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Sample records for adult specimens collected

  1. Blood culture collection through peripheral intravenous catheters increases the risk of specimen contamination among adult emergency department patients.

    PubMed

    Self, Wesley H; Speroff, Theodore; McNaughton, Candace D; Wright, Patty W; Miller, Geraldine; Johnson, James G; Daniels, Titus L; Talbot, Thomas R

    2012-05-01

    Five hundred five blood cultures collected through a peripheral intravenous catheter (PIV) in an emergency department were matched to cultures obtained by dedicated venipuncture from the same patient within 10 minutes. The relative risk of contamination for cultures collected through PIVs compared with dedicated venipuncture was 1.83 (95% confidence interval, 1.08-3.11).

  2. Collecting live ant specimens (colony sampling).

    PubMed

    Smith, Chris R; Tschinkel, Walter R

    2009-07-01

    Because of the great diversity of ants, it is difficult to give a single protocol for the collection of live specimens. Ant body size can be very small or extremely large; the ants can be hard or soft, sting or spray toxic chemicals, live in the open or in hard-to-reach places; and colony size can range from tens of individuals to millions. Thus, collection techniques must be tailored to each particular species. In particular, caution must always be taken when dealing with stinging species, and symptoms and basic first-aid measures, especially for the treatment of anaphylactic shock, should be reviewed before beginning fieldwork. Nonetheless, many species are collectable as whole colonies. This protocol reviews some basic techniques for collecting ground-nesting species and describes how to collect whole live colonies (with queens), which are necessary for long-term laboratory studies and addressing questions of social organization and ecology. PMID:20147204

  3. 21 CFR 862.1675 - Blood specimen collection device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Blood specimen collection device. 862.1675 Section... Systems § 862.1675 Blood specimen collection device. (a) Identification. A blood specimen collection device is a device intended for medical purposes to collect and to handle blood specimens and to...

  4. 21 CFR 862.1675 - Blood specimen collection device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Blood specimen collection device. 862.1675 Section... Systems § 862.1675 Blood specimen collection device. (a) Identification. A blood specimen collection device is a device intended for medical purposes to collect and to handle blood specimens and to...

  5. 21 CFR 862.1675 - Blood specimen collection device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Blood specimen collection device. 862.1675 Section... Systems § 862.1675 Blood specimen collection device. (a) Identification. A blood specimen collection device is a device intended for medical purposes to collect and to handle blood specimens and to...

  6. 21 CFR 862.1675 - Blood specimen collection device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Blood specimen collection device. 862.1675 Section... Systems § 862.1675 Blood specimen collection device. (a) Identification. A blood specimen collection device is a device intended for medical purposes to collect and to handle blood specimens and to...

  7. 21 CFR 862.1675 - Blood specimen collection device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Blood specimen collection device. 862.1675 Section... Systems § 862.1675 Blood specimen collection device. (a) Identification. A blood specimen collection device is a device intended for medical purposes to collect and to handle blood specimens and to...

  8. Wildlife specimen collection, preservation, and shipment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, C. LeAnn; Dusek, Robert J.; Franson, J. Christian; Friend, Milton; Gibbs, Samantha E.J.; Wild, Margaret A.

    2015-01-01

    Prior to collecting samples, it is important to determine the capabilities and submission criteria of the laboratory receiving the samples. Some laboratories may specialize in a limited number of tests, be equipped to accept only certain types of tissues (instead of entire carcasses), or specialize in particular species or group of animals (e.g., reptiles, birds, mammals). Diagnostic laboratories have specific requirements regarding preparation, labeling, and shipping of samples. Adherence to these requirements helps ensure the usefulness of any submitted specimens. Although laboratories may vary in the cost and turnaround times for diagnostic tests, some laboratories may be able to prioritize samples and accommodate accelerated time frames if communicated at the time of submission. Keeping a prepacked kit with basic carcass-collection supplies, including a paper copy of the specimen history form (available for download from the Web sites of most diagnostic laboratories), in the office or vehicle will decrease the chances of forgetting an essential item and decrease response time for arriving at an event.

  9. 10 CFR 26.83 - Specimens to be collected.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Specimens to be collected. 26.83 Section 26.83 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.83 Specimens to be collected. Except as permitted under § 26.31(d)(5), licensees and other entities who...

  10. 10 CFR 26.107 - Collecting a urine specimen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Collecting a urine specimen. 26.107 Section 26.107 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.107 Collecting a urine specimen. (a) The collector shall direct the donor to go into the room or stall used...

  11. 10 CFR 26.107 - Collecting a urine specimen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Collecting a urine specimen. 26.107 Section 26.107 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.107 Collecting a urine specimen. (a) The collector shall direct the donor to go into the room or stall used...

  12. 10 CFR 26.107 - Collecting a urine specimen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Collecting a urine specimen. 26.107 Section 26.107 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.107 Collecting a urine specimen. (a) The collector shall direct the donor to go into the room or stall used...

  13. 10 CFR 26.107 - Collecting a urine specimen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Collecting a urine specimen. 26.107 Section 26.107 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.107 Collecting a urine specimen. (a) The collector shall direct the donor to go into the room or stall used...

  14. 10 CFR 26.107 - Collecting a urine specimen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Collecting a urine specimen. 26.107 Section 26.107 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.107 Collecting a urine specimen. (a) The collector shall direct the donor to go into the room or stall used...

  15. 10 CFR 26.83 - Specimens to be collected.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Specimens to be collected. 26.83 Section 26.83 Energy... to be collected. Except as permitted under § 26.31(d)(5), licensees and other entities who are.... Breath must be collected for confirmatory tests for alcohol; and (b) Collect only urine specimens...

  16. 10 CFR 26.83 - Specimens to be collected.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Specimens to be collected. 26.83 Section 26.83 Energy... to be collected. Except as permitted under § 26.31(d)(5), licensees and other entities who are.... Breath must be collected for confirmatory tests for alcohol; and (b) Collect only urine specimens...

  17. 10 CFR 26.83 - Specimens to be collected.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Specimens to be collected. 26.83 Section 26.83 Energy... to be collected. Except as permitted under § 26.31(d)(5), licensees and other entities who are.... Breath must be collected for confirmatory tests for alcohol; and (b) Collect only urine specimens...

  18. 10 CFR 26.83 - Specimens to be collected.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... subject to this subpart shall— (a) Collect either breath or oral fluids for initial tests for alcohol. Breath must be collected for confirmatory tests for alcohol; and (b) Collect only urine specimens...

  19. 43 CFR 15.9 - Collection of scientific specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Collection of scientific specimens. 15.9 Section 15.9 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior KEY LARGO CORAL REEF PRESERVE § 15.9 Collection of scientific specimens. Collection of natural objects and marine life...

  20. 43 CFR 15.9 - Collection of scientific specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Collection of scientific specimens. 15.9 Section 15.9 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior KEY LARGO CORAL REEF PRESERVE § 15.9 Collection of scientific specimens. Collection of natural objects and marine life...

  1. 43 CFR 15.9 - Collection of scientific specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Collection of scientific specimens. 15.9 Section 15.9 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior KEY LARGO CORAL REEF PRESERVE § 15.9 Collection of scientific specimens. Collection of natural objects and marine life...

  2. 43 CFR 15.9 - Collection of scientific specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Collection of scientific specimens. 15.9 Section 15.9 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior KEY LARGO CORAL REEF PRESERVE § 15.9 Collection of scientific specimens. Collection of natural objects and marine life...

  3. 43 CFR 15.9 - Collection of scientific specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Collection of scientific specimens. 15.9 Section 15.9 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior KEY LARGO CORAL REEF PRESERVE § 15.9 Collection of scientific specimens. Collection of natural objects and marine life...

  4. 46 CFR 4.06-20 - Specimen collection requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... provide a specimen of their urine according to 46 CFR part 16 and 49 CFR part 40. (2) Specimen collection and shipping kits used to conduct drug testing must be used according to 49 CFR part 40. ... involved in the SMI must provide a specimen of their breath, blood, or saliva to the marine employer...

  5. 46 CFR 4.06-20 - Specimen collection requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... provide a specimen of their urine according to 46 CFR part 16 and 49 CFR part 40. (2) Specimen collection and shipping kits used to conduct drug testing must be used according to 49 CFR part 40. ... involved in the SMI must provide a specimen of their breath, blood, or saliva to the marine employer...

  6. 46 CFR 4.06-20 - Specimen collection requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... provide a specimen of their urine according to 46 CFR part 16 and 49 CFR part 40. (2) Specimen collection and shipping kits used to conduct drug testing must be used according to 49 CFR part 40. ... involved in the SMI must provide a specimen of their breath, blood, or saliva to the marine employer...

  7. 46 CFR 4.06-20 - Specimen collection requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... provide a specimen of their urine according to 46 CFR part 16 and 49 CFR part 40. (2) Specimen collection and shipping kits used to conduct drug testing must be used according to 49 CFR part 40. ... involved in the SMI must provide a specimen of their breath, blood, or saliva to the marine employer...

  8. 46 CFR 4.06-20 - Specimen collection requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... provide a specimen of their urine according to 46 CFR part 16 and 49 CFR part 40. (2) Specimen collection and shipping kits used to conduct drug testing must be used according to 49 CFR part 40. ... involved in the SMI must provide a specimen of their breath, blood, or saliva to the marine employer...

  9. Procedures for Collection of Induced Sputum Specimens From Children

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Lindsay R.; Murdoch, David R.; O’Brien, Katherine L.; Scott, J. Anthony

    2012-01-01

    In most settings, sputum is not routinely collected for microbiological diagnosis from children with lower respiratory disease. To evaluate whether it is feasible and diagnostically useful to collect sputum in the Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health (PERCH) study, we reviewed the literature on induced sputum procedures. Protocols for induced sputum in children were collated from published reports and experts on respiratory disease and reviewed by an external advisory group for recommendation in the PERCH study. The advisory group compared 6 protocols: 4 followed a nebulization technique using hypertonic saline, and 2 followed a chest or abdomen massage technique. Grading systems for specimen quality were evaluated. Collecting sputum from children with lower respiratory tract illness is feasible and is performed around the world. An external advisory group recommended that sputum be collected from children hospitalized with severe and very severe pneumonia who participate in the PERCH study provided no contraindications exist. PERCH selected the nebulization technique using hypertonic saline. PMID:22403228

  10. Proposition for a protocol for anatomical studies on collection specimens by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Chanet, Bruno; Guintard, Claude

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations for anatomical studies on collection specimens are becoming more and more frequent. As the presence of metallic objects within the specimens can disturb the acquisition of images and damage both specimens and materials, a simple protocol using radiographs is here proposed to detect these objects in collection specimens before conducting an MRI examination.

  11. 10 CFR 26.115 - Collecting a urine specimen under direct observation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Collecting a urine specimen under direct observation. 26.115 Section 26.115 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.115 Collecting a urine specimen under direct observation. (a) Procedures...

  12. 10 CFR 26.89 - Preparing to collect specimens for testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Preparing to collect specimens for testing. 26.89 Section 26.89 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.89 Preparing to collect specimens for testing. (a) When an individual has been notified of...

  13. 10 CFR 26.115 - Collecting a urine specimen under direct observation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Collecting a urine specimen under direct observation. 26.115 Section 26.115 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.115 Collecting a urine specimen under direct observation. (a) Procedures...

  14. 10 CFR 26.115 - Collecting a urine specimen under direct observation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Collecting a urine specimen under direct observation. 26.115 Section 26.115 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.115 Collecting a urine specimen under direct observation. (a) Procedures...

  15. 10 CFR 26.115 - Collecting a urine specimen under direct observation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Collecting a urine specimen under direct observation. 26.115 Section 26.115 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.115 Collecting a urine specimen under direct observation. (a) Procedures...

  16. 10 CFR 26.115 - Collecting a urine specimen under direct observation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Collecting a urine specimen under direct observation. 26.115 Section 26.115 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.115 Collecting a urine specimen under direct observation. (a) Procedures...

  17. 49 CFR 40.31 - Who may collect urine specimens for DOT drug testing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Who may collect urine specimens for DOT drug... urine specimens for DOT drug testing? (a) Collectors meeting the requirements of this subpart are the only persons authorized to collect urine specimens for DOT drug testing. (b) A collector must...

  18. 49 CFR 40.49 - What materials are used to collect urine specimens?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false What materials are used to collect urine specimens... in DOT Urine Collections § 40.49 What materials are used to collect urine specimens? For each DOT drug test, you must use a collection kit meeting the requirements of Appendix A of this part....

  19. 49 CFR 40.49 - What materials are used to collect urine specimens?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What materials are used to collect urine specimens... in DOT Urine Collections § 40.49 What materials are used to collect urine specimens? For each DOT drug test, you must use a collection kit meeting the requirements of appendix A of this part....

  20. 49 CFR 40.49 - What materials are used to collect urine specimens?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false What materials are used to collect urine specimens... in DOT Urine Collections § 40.49 What materials are used to collect urine specimens? For each DOT drug test, you must use a collection kit meeting the requirements of Appendix A of this part....

  1. 49 CFR 40.49 - What materials are used to collect urine specimens?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What materials are used to collect urine specimens... in DOT Urine Collections § 40.49 What materials are used to collect urine specimens? For each DOT drug test, you must use a collection kit meeting the requirements of Appendix A of this part....

  2. Revised List of Type Specimens on Deposit in the University of California Davis Nematode Collection

    PubMed Central

    Stock, S. Patricia; Nadler, Steven A.

    1998-01-01

    The list of deposited type specimens is updated for the University of California Davis Nematode Collection, as recommended by the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature. The type collection includes 1,001 species and more than 11,000 individual specimens mounted on microscope slides. This list can be used as a reference to locate specimens but is not meant to clarify ambiguities that may exist concerning the type status of particular specimens. PMID:19274230

  3. Evaluation of the intercept oral specimen collection device with HIV assays versus paired serum/plasma specimens.

    PubMed

    Beelaert, G; Van Heddegem, L; Van Frankenhuijsen, M; Vandewalle, G; Compernolle, V; Florence, E; Fransen, K

    2016-08-01

    Oral fluid has many advantages over blood-based techniques: it is less invasive, eliminates the occupational risk associated with needle stick accidents and collection can be self-administrated. Each individual test is packaged with a corresponding collection device. This study tested the suitability of the Intercept Oral Specimen Collection Device for different HIV diagnostic tests: three different rapid HIV tests and two adapted ELISAs, which were evaluated and compared with a gold standard on blood. In addition a total IgG quantification was performed to demonstrate the quality of the specimen. HIV antibodies were detected with a sensitivity of 100%, 99.3%, 98.6%, 100% and 95.7% for, DPP, OraQuick, Aware, Genscreen and Vironostika respectively using the Intercept Collection Device. Respective specificities were 100%, 100%, 99.3%, 97.3% and 100%. PMID:27142112

  4. Collection & Processing of Vertebrate Specimens for Arbovirus Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sudia, W. Daniel; And Others

    Described are techniques used by the National Communicable Disease Center in obtaining blood and tissues from man and other vertebrates for arbovirus isolation and antibody studies. Also included are techniques for capturing and handling vertebrates; banding and marking; restraining and bleeding; storing of specimens to preserve antibody and…

  5. Review of forensically important entomological specimens collected from human cadavers in Malaysia (2005-2010).

    PubMed

    Kavitha, Rajagopal; Nazni, Wasi Ahmad; Tan, Tian Chye; Lee, Han Lim; Azirun, Mohd Sofian

    2013-07-01

    Forensic entomological specimens collected from human decedents during crime scene investigations in Malaysia in the past 6 years (2005-2010) are reviewed. A total of 80 cases were recorded and 93 specimens were collected. From these specimens, 10 species of cyclorrphagic flies were identified, consisting of Chrysomya rufifacies (Macquart) -38 specimens (40.86%), Chrysomya megacephala (Fabricius) -36 specimens (38.70%), Chrysomya villeneuvi (Patton) -2 specimens (2.15%), Chrysomya nigripes (Aubertin) -2 specimens (2.15%), Chrysomya pinguis (Walker) -1 specimen (1.08%), Hermetia illucens (Linnaeus) -1 specimen (1.08%), Hemipyrellia liguriens (Wiedemann) -5 specimens (5.37%), Synthesiomyia nudiseta (Wulp) -1 specimen (1.08%), Megaselia scalaris (Loew)-1 specimen (1.08%) and Sarcophaga ruficornis (Fabricius) -4 specimens (4.30%). In two specimens (2.15%), the maggots were not identifiable. Ch. megacephala and Ch. rufifacies were the commonest species found in human decedents from three different ecological habitats. S. nudiseta is an uncommon species found only on human cadavers from indoors. A total of 75 cases (93.75%) had a single fly infestation and 5 cases (6.25%) had double fly infestation. In conclusion, although large numbers of fly species were found on human decedents, the predominant species are still those of Chrysomya.

  6. Type Specimens on Deposit at University of California Davis Nematode Collection

    PubMed Central

    Noffsinger, E. Mae

    1982-01-01

    A list of the deposited type specimens, historical highlights, and maintenance procedures are given for the type section of the University of California Davis Nematode Collection (UCDNC). The type specimen section contains more than 630 species and 10,740 individual specimens mounted on more than 3,600 microscope slides. This list of deposited types is only a type specimen location reference and should not be used for type status or as a check list. PMID:19295687

  7. 10 CFR 707.12 - Specimen collection, handling and laboratory analysis for drug testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Specimen collection, handling and laboratory analysis for drug testing. 707.12 Section 707.12 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WORKPLACE SUBSTANCE ABUSE PROGRAMS AT DOE SITES Procedures § 707.12 Specimen collection, handling and laboratory analysis for drug...

  8. 10 CFR 707.12 - Specimen collection, handling and laboratory analysis for drug testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Specimen collection, handling and laboratory analysis for drug testing. 707.12 Section 707.12 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WORKPLACE SUBSTANCE ABUSE PROGRAMS AT DOE SITES Procedures § 707.12 Specimen collection, handling and laboratory analysis for drug...

  9. 10 CFR 707.12 - Specimen collection, handling and laboratory analysis for drug testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Specimen collection, handling and laboratory analysis for drug testing. 707.12 Section 707.12 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WORKPLACE SUBSTANCE ABUSE PROGRAMS AT DOE SITES Procedures § 707.12 Specimen collection, handling and laboratory analysis for drug...

  10. 10 CFR 707.12 - Specimen collection, handling and laboratory analysis for drug testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Specimen collection, handling and laboratory analysis for drug testing. 707.12 Section 707.12 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WORKPLACE SUBSTANCE ABUSE PROGRAMS AT DOE SITES Procedures § 707.12 Specimen collection, handling and laboratory analysis for drug...

  11. 10 CFR 707.12 - Specimen collection, handling and laboratory analysis for drug testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Specimen collection, handling and laboratory analysis for drug testing. 707.12 Section 707.12 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WORKPLACE SUBSTANCE ABUSE PROGRAMS AT DOE SITES Procedures § 707.12 Specimen collection, handling and laboratory analysis for drug...

  12. Microbiologic and clinical value of primary broth cultures of wound specimens collected with swabs.

    PubMed Central

    Silletti, R P; Ailey, E; Sun, S; Tang, D

    1997-01-01

    In order to assess the microbiologic and clinical value of primary broth culture of wound specimens collected with swabs and submitted to the laboratory in transport medium, we compared the results of primary agar culture with the results of a corresponding primary broth culture for 344 aerobic specimens and 176 anaerobic specimens. While 8.7% (45 of 520) of the specimens yielded organisms from the primary broth culture that were not recovered from the corresponding primary agar culture, only 5.0% (26 of 520) of the specimens yielded organisms from the primary broth culture other than Staphylococcus epidermidis, viridans group streptococci, and Corynebacterium spp. Moreover, the primary broth culture of only 0.6% (3 of 520) of the specimens yielded organisms not recovered from the primary agar culture that caused a change in the therapy of the patient. Our conclusion is that primary broth cultures are unnecessary for the processing of wound specimens properly collected with swabs. PMID:9230370

  13. Urine specimen collection following consensual intercourse - A forensic evidence collection method for Y-DNA and spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Joki-Erkkilä, Minna; Tuomisto, Sari; Seppänen, Mervi; Huhtala, Heini; Ahola, Arja; Karhunen, Pekka J

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the prospective research was to evaluate the benefit of urine specimen as a collection technique for biological forensic evidence in adult volunteers following consensual intercourse. For detecting Y-chromosomal material Buccal Swab Spin Protocol(®) was used in DNA extraction and purification and samples were analysed with Quantifiler Y Human Male DNA Quantification Kit(®). The time frame for positive Y-DNA was evaluated. Immediate microscopy for detection of spermatozoa was performed. Y-DNA was detected in 173/205 (84.4%) urine samples. Of the 86 first post-coital void urine samples available, Y-DNA was detected in 83 (96.5%) specimens. Of the 119 urine samples from volunteers with post-coital activities Y-DNA was still measurable in 70 (58.8%) urine specimens. The male DNA amount was below 0.023 ng/μl in 28/153 (18.3%) urine samples. Of the 22 urine samples obtained after 24 post-coital hours, 9 (40.9%) were still Y-DNA positive. No associations were found between coital durance, coital frequency during the past two weeks prior to the study intercourse, post-coital activities, and the urine sample Y-DNA positivity. Of the 111 urine samples where the immediate microscopy was performed, in 66 (59.5%) samples spermatozoa were verified and one sample even contained motile spermatozoa. Microscopy detected 66 (67.3%) and failed to detect spermatozoa in 32 (32.7%) of Y-DNA positive samples. In addition to conventional invasive swab techniques, urine samples seem to be an effective biological trace collection method for Y-DNA and spermatozoa within 24 h following penile-vaginal penetration. Furthermore, it may be considered as a non-invasive collection method in suspected acute child sexual abuse cases to diminish time delay in forensic evidence collection and to improve patients' positive attitudes towards evidence collection.

  14. Adult Education Collection at Syracuse University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charters, Alexander N., Comp.

    Intended to give adult educators and adult education researchers greater and easier access to the Syracuse University adult education collection, the guide inventories, describes the resources, and names a contact person for each of 18 parts of the diverse collection. The following are the holdings attended to, which also reflect the guide's…

  15. Biological specimen collection and processing for molecular analysis.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Susan; Sellers, Holly

    2015-01-01

    This chapter provides a standardized best practice approach to sample collection and handling for the purpose of nucleic acid (NA) extraction and PCR. These methods are described through text and clearly illustrated figures. Furthermore, for those cases in which transportation of samples cannot be accomplished due to the inability to maintain the cold chain or limitations on the import of live disease agents in diagnostic samples, the chapter describes the use of FTA cards for collection transport and NA preparation of samples for PCR. This chapter also makes emphasis in the best safety practices for handling of samples/tissues to avoid unnecessary disease exposures to laboratory personnel. Finally, NA extraction best practices and methods will be briefly outlined.

  16. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 219 - Post-Accident Testing Specimen Collection

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...-Accident Testing Blood/Urine Custody and Control Form (49 CFR part 219) (Form FRA F 6180.74 (revised.... Collection of blood and urine specimens is required to be conducted at an independent medical facility... and transfer of blood and urine specimens for three surviving employees can be found in the FRA...

  17. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 219 - Post-Accident Testing Specimen Collection

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...-Accident Testing Blood/Urine Custody and Control Form (49 CFR part 219) (Form FRA F 6180.74 (revised.... Collection of blood and urine specimens is required to be conducted at an independent medical facility... and transfer of blood and urine specimens for three surviving employees can be found in the FRA...

  18. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 219 - Post-Accident Testing Specimen Collection

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...-Accident Testing Blood/Urine Custody and Control Form (49 CFR part 219) (Form FRA F 6180.74 (revised.... Collection of blood and urine specimens is required to be conducted at an independent medical facility... and transfer of blood and urine specimens for three surviving employees can be found in the FRA...

  19. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 219 - Post-Accident Testing Specimen Collection

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...-Accident Testing Blood/Urine Custody and Control Form (49 CFR part 219) (Form FRA F 6180.74 (revised.... Collection of blood and urine specimens is required to be conducted at an independent medical facility... and transfer of blood and urine specimens for three surviving employees can be found in the FRA...

  20. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 219 - Post-Accident Testing Specimen Collection

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...-Accident Testing Blood/Urine Custody and Control Form (49 CFR part 219) (Form FRA F 6180.74 (revised.... Collection of blood and urine specimens is required to be conducted at an independent medical facility... and transfer of blood and urine specimens for three surviving employees can be found in the FRA...

  1. Urine specimen collection with external devices for diagnosis of bacteriuria in elderly incontinent men.

    PubMed

    Nicolle, L E; Harding, G K; Kennedy, J; McIntyre, M; Aoki, F; Murray, D

    1988-06-01

    We determined the validity of using external devices for urine specimen collection from 24 elderly incontinent men residing in a nursing home by collecting three sequential specimens, two with external devices and then one by catheterization. The positive predictive value of organisms isolated in quantitative counts of greater than or equal to 10(5) CFU/ml in external devices for bladder bacteriuria was 86% for either sterile or clean collecting devices and 93% for the same organism in two consecutive specimens. The negative predictive value for organisms present in quantitative counts of less than 10(5) CFU/ml was 90% for both sterile and clean devices and 86% when the organism was present in both specimens. Contamination in external collection devices was not influenced by whether the device was clean or sterile, circumcision of the resident, or duration of time between device application and specimen collection. These data suggest that urine specimens collected by ward nursing staff with external devices are reliable for the diagnosis of bacteriuria in this patient population. PMID:3384923

  2. Collecting in collections: a PCR strategy and primer set for DNA barcoding of decades-old dried museum specimens.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Andrew

    2015-09-01

    Natural history museums are vastly underutilized as a source of material for DNA analysis because of perceptions about the limitations of DNA degradation in older specimens. Despite very few exceptions, most DNA barcoding projects, which aim to obtain sequence data from all species, generally use specimens collected specifically for that purpose, instead of the wealth of identified material in museums, constrained by the lack of suitable PCR methods. Any techniques that extend the utility of museum specimens for DNA analysis therefore are highly valuable. This study first tested the effects of specimen age and PCR amplicon size on PCR success rates in pinned insect specimens, then developed a PCR primer set and amplification strategy allowing greatly increased utilization of older museum specimens for DNA barcoding. PCR success rates compare favourably with the few published studies utilizing similar aged specimens, and this new strategy has the advantage of being easily automated for high-throughput laboratory workflows. The strategy uses hemi-nested, degenerate, M13-tailed PCR primers to amplify two overlapping amplicons, using two PCRs per amplicon (i.e. four PCRs per DNA sample). Initial PCR products are reamplified using an internal primer and a M13 primer. Together the two PCR amplicons yield 559 bp of the COI gene from Coleoptera, Lepidoptera, Diptera, Hemiptera, Odonata and presumably also other insects. BARCODE standard-compliant data were recovered from 67% (56 of 84) of specimens up to 25 years old, and 51% (102 of 197) of specimens up to 55 years old. Given the time, cost and specialist expertise required for fieldwork and identification, 'collecting in collections' is a viable alternative allowing researchers to capitalize on the knowledge captured by curation work in decades past.

  3. Attitudes of pregnant women towards collection of biological specimens during pregnancy and at birth.

    PubMed

    Nechuta, Sarah; Mudd, Lanay M; Elliott, Michael R; Lepkowski, James M; Paneth, Nigel

    2012-05-01

    Epidemiological investigations of maternal and child health may involve the collection of biological specimens, including cord blood and the placenta; however, the attitudes of pregnant women towards participation in the collection of biological specimens have been studied rarely. We evaluated attitudes towards collection and storage of biological specimens, and determined whether attitudes differed by maternal characteristics, in a cross-sectional study of pregnant women residing in Kent County, Michigan. Women were interviewed at their first visit for prenatal care between April and October 2006 (n = 311). Willingness to participate was highest for maternal blood collection (72%), followed by storage of biological specimens (68%), placenta collection (64%), and cord blood collection (63%). About one-quarter of women (25-28% by procedure) would not participate even if compensated. Hispanic ethnicity was associated with unwillingness to participate in maternal blood collection (OR = 2.16 [95% CI 1.15, 4.04]). Primiparity was associated with unwillingness to participate in cord blood collection (OR = 1.72 [95% CI 1.23, 2.42]). Among women willing to participate, Hispanic women were less likely to require compensation; while higher educated, married and primiparous women were more likely to require compensation. In conclusion, while many pregnant women were willing to participate in biological specimen collection, some women were more resistant, in particular Hispanic and primiparous women. Targeting these groups of women for enhanced recruitment efforts may improve overall participation rates and the representativeness of participants in future studies of maternal and child health.

  4. Agreement between self- and clinician-collected specimen results for detection and typing of high-risk human papillomavirus in specimens from women in Gugulethu, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Jones, Heidi E; Allan, Bruce R; van de Wijgert, Janneke H H M; Altini, Lydia; Taylor, Sylvia M; de Kock, Alana; Coetzee, Nicol; Williamson, Anna-Lise

    2007-06-01

    We assessed the agreement in detection of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV), as well as specific HPV types, between self- and clinician-obtained specimens for 450 women over 18 years of age attending a community health center in Gugulethu, South Africa. Both self-collected swabs and tampons had high agreement with clinician-obtained brushes when the Roche Reverse Line Blot Assay (RLBA) was used (for swabs, 86% concordance, with a kappa statistic [kappa] of 0.71; for tampons, 89% concordance, with kappa of 0.75). Agreement was lower, although still fair, with the Digene Hybrid Capture 2 test (HC2), with kappa higher for swabs than for tampons (for swabs, 81% concordance, with kappa of 0.61; for tampons, 82% concordance, with kappa of 0.55). Low-risk HPV types were nearly two times more common in self-collected specimens than in clinician-collected specimens tested by RLBA. All 15 women diagnosed with high-grade lesions by cytology tested positive for high-risk HPV with clinician-collected specimens tested by RLBA and HC2, while 11 out of 15 tested positive with self-collected specimens by HC2 and 5 out of 6 tested positive by RLBA. Self-collected specimens can provide valid specimens for HPV testing using nucleic acid amplification tests, although a few cytological abnormalities may be missed.

  5. Creating & using specimen images for collection documentation, research, teaching and outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demouthe, J. F.

    2012-12-01

    In this age of digital media, there are many opportunities for use of good images of specimens. On-line resources such as institutional web sites and global sites such as PaleoNet and the Paleobiology Database provide venues for collection information and images. Pictures can also be made available to the general public through popular media sites such as Flickr and Facebook, where they can be retrieved and used by teachers, students, and the general public. The number of requests for specimen loans can be drastically reduced by offering the scientific community access to data and specimen images using the internet. This is an important consideration in these days of limited support budgets, since it reduces the amount of staff time necessary for giving researchers and educators access to collections. It also saves wear and tear on the specimens themselves. Many institutions now limit or refuse to send specimens out of their own countries because of the risks involved in going through security and customs. The internet can bridge political boundaries, allowing everyone equal access to collections. In order to develop photographic documentation of a collection, thoughtful preparation will make the process easier and more efficient. Acquire the necessary equipment, establish standards for images, and develop a simple workflow design. Manage images in the camera, and produce the best possible results, rather than relying on time-consuming editing after the fact. It is extremely important that the images of each specimen be of the highest quality and resolution. Poor quality, low resolution photos are not good for anything, and will often have to be retaken when another need arises. Repeating the photography process involves more handling of specimens and more staff time. Once good photos exist, smaller versions can be created for use on the web. The originals can be archived and used for publication and other purposes.

  6. Cryptic species of hairworm parasites revealed by molecular data and crowdsourcing of specimen collections.

    PubMed

    Hanelt, Ben; Schmidt-Rhaesa, Andreas; Bolek, Matthew G

    2015-01-01

    Recognizing cryptic species promotes a better understanding of biodiversity, systematics, evolutionary biology, and biogeography. When cryptic species are disease-causing organisms, such as parasites, their correct recognition has important implications for the study of epidemiology, disease ecology, and host-parasite relationships. Freshwater nematomorphs (Nematomorpha: Gordiida) or hairworms, are an enigmatic yet fascinating group of parasites that are known to manipulate host behavior to aid transition from the parasitic phase, within terrestrial insects, to the free-living aquatic stage. Hairworm taxonomy has been hampered by a paucity of informative diagnostic characters and it has long been suspected that this group contains numerous cryptic species. Study of single hairworm species over large geographical areas has been difficult due to extremely rare encounters and unreliable methods of collecting adult worms. Here we report that by using crowdsourcing, citizen scientists have collected and submitted samples of Gordius cf. robustus from throughout its range in North America making its genetic study possible. Combined with our own collections, we examined samples from 28 localities within the USA; despite the collection of numerous hairworms from Canada and Mexico, G. cf. robustus were not collected outside of the contiguous United States. Mitochondrial CO1 genetic distances revealed that specimens grouped into 8 clades separated by 8-24.3%. In addition, molecular evidence from mitochondrial (CO1 and cytB) and nuclear (partial 28S, ITS1, 5.8S and ITS2) DNA suggests that these 8 clades are distinct species and that this group of species is paraphyletic, since the North American species G. attoni and the European species G. aquaticus and G. balticus group among the G. robustus lineages. Furthermore, there was a significant correlation between genetic (CO1) and geographic distance between the 8 Gordius species. This study demonstrates the value of involving the

  7. Quantitative urine confirmatory testing for synthetic cannabinoids in randomly collected urine specimens

    PubMed Central

    Castaneto, Marisol S.; Scheidweiler, Karl B.; Gandhi, Adarsh; Wohlfarth, Ariane; Klette, Kevin L.; Martin, Thomas M.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic cannabinoid intake is an ongoing health issue worldwide, with new compounds continually emerging, making drug testing complex. Parent synthetic cannabinoids are rarely detected in urine, the most common matrix employed in workplace drug testing. Optimal identification of synthetic cannabinoid markers in authentic urine specimens and correlation of metabolite concentrations and toxicities would improve synthetic cannabinoid result interpretation. We screened 20,017 randomly collected US military urine specimens between July 2011 and June 2012 with a synthetic cannabinoid immunoassay yielding 1,432 presumptive positive specimens. We analyzed all presumptive positive and 1,069 negative specimens with our qualitative synthetic cannabinoid LC-MS/MS method, which confirmed 290 positive specimens. All 290 positive and 487 randomly-selected negative specimens were quantified with the most comprehensive urine quantitative LC-MS/MS method published to date. 290 specimens confirmed positive for 22 metabolites from 11 parent synthetic cannabinoids. The five most predominant metabolites were JWH-018 pentanoic acid (93%), JWH-018 N-hydroxypentyl (84%), AM2201 N-hydroxypentyl (69%), JWH-073 butanoic acid (69%), and JWH-122 N-hydroxypentyl (45%) with 11.1 (0.1–2434), 5.1 (0.1–1239), 2.0 (0.1–321), 1.1 (0.1–48.6), and 1.1 (0.1–250) μg/L median (range) concentrations, respectively. Alkyl hydroxy and carboxy metabolites provided suitable biomarkers for 11 parent synthetic cannabinoids; although, hydroxyindoles also were observed. This is by far the largest data set of synthetic cannabinoid metabolites urine concentrations from randomly collected workplace drug testing specimens rather than acute intoxications or driving under the influence of drugs. These data improve the interpretation of synthetic cannabinoid urine test results and suggest suitable urine markers of synthetic cannabinoid intake. PMID:25231213

  8. Quantitative urine confirmatory testing for synthetic cannabinoids in randomly collected urine specimens.

    PubMed

    Castaneto, Marisol S; Scheidweiler, Karl B; Gandhi, Adarsh; Wohlfarth, Ariane; Klette, Kevin L; Martin, Thomas M; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2015-06-01

    Synthetic cannabinoid intake is an ongoing health issue worldwide, with new compounds continually emerging, making drug testing complex. Parent synthetic cannabinoids are rarely detected in urine, the most common matrix employed in workplace drug testing. Optimal identification of synthetic cannabinoid markers in authentic urine specimens and correlation of metabolite concentrations and toxicities would improve synthetic cannabinoid result interpretation. We screened 20 017 randomly collected US military urine specimens between July 2011 and June 2012 with a synthetic cannabinoid immunoassay yielding 1432 presumptive positive specimens. We analyzed all presumptive positive and 1069 negative specimens with our qualitative synthetic cannabinoid liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method, which confirmed 290 positive specimens. All 290 positive and 487 randomly selected negative specimens were quantified with the most comprehensive urine quantitative LC-MS/MS method published to date; 290 specimens confirmed positive for 22 metabolites from 11 parent synthetic cannabinoids. The five most predominant metabolites were JWH-018 pentanoic acid (93%), JWH-N-hydroxypentyl (84%), AM2201 N-hydroxypentyl (69%), JWH-073 butanoic acid (69%), and JWH-122 N-hydroxypentyl (45%) with 11.1 (0.1-2,434), 5.1 (0.1-1,239), 2.0 (0.1-321), 1.1 (0.1-48.6), and 1.1 (0.1-250) µg/L median (range) concentrations, respectively. Alkyl hydroxy and carboxy metabolites provided suitable biomarkers for 11 parent synthetic cannabinoids; although hydroxyindoles were also observed. This is by far the largest data set of synthetic cannabinoid metabolites urine concentrations from randomly collected workplace drug testing specimens rather than acute intoxications or driving under the influence of drugs. These data improve the interpretation of synthetic cannabinoid urine test results and suggest suitable urine markers of synthetic cannabinoid intake.

  9. 21 CFR 866.2900 - Microbiological specimen collection and transport device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Microbiological specimen collection and transport device. 866.2900 Section 866.2900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology...

  10. 21 CFR 866.2900 - Microbiological specimen collection and transport device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Microbiological specimen collection and transport device. 866.2900 Section 866.2900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology...

  11. 21 CFR 866.2900 - Microbiological specimen collection and transport device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Microbiological specimen collection and transport device. 866.2900 Section 866.2900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology...

  12. 21 CFR 866.2900 - Microbiological specimen collection and transport device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Microbiological specimen collection and transport device. 866.2900 Section 866.2900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology...

  13. 21 CFR 866.2900 - Microbiological specimen collection and transport device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Microbiological specimen collection and transport device. 866.2900 Section 866.2900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology...

  14. No specimen left behind: industrial scale digitization of natural history collections.

    PubMed

    Blagoderov, Vladimir; Kitching, Ian J; Livermore, Laurence; Simonsen, Thomas J; Smith, Vincent S

    2012-01-01

    Traditional approaches for digitizing natural history collections, which include both imaging and metadata capture, are both labour- and time-intensive. Mass-digitization can only be completed if the resource-intensive steps, such as specimen selection and databasing of associated information, are minimized. Digitization of larger collections should employ an "industrial" approach, using the principles of automation and crowd sourcing, with minimal initial metadata collection including a mandatory persistent identifier. A new workflow for the mass-digitization of natural history museum collections based on these principles, and using SatScan® tray scanning system, is described.

  15. Diphyllobothrium nihonkaiense: wide egg size variation in 32 molecularly confirmed adult specimens from Korea.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seoyun; Cho, Jaeeun; Jung, Bong-Kwang; Kim, Deok-Gyu; Jeon, Sarah Jiyoun; Jeon, Hyeong-Kyu; Eom, Keeseon S; Chai, Jong-Yil

    2015-06-01

    The eggs of Diphyllobothrium nihonkaiense were reported to be smaller than those of the classical Diphyllobothrium latum in general. However, verification using a large number of adult tapeworms is required. We assessed the egg size variation in 32 adult specimens of D. nihonkaiense recovered from Korean patients in 1975-2014. The diagnosis of individual specimens was based on analysis of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase 1 gene sequence. Uterine eggs (n = 10) were obtained from each specimen, and their length and width were measured by micrometry. The results indicated that the egg size of D. nihonkaiense (total number of eggs measured, 320) was widely variable according to individual specimens, 54-76 μm long (mean 64) and 35-58 μm wide (mean 45), with a length-width ratio of 1.32-1.70 (mean 1.46). The worm showing the smallest egg size had a length range of 54-62 μm, whereas the one showing the largest egg size had a length range of 68-76 μm. The two ranges did not overlap, and a similar pattern was observed for the egg width. Mapping of each egg size (n = 320) showed a wide variation in length and width. The widely variable egg size of D. nihonkaiense cannot be used for specific diagnosis of diphyllobothriid tapeworm infections in human patients.

  16. Type Specimens on Deposit in the United States Department of Agriculture Nematode Collection, Beltsville, Maryland

    PubMed Central

    Handoo, Zafar A.; Golden, A. Morgan; Ellington, Donna M. S.

    1998-01-01

    A list of the deposited type specimens with references, a detailed historical background, importance, and maintenance procedures are given for the type collection of the United States Department of Agriculture Nematode Collection (USDANC). The type specimen section is considered one of the largest and most valuable in existence. It contains 1,430 species mounted and preserved on 5,177 metal and glass slides and 404 vials. Also, a brief description of the other constituent divisions of the collection is given, which, including the type collection, consists of 34,000 permanent slides and vials and 19,500 species entries. The list of deposited types is a type specimen location reference only and should not be used for the status of type species. The generic and specific names are arranged in alphabetical order and are given as indicated by the author(s) or depositor(s) when the types were deposited in the type section of the USDANC. The complete title of the reference is not given for each species, only the author's date, and source and slide number(s). Also, included are authors of designated types other than those of the original type series, e.g. paralectotype, allolectotype, neotype. PMID:19274205

  17. “Cleansing” anatomical collections: The politics of removing specimens from German anatomical and medical collections 1988–92

    PubMed Central

    Weindling, Paul

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY In 1989–90 an intense debate erupted in the Federal Republic of Germany over the status of anatomical specimens from the period of National Socialism. Pressure was brought on the German universities and research institutes to remove body parts. The solution was deemed rapid burial of all specimens whose provenance was in doubt. A range of options was considered, and the eventual decision to bury cremated remains was deemed the best way to draw a line under an uncomfortable past of Nazi medical atrocities. The aim was to achieve closure on this issue by a rapid “cleansing” of collections. However, identification of victims was left unresolved amidst the heated debates at the time. PMID:22445542

  18. Acceptability and Feasibility of Repeated Mucosal Specimen Collection in Clinical Trial Participants in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Omosa-Manyonyi, Gloria; Park, Harriet; Mutua, Gaudensia; Farah, Bashir; Bergin, Philip J.; Laufer, Dagna; Lehrman, Jennifer; Chinyenze, Kundai; Barin, Burc; Fast, Pat; Gilmour, Jill; Anzala, Omu

    2014-01-01

    Background Mucosal specimens are essential to evaluate compartmentalized immune responses to HIV vaccine candidates and other mucosally targeted investigational products. We studied the acceptability and feasibility of repeated mucosal sampling in East African clinical trial participants at low risk of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. Methods and Findings The Kenya AIDS Vaccine Initiative (KAVI) enrolled participants into three Phase 1 trials of preventive HIV candidate vaccines in 2011–2012 at two clinical research centers in Nairobi. After informed consent to a mucosal sub-study, participants were asked to undergo collection of mucosal secretions (saliva, oral fluids, semen, cervico-vaginal and rectal), but could opt out of any collection at any visit. Specimens were collected at baseline and two additional time points. A tolerability questionnaire was administered at the final sub-study visit. Of 105 trial participants, 27 of 34 women (79%) and 62 of 71 men (87%) enrolled in the mucosal sub-study. Nearly all sub-study participants gave saliva and oral fluids at all visits. Semen was collected from about half the participating men (47–48%) at all visits. Cervico-vaginal secretions were collected by Softcup from about two thirds of women (63%) at baseline, increasing to 78% at the following visits, with similar numbers for cervical secretion collection by Merocel sponge; about half of women (52%) gave cervico-vaginal samples at all visits. Rectal secretions were collected with Merocel sponge from about a quarter of both men and women (24%) at all 3 visits, with 16% of men and 19% of women giving rectal samples at all visits. Conclusions Repeated mucosal sampling in clinical trial participants in Kenya is feasible, with a good proportion of participants consenting to most sampling methods with the exception of rectal samples. Experienced staff members of both sexes and trained counselors with standardized messaging may improve acceptance of rectal

  19. Buprenorphine and major metabolites in blood specimens collected for drug analysis in law enforcement purposes.

    PubMed

    Oechsler, Stephanie; Skopp, Gisela

    2010-02-25

    A liquid chromatographic/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometric method for the quantification of buprenorphine (BUP), norbuprenorphine (NBUP), buprenorphine-3-beta-D-glucuronide (BUPG) and norbuprenorphine-3-beta-D-glucuronide (NBUPG) in serum samples was developed and validated. Pre-treatment of BUP and NBUP was by liquid-liquid extraction, while glucuronides were favourably isolated by solid phase extraction. Separation in 2 separate runs (2 x 5 min) was achieved using isocratic elution. The method was applied to 20 authentic serum specimens collected for law enforcement purposes where BUP intake had been indicated. The parent drug was not detectable in half of the specimens at a lower limit of detection of 0.2 ng/mL, whereas NBUP could be determined from any sample but one. NBUPG is the major metabolite present, which could be identified along with BUPG in all samples under investigation. In authentic specimens it could be advisable to monitor BUP metabolites along with the parent drug. PMID:20006453

  20. Quality impact on diagnostic blood specimen collection using a new device to relieve venipuncture pain.

    PubMed

    Lima-Oliveira, Gabriel; Lippi, Giuseppe; Salvagno, Gian Luca; Montagnana, Martina; Picheth, Geraldo; Guidi, Gian Cesare

    2013-07-01

    A new device called Buzzy(®) has been recently presented that combines a cooling ice pack and a vibrating motor in order to relieve the venipuncture pain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of Buzzy(®) use during diagnostic blood specimen collection by venipuncture for routine immunochemistry tests. Blood was collected from 100 volunteers by a single, expert phlebotomist. A vein was located on the left forearm without applying tourniquet, in order to prevent any interference from venous stasis, and blood samples were collected using a 20-G straight needle directly into 5 mL vacuum tubes with clot activator and gel separator. In sequence, external cold and vibration by Buzzy(®) was applied on the right forearm-5 cm above the chosen puncture site-for 1 min before venipuncture and continued until the end of the same procedure already done in the left forearm. The panel of tests included the following: glucose, total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, total protein, albumin, c-reactive protein, urea, creatinine, uric acid, alkaline phosphatase, amylase, AST, ALT, g-glutamyltransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, total bilirubin, phosphorus, calcium, magnesium, iron, sodium, potassium, chloride, lipase, cortisol, insulin, thyroid-stimulating hormone, total triiodothyronine, free triiodothyronine, total thyroxine, free thyroxine and haemolysis index. Clinically significant differences between samples were found only for: total protein, albumin and transferrin. The Buzzy(®) can be used during diagnostic blood specimens collection by venipuncture for the majority of the routine immunochemistry tests. We only suggest avoiding this device during blood collection when protein, albumin and transferrin determinations should be performed. PMID:24426217

  1. The connective tissue of the adductor canal--a morphological study in fetal and adult specimens.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Flavia; de Vasconcellos Fontes, Ricardo Bragança; da Silva Baptista, Josemberg; Mayer, William Paganini; de Campos Boldrini, Silvia; Liberti, Edson Aparecido

    2009-03-01

    The adductor canal is a conical or pyramid-shaped pathway that contains the femoral vessels, saphenous nerve and a varying amount of fibrous tissue. It is involved in adductor canal syndrome, a claudication syndrome involving young individuals. Our objective was to study modifications induced by aging on the connective tissue and to correlate them to the proposed pathophysiological mechanism. The bilateral adductor canals and femoral vessels of four adult and five fetal specimens were removed en bloc and analyzed. Sections 12 microm thick were obtained and the connective tissue studied with Sirius Red, Verhoeff, Weigert and Azo stains. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) photomicrographs of the surfaces of each adductor canal were also analyzed. Findings were homogeneous inside each group. The connective tissue of the canal was continuous with the outer layer of the vessels in both groups. The pattern of concentric, thick collagen type I bundles in fetal specimens was replaced by a diffuse network of compact collagen bundles with several transversal fibers and an impressive content of collagen III fibers. Elastic fibers in adults were not concentrated in the thick bundles but dispersed in line with the transversal fiber system. A dynamic compression mechanism with or without an evident constricting fibrous band has been proposed previously for adductor canal syndrome, possibly involving the connective tissue inside the canal. The vessels may not slide freely during movement. These age-related modifications in normal individuals may represent necessary conditions for this syndrome to develop.

  2. The connective tissue of the adductor canal – a morphological study in fetal and adult specimens

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Flavia; de Vasconcellos Fontes, Ricardo Bragança; da Silva Baptista, Josemberg; Mayer, William Paganini; de Campos Boldrini, Silvia; Liberti, Edson Aparecido

    2009-01-01

    The adductor canal is a conical or pyramid-shaped pathway that contains the femoral vessels, saphenous nerve and a varying amount of fibrous tissue. It is involved in adductor canal syndrome, a claudication syndrome involving young individuals. Our objective was to study modifications induced by aging on the connective tissue and to correlate them to the proposed pathophysiological mechanism. The bilateral adductor canals and femoral vessels of four adult and five fetal specimens were removed en bloc and analyzed. Sections 12 µm thick were obtained and the connective tissue studied with Sirius Red, Verhoeff, Weigert and Azo stains. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) photomicrographs of the surfaces of each adductor canal were also analyzed. Findings were homogeneous inside each group. The connective tissue of the canal was continuous with the outer layer of the vessels in both groups. The pattern of concentric, thick collagen type I bundles in fetal specimens was replaced by a diffuse network of compact collagen bundles with several transversal fibers and an impressive content of collagen III fibers. Elastic fibers in adults were not concentrated in the thick bundles but dispersed in line with the transversal fiber system. A dynamic compression mechanism with or without an evident constricting fibrous band has been proposed previously for adductor canal syndrome, possibly involving the connective tissue inside the canal. The vessels may not slide freely during movement. These age-related modifications in normal individuals may represent necessary conditions for this syndrome to develop. PMID:19245505

  3. Which specimens from a museum collection will yield DNA barcodes? A time series study of spiders in alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jeremy A.; Beentjes, Kevin K.; van Helsdingen, Peter; IJland, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Abstract We report initial results from an ongoing effort to build a library of DNA barcode sequences for Dutch spiders and investigate the utility of museum collections as a source of specimens for barcoding spiders. Source material for the library comes from a combination of specimens freshly collected in the field specifically for this project and museum specimens collected in the past. For the museum specimens, we focus on 31 species that have been frequently collected over the past several decades. A series of progressively older specimens representing these 31 species were selected for DNA barcoding. Based on the pattern of sequencing successes and failures, we find that smaller-bodied species expire before larger-bodied species as tissue sources for single-PCR standard DNA barcoding. Body size and age of oldest successful DNA barcode are significantly correlated after factoring out phylogenetic effects using independent contrasts analysis. We found some evidence that extracted DNA concentration is correlated with body size and inversely correlated with time since collection, but these relationships are neither strong nor consistent. DNA was extracted from all specimens using standard destructive techniques involving the removal and grinding of tissue. A subset of specimens was selected to evaluate nondestructive extraction. Nondestructive extractions significantly extended the DNA barcoding shelf life of museum specimens, especially small-bodied species, and yielded higher DNA concentrations compared to destructive extractions. All primary data are publically available through a Dryad archive and the Barcode of Life database. PMID:24453561

  4. Which specimens from a museum collection will yield DNA barcodes? A time series study of spiders in alcohol.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jeremy A; Beentjes, Kevin K; van Helsdingen, Peter; Ijland, Steven

    2013-12-30

    We report initial results from an ongoing effort to build a library of DNA barcode sequences for Dutch spiders and investigate the utility of museum collections as a source of specimens for barcoding spiders. Source material for the library comes from a combination of specimens freshly collected in the field specifically for this project and museum specimens collected in the past. For the museum specimens, we focus on 31 species that have been frequently collected over the past several decades. A series of progressively older specimens representing these 31 species were selected for DNA barcoding. Based on the pattern of sequencing successes and failures, we find that smaller-bodied species expire before larger-bodied species as tissue sources for single-PCR standard DNA barcoding. Body size and age of oldest successful DNA barcode are significantly correlated after factoring out phylogenetic effects using independent contrasts analysis. We found some evidence that extracted DNA concentration is correlated with body size and inversely correlated with time since collection, but these relationships are neither strong nor consistent. DNA was extracted from all specimens using standard destructive techniques involving the removal and grinding of tissue. A subset of specimens was selected to evaluate nondestructive extraction. Nondestructive extractions significantly extended the DNA barcoding shelf life of museum specimens, especially small-bodied species, and yielded higher DNA concentrations compared to destructive extractions. All primary data are publically available through a Dryad archive and the Barcode of Life database. PMID:24453561

  5. Experimental basis of standardized specimen collection: effect of posture on blood picture.

    PubMed

    Leppänen, E A; Gräsbeck, R

    1988-03-01

    22 subjectively healthy females were supine, sat in an armchair and stood while specimens of peripheral venous blood were collected after at least 15 min in each position without using a tourniquet. The albumin, haemoglobin, erythrocyte concentration and the haematocrit increased significantly when the subjects assumed a more erect position, probably as a result of increased hydrostatic pressure. The leucocyte count did not rise, and there was a statistically significant drop in the lymphocyte concentration when changing from supine to sitting. However, the leucocyte concentration rose significantly from supine to sitting or standing. When interpreting laboratory data, the difference in the behaviour of different cell species should be kept in mind. However, on the whole this study supports the stipulation contained in international recommendations that the posture of the subject should be standardized before collection of peripheral blood for haematological tests. PMID:3356238

  6. 43 CFR 3505.11 - Do I need a prospecting permit to collect mineral specimens for non-commercial purposes?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... mineral specimens for hobby, recreation, scientific, research or similar purposes without a prospecting permit. However, the surface management agency may require a use permit. BLM's regulations for collecting... mineral specimens for non-commercial purposes? 3505.11 Section 3505.11 Public Lands: Interior...

  7. Ability of device to collect bacteria from cough aerosols generated by adults with cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Ku, David N.; Ku, Sarah K.; Helfman, Beth; McCarty, Nael A.; Wolff, Bernard J.; Winchell, Jonas M.; Anderson, Larry J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Identifying lung pathogens and acute spikes in lung counts remain a challenge in the treatment of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Bacteria from the deep lung may be sampled from aerosols produced during coughing. Methods: A new device was used to collect and measure bacteria levels from cough aerosols of patients with CF. Sputum and oral specimens were also collected and measured for comparison. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Streptococcus mitis were detected in specimens using Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) molecular assays. Results: Twenty adult patients with CF and 10 healthy controls participated. CF related bacteria (CFRB) were detected in 13/20 (65%) cough specimens versus 15/15 (100%) sputum specimens. Commensal S. mitis was present in 0/17 (0%, p=0.0002) cough specimens and 13/14 (93%) sputum samples. In normal controls, no bacteria were collected in cough specimens but 4/10 (40%) oral specimens were positive for CFRB. Conclusions: Non-invasive cough aerosol collection may detect lower respiratory pathogens in CF patients, with similar specificity and sensitivity to rates detected by BAL, without contamination by oral CFRB or commensal bacteria. PMID:27781088

  8. Implementing Self-collection of Biological Specimens With a Diverse Sample

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, April; Skinner, Martie L.; Woelfel, Tiffany; Carpenter, Thomas; Haggerty, Kevin P.

    2013-01-01

    Collecting saliva is the most noninvasive way to detect changing levels of cortisol (Adam & Kumari, 2009; Soo-Quee Koh & Choon-Huat Koh, 2007), a stress hormone of interest to behavioral and health scientists, where there are benefits from multiple samples taken over a period of days. Various self-collection strategies have been employed, ranging from treated cards to cotton swabs and passive drool methods. The current study investigates the effectiveness of a variety of reminder techniques in encouraging adherence with procedures requiring 4 samples per day on 3 separate days of passive drool collection among African American and European American young adults. The findings suggest that direct texts were associated with the greatest level of adherence, while phone reminders were most effective when controlling for total number of contacts. Results indicate that both traditional and novel reminder methods can positively influence adherence, even with challenging populations. PMID:24376374

  9. ColectoR, a digital field notebook for voucher specimen collection for smartphones1

    PubMed Central

    Maya-Lastra, Carlos A.

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: ColectoR was developed to aid botanists in the collection of data for voucher specimens using smartphones, accelerating the process of data capture in situ and its subsequent organization. Methods and Results: ColectoR features a minimalist design that uses an intuitive iconic interface. The integration of external application programming interfaces (APIs) and an automated spreadsheet extends its functionality and increases the information and tools available to the user. This app is currently supported by any Android device. Conclusions: ColectoR provides an efficient method for capturing data in the field while also serving to organize the information into a coherent database, thereby greatly reducing the time required for postcapture data organization and label printing. PMID:27437169

  10. Evidence based practice: laboratory feedback informs forensic specimen collection in NSW.

    PubMed

    Nittis, Maria; Stark, Margaret

    2014-07-01

    The importance of having clear, evidence-based guidelines for the taking of forensic samples from suspects detained in police custody (persons of interest) and complainants of crime is essential for forensic practitioners. The need for such guidelines was seen as desirable in New South Wales (NSW) and a working group was set up comprising scientists, practitioners and police. Feedback from the laboratory regarding the results of the specimens taken by forensic practitioners throughout the State was received and analysed. This has resulted in changes to current practice and highlighted the need for further research in this area. It has also highlighted areas that have not changed in response to evidence A quality service demands transparency, process review, relevant research and feedback in order to progress. Examiners need to obtain the results for their cases in order to reinforce the value of the service they provide as well as to monitor and, where necessary, improve their forensic collection skills. PMID:24931859

  11. Evidence based practice: laboratory feedback informs forensic specimen collection in NSW.

    PubMed

    Nittis, Maria; Stark, Margaret

    2014-07-01

    The importance of having clear, evidence-based guidelines for the taking of forensic samples from suspects detained in police custody (persons of interest) and complainants of crime is essential for forensic practitioners. The need for such guidelines was seen as desirable in New South Wales (NSW) and a working group was set up comprising scientists, practitioners and police. Feedback from the laboratory regarding the results of the specimens taken by forensic practitioners throughout the State was received and analysed. This has resulted in changes to current practice and highlighted the need for further research in this area. It has also highlighted areas that have not changed in response to evidence A quality service demands transparency, process review, relevant research and feedback in order to progress. Examiners need to obtain the results for their cases in order to reinforce the value of the service they provide as well as to monitor and, where necessary, improve their forensic collection skills.

  12. TEST FUSION IN ADULT FORAMINIFERA: A REVIEW WITH NEW OBSERVATIONS OF AN EARLY EOCENE NUMMULITES SPECIMEN

    PubMed Central

    Ferràndez-Cañadell, Carles; Briguglio, Antonino; Hohenegger, Johann; Wöger, Julia

    2015-01-01

    In foraminifera, so-called “double tests” usually arise due to abnormal growth originating mainly from twinning, but may also be caused by irregularities in the early chambers and by regeneration after test injury that modifies the direction of growth. A fourth cause of double tests has only rarely been reported: the fusion of the tests of two adult individuals. We studied an early Eocene Nummulites double test consisting of two adult individuals that fused after an extended period of independent growth. The specimen was studied using computed tomography with micrometric resolution (micro-CT) that allowed bi- and three-dimensional visualization of the internal structure. Before fusion each individual test had 30–36 chambers, which, by comparison with growth rates in recent nummulitids, implies at least three months of independent growth. After fusion, the compound test grew in two spirals that fused after about one whorl and then continued in a single spiral. To fuse their tests, either adult individuals have to be forced to do so or the allorecognition (ability to distinguish between self and another individual) mechanisms must fail. A possible explanation for the merged Nummulites tests in this study is forced fusion in attached individuals after surviving ingestion and digestion by a metazoan. Alternatively, environmental stress could lead to a failure of allorecognition mechanisms and/or foraminiferal motility. Once fused, subsequent growth seems to be determined mainly by the relative orientation of individual tests. In any case, the frequency in which adult fusion occurs remains unknown. PMID:26166916

  13. Reflectance-based identification of parasitized host eggs and adult Trichogramma specimens.

    PubMed

    Nansen, Christian; Coelho, Aloisio; Vieira, Jaci Mendes; Parra, Jose Roberto Postali

    2014-04-01

    A wide range of imaging and spectroscopy technologies is used in medical diagnostics, quality control in production systems, military applications, stress detection in agriculture, and ecological studies of both terrestrial and aquatic organisms. In this study, we hypothesized that reflectance profiling can be used to successfully classify animals that are otherwise very challenging to classify. We acquired hyperspectral images from adult specimens of the egg parasitoid genus Trichogramma (T. galloi, T. pretiosum and T. atopovirilia), which are ~1.0 mm in length. We also acquired hyperspectral images from host eggs containing developing Trichogramma instar and pupae. These obligate egg endoparasitoid species are commercially available as natural enemies of lepidopteran pests in food production systems. Because of their minute size and physical resemblance, classification is time consuming and requires a high level of technical experience. The classification of reflectance profiles was based on a combination of average reflectance and variogram parameters (describing the spatial structure of reflectance data) of reflectance values in individual spectral bands. Although variogram parameters (variogram analysis) are commonly used in large-scale spatial research (i.e. geoscience and landscape ecology), they have only recently been used in classification of high-resolution hyperspectral imaging data. The classification model of parasitized host eggs was equally successful for each of the three species and was successfully validated with independent data sets (>90% classification accuracy). The classification model of adult specimens accurately separated T. atopovirilia from the other two species, but specimens of T. galloi and T. pretiosum could not be accurately separated. Interestingly, molecular-based classification (using the DNA sequence of the internally transcribed spacer ITS2) of Trichogramma species published elsewhere corroborates the classification, as T

  14. Catalogue of the type specimens deposited in the Mollusca Collection of the Museu Nacional / UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, Alexandre Dias; Monteiro, Júlio César; Barbosa, André Favaretto; Salgado, Norma Campos; Coelho, Arnaldo Campos Dos Santos

    2014-03-20

    A curatorial revision of the type specimens deposited in the Mollusca Collection of the Museu Nacional / UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (MNRJ) revealed the existence of 518 lots of type specimens (holotypes, neotypes, syntypes and paratypes) for 285 names of molluscan taxa from 88 families, including 247 gastropods, 30 bivalves, three cephalopods and five scaphopods. A total of 106 holotypes and one neotype are deposited in the MNRJ. Type material for ten nominal taxa described as being deposited in the MNRJ was not located; the probable reasons are discussed. Some previously published erroneous information about types in the MNRJ is rectified. A total of 37 type specimens are illustrated.

  15. Vaginal Self-Swab Specimen Collection in a Home-Based Survey of Older Women: Methods and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Joscelyn N.; Lundeen, Katie; Jaszczak, Angela; McClintock, Martha K.; Jordan, Jeanne A.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To describe the methods used for, cooperation with, assays conducted on, and applications of vaginal specimens collected by older women in their homes. Methods Community-residing women (N = 1,550), ages 57–85 years, participated in a nationally representative probability survey. Vaginal self-swab specimen collection and in-home interviews were conducted between 2005 and 2006. Specimens were analyzed for bacterial vaginosis (BV), vaginal candidiasis (VC), high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV), and cytological characteristics. Field methods, consent procedures, the swab protocol, laboratory procedures, and results reporting are described. Results One thousand twenty-eight respondents (67.5% weighted) agreed to provide a vaginal specimen; 99.1% were successful. The specimen adequacy rates were BV and VC, 94.1%; HR-HPV, 99.7%; and cytology, 85.5%. The most common recorded reason for nonparticipation was a physical or health problem (38% of nonresponders). Responders were significantly more likely than nonresponders to be younger and more educated, and were more likely to report a recent pelvic examination, menopausal hormone use, and recent sexual activity. Discussion Collection of vaginal self-swab specimens from older women in a population-based study is feasible and provides novel data on microenvironmental characteristics of the female genital tract relevant to analyses of gynecologic health, sexual activity and problems, and immune and inflammatory function. PMID:19204072

  16. Efficient isolation of Swine influenza viruses by age-targeted specimen collection.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Makoto; Matsuu, Aya; Yonezawa, Kouki; Igarashi, Manabu; Okuya, Kosuke; Kawabata, Toshiko; Ito, Kimihito; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko; Taneno, Akira; Deguchi, Eisaburo

    2015-04-01

    The control of swine influenza virus (SIV) infection is paramount for increasing the productivity of pig farming and minimizing the threat of pandemic outbreaks. Thus, SIV surveillance should be conducted by region and on a regular basis. Here, we established a microneutralization assay specific for SIV seroprevalence surveillance by using reporter gene-expressing recombinant influenza viruses. Growth-based SIV seroprevalence revealed that most sows and piglets were positive for neutralizing antibodies against influenza viruses. In contrast, the 90-day-old growing pigs exhibited limited neutralizing activity in their sera, suggesting that this particular age of population is most susceptible to SIV infection and thus is an ideal age group for SIV isolation. From nasal swab specimens of healthy pigs in this age population, we were able to isolate SIVs at a higher incidence (5.3%) than those of previous reports. Nucleotide sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the hemagglutinin (HA) genes revealed that the isolated SIVs have circulated and evolved in pigs but not have been recently introduced from humans, implying that a large number of SIV lineages may remain "undiscovered" in the global porcine populations. We propose that the 90-day-old growing pig-targeted nasal swab collection presented in this study facilitates global SIV surveillance and contributes to the detection and control of SIV infection.

  17. Archaeological jade mystery solved using a 119-year-old rock collection specimen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harlow, G. E.; Davies, H. L.; Summerhayes, G. R.; Matisoo-Smith, E.

    2012-12-01

    In a recent publication (Harlow et al. 2012), a ~3200-year old small stone artefact from an archaeological excavation on Emirau Island, Bismarck Archipelago, Papua New Guinea was described and determined to be a piece of jadeite jade (jadeitite). True jadeitite from any part of New Guinea was not previously known, either in an archaeological or geological context, so this object was of considerable interest with respect to its geological source and what that would mean about trade between this source and Emirau Island. Fortuitously, the artefact, presumably a wood-carving gouge, is very unusual with respect to both pyroxene composition and minor mineral constituents. Pyroxene compositions lie essentially along the jadeite-aegirine join: Jd94Ae6 to Jd63Ae36, and without any coexisting omphacite. This contrasts with Jd-Di or Jd-Aug compositional trends commonly observed in jadeitites worldwide. Paragonite and albite occur in veins and cavities with minor titanite, epidote-allanite, and zircon, an assemblage seen in a few jadeitites. Surprisingly, some titanite contains up to 6 wt% Nb2O5 with only trace Ta and a single grain of a Y-Nb phase (interpreted as fergusonite) is present; these are unique for jadeitite. In a historical tribute to C.E.A. Wichmann, a German geologist who taught at Utrecht University, the Netherlands, a previously unpublished description of chlormelanite from the Torare River in extreme northeast Papua, Indonesia was given. The bulk composition essentially matches the pyroxene composition of the jade, so this sample was hypothesized as coming from the source. We were able to arrange a loan from the petrology collection at Utrecht University of the specimen acquired by Wichmann in 1893. In addition we borrowed stone axes from the Natural History Museum - Naturalis in Leiden obtained from natives near what is now Jayapura in eastern-most Papua. Petrography and microprobe analysis of sections of these samples clearly show that (1) Wichmann's 1893

  18. Abridged Description Listing for Adult and Continuing Education Research Collection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Syracuse Univ., NY. Publications Program in Continuing Education.

    This publication contains descriptions of 53 research collections in adult and continuing education housed at Syracuse University (Syracuse, New York) Collection strengths have been identified as the history of adult education as a profession, field, and practice; literacy; and civic education. Each collection is described, and the number of boxes…

  19. Comparison of ESwab and Wound Fiber Swab Specimen Collection Devices for Use with Xpert SA Nasal Complete Assay

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Eric T.; Reymann, Garrett C.

    2016-01-01

    Paired nasal swab specimens were collected from patients who were undergoing routine methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) screening prior to elective cardiac or orthopedic procedures. Each patient was swabbed using a traditional wound fiber liquid Stuart swab and an ESwab device, a flocked swab with a modified liquid Amies microbiology transport medium. The two specimens were tested using the Cepheid Xpert SA Nasal Complete assay. Results demonstrated a 95.5% agreement between the ESwab and the FDA-cleared wound fiber swab collection device. PMID:27122376

  20. Human neuro-specimen banking 1961-1992. The National Neurological Research Specimen Bank (a donor program of pre- and post-mortem tissues and cerebrospinal fluid/blood; and a collection of cryopreserved human neurological specimens for neuroscientists).

    PubMed

    Tourtellotte, W W; Rosario, I P; Conrad, A; Syndulko, K

    1993-01-01

    The National Neurological Research Specimen Bank (The Bank) was established in 1961 to provide a vital service to neuroscientists. Our purpose is to support medical research which seeks the etiopathogenesis for devastating neurological disorders with no known cause, treatment or precise animal model. It serves as a bridge between the neurology clinician who diagnoses and cares for patients with incurable disease and the basic scientist who has need for specimens to find their etiopathogenesis. In the long run this service should advance neurologic diagnoses and serve as the basis for designing treatment. The Bank has grown to be the largest, most diverse neurological specimen bank of its kind in the world. It is a type of "tissue bank" where donor members "will" their central nervous system tissues to science. Then we collect, photograph, seal in air tight bags, quick freeze, cryogenically store and distribute on request the donated tissue to research scientists around the world. All tissue diagnoses are confirmed by clinical records and neuropathologic examination; further histology is conducted on request. In addition to brain and spinal cord tissues, the Bank has samples of other tissues. There are also samples of pre- and post-mortem CSF and sera from normal individuals and patients with various neurological disorders, especially serial specimens on multiple sclerosis patients and HIV-1 seropositive and at risk individuals. This paper outlines the global operations of our human brain bank, based on protocols developed and used by the authors. These operations include donor solicitation, tissue acquisition and documentation, tissue processing and storage, specimen dissemination to users, outcome assessment of banking, quality control, cost of our operation, table of organization and the future. PMID:8360665

  1. Specimen Collection for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Research: Harmonizing the Approach to Informed Consent

    PubMed Central

    Lowenthal, Justin; Lipnick, Scott; Rao, Mahendra

    2012-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have elicited excitement in both the scientific and ethics communities for their potential to advance basic and translational research. They have been hailed as an alternative to derivation from embryos that provides a virtually unlimited source of pluripotent stem cells for research and therapeutic applications. However, research with iPSCs is ethically complex, uniquely encompassing the concerns associated with genomics, immortalized cell lines, transplantation, human reproduction, and biobanking. Prospective donation of tissue specimens for iPSC research thus requires an approach to informed consent that is constructed for this context. Even in the nascent stages of this field, approaches to informed consent have been variable in ways that threaten the simultaneous goals of protecting donors and safeguarding future research and translation, and investigators are seeking guidance. We address this need by providing concrete recommendations for informed consent that balance the perspectives of a variety of stakeholders. Our work combines analysis of consent form language collected from investigators worldwide with a conceptual balancing of normative ethical concerns, policy precedents, and scientific realities. Our framework asks people to consent prospectively to a broad umbrella of foreseeable research, including future therapeutic applications, with recontact possible in limited circumstances. We argue that the long-term goals of regenerative medicine, interest in sharing iPSC lines, and uncertain landscape of future research all would be served by a framework of ongoing communication with donors. Our approach balances the goals of iPSC and regenerative medicine researchers with the interests of individual research participants. PMID:23197820

  2. Prevalence of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in 120 archived specimens of Lithobates catesbeianus (American bullfrog) collected in California, 1924-2007.

    PubMed

    Huss, Monika; Huntley, Laura; Vredenburg, Vance; Johns, Jennifer; Green, Sherril

    2013-12-01

    The chytrid fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), has been identified as a major cause of the recent worldwide amphibian decline. Numerous species in North America alone are under threat or have succumbed to Bd-driven population extinctions. The American bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus) has been reported as a tolerant carrier of Bd. In this report, we used a qPCR assay to test 120 archived American bullfrog specimens collected between 1924 and 2007 in California, USA and Baja California, Mexico. The overall prevalence of Bd infection in this archived population of L. catesbeianus was 19.2%. The earliest positive specimen was collected in Sacramento County, California, USA in 1928 and is to date the earliest positive archived Bd specimen reported globally. These data demonstrate that Bd-infected wild amphibians have been present in California longer than previously known. PMID:24419668

  3. Prevalence of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in 120 archived specimens of Lithobates catesbeianus (American bullfrog) collected in California, 1924-2007.

    PubMed

    Huss, Monika; Huntley, Laura; Vredenburg, Vance; Johns, Jennifer; Green, Sherril

    2013-12-01

    The chytrid fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), has been identified as a major cause of the recent worldwide amphibian decline. Numerous species in North America alone are under threat or have succumbed to Bd-driven population extinctions. The American bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus) has been reported as a tolerant carrier of Bd. In this report, we used a qPCR assay to test 120 archived American bullfrog specimens collected between 1924 and 2007 in California, USA and Baja California, Mexico. The overall prevalence of Bd infection in this archived population of L. catesbeianus was 19.2%. The earliest positive specimen was collected in Sacramento County, California, USA in 1928 and is to date the earliest positive archived Bd specimen reported globally. These data demonstrate that Bd-infected wild amphibians have been present in California longer than previously known.

  4. 46 CFR 4.06-30 - Specimen collection in incidents involving fatalities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... fatalities. (a) When an individual engaged or employed on board a vessel dies as a result of a serious marine incident, blood and urine specimens must be obtained from the remains of the individual for...

  5. 46 CFR 4.06-30 - Specimen collection in incidents involving fatalities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... fatalities. (a) When an individual engaged or employed on board a vessel dies as a result of a serious marine incident, blood and urine specimens must be obtained from the remains of the individual for...

  6. Impact of a large-scale educational intervention program on venous blood specimen collection practices

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Phlebotomy performed with poor adherence to venous blood specimen collection (VBSC) guidelines jeopardizes patient safety and may lead to patient suffering and adverse events. A first questionnaire study demonstrated low compliance to VBSC guidelines, motivating an educational intervention of all phlebotomists within a county council. The aim was to evaluate the impact of a large-scale educational intervention program (EIP) on primary health care phlebotomists’ adherence to VBSC guidelines. We hypothesised that the EIP would improve phlebotomists’ VBSC practical performance. Methods The present study comprise primary health care centres (n = 61) from two county councils in northern Sweden. The final selected study group consisted of phlebotomists divided into an intervention group (n = 84) and a corresponding control group (n = 79). Both groups responded to a validated self-reported VBSC questionnaire twice. The EIP included three parts: guideline studies, an oral presentation, and an examination. Non-parametric statistics were used for comparison within and between the groups. Results Evaluating the EIP, we found significant improvements in the intervention group compared to the control group on self-reported questionnaire responses regarding information search (ES = 0.23-0.33, p < 0.001-0.003), and patient rest prior to phlebotomy (ES = 0.27, p = 0.004). Test request management, patient identity control, release of venous stasis, and test tube labelling had significantly improved in the intervention group but did not significantly differ from the control group (ES = 0.22- 0.49, p = < 0.001- 0.006). The control group showed no significant improvements at all (ES = 0–0.39, p = 0.016-0.961). Conclusions The present study demonstrated several significant improvements on phlebotomists’ adherence to VBSC practices. Still, guideline adherence improvement to several crucial phlebotomy practices is needed. We

  7. Famprofazone as the source of methamphetamine and amphetamine in urine specimen collected during sport competition.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Ying Lung; Lin, Chien-Tzong; Wang, Sheng-Meng; Liu, Ray H

    2007-03-01

    During a sport competition event in Taiwan, one urine specimen was found positive for both methamphetamine (2688 ng/mL) and amphetamine (462 ng/mL). The specimen donor claimed that she had taken Gewolen (a nonprescription drug manufactured in Taiwan) for treating abdominal pain and the medication was presented. Laboratory investigation confirmed that Gewolen contains famprofazone, which is known to metabolize to methamphetamine and amphetamine and is included in the prohibited list of the World Anti-Doping Agency. Study on the excretion profiles of three volunteers ingesting 50 mg famprofazone produced the following patterns similar to that observed in the case specimen: (a) the ratio of methamphetamine to amphetamine was approximately 6 to 1; (b) d- and l-enantiomers of both methamphetamine and amphetamine were present, while the amount of l-methamphetamine was 3-4-fold greater than its counterpart. The data suggested that famprofazone (as the ingredient of Gewolen) was likely the source of the prohibited drugs found in the case specimen.

  8. Type specimens of Heteroptera (Insecta: Hemiptera) collected from North Korea and adjacent regions deposited at Insect Collections of Chungnam National University (CNU) in Daejeon, Republic of Korea.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sunghoon; Kim, Junggon; Oh, Sumin; Heiss, Ernst

    2015-07-06

    A list of type specimens of Heteroptera (Insecta: Hemiptera) collected from North Korea (mostly by the late Dr. Michail Josifov, Sofia, Bulgaria) acquired earlier by E. Heiss, now donated to and deposited in the insect collections of Chungnam National University (CNU), Deajeon, Korea, is presented. A total of 31 holotypes and 694 paratypes of 41 species and 1 subspecies in 6 families and 9 subfamilies are presented: Miridae (Deraeocorinae, Mirinae, Orthotylinae, Phylinae), Tingidae (Tinginae), Piesmatidae (Piesmatinae), Berytidae (Metacanthinae), Cymidae (Cyminae), Pentatomidae (Asopinae).

  9. Binding of the blood group-reactive lectins to human adult kidney specimens.

    PubMed

    Laitinen, L; Juusela, H; Virtanen, I

    1990-01-01

    The binding of a panel of blood group-reactive lectins to frozen sections of human kidney was studied with a special emphasis on reactivity with endothelia and basement membranes. The blood group A-reactive lectins, all specific for alpha-D-N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc), Helix aspersa (HAA), Helix pomatia (HPA), and Griffonia simplicifolia I-A4 (GSA-I-A4) agglutinins bound to the endothelium in specimens with blood groups A and AB. In other samples, these lectins reacted predominantly with tubular basement membranes, as well as with certain tubules. Both Dolichos biflorus (DBA) and Vicia villosa agglutinins (VVA), reported to react with blood group A1 substance, failed to reveal endothelia in most specimens, but bound differently to tubules in all blood groups. The blood group B-reactive lectins, specific for alpha-D-galactose (alpha-Gal) or GalNAc, respectively, GSA-I-B4 and Sophora japonica agglutinin (SJA), bound to the endothelia in specimens from blood group B or AB and in other specimens bound only to certain tubules. Among the blood group O-reactive lectins, specific for alpha-L-fucose (Fuc), Ulex europaeus I agglutinin (UEA-I) conjugates, but not other lectins with a similar nominal specificity, bound strongly to endothelia in specimens with blood group O. The UEA-I conjugates bound distinctly more faintly to endothelia in specimens of other blood groups. The present results indicate that lectins, binding to defined blood group determinants, react with endothelia in specimens of the respective blood group status. Furthermore, they suggest that basement membranes and some tubules in the human kidney show a distinct heterogeneity in their expression of saccharide residues, related to their blood group status.

  10. Feasibility of self-collection of specimens for human papillomavirus testing in hard-to-reach women.

    PubMed

    Ogilvie, Gina; Krajden, Mel; Maginley, Juanita; Isaac-Renton, Judy; Hislop, Greg; Elwood-Martin, Ruth; Sherlock, Chris; Taylor, Darlene; Rekart, Michael

    2007-08-28

    To study the feasibility of self-collected specimens for testing human papillomavirus (HPV) status among hard-to-reach women, outreach nurses recruited women in women's centres, shelters and alleys in Vancouver's Downtown Eastside. Of the 151 participants for whom samples were available, 43 (28.5%) tested positive for high-risk HPV. Outreach nurses were able to recontact 81.4% of the participants who tested positive and referred them for further testing. About 14% (21/151) of participants had never received a Papanicolaou smear in British Columbia, as compared with 8.3% (608/7336) of women in the BC general population (p < 0.05). This difference suggests that self-collection of specimens for HPV testing is a feasible method to reach women who have not previously participated in cervical cancer screening programs.

  11. A catalog of bird specimens associated with Prince Maximilian of Wied-Neuwied and potential type material in the natural history collection in Wiesbaden

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Dorothee; Geller-Grimm, Fritz

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Bird specimens collected by 19th century explorer and ornithologist Prince Maximilian of Wied-Neuwied form one of the foundation collections of the American Museum of Natural History in New York. However, parts of his collection remained in Germany and came to the Museum Wiesbaden. Since Wied described numerous new species without designating types, some of these specimens might be type material. Here we present a catalog of the 30 Wiesbaden specimens associated with him and discuss their potential type status. We conclude that 17 individuals in 11 species are potential type specimens that should be considered in future taxonomic work. PMID:24294100

  12. A catalog of bird specimens associated with Prince Maximilian of Wied-Neuwied and potential type material in the natural history collection in Wiesbaden.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Dorothee; Geller-Grimm, Fritz

    2013-01-01

    Bird specimens collected by 19(th) century explorer and ornithologist Prince Maximilian of Wied-Neuwied form one of the foundation collections of the American Museum of Natural History in New York. However, parts of his collection remained in Germany and came to the Museum Wiesbaden. Since Wied described numerous new species without designating types, some of these specimens might be type material. Here we present a catalog of the 30 Wiesbaden specimens associated with him and discuss their potential type status. We conclude that 17 individuals in 11 species are potential type specimens that should be considered in future taxonomic work.

  13. Type specimens in the Port Elizabeth Museum, South Africa, including the historically important Albany Museum collection. Part 1: Amphibians.

    PubMed

    Conradie, Werner; Branch, William R; Watson, Gillian

    2015-01-01

    The Port Elizabeth Museum houses the consolidated herpetological collections of three provincial museums of the Eastern Cape, South Africa: the Port Elizabeth Museum (Port Elizabeth), the Amatole (previously Kaffarian) Museum (King Williams Town), and the Albany Museum (Grahamstown). Under John Hewitt, Albany Museum was the main centre of herpetological research in South Africa from 1910-1940, and he described numerous new species, many based on material in the museum collection. The types and other material from the Albany Museum are now incorporated into the Port Elizabeth Museum Herpetology collection (PEM). Due to the vague typification of much of Hewitt's material, the loss of the original catalogues in a fire and the subsequent deterioration of specimen labels, the identification of this type material is often troublesome. Significant herpetological research has been undertaken at the PEM in the last 35 years, and the collection has grown to be the third largest in Africa. During this period, numerous additional types have been deposited in the PEM collection, generated by active taxonomic research in the museum. As a consequence, 43 different amphibian taxa are represented by 37 primary and 151 secondary type specimens in the collection. This catalogue provides the first documentation of these types. It provides the original name, the original publication date, journal number and pagination, reference to illustrations, current name, museum collection number, type locality, notes on the type status, and photographs of all holotypes and lectotypes. Where necessary to maintain nomenclatural stability, and where confused type series are housed in the PEM collection, lectotypes and paralectotypes are nominated. PMID:25947420

  14. Type specimens in the Port Elizabeth Museum, South Africa, including the historically important Albany Museum collection. Part 1: Amphibians.

    PubMed

    Conradie, Werner; Branch, William R; Watson, Gillian

    2015-03-18

    The Port Elizabeth Museum houses the consolidated herpetological collections of three provincial museums of the Eastern Cape, South Africa: the Port Elizabeth Museum (Port Elizabeth), the Amatole (previously Kaffarian) Museum (King Williams Town), and the Albany Museum (Grahamstown). Under John Hewitt, Albany Museum was the main centre of herpetological research in South Africa from 1910-1940, and he described numerous new species, many based on material in the museum collection. The types and other material from the Albany Museum are now incorporated into the Port Elizabeth Museum Herpetology collection (PEM). Due to the vague typification of much of Hewitt's material, the loss of the original catalogues in a fire and the subsequent deterioration of specimen labels, the identification of this type material is often troublesome. Significant herpetological research has been undertaken at the PEM in the last 35 years, and the collection has grown to be the third largest in Africa. During this period, numerous additional types have been deposited in the PEM collection, generated by active taxonomic research in the museum. As a consequence, 43 different amphibian taxa are represented by 37 primary and 151 secondary type specimens in the collection. This catalogue provides the first documentation of these types. It provides the original name, the original publication date, journal number and pagination, reference to illustrations, current name, museum collection number, type locality, notes on the type status, and photographs of all holotypes and lectotypes. Where necessary to maintain nomenclatural stability, and where confused type series are housed in the PEM collection, lectotypes and paralectotypes are nominated.

  15. 76 FR 24862 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Protocol for Access to Tissue Specimen Samples...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-03

    ... information collection instrument and instructions should be directed to Patricia Lawson, 301-713-2289 or at Patricia.Lawson@noaa.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Abstract In 1989, the National Marine...

  16. Comparison of Ahlstrom grade 226, Munktell TFN, and Whatman 903 filter papers for dried blood spot specimen collection and subsequent HIV-1 load and drug resistance genotyping analysis.

    PubMed

    Rottinghaus, Erin; Bile, Ebi; Modukanele, Mosetsanagape; Maruping, Maruping; Mine, Madisa; Nkengasong, John; Yang, Chunfu

    2013-01-01

    Dried blood spots (DBS) collected onto filter paper have eased the difficulty of blood collection in resource-limited settings. Currently, Whatman 903 (W-903) filter paper is the only filter paper that has been used for HIV load and HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) testing. We therefore evaluated two additional commercially available filter papers, Ahlstrom grade 226 (A-226) and Munktell TFN (M-TFN), for viral load (VL) testing and HIVDR genotyping using W-903 filter paper as a comparison group. DBS specimens were generated from 344 adult patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Botswana. The VL was measured with NucliSENS EasyQ HIV-1 v2.0, and genotyping was performed for those specimens with a detectable VL (≥ 2.90 log(10) copies/ml) using an in-house method. Bland-Altman analysis revealed a strong concordance in quantitative VL analysis between W-903 and A-226 (bias = -0.034 ± 0.246 log(10) copies/ml [mean difference ± standard deviation]) and W-903 and M-TFN (bias = -0.028 ± 0.186 log(10) copies/ml) filter papers, while qualitative VL analysis for virological failure determination, defined as a VL of ≥ 3.00 log(10) copies/ml, showed low sensitivities for A-266 (71.54%) and M-TFN (65.71%) filter papers compared to W-903 filter paper. DBS collected on M-TFN filter paper had the highest genotyping efficiency (100%) compared to W-903 and A-226 filter papers (91.7%) and appeared more sensitive in detecting major HIVDR mutations. DBS collected on A-226 and M-TFN filter papers performed similarly to DBS collected on W-903 filter paper for quantitative VL analysis and HIVDR detection. Together, the encouraging genotyping results and the variability observed in determining virological failure from this small pilot study warrant further investigation of A-226 and M-TFN filter papers as specimen collection devices for HIVDR monitoring surveys.

  17. Virtual Specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Paor, D. G.

    2009-12-01

    Virtual Field Trips have been around almost as long as the Worldwide Web itself yet virtual explorers do not generally return to their desktops with folders full of virtual hand specimens. Collection of real specimens on fields trips for later analysis in the lab (or at least in the pub) has been an important part of classical field geoscience education and research for generations but concern for the landscape and for preservation of key outcrops from wanton destruction has lead to many restrictions. One of the author’s favorite outcrops was recently vandalized presumably by a geologist who felt the need to bash some of the world’s most spectacular buckle folds with a rock sledge. It is not surprising, therefore, that geologists sometimes leave fragile localities out of field trip itineraries. Once analyzed, most specimens repose in drawers or bins, never to be seen again. Some end up in teaching collections but recent pedagogical research shows that undergraduate students have difficulty relating specimens both to their collection location and ultimate provenance in the lithosphere. Virtual specimens can be created using 3D modeling software and imported into virtual globes such as Google Earth (GE) where, they may be linked to virtual field trip stops or restored to their source localities on the paleo-globe. Sensitive localities may be protected by placemark approximation. The GE application program interface (API) has a distinct advantage over the stand-alone GE application when it comes to viewing and manipulating virtual specimens. When instances of the virtual globe are embedded in web pages using the GE plug-in, Collada models of specimens can be manipulated with javascript controls residing in the enclosing HTML, permitting specimens to be magnified, rotated in 3D, and sliced. Associated analytical data may be linked into javascript and localities for comparison at various points on the globe referenced by ‘fetching’ KML. Virtual specimens open up

  18. 77 FR 37923 - Comment Request for Information Collection for the Workforce Investment Act (WIA) Adult and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-25

    ... Investment Act (WIA) Adult and Dislocated Worker Programs Gold Standard Evaluation (WIA Evaluation); New...: New collection. Title of Collection: WIA Adult and Dislocated Worker Programs Gold Standard...

  19. The reliability analysis of Xpert-positive result for smear-negative and culture-negative specimen collected from bone and joint tuberculosis suspects

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Guomei; Mu, Jing; Wang, Guirong; Huo, Fengmin; Dong, Lingling; Li, Yunxu

    2016-01-01

    Background The Xpert MTB/RIF assay (Xpert; Cepheid, Sunnyvale, CA, USA) has been widely used for pulmonary and extra-pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) diagnosis. In clinical practice, specimen yielding smear-negative, culture-negative but Xpert-positive results is frequently confronted. Due to the notorious possibility of contamination that molecular tests always been thought of, Xpert-positive results without bacteriological supporting evidence arouse great confusions to clinicians. Methods A retrospective study was performed. From April 2014 to February 2015, 852 clinical specimens were Xpert-positive. The results of Xpert assay, bacteriological and pathological examinations from either the same specimens or from the specimens collected during same clinical operations were investigated. Results A total of 90 specimens with Xpert-positive but smear-negative and culture-negative results were recruited, and 81 of them were pus specimens collected from Bone and Joint Tuberculosis (BJTB) patients. According to the pathological examination results, 77 of the 81 pus specimens, 8 of 9 other types of specimens were confirmed as either TB or strongly suggestive of TB; three pus specimens and one biopsy tissue were also suggested TB but with less stronger evidence; only one pus specimen was not TB suggestive. Conclusions Our study demonstrated that Xpert could be trusted for BJTB diagnosis even when no supporting bacteriological evidence is available in high TB prevalence settings. Our results will alleviate the confusion among clinicians in such scenarios. PMID:27293838

  20. Integration of salivary biomarkers into developmental and behaviorally-oriented research: problems and solutions for collecting specimens.

    PubMed

    Granger, Douglas A; Kivlighan, Katie T; Fortunato, Christine; Harmon, Amanda G; Hibel, Leah C; Schwartz, Eve B; Whembolua, Guy-Lucien

    2007-11-23

    Saliva has been championed as a diagnostic fluid of the future. Much of the attention that saliva receives as a biological specimen is due to the perception that the nature of sample collection is quick, uncomplicated, and non-invasive. In most cases, this perception matches reality; however, in some special circumstances and populations collecting saliva can be unexpectedly difficult, time consuming, and may not yield sufficient sample volume for assay. In this report, we review the nature and circumstances surrounding some of these problems in the context of developmental science and then present alternatives that can be used by investigators to improve the next generation of studies. We expect our findings will ease the burden on research participants and assistants, reduce the rate of missing values in salivary data sets, and increase the probability that salivary biomarkers will continue to be successfully integrated into developmental and behaviorally-oriented research.

  1. Description of female nymphal instars and adult female of Kermes echinatus Balachowsky (Hemiptera, Coccoidea, Kermesidae) based on specimens from Crete and mainland Greece, with a discussion on geographical variation.

    PubMed

    Porcelli, Francesco; Pellizzari, Giuseppina

    2014-10-22

    The first-instar nymph, second- and third-instar female nymphs and the adult female of Kermes echinatus Balachowsky (Hemiptera, Coccoidea, Kermesidae) are described and illustrated; micrographs of morphological details are also provided. The species was collected on the island of Crete (Greece) and on mainland Greece, new localities for this species, and are compared with Israeli specimens from where it was originally described.

  2. DNA Amplification from Pin Mounted Bumble Bees (Bombus) in a Museum Collection: Effects of Fragment Size and Specimen Age on Successful PCR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Historic data in the form of pinned specimens in entomological collections offer the potential to determine trends in genetic diversity of bumble bees (Bombus). We screened eight microsatellite loci for amplification success in pinned bumble bee specimens from the U.S. National Pollinating Insects C...

  3. [Adult and Continuing Education Collections at Syracuse University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Syracuse University Library Associates Courier, 1991

    1991-01-01

    This issue of the biannual "Syracuse University Library Associate Courier" is devoted to covering the world famous collections of adult and continuing education materials held by the Syracuse University Library. It contains five articles: "Laubach in India: 1935-1970" (S. Y. Shah) describes missionary and founder of Laubach Literacy International…

  4. Catalogue of the type specimens in the fish collection of the National Zoological Museum, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Ye, Enqi; Xing, Yingchun; Zhang, Chunguang; Zhao, Yahui

    2015-05-22

    A checklist of type specimens housed in the National Zoological Museum, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, is presented for research and scientific communication. Included are 80 holotypes, 1 lectotype, 1 neotype, 402 paratypes and 17 syntypes of 99 species belonging to 28 families and 12 orders. With 60 species, Cypriniformes has the largest representation. All of the specimens were collected in China and neighboring countries in the past 90 years.

  5. Occurrence of Panagrellus (Rhabditida: Panagrolaimidae) Nematodes in a Morphologically Aberrant Adult Specimen of Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Coleoptera: Dryophthoridae)

    PubMed Central

    Camerota, Manuela; Mazza, Giuseppe; Carta, Lynn K.; Paoli, Francesco; Torrini, Giulia; Benvenuti, Claudia; Carletti, Beatrice; Francardi, Valeria; Roversi, Pio Federico

    2016-01-01

    An aberrant specimen of Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Coleoptera: Dryophthoridae) also known as red palm weevil (RPW), the most economically important insect pest of palms in the world, was found among a batch of conspecifics reared for research purposes. A morphological analysis of this weevil revealed the presence of nematodes associated with a structured cuticle defect of the thorax. These nematodes were not able to be cultured, but were characterized by molecular analysis using 28S and 18S ribosomal DNA and shown to belong to the family Panagrolaimidae (Rhabditida), within a clade of Panagrellus. While most nematodes in the insect were juveniles, a single male adult was partially characterized by light microscopy. Morphometrics showed similarities to a species described from Germany. Excluding the entomopathogenic nematodes (EPN), only five other genera of entomophilic or saprophytic rhabditid nematodes are associated with this weevil. This is the first report of panagrolaimid nematodes associated with this invasive pest. Possible mechanisms of nematode-insect association are discussed. PMID:27168645

  6. Chromosome abnormalities diagnosed in utero: a Japanese study of 28 983 amniotic fluid specimens collected before 22 weeks gestations.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Miyuki; Yan, Jim; Yotsumoto, Junko; Sawai, Hideaki; Sekizawa, Akihiko; Kamei, Yoshimasa; Sago, Haruhiko

    2015-03-01

    To investigate the frequency and type of abnormal karyotype in Japan by amniocentesis before 22 weeks of gestation. We performed a retrospective analysis of 28 983 amniotic fluid specimens in a local population collected before 22 weeks gestations for fetal karyotyping. The incidence of abnormal karyotype was 6.0%. The main indication was advanced maternal age (AMA) of 35 years and older, which represented over half of the clinical indications. Abnormal karyotype was most frequently reported among the referrals for abnormal ultrasound findings (21.8%), followed by positive maternal serum screen results (5.3%). Three-fourths of abnormal karyotype was either autosomal aneuploidy (64.0%) or sex chromosome aneuploidy (11.6%). Abnormal karyotype was detected in 2.8% of pregnant women referred for AMA. Clinically significant abnormal karyotype increased with advancing maternal age. The frequency and type of abnormal karyotype detected by amniocentesis for various indications were determined. Amniocentesis was mainly performed among the referrals for AMA, which is a characteristic distribution of indications of Japan.

  7. Redescription of Parapercis okamurai Kamohara, 1960 (Perciformes: Pinguipedidae), based on specimens newly collected from Taiwan and Japan.

    PubMed

    Ho, Hsuan-Ching

    2014-01-01

    A rare species of sandperch, Parapercis okamurai, is redescribed based on 2 types and 15 specimens newly collected from Taiwan and Japan. The species is unique in having cycloid scales on the parietal, opercle and subopercle, except for few large ctenoid scale that covers the base of the opercular spine; body color yellowish dorsally, with 10 or 11 faint yellow bands on lateral body and pale ventrally; and black spots on inner side of upper pectoral fin base. It can also be distinguished from congeners by having a combination of the following characters: dorsal-fin rays V, 23; anal-fin rays I, 19; pectoral-fin rays 18; pored lateral-line scales 59-64; medial predorsal scales 9-10; transverse scale rows 4.5-5.5/14-15; circumpeduncular scales 20-21; gill raker4-5+9-10=13-16; -4 pairs of canine teeth at front of lower jaw; 2-4 rows of teeth on vomer; 2 rows of teeth on palatines; scales on cheek moderately large, each half embedded; and body color yellowish dorsally and a prominent ocellus at upper caudal-fin base. PMID:25283124

  8. 43 CFR 3505.11 - Do I need a prospecting permit to collect mineral specimens for non-commercial purposes?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... mineral specimens for hobby, recreation, scientific, research or similar purposes without a prospecting... mineral specimens for non-commercial purposes? 3505.11 Section 3505.11 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR...

  9. Collective Transformations, Collective Theories: What Adult Educators Can Learn From the Boston Women's Health Book Collective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birden, Susan

    The experiences of the 12-woman Boston Women's Health Book Collective was examined in a case study that focused on the collective's activities from its formation in 1969 through its publication of the book "Our Bodies, Ourselves" in 1973 and its opening of a women's clinic in downtown Boston that is still in operation today. The case study draws…

  10. Redescription of Chironomus javanus and Chironomus kiiensis (Diptera: Chironomidae) Larvae and Adults Collected from a Rice Field in Pulau Pinang, Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shami, Salman A; Rawi, Che Salmah Md; Ahmad, Abu Hassan; Nor, Siti Azizah Mohd

    2012-01-01

    Chironomus javanus (Kieffer) and Chironomus kiiensis Tokunaga were redescribed from materials collected from a rice field in Pulau Pinang, Malaysia. The larvae can only be distinguished after careful preparation and examination using a compound microscope, but the pupae were not useful to differentiate C. javanus from C. kiiensis. The adult specimens showed clear body and wing characteristics for rapid and accurate identification. PMID:24575227

  11. Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) in Fecal Specimens From Adults Diagnosed With Pulmonary Tuberculosis Using the Xpert MTB/Rifampicin Test

    PubMed Central

    Kokuto, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Yuka; Yoshimatsu, Shoji; Mizuno, Kazue; Yi, Lina; Mitarai, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Background. The Xpert Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB)/rifampicin (RIF) is a fully automated diagnostic test that allows for the detection of MTB including its RIF resistance. Although the test is used for the diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) in sputum samples worldwide, studies using fecal specimens are scarce. We therefore evaluated the efficacy of the Xpert MTB/RIF test for detection of MTB in fecal specimens obtained from adult pulmonary TB patients, confirmed by culture and/or molecular diagnostic methods. Methods. We conducted a retrospective case-control study to provide proof-of-concept regarding the efficacy of the Xpert MTB/RIF test using fecal samples for diagnosing pulmonary TB via detection of MTB in adult patients (≥20 years) at the Fukujuji Hospital in Tokyo, Japan. Results. Fecal specimens were obtained from 56 active pulmonary TB patients (including 48 sputum smear-positive and 8 sputum smear-negative patients), 10 non-TB patients (including 4 Myocobacterium avium complex infections), and 27 healthy individuals who were exposed to active pulmonary TB patients. The sensitivity of the fecal Xpert MTB/RIF was 100% (81.7%–100%) for detection of MTB in specimens from sputum smear-positive (1+ to 3+) patients, 81.0% (58.1%–94.6%) in specimens from sputum smear scanty positive patients, and 50.0% (15.7%–84.3%) in specimens from sputum smear-negative patients. Meanwhile, each of the fecal specimens from the non-TB group was negative for MTB (specificity 100%; 95% confidence interval, 86.2–100). Conclusions. The fecal Xpert MTB/RIF test could detect MTB in a large proportion of smear-positive pulmonary TB patients, without frequent false-positive results at a TB referral hospital in Japan. PMID:26125035

  12. Comparison of Rates of Positivity for Bordetella pertussis by Real-Time PCR between Specimens Collected with Rayon Swabs on Aluminum Wire Shaft in Amies Gel with Charcoal and Specimens Collected with Flocked Swabs in Universal Viral Transport Medium during an Epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Ferrieri, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    A comparison of real-time PCR positivity rates for Bordetella pertussis between specimens collected with rayon swabs on an aluminum wire shaft in Amies gel with charcoal and those collected with flocked swabs in universal viral transport medium during an epidemic revealed that their performances were comparable. PMID:24789194

  13. Comparison of rates of positivity for Bordetella pertussis by real-time PCR between specimens collected with rayon swabs on aluminum wire shaft in Amies gel with charcoal and specimens collected with flocked swabs in universal viral transport medium during an epidemic.

    PubMed

    Arbefeville, Sophie; Ferrieri, Patricia

    2014-07-01

    A comparison of real-time PCR positivity rates for Bordetella pertussis between specimens collected with rayon swabs on an aluminum wire shaft in Amies gel with charcoal and those collected with flocked swabs in universal viral transport medium during an epidemic revealed that their performances were comparable. PMID:24789194

  14. Comparison of rates of positivity for Bordetella pertussis by real-time PCR between specimens collected with rayon swabs on aluminum wire shaft in Amies gel with charcoal and specimens collected with flocked swabs in universal viral transport medium during an epidemic.

    PubMed

    Arbefeville, Sophie; Ferrieri, Patricia

    2014-07-01

    A comparison of real-time PCR positivity rates for Bordetella pertussis between specimens collected with rayon swabs on an aluminum wire shaft in Amies gel with charcoal and those collected with flocked swabs in universal viral transport medium during an epidemic revealed that their performances were comparable.

  15. Optimal Positive Cutoff Points for careHPV Testing of Clinician- and Self-Collected Specimens in Primary Cervical Cancer Screening: an Analysis from Rural China

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Le-Ni; Jeronimo, Jose; Zhao, Fang-Hui; Chen, Wen; Valdez, Melissa; Zhang, Xun; Bansil, Pooja; Paul, Proma; Bai, Ping; Peck, Roger; Li, Jing; Chen, Feng; Stoler, Mark H.

    2014-01-01

    careHPV, a lower-cost DNA test for human papillomavirus (HPV), is being considered for cervical cancer screening in low- and middle-income countries. However, not a single large-scaled study exists to investigate the optimal positive cutoff point of careHPV test. We pooled data for 9,785 women participating in two individual studies conducted from 2007 to 2011 in rural China. Woman underwent multiple screening tests, including careHPV on clinician-collected specimens (careHPV-C) and self-collected specimens (careHPV-S), and Hybrid Capture 2 on clinician-collected specimens (HC2-C) as a reference standard. The primary endpoint was cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3 or more severe (CIN3+) (n = 127), and secondary endpoint was CIN2+ (n = 213). The area under the curves (AUCs) for HC2-C and careHPV-C were similar (0.954 versus 0.948, P = 0.166), and better than careHPV-S (0.878; P < 0.001 versus both). The optimal positive cutoff points for HC2-C, careHPV-C, and careHPV-S were 1.40, 1.74, and 0.85, respectively. At the same cutoff point, careHPV-C was not significantly less sensitive and more specific for CIN3+ than HC2-C, and careHPV-S was significantly less sensitive for CIN3+ than careHPV-C and HC2-C. Raising the cutoff point of careHPV-C from 1.0 to 2.0 could result in nonsignificantly lower sensitivity but significantly higher specificity. Similar results were observed using CIN2+ endpoint. careHPV using either clinician- or self-collected specimens performed well in detecting cervical precancer and cancer. We found that the optimal cutoff points of careHPV were 2.0 on clinician-collected specimens and 1.0 on self-collected specimens. PMID:24671789

  16. 76 FR 68509 - Comment Request for Information Collection for Reintegration of Ex-Offenders-Adult Reporting...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-04

    ... Request for Information Collection for Reintegration of Ex-Offenders-Adult Reporting System, Extension... support the Reintegration of Ex-Offenders-Adult (RExO-Adult) grants, which expires on March 31, 2012. A... Reintegration of Ex-Offender-Adult (formerly Prisoner Reentry Initiative) grants, faith-based and...

  17. 77 FR 48973 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection Requests; Office of Vocational and Adult Education...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Notice of Proposed Information Collection Requests; Office of Vocational and Adult Education; Perkins... and financial reports for the Office of Vocational Adult Education office (OVAE) Division of...

  18. Investigation of Fossil Insect Systematics of Specimens Collected at the Clare Quarry Site in the Florissant Fossil Beds, Florissant, Colorado from 1996 to Present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cancellare, J. A.; Villalobos, J. I.; Lemone, D.

    2012-12-01

    The Clare Quarry is located in the town of Florissant, Teller County, Colorado, approximately 30 miles west of Colorado Springs on State Highway 27. The elevation at the quarry face is 2500 meters ASL. Ar40/Ar39 dating of the upper beds of the Florissant Formation indicates an age of 34.07 +/- 0.10 Ma.An Oreodont fossil jaw and other mammalian fossils place the formation in the Chadronian Age.The basin in which the formation lies is undergirded by Wall Mountain Tuff dated at 37Ma, which sits on Pike's Peak Granite, which is dated at1080 Ma. In the Late Eocene the Florissant region was lacustrine in nature due to the damning of the river valley which runs north into Florissant. The ash and lahars from volcanic eruptions from the Thirty-nine Mile Volcano Field formed impoundments that produced shallow lakes for what is thought to been a period for 5000 years. Repeated ash falls placed plant matter and insect material in the lakes and streams that were formed intermittently during the period. The ash layers in the Florissant Formation are very fine grained, and contain diatomaceous mats that formed on the lake deposited ash layers aiding in the preservation of plant and insects material. Previous work on Florissant Fossils has been done by Lesquereaux (plants) 1878, Scudder (insects) 1890, and Mc Ginitie (plants) 1953. This project began 17 years ago and has consisted of collection trips ranging from one to eight days in the summers at a proprietary quarry owned land adjacent to The Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument. The collection consists of 2700 catalogued plants, insects, and fish fossils. Of this number, 513 are insect fossils (19% of the total collection). Quality of preservation ranges from very poor to very good with the average qualitative evaluation between poor to fair. The largest series identied to family are Tipulids (Craneflies) with 23 specimens in the series. In this series wing venation is often incomplete and smaller characters including

  19. Using a Powered Bone Marrow Biopsy System Results in Shorter Procedures, Causes Less Residual Pain to Adult Patients, and Yields Larger Specimens

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In recent years, a battery-powered bone marrow biopsy system was developed and cleared by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to allow health care providers to access the bone marrow space quickly and efficiently. A multicenter randomized clinical trial was designed for adult patients to determine if the powered device had advantages over traditional manually-inserted needles in regard to length of procedure, patient pain, complications, user satisfaction, and pathological analysis of the specimens. Methods Adult patients requiring marrow sampling procedures were randomized for a Manual or Powered device. Visual Analog Scale (VAS) pain scores were captured immediately following the procedure and 1 and 7 days later. Procedure time was measured and core specimens were submitted to pathology for grading. Results Ten sites enrolled 102 patients into the study (Powered, n = 52; Manual, n = 50). Mean VAS scores for overall procedural pain were not significantly different between the arms (3.8 ± 2.8 for Powered, 3.5 ± 2.3 for Manual [p = 0.623]). A day later, more patients who underwent the Powered procedure were pain-free (67%) than those patients in the Manual group (33%; p = 0.003). One week later, there was no difference (83% for Powered patients; 76% for Manual patients.) Mean procedure time was 102.1 ± 86.4 seconds for the Powered group and 203.1 ± 149.5 seconds for the Manual group (p < 0.001). Pathology assessment was similar in specimen quality, but there was a significant difference in the specimen volume between the devices (Powered: 36.8 ± 21.2 mm3; Manual: 20.4 ± 9.0 mm3; p = 0.039). Two non-serious complications were experienced during Powered procedures (4%); but none during Manual procedures (p = 0.495). Conclusions The results of this first trial provide evidence that the Powered device delivers larger-volume bone marrow specimens for pathology evaluation. In addition, bone marrow specimens were secured more rapidly and subjects

  20. Occurrence of Panagrellus (Rhabditida: Panagrolaimidae) nematodes in a morphologically aberrant adult specimen of Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Coleoptera: Dryophthoridae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An aberrant specimen of Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Coleoptera: Dryophthoridae) also known as Red Palm Weevil, the most economically important insect pest of palms in the world, was found among a batch of conspecifics reared for research purposes. A morphological analysis of this weevil revealed the ...

  1. A Golden Age for Adult Education: The Collective Disorienting Dilemma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Susan

    2011-01-01

    The continuing challenge of engaging adult learners in the process of positive social change has summoned adult educators to a new understanding of their role as change agents in an increasingly complex world. Despite all obstacles presented by our contemporary culture, the nature of adult development continues to offer opportunities for adult…

  2. Good agreements between self and clinician-collected specimens for the detection of human papillomavirus in Brazilian patients

    PubMed Central

    de Campos, Karla Lopes Mandu; Machado, Ana Paula; de Almeida, Flávia Gatto; Bonin, Camila Mareti; Prata, Thiago Theodoro Martins; Almeida, Larissa Zatorre; Padovani, Cacilda Tezelli Junqueira; Ferreira, Alda Maria Teixeira; Fernandes, Carlos Eurico dos Santos; Tozetti, Inês Aparecida

    2014-01-01

    Women infected with human papillomavirus (HPV) are at a higher risk of developing cervical lesions. In the current study, self and clinician-collected vaginal and cervical samples from women were processed to detect HPV DNA using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with PGMY09/11 primers. HPV genotypes were determined using type-specific PCR. HPV DNA detection showed good concordance between self and clinician-collected samples (84.6%; kappa = 0.72). HPV infection was found in 30% women and genotyping was more concordant among high-risk HPV (HR-HPV) than low-risk HPV (HR-HPV). HPV16 was the most frequently detected among the HR-HPV types. LR-HPV was detected at a higher frequency in self-collected; however, HR-HPV types were more frequently identified in clinician-collected samples than in self-collected samples. HPV infections of multiple types were detected in 20.5% of clinician-collected samples and 15.5% of self-collected samples. In this study, we demonstrated that the HPV DNA detection rate in self-collected samples has good agreement with that of clinician-collected samples. Self-collected sampling, as a primary prevention strategy in countries with few resources, could be effective for identifying cases of HR-HPV, being more acceptable. The use of this method would enhance the coverage of screening programs for cervical cancer. PMID:24831549

  3. Aspects of Adult Literacy: A Collection of Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ben-Tovim, Margaret, Ed.; Kedney, R. J., Ed.

    The book contains 15 papers focusing on adult illiteracy in Great Britain in the context of the community, but excluding the prison population, trainees at Adult Training Centres, patients in mental hospitals, or literacy education in the armed forces. The papers are presented in three sections. Part 1 on students contains six papers: "The Scale…

  4. Adult Education. Part II: Collection of Learning Experiences. Volume 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peavey, Kay S., Ed.

    This document, which is the first in a series of best practice documents incorporating the wisdom and experiences of New York's adult educators, presents eight learning experiences that are specifically tailored for adult learners and instructors. The following information is provided for each learning experience: (1) a brief description of the…

  5. Hybridization Capture Using RAD Probes (hyRAD), a New Tool for Performing Genomic Analyses on Collection Specimens.

    PubMed

    Suchan, Tomasz; Pitteloud, Camille; Gerasimova, Nadezhda S; Kostikova, Anna; Schmid, Sarah; Arrigo, Nils; Pajkovic, Mila; Ronikier, Michał; Alvarez, Nadir

    2016-01-01

    In the recent years, many protocols aimed at reproducibly sequencing reduced-genome subsets in non-model organisms have been published. Among them, RAD-sequencing is one of the most widely used. It relies on digesting DNA with specific restriction enzymes and performing size selection on the resulting fragments. Despite its acknowledged utility, this method is of limited use with degraded DNA samples, such as those isolated from museum specimens, as these samples are less likely to harbor fragments long enough to comprise two restriction sites making possible ligation of the adapter sequences (in the case of double-digest RAD) or performing size selection of the resulting fragments (in the case of single-digest RAD). Here, we address these limitations by presenting a novel method called hybridization RAD (hyRAD). In this approach, biotinylated RAD fragments, covering a random fraction of the genome, are used as baits for capturing homologous fragments from genomic shotgun sequencing libraries. This simple and cost-effective approach allows sequencing of orthologous loci even from highly degraded DNA samples, opening new avenues of research in the field of museum genomics. Not relying on the restriction site presence, it improves among-sample loci coverage. In a trial study, hyRAD allowed us to obtain a large set of orthologous loci from fresh and museum samples from a non-model butterfly species, with a high proportion of single nucleotide polymorphisms present in all eight analyzed specimens, including 58-year-old museum samples. The utility of the method was further validated using 49 museum and fresh samples of a Palearctic grasshopper species for which the spatial genetic structure was previously assessed using mtDNA amplicons. The application of the method is eventually discussed in a wider context. As it does not rely on the restriction site presence, it is therefore not sensitive to among-sample loci polymorphisms in the restriction sites that usually causes

  6. Hybridization Capture Using RAD Probes (hyRAD), a New Tool for Performing Genomic Analyses on Collection Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Suchan, Tomasz; Pitteloud, Camille; Gerasimova, Nadezhda S.; Kostikova, Anna; Schmid, Sarah; Arrigo, Nils; Pajkovic, Mila; Ronikier, Michał; Alvarez, Nadir

    2016-01-01

    In the recent years, many protocols aimed at reproducibly sequencing reduced-genome subsets in non-model organisms have been published. Among them, RAD-sequencing is one of the most widely used. It relies on digesting DNA with specific restriction enzymes and performing size selection on the resulting fragments. Despite its acknowledged utility, this method is of limited use with degraded DNA samples, such as those isolated from museum specimens, as these samples are less likely to harbor fragments long enough to comprise two restriction sites making possible ligation of the adapter sequences (in the case of double-digest RAD) or performing size selection of the resulting fragments (in the case of single-digest RAD). Here, we address these limitations by presenting a novel method called hybridization RAD (hyRAD). In this approach, biotinylated RAD fragments, covering a random fraction of the genome, are used as baits for capturing homologous fragments from genomic shotgun sequencing libraries. This simple and cost-effective approach allows sequencing of orthologous loci even from highly degraded DNA samples, opening new avenues of research in the field of museum genomics. Not relying on the restriction site presence, it improves among-sample loci coverage. In a trial study, hyRAD allowed us to obtain a large set of orthologous loci from fresh and museum samples from a non-model butterfly species, with a high proportion of single nucleotide polymorphisms present in all eight analyzed specimens, including 58-year-old museum samples. The utility of the method was further validated using 49 museum and fresh samples of a Palearctic grasshopper species for which the spatial genetic structure was previously assessed using mtDNA amplicons. The application of the method is eventually discussed in a wider context. As it does not rely on the restriction site presence, it is therefore not sensitive to among-sample loci polymorphisms in the restriction sites that usually causes

  7. Mass digitization of scientific collections: New opportunities to transform the use of biological specimens and underwrite biodiversity science.

    PubMed

    Beaman, Reed S; Cellinese, Nico

    2012-01-01

    New information technologies have enabled the scientific collections community and its stakeholders to adapt, adopt, and leverage novel approaches for a nearly 300 years old scientific discipline. Now, few can credibly question the transformational impact of technology on efforts to digitize scientific collections, as IT now reaches into almost every nook and cranny of society. Five to ten years ago this was not the case. Digitization is an activity that museums and academic institutions increasingly recognize, though many still do not embrace, as a means to boost the impact of collections to research and society through improved access. The acquisition and use of scientific collections is a global endeavor, and digitization enhances their value by improved access to core biodiversity information, increases use, relevance and potential downstream value, for example, in the management of natural resources, policy development, food security, and planetary and human health. This paper examines new opportunities to design and implement infrastructure that will support not just mass digitization efforts, but also a broad range of research on biological diversity and physical sciences in order to make scientific collections increasingly relevant to societal needs and interest.

  8. Mass digitization of scientific collections: New opportunities to transform the use of biological specimens and underwrite biodiversity science

    PubMed Central

    Beaman, Reed S.; Cellinese, Nico

    2012-01-01

    Abstract New information technologies have enabled the scientific collections community and its stakeholders to adapt, adopt, and leverage novel approaches for a nearly 300 years old scientific discipline. Now, few can credibly question the transformational impact of technology on efforts to digitize scientific collections, as IT now reaches into almost every nook and cranny of society. Five to ten years ago this was not the case. Digitization is an activity that museums and academic institutions increasingly recognize, though many still do not embrace, as a means to boost the impact of collections to research and society through improved access. The acquisition and use of scientific collections is a global endeavor, and digitization enhances their value by improved access to core biodiversity information, increases use, relevance and potential downstream value, for example, in the management of natural resources, policy development, food security, and planetary and human health. This paper examines new opportunities to design and implement infrastructure that will support not just mass digitization efforts, but also a broad range of research on biological diversity and physical sciences in order to make scientific collections increasingly relevant to societal needs and interest. PMID:22859875

  9. PCR-based genotyping of Helicobacter pylori of Gambian children and adults directly from biopsy specimens and bacterial cultures

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Helicobacter pylori is an important agent of gastroduodenal disease in Africa and throughout the world. We sought to determine an optimum method for genotyping H. pylori strains from children and adults in The Gambia, West Africa. Results Virulence genes were amplified in 127 of 190 cases tested (121 adults and 6 children); each of 60 bacterial cultures, and 116 from DNA extracted directly from biopsies. The proportion of biopsies that were cagA+, the ratio of vacAs1/s2, and vacAm1/m2, and the proportion of mixed strain populations in individual subjects changed with age. Strains lacking virulence cagA and vacA genes and with apparently homogeneous (one predominant strain) infections were more common among infants than adults. Conclusions In order to detect the range of bacterial genotypes harbored by individual patients, direct PCR proved slightly superior to isolation of H. pylori by biopsy culture, but the techniques were complementary, and the combination of both culture and direct PCR produced the most complete picture. The seemingly higher virulence of strains from adult than infant infections in The Gambia merits further analysis. PMID:21507253

  10. Collection, handling and analysis of specimens for studies of mucosal immunity in animals of veterinary importance - Appendix III

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The validity of data in science depends on the reliability of the collection procedure and the methods used for data analysis. This becomes a major challenge in studies of mucosal immunology since samples for analysis come from various anatomical sources which differ remarkably in their content and ...

  11. Vaginal tampons as specimen collection device for the molecular diagnosis of non-ulcerative sexually transmitted infections in antenatal clinic attendees.

    PubMed

    Sturm, P D J; Connolly, Cathy; Khan, Nasreen; Ebrahim, Safiya; Sturm, A Willem

    2004-02-01

    Self-inserted vaginal tampons for the molecular diagnosis of non-ulcerative STIs were evaluated. Cervical and vaginal swabs, tampons and urines were collected from 185 first-time antenatal clinic attendees. Cultures and nucleic acid amplification assays (NAA) were performed. The sensitivity of PCR on tampons for Trichomonas vaginalis was with 94% (CI 85-98%) significantly higher (P<0.001) than culture (50%, CI 38-62%) or urine (53%, CI 41-65%). Neisseria gonorrhoeae culture had a sensitivity of 64% (CI 36-86%), strand displacement assay (SDA) had a sensitivity of 79% (CI 49-94%) using tampon specimens, 57% (CI 30-81%) using endocervical swabs and 43% (CI 19-70%) using urines. There was no difference in sensitivity of SDA for Chlamydia trachomatis using tampon specimens, urine or endocervical swabs. The specificity approached 100% for all assays on all specimens. NAA on tampons for the detection of T. vaginalis, N. gonorrhoeae and C. trachomatis identified more infections than assays on swabs or urines. This reached statistical significance for T. vaginalis only.

  12. Impact of the phlebotomy training based on CLSI/NCCLS H03-A6 - procedures for the collection of diagnostic blood specimens by venipuncture.

    PubMed Central

    Lima-Oliveira, Gabriel; Lippi, Giuseppe; Salvagno, Gian Luca; Montagnana, Martina; Picheth, Geraldo; Guidi, Gian Cesare

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The activities involving phlebotomy, a critical task for obtaining diagnostic blood samples, are poorly studied as regards the major sources of errors and the procedures related to laboratory quality control. The aim of this study was to verify the compliance with CLSI documents of clinical laboratories from South America and to assess whether teaching phlebotomists to follow the exact procedure for blood collection by venipuncture from CLSI/NCCLS H03-A6 - Procedures for the Collection of Diagnostic Blood Specimens by Venipuncture might improve the quality of the process. Materials and methods: A survey was sent by mail to 3674 laboratories from South America to verify the use of CLSI documents. Thirty skilled phlebotomists were trained with the CLSI H03-A6 document to perform venipuncture procedures for a period of 20 consecutive working days. The overall performances of the phlebotomists were further compared before and after the training program. Results: 2622 from 2781 laboratories that did answer our survey used CLSI documents to standardize their procedures and process. The phlebotomists’ training for 20 days before our evaluation completely eliminated non-conformity procedures for: i) incorrect friction of the forearm, during the cleaning of the venipuncture site to ease vein location; ii) incorrect sequence of vacuum tubes collection; and iii) inadequate mixing of the blood in primary vacuum tubes containing anticoagulants or clot activators. Unfortunately the CLSI H03-A6 document does not caution against both unsuitable tourniquet application time (i.e., for more than one minute) and inappropriate request to clench the fist repeatedly. These inadequate procedures were observed for all phlebotomists. Conclusion: We showed that strict observance of the CLSI H03-A6 document can remarkably improve quality, although the various steps for collecting diagnostic blood specimens are not a gold standard, since they may still permit errors. Tourniquet

  13. Spread of Ixodes scapularis (Acari:Ixodidae) in Indiana: collections of adults in 1991-1994 and description of a Borrelia burgdorferi-infected population.

    PubMed

    Pinger, R R; Timmons, L; Karris, K

    1996-09-01

    Collection records for the adult black legged tick, Ixodes scapularis Say, in Indiana for the period 1991-1994 are presented and a new, established population of Borrelia burgdorferi-infected I. scapularis is described. The number of I. scapularis adults collected in Indiana increased progressively from 19 in 1991 to > 200 in 1994, and the number of Indiana counties reporting at least 1 adult increased from 13 to 29. Also, during this period, 4 countries in northwestern Indiana yielded > 10 specimens each, and B. burgdorferi-infected ticks were collected in 2 of these counties. An established population of I. scapularis, as evidenced by the presence of questing larvae, nymphs, and adults, was discovered in Jasper County in 1993. Twelve of 39 adults (31%) and 4 of 44 nymphs (9%) collected with cloth drags were infected with B. burgdorferi. Three of 49 (6%) white-footed mice, Peromyscus leucopus, collected from the site were also infected with B. burgdorferi. We believe that this focus was established at least 8 yr ago, and that a tick originating from this focus was responsible for a case of Lyme disease reported from this county in 1985.

  14. Early collection of saliva specimens from Bell's palsy patients: quantitative analysis of HHV-6, HSV-1, and VZV.

    PubMed

    Turriziani, Ombretta; Falasca, Francesca; Maida, Paola; Gaeta, Aurelia; De Vito, Corrado; Mancini, Patrizia; De Seta, Daniele; Covelli, Edoardo; Attanasio, Giuseppe; Antonelli, Guido

    2014-10-01

    Bell's palsy is the most common cause of facial paralysis. Although it has been associated with diabetes mellitus, hypertension, pregnancy, and preeclampsia, the etiology of Bell's palsy remains unknown. The reactivation of latent herpes simplex virus (HSV) or varicella-zoster virus (VZV) with subsequent inflammation and entrapment of the facial nerve in the narrow labyrinthine segment has been implicated as a cause of facial paralysis, but the active role of these viruses in Bell's palsy is still discussed. This study quantified HSV-1 DNA, VZV DNA, and HHV-6 DNA in 95 saliva samples collected from patients within 48 hr from the onset of paralysis. HSV-1, VZV, and HHV-6 were detected in 13%, 3%, and 61% of patients, respectively. The detection rate did not differ significantly between patients and a control group of healthy donors. Interestingly, however, the value of HHV-6 DNA copies was significantly higher than that detected in healthy donors. In addition, the mean value of HHV-6 DNA recorded in patients who had at least a one grade improvement of palsy at the first visit was significantly lower than that detected in patients who showed no change in facial palsy grade or an increase of at least one grade. These findings call into question the role of HSV-1 and VZV in the etiology of Bell's palsy, and suggest that HHV-6 may be involved in the development of the disease or that the underlying disease mechanism might predispose patients to HHV-6 reactivation.

  15. Early collection of saliva specimens from Bell's palsy patients: quantitative analysis of HHV-6, HSV-1, and VZV.

    PubMed

    Turriziani, Ombretta; Falasca, Francesca; Maida, Paola; Gaeta, Aurelia; De Vito, Corrado; Mancini, Patrizia; De Seta, Daniele; Covelli, Edoardo; Attanasio, Giuseppe; Antonelli, Guido

    2014-10-01

    Bell's palsy is the most common cause of facial paralysis. Although it has been associated with diabetes mellitus, hypertension, pregnancy, and preeclampsia, the etiology of Bell's palsy remains unknown. The reactivation of latent herpes simplex virus (HSV) or varicella-zoster virus (VZV) with subsequent inflammation and entrapment of the facial nerve in the narrow labyrinthine segment has been implicated as a cause of facial paralysis, but the active role of these viruses in Bell's palsy is still discussed. This study quantified HSV-1 DNA, VZV DNA, and HHV-6 DNA in 95 saliva samples collected from patients within 48 hr from the onset of paralysis. HSV-1, VZV, and HHV-6 were detected in 13%, 3%, and 61% of patients, respectively. The detection rate did not differ significantly between patients and a control group of healthy donors. Interestingly, however, the value of HHV-6 DNA copies was significantly higher than that detected in healthy donors. In addition, the mean value of HHV-6 DNA recorded in patients who had at least a one grade improvement of palsy at the first visit was significantly lower than that detected in patients who showed no change in facial palsy grade or an increase of at least one grade. These findings call into question the role of HSV-1 and VZV in the etiology of Bell's palsy, and suggest that HHV-6 may be involved in the development of the disease or that the underlying disease mechanism might predispose patients to HHV-6 reactivation. PMID:24619963

  16. Collecting saliva and measuring salivary cortisol and alpha-amylase in frail community residing older adults via family caregivers.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Nancy A; Granger, Douglas A

    2013-12-18

    Salivary measures have emerged in bio-behavioral research that are easy-to-collect, minimally invasive, and relatively inexpensive biologic markers of stress. This article we present the steps for collection and analysis of two salivary assays in research with frail, community residing older adults-salivary cortisol and salivary alpha amylase. The field of salivary bioscience is rapidly advancing and the purpose of this presentation is to provide an update on the developments for investigators interested in integrating these measures into research on aging. Strategies are presented for instructing family caregivers in collecting saliva in the home, and for conducting laboratory analyses of salivary analytes that have demonstrated feasibility, high compliance, and yield quality specimens. The protocol for sample collection includes: (1) consistent use of collection materials; (2) standardized methods that promote adherence and minimize subject burden; and (3) procedures for controlling certain confounding agents. We also provide strategies for laboratory analyses include: (1) saliva handling and processing; (2) salivary cortisol and salivary alpha amylase assay procedures; and (3) analytic considerations.

  17. Collecting Saliva and Measuring Salivary Cortisol and Alpha-amylase in Frail Community Residing Older Adults via Family Caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, Nancy A.; Granger, Douglas A.

    2013-01-01

    Salivary measures have emerged in bio-behavioral research that are easy-to-collect, minimally invasive, and relatively inexpensive biologic markers of stress. This article we present the steps for collection and analysis of two salivary assays in research with frail, community residing older adults-salivary cortisol and salivary alpha amylase. The field of salivary bioscience is rapidly advancing and the purpose of this presentation is to provide an update on the developments for investigators interested in integrating these measures into research on aging. Strategies are presented for instructing family caregivers in collecting saliva in the home, and for conducting laboratory analyses of salivary analytes that have demonstrated feasibility, high compliance, and yield quality specimens. The protocol for sample collection includes: (1) consistent use of collection materials; (2) standardized methods that promote adherence and minimize subject burden; and (3) procedures for controlling certain confounding agents. We also provide strategies for laboratory analyses include: (1) saliva handling and processing; (2) salivary cortisol and salivary alpha amylase assay procedures; and (3) analytic considerations. PMID:24378361

  18. Catalog of type specimens of invertebrates in the collection of the Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazônia, Manaus, Brazil. VI. Hexapoda: Hemiptera: Heteroptera.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Higor D D; Ferreira-Keppler, Ruth L

    2013-01-01

    A catalog of type specimens of Heteroptera (Insecta: Hemiptera) deposited in the Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazônia (INPA), Manaus, Brazil, is presented and updated to May, 2012. A total of 37 holotypes and 61 lots of paratypes of 78 species are listed in their families: Miridae and Reduviidae (infraorder: Cimicomorpha); Mesoveliidae and Velfidae (Gerromorpha); Belostomatidae, Naucoridae, and Notonectidae (Nepomorpha); and Coreidae, Geocoridae [the older sense of "Lygaeidae"], and Pentatomidae (Pentatomomorpha). The taxa are presented alphabetically by infraorders, families, and genera, followed by epithet, bibliographic citation, type category, collection number, method of preservation, and present data on the labels. When necessary, we added localities data, and changes in taxonomic status of some species

  19. Doll Collecting; A Course Designed for the Adult Education Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Betty M.

    The author has attempted to organize the many materials to be found on doll collecting into a course which will provide a foundation of knowledge for appreciating and evaluating old dolls. The course has been divided into sessions in which old dolls will be studied by type (images, idols, and early playthings; child, doll, and social realities;…

  20. 76 FR 13339 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request-Child and Adult...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-11

    ... accuracy of meal claims submitted for reimbursement by family day care home providers for meals served to children who attend the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) day care homes. The assessment is tasked... family day care homes (FDCHs) during FY 2011. DATES: Written comments on this notice must be received...

  1. Antemortem Detection of Chronic Wasting Disease Prions in Nasal Brush Collections and Rectal Biopsy Specimens from White-Tailed Deer by Real-Time Quaking-Induced Conversion

    PubMed Central

    Siepker, Chris; Walter, W. David; Thomsen, Bruce V.; Greenlee, Justin J.; Lehmkuhl, Aaron D.; Richt, Jürgen A.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD), a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy of cervids, was first documented nearly 50 years ago in Colorado and Wyoming and has since spread to cervids in 23 states, two Canadian provinces, and the Republic of Korea. The expansion of this disease makes the development of sensitive diagnostic assays and antemortem sampling techniques crucial for the mitigation of its spread; this is especially true in cases of relocation/reintroduction of farmed or free-ranging deer and elk or surveillance studies of private or protected herds, where depopulation is contraindicated. This study sought to evaluate the sensitivity of the real-time quaking-induced conversion (RT-QuIC) assay by using recto-anal mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (RAMALT) biopsy specimens and nasal brush samples collected antemortem from farmed white-tailed deer (n = 409). Antemortem findings were then compared to results from ante- and postmortem samples (RAMALT, brainstem, and medial retropharyngeal lymph nodes) evaluated by using the current gold standard in vitro assay, immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis. We hypothesized that the sensitivity of RT-QuIC would be comparable to IHC analysis in antemortem tissues and would correlate with both the genotype and the stage of clinical disease. Our results showed that RAMALT testing by RT-QuIC assay had the highest sensitivity (69.8%) compared to that of postmortem testing, with a specificity of >93.9%. These data suggest that RT-QuIC, like IHC analysis, is an effective assay for detection of PrPCWD in rectal biopsy specimens and other antemortem samples and, with further research to identify more sensitive tissues, bodily fluids, or experimental conditions, has potential for large-scale and rapid automated testing for CWD diagnosis. PMID:26865693

  2. Antemortem Detection of Chronic Wasting Disease Prions in Nasal Brush Collections and Rectal Biopsy Specimens from White-Tailed Deer by Real-Time Quaking-Induced Conversion.

    PubMed

    Haley, Nicholas J; Siepker, Chris; Walter, W David; Thomsen, Bruce V; Greenlee, Justin J; Lehmkuhl, Aaron D; Richt, Jürgen A

    2016-04-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD), a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy of cervids, was first documented nearly 50 years ago in Colorado and Wyoming and has since spread to cervids in 23 states, two Canadian provinces, and the Republic of Korea. The expansion of this disease makes the development of sensitive diagnostic assays and antemortem sampling techniques crucial for the mitigation of its spread; this is especially true in cases of relocation/reintroduction of farmed or free-ranging deer and elk or surveillance studies of private or protected herds, where depopulation is contraindicated. This study sought to evaluate the sensitivity of the real-time quaking-induced conversion (RT-QuIC) assay by using recto-anal mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (RAMALT) biopsy specimens and nasal brush samples collected antemortem from farmed white-tailed deer (n= 409). Antemortem findings were then compared to results from ante- and postmortem samples (RAMALT, brainstem, and medial retropharyngeal lymph nodes) evaluated by using the current gold standardin vitroassay, immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis. We hypothesized that the sensitivity of RT-QuIC would be comparable to IHC analysis in antemortem tissues and would correlate with both the genotype and the stage of clinical disease. Our results showed that RAMALT testing by RT-QuIC assay had the highest sensitivity (69.8%) compared to that of postmortem testing, with a specificity of >93.9%. These data suggest that RT-QuIC, like IHC analysis, is an effective assay for detection of PrP(CWD)in rectal biopsy specimens and other antemortem samples and, with further research to identify more sensitive tissues, bodily fluids, or experimental conditions, has potential for large-scale and rapid automated testing for CWD diagnosis.

  3. Antemortem Detection of Chronic Wasting Disease Prions in Nasal Brush Collections and Rectal Biopsy Specimens from White-Tailed Deer by Real-Time Quaking-Induced Conversion.

    PubMed

    Haley, Nicholas J; Siepker, Chris; Walter, W David; Thomsen, Bruce V; Greenlee, Justin J; Lehmkuhl, Aaron D; Richt, Jürgen A

    2016-04-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD), a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy of cervids, was first documented nearly 50 years ago in Colorado and Wyoming and has since spread to cervids in 23 states, two Canadian provinces, and the Republic of Korea. The expansion of this disease makes the development of sensitive diagnostic assays and antemortem sampling techniques crucial for the mitigation of its spread; this is especially true in cases of relocation/reintroduction of farmed or free-ranging deer and elk or surveillance studies of private or protected herds, where depopulation is contraindicated. This study sought to evaluate the sensitivity of the real-time quaking-induced conversion (RT-QuIC) assay by using recto-anal mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (RAMALT) biopsy specimens and nasal brush samples collected antemortem from farmed white-tailed deer (n= 409). Antemortem findings were then compared to results from ante- and postmortem samples (RAMALT, brainstem, and medial retropharyngeal lymph nodes) evaluated by using the current gold standardin vitroassay, immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis. We hypothesized that the sensitivity of RT-QuIC would be comparable to IHC analysis in antemortem tissues and would correlate with both the genotype and the stage of clinical disease. Our results showed that RAMALT testing by RT-QuIC assay had the highest sensitivity (69.8%) compared to that of postmortem testing, with a specificity of >93.9%. These data suggest that RT-QuIC, like IHC analysis, is an effective assay for detection of PrP(CWD)in rectal biopsy specimens and other antemortem samples and, with further research to identify more sensitive tissues, bodily fluids, or experimental conditions, has potential for large-scale and rapid automated testing for CWD diagnosis. PMID:26865693

  4. Collective memories of three wars in United States history in younger and older adults.

    PubMed

    Zaromb, Franklin; Butler, Andrew C; Agarwal, Pooja K; Roediger, Henry L

    2014-04-01

    A collective memory is a representation of the past that is shared by members of a group. We investigated similarities and differences in the collective memories of younger and older adults for three major wars in U.S. history (the Civil War, World War II, and the Iraq War). Both groups were alive during the recent Iraq War, but only the older subjects were alive during World War II, and both groups learned about the Civil War from historical sources. Subjects recalled the 10 most important events that occurred during each war and then evaluated the emotional valence, the relative importance, and their level of knowledge for each event. They also estimated the percentage of people that would share their memory of each event within their age group and the other age group. Although most historical events were recalled by fewer than 25 % of subjects, younger and older adults commonly recalled a core set of events for each war that conform to a narrative structure that may be fundamental to collective remembering. Younger adults showed greater consensus in the events that they recalled for all three wars, relative to older adults, but there was less consensus in both groups for the Iraq War. Whereas younger adults recalled more specific events of short duration, older adults recalled more extended and summarized events of long duration. Our study shows that collective memories can be studied empirically and can differ depending on whether the events are experienced personally or learned from historical sources.

  5. Collections of adult Ixodes dammini in Indiana, 1987-1990, and the isolation of Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Pinger, R R; Holycross, J; Ryder, J; Mummert, M

    1991-09-01

    The collection records for Ixodes dammini Spielman, Clifford, Piesman & Corwin in Indiana are summarized for the period 1987-1990. In 1990, 13 of 729 deer examined were found to harbor adult I. dammini ticks. Eleven of these ticks were collected from 10 deer at a site in Newton County in northwestern Indiana. Borrelia burgdorferi spirochetes were isolated from a single female I. dammini tick collected from this site.

  6. A simple 'paper smear' method for dry collection, transport and storage of cervical cytological specimens for rapid screening of HPV infection by PCR.

    PubMed

    Kailash, U; Hedau, S; Gopalkrishna, V; Katiyar, S; Das, B C

    2002-07-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are major pathogens associated with the development of cancer of the uterine cervix, the most common malignant tumour of women worldwide. Reliable diagnosis of HPV infection, particularly the 'high-risk' types (16/18), may facilitate early identification of 'high-risk' populations for developing cervical cancer and may augment the sensitivity and specificity of primary cervical cancer screening programmes by complementing the conventional Pap test. A simple paper smear method has been developed for dry collection, transport and storage of cervical smears/scrapes at room temperature for subsequent detection of HPV DNA by PCR assay. Imprint biopsies, blood and fine-needle aspirates were also collected by this method. The cervical scrapes or other body fluids were smeared (within 0.5-1 cm diameter) and dried on to sterile small slides made of Whatman 3MM filter paper, and stored individually at room temperature or at 4 degrees C. A small piece (2-3 mm) of the paper smear was punched or cut out with a sterile surgical blade, boiled in an eppendorf tube containing 50 microl of distilled water for 5 min and used directly for PCR amplification. The quality and quantity of DNA derived from paper smears and the results of PCR amplifications for HPV type 16, BRCA1 and p53 genes were identical to those obtained from the same samples following collection in PBS, storage (-70 degrees C) and phenol-chloroform-based DNA extraction. DNA was stable in the paper smears for up to a year, whether stored at room temperature or at 4 degrees C. This method is simple, rapid and cost-effective, and can be effectively employed for large-scale population screening, especially for regions where the specimens are to be transported from distant places to the laboratory.

  7. Evaluation of laboratory tests for SAT serotypes of foot-and-mouth disease virus with specimens collected from convalescent cattle in Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Sammin, D J; Paton, D J; Parida, S; Ferris, N P; Hutchings, G H; Reid, S M; Shaw, A E; Holmes, C; Gibson, D; Corteyn, M; Knowles, N J; Valarcher, J-F; Hamblin, P A; Fleming, L; Gwaze, G; Sumption, K J

    2007-05-12

    During a field study in Zimbabwe, clinical specimens were collected from 403 cattle in six herds, in which the history of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) vaccination and infection appeared to be known with some certainty. Five herds had reported outbreaks of disease one to five months previously but clinical FMD had not been observed in the sixth herd. A trivalent vaccine (South African Territories [SAT] types 1, 2 and 3) had been used in some of the herds at various times either before and/or after the recent outbreaks of FMD. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of serological tests for the detection of SAT-type FMD virus infection, particularly elisas for antibodies to non-structural proteins (NSPs) of FMD virus and solid phase competition ELISAS (SPCEs) for serotypes SAT1 and SAT2. Secondary aims were to examine NSP seroconversion rates in cattle that had been exposed to infection and to compare virus detection rates by virus isolation and real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR (rtRT-PCR) tests on both oesophagopharyngeal fluids and nasopharyngeal brush swabbings. In addition, the hooves of sampled animals were examined for growth arrest lines as clinical evidence of FMD convalescence. Laboratory tests provided evidence of FMD virus infection in all six herds; SAT2 viruses were isolated from oesophagopharyngeal fluids collected from two herds in northern Zimbabwe, and SAT1 viruses were isolated from three herds in southern Zimbabwe. Optimised rtRT-PCR was more sensitive than virus isolation at detecting FMD virus persistence and when the results of the two methods were combined for oesophagopharyngeal fluids, between 12 and 35 per cent of the cattle sampled in the convalescent herds were deemed to be carriers. In contrast, nasopharyngeal swabs yielded only two virus-positive specimens. The overall seroprevalence in the five affected herds varied with the different NSPS from 56 per cent to 75 per cent, compared with 81 per cent and 91 per cent

  8. Evaluation of laboratory tests for SAT serotypes of foot-and-mouth disease virus with specimens collected from convalescent cattle in Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Sammin, D J; Paton, D J; Parida, S; Ferris, N P; Hutchings, G H; Reid, S M; Shaw, A E; Holmes, C; Gibson, D; Corteyn, M; Knowles, N J; Valarcher, J-F; Hamblin, P A; Fleming, L; Gwaze, G; Sumption, K J

    2007-05-12

    During a field study in Zimbabwe, clinical specimens were collected from 403 cattle in six herds, in which the history of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) vaccination and infection appeared to be known with some certainty. Five herds had reported outbreaks of disease one to five months previously but clinical FMD had not been observed in the sixth herd. A trivalent vaccine (South African Territories [SAT] types 1, 2 and 3) had been used in some of the herds at various times either before and/or after the recent outbreaks of FMD. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of serological tests for the detection of SAT-type FMD virus infection, particularly elisas for antibodies to non-structural proteins (NSPs) of FMD virus and solid phase competition ELISAS (SPCEs) for serotypes SAT1 and SAT2. Secondary aims were to examine NSP seroconversion rates in cattle that had been exposed to infection and to compare virus detection rates by virus isolation and real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR (rtRT-PCR) tests on both oesophagopharyngeal fluids and nasopharyngeal brush swabbings. In addition, the hooves of sampled animals were examined for growth arrest lines as clinical evidence of FMD convalescence. Laboratory tests provided evidence of FMD virus infection in all six herds; SAT2 viruses were isolated from oesophagopharyngeal fluids collected from two herds in northern Zimbabwe, and SAT1 viruses were isolated from three herds in southern Zimbabwe. Optimised rtRT-PCR was more sensitive than virus isolation at detecting FMD virus persistence and when the results of the two methods were combined for oesophagopharyngeal fluids, between 12 and 35 per cent of the cattle sampled in the convalescent herds were deemed to be carriers. In contrast, nasopharyngeal swabs yielded only two virus-positive specimens. The overall seroprevalence in the five affected herds varied with the different NSPS from 56 per cent to 75 per cent, compared with 81 per cent and 91 per cent

  9. Single genome amplification of proviral HIV-1 DNA from dried blood spot specimens collected during early infant screening programs in Lusaka, Zambia.

    PubMed

    Seu, Lillian; Mwape, Innocent; Guffey, M Bradford

    2014-07-01

    The ability to evaluate individual HIV-1 virions from the quasispecies of vertically infected infants was evaluated in a field setting at the Centre for Infectious Disease Research in Zambia. Infant heel-prick blood specimens were spotted onto dried blood spot (DBS) filter paper cards at government health clinics. Nucleic acid was extracted and used as a template for HIV-1 proviral DNA detection by a commercial Amplicor HIV-1 PCR test (Roche, version 1.5). On samples that tested positive by commercial diagnostic assay, amplification of DNA was performed using an in-house assay of the 5' and 3' region of the HIV-1 genome. Additionally, fragments covering 1200 nucleotides within pol (full length protease and partial reverse transcriptase) and 1400 nucleotides within env (variable 1-variable 5 region) were further analyzed by single genome amplification (SGA). In summary, we have demonstrated an in-house assay for amplifying the 5' and 3' proviral HIV-1 DNA as well as pol and env proviral DNA fragments from DBS cards collected and analyzed entirely in Zambia. In conclusion, this study shows the feasibility of utilizing DBS cards to amplify the whole proviral HIV-1 genome as well as perform SGA on key HIV-1 genes.

  10. Single genome amplification of proviral HIV-1 DNA from dried blood spot specimens collected during early infant screening programs in Lusaka, Zambia.

    PubMed

    Seu, Lillian; Mwape, Innocent; Guffey, M Bradford

    2014-07-01

    The ability to evaluate individual HIV-1 virions from the quasispecies of vertically infected infants was evaluated in a field setting at the Centre for Infectious Disease Research in Zambia. Infant heel-prick blood specimens were spotted onto dried blood spot (DBS) filter paper cards at government health clinics. Nucleic acid was extracted and used as a template for HIV-1 proviral DNA detection by a commercial Amplicor HIV-1 PCR test (Roche, version 1.5). On samples that tested positive by commercial diagnostic assay, amplification of DNA was performed using an in-house assay of the 5' and 3' region of the HIV-1 genome. Additionally, fragments covering 1200 nucleotides within pol (full length protease and partial reverse transcriptase) and 1400 nucleotides within env (variable 1-variable 5 region) were further analyzed by single genome amplification (SGA). In summary, we have demonstrated an in-house assay for amplifying the 5' and 3' proviral HIV-1 DNA as well as pol and env proviral DNA fragments from DBS cards collected and analyzed entirely in Zambia. In conclusion, this study shows the feasibility of utilizing DBS cards to amplify the whole proviral HIV-1 genome as well as perform SGA on key HIV-1 genes. PMID:24667303

  11. Single genome amplification of proviral HIV-1 DNA from dried blood spot specimens collected during early infant screening programs in Lusaka, Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Seu, Lillian; Mwape, Innocent; Guffey, M. Bradford

    2014-01-01

    The ability to evaluate individual HIV-1 virions from the quasispecies of vertically infected infants was evaluated in a field setting at the Centre for Infectious Disease Research in Zambia. Infant heel-prick blood specimens were spotted onto dried blood spot (DBS) filter paper cards at government health clinics. Nucleic acid was extracted and used as a template for HIV-1 proviral DNA detection by a commercial Amplicor HIV-1 PCR test (Roche, version 1.5). On samples that tested positive by commercial diagnostic assay, amplification of DNA was performed using an in-house assay of the 5′ and 3′ region of the HIV-1 genome. Additionally, fragments covering 1200 nucleotides within pol (full length protease and partial reverse transcriptase) and 1400 nucleotides within env (variable 1-variable 5 region) were further analyzed by single genome amplification (SGA). In summary, we have demonstrated an in-house assay for amplifying the 5′ and 3′ proviral HIV-1 DNA as well as pol and env proviral DNA fragments from DBS cards collected and analyzed entirely in Zambia. In conclusion, this study shows the feasibility of utilizing DBS cards to amplify the whole proviral HIV-1 genome as well as perform SGA on key HIV-1 genes. PMID:24667303

  12. Is Collective Efficacy Age Graded? The Development and Evaluation of a New Measure of Collective Efficacy for Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Galinsky, Adena M.; Cagney, Kathleen A.; Browning, Christopher R.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. Community processes are key determinants of older adults' ability to age in place, but existing scales measuring these constructs may not provide accurate, unbiased measurements among older adults because they were designed with the concerns of child-rearing respondents in mind. This study examines the properties of a new theory-based measure of collective efficacy (CE) that accounts for the perspectives of older residents. Methods. Data come from the population-based Chicago Neighborhood Organization, Aging and Health study (N = 1,151), which surveyed adults aged 65 to 95. Using descriptive statistics, correlations, and factor analysis, we explored the acceptability, reliability, and validity of the new measure. Results. Principal component analysis indicated that the new scale measures a single latent factor. It had good internal consistency reliability, was highly correlated with the original scale, and was similarly associated with neighborhood exchange and disorder, self-rated health, mobility, and loneliness. The new scale also showed less age-differentiated nonresponse compared to the original scale. Discussion. The older adult CE scale has reliability and validity equivalent to that of the existing measure but benefits from a more developed theoretical grounding and reduced likelihood of age-related differential nonresponse. PMID:22315685

  13. Cross-Sectional Study of Hepatitis A Virus Infection in the Pantanal Population before Vaccine Implementation in Brazil: Usage of Non-Invasive Specimen Collection

    PubMed Central

    Tourinho, Renata Santos; de Almeida, Adilson José; Villar, Livia Melo; Murat, Paula Guerra; Capelin, Gina Jonasson Mousquer; Motta Castro, Ana Rita Coimbra; de Paula, Vanessa Salete

    2015-01-01

    Population-based prevalence studies are essential tools for screening of hepatitis A and provide important data on susceptible groups. However, surveillance in isolated communities is difficult because of the limited access to these areas and the need for blood sample collection. This study aimed to determine the anti-HAV prevalence using oral fluid samples to provide an alternative tool for epidemiological studies that might be useful for vaccination-related decisions. The study population was composed of 224 volunteers from South Pantanal, aged 3 to 86 years old. This study was performed using oral fluids, previously standardized for anti-HAV antibody detection, which were collected using a ChemBio device. Eluates were tested using modified commercial EIA to detect anti-HAV antibodies. The overall prevalence was 79.1%, corresponding to 178 reactive EIA tests out of 224 samples. The age stratified data revealed a prevalence of 47.8% between 0–10 years, 84% in 11–20 years and 91.9% in subjects older than 21 years. Results indicate that hepatitis A prevalence was higher in adolescents and adults, corroborating the literature reports. Thus, oral fluid samples could replace serum in HAV epidemiological studies in isolated communities as they are efficient at detecting anti-HAV antibodies. PMID:26133128

  14. Cross-Sectional Study of Hepatitis A Virus Infection in the Pantanal Population before Vaccine Implementation in Brazil: Usage of Non-Invasive Specimen Collection.

    PubMed

    Tourinho, Renata Santos; de Almeida, Adilson José; Villar, Livia Melo; Murat, Paula Guerra; Capelin, Gina Jonasson Mousquer; Castro, Ana Rita Coimbra Motta; de Paula, Vanessa Salete

    2015-06-30

    Population-based prevalence studies are essential tools for screening of hepatitis A and provide important data on susceptible groups. However, surveillance in isolated communities is difficult because of the limited access to these areas and the need for blood sample collection. This study aimed to determine the anti-HAV prevalence using oral fluid samples to provide an alternative tool for epidemiological studies that might be useful for vaccination-related decisions. The study population was composed of 224 volunteers from South Pantanal, aged 3 to 86 years old. This study was performed using oral fluids, previously standardized for anti-HAV antibody detection, which were collected using a ChemBio device. Eluates were tested using modified commercial EIA to detect anti-HAV antibodies. The overall prevalence was 79.1%, corresponding to 178 reactive EIA tests out of 224 samples. The age stratified data revealed a prevalence of 47.8% between 0-10 years, 84% in 11-20 years and 91.9% in subjects older than 21 years. Results indicate that hepatitis A prevalence was higher in adolescents and adults, corroborating the literature reports. Thus, oral fluid samples could replace serum in HAV epidemiological studies in isolated communities as they are efficient at detecting anti-HAV antibodies.

  15. Techniques for collecting saliva from awake, unrestrained, adult monkeys for cortisol assay.

    PubMed

    Lutz, C K; Tiefenbacher, S; Jorgensen, M J; Meyer, J S; Novak, M A

    2000-10-01

    Cortisol levels serve as an index of pituitary-adrenal activity in nonhuman primates. In adult monkeys, cortisol is normally measured in blood (typically requiring restraint or sedation) or urine (reflecting a state rather than point estimate). In contrast, saliva collection is less invasive than drawing blood and allows for repeated sampling within a short period of time. Although protocols exist for collecting saliva from young monkeys, these procedures are inadequate for awake, unrestrained adult animals. Our laboratory has developed two methods for collecting saliva from adult rhesus monkeys: a "screen" method, which involves licking screen-covered gauze, and a "pole" method, which involves sucking and chewing on an attached rope. Twenty-three adult male rhesus monkeys were used to evaluate these two methods. After a period of adaptation, saliva samples were collected from 21 of 23 subjects. Saliva collection was faster with the pole than with the screen method (P < 0.01), but the pole method was not suitable for some animals because of their tendency to bite off the attached rope. An analysis of 19 saliva samples revealed a mean cortisol concentration of 0.84 microg/dl (range 0.27-1.77 microg/dl). There was no statistically significant difference in cortisol value between methods used (P > 0.22). The influence of the flavoring on the cortisol assay was tested, and was found to have no significant effect (P > 0.28). Our results indicate that either technique can be used to safely collect saliva from unrestrained adult monkeys. Choice of technique will depend on the proclivities of individual monkeys.

  16. Genomics and museum specimens.

    PubMed

    Nachman, Michael W

    2013-12-01

    Nearly 25 years ago, Allan Wilson and colleagues isolated DNA sequences from museum specimens of kangaroo rats (Dipodomys panamintinus) and compared these sequences with those from freshly collected animals (Thomas et al. 1990). The museum specimens had been collected up to 78 years earlier, so the two samples provided a direct temporal comparison of patterns of genetic variation. This was not the first time DNA sequences had been isolated from preserved material, but it was the first time it had been carried out with a population sample. Population geneticists often try to make inferences about the influence of historical processes such as selection, drift, mutation and migration on patterns of genetic variation in the present. The work of Wilson and colleagues was important in part because it suggested a way in which population geneticists could actually study genetic change in natural populations through time, much the same way that experimentalists can do with artificial populations in the laboratory. Indeed, the work of Thomas et al. (1990) spawned dozens of studies in which museum specimens were used to compare historical and present-day genetic diversity (reviewed in Wandeler et al. 2007). All of these studies, however, were limited by the same fundamental problem: old DNA is degraded into short fragments. As a consequence, these studies mostly involved PCR amplification of short templates, usually short stretches of mitochondrial DNA or microsatellites. In this issue, Bi et al. (2013) report a breakthrough that should open the door to studies of genomic variation in museum specimens. They used target enrichment (exon capture) and next-generation (Illumina) sequencing to compare patterns of genetic variation in historic and present-day population samples of alpine chipmunks (Tamias alpinus) (Fig. 1). The historic samples came from specimens collected in 1915, so the temporal span of this comparison is nearly 100 years.

  17. Organochlorine contaminant concentrations in caddisfly adults (Trichoptera) collected from great lakes connecting channels.

    PubMed

    Kovats, Z E; Ciborowski, J J

    1993-09-01

    Pennsylvania-style light traps were used to capture adult Trichoptera from the St. Marys, St. Clair, Detroit and Niagara rivers, Canada. Adequate biomass was acquired in single, 2-h collections to permit triplicate gas chromatographic analyses of 1-4 g samples for 36 organochlorine contaminants. Contaminant levels varied unpredictably but relatively little among samples taken at monthly intervals over the summer. Samples collected simultaneously from the two sides of the Detroit R. reflected local sediment contaminant patterns, suggesting limited dispersal by adults. Genus-specific differences in contaminant concentrations within the Hydropsychidae and Leptoceridae probably reflect differences in larval habitats and manner of feeding. Contaminant concentrations and relative composition paralleled published reports of contaminants in sediments from collection locations. St. Marys R. caddisflies contained contaminant levels indistinguishable from samples collected at reference sites. St. Clair R. samples contained high levels of compounds associated with petrochemical industries located in the river's upstream reaches. High levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and most other contaminants in Detroit R. samples reflected industrial loadings near Detroit, Michigan. Niagara R. samples contained elevated concentrations of PCBs and pesticides. Cluster analysis grouped samples into five clusters each with unique contaminant composition. These also corresponded to geographic origin: St. Marys, St. Clair, Detroit and upper and lower Niagara rivers. The relative ease of collection and consistent results obtained render adult Trichoptera potentially valuable candidates for surveys of aquatic contamination over a broad range of geographical and ecological conditions.

  18. Electronic Data Collection and Management System for Global Adult Tobacco Survey

    PubMed Central

    Pujari, Sameer J; Palipudi, Krishna M; Morton, Jeremy; Levinsohn, Jay; Litavecz, Steve; Green, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Portable handheld computers and electronic data management systems have been used for national surveys in many high-income countries, however their use in developing countries has been challenging due to varying geographical, economic, climatic, political and cultural environments. In order to monitor and measure global adult tobacco use, the World Health Organization and the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention initiated the Global Adult Tobacco Survey, a nationally representative household survey of adults, 15 years of age or older, using a standard core questionnaire, sample design, and data collection and management procedures. The Survey has been conducted in 14 low- and middle-income countries, using an electronic data collection and management system. This paper describes implementation of the electronic data collection system and associated findings. Methods: The Survey was based on a comprehensive data management protocol, to enable standardized, globally comparable high quality data collection and management. It included adaptation to specific country needs, selection of appropriate handheld hardware devices, use of open source software, and building country capacity and provide technical support. Results: In its first phase, the Global Adult Tobacco Survey was successfully conducted between 2008 and 2010, using an electronic data collection and management system for interviews in 302,800 households in 14 countries. More than 2,644 handheld computers were fielded and over 2,634 fieldworkers, supervisors and monitors were trained to use them. Questionnaires were developed and programmed in 38 languages and scripts. The global hardware failure rate was < 1% and data loss was almost 0%. Conclusion: Electronic data collection and management systems can be used effectively for conducting nationally representative surveys, particularly in low- and middle-income countries, irrespective of geographical, climatic, political and cultural

  19. Adiposity, inflammation, genetic variants and risk of post-menopausal breast cancer findings from a prospective-specimen-collection, retrospective-blinded-evaluation (PRoBE) design approach.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiaowei Sherry; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill; Chu, Xin; Li, Ling; Colonie, Ryan; Webster, Jessica; Smelser, Diane; Patel, Nikitaban; Prichard, Jeffery; Stark, Azadeh

    2013-01-01

    Chronic internal inflammation secondary to adiposity is a risk factor for sporadic breast cancer and Post-Menopausal Breast Cancer (PMBC) is largely defined as such. Adiposity is one of the clinical criteria for the diagnosis of Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) and is a risk factor for PMBC. We examined SNPs of eight genes implicated in adiposity, inflammation and cell proliferation in a Prospective-specimen-collection, Retrospective-Blinded-Evaluation (PRoBE) design approach. A total of 180 cases and 732 age-matched controls were identified from the MyCode prospective biobank database and then linked to the Clinical Decision Information System, an enterprise-wide data warehouse, to retrieve clinico-demographic data. Samples were analyzed in a core laboratory where the personnel were masked to their status. Results from multivariate logistic regression yielded one SNP (rs2922126) in the GHSR as protective against PMBC among homozygotes for the minor allele (A/A) (OR = 0.4, 95% CI 0.18-.89, P-value = .02); homozygosity for the minor allele (C/C) of the SNP (rs889312) of the gene MAP3K1 was associated with the risk of PMBC (OR = 2.41, 95% CI 1.25-4.63 P-value = .008). Advanced age was protective against PMBC (OR = 0.98, 95% CI 0.95-0.99, P-value = .02). Family history of breast cancer (OR = 2.22, 95% CI 1.14-4.43. P = .02), HRT (OR = 3.35; 95% CI 2.15-5.21, P < .001), and MetS (OR = 14.83, 95% CI 5.63-39.08, P < .001) and interaction between HRT and MetS (OR = 39.38, 95% CI 15.71-98.70, P < .001) were associated with the risk of PMBC. We did not detected significant interactions between SNPs or between the SNPs and the clinico-demographic risk factors. Our study further confirms that MetS increases the risk of PMBC and argues in favor of reducing exposure to HRT. Our findings are another confirmation that low penetrance genes involved in the inflammatory pathway, i.e. MAP3KI gene, may have a plausible causative role in

  20. Adiposity, inflammation, genetic variants and risk of post-menopausal breast cancer findings from a prospective-specimen-collection, retrospective-blinded-evaluation (PRoBE) design approach.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiaowei Sherry; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill; Chu, Xin; Li, Ling; Colonie, Ryan; Webster, Jessica; Smelser, Diane; Patel, Nikitaban; Prichard, Jeffery; Stark, Azadeh

    2013-01-01

    Chronic internal inflammation secondary to adiposity is a risk factor for sporadic breast cancer and Post-Menopausal Breast Cancer (PMBC) is largely defined as such. Adiposity is one of the clinical criteria for the diagnosis of Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) and is a risk factor for PMBC. We examined SNPs of eight genes implicated in adiposity, inflammation and cell proliferation in a Prospective-specimen-collection, Retrospective-Blinded-Evaluation (PRoBE) design approach. A total of 180 cases and 732 age-matched controls were identified from the MyCode prospective biobank database and then linked to the Clinical Decision Information System, an enterprise-wide data warehouse, to retrieve clinico-demographic data. Samples were analyzed in a core laboratory where the personnel were masked to their status. Results from multivariate logistic regression yielded one SNP (rs2922126) in the GHSR as protective against PMBC among homozygotes for the minor allele (A/A) (OR = 0.4, 95% CI 0.18-.89, P-value = .02); homozygosity for the minor allele (C/C) of the SNP (rs889312) of the gene MAP3K1 was associated with the risk of PMBC (OR = 2.41, 95% CI 1.25-4.63 P-value = .008). Advanced age was protective against PMBC (OR = 0.98, 95% CI 0.95-0.99, P-value = .02). Family history of breast cancer (OR = 2.22, 95% CI 1.14-4.43. P = .02), HRT (OR = 3.35; 95% CI 2.15-5.21, P < .001), and MetS (OR = 14.83, 95% CI 5.63-39.08, P < .001) and interaction between HRT and MetS (OR = 39.38, 95% CI 15.71-98.70, P < .001) were associated with the risk of PMBC. We did not detected significant interactions between SNPs or between the SNPs and the clinico-demographic risk factors. Our study further confirms that MetS increases the risk of PMBC and argues in favor of reducing exposure to HRT. Our findings are another confirmation that low penetrance genes involved in the inflammatory pathway, i.e. MAP3KI gene, may have a plausible causative role in

  1. NASA Biological Specimen Repository

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMonigal, K. A.; Pietrzyk, R. A.; Sams, C. F.; Johnson, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Biological Specimen Repository (NBSR) was established in 2006 to collect, process, preserve and distribute spaceflight-related biological specimens from long duration ISS astronauts. This repository provides unique opportunities to study longitudinal changes in human physiology spanning may missions. The NBSR collects blood and urine samples from all participating ISS crewmembers who have provided informed consent. These biological samples are collected once before flight, during flight scheduled on flight days 15, 30, 60, 120 and within 2 weeks of landing. Postflight sessions are conducted 3 and 30 days after landing. The number of in-flight sessions is dependent on the duration of the mission. Specimens are maintained under optimal storage conditions in a manner that will maximize their integrity and viability for future research The repository operates under the authority of the NASA/JSC Committee for the Protection of Human Subjects to support scientific discovery that contributes to our fundamental knowledge in the area of human physiological changes and adaptation to a microgravity environment. The NBSR will institute guidelines for the solicitation, review and sample distribution process through establishment of the NBSR Advisory Board. The Advisory Board will be composed of representatives of all participating space agencies to evaluate each request from investigators for use of the samples. This process will be consistent with ethical principles, protection of crewmember confidentiality, prevailing laws and regulations, intellectual property policies, and consent form language. Operations supporting the NBSR are scheduled to continue until the end of U.S. presence on the ISS. Sample distribution is proposed to begin with selections on investigations beginning in 2017. The availability of the NBSR will contribute to the body of knowledge about the diverse factors of spaceflight on human physiology.

  2. Cinemicrographic specimen housing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    Housing used to observe gravitation effects on specimens embedded in support media, such as agar, supports microbial specimens vertically for time-lapsed cinemicrographic studies. Procedure cannot be performed with conventional microscopes which see specimens in horizontal plane only.

  3. Generation of pure cultures of autologous Schwann cells by use of biopsy specimens of the dorsal cutaneous branches of the cervical nerves of young adult dogs.

    PubMed

    Lim, Ji-Hey; Olby, Natasha J

    2016-10-01

    OBJECTIVE To identify an optimal technique for isolation, purification, and amplification of Schwann cells (SCs) from biopsy specimens of the dorsal cutaneous branches of the cervical nerves of dogs. SAMPLE Biopsy specimens of dorsal cervical cutaneous nerves from the cadavers of three 1- to 2-year-old dogs. PROCEDURES Nerve specimens were dissected, predegenerated, and dissociated to isolate single cells. After culture to enhance SC growth, cells were immunopurified by use of magnetic beads. Cell purity was evaluated by assessing expression of cell surface antigens p75 (to detect SCs) and CD90 (to detect fibroblasts). Effects of various concentrations of recombinant human glial growth factor 2 (rhGGF2) on SC proliferation were tested. Cell doubling time was assessed in SC cultures with selected concentrations of rhGGF2. RESULTS Mean ± SD wet weight of nerve fascicles obtained from the biopsy specimens was 16.8 ± 2.8 mg. A mean predegeneration period of 8.6 days yielded approximately 6,000 cells/mg of nerve tissue, and primary culture yielded 43,000 cells/mg of nerve tissue in a mean of 11 days, of which 39.9 ± 9.1% expressed p75. Immunopurification with magnetic beads yielded a mean of 85.4 ± 1.9% p75-positive cells. Two passages of subculture with 10μM cytosine arabinoside further enhanced SC purity to a mean of 97.8 ± 1.2% p75-positive cells. Finally, rhGGF2 supplementation at a range of 40 to 100 ng/mL increased the SC proliferation rate up to 3-fold. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE SCs could be cultured from biopsy specimens of dorsal cervical cutaneous nerves and purified and expanded to generate adequate numbers for autologous transplants to treat dogs with spinal cord and peripheral nerve injuries. PMID:27668589

  4. Urine culture - catheterized specimen

    MedlinePlus

    Culture - urine - catheterized specimen; Urine culture - catheterization; Catheterized urine specimen culture ... urinary tract infections may be found in the culture. This is called a contaminant. You may not ...

  5. NASA Biological Specimen Repository

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pietrzyk, Robert; McMonigal, K. A.; Sams, C. F.; Johnson, M. A.

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Biological Specimen Repository (NBSR) has been established to collect, process, annotate, store, and distribute specimens under the authority of the NASA/JSC Committee for the Protection of Human Subjects. The International Space Station (ISS) provides a platform to investigate the effects of microgravity on human physiology prior to lunar and exploration class missions. The NBSR is a secure controlled storage facility that is used to maintain biological specimens over extended periods of time, under well-controlled conditions, for future use in approved human spaceflight-related research protocols. The repository supports the Human Research Program, which is charged with identifying and investigating physiological changes that occur during human spaceflight, and developing and implementing effective countermeasures when necessary. The storage of crewmember samples from many different ISS flights in a single repository will be a valuable resource with which researchers can validate clinical hypotheses, study space-flight related changes, and investigate physiological markers All samples collected require written informed consent from each long duration crewmember. The NBSR collects blood and urine samples from all participating long duration ISS crewmembers. These biological samples are collected pre-flight at approximately 45 days prior to launch, during flight on flight days 15, 30, 60 120 and within 2 weeks of landing. Postflight sessions are conducted 3 and 30 days following landing. The number of inflight sessions is dependent on the duration of the mission. Operations began in 2007 and as of October 2009, 23 USOS crewmembers have completed or agreed to participate in this project. As currently planned, these human biological samples will be collected from crewmembers covering multiple ISS missions until the end of U.S. presence on the ISS or 2017. The NBSR will establish guidelines for sample distribution that are consistent with ethical principles

  6. A pilot study comparing three salivary collection methods in an adult population with salivary gland hypofunction.

    PubMed

    Mulligan, R; Navazesh, M; Wood, G J

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to compare the reliability of three collection methods (draining, chewing of gum base, and the Saxon test) for whole saliva using a sample of middle-aged and older ambulatory adults (n = 18) with proven salivary gland hypofunction. The results demonstrated high reliability (r values ranging from 0.91 to 0.80, p < 0.001) for all three methods. MANOVA analysis revealed significant (p < 0.001) differences in flow rates among the draining, chewing-stimulated, and Saxon methods.

  7. 10 CFR 26.113 - Splitting the urine specimen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Splitting the urine specimen. 26.113 Section 26.113 Energy... Splitting the urine specimen. (a) Licensees and other entities may, but are not required to, use split-specimen methods of collection. (b) If the urine specimen is to be split into two specimen...

  8. 10 CFR 26.113 - Splitting the urine specimen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Splitting the urine specimen. 26.113 Section 26.113 Energy... Splitting the urine specimen. (a) Licensees and other entities may, but are not required to, use split-specimen methods of collection. (b) If the urine specimen is to be split into two specimen...

  9. 10 CFR 26.113 - Splitting the urine specimen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Splitting the urine specimen. 26.113 Section 26.113 Energy... Splitting the urine specimen. (a) Licensees and other entities may, but are not required to, use split-specimen methods of collection. (b) If the urine specimen is to be split into two specimen...

  10. DNA extraction from herbarium specimens.

    PubMed

    Drábková, Lenka Záveská

    2014-01-01

    With the expansion of molecular techniques, the historical collections have become widely used. Studying plant DNA using modern molecular techniques such as DNA sequencing plays an important role in understanding evolutionary relationships, identification through DNA barcoding, conservation status, and many other aspects of plant biology. Enormous herbarium collections are an important source of material especially for specimens from areas difficult to access or from taxa that are now extinct. The ability to utilize these specimens greatly enhances the research. However, the process of extracting DNA from herbarium specimens is often fraught with difficulty related to such variables as plant chemistry, drying method of the specimen, and chemical treatment of the specimen. Although many methods have been developed for extraction of DNA from herbarium specimens, the most frequently used are modified CTAB and DNeasy Plant Mini Kit protocols. Nine selected protocols in this chapter have been successfully used for high-quality DNA extraction from different kinds of plant herbarium tissues. These methods differ primarily with respect to their requirements for input material (from algae to vascular plants), type of the plant tissue (leaves with incrustations, sclerenchyma strands, mucilaginous tissues, needles, seeds), and further possible applications (PCR-based methods or microsatellites, AFLP). PMID:24415470

  11. The Adult Netherlands Twin Register: Twenty-Five Years of Survey and Biological Data Collection

    PubMed Central

    Willemsen, Gonneke; Vink, Jacqueline M.; Abdellaoui, Abdel; den Braber, Anouk; van Beek, Jenny H. D. A.; Draisma, Harmen H. M.; van Dongen, Jenny; van ‘t Ent, Dennis; Geels, Lot M.; van Lien, Rene; Ligthart, Lannie; Kattenberg, Mathijs; Mbarek, Hamdi; de Moor, Marleen H. M.; Neijts, Melanie; Pool, Rene; Stroo, Natascha; Kluft, Cornelis; Suchiman, H. Eka D.; Slagboom, P. Eline; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Boomsma, Dorret I.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past 25 years, the Adult Netherlands Twin Register (ANTR) has collected a wealth of information on physical and mental health, lifestyle, and personality in adolescents and adults. This article provides an overview of the sources of information available, the main research findings, and an outlook for the future. Between 1991 and 2012, longitudinal surveys were completed by twins, their parents, siblings, spouses, and offspring. Data are available for 33,957 participants, with most individuals having completed two or more surveys. Smaller projects provided in-depth phenotyping, including measurements of the autonomic nervous system, neurocognitive function, and brain imaging. For 46% of the ANTR participants, DNA samples are available and whole genome scans have been obtained in more than 11,000 individuals. These data have resulted in numerous studies on heritability, gene × environment interactions, and causality, as well as gene finding studies. In the future, these studies will continue with collection of additional phenotypes, such as metabolomic and telomere length data, and detailed genetic information provided by DNA and RNA sequencing. Record linkage to national registers will allow the study of morbidity and mortality, thus providing insight into the development of health, lifestyle, and behavior across the lifespan. PMID:23298648

  12. Collection of Clonorchis sinensis adult worms from infected humans after praziquantel treatment

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Chenghua; Kim, Jae-hwan; Lee, Jeong-Keun; Bae, Young Mee; Oh, Jin-Kyoung; Lim, Min Kyung; Shin, Hai-Rim; Hong, Sung-Tae

    2007-01-01

    A cohort was established for evaluation of cancer risk factors in Sancheong-gun, Gyeongsangnam-do, Korea. As one of the cohort studies, stools of 947 residents (403 males and 544 females, age range: 29-86 years) were screened for Clonorchis sinensis eggs using both Kato-Katz method and formalin-ether sedimentation technique. The overall egg positive rate of C. sinensis was 37.7% and individual EPG (eggs per gram of feces) counts ranged from 24 to 28,800. Eight egg positive residents voluntarily joined a process of collection of the passed worms after praziquantel treatment. A total of 158 worms were recovered from 5 of the 8 treated persons, ranged from 3 to 108 in each individual. The worms were 15-20 mm × 2-3 mm in size, and showed brown-pigmented, red, or white body colors. This is the first collection record of C. sinensis adult worms from humans through anthelmintic treatment and purgation. The adult worms of C. sinensis may be paralyzed by praziquantel and then discharged passively through bile flow in the bile duct and by peristaltic movement of the bowel. PMID:17570980

  13. Comparison of zopiclone concentrations in oral fluid sampled with Intercept(®) oral specimen collection device and Statsure Saliva Sampler™ and concentrations in blood.

    PubMed

    Gjerde, Hallvard; Øiestad, Elisabeth L; Øiestad, Åse Marit L; Langødegård, Marit; Gustavsen, Ingebjørg; Hjelmeland, Knut; Bernard, Jean-Paul; Christophersen, Asbjørg S

    2010-11-01

    A clinical study of zopiclone was performed using doses of 5 and 10 mg. Samples of oral fluid were collected using the Statsure and Intercept devices, and blood samples were collected simultaneously. Concentrations of zopiclone in samples of oral fluid and blood were determined with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, and concentrations in undiluted oral fluid were calculated. The concentrations of zopiclone in oral fluid were generally higher when using the Intercept compared to the Statsure device; the median oral fluid/whole blood concentration ratios were 3.8 (range 1.5-15.9) and 1.9 (range 1.2-4.6), respectively (n = 21). The correlation between zopiclone concentrations in oral fluid collected with the two devices was fairly poor, r(2) = 0.35. The results indicate that the type of sampling device may significantly affect the analytical result for zopiclone in sampled oral fluid.

  14. Collectivity, Distributivity, and the Interpretation of Plural Numerical Expressions in Child and Adult Language

    PubMed Central

    Musolino, Julien

    2013-01-01

    Sentences containing plural numerical expressions (e.g., two boys) can give rise to two interpretations (collective and distributive), arising from the fact that their representation admits of a part-whole structure. We present the results of a series of experiments designed to explore children’s understanding of this distinction and its implications for the acquisition of linguistic expressions with number words. We show that preschoolers access both interpretations, indicating that they have the requisite linguistic and conceptual machinery to generate the corresponding representations. Furthermore, they can shift their interpretation in response to structural and lexical manipulations. However, they are not fully adult-like: unlike adults, they are drawn to the distributive interpretation, and are not yet aware of the lexical semantics of each and together, which should favor one or another interpretation. This research bridges a gap between a well-established body of work in cognitive psychology on the acquisition of number words and more recent work investigating children’s knowledge of the syntactic and semantic properties of sentences featuring numerical expressions. PMID:24223477

  15. Minthorn Springs Creek Summer Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facility; 1994 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Rowan, Gerald D.

    1995-05-01

    The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) are cooperating in a joint effort to enhance steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. Bonifer Pond, Minthorn Springs and Imeques C-mem-ini-kem acclimation facilities are operated for acclimation and release of juvenile summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), fall and spring chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) and coho salmon (O, kisutch). Minthorn is also used for holding and spawning summer steelhead, fall chinook and coho salmon. In the spring of 1994, juvenile summer steelhead were acclimated at Bonifer and Minthorn. At Imeques C-mem-ini-kem, juvenile spring chinook were acclimated in the spring and fall. A total of 92 unmarked and 42 marked summer steelhead were collected for broodstock at Three Mile Dam from October 1, 1993 through May 2, 1994 and held at Minthorn. An estimated 234,432 green eggs were taken from 48 females. The eggs were transferred to Irrigon Hatchery for incubation and early rearing. Fingerlings were transferred to Umatilla Hatchery for final rearing and release into the Umatilla River in 1995. Fall chinook and coho salmon broodstock were not collected in 1994. Coded-wire tag recovery information was accessed to determine the contribution of Umatilla River releases to ocean, Columbia River and Umatilla River fisheries. Total estimated juvenile adult survival rates are detailed in this document.

  16. Isolation and characterization of a mutant liver aldolase in adult hereditary fructose intolerance. Identification of the enzyme variant by radioassay in tissue biopsy specimens

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Timothy M.; O'Donnell, Martin W.; Camilleri, Michael; Burghes, Arthur H.

    1983-01-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is a metabolic disorder caused by enzymic deficiency of aldolase B, a genetically distinct cytosolic isoenzyme expressed exclusively in liver, kidney, and intestine. The molecular basis of this enzyme defect has been investigated in three affected individuals from a nonconsanguineous kindred, in whom fructose-l-phosphate aldolase activities in liver or intestinal biopsy samples were reduced to 2-6% of mean control values. To identify a putative enzyme mutant in tissue extracts, aldolase B was purified from human liver by affinity chromatography and monospecific antibodies were prepared from antiserum raised in sheep. Immunodiffusion gels showed a single precipitin line common to pure enzyme and extracts of normal liver and intestine, but no reaction with extracts of brain, muscle, or HFI liver. However, weak positive staining for aldolase in hepatocyte and enterocyte cytosol was demonstrated by indirect immunofluorescence of HFI tissues. This was abolished by pretreatment with pure enzyme protein. Accordingly, a specific radioimmunoassay (detection limit 7.5 ng) was established to quantify immunoreactive aldolase B in human biopsy specimens. Extracts of tissue from affected patients gave 10-25% immunoreactive enzyme in control samples; immunoreactive aldolase in intestinal extracts from four heterozygotes was reduced (to 55%) when compared with seven samples from normal control subjects (P < 0.05). In extracts of HFI tissues, there was a sevenfold reduction in apparent absolute specific activity (1.02 vs. 8.82 U/mg) of immunoreactive fructose-l-phosphate aldolase B, but the apparent specific activity in heterozygotes (7.71 U/mg) was only slightly impaired. Displacement radioimmunotitration of aldolase B in liver supernatants showed a significant (P < 0.005) decrease in antibody avidity for immunoreactive protein in HFI tissue when compared with the pure enzyme or extract of normal control liver. Immunoaffinity chromatography on

  17. Could home STI specimen collection with e-prescription be a cost-effective strategy for clinical trials and clinical care?

    PubMed Central

    Blake, Diane R; Spielberg, Freya; Levy, Vivian; Lensing, Shelly; Wolff, Peter A.; Venkatasubramanian, Lalitha; Acevedo, Nincoshka; Padian, Nancy; Chattopadhyay, Ishita; Gaydos, Charlotte A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Results of a recent demonstration project evaluating feasibility, acceptability, and cost of a web-based STI testing and e-prescription treatment program (eSTI) suggest that this approach could be a feasible alternative to clinic based testing and treatment, but the results need to be confirmed by a randomized comparative effectiveness trial. Methods We modeled a decision tree comparing: 1) cost of eSTI screening using a home collection kit and an e-prescription for uncomplicated treatment versus 2) hypothetical costs derived from the literature for referral to standard clinic based STI screening and treatment. Primary outcome was number of STIs detected. Analyses were conducted from the clinical trial perspective and the healthcare system perspective. Results The eSTI strategy detected 75 infections, and the Clinic-referral strategy detected 45 infections. Total cost of eSTI was $94,938 ($1,266/STI detected) from the clinical trial perspective and $96,088 ($1,281/STI detected) from the healthcare system perspective. Total cost of clinic referral was $87,367 ($1,941/STI detected) from the clinical trial perspective and $71,668 ($1,593/STI detected) from the healthcare system perspective. Conclusions Results indicate that eSTI will likely be more cost-effective (lower cost/STI detected) than clinic based STI screening, both in the context of clinical trials and in routine clinical care. Although our results are promising, they are based on a demonstration project and estimates from other small studies. A comparative effectiveness research (CER) trial is needed to determine actual cost and impact of the eSTI system on identification and treatment of new infections and prevention of their sequelae. PMID:25504295

  18. 10 CFR 26.113 - Splitting the urine specimen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...-specimen methods of collection. (b) If the urine specimen is to be split into two specimen bottles, hereinafter referred to as Bottle A and Bottle B, the collector shall take the following steps: (1) The... urine specimen. The collector shall pour 30 mL of urine into Bottle A and a minimum of 15 mL of...

  19. 42 CFR 493.1232 - Standard: Specimen identification and integrity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard: Specimen identification and integrity... Nonwaived Testing General Laboratory Systems § 493.1232 Standard: Specimen identification and integrity. The... optimum integrity of a patient's specimen from the time of collection or receipt of the specimen...

  20. The type specimen of Anoura geoffroyi lasiopyga (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arroyo-Cabrales, Joaquin; Gardner, A.L.

    2003-01-01

    In 1868, Wilhelm Peters described Glossonycteris lasiopyga, based on a specimen provided by Henri de Saussure and collected in Mexico. The type specimen was presumed to be among those housed in the collections of the Zoologisches Museum of the Humboldt Universitat in Berlin, Germany. Our study of one of Saussure?s specimens from Mexico, discovered in the collections of the Museum d?Histoire Naturelle, Geneva, Switzerland, demonstrates that it and not one of the Berlin specimens is the holotype.

  1. 36 CFR 2.5 - Research specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... superintendent approves a written research proposal and determines that the collection will benefit science or... Park Service National Catalog. (2) Specimens and data derived from consumed specimens will be made... 43 CFR part 24. Regulations concerning archeological resources are found in 43 CFR part 3....

  2. 36 CFR 2.5 - Research specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... superintendent approves a written research proposal and determines that the collection will benefit science or... Park Service National Catalog. (2) Specimens and data derived from consumed specimens will be made... 43 CFR part 24. Regulations concerning archeological resources are found in 43 CFR part 3....

  3. 37 CFR 2.56 - Specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of the member's services. (4) A collective membership mark specimen must show use by members to... cassette tape recording, CD-ROM, or other appropriate medium. (4) For a TEAS submission, the specimen must be a digitized image in .jpg or .pdf format....

  4. 37 CFR 2.56 - Specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of the member's services. (4) A collective membership mark specimen must show use by members to... cassette tape recording, CD-ROM, or other appropriate medium. (4) For a TEAS submission, the specimen must be a digitized image in .jpg or .pdf format....

  5. 36 CFR 2.5 - Research specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... superintendent approves a written research proposal and determines that the collection will benefit science or... Park Service National Catalog. (2) Specimens and data derived from consumed specimens will be made... 43 CFR part 24. Regulations concerning archeological resources are found in 43 CFR part 3....

  6. 36 CFR 2.5 - Research specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... superintendent approves a written research proposal and determines that the collection will benefit science or... Park Service National Catalog. (2) Specimens and data derived from consumed specimens will be made... 43 CFR part 24. Regulations concerning archeological resources are found in 43 CFR part 3....

  7. 36 CFR 1002.5 - Research specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... collections will bear official National Park Service museum labels and their catalog numbers will be registered in the National Park Service National Catalog. (2) Specimens and data derived from consumed... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Research specimens....

  8. Cultural Codes as Catalysts for Collective Conscientisation in Environmental Adult Education: Mr. Floatie, Tree Squatting and Save-Our-Surfers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    This study examines how cultural codes in environmental adult education can be used to "frame" collective identity, develop counterhegemonic ideologies, and catalyse "educative-activism" within social movements. Three diverse examples are discussed, spanning environmental movements in urban Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, the redwoods of…

  9. 37 CFR 2.59 - Filing substitute specimen(s).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Filing substitute specimen(s..., DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE RULES OF PRACTICE IN TRADEMARK CASES Drawing § 2.59 Filing substitute specimen(s). (a... specimen(s), the applicant must: (1) For an amendment to allege use under § 2.76, verify by affidavit...

  10. Neutrophil adherence to isolated adult cardiac myocytes. Induction by cardiac lymph collected during ischemia and reperfusion.

    PubMed Central

    Youker, K; Smith, C W; Anderson, D C; Miller, D; Michael, L H; Rossen, R D; Entman, M L

    1992-01-01

    Canine neutrophils can be induced to adhere in vitro to isolated adult cardiac myocytes by stimulation of the neutrophils with chemotactic factors such as zymosan-activated serum (ZAS) only if the myocytes have been previously exposed to cytokines such as interleukin 1 (IL-1) or tumor necrosis factor-alpha. These cytokines induce synthesis and surface expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) on the myocyte, and neutrophil adhesion is almost entirely CD18 and ICAM-1 dependent. The present study examines cardiac-specific lymph collected from awake dogs during 1-h coronary occlusion and 3 d of reperfusion for its ability to induce both ICAM-1 expression in cardiac myocytes, and neutrophil-myocyte adherence. Reperfusion lymph induced ICAM-1 expression in isolated myocytes, and myocyte adherence to ZAS-stimulated neutrophils that was completely inhibited by anti-CD18 and anti-ICAM-1 monoclonal antibodies. This activity peaked at 90 min of reperfusion and persisted for up to 72 h. Preischemic lymph was not stimulatory. IL-1 appeared not to be a stimulating factor in lymph in that dilutions of lymph were found to inhibit the stimulatory effects of recombinant IL-1 beta. However, investigation of interleukin 6 (IL-6) revealed that recombinant IL-6 stimulated myocyte adhesiveness for ZAS-stimulated neutrophils (ED50 = 0.002 U/ml) and expression of ICAM-1 by isolated myocytes. IL-6 neutralizing antibody markedly reduced the ability of reperfusion lymph to stimulate adhesion and ICAM-1 expression, and estimates of levels of IL-6 in reperfusion lymph ranged from 0.035 to 0.14 U/ml. These results indicate that cytokines capable of promoting neutrophil-myocyte adhesion occur in extracellular fluid during reperfusion of ischemic myocardium, and that one of these cytokines is IL-6. Neutrophil-myocyte adhesion may be of pathogenic significance because it may enhance the cytotoxic activity of the neutrophil. Images PMID:1346618

  11. Quantitative detection of hepatitis C virus RNA with a solid-phase signal amplification method: definition of optimal conditions for specimen collection and clinical application in interferon-treated patients.

    PubMed

    Davis, G L; Lau, J Y; Urdea, M S; Neuwald, P D; Wilber, J C; Lindsay, K; Perrillo, R P; Albrecht, J

    1994-06-01

    To determine the optimal conditions for preparation of serum specimens for quantitative hepatitis C virus RNA determination, patient samples were processed such that differences in time from clot formation to centrifugation, centrifugation to separation of serum and collection of serum until freezing could be independently assessed. The effects of multiple cycles of freezing and thawing were also determined. There was progressive and significant loss of hepatitis C virus RNA activity when the time from the formation of the clot until centrifugation was longer than 2 hr. This reduction reached 32% after 6 hr and 49% after 24 hr. If centrifugation was performed immediately after formation of the clot, loss of hepatitis C virus RNA activity was reduced to less than 10% even though the serum remained unseparated from the clot for up to 6 hr. Centrifugation of blood through a paraffin plug (serum separator tube) prevented loss of hepatitis C virus RNA activity for up to 24 hr. There was no loss of hepatitis C virus RNA activity with up to three freeze-thaw cycles. When patient specimens were prepared under these optimal conditions, the sensitivity of the quantitative branched DNA signal amplification assay in patients with hepatitis C virus infection was 83% and the specificity in patients with liver disease was 100%. Fluctuations in hepatitis C virus RNA levels were shown to correlate with biochemical changes observed in patients treated with recombinant interferon-alpha 2b. These data demonstrate that improper or inconsistent methods of serum preparation may result in falsely low and unreliable levels of hepatitis C virus RNA.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Evaluation of some adhesives for collecting Musca domestica and Chrysomya megacephala adults or mosquito larvae in sticky traps.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, S; Yunus, H; Sohadi, R

    1987-07-01

    1. Seven types of water-insoluble adhesives were evaluated in sticky traps for collecting adults of Musca domestica L. and Chrysomya megacephala (Fabricius) or mosquito larvae (Aedes aegypti (L.) and Culex quinquefasciatus Say). 2. Adhesive viscosity affected the tackiness of the glues and this determined their trapping efficiency in air or water. 3. From the 'Hyvis' range of adhesives tested, 'Hyvis 200' was most effective for trapping adult flies. 4. With 24 h exposure to fourth instar Ae.aegypti larvae in tapwater, submerged plates coated with 'Hyvis 10', 'Hyvis 30' or 'Hyvis 200' formulations trapped the majority of larvae. In polluted water the highest rates of trapping were 17.3% of Ae.aegypti and 18.7% of Cx quinquefasciatus with 'Hyvis 200'. Floating traps were consistently less productive than submerged traps under laboratory conditions. 5. In a heavily polluted natural breeding-site of Cx quinquefasciatus, floating traps were more productive than submerged sticky traps with four of seven adhesives tested, the most efficient being 'Hyvis 200' (4.2 mosquitoes per hour) and Hyvis:polyethylene 90:10 (4.5/h). Despite the relative inefficiency of aquatic traps, emergent adults, pupae and second to fourth instars of larvae were collected quickly from the habitat. PMID:2979541

  13. Evaluation of some adhesives for collecting Musca domestica and Chrysomya megacephala adults or mosquito larvae in sticky traps.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, S; Yunus, H; Sohadi, R

    1987-07-01

    1. Seven types of water-insoluble adhesives were evaluated in sticky traps for collecting adults of Musca domestica L. and Chrysomya megacephala (Fabricius) or mosquito larvae (Aedes aegypti (L.) and Culex quinquefasciatus Say). 2. Adhesive viscosity affected the tackiness of the glues and this determined their trapping efficiency in air or water. 3. From the 'Hyvis' range of adhesives tested, 'Hyvis 200' was most effective for trapping adult flies. 4. With 24 h exposure to fourth instar Ae.aegypti larvae in tapwater, submerged plates coated with 'Hyvis 10', 'Hyvis 30' or 'Hyvis 200' formulations trapped the majority of larvae. In polluted water the highest rates of trapping were 17.3% of Ae.aegypti and 18.7% of Cx quinquefasciatus with 'Hyvis 200'. Floating traps were consistently less productive than submerged traps under laboratory conditions. 5. In a heavily polluted natural breeding-site of Cx quinquefasciatus, floating traps were more productive than submerged sticky traps with four of seven adhesives tested, the most efficient being 'Hyvis 200' (4.2 mosquitoes per hour) and Hyvis:polyethylene 90:10 (4.5/h). Despite the relative inefficiency of aquatic traps, emergent adults, pupae and second to fourth instars of larvae were collected quickly from the habitat.

  14. Adult Education. Proven Exemplary Educational Programs and Practices: A Collection from the National Diffusion Network (NDN).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Board of Education, Lansing.

    This booklet provides descriptions of 16 adult education programs that have been validated as successful by the Joint Dissemination Review Panel (JDRP), U.S. Department of Education and that are being promoted by the National Diffusion Network (NDN). Although the programs were developed by individual school districts in response to local needs,…

  15. New Adult Level Curriculum Materials in the Government Documents Collection. 1989-1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keith, Diana J., Comp.

    The purpose of this bibliography is to provide a list of government documents of special interest to students in education, especially adult students, teachers, and university faculty. Types of materials indexed include: curriculum guides and supplements, sources of government and non-government print and non-print resources, bibliographies,…

  16. 46 CFR 4.06-40 - Specimen handling and shipping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... qualified to conduct tests on such specimens. A proper chain of custody must be maintained for each specimen...-four (24) hours of receipt by the carrier. (b) The marine employer shall ensure that the urine specimen collection procedures of § 16.113 of this chapter and the chain of custody requirements of 49 CFR part...

  17. 46 CFR 4.06-40 - Specimen handling and shipping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... qualified to conduct tests on such specimens. A proper chain of custody must be maintained for each specimen...-four (24) hours of receipt by the carrier. (b) The marine employer shall ensure that the urine specimen collection procedures of § 16.113 of this chapter and the chain of custody requirements of 49 CFR part...

  18. 46 CFR 4.06-40 - Specimen handling and shipping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... qualified to conduct tests on such specimens. A proper chain of custody must be maintained for each specimen...-four (24) hours of receipt by the carrier. (b) The marine employer shall ensure that the urine specimen collection procedures of § 16.113 of this chapter and the chain of custody requirements of 49 CFR part...

  19. 10 CFR 26.109 - Urine specimen quantity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Urine specimen quantity. 26.109 Section 26.109 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.109 Urine specimen quantity. (a) Licensees and other entities who are subject to this subpart shall establish...

  20. 10 CFR 26.113 - Splitting the urine specimen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Splitting the urine specimen. 26.113 Section 26.113 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.113 Splitting the urine specimen. (a) Licensees and other entities may, but are not required to, use...

  1. 49 CFR 40.65 - What does the collector check for when the employee presents a specimen?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... reading the temperature strip attached to the collection container. (3) If the specimen temperature is... out of range, you must process both the original specimen and the specimen collected using direct... of tampering, you must process both the original specimen and the specimen collected using...

  2. Evaluation of various substances to increase adult Stomoxys calcitrans (Diptera: Muscidae) collections on alsynite cylinder traps in north Florida.

    PubMed

    Cilek, J E

    1999-09-01

    During 1993-1995, field studies evaluated various volatile substances to increase the catch of adult stable flies, Stomoxys calcitrans L., on adhesive-coated translucent fiberglass (Alsynite) cylinder traps. Dry ice, 1-octen-3-ol (referred to as octenol), acetone, 4:1:8 mixture of 1 octen-3-ol: 3-n-propylphenol: 4-methylphenol, and an eye gnat (Hippelates) attractant were tested. Using dry ice as a baseline, the latter 4 treatments also were considered as possible alternatives to carbon dioxide. Dry ice significantly increased fly collections on cylinders as much as 25-fold compared with cylinders with no odor. Although trap collections increased by approximately 4% with addition of octenol (release rate approximately 18.0 mg/h), it was not significantly different when compared with dry ice alone. Fly collections on cylinders baited with octenol only were significantly lower than dry ice and not significantly different from cylinders with no odor. Collections from Alsynite cylinders baited with either acetone released at approximately 62.0 mg/h or eye gnat bait plus sand caught significantly more stable flies than no odor. However, neither substance increased fly collections as much as dry ice. The 4:1:8 phenolic mixture (released at either 0.7 mg/h or 20.0 mg/h) significantly increased fly collection on cylinders nearly 6-fold compared with no odor and warrants further investigation as an alternative to carbon dioxide for sampling stable flies.

  3. Acceptance of Asthma Pharmacogenetic Study by Children and Adults

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ann Chen; Davis, Robert; Tantisira, Kelan; Dutta-Linn, M. Maya; Hemmes, Mia; Weiss, Scott T.

    2012-01-01

    Background Pharmacogenetic testing may change clinical medicine by allowing clinicians to tailor medications based on a patient’s genetic makeup, however, these tests must first be validated in large, real-life populations of subjects that include children. A dearth of knowledge exists for whether pediatric populations are as willing as adult populations to provide samples for such studies. Objective (1) To assess whether pediatric and adult patients with persistent asthma are willing to provide specimens for DNA extraction and genetic studies. (2) To assess whether patients’ willingness to provide blood as compared to buccal smear specimens differ. Methods Of 644 patients ages 4–38 years who had three or more prescription fills for inhaled corticosteroids in one year, 60% (385) were randomized to the blood specimen group and 40% (259) were randomized to the buccal smear group in order to study acceptance of different biospecimen collection methods. Research assistants contacted subjects to obtain consent, perform a phone survey, and request a specimen. Results There were no baseline differences between subjects randomized to the blood specimen group versus buccal smear group with respect to age, gender, or number of dispensings of inhaled corticosteroids. Of 259 subjects in the buccal smear group, 30% (78) provided samples, and of 385 subjects in the blood specimen group, 16% (60) provided samples. Subjects randomized to the buccal smear group were more likely to provide specimens for genetic study compared to subjects randomized to the blood specimen group (RR 1.21; 95% CI 1.10 – 1.32), even after adjusting for age. Pediatric subjects were more likely to provide specimens for genetic study than adult subjects with 23% (113) of pediatric subjects providing samples and 15% (25) of adult subjects providing samples (p=0.03). Conclusion Children with asthma are as likely to participate in genetic studies as adults. Both children and adult subjects are more

  4. 76 FR 52687 - Renewal of Agency Information Collection for the Bureau of Indian Education Adult Education...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-23

    ... Program. The information collection is currently authorized by OMB Control number 1076-0120, which expires... will be able to do so. III. Data OMB Control Number: 1076-0120. Title: Bureau of Indian Affairs...

  5. Biaxial Creep Specimen Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    JL Bump; RF Luther

    2006-02-09

    This report documents the results of the weld development and abbreviated weld qualification efforts performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for refractory metal and superalloy biaxial creep specimens. Biaxial creep specimens were to be assembled, electron beam welded, laser-seal welded, and pressurized at PNNL for both in-pile (JOYO reactor, O-arai, Japan) and out-of-pile creep testing. The objective of this test campaign was to evaluate the creep behavior of primary cladding and structural alloys under consideration for the Prometheus space reactor. PNNL successfully developed electron beam weld parameters for six of these materials prior to the termination of the Naval Reactors program effort to deliver a space reactor for Project Prometheus. These materials were FS-85, ASTAR-811C, T-111, Alloy 617, Haynes 230, and Nirnonic PE16. Early termination of the NR space program precluded the development of laser welding parameters for post-pressurization seal weldments.

  6. Collective Bargaining Agreement by and Between Moraine Park Vocational, Technical and Adult Education District and the Faculty Association of Vocational, Technical and Adult Education District 10, July 1973-June 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moraine Park Technical Inst., Fond du Lac, WI.

    This is the collective bargaining agreement between the Moraine Park Vocational, Technical and Adult Education District and the Faculty Association of Vocational, Technical and Adult Education District 10 covering the period July 1973-June 1974. Contents cover academic freedom; advancement on the salary schedule; aggrieved person; arbitration and…

  7. Multiaxial graphite test specimen

    SciTech Connect

    1988-09-01

    A multiaxial test program is to be conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on the core component graphite. The objectives of the tests are to obtain failure data under uniaxial and biaxial states of stress in order to construct a failure surface in a two-dimensional stress space. These data will be used in verifying the accuracy of the maximum stress failure theory being proposed for use in designing the core graphite components. Tubular specimens are proposed to be used and are either loaded axially and/or subjected to internal pressure. This report includes a study on three specimen configurations. The conclusions of that study indicate that an elliptical transition geometry procedures the smallest discontinuity effects. Several loading combustions were studied using the elliptical transition specimen. The primary purpose is to establish the location of the highest stress state and its relation to the gage section for all of the loading conditions. The tension/internal pres sure loading condition (1:1) indicated that the high stress area is just outside the gage section but still should be acceptable. 5 refs., 18 figs.

  8. With Reference to Appalachia. A Collection of Mid-Twentieth-Century Facts and Viewpoints Selected on the Basis of Pertinence to Adult Education in Appalachia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seay, Ruth H., Comp.

    Data describing conditions, resources, deficiencies, problems, and potentialities in Appalachia are presented as the first step of an evaluative and program-improvement study for the Appalachian Adult Basic Education Demonstration Center. The rationale for this data collection is that an adult education program can be significant only as it…

  9. Specimen Holder For Flammability Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle A.

    1992-01-01

    Fixture holds sheet specimens for flammability tests. Frame and clamps designed to minimize local overstress on specimen. Heat capacity of fixture low, interfering less with interpretation of results of test by drawing less heat away from specimen. Accepts films, fabrics, foams, and other sheets, rigid or flexible. Specimens thin or thick, or of variable thickness. Bent to accommodate curved rigid specimens. Also used for such other tests as particle-impact tests.

  10. Adult Learners in Cyberspace: A Collective Case Study of Reentry Women in a Virtual Learning Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Brian R.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this collective case study is to describe and explore a virtual learning community as experienced by women reentering higher education in an online graduate degree program. The grand tour question for this study was: How do reentry women in an online graduate program describe their experience in a virtual learning community? …

  11. Collectivity, Distributivity, and the Interpretation of Plural Numerical Expressions in Child and Adult Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Syrett, Kristen; Musolino, Julien

    2013-01-01

    Sentences containing plural numerical expressions (e.g., "two boys") can give rise to two interpretations (collective and distributive), arising from the fact that their representation admits of a part-whole structure. We present the results of a series of experiments designed to explore children's understanding of this distinction…

  12. 76 FR 78018 - Renewal of Agency Information Collection for the Bureau of Indian Education Adult Education...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-15

    ... information collection. BIE published a 60-day notice in the Federal Register on August 23, 2011. (76 FR 52687... currently authorized by OMB Control Number 1076-0120, which expires December 31, 2011. DATES: Interested... identifiable information, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so. III. Data OMB Control Number:...

  13. Method for thinning specimen

    DOEpatents

    Follstaedt, David M.; Moran, Michael P.

    2005-03-15

    A method for thinning (such as in grinding and polishing) a material surface using an instrument means for moving an article with a discontinuous surface with an abrasive material dispersed between the material surface and the discontinuous surface where the discontinuous surface of the moving article provides an efficient means for maintaining contact of the abrasive with the material surface. When used to dimple specimens for microscopy analysis, a wheel with a surface that has been modified to produce a uniform or random discontinuous surface significantly improves the speed of the dimpling process without loss of quality of finish.

  14. Automated Tracking of Drosophila Specimens.

    PubMed

    Chao, Rubén; Macía-Vázquez, Germán; Zalama, Eduardo; Gómez-García-Bermejo, Jaime; Perán, José-Ramón

    2015-01-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila Melanogaster has become a model organism in the study of neurobiology and behavior patterns. The analysis of the way the fly moves and its behavior is of great scientific interest for research on aspects such as drug tolerance, aggression or ageing in humans. In this article, a procedure for detecting, identifying and tracking numerous specimens of Drosophila by means of computer vision-based sensing systems is presented. This procedure allows dynamic information about each specimen to be collected at each moment, and then for its behavior to be quantitatively characterized. The proposed algorithm operates in three main steps: a pre-processing step, a detection and segmentation step, and tracking shape. The pre-processing and segmentation steps allow some limits of the image acquisition system and some visual artifacts (such as shadows and reflections) to be dealt with. The improvements introduced in the tracking step allow the problems corresponding to identity loss and swaps, caused by the interaction between individual flies, to be solved efficiently. Thus, a robust method that compares favorably to other existing methods is obtained. PMID:26258779

  15. Automated Tracking of Drosophila Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Rubén; Macía-Vázquez, Germán; Zalama, Eduardo; Gómez-García-Bermejo, Jaime; Perán, José-Ramón

    2015-01-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila Melanogaster has become a model organism in the study of neurobiology and behavior patterns. The analysis of the way the fly moves and its behavior is of great scientific interest for research on aspects such as drug tolerance, aggression or ageing in humans. In this article, a procedure for detecting, identifying and tracking numerous specimens of Drosophila by means of computer vision-based sensing systems is presented. This procedure allows dynamic information about each specimen to be collected at each moment, and then for its behavior to be quantitatively characterized. The proposed algorithm operates in three main steps: a pre-processing step, a detection and segmentation step, and tracking shape. The pre-processing and segmentation steps allow some limits of the image acquisition system and some visual artifacts (such as shadows and reflections) to be dealt with. The improvements introduced in the tracking step allow the problems corresponding to identity loss and swaps, caused by the interaction between individual flies, to be solved efficiently. Thus, a robust method that compares favorably to other existing methods is obtained. PMID:26258779

  16. Operations of the Bonifer and Minthorn Springs Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facilities, 1984-1986 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    James, Gary A.

    1987-05-01

    The Bonifer Springs salmon and steelhead juvenile release and adult collection facility is located in the upper Umatilla River drainage at Meacham Creek mile 2.0. The facility is one of two that are operated on the Umatilla Indian Reservation under contract with Bonneville Power Administration. Construction of the Bonifer facility was completed in the fall of 1983 and operations began in early 1984. The facility consists of a one acre spring-fed pond and a concrete fishway and adult fish holding area at the pond outlet. The facility is used for holding and spawning of adult summer steelhead and for acclimation/release of juvenile fall and spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead. The acclimation capacity is approximately 20,000 lbs. of fish. Minthorn Springs Creek is located about four miles east of Mission, Oregon, on the Umatilla Indian Reservation. It forms from several springs located immediately south of the Umatilla River. The total length of Minthorn Springs Creek is about one mile and the mouth is located at Umatilla River mile 63.7. The fishway and adult holding area of the Minthorn facility are located in Minthorn Springs Creek immediately upstream from the mouth. The juvenile raceways are located in the same general area about 25 feet from the bank of Minthorn Springs Creek. Like the Bonifer Springs project, the Minthorn facility is used for adult fish holding and for temporary rearing or acclimation of juvenile salmon and steelhead to imprint the fish on the particular water source and reduce stress from trucking prior to their downstream migration. The facility was completed in December of 1985 and first used for juvenile acclimation in the Spring of 1986. An existing pond was not available at the Minthorn site so two concrete raceways (120 x 12 feet) were constructed for juvenile holding/rearing. At a water depth of 3 feet and a single-pass water exchange rate of about 800 gpm through each raceway, the facility has a rearing capacity of about 15

  17. Vise holds specimens for microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greule, W. N.

    1980-01-01

    Convenient, miniature, spring-loaded clamp holds specimens for scanning electron microscope. Clamp is made out of nesting sections of studded angle-aluminum. Specimens are easier to mount and dismount with vise than with conductive adhesive or paint.

  18. 49 CFR 40.71 - How does the collector prepare the specimens?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Urine Specimen Collections § 40.71 How does the collector prepare the specimens? (a) All collections under DOT agency drug testing regulations must be split... the box on the CCF (Step 2) indicating that this was a split specimen collection. (2) You, not...

  19. Rehydration of forensically important larval Diptera specimens.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Michelle R; Pechal, Jennifer L; Tomberlin, Jeffery K

    2011-01-01

    Established procedures for collecting and preserving evidence are essential for all forensic disciplines to be accepted in court and by the forensic community at large. Entomological evidence, such as Diptera larvae, are primarily preserved in ethanol, which can evaporate over time, resulting in the dehydration of specimens. In this study, methods used for rehydrating specimens were compared. The changes in larval specimens with respect to larval length and weight for three forensically important blow fly (Diptera: Calliphoridae) species in North America were quantified. Phormia regina (Meigen), Cochliomyia macellaria (F.), and Chrysomya rufifacies (Macquart) third-instar larvae were collected from various decomposing animals and preserved with three preservation methods (80% ethanol, 70% isopropyl alcohol, and hot-water kill then 80% ethanol). Preservative solutions were allowed to evaporate. Rehydration was attempted with either of the following: 80% ethanol, commercial trisodium phosphate substitute solution, or 0.5% trisodium phosphate solution. All three methods partially restored weight and length of specimens recorded before preservation. Analysis of variance results indicated that effects of preservation, rehydration treatment, and collection animal were different in each species. The interaction between preservative method and rehydration treatment had a significant effect on both P. regina and C. macellaria larval length and weight. In addition, there was a significant interaction effect of collection animal on larval C. macellaria measurements. No significant effect was observed in C. rufifacies larval length or weight among the preservatives or treatments. These methods could be used to establish a standard operating procedure for dealing with dehydrated larval specimens in forensic investigations.

  20. Improving the Quality of Adult Mortality Data Collected in Demographic Surveys: Validation Study of a New Siblings' Survival Questionnaire in Niakhar, Senegal

    PubMed Central

    Helleringer, Stéphane; Pison, Gilles; Masquelier, Bruno; Kanté, Almamy Malick; Douillot, Laetitia; Duthé, Géraldine; Sokhna, Cheikh; Delaunay, Valérie

    2014-01-01

    Background In countries with limited vital registration, adult mortality is frequently estimated using siblings' survival histories (SSHs) collected during Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS). These data are affected by reporting errors. We developed a new SSH questionnaire, the siblings' survival calendar (SSC). It incorporates supplementary interviewing techniques to limit omissions of siblings and uses an event history calendar to improve reports of dates and ages. We hypothesized that the SSC would improve the quality of adult mortality data. Methods and Findings We conducted a retrospective validation study among the population of the Niakhar Health and Demographic Surveillance System in Senegal. We randomly assigned men and women aged 15–59 y to an interview with either the DHS questionnaire or the SSC. We compared SSHs collected in each group to prospective data on adult mortality collected in Niakhar. The SSC reduced respondents' tendency to round reports of dates and ages to the nearest multiple of five or ten (“heaping”). The SSC also had higher sensitivity in recording adult female deaths: among respondents whose sister(s) had died at an adult age in the past 15 y, 89.6% reported an adult female death during SSC interviews versus 75.6% in DHS interviews (p = 0.027). The specificity of the SSC was similar to that of the DHS questionnaire, i.e., it did not increase the number of false reports of deaths. However, the SSC did not improve the reporting of adult deaths among the brothers of respondents. Study limitations include sample selectivity, limited external validity, and multiple testing. Conclusions The SSC has the potential to collect more accurate SSHs than the questionnaire used in DHS. Further research is needed to assess the effects of the SSC on estimates of adult mortality rates. Additional validation studies should be conducted in different social and epidemiological settings. Trial Registration Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN06849961

  1. Minthorn Springs Creek Summer Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facility; Operation, Maintenance and Evaluation of the Bonifer and Minthorn Springs Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facilities, 1989 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Lofy, Peter T.; Rowan, Gerald D.

    1990-03-01

    The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) are cooperating in a joint effort to increase steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As part of this program, Bonifer and Minthorn Acclimation Facilities are operated for holding and spawning adult steelhead and acclimation and release of juvenile salmon and steelhead. Regularly-scheduled maintenance was completed in 1989. Equipment and pumps received maintenance and repair. An automatic dialing system was incorporated into the alarm system at the Minthorn facility. A security company has replaced the function of the Umatilla Tribal Police which was to contact fisheries personnel in case of an alarm. The configuration of the alarm system was upgraded to activate the alarm faster and provide better access to project personnel with a pager system. A survey was completed in 1988 by Thomas Bumstead of Albrook Hydraulics Lab in Pullman, WA. to determine potential measures to address the change in course of the Umatilla River around Minthorn as a result of the flood of 1986. Options and recommendations were submitted in a report in 1989. Fish Management Consultants Inc. submitted the final reports of evaluations for both the Bonifer and Minthorn facilities. A total of 150 adult steelhead were collected for broodstock at Threemile Dam from December through March and held at Minthorn. Forty-two pairs were spawned (37 pairs from Minthorn and 5 pairs collected and immediately spawned at Threemile Dam). The 241,682 eggs were transferred to Irrigon Hatchery for incubation and later moved to Oak Springs Hatchery for rearing. An estimated 368 adult hatchery steelhead returned to the Umatilla River in 1988-89 (based on Threemile Dam trap counts and harvest below Threemile Dam) these, and 349 were released upriver. Of seven returned to the Bonifer trap where the smolts were initially released. Acclimation of 79,984 spring chinook salmon and 22

  2. Unusual Histopathological Findings in Childhood Appendectomy Specimens.

    PubMed

    Buyukbese Sarsu, Sevgi; Ucak, Ramazan; Buyukbese, Mehmet Akif; Karakus, Suleyman Cuneyt; Deniz, Hale

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to find the unusual findings in the childhood appendectomy specimens and their incidence. The clinicopathological data of 1,306 patients whose ages ranged from 3 to 16 were retrospectively collected. Histopathological findings in appendectomy specimens taken from patients who had a prediagnosis of appendicitis were obtained. Incidental appendectomies were not included in the research. Unusual findings were reevaluated in the histopathological assessment of appendectomy specimens. The number of patients whose pathological findings are considered unusual is 25 (1.91 %). Nine of the patients were girls and 16 of them were boys. Their ages ranged from 6 to 15. Pathological results revealed that there were 16 (1.22 %) cases of parasitosis, 3 (0.23 %) cases of granulomatosis, 3 (0.23 %) cases of eosinophilic appendicitis, 2 (0.15 %) cases of carcinoid tumors, and 1 (0.08 %) case of appendiceal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. All patients underwent a standard appendectomy. Uncommon histopathological findings in childhood appendectomy specimens are more common than those in adulthood. This kind of certain unexpected lesions of the appendix may require advanced diagnostics, careful clinical care, follow-up for years, and a multidisciplinary approach. Therefore, histopathological examinations of appendectomy specimens must be performed routinely. PMID:26730070

  3. 10 CFR 26.109 - Urine specimen quantity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... follows split specimen procedures, tests for additional drugs, or performs initial testing at a licensee testing facility. Where collected specimens are to be split under the provisions of this subpart, the... shall encourage the donor to drink a reasonable amount of liquid (normally, 8 ounces of water every...

  4. 10 CFR 26.109 - Urine specimen quantity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... follows split specimen procedures, tests for additional drugs, or performs initial testing at a licensee testing facility. Where collected specimens are to be split under the provisions of this subpart, the... shall encourage the donor to drink a reasonable amount of liquid (normally, 8 ounces of water every...

  5. 10 CFR 26.109 - Urine specimen quantity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... follows split specimen procedures, tests for additional drugs, or performs initial testing at a licensee testing facility. Where collected specimens are to be split under the provisions of this subpart, the... shall encourage the donor to drink a reasonable amount of liquid (normally, 8 ounces of water every...

  6. 10 CFR 26.109 - Urine specimen quantity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... follows split specimen procedures, tests for additional drugs, or performs initial testing at a licensee testing facility. Where collected specimens are to be split under the provisions of this subpart, the... shall encourage the donor to drink a reasonable amount of liquid (normally, 8 ounces of water every...

  7. Real-Time TaqMan PCR Assay for the Detection of Heat-Labile and Heat-Stable Enterotoxin Genes in a Geographically Diverse Collection of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Strains and Stool Specimens.

    PubMed

    Pattabiraman, Vaishnavi; Parsons, Michele B; Bopp, Cheryl A

    2016-04-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are an important cause of diarrhea in children under the age of 5 years in developing countries and are the leading bacterial agent of traveler's diarrhea in persons traveling to these countries. ETEC strains secrete heat-labile (LT) and/or heat-stable (ST) enterotoxins that induce diarrhea by causing water and electrolyte imbalance. We describe the validation of a real-time TaqMan PCR (RT-PCR) assay to detect LT, ST1a, and ST1b enterotoxin genes in E. coli strains and in stool specimens. We validated LT/ST1b duplex and ST1a single-plex RT-PCR assay using a conventional PCR assay as a gold standard with 188 ETEC strains and 42 non-ETEC strains. We validated LT/ST1b duplex and ST1a single-plex RT-PCR assay in stool specimens (n = 106) using traditional culture as the gold standard. RT- PCR assay sensitivities for LT, ST1a, and ST1b detection in strains were 100%, 100%, and 98%; specificities were 95%, 98%, and 99%, and Pearson correlation coefficient r was 0.9954 between RT-PCR assay and the gold standard. In stool specimens, RT-PCR assay sensitivities for LT, ST1a, and ST1b detection were 97%, 100%, and 97%; and specificities were 99%, 94%, and 97%. Pearson correlation coefficient r was 0.9975 between RT-PCR results in stool specimens and the gold standard. Limits of detection of LT, ST1a, and ST1b by RT-PCR assay were 0.1 to1.0 pg/μL and by conventional PCR assay were 100 to1000 pg/μL. The accuracy, rapidity and sensitivity of this RT-PCR assay is promising for ETEC detection in public health/clinical laboratories and for laboratories in need of an independent method to confirm results of other culture independent diagnostic tests.

  8. Estimation of sodium and potassium intakes assessed by two 24 h urine collections in healthy Japanese adults: a nationwide study.

    PubMed

    Asakura, Keiko; Uechi, Ken; Sasaki, Yuki; Masayasu, Shizuko; Sasaki, Satoshi

    2014-10-14

    Excess Na intake and insufficient K intake are well-known risk factors for CVD. International comparative studies have reported that Japan has the highest intake of Na and the lowest intake of K in the world. However, no recent study has precisely assessed Na and K intakes in Japanese adults. In the present study, Na and K intakes were estimated from two 24 h urine collections implemented in twenty-three out of forty-seven prefectures in Japan. Apparently healthy men (n 384) and women (n 376), aged 20 to 69 years, who had been working in welfare facilities were recruited, with data collection conducted in February and March 2013. The mean Na excretion was 206·0 mmol/d in men and 173·9 mmol/d in women. The respective values of K excretion were 51·6 and 47·2 mmol/d. The excretion of both Na and K varied considerably among the prefectures, and was higher in subjects with a higher BMI. In contrast, only K excretion was associated with age. After estimating the usual intakes of Na and K, it was found that none of the male subjects met the recommended Na intake values of the WHO, and that only 3·2 % met those of the Japanese government. The respective values for females were 0·1 and 5·0 %. For K intake, 7·5 % of the total subjects met the recommended values of the WHO and 21·7 % met those of the Japanese government. These findings suggest that there is an urgent need for the development of an effective intervention programme to reduce Na intake and promote K intake in the Japanese population.

  9. More Than Just Chinese Food...A Collection of Writings by Adult ESL Learners and Three Approaches to Teaching and Writing in the ESL Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tao, Pauline; And Others

    This book consists of a collection of stories written by adults who attend a bilingual ESL (English as a Second Language) program co-sponsored by the Toronto Board of Education and Chinese Information and Community Services. All the writings deal with Chinese culture but the book may be used by people of diverse backgrounds and of varying levels…

  10. 49 CFR 40.71 - How does the collector prepare the specimens?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... employee, must first pour at least 30 mL of urine from the collection container into one specimen bottle... urine from the collection container into the second specimen bottle to be used for the split specimen. (4) You, not the employee, must place and secure (i.e., tighten or snap) the lids/caps on the...

  11. 49 CFR 40.189 - Where is other information concerning split specimens found in this regulation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... more information concerning split specimens in several sections of this part: § 40.3—Definition. § 40.... §§ 40.71-40.73—Collection process for split specimens. § 40.83—Laboratory accessioning of split specimens. § 40.99—Laboratory retention of split specimens. § 40.103—Blind split specimens. §...

  12. 49 CFR 40.189 - Where is other information concerning split specimens found in this regulation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... more information concerning split specimens in several sections of this part: § 40.3—Definition. § 40.... §§ 40.71-40.73—Collection process for split specimens. § 40.83—Laboratory accessioning of split specimens. § 40.99—Laboratory retention of split specimens. § 40.103—Blind split specimens. §...

  13. Preparation and Use of Voucher Specimens for Documenting Research in Weed Science

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Historically voucher specimens and herbarium collections have provided the basis for research in plant science. Available for study and verification by contemporary and future workers, voucher specimens are permanent records documenting identification, distribution, and interspecific and intraspeci...

  14. Manufacturing of Plutonium Tensile Specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, Cameron M

    2012-08-01

    Details workflow conducted to manufacture high density alpha Plutonium tensile specimens to support Los Alamos National Laboratory's science campaigns. Introduces topics including the metallurgical challenge of Plutonium and the use of high performance super-computing to drive design. Addresses the utilization of Abaqus finite element analysis, programmable computer numerical controlled (CNC) machining, as well as glove box ergonomics and safety in order to design a process that will yield high quality Plutonium tensile specimens.

  15. Current activities within the National Biomonitoring Specimen Bank.

    PubMed

    Wise, S A; Koster, B J; Langland, J K; Zeisler, R

    1993-11-01

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has been involved in biological environmental specimen banking activities since 1979. These activities, which are known collectively as the National Biomonitoring Specimen Bank (NBSB), include the banking of a variety of specimens (human liver, sediment, mussels/oysters, fish tissue and marine mammal tissues) from several different projects supported by different government agencies. The two most recent projects, the Alaska Marine Mammal Tissue Archival Project (AMMTAP) and the National Marine Mammal Tissue Bank (NMMTB), focus on the collection, banking and analysis of marine mammal tissues and they are part of a comprehensive plan to address marine mammal monitoring, specimen banking and quality assurance of analytical measurements associated with contaminant analyses in marine mammals.

  16. Detection of Helicobacter pylori DNA in inflamed dental pulp specimens from Japanese children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Ogaya, Yuko; Nomura, Ryota; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Nakano, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    The oral cavity has been implicated as a source of Helicobacter pylori infection in childhood. Various PCR methods have been used to detect H. pylori DNA in oral specimens with various detection rates reported. Such disparity in detection rates complicates the estimation of the true infection rate of H. pylori in the oral cavity. In the present study, we constructed a novel PCR system for H. pylori detection and used it to analyse oral specimens. Firstly, the nucleotide alignments of genes commonly used for H. pylori detection were compared using the complete genome information for 48 strains registered in the GenBank database. Candidate primer sets with an estimated amplification size of approximately 300-400 bp were selected, and the specificity and sensitivity of the detection system using each primer set were evaluated. Five sets of primers targeting ureA were considered appropriate, of which a single primer set was chosen for inclusion in the PCR system. The sensitivity of the system was considered appropriate and its detection limit established as one to ten cells per reaction. The novel PCR system was used to examine H. pylori distribution in oral specimens (40 inflamed pulp tissues, 40 saliva samples) collected from Japanese children, adolescents and young adults. PCR analysis revealed that the detection rate of H. pylori in inflamed pulp was 15 %, whereas no positive reaction was found in any of the saliva specimens. Taken together, our novel PCR system was found to be reliable for detecting H. pylori. The results obtained showed that H. pylori was detected in inflamed pulp but not saliva specimens, indicating that an infected root canal may be a reservoir for H. pylori. PMID:25332373

  17. Perinatal Specimens of Saurolophus angustirostris (Dinosauria: Hadrosauridae), from the Upper Cretaceous of Mongolia

    PubMed Central

    Dewaele, Leonard; Tsogtbaatar, Khishigjav; Barsbold, Rinchen; Garcia, Géraldine; Stein, Koen; Escuillié, François; Godefroit, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Background The Late Cretaceous Nemegt Formation, Gobi Desert, Mongolia has already yielded abundant and complete skeletons of the hadrosaur Saurolophus angustirostris, from half-grown to adult individuals. Methodology/Principal Findings Herein we describe perinatal specimens of Saurolophus angustirostris, associated with fragmentary eggshell fragments. The skull length of these babies is around 5% that of the largest known S. angustirostris specimens, so these specimens document the earliest development stages of this giant hadrosaur and bridge a large hiatus in our knowledge of the ontogeny of S. angustirostris. Conclusions/Significance The studied specimens are likely part of a nest originally located on a riverbank point bar. The perinatal specimens were buried by sediment carried by the river current presumably during the wet summer season. Perinatal bones already displayed diagnostic characters for Saurolophus angustirostris, including premaxillae with a strongly reflected oral margin and upturned premaxillary body in lateral aspect. The absence of a supracranial crest and unfused halves of the cervical neural arches characterize the earliest stages in the ontogeny of S. angustirostris. The eggshell fragments associated with the perinatal individuals can be referred to the Spheroolithus oogenus and closely resemble those found in older formations (e.g. Barun Goyot Fm in Mongolia) or associated with more basal hadrosauroids (Bactrosaurus-Gilmoreosaurus in the Iren Dabasu Fm, Inner Mongolia, China). This observation suggests that the egg microstructure was similar in basal hadrosauroids and more advanced saurolophines. Competing Interests One of the authors (FE) is employed by the commercial organization Eldonia. Eldonia provided support in the form of a salary for FE, but did not have any additional role or influence in the study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript and it does not alter the authors

  18. An interlaminar tension strength specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Wade C.; Martin, Roderick H.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a technique to determine interlaminar tension strength, sigma(sub 3c) of a fiber reinforced composite material using a curved beam. The specimen was a unidirectional curved beam, bent 90 degrees, with straight arms. Attached to each arm was a hinged loading mechanism which was held by the grips of a tensile testing machine. Geometry effects of the specimen, including the effects of loading arm length, inner radius, thickness, and width, were studied. The data sets fell into two categories: low strength corresponding to a macroscopic flaw related failure and high strength corresponding to a microscopic flaw related failure. From the data available, the loading arm length had no effect on sigma(sub 3c). The inner radius was not expected to have a significant effect on sigma(sub 3c), but this conclusion could not be confirmed because of differences in laminate quality for each curve geometry. The thicker specimens had the lowest value of sigma(sub 3c) because of poor laminate quality. Width was found to affect the value of sigma(sub 3c) only slightly. The wider specimens generally had a slightly lower strength since more material was under high stress, and hence, had a larger probability of containing a significant flaw.

  19. An Interlaminar Tensile Strength Specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Roderick H.; Jackson, Wade C.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a technique to determine interlaminar tensile strength, sigma(sub 3c), of a fiber reinforced composite material using a curved beam. The specimen was a unidirectional curved beam, bent 90 deg, with straight arms. Attached to each arm was a hinged loading mechanism that was held by the grips of a tension testing machine. Geometry effects of the specimen, including the effects of loading arm length, inner radius, thickness, and width, were studied. The data sets fell into two categories: low strength corresponding to a macroscopic flaw related failure and high strength corresponding to a microscopic flaw related failure. From the data available, the specimen width and loading arm length had little effect on sigma(sub 3c). The inner radius was not expected to have a significant effect on sigma(sub 3c), but this conclusion could not be confirmed because of differences in laminate quality for each curve geometry. The thicker specimens had the lowest value of sigma(sub 3c) because of poor laminate quality.

  20. Comparative Field Evaluation of Different Traps for Collecting Adult Phlebotomine Sand Flies (Diptera: Psychodidae) in an Endemic Area of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Quintana Roo, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Rojas, Jorge J; Arque-Chunga, Wilfredo; Fernández-Salas, Ildefonso; Rebollar-Téllez, Eduardo A

    2016-06-01

    Phlebotominae are the vectors of Leishmania parasites. It is important to have available surveillance and collection methods for the sand fly vectors. The objectives of the present study were to evaluate and compare traps for the collection of sand fly species and to analyze trap catches along months and transects. Field evaluations over a year were conducted in an endemic area of leishmaniasis in the state of Quintana Roo, Mexico. A randomized-block design was implemented in study area with tropical rainforest vegetation. The study design utilized 4 transects with 11 trap types: 1) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) light trap with incandescent bulb (CDC-I), 2) CDC light trap with blue light-emitting diodes (LEDs) (CDC-B), 3) CDC light trap with white LEDs (CDC-W), 4) CDC light trap with red LEDs (CDC-R), 5) CDC light trap with green LEDs (CDC-G), 6) Disney trap, 7) Disney trap with white LEDs, 8) sticky panels, 9) sticky panels with white LEDs, 10) delta-like trap, and 11) delta-like trap with white LEDs. A total of 1,014 specimens of 13 species and 2 genera (Lutzomyia and Brumptomyia) were collected. There were significant differences in the mean number of sand flies caught with the 11 traps; CDC-I was (P  =  0.0000) more effective than the other traps. Other traps exhibited the following results: CDC-W (17.46%), CDC-B (15.68%), CDC-G (14.89%), and CDC-R (14.30%). The relative abundance of different species varied according to trap types used, and the CDC-I trap attracted more specimens of the known vectors of Leishmania spp., such as like Lutzomyia cruciata, Lu. shannoni, and Lu. ovallesi. Disney trap captured more specimens of Lu. olmeca olmeca. Based on abundance and number of species, CDC light traps and Disney traps appeared to be good candidates for use in vector surveillance programs in this endemic area of Mexico. PMID:27280348

  1. Comparative Field Evaluation of Different Traps for Collecting Adult Phlebotomine Sand Flies (Diptera: Psychodidae) in an Endemic Area of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Quintana Roo, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Rojas, Jorge J; Arque-Chunga, Wilfredo; Fernández-Salas, Ildefonso; Rebollar-Téllez, Eduardo A

    2016-06-01

    Phlebotominae are the vectors of Leishmania parasites. It is important to have available surveillance and collection methods for the sand fly vectors. The objectives of the present study were to evaluate and compare traps for the collection of sand fly species and to analyze trap catches along months and transects. Field evaluations over a year were conducted in an endemic area of leishmaniasis in the state of Quintana Roo, Mexico. A randomized-block design was implemented in study area with tropical rainforest vegetation. The study design utilized 4 transects with 11 trap types: 1) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) light trap with incandescent bulb (CDC-I), 2) CDC light trap with blue light-emitting diodes (LEDs) (CDC-B), 3) CDC light trap with white LEDs (CDC-W), 4) CDC light trap with red LEDs (CDC-R), 5) CDC light trap with green LEDs (CDC-G), 6) Disney trap, 7) Disney trap with white LEDs, 8) sticky panels, 9) sticky panels with white LEDs, 10) delta-like trap, and 11) delta-like trap with white LEDs. A total of 1,014 specimens of 13 species and 2 genera (Lutzomyia and Brumptomyia) were collected. There were significant differences in the mean number of sand flies caught with the 11 traps; CDC-I was (P  =  0.0000) more effective than the other traps. Other traps exhibited the following results: CDC-W (17.46%), CDC-B (15.68%), CDC-G (14.89%), and CDC-R (14.30%). The relative abundance of different species varied according to trap types used, and the CDC-I trap attracted more specimens of the known vectors of Leishmania spp., such as like Lutzomyia cruciata, Lu. shannoni, and Lu. ovallesi. Disney trap captured more specimens of Lu. olmeca olmeca. Based on abundance and number of species, CDC light traps and Disney traps appeared to be good candidates for use in vector surveillance programs in this endemic area of Mexico.

  2. 10 CFR 26.95 - Conducting an initial test for alcohol using a breath specimen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Conducting an initial test for alcohol using a breath specimen. 26.95 Section 26.95 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.95 Conducting an initial test for alcohol using a breath specimen. (a)...

  3. 10 CFR 26.111 - Checking the acceptability of the urine specimen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Checking the acceptability of the urine specimen. 26.111 Section 26.111 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.111 Checking the acceptability of the urine specimen. (a) Immediately after the...

  4. Two Australian Fetuses: Frederic Wood Jones and the Work of an Anatomical Specimen.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Lisa; Jones, Ross L

    2015-01-01

    A close analysis of two fetal specimens is used to explore of role of material specimens in anatomical practice of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the significance of Indigenous bodies in that era's quest for an understanding of human difference, and the postcolonial legacies of the global project of creating collections of human specimens.

  5. 10 CFR 26.111 - Checking the acceptability of the urine specimen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Checking the acceptability of the urine specimen. 26.111 Section 26.111 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.111 Checking the acceptability of the urine specimen. (a) Immediately after the...

  6. 10 CFR 26.111 - Checking the acceptability of the urine specimen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Checking the acceptability of the urine specimen. 26.111 Section 26.111 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.111 Checking the acceptability of the urine specimen. (a) Immediately after the...

  7. 10 CFR 26.111 - Checking the acceptability of the urine specimen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Checking the acceptability of the urine specimen. 26.111 Section 26.111 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.111 Checking the acceptability of the urine specimen. (a) Immediately after the...

  8. 10 CFR 26.111 - Checking the acceptability of the urine specimen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Checking the acceptability of the urine specimen. 26.111 Section 26.111 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.111 Checking the acceptability of the urine specimen. (a) Immediately after the...

  9. Collective Efficacy and Adult Community: Teacher and Principal Perceptions after Two Years of Implementing "Leading Together" in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paxton, Carol L. C.; Leis, Micela; Rimm-Kaufman, Sara E.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a mixed-methods pilot study that was conducted in collaboration with the developers of a new adult community-building intervention called "Leading Together" (LT), which focuses on strengthening relational trust among staff. The primary research focus of the collaboration was to gather and share descriptive…

  10. Utility of Multiple-Stool-Specimen Ova and Parasite Examinations in a High-Prevalence Setting

    PubMed Central

    Cartwright, Charles P.

    1999-01-01

    A retrospective analysis of the results of 2,704 ova and parasite (O & P) examinations performed on stool specimens collected from 1,374 patients between October 1996 and September 1997 was performed to evaluate the utility of performing O & P examinations on multiple, independently collected stool specimens in a high-prevalence setting. A total of 995 specimens (36.8%) examined during the study contained parasites; 546 (20.2%) contained pathogenic organisms. The positivity rate (54.5%) for the patients from whom three specimens were examined was significantly higher than for the patients from whom either two specimens (33.3%) or a single specimen (19.8%) was submitted for examination. For the group of patients from whom at least 3 specimens were submitted for O & P examination, 373 independent opportunities for diagnosing infection with intestinal parasites could be analyzed. The first stool specimen collected proved to be adequate in only 75.9% (283 of 373) of evaluated cases; however, examination of two specimens increased the sensitivity of O & P detection to 92% (343 of 373). The third specimen collected provided additional information on only 30 of 373 occasions (8%). These data indicate that in populations with a high prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections, two independently collected stool specimens should be subjected to O & P examination to ensure adequate diagnostic sensitivity. PMID:10405376

  11. A Biorepository for Ophthalmic Surgical Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Skeie, Jessica M.; Tsang, Stephen H.; Zande, Ryan Vande; Fickbohm, Macy M.; Shah, Shaival S.; Vallone, John G.; Mahajan, Vinit B.

    2014-01-01

    Biorepositories are collections of surgically obtained human tissues for current and future investigations of disease mechanisms, therapeutics, and diagnostics. In ophthalmology, a critical challenge is how to interface the operating room with the laboratory. To attain standards required for basic research, clinical and research teams must cooperate to collect, annotate, and store specimens that yield consistent results required for advanced molecular techniques. We developed an efficient platform for obtaining vitreous and other eye tissues from the operating room and transferring them to the lab. The platform includes a mobile lab cart for on-site tissue processing, a multi-user, web-based database for point-of-care phenotypic capture, and an integrated data tracking system for long-term storage. These biorepository instruments have proven essential for our studies in ophthalmic disease proteomics. This system can be implemented in other operating rooms and laboratories for a variety of biological tissues. PMID:24115637

  12. Search for biological specimens from midwestern parks: pitfalls and solutions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bennett, J.P.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the results of searches of herbarium and museum collections and databases for records of vertebrate and vascular plant specimens that had been collected in 15 midwestern National Park System units. The records of these specimens were previously unknown to the National Park Service (NPS). In the course of our searches, numerous obstacles were encountered that prevented us from fully completing our task. These ranged from difficulties with the way databases are structured, to poor record-keeping, to incomplete or incorrect information on the actual location of specimens within collections. Despite these problems, we are convinced that the information to be gained from such searches in invaluable, and we believe that our experience, and the recommendations we offer, may well prove instructive to others undertaking this kind of work.

  13. Bird specimens and documentation: critical data for a critical resource

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, M.S.; Cannell, P.

    1990-01-01

    As governments impose increasingly stringent regulations on the collection of bird specimens and as man alters ever greater areas of habitat with the loss of many of their contained species, museum specimens increase immeasurably in importance. Yet at present, museum collections do not contain an adequate representation of the world's avifauna and, unfortunately, are not likely to do so. Thus, it is imperative that data associated with specimens that are obtained be as complete as possible. To this end, we describe categories of information with wide application to many types of studies, outline character states, and recommend standard forms of data notation. We recognize that under certain circumstances, it may be appropriate to record more limited data. However, we encourage at least those engaged in general collecting to record as many of these standard data as possible.

  14. Behavior and movement of adult summer steelhead following collection and release, lower Cowlitz River, Washington, 2012--2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kock, Tobias J.; Liedtke, Theresa L.; Ekstrom, Brian K.; Rondorf, Dennis W.; Gleizes, Chris; Dammers, Wolf; Gibson, Scott; Murphy, Jamie

    2013-01-01

    Historically, adult summer steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss returning to hatcheries on the lower Cowlitz River were sometimes transported and released in the river (recycled) to provide additional angling opportunity for the popular sport fishery in the basin. However, this practice has not been used in recent years because of concerns associated with interactions between hatchery fish and wild fish. Fishery managers were interested in resuming recycling but lacked information regarding effects of this practice on wild steelhead so we conducted a study during 2012–2013 to: (1) enumerate recycled steelhead that returned to the hatchery or were removed by anglers; and (2) determine if steelhead that were not removed from the river remained in the system where they could interact with wild fish. During June–August 2012, a total of 549 summer steelhead were captured at the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery, tagged, and released downstream near the Interstate 5 Bridge. All recycled steelhead were tagged with a white Floy® tag and opercle-punched; 109 (20 percent) of these fish also were radio-tagged. All adult steelhead that return to the hatchery were handled by hatchery staff so recycled steelhead that returned to the hatchery were enumerated daily. A creel survey and voluntary angler reports were used to determine the number of recycled steelhead that were caught by anglers. We established three fixed telemetry monitoring sites on the mainstem Cowlitz River and eight additional sites were deployed on tributaries to the lower Cowlitz River where wild winter steelhead are known to spawn. We also conducted mobile tracking from a boat during October 2012, November 2012, and January 2013 to locate radio-tagged fish. A total of 10,722 summer steelhead were captured at the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery in 2012, which was the largest return since 2008. River flows during much of the study period were similar to 2008–2011 average flows, however, high-flow periods in July and November

  15. No detection of severe Fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus from ixodid ticks collected in seoul.

    PubMed

    Ham, Heejin; Jo, Sukju; Jang, Jungim; Choi, Sungmin

    2014-04-01

    Larvae, nymphs, and adult stages of 3 species of ixodid ticks were collected by tick drag methods in Seoul during June-October 2013, and their infection status with severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) virus was examined using RT-PCR. During the period, 732 Haemaphysalis longicornis, 62 Haemaphysalis flava, and 2 Ixodes nipponensis specimens were collected. Among the specimens of H. longicornis, the number of female adults, male adults, nymphs, and larvae were 53, 11, 240, and 446, respectively. Ticks were grouped into 63 pools according to the collection site, species, and developmental stage, and assayed for SFTS virus. None of the pools of ticks were found to be positive for SFTS virus gene.

  16. Appendix A: Specimen 72275 documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marvin, U. B.

    1974-01-01

    The friability of the matrix of specimen 72275 caused numerous fragments and an abundance of fines to break away from the main mass during transport from the moon and handling in the lunar receiving laboratory. Samples 72275,1 to 72275,14 were labeled during PET examination. Samples 72275,1, 4, 6, 7, 8, and 9 were placed in storage, and the remainder were distributed.

  17. Operation, Maintenance and Evaluation of the Bonifer and Minthorn Springs Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facilities, 1988 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Lofy, Peter T.

    1989-12-01

    The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife are cooperating in a joint effort to increase steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As part of this program, Bonifer and Minthorn Acclimation Facilities are operated for holding adult steelhead and acclimation and release of juvenile steelhead and salmon. This report details the projects and maintenance done during 1988.

  18. Operation, Maintenance, and Evaluation of the Bonifer and Minthorn Springs Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facilities, 1987 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Lofy, Peter T.

    1988-12-01

    The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife are cooperating in a joint effort to increase steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As part of this program, Bonifer and Minthorn Acclimation Facilities are operated for holding adult steelhead and acclimation and release of juvenile steelhead and salmon. This report details the projects and maintenance done during 1987.

  19. [Anatomical specimens and surgical instruments in old Dresden].

    PubMed

    Klimpel, Volker

    2009-01-01

    Passionate collectors of anatomical specimens, curiosities and surgical instruments the electors of Saxony between 1560 and 1748 founded great collections of this matter. They struggled for knowledge of nature, of the human body and of diseases. The exhibits were used by members of the court, by citizens and by the students of the first surgical school of Dresden, the Collegium medico-chirurgicum, and its successor. A selection of human and animal bones, fetuses, specimens in alcohol, abnormalities and medical instruments are described by original papers. The whole collection of preparations and old instruments was lost by being given away, fire and wars.

  20. Eccentric loading of microtensile specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trapp, Mark A.

    2004-01-01

    Ceramic materials have a lower density than most metals and are capable of performing at extremely high temperatures. The utility of these materials is obvious; however, the fracture strength of brittle materials is not easily predicted and often varies greatly. Characteristically, brittle materials lack ductility and do not yield as other materials. Ceramics materials are naturally populated with microscopic cracks due to fabrication techniques. Upon application of a load, stress concentration occurs at the root of these cracks and fracture will eventually occur at some not easily predicted strength. In order to use ceramics in any application some design methodology must exist from which a component can be placed into service. This design methodology is CARES/LIFE (Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures) which has been developed and refined at NASA over the last several decades. The CARES/LIFE computer program predicts the probability of failure of a ceramic component over its service life. CARES combines finite element results from a commercial FE (finite element) package such as ANSYS and experimental results to compute the abovementioned probability of failure. Over the course of several tests CARES has had great success in predicting the life of various ceramic components and has been used throughout industry. The latest challenge is to verify that CARES is valid for MEMS (Micro-Electro Mechanical Systems). To investigate a series of microtensile specimens were fractured in the laboratory. From this data, material parameters were determined and used to predict a distribution of strength for other specimens that exhibit a known stress concentration. If the prediction matches the experimental results then these parameters can be applied to a desired component outside of the laboratory. During testing nearly half of the tensile Specimens fractured at a location that was not expected and hence not captured in the FE model. It has been my duty

  1. Isolation of Bacillus cereus in the feces of healthy adults in Taipei City.

    PubMed

    Yea, C L; Lee, C L; Pan, T M; Horng, C B

    1994-08-01

    Fecal specimens from 100 healthy adults were collected and examined for the presence of Bacillus cereus which has been associated with 28% of the outbreaks of food poisoning on Taiwan within the last 3 years. Total isolate rate from these specimens was 8%. Variations in isolation rates were found not only in sexes, but also in different age-groups. Therefore, presence of B. cereus in the feces of healthy adults may be unpredictable and relate to foods consumed or to other factors. Obviously, an isolation rate of B. cereus as high as 30% during the outbreak investigation is still not a strong evidence to implicate this organism as an etiological agent.

  2. Multiphoton microspectroscopy of biological specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Bai-Ling; Kao, Fu-Jen; Cheng, Ping C.; Sun, Chi-Kuang; Chen, RangWu; Wang, YiMin; Chen, JianCheng; Wang, Yung-Shun; Liu, Tzu-Ming; Huang, Mao-Kuo

    2000-07-01

    The non-linear nature of multi-photon fluorescence excitation restricts the fluorescing volume to the vicinity of the focal point. As a result, the technology has the capacity for micro- spectroscopy of biological specimen at high spatial resolution. Chloroplasts in mesophyll protoplast of Arabidopsis thaliana and maize stem sections were used to demonstrate the feasibility of multi-photon fluorescence micro-spectroscopy at subcellular compartments. Time-lapse spectral recording provides a means for studying the response of cell organelles to high intensity illumination.

  3. 49 CFR Appendix D to Part 40 - Report Format: Split Specimen Failure To Reconfirm

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    .... The following items are required on each report: 1. MRO name, address, phone number, and fax number. 2. Collection site name, address, and phone number. 3. Date of collection. 4. Specimen I.D. number. 5. Laboratory accession number. 6. Primary specimen laboratory name, address, and phone number. 7. Date...

  4. 49 CFR Appendix D to Part 40 - Report Format: Split Specimen Failure To Reconfirm

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    .... The following items are required on each report: 1. MRO name, address, phone number, and fax number. 2. Collection site name, address, and phone number. 3. Date of collection. 4. Specimen I.D. number. 5. Laboratory accession number. 6. Primary specimen laboratory name, address, and phone number. 7. Date...

  5. 49 CFR Appendix D to Part 40 - Report Format: Split Specimen Failure To Reconfirm

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    .... The following items are required on each report: 1. MRO name, address, phone number, and fax number. 2. Collection site name, address, and phone number. 3. Date of collection. 4. Specimen I.D. number. 5. Laboratory accession number. 6. Primary specimen laboratory name, address, and phone number. 7. Date...

  6. 49 CFR 219.205 - Specimen collection and handling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CONTROL OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE Post-Accident Toxicological Testing..., marked, preserved, handled, and made available to FRA consistent with the requirements of this...

  7. 49 CFR 219.205 - Specimen collection and handling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CONTROL OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE Post-Accident Toxicological Testing..., marked, preserved, handled, and made available to FRA consistent with the requirements of this...

  8. Collection of a 24-Hour Urine Specimen (Beyond the Basics)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Licensed Materials from any location via the Internet. b. STANDALONE WORKSTATION: A standalone subscription permits multiple ... computer. A Standalone Workstation license does not include Internet access to the Licensed Materials. c. INSTITUTIONAL SUBSCRIPTION: ...

  9. 49 CFR 40.65 - What does the collector check for when the employee presents a specimen?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., you must discard the original specimen, unless another problem (i.e., temperature out of range, signs... reading the temperature strip attached to the collection container. (3) If the specimen temperature...

  10. DEVEOPMENT OF A PERFORMANCE SPECIMEN CHECK LIST FOR MACHINING PERSONNEL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BOSTOCK, D.J.

    A MODIFIED CRITICAL INCIDENT PERFORMANCE EVALUATION FORM FOR HOURLY MACHINING PERSONNEL WAS DEVELOPED, AND CERTAIN RATER AND RATING INSTRUMENT CHARACTERISTICS WERE INVESTIGATED FROM THE STANDPOINT OF THEIR EFFECTS ON THE VARIANCE OF PERFORMANCE. INTERVIEWS WERE CONDUCTED WITH FRONTLINE FOREMEN TO COLLECT PERFORMANCE SPECIMENS WHICH WERE EVALUATED…

  11. The International Environmental Specimen Banks--let's get visible.

    PubMed

    Küster, Anette; Becker, Paul R; Kucklick, John R; Pugh, Rebecca S; Koschorreck, Jan

    2015-02-01

    Environmental specimen banks (ESBs) are facilities that archive samples from the environment for future research and monitoring purposes. In addition, the long-term preservation of representative specimens is an important complement to environmental research and monitoring. Today, environmental specimen banking is experiencing a renaissance due to an increase in regulatory interest in ESB biota standards and trend data. The International Environmental Specimen Bank Group (IESB) promotes the worldwide development of techniques and strategies of environmental specimen banking and the international cooperation and collaboration among national ESBs. In order to provide a current and comprehensive overview on international environmental specimen banking activities, a questionnaire was sent to the national ESBs and asked for detailed information on the respective ESBs. The results show the rich diversity of national sampling programs, including more detailed information on archived samples, sampling strategies, and studies that have already been performed in the respective countries. All ESBs completing the survey expressed a strong interest in cooperating with other ESBs on a collaborative project. The collected information of national ESBs is intended to be made publicly available. PMID:24390116

  12. Compressive behaviour of child and adult cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Öhman, Caroline; Baleani, Massimiliano; Pani, Carla; Taddei, Fulvia; Alberghini, Marco; Viceconti, Marco; Manfrini, Marco

    2011-10-01

    In this study, cortical bone tissue from children was investigated. It is extremely difficult to obtain human child tissue. Therefore, the only possibility was to use bone tissue, free from any lesion, collected from young bone cancer patients. The compressive mechanical behaviour of child bone tissue was compared to the behaviour of adult tissue. Moreover, two hypotheses were tested: 1) that the mechanical behaviour of both groups is correlated to ash density; 2) that yield strain is an invariant. Small parts of the diaphysis of femora or tibiae from 12 children (4-15 years) and 12 adults (22-61 years) were collected. Cylindrical specimens were extracted from the cortical wall along the longitudinal axis of the diaphysis. A total of 107 specimens underwent compressive testing (strain rate: 0.1 s(-1)). Only the specimens showing a regular load-displacement curve (94) were considered valid and thereafter reduced to ash. It was found that the child bone tissue had significant lower compressive Young's modulus (-34%), yield stress (-38%), ultimate stress (-33%) and ash density (-17%) than the adult tissue. Conversely, higher compressive ultimate strain was found in the child group (+24%). Despite specimens extracted from both children and adults, ash density largely described the variation in tissue strength and stiffness (R(2)=in the range of 0.86-0.91). Furthermore, yield strain seemed to be roughly an invariant to subject age and tissue density. These results confirm that the mechanical properties of child cortical bone tissue are different from that of adult tissue. However, such differences are correlated to differences in tissue ash density. In fact, ash density was found to be a good predictor of strength and stiffness, also for cortical bone collected from children. Finally, the present findings support the hypothesis that compressive yield strain is an invariant.

  13. 50 CFR 14.24 - Scientific specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... or 23 of this subchapter, dead, preserved, dried, or embedded scientific specimens or parts thereof... international mail system. Provided, that this exception will not apply to any specimens or parts thereof...

  14. 50 CFR 14.24 - Scientific specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... or 23 of this subchapter, dead, preserved, dried, or embedded scientific specimens or parts thereof... international mail system. Provided, that this exception will not apply to any specimens or parts thereof...

  15. 50 CFR 14.24 - Scientific specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... or 23 of this subchapter, dead, preserved, dried, or embedded scientific specimens or parts thereof... international mail system. Provided, that this exception will not apply to any specimens or parts thereof...

  16. 50 CFR 14.24 - Scientific specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... or 23 of this subchapter, dead, preserved, dried, or embedded scientific specimens or parts thereof... international mail system. Provided, that this exception will not apply to any specimens or parts thereof...

  17. Testing Biopsy and Cytology Specimens for Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Testing Biopsy and Cytology Specimens for Cancer Download Printable Version [ ... on the topics below to get started. Testing Biopsy and Cytology Specimens for Cancer How is cancer ...

  18. Evaluation of specimen preservatives for DNA analyses of bees

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frampton, M.; Droege, S.; Conrad, T.; Prager, S.; Richards, M.H.

    2008-01-01

    Large-scale insect collecting efforts that are facilitated by the use of pan traps result in large numbers of specimens being collected. Storage of these specimens can be problematic if space and equipment are limited. In this study, we investigated the effects of various preservatives (alcohol solutions and DMSO) on the amount and quality of DNA extracted from bees (specifically Halictidae, Apidae, and Andrenidae). In addition, we examined the amount and quality of DNA obtained from bee specimens killed and stored at -80 degrees C and from specimens stored for up to 24 years in ethanol. DNA quality was measured in terms of how well it could be PCR-amplified using a set of mitochondrial primers that are commonly used in insect molecular systematics. Overall the best methods of preservation were ultra-cold freezing and dimethyl sulfoxide, but these are both expensive and in the case of ultra-cold freezing, somewhat impractical for field entomologists. Additionally, dimethyl sulfoxide was shown to have adverse effects on morphological characters that are typically used for identification to the level of species. We therefore recommend that the best alternative is 95% ethanol, as it preserves bee specimens well for both morphological and molecular studies.

  19. Prevalence of tick-borne pathogens in adult Dermacentor spp. ticks from nine collection sites in France.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, S; de la Fuente, J; Nicollet, P; Liu, X; Madani, N; Blanchard, B; Maingourd, C; Alongi, A; Torina, A; Fernández de Mera, I G; Vicente, J; George, J-C; Vayssier-Taussat, M; Joncour, G

    2013-04-01

    The importance of Dermacentor spp. in the transmission of tick-borne pathogens is not well recognized in Europe. To investigate the role of Dermacentor spp. in the transmission of tick-borne pathogens, questing ticks were collected in 9 sites from southern to northwestern France (Camargue Delta to Eastern Brittany) where Dermacentor spp. exist and tick-borne diseases had occurred previously. Three tick species were collected during the spring and autumn of 2009. Collected ticks (both males and females) included D. marginatus (n=377), D. reticulatus (n=74), and I. ricinus (n=45). All ticks were analyzed by PCR or reverse line blot for the presence of pathogens' DNA. Pathogens analyzed were based on veterinarian reports and included Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Coxiella burnetii, Anaplasma marginale, Borrelia burgdorferi, Bartonella spp., Babesia spp., Theileria spp., and Francisella sp. Francisella tularensis was not detected in any of the analyzed ticks. In D. marginatus, infection prevalence for A. phagocytophilum (3%) was similar to that found in I. ricinus in Europe. Other pathogens present in D. marginatus included A. marginale (0.5%), Bartonella spp. (9%), C. burnetii (12%), F. philomiragia (1.3%), and Theileria annulata/Babesia bovis (0.3%), which were detected for the first time in France. Pathogens detected in D. reticulatus included A. marginale (1%), Bartonella spp. (12%), C. burnetii (16%), Borrelia spp. (1.5%), and F. philomiragia (19%). Pathogens detected in I. ricinus included A. phagocytophilum (41%), Bartonella spp. (9%), C. burnetii (18%), A. marginale (1%), Borrelia spp. (4.5%), and Babesia sp. (7%). This study represents the first epidemiological approach to characterize tick-borne pathogens infecting Dermacentor spp. in France and that may be transmitted by ticks from this genus. Further experiments using experimental infections and transmission may be now conducted to analyze vector competency of Dermacentor spp. for these pathogens and to

  20. 10 CFR 26.135 - Split specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Split specimens. 26.135 Section 26.135 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Licensee Testing Facilities § 26.135 Split specimens. (a) If the FFD program follows split-specimen procedures, as described in § 26.113, the licensee...

  1. Apparatus for automated testing of biological specimens

    DOEpatents

    Layne, Scott P.; Beugelsdijk, Tony J.

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus for performing automated testing of infections biological specimens is disclosed. The apparatus comprise a process controller for translating user commands into test instrument suite commands, and a test instrument suite comprising a means to treat the specimen to manifest an observable result, and a detector for measuring the observable result to generate specimen test results.

  2. 10 CFR 26.135 - Split specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Split specimens. 26.135 Section 26.135 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Licensee Testing Facilities § 26.135 Split specimens. (a) If the FFD program follows split-specimen procedures, as described in § 26.113, the licensee...

  3. 10 CFR 26.135 - Split specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Split specimens. 26.135 Section 26.135 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Licensee Testing Facilities § 26.135 Split specimens. (a) If the FFD program follows split-specimen procedures, as described in § 26.113, the licensee...

  4. 10 CFR 26.135 - Split specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Split specimens. 26.135 Section 26.135 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Licensee Testing Facilities § 26.135 Split specimens. (a) If the FFD program follows split-specimen procedures, as described in § 26.113, the licensee...

  5. The fate of the bird specimens from Cook's voyages possessed by Sir Joseph Banks.

    PubMed

    Medway, David G

    2009-10-01

    Joseph Banks possessed the greater part of the zoological specimens collected on James Cook's three voyages round the world (1768-1780). In early 1792, Banks divided his zoological collection between John Hunter and the British Museum. It is probable that those donations together comprised most of the zoological specimens then in the possession of Banks, including such bird specimens as remained of those that had been collected by himself and Daniel Solander on Cook's first voyage, and those that had been presented to him from Cook's second and third voyages. The bird specimens included in the Banks donations of 1792 became part of a series of transactions during the succeeding 53 years which involved the British Museum, the Royal College of Surgeons of England, and William Bullock. It is a great pity that, of the extensive collection of bird specimens from Cook's voyages once possessed by Banks, only two are known with any certainty to survive.

  6. Characterization of the Bacterial Community Associated with Larvae and Adults of Anoplophora chinensis Collected in Italy by Culture and Culture-Independent Methods

    PubMed Central

    Rizzi, Aurora; Crotti, Elena; Lupi, Daniela; Daffonchio, Daniele

    2013-01-01

    The wood-boring beetle Anoplophora chinensis Forster, native to China, has recently spread to North America and Europe causing serious damage to ornamental and forest trees. The gut microbial community associated with these xylophagous beetles is of interest for potential biotechnological applications in lignocellulose degradation and development of pest-control measures. In this study the gut bacterial community of larvae and adults of A. chinensis, collected from different host trees in North Italy, was investigated by both culture and culture-independent methods. Larvae and adults harboured a moderately diverse bacterial community, dominated by Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Firmicutes. The gammaproteobacterial family Enterobacteriaceae (genera Gibbsiella, Enterobacter, Raoultella, and Klebsiella) was the best represented. The abundance of such bacteria in the insect gut is likely due to the various metabolic abilities of Enterobacteriaceae, including fermentation of carbohydrates derived from lignocellulose degradation and contribution to nitrogen intake by nitrogen-fixing activity. In addition, bacteria previously shown to have some lignocellulose-degrading activity were detected at a relatively low level in the gut. These bacteria possibly act synergistically with endogenous and fungal enzymes in lignocellulose breakdown. The detection of actinobacterial symbionts could be explained by a possible role in the detoxification of secondary plant metabolites and/or protection against pathogens. PMID:24069601

  7. Pathogenesis and epidemiology of Brucellosis in Yellowstone bison: serologic and culture results from adult females and their offspring

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this prospective study was to follow the natural course of Brucella abortus infection in cohorts of seropositive and seronegative female bison and their offspring in Yellowstone National Park over a 5 year period. Specimens were collected from 53 adult, female bison at least once a...

  8. The type specimens of Hekstra's owl

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Browning, M.R.

    1989-01-01

    Twenty-four new subspecies of New World owls of the genus Otus were named in a paper by Hekstra (1982b) issued 17 December 1982. These same new names also appeared in Hekstra's (1982a) unpublished thesis. The holotypes of the new taxa are in 10 different collections, most of which are in the United States. Incorrect information was published with regard to museum designation, museum number, and collecting locality of many of the holotypes. I here list the holotypes with their correct specimen label data. The species names are here presented in the sequence proposed by Marshall & King (1988). The subspecies are generally arranged from north to south. The type localities given are standardized, and the spellings are corrected where required. Abbreviations for museum designations are given under acknowledgments. The numbers following the names refer to the pages where the descriptions were given (Hekstra 1982b). Several of the scientific names proposed were spelled incorrectly and these have been emended in accord with Article 31c and Appendix D of the International Code (International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature 1985). Taxonomic comments are appended for a small number of Hekstra's proposed taxa. The remaining forms he named require further study.

  9. ARCTOS: a relational database relating specimens, specimen-based science, and archival documentation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jarrell, Gordon H.; Ramotnik, Cindy A.; McDonald, D.L.

    2010-01-01

    Data are preserved when they are perpetually discoverable, but even in the Information Age, discovery of legacy data appropriate to particular investigations is uncertain. Secure Internet storage is necessary but insufficient. Data can be discovered only when they are adequately described, and visibility increases markedly if the data are related to other data that are receiving usage. Such relationships can be built within (1) the framework of a relational database, or (1) they can be built among separate resources, within the framework of the Internet. Evolving primarily around biological collections, Arctos is a database that does both of these tasks. It includes data structures for a diversity of specimen attributes, essentially all collection-management tasks, plus literature citations, project descriptions, etc. As a centralized collaboration of several university museums, Arctos is an ideal environment for capitalizing on the many relationships that often exist between items in separate collections. Arctos is related to NIH’s DNA-sequence repository (GenBank) with record-to-record reciprocal linkages, and it serves data to several discipline-specific web portals, including the Global Biodiversity Information Network (GBIF). The University of Alaska Museum’s paleontological collection is Arctos’s recent extension beyond the constraints of neontology. With about 1.3 million cataloged items, additional collections are being added each year.

  10. Relationship between salt consumption measured by 24-h urine collection and blood pressure in the adult population of Vitória (Brazil)

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, S.L.; Souza, P.R.; Pimentel, E.B.; Baldo, M.P.; Malta, D.C.; Mill, J.G.; Szwarcwald, C.L.

    2015-01-01

    High salt intake is related to an increase in blood pressure and development of hypertension. However, currently, there are no national representative data in Brazil using the gold standard method of 24-h urine collection to measure sodium consumption. This study aimed to determine salt intake based on 24-h urine collection in a sample of 272 adults of both genders and to correlate it with blood pressure levels. We used a rigorous protocol to assure an empty bladder prior to initiating urine collection. We excluded subjects with a urine volume <500 mL, collection period outside of an interval of 23-25 h, and subjects with creatinine excretion that was not within the range of 14.4-33.6 mg/kg (men) and 10.8-25.2 mg/kg (women). The mean salt intake was 10.4±4.1 g/day (d), and 94% of the participants (98% of men and 90% of women) ingested more than the recommended level of 5 g/d. We found a positive association between salt and body mass index (BMI) categories, as well as with salt and blood pressure, independent of age and BMI. The difference in systolic blood pressure reached 13 mmHg between subjects consuming less than 6 g/d of salt and those ingesting more than 18 g/d. Subjects with hypertension had a higher estimated salt intake than normotensive subjects (11.4±5.0 vs 9.8±3.6 g/d, P<0.01), regardless of whether they were under treatment. Our data indicate the need for interventions to reduce sodium intake, as well the need for ongoing, appropriate monitoring of salt consumption in the general population. PMID:26132095

  11. Behavior and movement of adult summer steelhead following collection and release, lower Cowlitz River, Washington, 2012--2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kock, Tobias J.; Liedtke, Theresa L.; Ekstrom, Brian K.; Rondorf, Dennis W.; Gleizes, Chris; Dammers, Wolf; Gibson, Scott; Murphy, Jamie

    2013-01-01

    Historically, adult summer steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss returning to hatcheries on the lower Cowlitz River were sometimes transported and released in the river (recycled) to provide additional angling opportunity for the popular sport fishery in the basin. However, this practice has not been used in recent years because of concerns associated with interactions between hatchery fish and wild fish. Fishery managers were interested in resuming recycling but lacked information regarding effects of this practice on wild steelhead so we conducted a study during 2012–2013 to: (1) enumerate recycled steelhead that returned to the hatchery or were removed by anglers; and (2) determine if steelhead that were not removed from the river remained in the system where they could interact with wild fish. During June–August 2012, a total of 549 summer steelhead were captured at the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery, tagged, and released downstream near the Interstate 5 Bridge. All recycled steelhead were tagged with a white Floy® tag and opercle-punched; 109 (20 percent) of these fish also were radio-tagged. All adult steelhead that return to the hatchery were handled by hatchery staff so recycled steelhead that returned to the hatchery were enumerated daily. A creel survey and voluntary angler reports were used to determine the number of recycled steelhead that were caught by anglers. We established three fixed telemetry monitoring sites on the mainstem Cowlitz River and eight additional sites were deployed on tributaries to the lower Cowlitz River where wild winter steelhead are known to spawn. We also conducted mobile tracking from a boat during October 2012, November 2012, and January 2013 to locate radio-tagged fish. A total of 10,722 summer steelhead were captured at the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery in 2012, which was the largest return since 2008. River flows during much of the study period were similar to 2008–2011 average flows, however, high-flow periods in July and November

  12. The SmokefreeTXT (SFTXT) Study: Web and Mobile Data Collection to Evaluate Smoking Cessation for Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Derick; Parvanta, Sarah; Dolina, Suzanne; Kelly, Bridget; Dever, Jill; Southwell, Brian G; Sanders, Amy; Augustson, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Background Text messaging (short message service, SMS) has been shown to be effective in delivering interventions for various diseases and health conditions, including smoking cessation. While there are many published studies regarding smoking cessation text messaging interventions, most do not provide details about the study’s operational methods. As a result, there is a gap in our understanding of how best to design studies of smoking cessation text messaging programs. Objective The purpose of this paper is to detail the operational methods used to conduct a randomized trial comparing three different versions of the National Cancer Institute’s SmokefreeText (SFTXT) program, designed for smokers 18 to 29 years of age. We detail our methods for recruiting participants from the Internet, reducing fraud, conducting online data collection, and retaining panel study participants. Methods Participants were recruited through website advertisements and market research online panels. Screening questions established eligibility for the study (eg, 18 to 29 years of age, current smoker). Antifraud measures screened out participants who could not meet the study requirements. After completing a baseline survey, participants were randomized to one of three study arms, which varied by type and timing of text message delivery. The study offered US $20 gift cards as incentives to complete each of four follow-up surveys. Automated email reminders were sent at designated intervals to increase response rates. Researchers also provided telephone reminders to those who had not completed the survey after multiple email reminders. We calculated participation rates across study arms and compared the final sample characteristics to the Current Population Survey to examine generalizability. Results Recruitment methods drove 153,936 unique visitors to the SFTXT Study landing page and 27,360 began the screener. Based on the screening questions, 15,462 out of 27,360 responders (56.51%) were

  13. A dengue vector surveillance by human population-stratified ovitrap survey for Aedes (Diptera: Culicidae) adult and egg collections in high dengue-risk areas of Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huai-Hui; Wang, Chih-Yuan; Teng, Hwa-Jen; Lin, Cheo; Lu, Liang-Chen; Jian, Shu-Wan; Chang, Niann-Tai; Wen, Tzai-Hung; Wu, Jhy-Wen; Liu, Ding-Ping; Lin, Li-Jen; Norris, Douglas E; Wu, Ho-Sheng

    2013-03-01

    Aedes aegypti L. is the primary dengue vector in southern Taiwan. This article is the first report on a large-scale surveillance program to study the spatial-temporal distribution of the local Ae. aegytpi population using ovitraps stratified according to the human population in high dengue-risk areas. The sampling program was conducted for 1 yr and was based on weekly collections of eggs and adults in Kaohsiung City. In total, 10,380 ovitraps were placed in 5,190 households. Paired ovitraps, one indoors and one outdoors were used per 400 people. Three treatments in these ovitraps (paddle-shaped wooden sticks, sticky plastic, or both) were assigned by stratified random sampling to two areas (i.e., metropolitan or rural, respectively). We found that the sticky plastic alone had a higher sensitivity for detecting the occurrence of indigenous dengue cases than other treatments with time lags of up to 14 wk. The wooden paddle alone detected the oviposition of Ae. aegypti throughout the year in this study area. Furthermore, significantly more Ae. aegypti females were collected indoors than outdoors. Therefore, our survey identified the whole year oviposition activity, spatial-temporal distribution of the local Ae. aegypti population and a 14 wk lag correlation with dengue incidence to plan an effectively proactive control. PMID:23540112

  14. A scanning electron microscopy specimen holder for viewing different angles of a single specimen.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Hans

    2010-12-01

    The specimen holder for scanning electron microscopy described herein allows a single specimen to be examined in any possible view and significantly improves object illumination. The specimen is glued to a fine pin and flexibly mounted on a double-sided adhesive conductive pad on a rotatable pivot. A milled pot placed beneath the specimen acts as an electron trap. This provides a homogeneous black image background by minimizing noisy signals from the specimen's surroundings. PMID:20196104

  15. 10 CFR 26.97 - Conducting an initial test for alcohol using a specimen of oral fluids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Conducting an initial test for alcohol using a specimen of oral fluids. 26.97 Section 26.97 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.97 Conducting an initial test for alcohol using a specimen of...

  16. Isolation of endothelial colony-forming cells from blood samples collected from the jugular and cephalic veins of healthy adult horses.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Ashley N; Seeto, Wen J; Winter, Randolph L; Zhong, Qiao; Lipke, Elizabeth A; Wooldridge, Anne A

    2016-10-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate optimal isolation of endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) from peripheral blood of horses. SAMPLE Jugular and cephalic venous blood samples from 17 adult horses. PROCEDURES Each blood sample was divided; isolation was performed with whole blood adherence (WBA) and density gradient centrifugation (DGC). Isolated cells were characterized by uptake of 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate-labeled acetylated low-density lipoprotein (DiI-Ac-LDL), vascular tubule formation, and expression of endothelial (CD34, CD105, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, and von Willebrand factor) and hematopoietic (CD14) cell markers by use of indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and flow cytometry. RESULTS Colonies with cobblestone morphology were isolated from 15 of 17 horses. Blood collected from the cephalic vein yielded colonies significantly more often (14/17 horses) than did blood collected from the jugular vein (8/17 horses). Of 14 cephalic blood samples with colonies, 13 were obtained with DGC and 8 with WBA. Of 8 jugular blood samples with colonies, 8 were obtained with DGC and 4 with WBA. Colony frequency (colonies per milliliter of blood) was significantly higher for cephalic blood samples and samples isolated with DGC. Cells formed vascular tubules, had uptake of DiI-Ac-LDL, and expressed endothelial markers by use of IFA and flow cytometry, which confirmed their identity as ECFCs. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Maximum yield of ECFCs was obtained for blood samples collected from both the jugular and cephalic veins and use of DGC to isolate cells. Consistent yield of ECFCs from peripheral blood of horses will enable studies to evaluate diagnostic and therapeutic uses.

  17. Isolation of endothelial colony-forming cells from blood samples collected from the jugular and cephalic veins of healthy adult horses.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Ashley N; Seeto, Wen J; Winter, Randolph L; Zhong, Qiao; Lipke, Elizabeth A; Wooldridge, Anne A

    2016-10-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate optimal isolation of endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) from peripheral blood of horses. SAMPLE Jugular and cephalic venous blood samples from 17 adult horses. PROCEDURES Each blood sample was divided; isolation was performed with whole blood adherence (WBA) and density gradient centrifugation (DGC). Isolated cells were characterized by uptake of 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate-labeled acetylated low-density lipoprotein (DiI-Ac-LDL), vascular tubule formation, and expression of endothelial (CD34, CD105, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, and von Willebrand factor) and hematopoietic (CD14) cell markers by use of indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and flow cytometry. RESULTS Colonies with cobblestone morphology were isolated from 15 of 17 horses. Blood collected from the cephalic vein yielded colonies significantly more often (14/17 horses) than did blood collected from the jugular vein (8/17 horses). Of 14 cephalic blood samples with colonies, 13 were obtained with DGC and 8 with WBA. Of 8 jugular blood samples with colonies, 8 were obtained with DGC and 4 with WBA. Colony frequency (colonies per milliliter of blood) was significantly higher for cephalic blood samples and samples isolated with DGC. Cells formed vascular tubules, had uptake of DiI-Ac-LDL, and expressed endothelial markers by use of IFA and flow cytometry, which confirmed their identity as ECFCs. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Maximum yield of ECFCs was obtained for blood samples collected from both the jugular and cephalic veins and use of DGC to isolate cells. Consistent yield of ECFCs from peripheral blood of horses will enable studies to evaluate diagnostic and therapeutic uses. PMID:27668588

  18. Lost in translation or deliberate falsification? Genetic analyses reveal erroneous museum data for historic penguin specimens.

    PubMed

    Boessenkool, Sanne; Star, Bastiaan; Scofield, R Paul; Seddon, Philip J; Waters, Jonathan M

    2010-04-01

    Historic museum specimens are increasingly used to answer a wide variety of questions in scientific research. Nevertheless, the scientific value of these specimens depends on the authenticity of the data associated with them. Here we use individual-based genetic analyses to demonstrate erroneous locality information for archive specimens from the late nineteenth century. Specifically, using 10 microsatellite markers, we analysed 350 contemporary and 43 historic yellow-eyed penguin (Megadyptes antipodes) specimens from New Zealand's South Island and sub-Antarctic regions. Factorial correspondence analysis and an assignment test strongly suggest that eight of the historic specimens purportedly of sub-Antarctic origin were in fact collected from the South Island. Interestingly, all eight specimens were obtained by the same collector, and all are currently held in the same museum collection. Further inspection of the specimen labels and evaluation of sub-Antarctic voyages did not reveal whether the erroneous data are caused by incorrect labelling or whether deliberate falsification was at play. This study highlights a promising extension to the well-known applications of assignment tests in molecular ecology, which can complement methods that are currently being applied for error detection in specimen data. Our results also serve as a warning to all who use archive specimens to invest time in the verification of collection information.

  19. Alfredo Dugès' type specimens of amphibians and reptiles revisited.

    PubMed

    Flores-Villela, Oscar; Ríos-Muñoz, César A; Magaña-Cota, Gloria E; Quezadas-Tapia, Néstor L

    2016-03-14

    The type specimens of amphibians and reptiles of the Museo de Historia Natural Alfredo Dugès, at the University of Guanajuato (MADUG) were reviewed following Smith & Necker's (1943) summary. Owing to this collection's eventful history and its historical importance as the oldest herpetological collection in Mexico, a review of its conservation status was needed. After many years, the collection has received proper recognition at the University of Guanajuato with a portion of the herpetological types considered "Precious Assets" of the university. We found 34 type specimens pertaining to 18 taxa; six are additional specimens to those previously reported; six herpetological types are missing, including the body of the type of Adelophis copei. All specimens are in good to reasonable condition except for the type of Rhinocheilus antonii, which has dried out completely. All specimens are illustrated to show their condition.

  20. Alfredo Dugès' type specimens of amphibians and reptiles revisited.

    PubMed

    Flores-Villela, Oscar; Ríos-Muñoz, César A; Magaña-Cota, Gloria E; Quezadas-Tapia, Néstor L

    2016-01-01

    The type specimens of amphibians and reptiles of the Museo de Historia Natural Alfredo Dugès, at the University of Guanajuato (MADUG) were reviewed following Smith & Necker's (1943) summary. Owing to this collection's eventful history and its historical importance as the oldest herpetological collection in Mexico, a review of its conservation status was needed. After many years, the collection has received proper recognition at the University of Guanajuato with a portion of the herpetological types considered "Precious Assets" of the university. We found 34 type specimens pertaining to 18 taxa; six are additional specimens to those previously reported; six herpetological types are missing, including the body of the type of Adelophis copei. All specimens are in good to reasonable condition except for the type of Rhinocheilus antonii, which has dried out completely. All specimens are illustrated to show their condition. PMID:27394365

  1. The mammal type specimens at the Natural History Museum, University of Oslo, Norway.

    PubMed

    Wiig, Oystein; Bachmann, Lutz

    2013-11-15

    A catalog of mammalian type specimens in the collections of Natural History Museum, University of Oslo, Norway, is presented. All type specimens in the Museum's mammal collection were revisited and the respective label information was compared with the data provided in the original descriptions. Most taxa were described from type series with no specimen particularly assigned to holotype. The compiled catalog of the type specimens is not intended as a taxonomic revision of the respective taxa, which is why we have not designated lectotypes from the collection's type series. Specimens that were clearly marked as "the type" in the original description were considered holotypes. The catalog consists of 19 taxa, with the year of authority corrected for three taxa.

  2. Estimation of mechanical properties of irradiated nuclear pressure vessel steel by use of subsized CT specimen and small punch specimen

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, X. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Takahashi, H. ); Kodaira, T. )

    1991-11-01

    This paper reports on the 2-1/4 Cr-1M{sub 0} steel that has been selected as the material for the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) of a multipurpose experimental high temperature gas cooled reactor designed by JAERI. The 2-1/4 Cr-1M{sub 0} steel has successful records for high temperature pressure vessels in the petrochemical industries and the ASME Code Case authorizes the use of the steel in these pressure vessels. However, the steel has not been used to nuclear reactor pressure vessels so far. Since the material in the so-called belt line region of the nuclear pressure vessels undergo changes in toughness and strength due to neutron irradiation, it is quite urgent to collect the fracture toughness and strength data of the irradiated steel for the evaluation of the structural intergravity of the reactor pressure vessel of high radiation resistance. In order to study irradiation damage of 2-1/4 Cr-1M{sub 0} steel, small specimens are required because of the severe limitations on specimen size in irradiated-material testing facilities (e.g. the limited space available for testing in nuclear reactors and the narrow damage zone produced by charged particle accelerators). In order to obtain more information about fracture properties of the 2-1/4 Cr- 1M{sub 0} steel from specimens, a subsized compact tensile (CT) specimen, a small punch (SP) specimen and tensile specimen of the irradiated 2-1/4 Cr-1M{sub 0} steel were used to provide radiation effects on fracture toughness, yield strength and ultimate strength. The small punch test, which has been developed recently provides information of the yield and ultimate strength as well as fracture toughness. This report describes the behavior of the neutron irradiation embrittlement of the nuclear reactor pressure vessel steel 2-1/4 Cr-1M{sub 0} by use of new testing approach - subsized specimen techniques.

  3. Nondestructive DNA extraction from museum specimens.

    PubMed

    Hofreiter, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Natural history museums around the world hold millions of animal and plant specimens that are potentially amenable to genetic analyses. With more and more populations and species becoming extinct, the importance of these specimens for phylogenetic and phylogeographic analyses is rapidly increasing. However, as most DNA extraction methods damage the specimens, nondestructive extraction methods are useful to balance the demands of molecular biologists, morphologists, and museum curators. Here, I describe a method for nondestructive DNA extraction from bony specimens (i.e., bones and teeth). In this method, the specimens are soaked in extraction buffer, and DNA is then purified from the soaking solution using adsorption to silica. The method reliably yields mitochondrial and often also nuclear DNA. The method has been adapted to DNA extraction from other types of specimens such as arthropods.

  4. 49 CFR 40.71 - How does the collector prepare the specimens?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... this requirement: you may use excess urine to conduct clinical tests (e.g., protein, glucose) if the... TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Urine Specimen Collections § 40.71 How does the... brings the urine specimen to you. You must take these steps in the presence of the employee. (1)...

  5. 49 CFR 40.71 - How does the collector prepare the specimens?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... this requirement: you may use excess urine to conduct clinical tests (e.g., protein, glucose) if the... TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Urine Specimen Collections § 40.71 How does the... brings the urine specimen to you. You must take these steps in the presence of the employee. (1)...

  6. Thick Concrete Specimen Construction, Testing, and Preliminary Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, Dwight A.; Hoegh, Kyle; Khazanovich, Lev

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is to develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the operating lifetimes of nuclear power plants (NPPs) beyond 60 years. Since many important safety structures in an NPP are constructed of concrete, inspection techniques must be developed and tested to evaluate the internal condition. In-service containment structures generally do not allow for the destructive measures necessary to validate the accuracy of these inspection techniques. This creates a need for comparative testing of the various nondestructive evaluation (NDE) measurement techniques on concrete specimens with known material properties, voids, internal microstructure flaws, and reinforcement locations. A preliminary report detailed some of the challenges associated with thick reinforced concrete sections and prioritized conceptual designs of specimens that could be fabricated to represent NPP concrete structures for using in NDE evaluation comparisons. This led to the construction of the concrete specimen presented in this report, which has sufficient reinforcement density and cross-sectional size to represent an NPP containment wall. Details on how a suitably thick concrete specimen was constructed are presented, including the construction materials, final nominal design schematic, as well as formwork and rigging required to safely meet the desired dimensions of the concrete structure. The report also details the type and methods of forming the concrete specimen as well as information on how the rebar and simulated defects were embedded. Details on how the resulting specimen was transported, safely anchored, and marked to allow access for systematic comparative NDE testing of defects in a representative NPP containment wall concrete specimen are also given. Data collection using the MIRA Ultrasonic NDE equipment and

  7. Using the acetabulum to estimate age at death of adult males.

    PubMed

    Rissech, Carme; Estabrook, George F; Cunha, Eugenia; Malgosa, Assumpció

    2006-03-01

    The acetabular region is often present and adequately preserved in adult human skeletal remains. Close morphological examination of the 242 left male os coxae from the identified collection of Coimbra (Portugal) has enabled the recognition of seven variables that can be used to estimate age at death. This paper describes these variables and argues their appropriateness by analyzing the correlation between these criteria and the age, the intra- and interobserver consistence, and the accuracy in age prediction using Bayesian inference to estimate age of identified specimens. Results show significant close correlation between the acetabular criteria and age, nonsignificant differences in intra- and interobserver test, and 89% accuracy in Bayes prediction. Obtained estimated age of the specimens had similar accuracy in all ages. These results indicate that these seven variables, based on the acetabular area, are potentially useful to estimate age at death for adult specimens.

  8. [A catalog of fish specimens preserved within Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences].

    PubMed

    Du, Li-Na; Chen, Xiao-Yong; Yang, Jun-Xing

    2013-08-01

    As of 2013, some 178 fish type species and 2131 type specimens belonging to 4 orders and 11 families were currently being preserved at the Kunming Natural History Museum of Zoology, located as art of the Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences. These specimens were collected from across western China, includingYunnan, Sicuan, Guizhou, Guangxi, Hunan, Chongqi, Gansu and Xinjiang. In general, most species are Cyprinidae (71 species and 1103 specimens), followed by Nemacheilidae (52 species and 556 specimens). For the convenience of research and communication, the present paper presents a detailed list of fish type species preserved in the Kunming Natural History Museum of Zoology.

  9. 36 CFR 1002.5 - Research specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Research specimens. 1002.5... RECREATION § 1002.5 Research specimens. (a) Taking plants, fish, wildlife, rocks or minerals except in... of research, baseline inventories, monitoring, impact analysis, group study, or museum display...

  10. 36 CFR 1002.5 - Research specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Research specimens. 1002.5... RECREATION § 1002.5 Research specimens. (a) Taking plants, fish, wildlife, rocks or minerals except in... of research, baseline inventories, monitoring, impact analysis, group study, or museum display...

  11. 36 CFR 1002.5 - Research specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Research specimens. 1002.5... RECREATION § 1002.5 Research specimens. (a) Taking plants, fish, wildlife, rocks or minerals except in... of research, baseline inventories, monitoring, impact analysis, group study, or museum display...

  12. 37 CFR 1.93 - Specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Specimens. 1.93 Section 1.93 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE....93 Specimens. When the invention relates to a composition of matter, the applicant may be required...

  13. Machining technique prevents undercutting in tensile specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moscater, R. E.; Royster, D. M.

    1968-01-01

    Machining technique prevents undercutting at the test section in tensile specimens when machining the four corners of the reduced section. Made with a gradual taper in the test section, the width of the center of the tensile specimen is less than the width at the four corners of the reduced section.

  14. 10 CFR 26.135 - Split specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... shall store Bottles A and B of the specimen in a secure manner until the facility has finished testing. If the initial validity and drug test results are negative and the specimen in Bottle A will not be forwarded to the HHS-certified laboratory, the licensee testing facility may discard both Bottle A...

  15. 37 CFR 1.166 - Specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... COMMERCE GENERAL RULES OF PRACTICE IN PATENT CASES National Processing Provisions Plant Patents § 1.166 Specimens. The applicant may be required to furnish specimens of the plant, or its flower or fruit, in a quantity and at a time in its stage of growth as may be designated, for study and inspection....

  16. 37 CFR 1.166 - Specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... COMMERCE GENERAL RULES OF PRACTICE IN PATENT CASES National Processing Provisions Plant Patents § 1.166 Specimens. The applicant may be required to furnish specimens of the plant, or its flower or fruit, in a quantity and at a time in its stage of growth as may be designated, for study and inspection....

  17. 37 CFR 1.166 - Specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... COMMERCE GENERAL RULES OF PRACTICE IN PATENT CASES National Processing Provisions Plant Patents § 1.166 Specimens. The applicant may be required to furnish specimens of the plant, or its flower or fruit, in a quantity and at a time in its stage of growth as may be designated, for study and inspection....

  18. 36 CFR 1002.5 - Research specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Research specimens. 1002.5... RECREATION § 1002.5 Research specimens. (a) Taking plants, fish, wildlife, rocks or minerals except in accordance with other regulations of this chapter or pursuant to the terms and conditions of a...

  19. 37 CFR 1.166 - Specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... COMMERCE GENERAL RULES OF PRACTICE IN PATENT CASES National Processing Provisions Plant Patents § 1.166 Specimens. The applicant may be required to furnish specimens of the plant, or its flower or fruit, in a quantity and at a time in its stage of growth as may be designated, for study and inspection....

  20. Layered Plating Specimens For Mechanical Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Linda B.; Flowers, Cecil E.

    1991-01-01

    Layered specimens readily made in standard sizes for tensile and other tests of mechanical properties. Standard specimen of metal ordinarily difficult to plate to standard grip thickness or diameter made by augmentation with easier-to-plate material followed by machining to standard size and shape.

  1. 37 CFR 1.93 - Specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Specimens. 1.93 Section 1.93 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE....93 Specimens. When the invention relates to a composition of matter, the applicant may be required...

  2. Demographic mechanism of a historical bird population collapse reconstructed using museum specimens.

    PubMed

    Green, Rhys E

    2008-10-22

    Long-term studies of demographic rates provide clues about the external causes of animal population declines, but systematic monitoring is rarely in place until after the decline has occurred. This study evaluates alternative hypotheses about the demographic mechanisms underlying the historical collapse of corncrake (Crexcrex) populations in Britain and Ireland in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries using characteristics of museum specimens. The proportion of adult corncrakes that are 1-year old was estimated from feather characteristics of birds collected before, during and after the population decline and showed a marked transitory reduction during the decline. This pattern would be expected if the decline was caused by a large reduction in the recruitment of young birds to the breeding population and is the opposite of what would be expected if a change in adult survival had caused the decline. These results are consistent with previous suggestions that the corncrake population decline was caused by adverse effects on breeding productivity caused by the mechanization of the harvesting of hay crops.

  3. In-Hospital Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccination Is Associated With Detection of Pneumococcal Vaccine Serotypes in Adults Hospitalized for Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Grijalva, Carlos G; Wunderink, Richard G; Zhu, Yuwei; Williams, Derek J; Balk, Robert; Fakhran, Sherene; Courtney, D Mark; Anderson, Evan J; Qi, Chao; Trabue, Christopher; Pavia, Andrew T; Moore, Matthew R; Jain, Seema; Edwards, Kathryn M; Self, Wesley H

    2015-12-01

    During an etiology study of adults hospitalized for pneumonia, in which urine specimens were examined for serotype-specific pneumococcal antigen detection, we observed that some patients received 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine before urine collection. Some urine samples became positive for specific vaccine pneumococcal serotypes shortly after vaccination, suggesting false-positive test results. PMID:26512357

  4. Clinical evaluation of the walk-away specimen processor and ESwab for recovery of Streptococcus agalactiae isolates in prenatal screening specimens.

    PubMed

    Buchan, Blake W; Olson, Wendy J; Mackey, Tami-Lea A; Ledeboer, Nathan A

    2014-06-01

    Rectal/vaginal specimens (n = 97) were collected in parallel using ESwab and Liquid Stuart (LS) rayon fiber wrapped swab collection devices. Each collection device was used to directly inoculate culture medium and LIM broth. Medium inoculation by ESwab was conducted using the Walk-Away specimen processor (WASP). Medium inoculation by the LS device was conducted manually. The sensitivities of ESwab and LS upon direct plating were 93.8% and 87.5%, respectively, and increased to 96.9% and 90.6%, respectively, following broth enrichment. PMID:24622104

  5. 10 CFR 26.165 - Testing split specimens and retesting single specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Testing split specimens and retesting single specimens. 26.165 Section 26.165 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Laboratories Certified by the Department of Health and Human Services § 26.165 Testing split specimens and...

  6. US-Canada Great Lakes Regional Specimen Bank Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Kerry, A; Edmonds, C J; Landon, L; Yonker, T L

    1993-11-01

    A study to examine the feasibility of establishing a Regional Specimen Bank in the Great Lakes area of the United States and Canada has recently been initiated by the Michigan Audubon Society. There are several existing formal and informal specimen banking facilities active in the region but their combined adequacy has not been evaluated. This feasibility study will establish the need and use of a regional bank and the institution(s) necessary to satisfy this need will be recommended. The study will address the scope required to meet present and future needs including the types of specimens to be represented in the bank, geographic coverage and protocols for collection, shipping, processing, analysis and storage. A management policy of the bank will be developed encompassing business operation, costs, governing structure and personnel requirements. The legal requirements of the bank will be determined with regards to the acquisition of samples, transport across national boundaries, access to specimens and information, and liability during operation. An effective information dissemination network will be recommended that is compatible with national and international partners, will facilitate technology and information transfer and support the quality and status of the bank. Determination of secure, long-term funding sources will be one of the key elements to ensuring a safe repository. This feasibility study is funded by the Great Lakes Protection Fund.

  7. Solution Preserves Nucleic Acids in Body-Fluid Specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Stowe, Raymond P.

    2004-01-01

    A solution has been formulated to preserve deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA) in specimens of blood, saliva, and other bodily fluids. Specimens of this type are collected for diagnostic molecular pathology, which is becoming the method of choice for diagnosis of many diseases. The solution makes it possible to store such specimens at room temperature, without risk of decomposition, for subsequent analysis in a laboratory that could be remote from the sampling location. Thus, the solution could be a means to bring the benefits of diagnostic molecular pathology to geographic regions where refrigeration equipment and diagnostic laboratories are not available. The table lists the ingredients of the solution. The functions of the ingredients are the following: EDTA chelates divalent cations that are necessary cofactors for nuclease activity. In so doing, it functionally removes these cations and thereby retards the action of nucleases. EDTA also stabilizes the DNA helix. Tris serves as a buffering agent, which is needed because minor contaminants in an unbuffered solution can exert pronounced effects on pH and thereby cause spontaneous degradation of DNA. SDS is an ionic detergent that inhibits ribonuclease activity. SDS has been used in some lysis buffers and as a storage buffer for RNA after purification. The use of the solution is straightforward. For example, a sample of saliva is collected by placing a cotton roll around in the subject's mouth until it becomes saturated, then the cotton is placed in a collection tube. Next, 1.5 mL of the solution are injected directly into the cotton and the tube is capped for storage at room temperature. The effectiveness of the solution has been demonstrated in tests on specimens of saliva containing herpes simplex virus. In the tests, the viral DNA, as amplified by polymerase chain reaction, was detected even after storage for 120 days.

  8. 49 CFR 40.65 - What does the collector check for when the employee presents a specimen?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... PROCEDURES FOR TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Urine Specimen Collections § 40.65.... You must check to ensure that the specimen contains at least 45 mL of urine. (1) If it does not, you... of tampering) also exists. (3) You are never permitted to combine urine collected from separate...

  9. 49 CFR 40.65 - What does the collector check for when the employee presents a specimen?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... PROCEDURES FOR TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Urine Specimen Collections § 40.65.... You must check to ensure that the specimen contains at least 45 mL of urine. (1) If it does not, you... of tampering) also exists. (3) You are never permitted to combine urine collected from separate...

  10. 49 CFR 40.65 - What does the collector check for when the employee presents a specimen?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... PROCEDURES FOR TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Urine Specimen Collections § 40.65.... You must check to ensure that the specimen contains at least 45 mL of urine. (1) If it does not, you... of tampering) also exists. (3) You are never permitted to combine urine collected from separate...

  11. Mode-II-Fracture Specimen And Holder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buzzard, Robert J.; Ghosn, Louis; Succop, George

    1991-01-01

    Test specimen and loading frame developed for fatigue and fracture testing of materials under mode-II (sliding-mode) loading. Assembly placed in compression-testing machine. Loads directed oppositely along centerline cause self-similar crack to propagate. Enables consistently accurate alignment of specimens before insertion of specimen/frame assemblies into compression-testing machine. Makes design attractive for testing in hostile environments in which access to machine or furnace limited. Additional feature, with little or no modification, placed horizontally into impact testing machine and subjected to loading at high speeds.

  12. Banking Brain Tumor Specimens Using a University Core Facility.

    PubMed

    Bregy, Amade; Papadimitriou, Kyriakos; Faber, David A; Shah, Ashish H; Gomez, Carmen R; Komotar, Ricardo J; Egea, Sophie C

    2015-08-01

    Within the past three decades, the significance of banking human cancer tissue for the advancement of cancer research has grown exponentially. The purpose of this article is to detail our experience in collecting brain tumor specimens in collaboration with the University of Miami/Sylvester Tissue Bank Core Facility (UM-TBCF), to ensure the availability of high-quality samples of central nervous system tumor tissue for research. Successful tissue collection begins with obtaining informed consent from patients following institutional IRB and federal HIPAA guidelines, and it needs a well-trained professional staff and continued maintenance of high ethical standards and record keeping. Since starting in 2011, we have successfully banked 225 brain tumor specimens for research. Thus far, the most common tumor histology identified among those specimens has been glioblastoma (22.1%), followed by meningioma (18.1%). The majority of patients were White, non-Hispanics accounting for 45.1% of the patient population; Hispanic/Latinos accounted for 23%, and Black/African Americans accounted for 14%, which represent the particular population of the State of Florida according to the 2010 census data. The most common tumors found in each subgroup were as follows: Black/African American, glioblastoma and meningioma; Hispanic, metastasis and glioblastoma; White, glioblastoma and meningioma. The UM-TBCF is a valuable repository, offering high-quality tumor samples from a unique patient population. PMID:26280502

  13. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Biological Specimen Repository

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMonigal, Kathleen A.; Pietrzyk, Robert a.; Johnson, Mary Anne

    2008-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Biological Specimen Repository (Repository) is a storage bank that is used to maintain biological specimens over extended periods of time and under well-controlled conditions. Samples from the International Space Station (ISS), including blood and urine, will be collected, processed and archived during the preflight, inflight and postflight phases of ISS missions. This investigation has been developed to archive biosamples for use as a resource for future space flight related research. The International Space Station (ISS) provides a platform to investigate the effects of microgravity on human physiology prior to lunar and exploration class missions. The storage of crewmember samples from many different ISS flights in a single repository will be a valuable resource with which researchers can study space flight related changes and investigate physiological markers. The development of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Biological Specimen Repository will allow for the collection, processing, storage, maintenance, and ethical distribution of biosamples to meet goals of scientific and programmatic relevance to the space program. Archiving of the biosamples will provide future research opportunities including investigating patterns of physiological changes, analysis of components unknown at this time or analyses performed by new methodologies.

  14. Banking Brain Tumor Specimens Using a University Core Facility.

    PubMed

    Bregy, Amade; Papadimitriou, Kyriakos; Faber, David A; Shah, Ashish H; Gomez, Carmen R; Komotar, Ricardo J; Egea, Sophie C

    2015-08-01

    Within the past three decades, the significance of banking human cancer tissue for the advancement of cancer research has grown exponentially. The purpose of this article is to detail our experience in collecting brain tumor specimens in collaboration with the University of Miami/Sylvester Tissue Bank Core Facility (UM-TBCF), to ensure the availability of high-quality samples of central nervous system tumor tissue for research. Successful tissue collection begins with obtaining informed consent from patients following institutional IRB and federal HIPAA guidelines, and it needs a well-trained professional staff and continued maintenance of high ethical standards and record keeping. Since starting in 2011, we have successfully banked 225 brain tumor specimens for research. Thus far, the most common tumor histology identified among those specimens has been glioblastoma (22.1%), followed by meningioma (18.1%). The majority of patients were White, non-Hispanics accounting for 45.1% of the patient population; Hispanic/Latinos accounted for 23%, and Black/African Americans accounted for 14%, which represent the particular population of the State of Florida according to the 2010 census data. The most common tumors found in each subgroup were as follows: Black/African American, glioblastoma and meningioma; Hispanic, metastasis and glioblastoma; White, glioblastoma and meningioma. The UM-TBCF is a valuable repository, offering high-quality tumor samples from a unique patient population.

  15. 37 CFR 2.56 - Specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... appropriate medium. (4) For a TEAS submission, the specimen must be a digitized image in .jpg or .pdf format. ... member uses the mark on the member's goods or in the sale or advertising of the member's services. (4)...

  16. 37 CFR 2.56 - Specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... appropriate medium. (4) For a TEAS submission, the specimen must be a digitized image in .jpg or .pdf format. ... member uses the mark on the member's goods or in the sale or advertising of the member's services. (4)...

  17. 37 CFR 2.56 - Specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... appropriate medium. (4) For a TEAS submission, the specimen must be a digitized image in .jpg or .pdf format. ... member uses the mark on the member's goods or in the sale or advertising of the member's services. (4)...

  18. A Live Specimen Cell for the Microscope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, D. W.

    1991-01-01

    Provides background and instructions for the assembly of a microaquarium, or specimen cell, in which the dynamic world of living microorganisms can be viewed through a microscope overextended periods of time utilizing the simplest of materials in the process. (JJK)

  19. Structure of Wet Specimens in Electron Microscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, D. F.

    1974-01-01

    Discussed are past work and recent advances in the use of electron microscopes for viewing structures immersed in gas and liquid. Improved environmental chambers make it possible to examine wet specimens easily. (Author/RH)

  20. Impact of specimen adequacy on the assessment of renal allograft biopsy specimens.

    PubMed

    Cimen, S; Geldenhuys, L; Guler, S; Imamoglu, A; Molinari, M

    2016-01-01

    The Banff classification was introduced to achieve uniformity in the assessment of renal allograft biopsies. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of specimen adequacy on the Banff classification. All renal allograft biopsies obtained between July 2010 and June 2012 for suspicion of acute rejection were included. Pre-biopsy clinical data on suspected diagnosis and time from renal transplantation were provided to a nephropathologist who was blinded to the original pathological report. Second pathological readings were compared with the original to assess agreement stratified by specimen adequacy. Cohen's kappa test and Fisher's exact test were used for statistical analyses. Forty-nine specimens were reviewed. Among these specimens, 81.6% were classified as adequate, 6.12% as minimal, and 12.24% as unsatisfactory. The agreement analysis among the first and second readings revealed a kappa value of 0.97. Full agreement between readings was found in 75% of the adequate specimens, 66.7 and 50% for minimal and unsatisfactory specimens, respectively. There was no agreement between readings in 5% of the adequate specimens and 16.7% of the unsatisfactory specimens. For the entire sample full agreement was found in 71.4%, partial agreement in 20.4% and no agreement in 8.2% of the specimens. Statistical analysis using Fisher's exact test yielded a P value above 0.25 showing that - probably due to small sample size - the results were not statistically significant. Specimen adequacy may be a determinant of a diagnostic agreement in renal allograft specimen assessment. While additional studies including larger case numbers are required to further delineate the impact of specimen adequacy on the reliability of histopathological assessments, specimen quality must be considered during clinical decision making while dealing with biopsy reports based on minimal or unsatisfactory specimens.

  1. Impact of specimen adequacy on the assessment of renal allograft biopsy specimens

    PubMed Central

    Cimen, S.; Geldenhuys, L.; Guler, S.; Imamoglu, A.; Molinari, M.

    2016-01-01

    The Banff classification was introduced to achieve uniformity in the assessment of renal allograft biopsies. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of specimen adequacy on the Banff classification. All renal allograft biopsies obtained between July 2010 and June 2012 for suspicion of acute rejection were included. Pre-biopsy clinical data on suspected diagnosis and time from renal transplantation were provided to a nephropathologist who was blinded to the original pathological report. Second pathological readings were compared with the original to assess agreement stratified by specimen adequacy. Cohen's kappa test and Fisher's exact test were used for statistical analyses. Forty-nine specimens were reviewed. Among these specimens, 81.6% were classified as adequate, 6.12% as minimal, and 12.24% as unsatisfactory. The agreement analysis among the first and second readings revealed a kappa value of 0.97. Full agreement between readings was found in 75% of the adequate specimens, 66.7 and 50% for minimal and unsatisfactory specimens, respectively. There was no agreement between readings in 5% of the adequate specimens and 16.7% of the unsatisfactory specimens. For the entire sample full agreement was found in 71.4%, partial agreement in 20.4% and no agreement in 8.2% of the specimens. Statistical analysis using Fisher's exact test yielded a P value above 0.25 showing that - probably due to small sample size - the results were not statistically significant. Specimen adequacy may be a determinant of a diagnostic agreement in renal allograft specimen assessment. While additional studies including larger case numbers are required to further delineate the impact of specimen adequacy on the reliability of histopathological assessments, specimen quality must be considered during clinical decision making while dealing with biopsy reports based on minimal or unsatisfactory specimens. PMID:27119314

  2. Mode 2 fatigue crack growth specimen development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buzzard, R. J.; Gross, B.; Srawley, J. E.

    1983-01-01

    A Mode II test specimen was developed which has potential application in understanding phemonena associated with mixed mode fatigue failures in high performance aircraft engine bearing races. The attributes of the specimen are: it contains one single ended notch, which simplifiers data gathering and reduction; the fatigue crack grous in-line with the direction of load application; a single axis test machine is sufficient to perform testing; and the Mode I component is vanishingly small.

  3. STRESS CORROSION CRACKING IN TEAR DROP SPECIMENS

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, P; Philip Zapp, P; Jonathan Duffey, J; Kerry Dunn, K

    2009-05-01

    Laboratory tests were conducted to investigate the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of 304L stainless steel used to construct the containment vessels for the storage of plutonium-bearing materials. The tear drop corrosion specimens each with an autogenous weld in the center were placed in contact with moist plutonium oxide and chloride salt mixtures. Cracking was found in two of the specimens in the heat affected zone (HAZ) at the apex area. Finite element analysis was performed to simulate the specimen fabrication for determining the internal stress which caused SCC to occur. It was found that the tensile stress at the crack initiation site was about 30% lower than the highest stress which had been shifted to the shoulders of the specimen due to the specimen fabrication process. This finding appears to indicate that the SCC initiation took place in favor of the possibly weaker weld/base metal interface at a sufficiently high level of background stress. The base material, even subject to a higher tensile stress, was not cracked. The relieving of tensile stress due to SCC initiation and growth in the HAZ and the weld might have foreclosed the potential for cracking at the specimen shoulders where higher stress was found.

  4. Spatial and temporal continuity of kangaroo rat populations shown by sequencing mitochondrial DNA from museum specimens.

    PubMed

    Thomas, W K; Pääbo, S; Villablanca, F X; Wilson, A C

    1990-08-01

    The advent of direct sequencing via the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has opened up the possibility of molecular studies on museum specimens. Here we analyze genetic variation in populations over time by applying PCR to DNA extracted from museum specimens sampled from populations of one species over the last 78 years. Included in this study were 43 museum specimens of the Panamint kangaroo rat Dipodomys panamintinus from localities representing each of three geographically distinct subspecies. These specimens were originally collected and prepared as dried skins in 1911, 1917, or 1937. For each specimen, a 225-bp segment of the mitochondrial genome was sequenced. These mitochondrial DNA sequences were compared to those of 63 specimens collected at the same localities in 1988. The three subspecies were nearly completely distinct. Only 2 of the 106 individuals shared mitochondrial types between subspecies. For all three localities, the diversity levels were maintained between the two temporal samples. The concordance observed between the two temporally separate phylogenies supports the use of museum specimens for phylogenetic inference. This study demonstrates the accuracy and routine nature of the use of museum specimens in the analysis of mitochondrial sequence variation in natural populations and, importantly, that a temporal aspect can now be added to such studies.

  5. Standard Specimen Reference Set: Pancreatic — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    The primary objective of the EDRN Pancreatic Cancer Working Group Proposal is to create a reference set consisting of well-characterized serum/plasma specimens to use as a resource for the development of biomarkers for the early detection of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. The testing of biomarkers on the same sample set permits direct comparison among them; thereby, allowing the development of a biomarker panel that can be evaluated in a future validation study. Additionally, the establishment of an infrastructure with core data elements and standardized operating procedures for specimen collection, processing and storage, will provide the necessary preparatory platform for larger validation studies when the appropriate marker/panel for pancreatic adenocarcinoma has been identified.

  6. Effects of sample collection and storage methods on antipneumococcal immunoglobulin A in saliva.

    PubMed

    Nurkka, A; Obiero, J; Käyhty, H; Scott, J A G

    2003-05-01

    Saliva contains components of both the mucosal and systemic immune systems. Variable flow rates, immunoglobulin proteases, and variation in collection and storage methods all introduce differences in the estimated concentrations of antibodies. We evaluated the effect of four collection methods and three storage protocols on the concentrations of immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies to pneumococcal capsular antigens 1, 5, 6B, and 14 and to pneumococcal surface adhesin A (PsaA) in saliva. Specimens were collected from 30 healthy Kenyan adults by collecting drool, by pipette suction, and with two commercial kits, OraSure and Oracol. Aliquots from each specimen were snap-frozen with glycerol in liquid nitrogen or stored for 4 to 8 h at +4 degrees C either with or without the addition of protease enzyme inhibitors prior to storage at -70 degrees C. Anticapsular IgA concentrations were not significantly different with different collection methods, but snap-freezing the specimens in liquid nitrogen led to concentrations 41 to 47% higher than those of specimens stored by the other methods (P < 0.0005).

  7. Closeout of JOYO-1 Specimen Fabrication Efforts

    SciTech Connect

    ME Petrichek; JL Bump; RF Luther

    2005-10-31

    Fabrication was well under way for the JOYO biaxial creep and tensile specimens when the NR Space program was canceled. Tubes of FS-85, ASTAR-811C, and T-111 for biaxial creep specimens had been drawn at True Tube (Paso Robles, CA), while tubes of Mo-47.5 Re were being drawn at Rhenium Alloys (Cleveland, OH). The Mo-47.5 Re tubes are now approximately 95% complete. Their fabrication and the quantities produced will be documented at a later date. End cap material for FS-85, ASTAR-811C, and T-111 had been swaged at Pittsburgh Materials Technology, Inc. (PMTI) (Large, PA) and machined at Vangura (Clairton, PA). Cutting of tubes, pickling, annealing, and laser engraving were in process at PMTI. Several biaxial creep specimen sets of FS-85, ASTAR-811C, and T-111 had already been sent to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for weld development. In addition, tensile specimens of FS-85, ASTAR-811C, T-111, and Mo-47.5 Re had been machined at Kin-Tech (North Huntington, PA). Actual machining of the other specimen types had not been initiated. Flowcharts 1-3 detail the major processing steps each piece of material has experienced. A more detailed description of processing will be provided in a separate document [B-MT(SRME)-51]. Table 1 lists the in-process materials and finished specimens. Also included are current metallurgical condition of these materials and specimens. The available chemical analyses for these alloys at various points in the process are provided in Table 2.

  8. Nasopharyngeal carriage of Streptococcus pneumoniae in adults infected with human immunodeficiency virus in Jakarta, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Harimurti, Kuntjoro; Saldi, Siti R F; Dewiasty, Esthika; Khoeri, Miftahuddin M; Yunihastuti, Evi; Putri, Tiara; Tafroji, Wisnu; Safari, Dodi

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the distribution of serotype and antimicrobial susceptibility of Streptococcus pneumoniae carried by adults infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in Jakarta, Indonesia. Specimens of nasopharyngeal swab were collected from 200 HIV infected adults aged 21 to 63 years. Identification of S. pneumoniae was done by optochin susceptibility test and PCR for the presence of psaA and lytA genes. Serotyping was performed with sequential multiplex PCR and antibiotic susceptibility with the disk diffusion method. S. pneumoniae strains were carried by 10% adults with serotype 6A/B 20% was common serotype among cultured strains in 20 adults. Most of isolates were susceptible to chloramphenicol (80%) followed by clindamycin (75%), erythromycin (75%), penicillin (55%), and tetracycline (50%). This study found resistance to sulphamethoxazole/trimethoprim was most common with only 15% of strains being susceptible. High non-susceptibility to sulphamethoxazole/trimethoprim was observed in S. pneumoniae strains carried by HIV infected adults in Jakarta, Indonesia.

  9. Monitoring STI prevalence using telephone surveys and mailed urine specimens: a pilot test

    PubMed Central

    Eggleston, E; Turner, C; Rogers, S; Roman, A; Miller, W; Villarroel, M; Ganapathi, L

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: This pilot test assessed the feasibility of a cost effective population based approach to STI monitoring using automated telephone interviews, urine specimen collection kits sent out and returned by US Postal Service mail, and monetary incentives to motivate participation. Methods: 100 residents of Baltimore, MD, USA, completed an automated telephone survey and agreed to mail in a urine specimen to be tested for chlamydia and gonorrhoea. Participants were paid $10 for completing the survey and $40 for mailing the specimen. Results: 86% of survey participants mailed in a urine specimen for testing. Conclusions: Automated telephone surveys linked with testing of mailed-in urine specimens may be a feasible lower cost (relative to household surveys) method of estimating infection prevalences in a population. PMID:15923293

  10. Canadian Adult Basic Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooke, W. Michael, Comp.

    "Trends," a publication of the Canadian Association for Adult Education, is a collection of abstracts on selected subjects affecting adult education; this issue is on adult basic education (ABE). It covers teachers and teacher training, psychological factors relating to the ABE teacher and students, manuals for teachers, instructional materials,…

  11. Nasopharyngeal versus oropharyngeal sampling for detection of pneumococcal carriage in adults.

    PubMed

    Watt, James P; O'Brien, Katherine L; Katz, Scott; Bronsdon, Melinda A; Elliott, John; Dallas, Jean; Perilla, Mindy J; Reid, Raymond; Murrow, Laurel; Facklam, Richard; Santosham, Mathuram; Whitney, Cynthia G

    2004-11-01

    Several studies have shown that nasopharyngeal sampling is more sensitive than oropharyngeal sampling for the detection of pneumococcal carriage in children. The data for adults are limited and conflicting. This study was part of a larger study of pneumococcal carriage on the Navajo and White Mountain Apache Reservation following a clinical trial of a seven-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine. Persons aged 18 years and older living in households with children enrolled in the vaccine trial were eligible. We collected both nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal specimens by passing a flexible calcium alginate wire swab either nasally to the posterior nasopharynx or orally to the posterior oropharynx. Swabs were placed in skim milk-tryptone-glucose-glycerin medium and frozen at -70 degrees C. Pneumococcal isolation was performed by standard techniques. Analyses were based on specimens collected from 1,994 adults living in 1,054 households. Nasopharyngeal specimens (11.1%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 9.8 and 12.6%) were significantly more likely to grow pneumococci than were oropharyngeal specimens (5.8%; 95% CI, 4.8 to 6.9%) (P < 0.0001). Few persons had pneumococcal growth from both specimens (1.7%). Therefore, both tests together were more likely to identify pneumococcal carriage (15.2%; 95% CI, 13.7 to 16.9%) than either test alone. Although we found that nasopharyngeal sampling was more sensitive than oropharyngeal sampling, nasopharyngeal sampling alone would have underestimated the prevalence of pneumococcal carriage in this adult population. Sampling both sites may give more accurate results than sampling either site alone in studies of pneumococcal carriage in adults. PMID:15528682

  12. Surface analysis of space telescope material specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fromhold, A. T.; Daneshvar, K.

    1985-01-01

    Qualitative and quantitative data on Space Telescope materials which were exposed to low Earth orbital atomic oxygen in a controlled experiment during the 41-G (STS-17) mission were obtained utilizing the experimental techniques of Rutherford backscattering (RBS), particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE), and ellipsometry (ELL). The techniques employed were chosen with a view towards appropriateness for the sample in question, after consultation with NASA scientific personnel who provided the material specimens. A group of eight samples and their controls selected by NASA scientists were measured before and after flight. Information reported herein include specimen surface characterization by ellipsometry techniques, a determination of the thickness of the evaporated metal specimens by RBS, and a determination of trace impurity species present on and within the surface by PIXE.

  13. The reptile type specimens preserved in the Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales (CSIC) of Madrid, Spain.

    PubMed

    García-Díez, Teresa; González-Fernández, José E

    2013-01-01

    A first complete list of the reptile type specimens preserved in the Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales (CSIC) of Madrid (updated until 15 July 2012) is provided. The collection houses a total of 319 type specimens representing 24 taxa belonging to 6 families and 12 genera. There are 22 taxa represented by primary types (19 holotypes, 2 neotypes and 1lectotype) and at least one paratype, and only two taxa are exclusively represented by one secondary type (paratype). The collection is specially rich in Spanish endemisms. Special attention is deserved by the type series of many subspecies of Podarcis lilfordi described by A. Salvador and V. Pdéez-Mellado. All type specimens are housed in the Herpetological collection except Blanus mariae and Psaimodroims occidentalis type series and Psammodroims hispanicus (neotype) which are preserved in the DNA/Tissues Collection.

  14. Isothermal Detection of Mycoplasma pneumoniae Directly from Respiratory Clinical Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Petrone, Brianna L.; Wolff, Bernard J.; DeLaney, Alexandra A.; Diaz, Maureen H.

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a leading cause of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) across patient populations of all ages. We have developed a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay that enables rapid, low-cost detection of M. pneumoniae from nucleic acid extracts and directly from various respiratory specimen types. The assay implements calcein to facilitate simple visual readout of positive results in approximately 1 h, making it ideal for use in primary care facilities and resource-poor settings. The analytical sensitivity of the assay was determined to be 100 fg by testing serial dilutions of target DNA ranging from 1 ng to 1 fg per reaction, and no cross-reactivity was observed against 17 other Mycoplasma species, 27 common respiratory agents, or human DNA. We demonstrated the utility of this assay by testing nucleic acid extracts (n = 252) and unextracted respiratory specimens (n = 72) collected during M. pneumoniae outbreaks and sporadic cases occurring in the United States from February 2010 to January 2014. The sensitivity of the LAMP assay was 88.5% tested on extracted nucleic acid and 82.1% evaluated on unextracted clinical specimens compared to a validated real-time PCR test. Further optimization and improvements to this method may lead to the availability of a rapid, cost-efficient laboratory test for M. pneumoniae detection that is more widely available to primary care facilities, ultimately facilitating prompt detection and appropriate responses to potential M. pneumoniae outbreaks and clusters within the community. PMID:26179304

  15. From museum cases to the classroom: Emerging opportunities for specimen-based education

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural history collections are one of the most powerful resources available for documenting the effects of changing environmental conditions on global biodiversity. Worldwide, more than 1.5 billion specimens are contained in natural history museums. These materials, collected over vast temporal and...

  16. A specimen of Rhamphorhynchus with soft tissue preservation, stomach contents and a putative coprolite.

    PubMed

    Hone, David; Henderson, Donald M; Therrien, François; Habib, Michael B

    2015-01-01

    Despite being known for nearly two centuries, new specimens of the derived non-pterodactyloid pterosaur Rhamphorhynchus continue to be discovered and reveal new information about their anatomy and palaeobiology. Here we describe a specimen held in the collections of the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology, Alberta, Canada that shows both preservation and impressions of soft tissues, and also preserves material interpreted as stomach contents of vertebrate remains and, uniquely, a putative coprolite. The specimen also preserves additional evidence for fibers in the uropatagium.

  17. A specimen of Rhamphorhynchus with soft tissue preservation, stomach contents and a putative coprolite

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Donald M.; Therrien, François; Habib, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    Despite being known for nearly two centuries, new specimens of the derived non-pterodactyloid pterosaur Rhamphorhynchus continue to be discovered and reveal new information about their anatomy and palaeobiology. Here we describe a specimen held in the collections of the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology, Alberta, Canada that shows both preservation and impressions of soft tissues, and also preserves material interpreted as stomach contents of vertebrate remains and, uniquely, a putative coprolite. The specimen also preserves additional evidence for fibers in the uropatagium. PMID:26312182

  18. A Collection of Selected Summaries from Books and Periodicals in the Field of Literacy and Adult Education Received by the IIALM during the First Half of the Year 1984 = Une collection des resumes choisis des livres et des periodiques, dans le domaine de l'alphabetisation et de l'education des adultes recu par l'IIALM pendant la premier moitie de 1984.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gozideh, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Based on material received by the International Institute for Adult Literacy Methods during the first half of 1984, this issue contains selected summaries of books, articles in periodicals, and conference and seminar reports published in the field of literacy and adult education. Some of the issues addressed include (1) the role of adult education…

  19. Circumpolar dataset of sequenced specimens of Promachocrinus kerguelensis (Echinodermata, Crinoidea).

    PubMed

    Hemery, Lenaïg G; Améziane, Nadia; Eléaume, Marc

    2013-01-01

    This circumpolar dataset of the comatulid (Echinodermata: Crinoidea) Promachocrinus kerguelensis (Carpenter, 1888) from the Southern Ocean, documents biodiversity associated with the specimens sequenced in Hemery et al. (2012). The aim of Hemery et al. (2012) paper was to use phylogeographic and phylogenetic tools to assess the genetic diversity, demographic history and evolutionary relationships of this very common and abundant comatulid, in the context of the glacial history of the Antarctic and Sub-Antarctic shelves (Thatje et al. 2005, 2008). Over one thousand three hundred specimens (1307) used in this study were collected during seventeen cruises from 1996 to 2010, in eight regions of the Southern Ocean: Kerguelen Plateau, Davis Sea, Dumont d'Urville Sea, Ross Sea, Amundsen Sea, West Antarctic Peninsula, East Weddell Sea and Scotia Arc including the tip of the Antarctic Peninsula and the Bransfield Strait. We give here the metadata of this dataset, which lists sampling sources (cruise ID, ship name, sampling date, sampling gear), sampling sites (station, geographic coordinates, depth) and genetic data (phylogroup, haplotype, sequence ID) for each of the 1307 specimens. The identification of the specimens was controlled by an expert taxonomist specialist of crinoids (Marc Eléaume, Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle, Paris) and all the COI sequences were matched against those available on the Barcode of Life Data System (BOLD: http://www.boldsystems.org/index.php/IDS_OpenIdEngine). This dataset can be used by studies dealing with, among other interests, Antarctic and/or crinoid diversity (species richness, distribution patterns), biogeography or habitat / ecological niche modeling. This dataset is accessible through the GBIF network at http://ipt.biodiversity.aq/resource.do?r=proke.

  20. 16 CFR Figure 3 to Part 1610 - Specimen Holder Supported in Specimen Rack

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Specimen Holder Supported in Specimen Rack 3 Figure 3 to Part 1610 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES Pt.1610, Fig. 3 Figure 3 to Part...

  1. 16 CFR Figure 3 to Part 1610 - Specimen Holder Supported in Specimen Rack

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Specimen Holder Supported in Specimen Rack 3 Figure 3 to Part 1610 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES Pt.1610, Fig. 3 Figure 3 to Part...

  2. 16 CFR Figure 6 to Subpart A of... - Dummy Specimen in Specimen Holder

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Dummy Specimen in Specimen Holder 6 Figure 6 to Subpart A of Part 1209 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS INTERIM SAFETY STANDARD FOR CELLULOSE INSULATION The Standard Pt. 1209, Subpt....

  3. 16 CFR Figure 6 to Subpart A of... - Dummy Specimen in Specimen Holder

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Dummy Specimen in Specimen Holder 6 Figure 6 to Subpart A of Part 1209 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS INTERIM SAFETY STANDARD FOR CELLULOSE INSULATION The Standard Pt. 1209, Subpt....

  4. 16 CFR Figure 6 to Subpart A of... - Dummy Specimen in Specimen Holder

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Dummy Specimen in Specimen Holder 6 Figure 6 to Subpart A of Part 1209 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS INTERIM SAFETY STANDARD FOR CELLULOSE INSULATION The Standard Pt. 1209, Subpt....

  5. 16 CFR Figure 6 to Subpart A of... - Dummy Specimen in Specimen Holder

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Dummy Specimen in Specimen Holder 6 Figure 6 to Subpart A of Part 1209 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS INTERIM SAFETY STANDARD FOR CELLULOSE INSULATION The Standard Pt. 1209, Subpt....

  6. 16 CFR Figure 6 to Subpart A of... - Dummy Specimen in Specimen Holder

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Dummy Specimen in Specimen Holder 6 Figure 6 to Subpart A of Part 1209 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS INTERIM SAFETY STANDARD FOR CELLULOSE INSULATION The Standard Pt. 1209, Subpt....

  7. 16 CFR Figure 3 to Part 1610 - Specimen Holder Supported in Specimen Rack

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Specimen Holder Supported in Specimen Rack 3 Figure 3 to Part 1610 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES Pt.1610, Fig. 3 Figure 3 to Part...

  8. 16 CFR Figure 3 to Part 1610 - Specimen Holder Supported in Specimen Rack

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Specimen Holder Supported in Specimen Rack 3 Figure 3 to Part 1610 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES Pt. 1610, Fig. 3 Figure 3 to Part...

  9. 16 CFR Figure 3 to Part 1610 - Specimen Holder Supported in Specimen Rack

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Specimen Holder Supported in Specimen Rack 3 Figure 3 to Part 1610 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES Pt. 1610, Fig. 3 Figure 3 to Part...

  10. The production of calibration specimens for impact testing of subsize Charpy specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D.J.; Corwin, W.R.; Owings, T.D.

    1994-09-01

    Calibration specimens have been manufactured for checking the performance of a pendulum impact testing machine that has been configured for testing subsize specimens, both half-size (5.0 {times} 5.0 {times} 25.4 mm) and third-size (3.33 {times} 3.33 {times} 25.4 mm). Specimens were fabricated from quenched-and-tempered 4340 steel heat treated to produce different microstructures that would result in either high or low absorbed energy levels on testing. A large group of both half- and third-size specimens were tested at {minus}40{degrees}C. The results of the tests were analyzed for average value and standard deviation, and these values were used to establish calibration limits for the Charpy impact machine when testing subsize specimens. These average values plus or minus two standard deviations were set as the acceptable limits for the average of five tests for calibration of the impact testing machine.

  11. 7 CFR 97.8 - Specimen requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... PLANT VARIETY AND PROTECTION The Application § 97.8 Specimen requirements. (a) The applicant may be..., in a quantity and at a specified stage of growth, as may be necessary to verify the statements in the... examiner. If the applicant requests the examiner to inspect plants in the field before a final decision...

  12. 7 CFR 97.8 - Specimen requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... PLANT VARIETY AND PROTECTION The Application § 97.8 Specimen requirements. (a) The applicant may be..., in a quantity and at a specified stage of growth, as may be necessary to verify the statements in the... examiner. If the applicant requests the examiner to inspect plants in the field before a final decision...

  13. 7 CFR 97.8 - Specimen requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... PLANT VARIETY AND PROTECTION The Application § 97.8 Specimen requirements. (a) The applicant may be..., in a quantity and at a specified stage of growth, as may be necessary to verify the statements in the... examiner. If the applicant requests the examiner to inspect plants in the field before a final decision...

  14. 7 CFR 97.8 - Specimen requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... PLANT VARIETY AND PROTECTION The Application § 97.8 Specimen requirements. (a) The applicant may be..., in a quantity and at a specified stage of growth, as may be necessary to verify the statements in the... examiner. If the applicant requests the examiner to inspect plants in the field before a final decision...

  15. 50 CFR 14.24 - Scientific specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Scientific specimens. 14.24 Section 14.24 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TAKING... systematic research purposes may enter or exit through any U.S. Customs port, or may be shipped through...

  16. 7 CFR 97.8 - Specimen requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... PLANT VARIETY AND PROTECTION The Application § 97.8 Specimen requirements. (a) The applicant may be..., in a quantity and at a specified stage of growth, as may be necessary to verify the statements in the... reimburse the Office for all costs, including travel, per diem or subsistence, and salary. (b)...

  17. Specimen banking of marine organisms in the United States: Current status and long-term prospective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Becker, P.R.; Wise, S.A.; Thorsteinson, L.; Koster, B.J.; Rowles, T.

    1997-01-01

    A major part of the activities conducted over the last decade by the National Biomonitoring Specimen Bank (NBSB) has involved the archival of marine specimens collected by ongoing environmental monitoring programs. These archived specimens include bivalves, marine sediments, and fish tissues collected by the National Status and Trends and the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill Damage Assessment programs, and marine mammal tissues collected by the Marine Mammal Health and Stranding Response Program and the Alaska Marine Mammal Tissue Archival Project. In addition to supporting these programs, the specimens have been used to investigate circumpolar patterns of chlorinated hydrocarbon concentrations, genetic separation of marine animal stocks, baseline levels of essential and nonessential elements in marine mammals, and the potential risk to human consumers in the Arctic from anthropogenic contaminants found in local subsistence foods. The NBSB specimens represent a resource that has the potential for addressing future issues of marine environmental quality and ecosystem changes through retrospective analysis; however, an ecosystem-based food web approach would maximize this potential. The current status of the NBSB activities related to the banking of marine organisms is presented and discussed, the long-term prospective of these activities is presented, and the importance of an ecosystem-based food web monitoring approach to the value of specimen banking is discussed.

  18. Increasing the efficiency of digitization workflows for herbarium specimens

    PubMed Central

    Tulig, Melissa; Tarnowsky, Nicole; Bevans, Michael; Anthony Kirchgessner; Thiers,  Barbara M.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The New York Botanical Garden Herbarium has been databasing and imaging its estimated 7.3 million plant specimens for the past 17 years. Due to the size of the collection, we have been selectively digitizing fundable subsets of specimens, making successive passes through the herbarium with each new grant. With this strategy, the average rate for databasing complete records has been 10 specimens per hour. With 1.3 million specimens databased, this effort has taken about 130,000 hours of staff time. At this rate, to complete the herbarium and digitize the remaining 6 million specimens, another 600,000 hours would be needed. Given the current biodiversity and economic crises, there is neither the time nor money to complete the collection at this rate. Through a combination of grants over the last few years, The New York Botanical Garden has been testing new protocols and tactics for increasing the rate of digitization through combinations of data collaboration, field book digitization, partial data entry and imaging, and optical character recognition (OCR) of specimen images. With the launch of the National Science Foundation’s new Advancing Digitization of Biological Collections program, we hope to move forward with larger, more efficient digitization projects, capturing data from larger portions of the herbarium at a fraction of the cost and time. PMID:22859882

  19. Specimen banking of marine organisms in the United States: current status and long-term prospective.

    PubMed

    Becker, P R; Wise, S A; Thorsteinson, L; Koster, B J; Rowles, T

    1997-05-01

    A major part of the activities conducted over the last decade by the National Biomonitoring Specimen Bank (NBSB) has involved the archival of marine specimens collected by ongoing environmental monitoring programs. These archived specimens include bivalves, marine sediments, and fish tissues collected by the National Status and Trends and the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill Damage Assessment programs, and marine mammal tissues collected by the Marine Mammal Health and Stranding, Response Program and the Alaska Marine Mammal Tissue Archival Project. In addition to supporting these programs, the specimens have been used to investigate circumpolar patterns of chlorinated hydrocarbon concentrations, genetic separation of marine animal stocks, baseline levels of essential and nonessential elements in marine mammals, and the potential risk to human consumers in the Arctic from anthropogenic contaminants found in local subsistence foods. The NBSB specimens represent a resource that has the potential for addressing future issues of marine environmental quality and ecosystem changes through retrospective analysis; however, an ecosystem-based food web approach would maximize this potential. The current status of the NBSB activities related to the banking of marine organisms is presented and discussed, the long-term prospective of these activities is presented, and the importance of an ecosystem-based food web monitoring approach to the value of specimen banking is discussed. PMID:9159892

  20. Simultaneous specimen and stage cleaning device for analytical electron microscope

    DOEpatents

    Zaluzec, Nestor J.

    1996-01-01

    An improved method and apparatus are provided for cleaning both a specimen stage, a specimen and an interior of an analytical electron microscope (AEM). The apparatus for cleaning a specimen stage and specimen comprising a plasma chamber for containing a gas plasma and an air lock coupled to the plasma chamber for permitting passage of the specimen stage and specimen into the plasma chamber and maintaining an airtight chamber. The specimen stage and specimen are subjected to a reactive plasma gas that is either DC or RF excited. The apparatus can be mounted on the analytical electron microscope (AEM) for cleaning the interior of the microscope.

  1. Exhaled breath condensate appears to be an unsuitable specimen type for the detection of influenza viruses with nucleic acid-based methods.

    PubMed

    St George, Kirsten; Fuschino, Meghan E; Mokhiber, Katharine; Triner, Wayne; Spivack, Simon D

    2010-01-01

    Exhaled breath condensate is an airway-derived specimen type that has shown significant promise in the diagnosis of asthma, cancer, and other disorders. The presence of human genomic DNA in this sample type has been proven, but there have been no reports on its utility for the detection of respiratory pathogens. The suitability of exhaled breath condensate for the detection of influenza virus was investigated, as an indication of its potential as a specimen type for respiratory pathogen discovery work. Matched exhaled condensates and nasopharyngeal swabs were collected from 18 adult volunteers. Eleven cases were positive for influenza A virus, and one was positive for influenza B virus. All swab samples tested positive in real-time amplification assays, but only one exhaled condensate, an influenza A positive sample with a very high viral load, tested positive in the real-time RT-PCR assay. Most of the positive nasopharyngeal swab samples inoculated for virus culture also tested positive, whereas influenza virus was not grown from any of the exhaled condensate specimens. It was concluded that influenza viruses are not readily detectable with culture or nucleic acid-based techniques in this sample type, and that exhaled breath condensate may not be suitable for respiratory pathogen investigations with molecular methods. PMID:19733195

  2. Genomic treasure troves: complete genome sequencing of herbarium and insect museum specimens.

    PubMed

    Staats, Martijn; Erkens, Roy H J; van de Vossenberg, Bart; Wieringa, Jan J; Kraaijeveld, Ken; Stielow, Benjamin; Geml, József; Richardson, James E; Bakker, Freek T

    2013-01-01

    Unlocking the vast genomic diversity stored in natural history collections would create unprecedented opportunities for genome-scale evolutionary, phylogenetic, domestication and population genomic studies. Many researchers have been discouraged from using historical specimens in molecular studies because of both generally limited success of DNA extraction and the challenges associated with PCR-amplifying highly degraded DNA. In today's next-generation sequencing (NGS) world, opportunities and prospects for historical DNA have changed dramatically, as most NGS methods are actually designed for taking short fragmented DNA molecules as templates. Here we show that using a standard multiplex and paired-end Illumina sequencing approach, genome-scale sequence data can be generated reliably from dry-preserved plant, fungal and insect specimens collected up to 115 years ago, and with minimal destructive sampling. Using a reference-based assembly approach, we were able to produce the entire nuclear genome of a 43-year-old Arabidopsis thaliana (Brassicaceae) herbarium specimen with high and uniform sequence coverage. Nuclear genome sequences of three fungal specimens of 22-82 years of age (Agaricus bisporus, Laccaria bicolor, Pleurotus ostreatus) were generated with 81.4-97.9% exome coverage. Complete organellar genome sequences were assembled for all specimens. Using de novo assembly we retrieved between 16.2-71.0% of coding sequence regions, and hence remain somewhat cautious about prospects for de novo genome assembly from historical specimens. Non-target sequence contaminations were observed in 2 of our insect museum specimens. We anticipate that future museum genomics projects will perhaps not generate entire genome sequences in all cases (our specimens contained relatively small and low-complexity genomes), but at least generating vital comparative genomic data for testing (phylo)genetic, demographic and genetic hypotheses, that become increasingly more horizontal

  3. Ron Leuschner donates over 11,000 specimens of Pyraloidea to the National Museum of Natural History

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ron Leuschner, Past President of the Lepidopterists’ Society, donated over 11,000 specimens of the Pyraloidea to the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC. This collection is strongly represented by specimens from the western United States and may prove to be on...

  4. Specimen Behavior in the Electron Beam.

    PubMed

    Glaeser, R M

    2016-01-01

    It has long been known that cryo-EM specimens are severely damaged by a level of electron exposure that is much lower than what is needed to obtain high-resolution images from single macromolecules. Perhaps less well appreciated in the cryo-EM literature, the vitreous ice in which samples are suspended is equally sensitivity to radiation damage. This chapter provides a review of several fundamental topics such as inelastic scattering of electrons, radiation chemistry, and radiation biology, which-together-can help one to understand why radiation damage occurs so "easily." This chapter also addresses the issue of beam-induced motion that occurs at even lower levels of electron exposure. While specimen charging may be a contributor to this motion, it is argued that both radiation-induced relief of preexisting stress and damage-induced generation of additional stress may be the dominant causes of radiation-induced movement. PMID:27572722

  5. Modeling of marine corrosion of steel specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Melchers, R.E.

    1997-12-31

    Phenomenological modeling of the long term general corrosion of mild and low alloy steel specimens under marine conditions is considered, using weight loss as a function of time. A conceptual model for immersion corrosion, tidal corrosion and atmospheric corrosion under marine conditions is proposed. The model uses accepted theories for short term surface corrosion and employs modern understanding of the action of bacterial colonization of the surfaces of specimens, including the development of anaerobic conditions. Kinetic, diffusion, nutrient and anaerobic components of the model are identified and mathematical descriptions given. The model is compared to some data available in the literature. Some observations are made about data requirements for further development of models of the type proposed.

  6. Transection of Radioactive Seeds in Breast Specimens.

    PubMed

    Gilcrease, Michael Z; Dogan, Basak E; Black, Dalliah M; Contreras, Alejandro; Dryden, Mark J; Jimenez, Sandra M

    2016-10-01

    Radioactive seed localization is a new procedure for localizing breast lesions that has several advantages over the standard wire-localization procedure. It is reported to be safe for both patients and medical personnel. Although it is theoretically possible to transect the titanium-encapsulated seed while processing the breast specimen in the pathology laboratory, the likelihood of such an event is thought to be exceedingly low. In fact, there are no previous reports of such an event in the literature to date. We recently encountered 2 cases in which a radioactive seed was inadvertently transected while slicing a breast specimen at the grossing bench. In this report, we describe each case and offer recommendations for minimizing radioactive exposure to personnel and for preventing radioactive contamination of laboratory equipment. PMID:27627744

  7. Motorized manipulator for positioning a TEM specimen

    DOEpatents

    Schmid, Andreas Karl; Andresen, Nord

    2010-12-14

    The invention relates to a motorized manipulator for positioning a TEM specimen holder with sub-micron resolution parallel to a y-z plane and rotating the specimen holder in the y-z plane, the manipulator comprising a base (2), and attachment means (30) for attaching the specimen holder to the manipulator, characterized in that the manipulator further comprises at least three nano-actuators (3.sup.a, 3.sup.b, 3.sup.c) mounted on the base, each nano-actuator showing a tip (4.sup.a, 4.sup.b, 4.sup.c), the at least three tips defining the y-z plane, each tip capable of moving with respect to the base in the y-z plane; a platform (5) in contact with the tips of the nano-actuators; and clamping means (6) for pressing the platform against the tips of the nano-actuators; as a result of which the nano-actuators can rotate the platform with respect to the base in the y-z plane and translate the platform parallel to the y-z plane.

  8. Specimen loading list for the varying temperature experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Qualls, A.L.; Sitterson, R.G.

    1998-09-01

    The varying temperature experiment HFIR-RB-13J has been assembled and inserted in the reactor. Approximately 5300 specimens were cleaned, inspected, matched, and loaded into four specimen holders. A listing of each specimen loaded into the steady temperature holder, its position in the capsule, and the identification of the corresponding specimen loaded into the varying temperature holder is presented in this report.

  9. 10 CFR 26.165 - Testing split specimens and retesting single specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...” feature when there is no one in the MRO's office to answer the phone). The donor's request may be oral or... reconfirming the first laboratory's findings by conducting specimen validity tests. The second laboratory...

  10. Influence of Specimen Preparation and Specimen Size on Composite Transverse Tensile Strength and Scatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OBrien, T. Kevin; Chawan, Arun D.; DeMarco, Kevin; Paris, Isabelle

    2001-01-01

    The influence of specimen polishing, configuration, and size on the transverse tension strength of two glass-epoxy materials, and one carbon-epoxy material, loaded in three and four point bending was evaluated. Polishing machined edges, arid/or tension side failure surfaces, was detrimental to specimen strength characterization instead of yielding a higher, more accurate, strength as a result of removing inherent manufacture and handling flaws. Transverse tension strength was typically lower for longer span lengths due to the classical weakest link effect. However, strength was less sensitive to volume changes achieved by increasing specimen width. The Weibull scaling law typically over-predicted changes in transverse tension strengths in three point bend tests and under-predicted changes in transverse tension strengths in four point bend tests. Furthermore, the Weibull slope varied with specimen configuration, volume, and sample size. Hence, this scaling law was not adequate for predicting transverse tension strength of heterogeneous, fiber-reinforced, polymer matrix composites.

  11. A New Specimen of the Controversial Chasmosaurine Torosaurus latus (Dinosauria: Ceratopsidae) from the Upper Cretaceous Hell Creek Formation of Montana.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Andrew T; Campbell, Carl E; Thomas, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Torosaurus latus is an uncommon and contentious taxon of chasmosaurine ceratopsid known from several upper Maastrichtian units in western North America. We describe a partial parietal of To. latus from the Hell Creek Formation of Montana. Although the specimen's ontogenetic maturity means that it cannot inform the ongoing debate over whether To. latus is the old adult form of the contemporary Triceratops, the specimen is one of the best-preserved To. latus parietals and supplements previous descriptions. PMID:26974149

  12. A New Specimen of the Controversial Chasmosaurine Torosaurus latus (Dinosauria: Ceratopsidae) from the Upper Cretaceous Hell Creek Formation of Montana.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Andrew T; Campbell, Carl E; Thomas, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Torosaurus latus is an uncommon and contentious taxon of chasmosaurine ceratopsid known from several upper Maastrichtian units in western North America. We describe a partial parietal of To. latus from the Hell Creek Formation of Montana. Although the specimen's ontogenetic maturity means that it cannot inform the ongoing debate over whether To. latus is the old adult form of the contemporary Triceratops, the specimen is one of the best-preserved To. latus parietals and supplements previous descriptions.

  13. A review of chevron-notched fracture specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The historical development of chevron notched fracture specimens is reviewed. Stress intensity factors and load line displacement solutions proposed for some of these specimens are compared. The original bend bar configurations up to the present day short rod and bar specimens are reviewed. The results of an analytical round robin that was conducted on chevron-notched specimens are presented. In the round robin, stress-intensity factors for either the chevron notched round rod or square bar specimens were calculated. The consensus stress intensity factor (compliance) solution for these specimens is assessed. The stress intensity factor solutions proposed for three and four point bend chevron notched specimens are reviewed.

  14. Comparison of a DNA probe with culture for detecting Chlamydia trachomatis directly from genital specimens.

    PubMed

    Gratton, C A; Lim-Fong, R; Prasad, E; Kibsey, P C

    1990-02-01

    A study was conducted to compare results between culture methods and the Gen-Probe (Gen-Probe Inc. San Diego, California) chemiluminescent technique of nucleic acid hybridization to identify Chlamydia trachomatis from genital specimens from 117 females and 70 males. Specimens collected from sexually transmitted diseases (STD) and infertility clinics were randomized as to whether probe or culture swabs were collected first. The Gen-Probe demonstrated a sensitivity of 83% and a specificity of 75% in the female population and a sensitivity of 68% and a specificity of 75% in the male population when compared to the reference culture method using cycloheximide-treated McCoy cells. Gen-Probe had an overall sensitivity of 74% and specificity of 75% when the two groups were combined. Chlamydiazyme (Abbott Labs) results were obtained on 135 specimens; 90 of which correlated with probe and culture. The remaining 45 specimens had varying combinations of probe, culture and Chlamydiazyme results. MicroTrak (Syva) was done on 49 specimens; 35 of which correlated with probe and culture. The remaining 14 specimens had varying combinations of probe, culture and MicroTrak results. The apparent lack of sensitivity of the DNA probe is a major drawback of this system. PMID:2179711

  15. Preparation of Regular Specimens for Atom Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, Kim; Wishard, James

    2003-01-01

    A method of preparation of specimens of non-electropolishable materials for analysis by atom probes is being developed as a superior alternative to a prior method. In comparison with the prior method, the present method involves less processing time. Also, whereas the prior method yields irregularly shaped and sized specimens, the present developmental method offers the potential to prepare specimens of regular shape and size. The prior method is called the method of sharp shards because it involves crushing the material of interest and selecting microscopic sharp shards of the material for use as specimens. Each selected shard is oriented with its sharp tip facing away from the tip of a stainless-steel pin and is glued to the tip of the pin by use of silver epoxy. Then the shard is milled by use of a focused ion beam (FIB) to make the shard very thin (relative to its length) and to make its tip sharp enough for atom-probe analysis. The method of sharp shards is extremely time-consuming because the selection of shards must be performed with the help of a microscope, the shards must be positioned on the pins by use of micromanipulators, and the irregularity of size and shape necessitates many hours of FIB milling to sharpen each shard. In the present method, a flat slab of the material of interest (e.g., a polished sample of rock or a coated semiconductor wafer) is mounted in the sample holder of a dicing saw of the type conventionally used to cut individual integrated circuits out of the wafers on which they are fabricated in batches. A saw blade appropriate to the material of interest is selected. The depth of cut and the distance between successive parallel cuts is made such that what is left after the cuts is a series of thin, parallel ridges on a solid base. Then the workpiece is rotated 90 and the pattern of cuts is repeated, leaving behind a square array of square posts on the solid base. The posts can be made regular, long, and thin, as required for samples

  16. A new approach to standardize multicenter studies: mobile lab technology for the German Environmental Specimen Bank.

    PubMed

    Lermen, Dominik; Schmitt, Daniel; Bartel-Steinbach, Martina; Schröter-Kermani, Christa; Kolossa-Gehring, Marike; von Briesen, Hagen; Zimmermann, Heiko

    2014-01-01

    Technical progress has simplified tasks in lab diagnosis and improved quality of test results. Errors occurring during the pre-analytical phase have more negative impact on the quality of test results than errors encountered during the total analytical process. Different infrastructures of sampling sites can highly influence the quality of samples and therewith of analytical results. Annually the German Environmental Specimen Bank (ESB) collects, characterizes, and stores blood, plasma, and urine samples of 120-150 volunteers each on four different sampling sites in Germany. Overarching goal is to investigate the exposure to environmental pollutants of non-occupational exposed young adults combining human biomonitoring with questionnaire data. We investigated the requirements of the study and the possibility to realize a highly standardized sampling procedure on a mobile platform in order to increase the required quality of the pre-analytical phase. The results lead to the development of a mobile epidemiologic laboratory (epiLab) in the project "Labor der Zukunft" (future's lab technology). This laboratory includes a 14.7 m(2) reception area to record medical history and exposure-relevant behavior, a 21.1 m(2) examination room to record dental fillings and for blood withdrawal, a 15.5 m(2) biological safety level 2 laboratory to process and analyze samples on site including a 2.8 m(2) personnel lock and a 3.6 m2 cryofacility to immediately freeze samples. Frozen samples can be transferred to their final destination within the vehicle without breaking the cold chain. To our knowledge, we herewith describe for the first time the implementation of a biological safety laboratory (BSL) 2 lab and an epidemiologic unit on a single mobile platform. Since 2013 we have been collecting up to 15.000 individual human samples annually under highly standardized conditions using the mobile laboratory. Characterized and free of alterations they are kept ready for retrospective

  17. A new approach to standardize multicenter studies: mobile lab technology for the German Environmental Specimen Bank.

    PubMed

    Lermen, Dominik; Schmitt, Daniel; Bartel-Steinbach, Martina; Schröter-Kermani, Christa; Kolossa-Gehring, Marike; von Briesen, Hagen; Zimmermann, Heiko

    2014-01-01

    Technical progress has simplified tasks in lab diagnosis and improved quality of test results. Errors occurring during the pre-analytical phase have more negative impact on the quality of test results than errors encountered during the total analytical process. Different infrastructures of sampling sites can highly influence the quality of samples and therewith of analytical results. Annually the German Environmental Specimen Bank (ESB) collects, characterizes, and stores blood, plasma, and urine samples of 120-150 volunteers each on four different sampling sites in Germany. Overarching goal is to investigate the exposure to environmental pollutants of non-occupational exposed young adults combining human biomonitoring with questionnaire data. We investigated the requirements of the study and the possibility to realize a highly standardized sampling procedure on a mobile platform in order to increase the required quality of the pre-analytical phase. The results lead to the development of a mobile epidemiologic laboratory (epiLab) in the project "Labor der Zukunft" (future's lab technology). This laboratory includes a 14.7 m(2) reception area to record medical history and exposure-relevant behavior, a 21.1 m(2) examination room to record dental fillings and for blood withdrawal, a 15.5 m(2) biological safety level 2 laboratory to process and analyze samples on site including a 2.8 m(2) personnel lock and a 3.6 m2 cryofacility to immediately freeze samples. Frozen samples can be transferred to their final destination within the vehicle without breaking the cold chain. To our knowledge, we herewith describe for the first time the implementation of a biological safety laboratory (BSL) 2 lab and an epidemiologic unit on a single mobile platform. Since 2013 we have been collecting up to 15.000 individual human samples annually under highly standardized conditions using the mobile laboratory. Characterized and free of alterations they are kept ready for retrospective

  18. Pharyngeal Neisseria gonorrhoeae detection in oral-throat wash specimens of male patients with urethritis.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Satoshi; Kurimura, Yuichiro; Hashimoto, Jiro; Takeyama, Koh; Koroku, Mikio; Tanda, Hitoshi; Nishimura, Masahiro; Tsukamoto, Taiji

    2008-12-01

    Detection of Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis in the pharynx has been highlighted in the prevention of the unexpected spread of sexually transmitted diseases. We tried to clarify the detection rate of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in the pharynx and the clinical relevance of oral-throat wash specimens to detect the organism in heterosexual men with gonococcal and nongonococcal urethritis. In our cohort of 79 male patients with urethritis, oral throat wash specimens were collected after they had gargled with normal saline for approximately 30 to 60 s. Positive pharyngeal N. gonorrhoeae was defined as a positive result on the strand displacement amplification test for the specimen from the oral-throat wash. N. gonorrhoeae was detected in the oral-throat wash specimens of 13 (31.7%) of the 41 male patients with gonococcal urethritis. Oral-throat wash with a nucleic acid amplification test can detect pharyngeal N. gonorrhoeae easily and efficiently.

  19. Herbarium specimens show contrasting phenological responses to Himalayan climate

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Robbie; Salick, Jan; Ranjitkar, Sailesh; Xu, Jianchu

    2014-01-01

    Responses by flowering plants to climate change are complex and only beginning to be understood. Through analyses of 10,295 herbarium specimens of Himalayan Rhododendron collected by plant hunters and botanists since 1884, we were able to separate these responses into significant components. We found a lack of directional change in mean flowering time over the past 45 y of rapid warming. However, over the full 125 y of collections, mean flowering time shows a significant response to year-to-year changes in temperature, and this response varies with season of warming. Mean flowering advances with annual warming (2.27 d earlier per 1 °C warming), and also is delayed with fall warming (2.54 d later per 1 °C warming). Annual warming may advance flowering through positive effects on overwintering bud formation, whereas fall warming may delay flowering through an impact on chilling requirements. The lack of a directional response suggests that contrasting phenological responses to temperature changes may obscure temperature sensitivity in plants. By drawing on large collections from multiple herbaria, made over more than a century, we show how these data may inform studies even of remote localities, and we highlight the increasing value of these and other natural history collections in understanding long-term change. PMID:25002486

  20. A Century of Shope Papillomavirus in Museum Rabbit Specimens.

    PubMed

    Escudero Duch, Clara; Williams, Richard A J; Timm, Robert M; Perez-Tris, Javier; Benitez, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Sylvilagus floridanus Papillomavirus (SfPV) causes growth of large horn-like tumors on rabbits. SfPV was described in cottontail rabbits (probably Sylvilagus floridanus) from Kansas and Iowa by Richard Shope in 1933, and detected in S. audubonii in 2011. It is known almost exclusively from the US Midwest. We explored the University of Kansas Natural History Museum for historical museum specimens infected with SfPV, using molecular techniques, to assess if additional wild species host SfPV, and whether SfPV occurs throughout the host range, or just in the Midwest. Secondary aims were to detect distinct strains, and evidence for strain spatio-temporal specificity. We found 20 of 1395 rabbits in the KU collection SfPV symptomatic. Three of 17 lagomorph species (S. nuttallii, and the two known hosts) were symptomatic, while Brachylagus, Lepus and eight additional Sylvilagus species were not. 13 symptomatic individuals were positive by molecular testing, including the first S. nuttallii detection. Prevalence of symptomatic individuals was significantly higher in Sylvilagus (1.8%) than Lepus. Half of these specimens came from Kansas, though new molecular detections were obtained from Jalisco-Mexico's first-and Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, and Texas, USA. We document the oldest lab-confirmed case (Kansas, 1915), pre-dating Shope's first case. SfPV amplification was possible from 63.2% of symptomatic museum specimens. Using multiple methodologies, rolling circle amplification and, multiple isothermal displacement amplification in addition to PCR, greatly improved detection rates. Short sequences were obtained from six individuals for two genes. L1 gene sequences were identical to all previously detected sequences; E7 gene sequences, were more variable, yielding five distinct SfPV1 strains that differing by less than 2% from strains circulating in the Midwest and Mexico, between 1915 and 2005. Our results do not clarify whether strains are host species specific, though

  1. Isolation Frequency Characteristics of Candida Species from Clinical Specimens.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ga-Yeon; Jeon, Jae-Sik; Kim, Jae Kyung

    2016-06-01

    Candida spp. is an invasive infectious fungus, a major risk factor that can increase morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. In this study, 2,508 Candida spp. were isolated from various clinical specimens collected from university hospitals from July 2011 to October 2014. They were identified in order to determine isolation frequencies and characteristics by specimen, gender, age group, year, season, and month. The strain-specific isolation rate of Candida spp. is in the order of Candida albicans (1,218 strains, 48.56%), Candida glabrata (416 strains, 16.59%), Candida utilis (305 strains, 12.16%), Candida tropicalis (304 strains, 12.12%), and Candida parapsilosis (116 strains, 4.63%) and these five species accounted for more than 94% of the total strains. Of the specimens, Candida spp. were most frequently isolated from urine-catheter, followed by urine-voided, blood, sputum, other, open pus, vaginal discharge, Tip, ear discharge, bronchial aspiration and bile, in that order. Looking at the age distribution, the detection rate of patients in their 60s and older was significantly higher at 75.8% (1,900/2,508). The detection rate of patients in their 20s and younger was shown to be very low at 2.55% (64/2,508). By year, the detection rate of non-albicans Candida spp. showed a tendency to gradually increase each year compared with C. albicans. As isolation of Candida spp. from clinical samples at the specie level can vary depending on characteristics of the patient, sample, season, etc., continual studies are required.

  2. A Century of Shope Papillomavirus in Museum Rabbit Specimens.

    PubMed

    Escudero Duch, Clara; Williams, Richard A J; Timm, Robert M; Perez-Tris, Javier; Benitez, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Sylvilagus floridanus Papillomavirus (SfPV) causes growth of large horn-like tumors on rabbits. SfPV was described in cottontail rabbits (probably Sylvilagus floridanus) from Kansas and Iowa by Richard Shope in 1933, and detected in S. audubonii in 2011. It is known almost exclusively from the US Midwest. We explored the University of Kansas Natural History Museum for historical museum specimens infected with SfPV, using molecular techniques, to assess if additional wild species host SfPV, and whether SfPV occurs throughout the host range, or just in the Midwest. Secondary aims were to detect distinct strains, and evidence for strain spatio-temporal specificity. We found 20 of 1395 rabbits in the KU collection SfPV symptomatic. Three of 17 lagomorph species (S. nuttallii, and the two known hosts) were symptomatic, while Brachylagus, Lepus and eight additional Sylvilagus species were not. 13 symptomatic individuals were positive by molecular testing, including the first S. nuttallii detection. Prevalence of symptomatic individuals was significantly higher in Sylvilagus (1.8%) than Lepus. Half of these specimens came from Kansas, though new molecular detections were obtained from Jalisco-Mexico's first-and Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, and Texas, USA. We document the oldest lab-confirmed case (Kansas, 1915), pre-dating Shope's first case. SfPV amplification was possible from 63.2% of symptomatic museum specimens. Using multiple methodologies, rolling circle amplification and, multiple isothermal displacement amplification in addition to PCR, greatly improved detection rates. Short sequences were obtained from six individuals for two genes. L1 gene sequences were identical to all previously detected sequences; E7 gene sequences, were more variable, yielding five distinct SfPV1 strains that differing by less than 2% from strains circulating in the Midwest and Mexico, between 1915 and 2005. Our results do not clarify whether strains are host species specific, though

  3. APTIMA® Trichomonas vaginalis, a transcription-mediated amplification assay for detection of Trichomonas vaginalis in urogenital specimens.

    PubMed

    Chapin, Kimberle; Andrea, Sarah

    2011-09-01

    The APTIMA(®) Trichomonas vaginalis (APTIMA TV; Gen-Probe Inc.) assay is the only amplification-based assay for T. vaginalis (TV) currently cleared by the US FDA. The assay was cleared in April 2011. APTIMA TV utilizes target capture specimen processing, transcription-mediated amplification and chemiluminescent probe hybridization for the qualitative detection of TV ribosomal RNA. The assay is used for the screening/diagnosis of trichomoniasis in women. Specimen types that can be used include physician-collected endocervical swabs, vaginal swabs, endocervical specimens collected in PreservCyt(®) (Thin Prep, Hologic Incorporated, MA, USA) solution and female urine specimens. The APTIMA TV assay has shown superior performance in side-by-side comparisons with other diagnostic methods in all patient populations and specimen types tested. Clinical sensitivity and specificity are >95 and 98%, respectively. The APTIMA TV assay fills a significant void in sexually transmitted infection diagnostics. PMID:21902528

  4. Controlled crack growth specimen for brittle systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calomino, Anthony M.; Brewer, David N.

    1992-01-01

    A pure Mode 1 fracture specimen and test procedure has been developed which provides extended, stable, through-thickness crack growth in ceramics and other brittle, nonmetallic materials. Fixed displacement loading, applied at the crack mouth, promotes stable crack extension by reducing the stored elastic strain energy. Extremely fine control of applied displacements is achieved by utilizing the Poisson's expansion of a compressively loaded cylindrical pin. Stable cracks were successfully grown in soda-lime glass and monolithic Al2O3 for lengths in excess of 2O mm without uncontrollable catastrophic failure.

  5. Controlled crack growth specimen for brittle systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calomino, Anthony M.; Brewer, David N.

    1990-01-01

    A pure Mode 1 fracture specimen and test procedure has been developed which provides extended, stable, through-thickness crack growth in ceramics and other brittle, nonmetallic materials. Fixed displacement loading, applied at the crack mouth, promotes stable crack extension by reducing the stored elastic strain energy. Extremely fine control of applied displacements is achieved by utilizing the Poisson's expansion of a compressively loaded cylindrical pin. Stable cracks were successfully grown in soda-lime glass and monolithic Al2O3 for lengths in excess of 20 mm without uncontrollable catastrophic failure.

  6. The Dugdale model for compact specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, S.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Plastic zone size and crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) equations were developed. Boundary collocation analyses were used to analyze the compact specimen subjected to various loading conditions (pin loads, concentrated forces, and uniform pressure acting on the crack surface). Stress intensity factor and crack surface displacement equations for some of these loadings were developed and used to obtain the Dugdale model. The results from the equations for plastic zone size and CTOD agreed well with numerical values calculated by Terada for crack length to width ratios greater than 0.4.

  7. The Dugdale model for the compact specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, S.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Plastic zone size and crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) equations were developed. Boundary collocation analyses were used to analyze the compact specimen subjected to various loading conditions (pin loads, concentrated forces, and uniform pressure acting on the crack surface). Stress intensity factor and crack surface displacement equations for some of these loadings were developed and used to obtain the Dugdale model. The results from the equations for plastic zone size and CTOD agreed well with numerical values calculated by Terada for crack length to width ratios greater than 0.4.

  8. Specimen size effect of explosive sensitivity under low velocity impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Danzhu; Chen, Pengwan; Dai, Kaida; Zhou, Qiang

    2014-05-01

    Low velocity impact may ignite the solid high explosives and cause undesired explosion incidents. The safety of high explosives under low velocity impact is one of the most important issues in handling, manufacture, storage, and transportation procedures. Various evaluation tests have been developed for low velocity impact scenarios, including, but not limited to the drop hammer test, the Susan test, the Spigot test, and the Steven test, with a charge mass varying from tens of milligrams to several kilograms. The effects of specimen size on explosive sensitivity were found in some impact tests such as drop hammer test and Steven tests, including the threshold velocity/height and reaction violence. To analyse the specimen size effects on explosive sensitivity under low velocity impacts, we collected the impact sensitivity data of several PBX explosives in the drop hammer test, the Steven test, the Susan test and the Spigot test. The effective volume of explosive charge and the critical specific mechanical energy were introduced to investigate the size-effect on the explosive reaction thresholds. The effective volumes of explosive charge in Steven test and Spigot test were obtained by numerical simulation, due to the deformation localization of the impact loading. The critical specific mechanical energy is closely related to the effective volume of explosive charge. The results show that, with the increase of effective volume, the critical mechanical energy needed for explosive ignition decreases and tends to reach a constant value. The mechanisms of size effects on explosive sensitivity are also discussed.

  9. Biological specimen banks in neonatal screening.

    PubMed

    Nørgaard-Pedersen, B; Simonsen, H

    1999-12-01

    The Danish neonatal screening program analyses dried blood spot samples (DBSS) from close to 70,000 newborns annually from Denmark, Greenland and the Faroe Islands. Since 1982, all DBSS have been stored in a biological specimen bank at -20 degrees C as a routine procedure after analysis. Before sampling, parents are given written information about the screening tests, the biobank and its use, and can choose to opt out. Since 1993 the biobank has been regulated by specific legislation, and thus assumes a unique position among biological specimen banks. Its purposes are: (i) diagnosis and treatment of diseases screened for, including repeat testing, quality assurance and group statistics; (ii) other diagnostic uses during infancy; and (iii) research projects. The stored samples have been used successfully to diagnose a range of genetic diseases using biochemical and molecular genetic assays, and to diagnose congenital CMV and toxoplasmosis infections using assays for specific IgM antibodies and pathogen nucleic acids. The unbiased nature and comprehensive coverage of the samples in the biobank make them attractive for research purposes. Our studies have focused on the epidemiology of genetic disease alleles and other molecular disease markers and on retrospective screening projects, which have allowed rapid appraisal of the performance of novel screening modalities, saving years of prospective screening trials. Storage of neonatal screening samples is thus beneficial not only to the individual testees, but also to future generations of newborns.

  10. Salvia divinorum: toxicological aspects and analysis in human biological specimens.

    PubMed

    Margalho, Cláudia; Corte-Real, Francisco; López-Rivadulla, Manuel; Gallardo, Eugenia

    2016-07-01

    The identification and quantitation of the main psychoactive component of Salvia divinorum (salvinorin A) in biological specimens are crucial in forensic and clinical toxicology. Despite all the efforts made, its uncontrolled abuse has increased quickly, exposing its users' health to serious risks both in the short and long term. The use of alternative biological matrices in toxicological analyzes can be advantageous as complementary postmortem samples, or in situations when neither blood nor urine can be collected; they may be useful tools in those determinations, providing important information about prior exposure. The aim of this article is to present a brief summary of legal aspects of Salvia divinorum and salvinorin A, including the methods used for the determination of the latter in biological matrices. PMID:27277872

  11. Specimen preparation for cryogenic coherent X-ray diffraction imaging of biological cells and cellular organelles by using the X-ray free-electron laser at SACLA.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Amane; Sekiguchi, Yuki; Oroguchi, Tomotaka; Okajima, Koji; Fukuda, Asahi; Oide, Mao; Yamamoto, Masaki; Nakasako, Masayoshi

    2016-07-01

    Coherent X-ray diffraction imaging (CXDI) allows internal structures of biological cells and cellular organelles to be analyzed. CXDI experiments have been conducted at 66 K for frozen-hydrated biological specimens at the SPring-8 Angstrom Compact Free-Electron Laser facility (SACLA). In these cryogenic CXDI experiments using X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) pulses, specimen particles dispersed on thin membranes of specimen disks are transferred into the vacuum chamber of a diffraction apparatus. Because focused single XFEL pulses destroy specimen particles at the atomic level, diffraction patterns are collected through raster scanning the specimen disks to provide fresh specimen particles in the irradiation area. The efficiency of diffraction data collection in cryogenic experiments depends on the quality of the prepared specimens. Here, detailed procedures for preparing frozen-hydrated biological specimens, particularly thin membranes and devices developed in our laboratory, are reported. In addition, the quality of the frozen-hydrated specimens are evaluated by analyzing the characteristics of the collected diffraction patterns. Based on the experimental results, the internal structures of the frozen-hydrated specimens and the future development for efficient diffraction data collection are discussed. PMID:27359147

  12. 49 CFR 40.67 - When and how is a directly observed collection conducted?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Urine Specimen Collections § 40.67 When and how is a... specimen a notation to this effect (e.g., collection 1 of 2, or 2 of 2) and the specimen ID number of the... employee's body into the collection container. (k) As the observer but not the collector, you must not...

  13. 10 CFR 26.87 - Collection sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Collection sites. 26.87 Section 26.87 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.87 Collection sites. (a) Each FFD program must have one or more designated collection sites that have all necessary...

  14. 10 CFR 26.87 - Collection sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Collection sites. 26.87 Section 26.87 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.87 Collection sites. (a) Each FFD program must have one or more designated collection sites that have all necessary...

  15. 10 CFR 26.87 - Collection sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Collection sites. 26.87 Section 26.87 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.87 Collection sites. (a) Each FFD program must have one or more designated collection sites that have all necessary...

  16. Maintaining respect and fairness in the usage of stored shared specimens

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Every year, research specimens are shipped from one institution to another as well as across national boundaries. A significant proportion of specimens move from poor to rich countries. Concerns are always raised on the future usage of the stored specimens shipped to research insitutions from developing countries. Creating awareness of the processes is required in all sectors involved in biomedical research. To maintain fairness and respect in sharing biomedical specimens and reserch products requires safeguarding by Ethics Review Committees in both provider and recepient institutions. Training in basic ethical principles in research is required to all sectors involved in biomedical research so as to level up the research playing field. Discussion By agreeing to provide specimens, individuals and communities from whom samples are collected would have placed their trust and all ensuing up-keep of the specimens to the researchers. In most collaborative set-up, laid down material transfer agreements are negotiated and signed before the shipment of specimens. Researchers, research ethics committees (RECs) and institutions in the countries of origin are supposed to serve as overseers of the specimens. There is need to advocate for honesty in sample handling and sharing, and also need to oversee any written commitments by researchers, RECs and institutions at source as well as in recipient institution. Commitments from source RECs and Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) and in the receiving institution on overseeing the future usage of stored specimens are required; including the ultimate confirmation abiding by the agreement. Training in ethical issues pertaining to sample handling and biomedical research in general is essential at all levels of academic pursuit. While sharing of biological specimens and research data demands honesty and oversight by ethical regulatory agents from both institutions in developing country and recepient institutions in developed

  17. Adult Books for Young Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Betty

    1997-01-01

    Considers the differences between young adult and adult books and maintains that teachers must be familiar with young adults' tastes for both. Suggests that traffic between these publishing divisions is a two-way street, with young adults reading adult books and adults reading young adult books. (TB)

  18. Evaluation of Two Enzyme Immunoassays for Detection of Human Rotaviruses in Fecal Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Eing, Bodo R.; May, Guenter; Baumeister, Horst G.; Kühn, Joachim E.

    2001-01-01

    The two assays evaluated in this study (the Ridascreen rotavirus and the Pathfinder rotavirus) exhibited comparable sensitivities (100%) but highly divergent positive predictive values (93.74 and 57.7%, respectively) when compared on 393 specimens. This difference should be considered when using these tests on collectives with an unknown or low prevalence. PMID:11724877

  19. West Nile virus documented in Indonesia from acute febrile illness specimens.

    PubMed

    Myint, Khin Saw Aye; Kosasih, Herman; Artika, I Made; Perkasa, Aditya; Puspita, Mita; Ma'roef, Chairin Nisa; Antonjaya, Ungke; Ledermann, Jeremy P; Powers, Ann M; Alisjahbana, Bachti

    2014-02-01

    We report the presence of West Nile virus in a cryopreserved, dengue-negative serum specimen collected from an acute fever case on Java in 2004-2005. The strain belongs to genotype lineage 2, which has recently been implicated in human outbreaks in Europe.

  20. First records of Nocomis biguttatus (Hornyhead Chub) from West Virginia discovered in museum voucher specimens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welsh, Stuart; Cincotta, Daniel A.; Starnes, Wayne C.

    2013-01-01

    Specimens of Nocomis biguttatus (Hornyhead Chub) from South Fork Hughes River (Little Kanawha River drainage, WV) were discovered in two museum lots at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences. These accessions, collected in 1960 and 1966, represent an addition to the state fauna and are the first distribution records for this species from the Appalachian Plateau, WV

  1. Adult Learning and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubenson, Kjell, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    As individuals and societies try to respond to fundamental economic and social transformation, the field of adult learning and education is rapidly getting increased attention and new topics for research on adult learning have emerged. This collection of articles from the International Encyclopedia of Education 3e offers practitioners and…

  2. Is cost-related non-collection of prescriptions associated with a reduction in health? Findings from a large-scale longitudinal study of New Zealand adults

    PubMed Central

    Jatrana, Santosh; Richardson, Ken; Norris, Pauline; Crampton, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether cost-related non-collection of prescription medication is associated with a decline in health. Settings New Zealand Survey of Family, Income and Employment (SoFIE)-Health. Participants Data from 17 363 participants with at least two observations in three waves (2004–2005, 2006–2007, 2008–2009) of a panel study were analysed using fixed effects regression modelling. Primary outcome measures Self-rated health (SRH), physical health (PCS) and mental health scores (MCS) were the health measures used in this study. Results After adjusting for time-varying confounders, non-collection of prescription items was associated with a 0.11 (95% CI 0.07 to 0.15) unit worsening in SRH, a 1.00 (95% CI 0.61 to 1.40) unit decline in PCS and a 1.69 (95% CI 1.19 to 2.18) unit decline in MCS. The interaction of the main exposure with gender was significant for SRH and MCS. Non-collection of prescription items was associated with a decline in SRH of 0.18 (95% CI 0.11 to 0.25) units for males and 0.08 (95% CI 0.03 to 0.13) units for females, and a decrease in MCS of 2.55 (95% CI 1.67 to 3.42) and 1.29 (95% CI 0.70 to 1.89) units for males and females, respectively. The interaction of the main exposure with age was significant for SRH. For respondents aged 15–24 and 25–64 years, non-collection of prescription items was associated with a decline in SRH of 0.12 (95% CI 0.03 to 0.21) and 0.12 (95% CI 0.07 to 0.17) units, respectively, but for respondents aged 65 years and over, non-collection of prescription items had no significant effect on SRH. Conclusion Our results show that those who do not collect prescription medications because of cost have an increased risk of a subsequent decline in health. PMID:26553826

  3. Detection of alpha human papillomaviruses in archival formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue specimens.

    PubMed

    Kocjan, Boštjan J; Hošnjak, Lea; Poljak, Mario

    2016-03-01

    Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue specimens stored in pathology departments worldwide are an invaluable source for diagnostic purposes when fresh clinical material is unavailable as well as for retrospective molecular and epidemiological studies, especially when dealing with rare clinical conditions for which prospective collection is not feasible. Accurate detection of HPV infection in these specimens is particularly challenging because nucleic acids are often degraded and therefore, not suitable for amplification of larger fragments of the viral genome or viral gene transcripts. This review provides a brief summary of molecular methods for detecting alpha-HPV DNA/RNA in FFPE tissue specimens. We specifically address the key procedural and environmental factors that have the greatest impact on the quality of nucleic acids extracted from FFPE tissue specimens, and describe some solutions that can be used to increase their integrity and/or amplifiability. Moreover, commonly used methods for HPV DNA/RNA detection in FFPE tissue specimens are presented and discussed, focusing on studies using polymerase chain reaction as an HPV detection method and published after 1999. Finally, we briefly summarize our 22 years of experience with HPV detection in FFPE tissue specimens. PMID:26514313

  4. Detection of alpha human papillomaviruses in archival formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue specimens.

    PubMed

    Kocjan, Boštjan J; Hošnjak, Lea; Poljak, Mario

    2016-03-01

    Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue specimens stored in pathology departments worldwide are an invaluable source for diagnostic purposes when fresh clinical material is unavailable as well as for retrospective molecular and epidemiological studies, especially when dealing with rare clinical conditions for which prospective collection is not feasible. Accurate detection of HPV infection in these specimens is particularly challenging because nucleic acids are often degraded and therefore, not suitable for amplification of larger fragments of the viral genome or viral gene transcripts. This review provides a brief summary of molecular methods for detecting alpha-HPV DNA/RNA in FFPE tissue specimens. We specifically address the key procedural and environmental factors that have the greatest impact on the quality of nucleic acids extracted from FFPE tissue specimens, and describe some solutions that can be used to increase their integrity and/or amplifiability. Moreover, commonly used methods for HPV DNA/RNA detection in FFPE tissue specimens are presented and discussed, focusing on studies using polymerase chain reaction as an HPV detection method and published after 1999. Finally, we briefly summarize our 22 years of experience with HPV detection in FFPE tissue specimens.

  5. A new specimen management system using RFID technology.

    PubMed

    Shim, Hun; Uh, Young; Lee, Seung Hwan; Yoon, Young Ro

    2011-12-01

    The specimen management system with barcode needs to be improved in order to solve inherent problems in work performance. This study describes the application of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) which is the solution for the problems associated with specimen labeling and management. A new specimen management system and architecture with RFID technology for clinical laboratory was designed. The suggested system was tested in various conditions such as durability to temperature and aspect of effective utilization of new work flow under a virtual hospital clinical laboratory environment. This system demonstrates its potential application in clinical laboratories for improving work flow and specimen management. The suggested specimen management system with RFID technology has advantages in comparison to the traditional specimen management system with barcode in the aspect of mass specimen processing, robust durability of temperature, humidity changes, and effective specimen tracking.

  6. 49 CFR 173.462 - Preparation of specimens for testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    .... (b) Any deviation found under paragraph (a) of this section from the specified design must be... specimens for testing. (a) Each specimen (i.e., sample, prototype or scale model) must be examined...

  7. A new specimen management system using RFID technology.

    PubMed

    Shim, Hun; Uh, Young; Lee, Seung Hwan; Yoon, Young Ro

    2011-12-01

    The specimen management system with barcode needs to be improved in order to solve inherent problems in work performance. This study describes the application of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) which is the solution for the problems associated with specimen labeling and management. A new specimen management system and architecture with RFID technology for clinical laboratory was designed. The suggested system was tested in various conditions such as durability to temperature and aspect of effective utilization of new work flow under a virtual hospital clinical laboratory environment. This system demonstrates its potential application in clinical laboratories for improving work flow and specimen management. The suggested specimen management system with RFID technology has advantages in comparison to the traditional specimen management system with barcode in the aspect of mass specimen processing, robust durability of temperature, humidity changes, and effective specimen tracking. PMID:20703777

  8. DNA probes for the detection of mycoplasmas in genital specimens.

    PubMed

    Roberts, M C; Hooton, M; Stamm, W; Holmes, K K; Kenny, G E

    1987-06-01

    The utility of whole-genomic DNA probes for the detection of infections by genital mycoplasmas was investigated in 220 men attending a sexually transmitted diseases clinic. In 144 patients, probe results were compared with quantitative culture results. The prevalence of Mycoplasma hominis was 11% by culture, whereas the prevalence of ureaplasmas was 38%. The M. hominis DNA probe detected 9 of 16 M. hominis culture-positive specimens and 2 of 128 culture-negative specimens. The Ureaplasma urealyticum DNA probe detected 36 of 57 U. urealyticum culture-positive specimens and 18 of 87 culture-negative specimens. Most of the probe-negative culture-positive specimens had colony counts of less than 10(3) organisms/ml of specimen. The DNA probe does not require viable organisms, and the probe-positive, culture-negative specimens suggest that false-negative cultures occurred, perhaps due to specimen handling or insensitivity of culture methods for some strains of mycoplasmas.

  9. Specimen illumination apparatus with optical cavity for dark field illumination

    DOEpatents

    Pinkel, Daniel; Sudar, Damir; Albertson, Donna

    1999-01-01

    An illumination apparatus with a specimen slide holder, an illumination source, an optical cavity producing multiple reflection of illumination light to a specimen comprising a first and a second reflective surface arranged to achieve multiple reflections of light to a specimen is provided. The apparatus can further include additional reflective surfaces to achieve the optical cavity, a slide for mounting the specimen, a coverslip which is a reflective component of the optical cavity, one or more prisms for directing light within the optical cavity, antifading solutions for improving the viewing properties of the specimen, an array of materials for analysis, fluorescent components, curved reflective surfaces as components of the optical cavity, specimen detection apparatus, optical detection equipment, computers for analysis of optical images, a plane polarizer, fiberoptics, light transmission apertures, microscopic components, lenses for viewing the specimen, and upper and lower mirrors above and below the specimen slide as components of the optical cavity. Methods of using the apparatus are also provided.

  10. Apparatus for determining thermophysical properties of test specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creel, T. R., Jr.; Jones, R. A.; Corwin, R. R.; Kramer, J. S. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Apparatus is described for directly measuring the quantity square root of pck of a test specimen such as a wind tunnel model where p is density, c is the specific heat and k is the thermal conductivity of the specimen. The test specimen and a reference specimen are simultaneously subjected to the heat from a heat source. A thermocouple is attached to the reference specimen for producing a first electrical analog signal proportional to the heat rate Q that the test specimen is subjected to and an infrared radiometer that is aimed at the test specimen produces a second electrical analog signal proportional to the surface temperature T of the test specimen. An analog-to-digital converter converts the first and second electrical analog signals to digital signals. These digital signals are applied to a computer for determining the quantity.

  11. Development of headspace SPME method for analysis of volatile organic compounds present in human biological specimens.

    PubMed

    Kusano, Maiko; Mendez, Eladio; Furton, Kenneth G

    2011-06-01

    In recent years, interest has increased regarding the identification of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) for metabolic profiling, human scent identification of the living and deceased, and diagnostic potentials for certain diseases that are known for its association with distinct odor. In this study, a method has been developed that is capable of sampling, identifying, and differentiating the VOCs present in various biological specimens of forensic importance (blood, breath, buccal cells, and urine) taken from the same individuals. The developed method requires a pretreatment step to remove targeted VOCs from the sampling apparatus prior to sampling of the individual specimens. The VOCs collected from the biological specimens were characterized by solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with ratios of the most abundant and frequent VOCs compared using qualitative and semiquantitative methods. Blood, breath, and buccal cells required extraction procedures ranging from 18 to 21 h in order to optimize the limit of detection, which averaged 5-15 ng across these specimens. The optimal method for measuring urine VOCs was complete in less than an hour; however, the limit of detection was higher with a range of 10-40 ng quantifiable. The demonstrated sensitivity and reproducibility of the methods developed allow for population studies of human scent VOCs from various biological specimen collection kits used in the forensic and clinical fields.

  12. Comparative analysis of hospital and forensic laboratory ethanol concentrations: A 15 month investigation of antemortem specimens.

    PubMed

    Saitman, Alec; Estrada, Julio; Fitzgerald, Robert L; McIntyre, Iain M

    2015-07-01

    Quantitative serum alcohol concentrations from regional hospitals (from specimens collected at time of hospital admission) were compared to results from whole blood (from specimens collected at the time of hospital admission) concentrations measured at the San Diego County Medical Examiner's Office (SDCMEO). Over a 15 month period (January 2012 to March 2013), the postmortem forensic toxicology laboratory analyzed a total of 2,321 cases. Of these, 280 were hospital cases (antemortem) representing 12% of the overall Medical Examiner toxicology casework. 59 of the 280 hospital cases (or 21%) screened positive for alcohol (ethanol). 39 of these 59 cases were included in the study based on available specimens for quantitative analyses. This investigation indicated that serum hospital ethanol concentrations correlated well (R(2) = 0.942) with ethanol values determined at SDCMEO (generally measured in whole blood). There was an observed negative bias with an average of -14.1%. A paired t-test was applied to the data and it was shown that this observed bias is statistically significant. These differences in ethanol concentrations could result from differences in specimen, analytical techniques, and/or calibration. The potential for specimen contamination is also discussed.

  13. Dissolution of bulk specimens of silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, W. F.; Merkle, E. J.

    1981-01-01

    An accurate chemical characterization of silicon nitride has become important in connection with current efforts to incorporate components of this material into advanced heat engines. However, there are problems concerning a chemical analysis of bulk silicon nitride. Current analytical methods require the pulverization of bulk specimens. A pulverization procedure making use of grinding media, on the other hand, will introduce contaminants. A description is given of a dissolution procedure which overcomes these difficulties. It has been found that up to at least 0.6 g solid pieces of various samples of hot pressed and reaction bonded silicon nitride can be decomposed in a mixture of 3 mL hydrofluoric acid and 1 mL nitric acid overnight at 150 C in a Parr bomb. High-purity silicon nitride is completely soluble in nitric acid after treatment in the bomb. Following decomposition, silicon and hydrofluoric acid are volatilized and insoluble fluorides are converted to a soluble form.

  14. Recording and submitting specimen history data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franson, J. Christian

    1987-01-01

    Webster defines history as "a chronological record of significant events." In wildlife disease investigations, determining the history or background of a problem is the first significant step in establishing a diagnosis. You can greatly assist the diagnostic process by providing a thorough history with specimens yo submit. This information is also of value in understanding the natural history of disease outbreaks, and is difficult if not impossible to obtain after the event has occurred. Detailed field observations during the course of a die-off and investigation of significant events preceding it also provide valuable information on which to base corrective actions. Remember, the most helpful information is that which obtained at the time of the event by a sensitive and aware observer.

  15. Examination of large intestine resection specimens

    PubMed Central

    Burroughs, S; Williams, G

    2000-01-01

    Macroscopic examination of large intestinal resection specimens by the surgical pathologist provides important diagnostic and prognostic information. This review summarises current recommended protocols and evidence based guidelines for gross description, dissection, and histological block selection in both neoplastic and non-neoplastic colorectal disease. Specific lesions discussed include colorectal cancer, polypectomies and polyposis syndromes, and inflammatory bowel disease. Microscopic examination is briefly described, with emphasis on certain pitfalls that might be encountered in routine practice. A section covering special techniques for the investigation of occult bleeding is included. J Clin Pathol(J Clin Pathol 2000;53:344–349) Key Words: large intestine • colorectal cancer • inflammatory bowel disease PMID:10889815

  16. Obtaining parotid saliva specimens after major surgery.

    PubMed

    Good, Marion; Wotman, Stephen; Anderson, Gene Cranston; Ahn, Sukhee; Cong, Xiaomei

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and test a standard method of collecting saliva from postoperative patients. Saliva was collected from patients following major abdominal surgery from both parotid glands in intraoral cups and measured in milliliters. Trained research nurses stimulated saliva production with lemon juice and collected saliva at 4 time points on postoperative day 2. Collection time was measured with a stopwatch, and flow rate was calculated by dividing the amount in milliliters by collection time in minutes. Attrition was 9% due to ineligibility after enrollment and 1 withdrawal. In participating patients (n = 68), there were 272 tests planned and 28% were missing. The reasons were postoperative health problems, hospital discharge, and not wanting to be bothered. When saliva collection attempts were made, three-fourths were successful, but the remainder resulted in "dry mouth." Milliliters, minutes, and flow rate were calculated with and without those with dry mouth. Mean flow rates were 0.23 to 0.33 ml/min excluding those with dry mouth and 0.17 to 0.24 ml/min including those with dry mouth. Saliva variables were correlated with antihypertension medications, opioids, opioid side effects, and length of surgery, but statistically significant correlations were not found consistently at all 4 time points. The findings suggest that nurse-researchers studying biological markers can successfully collect saliva from postoperative patients if they recognize the difficulties and make efforts to minimize and control for them.

  17. Drone Transport of Microbes in Blood and Sputum Laboratory Specimens.

    PubMed

    Amukele, Timothy K; Street, Jeff; Carroll, Karen; Miller, Heather; Zhang, Sean X

    2016-10-01

    Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) could potentially be used to transport microbiological specimens. To examine the impact of UAVs on microbiological specimens, blood and sputum culture specimens were seeded with usual pathogens and flown in a UAV for 30 ± 2 min. Times to recovery, colony counts, morphologies, and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS)-based identifications of the flown and stationary specimens were similar for all microbes studied.

  18. High-resolution, cryogenic, side-entry type specimen stage

    DOEpatents

    King, Wayne E.; Merkle, Karl L.

    1979-01-01

    A high-resolution, cryogenic side-entry type specimen stage includes a copper block within which a specimen can be positioned in the electron beam of an electron microscope, one end of the copper block constituting a specimen heat exchanger, means for directing a flow of helium at cryogenic temperature into the heat exchanger, and electrical leads running from the specimen to the exterior of the microscope for four point D.C. electrical resistivity measurements.

  19. Elastic-plastic analysis of the SS-3 tensile specimen

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, S.

    1998-09-01

    Tensile tests of most irradiated specimens of vanadium alloys are conducted using the miniature SS-3 specimen which is not ASTM approved. Detailed elastic-plastic finite element analysis of the specimen was conducted to show that, as long as the ultimate to yield strength ratio is less than or equal to 1.25 (which is satisfied by many irradiated materials), the stress-plastic strain curve obtained by using such a specimen is representative of the true material behavior.

  20. Accelerating plant DNA barcode reference library construction using herbarium specimens: improved experimental techniques.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chao; Dong, Wenpan; Shi, Shuo; Cheng, Tao; Li, Changhao; Liu, Yanlei; Wu, Ping; Wu, Hongkun; Gao, Peng; Zhou, Shiliang

    2015-11-01

    A well-covered reference library is crucial for successful identification of species by DNA barcoding. The biggest difficulty in building such a reference library is the lack of materials of organisms. Herbarium collections are potentially an enormous resource of materials. In this study, we demonstrate that it is likely to build such reference libraries using the reconstructed (self-primed PCR amplified) DNA from the herbarium specimens. We used 179 rosaceous specimens to test the effects of DNA reconstruction, 420 randomly sampled specimens to estimate the usable percentage and another 223 specimens of true cherries (Cerasus, Rosaceae) to test the coverage of usable specimens to the species. The barcode rbcLb (the central four-sevenths of rbcL gene) and matK was each amplified in two halves and sequenced on Roche GS 454 FLX+. DNA from the herbarium specimens was typically shorter than 300 bp. DNA reconstruction enabled amplification fragments of 400-500 bp without bringing or inducing any sequence errors. About one-third of specimens in the national herbarium of China (PE) were proven usable after DNA reconstruction. The specimens in PE cover all Chinese true cherry species and 91.5% of vascular species listed in Flora of China. It is very possible to build well-covered reference libraries for DNA barcoding of vascular species in China. As exemplified in this study, DNA reconstruction and DNA-labelled next-generation sequencing can accelerate the construction of local reference libraries. By putting the local reference libraries together, a global library for DNA barcoding becomes closer to reality.

  1. Assessment of Breast Specimens With or Without Calcifications in Diagnosing Malignant and Atypia for Mammographic Breast Microcalcifications Without Mass

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Yun-Chung; Juan, Yu-Hsiang; Ueng, Shir-Hwa; Lo, Yung-Feng; Huang, Pei-Chin; Lin, Yu-Ching; Chen, Shin-Cheh

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Presence of microcalcifications within the specimens frequently signifies a successful attempt of stereotactic vacuum-assisted breast biopsy (VABB) in obtaining a pathologic diagnosis of the breast microcalcifications. In this study, the authors aimed to assess and compare the accuracy and consistency of calcified or noncalcified specimens obtained from same sites of sampling on isolated microcalcifications without mass in diagnosing high-risk and malignant lesions. To the best of our knowledge, an individual case-based prospective comparison has not been reported. With the approval from institutional review board of our hospital (Chang Gung Memorial Hospital), the authors retrospectively reviewed all clinical cases of stereotactic VABBs on isolated breast microcalcifications without mass from our database. The authors included those having either surgery performed or had clinical follow-up of at least 3 years for analysis. All the obtained specimens with or without calcification were identified using specimen radiographs and separately submitted for pathologic evaluation. The concordance of diagnosis was assessed for both atypia and malignant lesions. A total of 390 stereotactic VABB procedures (1206 calcified and 1456 noncalcified specimens) were collected and reviewed. The consistent rates between calcified and noncalcified specimens were low for atypia and malignant microcalcifications (44.44% in flat epithelial atypia, 46.51% in atypical ductal hyperplasia, 55.73% in ductal carcinoma in situ, and 71.42% in invasive ductal carcinoma). The discordance in VABB diagnoses indicated that 41.33% of malignant lesions would be misdiagnosed by noncalcified specimens. Furthermore, calcified specimens showed higher diagnostic accuracy of breast cancer as compared with the noncalcified specimens (91.54 % versus 69.49%, respectively). The evaluation of both noncalcified specimens and calcified specimens did not show improvement of diagnostic accuracy as compared

  2. Plastinated Specimens Can Improve the Conceptual Quality of Biology Labs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Michael D.; Henry, R. W.

    2002-01-01

    Explains the benefits of using plastinated specimens on students' conceptual understanding. Argues for dropping the dissection component from introductory biology courses due to threatened animal populations and the high cost of providing some of the specimens. Describes how to use plastinated specimens in an investigative laboratory approach.…

  3. Environmental control system for cryogenic testing of tensile specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandergrift, E. F.; Yatsko, G. O.

    1967-01-01

    Environmental control system uses a special coil to permit the tensile testing of specimens which may be subjected to temperatures anywhere between liquid nitrogen and room temperature. The test specimen zone is surrounded by the coil which permits the selective flooding of the specimen with warm or cold gas.

  4. Adaptation of Museum Specimens for Use in Anatomical Teaching Aids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, P. F.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Color transparencies are prepared of a re-colored anatomical specimen after placing labels temporarily in position to indicate specific structures. The specimen is also radiographed to show skeletal and soft tissue structures. Cross-reference among the specimen, photographs, and radiographs is supplemented by examination and self-assessment…

  5. Detection of Measles Virus RNA in Air and Surface Specimens in a Hospital Setting.

    PubMed

    Bischoff, Werner E; McNall, Rebecca J; Blevins, Maria W; Turner, JoLyn; Lopareva, Elena N; Rota, Paul A; Stehle, John R

    2016-02-15

    Measles virus (MeV) is known to be highly contagious, with an infectious period lasting from 4 days before to 4 days after rash onset. An unvaccinated, young, female patient with measles confirmed by direct epidemiologic link was hospitalized on day 5 after rash onset. Environmental samples were collected over the 4-day period of hospitalization in a single room. MeV RNA was detectable in air specimens, on surface specimens, and on respirators on days 5-8 after rash onset. This is the first report of environmental surveillance for MeV, and the results suggest that MeV-infected fomites may be present in healthcare settings.

  6. Fixture For Compression-After-Impact Tests Of Thin Specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, Alan T.; Hodge, Andrew J.; Lance, David G.

    1994-01-01

    Special fixture holds specimen of laminated composite material in 20-klb (89-kN) or larger load frame for compression-after-impact test. In preparation for test, specimen damaged by dropping weight on it at known kinetic energy. During test, specimen loaded in compression, and load measured, until specimen fails. Measurement data used to characterize compressive strength of specimen after impact important indicator of ability of structural components made of composite material to tolerate damage. Tests give more-realistic measures of tolerance to damage.

  7. Apparatus and method for magnetically processing a specimen

    SciTech Connect

    Ludtka, Gerard M; Ludtka, Gail M; Wilgen, John B; Kisner, Roger A; Jaramillo, Roger A

    2013-09-03

    An apparatus for magnetically processing a specimen that couples high field strength magnetic fields with the magnetocaloric effect includes a high field strength magnet capable of generating a magnetic field of at least 1 Tesla and a magnetocaloric insert disposed within a bore of the high field strength magnet. A method for magnetically processing a specimen includes positioning a specimen adjacent to a magnetocaloric insert within a bore of a magnet and applying a high field strength magnetic field of at least 1 Tesla to the specimen and to the magnetocaloric insert. The temperature of the specimen changes during the application of the high field strength magnetic field due to the magnetocaloric effect.

  8. M553 sphere forming experiment: Pure nickel specimen evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, P. C.; Peters, E. T.

    1973-01-01

    A region or cap of very fine two-dimensional surface growth structure was observed at the top of three of the six pure nickel flight specimens. Such two-dimensional surface growth structures have been observed both on the ground-based specimens and on other surface areas of the flight specimens. However, the fine structures observed on the three flight samples are at least an order of magnitude finer than those previously observed, and resemble similar localized, fine, two-dimensional surface structures observed in both ground and flight specimens for the nickel alloys. The two-dimensional growth areas consist primarily of fine equiaxed grains, specimen SL-2.6, fine dendrites, specimen SL-2.5, or a core of fine equiaxed grains surrounded by a ring of fine dendrites, specimen SL-1.9.

  9. Strain energy release rate distributions for double cantilever beam specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crews, J. H., Jr.; Shivakumar, K. N.; Raju, I. S.

    1991-01-01

    A 24-ply composite double cantilever-beam specimen under mode I (opening) loading has been analyzed by a 3D FEM code that calculated along a straight delamination starter for several different specimen materials. An isotropic specimen was found to have a strain-energy release rate distribution which varied along its delamination front due to the boundary-layer effect and another effect associated with the anticlastic curvature of the bent specimen arms. A 0-deg graphite-reinforced epoxy specimen had a nearly-uniform strain-energy release rate distribution which dropped only near the edge, due to the boundary-layer effect, and a +/- 45-deg graphite/epoxy specimen exhibited a pronounced strain-energy release rate variation across the specimen width.

  10. A Century of Shope Papillomavirus in Museum Rabbit Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Escudero Duch, Clara; Williams, Richard A. J.; Timm, Robert M.; Perez-Tris, Javier; Benitez, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Sylvilagus floridanus Papillomavirus (SfPV) causes growth of large horn-like tumors on rabbits. SfPV was described in cottontail rabbits (probably Sylvilagus floridanus) from Kansas and Iowa by Richard Shope in 1933, and detected in S. audubonii in 2011. It is known almost exclusively from the US Midwest. We explored the University of Kansas Natural History Museum for historical museum specimens infected with SfPV, using molecular techniques, to assess if additional wild species host SfPV, and whether SfPV occurs throughout the host range, or just in the Midwest. Secondary aims were to detect distinct strains, and evidence for strain spatio-temporal specificity. We found 20 of 1395 rabbits in the KU collection SfPV symptomatic. Three of 17 lagomorph species (S. nuttallii, and the two known hosts) were symptomatic, while Brachylagus, Lepus and eight additional Sylvilagus species were not. 13 symptomatic individuals were positive by molecular testing, including the first S. nuttallii detection. Prevalence of symptomatic individuals was significantly higher in Sylvilagus (1.8%) than Lepus. Half of these specimens came from Kansas, though new molecular detections were obtained from Jalisco—Mexico’s first—and Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, and Texas, USA. We document the oldest lab-confirmed case (Kansas, 1915), pre-dating Shope’s first case. SfPV amplification was possible from 63.2% of symptomatic museum specimens. Using multiple methodologies, rolling circle amplification and, multiple isothermal displacement amplification in addition to PCR, greatly improved detection rates. Short sequences were obtained from six individuals for two genes. L1 gene sequences were identical to all previously detected sequences; E7 gene sequences, were more variable, yielding five distinct SfPV1 strains that differing by less than 2% from strains circulating in the Midwest and Mexico, between 1915 and 2005. Our results do not clarify whether strains are host species specific

  11. Maternal Screening for Hypothyroidism and Thyroiditis Using Filter Paper Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Foley, T.P.; Henry, J.J.; Hofman, L.F.; Sanfilippo, J.S.; Naylor, E.W.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background and Objective Hypothyroidism and autoimmune thyroiditis are more prevalent than previously considered in women during pregnancy and the postpartum, and are associated with adverse effects on the mother and her fetus. We determined the efficacy and accuracy of screening women for primary hypothyroidism and autoimmune thyroiditis by testing TSH and two thyroid antibodies (TAb): thyroperoxidase antibodies (TPOAb) and thyroglobulin antibodies (TgAb), in eluates of filter paper specimens collected during early pregnancy and the postpartum. Methods We enrolled 494 first-trimester pregnant women with no exclusion criteria into a prospective study to detect primary hypothyroidism and autoimmune thyroiditis. Finger stick blood was applied to filter paper, dried in room air, eluted, and promptly tested for TSH and TAb. A total of 178 of the pregnant women (36%) were tested in the early postpartum. Women with abnormal results had confirmatory serum tests. Results It was found that 91 pregnant women (18.4%) and 43 postpartum women (24.2%) had abnormal TSH values (>4.0 mU/L) and/or positive TAb; 140 pregnant women (28.3%) had TSH values >2.5 mU/L. All subjects with TSH values >4.0 mU/L tested positive for TAb. Eighteen women (3.6%) who tested normal during pregnancy tested abnormal in the postpartum. Conclusions This study confirms that TSH and TPOAb measured in eluates of blood-spotted filter paper specimens are excellent screening tests to detect primary hypothyroidism and autoimmune thyroiditis in pregnant and postpartum women. Results are very comparable to serum data in this population published in the literature. PMID:24025107

  12. Instrumental neutron activation analyses of lunar specimens.

    PubMed

    Golescaron, G G; Osawa, M; Randle, K; Beyer, R L; Jerome, D Y; Lindstrom, D J; Martin, M R; McKay, S M; Steinborn, T L

    1970-01-30

    Ten Apollo 11 specimnens were divided into 24 samtples. Sodillim contents of 8 diverse specimens clluster tightly abolit 0.3 percent. Plagioclase separated from sample 10044 contains aboltt 1.09 percent Na; barium is not enriched in the plagioclase separate. Contents of the rare earths are strikingly high, and relative abtmndances resemble those of calcium-rich achondrites or abyssal basalts but are depleted in Eu by factors of 2 to 3 and in La by about 20 percent. The plagioclase separate is enriched in Eu and pyroxenes (and opaqtte minerals are Eu-depleted. Fine fractions of 10044 are abotit 20 to 40 percent richer in most rare earths (50 percent for Eu) than coarse fractions, probably becaitse of the presence of small grains in which rare earths are mnarkedly concentrated. "Microgabbro" 10045 is imnpoverished, relative to the soil, in rare eartlhs and Hf. Ratios by mass of Zr to Hf are comlparatively low. Abttndances of Mn, Co, Fe, Sc and Cr stiggest systematic differences between igneous rocks on one hanid and breccias and "soil" on the other. Fromn the Co abuindances, no more than about 3 percent of the present "soil" can consist of chondritic mleteorite conitamination.

  13. Recording and submitting specimen history data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bodenstein, Barbara L.; Franson, J. Christian; Friend, Milton; Gibbs, Samantha E.J.; Wild, Margaret A.

    2016-06-14

    SummaryIn wildlife disease investigations, determining the history or background of a problem is the first significant step toward establishing a diagnosis and aiding agencies with management considerations. The diagnostic process and overall investigation is often greatly expedited by a chronological record accompanying specimens submitted for laboratory evaluation. Knowing where and when the outbreak is taking place, what the environmental conditions and species involved are, and clinical signs in sick animals, along with necropsy findings and diagnostic test results are important for understanding the natural history or epizootiology of disease outbreaks. It becomes increasingly difficult to retrospectively obtain all of the pertinent history as time passes. The most helpful information is that which is obtained at the time of the die-off event by perceptive field biologists and other observers. Significant events preceding morbidity and/or mortality also provide valuable information on which to base corrective actions. In this chapter, readers will find information regarding what type of information should be recorded, how it should be recorded and why it is relevant to a disease investigation. A thoughtful approach in providing as much information as possible surrounding the situation including about host species and the biotic and abiotic environment, greatly aids in determining the most likely causative agent(s).

  14. Evaluation of chlamydiazyme enzyme immunoassay for detection of Chlamydia trachomatis in urine specimens from men.

    PubMed Central

    Ehret, J M; Leszcynski, J C; Douglas, J M; Genova, S L; Chernesky, M A; Moncada, J; Schachter, J

    1993-01-01

    Paired first-voided urine and urethral swab specimens were collected from 540 men attending sexually transmitted disease clinics in three geographic locations. Urine specimens were tested for the presence of Chlamydia trachomatis by commercial enzyme immunoassay (Chlamydiazyme), and the results were compared with those of urethral swab cultures. Overall prevalence of urethral C. trachomatis by culture was 14%, and the Chlamydiazyme assay had an overall sensitivity of 83%, a specificity of 96%, a positive predictive value of 76%, and a negative predictive value of 97%. Sensitivity was greater (94%) in those culture-positive samples with a high antigen load (> or = 20 inclusion-forming units per coverslip) than those with a lower antigen load (68%). Assay of urine specimens from men attending sexually transmitted disease clinics by Chlamydiazyme appears to be a reliable, noninvasive method of detection of C. trachomatis infection, and further evaluation of its performance in asymptomatic and low-prevalence populations is indicated. PMID:8253969

  15. Museum genomics: low-cost and high-accuracy genetic data from historical specimens.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Kevin C; Singhal, Sonal; Macmanes, Matthew D; Ayroles, Julien F; Morelli, Toni Lyn; Rubidge, Emily M; Bi, Ke; Moritz, Craig C

    2011-11-01

    Natural history collections are unparalleled repositories of geographical and temporal variation in faunal conditions. Molecular studies offer an opportunity to uncover much of this variation; however, genetic studies of historical museum specimens typically rely on extracting highly degraded and chemically modified DNA samples from skins, skulls or other dried samples. Despite this limitation, obtaining short fragments of DNA sequences using traditional PCR amplification of DNA has been the primary method for genetic study of historical specimens. Few laboratories have succeeded in obtaining genome-scale sequences from historical specimens and then only with considerable effort and cost. Here, we describe a low-cost approach using high-throughput next-generation sequencing to obtain reliable genome-scale sequence data from a traditionally preserved mammal skin and skull using a simple extraction protocol. We show that single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from the genome sequences obtained independently from the skin and from the skull are highly repeatable compared to a reference genome.

  16. Ultrastable gold substrates: Properties of a support for high-resolution electron cryomicroscopy of biological specimens.

    PubMed

    Russo, Christopher J; Passmore, Lori A

    2016-01-01

    Electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) allows structure determination of a wide range of biological molecules and specimens. All-gold supports improve cryo-EM images by reducing radiation-induced motion and image blurring. Here we compare the mechanical and electrical properties of all-gold supports to amorphous carbon foils. Gold supports are more conductive, and have suspended foils that are not compressed by differential contraction when cooled to liquid nitrogen temperatures. These measurements show how the choice of support material and geometry can reduce specimen movement by more than an order of magnitude during low-dose imaging. We provide methods for fabrication of all-gold supports and preparation of vitrified specimens. We also analyse illumination geometry for optimal collection of high resolution, low-dose data. Together, the support structures and methods herein can improve the resolution and quality of images from any electron cryomicroscope.

  17. Ultrastable gold substrates: Properties of a support for high-resolution electron cryomicroscopy of biological specimens

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Christopher J.; Passmore, Lori A.

    2016-01-01

    Electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) allows structure determination of a wide range of biological molecules and specimens. All-gold supports improve cryo-EM images by reducing radiation-induced motion and image blurring. Here we compare the mechanical and electrical properties of all-gold supports to amorphous carbon foils. Gold supports are more conductive, and have suspended foils that are not compressed by differential contraction when cooled to liquid nitrogen temperatures. These measurements show how the choice of support material and geometry can reduce specimen movement by more than an order of magnitude during low-dose imaging. We provide methods for fabrication of all-gold supports and preparation of vitrified specimens. We also analyse illumination geometry for optimal collection of high resolution, low-dose data. Together, the support structures and methods herein can improve the resolution and quality of images from any electron cryomicroscope. PMID:26592474

  18. Genomic Treasure Troves: Complete Genome Sequencing of Herbarium and Insect Museum Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Staats, Martijn; Erkens, Roy H. J.; van de Vossenberg, Bart; Wieringa, Jan J.; Kraaijeveld, Ken; Stielow, Benjamin; Geml, József; Richardson, James E.; Bakker, Freek T.

    2013-01-01

    Unlocking the vast genomic diversity stored in natural history collections would create unprecedented opportunities for genome-scale evolutionary, phylogenetic, domestication and population genomic studies. Many researchers have been discouraged from using historical specimens in molecular studies because of both generally limited success of DNA extraction and the challenges associated with PCR-amplifying highly degraded DNA. In today's next-generation sequencing (NGS) world, opportunities and prospects for historical DNA have changed dramatically, as most NGS methods are actually designed for taking short fragmented DNA molecules as templates. Here we show that using a standard multiplex and paired-end Illumina sequencing approach, genome-scale sequence data can be generated reliably from dry-preserved plant, fungal and insect specimens collected up to 115 years ago, and with minimal destructive sampling. Using a reference-based assembly approach, we were able to produce the entire nuclear genome of a 43-year-old Arabidopsis thaliana (Brassicaceae) herbarium specimen with high and uniform sequence coverage. Nuclear genome sequences of three fungal specimens of 22–82 years of age (Agaricus bisporus, Laccaria bicolor, Pleurotus ostreatus) were generated with 81.4–97.9% exome coverage. Complete organellar genome sequences were assembled for all specimens. Using de novo assembly we retrieved between 16.2–71.0% of coding sequence regions, and hence remain somewhat cautious about prospects for de novo genome assembly from historical specimens. Non-target sequence contaminations were observed in 2 of our insect museum specimens. We anticipate that future museum genomics projects will perhaps not generate entire genome sequences in all cases (our specimens contained relatively small and low-complexity genomes), but at least generating vital comparative genomic data for testing (phylo)genetic, demographic and genetic hypotheses, that become increasingly more

  19. 36 CFR 2.5 - Research specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Section 2.5 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RESOURCE... outside of the park area and the primary purpose of the collection is to enhance the protection or... has the potential for improving the management and protection of park resources. (e) In park...

  20. Fracture toughness of brittle materials determined with chevron notch specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shannon, J. L., Jr.; Bursey, R. T.; Munz, D.; Pierce, W. S.

    1980-01-01

    The use of chevron-notch specimens for determining the plane strain fracture toughness (K sub Ic) of brittle materials is discussed. Three chevron-notch specimens were investigated: short bar, short rod, and four-point-bend. The dimensionless stress intensity coefficient used in computing K sub Ic is derived for the short bar specimen from the superposition of ligament-dependent and ligament-independent solutions for the straight through crack, and also from experimental compliance calibrations. Coefficients for the four-point-bend specimen were developed by the same superposition procedure, and with additional refinement using the slice model of Bluhm. Short rod specimen stress intensity coefficients were determined only by experimental compliance calibration. Performance of the three chevron-notch specimens and their stress intensity factor relations were evaluated by tests on hot-pressed silicon nitride and sintered aluminum oxide. Results obtained with the short bar and the four-point-bend specimens on silicon nitride are in good agreement and relatively free of specimen geometry and size effects within the range investigated. Results on aluminum oxide were affected by specimen size and chevron-notch geometry, believed due to a rising crack growth resistance curve for the material. Only the results for the short bar specimen are presented in detail.

  1. Contribution of natural history collection data to biodiversity assessment in national parks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Connell, A.F.; Gilbert, A.T.; Hatfield, J.S.

    2004-01-01

    There has been mounting interest in the use of museum and herbaria collections to assess biodiversity; information is often difficult to locate and access, however, and few recommendations are available for effectively using natural history collections. As part of an effort to inventory vertebrates and vascular plants in U.S. national parks, we searched manually and by computer for specimens originating within or adjacent to 14 parks throughout the northeastern United States. We compared the number of specimens located to collection size to determine whether there was any effect on detection rate of specimens. We evaluated the importance of park characteristics (e.g., age since establishment, size, theme [natural vs. cultural]) for influencing the number of specimens found in a collection. We located >31,000 specimens and compiled associated records (hereafter referred to as specimens) from 78 collections; >9000 specimens were park-significant, originating either within park boundaries or in the local township where the park was located. We found >2000 specimens by means of manual searches, which cost $0.001?0.15 per specimen searched and $0.81?151.95 per specimen found. Collection effort appeared relatively uniform between 1890 and 1980, with low periods corresponding to significant sociopolitical events. Detection rates for specimens were inversely related to collection size. Although specimens were most often located in collections within the region of interest, specimens can be found anywhere, particularly in large collections international in scope, suggesting that global searches will be necessary to evaluate historical biodiversity. Park characteristics indicated that more collecting effort occurred within or adjacent to larger parks established for natural resources than in smaller historical sites. Because many institutions have not yet established electronic databases for collections, manual searches can be useful for retrieving specimens. Our results

  2. Three decades of environmental specimen banking at the National Institute for Environmental Studies, Japan.

    PubMed

    Karube, Zin-Ichi; Tanaka, Atsushi; Takeuchi, Akinori; Takazawa, Yoshikatsu; Takagi, Mai; Kinoshita, Ayako; Seyama, Haruhiko; Shibata, Yasuyuki

    2015-02-01

    After two decades operation of the initial environmental specimen banking, a new program, Environmental Time Capsule Program, started in 2002 as a government-supported long-term program to construct a firm scientific basis for various environmental research studies. The program consists of long-term environmental specimen banking activity and specimen collection of endangered wildlife and is based on cryogenic sample preservation facility called Environmental Time Capsule building, which completed construction in 2004. After 9 years of extensive research, research focuses have been selected and the program was reorganized to the environmental sample collection part and endangered wildlife collection part in 2011. Due to huge environmental disaster caused by the Great East Japan earthquake and the tsunami as well as subsequent nuclear power plant accident at Fukushima, a new sampling and monitoring program started at affected areas in collaboration with the reorganized environmental sample collection and archiving program. Outlines of the quality assurance and quality control (QA/QC) activities in the program and future perspective under related international activities, particularly Stockholm Convention, are reported.

  3. The AIDS and Cancer Specimen Resource: Role in HIV/AIDS scientific discovery

    PubMed Central

    Ayers, Leona W; Silver, Sylvia; McGrath, Michael S; Orenstein, Jan M

    2007-01-01

    The AIDS Cancer and Specimen Resource (ACSR) supports scientific discovery in the area of HIV/AIDS-associated malignancies. The ACSR was established as a cooperative agreement between the NCI (Office of the Director, Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis) and regional consortia, University of California, San Francisco (West Coast), George Washington University (East Coast) and Ohio State University (Mid-Region) to collect, preserve and disperse HIV-related tissues and biologic fluids and controls along with clinical data to qualified investigators. The available biological samples with clinical data and the application process are described on the ACSR web site. The ACSR tissue bank has more than 100,000 human HIV positive specimens that represent different processing (43), specimen (15), and anatomical site (50) types. The ACSR provides special biospecimen collections and prepares speciality items, e.g., tissue microarrays (TMA), DNA libraries. Requests have been greatest for Kaposi's sarcoma (32%) and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (26%). Dispersed requests include 83% tissue (frozen and paraffin embedded), 18% plasma/serum and 9% other. ACSR also provides tissue microarrays of, e.g., Kaposi's sarcoma and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, for biomarker assays and has developed collaborations with other groups that provide access to additional AIDS-related malignancy specimens. ACSR members and associates have completed 63 podium and poster presentations. Investigators have submitted 125 letters of intent requests. Discoveries using ACSR have been reported in 61 scientific publications in notable journals with an average impact factor of 7. The ACSR promotes the scientific exploration of the relationship between HIV/AIDS and malignancy by participation at national and international scientific meetings, contact with investigators who have productive research in this area and identifying, collecting, preserving, enhancing, and dispersing HIV/AIDS-related malignancy specimens to

  4. Evaluation of composite flattened tubular specimen. [fatigue tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liber, T.; Daniel, I. M.

    1978-01-01

    Flattened tubular specimens of graphite/epoxy, S-glass/epoxy, Kevlar-49/epoxy, and graphite/S-glass/epoxy hybrid materials were evaluated under static and cyclic uniaxial tensile loading and compared directly with flat coupon data of the same materials generated under corresponding loading conditions. Additional development for the refinement of the flattened specimen configuration and fabrication was required. Statically tested graphite/epoxy, S-glass/epoxy, and Kevlar 49/epoxy flattened tube specimens exhibit somewhat higher average strengths than their corresponding flat coupons. Flattened tube specimens of the graphite/S-glass/epoxy hybrid and the graphite/epoxy flattened tube specimens failed in parasitic modes with consequential lower strength than the corresponding flat coupons. Fatigue tested flattened tube specimens failed in parasitic modes resulting in lower fatigue strengths than the corresponding flat coupons.

  5. Performance of the Amplicor human immunodeficiency virus type 1 PCR and analysis of specimens with false-negative results.

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, K L; Tosswill, J H; Parry, J V; Clewley, J P

    1997-01-01

    Over a 4-year period, the Roche Amplicor kit was used in a United Kingdom reference laboratory for the detection or confirmation of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 infection, particularly in infants born to HIV-infected mothers. Of 408 specimens from adults and older children tested, the 122 seronegative specimens were all Amplicor negative. Of the 286 seropositive specimens, 268 were Amplicor positive. On the basis of these results, the Amplicor assay has a specificity of 100% and a sensitivity of 93.7%. In addition, for 247 specimens from infants and young children, serological results may not have been diagnostic because of placental transfer of maternal antibodies. Forty-eight were Amplicor positive, and of the 199 Amplicor-negative specimens, 19 were assumed to be false negative on the basis of clinical data, serological markers (including p24 antigen), and/or results for previous or follow-up specimens. This represents a sensitivity of 75% for the Amplicor test for specimens from patients under 2 years of age. Of these 37 false-negative specimens plus 2 specimens from other laboratories, 31 could be characterized by amplifying extracted material from them by an in-house nested gag PCR spanning the Amplicor target region. The amplicons were sequenced and found to represent subtypes A (35.5%), B (22.6%), C (22.6%), D (16.1%), and G (3.2%). False-negative results by the Amplicor assay may be ascribed to low-target copy number, the physical behavior of one primer (SK462), and sequence variation in the target region of the other primer (SK431). PMID:9350745

  6. Optimization of image quality in breast tomosynthesis using lumpectomy and mastectomy specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timberg, Pontus; Ruschin, Mark; Båth, Magnus; Hemdal, Bengt; Andersson, Ingvar; Svahn, Tony; Mattsson, Sören; Tingberg, Anders

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine how image quality in breast tomosynthesis (BT) is affected when acquisition modes are varied, using human breast specimens containing malignant tumors and/or microcalcifications. Images of thirty-one breast lumpectomy and mastectomy specimens were acquired on a BT prototype based on a Mammomat Novation (Siemens) full-field digital mammography system. BT image acquisitions of the same specimens were performed varying the number of projections, angular range, and detector signal collection mode (binned and nonbinned in the scan direction). An enhanced filtered back projection reconstruction method was applied with constant settings of spectral and slice thickness filters. The quality of these images was evaluated via relative visual grading analysis (VGA) human observer performance experiments using image quality criteria. Results from the relative VGA study indicate that image quality increases with number of projections and angular range. A binned detector collecting mode results in less noise, but reduced resolution of structures. Human breast specimens seem to be suitable for comparing image sets in BT with image quality criteria.

  7. Quality assessment and preservation of RNA from biobank tissue specimens: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Caixeiro, Nicole Joaquim; Lai, Ken; Lee, Cheok Soon

    2016-03-01

    It is well recognised that genomic, proteomic and biomarker studies require properly annotated and well-characterised biospecimens. Consequently, this necessitates biobanks to collect, store and distribute biospecimens under stringent quality control and assurance measures. However, despite this realisation, there remains a lack of standardisation in quality management among biobanks and consensus as to which quality indicators provide the optimal molecular diagnostic performance tools and information for biospecimens. In an attempt to identify key factors that predict tissue specimen integrity and quality, this systematic review investigated the measures reported in the literature, which characterised the collection, processing and storage of high-quality tissue specimens. Our findings demonstrated RNA integrity, alone, may not be an effective measure of tissue quality. Furthermore, the frequently reported parameters related to biospecimen integrity, such as storage time, temperature, time to cryopreservation and tissue morphology were also not effective indicators of quality control and assurance. These findings suggest that it is unlikely that a single marker will provide the optimal diagnostic and performance information for biospecimens, but rather, a panel of markers assessing the molecular integrity of the lifespan of the biospecimen is required. Further work is needed to identify which factors predict specimen integrity and quality in biobanked tissue specimens. PMID:26598626

  8. Estimation of age-at-death for adult males using the acetabulum, applied to four Western European populations.

    PubMed

    Rissech, Carme; Estabrook, George F; Cunha, Eugenia; Malgosa, Assumpció

    2007-07-01

    Methods to estimate adult age from observations of skeletal elements are not very accurate and motivate the development of better methods. In this article, we test recently published method based on the acetabulum and Bayesian inference, developed using Coimbra collection (Portugal). In this study, to evaluate its utility in other populations, this methodology was applied to 394 specimens from four different documented Western European collections. Four strategies of analysis to estimate age were outlined: (a) each series separately; (b) on Lisbon collection, taken as a reference Coimbra collection; (c) on Barcelona collection, taken as a reference both Portuguese collections; and (d) on London collection taken as reference the three Iberian collections combined. Results indicate that estimates are accurate (83-100%). As might be expected, the least accurate estimates were obtained when the most distant collection was used as a reference. Observations of the fused acetabulum can be used to make accurate estimates of age for adults of any age, with less accurate estimates when a more distant reference collection is used.

  9. A New Approach to Standardize Multicenter Studies: Mobile Lab Technology for the German Environmental Specimen Bank

    PubMed Central

    Lermen, Dominik; Schmitt, Daniel; Bartel-Steinbach, Martina; Schröter-Kermani, Christa; Kolossa-Gehring, Marike; von Briesen, Hagen; Zimmermann, Heiko

    2014-01-01

    Technical progress has simplified tasks in lab diagnosis and improved quality of test results. Errors occurring during the pre-analytical phase have more negative impact on the quality of test results than errors encountered during the total analytical process. Different infrastructures of sampling sites can highly influence the quality of samples and therewith of analytical results. Annually the German Environmental Specimen Bank (ESB) collects, characterizes, and stores blood, plasma, and urine samples of 120–150 volunteers each on four different sampling sites in Germany. Overarching goal is to investigate the exposure to environmental pollutants of non-occupational exposed young adults combining human biomonitoring with questionnaire data. We investigated the requirements of the study and the possibility to realize a highly standardized sampling procedure on a mobile platform in order to increase the required quality of the pre-analytical phase. The results lead to the development of a mobile epidemiologic laboratory (epiLab) in the project “Labor der Zukunft” (future’s lab technology). This laboratory includes a 14.7 m2 reception area to record medical history and exposure-relevant behavior, a 21.1 m2 examination room to record dental fillings and for blood withdrawal, a 15.5 m2 biological safety level 2 laboratory to process and analyze samples on site including a 2.8 m2 personnel lock and a 3.6 m2 cryofacility to immediately freeze samples. Frozen samples can be transferred to their final destination within the vehicle without breaking the cold chain. To our knowledge, we herewith describe for the first time the implementation of a biological safety laboratory (BSL) 2 lab and an epidemiologic unit on a single mobile platform. Since 2013 we have been collecting up to 15.000 individual human samples annually under highly standardized conditions using the mobile laboratory. Characterized and free of alterations they are kept ready for retrospective

  10. Fixing Formalin: A Method to Recover Genomic-Scale DNA Sequence Data from Formalin-Fixed Museum Specimens Using High-Throughput Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Hykin, Sarah M; Bi, Ke; McGuire, Jimmy A

    2015-01-01

    For 150 years or more, specimens were routinely collected and deposited in natural history collections without preserving fresh tissue samples for genetic analysis. In the case of most herpetological specimens (i.e. amphibians and reptiles), attempts to extract and sequence DNA from formalin-fixed, ethanol-preserved specimens-particularly for use in phylogenetic analyses-has been laborious and largely ineffective due to the highly fragmented nature of the DNA. As a result, tens of thousands of specimens in herpetological collections have not been available for sequence-based phylogenetic studies. Massively parallel High-Throughput Sequencing methods and the associated bioinformatics, however, are particularly suited to recovering meaningful genetic markers from severely degraded/fragmented DNA sequences such as DNA damaged by formalin-fixation. In this study, we compared previously published DNA extraction methods on three tissue types subsampled from formalin-fixed specimens of Anolis carolinensis, followed by sequencing. Sufficient quality DNA was recovered from liver tissue, making this technique minimally destructive to museum specimens. Sequencing was only successful for the more recently collected specimen (collected ~30 ybp). We suspect this could be due either to the conditions of preservation and/or the amount of tissue used for extraction purposes. For the successfully sequenced sample, we found a high rate of base misincorporation. After rigorous trimming, we successfully mapped 27.93% of the cleaned reads to the reference genome, were able to reconstruct the complete mitochondrial genome, and recovered an accurate phylogenetic placement for our specimen. We conclude that the amount of DNA available, which can vary depending on specimen age and preservation conditions, will determine if sequencing will be successful. The technique described here will greatly improve the value of museum collections by making many formalin-fixed specimens available for

  11. Fixing Formalin: A Method to Recover Genomic-Scale DNA Sequence Data from Formalin-Fixed Museum Specimens Using High-Throughput Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Hykin, Sarah M; Bi, Ke; McGuire, Jimmy A

    2015-01-01

    For 150 years or more, specimens were routinely collected and deposited in natural history collections without preserving fresh tissue samples for genetic analysis. In the case of most herpetological specimens (i.e. amphibians and reptiles), attempts to extract and sequence DNA from formalin-fixed, ethanol-preserved specimens-particularly for use in phylogenetic analyses-has been laborious and largely ineffective due to the highly fragmented nature of the DNA. As a result, tens of thousands of specimens in herpetological collections have not been available for sequence-based phylogenetic studies. Massively parallel High-Throughput Sequencing methods and the associated bioinformatics, however, are particularly suited to recovering meaningful genetic markers from severely degraded/fragmented DNA sequences such as DNA damaged by formalin-fixation. In this study, we compared previously published DNA extraction methods on three tissue types subsampled from formalin-fixed specimens of Anolis carolinensis, followed by sequencing. Sufficient quality DNA was recovered from liver tissue, making this technique minimally destructive to museum specimens. Sequencing was only successful for the more recently collected specimen (collected ~30 ybp). We suspect this could be due either to the conditions of preservation and/or the amount of tissue used for extraction purposes. For the successfully sequenced sample, we found a high rate of base misincorporation. After rigorous trimming, we successfully mapped 27.93% of the cleaned reads to the reference genome, were able to reconstruct the complete mitochondrial genome, and recovered an accurate phylogenetic placement for our specimen. We conclude that the amount of DNA available, which can vary depending on specimen age and preservation conditions, will determine if sequencing will be successful. The technique described here will greatly improve the value of museum collections by making many formalin-fixed specimens available for

  12. Analysis of the stress state in an Iosipescu sheartest specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walrath, D. E.; Adams, D. F.

    1983-01-01

    The state of stress in an Iosipescu shear test specimen is analyzed, utilizing a finite element computer program. The influence of test fixture configuration on this stress state is included. Variations of the standard specimen configuration, including notch depth, notch angle, and notch root radius are modeled. The purpose is to establish guidelines for a specimen geometry which will accommodate highly orthotropic materials while minimizing stress distribution nonuniformities. Materials ranging from isotropic to highly orthotropic are considered. An optimum specimen configuration is suggested, along with changes in the test fixture.

  13. A new procedure for handling impervious biological specimens.

    PubMed

    Lindley, V A

    1992-06-01

    A new application of techniques for preparing impervious biological specimens for light microscopy (LM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been developed. Microwave irradiation was used to facilitate fixation. A priming technique was used to increase the bonding of the outer surface of the specimens with the resin. Priming the waxy or cuticular surface with Z-6040 (gamma-glycidoxypropyl trimethoxysilane) solved the problem of specimen "pull out" from the resin. Insect specimens with various types of cuticles (waxy or chitinous) and seeds were successfully studied ultrastructurally using this technique.

  14. Fission-gas-release rates from irradiated uranium nitride specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, M. B.; Kirchgessner, T. A.; Tambling, T. N.

    1973-01-01

    Fission-gas-release rates from two 93 percent dense UN specimens were measured using a sweep gas facility. Specimen burnup rates averaged .0045 and .0032 percent/hr, and the specimen temperatures ranged from 425 to 1323 K and from 552 to 1502 K, respectively. Burnups up to 7.8 percent were achieved. Fission-gas-release rates first decreased then increased with burnup. Extensive interconnected intergranular porosity formed in the specimen operated at over 1500 K. Release rate variation with both burnup and temperature agreed with previous irradiation test results.

  15. High-frequency ultrasonic imaging of thickly sliced specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyasaka, Chiaki; Tittmann, Bernhard R.; Chandraratna, Premindra A. N.

    2003-07-01

    It has been reported that a mechanical scanning reflection acoustic microscope (hereinafter called simply "SAM"), using high frequency ultrasonic tone-burst waves, can form a horizontal cross-sectional image (i.e., c-scan image) showing a highly resolved cellular structure of biological tissue. However, the tissue prepared for the SAM has been mostly a thinly sectioned specimen. In this study, the SAM images of specimens thickly sectioned from the tissue were analyzed. Optical and scanning acoustic microscopies were used to evaluate tissues of human small intestine and esophagus. For preparing thin specimens, the tissue was embedded in paraffin, and substantially sectioned at 5-10μm by the microtome. For optical microscopy, the tissue was stained with hematoxylin and eosin, and affixed onto glass substrates. For scanning acoustic microscopy, two types of specimens were prepared: thinly sectioned specimens affixed on the glass substrate, wherein the specimens were deparaffinized in xylene, but not stained, and thickely sectioned specimens. Images of the thick specimens obtained with frequency at 200 MHz revealed cellular structures. The morphology was very similar to that seen in the thinly sectioned specimens with optical and scanning acoustic microscopy. In addition, scanning electron microscopy was used to compare the images of biological tissue. An acoustic lens with frequency at 200 MHz permitted the imaging of surface and/or subsurface of microstructures in the thick sections of small intestine and esophagus.

  16. Revolutionizing the Use of Natural History Collections in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Karen E.; Prather, L. Alan; Cook, Joseph A.; Woolley, James; Bart, Henry L., Jr.; Monfils, Anna K.; Sierwald, Petra

    2014-01-01

    Natural history collections are an irreplaceable and extensive record of life, and form the basis of our understanding of biodiversity on our planet. Broad-scale educational accessibility to these vast specimen collections, specimen images, and their associated data is currently severely hampered. With emerging technologies and massive efforts…

  17. Building a Zoological Teaching Collection of Invertebrates Using Alcoholic Gel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mugnai, Riccardo; Barbosa, Julio Vianna; Baptista, Darcilio Fernandes

    2012-01-01

    Teaching collections are of great importance for science instruction at any level. There are several problems linked to the handling and curatorial management of this kind of collection. Among these is the relatively short life-span of specimens, due to the damage from continuous handling by students. Often the specimens used to replenish the…

  18. Making a Difference: Innovations in Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mauch, Werner, Ed.; Papen, Uta, Ed.

    This book highlights examples of innovative educational practices in the field of organized adult learning. Fifteen chapters present outcomes of collective research in the Innovations in Nonformal and Adult Education (INNAE) project. "Common Learning--Collective Research: Innovating Adult Education" (Werner Mauch, Uta Papen) describes the…

  19. Non-repeatable science: assessing the frequency of voucher specimen deposition reveals that most arthropod research cannot be verified

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Scientific findings need to be verifiable and grounded in repeatability. With specimen-level research this is in part achieved with the deposition of voucher specimens. These are labeled, curated, data-based specimens that have been deposited in a collection or museum, available for verification of the work and to ensure researchers are calling the same taxa by the same names. Voucher specimens themselves are the subject of research, from the discovery of new species by taxonomists to ecologists documenting historical records of invasive species. Our objective was to quantify the frequency of voucher specimen deposition in biodiversity and community ecology research through a survey of the peer-reviewed literature about arthropods, from 1989 until 2014. Overall rates of voucher deposition were alarmingly low, at under 25%. This rate increased significantly over time, with 35% of papers reporting on vouchers in 2014. Relative to the global mean, entomological research had a significantly higher rate of voucher deposition (46%), whereas researchers studying crustaceans deposited vouchers less than 6% of the time, significantly less than the mean. Researchers working in museums had a significantly higher frequency of voucher deposition. Our results suggest a significant culture shift about the process of vouchering specimens is required. There must be more education and mentoring about voucher specimens within laboratories and across different fields of study. Principal investigators and granting agencies need a proactive approach to ensuring specimen-level data are properly, long-term curated. Editorial boards and journals can also adopt policies to ensure papers are published only if explicit statements about the deposition of voucher specimens is provided. Although the gap is significant, achieving a higher rate of voucher specimen deposition is a worthy goal to ensure all research efforts are preserved for future generations. PMID:26339546

  20. Raman spectroscopic analyses of preserved historical specimens of human hair attributed to Robert Stephenson and Sir Isaac Newton.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Howell G M; Hassan, Nik F N; Wilson, Andrew S

    2004-10-01

    The Raman spectra of two historical specimens of human hair attributed to the engineer Robert Stephenson and scientist Sir Isaac Newton, preserved in private collections are reported. Comparisons are made with the Raman spectra of modern hair specimens and with hair from archaeological excavations. The hair spectra collected with a laser excitation of 785 nm are of a better quality than those collected using 1064 nm. The historical hair specimens are remarkably well-defined spectroscopically in terms of the amide I vibrational mode and the [small nu](SS), ascribed to a predominantly gauche-gauche-gauche CSSC conformation. The contrast with degraded hair specimens recovered from archaeological excavations is striking. The presence of a weak feature near 2590 cm(-1) in the hair samples attributed to a [small nu](SH) vibration could be indicative of a reduction process operative on the CSSC cystine keratotic linkages and a possible origin of this is bacterial biodegradation identified histologically. This study demonstrates the molecular information available from non-destructive Raman spectroscopic analysis from single hair shafts or small bundles of fibres which complements information available from histological and destructive analytical techniques for rare biological specimens subjected to conservation or curation procedures in museums or private collections.