia felis group, agents of flea-borne spotted fever. Here we report for the first time the detection of "Ca. R. asemboensis", a flea-associated organism, in Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks. It is the first occurrence of this emerging bacterium in Brazil, which increases the geographical distribution of this R. felis-like agent.

  9. Immunogenic potential of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus aquaporin 1 against Rhipicephalus sanguineus in domestic dogs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study evaluated a recombinant aquaporin 1 protein of Rhipicephalus microplus (RmAQP1) as antigen in a vaccine against R. sanguineus. Five dogs were vaccinated with RmAQP1 (10 µg) + adjuvant (Montanide) (G1), and five were inoculated with adjuvant only (G2), three times. Twenty-one days after th...

  10. One-month comparative efficacy of three topical ectoparasiticides against adult brown dog ticks (Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato) on mixed-bred dogs in controlled environment.

    PubMed

    Varloud, Marie; Fourie, Josephus J

    2015-05-01

    This study was designed to compare the therapeutic and residual efficacy for 1 month of three topical ectoparasiticides on mixed-bred dogs against the brown dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus. Adult dogs (n = 32, 10.8-18.4 kg BW) were allocated to 4 groups (n = 8) and infested with 50 adult ticks on days -8, -2, 7, 14, 21, and 28. Within each group, dogs were treated topically on day 0 with a control solution (CS), Vectra 3D (DPP), Frontline Plus (FM), or K9 Advantix (IP). Ticks were enumerated on dogs 24 h after treatment and each subsequent tick infestation by in situ thumb count assessment without removal and at 48 h by combing and removal. Acaricidal efficacy was calculated using arithmetic means for all 24 and 48 h tick count assessments. From 42 to 56% of the total, infested ticks were found on dogs 48 h post-challenge in the CS group. Therapeutic efficacy for all treatments ranged from 45.5 to 64.6% after 48 h of infestation. Residual efficacy after FM treatment was consistently lower compared to DPP or IP treatments at the 24 h assessments on days 8, 22, 23, and 29. Residual efficacy measured at this last time point was 94.8% for DPP, 83.1% for IP, and 46.9% for FM. This study demonstrates that permethrin-based formulations (DPP and IP) provided a quicker onset of residual protection against brown dog ticks compared to FM. Although DPP and IP are both permethrin-based formulations, DPP exhibited consistently higher residual acaricidal efficacies and was the only treatment that provided >90% protection for 1 month at 24 h post challenge.

  11. The taxonomic status of Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latreille, 1806).

    PubMed

    Nava, Santiago; Estrada-Peña, Agustín; Petney, Trevor; Beati, Lorenza; Labruna, Marcelo B; Szabó, Matias P J; Venzal, José M; Mastropaolo, Mariano; Mangold, Atilio J; Guglielmone, Alberto A

    2015-02-28

    The brown dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu stricto, is a species with considerable public health and economic importance. However, the taxonomic status of this species is far from resolved. After more than 110 years of scientific work on R. sanguineus s.s., the situation is that there is no type, no solid description, nor is there a consensus about the range of morphological variability within the species. Recent findings based on laboratory crosses and molecular genetics strongly suggest that there are several entities grouped under the same name. Here we review the history of the taxon, and we point out the caveats behind any further work on this tick. The current taxonomic status of R. sanguineus s.s. thus lacks an informative original description, and is based on the existence of several morphological descriptions based on ticks originating from different populations, which show, in some cases, biological incompatibility and significant genetic divergence. We suggests that as a result it is not possible to assign the specific name R. sanguineus s.s. to any population. Further work is required based on the rules issued by the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature to clearly define the morphological range of the different populations.

  12. Ehrlichia canis in Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks in the Ivory Coast.

    PubMed

    Socolovschi, Cristina; Gomez, José; Marié, Jean-Lou; Davoust, Bernard; Guigal, Pierre-Michel; Raoult, Didier; Parola, Philippe

    2012-12-01

    Canine monocytic ehrlichiosis caused by Ehrlichia canis is distributed globally, but its prevalence in Africa is poorly known. In the study reported herein, 27% of Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks collected from watchdogs in Abidjan, Ivory Coast, were positive for E. canis using quantitative real-time PCR. A new molecular strategy is proposed that can be used not only for epidemiological study, but also for the diagnosis of canine monocytic ehrlichiosis. Our findings show for the first time the presence of E. canis using molecular tools in the Ivory Coast, providing direct evidence for the presence of this pathogen.

  13. Apparent tick paralysis by Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Acari: Ixodidae) in dogs.

    PubMed

    Otranto, Domenico; Dantas-Torres, Filipe; Tarallo, Viviana Domenica; Ramos, Rafael Antonio do Nascimento; Stanneck, Dorothee; Baneth, Gad; de Caprariis, Donato

    2012-09-10

    Certain tick species including Ixodes holocyclus can inoculate neurotoxins that induce a rapid, ascending flaccid paralysis in animals. Rhipicephalus sanguineus, the most widespread tick of dogs, is recognized as a vector of several pathogens causing diseases in dogs and humans. A single report suggests its role as cause of paralysis in dogs. This study presents the clinical history of 14 young dogs heavily infested by R. sanguineus (intensity of infestation, 63-328) in an endemic area of southern Italy. During May to June of 2011, dogs were presented at the clinical examination with neurological signs of different degrees (e.g., hind limb ataxia, generalized lethargy, and difficulty in movements). All animals were treated with acaricides and by manual tick removal but ten of them died within a day, displaying neurological signs. The other 4 dogs recovered within 3 days with acaricidal and supportive treatment. Twelve dogs were positive by blood smear examination for Hepatozoon canis with a high parasitemia, two also for Babesia vogeli and two were negative for hemoparasites. Low-grade thrombocytopenia, hypoalbuminemia, and pancytopenia were the haematological alterations most frequently recorded. Other causes of neurological disease in dogs were excluded and the diagnosis of tick paralysis by R. sanguineus was confirmed (ex juvantibus) by early and complete recovery of 4 dogs following acaricidal treatment and tick removal.

  14. Sensitivity of the brown dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus to fungal pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The brown dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus, remains a primary ectoparasite concern in many dog kennels, shelters and residential homes. Challenges such as effective pesticide delivery and pesticide resistance confound control efforts. Use of biological control approaches such as fungal pathogen...

  15. Predominance of Ehrlichia chaffeensis in Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks from a kennel-confined dogs in Limbe, Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Ndip, Lucy M.; Ndip, Roland N.; Esemu, Seraphine N.; Walker, David H.; McBride, Jere W.

    2009-01-01

    Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks (n=63) collected from five dogs (two adults and three puppies) housed in a kennel were screened for ehrlichial agents (E. canis, E. chaffeensis and E. ewingii) using a species-specific multicolor real-time TaqMan PCR amplification of the (disulphide bond formation protein (dsb) gene. E. chaffeensis DNA was detected in 33 (56 %) ticks, E. canis DNA was detected in four (6 %) ticks, and one tick was coinfected. The E. chaffeensis and E. canis nucleotide sequences of the amplified dsb gene (374-bp) obtained from the Cameroonian R. sanguineus ticks were identical to the North American genotypes. PMID:19693681

  16. Five-month comparative efficacy evaluation of three ectoparasiticides against adult cat fleas (Ctenocephalides felis), flea egg hatch and emergence, and adult brown dog ticks (Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato) on dogs housed outdoors.

    PubMed

    Varloud, Marie; Hodgkins, Elizabeth

    2015-03-01

    This study was designed to compare the efficacy of three topical combinations on dogs in outdoor conditions against adult cat fleas (Ctenocephalides felis), flea egg hatch and emergence, and against adult brown dog ticks (Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato). Treatment was performed on day 0 with a placebo; dinotefuran, pyriproxifen and permethrin (DPP); fipronil and (S)-methoprene (FM) or imidacloprid and permethrin (IP). Dogs (n = 32), housed outdoors for 7 months, were treated monthly for four consecutive months (on days 0, 30, 60 and 90) and infested with ~100 unfed adult fleas on days 14, 55, 74, 115 and 150 and with ~50 unfed adult ticks on days 28, 44, 88 and 104. Adult fleas were counted and removed 24 h after infestation. Immediately after flea removal, dogs were reinfested with ~100 new adult fleas 72 h prior to egg collection for up to 48 h. Flea eggs were incubated for 32 days, and newly emerged adults were counted. Ticks were counted and removed 48 h after each infestation. FM had >90 % efficacy against fleas at each time point and variable efficacy against ticks (38.0-99.6 %). Efficacy of IP was <90 % against fleas at day 64 and against ticks at day 30 of the first post-treatment. No flea eggs were laid in the treated groups until infestation was carried out >60 days after the last treatment. Despite challenging weather conditions, DPP was highly effective, providing >90 % efficacy against adult ticks as well as adult and immature fleas at every time point of the study.

  17. Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato (Ixodidae) in synantropic rodents in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Winkel, Kathleen Tavares; Ribeiro, Paulo Bretanha; Antunes, Lidiane Oliveira; Cárcamo, Marcial Corrêa; Vianna, Elvia Elena Silveira

    2014-01-01

    Rhipicephalus sanguineus, the brown dog tick, is responsible for maintaining and transmitting various pathogens, both in animals and human beings, and it is of great sanitary importance. This communication reports the first occurrence of Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato parasitizing Rattus norvegicus in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, and it is also the first record of this tick species parasitizing Rattus rattus in Brazil. The rodents were captured from the port area, located in the city of Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. We collected 6 larvae of this tick species from 2 male R. rattus individuals, and 3 larvae from 2 female R. norvegicus individuals; parasitized specimens of both rodent species were captured from different sites within the experimental area. This record broadens the number of Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato hosts in urban areas, indicating the need for continued monitoring on population density for both R. sanguineus and synanthropic rodents.

  18. Detection of Rickettsia rickettsii and Bartonella henselae in Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks from California.

    PubMed

    Wikswo, Mary Elizabeth; Hu, Renjie; Metzger, Marco E; Eremeeva, Marina E

    2007-01-01

    Sixty-two questing adult Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latreille) ticks were collected by direct removal from blades of turfgrass and adjacent concrete walkways at a suburban home in Riverside County, CA, and tested for the presence of Rickettsia, Bartonella, and Ehrlichia DNA. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to amplify fragments of the 17-kDa antigen gene and the rOmpA gene of the spotted fever group rickettsiae. One male tick contained R. rickettsii DNA; its genotype differed from R. rickettsii isolates found in Montana and Arizona that cause Rocky Mountain spotted fever and from Hlp#2 and 364D serotypes. One male tick and one female tick contained B. henselae DNA. No Ehrlichia platys or Ehrlichia canis DNAs were detected using nested PCR for their 16S rRNA genes. These findings extend the area where Rickettsia rickettsii may be vectored by Rh. sanguineus. Rh. sanguineus also may be infected with Bartonella henselae, a human pathogen that is typically associated with fleas and causes cat scratch disease.

  19. First report of amitraz and cypermethrin resistance in Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato infesting dogs in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Vivas, R I; Ojeda-Chi, M M; Trinidad-Martinez, I; Bolio-González, M E

    2017-03-01

    Engorged female Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato (Ixodida: Ixodidae) were collected from dogs in the state of Yucatán, Mexico. Fourteen tick populations were collected from dogs at seven veterinary clinics, four residential homes and three cattle farms. The larval immersion test was used in the progeny of collected adult females to test susceptibility to amitraz and cypermethrin. Dose-mortality regressions, 50% lethal concentrations (LC50 ), confidence intervals and slope were estimated by probit analysis. For amitraz, 12 tick populations (85.7%) were classified as resistant and low inter-population variation in the phenotypic level of resistance was evident [resistance ratios (RRs) at LC50 : 1.0-13.0]. For cypermethrin, 12 tick populations (85.7%) were classified as resistant and substantial inter-population variation in the phenotypic level of resistance was evident (RRs at LC50 : 1.0-104.0). Thus, amitraz resistance in R. sanguineus s.l. is common, but generally occurs at low levels; however, alarmingly high levels of cypermethrin resistance are present in R. sanguineus s.l. populations in dogs in Yucatán, Mexico. The intensive use of both acaricides to control ectoparasites on dogs is likely to lead to more serious resistance problems that may cause high levels of control failure in the future.

  20. Molecular detection of tick-borne pathogens in Rhipicephalus sanguineus group ticks.

    PubMed

    Latrofa, Maria Stefania; Dantas-Torres, Filipe; Giannelli, Alessio; Otranto, Domenico

    2014-10-01

    The Rhipicephalus sanguineus group includes some of the most widespread dog ticks, whose identification currently represents a difficult task due to the morphological similarities of these ixodid species. Recently, following the morphological and molecular characterization of tick specimens collected from dogs in all continents, Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato (s.l.), Rhipicephalus turanicus and three different operational taxonomic units (namely Rhipicephalus sp. I-III) have been identified. Therefore, a comprehensive molecular study has been herein carried out to detect selected canine vector-borne pathogens (i.e., Anaplasma platys, Cercopithifilaria spp., Ehrlichia canis and Hepatozoon canis) in ticks belonging to the R. sanguineus group. A total of 204 tick specimens from dogs were examined and identified as R. sanguineus s.l. (n=81), R. turanicus (n=17), Rhipicephalus sp. I (n=66), Rhipicephalus sp. II (n=37), and Rhipicephalus sp. III (n=3). PCR assays were performed to detect mitochondrial and ribosomal target genes of Cercopithifilaria spp., A. platys, E. canis and H. canis. Out of 204 specimens examined, 2.5%, 7.4% and 21.6% scored positive to A. platys, H. canis and Cercopithifilaria spp., respectively. In addition, co-infections with two pathogens (i.e., Cercopithifilaria bainae and A. platys or H. canis) were detected in four tick specimens. This study suggests a relationship between ticks belonging to the R. sanguineus group and the geographical distribution of A. platys, H. canis and Cercopithifilaria spp. However, the role of each representative tick species within the R. sanguineus group in the transmission of these canine pathogens needs to be further investigated.

  1. Larvae of Ixodiphagus wasps (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae) in Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Bezerra Santos, Marcos Antônio; de Macedo, Lucia Oliveira; de Souza, Islanne Barbosa; do Nascimento Ramos, Carlos Alberto; Alves, Leucio Câmara; Ramos, Rafael Antonio Nascimento; de Carvalho, Gílcia Aparecida

    2017-03-21

    The biological control of ticks represents an alternative method to the chemical control, given its ecological-friendly approach. Amongst the alternatives, the use of parasitoids of the genus Ixodiphagus (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae) has been largely investigated. The aim of this study was to document and molecularly characterize Ixodiphagus wasps in ticks from a tropical region of Brazil. From October 2015 to March 2016, Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato ticks (n=1814) were collected from naturally infested dogs and Ixodiphagus larvae were detected by microscopic examination. In addition, adult wasps were obtained in the laboratory. Larvae and adults were molecularly identified as Ixodiphagus hookeri. These findings suggest that this type of parasitism deserves to be studied in local tick populations, in order to elucidate the role of these wasps as a potential alternative to chemical tick control.

  2. Reprolysin metalloproteases from Ixodes persulcatus, Rhipicephalus sanguineus and Rhipicephalus microplus ticks.

    PubMed

    Ali, Abid; Tirloni, Lucas; Isezaki, Masayoshi; Seixas, Adriana; Konnai, Satoru; Ohashi, Kazuhiko; da Silva Vaz Junior, Itabajara; Termignoni, Carlos

    2014-08-01

    Metalloproteases (MPs) have been considered essential for blood feeding and other physiological functions in several hematophagous animals, including ticks. We report the characterization of MP sequences of three important ticks from Asia, Africa and America: Ixodes persulcatus (Ip-MPs), Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Rs-MPs) and R. microplus (BrRm-MPs). Amino acid sequence identity between R. microplus and R. sanguineus MPs ranged from 76 to 100 %, and identities among I. persulcatus, I. ricinus and I. scapularis MP sequences ranged from 88 to 97 %. This high sequence identity and typical functional motifs show that all sequences are MPs. The presence of a zinc binding site, a Met-turn and cysteine rich domain at the C-terminal region indicates that these proteins belong to the reproplysin family of MPs. Differences in amino acid sequences of BrRm-MP1, BrRm-MP2, BrRm-MP4 and BrRm-MP5 (from Porto Alegre strain ticks) were 6, 2, 7 and 5 %, respectively, when compared with sequences deposited in GenBank for the same genes from other R. microplus isolates. Analyses of MPs predicted that they have various highly antigenic regions. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed the presence of transcripts in salivary glands of partially and fully fed female ticks. None of these transcripts were observed in males (except BrRm-MP4) and eggs. These enzymes may be functional components required during tick feeding to manipulate host defenses and support tick hematophagy.

  3. Further thoughts on the taxonomy and vector role of Rhipicephalus sanguineus group ticks.

    PubMed

    Dantas-Torres, Filipe; Otranto, Domenico

    2015-02-28

    Rhipicephalus sanguineus is a tick species described in 1806 by Latreille, based on specimens probably collected in France. However, this is a taxon with uncertain morphological definition and recent studies have gathered irrefutable evidence supporting the existence of a cryptic species-complex under the name 'R. sanguineus', whose number of sibling species around the world has yet to be ascertained. This fact is of great medical and veterinary concern, also considering that ticks currently identified as 'R. sanguineus' have been regarded as proven or putative vectors of several pathogens infecting dogs and humans. Differences in the distribution and prevalence of some of these microorganisms (e.g., Ehrlichia canis and Hepatozoon canis) further support the existence of distinct species under the name 'R. sanguineus' and suggest that the vector competence of these tick species may vary. This article provides an account on the taxonomy and the vector role of ticks belonging to the R. sanguineus group in the light of recent research.

  4. Transstadial transmission of Hepatozoon canis from larvae to nymphs of Rhipicephalus sanguineus.

    PubMed

    Giannelli, Alessio; Ramos, Rafael Antonio Nascimento; Di Paola, Giancarlo; Mencke, Norbert; Dantas-Torres, Filipe; Baneth, Gad; Otranto, Domenico

    2013-09-01

    Hepatozoon canis is an apicomplexan parasite of dogs, which is known to become infected by ingesting Rhipicephalus sanguineus adult ticks. To investigate the possibility of H. canis transovarial and transstadial transmission from larvae to nymphs, engorged adult female ticks were collected from a private animal shelter in southern Italy, where H. canis infection is highly prevalent. Female ticks (n=35) and egg batches were tested by PCR for H. canis. All eggs examined were PCR-negative whereas 88.6% of females from the environment tested positive. Additionally, fed larvae (n=120) from a dog naturally infected by H. canis were dissected at different time points post collection (i.e. 0, 10, 20 and 30 days). Molted nymphs dissected at 20 days post collection revealed immature oocysts displaying an amorphous central structure in 50% of the specimens, and oocysts containing sporocysts with sporozoites were found in 53.3% of the nymphs dissected at 30 days post collection. This study demonstrates that H. canis is not transmitted transovarially, but it is transmitted transstadially from larvae to nymphs of R. sanguineus and develops sporozoites in oocysts that may infect dogs.

  5. Tissue tropism and vertical transmission of Coxiella in Rhipicephalus sanguineus and Rhipicephalus turanicus ticks.

    PubMed

    Lalzar, Itai; Friedmann, Yael; Gottlieb, Yuval

    2014-12-01

    Arthropod symbionts present tissue tropism that corresponds to the nature of the association and the mode of transmission between host generations. In ticks, however, our knowledge of symbiont tissue tropism and function is limited. Here, we quantified and localized previously described Coxiella-like symbionts in several organs of the tick Rhipicephalus turanicus. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction revealed high densities of Coxiella in the female gonads, and both male and female Malpighian tubules. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization and transmission electron microscopy, we further showed that in the gonads of both Rh. turanicus and Rh. sanguineus, Coxiella does not colonize the primary oocytes but is found later in young and mature oocytes in a specific distribution, suggesting controlled vertical transmission. This method revealed the presence Coxiella in the distal part of the Malpighian tubules, suggesting a possible role in nitrogen metabolism. While testing Rickettsia symbionts, no specific tissue tropism was found, but a slightly higher densities in the tick gut. The low density of Rickettsia in the female ovaries suggests competition between Rickettsia and Coxiella for vertical transmission. The described tissue distribution supports an obligatory role for Coxiella in ticks.

  6. A novel approach to control brown dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus using sustained release poly-ɛ-caprolactone-pheromone microspheres.

    PubMed

    Bhoopathy, Dhivya; Latha, Bhaskaran Ravi; Uma, T S; Sreekumar, C; Leela, V

    2014-03-01

    Control of brown dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus was attempted by utilizing sustained release preparations of synthetic analogues of assembly pheromones. The assembly pheromone, in defined ratio, was encapsulated using poly-ɛ-caprolactone by water-in-oil-in-water double emulsion solvent evaporation technique. In the in vitro bioassay, percent mortality with test microspheres was 95.6, 64 and 44 among the unfed larvae, unfed nymph and unfed adults respectively, 24 hours post-exposure. Field trials were carried out to evaluate the efficacy of microspheres in luring and killing environmental stages of R. sanguineus in dog houses/kennels. Engorged and unfed stages in the environment were found adhered and dead on the specially designed lure.

  7. Transmission of Ehrlichia canis by Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks feeding on dogs and on artificial membranes.

    PubMed

    Fourie, Josephus J; Stanneck, Dorothee; Luus, Herman G; Beugnet, Frederic; Wijnveld, Michiel; Jongejan, Frans

    2013-11-08

    A South African strain of Ehrlichia canis was isolated and used to infect a laboratory-bred Beagle dog. Rhipicephalus sanguineus nymphs, which fed on this dog, moulted to adult ticks which carried infection rates of E. canis between 12% and 19% and were used in a series of in vivo and in vitro experiments. Five groups of 6 dogs were challenged with the infected R. sanguineus ticks, which were removed 24h, 12h, 6h or 3h after the ticks had been released onto the dogs. The animals were monitored for fever and thrombocytopenia and were considered infected if they became serologically positive for E. canis antibodies as well as PCR positive for E. canis DNA. Seven dogs became infected with E. canis in the following groups: Group 1 (24h tick challenge) 1 out of 6; Group 2 (12h) 1 of 6; Group 3 (6h) 2 of 6; Group 4 (6h) 2 of 6 and Group 5 (3h) 1 out of 6. Six of those 7 infected dogs developed fever and a significant thrombocytopenia. One dog did not show any symptoms, but seroconverted and was found PCR positive on several occasions. Five additional dogs were PCR positive on one test sample only but were not considered infected because they did not develop any specific E. canis antibodies. In vitro, R. sanguineus ticks attached and fed on bovine blood through silicone membranes with attachment rates up to 72.5% after 24h increasing to 84.2% at 72 h. The ticks transmitted E. canis as soon as 8h post application as demonstrated by E. canis DNA found in the nutritive blood medium. In conclusion, transmission of E. canis by R. sanguineus ticks starts within a few hours after attachment, which is earlier than previously thought. These findings underpin the need for acaricides to provide either a repellent, an anti-attachment and/or a rapid killing effect against ticks in order to decrease the risk of transmission of E. canis.

  8. First documentation of ivermectin resistance in Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato (Acari: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Vivas, R I; Ojeda-Chi, M M; Trinidad-Martinez, I; Pérez de León, A A

    2017-01-15

    The brown dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato (Latreille, 1806), is an ectoparasite and disease vector of significant veterinary and public health importance that is distributed widely around the world. The intensive use of synthetic acaricides for tick control exerts a strong selective pressure for brown dog ticks to become resistant to them. Here, we investigated claims from the field regarding treatment failure associated with the use of veterinary products containing ivermectin (IVM) to control brown dog ticks infesting dogs in Yucatan state, Mexico. Dogs in six state municipalities were inspected to sample 15 R. sanguineus s.l.

  9. Morphological and genetic diversity of Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato from the New and Old Worlds

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The taxonomic status of the brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu stricto), which has long been regarded as the most widespread tick worldwide and a vector of many pathogens to dogs and humans, is currently under dispute. Methods We conducted a comprehensive morphological and genetic study of 278 representative specimens, which belonged to different species (i.e., Rhipicephalus bursa, R. guilhoni, R. microplus, R. muhsamae, R. pusillus, R. sanguineus sensu lato, and R. turanicus) collected from Europe, Asia, Americas, and Oceania. After detailed morphological examination, ticks were molecularly processed for the analysis of partial mitochondrial (16S rDNA, 12S rDNA, and cox1) gene sequences. Results In addition to R. sanguineus s.l. and R. turanicus, three different operational taxonomic units (namely, R. sp. I, R. sp. II, and R. sp. III) were found on dogs. These operational taxonomical units were morphologically and genetically different from R. sanguineus s.l. and R. turanicus. Ticks identified as R. sanguineus s.l., which corresponds to the so-called “tropical species” (=northern lineage), were found in all continents and genetically it represents a sister group of R. guilhoni. R. turanicus was found on a wide range of hosts in Italy and also on dogs in Greece. Conclusions The tropical species and the temperate species (=southern lineage) are paraphyletic groups. The occurrence of R. turanicus in the Mediterranean region is confirmed. A consensual re-description of R. sanguineus s.s. and R. turanicus will be necessary to solve the taxonomic problems within the so-called R. sanguineus group. PMID:23880226

  10. Synergism of thymol, carvacrol and eugenol in larvae of the cattle tick, Rhipicephalus microplus, and brown dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus.

    PubMed

    Araújo, L X; Novato, T P L; Zeringota, V; Maturano, R; Melo, D; DA Silva, B C; Daemon, E; DE Carvalho, M G; Monteiro, C M O

    2016-12-01

    The effects of combinations of the monoterpenes thymol and carvacrol and the phenylpropanoid eugenol in larvae of Rhipicephalus microplus (Canestrini, 1888) (Acari: Ixodidae) and Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato (s.l.) (Acari: Ixodidae) were assessed by the larval packet test. The CompuSyn program was used to make qualitative assessments of the effects (synergistic, additive and antagonistic) of the associations. The effects of all combinations tested against R. microplus larvae were synergistic, with combination indices (CIs) <0.70. When tested against R. sanguineus, eight of the mixtures showed a synergistic effect (CI < 0.70); only the carvacrol + thymol mixture at LC50 presented a moderate synergistic effect, with CIs between 0.70-0.90. This study is the first to determine the effects of the interactions of these substances in the control of these two tick species. The combinations of carvacrol + thymol, carvacrol + eugenol and thymol + eugenol have synergistic effects in R. microplus and R. sanguineus s.l. larvae.

  11. Rhipicephalus sanguineus (ACARI: IXODIDAE) BITING A HUMAN BEING IN PORTOALEGRE CITY, RIO GRANDE DO SUL, BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    MENTZ, Márcia Bohrer; TROMBKA, Marcelo; da SILVA, Guilherme Liberato; SILVA, Carlos Eugênio

    2016-01-01

    We report the finding of a female brown dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Acari: Ixodidae) on the scalp of a male patient in Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Human parasitism by this tick is rare and has seldomly been reported in the literature, despite its recognized importance since it can act as a vector of Rickettsia rickettsii, the agent of spotted fever. PMID:27074329

  12. The dog factor in brown dog tick Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Acari: Ixodidae) infestations in and near human dwellings.

    PubMed

    Uspensky, Igor; Ioffe-Uspensky, Inna

    2002-06-01

    Three cases of the tick Rhipicephalus sanguineus infiltration in or near human dwellings caused by dogs, and their influence on epidemiological features of human habitats have been investigated. (a) The observation of dogs kept indoors proved that single tick females could engorge and oviposit inside apartments followed by the development of subadults. (b) Abundant micropopulations of ticks were formed in small yards or gardens near the dwellings where dogs lived in kennels. (c) A huge field population of R. sanguineus was observed on a farm where watchdogs constantly patrolled along the farm perimeter. Tick abundance near the kennels and in the permanent resting sites of the dogs reached more than 30 adults per 10 min of collecting, while the number of adults on a dog reached 100. Unfed adult females under conditions of constant dog availability had a larger scutal index than females collected in the control field site. On the basis of circumstantial evidence it is possible to conclude that under the above conditions tick development may change from the normal 3-host cycle to a 2-host cycle. Ticks in the field had one complete generation per year. Ticks on the farm, as well as ticks in kennels, developed faster and a significant part of their population had two complete generations per year. R. sanguineus is the main vector and reservoir of a pathogen from the Rickettsia conorii complex, the causative agent of Israeli tick typhus. The described conglomerations of R. sanguineus create a great risk to humans who can be attacked by infected ticks in and around their homes, even in large towns. Such a feature of the tick life history most likely exists not only in Israel but in other countries as well.

  13. The efficacy of Advantix® to prevent transmission of Ehrlichia canis to dogs by Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks.

    PubMed

    Fourie, Josephus Johannes; Luus, Herman Gerhardus; Stanneck, Dorothee; Jongejan, Frans

    2013-01-01

    The capacity of a topical combination of imidacloprid and permethrin (Advantix(®)) to prevent transmission of Ehrlichia canis was studied in two groups of six dogs. One group served as controls, whereas the other group was treated. All dogs were exposed to E. canis-infected Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks on Days 7, 14, 21 and Day 28 post acaricidal treatment. The adult R. sanguineus ticks were released into the individual kennels of the dogs to simulate natural tick exposure. In situ tick counts were conducted on Day 9, 16 and 23 and any remaining ticks were counted and removed on Day 30. The efficacy of the acaricidal treatment against R. sanguineus ranged between 96.1% and 98.9% at 48 h post-application and lasted up to 4 weeks. Four out of six control dogs became infected with E. canis, as demonstrated by the presence of specific E. canis antibodies and the detection by PCR of E. canis DNA in blood samples. These dogs became thrombocytopenic and displayed fever and were consecutively rescue-treated by doxycycline. None of the six treated dogs became infected with E. canis, as confirmed by the lack of specific antibodies and absence of E. canis DNA in blood samples. Advantix(®) prevented transmission of E. canis and provided protection against monocytic ehrlichiosis for 4 weeks post acaricidal treatment.

  14. Efficacy of Tagetes minuta (Asteraceae) essential oil against Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Acari: Ixodidae) on infested dogs and in vitro.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Elis Maressa Gonçalves; Rodrigues, Vinicius da Silva; Jorge, Jaciara de Oliveira; Osava, Carolina Fonseca; Szabó, Matias Pablo Juan; Garcia, Marcos Valério; Andreotti, Renato

    2016-12-01

    Ticks from Rhipicephalus sanguineus complex are widely distributed in the world and one species from this complex is the most common tick on dogs in Brazil, notably in urban areas. This tick is a vector of several diseases. Among others it transmits the agent of canine Ehrlichiosis, a major dog infectious disease and the agent of Rocky Mountain spotted fever. This tick can spread rapidly and develop intolerable infestations within no time. Currently tick control is done with acaricides and demand for such drugs has grown fast. However, R. sanguineus has already developed resistance to the main active compounds and the development of new acaricides is necessary. Many essential oils of plants have acaricidal effect and may be an important source of molecules for the synthesis of new acaricide products. In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness of a new herbal phytotherapic, consisting of the essential oil of Tagetes minuta L., against R. sanguineus in vitro and on dogs undergoing experimental infestations. The product displayed 100% efficacy against larvae, nymphs and adults of the tick on all tested conditions.

  15. Developmental profiles in tick water balance with a focus on the new Rocky Mountain spotted fever vector, Rhipicephalus sanguineus.

    PubMed

    Yoder, J A; Benoit, J B; Rellinger, E J; Tank, J L

    2006-12-01

    Recent reports indicate that the common brown dog tick, or kennel tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latreille) (Acari: Ixodidae) is a competent vector of Rocky Mountain spotted fever in the U.S.A. This tick is of concern to public health because of its high frequency of contact, as it has a unique ability to thrive within human homes. To assess the moisture requirements necessary for survival, water balance characteristics were determined for each developmental stage, from egg to adult. This is the first time that water relations in ticks have been assessed throughout the complete lifecycle. Notably, R. sanguineus is differentially adapted for life in a dry environment, as characterized by a suppressed water loss rate distinctive for each stage that distinguishes it from other ticks. Analysis of its dehydration tolerance limit and percentage body water content provides no evidence to suggest that the various stages of this tick can function more effectively containing less water, indicating that this species is modified for water conservation, not desiccation hardiness. All stages, eggs excepted, absorb water vapour from the air and can drink free water to replenish water stores. Developmentally, a shift in water balance strategies occurs in the transition from the larva, where the emphasis is on water gain (water vapour absorption from drier air), to the adult, where the emphasis is on water retention (low water loss rate). These results on the xerophilic-nature of R. sanguineus identify overhydration as the primary water stress, indicating that this tick is less dependent upon a moisture-rich habitat for survival, which matches its preference for a dry environment. We suggest that the controlled, host-confined conditions of homes and kennels have played a key role in promoting the ubiquitous distribution of R. sanguineus by creating isolated arid environments that enable this tick to establish within regions that are unfavourable for maintaining water balance.

  16. Rickettsial infections of dogs, horses and ticks in Juiz de Fora, southeastern Brazil, and isolation of Rickettsia rickettsii from Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, R C; Moraes-Filho, J; Guedes, E; Silveira, I; Richtzenhain, L J; Leite, R C; Labruna, M B

    2011-06-01

    The present study was performed in an area endemic for Brazilian spotted fever (BSF) in Juiz de Fora, state of Minas Gerais, Brazil, during the years 2007 and 2008, when fatal cases of BSF (caused by Rickettsia rickettsii) were reported. Adult ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) identified as Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latreille) and Amblyomma cajennense (Fabricius) were collected from dogs and horses, respectively, and tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Overall, 13.1% of the Rh. sanguineus ticks and none of the A. cajennense were found to be infected with R. rickettsii. Two isolates of R. rickettsii were successfully established in Vero cell culture from two Rh. sanguineus ticks. An indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) using R. rickettsii antigens detected blood serological reaction to R. rickettsii in 67.9% (53/78) of dogs and 41.0% (16/39) of horses living in the study area. Larval offspring from two Rh. sanguineus engorged females, naturally infected by R. rickettsii, were reared to adult stage in the laboratory. All active stages (larvae, nymphs, adults) remained 100% infected by R. rickettsii, which was efficiently transmitted to naïve rabbits. Overall, the results of the present study indicate a potential risk for transmission of R. rickettsii to humans by Rh. sanguineus, an occurrence yet to be documented in Brazil.

  17. Acaricidal activity of extract of Artemisia absinthium against Rhipicephalus sanguineus of dogs.

    PubMed

    Godara, R; Parveen, S; Katoch, R; Yadav, A; Verma, P K; Katoch, M; Kaur, D; Ganai, A; Raghuvanshi, P; Singh, N K

    2014-02-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the in vitro efficacy of different concentrations of chloroform extract obtained from the aerial parts of Artemisia absinthium in comparison to amitraz on adults, eggs and larvae of the dog tick Rhipicephalus sanguineus using the adult immersion test (AIT), egg hatchability test (EHT) and larval packet test (LPT), respectively. Five concentrations of the extract (1.25, 2.5, 5, 10 and 20 %) with three replications for each concentration were used in all the bioassays. A control group was established (water + dimethylsulphoxide) together with a positive control group (amitraz), with three repetitions each. In AIT, the mortality rates were 0.0, 13.3, 16.7, 33.3 and 93.3 % in concentrations of 1.25, 2.5, 5, 10 and 20 %, respectively, and the variation was significant (p=0.0151). The LC50 (CI) and LC95 (CI) values were calculated as 8.793 % (8.217-9.408) and 34.59 % (29.71-40.26), respectively. The egg production was reduced by 6.6, 6.6, 18.3, 42.5 and 85.1 % in the concentrations of 1.25, 2.5, 5, 10 and 20 %, respectively, and it was statistically significant (p=0.0274). In EHT, hatching was completely inhibited at 5, 10 and 20 % displaying 100 % ovicidal action while at the concentrations of 1.25 and 2.5 %, the inhibition rates were 20 and 60 %, respectively. In LPT, the extract caused 100 % mortality of larvae in the concentrations of 5, 10 and 20 % after 24 h while at the concentrations of 1.25 and 2.5 %, the mortality rates were 54.3 and 96.7 %, respectively. The LC50 (CI) and LC95 (CI) values were determined to be 1.11 % (1.099-1.121) and 2.37 % (2.328-2.423), respectively. The results show that the extract of A. absinthium has acaricidal properties and could be useful in controlling R. sanguineus which is an efficient vector of pathogens both in dogs and humans.

  18. Molecular Diagnosis of Ehrlichia canis in Dogs and Ticks Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Acari: Ixodidae) in Yucatan, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Pat-Nah, Henry; Rodriguez-Vivas, Roger Ivan; Bolio-Gonzalez, Manuel Emilio; Villegas-Perez, Sandra Luz; Reyes-Novelo, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Ehrlichia canis is the etiological agent behind canine monocytic ehrlichiosis, and the tick Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latreille) is its main vector. Blood smear and nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques were used to identify E. canis infection in dogs and R. sanguineus, and explore factors possibly associated with infection in dogs in Yucatan, Mexico. Blood samples were taken and ticks R. sanguineus collected from 50 dogs (10 house dogs and 40 in an animal control center). Data were collected on dog age, sex, body condition, and signs associated with platelet deficiencies (epistaxis). Blood smears were analyzed to identify E. canis morulae and generate platelet counts. Nested PCR analysis was done on blood samples and 200 ticks. A χ(2) test was done to identify factors associated with the E. canis infection in the tested dogs. The overall prevalence for infection, as determined by PCR, was 36% (18 out of 50). All positive dogs were from samples collected from the animal shelter, representing prevalence, for this sampling site, of 45% (18 out of 40). Morulae in monocytes were identified in only 4% of samples. Dog origin (i.e. animal control center) was the only variable associated with E. canis infection (P < 0.01). Male ticks had a higher (P < 0.05) infection rate than female ticks (24.5 vs 13.5%). It is concluded that E. canis infection is present in both dogs and the brown dog ticks R. sanguineus in Yucatan, Mexico.

  19. Molecular, biological, and morphometric comparisons between different geographical populations of Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato (Acari: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Sanches, Gustavo S; Évora, Patrícia M; Mangold, Atílio J; Jittapalapong, Sattaporn; Rodriguez-Mallon, Alina; Guzmán, Pedro E E; Bechara, Gervásio H; Camargo-Mathias, Maria I

    2016-01-15

    In this study, different geographical populations of Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato were compared by molecular, biological, and morphometric methods. Phylogenetic trees were constructed using 12S and 16S rDNA sequences and showed two distinct clades: one composed of ticks from Brazil (Jaboticabal, SP), Cuba (Havana) Thailand (Bangkok) and the so-called "tropical strain" ticks. The second clade was composed of ticks from Spain (Zaragoza), Argentina (Rafaela, Santa Fe) and the so-called "temperate strain" ticks. Morphometric analysis showed good separation between females of the two clades and within the temperate clade. Males also exhibited separation between the two clades, but with some overlap. Multiple biological parameters revealed differences between the two clades, especially the weight of the engorged female. These results confirm the existence of at least two species under the name "R. sanguineus".

  20. A Focus of Dogs and Rickettsia massiliae–Infected Rhipicephalus sanguineus in California

    PubMed Central

    Beeler, Emily; Abramowicz, Kyle F.; Zambrano, Maria L.; Sturgeon, Michele M.; Khalaf, Nada; Hu, Renjie; Dasch, Gregory A.; Eremeeva, Marina E.

    2011-01-01

    A recurrent focus of Rhipicephalus sanguineus infestation was investigated in a suburban area of southern California after reports of suspected Rocky Mountain spotted fever in two dogs on the same property. Abundant quantities of Rh. sanguineus were collected on the property and repeatedly from each dog, and Rickettsia massiliae DNA was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Whole blood and serum samples from four dogs were tested by using PCR and microimmunofluorescent assay for antibodies against spotted fever group rickettsiae. Serum samples from all four dogs contained antibodies reactive with R. massiliae, R. rhipicephali, R. rickettsii, and 364D Rickettsia but no rickettsial DNA was detected by PCR of blood samples. Serum cross-absorption and Western blot assays implicated R. massiliae as the most likely spotted fever group rickettsiae responsible for seropositivity. To our knowledge, this is the first detection of R. massiliae in ticks in California. PMID:21292893

  1. Detection of Rickettsia massiliae in Rhipicephalus sanguineus from the Eastern United States

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Joshua D.; Zawada, Sonya E.; Arias, Jorge R.; Norris, Douglas E.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract We report the first evidence of Rickettsia massiliae in the brown dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus, from the East Coast of the United States. As part of routine pathogen surveillance, DNA samples from ixodid ticks were tested for spotted fever group rickettsiae by nested PCR. A R. massiliae-positive tick was collected off a beagle mix recently rescued from North Carolina. Infection was confirmed by partial sequence analysis of the htrA, gltA, ompB, ompA, and sca4 genes, which had 100% identity to a R. massiliae isolate from Arizona. PMID:23199270

  2. Study on immunobiology in ectoparasites of public health interest: Rhipicephalus sanguineus.

    PubMed

    Palmas, C; Bortoletti, G; Conchedda, M; Contini, C; Gabriele, F; Ecca, A R

    2001-12-01

    The recently defined range of Mediterranean Spotted Fever (MSF) in Sardinia coincides with that of the widely studied Rickettsia conorii vector, the brown dog tick Rhipicephalus sanguineus. This tick is major vector of disease in humans, domestic and wild animals. Characteristic features of the vector with respect to their seasonal activity, abundance as well as incidence of human-tick contact and how these factors influence the incidence of MSF were studied. This paper also looks at host, pathogen and tick vector interactions, re-examining some of the immunobiological parameters involved. However, the primary objective of this research is to develop a strategy that will allow better and safer tick control.

  3. Establishing the discriminating concentration for permethrin and fipronil resistance in Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latreille) (Acari:Ixodidae), the brown dog tick

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latreille), the brown dog tick, is a veterinary canine and urban pest. These ticks have been found to develop permethrin resistance and fipronil tolerance, two commonly used acaricides. We developed a discriminating concentration that can be used to rapidly detect permethri...

  4. Heat-stressed Metarhizium anisopliae: Viability (in vitro) and virulence (in vivo) assessments against the tick Rhipicephalus sanguineus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The current study investigated the thermotolerance of Metarhizium anisopliae s.l. conidia from the commercial products Metarril® SP Organic and Metarril® WP. The efficacy of these M. anisopliae formulations against the tick Rhipicephalus sanguineus s.l. was studied in laboratory under optimum or hea...

  5. Ferritin 1 silencing effect in Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato (Acari: Ixodidae) during experimental infection with Ehrlichia canis.

    PubMed

    Ferrolho, Joana; Antunes, Sandra; Sanches, Gustavo S; Couto, Joana; Évora, Patrícia M; Rosa, Catarina; André, Marcos R; Machado, Rosângela Z; Bechara, Gervásio H; Domingos, Ana

    2017-01-01

    Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato (s.l.) is a very common ectoparasite of domestic dogs able to transmit several pathogens of human and veterinary importance. Tick infestations and tick-borne diseases (TBDs) remain a serious and persistent problem, due to the lack of efficient control measures. It is therefore vital that novel approaches to control are pursued. Whilst vaccination is recognised as a potential control method to reduce tick infestation, no anti-R. sanguineus vaccine is available. Ticks depend on their blood meals to obtain nutrients and to achieve sexual maturity, which exposes them to vast amounts of iron. Although an essential molecule for several biological processes, its excess can lead to oxidative stress. Iron homeostasis is achieved with the help of iron-binding proteins called ferritins, among others, present in several tick tissues and developmental stages. These evolutionarily conserved proteins regulate iron homeostasis by storing and releasing iron in a controlled manner. In this study the R. sanguineus ferritin 1 gene was silenced through RNA interference (RNAi) in adult females exposed to an experimental infection with Ehrlichia canis. The purpose of this study was to assess the role of this protein in tick feeding, ovary development, oogenesis, and pathogen acquisition. Our data has shown that silencing ferritin 1 alters tick competence to normally engorge and causes morphologic and histochemical changes in the ovaries (OV) and oocytes. Furthermore, our data revealed that no E. canis DNA was found in either experimental group. Determining the function of molecules that act in key biological processes, such as blood digestion or reproduction, and that could be considered potential tick antigens will contribute towards the improvement of current control measures against these ectoparasites and the pathogens they vector.

  6. Tick vectors of Cercopithifilaria bainae in dogs: Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato versus Ixodes ricinus.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Rafael Antonio Nascimento; Giannelli, Alessio; Brianti, Emanuele; Annoscia, Giada; Cantacessi, Cinzia; Dantas-Torres, Filipe; Otranto, Domenico

    2013-08-01

    Recently, dermal microfilariae of a Cercopithifilaria species (Spirurida, Onchocercidae), namely Cercopithifilaria bainae , were detected in dogs from several geographical areas of the Mediterranean basin. Evidence from both laboratory and field studies support the role of the brown dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato, as an intermediate host of this nematode. In the present study, we investigated the competence of Ixodes ricinus nymphs as vectors of C. bainae. On November 2012, fully engorged nymphs of I. ricinus (n = 174) and R. sanguineus s.l. (n = 10) were collected from a dog infected by C. bainae. The presence of C. bainae in I. ricinus was assessed by both microscopic dissection of specimens and detection of nematode DNA (PCR), at days 3, 10, 20 and 30 (T1-T4) post-collection; due to the small number of specimens available, R. sanguineus s.l. were examined using the same methods at T4 only. No developing larva of C. bainae was detected in I. ricinus specimens at different time points (T1-T4), even if four of these specimens were PCR-positive at T1. Seven out of ten R. sanguineus s.l. were positive for C. bainae third-stage larvae (L3) at both microscopical and molecular analysis at T4. This study indicates that C. bainae does not develop in I. ricinus nymphs, which preclude the role of this tick as an intermediate host of this parasite. Data presented herein provide new insights into the biology of this filarioid species and will lead to a better understanding of the role of different tick species as vectors of nematodes.

  7. Effects of Ricinus communis oil esters on salivary glands of Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latreille, 1806) (Acari: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Arnosti, André; Brienza, Paula Desjardins; Furquim, Karim Christina Scopinho; Chierice, Gilberto Orivaldo; Neto, Salvador Claro; Bechara, Gervásio Henrique; Sampieri, Bruno Rodrigues; Camargo-Mathias, Maria Izabel

    2011-02-01

    This study showed the interference of esters extracted from Ricinus communis in the secretory cycle of salivary glands of Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks, which consequently caused collateral effects on their feeding process. Ticks attached on hosts which were fed with commercial feed containing different concentrations of R. communis oil esters suffered damages such as cytoplasmic changes in their salivary glands, notably in the acinar cells, impairing the functioning of the acini and accelerating the organs degeneration as a whole. It was found that esters interfered with the activity of cellular secretion by changing the glycoprotein of salivary composition especially in acini II cells. It was also shown that the damages caused by esters in the salivary glands cells of these ectoparasites increased in higher concentrations of the product and degenerative glandular changes were more pronounced.

  8. Detection of Leishmania infantum DNA mainly in Rhipicephalus sanguineus male ticks removed from dogs living in endemic areas of canine leishmaniosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Sand flies are the only biologically adapted vectors of Leishmania parasites, however, a possible role in the transmission of Leishmania has been proposed for other hematophagous ectoparasites such as ticks. In order to evaluate natural infection by Leishmania infantum in Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks, taking into account its close association with dogs, 128 adult R. sanguineus ticks removed from 41 dogs living in endemic areas of canine leishmaniosis were studied. Methods Individual DNA extraction was performed from each tick and whole blood taken from dogs. Dog sera were tested for IgG antibodies to L. infantum antigen by ELISA and L. infantum real-time PCR was performed from canine whole blood samples and ticks. Results Leishmania infantum PCR was positive in 13 ticks (10.1%) including one female, (2.0%) and 12 males (15.2%), and in only five dogs (12.2%). Male ticks had a significantly higher infection rate when compared to female R. sanguineus. The percentage of L. infantum seroreactive dogs was 19.5%. All but two PCR positive dogs were seroreactive. Leishmania infantum PCR positive ticks were removed from seropositive and seronegative dogs with a variety of PCR results. Conclusions This study demonstrates high prevalence of L. infantum DNA in R. sanguineus ticks removed from L. infantum seropositive and seronegative dogs. The presence of L. infantum DNA was detected mainly in male ticks possibly due to their ability to move between canine hosts and feed on several canine hosts during the adult life stage. Additional studies are needed to further explore the role of R. sanguineus ticks and in particular, male adults, in both the epidemiology and immunology of L. infantum infection in dogs in endemic areas. PMID:22613502

  9. Experimental infection of Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks with the bacterium Rickettsia rickettsii, using experimentally infected dogs.

    PubMed

    Piranda, Eliane M; Faccini, João Luiz H; Pinter, Adriano; Pacheco, Richard C; Cançado, Paulo H D; Labruna, Marcelo B

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated if Rickettsia rickettsii-experimentally infected dogs could serve as amplifier hosts for hipicephalus sanguineus ticks. In addition, we checked if Rh. sanguineus ticks that acquired Ri. rickettsii from dogs could transmit the bacterium to susceptible hosts (vector competence), and if these ticks could maintain the bacterium by transstadial and transovarial transmissions. Uninfected larvae, nymphs, and adults of Rh. sanguineus were allowed to feed upon three groups of dogs: groups 1 (G1) and 2 (G2) composed of Ri. rickettsii-infected dogs, infected intraperitoneally and via tick bites, respectively, and group 3 composed of uninfected dogs. After larval and nymphal feeding on rickettsemic dogs, 7.1-15.2% and 35.8-37.9% of the molted nymphs and adults, respectively, were shown by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to be infected by Ri. rickettsii, confirming that both G1 and G2 dogs were efficient sources of rickettsial infection (amplifier host), resulting in transstadial transmission of the agent. These infected nymphs and adults successfully transmitted Ri. rickettsii to guinea pigs, confirming vector competence after acquisition of the infection from rickettsemic dogs. Transovarial transmission of Ri. rickettsii was observed in engorged females that had been infected as nymphs by feeding on both G1 and G2 dogs, but not in engorged females that acquired the infection during adult feeding on these same dogs. In the first case, filial infection rates were generally <50%. No tick exposed to G3 dogs was infected by rickettsiae in this study. No substantial mortality difference was observed between Ri. rickettsii-infected tick groups (G1 and G2) and uninfected tick group (G3). Our results indicate that dogs can be amplifier hosts of Ri. rickettsii for Rh. sanguineus, although only a minority of immature ticks (<45%) should become infected. It appears that Rh. sanguineus, in the absence of horizontal transmission, would not maintain Ri. rickettsii through

  10. Rhipicephalus sanguineus importation into the UK: surveillance, risk, public health awareness and One Health response.

    PubMed

    Hansford, K M; Phipps, L P; Cull, B; Pietzsch, M E; Medlock, J M

    2017-02-04

    As part of Public Health England's assessment of vectorborne disease risk to public health in the UK, tick specimens are regularly submitted by veterinarians for identification via the Tick Surveillance Scheme. Recently, a number of these specimens have been identified as the brown dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus This species is non-endemic to the UK and presents a risk to both human and animal health due to its role in the transmission of various tickborne pathogens. Although current climatic conditions in the UK are unlikely to permit the survival of this species outdoors, indoor infestations can occur and this can present a risk of disease transmission within an infested property. This paper documents 40 importation events involving R sanguineus on recently travelled or imported dogs into the UK since 2012. It also provides details of the response following these detections in line with the One Health concept. With the increasing number of dogs travelling or being imported, it is likely that importation and infestation events in the UK will continue and may result in pathogen transmission. It is therefore important to raise awareness of this risk and share lessons learned to improve our prevention and response strategies to this emerging issue.

  11. Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Acari: Ixodidae) female ticks exposed to castor oil (Ricinus communis): an ultrastructural overview.

    PubMed

    Sampieri, B R; Furquim, K C S; Nunes, P H; Camargo-Mathias, M I

    2013-02-01

    Tick control has been accomplished through the use of synthetic acaricides, which has created resistant individuals, as well as contaminating the environment and nontarget organisms. Substances of plant origin, such as oils and extracts of eucalyptus and neem leaves, have been researched as an alternative to replace the synthetic acaricides. Ricinoleic acid esters from castor oil have recently been shown as a promising alternative in eliminating bacterial contamination during ethanol fermentation, by acting as an effective biocide. The same positive results have been observed when these esters are added to the food given to tick-infested rabbits. This study tested the effect of these substance on the reproductive system of Rhipicephalus sanguineus females, added to rabbit food, more specifically on oogenesis. For this, four groups were established: four control groups (CG1, CG2, CG3, and CG4) and four treatment groups (TG1, TG2, TG3, and TG4) with one rabbit in each (New Zealand White), used as hosts. After full 4 days feeding (semi-engorgement), the females were collected and had their ovaries extracted. In this study, it was observed that R. sanguineus females exposed to esters had their ovaries modified, which was demonstrated through transmission electron microscopy techniques. The addition of ricinoleic esters to the diet of tick-infested rabbits revealed how toxic such substances are for the cytoplasmic organelles of oocytes and pedicel cells. These compounds can change the morphophysiology of germ and somatic cells, consequently influencing their viability and, therefore, confirming that the ricinoleic acid esters from castor oil are a promising substance in the control of R. sanguineus.

  12. In Vitro effect of the ethanolic extract of Tephrosia Vogelii on Rhipicephalus Sanguineus in Abomey-Calavi

    PubMed Central

    Jacques, Dougnon Tossou; Safiou, Adéhan; Jédirfort, Houessionon; Souaïbou, Farougou

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Ticks are vectors of several diseases, of which many are zoonosis transmissible to humans. The use of Tephrosia leafs’ extract as a low cost acaricide is spreading among farmers in central Kenya. Materials and Methods: The present study’s aim is to inventory endogenous control methods against dogs’ ticks among which Rhipicephalus sanguineus, in the Municipality of Abomey-Calavi. From September to October 2013, a survey was made on forty randomly selected breeders and ticks samples were collected on forty dogs. The web platform, www.epicollect.net, was used for the survey. In total, 77.5% (n=40) of examined dogs were infested with ticks Results: Three species of ticks were identified: Rhipicephalus sanguineus, Haemaphysalis leachi, and Amblyomma variegatum. They were found on 77.5%, 17.5%, and 15% of examined dogs, respectively. The numerical abundance of the three species was 87.06%, 11.9%, and 1.03%, respectively. The average number of ticks per animal was 16.83±5.04, 2.3±1.64, and 0.2±0.08 for Rhipicephalus sanguineus, Haemaphysalis leachi, and Amblyomma variegatum, respectively. Farmers used manual diptank (67.5%), plant ash (37.5%), petroleum (12.5%), motor oil (2.50 %), and sea water (7.5%) to fight against ticks. Conclusion: The phytochemical screening of the leafy stem’s powder of Tephrosia vogelii revealed the presence of catechol tannins, saponins, sugars, leuco-anthocyanins, polyterpenes, and sterols. A 100% larval mortality was observed at the concentration of 20% the ethanolic extract of the leafy stem of Tephrosia vogelii. The LC50 of this ethanolic extract against Rhipicephalus sanguineus larvae was equal to 2.6%. PMID:26101758

  13. Comparative efficacy of two oral treatments for dogs containing either afoxolaner or fluralaner against Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato and Dermacentor reticulatus.

    PubMed

    Beugnet, Frederic; Liebenberg, Julian; Halos, Lenaïg

    2015-04-15

    The present study compares the efficacy of two recent oral ectoparasiticides containing isoxazolines (NexGard(®), containing afoxolaner and administered at a monthly regimen, and Bravecto™ containing fluralaner and administered at a tri-monthly regimen) against Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato and Dermacentor reticulatus ticks on dogs. 24 dogs were randomly allocated to untreated control, NexGard(®) treated, and Bravecto™ treated groups. The treatments were administered on Days 0, 28 and 56 for afoxolaner and on Day 0 for fluralaner. Tick infestations were performed weekly with 50 unfed adult ticks per each species on each dog from Days 30 to 84 (with the exception of R. sanguineus on Day 63). Ticks were counted at 24h post-infestation. The dogs from both treated groups had statistically significantly (p<0.05) less R. sanguineus and D. reticulatus ticks compared to the untreated dogs on all assessment days. Percent efficacy against R. sanguineus ranged from 86.4% to 99.5% at 24h post-infestation for NexGard(®) and from 65.7% to 100% for Bravecto™. Statistically significantly (p<0.05) less R. sanguineus ticks were recorded for NexGard(®) treated dogs compared to Bravecto™ treated dogs on Day 78. Percent efficacy against D. reticulatus ranged from 85.2% to 99.6% at 24h post-infestation for NexGard(®) and from 63.4% to 99.1% for Bravecto™. Statistically significantly (p<0.05) less D. reticulatus ticks were recorded for NexGard(®) treated dogs compared to Bravecto™ treated dogs on Days 71, 78 and 85.

  14. Detection of Anaplasma platys in dogs and Rhipicephalus sanguineus group ticks by a quantitative real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Rafael Antonio Nascimento; Latrofa, Maria Stefania; Giannelli, Alessio; Lacasella, Vita; Campbell, Bronwyn Evelyn; Dantas-Torres, Filipe; Otranto, Domenico

    2014-09-15

    Anaplasma platys is an obligate intracellular, tick-borne pathogen of dogs, which causes canine infectious cyclic thrombocytopenia (CICT). The vector role of Rhipicephalus sanguineus group ticks has been only suggested, but definitive evidence is lacking. This study aimed to detect and quantify A. platys DNA in infected dogs and in their respective ticks through a quantitative real-time PCR assay. From March to May 2009, blood and tick samples from dogs residing in a CICT-endemic area were collected and molecularly analysed. Differences (p<0.05) were detected in the bacterial load between tick nymphs (3.5 × 10(-2)± 2.5 × 10(-2)) and adults (female: 1.2 × 10(-1) ± 1.1 × 10(-1); male: 9.3 × 10(-2)± 1.2 × 10(-2)) and between unengorged (1.1 × 10(-1) ± 2.8 × 10(-2)) and partially or fully engorged ticks (1.9 × 10(-1) ± 2.7 × 10(-2)). No difference was found between ticks collected from positive (1.1 × 10(-1)± 0.6 × 10(-1)) and negative (1.2 × 10(-1) ± 0.3 × 10(-1)) dogs (p>0.05). The mean bacterial load detected in positive dogs was lower than that in their respective ticks (p>0.05). This study provides circumstantial evidence of the putative role of Rhipicephalus sp. I as a vector of this pathogen.

  15. Assessment of the prophylactic speed of kill of Frontline Tri-Act® against ticks (Ixodes ricinus and Rhipicephalus sanguineus) on dogs

    PubMed Central

    Beugnet, Frédéric; Halos, Lénaïg; Liebenberg, Julian; Fourie, Josephus

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the study was to assess the speed of kill of a single topical treatment with a combination of fipronil and permethrin (Frontline Tri-Act®/Frontect®) against experimental infestations of Ixodes ricinus and Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks on dogs. In this parallel group designed, randomised, single centre, controlled efficacy study, 16 healthy adult dogs were allocated to two groups: 8 dogs were treated with the topical combination on Day 0 and the other 8 dogs served as untreated controls. Each dog was exposed in a crate to 100 I. ricinus (50 females, 50 males) and 50 R. sanguineus (25 males, 25 females) on Days 2, 7, 14, 21 and 28. Ticks were counted in situ at 6 and 12 h after exposure and removed at 24 h after exposure. Frontline Tri-Act® was effective (≥90%) against both R. sanguineus and I. ricinus tick infestations at 6, 12 and 24 h after exposure, from 2 to 28 days after treatment. This is the first time that a topical ectoparasiticide has demonstrated a preventive killing effect against these two tick species in 6 h for a full month. PMID:26795064

  16. Comparative biology of the tropical and temperate species of Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato (Acari: Ixodidae) under different laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Labruna, Marcelo B; Gerardi, Monize; Krawczak, Felipe S; Moraes-Filho, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the taxon Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato (s.l.) is represented in Latin America by two distinct species, designated as 'tropical species' (distributed from Mexico to Brazil) and 'temperate species' (restricted to the southern cone of South America). Since both tropical and temperate species of R. sanguineus s.l. are parasites primarily of domestic dogs, the reasons for their distinct geographical distribution in South America could be related to particular requirements of abiotic conditions for off-host development. With the purpose to test this hypothesis, this study evaluated the off-host developmental stages (eggs, engorged larvae, nymphs and females) of both tick species simultaneously inside incubators with temperature and photoperiod regimens that simulated the summer and winter conditions of tropical Brazil (where the 'tropical species' occurs) and temperate Brazil (where the 'temperate species' occurs). Results showed that the temperate species had significantly higher survival rates than the tropical species, when engorged ticks (larvae, nymphs and females) and eggs were incubated at lower temperatures simulating winter seasons of many parts of the southern cone of South America, where the temperate species is known to occur. These results suggest that the absence of established populations of the tropical species in temperate areas of South America is related to the low overwinter capacity of the tropical species in those areas. Regarding the temperate species, unfed adults that molted from nymphs under summer conditions of either tropical or temperate Brazil remained dormant, at the state of behavioral diapause for at least 20 weeks. Contrastingly, when engorged nymphs of the temperate species were held at winter conditions for at least 3 months, and then transferred to summer conditions to complete molting, no diapause was observed in adult ticks. These results were corroborated by infestation trials, which showed

  17. Occurrence of Hepatozoon canis and Cercopithifilaria bainae in an off-host population of Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato ticks.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Rafael Antonio Nascimento; Giannelli, Alessio; Carbone, Domenico; Baneth, Gad; Dantas-Torres, Filipe; Otranto, Domenico

    2014-04-01

    Hepatozoon canis (Eucoccidiorida, Hepatozoidae) and the filarioid Cercopithifilaria bainae (Spirurida, Onchocercidae) are tick-transmitted infectious agents of dogs, highly prevalent in the Mediterranean basin in association with Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato. Ticks were collected from the environment every 25±2 days in a confined location in southern Italy where a community of dogs lives, from August 2012 to July 2013. In order to study the occurrence of H. canis and C. bainae, 1091 tick specimens (770 adults; 271 nymphs, and 50 larvae) were dissected, and oocysts of H. canis and larvae of C. bainae were morphologically identified. Out of 1091 dissected ticks, 13.47% (n=147) were positive for H. canis, with the highest prevalence recorded in unfed adults (16.4%; 126/770), followed by nymphs collected as larvae and allowed to moult (14%; 7/50), unfed nymphs dissected immediately after collection (3%; 8/271), and adults collected as nymphs and allowed to moult (2%; 6/271). The highest number of H. canis-positive ticks (35.5%; 43/121; P<0.05) was recorded during the summer months (i.e., June-July). In addition, 6% of adult ticks (n=66) were positive for third-stage larvae of C. bainae, with the highest number in June (17%; 14/84; P<0.05). Based on the results reported herein, H. canis and C. bainae infections in the study area seem to be dependent on the seasonality of vector tick populations. Hence, dogs living in these areas are more exposed to both pathogens during the warmer months. These findings provide new insights into the ecology of both H. canis and C. bainae.

  18. Proteome of Rhipicephalus sanguineus tick saliva induced by the secretagogues pilocarpine and dopamine

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, C.J.; Anatriello, E.; de Miranda-Santos, I.K.; Francischetti, I.M.; Sá-Nunes, A.; Ferreira, B.R.; Ribeiro, J.M.C.

    2013-01-01

    One dimensional gel electrophoresis was used to separate proteins from the saliva of Rhipicephalus sanguineus female ticks fed on rabbits. Gel slices were subjected to tryptic digestion and analyzed by reversed-phase HPLC followed by MS/MS analysis. The data were compared to a database of salivary proteins of the same tick and to the predicted proteins of the host. Saliva was obtained by either pilocarpine or dopamine stimulation of partially-fed ticks. Electrophoretic separations of both yielded products that were identified by mass spectrometry, although the pilocarpine-derived sample was of much better quality. The majority of identified proteins were of rabbit origin, indicating the recycling of the host proteins in the tick saliva, including hemoglobin, albumin, haptoglobin, transferring, and a plasma serpin. The few proteins found that were previously associated with parasitism and blood feeding include 2 glycine-rich, cement-like proteins, 2 lipocalins, and a thyropin protease inhibitor. Among other of the 19 tick proteins identified, albeit with undefined roles, were SPARC and cyclophilin A. This catalog provides a resource that can be mined for secreted molecules that play a role in tick-host interactions. PMID:24029695

  19. Rocky Mountain spotted fever in Arizona: documentation of heavy environmental infestations of Rhipicephalus sanguineus at an endemic site.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, William L; Paddock, Christopher D; Demma, Linda; Traeger, Marc; Johnson, Brian; Dickson, Jeffrey; McQuiston, Jennifer; Swerdlow, David

    2006-10-01

    A recent epidemiologic investigation identified 16 cases and 2 deaths from Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) in two eastern Arizona communities. Prevalence studies were conducted by collecting free-living ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) from the home sites of RMSF patients and from other home sites within the community. Dry ice traps and flagging confirmed heavy infestations at many of the home sites. Only Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks were identified and all developmental stages were detected. It is evident that under certain circumstances, this species does transmit Rickettsia rickettsii to humans and deserves reconsideration as a vector in other geographic areas.

  20. Attachment of nymphal Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Acari: Ixodidae) to a human in an urban area followed by severe adverse reaction shortly before drop-off.

    PubMed

    Uspensky, Igor

    2009-03-01

    A case of attachment and complete engorgement of a Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latreille, 1806) nymph on a woman with severe pain shortly before nymphal drop-off is described. The pain continued for about 2 weeks after tick removal. Apparently, this is the first documented case of human adverse reaction developed at the very last stage of engorgement of nymphal R. sanguineus. The infestation most likely took place inside the enclosed household garden in the southern area of Jerusalem where the woman took care of the plants. The importance of immature R. sanguineus ticks in attacking humans is discussed.

  1. Histopathological study of ovaries of Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Acari: Ixodidae) exposed to different thymol concentrations.

    PubMed

    da Silva Matos, Renata; Daemon, Erik; Camargo-Mathias, Maria Izabel; Furquim, Karim Christina Scopinho; Sampieri, Bruno Rodrigues; Remédio, Rafael Neodini; Araújo, Laryssa Xavier; Novato, Tatiane Pinheiro Lopes

    2014-12-01

    Thymol is a monoterpene with proven acaricide action for several tick species. In addition to killing these ectoparasites, thymol can also reduce oviposition and egg hatch rate. However, the effects of thymol on the morphophysiology of tick ovaries are still unknown. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the morphophysiological changes caused by this active principle in ovaries of Rhipicephalus sanguineus after a 6-day feeding period, through the application of morphohistochemical techniques. After the feeding period, a total of 50 females were divided into five groups and immersed in the following solutions: (I) distilled water (control), (II) 30% ethanol (control), (III) 1.25 mg/mL thymol, (IV) 2.5 mg/mL thymol, and (V) 5.0 mg/mL thymol. The experimental groups were kept in a climatic chamber (27 ± 1 °C; RH 80 ± 10%) for 5 days. After this period, morphological (hematoxylin/eosin) and histochemical (von Kossa) techniques were applied after remotion of the ovaries. The morphological results revealed large vacuoles in germ cells at different developmental stages and invaginations that represent deformations in the chorionic membrane. From the results obtained in this study, it was concluded that thymol interfered with the development of oocytes, which showed degeneration signs. The treatment containing 5.0 mg/mL thymol affected more accentuately the morphological development. Moreover, thymol also altered the calcium content of yolk granules, which generally showed an intense staining for this element.

  2. Brown dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato, infestation ofsusceptible dog hosts is reduced by slow release of semiochemicalsfrom a less susceptible host

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Domestic dog breeds are hosts for the tick Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato, but infestation levels vary among breeds. Beagles are less susceptible to tick infestations than English cocker spaniels due to enhanced production of 2-hexanone and benzaldehyde that act as tick repellents. We report th...

  3. Acaricidal activity of hydroethanolic formulations of thymol against Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Acari: Ixodidae) and Dermacentor nitens (Acari: Ixodidae) larvae.

    PubMed

    Daemon, Erik; Maturano, Ralph; Monteiro, Caio Márcio de Oliveira; Goldner, Márcio Scoralik; Massoni, Tainara

    2012-05-25

    The aim of this study was to assess the acaricidal activity of hydroethanolic formulations of thymol at varying concentrations on Rhipicephalus sanguineus and Dermacentor nitens larvae. The larval packet test was used and the thymol concentrations tested were 2.5, 5.0, 10.0, 15.0 and 20.0 mg/ml. The control group was exposed only to water and ethanol (50/50%) and there were 10 repetitions for each treatment. The mortality was evaluated after 24 h. For the R. sanguineus larvae, the mortality rates were 47.5, 50.2, 96.7, 95.9 and 98.1%, while for D. nitens the rates were 14.1, 75.0, 90.2, 90.3 and 99.5%, at respective thymol concentrations of 2.5, 5.0, 10.0, 15.0 and 20.0 mg/ml. The results indicate that the hydroethanolic formulations of thymol tested have acaricidal activity on R. sanguineus and D. nitens larvae exposed topically, causing mortality greater than 90% 24 h post-treatment starting at the concentration of 10 mg/ml.

  4. Comparative susceptibility of larval stages of Amblyomma aureolatum, Amblyomma cajennense, and Rhipicephalus sanguineus to infection by Rickettsia rickettsii.

    PubMed

    Labruna, Marcelo B; Ogrzewalska, Maria; Martins, Thiago F; Pinter, Adriano; Horta, Maurício C

    2008-11-01

    The current study compared the susceptibility of larval stages of Amblyomma cajennense (F.), Amblyomma aureolatum (Pallas), and Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latreille) to infection by a Brazilian strain of Rickettsia rickettsii. Guinea pigs experimentally infected by R. rickettsii were simultaneously infested by larvae of the three tick species. Recovered engorged larvae were allowed to molt to nymphs and held in an incubator at 23 degrees C and 85-90% RH. Subsequent flat nymphs were tested for rickettsial infection by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Concomitant infestations with sibling ticks on noninfected guinea pigs (control) were done. While 10-60% of the A. cajennense nymphs were shown to be infected by R. rickettsii, both A. aureolatum and R. sanguineus were highly susceptible to R. rickettsii, since 80-100% of their nymphs were shown to be infected in the corresponding trials. Most of the engorged larvae (approximately 70-95%), regardless of being infected or not, successfully molted to nymphs. Mortality rates for engorged larvae tended to be statistically similar (P > 0.05) for ticks recovered from R. rickettsii-infected and noninfected guinea pigs, within each tick species. The only exceptions were the significantly higher mortalities (P < 0.05) for engorged A. cajennense larvae recovered from two infected guinea pigs. Therefore, A. cajennense was less susceptible to R. rickettsii infection than A. aureolatum and R. sanguineus, while feeding on rickettsemic guinea pigs. These two later species were similarly highly susceptible.

  5. Morphological alterations in salivary glands of Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) exposed to neem seed oil with known azadirachtin concentration.

    PubMed

    Remedio, R N; Nunes, P H; Anholeto, L A; Oliveira, P R; Sá, I C G; Camargo-Mathias, M I

    2016-04-01

    Neem (Azadirachta indica) has attracted the attention of researchers worldwide due to its repellent properties and recognized effects on the morphology and physiology of arthropods, including ticks. Therefore, this study aimed to demonstrate the effects of neem seed oil enriched with azadirachtin on salivary glands of Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks, targets of great veterinary interest because of their ability to transmit pathogens to dogs. For this, R. sanguineus semi-engorged females were subjected to treatment with neem seed oil, with known azadirachtin concentrations (200, 400 and 600ppm). After dissection, salivary glands were collected and evaluated through morphological techniques in light microscopy, confocal scanning laser microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, so that the possible relation between neem action and further impairment in these ectoparasites feed performance could be established. Neem oil demonstrated a clear dose-dependent effect in the analyzed samples. The agranular (type I) and granular acini (types II and III) showed, particularly in individuals treated with the highest concentrations of the product, cells with irregular shape, intense cytoplasmic disorganization and vacuolation, dilation of rough endoplasmic reticulum lumen, besides alterations in mitochondrial intermembrane space. These morphological damages may indicate modifications in salivary glands physiology, demonstrating the harmful effects of compounds present in neem oil on ticks. These results reinforce the potential of neem as an alternative method for controlling R. sanguineus ticks, instead of synthetic acaricides.

  6. Comparative Evaluation of the Vector Competence of Four South American Populations of the Rhipicephalus sanguineus Group for the Bacterium Ehrlichia canis, the Agent of Canine Monocytic Ehrlichiosis.

    PubMed

    Moraes-Filho, Jonas; Krawczak, Felipe S; Costa, Francisco B; Soares, João Fábio; Labruna, Marcelo B

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the vector competence of four populations of Rhipicephalus sanguineus group ticks for the bacterium Ehrlichia canis, the agent of canine monocytic ehrlichiosis (CME). Ticks (larvae and nymphs) from the four populations-one from São Paulo state, southeastern Brazil (BSP), one from Rio Grande do Sul state, southern Brazil (BRS), one from Argentina (ARG), and one from Uruguay (URU)-were exposed to E. canis infection by feeding on dogs that were experimentally infected with E. canis. Engorged ticks (larvae and nymphs) were allowed to molt to nymphs and adults, respectively, which were tested by molecular analysis (E. canis-specific PCR assay) and used to infest naïve dogs. Through infestation of adult ticks on naïve dogs, after nymphal acquisition feeding on E. canis-infected dogs, only the BSP population was shown to be competent vectors of E. canis, i.e., only the dogs infested with BSP adult ticks developed clinical illness, seroconverted to E. canis, and yielded E. canis DNA by PCR. This result, demonstrated by two independent replications, is congruent with epidemiological data, since BSP ticks were derived from São Paulo state, Brazil, where CME is highly endemic. On the other hand, BRS, ARG, and URU ticks were derived from a geographical region (South America southern cone) where CME has never been properly documented. Molecular analysis of unfed adults at 30 days post molting support these transmission results, since none of the BRS, ARG, and URU ticks were PCR positive, whereas 1% of the BSP nymphs and 31.8% of the BSP adults contained E. canis DNA. We conclude that the absence or scarcity of cases of CME due to E. canis in the South America southern cone is a result of vector incompetence of the R. sanguineus group ticks that prevail on dogs in this part of South America.

  7. Comparative Evaluation of the Vector Competence of Four South American Populations of the Rhipicephalus sanguineus Group for the Bacterium Ehrlichia canis, the Agent of Canine Monocytic Ehrlichiosis

    PubMed Central

    Moraes-Filho, Jonas; Krawczak, Felipe S.; Costa, Francisco B.; Soares, João Fábio; Labruna, Marcelo B.

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the vector competence of four populations of Rhipicephalus sanguineus group ticks for the bacterium Ehrlichia canis, the agent of canine monocytic ehrlichiosis (CME). Ticks (larvae and nymphs) from the four populations—one from São Paulo state, southeastern Brazil (BSP), one from Rio Grande do Sul state, southern Brazil (BRS), one from Argentina (ARG), and one from Uruguay (URU)–were exposed to E. canis infection by feeding on dogs that were experimentally infected with E. canis. Engorged ticks (larvae and nymphs) were allowed to molt to nymphs and adults, respectively, which were tested by molecular analysis (E. canis-specific PCR assay) and used to infest naïve dogs. Through infestation of adult ticks on naïve dogs, after nymphal acquisition feeding on E. canis-infected dogs, only the BSP population was shown to be competent vectors of E. canis, i.e., only the dogs infested with BSP adult ticks developed clinical illness, seroconverted to E. canis, and yielded E. canis DNA by PCR. This result, demonstrated by two independent replications, is congruent with epidemiological data, since BSP ticks were derived from São Paulo state, Brazil, where CME is highly endemic. On the other hand, BRS, ARG, and URU ticks were derived from a geographical region (South America southern cone) where CME has never been properly documented. Molecular analysis of unfed adults at 30 days post molting support these transmission results, since none of the BRS, ARG, and URU ticks were PCR positive, whereas 1% of the BSP nymphs and 31.8% of the BSP adults contained E. canis DNA. We conclude that the absence or scarcity of cases of CME due to E. canis in the South America southern cone is a result of vector incompetence of the R. sanguineus group ticks that prevail on dogs in this part of South America. PMID:26414283

  8. The expression of genes coding for distinct types of glycine-rich proteins varies according to the biology of three metastriate ticks, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, Rhipicephalus sanguineus and Amblyomma cajennense

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Ticks secrete a cement cone composed of many salivary proteins, some of which are rich in the amino acid glycine in order to attach to their hosts' skin. Glycine-rich proteins (GRPs) are a large family of heterogeneous proteins that have different functions and features; noteworthy are their adhesive and tensile characteristics. These properties may be essential for successful attachment of the metastriate ticks to the host and the prolonged feeding necessary for engorgement. In this work, we analyzed Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) similar to GRPs from cDNA libraries constructed from salivary glands of adult female ticks representing three hard, metastriate species in order to verify if their expression correlated with biological differences such as the numbers of hosts ticks feed on during their parasitic life cycle, whether one (monoxenous parasite) or two or more (heteroxenous parasite), and the anatomy of their mouthparts, whether short (Brevirostrata) or long (Longirostrata). These ticks were the monoxenous Brevirostrata tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, a heteroxenous Brevirostrata tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus, and a heteroxenous Longirostrata tick, Amblyomma cajennense. To further investigate this relationship, we conducted phylogenetic analyses using sequences of GRPs from these ticks as well as from other species of Brevirostrata and Longirostrata ticks. Results cDNA libraries from salivary glands of the monoxenous tick, R. microplus, contained more contigs of glycine-rich proteins than the two representatives of heteroxenous ticks, R. sanguineus and A. cajennense (33 versus, respectively, 16 and 11). Transcripts of ESTs encoding GRPs were significantly more numerous in the salivary glands of the two Brevirostrata species when compared to the number of transcripts in the Longirostrata tick. The salivary gland libraries from Brevirostrata ticks contained numerous contigs significantly similar to silks of true spiders (17 and 8 in

  9. Brown dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato, infestation of susceptible dog hosts is reduced by slow release of semiochemicals from a less susceptible host.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira Filho, Jaires Gomes; Ferreira, Lorena Lopes; Sarria, André Lucio Franceschini; Pickett, John A; Birkett, Michael A; Mascarin, Gabriel Moura; de León, Adalberto A Pérez; Borges, Lígia Miranda Ferreira

    2017-01-01

    Domestic dog breeds are hosts for the brown dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato, but infestation levels vary among breeds. Beagles are less susceptible to tick infestations than English cocker spaniels due to enhanced production of 2-hexanone and benzaldehyde that act as volatile tick repellents. We report the use of prototype slow-release formulations of these compounds to reduce the burden of R. sanguineus s. l. on English cocker spaniel dogs. Twelve dogs were randomly assigned to two groups with six dogs each. The treated group received collars with slow-release formulations of the compounds attached, while the control group received collars with clean formulations attached. Five environmental infestations were performed, with the number of ticks (at all stages) on the dogs being counted twice a day for 45days. The counts on the number of tick stages found per dog were individually fitted to linear mixed effects models with repeated measures and normal distribution for errors. The mean tick infestation in the treated group was significantly lower than in the control group. For larvae and nymphs, a decrease in tick infestation was observed at the fifth count, and for adults, lower average counts were observed in all counts. The compounds did not interfere with the distribution of the ticks on the body of the dogs, as a similar percentage of ticks was found on the anterior half of the dogs (54.5% for the control group and 56.2% for the treated group). The biological and reproductive parameters of the ticks were not affected by the repellents. This study highlights for the first time the potential use of a novel allomone (repellent)-based formulation for reduction of tick infestation on susceptible dogs.

  10. Detection of Rickettsia parkeri from within Piura, Peru, and the First Reported Presence of Candidatus Rickettsia andeanae in the Tick Rhipicephalus sanguineus

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Mendoza, Carmen; Florin, David; Felices, Vidal; Pozo, Edwar J.; Graf, Paul C.F.; Richards, Allen L.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Domestic farm animals (n=145) were sampled for the presence of ectoparasites in northwestern Peru during March, 2008. Ninety domestic animals (62%) were positive for the presence of an ectoparasite(s) and produced a total collection of the following: 728 ticks [Amblyomma maculatum, Anocentor nitens, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, Rhipicephalus sanguineus, and Otobius megnini], 12 lice (Haematopinus suis), and 3 fleas (Ctenocephalides felis). A Rickettsia genus-specific qPCR assay was performed on nucleic acid preparations of the collected ectoparasites that resulted in 5% (37/743, 35 ticks and 2 fleas) of the ectoparasites positive for the presence of Rickettsia. DNA from the positive individual ticks was tested with 2 other qPCR assays for the presence of the ompB gene in Candidatus Rickettsia andeanae or Rickettsia parkeri. Candidatus R. andeanae was found in 25 A. maculatum ticks and in two Rh. sanguineus ticks, whereas R. parkeri was detected in 6 A. maculatum ticks. Two A. maculatum were co-infected with both Candidatus R. andeanae and R. parkeri. Rickettsia felis was detected in 2 fleas, Ctenocephalides felis, by multilocus sequence typing of the 17-kD antigen and ompA genes. These findings expand the geographic range of R. parkeri to include Peru as well as expand the natural arthropod vector of Candidatus R. andeanae to include Rhipicephalus sanguineus. PMID:23488453

  11. Comparative analysis of spermatids of Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato (Ixodidae) and Ornithodoros rostratus ticks (Argasidae): morphophysiology aimed at systematics.

    PubMed

    Sampieri, Bruno Rodrigues; Calligaris, Izabela Bragião; Matos, Renata da Silva; Páez, Fredy Arvey Rivera; Bueno, Odair Corrêa; Camargo-Mathias, Maria Izabel

    2016-02-01

    The phylogenetic relationships among tick species (Acari: Ixodida) have been revisited by several researchers over the last decades. Two subfamilies, Rhipicephalinae (Ixodidae) and Ornithodorinae (Argasidae), deserve special attention. The male reproductive system morphology, as well as the ultrastructure of the germ cells, may provide important information for phylogeny and systematics of metazoan groups, with spermatozoa exhibiting characters that can be used for this purpose. With that information in mind, this study aimed at evaluating, through a comparative analysis, the morphology of the male reproductive systems and germ cells of ticks species Rhipicephalus sanguineus and Ornithodoros rostratus. In order to do that, histology and scanning electron microscopy techniques were used. The results have shown that despite the similarities in the general morphology of the male reproductive system among studied Ixodida so far, there are morphological differences among the species studied herein, mainly the U-shaped testis (ancestral character) in O. rostratus and the pair testes (derived character) in R. sanguineus, and the general morphology of germ cells (spermatids V). Besides that, the morphological changes observed during the spermiogenesis appear to be different between the species studied here, probably characterizing the two families considered. The data generated in this study showed the importance of comparative internal morphology studies, mainly in regard to spermatology, despite the morphological data obtained herein not being enough to product a cladogram (sperm cladistics), it was already possible to observe clear differences among families Argasidae and Ixodidae in regard to the organization of their male reproductive systems and concerning the external morphology of spermatids. Data yet to be obtained through transmission electron microscopy techniques will allow the application of spermiocladistics and spermiotaxonomy as tools for tick systematics.

  12. Infection with Ehrlichia canis and Anaplasma platys (Rickettsiales: Anaplasmataceae) in two lineages of Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato (Acari: Ixodidae) from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Cicuttin, Gabriel L; Tarragona, Evelina L; De Salvo, M Nazarena; Mangold, Atilio J; Nava, Santiago

    2015-09-01

    Natural infection with Ehrlichia canis and Anaplasma platys in ticks belonging to the tropical and temperate lineages of Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato from Argentina was evaluated. Samples were tested for Ehrlichia canis infection by PCR assays using 16S rRNA, dsb and p28 gene, while detection of A. platys was performed with 16S rRNA and groESL gene. The assignment of the ticks to each lineage was corroborated with 16S rDNA sequences. All ticks infected with E. canis and A. platys belonged to the tropical lineage. These results constitute the first record of E. canis infection in R. sanguineus s.l ticks from Argentina. No ticks from the temperate lineage were found to be infected with E. canis, coinciding with previous studies performed in Argentina and Uruguay where E. canis infection was not detected in R. sanguineus s.l from the temperate lineage. Because the presence of the tropical lineage of R. sanguineus s.l has been documented in tropical areas of northern Argentina between 22° and 24° of south latitude, the findings of this work indicate that transmission of E. canis and A. platys to dogs by R. sanguineus s.l probably occurs along this region.

  13. [Control of Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latrielle, 1806) (Acari: Ixodidae) in the kennel of the UFMG Veterinary School, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Paz, Gustavo F; Leite, Romário C; de Oliveira, Paulo R

    2008-01-01

    The present work was aimed at proposing a control measure for Rhipicephalus sanguineus in a naturally infected kennel of 72 m(2) of the UFMG Veterinary School with 25 dogs of different breeds. A sensitivity test to acaricide products was applied in a sample of R. sanguineus. Out of the acaricide products tested: 12.5% Amitraz (product 1); 2% Alfamethrin and 60% Dichlorvos association (product 2); 5% Deltamethrin (product 3) and the association between 77.6% Trichlorfon, 1.0% Coumaphos and 1.0% Cyfluthrin (product 4); only 1 and 4 products showed 100% efficacy. Amitraz (12.5%) was used for controlling R. sanguineus in the surrounding of the kennel, on which four treatments every seven days were carried out in the facilities. For parasitic R. sanguineus, a single topical treatment was used: Flumetrin 1.0% pour-on on all the 25 dogs. This control measure significantly reduced the population of R. sanguineus within the kennel. A slight infestation was observed in the seventh month after treatment. A new application of 12.5% Amitraz was done in the kennel as well as a new topical treatment with Flumetrin 1.0% pour-on on the dogs. The control procedure proposed in the present study was an emergency measure and its effectiveness was checked through environmental surveys throughout a one-year period.

  14. Detection of permethrin resistance and fipronil tolerance in Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Acari: Ixodidae) in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Permethrin is a commonly used acaricide for tick control on domestic animals and in residential environments, while fipronil use is restricted to on-animal treatment. Following widespread reports of permethrin and fipronil application failures to control indoor infestations of Rhipicephalus sanguin...

  15. Molecular characterization of Rickettsia massiliae and Anaplasma platys infecting Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks and domestic dogs, Buenos Aires (Argentina).

    PubMed

    Cicuttin, Gabriel L; Brambati, Diego F; Rodríguez Eugui, Juan I; Lebrero, Cecilia González; De Salvo, María N; Beltrán, Fernando J; Gury Dohmen, Federico E; Jado, Isabel; Anda, Pedro

    2014-09-01

    Rickettsioses, ehrlichioses and anaplasmoses are emerging diseases that are mainly transmitted by arthropods and that affect humans and animals. The aim of the present study was to use molecular techniques to detect and characterize those pathogens in dogs and ticks from Buenos Aires city. We studied 207 Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks and 52 canine blood samples from poor neighborhoods of Buenos Aires city. The samples were molecularly screened for the genera Rickettsia, Ehrlichia, and Anaplasma by PCR and sequencing. DNA of Rickettsia massiliae (3.4%) and Anaplasma platys (13.5%) was detected in ticks and blood samples, respectively. For characterization, the positive samples were subjected to amplification of a fragment of the 190-kDa outer membrane protein gene (spotted fever group rickettsiae) and a fragment of the groESL gene (specific for A. platys). A phylogenetic tree was constructed using the neighbor-joining method, revealing that the sequences were closely related to those of strains from other geographic regions. The results indicate that human and animal pathogens are abundant in dogs and their ticks in Buenos Aires city and portray the potentially high risk of human exposure to infection with these agents, especially in poor neighborhoods, where there is close contact with animals in an environment of poor health conditions.

  16. Effects of ricinoleic acid esters from castor oil of Ricinus communis on the vitellogenesis of Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latreille, 1806) (Acari: Ixodidae) ticks.

    PubMed

    Arnosti, André; Brienza, Paula Desjardins; Furquim, Karim Christina Scopinho; Chierice, Gilberto Orivaldo; Bechara, Gervásio Henrique; Calligaris, Izabela Braggião; Camargo-Mathias, Maria Izabel

    2011-02-01

    This study examines the effects of ricinoleic acid esters from Ricinus communis castor oil on the vitellogenesis of Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks attached to hosts that were fed with commercial rabbit food containing these esters. The oocytes of ticks from the treatment group (TG) showed cytoplasmic changes that inhibited the development of oocytes I and II to the advanced stages (IV and V) in addition to preventing the maturation of oocytes V, resulting in small ones. In addition, sperm was not observed in ampoules. Our findings confirm the acaricide potential of ricinoleic acid esters.

  17. Morphological effects of neem (Azadirachta indica A. Juss) seed oil with known azadirachtin concentrations on the oocytes of semi-engorged Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks (Acari: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Remedio, R N; Nunes, P H; Anholeto, L A; Oliveira, P R; Camargo-Mathias, M I

    2015-02-01

    The concern about the harmful effects caused by synthetic pesticides has led to the search for safe and ecological alternatives for pest control. In this context, the neem tree (Azadirachta indica) stands out due to its repellent properties and effects on various arthropods, including ticks. For this reason, this study aimed to demonstrate the potential of neem as a control method for Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks, important vectors of diseases in the veterinary point of view. For this, R. sanguineus semi-engorged females were subjected to treatment with neem seed oil enriched with azadirachtin, its main compound, and ovaries were assessed by means of morphological techniques in conventional light microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Neem demonstrated a clear dose-dependent effect in the analyzed samples. The observed oocytes presented, especially in the groups treated with higher concentrations of neem oil, obvious signs of cytoplasmic disorganization, cellular vacuolization, nuclear and nucleolar irregularity, dilation in mitochondrial cristae, alterations in mitochondrial matrix, and swelling of rough endoplasmic reticulum. Intracellular microorganisms were observed in all analyzed groups, reinforcing the importance of ticks in the transmission of pathogens. A greater quantity of microorganisms was noted as the concentration of neem increased, indicating that the damaged oocytes may be more susceptible for their development. Such morphological alterations may promote future damages in reproductive performance of these animals and demonstrate the potential of neem seed oil for the control of R. sanguineus ticks, paving the way for new, cheaper, and safer methods of control.

  18. Acaricidal activity of essential oil from Lippia sidoides on unengorged larvae and nymphs of Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Acari: Ixodidae) and Amblyomma cajennense (Acari: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Gomes, Geovany Amorim; Monteiro, Caio Márcio Oliveira; Julião, Lisieux de Santana; Maturano, Ralph; Senra, Tatiane Oliveira Souza; Zeringóta, Viviane; Calmon, Fernanda; Matos, Renata da Silva; Daemon, Erik; Carvalho, Mario Geraldo de

    2014-02-01

    The aims of this work were to identify the compounds and to investigate the acaricidal activity of the essential oil of Lippia sidoides for unengorged larvae and nymphs of Rhipicephalus sanguineus and Amblyomma cajennense. The oil was analyzed by gas chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. In total, 22 compounds comprising 98.5% of the total peak area were identified. The major constituent of the essential oil was thymol (69.9%). The acaricidal activity against larvae and nymphs was assessed using a modified larval packet test. In all experiments, oils were tested at concentrations of 2.35, 4.70, 9.40 14.10 and 18.80 mg/mL. The mortalities of larvae and nymphs of R. sanguineus were 20.6, 47.8, 73.6, 99.5 and 99.0% and 12.0, 50.0, 76.3, 96.0 and 96.1%, respectively. For larvae and nymphs of A. cajennense the rates of mortality were 41.9, 63.3, 77.8, 82.5 and 100.0% and 0.0, 32.8, 64.8, 71.1 and 94.0%, respectively. The LC 90 values of the L. sidoides oil were 11.56 and 12.97 mg/mL for larvae and nymphs of R. sanguineus and 15.70 and 18.52 mg/mL for larvae and nymphs of A. cajennense, respectively. The essential oil from L. sidoides has acaricidal activity on unengorged larvae and nymphs of R. sanguineus and A. cajennense.

  19. Morphological and molecular identification of the brown dog tick Rhipicephalus sanguineus and the camel tick Hyalomma dromedarii (Acari: Ixodidae) vectors of Rickettsioses in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Hend H. A. M.; El-Molla, Amal; Salib, Fayez A.; Allam, Nesreen A. T.; Ghazy, Alaa A.; Abdel-Shafy, Sobhy

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Rickettsioses have an epidemiological importance that includes pathogens, vectors, and hosts. The dog tick Rhipicephalus sanguineus and the camel tick Hyalomma dromedarii play important roles as vectors and reservoirs of Rickettsiae. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of Rickettsiae in ixodid ticks species infesting dogs and camels in Egypt, in addition to, the morphological and molecular identification of R. sanguineus and H. dromedarii. Materials and Methods: A total of 601 and 104 of ticks’ specimens were collected from dogs and camels, respectively, in Cairo, Giza and Sinai provinces. Hemolymph staining technique and OmpA and gltA genes amplification were performed to estimate the prevalence rate of Rickettsiae in ticks. For morphological identification of tick species, light microscope (LM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were used. In addition to the phylogenetic analyses of 18S rDNA, Second internal transcript spacer, 12S rDNA, cytochrome c oxidase subunit-1, and 16S rDNA were performed for molecular identification of two tick species. Results: The prevalence rate of Rickettsiae in ticks was 11.6% using hemolymph staining technique and 6.17% by OmpA and gltA genes amplification. Morphological identification revealed that 100% of dogs were infested by R. sanguineus while 91.9% of camels had been infested by H. dromedarii. The phylogenetic analyses of five DNA markers confirmed morphological identification by LM and SEM. The two tick species sequences analyses proved 96-100% sequences identities when compared with the reference data in Genbank records. Conclusion: The present studies confirm the suitability of mitochondrial DNA markers for reliable identification of ticks at both intra- and inter-species level over the nuclear ones. In addition to, the detection of Rickettsiae in both ticks’ species and establishment of the phylogenetic status of R. sanguineus and H. dromedarii would be useful in understanding the

  20. The dynamics of RNA participation in the vitellogenesis of Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks Latreille 1806 (Acari:Ixodidae). I. Nucleoli or Cajal bodies?

    PubMed

    Camargo Mathias, Maria Izabel; Arnosti, André; Brienza, Paula Desjardins; Furquim, Karim Christina Scopinho; Oliveira, Patrícia Rosa de; Denardi, Sandra Eloisi; Bechara, Gervásio Henrique

    2010-10-01

    To understand the morphological and histological aspects of internal systems of ticks has become important matter since these arthropods have an impact in the areas of the economy and public health. In this context, this study has provided morphological data on female germinative cells of Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks, ectoparasites of dogs that maintain a close relationship with human on a daily basis. Oocytes of engorged females were analyzed, through the PAS reaction (detection of polysaccharides) counterstained by methyl green (detection of RNA) revealing information that allowed to infer for the first time the presence of Cajal bodies, in the germinal vesicles (nuclei) of developing oocytes, as well as showing how the RNA and the polysaccharides are involved in the dynamics of the vitellogenesis in this species.

  1. Evaluation of pharmacokinetics and efficacy of ivermectin following oral administration in dogs against experimental infection of Ctenocephalides felis felis and Rhipicephalus sanguineus.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, Viviane S; Cid, Yara P; Ferreira, Thais P; Medeiros, Deborah M V; de S O Batista, Lilian C; Correia, Thais R; Albert, André L M; Scott, Fabio B

    2016-09-15

    With the increasing number of pets in home the human-animal relationship is increasingly close and care about control disease growing. Ivermectin (IVM) is frequently used because its proven safety. IVM is recommended for the treatment of demodectic scabies and prevention of heartworm in dogs, but informally is extremely used to control of Ctenocephalides felis felis and Rhipicephalus sanguineus. The aim of this study is evaluate the use of IVM in dogs, by the oral route at 0.6μg/kg dose, against experimental infection of these parasites using the construction of the plasma concentration curve and efficacy study. A IVM quantification method in canine plasma using HPLC-FL was developed and validated based on RE n°899/03 ANVISA. The samples collected during the efficacy test was analyzed by this validated method and prove Cmax of 350ng/mL at 4h (tmax) and AUC of 8411ng/h/mL. Spite of formulation have shown good absorption, the highest efficiency values found for Rhipcephalus sanguineus and Ctenocephalides felis felis were very low, 35% and 67% respectively, demonstrating this not be the most appropriate treatment for the control of these parasites.

  2. Effect of ricinoleic acid esters from castor oil (Ricinus communis) on the oocyte yolk components of the tick Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latreille, 1806) (Acari: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Sampieri, Bruno Rodrigues; Arnosti, André; Furquim, Karim Christina Scopinho; Chierice, Gilberto Orivaldo; Bechara, Gervásio Henrique; de Carvalho, Pedro Luiz Pucci Figueiredo; Nunes, Pablo Henrique; Camargo-Mathias, Maria Izabel

    2013-01-31

    Rhipicephalus sanguineus are bloodsucking ectoparasites, whose main host is the domestic dog, thus being present in urban areas and closely located to people. Eventually, this tick species parasitize humans and can become a potential vector of infectious diseases. Methods to control this type of pest have been the focus of many research groups worldwide. The use of natural products is increasingly considered nowadays, due to the low toxicity levels to the host and low waste generation to the environment. This study tested the effect of ricinoleic acid esters from castor oil (as an potential acaricide) on the reproductive system of R. sanguineus females, more specifically on the vitellogenesis process. For this, two groups were established: the control group (CG) and the treatment group (TG) with five rabbits in each (New Zealand White), used as hosts. NaCl and ester were added to rabbits' food and offered to the hosts. After full engorgement, the females were collected and had their ovaries extracted. The ticks ovaries were submitted to histochemical techniques so the effects of esters could be observed over polysaccharides, proteins and lipids yolk. Changes in the deposition of yolk components were observed. This caused modifications on elements of polysaccharide origin and on glycoprotein compounds, interfering in the final yolk synthesis and compromising the development of the future embryo.

  3. Morphological alterations in the synganglion and integument of Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks exposed to aqueous extracts of neem leaves (Azadirachta indica A. JUSS).

    PubMed

    Remedio, R N; Nunes, P H; Anholeto, L A; Camargo-Mathias, M I

    2014-12-01

    Currently, the necessity of controlling infestation by ticks, especially by Rhipicephalus sanguineus, has led researchers and public health managers around the world to search for new and more efficient control methods. This way, we can highlight neem (Azadirachta indica A. Juss) leaf, bark, and seed extracts, which have been very effective on tick control, and moreover causing less damage to the environment and to the host. This study showed the potential of neem as a control method for R. sanguineus through morphological and morphometric evaluation of the integument and synganglion of females, in semiengorged stage. To attain this, routine techniques of optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and morphometry of the cuticle and subcuticle of the integument were applied. Expressive morphological alterations were observed in both organs, presenting a dose-dependent effect. Integument epithelial cells and nerve cells of the synganglion showed signs of cell vacuolation, dilated intercellular boundaries, and cellular disorganization, alterations not previously reported in studies with neem. In addition, variations in subcuticle thickness were also observed. In general, the effects of neem are multiple, and affect the morphology and physiology of target animals in various ways. The results presented in this work are the first evidence of its effects in the coating and nervous system of ticks, thus allowing an indication of neem aqueous extracts as a potential control method of the brown dog tick and opening new perspectives on acaricide use.

  4. Ultrastructural changes in the ovary cells of engorged Rhipicephalus sanguineus female ticks treated with esters of ricinoleic acid from castor oil (Ricinus communis).

    PubMed

    Sampieri, Bruno Rodrigues; Arnosti, André; Nunes, Pablo Henrique; Furquim, Karim Christina Scopinho; Chierice, Gilberto Orivaldo; Mathias, Maria Izabel Camargo

    2012-05-01

    Rhipicephalus sanguineus is a widely distributed tick species that has adapted to the urban environment, and the dog is its main host. This species is also known as a vector and reservoir of diseases caused by bacteria, protozoa, and viruses. Currently, acaricides of synthetic chemical origin have been widely and indiscriminately used, leading to the development of resistance to these products by ticks and causing damage to the environment. Thus, these issues have made it necessary to seek other forms of controlling these ectoparasites. R. sanguineus was artificially infested in host New Zealand White rabbits, which were divided into four treatment groups: control (CG1 and CG2) and treatment (TG1 and TG2) groups. TG1 and TG2 hosts were provided with feed supplemented with esters of ricinoleic acid from castor oil at a concentration of 5 g/kg of feed for 7 and 15 days. Afterward, the ovaries of the female ticks were removed for analysis by transmission electron microscopy. The results showed ultrastructural changes in the somatic and germ cells of ovaries from TG1 and TG2 females, particularly with respect to chorion deposition, a protective membrane of the oocyte, as well as in the transport process of vitellogenic materials via the hemolymph and pedicel cells. Moreover, the mitochondria were less electron-dense and had cristae that were more disorganized than the mitochondria from CG1 and CG2 individuals. Thus, this study demonstrated the action of esters on the ovaries of R. sanguineus, signaling the prospect of a way to control this ectoparasite without affecting nontarget organisms or the environment.

  5. Rhipicephalus rossicus and not R. sanguineus is the dominant tick species of dogs in the wetlands of the Danube Delta, Romania.

    PubMed

    Sándor, Attila D; Dumitrache, Mirabela O; D'Amico, Gianluca; Kiss, Botond J; Mihalca, Andrei D

    2014-08-29

    Changes in the distribution of tick species are among the major causes for the increase in prevalence of zoonotic diseases worldwide, with tick-borne diseases' prevalence showing an emerging pattern. One of these ticks, Rhipicephalus rossicus, which is reported occasionally from humans, seems to be particularly interesting because of its demonstrated vectorial role for zoonotic pathogens like Francisella tularensis, Coxiella burnetii, or CCHF and West Nile viruses. Here we report a case of dominant occurrence of R. rossicus on household dogs in the wetlands of Eastern Europe (Romania). Ticks were collected from dogs in 5 distinct locations, with 1068 ticks of 6 species found. R. rossicus had a dominant occurrence in dogs in all but one location, accounting for 87.1% of all ticks (32.3-95.3% in different locations). Until this study, Rhipicephalus sanguineus was considered as the only important tick species on dogs in south-temperate regions of Europe, as well in Romania. The dominant presence of R. rossicus in dogs, its vectorial competence and broad host spectrum (including humans), make this tick species an important candidate for further analysis and highlight the paucity of our knowledge on disease vectors in this region of Europe.

  6. Prevention of transmission of Ehrlichia canis by Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks to dogs treated with a combination of fipronil, amitraz and (S)-methoprene (CERTIFECT®).

    PubMed

    Fourie, Josephus J; Ollagnier, Catherine; Beugnet, Frederic; Luus, Herman G; Jongejan, Frans

    2013-03-31

    The ability of CERTIFECT(®) (a combination of fipronil, amitraz and (S)-methoprene) to prevent transmission of Ehrlichia canis was studied in two groups of eight dogs. One group was treated with CERTIFECT while the other group remained untreated. All dogs were exposed to E. canis-infected Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks on Days 7, 14, 21 and again on day 28 post-treatment by releasing ticks into the kennels of the dogs to simulate the natural way of infestation. Animals were examined in situ for ticks on Days 9, 16 and 23 and any ticks present were counted and removed on Day 30. The efficacy of CERTIFECT against R. sanguineus was 100%, since no ticks were found on the treated dogs at any time. Clinical examinations (including monitoring body temperature and blood collections for PCR analysis and serology) were performed at intervals throughout the study until Day 56. Five out of 8 untreated control dogs (62.5%) became infected with E. canis, as demonstrated by detection of specific E. canis antibodies and the presence of E. canis DNA in blood samples by PCR. These dogs displayed fever and thrombocytopenia and were rescue-treated with doxycline. None of the 8 dogs treated with CERTIFECT became infected with E. canis, in comparison to the 5/8 control dogs, as confirmed by the lack of specific antibodies and absence of any ehrlichial DNA in blood samples by PCR. CERTIFECT prevented transmission of E. canis and effectively provided protection against monocytic ehrlichiose for at least 4 weeks post treatment.

  7. Dose determination of a novel formulation of metaflumizone plus amitraz for control of cat fleas (Ctenocephalides felis felis) and brown dog ticks (Rhipicephalus sanguineus) on dogs.

    PubMed

    Rugg, D; Hair, J A

    2007-12-15

    A novel spot-on formulation containing metaflumizone and amitraz (ProMeris/ProMeris Duo for Dogs, Fort Dodge Animal Health, Overland Park, KS) was evaluated in a laboratory study to determine the appropriate dose for efficacy against fleas and ticks on dogs for 1 month. Thirty-six Beagles were randomly allocated to six equal groups and individually housed. One group remained nontreated. Another was treated with a placebo formulation (solvents with no active ingredients). Three groups of dogs were treated topically with the metaflumizone plus amitraz formulation (150mg of each of metaflumizone and amitraz/ml), at volumes providing doses of 10, 20 and 40mgeachactive/kg. The final group was treated with a commercial spot-on providing 6.7mgfipronil/kg. All treatments were applied to the skin at a single spot between the scapulae on Day 0. Dogs were infested with 50 adult brown dog ticks (Rhipicephalus sanguineus) on each of Days -2, 5, 12, 19, 26, 33 and 40, and with 100 cat fleas (Ctenocephalides felis felis) on Days -1, 6, 13, 20, 27, 34 and 41. Dogs were examined and parasites "finger counted" on Day 1 to estimate knock down efficacy, and all animals were comb counted to determine the numbers of viable fleas and ticks on Days 7, 14, 21, 28, 35 and 42. There were no significant differences in parasite counts between the nontreated control and the placebo-treated control groups for either fleas or ticks (P>0.05) except for very slight reductions on Day 7 for fleas and Day 14 for ticks, demonstrating that the formulation excipients had no activity. The qualitative finger counts on Day 1 indicated that all of the insecticidal treatments resulted in a noticeable reduction in flea and tick numbers within 1 day of treatment. All of the metaflumizone and amitraz treatments and fipronil resulted in significantly lower flea and tick numbers relative to nontreated controls on all posttreatment count days (P<0.05). For the metaflumizone plus amitraz treatments, mean flea and

  8. Imidacloprid 10 % / flumethrin 4.5 % collars (Seresto®, Bayer) successfully prevent long-term transmission of Ehrlichia canis by infected Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks to dogs.

    PubMed

    Stanneck, Dorothee; Fourie, Josephus J

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the empirical efficacy of imidacloprid 10 %/flumethrin 4.5 % (Seresto®) collars in preventing long-term transmission of Ehrlichia canis by infected Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks to dogs. The study was a parallel group design, single centre, randomised, non-blinded, controlled, long-term efficacy study. The treatment group of 8 dogs was fitted with Seresto® collars, the untreated control group of 8 dogs received no collars. Ehrlichia canis-infected ticks were released into the dogs sleeping quarters at 14-day intervals up to Day +378. Control group dogs infected with E. canis were continuously replaced to keep the control sample size constant, and a total of 39 control dogs were required. The final clinical examination and blood sampling occurred on Day +420. The primary assessment criterion was the number of dogs infected with E. canis, as confirmed by IFA and PCR, and the secondary criterion was the acaricidal efficacy based on tick counts. All scheduled blood samples taken were subject to analyses for both PCR and IFA, but only positive cases are discussed. Up to Day +378, none of the collar-treated dogs were infected with E. canis, whereas 34 of the 35 untreated dogs enrolled before Day +371 were infected. The acaricidal efficacy of the collar ranged from 90 % to 100 % for the duration of the assessment period.

  9. Action of andiroba oil (Carapa guianensis) on Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latreille, 1806) (Acari: Ixodidae) semi-engorged females: morphophysiological evaluation of reproductive system.

    PubMed

    Vendramini, Maria Cláudia Ramalho; Mathias, Maria Izabel Camargo; De Faria, Adriano Uemura; Furquim, Karim Christina Scopinho; De Souza, Leonardo Peres; Bechara, Gervásio Henrique; Roma, Gislaine Cristina

    2012-12-01

    Because of the increasing medical-veterinary importance of ticks, the development of alternative control methods, less aggressive to the host and the environment has become the target of several researches. In this sense, the present study analyzed the action of different concentrations (5, 10, and 20%) of andiroba seed oil (Carapa guianensis) on the reproductive system of Rhipicephalus sanguineus females, through histochemical techniques and the quantification of the reproductive efficiency index. The results showed that andiroba oil is a potent natural agent, able to cause several changes in the oocytes of this species, impairing the reproductive success, once this natural product induces great physiological changes in the oocytes in all development stages, such as drastic reduction in proteins, polysaccharides, and lipids in these cells, and these components are essential for the viability of the embryo. In addition, it was observed that this product stimulate the oviposition, mainly at the concentration of 20%. This higher production of eggs represents a defense mechanism developed by the organism in order to ensure the reproductive success of the species, even in the presence of the toxic agent. However, the results obtained suggested that the laid eggs would not be viable, due to the great changes undergone by the oocytes. Thus, the present study showed that the use of this vegetal product would be an alternative way to control the ticks, bringing benefits similar to the ones obtained through the use of synthetic acaricides; however, with less damage to nontarget organisms and the environment as well.

  10. Rickettsia rickettsii in Rhipicephalus ticks, Mexicali, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Eremeeva, Marina E; Zambrano, Maria L; Anaya, Luis; Beati, Lorenza; Karpathy, Sandor E; Santos-Silva, Maria Margarida; Salceda, Beatriz; MacBeth, Donald; Olguin, Hector; Dasch, Gregory A; Aranda, Celia Alpuche

    2011-03-01

    Circulation of a unique genetic type of Rickettsia rickettsii in ticks of the Rhipicephalus sanguineus complex was detected in Mexicali, Baja California, Mexico. The Mexican R. rickettsii differed from all isolates previously characterized from the endemic regions of Rocky Mountain spotted fever in northern, central, and southern Americas. Rhipicephalus ticks in Mexicali are genetically different from Rh. sanguineus found in the United States.

  11. Ixodid fauna and zoonotic agents in ticks from dogs: first report of Rickettsia rickettsii in Rhipicephalus sanguineus in the state of Mato Grosso do Sul, mid-western Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Robson Ferreira Cavalcante; Garcia, Marcos Valério; Cunha, Rodrigo Casquero; Matias, Jaqueline; e Silva, Elaine Araújo; de Fatima Cepa Matos, Maria; Andreotti, Renato

    2013-05-01

    Ticks from 148 dogs from the urban area of the municipality of Campo Grande, state of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil, were collected, classified and analyzed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the identification of Rickettsia spp., Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania spp. A total of 2015 ticks were collected. The species Rhipicephalus sanguineus (98.9 %) and Amblyomma cajennense (1.1 %) were identified. Molecular analysis revealed that no tick samples were infected by T. cruzi. Regarding Leishmania spp., tick samples from 36 dogs spread across all regions of the municipality were positive for L. chagasi. One tick sample was positive for Rickettsia spp. (gltA gene) in the PCR reaction. This sample was submitted to further PCR based on the ompA gene and the amplicon was sequenced. Identity of 100 % was found with homologous sequences of R. rickettsii available in GenBank. This paper is the first to report the natural infection of R. sanguineus by R. rickettsii in the municipality of Campo Grande, state of Mato Grosso do Sul, mid-western Brazil.

  12. The effects of neem oil (Azadirachta indica A. JUSS) enriched with different concentrations of azadirachtin on the integument of semi-engorged Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato (Acari: Ixodidae) females.

    PubMed

    Lima de Souza, José Ribamar; Remedio, Rafael Neodini; Arnosti, André; de Abreu, Rusleyd Maria Magalhães; Camargo-Mathias, Maria Izabel

    2017-03-29

    Several studies searching for methods to control Rhipicephalus sanguineus s.l., (dog tick) infestations have been developed aiming to minimize the damages caused by these ectoparasites to the hosts and the environment, which is harmed by the indiscriminate use of toxic acaricide products. In this scenario, neem oil has been used as a natural alternative against ticks, once this chemical has repellent properties and interferes in the growth regulation of these ectoparasites, inhibiting ecdysis. The present study evaluated the effects of azadirachtin-enriched neem oil on the integument of semi-engorged R.sanguineus s.l., females through morphohistological techniques. The results showed the occurrence of significant morphological and histochemical alterations, mainly in the females exposed to higher concentrations, which demonstrates the dose-dependent action of the chemical. A decrease in the cuticle thickness was observed, as well as a modification in the distribution of the epithelial cells, which displayed pyknotic and fragmented nuclei, and intensely vacuolated cytoplasm, indicating that these cells would be undergoing death processes. These morphological alterations observed in the integument of the females exposed to the azadirachtin-enriched neem oil encourage the use of this chemical as a strategy to control these ectoparasites.

  13. Ticks' response to feeding on host immunized with glandular extracts of Rhipicephalus sanguineus females fed for 2, 4, and 6 days. I. Inactivity or early degeneration of salivary glands?

    PubMed

    Furquim, Karim Christina Scopinho; Mathias, Maria Izabel Camargo; Hebling, Letícia Maria Gráballos Ferraz; Roma, Gislaine Cristina; Bechara, Gervásio Henrique

    2011-07-01

    The present study histologically analyzed the salivary glands of Rhipicephalus sanguineus females fed for 2, 4, and 6 days in hosts which had been previously immunized with glandular extracts obtained from females from this same species in different periods of feeding, having as main objective verify the action of these extracts in the secretor cycle of these glands. For this, glandular extract of females fed for 2 days (SGE2), glandular extract of females fed for 4 days (SGE4), and glandular extract of females fed for 6 days (SGE6) extracts were obtained from salivary glands of R. sanguineus females fed for 2, 4, and 6 days respectively. Then, New Zealand White naive rabbits were inoculated either with extracts (test group = TG), or with a mixture of phosphate buffer and Freund's complete adjuvant (control group 2 = CG2). Each inoculated rabbit (TG and CG2) and non-inoculated (control group 1 = CG1) was posteriorly infested with 15 couples of fasting R. sanguineus from which the salivary glands had been collected from females fed for 2, 4, and 6 days. The results revealed that the resistance the hosts had acquired by the immunization with the extracts affected differently the secretory activity of the glandular cells. It was verified that the resistance to SGE2 and SGE4 extracts acted in the cells of acini II and III, being c1 and c5 from II and d from III inactivated due to the action of SGE2 and c1 and c4 from II and f from III inactivated by the action of SGE4. As for the resistance to SGE6 the effect was only on cells of acini II (c1, c3 e c4), which were also inactivated. In addition, the hosts' resistance to SGE2-SGE6 extracts made the degenerative process earlier in comparison to CG1. On the other hand, the resistance to the extracts did not influence the characteristics of the degenerative process normally found in salivary glands. The assynchronism of the degenerative process was maintained-acini III were always the most affected and I the

  14. Dinotefuran-induced morphophysiological changes in semi-engorged females Rhipicephalus sanguineus Latreille, 1806 (Acari: Ixodidae) ticks: Ultra-structural evaluation.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Patrícia Rosa; Anholeto, Luis Adriano; Bechara, Gerváso Henrique; Camargo Mathias, Maria Izabel

    2017-02-01

    The present study demonstrated the effects of dinotefuran (active ingredient of the acaricide Protetor Pet(®)) on the ovary and midgut cells of semi engorged R. sanguineus females exposed to different concentrations of this chemical. For this, 120 semi-engorged females were divided into four treatment groups with 30 individuals each: group I or control (distilled water), group II (5000ppm), groups III (6250ppm) and group IV (8334ppm of dinotefuran). All the ticks were immersed in the different concentrations of dinotefuran or in distilled water for 5min and then dried and kept in BOD incubator for 7days. The results showed alterations mainly regarding the damaged cell structures, such as yolk granules, organelles and the plasma membrane of the germ cells. In addition, structures related with defense mechanisms were found, such as vacuoles, cytoskeletal filaments, and myelin figures in the germ cells. Damages in the generative cells of the midgut, alterations in the size of digestive cells, the number of endosomes, digestive vacuoles, digestive residues, lipid drops and organelles in the cytoplasm of the digestive cells and the presence of microvilli in the plasma membrane of these cells also demonstrate the progressive damages caused by the action of dinotefuran in the midgut and germ cells of R. sanguineus semi-engorged females. The concentrations applied partially impaired the digestive processes; and, without proper nutrition, all the ectoparasite's physiologic events are prevented from occurring, leading the individual to death. The germ cells were also damaged, and probably would not be able to advance in their development (I-V) and complete the vitellogenesis, which would affect the fertility of the female and consequently impede the formation of a new individual.

  15. Dinotefuran-induced morphophysiological changes in the ovaries and midgut of semi-engorged females Rhipicephalus sanguineus Latreille, 1806 (Acari: Ixodidae) ticks.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Patrícia Rosa; Remédio, Rafael Neodini; Bechara, Gervásio Henrique; Anholeto, Luis Adriano; Mathias, Maria Izabel Camargo

    2016-02-01

    The present study demonstrated the effects of dinotefuran (active compound of the Protetor Pet® acaricide) in germ cells and the digestive processes of semi-engorged females of R. sanguineus exposed to different concentrations of the chemical. For this purpose, 120 semi-engorged females were divided into four treatment groups with 30 individuals each: group I or control (distilled water), group II (5000 ppm), group III (6250 ppm), and group IV (8334 ppm of dinotefuran). All ticks were immersed in different concentrations of dinotefuran or in distilled water for 5 min and then were dried and stored in biological oxygen demand (BOD) incubator for 7 days. The results show the action of this compound, exhibiting morphohistologic and histochemical changes in the oocytes and the midgut cells of individuals of different groups, which were compared with those of group I (control). The alterations occurred mainly in relation to the size of the germ cells and yolk granules; presence, quantity, size, and location of vacuoles found in the cytoplasm of these germ cells; the damage occurred in the generative cells of the midgut; the size of the digestive cells; the quantity of blood elements captured, accumulated digestive wastes and digestive vacuoles found in the cytoplasm of the digestive cells of the midgut, as well as the amount and distribution of proteins, polysaccharides, lipids of all cells in both organs. So, it has demonstrated the effectiveness of dinotefuran in the reduction of fertility and digestive processes of semi-engorged females of R. sanguineus, data that points the possibility of employing this chemical to control these ectoparasites.

  16. The effect of water and shampooing on the efficacy of a pyriprole 12.5% topical solution against brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus) and cat flea (Ctenocephalides felis) infestations on dogs.

    PubMed

    Schuele, G; Barnett, S; Bapst, B; Cavaliero, T; Luempert, L; Strehlau, G; Young, D R; Moran, C; Junquera, P

    2008-02-14

    The efficacy of a single treatment with a 12.5% pyriprole spot-on formulation against induced infestations with R. sanguineus ticks and cat fleas (C. felis) as well as its persistence after repeated washing and shampooing was investigated in four separate studies. In a first study on R. sanguineus involving 32 beagle dogs, the efficacy at various time-points during the 30 days that followed treatment assessed 48 h after re-infestation ranged from 100% to 99.3%. No engorged ticks, alive or dead, were found in the treated animals. Shampooing 2 days after treatment and weekly washings did not affect the efficacy. In a second study on R. sanguineus involving 32 beagle dogs, the efficacy at various time-points during the 30 days that followed treatment assessed 48 h after re-infestation ranged from 100% to 96.8%. Single washing 8h after treatment and single shampooing 24 h after treatment had no negative impact on the efficacy of the product. In a third study on C. felis involving 28 beagle dogs, the efficacy at various time-points during the 30 days that followed treatment assessed 48 h after re-infestation was always 100% and weekly washings did not diminish the efficacy. In a last study on C. felis involving 24 beagle dogs, the efficacy at various time-points during the 5 weeks that followed treatment assessed 48 h after re-infestation ranged from 100% to 99.8%, and shampooing 24 h after treatment did not reduce the efficacy. The product was well tolerated by the dogs.

  17. Bacteriological analysis of saliva from partially or fully engorged female adult Rhipicephalus microplus by next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Liangliang; Poźniak, Błażej; Cheng, Tian-Yin

    2017-01-01

    Tick-borne diseases are a major epidemiological problem worldwide. The aim of this study was to investigate the bacterial composition of saliva obtained from engorged adult Rhipicephalus microplus females. Saliva samples collected from partially or fully engorged adult female ticks were analysed using an ultra-high-throughput Illumina HiSeq 2500 sequencing system. To elucidate the possible routes of bacterial transmission, the bacterial flora from whole ticks were also investigated. Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Actinobacteria were the predominant phyla in all samples, and Acinetobacter, Rickettsia, Escherichia and Coxiella were the major genera. Microbial diversity in saliva samples from partially engorged ticks was more complex than that of samples from fully engorged individuals. The comparison of saliva and whole-tick samples suggests that bacteria in saliva also colonize the tick's body. We believe that some bacterial genera, such as Dermacoccus, Achromia, SMB53, Sutterella, Providencia, Mycoplana, Oscillospira, and Agrobacterium, were found and reported in ticks for the first time. The Coxiella and Rickettsia detected in this study might be tick-borne pathogens, suggesting health risks associated with exposure to R. microplus in humans and animals. These findings may serve as the basis for developing strategies to control ticks and tick-borne diseases.

  18. Acaricidal effect of Pelargonium roseum and Eucalyptus globulus essential oils against adult stage of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) annulatus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Pirali-Kheirabadi, Khodadad; Razzaghi-Abyaneh, Mehdi; Halajian, Ali

    2009-06-10

    In a laboratory trial, in west-central Iran, the acaricidal effects of the essential oils (EOs) prepared from two medicinal plants, i.e. Pelargonium roseum and Eucalyptus globulus on the adult stage of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) annulatus were evaluated. For this purpose, the engorged females of R. (B) annulatus were exposed to two-fold serial dilutions of oils (0.31-5.0%) using a "dipping method" in vitro. The engorged ticks were immersed in different plant dilutions (eight per dilution) for 1min then each replicate was incubated in separate petri dishes at 26 degrees C and 80% relative humidity. The mortality rate for adult ticks exposed to different dilutions of P. roseum and E. globulus EO's showed a dose-dependent decrease. It was however significant only for the 2.5% and 5.0% dilutions of P. roseum EO, when compared to the non-treated control (P<0.05). The mass of produced eggs in adult female ticks exposed to both P. roseum and E. globulus EOs had decreased dose-dependently. It was significant for only 2.5% and 5.0% dilutions of P. roseum EO, comparing the non-treated control (P<0.05). The highest decrease in egg laying was reported for ticks treated with 5% dilutions of P. roseum (87.5%) and E. globosus (25%) (P<0.05). This is the first report that details the acaricidal activity of EO's obtained from P. roseum and E. globosus against R. (B) annulatus. The results show that both plants, particularly P. Roseum can be considered as potential candidates for biocontrol of R. (B) annulatus in the field.

  19. Comparative analyses of mitochondrial and nuclear genetic markers for the molecular identification of Rhipicephalus spp.

    PubMed

    Latrofa, Maria S; Dantas-Torres, Filipe; Annoscia, Giada; Cantacessi, Cinzia; Otranto, Domenico

    2013-12-01

    The genus Rhipicephalus (Acari: Ixodidae) comprises a large number of vectors of pathogens of substantial medical and veterinary concern; however, species identification based solely on morphological features is often challenging. In the present study, genetic distance within selected Rhipicephalus species (i.e., Rhipicephalus bursa, Rhipicephalus guilhoni, Rhipicephalus muhsamae, Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato and Rhipicephalus turanicus), were investigated based on molecular and phylogenetic analyses of fragments of the mitochondrial 16S, 12S and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) genes, as well as of the whole sequences of the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer-2 (ITS-2) region. Mean values of inter-specific genetic distance (e.g., up to 12.6%, 11.1% and 15.2%), as well as of intra-specific genetic distance (e.g., 0.9%, 0.9% and 1%), calculated using the Kimura-2 parameter substitution model with uniform rates among sites for 16S, 12S and cox1 genes, respectively, confirmed the differentiation of the rhipicephaline species herein examined. The molecular identification was also supported by the distinct separation of species-specific clades inferred from the phylogenetic analyses of all mitochondrial sequences. Conversely, little interspecific divergence was detected amongst ribosomal ITS-2 sequences (i.e., up to 2.8%) for species belonging to the R. sanguineus complex, which resulted in the ambiguous placement of selected R. sanguineus s.l. and R. turanicus sequences in the corresponding phylogenetic tree. Results from this study confirm the suitability of mtDNA markers for the reliable identification of ticks within the Rhipicephalus genus and provide a framework for future studies of taxonomy, speciation history and evolution of this group of ticks.

  20. Acaricidal activity of Origanum bilgeri P.H. Davis (Lamiaceae) essential oil and its major component, carvacrol against adults Rhipicephalus turanicus (Acari: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Koc, Samed; Oz, Emre; Cinbilgel, Ilker; Aydin, Levent; Cetin, Huseyin

    2013-03-31

    The acaricidal activity of an essential oil obtained from aerial parts of Origanum bilgeri P.H. Davis (Lamiaceae), an endemic species in Turkey, and its major constituents, carvacrol was evaluated against unfed adults Rhipicephalus turanicus Pomerantzev (Acari: Ixodidae) collected from Kepez, Antalya. The composition of the essential oil was analyzed by GC/MS. The major compound identified in the oil was carvacrol (93.02%). Generally, tick mortalities to the O. bilgeri distillate and carvacrol increased with concentrations. O. bilgeri oil produced >83% mortality at 48h at a concentration of 0.8% and mortality was higher than 63% at a carvacrol concentration of 0.4%. Our results have shown that O. bilgeri essential oil and its major component, carvacrol, may have potential as acaricidal agents against R. turanicus.

  1. Rhipicephalus turanicus, a new vector of Hepatozoon canis.

    PubMed

    Giannelli, Alessio; Lia, Riccardo Paolo; Annoscia, Giada; Buonavoglia, Canio; Lorusso, Eleonora; Dantas-Torres, Filipe; Baneth, Gad; Otranto, Domenico

    2016-12-21

    The distribution of Hepatozoon canis mainly encompasses areas where its main tick vector, Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato, is present. However, the detection of this pathogen in dogs, foxes and golden jackals well outside the areas inhabited by this tick species reinforced the hypothesis that additional ixodids are involved in the life cycle and transmission of this protozoon. The present study provides, for the first time, data supporting the sporogonic development of H. canis in specimens of Rhipicephalus turanicus collected from a naturally infected fox from southern Italy. The epidemiological role of R. turanicus as a vector of H. canis is discussed, along with information on the potential use of cell cultures for the experimental infection with H. canis sporozoites. The in vitro infection of canine leucocytes by sporozoites from ticks is proposed as a potential tool for future in-depth studies on the biology of H. canis.

  2. The enigma of the dog mummy from Ancient Egypt and the origin of ‘Rhipicephalus sanguineus’

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Ticks belonging to the Rhipicephalus sanguineus group are amongst the most important vectors of pathogenic microorganisms to dogs and humans. However, the taxonomy of this species group is still the subject of debate, especially because there is no type specimen or reliable morphological description for Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu stricto. Recently, a comprehensive morphological and genetic study on representative tick specimens from Europe, Africa, Americas, and Oceania, revealed the existence of at least four morphologically and genetically distinct species under the name ‘R. sanguineus’ infesting dogs from different countries. Methods Herein, we examined morphologically tick specimens retrieved on a dog mummy from Ancient Egypt (ca. 1st century – 4th century A.D.). The dog mummy and associated ticks were found during an archaeological expedition conducted in El Deir. Results Scanning electron micrographs allowed us to assess their identity as belonging to the R. sanguineus group. In addition on the basis of the scutal punctation pattern, spiracular plates, width of dorsal tail of spiracular plates relative to the adjacent festoon, female genital aperture, male adanal plates and accessory shields, these ticks were tentatively identified as Rhipicephalus sp. II (=temperate species). Conclusions It can be concluded that R. sanguineus group ticks have infested dogs living in the Mediterranean region since ancient times. This finding represents the oldest record of ticks on any animal species and adds a new piece in the complex puzzle regarding tick parasitism on dogs and humans and their role as vectors of pathogens. PMID:24438558

  3. Comparative microarray analysis of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus expression profiles of larvae pre-attachment and feeding adult female stages on Bos indicus and Bos taurus cattle

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus is an obligate blood feeder which is host specific to cattle. Existing knowledge pertaining to the host or host breed effects on tick transcript expression profiles during the tick - host interaction is poor. Results Global analysis of gene expression changes in whole R. microplus ticks during larval, pre-attachment and early adult stages feeding on Bos indicus and Bos taurus cattle were compared using gene expression microarray analysis. Among the 13,601 R. microplus transcripts from BmiGI Version 2 we identified 297 high and 17 low expressed transcripts that were significantly differentially expressed between R. microplus feeding on tick resistant cattle [Bos indicus (Brahman)] compared to R. microplus feeding on tick susceptible cattle [Bos taurus (Holstein-Friesian)] (p ≤ 0.001). These include genes encoding enzymes involved in primary metabolism, and genes related to stress, defence, cell wall modification, cellular signaling, receptor, and cuticle formation. Microarrays were validated by qRT-PCR analysis of selected transcripts using three housekeeping genes as normalization controls. Conclusion The analysis of all tick stages under survey suggested a coordinated regulation of defence proteins, proteases and protease inhibitors to achieve successful attachment and survival of R. microplus on different host breeds, particularly Bos indicus cattle. R. microplus ticks demonstrate different transcript expression patterns when they encounter tick resistant and susceptible breeds of cattle. In this study we provide the first transcriptome evidence demonstrating the influence of tick resistant and susceptible cattle breeds on transcript expression patterns and the molecular physiology of ticks during host attachment and feeding. The microarray data used in this analysis have been submitted to NCBI GEO database under accession number GSE20605 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/query/acc.cgi?acc=GSE20605. PMID:20637126

  4. A new species of Rhipicephalus (Acari: Ixodidae), a parasite of giraffes in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Horak, Ivan G; Apanaskevich, Dmitry A; Kariuki, Edward K

    2013-07-01

    A new tick species belonging to the genus Rhipicephalus Koch, 1844 (Acari: Ixodidae), namely, Rhipicephalus walkerae n. sp., is described. The male and female of this species are similar to those of several species in the Rhipicephalus appendiculatus group but can be distinguished from them by the very dense pattern of medium-sized punctations covering the conscutum and scutum, long and narrow dorsal prolongation of the spiracular plate, and relatively short dorsal cornua; in addition, the male has long and narrow adanal plates without a posterolateral angle. R. walkerae is known only from Kenya, where the adults were collected from giraffes, Giraffa camelopardalis (L.).

  5. Immunogenic potential of the recombinant Rhipicephalus microplus aquaporin protein against the tick Rhipicephalus sanguineus Latreille, 1806 in domestic dogs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aquaporins regulate water transport through the highly hydrophobic lipid bilayer of cell membranes. As ticks ingest large volumes of host blood in relation to their size, they are required to concentrate blood components and have efficient water transport mechanisms. This study aimed to evaluate the...

  6. Molecular and functional characterization of Bm05br antigen from Rhipicephalus microplus.

    PubMed

    Alzugaray, María Fernanda; Parizi, Luís Fernando; Seixas, Adriana; Benavides, Uruguaysito; da Silva Vaz, Itabajara

    2017-02-01

    Rhipicephalus microplus is a cattle-specific tick, causing considerable losses in the livestock industry. The identification of molecules responsible for modulation of host defenses during different parasite stages can help in the development of alternative methods, such as vaccination, to control tick infestations. Hq05, a protein of unknown function identified in the tick Haemaphysalis qinghaiensis, induced a significant protective immune response when used as a vaccine in sheep. In the present study, we investigated Bm05br, the Hq05 homologous gene from R. microplus. Besides H. qinghaiensis, Bm05br homologous found in other tick species such as Rhipicephalus annulatus, Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato, Haemaphysalis longicornis and Ixodes scapularis were comparatively analyzed. Bm05br expression profile in different R. microplus tissues and life-stages was determined by qRT-PCR and Western blot. Bm05br was detected in ovaries, salivary glands and the fat body of both partially and fully engorged females. The highest transcription levels were observed in partially engorged females fat body and salivary glands. Gene knockdown by RNAi reduced egg hatching rate and the weight of tick larvae obtained from treated group, when compared to controls. These results indicate that Bm05br may be involved in R. microplus reproduction. Together with its distribution and high sequence conservation across different tick species, our data suggest Bm05br as a potential antigen for development of a multispecies anti-tick vaccine.

  7. Additional Instances of Human Parasitism by the Brown Dog Tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-05

    Europe. The brown dog tick has the potential for transmitting Ehrlichia canis , the rickettsia that causes canine ehrlichiosis, as well as other...T. I., R. T. Parmley, P. C. Logas, and S. Chambl in. 1989. Infection wiLh Ehrlichia canis in a child. J. Pediatrics 114: 809- 812. Ewing, S. A., E...M. Jonnson, and K. M. Kocan. 1987. Human infection with Ehrlichia canis . New England J. Med. 317: 899-900. Fishbein, D. B., A. Kemp, J. E. Dawson, N

  8. On a Cercopithifilaria sp. transmitted by Rhipicephalus sanguineus: a neglected, but widespread filarioid of dogs

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background This study was aimed at investigating the distribution of a Cercopithifilaria sp. sensu Otranto et al., 2011 with dermal microfilariae recently identified in a dog from Sicily (Italy). A large epidemiological survey was conducted by examining skin samples (n = 917) and ticks (n = 890) collected from dogs at different time points in Italy, central Spain and eastern Greece. Results The overall prevalence of Cercopithifilaria sp. in the sampled animal populations was 13.9% and 10.5% by microscopy of skin sediments and by PCR on skin samples, respectively. Up to 21.6% and 45.5% of dogs in Spain were positive by microscopical examination and by PCR. Cumulative incidence rates ranging from 7.7% to 13.9% were estimated in dogs from two sites in Italy. A low level of agreement between the two diagnostic tests (microscopical examination and PCR) was recorded in sites where samples were processed in parallel. Infestation rate as determined by tick dissection (from 5.2% to 16.7%) was higher than that detected by PCR (from 0% to 3.9%); tick infestation was significantly associated with Cercopithifilaria sp. infestation in dogs from two out of four sites. Developing larvae found in ticks were morphometrically studied and as many as 1469 larvae were found in a single tick. Conclusions Our data suggest that, in addition to the most common species of filarioids known to infest dogs (i.e., Dirofilaria immitis, Dirofilaria repens and Acanthocheilonema reconditum), Cercopithifilaria sp. with dermal microfilariae should be considered due to its widespread distribution in southern Europe and high frequency in tick-exposed dogs. PMID:22212459

  9. Discovery of Maritrema jebuensis n. sp. (Digenea: Microphallidae) from the Asian Shore Crab, Hemigrapsus sanguineus, in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Ok-Sik; Lee, Hye-Jung; Sohn, Woon-Mok; Lee, Seung-Ha; Park, Il-Yong; Oh, Sang-Ah; Chai, Jong-Yil

    2010-01-01

    Maritrema spp. (Digenea: Microphallidae) are parasites of birds, but have not been found in the Republic of Korea. In this study, metacercariae of Maritrema sp. were discovered in the Asian shore crab, Hemigrapsus sanguineus, caught in the mud-flats of Jebu-do, Hwasung-gun, Gyeonggi-do, and the adult flukes were confirmed by experimental infection into mice. Based on the symmetric ribbon-like vitellarium, adult flukes of Maritrema sp. were identified, but did not belong to previously described species in terms of the following morphologic characteristics: ceca reaching to the lateral wall at the anterior border of the ovary; ventral sucker larger than oral sucker; a prominent metraterm; and vitellarium forming a complete ring. Hence, we named this microphallid M. jebuensis n. sp. after the island where the second intermediate hosts were collected. From this study, it has been shown that Maritrema sp. is distributed in Korea and transmitted by the Asian shore crab, H. sanguineus. PMID:21234238

  10. Discovery of Maritrema jebuensis n. sp. (Digenea: Microphallidae) from the Asian Shore Crab, Hemigrapsus sanguineus, in Korea.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ok-Sik; Lee, Hye-Jung; Sohn, Woon-Mok; Lee, Seung-Ha; Park, Il-Yong; Oh, Sang-Ah; Chai, Jong-Yil; Seo, Min

    2010-12-01

    Maritrema spp. (Digenea: Microphallidae) are parasites of birds, but have not been found in the Republic of Korea. In this study, metacercariae of Maritrema sp. were discovered in the Asian shore crab, Hemigrapsus sanguineus, caught in the mud-flats of Jebu-do, Hwasung-gun, Gyeonggi-do, and the adult flukes were confirmed by experimental infection into mice. Based on the symmetric ribbon-like vitellarium, adult flukes of Maritrema sp. were identified, but did not belong to previously described species in terms of the following morphologic characteristics: ceca reaching to the lateral wall at the anterior border of the ovary; ventral sucker larger than oral sucker; a prominent metraterm; and vitellarium forming a complete ring. Hence, we named this microphallid M. jebuensis n. sp. after the island where the second intermediate hosts were collected. From this study, it has been shown that Maritrema sp. is distributed in Korea and transmitted by the Asian shore crab, H. sanguineus.

  11. Tests to determine LC50 and discriminating concentrations for fipronil against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Acari: Ixodidae) and their standardization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Laboratory test were carried out on larvae and adults of the cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, to determine fipronil toxicity. Adult immersion test (AIT), larval immersion test (LIT) and larval packet test (LPT) were standardized using susceptible strain (Mozo). Curves dose-response ...

  12. Functional characterisation of a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α subunit from the brown dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus☆

    PubMed Central

    Lees, Kristin; Jones, Andrew K.; Matsuda, Kazuhiko; Akamatsu, Miki; Sattelle, David B.; Woods, Debra J.; Bowman, Alan S.

    2014-01-01

    Ticks and tick-borne diseases have a major impact on human and animal health worldwide. Current control strategies rely heavily on the use of chemical acaricides, most of which target the CNS and with increasing resistance, new drugs are urgently needed. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are targets of highly successful insecticides. We isolated a full-length nAChR α subunit from a normalised cDNA library from the synganglion (brain) of the brown dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus. Phylogenetic analysis has shown this R. sanguineus nAChR to be most similar to the insect α1 nAChR group and has been named Rsanα1. Rsanα1 is distributed in multiple tick tissues and is present across all life-stages. When expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes Rsanα1 failed to function as a homomer, with and without the addition of either Caenorhabditis elegans resistance-to-cholinesterase (RIC)-3 or X. laevis RIC-3. When co-expressed with chicken β2 nAChR, Rsanα1 evoked concentration-dependent, inward currents in response to acetylcholine (ACh) and showed sensitivity to nicotine (100 μM) and choline (100 μM). Rsanα1/β2 was insensitive to both imidacloprid (100 μM) and spinosad (100 μM). The unreliable expression of Rsanα1 in vitro suggests that additional subunits or chaperone proteins may be required for more robust expression. This study enhances our understanding of nAChRs in arachnids and may provide a basis for further studies on the interaction of compounds with the tick nAChR as part of a discovery process for novel acaricides. PMID:24291321

  13. Detection of Borrelia theileri in Rhipicephalus geigyi from Mali.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Brandi N; Maïga, Ousmane; Schwan, Tom G

    2014-06-01

    Disease burden within cattle is a concern around the world. Bovine borreliosis, one such disease, is caused by the spirochete Borrelia theileri transmitted by the bite of an infected Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) species tick. A number of species within the genus are capable of transmitting the agent and are found on multiple continents. Cattle in the West African nation of Mali are infested with four species of Rhipicephalus ticks of the subgenus Boophilus: Rhipicephalus annulatus, Rhipicephalus microplus, Rhipicephalus decoloratus, and Rhipicephalus geigyi. To date, no reports of B. theileri within Mali have been documented. We tested 184 Rhipicephalus spp. ticks by PCR that were removed from cattle at a market near Bamako, Mali. One tick, R. geigyi, was positive for B. theileri, which confirmed the presence of this spirochete in Mali.

  14. Toxic effects of various solvents against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) annulatus.

    PubMed

    Ravindran, Reghu; Juliet, Sanis; Kumar, K G Ajith; Sunil, A R; Nair, Suresh N; Amithamol, K K; Rawat, Ajay Kumar Singh; Ghosh, Srikanta

    2011-09-01

    The current need of identification of a new acaricidal agent which is acceptable to public as environmentally safe is a daring task. Use of herbal acaricides is such an alternative. Most of the herbal extracts or fractions are dissolved in polar or non-polar solvents or detergents before tested for acaricidal activity. The solvent or detergent to be used for dissolving the herbal extract should be of little acaricidal activity. In the present study, experimentations were carried out on adult engorged female ticks to detect the toxicity of different solvents, viz. hexane, petroleum ether, n-butanol, isopropyl alcohol, chloroform, glycerol, ethyl acetate, acetone, ethanol, and methanol. The study revealed that methanol was the least toxic solvent against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) annulatus.

  15. Susceptibility of Four Tick Species Amblyomma americanum, Dermacentor variabilis, Ixodes scapularis, and Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Acari: Ixodidae) to Nootkatone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The essential oil nootkatone has shown acaricidal activity on ticks. The toxicity of nootkatone was determined in laboratory assays using a vial coating technique against unfed nymphs of four Ixodid ticks: Amblyomma americanum L., Dermacentor variabilis (Say), Ixodes scapularis Say, and Rhipicepha...

  16. Identification of Leishmania spp. promastigotes in the intestines, ovaries and salivary glands of Rhipicephalus sanguineus actively infesting dogs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sand flies are recognized as the major vector of canine visceral leishmaniasis. However, in some areas of Brazil where sand flies do not occur, this disease is found in humans and dogs. There has been speculation that ticks might play a role in transmission of canine visceral leishmaniasis and the D...

  17. Detection of Rickettsia in Rhipicephalus sanguineus Ticks and Ctenocephalides felis Fleas from Southeastern Tunisia by Reverse Line Blot Assay

    PubMed Central

    Khrouf, Fatma; M'Ghirbi, Youmna; Znazen, Abir; Ben Jemaa, Mounir; Hammami, Adnene

    2014-01-01

    Ticks (n = 663) and fleas (n = 470) collected from domestic animals from southeastern Tunisia were screened for Rickettsia infection using reverse line blot assay. Evidence of spotted fever group Rickettsia was obtained. We detected Rickettsia felis in fleas, Rickettsia massiliae Bar 29 and the Rickettsia conorii Israeli spotted fever strain in ticks, and Rickettsia conorii subsp. conorii and Rickettsia spp. in both arthropods. The sensitivity of the adopted technique allowed the identification of a new association between fleas and R. conorii subsp. conorii species. The presence of these vector-borne Rickettsia infections should be considered when diagnosing this disease in humans in Tunisia. PMID:24226919

  18. Light-induced inhibition of laccase in Pycnoporus sanguineus.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Christian A; Perroni, Yareni; Pérez, José Antonio García; Rivera, Beatriz Gutiérrez; Alarcón, Enrique

    2016-03-01

    The aim was to determine which specific regions of the visible light spectrum were responsible for the induction or inhibition of laccase in Pycnoporus sanguineus. Cultures were exposed to various bandwidth lights: blue (460 nm), green (525 nm), white (a combination of 460 and 560 nm), red (660 nm), and darkness. The results indicate that short wavelengths strongly inhibit the production of laccase: green (3.76 ± 1.12 U/L), blue (1.94 ± 0.36 U/L), and white (1.05 ± 0.21 U/L) in proportions of 85.8, 92.6, and 96.0%, respectively; whereas long wavelengths inhibit laccase production only partially i.e., red light (14.05 ± 4.79 U/L) in a proportion of 46.8%. Maximum activity was induced in absence of visible light (30 °C, darkness), i.e., 30.76 ± 4.0 U/L. It is concluded that the production of laccase in P. sanguineus responds to light stimuli [measured as wavelengths and lx] and that it does so inversely. This can be explained as an ecological mechanism of environmental recognition, given that P. sanguineus develops inside lignocellulose structures in conditions of darkness. The presence of short wavelength light (460-510 nm) would indicate that the organism finds itself in an external environment, unprovided of lignin, and that it is therefore unnecessary to secrete laccase. This possible new regulation in the laccase production in P. sanguineus has important biotechnological implications, for it would be possible to control the production of laccase using light stimuli.

  19. Ixodicide activity of Eysenhardtia polystachya against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, L; Sumano, H; Rivero, F; Alcala-Canto, Y

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the acaricidal effect of 2 compounds extracted from Eysenhardtia polystachya in vitro, namely coatlines and matlalines. Each extract was obtained by aqueous extraction in a nitrogen atmosphere. Engorged adult females of an amitraz-resistant strain of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus were used to produce larvae and to carry out the adult immersion test (AIT), while larvae were assayed using the larval packet test (LPT). After exposure to coatlines or matlalines, the mortality of larvae and engorged females, as well as the reproductive parameters of adult ticks were assessed. Coatlines were not lethal against larvae and did not decrease reproductive parameters. Conversely, matlalines showed a 90 to 100% efficacy against adults and larvae at all concentrations tested and a reduction of 76.41 to 80.64% oviposition and a 48.02 to 54.86% reduction in egg hatchability. Therefore, the acaricidal activity of matlalines was more efficient. Further studies are required to elucidate both the mode of action of matlalines as well the structure-activity relationships responsible for the observed differential efficacy between these 2 related isoflavans against the cattle tick.

  20. Pyrethroid resistance in Iranian field populations of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) annulatus.

    PubMed

    Ziapour, Seyyed Payman; Kheiri, Sadegh; Fazeli-Dinan, Mahmoud; Sahraei-Rostami, Farzaneh; Mohammadpour, Reza Ali; Aarabi, Mohsen; Nikookar, Seyed Hassan; Sarafrazi, Mohammad; Asgarian, Fatemeh; Enayati, Ahmadali; Hemingway, Janet

    2017-03-01

    Resistance to acaricides in ticks is becoming increasingly widespread throughout the world; therefore, tick control requires resistance monitoring for each tick species. The aims of this study were to monitor the susceptibility status of the cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) annulatus (Acari: Ixodidae), against pyrethroid acaricides from Mazandaran Province, northern Iran, and where resistance was evident, and establish the possible underlying mechanisms. Fully engorged adult R. (B.) annulatus females collected on cattle from Mazandaran Province. Twenty-nine tick populations produced 10-18days old larvae and bioassayed with cypermethrin and λ-cyhalothrin by larval packet test and the levels of detoxification enzymes were measured. Population AM-29 had a maximum resistance ratio (RR99) of 20.21 to cypermethrin and 53.57% of the tick populations were resistant at LC99 level. With λ-cyhalothrin, 17.86% of the tick populations were resistant and AM-29 was the most resistant population with RR99=4.54. AM-29 also showed significant elevation of cytochrome P450 monooxygenase (P450) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) (2.76- and 2.39-fold, respectively) (P<0.001). Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) annulatus showed resistance to pyrethroid insecticides with elevated levels of P450, GST and para-nitrophenyl acetate (p-NPA) in resistant populations. Operational failure was noted in controlling R. (B.) annulatus by pyrethroid insecticides, therefore alternative pest management measures should be adopted in Iran. For the first time, a new estimate of insecticide resistance based on effective dose recommended by the pesticide manufacturer termed Operational Dose Ratio (ODR) is defined and discussed.

  1. Binding mechanism of heavy metals biosorption by Pycnoporus sanguineus.

    PubMed

    Mashitah; Zulfadhly, Z; Bhatia, S

    1999-01-01

    Non-living biomass of Pycnoporus sanguineus has an ability to take up lead,copper and cadmium ions from an aqueous solution. The role played by various functional groups in the cell wall and the mechanism uptake of lead, copper and cadmium by Pycnoporus sanguineus were investigated. Modification of the functional groups such as lipids, carboxylic and amino was done through chemical pretreatment in order to study their role in biosorption of metal ions. Results showed that the chemical modification of these functional groups has modified the ability of biomass to remove lead, copper and cadmium ions from the solution. Scanning electron microscopy was also used to study the morphological structure of the biomass before and after adsorption. The electron micrograph indicated that the structure of biomass changed due to the adsorption of the metals onto the cell walls. Furthermore, the X-ray energy dispersion analysis (EDAX) showed that the calcium ion present in the cell wall of biomass was released and replaced by lead ions. This implied that an ion exchange is one of the principal mechanisms for metal biosorption.

  2. Efficacy of spinosad against acaricide-resistant and -susceptible Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus and acaricide-susceptible Amblyomma americanum and Dermacentor variabilis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Various acaricide-resistant strains of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, representative of the major resistance mechanisms found in Mexico and Brazil were exposed to spinosad using the FAO-Larval Packet Test and FAO-Adult Immersion Test (AIT). Larvae of all strains tested were found to be suscep...

  3. Demonstration of lumpy skin disease virus infection in Amblyomma hebraeum and Rhipicephalus appendiculatus ticks using immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Lubinga, Jimmy C; Clift, Sarah J; Tuppurainen, Eeva S M; Stoltsz, Wilhem H; Babiuk, Shawn; Coetzer, Jacobus A W; Venter, Estelle H

    2014-03-01

    Lumpy skin disease (LSD) is caused by lumpy skin disease virus (LSDV), a member of the genus Capripoxvirus. Transmission of the virus has been associated with haematophagous insects such as Stomoxys calcitrans as well as Aedes and Culex species of mosquitoes. Recent studies have reported the transmission of the virus by Amblyomma hebraeum, Rhipicephalus appendiculatus, and Rhipicephalus decoloratus ticks and the presence of LSDV in saliva of A. hebraeum and R. appendiculatus ticks. The aim of this study was to determine which tick organs become infected by LSDV following intrastadial infection and transstadial persistence of the virus in A. hebraeum and R. appendiculatus ticks. Nymphal and adult ticks were orally infected by feeding them on LSDV-infected cattle. Partially fed adult ticks were processed for testing while nymphs were fed to repletion and allowed to moult to adults before being processed for testing. The infection in tick organs was determined by testing for the presence of the viral antigen using monoclonal antibodies with immunohistochemical staining. The viral antigen was detected in salivary glands, haemocytes, synganglia, ovaries, testes, fat bodies, and midgut. Since the virus was shown to be able to cross the midgut wall and infect various tick organs, this may indicate potential for biological development and transmission of LSDV in ticks. This study strengthens the previously reported evidence of the occurrence of LSDV in tick saliva.

  4. Nomuraea rileyi as biological control agents of Rhipicephalus microplus tick.

    PubMed

    Perinotto, W M S; Terra, A L M; Angelo, I C; Fernandes, É K K; Golo, P S; Camargo, M G; Bittencourt, V R E P

    2012-10-01

    Nomuraea rileyi, a fungus pathogenic to insects, has been widely used for biological control of agricultural pests in Brazil. This study investigates the effects of N. rileyi, isolates Nr 138, Nr 151, and Nr 177, to eggs, larvae, and engorged females of Rhipicephalus microplus tick. Specimens were immersed in 1 ml of conidial suspension for 3 min, whereas the control group was immersed in 0.01% Tween 80 water solution. The isolate Nr 138 controlled 67.37% of ticks when the highest conidial concentration was used, 10(8) conidia ml(-1). The isolate Nr 177 significantly reduced the percentage of hatch of larvae from eggs treated with 10(8) conidia ml(-1). Conversely, the isolate Nr 151 was not virulent to eggs, larvae, or adults. Variability in virulence was observed among the N. rileyi isolates investigated in the current study-Nr 138 was more virulent to engorged females, while Nr 177 was more virulent to unfed larvae. Although N. rileyi proved to be virulent to several stages of R. microplus, the results obtained in this study indicate that N. rileyi does not appear to be a remarkable biological control agent for R. microplus.

  5. A First Insight into Pycnoporus sanguineus BAFC 2126 Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Rohr, Cristian O.; Levin, Laura N.; Mentaberry, Alejandro N.; Wirth, Sonia A.

    2013-01-01

    Fungi of the genus Pycnoporus are white-rot basidiomycetes widely studied because of their ability to synthesize high added-value compounds and enzymes of industrial interest. Here we report the sequencing, assembly and analysis of the transcriptome of Pycnoporus sanguineus BAFC 2126 grown at stationary phase, in media supplemented with copper sulfate. Using the 454 pyrosequencing platform we obtained a total of 226,336 reads (88,779,843 bases) that were filtered and de novo assembled to generate a reference transcriptome of 7,303 transcripts. Putative functions were assigned for 4,732 transcripts by searching similarities of six-frame translated sequences against a customized protein database and by the presence of conserved protein domains. Through the analysis of translated sequences we identified transcripts encoding 178 putative carbohydrate active enzymes, including representatives of 15 families with roles in lignocellulose degradation. Furthermore, we found many transcripts encoding enzymes related to lignin hydrolysis and modification, including laccases and peroxidases, as well as GMC oxidoreductases, copper radical oxidases and other enzymes involved in the generation of extracellular hydrogen peroxide and iron homeostasis. Finally, we identified the transcripts encoding all of the enzymes involved in terpenoid backbone biosynthesis pathway, various terpene synthases related to the biosynthesis of sesquiterpenoids and triterpenoids precursors, and also cytochrome P450 monooxygenases, glutathione S-transferases and epoxide hydrolases with potential functions in the biodegradation of xenobiotics and the enantioselective biosynthesis of biologically active drugs. To our knowledge this is the first report of a transcriptome of genus Pycnoporus and a resource for future molecular studies in P. sanguineus. PMID:24312521

  6. Homeobox genes in the ribbonworm Lineus sanguineus: Evolutionary implications

    PubMed Central

    Kmita-Cunisse, Marie; Loosli, Felix; Bièrne, Jacques; Gehring, Walter J.

    1998-01-01

    From our current understanding of the genetic basis of development and pattern formation in Drosophila and vertebrates it is commonly thought that clusters of Hox genes sculpt the morphology of animals in specific body regions. Based on Hox gene conservation throughout the animal kingdom it is proposed that these genes and their role in pattern formation evolved early during the evolution of metazoans. Knowledge of the history of Hox genes will lead to a better understanding of the role of Hox genes in the evolution of animal body plans. To infer Hox gene evolution, reliable data on lower chordates and invertebrates are crucial. Among the lower triploblasts, the body plan of the ribbonworm Lineus (nemertini) appears to be close to the common ancestral condition of protostomes and deuterostomes. In this paper we present the isolation and identification of Hox genes in Lineus sanguineus. We find that the Lineus genome contains a single cluster of at least six Hox genes: two anterior-class genes, three middle-class genes, and one posterior-class gene. Each of the genes can be definitely assigned to an ortholog group on the basis of its homeobox and its flanking sequences. The most closely related homeodomain sequences are invariably found among the mouse or Amphioxus orthologs, rather than Drosophila and other invertebrates. This suggests that the ribbonworms have diverged relatively little from the last common ancestors of protostomes and deuterostomes, the urbilateria. PMID:9501210

  7. Novel approaches for control of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We review recent progress for control of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus and R. (B.) annulatus. Outbreak infestations in the U.S. have reached alarming levels, due to increased populations of deer and other ungulates serving as alternative hosts. GIS mapping of infestations and deer habitat aids...

  8. Rhipicephalus microplus strain Deutsch, 10 BAC clone sequences

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, has a genome over 2.4 times the size of the human genome, and with over 70% of repetitive DNA, this genome would prove very costly to sequence at today's prices and difficult to assemble and analyze. We used labeled DNA probes from the coding reg...

  9. Magnetic Pycnoporus sanguineus-loaded alginate composite beads for removing dye from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chih-Hui; Shih, Ming-Cheng; Chiu, Han-Chen; Huang, Keng-Shiang

    2014-06-18

    Dye pollution in wastewater is a severe environmental problem because treating water containing dyes using conventional physical, chemical, and biological treatments is difficult. A conventional process is used to adsorb dyes and filter wastewater. Magnetic filtration is an emerging technology. In this study, magnetic Pycnoporus sanguineus-loaded alginate composite beads were employed to remove a dye solution. A white rot fungus, P. sanguineus, immobilized in alginate beads were used as a biosorbent to remove the dye solution. An alginate polymer could protect P. sanguineus in acidic environments. Superparamagnetic nanomaterials, iron oxide nanoparticles, were combined with alginate gels to form magnetic alginate composites. The magnetic guidability of alginate composites and biocompatibility of iron oxide nanoparticles facilitated the magnetic filtration and separation processes. The fungus cells were immobilized in loaded alginate composites to study the influence of the initial dye concentration and pH on the biosorption capacity. The composite beads could be removed easily post-adsorption by using a magnetic filtration process. When the amount of composite beads was varied, the results of kinetic studies of malachite green adsorption by immobilized cells of P. sanguineus fitted well with the pseudo-second-order model. The results indicated that the magnetic composite beads effectively adsorbed the dye solution from wastewater and were environmentally friendly.

  10. Cortinarius sanguineus and equally red species in Europe with an emphasis on northern European material.

    PubMed

    Niskanen, Tuula; Laine, Sanna; Liimatainen, Kare; Kytövuori, Ilkka

    2012-01-01

    The red species of Cortinarius subgenus Dermocybe in Europe were studied based on morphological and molecular data. Three completely red species were recognized: C. sanguineus (syn. C. sanguineus var. aurantiovaginatus), C. puniceus (syn. C. cruentus, C. rubrosanguineus) and C. vitiosus comb. nov. Cortinarius sanguineus has dusky red to red pileus, reddish yellow mycelium and lacking or with only slightly encrusted hyphae in pileipellis. It occurs in mesic to damp forests with Picea, often on rich soil in the boreal and montane areas of Europe, presumably also in eastern Canada. Cortinarius puniceus differs from C. sanguineus by its stronger purplish red, narrower spores and spot-like encrusted hyphae in pileipellis. It grows with deciduous trees in the temperate zone of Europe. Cortinarius vitiosus is known only from Fennoscandia and occurs in dry to mesic coniferous forests. It has fairly thin, often zonate, dark red to dark reddish brown pileus, pale red mycelium, small spores and encrusted lamellar trama and pileipellis hyphae. In addition to these three species C. fervidus and C. phoeniceus occasionally have red basidiomes. The relationships of the species were inferred by analysis of ITS sequences. Our study suggests that the section Sanguinei, as earlier defined, is polyphyletic. Here the section is limited to include C. sanguineus, C. puniceus and North American D. sierraensis. The relationships with other red species were not determined. Section Dermocybe, including C. cinnamomeus, C. croceus and C. uliginosus, formed a monophyletic group, and the section Malicoriae had some support. A total of 34 new sequences are published including nine from type specimens.

  11. Synergistic action of fatty acids, sulphides and stilbene against acaricide-resistant Rhipicephalus microplus ticks.

    PubMed

    Arceo-Medina, G N; Rosado-Aguilar, J A; Rodríguez-Vivas, R I; Borges-Argaez, R

    2016-09-15

    Six compounds in a methanolic extract of Petiveria alliacea stem (cis-stilbene; benzyl disulphide; benzyl trisulphide; and methyl esters of hexadecanoic acid, octadecadienoic acid and octadecenoic acid) are known to exercise acaricide activity against cattle tick Rhipicephalus microplus larvae and adults. The synergistic effect of 57 combinations of these six compounds on acaricide activity against R. microplus was evaluated. Larvae immersion tests produced the lethal concentrations needed to kill 50% (LC50) and 99% (LC99) of the population. Adult immersion tests produced rates (%) for mortality, oviposition inhibition and eclosion inhibition. Individually, none of the compounds (1% concentration) exhibited acaricide activity (mortality ≤2.3%). When combined, however, nine mixtures exhibited a synergistic increase in activity, with high mortality rates (≥92%) in larvae. Values for LC50 ranged from 0.07 to 0.51% and those for LC99 from 0.66 to 5.16%. Thirty six compound mixtures had no significant activity (mortality ≤30%) against larvae. Two mixtures exhibited synergism against adults, with high rates (≥92%) of oviposition inhibition. The mixtures based on the benzyl disulphide+benzyl trisulphide pairing produced a synergistic effect against acaricide-resistant R. microplus larva and adults, and are therefore the most promising combination for controlling this ubiquitous ectoparasite.

  12. Comparison of in vitro acaricidal effects of commercial preparations of cypermethrin and fenvalerate against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) annulatus.

    PubMed

    Ravindran, Reghu; Ramankutty, Sunil Athalathil; Juliet, Sanis; Palayullaparambil, Adarsh Krishna Thumadath; Gopi, Jyothimol; Gopalan, Ajith Kumar Karapparambu; Nair, Suresh Narayanan; Ghosh, Srikanta

    2014-01-01

    Commercially available preparations of cypermethrin (Clinar and Ectomin) and fenvalerate (Flytik and Ticomax, 20% E.C) were compared for their acaricidal activity against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) annulatus using adult immersion test. Adult tick mortality was higher with Ectomin compared to Clinar. Complete eclosion blocking was observed at all the tested concentrations with Ectomin while it was observed only at the highest concentration tested for Clinar. Compared to Flytik, adult tick mortality was higher with Ticomax at the tested concentrations. Complete blocking of hatching of laid ova was observed with Flytik at the highest concentration tested. At the manufacture recommended dosage of 200 ppm Ectomin elicited 93.37 per cent inhibition of fecundity, while it was 91.7 per cent for Clinar. For fenvalerate, the recommended concentration was 1200 ppm at which Ticomax showed 86 per cent and Flytik produced 80.05 per cent inhibition of fecundity respectively.

  13. Hemigrapsus sanguineus in Long Island salt marshes: experimental evaluation of the interactions between an invasive crab and resident ecosystem engineers.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Bradley J; Fournier, Alexa M; Furman, Bradley T; Carroll, John M

    2014-01-01

    The invasive Asian shore crab, Hemigrapsus sanguineus, has recently been observed occupying salt marshes, a novel environment for this crab species. As it invades this new habitat, it is likely to interact with a number of important salt marsh species. To understand the potential effects of H. sanguineus on this ecosystem, interactions between this invasive crab and important salt marsh ecosystem engineers were examined. Laboratory experiments demonstrated competition for burrows between H. sanguineus and the native fiddler crab, Uca pugilator. Results indicate that H. sanguineus is able to displace an established fiddler crab from its burrow. Feeding experiments revealed that the presence of H. sanguineus has a significantly negative impact on the number as well as the biomass of ribbed mussels (Geukensia demissa) consumed by the green crab, Carcinus maenas, although this only occurred at high predator densities. In addition, when both crabs foraged together, there was a significant shift in the size of mussels consumed. These interactions suggests that H. sanguineus may have long-term impacts and wide-ranging negative effects on the saltmarsh ecosystem.

  14. Hemigrapsus sanguineus in Long Island salt marshes: experimental evaluation of the interactions between an invasive crab and resident ecosystem engineers

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Alexa M.; Furman, Bradley T.; Carroll, John M.

    2014-01-01

    The invasive Asian shore crab, Hemigrapsus sanguineus, has recently been observed occupying salt marshes, a novel environment for this crab species. As it invades this new habitat, it is likely to interact with a number of important salt marsh species. To understand the potential effects of H. sanguineus on this ecosystem, interactions between this invasive crab and important salt marsh ecosystem engineers were examined. Laboratory experiments demonstrated competition for burrows between H. sanguineus and the native fiddler crab, Uca pugilator. Results indicate that H. sanguineus is able to displace an established fiddler crab from its burrow. Feeding experiments revealed that the presence of H. sanguineus has a significantly negative impact on the number as well as the biomass of ribbed mussels (Geukensia demissa) consumed by the green crab, Carcinus maenas, although this only occurred at high predator densities. In addition, when both crabs foraged together, there was a significant shift in the size of mussels consumed. These interactions suggests that H. sanguineus may have long-term impacts and wide-ranging negative effects on the saltmarsh ecosystem. PMID:25071995

  15. Emergence of oriental theileriosis in cattle and its transmission through Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus in Assam, India

    PubMed Central

    Kakati, Parikshit; Sarmah, Prabhat Chandra; Ray, Debdatta; Bhattacharjee, Kanta; Sharma, Rajeev Kumar; Barkalita, Luit Moni; Sarma, Dipak Kumar; Baishya, Bhaben Chandra; Borah, Pranjal; Stanley, Bobitha

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the present study was to investigate the presence of Theileria in blood samples of crossbred and indigenous adult cows raised under unorganized small scale farming system in a Babesia and Anaplasma endemic geographical area from Assam, India and to see its transmission through Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus ticks. Materials and Methods: For the present study, 57 clinical cases of cattle suspected to be of hemoparasitic infections were taken into consideration. The parasites were identified based on morphology in giemsa stained blood smear followed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Sera samples were tested for T. annulata antibodies in plate and Dot-ELISA. PCR was also conducted in eggs of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus tick collected from a Theileria orientalis positive animal. Results: PCR amplified 1124, 776, and 160 bp DNA fragments of B. bigemina (64.91%), T. orientalis (21.05%) and A. marginale (14.03%), respectively. This assay further conducted in 12 T. orientalis positive blood samples with primers of Buffeli, Chitose, and Ikeda variants of T. orientalis showed 3 samples positive to Ikeda type and none for Buffeli and Chitose. Babesia bovis and Theileria annulata specific primers also did not amplify any fragment during the PCR assay of the blood samples. Further, all sera samples tested negative to T. annulata antibodies in Plate and Dot-ELISA. PCR conducted in eggs of R (B).microplus tick collected from a T. orientalis positive animal revealed presence of the parasite DNA. Gradual improvement in physical condition leading to complete recovery in 10 out of 12 T. orientalis infected clinical cases treated with buparvaquone(at 2.5mg/kg.b.wt I/M) was the feedback obtained from field veterinarians and the cattle owners. Conclusion: The present investigation represents the first report of occurrence of T. orientalis in cattle of Assam with involvement of pathogenic Ikeda strain in clinical outbreaks and its possible natural

  16. Isolation of a Pax-6 homolog from the ribbonworm Lineus sanguineus.

    PubMed Central

    Loosli, F; Kmita-Cunisse, M; Gehring, W J

    1996-01-01

    The Pax-6 genes of vertebrates and Drosophila encode transcription factors with highly conserved paired- and homeodomains. They are expressed in the nervous system and the developing eyes. Loss-of-function mutations in mammals and flies lead to a reduction or absence of the eyes. By ectopic expression of Pax-6 in Drosophila ectopic eyes can be induced, indicating a determinative role in eye morphogenesis. We have isolated a Pax-6 homolog of the ribbonworm Lineus sanguineus. This gene shares extensive sequence identity and several conserved splice sites with the mammalian and Drosophila genes. During head regeneration the L. sanguineus Pax-6 homolog is expressed in the central nervous system, in the cerebral organ, and in the eye region. These findings support the hypothesis that Pax-6 was present in primitive metazoa before the evolutionary separation of vertebrates and arthropods and suggest a fundamental role in eye and central nervous system development. Images Fig. 4 PMID:8610097

  17. Control of Hemotropic Diseases of Dogs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-12-31

    ehrlichiosis. The potential of the brown dog tick Rhipicephalus sanguineus as a reservoir of Ehrlichia canis was investigated. R. sanguineus adults...harbored and efficiently transmitted E. canis to susceptible dogs for as long as 155 days after detachment as engorged nymphs from a dog experiencing...acute ehrlichiosis. Two modifications of the original tissue culture technique for the propagation of E. canis were developed to study the effect of

  18. Acaricidal activity of alkaloid fractions of Leucas indica Spreng against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) annulatus tick.

    PubMed

    Divya, T M; Soorya, V C; Amithamol, K K; Juliet, S; Ravindran, R; Nair, S N; Ajithkumar, K G

    2014-03-01

    The acaricidal activity from alkaloid and non-alkaloid fractions of Leucas indica were studied against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) annulatus tick using adult immersion test under laboratory conditions. For this purpose, the engorged female R.(B.) annulatus tick were exposed to two fold serial dilutions of alkaloid extract (50 mg/ml, 25 mg/ml, 12.5 mg/ml, 6 mg/ml and 3 mg/ml) using 'dipping method' in vitro. The efficacy was assessed by measuring the percentage of adult mortality, inhibition of fecundity and hatching rate. The alkaloid fraction of the extract produced concentration dependent delayed adult tick mortality. The extract at a concentration of 50 mg/ml demonstrated 66.67 per cent mortality and 55.16 per cent inhibition of fecundity. Nicotine was identified as one of the compounds of alkaloid fraction. However, it did not reveal any acaricidal activity when tested in vitro at concentrations ranging from 62.5-1000 μg/mL. Hence, the acaricidal action of L. indica is not due to nicotine. Non alkaloid fraction also did not reveal any acaricidal effects against R. (B.) annulatus tick.

  19. Production of laccase by Pynoporus sanguineus using 2,5 - Xylidine and ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Valeriano, Viviane S.; Silva, Anna Maria F.; Santiago, Mariângela F.; Bara, Maria T. F.; Garcia, Telma A.

    2009-01-01

    Enzyme application in biotechnological and environmental processes has had increasing interest due to its efficiency, selectivity and mainly for being environmentally healthful, but these applications require a great volume of enzymes. In this work the effect of different concentrations of ethanol and 2,5-xylidine on growth and production of laccase by Pycnoporus sanguineus was investigated. In a medium containing 200 mg.L-1 of 2,5-xylidine or 50 g.L-1 of ethanol, the maximum activity of laccase was 2019 U.L-1 and 1035 U.L-1, respectively. No direct correlation between biomass and activity of laccase was observed for any of the inducers used during the tests. Ethanol concentrations, larger than or equal to 20 g.L-1, inhibited the radial growth of P. sanguineus. This study showed that ethanol, which has less toxicity and cost than the majority of the studied inducers, presents promising perspectives for laccase production by P. sanguineus. PMID:24031426

  20. Biosorption of cadmium (II) ions by immobilized cells of Pycnoporus sanguineus from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Mashitah, M D; Yus Azila, Y; Bhatia, S

    2008-07-01

    Biosorption of cadmium (II) ions from aqueous solution onto immobilized cells of Pycnoporus sanguineus (P. sanguineus) was investigated in a batch system. Equilibrium and kinetic studies were conducted by considering the effect of pH, initial cadmium (II) concentration, biomass loading and temperature. Results showed that the uptake of cadmium (II) ions increased with the increase of initial cadmium (II) concentration, pH and temperature. Langmuir, Freundlich and Redlich-Peterson isotherm models were used to analyze the equilibrium data at different temperatures. Langmuir isotherm model described the experimental data well followed by Redlich-Peterson and Freundlich isotherm models. Biosorption kinetics data were fitted using pseudo-first, pseudo-second-order and intraparticle diffusion. It was found that the kinetics data fitted well the pseudo-second-order followed by intraparticle diffusion. Thermodynamic parameters such as standard Gibbs free energy (Delta G0), standard enthalpy (Delta H0) and standard entropy (Delta S0) were evaluated. The result showed that biosorption of cadmium (II) ions onto immobilized cells of P. sanguineus was spontaneous and endothermic nature.

  1. Exploring the midgut proteome of partially fed female cattle tick (Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus).

    PubMed

    Kongsuwan, Kritaya; Josh, Peter; Zhu, Ying; Pearson, Roger; Gough, Joanne; Colgrave, Michelle L

    2010-02-01

    The continued development of effective anti-tick vaccines remains the most promising prospect for the control of the cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus. A vaccine based on midgut proteins could interfere with successful tick feeding and additionally interfere with midgut developmental stages of Babesia parasites, providing opportunities for the control of both the tick and the pathogens it transmits. Midgut proteins from partially fed adult female cattle ticks were analysed using a combination of 2-DE and gel-free LC-MS/MS. Analysis of the urea-soluble protein fraction resulted in the confident identification of 105 gut proteins, while the PBS-soluble fraction yielded an additional 37 R. microplus proteins. The results show an abundance of proteins involved in mitochondrial ATP synthesis, electron transport chain, protein synthesis, chaperone, antioxidant and protein folding and transport activities in midgut tissues of adult female ticks. Among the novel products identified were clathrin-adaptor protein, which is involved in the assembly of clathrin-coated vesicles, and membrane-associated trafficking proteins such as syntaxin 6 and surfeit 4. The observations allow the formulation of hypotheses regarding midgut physiology and will serve as a basis for future vaccine development and tick-host interaction research.

  2. In vitro activities of plant extracts from the Brazilian Cerrado and Pantanal against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Acari: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Carolina da Silva; Borges, Ligia Miranda Ferreira; Nicácio, José; Alves, Reginaldo Dias; Miguita, Carlos Henrique; Violante, Ivana Maria Póvoa; Hamerski, Lidilhone; Garcez, Walmir Silva; Garcez, Fernanda Rodrigues

    2013-07-01

    A total of 73 ethanol extracts from different anatomical parts of 44 plant species belonging to 24 families, native to the Mid-Western region of Brazil, were assessed in vitro for their effect on the reproductive cycle of engorged females of the cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, using the adult immersion test. All extracts were evaluated at the concentration of 0.2 % and, among the extracts tested, the one obtained from the fruits of Guarea kunthiana (Meliaceae) proved to be highly efficacious, showing 99.1 % of product effectiveness. Extracts from other three species were shown to be moderately active, namely Nymphaea amazonum trunk (Nymphaeaceae) [51.7 %], Strychnos pseudoquina trunk (Loganiaceae) [48 %] [corrected] and Ocotea lancifolia leaves (Lauraceae) [34.5 %], while the remaining extracts were shown to be weakly active or inactive. This is the first report on the bioactivity of these species on egg production by engorged females of R. microplus.

  3. Acaricidal activity of Palicourea marcgravii, a species from the Amazon forest, on cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus.

    PubMed

    Silva, Wilson Castro; Martins, João Ricardo de Souza; Cesio, Maria Veronica; Azevedo, João Lúcio; Heinzen, Horacio; de Barros, Neiva Monteiro

    2011-06-30

    Leaves of Palicourea marcgravii were extracted successively with hexane, ethyl acetate and ethanol in order to evaluate their acaricidal activity on larvae and adult stages of the cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus. The ethyl acetate extract showed the highest bioactivity of the tested extracts, which contained 0.12% monofluoroacetic acid. On engorged female, the ethyl acetate extract showed a lethal concentration 50% - LC(50)=30.08 mg ml(-1), inhibitory concentration 50% - IC(50)=5.79 mg ml(-1) and lethal time 50% - LT(50)=4.72 days; 100% reproduction was controlled at concentrations of 50 mg ml(-1) and on larvae the ethyl acetate extract showed a LC(50)=2.46 mg ml(-1). No alkaloids were detected in any of the extracts. This is the first report on the acaricidal activity of P. marcgravii extracts against R. microplus as well as the acaricidal properties of a plant species containing monofluoroacetic acid.

  4. A comparison of three different methodologies for evaluating Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus susceptibility to topical spray compounds.

    PubMed

    Corrêa, Rafael Rodrigues; Lopes, Welber Daniel Zanetti; Teixeira, Weslen Fabricio Pires; Cruz, Breno Cayeiro; Gomes, Lucas Vinicius Costa; Felippelli, Gustavo; Maciel, Willian Giquelin; Fávero, Flávia Carolina; Buzzulini, Carolina; Bichuette, Murilo Abud; Soares, Vando Edésio; da Costa, Alvimar José

    2015-01-15

    This study aimed to compare three different methodologies (Adult Immersion Tests, field trials with naturally infected animals, and a Stall Test using artificially infested cattle) to evaluate the efficacy of two topical formulations that we administered as whole body sprays (15% Cypermethrin+30% Chlorpyriphos+15% Fenthion-Colosso(®) FC 30, Ouro Fino Agronegócios; and 60% Dichlorvos+20% Chlorpyriphos-Ectofós(®), Vallée Saúde Animal Ltd.), against a susceptible strain of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus. To achieve this objective, two natural infestation trials were conducted, as well as two artificial infestation trials (Stall Tests) and two Adult Immersion Tests (AIT). The AIT results showed that both spray formulations achieved 100% efficacy against R. (B.) microplus fully engorged females. However, when observing results obtained by field trials (natural infestations) and Stall Tests, none of these topically applied compounds reached 100% efficacy or affected the reproductive capacity of the fully engorged female ticks. Additional studies must be conducted to compare these in vivo methodologies with different in vitro techniques, such as the Larval Packet Test. However, based on results obtained here, we can conclude that depending on the spray formulations used, the AIT can overestimate acaricidal efficacy and values of reproductive efficiency of such compounds against R (B.) microplus. Specifically, when dealing with spray formulations in the Stall Tests, the period of residual action can increase because these animals are sheltered from contact with environmental factors that might interfere with the efficacy of the products tested. It may be necessary to take in vivo trial results into consideration (such as field trials with naturally infested animals or Stall Tests) to standardize a specific in vitro assay, such as the Adult Immersion Test.

  5. Enhanced production of thermostable laccases from a native strain of Pycnoporus sanguineus using central composite design.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Cavazos, Leticia I; Junghanns, Charles; Nair, Rakesh; Cárdenas-Chávez, Diana L; Hernández-Luna, Carlos; Agathos, Spiros N; Parra, Roberto

    2014-04-01

    The production of thermostable laccases from a native strain of the white-rot fungus Pycnoporus sanguineus isolated in Mexico was enhanced by testing different media and a combination of inducers including copper sulfate (CuSO4). The best conditions obtained from screening experiments in shaken flasks using tomato juice, CuSO4, and soybean oil were integrated in an experimental design. Enhanced levels of tomato juice as the medium, CuSO4 and soybean oil as inducers (36.8% (v/v), 3 mmol/L, and 1% (v/v), respectively) were determined for 10 L stirred tank bioreactor runs. This combination resulted in laccase titer of 143,000 IU/L (2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid), pH 3.0), which represents the highest activity so far reported for P. sanguineus in a 10-L fermentor. Other interesting media resulting from the screening included glucose-bactopeptone which increased laccase activity up to 20,000 IU/L, whereas the inducers Acid Blue 62 and Reactive Blue 19 enhanced enzyme production in this medium 10 times. Based on a partial characterization, the laccases of this strain are especially promising in terms of thermostability (half-life of 6.1 h at 60 °C) and activity titers.

  6. Xenobiotic Compounds Degradation by Heterologous Expression of a Trametes sanguineus Laccase in Trichoderma atroviride

    PubMed Central

    Balcázar-López, Edgar; Méndez-Lorenzo, Luz Helena; Batista-García, Ramón Alberto; Esquivel-Naranjo, Ulises; Ayala, Marcela; Kumar, Vaidyanathan Vinoth; Savary, Olivier; Cabana, Hubert; Herrera-Estrella, Alfredo; Folch-Mallol, Jorge Luis

    2016-01-01

    Fungal laccases are enzymes that have been studied because of their ability to decolorize and detoxify effluents; they are also used in paper bleaching, synthesis of polymers, bioremediation, etc. In this work we were able to express a laccase from Trametes (Pycnoporus) sanguineus in the filamentous fungus Trichoderma atroviride. For this purpose, a transformation vector was designed to integrate the gene of interest in an intergenic locus near the blu17 terminator region. Although monosporic selection was still necessary, stable integration at the desired locus was achieved. The native signal peptide from T. sanguineus laccase was successful to secrete the recombinant protein into the culture medium. The purified, heterologously expressed laccase maintained similar properties to those observed in the native enzyme (Km and kcat and kcat/km values for ABTS, thermostability, substrate range, pH optimum, etc). To determine the bioremediation potential of this modified strain, the laccase-overexpressing Trichoderma strain was used to remove xenobiotic compounds. Phenolic compounds present in industrial wastewater and bisphenol A (an endocrine disruptor) from the culture medium were more efficiently removed by this modified strain than with the wild type. In addition, the heterologously expressed laccase was able to decolorize different dyes as well as remove benzo[α]pyrene and phenanthrene in vitro, showing its potential for xenobiotic compound degradation. PMID:26849129

  7. Enhanced production of thermostable laccases from a native strain of Pycnoporus sanguineus using central composite design*

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Cavazos, Leticia I.; Junghanns, Charles; Nair, Rakesh; Cárdenas-Chávez, Diana L.; Hernández-Luna, Carlos; Agathos, Spiros N.; Parra, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    The production of thermostable laccases from a native strain of the white-rot fungus Pycnoporus sanguineus isolated in Mexico was enhanced by testing different media and a combination of inducers including copper sulfate (CuSO4). The best conditions obtained from screening experiments in shaken flasks using tomato juice, CuSO4, and soybean oil were integrated in an experimental design. Enhanced levels of tomato juice as the medium, CuSO4 and soybean oil as inducers (36.8% (v/v), 3 mmol/L, and 1% (v/v), respectively) were determined for 10 L stirred tank bioreactor runs. This combination resulted in laccase titer of 143 000 IU/L (2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid), pH 3.0), which represents the highest activity so far reported for P. sanguineus in a 10-L fermentor. Other interesting media resulting from the screening included glucose-bactopeptone which increased laccase activity up to 20 000 IU/L, whereas the inducers Acid Blue 62 and Reactive Blue 19 enhanced enzyme production in this medium 10 times. Based on a partial characterization, the laccases of this strain are especially promising in terms of thermostability (half-life of 6.1 h at 60 °C) and activity titers. PMID:24711355

  8. The host status of African buffaloes, Syncerus caffer, for Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) decoloratus.

    PubMed

    Horak, I G; Golezardy, H; Uys, A C

    2006-09-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the host status of African buffaloes, Syncerus caffer, for the one-host tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) decoloratus. To this end the R. (B.) decoloratus burdens of ten buffaloes examined in three north-eastern KwaZulu-Natal Province (KZN) nature reserves were compared with those of medium-sized to large antelope species in these reserves and in the southern Kruger National Park (KNP), Mpumalanga Province. The R. (B.) decoloratus burdens of the buffaloes were considerably smaller than those of the antelopes in the KNP, but not those in the KZN reserves. The life-stage structure of the R. (B.) decoloratus populations on the buffaloes, in which larvae predominated, was closer to that of this tick on blue wildebeest, Connochaetes taurinus, a tick-resistant animal, than to that on other antelopes. A single buffalo examined in the KNP was not infested with R. (B.) decoloratus, whereas a giraffe, Giraffa camelopardalis, examined at the same locality and time, harboured a small number of ticks. In a nature reserve in Mpumalanga Province adjacent to the KNP, two immobilized buffaloes, from which only adult ticks were collected, were not infested with R. (B.) decoloratus, whereas greater kudus, Tragelaphus strepsiceros, examined during the same time of year in the KNP harboured large numbers of adult ticks of this species. African buffaloes would thus appear to be resistant to infestation with R. (B.) decoloratus, and this resistance is expressed as the prevention of the majority of tick larvae from developing to nymphs.

  9. Presumptive evidence for the role of the white-tailed deer in the epidemiology of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) annulatus and Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) Microplus (Acari: Ixodidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    From 1907 when the fever tick eradication campaign began until 1933 when the tick eradication methods of dipping cattle in an acaricide and “pasture vacation” failed to eradicate Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus from parts of Florida, the two methods for tick eradication were used with success. ...

  10. Assembled contigs of the Haller's organ transcriptome from an Australian population of the cattle tick, Rhipicephalus microplus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In a collaboration with National Center for Genome Resources and University of Texas at El Paso researchers, we sequenced and assembled the transcriptome of the Haller's organ of an Australian strain (NRFS) of the cattle tick Rhipicephalus microplus (recently reclassified as Rhipicephalus australis...

  11. Kraft pulp biobleaching using an extracellular enzymatic fluid produced by Pycnoporus sanguineus.

    PubMed

    Eugenio, M E; Santos, S M; Carbajo, J M; Martín, J A; Martín-Sampedro, R; González, A E; Villar, J C

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this work was to obtain a LMS pre-treatment applicable to industrial TCF bleaching. Kraft pulp from Eucalyptus globulus was treated at 40 degrees C/pH 3 and 60 degrees C/pH 5 for 1h using an extracellular fluid enriched in laccase produced by Pycnoporus sanguineus and acetosyringone as mediator (HBT was used as a control mediator) (L). Alkaline extraction (E) and hydrogen peroxide (P) stages were then assayed. The LEP alternative was an efficient sequence to bleach kraft pulp since the enzymatic pre-treatment boosted the subsequent chemical bleaching. The best L pre-treatment was obtained with laccase-acetosyringone at 40 degrees C/pH 3. It reduces kappa number and hexenuronic acids, increases pulp viscosity, lowers hydrogen peroxide consumption down to an 87.4% (94.0% without L) and enhances brightness up to a 59% ISO (51% ISO without L).

  12. A High Redox Potential Laccase from Pycnoporus sanguineus RP15: Potential Application for Dye Decolorization

    PubMed Central

    Zimbardi, Ana L. R. L.; Camargo, Priscila F.; Carli, Sibeli; Aquino Neto, Sidney; Meleiro, Luana P.; Rosa, Jose C.; De Andrade, Adalgisa R.; Jorge, João A.; Furriel, Rosa P. M.

    2016-01-01

    Laccase production by Pycnoporus sanguineus RP15 grown in wheat bran and corncob under solid-state fermentation was optimized by response surface methodology using a Central Composite Rotational Design. A laccase (Lacps1) was purified and characterized and the potential of the pure Lacps1 and the crude culture extract for synthetic dye decolorization was evaluated. At optimal conditions (eight days, 26 °C, 18% (w/w) milled corncob, 0.8% (w/w) NH4Cl and 50 mmol·L−1 CuSO4, initial moisture 4.1 mL·g−1), the laccase activity reached 138.6 ± 13.2 U·g−1. Lacps1 was a monomeric glycoprotein (67 kDa, 24% carbohydrate). Optimum pH and temperature for the oxidation of 2,2’-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonate) (ABTS) were 4.4 and 74.4 °C, respectively. Lacps1 was stable at pH 3.0–8.0, and after two hours at 55–60 °C, presenting high redox potential (0.747 V vs. NHE). ABTS was oxidized with an apparent affinity constant of 147.0 ± 6.4 μmol·L−1, maximum velocity of 413.4 ± 21.2 U·mg−1 and catalytic efficiency of 3140.1 ± 149.6 L·mmol−1·s−1. The maximum decolorization percentages of bromophenol blue (BPB), remazol brilliant blue R and reactive blue 4 (RB4), at 25 or 40 °C without redox mediators, reached 90%, 80% and 60%, respectively, using either pure Lacps1 or the crude extract. This is the first study of the decolorization of BPB and RB4 by a P. sanguineus laccase. The data suggested good potential for treatment of industrial dye-containing effluents. PMID:27164083

  13. A High Redox Potential Laccase from Pycnoporus sanguineus RP15: Potential Application for Dye Decolorization.

    PubMed

    Zimbardi, Ana L R L; Camargo, Priscila F; Carli, Sibeli; Aquino Neto, Sidney; Meleiro, Luana P; Rosa, Jose C; De Andrade, Adalgisa R; Jorge, João A; Furriel, Rosa P M

    2016-05-05

    Laccase production by Pycnoporus sanguineus RP15 grown in wheat bran and corncob under solid-state fermentation was optimized by response surface methodology using a Central Composite Rotational Design. A laccase (Lacps1) was purified and characterized and the potential of the pure Lacps1 and the crude culture extract for synthetic dye decolorization was evaluated. At optimal conditions (eight days, 26 °C, 18% (w/w) milled corncob, 0.8% (w/w) NH₄Cl and 50 mmol·L(-1) CuSO₄, initial moisture 4.1 mL·g(-1)), the laccase activity reached 138.6 ± 13.2 U·g(-1). Lacps1 was a monomeric glycoprotein (67 kDa, 24% carbohydrate). Optimum pH and temperature for the oxidation of 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonate) (ABTS) were 4.4 and 74.4 °C, respectively. Lacps1 was stable at pH 3.0-8.0, and after two hours at 55-60 °C, presenting high redox potential (0.747 V vs. NHE). ABTS was oxidized with an apparent affinity constant of 147.0 ± 6.4 μmol·L(-1), maximum velocity of 413.4 ± 21.2 U·mg(-1) and catalytic efficiency of 3140.1 ± 149.6 L·mmol(-1)·s(-1). The maximum decolorization percentages of bromophenol blue (BPB), remazol brilliant blue R and reactive blue 4 (RB4), at 25 or 40 °C without redox mediators, reached 90%, 80% and 60%, respectively, using either pure Lacps1 or the crude extract. This is the first study of the decolorization of BPB and RB4 by a P. sanguineus laccase. The data suggested good potential for treatment of industrial dye-containing effluents.

  14. In vitro acaricidal activity of ethanolic and aqueous floral extracts of Calendula officinalis against synthetic pyrethroid resistant Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus.

    PubMed

    Godara, R; Katoch, R; Yadav, A; Ahanger, R R; Bhutyal, A D S; Verma, P K; Katoch, M; Dutta, S; Nisa, F; Singh, N K

    2015-09-01

    Detection of resistance levels against deltamethrin and cypermethrin in Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus collected from Jammu (India) was carried out using larval packet test (LPT). The results showed the presence of resistance level II and I against deltamethrin and cypermethrin, respectively. Adult immersion test (AIT) and LPT were used to evaluate the in vitro efficacy of ethanolic and aqueous floral extracts of Calendula officinalis against synthetic pyrethroid resistant adults and larvae of R. (B.) microplus. Four concentrations (1.25, 2.5, 5 and 10 %) of each extract with four replications for each concentration were used in both the bioassays. A concentration dependent mortality was observed and it was more marked with ethanolic extract. In AIT, the LC50 values for ethanolic and aqueous extracts were calculated as 9.9 and 12.9 %, respectively. The egg weight of the live ticks treated with different concentrations of the ethanolic and aqueous extracts was significantly lower than that of control ticks; consequently, the reproductive index and the percent inhibition of oviposition values of the treated ticks were reduced. The complete inhibition of hatching was recorded at 10 % of ethanolic extract. The 10 % extracts caused 100 % mortality of larvae after 24 h. In LPT, the LC50 values for ethanolic and aqueous extracts were determined to be 2.6 and 3.2 %, respectively. It can be concluded that the ethanolic extract of C. officinalis had better acaricidal properties against adults and larvae of R. (B.) microplus than the aqueous extract.

  15. Acaricidal activity of extracts from Petiveria alliacea (Phytolaccaceae) against the cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Acari: ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Rosado-Aguilar, J A; Aguilar-Caballero, A; Rodriguez-Vivas, R I; Borges-Argaez, R; Garcia-Vazquez, Z; Mendez-Gonzalez, M

    2010-03-25

    The acaricidal activity of crude extracts and fractions from stems and leaves of Petiveria alliacea (Phytolaccaceae) was carried out on larvae and adults of the cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus using the larval immersion test (LIT) and adult immersion test (AIT), respectively. Methanolic extracts of stems and leaves of P. alliacea showed 100% mortality on the LIT bioassay. On the other hand, methanolic extracts of leaves and stem on the AIT test showed 26% and 86% of mortality, respectively, egg laying inhibition of 40% and 91%, respectively and hatchability inhibition of 26% and 17%, respectively. Purification of the active stem methanolic extract showed that the activity was present in the n-hexane non-polar fraction. Bioassay-guided purification of the n-hexane fraction produced 10 semi-purified fractions; fraction B had the highest activity against tick larvae (100% mortality). Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry demonstrated that the chemical composition of the active fraction B samples were mainly composed of benzyltrisulfide (BTS) and benzyldisulfide (BDS). These metabolites might be responsible for the acaricidal activity of stem extract of P. alliacea. However, further experiments to evaluate the acaricidal activity of BTS and BDS on larvae and adults of R. (B.) microplus are needed. Our results showed that P. alliacea is a promising biocontrol candidate as acaricide against R. (B.) microplus resistant strains.

  16. Acaricidal activity of petroleum ether extract of leaves of Tetrastigma leucostaphylum (Dennst.) Alston against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) annulatus.

    PubMed

    Krishna, T P Adarsh; Krishna, T P Ajeesh; Chithra, N D; Deepa, P E; Darsana, U; Sreelekha, K P; Juliet, Sanis; Nair, Suresh N; Ravindran, Reghu; Kumar, K G Ajith; Ghosh, Srikanta

    2014-01-01

    The acaricidal activity of the petroleum ether extract of leaves of Tetrastigma leucostaphylum (Dennst.) Alston (family: Vitaceae) against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) annulatus was assessed using adult immersion test (AIT). The per cent of adult mortality, inhibition of fecundity, and blocking of hatching of eggs were studied at different concentrations. The extract at 10% concentration showed 88.96% inhibition of fecundity, 58.32% of adult tick mortality, and 50% inhibition of hatching. Peak mortality rate was observed after day 5 of treatment. Mortality of engorged female ticks, inhibition of fecundity, and hatching of eggs were concentration dependent. The LC50 value of the extract against R. (B.) annulatus was 10.46%. The HPTLC profiling of the petroleum ether extract revealed the presence of at least seven polyvalent components. In the petroleum ether extract, nicotine was identified as one of the components up to a concentration of 5.4%. However, nicotine did not reveal any acaricidal activity up to 20000 ppm (2%). Coconut oil, used as diluent for dissolving the extract, did not reveal any acaricidal effects. The results are indicative of the involvement of synergistic or additive action of the bioactive components in the tick mortality and inhibition of the oviposition.

  17. Assessment of bacterial diversity in the cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus through tag-encoded pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Ticks are regarded as the most relevant vectors of disease-causing pathogens in domestic and wild animals. The cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, hinders livestock production in tropical and subtropical parts of the world where it is endemic. Tick microbiomes remain largely unexplored. The objective of this study was to explore the R. microplus microbiome by applying the bacterial 16S tag-encoded FLX-titanium amplicon pyrosequencing (bTEFAP) technique to characterize its bacterial diversity. Pyrosequencing was performed on adult males and females, eggs, and gut and ovary tissues from adult females derived from samples of R. microplus collected during outbreaks in southern Texas. Results Raw data from bTEFAP were screened and trimmed based upon quality scores and binned into individual sample collections. Bacteria identified to the species level include Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus chromogenes, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Staphylococcus sciuri, Serratia marcescens, Corynebacterium glutamicum, and Finegoldia magna. One hundred twenty-one bacterial genera were detected in all the life stages and tissues sampled. The total number of genera identified by tick sample comprised: 53 in adult males, 61 in adult females, 11 in gut tissue, 7 in ovarian tissue, and 54 in the eggs. Notable genera detected in the cattle tick include Wolbachia, Coxiella, and Borrelia. The molecular approach applied in this study allowed us to assess the relative abundance of the microbiota associated with R. microplus. Conclusions This report represents the first survey of the bacteriome in the cattle tick using non-culture based molecular approaches. Comparisons of our results with previous bacterial surveys provide an indication of geographic variation in the assemblages of bacteria associated with R. microplus. Additional reports on the identification of new bacterial species maintained in nature by R. microplus that may be pathogenic to its vertebrate hosts

  18. Climate change and the genus Rhipicephalus (Acari: Ixodidae) in Africa.

    PubMed

    Olwoch, J M; Van Jaarsveld, A S; Scholtz, C H; Horak, I G

    2007-03-01

    The suitability of present and future climates for 30 Rhipicephalus species in Africa are predicted using a simple climate envelope model as well as a Division of Atmospheric Research Limited-Area Model (DARLAM). DARLAM's predictions are compared with the mean outcome from two global circulation models. East Africa and South Africa are considered the most vulnerable regions on the continent to climate-induced changes in tick distributions and tick-borne diseases. More than 50% of the species examined show potential range expansion and more than 70% of this range expansion is found in economically important tick species. More than 20% of the species experienced range shifts of between 50 and 100%. There is also an increase in tick species richness in the south-western regions of the sub-continent. Actual range alterations due to climate change may be even greater since factors like land degradation and human population increase have not been included in this modelling process. However, these predictions are also subject to the effect that climate change may have on the hosts of the ticks, particularly those that favour a restricted range of hosts. Where possible, the anticipated biological implications of the predicted changes are explored.

  19. Acaricide activity in vitro of Acmella oleracea against Rhipicephalus microplus.

    PubMed

    Castro, K N C; Lima, D F; Vasconcelos, L C; Leite, J R S A; Santos, R C; Paz Neto, A A; Costa-Júnior, L M

    2014-10-01

    Cattle tick control has been limited by the resistance of these parasites to synthetic acaricides. Natural products are a possible alternative as they have different mechanisms of action. Acmella oleracea is a native plant with a large cultivated area in the Amazon region and could be easily used for large-scale preparation of a commercial product. This study evaluated the in vitro action of the hexane extract of the aerial parts of A. oleracea on larvae and engorged females of the cattle tick Rhipicephalus microplus. Spilanthol was the major constituent with a content of 14.8% in the extract. The hexane extract of A. oleracea was highly effective against larvae of R. microplus with an LC50 of 0.8 mg mL(-1). Against engorged females, hexane extract of A. oleracea reduced oviposition and hatchability of eggs with an LC50 of 79.7 mg mL(-1). Larvae and engorged females were killed by the hexane extract with high efficiency (>95%) at concentrations of 3.1 and 150.0 mg mL(-1), respectively. These results demonstrate that the hexane extract of A. oleracea has significant activity against R. microplus and has potential to be developed into formulations for tick control.

  20. Immunoprotective potential of a Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus metalloprotease.

    PubMed

    Ali, Abid; Parizi, Luís Fernando; Guizzo, Melina Garcia; Tirloni, Lucas; Seixas, Adriana; Vaz, Itabajara da Silva; Termignoni, Carlos

    2015-01-15

    Ticks have serious impacts on animal and human health, causing significant economic losses in cattle breeding. Besides damage due to the hematophagous behavior, they transmit several pathogens. Low cost and environmental safety have made vaccines a promising alternative control method against tick infestation. Metalloproteases (MPs) have been shown to be essential for diverse biological functions in hematophagous organisms, inhibiting blood clotting, degrading extracellular matrix proteins, and inhibiting host tissue repair via anti-angiogenic activity. In this study, we analyzed the immunoprotective potential of a recombinant MP against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus infestation. First, a cDNA encoding R. microplus amino acids sequence with highly conserved regions of the metzincin (reprolysin) group of MP was identified (BrRm-MP4). After expression and purification, recombinant BrRm-MP4 was used as a vaccinal antigen against R. microplus infestation in cattle (Bos taurus taurus). All vaccinated bovines developed immune response to the antigen, resulting in increased antibody level throughout the immunization protocol. Immunization with rBrRm-MP4 reduced tick feeding success, decreasing the number of engorged females and their reproduction potential, representing a 60% overall protection. These results show that rBrRm-MP4 provides protection against tick infestation, placing it is a potential candidate for an anti-tick vaccine.

  1. In vitro efficacy of plant extracts and synthesized substances on Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) Microplus (Acari: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    de Souza Chagas, Ana Carolina; de Barros, Luiz Daniel; Cotinguiba, Fernando; Furlan, Maysa; Giglioti, Rodrigo; de Sena Oliveira, Márcia Cristina; Bizzo, Humberto Ribeiro

    2012-01-01

    Herbal drugs have been widely evaluated as an alternative method of parasite control, aiming to slow development of resistance and obtain low-cost biodegradable parasiticides. This study evaluated the in vitro efficacy on Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus of extracts from Carapa guianensis seed oil, Cymbopogon martinii and Cymbopogon schoenanthus leaf essential oil, and Piper tuberculatum leaf crude extract and similar synthesized substances. In the immersion test, engorged females were evaluated in five dilutions ranging from 10% to 0.030625% concentration. In the larval test on impregnated filter paper, the concentration ranged from 10% to 0.02%. The treatments and controls were done in three replicates. Chemical analysis of the oils was performed by gas chromatography. The main compounds were oleic acid (46.8%) for C. guianensis and geraniol for C. martinii (81.4%), and C. schoenanthus (62.5%). The isolated and synthesized substances showed no significant effect on larvae and adult. C. martinii and P. tuberculatum showed the best efficacy on the engorged females. The LC(50) and LC(90) were 2.93% and 6.66% and 3.76% and 25.03%, respectively. In the larval test, the LC(50) and LC(90) obtained for C. martinii, P. tuberculatum, and C. schoenanthus were 0.47% and 0.63%, 0.41% and 0.79%, 0.57% and 0.96%, respectively. The fact that geraniol is present in greater quantities in C. martinii explains its higher activity in relation to C. shoenanthus. It is necessary to validate the in vivo use of safe and effective phytoparasiticidal substances. Efforts should be focused on developing formulations that enhance the efficacy in vivo and lengthen the residual period.

  2. Minimum infection rate of Ehrlichia minasensis in Rhipicephalus microplus and Amblyomma sculptum ticks in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Izabelle T S; Melo, Andréia L T; Freitas, Leodil C; Verçoza, Rodolfo V; Alves, Alvair S; Costa, Jackeliny S; Chitarra, Cristiane S; Nakazato, Luciano; Dutra, Valéria; Pacheco, Richard C; Aguiar, Daniel M

    2016-07-01

    A new genotype phylogenetically close to Ehrlichia canis named as Ehrlichia minasensis was identified infecting cattle and deer in Canada, as well as Rhipicephalus microplus ticks and cattle in Brazil. Although it was detected in R. microplus, little is known about the epidemiology of this ehrlichiosis, especially in other tick species. This study evaluated the minimum infection rate of E. minasensis in Amblyomma sculptum and R. microplus ticks from locations where naturally infected cattle were previously detected. Overall, 45 engorged R. microplus ticks after molting [43 pools of adults (13.4%), and 2 pools of nymphs (4%)], and 42 engorged females post-oviposition (30.6%) (p=0.008) were positive by PCR for Ehrlichia sp. using the dsb, 16S rRNA and TRP36 genes, making a total of 87 R. microplus samples positive for Ehrlichia spp. (17.1%, IC 95% 14.01-20.75%). The partial sequences generated in the present study were 99-100% similar to the dsb DNA sequence of E. minasensis genotypes UFMG-EV and UFMT-BV, respectively, 100% similar to the 16S rRNA sequence of the E. minasensis genotype BOV2010 from Canada, and 99% similar to the TRP36 sequence of the Ehrlichia sp. UFMT-BV. The results of this study confirm the occurrence of transstadial transmission of this agent in R. microplus ticks and highlight the importance of R. microplus in the epidemiology and transmission of ehrlichiosis in cattle. No A. sculptum ticks were positive by PCR for E. minasensis.

  3. Evaluation of productivity and antioxidant profile of solid-state cultivated macrofungi Pleurotus albidus and Pycnoporus sanguineus.

    PubMed

    Gambato, Gabriela; Todescato, Kelly; Pavão, Elisa Maria; Scortegagna, Angélica; Fontana, Roselei Claudete; Salvador, Mirian; Camassola, Marli

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the production profile of Pleurotus albidus and Pycnoporus sanguineus on different waste substrates containing natural phenolics, and also to investigate whether phenolic-rich substrates can improve the phenolic content of these macrofungi. The medium formulated with Pinus sp. sawdust (PSW) made possible the highest yields (2.62±0.73%) of P. sanguineus. However, the supplementation of PSW with apple waste (AW) resulted in better P. albidus yields (23.94±2.92%). The results indicated that the substrate composition affected macrofungi production, also the chemical composition and the presence of phenolic compounds in the production media influence phenolic content and antioxidant activity in macrofungi.

  4. Laccase induction by synthetic dyes in Pycnoporus sanguineus and their possible use for sugar cane bagasse delignification.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Christian; Farnet Da Silva, Anne-Marie; Ziarelli, Fabio; Perraud-Gaime, Isabelle; Gutiérrez-Rivera, Beatriz; García-Pérez, José Antonio; Alarcón, Enrique

    2017-02-01

    The use of synthetic dyes for laccase induction in vivo has been scarcely explored. We characterized the effect of adding different synthetic dyes to liquid cultures of Pycnoporus sanguineus on laccase production. We found that carminic acid (CA) can induce 722 % and alizarin yellow 317 % more laccase than control does, and they promoted better fungal biomass development in liquid cultures. Aniline blue and crystal violet did not show such positive effect. CA and alizarin yellow were degraded up to 95 % during P. sanguineus culturing (12 days). With this basis, CA was selected as the best inducer and used to evaluate the induction of laccase on solid-state fermentation (SSF), using sugarcane bagasse (SCB) as substrate, in an attempt to reach selective delignification. We found that laccase induction occurred in SSF, and a slight inhibition of cellulase production was observed when CA was added to the substrate; also, a transformation of SCB under SSF was followed by the (13)C cross polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Results showed that P. sanguineus can selectively delignify SCB, decreasing aromatic C compounds by 32.67 % in 16 days; O-alkyl C region (polysaccharides) was degraded less than 2 %; delignification values were not correlated with laccase activities. Cellulose-crystallinity index was increased by 27.24 % in absence of CA and 15.94 % when 0.01 mM of CA was added to SCB; this dye also inhibits the production of fungal biomass in SSF (measured as alkyl C gain). We conclude that CA is a good inducer of laccase in liquid media, and that P. sanguineus is a fungus with high potential for biomass delignification.

  5. Molecular cloning and characterization of high mobility group box1 (Ls-HMGB1) from humphead snapper, Lutjanus sanguineus.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jia; Xia, Hongli; Huang, Yucong; Lu, Yishan; Wu, Zaohe; Jian, Jichang

    2014-10-01

    High mobility group box1 (HMGB1) is a kind of chromatin-associated nonhistone protein important for nucleosome formation, transcriptional regulation and inflammation. However, the reports about HMGB1 of marine fish were still limited. Here, we cloned and characterized a HMGB1 gene from humphead snapper, Lutjanus sanguineus (Ls-HMGB1). The Ls-HMGB1 cDNA composed of 1199 bp with a 70 bp of 5'-UTR, 630 bp open reading frame (ORF) and 499 bp 3'-UTR, encoded a polypeptide of 210 amino acids (GenBank Accession No: KJ783442). Sequence alignment of Ls-HMGB1 showed the highest similarity of 91% with Sciaenops ocellatus HMGB1 protein. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis revealed that Ls-HMGB1 had relatively high expression level in skin, kidney and heart. After Vibrio harveyi and poly I:C stimulation, transcripts of Ls-HMGB1 were significantly increased and reached to peak at 18 h p.i. The L. sanguineus interleukin-6 (Ls-IL6) transcription in HK leukocytes was significantly induced by recombinant LsHMGB1 (rLsHMGB1). These results indicated that Ls-HMGB1 may play an important role in immune response of L. sanguineus during pathogen challenge.

  6. In vitro acaricidal efficacy of plant extracts from Brazilian flora and isolated substances against Rhipicephalus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Valente, Paula Pimentel; Amorim, Juliana Mendes; Castilho, Rachel Oliveira; Leite, Romário Cerqueira; Ribeiro, Múcio Flávio Barbosa

    2014-01-01

    The tick Rhipicephalus microplus causes significant losses in livestock cattle and has developed increasing resistance to the primary acaricides that are used to treat these infections. The objective of this study was to identify new biomolecules or isolated substances showing acaricidal activity from plants. Larval packet tests were conducted to evaluate the effects of 11 species of plants and three isolated substances (betulinic acid, eugenol, and nerolidol) on R. microplus. An adult female immersion test was performed with the substance that showed the highest larvicidal activity, which was evaluated for inhibition of reproduction. Tests using Licania tomentosa, Hymenaea stigonocarpa, Hymenaea courbaril, Stryphnodendron obovatum, Jacaranda cuspidifolia, Jacaranda ulei, Struthanthus polyrhizus, Chrysobalanus icaco, Vernonia phosphorea, Duguetia furfuracea, and Simarouba versicolor extracts as well as the isolated substance betulinic acid indicated lower acaricidal effects on R. microplus larvae. The extract displaying the best larvicidal activity was the ethanolic extract from L. tomentosa at a concentration of 60%, resulting in a mortality rate of 40.3%. However, nerolidol and eugenol showed larvicidal activity, which was highest for eugenol. Nerolidol caused a 96.5% mortality rate in the R. microplus larvae at a high concentration of 30%, and eugenol caused 100% mortality at a concentration of 0.3%. In the adult immersion test, 5% eugenol was identified as a good biomolecule for controlling R. microplus, as demonstrated by its high acaricidal activity and inhibition of oviposition.

  7. In Vitro Acaricidal Activity of Atropa belladonna and Its Components, Scopolamine and Atropine, against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus

    PubMed Central

    Godara, R.; Katoch, M.; Yadav, Anish; Parveen, S.; Vij, Bhavna; Khajuria, Varun; Singh, G.; Singh, Nirbhay K.

    2014-01-01

    In vitro efficacy of methanolic extract of Atropa belladonna and its components scopolamine and atropine was assessed against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus. Five concentrations of the extract (1.25%, 2.5%, 5%, 10%, and 20%) were used whereas scopolamine and atropine were each tested at 0.1%. In adult immersion test, the extract was lethal to ticks at 20% concentration. The LC50 and LC95 values were determined as 6.875% and 17.306%, respectively. The extract caused a significant reduction (P < 0.05) in egg mass production at 10% concentration. In larval packet test, the extract was lethal to larvae in the concentrations of 10% and 20% after 24 h, with LC50 and LC95 values of 1.321% and 4.935%, respectively. Scopolamine and atropine showed 93.3% and 60.0% mortality of adult ticks, respectively, but they caused complete (100%) blocking of hatching as well as 100% larval mortality. Scopolamine and atropine were observed to be more potent than the crude extract at an equivalent concentration in both the bioassays. PMID:25516877

  8. Efficacy of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus Bm86 against Hyalomma dromedarii and Amblyomma cajennense tick infestations in camels and cattle.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Valle, Manuel; Taoufik, Amar; Valdés, Mario; Montero, Carlos; Ibrahin, Hassan; Hassan, Shawgi Mohammed; Jongejan, Frans; de la Fuente, Jose

    2012-05-14

    The recombinant Bm86-based tick vaccines have shown their efficacy for the control of cattle ticks, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus and R. annulatus infestations. However, cattle ticks often co-exist with multi-host ticks such as Hyalomma and Amblyomma species, thus requiring the control of multiple tick infestations for cattle and other hosts. Vaccination trials using a R. microplus recombinant Bm86-based vaccine were conducted in cattle and camels against Hyalomma dromedarii and in cattle against Amblyomma cajennense immature and adult ticks. The results showed an 89% reduction in the number of H. dromedarii nymphs engorging on vaccinated cattle, and a further 32% reduction in the weight of the surviving adult ticks. In vaccinated camels, a reduction of 27% and 31% of tick engorgement and egg mass weight, respectively was shown, while egg hatching was reduced by 39%. However, cattle vaccination with Bm86 did not have an effect on A. cajennense tick infestations. These results showed that Bm86 vaccines are effective against R. microplus and other tick species but improved vaccines containing new antigens are required to control multiple tick infestations.

  9. In vitro acaricidal effect of tannin-rich plants against the cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Acari: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Fernández-Salas, A; Alonso-Díaz, M A; Acosta-Rodríguez, R; Torres-Acosta, J F J; Sandoval-Castro, C A; Rodríguez-Vivas, R I

    2011-01-10

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the in vitro acaricidal effects of lyophilized extracts of four tannin rich plants (Acacia pennatula, Piscidia piscipula, Leucaena leucocephala and Lysiloma latisiliquum) against diverse stages of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, and to asses whether tannins were involved in the acaricidal effect using polyethylene glycol (PEG) to block tannins. Larval immersion (LIT) and adult immersion (AIT) tests were used to evaluate the acaricidal effect of each of the lyophilized extracts against larval and adult stages of R. microplus respectively. Larvae and adult ticks were exposed to increasing concentrations of each plant extract (0, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600 and 19,200 μg ml(-1)) for 10 min. Larval mortality was recorded at 48 h post-incubation. Adult mortality was recorded daily over 14 days, at which point their reproductive efficiency was evaluated. PEG was added to the extracts to verify whether tannins were involved in the acaricidal effect. The effect on egg laying inhibition and larval mortality was analyzed using the GLM procedure in SAS. A Kruskal-Wallis test was used to assess the effect of PEG on LIT results. Calculation of the lethal concentration 50 (LC50) was performed using a probit analysis. All extracts reduced the viability of R. microplus larval stages (P<0.001), and viability was restored with the addition of PEG suggesting an important role of tannins in the acaricidal effect (P<0.001). The LC50 values of L. latisiliquum and P. piscipula plant extracts were 6.402 and 2.466 μg ml(-1). None of the tannin-rich plant extracts affected adult mortality (P>0.05). Lysiloma latisiliquum extract inhibited egg hatching of R. microplus (P<0.01). Tannin-rich plant extracts from A. pennatula, P. piscipula, L. leucocephala and L. latisiliquum showed potential acaricidal activity. Further in vivo studies are needed to confirm this finding.

  10. Genetic Mutations Associated with Pesticide Resistance in Rhipicephalus microplus and Haematobia irritans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A number of gene mutation in various arthropods have been found to be associated with pesticide resistance. Some of these mutations have been found in the two cattle pests, Rhipicephalus microplus and Haematobia irritans. Sodium channel gene mutations have been associated with pyrethroid resistance ...

  11. The complexity of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus genome characterised through detailed analysis of two BAC clones

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Rmi) a major cattle ectoparasite and tick borne disease vector, impacts on animal welfare and industry productivity. In arthropod research there is an absence of a complete Chelicerate genome, which includes ticks, mites, spiders, scorpions and crusta...

  12. CattleTickBase: An integrated Internet-based bioinformatics resource for Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Rhipicephalus microplus genome is large and complex in structure, making a genome sequence difficult to assemble and costly to resource the required bioinformatics. In light of this, a consortium of international collaborators was formed to pool resources to begin sequencing this genome. We have...

  13. Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus aquaporin as an effective vaccine antigen to protect against cattle tick infestations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A cDNA encoding an aquaporin from the cattle tick, Rhipicephalus microplus, was isolated from transcriptomic studies. Bioinformatic analysis indicates this aquaporin, designated RmAQP1, shows greatest amino acid similarity to the human aquaporin 7 family. Members of this family of water-conducting c...

  14. Role of Rhipicephalus microplus cheliceral receptors in gustation and host differentiation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhipicephalus microplus is considered the most economically important ectoparasite of cattle worldwide. It is known that zebuine breeds of cattle are less susceptible to tick infestation than taurine breeds. Contact chemoreceptors in the cheliceral pit sensilla of ticks respond selectively to phagos...

  15. Targeted silencing of the aquaporin 2 gene of rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus reduces tick fitness

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ticks are blood-feeding arthropods that can affect human and animal health both directly by up taking blood and indirectly by transmitting pathogens. The cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus is one of the most economically important ectoparasites of bovines and it is responsible for the t...

  16. Pharmacological characterization of a tyramine receptor from the southern cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The southern cattle fever tick (Rhipicephalus microplus) is a hematophagous external parasite that vectors the causative agents (Babesia spp.), which results in cattle fever or red water fever. The southern cattle fever tick is a threat to the cattle industry in many locations throughout the world. ...

  17. Gene's Organ Transcriptome of the southern Cattle Fever Tick, Rhipicephalus microplus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The southern cattle fever tick (SCFT), Rhipicephalus microplus, is considered the most economically important ectoparasite of livestock worldwide and ranks sixth among the most pesticide resistant arthropods globally. This one-host hard tick is a vector of the infectious agents causing bovine babesi...

  18. Expression of 6-Cys gene superfamily defines babesia bovis sexual stage development within rhipicephalus microplus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Babesia bovis, an intra-erythrocytic tick-borne apicomplexan protozoan, is one of the agents of bovine babesiosis. Its life cycle includes sexual reproduction within cattle fever ticks, Rhipicephalus spp. Six B. bovis 6-Cys gene superfamily members were previously identified (A, B, C, D, E, F) and t...

  19. Assembled contigs of the synganglion transcriptome from an Australian population of the cattle tick, Rhipicephalus microplus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In a collaboration with National Center for Genome Resources and University of Texas at El Paso researchers, we sequenced and assembled the transcriptome of the synganglion of the Texas strain (Deutsch) of the cattle tick Rhipicephalus microplus. This transcriptome contains 43, 468 sequences and wa...

  20. Assembled contigs of the synganglion transcriptome from a Texas population of the cattle tick, Rhipicephalus microplus.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In a collaboration with National Center for Genome Resources and University of Texas at El Paso researchers, we sequenced and assembled the transcriptome of the synganglion of the Texas strain (Deutsch) of the cattle tick Rhipicephalus microplus. This transcriptome contains 43, 468 sequences and wa...

  1. Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus strain Deutsch, whole genome shotgun sequencing project first submission of genome sequence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The size and repetitive nature of the Rhipicephalus microplus genome makes obtaining a full genome sequence difficult. Cot filtration/selection techniques were used to reduce the repetitive fraction of the tick genome and enrich for the fraction of DNA with gene-containing regions. The Cot-selected ...

  2. Rhipicephalus microplus strain Deutsch, whole genome shotgun sequencing project Version 2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, has a genome over 2.4 times the size of the human genome, and with over 70% of repetitive DNA, this genome would prove very costly to sequence at today's prices and difficult to assemble and analyze. Cot filtration/selection techniques were used ...

  3. Peculiarities of metabolism of anthracene and pyrene by laccase-producing fungus Pycnoporus sanguineus H1.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuanzhen; Wang, Yan; Wu, Shijin; Qiu, Lequan; Gu, Li; Li, Jingjing; Zhang, Bao; Zhong, Weihong

    2014-01-01

    The metabolic peculiarities of anthracene and pyrene by Pycnoporus sanguineus H1 were investigated. The fungus H1 could grow on potato dextrose agar plates with anthracene and anthraquinone as carbon sources. In liquid medium, the strain degraded 8.5% of anthracene as the sole carbon source, with no ligninolytic enzymes detected, indicating that intracellular catabolic enzymes might be responsible for the initial oxidation of anthracene. When bran was added to the medium, the degradation rate of anthracene and pyrene increased to 71.3% and 30.2%, respectively, and the laccase activities increased to a maximal value of 501.2 and 587.6 U/L, respectively. By gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis, anthraquinone was detected as the unique intermediate product of anthracene oxidation, with a yield molar ratio of 0.3. In vitro experiments showed that the extracellular culture fluid containing laccase transformed anthracene to anthraquinone with a yield molar ratio of 1.0, which was less than that of the in vivo experiment, indicating that anthraquinone could be further metabolized by the strain. Pyrene could not be oxidized by culture fluid. These results showed that both extracellular laccase and intracellular catabolic enzymes might play an important role in the initial oxidation of anthracene, whereas pyrene could be only oxidized by intracellular catabolic enzymes through cometabolism.

  4. Heavy metals removal in fixed-bed column by the macro fungus Pycnoporus sanguineus.

    PubMed

    Zulfadhly, Z; Mashitah, M D; Bhatia, S

    2001-01-01

    The ability of Pycnoporus sanguineus to adsorb heavy metals from aqueous solution was investigated in fixed-bed column studies. The experiments were conducted to study the effect of important design parameters such as column bed height, flow rate and initial concentration of solution. The breakthrough profiles were obtained in these studies. A mathematical model based on external mass transfer and pore diffusion was used for the prediction of mass transfer coefficient and effective diffusivity of metals in macro-fungi bed. Experimental breakthrough profiles were compared with the simulated breakthrough profiles obtained from the mathematical model. Bed Depth Service Time (BDST) model was used to analyse the experimental data and evaluated the performance of biosorption column. The BDST model parameters needed for the design of biosorption columns were evaluated for lead, copper and cadmium removal in the column. The columns were regenerated by eluting the metal ions using 0.1 M hydrochloric acid solution after the adsorption studies. The columns were subjected to repeated cycles of adsorption of same metal ions and desorption to evaluate the removal efficiency after adsorption-desorption.

  5. Statistical optimization of pigment production by Monascus sanguineus under stress condition.

    PubMed

    Dikshit, Rashmi; Tallapragada, Padmavathi

    2014-01-01

    Natural pigments are produced by the Monascus sp., which are used for coloring food substances. The intent of this study was to optimize the pigment yield and biomass produced from the unexplored Monascus sanguineus in submerged culture under stress conditions. For inducing thermal stress, the spores were incubated at various temperatures at higher ranges. For inducing osmotic stress, varied concentrations of NaCl, glycerol, and peptone were used. The medium components were optimized by response surface methodology (RSM). The combined effects of the four medium constituents mentioned were studied using a 2⁴ full factorial central composite design (CCD). The relationships between the predicted values and actual values, independent variable, and the response were calculated according to a second-order quadratic model. It was deduced that the variable with the leading effect was the linear effect of glycerol concentration. Furthermore, the quadratic effects of peptone and the interactive effects of temperature and glycerol were more noteworthy than other factors. The optimum values for the test variables in coded factors were found to be spores treated with 70°C for temperature, 0.25 M for glycerol, 0.51% (w/v) for peptone, and 1.25% (w/v) for NaCl, corresponding to a maximum red pigment yield of 55.67 color value units (CVU)/mL. With optimized conditions, the pigment yield was almost three times the yield observed with the control.

  6. Knockdown of the rhipicephalus microplus cytochrome c oxidase subunit III gene is associated with a failure of anaplasma marginale transmission

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhipicephalus microplus is an obligate hematophagous ectoparasite of cattle and an important biological vector of Anaplasma marginale in tropical and subtropical regions. The primary determinants for Anaplasma transmission are infection of tick gut epithelial cells followed by infection of salivary ...

  7. Soil quality influences efficacy of Melia azedarach (Sapindales: Meliaceae), fruit extracts against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Acari: Ixodidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hexane extract of chinaberry, Melia azedarach L., unripe fruits obtained from different municipalities of Goias state in Brazil were evaluated on the southern cattle fever tick, Rhipicephalus microplus (Canestrini), engorged females. Hexanic extracts were assayed in decreasing concentrations from 0....

  8. Acaricidal activity of extracts from the leaves and aerial parts of Neoglaziovia variegata (Bromeliaceae) on the cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus.

    PubMed

    Dantas, A C S; Machado, D M R; Araujo, A C; Oliveira-Junior, R G; Lima-Saraiva, S R G; Ribeiro, L A A; Almeida, J R G S; Horta, M C

    2015-06-01

    This experiment was carried out to study the bioacaricidal activity of Neoglaziovia variegata against engorged females of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus. The mortality and fecundity of groups of engorged adult females exposed to different concentrations of ethanol, hexane, chloroform, and ethyl acetate extracts obtained from the leaves and aerial parts of N. variegata were evaluated, using three treatments with concentrations of 5, 10 e 25 mg/ml; two controls (distilled water and distilled water with drops of cremophor); with three replicates. The hexane extract of the leaves demonstrated significant results, presenting 94.1% inhibition of oviposition; 0.33% the average percentage of eclosion of eggs; and 99.8% of effectiveness. These results indicate N. variegata, particularly the hexane extract of leaves, as potential alternative control agents of R. (B.) microplus. Pharmacological and chemical studies are continuing in order to characterize the mechanism responsible for this effect.

  9. The ovarian transcriptome of the cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, feeding upon a bovine host infected with Babesia bovis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cattle babesiosis is a tick-borne disease of cattle with the most severe form of the disease caused by the apicomplexan, Babesia bovis. Babesiosis is transmitted to cattle through the bite of infected cattle ticks of the genus Rhipicephalus. The most prevalent species is Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, which is distributed throughout the tropical and subtropical countries of the world. The transmission of B. bovis is transovarian and a previous study of the R. microplus ovarian proteome identified several R. microplus proteins that were differentially expressed in response to infection. Through various approaches, we studied the reaction of the R. microplus ovarian transcriptome in response to infection by B. bovis. Methods A group of ticks were allowed to feed on a B. bovis-infected splenectomized calf while a second group fed on an uninfected splenectomized control calf. RNA was purified from dissected adult female ovaries of both infected and uninfected ticks and a subtracted B. bovis-infected cDNA library was synthesized, subtracting with the uninfected ovarian RNA. Four thousand ESTs were sequenced from the ovary subtracted library and annotated. Results The subtracted library dataset assembled into 727 unique contigs and 2,161 singletons for a total of 2,888 unigenes, Microarray experiments designed to detect B. bovis-induced gene expression changes indicated at least 15 transcripts were expressed at a higher level in ovaries from ticks feeding upon the B. bovis-infected calf as compared with ovaries from ticks feeding on an uninfected calf. We did not detect any transcripts from these microarray experiments that were expressed at a lower level in the infected ovaries compared with the uninfected ovaries. Using the technique called serial analysis of gene expression, 41 ovarian transcripts from infected ticks were differentially expressed when compared with transcripts of controls. Conclusion Collectively, our experimental approaches provide

  10. Acaricidal activity of Lippia gracilis essential oil and its major constituents on the tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Elizangela Mércia de Oliveira; Costa, Livio Martins; Pinto, Jessika Andreza Oliveira; Santos, Darlisson de Alexandria; de Araujo, Sandra Alves; Arrigoni-Blank, Maria de Fátima; Bacci, Leandro; Alves, Péricles Barreto; Cavalcanti, Sócrates Cabral de Holanda; Blank, Arie Fitzgerald

    2013-07-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the activity of Lippia gracilis Schauer essential oil obtained from different L. gracilis genotypes and their major components, carvacrol and thymol against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (cattle tick) larvae and engorged females. The larval test was performed parallel to the adult immersion test for engorged females for four L. gracilis genotypes. Similar tests were further performed for their major compounds carvacrol and thymol. Carvacrol (LC50 of 0.22 and 4.46 mg/mL, to larvae and engorged females, respectively) was more efficient than thymol (LC50 of 3.86 and 5.50 mg/mL, to larvae and engorged females, respectively). The lethal concentrations obtained for the isolated essential oil from genotypes LGRA-201 against larvae (1.31 mg/mL) and LGRA-106 against engorged females (4.66 mg/mL) confirmed the acaricidal activity of L. gracilis essential oil and its effectiveness in controlling the southern cattle tick.

  11. Acaricidal activity of leaf extracts of Dalbergia sissoo Roxb. (Fabaceae) against synthetic pyrethroid resistant Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nirbhay Kumar; Jyoti; Vemu, Bhaskar; Prerna, Mranalini; Singh, Harkirat; Dumka, V K; Sharma, S K

    2016-06-01

    Resistance status of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus against synthetic pyrethroids was assessed by larval packet test which revealed level I and II resistance against cypermethrin and deltamethrin, respectively. Adult immersion test was employed to study the acaricidal activity of leaf extracts of Dalbergia sissoo (sheesham) against these ticks. Mortality and fecundity of ticks exposed to sheesham leaf aqueous (SLA) and ethanolic (SLE) extracts were evaluated at concentrations of 0.625, 1.25, 2.5, 5.0 and 10.0% and controls (distilled water and 10% ethanol). Higher acaricidal activity was recorded in SLA with a lower LC50 (95% CL) value of 1.58% (0.92-2.71%) than SLE [5.25% (4.91-5.63%)]. A significant decrease in egg mass weight and reproductive index was recorded in treated ticks along with an increase in percent inhibition of oviposition. A complete inhibition of hatching was recorded in eggs laid by ticks treated with higher concentrations of SLA, whereas, SLE exhibited no effect on hatching percentage.

  12. Acaricidal activity of essential oils from Lippia alba genotypes and its major components carvone, limonene, and citral against Rhipicephalus microplus.

    PubMed

    Peixoto, Magna Galvão; Costa-Júnior, Livio Martins; Blank, Arie Fitzgerald; Lima, Aldilene da Silva; Menezes, Thays Saynara Alves; Santos, Darlisson de Alexandria; Alves, Péricles Barreto; Cavalcanti, Sócrates Cabral de Holanda; Bacci, Leandro; Arrigoni-Blank, Maria de Fátima

    2015-05-30

    The goal of the present study was to evaluate the acaricidal potential of Lippia alba essential oil, citral chemotypes (LA-10 and LA-44 genotypes) and carvone chemotypes (LA-13 and LA-57 genotypes), as well as purified citral and enantiomers of carvone and limonene. Efficacy against Rhipicephalus microplus was assessed by the larval packet and the engorged female immersion tests. Citral chemotypes had greater larvicidal activity than carvone chemotypes, and this was further supported by larvicidal and adulticidal activity of purified citral with LC50 values of 7.0 and 29.8 mg/mL, respectively. While purified enantiomers of carvone exhibited greater larvicidal activity than those of limonene, enantioselectivity of limonene was observed with R-(+) displaying significantly higher efficacy (LC50 of 31.2mg/mL) than S-(-) (LC50 of 54.5mg/mL). The essential oils and purified compounds were much less toxic toward engorged adult females, with the exception of citral, and this may be due to limited cuticular penetration.

  13. Molecular cloning and characterization of a glycine-like receptor gene from the cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Acari: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Flores-Fernández, José Miguel; Gutiérrez-Ortega, Abel; Padilla-Camberos, Eduardo; Rosario-Cruz, Rodrigo; Hernández-Gutiérrez, Rodolfo; Martínez-Velázquez, Moisés

    2014-01-01

    The cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus is the most economically important ectoparasite affecting the cattle industry in tropical and subtropical areas around the world. The principal method of tick control has relied mainly on the use of chemical acaricides, including ivermectin; however, cattle tick populations resistant to ivermectin have recently been reported in Brazil, Mexico, and Uruguay. Currently, the molecular basis for ivermectin susceptibility and resistance are not well understood in R. microplus. This prompted us to search for potential molecular targets for ivermectin. Here, we report the cloning and molecular characterization of a R. microplus glycine-like receptor (RmGlyR) gene. The characterized mRNA encodes for a 464-amino acid polypeptide, which contains features common to ligand-gated ion channels, such as a large N-terminal extracellular domain, four transmembrane domains, a large intracellular loop and a short C-terminal extracellular domain. The deduced amino acid sequence showed around 30% identity to GlyRs from some invertebrate and vertebrate organisms. The polypeptide also contains the PAR motif, which is important for forming anion channels, and a conserved glycine residue at the third transmembrane domain, which is essential for high ivermectin sensitivity. PCR analyses showed that RmGlyR is expressed at egg, larval and adult developmental stages. Our findings suggest that the deduced receptor is an additional molecular target to ivermectin and it might be involved in ivermectin resistance in R. microplus.

  14. Detection of amitraz and malathion resistance in field populations of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Acari: Ixodidae) in Jammu region of India.

    PubMed

    Dutta, S; Godara, R; Katoch, R; Yadav, A; Katoch, M; Singh, N K

    2017-03-01

    Detection of resistance levels against amitraz and malathion in Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus collected from four districts of Jammu region (India) was carried out using the adult immersion test. The regression graphs of probit mortality of ticks plotted against log values of concentration of drugs were utilised for the determination of slope of mortality, lethal concentration for 50% (LC50), 95% (LC95) and resistance factor (RF). On the basis of the data generated on variables (mortality, egg mass weight, reproductive index and percentage inhibition of oviposition) the resistance level was categorised as I, II, III and IV. Out of these four districts, resistance to amitraz was detected at level I in Udhampur (RF = 2.81), Jammu (RF = 2.53) and Samba isolates (RF = 2.24) whereas Rajouri isolate was found susceptible (RF = 1.0). Resistance to malathion was detected at level I in Udhampur (RF = 4.01) and Jammu isolates (RF = 1.76) whereas Rajouri (RF = 0.472) and Samba (RF = 0.199) isolates were found susceptible. The data generated on amitraz and malathion resistance status will help in formulating a tick control strategy in the region.

  15. Identification of potential plant extracts for anti-tick activity against acaricide resistant cattle ticks, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Acari: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Srikanta; Tiwari, Shashi Shankar; Kumar, Bhanu; Srivastava, Sharad; Sharma, Anil Kumar; Kumar, Sachin; Bandyopadhyay, A; Julliet, Sanis; Kumar, Rajesh; Rawat, A K S

    2015-05-01

    To develop an eco-friendly tick control method, seven plant extracts were prepared using 50 and 95% ethanol and evaluated for acaricidal activity against cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus. The adult immersion test was adopted for testing different extracts. Based on 72 h screening criterion, 95% ethanolic extracts of Datura metel fruits and Argemone mexicana whole plant were found effective showing more than 50% mortality of treated ticks. The 95% ethanolic extracts of D. metel fruits and A. mexicana whole plant exhibited acaricidal and reproductive inhibitory effects on treated ticks. The LC90 values of D. metel and A. mexicana extracts were determined as 7.13 and 11.3%, respectively. However, although both the extracts were found efficacious against deltamethrin-resistant IVRI-4 and multi-acaricide resistant IVRI-5 lines of R. (B.) microplus, they caused less mortality than treated ticks of the reference IVRI-I line. Phytochemical studies indicated the presence of alkaloids and glucosides in D. metel fruits and alkaloids, terpenoids, flavonoids and phenolics in A. mexicana whole plant extracts. The results indicated that these botanicals may play an important role in reducing the use of chemicals for tick control and possibly to manage resistant tick population in environment friendly manner.

  16. Laboratory investigations of the effects of predator sex and size on prey selection by the Asian crab, Hemigrapsus sanguineus.

    PubMed

    Brousseau, D J.; Filipowicz, A; Baglivo, J A.

    2001-07-30

    Laboratory studies have shown that the nonindigenous Asian shore crab, Hemigrapsus sanguineus, readily consumes three species of commercial bivalves: blue mussels, Mytilus edulis, soft-shell clams, Mya arenaria, and oysters, Crassostrea virginica. Although crabs can eat bivalves of a wide size range, they preferred the smaller prey (sanguineus can consume large numbers of mussels daily (12.7+/-11.6 mussels day(-1); sexes pooled; N=59). Mussel consumption rates increased with size of the predator and male crabs consumed more mussels than did similarly sized female crabs. The high densities of Hemigrapsus that occur in the wild, their effectiveness as predators of juvenile bivalves and their large appetites suggest an important role for these predators in restructuring the prey communities in habitats into which they have been introduced.

  17. Lipolytic activity of ricin from Ricinus sanguineus and Ricinus communis on neutral lipids.

    PubMed Central

    Lombard, S; Helmy, M E; Piéroni, G

    2001-01-01

    The present study was carried out with a view of determining ricin lipolytic activity on neutral lipids in emulsion and in a membrane-like model. Using 2,3-dimercapto-1-propanol tributyrate (BAL-TC(4)) as substrate, the lipolytic activity of ricin was found to be proportional to ricin and substrate concentrations, with an apparent K(m) (K(m,app)) of 2.4 mM, a k(cat) of 200 min(-1) and a specific activity of 1.0 unit/mg of protein. This work was extended to p-nitrophenyl (pNP) fatty acid esters containing two to twelve carbon atoms. Maximum lipolytic activity was registered on pNP decanoate (pNPC(10)), with a K(m,app) of 3.5 mM, a k(cat) of 173 min(-1) and a specific activity of 3.5 units/mg of protein. Ricin lipolytic activity is pH and galactose dependent, with a maximum at pH 7.0 in the presence of 0.2 M galactose. Using the monolayer technique with dicaprin as substrate, ricin showed a lipolytic activity proportional to the ricin concentration at 20 mN/m, which is dependent on the surface pressure of the lipid monolayer and is detectable up to 30 mN/m, a surface pressure that is of the same order of magnitude as that of natural cell membranes. The methods based on pNPC(10) and BAL-TC(4) hydrolysis are simple and reproducible; thus they can be used for routine studies of ricin lipolytic activity. Ricin from Ricinus communis and R. sanguineus were treated with diethyl p-nitrophenylphosphate, an irreversible serine esterase inhibitor, and their lipolytic activities on BAL-TC(4) and pNPC(10), and cytotoxic activity, were concurrently recorded. A reduction in lipolytic activity was accompanied by a decrease in cytotoxicity on Caco2 cells. These data support the idea that the lipolytic activity associated with ricin is relevant to a lipase whose activity is pH and galactose dependent, sensitive to diethyl p-nitrophenylphosphate, and that a lipolytic step may be involved in the process of cell poisoning by ricin. Both colorimetric tests used in this study are sensitive

  18. In vitro evaluation of acaricidal activity of novel green silver nanoparticles against deltamethrin resistance Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus.

    PubMed

    Avinash, B; Venu, R; Alpha Raj, M; Srinivasa Rao, K; Srilatha, Ch; Prasad, T N V K V

    2017-04-15

    An investigation was undertaken to study, for the first time, in vitro acaricidal activity of green silver nanoparticles on deltamethrin resistance Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus. The compounds tested were neem coated silver nanoparticles (N-Ag NPs), deltamethrin neem coated silver nanoparticles (DN-Ag NPs), 2, 3 dehydrosalannol (2,3 DHS), 2, 3 DHS coated silver nanoparticles (2, 3-DHS-Ag NPs), Quercetin dihydrate (QDH) and QDH coated silver nanoparticles (QDH-Ag NPs). Also included in this study, for the purpose of comparison, were neem leaf extract (NLE), silver nitrate (AgNO3) and deltamethrin (D). Acaricidal activity on larvae and adults of R. (B.) microplus was tested by larval packet test (LPT) and adult immersion test (AIT) respectively. In the LPT, 100% mortality was obtained at concentrations (ppm) of 360, 6000, 260, 200, 50, 300, 85, 600 and 200 for the compounds, D, NLE, Ag NO3, N-Ag NPs, DN-Ag NPs, 2, 3 DHS, 2, 3 DHS-Ag NPs, QDH, QDH-Ag NPs respectively. In AIT, the proportions of mortality and oviposition inhibition were proportionate but the reproductive index was inversely proportional to the concentration of the compounds used. The effect of DN-Ag NPs on mortality was the highest (93.33%) at 50ppm concentration. The mean reproductive index (0.01) and oviposition inhibition (99.16%) values were statistically significant when compared to control group. DN-Ag NPs showed significantly (P<0.05) lower LC50 (3.87ppm; 21.95ppm) and LC99 (53.05ppm; 90.06ppm) values against both the larvae and adults of R. (B.) microplus. The oviposition inhibiting ability of various compounds was determined to assess the reproductive performance of adult female ticks. The DN-Ag NPs had potent oviposition inhibitory activity with significantly lower IC50 and IC99 values compared to the rest of the treatments at 0.034 and 51.07ppm respectively. These results showed that the DN-Ag NPs had significant acaricidal activity against R. (B.) microplus.

  19. Rotenoid content and in vitro acaricidal activity of Tephrosia vogelii leaf extract on the tick Rhipicephalus appendiculatus.

    PubMed

    Kalume, M K; Losson, B; Angenot, L; Tits, M; Wauters, J N; Frédérich, M; Saegerman, C

    2012-11-23

    This study aimed to determine the rotenoid content of leaf extracts of the white (TVW) and purple (TVP) varieties of Tephrosia vogelii, both collected in North-Kivu Province, Democratic Republic of Congo and to evaluate their in vitro acaricidal efficacy on the tick Rhipicephalus appendiculatus. The high performance liquid chromatography analysis of rotenoid compounds from those extracts revealed that the contents of rotenone and deguelin were respectively higher in the leaves of TVW (0.044% and 1.13%) than in TVP (0.014% and 0.66%). Batches of 20 live adult ticks were immersed for 15 min in six different doses of each plant extract (0.625; 1.25; 2.5; 5; 10 and 20mg/mL of distilled water) and in the solution of Milbitraz(®) (12.5%m/v emulsifiable concentrate of amitraz) as a positive control. Additionally 9.5% ethanol and distilled water control groups were included. Tick mortalities were recorded every 24h for 5 days. The results indicated that there was no significant difference (P>0.05) between the acaricidal effect of Milbitraz(®) and the plant material used at a dose of at least 2.5 or 5mg/mL for TVW and TVP respectively. However, the dose response relationship determined at the fifth day after treatment showed a similar acaricidal effect for the two plant varieties with similar lethal dose 50 (LD(50)) of 0.83 and 0.81 mg/mL for TVW and TVP respectively. It is concluded that T. vogelii leaves may be used for the control of R. appendiculatus in areas where synthetic acaricides are either not available or affordable. However, T. vogelii extract should be sprayed in order to limit the potential risks of ecotoxicity linked to rotenoid compounds.

  20. First report of fluazuron resistance in Rhipicephalus microplus: a field tick population resistant to six classes of acaricides.

    PubMed

    Reck, José; Klafke, Guilherme Marcondes; Webster, Anelise; Dall'Agnol, Bruno; Scheffer, Ramon; Souza, Ugo Araújo; Corassini, Vivian Bamberg; Vargas, Rafael; dos Santos, Julsan Silveira; Martins, João Ricardo de Souza

    2014-03-17

    The control of the cattle tick Rhipicephalus microplus is based mainly on the use of chemical acaricides, which has contributed to the emerging problem of selection of resistant tick populations. Currently, there are six main classes of acaricides commercially available in Brazil to control cattle ticks, with fluazuron, a tick growth regulator with acaricidal properties, being the only active ingredient with no previous reports of resistance. Ticks (designated the Jaguar strain) were collected in a beef cattle ranch located at Rio Grande do Sul state, Southern Brazil, after a complaint of fluazuron treatment failure. To characterise the resistance of this strain against acaricides, larval tests were performed and showed that the Jaguar strain was resistant to all of the drugs tested: cypermethrin (resistance ratio, RR=31.242), chlorpyriphos (RR=103.926), fipronil (RR=4.441), amitraz (RR=11.907) and ivermectin (3.081). A field trial was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of fluazuron treatment in heifers that had been experimentally infested with the Jaguar or a susceptible strain. Between 14 and 28 days after treatment, the average efficacy in cattle experimentally infested with the susceptible strain was 96%, while for the Jaguar strain the efficacy was zero. Additionally, the Jaguar strain response to fluazuron was evaluated in vitro using a modified adult immersion test (AIT) and the artificial feeding assay (AFA). With the AIT, 50 ppm of fluazuron inhibited 99% of larvae hatching in the susceptible strain (POA) and less than 50% in the Jaguar strain. Results of the AFA showed a larval hatching rate of 67% at 2.5 ppm of fluazuron with the Jaguar strain; conversely, only 3% of larvae of the susceptible strain hatched at the same fluazuron concentration. The results showed here demonstrated the first case of fluazuron resistance in R. microplus and the first tick population resistant to six classes of acaricides in Brazil.

  1. Stimulation of the Antioxidative and Antimicrobial Potential of the Blood Red Bracket Mushroom Pycnoporus sanguineus (Higher Basidiomycetes).

    PubMed

    Jaszek, Magdalena; Osinska-Jaroszuk, Monika; Sulej, Justyna; Matuszewska, Anna; Stefaniuk, Dawid; Maciag, Kamil; Polak, Jolanta; Matuszewski, Lukasz; Grzywnowicz, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    The antioxidative and antibacterial properties of low-molecular-weight secondary metabolite subfractions (ex-LMS) from cultures of Pycnoporus sanguineus cultivated under different temperature conditions (25°C [ex-LMSa] and 30°C [ex-LMSb]) were assessed. The antioxidative properties were studied using chemiluminometric measurement, an ABTS assay, and a DPPH reduction rate assay with Trolox and ascorbic acid as the control. The values noted for the ex-LMSb were significantly higher than those for ex-LMSa: 97%, 52%, and 31% for chemiluminometric measurement, the ABTS assay, and the DPPH assay, respectively, at a concentration of 50 µg/mL. Half-maximal effective concentrations reached 4.17 µg/mL for chemiluminometric measurement, 47.25 µg/mL for the ABTS assay, and 51.46 µg/mL for DPPH assay. Toxicity tests against Vibrio fischeri yielded 99.8% for ex-LMSa and 99.85% for ex-LMSb. Antibacterial activity toward Staphylococcus aureus was observed in the ex-LMSb fractions (inhibition zone, 23.5 mm; minimum inhibitory concentration, 0.12 mg/mL). Scanning electron microscopy images exhibited severe disruption of the bacterial cells treated with ex-LMSb compared with the control. The results obtained suggest that the extracellular fluid isolated from P. sanguineus-submerged cultures might be a good source of antioxidative and antibacterial compounds. In addition, the increase in the culture temperature evidently enhanced the bioactive properties of the preparation.

  2. In vitro acaricidal activity of Murraya koenigii (L.) Spreng (Rutaceae) extracts against synthetic pyrethroid-resistant Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nirbhay Kumar; Jyoti; Vemu, Bhaskar; Singh, Harkirat; Prerna, Mranalini; Daundkar, Prashant S; Sharma, S K; Dumka, V K

    2015-04-01

    Larval packet test was used for detection of resistance status against cypermethrin and deltamethrin, the most commonly used synthetic pyrethroids in Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus collected from Faridkot district, Punjab (India). The slope of mortality, lethal concentration for 50 % (LC50) and resistance levels were determined from the regression graphs of probit mortality of ticks plotted against log values of increasing concentrations of cypermethrin and deltamethrin. Results indicated presence of resistance of levels I and II against cypermethrin (resistance factor (RF) = 2.82) and deltamethrin (RF = 8.44), respectively. Adult immersion test was used to assess the acaricidal activity of aqueous (MLAq), ethanol (MLE), chloroform (MLC), acetone (MLA) and hexane (MLH) extracts of leaves of Murraya koenigii against these synthetic pyrethroid (SP)-resistant engorged adult females of R. (B.) microplus by determination of per cent adult mortality, reproductive index (RI), per cent inhibition of oviposition (%IO) and hatching rate. The per cent mortality caused by various extracts at concentrations ranging from 0.625 to 10.0% varied from 0.0 to 100.0% with maximum per cent mortality of 10.0, 100.0, 70.0, 40.0 and 10.0 recorded against MLAq, MLE, MLC, MLA and MLH, respectively. Among all extracts, the highest acaricidal property against SP-resistant R. (B.) microplus was exhibited by the MLE as it showed the minimum LC50 [95% confidence limit (CL)] values of 2.97% (2.82-3.12%), followed by MLC as 10.26% (8.84-11.91 %) and MLA as 18.22% (16.18-20.52%). The average egg mass weight recorded in live ticks treated with various concentrations of different extracts was lower than the respective control group ticks and was significantly (p < 0.01) lower in ticks treated with MLH extract. However, no significant effect on hatchability of eggs of treated groups when compared to control was recorded. A significant (p < 0.05) decrease in the RI was recorded in

  3. Laboratory evaluation of verbutin as a synergist of acaricides against larvae of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Acari: Ixodidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Synergistic effects of verbutin, a member of aryl alkynyl derivatives, to three commonly used acaricides were evaluated with the modified Food and Agricultural Organization Larval Packet Test (FAO-LPT) against both susceptible and resistant strains of the southern cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilu...

  4. Research and development of anti-tick vaccines for use in Texas and Puerto Rico Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus control programs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This year marks the first time anti-tick vaccination will be used in the United States and Puerto Rico to control, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus and R. annulatus. The 110-year-old Cattle Fever Tick Eradication Program has eradicated the southern cattle fever tick from the majority of the Unite...

  5. Inhibitor Profile of bis(n)-tacrines and N-methylcarbamates on Acetylcholinesterase from Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus and Phlebotomus papatasi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Bm), and the sand fly, Phlebotomus papatasi (Pp), are disease vectors to cattle and humans, respectively. The purpose of this study was to characterize the inhibitor profile of acetylcholinesterases from Bm (BmAChE1) and Pp (PpAchE) compared to h...

  6. Acetylcholinesterase 1 in populations of organophosphate-resistant North American strains of the cattle tick, Rhipicephalus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhipicephalus microplus, the cattle fever tick, is a global economic problem to the cattle industry due to direct infestation of cattle and pathogens transmitted during feeding. Cattle fever tick outbreaks continue to occur along the Mexico-U.S. border even though the tick has been eradicated from t...

  7. Genetic factors potentially reducing fitness cost of organophosphate-insensitive acetylcholinesterase(s) in Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Acari: Ixodidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acaricidal activity of organophosphate (OP) and carbamate acaricides is believed to result from inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Previous studies in Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus demonstrated the presence of three presumptive AChE genes (BmAChEs). Biochemical characterization of re...

  8. Acetylcholinesterases of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus and Phlebotomus papatasi: Gene identification, expression and biochemical properties of recombinant proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Bm) is a vector of bovine babesiosis and anaplasmosis. Tick resistance to organophosphate (OP) acaricide involves acetylcholinesterase (AChE) insensitivity to OP and metabolic detoxification. In vitro expression of Bm genes encoding AChE allowed biochemical chara...

  9. Acetylcholinesterase of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus and Phlebotomus papatasi: Gene identification, expression, and biochemical properties of recombinant proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Bm) ticks are vectors of bovine babesiosis and anaplasmosis. Tick resistance to organophosphate (OP) acaricide involves acetylcholinesterase (AChE) insensitivity to OP and metabolic detoxification. Sequencing and in vitro expression of Bm genes encoding AChE allo...

  10. Integrated control of the southern cattle fever tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, in Puerto Rico using new and alternative products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Puerto Rico (PR) is plagued by the southern cattle fever tick (SCFT), Rhipicephalus microplus, which is considered the most economically important external parasite of livestock worldwide. A research coalition involving the livestock industry in PR, the PR Department of Agriculture (PR-DA), and the...

  11. Reduced efficacy of commercial acaricides against populations of resistant cattle tick Rhipicephalus microplus from two municipalities of Antioquia, Colombia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two distant Antioquian cattle farms where systemic and topical acaricides had previously failed to control infestations by Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus were studied. An initial in vivo study was conducted using single subcutaneous injections with a long-acting formulation of ivermectin (630 µ...

  12. Acetylcholinesterase 1 in populations of organophosphate resistant North American strains of the cattle tick, Rhipicephalus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In a collaboration with Purdue University researchers, we sequenced a 143,606 base pair Rhipicephalus microplus BAC library clone that contained the coding region for acetylcholinesterase 1 (AChE1). Sequencing was by Sanger protocols and the final assembly resulted in 15 contigs of varying length, e...

  13. Aquaporin 2 of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus as a potential target to control ticks and tick-borne parasites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In a collaboration with Washington State University and ARS-Pullman, WA researchers, we identified and sequenced a 1,059 base pair Rhipicephalus microplus transcript that contained the coding region for a water channel protein, Aquaporin 2 (RmAQP2). The clone sequencing resulted in the production of...

  14. Collection of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I gene sequences from Rhipicephalus ticks from various geographic locations around the world

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Determining the origin of the cattle tick, Rhipicephalus microplus, will be helpful to the effort to find biological control agents. Molecular phylogenetics can assist in this determination. Thus, we sequenced and assembled partial gene sequences from the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I coding r...

  15. Molecular and functional characterization of the first tick CAP2b (periviscerokinin) receptor from Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cDNA of the receptor for CAP2b/periviscerokinin (PVK) neuropeptides, designated Rhimi-CAP2b-R, was cloned from synganglia of tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus. This receptor is the ortholog of the insect CAP2b/PVK receptor, as concluded from analyses of the predicted protein sequence, ph...

  16. Transcriptome database derived from the Texas Deutsch outbreak strain population of the cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Southern cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, vectors Babesia bovis and B. bigemina, which are the protozoans causing cattle fever, a disease that is responsible for significant production losses to cattle producers in much of Africa, Central and South America, and Australia. We ini...

  17. Prediction of G protein-coupled receptor encoding sequences from the synganglion transcriptome of the cattle tick, Rhipicephalus microplus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, is a pest which causes multiple health complications in cattle. The G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) super-family presents an interesting target for developing novel tick control methods. However, GPCRs share limited sequence similarity among or...

  18. Structure Elucidation at the Nanomole-Scale. 1. Trisoxazole Macrolides and Thiazole-containing Cyclic Peptides from the Nudibranch Hexabranchus sanguineus

    PubMed Central

    Dalisay, Doralyn S.; Rogers, Evan W.; Edison, Arthur S.; Molinski, Tadeusz F.

    2009-01-01

    A single specimen of Hexabranchus sanguineus, a nudibranch from the Indo-Pacific that is known to sequester kabiramides B, C and other trisoxazole macrolides, yielded new kabiramide analogs – 9-desmethylkabiramide B and 33-methyltetrahydrohalichondramide – and two new unexpected thiazole-containing cyclic peptides in sub-micromole amounts. The structures of these cyclic peptides were determined by analyses of 1D and 2D NMR spectra recorded with a state-of-the-art 1-mm 1H NMR high-temperature superconducting micro-cryoprobe, together with mass spectra. In addition to two proline residues, each peptide contains a thiazole- or oxazole-modified amino acid residue, together with conventional amino acid residues. All of the amino acid residues were L- as determined by Marfey’s analysis of the acid hydrolysates of the peptides. This is the first report of cyclic thiazole peptides from H. sanguineus. Since thiazole-oxazole modified peptides are typically associated with cyanobacteria and tunicates, the finding may imply a dietary component of the H. sanguineus that was previously overlooked. PMID:19254038

  19. Acaricidal activity of Cymbopogon winterianus, Vitex negundo and Withania somnifera against synthetic pyrethroid resistant Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nirbhay Kumar; Jyoti; Vemu, Bhaskar; Nandi, Abhijit; Singh, Harkirat; Kumar, Rajender; Dumka, V K

    2014-01-01

    Detection of resistance levels against cypermethrin and deltamethrin, the most commonly used synthetic pyrethroids (SPs) against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus collected from Moga, Punjab (India) was carried out using larval packet test. Results indicated the presence of resistance of level I and III against cypermethrin (resistance factors (RF) = 4.67) and deltamethrin (RF = 34.2), respectively. Adult immersion test was used to assess the acaricidal activity of aqueous and ethanolic extracts of leaves of Cymbopogon winterianus, Vitex negundo, and Withania somnifera along with roots of V. negundo against the SP resistant engorged females of R. (B.) microplus. The efficacy of various extracts was assessed by estimation of percent adult mortality, reproductive index (RI), percent inhibition of oviposition (%IO), and hatching rate. A concentration dependent increase in tick mortality was recorded which was more marked with various ethanolic extracts, and highest mortality was recorded in ticks treated with ethanolic extract of leaves of C. winterianus. The LC50 values were determined by applying regression equation analysis to the probit transformed data of mortality for various aqueous and ethanolic extracts. Acaricidal property was recorded to be higher in ethanolic extracts, and high activity was found with the ethanolic extract of leaves of C. winterianus with LC50 (95% CL) values of 0.46% (0.35-0.59%), followed by W. somnifera as 5.21% (4.45-6.09%) and V. negundo as 7.02% (4.58-10.74%). The egg mass weight of the live ticks treated with different concentrations of the various extract was significantly (p < 0.01) lower than that of control ticks; consequently, the RI and the %IO value of the treated ticks were reduced. Further, complete inhibition of hatching was recorded in eggs laid by ticks treated with ethanolic extracts of leaves of V. negundo and aqueous extracts of leaves of W. somnifera. The results of the current study indicate that extracts of C

  20. The mitochondrial genome of a Texas outbreak strain of the cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, derived from whole genome sequencing Pacific Biosciences and Illumina reads

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cattle fever tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus is one of the most significant medical veterinary pests in the world, vectoring several serious livestock diseases negatively impacting agricultural economies of tropical and subtropical countries around the world. We assembled the complete ...

  1. Acaricide resistance and strategies to mitigate economic impact of the southern cattle fever tick (Rhipicephalus microplus) on livestock production systems in the Americas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND: The southern cattle fever tick (SCFT), Rhipicephalus microplus, is considered the most economically important external parasite of livestock worldwide. SCFT populations resistant to acaricides complicate efforts to enhance the productivity of livestock. Here, acaricide resistance is summ...

  2. Virulence of Mexican isolates of entomopathogenic fungi upon Rhipicephalus-Boophilus microplus larvae and the efficacy of conidia formulations to reduce larval tick density under field conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The first objective was laboratory evaluation of the virulence of 53 Mexican isolates of fungi against larvae of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus. Thirty three isolates of Metarhizium anisopliae var. anisopliae (Metschnickoff) Sorokin (Hypocreales: Clavicipitaceae) and 20 isolates of Isaria (Paec...

  3. Acaricidal activity of Metarhizium anisopliae isolated from paddocks in the Mexican tropics against two populations of the cattle tick Rhipicephalus microplus.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Salas, A; Alonso-Díaz, M A; Alonso-Morales, R A; Lezama-Gutiérrez, R; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, J C; Cervantes-Chávez, J A

    2017-03-01

    The acaricidal effects of 55 strains of Metarhizium anisopliae (Metschnikoff) Sorokin, 1883 (Hypocreales: Clavicipitaceae) isolated from paddocks of cattle farms were evaluated in two Rhipicephalus microplus (Canestrini 1887) (Ixodida: Ixodidae) populations, of which one was multi-resistant and one was susceptible to chemical acaricides. Percentage mortality and reproductive efficiency indices in R. microplus were evaluated by adult immersion tests at a dose of 1 × 10(8) conidia/mL for each fungal strain. Some strains were selected to calculate lethal concentrations to kill 50% (LC50 ) and 99% (LC99 ) of engorged ticks. Strains MaV22, MaV26 and MaV55 induced 100% mortality in R. microplus on day 14. Strains MaV05, MaV09 and MaV22 caused mortality of >90% from day 12 onward in both tick populations. The most effective acaricidal fungal strain, MaV55, inhibited egg laying by 54.86 and 55.86% in acaricide-resistant and -susceptible R. microplus populations, respectively. None of the fungal strains had statistically significant effects on larval hatching. In conclusion, nine strains of M. anisopliae demonstrated high acaricidal effects against R. microplus and reduced its egg laying. No differences in acaricidal effects were observed between the two populations of ticks tested.

  4. Bioinformatic prediction of G protein-coupled receptor encoding sequences from the transcriptome of the foreleg, including the Haller's organ, of the cattle tick, Rhipicephalus australis.

    PubMed

    Munoz, Sergio; Guerrero, Felix D; Kellogg, Anastasia; Heekin, Andrew M; Leung, Ming-Ying

    2017-01-01

    The cattle tick of Australia, Rhipicephalus australis, is a vector for microbial parasites that cause serious bovine diseases. The Haller's organ, located in the tick's forelegs, is crucial for host detection and mating. To facilitate the development of new technologies for better control of this agricultural pest, we aimed to sequence and annotate the transcriptome of the R. australis forelegs and associated tissues, including the Haller's organ. As G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are an important family of eukaryotic proteins studied as pharmaceutical targets in humans, we prioritized the identification and classification of the GPCRs expressed in the foreleg tissues. The two forelegs from adult R. australis were excised, RNA extracted, and pyrosequenced with 454 technology. Reads were assembled into unigenes and annotated by sequence similarity. Python scripts were written to find open reading frames (ORFs) from each unigene. These ORFs were analyzed by different GPCR prediction approaches based on sequence alignments, support vector machines, hidden Markov models, and principal component analysis. GPCRs consistently predicted by multiple methods were further studied by phylogenetic analysis and 3D homology modeling. From 4,782 assembled unigenes, 40,907 possible ORFs were predicted. Using Blastp, Pfam, GPCRpred, TMHMM, and PCA-GPCR, a basic set of 46 GPCR candidates were compiled and a phylogenetic tree was constructed. With further screening of tertiary structures predicted by RaptorX, 6 likely GPCRs emerged and the strongest candidate was classified by PCA-GPCR to be a GABAB receptor.

  5. Bioinformatic prediction of G protein-coupled receptor encoding sequences from the transcriptome of the foreleg, including the Haller’s organ, of the cattle tick, Rhipicephalus australis

    PubMed Central

    Munoz, Sergio; Guerrero, Felix D.; Kellogg, Anastasia; Heekin, Andrew M.

    2017-01-01

    The cattle tick of Australia, Rhipicephalus australis, is a vector for microbial parasites that cause serious bovine diseases. The Haller’s organ, located in the tick’s forelegs, is crucial for host detection and mating. To facilitate the development of new technologies for better control of this agricultural pest, we aimed to sequence and annotate the transcriptome of the R. australis forelegs and associated tissues, including the Haller's organ. As G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are an important family of eukaryotic proteins studied as pharmaceutical targets in humans, we prioritized the identification and classification of the GPCRs expressed in the foreleg tissues. The two forelegs from adult R. australis were excised, RNA extracted, and pyrosequenced with 454 technology. Reads were assembled into unigenes and annotated by sequence similarity. Python scripts were written to find open reading frames (ORFs) from each unigene. These ORFs were analyzed by different GPCR prediction approaches based on sequence alignments, support vector machines, hidden Markov models, and principal component analysis. GPCRs consistently predicted by multiple methods were further studied by phylogenetic analysis and 3D homology modeling. From 4,782 assembled unigenes, 40,907 possible ORFs were predicted. Using Blastp, Pfam, GPCRpred, TMHMM, and PCA-GPCR, a basic set of 46 GPCR candidates were compiled and a phylogenetic tree was constructed. With further screening of tertiary structures predicted by RaptorX, 6 likely GPCRs emerged and the strongest candidate was classified by PCA-GPCR to be a GABAB receptor. PMID:28231302

  6. Acaricidal properties of vetiver essential oil from Chrysopogon zizanioides (Poaceae) against the tick species Amblyomma cajennense and Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Acari: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Campos, Roseane Nunes de Santana; Nascimento Lima, Cecília Beatriz; Passos Oliveira, Alexandre; Albano Araújo, Ana Paula; Fitzgerald Blank, Arie; Barreto Alves, Péricles; Nascimento Lima, Rafaely; Albano Araújo, Vinícius; Santana, Alisson Silva; Bacci, Leandro

    2015-09-15

    Ticks are arthropods widely distributed in tropical and subtropical regions, which can transmit infectious agents also responsible for zoonoses. Excessive use of conventional acaricides has resulted in the onset of drug resistance by these parasites, thus the need to use alternative methods for their control. This study evaluated the acaricidal activities of Chrysopogon zizanioides (vetiver) essential oils containing different zizanoic and khuzimol (high and low acidity) acid concentrations on Amblyomma cajennense and Rhipicephalus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae). To this aims, toxicity tests of different concentrations of examined essential oils were conducted on adult females and larval stages. Results showed that the essential oils of C. zizanioides with high and low acidity reduced oviposition of females, eggs hatch and larval survival, being more effective than some commercial products widely used to control these ectoparasites. These results indicate that the C. zizanoides essential oils are promising candidates as acaricidal agents and represent also an add value to vetiver oil with high acidity, which is commercially undervalued in the cosmetic industry.

  7. Molecular cloning and characterization of two novel autophagy-related genes belonging to the ATG8 family from the cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Acari: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Flores Fernández, José Miguel; Gutiérrez Ortega, Abel; Rosario Cruz, Rodrigo; Padilla Camberos, Eduardo; Alvarez, Angel H; Martínez Velázquez, Moisés

    2014-12-01

    Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus is an obligate haematophagous arthropod and the major problem for cattle industry due to economic losses it causes. The parasite shows a remarkable adaptability to changing environmental conditions as well as an exceptional ability to survive long-term starvation. This ability has been related to a process of intracellular protein degradation called autophagy. This process in ticks is still poorly understood and only few autophagy-related (ATG) genes have been characterized. The aim of the present study was to examine the ESTs database, BmiGI, of R. microplus searching for ATG homologues. We predicted five putative ATG genes, ATG3, ATG4, ATG6 and two ATG8s. Further characterization led to the identification of RmATG8a and RmATG8b, homologues of GABARAP and MAP1LC3, respectively, and both of them belonging to the ATG8 family. PCR analyses showed that the expression level of RmATG8a and RmATG8b was higher in egg and larval stages when compared to ovary and midgut from adult ticks. This up-regulation coincides with the period in which ticks are in a starvation state, suggesting that autophagy is active in R. microplus.

  8. Identification of a glycine-rich protein from the tick Rhipicephalus haemaphysaloides and evaluation of its vaccine potential against tick feeding.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jinlin; Gong, Haiyan; Zhou, Yongzhi; Xuan, Xuenan; Fujisaki, Kozo

    2006-12-01

    A cDNA coding a glycine-rich protein was identified from the Rhipicephalus haemaphysaloides tick. The cDNA named here as RH50 was 1,823 bp, including a single open reading frame (ORF) of 1,518 nucleotides. The ORF encodes a polypeptide of 506 amino acid residues with a size of 50 kDa, as calculated by a computer. The predicted amino acid sequence of RH50 showed a low homology to sequences of some known extracellular matrix-like proteins. The native protein was identified in both the fed tick salivary gland lysates and extracts of cement material using the serum against the recombinant protein. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction results showed that RH50 mRNA was only transcribed in partially fed tick salivary glands, not in unfed tick salivary glands or partially fed tick midgut, fat body, or ovary. The differential expression of RH50 protein in fed tick salivary glands was confirmed by immunofluorescence. The low attachment rate both in the adult and nymphal tick, and the high mortality of immature ticks (nymph) feeding on recombinant RH50-immunized rabbits were found. These results show that the RH50 protein could be a useful candidate for anti-tick vaccine development.

  9. Acaricidal activity of the essential oil from Tetradenia riparia (Lamiaceae) on the cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Acari; Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Gazim, Zilda Cristiani; Demarchi, Izabel Galhardo; Lonardoni, Maria Valdrinez Campana; Amorim, Ana Carolina L; Hovell, Ana Maria C; Rezende, Claudia Moraes; Ferreira, Gilberto Alves; de Lima, Edson Luiz; de Cosmo, Fábio Antunes; Cortez, Diogenes Aparício Garcia

    2011-10-01

    Tetradenia riparia (Lamiaceae) is a well-known herbal medicine with a variety of useful properties, including its acaricidal effect. This experiment was carried out to study the bioacaricidal activity of T. riparia essential oil (EO) against engorged females of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Acari; Ixodidae). For this purpose, nine serial concentrations (12.50%, 6.25%, 3.75%, 1.80%, 0.90%, 0.45%, 0.22%, 0.11%, and 0.056% w/v) of T. riparia were used for the adult immersion test (AIT). For the larval packet test (LPT), we used 14 serial concentrations (100.00%, 50.00%, 25.00%, 12.50%, 6.25%, 3.65%, 1.82%, 0.91%, 0.45%, 0.228%, 0.114%, 0.057%, 0.028%, and 0.014% w/v). The results for AIT showed 100.00% and 2.05% mortality, 19.00 and 90.20% for the total number of eggs, egg-laying inhibition of 0.00% and 90.20%, hatchability inhibition of 0.00% and 70.23%, and product effectiveness of 100.00% and 2.89%, respectively. The AIT indicated that the LC(50) and LC(99.9), calculated using the Probit test, were for mortality (%) 0.534g/mL (0.436-0.632) and 1.552g/mL (1.183-1.92); for total number of eggs were 0.449g/mL (0.339-0.558) and 1.76g/mL (1.27-2.248); and for hatchability inhibition were 0.114g/mL (0.0-0.31) and 2.462g/mL (1.501-3.422), respectively. Larvae between 14 and 21days old were fasted and placed in each envelope. Bioassays were performed at 27°±1°C, RH⩾80%. Larval mortality was observed 24h after treatment and showed 10.60-100% mortality in the LPT bioassay. The LPT showed that the LC(50) and LC(99.9) were 1.222g/mL (0.655-1.788) and 11.382g/mL (7.84-14.91), respectively. A positive correlation between T. riparia EO concentration and tick control, was observed by the strong acaricidal effects against R. (B.) microplus, and the mortality rate of ticks was dose-dependent. Our results showed that T. riparia is a promising candidate as an acaricide against resistant strains of R. (B.) microplus.

  10. Reduced Efficacy of Commercial Acaricides Against Populations of Resistant Cattle Tick Rhipicephalus microplus from Two Municipalities of Antioquia, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Arias, Anderson; Villar-Argaiz, David; Chaparro-Gutierrez, Jenny J; Miller, Robert J; Perez de Leon, Adalberto A

    2014-01-01

    Two distant Antioquian cattle farms where systemic and topical acaricides had previously failed to control infestations by Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus were studied. An initial in vivo study was conducted using single subcutaneous injections with a long-acting formulation of ivermectin (630 μg/kg). Injections were made at 3-month intervals on animals at each farm to evaluate the therapeutic and persistent efficacy of ivermectin against R. microplus. Body tick counts and reproductive parameters of semi- or fully engorged females (≥5 mm) were assessed at 10-day intervals, and since no negative control group could be included, values were compared against those for day 0. Although there was an overall reduction of 50%-75% in tick numbers that persisted for 30-40 days, it was not significantly different at one of the farms and not enough to afford protection from severe infestations. The engorgement weight and egg mass weight of ticks from treated animals were significantly lower throughout the 50-day posttreatment period. Egg hatch was not significantly reduced posttreatment and remained at levels of 80%-90%. A random selection of 9 out of 28 commercial formulations of ivermectin sold in Colombia were analyzed by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). All were within the expected labeled concentration (±15% deviation) of 1% and 3.15% ivermectin except for one. A popular unregistered injectable widely used in both farms and labeled as "natural pyrethrin", was found to contain 10.5% ivermectin. An adult immersion test was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of topical acaricides to recommended concentrations of five commercial products and/or their combinations. Efficacy was determined by comparing the reproductive index of each treated group to that of the control group. Cypermethrin (150 ppm) was completely ineffective at both farms. Amitraz (208 ppm) exhibited low and intermediate efficacies of 14% and 56%. The combination of amitraz (100 ppm) and

  11. Reduced Efficacy of Commercial Acaricides Against Populations of Resistant Cattle Tick Rhipicephalus microplus from Two Municipalities of Antioquia, Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Arias, Anderson; Villar-Argaiz, David; Chaparro-Gutierrez, Jenny J; Miller, Robert J; Perez de Leon, Adalberto A

    2014-01-01

    Two distant Antioquian cattle farms where systemic and topical acaricides had previously failed to control infestations by Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus were studied. An initial in vivo study was conducted using single subcutaneous injections with a long-acting formulation of ivermectin (630 μg/kg). Injections were made at 3-month intervals on animals at each farm to evaluate the therapeutic and persistent efficacy of ivermectin against R. microplus. Body tick counts and reproductive parameters of semi- or fully engorged females (≥5 mm) were assessed at 10-day intervals, and since no negative control group could be included, values were compared against those for day 0. Although there was an overall reduction of 50%–75% in tick numbers that persisted for 30–40 days, it was not significantly different at one of the farms and not enough to afford protection from severe infestations. The engorgement weight and egg mass weight of ticks from treated animals were significantly lower throughout the 50-day posttreatment period. Egg hatch was not significantly reduced posttreatment and remained at levels of 80%–90%. A random selection of 9 out of 28 commercial formulations of ivermectin sold in Colombia were analyzed by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). All were within the expected labeled concentration (±15% deviation) of 1% and 3.15% ivermectin except for one. A popular unregistered injectable widely used in both farms and labeled as “natural pyrethrin”, was found to contain 10.5% ivermectin. An adult immersion test was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of topical acaricides to recommended concentrations of five commercial products and/or their combinations. Efficacy was determined by comparing the reproductive index of each treated group to that of the control group. Cypermethrin (150 ppm) was completely ineffective at both farms. Amitraz (208 ppm) exhibited low and intermediate efficacies of 14% and 56%. The combination of amitraz (100

  12. Characterization and expression analysis of B Cell receptor accessory molecule CD79 gene in humphead snapper ( Lutjanus sanguineus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yucong; Yan, Xiuying; Cai, Shuanghu; Cai, Jia; Jian, Jichang; Lu, Yishan; Tang, Jufen; Wu, Zaohe

    2016-04-01

    CD79, a key component of the B cell antigen receptor complex, is composed of CD79α(Igα) and CD79β(Igβ) encoded by mb-1 and B29 respectively, and plays an important role in B cell signaling. In this study, we isolated and characterized mb-1 and B29 from humphead snapper ( Lutjanus sanguineus). Their tissue distribution and expression profiles after stimulations in vitro and in vivo were also investigated. The humphead snapper mb-1 and B29 contain open reading frames of 684 bp and 606 bp, encoding 227 amino acids and 201 amino acids, respectively. Both CD79α and CD79β possess signal peptide, extracellular Ig domain, transmembrane region and immunoreceptor tyrosine kinase activation motif (ITAM). Mb-1 is highly expressed in lymphoid organs (thymus, posterior kidney and spleen) and mucosal-associated lymphoid tissues (gill and intestine), while B29 is mainly detected in posterior kidney, spleen, gill and skin. Furthermore, transcription of mb-1 and B29 in head kidney leucocytes was up-regulated following lipopolysaccharide (LPS), pokeweed mitogen (PWM), and polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (PolyI:C) stimulation, respectively, and their expression level in anterior kidney and spleen was also increased after challenged with formalin-inactived Vibrio harveyi. These results indicated that humphead snapper CD79 molecule might play an important role in immune response to pathogen infection.

  13. Improving the performance of a biofuel cell cathode with laccase-containing culture supernatant from Pycnoporus sanguineus.

    PubMed

    Fokina, Oleksandra; Eipper, Jens; Winandy, Lex; Kerzenmacher, Sven; Fischer, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Laccases are multicopper oxidoreductases that can be used in biofuel cells to improve cathode performance by cathodic oxygen reduction. Here we present a laccase from the ligninolytic white-rot fungus Pycnoporus sanguineus that, in contrast to the Trametes versicolor laccase, can be produced in the absence of inducers in a standard culture medium. After 7days of cultivation the activity of this laccase in culture supernatant reached 2.5U/ml, which is high enough for direct application of the supernatant in biofuel cells. The highest current density of 115.0±3.5μA/cm(2) at 400mV vs. SCE was obtained at pH 5 with a buckypaper cathode with a laccase-containing culture supernatant. The enzyme also showed electrocatalytic activity at pH 6 and 7. These results not only present a new cost-efficient laccase for improving cathode performance, but also show that new laccases with different catalytic properties can be suitable for biofuel cells.

  14. First detection of Ehrlichia canis in Rhipicephalus bursa ticks in Sardinia, Italy.

    PubMed

    Masala, Giovanna; Chisu, Valentina; Foxi, Cipriano; Socolovschi, Christina; Raoult, Didier; Parola, Philippe

    2012-12-01

    Canine monocytic ehrlichiosis is a common and widespread disease. This disease is present in Sardinia year-round because the temperate weather on the island permits the survival of many types of tick vectors. A total of 35 ticks was collected from goats in south-eastern Sardinia, Italy, and tested for Ehrlichia DNA using polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing. This study provides the first evidence of the presence of Ehrlichia canis in Rhipicephalus bursa ticks. The data presented here increase our knowledge of tick-borne diseases in Sardinia and provide a useful contribution toward understanding their epidemiology. The role of R. bursa in the life cycle and transmission of E. canis needs however further investigation.

  15. Natural occurrence of lethal aspergillosis in the cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Acari:Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Miranda-Miranda, E; Cossio-Bayugar, R; Martínez-Ibañez, F; Casasanero-Orduña, R; Folch-Mallol, J

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe an unreported entomopathogenic fungus that naturally infects the cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Acari: Ixodidae). Engorged female ticks, showed symptoms of fungal infection after controlled tick infestation of cattle. Infected ticks developed a distinctive dark colour, a pale mould grew over the cuticle and the ticks eventually died covered with fungal conidiophores. The responsible fungus was isolated and cultured on mycological medium and submitted to microscopic morphology, biochemical phenotyping and 18S rRNA ribotyping analyses, which identified it as aflatoxin-producing Aspergillus flavus. Spores from the cultured fungus were experimentally sprayed over healthy engorged female ticks, obtaining an 80% prevalence of experimental infection of healthy ticks and their egg masses, the larval progeny after incubation under laboratory conditions was also infected. These results demonstrate that A. flavus is the causative agent of the natural fungal disease of the cattle tick R. microplus described here.

  16. Toxicity of DMSO, Triton X 100 and Tween 20 against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) annulatus.

    PubMed

    Ravindran, Reghu; Juliet, Sanis; Gopalan, Ajith Kumar Karapparambu; Kavalimakkil, Amithamol Krishnan; Ramankutty, Sunil Athalathil; Nair, Suresh Narayanan; Narayanan, Priya Manakkulamparambil; Ghosh, Srikanta

    2011-10-01

    The problems associated with synthetic chemical pesticides include resistance, residues, pest resurgence and the adverse effects on non-target organisms. Hence, many ecofriendly newer alternatives are being evaluated among which one of the most important is the use of herbal agents. Many of the plant extracts or its fractions are dissolved in polar or non polar solvents or detergents before tested for acaricidal activity. The solvent or detergent used for dissolving the herbal extract should have little or no acaricidal effects. In the present study, laboratory tests were carried out on engorged female Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) annulatus ticks to detect the toxicity of common diluents such as dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), Tween 20 and Triton X 100 at 1% concentration. The result of the study revealed that least acaricidal activity was with Triton X 100 while the other two inhibited the hatching of eggs laid by treated ticks.

  17. Acaricidal activity of eugenol on Rhipicephalus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae) and Dermacentor nitens (Acari: Ixodidae) larvae.

    PubMed

    de Monteiro, Caio Márcio; Maturano, Ralph; Daemon, Erik; Catunda-Junior, Francisco Eduardo Aragão; Calmon, Fernanda; Senra, Tatiane de Souza; Faza, Aline; de Carvalho, Mário Geraldo

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the acaricidal activity of eugenol, with different solubilizations and concentrations, on Rhipicephalus microplus and Dermacentor nitens larvae and to determine the lethal time. The study consisted of four experiments, and the mortality was assessed using the larval packet test with adaptations. The mortality observed in the first experiment was 100 % for all the groups treated with eugenol solubilized in different solvents. In the second, the hydroethanolic formulation of eugenol was used, and the mortality rates for R. microplus and D. nitens was 100 % starting from the concentration of 5.0 μl/ml. In the third experiment, the mortality was 100 % for larvae of both R. microplus and D. nitens after 1 h of contact. And in the fourth experiment, the mortality was above 90 % and statistically similar (p > 0.05) for the four methods the test evaluated.

  18. Mechanical transmission of lumpy skin disease virus by Rhipicephalus appendiculatus male ticks.

    PubMed

    Tuppurainen, E S M; Lubinga, J C; Stoltsz, W H; Troskie, M; Carpenter, S T; Coetzer, J A W; Venter, E H; Oura, C A L

    2013-02-01

    Lumpy skin disease (LSD) is an economically important, acute or sub-acute, viral disease of cattle that occurs across Africa and in the Middle East. The aim of this study was to investigate if lumpy skin disease virus (LSDV) can be transmitted mechanically by African brown ear ticks (Rhipicephalus appendiculatus Neum.). Laboratory-bred R. appendiculatus males were fed on experimentally infected viraemic 'donor' cattle. Partially fed male ticks were then transferred to feed on an uninfected 'recipient' cow. The recipient animal became viraemic, showed mild clinical signs of LSD and seroconverted. Additionally, R. appendiculatus males were found to transmit LSDV through feeding on skin lacking visible lesions, demonstrating that viraemic animals without lesions at the feeding site of ticks may be a source of infection. This is the first time that transmission of poxviruses by a tick species has been demonstrated and the importance of this mode of transmission in the spread of LSDV in endemic settings is discussed.

  19. First report of fipronil resistance in Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Miller, Robert J; Almazán, Consuelo; Ortíz-Estrada, Martín; Davey, Ronald B; George, John E; De León, Adalberto Peréz

    2013-01-16

    Five strains of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus collected from Tamaulipas Mexico were tested for resistance against several classes of acaricides commonly used. All were resistant to fipronil. Four of five were co-resistant to permethrin and coumaphos in addition to being resistant to fipronil. One strain, El Zamora was found multi-resistant to permethrin, coumaphos, fipronil, and amitraz. Selection with fipronil for 3 generations produced a resistance ratio of 8.3 and 9.4 at the LC(50) and the LC(99) estimates, respectively. Permethrin resistance in El Zamora was possibly linked to elevated esterase (CZEST9) and could be a contributing factor of resistance to fipronil. The implications of resistance for the control of the southern cattle tick in the future are discussed.

  20. Cattle ticks in Cameroon: is Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus absent in Cameroon and the Central African region?

    PubMed

    Awa, D N; Adakal, H; Luogbou, N D D; Wachong, K H; Leinyuy, I; Achukwi, M D

    2015-03-01

    In most parts of the world, ticks are rapidly developing resistance to commonly used acaricides thus rendering control difficult. This constraint is further compounded by the introduction of new species in areas where they did not exist before. Such is the case with the introduction into and rapid spread of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus in some countries of West Africa. With the looming threat of its further spread in the region, the objective of the present study was to update knowledge on cattle ticks in Cameroon. Among 19,189 ticks collected monthly from 60 animals in 5 herds from March 2012 to February 2013, Rh. (B.) decoloratus was the most abundant species with a relative prevalence of 62.2%, followed by Amblyomma variegatum (28.4%), Rh. (B.) annulatus (0.2%), Rh. (B.) geigyi (0.03%), other Rhipicephalus spp. (8.4%) and Hyalomma spp. (0.3%). Rh. (B.) decoloratus and A. variegatum were also the most widely distributed in space. Infestation rate was generally high, with average tick count/animal of about 80 during peak periods. Tick distribution and abundance in the different sites was as varied as the underlying factors, among which the most important were management systems and climatic factors. The effects of rainfall and temperature were confounded by other factors and difficult to evaluate. However, it appears tick development depends among other factors, on a humidity threshold, above which there is not much more effect. Rh. microplus was not found during this study, but more extensive tick collections have to be done to confirm this. In conclusion, cattle tick infestation in Cameroon remains an important cause for concern. Farmers need assistance in the use and management of acaricides in order to increase their efficiency and reduce the development of resistance. Although Rh. microplus was not found, its introduction from other West African countries is imminent if adequate measures, especially in the control and limitation of animal movements

  1. SNP Analysis Infers that Recombination Is Involved in the Evolution of Amitraz Resistance in Rhipicephalus microplus

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Samantha; van der Merwe, Nicolaas A.; Madder, Maxime; Maritz-Olivier, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Rhipicephalus microplus, better known as the Asiatic cattle tick, is a largely invasive ectoparasite of great economic importance due to the negative effect it has on agricultural livestock on a global scale, particularly cattle. Tick-borne diseases (babesiosis and anaplasmosis) transmitted by R. microplus are alarming as they decrease the quality of livestock health and production. In sub-Saharan Africa, cattle represent a major source of meat and milk, but this region of the world is severely affected by the Rhipicephalus microplus tick. The principal method for tick control is the use of chemical acaricides, notably amitraz, which was implemented in the 1990’s after resistance to other acaricides surfaced. However, the efficiency of chemical control is hindered by an increase in the frequency of mutant resistance alleles to amitraz in tick populations. Presently, the only way to assess amitraz resistance is by means of larval packet tests, but this technique is time-consuming and not particularly cost effective. The main aims of this study were three-fold. First, we attempted to correlate two known SNPs in the octopamine/tyramine (OCT/Tyr) receptor with amitraz resistance in South African field samples of R. microplus. Second, we calculated gametic disequilibrium for these SNPs to determine whether they are randomly associated. Lastly, we conducted a study to assess the evolutionary effects of recombination within the OCT/Tyr receptor. Our results confirmed that the two SNPs are associated with amitraz resistance in the South African tick strain, and that they are in gametic disequilibrium. Additionally, recombination was detected in the OCT/Tyr receptor generating two recombinant haplotypes. These results are of concern to farmers in sub-Saharan Africa, and the emergence of amitraz resistance should be closely monitored in future. Therefore, we present a quick and affordable RFLP based diagnostic technique to assess amitraz resistance in field samples of R

  2. Eichhornia crassipes: Agro-waster for a novel thermostable laccase production by Pycnoporus sanguineus SYBC-L1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhixin; Liu, Jiayang; Ning, Yawei; Liao, Xiangru; Jia, Yingmin

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the utilization of an intractable waster of Eichhornia crassipes in laccase production by Pycnoporus sanguineus SYBC-L1. E. crassipes as the sole carbon and nitrogen source was confirmed to produce laccase (7.26 U/g dry substrate). The fermentation medium for the maximum enzyme production was optimized and the laccase was then purified and characterized. The optimized culture medium was 25.1% E. crassipes, 13.9% sawdust, 1.5 mM CuSO4, 40 μM gallic acid, 65% moisture content and initial pH 6.0. A maximum laccase activity of 32.02 U/g dry substrate was detected at 9th day, which was 4.5-fold compared to the initial medium. The molecular mass of the purified Lac-S was 58.4 kDa. The optimum activity of Lac-S for DMP was at pH 3.0 and 70°C. Lac-S showed not only high catalytic activities at low temperature, but also good stabilities toward pH and temperature. The residual catalytic activities of Lac-S were 30%, 40% and 50% at 0°C, 10°C and 20°C, and the half-lives at 50°C, 60°C and 70°C were 21.7, 9.7 and 1.5 h, respectively. The results provide a significant basis for E. crassipes further utilization and Lac-S specific application in harsh industry.

  3. Evaluation of stem aqueous extract and synthesized silver nanoparticles using Cissus quadrangularis against Hippobosca maculata and Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus.

    PubMed

    Santhoshkumar, Thirunavukkarasu; Rahuman, Abdul Abdul; Bagavan, Asokan; Marimuthu, Sampath; Jayaseelan, Chidambaram; Kirthi, Arivarasan Vishnu; Kamaraj, Chinnaperumal; Rajakumar, Govindasamy; Zahir, Abdul Abduz; Elango, Gandhi; Velayutham, Kanayairam; Iyappan, Moorthy; Siva, Chinnadurai; Karthik, Loganathan; Rao, Kokati Venkata Bhaskara

    2012-10-01

    The present study was to determine the efficacies of anti-parasitic activities of synthesized silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) using stem aqueous extract of Cissus quadrangularis against the adult of hematophagous fly, Hippobosca maculata (Diptera: Hippoboscidae), and the larvae of cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Acari: Ixodidae). Contact toxicity method was followed to determine the potential of parasitic activity. Twelve milliliters of stem aqueous extract of C. quadrangularis was treated with 88 ml of 1mM silver nitrate (AgNO(3)) solution at room temperature for 30 min and the resulting solution was yellow-brown color indicating the formation extracellular synthesis of Ag NPs. The synthesized Ag NPs were characterized with UV-visible spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. The synthesized Ag NPs were recorded by UV-visible spectrum at 420 nm and XRD patterns showed the nanoparticles crystalline in nature. FTIR analysis confirmed that the bioreduction of Ag((+)) ions to Ag NPs were due to the reduction by capping material of plant extract. FESEM image of Ag NPs showed spherical and oval in shape. By using the Bragg's Law and Scherrer's constant, the average mean size of synthesized Ag NPs was 42.46 nm. The spot EDX analysis showed the complete chemical composition of the synthesized Ag NPs. The mortality obtained by the synthesized Ag NPs from the C. quadrangularis was more effective than the aqueous extract of C. quadrangularis and AgNO(3) solution (1 mM). The adulticidal activity was observed in the aqueous extract, AgNO(3) solution and synthesized Ag NPs against the adult of H. maculata with LC(50) values of 37.08, 40.35 and 6.30 mg/L; LC(90) values of 175.46, 192.17 and 18.14 mg/L and r(2) values of 0.970, 0.992 and 0.969, respectively. The maximum efficacy showed in the aqueous extract, AgNO(3

  4. Acaricidal activity of five essential oils of Ocimum species on Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus larvae.

    PubMed

    Hüe, T; Cauquil, L; Fokou, J B Hzounda; Dongmo, P M Jazet; Bakarnga-Via, I; Menut, C

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the acaricidal activity on the cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus of essential oils from three Ocimum species. Acaricidal activity of five essential oils extracted from Ocimum gratissimum L. (three samples), O. urticaefolium Roth, and O. canum Sims was evaluated on 14- to 21-day-old Rhipicephalus microplus tick larvae using larval packet test bioassay. These essential oils were analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) showing great variations of their chemical compositions according to the botanical species and even within the O. gratissimum species; the acaricidal activity of their main compounds was also evaluated. The essential oils of O. urticaefolium and O. gratissimum collected in Cameroon were the most efficient with respective LC50 values of 0.90 and 0.98%. The two essential oils obtained from O. gratissimum collected in New Caledonia were partially active at a dilution of 5% while the essential oil of O. canum collected in Cameroon showed no acaricidal activity. The chemical analysis shows five different profiles. Whereas the essential oils of O. urticaefolium from Cameroon and O. gratissimum from New Caledonia contain high amounts of eugenol (33.0 and 22.3-61.0%, respectively), 1,8-cineole was the main component of the oil of an O. canum sample from Cameroon (70.2%); the samples of O. gratissimum oils from New Caledonia are also characterized by their high content of (Z)-β-ocimene (17.1-49.8%) while the essential oil of O. gratissimum collected in Cameroon is mainly constituted by two p-menthane derivatives: thymol (30.5%) and γ-terpinene (33.0%). Moreover, the essential oil of O. urticaefolium showed the presence of elemicin (18.1%) as original compound. The tests achieved with the main compounds confirmed the acaricidal activity of eugenol and thymol with residual activity until 0.50 and 1%, respectively, and revealed the acaricidal property of elemicin

  5. Biotransformation of Endocrine-Disrupting Compounds in Groundwater: Bisphenol A, Nonylphenol, Ethynylestradiol and Triclosan by a Laccase Cocktail from Pycnoporus sanguineus CS43.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Morales, R; Rodríguez-Delgado, M; Gomez-Mariscal, K; Orona-Navar, C; Hernandez-Luna, C; Torres, E; Parra, R; Cárdenas-Chávez, D; Mahlknecht, J; Ornelas-Soto, N

    The biodegradation of organic compounds present in water at trace concentration has become a critical environmental problem. In particular, enzymatic oxidation by fungal laccases offers a promising alternative for efficient and sustainable removal of organic pollutants in water. In this work, the biocatalytic ability of laccases from the Pycnoporus sanguineus CS43 fungus was evaluated. A filtered culture supernatant (laccase cocktail) evidenced an enhanced biotransformation capability to remove common endocrine-disruptor compounds (EDCs), such as bisphenol A, 4-nonylphenol, 17-α-ethynylestradiol and triclosan. A biodegradation of around 89-100 % was achieved for all EDCs using synthetic samples (10 mg L(-1)) and after the enzymatic treatment with 100 U L(-1) (50.3 U mg (-1)). The biodegradation rates obtained were fitted to a first order reaction. Furthermore, enzymatic biocatalytic activity was also evaluated in groundwater samples coming from northwestern Mexico, reaching biotransformation percentages between 55 and 93 % for all tested compounds. As far as we know this is the first study on real groundwater samples in which the enzymatic degradation of target EDCs by a laccase cocktail from any strain of Pycnoporus sanguineus was evaluated. In comparison with purified laccases, the use of cocktail offers operational advantages since additional purification steps can be avoided.

  6. Improving the bioremoval of sulfamethoxazole and alleviating cytotoxicity of its biotransformation by laccase producing system under coculture of Pycnoporus sanguineus and Alcaligenes faecalis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Xu, Qiu-Man; Cheng, Jing-Sheng; Yuan, Ying-Jin

    2016-11-01

    The occurrence of sulfamethoxazole (SMX) in aquatic environment is a health concern. The presence of SMX significantly inhibited the laccase activity of Pycnoporus sanguineus with a lower removal efficiency of SMX. Although a laccase system with 2,20-azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) eliminated 100% SMX within 6h, ABTS might cause an environmental issue. An alternative to SMX elimination is the coculture of Alcaligenes faecalis and P. sanguineus. The SMX removal efficiency at 48h under the coculture with vitamins was higher than that under their pure culture alone, indicating that a coculture was more efficient in eliminating SMX than a pure culture. Only 1% SMX was detected in mycelia, indicating that SMX elimination is achieved primarily through biotransformation rather than adsorption. Laccase production by the coculture effectively inhibited the accumulations of N4-acetyl-SMX and N-hydroxy-SMX and alleviated the cytotoxicity of SMX transformation products. The mixture of SMX and sulfadiazine inhibited their removal efficiency.

  7. Ixodid ticks on domestic animals in Samut Prakan Province, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Nithikathkul, C; Polseela, P; Changsap, B; Leemingsawat, S

    2002-01-01

    The prevalence of tick-harboring domestic animals, tick density, and the species of ticks were studied throughout the year 2000, in Muang Samut Prakan, Bang Phli and Phra Pradaeng districts of Samut Prakan Province. The animals examined were Canis lupus familiaris (450), Bos indicus (cross-bred) (189), Bos taurus (30), Bubalus bubalis (171) and Sus scrofa domestica (450). The total number of collected ticks was 1,491. The pigs did not harbor ticks. The stages of ticks collected were larvae, nymphs and adults. The prevalence rates of tick-harboring were 46% (Canis lupus familiaris), 42.86% (Bos indicus, cross-bred), 33.33% (Bos taurus) and 9.35% (Bubalus bubalis). The tick densities were 2.22 (Bos indicus, cross-bred), 2.16 (Canis lupus familiaris), 1.16 (Bos taurus) and 0.36 (Bubalus bubalis). Only 2 species of ixodid ticks, Boophilus microplus and Rhipicephalus sanguineus, were found. R. sanguineus was the dominant species of tick. The percentage of R. sanguineus was 65.2% and B. microplus was 34.8%. In Muang district, R. sanguineus was the dominant species in C. lupus familiaris; in Bang Phli district, B. microplus was the dominant species in Bos indicus (cross-bred). The density of B. microplus was high in the summer season; the density of R. sanguineus was high in the winter season. The number of ticks depended on the geographic location, animal host and season.

  8. Detection of Babesia bigemina in cattle of different genetic groups and in Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus tick.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, M C S; Oliveira-Sequeira, T C G; Regitano, L C A; Alencar, M M; Néo, T A; Silva, A M; Oliveira, H N

    2008-08-17

    Babesia bigemina infections were investigated in four genetic groups of beef cattle and in Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus engorged female ticks. Blood samples and engorged female ticks were collected from 15 cows and 15 calves from each of the following genetic groups: Nelore, Angus x Nelore, Canchim x Nelore, and Simmental x Nelore. Microscopic examination of blood smears and tick hemolymph revealed that merozoites of B. bigemina (6/60) as well as kinetes of Babesia spp. (9/549) were only detected in samples (blood and ticks, respectively) originated from calves. PCR-based methods using primers for specific detection of B. bigemina revealed 100% infection in both calves and cows, regardless the genetic group. Tick infection was detected by nested-PCR amplifications showing that the frequency of B. bigemina was higher (P<0.01) in female ticks collected from calves (134/549) than in those collected from cows (52/553). The frequency of B. bigemina was similar in ticks collected from animals, either cows or calves, of the four genetic groups (P>0.05).

  9. Structural and biochemical characterization of a recombinant triosephosphate isomerase from Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Jorge; Arreola, Rodrigo; Cabrera, Nallely; Saramago, Luiz; Freitas, Daniela; Masuda, Aoi; da Silva Vaz, Itabajara; Tuena de Gomez-Puyou, Marietta; Perez-Montfort, Ruy; Gomez-Puyou, Armando; Logullo, Carlos

    2011-06-01

    Triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) is an enzyme with a role in glycolysis and gluconeogenesis by catalyzing the interconversion between glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate and dihydroxyacetone phosphate. This enzyme has been used as a target in endoparasite drug development. In this work we cloned, expressed, purified and studied kinetic and structural characteristics of TIM from tick embryos, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (BmTIM). The Km and Vmax of the recombinant BmTIM with glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate as substrate, were 0.47 mM and 6031 μmol min⁻¹ mg protein⁻¹, respectively. The resolution of the diffracted crystal was estimated to be 2.4 Å and the overall data showed that BmTIM is similar to other reported dimeric TIMs. However, we found that, in comparison to other TIMs, BmTIM has the highest content of cysteine residues (nine cysteine residues per monomer). Only two cysteines could make disulfide bonds in monomers of BmTIM. Furthermore, BmTIM was highly sensitive to the action of the thiol reagents dithionitrobenzoic acid and methyl methane thiosulfonate, suggesting that there are five cysteines exposed in each dimer and that these residues could be employed in the development of species-specific inhibitors.

  10. Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus resistant to acaricides and ivermectin in cattle farms of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Vivas, Róger Iván; Pérez-Cogollo, Luis Carlos; Rosado-Aguilar, José Alberto; Ojeda-Chi, Melina Maribel; Trinidad-Martinez, Iris; Miller, Robert John; Li, Andrew Yongsheng; de León, Adalberto Pérez; Guerrero, Félix; Klafke, Guilherme

    2014-01-01

    Ticks and the diseases they transmit cause great economic losses to livestock in tropical countries. Non-chemical control alternatives include the use of resistant cattle breeds, biological control and vaccines. However, the most widely used method is the application of different chemical classes of acaricides and macrocyclic lactones. Populations of the cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, resistant to organophosphates (OP), synthetic pyrethroids (SP), amitraz and fipronil have been reported in Mexico. Macrocyclic lactones are the most sold antiparasitic drug in the Mexican veterinary market. Ivermectin-resistant populations of R. (B.) microplus have been reported in Brazil, Uruguay and especially in Mexico (Veracruz and Yucatan). Although ivermectin resistance levels in R. (B.) microplus from Mexico were generally low in most cases, some field populations of R. (B.) microplus exhibited high levels of ivermectin resistance. The CHPAT population showed a resistance ratio of 10.23 and 79.6 at lethal concentration of 50% and 99%, respectively. Many field populations of R. (B.) microplus are resistant to multiple classes of antiparasitic drugs, including organophosphates (chlorpyrifos, coumaphos and diazinon), pyrethroids (flumethrin, deltamethrin and cypermethrin), amitraz and ivermectin. This paper reports the current status of the resistance of R. (B.) microplus to acaricides, especially ivermectin, in Mexican cattle.

  11. Adrenergic ligands that block oviposition in the cattle tick Rhipicephalus microplus affect ovary contraction.

    PubMed

    Cossío-Bayúgar, Raquel; Miranda-Miranda, Estefan; Fernández-Rubalcaba, Manuel; Narváez Padilla, Verónica; Reynaud, Enrique

    2015-10-12

    The tyraminergic/octopaminergic system is central for the control of arthropod oviposition. Previous works demonstrated that the pharmacological perturbation of this system inhibits oviposition in the cattle tick Rhipicephalus microplus. In this work, we describe a physiologically active whole-mount preparation of the contractile tick ovary that allows the quantitative videometrical analysis of ovary contraction in response to different compounds. Eight adrenergic ligands known to inhibit oviposition, including octopamine and tyramine were tested. These compounds exhibited antagonistic effects; octopamine relaxes the ovary preparation while tyramine induces a very strong contraction. The other adrenergic compounds tested were classified as able to contract or relax ovary muscle tissue. Isoprotenerol has a stronger relaxative effect than octopamine. Tyramine induces the biggest contraction observed of all the compounds tested, followed, in descending amount of contraction, by salbutamol, prazosin, epinastine, clonidine and the acaricide amitraz. The effect of these adrenergic ligands on the ovary preparation, explains why these molecules inhibit tick oviposition and suggest a regulatory mechanism for ovary contraction and relaxation during oviposition. Our results also provide a physiological explanation of the egg-laying inhibition effect of amitraz when used on the cattle tick.

  12. First report of pyrethroid resistance in Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) annulatus larvae (Say, 1821) from Iran.

    PubMed

    Ziapour, Seyyed Payman; Kheiri, Sadegh; Asgarian, Fatemeh; Fazeli-Dinan, Mahmoud; Yazdi, Fariborz; Mohammadpour, Reza Ali; Aarabi, Mohsen; Enayati, Ahmadali

    2016-04-01

    Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) annulatus is one of the most important hard ticks parasitizing cattle in northern Iran. The aim of this study was to evaluate pyrethroid resistance levels of this species from Nur County, northern Iran. The hard ticks were collected through a multistage cluster randomized sampling method from the study area and fully engorged female R. (B.) annulatus were reared in a controlled insectary until they produced larvae for bioassay. Seventeen populations of the hard ticks were bioassayed with cypermethrin and 12 populations with lambda-cyhalothrin using a modified larval packet test (LPT). Biochemical assays to measure the contents/activity of different enzyme groups including mixed function oxidases (MFOs), glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) and general esterases were performed. Population 75 showed a resistance ratio of 4.05 with cypermethrin when compared with the most susceptible field population 66 at the LC50 level. With lambda-cyhalothrin the resistance ratio based on LC50 was 3.67 when compared with the susceptible population. The results of biochemical assays demonstrated significantly elevated levels of GSTs and esterases in populations tested compared with the heterozygous susceptible filed population and a correlation coefficient of these enzymes was found in association to lambda-cyhalothrin resistance. Based on the results, pyrethroid acaricides may operationally fail to control R. (B.) annulatus in North of Iran. This study is the first document of pyrethroid resistance in R. (B.) annulatus populations from Iran.

  13. Assessment of different Lippia sidoides genotypes regarding their acaricidal activity against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus.

    PubMed

    Soares, Alexandra Martins Dos Santos; Penha, Tatiane Aranha; Araújo, Sandra Alves de; Cruz, Elizangela Mércia Oliveira; Blank, Arie Fitzgerald; Costa-Junior, Livio Martins

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to select different genotypes of Lippia sidoides with the highest activity against larvae and engorged females of the tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus. The germplasms studied were LSID006, LSID102, LSID103 and LSID104. The LSID104 genotype, that presented carvacrol as a major constituent, was the germplasm with the worst larvicide effect (LC50 2.99 mg/mL). The LSID006 genotype was the least effective against engorged females (LC50 12.46 mg/mL), and it was chemically similar to the LSID102 genotype, which presented the highest acaricide activity (LC50 2.81 mg/mL). We conclude that chemical similarity of the germplasms was not correlated with acaricide activity against R. (B.) microplus. The essential oil of L. sidoides is a potent natural agent. However, the findings of this work provide a better understanding for product development based on this natural product, which must consider synergic effects or the action of minor compounds.

  14. Unveiling the oxidative metabolism of Rhipicephalus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae) experimentally exposed to entomopathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Tunholi-Alves, Vinícius Menezes; Tunholi Alves, Victor Menezes; da Silva, Jairo Pinheiro; Nora Castro, Rosane; Salgueiro, Fernanda Barbosa; Perinotto, Wendell Marcelo de Souza; Gôlo, Patrícia Silva; Camargo, Mariana Guedes; Angelo, Isabele da Costa; Bittencourt, Vânia Rita Elias Pinheiro

    2016-10-01

    Rhipicephalus microplus is an important tick in tropical regions due to the high economic losses caused by its parasitism. Metarhizium anisopliae and Beauveria bassiana are well-known entomopathogenic fungi that can afflict R. microplus ticks. The development of new targets and strategies to control this parasite can be driven by studies of this tick's physiology. Recently, it was reported that when exposed to adverse physiological conditions, ticks can activate fermentative pathways, indicating transition from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism. Nevertheless, the precise mechanism by which entomopathogenic fungi influence R. microplus metabolism has not been clarified, limiting understanding of the tick-fungus association. Thus, the present study aimed to evaluate the effect of infection of ticks by M. anisopliae and B. bassiana on the amount of selected carboxylic acids present in the hemolymph, enabling increased understanding of changes previously reported. The results showed preservation in the concentrations of oxalic, lactic, and pyruvic acids in the hemolymph 24 and 48 h after dropping from cattle; while there were variations in the concentration of these carboxylic acids after infection of female ticks to M. anisopliae and B. bassiana. Significant increases were observed in the concentration of oxalic and lactic acids and significant reduction of pyruvic acid for both observation times (24 and 48 h) after infection by entomopathogenic fungi. These results indicate that B. bassiana and M. anisopliae infection alters the basal metabolism of R. microplus females, resulting in the activation of fermentative pathways.

  15. Acaricidal activity of aqueous extract and synthesized silver nanoparticles from Manilkara zapota against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus.

    PubMed

    Rajakumar, G; Abdul Rahuman, A

    2012-08-01

    Traditional parasite control is primarily based on the use of chemical acaricides, which unfortunately have many negative side effects. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of plant synthesized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) using aqueous leaf extract of Manilkara zapota to control Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus. The synthesized AgNPs were characterized by UV-vis spectrum, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared and X-ray diffraction. The UV-vis spectrum of the aqueous medium containing silver nanostructures showed a peak at 421 nm corresponding to the surface plasmon resonance band of AgNPs. SEM supports the biosynthesis and characterization of AgNPs with spherical and oval in shape and size of 70-140 nm. Acaricidal activity of aqueous leaf extract of M. zapota and synthesized AgNPs were carried out against R. (B.) microplus and the results showed the LC(50) values of 16.72 and 3.44 mg/L; r(2)=0.856 and 0.783), respectively.

  16. Reassociation kinetics-based approach for partial genome sequencing of the cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The size and repetitive nature of the Rhipicephalus microplus genome makes obtaining a full genome sequence fiscally and technically problematic. To selectively obtain gene-enriched regions of this tick's genome, Cot filtration was performed, and Cot-filtered DNA was sequenced via 454 FLX pyrosequencing. Results The sequenced Cot-filtered genomic DNA was assembled with an EST-based gene index of 14,586 unique entries where each EST served as a potential "seed" for scaffold formation. The new sequence assembly extended the lengths of 3,913 of the 14,586 gene index entries. Over half of the extensions corresponded to extensions of over 30 amino acids. To survey the repetitive elements in the tick genome, the complete sequences of five BAC clones were determined. Both Class I and II transposable elements were found. Comparison of the BAC and Cot filtration data indicates that Cot filtration was highly successful in filtering repetitive DNA out of the genomic DNA used in 454 sequencing. Conclusion Cot filtration is a very useful strategy to incorporate into genome sequencing projects on organisms with large genome sizes and which contain high percentages of repetitive, difficult to assemble, genomic DNA. Combining the Cot selection approach with 454 sequencing and assembly with a pre-existing EST database as seeds resulted in extensions of 27% of the members of the EST database. PMID:20540747

  17. New insights from molecular characterization of the tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Csordas, Bárbara Guimarães; Garcia, Marcos Valério; Cunha, Rodrigo Casquero; Giachetto, Poliana Fernanda; Blecha, Isabella Maiumi Zaidan; Andreotti, Renato

    2016-01-01

    The Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus complex currently consists of five taxa, namely R. australis, R. annulatus, R. (B.) microplus clade A sensu, R. microplus clade B sensu, and R. (B.) microplus clade C sensu. Mitochondrial DNA-based methods help taxonomists when they are facing the morpho-taxonomic problem of distinguishing members of the R. (B.) microplus complex. The purpose of this study was to perform molecular characterization of ticks in all five regions of Brazil and infer their phylogenetic relationships. Molecular analysis characterized 10 haplotypes of the COX-1 gene. Molecular network analysis revealed that haplotype H-2 was the most dispersed of the studied populations (n = 11). Haplotype H-3 (n = 2) had the greatest genetic differentiation when compared to other Brazilian populations. A Bayesian phylogenetic tree of the COX-1 gene obtained strong support. In addition, it was observed that the population of R. (B.) microplus haplotype H-3 exhibited diverging branches among the other Brazilian populations in the study. The study concludes that the different regions of Brazil have R. (B.) microplus tick populations with distinct haplotypes.

  18. In vitro cultivation and cryopreservation of Babesia bigemina sporokinetes in hemocytes of Rhipicephalus microplus.

    PubMed

    de Rezende, Jania; Rangel, Charles P; McIntosh, Douglas; Silveira, Júlia A G; Cunha, Nathalie C; Ramos, Carlos A N; Fonseca, Adivaldo H

    2015-09-15

    Cultures of tick hemocytes represent alternative cell lines for the isolation and cultivation of a variety of hemoparasites. The present study reports the development and evaluation of methods for the in vitro culture and maintenance of sporokinetes of Babesia bigemina in association with hemocytes of the tick Rhipicephalus microplus. Hemolymph, from engorged females infected with B. bigemina sporokinetes, was incubated at 28 °C in L15 culture medium supplemented with 40% fetal bovine serum. Adherence of hemocytes to flask surfaces and the development of B. bigemina sporokinetes commenced on the first day of cultivation. The protozoa demonstrated clear motility and the capacity to adhere to hemocyte membranes for up to 25 days, at which time the hemocytes began to show signs of degeneration. Examination of Giemsa stained hemocyte cultures, revealed the presence of pyriformis forms, as well as mature and immature sporokinetes with dark red nuclei, centralized or near the apical extremities. Sporokinetes harvested from culture supernatants were cryopreserved in liquid nitrogen. Inoculation of parasite-free hemocyte cultures with defrosted sporokinetes, demonstrated the viability and interaction of the protozoa with the hemocytes over 21 days. Cultured hemocytes of R. microplus hold potential for development as a tool in the study of host parasite interactions and as a substrate for the in vitro maintenance of B. bigemina sporokinetes.

  19. [Immunization with synthetic peptide anti-tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus SBm7462 via mucosal routes].

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Gabriel D; Peconick, Ana P; Medeiros, Carla L; Vargas-V, Marlene I; Patarroyo, Joaquín H

    2008-09-01

    The mucosal immunization consists on antigen administration in these surfaces it is a not invasive method, inductor of local and systemic immune response. This work evaluated the immune response of the synthetic vaccine anti-tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus SBm7462®, via oral and nasal routes. Were used 60 BALB/c mice, divided in three groups of 20 animals each (I: oral immunization; II: nasal immunization; III: animals not immunized). Nine and 15 days after the first and the second immunization was collected, separately for each group, T cells from the immunized animals, cultivating them per 10 days. After the incubation, were determined the percentage of cellular viability and the specific nature of this T cells, which had held as memory T cell. The averages of T cell SBm7462-reagents had been submitted to the analysis of variance and comparison for Tukey test, 5% of probability. Group II presented higher cellular proliferation "in vitro". For ELISA test, were positive only two animals in group I and eight in group II. The oral and nasal routs alternatively viable for immunization with the synthetic peptide SBm7462®, however require greater number of doses to induce responses with high levels of immunoglobulins.

  20. Detection and phylogenetic characterization of Theileria spp. and Anaplasma marginale in Rhipicephalus bursa in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Ferrolho, Joana; Antunes, Sandra; Santos, Ana S; Velez, Rita; Padre, Ludovina; Cabezas-Cruz, Alejandro; Santos-Silva, Maria Margarida; Domingos, Ana

    2016-04-01

    Ticks are obligatory blood-sucking arthropod (Acari:Ixodida) ectoparasites of domestic and wild animals as well as humans. The incidence of tick-borne diseases is rising worldwide, challenging our approach toward diagnosis, treatment and control options. Rhipicephalus bursa Canestrini and Fanzago, 1877, a two-host tick widely distributed in the Palearctic Mediterranean region, is considered a multi-host tick that can be commonly found on sheep, goats and cattle, and occasionally on horses, dogs, deer and humans. R. bursa is a species involved in the transmission of several tick-borne pathogens with a known impact on animal health and production. The aim of this study was to estimate R. bursa prevalence in Portugal Mainland and circulating pathogens in order to contribute to a better knowledge of the impact of this tick species. Anaplasma marginale and Theileria spp. were detected and classified using phylogenetic analysis. This is the first report of Theileria annulata and Theileria equi detection in R. bursa ticks feeding on cattle and horses, respectively, in Portugal. This study contributes toward the identification of currently circulating pathogens in this tick species as a prerequisite for developing future effective anti-tick control measures.

  1. Adrenergic ligands that block oviposition in the cattle tick Rhipicephalus microplus affect ovary contraction

    PubMed Central

    Cossío-Bayúgar, Raquel; Miranda-Miranda, Estefan; Fernández-Rubalcaba, Manuel; Narváez Padilla, Verónica; Reynaud, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    The tyraminergic/octopaminergic system is central for the control of arthropod oviposition. Previous works demonstrated that the pharmacological perturbation of this system inhibits oviposition in the cattle tick Rhipicephalus microplus. In this work, we describe a physiologically active whole-mount preparation of the contractile tick ovary that allows the quantitative videometrical analysis of ovary contraction in response to different compounds. Eight adrenergic ligands known to inhibit oviposition, including octopamine and tyramine were tested. These compounds exhibited antagonistic effects; octopamine relaxes the ovary preparation while tyramine induces a very strong contraction. The other adrenergic compounds tested were classified as able to contract or relax ovary muscle tissue. Isoprotenerol has a stronger relaxative effect than octopamine. Tyramine induces the biggest contraction observed of all the compounds tested, followed, in descending amount of contraction, by salbutamol, prazosin, epinastine, clonidine and the acaricide amitraz. The effect of these adrenergic ligands on the ovary preparation, explains why these molecules inhibit tick oviposition and suggest a regulatory mechanism for ovary contraction and relaxation during oviposition. Our results also provide a physiological explanation of the egg-laying inhibition effect of amitraz when used on the cattle tick. PMID:26456007

  2. The action of two ethyl carbamates on acetylcholinesterase and reproductive organs of Rhipicephalus microplus.

    PubMed

    Prado-Ochoa, M G; Ramírez-Noguera, P; Díaz-Torres, R; Garrido-Fariña, G I; Vázquez-Valadez, V H; Velázquez-Sánchez, A M; Muñoz-Guzmán, M A; Angeles, E; Alba-Hurtado, F

    2014-01-31

    The effects produced by the new synthetic carbamates ethyl-(4-bromophenyl) carbamate and ethyl-(4-chlorophenyl) carbamate on the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, egg structure and reproductive organs of two Rhipicephalus microplus strains were evaluated. Inhibition kinetic parameters showed that the studied carbamates are weak inhibitors and have a low affinity for R. microplus AChE. Histologically, in oocytes from carbamate-treated engorged female ticks, a loss of shape, cytoplasmic vacuoles, decreased chorion deposition, alterations in cytoplasmic granularity and irregular membranes were observed. In oocyte germinal vesicles, a loss of shape, nucleolar fragmentation and membrane alterations with degenerative signs were observed. The ovarian epithelium was vacuolated, flattened, eroded and contained pyknotic nuclei. These alterations were observed from the first day and persisted and increased in severity until day 7 post-treatment. The ovaries from carbamate-treated ticks had fewer stage IV-V oocytes and more stage I-II oocytes. Additionally, eggs produced by the treated ticks had a modified appearance, decreased size, a reduced superficial waxy layer and a loss of viability. The results of this study show that the effects of carbamates on R. microplus were independent of AChE inhibition and show that the morphological alterations in the reproductive organs were due to carbamate actions on the vitellogenesis and viability of the ovarian cells.

  3. Influence of tea tree oil (Melaleuca alternifolia) on the cattle tick Rhipicephalus microplus.

    PubMed

    Pazinato, Rafael; Klauck, Vanderlei; Volpato, Andreia; Tonin, Alexandre A; Santos, Roberto C; de Souza, Márcia E; Vaucher, Rodrigo A; Raffin, Renata; Gomes, Patrícia; Felippi, Candice C; Stefani, Lenita M; Da Silva, Aleksandro S

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the influence of tea tree oil (TTO) (Melaleuca alternifolia) tested in its pure and nanostructured (TTO nanoparticles) forms on the reproduction of female Rhipicephalus microplus. For our purpose, female ticks were collected from naturally infected animals and treated in vitro with TTO (1, 5, and 10 %) and TTO nanoparticles (0.075, 0.375, and 0.75 %). In order to validate the tests, they were performed in triplicate using positive (amitraz) and negative (untreated) controls. It was possible to observe that pure TTO (5 and 10 %) and TTO nanoparticles (0.375 and 0.75 %) showed 100 % reproductive inhibition on female ticks. Additionally, pure TTO (1 %) also showed an acaricide effect (70 %), similarly to the positive control (78.3 %). This is the first study demonstrating the activity of pure TTO and TTO nanoparticles on female ticks. Therefore, based on these results, we were able to show that both forms and all concentrations of M. alternifolia affected tick reproduction by inhibiting egg laying and hatching. We were also able to show that TTO nanoparticles potentiated the inhibitor effect of pure TTO on the reproduction of R. microplus.

  4. Structural and biochemical characterization of a recombinant triosephosphate isomerase from Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus

    SciTech Connect

    Moraes, Jorge; Arreola, Rodrigo; Cabrera, Nallely; Saramago, Luiz; Freitas, Daniela; Masuda, Aoi; da Silva Vaz Jr., Itabajara; Tuena de Gomez-Puyou, Marietta; Perez-Montfort, Ruy; Gomez-Puyou, Armando; Logullo, Carlos

    2012-02-06

    Triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) is an enzyme with a role in glycolysis and gluconeogenesis by catalyzing the interconversion between glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate and dihydroxyacetone phosphate. This enzyme has been used as a target in endoparasite drug development. In this work we cloned, expressed, purified and studied kinetic and structural characteristics of TIM from tick embryos, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (BmTIM). The Km and Vmax of the recombinant BmTIM with glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate as substrate, were 0.47 mM and 6031 {micro}mol min{sup -1} mg protein{sup -1}, respectively. The resolution of the diffracted crystal was estimated to be 2.4 {angstrom} and the overall data showed that BmTIM is similar to other reported dimeric TIMs. However, we found that, in comparison to other TIMs, BmTIM has the highest content of cysteine residues (nine cysteine residues per monomer). Only two cysteines could make disulfide bonds in monomers of BmTIM. Furthermore, BmTIM was highly sensitive to the action of the thiol reagents dithionitrobenzoic acid and methyl methane thiosulfonate, suggesting that there are five cysteines exposed in each dimer and that these residues could be employed in the development of species-specific inhibitors.

  5. Acaricidal activity of the essential oils from three Lamiaceae plant species on Rhipicephalus turanicus Pom. (Acari: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Koc, Samed; Oz, Emre; Aydın, Levent; Cetin, Huseyin

    2012-10-01

    Acaricidal effects of three Labiatae essential oils extracted from ariel parts of Thymus sipyleus Boiss. subsp. sipyleus, Mentha longifolia L., and Dorystoechas hastata Boiss. & Heldr. ex Bentham on 10-day-old Rhipicephalus turanicus Pom. (Acari: Ixodidae) larvae were evaluated by using the larval packet test bioassay. Serial dilutions of the three essential oils were tested from a starting concentration of 1-0.1% (1.0, 0.5, 0.25, and 0.1% w/v). Results showed that all essential oils had very similar activity, producing complete mortality (100%) in all tested concentrations on 10-day-old R. turanicus tick larvae.

  6. In vitro activity of pineapple extracts (Ananas comosus, Bromeliaceae) on Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Acari: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Domingues, Luciana Ferreira; Giglioti, Rodrigo; Feitosa, Karina Alves; Fantatto, Rafaela Regina; Rabelo, Márcio Dias; Oliveira, Márcia Cristina de Sena; Oliveira, Gilson Pereira de; Bechara, Gervasio Henrique; Chagas, Ana Carolina de Souza

    2013-07-01

    Measures to control the cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, based only on chemical products are becoming unsustainable, mainly because of the development of resistance. The objective of this study was to test the effect of the aqueous extract of pineapple skin (AEPS) and bromelain extracted from the stem (Sigma-Aldrich®, B4882) on engorged females and larvae of R. (B.) microplus in vitro. These substances were diluted in water and evaluated at eight concentrations. Engorged females were collected and distributed in groups of 10, with three repetitions for each treatment. After immersion in the solutions, the females were placed in an incubator for observation of survival, oviposition and larval hatching. The larval packet method was used, also with three repetitions with about 100 larvae each. The packets were incubated and the readings were performed after 24 h. The estimated reproduction and efficacy of the solutions were calculated. The LC(50) and LC(90) were estimated using the Probit procedure of the SAS program. The eight concentrations were compared within each treatment by the Tukey test. For the experiment with engorged females, the most effective concentrations were 125, 250 and 500 mg/mL: 33%, 48% and 59% for the AEPS and 27%, 51% and 55% for the bromelain. The LC(50) and LC(90) values were, respectively, 276 and 8691 mg/mL for AEPS and 373 and 5172 mg/mL for bromelain. None of the dilutions tested was effective against the larvae of R. (B.) microplus. This is the first report of the action of pineapple extracts or their constituents on cattle ticks. The results demonstrate that further studies regarding composition of tick cuticle, with evaluation of other solvents and formulations, should be conducted seeking to enhance the effect of pineapple extracts and compounds against this ectoparasite.

  7. Partial characterization of an atypical family I inorganic pyrophosphatase from cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus.

    PubMed

    Costa, Evenilton P; Campos, Eldo; de Andrade, Caroline P; Façanha, Arnoldo R; Saramago, Luiz; Masuda, Aoi; Vaz, Itabajara da Silva; Fernandez, Jorge H; Moraes, Jorge; Logullo, Carlos

    2012-03-23

    The present paper presents the partial characterization of a family I inorganic pyrophosphatase from the hard tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (BmPPase). The BmPPase gene was cloned from the tick embryo and sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequence shared high similarity with other eukaryotic PPases, on the other hand, BmPPase presented some cysteine residues non-conserved in other groups. This pyrophosphatase is inhibited by Ca(2+), and the inhibition is antagonized by Mg(2+), suggesting that the balance between free Ca(2+) and free Mg(2+) in the eggs could be involved in BmPPase activity control. We observed that the BmPPase transcripts are present in the fat body, midgut and ovary of ticks, in two developmental stages (partially and fully engorged females). However, higher transcription amounts were found in ovary from fully engorged females. BmPPase activity was considerably abolished by the thiol reagent dithionitrobenzoic acid (DTNB), suggesting that cysteine residues are exposed in its structure. Therefore, these cysteine residues play a critical role in the structural stability of BmPPase. Molecular dynamics simulation analysis indicates that BmPPase is the first Family I PPase that could promote disulfide bonds between cysteine residues 138-339 and 167-295. Finally, we believe that these cysteine residues exposed in the BmPPase structure can play an important controlling role regarding enzyme activity, which would be an interesting mechanism of redox control. The results presented here also indicate that this enzyme can be involved in embryogenesis of this arthropod, and may be useful as a target in the development of new tick control strategies.

  8. An update on distribution models for Rhipicephalus microplus in West Africa.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, Eva M; Estrada-Peña, Agustin; Adehan, S; Madder, Maxime; Vanwambeke, Sophie O

    2013-11-01

    The cattle tick, Rhipicephalus microplus, which reached the West African region approximately 8 years ago, has established viable populations in Côte d'Ivoire and Benin and spread rapidly from the assumed points of introduction. However, existing maps of its distribution range do not agree on the areas at risk, most probably due to suboptimal modelling approaches. Therefore, we undertook a re-investigation of the potential distribution range based on a high-quality dataset from West Africa that includes information on 104 farms located all over Benin. Focussing on climate suitability and applying advanced modelling, a subset of representative and uncorrelated climate variables was selected and fed into Maxent software to obtain an estimate of climate suitability for West Africa. The resulting map was validated using an independent dataset of 13 farms along the apparent distribution edge. The entire southern part of West Africa (covering southern Nigeria, Benin, Togo and Ghana) features high climate suitability for R. microplus. All of Côte d'Ivoire is inside the distribution range of this tick and the southern rim of Burkina Faso is expected to be suitable for the establishment of R. microplus populations. The validation of the distribution, dated one year after the initial field visit, confirmed the predicted distribution range, although a small number of individuals of R. microplus were found north of the predicted limit. These low numbers might indicate that the climate is not suitable for the establishment of a viable tick population. An alternative explanation is the recent introduction by nomadic cattle herds passing through this location. In this region of the world, it is quite common for cattle owners to lead their livestock over distances of more than 500 km in search of food and water.

  9. Commercial formulation of Metarhizium anisopliae for the control of Rhipicephalus microplus in a pen study.

    PubMed

    Camargo, Mariana G; Marciano, Allan F; Sá, Fillipe A; Perinotto, Wendell M S; Quinelato, Simone; Gôlo, Patrícia S; Angelo, Isabele C; Prata, Márcia C A; Bittencourt, Vânia R E P

    2014-09-15

    The present study evaluated, for the first time, the effect of the commercial formulation Metarril(®) SP Organic of Metarhizium anisopliae plus 10% mineral oil to control Rhipicephalus microplus in a pen study. Three groups were formed with six animals each: the first group was exposed to Metarril(®) plus 10% mineral oil and 1% Tween 80; the second group was exposed to sterile distilled water, mineral oil and Tween 80 (oil control group); and the third group received no treatment (control group). The fungal formulation contained 1 × 10(8)conidiaml(-1). Each animal was sprayed with 3L of formulation. Fallen ticks were counted daily and a sample of 20 engorged females per day was incubated for assessment of biological parameters. Throughout the study period, Metarril(®) oil-based formulation showed an efficacy ranging from 19.20% to 67.39% in comparison with the control group; and from 8.18% to 61.38% in comparison with the oil control group. The average efficacy of Metarril(®) oil-based formulation was 47.74% and 40.89% in comparison with control and oil control groups, respectively. Changes in the biological parameters of engorged R. microplus females were observed in the first three days after treatment, with a significant reduction in hatching percentage and egg production index. We concluded that Metarril(®) SP Organic plus 10% mineral oil was efficient against R. microplus in pen studies. However, further in vivo studies are required to increase the efficacy and to establish a protocol for the use of this product in the field against the cattle tick.

  10. Acaricidal activity of thymol against larvae of Rhipicephalus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae) under semi-natural conditions.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Laryssa Xavier; Novato, Tatiane Pinheiro Lopes; Zeringota, Viviane; Matos, Renata Silva; Senra, Tatiane Oliveira Souza; Maturano, Ralph; Prata, Márcia Cristina Azevedo; Daemon, Erik; Monteiro, Caio Márcio Oliveira

    2015-09-01

    This is the first study to investigate the activity of thymol on Rhipicephalus microplus larvae under semi-natural conditions. For this purpose, tests were conducted in pots with Brachiaria decumbens seedlings containing cattle tick larvae. Thymol, diluted in ethanol 50° GL, was tested at concentrations of 2.5, 5.0, 10.0, 15.0, and 20.0 mg/mL, along with the control group treated with the solvent alone. Each treatment was composed of five pots (1 pot = a repetition). The experiment was performed in three steps. On the first day, the larvae were applied at the base of the signalgrass. Twenty-four hours later, approximately 25 mL of the solution was applied with thymol on the top of the vegetation in each pot. The survival of the larvae was measured 24 h after application of the solutions. Each pot was analyzed individually, and the grass fillets contained larvae were cut with scissors, placed in Petri dishes, and taken to the laboratory to count the number of living larvae. At the highest concentrations (10, 15, and 20 mg /mL), the number of live larvae declined by more than 95 % in relation to the control group. The lethal concentration 50 % (LC50) and LC90 values were 3.45 and 9.25 mg/ml, respectively. The application of thymol in semi-natural conditions starting concentration of 10 mg/mL significantly reduced the number of living R. microplus larvae.

  11. An intensive search for promising fungal biological control agents of ticks, particularly Rhipicephalus microplus.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Everton K K; Angelo, Isabele C; Rangel, Drauzio E N; Bahiense, Thiago C; Moraes, Aurea M L; Roberts, Donald W; Bittencourt, Vânia R E P

    2011-12-15

    Entomopathogenic fungi have been investigated worldwide as promising biological control agents of the cattle tick Rhipicephalus microplus. The current study evaluates the virulence of several fungal isolates to R. microplus larva in the laboratory as part of an effort to identify isolates with promise for effective biocontrol of R. microplus in the field. Sixty fungal isolates, encompassing 5 Beauveria spp. and 1 Engyodontium albus (=Beauveria alba), were included in this study. In addition to bioassays, the isolates were characterized morphologically and investigated as to their potential for conidial mass production. These findings were correlated with previous reports on the same fungal isolates of their natural UV-B tolerance (Fernandes et al., 2007), thermotolerance and cold activity (Fernandes et al., 2008), and genotypes (Fernandes et al., 2009). R. microplus larvae obtained from artificially infested calves were less susceptible to Beauveria bassiana infection than ticks acquired from naturally infested cattle from a different location. Isolates CG 464, CG 500 and CG 206 were among the most virulent Beauveria isolates tested in this study. All fungal isolates presented morphological features consistent with their species descriptions. Of the 53 B. bassiana isolates, five (CG 481, CG 484, CG 206, CG 235 and CG 487) had characteristics that qualified them as promising candidates for biological control agents of R. microplus, viz., mean LC(50) between 10(7) and 10(8)conidiaml(-1); produced 5000 conidia or more on 60mm(2) surface area of PDAY medium; and, in comparison to untreated (control) conidia, had the best conidial tolerances to UV-B (7.04 kJ m(-2)) and heat (45°C, 2h) of 50% or higher, and conidial cold (5°C, 15d) activity (mycelial growth) higher than 60%. The current study of 60 Beauveria spp. isolates, therefore, singles out a few (five) with high potential for controlling ticks under field conditions.

  12. In vivo efficacy of a biotherapic and eugenol formulation against Rhipicephalus microplus.

    PubMed

    Valente, Paula Pimentel; Moreira, Gustavo Henrique Ferreira Abreu; Serafini, Matheus Ferreira; Facury-Filho, Elias Jorge; Carvalho, Antônio Último; Faraco, André Augusto Gomes; Castilho, Rachel Oliveira; Ribeiro, Múcio Flávio Barbosa

    2017-03-01

    The control of Rhipicephalus microplus is essential to prevent cattle discomfort and economic losses. However, increased resistance and acaricides inefficiency lead producers to adopt strategies that could result in the accumulation of chemical residues in meat and milk with possibilities of poisoning in animals and people. This scenario demonstrates the necessity of research into the identification of novel, effective and environmentally safe therapeutic options for cattle tick control. The objectives of this study were to develop and assess the efficacy of R. microplus biotherapic and of 5% eugenol for the control of R. microplus in artificially infested calves. Eighteen male 6-month-old Holstein calves were divided into three groups of six animals. In Group 1, the animals did not receive medication (control group); in Group 2, the animals received 1 mL of R. microplus biotherapic at dilution 6CH (centesimal Hahnemannian), orally administered twice daily. And in Group 3, they received a single application of eugenol 5% in the pour-on formulation. The median efficacy for biotherapy and eugenol 5% was respectively 10.13 and 13.97%; however, upon analyzing reproductive efficiency, it is noteworthy that the biotherapic had 45.86% efficiency and was superior to the action of eugenol (12.03%) after 37 days of treatment. The ultrastructural study provided information about the effects of R. microplus biotherapic on the ovaries of engorged females and showed disorganization in the deposition of the oocyte exochorion. The results suggest hatchability inhibition of larvae, interference in R. microplus reproduction and future possibilities for eco-friendly control of R. microplus with biotherapic 6CH.

  13. Egg wax from the cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus inhibits Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Karine R; Macedo, Alexandre J; Nicastro, Gianlucca G; Baldini, Regina L; Termignoni, Carlos

    2013-09-01

    Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus is constantly challenged during its life cycle by microorganisms present in their hosts or in the environment. Tick eggs may be especially vulnerable to environmental conditions because they are exposed to a rich and diverse microflora in the soil. Despite being oviposited in such hostile sites, tick eggs remain viable, suggesting that the egg surface has defense mechanisms against opportunistic and/or pathogenic organisms. R. microplus engorged females deposit a superficial wax layer onto their eggs during oviposition. This egg wax is essential for preventing desiccation as well as acting as a barrier against attack by microorganisms. In this study, we report the detection of anti-biofilm activity of R. microplus egg wax against Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14. Genes involved in the functions of production and maintenance of the biofilm extracellular matrix, pelA and cdrA, respectively, were markedly downregulated by a tick egg-wax extract. Moreover, this extract strongly inhibited fliC gene expression. Instead of a compact extracellular matrix, P. aeruginosa PA14 treated with egg-wax extract produces a fragile one. Also, the colony morphology of cells treated with egg-wax extract appears much paler and brownish, instead of the bright purple characteristic of normal colonies. Swarming motility was also inhibited by treatment with the egg-wax extract. The inhibition of P. aeruginosa biofilm does not seem to depend on inhibition of the quorum sensing system since mRNA levels of the 3 regulators of this system were not inhibited by egg-wax extract.

  14. Evaluation of tea tree oil for controlling Rhipicephalus microplus in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Pazinatto Boito, Jhonatan; Santos, Roberto C; Vaucher, Rodrigo A; Raffin, Renata; Machado, Gustavo; Tonin, Alexandre A; Da Silva, Aleksandro S

    2016-07-30

    Our research aimed to test the effects of Melaleuca alternifolia oil (pure and in nanocapsules) in the control of Rhipicephalus microplus in dairy cattle. For this purpose, the in vivo studies used 15 cows distributed in three different groups with the same number of animals. Five cows remained untreated (Group A), representing the control group; other five cows were sprayed with TTO (at 5%) in its pure form (Group B); and five cows were sprayed with nanocapsules of TTO (at 0.75%) (Group C). On days 1 and 4 post-treatments (PT), all cows had their ticks counted. On day 1 PT, two ticks from each cow were collected to evaluate the effect of the treatment on ticḱs reproduction (in vitro assays). The pure form of TTO caused a significant reduction (P<0.05) in the number of ticks from the Group B compared to the Group A on day 4 PT. However, there was no significant difference in the number of ticks on cows from Groups A and C after treatment (P>0.05). Treatment with TTO in nanocapsules (Group C) interfered with R. microplus reproduction, leading to lower oviposition by female ticks and hatchability (34.5% of efficacy). On the other hand, TTO oil (Group B) did not interfere on ticḱs reproduction, i.e. showed higher hatchability than the control group. Therefore, it is possible to conclude that pure TTO has an acaricidal effect in dairy cows, in addition to an effect on ticḱs reproduction when used its nanocapsulated form.

  15. Role of Rhipicephalus microplus cheliceral receptors in gustation and host differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Lorena Lopes; Soares, Sara Fernandes; de Oliveira Filho, Jaires Gomes; Oliveira, Thaynara Tatielly; Pérez de León, Adalberto A; Borges, Lígia Miranda Ferreira

    2015-04-01

    Rhipicephalus microplus is considered the most economically important ectoparasite of cattle worldwide. It is known that zebuine breeds of cattle are less susceptible to tick infestation than taurine breeds. Contact chemoreceptors in the cheliceral pit sensilla of ticks respond selectively to phagostimulant compounds, however their role in blood feeding relative to host susceptibility to infestation remains to be fully understood. We addressed this topic by conducting taste electrophysiology experiments with cheliceral pit sensilla preparations of R. microplus females. Solutions of five known ixodid tick phagostimulants were tested at different concentrations: sodium (NaCl), and potassium chloride (KCl) (10(-3)-10(-1)M); glucose (10(-4)-10(-1)M); adenosine triphosphate (ATP) (10(-6)-10(-2)M); and reduced l-glutathione (GSH) (10(-6)-10(-2)M). Serum samples from six susceptible animals of the Girolando breed (5/8 Bos indicus×3/8 B. taurus) and six resistant Nelore bovines (pure B. indicus) were also tested. A dose-dependent response of gustatory neurons associated with the chelicerae sensillum to NaCl, glucose, GSH, and ATP were observed. Responses by the cheliceral inner digit pit sensilla of R. microplus to KCl and glucose were also observed and they are reported here for the first time. In addition to an electrophysiological response to known phagostimulants, chemoreceptors in the chelicera of R. microplus responded differently to serum from cattle susceptible and resistant to infestation. The cheliceral pit neurons were more responsive to serum of R. microplus resistant bovines with a higher mean spike frequency (53.5±2spikess(-1)) than to serum samples from susceptible cattle (40.3±2spikess(-1)). The implications of chemosensation during tick blood feeding are discussed.

  16. Allopatric speciation in ticks: genetic and reproductive divergence between geographic strains of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus

    PubMed Central

    Labruna, Marcelo B; Naranjo, Victoria; Mangold, Atilio J; Thompson, Carolina; Estrada-Peña, Agustín; Guglielmone, Alberto A; Jongejan, Frans; de la Fuente, José

    2009-01-01

    Background The cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, economically impact cattle industry in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. The morphological and genetic differences among R. microplus strains have been documented in the literature, suggesting that biogeographical and ecological separation may have resulted in boophilid ticks from America/Africa and those from Australia being different species. To test the hypothesis of the presence of different boophilid species, herein we performed a series of experiments to characterize the reproductive performance of crosses between R. microplus from Australia, Africa and America and the genetic diversity of strains from Australia, Asia, Africa and America. Results The results showed that the crosses between Australian and Argentinean or Mozambican strains of boophilid ticks are infertile while crosses between Argentinean and Mozambican strains are fertile. These results showed that tick strains from Africa (Mozambique) and America (Argentina) are the same species, while ticks from Australia may actually represent a separate species. The genetic analysis of mitochondrial 12S and 16S rDNA and microsatellite loci were not conclusive when taken separately, but provided evidence that Australian tick strains were genetically different from Asian, African and American strains. Conclusion The results reported herein support the hypothesis that at least two different species share the name R. microplus. These species could be redefined as R. microplus (Canestrini, 1887) (for American and African strains) and probably the old R. australis Fuller, 1899 (for Australian strains), which needs to be redescribed. However, experiments with a larger number of tick strains from different geographic locations are needed to corroborate these results. PMID:19243585

  17. The mitochondrial genome of a Texas outbreak strain of the cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, derived from whole genome sequencing Pacific Biosciences and Illumina reads

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cattle fever tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus is one of the most significant medical veterinary pests in the world, vectoring several serious livestock diseases negatively impacting agricultural economies of tropical and subtropical countries around the world. In our study, we assembled...

  18. Induction of humoral immune response to multiple recombinant rhipicephalus appendiculatus antigens and their effect on tick feeding success and pathogen transmission.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Rhipicephalus appendiculatus is the primary vector of Theileria parva, the etiologic agent of East Coast fever (ECF), a devastating disease of cattle in sub-Saharan Africa. We hypothesized that a vaccine targeting tick proteins that are involved in attachment and feeding might affect fee...

  19. Multiple mutations in the para-sodium channel gene are associated with pyrethroid resistance in Rhipicephalus microplus from the United States and Mexico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhipicephalus microplus is an invasive tick vector that transmits the protozoan parasites Babesia bovis and B. bigemina, the causative agents of bovine babesiosis (cattle fever). Acaricide resistant R. microplus populations have become a major problem for many cattle producing areas of the world. Py...

  20. Widespread Movement of Invasive Cattle Fever Ticks (Rhipicephalus microplus) in Southern Texas Leads to Shared Local Infestations on Cattle and Deer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Rhipicephalus microplus is a highly-invasive tick that vectors cattle fever parasites (Babesia bovis and B. bigemina). In North America, ticks and Babesia are endemic in Mexico and ticks persist in the United States inside a narrow permanent quarantine zone (PQZ) along the Rio Grande. Th...

  1. Acaricide and Ivermectin resistance in a field population of Rhipicephalus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae) collected from Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) in the Mexican Tropics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red deer (Cervus elaphus), taurine (Bos taurus) and zebuine (Bos indicus) breeds of cattle and their crosses, and the southern cattle fever tick (Rhipicephalus microplus) are non-native species that were introduced to Mexico through the livestock trade. Red deer raised in the Neotropics can die from...

  2. Simulated interactions of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), climate variation and habitat heterogeneity on southern cattle tick (Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus) eradication methods in South Texas, USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    White-tailed deer (odocoileus Virginiamis) is a host for cattle fever ticks, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) sp.), which are vectors of the pathogens causing bovine babesiosis and anaplasmosis in cattle. Thus the potential role of white-tailed deer in compromising tick eradication efforts focused on cattl...

  3. Distribution Patterns of Three Sodium Channel Mutations Associated with Pyrethroid Resistance in Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) Microplus Populations from North and South America, South Africa and Australia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistance to synthetic pyrethroids (SP) in the cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus is widespread throughout its distribution area. Three single nucleotide substitutions identified in the Domains II and III of the sodium channel gene of R. (B.) microplus are known to be associated with t...

  4. Acaricide Resistance in Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus: Impact on Agro-Biosecurity and Cattle Trade between Mexico and the United States of America

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Animal health issues are important aspects of the bilateral partnership between Mexico and the United States of America (U.S.). Because the U.S. is free of the cattle fever ticks Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus and R. (B.) annulatus, and bovine babesiosis, the widespread distribution of cattle f...

  5. Molecular and pharmacological characterization of the first Chelicerata pyrokinin receptor from a worldwide tick vector of zoonotic pathogens, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We identified the first pyrokinin receptor (Rhimi-PK-R) from the Chelicerata and analyzed structure-activity relationships of cognate ligand neuropeptides and their analogs. This receptor, which we cloned from larvae of the tick Rhipicephalus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae), is the ortholog of the inse...

  6. Discovery, adaptation and transcriptional activity of two tick promoters: Construction of a dual luciferase reporter system for optimization of RNA interference in Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus cell lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dual luciferase reporter systems are valuable tools for functional genomic studies, but have not previously been developed for use in tick cell culture. We evaluated expression of available luciferase constructs in tick cell cultures derived from Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, an important vec...

  7. Exploring the use of anti-tick vaccine as tool for integrated eradication of the cattle fever tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) annulatus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine babesiosis, also known as cattle fever, is a tick-borne protozoal disease foreign to the United States. It was eradicated by eliminating the vector species, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) annulatus and R. (B.) microplus, through the efforts of the Cattle Fever Tick Eradication Program (CFTEP), wit...

  8. Evolutionary conserved microRNAs are ubiquitously expressed compared to tick-specific miRNAs in the cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that act as regulators of gene expression in eukaryotes modulating a large diversity of biological processes. The discovery of miRNAs has provided new opportunities to understand the biology of a number of species. The cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus...

  9. Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus strain Deutsch, 5 BAC clone sequencing, including two encoding Cytochrome P450s and one encoding CzEst9 carboxylesterase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, has a genome over 2.4 times the size of the human genome, and with over 70% of repetitive DNA, this genome would prove very costly to sequence at today's prices and difficult to assemble and analyze. BAC clones give insight into the genome struct...

  10. Mutation in the RmβAOR gene is associated with amitraz resistance in the cattle tick Rhipicephalus microplus

    PubMed Central

    Corley, Sean W.; Jonsson, Nicholas N.; Piper, Emily K.; Cutullé, Christian; Stear, Michael J.; Seddon, Jennifer M.

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to describe the evolution of resistance to amitraz in Rhipicephalus microplus in the field and to test the association between amitraz resistance and the frequency of a mutation in the β-adrenergic octopamine receptor gene (RmβAOR). We established six populations of Rhipicephalus microplus ticks in similar paddocks by the admixture of ticks from strains known to be susceptible and resistant to amitraz and synthetic pyrethroids. Each population was managed using one of three acaricide treatment regimes: always amitraz, always spinosad, or rotation between amitraz and spinosad. We used microsatellites to elucidate population structure over time, an SNP in the para-sodium channel gene previously demonstrated to confer resistance to synthetic pyrethroids to quantify changes in resistance to synthetic pyrethroids over time, and a nonsynonymous SNP in the RmβAOR, a gene that we proposed to confer resistance to amitraz, to determine whether selection with amitraz increased the frequency of this mutation. The study showed panmixia of the two strains and that selection of ticks with amitraz increased the frequency of the RmβAOR mutation while increasing the prevalence of amitraz-resistance. We conclude that polymorphisms in the RmβAOR gene are likely to confer resistance to amitraz. PMID:24082133

  11. Laboratory and field evaluation of brown dog tick behavioral responses to potential semiochemicals.

    PubMed

    Carnohan, Lucas P; Kaufman, Phillip E; Allan, Sandra A; Gezan, Salvador A; Weeks, Emma N I

    2017-02-01

    The brown dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato (Parasitiformis: Ixodidae), is an ectoparasite of dogs that can be found worldwide. This tick poses unique difficulties in management because it can complete its entire life cycle indoors and has demonstrated acaricide resistance. The ability to monitor for tick presence and abundance is necessary for developing effective control programs. As such, an evaluation of adult brown dog tick behavioral responses to 16 potential semiochemicals was undertaken using Y-tube and straight-tube olfactometers. Both sexes of ticks were activated by nine of the 16 semiochemicals tested, including 300μg of 1-octen-3-ol, benzaldehyde, benzyl alcohol, hexanoic acid, nonanoic acid, methyl salicylate, o-nitrophenol, 2,6-dichlorophenol and salicylaldehyde. Rhipicephalus sanguineus s.l. behaviors including movement speed, direction and duration, as well as turning, were quantified following exposure to the same nine chemicals in a straight-tube olfactometer, individually at 300μg and as mixtures. Three individual chemicals, 1-octen-3-ol, hexanoic acid, and methyl salicylate induced strong responses. These three chemicals were evaluated in a semi-field setting using a modified bed bug trap but were found to provide no significant increase in attraction compared with CO2 alone. The results of these studies provide a foundation for future research regarding semiochemicals of R. sanguineus s.l.

  12. Molecular detection of Ehrlichia canis, Anaplasma bovis, Anaplasma platys, Candidatus Midichloria mitochondrii and Babesia canis vogeli in ticks from Israel.

    PubMed

    Harrus, S; Perlman-Avrahami, A; Mumcuoglu, K Y; Morick, D; Eyal, O; Baneth, G

    2011-03-01

    : Ticks are vectors of important pathogens of human and animals. Therefore, their microbial carriage capacity is constantly being investigated. The aim of this study was to characterize the diversity of domestic animal pathogens in ticks collected from vegetation and the ground, from different parts of Israel. Non-engorged questing adult ticks were collected from 13 localities. A total of 1196 ticks in 131 pools-83 pools of Rhipicephalus turanicus and 48 of Rhipicephalus sanguineus (with two to ten ticks per pool)-were included in this study. In addition, 13 single free-roaming Hyalomma spp. ticks were collected. Screening by molecular techniques revealed the presence of Ehrlichia canis, Anaplasma platys, Anaplasma bovis and Babesia canis vogeli DNA in R. turanicus ticks. E. canis, A. bovis, B. canis vogeli and Candidatus Midichloria mitochondrii DNA sequences were detected in R. sanguineus ticks. Candidatus Midichloria mitochondrii DNA was also detected in Hyalomma spp. ticks. Neither Hepatozoon spp. nor Bartonella spp. DNA was detected in any of the ticks examined. This study describes the first detection of E. canis in the tick R. turanicus, which may serve as a vector of this canine pathogen; E. canis was the most common pathogen detected in the collected questing ticks. It also describes the first detection of A. bovis and Candidatus Midichloria mitochondrii in Israel. To the best of the author's knowledge, this is the first report describing the detection of DNA of the latter two pathogens in R. sanguineus, and of A. bovis in R. turanicus.

  13. A study of ectoparasites of Canis lupus familiaris in Mueang district, Khon Kaen, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Nithikathkul, Choosak; Polseela, Ruxsina; Iamsa-ard, Jareerat; Wongsawad, Chalobol; Jittapalapong, Sathaporn

    2005-01-01

    We studied ectoparasites found on Canis lupus familiaris sampled in five areas in Mueang district, Khon Kaen Province, Thailand. The prevalence of fleas and ticks as well as their density were determined in 100 dogs that did not receive treatments. A total number of 458 ectoparasites was found corresponding to two species: 25.8% Ctenocephalides canis and 74.2% Rhipicephalus sanguineus. R. sanguineus was the most abundant species, and Ct. canis was the only flea species found. The stages of R. sanguineus were larvae (5.3%), nymphs (29.1%) and adults (39.1% in male and 26.5% in female). The stages of Ct. canis were larvae (41.5%) and adults (58.5%). Both species were commonly found on domestic dogs in all areas of the study. Ct. canis was not present on domestic dogs in one sub-district. The prevalence rates of tick-harboring domestic dogs was 80% (R. sanguineus), and flea-haboring domestic dogs was 26% (Ct. canis).

  14. Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Differential Expression of miRNAs in Male and Female Rhipicephalus haemaphysaloides Ticks

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Houshuang; Zhou, Yongzhi; Cao, Jie; Zhou, Jinlin

    2015-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulates the innate immune response in arthropods. In tick vectors, LPS activates expression of immune genes, including those for antibacterial peptides. miRNAs are 21–24 nt non-coding small RNAs that regulate target mRNAs at the post-transcriptional level. However, our understanding of tick innate immunity is limited to a few cellular immune reactions and some characterized immune molecules. Moreover, there is little information on the regulation of the immune system in ticks by miRNA. Therefore, this study aimed to analyze the differential expression of miRNAs in male and female ticks after LPS injection. LPS was injected into male and female Rhipicephalus haemaphysaloides ticks to stimulate immune response, with phosphate buffered saline (PBS)-injected ticks as negative controls. miRNAs from each group were sequenced and analyzed. In the PBS- and LPS-injected female ticks, 11.46 and 12.82 million reads of 18–30 nt were obtained respectively. There were 13.92 and 15.29 million reads of 18–30 nt obtained in the PBS- and LPS-injected male ticks, respectively. Expression of miRNAs in male ticks was greater than that in female ticks. There were 955 and 984 conserved miRNA families in the PBS- and LPS-injected female ticks, respectively, and correspondingly 1684 and 1552 conserved miRNA families in male ticks. Nine novel miRNAs were detected as common miRNAs in two or more tested samples. There were 37 known miRNAs up-regulated >10-fold and 33 down-regulated >10-fold in LPS-injected female ticks; and correspondingly 52 and 59 miRNAs in male ticks. Differential expression of miRNAs in PBS- and LPS-injected samples supports their involvement in the regulation of innate immunity. These data provide an important resource for more detailed functional analysis of miRNAs in this species. PMID:26430879

  15. Inhibition of the recombinant cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) annulatus glutathione S-transferase.

    PubMed

    Guneidy, Rasha A; Shahein, Yasser E; Abouelella, Amira M K; Zaki, Eman R; Hamed, Ragaa R

    2014-09-01

    Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) annulatus is a bloodsucking ectoparasite that causes severe production losses in the cattle industry. This study aims to evaluate the in vitro effects of tannic acid, hematin (GST inhibitors) and different plant extracts (rich in tannic acid) on the activity of the recombinant glutathione S-transferase enzyme of the Egyptian cattle tick R. annulatus (rRaGST), in order to confirm their ability to inhibit the parasitic essential detoxification enzyme glutathione S-transferase. Extraction with 70% ethanol of Hibiscus cannabinus (kenaf flowers), Punica granatum (red and white pomegranate peel), Musa acuminata (banana peel) (Musaceae), Medicago sativa (alfalfa seeds), Tamarindus indicus (seed) and Cuminum cyminum (cumin seed) were used to assess: (i) inhibitory capacities of rRaGST and (ii) their phenolic and flavonoid contents. Ethanol extraction of red pomegranate peel contained the highest content of phenolic compounds (29.95mg gallic acid/g dry tissue) compared to the other studied plant extracts. The highest inhibition activities of rRaGST were obtained with kenaf and red pomegranate peel (P. granatum) extracts with IC50 values of 0.123 and 0.136mg dry tissue/ml, respectively. Tannic acid was the more effective inhibitor of rRaGST with an IC50 value equal to 4.57μM compared to delphinidine-HCl (IC50=14.9±3.1μM). Gossypol had a weak inhibitory effect (IC50=43.7μM), and caffeic acid had almost no effect on tick GST activity. The IC50 values qualify ethacrynic acid as a potent inhibitor of rRaGST activity (IC50=0.034μM). Cibacron blue and hematin showed a considerable inhibition effect on rRaGST activity, and their IC50 values were 0.13μM and 7.5μM, respectively. The activity of rRaGST was highest for CDNB (30.2μmol/min/mg protein). The enzyme had also a peroxidatic activity (the specific activity equals 26.5μmol/min/mg protein). Both tannic acid and hematin inhibited rRaGST activity non-competitively with respect to GSH and

  16. The complexity of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus genome characterised through detailed analysis of two BAC clones

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Rmi) a major cattle ectoparasite and tick borne disease vector, impacts on animal welfare and industry productivity. In arthropod research there is an absence of a complete Chelicerate genome, which includes ticks, mites, spiders, scorpions and crustaceans. Model arthropod genomes such as Drosophila and Anopheles are too taxonomically distant for a reference in tick genomic sequence analysis. This study focuses on the de-novo assembly of two R. microplus BAC sequences from the understudied R microplus genome. Based on available R. microplus sequenced resources and comparative analysis, tick genomic structure and functional predictions identify complex gene structures and genomic targets expressed during tick-cattle interaction. Results In our BAC analyses we have assembled, using the correct positioning of BAC end sequences and transcript sequences, two challenging genomic regions. Cot DNA fractions compared to the BAC sequences confirmed a highly repetitive BAC sequence BM-012-E08 and a low repetitive BAC sequence BM-005-G14 which was gene rich and contained short interspersed elements (SINEs). Based directly on the BAC and Cot data comparisons, the genome wide frequency of the SINE Ruka element was estimated. Using a conservative approach to the assembly of the highly repetitive BM-012-E08, the sequence was de-convoluted into three repeat units, each unit containing an 18S, 5.8S and 28S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) encoding gene sequence (rDNA), related internal transcribed spacer and complex intergenic region. In the low repetitive BM-005-G14, a novel gene complex was found between to 2 genes on the same strand. Nested in the second intron of a large 9 Kb papilin gene was a helicase gene. This helicase overlapped in two exonic regions with the papilin. Both these genes were shown expressed in different tick life stage important in ectoparasite interaction with the host. Tick specific sequence differences were also

  17. Efficacy of 11 Brazilian essential oils on lethality of the cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus.

    PubMed

    Chagas, Ana Carolina de Souza; Oliveira, Márcia Cristina de Sena; Giglioti, Rodrigo; Santana, Raul Costa Mascarenhas; Bizzo, Humberto Ribeiro; Gama, Paola Ervatti; Chaves, Francisco Celio Maia

    2016-04-01

    Herbal extracts have been investigated as an alternative for parasite control, aiming to slow the development of resistance and to obtain low-cost biodegradable parasiticides. The goal of this study was to evaluate the efficacy, in vitro, of 11 essential oils from Brazil on reproductive efficiency and lethality of the cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus. The effects of oils extracted from Curcuma longa, Zingiber officinale, Lippia alba, Lippia gracilis, Lippia origanoides, Lippia sidoides, Mentha arvensis, Mentha piperita, Croton cajucara (white and red), and Croton sacaquinha on ticks were investigated by the Immersion Test with Engorged Females (ITEF) and the modified Larval Packet Test (LPT). Distilled water and 2% Tween 80 were used as control treatments. Chemical analysis of the oils was done with gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. Analysis of the in vitro tests using Probit (SAS program) allowed the calculation of lethal concentrations (LCs). Lower reproductive efficiency indexes and higher efficacy percentages in the ITEF were obtained with the oils extracted from C. longa (24 and 71%, respectively) and M. arvensis oils (27 and 73%, respectively). Lower LC50 was reached with C. longa (10.24 mg/mL), L. alba (10.78 mg/mL), M. arvensis (22.31 mg/mL), L. sidoides (27.67 mg/mL), and C. sacaquinha (29.88 mg/mL) oils. In the LPT, species from Zingiberaceae and Verbenaceae families caused 100% lethality at 25 mg/mL, except for L. sidoides. The most effective oils were from C. longa, L. gracilis, L. origanoides, L. alba, and Z. officinale. The LC50 and LC90 were, respectively: 0.54 and 1.80 mg/mL, 3.21 and 7.03 mg/mL, 3.10 and 8.44 mg/mL, 5.85 and 11.14 mg/mL, and 7.75 and 13.62 mg/mL. The efficacy was directly related to the major components in each essential oil, and the oils derived from Croton genus presented the worst performance, suggesting the absence of synergistic effect among its compounds. Since C. longa, containing 62

  18. Suppressive subtractive hybridization analysis of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus larval and adult transcript expression during attachment and feeding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ticks, as blood-feeding ectoparasites, affect their hosts both directly and as vectors of viral, bacterial and protozoal diseases. The tick’s mode of feeding means it must maintain intimate contact with the host in the face of host defensive responses for a prolonged time. The parasite: host interac...

  19. In vitro acaricidal properties of Semecarpus anacardium fruit and Datura stramonium leaf extracts against acaricide susceptible (IVRI-I line) and resistant (IVRI-V line) Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Srikant; Tiwari, Shashi Shankar; Srivastava, Sharad; Kumar, Sachin; Sharma, Anil Kumar; Nagar, Gaurav; Kumar, K G Ajith; Kumar, Rajesh; Rawat, A K S

    2015-08-01

    In an attempt to identify plants having anti-tick properties, the 95% ethanolic and 50% hydro-ethanolic extracts of the fruits of Semecarpus anacardium and leaves of Datura stramonium were evaluated against reference tick lines of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus. The 95% ethanolic extracts of S. anacardium and D. stramonium caused 50% and 20% mortality, respectively, within 72 h of treatment by adult immersion test. The LC90 value of the ethanolic fruit extract of S. anacardium was determined as 13.5% (CI 12.05-15.12). The extract was also found efficacious (73.3%±3.3%) against the multi-acaricide-resistant IVRI-V line of R.(B.) microplus. The S. anacardium extract significantly affected the reproductive physiology of treated ticks by inhibiting the oviposition and was found safe. The HPTLC fingerprinting profile revealed the presence of pyrocatechol as a marker compound. The acaricidal property of S. anacardium against chemical acaricide-resistant R. (B.) microplus was discussed.

  20. Inhibition of enzyme activity of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus triosephosphate isomerase and BME26 cell growth by monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Saramago, Luiz; Franceschi, Mariana; Logullo, Carlos; Masuda, Aoi; Vaz, Itabajara da Silva; Farias, Sandra Estrazulas; Moraes, Jorge

    2012-10-12

    In the present work, we produced two monoclonal antibodies (BrBm37 and BrBm38) and tested their action against the triosephosphate isomerase of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (RmTIM). These antibodies recognize epitopes on both the native and recombinant forms of the protein. rRmTIM inhibition  by BrBm37 was up to 85% whereas that of BrBrm38 was 98%, depending on the antibody-enzyme ratio. RmTIM activity was lower in ovarian, gut, and fat body tissue extracts treated with BrBm37 or BrBm38 mAbs. The proliferation of the embryonic tick cell line (BME26) was inhibited by BrBm37 and BrBm38 mAbs. In summary, the results reveal that it is possible to interfere with the RmTIM function using antibodies, even in intact cells.

  1. Acaricidal activity of Ocimum basilicum and Spilanthes acmella against the ectoparasitic tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Arachinida: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Veeramani, V; Sakthivelkumar, S; Tamilarasan, K; Aisha, S O; Janarthanan, S

    2014-09-01

    The ectoparasitic tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus collected at various cattle farms in and around Chennai was subjected to treatment of different crude solvent extracts of leaves of Ocimum basilicum and Spilanthes acmella for acaricidal activity. Among various solvent extracts of leaves of O. basilicum and S. acmella used, chloroform extract of O. basilicum at concentrations between 6% and 10% exhibited 70% and 100% mortality of ticks when compared to control. The LC50 and LC90 values of the chloroform extract of leaves of O. basilicum treatment on the ticks after 24 h were observed as 5.46% and 7.69%. Quantitative and qualitative analysis of α- and β- carboxylesterase enzymes in the whole gut homogenate of cattle tick, R. microplus treated with chloroform extract of leaves of O. basilicum revealed higher level of activities for the enzymes. This indicated that there was an induced response in the tick, R. microplus against the toxic effects of the extract of O. basilicum.

  2. Inhibition of Enzyme Activity of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus Triosephosphate Isomerase and BME26 Cell Growth by Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Saramago, Luiz; Franceschi, Mariana; Logullo, Carlos; Masuda, Aoi; Vaz, Itabajara da Silva; Farias, Sandra Estrazulas; Moraes, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    In the present work, we produced two monoclonal antibodies (BrBm37 and BrBm38) and tested their action against the triosephosphate isomerase of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (RmTIM). These antibodies recognize epitopes on both the native and recombinant forms of the protein. rRmTIM inhibition by BrBm37 was up to 85% whereas that of BrBrm38 was 98%, depending on the antibody-enzyme ratio. RmTIM activity was lower in ovarian, gut, and fat body tissue extracts treated with BrBm37 or BrBm38 mAbs. The proliferation of the embryonic tick cell line (BME26) was inhibited by BrBm37 and BrBm38 mAbs. In summary, the results reveal that it is possible to interfere with the RmTIM function using antibodies, even in intact cells. PMID:23202941

  3. Acaricidal activity of essential oils from five endemic conifers of New Caledonia on the cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus.

    PubMed

    Lebouvier, Nicolas; Hue, Thomas; Hnawia, Edouard; Lesaffre, Leïla; Menut, Chantal; Nour, Mohammed

    2013-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to demonstrate acaricidal activity on the cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus of essential oils from endemic conifers of New Caledonia in the context of the development of natural alternatives. Acaricidal activity of essential oils extracted from resin and heartwood of five endemic conifers of New Caledonia (Araucaria columnaris, Agathis moorei, Agathis ovata, Callitris sulcata, and Neocallitropsis pancheri) was evaluated on 14- to 21-day-old Rhipicephalus microplus tick larvae using the Larval Packal Test bioassay. A first screening with 5% dilute solution was carried out and the oils with 100% of mortality at this rate were diluted until no activity was shown. The heartwood oils of the two Cupressaceae were the most active with LC50 value of 0.65% for C. sulcata and 0.55% for N. pancheri while resin oil of A. columnaris (LC50=1.62%) was the most active of the Araucariaceae family. Negative control (ethanol) was not toxic to the larvae. The chemical composition of essential oil from resin of A. columnaris was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The essential oil was characterized by high level of sesquiterpene hydrocarbons and oxygenated sesquiterpenes and was composed mainly of aromadendrene (23.1%) and bicyclogermacrene (16.0%). In order to compare different plant resources in a sustainable program of natural acaricide, an "essential oil efficiency EOE" can be measured as the ratio between the yield of extraction and LC50 value. This study shows that A. columnaris (EOE=2.36) and N. pancheri (EOE=3.51) could provide valuable and effective natural acaricides for control of the cattle tick R. microplus.

  4. The mitochondrial genome of a Texas outbreak strain of the cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, derived from whole genome sequencing Pacific Biosciences and Illumina reads.

    PubMed

    McCooke, John K; Guerrero, Felix D; Barrero, Roberto A; Black, Michael; Hunter, Adam; Bell, Callum; Schilkey, Faye; Miller, Robert J; Bellgard, Matthew I

    2015-10-15

    The cattle fever tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus is one of the most significant medical veterinary pests in the world, vectoring several serious livestock diseases negatively impacting agricultural economies of tropical and subtropical countries around the world. In our study, we assembled the complete R. microplus mitochondrial genome from Illumina and Pac Bio sequencing reads obtained from the ongoing R. microplus (Deutsch strain from Texas, USA) genome sequencing project. We compared the Deutsch strain mitogenome to the mitogenome from a Brazilian R. microplus and from an Australian cattle tick that has recently been taxonomically designated as Rhipicephalus australis after previously being considered R. microplus. The sequence divergence of the Texas and Australia ticks is much higher than the divergence between the Texas and Brazil ticks. This is consistent with the idea that the Australian ticks are distinct from the R. microplus of the Americas.

  5. Chemical identification of Tagetes minuta Linnaeus (Asteraceae) essential oil and its acaricidal effect on ticks.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Marcos Valério; Matias, Jaqueline; Barros, Jacqueline Cavalcante; de Lima, Dênis Pires; Lopes, Rosângela da Silva; Andreotti, Renato

    2012-01-01

    The control of tick species that affect animal production is vital for the economic welfare of the cattle industry. This study focused on testing the acaricidal activity of the essential oil from the leaves and stems of Tagetes minuta against several Brazilian tick species, including Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, Rhipicephalus sanguineus, Amblyomma cajennense and Argas miniatus. The chemical composition of the essential oil was determined by chromatography and spectroscopy analyses, which revealed the presence of monoterpenes. The adult immersion test (AIT) and the larval packet test (LPT) were used to evaluate the efficacy of T. minuta essential oil in tick management at concentrations of 2.5, 5, 10, 20 and 40%. The results demonstrated that the T. minuta essential oil had over 95% efficacy against four species of ticks at a concentration of 20%. These results suggest that the essential oil of T. minuta could be used as an environmentally friendly acaricide.

  6. Analysis of Babesia bovis infection-induced gene expression changes in larvae from the cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cattle babesiosis is a tick-borne disease of cattle that has severe economic impact on cattle producers throughout the world’s tropical and subtropical countries. The most severe form of the disease is caused by the apicomplexan, Babesia bovis, and transmitted to cattle through the bite of infected cattle ticks of the genus Rhipicephalus, with the most prevalent species being Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus. We studied the reaction of the R. microplus larval transcriptome in response to infection by B. bovis. Methods Total RNA was isolated for both uninfected and Babesia bovis-infected larval samples. Subtracted libraries were prepared by subtracting the B. bovis-infected material with the uninfected material, thus enriching for expressed genes in the B. bovis-infected sample. Expressed sequence tags from the subtracted library were generated, assembled, and sequenced. To complement the subtracted library method, differential transcript expression between samples was also measured using custom high-density microarrays. The microarray probes were fabricated using oligonucleotides derived from the Bmi Gene Index database (Version 2). Array results were verified for three target genes by real-time PCR. Results Ticks were allowed to feed on a B. bovis-infected splenectomized calf and on an uninfected control calf. RNA was purified in duplicate from whole larvae and subtracted cDNA libraries were synthesized from Babesia-infected larval RNA, subtracting with the corresponding uninfected larval RNA. One thousand ESTs were sequenced from the larval library and the transcripts were annotated. We used a R. microplus microarray designed from a R. microplus gene index, BmiGI Version 2, to look for changes in gene expression that were associated with infection of R. microplus larvae. We found 24 transcripts were expressed at a statistically significant higher level in ticks feeding upon a B. bovis-infected calf contrasted to ticks feeding on an uninfected calf

  7. Effect of surfactants on Ra-sHSPI - A small heat shock protein from the cattle tick Rhipicephalus annulatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqi, Mohammad Khursheed; Shahein, Yasser E.; Hussein, Nahla; Khan, Rizwan H.

    2016-09-01

    Electrostatic interaction plays an important role in protein aggregation phenomenon. In this study, we have checked the effect of anionic - Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS) and cationic-Cetyltrimethyl Ammonium Bromide (CTAB) surfactant on aggregation behavior of Ra-sHSPI, a small heat shock protein purified from Rhipicephalus annulatus tick. To monitor the effect of these surfactants, we have employed several spectroscopic methods such as Rayleigh light scattering measurements, ANS (8-Anilinonaphthalene-1-sulfonic acid) fluorescence measurements, ThT (Thioflavin T) binding assays, Far-UV CD (Circular Dichroism) and dynamic light scattering measurements. In the presence of anionic surfactant-SDS, Ra-sHSPI forms amyloid fibrils, in contrast, no amyloid formation was observed in presence of cationic surfactant at low pH. Enhancement of ANS fluorescence intensity confirms the exposition of more hydrophobic patches during aggregation. ThT binding assay confirms the amyloid fibrillar nature of the SDS induced Ra-sHSPI aggregates and supported by PASTA 2.0 (prediction of amyloid structural aggregation) software. This study demonstrates the crucial role of charge during amyloid fibril formation at low pH in Ra-sHSPI.

  8. Effectiveness of Beauveria bassiana sensu lato strains for biological control against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Acari: Ixodidae) in China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ming; Ren, Qiaoyun; Guan, Guiquan; Li, Yufeng; Han, Xueqing; Ma, Chao; Yin, Hong; Luo, Jianxun

    2013-10-01

    Owing to the need to combat the spread of acaricide-resistant ticks, the development of long-term biological control has become a hot topic for tick control. In this study, we investigated the pathogenicity of three Beauveria bassiana isolates on the engorged female Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus ticks using different conidial concentrations. The results showed that B. bassiana B.bAT17 was highly pathogenic against engorged R. (B.) microplus females, resulting in lethal time (LT50 and LT90) of 7.14 and 9.33 days at a concentration of 10(9)conidia/ml. R. (B.) microplus females treated with B. bassiana B.bAT17 significantly reduced the amount of ovipositioning; and most ticks died before they could begin to oviposit. Proteases and chitinases were analyzed in order to establish a screening method for identification of high virulent strains. This study has confirmed the significant pathogenic effect of entomopathogenic fungi against engorged R. (B.) microplus females in China, and further studies on the efficiency of the fungus against ticks in the field are required.

  9. Characterization of proteinases from the midgut of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus involved in the generation of antimicrobial peptides

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Hemoglobin is a rich source of biologically active peptides, some of which are potent antimicrobials (hemocidins). A few hemocidins have been purified from the midgut contents of ticks. Nonetheless, how antimicrobials are generated in the tick midgut and their role in immunity is still poorly understood. Here we report, for the first time, the contribution of two midgut proteinases to the generation of hemocidins. Results An aspartic proteinase, designated BmAP, was isolated from the midgut of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus using three chromatographic steps. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction revealed that BmAP is restricted to the midgut. The other enzyme is a previously characterized midgut cathepsin L-like cysteine proteinase designated BmCL1. Substrate specificities of native BmAP and recombinant BmCL1 were mapped using a synthetic combinatorial peptide library and bovine hemoglobin. BmCL1 preferred substrates containing non-polar residues at P2 subsite and polar residues at P1, whereas BmAP hydrolysed substrates containing non-polar amino acids at P1 and P1'. Conclusions BmAP and BmCL1 generate hemocidins from hemoglobin alpha and beta chains in vitro. We postulate that hemocidins may be important for the control of tick pathogens and midgut flora. PMID:20663211

  10. Acaricidal activity of the organic extracts of thirteen South African plants against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) decoloratus (Acari: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Fouche, Gerda; Ramafuthula, Mary; Maselela, Vusi; Mokoena, Moses; Senabe, Jeremiah; Leboho, Tlabo; Sakong, Bellonah M; Adenubi, Olubukola T; Eloff, Jacobus N; Wellington, Kevin W

    2016-07-15

    The African blue tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) decoloratus, is a common tick species found in South Africa and affects cattle production as well as vectoring pathogens in regions of Africa and Asia. In an attempt to develop a non-toxic, lower cost and environmentally friendly tick control method, twenty-six plant extracts were prepared from thirteen plant species using 99.5% acetone and 99% ethanol. The adapted Shaw Larval Immersion Test (SLIT) was used to test the efficacy of the extracts. A 1% solution of each of the plant extracts was prepared for efficacy testing and the ethanol extracts were found to have better acaricidal activity than the acetone extracts. The ethanol extract from the leaves and flowers of Calpurnia aurea had the best activity [corrected mortality (CM)=82.9%] which was followed by the stem extract of Cissus quadrangularis (CM=80.4%). The plant species were screened against Vero cells and were found to have low toxicity. From this study it is apparent that there is potential for the development of botanicals as natural acaricides against R. (B.) decoloratus.

  11. Further studies on South African plants: Acaricidal activity of organic plant extracts against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Acari: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Wellington, Kevin W; Leboho, Tlabo; Sakong, Bellonah M; Adenubi, Olubukola T; Eloff, Jacobus N; Fouche, Gerda

    2017-01-30

    The goal of our research is to develop a lower cost eco-friendly tick control method because acaricides that are commonly used to control ticks are often toxic, harmful to the environment or too expensive for resource-limited farmers. Acetone and ethanol extracts were prepared and their acaricidal activities determined against the southern cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus. A 1% solution of each of the plant extracts was prepared for efficacy testing using the adapted Shaw Larval Immersion Test (SLIT). The acetone stem extract from Cissus quadrangularis (Vitaceae) and the ethanol leaf and flower extract from Calpurnia aurea (Fabaceae) had potent activity like that of the commercial acaricide, chlorfenvinphos [corrected mortality (CM)=100.0%]. The ethanol extracts of the stem of C. quadrangularis (CM=98.9%) and that of the roots, leaves and fruit of Senna italica subsp arachoides (CM=96.7%) also had good acaricidal activity. There is potential for the development of botanicals as natural acaricides against R. (B.) microplus that can be used commercially to protect animals against tick infestation. Further studies to isolate the acaricidal active compounds and to determine the environmental fate, species toxicity and skin toxicity of these plants species are, however, required before they can be considered as a treatment against ticks.

  12. Identification of intestinal bacterial flora in Rhipicephalus microplus ticks by conventional methods and PCR-DGGE analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xing-Li; Cheng, Tian-Yin; Yang, Hu; Yan, Fen

    2015-06-01

    In this study, we have analyzed the intestinal microbial flora associated with Rhipicephalus microplus ticks using both culture-dependent and independent methods based on PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE). The R. microplus ticks were collected from cattle and goats in Jiangxi, Hunan and Guizhou Provinces of China. Three distinct strains of bacteria were isolated using culture-dependent methods: Staphylococcus simulans, Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus flexus strain. Nineteen distinct DGGE bands were found using PCR-DGGE analysis, and their search for identity shows that they belonged to Rickettsiaceae, Xanthomonadaceae, Coxiella sp., Ehrlichia sp., Pseudomonas sp., Ehrlichia sp., Orphnebius sp., Rickettsia peacockii, Bacillus flexus. Rickettsia peacockii and Coxiella genus were the dominant strain of the R. microplus ticks from cattle, Pseudomonas sp. and B. flexus strain were the most common species in all tick samples from goats. Ehrlichia canis were detected only in R. microplus ticks from Yongshun area in Hunan Province. The results indicate that the intestinal microbial diversity of R. microplus ticks was influenced by tick hosts and local differences in the sampling location and these two aspects may affect transmission of pathogen to humans and animals.

  13. Proteomic analysis of cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus saliva: a comparison between partially and fully engorged females.

    PubMed

    Tirloni, Lucas; Reck, José; Terra, Renata Maria Soares; Martins, João Ricardo; Mulenga, Albert; Sherman, Nicholas E; Fox, Jay W; Yates, John R; Termignoni, Carlos; Pinto, Antônio F M; Vaz, Itabajara da Silva

    2014-01-01

    The cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus is one of the most harmful parasites affecting bovines. Similarly to other hematophagous ectoparasites, R. microplus saliva contains a collection of bioactive compounds that inhibit host defenses against tick feeding activity. Thus, the study of tick salivary components offers opportunities for the development of immunological based tick control methods and medicinal applications. So far, only a few proteins have been identified in cattle tick saliva. The aim of this work was to identify proteins present in R. microplus female tick saliva at different feeding stages. Proteomic analysis of R. microplus saliva allowed identifying peptides corresponding to 187 and 68 tick and bovine proteins, respectively. Our data confirm that (i) R. microplus saliva is complex, and (ii) that there are remarkable differences in saliva composition between partially engorged and fully engorged female ticks. R. microplus saliva is rich mainly in (i) hemelipoproteins and other transporter proteins, (ii) secreted cross-tick species conserved proteins, (iii) lipocalins, (iv) peptidase inhibitors, (v) antimicrobial peptides, (vii) glycine-rich proteins, (viii) housekeeping proteins and (ix) host proteins. This investigation represents the first proteomic study about R. microplus saliva, and reports the most comprehensive Ixodidae tick saliva proteome published to date. Our results improve the understanding of tick salivary modulators of host defense to tick feeding, and provide novel information on the tick-host relationship.

  14. [Selection of isolates of entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana (Ascomycetes: Clavicipitaceae) for control of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Acari: Ixodidae)].

    PubMed

    Barci, Leila A G; de Almeida, José Eduardo M; de Campos Nogueira, Adriana H; Zappelini, Luciano O; do Prado, Angelo P

    2009-12-01

    This study was carried out to select isolates of the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana with pathogenic potential to control the Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus tick. The effectiveness of thirty isolates was first tested at a concentration of 5 x 108 conidia.mL(-1). Of these, eight were evaluated (IBCB01, IBCB02, IBCB07, IBCB17, IBCB21, IBCB74, IBCB149, IBCB165) and showed an effectiveness between 90 and 99%; thirteen (IBCB03, IBCB14, IBCB16, IBCB24, IBCB95, IBCB97, IBCB102, IBCB141, IBCB146, IBCB147, IBCB150, IBCB154, IBCB157) between 80 and 89,5%; six (IBCB47, IBCB75, IBCB84, IBCB145, IBCB161, IBCB164) between 70 and 79%, and only two (IBCB13 and IBCB143) had lower pathogenicity (70% or below). In the second step of the study, the five more effective strains in the first phase of the experiment (IBCB01, IBCB07, IBCB21, IBCB66, IBCB165) were analyzed comparatively. Based on in vitro results, it can be concluded that IBCB66 and IBCB21 are the isolates with higher potential for field control of R. (B.) microplus. IBCB01, IBCB07, IBCB21, IBCB66 e IBCB165 isolates were submitted to a conidial production test using a rice-based substrate. The best mass production of the entomopathogenic fungus was obtained with the IBCB66 strain.

  15. Ehrlichia minasensis sp. nov., a new species within the genus Ehrlichia isolated from the tick Rhipicephalus microplus.

    PubMed

    Cabezas-Cruz, Alejandro; Zweygarth, Erich; Vancová, Marie; Broniszewska, Marzena; Grubhoffer, Libor; Passos, Lygia Maria Friche; Ribeiro, Múcio Flávio Barbosa; Alberdi, Pilar; de la Fuente, José

    2016-01-12

    Recently, we obtained a rickettsial isolate (Ehrlichia sp. UFMG-EV) from the hemolymph of Rhipicephalus microplus engorged tick females. On the basis of maximum likelihood phylogenetic analysis using 16S rRNA, groEL, dsb, gltA and trp36 nucleotide sequences we showed that Ehrlichia sp. UFMG-EV belongs to the α-Proteobacteria, family Anaplasmataceae, genus Ehrlichia. Ehrlichia sp. UFMG-EV is a sister taxa of E. canis with 16S rRNA, groEL, dsb, gltA and trp36 nucleotide sequence similarity of 98.3%, 97.2%, 94.7%, 94.3% and 49.1%, respectively. Ehrlichia sp. UFMG-EV has been maintained in the laboratory by continuous passage in the IDE8 tick cell line where the ultrastructure was characterized using electron microscopy and it resembles that of E. canis, E. muris and E. chaffensis, but not E. ruminantium and E. ewingii. We propose the name Ehrlichia minasensis sp. nov. for this bacterium to acknowledge the place from where it was isolate for first time, Minas Gerais, Brazil. The type strain of Ehrlichia minasensis sp. nov. is strain Ehrlichia sp. UFMG-EV (= DSM 100393, = TCB-TBB-0018).

  16. Anaplasma marginale infection in a Japanese Black cow 13 years after eradication of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus in Okinawa, Japan.

    PubMed

    Ooshiro, Mamoru; Zakimi, Satoshi; Matsukawa, Yoshimasa; Yafuso, Makoto; Katagiri, Yoshito; Inokuma, Hisashi

    2009-03-23

    In October 2007, a 15-year-old Japanese Black cow on Ishigaki Island, Okinawa, Japan, was diagnosed with Anaplasma marginale infection based on clinical symptoms, blood examination, smear observation, 16S rRNA and groEL gene sequence analysis, and the result of a CF test. The cow was introduced into the farm from mainland Japan as a calf in 1993, one year before the eradication of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, the main vector of A. marginale in Okinawa Prefecture. It is possible that the cow was first infected with A. marginale as a calf in Ishigaki Island and had been persistently infected since then. This is the first reported clinical case of A. marginale infection of cattle since the eradication of R. microplus in Okinawa Prefecture. Additional analysis of major surface protein 1alpha amino acid sequences revealed that the A. marginale Okinawa strain presented four new repeat forms which were not seen in other strains. This indicates that the Okinawa strain may be a unique geographical variant of A. marginale.

  17. Red deer (Cervus elaphus) as a host for the cattle tick Rhipicephalus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae) in Yucatan, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Vivas, R I; Ojeda-Chi, M M; Rosado-Aguilar, J A; Trinidad-Martínez, I C; Torres-Acosta, J F J; Ticante-Perez, V; Castro-Marín, J M; Tapia-Moo, C A; Vázquez-Gómez, G

    2013-08-01

    Rhipicephalus microplus is the most economically important cattle tick in the Mexican tropics. Wild ungulate species, including red deer (Cervus elaphus), are gaining popularity in diversified livestock ranching operations in Mexico. However, there is no information available on the susceptibility of red deer to infestation with the cattle tick, R. microplus, under hot, subhumid tropical conditions in Mexico. Biological data on R. microplus as an ectoparasite of cattle and red deer in a farm in the Mexican tropics are presented here. Ticks collected from red deer were identified as R. microplus (97 %) and Amblyomma cajennense (3 %), and tick species infesting cattle included R. microplus (95 %) and A. cajennense (5 %). Standard counts of R. microplus engorged females on red deer were 11 times higher than on cattle (428 ± 43 vs. 40 ± 18; p < 0.001). The reproductive efficiency index and larval hatching of R. microplus collected from cattle and red deer were similar (p > 0.05). Hemolymph samples of R. microplus collected from cattle were positive for Babesia spp. (10 %, 2/50) and all the samples from ticks infesting red deer were negative. Seventeen and ten percent of the blood samples from cattle and red deer were positive for Anaplasma marginale, respectively. The role of red deer as a host of R. microplus in Yucatan, Mexico and the importance of this host-parasite relationship relative to the epidemiology of R. microplus-borne diseases are discussed.

  18. Inorganic Polyphosphates Regulate Hexokinase Activity and Reactive Oxygen Species Generation in Mitochondria of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus Embryo

    PubMed Central

    Fraga, Amanda; Moraes, Jorge; da Silva, José Roberto; Costa, Evenilton P.; Menezes, Jackson; da Silva Vaz Jr, Itabajara; Logullo, Carlos; da Fonseca, Rodrigo Nunes; Campos, Eldo

    2013-01-01

    The physiological roles of polyphosphates (poly P) recently found in arthropod mitochondria remain obscure. Here, the possible involvement of poly P with reactive oxygen species generation in mitochondria of Rhipicephalus microplus embryos was investigated. Mitochondrial hexokinase and scavenger antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione reductase were assayed during embryogenesis of R. microplus. The influence of poly P3 and poly P15 were analyzed during the period of higher enzymatic activity during embryogenesis. Both poly Ps inhibited hexokinase activity by up to 90% and, interestingly, the mitochondrial membrane exopolyphosphatase activity was stimulated by the hexokinase reaction product, glucose-6-phosphate. Poly P increased hydrogen peroxide generation in mitochondria in a situation where mitochondrial hexokinase is also active. The superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione reductase activities were higher during embryo cellularization, at the end of embryogenesis and during embryo segmentation, respectively. All of the enzymes were stimulated by poly P3. However, superoxide dismutase was not affected by poly P15, catalase activity was stimulated only at high concentrations and glutathione reductase was the only enzyme that was stimulated in the same way by both poly Ps. Altogether, our results indicate that inorganic polyphosphate and mitochondrial membrane exopolyphosphatase regulation can be correlated with the generation of reactive oxygen species in the mitochondria of R. microplus embryos. PMID:23983617

  19. Assessment of the repellent effect of Lippia alba essential oil and major monoterpenes on the cattle tick Rhipicephalus microplus.

    PubMed

    Lima, A da Silva; Carvalho, J F de; Peixoto, M G; Blank, A F; Borges, L M F; Costa Junior, L M

    2016-03-01

    The control of Rhipicephalus microplus (Ixodida: Ixodidae) is achieved using synthetic acaricides. However, resistant tick populations are widespread around the world. Plant essential oils can act as repellents, keeping ticks away from hosts and decreasing the selection pressure on synthetic acaricides. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro repellent effect of Lippia alba essential oil on R. microplus larvae. Leaves from two L. alba genotypes maintained under the same agronomic and environmental conditions were collected. Essential oil was extracted by hydrodistillation and analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The major monoterpenes detected in the chemical analysis were commercially acquired and tested. For the repellency test, a glass rod was vertically fixed to measure active climbing of approximately 30 R. microplus larvae aged 14-21 days in response to essential oils and monoterpenes. Repellency was evaluated at 1 h, 3 h and 5 h after treatment. Variation in repellent action was detected between the genotypes. The major monoterpenes identified in the essential oils (limonene and carvone) showed low repellent effects in comparison with intact essential oils. Thus, the present results showed that L. alba essential oil contains bioactive compounds with great repellent activity against ticks that varies according to the plant genotype.

  20. Prediction of G protein-coupled receptor encoding sequences from the synganglion transcriptome of the cattle tick, Rhipicephalus microplus

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Felix D.; Kellogg, Anastasia; Ogrey, Alexandria N.; Heekin, Andrew M.; Barrero, Roberto; Bellgard, Matthew I.; Dowd, Scot E.; Leung, Ming-Ying

    2016-01-01

    The cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, is a pest which causes multiple health complications in cattle. The G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) super-family presents a candidate target for developing novel tick control methods. However, GPCRs share limited sequence similarity among orthologous family members, and there is no reference genome available for R. microplus. This limits the effectiveness of alignment-dependent methods such as BLAST and Pfam for identifying GPCRs from R. microplus. However, GPCRs share a common structure consisting of seven transmembrane helices. We present an analysis of the R. microplus synganglion transcriptome using a combination of structurally-based and alignment-free methods which supplement the identification of GPCRs by sequence similarity. TMHMM predicts the number of transmembrane helices in a protein sequence. GPCRpred is a support vector machine-based method developed to predict and classify GPCRs using the dipeptide composition of a query aminoacid sequence. These two bioinformatic tools were applied to our transcriptome assembly of the cattle tick synganglion. Together, BLAST and Pfam identified 85 unique contigs as encoding partial or full length candidate cattle tick GPCRs. Collectively, TMHMM and GPCRpred identified 27 additional GPCR candidates that BLAST and Pfam missed. This demonstrates that the addition of structurally-based and alignment-free bioinformatic approaches to transcriptome annotation and analysis produces a greater collection of prospective GPCRs than an analysis based solely upon methodologies dependent upon sequence alignment and similarity. PMID:26922323

  1. First report of ivermectin resistance in field populations of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Acari: Ixodidae) in Punjab districts of India.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nirbhay Kumar; Singh, Harkirat; Jyoti; Prerna, Mranalini; Rath, Shitanshu S

    2015-11-30

    The larval immersion test (LIT) was used on the progenies of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus collected from four districts of the Punjab state, India to test the resistance to ivermectin. The regression graphs of probit mortality of larval ticks plotted against log values of increasing concentrations of ivermectin were utilized for the determination of slope of mortality, lethal concentration for 50%(LC50), 95%(LC95), resistance ratios (RR50, RR95) and the resistance levels (RL). Values of the coefficient of determination (R(2)) for LIT ranged from 0.900 to 0.978, and the RR50 and RR95 values against ivermectin ranged from 2.97 to 8.85 and 2.42 to 8.47, respectively, indicating resistance status in all field isolates. On the basis of RR values, three field isolates (BAT, GUR, HOS) showed level II, whereas PTK isolate showed presence of level I resistance status against ivermectin. This appears to be the first report of ivermectin resistance in R. (B.) microplus from Punjab, India.

  2. Artificial feeding of Rhipicephalus microplus female ticks with anti calreticulin serum do not influence tick and Babesia bigemina acquisition.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Sandra; Merino, Octávio; Lérias, Joana; Domingues, Nuno; Mosqueda, Juan; de la Fuente, José; Domingos, Ana

    2015-02-01

    Ticks are obligate haematophagous ectoparasites considered the principal vectors of disease among animals. Rhipicephalus microplus and R. annulatus ticks are the most important vectors for Babesia bigemina and B. bovis, two of the most important intraerythrocytic protozoan parasites species in cattle, responsible for babesiosis which together with anaplasmosis account for substantial economic losses in the livestock industry worldwide. Anti-tick vaccines are a proved alternative to traditional tick and tick borne diseases control methods but are still limited primarily due to the lack of effective antigens. Subsequently to the identification of antigens the validation is a laborious work often expensive. Tick artificial feeding, is a low cost alternative to test antigens allowing achieving critical data. Herein, R. microplus females were successfully artificially fed using capillary tubes. Calreticulin (CRT) protein, which in a previous study has been identified as being involved in B. bigemina infection in R. annulatus ticks, was expressed as recombinant protein (rCRT) in an E. coli expression system and antibodies raised against rCRT. Anti-rCRT serum was supplemented to a blood meal, offered to partially engorged R. microplus females and their effect in feeding process as well as infection by B. bigemina was analyzed. No significant reductions in tick and egg weight were observed when ticks fed with anti-rCRT serum. Furthermore, B. bigemina infection levels did not show a statistically significant decrease when ticks fed with anti-rCRT antibodies. Results suggest that CRT is not a suitable candidate for cattle vaccination trials.

  3. Inhibitor profile of bis(n)-tacrines and N-methylcarbamates on acetylcholinesterase from Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus and Phlebotomus papatasi

    PubMed Central

    Swale, Daniel R.; Tong, Fan; Temeyer, Kevin B.; Li, Andrew; Lam, Polo C-H.; Totrov, Maxim M.; Carlier, Paul R.; Pérez de León, Adalberto A.; Bloomquist, Jeffrey R.

    2013-01-01

    The cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Bm), and the sand fly, Phlebotomus papatasi (Pp), are disease vectors to cattle and humans, respectively. The purpose of this study was to characterize the inhibitor profile of acetylcholinesterases from Bm (BmAChE1) and Pp (PpAChE) compared to human and bovine AChE, in order to identify divergent pharmacology that might lead to selective inhibitors. Results indicate that BmAChE has low sensitivity (IC50 = 200 μM) toward tacrine, a monovalent catalytic site inhibitor with sub micromolar blocking potency in all previous species tested. Similarly, a series of bis(n)-tacrine dimer series, bivalent inhibitors and peripheral site AChE inhibitors possess poor potency toward BmAChE. Molecular homology models suggest the rBmAChE enzyme possesses a W384F orthologous substitution near the catalytic site, where the larger tryptophan side chain obstructs the access of larger ligands to the active site, but functional analysis of this mutation suggests it only partially explains the low sensitivity to tacrine. In addition, BmAChE1 and PpAChE have low nanomolar sensitivity to some experimental carbamate anticholinesterases originally designed for control of the malaria mosquito, Anopheles gambiae. One experimental compound, 2-((2-ethylbutyl)thio)phenyl methylcarbamate, possesses >300-fold selectivity for BmAChE1 and PpAChE over human AChE, and a mouse oral LD50 of >1500 mg/kg, thus providing an excellent new lead for vector control. PMID:24187393

  4. Non-parasitic life cycle of the cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus in Panicum maximum pastures in northern Argentina.

    PubMed

    Mastropaolo, Mariano; Mangold, Atilio J; Guglielmone, Alberto A; Nava, Santiago

    2017-03-21

    The aim of this work was to study the non-parasitic phase of the Rhipicephalus microplus life cycle in Panicum maximum grasses from northern Argentina, in order to provide ecological information for designing methods of tick control. Four localities were chosen as replicates. The biological parameters measured were proportion of females ovipositing, the pre-oviposition period, the proportion of egg clusters hatching, the incubation period of eggs, larval longevity, and the total non-parasitic period (time from the exposure of the female to the date of death of the last larva) (TNPP)). The following general trends were observed: I) a longer TNPP occurred when female ticks were exposed in mid- and late summer and early spring; II) the shortest TNPP occurred when female ticks were exposed from late winter to late spring; III) larvae that were active in early and mid-summer had the shortest longevity; IV) incubation periods of eggs, which originated from females exposed in late summer, early autumn and mid-spring, were longer than the incubation period of eggs produced by females exposed in late spring and early summer; V) eggs did not hatch when the engorged females were exposed in the pastures in mid- and late autumn and winter. The spelling period of the P. maximum grasses that is needed to ensure total control of R. microplus consists of 19-20weeks if the spelling starts in late spring and early summer, and 27-28weeks if the spelling begins in mid- and late summer or in autumn.

  5. Spectroscopic evaluation of thymol dissolved by different methods and influence on acaricidal activity against larvae of Rhipicephalus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Daemon, Erik; Monteiro, Caio Márcio Oliveira; Maturano, Ralph; Senra, Tatiane Oliveira Souza; Calmon, Fernanda; Faza, Aline; de Azevedo Prata, Márcia Cristina; Georgopoulos, Stéfanos Leite; de Oliveira, Luiz Fernando Cappa

    2012-11-01

    The acaricidal activity of three thymol formulations was investigated at five concentrations (1.25, 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, and 10.0 mg/ml) on Rhipicephalus microplus larvae, and the behavior of its solubility in these formulations was analyzed. The thymol was dissolved in distilled water plus 1 % dimethylsulfoxide as adjuvant under two heating regimes (water bath in formulation 1 and hot plate in formulation 2) as well as without heating in 50 % ethanol and 50 % water (v/v). The acaricidal activity was assessed by the modified larval packet test, and the solubilization behavior was investigated by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, based on the Beer-Lambert law. With formulations 1 and 2, the mortality was greater than 95 % starting at the thymol concentrations of 5.0 and 7.5 mg/ml, respectively, while with formulation 3, this mortality level was reached starting at a concentration of 2.5 mg/ml, showing that the addition of ethanol in the solution enhanced the acaricidal action of thymol. This result was supported by the LC 90 values, which were 3.3, 2.4, and 1.6 mg/ml of thymol for formulations 1, 2, and 3, respectively. This result is related to the better solubility of thymol in the hydroethanolic formulation, since the spectroscopic analysis revealed that the thymol dissolved more completely in this formulation. This fact was evident once the R (2) obtained from the linear regression analysis of the relation absorbance × concentration of the formulations 1, 2, and 3 approached the optimal value (R (2) = 1) in the following sequence: 1, 2, and 3 (0.717, 0.901, and 0.968, respectively).

  6. Identification of immunogenic proteins from ovarian tissue and recognized in larval extracts of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, through an immunoproteomic approach.

    PubMed

    Ramírez Rodríguez, Patricia Berenice; Rosario Cruz, Rodrigo; Domínguez García, Delia Inés; Hernández Gutiérrez, Rodolfo; Lagunes Quintanilla, Rodolfo Esteban; Ortuño Sahagún, Daniel; González Castillo, Celia; Gutiérrez Ortega, Abel; Herrera Rodríguez, Sara Elisa; Vallejo Cardona, Adriana; Martínez Velázquez, Moisés

    2016-11-01

    Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus ticks are obligatory hematophagous ectoparasites of cattle and act as vectors for disease-causing microorganisms. Conventional tick control is based on the use of chemical acaricides; however, their uncontrolled use has increased tSresistant tick populations, as well as food and environmental contamination. Alternative immunological tick control has shown to be partially effective. The only anti-tick vaccine commercially available at present in the world is based on intestinal Bm86 protein, and shows a variable effectiveness depending on tick strains or geographic isolates. Therefore, there is a need to characterize new antigens in order to improve immunological protection. The aim of this work was to identify immunogenic proteins from ovarian tissue extracts of R. microplus, after cattle immunization. Results showed that ovarian proteins complexed with the adjuvant Montanide ISA 50 V generated a strong humoral response on vaccinated cattle. IgG levels peaked at fourth post-immunization week and remained high until the end of the experiment. 1D and 2D SDS-PAGE-Western blot assays with sera from immunized cattle recognized several ovarian proteins. Reactive bands were cut and analyzed by LC-MS/MS. They were identified as Vitellogenin, Vitellogenin-2 precursor and Yolk Cathepsin. Our findings along with bioinformatic analysis indicate that R. microplus has several Vitellogenin members, which are proteolytically processed to generate multiple polypeptide fragments. This apparent complexity of vitellogenic tick molecular targets gives the opportunity to explore their potential usefulness as vaccine candidates but, at the same time, imposes a challenge on the selection of the appropriate set of antigens.

  7. Identification and Structural-Functional Analysis of Cyclin-Dependent Kinases of the Cattle Tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Helga; Romeiro, Nelilma C.; Braz, Gloria R. C.; de Oliveira, Eduardo Alves Gamosa; Rodrigues, Camilla; da Fonseca, Rodrigo Nunes; Githaka, Naftaly; Isezaki, Masayoshi; Konnai, Satoru; Ohashi, Kazuhiko; da Silva Vaz, Itabajara; Logullo, Carlos; Moraes, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are a family of serine/threonine kinases essential for cell cycle progression. Herein, we describe the participation of CDKs in the physiology of Rhipicephalus microplus, the southern cattle tick and an important disease vector. Firstly, amino acid sequences homologous with CDKs of other organisms were identified from a R. microplus transcriptome database in silico. The analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences of CDK1 and CDK10 from R. microplus showed that both have caspase-3/7 cleavage motifs despite their differences in motif position and length of encoded proteins. CDK1 has two motifs (DKRGD and SAKDA) located opposite to the ATP binding site while CDK10 has only one motif (SLLDN) for caspase 3–7 near the ATP binding site. Roscovitine (Rosco), a purine derivative that inhibits CDK/cyclin complexes by binding to the catalytic domain of the CDK molecule at the ATP binding site, which prevents the transfer of ATP's γphosphoryl group to the substrate. To determine the effect of Rosco on tick CDKs, BME26 cells derived from R. microplus embryo cells were utilized in vitro inhibition assays. Cell viability decreased in the Rosco-treated groups after 24 hours of incubation in a concentration-dependent manner and this was observed up to 48 hours following incubation. To our knowledge, this is the first report on characterization of a cell cycle protein in arachnids, and the sensitivity of BME26 tick cell line to Rosco treatment suggests that CDKs are potential targets for novel drug design to control tick infestation. PMID:24146826

  8. Lavandula angustifolia essential oil as a novel and promising natural candidate for tick (Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) annulatus) control.

    PubMed

    Pirali-Kheirabadi, Khodadad; Teixeira da Silva, Jaime A

    2010-10-01

    Lavandula angustifolia is a well known herbal medicine with a variety of useful properties, including its acaricidal effect. This experiment was carried out to study the bioacaricidal activity of L. angustifolia essential oil (EO) against engorged Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) annulatus (Acari; Ixodidae) females. For this purpose six serial concentrations (0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0, 6.0 and 8.0% w/v) of L. angustifolia EO were used. There was considerable mortality in concentrations more than 4.0% although there were no differences between 6.0 and 8.0% in all measured criteria. The mortality rate 24 h after inoculation was 73.26 and 100% in groups treated with 4.0 and 8.0% EO, respectively. Lavender EO also reduced tick egg weight in a concentration-dependent manner. The amount of eggs produced varied from 0.12 g (at 0.5% EO) to 0.00 g (at 8.0% EO) but did not differ statistically from the control. L. angustifolia EO caused 100% failure in egg laying at 6.0 and 8.0% whereas this value in the control group was zero. A positive correlation between L. angustifolia EO concentration and tick control, assessed by relative mortality rate and egg-laying weight, was observed by the EO LC/EC(50), which, when calculated using the Probit test, was 2.76-fold higher than the control. Lavender is a promising acaricidal against R. (B.) annulatus in vitro.

  9. Sexual differences in the sialomes of the zebra tick, Rhipicephalus pulchellus

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Angelina W. L.; Francischetti, Ivo M.B.; Slovak, Mirko; Manjunatha, Kini R.; Ribeiro, José M. C.

    2015-01-01

    Ticks rely exclusively on vertebrate blood for their survival. During feeding ticks inject into their hosts a sophisticated salivary potion that overcomes host hemostasis and adverse inflammatory responses. These mediators may also enhance pathogen transmission. Knowledge of the tick salivary protein repertoire may lead to vaccine targets to disrupt feeding and/or parasite transmission as well as to the discovery of novel pharmacological agents. Male saliva may also assist reproduction because males use their mouthparts to lubricate and introduce their spermatophores into the females’ genital pore. The analyses of the sialomes of male and female ticks independently allow us to understand the strategy used by each gender to feed successfully.We sequenced cDNA libraries from pools of salivary glands from adult male and female R. pulchellus feeding at different time points, using the Illumina HiSeq protocol. De novo assembly of a total of 241,229,128 paired-end reads lead to extraction of 50,460 coding sequences (CDS), 11,277 of which had more than 75% coverage to known transcripts, or represented novel sequences, and were submitted to GenBank. Additionally, we generated the proteome, from the salivary gland extracts of male and female R. pulchellus, yielding a total of 454 and 2,063 proteins respectively which were identified by one or more peptides with at least 95% confidence. The data set is presented as an annotated hyperlinked Excel spreadsheet, describing 121 putative secreted protein families. Female and male specific transcripts were identified. PMID:25576852

  10. Rhipicephalus annulatus (Acari: Ixodidae) Control by Nigella sativa, Thyme and Spinosad Preparations

    PubMed Central

    Aboelhadid, Shawky Mohamed; Mahran, Hesham A; El-Hariri, Hazem M; Shokier, Khalid Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Background: Several compounds obtained from plants have potential insecticidal, growth deterrent or repellent characteristics. The control of hard ticks by non-chemical substances was targeted in this study. Methods: The effect of 36 materials on in-vitro ticks was studied, including 2 absolute controls (water only or absolute ethyl alcohol only), 6 conventionally used spinosad preparations (aqueous solutions), 12 Nigella sativa (N. sativa) preparations (aqueous and alcoholic solutions), and 12 Thyme preparations (aqueous and alcoholic solutions). The engorged ticks were tested in-vitro for mortality and oviposition ability using the studied materials. Results: The final mortality after 48 hours of application in N. sativa aqueous preparations began from 10.0% concentration, 1.0% to 100% by concentration preparations ≥10%. In addition, N. sativa alcoholic preparations began from 50.0% concentration, 2 % to 100% by concentration ≥5%. Meanwhile, Thyme aqueous and alcoholic preparations began from 70.0% concentration, 5% to 90% by concentration 10–20%. Additionally, spinosad aqueous preparations and both of control preparations (Water and Alcohol) resulted in no mortality. All differences were statistically significant. The oviposition was stopped in N. sativa (aqueous ≥10% and alcoholic ≥5%) and in spinosad (aqueous≥25%). The aqoues dilution of the used matters killed B. annulatus larvae beginning from the concentration 5%. Conclusion: Nigella sativa alcohol 20% was the best of studied preparations being the lowest concentration (20%) that could achieve the highest lethal (100%) effect in shortest time (12 hours). Moreover, Thyme oil and spinosad could not kill 100% of adult but did on larvae. PMID:27308273

  11. Differential expression of genes in salivary glands of male Rhipicephalus (Boophilus)microplus in response to infection with Anaplasma marginale

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Bovine anaplasmosis, caused by the rickettsial tick-borne pathogen Anaplasma marginale (Rickettsiales: Anaplasmataceae), is vectored by Rhipicephalus (Boophilus)microplus in many tropical and subtropical regions of the world. A. marginale undergoes a complex developmental cycle in ticks which results in infection of salivary glands from where the pathogen is transmitted to cattle. In previous studies, we reported modification of gene expression in Dermacentor variabilis and cultured Ixodes scapularis tick cells in response to infection with A. marginale. In these studies, we extended these findings by use of a functional genomics approach to identify genes differentially expressed in R. microplus male salivary glands in response to A. marginale infection. Additionally, a R. microplus-derived cell line, BME26, was used for the first time to also study tick cell gene expression in response to A. marginale infection. Results Suppression subtractive hybridization libraries were constructed from infected and uninfected ticks and used to identify genes differentially expressed in male R. microplus salivary glands infected with A. marginale. A total of 279 ESTs were identified as candidate differentially expressed genes. Of these, five genes encoding for putative histamine-binding protein (22Hbp), von Willebrand factor (94Will), flagelliform silk protein (100Silk), Kunitz-like protease inhibitor precursor (108Kunz) and proline-rich protein BstNI subfamily 3 precursor (7BstNI3) were confirmed by real-time RT-PCR to be down-regulated in tick salivary glands infected with A. marginale. The impact of selected tick genes on A. marginale infections in tick salivary glands and BME26 cells was characterized by RNA interference. Silencing of the gene encoding for putative flagelliform silk protein (100Silk) resulted in reduced A. marginale infection in both tick salivary glands and cultured BME26 cells, while silencing of the gene encoding for subolesin (4D8

  12. Species distribution modelling for Rhipicephalus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae) in Benin, West Africa: comparing datasets and modelling algorithms.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, E M; Leta, S; Estrada-Peña, A; Madder, M; Adehan, S; Vanwambeke, S O

    2015-01-01

    Rhipicephalus microplus is one of the most widely distributed and economically important ticks, transmitting Babesia bigemina, B. bovis and Anaplasma marginale. It was recently introduced to West Africa on live animals originating from Brazil. Knowing the precise environmental suitability for the tick would allow veterinary health officials to draft vector control strategies for different regions of the country. To test the performance of modelling algorithms and different sets of environmental explanatory variables, species distribution models for this tick species in Benin were developed using generalized linear models, linear discriminant analysis and random forests. The training data for these models were a dataset containing reported absence or presence in 104 farms, randomly selected across Benin. These farms were sampled at the end of the rainy season, which corresponds with an annual peak in tick abundance. Two environmental datasets for the country of Benin were compared: one based on interpolated climate data (WorldClim) and one based on remotely sensed images (MODIS). The pixel size for both environmental datasets was 1 km. Highly suitable areas occurred mainly along the warmer and humid coast extending northwards to central Benin. The northern hot and drier areas were found to be unsuitable. The models developed and tested on data from the entire country were generally found to perform well, having an AUC value greater than 0.92. Although statistically significant, only small differences in accuracy measures were found between the modelling algorithms, or between the environmental datasets. The resulting risk maps differed nonetheless. Models based on interpolated climate suggested gradual variations in habitat suitability, while those based on remotely sensed data indicated a sharper contrast between suitable and unsuitable areas, and a patchy distribution of the suitable areas. Remotely sensed data yielded more spatial detail in the predictions. When

  13. Invitro acaricidal activity of ethnoveterinary plants and green synthesis of zinc oxide nanoparticles against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus.

    PubMed

    Banumathi, Balan; Malaikozhundan, Balasubramanian; Vaseeharan, Baskaralingam

    2016-01-30

    The present study was designed to investigate the invitro acaricidal effects of seven ethnoveterinary plants, zinc acetate and green synthesized zinc oxide nanoparticles against the Southern cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus. The selected ethnoveterinary plants were extracted using ethanol and aqueous (water) solvents at 0.02mg/ml and 0.04mg/ml concentrations. Of these seven plants, Lobelia leschenaultiana showed the highest percentage of tick mortality. The ethanol extracts of L. leschenaultiana showed 93.33% mortality at 0.04mg/ml and its LC50 was 0.05mg/ml. However, zinc acetate exhibited 70% mortality at 0.04mg/ml (LC50: 0.0192mg/ml). Further, we synthesized ZnO nanoparticle using the leaf extracts of L. leschenaultiana and zinc acetate as the precursor material to control R. (B.) microplus. The structural characterization of the synthesized ZnO nanoparticles (Ll-ZnO NPs) was performed by UV-vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microsopy (TEM). UV-vis spectra showed the absorption band at 383nm. XRD analysis clearly showed the crystalline nature of Ll-ZnO NPs with various Bragg's reflection peaks at 100, 002, 101, 102, 110, 103, 200, 201 and 202 planes. FTIR analysis showed the possible functional groups of Ll-ZnO NPs with strong band at 3420.63 and 2922.48cm(-1). SEM and TEM analysis revealed that the Ll-ZnO NPs were spherical and hexagonal in shape with particle size ranging between 20 and 65nm. The mortality of R. (B.) microplus after treatment with Ll-ZnO NPs was 35, 57.5 and 82.5% at 0.001, 0.002 and 0.004mg/ml. On the otherhand, 100% mortality of R. (B.) microplus was observed at 0.008mg/ml (LC50: 0.0017mg/ml). The results indicated that the Ll-ZnO NPs have good acaricidal properties compared to L. leschenaultiana leaf extract and zinc acetate.

  14. In vitro and in vivo acaricide action of juvenoid analogs produced from the chemical modification of Cymbopogon spp. and Corymbia citriodora essential oil on the cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus.

    PubMed

    Chagas, Ana Carolina S; Domingues, Luciana F; Fantatto, Rafaela R; Giglioti, Rodrigo; Oliveira, Márcia C S; Oliveira, Daniela H; Mano, Renata A; Jacob, Raquel G

    2014-09-15

    The present study aimed to evaluate the acaricidal action of the chemically modified essential oil of Cymbopogon spp. and Corymbia citriodora on Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus. Citronellal was converted into N-butylcitronellylamine and in N-prop-2-inylcitronellylamine, analogs of juvenoids, by reductive amination using butylamine (N1 to N3) and propargylamine (N4 to N7). In vitro assays included the adult immersion, and larval packet tests. Engorged females were weighed in groups of 10 and tested in three replicates for six concentrations. They were immersed in the modified oils or control solution and incubated. In the larval packet test, the same substances and concentrations were evaluated in three replicates. In the in vivo test, six pastured heifers naturally infested with R. (B.) microplus were used per treatment: negative control, positive control (amitraz, Triatox(®)), original oil of C. citriodora at 1.5%, and modified oil containing 0.9% N-prop-2-inylcitronellylamine (N7). Ticks were counted in the right side of the body in 24 animals from day D-3 to D21. LC50 and LC90 were obtained by Probit analysis, while the in vivo results were log transformed and compared using the Tukey test. Among the nitrocellylamines tested in vitro, N6 was most effective on the engorged females (100% efficacy at 50mg/mL) and N7 on the larvae (100% efficacy at 6.25mg/mL). In the test with larvae, the original oil of C. citriodora was less effective than the counterpart modified oil (N7), proving that the chemical modification optimized its effect. In the in vivo test, no significant difference was observed between N7 and the negative control. The average numbers of ticks on the animals' right side were 32.8, 8.1, 37.9 and 35.4 for the negative control, positive control, original oil and N7, respectively. The chemical modification improved the efficacy in vitro, but it was not observed in vivo, perhaps due to the low stability of the amines under field conditions. The

  15. Effect of deforestation and introduction of exotic grasses as livestock forage on the population dynamics of the cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Acari: Ixodidae) in northern Argentina.

    PubMed

    Nava, Santiago; Mastropaolo, Mariano; Guglielmone, Alberto A; Mangold, Atilio J

    2013-12-01

    The effect of deforestation and the introduction of exotic grasses on the population dynamics of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus in northern Argentina was analysed. Biological parameters that were measured included proportion of females ovipositing, pre-oviposition period, incubation period of eggs, proportion of egg clusters hatching, larval longevity and total non-parasitic period. No significant differences were observed in proportion of females ovipositing and in pre-oviposition period between forested and grassland areas. Regarding the other parameters, in the majority of the temporal series there were no significant differences. In the cases where differences with statistical significance were detected, they were not unidirectional. The replacement of native forest by grasses can potentially increase tick abundance not by the modification of microclimatic conditions, but by increasing the tick-host encounter rate due to a higher cattle density. The hypothesis that deforestation and introduction of exotic grasses affects the non-parasitic phase of R. microplus in northern Argentina was not supported.

  16. Ticks infesting humans in Northern Misiones, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Lamattina, Daniela; Nava, Santiago

    2016-01-01

    This work presents records of ticks infesting humans in northern Misiones Province, Argentina. Also, notes on potential transmission of tick-borne pathogens are included. A total of 282 ticks attached to researchers were collected and identified by their morphological characters. Eight tick species were found: Amblyomma brasiliense, Amblyomma coelebs, Amblyomma dubitatum, Amblyomma incisum, Amblyomma ovale, Haemaphysalis juxtakochi, Rhipicephalus sanguineus and Rhipicephalus microplus. Some of these species as A. dubitatum, A. ovale and R. sanguineus have been found infected with spotted fever group rickettsiae pathogenic to humans in Brazil and Argentina. The potential role as vectors of humans pathogens of the ticks found attached to humans in this study is discussed.

  17. Polymyositis - adult

    MedlinePlus

    ... rash is a sign of a similar condition, dermatomyositis . Common symptoms include: Muscle weakness in the shoulders ... in the treatment of refractory adult and juvenile dermatomyositis and adult polymyositis: a randomized, placebo-phase trial. ...

  18. Acaricide rotation strategy for managing resistance in the tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Acarina: Ixodidae): laboratory experiment with a field strain from Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Thullner, Friederike; Willadsen, Peter; Kemp, David

    2007-09-01

    During the past two decades, resistance to pyrethroids within the cattle tick genus Boophilus has caused tick control problems in various tropical countries, mainly in Latin America, southern Africa, Australia, and New Caledonia. A Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Canestrini) strain from Costa Rica, exhibiting resistance to the pyrethroid deltamethrin but only a very low resistance to organophosphates (OP) was kept under selection pressure for 9 to 11 generations by using deltamethrin or coumaphos (OP), either exclusively or in rotation. The objective of this acaricide rotation was to examine the possibility of delaying or reducing the full emergence of pyrethroid resistance. In the substrain selected with deltamethrin at the LD50 concentration, resistance to deltamethrin was measured after five generations (resistance factor [RF] = 9.2) and very high resistance after 11 generations (RF = 756), compared with the starting field strain from Costa Rica. In the substrain selected with deltamethrin then coumaphos in rotation, resistance to deltamethrin was variable from one generation to the next (RF = 1-4.2), but no high, stable resistance developed. After 10 generations of rotation, the deltamethrin RF was 1.6. In the substrains selected continuously with coumaphos or coumaphos and deltamethrin in rotation, no consistent change in resistance to coumaphos was observed. Rotation of deltamethrin with coumaphos seems to delay the development of strong resistance to deltamethrin in a population that had initially a low level of deltamethrin resistance.

  19. Molecular characterization and expression analysis of three novel autophagy-related genes from the cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Acari: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Flores Fernández, José Miguel; Barragán Álvarez, Carla Patricia; Sánchez Hernández, Carla Vanessa; Padilla Camberos, Eduardo; González Castillo, Celia; Ortuño Sahagún, Daniel; Martínez Velázquez, Moisés

    2016-11-01

    The cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus is a hematophagous ectoparasite of major importance for the livestock industry. It shows a remarkable ability to survive over long periods without feeding. However, the mechanisms used to endure long-term starvation are poorly understood. It is believed that autophagy, a process of intracellular protein degradation, may play a significant role to confront adverse environmental conditions. To advance our understanding of autophagy in R. microplus, in the present study we report the molecular characterization of three autophagy-related (ATG) genes, namely, RmATG3, RmATG4 and RmATG6, as well as their expression profiles in different developmental stages and organs of the parasite. The deduced amino acid sequences derived from the characterized gene sequences were subjected to Basic Local Alignment Search Tool analysis. The testing produced significant alignments with respective ATG proteins from Haemaphysalis longicornis and Ixodes scapularis ticks. Real-time polymerase chain reaction assays revealed that RmATG4 and RmATG6 transcripts were elevated in egg and ovary tissue, when compared with larva and midgut samples, while RmATG3 expression in midgut was 2-fold higher than in egg, larva and ovary samples.

  20. Population dynamics of the cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus in a subtropical subhumid region of Argentina for use in the design of control strategies.

    PubMed

    Canevari, J T; Mangold, A J; Guglielmone, A A; Nava, S

    2017-03-01

    The population dynamics of Rhipicephalus microplus (Ixodida: Ixodidae) in northwest Argentina was analysed to support the design of strategic methods for its control. Both parasitic and non-parasitic phases were studied. The seasonal activity of R. microplus in its parasitic phase was characterized by three peaks in abundance: the first in mid-late spring; the second in summer, and the third in autumn. The non-parasitic phase of R. microplus was characterized by a long total non-parasitic period observed after exposures of females from mid-summer to early autumn, a short total non-parasitic period observed after exposures of females from late winter to late spring, a short period of larval longevity in early and mid-summer, and no hatch of the eggs produced by females exposed in mid- and late autumn and winter. Treatments of cattle administered during the period from late winter to late spring will act on small cohorts of R. microplus, preventing the emergence of larger generations in summer and autumn. A 17-week spelling period starting in late spring and early summer will be necessary to achieve optimal control of R. microplus free-living larvae. If spelling begins in mid- or late summer or in autumn, the required period will be 26-27 weeks.

  1. Evaluation of In Vivo Acaricidal Effect of Soap Containing Essential Oil of Chenopodium ambrosioides Leaves on Rhipicephalus lunulatus in the Western Highland of Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Kouam, Marc K; Payne, Vincent K; Miégoué, Emile; Tendonkeng, Fernand; Lemoufouet, Jules; Kana, Jean R; Boukila, Benoit; Pamo, E Tedonkeng; Mnm, Bertine

    2015-01-01

    A study on the acaricidal properties of foam soap containing the essential oil of Chenopodium ambrosioides leaves was carried out on Rhipicephalus lunulatus. Four doses (0.03, 0.06, 0.09, and 0.12 µL of essential oil per gram of soap) and a control (soap without essential oil) with four replications for each treatment were used for in vitro trial. Each replication consisted of 10 ticks in a Petri dish with filter paper impregnated with the foam soap on the bottom. Following in vitro trials, three doses (0.06, 0.09, and 0.12 µL/g) and the control in two replications were selected for in vivo test based on mortality rate recorded from the in vitro trial. Each replication was made up of 10 goats naturally infested with ticks. Results show that soap containing essential oil is toxic to R. lunulatus. The in vivo mortality rate in the control on day 8 was 22.69% whereas the highest dose (0.12 µL/g) killed 96.29% of the ticks on day 8. The LD50 of the foam soap containing essential oil was 0.037 and 0.059 µL/g on day 2 in the laboratory and on the farm, respectively. This indicates the potentially high efficiency of this medicated soap on this parasite.

  2. Development of a Spatially Targeted Field Sampling Technique for the Southern Cattle Tick, Rhipicephalus microplus, by Mapping Whitetailed Deer, Odocoileus virginianus, Habitat in South Texas

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Pamela L.; Welch, John B.; Kramer, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The objective of our study was to determine whether satellite remote sensed data could be used to identify white-tailed deer, Odocoileus virginianus (Zimmerman) (Artiodactyla: Cervidae), habitat and target locations for sampling free-living larvae of the southern cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Canestrini) (Ixodida: Ixodidae) in South Texas. Two methods for mapping white-tailed deer habitat were used, an object-oriented method to identify closed canopies and waterways for deer movement and two vegetation indices: the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index and the Modified Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index to identify forage for deer. These two data sets of favorable white-tailed deer habitat were combined within a geographic information system to identify locations for sampling ticks. Larvae of R. (B.) microplus, were sampled in Zapata County, Texas, by walking transects with attached flannel panels to jeans. Although the data set and sampling period were limited, data analysis demonstrated that sampling of free-living larvae of R. (B.) microplus can be conducted in South Texas, and larvae were most abundant in areas that harbored O. virginianus. Spatial analysis of satellite imagery to classify white-tailed deer/southern cattle tick habitat proved efficacious and may be useful in directing sampling activities in the field. PMID:25368044

  3. In vitro assessment of the acaricidal activity of computer-selected analogues of carvacrol and salicylic acid on Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus.

    PubMed

    Concepción, Ramírez L; Froylán, Ibarra V; Herminia I, Pérez M; Norberto, Manjarrez A; Héctor J, Salgado Z; Yeniel, González C

    2013-10-01

    Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus is a tick that causes huge economic losses in cattle. The indiscriminate use of acaricides has generated resistance to most compounds present on the market. This makes further investigation on other potential acaricides necessary, the in silico assay being an alternative to the design of new compounds. In the present study a biosilico assay was performed using TOMOCOMD-CARDD (TOpological MOlecular COMputer Design-Computer-Aided Rational Drug Design) and WEKA (Waikato Environment for Knowledge Analysis) software. Two carvacrol and four salicylic acid derivatives, synthesized by conventional methods and evaluated with the larval packet test on larvae of R. (B.) microplus were selected. All evaluated compounds presented acaricidal activity; however, ethyl 2-methoxybenzoate (91.8 ± 1.7 % mortality) and ethyl 2,5-dihydroxybenzoate (89.1 ± 1.6 % mortality) showed greater activity than salicylic acid. With regard to the carvacrol analogues, carvacrol acetate (67.8 ± 2.1 % mortality) and carvacrol methyl ether (71.7 ± 1.6 % mortality) also showed greater activity than carvacrol (35.9 ± 3.2 % mortality). TOMOCOMD-CARDD and WEKA software were helpful tools in the search for alternative structures with potential acaricidal activity on R. (B.) microplus.

  4. Resistance to cypermethrin, deltamethrin and chlorpyriphos in populations of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Acari: Ixodidae) from small farms of the State of São Paulo, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Mendes, M C; Lima, C K P; Nogueira, A H C; Yoshihara, E; Chiebao, D P; Gabriel, F H L; Ueno, T E H; Namindome, A; Klafke, G M

    2011-06-10

    A field survey of resistance was conducted based on the larval packet test technique with synthetic pyrethroids (cypermethrin and deltamethrin) and organophosphates (chlorpyriphos) in Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus field populations from six different regions of the State of São Paulo (Brazil). 82.6% of the populations showed resistance to cypermethrin, 86.36% to deltamethrin and 65.25% to chlorpyriphos, with 50% presenting resistance to both SP and OP acaricide. According to the questionnaires completed by the producers, OP+SP mixtures followed by SP-only formulations were the products most commonly used for controlling the cattle tick in the surveyed areas. The present study showed high occurrence of resistance to SP and OP in the State of São Paulo, Brazil and revealed the type of strategy adopted by small dairy farms in this state. This information is fundamental in order to establish the monitoring of resistance on each farm individually, contributing to the rational use of acaricides for the control of R. (B.) microplus.

  5. [Determination of LC 90 and LT 90 of IBCB66 Beauveria bassiana (Ascomycetes: Clavicipitaceae) isolate for Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Acari: Ixodidae) control].

    PubMed

    Barci, Leila A G; de Almeida, José Eduardo M; de Campos Nogueira, Adriana H; do Prado, Angelo P

    2009-12-01

    The objective of this research was to evaluate the pathogenicity and the virulence of the IBCB66 isolate of Beauveria bassiana on infected larvae of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus. The IBCB66 fungus strain was used as standard isolates of B. bassiana against R. (B.) microplus larvae. The larval bioassay tests using the IBCB66 isolate were carried out to determine the (Lethal Concentration) LC50, LC90, (Lethal Time) LT50 and LT90. The IBCB66 fungus strain was tested at six different concentrations (5x10(6), 10(7), 5x10(7), 10(8), 5x10(8) and 10(9) conidia.mL(-1)) to determine the percentage of larval mortality. In addition, a Probit analysis was also performed. Total larval mortality was observed eighteen days after the beginning of the test in the group treated with 5x10(9) conidia.mL(1). The LC50 and LC90 were 3x10(7) and 5x10(8) respectively and the LT50 and LT90 were 10 and 16 days.

  6. Repellent effects of Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree) oil against cattle tick larvae (Rhipicephalus australis) when formulated as emulsions and in β-cyclodextrin inclusion complexes.

    PubMed

    Yim, Wei Tsun; Bhandari, Bhesh; Jackson, Louise; James, Peter

    2016-07-30

    Rhipicephalus australis (formerly Boophilus microplus) is a one host tick responsible for major economic loss in tropical and subtropical cattle production enterprises. Control is largely dependent on the application of acaricides but resistance has developed to most currently registered chemical groups. Repellent compounds that prevent initial attachment of tick larvae offer a potential alternative to control with chemical toxicants. The repellent effects of Melaleuca alternifolia oil (TTO) emulsions and two β-cyclodextrin complex formulations, a slow release form (SR) and a modified faster release form (FR), were examined in a series of laboratory studies. Emulsions containing 4% and 5% TTO applied to cattle hair in laboratory studies completely repelled ascending tick larvae for 24h whereas 2% and 3% formulations provided 80% protection. At 48h, 5% TTO provided 78% repellency but lower concentrations repelled less than 60% of larvae. In a study conducted over 15 days, 3% TTO emulsion applied to cattle hair provided close to 100% repellency for 2 days, but then protection fell to 23% by day 15. The FR formulation gave significantly greater repellency than the emulsion and the SR formulation from day 3 until the end of the study (P<0.05), providing almost complete repellency at day 3 (99.5%), then decreasing over the period of the study to 49% repellency at day 15. Proof of concept is established for the use of appropriately designed controlled-release formulations to extend the period of repellency provided by TTO against R. australis larvae.

  7. Development of a spatially targeted field sampling technique for the southern cattle tick, Rhipicephalus microplus, by mapping white-tailed deer, Odocoileus virginianus, habitat in South Texas.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Pamela L; Welch, John B; Kramer, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The objective of our study was to determine whether satellite remote sensed data could be used to identify white-tailed deer, Odocoileus virginianus (Zimmerman) (Artiodactyla: Cervidae), habitat and target locations for sampling free-living larvae of the southern cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Canestrini) (Ixodida: Ixodidae) in South Texas. Two methods for mapping white-tailed deer habitat were used, an object-oriented method to identify closed canopies and waterways for deer movement and two vegetation indices: the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index and the Modified Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index to identify forage for deer. These two data sets of favorable white-tailed deer habitat were combined within a geographic information system to identify locations for sampling ticks. Larvae of R. (B.) microplus, were sampled in Zapata County, Texas, by walking transects with attached flannel panels to jeans. Although the data set and sampling period were limited, data analysis demonstrated that sampling of free-living larvae of R. (B.) microplus can be conducted in South Texas, and larvae were most abundant in areas that harbored O. virginianus. Spatial analysis of satellite imagery to classify white-tailed deer/southern cattle tick habitat proved efficacious and may be useful in directing sampling activities in the field.

  8. Activation of several key components of the epidermal differentiation pathway in cattle following infestation with the cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus.

    PubMed

    Kongsuwan, Kritaya; Josh, Peter; Colgrave, Michelle L; Bagnall, Neil H; Gough, Joanne; Burns, Brian; Pearson, Roger

    2010-03-15

    The cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, and the diseases it transmits pose a persistent threat to tropical beef production. Genetic selection of host resistance has become the method of choice for non-chemical control of cattle tick. Previous studies have suggested that larval stages are most susceptible to host resistance mechanisms. To gain insights into the molecular basis of host resistance that occurs during R. microplus attachment, we assessed the abundance of proteins (by isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) and Western blot analyses) and mRNAs (by quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR)) in skin adjacent to tick bite sites from high tick-resistant (HR) and low tick-resistant (LR) Belmont Red cattle following challenge with cattle tick. We showed substantially higher expression of the basal epidermal keratins KRT5 and KRT14, the lipid processing protein, lipocalin 9 (LCN9), the epidermal barrier catalysing enzyme transglutaminase 1 (TGM1), and the transcriptional regulator B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein 1 (Blimp1) in HR skin. Our data reveals the essential role of the epidermal permeability barrier in conferring greater resistance of cattle to tick infestation, and suggest that the physical structure of the epidermal layers of the skin may represent the first line of defence against ectoparasite invasion.

  9. Evaluation of In Vivo Acaricidal Effect of Soap Containing Essential Oil of Chenopodium ambrosioides Leaves on Rhipicephalus lunulatus in the Western Highland of Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Kouam, Marc K.; Payne, Vincent K.; Miégoué, Emile; Tendonkeng, Fernand; Lemoufouet, Jules; Kana, Jean R.; Boukila, Benoit; Pamo, E. Tedonkeng; MNM, Bertine

    2015-01-01

    A study on the acaricidal properties of foam soap containing the essential oil of Chenopodium ambrosioides leaves was carried out on Rhipicephalus lunulatus. Four doses (0.03, 0.06, 0.09, and 0.12 µL of essential oil per gram of soap) and a control (soap without essential oil) with four replications for each treatment were used for in vitro trial. Each replication consisted of 10 ticks in a Petri dish with filter paper impregnated with the foam soap on the bottom. Following in vitro trials, three doses (0.06, 0.09, and 0.12 µL/g) and the control in two replications were selected for in vivo test based on mortality rate recorded from the in vitro trial. Each replication was made up of 10 goats naturally infested with ticks. Results show that soap containing essential oil is toxic to R. lunulatus. The in vivo mortality rate in the control on day 8 was 22.69% whereas the highest dose (0.12 µL/g) killed 96.29% of the ticks on day 8. The LD50 of the foam soap containing essential oil was 0.037 and 0.059 µL/g on day 2 in the laboratory and on the farm, respectively. This indicates the potentially high efficiency of this medicated soap on this parasite. PMID:26770829

  10. Acaricidal effect and chemical composition of essential oils extracted from Cuminum cyminum, Pimenta dioica and Ocimum basilicum against the cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Acari: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Martinez-Velazquez, Moises; Castillo-Herrera, Gustavo Adolfo; Rosario-Cruz, Rodrigo; Flores-Fernandez, Jose Miguel; Lopez-Ramirez, Julisa; Hernandez-Gutierrez, Rodolfo; Lugo-Cervantes, Eugenia del Carmen

    2011-02-01

    Acaricidal activity of essential oils extracted from cumin seeds (Cuminum cyminum), allspice berries (Pimenta dioica) and basil leaves (Ocimum basilicum) were tested on 10-day-old Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus tick larvae using the LPT. Two-fold dilutions of the three essential oils were tested from a starting dilution of 20% down to 1.25%. Results showed a high toxicological effect for cumin, producing 100% mortality in all tested concentrations on R. microplus larvae. Similarly, allspice essential oil produced 100% mortality at all concentrations with the exception of a dramatic decrease at 1.25% concentration. Conversely, basil essential oil was not shown to be toxic against R. microplus larvae. The most common compounds detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry were as follows: cumin: cuminaldehyde (22.03%), γ-terpinene (15.69%) and 2-caren-10-al (12.89%); allspice: methyl eugenol (62.7%) and eugenol (8.3%); basil: linalool (30.61%) and estragole (20.04%). Results clearly indicate that C. cyminum and P. dioica essential oils can be used as an effective alternative for R. microplus tick control, and there is a high probability they can be used for other ticks affecting cattle in Mexico and throughout the world, thereby reducing the necessity for traditional and unfriendly synthetic acaricides.

  11. Acute Oral Mammalian Toxicity and Effect of Solvents on Efficacy of Maerua edulis (Gilg. & Ben.) De Wolf against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) decoloratus Koch, 1844 (Acarina: Ixodidae), Tick Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Mvumi, Brighton M.; Maramba, Tatenda

    2016-01-01

    Efficacy and toxicity of aqueous and organic solvents extracts of Maerua edulis against ticks and mice, respectively, were determined. Ground leaves were extracted separately using cold water, cold water plus surfactant (1% v/v liquid soap), hot water plus surfactant, hexane, or methanol to make 25% w/v stock solutions from which serial dilutions of 5, 10, 20, and 25% were made. For each concentration, 20 Rhipicephalus decoloratus tick larvae were put in filter papers impregnated with extracts and incubated for 48 h at 27°C and 85–90% RH for mortality observation after 24 h and 48 h. In the toxicity experiment, hot water plus surfactant treatments of 5, 10, 20, and 25% (w/v) M. edulis were administered in suspension per os to sexually mature Balb/C mice and observed for clinical signs and mortality for 72 h. Larvae mortality was highest (>98%) in methanol-extracted M. edulis treatments (20 and 25%), which was not different from the amitraz-based control (Tickbuster®). Mortality was also higher in the hot water than in cold water plus surfactant treatments (P < 0.05). No postadministration adverse health effects were observed in the mice. These results suggest that M. edulis is an effective tick remedy best extracted using methanol or hot water plus surfactant. PMID:27660762

  12. Protective action of Tagetes minuta (Asteraceae) essential oil in the control of Rhipicephalus microplus (Canestrini, 1887) (Acari: Ixodidae) in a cattle pen trial.

    PubMed

    Andreotti, Renato; Garcia, Marcos Valério; Cunha, Rodrigo Casquero; Barros, Jacqueline Cavalcante

    2013-10-18

    The Rhipicephalus microplus tick is globally regarded as the most economically important ectoparasite of livestock, and the evolution of resistance to commercial acaricides among cattle tick populations is of great concern. The essential oil derived from Tagetes minuta may be efficacious against cattle tick infestation, and the results of a cattle pen trial using this essential oil for the control of ticks are reported here. The chemical composition of the essential oil was determined by GC-MS and NMR spectroscopy analyses, which revealed the presence of four major components in the essential oil. These components represent more than 70% of the essential oil: limonene (6.96%), β-ocimene (5.11%), dihydrotagetone (54.10%) and tagetone (6.73%). The results of the cattle pen trial indicated significant differences among the average values of the analyzed biological parameters, including the number of ticks, the average weight of the ticks, the average egg weight per engorged female and larval viability. Treatment with the T. minuta essential oil prepared in this study promoted significant effects on all biological indicators analyzed. Based on the biological indicators, the essential oil showed 99.98% efficacy compared to the control group when used at a 20% concentration. The results obtained in this study suggest that the T. minuta essential oil is a potential R. microplus tick control agent and may be used to mitigate the economic losses caused by tick infestation.

  13. [Factors associated with Ehrlichia canis infection in dogs infested with ticks from Huanuco, Peru].

    PubMed

    Huerto-Medina, Edward; Dámaso-Mata, Bernardo

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the frequency and associated factors of Ehrlichia canis infection in dogs. Blood samples from 150 dogs infested with ticks in 10 veterinary clinics in the city of Huanuco in Peru were collected. The dogs were randomly selected without regard to breed, age or sex. Ehrlichia canis antibodies were detected by chromatographic immunoassay.51.3% of dogs were infected with Ehrlichia canis. In the multivariate analysis, factors associated with the presence of Ehrlichia canis were: poor health of the dog (p = 0.049), a higher average of tick infestation (p = 0.018), and adult dogs (p = 0.038). The frequency of Ehrlichia canis in dogs of this city is high. Control of the brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus) vector of Ehrlichia canis is recommended.

  14. Tick-borne zoonotic bacteria in ticks collected from central Spain.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Alvaro; Olmeda, A Sonia; Escudero, Raquel; Jado, Isabel; Valcárcel, Félix; Casado-Nistal, Miguel A; Rodríguez-Vargas, Manuela; Gil, Horacio; Anda, Pedro

    2009-07-01

    The prevalence of tick-borne and related bacteria infecting adult ticks in central Spain was assessed by molecular methods. Six areas were sampled monthly during a 2-year longitudinal study. A total of 1,038 questing and 442 feeding ticks, belonging to eight different species, were tested. The most abundant species were Hyalomma lusitanicum (54% of captures), followed by Dermacentor marginatus (23%) and Rhipicephalus sanguineus (10%). Four human pathogens, including seven Rickettsia species, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Borrelia burgdorferi, and Francisella tularensis, were detected at percentages of 19.0, 2.2, 1.7, and 0.5, respectively, whereas Bartonella spp. was never detected. In terms of infection and tick abundance, H. lusitanicum seems to be the most significant tick species in the area, carrying three of the five agents tested, and the anthropophilic tick, D. marginatum, infected with Rickettsia spp. and F. tularensis, is the most relevant in terms of public health. The significance of these data is discussed.

  15. A Rare Case of Mediterranean Spotted Fever and Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Maria João; Matos Costa, João

    2016-01-01

    Mediterranean spotted fever is a tick-borne zoonotic disease caused by Rickettsia conorii. It is transmitted by the dog tick Rhipicephalus sanguineus. It usually presents as a benign self-limited disease characterized by a skin rash, high fever, and, sometimes, a characteristic ulcer at the tick bite site called tache noir. The course of this disease is usually benign, although severe manifestations have been previously described, mainly in adults. Neurological manifestations are very unusual. We present a case of Mediterranean spotted fever with encephalitis to highlight the importance of clinical suspicion, mainly in endemic areas, the potential severity of this disease, and the need of early initiation of therapy in order to prevent severe complications. PMID:28053795

  16. Seasonal dynamics of ixodid ticks on wild rabbits Oryctolagus cuniculus (Leporidae) from Central Spain.

    PubMed

    González, J; Valcárcel, F; Pérez-Sánchez, J L; Tercero-Jaime, J M; Olmeda, A S

    2016-11-01

    Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease and Myxomatosis caused a decline in the rabbit population in the second half of the last century. Despite some recovery, the risk of vector-borne disease is present and thus the importance of controlling vector populations. In the current study, we describe the ixodid tick fauna in wild rabbit in a natural reserve in Ciudad Real (Central Spain) during the course of two 3-year periods (2007-2009 and 2012-2014). Of all the ticks collected on average 72.5 % were larvae, 24.4 % nymphs and 3.1 % adults, although the percentage varied monthly. Seven tick species were identified: Hyalomma lusitanicum Koch (Parasitic indicator [PI] = number of ticks per examined rabbit = 96.47), Rhipicephalus pusillus Gil Collado (PI = 47.37), Haemaphysalis hispanica Gil Collado (PI = 12.15), Ixodes ventalloi Gil Collado (PI = 0.65), R. bursa Canestrini and Fanzago (PI = 0.18), R. sanguineus Latreille (PI = 0.11), Dermacentor marginatus Sulzer (PI = 0.01). In spring and summer, most abundant were larvae of H. lusitanicum, followed by immature stages of R. pusillus and Ha. hispanica. In autumn, the main tick species were nymphs of I. ventalloi whereas in winter adults of Ha. hispanica were more numerous. Rhipicephalus pusillus was present all year long, although not always in high percentage. PI of other species (R. bursa, R. sanguineus and D. marginatus) were too low to be representative. The seasonal dynamics of ticks on wild rabbit defined in this study could be useful to design species-specific control strategies.

  17. Use of Ivermectin as Endoparasiticide in Tropical Cattle Herds Generates Resistance in Gastrointestinal Nematodes and the Tick Rhipicephalus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Alegría-López, M A; Rodríguez-Vivas, R I; Torres-Acosta, J F J; Ojeda-Chi, M M; Rosado-Aguilar, J A

    2015-03-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine simultaneously the status of resistance against ivermectin (IVM) in gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) and Rhipicephalus microplus (Canestrini, 1888) ticks in 12 cattle farms where IVM was used for the control of GIN in the Mexican tropics. Six farms had frequent use of IVM (≥ 4 times per year) and six farms had low frequency of IVM use (1-2 times per year). The fecal egg count reduction test and the larval immersion test were used to determine the resistant status of GIN and R. microplus against IVM, respectively. The results indicated that 100% of the surveyed farms had IVM-resistant GIN (reduction % from 0 to 67%). The genera involved were Haemonchus, Cooperia, Ostertagia, Trichostrongylus, and Oesophagostomum. Although the IVM was never used for the control of ticks, 50% of the surveyed farms presented GIN and R. microplus simultaneously resistant to IVM. Furthermore, two R. microplus populations showed high resistance ratio (RR) to IVM (farm TAT: RR50% = 7 and RR99% = 40.1; and farm SLS: RR50% = 2.4; RR99% = 11.0). A high frequency of IVM use (≥ 4 times per year) seemed to promote IVM resistance amongst R. microplus ticks compared with the farms with low frequency of IVM use (1-2 times per year; 66.6 vs. 25.0%, respectively). However, the number of surveyed farms was insufficient to show clear statistical inferences (odds ratio = 6.00; 95% CI = 0.341-105.5). The use of IVM for the control of GIN promoted simultaneously the development of IVM resistance in the GIN and R. microplus populations of the cattle herds surveyed.

  18. Prevalence and genetic characterization of Anaplasma marginale in zebu cattle (Bos indicus) and their ticks (Amblyomma variegatum, Rhipicephalus microplus) from Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Pothmann, Daniela; Poppert, Sven; Rakotozandrindrainy, Raphael; Hogan, Benedikt; Mastropaolo, Mariano; Thiel, Claudia; Silaghi, Cornelia

    2016-10-01

    Tick-borne bovine anaplasmosis, caused by the obligate intracellular pathogen Anaplasma marginale (Rickettsiales: Anaplasmataceae), is a major constraint to cattle production in tropical and subtropical regions. From Madagascar, clinical cases were published but data based on molecular methods regarding the prevalence and genetic diversity of this pathogen on the island are lacking. The aims of this study were to investigate (1) the prevalence of A. marginale in Malagasy zebu cattle (Bos indicus) and their ticks with a species-specific real-time PCR, (2) the genetic diversity of A. marginale based on tandem repeats and microsatellites of the msp1α gene, and (3) the phylogenetic relationship between A. marginale isolates from Madagascar and strains found worldwide. Two hundred fourteen blood samples and 1822 ticks from 214 zebu cattle were collected. Rhipicephalus (R) microplus (40.2%) and Amblyomma (A) variegatum (59.8%) were identified on the cattle. A. marginale DNA was found in 89.7% of the examined zebu cattle and in 62.3% of the examined ticks. The tandem repeat and microsatellite analyses of the mspa1 gene showed high genetic diversity among the isolates between and within the different regions and high infection potential. Eighteen of the 25 tandem repeats identified have not been described before. Phylogenetic analysis revealed clustering of A. marginale strains from Madagascar with South Africa, America and Israel. A common ancestor may originate from South Africa and may have evolved due to phylogeographic characteristics or by a history of cattle movement. Its high prevalence in cattle and ticks, together with a low number of clinical manifestations and a high genetic heterogeneity among the investigated strains, confirms endemic stability of A. marginale in cattle from Madagascar.

  19. Chemical composition and acaricidal activity of essential oil from Lippia sidoides on larvae of Dermacentor nitens (Acari: Ixodidae) and larvae and engorged females of Rhipicephalus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Gomes, Geovany Amorim; Monteiro, Caio Márcio de Oliveira; Senra, Tatiane de Oliveira Souza; Zeringota, Viviane; Calmon, Fernanda; Matos, Renata da Silva; Daemon, Erik; Gois, Roberto Wagner da Silva; Santiago, Gilvandete Maria Pinheiro; de Carvalho, Mario Geraldo

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this work was to identify the compounds and to investigate the acaricidal activity of the essential oil from the leaves of Lippia sidoides on Rhipicephalus microplus and Dermacentor nitens. The oil was obtained by hydrodistillation and analyzed by gas chromatography (GC/FID) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. In total, 15 compounds comprising 99.97 % of the total peak area were identified. The main constituent of the essential oil was thymol (67.60 %). The acaricidal activity was assessed by the modified larval packet test, with oil concentrations of 2.5, 5.0, 10.0, 15.0, and 20.0 μl/ml, and by the female immersion test with concentrations of 10.0, 20.0, 40.0, 60.0, and 80.0 μl/ml. The mortality of the R. microplus and D. nitens larvae was greater than 95 % starting at concentrations of 10.0 and 20.0 μl/ml, respectively. In the test with the engorged females, the L. sidoides essential oil starting at a concentration of 40.0 μl/ml caused a significant reduction (p < 0.05) in the values of the egg mass weight and egg production index. The viability of the eggs was affected in all the treated groups, with significantly lower hatching rates (p < 0.05) in relation to the control group. The control percentages at concentrations of 10.0, 20.0, and 30.0 μl/ml were 54, 57, and 72 %, and reached 100 % at the highest two concentrations (60.0 and 80.0 μl/ml). Therefore, it can be concluded that the essential oil from the leaves of L. sidoides has acaricidal activity on R. microplus and D. nitens.

  20. Assessment of the acaricidal activity of carvacrol, (E)-cinnamaldehyde, trans-anethole, and linalool on larvae of Rhipicephalus microplus and Dermacentor nitens (Acari: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    de Oliveira Souza Senra, Tatiane; Zeringóta, Viviane; de Oliveira Monteiro, Caio Márcio; Calmon, Fernanda; Maturano, Ralph; Gomes, Geovany Amorim; Faza, Aline; de Carvalho, Mario Geraldo; Daemon, Erik

    2013-04-01

    The acaricidal activity of carvacrol, (E)-cinnamaldehyde, trans-anethole, and linalool was studied on Rhipicephalus microplus and Dermacentor nitens larvae. All the substances were tested at concentrations of 2.5, 5.0, 10.0, 15.0, and 20.0 μl/ml, with 10 repetitions per treatment. The modified larval packet technique was employed in the tests and the mortality was evaluated after 24 h. In the groups treated with carvacrol, the lowest concentration (2.5 μl/ml) was sufficient to cause 100% death of the R. microplus and D. nitens larvae. The same concentration of (E)-cinnamaldehyde resulted in death of approximately 99% of the larvae of both tick species and reached 100% at the other concentrations. For trans-anethole, mortality rates above 90% of the R. microplus and D. nitens larvae were only observed starting at the concentration of 15.0 μl/ml and reached 100% at the highest concentration (20.0 μl/ml). Finally, the mortality rates of the groups treated with linalool were low, only reaching 8.4 and 14.5% at the highest concentration (20.0 μl/ml) for larvae of D. nitens and R. microplus, respectively. These results show that carvacrol, (E)-cinnamaldehyde, and trans-anethole have acaricidal activity, particularly carvacrol and (E)-cinnamaldehyde, both of which resulted in high mortality rates for the larvae of these two tick species even at the lowest concentration.

  1. Acaricidal efficacies of Lippia gracilis essential oil and its phytochemicals against organophosphate-resistant and susceptible strains of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus.

    PubMed

    Costa-Júnior, Livio M; Miller, Robert J; Alves, Péricles B; Blank, Arie F; Li, Andrew Y; Pérez de León, Adalberto A

    2016-09-15

    Plant-derived natural products can serve as an alternative to synthetic compounds for control of ticks of veterinary and medical importance. Lippia gracilis is an aromatic plant that produces essential oil with high content of carvacrol and thymol monoterpenes. These monoterpenes have high acaricidal activity against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus. However, there are no studies that show efficacy differences of essential oils between susceptible and organophosphate resistant strains of R. (B.) microplus. The aim of the present study was to compare acaricidal effects of essential oils extracted from two different genotypes of L. gracilis and the main monoterpenes on larvae of both susceptible and organophosphate resistant R. (B.) microplus larvae. The efficacy of the essential oil of two genotypes of L. gracilis (106 and 201) and their monoterpenes carvacrol and thymol was measured using the larval immersion test on coumaphos-resistant and susceptible strains of R. (B.) microplus. Lethal concentrations were calculated using GraphPad Prism 6.0. Chemical analysis was performed by GC-MS and FID. Thymol and carvacrol were observed to be major constituents in 106 and 201L. gracilis genotype essential oils, respectively. Essential oils of both genotypes were more effective against organophosphate-resistant tick strain than susceptible tick strain. Carvacrol was 3.2 times more toxic to organophosphate resistant strain than to susceptible strain. Thymol was equally toxic to resistant and susceptible tick strains. The significantly higher efficacy monoterpene carvacrol against resistant ticks may lead to development of new natural product acaricide formulations for use to control organophosphate resistant R. (B.) microplus populations.

  2. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of cypermethrin, amitraz, and piperonyl butoxide mixtures for the control of resistant Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Acari: Ixodidae) in the Mexican tropics.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Vivas, R I; Li, A Y; Ojeda-Chi, M M; Trinidad-Martinez, I; Rosado-Aguilar, J A; Miller, R J; Pérez de León, A A

    2013-10-18

    A study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of cypermethrin, amitraz, and piperonyl butoxide (PBO) mixtures, through in vitro laboratory bioassays and in vivo on-animal efficacy trials, for the control of resistant Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus on cattle in the Mexican tropics. Also, to examine mechanisms of resistance to cypermethrin in this tick population, the frequency of a mutated sodium channel gene (F1550I) was determined using a PCR assay. Results of laboratory bioassays using modified larval packet tests revealed that cypermethrin toxicity was synergized by PBO (from 46.6-57.0% to 83.7-85.0% larval mortality; P<0.05). The cypermethrin and amitraz mixture showed an additive effect (from 46.6-57.0% to 56.0-74.3% larval mortality). Strong synergism was observed with the mixture of cypermethrin+amitraz+PBO and this mixture was the most effective killing resistant tick larvae in vitro (96.7-100% of larval mortality). Tick larvae surviving exposure to cypermethrin or mixtures either with amitraz and PBO in vitro showed 2.9-49.6 higher probability to present the mutated allele than those killed by acaricide treatment (P<0.05). In the in vivo trial, the mixtures containing cypermethrin+PBO (80.6-97.3%), and cypermethrin+amitraz (87.0-89.7%) were more efficacious than cypermethrin alone (76.3-80.5%). The highest level of efficacy was obtained with the mixture of cypermethrin+amitraz+PBO, which yielded >95% control that persisted for 28 days post-treatment against R. microplus infesting cattle when tested under field conditions in the Mexican tropics. Although this mixture is a potentially useful tool to combat pyrethroid resistance, a product based on an acaricide mixture like the one tested in this study has to be used rationally.

  3. Genetic diversity, acaricide resistance status and evolutionary potential of a Rhipicephalus microplus population from a disease-controlled cattle farming area in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Robbertse, Luïse; Baron, Samantha; van der Merwe, Nicolaas A; Madder, Maxime; Stoltsz, Wilhelm H; Maritz-Olivier, Christine

    2016-06-01

    The Southern cattle tick, Rhipicephalus microplus is a hematophagous ectoparasite of great veterinary and economic importance. Along with its adaptability, reproductive success and vectoring capacity, R. microplus has been reported to develop resistance to the major chemical classes of acaricides currently in use. In South Africa, the Mnisi community in the Mpumalanga region offers a unique opportunity to study the adaptive potential of R. microplus. The aims of this study therefore included characterising acaricide resistance and determining the level and pattern of genetic diversity for R. microplus in this region from one primary population consisting of 12 communal dip-stations. The level of acaricide resistance was evaluated using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes that contribute to acaricide insensitivity. Additionally, the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) gene fragments of collected individuals were sequenced and a haplotype network was constructed. A high prevalence of alleles attributed to resistance against formamidines (amitraz) in the octopamine/tyramine (OCT/Tyr) receptor (frequency of 0.55) and pyrethroids in the carboxylesterase (frequency of 0.81) genes were observed. Overall, the sampled tick population was homozygous resistant to pyrethroid-based acaricides in the voltage-gated sodium channel (VGS) gene. A total of 11 haplotypes were identified in the Mnisi R. microplus population from ITS2 analysis with no clear population structure. From these allele frequencies it appears that formamidine resistance in the Mnisi community is on the rise, as the R. microplus populations is acquiring or generating these resistance alleles. Apart from rearing multi-resistant ticks to commonly used acaricides in this community these ticks may pose future problems to its surrounding areas.

  4. Genetic polymorphism of Babesia bovis merozoite surface antigens-2 (MSA-2) isolates from bovine blood and Rhipicephalus annulatus ticks in Israel.

    PubMed

    Molad, T; Fleiderovitz, L; Leibovich, B; Wolkomirsky, R; Erster, O; Roth, A; Mazuz, M L; Markovics, A; Shkap, V

    2014-09-15

    This study demonstrated the genetic diversity among MSA-2c, MSA-2a1 and MSA-2b proteins of Babesia bovis isolates obtained from bovine blood and Rhipicephalus annulatus tick samples. The least identities that were observed among the deduced amino acid sequences of MSA-2c, MSA-2a1 and MSA-2b were 55, 63, and 71%, respectively. During the study four B. bovis calves, aged about 1 month, were found to be infected with virulent field strains and developed babesiosis. Probably, the calves had received insufficient antibodies, or the antibodies raised against the vaccine strain did not cross-protect against virulent field isolates. The complete msa-2 locus from the Israeli B. bovis vaccine strain and two field isolates were characterized. Similarly to the Australian strains and isolates, the msa-2 loci of the examined Israeli strain and isolates had only two msa-2 genes - msa-2c and msa-2a/b - located between msa-2c and orfB. Several of the examined samples, contained different MSA-2 genotypes concurrently. No obvious geographical relationships among isolates from various regions of Israel were established. Moreover, in the phylogenetic analyses, the Israeli deduced MSA-2 amino acid sequences of the three examined genes were clustered together with sequences derived from other countries, proving that the msa-2 gene sequences of B. bovis shared the same genetic characters worldwide. The present study clearly showed that the MSA-2 proteins of B. bovis isolates from Israel were genetically distinct from the vaccine strains. Thus, further research will be needed in order to understand the genetic diversity mechanisms of B. bovis, and the immunological responses of the infected animals.

  5. Efficiency of sulphur in garlic extract and non-sulphur homeopathy in the control of the cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus.

    PubMed

    Costa, L M; Furlong, J

    2011-03-01

    The objective of the present work was to evaluate the efficacy of a non-sulphur-based homeopathic preparation and a sulphur-containing natural product derived from Allium sativum (Linnaeus) against infestation by the cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Canestrini) (Acari: Ixodidae). A total of 24 crossbred calves (7 : 8 Holstein : Zebu), aged 6-8 months and maintained in individual stables under tick-free conditions, were divided into three groups. Group 1 (control group) received no treatment; Group 2 was treated with 0.01 g/day of the homeopathic preparation Fator C&MC(®), and Group 3 was treated with 20 g/day of Enxofre-Allium sativum(®). After adaptation to the diet for 1 month, each calf was subjected to artificial infestation with 8000 R. (B.) microplus larvae (aged 7-14 days) twice per week over a 5-month period. Numbers of engorged females were recorded every 14 days and samples of freely released engorged females were collected at 14-day intervals commencing 3 months after the start of the experiment. The engorged females were weighed, incubated for 15 days under biochemical oxygen demand conditions at 27 ± 1 °C and relative humidity >85%, and the weights of the egg masses produced were recorded. Other biological parameters, including reproduction estimate, reduction in oviposition and efficiency of treatment, were determined. A significant reduction in the number of engorged females was detected on animals treated with Enxofre-Allium sativum(®) (Group 3) in comparison with the other two groups. The overall efficiency of the treatment with the sulphur-containing product was 64%, whereas that of the homeopathic preparation was 26%. Under the experimental conditions established, Enxofre-Allium sativum(®) can reduce the intensity of the R. (B.) microplus infestation.

  6. CPR: Adult

    MedlinePlus

    Refresher Center Home FIRST AID, CPR and AED LIFEGUARDING Refresher Putting It All Together: CPR—Adult (2:03) Refresher videos only utilize this player QUICK LINKS Home RedCross.org Purchase Course ...

  7. Laboratory and field evaluation of brown dog tick behavioral responses to potential semiochemicals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The brown dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latreille), is a pest that can be found worldwide. This tick poses unique difficulties in management because it can complete its entire life cycle indoors and has demonstrated acaricide resistance, resulting in infestations in residential areas and kenne...

  8. Military Working Dogs and Canine Ehrlichiosis (Tropical Canine Pancytopenia) in the Vietnam War

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-05

    An organism tentatively identified as Ehrlichia canis was consistently isolated from naturally occurring cases, and intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies...thought to be Ehrlichia canis were found in mononuclear cells of both naturally occurring cases and in experimentally infected German Shepherds and...chemotherapeutic, electron microscopic, and Ehrlichia canis preservation studies; and continued work on a "clean" Rhipicephalus sanguineus colony

  9. Quantification of brown dog tick repellents, 2-hexanone and benzaldehyde, and release from tick-resistant beagles, Canis lupus familiaris

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have recently shown that repellency of the tick Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato by the tick resistant dog breed Beagle is mediated by volatile organic compounds 2-hexanone and benzaldehyde present in Beagle dog odour. Ectoparasite location on animal hosts is affected by variation in odour com...

  10. Diagnosing Medical Parasites: A Public Health Officers Guide to Assisting Laboratory and Medical Officers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    PHIL 5968 – CDC) Diseases Both Dermacentor and Amblyomma transmit Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (Rickettsia rickettsia). The different strains...granulocytic erlichiosis (Ehrlichia chaffeensis). Rhipicephalus sanguineus transmits Mediterranean Spotted Fever and African Tick Typhus...crushed tissues or feces of the tick. • Spotted fever due to Rickettsia rickettsii occurs in Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Mexico, Panama and the USA

  11. Ticks: Geographic Distribution

    MedlinePlus

    ... areas on the Pacific Coast. Transmits: Tularemia and Rocky Mountain spotted fever . Comments: The highest risk of being bitten occurs ... dog tick ( Rhipicephalus sanguineus ) Where found: Worldwide. Transmits: Rocky Mountain spotted fever (in the southwestern U.S. and along the U.S.- ...

  12. Disease Vector Ecology Profile: Haiti

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-09-01

    puertoricensis P. humanus capitis Rhipicephalus sanguineus Pthirus pubis Bugs : Cimex hemipterus Scorpions: Tityus crassimanus C. lectularius Triatoma...DSN 850- 2271/3191 or commercial (614) 238-2271/3191. For personal protection equipment ( bed nets, head nets, etc.): contact the Defense Personnel

  13. Ticks associated with domestic dogs and cats in Florida, USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Voluntary collections of ticks from domestic dogs and cats by veterinary practitioners across Florida were conducted over a 10 month period. Of the 1,337 ticks submitted, five species of ixodid ticks were identified and included Rhipicephalus sanguineus, Amblyomma americanum, A. maculatum, Dermacen...

  14. Acaricidal activity of methanol extract of Acmella oleracea L. (Asteraceae) and spilanthol on Rhipicephalus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae) and Dermacentor nitens (Acari: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Cruz, Paula Barroso; Barbosa, Alan Franco; Zeringóta, Viviane; Melo, Diego; Novato, Tatiane; Fidelis, Queli Cristina; Fabri, Rodrigo Luiz; de Carvalho, Mário Geraldo; Oliveira Sabaa-Srur, Armando Ubirajara; Daemon, Erik; Monteiro, Caio Márcio Oliveira

    2016-09-15

    We evaluated the acaricidal activity of Acmella oleracea methanol extract and spilanthol on Rhipicephalus microplus and Dermacentor nitens. The extract was made through maceration with methanol. From this extract, a dichloromethane fraction with 99% spilanthol was obtained and tested on R. microplus larvae and engorged females and D. nitens larvae. For evaluation against larvae, the modified larval packet test was used, and both the methanol extract and dichloromethane fraction were tested at concentrations of 0.2-50mg/mL. The modified larval packet test was also used in the lethal time (LT) test, with the methanol extract at a concentration of 12.5mg/mL and the percentage mortality was assessed after 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, 90, 120min and 24h. The 50% lethal time calculation (LT50) was performed in this test. The engorged female test was performed with R. microplus only, at concentrations of 25-200mg/mL for methanol extract and 2.5-20.0mg/mL for spilanthol. The methanol extract caused 100% mortality of the R. microplus and D. nitens larvae at concentrations of 3.1 and 12.5mg/mL, respectively. Spilanthol resulted in 100% mortality of R. microplus larvae at concentration of 1.6mg/mL and of D. nitens at 12.5mg/mL. In the lethal time assay using the methanol extract, the mortality rate was 100% for R. microplus and D. nitens larvae after 120min and 24h, with LT50 values of 38 and 57min, respectively. In the test of females, the egg mass weight and the hatching percentage of the groups treated with concentrations equal to or higher than 50.0mg/mL of methanol extract were significantly reduced (p<0.05), while for spilanthol, the reduction of the egg mass weight and hatching percentage occurred from concentrations of 10.0mg/mL and 2.5mg/mL, respectively. Females treated with 200.0mg/mL of extract died before starting oviposition, resulting in 100% effectiveness, while the best efficacy for spilanthol was 92.9% at a concentration of 20.0mg/mL. Thus we conclude that the

  15. Acaricide and ivermectin resistance in a field population of Rhipicephalus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae) collected from red deer (Cervus elaphus) in the Mexican tropics.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Vivas, R I; Miller, R J; Ojeda-Chi, M M; Rosado-Aguilar, J A; Trinidad-Martínez, I C; Pérez de León, A A

    2014-02-24

    In the Neotropics the control of tick infestations in red deer (Cervus elaphus) is achieved primarily through the use of acaricides and macrocyclic lactones. In Mexico, resistance to one or multiple classes of acaricides has been reported in Rhipicephalus microplus infesting cattle, but information on acaricide susceptibility in R. microplus infesting red deer is lacking. In this study we report the level of resistance to different classes of acaricides and ivermectin in R. microplus collected from red deer in the Mexican tropics. Engorged R. microplus females were collected from a red deer farm in Yucatan, Mexico. The larval packet test was used to detect resistance to the organophosphates (OPs) chlorpyrifos and coumaphos, synthetic pyrethroids (SPs) cypermethrin and permethrin, and the phenylpyrazol, fipronil. Resistance to the formamidine amitraz (Am), and ivermectin was ascertained using the larval immersion test. Data were subjected to probit analysis to determine lethal concentrations and resistance ratios to kill 50% (RR50) and 99% (RR99) of the tick population under evaluation in relation to susceptible reference strains. Additionally, allele specific polymerase chain reaction was used to detect the sodium channel F1550I mutation associated with SP resistance in R. microplus. The R. microplus population from red deer in Yucatan showed very high resistance to the two SPs evaluated (RRs>72.2 for cypermethrin; RR for permethrin resistance was so high a dose-response curve was not possible). All individual larvae tested to detect the sodium channel F1550I mutation associated with SP resistance in R. microplus were homozygous. The same tick population showed different levels of resistance to OPs (chlorpyrifos: RR50=1.55, RR99=0.63; coumaphos: RR50=6.8, RR99=5.9), fipronil (RR50=1.8, RR99=0.9), and amitraz (RR50=2.3, RR99=4.4). Resistance to ivermectin was regarded as moderate (RR50=7.1, RR99=5.0). This is the first report of R. microplus ticks collected from red

  16. Two initial vaccinations with the Bm86-based Gavacplus vaccine against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus induce similar reproductive suppression to three initial vaccinations under production conditions

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, affects livestock production in many regions of the world. Up to now, the widespread use of chemical acaricides has led to the selection of acaricide-resistant ticks and to environmental contamination. Gavacplus is a subunit vaccine based on the recombinant Bm86 tick antigen expressed in yeast, capable to control infestations of R. microplus under controlled and production conditions. The vaccine constitutes the core element of broad control programs against this ectoparasite, in which acquired immunity in cattle to Bm86 is combined with a rational use of acaricides. At present, the conventional vaccine scheme consists of three doses that should be administered at weeks 0, 4 and 7, followed by a booster every six months. Results In this study we assayed a reduction in the number of the initial doses of Gavacplus, evaluated the time course and the level of bovine anti-Bm86 antibodies elicited, and analyzed the vaccine effect on ticks engorging on immunized cattle under production conditions. Following three different immunization schemes, the bovines developed a strong and specific immune response characterized by elevated anti-Bm86 IgG titers. A reduction in the weight of engorging female ticks, in the weight of the eggs laid and also in R. microplus viable eggs percentage was obtained by using only two doses of Gavacplus administered at weeks 0 and 4, followed by a booster six months later. This reduction did not differ from the results obtained on ticks engorging on cattle immunized at weeks 0, 4 and 7. It was also demonstrated that anti-Bm86 antibody titers over 1:640, measured in bovines immunized at weeks 0 and 4, were sufficient to affect weight and reproductive potential of female ticks as compared with ticks engorging on unvaccinated animals. In addition, no statistically significant differences were detected in the average weight of eggs laid by ticks engorged on immunized cattle that showed

  17. Strategic applications of long-acting acaricides against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus in northwestern Argentina, with an analysis of tick distribution among cattle.

    PubMed

    Nava, Santiago; Mangold, Atilio J; Canevari, José T; Guglielmone, Alberto A

    2015-03-15

    Strategic applications of long-acting acaricides for the control of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus in northwestern Argentina were evaluated for one year. In addition, tick distribution among cattle was analyzed to evaluate if partial selective treatment or culling the small proportion of most heavily infested animals were feasible options to control R. (B.) microplus. Two different treatments schemes based on two applications of fluazuron and one application of 3.15% ivermectin were performed. Treatments were made in late winter and spring so as to act on the small 1st spring generation of R. (B.) microplus, in order to preclude the rise of the larger autumn generation. The overall treatment effect was positively significant in both schemes. The number of ticks observed in the control group was significantly higher than in the treated groups on all post-treatment counts. Group 2 exhibited more than 80% of efficacy almost throughout the study period, whereas Group 1 exhibited an efficacy percentage higher than 80% in September, October, December, February, April and May, but not in November (73.4%), January (58.3%), March (45.2%) or June (53.4%). Absolute control was observed in Group 2 in the counts of September and October, and in Group 1 in the count of February. The control strategies evaluated in this work provide an acceptable control level with only three applications of acaricides; at the same time, they prevent the occurrence of the autumn peak of tick burdens, which is characteristic of R. (B.) microplus in northwestern Argentina. Tick distribution was markedly aggregated in all counts. Although ticks were not distributed evenly among calves, the individual composition of the most heavily infested group was not consistent throughout the study period. In addition, the level of aggregation varied with tick abundance. These results suggest that applying acaricides to a portion of the herd or culling the most infested individuals at a given moment of the

  18. Molecular detection of Rickettsia conorii and other zoonotic spotted fever group rickettsiae in ticks, Romania.

    PubMed

    Ionita, Mariana; Silaghi, Cornelia; Mitrea, Ioan Liviu; Edouard, Sophie; Parola, Philippe; Pfister, Kurt

    2016-02-01

    The diverse tick fauna as well as the abundance of tick populations in Romania represent potential risks for both human and animal health. Spotted fever group (SFG) rickettsiae are recognized as important agents of emerging human tick-borne diseases worldwide. However, the epidemiology of rickettsial diseases has been poorly investigated in Romania. In urban habitats, companion animals which are frequently exposed to tick infestation, play a role in maintenance of tick populations and as reservoirs of tick-borne pathogens. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the occurrence of SFG rickettsiae in ticks infesting dogs in a greater urban area in South-eastern Romania. Adult ixodid ticks (n=205), including Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato (n=120), Dermacentor reticulatus (n=76) and Ixodes ricinus (n=9) were collected from naturally infested dogs and were screened for SFG rickettsiae using conventional PCR followed by sequencing. Additionally, ticks were screened for DNA of Babesia spp., Hepatozoon spp., Ehrlichia canis, and Anaplasma platys. Four zoonotic SFG rickettsiae were identified: Rickettsia raoultii (16%) and Rickettsia slovaca (3%) in D. reticulatus, Rickettsia monacensis (11%) in I. ricinus, and Rickettsia conorii (0.8%) in Rh. sanguineus s.l. Moreover, pathogens of veterinary importance, such as B. canis (21%) in D. reticulatus and E. canis (7.5%) in Rh. sanguineus s.l. were identified. The findings expand the knowledge on distribution of SFG rickettsiae as well as canine pathogens in Romania. Additionally, this is the first report describing the molecular detection of R. conorii in ticks from Romania.

  19. The novel isoxazoline ectoparasiticide fluralaner: selective inhibition of arthropod γ-aminobutyric acid- and L-glutamate-gated chloride channels and insecticidal/acaricidal activity.

    PubMed

    Gassel, Michael; Wolf, Christian; Noack, Sandra; Williams, Heike; Ilg, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    Isoxazolines are a novel class of parasiticides that are potent inhibitors of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-gated chloride channels (GABACls) and L-glutamate-gated chloride channels (GluCls). In this study, the effects of the isoxazoline drug fluralaner on insect and acarid GABACl (RDL) and GluCl and its parasiticidal potency were investigated. We report the identification and cDNA cloning of Rhipicephalus (R.) microplus RDL and GluCl genes, and their functional expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes. The generation of six clonal HEK293 cell lines expressing Rhipicephalus microplus RDL and GluCl, Ctenocephalides felis RDL-A285 and RDL-S285, as well as Drosophila melanogaster RDLCl-A302 and RDL-S302, combined with the development of a membrane potential fluorescence dye assay allowed the comparison of ion channel inhibition by fluralaner with that of established insecticides addressing RDL and GluCl as targets. In these assays fluralaner was several orders of magnitude more potent than picrotoxinin and dieldrin, and performed 5-236 fold better than fipronil on the arthropod RDLs, while a rat GABACl remained unaffected. Comparative studies showed that R. microplus RDL is 52-fold more sensitive than R. microplus GluCl to fluralaner inhibition, confirming that the GABA-gated chloride channel is the primary target of this new parasiticide. In agreement with the superior RDL on-target activity, fluralaner outperformed dieldrin and fipronil in insecticidal screens on cat fleas (Ctenocephalides felis), yellow fever mosquito larvae (Aedes aegypti) and sheep blowfly larvae (Lucilia cuprina), as well as in acaricidal screens on cattle tick (R. microplus) adult females, brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus) adult females and Ornithodoros moubata nymphs. These findings highlight the potential of fluralaner as a novel ectoparasiticide.

  20. Adult Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bischof, Ledford J.

    This volume comprehensively reviews the research on the psychology of the middle aged (ages 40-65). Topics include the concept of maturity and maturation models, the measurement and influences of adult self image; marriage and sexual patterns; intergenerational relationships between and children; vocations and avocations (work, retirement, play,…

  1. Rickettsia africae and Candidatus Rickettsia barbariae in Ticks in Israel

    PubMed Central

    Waner, Trevor; Keysary, Avi; Eremeeva, Marina E.; Din, Adi Beth; Mumcuoglu, Kosta Y.; King, Roni; Atiya-Nasagi, Yafit

    2014-01-01

    DNA of several spotted fever group rickettsiae was found in ticks in Israel. The findings include evidence for the existence of Rickettsia africae and Candidatus Rickettsia barbariae in ticks in Israel. The DNA of R. africae was detected in a Hyalomma detritum tick from a wild boar and DNA of C. Rickettsia barbariae was detected in Rhipicephalus turanicus and Rhipicephalus sanguineus collected from vegetation. The DNA of Rickettsia massiliae was found in Rh. sanguineus and Haemaphysalis erinacei, whereas DNA of Rickettsia sibirica mongolitimonae was detected in a Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) annulatus. Clinicians should be aware that diseases caused by a variety of rickettsiae previously thought to be present only in other countries outside of the Middle East may infect residents of Israel who have not necessarily traveled overseas. Furthermore, this study reveals again that the epidemiology of the spotted fever group rickettsiae may not only involve Rickettsia conorii but may include other rickettsiae. PMID:24615133

  2. Ticks infesting wild and domestic animals and humans of Sri Lanka with new host records.

    PubMed

    Liyanaarachchi, D R; Rajakaruna, R S; Dikkumbura, A W; Rajapakse, R P V J

    2015-02-01

    An island-wide collection of tick species infesting humans, domesticated and wild animals and questing ticks in domestic and peridomestic environments was carried out during 2009-2011. A total of 30,461 ticks were collected from 30 different hosts and free living stages from the ground. The collection consisted of 22 tick species from 30 different hosts recording 12 tick species from humans, 19 from domesticated animals and 21 from wild animals, with a total of 97 new host records. The most common tick species on humans were Dermacentor auratus and Amblyomma testudinairum, while Haemaphysalis intermedia, Rhipicephalus microplus and Rhipicephalus sanguineus were common in domesticated and wild animals sharing 20 host species. Among the questing ticks, immature D. auratus was the most abundant. Humans and domesticated animals were mostly infested by the nymphal stages while adult ticks were found on wild animals. High number of new host records could be due to domestic animals picking tick species from wildlife and vise versa at the human/animal interface. Habitat destruction due to forest fragmentation has lead to wild animals roaming in urban and semi-urban neighbourhoods increasing the interactions of wild animals with domesticated animals. Wild animals play a significant role as a reservoir of many tick borne infections which can easily be spread to domesticated animals and then to humans via tick infestations. Data in this paper are useful for those interested in tick infesting wild and domestic animals and humans in describing the zoonotic potential of tick borne infections.

  3. Ticks infesting humans in Italy and associated pathogens

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Ticks may transmit a large variety of pathogens, which cause illnesses in animals and humans, commonly referred to as to tick-borne diseases (TBDs). The incidence of human TBDs in Italy is underestimated because of poor surveillance and the scant amount of studies available. Methods Samples (n = 561) were collected from humans in four main geographical areas of Italy (i.e., northwestern, northeastern, southern Italy, and Sicily), which represent a variety of environments. After being morphologically identified, ticks were molecularly tested with selected protocols for the presence of pathogens of the genera Rickettsia, Babesia, Theileria, Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis, Borrelia and Anaplasma. Results Ticks belonged to 16 species of the genera Argas, Dermacentor, Haemaphysalis, Hyalomma, Ixodes and Rhipicephalus, with Ixodes ricinus (59.5%) being the species most frequently retrieved, followed by Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato (21.4%). Nymphs were the life stage most frequently retrieved (41%), followed by adult females (34.6%). The overall positivity to any pathogen detected was 18%. Detected microorganisms were Rickettsia spp. (17.0%), Anaplasma phagocytophilum (0.8%), Borrelia afzelii (0.5%), Borrelia valaisiana (0.3%), C. N. mikurensis (0.5%) and Babesia venatorum (0.6%). Conclusions Results indicate that people living in the Italian peninsula are at risk of being bitten by different tick species, which may transmit a plethora of TBD causing pathogens and that co-infections may also occur. PMID:25023709

  4. Ectoparasites of sheep in three agro-ecological zones in central Oromia, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Kumsa, Bersissa; Beyecha, Kebede; Geloye, Mesula

    2012-10-23

    A cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the prevalence and risk factors for ectoparasites infestation in sheep in three agro-ecological zones in central Oromia, Ethiopia, from October 2009 to April 2010. The study revealed that 637 (48.1%) of the 1325 sheep examined were infested with one or more ectoparasites. The ectoparasites identified were Bovicola ovis (27.2%), Melophagus ovinus (16.4%), Ctenocephalides sp. (2.3%), Linognathus africanus (1.2%), Linognathus ovillus (0.3%), Sarcoptes sp. (1.2%), Amblyomma variegatum (4.4%), Rhipicephalus evertsi evertsi (1.9%), Rhipicephalus pravus (1.9%), Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) decoloratus (1.1%), Rhipicephalus sanguineus (0.9%), Rhipicephalus praetextatus (1.1%) and Hyalomma truncatum (1.6%). Statistically significant difference was observed in prevalence of B. ovis amongst study agroecological zones: highland 36.6%, midland 20.9% and lowland 14.0%. Significantly higher prevalence was recorded in highland agroecological zone. A significantly (OR = 0.041, p < 0.001) higher prevalence of M. ovinus in the highland (31.7%) than in both the lowland (0%) and midland (1.9%) was observed. The risk of tick infestation in the lowland and midland was 9.883 times and 13.988 times higher than the risk in the highland, respectively. A significantly higher prevalence of Ctenocephalides species was encountered in both the lowland (OR = 4.738, p = 0.011) and midland (OR = 8.078, p = 0.000) than in the highland agro-ecological zone. However, a significant difference (p = 0.191) amongst agro-ecological zones was not found for the prevalence of Linognathus and Sarcoptes species. Statistically significant variation (p > 0.05) was never recorded in the prevalence of all the identified species of ectoparasites between male and female sheep hosts. However, a significantly (p = 0.006) higher prevalence of B. ovis was recorded between young and adult sheep. The risk of B. ovis infestation was 1.45 times higher in young than the adult

  5. ADULT EDUCATION OF MIGRANT ADULTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BEAL, CATHERINE; AND OTHERS

    UNITS ON MIGRANT ADULT EDUCATION, AND A UNIT ON ORGANIZING INFORMAL GROUPS OF MIGRANT WOMEN TO DISCUSS MAINTAINING AND IMPROVING THEIR TEMPORARY HOMES, ARE PRESENTED. THE GOALS OF THE UNIT ON EDUCATION FOR MIGRANT MEN ARE ECONOMIC INDEPENDENCE, BETTER HEALTH AND WELL-BEING, AND BETTER HANDLING OF RESPONSIBILITIES. THE MAIN DIVISIONS OF THE…

  6. Panic Disorder among Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder ... Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder ...

  7. Obstructive sleep apnea - adults

    MedlinePlus

    Sleep apnea - obstructive - adults; Apnea - obstructive sleep apnea syndrome - adults; Sleep-disordered breathing - adults; OSA - adults ... When you sleep, all of the muscles in your body become more relaxed. This includes the muscles that help keep your ...

  8. Adult Development and Learning of Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberson, Donald N., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    This summary of adult development covers a wide range of authors. Adult development is one way of understanding how the internal and external changes in our lives have an impact on learning. Of particular importance in this work are the developmental issues of older adults. I present various theories of adult development such as linear and…

  9. A comparative test of ixodid tick identification by a network of European researchers.

    PubMed

    Estrada-Peña, A; D'Amico, G; Palomar, A M; Dupraz, M; Fonville, M; Heylen, D; Habela, M A; Hornok, S; Lempereur, L; Madder, M; Núncio, M S; Otranto, D; Pfaffle, M; Plantard, O; Santos-Silva, M M; Sprong, H; Vatansever, Z; Vial, L; Mihalca, A D

    2017-03-08

    This study reports the results of a comparative test of identification of ticks occurring in Western Europe and Northern Africa. A total of 14 laboratories were voluntarily enrolled in the test. Each participant received between 22 and 25 specimens of adult and nymphal ticks of 11 species: Dermacentor marginatus, D. reticulatus, Haemaphysalis punctata, Hyalomma lusitanicum, Hy. marginatum, Ixodes ricinus, I. hexagonus, Rhipicephalus annulatus, R. bursa, R. rossicus, and/or R. sanguineus s.l. Ticks were morphologically identified by three of the co-authors and the identification confirmed by a fourth co-author who used molecular methods based on several genes. Then ticks were randomly selected and blindly distributed among participants, together with a questionnaire. Only specimens collected while questing and, if possible, in the same survey, were circulated. Because of the random nature of the test, a participant could receive several specimens of the same species. Species in the different genera had variable misidentification rates (MR) of 7% (Dermacentor), 14% (Ixodes), 19% (Haemaphysalis), 36% (Hyalomma), and 54% (Rhipicephalus). Within genera, the MR was also variable ranging from 5.4% for I. ricinus or 7.4% for D. marginatus or D. reticulatus to 100% for R. rossicus. The test provided a total misidentification rate of 29.6% of the species of ticks. There are no significant differences in MR according to the sex of the tick. Participants were requested to perform a second round of identifications on the same set of ticks, using only purposely prepared keys (without illustrations), circulated to the enrolled participants, including 2 species of the genus Dermacentor, 8 of Haemaphysalis, 10 of Hyalomma, 23 of Ixodes, and 6 of Rhipicephalus. The average MR in the second round was 28%: 0% (Dermacentor), 33% (Haemaphysalis), 30% (Hyalomma) 18% (Ixodes), and 50% (Rhipicephalus). Species which are not reported in the countries of a participating laboratory had always

  10. Distribution of Spotted Fever Group Rickettsiae in Hard Ticks (Ixodida: Ixodidae) from Panamanian Urban and Rural Environments (2007-2013).

    PubMed

    Bermúdez, Sergio E; Castro, Angélica M; Trejos, Diomedes; García, Gleydis G; Gabster, Amanda; Miranda, Roberto J; Zaldívar, Yamitzel; Paternina, Luis E

    2016-06-01

    Tick-borne rickettsiosis is an important emerging disease in Panama; to date, there have been 12 confirmed cases, including eight fatalities. To evaluate the distribution of rickettsiae in Panamanian ticks, we collected questing and on-host ticks in urban and rural towns in elevations varying between 0 and 2300 m. A total of 63 sites (13 urban and 50 rural towns) were used to develop models of spatial distributions. We found the following tick species: Rhipicephalus sanguineus s.l. (present in 54 of 63 towns and cities), Amblyomma mixtum (45/63), Dermacentor nitens (40/63), A. ovale (37/63), Rhipicephalus microplus (33/63), A. oblongoguttatum (33/63), Ixodes affinis (3/63), and Ixodes boliviensis (2/63). Rhipicephalus sanguineus s.l. was present in urban and rural towns, and other species were present only in rural towns. DNA was extracted from 408 R. sanguineus s.l., 387 A. mixtum, 103 A. ovale, and 11 A. oblongoguttatum and later tested for rickettsiae genes using PCR. Rickettsia DNA was detected in ticks from 21 of 63 localities. Rickettsia rickettsii was detected in five A. mixtum (1.29%), and Candidatus "Rickettsia amblyommii" was found in 138 A. mixtum (35%), 14 R. sanguineus (3.4%), and one A. ovale (0.9%). These results suggest that much of rural Panama is suitable for the expansion of tick populations and could favor the appearance of new tick-borne rickettsiosis outbreaks.

  11. Preparing Educators of Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grabowski, Stanley M.; And Others

    Model programs are described for two areas of adult education--the preparation of adult educators and the training conducted by adult educators. In Chapter One, Phyllis Caldwell reviews the literature concerning the preservice training of adult educators, concentrating on the competencies of adult education administrators and teachers. In Chapter…

  12. Adults Need Vaccines, Too!

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn JavaScript on. Feature: Adult Vaccinations Adults Need Vaccines, Too! Past Issues / Summer 2015 Table of Contents ... of the millions of adults not receiving the vaccines you need? What vaccines do you need? All ...

  13. Brain tumor - primary - adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma) - adults; Meningioma - adults; Cancer - brain tumor (adults) ... Primary brain tumors include any tumor that starts in the brain. Primary brain tumors can start from brain cells, ...

  14. Adult Day Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Page Resize Text Printer Friendly Online Chat Adult Day Care Adult Day Care Centers are designed to provide care and ... adults who need assistance or supervision during the day. Programs offer relief to family members and caregivers, ...

  15. Adult Still's disease

    MedlinePlus

    Still's disease - adult; AOSD ... than 1 out of 100,000 people develop adult-onset Still's disease each year. It affects women more often than men. The cause of adult Still's disease is unknown. No risk factors for ...

  16. Adult Recruitment Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Juliet, Ed.; And Others

    Findings of an American College Testing Program 1981 survey on college recruitment of adult students are summarized, and 12 articles on adult recruitment are presented. Titles and authors are as follows: "Adult Recruitment Practices: A Report of a National Survey" (Patricia Spratt, Juliet Kaufmann, Lee Noel); "Three Programs for Adults in Shopping…

  17. Clueless? Adult Mysteries with Young Adult Appeal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles, John; Morrison, Joanna

    1997-01-01

    Presents a list of adult mystery titles for young adult readers. Includes first titles in a series (for reading in order); new and lesser-known mystery authors' works are the focus. Annotations include plot summary. The rest of each annotation is for professional use (includes date and name of award bestowed). (AEF)

  18. Young Adult Literature for Young Adult Males.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gill, Sam D.

    1999-01-01

    Argues that young adult literature can play a significant role in the emotional and mental health of an adolescent as well as help young males become more literate. Offers a 19-item annotated list of young adult novels with male protagonists, sorted by themes: nature and adventure stories, sports stories, genre stories, historical stories, and…

  19. Depression in Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stickle, Fred; Onedera, Jill D.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to address selected aspects of depression in older adults. Specifically, symptoms, risk factors, diagnosis, and interventions for depression in older adults are reviewed.

  20. Immunization Schedules for Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACIP Vaccination Recommendations Why Immunize? Vaccines: The Basics Immunization Schedules for Adults in Easy-to-read Formats ... previous immunizations. View or Print a Schedule Recommended Immunizations for Adults (19 Years and Older) by Age ...

  1. Adult Education Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Clyde W.

    1975-01-01

    Summarized are speeches dealing with adult education's stiff-necked adherence to middle-class values; the need for upgraded management skills; and a report of a study of adult education in area vocational schools in Georgia. (Author/AJ)

  2. Chemical composition and acaricidal activity of the essential oil of Baccharis dracunculifolia De Candole (1836) and its constituents nerolidol and limonene on larvae and engorged females of Rhipicephalus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    de Assis Lage, Tiago Coelho; Montanari, Ricardo Marques; Fernandes, Sergio Antonio; de Oliveira Monteiro, Caio Márcio; de Oliveira Souza Senra, Tatiane; Zeringota, Viviane; da Silva Matos, Renata; Daemon, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Baccharis dracunculifolia DC (common name "alecrim-do-campo" in Brazil) is a plant with widespread distribution in South America that is the botanical origin of green propolis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the chemical composition and acaricidal activity of the essential oil of B. dracunculifolia and its constituents nerolidol and limonene on unengorged larvae and engorged females of Rhipicephalus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae). The essential oil yield was 0.8% of dry mass and the major constituents were nerolidol (22.3%), germacrene D (7.2%), limonene (6.9%), β-pinene (6.7) and bicyclogermacrene (6.5%). The acaricidal activity of the essential oil and the pure compounds nerolidol and (R)-(+)-limonene were assessed in the laboratory through the modified larval packet test (LPT) and the female immersion test (FIT). In the LPT, the essential oil and nerolidol were both active, causing more than 90% mortality at concentrations from 15.0 and 10.0 mg mL(-1), respectively, whereas (R)-(+)-limonene was not active. In the FIT, the oil and nerolidol caused reduction in the quantity and quality of eggs produced, with control percentages of 96.3% and 90.3% at concentrations of 60.0 and 50.0 mg mL(-1), respectively. It can be concluded that the essential oil obtained from the aerial parts of B. dracunculifolia and its major component nerolidol have high activity on R. microplus larvae and engorged females.

  3. In vitro activity of 3β-O-tigloylmelianol from Guarea kunthiana A. Juss (Meliaceae) on oogenesis and ecdysis of the cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Canestrini) (Acari: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Carolina da Silva; Borges, Lígia Miranda Ferreira; Louly, Carla Cristina Braz; Rocha, Thiago Lopes; de Sabóia-Morais, Simone Maria Teixeira; Miguita, Carlos Henrique; Garcez, Walmir Silva; Garcez, Fernanda Rodriguez

    2016-05-01

    We evaluated the effects of 3β-O-tigloylmelianol from Guarea kunthiana A. Juss (Meliaceae) on oogenesis, as a larvicide and on ecdysis of the larvae and the nymphs of the cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Canestrini) (Acari: Ixodidae). On the oogenesis' test, 48 engorged females were divided into three groups, evaluated at 24, 48 and 72 h post-treatment. Half of the females were treated with 0.01% 3β-O-tigloylmelianol diluted in distilled water and 5% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), while the other half (controls) were exposed to distilled water and 5% DMSO. After treatment, the ovaries were weighed in order to measure the gonadosomatic index (GSI) and were also subjected to standard histological technical tests. On the larvicide and ecdysis' tests, 3β-O-tigloylmelianol was tested at concentrations of 0.01, 0.005, 0.0025 and 0.00125%. Compared with the controls, there was a reduction of GSI of approximately 50% on the treated group, which started at 48 h post treatment. Overall, the protolimonoid 3β-O-tigloylmelianol has caused a significant reduction in the number of oocytes. It has also caused alteration of the cytoplasmic and germinal vesicle diameters. Morphological changes, such as vacuolization, chorion irregularity which has modified the oocytes' morphology as well as alterations on the yolk's granules were also observed. The compound was not larvicide, however, interfered in the ecdysis of the larvae and the nymphs. This study shows that the protolimonoid 3β-O-tigloylmelianol from G. kunthiana acts on oogenesis and ecdysis of R. (B.) microplus, but not as larvicide, indicating that it acts on the endocrine system of the tick.

  4. Adult Education in Sweden.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Harry; And Others

    Folk high schools, study circles, labor market training, union education, and municipal adult schools are the major providers of adult education in Sweden. For the most part, these programs are financed by the government and are tuition free. Folk high schools, which are the oldest type, were founded to provide young adults with a general civic…

  5. The Adult Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belsky, Janet

    The 14 chapters of this textbook chronicle adult development from youth through old age, emphasizing both research and interviews with adults at various stages in their lives. Topics covered include the following: (1) the academic field of adult development; (2) theories and research methods; (3) aging and disease prevention; (4) sexuality and…

  6. Adult Survival Skills Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsko, Gregory M.

    The purpose of this instrument is to supplement data from the Adult Basic Learning Examination in assessing the functional level of adults in daily situations. It may also be used as a teaching tool for adults requesting tutoring in specific concepts and skills presented in the instrument. This instrument is an informal assessment instrument and…

  7. Kids Who Outwit Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seita, John R.; Brendtro, Larry K.

    Kids who distrust adults are highly skilled at hiding their real nature and resisting change. Most adults shun such youths or get mired in conflict with them. Punitive get tough practices as well as traditional flaw-fixing treatment are reactive strategies that often drive these youths further from adult bonds and reinforce oppositional and…

  8. Urbanization and Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Short, W. Fisher

    1974-01-01

    The impact of urbanization, the main tasks facing the adult educator in an urban context, identifying the casualties of urbanization, recognizing and dealing with social deprivation, and the various agencies involved in adult education are relevant considerations for adult educators. (MW)

  9. Dimensions of Adult Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foley, Griff, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    This broad introduction to adult and postcompulsory education offers an overview of the field for students, adult educators and workplace trainers. The book establishes an analytical framework to emphasize the nature of learning and agency of learners; examines the core knowledge and skills that adult educators need; discusses policy, research and…

  10. Adult Learning: A Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Peter, Ed.

    This book on adult learning is divided into six sections. Section 1, Cognitive Processes, includes the following chapters: "Cognitive Processes: Contemporary Paradigms of Learning" (Jack Mezirow); "Information Processing, Memory, Age and Adult Learning" (Gillian Boulton-Lewis); "Adult Learners' Metacognitive Behaviour in Higher Education" (Barry…

  11. Adult Education in Israel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirmayer, Paul, Ed.; And Others

    This volume contains 13 articles that reflect the development of adult education in Israel during recent years. The material relates to the principal areas with which the Division of Adult Education deals: formal and nonformal education for adults, language and cultural absorption of new immigrants, and training of facilitators for parental…

  12. Adults Role in Bullying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Notar, Charles E.; Padgett, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    Do adults play a role in bullying? Do parents, teachers, school staff, and community adult leaders influence bullying behavior in children and teenagers? This article will focus on research regarding all adults who have almost daily contact with children and teens and their part in how bullying is identified, addressed, and prevented. This article…

  13. Adult Education in Greece

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kokkos, Alexios

    2008-01-01

    The central aim of this article is to analyse the current situation of adult education in Greece. The article focuses on the following points: (a) the degree of participation in programmes of continuing professional training and general adult education courses, (b) the quality and the outcomes of the adult education provision in Greece, and (c)…

  14. Adult Competency Education Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Occupational and Adult Education (DHEW/OE), Washington, DC. Div. of Adult Education.

    A compilation of abstracts of 120 current Adult Performance Level (APL) and Adult Competency Education (ACE) federally supported projects being conducted in 34 States and the District of Columbia, this project profile was developed for adult and secondary education administrators, teachers, and program developers who are beginning or are currently…

  15. Adult Competency Education Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Occupational and Adult Education (DHEW/OE), Washington, DC. Div. of Adult Education.

    A compilation of brief descriptions of 20 current resources for Adult Performance Level (APL) and Adult Competency Education (ACE) programs, this guide was developed for adult and secondary education administrators, teachers, and program developers who are beginning or are already involved with APL/ACE programs. Each citation contains information…

  16. Adult Academy Volunteer Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cora, Marie T., Ed.; Wood, Nicole R., Ed.

    This handbook was written specifically for volunteer tutors but is appropriate for teachers, student interns, coordinators, and others working with Adult Basic Education (ABE) and English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) adult learners. It presents an overview of adult and non-traditional education models, some principles of reading and writing, a…

  17. Canadian Adult Basic Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooke, W. Michael, Comp.

    "Trends," a publication of the Canadian Association for Adult Education, is a collection of abstracts on selected subjects affecting adult education; this issue is on adult basic education (ABE). It covers teachers and teacher training, psychological factors relating to the ABE teacher and students, manuals for teachers, instructional…

  18. Young Adult Services Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boegen, Anne, Ed.

    Designed to offer guidelines, ideas and help to those who provide library service to young adults, this manual includes information about the provision of young adult (YA) services in six sections. The first section, which addresses planning and administration, includes a definition of a young adult and a checklist for determining community needs…

  19. Adult Educators' Core Competences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahlgren, Bjarne

    2016-01-01

    Which competences do professional adult educators need? This research note discusses the topic from a comparative perspective, finding that adult educators' required competences are wide-ranging, heterogeneous and complex. They are subject to context in terms of national and cultural environment as well as the kind of adult education concerned…

  20. An Adult ESL Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina Literacy Resource Center, Columbia.

    This curriculum framework for adult literacy was written by 21 South Carolina adult English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) instructors, as submitted to the South Carolina Literacy Resource Center. It is based on current theories in the fields of adult education and second language acquisition and is designed to be flexible so that it may be adapted to…

  1. Obsessive Compulsive Disorder among Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder ... Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder ...

  2. A list of the 70 species of Australian ticks; diagnostic guides to and species accounts of Ixodes holocyclus (paralysis tick), Ixodes cornuatus (southern paralysis tick) and Rhipicephalus australis (Australian cattle tick); and consideration of the place of Australia in the evolution of ticks with comments on four controversial ideas.

    PubMed

    Barker, Stephen C; Walker, Alan R; Campelo, Dayana

    2014-10-15

    Seventy species of ticks are known from Australia: 14 soft ticks (family Argasidae) and 56 hard ticks (family Ixodidae). Sixteen of the 70 ticks in Australia may feed on humans and domestic animals (Barker and Walker 2014). The other 54 species of ticks in Australia feed only on wild mammals, reptiles and birds. At least 12 of the species of ticks in Australian also occur in Papua New Guinea. We use an image-matching system much like the image-matching systems of field guides to birds and flowers to identify Ixodes holocyclus (paralysis tick), Ixodes cornuatus (southern paralysis tick) and Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) australis (Australian cattle tick). Our species accounts have reviews of the literature on I. holocyclus (paralysis tick) from the first paper on the biology of an Australian tick by Bancroft (1884), on paralysis of dogs by I. holocyclus, to papers published recently, and of I. cornuatus (southern paralysis tick) and Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) australis (Australian cattle tick). We comment on four controversial questions in the evolutionary biology of ticks: (i) were labyrinthodont amphibians in Australia in the Devonian the first hosts of soft, hard and nuttalliellid ticks?; (ii) are the nuttalliellid ticks the sister-group to the hard ticks or the soft ticks?; (iii) is Nuttalliella namaqua the missing link between the soft and hard ticks?; and (iv) the evidence for a lineage of large bodied parasitiform mites (ticks plus the holothyrid mites plus the opiliocarid mites).

  3. Molecular detection of bacterial and parasitic pathogens in hard ticks from Portugal.

    PubMed

    Maia, Carla; Ferreira, Andreia; Nunes, Mónica; Vieira, Maria Luísa; Campino, Lenea; Cardoso, Luís

    2014-06-01

    Ticks are important vector arthropods of human and animal pathogens. As information about agents of disease circulating in vectors in Portugal is limited, the aim of the present study was to detect bacteria and parasites with veterinary and zoonotic importance in ticks collected from dogs, cats, and field vegetation. A total of 925 ticks, comprising 888 (96.0%) adults, 8 (0.9%) nymphs, and 29 (3.1%) larvae, were collected in 4 geographic areas (districts) of Portugal. Among those, 620 (67.0%) were removed from naturally infested dogs, 42 (4.5%) from cats, and 263 (28.4%) were questing ticks obtained from field vegetation. Rhipicephalus sanguineus was the predominant tick species, and the only one collected from dogs and vegetation, while all Ixodes ricinus specimens (n=6) were recovered from cats. Rickettsia massiliae and Rickettsia conorii were identified in 35 ticks collected from cats and dogs and in 3 ticks collected from dogs. Among ticks collected from cats or dogs, 4 Rh. sanguineus specimens were detected with Hepatozoon felis, 3 with Anaplasma platys, 2 with Hepatozoon canis, one with Anaplasma phagocytophilum, one with Babesia vogeli, one with Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato and one with Cercopithifilaria spp. Rickettsia helvetica was detected in one I. ricinus tick collected from a cat. To the best of our knowledge, this was the first time that Cercopithifilaria spp., Ba. vogeli, H. canis, and H. felis have been detected in ticks from Portugal. The wide range of tick-borne pathogens identified, some of zoonotic concern, suggests a risk for the emergence of tick-borne diseases in domestic animals and humans in Portugal. Further studies on these and other tick-borne agents should be performed to better understand their epidemiological and clinical importance, and to support the implementation of effective control measures.

  4. Rickettsiae in arthropods collected from the North African Hedgehog (Atelerix algirus) and the desert hedgehog (Paraechinus aethiopicus) in Algeria.

    PubMed

    Khaldi, Mourad; Socolovschi, Cristina; Benyettou, Meryam; Barech, Ghania; Biche, Mohamed; Kernif, Tahar; Raoult, Didier; Parola, Philippe

    2012-03-01

    Hedgehogs have become a popular pet despite their potential role in zoonotic disease transmission. We conducted an entomological study in a mountainous region of northeast Algeria in which we collected 387 fleas (Archeopsylla erinacei) and 342 ticks (Rhipicephalus sanguineus and Haemaphysalis erinacei) from Paraechinus aethiopicus and Atelerix algirus hedgehogs. Of the hedgehogs sampled, 77.7% and 91% were infested with fleas and ticks, respectively. Significantly more ticks and fleas were collected from A. algirus than from P. aethiopicus. Rickettsia felis was detected in 95.5% of fleas and R. massiliae was detected in 6.25% of Rh. sanguineus ticks by molecular tools. A new Rickettsia species of the spotted fever group was detected in 11.25% of Rh. sanguineus and in 77% of H. erinacei ticks. Overall, we show that hedgehogs can act as hosts for ectoparasites infected with several rickettsial agents. These data justify a more detailed investigation of animal reservoirs for Rickettsiae.

  5. Occurrence of pathogenic fungi to Amblyomma cajennense in a rural area of Central Brazil and their activities against vectors of Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, Walmirton B; Humber, Richard A; Luz, Christian

    2012-08-13

    Two isolates of Beauveria bassiana and one of Purpureocillium lilacinum (=Paecilomyces lilacinus) were found infecting Amblyomma cajennense engorged females collected on horses (0.15% infection rate from a total of 1982 specimens) and another two isolates of P. lilacinum and one Metarhizium anisopliae detected in soils (2.1% from 144 samples) collected in typical pasture habitats of this tick in Central Brazil from October 2009 to March 2011. Fungi were isolated from soils with Rhipicephalus sanguineus as surrogate baits. No fungi were found in ticks or soils during the driest months (May to August). Testing pathogenicity of fungi all R. sanguineus females were killed regardless of the isolate and fungi sporulated abundantly on the cadavers. A. cajennense was less susceptible to infection with P. lilacinum within 20 days than R. sanguineus. All three fungal species probably act as natural antagonists of A. cajennense particularly in the rainy season and have interest for integrate control of vectors of Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

  6. Molecular typing of novel Rickettsia rickettsii isolates from Arizona.

    PubMed

    Eremeeva, Marina E; Bosserman, Elizabeth; Zambrano, Maria; Demma, Linda; Dasch, Gregory A

    2006-10-01

    Seven isolates of Rickettsia rickettsii were obtained from a skin biopsy, two whole-blood specimens, and from Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks from eastern Arizona. Molecular typing of seven isolates of R. rickettsii and DNA samples from two other Rh. sanguineus ticks infected with R. rickettsii was conducted by PCR and DNA sequencing of rompA and 12 variable-number tandem repeat regions (VNTRs). All DNA specimens from Arizona were identical to each other and to reference human and Dermacentor andersoni isolates of R. rickettsii from Montana in their rOmpA gene sequences and 10 VNTRs. Two of the twelve VNTRs had differences in the number of repeat sequences in isolates from Arizona compared to those from Montana, thus conferring the novelty of the Rh. sanguineus-associated R. rickettsii.

  7. Adult Education Regional Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Community Colleges, Chancellor's Office, 2015

    2015-01-01

    For more than one hundred and fifty years, until 2008, California was an undisputed national leader in its commitment to adult education. The state's investment in adult learners topped $750 million, a sum greater than the combined total of every other state in the nation. However, for the past several years recession and fiscal crisis have left…

  8. Young Adult Library Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    The Bookmark, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Eight articles in this Spring 1985 issue of The Bookmark focus on young adult library services. In addition to these thematic articles, an introduction and three reports are presented. The issue contains: (1) "In Perspective" (E. J. Josey); (2) "Young Adult Literature in the 1980's--Awesome!" (Ellin Chu); (3) "Young Adult…

  9. Toward Transpersonal Adult Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boucouvalas, Marcie

    2016-01-01

    As a foundation for discussing transpersonal adult development, the author traces her trajectory, involvement in, and contribution to the modern transpersonal movement and her introduction of it to the adult learning literature, beginning during the early 1980s. Highlighted are the transpersonal domain and a differentiation between transpersonal…

  10. Adult Day Services

    MedlinePlus

    A Smart Choice Adult Day Services Comparison At-a-Glance 1 Adult Day Services Assisted Living Home Care Nursing Homes Live at home with family ... supervision Nursing care available as needed during the day Flexibility to receive care only on days when ...

  11. Adult Tech Prep.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaad, Donna

    For over 2 years, Blak Hawk College (Illinois) has provided high school equivalency (GED) candidates and recipients, older returning students, and underprepared high school graduates with a Tech Prep curriculum to give them the skills to make the transition from adult basic education to college or work. The Adult Tech Prep (ATP) core curriculum…

  12. Authenticity in Adult Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashton, Sam

    2010-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the relationship between authenticity and adult learning and prompted by some studies in which adult "authentic learning" is a central concept. The implication revealed by them is that real-worldness of learning contexts, learning content and learning tasks is perceived as conferring authenticity on learning. Here,…

  13. Adult Learning and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubenson, Kjell, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    As individuals and societies try to respond to fundamental economic and social transformation, the field of adult learning and education is rapidly getting increased attention and new topics for research on adult learning have emerged. This collection of articles from the International Encyclopedia of Education 3e offers practitioners and…

  14. Today's Adult Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Who are the adult students in career and technical education (CTE) today? There is not one simple answer to that question. Some are young with little life experience, while others are returning to the workforce and learning new skills to reinvent themselves. Whatever the case, educating adult students is an integral part of ACTE's mission, and the…

  15. Adult Literacy in Zanzibar.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saadat, Ahmed H.

    The philosophy behind adult literacy in Zanzibar is that adult literacy is a process whereby the illiterate is empowered to become aware of his or her potential. Literacy activities emphasize a relation to work, sometimes known as functional literacy. Specific objectives of literacy programs are to improve living conditions, impart self-reliant…

  16. Adult Vocational Trajectory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riverin-Simard, Danielle

    1990-01-01

    Proposes a "spatial-temporal" model conceiving adult vocational development as a complex and constant readjustment in always changing perception of personal space-time, based on interviews of 786 adults. Presents two propositions of this model: the continuous alternation between states of instability and interaction of influences.…

  17. Counseling Adult Adoptees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corder, Kate

    2012-01-01

    This review presents various resources about working with adult adoptees in order to inform counselors in their practice. Topics covered include basics of adoption, including types of adoption and adoption statistics; possible issues adult adoptees may face; and suggestions and implications for counselors. The article addresses some of the serious…

  18. Alternative Programming for Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flint, Thomas A.; Frey, Ruth

    2003-01-01

    The Council for Adult and Experiential Learning is currently cataloguing alternative programming features that are most effective with adult students in a best practices inventory organized around a framework of high-level descriptive principles of effectiveness. This chapter identifies a few interesting features from a quick survey of this…

  19. Adult Education and Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinzen, Heribert, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This document contains 19 papers on adult education and development worldwide. The following papers are included: "Editorial" (Heribert Hinzen); "Lifelong Learning in Europe: Moving towards EFA (Dakar Framework for Action on Education for All) Goals and the CONFINTEA V Agenda" (Sofia Conference on Adult Education);…

  20. Adult Education in Finland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szekely, Radu

    2006-01-01

    Ever since the first ideas of national independence appeared in Finland, adult education has played an essential role in shaping the destiny of the Finns. With a history of almost 130 years, during which it has continuously increased in quality and quantity, the Finnish adult education system has ensured that Finland stays among the most…

  1. Financing of Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, David

    2007-01-01

    The 2008 EFA Global Monitoring Report recognises adult literacy as the most neglected of the EFA goals. It is neglected most obviously in respect of the financial allocations made by governments and donors. This shortage of financing creates a dangerous situation in which adult educators seek to convince politicians to invest, based on false…

  2. Gender Dysphoria in Adults.

    PubMed

    Zucker, Kenneth J; Lawrence, Anne A; Kreukels, Baudewijntje P C

    2016-01-01

    Gender dysphoria (GD), a term that denotes persistent discomfort with one's biologic sex or assigned gender, replaced the diagnosis of gender identity disorder in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders in 2013. Subtypes of GD in adults, defined by sexual orientation and age of onset, have been described; these display different developmental trajectories and prognoses. Prevalence studies conclude that fewer than 1 in 10,000 adult natal males and 1 in 30,000 adult natal females experience GD, but such estimates vary widely. GD in adults is associated with an elevated prevalence of comorbid psychopathology, especially mood disorders, anxiety disorders, and suicidality. Causal mechanisms in GD are incompletely understood, but genetic, neurodevelopmental, and psychosocial factors probably all contribute. Treatment of GD in adults, although largely standardized, is likely to evolve in response to the increasing diversity of persons seeking treatment, demands for greater client autonomy, and improved understanding of the benefits and limitations of current treatment modalities.

  3. Depression in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Fiske, Amy; Wetherell, Julie Loebach; Gatz, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    Depression is less prevalent among older adults than among younger adults but can have serious consequences. Over half of cases represent a first onset in later life. Although suicide rates in the elderly are declining, they are still higher than in younger adults and more closely associated with depression. Depressed older adults are less likely to endorse affective symptoms and more likely to display cognitive changes, somatic symptoms, and loss of interest than are younger adults. Risk factors leading to the development of late life depression likely comprise complex interactions among genetic vulnerabilities, cognitive diathesis, age-associated neurobiological changes, and stressful events. Insomnia is an often overlooked risk factor for late life depression. We suggest that a common pathway to depression in older adults, regardless of which predisposing risks are most prominent, may be curtailment of daily activities. Accompanying self-critical thinking may exacerbate and maintain a depressed state. Offsetting the increasing prevalence of certain risk factors in late life are age-related increases in psychological resilience. Other protective factors include higher education and socioeconomic status, engagement in valued activities, and religious or spiritual involvement. Treatments including behavioral therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, cognitive bibliotherapy, problem-solving therapy, brief psychodynamic therapy, and life review/reminiscence therapy are effective but too infrequently used with older adults. Preventive interventions including education for individuals with chronic illness, behavioral activation, cognitive restructuring, problem-solving skills training, group support, and life review have also received support. PMID:19327033

  4. Mosquito, adult (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This illustration shows an adult southern house mosquito. This mosquito feeds on blood and is the carrier of many diseases, such as encephalitis, West Nile, dengue fever, yellow fever, and others. ( ...

  5. Older Adults and Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alcohol Exposure Support & Treatment Alcohol Policy Special Populations & Co-occurring Disorders Publications & Multimedia Brochures & Fact Sheets NIAAA ... are here Home » Alcohol & Your Health » Special Populations & Co-occurring Disorders » Older Adults In this Section Underage ...

  6. Speech impairment (adult)

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003204.htm Speech impairment (adult) To use the sharing features on ... 2017, A.D.A.M., Inc. Duplication for commercial use must be authorized in writing by ADAM ...

  7. Motivation and Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veeraraghavan, J.

    1974-01-01

    The paper examines the role of adult education and the contribution it can make to the solution of current problems in developing countries, particularly the problems of economic under-development and over-population. (Author/AG)

  8. Motivation and Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, J. Rodney

    1982-01-01

    The author reviews theories of human motivation: Lewin's force field analysis, Skinner's operant reinforcement theory, and Maslow's hierarchy of needs. He then extracts the implications of these theories for adult learning. SK)

  9. Older Adults and Depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... find more information? Reprints Share Older Adults and Depression Download PDF Download ePub Order a free hardcopy ... depression need treatment to feel better. Types of Depression There are several types of depression. The most ...

  10. Young Adult Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Connie C.

    1987-01-01

    Considers the similarities between science fiction writing and young adult literature, and points out that several well-known authors, such as Robert Heinlein and Jane Yolen, write in both genres. (NKA)

  11. Cardiac imaging in adults

    SciTech Connect

    Jaffe, C.C.

    1987-01-01

    This book approaches adult cardiac disease from the correlative imaging perspective. It includes chest X-rays and angiographs, 2-dimensional echocardiograms with explanatory diagrams for clarity, plus details on digital radiology, nuclear medicine techniques, CT and MRI. It also covers the normal heart, valvular heart disease, myocardial disease, pericardial disease, bacterial endocarditis, aortic aneurysm, cardiac tumors, and congenital heart disease of the adult. It points out those aspects where one imaging technique has significant superiority.

  12. Detection of Leishmania infantum, Babesia canis, and rickettsiae in ticks removed from dogs living in Italy.

    PubMed

    Trotta, Michele; Nicetto, Martina; Fogliazza, Alessandro; Montarsi, Fabrizio; Caldin, Marco; Furlanello, Tommaso; Solano-Gallego, Laia

    2012-12-01

    The aims of this study were to determine natural infections by Anaplasma phagocytophilum/Anaplasma platys, Bartonella henselae, Ehrlichia canis, Leishmania infantum, Rickettsia spp., Babesia spp., and Hepatozoon spp. by molecular methods in ticks (n=91) removed from dogs with clinical signs and laboratory abnormalities compatible with tick-borne diseases (n=22) living in Italy and to assess the distribution and species of ticks encountered. Ticks from dogs living in southern Italy were all identified as Rhipicephalus sanguineus (n=25), ticks from central Italy included Rh. sanguineus (n=8) and Ixodes ricinus (n=9), ticks from northern Italy included Rh. sanguineus (n=45), Dermacentor marginatus (n=3), and one I. ricinus. Leishmania infantum, Rickettsia spp., and Babesia canis were the only pathogens detected in 7 (8%), 4 (4%), and 2 (2%) out of 91 ticks, respectively. L. infantum was detected in I. ricinus from central Italy and in Rh. sanguineus from northern and central Italy. Rickettsia conorii and Ri. massiliae were detected in Rh. sanguineus ticks from central and southern Italy (Sicily), respectively. Bab. canis was detected in D. marginatus ticks from northern Italy.

  13. Adult educators' core competences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne

    2016-06-01

    Which competences do professional adult educators need? This research note discusses the topic from a comparative perspective, finding that adult educators' required competences are wide-ranging, heterogeneous and complex. They are subject to context in terms of national and cultural environment as well as the kind of adult education concerned (e.g. basic education, work-related education etc.). However, it seems that it is possible to identify certain competence requirements which transcend national, cultural and functional boundaries. This research note summarises these common or "core" requirements, organising them into four thematic subcategories: (1) communicating subject knowledge; (2) taking students' prior learning into account; (3) supporting a learning environment; and (4) the adult educator's reflection on his or her own performance. At the end of his analysis of different competence profiles, the author notes that adult educators' ability to train adult learners in a way which then enables them to apply and use what they have learned in practice (thus performing knowledge transfer) still seems to be overlooked.

  14. [Orthodontic treatment for adults].

    PubMed

    Kuitert, R B

    2000-04-01

    The number of adults undergoing orthodontic treatment has increased strongly and the average age that adult patients undergo orthodontic treatment increased steadily although 3/4 is still younger than 27 years. In adults the facial skeletal pattern can only be changed in a very confined way, consequently in case of an abnormal skeletal pattern one has to choose between a combined orthodontic-surgical approach (which is the case in 18% of the patients) and a compromised orthodontic treatment, if necessary combined with other disciplines. It is still controversial whether tooth movement in adults is slower and more difficult than in adolescents. The same holds true for the risk for loss of periodontal support, for root resorption, for gnathologic problems and for relapse. As related to these variables there appears to be a large individual variation. Many adults show one or more problems in their dentition that may influence their orthodontic treatment. About 60% of the adult patients need a multidisciplinary approach. The development of implantology and of bone regeneration and bone grafting has lead to more combined treatments. The risks of such complex treatment plans are generally larger than those for more simple kinds of treatment. A very careful treatment planning and good communication between the different specialists is essential. Moreover the treatment plan with all its (dis)advantages has to be extensively discussed with the patient.

  15. The State of Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Ted

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the author looks at the state of adult education in Ireland. He is suggesting that the state here means both the condition in which one now finds adult education and the role of the Irish State in adult education. He briefly outlines some recent developments in adult education, makes some critical comments on the state of adult…

  16. The ABC's of Adult Ed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roehrig, Lucy

    2010-01-01

    According to the 2003 National Assessment of Adult Literacy, it is estimated that 93 million adults in the United States have basic or below basic literacy skills. Those individuals found most lacking in literacy skills were adults living in poverty, adults lacking a high school diploma, seniors and the elderly aged 65 and older, the more than one…

  17. Designing an Adult Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rand, Margaret

    Intended for planners of adult education curriculums, this literature review explains the concepts involved in designing an adult education program, provides information about the roles of the people involved in the adult education process, cites some program planning models, and applies the program planning principles to an Adult Basic Education…

  18. The Adult Learner: Four Aspects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, John A., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Topics concerning the adult learner that are relevant to institutional researchers are addressed in four articles: marketing, predicting success for adult students, enrollment projection, and follow-up studies of adult learners. In "Institutional Research in Support of Marketing the Adult Student," Lydia Jurand notes the importance of…

  19. Rich Environments for Adult Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bentham, Renee

    2008-01-01

    Unaware of the messages a bare adult learning environment sends and its effect on adult learners, a trainer attends an intensive Reggio Emilia course and learns that the physical environment is the "third teacher"--for adults as well as for children. Using principles of Reggio, she offers suggestions for enhancing adult learning spaces and…

  20. Tick (Acari: Ixodidae) infestations in cattle along Geba River basin in Guinea-Bissau.

    PubMed

    Zúquete, Sara Tudela; Coelho, João; Rosa, Fernanda; Vaz, Yolanda; Cassamá, Bernardo; Padre, Ludovina; Santos, Dulce; Basto, Afonso P; Leitão, Alexandre

    2017-01-01

    Tick infestations are a major problem for animal production in tropical areas where prevention and control remain deficient. The present study sought to assess the awareness of traditional cattle producers towards the importance of ticks and aimed at the identification of tick species infesting bovines within the Geba River basin, Guinea-Bissau. Interviews with producers revealed that the majority directly correlates the presence of ticks with the occurrence of diseases in cattle. However, insufficient or inadequate control approaches prevail. A total of 337 ticks were collected on bovines at 18 different villages (10 during dry season, and 8 during rainy season). The tick species collected during the dry season were Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) geigyi (56.5%), followed by Amblyomma variegatum (23.3%), Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) annulatus (17.6%) and Hyalomma truncatum (1%). In the rainy season A. variegatum was the most collected (88.9%), followed by R. (Boophilus) geigyi (4.2%), R. (Boophilus) annulatus (3.4%), Rhipicephalus sanguineus group (2.8%) and H. truncatum (0.7%). To support species identification, segments of both cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) and 12S ribosomal RNA (12S) genes were sequenced and the data gathered were analysed by maximum likelihood and parsimony. Morphological and genetic data of individual specimens gathered in this study provide relevant information for future studies on tick population dynamics in the region. In addition, it led to a deeper characterization of R. sulcatus and a R. sanguineus-like specimen, exploring their genetic relationship with other R. sanguineus, which supports their classification as distinct species within R. sanguineus group.

  1. Adult-onset Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kanwar, Amrinder Jit

    2016-01-01

    Adult-onset atopic dermatitis is still an under recognized condition as there are only few studies regarding this entity. As compared to childhood onset atopic dermatitis, clinical features of adult onset atopic dermatitis are still not categorized. Adult atopic dermatitis can present for the first time in adult age with atypical morphology or may progress from childhood onset. This article reviews the characteristic clinical features of adult atopic dermatitis, associated risk factors and management. PMID:27904186

  2. Altitudinal and seasonal differences of tick communities in dogs from pastoralist tribes of Northern Kenya.

    PubMed

    D'Amico, Gianluca; Dumitrache, Mirabela O; Široký, Pavel; Albrechtová, Kateřina; Sloboda, Michal; Domşa, Cristian; Sándor, Attila D; Balázsi, Robert; Kanyari, Paul W N; Modrý, David; Mihalca, Andrei D

    2015-09-15

    Studies regarding the distribution and ecology of ticks in dogs from Eastern Africa are scarce. Our research was based on a long-term screening of ticks parasitising the domestic dogs living with indigenous people around Lake Turkana, Mt. Kulal and Mt. Nyiru areas, Northern Kenya. A total of 9977 ticks were collected from 1464 dogs of all ages and both sexes. Identification was performed using morphological keys and data were analyzed using the Repeated Measures ANOVA, post-hoc Scheffe test and F test, relating independent variables as seasons and regions. Final results were translated to maps using GIS software. Five species of ticks were identified: Rhipicephalus pulchellus, Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato (s.l.), Rhipicephalus armatus, Amblyomma gemma and Hyalomma truncatum. Our results suggest a statistical difference of the tick community structure related to seasonal and altitudinal distribution. Parasitism with R. armatus and R. pulchellus was higher in September-October than in January, whereas, R. sanguineus s.l. was not influenced by the season. Rhipicephalus armatus was present exclusively on dogs living in semi-desert areas, while R. sanguineus s.l. was the dominant species present on the shores of Lake Turkana. Although R. pulchellus was present in the all studied areas, this species had a significantly higher abundance in the afromontane region of Mt. Kulal and montane xeromorphic forest of Mt. Nyiru; these regions are characterized by elevated humidity and cooler climate. Similar geo-climatic distribution is typical also for A. gemma, which was found in dogs exclusively in Mt. Kulal afromontane area. The current work represents the most extensive study performed on the tick community structure of dogs in Eastern Africa. The results showed a relatively limited tick species diversity, with clear seasonal differences and altitudinal distribution.

  3. Molecular Detection and Characterization of Tick-borne Pathogens in Dogs and Ticks from Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Kamani, Joshua; Baneth, Gad; Mumcuoglu, Kosta Y.; Waziri, Ndadilnasiya E.; Eyal, Osnat; Guthmann, Yifat; Harrus, Shimon

    2013-01-01

    Background Only limited information is currently available on the prevalence of vector borne and zoonotic pathogens in dogs and ticks in Nigeria. The aim of this study was to use molecular techniques to detect and characterize vector borne pathogens in dogs and ticks from Nigeria. Methodology/Principal Findings Blood samples and ticks (Rhipicephalus sanguineus, Rhipicephalus turanicus and Heamaphysalis leachi) collected from 181 dogs from Nigeria were molecularly screened for human and animal vector-borne pathogens by PCR and sequencing. DNA of Hepatozoon canis (41.4%), Ehrlichia canis (12.7%), Rickettsia spp. (8.8%), Babesia rossi (6.6%), Anaplasma platys (6.6%), Babesia vogeli (0.6%) and Theileria sp. (0.6%) was detected in the blood samples. DNA of E. canis (23.7%), H. canis (21.1%), Rickettsia spp. (10.5%), Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis (5.3%) and A. platys (1.9%) was detected in 258 ticks collected from 42 of the 181 dogs. Co- infections with two pathogens were present in 37% of the dogs examined and one dog was co-infected with 3 pathogens. DNA of Rickettsia conorii israelensis was detected in one dog and Rhipicephalus sanguineus tick. DNA of another human pathogen, Candidatus N. mikurensis was detected in Rhipicephalus sanguineus and Heamaphysalis leachi ticks, and is the first description of Candidatus N. mikurensis in Africa. The Theileria sp. DNA detected in a local dog in this study had 98% sequence identity to Theileria ovis from sheep. Conclusions/Significance The results of this study indicate that human and animal pathogens are abundant in dogs and their ticks in Nigeria and portray the potential high risk of human exposure to infection with these agents. PMID:23505591

  4. Adult onset retinoblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Sabyasachi; Pan, Utsab; Khetan, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB) is the most common primary malignant intraocular tumor of childhood presenting usually before 5 years of age. RB in adults older than 20 years is extremely rare. A literature search using PubMed/PubMed Central, Scopus, Google Scholar, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases revealed only 45 cases till date. Over the past decade, there has been a significant increase in the number of such reports, indicating heightened level of suspicion among ophthalmologists. Compared to its pediatric counterpart, adult onset RB poses unique challenges in diagnosis and treatment. This article summarizes available literature on adult onset RB and its clinical and pathologic profile, genetics, association with retinocytoma, diagnostics, treatment, and outcomes. PMID:27609158

  5. Adult Seborrheic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Seborrheic dermatitis is a common chronic-recurrent inflammatory disorder that most commonly affects adults; however, a more transient infantile form also occurs. The definitive cause of seborrheic dermatitis is unknown. However, proliferation of Malassezia species has been described as a contributing factor. The adult form of seborrheic dermatitis affects up to approximately five percent of the general population. The disorder commonly affects the scalp, face, and periauricular region, with the central chest, axillae, and genital region also involved in some cases. Pruritus is not always present and is relatively common, especially with scalp disease. A variety of treatments are available including topical corticosteroids, topical antifungal agents, topical calcineurin inhibitors, and more recently, a nonsteroidal “device ”cream. This article reviews the practical topical management of seborrheic dermatitis in the United States, focusing on the adult population. PMID:21607192

  6. Electroporation of adult zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Rao, N Madhusudhana; Rambabu, K Murali; Rao, S Harinarayana

    2008-01-01

    We generated transient transgenic zebrafish by applying electrical pulses subsequent to injection of DNA into muscle tissue of 3-6-month old adult zebrafish. Electroporation parameters, such as number of pulses, voltage, and amount of plasmid DNA, were optimized and found that 6 pulses of 40 V/cm at 15 mug/fish increased the luciferase expression by 10-fold compared with those in controls. By measuring the expression of luciferase, in vivo by electroporation in adult zebrafish and in vitro using fish cell line (Xiphophorus xiphidium A2 cells), the strength of three promoters (CMV, human EF-1alpha, and Xenopus EF-1alpha) was compared. Subsequent to electroporation after injecting DNA in the mid region of zebrafish, expression of green fluorescent protein was found far away from the site of injection in the head and the tail sections. Thus, electroporation in adult zebrafish provides a rapid way of testing the behavior of gene sequences in the whole organism.

  7. Back pain in adults.

    PubMed

    Becker, Jonathan A; Stumbo, Jessica R

    2013-06-01

    This article provides a summary of the many causes of back pain in adults. There is an overview of the history and physical examination with attention paid to red flags that alert the clinician to more worrisome causes of low back pain. An extensive differential diagnosis for back pain in adults is provided along with key historical and physical examination findings. The various therapeutic options are summarized with an emphasis on evidence-based findings. These reviewed treatments include medication, physical therapy, topical treatments, injections, and complementary and alternative medicine. The indications for surgery and specialty referral are also discussed.

  8. [Adult oligosymptomatic coeliac disease].

    PubMed

    Cabral Rodríguez, R; Arrieta Blanco, F J; Vicente Sánchez, F; Cordobés Martín, F J; Moreno Caballero, B

    2004-12-01

    Coeliac disease is a chronic pathology of the small intestine. The pathogenic mechanism is caused by gluten intolerance. This disease present a characteristic and unspecific injury that causes nutrients and vitamins malabsorption. In adults is an underdiagnosed entity due to atypical forms. To make a premature diagnosis is basic because gluten-free diet prevent the complications after long-term like the intestinal T lymphoma and other digestives malignancies, and decrease the mortality of these patients. We present a case of adult oligosymptomatic coeliac disease in a patient with iron deficiency anaemia and vaginal bleeding. We study the clinic-nutrition and the alterations evolution of the patient.

  9. Adult Learning Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adults Learning, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Campaigning Alliance for Lifelong Learning is to lobby parliament for the restoration of the 1.5 million adult learning places lost over the past two years. The campaign has attracted supporters from an astonishingly wide range of backgrounds. In this article, Gordon Marsden, Caroline Biggins, Beth Walker, Mike Chaney, Peter Davies, Sian…

  10. Facilitation of Adult Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boydell, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Taking an autobiographical approach, I tell the story of my experiences facilitating adult development, in a polytechnic and as a management consultant. I relate these to a developmental framework of Modes of Being and Learning that I created and elaborated with colleagues. I connect this picture with a number of related models, theories,…

  11. Hearing Loss in Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    House, John W.

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses hearing loss in adults. It begins with an explanation of the anatomy of the ear and then explains the three types of hearing loss: conductive hearing loss, sensorineural hearing loss, and mixed conductive-sensorineural hearing loss. Tinnitus, hearing aids, and cochlear implants are also addressed. (CR)

  12. Older Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forman, Jeffrey

    In an effort to improve the quality of life for area senior citizens, De Anza College has established an older adult education program which combines adaptive physical education with holistic health care principles to instruct students in relaxation, nutrition, and physical activity. Classes are held in convalescent hospitals, retirement homes,…

  13. Adult Education in Brazil.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministerio da Educacao e Cultura, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil).

    The status and goals of adult education programs in Brazil are discussed in this report. Supplemental systems such as the Brazilian Literacy Movement (Mobral) and their results are described and evaluated. Charts detailing the evolution of literacy are shown and priorities in education are suggested. The progress of other educational entities is…

  14. Adult Basic Education Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts Career Development Inst., Springfield.

    This booklet, aimed at adult basic education students, pinpoints and summarizes a few common spelling rules to help make spelling easier, and includes a component on using the dictionary. In the text, each rule is presented with many examples. Exercises follow each spelling rule, allowing students the opportunity to apply the rule to specific…

  15. Police and Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sims, Vic

    The literature on adult education for police is reviewed and criticized. Among the publications that have been influential in debating the need for police education are Charles B. Saunder's "The Challenge of Crime in a Free Society" (1976), which endorses the Presidential Commission on Law Enforcement's recommendations regarding the vital…

  16. Dance for Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pruett, Diane Milhan, Ed.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Dance programs for older adults that encourage exercise and socializing are described in six articles. Program guidelines of the American Alliance Committee on Aging are explained, and other articles emphasize a movement education approach that may involve intergenerational contact. A dance program held in a worship setting is also discussed. (PP)

  17. Migration and Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gois, William

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to highlight the role of adult education as a tool in addressing labour migration issues, specifically those concerning the protection of migrant workers' rights and the transformation of the impact of migration into positive holistic developmental gains. The view of labour migration as a means to forge the economic…

  18. How Do Adults Learn?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Alan; Illeris, Knud

    2003-01-01

    This dialog between Alan Rogers and Knud Illeris debates arguments Rogers made in a previous article about the differences between adult and child learning. Rogers emphasizes differences in teacher-learner relationships. Illeris believes the differences result from different motivations for learning. (SK)

  19. Encyclopedia of Adult Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastenbaum, Robert, Ed.

    This encyclopedia contains 106 articles on adult development that were written by more than 75 specialists in such diverse fields as anthropology, communication, education, health sciences, history, and psychology. In a guide to related topics that is presented at the beginning of the encyclopedia, the 106 articles are grouped under the following…

  20. Sinusitis in adults - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000563.htm Sinusitis in adults - aftercare To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Your sinuses are chambers in ... They are filled with air. Sinusitis is an infection of these chambers, which causes ...

  1. Helping Adults to Spell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moorhouse, Catherine

    This book presents a range of strategies for adult literacy tutors and offers a wealth of practical advice on teaching spelling within the context of writing. Chapters 1-3 offer basic information on talking with the student about spelling, finding out how the student spells and helping the student to see himself/herself as a "good" speller, and…

  2. Immigration and Adult Transitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rumbaut, Ruben G.; Komaie, Golnaz

    2010-01-01

    Almost 30 percent of the more than 68 million young adults aged eighteen to thirty-four in the United States today are either foreign born or of foreign parentage. As these newcomers make their transitions to adulthood, say Ruben Rumbaut and Golnaz Komaie, they differ significantly not only from one another but also from their native-parentage…

  3. Profiles of Adult Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Library, Springfield.

    Since January 1986, when the Illinois Secretary of State Literacy Grant Program began funding a wide variety of adult literacy programs, more than 30,000 students have sought help with reading. They have been matched with 25,000 tutors who have provided more than 2 million hours of volunteer instruction. The profiles in this booklet are stories of…

  4. Adult Literacy Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Maurice C., Ed.; Draper, James A., Ed.

    This book, intended to serve as a professional reference work, proposes to define the field of Adult Basic Education in its evolution, its contribution to professional education, and the principal problems and issues. The volume contains the following treatises: "Definitions and Evolution of the Concepts" (Thomas); "Selected…

  5. Depression - older adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... slowly than in younger adults. To better manage depression at home: Exercise regularly, if the provider says it is OK. Surround yourself with caring, positive people and do fun activities. ... signs of depression, and know how to react if these occur. ...

  6. TRENDS IN ADULT READING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MILLER, JUSTIN H.

    TRENDS EVIDENT IN ADULT READING DURING THE 1960'S IN THE AREAS OF ADMINISTRATION, PROGRAMS, TEACHING, TECHNIQUES, RESEARCH PROJECTS, AND METHODS OF PROMOTION OF READING PROGRAMS ARE DISCUSSED. TWO INSTANCES OF COMMERCIAL EXPLOITATION BASED ON INTENSE AND OFTEN FALLACIOUS ADVERTISING AND ON PUBLIC IGNORANCE ARE CITED. A POSITIVE TREND IN THE AREA…

  7. Newly Diagnosed: Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Children Newly Diagnosed: Older Adults Related Topics on AIDS.gov Aging with HIV/AIDS National HIV/AIDS ... an Emerging Challenge Last revised: 07/10/2015 AIDS.gov HIV/AIDS Basics • Federal Resources • Using New ...

  8. Utah Adult Education Services. Adult Education Report 1968-69.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Board of Education, Salt Lake City.

    Major purposes for the preparation of this report on public school adult education in Utah were: to provide the public with a description of achievements, trends, and needs, and with meaningful cost accounting information; to make comparisons and analyses of adult education by program, school district, and year; and to provide the adult education…

  9. What is Young Adult Literature? (Young Adult Literature).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowe, Chris, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    Outlines some of the many confusions about young adult literature. Sheds some light on what young adult literature is (defining it as all genres of literature published since 1967 that are written for and marketed to young adults). Discusses briefly how it can be used in schools. Offers a list of the author's 20 favorite books for teenagers. (SR)

  10. Teaching Nontraditional Adult Students: Adult Learning Theories in Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Joseph C.

    2014-01-01

    As the USA experiences rapid growth of nontraditional adult students in higher education, educators and institutions will increasingly need to look beyond the traditional youth-centric educational models to better address adult learning needs. To date, no research has been conducted examining the learning experiences of adult students enrolled in…

  11. Congenital Heart Disease in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... and genetics may play a role. Why congenital heart disease resurfaces in adulthood Some adults may find that ... in following adults with congenital heart disease. Congenital heart disease and pregnancy Women with congenital heart disease who ...

  12. Adult Education for Social Mobilization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Echeverria, Luis

    1981-01-01

    Suggests some ideas that could stimulate and be incentives for defining programs of adult education in the future. These involve changing priorities, developing a framework which allows adult education programs to be established, and managing decision-making processes. (CT)

  13. College-Age & Young Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adolescent Brain Comorbidity College-Age & Young Adults Criminal Justice Drugged Driving Drug Testing Drugs and the Brain ... Age & Young Adults College Addiction Studies Programs Criminal Justice Drugged Driving Drug Testing Drugs and the Brain ...

  14. Renal Disease and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources for Healthcare Professionals Renal Disease and Adult Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vaccines are ... have immunity to this disease Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Type 1 ...

  15. Alcohol Use and Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Alcohol Use and Older Adults Alcohol and Aging Adults of any age can have ... Escape (Esc) button on your keyboard.) What Is Alcohol? Alcohol, also known as ethanol, is a chemical ...

  16. Liver Disease and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vaccination Recommendations Adult Vaccination Resources for Healthcare Professionals Liver Disease and Adult Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... critical for people with health conditions such as liver disease. If you have chronic liver disease, talk ...

  17. Enhancing Older Adults' Reading Comprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemper, Susan; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Investigates older adults' reading comprehension skills through syntactic measures and measures of sentence content. Analyzes the apparent reading difficulties of older adults. Provides guidelines for the preparation of prose materials for older readers. (HB)

  18. Adult Development and the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heffernan, James M.

    Little attention has been given to how adults develop through their lifetimes and what roles their workplace environments play in that development. Research and theory regarding adult psychosocial development have confirmed the developmental life-cycle phases of adulthood. These are: leaving the family (ages 16-22), getting into the adult world…

  19. Facilitating Creativity in Adult Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Kuan Chen

    2013-01-01

    Creativity in education research has received increasing attention, although the major focus of this research has been on children. Despite pleas by several adult educators for promoting creativity, very few studies have focused on adult learners, leaving to it to be explored what approaches are useful for adult educators to facilitate creativity…

  20. Adult Learning. ARIS Information Sheet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Languages and Literacy Inst. of Australia, Melbourne. Adult Education Resource and Information Service.

    This information sheet provides a summary of general observations regarding adult learners. Adults from different walks of life may seek out learning at different times in their lives, for different reasons, and for vastly different purposes. Adult learning groups may include students of different ages, cultures, and educational and socioeconomic…