Science.gov

Sample records for adult service users

  1. Involving Adult Service Users with Learning Disabilities in the Training of Speech and Language Therapy Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harding, Celia

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a pilot project carried out at City University London, Department of Language and Communication Science, where adult service users with learning disabilities trained first-year speech and language therapy students. The training involved presentations by the service users on their involvement in interviewing support staff,…

  2. Distributed user services for supercomputers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sowizral, Henry A.

    1989-01-01

    User-service operations at supercomputer facilities are examined. The question is whether a single, possibly distributed, user-services organization could be shared by NASA's supercomputer sites in support of a diverse, geographically dispersed, user community. A possible structure for such an organization is identified as well as some of the technologies needed in operating such an organization.

  3. Charging Users for Library Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Michael D.

    1978-01-01

    Examines the question of instituting direct charges for library service, using on-line bibliographic searching as an example, and contrasts this with the current indirect charging system where services are paid for by taxes. Information, as a merit good, should be supplied with or without direct charges, depending upon user status. (CWM)

  4. Adult Day Services

    MedlinePlus

    A Smart Choice Adult Day Services Comparison At-a-Glance 1 Adult Day Services Assisted Living Home Care Nursing Homes Live at home with family ... supervision Nursing care available as needed during the day Flexibility to receive care only on days when ...

  5. Unifying access to services: ESO's user portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavan, A. M.; Tacconi-Garman, L. E.; Peron, M.; Sogni, F.; Canavan, T.; Nass, P.

    2006-06-01

    The European Southern Observatory (ESO) is in the process of creating a central access point for all services offered to its user community via the Web. That gateway, called the User Portal, will provide registered users with a personalized set of service access points, the actual set depending on each user's privileges. Correspondence between users and ESO will take place by way of "profiles", that is, contact information. Each user may have several active profiles, so that an investigator may choose, for instance, whether their data should be delivered to their own address or to a collaborator. To application developers, the portal will offer authentication and authorization services, either via database queries or an LDAP server. The User Portal is being developed as a Web application using Java-based technology, including servlets and JSPs.

  6. Public Service Communications Satellite User Requirements Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolff, E. A.

    1977-01-01

    Information on user requirements for public service communications was acquired to provide the basis of a study to determine the optimum satellite system to satisfy user requirements. The concept for such a system is described: Topics discussed included requirements for data and message services, elementary and secondary education, extension and continuing education, environmental communications, library services, medical education, medical services, public broadcasting, public safety, religious applications, state and local communications, and voluntary services. Information was also obtained on procedures to follow to make the transfer to commercial services.

  7. Determining User Preferences for Information Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halperin, Michael

    1981-01-01

    Reviews the various techniques and methods employed to measure user preferences with respect to the provision of particular library services. The ranking of user preferences, direct judgment methods of measurement, tradeoff analysis, and conjoint analysis are among the topics discussed. A reference list is included. (JL)

  8. Performance measures, hours of caregiving assistance, and risk of adverse care outcomes among older adult users of Medicaid home and community-based services

    PubMed Central

    Danilovich, Margaret K; Corcos, Daniel M; Marquez, David X; Eisenstein, Amy R; Hughes, Susan L

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study used validated physical performance measures to examine function, risk of adverse health outcomes, and the relationship with allocated hours of weekly caregiving assistance among older adults receiving home and community-based services through a Medicaid waiver program. Methods: Older adults (n = 42) completed physical performance measures including grip strength, 30-s chair rise, Timed Up and Go, and gait speed. Demographic information including age, gender, and allocated hours of weekly caregiving assistance were also collected. Results: A majority, 72% of females and 86% of males, had weak grip strength, 57% met criteria for fall risk based on their Timed Up and Go score, 83% had lower extremity strength impairments, and 98% were unable to ambulate more than 1.0 m/s. Frailty was prevalent in the sample with 72% of clients meeting Fried’s frailty criteria. The most significant predictors of allocated hours of weekly caregiving assistance approved for clients were race and gait speed. Conclusion: Based on scores on physical performance measures, clients are at risk of falls, hospitalization, and mortality, and scores indicate an urgent need to assess performance in addition to self-reported activities of daily living limitations for this population. Performance measures associated with quantifiable risk of adverse outcomes can be critical indicators for referrals and services needed to enhance the safety and improve care outcomes for homebound older adults. PMID:27092257

  9. Service on demand for ISS users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hüser, Detlev; Berg, Marco; Körtge, Nicole; Mildner, Wolfgang; Salmen, Frank; Strauch, Karsten

    2002-07-01

    Since the ISS started its operational phase, the need of logistics scenarios and solutions, supporting the utilisation of the station and its facilities, becomes increasingly important. Our contribution to this challenge is a SERVICE On DEMAND for ISS users, which offers a business friendly engineering and logistics support for the resupply of the station. Especially the utilisation by commercial and industrial users is supported and simplified by this service. Our industrial team, consisting of OHB-System and BEOS, provides experience and development support for space dedicated hard- and software elements, their transportation and operation. Furthermore, we operate as the interface between customer and the envisaged space authorities. Due to a variety of tailored service elements and the ongoing servicing, customers can concentrate on their payload content or mission objectives and don't have to deal with space-specific techniques and regulations. The SERVICE On DEMAND includes the following elements: ITR is our in-orbit platform service. ITR is a transport rack, used in the SPACEHAB logistics double module, for active and passive payloads on subrack- and drawer level of different standards. Due to its unique late access and early retrieval capability, ITR increases the flexibility concerning transport capabilities to and from the ISS. RIST is our multi-functional test facility for ISPR-based experiment drawer and locker payloads. The test program concentrates on physical and functional interface and performance testing at the payload developers site prior to the shipment to the integration and launch. The RIST service program comprises consulting, planning and engineering as well. The RIST test suitcase is planned to be available for lease or rent to users, too. AMTSS is an advanced multimedia terminal consulting service for communication with the space station scientific facilities, as part of the user home-base. This unique ISS multimedia kit combines

  10. Communication satellite services for special purpose users

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, D. L.; Kiesling, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    The present study identifies potential satellite services, examines the technology necessary for efficient implementation of these services, and determines minimum service cost versus user network size. The generic satellite services evaluated comprise TV and radio distribution (for retransmission), video teleconferencing (interactive), audio/facsimile teleconferencing (interactive), multiplexed data/voice (point-to-point), and satellite-supported land mobile. Satellite costs are based on extrapolations from ongoing commercial satellite programs. Production methods, new technology, and effect of production quantities on present and future production costs are examined to provide information on earth station equipment cost versus the variable 'buy'. Six different launch vehicles from a Delta 2914 to a dedicated Shuttle and three frequency bands and both broadcast (no eclipse capability) and fixed service satellites are considered to assess the effect of satellite size on cost and performance. It is assumed that the user pays only for his prorata share of the space segment costs.

  11. Involving service users in the classroom with social work students.

    PubMed

    Mackay, Rob; Millar, Jeremy

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore and discuss issues related to the requirement by the Scottish Social Services Council (SSSC) and the Scottish Government that service users and carers are partners and stakeholders in social work education. This requirement is one of several that are used by the SSSC in the approval of Scottish Universities to deliver social work courses. This paper explains the developmental process of involving service users and carers as partners in the planning of social work courses at the Robert Gordon University (RGU), Aberdeen. This is illustrated with reference to a group made up of young people ('The Voice of Reason') and also in relation to a group made up of adult service users (the Service User Panel). This short paper suggests there are benefits for student learning if we invite service users and carers to become partners in the teaching/learning process. There are also benefits for teaching staff and indeed for the University itself as a public institution on the basis that an ongoing relationship allows for good partnership working. This enables the University and its staff to be viewed positively and from that vantage point further developments are more likely. At the same time this paper has discussed the need to avoid tokenistic moves through ensuring a sound organisational commitment is made to providing effective support and putting in place enabling structures and processes. Lastly it discusses the broader implications for partnership working in relation to the education and training of students for professional practice. The suggestion is made that such a teaching and learning approach equips the students with good partnership skills and attitudes that will help to inform their practice post-qualification. Interest is expressed in the experiences of other professions who have adopted similar approaches to incorporating service users into students' learning experiences. PMID:22035881

  12. It's about Putting Service-Users First

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAleavy, Tony

    2009-01-01

    From 2010 the Government plans to have in place a universal Adult Advancement and Careers Service. Beyond the general support to help find jobs and complete applications offered by Job Centre Plus, the new framework will provide a more holistic approach to employment and training. Currently, this kind of holistic support is only available to…

  13. 14 CFR 1215.109 - Scheduling user service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Scheduling user service. 1215.109 Section 1215.109 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION TRACKING AND DATA RELAY SATELLITE SYSTEM (TDRSS) Use and Reimbursement Policy for Non-U.S. Government Users § 1215.109 Scheduling user service. (a) User service shall...

  14. 14 CFR 1215.109 - Scheduling user service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Scheduling user service. 1215.109 Section 1215.109 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION TRACKING AND DATA RELAY SATELLITE SYSTEM (TDRSS) Use and Reimbursement Policy for Non-U.S. Government Users § 1215.109 Scheduling user service. (a) User service shall...

  15. Mental health services--the user's view.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, P

    1993-01-01

    The needs of people with serious mental illnesses have dominated much of the debate on reforming community care. In this article Peter Campbell, who has used mental health services many times in the past, explains how the reforms could affect people like him. He welcomes the thinking behind the changes, particularly the idea that people who use community care should take part in planning services, but he warns that implementing the new philosophy might prove very difficult. Mr Campbell is secretary of a voluntary organisation for users of mental health services called Survivors Speak Out. The views he expresses here are his own, and do not necessarily reflect those of Survivors Speak Out. Images p849-a p850-a PMID:8490382

  16. 14 CFR 1215.111 - User postponement of service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false User postponement of service. 1215.111 Section 1215.111 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION TRACKING AND DATA RELAY SATELLITE SYSTEM (TDRSS) Use and Reimbursement Policy for Non-U.S. Government Users § 1215.111 User postponement of service. The user...

  17. Coping with Loneliness: Young Adult Drug Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rokach, Ami; Orzeck, Tricia

    Since there appears to be a connection between substance use (and abuse) and loneliness it is of theoretical and clinical interest to explore the differences of coping with loneliness which drug users employ. The present study examined the manner in which MDMA (Ecstasy) users in comparison with non-MDMA (Non-Ecstasy) users and the general…

  18. Older Adults' Perceptions of Home Telehealth Services

    PubMed Central

    Brenčič, Maja Makovec; Trkman, Peter; de Leonni Stanonik, Mateja

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The success of home telemedicine depends on end-user adoption, which has been slow despite rapid advances in technological development. This study focuses on an examination of significant factors that may predict the successful adoption of home telemedicine services (HTS) among older adults. Based on previous studies in the fields of remote patient monitoring, assisted living technologies, and consumer health information technology acceptance, eight factors were identified as a framework for qualitative testing. Twelve focus groups were conducted with an older population living in both urban and rural environments. The results reveal seven predictors that play an important role in perceptions of HTS: perceived usefulness, effort expectancy, social influence, perceived security, computer anxiety, facilitating conditions, and physicians' opinion. The results provide important insights in the field of older adults' acceptance of HTS, with guidelines for the strategic planning, developing, and marketing of HTS for the graying market. PMID:23931702

  19. Older adults' perceptions of home telehealth services.

    PubMed

    Cimperman, Miha; Brenčič, Maja Makovec; Trkman, Peter; Stanonik, Mateja de Leonni

    2013-10-01

    The success of home telemedicine depends on end-user adoption, which has been slow despite rapid advances in technological development. This study focuses on an examination of significant factors that may predict the successful adoption of home telemedicine services (HTS) among older adults. Based on previous studies in the fields of remote patient monitoring, assisted living technologies, and consumer health information technology acceptance, eight factors were identified as a framework for qualitative testing. Twelve focus groups were conducted with an older population living in both urban and rural environments. The results reveal seven predictors that play an important role in perceptions of HTS: perceived usefulness, effort expectancy, social influence, perceived security, computer anxiety, facilitating conditions, and physicians' opinion. The results provide important insights in the field of older adults' acceptance of HTS, with guidelines for the strategic planning, developing, and marketing of HTS for the graying market. PMID:23931702

  20. Service providers and users discover the Internet.

    PubMed Central

    Lacroix, E M; Backus, J E; Lyon, B J

    1994-01-01

    Although the Internet has evolved over more than twenty years, resources useful to health information professionals have become available on the Internet only recently. A survey conducted by the Regional Medical Libraries of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine in the fall of 1993 indicates that libraries at academic institutions are much more likely to have access to the Internet (72%) than are libraries in hospital environments (24%). Health information professionals who take on the challenge and exploit the Internet's resources find rewards for themselves and their clients. The basic electronic mail capability of the Internet allows colleagues to collaborate, communicate, and participate in daily continuing education. Internet terminal and file-transfer capabilities provide improved access to traditional resources and first-time access to new electronic resources. Through the Internet, online catalogs are available worldwide, and document delivery is faster, cheaper, and more reliable than ever before. Institutions can make organizational, full-text, online, and publication information available through Internet tools such as direct file-transfer protocol (FTP), menu-based Gopher, and hypertext-based Mosaic. The National Library of Medicine (NLM) is among organizations finding new ways to provide service through the Internet. NLM now uses electronic mail to communicate with users, FTP service to distribute publications, and tools such as Gopher and Mosaic to distribute publications and graphics and connect users to online services. The Internet allows service providers and health sciences information professionals to work in a rich, new medium whose potential is just beginning to be explored. At the same time, its characteristics--including lack of formal organization, standards, quality control, and permanence--pose a challenge. PMID:7841912

  1. Preparing Technical Communication Students to Function as User Advocates in a Self-Service Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleary, Yvonne; Flammia, Madelyn

    2012-01-01

    The self-service nature of today's society means that technical communicators are needed more than ever before since users may find themselves struggling to make sense of online documentation with minimal support from the institutions that provide it. Certain demographics within the user population (older adults, disabled persons, non-native…

  2. Involving service users in trials: developing a standard operating procedure

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Many funding bodies require researchers to actively involve service users in research to improve relevance, accountability and quality. Current guidance to researchers mainly discusses general principles. Formal guidance about how to involve service users operationally in the conduct of trials is lacking. We aimed to develop a standard operating procedure (SOP) to support researchers to involve service users in trials and rigorous studies. Methods Researchers with experience of involving service users and service users who were contributing to trials collaborated with the West Wales Organisation for Rigorous Trials in Health, a registered clinical trials unit, to develop the SOP. Drafts were prepared in a Task and Finish Group, reviewed by all co-authors and amendments made. Results We articulated core principles, which defined equality of service users with all other research team members and collaborative processes underpinning the SOP, plus guidance on how to achieve these. We developed a framework for involving service users in research that defined minimum levels of collaboration plus additional consultation and decision-making opportunities. We recommended service users be involved throughout the life of a trial, including planning and development, data collection, analysis and dissemination, and listed tasks for collaboration. We listed people responsible for involving service users in studies and promoting an inclusive culture. We advocate actively involving service users as early as possible in the research process, with a minimum of two on all formal trial groups and committees. We propose that researchers protect at least 1% of their total research budget as a minimum resource to involve service users and allow enough time to facilitate active involvement. Conclusions This SOP provides guidance to researchers to involve service users successfully in developing and conducting clinical trials and creating a culture of actively involving service

  3. Library Users' Service Desires: A LibQUAL+ Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Bruce; Kyrillidou, Martha; Cook, Colleen

    2008-01-01

    The present study was conducted to explore library users' desired service quality levels on the twenty-two core LibQUAL+ items. Specifically, we explored similarities and differences in users' desired library service quality levels across user groups (i.e., undergraduate students, graduate students, and faculty), across geographic locations (i.e.,…

  4. 14 CFR 1215.110 - User cancellation of all services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false User cancellation of all services. 1215.110 Section 1215.110 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION TRACKING AND DATA RELAY SATELLITE SYSTEM (TDRSS) Use and Reimbursement Policy for Non-U.S. Government Users § 1215.110 User cancellation of all services. The...

  5. 14 CFR 1215.109 - Scheduling user service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... NASA Administrator or his/her designee. Requests for normally scheduled service must be received by the... Administrator or his/her designee as the priorities stated in paragraph (b)(2) of this section are indicative of... user service. (a) User service shall be scheduled only by NASA. Scheduling refers to that...

  6. User Needs of Digital Service Web Portals: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heo, Misook; Song, Jung-Sook; Seol, Moon-Won

    2013-01-01

    The authors examined the needs of digital information service web portal users. More specifically, the needs of Korean cultural portal users were examined as a case study. The conceptual framework of a web-based portal is that it is a complex, web-based service application with characteristics of information systems and service agents. In…

  7. Service user movement. The customer is sometimes right.

    PubMed

    Sang, B

    1999-08-19

    Patients' groups and service user organisations have grown enormously in the past 20 years. The NHS is beginning to take the principle of patients managing their own conditions seriously. Sustained service user involvement in the planning of local services is still some way off. PMID:10662310

  8. The role of service-user feedback in undergraduate nursing courses.

    PubMed

    Ward, Sue; Benbow, Judith

    2016-07-14

    There is an increasing expectation that service users should contribute in a meaningful way to student nurse education courses. This article describes how service-user feedback on undergraduate student nurses' performance during practice learning opportunities (PLOs) gives an insight into the qualities service users value in student nurses. At Cardiff University, the new Bachelor of Nursing course, launched in September 2012, took into account the Nursing and Midwifery (NMC) standards for preregistration, implementing a mechanism for service users to feed back on students' clinical performance. To facilitate this service, user/carer feedback pages were inserted into the students' bound clinical practice portfolio. A large sample of the clinical portfolios (n=100) from one cohort across adult, child and mental health nursing fields were examined at the end of year 1, year 2 and again at the end of year 3, and service users' comments collated. In considering the words used by service users, the authors propose that they reflected the six fundamental values-or 6Cs-of care, compassion, competence, communication, courage and commitment that underpin the delivery of excellent care. Conclusions drawn from the feedback were that students exhibited the caring and professional qualities that service users value, and indeed showed the dignity and respect for patients and people that the profession demands. PMID:27409785

  9. User Evaluation of Student and Auxiliary Services, Fall 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weglarz, Shirley

    The Fall 1998 Student/Auxiliary Services User Evaluation for Johnson County Community College (JCCC) in Kansas was expanded to include information about service learning, vending services, services not included in the biennial evaluation, and answers to questions of topical interest submitted by managers of ten student/auxiliary services. A total…

  10. Characteristics and Outcomes of Young Adult Opiate Users Receiving Residential Substance Abuse Treatment.

    PubMed

    Morse, Siobhan; MacMaster, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Opiate use patterns, user characteristics, and treatment response among young adults are of interest due to current high use prevalence and historical low levels of treatment engagement relative to older populations. Prior research in this population suggests that overall, young adults present at treatment with different issues. In this study the authors investigated potential differences between young adult (18-25 years of age) and older adult (26 and older) opiate users and the impact of differences relative to treatment motivation, length and outcomes. Data for this study was drawn from 760 individuals who entered voluntary, private, residential treatment. Study measures included the Addiction Severity Index (ASI), the Treatment Service Review (TSR), and University of Rhode Island Change Assessment (URICA). Interviews were conducted at program intake and 6-month post-discharge. Results indicate that older adults with a history of opiate use present at treatment with higher levels of severity for alcohol, medical, and psychological problems and young adults present at treatment with greater drug use and more legal issues. Significant improvement for both groups was noted at 6 months post treatment; there were also fewer differences between the two age groups of opiate users. Results suggest different strategies within treatment programs may provide benefit in targeting the disparate needs of younger opiate users. Overall, however, results suggest that individualized treatment within a standard, abstinence-based, residential treatment model can be effective across opiate users at different ages and with different issues, levels of severity, and impairment at intake. PMID:25879396

  11. New Library Services for Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mielke, Linda

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the library services needed by mentally and physically impaired older adults and gives examples of such programs which are in existence in Maryland, including the traditional shut-in delivery service and the nontraditional group programing techniques. (LLS)

  12. Charging User Fees for Social Services: Education in Malawi.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thobani, Mateen

    1984-01-01

    A partial equilibrium framework (user charges/government subsidy) analyzes optimal user charges for social services. The framework is applied to Malawi's education sector to formulate policy recommendations for solving problems of high student-teacher ratios and drop-out rates. Malawi's school user fees were increased in 1982 based on this…

  13. National Environmental Data Referral Service (NEDRES) User Survey. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MAXIMA Corp., Silver Spring, MD.

    A survey was conducted to assess environmental data users' interest in a referral system such as the National Environmental Data Referral Service (NEDRES) and to gauge user willingness to participate in a proposed NEDRES network and to comply with a system of NEDRES user fees. Twenty-one organizations were identified and 3,200 individuals were…

  14. User Education and Marketing of Information Services in Brazil.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Figueiredo, Nice

    Arguing that marketing appears to be a solid means for creating users' needs for information as well as for attracting potential users to the library, this paper reviews the current literature in Brazil on marketing information services and on user education. It also discusses the current status of library education in Brazil. An analysis of the…

  15. Satellite services system analysis study. Volume 2: Satellite and services user model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Satellite services needs are analyzed. Topics include methodology: a satellite user model; representative servicing scenarios; potential service needs; manned, remote, and automated involvement; and inactive satellites/debris. Satellite and services user model development is considered. Groundrules and assumptions, servicing, events, and sensitivity analysis are included. Selection of references satellites is also discussed.

  16. Developing Public Library Services for Young Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Jim

    From November 1992 through May 1993, a series of staff development and training workshops were presented as part of the project, "Developing Library Services for Young Adults." The workshops included: "Redirecting Young Adult Behavior" (Glenna O. Auxier & Bob Perchalski); "The Youth Services Librarian and the Law" (Gary Becker & Julie Law); and…

  17. Musical FAVORS: Reintroducing music to adult cochlear implant users.

    PubMed

    Plant, Geoff

    2015-09-01

    Music represents a considerable challenge for many adult users of cochlear implants (CIs). Around half of adult CI users report that they do not find music enjoyable, and, in some cases, despite enhanced speech perception skills, this leads to considerable frustration and disappointment for the CI user. This paper presents suggestions to improve the musical experiences of deafened adults with CIs. Interviews with a number of adult CI users revealed that there were a number of factors which could lead to enhanced music experiences. The acronym FAVORS (familiar music, auditory-visual access, open-mindedness, and simple arrangements) summarizes the factors that have been identified, which can help CI users in their early music listening experiences. Each of these factors is discussed in detail, along with suggestions for how they can be used in therapy sessions. The use of a group approach (music focus groups) is also discussed and an overview of the approach and exercises used is presented. The importance of live music experiences is also discussed. PMID:26561887

  18. Grid Service for User-Centric Job

    SciTech Connect

    Lauret, Jerome

    2009-07-31

    The User Centric Monitoring (UCM) project was aimed at developing a toolkit that provides the Virtual Organization (VO) with tools to build systems that serve a rich set of intuitive job and application monitoring information to the VO’s scientists so that they can be more productive. The tools help collect and serve the status and error information through a Web interface. The proposed UCM toolkit is composed of a set of library functions, a database schema, and a Web portal that will collect and filter available job monitoring information from various resources and present it to users in a user-centric view rather than and administrative-centric point of view. The goal is to create a set of tools that can be used to augment grid job scheduling systems, meta-schedulers, applications, and script sets in order to provide the UCM information. The system provides various levels of an application programming interface that is useful through out the Grid environment and at the application level for logging messages, which are combined with the other user-centric monitoring information in a abstracted “data store”. A planned monitoring portal will also dynamically present the information to users in their web browser in a secure manor, which is also easily integrated into any JSR-compliant portal deployment that a VO might employ. The UCM is meant to be flexible and modular in the ways that it can be adopted to give the VO many choices to build a solution that works for them with special attention to the smaller VOs that do not have the resources to implement home-grown solutions.

  19. Perception of Influencing Factors on Acceptance of Mobile Health Monitoring Service: A Comparison between Users and Non-users

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jaebeom

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To improve and promote mobile health monitoring services, this study investigated the perception of various factors influencing the acceptance of services between users and non-users. Methods This study drew 9 variables from studies related to mobile health monitoring services and the unified theory of acceptance and the use of technology model. A total of 219 samples were collected by a paper-based survey from users (n = 106) and non-users (n = 113). Analysis was carried out using a two-independent samples t-test. Results The findings indicate that users have a more positive perception of service benefits than non-users. Although there were difference between users and non-users, all respondents had a positive perception of the service benefits. After users used the service, they were less concerned about the risks involved with it. However, both users and non-users had a high negative perception of service risk. Users also had a more positive perception of intimacy and communication associated with the services than non-users. Both users and non-users had a high behavioral intention to use the services. Finally, this study observed that older subjects tended to recognize the higher value of the services. Conclusions This study provides insights to improve and invigorate mobile health monitoring services. This study also offers insights into how to increase the number of users of mobile health monitoring services in South Korea. PMID:24175115

  20. User Evaluation of a Corporate Library Online Search Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warden, Carolyn L.

    1981-01-01

    Summarizes the findings of a survey taken to measure user satisfaction with General Electric's online search services, including search retrieval relevance and search benefits. Nine references are cited and a sample questionnaire is provided. (FM)

  1. 14 CFR 1215.111 - User postponement of service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true User postponement of service. 1215.111 Section 1215.111 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION TRACKING AND DATA RELAY SATELLITE SYSTEM (TDRSS) Use and Reimbursement Policy for Non-U.S. Government Users §...

  2. 14 CFR 1215.110 - User cancellation of all services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false User cancellation of all services. 1215.110 Section 1215.110 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION TRACKING AND DATA RELAY SATELLITE SYSTEM (TDRSS) Use and Reimbursement Policy for Non-U.S. Government Users §...

  3. 14 CFR 1215.110 - User cancellation of all services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true User cancellation of all services. 1215.110 Section 1215.110 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION TRACKING AND DATA RELAY SATELLITE SYSTEM (TDRSS) Use and Reimbursement Policy for Non-U.S. Government Users §...

  4. 14 CFR 1215.111 - User postponement of service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false User postponement of service. 1215.111 Section 1215.111 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION TRACKING AND DATA RELAY SATELLITE SYSTEM (TDRSS) Use and Reimbursement Policy for Non-U.S. Government Users §...

  5. 14 CFR 1215.111 - User postponement of service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false User postponement of service. 1215.111 Section 1215.111 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION TRACKING AND DATA RELAY SATELLITE SYSTEM (TDRSS) Use and Reimbursement Policy for Non-U.S. Government Users §...

  6. 14 CFR 1215.108 - Defining user service requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Defining user service requirements. 1215.108 Section 1215.108 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION TRACKING AND DATA RELAY SATELLITE SYSTEM (TDRSS) Use and Reimbursement Policy for Non-U.S. Government Users §...

  7. 14 CFR 1215.108 - Defining user service requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Defining user service requirements. 1215.108 Section 1215.108 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION TRACKING AND DATA RELAY SATELLITE SYSTEM (TDRSS) Use and Reimbursement Policy for Non-U.S. Government Users §...

  8. 14 CFR § 1215.111 - User postponement of service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false User postponement of service. § 1215.111 Section § 1215.111 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION TRACKING AND DATA RELAY SATELLITE SYSTEM (TDRSS) Use and Reimbursement Policy for Non-U.S. Government Users...

  9. 14 CFR 1215.108 - Defining user service requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Defining user service requirements. 1215.108 Section 1215.108 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION TRACKING AND DATA RELAY SATELLITE SYSTEM (TDRSS) Use and Reimbursement Policy for Non-U.S. Government Users §...

  10. 14 CFR 1215.110 - User cancellation of all services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false User cancellation of all services. 1215.110 Section 1215.110 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION TRACKING AND DATA RELAY SATELLITE SYSTEM (TDRSS) Use and Reimbursement Policy for Non-U.S. Government Users §...

  11. Introducing Online Bibliographic Service to its Users: The Online Presentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crane, Nancy B.; Pilachowski, David M.

    1978-01-01

    A description of techniques for introducing online services to new user groups includes discussion of terms and their definitions, evolution of online searching, advantages and disadvantages of online searching, production of the data bases, search strategies, Boolean logic, costs and charges, "do's and don'ts," and a user search questionnaire. (J…

  12. Characteristics and determinants of music appreciation in adult CI users.

    PubMed

    Philips, Birgit; Vinck, Bart; De Vel, Eddy; Maes, Leen; D'Haenens, Wendy; Keppler, Hannah; Dhooge, Ingeborg

    2012-03-01

    The main objective of this study was to assess the associations between self-reported listening habits and perception of music and speech perception outcomes in quiet and noise for both unilateral cochlear implant (CI) users and bimodal (CI in one ear, hearing aid in contra-lateral ear) users. Information concerning music appreciation was gathered by means of a newly developed questionnaire. Moreover, audiological data (pure-tone audiometry, speech tests in noise and quiet) were gathered and the relationship between speech perception and music appreciation is studied. Bimodal users enjoy listening to music more in comparison with unilateral CI users. Also, music training within rehabilitation is still uncommon, while CI recipients believe that music training might be helpful to maximize their potential with current CI technology. Music training should not be exclusively reserved for the good speech performers. Therefore, a music training program (MTP) that consists of different difficulty levels should be developed. Hopefully, early implementation of MTP in rehabilitation programs can enable adult CI users to enjoy and appreciate music and to maximize their potential with commercially available technology. Furthermore, because bimodal users consider the bimodal stimulation to be the most enjoyable way to listen to music, CI users with residual hearing in the contra-lateral ear should be encouraged to continue wearing their hearing aid in that ear. PMID:21847672

  13. A public service communications satellite user brochure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The capabilities of a proposed communications satellite that would be devoted to experiments and demonstrations of various public services is described. A Public Service Communications Satellite study was undertaken at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) to define the problems and opportunities of a renewed NASA role and the form such NASA involvement should take. The concept that has evolved has resulted from careful consideration of experiments that were already undertaken on existing satellites.

  14. The experiences of detained mental health service users: issues of dignity in care

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background When mental health service users are detained under a Section of the Mental Health Act (MHA), they must remain in hospital for a specific time period. This is often against their will, as they are considered a danger to themselves and/or others. By virtue of being detained, service users are assumed to have lost control of an element of their behaviour and as a result their dignity could be compromised. Caring for detained service users has particular challenges for healthcare professionals. Respecting the dignity of others is a key element of the code of conduct for health professionals. Often from the service user perspective this is ignored. Methods This paper reports on the experiences of 19 adult service users who were, at the time of interview, detained under a Section of the MHA. These service users had experienced coercive interventions and they gave their account of how they considered their dignity to be protected (or not), and their sense of self respected (or not). Results The service users considered their dignity and respect compromised by 1) not being ‘heard’ by staff members, 2) a lack of involvement in decision-making regarding their care, 3) a lack of information about their treatment plans particularly medication, 4) lack of access to more talking therapies and therapeutic engagement, and 5) the physical setting/environment and lack of daily activities to alleviate their boredom. Conclusions Dignity and respect are important values in recovery and practitioners need time to engage with service user narratives and to reflect on the ethics of their practice. PMID:24972627

  15. Dynamic User Interfaces for Service Oriented Architectures in Healthcare.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, Marco; Hoerbst, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Electronic Health Records (EHRs) play a crucial role in healthcare today. Considering a data-centric view, EHRs are very advanced as they provide and share healthcare data in a cross-institutional and patient-centered way adhering to high syntactic and semantic interoperability. However, the EHR functionalities available for the end users are rare and hence often limited to basic document query functions. Future EHR use necessitates the ability to let the users define their needed data according to a certain situation and how this data should be processed. Workflow and semantic modelling approaches as well as Web services provide means to fulfil such a goal. This thesis develops concepts for dynamic interfaces between EHR end users and a service oriented eHealth infrastructure, which allow the users to design their flexible EHR needs, modeled in a dynamic and formal way. These are used to discover, compose and execute the right Semantic Web services. PMID:27577496

  16. Rethinking Library Service: Improving the User Experience with Service Blueprinting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pretlow, Cassi; Sobel, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Service blueprinting is a process that businesses use for analyzing and improving service. Originally presented in the Harvard Business Review in 1984, it has retained a strong following ever since. At present, it is experiencing a revival at numerous academic institutions. The authors of this article present the process of service blueprinting.…

  17. Services for Visually Impaired Adults in Canada.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magarrell, G.

    1990-01-01

    The article examines the partnership between the Canadian government and nonprofit organizations in delivering rehabilitation services to blind/visually impaired adults. Discussed are legislation, concessions to blind persons, services of the Canadian National Institute for the Blind, special equipment, dog guide schools, consumer groups, and the…

  18. 9 CFR 130.8 - User fees for other services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false User fees for other services. 130.8 Section 130.8 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... agricultural hold: Simple (2 hours or less) Per release 99.00 102.00 105.00 108.00 111.00 Complicated...

  19. 9 CFR 130.8 - User fees for other services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false User fees for other services. 130.8 Section 130.8 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... agricultural hold: Simple (2 hours or less) Per release 99.00 102.00 105.00 108.00 111.00 Complicated...

  20. User Preferences in Reference Services: Virtual Reference and Academic Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummings, Joel; Cummings, Lara; Frederiksen, Linda

    2007-01-01

    This study examines the use of chat in an academic library's user population and where virtual reference services might fit within the spectrum of public services offered by academic libraries. Using questionnaires, this research demonstrates that many within the academic community are open to the idea of chat-based reference or using chat for…

  1. Librarians without Borders? Virtual Reference Service to Unaffiliated Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kibbee, Jo

    2006-01-01

    The author investigates issues faced by academic research libraries in providing virtual reference services to unaffiliated users. These libraries generally welcome visitors who use on-site collections and reference services, but are these altruistic policies feasible in a virtual environment? This paper reviews the use of virtual reference…

  2. A Frequency Study for Public Services Users of Satellite Telecommunications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federation of Rocky Mountain States, Inc., Denver, CO.

    This analysis attempts to consolidate frequency studies done by public broadcasting, to compile some important characteristics of potentially available bands, and to prioritize the frequency options of public service users of satellite communications. Those bands are emphasized which facilitate the transfer of public service activities to…

  3. Insights into Library Services and Users from Qualitative Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lincoln, Yvonna S.

    2002-01-01

    Describes a study that used interview data to adapt SERVQUAL, a survey to determine customer perceptions of service quality, to LibQUAL[TM], a Web-based survey to investigate users' perceptions of library service quality. Offers hypotheses regarding how data was categorized as it was. (Author/LRW)

  4. Standard user data services for spacecraft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. F.; Hwang, C.; Fowell, S.; Plummer, C.

    2003-01-01

    The Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems is an international organization of national space agencies that is branching out to provide new standards to enhanced reuse of spacecraft equiptment and software. These Spacecraft Onboard Interface (SOIF) standards will be based on the well-known Internet protocols. this paper will review the SOIF standards by looking at the services that are being proposed for SOIF.

  5. User Satisfaction with Orthotic Devices and Service in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chiung-Ling; Teng, Ya-Ling; Lou, Shu-Zon; Lin, Chung-Hui; Chen, Fen-Fen; Yeung, Kwok-Tak

    2014-01-01

    User satisfaction is afforded considerable importance as an outcome measurement in evidence-based healthcare and the client-centered approach. Several studies have investigated user satisfaction with orthoses. Few studies have investigated user satisfaction with orthoses in Taiwan. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the user satisfaction with orthotic devices and service using the Taiwanese version of Quebec User Evaluation of Satisfaction with Assistive Technology. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 280 subjects who had used orthoses and received services. The results showed that the mean satisfaction score was 3.74 for the devices and 3.56 for service. Concerning the participants, 69.1% and 59.6% were quite satisfied or very satisfied with their devices and service, respectively. The satisfaction score of orthotic service was lower than that of the devices. Regarding demographic characteristics, participants living in different areas differed only in service score (p = 0.002). The participants living in eastern area and offshore islands were the least satisfied with the orthotic service. For clinical characteristics, there was a significant difference in satisfaction scores among severity of disability (all p = 0.015), types of orthoses (all p = 0.001), and duration of usage (all p = 0.001). The participants with mild disability, wearing the pressure garment and using the orthosis for less than one year, were the most satisfied with their orthotic devices and service. There is a need for improved orthotic devices and services, especially with respect to the comfort of the devices and the provision of subsidy funding. PMID:25338026

  6. Service users, metaphors and teamworking in mental health.

    PubMed

    Warne, T; Stark, S

    2004-12-01

    Despite the United Kingdom's recent governmental mental health policy directives aimed at strengthening professional collaboration and increasing service user involvement, the prevailing mental health care culture remains steeped in a discourse of treatment and care, control and compliance and professional expertise. Drawing upon the data collected during the two phases of a 2-year national evaluation undertaken for the English National Board for Nursing, Midwifery and Health Visiting, the perceptions of a group of mental health service users in relation to their experiences and contact with the multi-professional team are explored. A series of metaphorical descriptions were developed with these service users drawn from their experience. These begin to illuminate a realistic way of thinking about how teams are set up, how and why they carry out their various roles, and the need to think in non-professional terms about the relationships that are developed with service users. A hierarchy of power was noted that was congruent with the outcomes of other studies. However, there was also a concurrent acknowledgement of the 'usefulness'(to the individual service user) of each of the professional group members. This appeared to have been constructed alongside the power hierarchy and serves to illustrate how individual service users sought to find an accommodation within the social system they were placed in. This paper argues however, that the use of metaphors, as a form of shared communication, can be an effective first step in working towards this objective. Working in the way described here can allow for a greater shared understanding of what each group is experiencing and help ensure that future service development reflects a broader view of the mental health care world. PMID:15544662

  7. National Adult Protective Services Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... and administrators, professionals in the aging and disabilities networks, students in social service programs, or anyone committed to protecting our most vulnerable citizens. NAPSA will connect you with peers throughout the country, provide the most ... Our supporters have become part of a network whose valuable donations of time and money are ...

  8. Looking beyond the illness: forensic service users' perceptions of rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Barnao, Mary; Ward, Tony; Casey, Sharon

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this qualitative study was to explore perspectives on rehabilitation of those detained in a New Zealand forensic hospital setting. Twenty forensic service users participated in individual interviews, which were audio-taped, transcribed verbatim, and subjected to thematic analysis. The analysis identified seven themes that were broadly categorized into those that concerned the rehabilitation context (external) and those that more directly reflected the forensic service user's personal experience (internal). External themes highlighted a person-centered approach, the nature of relationships with staff, consistency of care, and awareness of the rehabilitation pathway. Internal themes related to forensic service users' self-evaluations, agency, and coping strategies. These findings are discussed within the broader context in which rehabilitation took place. PMID:25049033

  9. AQUA-USERS: AQUAculture USEr Driven Operational Remote Sensing Information Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laanen, Marnix; Poser, Kathrin; Peters, Steef; de Reus, Nils; Ghebrehiwot, Semhar; Eleveld, Marieke; Miller, Peter; Groom, Steve; Clements, Oliver; Kurekin, Andrey; Martinez Vicente, Victor; Brotas, Vanda; Sa, Carolina; Couto, Andre; Brito, Ana; Amorim, Ana; Dale, Trine; Sorensen, Kai; Boye Hansen, Lars; Huber, Silvia; Kaas, Hanne; Andersson, Henrik; Icely, John; Fragoso, Bruno

    2015-12-01

    The FP7 project AQUA-USERS provides the aquaculture industry with user-relevant and timely information based on the most up-to-date satellite data and innovative optical in-situ measurements. Its key purpose is to develop an application that brings together satellite information on water quality and temperature with in-situ observations as well as relevant weather prediction and met-ocean data. The application and its underlying database are linked to a decision support system that includes a set of (user-determined) management options. Specific focus is on the development of indicators for aquaculture management including indicators for harmful algae bloom (HAB) events. The methods and services developed within AQUA-USERS are tested by the members of the user board, who represent different geographic areas and aquaculture production systems.

  10. User-defined Services in G-Lite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goranova, R.

    2009-10-01

    Service-oriented architecture (SOA) is an architectural model for developing reliable distributed systems, where functionality is provided as services. g-Lite is a middleware for Grid computing, which provides low and high level services for access to Grid resources. Some of the services exposed by the environment are service-enabled (follow the principles of SOA), but the rest are not. This makes the environment partially service-oriented and creates difficulties with the development of Grid applications. From SOA principle point of view, the problems in g-Lite are related with lack of rules for- and difficulties with creating, registering, deploying and certifying user-defined Grid service in the environment. In this article we discuss these issues and provide a simple solution to avoid these problems.

  11. Changing practice: involving mental health service users in planning service provision.

    PubMed

    Rea, David M

    2004-01-01

    Changes to professional work now ensure that social care and health care workers should be accountable to service users, and not only to their professional colleagues. This paper seeks to explore how this may eventually be realised in new working relationships that will profoundly affect mental health social work. These changes are driven by factors that are external to the social work profession-in policy initiatives that introduce measures of performance that incorporate the service user in both evaluating and planning services, in efforts to build new relationships, and in a breakdown of barriers between social work practitioners and service managers. While these changes are sometimes likely to be resisted by practitioners and service users alike, the demands of policy makers for a new professional accountability to service users can be used to pave the way for effective dialogue. The paper outlines the steps necessary to build confidence among both service users and service providers. This requires sensitive management and leadership. It also requires that action demonstrably follows from such dialogue. The paper uses evidence from Community Mental Health Teams in Swansea, over a three-year period, to demonstrate how the policy and management imperatives faced by service providers can be reconciled with the expressed desires of mental health service users. PMID:15774399

  12. Audio-vocal responses elicited in adult cochlear implant users

    PubMed Central

    Loucks, Torrey M.; Suneel, Deepa; Aronoff, Justin M.

    2015-01-01

    Auditory deprivation experienced prior to receiving a cochlear implant could compromise neural connections that allow for modulation of vocalization using auditory feedback. In this report, pitch-shift stimuli were presented to adult cochlear implant users to test whether compensatory motor changes in vocal F0 could be elicited. In five of six participants, rapid adjustments in vocal F0 were detected following the stimuli, which resemble the cortically mediated pitch-shift responses observed in typical hearing individuals. These findings suggest that cochlear implants can convey vocal F0 shifts to the auditory pathway that might benefit audio-vocal monitoring. PMID:26520350

  13. Using archetypes to design services for high users of healthcare.

    PubMed

    Vaillancourt, Samuel; Shahin, Ilan; Aggarwal, Payal; Pomedli, Steve; Hayden, Leigh; Pus, Laura; Bhattacharyya, Onil

    2014-01-01

    A subset of people with complex health and social needs account for the majority of healthcare costs in Ontario. There is broad agreement that better solutions for these patients could lead to better health outcomes and lower costs, but we have few tools to design services around their diverse needs. Predictive modelling may help determine numbers of high users, but design methods such as user archetypes may offer important ways of understanding how to meet their needs. We studied a range of patient profiles and interviews with frequent emergency department users to develop four archetypes of patients with complex needs to orient the service design process. These can be refined and adapted for use within initiatives like Health Links to help provide more appropriate cost-effective care. PMID:25880862

  14. Diabetes and Adult Day Health Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dabelko, Holly I.; DeCoster, Vaughn A.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide a profile of individuals with diabetes who receive services in adult day centers. This exploratory study uses an administrative data set (N = 280) from five programs in central Ohio to examine four areas: demographics, health and mental health, financial and social resources, and disenrollment status. Older…

  15. Reference Services for Children and Young Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reference Librarian, 1983

    1983-01-01

    This 25-article issue presents overview of reference services for childern and young adults, including public and school libraries, information needs, reference interviews, children's librarians, library instruction, library cooperation, production of information resources, material selection, and vertical files. References are included. (Haworth…

  16. Services for Older Adults: Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mumme, Debbie

    This curriculum guide contains materials for a course that provides occupationally specific training designed to develop knowledge and skills for employment in the area of services for older adults. Contents include an introduction, the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) covered; sample course outlines; instructional strategies organized…

  17. Third International Satellite Direct Broadcast Services User's Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamowski, J.; Vermillion, C.

    1988-01-01

    A workshop titled, The Third International Satellite Direct Broadcast Services User's Conference, jointly sponsored by NASA and NOAA/NESDIS was scheduled to be held June 20 to 24, 1988, at the International Hotel located at the Baltimore-Washington Airport. Details concerning the organizing of the conference are given.

  18. User Evaluation of Student and Auxiliary Services, Spring 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weglarz, Shirley G.

    Since 1986, Johnson County Community College (JCCC) (Kansas) has conducted user evaluations of student/auxiliary services every other year. This document presents the results for the spring 2001 survey. In total, 585 surveys were returned from students in the sample of classes selected to generally represent career/transfer, day/evening, and…

  19. 14 CFR 1215.109 - Scheduling user service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 1215.109 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION TRACKING AND DATA RELAY SATELLITE SYSTEM (TDRSS) Use and Reimbursement Policy for Non-U.S. Government Users § 1215.109 Scheduling... of TDRSS services desired (e.g., multiple access, tracking, etc.), and the frequency and duration...

  20. 14 CFR § 1215.108 - Defining user service requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Defining user service requirements. § 1215.108 Section § 1215.108 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION TRACKING AND DATA RELAY SATELLITE SYSTEM (TDRSS) Use and Reimbursement Policy for Non-U.S. Government...

  1. Motivational and mindfulness intervention for young adult female marijuana users

    PubMed Central

    de Dios, Marcel A.; Herman, Debra S.; Britton, Willoughby B.; Hagerty, Claire E.; Anderson, Bradley J.; Stein, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    This pilot study tested the efficacy of a brief intervention using motivational interviewing (MI) plus mindfulness meditation (MM) to reduce marijuana use among young adult female. Thirty-four female marijuana users between the ages of 18–29 were randomized to either the intervention group (n = 22), consisting of 2 sessions of MI-MM or an assessment-only control group (n = 12). Participants’ marijuana use was assessed at baseline, 1, 2, and 3 months post-treatment. Fixed-effects regression modeling was used to analyze treatment effects. Participants randomized to the intervention group were found to use marijuana on 6.15 (z = −2.42, p=.015), 7.81 (z = −2.78, p=.005), and 6.83 (z = −2.23, p=.026) fewer days at months 1, 2, and 3, respectively, than controls. Findings from this pilot study provide preliminary evidence for the feasibility and effectiveness of a brief MI-MM for young adult female marijuana users. PMID:21940136

  2. Duty of Care and Autonomy: How Support Workers Managed the Tension between Protecting Service Users from Risk and Promoting Their Independence in a Specialist Group Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, R.; Redley, M.; Holland, A. J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: In the UK those paid to support adults with intellectual disabilities must manage two potentially conflicting duties that are set out in policy documents as being vital to their role: protecting service users (their duty of care) and recognising service users' autonomy. This study focuses specifically on the support of people with the…

  3. Use of Adult Day Care Centers: Do They Offset Utilization of Health Care Services?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iecovich, Esther; Biderman, Aya

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Based on the medical offset effect, the goal of the study was to examine the extent to which users and nonusers of adult day care centers (ADCC) differ in frequency of use of out-patient health services (visits to specialists) and in-patient health services (number of hospital admissions, length of hospitalizations, and visits to…

  4. Understanding Climate Service Science: Balancing Users' Needs with Providers' Capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Street, Roger B.; Bley, Dagmar; Manez, Maria

    2013-04-01

    Understanding Climate Service Science: Balancing Users' Needs with Providers' Capabilities The overall strategic objective of the Joint Programming Initiative (JPI)-Climate is to contribute to highly coordinated knowledge development by not only improving the scientific expertise on climate change risks and adaptation options, but also by connecting that knowledge with decision making. Understanding the nature and scope of those providing climate services and the services being provided and understanding userś needs and requirements is critical to realisation of this strategic objective. The main aim of the JPI-Climate Working Group 2 "Researching and advancing Climate Service Development" is to coordinate knowledge development and transfer to improve the climate (change) services to society and within Europe. In order to avoid duplication of efforts and picking on differences in the quality and nature of information being provided from country to country there is a need for a certain degree of consistency of approaches and quality assurance. The JPI-Climate will bring interaction between the emerging national and European climate services initiatives. Climate services produce strongly science-based client-oriented information. They should be built on a good understanding of the stakeholder needs, and provide easy access to up-to-date information and expertise regarding specific policy or research questions. It is evident from experience that such services need (and are perceived) to be salient, credible and legitimate from the perspective of the intended users and providers of those services, and within the supportive research community. Achieving this aim and developing and delivering the required services necessitates the engagement of the spectrum of users and providers, as well as researchers from the physical, natural, engineering, economics and social sciences - the science underpinning climate services. The JPI-Climate, Module 2 Fast Track Activities (FTAs

  5. High risk and little knowledge: Overdose experiences and knowledge among young adult nonmedical prescription opioid users

    PubMed Central

    Frank, David; Mateu-Gelabert, Pedro; Guarino, Honoria; Bennett, Alex; Wendel, Travis; Jessell, Lauren; Teper, Anastasia

    2014-01-01

    Background Opioid-involved overdoses in the United States have dramatically increased in the last 15 years, largely due to a rise in prescription opioid (PO) use. Yet few studies have examined the overdose knowledge and experience of nonmedical PO users. Methods In depth, semi-structured, audio-recorded interviews were conducted with 46 New York City young adults (ages 18–32) who reported using POs nonmedically within the past 30 days. Verbatim interview transcripts were coded for key themes in an analytic process informed by grounded theory. Results Despite significant experience with overdose (including overdose deaths), either personally or within opioid-using networks, participants were relatively uninformed about overdose awareness, avoidance and response strategies, in particular the use of naloxone. Overdose experiences typically occurred when multiple pharmaceuticals were used (often in combination with alcohol) or after participants had transitioned to heroin injection. Participants tended to see themselves as distinct from traditional heroin users, and were often outside of the networks reached by traditional opioid safety/overdose prevention services. Consequently, they were unlikely to utilize harm reduction services, such as syringe exchange programs (SEPs), that address drug users' health and safety. Conclusions These findings suggest that many young adult nonmedical PO users are at high risk of both fatal and non-fatal overdose. There is a pressing need to develop innovative outreach strategies and overdose prevention programs to better reach and serve young PO users and their network contacts. Prevention efforts addressing risk for accidental overdose, including opioid safety/overdose reversal education and naloxone distribution, should be tailored for and targeted to this vulnerable group. PMID:25151334

  6. Demographic Characteristics, Health Conditions, and Residential Service Use in Adults with Down Syndrome in 25 U.S. States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stancliffe, Roger J.; Lakin, K. Charlie; Larson, Sheryl A.; Engler, Joshua; Taub, Sarah; Fortune, Jon; Bershadsky, Julie

    2012-01-01

    This study describes service users with Down syndrome (N = 1,199) and a comparative sample with intellectual and developmental disabilities but not Down syndrome (N = 11,182), drawn from National Core Indicator surveys of adult service users in 25 U.S. states. Individuals with Down syndrome were younger than were individuals without Down syndrome.…

  7. 9 CFR 130.22 - User fees for inspection services outside the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false User fees for inspection services outside the United States. 130.22 Section 130.22 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE USER FEES USER FEES § 130.22 User fees for inspection services outside the United States. (a) If...

  8. Quality of emergency rooms and urgent care services: user satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Cássio de Almeida; dos Santos, Bruna Tatiane Prates; Andrade, Dina Luciana Batista; Barbosa, Francielle Alves; da Costa, Fernanda Marques; Carneiro, Jair Almeida

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the quality of emergency rooms and urgent care services according to the satisfaction of their users. Methods A cross-sectional descriptive study with a quantitative approach. The sample comprised 136 users and was drawn at random. Data collection took place between October and November 2012 using a structured questionnaire. Results Participants were mostly male (64.7%) aged less than 30 years (55.8%), and the predominant level of education was high school (54.4%). Among the items evaluated, those that were statistically associated with levels of satisfaction with care were waiting time, confidence in the service, model of care, and the reason for seeking care related to acute complaints, cleanliness, and comfortable environment. Conclusion Accessibility, hospitality, and infrastructure were considered more relevant factors for patient satisfaction than the cure itself. PMID:26313440

  9. Factors associated with condom use among young adult ecstasy users

    PubMed Central

    Elifson, Kirk W.; Sterk, Claire E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective This paper examines the prevalence of and the factors associated with condom use in a sample of 283 young adult ecstasy users. Methods The study, which relied upon targeted sampling and ethnographic mapping, took place between 2002 and 2004. It entailed conducting two-hour-long, face-to-face interviews in the Atlanta, Georgia metropolitan area. Results Condom use was inconsistent; only 35.2% of all sex acts were protected. Using multiple regression, five factors were related to condom use: race (Caucasians used condoms less than other groups), income (lower income = greater condom use), relationship status (persons involved in relationships reported less condom use than those who were not “involved”), multiple sex partners (multiple sex partners = more condom use), and condom use self-efficacy (higher efficacy level = more condom use). Conclusions Condom use rates were not optimal in this population. In particular, targeted interventions are needed for Caucasian ecstasy users. Intervention efforts ought to address relationship (in)fidelity as it pertains to engaging in safer sex practices, especially among persons involved in relationships. Intervention efforts also need to work to increase condom use self-efficacy. PMID:20517633

  10. Anthropometric data of adult wheelchair users for Mexican population.

    PubMed

    Lucero-Duarte, Karla; de la Vega-Bustillos, Enrique; López-Millán, Francisco; Soto-Félix, Selene

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to obtain anthropometric data of adult wheelchair users at Mexico. This study count with 108 disabled people (56 men and 52 women) using the wheelchair and having the upper extremities sufficiently efficient to perform professional activities. The subjects were aged 18-60. From the measurements obtained, it can be said that in each of these measures was observed that men have larger dimensions than women, except for body depth, in which women had a slightly greater difference. When comparing the data in this study against other studies it shows that there is a significant difference between the averages of these studies. Similar results were obtained when comparing our data against data of standard population. Anthropometric data obtained through this study appear to be the only of this kind in Mexico and showed significant differences between measures of disabled persons and standard persons. the use of these data may be helpful for the proper design of workstations designed for use by adults who use. PMID:22317567

  11. Climate services communication and user interface in Germany - Experiences of the German Meteorological Service (DWD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Tobias; Schreiber, Klaus-Jürgen; Becker, Paul

    2013-04-01

    Structured interaction of climate researchers, climate service providers, and operational users via a user interface platform is an important component for the success of the Global Framework for Climate Services (GFCS), whose implementation has been approved by the World Meteorological Congress from 29 until 31 October 2012 in Geneva. The development of suitable climate change adaptation measures requires intensive advisory activity. In Germany the user communication and consultancy concerning climate change information is quite diverse because climate research is a responsibility of institutions on federal, state and municipial level, as well as of scientific institutions. The German Meteorological Service DWD has a long term experience in interaction with users from research as well as from operational institution side. Traditional interaction with users is based on in kind meetings, as well as on exchange via phone/mail/fax. The organisational structure of DWD with regional offices (regional climate bureaus) in different German regions enables the close interaction - often backed by formal cooperation agreements - with regional research entities as well as with operational user institutions on federal, state (Laender), and municipial level responsible for adaptation to climate change. Recently a new user interaction tool has been developed and implemented by DWD: The German climate portal (http://www.deutschesklimaportal.de/EN/) provides climate research results of many German institutions, which are responsible for climate adaptation in different economic sectors and on different regional levels. This user specific information portal supports networking and policy decisions with regard to climate change adaptation and sustainable development. A new component of the portal is a tool for moderated discussion between information users and providers on specific topics. The German climate portal will be further developed. Objective is to include all relevant German

  12. AVISO: Online Data Extraction Service for all altimetry users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosmorduc, Vinca; Bronner, Emilie; Briol, Frederic; Dibarboure, Gerald; Guinle, Thierry; Lauret, Olivier; Morrow, Rosemary; Nicolas, Clara; Nino, Fernando; Birol, Florence

    2014-05-01

    Altimetry users have a wide variety of needs ranging from research to operational applications. Standards datasets provide a robust base to meet most of them, but research-grade algorithms and corrections are not easily accessible to the general audience. Similarly, classical distribution channels make it difficult to provide ad-hoc datasets in a convenient way, especially when product size and bandwidth are a concern. To address such evolving user needs, AVISO developed a new distribution channel, the Online Data Extraction Service (ODES), in order to provide users and applications with a wider range of altimetry-derived data (including high-resolution and coastal data). The platform is designed to distribute both operational products from CNES and partner Agencies (Eumetsat, ESA, NOAA, NASA) but also research-grade data from LEGOS/CTOH and CLS and other contributions from the OSTST research community. Accessible products include GDR-class level 2 data, PISTACH coastal and hydrology demonstrators and XTRACK level 3 data. Various research-grade parameters (e.g. alternative geophysical corrections...) from the OSTST PI community are also available. Most importantly, the ODES system provides flexible interfaces and an ad-hoc response. To illustrate, ODES users can use a user-friendly web interface to download along-track altimetry data only over their area of interest, choose their period of interest in a multi-mission context, limit the parameters and variables they wish to download (e.g. select only significant wave height-related variables) and apply more complex selection criteria. Most features aim at streamlining the data acquisition in an intuitive way. The extraction service is also "on-the-fly", with no delay nor cache necessary, so that users can immediately begins their download. Lastly the ordering and downloading process can be automated and scripted for operational users with a custom and ad-hoc environment containing only the products they want. Thanks

  13. Realizing the Potential of Information Resources: Information, Technology, and Services. Track 4: Rethinking User Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAUSE, Boulder, CO.

    Six papers and two abstracts of papers are presented from the 1995 CAUSE conference track on user services issues faced by managers of information technology at colleges and universities. The papers include: (1) "Academic Computing Services: MORE than a Utility" (Scott Bierman and Cathy Smith), which focuses on Carleton College's efforts to serve…

  14. USER SERVICES AND EXTENSION SERVICES IN SELECTED SPECIAL LIBRARIES AND INFORMATION CENTERS IN THE UNITED STATES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NONINI, CERISE

    A SURVEY BY QUESTIONNAIRE WAS MADE OF THE PROBLEM OF USER SERVICES AND EXTENSION SERVICES USED IN THE DISSEMINATION OF MATERIALS AND INFORMATION TO A SELECTED NUMBER OF INDUSTRIAL LIBRARIES. THE SURVEY RESULTED IN DATA CONCERNING STAFF SIZE, PROFESSIONAL-TO-CLERICAL RATIO, SIZE OF BOOK, DOCUMENT, PERIODICAL AND MICROFORM COLLECTIONS, LIBRARY…

  15. User-driven generation of standard data services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, Laura; Granell, Carlos; Gould, Michael; Huerta, Joaquín.

    2010-05-01

    Geospatial Information systems are experiencing the shift from monolithic to distributed environments (Bernard, 2003). Current research trends for discover and access of geospatial resources, in these distributed environments, are being addressed by deployment of interconnected Spatial Data Infrastructure (SDI) nodes at different scales to build a global spatial information infrastructure (Masser et al., 2008; Rajabifard et al., 2002). One of the challenges for implementing these global and multiscale SDIs is to agree with common standards in consideration with heterogeneity of various stakeholders [Masser 2005]. In Europe, the European Commission took the INSPIRE initiative to monitor the development of European SDIs. INSPIRE Directive addresses the need for web services to discover, view, transform, invoke, and download geospatial resources, which enable various stakeholders to share resources in an interoperable manner [INSPIRE 2007]. Such web services require technical specifications for the interoperability and harmonization of their SDIs [INSPIRE 2007]. Moreover, interoperability is ensured by a number of specification efforts, in the geo domain most prominently by ISO/TC 211 and the OpenGIS Consortium (OGC) (Bernard, 2003). Other research challenges regarding SDI are on one hand how to handle complexity by users in charge of maintaining SDIs as they grow, and on the other hand the fact the SDI maintenance and evolution should be guided (Bejar et al, 2009). So there is a motivation to improve the complex deployment mechanisms in SDI since there is a need of expertise and time to deploy resources and integrate them by means of standard services. In this context we present an architecture following the INSPIRE technical guidelines and therefore based on SDI principles. This architecture supports distributed applications and provides components to assist users in deploying and updating SDI resources. Therefore mechanisms and components for the automatic

  16. Design in mind: eliciting service user and frontline staff perspectives on psychiatric ward design through participatory methods

    PubMed Central

    Csipke, Emese; Papoulias, Constantina; Vitoratou, Silia; Williams, Paul; Rose, Diana; Wykes, Til

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Psychiatric ward design may make an important contribution to patient outcomes and well-being. However, research is hampered by an inability to assess its effects robustly. This paper reports on a study which deployed innovative methods to capture service user and staff perceptions of ward design. Method: User generated measures of the impact of ward design were developed and tested on four acute adult wards using participatory methodology. Additionally, inpatients took photographs to illustrate their experience of the space in two wards. Data were compared across wards. Results: Satisfactory reliability indices emerged based on both service user and staff responses. Black and minority ethnic (BME) service users and those with a psychosis spectrum diagnosis have more positive views of the ward layout and fixtures. Staff members have more positive views than service users, while priorities of staff and service users differ. Inpatient photographs prioritise hygiene, privacy and control and address symbolic aspects of the ward environment. Conclusions: Participatory and visual methodologies can provide robust tools for an evaluation of the impact of psychiatric ward design on users. PMID:26886239

  17. User Acceptance of Internet Banking Service in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yenyuen, Yee; Yeow, P. H. P.

    The study is the first research in Malaysia that investigates user acceptance of Internet banking service (IBS) based on Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology model (Venkatesh, Morris, Davis and Davis, 2003). Two hundred and eighty questionnaires were distributed and collected from two major cities, Kuala Lumpur and Melaka. Descriptive statistics was used to analyse the data. The results show that Malaysians have intentions of using IBS (mean rating of close to 4.00). Moreover, Malaysians recognize the benefits of IBS by giving a high mean rating (close to 4.00) to performance expectancy. However, they give relative low mean ratings (close to 3.00) on other indicators of Behavioural Intention to Use IBS such as effort expectancy, social influence, facilitating conditions and perceived credibility. Recommendations were given to promote a safe, efficient and conducive environment for user adoption of Internet banking.

  18. Services in the Community for Adults with Psychosis and Intellectual Disabilities: A Delphi Consultation of Professionals' Views

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemmings, C. P.; Underwood, L. A.; Bouras, N.

    2009-01-01

    Background: There remains a severe lack of evidence on the effectiveness of community services for adults with psychosis and intellectual disabilities (ID). There has been little consensus even of what services should provide for this service user group. Method: A consultation of multidisciplinary professionals was carried out by using a…

  19. Bare Bones Young Adult Services: Tips for Public Library Generalists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaillancourt, Renee J.

    This book is a hands-on guide to the philosophy and practice of young adult services in the public libraries. The following chapters are included: (1) "Young Adult Services Philosophy," including reasons to serve teens, why teens are the way they are, who serves young adults, and how to interact with teens; (2) "Youth Participation," including…

  20. User engagement in the delivery and design of maternity services.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nashita; Rajasingam, Daghni

    2013-08-01

    User engagement is defined as a mutual exchange of information between the patient and the health professional, which has shown to improve patient experience as well as outcomes. Engaging the patient is vital for the healthcare system to remain sustainable. The National Health Service has attempted to incorporate and enhance patient engagement in the delivery of maternity services for the last decade. The financial crisis, changing socio-demographic status, increase in birth rate and public expectations-engaging the patient to take responsibility of their own health has not been achieved. Through in-depth examinations of these barriers we are able to draw conclusions as to why current policies have failed and recommend potential solutions. PMID:23768954

  1. Leveling the Playing Field for Users with Web Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trabant, C. M.; Ahern, T. K.; Karstens, R.; Weertman, B.; Suleiman, Y. Y.

    2013-12-01

    The dawn of digital seismological data recording began approximately 4 decades ago. Since then multiple networks of seismological recording stations have and continue to exist. It is common for each network to operate a data center to store and distribute the collected data. Increasingly there are data centers that archive and distribute data produced by multiple networks and organizations. The modern landscape for seismological data users consists of many data centers spread across the globe offering a variety of data. Luckily most of these centers exchange data in standard formats defined by the International Federation of Digital Seismograph Networks (FDSN). Working with our partners in the FDSN, the IRIS Data Management Center (DMC) developed specifications for 3 standard web service interfaces that are intended to provide an abstraction layer on each center's customized data management system. These services provide access to seismological time series data, related metadata and event (earthquake) parameters. An important part of the interface design is to adhere to web standards and common conventions, which allows use of ubiquitous web client software and toolkits. Another critical design criteria is simple usage, we recognize that our user base is scientific data consumers and not necessarily technologists. The IRIS DMC has implemented each of these 3 service interfaces and made the common software components freely available. Under the NSF's EarthScope program and within the international COOPEUS project, the DMC worked with European partners to help install these standardized interfaces on their own data management systems. One key development was the addition of these web services to the SeisComP3 data handling system, which is common in many seismological data centers, especially in Europe. The combination of standardized data formats and access interfaces removes the need for complex request brokers that translate between centers. Instead, it allows

  2. Recovery in Hong Kong: service user participation in mental health services.

    PubMed

    Tse, Samson; Cheung, Eric; Kan, Alice; Ng, Roger; Yau, Sania

    2012-02-01

    This article provides an overview of mental health services (MHS) and the application of the recovery concept in Hong Kong, focusing on user participation. It presents stakeholders' views of the recovery movement in a round-table discussion format, demonstrating agreement that user participation merits more public and official attention. Some of the present difficulties with the movement are also reviewed. Social identity theory (SIT) is then analysed as a potentially useful framework for theorizing how service users' identities change as they become service providers. The paper then provides an overview of the current financial and political position of MHS, and identifies signs that the recovery approach is becoming accepted. It also addresses the cultural meanings of the concept, and sets out examples of its implementation in the health and social welfare sectors. Lastly, it summarizes the challenges facing service providers and users and concludes that as the recovery movement is still in its infancy in Hong Kong, more coordinated efforts are needed to establish the organizational support and policy framework, so that sustainable and evidence-based service provision can be achieved. PMID:22385425

  3. Integrating service user participation in mental health care: what will it take?

    PubMed Central

    Lawn, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    Participation in mental health care poses many challenges for mental health service users and service providers. Consideration of these issues for improving the integration of service user participation in mental health care can help to inform integrated care within health care systems, broadly. This paper argues for practicing greater empathy and teaching it, stigma reduction, changing what we measure, valuing the intrinsic aspects of care more, employing more people with lived experience within mental health services, raising the visibility of service users as leaders and our teachers within services and redefining integrated care from the service user perspective. PMID:25759608

  4. Childhood Conduct Problems and Other Early Risk Factors in Rural Adult Stimulant Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, Teresa L.; Han, Xiaotong; Leukefeld, Carl; Booth, Brenda M.; Edlund, Carrie

    2009-01-01

    Context: Understanding childhood risk factors associated with adult substance use and legal problems is important for treatment and prevention. Purpose: To examine the relationship of early substance use, conduct problems before age 15, and family history of substance abuse on adult outcomes in rural, stimulant users. Methods: Adult cocaine and…

  5. Marketing Tools for Information Services in Corporations: A New Age for Users/Customers Excellent Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balmisa, Yolanda Gonzalo

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the role of information services (IS) in corporations; characteristics of business information resources (BIR); characteristics of users of BIR in corporations; and change management in IS, including total quality management, strategic planning, and marketing tips. Provides a chart of keys to IS superiority and a map for IS change. (PEN)

  6. 75 FR 22026 - User Fees for 2010 Crop Cotton Classification Services to Growers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-27

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 28 RIN 0581-AC99 User Fees for 2010 Crop Cotton Classification Services to Growers AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: The Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) is proposing to maintain user fees for...

  7. 78 FR 18898 - User Fees for 2013 Crop Cotton Classification Services to Growers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-28

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 28 RIN 0581-AD30 User Fees for 2013 Crop Cotton Classification Services to Growers AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: The Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) is proposing to maintain user fees for...

  8. 76 FR 16321 - User Fees for 2011 Crop Cotton Classification Services to Growers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-23

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 28 RIN 0581-AD11 User Fees for 2011 Crop Cotton Classification Services to Growers AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: The Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) is proposing to maintain user fees for...

  9. 77 FR 21684 - User Fees for 2012 Crop Cotton Classification Services to Growers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-11

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 28 RIN 0581-AD23 User Fees for 2012 Crop Cotton Classification Services to Growers AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: The Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) is proposing to maintain user fees for...

  10. 47 CFR 54.712 - Contributor recovery of universal service costs from end users.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Contributor recovery of universal service costs from end users. 54.712 Section 54.712 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Administration § 54.712 Contributor recovery of universal service costs from end users....

  11. Service User Involvement in Methadone Maintenance Programmes: The "Philosophy, the Ideal and the Reality"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Aoibhinn

    2011-01-01

    Internationally, service user involvement has become a common feature of public policy and more specifically public health policy in the recent decades. In a general context, the involvement of service users in health services has been well documented; however, less evidence is available within the area of drug treatment service provision. This…

  12. User Acceptance of Long-Term Evolution (LTE) Services: An Application of Extended Technology Acceptance Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Eunil; Kim, Ki Joon

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to propose an integrated path model in order to explore user acceptance of long-term evolution (LTE) services by examining potential causal relationships between key psychological factors and user intention to use the services. Design/methodology/approach: Online survey data collected from 1,344 users are analysed…

  13. Utah Adult Education Services. Adult Education Report 1968-69.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Board of Education, Salt Lake City.

    Major purposes for the preparation of this report on public school adult education in Utah were: to provide the public with a description of achievements, trends, and needs, and with meaningful cost accounting information; to make comparisons and analyses of adult education by program, school district, and year; and to provide the adult education…

  14. Associations of eHealth Literacy With Health Behavior Among Adult Internet Users

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Ai; Ishii, Kaori; Oka, Koichiro

    2016-01-01

    Background In the rapidly developing use of the Internet in society, eHealth literacy—having the skills to utilize health information on the Internet—has become an important prerequisite for promoting healthy behavior. However, little is known about whether eHealth literacy is associated with health behavior in a representative sample of adult Internet users. Objective The aim of this study was to examine the association between eHealth literacy and general health behavior (cigarette smoking, physical exercise, alcohol consumption, sleeping hours, eating breakfast, eating between meals, and balanced nutrition) among adult Internet users in Japan. Methods The participants were recruited among registrants of a Japanese Internet research service company and asked to answer a cross-sectional Internet-based survey in 2012. The potential respondents (N=10,178) were randomly and blindly invited via email from the registrants in accordance with the set sample size and other attributes. eHealth literacy was assessed using the Japanese version of the eHealth Literacy Scale. The self-reported health behaviors investigated included never smoking cigarettes, physical exercise, alcohol consumption, sleeping hours, eating breakfast, not eating between meals, and balanced nutrition. We obtained details of sociodemographic attributes (sex, age, marital status, educational attainment, and household income level) and frequency of conducting Internet searches. To determine the association of each health behavior with eHealth literacy, we performed a logistic regression analysis; we adjusted for sociodemographic attributes and frequency of Internet searching as well as for other health behaviors that were statistically significant with respect to eHealth literacy in univariate analyses. Results We analyzed the data of 2115 adults (response rate: 24.04%, 2142/10,178; male: 49.74%, 1052/2115; age: mean 39.7, SD 10.9 years) who responded to the survey. Logistic regression analysis

  15. 75 FR 18887 - FBI Criminal Justice Information Services Division User Fees

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-13

    ... Federal Bureau of Investigation FBI Criminal Justice Information Services Division User Fees AGENCY: Federal Bureau of Investigation, Justice. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This notice establishes the user fee..., III, Director, Federal Bureau of Investigation. BILLING CODE 4410-02-P...

  16. What Do Our Users Want? Perspectives on Understanding and Meeting User Needs for Multi-Mission Data Services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGuire, Robert E.; Candey, Robert M.; Bilitza, D.

    2006-01-01

    The Sun-Earth Connection Active Archive (SECAA) project of NASA's Space Physics Data Facility operates a range of unique and heavily used multi-mission data services in support of the large-scale science objectives of the Great Observatory, including services such as CDAWeb, the CDAWeb Plus client, SSCWeb, OMNIweb and the CDF data format. In developing and operating these services, we have encountered and continue to struggle with a wide range of issues such as balancing scope and functionality with simplicity and ease of use, understanding the effectiveness of our choices and identifying areas most important for further improvement. In this paper, we will review our key services and then discuss some of our observations and new approaches to understanding and meeting user data service requirements. Some observations are obvious but may still have substantial implications; e.g. functionality without information content is of little user interest, which has led to our recent emphasis on development of web services interfaces, so the content and functionality we already serve is readily and fully available as a building block for new services. Some observations require careful design and tradeoffs; e.g. users will complain when they are offered interfaces with limited options but users are also easily intimidated and become lost when offered extensive options for customization. Some observations remain highly challenging; e.g. a comprehensive multi-mission, multi-source view of all data and services available easily produces a daunting list, but a more selective view can easily lead users to overlook available and relevant data. It is often difficult to obtain and meaningfully interpret measures of true productive usage and overall user satisfaction, even with a variety of techniques including statistics, citations, case studies, user feedback and advisory committees. Most of these issues will apply to and may even be more acute for distributed implementation

  17. What Do Our Users Want? Perspectives on Understanding and Meeting User Needs for Multi-Mission Data Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, R. E.; Candey, R. M.; Bilitza, D.

    2006-05-01

    The Sun-Earth Connection Active Archive (SECAA) project of NASA's Space Physics Data Facility operates a range of unique and heavily used multi-mission data services in support of the large-scale science objectives of the Great Observatory, including services such as CDAWeb, the CDAWeb Plus client, SSCWeb, OMNIweb and the CDF data format. In developing and operating these services, we have encountered and continue to struggle with a wide range of issues such as balancing scope and functionality with simplicity and ease of use, understanding the effectiveness of our choices and identifying areas most important for further improvement. In this paper, we will review our key services and then discuss some of our observations and new approaches to understanding and meeting user data service requirements. Some observations are obvious but may still have substantial implications; e.g. functionality without information content is of little user interest, which has led to our recent emphasis on development of web services interfaces, so the content and functionality we already serve is readily and fully available as a building block for new services. Some observations require careful design and tradeoffs; e.g. users will complain when they are offered interfaces with limited options but users are also easily intimidated and become lost when offered extensive options for customization. Some observations remain highly challenging; e.g. a comprehensive multi-mission, multi-source view of all data and services available easily produces a daunting list, but a more selective view can easily lead users to overlook available and relevant data. It is often difficult to obtain and meaningfully interpret measures of true productive usage and overall user satisfaction, even with a variety of techniques including statistics, citations, case studies, user feedback and advisory committees. Most of these issues will apply to and may even be more acute for distributed implementation

  18. A Telephone Based Regional Adult Education Information Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eyler, David R.

    This report describes a cooperative project designed to inform area residents of available adult education opportunities and to establish a central information contact point. The regional Adult Education Coordinating Committee compiled a list of adult education courses and services offered by member institutions, devised newspaper and radio…

  19. IoT-based user-driven service modeling environment for a smart space management system.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hoan-Suk; Rhee, Woo-Seop

    2014-01-01

    The existing Internet environment has been extended to the Internet of Things (IoT) as an emerging new paradigm. The IoT connects various physical entities. These entities have communication capability and deploy the observed information to various service areas such as building management, energy-saving systems, surveillance services, and smart homes. These services are designed and developed by professional service providers. Moreover, users' needs have become more complicated and personalized with the spread of user-participation services such as social media and blogging. Therefore, some active users want to create their own services to satisfy their needs, but the existing IoT service-creation environment is difficult for the non-technical user because it requires a programming capability to create a service. To solve this problem, we propose the IoT-based user-driven service modeling environment to provide an easy way to create IoT services. Also, the proposed environment deploys the defined service to another user. Through the personalization and customization of the defined service, the value and dissemination of the service is increased. This environment also provides the ontology-based context-information processing that produces and describes the context information for the IoT-based user-driven service. PMID:25420153

  20. IoT-Based User-Driven Service Modeling Environment for a Smart Space Management System

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hoan-Suk; Rhee, Woo-Seop

    2014-01-01

    The existing Internet environment has been extended to the Internet of Things (IoT) as an emerging new paradigm. The IoT connects various physical entities. These entities have communication capability and deploy the observed information to various service areas such as building management, energy-saving systems, surveillance services, and smart homes. These services are designed and developed by professional service providers. Moreover, users' needs have become more complicated and personalized with the spread of user-participation services such as social media and blogging. Therefore, some active users want to create their own services to satisfy their needs, but the existing IoT service-creation environment is difficult for the non-technical user because it requires a programming capability to create a service. To solve this problem, we propose the IoT-based user-driven service modeling environment to provide an easy way to create IoT services. Also, the proposed environment deploys the defined service to another user. Through the personalization and customization of the defined service, the value and dissemination of the service is increased. This environment also provides the ontology-based context-information processing that produces and describes the context information for the IoT-based user-driven service. PMID:25420153

  1. Jewishly-Informed Mature Adult Service-Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bretan, Gail Helene

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe, implement, and interpret the intersection of service-learning, Jewish values and ways of knowing, adult education, and lifelong learning for people over the age of 50. By expanding service-learning to include both older adults and Jewish ways of knowing, there is potential for transforming these frameworks…

  2. Users' Perceptions of Library Service Quality: A LibQUAL+ Qualitative Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Colleen; Heath, Fred M.

    2001-01-01

    Describes a study of ARL (Association of Research Libraries) members called LibQUAL+ that identified users' perceptions of library service quality and measured gaps between expected service and perceived service. Discusses results of user interviews regarding information seeking behavior; self reliance; ubiquity and ease of access; and hours of…

  3. Survey of User Services in 42 Medical Libraries in Metropolitan Detroit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pendell, Sandra Hanes

    Data regarding current services in hospital libraries of the metropolitan Detroit area form the nucleus of this study. The purpose of this study is two-fold: (1) to ascertain what services are given to users of hospital libraries and (2) to determine the value of the inventory as a means for obtaining information on user-services in hospital…

  4. Library Services for Users of Personal Digital Assistants: A Needs Assessment and Program Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carney, Stephen; Koufogiannakis, Denise; Ryan, Pam

    2007-01-01

    Research was undertaken to guide development of services for personal digital assistant (PDA) users at the University of Alberta Libraries. A variety of qualitative methods were used to assess user satisfaction with current PDA services and identify potential PDA services for the libraries and resources. The research and needs assessment results…

  5. Service User- and Carer-Reported Measures of Involvement in Mental Health Care Planning: Methodological Quality and Acceptability to Users

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Chris J.; Bee, Penny E.; Walker, Lauren; Price, Owen; Lovell, Karina

    2014-01-01

    Background: Increasing service user and carer involvement in mental health care planning is a key healthcare priority but one that is difficult to achieve in practice. To better understand and measure user and carer involvement, it is crucial to have measurement questionnaires that are both psychometrically robust and acceptable to the end user. Methods: We conducted a systematic review using the terms “care plan$,” “mental health,” “user perspective$,” and “user participation” and their linguistic variants as search terms. Databases were searched from inception to November 2012, with an update search at the end of September 2014. We included any articles that described the development, validation or use of a user and/or carer-reported outcome measures of involvement in mental health care planning. We assessed the psychometric quality of each instrument using the “Evaluating the Measurement of Patient-Reported Outcomes” (EMPRO) criteria. Acceptability of each instrument was assessed using novel criteria developed in consultation with a mental health service user and carer consultation group. Results: We identified eleven papers describing the use, development, and/or validation of nine user/carer-reported outcome measures. Psychometric properties were sparsely reported and the questionnaires met few service user/carer-nominated attributes for acceptability. Where reported, basic psychometric statistics were of good quality, indicating that some measures may perform well if subjected to more rigorous psychometric tests. The majority were deemed to be too long for use in practice. Discussion: Multiple instruments are available to measure user/carer involvement in mental health care planning but are either of poor quality or poorly described. Existing measures cannot be considered psychometrically robust by modern standards, and cannot currently be recommended for use. Our review has identified an important knowledge gap, and an urgent need to

  6. Comparing Intervention Strategies among Rural, Low SES, Young Adult Tobacco Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zanis, David A.; Hollm, Ronald E.; Derr, Daniel; Ibrahim, Jennifer K.; Collins, Bradley N.; Coviello, Donna; Melochick, Jennifer Ryan

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate 3-month tobacco quit rates of young adult tobacco users randomized to 2 intervention conditions. Methods: Overall 192 non-treatment-seeking 18-to-24-year-old tobacco users received educational information and advice to quit smoking. Participants were then block randomized to 2 brief intervention conditions: (1) a telephone…

  7. National Household Education Survey. Adult and Course Data Files User's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brick, J. Michael; And Others

    This manual provides documentation and guidance for users of the public release data files (adult file and course file) for Adult Education (AE) component of the 1991 National Household Education Survey (NHES:91). The NHES:91 was a random-digit dial telephone survey developed by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) and conducted by…

  8. Evaluating Websites for Older Adults: Adherence to "Senior-Friendly" Guidelines and End-User Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, T. A.; Chaparro, B. S.; Halcomb, C. G.

    2008-01-01

    Older adults in the US are the fastest-growing demographic, and also the largest-growing group of internet users. The aim of this research was to evaluate websites designed for older adults in terms of (1) how well they adhere to "senior-friendly" guidelines and (2) overall ease of use and satisfaction. In Experiment I, 40 websites designed for…

  9. Global Document Delivery, User Studies, and Service Evaluation: The Gateway Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Rush; Xu, Hong; Zou, Xiuying

    2008-01-01

    This study examines user and service data from 2002-2006 at the East Asian Gateway Service for Chinese and Korean Academic Journal Publications (Gateway Service), the University of Pittsburgh. Descriptive statistical analysis reveals that the Gateway Service has been consistently playing the leading role in global document delivery service as well…

  10. 47 CFR 54.712 - Contributor recovery of universal service costs from end users.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Contributor recovery of universal service costs...) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Administration § 54.712 Contributor recovery of universal service costs from end users. (a) Federal universal service contribution costs may be...

  11. 47 CFR 54.712 - Contributor recovery of universal service costs from end users.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Contributor recovery of universal service costs...) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Administration § 54.712 Contributor recovery of universal service costs from end users. (a) Federal universal service contribution costs may be...

  12. 47 CFR 54.712 - Contributor recovery of universal service costs from end users.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Contributor recovery of universal service costs...) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Administration § 54.712 Contributor recovery of universal service costs from end users. (a) Federal universal service contribution costs may be...

  13. 47 CFR 54.712 - Contributor recovery of universal service costs from end users.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Contributor recovery of universal service costs...) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Administration § 54.712 Contributor recovery of universal service costs from end users. (a) Federal universal service contribution costs may be...

  14. Expanding Services to Young Disadvantaged Adults. Public Library Training Institutes Library Service Guide No. 31.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Barbara

    After descriptions of some problems encountered by disadvantaged youths and some general services libraries can provide, specific guidelines for library services to young disadvantaged adults are given. These include services both inside and outside the library: the selection of staff to work with the young adults, cooperation between the library…

  15. Involvement in Mental Health and Substance Abuse Work: Conceptions of Service Users

    PubMed Central

    Laitila, Minna; Nikkonen, Merja; Pietilä, Anna-Maija

    2011-01-01

    Service user involvement (SUI) is a principal and a guideline in social and health care and also in mental health and substance abuse work. In practice, however, there are indicators of SUI remaining rhetoric rather than reality. The purpose of this study was to analyse and describe service users' conceptions of SUI in mental health and substance abuse work. The following study question was addressed: what are service users' conceptions of service user involvement in mental health and substance abuse work? In total, 27 users of services participated in the study, and the data was gathered by means of interviews. A phenomenographic approach was applied in order to explore the qualitative variations in participants' conceptions of SUI. As a result of the data analysis, four main categories of description representing service users' conceptions of service user involvement were formed: service users have the best expertise, opinions are not heard, systems make the rules, and courage and readiness to participate. In mental health and substance abuse work, SUI is still insufficiently achieved and there are obstacles to be taken into consideration. Nurses are in a key position to promote and encourage service user involvement. PMID:21994839

  16. "User Involvement Is a Sine Qua Non, Almost, in Medical Education": Learning with Rather than Just about Health and Social Care Service Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rees, C. E.; Knight, L. V.; Wilkinson, C. E.

    2007-01-01

    Despite the General Medical Council emphasising the value of service users to medical students' education, there is scant literature about service user involvement in medical education. Although some research has outlined the effectiveness of service users as teachers, none has explored social issues surrounding how medical students learn "with"…

  17. Use of adult day care service centers in an ethnically diverse sample of older adults.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ellen L; Friedemann, Marie-Luise; Mauro, Ana C

    2014-03-01

    Our nation is aging and unprepared to meet the needs of community-dwelling seniors and their caregivers. This study explored the perceived need for and use of adult day care services (ADS) in a low-income population. A random sample of 537 patient-caregiver dyads were recruited in home care agencies, and separate in-home surveys were conducted. Patients and caregivers were primarily women and 50.2% were of Hispanic origin. Although half (n = 267/537, 49.7%) of the caregivers had a perceived need for using ADS, only 19.1% of these caregivers used these services, mostly in the context of severe patient cognitive impairment. There were no racial or ethnic differences among ADS users and nonusers. The overall low use of ADS in a growing ethnically diverse senior population with a perceived need for services warrants further investigation and action as states seek to decrease nursing home placement and find solutions for our looming caregiving crisis. PMID:24652954

  18. Service user integration into social work education: lessons learned from nordic participatory action projects.

    PubMed

    Angelin, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Service users have lacked substantial influence, access, and participation in social work education in Norway and Sweden. In this article the author presents comparative analyses of two participatory projects that have developed and implemented practices that integrate service users into academic social work education and empower service users. The Norwegian HUSK project and the Social Work as Mobilization and Entrepreneurship course, also known as the "Mobilization course," at Lund University in Sweden demonstrate collaboration between research, social work education, and service users. The conclusions focus on the importance of the empowering processes by including recognition and dialogue, co-learning in practice, and the use of neutral venues to ensure effective user participation. The inclusion of service users in social work education can improve both practice and education. PMID:25662088

  19. A Supporting System for Cloud Service Integration Based on User Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okabe, Tatsuya; Matsumoto, Keinosuke; Mori, Naoki

    While abundant information can be referred to the Internet Cloud, it is becoming difficult for a user to acquire desired information pertinently. Therefore, it is necessary to support an unfamiliar user to IT to offer the information suitable for user's preference. This research proposes a service integration supporting system equipped with recommendation function based on a user's preference. The research regards bookmarks on Web browser and tags given to Web services as information showing a user's preference, and a user profile is created using them. A service integration model is built and the proposed system recommends some appropriate example of integrated services. As compared with conventional supporting systems, the proposed system requires less amount of work for creation or execution of service integration.

  20. Improving Access to EOSDIS Data and Services by a User Registration System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, P.; Mitchell, A.; Farley, J. D.; Murphy, K. J.; Nakamura, E.

    2011-12-01

    As NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) systems have evolved over the years, most of the EOSDIS data are now available to users via anonymous on-line access. Although the changes have improved the dissemination efficiency of earth science data, the anonymous access has made it difficult to characterize users, capture metrics on the value of EOSDIS and provide customized services that benefit users. As the number of web-based applications continues to grow, data centers and application providers have implemented their own user registration systems and provided new tools and interfaces for their registered users. This has led to the creation of independent registration systems for accessing data and interacting with online tools and services. The user profile information maintained at each of these registration systems is not consistent and the registration enforcement varies by system as well. This problem is in no way unique to EOSDIS and represents a general challenge to the distributed computing community. In a study done in 2007*, the average user has approximately 7 passwords for about 25 accounts and enters a password 8 times a day. These numbers have only increased in the last three years. A consolidation of registration systems into an EOSDIS wide User Registration System (URS) presents an opportunity to improve the user experience through simplification of user registration and profile management. Users will be able to register once at a central location and gain basic access to publicly available EOSDIS data or services hosted at each of the data centers, including accessing tools & data that cannot fully interoperate without user identification. This single source of user profile information is simple for the user to update, and allows Data Center staff to seamlessly continue to provide account services. The Data Centers will offer new services such as providing targeted notifications of changes to data and service

  1. Systematic synthesis of barriers and facilitators to service user-led care planning

    PubMed Central

    Bee, Penny; Price, Owen; Baker, John; Lovell, Karina

    2015-01-01

    Background Service user (patient) involvement in care planning is a principle enshrined by mental health policy yet often attracts criticism from patients and carers in practice. Aims To examine how user-involved care planning is operationalised within mental health services and to establish where, how and why challenges to service user involvement occur. Method Systematic evidence synthesis. Results Synthesis of data from 117 studies suggests that service user involvement fails because the patients' frame of reference diverges from that of providers. Service users and carers attributed highest value to the relational aspects of care planning. Health professionals inconsistently acknowledged the quality of the care planning process, tending instead to define service user involvement in terms of quantifiable service-led outcomes. Conclusions Service user-involved care planning is typically operationalised as a series of practice-based activities compliant with auditor standards. Meaningful involvement demands new patient-centred definitions of care planning quality. New organisational initiatives should validate time spent with service users and display more tangible and flexible commitments to meeting their needs. PMID:26243762

  2. Modified Assessment for Adult Readers: Collage. User's Guide. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilt, Gaie Isett

    A project was conducted to design an alternative assessment tool for use with adult learners traditionally identified as reading below fifth-grade level. This assessment allows for the creation of a goal-oriented Individual Education Plan that is personalized to the learner's needs and educational goals. The approach, analogous to the art…

  3. Service Patterns of Adult Survivors of Childhood versus Adult Sexual Assault/Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossman, Susan F.; Lundy, Marta; Bertrand, Cathy; Ortiz, Cynthia; Tomas-Tolentino, Grace; Ritzema, Kim; Matson, Julia

    2009-01-01

    This analysis compared the characteristics and service patterns of adult survivors of childhood sexual assault/abuse and adult survivors of adult sexual assault/abuse. Utilizing data from sexual assault crisis centers serving survivors in a Midwestern state over a six year period and controlling for revictimization, we describe and compare the…

  4. A qualitative study of views on disability and expectations from community rehabilitation service users.

    PubMed

    Kulnik, Stefan T; Nikoletou, Dimitra

    2014-12-01

    Conceptualisations of disability influence perspectives in clinical rehabilitation. The individual model and the social model framing of disability offer differing interpretations of the causality of problems and suggested actions to achieve improvement. Current rehabilitation practice centres on a problem-solving goal-oriented approach. How clients and professionals think about disability will invariably influence reasoning and suggestions for action. We explored these issues in a convenience sample of 10 community rehabilitation service users in London, United Kingdom. We took a phenomenological approach, aiming to discover interviewees' individual experiences and conceptualisations of disability, and expectations from community rehabilitation. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted from June to August 2011. Interview transcripts were analysed through open coding, constant comparison and thematic analysis. Participants constituted a group of older adults with acquired impairments and diverse medical background. Participants generally understood disability according to the individual model. There was a lack of self-identification as disabled and of explicit socio-political views on disability. This seemed to correlate with participants' life course and the experience of impairments and increasing vulnerability with old age. However, accounts of interviewees' current difficulties in life provided examples of the applicability and relevance of social model thinking. Participants' expectations from community rehabilitation ranged from those who had no clear expectations and took a passive service user role to those who had concrete wishes and were actively engaged with the service. Our interpretation of these findings is that it may be necessary to raise the public profile of community rehabilitation as a service; and that there is scope for conceptual work to actively develop and incorporate alternative ways of looking at disability into clinical

  5. User-Centric Secure Cross-Site Interaction Framework for Online Social Networking Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ko, Moo Nam

    2011-01-01

    Social networking service is one of major technological phenomena on Web 2.0. Hundreds of millions of users are posting message, photos, and videos on their profiles and interacting with other users, but the sharing and interaction are limited within the same social networking site. Although users can share some content on a social networking site…

  6. Timbral recognition and appraisal by adult cochlear implant users and normal-hearing adults.

    PubMed

    Gfeller, K; Knutson, J F; Woodworth, G; Witt, S; DeBus, B

    1998-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the appraisal and recognition of timbre (four different musical instruments) by recipients of Clarion cochlear implants (CIS strategy, 75- or 150-microsec pulse widths) and to compare their performance with that of normal-hearing listeners. Twenty-eight Clarion cochlear implant users and 41 normal-hearing listeners were asked to give a subjective assessment of the pleasantness of each instrument using a visual analog scale with anchors of "like very much" to "dislike very much," and to match each sound with a picture of the instrument they believed had produced it. No significant differences were found between the two different pulse widths for either appreciation or recognition; thus, data from the two pulse widths following 12 months of Clarion implant use were collapsed for further analyses. Significant differences in appraisal were found between normal-hearing listeners and implant recipients for two of the four instruments sampled. Normal-hearing adults were able to recognize all of the instruments with significantly greater accuracy than implant recipients. Performance on timbre perception tasks was correlated with speech perception and cognitive tasks. PMID:9493937

  7. An Interative Grahical User Interface for Maritime Security Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reize, T.; Müller, R.; Kiefl, R.

    2013-10-01

    In order to analyse optical satellite images for maritime security issues in Near-Real-Time (NRT) an interactive graphical user interface (GUI) based on NASA World Wind was developed and is presented in this article. Targets or activities can be detected, measured and classified with this tool simply and quickly. The service uses optical satellite images, currently taken from 6 sensors: Worldview-1 and Worldview-2, Ikonos, Quickbird, GeoEye-1 and EROS-B. The GUI can also handle SAR-images, air-borne images or UAV images. Software configurations are provided in a job-order file and thus all preparation tasks, such as image installation are performed fully automatically. The imagery can be overlaid with vessels derived by an automatic detection processor. These potential vessel layers can be zoomed in by a single click and sorted with an adapted method. Further object properties, such as vessel type or confidence level of identification, can be added by the operator manually. The heading angle can be refined by dragging the vessel's head or switching it to 180° with a single click. Further vessels or other relevant objects can be added. The objects length, width, heading and position are calculated automatically from three clicks on top, bottom and an arbitrary point at one of the object's longer side. In case of an Activity Detection, the detected objects can be grouped in area of interests (AOI) and classified, according to the ordered activities. All relevant information is finally written to an exchange file, after quality control and necessary correction procedures are performed. If required, image thumbnails can be cut around objects or around whole areas of interest and saved as separated, geo-referenced images.

  8. Building a Web-Based Laboratory so Users Can Experiment with New Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battles, Jason J.; Combs, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    Librarians expend considerable resources to develop services and implement new products catering their users' changing needs. Such efforts begs for the involvement of library users in the development and/or beta process. The authors, both academic librarians, realized that much of their online services were underused, so they devised a plan to…

  9. Users' Hierarchical Perspectives on Library Service Quality: A "LibQUAL+" Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Colleen; Heath, Fred; Thompson, Bruce

    2001-01-01

    The "LibQUAL+" diagnostic tool, product of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL), shows that although a single factor dominates user thinking about library service quality, all items in the survey suffuse this factor. Several first-order factors contribute unique information to the notion of service quality. As different users place varying…

  10. Service Users and Carers: Preparing to Be Involved in Work-Based Practice Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dearnley, Christine; Coulby, Ceridwen; Rhodes, Christine; Taylor, Jill; Coates, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    This paper will provide an overview of the specific issues related to involving service users and carers in work-based practice assessment of health and social care students. The outcomes of a shared workshop that involved service users and carers, practice assessors and students in the development of an interprofessional assessment tool, will be…

  11. Changing Reference Service Environment: A Review of Perspectives from Managers, Librarians, and Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rieh, Soo Young

    1999-01-01

    Reviews the literature on academic library reference service, and examines changes in the traditional reference desk model. Based on the review from the perspectives of managers, librarians, and users, new research directions are proposed in which users' information-search processes and librarians' intervention in reference service are integrated.…

  12. E-Resources, Services and User Surveys in Tsinghua University Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Min, Shao; Yi, Yang

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The paper aims to provide an overview of the e-resources and services in Tsinghua University Library, Beijing, and describe five campus-wide user surveys. It states how these user surveys play an important role in service quality enhancement. Design/methodology/approach: Following a brief history of Tsinghua University Library, a summary…

  13. Exploring Factors Influencing Mobile Users' Intention to Adopt Multimedia Messaging Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Shuchih Ernest; Pan, Ying-Hui Vera

    2011-01-01

    While short messaging service (SMS) is discussed often in recent literature, multimedia messaging service (MMS), a media rich successor of SMS, is seldom heard or understood by mobile users in Taiwan. The adoption rates of MMS are far from satisfactory, implying that there might be some factors keeping the potential users away from using MMS. This…

  14. Transferring Knowledge to the Providers and Users of Health and Mental Health Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dadich, Ann

    2010-01-01

    Communicating evidence-based practices to the providers and users of health services can enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of these services. However, this knowledge is not consistently conveyed to either cohort. To address this issue, this paper identifies didactic methods that facilitate knowledge transfer to providers and users of health…

  15. "The View from Inside": Understanding Service User Involvement in Health and Social Care Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Joanna

    2011-01-01

    Service users are increasingly involved in health and social care education, whilst the government is committed to increasing access to employment for people with mental health needs. The benefits of involving service users in social work education have been identified, including increasing skills, confidence, and building capacity; yet there is…

  16. Quality of care in psychosis and bipolar disorder from the service user perspective.

    PubMed

    Skelly, Niamh; Schnittger, Rebecca I; Butterly, Lisa; Frorath, Charlotte; Morgan, Craig; McLoughlin, Declan M; Fearon, Paul

    2013-12-01

    According to the recovery model of mental health care, service development should incorporate the expert knowledge of service users. To date, there has been limited research into conceptualizations of mental health care quality among services users diagnosed with bipolar disorder or psychosis. To investigate service user perspectives on quality of care, we conducted six focus groups (N = 29) with inpatients and outpatients of an independent Irish mental health service. We undertook an inductive thematic analysis of the data. Participants identified proactive staff, meaningful and warm staff-patient interactions, and safety and sociability in the inpatient environment as components of good quality mental health care. Participants also discussed how the implementation of best practice guidelines does not necessarily improve quality of care from the service user perspective. This and similar qualitative research should be used to inform service development and the creation of evaluation instruments compatible with the recovery model. PMID:24163347

  17. Agent-based user-adaptive service provision in ubiquitous systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saddiki, H.; Harroud, H.; Karmouch, A.

    2012-11-01

    With the increasing availability of smartphones, tablets and other computing devices, technology consumers have grown accustomed to performing all of their computing tasks anytime, anywhere and on any device. There is a greater need to support ubiquitous connectivity and accommodate users by providing software as network-accessible services. In this paper, we propose a MAS-based approach to adaptive service composition and provision that automates the selection and execution of a suitable composition plan for a given service. With agents capable of autonomous and intelligent behavior, the composition plan is selected in a dynamic negotiation driven by a utility-based decision-making mechanism; and the composite service is built by a coalition of agents each providing a component necessary to the target service. The same service can be built in variations for catering to dynamic user contexts and further personalizing the user experience. Also multiple services can be grouped to satisfy new user needs.

  18. Non-Academic Service Quality: Comparative Analysis of Students and Faculty as Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharif, Khurram; Kassim, Norizan Mohd

    2012-01-01

    The research focus was a non-academic service quality assessment within higher education. In particular, non-academic service quality perceptions of faculty and students were evaluated using a service profit chain. This enabled a comparison which helped understanding of non-academic service quality orientation from a key users' perspective. Data…

  19. Disconfirming User Expectations of the Online Service Experience: Inferred versus Direct Disconfirmation Modeling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Martin; Palmer, Adrian; Wright, Christine

    2003-01-01

    Disconfirmation models of online service measurement seek to define service quality as the difference between user expectations of the service to be received and perceptions of the service actually received. Two such models-inferred and direct disconfirmation-for measuring quality of the online experience are compared (WebQUAL, SERVQUAL). Findings…

  20. Residual Neural Processing of Musical Sound Features in Adult Cochlear Implant Users

    PubMed Central

    Timm, Lydia; Vuust, Peter; Brattico, Elvira; Agrawal, Deepashri; Debener, Stefan; Büchner, Andreas; Dengler, Reinhard; Wittfoth, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Auditory processing in general and music perception in particular are hampered in adult cochlear implant (CI) users. To examine the residual music perception skills and their underlying neural correlates in CI users implanted in adolescence or adulthood, we conducted an electrophysiological and behavioral study comparing adult CI users with normal-hearing age-matched controls (NH controls). We used a newly developed musical multi-feature paradigm, which makes it possible to test automatic auditory discrimination of six different types of sound feature changes inserted within a musical enriched setting lasting only 20 min. The presentation of stimuli did not require the participants’ attention, allowing the study of the early automatic stage of feature processing in the auditory cortex. For the CI users, we obtained mismatch negativity (MMN) brain responses to five feature changes but not to changes of rhythm, whereas we obtained MMNs for all the feature changes in the NH controls. Furthermore, the MMNs to deviants of pitch of CI users were reduced in amplitude and later than those of NH controls for changes of pitch and guitar timber. No other group differences in MMN parameters were found to changes in intensity and saxophone timber. Furthermore, the MMNs in CI users reflected the behavioral scores from a respective discrimination task and were correlated with patients’ age and speech intelligibility. Our results suggest that even though CI users are not performing at the same level as NH controls in neural discrimination of pitch-based features, they do possess potential neural abilities for music processing. However, CI users showed a disrupted ability to automatically discriminate rhythmic changes compared with controls. The current behavioral and MMN findings highlight the residual neural skills for music processing even in CI users who have been implanted in adolescence or adulthood. Highlights: -Automatic brain responses to musical feature changes

  1. Experiences of service user and carer participation in health care education.

    PubMed

    Lathlean, Judith; Burgess, Abigail; Coldham, Tina; Gibson, Colin; Herbert, Lesley; Levett-Jones, Tracy; Simons, Lucy; Tee, Stephen

    2006-12-01

    The agenda of involving service users and their carers more meaningfully in the development, delivery and evaluation of professional education in health is gaining in importance. The paper reports on a symposium which presented three diverse initiatives, established within a school of nursing and midwifery in the United Kingdom. These represent different approaches and attempts to engage service users and in some instances carers more fully in professional education aimed at developing mental health practitioners. Each is presented as achieving movement on a continuum of participation from service users as passive recipients to service users as collaborators and co-researchers. The paper concludes with a discussion of the lessons to be learnt which will hopefully stimulate service user involvement on a wider basis. PMID:17030491

  2. Young Adult, Rural, African American Stimulant Users: Antecedents and Vulnerabilities

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Teresa L.; Han, Xiaotong; Booth, Brenda M.

    2009-01-01

    Early initiation of substance use appears to be an alarming trend among rural minorities. This study focuses on 18–21 year old African American stimulant users in the Arkansas Mississippi Delta. Most participants had no high school diploma and were unemployed; 74.5% had already been arrested. Substance use was initiated early, and nearly all of the men and three quarters of the women already met criteria for lifetime abuse or dependence. Only 18% reported they had ever received substance abuse treatment. The results suggest that substance use interventions in rural communities will require multi-faceted strategies addressing economic, educational and healthcare disparities. PMID:20098663

  3. User support for a library-managed online database search service: the BMA Library free MEDLINE service.

    PubMed

    Rowlands, J; Yeadon, J; Forrester, W; McSeán, T

    1997-07-01

    This paper discusses user support in the context of a library-managed online database search service. Experience is drawn from the British Medical Association (BMA) Library's Free MEDLINE Service. More than 9,600 BMA members, who are largely unfamiliar with computer communications and database searching, have registered as users of the service. User support has played a significant role in the development of the service and has comprised four main aspects: an information pack, a help desk, online help, and MEDLINE courses. The paper includes an analysis of help desk usage statistics collected from January 1996 through June 1996, and highlights other relevant research. Plans for further service enhancements and their implications in terms of future user support are discussed. PMID:9285124

  4. Delivering Service Quality in Alcohol Treatment: A Qualitative Comparison of Public and Private Treatment Centres by Service Users and Service Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Resnick, Sheilagh M.; Griffiths, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    In the UK, quality of care has now been placed at the centre of the National Health Service (NHS) modernisation programme. To date, there has been little research on the service quality delivery of alcohol treatment services from the perspective of both the service user and service provider. Therefore, this qualitative study explored the…

  5. Competency-Based Adult High School Completion Student Services Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Elizabeth; And Others

    Designed as part of a 310 Special Demonstration and Teacher Training Project undertaken at Brevard Community College, this student services guide contains information to assist adult education administrators, counselors, instructors, and office personnel in meeting the needs of students enrolled in adult/community education schools. Primary…

  6. Service Users' Experiences of a Brief Intervention Service for Children and Adolescents: A Service Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, Jen; Schlösser, Annette

    2015-01-01

    Ten per cent of young people experience mental health difficulties at any one time. Prevention and early intervention leads to better prognosis for young people's mental well-being in the short and long term. Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) must be able to provide swift and effective interventions for a range of difficulties to…

  7. Assessment of Patients’ Perception of Telemedicine Services Using the Service User Technology Acceptability Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Dario, Claudio; Dal Pozzo, Enrico; Mancin, Silvia; Aletras, Vassilis; Newman, Stanton; Gubian, Lorenzo; Saccavini, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this paper is to assess if similar telemedicine services integrated in the management of different chronic diseases are acceptable and well perceived by patients or if there are any negative perceptions. Theory and methods: Participants suffering from different chronic diseases were enrolled in Veneto Region and gathered into clusters. Each cluster received a similar telemedicine service equipped with different disease-specific measuring devices. Participants were patients with diabetes (n = 163), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (n = 180), congestive heart failure (n = 140) and Cardiac Implantable Electronic Devices (n = 1635). The Service User Technology Acceptability Questionnaire (SUTAQ) was initially translated, culturally adapted and pretested and subsequently used to assess patients’ perception of telemedicine. Data were collected after 3 months and after 12 months from the beginning of the intervention. Data for patients with implantable devices was collected only at 12 months. Results: Results at 12 months for all clusters are similar and assessed a positive perception of telemedicine. The SUTAQ results for clusters 2 (diabetes), 5 (COPD) and 7 (CHF) after 3 months of intervention were confirmed after 12 months. Conclusions: Telemedicine was perceived as a viable addition to usual care. A positive perception for telemedicine services isn’t a transitory effect, but extends over the course of time.

  8. Interagency Cooperation for Service to Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balkema, John B.

    1979-01-01

    Develops the concept of "coordinated service delivery" in relation to the public library and describes several successful library-agency liaisons, including the bicentennial project, Operation Independence. (JD)

  9. 14 CFR § 1215.109 - Scheduling user service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Services Management Center (DSMC) no later than 21 days prior to the requested support time. (2) At times..., disruptions to scheduled service will occur. (3) The DSMC reserves the sole right to schedule, reschedule,...

  10. The day surgery experience from the perspective of service users.

    PubMed

    McCloy, Oonagh; McCutcheon, Karen

    2016-07-14

    Although health policy would suggest that day surgery is the best service for patients undergoing a surgical procedure, it is important to consider the patient and whether this type of service is what they want. This information can be generated through a service evaluation with the results used to inform local decision-making, changes to care delivery and improvements in patient care. This article describes the results of a service evaluation performed in a single-site day surgery unit. PMID:27409781

  11. User Perceptions of Current Awareness Services: A Faculty Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, Leila

    2002-01-01

    Discusses results of a science faculty survey conducted at York University to determine researchers' use of current awareness services, including print and Web-based services. Considers differences between science disciplines and implications for future library services and includes a copy of the survey. (Author/LRW)

  12. 77 FR 35355 - User Fee Schedule for Trade Promotion Services

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-13

    ... US&FCS to use an activity-based costing model to determine the true cost of services listed in the... an independent cost of service study finding, which concluded that the US&FCS is not fully covering...-0001 U.S. & Foreign Commercial Service, Office of Strategic Planning & Resource Management,...

  13. Developing a User-Centred Planning Tool for Young Adults with Development Disorders: A Research-Based Teaching Project.

    PubMed

    Ribu, Kirsten; Patel, Tulpesh

    2016-01-01

    People with development disorders, for instance autism, need structured plans to help create predictability in their daily lives. Digital plans can facilitate enhanced independency, learning, and quality of life, but existing apps are largely general purpose and lack the flexibility required by this specific but heterogeneous user group. Universal design is both a goal and a process and should be based on a holistic approach and user-centered design, interacting with the users in all stages of the development process. At Oslo and Akershus University College (HiOA) we conducted a research-based teaching project in co-operation with the Department of Neuro-habilitation at Oslo University Hospital (OUS) with two employees acting as project managers and students as developers. Three groups of Computer Science bachelor students developed digital prototypes for a planning tool for young adults with pervasive development disorders, who live either with their families or in supervised residences, and do not receive extensive public services. The students conducted the initial planning phase of the software development process, focusing on prototyping the system requirements, whilst a professional software company programmed the end solution. The goal of the project was to develop flexible and adaptive user-oriented and user-specific app solutions for tablets that can aid this diverse user group in structuring daily life, whereby, for example, photos of objects and places known to the individual user replace general pictures or drawings, and checklists can be elaborate or sparse as necessary. The three student groups worked independently of each other and created interactive working prototypes based on tests, observations and short interviews with end users (both administrators and residents) and regular user feedback from the project managers. Three very different solutions were developed that were of high enough quality that an external software company were able to

  14. Life in acute mental health settings: experiences and perceptions of service users and nurses.

    PubMed

    Rose, D; Evans, J; Laker, C; Wykes, T

    2015-02-01

    Background. Acute psychiatric provision in the UK today as well as globally has many critics including service users and nurses. Method. Four focus groups, each meeting twice, were held separately for service users and nurses. The analysis was not purely inductive but driven by concerns with the social position of marginalised groups - both patients and staff. Results. The main themes were nurse/patient interaction and coercion. Service users and nurses conceptualised these differently. Service users found nurses inaccessible and uncaring, whereas nurses also felt powerless because their working life was dominated by administration. Nurses saw coercive situations as a reasonable response to factors 'internal' to the patient whereas for service users they were driven to extreme behaviour by the environment of the ward and coercive interventions were unnecessary and heavy handed. Conclusion. This study sheds new light on living and working in acute mental health settings today by comparing the perceptions of service users and nurses and deploying service user and nurse researchers. The intention is to promote better practice by providing a window on the perceptions of both groups. PMID:24330951

  15. Human Service Planning as a Collective Adult Learning Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Joan

    Based on a study by the Department of Community Service Education, Cornell University, to evaluate human service planning (HSP) nationwide, this paper discusses the premises that HSP may be defined as community learning and that the community (according to the Robert Boyd and Jerold Apps model for adult education) is both a beneficiary of and…

  16. Older Adult Services in Northeastern Ohio Public Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fegen, Darlene A.

    The purpose of this study is to determine the level of public library service given to those over age 64 in the seven Ohio counties which make up the Northeastern Ohio Library Association (NOLA). Based on a survey of the 34 public libraries in NOLA, this study of older adult services may be used as a basis for setting performance goals and…

  17. Power mobility with collision avoidance for older adults: user, caregiver, and prescriber perspectives.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rosalie H; Korotchenko, Alexandra; Hurd Clarke, Laura; Mortenson, W Ben; Mihailidis, Alex

    2013-01-01

    Collision avoidance technology has the capacity to facilitate safer mobility among older power mobility users with physical, sensory, and cognitive impairments, thus enabling independence for more users. Little is known about consumers' perceptions of collision avoidance. This article draws on interviews (29 users, 5 caregivers, and 10 prescribers) to examine views on design and utilization of this technology. Data analysis identified three themes: "useful situations or contexts," "technology design issues and real-life application," and "appropriateness of collision avoidance technology for a variety of users." Findings support ongoing development of collision avoidance for older adult users. The majority of participants supported the technology and felt that it might benefit current users and users with visual impairments, but might be unsuitable for people with significant cognitive impairments. Some participants voiced concerns regarding the risk for injury with power mobility use and some identified situations where collision avoidance might be beneficial (driving backward, avoiding dynamic obstacles, negotiating outdoor barriers, and learning power mobility use). Design issues include the need for context awareness, reliability, and user interface specifications. User desire to maintain driving autonomy supports development of collaboratively controlled systems. This research lays the groundwork for future development by illustrating consumer requirements for this technology. PMID:24458968

  18. Medicare and Medicaid Home Health and Medicaid Waiver Services for Dually Eligible Older Adults: Risk Factors for Use and Correlates of Expenditures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortinsky, Richard H.; Fenster, Juliane R.; Judge, James O.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to, among frail dually eligible older adults, determine risk factors for the likelihood of using Medicare home health and Medicaid home health services and to, among service users, determine correlates of Medicare home health, Medicaid home health, and Medicaid waiver service expenditures. Design and Methods:…

  19. Emotion and self-cutting: narratives of service users referred to a personality disorder service.

    PubMed

    Morris, Charlotte; Simpson, Jane; Sampson, Mark; Beesley, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Theory and existing research suggest that emotion regulation capabilities develop during the formative years. Emotion dysregulation is associated with psychological distress and may contribute towards difficulties such as personality disorder and self-harm. This study aimed to explore the contexts in which individuals' narratives of emotional experience and self-harm developed. Eight participants who cut themselves and were seen by a personality disorder service were recruited. Semi-structured interviews were carried out, and interview transcripts were analysed using a narrative approach. Five temporal themes were generated: 'Seen and not heard', 'A big release … to get rid of all the pain and hurt', 'A vicious circle', 'A different world' and 'Trying to turn my life around'. The findings highlight how early experiences may have led participants to perceive emotions as unacceptable and subsequently suppress emotion in adulthood. Suppression of emotions appeared to be related to appraisals of emotions and to secondary emotional distress. Furthermore, cutting was linked to suppression of emotions as well as negative self-beliefs formed during childhood and reinforced through subsequent experiences. The study emphasizes the need for therapeutic approaches to focus on emotions when working with individuals who self-cut. Furthermore, the findings indicate the need for compassionate and validating health services that may help service users develop more optimistic future narratives. PMID:24115508

  20. Should service user involvement be consigned to history? A critical realist perspective.

    PubMed

    Stickley, T

    2006-10-01

    Service user involvement in the UK healthcare agenda is now widely expected. Historically, service user groups have been increasingly successful in their demands for greater involvement. Hierarchies of involvement exist that include consultation and partnership working. Psychiatry is an archetypal arena in terms of power and control. The traditional view of interpreting the place of service users within this arena is that the service user is at the bottom of this hierarchy; involvement allows transcendence of the power hierarchy. Critical realist theory is offered as an alternative approach to understanding these complex relationships. It is argued that contemporary models of involvement perpetuate and sustain the power positions of the dominant discourse within psychiatry. It is suggested that a critical realism perspective, offers a model that does not kowtow to the dominant discourse but rather recognizes that service users now possess power, especially in terms of being able to provide services that statutory services providers now require. Is it time for service users to call the tune, and, in doing so, establish a power position outside the traditional hierarchy of power? PMID:16965476

  1. The energy services revolution: New opportunities for commercial and industrial end-users

    SciTech Connect

    Hoggard, J.

    1997-07-01

    The changing energy services industry presents significant cost-control opportunities for end-users. However, the transition period from a monopoly to a deregulated market will be chaotic and confusing. For end-users, knowing who to turn to is the first step in taking advantage of the energy services revolution. For energy and energy services providers, bridging the gap between what suppliers perceive as key customer needs and what large energy users actually want will be the key in producing mutually successful ventures.

  2. Reconciling the Perspective of Practitioner and Service User: Findings from The Aphasia in Scotland Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Law, James; Huby, Guro; Irving, Anne-Marie; Pringle, Ann-Marie; Conochie, Douglas; Haworth, Catherine; Burston, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    Background: It is widely accepted that service users should be actively involved in new service developments, but there remain issues about how best to consult with them and how to reconcile their views with those of service providers. Aims: This paper uses data from The Aphasia in Scotland study, set up by NHS Quality Improvement Scotland to…

  3. Community-Based Information Technology Services 1: What (Some) Users Want.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Barrett S.; Robertson, Jenifer W.

    1996-01-01

    Addresses issues regarding the design of electronic community information services and user preferences for information services. Presents results of surveying 80 Wisconsin residents about their community information needs. The following community information needs were identified: library services, local government and banking, local calendars of…

  4. Survey of User Service Policies in Indiana Libraries and Information Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Edwin E.

    The areas of strength and the areas of weakness in the general patterns of library user service policies in Indiana are identified. The study also presents information which will have an impact on planning and provision of future library services in the state. The current pattern of library service policies in Indiana are compared with the optimal…

  5. People Come First: User-Centered Academic Library Service. ACRL Publications in Librarianship No. 53.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montanelli, Dale S., Ed.; Stenstrom, Patricia F., Ed.

    This book, emphasizing service to users, includes 10 chapters by different librarians who have had experience as practitioners. Chapters are: (1) "Avoiding the Seven Deadly Sins, or Technology and the Future of Library Service in Academic Libraries" (Michael Gorman); (2) "The Gateway Library: Rethinking Undergraduate Services" (Lizabeth A.…

  6. Enabling Interoperability and Servicing Multiple User Segments Through Web Services, Standards, and Data Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanisamy, Giriprakash; Wilson, Bruce E.; Cook, Robert B.; Lenhardt, Chris W.; Santhana Vannan, Suresh; Pan, Jerry; McMurry, Ben F.; Devarakonda, Ranjeet

    2010-12-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center (ORNL DAAC) is one of the science-oriented data centers in EOSDIS, aligned primarily with terrestrial ecology. The ORNL DAAC archives and serves data from NASA-funded field campaigns (such as BOREAS, FIFE, and LBA), regional and global data sets relevant to biogeochemical cycles, land validation studies for remote sensing, and source code for some terrestrial ecology models. Users of the ORNL DAAC include field ecologists, remote sensing scientists, modelers at various scales, synthesis scientific groups, a range of educational users (particularly baccalaureate and graduate instruction), and decision support analysts. It is clear that the wide range of users served by the ORNL DAAC have differing needs and differing capabilities for accessing and using data. It is also not possible for the ORNL DAAC, or the other data centers in EDSS to develop all of the tools and interfaces to support even most of the potential uses of data directly. As is typical of Information Technology to support a research enterprise, the user needs will continue to evolve rapidly over time and users themselves cannot predict future needs, as those needs depend on the results of current investigation. The ORNL DAAC is addressing these needs by targeted implementation of web services and tools which can be consumed by other applications, so that a modeler can retrieve data in netCDF format with the Climate Forecasting convention and a field ecologist can retrieve subsets of that same data in a comma separated value format, suitable for use in Excel or R. Tools such as our MODIS Subsetting capability, the Spatial Data Access Tool (SDAT; based on OGC web services), and OPeNDAP-compliant servers such as THREDDS particularly enable such diverse means of access. We also seek interoperability of metadata, recognizing that terrestrial ecology is a field where there are a very large number of relevant data repositories. ORNL DAAC

  7. 14 CFR 1215.108 - Defining user service requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... assigned to the project to produce the detailed requirements, plans and documentation necessary for support... finite, and service will be provided in accordance with operational priorities established by...

  8. Homeless and nonhomeless VA service users likely eligible for Medicaid expansion.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jack; Rosenheck, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    Administrative data on the population of Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) service users in 2010 under the age of 65 (n = 3,841,225) were analyzed to identify the number and characteristics of homeless and nonhomeless VA service users who are likely to be eligible for the Medicaid expansion (LEME) option under the Affordable Care Act. Results showed that, estimating conservatively, about 1.2 million (21%) current VA users are LEME if all states implement the expansion. Homeless service users were twice as likely to be eligible than nonhomeless users (64% vs 30%). VA service users who are LEME, regardless of housing status, were physically healthier than those not LEME but were more likely to have substance use disorders and posttraumatic stress disorder. These findings suggest that many VA service users are LEME, particularly those who are homeless and/or have mental health needs. Cross-system use of VA and Medicaid-funded services may be advantageous for veterans with extensive medical and psychiatric needs but also risks fragmented care. Information and education for VA clinicians and their patients about possible implications of the Affordable Care Act may be important. PMID:25358031

  9. Technical Report and Data File User's Manual for the 1992 National Adult Literacy Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirsch, Irwin; Yamamoto, Kentaro; Norris, Norma; Rock, Donald; Jungeblut, Ann; O'Reilly, Patricia; Berlin, Martha; Mohadjer, Leyla; Waksberg, Joseph; Goksel, Huseyin; Burke, John; Rieger, Susan; Green, James; Klein, Merle; Campbell, Anne; Jenkins, Lynn; Kolstad, Andrew; Mosenthal, Peter; Baldi, Stephane

    Chapter 1 of this report and user's manual describes design and implementation of the 1992 National Adult Literacy Survey (NALS). Chapter 2 reviews stages of sampling for national and state survey components; presents weighted and unweighted response rates for the household component; and describes non-incentive and prison sample designs. Chapter…

  10. Childhood Conduct Problems and Other Early Risk Factors in Rural Adult Stimulant Users

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Teresa L.; Han, Xiaotong; Leukefeld, Carl; Booth, Brenda M.; Edlund, Carrie

    2009-01-01

    Context Understanding childhood risk factors associated with adult substance use and legal problems is important for treatment and prevention. Purpose To examine the relationship of early substance use, conduct problems before age 15, and family history of substance abuse on adult outcomes in rural, stimulant users. Methods Adult cocaine and methamphetamine users (N=544) in rural Arkansas and Kentucky were interviewed. Data were analyzed using both bivariate analyses and multiple logistic and log-linear regression models, with dependent variables being any substance abuse/dependence, stimulant abuse/dependence, total number of arrests since age 18 and days incarcerated since age 18. Findings One-third reported three or more conduct disorder problems prior to age 15; half reported initiation of substances (excluding alcohol) before age 15; and 60% reported family history of substance problems. All three variables were associated with adult substance abuse/dependence but only the latter two were associated with stimulant abuse/dependence. Conclusions This study highlights early risk factors for adult substance abuse/dependence among rural stimulant users. PMID:19166561

  11. Richmond Wellbeing Service Access Strategy for Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Gowling, Sarah; Persson, Jennie; Holt, Genevieve; Ashbourne, Sue; Bloomfield, James; Shortland, Hannah; Bate, Clare

    2016-01-01

    IAPT (Improving Access to Psychological Therapies) is a national programme aimed at increasing availability of evidence based psychological therapies in the NHS. IAPT is primarily for people who have mild to moderate, common mental health difficulties such as depression, anxiety, phobias and post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The programme seeks to use the least intrusive method of care possible to treat people at the time when it will be of most help to them. Individuals are able to self-refer into most IAPT services or alternatively can request to be referred by their GP or other services in the community. Richmond Wellbeing Service (RWS) is one such IAPT Service and this research is based on our work to promote accessibility of the service to one of the harder to reach population groups - older adults. We know that IAPT services could have a positive impact on older adults as it is believed on average, 25% of over 65 year olds face common mental health problems. However, only a third of these people discuss this with their GP and so are less likely to be referred to an IAPT Service. In relation to the above, this project was designed to look at increasing access for older adults into Richmond Wellbeing Service (RWS) specifically to improve access to the RWS by older adults by 100. The overall goal was to increase older adult (65+) referral rates by 20% over a year, in raw number this would translate to an increase of 100 over a year period, and in percentage terms an average of 8% of total referrals. Results yielded an increase of 39 referrals between baseline and test period. The majority of this increase had occurred in the final five months of the projects duration(31). Interestingly the number of older adults in the older age band (85+) almost doubled within this period (from 12 to 21). In total, in percentage terms this translates to an an increase of OA referrals from 6% up to 6.7%, as above we are aiming for 8% or an additional increase of 61 patients

  12. Richmond Wellbeing Service Access Strategy for Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Gowling, Sarah; Persson, Jennie; Holt, Genevieve; Ashbourne, Sue; Bloomfield, James; Shortland, Hannah; Bate, Clare

    2016-01-01

    IAPT (Improving Access to Psychological Therapies) is a national programme aimed at increasing availability of evidence based psychological therapies in the NHS. IAPT is primarily for people who have mild to moderate, common mental health difficulties such as depression, anxiety, phobias and post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The programme seeks to use the least intrusive method of care possible to treat people at the time when it will be of most help to them. Individuals are able to self-refer into most IAPT services or alternatively can request to be referred by their GP or other services in the community. Richmond Wellbeing Service (RWS) is one such IAPT Service and this research is based on our work to promote accessibility of the service to one of the harder to reach population groups - older adults. We know that IAPT services could have a positive impact on older adults as it is believed on average, 25% of over 65 year olds face common mental health problems. However, only a third of these people discuss this with their GP and so are less likely to be referred to an IAPT Service. In relation to the above, this project was designed to look at increasing access for older adults into Richmond Wellbeing Service (RWS) specifically to improve access to the RWS by older adults by 100. The overall goal was to increase older adult (65+) referral rates by 20% over a year, in raw number this would translate to an increase of 100 over a year period, and in percentage terms an average of 8% of total referrals. Results yielded an increase of 39 referrals between baseline and test period. The majority of this increase had occurred in the final five months of the projects duration(31). Interestingly the number of older adults in the older age band (85+) almost doubled within this period (from 12 to 21). In total, in percentage terms this translates to an an increase of OA referrals from 6% up to 6.7%, as above we are aiming for 8% or an additional increase of 61 patients

  13. Risk perceptions of smokeless tobacco among adolescents and adult users and nonusers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sherry T.; Nemeth, Julianna M.; Klein, Elizabeth G.; Ferketich, Amy K.; Kwan, Mei-Po; Wewers, Mary Ellen

    2015-01-01

    The recent growth in smokeless tobacco (ST) consumption has raised questions about consumer risk perceptions of ST products, especially in high-risk vulnerable populations. This qualitative study examined risk perceptions of ST among adolescent and adult users and non-users in Ohio Appalachia. Focus groups and interviews were held with adolescents (n=53; mean age of 17 years) and adults (n=63; mean age of 34 years) from four Ohio Appalachian counties. Participants were asked about their perceptions of ST-related health risks, ST safety, and the relative safety of ST compared to cigarettes. Transcriptions were coded independently by two individuals. Overall, participants were knowledgeable about health problems from ST use (e.g., oral cancers, periodontal disease). Nearly all participants stated that ST use is not safe; however, there was disagreement about its relative safety. Some perceived all tobacco products as equally harmful; others believed that ST is safer than cigarettes for either the user or those around the user. Disagreements about ST relative safety may reflect mixed public health messages concerning the safety of ST. Comprehensive consumer messages about the relative safety of ST compared to cigarettes are needed. Messages should address the effect of ST on the health of the user as well as those exposed to the user. PMID:25832126

  14. 7 CFR 354.4 - User fees for certain domestic services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... an agreement is terminated, any unobligated funds remain in the user fee account, APHIS will return... agreements with APHIS to receive, at points of entry in the United States inspection services in addition...

  15. 76 FR 78950 - FBI Criminal Justice Information Services Division; Revised User Fee Schedule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Federal Bureau of Investigation FBI Criminal Justice Information Services Division; Revised User Fee Schedule AGENCY: Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Justice. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Pursuant to...

  16. Library Services to Community Users: Current Practices of Urban and Metropolitan Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dole, Wanda V.; Hill, J. B.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes one of the ways in which the Coalition of Urban and Metropolitan Universities (CUMU) makes a difference in neighborhoods, cities, and regions by extending library privileges to community users. It reports the results of a study of the services that CUMU libraries provide to community users.

  17. User Selection of Purchased Information Services. Interim Technical Report (June 1975-January 1976).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Homer J.

    Interviews conducted in the first phase of a project to develop a method for user selection of purchased scientific and technical information services identified a number of relationship among different populations of users. Research scientists, engineers, and patent attorneys want convenient access to original data identified in the search.…

  18. A new international position reporting service for maritime and land mobile users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekman, Anders

    A position reporting service intended for land mobile and maritime users is discussed. The position reporting format is described, and information is given on how user-specific data can be included in the reports. The integration of the system with fleet management systems is discussed. Automatic vehicle location software is also described.

  19. Adult Literacy Services in Rural Public Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Backus, Mary Jane

    This paper examines the literacy services provided by public libraries in the rural areas (communities of 25,000 people or less) of West Virginia and Kentucky. Of the 93 libraries (68%) which responded to the survey, 89.8% acknowledge illiteracy as being a problem. However, although 92% of the librarians agree that illiteracy programs are an…

  20. 76 FR 30542 - Adult Signature Services

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-26

    ... Signature labels are located in the Intelligent Mail Package Barcode Specification and the addendum to Publication 91, Addendum for Intelligent Mail Package Barcode (IMpb) and 3-digit Service Type Code, available... Intelligent Mail package barcode. * * * * * 3.0 Certified Mail * * * * * 3.2 Basic Information * * * * *...

  1. Producing Decisions in Service-User Groups for People with an Intellectual Disability: Two Contrasting Facilitator Styles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antaki, Charles; Finlay, W. M. L.; Sheridan, Emma; Jingree, Treena; Walton, Chris

    2006-01-01

    Service-user groups whose goals include the promotion of self-advocacy for people with an intellectual disability aim, among other things, to encourage service users to identify problems and find solutions. However, service users' contributions to group sessions may not always be full and spontaneous. This presents a dilemma to the facilitator. In…

  2. The Effect of Free Adult Preventive Care Services on Subsequent Utilization of Inpatient Services in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Tian, Wei-Hua

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this article is to investigate the relationship between the utilization of free adult preventive care services and subsequent utilization of inpatient services among elderly people under the National Health Insurance program in Taiwan. The study used secondary data from the 2005 Taiwan National Health Interview Survey and claim data from the 2006 Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database for the elderly aged 65 or over. A bivariate probit model was used to avoid the possible endogeneity in individuals' utilization of free adult preventive care and inpatient services. This study finds that, when individuals had utilized the preventive care services in 2005, the probability that they utilized inpatient services in 2006 was significantly reduced by 13.89%. The findings of this study may provide a good reference for policy makers to guide the efficient allocation of medical resources through the continuous promotion of free adult preventive care services under the National Health Insurance program. PMID:27287671

  3. Identification of general characteristics, motivation, and satisfaction of internet-based medical consultation service users in Croatia

    PubMed Central

    Klinar, Ivana; Balažin, Ana; Baršić, Bruno; Tiljak, Hrvoje

    2011-01-01

    Aim To identify users’ reasons to look for physician consultation on the internet instead of visiting a physician and to explore their general characteristics, motivation, and satisfaction with internet medical consultation service ‘Your Questions.’ Methods Users of a free internet medical consultation service ‘Your Questions’ (www.plivazdravlje.hr) were invited to participate in a web-based survey designed to explore their general characteristics (age, sex, etc), reasons for using the service, the nature of their health problem or question, and their satisfaction with the service. Respondents were divided into two groups: users who consulted an internet physician only (Group I) and users who used internet consulting before or after visiting a physician (Group II). Results The response rate was 38% (1036/2747), with 79% female respondents. A fifth of the respondents (21%) consulted an internet physician only (Group I). Multivariate analysis revealed that the respondents in Group I were younger (median 24 vs 28 years in Group II), more interested into questions about pregnancy (odds ratio [OR], 1.984; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.203-3.272), more often embarrassed to talk to a physician in person (OR, 1.828; 95% CI, 1.119-2.989), and more motivated to protect their privacy (OR, 1.727; 95% CI, 1.252-2.380). They also had greater satisfaction with the service (77% vs 60%, P < 0.001). Conclusion The factors associated with the use of internet-based medical consultation services were younger age, need for privacy protection, avoidance of embarrassment at the physician’s office, and having a question related to pregnancy. This reveals the internet medical consultation service as a useful health promotion supplement that is particularly applicable for the population of young adults. PMID:21853551

  4. Mental health service users' and practitioners' experiences of engagement in assertive outreach: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Wright, N; Callaghan, P; Bartlett, P

    2011-11-01

    Assertive outreach services have been central to community mental health policy within the UK. These multidisciplinary teams were established to engage with service users who have severe and enduring mental health problems and have found traditional community services unable to meet their needs. Mental health nurses have a pivotal role in these multidisciplinary teams, yet the nature of these relationships from the perspective of those who work in and receive care is poorly understood. This study set out to explore the nature and meaning of engagement for practitioners and service users within assertive outreach services. A qualitative approach, informed by philosophical hermeneutics, underpinned the study. Participants were recruited from a single assertive outreach team in the UK. To be eligible for the study, mental health practitioners needed to be employed within the assertive outreach team. All service users residing in the community and receiving care from the team were also eligible for inclusion. In total 14 interviews were conducted with mental health practitioners and 13 with service users. Data analysis was informed by Turner's method. Four themes emerged from the data; contact, dialogue, transformation and shared understanding. Meaningful engagement was found to manifest itself through experiences such as providing and receiving practical assistance, having a genuine two-way conversation and valuing the experiences and personal attributes of the other person. The findings indicate that engagement is an active, dynamic and skilled process, which leads practitioners and service users to transform together to create a new relationship. PMID:21985685

  5. User requirements for the snow and land ice services - CryoLand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malnes, E.; Buanes, A.; Nagler, T.; Bippus, G.; Gustafsson, D.; Schiller, C.; Metsämäki, S.; Pulliainen, J.; Luojus, K.; Larsen, H. E.; Solberg, R.; Diamandi, A.; Wiesmann, A.

    2015-06-01

    CryoLand (2011-2015) is a project carried out within the 7th Framework of the European Commission aimed at developing downstream services for monitoring seasonal snow, glaciers and lake/river ice primarily based on satellite remote sensing. The services target private and public users from a wide variety of application areas, and aim to develop sustainable services after the project is completed. The project has performed a thorough user requirement survey in order to derive targeted requirements for the service and provide recommendations for the design and priorities of the service. In this paper we describe the methods used, the major findings in this user survey, and how we used the results to design and specify the CryoLand snow and land ice service. The user requirement analysis shows that a European operational snow and land ice service is required and that there exists developed cryosphere products that can meet the specific needs. The majority of the users were mainly interested not only in the snow services, but also the lake/river ice products and the glacier products were desired.

  6. 75 FR 34319 - User Fees for 2010 Crop Cotton Classification Services to Growers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-17

    ...The Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) will maintain user fees for cotton producers for 2010 crop cotton classification services under the Cotton Statistics and Estimates Act at the same level as in 2009. These fees are also authorized under the Cotton Standards Act of 1923. The 2009 crop user fee was $2.20 per bale, and this rule will continue the fee for the 2010 cotton crop at that same......

  7. Optimizing Performance in Adult Cochlear Implant Users through Clinician Directed Auditory Training.

    PubMed

    Plant, Geoff; Bernstein, Claire Marcus; Levitt, Harry

    2015-11-01

    Clinician-directed auditory training using the KTH Speech Tracking Procedure can be a powerful approach for maximizing outcomes with adult cochlear implant (CI) users. This article first reviews prior research findings from an 8-week clinician-directed auditory training (AT) program using speech tracking that yielded significant gains in speech tracking rate and sentence recognition scores following training. The second focus of the article is to illustrate the value of intensive face-to-face long-term AT using speech tracking with adult CI users. A detailed case study report is presented that demonstrates major ongoing and progressive gains in tracking rate, sentence recognition, and improvements in self-perceived competence and confidence over the course of intensive long-term training. Given the potential of both short- and long-term clinician-directed auditory training via KTH speech tracking to help CI users reach their optimal performance level, consideration for more widespread clinical use is proposed in the overall rehabilitation of adult CI users. PMID:27587916

  8. Consume users guide. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Ottmar, R.D.; Burns, M.F.; Hall, J.N.; Hanson, A.D.

    1993-01-01

    CONSUME is a user-friendly computer program designed for resource managers with some working knowledge of IBM-PC applications. The software predicts the amount of fuel consumption on logged units based on weather data, the amount and fuel moisture of fuels, and a number of other factors. Using these predictions, the resource manager can accurately determine when and where to conduct a prescribed burn to achieve desired objectives, while reducing impacts on other resources. CONSUME can be used for most broadcast and underburns on forested lands in the western states if the woody fuels are relatively homogeneous and composed of Douglas-fir, hemlock, alder, lodgepole pine, or mixed conifer species.

  9. Adult protective services and animal welfare: should animal abuse and neglect be assessed during adult protective services screening?

    PubMed

    Peak, Terry; Ascione, Frank; Doney, Jylisa

    2012-01-01

    Past research has examined links among animal abuse, child maltreatment, and intimate partner violence and demonstrated the importance of addressing the needs of both human and animal victims. We hypothesized that there might be a similar link between animal abuse and older adult welfare issues. As a first step in the earlier research was the development of a screening protocol that shed light on the link between domestic violence and animal abuse, we decided to follow a similar route to explore this new topic by asking state government representatives about their experiences, if any, with this topic. Here we report the results of a national survey of state Adult Protective Services agencies regarding their protocols for assessing animal welfare issues in the context of older adult maltreatment. We also describe a model assessment protocol we developed in collaboration with the Utah Division of Aging and Adult Services. PMID:22206511

  10. 'We're doing it already ...': adult protection in mental health services.

    PubMed

    Brown, H; Keating, F

    1998-08-01

    This paper explores the implementation of generic adult protection policies in mental health services, both in terms of conceptual issues about the nature and thresholds of abuse which are identified and/or tolerated within different settings, and in relation to existing structures for working on risk assessment, such as the Care Programme Approach and Supervised Discharge. The paper asks if resistance from mental health workers to new adult protection procedures reflects a reality that they have 'been doing it already' or whether there is a deeper resistance to acknowledgement of abuse issues in the lives of service users, and to the burden which such knowledge places on workers who are already stretched to the limit. PMID:9807364

  11. Distance Learning: Information Access and Services for Virtual Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iyer, Hemalata, Ed.

    This volume centers broadly on information support services for distance education. The articles in this book can be categorized into two areas: access to information resources for distance learners, and studies of distance learning programs. Contents include: "The Challenges and Benefits of Asynchronous Learning Networks" (Daphne Jorgensen);…

  12. Applications of Paper and Interactive Prototypes in Designing Telecare Services for Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Duh, Emilija Stojmenova; Guna, Jože; Pogačnik, Matevž; Sodnik, Jaka

    2016-04-01

    We present the results of the user studies of the CareMe prototype telecare service for supporting older adults with remote telecare services. The CareMe solution targets older adults who are capable of living independently and outside of a dedicated medical institution or a nursing home, but require occasional medical attention, and formal or informal care. The studies were conducted between November 2013 and March 2014 and followed the participatory design approach. The research questions focused on understanding the difference in the participatory design approach when older adults use paper prototypes vs interactive prototypes, and the difference when older adults use interactive prototypes with poor interface design vs interactive prototypes with rich interface design. In total, 45 older adults living in Slovenia participated in the field trial. They were retired, 32 of whom were nursing home residents and 13 were living independently at home. The study sample's age distribution was between 64 and 91 years. The analysis of the filed trial results indicated the importance of the factors that influence users' decision about how and when they use new technology, i.e., the perceived usefulness and the perceived ease-of-use. Main insights gained from the studies show, that it is very difficult to keep older people focused on the topics of discussion and that they have often difficulties to clearly present/express their ideas. Furthermore, abstract concepts, such as paper only prototypes proved to be challenging to cope with, whereas using real applications and services when trying out scenarios using interactive prototypes provided much better experience and feedback. PMID:26860915

  13. A gendered users' perspective on decentralized primary health services in rural Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Masanyiwa, Zacharia S; Niehof, Anke; Termeer, Catrien J A M

    2015-01-01

    Since the 1990s, Tanzania has been implementing health sector reforms including decentralization of primary healthcare services to districts and users. The impact of the reforms on the access, quality and appropriateness of primary healthcare services from the viewpoint of users is, however, not clearly documented. This article draws on a gendered users' perspective to address the question of whether the delivery of gender-sensitive primary health services has improved after the reforms. The article is based on empirical data collected through a household survey, interviews, focus group discussions, case studies and analysis of secondary data in two rural districts in Tanzania. The analysis shows that the reforms have generated mixed effects: they have contributed to improving the availability of health facilities in some villages but have also reinforced inter-village inequalities. Men and women hold similar views on the perceived changes and appropriateness to women on a number of services. Gender inequalities are, however, reflected in the significantly low membership of female-headed households in the community health fund and their inability to pay the user fees and in the fact that women's reproductive and maternal health needs are as yet insufficiently addressed. Although over half of users are satisfied with the services, more women than men are dissatisfied. The reforms appear to have put much emphasis on building health infrastructure and less on quality issues as perceived by users. PMID:24285278

  14. 9 CFR 130.22 - User fees for inspection services outside the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false User fees for inspection services outside the United States. 130.22 Section 130.22 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... outside the United States. (a) If inspection services (including inspection, testing, and...

  15. 9 CFR 130.22 - User fees for inspection services outside the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false User fees for inspection services outside the United States. 130.22 Section 130.22 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... outside the United States. (a) If inspection services (including inspection, testing, and...

  16. 9 CFR 130.22 - User fees for inspection services outside the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false User fees for inspection services outside the United States. 130.22 Section 130.22 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... outside the United States. (a) If inspection services (including inspection, testing, and...

  17. Staff Perspectives of Service User Involvement on Two Clinical Psychology Training Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Simon P.; Holttum, Sue

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated both negative and positive staff perspectives of service user involvement on two clinical psychology training courses as part of an ongoing process of service evaluation. Ten clinical psychology staff from two training courses were interviewed over the telephone by a current trainee clinical psychologist using a…

  18. Measuring Levels of End-Users' Acceptance and Use of Hybrid Library Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tibenderana, Prisca; Ogao, Patrick; Ikoja-Odongo, J.; Wokadala, James

    2010-01-01

    This study concerns the adoption of Information Communication Technology (ICT) services in libraries. The study collected 445 usable data from university library end-users using a cross-sectional survey instrument. It develops, applies and tests a research model of acceptance and use of such services based on an existing UTAUT model by Venkatesh,…

  19. 9 CFR 130.22 - User fees for inspection services outside the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false User fees for inspection services outside the United States. 130.22 Section 130.22 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... outside the United States. (a) If inspection services (including inspection, testing, and...

  20. User Analysis of the University of Kentucky Medical Library Health Sciences Information Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barcley, Janet A.

    The results of a questionnaire sent to the users of the Health Sciences Information Service (HSIS) at the University of Kentucky are summarized by this report. Several observations were made from the data presented: (1) when a dependable information service is organized it gets used; (2) the number of individuals who report the use of HSIS through…

  1. Activity-Based Costing in User Services of an Academic Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis-Newman, Jennifer

    2003-01-01

    The rationale for using Activity-Based Costing (ABC) in a library is to allocate indirect costs to products and services based on the factors that most influence them. This paper discusses the benefits of ABC to library managers and explains the steps involved in implementing ABC in the user services area of an Australian academic library.…

  2. Comparison of Service Centers and Document Data Bases--A User's View

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donohue, C. H.

    1973-01-01

    An analysis of five commercial service centers and various data bases is presented. A current awareness profile covering both chemical and botanical fields was sent to each service center. The responses were evaluated on the basis of promptness, interaction with the user, and physical format of the listing, among other things. (Author/NH)

  3. Bullying Experiences of Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service-Users: A Pilot Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyer, Kevin; Teggart, Tom

    2007-01-01

    Victims and perpetrators of bullying experience a variety of psychological problems. The aim of the current pilot study was to explore the bullying experiences of Child and Adolescent Mental Health (CAMHS) service-users. The investigation was conducted as a cross-sectional survey at a community-based specialist CAMH service. A modified version of…

  4. Archival Services and the Concept of the User: A RAMP Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Hugh A.

    Prepared under contract with the International Council on Archives (ICA), this study is intended to assist archivists and information specialists in creating, developing, and evaluating modern archival systems and services, particularly with reference to the concept and the role of the user in such systems and services. It ranges over a wide field…

  5. Group Treatment for Men with Intellectual Disability and Sexually Abusive Behaviour: Service User Views

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hays, Sarah-Jane; Murphy, Glynis H.; Langdon, Peter E.; Rose, David; Reed, Tracy

    2007-01-01

    Background: Men with intellectual disability (ID) and sexually abusive behaviour are a disempowered and marginalised group. Nevertheless, as service users, they can be consulted and involved in a variety of different ways, including ascertaining their views of the services they receive. Method: A group of 16 men with ID and sexually abusive…

  6. User Evaluation of the NASA Technical Report Server Recommendation Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Michael L.; Bollen, Johan; Calhoun, JoAnne R.; Mackey, Calvin E.

    2004-01-01

    We present the user evaluation of two recommendation server methodologies implemented for the NASA Technical Report Server (NTRS). One methodology for generating recommendations uses log analysis to identify co-retrieval events on full-text documents. For comparison, we used the Vector Space Model (VSM) as the second methodology. We calculated cosine similarities and used the top 10 most similar documents (based on metadata) as 'recommendations'. We then ran an experiment with NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) staff members to gather their feedback on which method produced the most 'quality' recommendations. We found that in most cases VSM outperformed log analysis of co-retrievals. However, analyzing the data revealed the evaluations may have been structurally biased in favor of the VSM generated recommendations. We explore some possible methods for combining log analysis and VSM generated recommendations and suggest areas of future work.

  7. User Evaluation of the NASA Technical Report Server Recommendation Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Michael L.; Bollen, Johan; Calhoun, JoAnne R.; Mackey, Calvin E.

    2004-01-01

    We present the user evaluation of two recommendation server methodologies implemented for the NASA Technical Report Server (NTRS). One methodology for generating recommendations uses log analysis to identify co-retrieval events on full-text documents. For comparison, we used the Vector Space Model (VSM) as the second methodology. We calculated cosine similarities and used the top 10 most similar documents (based on metadata) as recommendations . We then ran an experiment with NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) staff members to gather their feedback on which method produced the most quality recommendations. We found that in most cases VSM outperformed log analysis of co-retrievals. However, analyzing the data revealed the evaluations may have been structurally biased in favor of the VSM generated recommendations. We explore some possible methods for combining log analysis and VSM generated recommendations and suggest areas of future work.

  8. National Assessment of Adult Literacy, 2003: Public-Use Data File User's Guide. NCES 2007-464

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Elizabeth; Jin, Ying; White, Sheida

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Education's National Center for Education Statistics has updated the household and prison public-use data files for the 2003 National Assessment of Adult Literacy and the 1992 National Adult Literacy Survey. The accompanying 2003 National Assessment of Adult Literacy Public-Use Data File User's Guide explains how the data…

  9. Users' Information-Seeking Behavior. What Are They Really Doing? A Bibliography. User Access to Services Committee, RUSA Machine-Assisted Reference Section (MARS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashley, Teresa; Colborn, Nancy Wootton; Crawford, Gregory; Freund, LeiLani S.; Heise, Jennifer; Hocker, Susan E.; Hoover, Danise; Jacobs, Sally J.; Kelsey, Sigrid; Lacks, Bernice; Lyon, Sally; McDonald, Brenda; McHugh, William; Popp, Mary Pagliero; Swanson, Signe; Wright, Arthuree R. M.

    2001-01-01

    This bibliography on users' machine-assisted information seeking behavior was compiled by the American Library Association's Reference and User Services Association (RUSA) Machine-Assisted Reference Section (MARS). Includes adoption of technology; digital library services; hypertext; interface design; models and theory; relevance; resource…

  10. Public service user terminus study compendium of terminus equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    General descriptions and specifications are given for equipments which facilitate satellite and terrestrial communications delivery by acting as interfaces between a human, mechanical, or electrical information generator (or source) and the communication system. Manufactures and suppliers are given as well as the purchase, service, or lease costs of various products listed under the following cateories: voice/telephony/facsimile equipment; data/graphics terminals; full motion and processes video equipment; and multiple access equipment.

  11. Introducing Advanced Clinical Reasoning to an Adult Learning Disability Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stansfield, Jois; Matthews, Alison

    2014-01-01

    The advanced clinical reasoning approach is widely adopted in speech and language therapy practice. This article reports on the introduction of the approach across a multidisciplinary adult learning disability service and staff reports on the impact of this initiative. Staff and team managers reported that the training had a positive impact on…

  12. Services for Learning Disabled Adults in California's Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostertag, Bruce A.; And Others

    During the 1980's, a series of studies have been conducted to examine assessment strategies, teaching methodologies, core services, and delivery systems for Learning Disabled Average (LDA) adults in California's community colleges. Study findings included the following: (1) between 1981-82 and 1985-86, the number of formal programs for LDA adults…

  13. Services for Older Adults. Reference Book [and] Student Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Curriculum Center for Family and Consumer Sciences.

    This student activity book and reference book, which are part of a family and consumer sciences education series focusing on a broad range of employment opportunities, are intended for use in 1- and 2- programs preparing Texas high school students for employment in occupations related to providing services for older adults. The reference book…

  14. Mental health service users' experiences of mental health care: an integrative literature review.

    PubMed

    Newman, D; O'Reilly, P; Lee, S H; Kennedy, C

    2015-04-01

    A number of studies have highlighted issues around the relationship between service users and providers. The recovery model is predominant in mental health as is the recognition of the importance of person-centred practice. The authors completed an in-depth search of the literature to answer the question: What are service users' experiences of the mental health service? Three key themes emerged: acknowledging a mental health problem and seeking help; building relationships through participation in care; and working towards continuity of care. The review adds to the current body of knowledge by providing greater detail into the importance of relationships between service users and providers and how these may impact on the delivery of care in the mental health service. The overarching theme that emerged was the importance of the relationship between the service user and provider as a basis for interaction and support. This review has specific implications for mental health nursing. Despite the recognition made in policy documents for change, issues with stigma, poor attitudes and communication persist. There is a need for a fundamental shift in the provider-service user relationship to facilitate true service-user engagement in their care. The aim of this integrative literature review was to identify mental health service users' experiences of services. The rationale for this review was based on the growing emphasis and requirements for health services to deliver care and support, which recognizes the preferences of individuals. Contemporary models of mental health care strive to promote inclusion and empowerment. This review seeks to add to our current understanding of how service users experience care and support in order to determine to what extent the principles of contemporary models of mental health care are embedded in practice. A robust search of Web of Science, the Cochrane Database, Science Direct, EBSCO host (Academic Search Complete, MEDLINE, CINAHL Plus

  15. Smart environment as a service: three factor cloud based user authentication for telecare medical information system.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Zeeshan; Abdullah, Abdul Hanan; Khan, Muhammad Khurram; Alghamdi, Abdullah S

    2014-01-01

    The Telecare Medical Information System (TMIS) provides a set of different medical services to the patient and medical practitioner. The patients and medical practitioners can easily connect to the services remotely from their own premises. There are several studies carried out to enhance and authenticate smartcard-based remote user authentication protocols for TMIS system. In this article, we propose a set of enhanced and authentic Three Factor (3FA) remote user authentication protocols utilizing a smartphone capability over a dynamic Cloud Computing (CC) environment. A user can access the TMIS services presented in the form of CC services using his smart device e.g. smartphone. Our framework transforms a smartphone to act as a unique and only identity required to access the TMIS system remotely. Methods, Protocols and Authentication techniques are proposed followed by security analysis and a performance analysis with the two recent authentication protocols proposed for the healthcare TMIS system. PMID:24346931

  16. User charges in health care: Evidence of effect on service utilization & equity from north India

    PubMed Central

    Prinja, Shankar; Aggarwal, Arun Kumar; Kumar, Rajesh; Kanavos, Panos

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: User charges have been advocated on efficiency grounds despite the widespread criticism about their adverse effect on equity. We assessed the effect of user charges on inpatient hospitalizations rate and equity in Haryana State. Methods: The inpatient department (IPD) statistics of the public sector facilities in Yamuna Nagar district where user charges had been introduced were analysed and compared with Rohtak district which did not have user charge between 2000 and 2006. National Sample Survey data of Haryana for the 2004-2005 period were analyzed to compare utilization of public sector facilities for hospitalization, cost of hospitalization, and prevalence of catastrophic out-of-pocket (OOP) expenditure by income quintiles in three districts which had user charges and 17 districts of Haryana which did not levy user charges. Results: During 2000 and 2006, hospital admissions declined by 23.8 per cent in Yamuna Nagar district where user charges had been introduced compared to an almost static hospitalization rate in Rohtak district which did not have user charges (P<0.01). Public sector hospital utilization for inpatient services had a pro-rich (concentration index 0.144) distribution in the three districts with user charges and pro-poor (concentration index -0.047) in the 17 districts without user charges. Significantly higher prevalence of catastrophic health expenditure was observed in public sector institutions with user charges (48%) compared to those without user charges (35.4%) (P<0.001). Interpretation & conclusions: The findings of our study showed that user charges had a negative influence on hospitalizations in Haryana especially among the poor. Public policies for revenue generation should avoid user charges. PMID:23287137

  17. Service description of communication systems supporting multi-media multi-user applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heijenk, G. J.; Hou, X.; Niemegeers, I. G.

    The paper presents a service description of communication systems supporting multi-media multi-user applications. In particular, it focuses on service elements related to the call control. The service description specifies the functional behavior of the communication system as a whole. It can be used as a common reference in the next design stages, e.g., in the protocol design and implementation of both Customer Premises Networks and public telecommunication networks. After discussing the requirements of multi-media multi-user applications, a call model is presented. This model creates an abstract view of those aspects of the call relevant for the design and helps us in structuring the service. Only those service elements of a communication system that are related to the call establishment, modification and termination are fully specified by describing service primitives, their parameters and temporal ordering constraints.

  18. Related factors and use of free preventive health services among adults with intellectual disabilities in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study aimed to investigate the utilization of preventive health services in the adults with intellectual disabilities from the nationwide database. Methods The research method of this study is secondary data analysis. The data was obtained from three nationwide databases from 2006 to 2008. This study employed descriptive statistics to analyze the use and rate of preventive health services by intellectual disabled adults. Chi-square test was used to determine the relationship between the utilization of preventive health services and these variables. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to explore the factors that affect intellectual disabled adults’ use of preventive health services. Results Our findings indicated 16.65% of people with intellectual disabilities aged over 40 years used the preventive health services. Females were more frequent users than males (18.27% vs. 15.21%, p <0.001). The utilization rate decreased with increasing severity of intellectual disabilities. The utilization was lowest (13.83%) for those with very severe disability, whereas that was the highest (19.38%) for those with mild severity. The factors significantly influencing utilization of the services included gender, age, and marital status, urbanization of resident areas, monthly payroll, low-income household status, catastrophic illnesses status and relevant chronic diseases and severity of disability. Conclusions Although Taiwan’s Health Promotion Administration (HPA) has provided free preventive health services for more than 15 years, people with intellectual disabilities using preventive health care tend to be low. Demographics, economic conditions, health status, relevant chronic diseases, environmental factor, and severity of disability are the main factors influencing the use of preventive healthcare. According to the present findings, it is recommended that the government should increase the reimbursement of the medical staff performing health

  19. Multiscale Laboratory Infrastructure and Services to users: Plans within EPOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiers, Chris; Willingshofer, Ernst; Drury, Martyn; Funiciello, Francesca; Rosenau, Matthias; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Sagnotti, Leonardo; EPOS WG6, Corrado Cimarelli

    2015-04-01

    The participant countries in EPOS embody a wide range of world-class laboratory infrastructures ranging from high temperature and pressure experimental facilities, to electron microscopy, micro-beam analysis, analogue modeling and paleomagnetic laboratories. Most data produced by the various laboratory centres and networks are presently available only in limited "final form" in publications. Many data remain inaccessible and/or poorly preserved. However, the data produced at the participating laboratories are crucial to serving society's need for geo-resources exploration and for protection against geo-hazards. Indeed, to model resource formation and system behaviour during exploitation, we need an understanding from the molecular to the continental scale, based on experimental data. This contribution will describe the plans that the laboratories community in Europe is making, in the context of EPOS. The main objectives are: • To collect and harmonize available and emerging laboratory data on the properties and processes controlling rock system behaviour at multiple scales, in order to generate products accessible and interoperable through services for supporting research activities. • To co-ordinate the development, integration and trans-national usage of the major solid Earth Science laboratory centres and specialist networks. The length scales encompassed by the infrastructures included range from the nano- and micrometer levels (electron microscopy and micro-beam analysis) to the scale of experiments on centimetre sized samples, and to analogue model experiments simulating the reservoir scale, the basin scale and the plate scale. • To provide products and services supporting research into Geo-resources and Geo-storage, Geo-hazards and Earth System Evolution. If the EPOS Implementation Phase proposal presently under construction is successful, then a range of services and transnational activities will be put in place to realize these objectives.

  20. 77 FR 33289 - User Fees for 2012 Crop Cotton Classification Services to Growers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-06

    ...The Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) will maintain user fees for cotton producers for 2012 crop cotton classification services under the Cotton Statistics and Estimates Act and the Cotton Standards Act of 1923 at $2.20 per bale--the same level as in 2011. This fee and the existing reserve are sufficient to cover the costs of providing classification services for the 2012 crop, including......

  1. A preliminary report of music-based training for adult cochlear implant users: rationales and development

    PubMed Central

    Gfeller, Kate; Guthe, Emily; Driscoll, Virginia; Brown, Carolyn J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This paper provides a preliminary report of a music-based training program for adult cochlear implant (CI) recipients. Included in this report are descriptions of the rationale for music-based training, factors influencing program development, and the resulting program components. Methods Prior studies describing experience-based plasticity in response to music training, auditory training for persons with hearing impairment, and music training for cochlear implant recipients were reviewed. These sources revealed rationales for using music to enhance speech, factors associated with successful auditory training, relevant aspects of electric hearing and music perception, and extant evidence regarding limitations and advantages associated with parameters for music training with CI users. This information formed the development of a computer-based music training program designed specifically for adult CI users. Results Principles and parameters for perceptual training of music, such as stimulus choice, rehabilitation approach, and motivational concerns were developed in relation to the unique auditory characteristics of adults with electric hearing. An outline of the resulting program components and the outcome measures for evaluating program effectiveness are presented. Conclusions Music training can enhance the perceptual accuracy of music, but is also hypothesized to enhance several features of speech with similar processing requirements as music (e.g., pitch and timbre). However, additional evaluation of specific training parameters and the impact of music-based training on speech perception of CI users are required. PMID:26561884

  2. A new service support tool for COSMO-SkyMed: civil user coordination service and civil request management optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daraio, M. G.; Battagliere, M. L.; Sacco, P.; Fasano, L.; Coletta, A.

    2015-10-01

    COSMO-SkyMed is a dual-use program for both civilian and defense provides user community (institutional and commercial) with SAR data in several environmental applications. In the context of COSMO-SkyMed data and User management, one of the aspects carefully monitored is the user satisfaction level, it is links to satisfaction of submitted user requests. The operational experience of the first years of operational phase, and the consequent lessons learnt by the COSMO-SkyMed data and user management, have demonstrated that a lot of acquisition rejections are due to conflicts (time conflicts or system conflicts) among two or more civilian user requests, and they can be managed and solved implementing an improved coordination of users and their requests on a daily basis. With this aim a new Service Support Tool (SST) has been designed and developed to support the operators in the User Request coordination. The Tool allow to analyze conflicts among Acquisition Requests (ARs) before the National Rankization phase and to elaborate proposals for conflict resolution. In this paper the most common causes of the occurred rejections will be showed, for example as the impossibility to aggregate different orders, and the SST functionalities will be described, in particular how it works to remove or minimize the conflicts among different orders.

  3. 9 CFR 130.19 - User fees for other veterinary diagnostic services or materials provided at NVSL (excluding FADDL).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false User fees for other veterinary... User fees for other veterinary diagnostic services or materials provided at NVSL (excluding FADDL). (a) User fees for other veterinary diagnostic services or materials available from NVSL (excluding...

  4. Confidentiality Protection of User Data and Adaptive Resource Allocation for Managing Multiple Workflow Performance in Service-Based Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    An, Ho

    2012-01-01

    In this dissertation, two interrelated problems of service-based systems (SBS) are addressed: protecting users' data confidentiality from service providers, and managing performance of multiple workflows in SBS. Current SBSs pose serious limitations to protecting users' data confidentiality. Since users' sensitive data is sent in…

  5. Prison-Based Relationship Counselling: Service User Perceptions and Implications for Resettlement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meek, Rosie

    2011-01-01

    This article is based on a brief evaluation carried out on behalf of the relationship counselling service, Relate, regarding the delivery of a pilot specialist counselling service for adult male prisoners at HMP Ford, a low security "category D" prison in the South East of England. At the heart of the research lies a focus on the perceptions of…

  6. Young adult stimulant users' increased striatal activation during uncertainty is related to impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Leland, David S.; Arce, Estibaliz; Feinstein, Justin S.; Paulus, Martin P.

    2006-01-01

    Background Young adults who use stimulants (e.g., cocaine, amphetamines) are at particular risk of transitioning to dependence. Previously, we demonstrated increased risk-taking in young adults who had used stimulants (Leland and Paulus, 2005). Since outcome uncertainty is a critical element of risk, we investigated whether such individuals have different neural responses to uncertainty than their stimulant-naïve peers. Method Eleven young adults (age 18–25) who had used stimulants were compared with 11 age- and education-matched stimulant-naïve controls using functional magnetic resonance imaging and a card prediction task with relatively certain/uncertain outcome conditions. Results The caudate, an area involved in processing salient events, was among those regions more active in users than controls in response to uncertainty. Personality measures revealed that users were more impulsive than controls, and that neural response to uncertainty in a number of areas including the thalamus/caudate was positively correlated with impulsivity. Conclusions These results are consistent with the idea that young adults who have used stimulant find uncertainty particularly salient, due in part to preexisting differences in impulsivity, and may be subject to more “action pressure” when making decisions under uncertainty. This neural and personality profile may constitute a marker for increased risk of stimulant use. PMID:16959497

  7. Shared decision-making in mental health care—A user perspective on decisional needs in community-based services

    PubMed Central

    Grim, Katarina; Rosenberg, David; Svedberg, Petra; Schön, Ulla-Karin

    2016-01-01

    Background Shared decision-making (SDM) is an emergent research topic in the field of mental health care and is considered to be a central component of a recovery-oriented system. Despite the evidence suggesting the benefits of this change in the power relationship between users and practitioners, the method has not been widely implemented in clinical practice. Objective The objective of this study was to investigate decisional and information needs among users with mental illness as a prerequisite for the development of a decision support tool aimed at supporting SDM in community-based mental health services in Sweden. Methods Three semi-structured focus group interviews were conducted with 22 adult users with mental illness. The transcribed interviews were analyzed using a directed content analysis. This method was used to develop an in-depth understanding of the decisional process as well as to validate and conceptually extend Elwyn et al.'s model of SDM. Results The model Elwyn et al. have created for SDM in somatic care fits well for mental health services, both in terms of process and content. However, the results also suggest an extension of the model because decisions related to mental illness are often complex and involve a number of life domains. Issues related to social context and individual recovery point to the need for a preparation phase focused on establishing cooperation and mutual understanding as well as a clear follow-up phase that allows for feedback and adjustments to the decision-making process. Conclusions and Implications for Practice The current study contributes to a deeper understanding of decisional and information needs among users of community-based mental health services that may reduce barriers to participation in decision-making. The results also shed light on attitudinal, relationship-based, and cognitive factors that are important to consider in adapting SDM in the mental health system. PMID:27167556

  8. Divided care and the Third Way: user involvement in statutory and voluntary sector cancer services.

    PubMed

    Tritter, J Q; Barley, V; Daykin, N; Evans, Simon; McNeill, Judith; Rimmer, James; Sanidas, M; Turton, Pat

    2003-07-01

    In health care, as in much of the public sphere, the voluntary sector is playing an increasingly large role in the funding, provision and delivery of services and nowhere is this more apparent than in cancer care. Simultaneously the growth of privatisation, marketisation and consumerism has engendered a rise in the promotion of 'user involvement' in health care. These changes in the organisation and delivery of health care, in part inspired by the 'Third Way' and the promotion of public and citizen participation, are particularly apparent in the British National Health Service. This paper presents initial findings from a three-year study of user involvement in cancer services. Using both case study and survey data, we explore the variation in the definition, aims, usefulness and mechanisms for involving users in the evaluation and development of cancer services across three Health Authorities in South West England. The findings have important implications for understanding shifts in power, autonomy and responsibility between patients, carers, clinicians and health service managers. The absence of any common definition of user involvement or its purpose underlines the limited trust between the different actors in the system and highlights the potentially negative impact of a Third Way health service. PMID:14498919

  9. A Novel User Created Message Application Service Design for Bidirectional TPEG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Hee; Jo, Kang-Hyun

    The T-DMB (Terrestrial-Digital Multimedia Broadcasting) is the national service, currently successful in use in Korea since 2008. Among other services, TPEG (Transport Protocol Experts Group) service has been spotlighted in the aspects of creating earnings. At present, TPEG service is not so popular as it fails to satisfy the user’s demands on various aspects. Thus, the variety of services including bidirectional service is necessary in stage of DMB2.0. In this paper, the limitations of existing TPEG-POI (Point of Interest) application service using the wireless communication network are indicated. To overcome such limitations, we propose a business model for TPEG-UCM (User Created Message) application service which uses individual bidirectional media. The experiment shown in this paper proves the usability and operability of the proposed method, suggesting that the implementation of the proposed method would be overcome a lack of variety and unidirectional of existing TPEG application.

  10. Innovation in user-centered skills and performance improvement for sustainable complex service systems.

    PubMed

    Karwowski, Waldemar; Ahram, Tareq Z

    2012-01-01

    In order to leverage individual and organizational learning and to remain competitive in current turbulent markets it is important for employees, managers, planners and leaders to perform at high levels over time. Employee competence and skills are extremely important matters in view of the general shortage of talent and the mobility of employees with talent. Two factors emerged to have the greatest impact on the competitiveness of complex service systems: improving managerial and employee's knowledge attainment for skills, and improving the training and development of the workforce. This paper introduces the knowledge-based user-centered service design approach for sustainable skill and performance improvement in education, design and modeling of the next generation of complex service systems. The rest of the paper cover topics in human factors and sustainable business process modeling for the service industry, and illustrates the user-centered service system development cycle with the integration of systems engineering concepts in service systems. A roadmap for designing service systems of the future is discussed. The framework introduced in this paper is based on key user-centered design principles and systems engineering applications to support service competitiveness. PMID:22317322

  11. EMS-STARS: Emergency Medical Services "Superuser" Transport Associations: An Adult Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Hall, M Kennedy; Raven, Maria C; Hall, Jane; Yeh, Clement; Allen, Elaine; Rodriguez, Robert M; Tangherlini, Niels L; Sporer, Karl A; Brown, John F

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective. Emergency medical services (EMS) "superusers" -those who use EMS services at extremely high rates -have not been well characterized. Recent interest in the small group of individuals who account for a disproportionate share of health-care expenditures has led to research on frequent users of emergency departments and other health services, but little research has been done regarding those who use EMS services. To inform policy and intervention implementation, we undertook a descriptive analysis of EMS superusers in a large urban community. In this paper we compare EMS superusers to low, moderate, and high users to characterize factors contributing to EMS use. We also estimate the financial impact of EMS superusers. Methods. We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional study based on 1 year of data from an urban EMS system. Data for all EMS encounters with patients age ≥18 years were extracted from electronic records generated on scene by paramedics. We identified demographic and clinical variables associated with levels of EMS use. EMS users were characterized by the annual number of EMS encounters: low (1), moderate (2-4), high (5-14), and superusers (≥15). In addition, we performed a financial analysis using San Francisco Fire Department (SFFD) 2009 charge and reimbursement data. Results. A total of 31,462 adults generated 43,559 EMS ambulance encounters, which resulted in 39,107 transports (a 90% transport rate). Encounters for general medical reasons were common among moderate and high users and less frequent among superusers and low users, while alcohol use was exponentially correlated with encounter frequency. Superusers were significantly younger than moderate EMS users, and more likely to be male. The superuser group created a significantly higher financial burden/person than any other group, comprising 0.3% of the study population, but over 6% of annual EMS charges and reimbursements. Conclusions. In this retrospective study, adult

  12. An analysis of high-cost users at an Australian public health service organization.

    PubMed

    Heslop, Liza; Athan, Dean; Gardner, Brendon; Diers, Donna; Poh, Boon Choo

    2005-11-01

    High-cost users generate extremely high costs when compared with average users in the same diagnostic-related group (DRG). They represent a major financial loss for a health service organization. The research was conducted using an area health service patient database for online analytical processing to produce descriptive statistics and graphs of 'high-cost' and 'non-high-cost users'. Trends and patterns were identified across key variables derived from clinical, financial and operational categories. The main results are: 20% of costs are spent by 3% of the population; elective admission is higher in the high-cost group; tracheostomy has the most number of cases and is the most expensive DRG; LOS is mostly longer for complex cases however, high costs can be attributed to other factors. In conclusion, these findings are potentially useful to patients, medical staff, management and health service decision-makers. The limitation of this study is the exclusion of profitability. PMID:16259671

  13. "It's Only Right that We Get Involved": Service-User Perspectives on Involvement in Learning Disability Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoole, Lucy; Morgan, Sally

    2011-01-01

    Promotion of service-user and carer involvement is part of the mainstream policy agenda in health and social care ["Crit Soc Policy 25" (2005) 164]. Much effort has been invested into involving people with learning disabilities in decisions regarding aspects of their lives through advocacy projects and the utilisation of person-centred planning…

  14. Assessing Quality of Experience while comparing competing mobile broadband services from the user perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madruga, Ewerton L.; David, Rodrigo; Sabóia de Souza, Rodolfo; Dantas, Romulo

    2015-01-01

    The growth of mobile traffic is exploding globally, and users can already choose their best smartphone or tablet options from a handful of manufacturers based on specific criteria such as price and usability. It is much less clear when the user needs to pick from various mobile broadband service providers when choices are available. After all, how does one know what is the best provider for a given usage profile? This work uses drive tests to investigate the variation of radio frequency conditions and relate them to the quality of experience from the viewpoint of the user.

  15. Involving service users in interprofessional education narrowing the gap between theory and practice.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Helen; Spencer-Dawe, Eileen

    2006-12-01

    Calls for greater collaboration between professionals in health and social care have led to pressures to move toward interprofessional education (IPE) at both pre- and post-registration levels. Whilst this move has evolved out of "common sense" demands, such a multiple systems approach to education does not fit easily into existing traditional educational frameworks and there is, as yet, no proven theoretical framework to guide its development. A research study of an IPE intervention at the University of Liverpool in the UK drew on complexity theory to conceptualize the intervention and to evaluate its impact on a group of approximately 500 students studying physiotherapy, medicine, occupational therapy, nursing and social work. The intervention blended a multidisciplinary (non-interactive) plenary with self-directed e-learning and a series of interdisciplinary (interactive) workshops. Two evaluations took place: the first when the workshops were facilitated by trained practitioners; the second when the practitioners co-facilitated with trained service users. This paper reports findings from the second evaluation which focused on narrowing the gap between theory and practice. A multi-stakeholder evaluation was used including: students' reflective narratives, a focus group with practitioners and individual semi-structured interviews with service users. Findings showed that service users can make an important contribution to IPE for health and social care students in the early stages of their training. By exposure to a service user perspective, first year students can begin to learn and apply the principles of team work, to place the service user at the centre of the care process, to make connections between theory and "real life" experiences, and to narrow the gap between theory and practice. Findings also revealed benefits for facilitators and service users. PMID:17095439

  16. Development of a music perception test for adult hearing-aid users.

    PubMed

    Uys, Marinda; van Dijk, Catherine

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this research was twofold: firstly, to develop a music perception test (MPT) for hearing-aid users, and secondly, to evaluate the influence of non-linear frequency compression (NFC) on music perception with the use of the self-compiled test. This article focuses on the description of the development and validation of the MPT. To date, the main direction in frequency-lowering hearing-aid studies has been in relation to speech perception abilities. As hearing-aid technology has improved, interest has grown in musical perception as a dimension that could improve hearing-aid users' quality of life. The MPT was designed to evaluate different aspects of rhythm, timbre, pitch and melody. The development of the MPT could be described as design-based. Phase 1 of the study included test development and recording, while phase 2 entailed presentation of stimuli to normal hearing listeners (n = 15) and hearing-aid users (n = 4). Based on the findings of phase 2, item analysis was performed to eliminate or change stimuli that resulted in high error rates. During phase 3 the adapted version of the test was performed on a smaller group of normal hearing listeners (n = 4) and 20 hearing-aid users. Results proved that adults with normal hearing as well as adults using hearing aids were able to complete all the sub-tests of the MPT, although hearing-aid users scored lower on the various sub-tests than normal hearing listeners. For the rhythm section of the MPT normal hearing listeners scored on average 93.8% versus 75.5% of hearing-aid users; for the timbre section the scores were 83% versus 62.3% respectively. Normal hearing listeners obtained an average score of 86.3% for the pitch section and 88.2% for the melody section, compared with the 70.8% and 61.9% respectively obtained by hearing-aid users. This implies that the MPT can be used successfully for assessment of music perception in hearing-aid users within the South African context and may therefore result in

  17. Services used by perinatal substance-users with child welfare involvement: a descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Substance use during pregnancy often leads to involvement in the child welfare system, resulting in multiple social service systems and service providers working with families to achieve successful child welfare outcomes. The Vulnerable Infants Program of Rhode Island (VIP-RI) is a care coordination program developed to work with perinatal substance-users to optimize opportunities for reunification and promote permanency for substance-exposed infants. This paper describes services used by VIP-RI participants and child welfare outcomes. Methods Data collected during the first four years of VIP-RI were used to identify characteristics of program participants, services received, and child welfare outcomes: closed child welfare cases, reunification with biological mothers and identified infant permanent placements. Descriptive Results Medical and financial services were associated with positive child welfare outcomes. Medical services included family planning, pre- and post-natal care and HIV test counseling. Financial services included assistance with obtaining entitlement benefits and receiving tangible support such as food and clothing. Conclusions Findings from this study suggest services that address basic family needs were related to positive child welfare outcomes. The provision of basic services, such as health care and financial assistance through entitlement benefits and tangible donations, may help to establish a foundation so mothers can concentrate on recovery and parenting skills. Identification of services for perinatal substance users that are associated with more successful child welfare outcomes has implications for the child welfare system, treatment providers, courts and families. PMID:20807432

  18. Do Service Users with Intellectual Disabilities Want to Be Involved in the Risk Management Process? A Thematic Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilcommons, Aoiffe M.; Withers, Paul; Moreno-Lopez, Agueda

    2012-01-01

    Background: Involving ID service users in risk decision making necessitates consideration of an individual's ability to assess the implications and associated risks and thus make an informed choice. This calls for research on service users' awareness and understanding of risk management (RM). Method: Thirteen people in a residential ID service who…

  19. User fees exemptions alone are not enough to increase indigent use of healthcare services.

    PubMed

    Atchessi, Nicole; Ridde, Valéry; Zunzunegui, Maria-Victoria

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether user fees exemptions increased healthcare services use among indigents in the Ouargaye district in Burkina Faso. In this pre-post study, we surveyed 1224 indigents in 2010 about their healthcare services use over the preceding 6 months. Of these, 540 subsequently received a user fees exemption card. A follow-up survey was conducted 1 year later with a 55.3% retention rate. Analyses were performed in accordance with Andersen and Newman's model (Societal and individual determinants of medical care utilization in the United States. Milbank Q 1973;51:95-124) to explain healthcare services use by considering predisposing and facilitating factors and health needs indicators. Logistic regression analyses were performed.Among indigents exempted from user fees, 46.2% increased their healthcare services use in 2011, as opposed to 42.1% among the non-exempted. Being exempted was not associated with increased use of services (odds ratio, OR = 1.1, 95% confidence interval, CI [0.80-1.51]). Regardless of whether they were exempted or not, the indigents most likely to have increased their healthcare services use were older than 69 years of age (OR = 1.66, 95% CI [1.05-2.64]), male (OR = 1.44, 95% CI [0.99-2.08]), in low-income households (OR = 1.71, 95% CI [1.15-2.54]), and had received financial support from their families to obtain healthcare (OR = 1.59, 95% CI [1.1-2.28]). The indigents' increased healthcare services use was not attributable to user fees exemptions. Some contamination of the intervention is conceivable. Interventions combining user fees exemptions with actions targeting other obstacles to healthcare access would probably be more effective in increasing indigents' use of healthcare centres. PMID:26856363

  20. QuickStats: Percentage of Adult Day Services Center Participants, by Selected Diagnoses

    MedlinePlus

    ... MMWR ) MMWR Share Compartir QuickStats: Percentage of Adult Day Services Center Participants,* by Selected Diagnoses † — National Study ... which is the estimated number of enrolled adult day services center participants in the United States on ...

  1. Combinations of Types of Mental Health Services Received in the Past Year Among Young Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... 08, 2015* Combinations of types of mental health services received in the past year among young adults Combinations of types of mental health services received in the past year among young adults ...

  2. Transition of care from paediatric to adult services in haematology

    PubMed Central

    Bolton‐Maggs, Paula H B

    2007-01-01

    The need for adequate preparation for transition for young people with health care needs who require long term follow‐up in the adult sector has long been recognised and is a required part of the national service framework for children. The Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health and the Royal College of Nursing have endorsed this need for improvement in services for adolescents. In 2006 the Department of Health launched guidelines with a wealth of recommendations. Despite these initiatives only slow progress has been made (usually by enthusiasts) and much work is needed to develop good programmes in many specialties, including non‐malignant haematology. PMID:17715443

  3. Dental service trends for older US adults, 1998-2006.

    PubMed

    Skaar, Daniel D; O'Connor, Heidi

    2012-03-01

    This study of the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS) updates trends in utilization of dental services between 1998 and 2006 for community-dwelling U.S. adults of age 65 years and older. Bivariate comparisons were made between dependent variables (annual dental visits and types of dental procedures) and independent variables (age, gender, race, income, education, population density, marital status, U.S. Census Bureau regions, and self-reported health). The estimated percentage of community-dwelling Medicare beneficiaries with a dental visit for the years studied increased from 45.0% in 1998 to 46.3% in 2006. The age group of respondents who were 85 years and older had the greatest percentage increase in dental visits. Those reporting visits with preventive procedures increased from 87.8% to 91.2% whereas those reporting visits with nonpreventive procedures declined from 63.9% to 58.4%. The prevalence of dental visits continues to trend upward for this population of older adults. Increasing delivery of preventive services will likely impact the future mix of dental services as U.S. adults live longer. PMID:22416985

  4. 20 CFR 663.300 - What are training services for adults and dislocated workers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What are training services for adults and..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Training Services § 663.300 What are training services for adults and dislocated workers? Training...

  5. 20 CFR 663.200 - What are intensive services for adults and dislocated workers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What are intensive services for adults and..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Intensive Services § 663.200 What are intensive services for adults and dislocated workers? (a)...

  6. 20 CFR 663.800 - What are supportive services for adults and dislocated workers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What are supportive services for adults and..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Supportive Services § 663.800 What are supportive services for adults and dislocated workers?...

  7. 20 CFR 663.800 - What are supportive services for adults and dislocated workers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What are supportive services for adults and..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Supportive Services § 663.800 What are supportive services for adults and dislocated...

  8. 20 CFR 663.200 - What are intensive services for adults and dislocated workers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What are intensive services for adults and..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Intensive Services § 663.200 What are intensive services for adults and dislocated workers?...

  9. 20 CFR 663.200 - What are intensive services for adults and dislocated workers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What are intensive services for adults and..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Intensive Services § 663.200 What are intensive services for adults and dislocated workers?...

  10. 20 CFR 663.300 - What are training services for adults and dislocated workers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What are training services for adults and..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Training Services § 663.300 What are training services for adults and dislocated...

  11. 20 CFR 663.200 - What are intensive services for adults and dislocated workers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What are intensive services for adults and..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Intensive Services § 663.200 What are intensive services for adults and dislocated workers?...

  12. 20 CFR 663.300 - What are training services for adults and dislocated workers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What are training services for adults and..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Training Services § 663.300 What are training services for adults and dislocated...

  13. 20 CFR 663.800 - What are supportive services for adults and dislocated workers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What are supportive services for adults and..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Supportive Services § 663.800 What are supportive services for adults and dislocated...

  14. 20 CFR 663.300 - What are training services for adults and dislocated workers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What are training services for adults and..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Training Services § 663.300 What are training services for adults and dislocated...

  15. 20 CFR 663.800 - What are supportive services for adults and dislocated workers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What are supportive services for adults and..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Supportive Services § 663.800 What are supportive services for adults and dislocated...

  16. CMS users data management service integration and first experiences with its NoSQL data storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riahi, H.; Spiga, D.; Boccali, T.; Ciangottini, D.; Cinquilli, M.; Hernàndez, J. M.; Konstantinov, P.; Mascheroni, M.; Santocchia, A.

    2014-06-01

    The distributed data analysis workflow in CMS assumes that jobs run in a different location to where their results are finally stored. Typically the user outputs must be transferred from one site to another by a dedicated CMS service, AsyncStageOut. This new service is originally developed to address the inefficiency in using the CMS computing resources when transferring the analysis job outputs, synchronously, once they are produced in the job execution node to the remote site. The AsyncStageOut is designed as a thin application relying only on the NoSQL database (CouchDB) as input and data storage. It has progressed from a limited prototype to a highly adaptable service which manages and monitors the whole user files steps, namely file transfer and publication. The AsyncStageOut is integrated with the Common CMS/Atlas Analysis Framework. It foresees the management of nearly nearly 200k users' files per day of close to 1000 individual users per month with minimal delays, and providing a real time monitoring and reports to users and service operators, while being highly available. The associated data volume represents a new set of challenges in the areas of database scalability and service performance and efficiency. In this paper, we present an overview of the AsyncStageOut model and the integration strategy with the Common Analysis Framework. The motivations for using the NoSQL technology are also presented, as well as data design and the techniques used for efficient indexing and monitoring of the data. We describe deployment model for the high availability and scalability of the service. We also discuss the hardware requirements and the results achieved as they were determined by testing with actual data and realistic loads during the commissioning and the initial production phase with the Common Analysis Framework.

  17. Professional perspectives on service user and carer involvement in mental health care planning: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Bee, Penny; Brooks, Helen; Fraser, Claire; Lovell, Karina

    2015-01-01

    Background Involving users/carers in mental health care-planning is central to international policy initiatives yet users frequently report feeling excluded from the care planning process. Rigorous explorations of mental health professionals’ experiences of care planning are lacking, limiting our understanding of this important translational gap. Objectives To explore professional perceptions of delivering collaborative mental health care-planning and involving service users and carers in their care. Design Qualitative interviews and focus groups with data combined and subjected to framework analysis. Setting UK secondary care mental health services. Participants 51 multi-disciplinary professionals involved in care planning and recruited via study advertisements. Results Emergent themes identified care-planning as a meaningful platform for user/carer involvement but revealed philosophical tensions between user involvement and professional accountability. Professionals emphasised their individual, relational skills as a core facilitator of involvement, highlighting some important deficiencies in conventional staff training programmes. Conclusions Although internationally accepted on philosophical grounds, user-involved care-planning is poorly defined and lacks effective implementation support. Its full realisation demands greater recognition of both the historical and contemporary contexts in which statutory mental healthcare occurs. PMID:26253574

  18. Young adult Ecstasy users' enhancement of the effects of their Ecstasy use.

    PubMed

    Klein, Hugh; Elifson, Kirk W; Sterk, Claire E

    2009-06-01

    This study examines drug effect-enhancing behaviors practiced by young adult users of the drug, Ecstasy. Between August 2002 and August 2004, 283 face-to-face interviews were conducted with active Ecstasy users. Study participants were recruited in the Atlanta, Georgia metropolitan area using a targeted sampling approach. The large majority of study participants (87%) engaged in at least one behavior specifically designed to bolster the effects of their Ecstasy use, with 61% of the study participants reporting having engaged in at least three such behaviors during the past 30 days. Taking steps to boost one's Ecstasy-related high was associated with binging on Ecstasy and a variety of adverse outcomes, such as experiencing a greater number of negative consequences resulting from Ecstasy use and experiencing more Ecstasy-related drug dependency symptoms. Multivariate analysis revealed several factors associated with greater involvement in effects-boosting behaviors, including race (not being African American), spending time with other drug users, using Ecstasy for its touch-enhancing qualities, enjoyment of the music-and-Ecstasy-use experience, and childhood maltreatment experiences. The implications of these findings for treatment, prevention, and intervention for drug problems among Ecstasy users are discussed. PMID:19705673

  19. Frequent users of emergency services: associated factors and reasons for seeking care1

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Aline Marques; Lima, Maria Alice Dias da Silva

    2015-01-01

    Aim: to identify the profile of frequent users of emergency services, to verify the associated factors and to analyze the reasons for the frequent use of the services. METHOD: An explanatory sequential type mixed method was adopted. Quantitative data were collected from the electronic medical records, with a sample of 385 users attended four or more times in an emergency service, during the year 2011. Qualitative data were collected through semi-structured interviews with 18 users, intentionally selected from the results of the quantitative stage. Quantitative data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics and qualitative data using thematic analysis. RESULTS: It was found that 42.9% were elderly, 84.9% had chronic diseases, 63.5% were classified as urgent, 42.1% stayed for more than 24 hours in the service and 46.5% were discharged. Scheduled follow-up appointment, risk classification, length of stay and outcome were factors associated with frequent use. The reasons for seeking the services were mainly related to the exacerbation of chronic diseases, to easier access and concentration of technology, to the bond, and to the scheduled appointments. CONCLUSIONS: The results contribute to comprehending the repeated use of emergency services and provide additional data to plan alternatives to reduce frequent use. PMID:26039306

  20. Climate information products for users: Examples from the German Climate Service Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hänsler, Andreas; Jacob, Daniela; Brasseur, Guy; Pfeifer, Susanne; Rechid, Diana; Hennemuth, Barbara; Keup-Thiel, Elke

    2014-05-01

    In 2009, the German Federal Government (BMBF) established the German Climate Service Center (CSC) as part of the Hightech-Strategy for protection against climate change and the German Adaptation Strategy. The fundamental objective of the CSC is to support society (business, administration) to cope with climate risks and opportunities. In the first five years, the CSC developed a set of tools and products in order to provide climate information to users. These products were mostly developed in close cooperation with the customers and are therefore sector-specific and tailored to the actual users needs. In the presentation a selection of those user-tailored climate service products such as Climate-Fact-Sheets or Climate Signal Maps will be introduced and their application will be highlighted.

  1. User charges for health services in developing countries: a review of the economic literature.

    PubMed

    McPake, B

    1993-06-01

    Literature suggests that in theory, the efficiency of user charges for health services is related to the level of externality, the price elasticity of demand, the proportion of total costs which are private access costs, and the level of the government budget constraint. Theoretical models predict that price elasticity of demand for health services is likely to be higher for lower income groups and that user charges are therefore unlikely to promote equity, or reduce the discrepancies between the utilisation rates of the rich and poor, 'ceteris paribus'. Empirical evidence tends to confirm the latter prediction but to suggest that user charges in many countries provide the scope for welfare gains for the majority. Unfortunately, this scope is seldom exploited in practice. It is argued that many countries have little choice but to try to exploit the potential for majority gains, but that more emphasis should be placed on ensuring quality improvements than on superficial financial measures of success. PMID:8511628

  2. Exploring the Experiences of People with Intellectual Disabilities when Service Users Die

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Karen; Guerin, Suzanne; Dodd, Philip; McEvoy, John

    2011-01-01

    Research is lacking on the effect of the deaths of fellow service users on people with intellectual disabilities. This qualitative study formed part of a project which aimed to describe the provision of palliative care to people with intellectual disabilities in Ireland and to assess the population's palliative care needs. We report on findings…

  3. How Homeless Sector Workers Deal with the Death of Service Users: A Grounded Theory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakeman, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Homeless sector workers often encounter the deaths of service users. A modified grounded theory methodology project was used to explore how workers make sense of, respond to, and cope with sudden death. In-depth interviews were undertaken with 16 paid homeless sector workers who had experienced the death of someone with whom they worked.…

  4. Sexuality and Personal Relationships for People with an Intellectual Disability. Part I: Service-User Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healy, E.; McGuire, B. E.; Evans, D. S.; Carley, S. N.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Despite a recent ideological shift towards the recognition of sexual autonomy for people with an intellectual disability (ID), there are continuing social and cultural barriers to sexual expression. Part I of the current two-part study assessed the sexual knowledge, experiences and aspirations of service users through focus groups and…

  5. 14 CFR § 1215.110 - User cancellation of all services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false User cancellation of all services. § 1215.110 Section § 1215.110 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION TRACKING AND DATA RELAY SATELLITE SYSTEM (TDRSS) Use and Reimbursement Policy for Non-U.S. Government...

  6. Restructuring to Promote Collaboration and Exceed User Needs: The Blackwell Library Access Services Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chakraborty, Mou; English, Michael; Payne, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    Through vision, leadership, and creativity, Salisbury University's Blackwell Library transformed its access services department structurally and philosophically to better position itself to meet, and strive to exceed, today's user needs and expectations. Restructuring and the introduction of new leadership and new ideas provided the foundation for…

  7. Enhancing User Satisfaction with University Computing Center Services. IR Applications, Volume 13, July 31, 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Chung-Tzer; Du, Timon C.; Kuo, Fonchu

    2007-01-01

    To provide quality education, a university needs to make available a well-equipped computing center. However, such centers are expensive, and their provision is a problem for administrators when budgets are tight. Hence, it is important that money be invested in services that will enhance user satisfaction the most. This study explores the…

  8. GPS Space Service Volume: Ensuring Consistent Utility Across GPS Design Builds for Space Users

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Frank H.; Parker, Joel Jefferson Konkl; Valdez, Jennifer Ellen

    2015-01-01

    GPS availability and signal strength originally specified for users on or near surface of Earth with transmitted power levels specified at edge-of-Earth, 14.3 degrees. Prior to the SSV specification, on-orbit performance of GPS varied from block build to block build (IIA, IIRM, IIF) due to antenna gain and beam width variances. Unstable on-orbit performance results in significant risk to space users. Side-lobe signals, although not specified, were expected to significantly boost GPS signal availability for users above the constellation. During GPS III Phase A, NASA noted significant discrepancies in power levels specified in GPS III specification documents, and measured on-orbit performance. To stabilize the signal for high altitude space users, NASA DoD team in 2003-2005 led the creation of new Space Service Volume (SSV) definition and specifications.

  9. The use of dental services by adult Singaporeans.

    PubMed

    Lo, G L

    1993-06-01

    The aims of this study were to assess the rate of dental service utilisation amongst the adult Singaporeans and to examine factors influencing their service utilisation. 1959 subjects aged between 18-75 years participated in a questionnaire survey. Respondents were asked whether they had seen a dentist in the past twelve months. It was found that 57% of the subjects had not seen a dentist in the past year. The reasons given for non-attendance were "felt it was unnecessary" (69.7%), "lack of time" (13.8%), "fear" (5.7%) and "cost" (2.4%). The low level of dental awareness appeared to be the major block to utilisation of dental services in this population. PMID:9582690

  10. Introducing advanced clinical reasoning to an adult learning disability service.

    PubMed

    Stansfield, Jois; Matthews, Alison

    2014-03-01

    The advanced clinical reasoning approach is widely adopted in speech and language therapy practice. This article reports on the introduction of the approach across a multidisciplinary adult learning disability service and staff reports on the impact of this initiative. Staff in the service were offered training in the approach. Staff completed pre-course questionnaires, immediate post-course evaluations of the training and questionnaires a year after initial training. Semi-structured interviews took place with three team managers a year after the training. Staff and team managers reported that the training had a positive impact on their practice. All respondents demonstrated confidence in the use of the advanced clinical reasoning terminology and a clear understanding of the nature of duty of care and clinical risk. Enhanced knowledge about caseloads and greater confidence in managing episodes of care were reported by staff and team managers to have resulted in a more efficient and effective service. PMID:24288213

  11. The Next Generation of Users: Prevalence and Longitudinal Patterns of Tobacco Use Among US Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Valerie; Rath, Jessica; Villanti, Andrea C.; Vallone, Donna

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We monitored the prevalence and patterns of use of the array of tobacco products available to young adults, who are at risk for initiation and progression to established tobacco use. Methods. We used data from waves 1 to 3 of GfK’s KnowledgePanel (2011–2012), a nationally representative cohort of young adults aged 18 to 34 years (n = 2144). We examined prevalence and patterns of tobacco product use over time, associated demographics, and state-level tobacco policy. We used multivariable logistic regression to determine predictors of initiation of cigarettes as well as noncombustible and other combustible products. Results. The prevalence of ever tobacco use rose from 57.28% at wave 1 to 67.43% at wave 3. Use of multiple products was the most common pattern (66.39% of tobacco users by wave 3). Predictors of initiation differed by product type and included age, race/ethnicity, policy, and use of other tobacco products. Conclusions. Tobacco use is high among young adults and many are using multiple products. Efforts to implement policy and educate young adults about the risks associated with new and emerging products are critical to prevent increased initiation of tobacco use. PMID:24922152

  12. Issues in Accessing Services. Tierra de Oportunidad Module 13. LAES: Latino Adult Education Services Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kissam, Ed; Dorsey, Holda

    This module, which may be used as the basis for a workshop or as a special topic unit in adult basic education or English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) courses, discusses how to access the formalized human service delivery systems in the United States, which often replace the networks of extended families and friends that immigrants relied on in…

  13. Differences Among Older Adults in the Types of Dental Services Used in the United States.

    PubMed

    Manski, Richard J; Hyde, Jody Schimmel; Chen, Haiyan; Moeller, John F

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore differences in the socioeconomic, demographic characteristics of older adults in the United States with respect to their use of different types of dental care services. The 2008 Health and Retirement Study (HRS) collected information about patterns of dental care use and oral health from individuals aged 55 years and older in the United States. We analyze these data and explore patterns of service use by key characteristics before modeling the relationship between service use type and those characteristics. The most commonly used service category was fillings, inlays, or bonding, reported by 43.6% of those with any utilization. Just over one third of those with any utilization reported a visit for a crown, implant, or prosthesis, and one quarter reported a gum treatment or tooth extraction. The strongest consistent predictors of use type are denture, dentate, and oral health status along with dental insurance coverage and wealth. Our results provide insights into the need for public policies to address inequalities in access to dental services among an older US population. Our findings show that lower income, less wealthy elderly with poor oral health are more likely to not use any dental services rather than using only preventive dental care, and that cost prevents most non-users who say they need dental care from going to the dentist. These results suggest a serious access problem and one that ultimately produces even worse oral health and expensive major procedures for this population in the future. PMID:27284127

  14. Trace saver: A tool for network service improvement and personalised analysis of user centric statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilal, Muhammad; Asfand-e-Yar, Mockford, Steve; Khan, Wasiq; Awan, Irfan

    2012-11-01

    Mobile technology is among the fastest growing technologies in today's world with low cost and highly effective benefits. Most important and entertaining areas in mobile technology development and usage are location based services, user friendly networked applications and gaming applications. However, concern towards network operator service provision and improvement has been very low. The portable applications available for a range of mobile operating systems which help improve the network operator services are desirable by the mobile operators. This paper proposes a state of the art mobile application Tracesaver, which provides a great achievement over the barriers in gathering device and network related information, for network operators to improve their network service provision. Tracesaver is available for a broad range of mobile devices with different mobile operating systems and computational capabilities. The availability of Tracesaver in market has proliferated over the last year since it was published. The survey and results show that Tracesaver is being used by millions of mobile users and provides novel ways of network service improvement with its highly user friendly interface.

  15. Identifying Frequent Users of an Urban Emergency Medical Service Using Descriptive Statistics and Regression Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Norman, Chenelle; Mello, Michael; Choi, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    This retrospective cohort study provides a descriptive analysis of a population that frequently uses an urban emergency medical service (EMS) and identifies factors that contribute to use among all frequent users. For purposes of this study we divided frequent users into the following groups: low- frequent users (4 EMS transports in 2012), medium-frequent users (5 to 6 EMS transports in 2012), high-frequent users (7 to 10 EMS transports in 2012) and super-frequent users (11 or more EMS transports in 2012). Overall, we identified 539 individuals as frequent users. For all groups of EMS frequent users (i.e. low, medium, high and super) one or more hospital admissions, receiving a referral for follow-up care upon discharge, and having no insurance were found to be statistically significant with frequent EMS use (P<0.05). Within the diagnostic categories, 41.61% of super-frequent users had a diagnosis of “primarily substance abuse/misuse” and among low-frequent users a majority, 53.33%, were identified as having a “reoccurring (medical) diagnosis.” Lastly, relative risk ratios for the highest group of users, super-frequent users, were 3.34 (95% CI [1.90–5.87]) for obtaining at least one referral for follow-up care, 13.67 (95% CI [5.60–33.34]) for having four or more hospital admissions and 5.95 (95% CI [1.80–19.63]) for having a diagnoses of primarily substance abuse/misuse. Findings from this study demonstrate that among low- and medium-frequent users a majority of patients are using EMS for reoccurring medical conditions. This could potentially be avoided with better care management. In addition, this study adds to the current literature that illustrates a strong correlation between substance abuse/misuse and high/super-frequent EMS use. For the subgroup analysis among individuals 65 years of age and older, we did not find any of the independent variables included in our model to be statistically significant with frequent EMS use. PMID:26823929

  16. Neighborhood disadvantage and refusal of formal services among cases reported to adult protection services.

    PubMed

    Gainey, Randy R; Payne, Brian K; Kropf, Nancy

    2010-07-01

    Research suggests that certain factors influence the way caregivers of older adults experience the role of caretaker. Aspects of the caregiving experience that have been considered include factors influencing decisions to seek services, causes of caregiver burden, and the relationship between caregiver burden and maltreatment. Most of this research has focused on characteristics of caregivers and how these individual characteristics influence the caregiving experience and subsequent maltreatment. Very little research, however, has examined the influence of contextual factors on the caregiving experience. This study considers how neighborhood context influences decisions to reject formal services among cases reported to Adult Protective Services. A specific focus is given to caregivers of persons with Alzheimer's and related diseases. PMID:20799132

  17. Perception, demand and user contribution to ecosystem services in the Bilbao Metropolitan Greenbelt.

    PubMed

    Casado-Arzuaga, Izaskun; Madariaga, Iosu; Onaindia, Miren

    2013-11-15

    Peri-urban ecosystems are often managed as recreation areas or to enhance aesthetic value on the urban fringe. Scholars and land-use practitioners lack a current understanding of the supply of and the demands for these peri-urban ecosystem services (ES). In this study, we analysed the perceptions of 500 users and interest groups regarding the ES provided by the Bilbao Metropolitan Greenbelt (BMG) ecosystems in northern Spain, and we compared these perceptions to the demands for ES. The objective of this study is to understand user preferences and to thereby better orient land use planning. The results show that the demand for ES in the BMG did not correspond to what users perceived these ecosystems to provide. The respondents' perceptions appeared to be related to the management practices in the area, whereas their demand was related to the benefits they would like to obtain from the BMG. The interviewees were in favour of improvements to peri-urban rural areas, and the results suggested that the authorities should highlight the role of the BMG ecosystems with respect to regulating services and historic and cultural values to improve people's awareness of the ecosystems' capacity to provide benefits to society. Application of this framework also highlighted that there were differences in the perception of and demand for ES among different user groups. This holistic method of matching user demand with policy could be a useful tool to reorient ES-based land planning. PMID:23792888

  18. Young adult Ecstasy users and multiple sexual partners: understanding the factors underlying this HIV risk practice.

    PubMed

    Sterk, Claire E; Klein, Hugh; Elifson, Kirk W

    2008-09-01

    The purposes of this study are to (1) examine the extent to which young adult Ecstasy users recently reported having had multiple sex partners and (2) identify the factors predictive of engaging in this behavior. Potential predictors included demographic characteristics, background and experiences measures, childhood maltreatment experiences, substance use variables, and measures assessing psychological/psychosocial functioning. This research is based on a sample of 283 young adult recurrent users of the drug, Ecstasy. Study participants were recruited in Atlanta, Georgia between August 2002 and August 2004 using a targeted sampling and ethnographic mapping approach. Interviews took approximately two hours to complete. Nearly one-third of the study participants had more than one sex partner during the preceding month, and sexual protection rates tended to be low. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed seven predictors associated with an increased likelihood of having multiple sex partners: (1) being nonwhite, (2) knowing someone who was HIV-positive, (3) younger age of first sexual experience, (4) using Ecstasy for its touch-enhancing qualities, (5) higher self-esteem, (6) handling disagreements more dysfunctionally, and (7) not being involved in a romantic relationship. The HIV prevention- and intervention-related implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:19004415

  19. Young Adult Ecstasy Users and Multiple Sexual Partners: Understanding the Factors Underlying this HIV Risk Practice†

    PubMed Central

    Sterk, Claire E.; Klein, Hugh; Elifson, Kirk W.

    2013-01-01

    The purposes of this study are to (1) examine the extent to which young adult Ecstasy users recently reported having had multiple sex partners and (2) identify the factors predictive of engaging in this behavior. Potential predictors included demographic characteristics, background and experiences measures, childhood maltreatment experiences, substance use variables, and measures assessing psychological/psychosocial functioning. This research is based on a sample of 283 young adult recurrent users of the drug, Ecstasy. Study participants were recruited in Atlanta, Georgia between August 2002 and August 2004 using a targeted sampling and ethnographic mapping approach. Interviews took approximately two hours to complete. Nearly one-third of the study participants had more than one sex partner during the preceding month, and sexual protection rates tended to be low. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed seven predictors associated with an increased likelihood of having multiple sex partners: (1) being nonwhite, (2) knowing someone who was HIV-positive, (3) younger age of first sexual experience, (4) using Ecstasy for its touch-enhancing qualities, (5) higher self-esteem, (6) handling disagreements more dysfunctionally, and (7) not being involved in a romantic relationship. The HIV prevention- and intervention-related implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:19004415

  20. Interview as intervention: The case of young adult multidrug users in the club scene

    PubMed Central

    Kurtz, Steven P.; Surratt, Hilary L.; Buttram, Mance E.; Levi-Minzi, Maria A.; Chen, Minxing

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on changes in substance use and substance dependence symptoms - without intervention - among young adult multidrug users in the club scene, ages 18–29, (N=444) who participated in a natural history study. Computer-assisted personal interviews at baseline and 6-, 12-, and 18-month follow-ups included well-tested measures of substance use and dependence. Changes in substance dependence symptoms and drug use frequencies were calculated using the Cohen’s d statistic. Mean age was 22; 40% were female; 58% Hispanic, 17% White, and 21% Black. At 18-month follow-up assessment, participants reported significantly fewer days of cocaine (d= −.85 at 18 months), ecstasy (d= −.93), benzodiazepine (d= −.82), and prescription opioid (d= −.81) use, as well as reduced substance dependence symptoms (d= −.42). These results, together with data from focus groups with completers, suggest that comprehensive health and social risk assessments may have quite strong intervention effects among young adult multidrug users. PMID:22971689

  1. Using the NIATx Model to Implement User-Centered Design of Technology for Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Gustafson, David H; Maus, Adam; Judkins, Julianne; Dinauer, Susan; Isham, Andrew; Johnson, Roberta; Landucci, Gina; Atwood, Amy K

    2016-01-01

    What models can effectively guide the creation of eHealth and mHealth technologies? This paper describes the use of the NIATx model as a framework for the user-centered design of a new technology for older adults. The NIATx model is a simple framework of process improvement based on the following principles derived from an analysis of decades of research from various industries about why some projects fail and others succeed: (1) Understand and involve the customer; (2) fix key problems; (3) pick an influential change leader; (4) get ideas from outside the field; (5) use rapid-cycle testing. This paper describes the use of these principles in technology development, the strengths and challenges of using this approach in this context, and lessons learned from the process. Overall, the NIATx model enabled us to produce a user-focused technology that the anecdotal evidence available so far suggests is engaging and useful to older adults. The first and fourth principles were especially important in developing the technology; the fourth proved the most challenging to use. PMID:27025985

  2. Using the NIATx Model to Implement User-Centered Design of Technology for Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Maus, Adam; Judkins, Julianne; Dinauer, Susan; Isham, Andrew; Johnson, Roberta; Landucci, Gina; Atwood, Amy K

    2016-01-01

    What models can effectively guide the creation of eHealth and mHealth technologies? This paper describes the use of the NIATx model as a framework for the user-centered design of a new technology for older adults. The NIATx model is a simple framework of process improvement based on the following principles derived from an analysis of decades of research from various industries about why some projects fail and others succeed: (1) Understand and involve the customer; (2) fix key problems; (3) pick an influential change leader; (4) get ideas from outside the field; (5) use rapid-cycle testing. This paper describes the use of these principles in technology development, the strengths and challenges of using this approach in this context, and lessons learned from the process. Overall, the NIATx model enabled us to produce a user-focused technology that the anecdotal evidence available so far suggests is engaging and useful to older adults. The first and fourth principles were especially important in developing the technology; the fourth proved the most challenging to use. PMID:27025985

  3. Services for adults with ADHD: work in progress†

    PubMed Central

    Coghill, David

    2015-01-01

    Magon and colleagues highlight a number of relative strengths and weaknesses very reminiscent of those we have seen over the years in the development of similar services for children and adolescents. It is clear that we all have a lot of work to do to improve our approach to the transition from child to adult services. There was clear evidence that adult services can adapt to manage ADHD, but there is also a clear need for increased upskilling of clinicians in the practical management of medication and other treatments. I disagree with Magon and colleagues about the role of primary care and believe that treatment initiation and ongoing monitoring should, for the time being, remain in secondary care and that, because of the volume of work that will come our way, this will need to become a core rather than specialist task. As with other aspects of psychiatric care, there is a clear role for specialist nurses in delivering a significant proportion of the core care. PMID:26191454

  4. Periodontal status of adult Sudanese habitual users of miswak chewing sticks or toothbrushes.

    PubMed

    Darout, I A; Albandar, J M; Skaug, N

    2000-02-01

    Miswak chewing sticks are prepared from the roots or twigs of Salvadora persica plants. They are widely used as a traditional oral hygiene tool in several African and Middle Eastern countries. The aim of this study was to assess and compare the periodontal status of adult Sudanese habitual miswak and toothbrush users. The study population comprised male miswak users (n = 109) and toothbrush users (n = 104) with age range 20-65 years (mean 36.6 years) having 18 or more teeth present. They were recruited among employees and students at the Medical Sciences Campus in Khartoum, Sudan. One examiner used the Community Periodontal Index (CPI) to score gingival bleeding, supragingival dental calculus, and probing pocket depth of the index teeth of each sextant. In addition, the attachment level was measured, which, along with the CPI, was used to assess the periodontal status of the two test groups. Gingival bleeding and dental calculus were highly prevalent in the study population. Approximately 10% of the subjects had > or =4 mm probing depth and 51% had > or =4 mm attachment loss in one or more sextants. Subjects in the age group 40-65 years had a significantly (p < 0.05) higher number of sextants with gingival bleeding and with > or =4 mm probing depth and attachment loss than the 30-39 years group. Miswak users had significantly (p < 0.05) lower dental calculus and > or =4 mm probing depth and higher > or =4 mm attachment loss as well as a tendency (p = 0.09) to lower gingival bleeding in the posterior sextants than did toothbrush users. These differences were not significant in the anterior sextants. It is concluded that the periodontal status of miswak users in this Sudanese population is better than that of toothbrush users, suggesting that the efficacy of miswak use for oral hygiene in this group is comparable or slightly better than a toothbrush. Given the availability and low cost of miswak, it should be recommended for use in motivated persons in developing

  5. Injection drug users' perspectives on placing HIV prevention and other clinical services in pharmacy settings.

    PubMed

    Lutnick, Alexandra; Case, Patricia; Kral, Alex H

    2012-04-01

    In their role as a source of sterile syringes, pharmacies are ideally situated to provide additional services to injection drug users (IDUs). Expanding pharmacy services to IDUs may address the low utilization rates of healthcare services among this population. This qualitative study of active IDUs in San Francisco explored perspectives on proposed health services and interventions offered in pharmacy settings, as well as facilitators and barriers to service delivery. Eleven active IDUs participated in one-on-one semistructured interviews at a community field site and at a local syringe exchange site between February and May 2010. Results revealed that most had reservations about expanding services to pharmacy settings, with reasons ranging from concerns about anonymity to feeling that San Francisco already offers the proposed services in other venues. Of the proposed health services, this group of IDUs prioritized syringe access and disposal, clinical testing and vaccinations, and provision of methadone. Pharmacists' and pharmacy staff's attitudes were identified as a major barrier to IDUs' comfort with accessing services. The findings suggest that although IDUs would like to see some additional services offered within pharmacy settings, this is contingent upon pharmacists and their staff receiving professional development trainings that cultivate sensitivity towards the needs and experiences of IDUs. PMID:22231488

  6. Ocean services user needs assessment. Volume 1: Survey results, conclusions and recommendations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, D. R.; Patton, R. J.; Mccandless, S. W.

    1984-01-01

    An interpretation of environmental information needs of marine users, derived from a direct contact survey of eight important sectors of the marine user community is presented. Findings of the survey and results and recommendations are reported. The findings consist of specific and quantized measurement and derived product needs for each sector and comparisons of these needs with current and planned NOAA data and services. The following supportive and reference material are examined: direct contact interviews with industry members, analyses of current NOAA data gathering and derived product capabilities, evaluations of new and emerging domestic and foreign satellite data gathering capabilities, and a special commercial fishing survey conducted by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL).

  7. Cannabis use is quantitatively associated with nucleus accumbens and amygdala abnormalities in young adult recreational users.

    PubMed

    Gilman, Jodi M; Kuster, John K; Lee, Sang; Lee, Myung Joo; Kim, Byoung Woo; Makris, Nikos; van der Kouwe, Andre; Blood, Anne J; Breiter, Hans C

    2014-04-16

    Marijuana is the most commonly used illicit drug in the United States, but little is known about its effects on the human brain, particularly on reward/aversion regions implicated in addiction, such as the nucleus accumbens and amygdala. Animal studies show structural changes in brain regions such as the nucleus accumbens after exposure to Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, but less is known about cannabis use and brain morphometry in these regions in humans. We collected high-resolution MRI scans on young adult recreational marijuana users and nonusing controls and conducted three independent analyses of morphometry in these structures: (1) gray matter density using voxel-based morphometry, (2) volume (total brain and regional volumes), and (3) shape (surface morphometry). Gray matter density analyses revealed greater gray matter density in marijuana users than in control participants in the left nucleus accumbens extending to subcallosal cortex, hypothalamus, sublenticular extended amygdala, and left amygdala, even after controlling for age, sex, alcohol use, and cigarette smoking. Trend-level effects were observed for a volume increase in the left nucleus accumbens only. Significant shape differences were detected in the left nucleus accumbens and right amygdala. The left nucleus accumbens showed salient exposure-dependent alterations across all three measures and an altered multimodal relationship across measures in the marijuana group. These data suggest that marijuana exposure, even in young recreational users, is associated with exposure-dependent alterations of the neural matrix of core reward structures and is consistent with animal studies of changes in dendritic arborization. PMID:24741043

  8. Cannabis Use Is Quantitatively Associated with Nucleus Accumbens and Amygdala Abnormalities in Young Adult Recreational Users

    PubMed Central

    Gilman, Jodi M.; Kuster, John K.; Lee, Sang; Lee, Myung Joo; Kim, Byoung Woo; Makris, Nikos; van der Kouwe, Andre; Blood, Anne J.

    2014-01-01

    Marijuana is the most commonly used illicit drug in the United States, but little is known about its effects on the human brain, particularly on reward/aversion regions implicated in addiction, such as the nucleus accumbens and amygdala. Animal studies show structural changes in brain regions such as the nucleus accumbens after exposure to Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, but less is known about cannabis use and brain morphometry in these regions in humans. We collected high-resolution MRI scans on young adult recreational marijuana users and nonusing controls and conducted three independent analyses of morphometry in these structures: (1) gray matter density using voxel-based morphometry, (2) volume (total brain and regional volumes), and (3) shape (surface morphometry). Gray matter density analyses revealed greater gray matter density in marijuana users than in control participants in the left nucleus accumbens extending to subcallosal cortex, hypothalamus, sublenticular extended amygdala, and left amygdala, even after controlling for age, sex, alcohol use, and cigarette smoking. Trend-level effects were observed for a volume increase in the left nucleus accumbens only. Significant shape differences were detected in the left nucleus accumbens and right amygdala. The left nucleus accumbens showed salient exposure-dependent alterations across all three measures and an altered multimodal relationship across measures in the marijuana group. These data suggest that marijuana exposure, even in young recreational users, is associated with exposure-dependent alterations of the neural matrix of core reward structures and is consistent with animal studies of changes in dendritic arborization. PMID:24741043

  9. Characteristics of Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder Who Use Adult Developmental Disability Services: Results from 25 US States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewitt, Amy S.; Stancliffe, Roger J.; Sirek, Annie Johnson; Hall-Lande, Jennifer; Taub, Sarah; Engler, Joshua; Bershadsky, Julie; Fortune, Jon; Moseley, Charles R.

    2012-01-01

    There is a significant increase in the prevalence of autism and autism spectrum disorders (ASD) in children with estimates now reaching 1 in 110 children in the United States. Families report difficulties in finding services for their young and adult children. Many adults with ASD receive services and supports through state intellectual and…

  10. Health care provision in Brazil: A dialogue between health professionals and lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender service users.

    PubMed

    Moscheta, Murilo S; Souza, Laura V; Santos, Manoel A

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to encourage the development of resources to improve health care for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender service users. Dialogues between health professionals and lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender service users (inspired by the Public Conversations Project) highlighted the need (a) to improve communication between users and health professionals; (b) to question what constitutes an expert on lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender care; (c) to reconfigure rigid notions about sexual identity; (d) to deconstruct the association between sexually transmitted diseases and lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender service users; and (e) to adopt a less judgemental attitude towards lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people during hospital admissions. PMID:26987831

  11. Compassion fatigue and the adult protective services social worker.

    PubMed

    Bourassa, Dara Bergel

    2009-04-01

    Compassion fatigue is a relatively new term that describes the symptoms that are experienced by social workers and other helping professionals who work with clients experiencing trauma. This article defines the concept of compassion fatigue and relates compassion fatigue to Adult Protective Services (APS) social workers. It is proposed that APS social workers may be susceptible to the deleterious effects of compassion fatigue due to the nature of their work and environment. Suggestions for avoidance of compassion fatigue are also discussed, including self-care strategies and the need for continuing education regarding this phenomenon. PMID:19308828

  12. Effects of Aging and Adult Development Education and Service Learning on Attitude, Anxiety, and Occupational Interest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boswell, Stefanie S.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of a semester-long aging and adult development course that included an intergenerational, service-learning component on attitudes toward older adult men and women, aging anxiety, and interest in occupations that serve older adults among individuals training for careers in healthcare and social services. It also…

  13. Is there a role for telemedicine in adult allergy services?

    PubMed

    Krishna, M T; Knibb, R C; Huissoon, A P

    2016-05-01

    Telemedicine refers to the application of telecommunication and information technology (IT) in the delivery of health and clinical care at a distance or remotely and can be broadly considered in two modalities: store-and-forward and real-time interactive services. Preliminary studies have shown promising results in radiology, dermatology, intensive care, diabetes, rheumatology and primary care. However, the evidence is limited and hampered by small sample sizes, paucity of randomized control studies and lack of data relating to cost-effectiveness, health-related quality of life and patient and clinician satisfaction. This review appraises the evidence from studies that have employed telemedicine tools in other disciplines and makes suggestions for its potential applications in specific clinical scenarios in adult allergy services. Possible examples include: triaging patients to determine the need for allergy tests; pre-assessment for specialized treatments such as allergen immunotherapy, follow-up to assess treatment response and side effects; and education in self-management plan including training updates for self-injectable adrenaline and nasal spray use. This approach might improve access for those with limited mobility or living far away from regional centres, as well as bringing convenience and cost savings for the patient and service provider. These potential benefits need to be carefully weighed against evidence of service safety and quality. Keys to success include delineation of appropriate clinical scenarios, patient selection, training, IT support and robust information governance framework. Well-designed prospective studies are needed to evaluate its role. PMID:26742680

  14. Service user and carer involvement in learning and teaching: a faculty of health staff perspective.

    PubMed

    Gutteridge, Robin; Dobbins, Kerry

    2010-08-01

    As part of a larger evaluation study, 20 members of staff in a Faculty of Health were interviewed about the impact of service user and carer involvement on learning and teaching. A qualitative approach was adopted and semi-structured interviews were used to explore current levels of involvement, barriers and solutions. The data generated was analysed using the principles of grounded theory. Findings suggest respondents recognised the requirement to involve service users and carers in their learning activities. Most wanted to develop this aspect of their educational provision but a number of barriers were described. Strategic and operational solutions were proposed to overcome these and respondents were positive about achieving meaningful involvement. PMID:19959262

  15. Service users and staff from secure intellectual disability settings: views on three physical restraint procedures.

    PubMed

    Jones, Peter; Stenfert Kroese, Biza

    2008-09-01

    The appropriateness of and justification for physical restraint procedures in intellectual disabilities settings is an emotive issue. It creates a number of ethical dilemmas for nursing staff. This article examines the views of service users and nursing staff from secure residential facilities where restraint is used frequently. Both groups were asked to rate three videotaped restraint procedures for their acceptability. There were no significant differences between the two groups in the acceptability ratings of the methods of restraint. Service users were then interviewed about their restraint experiences. They reported feeling very angry, sad, stressed and confused and not at all happy or relaxed when being restrained. Scores indicated that participants were significantly happier and less stressed after restraint than during restraint. PMID:18728144

  16. The Novice User and CD-ROM Database Services. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schamber, Linda

    This digest answers the following questions that beginning or novice users may have about CD-ROM (a compact disk with read-only memory) database services: (1) What is CD-ROM? (2) What databases are available? (3) Is CD-ROM difficult to use? (4) How much does CD-ROM cost? and (5) What is the future of CD-ROM? (15 references) (MES)

  17. Evaluating User Perceptions of Mobile Medication Management Applications With Older Adults: A Usability Study

    PubMed Central

    Gates, Allison

    2014-01-01

    Background Medication nonadherence has a significant impact on the health and wellbeing of individuals with chronic disease. Several mobile medication management applications are available to help users track, remember, and read about their medication therapy. Objective The objective of this study was to explore the usability and usefulness of existing medication management applications for older adults. Methods We recruited 35 participants aged 50 and over to participate in a 2-hour usability session. The average age ranged from 52-78 years (mean 67 years) and 71% (25/35) of participants were female. Each participant was provided with an iPad loaded with four medication management applications: MyMedRec, DrugHub, Pillboxie, and PocketPharmacist. These applications were evaluated using the 10 item System Usability Scale (SUS) and visual analog scale. An investigator-moderated 30-minute discussion followed, and was recorded. We used a grounded theory (GT) approach to analyze qualitative data. Results When assessing mobile medication management applications, participants struggled to think of a need for the applications in their own lives. Many were satisfied with their current management system and proposed future use only if cognition and health declined. Most participants felt capable of using the applications after a period of time and training, but were frustrated by their initial experiences with the applications. The early experiences of participants highlighted the benefits of linear navigation and clear wording (eg, “undo” vs “cancel”) when designing for older users. While there was no order effect, participants attributed their poor performance to the order in which they tried the applications. They also described being a part of a technology generation that did not encounter the computer until adulthood. Of the four applications, PocketPharmacist was found to be the least usable with a score of 42/100 (P<.0001) though it offered a drug interaction

  18. Collaboration with service users to develop reusable learning objects: the ROOT to success.

    PubMed

    Beadle, Mary; Needham, Yvonne; Dearing, Mary

    2012-11-01

    The involvement of service users in the education of health workers is seen as an important component within the curriculum. It is thought to facilitate the students into developing a deeper understanding around the real lives of their patients, and therefore ensuring their care is more person centred. The subject area focused upon was developing students' awareness of the needs of people with a learning disability. Recent incidents in the press have highlighted examples of poor quality care and a lack of understanding by health and social care professionals in regard to their needs. This article highlights a number of key issues which must be considered when involving service users, namely consent, ethical practice and collaboration. This article will describe the participation of service users in the development of reusable learning objects (RLO's) and make recommendations on the optimum way to undertake such an activity. From this process a framework has been developed, described as the ROOT to success. The ROOT element of the structure relates to Relationship, Organization, Outcome and Team. PMID:22634061

  19. Monitoring Users' Satisfactions of the NOAA NWS Climate Products and Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horsfall, F. M.; Timofeyeva, M. M.; Dixon, S.; Meyers, J. C.

    2011-12-01

    The NOAA's National Weather Service (NWS) Climate Services Division (CSD) ensures the relevance of NWS climate products and services. There are several ongoing efforts to identify the level of user satisfaction. One of these efforts includes periodical surveys conducted by Claes Fornell International (CFI) Group using the American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI), which is "the only uniform, national, cross-industry measure of satisfaction with the quality of goods and services available in the United States" (http://www.cfigroup.com/acsi/overview.asp). The CFI Group conducted NWS Climate Products and Services surveys in 2004 and 2009. In 2010, a prominent routine was established for a periodical assessment of the customer satisfaction. From 2010 onward, yearly surveys will cover major climate services products and services. An expanded suite of climate products will be surveyed every other year. Each survey evaluated customer satisfaction with a range of NWS climate services, data, and products, including Climate Prediction Center (CPC) outlooks, drought monitoring, and ENSO monitoring and forecasts, as well as NWS local climate data and forecast products and services. The survey results provide insight into the NWS climate customer base and their requirements for climate services. They also evaluate whether we are meeting the needs of customers and the ease of their understanding for routine climate services, forecasts, and outlooks. In addition, the evaluation of specific topics, such as NWS forecast product category names, probabilistic nature of climate products, interpretation issues, etc., were addressed to assess how our users interpret prediction terminology. This paper provides an analysis of the following products: hazards, extended-range, long-lead and drought outlooks, El Nino Southern Oscillation monitoring and predictions as well as local climate data products. Two key issues make comparing the different surveys challenging, including the

  20. Self-Esteem and HIV Risk Practices among Young Adult “Ecstasy” Users

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Hugh; Elifson, Kirk W.; Sterk, Claire E.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the role that self-esteem plays in HIV-related risk taking among users of the drug, ecstasy. The first part of the analysis focuses on the relationship of self-esteem to HIV risk-taking. The second part of the analysis examines predictors of self-esteem in this population. The research is based on a sample of 283 young adult ecstasy users. The study took place between August 2002 and August 2004 and entailed face-to-face interviews that were completed with the use of computer-assisted structured interviews. Study participants were recruited in the Atlanta, Georgia metropolitan area using a targeted sampling and ethnographic mapping approach. Interviews took approximately two hours to complete. Results of multivariate analyses indicated that self-esteem is associated with a variety of risky practices, including: the number of sex partners that people reported having, individuals’ likelihood of having multiple sex partners, the number of different types of illegal drugs that people reported using, and their condom use self-efficacy. The multivariate analysis conducted to ascertain the factors that impact young adult ecstasy users’ levels of self-esteem yielded six such factors: educational attainment (positive), coming from a family-of-origin whose members got along well (positive), the extent of alcohol problems experienced recently (negative), the number of positive effects experienced recently as a result of ecstasy use (positive), the number of negative effects experienced recently as a result of ecstasy use (negative), and the extent of experiencing symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (negative). PMID:21305909

  1. Does Providing Transition Services Early Enable Students with ASD to Achieve Better Vocational Outcomes as Adults?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cimera, Robert Evert; Burgess, Sloane; Wiley, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated whether receiving transition services early (i.e., by age 14) promoted better vocational outcomes than receiving transition services later (i.e., by age 16) for young adults with ASD. To do this, the outcomes achieved by two matched groups were examined--453 young adults from states requiring transition services be…

  2. Self-esteem and HIV risk practices among young adult ecstasy users.

    PubMed

    Klein, Hugh; Elifson, Kirk W; Sterk, Claire E

    2010-12-01

    This study examines the role that self-esteem plays in HIV-related risk taking among users of the drug, Ecstasy. The first part of the analysis focuses on the relationship of self-esteem to HIV risk-taking. The second part examines predictors of self-esteem in this population. Conducted between 2002 and 2004, the research is based on a sample of 283 young adult Ecstasy users who completed approximately two-hour-long, face-to-face interviews via computer-assisted structured interviews. Study participants were recruited in the Atlanta, Georgia metropolitan area using targeted sampling and ethnographic mapping. Results indicated that self-esteem is associated with a variety of risky practices, including: the number of sex partners that people had, individuals' likelihood of having multiple sex partners, the number of different illegal drugs people used, and their condom use self-efficacy. The multivariate analysis conducted to ascertain the factors that impact participants' levels of self-esteem yielded six factors: educational attainment (positive), coming from a family-of-origin whose members got along well (positive), the extent of alcohol problems (negative), the number of positive effects experienced as a result of Ecstasy use (positive), the number of negative effects experienced as a result of Ecstasy use (negative), and the extent of experiencing symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (negative). PMID:21305909

  3. Factors that help injecting drug users to access and benefit from services: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Neale, Joanne; sheard, Laura; Tompkins, Charlotte NE

    2007-01-01

    Background International research shows that injecting drug users (IDUs) can encounter many barriers when they try to access drug treatment and other services. However, the existing literature is mostly quantitative and does not consider the kinds of factors that injectors themselves identify as enabling them to access and benefit from services. Responding to this gap in knowledge, our paper explores IDUs' own suggestions for improving service engagement and their reports of other factors enabling them to seek help. Methods Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with 75 current illicit drug injectors in three geographically diverse areas of West Yorkshire, England. Recruitment was through needle exchange programmes, with additional snowball sampling to ensure inclusivity of gender, ethnicity and primary drug injected. Transcribed data were analysed thematically using Framework. Results Although participants were often satisfied with current access to services, they made three broad suggestions for improving engagement. These were: providing more services (more providers and more forms of support); better operation of existing services (including better communication systems and more flexibility around individual needs); and staffing-related improvements (particularly, less judgemental and more understanding staff attitudes). Other factors identified as important enablers of help seeking were: having supporting relationships (particularly with family members); personal circumstances/life events (especially becoming a parent); and an injector's state of mind (such as feeling motivated and positive). Conclusion A range of practical suggestions for improving IDUs' access to drug treatment and other services are identified. PMID:17971204

  4. What service users want: a new clinic results service. Can we satisfy both patients' needs and wants?

    PubMed

    Challenor, R; Deegan, S

    2009-10-01

    Many clinics still have a 'no news is good news' (NNIGN) policy for clinic results. We asked our service users their preferences for obtaining results. We also designed a new clinic results service. Patients were invited to complete a service evaluation questionnaire. They were given nine options for obtaining results and asked to rate acceptability on a 1-9 scale (unacceptable to acceptable). Completed questionnaires were compared with the actual method they chose to obtain results for that visit. In all, 1000 questionnaires (561 females, 439 males) were completed. Average acceptability score was highest for mobile phone (7.7), followed by text (5.8) and letter (5.7). NNIGN (3.7) and returning for results (3.6) received the least popular ratings. When compared with the actual method chosen, mobile phone was the most popular (62%) followed by letter (17%). Only 10% of patients found NNIGN acceptable. Following the evaluation we purchased texting software and redesigned our results service. There are now four options for receiving results - texting, letter, patient telephones us and NNIGN. We believe we have been able to satisfy both patients' needs and their wishes by redesigning our service around their views. PMID:19815915

  5. Stigma- and non-stigma-related treatment barriers to mental healthcare reported by service users and caregivers.

    PubMed

    Dockery, Lisa; Jeffery, Debra; Schauman, Oliver; Williams, Paul; Farrelly, Simone; Bonnington, Oliver; Gabbidon, Jheanell; Lassman, Francesca; Szmukler, George; Thornicroft, Graham; Clement, Sarah

    2015-08-30

    Delayed treatment seeking for people experiencing symptoms of mental illness is common despite available mental healthcare. Poor outcomes are associated with untreated mental illness and caregivers may eventually need to seek help on the service user's behalf. More attention has recently focused on the role of stigma in delayed treatment seeking. This study aimed to establish the frequency of stigma- and non-stigma-related treatment barriers reported by 202 service users and 80 caregivers; to compare treatment barriers reported by service users and caregivers; and to investigate demographic predictors of reporting stigma-related treatment barriers. The profile of treatment barriers differed between service users and caregivers. Service users were more likely to report stigma-related treatment barriers than caregivers across all stigma-related items. Service users who were female, had a diagnosis of schizophrenia or with GCSEs (UK qualifications usually obtained at age 16) were significantly more likely to report stigma-related treatment barriers. Caregivers who were female or of Black ethnicities were significantly more likely to report stigma-related treatment barriers. Multifaceted approaches are needed to reduce barriers to treatment seeking for both service users and caregivers, with anti-stigma interventions being of particular importance for the former group. PMID:26115840

  6. Data Quality, Provenance and IPR Management services: their role in empowering geospatial data suppliers and users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millard, Keiran

    2015-04-01

    This paper looks at current experiences of geospatial users and geospatial suppliers and how they have been limited by suitable frameworks for managing and communicating data quality, data provenance and intellectual property rights (IPR). Current political and technological drivers mean that increasing volumes of geospatial data are available through a plethora of different products and services, and whilst this is inherently a good thing it does create a new generation of challenges. This paper consider two examples of where these issues have been examined and looks at the challenges and possible solutions from a data user and data supplier perspective. The first example is the IQmulus project that is researching fusion environments for big geospatial point clouds and coverages. The second example is the EU Emodnet programme that is establishing thematic data portals for public marine and coastal data. IQmulus examines big geospatial data; the data from sources such as LIDAR, SONAR and numerical simulations; these data are simply too big for routine and ad-hoc analysis, yet they could realise a myriad of disparate, and readily useable, information products with the right infrastructure in place. IQmulus is researching how to deliver this infrastructure technically, but a financially sustainable delivery depends on being able to track and manage ownership and IPR across the numerous data sets being processed. This becomes complex when the data is composed of multiple overlapping coverages, however managing this allows for uses to be delivered highly-bespoke products to meet their budget and technical needs. The Emodnet programme delivers harmonised marine data at the EU scale across seven thematic portals. As part of the Emodnet programme a series of 'check points' have been initiated to examine how useful these services and other public data services actually are to solve real-world problems. One key finding is that users have been confused by the fact that often

  7. Mainstream In-Patient Mental Health Care for People with Intellectual Disabilities: Service User, Carer and Provider Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donner, Ben; Mutter, Robin; Scior, Katrina

    2010-01-01

    Background: Government guidelines promote the use of mainstream mental health services for people with intellectual disabilities whenever possible. However, little is known about the experiences of people with intellectual disabilities who use such services. Materials and Methods: Face-to-face interviews with service users, carers and community…

  8. Greek mental health reform: views and perceptions of professionals and service users.

    PubMed

    Loukidou, E; Mastroyiannakis, A; Power, T; Craig, T; Thornicroft, G; Bouras, N

    2013-01-01

    The Greek mental health system has been undergoing radical reforms for over the past twenty years. In congruence with trends and practices in other European countries, Greek mental health reforms were designed to develop a community-based mental health service system. The implementation of an extensive transformation became possible through the "Psychargos" program, a national strategic and operational plan, which was developed by the Ministry of Health and Social Solidarity. The Psychargos program was jointly funded by the European Union by 75% of the cost over a period of 5 years and the Greek State. After the period of 5 years, the entire cost of the new services became the responsibility of the Greek National Budget. Over the years the Psychargos program became almost synonymous with the deinstitutionalisation of long term psychiatric patients with the development of a wide range of community mental health services. The Psychargos program ended in December 2009. This article presents the views of service providers and service users as part an ex-post evaluation of the Psychargos program carried out in 2010. Data derived for this part of the evaluation are from the application of the qualitative method of focus groups. The outcomes of the study identified several positive and noteworthy achievements by the reforms of the Greek mental health system as well as weaknesses. There was considerable similarity of the views expressed by both focus groups. In addition the service users' focus group emphasized more issues related to improving their mental health wellbeing and living a satisfying, hopeful, and contributing life. PMID:23603267

  9. A Web-based assessment of bioinformatics end-user support services at US universities

    PubMed Central

    Messersmith, Donna J.; Benson, Dennis A.; Geer, Renata C.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: This study was conducted to gauge the availability of bioinformatics end-user support services at US universities and to identify the providers of those services. The study primarily focused on the availability of short-term workshops that introduce users to molecular biology databases and analysis software. Methods: Websites of selected US universities were reviewed to determine if bioinformatics educational workshops were offered, and, if so, what organizational units in the universities provided them. Results: Of 239 reviewed universities, 72 (30%) offered bioinformatics educational workshops. These workshops were located at libraries (N = 15), bioinformatics centers (N = 38), or other facilities (N = 35). No such training was noted on the sites of 167 universities (70%). Of the 115 bioinformatics centers identified, two-thirds did not offer workshops. Conclusions: This analysis of university Websites indicates that a gap may exist in the availability of workshops and related training to assist researchers in the use of bioinformatics resources, representing a potential opportunity for libraries and other facilities to provide training and assistance for this growing user group. PMID:16888663

  10. Identification and characteristics of vulnerable adults attending an inner city sexual health service.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Verity; Cheserem, Emily; Milne, Cliodhna; Hopkins, Marina; Lock, Eleanor; Hamlyn, Elizabeth

    2015-10-01

    Adult safeguarding is the function of protecting vulnerable adults from abuse or neglect. The 2012 Department of Health Draft Care and Support Bill highlighted adult safeguarding as a key government priority and stated that a clear framework is required for organisations dealing with 'adults at risk'. Adults at risk present to sexual health services but no formal guidance currently exists to aid their identification and management in this setting. We conducted a retrospective case note review which identified that vulnerable adults attend our service. They may display recognised risk factors, awareness of which is likely to facilitate identification and assessment of this group and aid appropriate onward referral. PMID:25411348

  11. Understanding User Preferences and Awareness: Privacy Mechanisms in Location-Based Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burghardt, Thorben; Buchmann, Erik; Müller, Jens; Böhm, Klemens

    Location based services (LBS) let people retrieve and share information related to their current position. Examples are Google Latitude or Panoramio. Since LBS share user-related content, location information etc., they put user privacy at risk. Literature has proposed various privacy mechanisms for LBS. However, it is unclear which mechanisms humans really find useful, and how they make use of them. We present a user study that addresses these issues. To obtain realistic results, we have implemented a geotagging application on the web and on GPS cellphones, and our study participants use this application in their daily lives. We test five privacy mechanisms that differ in the awareness, mental effort and degree of informedness required from the users. Among other findings, we have observed that in situations where a single simple mechanism does not meet all privacy needs, people want to use simple and sophisticated mechanisms in combination. Further, individuals are concerned about the privacy of others, even when they do not value privacy for themselves.

  12. User assembly and servicing system for Space Station, an evolving architecture approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavigna, Thomas A.; Cline, Helmut P.

    1988-01-01

    On-orbit assembly and servicing of a variety of scientific and applications hardware systems is expected to be one of the Space Station's primary functions. The hardware to be serviced will include the attached payloads resident on the Space Station, the free-flying satellites and co-orbiting platforms brought to the Space Station, and the polar orbiting platforms. The requirements for assembly and servicing such a broad spectrum of missions have led to the development of an Assembly and Servicing System Architecture that is composed of a complex array of support elements. This array is comprised of US elements, both Space Station and non-Space Station, and elements provided by Canada to the Space Station Program. For any given servicing or assembly mission, the necessary support elements will be employed in an integrated manner to satisfy the mission-specific needs. The structure of the User Assembly and Servicing System Architecture and the manner in which it will evolved throughout the duration of the phased Space Station Program are discussed. Particular emphasis will be placed upon the requirements to be accommodated in each phase, and the development of a logical progression of capabilities to meet these requirements.

  13. Improving access to competitive employment for service users in forensic psychiatric units

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Charlotte; Wernham, Connie

    2014-01-01

    Employment has been proven to be an effective recovery tool and therapeutic intervention for those with severe and enduring mental health conditions. Aside from monetary reward, employment is a means of structuring time and provides a sense of worth and achievement, which enhances self-esteem and confidence. A social identity is developed through employment, encouraging social support and increasing social networks. Securing employment can bring about improved quality of life and positive change in one's social circumstances; therefore it can reduce symptoms associated with mental illness and potentially prevent re-offending, as the individual develops a sense of independence, self-efficacy, and value. Barriers to employment exist for forensic mental health service users and therefore it is imperative that employment needs are addressed at the earliest possible stage in recovery. An evaluation of employment activities across two forensic mental health units revealed a lack of appropriate employment opportunities for service users, and those roles available were not implemented in line with recommended best practice. In response to this issue several enterprises were established to offer opportunities for service users to engage in meaningful employment and develop skills that a future employer would value. Each enterprise responds to a business need within the units to ensure sustainability of services. The enterprises are essentially micro-businesses with social objectives whose surpluses are reinvested for the purpose of increasing opportunities for service users. The enterprises are underpinned by the philosophy of the Individual Placement and Support (IPS) model; empirical evidence suggests that the IPS model is the most effective intervention, based on the ‘place then train’ philosophy. The model recommends a focus upon rapid job search to achieve competitive employment for those who want to work; opportunities sourced should be consistent with individual

  14. Improving access to competitive employment for service users in forensic psychiatric units.

    PubMed

    Beck, Charlotte; Wernham, Connie

    2014-01-01

    Employment has been proven to be an effective recovery tool and therapeutic intervention for those with severe and enduring mental health conditions. Aside from monetary reward, employment is a means of structuring time and provides a sense of worth and achievement, which enhances self-esteem and confidence. A social identity is developed through employment, encouraging social support and increasing social networks. Securing employment can bring about improved quality of life and positive change in one's social circumstances; therefore it can reduce symptoms associated with mental illness and potentially prevent re-offending, as the individual develops a sense of independence, self-efficacy, and value. Barriers to employment exist for forensic mental health service users and therefore it is imperative that employment needs are addressed at the earliest possible stage in recovery. An evaluation of employment activities across two forensic mental health units revealed a lack of appropriate employment opportunities for service users, and those roles available were not implemented in line with recommended best practice. In response to this issue several enterprises were established to offer opportunities for service users to engage in meaningful employment and develop skills that a future employer would value. Each enterprise responds to a business need within the units to ensure sustainability of services. The enterprises are essentially micro-businesses with social objectives whose surpluses are reinvested for the purpose of increasing opportunities for service users. The enterprises are underpinned by the philosophy of the Individual Placement and Support (IPS) model; empirical evidence suggests that the IPS model is the most effective intervention, based on the 'place then train' philosophy. The model recommends a focus upon rapid job search to achieve competitive employment for those who want to work; opportunities sourced should be consistent with individual

  15. User's perspectives of barriers and facilitators to implementing quality colonoscopy services in Canada: a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) represents a serious and growing health problem in Canada. Colonoscopy is used for screening and diagnosis of symptomatic or high CRC risk individuals. Although a number of countries are now implementing quality colonoscopy services, knowledge synthesis of barriers and facilitators perceived by healthcare professionals and patients during implementation has not been carried out. In addition, the perspectives of various stakeholders towards the implementation of quality colonoscopy services and the need of an efficient organisation of such services have been reported in the literature but have not been synthesised yet. The present study aims to produce a comprehensive synthesis of actual knowledge on the barriers and facilitators perceived by all stakeholders to the implementation of quality colonoscopy services in Canada. Methods First, we will conduct a comprehensive review of the scientific literature and other published documentation on the barriers and facilitators to implementing quality colonoscopy services. Standardised literature searches and data extraction methods will be used. The quality of the studies and their relevance to informing decisions on colonoscopy services implementation will be assessed. For each group of users identified, barriers and facilitators will be categorised and compiled using narrative synthesis and meta-analytical techniques. The principle factors identified for each group of users will then be validated for its applicability to various Canadian contexts using the Delphi study method. Following this study, a set of strategies will be identified to inform decision makers involved in the implementation of quality colonoscopy services across Canadian jurisdictions. Discussion This study will be the first to systematically summarise the barriers and facilitators to implementation of quality colonoscopy services perceived by different groups and to consider the local contexts in order to ensure the

  16. User fees, health staff incentives, and service utilization in Kabarole District, Uganda.

    PubMed Central

    Kipp, W.; Kamugisha, J.; Jacobs, P.; Burnham, G.; Rubaale, T.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the impact of user fees on the utilization of health services in a community-based cost-sharing scheme in Kabarole District, western Uganda. METHODS: Of the 38 government health units that had introduced user-fee financing schemes, 11 were included in the study. Outpatient utilization was assessed as the median number of visits per month before and after cost sharing began. FINDINGS: After the introduction of cost sharing, overall utilization of general outpatient services, assessed by combining the data from all the participating units, dropped by 21.3%. Utilization increased, however, in facilities located in remote areas, while it decreased in those located in urban or semi-urban areas. The increased utilization in remote facilities was considered to be largely attributable to health workers' incentive payments derived from cost-sharing revenues. CONCLUSIONS: Incentive payments led the health workers to offer improved services. Other factors may also have been influential, such as an improved drug supply to health facilities and increased public identification with community projects in remote areas. PMID:11731810

  17. The Online Positioning User Service: a Web Utility for Precise Geodetic Positioning in the Geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, W. A.

    2014-12-01

    Geoscientists often require precise positioning capability to support research. Accurate Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) positioning is a specialized skill involving expertise and fraught with accuracy-compromising nuances. With the goal of providing a robust and high accuracy positioning tool and enhanced access to the United States' National Spatial Reference System (NSRS), the nation's fundamental positioning infrastructure, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey (NGS) developed the Online Positioning User Service (OPUS). OPUS is a free Web utility for processing user-submitted GNSS observations and producing geodetic coordinates referenced to both NSRS and a global reference frame. Relying on NGS' national network of GNSS Continuously Operating Reference Stations (CORS), OPUS is a powerful and user-friendly tool for production and scientific research. OPUS is widely used in geomatics professions and holds great, yet not fully tapped, potential for research geoscientists requiring accurate positional information. OPUS became operational in 2002 as a single point processing tool for multi-hour GPS occupations (OPUS-Static). Its capability has since evolved, adding the ability to process short (15 minutes) sessions (OPUS-RapidStatic) and to provide a solution sharing option. All OPUS variations have proven to be popular, with typical monthly submissions now numbering 40,000. In 2014, NGS released a network version of OPUS, OPUS-Projects, the focus of this discussion. Although other versions of OPUS process a single GNSS occupation per submission, OPUS-Projects offers rigorous geodetic network analysis and processing capability by assembling and processing GNSS observations collected over time and at multiple locations. Least squares geodetic network adjustment of included observations results in an optimal set of station coordinates, including their uncertainties and graphical statistical plots, derived from user-submitted observation data, CORS observation

  18. Developing an online learning community for mental health professionals and service users: a discursive analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There is increasing interest in online collaborative learning tools in health education, to reduce costs, and to offer alternative communication opportunities. Patients and students often have extensive experience of using the Internet for health information and support, and many health organisations are increasingly trying out online tools, while many healthcare professionals are unused to, and have reservations about, online interaction. Methods We ran three week-long collaborative learning courses, in which 19 mental health professionals (MHPs) and 12 mental health service users (MHSUs) participated. Data were analysed using a discursive approach to consider the ways in which participants interacted, and how this contributed to the goal of online learning about using Internet technologies for mental health practice. Results MHSUs and MHPs were able to discuss issues together, listening to the views of the other stakeholders. Discussions on synchronous format encouraged participation by service users while the MHPs showed a preference for an asynchronous format with longer, reasoned postings. Although participants regularly drew on their MHP or MHSU status in discussions, and participants typically drew on either a medical expert discourse or a "lived experience" discourse, there was a blurred boundary as participants shifted between these positions. Conclusions The anonymous format was successful in that it produced a "co-constructed asymmetry" which permitted the MHPs and MHSUs to discuss issues online, listening to the views of other stakeholders. Although anonymity was essential for this course to 'work' at all, the recourse to expert or lay discourses demonstrates that it did not eliminate the hierarchies between teacher and learner, or MHP and MHSU. The mix of synchronous and asynchronous formats helped MHSUs to contribute. Moderators might best facilitate service user experience by responding within an experiential discourse rather than an

  19. The NASA-GES-DISC Satellite Data/Products Access, Distribution, Services and Dissemination to Users

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vicente, Gilberto A.

    2005-01-01

    The NASA/GES/DISC/DAAC is a virtual data portal that provides convenient access to Atmospheric, Oceanic and Land datasets and value added products from various current NASA missions and instruments as well as heritage datasets from AIRS/AMSU/HSB, AVHRR, CZCS, LIMS, MODIS, MSU, OCTS, SeaWiFS, SORCE, SSI, TOMS, TOVS, UARS and TRMM. The GES-DISC-DAAC also provided a variety of services that allow users to analyze and visualize gridded data interactively online without having to download any data.

  20. Guidance Services in Adult Education Programs; A Leadership Monograph.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Bureau of Adult Education.

    This guide provides an in-depth description of guidance and counseling as they relate to adult education. One major theme stressed is that guidance is an integral part of adult education, serving students by facilitating their learning and self-fulfillment. Topics covered are the concept of guidance within adult education and the adult education…

  1. Costs and Their Assessment to Users of a Medical Library, Part I: An Overview of Services, Users, and Budgeting of a Medical Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bres, E.; And Others

    This study investigated ways in which the costs of a library's direct and indirect services can be equitably allocated to its heterogeneous group of institution users. It was conducted from October 1, 1974 to March 31, 1977. The final report is divided into four parts, each describing a separate issue. Part I discusses the general administrative…

  2. 20 CFR 663.110 - What are the eligibility criteria for core services for adults in the adult and dislocated worker...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... services for adults in the adult and dislocated worker programs? 663.110 Section 663.110 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Delivery of Adult and Dislocated Worker Services...

  3. Pitfalls in Persuasion: How Do Users Experience Persuasive Techniques in a Web Service?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segerståhl, Katarina; Kotro, Tanja; Väänänen-Vainio-Mattila, Kaisa

    Persuasive technologies are designed by utilizing a variety of interactive techniques that are believed to promote target behaviors. This paper describes a field study in which the aim was to discover possible pitfalls of persuasion, i.e., situations in which persuasive techniques do not function as expected. The study investigated persuasive functionality of a web service targeting weight loss. A qualitative online questionnaire was distributed through the web service and a total of 291 responses were extracted for interpretative analysis. The Persuasive Systems Design model (PSD) was used for supporting systematic analysis of persuasive functionality. Pitfalls were identified through situations that evoked negative user experiences. The primary pitfalls discovered were associated with manual logging of eating and exercise behaviors, appropriateness of suggestions and source credibility issues related to social facilitation. These pitfalls, when recognized, can be addressed in design by applying functional and facilitative persuasive techniques in meaningful combinations.

  4. User Preferences for Content, Features, and Style for an App to Reduce Harmful Drinking in Young Adults: Analysis of User Feedback in App Stores and Focus Group Interviews

    PubMed Central

    Khadjesari, Zarnie; Fincham-Campbell, Stephanie; Deluca, Paolo; Watson, Rod; Drummond, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Background Electronic screening and brief intervention (eSBI) is effective in reducing weekly alcohol consumption when delivered by a computer. Mobile phone apps demonstrate promise in delivering eSBI; however, few have been designed with an evidence-based and user-informed approach. Objective This study aims to explore from a user perspective, preferences for content, appearance, and operational features to inform the design of a mobile phone app for reducing quantity and frequency of drinking in young adults engaged in harmful drinking (18-30 year olds). Methods Phase 1 included a review of user reviews of available mobile phone apps that support a reduction in alcohol consumption. Apps were identified on iTunes and Google Play and were categorized into alcohol reduction support, entertainment, blood alcohol content measurement (BAC), or other. eSBI apps with ≥18 user reviews were subject to a content analysis, which coded praise, criticism, and recommendations for app content, functionality, and esthetics. Phase 2 included four focus groups with young adults drinking at harmful levels and residing in South London to explore their views on existing eSBI apps and preferences for future content, functionality, and appearance. Detailed thematic analysis of the data was undertaken. Results In Phase 1, of the 1584 apps extracted, 201 were categorized as alcohol reduction, 154 as BAC calculators, 509 as entertainment, and 720 as other. We classified 32 apps as eSBI apps. Four apps had ≥18 user reviews: Change for Life Drinks Tracker, Drinksmeter, Drinkaware, and Alcohol Units Calculator. The highest proportion of content praises were for information and feedback provided in the apps (12/27, 44%), followed by praise for the monitoring features (5/27, 19%). Many (8/12, 67%) criticisms were for the drinking diary; all of these were related to difficulty entering drinks. Over half (18/32, 56%) of functionality criticisms were descriptions of software bugs, and over

  5. Tools and Data Services from the GSFC Earth Sciences DAAC for Aura Science Data Users

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempler, S.; Johnson, J.; Leptoukh, G.; Ahmad, S.; Pham, L.; Eng, E.; Berrick, S.; Teng, W.; Vollmer, B.

    2004-01-01

    In these times of rapidly increasing amounts of archived data, tools and data services that manipulate data and uncover nuggets of information that potentially lead to scientific discovery are becoming more and more essential. The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Earth Sciences (GES) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) has made great strides in facilitating science and applications research by, in consultation with its users, developing innovative tools and data services. That is, as data users become more sophisticated in their research and more savvy with information extraction methodologies, the GES DAAC has been responsive to this evolution. This presentation addresses the tools and data services available and under study at the GES DAAC, applied to the Earth sciences atmospheric data. Now, with the data from NASA's latest Atmospheric Chemistry mission, Aura, being readied for public release, GES DAAC tools, proven successful for past atmospheric science missions such as MODIS, AIRS, TRMM, TOMS, and UARS, provide an excellent basis for similar tools updated for the data from the Aura instruments. GES DAAC resident Aura data sets are from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS), Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), and High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS). Data obtained by these instruments afford researchers the opportunity to acquire accurate and continuous visualization and analysis, customized for Aura data, will facilitate the use and increase the usefulness of the new data. The Aura data, together with other heritage data at the GES DAAC, can potentially provide a long time series of data. GES DAAC tools will be discussed, as well as the GES DAAC Near Archive Data Mining (NADM) environment, the GIOVANNI on-line analysis tool, and rich data search and order services. Information can be found at: http://daac.gsfc.nasa.gov/upperatm/aura/. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  6. The Health Service Use of Frequent Users of Telephone Helplines in a Cohort of General Practice Attendees with Depressive Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Aves; Pirkis, Jane; Chondros, Patty; Bassilios, Bridget; Gunn, Jane

    2016-09-01

    We examined the relationship between frequent use of telephone helplines and health service use over time in a cohort of 789 general practice attendees with depressive symptoms. Telephone helpline use (no use, non-frequent use, frequent use) was measured at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months and analysed using ordered logistic regression. Sixteen participants (2 %) reported frequent use of telephone helplines. Reporting frequent use was associated with visiting multiple general practitioners, using emergency services and visiting mental health specialists in the previous 3 months. Despite this pattern of service use, there was evidence that these services were not meeting the needs of frequent users of telephone helplines, as they were also more likely to report dissatisfaction with their access to health services compared to non-frequent and non-users of telephone helplines. Our findings suggest that a model of care which addresses the complex needs of frequent users of telephone helplines is needed. PMID:26370273

  7. 76 FR 23479 - Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Uniformed Services (CHAMPUS); TRICARE Young Adult

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-27

    ... (CHAMPUS); TRICARE Young Adult AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, DoD. ACTION: Interim final rule with... Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2011 (NDAA for FY11). It establishes the TRICARE Young Adult... age of 26 of uniformed services sponsors. The TRICARE Young ] Adult program is a premium-based...

  8. Reference Services for the Adult Learner: Challenging Issues for the Traditional and Technological Era.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarkodie-Mensah, Kwasi, Ed.

    This book offers approaches for teaching adult patrons how and where to find information in libraries and through information services. It includes 34 papers, organized in seven sections, expressing the views of faculty, adult students, and administrators as well as librarians on theories of educational psychology that explain how adults learn.…

  9. An Information Needs Profile of Israeli Older Adults, regarding the Law and Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Getz, Irith; Weissman, Gabriella

    2010-01-01

    Based on Nicholas' framework for assessing information needs, this research aims to construct a profile of both Israeli older adults and their information needs regarding laws and social services. Data were collected by questionnaires answered by 200 older adults, born in Europe, Asia and Africa, who attended social clubs for older adults. The…

  10. Management Services; A Training Guide for Out-of-school Youth and Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Continuing Education Curriculum Development.

    This guide is intended to aid adult education directors, school principals, supervisors of home economics, and area center program planners in organizing occupational programs for adults, and to help instructors train adults for employment in management services in public and private institutions and housing projects. Section I outlines suggested…

  11. 20 CFR 663.150 - What core services must be provided to adults and dislocated workers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... core services described in WIA section 134(d)(2) and 20 CFR 662.240 must be provided in each local area... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What core services must be provided to adults... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE...

  12. 20 CFR 663.150 - What core services must be provided to adults and dislocated workers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., all of the core services described in WIA section 134(d)(2) and 20 CFR 662.240 must be provided in... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What core services must be provided to adults... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF...

  13. 20 CFR 663.150 - What core services must be provided to adults and dislocated workers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... core services described in WIA section 134(d)(2) and 20 CFR 662.240 must be provided in each local area... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What core services must be provided to adults... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE...

  14. 20 CFR 663.150 - What core services must be provided to adults and dislocated workers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., all of the core services described in WIA section 134(d)(2) and 20 CFR 662.240 must be provided in... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What core services must be provided to adults... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF...

  15. 20 CFR 663.150 - What core services must be provided to adults and dislocated workers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., all of the core services described in WIA section 134(d)(2) and 20 CFR 662.240 must be provided in... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What core services must be provided to adults... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF...

  16. 20 CFR 663.200 - What are intensive services for adults and dislocated workers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What are intensive services for adults and dislocated workers? 663.200 Section 663.200 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Intensive Services § 663.200 What...

  17. 20 CFR 663.800 - What are supportive services for adults and dislocated workers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What are supportive services for adults and dislocated workers? 663.800 Section 663.800 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Supportive Services § 663.800 What...

  18. 20 CFR 663.300 - What are training services for adults and dislocated workers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What are training services for adults and dislocated workers? 663.300 Section 663.300 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Training Services § 663.300 What...

  19. Determining Factors for Utilization of Preventive Health Services among Adults with Disabilities in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kung, Pei-Tseng; Tsai, Wen-Chen; Li, Ya-Hsin

    2012-01-01

    Taiwan has provided free health checks for adults since 1995. However, very little previous research has explored the use of preventive health services by physically and mentally disabled adults. The present study aimed to understand this use of preventive health services and the factors that influence it. Research participants included disabled…

  20. Perceptions of Biopsychosocial Services Needs among Older Adults with Severe Mental Illness: Met and Unmet Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummings, Sherry M.; Cassie, Kimberly McClure

    2008-01-01

    This study sought to identify the psychiatric, physical, and social services needs experienced by older adults with severe mental illness (SMI) and to examine factors influencing their experience of need and service provision adequacy. Seventy-five older adults with SMI were recruited from a community mental health center to participate in the…

  1. Health Service Utilization among Older Adults in British Columbia: Making Sense of Geography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allan, Diane; Cloutier-Fisher, Denise

    2006-01-01

    The utilization of health services by older adults has received increased attention over the past decade, but little is known about how service utilization varies between rural and urban areas. In an era of restructuring and downsizing within the Canadian health care system, there are concerns that rural older adults may be increasingly…

  2. Marijuana use motives: A confirmatory test and evaluation among young adult marijuana users.

    PubMed

    Zvolensky, Michael J; Vujanovic, Anka A; Bernstein, Amit; Bonn-Miller, Marcel O; Marshall, Erin C; Leyro, Teresa M

    2007-12-01

    The present investigation evaluated the measurement model and construct validity of marijuana use motives as measured by the Marijuana Motives Measure (MMM; [Simons, J., Correia, C. J., Carey, K. B., and Borsari, B. E. (1998). Validating a five-factor marijuana motives measure: Relations with use, problems, and alcohol motives. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 45, 265-273]). Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and incremental tests of validity of marijuana use motives were conducted on a sample of young adult marijuana users (n=227, 127 women; M(age)=20.11, SD=4.30 years). As hypothesized, CFA analysis of marijuana use motives, as indexed by the MMM, demonstrated support for a multidimensional measurement model; specifically, a five-factor solution denoting Enhancement, Conformity, Expansion, Coping, and Social motives for marijuana use, each with satisfactory levels of internal consistency. Subsequent tests of incremental validity suggested that only certain motives were uniquely related to current substance use and cognitive-affective factors. Results are discussed in relation to refining the scientific understanding of marijuana use motives. PMID:17602842

  3. Mental health service users' experiences of diabetes care by Mental Health Nurses: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Nash, M

    2014-10-01

    This paper is a report of a study exploring mental health service users' (MHSUs') experiences of diabetes care. Diabetes is a growing clinical concern in mental health nursing practice. However, little is known about MHSUs' experience of diabetes care. This is a descriptive qualitative study. Semi-structured telephone interviews were held between June and October 2011, with seven MHSUs who had diabetes. Participants reported experiences of stigma and diagnostic overshadowing (DO) when reporting symptoms of diabetes or when feeling unwell. Participants also encountered a split between their mental health and diabetes care needs, which resulted in a lack of holistic or integrated care. All participants mentioned experiencing complications of diabetes even to the extent of diabetic ketoacidosis. Mental health nurses (MHNs) must critically reflect on their attitudes towards service users that report physical symptoms to ensure that stigma and DO do not constitute barriers to appropriate screening and treatment. The complex relationship that exists between mental illness and diabetes requires MHNs to ensure physical and mental health care are wholly integrated and not split. Education needs are apparent so that symptoms and complications can be recognized and treated accordingly. PMID:24548452

  4. Service user involvement in practitioner education: Movement politics and transformative change.

    PubMed

    Mckeown, Mick; Dix, Julie; Jones, Fiona; Carter, Bernie; Malihi-Shoja, Lisa; Mallen, Ernie; Harrison, Nigel

    2014-08-01

    This paper will attempt to celebrate both key developments and best practice involving the users of health and social care services in programmes of practitioner education in a UK context, and offer a critical appraisal of the extent to which such initiatives meet some of the more transformative objectives sought by service user activists for change. The approach is largely that of a discussion paper but we will illustrate some of the themes relating to movement activism with selected data. These data relate to earlier research and two specially convened focus groups within the Comensus initiative at the University of Central Lancashire; itself constituted as a piece of participatory action research. We conclude that universities represent paradoxical sites for the facilitation of debate and learning relevant to key issues of social justice and change. As such, they are places that can impede or support movement aims. Particular strategic responses might be more likely to engender progressive outcomes. These ought to include the presence of critically engaged academic staff operating within a scholarly culture that fosters forms of deliberative democratic decision making. PMID:24815179

  5. Benefits of hospital-wide PACS networks: a survey of clinical users of radiology services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, Stirling; Weatherburn, Gwyneth C.; Watkins, Jessamy; Buxton, Martin J.

    1998-07-01

    An independent evaluation of PACS has been carried out at Hammersmith Hospital. This paper describes one element: the use of a questionnaire instrument to assess radiology service user's views on the quality of the service being provided; major causes of dissatisfaction with the service; the extent to which images are unavailable; and the consequences of images unavailability. The objective was to investigate some of the key claims made for the PACS technology. The principal research design was a 'before and after' comparison at Hammersmith Hospital. A number of other, comparator, hospitals were included in this survey in order to allow inferences to be made about the any observed changes at Hammersmith. The questionnaire was distributed on three occasions before PACS was operational at Hammersmith and on one occasion afterwards. Across all data collection rounds and all sites, very high levels of satisfaction with image quality were reported. When asked about satisfaction with the written reporting service, a larger proportion of respondents across all sites and rounds indicated their discontent Following the introduction of PACS, the proportion of respondents indicating that lost ward or outpatient images was a problem was significantly lower and the rate of re-examination was lower.

  6. Global Imagery Browse Services (GIBS) - Rapidly Serving NASA Imagery for Applications and Science Users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmaltz, J. E.; Ilavajhala, S.; Plesea, L.; Hall, J. R.; Boller, R. A.; Chang, G.; Sadaqathullah, S.; Kim, R.; Murphy, K. J.; Thompson, C. K.

    2012-12-01

    Expedited processing of imagery from NASA satellites for near-real time use by non-science applications users has a long history, especially since the beginning of the Terra and Aqua missions. Several years ago, the Land Atmosphere Near-real-time Capability for EOS (LANCE) was created to greatly expand the range of near-real time data products from a variety of Earth Observing System (EOS) instruments. NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) began exploring methods to distribute these data as imagery in an intuitive, geo-referenced format, which would be available within three hours of acquisition. Toward this end, EOSDIS has developed the Global Imagery Browse Services (GIBS, http://earthdata.nasa.gov/gibs) to provide highly responsive, scalable, and expandable imagery services. The baseline technology chosen for GIBS was a Tiled Web Mapping Service (TWMS) developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Using this, global images and mosaics are divided into tiles with fixed bounding boxes for a pyramid of fixed resolutions. Initially, the satellite imagery is created at the existing data systems for each sensor, ensuring the oversight of those most knowledgeable about the science. There, the satellite data is geolocated and converted to an image format such as JPEG, TIFF, or PNG. The GIBS ingest server retrieves imagery from the various data systems and converts them into image tiles, which are stored in a highly-optimized raster format named Meta Raster Format (MRF). The image tiles are then served to users via HTTP by means of an Apache module. Services are available for the entire globe (lat-long projection) and for both polar regions (polar stereographic projection). Requests to the services can be made with the non-standard, but widely known, TWMS format or via the well-known OGC Web Map Tile Service (WMTS) standard format. Standard OGC Web Map Service (WMS) access to the GIBS server is also available. In addition, users may request a

  7. Digital Library Services: Perceptions and Expectations of User Communities and Librarians in a New Zealand Academic Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xia, Wei

    2003-01-01

    Provides an overview of research conducted at Victoria University of Wellington regarding differing perceptions and expectations of user communities and librarians related to the usability of digital services. Considers access to services, currency of information on the Web site, the online public access catalog, databases, electronic journals,…

  8. Academic Scientists' Reaction to End-User Services: Observations on a Trial Service Giving Access to MEDLINE Using the GRATEFUL MED Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tilson, Yvette; East, Harry

    1994-01-01

    Conducted at two British universities in 1993, a year-long trial service study of 20 bio-scientists using GRATEFUL MED software access to National Library of Medicine databases, principally MEDLINE, found that the users approved most of the service's ease, convenience, and time saving features and disapproved of its susceptibility to network…

  9. Navigating the Alcohol Treatment Pathway: A Qualitative Study from the Service Users' Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Gilburt, Helen; Drummond, Colin; Sinclair, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Aims Provision of effective treatment for dependent drinkers has been identified as a priority in England yet evidence suggests that access is problematic and there are low levels of retention. This qualitative study explores how the alcohol treatment system is experienced by service users, identifying barriers and facilitators that influence treatment outcomes. Methods A total of 20 semi-structured face-to-face interviews were conducted with patients from community alcohol treatment services in three London boroughs in 2012. Interviews were undertaken one year after initially entering treatment. A thematic analysis was conducted, with the results further abstracted to relate them to specific aspects of the treatment journey. Results Patients journeys were characterized by a perceived lack of control leading to help-seeking, with treatment outcomes influenced by an individuals' self-efficacy and the capabilities and skills of staff in actively engaging and supporting patients on the journey. A focus of services on the detoxification process and fragmented care pathways impacted negatively on engagement. Conclusions Current alcohol care pathways require significant levels of motivation and self-efficacy to navigate that few patients possess. Pathways need to better reflect the capacity and capabilities of patients to be successful in supporting recovery. PMID:25825267

  10. Social media's and online user-generated content's role in services advertising

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavrianea, A.; Kavoura, Androniki

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to present results from a study that examines the use of the Internet for collecting material and the attention people pay to advertisements through different media sources in the context of services. A representative stratified sample of 301 respondents of foreign arrivals of tourists in the Athens airport, Greece, collected in June and July 2014 was employed. We present which social media sources and user-generated material that promote advertisements were found to be important in capturing people's attention. Results illustrated the significant role that advertisements on Facebook play on the way people pay attention to. In fact, Facebook was found to be the second most important medium that people use when collecting material. In addition, Facebook was found to be the third source that respondents strongly agreed that they pay attention to advertisements, with the official websites/blogs to be the first source and travel guidebooks and travel magazines to follow, leaving traditional media far behind. Implications and suggestions are provided for online communication programs that may incorporate social media in services marketing communications campaigns. Libraries and corporate bodies may employ social media for advertising their services based on the significant role social media have.

  11. Digital Watermarks Enabling E-Commerce Strategies: Conditional and User Specific Access to Services and Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmann, Jana; Steinebach, Martin; Wohlmacher, Petra; Ackermann, Ralf

    2002-12-01

    Digital watermarking is well known as enabling technology to prove ownership on copyrighted material, detect originators of illegally made copies, monitor the usage of the copyrighted multimedia data and analyze the spread spectrum of the data over networks and servers. Research has shown that data hiding techniques can be applied successfully to other application areas like manipulations recognition. In this paper, we show our innovative approach for integrating watermark and cryptography based methods within a framework of new application scenarios spanning a wide range from dedicated and user specific services, "Try&Buy" mechanisms to general means for long-term customer relationships. The tremendous recent efforts to develop and deploy ubiquitous mobile communication possibilities are changing the demands but also possibilities for establishing new business and commerce relationships. Especially we motivate annotation watermarks and aspects of M-Commerce to show important scenarios for access control. Based on a description of the challenges of the application domain and our latest work we discuss, which methods can be used for establishing services in a fast convenient and secure way for conditional access services based on digital watermarking combined with cryptographic techniques. We introduce an example scenario for digital audio and an overview of steps in order to establish these concepts practically.

  12. NSI customer service representatives and user support office: NASA Science Internet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The NASA Science Internet, (NSI) was established in 1987 to provide NASA's Offices of Space Science and Applications (OSSA) missions with transparent wide-area data connectivity to NASA's researchers, computational resources, and databases. The NSI Office at NASA/Ames Research Center has the lead responsibility for implementing a total, open networking program to serve the OSSA community. NSI is a full-service communications provider whose services include science network planning, network engineering, applications development, network operations, and network information center/user support services. NSI's mission is to provide reliable high-speed communications to the NASA science community. To this end, the NSI Office manages and operates the NASA Science Internet, a multiprotocol network currently supporting both DECnet and TCP/IP protocols. NSI utilizes state-of-the-art network technology to meet its customers' requirements. THe NASA Science Internet interconnects with other national networks including the National Science Foundation's NSFNET, the Department of Energy's ESnet, and the Department of Defense's MILNET. NSI also has international connections to Japan, Australia, New Zealand, Chile, and several European countries. NSI cooperates with other government agencies as well as academic and commercial organizations to implement networking technologies which foster interoperability, improve reliability and performance, increase security and control, and expedite migration to the OSI protocols.

  13. Service user involvement in pre-registration mental health nurse education classroom settings: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Terry, J

    2012-11-01

    Service user involvement in pre-registration nurse education is now a requirement, yet little is known about how students engage with users in the classroom, how such initiatives are being evaluated, how service users are prepared themselves to teach students, or the potential influence on clinical practice. The aim of this literature review was to bring together published articles on service user involvement in classroom settings in pre-registration mental health nurse education programmes, including their evaluations. A comprehensive review of the literature was carried out via computer search engines and the Internet, as well as a hand search of pertinent journals and references. This produced eight papers that fitted the inclusion criteria, comprising four empirical studies and four review articles, which were then reviewed using a seven-item checklist. The articles revealed a range of teaching and learning strategies had been employed, ranging from exposure to users' personal stories, to students being required to demonstrate awareness of user perspectives in case study presentations, with others involving eLearning and assessment skills initiatives. This review concludes that further longitudinal research is needed to establish the influence of user involvement in the classroom over time. PMID:22296494

  14. Neuropsychological Sex Differences Associated with Age of Initiated Use Among Young Adult Cannabis Users

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Natania A.; Schuster, Randi Melissa; Mermelstein, Robin J.; Gonzalez, Raul

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Earlier initiation of cannabis use is associated with poorer neuropsychological functioning across several domains. Given well-documented sex differences in neuromaturation during adolescence, initiation of cannabis use during this time may affect neuropsychological functioning differently for males and females. Method In the current study, we examined sex differences in the relationship between age of initiated cannabis use and neuropsychological performance after controlling for amount of lifetime cannabis use in 44 male and 25 female young adult cannabis users. Results We found that an earlier age of initiated use was related to poorer episodic memory, especially immediate recall, in females, but not in males. On the other hand, we found that, surprisingly, an earlier age of initiated use was associated with better decision-making overall. However, exploratory analyses found sex-specific factors associated with decision-making and age of initiated use, specifically that ADHD symptoms in females may drive the relationship between an earlier age of initiated use and better decision-making. Further, an earlier age of initiated use was associated with less education, a lower IQ, and fewer years of mother’s education for females, but more lifetime cannabis use for males. Conclusions Taken together, our findings suggest there are sex-differences in the associations between age of initiated cannabis use and neuropsychological functioning. The current study provides preliminary evidence that males and females may have different neuropsychological vulnerabilities that place them at risk for initiating cannabis use and continued cannabis use, highlighting the importance of examining the impact of cannabis on neuropsychological functioning separately for males and females. PMID:25832823

  15. Effects of user fee exemptions on the provision and use of maternal health services: a review of literature.

    PubMed

    Hatt, Laurel E; Makinen, Marty; Madhavan, Supriya; Conlon, Claudia M

    2013-12-01

    User fee removal has been put forward as an approach to increasing priority health service utilization, reducing impoverishment, and ultimately reducing maternal and neonatal mortality. However, user fees are a source of facility revenue in many low-income countries, often used for purchasing drugs and supplies and paying incentives to health workers. This paper reviews evidence on the effects of user fee exemptions on maternal health service utilization, service provision, and outcomes, including both supply-side and demand-side effects. We reviewed 19 peer-reviewed research articles addressing user fee exemptions and maternal health services or outcomes published since 1990. Studies were identified through a USAID-commissioned call for evidence, key word search, and screening process. Teams of reviewers assigned criteria-based quality scores to each paper and prepared structured narrative reviews. The grade of the evidence was found to be relatively weak, mainly from short-term, non-controlled studies. The introduction of user fee exemptions appears to have resulted in increased rates of facility-based deliveries and caesarean sections in some contexts. Impacts on maternal and neonatal mortality have not been conclusively demonstrated; exemptions for delivery care may contribute to modest reductions in institutional maternal mortality but the evidence is very weak. User fee exemptions were found to have negative, neutral, or inconclusive effects on availability of inputs, provider motivation, and quality of services. The extent to which user fee revenue lost by facilities is replaced can directly affect service provision and may have unintended consequences for provider motivation. Few studies have looked at the equity effects of fee removal, despite clear evidence that fees disproportionately burden the poor. This review highlights potential and documented benefits (increased use of maternity services) as well as risks (decreased provider motivation and quality

  16. User-Friendly Interface Developed for a Web-Based Service for SpaceCAL Emulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liszka, Kathy J.; Holtz, Allen P.

    2004-01-01

    A team at the NASA Glenn Research Center is developing a Space Communications Architecture Laboratory (SpaceCAL) for protocol development activities for coordinated satellite missions. SpaceCAL will provide a multiuser, distributed system to emulate space-based Internet architectures, backbone networks, formation clusters, and constellations. As part of a new effort in 2003, building blocks are being defined for an open distributed system to make the satellite emulation test bed accessible through an Internet connection. The first step in creating a Web-based service to control the emulation remotely is providing a user-friendly interface for encoding the data into a well-formed and complete Extensible Markup Language (XML) document. XML provides coding that allows data to be transferred between dissimilar systems. Scenario specifications include control parameters, network routes, interface bandwidths, delay, and bit error rate. Specifications for all satellite, instruments, and ground stations in a given scenario are also included in the XML document. For the SpaceCAL emulation, the XML document can be created using XForms, a Webbased forms language for data collection. Contrary to older forms technology, the interactive user interface makes the science prevalent, not the data representation. Required versus optional input fields, default values, automatic calculations, data validation, and reuse will help researchers quickly and accurately define missions. XForms can apply any XML schema defined for the test mission to validate data before forwarding it to the emulation facility. New instrument definitions, facilities, and mission types can be added to the existing schema. The first prototype user interface incorporates components for interactive input and form processing. Internet address, data rate, and the location of the facility are implemented with basic form controls with default values provided for convenience and efficiency using basic XForms operations

  17. Experts by experience; the views of service user educators providing feedback on medical students' work based assessments.

    PubMed

    Muir, Delia; Laxton, Julie Clare

    2012-02-01

    Assessment tools were designed to provide health and social care students with multi-sourced, interprofessional feedback in practice. This includes feedback from service users. Third year medical students at the University of Leeds were given accesses to 4 assessment tools whilst in practice. Completed assessments were then sent to the university where service users and carers worked with university tutors to give further feedback and comment on the overall development of students. Three service users then took part in a focus group and one provided written feedback. Four key themes were identified from the focus group: • Preparation and support • The design of the tools • The process of using the tools in practice • Feedback. We found that the project provided both challenges and rewards for all involved. The service user educators involved were able to bring a different and valuable perspective to formative feedback. The combination of their personal and professional experiences, along with the preparation they had received, helped bridge the gap between service users in practice and university based tutors. The findings from this study went on to inform a review of the assessment tools and revised versions are now being used. PMID:21955778

  18. Dialectical behaviour therapy in an inpatient unit for women with a learning disability: Service users' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Roscoe, Paula; Petalas, Michael; Hastings, Richard; Thomas, Cathy

    2016-09-01

    There is a general lack of self-report data from service users with an intellectual disability (ID) about their views of psychological interventions. This research explored the views and experiences of female inpatients, with a diagnosis of a personality disorder and an ID, about dialectical behaviour therapy (DBT). Semi-structured interviews were used with 10 women, recruited from two independent mental health hospitals. The interviews were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Participants showed varying levels of understanding of DBT. Findings highlight the need for a standardized approach with a suitably adapted structure and curriculum to meet the needs of inpatients with an ID. Factors such as the therapeutic relationship were identified as playing a role in participants' motivation, engagement and participation in DBT. PMID:26514772

  19. Health Services Utilization between Older and Younger Homeless Adults.(author Abstract)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakonezny, Paul A.; Ojeda, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Our purpose in the current study was to examine the relationship between health services utilization delivered by means of the Homeless Outreach Medical Services (HOMES) program and health services utilization delivered by means of the Parkland emergency room and inpatient units among a sample of older and younger homeless adults being…

  20. 9 CFR 130.7 - User fees for import or entry services for live animals at land border ports along the United...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... for live animals at land border ports along the United States-Canada border. 130.7 Section 130.7... FEES USER FEES § 130.7 User fees for import or entry services for live animals at land border ports along the United States-Canada border. (a) User fees for any service rendered by an APHIS...

  1. 9 CFR 130.7 - User fees for import or entry services for live animals at land border ports along the United...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... for live animals at land border ports along the United States-Canada border. 130.7 Section 130.7... FEES USER FEES § 130.7 User fees for import or entry services for live animals at land border ports along the United States-Canada border. (a) User fees for any service rendered by an APHIS...

  2. Young Adult Ecstasy Users Who Forego Necessary Medical Care: A Fairly Common Occurrence with Important Health Implications

    PubMed Central

    Elifson, Kirk W.; Klein, Hugh; Sterk, Claire E.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the practice of foregoing necessary medical care in a population of young adult Ecstasy users. The objectives of the paper are to (1) investigate how the failure to receive needed medical care is related to drug-related outcomes, and (2) identify factors that are associated with receiving versus foregoing needed medical care. Face-to-face, computer-assisted, structured interviews were conducted with 283 active young adult Ecstasy users in Atlanta, Georgia between August 2002 and October 2007. Study participants were recruited using a targeted sampling approach. Results indicated that almost one-third of the young adult Ecstasy users interviewed did not receive the medical care that they needed during the preceding year. Foregoing such care was associated with a variety of adverse drug-related outcomes, including experiencing a greater number of negative effects from using Ecstasy, experiencing a larger number of drug dependency symptoms, a greater likelihood of ever having binged on Ecstasy, and a greater likelihood of being classified as a “high end” polydrug abuser. Several factors were found to be associated with a greater tendency not to receive the medical care they needed, including race (not being African American), educational attainment (having completed at least high school), self-identification as belonging to the lowest socioeconomic status grouping, low self-esteem, and having experienced sexual abuse during one’s formative years. PMID:20464807

  3. Assessing the user experience of older adults using a neural network trained to recognize emotions from brain signals.

    PubMed

    Meza-Kubo, Victoria; Morán, Alberto L; Carrillo, Ivan; Galindo, Gilberto; García-Canseco, Eloisa

    2016-08-01

    The use of Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) technologies as a means to cope with problems that arise due to an increasing and aging population is becoming usual. AAL technologies are used to prevent, cure and improve the wellness and health conditions of the elderly. However, their adoption and use by older adults is still a major challenge. User Experience (UX) evaluations aim at aiding on this task, by identifying the experience that a user has while interacting with an AAL technology under particular conditions. This may help designing better products and improve user engagement and adoption of AAL solutions. However, evaluating the UX of AAL technologies is a difficult task, due to the inherent limitations of their subjects and of the evaluation methods. In this study, we validated the feasibility of assessing the UX of older adults while they use a cognitive stimulation application using a neural network trained to recognize pleasant and unpleasant emotions from electroencephalography (EEG) signals by contrasting our results with those of additional self-report and qualitative analysis UX evaluations. Our study results provide evidence about the feasibility of assessing the UX of older adults using a neural network that take as input the EEG signals; the classification accuracy of our neural network ranges from 60.87% to 82.61%. As future work we will conduct additional UX evaluation studies using the three different methods, in order to appropriately validate these results. PMID:27392644

  4. Development of a first-contact protocol to guide assessment of adult patients in rehabilitation services networks

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Mariana A. P.; Ferreira, Fabiane R.; César, Cibele C.; Furtado, Sheyla R. C.; Coster, Wendy J.; Mancini, Marisa C.; Sampaio, Rosana F.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This paper describes the development of the Protocol for Identification of Problems for Rehabilitation (PLPR), a tool to standardize collection of functional information based on the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Development of the protocol: The PLPR was developed for use during the initial contact with adult patients within a public network of rehabilitation services. Steps to develop the protocol included: survey of the ICF codes most used by clinical professionals; compilation of data from functional instruments; development and pilot testing of a preliminary version in the service settings; discussion with professionals and development of the final version. The final version includes: user identification; social and health information; brief functional description (BFD); summary of the BFD; and PLPR results. Further testing of the final version will be conducted. Conclusions: The protocol standardizes the first contact between the user and the rehabilitation service. Systematic use of the protocol could also help to create a functional database that would allow comparisons between rehabilitation services and countries over time. PMID:26786075

  5. Development of services for irrigation management: the experience with the users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuolo, Francesco; Neugebauer, Nikolaus; D'Urso, Guido; De Michele, Carlo

    2014-05-01

    Irrigated agriculture is the main user of freshwater resources (30% in Central Europe, 60% in the South). Efficient water management is therefore of essential importance, especially where water scarcity and water quality are becoming severe challenges. To achieve a successful and effective use of resources, farmers and water managers require easy-to-use decision support tools and reliable information. Our approach is based on Earth observation (EO) techniques and decision support tools. Generally, the service concept is based on two main components: i) the processing of time-series of high spatial resolution (10-30-m pixel size) images from satellite, currently available from public and commercial data providers, to timely monitor the crop growth and to estimate the crop water requirements throughout the growing season; ii) the adaptation and integration in local management practices & tools of easy to use geo-spatial technologies to make the information available to users and to support the decision-making process in near-real-time. The participation and feedback we receive from the users is fundamental to develop and provide easy-to-use technologies that can be embedded in standard approaches. In this paper, we briefly describe some examples of pre- and fully operational applications at field and irrigation scheme level and report some success stories of cooperation between decision makers and scientists. The paper includes the outcomes of ongoing activities such as Irrisat (www.irrisat.it), a regional operational service supported by rural development funds in Southern Italy and EO4Water (www.eo4water.com), a case study of knowledge and technology transfer in Eastern Austria funded by the Austrian Space Application Programme. The new capacities we develop to assist farmers in monitoring their crops are a step towards a better integration of tools and production. More technical advice and recommendation regarding sustainable land and resource use could then be

  6. Users' Support as a Social Resource in Educational Services: Construct Validity and Measurement Invariance of the User-Initiated Support Scale (UISS).

    PubMed

    Loera, Barbara; Martini, Mara; Viotti, Sara; Converso, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Social support is an important resource for reducing the risks of stress and burnout at work. It seems to be particularly helpful for educational and social professionals. The constant and intense relationships with users that characterize this kind of service can be very demanding, increasing stress and leading to burnout. While significant attention has been paid to supervisors and colleagues in the literature, users have rarely been considered as possible sources of social support. The only exception is the Zimmermann et al.'s (2011) research, focused on customer support as a resource for workers' well-being. This paper proposes the validation of the customer-initiated support scale developed by Zimmermann et al. (2011), translated into Italian and focused on educational services users (children's parents), to measure the user support perceived by workers: the User-Initiated Support Scale (UISS). In Study 1 (105 teachers), which specifically involved educators and kindergarten teachers, the items and scale properties were preliminarily examined using descriptive analyses and exploratory factor analysis (EFA). In Study 2 (304 teachers), the construct and criterion validity and scale dimensionality were analyzed using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). In Study 3 (304 teachers from Study 2 and 296 educators), measurement invariance (MI) was tested. The EFA results from Study 1 showed a one-factor solution (explained variance, 67.2%). The scale showed good internal coherence (alpha = 0.88). The CFA in Study 2 validated the one-factor solution (comparative fit index = 0.987; standardized root mean square residual = 0.054). Bivariate correlations confirmed construct validity; the UISS was positively associated (convergent) with user gratitude, and not associated (divergent) with disproportionate customer expectations. Regarding the criterion validity test, the UISS was strongly correlated with burnout and job satisfaction. The analysis of MI performed on the Study 3

  7. Patient and professional user experiences of simple telehealth for hypertension, medication reminders and smoking cessation: a service evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Cottrell, Elizabeth; Cox, Tracey; O'Connell, Phil; Chambers, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To establish patient and professional user satisfaction with the Advice & Interactive Messaging (AIM) for Health programme delivered using a mobile phone-based, simple telehealth intervention, ‘Florence’. Design A service evaluation using data extracted from Florence and from a professional user electronic survey. Setting 425 primary care practices across 31 Clinical Commissioning Groups in England. Participants 3381 patients registered on 1 of 10 AIM protocols between March 2013 and January 2014 and 77 professional users. Intervention The AIM programme offered 10 clinical protocols, in three broad groups: (1) hypertension diagnosis/monitoring, (2) medication reminders and (3) smoking cessation. Florence sent patients prompts to submit clinical information, educational messages and user satisfaction questions. Patient responses were reviewed by their primary healthcare providers. Primary outcome measures Patients and professional user experiences of using AIM, and within this, Florence. Results Patient activity using Florence was generally good at month 1 for the hypertension protocols (71–80%), but reduced over 2–3 months (31–60%). For the other protocols, patient activity was 0–39% at 3 months. Minimum target days of texting were met for half the hypertension protocols. 1707/2304 (74%) patients sent evaluative texts responded at least once. Among responders, agreement with the adapted friends and family statement generally exceeded preproject aspirations. Professional responders were generally positive or equivocal about the programme. Conclusions Satisfaction with AIM appeared optimal when patients were carefully selected for the protocol; professional users were familiar with the system, the programme addressed a problem with the previous service delivery that was identified by users and users took an active approach to achieve clinical goals. However, there was a significant decrease in patients’ use of Florence over time. Future

  8. Expanding Educational Services for Adults. OPTIONS. Publicity Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This publicity kit is intended to provide adult educators with materials for promoting and recruiting students into an adult education program designed according to the OPTIONS model (i.e., programs geared toward teaching the literacy, technical, and entrepreneurship skills that are necessary to adapt to changing labor market conditions resulting…

  9. Autism spectrum disorder in adults: diagnosis, management, and health services development

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Clodagh M; Wilson, C Ellie; Robertson, Dene M; Ecker, Christine; Daly, Eileen M; Hammond, Neil; Galanopoulos, Anastasios; Dud, Iulia; Murphy, Declan G; McAlonan, Grainne M

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a common neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by pervasive difficulties since early childhood across reciprocal social communication and restricted, repetitive interests and behaviors. Although early ASD research focused primarily on children, there is increasing recognition that ASD is a lifelong neurodevelopmental disorder. However, although health and education services for children with ASD are relatively well established, service provision for adults with ASD is in its infancy. There is a lack of health services research for adults with ASD, including identification of comorbid health difficulties, rigorous treatment trials (pharmacological and psychological), development of new pharmacotherapies, investigation of transition and aging across the lifespan, and consideration of sex differences and the views of people with ASD. This article reviews available evidence regarding the etiology, legislation, diagnosis, management, and service provision for adults with ASD and considers what is needed to support adults with ASD as they age. We conclude that health services research for adults with ASD is urgently warranted. In particular, research is required to better understand the needs of adults with ASD, including health, aging, service development, transition, treatment options across the lifespan, sex, and the views of people with ASD. Additionally, the outcomes of recent international legislative efforts to raise awareness of ASD and service provision for adults with ASD are to be determined. Future research is required to identify high-quality, evidence-based, and cost-effective models of care. Furthermore, future health services research is also required at the beginning and end of adulthood, including improved transition from youth to adult health care and increased understanding of aging and health in older adults with ASD. PMID:27462160

  10. The same but different: discussing the literature regarding mental health nurses' difficulty in meeting the physical health needs of service users, regardless of differing education programmes.

    PubMed

    Walker, S; McAndrew, S

    2015-10-01

    In the Western world, there is increasing concern regarding the ability of health care professionals to meet the physical health care needs of those diagnosed with mental illness. This discussion paper seeks to explore some of the issues facing mental health nurses in delivering care to those who have both mental and physical illness. Criticism of the National Health Service for failing to meet the physical health needs of people with serious mental illness has generated a number of political strategies aimed at addressing inequalities between mental and physical health care, a consequence being a change in pre-registration nurse education. It is envisaged that such changes will enable all nurses to deliver safe, effective care to service users, with adult and mental health nurses being more adept at meeting both the mental and physical health needs of those in their care. The impact of three key areas identified within the literature will be considered: the impact of co-existing physical and mental illness; the role of mental health nurses and perceptions of service users re physical health care; and education, training and learning from others in the Western world. In conclusion, the complexities of delivering such care will be addressed. PMID:26337595

  11. 20 CFR 663.110 - What are the eligibility criteria for core services for adults in the adult and dislocated worker...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... services for adults in the adult and dislocated worker programs? 663.110 Section 663.110 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Delivery of Adult and Dislocated...

  12. 20 CFR 663.110 - What are the eligibility criteria for core services for adults in the adult and dislocated worker...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... services for adults in the adult and dislocated worker programs? 663.110 Section 663.110 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Delivery of Adult and Dislocated...

  13. 20 CFR 663.110 - What are the eligibility criteria for core services for adults in the adult and dislocated worker...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... services for adults in the adult and dislocated worker programs? 663.110 Section 663.110 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Delivery of Adult and Dislocated...

  14. STUDENT PERSONNEL SERVICES FOR ADULTS IN HIGHER EDUCATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FARMER, MARTHA L.

    THIS REFERENCE WORK ON PERSONNEL SERVICES IN EVENING COLLEGES INCLUDES PAPERS ON THE HISTORICAL BACKGROUND OF EVENING COLLEGES, AND ON STUDENT PERSONNEL SERVICES, ADMINISTRATIVE ORGANIZATION, ADMISSIONS, STUDENT ACTIVITIES, COUNSELING, PLACEMENT, TRAINING OF PERSONNEL WORKERS, SERVICE TO BUSINESS, INDUSTRY, AND LABOR, FINANCIAL AID, AND THE…

  15. Social values for ecosystem services (SolVES): Documentation and user manual, version 2.0

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherrouse, Benson C.; Semmens, Darius J.

    2012-01-01

    In response to the need for incorporating quantified and spatially explicit measures of social values into ecosystem services assessments, the Rocky Mountain Geographic Science Center (RMGSC), in collaboration with Colorado State University, developed a geographic information system (GIS) application, Social Values for Ecosystem Services (SolVES). With version 2.0 (SolVES 2.0), RMGSC has improved and extended the functionality of SolVES, which was designed to assess, map, and quantify the perceived social values of ecosystem services. Social values such as aesthetics, biodiversity, and recreation can be evaluated for various stakeholder groups as distinguished by their attitudes and preferences regarding public uses, such as motorized recreation and logging. As with the previous version, SolVES 2.0 derives a quantitative, 10-point, social-values metric, the Value Index, from a combination of spatial and nonspatial responses to public attitude and preference surveys and calculates metrics characterizing the underlying environment, such as average distance to water and dominant landcover. Additionally, SolVES 2.0 integrates Maxent maximum entropy modeling software to generate more complete social value maps and to produce robust statistical models describing the relationship between the social values maps and explanatory environmental variables. The performance of these models can be evaluated for a primary study area, as well as for similar areas where primary survey data are not available but where social value mapping could potentially be completed using value-transfer methodology. SolVES 2.0 also introduces the flexibility for users to define their own social values and public uses, model any number and type of environmental variable, and modify the spatial resolution of analysis. With these enhancements, SolVES 2.0 provides an improved public domain tool for decisionmakers and researchers to evaluate the social values of ecosystem services and to facilitate

  16. The User Community and a Multi-Mission Data Project: Services, Experiences and Directions of the Space Physics Data Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, Shing F.; Bilitza, D.; Candey, R.; Chimiak, R.; Cooper, John; Fung, Shing; Harris, B.; Johnson R.; King, J.; Kovalick, T.; Leckner, H.; Papitashvili, N.; Roberts, Aaron

    2008-01-01

    From a user's perspective, the multi-mission data and orbit services of NASA's Space Physics Data Facility (SPDF) project offer a unique range of important data and services highly complementary to other services presently available or now evolving in the international heliophysics data environment. The VSP (Virtual Space Physics Observatory) service is an active portal to a wide range of distributed data sources. CDAWeb (Coordinate Data Analysis Web) enables plots, listings and file downloads for current data cross the boundaries of missions and instrument types (and now including data from THEMIS and STEREO). SSCWeb, Helioweb and our 3D Animated Orbit Viewer (TIPSOD) provide position data and query logic for most missions currently important to heliophysics science. OMNIWeb with its new extension to 1- and 5-minute resolution provides interplanetary parameters at the Earth's bow shock as a unique value-added data product. SPDF also maintains NASA's CDF (common Data Format) standard and a range of associated tools including translation services. These capabilities are all now available through webservices-based APIs as well as through our direct user interfaces. In this paper, we will demonstrate the latest data and capabilities now supported in these multi-mission services, review the lessons we continue to learn in what science users need and value in this class of services, and discuss out current thinking to the future role and appropriate focus of the SPDF effort in the evolving and increasingly distributed heliophysics data environment.

  17. 'Workers', 'clients' and the struggle over needs: understanding encounters between service providers and injecting drug users in an Australian city.

    PubMed

    Moore, David

    2009-03-01

    A feature of contemporary Western, neo-liberal democracies is the frequent interaction between representatives of health and social services and the members of stigmatised and 'unruly' populations, such as injecting drug users. Previous research on drugs has tended to ignore the power relations and cultural dynamics at work in these encounters, and the ways in which they are framed by the wider neo-liberal context. Drawing on an ethnography of street-based heroin use in Melbourne, Australia's second largest city, I show how the discourses of both service providers and injecting drug users draw on wider neo-liberal values of independence, autonomy, rationality and responsibility. Service providers negotiate a framework of needs interpretation that creates and reproduces professional identities, and maintains boundaries between 'workers' and 'clients'. It also includes tensions around the definition of injecting drug users as 'chaotic' (i.e., failed neo-liberal) subjects, and slippage between service philosophies that emphasise a social model of health and forms of service delivery that emphasise the production of responsibilised subjects. For their part, street-based injectors construct an alternative framework of needs interpretation that emphasises their self-reliance, autonomy and independence, attributes and capacities largely denied them in service-provider discourse. In encounters with service providers, street-based injectors respond in various ways that include elements of resistance, strategic accommodation and the incorporation of therapeutic discourse. I conclude by considering the implications of my analysis for the future development of drug policy and practice. PMID:19167141

  18. Design of an online health-promoting community: negotiating user community needs with public health goals and service capabilities

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background An online health-promoting community (OHPC) has the potential to promote health and advance new means of dialogue between public health representatives and the general public. The aim of this study was to examine what aspects of an OHPC that are critical for satisfying the needs of the user community and public health goals and service capabilities. Methods Community-based participatory research methods were used for data collection and analysis, and participatory design principles to develop a case study OHPC for adolescents. Qualitative data from adolescents on health appraisals and perspectives on health information were collected in a Swedish health service region and classified into categories of user health information exchange needs. A composite design rationale for the OHPC was completed by linking the identified user needs, user-derived requirements, and technical and organizational systems solutions. Conflicts between end-user requirements and organizational goals and resources were identified. Results The most prominent health information needs were associated to food, exercise, and well-being. The assessment of the design rationale document and prototype in light of the regional public health goals and service capabilities showed that compromises were needed to resolve conflicts involving the management of organizational resources and responsibilities. The users wanted to discuss health issues with health experts having little time to set aside to the OHPC and it was unclear who should set the norms for the online discussions. Conclusions OHPCs can be designed to satisfy both the needs of user communities and public health goals and service capabilities. Compromises are needed to resolve conflicts between users’ needs to discuss health issues with domain experts and the management of resources and responsibilities in public health organizations. PMID:23826944

  19. International Family, Adult, and Child Enhancement Services (FACES): a community-based comprehensive services model for refugee children in resettlement.

    PubMed

    Birman, Dina; Beehler, Sarah; Harris, Emily Merrill; Everson, Mary Lynn; Batia, Karen; Liautaud, Joan; Frazier, Stacy; Atkins, Marc; Blanton, Shanika; Buwalda, Johanna; Fogg, Louis; Cappella, Elise

    2008-01-01

    The development of evidence-based mental health interventions for refugees is complicated by the cultural and linguistic diversity of the participants, and the need to balance treatment of past traumatic experiences with ongoing support during the process of acculturation. In an effort to gather "practice-based evidence" from existing mental health services for refugees, a collaborative study of International Family, Adult, and Child Enhancement Services (FACES), a comprehensive, community-based mental health program working with refugee children, was conducted to describe the program participants and service delivery model and to assess whether participants improved over time as a function of services. Results showed that participants improved, but that the improvement was not related to dosage of services. Implications of these findings for refugee mental health services are discussed and suggestions are made for future evaluation research of mental health services with refugees. PMID:18444734

  20. Adult Guidance Services in the European Learning Society: A Scottish Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rees, Teresa; Bartlett, Will

    1999-01-01

    A study shows adult guidance services in Fife, Scotland, responding to changing labor market conditions with a well-developed infrastructure and network. Although the skills-development model dominates the agenda of external funders, Fife providers tend toward personal development and social learning as the focus of adult guidance. (SK)

  1. Consumers' Perspectives on Effective Orientation and Mobility Services for Diabetic Adults Who Are Visually Impaired

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin-Shirley, Nora; Kelley, Pat; Matlock, Dwayne; Page, Anita

    2006-01-01

    The authors interviewed and videotaped diabetic adults with visual impairments about their perceptions of orientation and mobility (O&M) services that they had received. The visual impairments of these middle-aged adults ranged from totally blind to low vision. The interview questions focused on demographic information about the interviewees, the…

  2. Where Would You Turn for Help? Older Adults' Awareness of Community Support Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denton, M.; Ploeg, J.; Tindale, J.; Hutchison, B.; Brazil, K.; Akhtar-Danesh, N.; Quinlan, M.; Lillie, J.; Plenderleith, J. Millen; Boos, L.

    2008-01-01

    Previous findings on older adults' awareness of community support services (CSSs) have been inconsistent and marred by acquiescence or over-claiming bias. To address this issue, this study used a series of 12 vignettes to describe common situations faced by older adults for which CSSs might be appropriate. In telephone interviews, 1,152 adults…

  3. Community Service and User Support for the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) Data Assimilation and Analysis System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, H.; Hu, M.; Stark, D.; Newman, K.; Zhou, C.; Derber, J.; Lueken, M.

    2013-12-01

    . The DTC has built and continues to maintain a community GSI User's Page to provide GSI code, documentation, and on-line tutorials for the research community. The DTC staff has been providing support to GSI users through the GSI help desk since the release of version 1 of the community code in 2009. This paper will briefly describe the GSI system and emphasize the GSI community services and support available from the DTC and other developers.

  4. Validation and User Evaluation of a Sensor-Based Method for Detecting Mobility-Related Activities in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Geraedts, Hilde A. E.; Zijlstra, Wiebren; Van Keeken, Helco G.; Zhang, Wei; Stevens, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Regular physical activity is essential for older adults to stay healthy and independent. However, daily physical activity is generally low among older adults and mainly consists of activities such as standing and shuffling around indoors. Accurate measurement of this low-energy expenditure daily physical activity is crucial for stimulation of activity. The objective of this study was to assess the validity of a necklace-worn sensor-based method for detecting time-on-legs and daily life mobility related postures in older adults. In addition user opinion about the practical use of the sensor was evaluated. Twenty frail and non-frail older adults performed a standardized and free movement protocol in their own home. Results of the sensor-based method were compared to video observation. Sensitivity, specificity and overall agreement of sensor outcomes compared to video observation were calculated. Mobility was assessed based on time-on-legs. Further assessment included the categories standing, sitting, walking and lying. Time-on-legs based sensitivity, specificity and percentage agreement were good to excellent and comparable to laboratory outcomes in other studies. Category-based sensitivity, specificity and overall agreement were moderate to excellent. The necklace-worn sensor is considered an acceptable valid instrument for assessing home-based physical activity based upon time-on-legs in frail and non-frail older adults, but category-based assessment of gait and postures could be further developed. PMID:26361009

  5. Geography of Service Delivery: On the Role of Mental Health Service Structure in Community Senior Services for Puerto Rican Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Velez Ortiz, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to examine the role of mental health services structure in community senior centers and how it interacts with Puerto Rican older adults' historical, social, and cultural experiences to relate to their perceptions, awareness, and utilization of mental health services. The study was carried out within a concurrent…

  6. Principles and Principals: A Dictionary of Contemporary Adult Education Terms and Their Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raiskums, Bernadine W.

    This document, which is designed to help individuals entering adult education graduate programs in North America, contains definitions of nearly 538 contemporary adult education-related terms and practitioners. The terms included were selected based on a review of more than half of the 139 papers published in the proceedings of the 41st Annual…

  7. Understanding Tobacco-Related Attitudes among College and Noncollege Young Adult Hookah and Cigarette Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Youn Ok; Bahreinifar, Sareh; Ling, Pamela M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine differences in tobacco-related attitudes and hookah and cigarette use among college and noncollege young adults. Participants: Time-location samples of young adult bar patrons in San Diego, California ("N" = 2,243), Tulsa ("N" = 2,095) and Oklahoma City ("N" = 2,200), Oklahoma, Albuquerque…

  8. Characterisation of User-Defined Health Status in Older Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starr, J. M.; Marsden, L.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Older adults with Intellectual Disabilities (ID) have an excess disease burden that standard health assessments are designed to detect. Older adults with ID have a broader concept of health with dimensions of well being in addition to absence of disease in line with the World Health Organization's health definition. We sought to…

  9. A critical analysis of user satisfaction surveys in addiction services: opioid maintenance treatment as a representative case study

    PubMed Central

    Trujols, Joan; Iraurgi, Ioseba; Oviedo-Joekes, Eugenia; Guàrdia-Olmos, Joan

    2014-01-01

    Background Satisfaction with services represents a key component of the user’s perspective, and user satisfaction surveys are the most commonly used approach to evaluate the aforementioned perspective. The aim of this discursive paper is to provide a critical overview of user satisfaction surveys in addiction treatment and harm reduction services, with a particular focus on opioid maintenance treatment as a representative case. Methods We carried out a selective critical review and analysis of the literature on user satisfaction surveys in addiction treatment and harm reduction services. Results Most studies that have reported results of satisfaction surveys have found that the great majority of users (virtually all, in many cases) are highly satisfied with the services received. However, when these results are compared to the findings of studies that use different methodologies to explore the patient’s perspective, the results are not as consistent as might be expected. It is not uncommon to find that “highly satisfied” patients report significant problems when mixed-methods studies are conducted. To understand this apparent contradiction, we explored two distinct (though not mutually exclusive) lines of reasoning, one of which concerns conceptual aspects and the other, methodological questions. Conclusion User satisfaction surveys, as currently designed and carried out in addiction treatment and harm reduction services, do not significantly help to improve service quality. Therefore, most of the enthusiasm and naiveté with which satisfaction surveys are currently performed and interpreted – and rarely acted on in the case of nonoptimal results – should be avoided. A truly participatory approach to program evaluation is urgently needed to reshape and transform patient satisfaction surveys. PMID:24482571

  10. Religiosity and exposure to users in explaining illicit drug use among emerging adults.

    PubMed

    Palamar, Joseph J; Kiang, Mathew V; Halkitis, Perry N

    2014-06-01

    Religiosity is a protective factor against illicit drug use, but further investigation is needed to delineate which components of religiosity are protective against use. A racially diverse sample (N = 962) was surveyed about religiosity, exposure to users, and recent use of marijuana, powder cocaine, ecstasy, and nonmedical use of opioids and amphetamine. Results suggest that identifying as Agnostic increased odds of use for each of the five drugs; however, this effect disappeared when controlling for religious importance and attendance. High levels of religious attendance were protective against recent use of marijuana and cocaine, but protective effects diminished when controlling for exposure to users, which was a robust predictor of use of every drug. Religion is a protective mechanism against drug use, but this effect may diminish in light of exposure to users. Alternative preventative methods need to be directed toward individuals who are not religious or are highly exposed to users. PMID:23114835

  11. Do young adults demand more dental services as their income increases?

    PubMed

    Grytten, Jostein; Holst, Dorthe

    2002-12-01

    Several studies from the USA have shown that there is a positive and strong relationship between income and demand for dental care. All these studies have been performed on populations where treatment needs were high. Today, young adults represent one group of the population where treatment needs are low. But young adults will not necessarily demand or utilize more dental services as their income increases. As we do not know the extent to which demand will increase when income increases among young adults, future needs for dental manpower could be less than predicted from previous studies. The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship between income and demand/utilization for dental services among young adults in Norway. The analyses were performed on two large sets of survey data, collected in 1985 and 1995, which were representative of the Norwegian population aged 20 years and above. The main finding was that the increase in demand with an increase in income was less for young adults than for older adults. In particular, there was a marked fall in the income elasticities among young adults from 1985 to 1995. The fall in the income elasticity corresponds to a marked decrease in the prevalence of dental diseases among young adults during that period. Our results imply that future policies for dental manpower should take into account the lower income elasticity for young adults compared to for older adults, and that future needs for dental personnel should be planned accordingly. PMID:12453118

  12. 'Is it the crime of the century?': factors for psychiatrists and service users that influence the long-term prescription of hypnosedatives.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Joanna; Garvie, Christopher; Gordon, Sarah; Huthwaite, Mark; Mathieson, Fiona; Wood, Amber-Jane; Romans, Sarah

    2015-07-01

    Given the longstanding controversy about hypnosedative use, we aimed to investigate the attitudes of prescribing psychiatrists and service users towards long-term use of hypnosedative medication, and their perceptions of barriers to evidence-based nonmedication alternatives. Qualitative data from focus groups in Aotearoa/NZ were analysed thematically. A novel research design involved a service user researcher contributing throughout the research design and process. Service users and psychiatrists met to discuss each other's views, initially separately, and subsequently together. Analysis of the data identified four key themes: the challenge, for both parties, of sleep disturbance among service users with mental health problems; the conceptual and ethical conflicts for service users and psychiatrists in managing this challenge; the significant barriers to service users accessing evidence-based nonmedication alternatives; and the initial sense of disempowerment, shared by both service users and psychiatrists, which was transformed during the research process. Our results raise questions about the relevance of the existing guidelines for this group of service users, highlight the resource and time pressures that discourage participants from embarking on withdrawal regimes and education programmes on alternatives, highlight the lack of knowledge about alternatives and reflect the complex interaction between sleep and mental health problems, which poses a significant dilemma for service users and psychiatrists. PMID:25918885

  13. Multivitamin Use and Serum Vitamin B12 Concentrations in Older-Adult Metformin Users in REGARDS, 2003-2007

    PubMed Central

    Kancherla, Vijaya; Garn, Joshua V.; Zakai, Neil A.; Williamson, Rebecca S.; Cashion, Winn T.; Odewole, Oluwaseun; Judd, Suzanne E.; Oakley, Godfrey P.

    2016-01-01

    Metformin, an insulin-sensitizing drug, is a first line treatment for type 2 diabetes. Long-term use of metformin has been associated with subsequent reductions in vitamin B12 concentrations. The objective of our study was to determine whether metformin use is associated with lower serum vitamin B12 concentrations in older adults, and whether concurrent use of multivitamins modifies this association. We examined 2,510 participants aged 50 years and over, participating in the national population-based Reasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) Study. Multivariable linear and logistic regression models were used to assess associations between multivitamin use and serum vitamin B12 concentrations. We estimated adjusted odds ratios (aOR)s and confidence intervals (CI)s. Results were stratified by three metformin/diabetes sub-groups: 1) participants with diabetes who were metformin users; 2) participants with diabetes who were not metformin users; and 3) participants without diabetes. We found that diabetic metformin users had significantly lower geometric mean serum B12 concentrations (409 pmol/L) than the group with diabetes not taking metformin (485 pmol/L; P<0.01), and the group without diabetes (445 pmol/L; P = 0.02). The geometric mean serum B12 concentrations were greater for multivitamin users (509 pmol/L) compared to those who did not use multivitamins (376 pmol/L; p<0.01). Among the participants with diabetes who were on metformin therapy, multivitamin use was associated with geometric mean serum vitamin B12 concentrations that were 50% (or 161 pmol/L) higher, compared to those not using multivitamins. Among metformin users, multivitamin use was associated with lower prevalence of combined low and borderline vitamin B12 concentrations (aOR = 0.14; 95% CI = 0.04, 0.54) compared to those not using multivitamins. In conclusion, metformin use was associated with lower geometric mean serum vitamin B12 concentrations among diabetic older

  14. Interlibrary Loan Article Use and User GPA: Findings and Implications for Library Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Mitchell

    2014-01-01

    A recent institutional study at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay investigated the academic achievement of interlibrary loan (ILL) users as compared to non-ILL users. While this study provided important local insight into ILL use and the demographics of ILL users (class rank, major), it uncovered a rather minor overall GPA difference, 0.20 GPA…

  15. 7 CFR 354.4 - User fees for certain domestic services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... of user fees credited to the account is equal to the amount of money paid into the account by the... appropriate, his or her agent, agrees to maintain a balance in the user fee payment account equal to the cost... an agreement is terminated, any unobligated funds remain in the user fee account, APHIS will...

  16. Web 2.0 as Catalyst: Virtually Reaching Out to Users and Connecting Them to Library Resources and Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xiao, Norah

    2008-01-01

    This article is based on services to library users in the area of chemistry at the Science and Engineering (S&E) Library of the University of Southern California (USC), to which I applied various new technologies as outreach approaches. Various Web 2.0 technologies such as a blog, tags, YouTube, RSS feeds, Instant Messaging, online presentation…

  17. Partnerships for better mental health worldwide: WPA recommendations on best practices in working with service users and family carers

    PubMed Central

    WALLCRAFT, JAN; AMERING, MICHAELA; FREIDIN, JULIAN; DAVAR, BHARGAVI; FROGGATT, DIANE; JAFRI, HUSSAIN; JAVED, AFZAL; KATONTOKA, SYLVESTER; RAJA, SHOBA; RATAEMANE, SOLOMON; STEFFEN, SIGRID; TYANO, SAM; UNDERHILL, CHRISTPHER; WAHLBERG, HENRIK; WARNER, RICHARD; HERRMAN, HELEN

    2011-01-01

    WPA President M. Maj established the Task Force on Best Practice in Working with Service Users and Carers in 2008, chaired by H. Herrman. The Task Force had the remit to create recommendations for the international mental health community on how to develop successful partnership working. The work began with a review of literature on service user and carer involvement and partnership. This set out a range of considerations for good practice, including choice of appropriate terminology, clarifying the partnership process and identifying and reducing barriers to partnership working. Based on the literature review and on the shared knowledge in the Task Force, a set of ten recommendations for good practice was developed. These recommendations were the basis for a worldwide consultation of stakeholders with expertise as service users, families and carers, and the WPA Board and Council. The results showed a strong consensus across the international mental health community on the ten recommendations, with the strongest agreement coming from service users and carers. This general consensus gives a basis for Task Force plans to seek support for activities to promote shared work worldwide to identify best practice examples and create a resource to assist others to begin successful collaboration. PMID:21991284

  18. Participation as Governmentality? The Effect of Disciplinary Technologies at the Interface of Service Users and Providers, Families and the State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKay, Jane; Garratt, Dean

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the concept of participation in relation to a range of recently imposed social and education policies. Drawing on recent empirical research, we explore how disciplinary technologies, including government policy, operate at the interface of service users and providers, and examine the interactional aspects of participation where…

  19. Promoting Service User Inclusion in Risk Assessment and Management: A Pilot Project Developing a Human Rights-Based Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenhill, Beth; Whitehead, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Recent reports highlight the extent to which many people with learning disabilities are not afforded access to their basic human rights. In addition, traditional approaches to risk management often focus on professional assessments of risks and challenging behaviour and exclude service user perspectives. In this paper, we outline what we believe…

  20. Reliability and validity of the Marijuana Motives Measure among young adult frequent cannabis users and associations with cannabis dependence.

    PubMed

    Benschop, Annemieke; Liebregts, Nienke; van der Pol, Peggy; Schaap, Rick; Buisman, Renate; van Laar, Margriet; van den Brink, Wim; de Graaf, Ron; Korf, Dirk J

    2015-01-01

    The Marijuana Motives Measure (MMM) has so far been examined mainly in student populations, often with relatively limited involvement in cannabis use. This study evaluated the factor structure of the MMM in a demographically mixed sample of 600 young adult (18-30 years) frequent (≥ 3 days per week) cannabis users in the Netherlands. Analysis confirmed a five-factor solution, denoting coping, enhancement, social, conformity and expansion motives. Additionally, the original MMM was extended with two items (boredom and habit), which formed a distinct, internally consistent sixth factor labelled routine motives. In a multivariable logistic regression analysis, coping and routine motives showed significant associations with 12-month DSM-IV cannabis dependence. The results suggest general reliability and validity of the MMM in a heterogeneous population of experienced cannabis users. PMID:25240105

  1. Teaching Young Adults with Disabilities through Service Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodruff, Elizabeth A.; Sinelnikov, Oleg A.

    2015-01-01

    While many scholars agree that service learning is beneficial to both the student and the community, the research on service learning in the physical education setting is limited. However, there are courses that can be aligned with the professional preparation needs of students and the broader needs of the community. Drawing on theory which has…

  2. Older Caregivers of Adults with Mental Retardation: Service Utilization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelhardt, Jean L.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    The study examined the relationship between service utilization and characteristics of older parents and other caregivers, their dependents with mental retardation, and their ability to provide care. Caregivers' assessment of current ability to provide care was significantly related to amount of service use, but caregiver and dependent…

  3. Effect of removing user fees on attendance for curative and preventive primary health care services in rural South Africa.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, D.; Gouws, E.; Sach, M.; Karim, S. S.

    2001-01-01

    User fees are used to recover costs and discourage unnecessary attendance at primary care clinics in many developing countries. In South Africa, user fees for children aged under 6 years and pregnant women were removed in 1994, and in 1997 all user fees at all primary health care clinics were abolished. The intention of these policy changes was to improve access to health services for previously disadvantaged communities. We investigated the impact of these changes on clinic attendance patterns in Hlabisa health district. Average quarterly new registrations and total attendances for preventive services (antenatal care, immunization, growth monitoring) and curative services (treatment of ailments) at a mobile primary health care unit were studied from 1992 to 1998. Regression analysis was undertaken to assess whether trends were statistically significant. There was a sustained increase in new registrations (P = 0.0001) and total attendances (P = 0.0001) for curative services, and a fall in new registrations (P = 0.01) and total attendances for immunization and growth monitoring (P = 0.0002) over the study period. The upturn in demand for curative services started at the time of the first policy change. The decreases in antenatal registrations (P = 0.07) and attendances (P = 0.09) were not statistically significant. The number of new registrations for immunization and growth monitoring increased following the first policy change but declined thereafter. We found no evidence that the second policy change influenced underlying trends. The removal of user fees improved access to curative services but this may have happened at the expense of some preventive services. Governments should remain vigilant about the effects of new health policies in order to ensure that objectives are being met. PMID:11477970

  4. A Community Development Approach to Service-Learning: Building Social Capital between Rural Youth and Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henness, Steven A.; Ball, Anna L.; Moncheski, MaryJo

    2013-01-01

    Using 4-H and FFA case study findings, this article explores how community service-learning supports the building of social capital between rural youth and adults and the positive effects on community viability. Key elements of practice form a community development approach to service-learning, which opens up doorways for youth to partner with…

  5. Psychiatric Service Use and Psychiatric Disorders in Adults with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhaumik, S.; Tyrer, F. C.; McGrother, C.; Ganghadaran, S. K.

    2008-01-01

    Background: UK policies aim to facilitate access to general psychiatric services for adults with intellectual disability (ID). If this is to be achieved, it is important to have a clear idea of the characteristics and proportion of people with ID who currently access specialist psychiatric services and the nature and extent of psychiatric…

  6. The Role of Libraries in Providing Services to Adults Learning English. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quezada, Shelley

    This digest discusses some of the challenges facing libraries in the area of service to adults learning English as a Second Language. It describes services provided for this population by some libraries, and suggests tools and approaches that other libraries can use. It also outlines actions that participants at the 1991 White House Conference on…

  7. RETRAINING OLDER ADULTS FOR EMPLOYMENT IN COMMUNITY SERVICE. FINAL PROGRESS REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    THUNE, JEANNE M.; TINE, SEBASTIAN

    THIS PROJECT SOUGHT TO DEMONSTRATE THE CAPABILITY OF OLDER ADULTS TO BEGIN NEW CAREERS AS LEADERS IN COMMUNITY SERVICES. PROJECT STAFF OFFERED FIVE 3-MONTH TRAINING INSTITUTES IN COMMUNITY SERVICE IN NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE, DURING 1963-65 WITH THE HELP OF CONSULTANTS AND REPRESENTATIVES OF PUBLIC AND PRIVATE AGENCIES AND SEVERAL AREA UNIVERSITIES.…

  8. Behavioral Health Services Utilization among Older Adults Identified within a State Abuse Hotline Database

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schonfeld, Lawrence; Larsen, Rebecca G.; Stiles, Paul G.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the extent to which older adults identified in a statewide abuse hotline registry utilized behavioral health services. This is important as mental health issues have been identified as a high priority for filling gaps in services for victims of mistreatment. Design and Methods: We compared Medicaid and Medicare claims…

  9. Rural Older Adults' Access Barriers to In-Home and Community-Based Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Hong

    2006-01-01

    This study identified specific access barriers to seven commonly used in-home and community-based services (CBS) and examined factors that were related to barriers to these services. The data used in this study were extracted from the 1999 National Long Term Care Survey and included 283 dyads of rural older adults and their caregivers. The CBS to…

  10. Understanding Patterns of Service Utilization among Informal Caregivers of Community Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Song-Iee

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The article seeks to identify patterns of service utilization among informal caregivers of frail older adults. In particular, the study examined determinants that explain heterogeneous variations in caregivers' service use patterns. Methods: Using a latent class analysis (LCA) on the 2004 National Long-Term Care Survey and Informal…

  11. Adult ESOL Students and Service-Learning: Voices, Experiences, and Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bippus, Sharon L.; Eslami, Zohreh R.

    2013-01-01

    This multiple-case study examined the unique perspectives of six adult English for speakers of other languages (ESOL) students who participated as the givers of a service in a semester-long service learning community college ESOL course. Their ages ranged from 19 to 45 and they hailed from five different countries (Colombia, Mexico, South Korea,…

  12. CETA Programs for Disadvantaged Adults--What Do We Know about Their Enrollees, Services, and Effectiveness?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC.

    With expiration of the Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA) impending, the United States General Accounting Office (GAO) reviewed four types of adult-oriented service: classroom training, on-the-job training, work experience, and public service employment. The GAO researched and synthesized program administrative data and the results…

  13. A Crisis Intervention Service: Comparison of Younger and Older Adult Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winogrond, Iris R.; Mirassou, Marlene M.

    1983-01-01

    Compares adult and elderly clients of a Crisis Intervention Service in an urban metropolitan area, which included a telephone counseling/referral service and a mobile intervention team for home assessments. Findings indicated the importance of using a biopsychosocial model, particularly in the assessment of elderly persons. (JAC)

  14. Youth with special health care needs: transition to adult health care services.

    PubMed

    Oswald, Donald P; Gilles, Donna L; Cannady, Mariel S; Wenzel, Donna B; Willis, Janet H; Bodurtha, Joann N

    2013-12-01

    Transition to adult services for children and youth with special health care needs (CYSHCN) has emerged as an important event in the life course of individuals with disabilities. Issues that interfere with efficient transition to adult health care include the perspectives of stakeholders, age limits on pediatric service, complexity of health conditions, a lack of experienced healthcare professionals in the adult arena, and health care financing for chronic and complex conditions. The purposes of this study were to develop a definition of successful transition and to identify determinants that were associated with a successful transition. The 2007 Survey of Adult Transition and Health dataset was used to select variables to be considered for defining success and for identifying predictors of success. The results showed that a small percentage of young adults who participated in the 2007 survey had experienced a successful transition from their pediatric care. PMID:23160763

  15. Youth with Special Health Care Needs: Transition to Adult Health Care Services

    PubMed Central

    Oswald, Donald P.; Gilles, Donna L.; Cannady, Mariel S.; Wenzel, Donna B.; Willis, Janet H.; Bodurtha, Joann N.

    2016-01-01

    Transition to adult services for children and youth with special health care needs (CYSHCN) has emerged as an important event in the life course of individuals with disabilities. Issues that interfere with efficient transition to adult health care include the perspectives of stakeholders, age limits on pediatric service, complexity of health conditions, a lack of experienced healthcare professionals in the adult arena, and health care financing for chronic and complex conditions. The purposes of this study were to develop a definition of successful transition and to identify determinants that were associated with a successful transition. The 2007 Survey of Adult Transition and Health dataset was used to select variables to be considered for defining success and for identifying predictors of success. The results showed that a small percentage of young adults who participated in the 2007 survey had experienced a successful transition from their pediatric care. PMID:23160763

  16. Evening and Weekend Library Services for Disadvantaged Adults. Public Library Training Institutes Library Service Guide No. 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McRae, Jane Carroll

    Guidelines are given for expanding library hours so that disadvantaged adults may use library facilities and services on nights and weekends. There are discussions of cost, staffing, security problems, and publicity. Shifting library, bookmobile, and special programs to different hours; moving some programs outside the library; and special…

  17. Andragogical Characteristics and Expectations of University of Hawai'i Adult Learners in a 3D Multi-User Virtual Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meeder, Rebecca L.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to discover which andragogical characteristics and expectations of adult learners manifested themselves in the three-dimensional, multi-user virtual environment known as Second Life. This digital ethnographic study focused specifically on adult students within the University of Hawai'i Second Life group and their…

  18. 2004 Survey of Adult Protective Services: Abuse of Adults 18 Years of Age and Older

    MedlinePlus

    ... for adults 18-59 (21.6%), followed by physical abuse (19.5%), and caregiver neglect/abandonment (18.3%) ( ... third largest category for adults 18-59 was physical abuse (13.2%). Percentages of self-neglect appeared to ...

  19. Access to Adult Learning Opportunities. Tierra de Oportunidad Module 6. LAES: Latino Adult Education Services Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kissam, Ed; Dorsey, Holda

    This module, which may be used as the basis for a workshop or as a special topic unit in an adult basic education or English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) course, focuses on access to adult learning opportunities. The following items are included: module overview; list of basic, thinking, interpersonal, information utilization, and other skills…

  20. Adult Basic Education. Child Care, Transportation, Support Services Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Deborah; Morris, Jamie, Ed.

    This workbook focuses on two primary needs of adult basic education (ABE) students--child care and transportation--and provides ideas to assist program administrators (especially in Texas) to develop appropriate, workable, community-based strategies to meet these needs. The book contains five chapters. Each chapter addresses a particular aspect of…

  1. Math In-Service Training for Adult Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Llorente, Juan Carlos; Porras, Marta; Martinez, Rosa

    In a series of mathematics education workshops in which teachers from adult basic education and vocational education worked together to design teaching situations on particular contents in mathematics in order to make explicit and bring into reflection the teaching strategies used by each group. The workshops constituted a common space of…

  2. Provider Types Utilized and Recency of Mental Health Service Use among African American Emerging Adults

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Sha-Lai

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study examined factors associated with mental health service utilization among African American emerging adults, specifically, when services were used (recency) and the types of providers utilized (mental health/non-mental health). Methods Guided by the Behavioral Model for Vulnerable Populations, secondary analysis of the National Survey of American Life (2001-2003) was conducted. A nationally representative sample of African American emerging adults, ages 18-29 (n=806), were assessed using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. “Evaluated need” was determined by endorsement for one of four DSM-IV diagnosis types (mood, anxiety, substance use, impulse control). Respondents who reported a need for services for emotional/substance use problems were considered to have a “perceived need”. Those who reported voluntary use of mental health/health services to address these problems were considered to have utilized services. Results 25%of the sample utilized services in their lifetime, while 9% utilized services in the past 12 months. Females were more likely than males to utilize services in three of the four service use categories (lifetime, mental health sector, and non-mental health sector).Respondents with an evaluated need for services were 2-12 times more likely to have utilized services compared to those without a need. Conclusions Little is known about why African American emerging adults underutilize mental health services. These findings indicate that being female and having an evaluated need for services were associated with greater odds of service use among this sample. This suggests the need for additional examination of gender differences in service utilization and greater mental health outreach/education among African American males. PMID:24981778

  3. 20 CFR 663.145 - What services are WIA title I adult and dislocated workers formula funds used to provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What services are WIA title I adult and... TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Delivery of Adult and Dislocated Worker Services Through the...

  4. 20 CFR 663.145 - What services are WIA title I adult and dislocated workers formula funds used to provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What services are WIA title I adult and... TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Delivery of Adult and Dislocated Worker Services Through the...

  5. 20 CFR 663.145 - What services are WIA title I adult and dislocated workers formula funds used to provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What services are WIA title I adult and... TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Delivery of Adult and Dislocated Worker Services Through the One-Stop...

  6. 20 CFR 663.145 - What services are WIA title I adult and dislocated workers formula funds used to provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What services are WIA title I adult and... TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Delivery of Adult and Dislocated Worker Services Through the...

  7. A Demonstration of GPS Landslide Monitoring Using Online Positioning User Service (OPUS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G.

    2011-12-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) technologies have been frequently applied to landslide study, both as a complement, and as an alternative to conventional surveying methods. However, most applications of GPS for landslide monitoring have been limited to the academic community for research purposes. High-accuracy GPS has not been widely equipped in geotechnical companies and used by technicians. The main issue that limits the applications of GPS in the practice of high-accuracy landslide monitoring is the complexity of GPS data processing. This study demonstrated an approach using the Online Positioning User Service (OPUS) (http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/OPUS) provided by the National Geodetic Survey (NGS) of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to process GPS data and conduct long-term landslide monitoring in the Puerto Rico and Virgin Islands Region. Continuous GPS data collected at a creeping landslide site during two years were used to evaluate different scenarios for landslide surveying: continuous or campaign, long duration or short duration, morning or afternoon (different weather conditions). OPUS uses Continuously Operating Reference Station (CORS) managed by NGS (http://www.ngs.noaa.giv/CORS/) as references and user data as a rover to solve a position. There are 19 CORS permanent GPS stations in the Puerto Rico and Virgin Islands region. The dense GPS network provides a precise and reliable reference frame for subcentimeter-accuracy landslide monitoring in this region. Our criterion for the accuracy was the root-mean-square (RMS) of OPUS solutions over a 2-year period with respect to true landslide displacement time series overt the same period. The true landslide displacements were derived from a single-baseline (130 m) GPS processing by using 24-hour continuous data. If continuous GPS surveying is performed in the field, then OPUS static processing can provide 0.6 cm horizontal and 1.1 cm vertical precision with few outliers. If repeated

  8. What Characteristics Do Service Users with Intellectual Disability Value in Direct Support Staff within Residential Forensic Services?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarkson, Rachael; Murphy, Glynis H.; Coldwell, Jon B.; Dawson, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Background: This study explores the perceptions of a group of adults with intellectual disability regarding direct support staff. Method: Semi-structured interviews relating to experiences of direct support staff were developed from two focus groups. These interviews were conducted with 11 adults with intellectual disability residing within a…

  9. Minimal effects of visual memory training on auditory performance of adult cochlear implant users.

    PubMed

    Oba, Sandra I; Galvin, John J; Fu, Qian-Jie

    2013-01-01

    Auditory training has been shown to significantly improve cochlear implant (CI) users' speech and music perception. However, it is unclear whether posttraining gains in performance were due to improved auditory perception or to generally improved attention, memory, and/or cognitive processing. In this study, speech and music perception, as well as auditory and visual memory, were assessed in 10 CI users before, during, and after training with a nonauditory task. A visual digit span (VDS) task was used for training, in which subjects recalled sequences of digits presented visually. After the VDS training, VDS performance significantly improved. However, there were no significant improvements for most auditory outcome measures (auditory digit span, phoneme recognition, sentence recognition in noise, digit recognition in noise), except for small (but significant) improvements in vocal emotion recognition and melodic contour identification. Posttraining gains were much smaller with the nonauditory VDS training than observed in previous auditory training studies with CI users. The results suggest that posttraining gains observed in previous studies were not solely attributable to improved attention or memory and were more likely due to improved auditory perception. The results also suggest that CI users may require targeted auditory training to improve speech and music perception. PMID:23516087

  10. Perspectives on Health among Adult Users of Illicit Stimulant Drugs in Rural Ohio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegal, Harvey A.; Draus, Paul J.; Carlson, Robert G.; Falck, Russel S.; Wang, Jichuan

    2006-01-01

    Context: Although the nonmedical use of stimulant drugs such as cocaine and methamphetamine is increasingly common in many rural areas of the United States, little is known about the health beliefs of people who use these drugs. Purpose: This research describes illicit stimulant drug users' views on health and health-related concepts that may…

  11. Users' Satisfaction with Library Information Resources and Services: A Case Study College of Health Sciences Library Niger Delta University, Amassoma, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tiemo, Pereware Aghwotu; Ateboh, Benedict Alaowei

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated users' satisfaction with library information resources and services at the College of Health Sciences (CHS) library Niger Delta University, Nigeria. The objective was to determine the level of users satisfaction with library information resources and services. 2 (two) research questions were formulated to guide the study.…

  12. 78 FR 45176 - Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care Home Food Service...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-26

    ... Food and Nutrition Service Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care... Day Care Homes for the Period July 1, 2013 Through June 30, 2014 AGENCY: Food and Nutrition Service...-risk afterschool care centers, and adult day care centers; the food service payment rates for meals...

  13. The User Interface as a Supplier of Intertwined e-Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hultgren, Göran; Eriksson, Owen

    Today, much of the world economy is focused on the service sector (Stafford and Saunders 2004). One of the changes driving service economic growth has been the rapid development in computer technology, mobile technology and the Internet (ibid.). There are e.g. mobile positioning services, traffic information services and intermediary services such as banking services on the Internet. With the help of channels such as the Internet and mobile telecommunications, information and functionalities are delivered by service providers, and are used by customers with the help of information technology (IT) systems. Many of these services have a characteristic where customers can meet and communicate with each other.

  14. Online anonymous discussion between service users and health professionals to ascertain stakeholder concerns in using e-health services in mental health.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ray B; Ashurst, Emily J

    2013-12-01

    Implementation of e-health in mental health services requires that we are aware of stakeholders' concerns. We ascertained the views of mental health professionals and mental health service users through the (1) development of 12 topics based on the research literature, (2) presentation to 31 participants (19 mental health professionals and 12 mental health service users) and discussion in three 1-week programmes, (3) thematic analysis of transcripts, and (4) comparison with the literature to identify areas requiring attention in e-health implementation. This method of engaging mental health service users and mental health professionals was effective. We identified areas that (1) should be the first to implement (e.g. discussion forums, email, and Skype), (2) where further education and engagement are necessary before e-health methods could be used (e.g. unsupported computerised cognitive behavioural therapy, computer-patient interviewing, and patient access to online medical records), and (3) for further research (e.g. the impact of bad online experiences). PMID:24255052

  15. 20 CFR 663.110 - What are the eligibility criteria for core services for adults in the adult and dislocated worker...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What are the eligibility criteria for core services for adults in the adult and dislocated worker programs? 663.110 Section 663.110 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE...

  16. Patterns, determinants and barriers of health and social service utilization among young urban crack users in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Crack use is prevalent across the Americas, and specifically among marginalized urban street drug users in Brazil. Crack users commonly feature multiple physical and mental health problems, while low rates of and distinct barriers to help service use have been observed in these populations. This study examined profiles and determinants of social and health service utilization, and unmet service needs, in a two-city sample of young (18–24 years), marginalized crack users in Brazil. Methods N = 160 study participants were recruited by community-based methods from impoverished neighborhoods in the cities of Rio de Janeiro (n = 81) and Salvador (n = 79). A mixed methods protocol was used. Participants’ drug use, health, and social and health service utilization characteristics were assessed by an anonymous interviewer-administered questionnaire completed in a community setting; descriptive statistics on variables of interest were computed. Service needs and barriers were further assessed by way of several focus groups with the study population; narrative data were qualitatively analyzed. The study protocol was approved by institutional ethics review boards; data were collected between November 2010 and June 2011. Results The majority of the sample was male, without stable housing, and used other drugs (e.g., alcohol, marijuana). About half the sample reported physical and mental health problems, yet most had not received medical attention for these problems. Only small minorities had utilized locally available social or health services; utilization appeared to be influenced by sex, race and housing characteristics in both sites. Participants cited limited service resources, lack of needs-specific professional skills, bureaucratic barriers and stigma as obstacles to better service access. However, most respondents stated strong interest and need for general social, health and treatment services designed for the study population, for which various

  17. QuickStats: Percentages* of Residential Care Communities and Adult Day Services Centers That Provided(†) Selected Services - United States, 2014.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    In 2014, a greater percentage of residential care communities than adult day service centers provided five of seven selected services. The majority of residential care communities provided pharmacy services (82%); followed by transportation for social activities (79%); physical, occupational, or speech therapy (69%); hospice (62%); skilled nursing (59%); and mental health services (52%). Fewer than half provided social work services (48%). The majority of adult day services centers provided transportation for social activities (69%); skilled nursing (66%); and social work (52%). %). Fewer than half provided physical, occupational, or speech therapy (49%). One third or less provided mental health (33%), pharmacy (27%), and hospice services (12%). PMID:27607333

  18. A Domain Specific Modeling Approach for Coordinating User-Centric Communication Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Yali

    2011-01-01

    Rapid advances in electronic communication devices and technologies have resulted in a shift in the way communication applications are being developed. These new development strategies provide abstract views of the underlying communication technologies and lead to the so-called "user-centric communication applications." One user-centric…

  19. The Relationship between Cultural Diversity and User Needs in Virtual Reference Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shachaf, Pnina; Snyder, Mary

    2007-01-01

    While the racial diversity of academic library users continues to grow, research on the effects of this diversity remains scarce. This study looks at similarities and differences between non-traditional Caucasian and African American library users through content analysis of ninety-four virtual reference transactions.

  20. User Problems Associated with the Services of Federal and Quasi-Federal Technical Information Producing Agencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Los Angeles Regional Technical Information Users Council, CA.

    Nine reports of the Los Angeles Regional Technical Information Users Council, which identify and discuss user problem areas and recommend solutions, comprise this document. The topics of the reports are: (1) Air Force Technical Objective Document Release Program (AFTOD); (2) Army Qualitative Requirements Information Program (QDRI); (3)…

  1. Treatment Implications for Young Adult Users of MDMA (3,4-Methylenedyoxymethamphetamine)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dew, Brian J.; Elifson, Kirk W.; Sterk, Claire E.

    2006-01-01

    Young adults' 3,4-methylenedyoxymethamphetamine (MDMA) use is a national public health concern. Although research on the epidemiology of MDMA use has increased, inquiry into intervention and treatment is needed. The authors examine results from an epidemiological investigation from a clinical perspective and provide suggestions for clinicians…

  2. Helper Bank: A Reciprocal Services Program for Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Catherine Chase

    1984-01-01

    Describes a hypothetical program called the Helper Bank, which uses time instead of money as the medium of exchange for services. The reciprocal relationship allows older persons to volunteer to help others as well as provide for future needs such as shopping, transportation or housekeeping. (JAC)

  3. Designing a Full-Service Adult ESOL Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batt, Sarah; Bauer, Roxanne; Jensen, Byron; Wann, Dan; Westfall, Timmie

    This document describes how professionals representing the Indianapolis public school system, Goodwill Industries, Indy Reads (a literacy advocacy group), and an English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) professional development consultant designed a comprehensive ESL education and social service system in metropolitan Indianapolis. The document…

  4. Spousal caregiving when the adult day services center is closed.

    PubMed

    Campell, D D; Travis, S S

    1999-08-01

    Of those spousal caregivers who identified a time when they most needed assistance, morning or afternoon time periods appeared to be most problematic. Spousal caregivers who reported receiving respite time on the weekends identified adult children as the informal support person most often available. However, more than half of the caregivers reported having no respite time during the weekend. Differences in the ways spousal caregivers spent their respite time on the weekends, if available, varied by gender, length of tenure as a caregiver, and age. PMID:10461273

  5. Chaplains' Engagement with Suicidality among Their Service Users: Findings from the VA/DoD Integrated Mental Health Strategy.

    PubMed

    Kopacz, Marek S; Nieuwsma, Jason A; Jackson, George L; Rhodes, Jeffrey E; Cantrell, William C; Bates, Mark J; Meador, Keith G

    2016-04-01

    Chaplains play an important role in supporting the mental health of current and former military personnel; in this study, the engagement of Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), Army, Navy, and Air Force chaplains with suicidality among their service users were examined. An online survey was used to collect data from 440 VA and 1,723 Department of Defense (DoD) chaplains as part of the VA/DoD Integrated Mental Health Strategy. Differences were noted for demographics, work setting characteristics, encountering suicidality, and self-perceived preparation for dealing with suicidality. Compared to DoD chaplains, VA chaplains encounter more at-risk service users, yet feel less prepared for dealing with suicidality. PMID:26255592

  6. Meeting Art with Art: Arts-Based Methods Enhance Researcher Reflexivity in Research with Mental Health Service Users.

    PubMed

    McCaffrey, Tríona; Edwards, Jane

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a rationale for arts-based practices in music therapy research, and provides an example of using ABR techniques in research. Arts-based materials are increasingly demonstrated to have the capacity to extend processes of reflexivity and analysis in a range of qualitative health research studies. By comparison, music therapy research studies have rarely employed arts-based methods or techniques. There is a need for more studies in music therapy that employ arts-based research to demystify and elaborate a wider range of creative approaches within music therapy inquiry. In the study described in this paper, ABR was used to reflect on the contribution of a service user in a community mental health context who participated in a focus group about his experiences of music therapy. ABR was found to offer a creative way to engage service users, and to deepen and extend the researcher's reflexivity when responding to materials created by research participants. PMID:26705349

  7. Final Report - "UCM-Grid Service for User-Centric Monitoring"

    SciTech Connect

    David A Alexander

    2009-11-12

    The User Centric Monitoring (UCM) project was aimed at developing a toolkit that provides the Virtual Organization (VO) with tools to build systems that serve a rich set of intuitive job and application monitoring information to the VO's scientists so that they can be more productive. The tools help collect and serve the status and error information through a Web interface. The proposed UCM toolkit is composed of a set of library functions, a database schema, and a Web portal that will collect and filter available job monitoring information from various resources and present it to users in a user-centric view rather than and administrative-centric point of view.

  8. An Ambient Intelligence Framework for End-User Service Provisioning in a Hospital Pharmacy: a Case Study.

    PubMed

    Martín, Diego; Alcarria, Ramón; Sánchez-Picot, Álvaro; Robles, Tomás

    2015-10-01

    End-user development is a new trend to provide tailored services to dynamic environments such as hospitals. These services not only facilitate daily work for pharmacy personnel but also improve self-care in elder people that are still related to hospital, such as discharged patients. This paper presents an ambient intelligence (AmI) environment for End-user service provisioning in the pharmacy department of Gregorio Marañón Hospital in Madrid, composed of a drug traceability infrastructure (DP-TraIN) and a ubiquitous application for enabling the pharmacy staff to create and execute their own services for facilitating drug management and dispensing. The authors carried out a case study with various experiments where different roles from the pharmacy department of Gregorio Marañón Hospital were involved in activities such as drug identification, dispensing and medication administering. The authors analyzed the effort required to create services by pharmacy staff, the discharged patients' perception of the AmI environment and the quantifiable benefits in reducing patient waiting time for drug dispensing. PMID:26286317

  9. User perceptions of and willingness to pay for household container-based sanitation services: experience from Cap Haitien, Haiti

    PubMed Central

    Russel, Kory; Tilmans, Sebastien; Kramer, Sasha; Sklar, Rachel; Tillias, Daniel; Davis, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Household-level container-based sanitation (CBS) services may help address the persistent challenge of providing effective, affordable sanitation services for which low-income urban households are willing to pay. Little is known, however, about user perceptions of and demand for household CBS services. This study presents the results of a pilot CBS service programme in Cap Haitien, Haiti. One hundred and eighteen households were randomly selected to receive toilets and a twice-weekly collection service. After three months, changes in these households’ satisfaction with their sanitation situation, along with feelings of pride, modernity and personal safety, were compared to 248 households in two comparison cohorts. Following the service pilot, 71 per cent of participating households opted to continue with the container-based sanitation service as paying subscribers. The results from this study suggest that, in the context of urban Haiti, household CBS systems have the potential to satisfy many residents’ desire for safe, convenient and modern sanitation services. PMID:26640322

  10. Developing a service user facilitated, interactive case study--a reflective and evaluative account of a teaching method.

    PubMed

    Ward, Lisa J; Padgett, Kath

    2012-02-01

    This article describes the development and ongoing evaluation of a method of service user facilitated case study in health and social care education in a U.K. University. An action research approach (Norton 2009) has been used in which the aim of the work is to improve personal practice with the aim of enhancing the student experience. The paper is written from the perspective of the service user with support from an academic colleague. The paper describes how a narrative monologue, over time is developed into an interactive case study. In draws upon literature from service user involvement, case study and pedagogic action research. The research group are health and social care students both under and post-graduates. Analysis is via a session evaluation form. Thematic analysis draws out key themes. Firstly that first person accounts have a reasonance and interest with students. Secondly that the built in thinking time helps students to develop their reflection and critical thinking skills. Furthermore a theme emerges on how the technique supports students with their future careers. Finally the author reflects on how the approach enables the development of teaching practice and enhanced student learning. PMID:22036271

  11. ‘Recovery work’ and ‘magic’ among long-term mental health service-users

    PubMed Central

    Laws, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Based on an extended period of qualitative research with mental health service-users in north-east England, this article considers the various forms of ‘magical work’ and ‘recovery work’ that emerge in the lives of people living with severe mental health problems. Given the now sizeable body of literature which seeks to problematize traditional conceptual boundaries of work, the article asks to what extent these hidden and unusual work-forms might also be considered legitimate members of the category. Rather than argue for the expansion of the construct to accommodate these activities, the paper attempts simply to problematize the extent to which so-called ‘mad’ forms of work are irresolvably different to more conventional forms of occupation. In challenging notions of the psychiatric patient as inevitably inactive, new vocabularies for service-user work are explored. Concluding remarks are also directed to recent policy debates concerning ‘back-to-work’ welfare reform for long-term out of work service-users. PMID:24223439

  12. Experiences of Multidisciplinary Development Team Members During User-Centered Design of Telecare Products and Services: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background User-centered design (UCD) methodologies can help take the needs and requirements of potential end-users into account during the development of innovative telecare products and services. Understanding how members of multidisciplinary development teams experience the UCD process might help to gain insight into factors that members with different backgrounds consider critical during the development of telecare products and services. Objective The primary objective of this study was to explore how members of multidisciplinary development teams experienced the UCD process of telecare products and services. The secondary objective was to identify differences and similarities in the barriers and facilitators they experienced. Methods Twenty-five members of multidisciplinary development teams of four Research and Development (R&D) projects participated in this study. The R&D projects aimed to develop telecare products and services that can support self-management in elderly people or patients with chronic conditions. Seven participants were representatives of end-users (elderly persons or patients with chronic conditions), three were professional end-users (geriatrician and nurses), five were engineers, four were managers (of R&D companies or engineering teams), and six were researchers. All participants were interviewed by a researcher who was not part of their own development team. The following topics were discussed during the interviews: (1) aim of the project, (2) role of the participant, (3) experiences during the development process, (4) points of improvement, and (5) what the project meant to the participant. Results Experiences of participants related to the following themes: (1) creating a development team, (2) expectations regarding responsibilities and roles, (3) translating user requirements into technical requirements, (4) technical challenges, (5) evaluation of developed products and services, and (6) valorization. Multidisciplinary team members

  13. Users guide for SAMM: A prototype southeast Alaska multiresource model. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Weyermann, D.L.; Fight, R.D.; Garrett, F.D.

    1991-08-01

    This paper instructs resource analysts on using the southeast Alaska multiresource model (SAMM). SAMM is an interactive microcomputer program that allows users to explore relations among several resources in southeast Alaska (timber, anadromous fish, deer, and hydrology) and the effects of timber management activities (logging, thinning, and road building) on those relations and resources. This guide assists users in installing SAMM on a microcomputer, developing input data files, making simulation runs, and strong output data for external analysis and graphic display.

  14. [Prevalence and alcohol user profile in adult population in a south Brazilian city].

    PubMed

    Bortoluzzi, Marcelo Carlos; Traebert, Jefferson; Loguercio, Alessandro; Kehrig, Ruth Terezinha

    2010-05-01

    This is an observational cross-sectional survey which included 707 individuals from a south Brazilian city (Joaçaba, in Santa Catarina State) aiming to know the alcohol user prevalence as well as the profile of the user. The results showed that 45.5% (322) of that population consume alcohol on regular basis and had used it at least once in the last month. The regular alcohol consumption occurs predominantly on males (p <0.001), in people under 39 years old (p =0.007), occurring predominantly with ones working comparing to the ones not working, (p <0.001), have more than 8 years of education (p <0.001) and with income greater than 1738.00 reais - Brazilian currency (p <0.001). The regular alcohol consumption was greater on those who classified his health status as regular, good or very good (p <0.006), also this relation happen to those people who haven't been under hospital internment in the last year (p <0.013). The depression levels scored by the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) showed low levels to those who regularly consume alcohol (p <0.047). PMID:20464180

  15. Space Station user traffic model analysis for mission payload servicing into the twenty-first century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, G. J.

    1986-01-01

    The Space Station-based Customer Servicing Facility service bay requirements for service accommodation to the Initial Orbit Capability (IOC) and far-term Station Accommodation Test Sets (SETS) missions are analyzed using the developed mission traffic model. Analysis results are presented which indicate that one servicing bay will be sufficient to accommodate IOC customer servicing requirements. Growth servicing requirements indicate that an additional servicing bay will be needed for accommodation of the far-term SATS mission payloads. Even though the level of total mission accommodation is below 100 percent for one bay at IOC and two bays during growth operations, the levels are such that operational work-around exists so that additional servicing bays will not be required.

  16. Identifying Programmatic Gaps: Inequities in Harm Reduction Service Utilization among Male and Female Drug Users in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Lambdin, Barrot H.; Bruce, R. Douglas; Chang, Olivia; Nyandindi, Cassian; Sabuni, Norman; Zamudio-Haas, Sophia; McCurdy, Sheryl; Masao, Frank; Ivo, Yovin; Msami, Amani; Ubuguy, Omar; Mbwambo, Jessie

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Current estimates suggest an HIV prevalence of 42% among people who inject drugs (PWIDs) in Dar es Salaam, while HIV prevalence is estimated to be 8.8% among the general population in the city. To address the HIV epidemic in this population, the government of Tanzania began establishing HIV prevention, treatment and care services including outreach and medication assisted treatment (MAT) for PWIDs in 2010. We assessed gender inequities in utilization of outreach and MAT services and evaluated differences in HIV risk behaviors between female and male PWIDs. Materials and Methods Routine outreach data between December 2010 to mid-August 2012 and baseline data on clients enrolling in methadone from February 2011 to August 2012 were utilized. Binomial regression was used to estimate adjusted relative risk estimates comparing females to males. Results From December 2010 to August 2012, 8,578 contacts were made to drug users; among them 1,898 were injectors. A total of 453 injectors were eligible and referred to MAT, of which, 443 enrolled in treatment. However, regarding total outreach contacts, outreach to PWID, referral to MAT and enrollment in MAT, 8% or less of drug users accessing services were women. In contrast, weighted estimations from surveys suggest that 34% of PWIDs are female, and this approximation is similar to recent population size estimations. Overall, 43% of traditional outreach workers conducting outreach with drug users were female. Though reporting higher levels of condom usage, female PWID were more likely to report multiple sex partners, anal sex, commercial sex work and struggle under a higher burden of addiction, mental disorders and abuse. Conclusions Services have not been mobilized adequately to address the clear needs of females who inject drugs. A clear and urgent need exists for women-centered strategies that effectively engage female PWID into HIV prevention services. PMID:23825620

  17. A comparison of metropolitan and non-metropolitan employment characteristics: Indications of the size of non-metropolitan mobile communication services user classes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    The similarities and differences between areas inside and outside U.S. metropolitan areas were evaluated in terms of their commercial/industrial and government employment characteristics. The comparison focuses on the levels, shares, and composition of employment in the commercial/industrial and government sectors that represent potential classes of land mobile communications users. The major findings of the analysis are as follows: (1) non-metropolitan commercial/industrial user classes of land mobile communication services exist in significant numbers; (2) the compositions of non-metropolitan and metropolitan commercial/industrial user classes of land mobile communication services closely resemble each other; (3) non-metropolitan areas have significant levels of the government user classes that represent potential markets for land mobile communication services; and (4) non-metropolitan local governments have a significantly larger proportion of their employment in the primary user classes of private land mobile radio service than do metropolitan local governments.

  18. Individual and socio-environmental factors associated with unsafe injection practices among young adult injection drug users in San Diego.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Fátima; Burgos, José Luis; Cuevas-Mota, Jazmine; Teshale, Eyasu; Garfein, Richard S

    2015-01-01

    Unsafe injection practices significantly increase the risk of hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection among injection drug users (IDUs). We examined individual and socio-environmental factors associated with unsafe injection practices in young adult IDUs in San Diego, California. Of 494 IDUs, 46.9 % reported receptive syringe sharing and 68.8 % sharing drug preparation paraphernalia in the last 3 months. Unsafe injection practices were associated with increased odds of having friends who injected drugs with used syringes, injecting with friends or sexual partners, and injecting heroin. Perceived high susceptibility to HIV and perceived barriers to obtaining sterile syringes were associated with increased odds of receptive syringe sharing, but not with sharing injection paraphernalia. Over half the IDUs reported unsafe injection practices. Our results suggest that personal relationships might influence IDUs' perceptions that dictate behavior. Integrated interventions addressing individual and socio-environmental factors are needed to promote safe injection practices in this population. PMID:24920342

  19. Individual and socio-environmental factors associated with unsafe injection practices among young adult injection drug users in San Diego

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Fátima; Burgos, José Luis; Cuevas-Mota, Jazmine; Teshale, Eyasu; Garfein, Richard S.

    2014-01-01

    Unsafe injection practices significantly increase the risk of hepatitis C virus and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection among injection drug users (IDUs). We examined individual and socio-environmental factors associated with unsafe injection practices in young adult IDUs in San Diego, California. Of 494 IDUs, 46.9% reported receptive syringe sharing and 68.8% sharing drug preparation paraphernalia in the last 3 months. Unsafe injection practices were associated with increased odds of having friends who injected drugs with used syringes, injecting with friends, sexual partners, and injecting heroin. Perceived high susceptibility to HIV and perceived barriers to obtaining sterile syringes were associated with increased odds of receptive syringe sharing, but not with sharing injection paraphernalia. Over half IDUs reported unsafe injection practices, and our results suggest that personal relationships might influence IDUs’ perceptions that dictate behavior. Integrated interventions addressing individual and socio-environmental factors are needed to promote safe injection practices in this population. PMID:24920342

  20. Exploiting OAuth 2.0: from User Delegation for OGC Services to a Generic Federation-as-a-Service Solution for Federated Identity Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kershaw, Philip; Jensen, Jens; Stephens, Ag; van Engen, Willem

    2013-04-01

    We explore an application of OAuth to enable user delegation for OGC-based services and the evolution of this solution to form part of a wider Federation-as-a-Service offering for federated identity management. OAuth has established itself in the commercial sector as a means for users to delegate access to secured resources under their control to third parties. It has also found its way into the academic and research domains as a solution for user delegation. Notable examples including the CILogon project for Teragrid in the US, and also, closer to the Earth Sciences, as part of the OGC Web Services, Phase 6 Testbed. Both are examples of OAuth 1.0 implementations. Version 2.0 has seen significant changes to this original specification which have not been without controversy but it has arguably provided a greater degree of flexibility in how it can be applied and the use cases that it can address. At CEDA (Centre for Environmental Data Archival, STFC), a Python implementation of OAuth 2.0 was made to explore these capabilities with a focus on providing a solution for user delegation for data access, processing and visualisation services for the Earth Observation and Climate sciences domains. The initial goal was to provide a means of delegating short-lived user credentials to trusted services along the same lines as the established approach of Proxy certificates widely used in Grid computing. For the OGC and other HTTP-based services employed by CEDA, OAuth makes a natural fit for this role, integrating with minimal impact on existing interfaces. Working implementations have been made for CEDA's COWS Web Processing Service and Web Map Service. Packaging the software and making it available in Open Source repositories together with the generic nature of the solution have made it readily exploitable in other application domains. At the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics (Nijmegen, The Netherlands), the software will be used to integrate some tools in the

  1. Neural mechanisms of sensitivity to peer information in young adult cannabis users.

    PubMed

    Gilman, Jodi M; Schuster, Randi M; Curran, Max T; Calderon, Vanessa; van der Kouwe, Andre; Evins, A Eden

    2016-08-01

    Though social influence is a critical factor in the initiation and maintenance of marijuana use, the neural correlates of influence in those who use marijuana are unknown. In this study, marijuana-using young adults (MJ; n = 20) and controls (CON; n = 23) performed a decision-making task in which they made a perceptual choice after viewing the choices of unknown peers via photographs, while they underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging scans. The MJ and CON groups did not show differences in the overall number of choices that agreed with versus opposed group influence, but only the MJ group showed reaction time slowing when deciding against group choices. Longer reaction times were associated with greater activation of frontal regions. The MJ goup, compared to CON, showed significantly greater activation in the caudate when presented with peer information. Across groups, caudate activation was associated with self-reported susceptibility to influence. These findings indicate that young adults who use MJ may exhibit increased effort when confronted with opposing peer influence, as well as exhibit greater responsivity of the caudate to social information. These results not only better define the neural basis of social decisions, but also suggest that marijuana use is associated with exaggerated neural activity during decision making that involves social information. PMID:27068178

  2. Multivariate Predictors of Music Perception and Appraisal by Adult Cochlear Implant Users

    PubMed Central

    Gfeller, Kate; Oleson, Jacob; Knutson, John F.; Breheny, Patrick; Driscoll, Virginia; Olszewski, Carol

    2009-01-01

    The research examined whether performance by adult cochlear implant recipients on a variety of recognition and appraisal tests derived from real-world music could be predicted from technological, demographic, and life experience variables, as well as speech recognition scores. A representative sample of 209 adults implanted between 1985 and 2006 participated. Using multiple linear regression models and generalized linear mixed models, sets of optimal predictor variables were selected that effectively predicted performance on a test battery that assessed different aspects of music listening. These analyses established the importance of distinguishing between the accuracy of music perception and the appraisal of musical stimuli when using music listening as an index of implant success. Importantly, neither device type nor processing strategy predicted music perception or music appraisal. Speech recognition performance was not a strong predictor of music perception, and primarily predicted music perception when the test stimuli included lyrics. Additionally, limitations in the utility of speech perception in predicting musical perception and appraisal underscore the utility of music perception as an alternative outcome measure for evaluating implant outcomes. Music listening background, residual hearing (i.e., hearing aid use), cognitive factors, and some demographic factors predicted several indices of perceptual accuracy or appraisal of music. PMID:18669126

  3. Multivariate predictors of music perception and appraisal by adult cochlear implant users.

    PubMed

    Gfeller, Kate; Oleson, Jacob; Knutson, John F; Breheny, Patrick; Driscoll, Virginia; Olszewski, Carol

    2008-02-01

    The research examined whether performance by adult cochlear implant recipients on a variety of recognition and appraisal tests derived from real-world music could be predicted from technological, demographic, and life experience variables, as well as speech recognition scores. A representative sample of 209 adults implanted between 1985 and 2006 participated. Using multiple linear regression models and generalized linear mixed models, sets of optimal predictor variables were selected that effectively predicted performance on a test battery that assessed different aspects of music listening. These analyses established the importance of distinguishing between the accuracy of music perception and the appraisal of musical stimuli when using music listening as an index of implant success. Importantly, neither device type nor processing strategy predicted music perception or music appraisal. Speech recognition performance was not a strong predictor of music perception, and primarily predicted music perception when the test stimuli included lyrics. Additionally, limitations in the utility of speech perception in predicting musical perception and appraisal underscore the utility of music perception as an alternative outcome measure for evaluating implant outcomes. Music listening background, residual hearing (i.e., hearing aid use), cognitive factors, and some demographic factors predicted several indices of perceptual accuracy or appraisal of music. PMID:18669126

  4. Differential Outcomes for American College Students Engaged in Community Service-Learning Involving Youth and Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seider, Scott; Rabinowicz, Samantha; Gillmor, Susan

    2012-01-01

    The Serve Program at Ignatius University is a community service-learning program that combines academic study of philosophy with a yearlong field-based project at one of approximately 50 different sites. Half of these projects entail working with youth, while the other half entail working with adults. This mixed methods analysis found that college…

  5. Service Providers' Perceptions of Active Ageing among Older Adults with Lifelong Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buys, L.; Aird, R.; Miller, E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Considerable attention is currently being directed towards both active ageing and the revising of standards for disability services within Australia and internationally. Yet, to date, no consideration appears to have been given to ways to promote active ageing among older adults with intellectual disabilities (IDs). Methods:…

  6. New Research into General Psychiatric Services for Adults with Intellectual Disability and Mental Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaplin, R.

    2009-01-01

    Background: There are a variety of models for the mental health care of adults with comorbid intellectual disability (ID) and mental illness. There has been a long-running debate as to whether this should be provided by general psychiatric or specialised ID services. A previous review concluded that there was no clear evidence to support either…

  7. Student Support Services and Success Factors for Adult On-Line Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greer,Linda B; Hudson, Larry; Paugh, Robert

    A study examined a variety of student support services and four areas for student success from the viewpoint of World Wide Web-based learners in the University of Central Florida College of Education, Vocational Education area. A two-part on-line survey form was included in the exam files for adult learners in four Web-based courses during spring…

  8. How to Assess Needs for Community Instructional Services: A Guide for Adult Education Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aker, George F.; Kemerer, Richard W.

    This guide is intended to assist in identifying the nature and extent of learning needs within the community and determining program priorities consistent with those needs. It is designed specifically for developing Community Instructional Services, a Florida program that addresses the in-life learning needs of adult citizens that are…

  9. Informal Adult Learning and Emotion Work of Service Providers for Refugee Claimants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brigham, Susan M.; Baillie Abidi, Catherine; Tastsoglou, Evangelia; Lange, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Like the immigrant clients they serve, service providers have been overlooked in adult education literature, yet their roles are crucial for addressing the serious concerns of refugees and refugee claimants who flee their home countries hoping to find safe refuge in another country.

  10. Unmet Healthcare and Social Services Needs of Older Canadian Adults with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shooshtari, Shahin; Naghipur, Saba; Zhang, Jin

    2012-01-01

    The authors sought to create a demographic, socioeconomic, and health-related profile of older (40+) Canadian adults with developmental disabilities (DD) residing in their communities, and to enhance current knowledge of their unmet health and social support services needs. They provide a secondary analysis of cross-sectional data from the 2001…

  11. Adult College Career Employment Support Services: ACCESS. Emeritus Career and Vocational Exploration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrew, Lee

    A part of the Adult College Career Employment Support Services (ACCESS), the minicourse entitled Emeritus Career and Vocational Exploration has been designed to facilitate the entry or reentry of older persons into the work force as paid or volunteer workers. Organized into two four-week modules, the course offers participants assistance in…

  12. Food Security in Older Adults: Community Service Provider Perceptions of Their Roles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Heather H.; Dwyer, John J. M.; Edwards, Vicki; Senson, Christine; Edward, H. Gayle

    2007-01-01

    Food insecurity in older adults is influenced by financial constraints, functional disability, and isolation. Twenty-eight social- and community-service providers participated in four focus groups to report (a) perceptions and experiences with food insecurity in their older clients, (b) beliefs about their potential role(s) in promoting food…

  13. A SURVEY OF PUBLIC SCHOOL ADULT GUIDANCE SERVICES IN FIFTY CITIES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PRESGRAVES, JAMES S.

    A QUESTIONNAIRE MEASURING ENROLLMENT OF POTENTIAL CLIENTS AND ADMINISTRATION OF PUBLIC SCHOOL ADULT GUIDANCE WAS SENT TO 50 CITIES. INFORMATION WAS RETURNED FROM 30 CITIES, AND INCLUDED DATA ON ADMINISTRATION, PUBLICITY, FINANCING, COUNSELING, TESTING, AND RECORDS. RESPONSES INDICATED COUNSELING SERVICES HAD BEEN OPERATING FOR A MEDIAN OF 10 YEARS…

  14. Physical Therapists' Perceptions of Providing Services to Adults with Childhood-Onset Neuromotor Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Compton-Griffith, Kelsi N.; Cicirello, Nancy A.; Turner, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Adults with childhood-onset neuromotor disabilities face problems accessing health care services. There are often challenges finding primary care providers or specialized providers, such as physical therapists, who are knowledgeable about neuromotor disabilities. The purpose of this study was to determine the perceptions of physical therapists…

  15. Examining Self-Protection Measures Guarding Adult Protective Services Social Workers against Compassion Fatigue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourassa, Dara

    2012-01-01

    Little research has focused on the risk factors, effects, and experiences of compassion fatigue among gerontological social workers. This qualitative study explores the experiences and perspectives of nine Adult Protective Services (APS) social workers in relation to compassion fatigue. Results show that the APS social workers combined personal…

  16. Emerging New Service Roles for Older Adults on College and University Campuses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchard, David C.; Tomb, Karyl

    1981-01-01

    Explored number of programs initiated to involve older adults in meaningful volunteer tasks, responsibilities, and roles on university campuses. Data demonstrate the feasibility of these programs and positive outcomes include improvement of intergenerational communication, reduction of ageism, provision of services to educational institutions, and…

  17. A Meta-Ethnographic Synthesis of Support Services for Adult Learners in Distance Learning Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuquero, Jean M.

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative research study utilized Noblit and Hare's (1988) meta-ethnographic approach to synthesize findings of five dissertations that focused on distance learning support services for adult learners. Noblit and Hare's (1988) meta-ethnographic approach consists of seven phases. Each meta-ethnographic phase guided the identification process…

  18. The Prevalence of Undiagnosed Geriatric Health Conditions among Adult Protective Service Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath, John M.; Brown, Merle; Kobylarz, Fred A.; Castano, Susan

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: We sought to determine the prevalence of remediable health conditions from in-home geriatric assessments of referred adult protective service (APS) clients suffering elder mistreatment. Design and Methods: We used a retrospective cohort study of 211 APS clients (74% female; age, M = 77 years) in two central New Jersey counties. Results:…

  19. Impact of Adult Day Services on Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Femia, Elia E.; Zarit, Steven H.; Stephens, Mary Ann Parris; Greene, Rick

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This study explored whether adult day service (ADS) use was associated with reductions in behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) in individuals with dementia. Design and Methods: We used a quasi-experimental design to compare a group of 133 persons with dementia (PWDs) who initially enrolled in an ADS program to a…

  20. Young Adult Cannabis Users Report Greater Propensity for Risk-Taking Only in Non-Monetary Domains

    PubMed Central

    Gilman, Jodi M.; Calderon, Vanessa; Curran, Max T.; Evins, A. Eden

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Though substance use is often associated with elevated risk-taking in real-world scenarios, many risk-taking tasks in experimental psychology using financial gambles fail to find significant differences between individuals with substance use disorders and healthy controls. We assessed whether participants using marijuana would show a greater propensity for risk-taking in distinct domains including, but not limited to, financial risk-taking. METHODS In the current study, we assessed risk-taking in young adult (age 18–25) regular marijuana users and in non-using control participants using a domain-specific risk-taking self-report scale (DOSPERT) encompassing five domains of risk-taking (social, financial, recreational, health/safety, and ethical). We also measured behavioral risk-taking using a laboratory monetary risk-taking task. RESULTS Marijuana users and controls reported significant differences on the social, health/safety, and ethical risk-taking scales, but no differences in the propensity to take recreational or financial risks. Complementing the self-report finding, there were no differences between marijuana users and controls in their performance on the laboratory risk-taking task. CONCLUSIONS These findings suggest that financial risk-taking may be less sensitive than other domains of risk-taking in assessing differences in risky behavior between those who use marijuana and those who do not. In order to more consistently determine whether increased risk-taking is a factor in substance use, it may be necessary to use both monetary risk-taking tasks and complementary assessments of non-monetary-based risk-taking measures. PMID:25577478