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Sample records for adult squirrel monkeys

  1. Androgen Resistance in Squirrel Monkeys (Saimiri spp.)

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Katherine L; Westberry, Jenne M; Hubler, Tina R; Sadosky, Patti W; Singh, Ravinder J; Taylor, Robert L; Scammell, Jonathan G

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this study was to understand the basis for high androgen levels in squirrel monkeys (Saimiri spp.). Mass spectrometry was used to analyze serum testosterone, androstenedione, and dihydrotestosterone of male squirrel monkeys during the nonbreeding (n = 7) and breeding (n = 10) seasons. All hormone levels were elevated compared with those of humans, even during the nonbreeding season; the highest levels occurred during the breeding season. The ratio of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone in squirrel monkeys is high during the breeding season compared to man. Squirrel monkeys may have high testosterone to compensate for inefficient metabolism to dihydrotestosterone. We also investigated whether squirrel monkeys have high androgens to compensate for low-activity androgen receptors (AR). The response to dihydrotestosterone in squirrel monkey cells transfected with AR and AR-responsive reporter plasmids was 4-fold, compared with 28-fold in human cells. This result was not due to overexpression of cellular FKBP51, which causes glucocorticoid and progestin resistance in squirrel monkeys, because overexpression of FKBP51 had no effect on dihydrotestosterone-stimulated reporter activity in a human fibroblast cell line. To test whether the inherently low levels of FKBP52 in squirrel monkeys contribute to androgen insensitivity, squirrel monkey cells were transfected with an AR expression plasmid, an AR-responsive reporter plasmid, and a plasmid expressing FKBP52. Expression of FKBP52 decreased the EC50 or increased the maximal response to dihydrotestosterone. Therefore, the high androgen levels in squirrel monkeys likely compensate for their relatively low 5α-reductase activity during the breeding season and AR insensitivity resulting from low cellular levels of FKBP52. PMID:18724781

  2. Endemic Viruses of Squirrel Monkeys (Saimiri spp.)

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Donna L; McClure, Gloria B; Ruiz, Julio C; Abee, Christian R; Vanchiere, John A

    2015-01-01

    Nonhuman primates are the experimental animals of choice for the study of many human diseases. As such, it is important to understand that endemic viruses of primates can potentially affect the design, methods, and results of biomedical studies designed to model human disease. Here we review the viruses known to be endemic in squirrel monkeys (Saimiri spp.). The pathogenic potential of these viruses in squirrel monkeys that undergo experimental manipulation remains largely unexplored but may have implications regarding the use of squirrel monkeys in biomedical research. PMID:26141448

  3. Kittens as therapists: social behavior sequences in isolated squirrel monkeys after exposure to young nonconspecifics.

    PubMed

    Huebner, D K; King, J E

    1984-05-01

    Squirrel monkeys that had been exposed to repeated separations from cloth surrogates were given continuous access to domestic kittens. Information-theoretic measures showed that these monkeys exerted greater constraint on behaviors of adult feral squirrel monkeys than did monkeys who had not received previous kitten exposure. The latter monkeys displayed a behavioral encapsulation characterized by increased susceptibility to the constraint imposed by their own preceding behaviors and a decreased susceptibility to constraint from other monkeys' behaviors. In addition, kitten-reared monkeys displayed a high level of positive social behaviors, particularly following noncohesive or divisive behaviors by another monkey. PMID:6724141

  4. Responses of squirrel monkeys to their experimentally modified mobbing calls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fichtel, Claudia; Hammerschmidt, Kurt

    2003-05-01

    Previous acoustic analyses suggested emotion-correlated changes in the acoustic structure of squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus) vocalizations. Specifically, calls given in aversive contexts were characterized by an upward shift in frequencies, often accompanied by an increase in amplitude. In order to test whether changes in frequencies or amplitude are indeed relevant for conspecific listeners, playback experiments were conducted in which either frequencies or amplitude of mobbing calls were modified. Latency and first orienting response were measured in playback experiments with six adult squirrel monkeys. After broadcasting yaps with increased frequencies or amplitude, squirrel monkeys showed a longer orienting response towards the speaker than after the corresponding control stimuli. Furthermore, after broadcasting yaps with decreased frequencies or amplitude, squirrel monkeys showed a shorter orienting response towards the speaker than after the corresponding manipulated calls with higher frequencies or amplitude. These results suggest that changes in frequencies or amplitude were perceived by squirrel monkeys, indicating that the relationship between call structure and the underlying affective state of the caller agreed with the listener's assessment of the calls. However, a simultaneous increase in frequencies and amplitude did not lead to an enhanced response, compared to each single parameter. Thus, from the receiver's perspective, both call parameters may mutually replace each other.

  5. Squirrel Monkey Requirements for Chronic Acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, Charles A.

    1996-01-01

    This study examined: (1) the ability of a small non-human primate to tolerate chronic centrifugation on a centrifuge with a radius of 0.9 m, and (2) the influence of centrifuge radius on the response of primates to hyperdynamic fields. Eight adult male squirrel monkeys were exposed to 1.5 g via centrifugation at two different radii (0.9 m and 3.0 m). Body temperature, activity, feeding and drinking were monitored. These primates did tolerate and adapt to 1.5G via centrifugation on either radius centrifuge. The results show, however, that centrifuge radius does have an effect on the responses of the primate to the hyperdynamic environment. Adaptation to the hyperdynamic environment occurred more quickly on the larger centrifuge. This study demonstrates that a small, non-human primate model, such as the squirrel monkey, could be used on a 0.9 m radius centrifuge such as is being considered by the NASA Space Station Program.

  6. Cup tool use by squirrel monkeys.

    PubMed

    Buckmaster, Christine L; Hyde, Shellie A; Parker, Karen J; Lyons, David M

    2015-12-01

    Captive-born male and female squirrel monkeys spontaneously 'invented' a cup tool use technique to Contain (i.e., hold and control) food they reduced into fragments for consumption and to Contain water collected from a valve to drink. Food cup use was observed more frequently than water cup use. Observations indicate that 68% (n = 39/57) of monkeys in this population used a cup (a plastic slip cap) to Contain food, and a subset of these monkeys, 10% (n = 4/39), also used a cup to Contain water. Cup use was optional and did not replace, but supplemented, the hand/arm-to-mouth eating and direct valve drinking exhibited by all members of the population. Strategies monkeys used to bring food and cups together for food processing activity at preferred upper-level perching areas, in the arboreal-like environment in which they lived, provides evidence that monkeys may plan food processing activity with the cups. Specifically, prior to cup use monkeys obtained a cup first before food, or obtained food and a cup from the floor simultaneously, before transporting both items to upper-level perching areas. After food processing activity with cups monkeys rarely dropped the cups and more often placed the cups onto perching. Monkeys subsequently returned to use cups that they previously placed on perching after food processing activity. The latter behavior is consistent with the possibility that monkeys may keep cups at preferred perching sites for future food processing activity and merits experimental investigation. Reports of spontaneous tool use by squirrel monkeys are rare and this is the first report of population-level tool use. These findings offer insights into the cognitive abilities of squirrel monkeys and provide a new context for behavior studies with this genus and for comparative studies with other primates.

  7. Positive reinforcement training in squirrel monkeys using clicker training.

    PubMed

    Gillis, Timothy E; Janes, Amy C; Kaufman, Marc J

    2012-08-01

    Nonhuman primates in research environments experience regular stressors that have the potential to alter physiology and brain function, which in turn can confound some types of research studies. Operant conditioning techniques such as positive reinforcement training (PRT), which teaches animals to voluntarily perform desired behaviors, can be applied to improve behavior and reactivity. PRT has been used to train rhesus macaques, marmosets, and several other nonhuman primate species. To our knowledge, the method has yet to be used to train squirrel monkeys to perform complex tasks. Accordingly, we sought to establish whether PRT, utilizing a hand-box clicker (which emits a click sound that acts as the conditioned reinforcer), could be used to train adult male squirrel monkeys (Saimiri boliviensis, N = 14). We developed and implemented a training regimen to elicit voluntary participation in routine husbandry, animal transport, and injection procedures. Our secondary goal was to quantify the training time needed to achieve positive results. Squirrel monkeys readily learned the connection between the conditioned reinforcer (the clicker) and the positive reinforcer (food). They rapidly developed proficiency on four tasks of increasing difficulty: target touching, hand sitting, restraint training, and injection training. All subjects mastered target touching behavior within 2 weeks. Ten of 14 subjects (71%) mastered all tasks in 59.2 ± 2.6 days (range: 50-70 days). In trained subjects, it now takes about 1.25 min per monkey to weigh and administer an intramuscular injection, one-third of the time it took before training. From these data, we conclude that clicker box PRT can be successfully learned by a majority of squirrel monkeys within 2 months and that trained subjects can be managed more efficiently. These findings warrant future studies to determine whether PRT may be useful in reducing stress-induced experimental confounds in studies involving squirrel monkeys.

  8. Positive Reinforcement Training in Squirrel Monkeys Using Clicker Training

    PubMed Central

    Gillis, Timothy E.; Janes, Amy C.; Kaufman, Marc J.

    2012-01-01

    Nonhuman primates in research environments experience regular stressors that have the potential to alter physiology and brain function, which in turn can confound some types of research studies. Operant conditioning techniques such as positive reinforcement training (PRT), which teaches animals to voluntarily perform desired behaviors, can be applied to improve behavior and reactivity. PRT has been used to train rhesus macaques, marmosets, and several other nonhuman primate species. To our knowledge, the method has yet to be used to train squirrel monkeys to perform complex tasks. Accordingly, we sought to establish whether PRT, utilizing a hand-box clicker (which emits a click sound that acts as the conditioned reinforcer), could be used to train adult male squirrel monkeys (Saimiri boliviensis, N=14). We developed and implemented a training regimen to elicit voluntary participation in routine husbandry, animal transport, and injection procedures. Our secondary goal was to quantify the training time needed to achieve positive results. Squirrel monkeys readily learned the connection between the conditioned reinforcer (the clicker) and the positive reinforcer (food). They rapidly developed proficiency on 4 tasks of increasing difficulty: target touching, hand sitting, restraint training, and injection training. All subjects mastered target touching behavior within 2 weeks. Ten of 14 subjects (71%) mastered all tasks in 59.2±2.6 days (range: 50–70 days). In trained subjects, it now takes about 1.25 minutes per monkey to weigh and administer an intramuscular injection, one-third of the time it took before training. From these data, we conclude that clicker box PRT can be successfully learned by a majority of squirrel monkeys within two months and that trained subjects can be managed more efficiently. These findings warrant future studies to determine whether PRT may be useful for reducing stress-induced experimental confounds in studies involving squirrel monkeys

  9. Immunolocalization of Growth, Inhibitory, and Proliferative Factors Involved in Initial Ovarian Folliculogenesis From Adult Common Squirrel Monkey (Saimiri collinsi)

    PubMed Central

    Brito, A. B.; Domingues, S. F. S.; Santos, R. R.; Amorim, C. A.

    2015-01-01

    We performed an immunohistochemical (IHC) study to determine the follicular expression of growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF-9), anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH), Kit Ligand (KL), and c-Kit in squirrel monkey ovary. Ovarian tissue fragments from 4 squirrel monkeys were collected by laparotomy and processed for classical histology and IHC. Additionally, follicle development was assessed by Ki67 immunostaining to evaluate proliferative status of granulosa cells. A total of 4025 follicles were examined (1475 for classical histology and 2550 for immunohistochemistry). More than 80% of the evaluated follicles were morphologically normal. The GDF-9 protein was detectable in oocyte cytoplasm from primordial (100%), primary (99.1%), and secondary (100%) follicles. The AMH was not expressed in primordial follicles but just in few primary follicles (13.8%). On the other hand, it was highly expressed in granulosa cells from secondary follicles (67.9%). c-Kit, KL receptor, was found in the oolemma of primordial (100%), primary (100%), and secondary (100%) follicles. The KL expression was observed in oocytes and granulosa cells from primordial (94.9%), primary (91.6%) and secondary follicles (100%). Ki67 immunostaining was observed in granulosa cells from primary (5.7%) and secondary (54.8%) follicles but not in primordial follicles. In conclusion, we described the localization of GDF-9, KL, c-Kit, and Ki67 proteins and confirmed the presence of AMH protein in preantral follicles from squirrel monkey. Our results offer contribution for understanding of folliculogenesis in neotropical nonhuman primates. Moreover, these markers can be used to assess follicular viability and functionality after cryopreservation, transplantation, or in vitro culture of ovarian tissue. PMID:24784715

  10. Metabolism of lithocholic and chenodeoxycholic acids in the squirrel monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, H.; Hamada, M.; Kato, F.

    1985-09-01

    Metabolism of lithocholic acid (LCA) and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) was studied in the squirrel monkey to clarify the mechanism of the lack of toxicity of CDCA in this animal. Radioactive LCA was administered to squirrel monkeys with biliary fistula. Most radioactivity was excreted in the bile in the form of unsulfated lithocholyltaurine. The squirrel monkey thus differs from humans and chimpanzees, which efficiently sulfate LCA, and is similar to the rhesus monkey and baboon in that LCA is poorly sulfated. When labeled CDCA was orally administered to squirrel monkeys, less than 20% of the dosed radioactivity was recovered as LCA and its further metabolites in feces over 3 days, indicating that bacterial metabolism of CDCA into LCA is strikingly less than in other animals and in humans. It therefore appears that LCA, known as a hepatotoxic secondary bile acid, is not accumulated in the squirrel monkey, not because of its rapid turnover through sulfation, but because of the low order of its production.

  11. Acute physiological responses of squirrel monkeys exposed to hyperdynamic environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    Physiological and behavioral responses to a hyperdynamic environment were examined in four adult male squirrel monkeys. After baseline monitoring at 1 G, monkeys were exposed to one of three conditions: (1) +2 Gz for 60 minutes, (2) +2.9 Gz max for 8 minutes (simulating Space Shuttle launch), or (3) +1.7 Gz max for 19 minutes (simulating Space Shuttle reentry). During all experimental conditions, heart rate rose, and colonic temperature began to decline within the first ten minutes of centrifugation and decreased by as much as 2 C in some instances. Behaviorally, during centrifugation, the monkeys seemed to exhibit drowsiness and fall asleep, an observation not made during the control period. It is concluded that primates are susceptible to acute hyperdynamic field exposure.

  12. Environmental synchronizers of squirrel monkey circadian rhythms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sulzman, F. M.; Fuller, C. A.; Moore-Ede, M. C.

    1977-01-01

    Various temporal signals in the environment were tested to determine if they could synchronize the circadian timing system of the squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus). The influence of cycles of light and dark, eating and fasting, water availability and deprivation, warm and cool temperature, sound and quiet, and social interaction and isolation on the drinking and activity rhythms of unrestrained monkeys was examined. In the absence of other time cues, 24-hr cycles of each of these potential synchronizers were applied for up to 3 wk, and the periods of the monkey's circadian rhythms were examined. Only light-dark cycles and cycles of food availability were shown to be entraining agents, since they were effective in determining the period and phase of the rhythmic variables. In the presence of each of the other environmental cycles, the monkey's circadian rhythms exhibited free-running periods which were significantly different from 24 hr with all possible phase relationships between the rhythms and the environmental cycles being examined.

  13. Environmental synchronizers of squirrel monkey circadian rhythms.

    PubMed

    Sulzman, F M; Fuller, C A; Moore-Ede, M C

    1977-11-01

    Various temporal signals in the environment were tested to determine if they could synchronize the circadian timing system of the squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus). The influence of cycles of light and dark, eating and fasting, water availability and deprivation, warm and cool temperature, sound and quiet, and social interaction and isolation was examined on the drinking and activity rhythms of unrestrained monkeys. In the absence of other time cues, 24-h cycles of each of these potential synchronizers were applied for up to 3 wk, and the periods of the monkey's circadian rhythms were examined. Only light-dark cycles and cycles of food availability were shown to be entraining agents, since they were effective in determining the period and phase of rhythmic variables. In the presence of each of the other environmental cycles, the monkey's circadian rhythms exhibited free-running periods which were significantly different from 24 h with all possible phase relationships between the rhythms and the environmental cycles being examined. PMID:412829

  14. Frustrative nonreward and pituitary-adrenal activity in squirrel monkeys.

    PubMed

    Lyons, D M; Fong, K D; Schrieken, N; Levine, S

    2000-12-01

    Little is known about frustration-induced changes in stress physiology in humans and nonhuman primates. Here we assess in two experiments with squirrel monkeys plasma levels of pituitary-adrenal stress hormones in conditions designed to provoke frustrative nonreward. In the first experiment 18 prepubertal monkeys were trained to feed from one of eight sites, and then tested without food at any of the sites. These monkeys responded with significant increases in cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). In the second experiment 18 adult monkeys were trained to feed from one of eight sites, and then tested after food was moved to a different foraging site. Nine monkeys found food at the relocated site, discontinued foraging at the previously baited site, and responded with decreases in cortisol. The other nine monkeys failed to find the relocated site, initially increased their visits to the previously baited site, and responded with elevations in cortisol and ACTH. In keeping with comparable findings in rats, our observations indicate that frustrative nonreward elicits ACTH-stimulated secretion of cortisol in primates. PMID:11239675

  15. The first report of peritoneal tetrathyridiosis in squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus).

    PubMed

    Tokiwa, Toshihiro; Taira, Kensuke; Yamazaki, Mutsumi; Kashimura, Akane; Une, Yumi

    2014-10-01

    This report describes a case of peritoneal larval cestodiasis caused by tetrathyridia of Mesocestoides sp. in an adult female squirrel monkey. The monkey had lived in a zoological garden in Japan and had a clinical history of wasting. At necropsy, numerous whitish oval masses were found in the liver and peritoneal cavity. These masses contained larval cestodes. Morphological observation and molecular analyses of the mitochondrial 12S ribosomal RNA gene and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene sequences allowed us to identify the larva as the tetrathyridium of Mesocestoides sp. This is the first report of Mesocestoides larvae in a squirrel monkey in Japan.

  16. A brain MRI atlas of the common squirrel monkey, Saimiri sciureus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yurui; Schilling, Kurt G.; Khare, Shweta P.; Panda, Swetasudha; Choe, Ann S.; Stepniewska, Iwona; Li, Xia; Ding, Zhoahua; Anderson, Adam; Landman, Bennett A.

    2014-03-01

    The common squirrel monkey, Saimiri sciureus, is a New World monkey with functional and microstructural organization of central nervous system similar to that of humans. It is one of the most commonly used South American primates in biomedical research. Unlike its Old World macaque cousins, no digital atlases have described the organization of the squirrel monkey brain. Here, we present a multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) atlas constructed from the brain of an adult female squirrel monkey. In vivo MRI acquisitions include high resolution T2 structural imaging and low resolution diffusion tensor imaging. Ex vivo MRI acquisitions include high resolution T2 structural imaging and high resolution diffusion tensor imaging. Cortical regions were manually annotated on the co-registered volumes based on published histological sections.

  17. Microwaves modify thermoregulatory behavior in squirrel monkey.

    PubMed

    Adair, E R; Adams, B W

    1980-01-01

    Squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) trained to regulate environmental temperature (Ta) behaviorally were exposed in the far field of a horn antenna to ten-minute periods of 2,450 MHz CW microwaves. Incident power density ranged from 1 to 22 mW/cm2. The corresponding specific absorption rate (SAR), derived from temperature increments in saline-filled styrofoam models, ranged from 0.15 to 3.25 W/kg. Controls included exposure to infrared radiation equivalent incident energy and no radiation exposure. Normal thermo-regulatory behavior produces tight control over environmental and body temperatures; most monkeys select a Ta of 34-36 degrees C. Ten-minute exposures to 2,450 MHz CW microwaves at an incident power density of 6-8 mW/cm2 stimulated all animals to select a lower Ta. This threshold energy represents a whole-body SAR of 1.1 W/kg, about 20% of the resting metabolic rate of the monkey. Thermoregulatory behavior was highly efficient, and skin and rectal temperatures remained stable, even at 22 mW/cm2 where the preferred Ta was lowered by as much as 4 degrees C. No comparable reduction in selected Ta below control levels occurred during exposure to infrared radiation of equal incident power density.

  18. Microwaves modify thermoregulatory behavior in squirrel monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Adair, E.R.; Adams, B.W.

    1980-01-01

    Squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) trained to regulate environmental temperature (Ta) behaviorally were exposed in the far field of a horn antenna to ten-minute periods of 2,450 MHz CW microwaves. Incident power density ranged from 1 to 22 mW/cm2. The corresponding specific absorption rate (SAR), derived from temperature increments in saline-filled styrofoam models, ranged from 0.15 to 3.25 W/kg. Controls included exposure to infrared radiation equivalent incident energy and no radiation exposure. Normal thermo-regulatory behavior produces tight control over environmental and body temperatures; most monkeys select a Ta of 34-36 degrees C. Ten-minute exposures to 2,450 MHz CW microwaves at an incident power density of 6-8 mW/cm2 stimulated all animals to select a lower Ta. This threshold energy represents a whole-body SAR of 1.1 W/kg, about 20% of the resting metabolic rate of the monkey. Thermoregulatory behavior was highly efficient, and skin and rectal temperatures remained stable, even at 22 mW/cm2 where the preferred Ta was lowered by as much as 4 degrees C. No comparable reduction in selected Ta below control levels occurred during exposure to infrared radiation of equal incident power density.

  19. Tissue-specific expression of squirrel monkey chorionic gonadotropin

    PubMed Central

    Vasauskas, Audrey A.; Hubler, Tina R.; Boston, Lori; Scammell, Jonathan G.

    2010-01-01

    Pituitary gonadotropins LH and FSH play central roles in reproductive function. In Old World primates, LH stimulates ovulation in females and testosterone production in males. Recent studies have found that squirrel monkeys and other New World primates lack expression of LH in the pituitary. Instead, chorionic gonadotropin (CG), which is normally only expressed in the placenta of Old World primates, is the active luteotropic pituitary hormone in these animals. The goal of this study was to investigate the tissue-specific regulation of squirrel monkey CG. We isolated the squirrel monkey CGβ gene and promoter from genomic DNA from squirrel monkey B-lymphoblasts and compared the promoter sequence to that of the common marmoset, another New World primate, and human CGβ and LHβ. Using reporter gene assays, we found that a squirrel monkey CGβ promoter fragment (−1898/+9) is active in both mouse pituitary LβT2 and human placenta JEG3 cells, but not in rat adrenal PC12 cells. Furthermore, within this construct separate cis-elements are responsible for pituitary- and placenta-specific expression. Pituitary-specific expression is governed by Egr-1 binding sites in the proximal 250 bp of the promoter, whereas placenta-specific expression is controlled by AP-2 sites further upstream. Thus, selective expression of the squirrel monkey CGβ promoter in pituitary and placental cells is governed by distinct cis-elements that exhibit homology with human LHβ and marmoset CGβ promoters, respectively. PMID:21130091

  20. Motion Sickness-Induced Food Aversions in the Squirrel Monkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roy, M. Aaron; Brizzee, Kenneth R.

    1979-01-01

    Conditioned aversions to colored, flavored water were established in Squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) by following consumption with 90 min of simultaneous rotational and vertical stimulation. The experimental group (N= 13) drank significantly less of the green, almond-flavored test solution than did the control group (N=14) during three post-treatment preference testing days. Individual differences were noted in that two experimental monkeys readily drank the test solution after rotational stimulation. Only two of the experimental monkeys showed emesis during rotation, yet 10 monkeys in this group developed an aversion. These results suggest that: (1) motion sickness can be readily induced in Squirrel monkeys with simultaneous rotational and vertical stimulation, and (2) that conditioned food aversions are achieved in the absence of emesis in this species.

  1. Polymorphism of photopigments in the squirrel monkey: a sixth phenotype.

    PubMed

    Bowmaker, J K; Jacobs, G H; Mollon, J D

    1987-08-21

    We describe here a trichromatic type of squirrel monkey that resembles Old World monkeys in having two well-separated photopigments in the red-green part of the spectrum; the cones of this phenotype have peak sensitivities close to 430, 536 and 564 nm. The existence of such animals is predicted by a genetic model that postulates three alleles for a single locus on the X-chromosome of the squirrel monkey. The three alleles correspond to three different photopigments in the red-green spectral range. A male monkey, or a homozygous female, will be dichromatic, combining short-wave cones with just one of the cone types in the red-green range. But a female monkey, if heterozygous at the locus, draws any two of the three alleles from the set. X-chromosome inactivation ensures that the two alleles are expressed in different subpopulations of retinal cone, giving the monkey the basis for trichromatic colour vision. This model requires three trichromatic types of female squirrel monkey. The photopigment complements of two types have previously been reported and microspectrophotometric data are now given for the third type. Behaviourally, this third type of trichromat gives precise Rayleigh matches that are intermediate between those of the other two types of trichromat. The polymorphism of photopigments in the squirrel monkey may be maintained by the heterozygous advantage enjoyed by the trichromatic females. This would be an instructive instance of heterozygous advantage because it is a case where X-chromosome inactivation plays a crucial role in segregating the two different gene-products into different cells. PMID:2888125

  2. [Squirrel monkey--an ideal primate (correction of prmate) model of space physiology].

    PubMed

    Matsunami, K

    1997-06-01

    Investigation of the vestibulo-ocular system of the squirrel monkey was reviewed in consideration of space motion sickness (SMS), or which is recently more often termed as space adaptation syndrome (SAS). Since the first launching of the space satellite, Sputnik [correction of Sputonik] in October 1957, many experiments were carried out in biological and medical fields. A various kind of creatures were used as experimental models from protozoa to human beings. Rats and monkeys are most favorite animals, particularly the non-human primate seems to be the one, because of its phylogenetic relatives akin to the human beings. Chimpanzees, rhesus monkeys, pig tailed-monkeys, red-faced monkeys and squirrel monkeys have been used mostly in American space experiments. Russian used rhesus monkeys. Among these, however, the squirrel monkey has an advantage of the small size of the body, ranging from 600- l000g in adult. This small size as a primate is very advantageous in experiments conducted in a narrow room of the space satellite or shuttle because of its space-saving. The squirrel monkey has another advantage to rear easily as is demonstrated to keep it as a pet. Accordingly, this petit animal provides us a good animal model in biological and medical experiments in space craft. The size of the brain of the squirrel monkey is extraordinary large relative to the body size, which is even superior to that of the human beings. This is partly owed to enlargement of the occipito-temporal cortices, which are forced to well develop for processing a huge amount of audio-visual information indispensable to the arboreal habitant to survive in tropical forest. The vestibular system of the squirrel monkey seems to be the most superior as well, when judged from it relative size of the vestibular nuclear complex. Balancing on swinging twigs or jumping from tree to tree developed the capability of this equilibrium system. Fernandez, Goldberg and his collaborators used the squirrel monkey

  3. [Squirrel monkey--an ideal primate (correction of prmate) model of space physiology].

    PubMed

    Matsunami, K

    1997-06-01

    Investigation of the vestibulo-ocular system of the squirrel monkey was reviewed in consideration of space motion sickness (SMS), or which is recently more often termed as space adaptation syndrome (SAS). Since the first launching of the space satellite, Sputnik [correction of Sputonik] in October 1957, many experiments were carried out in biological and medical fields. A various kind of creatures were used as experimental models from protozoa to human beings. Rats and monkeys are most favorite animals, particularly the non-human primate seems to be the one, because of its phylogenetic relatives akin to the human beings. Chimpanzees, rhesus monkeys, pig tailed-monkeys, red-faced monkeys and squirrel monkeys have been used mostly in American space experiments. Russian used rhesus monkeys. Among these, however, the squirrel monkey has an advantage of the small size of the body, ranging from 600- l000g in adult. This small size as a primate is very advantageous in experiments conducted in a narrow room of the space satellite or shuttle because of its space-saving. The squirrel monkey has another advantage to rear easily as is demonstrated to keep it as a pet. Accordingly, this petit animal provides us a good animal model in biological and medical experiments in space craft. The size of the brain of the squirrel monkey is extraordinary large relative to the body size, which is even superior to that of the human beings. This is partly owed to enlargement of the occipito-temporal cortices, which are forced to well develop for processing a huge amount of audio-visual information indispensable to the arboreal habitant to survive in tropical forest. The vestibular system of the squirrel monkey seems to be the most superior as well, when judged from it relative size of the vestibular nuclear complex. Balancing on swinging twigs or jumping from tree to tree developed the capability of this equilibrium system. Fernandez, Goldberg and his collaborators used the squirrel monkey

  4. Quantitative genetics of costly neonatal sexual size dimorphism in squirrel monkeys (Saimiri boliviensis)

    PubMed Central

    BLOMQUIST, G. E.; WILLIAMS, L. E.

    2015-01-01

    Offspring size is often an intimate link between the fitness of parents and offspring. Among mammals, neonate mass is also related to adult levels of dimorphism and intrasexual competitive mating. We describe the sex-specific genetic architecture of neonate mass in captive squirrel monkeys (Saimiri boliviensis), a small Neotropical primate. Best fitting quantitative genetic models show strong maternal genetic effects with little difference between sexes offering limited opportunity for neonatal dimorphism to respond to observed or hypothetical selection. Heritabilities that are approximately zero also imply it is unlikely that neonatal dimorphism can evolve as a correlated response to selection on adult size. However, male mass is also more dependent on maternal condition (age and parity) making dimorphism plastic. Finally, we hypothesize that large maternal genetic effects reflect income breeding and tightly synchronized seasonal reproduction in squirrel monkeys, both of which require strong maternal control of offspring growth and timing of birth. PMID:23437981

  5. Dissecting the mechanisms of squirrel monkey (Saimiri boliviensis) social learning

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, AN; Williams, LE; Brosnan, SF

    2013-01-01

    Although the social learning abilities of monkeys have been well documented, this research has only focused on a few species. Furthermore, of those that also incorporated dissections of social learning mechanisms, the majority studied either capuchins (Cebus apella) or marmosets (Callithrix jacchus). To gain a broader understanding of how monkeys gain new skills, we tested squirrel monkeys (Saimiri boliviensis) which have never been studied in tests of social learning mechanisms. To determine whether S. boliviensis can socially learn, we ran “open diffusion” tests with monkeys housed in two social groups (N = 23). Over the course of 10 20-min sessions, the monkeys in each group observed a trained group member retrieving a mealworm from a bidirectional task (the “Slide-box”). Two thirds (67%) of these monkeys both learned how to operate the Slide-box and they also moved the door significantly more times in the direction modeled by the trained demonstrator than the alternative direction. To tease apart the underlying social learning mechanisms we ran a series of three control conditions with 35 squirrel monkeys that had no previous experience with the Slide-box. The first replicated the experimental open diffusion sessions but without the inclusion of a trained model, the second was a no-information control with dyads of monkeys, and the third was a ‘ghost’ display shown to individual monkeys. The first two controls tested for the importance of social support (mere presence effect) and the ghost display showed the affordances of the task to the monkeys. The monkeys showed a certain level of success in the group control (54% of subjects solved the task on one or more occasions) and paired controls (28% were successful) but none were successful in the ghost control. We propose that the squirrel monkeys’ learning, observed in the experimental open diffusion tests, can be best described by a combination of social learning mechanisms in concert; in this

  6. Spontaneous Cholelithiasis in a Squirrel Monkey (Saimiri sciureus)

    PubMed Central

    Lieberman, Mia T.; Wachtman, Lynn M.; Marini, Robert P.; Bakthavatchalu, Vasu; Fox, James G.

    2016-01-01

    A mature female squirrel monkey was noted during routine semiannual examinations to have moderate progressive weight loss. Serum chemistry panels revealed marked increases in hepatic enzyme, bilirubin, and bile salt concentrations and hypoalbuminemia. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed echogenic, shadowing debris in the gallbladder, consistent with cholelithiasis. At necropsy, marked thickening and distension of the gallbladder, cystic duct, and common bile duct was noted, and more than 50 irregularly shaped, black gallstones were removed from the biliary tract. Gallbladder tissue, bile, and gallstones cultured positive for Escherichia coli and Proteus spp., suggesting a brown-pigment gallstone type secondary to a bacterial nidus. Histopathology revealed severe chronic–active diffuse cholecystitis and severe chronic-active hepatic degeneration and necrosis with severe cholestasis. To our knowledge, this report is the first description of spontaneous choleilthiasis in a squirrel monkey. PMID:26884412

  7. Eye-head coordination during optokinetic stimulation in squirrel monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubo, T.; Igarashi, M.; Jensen, D. W.; Homick, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    Head and eye movements in the yaw plane were recorded during and after optokinetic stimulation in squirrel monkeys. 1) Phasic or tonic head deviations to the side of the ocular quick phase occurred in 94% of total recordings (n = 50) during the perstimulus period, and in 75% of recordings (n = 49) during the poststimulus period. Magnitude of mean head deviation was significantly different between perstimulus and poststimulus periods. 2) Head nystagmus associated with eye nystagmus was consistently observed in seven of nine squirrel monkeys during optokinetic stimulation. Squirrel monkeys are thereby less prone to display head nystagmus than either guinea pigs, pigeons or chickens. 3) Slow phase speeds of coupled head and eye nystagmus were subjected to statistical analysis. A highly significant negative correlation was found between slow phase head and eye speeds. The correlation coefficient was - 0.81 at 60 degrees / sec stimulus (n = 119) and -0.72 at 100 degrees / sec stimulus (n = 131). The gaze speed, calculated by summing the head and eye speeds, was 59.1 plus or minus 6.8 / sec at 60 degrees / sec and 92.2 plus or minus 11.4 at 100 degrees / sec stimulus. There was no significant difference between the gaze speed in a free head condition and the eye speed when the head was fixed.

  8. The squirrel monkey as a candidate for space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brizzee, K. R.; Ordy, J. M.; Kaack, B.

    1977-01-01

    Because of its size and other unique diurnal-primate characteristics, the squirrel monkey is used in: (1) actual bioflight missions, (2) in laboratory tests designed to clarify the risks to man during launch and recovery as well as in hazardous spaceflight environments; and (3) in the acquisition of data on unknown risks encountered in long duration space exploration. Pertinent data concerning samiri sciureus as described in published and unpublished reports are summarized. Topics include: taxonomy, ethology, life history, sensory-learning-motor capabilities in primate perspective, anatomy and physiology (including homeostatic adaptation to stress), susceptibility to environmental hazards, reproduction, care and clinical management, and previous use in aerospace biomedical research.

  9. Comparative studies of squirrel monkeys (Saimiri) and titi monkeys (Callicebus) in travel tasks.

    PubMed

    Fragaszy, D M

    1980-01-01

    Squirrel and titi monkeys were observed in a series of experiments in which the subjects' task was to move to a distant goal along above-ground pathways. The pathways were entirely visible to the subjects in all experiments. However, visual cues along the pathways (in Experiment I) and physical and spatial properties of the pathways (in Experiments II and III) were varied systematically in order to determine what effect features had upon selection of travel paths for monkeys of each species. Marked performance differences between the species were evident in these experiments, including differences in latency to move past the choice point, proportion of trials in which the shortest route was chosen first, and changes over test sessions in frequency of initial choice of the shortest route. In particular, titis tended to move past the choice point more slowly than squirrel monkeys; to pay more attention to distant properties of the pathways prior to making a decision, especially after experience in the test setting; and to prefer habitual pathways when these were available, whereas squirrel monkeys preferred novel routes when these were available. The relative "optimality" of decision making in these tasks in relation to species-typical modes of traveling and foraging in natural habitats is discussed. An alternative view of decision making, in which optimality is not assumed to be the only decision-making strategy, is suggested as an appropriate vehicle for further investigation into the sources of short-term variability in choice behavior. PMID:7223106

  10. Comparative studies of squirrel monkeys (Saimiri) and titi monkeys (Callicebus) in travel tasks.

    PubMed

    Fragaszy, D M

    1980-01-01

    Squirrel and titi monkeys were observed in a series of experiments in which the subjects' task was to move to a distant goal along above-ground pathways. The pathways were entirely visible to the subjects in all experiments. However, visual cues along the pathways (in Experiment I) and physical and spatial properties of the pathways (in Experiments II and III) were varied systematically in order to determine what effect features had upon selection of travel paths for monkeys of each species. Marked performance differences between the species were evident in these experiments, including differences in latency to move past the choice point, proportion of trials in which the shortest route was chosen first, and changes over test sessions in frequency of initial choice of the shortest route. In particular, titis tended to move past the choice point more slowly than squirrel monkeys; to pay more attention to distant properties of the pathways prior to making a decision, especially after experience in the test setting; and to prefer habitual pathways when these were available, whereas squirrel monkeys preferred novel routes when these were available. The relative "optimality" of decision making in these tasks in relation to species-typical modes of traveling and foraging in natural habitats is discussed. An alternative view of decision making, in which optimality is not assumed to be the only decision-making strategy, is suggested as an appropriate vehicle for further investigation into the sources of short-term variability in choice behavior.

  11. Diffusion dynamics of socially learned foraging techniques in squirrel monkeys.

    PubMed

    Claidière, Nicolas; Messer, Emily J E; Hoppitt, William; Whiten, Andrew

    2013-07-01

    Social network analyses and experimental studies of social learning have each become important domains of animal behavior research in recent years yet have remained largely separate. Here we bring them together, providing the first demonstration of how social networks may shape the diffusion of socially learned foraging techniques. One technique for opening an artificial fruit was seeded in the dominant male of a group of squirrel monkeys and an alternative technique in the dominant male of a second group. We show that the two techniques spread preferentially in the groups in which they were initially seeded and that this process was influenced by monkeys' association patterns. Eigenvector centrality predicted both the speed with which an individual would first succeed in opening the artificial fruit and the probability that they would acquire the cultural variant seeded in their group. These findings demonstrate a positive role of social networks in determining how a new foraging technique diffuses through a population. PMID:23810529

  12. Subgingival microbiota in squirrel monkeys with naturally occurring periodontal diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Beem, J E; Hurley, C G; Magnusson, I; McArthur, W P; Clark, W B

    1991-01-01

    The squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus) has been proposed as an in vivo model for the study of subgingival colonization by suspected periodontopathogens, such as black-pigmented porphyromonads and prevotellas (BP/P). However, the indigenous microbiota of the squirrel monkey has not been well described. Therefore, in order to more fully characterize the oral microbiota of these animals, we studied two groups of squirrel monkeys from widely different sources. Group I consisted of 50 breeding colony monkeys ranging in age from 9 months to over 6 years which had been raised in captivity; group II consisted of 16 young sexually mature monkeys recently captured in the wild in Guyana. Group I animals in captivity had developed moderate to severe gingivitis, with a mean gingival index (GI) of 2.6; 52% of the sites bled, 26% had detectable calculus, and 83% had detectable BP/P. A group I subset (six animals), for which predominant cultivable microbiota was described, had a mean GI of 2.4. Colony morphology enumeration revealed that five of the six subset animals were detectably colonized with BP/P (range, 0 to 16.9%) and Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (range, 0 to 3.9%); all subset animals were colonized with Fusobacterium species (range, 0.8 to 3.6%), Actinomyces species (range, 2.3 to 11%), and gram-positive cocci (range, 1.4 to 21.4%). Predominant cultivable microbiota results revealed the presence of many bacterial species commonly found in the human gingival sulcus. At baseline, group II animals were clinically healthy and had a mean GI of 1.4; 67% of the sites bled and 2.1% had calculus, and none of the animals had detectable BP/P. Neisseriae were very common in noninflamed sites. Subsequently, when inflamed sites were compared with noninflamed sites in group II animals after they had been maintained in captivity for 6 months, inflamed sites exhibited a more complex microbiota and increased proportions of gram-negative rods and asaccharolytic bacteria. PMID

  13. Integrating histology and MRI in the first digital brain of common squirrel monkey, Saimiri sciureus

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Peizhen; Parvathaneni, Prasanna; Schilling, Kurt G.; Gao, Yurui; Janve, Vaibhav; Anderson, Adam; Landman, Bennett A.

    2015-01-01

    This effort is a continuation of development of a digital brain atlas of the common squirrel monkey, Saimiri sciureus, a New World monkey with functional and microstructural organization of central nervous system similar to that of humans. Here, we present the integration of histology with multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) atlas constructed from the brain of an adult female squirrel monkey. The central concept of this work is to use block face photography to establish an intermediate common space in coordinate system which preserves the high resolution in-plane resolution of histology while enabling 3-D correspondence with MRI. In vivo MRI acquisitions include high resolution T2 structural imaging (300 µm isotropic) and low resolution diffusion tensor imaging (600 um isotropic). Ex vivo MRI acquisitions include high resolution T2 structural imaging and high resolution diffusion tensor imaging (both 300 µm isotropic). Cortical regions were manually annotated on the co-registered volumes based on published histological sections in-plane. We describe mapping of histology and MRI based data of the common squirrel monkey and construction of a viewing tool that enable online viewing of these datasets. The previously descried atlas MRI is used for its deformation to provide accurate conformation to the MRI, thus adding information at the histological level to the MRI volume. This paper presents the mapping of single 2D image slice in block face as a proof of concept and this can be extended to map the atlas space in 3D coordinate system as part of the future work and can be loaded to an XNAT system for further use. PMID:25914510

  14. Integrating histology and MRI in the first digital brain of common squirrel monkey, Saimiri sciureus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Peizhen; Parvathaneni, Prasanna; Schilling, Kurt G.; Gao, Yurui; Janve, Vaibhav; Anderson, Adam; Landman, Bennett A.

    2015-03-01

    This effort is a continuation of development of a digital brain atlas of the common squirrel monkey, Saimiri sciureus, a New World monkey with functional and microstructural organization of central nervous system similar to that of humans. Here, we present the integration of histology with multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) atlas constructed from the brain of an adult female squirrel monkey. The central concept of this work is to use block face photography to establish an intermediate common space in coordinate system which preserves the high resolution in-plane resolution of histology while enabling 3-D correspondence with MRI. In vivo MRI acquisitions include high resolution T2 structural imaging (300 μm isotropic) and low resolution diffusion tensor imaging (600 um isotropic). Ex vivo MRI acquisitions include high resolution T2 structural imaging and high resolution diffusion tensor imaging (both 300 μm isotropic). Cortical regions were manually annotated on the co-registered volumes based on published histological sections in-plane. We describe mapping of histology and MRI based data of the common squirrel monkey and construction of a viewing tool that enable online viewing of these datasets. The previously descried atlas MRI is used for its deformation to provide accurate conformation to the MRI, thus adding information at the histological level to the MRI volume. This paper presents the mapping of single 2D image slice in block face as a proof of concept and this can be extended to map the atlas space in 3D coordinate system as part of the future work and can be loaded to an XNAT system for further use.

  15. Cerebrovascular amyloidosis in squirrel monkeys and rhesus monkeys: apolipoprotein E genotype.

    PubMed

    Morelli, L; Wei, L; Amorim, A; McDermid, J; Abee, C R; Frangione, B; Walker, L C; Levy, E

    1996-01-29

    Some neuropathological changes characteristic of aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD) in humans are present also in senescent non-human primates. The human apoE4 allele is associated with an increased risk of developing late-onset familial and sporadic AD. We found that rhesus monkeys and three subspecies of squirrel monkeys are homozygous for apoE phenotype with arginine at positions 112 and 158 as in human apoE4. However, in both species threonine replaces arginine at position 61 of human apoE. It was previously shown that arginine 61 was critical in determining apoE4 lipoprotein distribution in humans.

  16. Influence of exposure to a prolonged hyperdynamic field on body temperature in the squirrel monkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of gravitational loading on the regulation of body temperature is examined. Five adult male squirrel monkeys were exposed to a 2-G environment twice for 48 hours, once beginning in the middle of their light cycle and the second time in the middle of their dark cycle. It is observed that a reduction in body temperature occurs during the light cycle phase and at night there is an insignificant change in body temperature. The rhythmic characteristics of the light and dark cycles are analyzed. The data reveal that the body temperature in animals at 2 G is influenced more during the active phase of the animals 24-hour cycle.

  17. Larva migrans in squirrel monkeys experimentally infected with Baylisascaris potosis.

    PubMed

    Tokiwa, Toshihiro; Tsugo, Kosuke; Nakamura, Shohei; Taira, Kensuke; Une, Yumi

    2015-10-01

    Roundworms of the genus Baylisascaris are natural parasites primarily of wild carnivores, and they can occasionally cause infection in humans and animals. Infection results in visceral larva migrans and/or neural larva migrans, which can be severe or fatal in some animals. Recently, Baylisascaris nematodes isolated from kinkajous (Potos flavus) and previously referred to as Baylisascaris procyonis were renamed as Baylisascaris potosis; however, data regarding the pathogenicity of B. potosis towards animals and humans are lacking. In the present study, we experimentally infected squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) with B. potosis to determine the suitability of the monkey as a primate model. We used embryonated eggs of B. potosis at two different doses (10,000 eggs and 100,000 eggs) and examined the animals at 30 days post-infection. Histopathological examination showed the presence of B. potosis larvae and infiltration of inflammatory cells around a central B. potosis larvae in the brain, intestines, and liver. Nevertheless, the monkeys showed no clinical signs associated with infection. Parasitological examination revealed the presence of B. potosis larvae in the intestines, liver, lung, muscles, brain, kidney, and diaphragm. Our findings extend the range of species that are susceptible to B. potosis and provide evidence for the zoonotic potential of larva migrans in high dose infections.

  18. Operant control of convective cooling and microwave irradiation by the squirrel monkey.

    PubMed

    Bruce-Wolfe, V; Adair, E R

    1985-01-01

    Adult male squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) were individually chair-restrained in an air-conditioned Styrofoam box in the far field of a horn antenna. Each monkey first received extensive training to regulate the temperature of the air circulating through the box by selecting between 10 and 50 degrees C air source temperatures. Then, to investigate the ability of the animals to utilize microwaves as a source of thermalizing energy, 2450-MHz continuous wave microwaves accompanied by thermoneutral (30 degrees C) air were substituted for the 50 degrees C air. Irradiation at each of three power densities was made available, ie, at 20, 25, and 30 mW/cm2 [SAR = 0.15 (W/kg)/(mW/cm2)]. The percentage of time that the monkeys selected microwave irradiation paired with thermoneutral air averaged 90% at 20 and at 25 mW/cm2. The mean percentage declined reliably (p less than 0.001) to 81% at 30 mW/cm2, confirming the monkey's ability to utilize microwave irradiation as a source of thermal energy during the course of behavioral thermoregulation. All animals readily made the warm-air to microwave-field transition, regulating rectal temperature with precision by sequentially selecting 10 degrees C air, then microwave irradiation accompanied by 30 degrees C air. Although the selection of cooler air resulted in a slight reduction of skin temperatures, normal rectal temperature was maintained. The results indicate that the squirrel monkey can utilize a microwave source in conjunction with convective cooling to regulate body temperature behaviorally.

  19. Which senses play a role in nonhuman primate food selection? A comparison between squirrel monkeys and spider monkeys.

    PubMed

    Laska, Matthias; Freist, Pamela; Krause, Stephanie

    2007-03-01

    In order to optimize foraging efficiency and avoid toxicosis, animals must be able to detect, discriminate, and learn about the predictive signals of potential food. Primates are typically regarded as animals that rely mainly on their highly developed visual systems, and little is known about the role that the other senses may play in food selection. It was therefore the aim of the present study to assess which senses are involved in the evaluation of food by two species of New World primates: the squirrel monkey and the spider monkey. To this end, six animals per species were repeatedly presented with both familiar and novel food items, and their behavior was videotaped and analyzed. To obtain a further indication of the relative importance of visual and chemosensory cues, the animals were also presented with familiar food items that were experimentally modified in color, odor, or both color and odor. The results demonstrate that squirrel monkeys and spider monkeys use olfactory, gustatory, and tactile cues in addition to visual information to evaluate novel food, whereas they mainly inspect familiar food items visually prior to consumption. Our findings also show that in both species the use of nonvisual cues decreased rapidly with repeated presentations of novel food, suggesting a fast multimodal learning process. Further, the two species clearly differ in their relative use of nonvisual cues when evaluating novel or modified food, with spider monkeys relying more on olfactory cues than squirrel monkeys, and squirrel monkeys relying more on tactile cues compared to spider monkeys. PMID:17146790

  20. Olfactory communication among Costa Rican squirrel monkeys: a field study.

    PubMed

    Boinski, S

    1992-01-01

    Behaviors with a possible role in olfactory communication among troop members were investigated as part of a field study on the reproductive and foraging ecology of squirrel monkeys (Saimiri oerstedi) in Costa Rica. All age classes engaged in the olfaction-related behaviors. Apart from olfactory investigation of female genitals by males during the mating season, no other potential olfaction-related behavior (urine wash, branch investigation, rump, chest, back rub and sneeze) exceeded 1% of mean behavioral samples. Assessment of reproduction condition appears to be the primary function of such olfactory investigation of the female genital region. The primary function of urine washing is suggested to be the general communication of reproductive status, possibly facilitating reproductive synchrony. Sneezing, rump, back and chest rubbing do not appear to deposit substances active in olfactory communication. PMID:1306175

  1. Motion sickness elicited by passive rotation in squirrel monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daunton, Nancy G.; Fox, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    Current theory and recent evidence suggest that motion sickness occurs under conditions of sensory input in which the normal motor programs for producing eye, head, and body movements are not functionally effective, i.e. under conditions in which there are difficulties in maintaining posture and controlling eye movements. Conditions involving conflicting or inconsistent visual-vestibular (VV) stimulation should thus result in greater sickness rates since the existing motor programs do not produce effective control of eye-head-body movements under such conditions. It is felt that the relationship of postural control to motion sickness is an important one and one often overlooked. The results are reported which showed that when postural requirements were minimized by fully restraining squirrel monkeys during hypogravity parabolic flight, no animals became motion sick, but over 80 percent of the same 11 animals became sick if they were unrestrained and maintained control of their posture.

  2. Acute toxoplasmosis in squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Cedillo-Peláez, Carlos; Rico-Torres, Claudia Patricia; Salas-Garrido, Carlos Gerardo; Correa, Dolores

    2011-08-25

    Toxoplasma gondii causes fatal multisystemic disease in New World primates, with respiratory failure and multifocal necrotic lesions. Although cases and outbreaks of toxoplasmosis have been described, there are few genotyping studies and none has included parasite load quantification. In this article, we describe two cases of lethal acute toxoplasmosis in squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) of Mexico city. The main pathological findings included pulmonary edema, interstitial pneumonia, hepatitis and necrotizing lymphadenitis, and structures similar to T. gondii tachyzoites observed by histopathology in these organs. Diagnosis was confirmed by immunohistochemistry, transmission electron microscopy and both end point and real time PCR. The load was between <14 and 23 parasites/mg tissue. Digestion of the SAG3 gene amplicon showed similar bands to type I reference strains. These are the first cases of toxoplasmosis in primates studied in Mexico, with clinical features similar to others reported in Israel and French Guiana, although apparently caused by a different T. gondii variant.

  3. Regulation and distribution of squirrel monkey chorionic gonadotropin and secretogranin II in the pituitary

    PubMed Central

    Vasauskas, Audrey A.; Hubler, Tina R.; Mahanic, Christina; Gibson, Susan; Kahn, Andrea G.; Scammell, Jonathan G.

    2011-01-01

    Secretogranin II (SgII) is a member of the granin family of proteins found in neuroendocrine and endocrine cells. The expression and storage of SgII in the pituitary gland of Old World primates and rodents have been linked with those of luteinizing hormone (LH). However, New World primates including squirrel monkeys do not express LH in the pituitary gland, but rather CG is expressed. If CG takes on the luteotropic role of LH in New World primates, SgII may be associated with the expression and storage of CG in the pituitary gland. The goal of this study was to evaluate the regulation and distribution of CG and SgII in the squirrel monkey. A DNA fragment containing approximately 750 bp of squirrel monkey SgII promoter was isolated from genomic DNA and found to contain a cyclic AMP response element that is also present in the human SgII promoter and important for GnRH responsiveness. The squirrel monkey and human SgII promoters were similarly activated by GnRH in luciferase reporter gene assays in LβT2 cells. Double immunofluorescence microscopy demonstrated close association of SgII and CG in gonadotrophs of squirrel monkey pituitary gland. These results suggest that CG and SgII have a similar intercellular distribution and are coregulated in squirrel monkey pituitary gland. PMID:21095191

  4. Isolation and amino acid sequences of squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciurea) insulin and glucagon.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, J H; Eng, J; Yalow, R S

    1990-01-01

    It was reported two decades ago that insulin was not detectable in the glucose-stimulated state in Saimiri sciurea, the New World squirrel monkey, by a radioimmunoassay system developed with guinea pig anti-pork insulin antibody and labeled pork insulin. With the same system, reasonable levels were observed in rhesus monkeys and chimpanzees. This suggested that New World monkeys, like the New World hystricomorph rodents such as the guinea pig and the coypu, might have insulins whose sequences differ markedly from those of Old World mammals. In this report we describe the purification and amino acid sequences of squirrel monkey insulin and glucagon. We demonstrate that the substitutions at B29, B27, A2, A4, and A17 of squirrel monkey insulin are identical with those previously found in another New World primate, the owl monkey (Aotus trivirgatus). The immunologic cross-reactivity of this insulin in our immunoassay system is only a few percent of that of human insulin. Squirrel monkey glucagon is identical with the usual glucagon found in Old World mammals, which predicts that the glucagons of other New World monkeys would not differ from the usual Old World mammalian glucagon. It appears that the peptides of the New World monkeys have diverged less from those of the Old World mammals than have those of the New World hystricomorph rodents. The striking improvements in peptide purification and sequencing have the potential for adding new information concerning the evolutionary divergence of species. PMID:2263627

  5. Ontogeny of joint mechanics in squirrel monkeys (Saimiri boliviensis): functional implications for mammalian limb growth and locomotor development.

    PubMed

    Young, Jesse W

    2009-05-01

    Juvenile animals must often compete against adults for common resources, keep pace during group travel and evade common predators, despite reduced body size and an immature musculoskeletal system. Previous morphometric studies of a diverse array of mammals, including jack rabbits, cats and capuchin monkeys, have identified growth-related changes in anatomy, such as negative allometry of limb muscle mechanical advantage, which should theoretically permit young mammals to overcome such ontogenetic limits on performance. However, it is important to evaluate the potential impact of such ;compensatory' growth trajectories within the context of developmental changes in locomotor behavior. I used standard kinematic and kinetic techniques to investigate the ontogenetic scaling of joint postures, substrate reaction forces, joint load arm lengths and external joint moments in an ontogenetic sample of squirrel monkeys (Saimiri boliviensis). Results indicated that young squirrel monkeys were frequently able to limit forelimb and hind limb joint loading via a combination of changes in limb posture and limb force distribution, potentially compensating for limited muscularity at younger ages. These results complement previous morphometric studies and suggest that immature mammals may utilize a combination of behavioral and anatomical mechanisms to mitigate ontogenetic limits on locomotor performance. However, ontogenetic changes in joint posture, not limb length per se, explained most of the variation in load arm lengths and joint loading in growing squirrel monkeys, indicating the importance of incorporating both anatomical and performance measures when studying the ontogeny of limb joint mechanics.

  6. Phenotypic and Functional Characterization of Lymphocytes from Different Age Groups of Bolivian Squirrel Monkeys (Saimiri boliviensis boliviensis)

    PubMed Central

    Nehete, Pramod N.; Hanley, Patrick W.; Nehete, Bharti P.; Yang, Guojun; Ruiz, Julio C.; Williams, Lawrence; Abee, Christian R.; Sastry, K. Jagannadha

    2013-01-01

    Due to many physiological and genetic characteristic similarities to humans, squirrel monkeys provide an ideal animal model specifically for studying malaria, and transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease). While squirrel monkeys three years and older are generally considered adult subjects suitable for use in medical research studies, little is known about the functional properties of lymphocytes in relation to the age of these animals, which could significantly impact the quality and quantity of innate and adaptive immune responses. In this study, we investigated differences in the phenotype and function of lymphocytes subsets of young (3–4 years), adult (8–10 years) and aged (16–19 years) squirrel monkeys. In general, animals in all three age groups exhibited comparable numbers of different lymphocyte subsets except for CD20+ B cells that were significantly lower in aged relative to young animals and T cells subsets expressing both CD4 and CD8 (double positive) were significantly higher in aged relative to young animals. With increasing age, phenotypic differences in central and effector memory T cells subsets were observed, that were more pronounced for the CD8+ T cells. Despite equal proportions of CD3+ T cells among the three age groups, responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells to T cell mitogens PHA and Con A showed lower IFN-γ producing cells in the aged group than that in the young group. Furthermore, aged animals showed significantly higher plasma levels of inflammatory cytokines IL-6, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-10 and IL-12. These findings suggest that while the squirrel monkeys in general share phenotypic and functional similarities of lymphocyte subsets with humans in relation to age, specific differences exist in immune function of lymphocytes between young and old animals that could potentially impact experimental outcomes for which the measurement of immunologic endpoints are critical. PMID:24282512

  7. Molecular cloning of pituitary glycoprotein alpha-subunit and follicle stimulating hormone and chorionic gonadotropin beta-subunits from New World squirrel monkey and owl monkey.

    PubMed

    Scammell, Jonathan G; Funkhouser, Jane D; Moyer, Felricia S; Gibson, Susan V; Willis, Donna L

    2008-02-01

    The goal of this study was to characterize the gonadotropins expressed in pituitary glands of the New World squirrel monkey (Saimiri sp.) and owl monkey (Aotus sp.). The various subunits were amplified from total RNA from squirrel monkey and owl monkey pituitary glands by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and the deduced amino acid sequences compared to those of other species. Mature squirrel monkey and owl monkey glycoprotein hormone alpha-polypeptides (96 amino acids in length) were determined to be 80% homologous to the human sequence. The sequences of mature beta subunits of follicle stimulating hormone (FSHbeta) from squirrel monkey and owl monkey (111 amino acids in length) are 92% homologous to human FSHbeta. New World primate glycoprotein hormone alpha-polypeptides and FSHbeta subunits showed conservation of all cysteine residues and consensus N-linked glycosylation sites. Attempts to amplify the beta-subunit of luteinizing hormone from squirrel monkey and owl monkey pituitary glands were unsuccessful. Rather, the beta-subunit of chorionic gonadotropin (CG) was amplified from pituitaries of both New World primates. Squirrel monkey and owl monkey CGbeta are 143 and 144 amino acids in length and 77% homologous with human CGbeta. The greatest divergence is in the C terminus, where all four sites for O-linked glycosylation in human CGbeta, responsible for delayed metabolic clearance, are predicted to be absent in New World primate CGbetas. It is likely that CG secreted from pituitary of New World primates exhibits a relatively short half-life compared to human CG.

  8. Interhemispheric connections in the visual cortex of the squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus).

    PubMed

    Gould, H J; Weber, J T; Rieck, R W

    1987-02-01

    The callosal connections within the posterior parietal and occipital cortices were studied in the squirrel monkey with horseradish peroxidase tracing techniques. The data were evaluated with particular emphasis on the relationship of major callosal connections along the 17-18 border. The overall pattern of callosal connections in the squirrel monkey also was compared with callosal patterns in other New World simians. Our results show that the dense band of callosal connections along the 17-18 border in the squirrel monkey differs from the connections observed in other New World monkeys in that it is virtually confined to area 18 and avoids area 17. In addition to a continuous band of callosal connections in area 18 that parallels the 17-18 border, rostral extensions of the band are oriented perpendicular to the 17-18 border and present an obvious periodicity. The remaining parieto-occipital cortex contains a complex pattern of callosal connections that is strikingly similar to patterns reported for other New World monkeys. Thus, it is likely that the dorsolateral extrastriate visual cortex in the squirrel monkey is organized in a manner similar to that found within other New World monkeys.

  9. Pattern of maternal circulating CRH in laboratory-housed squirrel and owl monkeys.

    PubMed

    Power, M L; Williams, L E; Gibson, S V; Schulkin, J; Helfers, J; Zorrilla, E P

    2010-11-01

    The anthropoid primate placenta appears to be unique in producing corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH). Placental CRH is involved in an endocrine circuit key to the production of estrogens during pregnancy. CRH induces cortisol production by the maternal and fetal adrenal glands, leading to further placental CRH production. CRH also stimulates the fetal adrenal glands to produce dehydroepiandrostendione sulfate (DHEAS), which the placenta converts into estrogens. There are at least two patterns of maternal circulating CRH across gestation among anthropoids. Monkeys examined to date (Papio and Callithrix) have an early-to-mid gestational peak of circulating CRH, followed by a steady decline to a plateau level, with a possible rise near parturition. In contrast, humans and great apes have an exponential rise in circulating CRH peaking at parturition. To further document and compare patterns of maternal circulating CRH in anthropoid primates, we collected monthly blood samples from 14 squirrel monkeys (Saimiri boliviensis) and ten owl monkeys (Aotus nancymaae) during pregnancy. CRH immunoreactivity was measured from extracted plasma by using solid-phase radioimmunoassay. Both squirrel and owl monkeys displayed a mid-gestational peak in circulating CRH: days 45-65 of the 152-day gestation for squirrel monkeys (mean±SEM CRH=2,694±276 pg/ml) and days 60-80 of the 133-day gestation for owl monkeys (9,871±974 pg/ml). In squirrel monkeys, circulating CRH declined to 36% of mean peak value by 2 weeks before parturition and then appeared to increase; the best model for circulating CRH over gestation in squirrel monkeys was a cubic function, similar to previous results for baboons and marmosets. In owl monkeys, circulating CRH appeared to reach plateau with no subsequent significant decline approaching parturition, although a cubic function was the best fit. This study provides additional evidence for a mid-gestational peak of maternal circulating CRH in ancestral

  10. Pattern of maternal circulating CRH in laboratory-housed squirrel and owl monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Power, ML; Williams, LE; Gibson, SV; Schulkin, J; Helfers, J; Zorrilla, EP

    2010-01-01

    The anthropoid primate placenta appears to be unique in producing corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH). Placental CRH is involved in an endocrine circuit key to the production of estrogens during pregnancy. CRH induces cortisol production by the maternal and fetal adrenal glands, leading to further placental CRH production. CRH also stimulates the fetal adrenal glands to produce dehydroepiandrostendione sulfate (DHEAS) which the placenta converts into estrogens. There are at least two patterns of maternal circulating CRH across gestation among anthropoids. Monkeys examined to date (Papio and Callithrix) have an early-to-mid gestational peak of circulating CRH, followed by a steady decline to a plateau level, with a possible rise near parturition. In contrast, humans and great apes have an exponential rise in circulating CRH peaking at parturition. To further document and compare patterns of maternal circulating CRH in anthropoid primates, we collected monthly blood samples on 14 squirrel monkeys (Saimiri boliviensis) and 10 owl monkeys (Aotus nancymaae) during pregnancy. CRH immunoreactivity was measured from extracted plasma by solid-phase RIA. Both squirrel and owl monkeys displayed a mid-gestational peak in circulating CRH: days 45–65 of the 152-day gestation for squirrel monkeys (mean±SEM CRH = 2694±276 pg/ml) and days 60–80 of the 133-day gestation for owl monkeys (9871±974 pg/ml). In squirrel monkeys, circulating CRH declined to 36% of mean peak value by two weeks before parturition and then appeared to increase; the best model for circulating CRH over gestation in squirrel monkeys was a cubic function, similar to previous results for baboons and marmosets. In owl monkeys, circulating CRH appeared to plateau with no subsequent significant decline approaching parturition, although a cubic function was the best fit. This study provides additional evidence for a mid-gestational peak of maternal circulating CRH in ancestral anthropoids that has been lost

  11. Habitat use by squirrel monkeys (Saimiri oerstedi) in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Boinski, S

    1987-01-01

    This paper analyses movement patterns, habitat preferences, activity schedules, and dispersion of troop members in squirrel monkeys (Saimiri oerstedi) in relation to seasonal changes in food abundance in a Costa Rican tropical wet forest. Secondary forest was the preferred habitat and use of primary forest and late successional forest was limited primarily to seasons when food availability was low. Range area differed between seasons, varying from 79 to 110 ha, and totaling 176 ha over 11 months. The number of hectares used, hourly rate of group movement, and proportion of time spent foraging each season were all negatively related to relative food abundance. There was a tendency to spend less time in foraging activities in the middle of the day and to spend more time exclusively in travel at dawn and dusk. In all seasons dispersion was least when the troop was travelling and it was generally greatest during seasons of low food abundance. Measures of the allocation of time by the troop to food-related activities and the extent of troop dispersion each season were consistent with estimates based on behavior sampling of individuals. PMID:3504420

  12. Three dimensional eye movements of squirrel monkeys following postrotatory tilt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merfeld, D. M.; Young, L. R.; Paige, G. D.; Tomko, D. L.

    1993-01-01

    Three-dimensional squirrel monkey eye movements were recorded during and immediately following rotation around an earth-vertical yaw axis (160 degrees/s steady state, 100 degrees/s2 acceleration and deceleration). To study interactions between the horizontal angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) and head orientation, postrotatory VOR alignment was changed relative to gravity by tilting the head out of the horizontal plane (pitch or roll tilt between 15 degrees and 90 degrees) immediately after cessation of motion. Results showed that in addition to post rotatory horizontal nystagmus, vertical nystagmus followed tilts to the left or right (roll), and torsional nystagmus followed forward or backward (pitch) tilts. When the time course and spatial orientation of eye velocity were considered in three dimensions, the axis of eye rotation always shifted toward alignment with gravity, and the postrotatory horizontal VOR decay was accelerated by the tilts. These phenomena may reflect a neural process that resolves the sensory conflict induced by this postrotatory tilt paradigm.

  13. Endogenous thermoregulatory rhythms of squirrel monkeys in thermoneutrality and cold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, E. L.; Fuller, C. A.

    1999-01-01

    Whole body heat production (HP) and heat loss (HL) were examined to determine if the free-running circadian rhythm in body temperature (Tb) results from coordinated changes in HP and HL rhythms in thermoneutrality (27 degrees C) as well as mild cold (17 degrees C). Squirrel monkey metabolism (n = 6) was monitored by both indirect and direct calorimetry, with telemetered measurement of Tb and activity. Feeding was also measured. Rhythms of HP, HL, and conductance were tightly coupled with the circadian Tb rhythm at both ambient temperatures (TA). At 17 degrees C, increased HP compensated for higher HL at all phases of the Tb rhythm, resulting in only minor changes to Tb. Parallel compensatory changes of HP and HL were seen at all rhythm phases at both TA. Similar time courses of Tb, HP, and HL in their respective rhythms and the relative stability of Tb during both active and rest periods suggest action of the circadian timing system on Tb set point.

  14. Evaluation of neonatal squirrel monkeys receiving tritiated water throughout gestation

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, D.C.L.; Krebs, J.S.; Sasmore, D.P.; Mitoma, C.

    1980-09-01

    Pregnant squirrel monkeys received tritiated water (HTO) in the drinking water throughout gestation at levels ranging from 16 to 1000 times the permissible level for human consumption (0.003 ..mu..Ci/ml), resulting in mean body water HTO levels ranging from 0.05 to 3.1 ..mu..Ci/ml. There were no discernible effects of HTO administration on the newborn progeny in terms of body weight, body dimensions, selected organ weights (brain, heart, adrenal, kidney, liver, spleen), hematologic patterns, and histology of selected organs and tissues (adrenal, kidney, liver, lung, brain, pancreas, jejunum, pituitary, spleen, testes, thymus, skin) other than ovaries. The number of primary oocytes in female progeny decreased markedly with increasing levels of HTO in maternal drinking water. Quantitative analysis of neonate ovaries, testes, brain tissue, and retinal tissue is in progress. No effects of HTO administration on maternal body weight, gestation time, or maintenance of pregnancy to full term were observed. Body weights of HTO-treated inseminated females that did not deliver were less than control weights, but the lack of dose dependence implies that this effect may have been associated with a stimulus characteristic of the HTO administration rather than with irradiation.

  15. Isolation and amino acid sequences of squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciurea) insulin and glucagon

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Jinghua ); Eng, J.; Yalow, R.S. City Univ. of New York, NY )

    1990-12-01

    It was reported two decades ago that insulin was not detectable in the glucose-stimulated state in Saimiri sciurea, the New World squirrel monkey, by a radioimmunoassay system developed with guinea pig anti-pork insulin antibody and labeled park insulin. With the same system, reasonable levels were observed in rhesus monkeys and chimpanzees. This suggested that New World monkeys, like the New World hystricomorph rodents such as the guinea pig and the coypu, might have insulins whose sequences differ markedly from those of Old World mammals. In this report the authors describe the purification and amino acid sequences of squirrel monkey insulin and glucagon. They demonstrate that the substitutions at B29, B27, A2, A4, and A17 of squirrel monkey insulin are identical with those previously found in another New World primate, the owl monkey (Aotus trivirgatus). The immunologic cross-reactivity of this insulin in their immunoassay system is only a few percent of that of human insulin. It appears that the peptides of the New World monkeys have diverged less from those of the Old World mammals than have those of the New World hystricomorph rodents. The striking improvements in peptide purification and sequencing have the potential for adding new information concerning the evolutionary divergence of species.

  16. Responses of squirrel monkeys to seasonal changes in food availability in an eastern Amazonian forest.

    PubMed

    Stone, Anita I

    2007-02-01

    Tropical forests are characterized by marked temporal and spatial variation in productivity, and many primates face foraging problems associated with seasonal shifts in fruit availability. In this study, I examined seasonal changes in diet and foraging behaviors of two groups of squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus), studied for 12 months in Eastern Brazilian Amazonia, an area characterized by seasonal rainfall. Squirrel monkeys were primarily insectivorous (79% of feeding and foraging time), with fruit consumption highest during the rainy season. Although monkeys fed from 68 plant species, fruit of Attalea maripa palms accounted for 28% of annual fruit-feeding records. Dietary shifts in the dry season were correlated with a decline in ripe A. maripa fruits. Despite pronounced seasonal variation in rainfall and fruit abundance, foraging efficiency, travel time, and distance traveled remained stable between seasons. Instead, squirrel monkeys at this Eastern Amazonian site primarily dealt with the seasonal decline in fruit by showing dietary flexibility. Consumption of insects, flowers, and exudates increased during the dry season. In particular, their foraging behavior at this time strongly resembled that of tamarins (Saguinus sp.) and consisted of heavy use of seed-pod exudates and specialized foraging on large-bodied orthopterans near the forest floor. Comparisons with squirrel monkeys at other locations indicate that, across their geographic range, Saimiri use a variety of behavioral tactics during reduced periods of fruit availability. PMID:17154390

  17. Artificial turf foraging boards as environmental enrichment for pair-housed female squirrel monkeys.

    PubMed

    Fekete, J M; Norcross, J L; Newman, J D

    2000-03-01

    We investigated the use of artificial turf foraging boards to determine if providing captive squirrel monkeys an opportunity for semi-natural foraging behavior would 1) alter the monkeys' time budget to better approximate that seen in wild populations, 2) reduce the stereotypic, self-injurious, and aggressive behavior occasionally seen in captive squirrel monkeys, and 3) provide sustained enrichment. Five groups of pair-housed female squirrel monkeys were videotaped the week prior to, the week following, and for 2 weeks during the enrichment phase, when treat-enhanced boards were provided for 2 h daily. During the first 30 min of daily enrichment, inactivity declined 35.3%, locomotion increased 3.8%, and board-related behaviors occupied 36.3% of the activity budget; these changes were not evident after 1.5 h. Stereotypic behavior (pacing, headswinging, tailchewing) and aggression were not altered by the foraging opportunity. The foraging board retained the interest of the subjects across 2 weeks in the same daily pattern. Use of the foraging board altered the squirrel monkeys' time budget to become more like activity patterns seen in wild populations. PMID:11487235

  18. Artificial turf foraging boards as environmental enrichment for pair-housed female squirrel monkeys.

    PubMed

    Fekete, J M; Norcross, J L; Newman, J D

    2000-03-01

    We investigated the use of artificial turf foraging boards to determine if providing captive squirrel monkeys an opportunity for semi-natural foraging behavior would 1) alter the monkeys' time budget to better approximate that seen in wild populations, 2) reduce the stereotypic, self-injurious, and aggressive behavior occasionally seen in captive squirrel monkeys, and 3) provide sustained enrichment. Five groups of pair-housed female squirrel monkeys were videotaped the week prior to, the week following, and for 2 weeks during the enrichment phase, when treat-enhanced boards were provided for 2 h daily. During the first 30 min of daily enrichment, inactivity declined 35.3%, locomotion increased 3.8%, and board-related behaviors occupied 36.3% of the activity budget; these changes were not evident after 1.5 h. Stereotypic behavior (pacing, headswinging, tailchewing) and aggression were not altered by the foraging opportunity. The foraging board retained the interest of the subjects across 2 weeks in the same daily pattern. Use of the foraging board altered the squirrel monkeys' time budget to become more like activity patterns seen in wild populations.

  19. Molecular characterization of the first polyomavirus from a New World primate: squirrel monkey polyomavirus.

    PubMed

    Verschoor, Ernst J; Groenewoud, Marlous J; Fagrouch, Zahra; Kewalapat, Aruna; van Gessel, Sabine; Kik, Marja J L; Heeney, Jonathan L

    2008-01-01

    DNA samples from a variety of New World monkeys were screened by using a broad-spectrum PCR targeting the VP1 gene of polyomaviruses. This resulted in the characterization of the first polyomavirus from a New World primate. This virus naturally infects squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sp.) and is provisionally named squirrel monkey polyomavirus (SquiPyV). The complete genome of SquiPyV is 5,075 bp in length, and encodes the small T and large T antigens and the three structural proteins VP1, VP2 and VP3. Interestingly, the late region also encodes a putative agnoprotein, a feature that it shares with other polyomaviruses from humans, baboons and African green monkeys. Comparison with other polyomaviruses revealed limited sequence similarity to any other polyomavirus, and phylogenetic analysis of the VP1 gene confirmed its uniqueness.

  20. Conditioned taste aversion and motion sickness in cats and squirrel monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert A.; Corcoran, Meryl Lee; Brizzee, Kenneth R.

    1991-01-01

    The relationship between vomiting and conditioned taste aversion was studied in intact cats and squirrel monkeys and in cats and squirrel monkeys in which the area postrema was ablated by thermal cautery. In cats conditioned 7-12 months after ablation of the area postrema, three successive treatments with xylazine failed to produce either vomiting or conditioned taste aversion to a novel fluid. Intact cats, however, vomited and formed a conditioned aversion. In squirrel monkeys conditioned 6 months after ablation of the area postrema, three treatments with lithium chloride failed to produce conditioned taste aversion. Intact monkeys did condition with these treatments. Neither intact nor ablated monkeys vomited or evidenced other signs of illness when injected with lithium chloride. When the same ablated cats and monkeys were exposed to a form of motion that produced vomiting prior to surgery, conditioned taste aversion can be produced after ablation of the area postrema. The utility of conditioned taste aversion as a measure of subemetic motion sickness is discussed by examining agreement and disagreement between identifications of motion sickness by conditioned taste aversion and vomiting. It is suggested that a convincing demonstration of the utility of conditioned taste aversion as a measure of nausea requires the identification of physiological correlates of nausea, and caution should be exercised when attempting to interpret conditioned taste aversion as a measure of nausea.

  1. Endogenous retrovirus HC2 pol fragments in the squirrel monkey: expression, evolution, and phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Yi, J-M; Kim, T-H; Huh, J-I; Nakamura, S; Takenaka, O; Lee, W-H; Hyun, B-H; Kim, H-S

    2003-11-01

    Human endogenous retrovirus HC2 is an incomplete provirus containing the entire gag and pol genes and a 3' LTR, whereas the 5' LTR and env gene are missing. We investigated expression of the HC2 pol gene in the squirrel monkey ( Saimiri sciureus) by RT-PCR. The pol gene was expressed in cerebellum, liver, lung, and spleen of the squirrel monkey, but not in six other tissues tested. RT-PCR products were cloned and sequenced resulting in seven sequences that were analyzed. These sequences showed 73.7-89.2% sequence similarity to HC2 pol genes present in the human genome. No frameshifts or termination codons caused by deletion/insertion or point mutation were found in clones SM-HC27-1 and SM-HC27-4 isolated from squirrel monkey lung tissues. Phylogenetic analysis showed that HC2 pol elements from the squirrel monkey were randomly clustered with those in human genome and the genomes of other nonhuman primates, indicating that substantial evolution of the HC2 elements occurred prior to primate speciation with additional evolution of the elements, independent of each other, after speciation.

  2. Social Behavior in Interacting Squirrel Monkeys with Differential Nutritional and Environmental Histories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chappell, Patricia F.

    This paper reports an observational study of the effects of handling on the social behavior of squirrel monkeys who received a protein deficient diet. After birth, experimental animals received a low-protein diet for a 6-week period. A subgroup of these animals were handled between 3 and 12 weeks of age. All of the animals interacted (in four…

  3. Investigation of anti-motion sickness drugs in the squirrel monkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, B. S.; Money, K. E.; Kohl, R. L.; Kinter, L. B.

    1992-01-01

    Early attempts to develop an animal model for anti-motion sickness drugs, using dogs and cats; were unsuccessful. Dogs did not show a beneficial effect of scopolamine (probably the best single anti-motion sickness drug for humans thus far) and the findings in cats were not definitive. The authors have developed an animal model using the squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus) of the Bolivian phenotype. Unrestrained monkeys in a small lucite cage were tested in an apparatus that induces motion sickness by combining vertical oscillation and horizontal rotation in a visually unrestricted laboratory environment. Signs of motion sickness were scored using a rating scale. Ten susceptible monkeys (weighing 800-1000 g) were given a total of five tests each, to establish the baseline susceptibility level. Based on the anticholinergic activity of scopolamine, the sensitivity of squirrel monkey to scopolamine was investigated, and the appropriate dose of scopolamine for this species was determined. Then various anti-motion sickness preparations were administered in subsequent tests: 100 ug scopolamine per monkey; 140 ug dexedrine; 50 ug scopolamine plus 70 ug dexedrine; 100 ug scopolamine plus 140 ug dexedrine; 3 mg promethazine; 3 mg promethazine plus 3 mg ephedrine. All these preparations were significantly effective in preventing motion sickness in the monkeys. Ephedrine, by itself, which is marginally effective in humans, was ineffective in the monkeys at the doses tried (0.3-6.0 mg). The squirrel monkey appears to be a good animal model for antimotion sickness drugs. Peripherally acting antihistamines such as astemizole and terfenadine were found to be ineffective, whereas flunarizine, and an arginine vasopressin V1 antagonist, showed significant activity in preventing motion sickness.

  4. Phenotype and Age Differences in Blood Gas Characteristics, Electrolytes, Hemoglobin, Plasma Glucose and Cortisol in Female Squirrel Monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brizzee, K. R.; Ordy, J. M.; Dunlap, W. P.; Kendrick, R.; Wengenack, T. M.

    1988-01-01

    Due to its small size, lower cost, tractable nature, successful breeding in captivity and its status near the middle of the primate phylogenetic scale, the squirrel monkey has become an attractive primate model for basic and biomedical research. Although the squirrel monkey now is being used more extensively in many laboratories with diverse interests, only fragmentary reports have been published regarding basic physiological characteristics, or baseline blood reference values of different phenotypes, particularly blood gases, hematology and serum chemical constituents. It is becoming recognized increasingly that these baseline blood reference values are important not only in the care and maintenance of the squirrel monkey, but are critical for assessing normal physiological status, as well as the effects of various experimental treatments. The purpose of this study was to compare differences in blood gases, electrolytes, hematology, blood glucose and cortisol among young and old Bolivian (Roman type) and Colombian (Gothic type) phenotypes of the squirrel monkey.

  5. Natural occurrence of black-pigmented Bacteroides species in the gingival crevice of the squirrel monkey.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, W B; Magnusson, I; Abee, C; Collins, B; Beem, J E; McArthur, W P

    1988-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether the squirrel monkey (Saimiri scuireus) is indigenously colonized with black-pigmented bacteroides (BPB) resembling human Bacteroides gingivalis and Bacteroides intermedius (suspected periodontal pathogens) and to determine the usefulness of the squirrel monkey as an in vivo model for studying colonization by putative pathogens. We assayed the subgingival plaques of 138 monkeys of various ages and in four different colonies for the presence of anaerobic BPB microorganisms. We also tested half the animals for the presence of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans. Clinical indices and levels of serum antibody to B. gingivalis were recorded. We detected BPB in 50% of the animals and A. actinomycetemcomitans in 69% of the animals. The presence of BPB was generally associated with increased age, increased gingival index, presence of calculus, and increased levels of serum antibody. These data indicate that the squirrel monkey may be a good model for studying the parameters of natural infection of the gingival crevice with suspected periodontopathogenic BPB microorganisms. PMID:3410543

  6. Planar relationships of the semicircular canals in rhesus and squirrel monkeys.

    PubMed

    Blanks, R H; Curthoys, I S; Bennett, M L; Markham, C H

    1985-08-12

    The technique of principal-component analysis was used to define anatomically the semicircular canal planes of the rhesus and squirrel monkeys with respect to the stereotaxic coordinate system. The analyses were performed on a series of points obtained from the dissected osseous labyrinths. A planar equation was defined for each canal plane in the stereotaxic coordinate system and angles were calculated between the 3 ipsilateral canal planes, between synergistic canal pairs and between each canal plane and the stereotaxic planes. The data from both species are similar: the ipsilateral canal planes are nearly orthogonal; synergistic pairs of canal planes are approximately parallel with angles of 2 degrees-12 degrees between pairs in the rhesus monkey and 13 degrees-16 degrees between pairs in the squirrel monkey. The horizontal canal planes form angles of 22 degrees and 18 degrees with the horizontal stereotaxic plane in the rhesus and squirrel monkeys, respectively. A head position of 15 degrees (pitch nose-down) was calculated to produce an optimal head position in both species for maximally stimulating the horizontal canals and minimally stimulating the vertical canals during horizontal angular acceleration. The radii of curvature (R) of the horizontal, anterior and posterior canals were also measured for both species using a calibrated reticle. These measurements indicate that the anterior canal of both species has the largest radius of curvature. This anatomical information is discussed in relation to the available physiological data. PMID:3896405

  7. Biochemical genetic markers of squirrel monkeys and their use for pedigree validation.

    PubMed

    VandeBerg, J L; Aivaliotis, M J; Williams, L E; Abee, C R

    1990-02-01

    Family data for 14 biochemical genetic markers fo squirrel monkeys (genus Saimiri) were derived from 73 pedigreed progeny and both parents of each, as well as from 16 additional progeny and one parent of each. The data for each marker and the phenotypic patterns were consistent with autosomal codominant inheritance. It was concluded from the genetic marker data that the pedigree records of seven progeny were incorrect. Retrospective investigations of colony records followed by typing of animals that might possibly have been a parent enabled five of the pedigree records to be corrected. Although five of the pedigree errors were cases of mistaken paternity, the other two apparently were the consequence of infant swapping between dams shortly after birth. Because squirrel monkeys exhibit a high degree of allomaternal behavior, infant swapping between dams may occur more frequently than in many other nonhuman primate species. PMID:2344347

  8. Adjustments in metabolic heat production by squirrel monkeys exposed to microwaves

    SciTech Connect

    Adair, E.R.; Adams, B.W.

    1982-04-01

    The basic fact that microwave exposure can lower metabolic heat production has been previously demonstrated for the mouse by Ho and Edwards (1977) and for the rat by Phillips et al. (1975). The general conclusion drawn from both studies was that the metabolic reduction produced by microwave exposure was dose dependent. The present study extends the investigation into the effects of microwave exposure on metabolic heat production to a primate, the squirrel monkey. When squirrel monkeys are restrained in cool environments, body temperature is regulated by an increase in metabolic heat production. The results of the current study demonstrate that either brief or prolonged whole-body exposure to a microwave field will cause a reduction of this elevated heat production by an amount directly related to the microwave energy absorbed.

  9. Sequences and evolution of human and squirrel monkey blue opsin genes.

    PubMed

    Shimmin, L C; Mai, P; Li, W H

    1997-04-01

    The sequences of the entire blue opsin gene in the squirrel monkey (Saimiri boliviensis) and the five introns of the human blue opsin gene were obtained. Intron 3 of these genes contains an Alu sequence and intron 4 contains a partial mer13 sequence. A comparison of the squirrel monkey opsin sequence with published mammalian opsin sequences shows that features believed to be functionally critical are all conserved. However, the blue opsin has evolved twice as fast as rhodopsin and is only as conservative as the beta globin, which has evolved at the average rate of mammalian proteins. Interestingly, the interhelical loops are, on average, actually more conservative than the transmembrane alpha helical regions. The introns of the blue opsin gene have evolved at the average rate of introns in primate genes.

  10. Temperature characteristics of squirrel monkey horizontal semicircular canals during caloric irrigation.

    PubMed

    Wilpizeski, C

    1981-01-01

    Current assumptions concerning body temperature of experimental animals, particularly as it relates to the selection of caloric test stimuli, are likely to be inaccurate guesses. Although the temporal bone of squirrel monkeys attenuates irrigation temperature by a factor of nearly 10, there is a high correlation between thermal changes in inner ear fluid and irrigation values. In this study, nystagmus (defined by electronystagmographic thresholds) occurred when horizontal canal temperatures deviated from resting temperature by +/- 0.14 C.

  11. Squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) infected with the agent of bovine spongiform encephalopathy develop tau pathology.

    PubMed

    Piccardo, P; Cervenak, J; Yakovleva, O; Gregori, L; Pomeroy, K; Cook, A; Muhammad, F S; Seuberlich, T; Cervenakova, L; Asher, D M

    2012-07-01

    Squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) were infected experimentally with the agent of classical bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). Two to four years later, six of the monkeys developed alterations in interactive behaviour and cognition and other neurological signs typical of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE). At necropsy examination, the brains from all of the monkeys showed pathological changes similar to those described in variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) of man, except that the squirrel monkey brains contained no PrP-amyloid plaques typical of that disease. Constant neuropathological features included spongiform degeneration, gliosis, deposition of abnormal prion protein (PrP(TSE)) and many deposits of abnormally phosphorylated tau protein (p-Tau) in several areas of the cerebrum and cerebellum. Western blots showed large amounts of proteinase K-resistant prion protein in the central nervous system. The striking absence of PrP plaques (prominent in brains of cynomolgus macaques [Macaca fascicularis] with experimentally-induced BSE and vCJD and in human patients with vCJD) reinforces the conclusion that the host plays a major role in determining the neuropathology of TSEs. Results of this study suggest that p-Tau, found in the brains of all BSE-infected monkeys, might play a role in the pathogenesis of TSEs. Whether p-Tau contributes to development of disease or appears as a secondary change late in the course of illness remains to be determined.

  12. Emergence of Cryptosporidium hominis Monkey Genotype II and Novel Subtype Family Ik in the Squirrel Monkey (Saimiri sciureus) in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ziyao; Zhong, Zhijun; Shen, Liuhong; Cao, Suizhong; Yu, Xingming; Hu, Yanchuan; Chen, Weigang; Peng, Gangneng

    2015-01-01

    A single Cryptosporidium isolate from a squirrel monkey with no clinical symptoms was obtained from a zoo in Ya’an city, China, and was genotyped by PCR amplification and DNA sequencing of the small-subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA), 70-kDa heat shock protein (HSP70), Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein, and actin genes. This multilocus genetic characterization determined that the isolate was Cryptosporidium hominis, but carried 2, 10, and 6 nucleotide differences in the SSU rRNA, HSP70, and actin loci, respectively, which is comparable to the variations at these loci between C. hominis and the previously reported monkey genotype (2, 3, and 3 nucleotide differences). Phylogenetic studies, based on neighbor-joining and maximum likelihood methods, showed that the isolate identified in the current study had a distinctly discordant taxonomic status, distinct from known C. hominis and also from the monkey genotype, with respect to the three loci. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms of the SSU rRNA gene obtained from this study were similar to those of known C. hominis but clearly differentiated from the monkey genotype. Further subtyping was performed by sequence analysis of the gene encoding the 60-kDa glycoprotein (gp60). Maximum homology of only 88.3% to C. hominis subtype IdA10G4 was observed for the current isolate, and phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that this particular isolate belonged to a novel C. hominis subtype family, IkA7G4. This study is the first to report C. hominis infection in the squirrel monkey and, based on the observed genetic characteristics, confirms a new C. hominis genotype, monkey genotype II. Thus, these results provide novel insights into genotypic variation in C. hominis. PMID:26509708

  13. Emergence of Cryptosporidium hominis Monkey Genotype II and Novel Subtype Family Ik in the Squirrel Monkey (Saimiri sciureus) in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuehan; Xie, Na; Li, Wei; Zhou, Ziyao; Zhong, Zhijun; Shen, Liuhong; Cao, Suizhong; Yu, Xingming; Hu, Yanchuan; Chen, Weigang; Peng, Gangneng

    2015-01-01

    A single Cryptosporidium isolate from a squirrel monkey with no clinical symptoms was obtained from a zoo in Ya'an city, China, and was genotyped by PCR amplification and DNA sequencing of the small-subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA), 70-kDa heat shock protein (HSP70), Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein, and actin genes. This multilocus genetic characterization determined that the isolate was Cryptosporidium hominis, but carried 2, 10, and 6 nucleotide differences in the SSU rRNA, HSP70, and actin loci, respectively, which is comparable to the variations at these loci between C. hominis and the previously reported monkey genotype (2, 3, and 3 nucleotide differences). Phylogenetic studies, based on neighbor-joining and maximum likelihood methods, showed that the isolate identified in the current study had a distinctly discordant taxonomic status, distinct from known C. hominis and also from the monkey genotype, with respect to the three loci. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms of the SSU rRNA gene obtained from this study were similar to those of known C. hominis but clearly differentiated from the monkey genotype. Further subtyping was performed by sequence analysis of the gene encoding the 60-kDa glycoprotein (gp60). Maximum homology of only 88.3% to C. hominis subtype IdA10G4 was observed for the current isolate, and phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that this particular isolate belonged to a novel C. hominis subtype family, IkA7G4. This study is the first to report C. hominis infection in the squirrel monkey and, based on the observed genetic characteristics, confirms a new C. hominis genotype, monkey genotype II. Thus, these results provide novel insights into genotypic variation in C. hominis.

  14. Olfactory discrimination ability for aliphatic esters in squirrel monkeys and humans.

    PubMed

    Laska, M; Freyer, D

    1997-08-01

    Using a behavioral paradigm designed to simulate olfactory-guided foraging, the ability of five squirrel monkeys to distinguish iso-amyl acetate from n- and iso-forms of other acetic esters (ethyl acetate to decyl acetate) and from other esters carrying the iso-amyl group (iso-amyl propionate to iso-amyl capronate) was investigated. We found (i) that all five animals were clearly able to discriminate between all odor pairs tested; (ii) a significant negative correlation between discrimination performance and structural similarity of odorants in terms of differences in carbon chain length of both the aliphatic alcohol group and the aliphatic acid group of the esters; and (iii) that iso- and n-amyl acetate were perceived as qualitatively similar despite different steric conformation. Using a triple-forced choice procedure, 20 human subjects were tested on the same tasks in parallel and showed a very similar pattern of discrimination performance compared with the squirrel monkeys. Thus, the results of this study provide evidence of well-developed olfactory discrimination ability in squirrel monkeys for aliphatic esters and support the assumption that human and non-human primates may share common principles of odor quality perception. PMID:9279468

  15. Biological and behavioral effects of prenatal and postnatal exposure to 2450-MHz electromagnetic radiation in the squirrel monkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, J.; Polson, P.; Rebert, C.; Lunan, K.; Gage, M.

    1982-01-01

    Near the beginning of the second trimester of pregnancy, 33 squirrel monkeys were exposed to 2450-MHz irradiation in a multimode cavity at whole-body average specific absorption rates equivalent to those resulting from exposure to plane wave irradiation at 0.034, 0.34, and 3.4 W/kg; exposed monkeys were compared with eight pregnant sham-exposed monkeys. Eighteen of the irradiated mothers and their offspring were exposed for an additional 6 months after parturition, and then their offspring were exposed for another 6 months. No differences were found between irradiated and control adults with respect to the number of live births produced or to measures of locomotor activity, maternal care, urinary catecholamines, plasma cortisol, 3H-thymidine and 14C-uridine uptake by phytohemagglutininstimulated blood lymphocytes, or electroencephalographic (EEG) activity. Similarly, no differences were found between exposed and nonexposed offspring on the same blood, urine, and EEG parameters. Growth rate and most aspects of behavioral development were not altered by exposure. The major difference between irradiated and control offspring was the high mortality rate (4/5) before 6 months of age in those exposed at 3.4 W/kg both before and after birth. These results indicate that microwaves at power densities to 3.4 W/kg might have little direct effect on the monkey fetus when exposures occur in utero during the latter half to two-thirds of pregnancy, but that continued exposure after birth might be harmful.

  16. High incidence of the gullet worm, Gongylonema pulchrum, in a squirrel monkey colony in a zoological garden in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hiroshi; Une, Yumi; Takada, Mariko

    2005-01-20

    Histological examination revealed the gullet worm (Gongylonema pulchrum) embedded in the lingual mucosa of two of four dead Bolivian squirrel monkeys (Saimiri boliviensis) from a zoological garden in Kyushu, Japan. The zoo had kept the monkeys as a colony of approximately 80-100 individuals in a moated, open ground since 1981. To assess the incidence of G. pulchrum infection in this colony, lingual scraping with disposable plastic sticks was conducted in February during 2 consecutive years (2003 and 2004). The oval, thick-shelled egg containing a larva was found in 15 of 27 arbitrarily-chosen adult monkeys (55.5%) in 2003, and 27 of 106 monkeys (25.5%) in 2004. Infection of other zoo-kept mammals with G. pulchrum was not assessed. Since the gullet worm infects a variety of mammals including primates as natural definitive hosts, and dung beetles and cockroaches as intermediate hosts, the zoological garden may provide an ideal environment for the parasite. Zoo veterinarians should be aware of this disease in kept mammals, and should consider in the case of primates, monthly or bimonthly prophylactic anthelmintic treatment.

  17. Effects of GABA[subscript A] Modulators on the Repeated Acquisition of Response Sequences in Squirrel Monkeys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Una C.; Winsauer, Peter J.; Stevenson, Michael W.; Moerschbaecher, Joseph M.

    2004-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of positive and negative GABA[subscript A] modulators under three different baselines of repeated acquisition in squirrel monkeys in which the monkeys acquired a three-response sequence on three keys under a second-order fixed-ratio (FR) schedule of food reinforcement. In two of these baselines, the…

  18. Polyamines in the lateral vestibular nuclei of the squirrel monkey and their potential role in vestibular compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henley, C.; Igarashi, M.

    1993-01-01

    Polyamine synthesis increases in response to injurious stimuli including axotomy and denervation. Reduced eye nystagmus and head-deviation have been observed in unilateral labyrinthectomized (UL) guinea pigs treated with an inhibitor of polyamine synthesis, alpha-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO). We quantified polyamines in the lateral vestibular nuclei (LVN) of control and UL squirrel monkeys during the phase of vestibular compensation (VC) and performed an experiment to determine if DFMO reduces nystagmus previously observed in the guinea pig. Polyamines were detected in the LVN of control and UL squirrel monkeys. Putrescine and spermidine increased in the ipsilateral LVN 3 days after UL with no change in the contralateral LVN. No left-right differences were noted in the 5-day post-UL monkey. DFMO reduced nystagmus in a UL squirrel monkey. These findings suggest that polyamines are important in vestibular function and may contribute to nystagmus observed in VC.

  19. Purification and properties of squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus) corticosteroid binding globulins

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhn, R.W.; Weber, C.V.; Siiteri, P.K.

    1988-04-05

    Corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG), a serum glycoprotein which binds glucocorticoids and progestins with high affinity, is widely distributed throughout the animal world. Although its charge and size characteristics have largely been conserved across species, the authors found the behavior of CBG in squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus) serum during fractionation by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis or Sephadex chromatography was consistent with a molecule about twice the size of that found in most species. To more fully understand the basis for this difference, they purified the protein by sequential affinity and DEAE-Sepharose chromatographies. The final product was obtained in greater than 60% yield and was found to migrate as a single homogeneous band when examined by electrophoresis. The steroid binding specificity of the purified protein was identical with that of the protein in the starting serum. In contrast to the single protein band observed following electrophoresis under normal conditions, separations in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) resolved the pure protein into two bands: one at 54,000 daltons and one at 57,000 daltons. Unlike other species, squirrel monkey CBG exists as a dimer in its native state. Antibodies were generated against the purified material and tested for cross-reactivity against the sera from other species by both radioimmunodiffusion and radioimmunoassay techniques. Only serum from titi monkeys was observed to cross-react when examined by radioimmunoassay. Taken together, the results suggest that New World monkey CBG's are distinct from those of other species in both size and immunologic characteristics.

  20. Adaptation of the mineralocorticoid target tissues to the high circulating cortisol and progesterone plasma levels in the squirrel monkey.

    PubMed

    Chrousos, G P; Loriaux, D L; Brandon, D; Shull, J; Renquist, D; Hogan, W; Tomita, M; Lipsett, M B

    1984-07-01

    Many New World primate species have elevated circulating free plasma cortisol concentrations, target tissue resistance to cortisol, and no evidence of sodium retention. A representative New World primate, the squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus), has plasma cortisol concentrations above those necessary to cause complete suppression of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone axis in an Old World primate, the cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis). Despite this, the arterial blood pressure as well as the plasma sodium, potassium, and bicarbonate levels of the squirrel monkey are similar to those of the cynomolgus monkey, and its plasma aldosterone concentrations are approximately 2-fold higher. These findings suggest that cortisol has minimal sodium-retaining effects in this species. Renal cytosol aldosterone receptor concentrations are about 2- to 3-fold lower in the squirrel monkey than in the cynomolgus, whereas the receptor affinities for [3H]aldosterone are similar in the two monkeys. Higher concentrations of cortisol are needed to displace [3H]aldosterone from the mineralocorticoid receptor in the squirrel monkey than from the renal receptor in the cynomolgus [apparent equilibrium dissociation constant (Ki) = 7.8 X 10(-7) vs. 2.9 X 10(-8) M, respectively]. In addition, in contrast to man and presumably other Old World primates, plasma aldosterone concentrations in the female squirrel monkey do not increase during the reproductive cycle or pregnancy when progesterone concentrations are 10- to 20-fold higher than those of the male or the reproductively quiescent female. This suggests that progesterone is a poor aldosterone antagonist in this species. We conclude that a low concentration of mineralocorticoid receptors in New World Primates is compensated for by higher aldosterone levels, with a concomitant increase in receptor occupancy. The salt-retaining potency of cortisol is low, presumably because of a decrease in the affinity of the aldosterone receptor for

  1. Effects of restricted feeding schedules on circadian organization in squirrel monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boulos, Z.; Frim, D. M.; Dewey, L. K.; Moore-Ede, M. C.

    1989-01-01

    Free running circadian rhythms of motor activity, food-motivated lever-pressing, and either drinking (N = 7) or body temperature (N = 3) were recorded from 10 squirrel monkeys maintained in constant illumination with unlimited access to food. Food availability was then restricted to a single unsignaled 3-hour interval each day. The feeding schedule failed to entrain the activity rhythms of 8 monkeys, which continued to free-run. Drinking was almost completely synchronized by the schedule, while body temperature showed a feeding-induced rise superimposed on a free-running rhythm. Nonreinforced lever-pressing showed both a free-running component and a 24-hour component that anticipated the time of feeding. At the termination of the schedule, all recorded variables showed free-running rhythms, but in 3 animals the initial phase of the postschedule rhythms was advanced by several hours, suggesting relative coordination. Of the remaining 2 animals, one exhibited stable entrainment of all 3 recorded rhythms, while the other appeared to entrain temporarily to the feeding schedule. These results indicate that restricted feeding schedules are only a weak zeitgeber for the circadian pacemaker generating free-running rhythms in the squirrel monkey. Such schedules, however, may entrain a separate circadian system responsible for the timing of food-anticipatory changes in behavior and physiology.

  2. Vestibular afferent responses to linear accelerations in the alert squirrel monkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somps, Christopher J.; Schor, Robert H.; Tomko, David L.

    1994-01-01

    The spontaneous activity of 40 otolith afferents and 44 canal afferents was recorded in 4 alert, intact squirrel monkeys. Polarization vectors and response properties of otolith afferents were determined during static re-orientations relative to gravity and during Earth-horizontal, sinusoidal, linear oscillations. Canal afferents were tested for sensitivity to linear accelerations. For regular otolith afferents, a significant correlation between upright discharge rate and sensitivity to dynamic acceleration in the horizontal plane was observed. This correlation was not present in irregular units. The sensitivity of otolith afferents to both static tilts and dynamic linear acceleration was much greater in irregularly discharging units than in regularly discharging units. The spontaneous activity and static and dynamic response properties of regularly discharging otolith afferents were similar to those reported in barbiturate-anesthetized squirrel monkeys. Irregular afferents also had similar dynamic response properties when compared to anesthetized monkeys. However, this sample of irregular afferents in alert animals had higher resting discharge rates and greater sensitivity to static tilts. The majority of otolith polarization vectors were oriented near the horizontal in the plane of the utricular maculae; however, directions of maximum sensitivity were different during dynamic and static testing. Canal afferents were not sensitive to static tilts or linear oscillations of the head.

  3. Social organization of a stable natal group of captive Guyanese squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus sciureus).

    PubMed

    Bashaw, Meredith J; McIntyre, Chelsea; Salenetri, Nicole D

    2011-10-01

    Socioecological models suggest competition for food, foraging efficiency, predation, infanticide risk, and the costs of dispersal regulate primate social structure and organization. Wild populations of squirrel monkeys (Saimiri spp.) appear to conform to the predictions of the predation/competition socioecological model (Sterck et al. in Behav Ecol Sociobiol 41:291-309, 1997) and the dispersal/foraging efficiency model (Isbell in Kinship and behavior in primates. Oxford University, New York, pp 71-108, 2004). However, squirrel monkeys in captivity are reported to maintain patterns of social behavior observed in their wild conspecifics despite different food distribution, predation risk, and dispersal options. This behavioral similarity suggests squirrel monkeys' social behavior has limited flexibility to respond to environmental changes. In this study, we experimentally evaluated the flexibility of social behavior within a captive group of S. sciureus. First, we determined whether dominance and affiliative relationships observed under normal laboratory conditions (with abundant, widely distributed, food; no dispersal option; and no predators) better matched published reports of relationships among wild conspecifics or the predictions of the predation/competition model. Second, we made preferred food items defensible to determine whether dominance interactions would become more frequent and linear, as predicted by the model. The model correctly predicted rates of dominance behavior in both conditions and a linear hierarchy in the defensible food condition but did not predict the consistent affiliative relationships and linear dominance hierarchy observed in normal lab conditions. Although hierarchies were linear and male dominant, manipulating food distribution changed the dominant individual within each sex. Our findings suggest interaction rates adapt more rapidly than social structure to environmental changes in Saimiri and recommend caution in interpreting tests

  4. Time-course of cerebrospinal fluid histamine in the wake-consolidated squirrel monkey.

    PubMed

    Zeitzer, Jamie M; Kodama, Tohru; Buckmaster, Christine L; Honda, Yoshiko; Lyons, David M; Nishino, Seiji; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2012-04-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) histamine is low in individuals with narcolepsy, a disease characterized by severe fragmentation of both sleep and wake. We have developed a primate model, the squirrel monkey, with which we can examine the role of the CNS in the wake-consolidation process, as these primates are day-active, have consolidated wake and sleep and have cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that is readily accessible. Using this model and three distinct protocols, we report herein on the role of CNS histamine in the wake consolidation process. CSF histamine has a robust daily rhythm, with a mean of 24.9 ± 3.29 pg mL(-1) , amplitude of 31.7 ± 6.46 pg mL(-1) and a peak at 17:49 ± 70.3 min (lights on 07:00-19:00 hours). These levels are not significantly affected by increases (up to 161 ± 40.4% of baseline) or decreases (up to 17.2 ± 2.50% of baseline) in locomotion. In direct contrast to the effects of sleep deprivation in non-wake-consolidating mammals, in whom CSF histamine increases, pharmacologically induced sleep (γ-hydroxybutyrate) and wake (modafinil) have no direct effects on CSF histamine concentrations. These data indicate that the time-course of histamine in CSF in the wake-consolidated squirrel monkey is robust against variation in activity and sleep and wake-promoting pharmacological compounds, and may indicate that histamine physiology plays a role in wake-consolidation such as is present in the squirrel monkey and humans.

  5. Time-course of CSF histamine in the wake-consolidated squirrel monkey

    PubMed Central

    Zeitzer, Jamie M.; Kodama, Tohru; Buckmaster, Christine L.; Honda, Yoshiko; Lyons, David M.; Nishino, Seiji; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Central nervous system (CNS) histamine is low in individuals with narcolepsy, a disease characterized by severe fragmentation of both sleep and wake. We have developed a primate model, the squirrel monkey, with which we can examine the role of the CNS in the wake-consolidation process as these primates are day-active, have consolidated wake and sleep, and have cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that is readily accessible. Using this model and three distinct protocols, we herein report on the role of CNS histamine in the wake consolidation process. CSF histamine has a robust daily rhythm, with a mean of 24.9 ± 3.29 pg·mL−1, amplitude of 31.7 ± 6.46 pg·mL−1 and a peak at 17:49 ± 70.3 min (lights on 07:00–19:00). These levels are not significantly affected by increases (up to 161±40.4% of baseline) or decreases (up to 17.2±2.50% of baseline) in locomotion. In direct contrast to the effects of sleep deprivation in non-wake consolidating mammals, in whom CSF histamine increases, pharmacologically-induced sleep (γ-hydroxybutyrate) and wake (modafinil) have no direct effects on CSF histamine concentrations. These data indicate that the time-course of histamine in CSF in the wake-consolidated squirrel monkey is robust against variation in activity and sleep and wake promoting pharmacological compounds, and may indicate that histamine physiology plays a role in wake-consolidation such as present in the squirrel monkey and humans. PMID:21910776

  6. Effect of physical exercise prelabyrinthectomy on locomotor balance compensation in the squirrel monkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Igarashi, M.; Ohashi, K.; Yoshihara, T.; MacDonald, S.

    1989-01-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of physical exercise, during a prepathology state, on locomotor balance compensation after subsequent unilateral labyrinthectomy in squirrel monkeys. An experimental group underwent 3 hr. of daily running exercise on a treadmill for 3 mo. prior to the surgery, whereas a control group was not exercised. Postoperatively, the locomotor balance function of both groups was tested for 3 mo. There was no significant difference in gait deviation counts in the acute phase of compensation. However, in the chronic compensation maintenance phase, the number of gait deviation counts was fewer in the exercise group, which showed significantly better performance stability.

  7. Renal response to seven days of lower body positive pressure in the squirrel monkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Churchill, Susanne; Pollock, David M.; Natale, Mary Ellen; Moore-Ede, Martin C.

    1987-01-01

    As a ground-based model for weightlessness, the response of the chair-trained squirrel monkey to lower body positive pressure (LBPP) was evaluated in a length of study similar to a typical Space Shuttle mission (7 days). Results were compared to time control experiments that included chair-sitting without exposure to LBPP. Chronic exposure to LBPP results in an acute diuretic and natriuretic response independent of changes in plasma aldosterone concentrations and produces a chronic reduction in fluid volume lasting the duration in the stimulus.

  8. A detailed analysis of the erythropoietic control system in the human, squirrel, monkey, rat and mouse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordheim, A. W.

    1985-01-01

    The erythropoiesis modeling performed in support of the Body Fluid and Blood Volume Regulation tasks is described. The mathematical formulation of the species independent model, the solutions to the steady state and dynamic versions of the model, and the individual species specific models for the human, squirrel monkey, rat and mouse are outlined. A detailed sensitivity analysis of the species independent model response to parameter changes and how those responses change from species to species is presented. The species to species response to a series of simulated stresses directly related to blood volume regulation during space flight is analyzed.

  9. Effect of environmental enrichment devices on behaviors of single- and group-housed squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spring, S. E.; Clifford, J. O.; Tomko, D. L.

    1997-01-01

    Squirrel monkeys display an interest in novel places, habituate to new situations, and spend most of their daily activity in the wild in large groups engaging in feeding behaviors over a broad area. Captivity limits these behaviors and consequently may disrupt normal social organizations. In captivity, squirrel monkeys may exhibit stereotypical behaviors that are believed to indicate decreased psychologic well-being. When a monkey's behavior can be made to approach that seen in the wild, and stereotypical behaviors are minimal, it is assumed that psychologic well-being is adequate. Environmental enrichment devices have been used to address the Animal Welfare Act requirement that psychologic well-being of captive nonhuman primates be considered. The purpose of the study reported here was to examine whether various environmental enrichment devices improve the psychologic well-being of captive squirrel monkeys. In the study, we used behavioral observation to quantify the effectiveness of several environmental enrichment devices for reducing stereotypical behaviors in squirrel monkeys housed alone or in groups. Analysis of our results revealed that the environmental enrichment devices did not affect the expression of normal or stereotypical behaviors, but that the type of housing did.

  10. Effect of environmental enrichment devices on behaviors of single- and group-housed squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus).

    PubMed

    Spring, S E; Clifford, J O; Tomko, D L

    1997-05-01

    Squirrel monkeys display an interest in novel places, habituate to new situations, and spend most of their daily activity in the wild in large groups engaging in feeding behaviors over a broad area. Captivity limits these behaviors and consequently may disrupt normal social organizations. In captivity, squirrel monkeys may exhibit stereotypical behaviors that are believed to indicate decreased psychologic well-being. When a monkey's behavior can be made to approach that seen in the wild, and stereotypical behaviors are minimal, it is assumed that psychologic well-being is adequate. Environmental enrichment devices have been used to address the Animal Welfare Act requirement that psychologic well-being of captive nonhuman primates be considered. The purpose of the study reported here was to examine whether various environmental enrichment devices improve the psychologic well-being of captive squirrel monkeys. In the study, we used behavioral observation to quantify the effectiveness of several environmental enrichment devices for reducing stereotypical behaviors in squirrel monkeys housed alone or in groups. Analysis of our results revealed that the environmental enrichment devices did not affect the expression of normal or stereotypical behaviors, but that the type of housing did.

  11. Behavioral and physiological responses of mother and infant squirrel monkeys to fearful stimuli.

    PubMed

    Wiener, S G; Levine, S

    1992-03-01

    The behavioral and adrenocortical responses of feral squirrel monkey mothers and their laboratory-born infants were measured following exposure to a live snake and to a flying predator model (hawk). The dyads were either socially or individually housed. The different stimuli were presented above the home cage for 1 hr; behaviors were observed during this period. Blood samples were obtained at the end of the test session and assayed for cortisol. The results indicated that individually housed dyads markedly increased their time spent in contact and their avoidance of the stimuli, and showed increased levels of cortisol when exposed to the snake or hawk model. Socially reared monkeys responded only to the snake. Thus, the presence of social partners ameliorated the response to the hawk model. The marked increase in contact during the presentation of the fear-eliciting stimuli may be partly responsible for the infants' response. PMID:1577203

  12. Temperature and behavioral responses of squirrel monkeys to 2Gz acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, C. A.; Tremor, J.; Connolly, J. P.; Williams, B. A.

    1982-01-01

    This study examines the responses of squirrel monkeys to acute +2Gz exposure. Body temperature responses of loosely restrained animals were recorded via a thermistor in the colon. Behavioral responses were recorded by video monitoring. After baseline recording at 1G, monkeys were exposed to 2G for 60 min. The body temperature started to fall within 10 min of the onset of centrifugation and declined an average of 1.4 C in 60 min. This is in contrast to a stable body temperature during the control period. Further, after a few minutes at 2G, the animals became drowsy and appeared to fall asleep. During the control period, however, they were alert and continually shifting their gaze about the cage. Thus, primates are susceptible to hypergravic fields in the +Gz orientation. The depression in primate body temperature was consistent and significant. Further, the observed drowsiness in this study has significant ramifications regarding alertness and performance in man.

  13. Discriminating parts from the whole: determinants of odor mixture perception in squirrel monkeys, Saimiri sciureus.

    PubMed

    Laska, M; Hudson, R

    1993-08-01

    In a task designed to simulate olfactory-guided foraging, the ability of squirrel monkeys to discriminate an artificial 12-component odorant from 3-, 6-, 9- or 11-component submixtures was investigated. A combination of factors was found to contribute to the animals' performance: 1. Discriminability generally decreased as the number of components in the submixture increased. 2. Submixtures did not contribute equally to mixture perception, and one component in particular (cineole) disproportionately influenced stimulus discriminability. 3. Interactive effects between submixtures resulted in marked deviations from the general pattern of discriminability. 4. Changes in the relative concentration of submixtures could also influence discriminability. 5. Finally, individual differences in responsiveness to particular stimuli were apparent. These findings demonstrate that the interaction between components in odor mixtures can be complex and that seemingly small changes in composition can strongly affect perception and thus potential signal function. It is therefore suggested that in future investigations of squirrel monkey semiochemistry, the method of systematically varying submixtures may be particularly useful in defining the contribution of components to a signal. PMID:8410741

  14. Effect of Environmental Enrichment on Singly- and Group-Housed Squirrel Monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spring, Sarah E.; Clifford, James O.; Tomko, David L.; Hargens, Alan R. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Nonhuman primates display an interest in novel places, habituate to new situations, and spend most of their daily activity in the wild in large groups engaging in feeding behaviors. Captivity changes these behaviors, and disrupts normal social hierarchies. In captivity, animals may exhibit stereotypical behaviors which are thought to indicate decreased psychological well-being (PWB). If an animal's behaviors can be made to approach those seen in the wild, and stereotypical behaviors are minimal it is assumed that PWB is adequate. Environmental enrichment (EE) devices have been used to address the Animal Welfare Act's requirement that the PWB of captive nonhuman primates be considered. The purpose of the present study was to examine whether various EE devices improve the PWB of captive squirrel monkeys. The present study used behavioral observation to quantify the effectiveness of several EE devices in reducing stereotypical behaviors in squirrel monkeys housed singly or in groups. Results showed that the EE devices used did not affect the expression of normal or stereotypical behaviors, but that the type of housing did.

  15. Recovery of the vomiting reflex following area postrema ablation in squirrel monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elfar, S.; Brizzee, Kenneth R.; Fox, Robert A.; Corcoran, Meryl Lee; Daunton, Nancy G.; Coleman, J.

    1991-01-01

    The role of the area postrema (AP) in motion-induced emesis was re-assessed recently in several different species. In a few of these studies, the role of the AP in motion-induced conditioned taste aversion (CTA) was also addressed. The purpose was to extend this comparative study to the squirrel monkey, to evaluate further the role of AP in vomiting, and to investigate the dynamics of the recovery process. The AP was ablated bilaterally in 7 motion-susceptible squirrel monkeys which previously had been characterized in terms of their responses to various motion sickness-inducing stimuli. After recovery from surgery all animals were tested at 30-day intervals for a period of 11 months to determine the effects of AP ablations on susceptibility to the same sickness-inducing conditions. In addition, the effectiveness of motion in preducing CTA was evaluated. All pre-ablation motion tests involved stimulation for 30 min., while post-lesion tests were 60 min., in duration. All animals showed significant increases in latencies to vomiting after AP ablations. However, the latencies tended to decrease with time after ablation. All but one animal vomited on at least one of the 10 motion tests occurring after ablation of AP. In addition, CTA was produced by motion used in the conditioning sessions. These results suggest that structures other than AP, and processes other that those mediated through AP, may play an important role in motion-induced emesis.

  16. A comparison of positive reinforcement training techniques in owl and squirrel monkeys: time required to train to reliability.

    PubMed

    Rogge, Jessica; Sherenco, Katrina; Malling, Rachel; Thiele, Erica; Lambeth, Susan; Schapiro, Steve; Williams, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    Positive reinforcement training (PRT) techniques enhance the psychological well being of nonhuman primates by increasing the animal's control over his or her environment and desensitizing the animal to stressful stimuli. However, the literature on PRT in neotropical primates is limited. Here PRT data from owl monkeys and squirrel monkeys are presented, including the length of time to train subjects to target, present hand, and present foot, important responses that can be used to aid in health inspection and treatment. A high percentage of the squirrel and owl monkeys were successfully trained on target and present hand. Present foot, a less natural response, was harder to train and maintain. Although squirrel monkeys did learn to target significantly faster than owl monkeys, the 2 genera did not differ on time to train on subsequent behavior. These data demonstrate that although owl monkeys may require slightly more time to acclimate to a PRT program, it is still possible to establish a PRT program with neotropical primates, and once animals have been introduced to the program, they can learn new responses in a relatively few short sessions.

  17. A Comparison of Positive Reinforcement Training Techniques in Owl and Squirrel Monkeys: Time Required to Train to Reliability

    PubMed Central

    Rogge, Jessica; Sherenco, Katrina; Malling, Rachel; Thiele, Erica; Lambeth, Susan; Schapiro, Steve; Williams, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Positive reinforcement training (PRT) techniques enhance the psychological well being of nonhuman primates by increasing the animal’s control over his or her environment and desensitizing the animal to stressful stimuli. However, the literature on PRT in neotropical primates is limited. Here PRT data from owl monkeys and squirrel monkeys are presented, including the length of time to train subjects to target, present hand, and present foot, important responses that can be used to aid in health inspection and treatment. A high percentage of the squirrel and owl monkeys were successfully trained on target and present hand. Present foot, a less natural response, was harder to train and maintain. Although squirrel monkeys did learn to target significantly faster than owl monkeys, the 2 genera did not differ on time to train on subsequent behavior. These data demonstrate that although owl monkeys may require slightly more time to acclimate to a PRT program, it is still possible to establish a PRT program with neotropical primates, and once animals have been introduced to the program, they can learn new responses in a relatively few short sessions. PMID:23795685

  18. Spatial orientation of VOR to combined vestibular stimuli in squirrel monkeys.

    PubMed

    Merfeld, D M; Young, L R; Tomko, D L; Paige, G D

    1991-01-01

    The interaction of angular and linear stimuli produces a complex alignment of spatial orientation and the VOR. This phenomenon was studied by measuring three dimensional eye movements in 6 squirrel monkeys during centrifugation in the dark. The axis of eye rotation was always aligned with gravity and with the spinal axis of the upright monkeys. The erect monkeys were oriented such that they were either facing toward the direction of motion or were facing away from the motion. Angular velocity trapezoids were utilized as the motion stimuli with a ramp acceleration of 10 degrees/s2 to a constant velocity of 200 degrees/s. This yields a final centripetal acceleration of 1 g. The orientation of centripetal acceleration dramatically altered the VOR by changing the axis of eye rotation, the peak value of slow phase eye velocity, and the time constant of per-rotary decay. The axis of eye rotation always tended to align with gravito-inertial force, the peak value of slow phase eye velocity was greater when the monkey faced the motion than when it faced away from the motion, and the time constant of decay was smaller when the monkey faced the motion than when it faced away from the motion. These findings were statistically significant (p less than 0.05) and were consistent across all monkeys. The data also indicate that the VOR may be separated into two reflexes, a linear reflex and a rotational reflex. The linear reflex decays as the axis of eye rotation aligns with gravito-inertial force (GIF). These results indicate that GIF is resolved into two components: one representing an internal estimate of linear acceleration and one representing an internal estimate of gravity.

  19. Reverse-reward learning in squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus): retesting after 5 years, and assessment on qualitative transfer.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Ikuma; Anderson, James R; Fujita, Kazuo

    2011-02-01

    Seven squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) previously trained on reverse-reward tasks were presented with the original "1-versus-4" task after a 5-year interval without reverse-reward experience (Experiment 1). None of them reliably selected the smaller food array; however, at around chance level, their performance was superior to when they were first exposed to the task almost 6 years previously, suggesting some long-term memory retention. One naive monkey consistently selected the larger array, as expected. In Experiment 2, trials consisting of 1 versus 1 piece of two qualitatively different types of food were interspersed among familiar 1-versus-4 trials. None of five monkeys tested reliably selected the less-preferred food to get the more preferred food as the reward, and one monkey scored below chance. However, when one piece of low-preference food was paired with four pieces of high-preference food (Experiment 3), all four monkeys tested avoided reaching for the latter and thereby obtained it as the reward; two monkeys obtained perfect scores on these trials. These two monkeys were trained on a specific qualitative reverse-reward pairing and then again tested on new pairings (Experiment 4), but transfer was incomplete. Compound trials that pit quantity against quality in novel ways appear taxing for squirrel monkeys, despite competence in reverse-reward on both dimensions separately. PMID:21244136

  20. The vestibulo-ocular reflex of the squirrel monkey during eccentric rotation and roll tilt.

    PubMed

    Merfeld, D M; Young, L R

    1995-01-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflexes (VOR) are determined not only by angular acceleration, but also by the presence of gravity and linear acceleration. This phenomenon was studied by measuring three-dimensional nystagmic eye movements, with implanted search coils, in six male squirrel monkeys during eccentric rotation. Monkeys were rotated in the dark at a constant velocity of 200 degrees/s (centrally or 79 cm off axis) with the axis of rotation always aligned with gravity and the spinal axis of the upright monkeys. The monkey's orientation (facing-motion or back-to-motion) had a dramatic influence on the VOR. These experiments show that: (a) the axis of eye rotation always shifted toward alignment with gravito-inertial force; (b) the peak value of horizontal slow phase eye velocity was greater with the monkey facing-motion than with back-to-motion; and (c) the time constant of horizontal eye movement decay was smaller with the monkey facing-motion than with back-to-motion. All of these findings were statistically significant and consistent across monkeys. In another set of tests, the same monkeys were rapidly tilted about their naso-occipital (roll) axis. Tilted orientations of 45 degrees and 90 degrees were maintained for 1 min. Other than a compensatory angular VOR during the angular rotation, no consistent eye velocity response was observed during or following the tilt for any of the six monkeys. The absence of any eye movement response following tilt weighs against the possibility that translational linear VOR responses are due to simple high-pass filtering of the otolith signals. The VOR response during eccentric rotation was divided into the more familiar angular VOR and linear VOR components. The angular component is known to depend upon semicircular canal dynamics and central influences. The linear component of the response decays rapidly with a mean duration of only 6.6 s, while the axis of eye rotation rapidly aligns (< 10 s) with gravito-inertial force. These

  1. The vestibulo-ocular reflex of the squirrel monkey during eccentric rotation and roll tilt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merfeld, D. M.; Young, L. R.

    1995-01-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflexes (VOR) are determined not only by angular acceleration, but also by the presence of gravity and linear acceleration. This phenomenon was studied by measuring three-dimensional nystagmic eye movements, with implanted search coils, in six male squirrel monkeys during eccentric rotation. Monkeys were rotated in the dark at a constant velocity of 200 degrees/s (centrally or 79 cm off axis) with the axis of rotation always aligned with gravity and the spinal axis of the upright monkeys. The monkey's orientation (facing-motion or back-to-motion) had a dramatic influence on the VOR. These experiments show that: (a) the axis of eye rotation always shifted toward alignment with gravito-inertial force; (b) the peak value of horizontal slow phase eye velocity was greater with the monkey facing-motion than with back-to-motion; and (c) the time constant of horizontal eye movement decay was smaller with the monkey facing-motion than with back-to-motion. All of these findings were statistically significant and consistent across monkeys. In another set of tests, the same monkeys were rapidly tilted about their naso-occipital (roll) axis. Tilted orientations of 45 degrees and 90 degrees were maintained for 1 min. Other than a compensatory angular VOR during the angular rotation, no consistent eye velocity response was observed during or following the tilt for any of the six monkeys. The absence of any eye movement response following tilt weighs against the possibility that translational linear VOR responses are due to simple high-pass filtering of the otolith signals. The VOR response during eccentric rotation was divided into the more familiar angular VOR and linear VOR components. The angular component is known to depend upon semicircular canal dynamics and central influences. The linear component of the response decays rapidly with a mean duration of only 6.6 s, while the axis of eye rotation rapidly aligns (< 10 s) with gravito-inertial force. These

  2. Functional organization of squirrel monkey primary auditory cortex: responses to pure tones.

    PubMed

    Cheung, S W; Bedenbaugh, P H; Nagarajan, S S; Schreiner, C E

    2001-04-01

    The spatial organization of response parameters in squirrel monkey primary auditory cortex (AI) accessible on the temporal gyrus was determined with the excitatory receptive field to pure tone stimuli. Dense, microelectrode mapping of the temporal gyrus in four animals revealed that characteristic frequency (CF) had a smooth, monotonic gradient that systematically changed from lower values (0.5 kHz) in the caudoventral quadrant to higher values (5--6 kHz) in the rostrodorsal quadrant. The extent of AI on the temporal gyrus was approximately 4 mm in the rostrocaudal axis and 2--3 mm in the dorsoventral axis. The entire length of isofrequency contours below 6 kHz was accessible for study. Several independent, spatially organized functional response parameters were demonstrated for the squirrel monkey AI. Latency, the asymptotic minimum arrival time for spikes with increasing sound pressure levels at CF, was topographically organized as a monotonic gradient across AI nearly orthogonal to the CF gradient. Rostral AI had longer latencies (range = 4 ms). Threshold and bandwidth co-varied with the CF. Factoring out the contribution of the CF on threshold variance, residual threshold showed a monotonic gradient across AI that had higher values (range = 10 dB) caudally. The orientation of the threshold gradient was significantly different from the CF gradient. CF-corrected bandwidth, residual Q10, was spatially organized in local patches of coherent values whose loci were specific for each monkey. These data support the existence of multiple, overlying receptive field gradients within AI and form the basis to develop a conceptual framework to understand simple and complex sound coding in mammals.

  3. "Anxiolytic" and "anxiogenic" benzodiazepines and beta-carbolines: effects on aggressive and social behavior in rats and squirrel monkeys.

    PubMed

    Weerts, E M; Tornatzky, W; Miczek, K A

    1993-01-01

    Ethopharmacological studies on the behavior of socially housed rats and squirrel monkeys were conducted to explore the role of the benzodiazepine GABAA-coupled ionophore receptor complex in aggressive and social interactions. Benzodiazepine receptor (BZR) antagonists, ZK 93426 (1-10 mg/kg) and flumazenil (3-10 mg/kg), the partial agonist, ZK 91296 (1-10 mg/kg) and the partial inverse agonists Ro 15-4513 (0.3-10 mg/kg), were administered to (1) squirrel monkeys prior to 1 h focal observations within established social groups or to (2) resident male rats before confrontations with a naive male intruder in their home cage for 5 min. Aggression was modified in a similar manner in both species, although squirrel monkeys were more sensitive to BZR challenges. Specifically, resident male rats showed dose dependent reductions in attack bites directed at intruder males that were significant at the highest dose of ZK 93426 (10 mg/kg). In squirrel monkeys, ZK 93426 (3 and 10 mg/kg) reduced aggressive grasps, threats and displays, as well as reducing the duration of being the target of aggression from untreated group members (1-10 mg/kg). The BZR partial agonist, ZK 91296 and the antagonist, flumazenil produced few effects on social behavior, low and high intensity aggression and motor activity in both species. Flumazenil (10-30 mg/kg) and ZK 91296 (10 mg/kg), but not ZK 93426, produced significant increases in foraging and feeding behaviors in squirrel monkeys. The hyperphagic effects of ZK 91296 and flumazenil, that are typical of BZR agonists compounds, were not observed in rats.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7870916

  4. Audio-vocal interactions during vocal communication in squirrel monkeys and their neurobiological implications.

    PubMed

    Hage, Steffen R

    2013-07-01

    Several strategies have evolved in the vertebrate lineage to facilitate signal transmission in vocal communication. Here, I present a mechanism to facilitate signal transmission in a group of communicating common squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus sciureus). Vocal onsets of a conspecific affect call initiation in all other members of the group in less than 100 ms. The probability of vocal onsets in a range of 100 ms after the beginning of a vocalization of another monkey was significantly decreased compared to the mean probability of call onsets. Additionally, the probability for vocal onsets of conspecifics was significantly increased just a few hundreds of milliseconds after call onset of others. These behavioral data suggest neural mechanisms that suppress vocal output just after the onset of environmental noise, such as vocalizations of conspecifics, and increase the probability of call initiation of group mates shortly after. These findings add new audio-vocal behaviors to the known strategies that modulate signal transmission in vocal communication. The present study will guide future neurobiological studies that explore how the observed audio-vocal behaviors are implemented in the monkey brain. PMID:23516002

  5. Age and seasonal effects on predator-sensitive foraging in squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus): a field experiment.

    PubMed

    Stone, Anita I

    2007-02-01

    A field experiment was conducted to examine the effect of perceived predation risk on the use of foraging areas by juvenile and adult primates under different conditions of local food abundance. Wild squirrel monkeys, Saimiri sciureus, were observed in an experiment conducted during the dry and the wet seasons at a site in Eastern Amazonia, Brazil. Animals were presented with feeding platforms that differed in food quantity and exposure to aerial predators through varying vegetative cover. In the dry season, juveniles and adults chose platforms based solely on food quantity. However, in the wet season, juveniles foraged preferentially on high-reward platforms only if cover level also was high (i.e., potentially offered greater concealment from predators). In contrast, adults showed the same pattern of platform use regardless of season. These results indicate that age and local resource availability based on seasonality affect whether primates forage in a predator-sensitive manner. Juveniles may be more sensitive to predation risk when foraging, and individuals may take fewer risks when resource abundance is high in their environment. PMID:17154385

  6. Diet of a free-ranging group of squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) in eastern Brazilian Amazonia.

    PubMed

    Lima, Eldianne M; Ferrari, Stephen F

    2003-01-01

    The feeding behaviour of free-ranging Saimiri sciureus was monitored over a 6-month period in eastern Brazilian Amazonia. Behavioural data were collected in scan samples (7-9 days per month), and fruit and arthropod availability were recorded monthly. A total of 3,546 feeding records were collected, divided between reproductive plant parts (55.1%) and arthropods (44.9%). The majority of identified prey were orthopterans and lepidopterans, and 10 of the 23 plant species exploited were Leguminosae and Sapotaceae. The diet varied progressively between August (20.0% plant, 80.0% animal) and January (79.7% plant, 20.3% animal). This shift accompanied an increase in the number of fruiting trees and evidence of declining arthropod availability. This included a marked reduction in foraging success and increasing consumption of immature prey. Overall, the data indicate that Amazonian squirrel monkeys may be relatively frugivorous during periods when prey is scarce. PMID:12826734

  7. Increasing length of wakefulness and modulation of hypocretin-1 in the wake-consolidated squirrel monkey.

    PubMed

    Zeitzer, Jamie M; Buckmaster, Christine L; Lyons, David M; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2007-10-01

    The neuropeptides hypocretins (orexins), the loss of which results in the sleep disorder narcolepsy, are hypothesized to be involved in the consolidation of wakefulness and have been proposed to be part of the circadian-driven alertness signal. To elucidate the role of hypocretins in the consolidation of human wakefulness we examined the effect of wake extension on hypocretin-1 in squirrel monkeys, primates that consolidate wakefulness during the daytime as do humans. Wake was extended up to 7 h with hypocretin-1, cortisol, ghrelin, leptin, locomotion, and feeding, all being assayed. Hypocretin-1 (P < 0.01), cortisol (P < 0.001), and locomotion (P < 0.005) all increased with sleep deprivation, while ghrelin (P = 0.79) and leptin (P = 1.00) did not change with sleep deprivation. Using cross-correlation and multivariate modeling of these potential covariates along with homeostatic pressure (a measure of time awake/asleep), we found that time of day and homeostatic pressure together explained 44% of the variance in the hypocretin-1 data (P < 0.001), while cortisol did not significantly contribute to the overall hypocretin-1 variance. Locomotion during the daytime, but not during the nighttime, helped explain < 5% of the hypocretin-1 variance (P < 0.05). These data are consistent with earlier evidence indicating that in the squirrel monkey hypocretin-1 is mainly regulated by circadian inputs and homeostatic sleep pressure. Concomitants of wakefulness that affect hypocretin-1 in polyphasic species, such as locomotion, food intake, and food deprivation, likely have a more minor role in monophasic species, such as humans. PMID:17686881

  8. Effects of the Nanoparticle-Based Vaccine, SEL-068, on Nicotine Discrimination in Squirrel Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Rajeev I; Bergman, Jack

    2015-01-01

    A key feature of addiction to nicotine likely resides in its ability to produce subjective effects that, in turn, may be reflected in its discriminative-stimulus properties. Vaccination against such effects of nicotine offers an intriguing therapeutic approach for smoking cessation, but a reliably effective and immunologically safe vaccine remains to be identified. Here we report on the ability of SEL-068, a nanoparticle-based vaccine that targets nicotine, to modify the discriminative-stimulus effects of nicotine in a primate species. Results indicate that squirrel monkeys vaccinated with SEL-068 failed to acquire 0.1 mg/kg nicotine discrimination but readily learned to discriminate 0.001 mg/kg of the nicotinic full agonist (+)-epibatidine ((+)-EPI). After (+)-EPI training, doses of nicotine ⩾0.32 mg/kg, which produced behaviorally adverse actions, still failed to substitute for the (+)-EPI training stimulus in immunized monkeys, whereas (+)-EPI and the partial agonist varenicline engendered, respectively, complete and partial substitution in all monkeys with potency comparable to their potency in non-immunized subjects. In other subjects, nicotine was trained as a discriminative-stimulus and then replaced by (+)-EPI. Subsequent vaccination with SEL-068 led to a threefold and long-lasting (>30 weeks) decrease in the potency of nicotine but not (+)-EPI or varenicline. Collectively, our results show that SEL-068 can block the development of nicotine discrimination and attenuate nicotine's effects in nicotine-experienced monkeys without altering the discriminative-stimulus properties of other nicotinic drugs. The difference in the vaccine's effects in naive and nicotine-experienced subjects provides important insight into the conditions under which immunotherapy may be effective in combating nicotine addiction. PMID:25742871

  9. Effects of the Nanoparticle-Based Vaccine, SEL-068, on Nicotine Discrimination in Squirrel Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Desai, Rajeev I; Bergman, Jack

    2015-08-01

    A key feature of addiction to nicotine likely resides in its ability to produce subjective effects that, in turn, may be reflected in its discriminative-stimulus properties. Vaccination against such effects of nicotine offers an intriguing therapeutic approach for smoking cessation, but a reliably effective and immunologically safe vaccine remains to be identified. Here we report on the ability of SEL-068, a nanoparticle-based vaccine that targets nicotine, to modify the discriminative-stimulus effects of nicotine in a primate species. Results indicate that squirrel monkeys vaccinated with SEL-068 failed to acquire 0.1 mg/kg nicotine discrimination but readily learned to discriminate 0.001 mg/kg of the nicotinic full agonist (+)-epibatidine ((+)-EPI). After (+)-EPI training, doses of nicotine ⩾ 0.32 mg/kg, which produced behaviorally adverse actions, still failed to substitute for the (+)-EPI training stimulus in immunized monkeys, whereas (+)-EPI and the partial agonist varenicline engendered, respectively, complete and partial substitution in all monkeys with potency comparable to their potency in non-immunized subjects. In other subjects, nicotine was trained as a discriminative-stimulus and then replaced by (+)-EPI. Subsequent vaccination with SEL-068 led to a threefold and long-lasting (>30 weeks) decrease in the potency of nicotine but not (+)-EPI or varenicline. Collectively, our results show that SEL-068 can block the development of nicotine discrimination and attenuate nicotine's effects in nicotine-experienced monkeys without altering the discriminative-stimulus properties of other nicotinic drugs. The difference in the vaccine's effects in naive and nicotine-experienced subjects provides important insight into the conditions under which immunotherapy may be effective in combating nicotine addiction.

  10. Some relations between classically conditioned aggression and conditioned suppression in squirrel monkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Hake, D F; Campbell, R L

    1980-01-01

    During three experiments with squirrel monkeys, stimulus and shock pairings were given in the presence of a bite tube. Experiments 1 and 2 used a conditioned-suppression procedure in which bar pressing was reinforced with food. A transparent shield prevented biting of the bar. When the stimulus was paired with shock, bar pressing decreased (conditioned suppression) and tube biting increased during the stimulus (classically conditioned aggression). When the bite tube was removed on alternate sessions in Experiment 2, there was more suppression when the tube was present, thus suggesting that biting competed with bar pressing. However, this simple competing-response interpretation was complicated by the findings of Experiment 3 where, with naive monkeys, bar pressing was never reinforced with food, yet bar pressing was induced during the stimulus and was highest when the bite tube was absent. The fact that stimulus-induced bar pressing developed inciated that bar pressing in conditioned-suppression procedures, suppressed or not, may be maintained by two types of control--the food reinforcer and induced CS control. The higher rate of induced bar pressing during the stimulus with the bite tube absent confounds a simple competing response interpretation of conditioned suppression. It suggests that shock-induced responses during conditioned suppression could be both contributing to and competing with responding maintained by food, with the net effect depending on specific but ill-defined features of the situation. PMID:7190996

  11. Effects of GABA modulators on the repeated acquisition of response sequences in squirrel monkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Una C; Winsauer, Peter J; Stevenson, Michael W; Moerschbaecher, Joseph M

    2004-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of positive and negative GABA(A) modulators under three different baselines of repeated acquisition in squirrel monkeys in which the monkeys acquired a three-response sequence on three keys under a second-order fixed-ratio (FR) schedule of food reinforcement. In two of these baselines, the second-order FR schedule and the discriminative stimuli for the response sequence were manipulated ("chain-strained" and "tandem-strained"). In the third baseline condition, response-independent tail shock was presented during acquisition of the response sequence. All of these baselines maintained high error levels and produced slow rates of acquisition. Under both the chain-strained and tandem-strained conditions, the positive GABA(A) modulator triazolam (0.0032-0.1 mg/kg) and the negative GABA(A) modulators beta-CCE (ethyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxylate; 0.01-1 mg/kg), beta-CCM (methyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxylate; 0.0032-0.1 mg/kg), and FG-7142 (methyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxamide; 0.18-10 mg/kg) dose-dependently decreased overall response rate compared to administration of saline (control). Under the same two conditions, triazolam and the negative GABA(A) modulators also increased the percentage of errors; however, the effects on accuracy frequently depended on the baseline condition and the particular modulator. In contrast, triazolam only decreased errors and enhanced acquisition in the presence of concurrent response-independent tail shock when compared to saline administration under this condition. The neutral GABA(A) modulator, flumazenil (1 mg/kg), had no effect on rate or accuracy of responding when administered alone, but antagonized the rate-decreasing and error-increasing effects produced by the negative GABA(A) modulators. Together, these data suggest that the effects of both the positive and negative GABAA modulators on acquisition can be similar in squirrel monkeys (i.e., both types of modulator may produce rate

  12. Experimental protein malnutrition in primates: electronmicroscopic observations on the cerebellum of healthy and malnourished squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus).

    PubMed

    Manocha, S L; Kumamoto, T; Sharma, S P

    1977-01-01

    Eight young adult squirrel monkeys were maintained on a protein deficient (2% calories from proteins) diet for a period of 15 weeks during which the animals lost wieght steadily and developed varying degrees of sensory and motor impairments as evidenced by lack of interest in the surrounding environment and changes in posture and gait. An additional eight animals were maintained on a high protein diet (25% calories from proteins) to serve as controls. Two animals each from the experimental and control groups were sacrificed at 9, 11, 13 and 15 weeks of special feeding schedule. The Purkinje cells of the cerebellum of malnourished animals showed significant changes in the ribosomes, endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi zone indicating greatly disturbed protein metabolism. The granule cells, especially of the pale variety show prominent watery swellings with scant cell organelles. The most prominent change appeared in various types of neurons related to the multiplication of various types of lysosomes, multivesicular lamellar bodies and the lipofuscin pigment bodies. In the animals sacrificed at different intervals, the relatively more malnourished animals showed significantly larger number of lipofuscin pigment in the various types of neurons of the cerebellar cortex. The dendritic changes included honey-comb formation in the lumen. The astrocyte glial fibers were greatly increased. The pericytes of the blood vessels showed irregular outlines and were greatly enlarged with numerous osmiophilic bodies (presumably lipofuscin) in the experimental animals as compared to the controls. PMID:200673

  13. Experimental protein malnutrition in primates: electronmicroscopic observations on the cerebellum of healthy and malnourished squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus).

    PubMed

    Manocha, S L; Kumamoto, T; Sharma, S P

    1977-01-01

    Eight young adult squirrel monkeys were maintained on a protein deficient (2% calories from proteins) diet for a period of 15 weeks during which the animals lost wieght steadily and developed varying degrees of sensory and motor impairments as evidenced by lack of interest in the surrounding environment and changes in posture and gait. An additional eight animals were maintained on a high protein diet (25% calories from proteins) to serve as controls. Two animals each from the experimental and control groups were sacrificed at 9, 11, 13 and 15 weeks of special feeding schedule. The Purkinje cells of the cerebellum of malnourished animals showed significant changes in the ribosomes, endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi zone indicating greatly disturbed protein metabolism. The granule cells, especially of the pale variety show prominent watery swellings with scant cell organelles. The most prominent change appeared in various types of neurons related to the multiplication of various types of lysosomes, multivesicular lamellar bodies and the lipofuscin pigment bodies. In the animals sacrificed at different intervals, the relatively more malnourished animals showed significantly larger number of lipofuscin pigment in the various types of neurons of the cerebellar cortex. The dendritic changes included honey-comb formation in the lumen. The astrocyte glial fibers were greatly increased. The pericytes of the blood vessels showed irregular outlines and were greatly enlarged with numerous osmiophilic bodies (presumably lipofuscin) in the experimental animals as compared to the controls.

  14. Testicular and serum testosterone variations in squirrel monkeys during seasonal cyclicity.

    PubMed

    Pasqualini, T; Colillas, O; Rivarola, M A

    1986-01-01

    The seasonal testicular maturation of squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) was used as a model of maturational hormonal regulation of the testis. Testicular testosterone and serum testosterone concentrations were determined during the circannual variations of body weight and testicular volume. These data have been correlated with changes in the germinal epithelium. According to individual weight curves and time of the year, the monkeys were divided into five groups: group A1, maximal weight, April-May; A2, July; A3, November; A4, minimal weight, February-March; and A5, March-April. Variations in testicular volume followed very closely variations in body weight. Sexual activity started at A1 and persisted in A2. A marked drop in the mean width of the germinal epithelium and the diameters of the seminiferous tubules was observed in A3, followed by a recovery during A4 and A5. Testicular testosterone showed two annual elevations. The first peak, 3.91 +/- 0.31 micrograms/g (mean +/- SE), coincided with the serum testosterone peak when body weight and testicular volume were high and the trophic response of the germinal epithelium was complete. The second peak reached levels of 5.21 +/- 1.48 micrograms/g and was observed before the reinitiation of spermatogenesis. This was accompanied by a moderate increase in serum testosterone. The second peak of testicular testosterone, which has been reported to occur in the rat and in humans, might represent a local androgen need for initiation of spermatogenesis, while the first peak might represent the androgen need for full stimulation of spermatogenesis.

  15. Feeding demand conditions and plasma cortisol in socially-housed squirrel monkey mother-infant dyads.

    PubMed

    Champoux, M; Hwang, L; Lang, O; Levine, S

    2001-07-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that experimentally altering the accessibility and availability of food can have profound impact on behavior and adrenocortical activity in nonhuman primate species. In this study, groups of mother-infant squirrel monkey dyads were housed in either high demand (HFD: 120% normal daily food intake provided), low demand (LFD: 600% normal daily food intake provided) or variable demand (VFD: alternating two-week blocks of low demand and high demand) conditions for 12 weeks. During the 12-week experimental foraging phase, animals in the HFD group exhibited prolonged and consistent cortisol elevations. The cortisol levels in the VFD group reflected the ambient demand condition, with higher levels exhibited during the high demand phases of the study, and lower values when the low demand condition was in effect. Overall, mothers were more affected by the experimental manipulation than were infants. The experimental condition did not affect the infants' response to a 24-h separation from their mothers. A suppression of cortisol levels, particularly in the HFD group, was observed upon resumption of ad-libitum feeding. PMID:11337131

  16. Neuronal Control of Mammalian Vocalization, with Special Reference to the Squirrel Monkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jürgens, Uwe

    Squirrel monkey vocalization can be considered as a suitable model for the study in humans of the neurobiological basis of nonverbal emotional vocal utterances, such as laughing, crying, and groaning. Evaluation of electrical and chemical brain stimulation data, lesioning studies, single-neurone recordings, and neuroanatomical tracing work leads to the following conclusions: The periaqueductal gray and laterally bordering tegmentum of the midbrain represent a crucial area for the production of vocalization. This area collects the various vocalization-triggering stimuli, such as auditory, visual, and somatosensory input from diverse sensory-processing structures, motivation-controlling input from some limbic structures, and volitional impulses from the anterior cingulate cortex. Destruction of this area causes mutism. It is still under dispute whether the periaqueductal region harbors the vocal pattern generator or merely couples vocalization-triggering information to motor-coordinating structures further downward in the brainstem. The periaqueductal region is connected with the phonatory motoneuron pools indirectly via one or several interneurons. The nucleus retroambiguus represents a crucial relay station for the laryngeal and expiratory component of vocalization. The articulatory component reaches the orofacial motoneuron pools via the parvocellular reticular formation. Essential proprioceptive feedback from the larynx and lungs enter the vocal-controlling network via the solitary tract nucleus.

  17. Effects of cocaine and cocaine metabolites on cardiovascular function in squirrel monkeys.

    PubMed

    Schindler, C W; Zheng, J W; Goldberg, S R

    2001-11-01

    The effects of cocaine and the cocaine metabolites norcocaine, ecgonine methyl ester, benzoylecgonine and cocaethylene were evaluated in conscious squirrel monkeys for their effects on blood pressure and heart rate. Norcocaine, ecgonine methyl ester and benzoylecgonine are produced in vivo following cocaine use. Cocaethylene is produced in vivo following concurrent cocaine and alcohol use. Increases in both blood pressure and heart rate were observed following cocaine doses of 0.3-3.0 mg/kg. Ecgonine methyl ester and benzoylecgonine had no effect on either parameter up to doses of 10.0 mg/kg. Norcocaine increased blood pressure, but was less potent than cocaine. Norcocaine did not affect heart rate at doses up to 3.0 mg/kg. In contrast to the other metabolites, cocaethylene increased blood pressure and heart rate similarly to cocaine. These results suggest that ecgonine methyl ester and benzoylecgonine are devoid of cardiovascular effects at doses comparable to cocaine and would not be expected to contribute to cocaine's overall cardiovascular effects. Norcocaine's effect on blood pressure might contribute to the cardiovascular effects of cocaine, but this metabolite is produced only at low levels in vivo. The one metabolite that might be expected to contribute to cocaine's overall cardiovascular effect is cocaethylene, although the degree of this contribution is not clear.

  18. Sleep-wake responses of squirrel monkeys exposed to hyperdynamic environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, C. A.

    1983-01-01

    This study examines the sleep responses of primates to acute 3 Gz environments. To investigate this question, loosely-restrained squirrel monkeys were exposed to 70 minutes of 3 Gz during the day. The animals' behavioral state was polygraphically monitored (EEG, EMG, EOG) along with video and deep body temperature. During the control period, animals exhibited slow wave sleep (SWS) napping behavior. SWS occurred during approximately 20 percent of the control period. Body temperature was maintained at 38.7 C. At 3 Gz, SWS was inhibited for 5 minutes, after which SWS occurred at levels 50 percent lower than in the control period. During the post-centrifugation period, SWS was elevated above the control (50 percent) and hyperdynamic (100 percent) levels. Body temperature was depressed 1.5 C when the animals were at 3 Gz. Thus, hyperdynamic environments are capable of modifying primate sleep behavior, at least as a result of acute exposure. Further, the increased arousal in the hyperdynamic environment is correlated with a lower body temperature. This negative correlation differs from the normal positive correlation of arousal and body temperature.

  19. Behavioral and physiological responses to maternal separation in squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus).

    PubMed

    Wiener, S G; Bayart, F; Faull, K F; Levine, S

    1990-02-01

    This study extends an examination of the behavioral and pituitary-adrenal responses of infant squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) separated from their mothers under different environmental conditions to another physiological system by measuring the metabolites of the central monoamines found in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This study included spectrographic examination of the vocalizations emitted by the infant during separation. Infants were separated from their mothers for 24 hr under 3 conditions: Home, infant remained in its home cage after removal of mother; adjacent, infant was placed in a cage adjacent to its mother; and total, infant was totally isolated. The behavioral results indicated that the number of calls emitted differed with condition (adjacent greater than total greater than home), and the peak frequency of the calls and number of multiple calls was greatest in the total condition. Plasma cortisol elevations after separation differentiated the conditions of separation (total greater than adjacent greater than home greater than base). The elevations in the CSF catecholamine metabolites (3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol and homovanillic acid) were also sensitive to the conditions of separation (total greater than adjacent greater than base). These results are discussed in the context of coping theory. PMID:1690548

  20. Maintenance and suppression of behavior by intravenous nicotine injections in squirrel monkeys.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, S R; Spealman, R D

    1982-02-01

    Nicotine appears to be a contributing factor in maintaining cigarette smoking, but experimental evidence for its reinforcing effects is scarce. Indeed, it has been suggested that in some situations nicotine may have noxious properties, which limit smoking behavior. These ideas were explored by comparing the effects of intravenous injections of nicotine on behavior of squirrel monkeys under two experimental procedures. Under a fixed-interval schedule of nicotine self-administration, responding was well maintained by injections of 30-300 microgram/kg of nicotine. Nicotine-maintained responding could be reduced by presession treatment with the nicotine antagonist, mecamylamine, or by substitution of saline for nicotine. In a second experiment, responding was maintained under a two-component fixed-ratio schedule of food presentation in which responses during one component (punishment component) also resulted in injections of 10-30 microgram/kg of nicotine. Nicotine markedly suppressed responding during the punishment component but not during the alternating nonpunishment components. The suppressant effects of nicotine could be reversed by presession treatment with either mecamylamine or the antianxiety drug chlordiazepoxide, or by substitution of saline for nicotine. Nicotine had pronounced effects both as a reinforcer and as a punisher; the nature of the effects depended on the schedule under which nicotine was administered. PMID:7060749

  1. Light masking of circadian rhythms of heat production, heat loss, and body temperature in squirrel monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, E. L.; Fuller, C. A.

    1999-01-01

    Whole body heat production (HP) and heat loss (HL) were examined to determine their relative contributions to light masking of the circadian rhythm in body temperature (Tb). Squirrel monkey metabolism (n = 6) was monitored by both indirect and direct calorimetry, with telemetered measurement of body temperature and activity. Feeding was also measured. Responses to an entraining light-dark (LD) cycle (LD 12:12) and a masking LD cycle (LD 2:2) were compared. HP and HL contributed to both the daily rhythm and the masking changes in Tb. All variables showed phase-dependent masking responses. Masking transients at L or D transitions were generally greater during subjective day; however, L masking resulted in sustained elevation of Tb, HP, and HL during subjective night. Parallel, apparently compensatory, changes of HL and HP suggest action by both the circadian timing system and light masking on Tb set point. Furthermore, transient HL increases during subjective night suggest that gain change may supplement set point regulation of Tb.

  2. Cooling and freezing of sperm from captive, free-living and endangered squirrel monkey species.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Karol G; Santos, Regiane R; Leão, Danuza L; Brito, Adriel B; Lima, Julianne S; Sampaio, Wlaísa V; Domingues, Sheyla F S

    2016-06-01

    Germoplasm banking is an important tool for the preservation of genetic material from Neotropical primates in captivity, and from free living species, especially the endangered ones like Saimiri vanzolinii (Black-headed squirrel monkey), a primate with a low incidence area (870 km(2) of floodplains) in the southern part of the Mamirauá Sustainable Development Reserve, Brazil. Therefore, in the present study we aimed to develop a sperm cryopreservation protocol comparing sperm cooling in presence (T1) and absence (T2) of egg yolk, and to test freezing protocols to preserve semen from captive (Saimiri collinsi), and free-living (Saimiri vanzolinii, Saimiri cassiquiarensis and Saimiri macrodon) New World primates. Cooling preserved sperm of S. collinsi in all evaluated microscopic parameters, except for sperm motility. No differences were observed among the treatments, indicating that semen of this species can be cooled without egg yolk. Freezing did not affect sperm quality of S. collinsi, except plasma membrane integrity that was negatively affected. Generally, a good maintenance rate was observed between cooling and thawing of semen for the four species, showing the positive translational application of protocols from S. collinsi to the free-living species. Developed freezing protocol proved to be useful for sperm cryopreservation of S. collinsi and in field conditions. PMID:26994833

  3. Enrichment and individual differences affect welfare indicators in squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus).

    PubMed

    Izzo, Genevieve N; Bashaw, Meredith J; Campbell, John B

    2011-08-01

    Enrichment aims to improve captive animals' welfare by enhancing their environments. Two of the struggles associated with measuring welfare are identifying when animals' needs are being met or surpassed and identifying how individual differences play a role in these outcomes. Using a group of related Guyanese squirrel monkeys, we studied changes in five welfare indicators under different environmental conditions. Manipulating food presentation, walkways, and toys, we created five enrichment levels ranging from just above USDA standards to considerably more complex than the animals' normal housing. At the end of each level, a novelty test was performed in which an unfamiliar woman entered the enclosure and offered food. Changes in behavior as a function of enrichment condition were analyzed using a repeated-measures MANOVA. Compared to baseline, less enrichment consistently increased negative welfare indicators (abnormal behavior, aggression, and negative responses to the novelty test), while more enrichment sometimes decreased these indicators. Positive welfare indicators were less consistently related to enrichment, but positive response to the novelty test did increase somewhat in the most enriched condition. Across conditions, rank correlations revealed that individuals had highly consistent individual differences in positive responses to novelty and somewhat consistent individual differences in rates of aggression. The goal of the enrichment and the species, sex, and individual animals to be enriched should be considered when selecting a welfare indicator, and facilities measuring animal welfare should study changes in the behavior of specific individuals to control for individual differences.

  4. Cooling and freezing of sperm from captive, free-living and endangered squirrel monkey species.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Karol G; Santos, Regiane R; Leão, Danuza L; Brito, Adriel B; Lima, Julianne S; Sampaio, Wlaísa V; Domingues, Sheyla F S

    2016-06-01

    Germoplasm banking is an important tool for the preservation of genetic material from Neotropical primates in captivity, and from free living species, especially the endangered ones like Saimiri vanzolinii (Black-headed squirrel monkey), a primate with a low incidence area (870 km(2) of floodplains) in the southern part of the Mamirauá Sustainable Development Reserve, Brazil. Therefore, in the present study we aimed to develop a sperm cryopreservation protocol comparing sperm cooling in presence (T1) and absence (T2) of egg yolk, and to test freezing protocols to preserve semen from captive (Saimiri collinsi), and free-living (Saimiri vanzolinii, Saimiri cassiquiarensis and Saimiri macrodon) New World primates. Cooling preserved sperm of S. collinsi in all evaluated microscopic parameters, except for sperm motility. No differences were observed among the treatments, indicating that semen of this species can be cooled without egg yolk. Freezing did not affect sperm quality of S. collinsi, except plasma membrane integrity that was negatively affected. Generally, a good maintenance rate was observed between cooling and thawing of semen for the four species, showing the positive translational application of protocols from S. collinsi to the free-living species. Developed freezing protocol proved to be useful for sperm cryopreservation of S. collinsi and in field conditions.

  5. Predation of a squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus) by an Amazon tree boa (Corallus hortulanus): even small boids may be a potential threat to small-bodied platyrrhines.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro-Júnior, Marco Antônio; Ferrari, Stephen Francis; Lima, Janaina Reis Ferreira; da Silva, Claudia Regina; Lima, Jucivaldo Dias

    2016-07-01

    Predation has been suggested to play a major role in the evolution of primate ecology, although reports of predation events are very rare. Mammalian carnivores, raptors, and snakes are known predators of Neotropical primates, and most reported attacks by snakes are attributed to Boa constrictor (terrestrial boas). Here, we document the predation of a squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus) by an Amazon tree boa (Corallus hortulanus), the first record of the predation of a platyrrhine primate by this boid. The event was recorded during a nocturnal herpetological survey in the Piratuba Lake Biological Reserve, in the north-eastern Brazilian Amazon. The snake was encountered at 20:00 hours on the ground next to a stream, at the final stage of ingesting the monkey. The C. hortulanus specimen was 1620 mm in length (SVL) and weighed 650 g, while the S. sciureus was a young adult female weighing 600 g, 92 % of the body mass of the snake and the largest prey item known to have been ingested by a C. hortulanus. The evidence indicates that the predation event occurred at the end of the afternoon or early evening, and that, while capable of capturing an agile monkey like Saimiri, C. hortulanus may be limited to capturing small platyrrhines such as callitrichines.

  6. Predation of a squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus) by an Amazon tree boa (Corallus hortulanus): even small boids may be a potential threat to small-bodied platyrrhines.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro-Júnior, Marco Antônio; Ferrari, Stephen Francis; Lima, Janaina Reis Ferreira; da Silva, Claudia Regina; Lima, Jucivaldo Dias

    2016-07-01

    Predation has been suggested to play a major role in the evolution of primate ecology, although reports of predation events are very rare. Mammalian carnivores, raptors, and snakes are known predators of Neotropical primates, and most reported attacks by snakes are attributed to Boa constrictor (terrestrial boas). Here, we document the predation of a squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus) by an Amazon tree boa (Corallus hortulanus), the first record of the predation of a platyrrhine primate by this boid. The event was recorded during a nocturnal herpetological survey in the Piratuba Lake Biological Reserve, in the north-eastern Brazilian Amazon. The snake was encountered at 20:00 hours on the ground next to a stream, at the final stage of ingesting the monkey. The C. hortulanus specimen was 1620 mm in length (SVL) and weighed 650 g, while the S. sciureus was a young adult female weighing 600 g, 92 % of the body mass of the snake and the largest prey item known to have been ingested by a C. hortulanus. The evidence indicates that the predation event occurred at the end of the afternoon or early evening, and that, while capable of capturing an agile monkey like Saimiri, C. hortulanus may be limited to capturing small platyrrhines such as callitrichines. PMID:27165689

  7. Effects of Pharmacologic Dopamine β-Hydroxylase Inhibition on Cocaine-Induced Reinstatement and Dopamine Neurochemistry in Squirrel Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Debra A.; Kimmel, Heather L.; Manvich, Daniel F.; Schmidt, Karl T.; Weinshenker, David

    2014-01-01

    Disulfiram has shown promise as a pharmacotherapy for cocaine dependence in clinical settings, although it has many targets, and the behavioral and molecular mechanisms underlying its efficacy are unclear. One of many biochemical actions of disulfiram is inhibition of dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH), the enzyme that converts dopamine (DA) to norepinephrine (NE) in noradrenergic neurons. Thus, disulfiram simultaneously reduces NE and elevates DA tissue levels in the brain. In rats, both disulfiram and the selective DBH inhibitor nepicastat block cocaine-primed reinstatement, a paradigm which is thought to model some aspects of drug relapse. This is consistent with some clinical results and supports the use of DBH inhibitors for the treatment of cocaine dependence. The present study was conducted to confirm and extend these results in nonhuman primates. Squirrel monkeys trained to self-administer cocaine were pretreated with disulfiram or nepicastat prior to cocaine-induced reinstatement sessions. Neither DBH inhibitor altered cocaine-induced reinstatement. Unexpectedly, nepicastat administered alone induced a modest reinstatement effect in squirrel monkeys, but not in rats. To investigate the neurochemical mechanisms underlying the behavioral results, the effects of DBH inhibition on extracellular DA were analyzed in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) using in vivo microdialysis in squirrel monkeys. Both DBH inhibitors attenuated cocaine-induced DA overflow in the NAc. Hence, the attenuation of cocaine-induced changes in accumbal DA neurochemistry was not associated with altered cocaine-seeking behavior. Overall, the reported behavioral effects of DBH inhibition in rodent models of relapse did not extend to nonhuman primates under the conditions used in the current studies. PMID:24817036

  8. Effect of Ablation of Area Postrema on Frequency and Latency of Motion Sickness-Induced Emesis in the Squirrel Monkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brizzee, K. R.; Ordy, J. M.; Mehler, W. R.

    1980-01-01

    Twelve young adult squirrel monkeys of the Bolivian subspecies were subjected to continuous counter-clockwise horizontal rotary motion at 25 rpm, together with a sinusoidal vertical excursion of 6 in. every 2 sec (0.5 Hz). Each animal was exposed to this motion regimen for a period of 60 min once each week for three consecutive weeks. Following the third weekly motion test bilateral ablation of the Area Postrema (AP) was performed in eight of the animals by thermal cautery. Two control animals were sham-operated after the third motion test while two additional controls were given the motion tests as noted above but were not operated. The four controls were considered as a single group for statistical analyses of results of the motion tests. After a recovery period of 30 to 40 days, and at a comparable interval in the non-operated controls, each animal was again tested for motion sensitivity for three consecutive weeks. The brains of all of the animals were then fixed by left ventriculal cardiac perfusion with Bouin's fluid and processed for histological evaluation of the bilateral AP ablation in comparison with the control brains. Five of the AP-ablated animals postoperatively were completely refractory to the motion stimuli, two exhibited a decreased number of emetic responses, and one exhibited the same number of responses before and after the AP lesions. The controls exhibited no significant difference in emetic sensitivity on the second series of three weekly tests than on the first series. The results of this investigation appear to be in agreement with the observations of Wang and Chinn in the dog indicating that the integrity of the AP (CTZ) is essential to the emetic response to motion.

  9. Polyspecific associations between squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) and other primates in eastern Amazonia.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Tatyana; Ferrari, Stephen F; Lopes, Maria Aparecida

    2011-11-01

    One of the most common types of polyspecific association observed in Neotropical primate communities is that between squirrel monkeys (Saimiri) and capuchins (Cebus). The present study focused on association patterns in two Saimiri sciureus groups in eastern Brazilian Amazonia, between March and October, 2009. The associations were analyzed in terms of the species involved, the degree of association, and niche breadth and overlap. The study involved two S. sciureus groups (B4 and GI) on the right and left bank of the Tocantins River, respectively, within the area of the Tucuruí reservoir in southeastern Pará. Relations between species were classified as associations (individuals within 50 m and moving in the same direction), and encounters (individuals within 50 m and no coordinated movement). Group B4 was in association with Cebus apella during 100% of monitoring, and with Chiropotes satanas in 20.2%. By contrast, Group GI associated with Cebus 54.8% of the time, and with Chiropotes utahickae 2.5%. Encounters with Alouatta belzebul and Saguinus niger were recorded at both sites, with Aotus azarae and Dasyprocta prymnolopha at B4, and with Callicebus moloch, Dasyproct aleporina, Mazama gouazoubira, and Nasua nasua at GI. Overall, Saimiri had a broader niche than Cebus in terms of vertical spacing and diet, but not for substrate use. This pattern did not appear to be affected by association. While group GI spent significantly (P < 0.05) more time in association with Cebus during the wet season, group B4 associated with Chiropotes more during the dry season. Despite the higher association rates, niche overlap was greater for all variables at B4. This may reflect differences in the ranging and foraging patterns at the two sites, and the varying potential benefits of association for Saimiri. PMID:21809365

  10. Differential adaptation of the linear and nonlinear components of the horizontal vestibuloocular reflex in squirrel monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clendaniel, Richard A.; Lasker, David M.; Minor, Lloyd B.; Shelhamer, M. J. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Previous work in squirrel monkeys has demonstrated the presence of linear and nonlinear components to the horizontal vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) evoked by high-acceleration rotations. The nonlinear component is seen as a rise in gain with increasing velocity of rotation at frequencies more than 2 Hz (a velocity-dependent gain enhancement). We have shown that there are greater changes in the nonlinear than linear component of the response after spectacle-induced adaptation. The present study was conducted to determine if the two components of the response share a common adaptive process. The gain of the VOR, in the dark, to sinusoidal stimuli at 4 Hz (peak velocities: 20-150 degrees /s) and 10 Hz (peak velocities: 20 and 100 degrees /s) was measured pre- and postadaptation. Adaptation was induced over 4 h with x0.45 minimizing spectacles. Sum-of-sines stimuli were used to induce adaptation, and the parameters of the stimuli were adjusted to invoke only the linear or both linear and nonlinear components of the response. Preadaptation, there was a velocity-dependent gain enhancement at 4 and 10 Hz. In postadaptation with the paradigms that only recruited the linear component, there was a decrease in gain and a persistent velocity-dependent gain enhancement (indicating adaptation of only the linear component). After adaptation with the paradigm designed to recruit both the linear and nonlinear components, there was a decrease in gain and no velocity-dependent gain enhancement (indicating adaptation of both components). There were comparable changes in the response to steps of acceleration. We interpret these results to indicate that separate processes drive the adaptation of the linear and nonlinear components of the response.

  11. Modeling the vestibulo-ocular reflex of the squirrel monkey during eccentric rotation and roll tilt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merfeld, D. M.; Paloski, W. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    Model simulations of the squirrel monkey vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) are presented for two motion paradigms: constant velocity eccentric rotation and roll tilt about a naso-occipital axis. The model represents the implementation of three hypotheses: the "internal model" hypothesis, the "gravito-inertial force (GIF) resolution" hypothesis, and the "compensatory VOR" hypothesis. The internal model hypothesis is based on the idea that the nervous system knows the dynamics of the sensory systems and implements this knowledge as an internal dynamic model. The GIF resolution hypothesis is based on the idea that the nervous system knows that gravity minus linear acceleration equals GIF and implements this knowledge by resolving the otolith measurement of GIF into central estimates of gravity and linear acceleration, such that the central estimate of gravity minus the central estimate of acceleration equals the otolith measurement of GIF. The compensatory VOR hypothesis is based on the idea that the VOR compensates for the central estimates of angular velocity and linear velocity, which sum in a near-linear manner. During constant velocity eccentric rotation, the model correctly predicts that: (1) the peak horizontal response is greater while "facing-motion" than with "back-to-motion"; (2) the axis of eye rotation shifts toward alignment with GIF; and (3) a continuous vertical response, slow phase downward, exists prior to deceleration. The model also correctly predicts that a torsional response during the roll rotation is the only velocity response observed during roll rotations about a naso-occipital axis. The success of this model in predicting the observed experimental responses suggests that the model captures the essence of the complex sensory interactions engendered by eccentric rotation and roll tilt.

  12. Modeling the vestibulo-ocular reflex of the squirrel monkey during eccentric rotation and roll tilt.

    PubMed

    Merfeld, D M

    1995-01-01

    Model simulations of the squirrel monkey vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) are presented for two motion paradigms: constant velocity eccentric rotation and roll tilt about a naso-occipital axis. The model represents the implementation of three hypotheses: the "internal model" hypothesis, the "gravito-inertial force (GIF) resolution" hypothesis, and the "compensatory VOR" hypothesis. The internal model hypothesis is based on the idea that the nervous system knows the dynamics of the sensory systems and implements this knowledge as an internal dynamic model. The GIF resolution hypothesis is based on the idea that the nervous system knows that gravity minus linear acceleration equals GIF and implements this knowledge by resolving the otolith measurement of GIF into central estimates of gravity and linear acceleration, such that the central estimate of gravity minus the central estimate of acceleration equals the otolith measurement of GIF. The compensatory VOR hypothesis is based on the idea that the VOR compensates for the central estimates of angular velocity and linear velocity, which sum in a near-linear manner. During constant velocity eccentric rotation, the model correctly predicts that: (1) the peak horizontal response is greater while "facing-motion" than with "back-to-motion"; (2) the axis of eye rotation shifts toward alignment with GIF; and (3) a continuous vertical response, slow phase downward, exists prior to deceleration. The model also correctly predicts that a torsional response during the roll rotation is the only velocity response observed during roll rotations about a naso-occipital axis. The success of this model in predicting the observed experimental responses suggests that the model captures the essence of the complex sensory interactions engendered by eccentric rotation and roll tilt. PMID:8542968

  13. Functional characterization of the heterodimeric sweet taste receptor T1R2 and T1R3 from a New World monkey species (squirrel monkey) and its response to sweet-tasting proteins.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Ha, Matthew; Meng, Xuan-Yu; Khaleduzzaman, Mohammed; Zhang, Zhe; Li, Xia; Cui, Meng

    2012-10-19

    The family C G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) T1R2 and T1R3 heterodimer functions as a broadly acting sweet taste receptor. Perception of sweet taste is a species-dependent physiological process. It has been widely reported that New World monkeys and rodents are not able to perceive some of the artificial sweeteners and sweet-tasting proteins that can be perceived by humans, apes, and Old World monkeys. Until now, only the sweet receptors of humans, mice and rats have been functionally characterized. Here we report characterization of the sweet taste receptor (T1R2/T1R3) from a species of New World primate, squirrel monkey. Our results show that the heterodimeric receptor of squirrel monkey does not respond to artificial sweeteners aspartame, neotame, cyclamate, saccharin and sweet-tasting protein monellin, but surprisingly, it does respond to thaumatin at high concentrations (>18 μM). This is the first report demonstrating that species of New World monkey can perceive some specific sweet-tasting proteins. Furthermore, the sweet receptor of squirrel monkey responses to the such sweeteners cannot be inhibited by the sweet inhibitor lactisole. We compared the response differences of the squirrel monkey and human receptors and found that the residues in T1R2 determine species-dependent sweet taste toward saccharin, while the residues in either T1R2 or T1R3 are responsible for the sweet taste difference between humans and squirrel monkeys toward monellin. Molecular models indicated that electrostatic properties of the receptors probably mediate the species-dependent response to sweet-tasting proteins.

  14. Vestibulo-ocular reflex of the squirrel monkey during eccentric rotation with centripetal acceleration along the naso-occipital axis.

    PubMed

    Merfeld, D M

    1996-01-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflexes (VOR) are determined not only by angular acceleration, but also by the presence of gravity and linear acceleration. This phenomenon was studied by measuring three-dimensional nystagmic eye movements, with implanted search coils, in four male squirrel monkeys. Monkeys were rotated in the dark at 200 degrees/s, centrally or 79 cm off-axis, with the axis of rotation always aligned with gravity and the spinal axis of the upright monkeys. The monkey's position relative to the centripetal acceleration (facing center or back to center) had a dramatic influence on the VOR. These studies show that a torsional response was always elicited that acted to shift the axis of eye rotation toward alignment with gravito-inertial force. On the other hand, a slow phase downward vertical response usually existed, which shifted the axis of eye rotation away from the gravito-inertial force. These findings were consistent across all monkeys. In another set of tests, the same monkeys were rapidly tilted about their interaural (pitch) axis. Tilt orientations of 45 degrees and 90 degrees were maintained for 1 min. Other than a compensatory angular VOR during the rotation, no consistent eye velocity response was ever observed during or following the tilt. The absence of any response following tilt proves that the observed torsional and vertical responses were not a positional nystagmus. Model simulations qualitatively predict all components of these eccentric rotation and tilt responses. These simulations support the conclusion that the VOR during eccentric rotation may consist of two components: a linear VOR and a rotational VOR. The model predicts a slow phase downward, vertical, linear VOR during eccentric rotation even though there was never a change in the force aligned with monkey's spinal (Z) axis. The model also predicts the torsional components of the response that shift the rotation axis of the angular VOR toward alignment with gravito-inertial force

  15. Vestibulo-ocular reflex of the squirrel monkey during eccentric rotation with centripetal acceleration along the naso-occipital axis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merfeld, D. M.; Paloski, W. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflexes (VOR) are determined not only by angular acceleration, but also by the presence of gravity and linear acceleration. This phenomenon was studied by measuring three-dimensional nystagmic eye movements, with implanted search coils, in four male squirrel monkeys. Monkeys were rotated in the dark at 200 degrees/s, centrally or 79 cm off-axis, with the axis of rotation always aligned with gravity and the spinal axis of the upright monkeys. The monkey's position relative to the centripetal acceleration (facing center or back to center) had a dramatic influence on the VOR. These studies show that a torsional response was always elicited that acted to shift the axis of eye rotation toward alignment with gravito-inertial force. On the other hand, a slow phase downward vertical response usually existed, which shifted the axis of eye rotation away from the gravito-inertial force. These findings were consistent across all monkeys. In another set of tests, the same monkeys were rapidly tilted about their interaural (pitch) axis. Tilt orientations of 45 degrees and 90 degrees were maintained for 1 min. Other than a compensatory angular VOR during the rotation, no consistent eye velocity response was ever observed during or following the tilt. The absence of any response following tilt proves that the observed torsional and vertical responses were not a positional nystagmus. Model simulations qualitatively predict all components of these eccentric rotation and tilt responses. These simulations support the conclusion that the VOR during eccentric rotation may consist of two components: a linear VOR and a rotational VOR. The model predicts a slow phase downward, vertical, linear VOR during eccentric rotation even though there was never a change in the force aligned with monkey's spinal (Z) axis. The model also predicts the torsional components of the response that shift the rotation axis of the angular VOR toward alignment with gravito-inertial force.

  16. Induction of follicular growth in the squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus): enhanced recovery of mature ova for fertilization in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ozasa, H; Gould, K G

    1987-01-01

    In order to improve the rate of recovery of mature ova over those previously reported, we evaluated a new hormonal regimen for induction of follicular growth in the squirrel monkey. This regimen, which consisted of 50 IU pregnant mare's serum (PMS) per day for 4 days followed by 50 IU PMS and 250 IU human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) on the 5th day, gave an average yield of 2.3 mature ova per animal from 14 experiments involving 11 animals. Ova were recovered through laparotomy or laparoscopy 18 h after PMS and hCG. This number reached 3.3 per animal when ova matured in vitro were included. The fertilization rate was significantly higher for ova matured in vivo (44%) than for in vitro-matured ova (7%) (P less than 0.05), showing the importance of recovering mature ova for successful fertilization in vitro. In agreement with previous observations, a seasonal pattern was noted for the response of animals to induction of follicular development, with a reduction in response occurring during a summer period from July to September. Our observations also suggest the occurrence of immunologic problems associated with the use of PMS in the squirrel monkey.

  17. Comparison of the effects of antipsychotic drugs on the schedule-controlled behavior of squirrel monkeys and pigeons.

    PubMed

    Barrett, J E

    1983-04-01

    Lever pressing by squirrel monkeys and key pecking by pigeons were maintained under a multiple 3-min fixed-interval (FI), 30-response fixed-ratio (FR) schedule by the presentation of food. These responses, which differed under the two schedules, but were similar for both species, were used to compare the effects of antipsychotic compounds from different pharmacological classes. Except for differences in potency levels, the effects of intermediate doses of haloperidol and molindone were similar in monkeys and pigeons; these compounds decreased responding under the fixed-interval schedule at doses that did not affect fixed-ratio responding. Similar effects also occurred with chlorpromazine, promazine and thiothixene in pigeons. With monkeys, however, intermediate doses of promazine decreased fixed-ratio responding more than responding maintained under the fixed-interval schedule, while chlorpromazine and thiothixene produced similar effects on responding under both schedules. The effects of novel antipsychotic, clozapine, differed from those of the other agents in both monkeys and pigeons. With both species clozapine increased fixed interval responding at doses that did not affect responding under the fixed-ratio schedule. Doses required to reduce responding at least 50% were approximately 5 to 160 times greater for pigeons than for monkeys for all drugs except clozapine which was equipotent in both species. In monkeys the order of potency was haloperidol greater than molindone = thiothixene greater than chlorpromazine greater than clozapine greater than promazine, whereas in pigeons the order was haloperidol greater than thiothixene greater than clozapine greater than molindone greater than promazine greater than chlorpromazine.

  18. Torsional Eye Movements Evoked by Unilateral Labyrinthine Galvanic Polarizations in the Squirrel Monkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minor, Lloyd B.; Tomko, David L.; Paige, Gary D.

    1995-01-01

    longer periods of current administration. This adaptation is manifested as a perstimulus return toward resting discharge and poststimulus after-response in the opposite direction (Goldberg et al., 1984; Minor and Goldberg, l991). Cathodal currents (with respect to the perilymphatic space of the vestibule) are excitatory whereas anodal currents are inhibitory. Horizontal eye movements evoked by unilateral galvanic polarizations administered through chronically implanted labyrinthine stimulating electrodes have been studied in alert squirrel monkeys (Minor and Goldberg, 1991). We sought to extend this analysis by recording three-dimensional eye movements during galvanic stimulation. As predicted based upon roughly equal stimulation of ampullary nerves innervating the vertical canals, a substantial torsional component to the nystagmus is noted. The trajectory of torsional slow phases and nystagmus profile after the polarization provide insight into the central mechanisms that influence these responses.

  19. Physiological identification of morphologically distinct afferent classes innervating the cristae ampullares of the squirrel monkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lysakowski, A.; Minor, L. B.; Fernandez, C.; Goldberg, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    1. Semicircular-canal afferents in the squirrel monkey were characterized by their resting discharge, discharge regularity, sensitivity to galvanic currents delivered to the ear (beta *), the gain (g2Hz), and phase lead (phi 2Hz) of their response to 2-Hz sinusoidal head rotations, and their antidromic conduction velocity. Discharge regularity was measured by a normalized coefficient of variation (CV*); the higher the CV*, the more irregular the discharge. g2Hz and phi 2Hz were expressed relative to angular head velocity. 2. These physiological measures were used in an attempt to discern the discharge properties of the three morphological classes of afferents innervating the crista. Presumed bouton (B) fibers were identified as slowly conducting afferents. Presumed calyx (C) fibers were recognized by their irregular discharge and low rotational gains. The remaining fibers were considered to be dimorphic (D) units. Single letters (B, C, and D) are used to emphasize that the classification is based on circumstantial evidence and may be wrong for individual fibers. Of the 125 identified fibers, 13 (10%) were B units, 36 (29%) were C units, and 76 (61%) were D units. 3. B units were regularly discharging D units ranged from regularly to irregularly discharging. C units were the most irregularly discharging afferents encountered. The mean resting discharge for the entire sample was 74 spikes/s. Resting rates were similar for regularly discharging B and D units and higher than those for irregularly discharging C and D units. 4. Except for their lower conduction velocities, the discharge properties of B units are indistinguishable from those of regularly discharging D units. Many of the discharge properties of B and D units vary with discharge regularity. There is a strong, positive relation when beta *, g2Hz, or phi 2Hz is plotted against CV*. For beta * or phi 2Hz, C units conform to the relation for B and D units. In contrast, values of g2Hz for C units are three to

  20. Horizontal vestibuloocular reflex evoked by high-acceleration rotations in the squirrel monkey. I. Normal responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minor, L. B.; Lasker, D. M.; Backous, D. D.; Hullar, T. E.; Shelhamer, M. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The horizontal angular vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) evoked by high-frequency, high-acceleration rotations was studied in five squirrel monkeys with intact vestibular function. The VOR evoked by steps of acceleration in darkness (3,000 degrees /s(2) reaching a velocity of 150 degrees /s) began after a latency of 7.3 +/- 1.5 ms (mean +/- SD). Gain of the reflex during the acceleration was 14.2 +/- 5.2% greater than that measured once the plateau head velocity had been reached. A polynomial regression was used to analyze the trajectory of the responses to steps of acceleration. A better representation of the data was obtained from a polynomial that included a cubic term in contrast to an exclusively linear fit. For sinusoidal rotations of 0.5-15 Hz with a peak velocity of 20 degrees /s, the VOR gain measured 0.83 +/- 0.06 and did not vary across frequencies or animals. The phase of these responses was close to compensatory except at 15 Hz where a lag of 5.0 +/- 0.9 degrees was noted. The VOR gain did not vary with head velocity at 0.5 Hz but increased with velocity for rotations at frequencies of >/=4 Hz (0. 85 +/- 0.04 at 4 Hz, 20 degrees /s; 1.01 +/- 0.05 at 100 degrees /s, P < 0.0001). No responses to these rotations were noted in two animals that had undergone bilateral labyrinthectomy indicating that inertia of the eye had a negligible effect for these stimuli. We developed a mathematical model of VOR dynamics to account for these findings. The inputs to the reflex come from linear and nonlinear pathways. The linear pathway is responsible for the constant gain across frequencies at peak head velocity of 20 degrees /s and also for the phase lag at higher frequencies being less than that expected based on the reflex delay. The frequency- and velocity-dependent nonlinearity in VOR gain is accounted for by the dynamics of the nonlinear pathway. A transfer function that increases the gain of this pathway with frequency and a term related to the third power of head

  1. Background and stimulus-induced patterns of high metabolic activity in the visual cortex (area 17) of the squirrel and macaque monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Humphrey, A.L.; Hendrickson, A.E.

    1983-02-01

    The authors have used 2-deoxy-D-(/sup 14/C)glucose (2-DG) autoradiography and cytochrome oxidase histochemistry to examine background and stimulus-induced patterns of metabolic activity in monkey striate cortex. In squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) that binocularly or monocularly viewed diffuse white light or binocularly viewed bars of many orientations and spatial frequencies, 2-DG consumption was not uniform across the cortex but consisted of regularly spaced radial zones of high uptake. The cytochrome oxidase stain in these animals also revealed patches of high metabolism which coincided with the 2-DG patches. Squirrel monkeys binocularly viewing vertical stripes showed parallel bands of increased 2-DG uptake in the cortex, while the cytochrome label in these animals remained patchy. In macaque (Macaca nemestrina) monkeys, binocular stimulation with many orientations and spatial frequencies produced radial zones of high 2-DG uptake. When viewed tangentially, these zones formed a dots-in-rows pattern with a spacing of 350 X 500 microns; cytochrome oxidase staining produced an identical pattern. Macaca differed from Saimiri in that monocular stimulation labeled alternate rows. These results indicate that there are radial zones of high background metabolism across squirrel and macaque monkey striate cortex. In Saimiri these zones do not appear to be related to an eye dominance system, while in Macaca they do. The presence of these zones of high metabolism may complicate the interpretation of 2-DG autoradiographs that result from specific visual stimuli.

  2. Morphology and mitochondrial phylogenetics reveal that the Amazon River separates two eastern squirrel monkey species: Saimiri sciureus and S. collinsi.

    PubMed

    Mercês, Michelle P; Lynch Alfaro, Jessica W; Ferreira, Wallax A S; Harada, Maria L; Silva Júnior, José S

    2015-01-01

    Saimiri has a complicated taxonomic history, and there is continuing disagreement about the number of valid taxa. Despite these controversies, one point of consensus among morphologists has been that the eastern Amazonian populations of squirrel monkeys form a single terminal taxon, Saimiri sciureus sciureus (Linnaeus, 1758). This group is distributed to both the north and south of the middle to lower Amazon River and in the Marajó Archipelago. However, a recent molecular study by Lavergne and colleagues suggested that the Saimiri sciureus complex (comprised of S. s. sciureus sensu lato, S. s. albigena, S. s. macrodon, and S. s. cassiquiarensis) was paraphyletic. The discordance between morphological and molecular studies prompted us to conduct a new multidisciplinary analysis, employing a combination of morphological, morphometric, and molecular markers. Our results suggest the currently recognized taxon S. s. sciureus contains two distinct species, recognized by the Phylogenetic Species Concept: Saimiri sciureus (Linnaeus, 1758) and Saimiri collinsi Osgood, 1916. East Amazonian squirrel monkeys north of the Amazon have a gray crown (S. sciureus), and south of the Amazon, the crown is yellow (S. collinsi). Morphometric measurements also clearly distinguish between the two species, with the most important contributing factors including width across upper canines for both sexes. For males, the mean zygomatic breadth was significantly wider in S. sciureus compared to S. collinsi, and for females, the width across the upper molars was wider in S. sciureus compared to S. collinsi. Mitochondrial phylogenetic analyses support this separation of the eastern Amazonian squirrel monkeys into two distinct taxa, recovering one clade (S. sciureus) distributed to the north of the Amazon River, from the Negro River and Branco River to the Guiana coast and the Brazilian state of Amapá, and another clade (S. collinsi) south of the Amazon River, from the region of the Tapaj

  3. Effects of single-use and group-use enrichment on stereotypy and intragroup aggressive and affiliative behaviors of a social group of squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) at the Singapore Zoo.

    PubMed

    Sha, John; Han, Sharleen; Marlena, Diana; Kee, Julienne

    2012-01-01

    Four food-based enrichment devices were used to test the effects of single-use and group-use enrichment devices on stereotypy, intragroup aggression, and affiliation in a compatible group of 5 squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus). All enrichment devices were found to reduce overall stereotypic behavior from baseline levels (without enrichment). The occurrence of stereotypic behavior differed between individual squirrel monkeys with an adult female showing the highest level of stereotypic behavior. This individual also showed the highest usage of enrichment devices, and stereotypic behavior was significantly reduced when enrichment was applied. The occurrence of stereotypic behavior did not differ significantly between single-use and group-use enrichment treatments. Higher intragroup aggression and lower affiliation were observed during the provision of enrichment compared with baseline levels. However, aggressive behavior was higher and affiliation lower during single-use enrichment compared with group-use enrichment. The results of this study showed that enrichment had positive effects on alleviating stereotypic behavior in a group of zoo-housed squirrel monkeys and such effects were similar when group-use and single-use enrichment devices were used, but with variations between individuals. The application of enrichment, particularly single-use enrichment devices, elicited higher levels of aggression within the group and lower affiliation. Such effects could curtail the benefits of original enrichment goals as higher intragroup aggression could lead to higher stress levels within the group. When food-based enrichment for social nonhuman primates is implemented, the most appropriate methods to alleviate undesirable behavior without additional negative effects such as increased group aggression should be considered.

  4. Numerity of a socially housed hamadryas baboon (Papio hamadryas) and a socially housed squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus).

    PubMed

    Smith, Brian R; Piel, Alexander K; Candland, Douglas K

    2003-06-01

    To extend a study conducted by E. M. Brannon and H. S. Terrace (1998, 2000), the authors trained 1 hamadryas baboon (Papio hamadryas) and 1 squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus) to respond to stimuli representing the numerosities 1-4 in ascending order. When tested with novel stimuli of the same numerosities, both subjects' performance appeared to be based on the numerical attributes of stimuli. Subjects were then tested on their ability to order pairs of numerosities derived from the values 1-9. Both subjects successfully ordered pairs that included the untrained numerosities 5-9 regardless of the total surface area of numerosities. Accuracy and latency of responding also showed numerical distance and magnitude effects. Numerosity was a salient cue to both subjects, suggesting that these 2 families of primates perceive ordinal relations. The outcome shows that cognitive studies of this type can be effectively conducted with socially housed animals.

  5. Activity budget, diet, and use of space by two groups of squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) in eastern Amazonia.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Tatyana; Ferrari, Stephen F; Lopes, Maria Aparecida

    2013-07-01

    Squirrel monkeys (Saimiri spp.) are widely distributed in the Amazon basin. This study describes the ecological and behavioral patterns of two social groups of S. sciureus in forests adjacent to the Tucuruí hydroelectric reservoir in eastern Amazonia, including range size, activity budgets, and composition of the diet. The groups were monitored at Base 4 (group B4) and Germoplasma Island (group GI). Quantitative behavioral data were collected using instantaneous scan sampling to record behavior, substrate use, and height. Home ranges were delimited using a GPS to determine group position after each 50 m of movement. Home ranges were 75.0 ha for group B4 (39 members) and 77.5 ha for group GI (32 members). The use of vertical strata was well defined, with a marked preference for the middle and lower levels of the canopy. The activity budgets of both groups were typical of those of other squirrel monkeys and were dominated by foraging (B4 = 48.7 %; GI = 49.6 %), moving (both groups 28.9 %), and feeding (B4 = 14.6 %; GI = 12.4 %). Resting was rare (B4 = 3.5 %; GI = 2.6 %) and less common than social behavior (B4 = 4.3 %; GI = 6.4 %). The diet of both groups was dominated by plant material (B4 = 70.7 % of feeding records; GI = 71.4 %), which is in contrast with the more insectivorous diets recorded for Saimiri at other sites. Group GI spent more time foraging during the dry season, whereas group B4 spent more time in the rainy season when the consumption of fruit increased (significantly, in the case of group GI). The less insectivorous diet of these groups may be due to a number of factors, including the unique habitat configuration at the site and reduced hydrological stress due to the proximity of the reservoir. PMID:23546826

  6. Background and stimulus-induced patterns of high metabolic activity in the visual cortex (area 17) of the squirrel and macaque monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Humphrey, A.L.; Hendrickson, A.E.

    1983-02-01

    We have used 2-deoxy-D-(/sup 14/C)glucose (2-DG) autoradiography and cytochrome oxidase histochemistry to examine background and stimulus-induced patterns of metabolic activity in monkey striate cortex. In squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) that binocularly or monocularly viewed diffuse white light or binocularly viewed bars of many orientations and spatial frequencies, 2-DG consumption was not uniform across the cortex but consisted of regularly spaced radial zones of high uptake. The zones extended through all laminae except IVc beta and, when viewed tangentially, formed separate patches 500 microns apart. The cytochrome oxidase stain in these animals also revealed patches of high metabolism which coincided with the 2-DG patches. Squirrel monkeys binocularly viewing vertical stripes showed parallel bands of increased 2-DG uptake in the cortex, while the cytochrome label in these animals remained patchy. When monkeys were kept in the dark during 2-DG exposure, 2-DG-labeled patches were not seen but cytochrome oxidase-positive patches remained. In macaque (Macaca nemestrina) monkeys, binocular stimulation with many orientations and spatial frequencies produced radial zones of high 2-DG uptake in layers I to IVa and VI. When viewed tangentially, these zones formed a dots-in-rows pattern with a spacing of 350 X 500 microns; cytochrome oxidase staining produced an identical pattern. Macaca differed from Saimiri in that monocular stimulation labeled alternate rows. These results indicate that there are radial zones of high background metabolism across squirrel and macaque monkey striate cortex. In Saimiri these zones do not appear to be related to an eye dominance system, while in Macaca they do. The presence of these zones of high metabolism may complicate the interpretation of 2-DG autoradiographs that result from specific visual stimuli.

  7. Metabolism of 1,2,3,4-, 1,2,3,5-, and 1,2,4,5-tetrachlorobenzene in the squirrel monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, H.; Chu, I.; Villeneuve, D.C.; Benoit, F.M.

    1987-01-01

    The metabolism of three tetrachlorobenzene isomers (TeCB) was investigated in the squirrel monkey. The animals were administered orally 6 single doses of /sup 14/C-labeled 1,2,3,4-, 1,2,4,5-, or 1,2,3,5-tetrachlorobenzene over a 3-wk period at levels ranging from 50 to 100 mg/kg body weight (b.w) and kept in individual metabolism cages to collect urine and feces for radioassay. Approximately 38% (1,2,3,4-TeCB), 36% (1,2,3,5-TeCB), and 18% (1,2,4,5-TeCB) of the doses were excreted respectively in the feces 48 h post administration. In monkeys dosed with 1,2,3,4-TeCB, unchanged compound accounted for 50% of the fecal radioactivity. Unchanged compound accounted for more than 50% of the fecal radioactivity found in the monkeys dosed with 1,2,3,5-TeCB. The fecal metabolites were identified in both groups. No metabolites were detected in the feces of monkeys dosed with 1,2,4,5-TeCB. While the fecal route represented the major route of excretion for 1,2,3,4-TeCB, the other two isomers were eliminated exclusively in the feces. The above data in the squirrel monkey are different from those obtained with the rat and the rabbit, and demonstrate the different metabolic pathways for the isomers.

  8. Living together: behavior and welfare in single and mixed species groups of capuchin (Cebus apella) and squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus).

    PubMed

    Leonardi, Rebecca; Buchanan-Smith, Hannah M; Dufour, Valérie; MacDonald, Charlotte; Whiten, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    There are potential advantages of housing primates in mixed species exhibits for both the visiting public and the primates themselves. If the primates naturally associate in the wild, it may be more educational and enjoyable for the public to view. Increases in social complexity and stimulation may be enriching for the primates. However, mixed species exhibits might also create welfare problems such as stress from interspecific aggression. We present data on the behavior of single and mixed species groups of capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) and squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) housed at the Living Links to Human Evolution Research Centre in the Royal Zoological Society of Scotland's Edinburgh Zoo. These species associate in the wild, gaining foraging benefits and decreased predation. But Cebus are also predators themselves with potential risks for the smaller Saimiri. To study their living together we took scan samples at > or =15 min intervals on single (n=109) and mixed species groups (n=152), and all occurrences of intraspecific aggression and interspecific interactions were recorded. We found no evidence of chronic stress and Saimiri actively chose to associate with Cebus. On 79% of scans, the two species simultaneously occupied the same part of their enclosure. No vertical displacement was observed. Interspecific interactions were common (>2.5/hr), and equally divided among mildly aggressive, neutral, and affiliative interactions such as play. Only one aggressive interaction involved physical contact and was non-injurious. Aggressive interactions were mostly (65%) displacements and vocal exchanges, initiated almost equally by Cebus and Saimiri. Modifications to the enclosure were successful in reducing these mildly aggressive interactions with affiliative interactions increasing in frequency and diversity. Our data suggest that in carefully designed, large enclosures, naturally associating monkeys are able to live harmoniously and are enriched by each other

  9. Rapid diagnosis and quantification of Francisella tularensis in organs of naturally infected common squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus).

    PubMed

    Abril, Carlos; Nimmervoll, Helena; Pilo, Paola; Brodard, Isabelle; Korczak, Bozena; Markus, Seiler; Miserez, Raymond; Frey, Joachim

    2008-02-01

    Francisella tularensis, a small Gram-negative facultative intracellular bacterium, is the causative agent of tularaemia, a severe zoonotic disease transmitted to humans mostly by vectors such as ticks, flies and mosquitoes. The disease is endemic in many parts of the northern hemisphere. Among animals, the most affected species belong to rodents and lagomorphs, in particular hares. However, in the recent years, many cases of tularaemia among small monkeys in zoos were reported. We have developed a real-time PCR that allows to quantify F. tularensis in tissue samples. Using this method, we identified the spleen and the kidney as the most heavily infected organ containing up to 400 F. tularensis bacteria per simian host cell in two common squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) from a zoo that died of tularaemia. In other organs such as the brain, F. tularensis was detected at much lower titres. The strain that caused the infection was identified as F. tularensis subsp. holarctica biovar I, which is susceptible to erythromycin. The high number of F. tularensis present in soft organs such as spleen, liver and kidney represents a high risk for persons handling such carcasses and explains the transmission of the disease to a pathologist during post-mortem analysis. Herein, we show that real-time PCR allows a reliable and rapid diagnosis of F. tularensis directly from tissue samples of infected animals, which is crucial in order to attempt accurate prophylactic measures, especially in cases where humans or other animals have been exposed to this highly contagious pathogen. PMID:17875369

  10. Visual recognition memory in squirrel monkeys: effects of serotonin antagonists on baseline and hypoxia-induced performance deficits.

    PubMed

    DeNoble, V J; Schrack, L M; Reigel, A L; DeNoble, K F

    1991-08-01

    Cognitive deficits resulting from neuropathological brain changes such as Alzheimer's Disease or normal aging are most likely due to alterations in multiple neurotransmitter systems. While the majority of preclinical studies have focused on the effects of acetylcholine (ACh), it has been shown that activation of the serotonergic (5-HT) pathways in the central nervous system interferes with passive avoidance retention in rats. In contrast, decreased 5-HT activity has been shown to improve learning and memory in rats using similar procedures. In the present experiment, 5-HT antagonists were evaluated for their effects on performance in a delayed match to sample task (DMTS) in two groups of squirrel monkeys: one in which the baseline level of performance was low (less than 65% correct, N = 5; group 1) and another in which DMTS performance was high (greater than 80% correct, N = 3; group 2) but impaired by exposure to hypoxia. Initial parametric tests exposing group 2 to various levels of oxygen deprivation were conducted to determine optimal conditions for performance deficits. Each monkey in both normoxia (group 1) and hypoxia (group 2) served as his own control and received an individualized range of doses for each test compound. For both groups, ketanserin and mianserin, the 5-HT2-selective antagonists, produced dose-dependent increases in DMTS performance at 0.3-1.5 mg/kg PO and 0.05-1.5 mg/kg PO, respectively. Pirenperone, another 5-HT2-selective antagonist, was active in improving performance in group 1 at 0.001 to 0.2 mg/kg PO but was not effective against hypoxia-induced performance deficits.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1763118

  11. Suppression of behavior by intravenous injections of nicotine or by electric shocks in squirrel monkeys: effects of chlordiazepoxide and mecamylamine.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, S R; Spealman, R D

    1983-02-01

    Squirrel monkeys responded under a two-component fixed-ratio schedule of food presentation with both nonpunishment and punishment components. In both components of the multiple schedule, every 30th key-pressing response resulted in food presentation. In the punishment component, the first response in each 30-response fixed ratio also produced either an i.v. injection of nicotine (10-30 micrograms/kg) or an electric shock (1-5 mA). Response-produced nicotine injections or electric shocks functioned similarly to suppress responding by over 70% in the punishment component. Presession treatment with chlordiazepoxide (5.6-10 mg/kg i.m.) markedly increased responding that had been suppressed by either nicotine injection or electric shock. In contrast, presession treatment with the nicotinic antagonist, mecamylamine (0.1-0.3 mg/kg i.m.) increased responding that had been suppressed by nicotine injection but did not increase responding that had been suppressed by electric shock. Thus, chlordiazepoxide appeared to have general rate-increasing effects on suppressed responding, regardless of the nature of the event suppressing responding, whereas mecamylamine appeared to selectively antagonize the suppressant effects of nicotine. Doses of chloridazepoxide and mecamylamine that increased suppressed responding in punishment components either had little effect on or slightly increased responding in nonpunishment components. These results show that under suitable environmental conditions response-produced i.v. injection of nicotine can function effectively as a punisher. PMID:6822959

  12. Measurement of /sup 125/I-low density lipoprotein uptake in selected tissues of the squirrel monkey by quantitative autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Tompkins, R.G.; Schnitzer, J.J.; Yarmush, M.L.; Colton, C.K.; Smith, K.A.

    1988-09-01

    A recently developed technique of absolute quantitative light microscopic autoradiography of /sup 125/I-labeled proteins in biologic specimens was used to measure /sup 125/I-low density lipoprotein (/sup 125/I-LDL) concentration levels in various tissues of the squirrel monkey after 30 minutes of in vivo LDL circulation. Liver and adrenal cortex exhibited high /sup 125/I-LDL concentrations, presumably because of binding to specific cell surface receptors and/or internalization in vascular beds with high permeability to LDL. High tissue concentrations of LDL were associated with the zona fasciculata and reticularis of the adrenal cortex and the interstitial cells of Leydig in the testis; significantly lower levels of /sup 125/I-LDL were observed in the adrenal medulla, the zona glomerulosa, and germinal centers of the testis. Contrary to previous reports, low /sup 125/I-LDL concentrations were observed throughout the gastrointestinal tract and in lymph nodes. In addition, multiple arterial intramural focal areas of high /sup 125/I-LDL concentrations were identified in arteries supplying the adrenal gland, lymph node, small bowel, and liver.

  13. A 3D high resolution ex vivo white matter atlas of the common squirrel monkey (saimiri sciureus) based on diffusion tensor imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yurui; Parvathaneni, Prasanna; Schilling, Kurt G.; Wang, Feng; Stepniewska, Iwona; Xu, Zhoubing; Choe, Ann S.; Ding, Zhaohua; Gore, John C.; Chen, Li min; Landman, Bennett A.; Anderson, Adam W.

    2016-03-01

    Modern magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain atlases are high quality 3-D volumes with specific structures labeled in the volume. Atlases are essential in providing a common space for interpretation of results across studies, for anatomical education, and providing quantitative image-based navigation. Extensive work has been devoted to atlas construction for humans, macaque, and several non-primate species (e.g., rat). One notable gap in the literature is the common squirrel monkey - for which the primary published atlases date from the 1960's. The common squirrel monkey has been used extensively as surrogate for humans in biomedical studies, given its anatomical neuro-system similarities and practical considerations. This work describes the continued development of a multi-modal MRI atlas for the common squirrel monkey, for which a structural imaging space and gray matter parcels have been previously constructed. This study adds white matter tracts to the atlas. The new atlas includes 49 white matter (WM) tracts, defined using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in three animals and combines these data to define the anatomical locations of these tracks in a standardized coordinate system compatible with previous development. An anatomist reviewed the resulting tracts and the inter-animal reproducibility (i.e., the Dice index of each WM parcel across animals in common space) was assessed. The Dice indices range from 0.05 to 0.80 due to differences of local registration quality and the variation of WM tract position across individuals. However, the combined WM labels from the 3 animals represent the general locations of WM parcels, adding basic connectivity information to the atlas.

  14. Scale-dependent effects of a heterogeneous landscape on genetic differentiation in the Central American squirrel monkey (Saimiri oerstedii).

    PubMed

    Blair, Mary E; Melnick, Don J

    2012-01-01

    Landscape genetic studies offer a fine-scale understanding of how habitat heterogeneity influences population genetic structure. We examined population genetic structure and conducted a landscape genetic analysis for the endangered Central American Squirrel Monkey (Saimiri oerstedii) that lives in the fragmented, human-modified habitats of the Central Pacific region of Costa Rica. We analyzed non-invasively collected fecal samples from 244 individuals from 14 groups for 16 microsatellite markers. We found two geographically separate genetic clusters in the Central Pacific region with evidence of recent gene flow among them. We also found significant differentiation among groups of S. o. citrinellus using pairwise F(ST) comparisons. These groups are in fragments of secondary forest separated by unsuitable "matrix" habitats such as cattle pasture, commercial African oil palm plantations, and human residential areas. We used an individual-based landscape genetic approach to measure spatial patterns of genetic variance while taking into account landscape heterogeneity. We found that large, commercial oil palm plantations represent moderate barriers to gene flow between populations, but cattle pastures, rivers, and residential areas do not. However, the influence of oil palm plantations on genetic variance was diminished when we restricted analyses to within population pairs, suggesting that their effect is scale-dependent and manifests during longer dispersal events among populations. We show that when landscape genetic methods are applied rigorously and at the right scale, they are sensitive enough to track population processes even in species with long, overlapping generations such as primates. Thus landscape genetic approaches are extremely valuable for the conservation management of a diverse array of endangered species in heterogeneous, human-modified habitats. Our results also stress the importance of explicitly considering the heterogeneity of matrix habitats in

  15. Cortical Connections to Single Digit Representations in Area 3b of Somatosensory Cortex in Squirrel Monkeys and Prosimian Galagos

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chia-Chi; Gharbawie, Omar A.; Qi, Huixin; Kaas, Jon H.

    2014-01-01

    The ventral posterior nucleus of thalamus sends highly segregated inputs into each digit representation in area 3b of primary somatosensory cortex. However, the spatial organization of the connections that link digit representations of areas 3b with other somatosensory areas is less understood. Here we examined the cortical inputs to individual digit representations of area 3b in four squirrel monkeys and one prosimian galago. Retrograde tracers were injected into neurophysiologically defined representations of individual digits of area 3b. Cortical tissues were cut parallel to the surface in some cases and showed that feedback projections to individual digits overlapped extensively in the hand representations of areas 3b, 1, and parietal ventral (PV) and second somatosensory (S2) areas. Other regions with overlapping populations of labeled cells included area 3a and primary motor cortex (M1). The results were confirmed in other cases in which the cortical tissues were cut in the coronal plane. The same cases also showed that cells were primarily labeled in the infragranular and supragranular layers. Thus, feedback projections to individual digit representations in area 3b mainly originate from multiple digits and other portions of hand representations of areas 3b, 1, PV, and S2. This organization is in stark contrast to the segregated thalamocortical inputs, which originate in single digit representations and terminate in the matching digit representation in the cortex. The organization of feedback connections could provide a substrate for the integration of information across the representations of adjacent digits in area 3b. PMID:23749740

  16. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 shows different patterns of localization within the parallel visual pathways in macaque and squirrel monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Shostak, Yuri; Wenger, Ashley; Mavity-Hudson, Julia; Casagrande, Vivien A

    2015-01-01

    Glutamate is used as an excitatory neurotransmitter by the koniocellular (K), magnocellular (M), and parvocellular (P) pathways to transfer signals from the primate lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) to primary visual cortex (V1). Glutamate acts through both fast ionotropic receptors, which appear to carry the main sensory message, and slower, modulatory metabotropic receptors (mGluRs). In this study, we asked whether mGluR5 relates in distinct ways to the K, M, and P LGN axons in V1. To answer this question, we used light microscopic immunocytochemistry and preembedding electron microscopic immunogold labeling to determine the localization of mGluR5 within the layers of V1 in relation to the K, M, and P pathways in macaque and squirrel monkeys. These pathways were labeled separately via wheat germ agglutinin–horseradish peroxidase (WGA–HRP) injections targeting the LGN layers. mGluR5 is of interest because it: 1) has been shown to be expressed in the thalamic input layers; 2) appears to be responsible for some types of oscillatory firing, which could be important in the binding of visual features; and 3) has been associated with a number of sensory-motor gating-related pathologies, including schizophrenia and autism. Our results demonstrated the presence of mGluR5 in the neuropil of all V1 layers. This protein was lowest in IVCα (M input) and the infragranular layers. In layer IVC, mGluR5 also was found postsynaptic to about 30% of labeled axons, but the distribution was uneven, such that postsynaptic mGluR5 label tended to occur opposite smaller (presumed P), and not larger (presumed M) axon terminals. Only in the K pathway in layer IIIB, however, was mGluR5 always found in the axon terminals themselves. The presence of mGluR5 in K axons and not in M and P axons, and the presence of mGluR5 postsynaptic mainly to smaller P and not larger M axons suggest that the response to the release of glutamate is modulated in distinct ways within and between the parallel

  17. Anatomical and physiological characteristics of vestibular neurons mediating the vertical vestibulo-ocular reflexes of the squirrel monkey.

    PubMed

    McCrea, R A; Strassman, A; Highstein, S M

    1987-10-22

    The morphology of 35 vestibular neurons whose firing rate was related to vertical eye movements was studied by injection of horseradish peroxidase intracellularly into physiologically identified vestibular axons in alert squirrel monkeys. The intracellularly injected cells were readily classified into four main groups. One group of cells, down position-vestibular-pause neurons (down PVPs; N = 12), increased their firing rate during downward eye positions, paused during saccades, and were located in the medial vestibular nucleus (MV) and the adjacent ventrolateral vestibular nucleus (VLV). They had axons that crossed the midline and ascended in the medial longitudinal fasciculus (MLF) to terminate in the trochlear nucleus, the lateral aspect of the caudal oculomotor nucleus, and the dorsal aspect of the rostral oculomotor nucleus. A second group of cells (N = 15) were also located in the MV and VLV, but increased their firing rate during upward eye positions, and paused during saccades. These cells had axons that crossed the midline and ascended in the contralateral MLF to terminate in the medial aspect of the oculomotor nucleus. A third group of cells (N = 4) were located in the superior vestibular nucleus, generated bursts of spikes during upward saccades, and increased their tonic firing rate during upward eye positions. These cells had axons that ascended laterally to the ipsilateral MLF to terminate in regions of the trochlear and oculomotor nuclei similar to those in which down PVPs terminated. A fourth group of cells (N = 4), located in the VLV, had axons that projected to the spinal cord, although they had firing rates that were significantly correlated with vertical eye position. Electrical stimulation of the vestibular nerve evoked spikes at monosynaptic latencies in each of the above classes of cells, six of which were injected with horseradish peroxidase. Each group of cells had collateral projections to other areas of the brainstem. Some of the neurons

  18. Horizontal vestibuloocular reflex evoked by high-acceleration rotations in the squirrel monkey. III. Responses after labyrinthectomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lasker, D. M.; Hullar, T. E.; Minor, L. B.; Shelhamer, M. J. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    The horizontal angular vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) evoked by high-frequency, high-acceleration rotations was studied in four squirrel monkeys after unilateral labyrinthectomy. Spontaneous nystagmus was measured at the beginning and end of each testing session. During the period that animals were kept in darkness (4 days), the nystagmus at each of these times measured approximately 20 degrees /s. Within 18-24 h after return to the light, the nystagmus (measured in darkness) decreased to 2.8 +/- 1.5 degrees /s (mean +/- SD) when recorded at the beginning but was 20.3 +/- 3.9 degrees /s at the end of the testing session. The latency of the VOR measured from responses to steps of acceleration (3,000 degrees /s(2) reaching a velocity of 150 degrees /s) was 8.4 +/- 0.3 ms for responses to ipsilesional rotations and 7.7 +/- 0.4 ms for contralesional rotations. During the period that animals were kept in darkness after the labyrinthectomy, the gain of the VOR measured during the steps of acceleration was 0.67 +/- 0.12 for contralesional rotations and 0.39 +/- 0.04 for ipsilesional rotations. Within 18-24 h after return to light, the VOR gain for contralesional rotations increased to 0.87 +/- 0.08, whereas there was only a slight increase for ipsilesional rotations to 0.41 +/- 0. 06. A symmetrical increase in the gain measured at the plateau of head velocity was noted after the animals were returned to light. The VOR evoked by sinusoidal rotations of 2-15 Hz, +/-20 degrees /s, showed a better recovery of gain at lower (2-4 Hz) than at higher (6-15 Hz) frequencies. At 0.5 Hz, gain decreased symmetrically when the peak amplitude was increased from 20 to 100 degrees /s. At 10 Hz, gain was decreased for ipsilesional half-cycles and increased for contralesional half-cycles when velocity was raised from 20 to 50 degrees /s. A model incorporating linear and nonlinear pathways was used to simulate the data. Selective increases in the gain for the linear pathway accounted for the

  19. Horizontal vestibuloocular reflex evoked by high-acceleration rotations in the squirrel monkey. II. Responses after canal plugging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lasker, D. M.; Backous, D. D.; Lysakowski, A.; Davis, G. L.; Minor, L. B.

    1999-01-01

    The horizontal angular vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) evoked by high-frequency, high-acceleration rotations was studied in four squirrel monkeys after unilateral plugging of the three semicircular canals. During the period (1-4 days) that animals were kept in darkness after plugging, the gain during steps of acceleration (3, 000 degrees /s(2), peak velocity = 150 degrees /s) was 0.61 +/- 0.14 (mean +/- SD) for contralesional rotations and 0.33 +/- 0.03 for ipsilesional rotations. Within 18-24 h after animals were returned to light, the VOR gain for contralesional rotations increased to 0. 88 +/- 0.05, whereas there was only a slight increase in the gain for ipsilesional rotations to 0.37 +/- 0.07. A symmetrical increase in the gain measured at the plateau of head velocity was noted after animals were returned to light. The latency of the VOR was 8.2 +/- 0. 4 ms for ipsilesional and 7.1 +/- 0.3 ms for contralesional rotations. The VOR evoked by sinusoidal rotations of 0.5-15 Hz, +/-20 degrees /s had no significant half-cycle asymmetries. The recovery of gain for these responses after plugging was greater at lower than at higher frequencies. Responses to rotations at higher velocities for frequencies >/=4 Hz showed an increase in contralesional half-cycle gain, whereas ipsilesional half-cycle gain was unchanged. A residual response that appeared to be canal and not otolith mediated was noted after plugging of all six semicircular canals. This response increased with frequency to reach a gain of 0.23 +/- 0.03 at 15 Hz, resembling that predicted based on a reduction of the dominant time constant of the canal to 32 ms after plugging. A model incorporating linear and nonlinear pathways was used to simulate the data. The coefficients of this model were determined from data in animals with intact vestibular function. Selective increases in the gain for the linear and nonlinear pathways predicted the changes in recovery observed after canal plugging. An increase in gain of

  20. Relation between discharge regularity and responses to externally applied galvanic currents in vestibular nerve afferents of the squirrel monkey.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, J M; Smith, C E; Fernández, C

    1984-06-01

    Most vestibular nerve afferents can be classified as regularly or irregularly discharging. Two factors are theoretically identified as being potentially responsible for differences in discharge regularity. The first, ascribable to synaptic noise, is the variance (sigma v2) characterizing the transmembrane voltage fluctuations of the axon's spike trigger site, i.e., the place where impulses normally arise. The second factor is the slope (dmuv/dt) of the trigger site's postspike recovery function. Were (dmuv/dt) a major determinant of discharge regularity, the theory predicts that the more irregular the discharge of a unit, the greater should be its sensitivity to externally applied galvanic currents and the faster should be the postspike recovery of its electrical excitability. The predictions would not hold if differences in the discharge regularity between units largely reflected variations in sigma v. To test these predictions, the responses of vestibular nerve afferents to externally applied galvanic currents were studied in the barbiturate-anesthetized squirrel monkey. Current steps of 5-s duration and short (50 microsecond) shocks were delivered by way of the perilymphatic space of the vestibule. Results were similar regardless of which end organ an afferent innervated. The regularity of discharge of each unit was expressed by a normalized coefficient of variation (CV*). The galvanic sensitivity (beta p) of a unit, measured from its response to current steps, was linearly related to discharge regularity (CV*), there being approximately 20-fold variations in both variables across the afferent population. Various geometric factors--including fiber diameter, position of individual axons within the various nerve branches, and the configuration of unmyelinated processes within the sensory epithelium--are unlikely to have made a major contribution to the positive relation between beta P and CV*. The postspike recovery of electrical excitability was measured as

  1. Horizontal vestibuloocular reflex evoked by high-acceleration rotations in the squirrel monkey. IV. Responses after spectacle-induced adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clendaniel, R. A.; Lasker, D. M.; Minor, L. B.; Shelhamer, M. J. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    The horizontal angular vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) evoked by sinusoidal rotations from 0.5 to 15 Hz and acceleration steps up to 3,000 degrees /s(2) to 150 degrees /s was studied in six squirrel monkeys following adaptation with x2.2 magnifying and x0.45 minimizing spectacles. For sinusoidal rotations with peak velocities of 20 degrees /s, there were significant changes in gain at all frequencies; however, the greatest gain changes occurred at the lower frequencies. The frequency- and velocity-dependent gain enhancement seen in normal monkeys was accentuated following adaptation to magnifying spectacles and diminished with adaptation to minimizing spectacles. A differential increase in gain for the steps of acceleration was noted after adaptation to the magnifying spectacles. The gain during the acceleration portion, G(A), of a step of acceleration (3,000 degrees /s(2) to 150 degrees /s) increased from preadaptation values of 1.05 +/- 0.08 to 1.96 +/- 0.16, while the gain during the velocity plateau, G(V), only increased from 0.93 +/- 0.04 to 1.36 +/- 0.08. Polynomial fits to the trajectory of the response during the acceleration step revealed a greater increase in the cubic than the linear term following adaptation with the magnifying lenses. Following adaptation to the minimizing lenses, the value of G(A) decreased to 0.61 +/- 0.08, and the value of G(V) decreased to 0.59 +/- 0.09 for the 3,000 degrees /s(2) steps of acceleration. Polynomial fits to the trajectory of the response during the acceleration step revealed that there was a significantly greater reduction in the cubic term than in the linear term following adaptation with the minimizing lenses. These findings indicate that there is greater modification of the nonlinear as compared with the linear component of the VOR with spectacle-induced adaptation. In addition, the latency to the onset of the adapted response varied with the dynamics of the stimulus. The findings were modeled with a bilateral model

  2. Antipredator vigilance of juvenile and adult thirteen-lined ground squirrels and the role of nutritional need.

    PubMed

    Arenz; Leger

    2000-03-01

    Juvenile thirteen-lined ground squirrels, Spermophilus tridecemlineatus, are less vigilant (i.e. they spend less time visually scanning the environment) than adults. To determine whether nutritional need was a potential cause of this difference, we supplemented two groups of free-ranging juveniles during the predispersal stage, while juveniles were still near and around the natal burrows. The high-energy food group (HEF: 11 squirrels) received peanut butter and oats while the low-energy food group (LEF: seven squirrels) received lettuce. Adults (14 squirrels) were also supplemented, but due to their greater home range sizes, it was not feasible to classify them as either HEF or LEF. To evaluate the effect of supplementation on antipredator vigilance, the behavioural act of visually scanning for predators, we videotaped individuals while they were foraging above ground during 5-min observation periods. Each squirrel was observed and weighed during three time periods over 23 days. From the videotape, we extracted measures of time spent vigilant, locomoting and foraging. All three categories of squirrels gained mass over the study period, but the HEF juveniles rapidly exceeded that of the LEF juveniles. Early in the study, LEF and HEF juveniles did not significantly differ in either body mass or time budgets, and, initially, both juvenile groups were similar to adults in the amount of time devoted to vigilance. Later in the study, the behaviour of HEF juveniles closely resembled that of adults (increased time devoted to vigilance and decreased time devoted to foraging), while LEF juveniles decreased vigilance and increased their foraging time. This study indicates that for thirteen-lined ground squirrels the lower vigilance of juveniles is due, at least in part, to the greater nutritional needs of young animals with consequent increases in foraging, which is largely incompatible with vigilance. Copyright 2000 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. PMID

  3. Resynchronization of circadian sleep-wake and temperature cycles in the squirrel monkey following phase shifts of the environmental light-dark cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Wexler, D.B.; Moore-ede, M.C.

    1986-12-01

    Circadian rhythms in physiological and behavioral functions gradually resynchronize after phase shifts in environmental time cues. In order to characterize the rate of circadian resynchronization in a diurnal primate model, the temperature, locomotor activity, and polygraphically determined sleep-wake states were monitored in squirrel monkeys before and after 8-h phase shifts of an environmental light-dark cycle of 12 h light and 12 h dark (LD 12:12). For the temperature rhythm, resynchronization took 4 d after phase delay shift and 5 d after phase advance shift; for the rest-activity cycle, resynchronization times were 3 d and 6 d, respectively. The activity acrophase shifted more rapidly than the temperature acrophase early in the post-delay shift interval, but this internal desynchronization between rhythms disappeared during the course of resynchronization. Further study of the early resynchronization process requires emphasis on identifying evoked effects and measuring circadian pacemaker function. 13 references.

  4. Resynchronization of circadian sleep-wake and temperature cycles in the squirrel monkey following phase shifts of the environmental light-dark cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wexler, D. B.; Moore-Ede, M. C.

    1986-01-01

    Circadian rhythms in physiological and behavioral functions gradually resynchronize after phase shifts in environmental time cues. In order to characterize the rate of circadian resynchronization in a diurnal primate model, the temperature, locomotor activity, and polygraphically determined sleep-wake states were monitored in squirrel monkeys before and after 8-h phase shifts of an environmental light-dark cycle of 12 h light and 12 h dark (LD 12:12). For the temperature rhythm, resynchronization took 4 d after phase delay shift and 5 d after phase advance shift; for the rest-activity cycle, resynchronization times were 3 d and 6 d, respectively. The activity acrophase shifted more rapidly than the temperature acrophase early in the post-delay shift interval, but this internal desynchronization between rhythms disappeared during the course of resynchronization. Further study of the early resynchronization process requires emphasis on identifying evoked effects and measuring circadian pacemaker function.

  5. Hair-cell counts and afferent innervation patterns in the cristae ampullares of the squirrel monkey with a comparison to the chinchilla

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, C.; Lysakowski, A.; Goldberg, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    1. The numbers of type I and type II hair cells were estimated by dissector techniques applied to semithin, stained sections of the horizontal, superior, and posterior cristae in the squirrel monkey and the chinchilla. 2. The crista in each species was divided into concentrically arranged central, intermediate, and peripheral zones of equal areas. The three zones can be distinguished by the sizes of individual hair cells and calyx endings, by the density of hair cells, and by the relative frequency of calyx endings innervating single or multiple type I hair cells. 3. In the monkey crista, type I hair cells outnumber type II hair cells by a ratio of almost 3:1. The ratio decreases from 4-5:1 in the central and intermediate zones to under 2:1 in the peripheral zone. For the chinchilla, the ratio is near 1:1 for the entire crista and decreases only slightly between the central and peripheral zones. 4. Nerve fibers supplying the cristae in the squirrel monkey were labeled by extracellular injections of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) into the vestibular nerve. Peripheral terminations of individual fibers were reconstructed and related to the zones of the cristae they innervated and to the sizes of their parent axons. Results were similar for the horizontal, superior, and posterior cristae. 5. Axons seldom bifurcate below the neuroepithelium. Most fibers begin branching shortly after crossing the basement membrane. Their terminal arbors are compact, usually extending no more than 50-100 microns from the parent exon. A small number of long intraepithelial fibers enter the intermediate and peripheral zones of the cristae near its base, then run unbranched for long distances through the neuroepithelium to reach the central zone. 6. There are three classes of afferent fibers innervating the monkey crista. Calyx fibers terminate exclusively on type I hair cells, and bouton fibers end only on type II hair cells. Dimorphic fibers provide a mixed innervation, including calyx

  6. Histamine as a punisher in squirrel monkeys: effects of pentobarbital, chlordiazepoxide and H1- and H2-receptor antagonists on behavior and cardiovascular responses.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, S R

    1980-09-01

    Squirrel monkeys pressed a key under a two-component, 30-response fixed-ratio schedule of food presentation. In both nonpunishment and punishment components, every 30th key-pressing response resulted in food presentation. In the punishment component, the 11th and 22nd response in each 30-response fixed-ratio also produced a 200msec i.v. injection of 30 to 100 microgram/kg of histamine; this resulted in about an 80% suppression of responding in the punishment component. A second group of squirrel monkeys, with arterial catheters for monitoring of blood pressure and heart rate, received automatic i.v. injections of 30 and 100 microgram/kg of histamine; key presses had no programmed consequences. Mean arterial blood pressure decreased by 5 to 20 min Hg and heart rate increased by 60 to 120 beats/min after each injection of histamine. As an effective punisher, histamine was functionally similar to other noxious stimuli such as electric shock. Behavior suppressed by histamine could be markedly increased by presession i.m. treatment with pentobarbital (3-5.6 mg/kg) or chlordiazepoxide (10-30 mg/kg). Presession i.m. treatment with 1 to 3 mg/kg of the H1-receptor antagonist, diphenhydramine, reversed the punishment effects of histamine but only enhanced the cardiovascular effects of histamine. In contrast, 10 to 30 mg/kg of the H2-receptor antagonist, cimetidine, failed to reverse the punishment effects of histamine but markedly attenuated the cardiovascular effects of histamine. Thus, histamine's suppression of responding appeared to be an H1 effect and did not appear to be related to its effects on blood pressure and heart rate. PMID:6105208

  7. Differential effects of presynaptic versus postsynaptic adenosine A2A receptor blockade on Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) self-administration in squirrel monkeys.

    PubMed

    Justinová, Zuzana; Redhi, Godfrey H; Goldberg, Steven R; Ferré, Sergi

    2014-05-01

    Different doses of an adenosine A2A receptor antagonist MSX-3 [3,7-dihydro-8-[(1E)-2-(3-ethoxyphenyl)ethenyl]-7 methyl-3-[3-(phosphooxy)propyl-1-(2 propynil)-1H-purine-2,6-dione] were found previously to either decrease or increase self-administration of cannabinoids delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) or anandamide in squirrel monkeys. It was hypothesized that the decrease observed with a relatively low dose of MSX-3 was related to blockade of striatal presynaptic A2A receptors that modulate glutamatergic neurotransmission, whereas the increase observed with a higher dose was related to blockade of postsynaptic A2A receptors localized in striatopallidal neurons. This hypothesis was confirmed in the present study by testing the effects of the preferential presynaptic and postsynaptic A2A receptor antagonists SCH-442416 [2-(2-furanyl)-7-[3-(4-methoxyphenyl)propyl]-7H-pyrazolo[4,3-e][1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidin-5-amine] and KW-6002 [(E)-1, 3-diethyl-8-(3,4-dimethoxystyryl)-7-methyl-3,7-dihydro-1H-purine-2,6-dione], respectively, in squirrel monkeys trained to intravenously self-administer THC. SCH-442416 produced a significant shift to the right of the THC self-administration dose-response curves, consistent with antagonism of the reinforcing effects of THC. Conversely, KW-6002 produced a significant shift to the left, consistent with potentiation of the reinforcing effects of THC. These results show that selectively blocking presynaptic A2A receptors could provide a new pharmacological approach to the treatment of marijuana dependence and underscore corticostriatal glutamatergic neurotransmission as a possible main mechanism involved in the rewarding effects of THC.

  8. The novel metabotropic glutamate receptor 2 positive allosteric modulator, AZD8529, decreases nicotine self-administration and relapse in squirrel monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Justinova, Zuzana; Panlilio, Leigh V.; Secci, Maria E.; Redhi, Godfrey H.; Schindler, Charles W.; Cross, Alan J.; Mrzljak, Ladislav; Medd, Amy; Shaham, Yavin; Goldberg, Steven R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Based on rodent studies, Group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR2 & 3) were suggested as targets for addiction treatment. However, LY379268 and other Group II agonists do not discriminate between the mainly presynaptic inhibitory mGluR2 (the proposed treatment target) and mGluR3. These agonists also produce tolerance over repeated administration and are no longer considered for addiction treatment. Here, we determined the effects of AZD8529, a selective positive allosteric modulator (PAM) of mGluR2, on abuse-related effects of nicotine in squirrel monkeys and rats. Methods We first assessed modulation of mGluR2 function by AZD8529 using functional in-vitro assays in both membranes prepared from a cell line expressing human mGluR2 and in primate brain slices. We then determined AZD8529 (0.03-10 mg/kg, i.m.) effects on intravenous nicotine self-administration and reinstatement of nicotine seeking induced by nicotine priming or nicotine-associated cues. We also determined AZD8529 effects on food self-administration in monkeys and nicotine-induced dopamine release in accumbens shell in rats. Results AZD8529 potentiated agonist-induced activation of mGluR2 in both the membrane-binding assay and in primate cortex, hippocampus, and striatum. In monkeys, AZD8529 decreased nicotine self-administration at doses (0.3-3 mg/kg) that did not affect food self-administration. AZD8529 also reduced nicotine priming- and cue-induced reinstatement of nicotine seeking after extinction of the drug-reinforced responding. In rats, AZD8529 decreased nicotine-induced accumbens dopamine release. Conclusions Our results provide evidence for efficacy of PAMs of mGluR2 in non-human primate models of nicotine reinforcement and relapse. We propose that this drug class should be considered for nicotine addiction treatment. PMID:25802079

  9. Pharmacokinetics of bisphenol A in neonatal and adult rhesus monkeys

    SciTech Connect

    Doerge, Daniel R.; Twaddle, Nathan C.; Woodling, Kellie A.; Fisher, Jeffrey W.

    2010-10-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a high-production volume industrial chemical used in the manufacture of polycarbonate plastic products and epoxy resin-based food can liners. The presence of BPA in urine of > 90% of Americans aged 6-60 is controversial because of the potential for endocrine disruption, particularly during perinatal development, as suggested by in vitro, experimental animal, and epidemiological studies. The current study used LC/MS/MS to measure serum pharmacokinetics of aglycone (active) and conjugated (inactive) BPA in adult and neonatal rhesus monkeys by oral (PND 5, 35, 70) and intravenous injection (PND 77) routes using d6-BPA to avoid sample contamination. The concentration-time profiles observed in adult monkeys following oral administration of 100 {mu}g/kg bw were remarkably similar to those previously reported in human volunteers given a similar dose; moreover, minimal pharmacokinetic differences were observed between neonatal and adult monkeys for the receptor-active aglycone form of BPA. Circulating concentrations of BPA aglycone were quite low following oral administration (< 1% of total), which reflects the redundancy of active UDP-glucuronosyl transferase isoforms in both gut and liver. No age-related changes were seen in internal exposure metrics for aglycone BPA in monkeys, a result clearly different from developing rats where significant inverse age-related changes, based on immaturity of Phase II metabolism and renal excretion, were recently reported. These observations imply that any toxicological effect observed in rats from early postnatal exposures to BPA could over-predict those possible in primates of the same age, based on significantly higher internal exposures and overall immaturity at birth.

  10. Modeling depression in adult female cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Willard, Stephanie L; Shively, Carol A

    2012-06-01

    Depressive disorders are prevalent, costly, and poorly understood. Male rodents in stress paradigms are most commonly used as animal models, despite the two-fold increased prevalence of depression in women and sex differences in response to stress. Although these models have provided valuable insights, new models are needed to move the field forward. Social stress-associated behavioral depression in adult female cynomolgus macaques closely resembles human depression in physiological, neurobiological, and behavioral characteristics, including reduced body mass, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis perturbations, autonomic dysfunction, increased cardiovascular disease risk, reduced hippocampal volume, altered serotonergic function, decreased activity levels, and increased mortality. In addition, behaviorally depressed monkeys also have low ovarian steroid concentrations, even though they continue to have menstrual cycles. Although this type of ovarian dysfunction has not been reported in depressed women and is difficult to identify, it may be the key to understanding the high prevalence of depression in women. Depressive behavior in female cynomolgus monkeys is naturally occurring and not induced by experimental manipulation. Different social environmental challenges, including isolation vs. subordination, may elicit the depression-like response in some animals and not others. Similarly, social subordination is stressful and depressive behavior is more common in socially subordinate monkeys. Yet, not all subordinates exhibit behavioral depression, suggesting individual differences in sensitivity to specific environmental stressors and enhanced risk of behavioral depression in some individuals. The behavior and neurobiology of subordinates is distinctly different than that of behaviorally depressed monkeys, which affords the opportunity to differentiate between stressed and depressed states. Thus, behaviorally depressed monkeys exhibit numerous physiological

  11. White Matter Neurons in Young Adult and Aged Rhesus Monkey

    PubMed Central

    Mortazavi, Farzad; Wang, Xiyue; Rosene, Douglas L.; Rockland, Kathleen S.

    2016-01-01

    In humans and non-human primates (NHP), white matter neurons (WMNs) persist beyond early development. Their functional importance is largely unknown, but they have both corticothalamic and corticocortical connectivity and at least one subpopulation has been implicated in vascular regulation and sleep. Several other studies have reported that the density of WMNs in humans is altered in neuropathological or psychiatric conditions. The present investigation evaluates and compares the density of superficial and deep WMNs in frontal (FR), temporal (TE), and parietal (Par) association regions of four young adult and four aged male rhesus monkeys. A major aim was to determine whether there was age-related neuronal loss, as might be expected given the substantial age-related changes known to occur in the surrounding white matter environment. Neurons were visualized by immunocytochemistry for Neu-N in coronal tissue sections (30 μm thickness), and neuronal density was assessed by systematic random sampling. Per 0.16 mm2 sampling box, this yielded about 40 neurons in the superficial WM and 10 in the deep WM. Consistent with multiple studies of cell density in the cortical gray matter of normal brains, neither the superficial nor deep WM populations showed statistically significant age-related neuronal loss, although we observed a moderate decrease with age for the deep WMNs in the frontal region. Morphometric analyses, in contrast, showed significant age effects in soma size and circularity. In specific, superficial WMNs were larger in FR and Par WM regions of the young monkeys; but in the TE, these were larger in the older monkeys. An age effect was also observed for soma circularity: superficial WMNs were more circular in FR and Par of the older monkeys. This second, morphometric result raises the question of whether other age-related morphological, connectivity, or molecular changes occur in the WMNs. These could have multiple impacts, given the wide range of putative

  12. Effects of kappa opioid agonists alone and in combination with cocaine on heart rate and blood pressure in conscious squirrel monkeys.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Charles W; Graczyk, Zofi; Gilman, Joanne P; Negus, S Stevens; Bergman, Jack; Mello, Nancy K; Goldberg, Steven R

    2007-12-01

    As kappa agonists have been proposed as treatments for cocaine abuse, the cardiovascular effects of the kappa opioid receptor agonists ethylketocyclazocine (EKC) and enadoline were investigated in conscious squirrel monkeys. Both EKC and enadoline increased heart rate with little effect on blood pressure. This effect appeared to be specific for kappa receptors as the mu opioid agonist morphine did not mimic the effects of the kappa agonists. The opioid antagonist naltrexone, at a dose of 1.0 mg/kg, blocked the effect of EKC. An action at both central and peripheral receptors may be responsible for the heart rate increase following kappa agonist treatment. The ganglionic blocker chlorisondamine partially antagonized the effect of EKC on heart rate, suggesting central involvement, while the peripherally-acting agonist ICI 204,448 ((+/-)-1-[2,3- (Dihydro-7-methyl-1H-inden-4-yl)oxy]-3-[(1-methylethyl)amino]-2-butanol hydrochloride) also increased heart rate, supporting a peripheral site of action. When given in combination with cocaine, EKC produced effects that were sub-additive, suggesting that the kappa agonists may be used safely as cocaine abuse treatments.

  13. Effect of undernutrition on cranial components and somatotroph-lactotroph pituitary populations in the squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus boliviensis).

    PubMed

    Cónsole, G M; Oyhenart, E E; Jurado, S B; Riccillo, F L; Pucciarelli, H M; Gómez Dumm, C L

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate in monkeys the effects of undernutrition on neurocranial and facial components, correlated with a histometric and ultrastructural analysis of somatotroph (growth hormone, GH) and lactotroph (prolactin, PRL) pituitary populations. Twenty Saimiri sciureus boliviensis (Cebidae) of both sexes were employed. The monkeys were born in captivity and when they reached 1 year of age, they were separated into two groups: control and undernourished animals. They were fed ad libitum a 20% and 10% protein diet, respectively. The monkeys were radiographed when they were 3 years old in order to measure the length, width and height of the anterior, middle and posterior components of the neurocranium, as well as those of the masticatory, respiratory and optic components of the face. The volumetric and morphometric indices were then calculated. After the sacrifice, pituitary glands were processed for light and electron microscopy. The quantitative immunohistochemistry revealed a decrease in the volume density and cell density of both GH and PRL cells from malnourished animals when compared to control ones. The ultrastructural study showed changes suggestive of cellular hyperfunction for both types of cells in the former experimental group. Under nutrition also affected the size of the cranial components, with males being more affected than females; brain weight was, however, nonmodified by stress, with the brain/body ratio difference being the same for both sexes. We conclude that in monkeys, experimental undernutrition produces a decrease in the pituitary GH and PRL cell populations, in some way related to changes in the cranio-facial morphometric patterns.

  14. Growth and differentiation of adult hippocampal arctic ground squirrel neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Drew, Kelly L; McGee, Rebecca C; Wells, Matthew S; Kelleher-Andersson, Judith A

    2011-01-07

    Arctic ground squirrels (Urocitellus parryii, AGS) are unique in their ability to hibernate with a core body temperature near or below freezing. These animals also resist ischemic injury to the brain in vivo and oxygen-glucose deprivation in vitro. These unique qualities provided the impetus to isolate AGS neurons to examine inherent neuronal characteristics that could account for the capacity of AGS neurons to resist injury and cell death caused by ischemia and extremely cold temperatures. Identifying proteins or gene targets that allow for the distinctive properties of these cells could aid in the discovery of effective therapies for a number of ischemic indications and for the study of cold tolerance. Adult AGS hippocampus contains neural stem cells that continue to proliferate, allowing for easy expansion of these stem cells in culture. We describe here methods by which researchers can utilize these stem cells and differentiated neurons for any number of purposes. By closely following these steps the AGS neural stem cells can be expanded through two passages or more and then differentiated to a culture high in TUJ1-positive neurons (~50%) without utilizing toxic chemicals to minimize the number of dividing cells. Ischemia induces neurogenesis and neurogenesis which proceeds via MEK/ERK and PI3K/Akt survival signaling pathways contributes to ischemia resistance in vivo and in vitro (Kelleher-Anderson, Drew et al., in preparation). Further characterization of these unique neural cells can advance on many fronts, using some or all of these methods.

  15. Differences in alarm calls of juvenile and adult European ground squirrels (Spermophilus citellus): Findings on permanently marked animals from a semi-natural enclosure.

    PubMed

    Schneiderov, Irena; Schnitzerov, Petra; Uhlikov, Jitka; Brandl, Pavel; Zouhar, Jan; Matejů, Jan

    2015-11-01

    The European ground squirrel (Spermophilus citellus) emits alarm calls that warn conspecifics of potential danger. Although it has been observed that inexperienced juveniles of this species emit alarm calls that sound similar to those of adults, studies focusing on juvenile alarm calls are lacking. We analyzed the acoustic structure of alarm calls emitted by six permanently marked European ground squirrels living in a semi-natural enclosure when they were juveniles and after 1 year as adults. We found that the acoustic structure of the juvenile alarm calls was significantly different from those of adults and that the alarm calls underwent nearly the same changes in all studied individuals. All juveniles emitted alarm calls consisting of one element with almost constant frequency, but their alarm calls included a second frequency-modulated element after their first hibernation as adults. Our data show that the duration of the first element is significantly shorter in adults than in juveniles. Additionally, the frequency of the first element is significantly higher in adults than in juveniles. Similar to previous findings in other Palearctic ground squirrel species, our data are inconsistent with the assumption that juvenile mammals emit vocalizations with higher fundamental frequencies than adults. However, our results do not support the previously suggested hypothesis that juvenile ground squirrels conceal information regarding their age in their alarm calls because we found significant differences in alarm calls of juveniles and adults.

  16. Monkey Able Being Ready for preflight Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    A squirrel monkey, Able, is being ready for placement into a capsule for a preflight test of Jupiter, AM-18 mission. AM-18 was launched on May 28, 1959 and also carried a rhesus monkey, Baker, into suborbit.

  17. Adrenergic responsiveness is reduced, while baseline cardiac function is preserved in old adult conscious monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sato, N.; Kiuchi, K.; Shen, Y. T.; Vatner, S. F.; Vatner, D. E.

    1995-01-01

    To examine the physiological deficit to adrenergic stimulation with aging, five younger adult (3 +/- 1 yr old) and nine older adult (17 +/- 1 yr old) healthy monkeys were studied after instrumentation with a left ventricular (LV) pressure gauge, aortic and left atrial catheters, and aortic flow probes to measure cardiac output directly. There were no significant changes in baseline hemodynamics in conscious older monkeys. For example, an index of contractility, the first derivative of LV pressure (LV dP/dt) was similar (3,191 +/- 240, young vs. 3,225 +/- 71 mmHg/s, old) as well as in isovolumic relaxation, tau (24.3 +/- 1.7 ms, young vs. 23.0 +/- 1.0 ms, old) was similar. However, inotropic, lusitropic, and chronotropic responses to isoproterenol (Iso; 0.1 micrograms/kg), norepinephrine (NE; 0.4 micrograms/kg), and forskolin (For; 75 nmol/kg) were significantly (P < 0.05) depressed in older monkeys. For example. Iso increased LV dP/dt by by 146 +/- 14% in younger monkeys and by only 70 +/- 5% in older monkeys. Iso also reduced tau more in younger monkeys (-28 +/- 7%) compared with older monkeys (-13 +/- 3%). Furthermore, peripheral vascular responsiveness to Iso, NE, For, and phenylephrine (PE; 5 micrograms/kg) was significantly (P < 0.05) reduced in older monkeys. For example, phenylephrine (5 micrograms/kg) increased total peripheral resistence by 69 +/- 4% in younger monkeys and by only 45 +/- 3% in older monkeys. Thus in older monkeys without associated cardiovascular disease, baseline hemodynamics are preserved, but adrenergic receptor responsiveness is reduced systemically, not just in the heart.

  18. Inputs from regularly and irregularly discharging vestibular nerve afferents to secondary neurons in squirrel monkey vestibular nuclei. III. Correlation with vestibulospinal and vestibuloocular output pathways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, R.; Goldberg, J. M.; Highstein, S. M.

    1992-01-01

    1. A previous study measured the relative contributions made by regularly and irregularly discharging afferents to the monosynaptic vestibular nerve (Vi) input of individual secondary neurons located in and around the superior vestibular nucleus of barbiturate-anesthetized squirrel monkeys. Here, the analysis is extended to more caudal regions of the vestibular nuclei, which are a major source of both vestibuloocular and vestibulospinal pathways. As in the previous study, antidromic stimulation techniques are used to classify secondary neurons as oculomotor or spinal projecting. In addition, spinal-projecting neurons are distinguished by their descending pathways, their termination levels in the spinal cord, and their collateral projections to the IIIrd nucleus. 2. Monosynaptic excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) were recorded intracellularly from secondary neurons as shocks of increasing strength were applied to Vi. Shocks were normalized in terms of the threshold (T) required to evoke field potentials in the vestibular nuclei. As shown previously, the relative contribution of irregular afferents to the total monosynaptic Vi input of each secondary neuron can be expressed as a %I index, the ratio (x100) of the relative sizes of the EPSPs evoked by shocks of 4 x T and 16 x T. 3. Antidromic stimulation was used to type secondary neurons as 1) medial vestibulospinal tract (MVST) cells projecting to spinal segments C1 or C6; 2) lateral vestibulospinal tract (LVST) cells projecting to C1, C6; or L1; 3) vestibulooculo-collic (VOC) cells projecting both to the IIIrd nucleus and by way of the MVST to C1 or C6; and 4) vestibuloocular (VOR) neurons projecting to the IIIrd nucleus but not to the spinal cord. Most of the neurons were located in the lateral vestibular nucleus (LV), including its dorsal (dLV) and ventral (vLV) divisions, and adjacent parts of the medial (MV) and descending nuclei (DV). Cells receiving quite different proportions of their direct inputs

  19. Monkey Able After Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    On May 28, 1959, a Jupiter Intermediate Range Ballistic Missile provided by a U.S. Army team in Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, launched a nose cone carrying Baker, A South American squirrel monkey and Able, An American-born rhesus monkey. This photograph shows Able after recovery of the nose cone of the Jupiter rocket by U.S.S. Kiowa.

  20. The effect of housing and environmental enrichment on stereotyped behavior of adult vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops).

    PubMed

    Seier, Jürgen; de Villiers, Charon; van Heerden, Joritha; Laubscher, Ria

    2011-06-21

    Little information is available on the response of vervet monkeys to different housing conditions or on the suitability of enrichment devices or methods for vervet monkeys. In this study, the authors evaluated the occurrence of stereotyped behavior in adult vervet monkeys under various conditions of housing and enrichment. The variables included cage size, cage level (upper or lower), enrichment with a foraging log, enrichment with an exercise cage and presence of a mate. The authors first determined the incidence of stereotyped behavior in captive-bred, singly housed adult female and male vervet monkeys. They then exposed monkeys to different housing and enrichment situations and compared the incidence of stereotyped behavior among the monkeys. The authors found that more females than males engaged in stereotyped behavior and that females, on average, engaged in such behavior for longer periods of time than males. Stereotyped behavior was most often associated with a small, single cage. The average amount of observed stereotyped activity in monkeys housed in a small cage was significantly lower when the monkeys had access to either a foraging log or an exercise cage. Stereotyped behavior was also lower in female monkeys that were housed (either with a male or without a male) in a larger cage. The least amount of abnormal behavior was associated with the largest, most complex and enriched housing situation. Males and females housed in cages on the lower level of two-level housing engaged in more stereotyped behavior than did monkeys housed in the upper level, regardless of the presence or type of enrichment provided.

  1. Early life stress affects cerebral glucose metabolism in adult rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Parr, Lisa A; Boudreau, Matthew; Hecht, Erin; Winslow, James T; Nemeroff, Charles B; Sánchez, Mar M

    2012-01-01

    Early life stress (ELS) is a risk factor for anxiety, mood disorders and alterations in stress responses. Less is known about the long-term neurobiological impact of ELS. We used [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography (FDG-PET) to assess neural responses to a moderate stress test in adult monkeys that experienced ELS as infants. Both groups of monkeys showed hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis stress-induced activations and cardiac arousal in response to the stressor. A whole brain analysis detected significantly greater regional cerebral glucose metabolism (rCGM) in superior temporal sulcus, putamen, thalamus, and inferotemporal cortex of ELS animals compared to controls. Region of interest (ROI) analyses performed in areas identified as vulnerable to ELS showed greater activity in the orbitofrontal cortex of ELS compared to control monkeys, but greater hippocampal activity in the control compared to ELS monkeys. Together, these results suggest hyperactivity in emotional and sensory processing regions of adult monkeys with ELS, and greater activity in stress-regulatory areas in the controls. Despite these neural responses, no group differences were detected in neuroendocrine, autonomic or behavioral responses, except for a trend towards increased stillness in the ELS monkeys. Together, these data suggest hypervigilance in the ELS monkeys in the absence of immediate danger. PMID:22682736

  2. Transplantation of Adult Monkey Neural Stem Cells into A Contusion Spinal Cord Injury Model in Rhesus Macaque Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Hajinasrollah, Mostafa; Zare Mehrjerdi, Nargess; Azizi, Hossein; Hemmesi, Katayoun; Moghiminasr, Reza; Azhdari, Zahra; Talebi, Ardeshir; Mohitmafi, Soroush; Vosough Taqi Dizaj, Ahmad; Sharifi, Giuve; Baharvand, Hossein; Rezaee, Omidvar; Kiani, Sahar

    2014-01-01

    Objective Currently, cellular transplantation for spinal cord injuries (SCI) is the subject of numerous preclinical studies. Among the many cell types in the adult brain, there is a unique subpopulation of neural stem cells (NSC) that can self-renew and differentiate into neurons. The study aims, therefore, to explore the efficacy of adult monkey NSC (mNSC) in a primate SCI model. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, isolated mNSCs were analyzed by flow cytometry, immunocytochemistry, and RT-PCR. Next, BrdU-labeled cells were transplanted into a SCI model. The SCI animal model was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histological analysis. Animals were clinically observed for 6 months. Results Analysis confirmed homing of mNSCs into the injury site. Transplanted cells expressed neuronal markers (TubIII). Hind limb performance improved in trans- planted animals based on Tarlov’s scale and our established behavioral tests for monkeys. Conclusion Our findings have indicated that mNSCs can facilitate recovery in contusion SCI models in rhesus macaque monkeys. Additional studies are necessary to determine the im- provement mechanisms after cell transplantation. PMID:24567941

  3. The susceptibility of rhesus monkeys to motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, Meryl L.; Daunton, Nancy G.; Fox, Robert A.

    1990-01-01

    The susceptibility of rhesus monkeys to motion sickness was investigated using test conditions that are provocative for eliciting motion sickness in squirrel monkeys. Ten male rhesus monkeys and ten male Bolivian squirrel monkeys were rotated in the vertical axis at 150 deg/s for a maximum duration of 45 min. Each animal was tested in two conditions, continuous rotation and intermittent rotation. None of the rhesus monkeys vomited during the motion tests but all of the squirrel monkeys did. Differences were observed between the species in the amount of activity that occurred during motion test, with the squirrel monkeys being significantly more active than the rhesus monkeys. These results, while substantiating anecdotal reports of the resistance of rhesus monkeys to motion sickness, should be interpreted with caution because of the documented differences that exist between various species with regard to stimuli that are provocative for eliciting motion sickness.

  4. Behavioral effects in monkeys of racemates of two biologically active marijuana constituents.

    PubMed

    Scheckel, C L; Boff, E; Dahlen, P; Smart, T

    1968-06-28

    Both dl-Delta(8)- and dl-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol produced marked alterations of behavior in rhesus and squirrel monkeys. Squirrel monkeys appeared to have visual hallucinations. Continuous avoidance behavior of squirrel monkeys was stimulated by both drugs, but high doses of dl-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol also caused depression after the stimulant phase. Complex behavior involving memory and visual discrimination in rhesus monkeys was markedly disrupted by both drugs.

  5. When size makes a difference: allometry, life-history and morphological evolution of capuchins (Cebus) and squirrels (Saimiri) monkeys (Cebinae, Platyrrhini)

    PubMed Central

    Marroig, Gabriel

    2007-01-01

    Background How are morphological evolution and developmental changes related? This rather old and intriguing question had a substantial boost after the 70s within the framework of heterochrony (changes in rates or timing of development) and nowadays has the potential to make another major leap forward through the combination of approaches: molecular biology, developmental experimentation, comparative systematic studies, geometric morphometrics and quantitative genetics. Here I take an integrated approach combining life-history comparative analyses, classical and geometric morphometrics applied to ontogenetic series to understand changes in size and shape which happen during the evolution of two New World Monkeys (NWM) sister genera. Results Cebus and Saimiri share the same basic allometric patterns in skull traits, a result robust to sexual and ontogenetic variation. If adults of both genera are compared in the same scale (discounting size differences) most differences are small and not statistically significant. These results are consistent using both approaches, classical and geometric Morphometrics. Cebus is a genus characterized by a number of peramorphic traits (adult-like) while Saimiri is a genus with paedomorphic (child like) traits. Yet, the whole clade Cebinae is characterized by a unique combination of very high pre-natal growth rates and relatively slow post-natal growth rates when compared to the rest of the NWM. Morphologically Cebinae can be considered paedomorphic in relation to the other NWM. Geometric morphometrics allows the precise separation of absolute size, shape variation associated with size (allometry), and shape variation non-associated with size. Interestingly, and despite the fact that they were extracted as independent factors (principal components), evolutionary allometry (those differences in allometric shape associated with intergeneric differences) and ontogenetic allometry (differences in allometric shape associated with

  6. Techniques for collecting saliva from awake, unrestrained, adult monkeys for cortisol assay.

    PubMed

    Lutz, C K; Tiefenbacher, S; Jorgensen, M J; Meyer, J S; Novak, M A

    2000-10-01

    Cortisol levels serve as an index of pituitary-adrenal activity in nonhuman primates. In adult monkeys, cortisol is normally measured in blood (typically requiring restraint or sedation) or urine (reflecting a state rather than point estimate). In contrast, saliva collection is less invasive than drawing blood and allows for repeated sampling within a short period of time. Although protocols exist for collecting saliva from young monkeys, these procedures are inadequate for awake, unrestrained adult animals. Our laboratory has developed two methods for collecting saliva from adult rhesus monkeys: a "screen" method, which involves licking screen-covered gauze, and a "pole" method, which involves sucking and chewing on an attached rope. Twenty-three adult male rhesus monkeys were used to evaluate these two methods. After a period of adaptation, saliva samples were collected from 21 of 23 subjects. Saliva collection was faster with the pole than with the screen method (P < 0.01), but the pole method was not suitable for some animals because of their tendency to bite off the attached rope. An analysis of 19 saliva samples revealed a mean cortisol concentration of 0.84 microg/dl (range 0.27-1.77 microg/dl). There was no statistically significant difference in cortisol value between methods used (P > 0.22). The influence of the flavoring on the cortisol assay was tested, and was found to have no significant effect (P > 0.28). Our results indicate that either technique can be used to safely collect saliva from unrestrained adult monkeys. Choice of technique will depend on the proclivities of individual monkeys.

  7. Monkey Baker in bio-pack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    A squirrel monkey, Baker, in bio-pack couch being readied for Jupiter (AM-18 flight). Jupiter, AM-18 mission, also carried an American-born rhesus monkey, Able into suborbit. The flight was successful and both monkeys were recovered in good condition. AM-18 was launched on May 28, 1959.

  8. No evidence for neo-oogenesis may link to ovarian senescence in adult monkey.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jihong; Zhang, Dongdong; Wang, Lei; Liu, Mengyuan; Mao, Jian; Yin, Yu; Ye, Xiaoying; Liu, Na; Han, Jihong; Gao, Yingdai; Cheng, Tao; Keefe, David L; Liu, Lin

    2013-11-01

    Female germline or oogonial stem cells transiently residing in fetal ovaries are analogous to the spermatogonial stem cells or germline stem cells (GSCs) in adult testes where GSCs and meiosis continuously renew. Oocytes can be generated in vitro from embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, but the existence of GSCs and neo-oogenesis in adult mammalian ovaries is less clear. Preliminary findings of GSCs and neo-oogenesis in mice and humans have not been consistently reproducible. Monkeys provide the most relevant model of human ovarian biology. We searched for GSCs and neo-meiosis in ovaries of adult monkeys at various ages, and compared them with GSCs from adult monkey testis, which are characterized by cytoplasmic staining for the germ cell marker DAZL and nuclear expression of the proliferative markers PCNA and KI67, and pluripotency-associated genes LIN28 and SOX2, and lack of nuclear LAMIN A, a marker for cell differentiation. Early meiocytes undergo homologous pairing at prophase I distinguished by synaptonemal complex lateral filaments with telomere perinuclear distribution. By exhaustive searching using comprehensive experimental approaches, we show that proliferative GSCs and neo-meiocytes by these specific criteria were undetectable in adult mouse and monkey ovaries. However, we found proliferative nongermline somatic stem cells that do not express LAMIN A and germ cell markers in the adult ovaries, notably in the cortex and granulosa cells of growing follicles. These data support the paradigm that adult ovaries do not undergo germ cell renewal, which may contribute significantly to ovarian senescence that occurs with age.

  9. A natural model of behavioral depression in postpartum adult female cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    CHU, Xun-Xun; Rizak, Joshua Dominic; YANG, Shang-Chuan; WANG, Jian-Hong; MA, Yuan-Ye; HU, Xin-Tian

    2014-01-01

    Postpartum depression (PPD) is a modified form of major depressive disorders (MDD) that can exert profound negative effects on both mothers and infants than MDD. Within the postpartum period, both mothers and infants are susceptible; but because PPD typically occurs for short durations and has moderate symptoms, there exists challenges in exploring and addressing the underlying cause of the depression. This fact highlights the need for relevant animal models. In the present study, postpartum adult female cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) living in breeding groups were observed for typical depressive behavior. The huddle posture behavior was utilized as an indicator of behavioral depression postpartum (BDP) as it has been established as the core depressive-like behavior in primates. Monkeys were divided into two groups: A BDP group (n=6), which were found to spend more time huddling over the first two weeks postpartum than other individuals that formed a non-depression control group (n=4). The two groups were then further analyzed for locomotive activity, stressful events, hair cortisol levels and for maternal interactive behaviors. No differences were found between the BDP and control groups in locomotive activity, in the frequencies of stressful events experienced and in hair cortisol levels. These findings suggested that the postpartum depression witnessed in the monkeys was not related to external factors other than puerperium period. Interestingly, the BDP monkeys displayed an abnormal maternal relationship consisting of increased infant grooming. Taken together, these findings suggest that the adult female cynomolgus monkeys provide a natural model of behavioral postpartum depression that holds a number of advantages over commonly used rodent systems in PPD modeling. The cynomolgus monkeys have a highly-organized social hierarchy and reproductive characteristics without seasonal restriction—similar to humans—as well as much greater homology to

  10. A natural model of behavioral depression in postpartum adult female cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Chu, Xun-Xun; Dominic Rizak, Joshua; Yang, Shang-Chuan; Wang, Jian-Hong; Ma, Yuan-Ye; Hu, Xin-Tian

    2014-05-01

    Postpartum depression (PPD) is a modified form of major depressive disorders (MDD) that can exert profound negative effects on both mothers and infants than MDD. Within the postpartum period, both mothers and infants are susceptible; but because PPD typically occurs for short durations and has moderate symptoms, there exists challenges in exploring and addressing the underlying cause of the depression. This fact highlights the need for relevant animal models. In the present study, postpartum adult female cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) living in breeding groups were observed for typical depressive behavior. The huddle posture behavior was utilized as an indicator of behavioral depression postpartum (BDP) as it has been established as the core depressive-like behavior in primates. Monkeys were divided into two groups: A BDP group (n=6), which were found to spend more time huddling over the first two weeks postpartum than other individuals that formed a non-depression control group (n=4). The two groups were then further analyzed for locomotive activity, stressful events, hair cortisol levels and for maternal interactive behaviors. No differences were found between the BDP and control groups in locomotive activity, in the frequencies of stressful events experienced and in hair cortisol levels. These findings suggested that the postpartum depression witnessed in the monkeys was not related to external factors other than puerperium period. Interestingly, the BDP monkeys displayed an abnormal maternal relationship consisting of increased infant grooming. Taken together, these findings suggest that the adult female cynomolgus monkeys provide a natural model of behavioral postpartum depression that holds a number of advantages over commonly used rodent systems in PPD modeling. The cynomolgus monkeys have a highly-organized social hierarchy and reproductive characteristics without seasonal restriction-similar to humans-as well as much greater homology to humans

  11. Asthma in an Adult Female Vervet Monkey (Chlorocebus sabaeus)

    PubMed Central

    Köster, Liza S; Simon, Bradley; Rawlins, Gilda; Beierschmitt, Amy

    2016-01-01

    A 9-y-old, colony-bred, female vervet monkey (Chlorocebus sabaeus) presented with a 6-y history of open-mouth breathing, tachypnea, and sibilant wheezing. These symptoms did not significantly affect her activity or quality of life. Thoracic radiographs and results of bronchoalveolar lavage supported the diagnosis of asthma. Treatment comprising intramuscular prednisolone (tapered over 2 mo from twice daily to every other day), inhaled salmeterol–fluticasone (25 µg–250 µg per actuation twice daily) by mask, and a metered dose inhaler was successful in restoring a normal respiratory pattern. Despite the availability of several primate models of human asthma, this case represents the first report of spontaneous asthma in a NHP. PMID:26884413

  12. Pharmacokinetics of isoflavones from soy infant formula in neonatal and adult rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Doerge, Daniel R; Woodling, Kellie A; Churchwell, Mona I; Fleck, Stefanie C; Helferich, William G

    2016-06-01

    Consumption of soy infant formula represents a unique exposure scenario in which developing children ingest a mixture of endocrine-active isoflavones along with a substantial portion of daily nutrition. Genistein and daidzein were administered as glucoside conjugates to neonatal rhesus monkeys in a fortified commercial soy formula at 5, 35, and 70 days after birth. A single gavage dosing with 10 mg/kg bw genistein and 6 mg/kg bw daidzein was chosen to represent the upper range of typical daily consumption and to facilitate complete pharmacokinetic measurements for aglycone and total isoflavones and equol. Adult monkeys were also gavaged with the same formula solution at 2.8 and 1.6 mg/kg bw genistein and daidzein, respectively, and by IV injection with isoflavone aglycones (5.2 and 3.2 mg/kg bw, respectively) to determine absolute bioavailability. Significant differences in internal exposure were observed between neonatal and adult monkeys, with higher values for dose-adjusted AUC and Cmax of the active aglycone isoflavones in neonates. The magnitude and frequency of equol production by the gut microbiome were also significantly greater in adults. These findings are consistent with immaturity of metabolic and/or physiological systems in developing non-human primates that reduces total clearance of soy isoflavones from the body. PMID:27084109

  13. Early prenatal androgenization results in diminished ovarian reserve in adult female rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Dumesic, D.A.; Patankar, M.S.; Barnett, D.K.; Lesnick, T.G.; Hutcherson, B.A.; Abbott, D.H.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Early prenatal androgenization (PA) accelerates follicle differentiation and impairs embryogenesis in adult female rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) undergoing FSH therapy for IVF. To determine whether androgen excess in utero affects follicle development over time, this study examines whether PA exposure, beginning at gestational days 40–44 (early treated) or 100–115 (late treated), alters the decline in serum anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH) levels with age in adult female rhesus monkeys and perturbs their ovarian response to recombinant human FSH (rhFSH) therapy for IVF. METHODS Thirteen normal (control), 11 early-treated and 6 late-treated PA adult female monkeys had serum AMH levels measured at random times of the menstrual cycle or anovulatory period. Using some of the same animals, basal serum AMH, gonadotrophins and steroids were also measured in six normal, five early-treated and three late-treated PA female monkeys undergoing FSH therapy for IVF during late-reproductive life (>17 years); serum AMH also was measured on day of HCG administration and at oocyte retrieval. RESULTS Serum AMH levels in early-treated PA females declined with age to levels that were significantly lower than those of normal (P ≤ 0.05) and late-treated PA females (P ≤ 0.025) by late-reproductive life. Serum AMH levels positively predicted numbers of total/mature oocytes retrieved, with early-treated PA females having the lowest serum AMH levels, fewest oocytes retrieved and lowest percentage of females with fertilized oocytes that cleaved. CONCLUSIONS Based on these animals, early PA appears to program an exaggerated decline in ovarian reserve with age, suggesting that epigenetically induced hormonal factors during fetal development may influence the cohort size of ovarian follicles after birth. PMID:19740899

  14. Strategies in Landmark Use by Children, Adults, and Marmoset Monkeys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDonald, Suzanne E.; Spetch, Marcia L.; Kelly, Debbie M.; Cheng, Ken

    2004-01-01

    Common marmosets ("Callithrix jacchus jacchus"), human children, and human adults learned to find a goal that was located in the center of a square array of four identical landmarks. The location of the landmark array and corresponding goal varied across trials, so the task could not be solved without using the landmark array. In Experiment 1, a…

  15. Social stress-associated depression in adult female cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Shively, Carol A; Register, Thomas C; Friedman, David P; Morgan, Timothy M; Thompson, Jalonda; Lanier, Tasha

    2005-04-01

    This paper describes a behavior pattern in adult female cynomolgus monkeys that has several behavioral and physiological characteristics in common with human depression including reduced body fat, low levels of activity, high heart rate, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis disturbances, and increased mortality. Under certain circumstances, this depressive behavior appears more common in socially stressed subordinate, than dominant, females. This is the first animal model of social stress-related depression in females and the first primate model of adult depression. It is important to have a female animal model of depression because women are more likely to experience a clinically significant depression than men, and depression in women is often associated with changes in reproductive system function. This model is particularly useful because these monkeys have menstrual cycles that are similar to those of women, and those that exhibit depressive behavior have relatively low levels of ovarian steroids. These monkeys may be a useful model of reproductive system-associated mood disorders in females.

  16. METABOLIC SYNDROME AND NEUROMETABOLIC ASYMMETRY OF HIPPOCAMPUS IN ADULT BONNET MONKEYS

    PubMed Central

    Coplan, Jeremy D.; Abdallah, Chadi G.; Mathew, Sanjay J.; Shungu, Dikoma C.; Mao, Xiangling; Smith, Eric L.P.; Kaufman, Daniel; Gorman, Jack M.; Owens, Michael J.; Nemeroff, Charles B.; Banerji, Mary Ann; Rosenblum, Leonard A.; Kral, John G.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Obesity is associated with the insulin resistance metabolic syndrome, postulated to be mediated by stress-induced alterations within the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. In adult bonnet macaques we examined relationships between components of the metabolic syndrome, hippocampal neurometabolic asymmetry, an indicator of negative affect, and juvenile cerebrospinal fluid (csf) corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) levels obtained after stress exposure associated with maternal food insecurity and in controls. Methods Eleven adult male monkeys (seven with early life stress) who had undergone csf-CRF analyses as juveniles had magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) of bilateral hippocampus, morphometry (body mass index, BMI; sagittal abdominal diameter, SAD) and determination of fasting plasma glucose and insulin as adults. Neurometabolite ratios included N-acetyl-aspartate as numerator (NAA; a marker of neuronal integrity) and choline (Cho; cell turnover) and creatine (Cr; reference analyte) as denominators. Results Elevated juvenile csf-CRF levels positively predicted adult BMI and SAD and were associated with right > left shift of NAA ratio within the hippocampus. Adult visceral obesity and insulin level correlated with right > left shift in hippocampal NAA concentrations, controlling for age and denominator. Conclusion Juvenile csf-CRF levels, a neuropeptide associated with early life stress, predict adult visceral obesity and hippocampal asymmetry supporting the hypothesis that metabolic syndrome in adults may be related to early life stress. Furthermore, this study demonstrates asymmetrical hippocampal alterations related to obesity. PMID:21459102

  17. Skin tumors on squirrels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herman, C.M.; Reilly, J.R.

    1955-01-01

    Skin tumors having the gross appearance of previously reported fibromas are reported on gray squirrels from N. Y., Md., Va., N. C., and W. Va. and from a fox squirrel from W. Va. and a porcupine from Pa.

  18. Conjugated and unconjugated bilirubins in bile of humans and rhesus monkeys. Structure of adult human and rhesus-monkey bilirubins compared with dog bilirubins.

    PubMed Central

    Blumenthal, S G; Taggart, D B; Ikeda, R; Ruebner, B; Bergstrom, D E

    1977-01-01

    1. Bilirubin-IXalpha, -IXalpha diglucuronide, -IXalpha monoglucuronide, -IXalpha monoglucoside -IXalpha monoxyloside, a bilirubin-IXalpha diconjugate containing glucose and another unknown compound, and bilirubin-IXbeta are present in gall-bladder bile of adult human, rhesus monkey and dog. Dog bile normally also contains other bilirubin-IXalpha diconjugates, i.e. compounds containing two conjugating sugars such as glucuronic acid and glucose, glucuronic acid and xylose and glucose xylose. 2. Azopigments alphaF, alphaO, alpha2, alpha3, betax and delta derived from human and rhesus-monkey bilirubins are identical in their chemical composition with those obtained from the dog. 3. Azopigments alphaF and betax found in diazotized biles of adult humans, rhesus monkeys and dogs are products of unconjugated bilirubin-IXbeta. 4. Technical modifications of previously published procedures [Heirwegh, Fevery, Michiels, Van Hees & Compernolle, (1975) Biochem. J. 145, 185-199] were introduced which make it possible to separate the bilirubins, diazotize the separated bilirubins, extract the azopigments and chromatograph them in one working day (6-8h). Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:414741

  19. Ocular dominance columns in the adult New World Monkey Callithrix jacchus.

    PubMed

    Chappert-Piquemal, C; Fonta, C; Malecaze, F; Imbert, M

    2001-01-01

    In the marmoset Callithrix jacchus, ocular dominance columns (ODC) have been reported to be present in young animals, but absent in adults (Spatz, 1989). We have studied in juvenile and adult animals the postnatal organization of the retino-geniculo-cortical afferents by means of transneuronal labeling. We show in the present work that ODC are present in the primary visual cortex of Callithrix jacchus, both in the adult and in the juvenile animal. The present work confirms the presence of ODC in the visual cortex of juvenile marmoset before the end of the first postnatal month. In 2-month-old animals, ODC are well demarcated in IVcalpha and IVcbeta. In the adult marmosets, the present data clearly show that the primary visual cortex is also organized with ODC. In horizontal sections, they form a mosaic through the ventral and dorsal calcarine cortex and through the dorso-lateral occipital part of the striate cortex. In frontal sections, their presence is manifest in IVcbeta within the calcarine cortex and they only faintly appear in IVcalpha. These new findings are important since they underline the usefulness of the adult New World Monkeys as a model in visual research.

  20. Individual differences in physical activity are closely associated with changes in body weight in adult female rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Elinor L.; Koegler, Frank H.; Cameron, Judy L.

    2010-01-01

    The increased prevalence of overweight adults has serious health consequences. Epidemiological studies suggest an association between low activity and being over-weight; however, few studies have objectively measured activity during a period of weight gain, so it is unknown whether low activity is a cause or consequence of being overweight. To determine whether individual differences in adult weight gain are linked to an individual's activity level, we measured activity, via accelerometry, over a prolonged period (9 mo) in 18 adult female rhesus monkeys. Weight, food intake, metabolic rate, and activity were first monitored over a 3-mo period. During this period, there was mild but significant weight gain (5.5 ± 0.88%; t =−6.3, df = 17, P < 0.0001), whereas caloric intake and activity remained stable. Metabolic rate increased, as expected, with weight gain. Activity level correlated with weight gain (r = −0.52, P = 0.04), and the most active monkeys gained less weight than the least active monkeys (t = −2.74, df = 8, P = 0.03). Moreover, there was an eightfold difference in activity between the most and least active monkeys, and initial activity of each monkey was highly correlated with their activity after 9 mo (r = 0.85, P < 0.0001). In contrast, food intake did not correlate with weight gain, and there was no difference in weight gain between monkeys with the highest vs. lowest caloric intake, total metabolic rate, or basal metabolic rate. We conclude that physical activity is a particularly important factor contributing to weight change in adulthood and that there are large, but stable, differences in physical activity among individuals. PMID:16614060

  1. Depressive-like behavioral response of adult male rhesus monkeys during routine animal husbandry procedure

    PubMed Central

    Hennessy, Michael B.; McCowan, Brenda; Jiang, Jing; Capitanio, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Social isolation is a major risk factor for the development of depressive illness; yet, no practical nonhuman primate model is available for studying processes involved in this effect. In a first study, we noted that adult male rhesus monkeys housed individually indoors occasionally exhibited a hunched, depressive-like posture. Therefore, Study 2 investigated the occurrence of a hunched posture by adult males brought from outdoor social groups to indoor individual housing. We also scored two other behaviors—lying on the substrate and day time sleeping—that convey an impression of depression. During the first week of observation following individual housing, 18 of 26 adult males exhibited the hunched posture and 21 of 26 displayed at least one depressive-like behavior. Over 2 weeks, 23 of 26 males showed depressive-like behavior during a total of only 20 min observation. Further, the behavior during the first week was positively related to the level of initial response to a maternal separation procedure experienced in infancy. In Study 3, more than half of 23 adult males of a new sample displayed depressive-like behavior during 10 min of observation each of Weeks 7–14 of individual housing. The surprisingly high frequency of depressive-like behavior in Studies 2 and 3 may have been due to recording behavior via camera with no human in the room to elicit competing responses. These results suggest that a common animal husbandry procedure might provide a practical means for examining effects of social isolation on depression-related endpoints in a nonhuman primate. The findings also suggest that trait-like differences in emotional responsiveness during separation in infancy may predict differences in responsiveness during social isolation in adulthood. PMID:25249954

  2. Maturation time of new granule cells in the dentate gyrus of adult macaque monkeys exceeds six months.

    PubMed

    Kohler, Shawn J; Williams, Nancy I; Stanton, Gregory B; Cameron, Judy L; Greenough, William T

    2011-06-21

    We studied two groups of adult macaque monkeys to determine the time course of adult neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. In the first group, six adult monkeys (Macaca mulatta) received a single injection of the thymidine analog BrdU (75 mg/kg), which is incorporated into replicating DNA and serves as a marker for new cell birth. Brain tissue was collected 48 h, 2 wk, and 6 wk after BrdU injection to examine the initial stages of neurogenesis. Because mature neurons were not evident at 6 wk, we examined tissue collected over a longer time course in a second study. In this study, eight monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) who were subjects in a separate exercise study received 10 weekly injections of BrdU (75 mg/kg), and brain tissue was collected at 16 and 28 wk from the first injection. Based on the timing of expression of neuronal cell markers (βIII-tubulin, doublecortin, NeuN), the extent of dendritic arborization, and acquisition of mature cell body morphology, we show that granule cell maturation in the dentate gyrus of a nonhuman primate is protracted over a minimum of a 6-mo time period, more than 6 times longer than in rodents. The lengthened time course for new cell maturation in nonhuman primates may be appropriate for preservation of neural plasticity over their longer life span and is relevant to our understanding of antidepressant and other therapies that have been linked to neurogenesis in humans.

  3. Stimulus Similarity and Encoding Time Influence Incidental Recognition Memory in Adult Monkeys with Selective Hippocampal Lesions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeamer, Alyson; Meunier, Martine; Bachevalier, Jocelyne

    2011-01-01

    Recognition memory impairment after selective hippocampal lesions in monkeys is more profound when measured with visual paired-comparison (VPC) than with delayed nonmatching-to-sample (DNMS). To clarify this issue, we assessed the impact of stimuli similarity and encoding duration on the VPC performance in monkeys with hippocampal lesions and…

  4. Monkeys, Apes and Other Primates. Young Discovery Library Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, Andre

    This book is written for children 5 through 10. Part of a series designed to develop their curiosity, fascinate them and educate them, this volume introduces the primate family, their physiology, and habits. Topics described include: (1) kinds of monkeys, including lemur, chimpanzee, gorilla, squirrel monkey, and marmoset; (2) behaviors when…

  5. Possible modulation of N-methyl-D,L-aspartic acid induced prolactin release by testicular steroids in the adult male rhesus monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Arslan, M.; Rizvi, S.S.R.; Jahan, S.; Zaidi, P.; Shahab, M. )

    1991-01-01

    N-methyl-D,L-aspartic acid (NMA), an agonist of the neurotransmitter glutamate has been shown to acutely stimulate the release of prolactin (PRL) in intact rats and monkeys. To further investigate the role of neuroexcitatory amino acids in PRL secretion, the effects of NMA administration were examined on PRL release in long term orchidectomized adult rhesus monkeys, in both the absence and presence of testosterone. Intact and long term castrated adult male monkeys weighing between 8-13 kg, were implanted with a catheter via the saphenous vein for blood withdrawal and drug infusion. Blood samples were collected at 10 min intervals for 50 min before and 70 min after administration of the drug or vehicle. Plasma PRL concentrations were estimated using radioimmunoassay. Whereas a single iv injection of NMA induced a prompt discharge of PRL in intact monkeys, an identical dose had surprisingly no effect on PRL secretion in orchidectomized animals. On the other hand, plasma PRL increases in response to a challenge dose of thyrotropin releasing hormone were similar in magnitude in the two groups of monkeys. Testosterone replacement in orchidectomized animals by parenteral administration of testosterone enanthate reinitiated the PRL responsiveness to acute NMA stimulation. These results indicate that N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) dependent drive to PRL release in the adult male rhesus monkey may be overtly influenced by the sex steroid milieu.

  6. Dynamic changes in global and gene-specific DNA methylation during hibernation in adult thirteen-lined ground squirrels, Ictidomys tridecemlineatus.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Sebastian; Mak, Timothy; Liu, Sara; Storey, Kenneth B; Szyf, Moshe

    2015-06-01

    Hibernating mammals conserve energy in the winter by undergoing prolonged bouts of torpor, interspersed with brief arousals back to euthermia. These bouts are accompanied by a suite of reversible physiological and biochemical changes; however, much remains to be discovered about the molecular mechanisms involved. Given the seasonal nature of hibernation, it stands to reason that underlying plastic epigenetic mechanisms should exist. One such form of epigenomic regulation involves the reversible modification of cytosine bases in DNA by methylation. DNA methylation is well known to be a mechanism that confers upon DNA its cellular identity during differentiation in response to innate developmental cues. However, it has recently been hypothesized that DNA methylation also acts as a mechanism for adapting genome function to changing external environmental and experiential signals over different time scales, including during adulthood. Here, we tested the hypothesis that DNA methylation is altered during hibernation in adult wild animals. This study evaluated global changes in DNA methylation in response to hibernation in the liver and skeletal muscle of thirteen-lined ground squirrels along with changes in expression of DNA methyltransferases (DNMT1/3B) and methyl binding domain proteins (MBDs). A reduction in global DNA methylation occurred in muscle during torpor phases whereas significant changes in DNMTs and MBDs were seen in both tissues. We also report dynamic changes in DNA methylation in the promoter of the myocyte enhancer factor 2C (mef2c) gene, a candidate regulator of metabolism in skeletal muscle. Taken together, these data show that genomic DNA methylation is dynamic across torpor-arousal bouts during winter hibernation, consistent with a role for this regulatory mechanism in contributing to the hibernation phenotype.

  7. Endovascular ischemic stroke models of adult rhesus monkeys: a comparison of two endovascular methods

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Di; Chen, Jian; Wang, Bincheng; Zhang, Mo; Shi, Jingfei; Ma, Yanhui; Zhu, Zixin; Yan, Feng; He, Xiaoduo; Li, Shengli; Dornbos III, David; Ding, Yuchuan; Ji, Xunming

    2016-01-01

    To further investigate and improve upon current stroke models in nonhuman primates, infarct size, neurologic function and survival were evaluated in two endovascular ischemic models in sixteen rhesus monkeys. The first method utilized a micro-catheter or an inflatable balloon to occlude the M1 segment in six monkeys. In the second model, an autologous clot was injected via a micro-catheter into the M1 segment in ten monkeys. MRI scanning was performed on all monkeys both at baseline and 3 hours after the onset of ischemia. Spetzler neurologic functions were assessed post-operatively, and selective perfusion deficits were confirmed by DSA and MRI in all monkeys. Animals undergoing micro-catheter or balloon occlusion demonstrated more profound hemiparesis, larger infarct sizes, lower Spetzler neurologic scores and increased mortality compared to the thrombus occlusion group. In animals injected with the clot, there was no evidence of dissolution, and the thrombus was either near the injection site (M1) or flushed into the superior division of the MCA (M2). All animals survived the M2 occlusion. M1 occlusion with thrombus generated 50% mortality. This study highlighted clinically important differences in these two models, providing a platform for further study of a translational thromboembolic model of acute ischemic stroke. PMID:27534985

  8. Effects of Aroclor 1254 reg sign on hydrocortisone levels in adult Rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta)

    SciTech Connect

    Loo, J.C.K.; Tryphonas, H.; Jordan, N.; Brien, R.; Karpinski, K.R.; Arnold, D.L. )

    1989-11-01

    Researchers, using female Sprague Dawley rats, reported the effects of chronic (5-7 months) oral dosing with Aroclor 1254{reg sign} (Polychlorinated biphenyls-PCB) on the serum levels of corticosterone, the principle glucocorticoid in rats. Their findings indicated that corticosterone levels were significantly depressed at dose levels of 479 {mu}g/kg bw/day and above. The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of PCB on the hydrocortisone levels in Rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) serum. In the monkey the controlling hormone is hydrocortisone which is identical to that of humans.

  9. How habitat features shape ground squirrel (Urocitellus beldingi) navigation.

    PubMed

    Bruck, Jason N; Mateo, Jill M

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether Belding's ground squirrels (Urocitellus beldingi) from areas rich in beacons perform differently in a task of spatial memory compared with squirrels from beacon-thin areas. To assess the role of environmental experience in spatial memory, wild-born squirrels with several days of experience in the field were compared with squirrels born in a lab and with no experience in their original habitat. Over two summers, squirrels captured from beacon-dense and beacon-thin areas were tested in a radial maze interspersed with beacons, using number of trials to criterion as a measure of spatial memory. To evaluate the effect of landmark navigation, in year 2 juveniles were prevented from seeing outside the maze area. In both years squirrels from beacon-dense populations reached criterion faster than squirrels from beacon-thin populations, and a weak rearing effect was present in 1 year. Despite sex differences in adult spatial skills, no differences were found between males and females in the maze. This demonstrates variation in the navigation strategies of young U. beldingi, and highlights the need to evaluate spatial preferences as a function of population or ecology in addition to species and sex.

  10. Monkey see, monkey do: contagious itch in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Feneran, Ashley N; O'Donnell, Russell; Press, Ashley; Yosipovitch, Gil; Cline, Mark; Dugan, Greg; Papoiu, Alexandru D P; Nattkemper, Leigh A; Chan, Yiong Huak; Shively, Carol A

    2013-01-01

    "Contagious itch" has been anecdotally reported and recently confirmed in a controlled setting in humans. Here, we investigated in adult rhesus macaques whether 'contagious itch' occurs spontaneously in monkeys. In a first experiment, the latency to scratch following cage-mate scratching was observed in pair-housed adult rhesus macaques. Scratching increased within the first 60 s and subsequently declined. In a second experiment, scratching behavior was recorded for individually caged adult rhesus macaques which where shown videos of monkeys scratching, but also neutral stimuli. A greater frequency of scratching was observed when monkeys viewed a video sequence of another monkey scratching as well as during the neutral stimulus immediately following the monkey scratching segment. In conclusion, viewing other monkeys scratching significantly increased scratching behavior in adult rhesus macaques.

  11. Populations and habitat relationships of Piute ground squirrels in southwest Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steenhof, Karen; Yensen, Eric; Kochert, Michael N.; Gage, K.

    2006-01-01

    Piute ground squirrels (Spermophilus mollis idahoensis) are normally above ground from late January until late June or early July in the Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area in southwestern Idaho. In 2002 they were rarely seen above ground after early May. Because of the ecological importance of ground squirrels for nesting raptors and other species, we sought to determine the reasons for their early disappearance. We sampled 12 sites from January 2003 through March 2003 to determine if a population crash had occurred in 2002. Tests indicated that Piute ground squirrels had not been exposed to plague within the past year. The presence of yearlings in the population indicated that squirrels reproduced in 2002 and that at least some yearlings survived the winter. Both yearling and adult squirrels appeared to be reproducing at or above normal rates in 2003. The most plausible explanation for the early disappearance of Piute ground squirrels in 2002 is that squirrels entered seasonal torpor early in response to a late spring drought. In addition, the breeding chronology of squirrels may have shifted during the past 2 decades in response to climate change and/or habitat alteration. Shrub habitats provide a more favorable and stable environment for squirrels than grass habitats. Squirrel abundance was higher on live-trapping grids with sagebrush than on grids dominated by grass, and squirrel masses were higher at sites dominated by shrubs and Sandberg bluegrass (Poa secunda). Densities in big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) were within the ranges reported for earlier years, but densities in grass were lower than previously reported. Low densities at grassland sites in 2003 support other findings that drought affects squirrels in altered grass communities more than those in native shrub habitats. Long-term shifts in ground squirrel breeding chronology may have implications for raptors that depend on them for food.

  12. Rod Photoreceptors Express GPR55 in the Adult Vervet Monkey Retina

    PubMed Central

    Bouskila, Joseph; Javadi, Pasha; Casanova, Christian; Ptito, Maurice; Bouchard, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    Cannabinoids exert their actions mainly through two receptors, the cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R) and cannabinoid CB2 receptor (CB2R). In recent years, the G-protein coupled receptor 55 (GPR55) was suggested as a cannabinoid receptor based on its activation by anandamide and tetrahydrocannabinol. Yet, its formal classification is still a matter of debate. CB1R and CB2R expression patterns are well described for rodent and monkey retinas. In the monkey retina, CB1R has been localized in its neural (cone photoreceptor, horizontal, bipolar, amacrine and ganglion cells) and CB2R in glial components (Müller cells). The aim of this study was to determine the expression pattern of GPR55 in the monkey retina by using confocal microscopy. Our results show that GPR55 is strictly localized in the photoreceptor layer of the extrafoveal portion of the retina. Co-immunolabeling of GPR55 with rhodopsin, the photosensitive pigment in rods, revealed a clear overlap of expression throughout the rod structure with most prominent staining in the inner segments. Additionally, double-label of GPR55 with calbindin, a specific marker for cone photoreceptors in the primate retina, allowed us to exclude expression of GPR55 in cones. The labeling of GPR55 in rods was further assessed with a 3D visualization in the XZ and YZ planes thus confirming its exclusive expression in rods. These results provide data on the distribution of GPR55 in the monkey retina, different than CB1R and CB2R. The presence of GPR55 in rods suggests a function of this receptor in scotopic vision that needs to be demonstrated. PMID:24244730

  13. Sexual dimorphism of sulcal length asymmetry in the cerebrum of adult cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Imai, Noritaka; Sawada, Kazuhiko; Fukunishi, Katsuhiro; Sakata-Haga, Hiromi; Fukui, Yoshihiro

    2011-12-01

    The present study aimed to quantitatively clarify the gross anatomical asymmetry and sexual dimorphism of the cerebral hemispheres of cynomolgus monkeys. While the fronto-occipital length of the right and left cerebral hemispheres was not different between sexes, a statistically significant rightward asymmetry was detected in the cerebral width at the perisylvian region in females, but not in males (narrower width of the left side in the females). An asymmetry quotient of the sulcal lengths revealed a rightward asymmetry in the inferior occipital sulcus and a leftward asymmetry in the central and intraparietal sulci in both sexes. However, the laterality of the lengths of other sulci was different for males and females. The arcuate sulcus was directed rightward in males but there was no rightward bias in females. Interestingly, the principle sulcus and lateral fissure were left-lateralized in the males, but right-lateralized in the females. The results suggest that lateralization patterns are regionally and sexually different in the cerebrum of cynomolgus monkeys. The present results provide a reference for quantitatively evaluating the normality of the cerebral cortical morphology in cynomolgus monkeys.

  14. Reproductive toxicity of chromium in adult bonnet monkeys (Macaca radiata Geoffrey). Reversible oxidative stress in the semen

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, Senthivinayagam . E-mail: subbi100@yahoo.co.uk; Rajendiran, Gopalakrishnan; Sekhar, Pasupathi; Gowri, Chandrahasan; Govindarajulu, Pera; Aruldhas, Mariajoseph Michael

    2006-09-15

    The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that oxidative stress mediates chromium-induced reproductive toxicity. Monthly semen samples were collected from adult monkeys (Macaca radiata), which were exposed to varying doses (50, 100, 200 and 400 ppm) of chromium (as potassium dichromate) for 6 months through drinking water. Chromium treatment decreased sperm count, sperm forward motility and the specific activities of antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase and catalase, and the concentration of reduced glutathione in both seminal plasma and sperm in a dose- and duration-dependent manner. On the other hand, the quantum of hydrogen peroxide in the seminal plasma/sperm from monkeys exposed to chromium increased with increasing dose and duration of chromium exposure. All these changes were reversed after 6 months of chromium-free exposure period. Simultaneous supplementation of vitamin C (0.5 g/L; 1.0 g/L; 2.0 g/L) prevented the development of chromium-induced oxidative stress. Data support the hypothesis and show that chronic chromium exposure induces a reversible oxidative stress in the seminal plasma and sperm by creating an imbalance between reactive oxygen species and antioxidant system, leading to sperm death and reduced motility of live sperm.

  15. Reproductive toxicity of chromium in adult bonnet monkeys (Macaca radiata Geoffrey). Reversible oxidative stress in the semen.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Senthivinayagam; Rajendiran, Gopalakrishnan; Sekhar, Pasupathi; Gowri, Chandrahasan; Govindarajulu, Pera; Aruldhas, Mariajoseph Michael

    2006-09-15

    The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that oxidative stress mediates chromium-induced reproductive toxicity. Monthly semen samples were collected from adult monkeys (Macaca radiata), which were exposed to varying doses (50, 100, 200 and 400 ppm) of chromium (as potassium dichromate) for 6 months through drinking water. Chromium treatment decreased sperm count, sperm forward motility and the specific activities of antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase and catalase, and the concentration of reduced glutathione in both seminal plasma and sperm in a dose- and duration-dependent manner. On the other hand, the quantum of hydrogen peroxide in the seminal plasma/sperm from monkeys exposed to chromium increased with increasing dose and duration of chromium exposure. All these changes were reversed after 6 months of chromium-free exposure period. Simultaneous supplementation of vitamin C (0.5 g/L; 1.0 g/L; 2.0 g/L) prevented the development of chromium-induced oxidative stress. Data support the hypothesis and show that chronic chromium exposure induces a reversible oxidative stress in the seminal plasma and sperm by creating an imbalance between reactive oxygen species and antioxidant system, leading to sperm death and reduced motility of live sperm. PMID:16678873

  16. “Subpial Fan Cell” — A Class of Calretinin Neuron in Layer 1 of Adult Monkey Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Gabbott, Paul L. A.

    2016-01-01

    Layer 1 of the cortex contains populations of neurochemically distinct neurons and afferent fibers which markedly affect neural activity in the apical dendritic tufts of pyramidal cells. Understanding the causal mechanisms requires knowledge of the cellular architecture and synaptic organization of layer 1. This study has identified eight morphological classes of calretinin immunopositive (CRet+) neurons (including Cajal-Retzius cells) in layer 1 of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) in adult monkey (Macaca fasicularis), with a distinct class — termed “subpial fan (SPF) cell” — described in detail. SPF cells were rare horizontal unipolar CRet+ cells located directly beneath the pia with a single thick primary dendrite that branched into a characteristic fan-like dendritic tree tangential to the pial surface. Dendrites had spines, filamentous processes and thorny branchlets. SPF cells lay millimeters apart with intralaminar axons that ramified widely in upper layer 1. Such cells were GABA immunonegative (-) and occurred in areas beyond PFC. Interspersed amidst SPF cells displaying normal structural integrity were degenerating CRet+ neurons (including SPF cells) and clumps of lipofuscin-rich cellular debris. The number of degenerating SPF cells increased during adulthood. Ultrastructural analyses indicated SPF cell somata received asymmetric (A — presumed excitatory) and symmetric (S — presumed inhibitory) synaptic contacts. Proximal dendritic shafts received mainly S-type and distal shafts mostly A-type input. All dendritic thorns and most dendritic spines received both synapse types. The tangential areal density of SPF cell axonal varicosities varied radially from parent somata — with dense clusters in more distal zones. All boutons formed A-type contacts with CRet- structures. The main post-synaptic targets were dendritic shafts (67%; mostly spine-bearing) and dendritic spines (24%). SPF-SPF cell innervation was not observed. Morphometry of SPF cells

  17. A newly-found pattern of social relationships among adults within one-male units of golden snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus roxenalla) in the Qinling Mountains, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaowei; Wang, Chengliang; Qi, Xiaoguang; Guo, Songtao; Zhao, Haitao; Li, Baoguo

    2013-12-01

    Group living provides various advantages to individuals in regards to protection avoidance, intergroup competition, productive success and social information. Stable one-male units (OMUs) consist of relationships between the adult females and the resident male as well as the relationships among adult females. Based on continuous observation of a reproductive group of golden snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus roxellana) in the Qinling Mountains, we analyzed the relationships among adult individual dyads within 4 OMUs. The results indicated that in golden snub-nosed monkey societies, females not only had no strong tendency to build a relationship with the resident male in the OMU but also had no strong tendency to build relationships with other females in the OMU. In comparison with hamadryas (Papio hamadryas) and gelada baboons (Theropithecus gelada), the relationships within golden snub-nosed monkeys OMUs showed neither the star-shaped pattern observed in hamadryas baboons nor the net-shaped pattern observed in gelada baboons. We concluded that the relationships within golden snub-nosed monkey OMUs indicated a third pattern in nonhuman primate societies. Future research is required to determine the potential mechanisms for such a pattern.

  18. Origins and antiquity of X-linked triallelic color vision systems in New World monkeys.

    PubMed

    Boissinot, S; Tan, Y; Shyue, S K; Schneider, H; Sampaio, I; Neiswanger, K; Hewett-Emmett, D; Li, W H

    1998-11-10

    It is known that the squirrel monkey, marmoset, and other related New World (NW) monkeys possess three high-frequency alleles at the single X-linked photopigment locus, and that the spectral sensitivity peaks of these alleles are within those delimited by the human red and green pigment genes. The three alleles in the squirrel monkey and marmoset have been sequenced previously. In this study, the three alleles were found and sequenced in the saki monkey, capuchin, and tamarin. Although the capuchin and tamarin belong to the same family as the squirrel monkey and marmoset, the saki monkey belongs to a different family and is one of the species that is most divergent from the squirrel monkey and marmoset, suggesting the presence of the triallelic system in many NW monkeys. The nucleotide sequences of these alleles from the five species studied indicate that gene conversion occurs frequently and has partially or completely homogenized intronic and exonic regions of the alleles in each species, making it appear that a triallelic system arose independently in each of the five species studied. Nevertheless, a detailed analysis suggests that the triallelic system arose only once in the NW monkey lineage, from a middle wavelength (green) opsin gene, and that the amino acid differences at functionally critical sites among alleles have been maintained by natural selection in NW monkeys for >20 million years. Moreover, the two X-linked opsin genes of howler monkeys (a NW monkey genus) were evidently derived from the incorporation of a middle (green) and a long wavelength (red) allele into one chromosome; these two genes together with the (autosomal) blue opsin gene would immediately enable even a male monkey to have trichromatic vision. PMID:9811872

  19. Hepatic capillariasis in a Cape ground squirrel (Xerus inaurus).

    PubMed

    Erlwanger, K H; De Witt, B A; Fick, L G; Hetem, R S; Meyer, L C R; Mitchell, D; Wilson, W A; Mitchell, B

    2009-12-01

    We report, for the first time, an incidental finding of Calodium hepaticum infestation in a sub-adult female Cape ground squirrel (Xerus inaurus). Post mortem examination of the squirrel revealed severe haemoperitoneum, splenomegaly and hepatomegaly with miliary white spots distributed diffusely throughout the hepatic parenchyma. Histologically the portal tracts in the liver showed granulomatous inflammation with fibrosis and numerous giant cells. Occasional adult worms were identified and there were multiple C. hepaticum eggs distributed diffusely throughout the portal tracts and the parenchyma. The spleen also contained C. hepaticum eggs. The genus Rattus is the primary host and reservoir of C. hepaticum, but C. hepaticum infections have been reported previously in other Sciuridae. Based on our findings, people should be cautious of the zoonotic potential of C. hepaticum, when they come into contact with the Cape ground squirrel.

  20. Squirrel Foraging Preferences: Gone Nuts?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darling, Randi A.

    2007-01-01

    This field exercise examines the feeding preferences of Gray Squirrels ("Sciurus carolinensis"). Students present squirrels with a variety of food types in a cafeteria-style arrangement in order to test hypotheses about foraging preferences. This exercise, which is appropriate for introductory biology, ecology, and animal behavior classes, is…

  1. Diurnal pattern of pulsatile luteinizing hormone and testosterone secretion in adult male rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta): influence of the timing of daily meal intake.

    PubMed

    Mattern, L G; Helmreich, D L; Cameron, J L

    1993-03-01

    Adult male rhesus monkeys have a diurnal pattern of reproductive hormone secretion that is characterized by significantly elevated LH and testosterone secretion in the evening hours and a nadir in secretion of these hormones in the morning. To test the hypothesis that the daily pattern of food intake may play a role in regulating the diurnal pattern of reproductive hormone secretion we performed three studies. First, to determine the relationship between the timing of the diurnal rise in LH secretion and meal consumption, blood samples were collected from 13 adult male rhesus monkeys via chronically indwelling venous catheters (samples every 15-20 min from 0800-0800 h) while monkeys were maintained on the standard feeding regimen in our colony (one meal of Purina monkey chow fed between 1100 and 1200 h). On a day of normal feeding there was a significant diurnal rhythm in mean LH concentrations with elevated levels at night (nadir: 13.41 +/- 0.82 ng/ml from 0800-1100 h; peak: 21.34 +/- 1.56 ng/ml from 2000-2300 h, P < or = 0.05). The rising phase of the diurnal rhythm in LH secretion was apparent starting in the early afternoon, shortly after the daily meal, at 1400 h (5 h before lights went off at 1900 h), and the diurnal rise in LH secretion was no longer apparent by 0500 h (several hours before the lights went on at 0700 h). Second, we examined the influence of missing the daily meal on the diurnal pattern of LH and testosterone secretion. Blood samples were collected for a 24-h period on a day of fasting from 9 monkeys. On a day of fasting there was no diurnal rise in plasma LH or testosterone concentrations; plasma concentrations of these hormones remained at the low morning levels throughout the day. Third, we examined the diurnal pattern of LH and testosterone secretion after adapting 5 monkeys (for 6-8 weeks) to a new meal time that was 6 h later in the day than the standard meal time (i.e. at 1700 h). After adaptation to this later feeding time monkeys

  2. Fasting-induced suppression of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in the adult rhesus monkey: evidence for involvement of excitatory amino acid neurotransmitters.

    PubMed

    Shahab, M; Zaman, W; Bashir, K; Arslan, M

    1997-01-01

    The present study was designed to examine whether acute food-restriction in non-human primates, suppresses hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular (HPT) axis via alterations in the excitatory amino acid (EAA) neurotransmitter-utilizing drive to the GnRH neuron. This was achieved indirectly by comparing the plasma testosterone (T) responses to administration of an excitatory amino acid analogue, N-methyl-D,L-aspartic acid (NMA), in acutely fasted and normal fed monkeys. A set of 4 chair-restrained adult male rhesus monkeys, was assigned to the following treatments: a) normal feeding, b) one-day fasting (omission of morning and afternoon meals), c) normal feeding+NMA (15 mg/kg BW) and d) one-day fasting+NMA (15 mg/kg BW). Starting 1 h after the provision or omission of the afternoon meal, frequent blood sampling was initiated at 15-min intervals for a period of 3-h. NMA was administered as an iv bolus 1 h after start of the sampling. Secretion of T was affected (P<0.005) by the treatments. A peak in T was evident during the first h of the sampling in fed but not fasted monkeys. Mean 3-h T concentrations were suppressed (P<0.001) by the fasting. Administration of NMA in fasting conditions resulted into an acute stimulation of T secretion in 2 of the 4 monkeys. However, mean 60-min post-NMA T concentrations were greater (P<0.05) than those prevailing during the same period in fasted animals not given NMA. In contrast, all 4 fed-monkeys showed significant T elevations in plasma immediately following the NMA challenge and mean T levels during the 60-min post-NMA period were higher (P<0.05) than those in fed animals not injected with NMA, at a comparable time. Testosterone area under the curve for the 2-h post-NMA period was greater (P<0.05) in fed- than in fasted-monkeys. These results indicate that although NMA can stimulate GnRH release both in fed and short-term fasting conditions, the response appears to be suppressed in the later situation suggesting that fasting

  3. North American tree squirrels and ground squirrels with overlapping ranges host different Cryptosporidium species and genotypes.

    PubMed

    Stenger, Brianna L S; Clark, Mark E; Kváč, Martin; Khan, Eakalak; Giddings, Catherine W; Prediger, Jitka; McEvoy, John M

    2015-12-01

    Wildlife-associated Cryptosporidium are an emerging cause of cryptosporidiosis in humans. The present study was undertaken to determine the extent to which North American tree squirrels and ground squirrels host zoonotic Cryptosporidium species and genotypes. Fragments of the Cryptosporidium 18S rRNA and actin genes were amplified and sequenced from fecal samples obtained from three tree squirrel and three ground squirrel species. In tree squirrels, Cryptosporidium was identified in 40.5% (17/42) of American red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus), 40.4% (55/136) of eastern gray squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis), and 28.6% (2/7) of fox squirrels (Sciurus niger). Human-pathogenic Cryptosporidium ubiquitum and Cryptosporidium skunk genotype were the most prevalent species/genotypes in tree squirrels. Because tree squirrels live in close proximity to humans and are frequently infected with potentially zoonotic Cryptosporidium species/genotypes, they may be a significant reservoir of infection in humans. In ground squirrels, Cryptosporidium was detected in 70.2% (33/47) of 13-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus), 35.1% (27/77) of black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus), and the only golden-mantled ground squirrel (Callospermophilus lateralis) that was sampled. Cryptosporidium rubeyi and ground squirrel genotypes I, II, and III were identified in isolates from these ground squirrel species. In contrast to the Cryptosporidium infecting tree squirrels, these species/genotypes appear to be specific for ground squirrels and are not associated with human disease. PMID:26437239

  4. North American tree squirrels and ground squirrels with overlapping ranges host different Cryptosporidium species and genotypes.

    PubMed

    Stenger, Brianna L S; Clark, Mark E; Kváč, Martin; Khan, Eakalak; Giddings, Catherine W; Prediger, Jitka; McEvoy, John M

    2015-12-01

    Wildlife-associated Cryptosporidium are an emerging cause of cryptosporidiosis in humans. The present study was undertaken to determine the extent to which North American tree squirrels and ground squirrels host zoonotic Cryptosporidium species and genotypes. Fragments of the Cryptosporidium 18S rRNA and actin genes were amplified and sequenced from fecal samples obtained from three tree squirrel and three ground squirrel species. In tree squirrels, Cryptosporidium was identified in 40.5% (17/42) of American red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus), 40.4% (55/136) of eastern gray squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis), and 28.6% (2/7) of fox squirrels (Sciurus niger). Human-pathogenic Cryptosporidium ubiquitum and Cryptosporidium skunk genotype were the most prevalent species/genotypes in tree squirrels. Because tree squirrels live in close proximity to humans and are frequently infected with potentially zoonotic Cryptosporidium species/genotypes, they may be a significant reservoir of infection in humans. In ground squirrels, Cryptosporidium was detected in 70.2% (33/47) of 13-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus), 35.1% (27/77) of black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus), and the only golden-mantled ground squirrel (Callospermophilus lateralis) that was sampled. Cryptosporidium rubeyi and ground squirrel genotypes I, II, and III were identified in isolates from these ground squirrel species. In contrast to the Cryptosporidium infecting tree squirrels, these species/genotypes appear to be specific for ground squirrels and are not associated with human disease.

  5. The maxillary sinus in three genera of new world monkeys: factors that constrain secondary pneumatization.

    PubMed

    Smith, Timothy D; Rossie, James B; Cooper, Gregory M; Carmody, Kelly A; Schmieg, Robin M; Bonar, Christopher J; Mooney, Mark P; Siegel, Michael I

    2010-01-01

    The air filled cavities of paranasal sinuses are thought by some to appear opportunistically in spatial "gaps" within the craniofacial complex. Anthropoid primates provide excellent natural experiments for testing this model, since not all species possess a full complement of paranasal sinuses. In this study, two genera of monkeys (Saguinus and Cebuella) which form maxillary sinuses (MS) as adults were compared to squirrel monkeys (Saimiri spp.), in which a MS does not form. Using microCT and histomorphometric methods, the spatial position of paranasal spaces was assessed and size of the adjacent dental sacs was measured. In Saguinus, secondary pneumatization is underway perinatally, and the sinus extends alongside deciduous premolars (dp). The MS overlaps all permanent molars in the adult. In Saimiri, the homologous space (maxillary recess) extends no farther posterior than the first deciduous premolar at birth and extends no farther than the last premolar in the adult. Differences in dental size and position may account for this finding. For example, Saimiri has significantly larger relative dp volumes, and enlarged orbits, which encroach on the internasal space to a greater degree when compared to Saguinus. These factors limit space for posterior expansion of the maxillary recess. These findings support the hypothesis that secondary pneumatization is a novel, opportunistic growth mechanism that removes "unneeded" bone. Moreover, paranasal spaces occur in association with semiautonomous skeletal elements that border more than one functional matrix, and the spatial dynamics of these units can act as a constraint on pneumatic expansion of paranasal spaces.

  6. Responses towards a dying adult group member in a wild New World monkey.

    PubMed

    Bezerra, Bruna Martins; Keasey, Matthew Philip; Schiel, Nicola; da Silva Souto, Antonio

    2014-04-01

    Compassionate caretaking behaviour towards dying adult group members has been reported as being unique to humans and chimpanzees. Here we describe in detail the reaction of a wild dominant male common marmoset, a neotropical primate, to the accidental death of the dominant female of its group. The male exhibited behaviours towards the dying female that resembled those of chimpanzees and humans. The long-term relationship between the dominant pair (which lasted at least 3.5 years) and their social status in the group may have contributed to the male's behavioural response. The male prevented young individuals from approaching the dying female, behaviour previously observed in chimpanzees. The data provide an interesting insight into compassionate caretaking behaviours in New World primates as well as the pair-bond systems of common marmosets. These are rare observations, and thus their detailed descriptions are essential if we are to create a comparative and enhanced understanding of human and nonhuman primate thanatology. PMID:24566801

  7. Responses towards a dying adult group member in a wild New World monkey.

    PubMed

    Bezerra, Bruna Martins; Keasey, Matthew Philip; Schiel, Nicola; da Silva Souto, Antonio

    2014-04-01

    Compassionate caretaking behaviour towards dying adult group members has been reported as being unique to humans and chimpanzees. Here we describe in detail the reaction of a wild dominant male common marmoset, a neotropical primate, to the accidental death of the dominant female of its group. The male exhibited behaviours towards the dying female that resembled those of chimpanzees and humans. The long-term relationship between the dominant pair (which lasted at least 3.5 years) and their social status in the group may have contributed to the male's behavioural response. The male prevented young individuals from approaching the dying female, behaviour previously observed in chimpanzees. The data provide an interesting insight into compassionate caretaking behaviours in New World primates as well as the pair-bond systems of common marmosets. These are rare observations, and thus their detailed descriptions are essential if we are to create a comparative and enhanced understanding of human and nonhuman primate thanatology.

  8. Habitat Suitability Index Models: Fox squirrel

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, Arthur W.

    1982-01-01

    The fox squirrel (Sciurus niger) is the largest of the North American tree squirrels. The species is widely distributed throughout eastern North American and has been introduced in many portions of the West (Wright 1979). Fox squirrels also have expanded their range westward through utilization of gallery forest habitats along major river drainages (Armstrong 1972; Wright 1979).

  9. Responses of neurons in the middle temporal visual area after long-standing lesions of the primary visual cortex in adult new world monkeys.

    PubMed

    Collins, Christine E; Lyon, David C; Kaas, Jon H

    2003-03-15

    The retinotopic organization of the middle temporal visual area (MT) was determined in six adult owl monkeys and one adult marmoset 69 d to 10 months after lesions of the dorsolateral primary visual cortex (V1). The lesions removed were limited to extensive parts of the representation of the lower visual quadrant in V1. Microelectrodes were used to record from neurons at numerous sites in MT to determine whether parts of MT normally devoted to the lower visual quadrant (1) were unresponsive to visual stimuli, (2) acquired responsiveness to inputs from intact portions of V1, or (3) became responsive to some other visually driven input such as a relay from the superior colliculus via the pulvinar to MT. All monkeys (n = 6) with moderate to moderately large lesions had unresponsive portions of MT even after 10 months of recovery. These unresponsive regions were retinotopically equivalent to the removed parts of V1 in normal animals. Thus, there was no evidence for an alternative source of activation. In addition, these results indicate that any retinotopic reorganization of MT based on inputs from intact portions of V1 was not extensive, yet neurons near the margins of responsive cortex may have acquired new receptive fields, and the smallest 5 degrees lesion of V1 failed to produce an unresponsive zone. Deprived portions of MT were not remarkably changed in histological appearance in cytochrome oxidase, Nissl, and Wisteria floribunda agglutinin preparations. Nevertheless, some reduction in myelin staining and other histological changes were suggested. We conclude that MT is highly dependent on V1 for activation in these monkeys, and alternative sources do not become effective over months when normal activation is absent. Additionally, remaining V1 inputs have only a limited capacity to expand their activation territory into deprived portions of MT.

  10. Waiting by mistake: symbolic representation of rewards modulates intertemporal choice in capuchin monkeys, preschool children and adult humans.

    PubMed

    Addessi, Elsa; Bellagamba, Francesca; Delfino, Alexia; De Petrillo, Francesca; Focaroli, Valentina; Macchitella, Luigi; Maggiorelli, Valentina; Pace, Beatrice; Pecora, Giulia; Rossi, Sabrina; Sbaffi, Agnese; Tasselli, Maria Isabella; Paglieri, Fabio

    2014-03-01

    In the Delay choice task subjects choose between a smaller immediate option and a larger delayed option. This paradigm, also known as intertemporal choice task, is frequently used to assess delay tolerance, interpreting a preference for the larger delayed option as willingness to wait. However, in the Delay choice task subjects face a dilemma between two preferred responses: "go for more" (i.e., selecting the larger, but delayed, option) vs. "go for sooner" (i.e., selecting the immediate, but smaller, option). When the options consist of visible food amounts, at least some of the choices of the larger delayed option might be due to a failure to inhibit a prepotent response towards the larger option rather than to a sustained delay tolerance. To disentangle this issue, we tested 10 capuchin monkeys, 101 preschool children, and 88 adult humans in a Delay choice task with food, low-symbolic tokens (objects that can be exchanged with food and have a one-to-one correspondence with food items), and high-symbolic tokens (objects that can be exchanged with food and have a one-to-many correspondence with food items). This allows evaluating how different methods of representing rewards modulate the relative contribution of the "go for more" and "go for sooner" responses. Consistently with the idea that choices for the delayed option are sometimes due to a failure at inhibiting the prepotent response for the larger quantity, we expected high-symbolic tokens to decrease the salience of the larger option, thus reducing "go for more" responses. In fact, previous findings have shown that inhibiting prepotent responses for quantity is easier when the problem is framed in a symbolic context. Overall, opting for the larger delayed option in the visible-food version of the Delay choice task seems to partially result from an impulsive preference for quantity, rather than from a sustained delay tolerance. In capuchins and children high-symbolic stimuli decreased the individual

  11. Ultrasonic Vocalizations Emitted by Flying Squirrels

    PubMed Central

    Murrant, Meghan N.; Bowman, Jeff; Garroway, Colin J.; Prinzen, Brian; Mayberry, Heather; Faure, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Anecdotal reports of ultrasound use by flying squirrels have existed for decades, yet there has been little detailed analysis of their vocalizations. Here we demonstrate that two species of flying squirrel emit ultrasonic vocalizations. We recorded vocalizations from northern (Glaucomys sabrinus) and southern (G. volans) flying squirrels calling in both the laboratory and at a field site in central Ontario, Canada. We demonstrate that flying squirrels produce ultrasonic emissions through recorded bursts of broadband noise and time-frequency structured frequency modulated (FM) vocalizations, some of which were purely ultrasonic. Squirrels emitted three types of ultrasonic calls in laboratory recordings and one type in the field. The variety of signals that were recorded suggest that flying squirrels may use ultrasonic vocalizations to transfer information. Thus, vocalizations may be an important, although still poorly understood, aspect of flying squirrel social biology. PMID:24009728

  12. Ultrasonic vocalizations emitted by flying squirrels.

    PubMed

    Murrant, Meghan N; Bowman, Jeff; Garroway, Colin J; Prinzen, Brian; Mayberry, Heather; Faure, Paul A

    2013-01-01

    Anecdotal reports of ultrasound use by flying squirrels have existed for decades, yet there has been little detailed analysis of their vocalizations. Here we demonstrate that two species of flying squirrel emit ultrasonic vocalizations. We recorded vocalizations from northern (Glaucomys sabrinus) and southern (G. volans) flying squirrels calling in both the laboratory and at a field site in central Ontario, Canada. We demonstrate that flying squirrels produce ultrasonic emissions through recorded bursts of broadband noise and time-frequency structured frequency modulated (FM) vocalizations, some of which were purely ultrasonic. Squirrels emitted three types of ultrasonic calls in laboratory recordings and one type in the field. The variety of signals that were recorded suggest that flying squirrels may use ultrasonic vocalizations to transfer information. Thus, vocalizations may be an important, although still poorly understood, aspect of flying squirrel social biology. PMID:24009728

  13. Experimental infection of ectoparasitic arthropods with Rickettsia prowazekii (GvF-16 strain) and transmission to flying squirrels.

    PubMed

    Bozeman, F M; Sonenshine, D E; Williams, M S; Chadwick, D P; Lauer, D M; Elisberg, B L

    1981-01-01

    Epizootiologic studies conducted during the past few years showed the existence of widespread natural infection of the southern flying squirrel, Glaucomys volans, with epidemic typhus rickettsiae, Rickettsia prowazekii. The ecological findings strongly implicated transmission of the etiologic agent by an arthropod vector. Studies were conducted under controlled laboratory conditions to determine whether ectoparasites naturally associated with flying squirrels (squirrel fleas, lice, mites and ticks) were capable of acquiring, maintaining and transmitting the infection. Also studied were the cat flea, oriental rat flea and the human body louse. Flying squirrels inoculated with the GvF-16 strain of R. prowazekii circulated rickettsiae in their blood for 2-3 weeks, thus providing ample opportunity for arthropods feeding on them to become infected. The results with Dermacentor variabilis ticks indicated that the rickettsiae did not consistently survive in this insect and were not passed to the eggs of adult females that had been infected subcuticularly. Mites became infected by feeding on infectious blood but failed to sustain the infection. Also, mites fed on an infected flying squirrel did not transmit the infection to a normal squirrel. Squirrel, cat, and oriental rat fleas readily became infected by feeding on a rickettsemic host or on infectious blood through membranes, but failed to transmit the infection to susceptible flying squirrels. In the studies with flying squirrel lice, however, transmission of epidemic typhus from infected to uninfected flying squirrels was demonstrated. Infection of the human body louse with the GvF-16 flying squirrel strain of R. prowazekii was similar to that previously observed with classical human strains, viz., multiplication of the rickettsiae and excretion in the feces. PMID:6782900

  14. Home range, social behavior, and dominance relationships in the African unstriped ground squirrel, Xerus rutilus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Shea, Thomas J.

    1976-01-01

    A field study of home range, social behavior, and dominance relationships in the African unstriped ground squirrel, Xerus rutilus, was conducted in semi-arid bushland near Kibwezi, Kenya. Ground squirrels lived alone or in small groups in isolated burrow systems and had broadly overlapping home ranges. They were neither territorial or colonial. Home ranges were estimated by visual observation of marked animals and those of males were considerably larger (mean=7.01 hectares (ha); n=4) than those of females (mean=1.37 ha; n-6). A continuum of agonistic behavior ranging from threat to combat is described, although actual combat was rarely observed. Sexual behavior includes a stereotypical tail display by adult males. Dominance relationships, based on 542 observed encounters between marked individuals, include a consistent male dominance over females and a fairly constant linear hierarchy among all individuals with shared home ranges. Similarities in the behavior of African ground squirrels and tree squirrels (Sciurus) are discussed.

  15. Monkey Baker at U.S. Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville, Alabama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1958-01-01

    On May 28, 1958, Jupiter Intermediate Range Ballistic Missile provided by U.S. Army team in Huntsville, Alabama, launched a nose cone carrying Baker, a South American squirrel monkey and Able, an American-born rhesus monkey. Baker, pictured here and commonly known as 'Miss Baker', was later given a home at the U.S. Space and Rocket Center until her death on November 29, 1984. Able died in 1958. (Photo - Courtesy of Huntsville/Madison County Public Library)

  16. The Autopsy of Squirrel Doe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dick, Timothy T.; Watson, Jason

    2005-01-01

    Introductory biology laboratory experiences frequently rely on preserved chordates for anatomical study. Unfortunately, these preserved organisms rarely reflect the appearance of a living creature. Since community colleges are generally prohibited the use of live chordates, this paper describes the autopsy of a "road kill" squirrel to facilitate…

  17. Habitat exploration and use in dispersing juvenile flying squirrels.

    PubMed

    Selonen, Vesa; Hanski, Ilpo K

    2006-11-01

    1. Variation in behaviours involved in habitat selection is important for several evolutionary and ecological processes. For example, habitat use during dispersal may differ from breeding habitat use, and for dispersers the scale of habitat familiarity is determined by exploratory behaviour. We studied habitat use and exploration of 56 radio-collared juvenile flying squirrels Pteromys volans L. within natal home range and during dispersal, and compared habitat use between juveniles and 37 adults within breeding home range. 2. Before dispersal, young flying squirrels actively moved around the natal site. Surprisingly, long-distance dispersers explored less than short-distance dispersers, but philopatric individuals explored similar distances as dispersers. Females explored less than males, although females are the more dispersive sex in flying squirrels. 3. For most of the individuals the settlement area was unfamiliar due to long dispersal distance. Consequently, direction and distance of exploration were not very strong predictors of settlement location. However, individuals familiar with the settlement area concentrated exploration to that area. Exploration did not correlate with short-term survival. 4. Dispersers preferred breeding habitat while dispersing, but were found more often in matrix habitat than juveniles within natal, or adults within breeding, home ranges. 5. We conclude that familiarity does not determine settlement as much as, for example, availability of the habitat for flying squirrels. Based on our results, it also seems clear that data on adult habitat use are not enough to predict habitat use of dispersing individuals. In addition, our results support the recent view that short- and long-distance dispersers may need to be analysed separately in ecological and evolutionary analyses. PMID:17032376

  18. [Monkey-pox, a model of emergent then reemergent disease].

    PubMed

    Georges, A J; Matton, T; Courbot-Georges, M C

    2004-01-01

    The recent emergence of monkey pox in the United States of America highlights the problem (known for other infectious agents) of dissemination of pathogens outside their endemic area, and of subsequent global threats of variable gravity according to agents. It is a real emergency since monkey pox had been confined to Africa for several decades, where small epidemics occurred from time to time, monkey pox is a "miniature smallpox" which, in Africa, evolves on an endemic (zoonotic) mode with, as reservoirs, several species of wild rodents (mainly squirrels) and some monkey species. It can be accidentally transmitted to man then develops as epidemics, sometimes leading to death. The virus was imported in 2003 in the United States of America, via Gambia rats and wild squirrels (all African species), and infected prairie dogs (which are now in fashion as pets), then crossed the species barrier to man. In the United States of America, screening campaigns, epidemiological investigations, and subsequent treatments led to a rapid control of the epidemic, which is a model of emergent disease for this country. Therapeutic and preventive measures directly applicable to monkey pox are discussed. They can also be applied against other pox virus infections (including smallpox). The risk of criminal introduction of pox viruses is discussed since it is, more than ever, a real worldwide threat.

  19. Study of the effect of 26RF- and 43RF-amides on testosterone and prolactin secretion in the adult male rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Wahab, Fazal; Salahuddin, Hina; Anees, Mariam; Leprince, Jerome; Vaudry, Hubert; Tena-Sempere, Manuel; Shahab, Muhammad

    2012-07-01

    RF-amides (RFa), a superfamily of evolutionary-conserved neuropeptides, are expressed in both invertebrates and vertebrates. While some endocrine functions have been attributed to these peptides in lower vertebrates and few mammalian models, not much is known about their actions in primates. Therefore, the present study was designed to examine the effects of peripheral administration of two recently cloned human RFa peptides, 26RFa and 43RFa, on testosterone and prolactin secretion in the adult male adult male rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta). For control purposes, a scrambled sequence of 26RFa (Sc-26RFa) and normal saline (1ml) were injected. Three different doses of 26RFa and 43RFa (19-nmol, 38-nmol and 76-nmol) and a single dose (38-nmol) of Sc-26RFa were tested. A set of four chair-restraint habituated monkeys was used. Comparison of post-treatment T levels with respective pre levels showed that none of the doses of both 26RFa and 43RFa changed T release. Similarly, Sc-26RFa and saline administration also did not affect T levels. In contrast, all doses of 26RFa and 43RFa significantly (P<0.05) stimulated prolactin secretion. 43RFa dose dependently increased prolactin secretion while dose dependency was not observed for 26RFa. Saline and Sc-26RFa injection had no effect on prolactin concentrations. Thus, present study demonstrated that peripheral administration of 26RFa and 43RFa, in the doses tested, have no effect on T secretion, suggesting possible selective lack of their neuroendocrine role in controlling hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in the adult male primates. The prominent stimulation of prolactin suggests a neuroendocrine role of RFa peptides in regulation of prolactin release in primates.

  20. Low circulating levels of bisphenol-A induce cognitive deficits and loss of asymmetric spine synapses in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and hippocampus of adult male monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Elsworth, John D; Jentsch, James D; Groman, Stephanie M; Roth, Robert H; Redmond, D. Eugene; Leranth, Csaba

    2015-01-01

    Bisphenol-A (BPA) is widely used in the manufacture of plastics, epoxy resins and certain paper products. A majority of the population in the developed world is routinely exposed to BPA from multiple sources and has significant circulating levels of BPA. Although BPA is categorized as an endocrine disruptor with a growing literature on adverse effects, it is uncertain whether cognitive dysfunction is induced in humans by exposure to BPA. The present study examined the impact of BPA in primate brain by exposing adult male vervet monkeys for 4 weeks continuously to circulating levels of BPA that were in the range measured in studies of humans environmentally exposed to BPA. This regimen of exposure to BPA decreased both working memory accuracy and the number of excitatory synaptic inputs on dendritic spines of pyramidal neurons in two brain regions that are necessary for working memory (prefrontal cortex and hippocampus). These observed behavioral and synaptic effects ameliorated following withdrawal from BPA. As Old world monkeys (e.g., vervets) and humans share some uniquely primate morphological, endocrine and cognitive traits, this study indicates the potential for significant cognitive disruption following exposure of humans to BPA. PMID:25557059

  1. Metabolism and pharmacokinetics of the combination Zidovudine plus Lamivudine in the adult Erythrocebus patas monkey determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Divi, Rao L.; Doerge, Daniel R.; Twaddle, Nathan C.; Shockley, Marie E.; St Claire, Marisa C.; Harbaugh, Jeffrey W.; Harbaugh, Steven W.; Poirier, Miriam C.

    2008-01-15

    Because of their similarity to humans, non-human primates constitute useful preclinical models in which to examine potential human drug toxicities. Antiretroviral nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) toxicity is currently under investigation in Erythrocebus patas monkeys, and whereas NRTI pharmacokinetics have been studied in other monkey species, pharmacokinetics for Zidovudine plus Lamivudine (AZT/3TC) dosing have not been reported in the patas. Here we present 24 h serum pharmacokinetic parameters after a single oral exposure to the combination of AZT (40 mg) and 3TC (24 mg), doses equivalent to a human daily dose of Combivir (registered) . The patas (n = 3) AZT/3TC pharmacokinetic profiles were similar to those seen in other primate species. Average maximum serum concentrations (C{sub max}) for AZT and 3TC were 2.35 and 2.65 {mu}g/ml, respectively, and were observed at 0.83 h (T{sub max}). C{sub max} was 13.34 {mu}g/ml for the AZT-glucuronide (AZT-G) and was 0.023 {mu}g/ml for the potentially toxic minor metabolite 3'-amino-3'-deoxythymidine (AMT), both occurring at about 1 h after dosing. Similar elimination half-times, 0.70 and 0.68 h{sup -1}, were found for AZT and AZT-G, respectively, while 3TC was eliminated about half as fast (0.33 h{sup -1}) resulting in AUC{sub (0-{infinity})} values of 6.97 {mu}g/ml h for 3TC, 2.99 {mu}g/ml h for AZT, 20.5 {mu}g/ml h for AZT-G and 0.002 for AMT 6.97 {mu}g/ml h. This study shows similar metabolism and pharmacokinetics for oral administration of AZT/3TC in the adult patas monkey, other primate species and humans. The data validate the use of the patas monkey for studies of NRTI toxicity.

  2. Scaling of the mandible in squirrels.

    PubMed

    Velhagen, W A; Roth, V L

    1997-05-01

    We compared the shape of the mandible among New World tree squirrels and selected outgroup taxa using linear measurements and areas defined by the median axis and conventional anatomical landmarks. We modified the median axis technique to define novel measurements, which proved complementary to those obtained from conventional landmarks. Allometric analyses showed that the scaling of the mandible among the New World tree squirrels is generally isometric (as has been observed in other groups of mammals), but diverges from isometry in a tendency in smaller animals for the masseteric ridge to be displaced anteriorly, the condylar process and posterior portion of the ascending ramus to be relatively elongated, and the coronoid process to be shortened. Allometric analyses also revealed the ways and extent that outgrowth taxa deviated from the scaling pattern observed for the New World tree squirrels. A flying squirrel (subfamily Pteromyinae), a moderate-sized callosciurine squirrel, and three species of pygmy tree squirrels from Asia and Africa show mandibular proportions very similar to those predicted for New World tree squirrels of corresponding size. Ground squirrels (tribe Marmotini) and successively more distant relatives such as Aplodontia, two myomorph rodents, and a rabbit show greater differences from the New World tree squirrels in their mandibular proportions. Combining the use of median-axis and conventional measurements makes it possible to examine changing relationships between locations of anatomically homologous landmarks and the geometry of the form. PMID:9097464

  3. Age differences in arousal and vigilance in California ground squirrels (Spermophilus beecheyi).

    PubMed

    Hanson, M T; Coss, R G

    2001-11-01

    Newly emerged pup, juvenile, and adult California ground squirrels (Spermophilus beecheyi douglasii) were videorecorded at a seminatural field site in northern California. Video data revealed age differences in the budgeting of ground squirrel behavior, habitat use, and physiological arousal as indicated by morphometric analyses of tail piloerection. Adults and juveniles devoted their time to foraging in the open at feeding stations while displaying low to moderate levels of arousal, respectively. Pups remained vigilant on the fringe of covered habitats while displaying comparatively higher levels of arousal. Higher pup arousal may facilitate memory formation during early stages of development. PMID:11745313

  4. The time course of follicle-stimulating hormone suppression by recombinant human inhibin A in the adult male rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Ramaswamy, S; Pohl, C R; McNeilly, A S; Winters, S J; Plant, T M

    1998-08-01

    In higher primates, FSH secretion appears to be regulated by a control system consistent with that described by the classical inhibin hypothesis. The purpose of the present experiment was to examine the time course of inhibin's action to suppress FSH secretion in the intact adult male rhesus monkey. To this end, five adult males implanted with indwelling venous catheters and exhibiting typical episodic patterns of LH and testosterone (T) secretion received a 4-day i.v. infusion of recombinant human (rh) inhibin A (832 ng/h x kg) followed, after a 4-week interval, by vehicle infusion of similar duration. Changes in circulating FSH concentrations during the inhibin and vehicle infusions were determined using a sensitive homologous macaque RIA, whereas enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were employed to track inhibin A, inhibin B, and inhibin pro-alpha-C levels during the experiment. Normal pulsatile activity in the hypothalamic-pituitary-Leydig cell axis was confirmed by monitoring changes in circulating concentrations of LH and T in 12-h windows of sequential blood collection (1200-2400 h; every 20 min) before, during, and after the rh inhibin A and vehicle infusions. Although infusion of rh inhibin A, which led to a 12 ng/ml square wave increment in circulating levels of this inhibin dimer, produced a marked decline in circulating FSH concentrations, significant suppression of the secretion of this gonadotropin was not manifest until 54 h after initiation of the infusion. Despite the marked decline in FSH secretion during the last 24 h of the 4-day infusion of recombinant hormone, circulating inhibin B and pro-alpha-C concentrations were maintained at preinfusion control levels (1 ng/ml). The finding that imposition of an exaggerated circulating inhibin signal led to suppression of FSH secretion in the male monkey only after 2 days of exposure to the hormone indicates that in this species the feedback action of testicular inhibin on FSH secretion is heavily lagged

  5. Monkey Business

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackwood, Christine Horvatis

    2012-01-01

    A ballerina, a gladiator, a camper, a baseball player, a surfer, and a shopper; these are just a few of the amazing monkeys that the author's seventh graders created from papier-mache. This project provided an opportunity for students to express themselves through the creation of sculptural characters based on their own interests, hobbies, and…

  6. Oxytocin enhances gaze-following responses to videos of natural social behavior in adult male rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Putnam, P T; Roman, J M; Zimmerman, P E; Gothard, K M

    2016-10-01

    Gaze following is a basic building block of social behavior that has been observed in multiple species, including primates. The absence of gaze following is associated with abnormal development of social cognition, such as in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Some social deficits in ASD, including the failure to look at eyes and the inability to recognize facial expressions, are ameliorated by intranasal administration of oxytocin (IN-OT). Here we tested the hypothesis that IN-OT might enhance social processes that require active engagement with a social partner, such as gaze following. Alternatively, IN-OT may only enhance the perceptual salience of the eyes, and may not modify behavioral responses to social signals. To test this hypothesis, we presented four monkeys with videos of conspecifics displaying natural behaviors. Each video was viewed multiple times before and after the monkeys received intranasally either 50 IU of OT or saline. We found that despite a gradual decrease in attention to the repeated viewing of the same videos (habituation), IN-OT consistently increased the frequency of gaze following saccades. Further analysis confirmed that these behaviors did not occur randomly, but rather predictably in response to the same segments of the videos. These findings suggest that in response to more naturalistic social stimuli IN-OT enhances the propensity to interact with a social partner rather than merely elevating the perceptual salience of the eyes. In light of these findings, gaze following may serve as a metric for pro-social effects of oxytocin that target social action more than social perception.

  7. Early life stress and novelty seeking behavior in adolescent monkeys.

    PubMed

    Parker, Karen J; Rainwater, Kimberly L; Buckmaster, Christine L; Schatzberg, Alan F; Lindley, Steven E; Lyons, David M

    2007-08-01

    Recent evidence suggests that early exposure to mild stress promotes the development of novelty seeking behavior. Here we test this hypothesis in squirrel monkeys and investigate whether novelty seeking behavior is associated with differences in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of the serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5HIAA), the dopamine metabolite homovanillic acid (HVA), the norepinephrine metabolite 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylethylene glycol (MHPG), and the neuropeptide corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF). Monkeys were randomized early in life to either mild intermittent stress (IS) or no stress (NS) conditions, and subsequently presented with opportunities to interact with a familiar or novel object in a test box that was connected to each monkey's home cage. To further minimize the potentially stressful nature of the test situation, monkeys were acclimated to the test procedures prior to study initiation. Post-test plasma levels of cortisol in IS and NS monkeys did not differ significantly from baseline levels measured in undisturbed conditions. During testing, more IS than NS monkeys voluntarily left the home cage, and IS monkeys spent more time in the test box compared to NS monkeys. More IS than NS monkeys engaged in object exploration in the test box, and IS monkeys preferred to interact with the novel vs. familiar object. Novelty seeking was not associated with differences in 5HIAA, HVA, MHPG, or CRF, but correlated with differences in object exploration observed in a different test situation at an earlier age. These trait-like differences in novelty seeking appear to reflect mild early stress-induced adaptations that enhance curiosity and resilience. PMID:17604913

  8. Precocious quantitative cognition in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Ferrigno, Stephen; Hughes, Kelly D; Cantlon, Jessica F

    2016-02-01

    Basic quantitative abilities are thought to have an innate basis in humans partly because the ability to discriminate quantities emerges early in child development. If humans and nonhuman primates share this developmentally primitive foundation of quantitative reasoning, then this ability should be present early in development across species and should emerge earlier in monkeys than in humans because monkeys mature faster than humans. We report that monkeys spontaneously make accurate quantity choices by 1 year of age in a task that human children begin to perform only at 2.5 to 3 years of age. Additionally, we report that the quantitative sensitivity of infant monkeys is equal to that of the adult animals in their group and that rates of learning do not differ between infant and adult animals. This novel evidence of precocious quantitative reasoning in infant monkeys suggests that human quantitative reasoning shares its early developing foundation with other primates. The data further suggest that early developing components of primate quantitative reasoning are constrained by maturational factors related to genetic development as opposed to learning experience alone. PMID:26187058

  9. Precocious quantitative cognition in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Ferrigno, Stephen; Hughes, Kelly D; Cantlon, Jessica F

    2016-02-01

    Basic quantitative abilities are thought to have an innate basis in humans partly because the ability to discriminate quantities emerges early in child development. If humans and nonhuman primates share this developmentally primitive foundation of quantitative reasoning, then this ability should be present early in development across species and should emerge earlier in monkeys than in humans because monkeys mature faster than humans. We report that monkeys spontaneously make accurate quantity choices by 1 year of age in a task that human children begin to perform only at 2.5 to 3 years of age. Additionally, we report that the quantitative sensitivity of infant monkeys is equal to that of the adult animals in their group and that rates of learning do not differ between infant and adult animals. This novel evidence of precocious quantitative reasoning in infant monkeys suggests that human quantitative reasoning shares its early developing foundation with other primates. The data further suggest that early developing components of primate quantitative reasoning are constrained by maturational factors related to genetic development as opposed to learning experience alone.

  10. Adult Cleaner Wrasse Outperform Capuchin Monkeys, Chimpanzees and Orang-utans in a Complex Foraging Task Derived from Cleaner – Client Reef Fish Cooperation

    PubMed Central

    Proctor, Darby; Essler, Jennifer; Pinto, Ana I.; Wismer, Sharon; Stoinski, Tara; Brosnan, Sarah F.; Bshary, Redouan

    2012-01-01

    The insight that animals' cognitive abilities are linked to their evolutionary history, and hence their ecology, provides the framework for the comparative approach. Despite primates renowned dietary complexity and social cognition, including cooperative abilities, we here demonstrate that cleaner wrasse outperform three primate species, capuchin monkeys, chimpanzees and orang-utans, in a foraging task involving a choice between two actions, both of which yield identical immediate rewards, but only one of which yields an additional delayed reward. The foraging task decisions involve partner choice in cleaners: they must service visiting client reef fish before resident clients to access both; otherwise the former switch to a different cleaner. Wild caught adult, but not juvenile, cleaners learned to solve the task quickly and relearned the task when it was reversed. The majority of primates failed to perform above chance after 100 trials, which is in sharp contrast to previous studies showing that primates easily learn to choose an action that yields immediate double rewards compared to an alternative action. In conclusion, the adult cleaners' ability to choose a superior action with initially neutral consequences is likely due to repeated exposure in nature, which leads to specific learned optimal foraging decision rules. PMID:23185293

  11. Decrease in hypothalamic Kiss1 and Kiss1r expression: a potential mechanism for fasting-induced suppression of the HPG axis in the adult male rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Wahab, F; Ullah, F; Chan, Y-M; Seminara, S B; Shahab, M

    2011-02-01

    Fasting suppresses functioning of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis by mechanisms that are incompletely understood. In 2003, hypothalamic kisspeptin-Kiss1r signaling was discovered to play a significant role in regulating the HPG axis. We have recently shown that in adult male macaques, short-term fasting attenuates the response of the HPG axis to an exogenous kisspeptin challenge. In the present study, we explored the mechanism underlying this attenuated response by examining the modulation of the hypothalamic expression of KISS1 and KISS1R under short-term fasting and normal feeding conditions in the adult male macaques. Hypothalamic mRNA was extracted from normal fed (n=3) and 48-h fasted (n=3) monkeys. KISS1, KISS1R, and GNRH1 mRNA were quantified by reverse transcription followed by real-time polymerase chain reaction. In addition, blood samples were collected for measurement of plasma concentrations of glucose, cortisol, leptin, and testosterone. In contrast to fed animals, plasma glucose, leptin, and testosterone levels decreased and cortisol levels increased in fasted animals. The hypothalamic expression of KISS1 and KISS1R mRNA was significantly lower (p<0.05) in fasted monkeys compared to fed monkeys while hypothalamic GNRH1 mRNA expression was comparable between the 2 groups. Thus, our results demonstrate that expression of hypothalamic KISS1 and KISS1R decrease after a short-term fasting in monkeys. This decrease may contribute to the suppression of the HPG axis during fasting conditions in primates. In addition, our finding of lower expression of KISS1R in fasted monkeys provides an explanation for the attenuation in the HPG axis response to peripheral kisspeptin challenge during short-term fasting.

  12. A comparison of adult body size between captive and wild vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops sabaeus) on the island of St. Kitts.

    PubMed

    Turner, Trudy R; Cramer, Jennifer Danzy; Nisbett, Alexis; Patrick Gray, J

    2016-04-01

    Weight and 34 morphological measurements were obtained from 103 vervet monkeys living either in the wild or in captive colonies derived from the wild populations on the island of St. Kitts in the Eastern Caribbean. All measures were taken during the same week, eliminating bias that might result from changing seasonal environmental conditions. Vervets on St. Kitts are all descended from a small number of individuals brought to the island approximately 400 years ago from West Africa, thus eliminating bias that might result from subspecific size differences. We conducted a principal components analysis (PCA) and compared individual traits between captive and wild adult animals. Morphological measures such as body, arm, and leg length did not differ significantly between animals living in the wild and animals in captivity. Weight and measures indicating condition-including body mass index (BMI), chest, thigh, and upper arm girth were all higher for animals living in captivity. More consistent available food is probably the cause of differences in measures reflecting condition. PMID:26801341

  13. Ovarian hormones differentially influence immunoreactivity for dopamine beta- hydroxylase, choline acetyltransferase, and serotonin in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex of adult rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Kritzer, M F; Kohama, S G

    1999-07-01

    Recent studies have shown that ovariectomy reduces, and subsequent hormone replacement restores the density of axons immunoreactive for tyrosine hydroxylase in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex of adult female rhesus monkeys. The present study indicates that three additional extrathalamic frontal lobe afferents are also sensitive to changes in the ovarian hormone environment. Specifically, the combination of hormone manipulation with qualitative and quantitative analysis of immunocytochemistry for dopamine beta-hydroxylase, choline acetyltransferase, and serotonin in the primate prefrontal cortex revealed quantitative responses in both cholinergic and monoaminergic axons to changing ovarian hormone levels. However, whereas ovariectomy produced a modest net decrease in the density of fibers immunoreactive for choline acetyltransferase, this same treatment markedly increased the density of axons immunoreactive for dopamine beta-hydroxylase and for serotonin. Further, the effects of ovariectomy on these afferent systems were differentially attenuated by estrogen verses estrogen plus progesterone hormone replacement. Estrogen was as effective as estrogen plus progesterone in stimulating normal prefrontal immunoreactivity for choline acetyltransferase and dopamine beta-hydroxylase. The dual replacement of estrogen plus progesterone, however, was a much more potent influence than estrogen alone for serotonin immunoreactivity. Thus, ovarian hormones appear to provide stimulation that differentially affects each of four chemically identified extrathalamic prefrontal afferent systems examined to date, and may have roles in maintaining the normal balance and functional interactions between these neurotransmitter systems.

  14. Fitness implications of seasonal climate variation in Columbian ground squirrels.

    PubMed

    Dobson, F Stephen; Lane, Jeffrey E; Low, Matthew; Murie, Jan O

    2016-08-01

    The influence of climate change on the fitness of wild populations is often studied in the context of the spring onset of the reproductive season. This focus is relevant for climate influences on reproductive success, but neglects other fitness-relevant periods (e.g., autumn preparation for overwintering). We examined variation in climate variables (temperature, rainfall, snowfall, and snowpack) across the full annual cycle of Columbian ground squirrels (Urocitellus columbianus) for 21 years. We investigated seasonal climate variables that were associated with fitness variables, climate variables that exhibited directional changes across the study period, and finally observed declines in fitness (-0.03 units/year; total decline = 37%) that were associated with directional changes in climate variables. Annual fitness of adult female ground squirrels was positively associated with spring temperature (r = 0.69) and early summer rainfall (r = 0.56) and negatively associated with spring snow conditions (r = -0.44 to -0.66). Across the 21 years, spring snowmelt has become significantly delayed (r = 0.48) and summer rainfall became significantly reduced (r = -0.53). Using a standardized partial regression model, we found that directional changes in the timing of spring snowmelt and early summer rainfall (i.e., progressively drier summers) had moderate influences on annual fitness, with the latter statistically significant (ρ = -0.314 and 0.437, respectively). The summer period corresponds to prehibernation fattening of young and adult ground squirrels. Had we focused on a single point in time (viz. the onset of the breeding season), we would have underestimated the influences of climate change on our population. Rather, we obtained a comprehensive understanding of the influences of climate change on individual fitness by investigating the full lifecycle. PMID:27547341

  15. Fitness implications of seasonal climate variation in Columbian ground squirrels.

    PubMed

    Dobson, F Stephen; Lane, Jeffrey E; Low, Matthew; Murie, Jan O

    2016-08-01

    The influence of climate change on the fitness of wild populations is often studied in the context of the spring onset of the reproductive season. This focus is relevant for climate influences on reproductive success, but neglects other fitness-relevant periods (e.g., autumn preparation for overwintering). We examined variation in climate variables (temperature, rainfall, snowfall, and snowpack) across the full annual cycle of Columbian ground squirrels (Urocitellus columbianus) for 21 years. We investigated seasonal climate variables that were associated with fitness variables, climate variables that exhibited directional changes across the study period, and finally observed declines in fitness (-0.03 units/year; total decline = 37%) that were associated with directional changes in climate variables. Annual fitness of adult female ground squirrels was positively associated with spring temperature (r = 0.69) and early summer rainfall (r = 0.56) and negatively associated with spring snow conditions (r = -0.44 to -0.66). Across the 21 years, spring snowmelt has become significantly delayed (r = 0.48) and summer rainfall became significantly reduced (r = -0.53). Using a standardized partial regression model, we found that directional changes in the timing of spring snowmelt and early summer rainfall (i.e., progressively drier summers) had moderate influences on annual fitness, with the latter statistically significant (ρ = -0.314 and 0.437, respectively). The summer period corresponds to prehibernation fattening of young and adult ground squirrels. Had we focused on a single point in time (viz. the onset of the breeding season), we would have underestimated the influences of climate change on our population. Rather, we obtained a comprehensive understanding of the influences of climate change on individual fitness by investigating the full lifecycle.

  16. Functional Signature of Recovering Cortex: Dissociation of Local Field Potentials and Spiking Activity in Somatosensory Cortices of Spinal Cord Injured Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zheng; Qi, Hui-Xin; Kaas, Jon H.; Roe, Anna W.; Chen, Li Min

    2013-01-01

    After disruption of dorsal column afferents at high cervical spinal levels in adult monkeys, somatosensory cortical neurons recover responsiveness to tactile stimulation of the hand; this reactivation correlates with a recovery of hand use. However, it is not known if all neuronal response properties recover, and whether different cortical areas recover in a similar manner. To address this, we recorded neuronal activity in cortical area 3b and S2 in adult squirrel monkeys weeks after unilateral lesion of the dorsal columns. We found that in response to vibrotactile stimulation, local field potentials remained robust at all frequency ranges. However, neuronal spiking activity failed to follow at high frequencies (≥15Hz). We suggest that the failure to generate spiking activity at high stimulus frequency reflects a changed balance of inhibition and excitation in both area 3b and S2, and that this mismatch in spiking and local field potential is a signature of an early phase of recovering cortex (< two months). PMID:24017995

  17. Ground squirrel tail-flag displays alter both predatory strike and ambush site selection behaviours of rattlesnakes.

    PubMed

    Barbour, Matthew A; Clark, Rulon W

    2012-09-22

    Many species approach, inspect and signal towards their predators. These behaviours are often interpreted as predator-deterrent signals--honest signals that indicate to a predator that continued hunting is likely to be futile. However, many of these putative predator-deterrent signals are given when no predator is present, and it remains unclear if and why such signals deter predators. We examined the effects of one such signal, the tail-flag display of California ground squirrels, which is frequently given both during and outside direct encounters with northern Pacific rattlesnakes. We video-recorded and quantified the ambush foraging responses of rattlesnakes to tail-flagging displays from ground squirrels. We found that tail-flagging deterred snakes from striking squirrels, most likely by advertising squirrel vigilance (i.e. readiness to dodge a snake strike). We also found that tail-flagging by adult squirrels increased the likelihood that snakes would leave their ambush site, apparently by elevating the vigilance of nearby squirrels which reduces the profitability of the ambush site. Our results provide some of the first empirical evidence of the mechanisms by which a prey display, although frequently given in the absence of a predator, may still deter predators during encounters. PMID:22787023

  18. Ground squirrel tail-flag displays alter both predatory strike and ambush site selection behaviours of rattlesnakes.

    PubMed

    Barbour, Matthew A; Clark, Rulon W

    2012-09-22

    Many species approach, inspect and signal towards their predators. These behaviours are often interpreted as predator-deterrent signals--honest signals that indicate to a predator that continued hunting is likely to be futile. However, many of these putative predator-deterrent signals are given when no predator is present, and it remains unclear if and why such signals deter predators. We examined the effects of one such signal, the tail-flag display of California ground squirrels, which is frequently given both during and outside direct encounters with northern Pacific rattlesnakes. We video-recorded and quantified the ambush foraging responses of rattlesnakes to tail-flagging displays from ground squirrels. We found that tail-flagging deterred snakes from striking squirrels, most likely by advertising squirrel vigilance (i.e. readiness to dodge a snake strike). We also found that tail-flagging by adult squirrels increased the likelihood that snakes would leave their ambush site, apparently by elevating the vigilance of nearby squirrels which reduces the profitability of the ambush site. Our results provide some of the first empirical evidence of the mechanisms by which a prey display, although frequently given in the absence of a predator, may still deter predators during encounters.

  19. Predation on giant flying squirrels (Petaurista philippensis) by black crested gibbons (Nomascus concolor jingdongensis) at Mt. Wuliang, Yunnan, China.

    PubMed

    Fan, Peng-Fei; Jiang, Xue-Long

    2009-01-01

    Predation on vertebrates is infrequent in gibbons. In a 14-month field study of the central Yunnan black crested gibbon (Nomascus concolor jingdongensis) at Mt. Wuliang, Yunnan, China, we observed gibbons attacking, killing and eating giant flying squirrels (Petaurista philippensis). During 845 h of observation on one study group, the gibbons attacked giant flying squirrels 11 times, and succeeded in 4 cases. Although all members of the group attempted to attack the squirrels, all four successful attacks were made by the same adult female. The victims were infants in three cases and a juvenile or sub-adult in one case. Black crested gibbons also attacked adult giant flying squirrels by grabbing their long tails and throwing them from the canopy, but they failed to catch or kill the prey in three cases observed. Passive meat sharing occurred in three out of four successful cases. Besides hunting giant flying squirrels, the black crested gibbons also ate eggs or chicks in two birds' nests and one lizard. PMID:19015936

  20. Tularemia without lesions in grey tree squirrels: A diagnostic challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fifteen cases of Francisella tularenesis infection (tularemia) were identified in western grey (Sciurus griseus) and eastern grey (Sciurus carolinesis) squirrels submitted to the Washington Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory between 2008 and 2011. All of the squirrels originated in Washington stat...

  1. Thirteen-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) show microstructural bone loss during hibernation but preserve bone macrostructural geometry and strength.

    PubMed

    McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E; Stoll, Danielle M; Mantila, Emily R; Fahrner, Bryna K; Carey, Hannah V; Donahue, Seth W

    2011-04-15

    Lack of activity causes bone loss In most animals. Hibernating bears have physiological processes to prevent cortical and trabecular bone loss associated with reduced physical activity, but different mechanisms of torpor among hibernating species may lead to differences in skeletal responses to hibernation. There are conflicting reports regarding whether small mammals experience bone loss during hibernation. To investigate this phenomenon, we measured cortical and trabecular bone properties in physically active and hibernating juvenile and adult 13-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus, previous genus name Spermophilus). Cortical bone geometry, strength and mineral content were similar in hibernating compared with active squirrels, suggesting that hibernation did not cause macrostructural cortical bone loss. Osteocyte lacunar size increased (linear regression, P=0.001) over the course of hibernation in juvenile squirrels, which may indicate an osteocytic role in mineral homeostasis during hibernation. Osteocyte lacunar density and porosity were greater (+44 and +59%, respectively; P<0.0001) in hibernating compared with active squirrels, which may reflect a decrease in osteoblastic activity (per cell) during hibernation. Trabecular bone volume fraction in the proximal tibia was decreased (-20%; P=0.028) in hibernating compared with physically active adult squirrels, but was not different between hibernating and active juvenile squirrels. Taken together, these data suggest that 13-lined ground squirrels may be unable to prevent microstructural losses of cortical and trabecular bone during hibernation, but importantly may possess a biological mechanism to preserve cortical bone macrostructure and strength during hibernation, thus preventing an increased risk of bone fracture during remobilization in the spring.

  2. Woodland fragmentation affects space use of Eurasian red squirrels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbeylen, Goedele; Wauters, Lucas A.; De Bruyn, Luc; Matthysen, Erik

    2009-01-01

    When habitats become fragmented, variation in patch size and quality are expected to impose changes on the spacing pattern and social organization of animal populations. General theory predicts different possible responses including shrinking home ranges (fission response), increasing range overlap (fusion) and incorporation of multiple patches in the home range (expansion response) as fragmentation increases. We studied space use and social organization in a metapopulation of red squirrels ( Sciurus vulgaris) in 15 woodland fragments differing in size and tree species composition. Home ranges and core areas of males were larger than females, and fragmentation had different and complex effects on the spacing pattern of both sexes. In food-supplemented patches, high densities led to increased intra-sexual overlap. In linear-shaped patches, squirrels used smaller home ranges and core areas and had lower male-male and male-female overlap levels, independent of patch quality or size. Home range and core area size of males increased with patch size, and male core areas overlapped extensively those of other males and females. Hence males seemed to show a fission response only in some patches. In contrast, home range and core area size of females was not related with patch size, but decreased with habitat quality, supporting predictions of a fusion response and intra-sexual defense of food-based core areas. Hence, where patch size and shape strongly affected space use of male red squirrels, social organization of females was only affected in small, food-supplemented patches, suggesting that the basic spatio-social organization of adult females is very resistant to fragmentation.

  3. Comparative myology of the forelimb of squirrels (Sciuridae).

    PubMed

    Thorington, R W; Darrow, K; Betts, A D

    1997-11-01

    The musculature of the shoulder, arm, and forearm was studied in 19 genera of squirrels, representing the Pteromyinae (flying squirrels) and all 7 tribes of the Sciurinae (tree and ground squirrels). The objective was to locate derived anatomical features of functional or phylogenetic significance and to determine how much morphological variation underlies the diverse locomotor behavior of squirrels, which includes terrestrial and arboreal bounding, climbing, digging, and gliding. The fossil evidence suggests that arboreality is primitive for squirrels, and in fact tree squirrels appear to represent the primitive sciurid morphology. Ground squirrels are less uniform and exhibit a few derived features, including a clavobrachialis muscle not seen in other squirrels. Pygmy tree squirrels, which have evolved independently in three tribes, exhibit convergence of forelimb anatomy, including the loss or reduction of several muscles in the shoulder and forearm. The forelimb anatomy of flying squirrels is the most derived and differs from that of tree squirrels in details of shoulder, arm, and forearm musculature. Some of these muscular differences among squirrels have phylogenetic significance, being shared by closely related genera, but none has significance above the tribal level. Many of the differences suggest a variety of changes in function that are amenable to further study. PMID:9360319

  4. The occurrence of hepatozoon in the gray squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herman, C.M.; Price, D.L.

    1955-01-01

    Hepatozoon sciuri (Coles, 1914) is reported from gray squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis) in Washington, D.C. and Maryland. Blood smears stained with Giemsa's stain revealed a parasitemia in 16 to 71% of the squirrels examined. A technique for laking the red cells and concentrating the white cells in blood samples demonstrated this protozoon to be present in every squirrel so tested.

  5. The tree squirrel HP-25 gene is a pseudogene.

    PubMed

    Kojima, M; Shiba, T; Kondo, N; Takamatsu, N

    2001-11-01

    The gene for the hibernation-specific protein HP-25 is expressed in the liver in hibernating species of the squirrel family (chipmunk and ground squirrel), but not in a nonhibernating species (tree squirrel). To investigate why the HP-25 gene is not expressed in the tree squirrel, we isolated the tree squirrel HP-25 gene and compared its gene structure and promoter activity with that of the chipmunk. The tree squirrel HP-25 gene is composed of three exons, and the gene structures are conserved between the tree squirrel and chipmunk. However, the tree squirrel HP-25 gene has an insertional mutation of 13 nucleotides in exon 2 that disrupts the ORF. In the chipmunk HP-25 gene, the 80-bp 5' flanking sequence is sufficient for the liver-specific promoter activity, and HNF-4, which binds to the sequence from nucleotides -67 to -51, is involved in its transcriptional regulation. In contrast, the corresponding tree squirrel 5' flanking sequence had almost no promoter activity in HepG2 cells, and HNF-4 did not bind to the corresponding region of the tree squirrel HP-25 gene. Furthermore, a tree squirrel-type G to A mutation at -57 in the chipmunk HP-25 gene promoter context abolished its binding to and transactivation by HNF-4. Thus, the point mutation in the HNF-4-binding site is likely to be involved in the lack of HP-25 gene expression in the tree squirrel.

  6. Generation of Transgenic Monkeys with Human Inherited Genetic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Anthony W.S; Yang, Shang-Hsun

    2009-01-01

    Modeling human diseases using nonhuman primates including chimpanzee, rhesus, cynomolgus, marmoset and squirrel monkeys has been reported in the past decades. Due to the high similarity between nonhuman primates and humans, including genome constitution, cognitive behavioral functions, anatomical structure, metabolic, reproductive, and brain functions; nonhuman primates have played an important role in understanding physiological functions of the human body, clarifying the underlying mechanism of human diseases, and the development of novel treatments for human diseases. However, nonhuman primate research has been restricted to cognitive, behavioral, biochemical and pharmacological approaches of human diseases due to the limitation of gene transfer technology in nonhuman primates. The recent advancement in transgenic technology that has led to the generation of the first transgenic monkey in 2001 and a transgenic monkey model of Huntington's disease (HD) in 2008 has changed that focus. The creation of transgenic HD monkeys that replicate key pathological features of human HD patients further suggests the crucial role of nonhuman primates in the future development of biomedicine. These successes have opened the door to genetic manipulation in nonhuman primates and a new era in modeling human inherited genetic disorders. We focused on the procedures in creating transgenic Huntington's disease monkeys, but our work can be applied to transgenesis in other nonhuman primate species. PMID:19467335

  7. Hepatocellular carcinoma in ground squirrels persistently infected with ground squirrel hepatitis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Marion, P L; Van Davelaar, M J; Knight, S S; Salazar, F H; Garcia, G; Popper, H; Robinson, W S

    1986-01-01

    Although persistent infection with hepatitis B virus and woodchuck hepatitis virus has been associated with development of hepatocellular carcinoma in the host, little has been known of such an association with ground squirrel hepatitis virus (GSHV), which is closely related to the woodchuck virus. Colonies of GSHV-infected and -uninfected Beechey ground squirrels were observed for tumors for a period of 5 years. Tumors developed in seven squirrels after a minimum of 2.4 years of observation per animal; each of the seven animals was over 4 years old when the tumor was detected. The predominant type of tumor was hepatocellular carcinoma, which appeared in 2 of 28 GSHV-bearing animals studied and in 1 of 23 squirrels with antibody to the virus. No hepatocellular carcinoma appeared in 24 GSHV marker-free squirrels. Integrated GSHV DNA was found in the hepatocellular carcinoma tissue of the one carrier animal examined, paralleling the frequent findings of integrated hepatitis B and woodchuck hepatitis viral DNA in human and woodchuck hepatocellular carcinoma. Although the incidence of liver carcinoma reported here in carrier ground squirrels is neither as great as that in carrier woodchucks nor statistically different from the incidence in noncarrier squirrels, the data presented suggest that persistent infection with GSHV may also be associated with hepatocellular carcinoma. Images PMID:3012572

  8. Jaw muscles of New World squirrels.

    PubMed

    Ball, S S; Roth, V L

    1995-06-01

    The jaw, suprahyoid, and extrinsic tongue muscles are described for eight species of New World squirrels, spanning more than an order of magnitude in body mass. Anatomical differences are discussed in the light of body size, natural history, and phylogeny. The relative sizes of different muscles, their orientations, and the shapes and positions of their areas of attachment vary but show few trends in relation to body size. The anatomical differences are likewise not readily explained by the mechanical requirements of the animals' diets, which are similar. The most marked anatomical differences occur in Sciurillus (the pygmy tree squirrel), as well as those genera--Glaucomys (the flying squirrel) and Tamias (the chipmunk)--that are taxonomically most distinct from the tree squirrels. Sciurillus is noteworthy for its unusually small temporalis and an anterior deep masseter that is oriented to assist in retraction of the jaw. Tamias has a more vertically oriented temporalis and greater inclination in the anterior masseter muscles than the other squirrels, features that may be associated with its large diastema and relatively posteriorly situated cheek teeth, which in turn may relate to its having cheek pouches. Our results form a valuable database of information to be used in further studies of functional morphology and phylogeny. PMID:7541086

  9. A squirrel searches for food at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    An Eastern gray squirrel pauses in its daily search for food in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. The Eastern gray squirrel is found in wooded, suburban, and urban areas statewide. It nests in tree hollows or leaf nests in treetops. It forages during the day, mainly early morning and late afternoon, both on the ground and in trees, living on a diet of acorns, nuts, fruits, berries, insects, and bird eggs. Food plants include cypress, buckeyes, elms, grapes, tulip trees, mulberries, and tupelo. It breeds in late winter or early spring and again in late spring or summer, bearing two to six young. The eastern gray squirrel chatters when disturbed. The 92,000-acre wildlife refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles.

  10. Eye model for the ground squirrel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sussman, Dafna; Chou, B. Ralph; Lakshminarayanan, Vasudevan

    2011-11-01

    This paper presents an anatomically-correct eye model for the ground squirrel, a diurnal, highly-developed mammal with high visual acuity. This model can assist in understanding the relationship between ocular structural development and its corresponding function. The eye model is constructed based on anatomical measurements of thicknesses and indices of refraction of the various ocular media. The model then derives the gradient index distribution of the crystalline lens using a ray tracing method with a Monte Carlo optimization. Results indicate a diffraction-limited ocular behaviour, implying the visual acuity of the ground squirrel is more likely to be limited by photoreceptor density and diffraction effects, than by ocular geometry.

  11. Spatial Relational Memory in 9-Month-Old Macaque Monkeys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavenex, Pierre; Lavenex, Pamela Banta

    2006-01-01

    This experiment assesses spatial and nonspatial relational memory in freely moving 9-mo-old and adult (11-13-yr-old) macaque monkeys ("Macaca mulatta"). We tested the use of proximal landmarks, two different objects placed at the center of an open-field arena, as conditional cues allowing monkeys to predict the location of food rewards hidden in…

  12. Suspension of mitotic activity in dentate gyrus of the hibernating ground squirrel.

    PubMed

    Popov, Victor I; Kraev, Igor V; Ignat'ev, Dmitri A; Stewart, Michael G

    2011-01-01

    Neurogenesis occurs in the adult mammalian hippocampus, a region of the brain important for learning and memory. Hibernation in Siberian ground squirrels provides a natural model to study mitosis as the rapid fall in body temperature in 24 h (from 35-36°C to +4-6°C) permits accumulation of mitotic cells at different stages of the cell cycle. Histological methods used to study adult neurogenesis are limited largely to fixed tissue, and the mitotic state elucidated depends on the specific phase of mitosis at the time of day. However, using an immunohistochemical study of doublecortin (DCX) and BrdU-labelled neurons, we demonstrate that the dentate gyrus of the ground squirrel hippocampus contains a population of immature cells which appear to possess mitotic activity. Our data suggest that doublecortin-labelled immature cells exist in a mitotic state and may represent a renewable pool for generation of new neurons within the dentate gyrus.

  13. Delayed effect of pinealectomy on hibernation of the golden-mantled ground squirrel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralph, C. L.; Harlow, H. J.; Phillips, J. A.

    1982-12-01

    Pinealectomy or radical sham pinealectomy were performed on adult golden-mantled ground squirrels, Spermophilus (=Citellus) lateralis, approximately 1 month prior to the date of normal winter emergence. The first hibernatory period and subsequent active season were not different in either of the operated groups from intact animals. However, although the initiation of the second hibernatory period was not affected in the pinealectomized animals, this group failed to show the progressive increase in the length of heterothermic bouts that is characteristic of normal hibernation. Also, terminal arousal occurred approximately 6 weeks earlier in the second year after pinealectomy. Male squirrels showed a corresponding time compression in their annual gonadal cycle, as was assessed by testicular state. These results suggest that the pineal gland of the golden-mantled ground squirrel is involved in the expression of the annual hibernatory cycle. In the absence of the pineal gland the adult of this species is unable to sustain the normal depth and duration of hibernation in the second over-wintering period following pinealectomy. We have carried out additional experiments with young, laboratory-born S. lateralis and with field-caught, adult S. richardsonii. The results of these studies also are described in this paper.

  14. Flying squirrels and their ectoparasites: disseminators of epidemic typhus.

    PubMed

    McDade, J E

    1987-03-01

    Information gathered during the past decade indicates that the eastern flying squirrel, Glaucomys volans, is a zoonotic reservoir of Rickettsia prowazekii - causative agent of louse-borne (epidemic) typhus. The sporadic cases o f typhus that have occurred in the USA in association with flying squirrels provide evidence that flying squirrels can transmit R. prowazekii infection to humons. Strains of R. prowazekii, isolated from flying squirrels multiply readily in human body lice, but flying squirrel lice, although readily infected, are very host specific and tend not to bite humans. It may be that the infection is spread to humans in infective ectoporasite faeces aerosolized when the flying squirrels groom themselves. As Joseph McDade emphasizes in this article, current concepts of typhus epidemiology and control must be re-evaluated to take into account this zoonotic aspect. PMID:15462918

  15. Hoarding patterns in the southern flying squirrel (Glaucomys volans)

    SciTech Connect

    Clemmer, S.M.

    1984-05-01

    Southern flying squirrels, Glaucomys volans, were individually offered two size classes of pecans in a 1:1 ratio to establish preference. All but one squirrel preferred small pecans. As relative abundance of preferred food diminished to 0.10, squirrels switched preference. Absolute abundance of either food did not affect caching levels. A difficulty-of-retrieval experiment did not result in switching of preference. No effect of sex on hoarding was exhibited. There was an inverse correlation between individual storing effort and caching levels of the same squirrels tested as pairs, with individual non-storers showing increases in numbers of pecans stored. Animals that were active storers as individuals showed decreases when paired. Total number stored did not decrease significantly when squirrels were offered previously marked pecans. When offered own-marked and other-marked pecans, squirrels did not discriminate. 43 references, 3 figures, 6 tables.

  16. On the replacement of the red squirrel in Britain: a phytotoxic explanation.

    PubMed

    Kenward, R E; Holm, J L

    1993-03-22

    Diffusion modelling has shown that conservative demographic traits combined with feeding competition could explain red squirrel replacement by grey squirrels. We used field data from seven separate red and grey squirrel populations, in oak-hazel woods and Scots pines, to reject the hypothesis that red squirrel density and breeding is intrinsically poorer than that of grey squirrels. In oak-hazel woods, grey squirrel foraging, density and productivity were related to oak and acorn abundance. In contrast, red squirrels foraged where hazels were abundant; their relatively low density and breeding success were related to the abundance of hazel nuts. Red squirrels failed to exploit good acorn crops, although acorns were more abundant than hazels, but in Scots pines had densities and breeding success as high as grey squirrels in deciduous woods. Captive grey squirrels thrived on a diet of acorns, but red squirrels had a comparative digestive efficiency of only 59%, apparently because they were much less able than grey squirrels to neutralize acorn polyphenols. A model with simple competition for the autumn hazel crop, which was eaten by grey squirrels before the acorn crop, shows that red squirrels are unlikely to persist with grey squirrels in woods with more than 14% oak canopy. With oaks in most British deciduous woods giving grey squirrels a food refuge which red squirrels fail to exploit, replacement of red squirrels can be explained by feeding competition alone, exacerbated by the post-war decline in coppiced hazel. PMID:8097326

  17. Characterization of the Sweet Taste Receptor Tas1r2 from an Old World Monkey Species Rhesus Monkey and Species-Dependent Activation of the Monomeric Receptor by an Intense Sweetener Perillartine.

    PubMed

    Cai, Chenggu; Jiang, Hua; Li, Lei; Liu, Tianming; Song, Xuejie; Liu, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Sweet state is a basic physiological sensation of humans and other mammals which is mediated by the broadly acting sweet taste receptor-the heterodimer of Tas1r2 (taste receptor type 1 member 2) and Tas1r3 (taste receptor type 1 member 3). Various sweeteners interact with either Tas1r2 or Tas1r3 and then activate the receptor. In this study, we cloned, expressed and functionally characterized the taste receptor Tas1r2 from a species of Old World monkeys, the rhesus monkey. Paired with the human TAS1R3, it was shown that the rhesus monkey Tas1r2 could respond to natural sugars, amino acids and their derivates. Furthermore, similar to human TAS1R2, rhesus monkey Tas1r2 could respond to artificial sweeteners and sweet-tasting proteins. However, the responses induced by rhesus monkey Tas1r2 could not be inhibited by the sweet inhibitor amiloride. Moreover, we found a species-dependent activation of the Tas1r2 monomeric receptors of human, rhesus monkey and squirrel monkey but not mouse by an intense sweetener perillartine. Molecular modeling and sequence analysis indicate that the receptor has the conserved domains and ligand-specific interactive residues, which have been identified in the characterized sweet taste receptors up to now. This is the first report of the functional characterization of sweet taste receptors from an Old World monkey species. PMID:27479072

  18. Characterization of the Sweet Taste Receptor Tas1r2 from an Old World Monkey Species Rhesus Monkey and Species-Dependent Activation of the Monomeric Receptor by an Intense Sweetener Perillartine

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Chenggu; Jiang, Hua; Li, Lei; Liu, Tianming; Song, Xuejie; Liu, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Sweet state is a basic physiological sensation of humans and other mammals which is mediated by the broadly acting sweet taste receptor-the heterodimer of Tas1r2 (taste receptor type 1 member 2) and Tas1r3 (taste receptor type 1 member 3). Various sweeteners interact with either Tas1r2 or Tas1r3 and then activate the receptor. In this study, we cloned, expressed and functionally characterized the taste receptor Tas1r2 from a species of Old World monkeys, the rhesus monkey. Paired with the human TAS1R3, it was shown that the rhesus monkey Tas1r2 could respond to natural sugars, amino acids and their derivates. Furthermore, similar to human TAS1R2, rhesus monkey Tas1r2 could respond to artificial sweeteners and sweet-tasting proteins. However, the responses induced by rhesus monkey Tas1r2 could not be inhibited by the sweet inhibitor amiloride. Moreover, we found a species-dependent activation of the Tas1r2 monomeric receptors of human, rhesus monkey and squirrel monkey but not mouse by an intense sweetener perillartine. Molecular modeling and sequence analysis indicate that the receptor has the conserved domains and ligand-specific interactive residues, which have been identified in the characterized sweet taste receptors up to now. This is the first report of the functional characterization of sweet taste receptors from an Old World monkey species. PMID:27479072

  19. Characterization of the Sweet Taste Receptor Tas1r2 from an Old World Monkey Species Rhesus Monkey and Species-Dependent Activation of the Monomeric Receptor by an Intense Sweetener Perillartine.

    PubMed

    Cai, Chenggu; Jiang, Hua; Li, Lei; Liu, Tianming; Song, Xuejie; Liu, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Sweet state is a basic physiological sensation of humans and other mammals which is mediated by the broadly acting sweet taste receptor-the heterodimer of Tas1r2 (taste receptor type 1 member 2) and Tas1r3 (taste receptor type 1 member 3). Various sweeteners interact with either Tas1r2 or Tas1r3 and then activate the receptor. In this study, we cloned, expressed and functionally characterized the taste receptor Tas1r2 from a species of Old World monkeys, the rhesus monkey. Paired with the human TAS1R3, it was shown that the rhesus monkey Tas1r2 could respond to natural sugars, amino acids and their derivates. Furthermore, similar to human TAS1R2, rhesus monkey Tas1r2 could respond to artificial sweeteners and sweet-tasting proteins. However, the responses induced by rhesus monkey Tas1r2 could not be inhibited by the sweet inhibitor amiloride. Moreover, we found a species-dependent activation of the Tas1r2 monomeric receptors of human, rhesus monkey and squirrel monkey but not mouse by an intense sweetener perillartine. Molecular modeling and sequence analysis indicate that the receptor has the conserved domains and ligand-specific interactive residues, which have been identified in the characterized sweet taste receptors up to now. This is the first report of the functional characterization of sweet taste receptors from an Old World monkey species.

  20. Red squirrel habitat mapping using remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaherty, Silvia Susana

    This study investigated the relationship between squirrel feeding activity and structural characteristics of Scots pine forests. Field data were collected from two study areas: Abernethy and Aberfoyle Forests. Canopy closure, diameter at breast height, height and number of trees were measured in 56 plots. Abundance of squirrel feeding signs was used as an index of habitat use. A GLM was used to model the response of cones stripped by squirrels in relation to the field collected structural variables. Results show that forest structural characteristics are significant predictors of feeding sign presence, with canopy closure, number of trees and tree height explaining 43% of the variation in stripped cones. The GLM was also implemented using LiDAR data to assess at wider scales the number of cones stripped by squirrels. . The use of remote sensing -in particular Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) - enables cost efficient assessments of forest structure at large scales and can be used to retrieve the three variables explored in this study; canopy cover, tree height and number of trees, that relate to red squirrel feeding behaviour. Correlation between field-predicted and LiDAR-predicted number of stripped cones was performed to assess LiDAR-based model performance. LiDAR data acquired at Aberfoyle and Abernethy Forests had different characteristics (in particular pulse density), which influences the accuracy of LiDAR derived metrics. Therefore correlations between field predicted and LiDAR predicted number of cones (LSC) were assessed for each study area separately. Strong correlations (rs=0.59 for Abernethy and 0.54 for Aberfoyle) suggest that LiDAR-based model performed relatively well over the study areas. The LiDAR-based model was not expected to provide absolute numbers of cones stripped by squirrels but a relative measure of habitat use. This can be interpreted as different levels of habitat suitability for red squirrels. LiDAR-based GLM maps were classified

  1. A primate genesis model of focal dystonia and repetitive strain injury: I. Learning-induced dedifferentiation of the representation of the hand in the primary somatosensory cortex in adult monkeys.

    PubMed

    Byl, N N; Merzenich, M M; Jenkins, W M

    1996-08-01

    In this study we tested a neuroplasticity/learning origins hypothesis for repetitive strain injuries (RSIs), including occupationally induced focal dystonia. Repetitive movements produced in a specific form and in an appropriate behavioral context cause a degradation of the sensory feedback information controlling fine motor movements, resulting in the "learned" genesis of RSIs. Two adult New World owl monkeys were trained at a behavioral task that required them to maintain an attended grasp on a hand grip that repetitively and rapidly (20 msec) opened and closed over short distances. The monkeys completed 300 behavioral trials per day (1,100 to 3,000 movement events) with an accuracy of 80 to 90%. A movement control disorder was recorded in both monkeys. Training was continued until the performance accuracy dropped to below 50%. We subsequently conducted an electrophysiologic mapping study of the representations of the hand within the primary somatosensory (SI) cortical zone. The hand representation in the true primary somatosensory cortical field, SI area 3b, was found to be markedly degraded in these monkeys, as characterized by (1) a dedifferentiation of cortical representations of the skin of the hand manifested by receptive fields that were 10 to 20 times larger than normal, (2) the emergence of many receptive fields that covered the entire glabrous surface of individual digits or that extended across the surfaces of two or more digits, (3) a breakdown of the normally sharply segregated area 3b representations of volar glabrous and dorsal hairy skin of the hand, and (4) a breakdown of the local shifted-overlap receptive field topography of area 3b, with many digital receptive fields overlapping the fields of neurons sampled in cortical penetrations up to more than four times farther apart than normal. Thus, rapid, repetitive, highly stereotypic movements applied in a learning context can actively degrade cortical representations of sensory information guiding

  2. Monkey Retardate Learning Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamove, A. S.; Molinaro, T. J.

    1978-01-01

    Seven rhesus monkeys reared on diets high in phenylalanine to induce phenylketonuria (PKU--a metabolic disorder associated with mental retardation if untreated) were compared with normal, pair-fed, and younger controls; frontal brain-lesioned monkeys; and those raised on high-tryptophan diets in three object discrimination tasks. (Author)

  3. Animal cognition: monkey meteorology.

    PubMed

    Platt, Michael

    2006-06-20

    Mangabey monkeys have been shown to rely on memory of recent trends in temperature and solar radiation to decide whether to feed on a particular patch of fruit. These observations reveal a rich mental representation of the physical environment in monkeys and suggest foraging may have been an important selective pressure in primate cognitive evolution.

  4. [Visually-guided discrimination and preference of sexuality in female macaque monkeys].

    PubMed

    Mizuno, M

    1997-04-01

    Visual information about face and body including facial expression and bodily behavioral patterns has been known to play an important role in social and emotional communication in monkeys. Its involvement in sexual activity has also been demonstrated in male monkeys but it is poorly understood in female monkeys. In the present study, visually-guided discrimination and preference of sexuality were investigated in female macaque monkeys performing operant bar-press tasks in an experimental cage which had a transparent panel facing a display. In the sex discrimination task, two rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were trained to discriminate sex of a monkey shown in a picture which was randomly selected from six photographs (three males and three females) and was presented on the display. The monkey pressed a right or left bar for male or female monkey, respectively, to get water as a reward. Under this discrimination task, the monkeys could discriminate the sexes of monkeys shown in newly presented pictures. When choice bars were reversed, correct responses significantly decreased below chance level. In the sex preference task, three rhesus monkeys and three Japanese monkeys (M. juscata) were used. The monkeys voluntarily pressed the bar to watch the video movie showing either male or female rhesus monkeys. The movies were presented as long as the subject kept pressing the bar. The same movie was continued when the monkey pressed the bar again within 10s after the previous release of the bar, while it was changed to the other when 10s passed after the subject released the bar. The total duration of the responses in daily sessions was measured. In this visual preference task, four out of six monkeys showed sex preference. Three adult Japanese monkeys (6-8 y) pressed the bar to watch the video movie of male monkeys which was taken in breeding season with longer duration than that of female monkeys taken in the same season. The other two adult rhesus monkeys (7 8 y) did not

  5. Leptospirosis in squirrels imported from United States to Japan.

    PubMed

    Masuzawa, Toshiyuki; Okamoto, Yoshihiro; Une, Yumi; Takeuchi, Takahiro; Tsukagoshi, Keiko; Koizumi, Nobuo; Kawabata, Hiroki; Ohta, Shuji; Yoshikawa, Yasuhiro

    2006-07-01

    We diagnosed leptospirosis in 2 patients exposed to southern flying squirrels imported from the United States to Japan. Patients worked with exotic animals in their company. Leptospira isolates from 1 patient and 5 of 10 squirrels at the company were genetically and serologically identical and were identified as Leptospira kirschneri. PMID:16836840

  6. Sciurid phylogeny and the paraphyly of Holarctic ground squirrels (Spermophilus).

    PubMed

    Herron, Matthew D; Castoe, Todd A; Parkinson, Christopher L

    2004-06-01

    The squirrel family, Sciuridae, is one of the largest and most widely dispersed families of mammals. In spite of the wide distribution and conspicuousness of this group, phylogenetic relationships remain poorly understood. We used DNA sequence data from the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene of 114 species in 21 genera to infer phylogenetic relationships among sciurids based on maximum parsimony and Bayesian phylogenetic methods. Although we evaluated more complex alternative models of nucleotide substitution to reconstruct Bayesian phylogenies, none provided a better fit to the data than the GTR+G+I model. We used the reconstructed phylogenies to evaluate the current taxonomy of the Sciuridae. At essentially all levels of relationships, we found the phylogeny of squirrels to be in substantial conflict with the current taxonomy. At the highest level, the flying squirrels do not represent a basal divergence, and the current division of Sciuridae into two subfamilies is therefore not phylogenetically informative. At the tribal level, the Neotropical pygmy squirrel, Sciurillus, represents a basal divergence and is not closely related to the other members of the tribe Sciurini. At the genus level, the sciurine genus Sciurus is paraphyletic with respect to the dwarf squirrels (Microsciurus), and the Holarctic ground squirrels (Spermophilus) are paraphyletic with respect to antelope squirrels (Ammospermophilus), prairie dogs (Cynomys), and marmots (Marmota). Finally, several species of chipmunks and Holarctic ground squirrels do not appear monophyletic, indicating a need for reevaluation of alpha taxonomy. PMID:15120398

  7. Anatomy of the squirrel wrist: bones, ligaments, and muscles.

    PubMed

    Thorington, R W; Darrow, K

    2000-11-01

    Anatomical differences among squirrels are usually most evident in the comparison of flying squirrels and nongliding squirrels. This is true of wrist anatomy, probably reflecting the specializations of flying squirrels for the extension of the wing tip and control of it during gliding. In the proximal row of carpals of most squirrels, the pisiform articulates only with the triquetrum, but in flying squirrels there is also a prominent articulation between the pisiform and the scapholunate, providing a more stable base for the styliform cartilage, which supports the wing tip. In the proximal wrist joint, between these carpals and the radius and ulna, differences in curvature of articular surfaces and in the location of ligaments also correlate with differences in degree and kind of movement occurring at this joint, principally reflecting the extreme dorsal flexion and radial deviation of the wrist in flying squirrels when gliding. The distal wrist joint, between the proximal and distal rows of carpals, also shows most variation among flying squirrels, principally in the articulations of the centrale with the other carpal bones, probably causing the distal row of carpal bones to function more like a single unit in some animals. There is little variation in wrist musculature, suggesting only minor evolutionary modification since the tribal radiation of squirrels, probably in the early Oligocene. Variation in the carpal bones, particularly the articulation of the pisiform with the triquetrum and the scapholunate, suggests a different suprageneric grouping of flying squirrels than previously proposed by McKenna (1962) and Mein (1970). J. Morphol. 246:85-102, 2000. Published 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:11074577

  8. Ectoparasites and fitness of female Columbian ground squirrels.

    PubMed

    Raveh, Shirley; Neuhaus, Peter; Dobson, F Stephen

    2015-05-26

    Parasites play an important role in the evolution of host traits via natural selection, coevolution and sexually selected ornaments used in mate choice. These evolutionary scenarios assume fitness costs for hosts. To test this assumption, we conducted an ectoparasite removal experiment in free-living Columbian ground squirrels (Urocittelus columbianus) in four populations over three years. Adult females were randomly chosen to be either experimentally treated with anti-parasite treatments (spot-on solution and flea powder, N = 61) or a sham treatment (control, N = 44). We expected that experimental females would show better body condition, increased reproductive success and enhanced survival. Contrary to our expectations, body mass was not significantly different between treatments at mating, birth of litter or weaning of young. Further, neither number nor size of young at weaning differed significantly between the two treatments. Survival to the next spring for adult females and juveniles was not significantly different between experimental and control treatments. Finally, annual fitness was not affected by the treatments. We concluded that females and their offspring were able compensate for the presence of ectoparasites, suggesting little or no fitness costs of parasites for females in the different colonies and during the years of our experiments. PMID:25870399

  9. Ectoparasites and fitness of female Columbian ground squirrels

    PubMed Central

    Raveh, Shirley; Neuhaus, Peter; Dobson, F. Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Parasites play an important role in the evolution of host traits via natural selection, coevolution and sexually selected ornaments used in mate choice. These evolutionary scenarios assume fitness costs for hosts. To test this assumption, we conducted an ectoparasite removal experiment in free-living Columbian ground squirrels (Urocittelus columbianus) in four populations over three years. Adult females were randomly chosen to be either experimentally treated with anti-parasite treatments (spot-on solution and flea powder, N = 61) or a sham treatment (control, N = 44). We expected that experimental females would show better body condition, increased reproductive success and enhanced survival. Contrary to our expectations, body mass was not significantly different between treatments at mating, birth of litter or weaning of young. Further, neither number nor size of young at weaning differed significantly between the two treatments. Survival to the next spring for adult females and juveniles was not significantly different between experimental and control treatments. Finally, annual fitness was not affected by the treatments. We concluded that females and their offspring were able compensate for the presence of ectoparasites, suggesting little or no fitness costs of parasites for females in the different colonies and during the years of our experiments. PMID:25870399

  10. Ectoparasites and fitness of female Columbian ground squirrels.

    PubMed

    Raveh, Shirley; Neuhaus, Peter; Dobson, F Stephen

    2015-05-26

    Parasites play an important role in the evolution of host traits via natural selection, coevolution and sexually selected ornaments used in mate choice. These evolutionary scenarios assume fitness costs for hosts. To test this assumption, we conducted an ectoparasite removal experiment in free-living Columbian ground squirrels (Urocittelus columbianus) in four populations over three years. Adult females were randomly chosen to be either experimentally treated with anti-parasite treatments (spot-on solution and flea powder, N = 61) or a sham treatment (control, N = 44). We expected that experimental females would show better body condition, increased reproductive success and enhanced survival. Contrary to our expectations, body mass was not significantly different between treatments at mating, birth of litter or weaning of young. Further, neither number nor size of young at weaning differed significantly between the two treatments. Survival to the next spring for adult females and juveniles was not significantly different between experimental and control treatments. Finally, annual fitness was not affected by the treatments. We concluded that females and their offspring were able compensate for the presence of ectoparasites, suggesting little or no fitness costs of parasites for females in the different colonies and during the years of our experiments.

  11. Control of food handling by cutaneous receptor input in squirrels.

    PubMed

    Brenowitz, G L

    1980-01-01

    In a complementary neuroanatomical study by Brenowitz in 1980, it was shown that tree squirrels (Sciurus niger) have a higher relative density of mechanoreceptors in their glabrous forepaw skin than do ground squirrels (Spermophilus tridecemlineatus). The main purpose of this sudy was to test the prediction that tree squirrels would depend upon somatic sensory (cutaneous) input from their forepaws to a greater extent than would ground squirrels in food handling behavior. In addition, a series of more general questions about the sensory control of food handling was examined. First, using different sized food items, it was shown that food handling (rate of manipulation) is subject to sensory control, in general. Secondly, comparision of sham-operated groups with groups receiving median nerve (innervating the palmar surface) lesions showed that cutaneous input from the volar surface of the forepaw contributes to the sensory control in both species of squirrels. Thirdly, comparison of lesion effects in the two species showed that, as predicted, tree squirrels depend upon cutaneous input from their volar forepaw to a greater extent than do ground squirrels. Fourthly, by reanalyzing the above data it was shown that there is continued sensory feedback from food items rather than only an initial evaluation of them. PMID:7437901

  12. Flexibility of cue use in the fox squirrel (Sciurus niger).

    PubMed

    Waisman, Anna S; Jacobs, Lucia F

    2008-10-01

    Recent work on captive flying squirrels has demonstrated a novel degree of flexibility in the use of different orientation cues. In the present study, we examine to what extent this flexibility is present in a free-ranging population of another tree squirrel species, the fox squirrel. We trained squirrels to a rewarded location within a square array of four feeders and then tested them on transformations of the array that either pitted two cue types against one cue type, the majority tests, or all cue types against each other, the forced-hierarchy test. In Experiment 1, squirrels reoriented to the two-cue-type location in all majority tests and to the location indicated by the visual features of the feeders in the forced-hierarchy test. This preference for visual features runs contrary to previous studies that report the use of spatial cues over visual features in food-storing species. In Experiments 2-5 we tested squirrels with different trial orders (Experiments 2 and 3), a different apparatus (Experiment 4) and at different times of the year (Experiment 5) to determine why these squirrels had chosen to orient using visual features in the first experiment. Like captive flying squirrels, free-ranging fox squirrels showed a large degree of flexibility in their use of cues. Furthermore, their cue use appeared to be sensitive both to changes in the test apparatus and the season in which we tested. Altogether our results suggest that the study of free-ranging animals over a variety of conditions is necessary for understanding spatial cognition. PMID:18350324

  13. Phylogenomics of species from four genera of New World monkeys by flow sorting and reciprocal chromosome painting

    PubMed Central

    Dumas, Francesca; Stanyon, Roscoe; Sineo, Luca; Stone, Gary; Bigoni, Francesca

    2007-01-01

    Background The taxonomic and phylogenetic relationships of New World monkeys (Platyrrhini) are difficult to distinguish on the basis of morphology and because diagnostic fossils are rare. Recently, molecular data have led to a radical revision of the traditional taxonomy and phylogeny of these primates. Here we examine new hypotheses of platyrrhine evolutionary relationships by reciprocal chromosome painting after chromosome flow sorting of species belonging to four genera of platyrrhines included in the Cebidae family: Callithrix argentata (silvered-marmoset), Cebuella pygmaea (pygmy marmoset), Callimico goeldii (Goeldi's marmoset) and Saimiri sciureus (squirrel monkey). This is the first report of reciprocal painting in marmosets. Results The paints made from chromosome flow sorting of the four platyrrhine monkeys provided from 42 to 45 hybridization signals on human metaphases. The reciprocal painting of monkey probes on human chromosomes revealed that 21 breakpoints are common to all four studied species. There are only three additional breakpoints. A breakpoint on human chromosome 13 was found in Callithrix argentata, Cebuella pygmaea and Callimico goeldii, but not in Saimiri sciureus. There are two additional breakpoints on human chromosome 5: one is specific to squirrel monkeys, and the other to Goeldi's marmoset. Conclusion The reciprocal painting results support the molecular genomic assemblage of Cebidae. We demonstrated that the five chromosome associations previously hypothesized to phylogenetically link tamarins and marmosets are homologous and represent derived chromosome rearrangements. Four of these derived homologous associations tightly nest Callimico goeldii with marmosets. One derived association 2/15 may place squirrel monkeys within the Cebidae assemblage. An apparently common breakpoint on chromosome 5q33 found in both Saimiri and Aotus nancymae could be evidence of a phylogenetic link between these species. Comparison with previous reports

  14. Endogenous New World primate retrovirus: interspecies antigenic determinants shared with the major structural protein of type-D RNA viruses of Old World monkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Hino, S; Tronick, S R; Heberling, R L; Kalter, S S; Hellman, A; Aaronson, S A

    1977-01-01

    A reverse transcriptase-containing virus has recently been isolated from a squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus). Molecular hybridization studies demonstrate that the squirrel monkey retrovirus (SMRV) is endogenous to this New World primate, yet lacks detectable nucleotide sequence homology with cellular DNAs of representative Old World primates or with the genomes of previously isolated Old World primate retroviruses. The 35,000-dalton major structural protein (p35) of SMRV was purified and shown to possess antigenic determinants distinct from those of known retroviruses. While SMRV was found to lack antigenic determinants broadly shared among mammalian type-C viruses, immunologic crossreactivity was demonstrated between SMRV p35 and the major structural protein (p26) of Mason-Pfizer monkey virus, a prototype type-D retrovirus of Old World monkeys. These findings support the concept that SMRV and Mason-Pfizer monkey virus are evolutionarily related, and raise the possibility that a progenitor of type-D retroviruses became genetically associated with primates at a very early time in their evolution. PMID:74833

  15. Modification of pharmacokinetic and abuse-related effects of cocaine by human-derived cocaine hydrolase in monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Schindler, Charles W.; Justinova, Zuzana; Lafleur, David; Woods, Doug; Roschke, Viktor; Hallak, Hussein; Sklair-Tavron, Liora; Redhi, Godfrey H.; Yasar, Sevil; Bergman, Jack; Goldberg, Steven R.

    2011-01-01

    Although substantial research effort has focused on developing pharmacological treatments for cocaine abuse, no effective medications have been developed. Recent studies show that enzymes that metabolize cocaine in the periphery, forestalling its entry into the brain, can prevent cocaine toxicity and its behavioral effects in rodents. Here we report on effects of one such enzyme (Albu-CocH) on the pharmacokinetic and behavioral effects of cocaine in squirrel monkeys. Albu-CocH was developed from successive mutations of human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) and has 1000-fold greater catalytic activity against cocaine than naturally occurring BChE. Pharmacokinetic studies showed that Albu-CocH (5 mg/kg) had a half-life of 56.6 hours in squirrel monkeys. In these studies, plasma levels of cocaine following i.v. 1 mg/kg cocaine were reduced two hours after administration of Albu-CocH, whereas plasma levels of the cocaine metabolite ecgonine methyl ester were increased. These effects were still evident 72 hrs following Albu-CocH administration. In behavioral experiments in monkeys, pretreatment with 5 mg/kg Albu-CocH dramatically decreased self-administration of a reinforcing dose of i.v. cocaine (30 μg/kg/injection) for over 24 hours. Pretreatment with 5 mg/kg Albu-CocH also attenuated the reinstatement of extinguished cocaine self-administration by an i.v. priming injection of cocaine (0.1 or 0.3 mg/kg) and, in separate studies, attenuated the discriminative stimulus effects of cocaine. The ability of Albu-CocH to attenuate the abuse-related effects of cocaine in squirrel monkeys indicates that further investigation of BChE mutants as potential treatment for cocaine abuse and toxicity is warranted. PMID:22264200

  16. Rhesus monkey platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Harbury, C.B.

    1986-03-01

    The purpose of this abstract is to describe the adenine nucleotide metabolism of Rhesus monkey platelets. Nucleotides are labelled with /sup 14/C-adenine and extracted with EDTA-ethanol (EE) and perchlorate (P). Total platelet ATP and ADP (TATP, TADP) is measured in the Holmsen Luciferase assay, and expressed in nanomoles/10/sup 8/ platelets. TR=TATP/TADP. Human platelets release 70% of their TADP, with a ratio of released ATP/ADP of 0.7. Rhesus platelets release 82% of their TADP, with a ratio of released ATP/ADP of 0.33. Thus, monkey platelets contain more ADP than human platelets. Thin layer chromatography of EE gives a metabolic ratio of 11 in human platelets and 10.5 in monkey platelets. Perchlorate extracts metabolic and actin bound ADP. The human and monkey platelets ratios were 5, indicating they contain the same proportion of actin. Thus, the extra ADP contained in monkey platelets is located in the secretory granules.

  17. 2. Light tower, view west towards Squirrel Island, south and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Light tower, view west towards Squirrel Island, south and east sides - Ram Island Light Station, Ram Island, south of Ocean Point & just north of Fisherman Island, marking south side of Fisherman Island Passage, Ocean Point, Lincoln County, ME

  18. Predation of wild spider monkeys at La Macarena, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Ikki; Izawa, Kosei

    2008-01-01

    The killing of an adult male spider monkey (Ateles belzebuth ) by a jaguar (Panthera onca) and a predation attempt by a puma (Felis concolor) on an adult female spider monkey have been observed at the CIEM (Centro de Investigaciones Ecológicas La Macarena), La Macarena, Colombia. These incidents occurred directly in front of an observer, even though it is said that predation under direct observation on any type of primate rarely occurs. On the basis of a review of the literature, and the observations reported here, we suggest that jaguars and pumas are likely to be the only significant potential predators on adult spider monkeys, probably because of their large body size.

  19. Insect-foraging in captive owl monkeys (Aotus nancymaae).

    PubMed

    Wolovich, Christy K; Rivera, Jeanette; Evans, Sian

    2010-08-01

    Whereas the diets of diurnal primate species vary greatly, almost all nocturnal primate species consume insects. Insect-foraging has been described in nocturnal prosimians but has not been investigated in owl monkeys (Aotus spp.). We studied 35 captive owl monkeys (Aotus nancymaae) in order to describe their foraging behavior and to determine if there were any age or sex differences in their ability to capture insect prey. Because owl monkeys cooperate in parental care and in food-sharing, we expected social interactions involving insect prey. We found that owl monkeys most often snatched flying insects from the air and immobilized crawling insects against a substrate using their hands. Immatures and adult female owl monkeys attempted to capture prey significantly more often than did adult males; however, there was no difference in the proportion of attempts that resulted in capture. Social interactions involving prey appeared similar to those with provisioned food, but possessors of prey resisted begging attempts more so than did possessors of other food. Owl monkeys attempted to capture prey often (mean = 9.5 +/- 5.8 attempts/h), and we speculate that the protein and lipid content of captured prey is important for meeting the metabolic demands for growth and reproduction.

  20. Insect-foraging in captive owl monkeys (Aotus nancymaae).

    PubMed

    Wolovich, Christy K; Rivera, Jeanette; Evans, Sian

    2010-08-01

    Whereas the diets of diurnal primate species vary greatly, almost all nocturnal primate species consume insects. Insect-foraging has been described in nocturnal prosimians but has not been investigated in owl monkeys (Aotus spp.). We studied 35 captive owl monkeys (Aotus nancymaae) in order to describe their foraging behavior and to determine if there were any age or sex differences in their ability to capture insect prey. Because owl monkeys cooperate in parental care and in food-sharing, we expected social interactions involving insect prey. We found that owl monkeys most often snatched flying insects from the air and immobilized crawling insects against a substrate using their hands. Immatures and adult female owl monkeys attempted to capture prey significantly more often than did adult males; however, there was no difference in the proportion of attempts that resulted in capture. Social interactions involving prey appeared similar to those with provisioned food, but possessors of prey resisted begging attempts more so than did possessors of other food. Owl monkeys attempted to capture prey often (mean = 9.5 +/- 5.8 attempts/h), and we speculate that the protein and lipid content of captured prey is important for meeting the metabolic demands for growth and reproduction. PMID:20523055

  1. Models of neurological disease (substance abuse): self-administration in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Platt, Donna M; Carey, Galen; Spealman, Roger D

    2011-12-01

    Drug self-administration is a procedure in which a subject performs a specified response that results in the delivery of a drug injection. This procedure is viewed as a relevant model for the study of human drug-taking behavior. Drug self-administration in primates has several characteristics that resemble drug-taking behavior in humans, and agents commonly abused by humans also generally maintain self-administration behavior in monkeys. Self-administration procedures allow for the study of a variety of drug properties. For instance, they can be used to investigate the abuse potential of new compounds and to study the effects of candidate medications for the treatment of drug addiction. These procedures can also be employed for examining drug reinforcement mechanisms. Described in this unit are procedures for studying intravenous drug self-administration in large primates, such as rhesus macaques, and smaller primates, such as squirrel monkeys.

  2. Models of Neurological Disease (Substance Abuse): Self-Administration in Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Platt, Donna M.; Carey, Galen; Spealman, Roger D.

    2012-01-01

    Drug self-administration is a procedure in which a subject performs a specified response that results in the delivery of a drug injection. This procedure is viewed as a relevant model for the study of human drug-taking behavior. Drug self-administration in primates has several characteristics that resemble drug-taking behavior in humans, and agents commonly abused by humans also generally maintain self-administration behavior in monkeys. Self-administration procedures allow for the study of a variety of drug properties. For instance, they can be used to investigate the abuse potential of new compounds and to study the effects of candidate medications for the treatment of drug addiction. These procedures also can be employed for examining drug reinforcement mechanisms. Described in this unit are procedures for studying intravenous drug self-administration in large primates, such as rhesus macaques, and smaller primates, such as squirrel monkeys. PMID:22382996

  3. Formation of functional CENP-B boxes at diverse locations in repeat units of centromeric DNA in New World monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Kugou, Kazuto; Hirai, Hirohisa; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Koga, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    Centromere protein B, which is involved in centromere formation, binds to centromeric repetitive DNA by recognizing a nucleotide motif called the CENP-B box. Humans have large numbers of CENP-B boxes in the centromeric repetitive DNA of their autosomes and X chromosome. The current understanding is that these CENP-B boxes are located at identical positions in the repeat units of centromeric DNA. Great apes also have CENP-B boxes in locations that are identical to humans. The purpose of the present study was to examine the location of CENP-B box in New World monkeys. We recently identified CENP-B box in one species of New World monkeys (marmosets). In this study, we found functional CENP-B boxes in CENP-A-assembled repeat units of centromeric DNA in 2 additional New World monkeys (squirrel monkeys and tamarins) by immunostaining and ChIP-qPCR analyses. The locations of the 3 CENP-B boxes in the repeat units differed from one another. The repeat unit size of centromeric DNA of New World monkeys (340–350 bp) is approximately twice that of humans and great apes (171 bp). This might be, associated with higher-order repeat structures of centromeric DNA, a factor for the observed variation in the CENP-B box location in New World monkeys. PMID:27292628

  4. Formation of functional CENP-B boxes at diverse locations in repeat units of centromeric DNA in New World monkeys.

    PubMed

    Kugou, Kazuto; Hirai, Hirohisa; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Koga, Akihiko

    2016-06-13

    Centromere protein B, which is involved in centromere formation, binds to centromeric repetitive DNA by recognizing a nucleotide motif called the CENP-B box. Humans have large numbers of CENP-B boxes in the centromeric repetitive DNA of their autosomes and X chromosome. The current understanding is that these CENP-B boxes are located at identical positions in the repeat units of centromeric DNA. Great apes also have CENP-B boxes in locations that are identical to humans. The purpose of the present study was to examine the location of CENP-B box in New World monkeys. We recently identified CENP-B box in one species of New World monkeys (marmosets). In this study, we found functional CENP-B boxes in CENP-A-assembled repeat units of centromeric DNA in 2 additional New World monkeys (squirrel monkeys and tamarins) by immunostaining and ChIP-qPCR analyses. The locations of the 3 CENP-B boxes in the repeat units differed from one another. The repeat unit size of centromeric DNA of New World monkeys (340-350 bp) is approximately twice that of humans and great apes (171 bp). This might be, associated with higher-order repeat structures of centromeric DNA, a factor for the observed variation in the CENP-B box location in New World monkeys.

  5. Electrofriction method of manufacturing squirrel cage rotors

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, John S.

    2005-04-12

    A method of making a squirrel cage rotor of copper material for use in AC or DC motors, includes forming a core with longitudinal slots, inserting bars of conductive material in the slots, with ends extending out of opposite ends of the core, and joining the end rings to the bars, wherein the conductive material of either the end rings or the bars is copper. Various methods of joining the end rings to the bars are disclosed including electrofriction welding, current pulse welding and brazing, transient liquid phase joining and casting. Pressure is also applied to the end rings to improve contact and reduce areas of small or uneven contact between the bar ends and the end rings. Rotors made with such methods are also disclosed.

  6. Whitebark pine, grizzly bears, and red squirrels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mattson, D.J.; Kendall, K.C.; Reinhart, D.P.; Tomback, D.F.; Arno, S.F.; Keane, R.E.

    2001-01-01

    Appropriately enough, much of this book is devoted to discussing management challenges and techniques. However, the impetus for action—the desire to save whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis)—necessarily arises from the extent to which we cherish it for its beauty and its connections with other things that we value. Whitebark pine is at the hub of a fascinating web of relationships. It is the stuff of great stories (cf. Quammen 1994). One of the more interesting of these stories pertains to the dependence of certain grizzly bear (Ursus arctos horribilis) populations on its seeds, and the role that red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus) play as an agent of transfer between tree and bear.

  7. Pharmacokinetic modeling: Prediction and evaluation of route dependent dosimetry of bisphenol A in monkeys with extrapolation to humans

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Jeffrey W. Twaddle, Nathan C.; Vanlandingham, Michelle; Doerge, Daniel R.

    2011-11-15

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed for bisphenol A (BPA) in adult rhesus monkeys using intravenous (iv) and oral bolus doses of 100 {mu}g d6-BPA/kg (). This calibrated PBPK adult monkey model for BPA was then evaluated against published monkey kinetic studies with BPA. Using two versions of the adult monkey model based on monkey BPA kinetic data from and , the aglycone BPA pharmacokinetics were simulated for human oral ingestion of 5 mg d16-BPA per person (Voelkel et al., 2002). Voelkel et al. were unable to detect the aglycone BPA in plasma, but were able to detect BPA metabolites. These human model predictions of the aglycone BPA in plasma were then compared to previously published PBPK model predictions obtained by simulating the Voelkel et al. kinetic study. Our BPA human model, using two parameter sets reflecting two adult monkey studies, both predicted lower aglycone levels in human serum than the previous human BPA PBPK model predictions. BPA was metabolized at all ages of monkey (PND 5 to adult) by the gut wall and liver. However, the hepatic metabolism of BPA and systemic clearance of its phase II metabolites appear to be slower in younger monkeys than adults. The use of the current non-human primate BPA model parameters provides more confidence in predicting the aglycone BPA in serum levels in humans after oral ingestion of BPA. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A bisphenol A (BPA) PBPK model for the infant and adult monkey was constructed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The hepatic metabolic rate of BPA increased with age of the monkey. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The systemic clearance rate of metabolites increased with age of the monkey. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gut wall metabolism of orally administered BPA was substantial across all ages of monkeys. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aglycone BPA plasma concentrations were predicted in humans orally given oral doses of deuterated BPA.

  8. Pulse register phonation in Diana monkey alarm calls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riede, Tobias; Zuberbühler, Klaus

    2003-05-01

    The adult male Diana monkeys (Cercopithecus diana) produce predator-specific alarm calls in response to two of their predators, the crowned eagles and the leopards. The acoustic structure of these alarm calls is remarkable for a number of theoretical and empirical reasons. First, although pulsed phonation has been described in a variety of mammalian vocalizations, very little is known about the underlying production mechanism. Second, Diana monkey alarm calls are based almost exclusively on this vocal production mechanism to an extent that has never been documented in mammalian vocal behavior. Finally, the Diana monkeys' pulsed phonation strongly resembles the pulse register in human speech, where fundamental frequency is mainly controlled by subglottal pressure. Here, we report the results of a detailed acoustic analysis to investigate the production mechanism of Diana monkey alarm calls. Within calls, we found a positive correlation between the fundamental frequency and the pulse amplitude, suggesting that both humans and monkeys control fundamental frequency by subglottal pressure. While in humans pulsed phonation is usually considered pathological or artificial, male Diana monkeys rely exclusively on pulsed phonation, suggesting a functional adaptation. Moreover, we were unable to document any nonlinear phenomena, despite the fact that they occur frequently in the vocal repertoire of humans and nonhumans, further suggesting that the very robust Diana monkey pulse production mechanism has evolved for a particular functional purpose. We discuss the implications of these findings for the structural evolution of Diana monkey alarm calls and suggest that the restricted variability in fundamental frequency and robustness of the source signal gave rise to the formant patterns observed in Diana monkey alarm calls, used to convey predator information.

  9. Pulse register phonation in Diana monkey alarm calls.

    PubMed

    Riede, Tobias; Zuberbühler, Klaus

    2003-05-01

    The adult male Diana monkeys (Cercopithecus diana) produce predator-specific alarm calls in response to two of their predators, the crowned eagles and the leopards. The acoustic structure of these alarm calls is remarkable for a number of theoretical and empirical reasons. First, although pulsed phonation has been described in a variety of mammalian vocalizations, very little is known about the underlying production mechanism. Second, Diana monkey alarm calls are based almost exclusively on this vocal production mechanism to an extent that has never been documented in mammalian vocal behavior. Finally, the Diana monkeys' pulsed phonation strongly resembles the pulse register in human speech, where fundamental frequency is mainly controlled by subglottal pressure. Here, we report the results of a detailed acoustic analysis to investigate the production mechanism of Diana monkey alarm calls. Within calls, we found a positive correlation between the fundamental frequency and the pulse amplitude, suggesting that both humans and monkeys control fundamental frequency by subglottal pressure. While in humans pulsed phonation is usually considered pathological or artificial, male Diana monkeys rely exclusively on pulsed phonation, suggesting a functional adaptation. Moreover, we were unable to document any nonlinear phenomena, despite the fact that they occur frequently in the vocal repertoire of humans and nonhumans, further suggesting that the very robust Diana monkey pulse production mechanism has evolved for a particular functional purpose. We discuss the implications of these findings for the structural evolution of Diana monkey alarm calls and suggest that the restricted variability in fundamental frequency and robustness of the source signal gave rise to the formant patterns observed in Diana monkey alarm calls, used to convey predator information.

  10. Do monkeys think in metaphors? Representations of space and time in monkeys and humans.

    PubMed

    Merritt, Dustin J; Casasanto, Daniel; Brannon, Elizabeth M

    2010-11-01

    Research on the relationship between the representation of space and time has produced two contrasting proposals. ATOM posits that space and time are represented via a common magnitude system, suggesting a symmetrical relationship between space and time. According to metaphor theory, however, representations of time depend on representations of space asymmetrically. Previous findings in humans have supported metaphor theory. Here, we investigate the relationship between time and space in a nonverbal species, by testing whether non-human primates show space-time interactions consistent with metaphor theory or with ATOM. We tested two rhesus monkeys and 16 adult humans in a nonverbal task that assessed the influence of an irrelevant dimension (time or space) on a relevant dimension (space or time). In humans, spatial extent had a large effect on time judgments whereas time had a small effect on spatial judgments. In monkeys, both spatial and temporal manipulations showed large bi-directional effects on judgments. In contrast to humans, spatial manipulations in monkeys did not produce a larger effect on temporal judgments than the reverse. Thus, consistent with previous findings, human adults showed asymmetrical space-time interactions that were predicted by metaphor theory. In contrast, monkeys showed patterns that were more consistent with ATOM.

  11. A coprological survey of parasites of wild mantled howling monkeys, Alouatta palliata palliata.

    PubMed

    Stuart, M D; Greenspan, L L; Glander, K E; Clarke, M R

    1990-10-01

    Fecal samples from 155 mantled howling monkeys (Alouatta palliata palliata) examined at Centro Ecologico La Pacifica, Guanacaste Province, Costa Rica, revealed 75 (48%) had parasitic infections. A sampling of nine howling monkeys from Santa Rosa National Park. Costa Rica indicated only one infected animal (11%). Only three of 19 (16%) spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi) also from Santa Rosa were infected. Controrchis biliophilus, Trypanoxyuris minutus, unidentified strongylid eggs and Isospora sp. oocysts were found. Three monkeys from La Pacifica died and were examined for adult helminths. They were infected with Ascaris lumbricoides, C. biliophilus and T. minutus.

  12. DNA evidence on the phylogenetic systematics of New World monkeys: support for the sister-grouping of Cebus and Saimiri from two unlinked nuclear genes.

    PubMed

    Harada, M L; Schneider, H; Schneider, M P; Sampaio, I; Czelusniak, J; Goodman, M

    1995-09-01

    Previous inferences from epsilon-globin gene sequences on cladistic relationships among the 16 extant genera of Ceboidea (the New World monkeys) were tested by strength of grouping and bootstrap values for the clades in the most parsimonious trees found: for this epsilon data set enlarged with additional Cebus and Saimiri orthologues; for another nuclear DNA sequence data set consisting of IRBP (interstitial retinol-binding protein gene) intron 1 orthologues; and for tandemly combined epsilon and IRBP sequences. Different ceboid species of the same genus always grouped strongly together as demonstrated by results on Cebus (capuchin monkeys), Saimiri (squirrel monkeys), Callicebus (titi monkeys), Aotus (night monkeys), Ateles (spider monkeys), and Alouatta (howler monkeys). Other strong groupings that could be represented as monophyletic taxa in a cladistic classification were: Cebuella (pygmy marmoset) and Callithrix (marmoset) into subtribe Callitrichina; Callitrichina, Callimico (Goeldi's monkey), Leontopithecus (lion tamarin), and Saguinus (tamarin) into subfamily Callitrichinae; Callitrichinae, Aotus, Cebus, and Saimiri into family Cebidae; Cacajao (uakari monkey) and Chiropotes (saki) into subtribe Chiropotina; Chiropotina and Pithecia (bearded saki) into tribe Pitheciini; Pitheciini and Callicebus into subfamily Pitheciinae; Brachyteles (woolly spider monkey), Lagothrix (woolly monkey), and Ateles into tribe Atelini; and Atelini and Alouatta into subfamily Atelinae. In addition the epsilon and IRBP results congruently grouped (but at lesser strengths) Brachyteles and Lagothrix into subtribe Brachytelina within Atelini, and also Cebus and Saimiri into subfamily Cebinae within Cebidae. Because the IRBP results weakly grouped Pitheciinae with Cebidae, whereas the epsilon results weakly grouped Pitheciinae with Atelinae, the present evidence is best represented in an interim cladistic classification of ceboids by dividing the superfamily Ceboidea into three

  13. Survey for zoonotic rickettsial pathogens in northern flying squirrels, Glaucomys sabrinus, in California.

    PubMed

    Foley, Janet E; Nieto, Nathan C; Clueit, S Bernadette; Foley, Patrick; Nicholson, William N; Brown, Richard N

    2007-10-01

    Epidemic typhus, caused by Rickettsia prowazekii, is maintained in a southern flying squirrel (Glaucomys volans) sylvatic cycle in the southeastern United States. The northern flying squirrel (Glaucomys sabrinus) has not been previously associated with R. prowazekii transmission. A second rickettsial pathogen, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, infects dusky-footed woodrats (Neotoma fuscipes) and tree squirrels in northern California. Because northern flying squirrels or their ectoparasites have not been tested for these rickettsial pathogens, serology and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were used to test 24 northern flying squirrels for R. prowazekii and A. phagocytophilum infection or antibodies. Although there was no evidence of exposure to R. prowazekii, we provide molecular evidence of A. phagocytophilum infection in one flying squirrel; two flying squirrels also were seropositive for this pathogen. Fleas and ticks removed from the squirrels included Ceratophyllus ciliatus mononis, Opisodasys vesperalis, Ixodes hearlei, Ixodes pacificus, and Dermacentor paramapertus. PMID:17984264

  14. Karyotypic evolution of the family Sciuridae: inferences from the genome organizations of ground squirrels.

    PubMed

    Li, T; Wang, J; Su, W; Nie, W; Yang, F

    2006-01-01

    Cross-species chromosome painting has made a great contribution to our understanding of the evolution of karyotypes and genome organizations of mammals. Several recent papers of comparative painting between tree and flying squirrels have shed some light on the evolution of the family Sciuridae and the order Rodentia. In the present study we have extended the comparative painting to the Himalayan marmot (Marmotahimalayana) and the African ground squirrel (Xerus cf. erythropus), i.e. representative species from another important squirrel group--the ground squirrels--, and have established genome-wide comparative chromosome maps between human, eastern gray squirrel, and these two ground squirrels. The results show that 1) the squirrels so far studied all have conserved karyotypes that resemble the ancestral karyotype of the order Rodentia; 2) the African ground squirrels could have retained the ancestral karyotype of the family Sciuridae. Furthermore, we have mapped the evolutionary rearrangements onto a molecular-based consensus phylogenetic tree of the family Sciuridae.

  15. Male-directed infanticide in spider monkeys (Ateles spp.).

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Sara; Di Fiore, Anthony; Champion, Jane; Pavelka, Mary Susan; Páez, Johanna; Link, Andrés

    2015-04-01

    Infanticide is considered a conspicuous expression of sexual conflict amongst mammals, including at least 35 primate species. Here we describe two suspected and one attempted case of intragroup infanticide in spider monkeys that augment five prior cases of observed or suspected infanticide in this genus. Contrary to the typical pattern of infanticide seen in most primate societies, where infants are killed by conspecifics independent of their sex, all eight cases of observed or suspected infanticide in spider monkeys have been directed toward male infants within their first weeks of life. Moreover, although data are still scant, infanticides seem to be perpetrated exclusively by adult males against infants from their own social groups and are not associated with male takeovers or a sudden rise in male dominance rank. Although the slow reproductive cycles of spider monkeys might favor the presence of infanticide because of the potential to shorten females' interbirth intervals, infanticide is nonetheless uncommon among spider monkeys, and patterns of male-directed infanticide are not yet understood. We suggest that given the potentially close genetic relationships among adult males within spider monkey groups, and the need for males to cooperate with one another in territorial interactions with other groups of related males, infanticide may be expected to occur primarily where the level of intragroup competition among males outweighs that of competition between social groups. Finally, we suggest that infanticide in spider monkeys may be more prevalent than previously thought, given that it may be difficult for observers to witness cases of infanticide or suspected infanticide that occur soon after birth in taxa that are characterized by high levels of fission-fusion dynamics. Early, undetected, male-biased infanticide could influence the composition of spider monkey groups and contribute to the female-biased adult sex ratios often reported for this genus.

  16. Macroparasites of Pallas's squirrels (Callosciurus erythraeus) introduced into Europe.

    PubMed

    Dozières, A; Pisanu, B; Gerriet, O; Lapeyre, C; Stuyck, J; Chapuis, J-L

    2010-08-27

    Introduced pets released in natura can lead to sanitary risks for native fauna and humans. We analysed the macroparasite fauna of a total of 49 Pallas's squirrels, Callosciurus erythraeus, from two populations introduced into urbanised areas in Europe (n=16 female symbol and 13 male symbol from Antibes, France, 43 degrees 33'N-7 degrees 7'E; n=11 female symbol and 9 male symbol in from Dadizele, Belgium, 50 degrees 52'N-3 degrees 5'E). Of the 185 identified ectoparasites from Antibes, 183 were sucking lice Enderleinellus kumadai, with male squirrels 10 times more intensely infested than females. The flea Nosopsyllus fasciatus was found on two hosts. No hard ticks were recovered. Of the 131 arthropods specimens from Dadizele, 45 belonged to E. kumadai, with male squirrels three times more intensely infested than females. Eighty-six arthropods belonged to another sucking louse, Hoplopleura erismata, with males infested twice as intensely as females. No fleas or hard ticks were found. We only found 12 immature Hymenolepis sp. cestodes in the small intestine of three squirrels from Antibes and two immature Mastophorus sp. female nematodes in the stomach of a squirrel from Dadizele. We found no other helminths in the body cavity, heart, lung, liver, kidney or bladder. The macroparasite fauna of these two squirrel populations is consistent with what is expected from an introduced host, i.e., a few species dominated by specialist taxa imported with founders. The scarcity of other rodent species in the urbanized areas where Pallas's squirrels were sampled may explain the low variety of newly acquired macroparasites. The discrepancy in sucking lice infestations between males and females could be due to differences in either behaviour or physiology in this non-sexually dimorphic host. Based on the macroparasites found in this study, we expect minimal sanitary risks for both native fauna and humans in urbanized habitats such as those in our study.

  17. Chronic, multisite, multielectrode recordings in macaque monkeys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolelis, Miguel A. L.; Dimitrov, Dragan; Carmena, Jose M.; Crist, Roy; Lehew, Gary; Kralik, Jerald D.; Wise, Steven P.

    2003-09-01

    A paradigm is described for recording the activity of single cortical neurons from awake, behaving macaque monkeys. Its unique features include high-density microwire arrays and multichannel instrumentation. Three adult rhesus monkeys received microwire array implants, totaling 96-704 microwires per subject, in up to five cortical areas, sometimes bilaterally. Recordings 3-4 weeks after implantation yielded 421 single neurons with a mean peak-to-peak voltage of 115 ± 3 μV and a signal-to-noise ratio of better than 5:1. As many as 247 cortical neurons were recorded in one session, and at least 58 neurons were isolated from one subject 18 months after implantation. This method should benefit neurophysiological investigation of learning, perception, and sensorimotor integration in primates and the development of neuroprosthetic devices.

  18. Metabolic rate and prehibernation fattening in free-living arctic ground squirrels.

    PubMed

    Sheriff, Michael J; Fridinger, Robert W; Tøien, Øivind; Barnes, Brian M; Buck, C Loren

    2013-01-01

    Hibernating mammals become sequestered and cease foraging during prolonged seasonal periods of reduced or unpredictable food availability and instead rely on cached food and/or endogenous reserves of fat and protein accumulated during the previous active season. The gain in weight is due to increased food consumption, but it also has been hypothesized that hibernators maximize rates of fattening by decreasing costs of maintenance before weight gain, reflected in reduced resting metabolic rate (RMR). We recorded repeated measures of total body, lean, and fat mass in individual adult male and female arctic ground squirrels across their active season and found that squirrels increased body mass by 42% (males) and 62% (females). This gain was achieved through a 17% increase in lean mass and a 7-8-fold increase in fat mass; however, mass gain was not linear and patterns differed between sexes. Contrary to our hypothesis, decreases in RMR were not associated with rapid mass gain. We found RMR of males increased (whole-animal RMR or lean-mass-specific RMR) or remained constant (mass-specific RMR) for most of the active season and decreased only after the majority of mass had been gained. In females, although RMR (whole-animal, mass-specific, and lean-mass RMR) generally decreased across the active season, the greatest decrease occurred late in the active season after the majority of mass had been gained. In conclusion, arctic ground squirrels do not trade off metabolism to facilitate rates of weight gain before hibernation, but they do use energy sparing strategies before hibernation that help maintain peak mass. PMID:23995482

  19. Living on the edge: Space use of Eurasian red squirrels in marginal high-elevation habitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeo, Claudia; Wauters, Lucas A.; Preatoni, Damiano; Tosi, Guido; Martinoli, Adriano

    2010-11-01

    In marginal habitats located at the edge of a species' range, environmental conditions are frequently extreme and individuals may be subject to different selective pressures compared to central populations. These so-called edge or marginal populations tend to have lower densities and reproductive rates than populations located in more suitable habitats, but little is known about local adaptations in spacing behavior. We studied space use and social organization in a population of Eurasian red squirrels ( Sciurus vulgaris) in a high-elevation marginal habitat of dwarf mountain pine ( Pinus mugo) and compared it with spacing patterns in high-quality Scots pine ( Pinus sylvestris) forest at lower-elevation. Home ranges and core areas were larger in the marginal habitat. In both habitats, males used larger home ranges than females, but sex differences in core area size were significant only in the edge population. Patterns of core area overlap were similar in both habitats with intra-sexual territoriality among adult females and higher degrees of inter-sexual overlap, typical for the species throughout its range. However, low densities in the edge population resulted in higher female by males overlap in spring-summer, suggesting males increased home ranges and core areas during mating season to augment access to estrus females. Thus, in the marginal habitat, with low food abundance and low population densities, linked with extreme winter conditions, squirrels, especially males, used large home ranges. Finally, squirrels responded more strongly to variation in food availability (inverse relation between home range size and seed abundance), and even to fluctuations in density (inverse relation between core area size and density of animals of the same sex), in the marginal than in the high-quality habitat, suggesting high behavioral plasticity to respond to the ecological constraints in marginal habitats.

  20. Phylogeny, biogeography and systematic revision of plain long-nosed squirrels (genus Dremomys, Nannosciurinae).

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Melissa T R; Helgen, Kristofer M; Maldonado, Jesus E; Rockwood, Larry L; Tsuchiya, Mirian T N; Leonard, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    The plain long-nosed squirrels, genus Dremomys, are high elevation species in East and Southeast Asia. Here we present a complete molecular phylogeny for the genus based on nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequences. Concatenated mitochondrial and nuclear gene trees were constructed to determine the tree topology, and date the tree. All speciation events within the plain-long nosed squirrels (genus Dremomys) were ancient (dated to the Pliocene or Miocene), and averaged older than many speciation events in the related Sunda squirrels, genus Sundasciurus. Within the plain long-nosed squirrels, the most recent interspecific split occurred 2.9 million years ago, older than some splits within Sunda squirrels, which dated to the Pleistocene. Our results demonstrate that the plain long-nosed squirrels are not monophyletic. The single species with a distinct distribution, the Bornean mountain ground squirrel (Dremomys everetti), which is endemic to the high mountains of Borneo, is nested within the Sunda squirrels with high support. This species diverged from its sister taxa in the Sunda squirrels 6.62 million years ago, and other plain long-nosed squirrels over 11 million years ago. Our analyses of morphological traits in these related genera support the re-classification of the Bornean mountain ground squirrel, Dremomys everetti, to the genus Sundasciurus, which changes its name to Sundasciurus everetti. Past inclusion in the plain long-nosed squirrels (Dremomys) reflects convergent evolution between these high elevation species.

  1. Allelic variation in the squirrel monkey x-linked color vision gene: biogeographical and behavioral correlates.

    PubMed

    Cropp, Susan; Boinski, Sue; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2002-06-01

    Most Neotropical primate species possess a polymorphic X-linked and a monomorphic autosomal color vision gene. Consequently, populations are composed of both dichromatics and trichromatics. Most theories on the maintenance of this genetic system revolve around possible advantages for foraging ecology. To examine the issue from a different angle, we compared the numbers and relative frequencies of alleles at the X-linked locus among three species of Saimiri representing a wide range of geographical and behavioral variation in the genus. Exons 3, 4, and 5 of the X-linked opsin gene were sequenced for a large number of X chromosomes for all three species. Several synonymous mutations were detected in exons 4 and 5 for the originally reported alleles but only a single nonsynonymous change was detected. Two alleles were found that appeared to be the result of recombination events. The low occurrence of recombinant alleles and absence of mutations in the amino acids critical for spectral tuning indicates that stabilizing selection acts to maintain the combinations of critical sites specific to each allele. Allele frequencies were approximately the same for all Saimiri species, with a slight but significant difference between S. boliviensis and S. oerstedii. No apparent correlation exists between allele frequencies and behavioral or biogeographical differences between species, casting doubt on the speculation that the spectral sensitivities of the alleles have been maintained because they are specifically well-tuned to Saimiri visual ecology. Rather, the spectral tuning peaks might have been maintained because they are as widely spaced as possible within the limited range of middlewave to longwave spectra useful to all primates. This arrangement creates a balance between maximizing the distance between spectral tuning peaks (allowing the color opponency of the visual system to distinguish between peaks) and maximizing the number of alleles within a limited range (yielding the greatest possible frequency of heterozygotes). PMID:12029355

  2. Changes in Blood Pressure and Heart Rate during Fixed-Interval Responding in Squirrel Monkeys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeWeese, Jo

    2009-01-01

    Episodic and sustained increases in heart rate and mean arterial blood pressure can occur with recurring patterns of schedule-controlled behavior. Most previous studies were conducted under fixed-ratio schedules, which maintained a consistent high rate of responding that alternated with periods of no responding during times when the schedule was…

  3. Cone pigment polymorphism in New World monkeys: are all pigments created equal?

    PubMed

    Rowe, Mickey P; Jacobs, Gerald H

    2004-01-01

    Most platyrrhine monkeys have a triallelic M/L opsin gene polymorphism that underlies significant individual variations in color vision. A survey of the frequencies of these polymorphic genes suggests that the three alleles occur with equal frequency among squirrel monkeys (subfamily Cebinae), but are not equally frequent in a number of species from the subfamily Callitrichinae. This departure from equal frequency in the Callitrichids should slightly increase the ratio of dichromats to trichromats in the population and significantly alter the relative representation of the three possible dichromatic and trichromatic phenotypes. A particular feature of the inequality is that it leads to a relative increase in the number of trichromats whose M/L pigments have the largest possible spectral separation. To assess whether these trichromatic phenotypes are equally well equipped to make relevant visual discriminations, psychophysical experiments were run on human observers. A technique involving the functional substitution of photopigments was used to simulate the discrimination between fruits among a background of leaves. The goal of the simulation was to reproduce in the cones of human observers excitations equivalent to those produced in monkey cones as the animals view fruit. Three different viewing conditions were examined involving variations in the relative luminances of fruit and leaves and the spectrum of the illuminant. In all cases, performance was best for simulated trichromacies including M/L pigments with the largest spectral separation. Thus, the inequality of opsin gene frequency in Callitrichid monkeys may reflect adaptive pressures. PMID:15518191

  4. A new hepadnavirus endemic in arctic ground squirrels in Alaska.

    PubMed Central

    Testut, P; Renard, C A; Terradillos, O; Vitvitski-Trepo, L; Tekaia, F; Degott, C; Blake, J; Boyer, B; Buendia, M A

    1996-01-01

    We present evidence for a novel member of the hepadnavirus family that is endemic in wild arctic ground squirrels (Spermophylus parryi kennicotti) in Alaska. This virus, designated arctic squirrel hepatitis virus (ASHV), was initially detected in the livers of animals bearing large hepatic nodules by nucleic acid hybridization with hepadnavirus probes and in plasma by cross-reactivity with antibodies to hepadnavirus surface and core antigens. The complete nucleotide sequence of the 3,302-bp-long ASHV genome was determined and compared with those of ground squirrel hepatitis virus (GSHV) and woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV); all sequences were organized into four open reading frames, designated pre-C/C, pre-S/S, pol, and X. Despite roughly equivalent variability among the three rodent hepadnaviruses (around 16% base and 19% amino acid exchanges), ASHV appeared to be more closely related to GSHV than to WHV in phylogenetic analysis. Accordingly, preliminary studies of the pathology of ASHV infection suggested that ASHV may be a less efficient oncogenic agent than WHV. About one-third of aged animals maintained in captivity, including virus-infected as well as uninfected squirrels, developed large liver nodules, consisting of hepatocellular adenomas or carcinomas or nonmalignant lesions characterized by drastic microvesicular steatosis. ASHV-infected arctic ground squirrels may serve as a new model with which to analyze the contribution of hepadnavirus- and host-specific determinants to liver pathology and tumorigenesis. PMID:8676441

  5. Depth perception from moving cast shadow in macaque monkey.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Saneyuki; Usui, Nobuo; Yokota, Takanori; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Taira, Masato; Katsuyama, Narumi

    2015-07-15

    In the present study, we investigate whether the macaque monkey can perceive motion in depth using a moving cast shadow. To accomplish this, we conducted two experiments. In the first experiment, an adult Japanese monkey was trained in a motion discrimination task in depth by binocular disparity. A square was presented on the display so that it appeared with a binocular disparity of 0.12 degrees (initial position), and moved toward (approaching) or away from (receding) the monkey for 1s. The monkey was trained to discriminate the approaching and receding motion of the square by GO/delayed GO-type responses. The monkey showed a significantly high accuracy rate in the task, and the performance was maintained when the position, color, and shape of the moving object were changed. In the next experiment, the change in the disparity was gradually decreased in the motion discrimination task. The results showed that the performance of the monkey declined as the distance of the approaching and receding motion of the square decreased from the initial position. However, when a moving cast shadow was added to the stimulus, the monkey responded to the motion in depth induced by the cast shadow in the same way as by binocular disparity; the reward was delivered randomly or given in all trials to prevent the learning of the 2D motion of the shadow in the frontal plane. These results suggest that the macaque monkey can perceive motion in depth using a moving cast shadow as well as using binocular disparity.

  6. Stochastic Population Dynamics of a Montane Ground-Dwelling Squirrel

    PubMed Central

    Hostetler, Jeffrey A.; Kneip, Eva; Van Vuren, Dirk H.; Oli, Madan K.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the causes and consequences of population fluctuations is a central goal of ecology. We used demographic data from a long-term (1990–2008) study and matrix population models to investigate factors and processes influencing the dynamics and persistence of a golden-mantled ground squirrel (Callospermophilus lateralis) population, inhabiting a dynamic subalpine habitat in Colorado, USA. The overall deterministic population growth rate λ was 0.94±SE 0.05 but it varied widely over time, ranging from 0.45±0.09 in 2006 to 1.50±0.12 in 2003, and was below replacement (λ<1) for 9 out of 18 years. The stochastic population growth rate λs was 0.92, suggesting a declining population; however, the 95% CI on λs included 1.0 (0.52–1.60). Stochastic elasticity analysis showed that survival of adult females, followed by survival of juvenile females and litter size, were potentially the most influential vital rates; analysis of life table response experiments revealed that the same three life history variables made the largest contributions to year-to year changes in λ. Population viability analysis revealed that, when the influences of density dependence and immigration were not considered, the population had a high (close to 1.0 in 50 years) probability of extinction. However, probability of extinction declined to as low as zero when density dependence and immigration were considered. Destabilizing effects of stochastic forces were counteracted by regulating effects of density dependence and rescue effects of immigration, which allowed our study population to bounce back from low densities and prevented extinction. These results suggest that dynamics and persistence of our study population are determined synergistically by density-dependence, stochastic forces, and immigration. PMID:22479616

  7. Stochastic population dynamics of a montane ground-dwelling squirrel.

    PubMed

    Hostetler, Jeffrey A; Kneip, Eva; Van Vuren, Dirk H; Oli, Madan K

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the causes and consequences of population fluctuations is a central goal of ecology. We used demographic data from a long-term (1990-2008) study and matrix population models to investigate factors and processes influencing the dynamics and persistence of a golden-mantled ground squirrel (Callospermophilus lateralis) population, inhabiting a dynamic subalpine habitat in Colorado, USA. The overall deterministic population growth rate λ was 0.94±SE 0.05 but it varied widely over time, ranging from 0.45±0.09 in 2006 to 1.50±0.12 in 2003, and was below replacement (λ<1) for 9 out of 18 years. The stochastic population growth rate λ(s) was 0.92, suggesting a declining population; however, the 95% CI on λ(s) included 1.0 (0.52-1.60). Stochastic elasticity analysis showed that survival of adult females, followed by survival of juvenile females and litter size, were potentially the most influential vital rates; analysis of life table response experiments revealed that the same three life history variables made the largest contributions to year-to year changes in λ. Population viability analysis revealed that, when the influences of density dependence and immigration were not considered, the population had a high (close to 1.0 in 50 years) probability of extinction. However, probability of extinction declined to as low as zero when density dependence and immigration were considered. Destabilizing effects of stochastic forces were counteracted by regulating effects of density dependence and rescue effects of immigration, which allowed our study population to bounce back from low densities and prevented extinction. These results suggest that dynamics and persistence of our study population are determined synergistically by density-dependence, stochastic forces, and immigration.

  8. Bipolar cells of the ground squirrel retina.

    PubMed

    Puller, Christian; Ondreka, Katharina; Haverkamp, Silke

    2011-03-01

    Parallel processing of an image projected onto the retina starts at the first synapse, the cone pedicle, and each cone feeds its light signal into a minimum of eight different bipolar cell types. Hence, the morphological classification of bipolar cells is a prerequisite for analyzing retinal circuitry. Here we applied common bipolar cell markers to the cone-dominated ground squirrel retina, studied the labeling by confocal microscopy and electron microscopy, and compared the resulting bipolar cell types with those of the mouse (rod dominated) and primate retina. Eight different cone bipolar cell types (three OFF and five ON) and one rod bipolar cell were distinguished. The major criteria for classifying the cells were their immunocytochemical identity, their dendritic branching pattern, and the shape and stratification level of their axons in the inner plexiform layer (IPL). Immunostaining with antibodies against Gγ13, a marker for ON bipolar cells, made it possible to separate OFF and ON bipolars. Recoverin-positive OFF bipolar cells partly overlapped with ON bipolar axon terminals at the ON/OFF border of the IPL. Antibodies against HCN4 labeled the S-cone selective (bb) bipolar cell. The calcium-binding protein CaB5 was expressed in two OFF and two ON cone bipolar cell types, and CD15 labeled a widefield ON cone bipolar cell comparable to the DB6 in primate.

  9. Brain tumors in irradiated monkeys.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haymaker, W.; Miquel, J.; Rubinstein, L. J.

    1972-01-01

    A study was made of 32 monkeys which survived one to seven years after total body exposure to protons or to high-energy X rays. Among these 32 monkeys there were 21 which survived two years or longer after exposure to 200 to 800 rad. Glioblastoma multiforme developed in 3 of the 10 monkeys surviving three to five years after receiving 600 or 800 rad 55-MeV protons. Thus, the incidence of tumor development in the present series was far higher than the incidence of spontaneously developing brain tumors in monkeys cited in the literature. This suggests that the tumors in the present series may have been radiation-induced.

  10. Effect of new training technique on affinity of cynomolgus monkeys for animal care personnel.

    PubMed

    Nishimoto, Ai; Tachibana, Yuki; Takaura, Kaoru; Ochi, Takehiro; Koyama, Hironari

    2015-01-01

    To confirm our hypothesis that the sex and age of cynomolgus monkeys influences the effect of training, we employed a new training technique designed to increase the animal's affinity for animal care personnel. During 151 days of training, monkeys aged 2 to 10 years accepted each 3 raisins/3 times/day, and communicated with animal care personnel (5 times/day). Behavior was scored using integers between -1 and 5. Before training, 35 of the 61 monkeys refused raisins offered directly by animal care personnel (Score -1, 0 and 1). After training, 28 of these 35 monkeys (80%) accepted raisins offered directly by animal care personnel (>Score 2). The mean score of monkeys increased from 1.2 ± 0.1 to 4.3 ± 0.2. The minimum training period required for monkeys to reach Score 2 was longer for females than for males. After 151 days, 6 of the 31 females and 1 of the 30 males still refused raisins offered directly by animal care personnel. Beneficial effects of training were obtained in both young and adult monkeys. These results indicate that our new training technique markedly improves the affinity of monkeys for animal care personnel, and that these effects tend to vary by sex but not age. In addition, abnormal behavior and symptoms of monkeys were improved by this training.

  11. Red-tailed monkeys (Cercopithecus ascanius) hunt green pigeons (Treron calva) in the Kalinzu Forest in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Furuichi, Takeshi

    2006-04-01

    Red-tailed monkeys (Cercopithecus ascanius) were observed hunting green pigeons (Treron calva) in the Kalinzu Forest in Uganda. During 2 h 39 min, I observed two cases of successful hunting and one case of unsuccessful hunting in a Ficus saussureana tree. Red-tailed monkeys stalked the pigeons until they were within 2-3 m, and then jumped and caught them. In both successful cases, blue monkeys (C. mitis) ran to the hunting site from adjacent trees in order to poach the prey, and the red-tailed monkeys fled. One of these red-tailed monkeys dropped the pigeon while fleeing, and the blue monkey climbed down from the tree to search for it. This is the first record of cercopithecoid monkeys hunting birds that are outside of the nest and moving freely, and also the first record of red-tailed monkeys hunting vertebrates. However rare it may be, the repeated hunting attempts using similar techniques and the immediate attempt of blue monkeys to poach the prey suggest that this type of hunting was not a one-time event that happened by chance. Blue monkeys and an adult chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) in and around the fig tree did not attempt to hunt. The hunting of volant birds may be enabled by the small body size and the quick movements of red-tailed monkeys. PMID:16467957

  12. Biodiversity threats from outside to inside: effects of alien grey squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis) on helminth community of native red squirrel (Sciurus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Romeo, Claudia; Ferrari, Nicola; Lanfranchi, Paolo; Saino, Nicola; Santicchia, Francesca; Martinoli, Adriano; Wauters, Lucas A

    2015-07-01

    Biological invasions are among the major causes of biodiversity loss worldwide, and parasites carried or acquired by invaders may represent an added threat to native species. We compared gastrointestinal helminth communities of native Eurasian red squirrels (Sciurus vulgaris) in the presence and absence of introduced Eastern grey squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis) to detect alterations induced by the alien species. In particular, we investigated whether spillover of a North American nematode Strongyloides robustus occurs and whether prevalence of a local parasite Trypanoxyuris sciuri in red squirrels is affected by grey squirrel presence. The probability of being infected by both parasites was significantly higher in areas co-inhabited by the alien species, where 61 % of examined red squirrels (n = 49) were infected by S. robustus and 90 % by T. sciuri. Conversely, in red-only areas, the two parasites infected only 5 and 70 % of individuals (n = 60). Overall, our findings support the hypothesis that red squirrels acquire S. robustus via spillover from the alien congener and suggest that invaders' presence may also indirectly affect infection by local parasites through mechanisms diverse than spill-back and linked to the increased competitive pressure to which red squirrels are subjected. These results indicate that the impact of grey squirrel on red squirrels may have been underestimated and highlight the importance of investigating variation in macroparasite communities of native species threatened by alien competitors.

  13. Demography and Life Histories of Sympatric Patas Monkeys, Erythrocebus patas, and Vervets, Cercopithecus aethiops, in Laikipia, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Young, Truman P.; Jaffe, Karin Enstam; Carlson, Anne A.; Chancellor, Rebecca L.

    2009-01-01

    Mortality patterns are thought to be strong selective forces on life history traits, with high adult mortality and low immature mortality favoring early and rapid reproduction. Patas monkeys (Erythrocebus patas) have the highest potential rates of population increase for their body size of any haplorhine primate because they reproduce both earlier and more often. We report here 10 yr of comparative demographic data on a population of patas monkeys and a sympatric population of vervet monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops), a closely related species differing in aspects of social system, ecology, and life history. The data reveal that 1) adult female patas monkeys have significantly higher mortality than adult female vervets; 2) infant mortality in patas monkeys is relatively low compared to the norm for mammals because it is not significantly different from that of adult female patas monkeys; and 3) infant mortality is significantly higher than adult female mortality in vervets. For both species, much of the mortality could be attributed to predation. An epidemic illness was also a major contributor to the mortality of adult female patas monkeys whereas chronic exposure to pathogens in a cold and damp microenvironment may have contributed to the mortality of infant vervets. Both populations experienced large fluctuations during the study period. Our results support the prediction from demographic models of life history evolution that high adult mortality relative to immature mortality selects for early maturation. PMID:20976285

  14. Ames Research Center life sciences payload - Overview of results of a spaceflight of 24 rats and 2 monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callahan, P. X.; Schatte, C.; Grindeland, R. E.; Bowman, G.; Lencki, W. A.

    1985-01-01

    Engineering and biological data gathered with the research animal holding facilities (RAHFs) used on the Spacelab 3 mission are summarized. The animals totaled 24 rats and two squirrel monkeys. The RAHFs included biotelemetry, cameras and environmental monitoring equipment. The primary mission goal was engineering evaluation of the RAHFs and ancillary equipment. Tightly-fitted seals were found to be a necessity for keeping waste and food particles from contaminating the Spacelab equipment. All the rats returned with little muscle tone and suppressed immune systems. The monkeys displayed highly individual responses to spaceflight. Both species exhibited reduced abilities to maintain meticulously clean furs in weightlessness. Details of several physiological changes detected during post-flight autopsies are provided.

  15. Circadian phase relationships in monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. E.; Wekstein, D. R.

    1973-01-01

    Two adult male pigtail monkeys were placed in an isolated, soundproofed chamber (entered for cleaning only) for a period of six months, during which time their deep body temperatures T sub DB, telemetered from transmitters implanted in the abdominal cavity), fluid intake, urinary output (UV), urinary sodium and potassium were continuously monitored. During the first 3 1/2 months, lights (L) were turned on at 0000 hours, off at 1200 hours. Photoperiod phase was then delayed (light span prolonged) 6 hours to a new schedule: L on at 0600 hours, off at 1800 hours. Six weeks later, photoperiod phase was advanced 6 hours to return to the original schedule. Prior to shift, T sub DB typically began a steep rise 0-5 hours prior to L on, a steep fall 3-4 hours prior to L off, relative plateaus in between. Urinary Na typically peaks 2 hours prior to L off, has a minimum 2-4 hours prior to L on; K tends both to peak and show a minimum 2-8 hours earlier than Na; in contrast, UV peaks at L on, has a minimum 2-6 hours after L off. Upon delaying photoperiod phase, T sub DB shift was completed in 8 days. UV shifted more rapidly but tended to overshoot the new phase. Within 5 days, UV and K completed their shifts, although Na did not fully resynchronize within the 6 week period monitored.

  16. Fire, red squirrels, whitebark pine, and Yellowstone grizzly bears

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Podruzny, Shannon; Reinhart, D.P.; Mattson, David J.

    1999-01-01

    Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) habitats are important to Yellowstone grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) as refugia and sources of food. Ecological relationships between whitebark pine, red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus), and grizzly bear use of pine seeds on Mt. Washburn in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, were examined during 1984-86. Following large-scale fires in 1988, we repeated the study in 1995-97 to examine the effects of fire on availability of whitebark pine seed in red squirrel middens and on bear use of middens. Half of the total length of the original line transects burned. We found no red squirrel middens in burned areas. Post-fire linear-abundance (no./km) of active squirrel middens that were pooled from burned and unburned areas decreased 27% compared to pre-fire abundance, but increased in unburned portions of some habitat types. Mean size of active middens decreased 54% post-fire. Use of pine seeds by bears (linear abundance of excavated middens) in pooled burned and unburned habitats decreased by 64%, likely due to the combined effects of reduced midden availability and smaller midden size. We discourage any further large-scale losses of seed producing trees from management-prescribed fires or timber harvesting until the effects of fire on ecological relationships in the whitebark pine zone are better understood.

  17. Squirrels--A Teaching Resource in Your Schoolyard.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaHart, David E.

    1991-01-01

    This lesson plan demonstrates how to use common animals in your backyard or school grounds to study basic ecological principles with students. An example study uses squirrels for observational study. Includes background information, references, suggested equipment, activities, and observation techniques. (MCO)

  18. The feeding ecology and activity budget of proboscis monkeys.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Ikki; Tuuga, Augustine; Higashi, Seigo

    2009-06-01

    A group of proboscis monkeys (Nasalis larvatus) consisting of an alpha-male, six adult females, and several immatures was observed from May 2005-2006. We collected over 1,968 hr of focal data on the adult male and 1,539 hr of focal data on the six females in a forest along the Menanggul River, Sabah, Malaysia. Availability and seasonal changes in plant species consumed by the focal monkeys were determined by vegetation surveys carried out across an area of 2.15 ha along 200-500 m trails in riverine forest. A total of 188 plant species were consumed by the focal monkeys. The activity budget of members of our study group was 76.5% resting, 19.5% feeding, and 3.5% moving. Young leaves (65.9%) and fruits (25.9%) accounted for the majority of feeding time. Over 90% of fruit feeding involved the consumption of unripe fruits and in the majority of case both the fruit flesh and seeds were eaten. Although fruit eating was rare in some months, during other times of the year time fruit feeding exceeded the time devoted to young leaves. We found that monthly fruit availability was positively related to monthly fruit eating and feeding activity, and seasonal fluctuations in dietary diversity were significantly affected by fruit eating. These results suggest that fruit availability and fruit-eating behaviors are key factors that influence the activity budget of proboscis monkeys. Earlier assumptions that colobine monkeys are obligate folivores do not apply well to proboscis monkeys and certain other colobines. Our findings may help contribute to a better understanding of the dietary adaptations and feeding ecology of Asian colobines. PMID:19288553

  19. Monkeys reject unequal pay.

    PubMed

    Brosnan, Sarah F; De Waal, Frans B M

    2003-09-18

    During the evolution of cooperation it may have become critical for individuals to compare their own efforts and pay-offs with those of others. Negative reactions may occur when expectations are violated. One theory proposes that aversion to inequity can explain human cooperation within the bounds of the rational choice model, and may in fact be more inclusive than previous explanations. Although there exists substantial cultural variation in its particulars, this 'sense of fairness' is probably a human universal that has been shown to prevail in a wide variety of circumstances. However, we are not the only cooperative animals, hence inequity aversion may not be uniquely human. Many highly cooperative nonhuman species seem guided by a set of expectations about the outcome of cooperation and the division of resources. Here we demonstrate that a nonhuman primate, the brown capuchin monkey (Cebus apella), responds negatively to unequal reward distribution in exchanges with a human experimenter. Monkeys refused to participate if they witnessed a conspecific obtain a more attractive reward for equal effort, an effect amplified if the partner received such a reward without any effort at all. These reactions support an early evolutionary origin of inequity aversion.

  20. Early Wisconsinan (MIS 4) Arctic ground squirrel middens and a squirrel-eye-view of the mammoth-steppe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zazula, Grant D.; Froese, Duane G.; Elias, Scott A.; Kuzmina, Svetlana; Mathewes, Rolf W.

    2011-08-01

    Fossil arctic ground squirrel ( Spermophilus parryii) middens were recovered from ice-rich loess sediments in association with Sheep Creek-Klondike and Dominion Creek tephras (ca 80 ka) exposed in west-central Yukon. These middens provide plant and insect macrofossil evidence for a steppe-tundra ecosystem during the Early Wisconsinan (MIS 4) glacial interval. Midden plant and insect macrofossil data are compared with those previously published for Late Wisconsinan middens dating to ˜25-29 14C ka BP (MIS 3/2) from the region. Although multivariate statistical comparisons suggest differences between the relative abundances of plant macrofossils, the co-occurrence of steppe-tundra plants and insects (e.g., Elymus trachycaulus, Kobresia myosuroides, Artemisia frigida, Phlox hoodii, Connatichela artemisiae) provides evidence for successive reestablishment of the zonal steppe-tundra habitats during cold stages of the Late Pleistocene. Arctic ground squirrels were well adapted to the cold, arid climates, steppe-tundra vegetation and well-drained loessal soils that characterize cold stages of Late Pleistocene Beringia. These glacial conditions enabled arctic ground squirrel populations to expand their range to the interior regions of Alaska and Yukon, including the Klondike, where they are absent today. Arctic ground squirrels have endured numerous Quaternary climate oscillations by retracting populations to disjunct "interglacial refugia" during warm interglacial periods (e.g., south-facing steppe slopes, well-drained arctic and alpine tundra areas) and expanding their distribution across the mammoth-steppe biome during cold, arid glacial intervals.

  1. Fatal Systemic Toxoplasma gondii Infection in a Red Squirrel (Sciurus vulgaris), a Swinhoe's Striped Squirrel (Tamiops swinhoei) and a New World Porcupine (Erethizontidae sp.).

    PubMed

    Fayyad, A; Kummerfeld, M; Davina, I; Wohlsein, P; Beineke, A; Baumgärtner, W; Puff, C

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a parasitic disease that affects man and animals worldwide. The primary hosts and major reservoir for Toxoplasma gondii are felids and the intermediate hosts are most warm-blooded animals including man. This report describes fatal toxoplasmosis in three different rodent species in Germany: a female red squirrel (Sciurus vulgaris) and a male Swinhoe's striped squirrel (Tamiops swinhoei), both kept as pets, and a female New World porcupine (Erethizontidae sp.) from a zoo. All three animals had multifocal necrotizing hepatitis. Additional findings included lymphohistiocytic and necrotizing myocarditis in the New World porcupine and the Swinhoe's striped squirrel, lymphohistiocytic encephalomyelitis in the New World porcupine and suppurative lymphadenitis in the red squirrel. Numerous tachyzoites were identified associated with the lesions. The diagnosis was confirmed by Toxoplasma. gondii immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. This is the first report of toxoplasmosis in a New World porcupine and a Swinhoe's striped squirrel.

  2. Weak orientation and direction selectivity in lateral geniculate nucleus representing central vision in the gray squirrel Sciurus carolinensis

    PubMed Central

    Zaltsman, Julia B.; Heimel, J. Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Classic studies of lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) and visual cortex (V1) in carnivores and primates have found that a majority of neurons in LGN exhibit a center-surround organization, while V1 neurons exhibit strong orientation selectivity and, in many species, direction selectivity. Recent work in the mouse and the monkey has discovered previously unknown classes of orientation- and direction-selective neurons in LGN. Furthermore, some recent studies in the mouse report that many LGN cells exhibit pronounced orientation biases that are of comparable strength to the subthreshold inputs to V1 neurons. These results raise the possibility that, in rodents, orientation biases of individual LGN cells make a substantial contribution to cortical orientation selectivity. Alternatively, the size and contribution of orientation- or direction-selective channels from LGN to V1 may vary across mammals. To address this question, we examined orientation and direction selectivity in LGN and V1 neurons of a highly visual diurnal rodent: the gray squirrel. In the representation of central vision, only a few LGN neurons exhibited strong orientation or direction selectivity. Across the population, LGN neurons showed weak orientation biases and were much less selective for orientation compared with V1 neurons. Although direction selectivity was weak overall, LGN layers 3abc, which contain neurons that express calbindin, exhibited elevated direction selectivity index values compared with LGN layers 1 and 2. These results suggest that, for central visual fields, the contribution of orientation- and direction-selective channels from the LGN to V1 is small in the squirrel. As in other mammals, this small contribution is elevated in the calbindin-positive layers of the LGN PMID:25717157

  3. Do You See What I See? A Comparative Investigation of the Delboeuf Illusion in Humans (Homo sapiens), Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca mulatta) and Capuchin Monkeys (Cebus apella)

    PubMed Central

    Parrish, Audrey E.; Brosnan, Sarah F.; Beran, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Studying visual illusions is critical to understanding typical visual perception. We investigated whether rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) and capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) perceived the Delboeuf illusion in a similar manner as human adults (Homo sapiens). To test this, in Experiment 1, we presented monkeys and humans with a relative discrimination task that required subjects to choose the larger of two central dots that were sometimes encircled by concentric rings. As predicted, humans demonstrated evidence of the Delboeuf illusion, overestimating central dots when small rings surrounded them and underestimating the size of central dots when large rings surrounded them. However, monkeys did not show evidence of the illusion. To rule out an alternate explanation, in Experiment 2, we presented all species with an absolute classification task that required them to classify a central dot as ‘small’ or ‘large.’ We presented a range of ring sizes to determine whether the Delboeuf illusion would occur for any dot-to-ring ratios. Here, we found evidence of the Delboeuf illusion in all three species. Humans and monkeys underestimated central dot size to a progressively greater degree with progressively larger rings. The Delboeuf illusion now has been extended to include capuchin monkeys and rhesus monkeys, and through such comparative investigations we can better evaluate hypotheses regarding illusion perception among nonhuman animals. PMID:26322505

  4. How monkeys see others: Discrimination and recognition of monkeys' shape.

    PubMed

    Dittrich, W

    1994-12-01

    The two experiments described in this study address the question of the perceptual basis of species discrimination and body recognition in monkeys. Longtailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis) were trained to discriminate line drawings of different monkey bodies. The procedure consisted of a simultaneous discrimination between four images under continuous reinforcement. Social communication between the test animal and other group members during test sessions was almost unrestricted. In the first experiment all monkeys learned, within at least 7 sessions, to discriminate one monkey from other monkeys. Discrimination was invariant against transformations of size and rotation of the stimuli. A preference test for particular features resulted in a graded estimation of particular body features. Generalisation to different views of facial stimuli was demonstrated. In the second experiment the monkeys had to relearn a new association which involved a differentiation of the previously shown stimuli. After reaching the learning criterion it was shown that the same features as in the previous experiment were evaluated differently. The experiments generally support the view that perceptual mechanisms of the signal receiver are crucial for individual recognition. Results are discussed in contrast to a 'theory of mind' approach in primate cognition.

  5. The monkey in the mirror: Hardly a stranger

    PubMed Central

    de Waal, Frans B. M.; Dindo, Marietta; Freeman, Cassiopeia A.; Hall, Marisa J.

    2005-01-01

    It is widely assumed that monkeys see a stranger in the mirror, whereas apes and humans recognize themselves. In this study, we question the former assumption by using a detailed comparison of how monkeys respond to mirrors versus live individuals. Eight adult female and six adult male brown capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) were exposed twice to three conditions: (i) a familiar same-sex partner, (ii) an unfamiliar same-sex partner, and (iii) a mirror. Females showed more eye contact and friendly behavior and fewer signs of anxiety in front of a mirror than they did when exposed to an unfamiliar partner. Males showed greater ambiguity, but they too reacted differently to mirrors and strangers. Discrimination between conditions was immediate, and blind coders were able to tell the difference between monkeys under the three conditions. Capuchins thus seem to recognize their reflection in the mirror as special, and they may not confuse it with an actual conspecific. Possibly, they reach a level of self–other distinction intermediate between seeing their mirror image as other and recognizing it as self. PMID:16055557

  6. Biologic Data of Cynomolgus Monkeys Maintained under Laboratory Conditions.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Marilena Caterina; Badino, Paola; Ferrero, Giulio; Costa, Roberto; Cordero, Francesca; Steidler, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    The cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis) is a well-known non-human primate species commonly used in non-clinical research. It is important to know basal clinical pathology parameters in order to have a reference for evaluating any potential treatment-induced effects, maintaining health status among animals and, if needed, evaluating correct substantiative therapies. In this study, data from 238 untreated cynomolgus monkeys (119 males and 119 females of juvenile age, 2.5 to 3.5 years) kept under laboratory conditions were used to build up a reference database of clinical pathology parameters. Twenty-two hematology markers, 24 clinical chemistry markers and two blood coagulation parameters were analyzed. Gender-related differences were evaluated using statistical analyses. To assess the possible effects of stress induced by housing or handling involved in treatment procedures, 78 animals (35 males and 35 females out of 238 juvenile monkeys and four adult males and four adult females) were used to evaluate cortisol, corticosterone and behavioral assessment over time. Data were analyzed using a non-parametric statistical test and machine learning approaches. Reference clinical pathology data obtained from untreated animals may be extremely useful for investigators employing cynomolgus monkeys as a test system for non-clinical safety studies. PMID:27280447

  7. Biologic Data of Cynomolgus Monkeys Maintained under Laboratory Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Rosso, Marilena Caterina; Badino, Paola; Ferrero, Giulio; Costa, Roberto; Cordero, Francesca; Steidler, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    The cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis) is a well-known non-human primate species commonly used in non-clinical research. It is important to know basal clinical pathology parameters in order to have a reference for evaluating any potential treatment-induced effects, maintaining health status among animals and, if needed, evaluating correct substantiative therapies. In this study, data from 238 untreated cynomolgus monkeys (119 males and 119 females of juvenile age, 2.5 to 3.5 years) kept under laboratory conditions were used to build up a reference database of clinical pathology parameters. Twenty-two hematology markers, 24 clinical chemistry markers and two blood coagulation parameters were analyzed. Gender-related differences were evaluated using statistical analyses. To assess the possible effects of stress induced by housing or handling involved in treatment procedures, 78 animals (35 males and 35 females out of 238 juvenile monkeys and four adult males and four adult females) were used to evaluate cortisol, corticosterone and behavioral assessment over time. Data were analyzed using a non-parametric statistical test and machine learning approaches. Reference clinical pathology data obtained from untreated animals may be extremely useful for investigators employing cynomolgus monkeys as a test system for non-clinical safety studies. PMID:27280447

  8. Photoacoustic detection of functional responses in the motor cortex of awake behaving monkey during forelimb movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Janggun; Zhang, Hongyu; Cheney, Paul D.; Yang, Xinmai

    2012-11-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging was applied to detect the neuronal activity in the motor cortex of an awake, behaving monkey during forelimb movement. An adult macaque monkey was trained to perform a reach-to-grasp task while PA images were acquired through a 30-mm diameter implanted cranial chamber. Increased PA signal amplitude results from an increase in regional blood volume and is interpreted as increased neuronal activity. Additionally, depth-resolved PA signals enabled the study of functional responses in deep cortical areas. The results demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing PA imaging for studies of functional activation of cerebral cortex in awake monkeys performing behavioral tasks.

  9. Pregnancy zone protein analogue in pregnant and non-pregnant primates, and its decrease during pregnancy in some monkey species.

    PubMed

    Lin, T M; Halbert, S P; Plasencia, R

    1976-12-01

    Rabbit antiserum to human pregnancy zone protein (PZP) cross-reacted with analogous proteins in several species of primates. The chimpanzee PZP showed reactions of identity with human PZP, while the PZP analogue in the orangutan, in four species of old world monkeys (pig-tailed, rhesus, cynomolgus and stump-tailed) and in a species of new world monkey (squirrel) showed equivalent reactions of partial identity with human PZP. In the chimpanzee and orangutan, the PZP analogue was present in low concentrations in non-pregnant animals, but as in the human, it increased quite appreciably during gestation. In the chimpanzee, this increase in pregnancy was about four-fold greater than in the human. In sharp contrast, in the old and new world monkeys, the PZP analogue was present in much higher concentrations in non-pregnant animals than it is in humans. In addition, during pregnancy the PZP analogue in these monkey species actually decreased during pregnancy. In the few cases studied, normal levels were regained about 1 month after delivery. A normal plasma protein, alpha2-macroglobin, was also studied in these primate species, because this protein shares some characteristics with PZP. Analogous alpha2-macroglobulin serum proteins were found in all the primates tested, but the observed gel diffusion identity patterns suggested that this protein was phylogenetically older than PZP. alpha2-macroglobulin increased slightly during human pregnancy, but in all the other primates studied, the alpha-macroglobulin analogue was either unchanged or slightly decreased during gestation.

  10. Seasonal use of red-cockaded woodpecker cavities by southern flying squirrels.

    SciTech Connect

    Loeb, Susan C.; Ruth, Deanna L.

    2004-12-31

    Loeb, Susan C., and Deanna L. Ruth. 2004. Seasonal use of red-cockaded woodpecker cavities by southern flying squirrels. In: Red-cockaded woodpecker; Road to Recovery. Proceedings of the 4th Red-cockaded woodpecker Symposium. Ralph Costa and Susan J. Daniels, eds. Savannah, Georgia. January, 2003. Chapter 8. Cavities, Cavity Trees, and Cavity Communities. Pp 501-502. Abstract: Southern flying squirrels can significantly impact red-cockaded woodpecker reproductive success (Laves and Loeb 1999). Thus exclusion or removal of flying squirrels from red-cockaded woodpecker cavities and clusters may be warranted in small woodpecker populations (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 2003). However, development of effective and efficient protocols for southern flying squirrel control requires an understanding of the seasonal dynamics of southern flying squirrel cavity use. Most studies of southern flying squirrel use of red-cockaded woodpecker cavities have been conducted during spring (e.g., Harlow and Lennartz 1983, Rudolph et al. 1990a, Loeb 1993) and no studies have examined the effects of long term flying squirrel control on subsequent cavity use. The objectives of this study were to determine: (1) whether flying squirrel use of red-cockaded woodpecker cavities varies with season or cavity type, and (2) the long term effect of continuous squirrel removal.

  11. Transmission of ground squirrel hepatitis virus to homologous and heterologous hosts.

    PubMed

    Trueba, D; Phelan, M; Nelson, J; Beck, F; Pecha, B S; Brown, R J; Varmus, H E; Ganem, D

    1985-01-01

    The infectivity and host range of ground squirrel hepatitis virus (GSHV) have been further examined by animal inoculation experiments. Although carrier squirrel sera usually harbor 10(9) to 10(10) virions per ml as determined by physical measurements, titration of one such serum revealed that squirrel infectivity was lost following dilution of the sample over 10(6)-fold. Infectivity is markedly reduced by NP40 pretreatment of infected serum. GSHV infection cannot be readily transmitted to several related ground squirrel species, but chipmunks can be experimentally infected by GSHV virions or by cloned GSHV DNA, and the resulting infection closely resembles that seen in the normal host.

  12. Evaluation of squirrels (Rodentia: Sciuridae) as ecologically significant hosts for Anaplasma phagocytophilum in California.

    PubMed

    Nieto, Nathan C; Foley, Janet E

    2008-07-01

    Granulocytic anaplasmosis (GA), caused by Anaplasma phagocytophilum, is a potentially fatal, emerging rickettsial disease of humans, domestic animals, and wildlife. The purpose of this study was to determine whether sciurids from multiple areas of northern California were infested with ticks or exposed to or infected with A. phagocytophilum using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and indirect-fluorescent antibody (IFA) serology. Sciurids of nine different tree- and ground-dwelling species were assessed: arboreal squirrels (western and eastern gray squirrels, Sciurus griseus and S. carolinensis, and Douglas squirrels, Tamiasciurus douglasii) but not northern flying squirrels (Glaucomys sabrinus) had greater evidence of exposure and current infection than did semiarboreal or ground dwelling sciurids (California ground squirrels, Spermophilus beecheyi, and chipmunks, Tamias spp.). Western gray squirrels had the most extensive exposure (70.7% seroprevalence and 12.1% PCR prevalence). Positive squirrels were identified in all regions where squirrels were collected. A logistic regression identified being a western gray squirrel (OR = 20.5, P = 2.95 X 10(-8)) and from the north coastal region of California (OR = 9.052, P = 1.41 X 10(-6)) as having the highest risk of exposure to A. phagocytophilum. Five of nine sciurid species had evidence of infestation with Ixodes pacificus or I. spinipalpis that could vector A. phagocytophilum. Extensive exposure from multiple areas suggests sciurids may be important in the maintenance of GA in California and indicates that studies of reservoir competence of these species are warranted. PMID:18714881

  13. The influence of changing seasonality and snow cover on arctic ground squirrel phenology.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, B.; Sheriff, M.; Kenagy, J.; Buck, L.; Team Squirrel

    2011-12-01

    A warming climate in the Arctic may have asymmetrical effects on seasonality, depending on the timing and extent of snow cover. Warm autumns that delay the onset of persistent snow cover will lengthen growing seasons of some plants and, combined with continuing access to fallen seeds, berries, and leaves, extend feeding opportunities for ground foragers. Warming in spring should advance when the ground becomes snow free and the onset of plant productivity, leading overall to a longer growing season. However, if winter and spring precipitation increase, as is predicted in climate models, the amount and seasonal extent of snow pack will increase, which will delay melt and lead to delayed springs. Either of these scenarios may develop regionally, depending on local weather, snow, and wind. Since 1996, we have been investigating the timing of annual events in natural populations of arctic ground squirrels, Urocitellus parryii, living at two nearby sites (Toolik and Atigun, 68o38'N) in arctic Alaska that greatly differ in timing and duration of snow cover. Since arctic ground squirrels are highly dependent on snow free ground for foraging, we predicted that these environmental differences will have had major impacts on life histories and timing of annual events on the local populations. Precision in dates of the beginning and end of hibernation, use of heterothermy, and birth of young were determined by temperature-sensitive data loggers implanted into juvenile and adult animals of both sexes. Weather stations, snow cameras, and transects for plant phenology are in place at both locations, although record lengths differ. While across the past 15 years annual timing of hibernation and breeding has not shown significant trends at either site, the two populations have differed consistently in hibernation timing and length of active season, and they show a 13 day difference in average timing of reproduction. These results reveal a substantial flexibility of timing of the

  14. Subcortical afferent connections of the amygdala in the monkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehler, W. R.

    1980-01-01

    The cells of origin of the afferent connections of the amygdala in the rhesus and squirrel monkeys are determined according to the retrograde axonal transport of the enzyme horseradish peroxidase injected into various quadrants of the amygdala. Analysis of the distribution of enzyme-labeled cells reveals afferent amygdalar connections with the ipsilateral halves of the midline nucleus paraventricularis thalami and both the parvo- and magnocellular parts of the nucleus subparafascicularis in the dorsal thalamus, all the subdivisions of the midline nucleus centralis complex, the nucleus reuniens ventralis and the nucleus interventralis. The largest populations of enzyme-labeled cells in the hypothalamus are found to lie in the middle and posterior parts of the ipsilateral, lateral hypothalamus and the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus, with scattered cells in the supramammillary and dorsomedial nuclei and the posterior hypothalamic area, Tsai's ventral tegmental area, the rostral and caudal subdivisions of the nucleus linearis in the midbrain and the dorsal raphe nucleus. The most conspicuous subdiencephalic source of amygdalar afferent connections is observed to be the pars lateralis of the nucleus parabrachialis in the dorsolateral pontine tegmentum, with a few labeled cells differentiated from pigmented cells in the locus coeruleus.

  15. Fitness consequences of hoarding behaviour in the Eurasian red squirrel.

    PubMed

    Wauters, L A; Suhonen, J; Dhondt, A A

    1995-12-22

    Hoarding increases food availability during periods of scarcity, and therefore should enhance fitness. Although short-term advantages of hoarding have been described for birds, effects over an animal's lifetime have not yet been documented. Here, we report that in the red squirrel, Sciurus vulgaris, individuals which recovered many cached tree seeds increased their body mass and were more likely to survive the spring breeding season than those that recovered fewer seeds. There was no significant effect of the time spent recovering cached food on the probability for females to produce a spring litter. In the long-term, hoarding behaviour was related to fitness in two ways; (i) squirrels spending more time recovering hoards survived longer; and (ii) females with a high recovery activity tended to wean more young in their lifetime than those that spent less time recovering hoards. Our data indicate that in red squirrels, food hoarding is an adaptive foraging strategy to preserve temporarily abundant food resources for future periods of hardship, and that individuals that hoard and recovery many tree seeds are more likely to survive and reproduce. PMID:8587886

  16. Architectonic subdivisions of neocortex in the grey squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis)

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Peiyan; Kaas, Jon H.

    2010-01-01

    Squirrels are highly visual mammals with an expanded cortical visual system and a number of well-differentiated architectonic fields. In order to describe and delimit cortical fields, subdivisions of cortex were reconstructed from serial brain sections cut in the coronal, sagittal, or horizontal planes. Architectonic characteristics of cortical areas were visualized after brain sections were processed with immunohistochemical and histochemical procedures for revealing parvalbumin, calbindin, neurofilament protein, vesicle glutamate transporter 2, limbic-associated membrane protein, synaptic zinc, cytochrome oxidase, myelin or Nissl substance. In general, these different procedures revealed similar boundaries between areas, suggesting that functionally relevant borders were being detected. The results allowed a more precise demarcation of previously identified areas as well as the identification of areas that had not been previously described. Primary sensory cortical areas characterized by sparse zinc staining of layer 4, as thalamocortical terminations lack zinc, as well as by layer 4 terminations rich in parvalbumin and vesicle glutamate transporter 2. Primary areas also expressed higher levels of cytochrome oxidase and myelin. Primary motor cortex was associated with large SMI-32 labeled pyramidal cells in layers 3 and 5. Our proposed organization of cortex in grey squirrels includes both similarities and differences to the proposed of cortex in other rodents such as mice and rats. The presence of a number of well-differentiated cortical areas in squirrels may serve as a guide to the identification of homologous fields in other rodents, as well as a useful guide in further studies of cortical organization and function. PMID:18780299

  17. Fitness consequences of hoarding behaviour in the Eurasian red squirrel.

    PubMed

    Wauters, L A; Suhonen, J; Dhondt, A A

    1995-12-22

    Hoarding increases food availability during periods of scarcity, and therefore should enhance fitness. Although short-term advantages of hoarding have been described for birds, effects over an animal's lifetime have not yet been documented. Here, we report that in the red squirrel, Sciurus vulgaris, individuals which recovered many cached tree seeds increased their body mass and were more likely to survive the spring breeding season than those that recovered fewer seeds. There was no significant effect of the time spent recovering cached food on the probability for females to produce a spring litter. In the long-term, hoarding behaviour was related to fitness in two ways; (i) squirrels spending more time recovering hoards survived longer; and (ii) females with a high recovery activity tended to wean more young in their lifetime than those that spent less time recovering hoards. Our data indicate that in red squirrels, food hoarding is an adaptive foraging strategy to preserve temporarily abundant food resources for future periods of hardship, and that individuals that hoard and recovery many tree seeds are more likely to survive and reproduce.

  18. Red Squirrel Middens Influence Abundance but Not Diversity of Other Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Posthumus, Erin E.; Koprowski, John L.; Steidl, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Some animals modify the environment in ways that can influence the resources available to other species. Because red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus) create large piles of conifer-cone debris (middens) in which they store cones, squirrels concentrate resources that might affect biodiversity locally. To determine whether other animals are attracted to midden sites beyond their affinity for the same resources that attract red squirrels, we assessed associations between middens, mammals, and birds at population and community levels. We surveyed 75 middens where residency rates of red squirrels varied during the previous five years; sampling along this residency gradient permitted us to evaluate the influence of resources at middens beyond the influence of a resident squirrel. At each location, we quantified vegetation, landscape structure, abundance of conifer cones, and midden structure, and used capture–recapture, distance sampling, and remote cameras to quantify presence, abundance, and species richness of mammals and birds. Red squirrels and the resources they concentrated at middens influenced mammals and birds at the population scale and to a lesser extent at the community scale. At middens with higher residency rates of red squirrels, richness of medium and large mammals increased markedly and species richness of birds increased slightly. After accounting for local forest characteristics, however, only species richness of medium-to-large mammals was associated with a red squirrel being resident during surveys. In areas where red squirrels were resident during surveys or in areas with greater amounts of resources concentrated by red squirrels, abundances of two of four small mammal species and two of four bird species increased. We conclude that the presence of this ecosystem modifier and the resources it concentrates influence abundance of some mammals and birds, which may have implications for maintaining biodiversity across the wide geographic range

  19. Red squirrel middens influence abundance but not diversity of other vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Posthumus, Erin E; Koprowski, John L; Steidl, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    Some animals modify the environment in ways that can influence the resources available to other species. Because red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus) create large piles of conifer-cone debris (middens) in which they store cones, squirrels concentrate resources that might affect biodiversity locally. To determine whether other animals are attracted to midden sites beyond their affinity for the same resources that attract red squirrels, we assessed associations between middens, mammals, and birds at population and community levels. We surveyed 75 middens where residency rates of red squirrels varied during the previous five years; sampling along this residency gradient permitted us to evaluate the influence of resources at middens beyond the influence of a resident squirrel. At each location, we quantified vegetation, landscape structure, abundance of conifer cones, and midden structure, and used capture-recapture, distance sampling, and remote cameras to quantify presence, abundance, and species richness of mammals and birds. Red squirrels and the resources they concentrated at middens influenced mammals and birds at the population scale and to a lesser extent at the community scale. At middens with higher residency rates of red squirrels, richness of medium and large mammals increased markedly and species richness of birds increased slightly. After accounting for local forest characteristics, however, only species richness of medium-to-large mammals was associated with a red squirrel being resident during surveys. In areas where red squirrels were resident during surveys or in areas with greater amounts of resources concentrated by red squirrels, abundances of two of four small mammal species and two of four bird species increased. We conclude that the presence of this ecosystem modifier and the resources it concentrates influence abundance of some mammals and birds, which may have implications for maintaining biodiversity across the wide geographic range

  20. Red squirrel middens influence abundance but not diversity of other vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Posthumus, Erin E; Koprowski, John L; Steidl, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    Some animals modify the environment in ways that can influence the resources available to other species. Because red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus) create large piles of conifer-cone debris (middens) in which they store cones, squirrels concentrate resources that might affect biodiversity locally. To determine whether other animals are attracted to midden sites beyond their affinity for the same resources that attract red squirrels, we assessed associations between middens, mammals, and birds at population and community levels. We surveyed 75 middens where residency rates of red squirrels varied during the previous five years; sampling along this residency gradient permitted us to evaluate the influence of resources at middens beyond the influence of a resident squirrel. At each location, we quantified vegetation, landscape structure, abundance of conifer cones, and midden structure, and used capture-recapture, distance sampling, and remote cameras to quantify presence, abundance, and species richness of mammals and birds. Red squirrels and the resources they concentrated at middens influenced mammals and birds at the population scale and to a lesser extent at the community scale. At middens with higher residency rates of red squirrels, richness of medium and large mammals increased markedly and species richness of birds increased slightly. After accounting for local forest characteristics, however, only species richness of medium-to-large mammals was associated with a red squirrel being resident during surveys. In areas where red squirrels were resident during surveys or in areas with greater amounts of resources concentrated by red squirrels, abundances of two of four small mammal species and two of four bird species increased. We conclude that the presence of this ecosystem modifier and the resources it concentrates influence abundance of some mammals and birds, which may have implications for maintaining biodiversity across the wide geographic range

  1. Inequity responses of monkeys modified by effort

    PubMed Central

    van Wolkenten, Megan; Brosnan, Sarah F.; de Waal, Frans B. M.

    2007-01-01

    Without joint benefits, joint actions could never have evolved. Cooperative animals need to monitor closely how large a share they receive relative to their investment toward collective goals. This work documents the sensitivity to reward division in brown, or tufted, capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella). In addition to confirming previous results with a larger subject pool, this work rules out several alternative explanations and adds data on effort sensitivity. Thirteen adult monkeys exchanged tokens for rewards, showing negative reactions to receiving a less-favored reward than their partner. Because their negative reaction could not be attributed to the mere visibility of better rewards (greed hypothesis) nor to having received such rewards in the immediate past (frustration hypothesis), it must have been caused by seeing their partner obtain the better reward. Effort had a major effect in that by far the lowest level of performance in the entire study occurred in subjects required to expend a large effort while at the same time seeing their partner receive a better reward. It is unclear whether this effort–effect was based on comparisons with the partner, but it added significantly to the intensity of the inequity response. These effects are as expected if the inequity response evolved in the context of cooperative survival strategies. PMID:18000045

  2. Spaceflight and immune responses of rhesus monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Morton, Darla S.; Swiggett, Jeanene P.; Hakenewerth, Anne M.; Fowler, Nina A.

    1995-01-01

    The effects of restraint on immunological parameters was determined in an 18 day ARRT (adult rhesus restraint test). The monkeys were restrained for 18 days in the experimental station for the orbiting primate (ESOP), the chair of choice for Space Shuttle experiments. Several immunological parameters were determined using peripheral blood, bone marrow, and lymph node specimens from the monkeys. The parameters included: response of bone marrow cells to GM-CSF (granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor), leukocyte subset distribution, and production of IFN-a (interferon-alpha) and IFN-gamma (interferon-gamma). The only parameter changed after 18 days of restraint was the percentage of CD8+ T cells. No other immunological parameters showed changes due to restraint. Handling and changes in housing prior to the restraint period did apparently result in some restraint-independent immunological changes. Handling must be kept to a minimum and the animals allowed time to recover prior to flight. All experiments must be carefully controlled. Restraint does not appear to be a major issue regarding the effects of space flight on immune responses.

  3. Population density-dependent hair cortisol concentrations in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Dettmer, A M; Novak, M A; Meyer, J S; Suomi, S J

    2014-04-01

    Population density is known to influence acute measures of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity in a variety of species, including fish, deer, birds, and humans. However, the effects of population density on levels of chronic stress are unknown. Given the fact that exposure to chronically elevated levels of circulating glucocorticoids results in a host of health disparities in animals and humans alike, it is important to understand how population density may impact chronic stress. We assessed hair cortisol concentrations (HCCs), which are reliable indicators of chronic HPA axis activity, in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) to determine the influence of population density on these values. In Experiment 1, we compared HCCs of monkeys living in high-density (HD; 1 monkey/0.87m(2)) and low-density (LD; 1 monkey/63.37m(2)) environments (N=236 hair samples) and found that HD monkeys exhibited higher hair cortisol across all age categories (infant, juvenile, young adult, adult, and aged) except infancy and aged (F(5)=4.240, p=0.001), for which differences were nearly significant. HD monkeys also received more severe fight wounds than LD monkeys (χ(2)=26.053, p<0.001), though no effects of dominance status emerged. In Experiment 2, we examined how HCCs change with fluctuating population levels across 5 years in the adult LD monkeys (N=155 hair samples) and found that increased population density was significantly positively correlated with HCCs in this semi-naturalistic population (r(s)=0.975, p=0.005). These are the first findings to demonstrate that increased population density is associated with increased chronic, endogenous glucocorticoid exposure in a nonhuman primate species. We discuss the implications of these findings with respect to laboratory research, population ecology, and human epidemiology.

  4. Thyroid status of female rhesus monkeys and preliminary information on impact of perchlorate administration.

    PubMed

    Ozpinar, Aysel; Golub, Mari S; Poppenga, Robert H; Blount, Benjamin C; Gillespie, Jerry R

    2011-07-01

    Thyroid status was assessed in adult female rhesus monkey breeders at the California National Primate Research Center at the beginning of the breeding season. The 95% confidence intervals for thyrotropin (TSH), thyroxine (T(4)) and triiodothyronine (T(3)) (n = 66-80) were similar to those previously reported in smaller samples of macaque monkeys. Based on human criteria, 10 of 80 monkeys (12%) were hypothyroid (TSH > 2.0 µIU/mL). Because hypothyroxinaemia can be a risk factor in pregnancy, T(4) status was compared with past breeding history, breeding outcome for that season and general health records in a subset of 42 breeders. Age, weight and parity did not differ between monkeys in the lowest T(4) quartile as compared with those in the upper three quartiles. However, T(4) concentrations were significantly associated with the number of missed menstrual cycles during the previous breeding season. In additional work, three healthy lactating rhesus monkeys were given three different doses of environmental contaminant and thyroid iodine uptake inhibitor, ammonium perchlorate (0.006, 0.34, 12.8 mg/kg/day, respectively) in food for two weeks. Thyroid status variables (TSH, T(4), T(3), thyroid radioactive iodine uptake) were then measured. In the monkey receiving the highest perchlorate dose, iodine uptake was suppressed relative to baseline. The study shows the availability of tools to study thyroid status in rhesus monkeys, the variability of thyroid status in the breeder colony and the potential ability of environmental factors to influence thyroid status.

  5. Spontaneous Metacognition in Rhesus Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Rosati, Alexandra G; Santos, Laurie R

    2016-09-01

    Metacognition is the ability to think about thinking. Although monitoring and controlling one's knowledge is a key feature of human cognition, its evolutionary origins are debated. In the current study, we examined whether rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta; N = 120) could make metacognitive inferences in a one-shot decision. Each monkey experienced one of four conditions, observing a human appearing to hide a food reward in an apparatus consisting of either one or two tubes. The monkeys tended to search the correct location when they observed this baiting event, but engaged in information seeking-by peering into a center location where they could check both potential hiding spots-if their view had been occluded and information seeking was possible. The monkeys only occasionally approached the center when information seeking was not possible. These results show that monkeys spontaneously use information about their own knowledge states to solve naturalistic foraging problems, and thus provide the first evidence that nonhumans exhibit information-seeking responses in situations with which they have no prior experience. PMID:27388917

  6. Spontaneous Metacognition in Rhesus Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Rosati, Alexandra G; Santos, Laurie R

    2016-09-01

    Metacognition is the ability to think about thinking. Although monitoring and controlling one's knowledge is a key feature of human cognition, its evolutionary origins are debated. In the current study, we examined whether rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta; N = 120) could make metacognitive inferences in a one-shot decision. Each monkey experienced one of four conditions, observing a human appearing to hide a food reward in an apparatus consisting of either one or two tubes. The monkeys tended to search the correct location when they observed this baiting event, but engaged in information seeking-by peering into a center location where they could check both potential hiding spots-if their view had been occluded and information seeking was possible. The monkeys only occasionally approached the center when information seeking was not possible. These results show that monkeys spontaneously use information about their own knowledge states to solve naturalistic foraging problems, and thus provide the first evidence that nonhumans exhibit information-seeking responses in situations with which they have no prior experience.

  7. Karyotypic evolution of the family Sciuridae: inferences from the genome organizations of ground squirrels.

    PubMed

    Li, T; Wang, J; Su, W; Nie, W; Yang, F

    2006-01-01

    Cross-species chromosome painting has made a great contribution to our understanding of the evolution of karyotypes and genome organizations of mammals. Several recent papers of comparative painting between tree and flying squirrels have shed some light on the evolution of the family Sciuridae and the order Rodentia. In the present study we have extended the comparative painting to the Himalayan marmot (Marmotahimalayana) and the African ground squirrel (Xerus cf. erythropus), i.e. representative species from another important squirrel group--the ground squirrels--, and have established genome-wide comparative chromosome maps between human, eastern gray squirrel, and these two ground squirrels. The results show that 1) the squirrels so far studied all have conserved karyotypes that resemble the ancestral karyotype of the order Rodentia; 2) the African ground squirrels could have retained the ancestral karyotype of the family Sciuridae. Furthermore, we have mapped the evolutionary rearrangements onto a molecular-based consensus phylogenetic tree of the family Sciuridae. PMID:16484783

  8. Evolution of genome organizations of squirrels (Sciuridae) revealed by cross-species chromosome painting.

    PubMed

    Li, Tangliang; O'Brien, Patricia C M; Biltueva, Larisa; Fu, Beiyuan; Wang, Jinhuan; Nie, Wenhui; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A; Graphodatsky, Alexander S; Yang, Fengtang

    2004-01-01

    With complete sets of chromosome-specific painting probes derived from flow-sorted chromosomes of human and grey squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis), the whole genome homologies between human and representatives of tree squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis, Callosciurus erythraeus), flying squirrels (Petaurista albiventer) and chipmunks (Tamias sibiricus) have been defined by cross-species chromosome painting. The results show that, unlike the highly rearranged karyotypes of mouse and rat, the karyotypes of squirrels are highly conserved. Two methods have been used to reconstruct the genome phylogeny of squirrels with the laboratory rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) as the out-group: (1) phylogenetic analysis by parsimony using chromosomal characters identified by comparative cytogenetic approaches; (2) mapping the genome rearrangements onto recently published sequence-based molecular trees. Our chromosome painting results, in combination with molecular data, show that flying squirrels are phylogenetically close to New World tree squirrels. Chromosome painting and G-banding comparisons place chipmunks (Tamias sibiricus ), with a derived karyotype, outside the clade comprising tree and flying squirrels. The superorder Glires (orde Rodentia + order Lagomorpha) is firmly supported by two conserved syntenic associations between human chromosomes 1 and 10p homologues, and between 9 and 11 homologues. PMID:15241012

  9. Donning your enemy's cloak: ground squirrels exploit rattlesnake scent to reduce predation risk.

    PubMed

    Clucas, Barbara; Owings, Donald H; Rowe, Matthew P

    2008-04-01

    Ground squirrels (Spermophilus spp.) have evolved a battery of defences against the rattlesnakes (Crotalus spp.) that have preyed on them for millions of years. The distinctive behavioural reactions by these squirrels to rattlesnakes have recently been shown to include self-application of rattlesnake scent-squirrels apply scent by vigorously licking their fur after chewing on shed rattlesnake skins. Here, we present evidence that this behaviour is a novel antipredator defence founded on exploitation of a foreign scent. We tested three functional hypotheses for snake scent application--antipredator, conspecific deterrence and ectoparasite defence--by examining reactions to rattlesnake scent by rattlesnakes, ground squirrels and ectoparasites (fleas). Rattlesnakes were more attracted to ground squirrel scent than to ground squirrel scent mixed with rattlesnake scent or rattlesnake scent alone. However, ground squirrel behaviour and flea host choice were not affected by rattlesnake scent. Thus, ground squirrels can reduce the risk of rattlesnake predation by applying rattlesnake scent to their bodies, potentially as a form of olfactory camouflage. Opportunistic exploitation of heterospecific scents may be widespread; many species self-apply foreign odours, but few such cases have been demonstrated to serve in antipredator defence.

  10. Donning your enemy's cloak: ground squirrels exploit rattlesnake scent to reduce predation risk

    PubMed Central

    Clucas, Barbara; Owings, Donald H; Rowe, Matthew P

    2008-01-01

    Ground squirrels (Spermophilus spp.) have evolved a battery of defences against the rattlesnakes (Crotalus spp.) that have preyed on them for millions of years. The distinctive behavioural reactions by these squirrels to rattlesnakes have recently been shown to include self-application of rattlesnake scent—squirrels apply scent by vigorously licking their fur after chewing on shed rattlesnake skins. Here, we present evidence that this behaviour is a novel antipredator defence founded on exploitation of a foreign scent. We tested three functional hypotheses for snake scent application—antipredator, conspecific deterrence and ectoparasite defence—by examining reactions to rattlesnake scent by rattlesnakes, ground squirrels and ectoparasites (fleas). Rattlesnakes were more attracted to ground squirrel scent than to ground squirrel scent mixed with rattlesnake scent or rattlesnake scent alone. However, ground squirrel behaviour and flea host choice were not affected by rattlesnake scent. Thus, ground squirrels can reduce the risk of rattlesnake predation by applying rattlesnake scent to their bodies, potentially as a form of olfactory camouflage. Opportunistic exploitation of heterospecific scents may be widespread; many species self-apply foreign odours, but few such cases have been demonstrated to serve in antipredator defence. PMID:18198147

  11. Risky business: rhesus monkeys exhibit persistent preferences for risky options.

    PubMed

    Xu, Eric R; Kralik, Jerald D

    2014-01-01

    Rhesus monkeys have been shown to prefer risky over safe options in experiential decision-making tasks. These findings might be due, however, to specific contextual factors, such as small amounts of fluid reward and minimal costs for risk-taking. To better understand the factors affecting decision-making under risk in rhesus monkeys, we tested multiple factors designed to increase the stakes including larger reward amounts, distinct food items rather than fluid reward, a smaller number of trials per session, and risky options with greater variation that also included non-rewarded outcomes. We found a consistent preference for risky options, except when the expected value of the safe option was greater than the risky option. Thus, with equivalent mean utilities between the safe and risky options, rhesus monkeys appear to have a robust preference for the risky options in a broad range of circumstances, akin to the preferences found in human children and some adults in similar tasks. One account for this result is that monkeys make their choices based on the salience of the largest payoff, without integrating likelihood and value across trials. A related idea is that they fail to override an impulsive tendency to select the option with the potential to obtain the highest possible outcome. Our results rule out strict versions of both accounts and contribute to an understanding of the diversity of risky decision-making among primates. PMID:24795661

  12. Get the Monkey off Your Back

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciabattini, David; Custer, Timothy J.

    2008-01-01

    Monkeys are the problems that need solutions, the tasks that need to be accomplished, the decisions that need to be made, and the actions that need to be taken. According to a theory, people carry monkeys around on their backs until they can successfully shift their burden to someone else and the monkey leaps from one back to the next. Managers…

  13. Monkeys Match and Tally Quantities across Senses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Kerry E.; MacLean, Evan L.; Brannon, Elizabeth M.

    2008-01-01

    We report here that monkeys can actively match the number of sounds they hear to the number of shapes they see and present the first evidence that monkeys sum over sounds and sights. In Experiment 1, two monkeys were trained to choose a simultaneous array of 1-9 squares that numerically matched a sample sequence of shapes or sounds. Monkeys…

  14. Seasonal change in irradiance: a zeitgeber for circannual rhythms in ground squirrels.

    PubMed

    Davis, D E

    1991-01-01

    1. Zeitgebers for circannual rhythms have been elusive. Demonstration that an external factor is a zeitgeber requires proof of a phase-shift that endures for several years. 2. The California ground squirrel (Spermophilus beecheyi) is an ideal subject. Many features of behavior have circannual rhythms of which change in mass is the easiest to measure. The squirrels thrive in captivity for up to 10 years. The squirrels were kept in individual cages in an air conditioned room, fed lab chow ad lib, and weighed twice a month. They were exposed to a 6-month phase shift of (a) length of day (b) seasonal change in temperature, (c) both, (d) seasonal cycle of irradiance. 3. The squirrels maintained circannual rhythms for up to 9 years. Entrainment was evident only by squirrels exposed to seasonal change in irradiance. PMID:1673890

  15. Clouded leopard (Neofelis diardi) predation on proboscis monkeys (Nasalis larvatus) in Sabah, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Ikki; Tuuga, Augustine; Higashi, Seigo

    2008-07-01

    In this study, we have reported two direct observations of individuals from a one-male group of proboscis monkeys (Nasalis larvatus) being killed by clouded leopards (Neofelis diardi) in the riverine forest along the Menanggul river, a tributary of the Kinabatangan river in Sabah, Malaysia. One of the two individuals was an infant female and the other was a juvenile female. Based on literature reviews and the observations reported here, we suggest that clouded leopard and crocodile might be significant potential predators of proboscis monkeys of any age or sex and that predation threats elicit the monkeys' anti-predator strategies. Moreover, the observations of the monkeys' behaviour when the group is attacked by a predator suggest that the adult males in one-male groups play an important role as protectors. PMID:18484152

  16. Competition between Eurasian red and introduced Eastern grey squirrels: the energetic significance of body-mass differences.

    PubMed

    Bryce, J M; Speakman, J R; Johnson, P J; Macdonald, D W

    2001-08-22

    Daily energy expenditure (DEE) was measured in sympatric populations of red and grey squirrels using the doubly labelled water technique. Grey squirrels had significantly higher DEEs than red squirrels. However, the difference between the species was not separable from the effects of body mass on DEE. The DEEs of both species were in accordance with published allometric predictions incorporating body mass and ambient temperature. The differences in energetic requirements and social dominance, both consequences of body size, may represent means by which grey squirrels exert more interspecific competition on red squirrels than do conspecifics, potentially driving populations below viable levels in some sites.

  17. Breeding monkeys for biomedical research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourne, G. H.; Golarzdebourne, M. N.; Keeling, M. E.

    1973-01-01

    Captive bred rhesus monkeys show much less pathology than wild born animals. The monkeys may be bred in cages or in an outdoor compound. Cage bred animals are not psychologically normal which makes then unsuited for some types of space related research. Compound breeding provides contact between mother and infant and an opportunity for the infants to play with their peers which are important requirements to help maintain their behavioral integrity. Offspring harvested after a year in the compound appear behaviorally normal and show little histopathology. Compound breeding is also an economical method for the rapid production of young animals. The colony can double its size about every two and a half years.

  18. Systems biology of the vervet monkey.

    PubMed

    Jasinska, Anna J; Schmitt, Christopher A; Service, Susan K; Cantor, Rita M; Dewar, Ken; Jentsch, James D; Kaplan, Jay R; Turner, Trudy R; Warren, Wesley C; Weinstock, George M; Woods, Roger P; Freimer, Nelson B

    2013-01-01

    Nonhuman primates (NHP) provide crucial biomedical model systems intermediate between rodents and humans. The vervet monkey (also called the African green monkey) is a widely used NHP model that has unique value for genetic and genomic investigations of traits relevant to human diseases. This article describes the phylogeny and population history of the vervet monkey and summarizes the use of both captive and wild vervet monkeys in biomedical research. It also discusses the effort of an international collaboration to develop the vervet monkey as the most comprehensively phenotypically and genomically characterized NHP, a process that will enable the scientific community to employ this model for systems biology investigations.

  19. Postnatal change in sulcal length asymmetry in cerebrum of cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Kazuhito; Sawada, Kazuhiko; Fukunishi, Katsuhiro; Noritaka, Imai; Sakata-Haga, Hiromi; Yoshihiro, Fukui

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the timing of the onset of adult-type sulcal length asymmetry during postnatal development of the male cynomolgus monkey cerebrum. The monkey brain has already reached adult size by 3 months of age, although the body weight only represents 1/8 of the adult body weight by that time. The fronto-occipital length and the cerebral width also reached adult levels by that postnatal age with no left/right bias. Consistently, lengths of the major primary sulci reached adult levels by 3 months of age, and then decreased slightly in sexually mature monkeys (4-6.5 years of age). Asymmetry quotient analysis showed that sulcal length asymmetry patterns gradually changed during postnatal development. The male adult pattern of sulcal length asymmetry was acquired after 24 months of age. In particular, age-dependent rightward lateralization of the arcuate sulcal length was revealed during cerebral maturation by three-way ANOVA. The results suggest that the regional difference in cerebral maturation from adolescence to young adulthood modifies the sulcal morphology with characteristic asymmetric patterns in male cynomolgus monkeys.

  20. Modelling Social Learning in Monkeys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendal, Jeremy R.

    2008-01-01

    The application of modelling to social learning in monkey populations has been a neglected topic. Recently, however, a number of statistical, simulation and analytical approaches have been developed to help examine social learning processes, putative traditions, the use of social learning strategies and the diffusion dynamics of socially…

  1. Monkey lipsmacking develops like the human speech rhythm.

    PubMed

    Morrill, Ryan J; Paukner, Annika; Ferrari, Pier F; Ghazanfar, Asif A

    2012-07-01

    Across all languages studied to date, audiovisual speech exhibits a consistent rhythmic structure. This rhythm is critical to speech perception. Some have suggested that the speech rhythm evolved de novo in humans. An alternative account--the one we explored here--is that the rhythm of speech evolved through the modification of rhythmic facial expressions. We tested this idea by investigating the structure and development of macaque monkey lipsmacks and found that their developmental trajectory is strikingly similar to the one that leads from human infant babbling to adult speech. Specifically, we show that: (1) younger monkeys produce slower, more variable mouth movements and as they get older, these movements become faster and less variable; and (2) this developmental pattern does not occur for another cyclical mouth movement--chewing. These patterns parallel human developmental patterns for speech and chewing. They suggest that, in both species, the two types of rhythmic mouth movements use different underlying neural circuits that develop in different ways. Ultimately, both lipsmacking and speech converge on a ~5 Hz rhythm that represents the frequency that characterizes the speech rhythm of human adults. We conclude that monkey lipsmacking and human speech share a homologous developmental mechanism, lending strong empirical support to the idea that the human speech rhythm evolved from the rhythmic facial expressions of our primate ancestors.

  2. POLIOMYELITIS IN THE CYNOMOLGUS MONKEY

    PubMed Central

    Faber, Harold K.; Silverberg, Rosalie J.; Dong, Luther

    1944-01-01

    1. Poliomyelitis virus suspensions were atomized so as to produce dry droplet nuclei which, suspended in air, were introduced into a special infecting chamber and inhaled by test animals, both rhesus and cynomolgus monkeys. 2. Without olfactory blockade, 5 of 7 rhesus and 6 of 7 cynomolgus monkeys developed poliomyelitis of the CNS with entry through the olfactory nerves. 3. With olfactory blockade, 2 of 35 rhesus and 4 of 10 cynomolgus monkeys developed this form of the disease by routes proved by serial sections of the olfactory bulbs not to have been olfactory. 4. The neural pathways of infection from the mucous surfaces to the CNS in the 4 cynomolgus monkeys with blockade were shown in 2 instances to have been the afferent fibers of the trigeminal nerve into the Gasserian ganglion and thence to its central connections in the pons-medulla; in another case this was the probable route. In one instance the pathway consisted of the sympathetic fibers of the nose or nasopharynx into the cervical sympathetic ganglia and thence into the uppermost levels of the thoracic cord. The routes in the 2 rhesus monkeys with non-olfactory takes were not accurately determined but in one there was suggestive evidence of entry through the trigeminal nerve. 5. Study of the peripheral ganglia in a number of exposed cynomolgus and rhesus monkeys, including several with no demonstrated involvement of the CNS, revealed lesions most constantly in the Gasserian ganglia; less so in the cervical sympathetics and still less so in the celiac. In 2 rhesus monkeys dying of other causes a few days after exposure, lesions were limited to the Gasserian ganglia. No evidence was found in any case of passage of infection from the celiac ganglia into the CNS. 6. The importance of the peripheral ganglia as intermediate stations in the centripetal passage of infection from the body surface is again emphasized. 7. Comparison of the present with a previous study suggests that infection by inhalation of

  3. Effect of prolonged ketamine exposure on cardiovascular physiology in pregnant and infant rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Hotchkiss, Charlotte E; Wang, Cheng; Slikker, William

    2007-11-01

    Physiologic measurements in nonhuman primates usually are collected from animals that are chemically or physically restrained. Both types of restraint may affect the parameters measured, and those effects can vary with age. Heart rate, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, expired CO2, blood pressure, temperature, blood glucose, hematocrit, and venous blood gasses were measured in rhesus monkeys that were either infused intravenously with ketamine for 24 h or were cage-housed and physically restrained for sample collection. The subjects were pregnant monkeys at gestational day 120 to 123, infants 5 to 6 d old, and infants 35 to 37 d old. Heart rate and blood pressure were lower in ketamine-treated monkeys than physically restrained monkeys. Heart rate was higher in infants than adults, whereas blood pressure was lower in infants. Respiratory rate was higher in infants than adults and higher in physically restrained infants than ketamine-sedated infants but was not affected by ketamine in pregnant adults. Hematocrit was decreased in older infants. In summary, both physical restraint and ketamine sedation altered several physiologic parameters in pregnant and infant rhesus macaques. Investigators should consider these effects when designing experiments and evaluating experimental outcomes in monkeys.

  4. Macroparasite Fauna of Alien Grey Squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis): Composition, Variability and Implications for Native Species

    PubMed Central

    Romeo, Claudia; Wauters, Lucas A.; Ferrari, Nicola; Lanfranchi, Paolo; Martinoli, Adriano; Pisanu, Benoît; Preatoni, Damiano G.; Saino, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Introduced hosts populations may benefit of an "enemy release" through impoverishment of parasite communities made of both few imported species and few acquired local ones. Moreover, closely related competing native hosts can be affected by acquiring introduced taxa (spillover) and by increased transmission risk of native parasites (spillback). We determined the macroparasite fauna of invasive grey squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis) in Italy to detect any diversity loss, introduction of novel parasites or acquisition of local ones, and analysed variation in parasite burdens to identify factors that may increase transmission risk for native red squirrels (S. vulgaris). Based on 277 grey squirrels sampled from 7 populations characterised by different time scales in introduction events, we identified 7 gastro-intestinal helminths and 4 parasite arthropods. Parasite richness is lower than in grey squirrel's native range and independent from introduction time lags. The most common parasites are Nearctic nematodes Strongyloides robustus (prevalence: 56.6%) and Trichostrongylus calcaratus (6.5%), red squirrel flea Ceratophyllus sciurorum (26.0%) and Holarctic sucking louse Neohaematopinus sciuri (17.7%). All other parasites are European or cosmopolitan species with prevalence below 5%. S. robustus abundance is positively affected by host density and body mass, C. sciurorum abundance increases with host density and varies with seasons. Overall, we show that grey squirrels in Italy may benefit of an enemy release, and both spillback and spillover processes towards native red squirrels may occur. PMID:24505348

  5. Effects of tannins on digestion and detoxification activity in gray squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis).

    PubMed

    Chung-MacCoubrey, A L; Hagerman, A E; Kirkpatrick, R L

    1997-01-01

    Acorn tannins may affect food preferences and foraging strategies of squirrels through effects on acorn palatability and digestibility and squirrel physiology. Captive eastern gray squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis) were fed 100% red oak (Quercus rubra) or white oak (Quercus alba) acorn diets to determine effects on intake, digestion, and detoxification activity. Red oak acorns had higher phenol and tannin levels, which may explain the lower dry matter intakes and apparent protein digestibilities and the higher glucuronidation activities observed in squirrels. Although the white oak acorn diet had lower apparent protein digestibilities than the reference diet, it did not suppress dry matter intake for a prolonged period or stimulate glucuronidation. Negative physiological effects of a 100% red oak acorn diet suggest gray squirrels may require other foods to dilute tannin intake and provide additional nutrients. To distinguish the roles of different tannin types in the observed effects of acorn diets on squirrels, squirrels were fed rat chow containing no tannins, 4% or 8% tannic acid (hydrolyzable tannin), or 3% or 6% quebracho (condensed tannin). Apparent protein digestibilities were reduced by tannic acid and quebracho diets. Only the 8% tannic acid diet tended to increase glucuronidation. Specific effects of tannins may largely depend on tannin type, composition, and source and on other nutritional and physiological factors. PMID:9231400

  6. Behavioural responses of Eastern grey squirrels, Sciurus carolinensis, to cues of risk while foraging.

    PubMed

    Jayne, Kimberley; Lea, Stephen E G; Leaver, Lisa A

    2015-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that Eastern grey squirrels modify their behaviour while foraging to offset risks of social and predatory costs, but none have simultaneously compared whether such modifications are performed at a cost to foraging. The present study directly compares how grey squirrels respond to cues of these risks while foraging. We simulated social risk and predatory risk using acoustic playbacks of stimuli that grey squirrels might be exposed to at a foraging patch: calls of conspecifics, heterospecifics (competitor and non-competitor) and predators. We found that grey squirrels responded to predator, heterospecific competitor and conspecific playbacks by altering their foraging and vigilance behaviours. Foraging was most disrupted by increased vigilance when we played calls of predators. Squirrels' response to calls of heterospecific competitors did not differ from their response to conspecific calls, and they resumed foraging more quickly after both compared to predator calls: whereas they showed little response to calls of non-competitor heterospecifics and a white noise control. We conclude that squirrels respond differentially to calls made by conspecifics, heterospecific competitors and predators, with the most pronounced response being to calls of predators. We suggest that squirrels may view conspecific and corvid vocalisations as cues of potential conflict while foraging, necessitating increased vigilance. PMID:25957953

  7. Toxoplasmosis in a woodchuck (Marmota monax) and two American red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus).

    PubMed

    Bangari, Dinesh S; Mouser, Pamela; Miller, Margaret A; Stevenson, Gregory W; Vemulapalli, Ramesh; Thacker, H Leon

    2007-11-01

    Toxoplasmosis was diagnosed in a woodchuck (Marmota monax) and 2 American red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus). The woodchuck was euthanized by a wildlife rescue organization in New York after progressive clinical signs of head tilt, circling, and rapid weight loss. Necropsy examination revealed acute subdural hemorrhage over the right cerebral hemisphere. Histologic lesions included meningoencephalitis, myocarditis, and hepatitis. Protozoal cysts were present in affected and unaffected neuroparenchyma. The squirrels were found dead, emaciated, and moderately infested with fleas near a park in northern Indiana. In both squirrels, the lungs were consolidated with numerous nodules up to 2 mm in diameter. Histologically, pneumonia and encephalitis were associated with intracellular and free protozoa. Additional histologic lesions included multifocal lymphoplasmacytic encephalitis with intralesional protozoa in both squirrels. The protozoa were positive with Toxoplasma gondii-specific immunohistochemistry and had ultrastructural features consistent with T. gondii in both squirrels. A real-time polymerase chain reaction test using T. gondii-specific probes demonstrated protozoal DNA in the lung, brain, and kidney of the squirrels and in the brain and heart of the woodchuck. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of toxoplasmosis in woodchucks or American red squirrels. Because rodents are common near urban settlements, this finding underscores their role as important intermediate hosts for T. gondii.

  8. Daily Activity and Nest Occupation Patterns of Fox Squirrels (Sciurus niger) throughout the Year

    PubMed Central

    Wassmer, Thomas; Refinetti, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The authors investigated the general activity and nest occupation patterns of fox squirrels in a natural setting using temperature-sensitive data loggers that measure activity as changes in the microenvironment of the animal. Data were obtained from 25 distinct preparations, upon 14 unique squirrels, totaling 1385 recording days. The animals were clearly diurnal, with a predominantly unimodal activity pattern, although individual squirrels occasionally exhibited bimodal patterns, particularly in the spring and summer. Even during the short days of winter (9 hours of light), the squirrels typically left the nest after dawn and returned before dusk, spending only about 7 hours out of the nest each day. Although the duration of the daily active phase did not change with the seasons, the squirrels exited the nest earlier in the day when the days became longer in the summer and exited the nest later in the day when the days became shorter in the winter, thus tracking dawn along the seasons. During the few hours spent outside the nest each day, fox squirrels seemed to spend most of the time sitting or lying. These findings suggest that fox squirrels may have adopted a slow life history strategy that involves long periods of rest on trees and short periods of ground activity each day. PMID:26963918

  9. Macroparasite fauna of alien grey squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis): composition, variability and implications for native species.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Claudia; Wauters, Lucas A; Ferrari, Nicola; Lanfranchi, Paolo; Martinoli, Adriano; Pisanu, Benoît; Preatoni, Damiano G; Saino, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Introduced hosts populations may benefit of an "enemy release" through impoverishment of parasite communities made of both few imported species and few acquired local ones. Moreover, closely related competing native hosts can be affected by acquiring introduced taxa (spillover) and by increased transmission risk of native parasites (spillback). We determined the macroparasite fauna of invasive grey squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis) in Italy to detect any diversity loss, introduction of novel parasites or acquisition of local ones, and analysed variation in parasite burdens to identify factors that may increase transmission risk for native red squirrels (S. vulgaris). Based on 277 grey squirrels sampled from 7 populations characterised by different time scales in introduction events, we identified 7 gastro-intestinal helminths and 4 parasite arthropods. Parasite richness is lower than in grey squirrel's native range and independent from introduction time lags. The most common parasites are Nearctic nematodes Strongyloides robustus (prevalence: 56.6%) and Trichostrongylus calcaratus (6.5%), red squirrel flea Ceratophyllus sciurorum (26.0%) and Holarctic sucking louse Neohaematopinus sciuri (17.7%). All other parasites are European or cosmopolitan species with prevalence below 5%. S. robustus abundance is positively affected by host density and body mass, C. sciurorum abundance increases with host density and varies with seasons. Overall, we show that grey squirrels in Italy may benefit of an enemy release, and both spillback and spillover processes towards native red squirrels may occur. PMID:24505348

  10. Macroparasite fauna of alien grey squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis): composition, variability and implications for native species.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Claudia; Wauters, Lucas A; Ferrari, Nicola; Lanfranchi, Paolo; Martinoli, Adriano; Pisanu, Benoît; Preatoni, Damiano G; Saino, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Introduced hosts populations may benefit of an "enemy release" through impoverishment of parasite communities made of both few imported species and few acquired local ones. Moreover, closely related competing native hosts can be affected by acquiring introduced taxa (spillover) and by increased transmission risk of native parasites (spillback). We determined the macroparasite fauna of invasive grey squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis) in Italy to detect any diversity loss, introduction of novel parasites or acquisition of local ones, and analysed variation in parasite burdens to identify factors that may increase transmission risk for native red squirrels (S. vulgaris). Based on 277 grey squirrels sampled from 7 populations characterised by different time scales in introduction events, we identified 7 gastro-intestinal helminths and 4 parasite arthropods. Parasite richness is lower than in grey squirrel's native range and independent from introduction time lags. The most common parasites are Nearctic nematodes Strongyloides robustus (prevalence: 56.6%) and Trichostrongylus calcaratus (6.5%), red squirrel flea Ceratophyllus sciurorum (26.0%) and Holarctic sucking louse Neohaematopinus sciuri (17.7%). All other parasites are European or cosmopolitan species with prevalence below 5%. S. robustus abundance is positively affected by host density and body mass, C. sciurorum abundance increases with host density and varies with seasons. Overall, we show that grey squirrels in Italy may benefit of an enemy release, and both spillback and spillover processes towards native red squirrels may occur.

  11. Influence of habitat on behavior of Towndsend's ground squirrels (Spermophilus townsendii)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sharpe, Peter B.; Van Horne, Beatrice

    1998-01-01

    Trade-offs between foraging and predator avoidance may affect an animal's survival and reproduction. These trade-offs may be influenced by differences in vegetative cover, especially if foraging profitability and predation risk differ among habitats. We examined above-ground activity of Townsend's ground squirrels (Spermophilus townsendii) in four habitats in the Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area in southwestern Idaho to determine if behavior of ground squirrels varied among habitats, and we assessed factors that might affect perceived predation risk (i. e. predator detectability, predation pressure, population density). The proportion of time spent in vigilance by ground squirrels in winterfat (Krascheninnikovia lanata) and mosaic habitats of winterfat-sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) was more than twice that of ground squirrels in burned and unburned sagebrush habitats. We found no evidence for the 'many-eyes' hypothesis as an explanation for differences in vigilance among habitats. Instead, environmental heterogeneity, especially vegetation structure, likely influenced activity budgets of ground squirrels. Differences in vigilance may have been caused by differences in predator detectability and refuge availability, because ground squirrels in the winterfat and mosaic habitats also spent more time in upright vigilant postures than ground squirrels in burned-sagebrush or sagebrush habitats. Such postures may enhance predator detection in low-growing winterfat.

  12. Interaction of cocaine and dopamine transporter inhibitors on behavior and neurochemistry in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Ginsburg, Brett C; Kimmel, Heather L; Carroll, F Ivy; Goodman, Mark M; Howell, Leonard L

    2005-03-01

    Drugs that target the dopamine transporter (DAT) have been proposed as pharmacotherapies to treat cocaine abuse. Accordingly, it is paramount to understand pharmacological interactions between cocaine and DAT inhibitors. The present study characterized acute interactions between cocaine and several DAT inhibitors (RTI-177, FECNT, RTI-112) that differed in selectivity for monoamine transporters on operant behavior and in vivo neurochemistry in squirrel monkeys. RTI-177 and FECNT, two DAT inhibitors with low affinity at norepinephrine transporters (NET), produced dose-dependent stimulant effects on behavior maintained by a fixed-interval schedule of stimulus termination. Compared to cocaine, RTI-177 and FECNT had a slower onset and longer duration of action. In vivo microdialysis in the caudate nucleus of awake monkeys confirmed dose-dependent increases in extracellular dopamine that corresponded to behavioral effects. Among the drugs characterized, RTI-112 is reportedly the least selective for binding to DAT, NET, and serotonin transporters (SERT). Interestingly, RTI-112 failed to produce significant behavioral-stimulant effects, and its effects on extracellular dopamine were highly variable across subjects. The results indicate that the pharmacological profile of DAT inhibitors may be influenced by actions at multiple monoamine transporters. Importantly, there was little evidence of additivity on behavioral or neurochemical measures when cocaine was administered in combination with behavioral-stimulant doses of the DAT inhibitors.

  13. First skull of Antillothrix bernensis, an extinct relict monkey from the Dominican Republic.

    PubMed

    Rosenberger, Alfred L; Cooke, Siobhán B; Rímoli, Renato; Ni, Xijun; Cardoso, Luis

    2011-01-01

    The nearly pristine remains of Antillothrix bernensis, a capuchin-sized (Cebus) extinct platyrrhine from the Dominican Republic, have been found submerged in an underwater cave. This represents the first specimen of an extinct Caribbean primate with diagnostic craniodental and skeletal parts in association, only the second example of a skull from the region, and one of the most complete specimens of a fossil platyrrhine cranium yet discovered. Cranially, it closely resembles living cebines but is more conservative. Dentally, it is less bunodont and more primitive than Cebus, with crowns resembling Saimiri (squirrel monkeys) and one of the oldest definitive cebines, the late Early Miocene Killikaike blakei from Argentina. The tricuspid second molar also resembles the enigmatic marmosets and tamarins, whose origins continue to present a major gap in knowledge of primate evolution. While the femur is oddly short and stout, the ulna, though more robust, compares well with Cebus. As a member of the cebid clade, Antillothrix demonstrates that insular Caribbean monkeys are not monophyletically related and may not be the product of a single colonizing event. Antillothrix bernensis is an intriguing mosaic whose primitive characters are consistent with an early origin, possibly antedating the assembly of the modern primate fauna in greater Amazonia during the La Venta horizon. While most Greater Antillean primate specimens are quite young geologically, this vanished radiation, known from Cuba (Paralouatta) and Jamaica (Xenothrix) as well as Hispaniola, appears to be composed of long-lived lineages like several other mainland clades. PMID:20659936

  14. First skull of Antillothrix bernensis, an extinct relict monkey from the Dominican Republic

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberger, Alfred L.; Cooke, Siobhán B.; Rímoli, Renato; Ni, Xijun; Cardoso, Luis

    2011-01-01

    The nearly pristine remains of Antillothrix bernensis, a capuchin-sized (Cebus) extinct platyrrhine from the Dominican Republic, have been found submerged in an underwater cave. This represents the first specimen of an extinct Caribbean primate with diagnostic craniodental and skeletal parts in association, only the second example of a skull from the region, and one of the most complete specimens of a fossil platyrrhine cranium yet discovered. Cranially, it closely resembles living cebines but is more conservative. Dentally, it is less bunodont and more primitive than Cebus, with crowns resembling Saimiri (squirrel monkeys) and one of the oldest definitive cebines, the late Early Miocene Killikaike blakei from Argentina. The tricuspid second molar also resembles the enigmatic marmosets and tamarins, whose origins continue to present a major gap in knowledge of primate evolution. While the femur is oddly short and stout, the ulna, though more robust, compares well with Cebus. As a member of the cebid clade, Antillothrix demonstrates that insular Caribbean monkeys are not monophyletically related and may not be the product of a single colonizing event. Antillothrix bernensis is an intriguing mosaic whose primitive characters are consistent with an early origin, possibly antedating the assembly of the modern primate fauna in greater Amazonia during the La Venta horizon. While most Greater Antillean primate specimens are quite young geologically, this vanished radiation, known from Cuba (Paralouatta) and Jamaica (Xenothrix) as well as Hispaniola, appears to be composed of long-lived lineages like several other mainland clades. PMID:20659936

  15. First skull of Antillothrix bernensis, an extinct relict monkey from the Dominican Republic.

    PubMed

    Rosenberger, Alfred L; Cooke, Siobhán B; Rímoli, Renato; Ni, Xijun; Cardoso, Luis

    2011-01-01

    The nearly pristine remains of Antillothrix bernensis, a capuchin-sized (Cebus) extinct platyrrhine from the Dominican Republic, have been found submerged in an underwater cave. This represents the first specimen of an extinct Caribbean primate with diagnostic craniodental and skeletal parts in association, only the second example of a skull from the region, and one of the most complete specimens of a fossil platyrrhine cranium yet discovered. Cranially, it closely resembles living cebines but is more conservative. Dentally, it is less bunodont and more primitive than Cebus, with crowns resembling Saimiri (squirrel monkeys) and one of the oldest definitive cebines, the late Early Miocene Killikaike blakei from Argentina. The tricuspid second molar also resembles the enigmatic marmosets and tamarins, whose origins continue to present a major gap in knowledge of primate evolution. While the femur is oddly short and stout, the ulna, though more robust, compares well with Cebus. As a member of the cebid clade, Antillothrix demonstrates that insular Caribbean monkeys are not monophyletically related and may not be the product of a single colonizing event. Antillothrix bernensis is an intriguing mosaic whose primitive characters are consistent with an early origin, possibly antedating the assembly of the modern primate fauna in greater Amazonia during the La Venta horizon. While most Greater Antillean primate specimens are quite young geologically, this vanished radiation, known from Cuba (Paralouatta) and Jamaica (Xenothrix) as well as Hispaniola, appears to be composed of long-lived lineages like several other mainland clades.

  16. Primacy and recency effects in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) using a serial probe recognition task. III. A developmental analysis.

    PubMed

    Matzke, S M; Castro, C A

    1998-04-01

    In children, the recency effect emerges prior to the primacy effect. To determine whether this dissociation is also seen in nonhuman primates, we evaluated the development of the primacy and recency effect in 3 young adult (35 months) and 4 adolescent (21 months) male rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) using a six-item serial probe recognition (SPR) task. As predicted, the young adult monkeys displayed both effects, while the adolescent monkeys only displayed the recency effect. Not until after 26 months of training on the SPR task did the adolescent monkeys exhibit both the primacy and recency effect. Interference and strategy differences are discussed in terms of the results along with an interpretation of Rudy's (1992) configural association theory of cognitive development. Additional possible explanations for this developmental dissociation include the delayed maturation of the neocortical, hippocampal, and/or cholinergic systems, the latter two having been shown to be important in the expression of the primacy but not the recency effect.

  17. Natal habitat-biased dispersal in the Siberian flying squirrel.

    PubMed

    Selonen, Vesa; Hanski, Ilpo K; Desrochers, André

    2007-08-22

    Theoretically, dispersers should target the habitat where prospects for fitness will be highest. Aiming for a habitat similar to the natal area (natal habitat-biased dispersal) has been hypothesized as a probable rule of thumb for dispersers, but has received very little empirical support to date. We investigated similarities between natal and post-dispersal settlement sites with radio-collared Siberian flying squirrels (Pteromys volans L.). Juveniles born in small patches and raised in nests close to patch edge settled in small patches and used nests close to edges after dispersal. In addition, post-dispersal use of dreys (versus cavities) was similar to that observed in natal sites. However, the quality of settlement habitat was unrelated to the quality of the natal site, which suggests that natal experience on average-quality habitats may not lead to ecological traps for flying squirrels. This study provides evidence that habitat selection at the landscape scale is influenced by habitat of natal area. PMID:17567559

  18. Ground squirrels use an infrared signal to deter rattlesnake predation

    PubMed Central

    Rundus, Aaron S.; Owings, Donald H.; Joshi, Sanjay S.; Chinn, Erin; Giannini, Nicolas

    2007-01-01

    The evolution of communicative signals involves a major hurdle; signals need to effectively stimulate the sensory systems of their targets. Therefore, sensory specializations of target animals are important sources of selection on signal structure. Here we report the discovery of an animal signal that uses a previously unknown communicative modality, infrared radiation or “radiant heat,” which capitalizes on the infrared sensory capabilities of the signal's target. California ground squirrels (Spermophilus beecheyi) add an infrared component to their snake-directed tail-flagging signals when confronting infrared-sensitive rattlesnakes (Crotalus oreganus), but tail flag without augmenting infrared emission when confronting infrared-insensitive gopher snakes (Pituophis melanoleucus). Experimental playbacks with a biorobotic squirrel model reveal this signal's communicative function. When the infrared component was added to the tail flagging display of the robotic models, rattlesnakes exhibited a greater shift from predatory to defensive behavior than during control trials in which tail flagging included no infrared component. These findings provide exceptionally strong support for the hypothesis that the sensory systems of signal targets should, in general, channel the evolution of signal structure. Furthermore, the discovery of previously undescribed signaling modalities such as infrared radiation should encourage us to overcome our own human-centered sensory biases and more fully examine the form and diversity of signals in the repertoires of many animal species. PMID:17704254

  19. The demographic basis of population regulation in columbian ground squirrels.

    PubMed

    Dobson, F S; Oli, M K

    2001-09-01

    Environmental factors influence the dynamics and regulation of biological populations through their influences on demographic variables, but demographic mechanisms of population regulation have received little attention. We investigated the demographic basis of regulation of Columbian ground squirrel (Spermophilus columbianus) populations under natural and experimentally food-supplemented conditions. Food supplementation caused substantial increases in population density, and population densities returned to pretreatment levels when the supplementation ended. Control (untreated) populations remained relatively stable throughout the study period (1981-1986). Because food resources regulated the size of the ground squirrel populations, we used life-table response experiment (LTRE) analyses to examine the demographic basis of changes in population growth rate and thus also demographic influences on population regulation. LTRE analyses of two food-manipulated populations revealed that changes in age at maturity and fertility rate of females generally made the largest contributions to observed changes in population growth rate. Thus, our results suggested that abundance of food resources regulated the size of our study populations through the effects of food resources on age at maturity and fertility rates. Our results also indicated that different demographic mechanisms can underlie population regulation under different environmental conditions, because lower juvenile survival substantially contributed to population decline, but in only one of the populations. Demographic analyses of experimental data, such as those presented here, offer a rigorous and unambiguous means to elucidate the demographic basis of population regulation and to help identify environmental factors that underlie dynamics and regulation of biological populations. PMID:18707321

  20. Mesoamerican tree squirrels evolution (Rodentia: Sciuridae): a molecular phylogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Villalobos, Federico; Gutierrez-Espeleta, Gustavo

    2014-06-01

    The tribe Sciurini comprehends the genera Sciurus, Syntheosiurus, Microsciurus, Tamiasciurus and Rheinthrosciurus. The phylogenetic relationships within Sciurus have been only partially done, and the relationship between Mesoamerican species remains unsolved. The phylogenetic relationships of the Mesoamerican tree squirrels were examined using molecular data. Sequence data publicly available (12S, 16S, CYTB mitochondrial genes and IRBP nuclear gene) and cytochrome B gene sequences of four previously not sampled Mesoamerican Sciurus species were analyzed under a Bayesian multispecies coalescence model. Phylogenetic analysis of the multilocus data set showed the neotropical tree squirrels as a monophyletic clade. The genus Sciurus was paraphyletic due to the inclusion of Microsciurus species (M. alfari and M. flaviventer). The South American species S. aestuans and S. stramineus showed a sister taxa relationship. Single locus analysis based on the most compact and complete data set (i.e. CYTB gene sequences), supported the monophyly of the South American species and recovered a Mesoamerican clade including S. aureogaster, S. granatensis and S. variegatoides. These results corroborated previous findings based on cladistic analysis of cranial and post-cranial characters. Our data support a close relationship between Mesoamerican Sciurus species and a sister relationship with South American species, and corroborates previous findings in relation to the polyphyly of Microsciurus and Syntheosciurus paraphyly.

  1. Noninvasive imaging of the thirteen-lined ground squirrel photoreceptor mosaic

    PubMed Central

    Sajdak, Benjamin; Sulai, Yusufu N.; Langlo, Christopher S.; Luna, Gabriel; Fisher, Steven K.; Merriman, Dana K.; Dubra, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Ground squirrels are an increasingly important model for studying visual processing, retinal circuitry, and cone photoreceptor function. Here, we demonstrate that the photoreceptor mosaic can be longitudinally imaged noninvasively in the 13-lined ground squirrel (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) using confocal and nonconfocal split-detection adaptive optics scanning ophthalmoscopy using 790 nm light. Photoreceptor density, spacing, and Voronoi analysis are consistent with that of the human cone mosaic. The high imaging success rate and consistent image quality in this study reinforce the ground squirrel as a practical model to aid drug discovery and testing through longitudinal imaging on the cellular scale. PMID:26923645

  2. Noninvasive imaging of the thirteen-lined ground squirrel photoreceptor mosaic.

    PubMed

    Sajdak, Benjamin; Sulai, Yusufu N; Langlo, Christopher S; Luna, Gabriel; Fisher, Steven K; Merriman, Dana K; Dubra, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Ground squirrels are an increasingly important model for studying visual processing, retinal circuitry, and cone photoreceptor function. Here, we demonstrate that the photoreceptor mosaic can be longitudinally imaged noninvasively in the 13-lined ground squirrel (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) using confocal and nonconfocal split-detection adaptive optics scanning ophthalmoscopy using 790 nm light. Photoreceptor density, spacing, and Voronoi analysis are consistent with that of the human cone mosaic. The high imaging success rate and consistent image quality in this study reinforce the ground squirrel as a practical model to aid drug discovery and testing through longitudinal imaging on the cellular scale.

  3. Strongyloides robustus and the northern sympatric populations of northern (Glaucomys sabrinus) and southern (G. volans) flying squirrels.

    PubMed

    Pauli, Jonathan N; Dubay, Shelli A; Anderson, Eric M; Taft, Stephen J

    2004-07-01

    Within North America, northern (Glaucomys sabrinus) and southern (Glaucomys volans) flying squirrels occupy distinct ranges with limited overlap. Sympatry in northern latitudes coincides with northern hardwood vegetation from Minnesota to New England. Strongyloides robustus is an intestinal parasite that infects both species but appears to be deleterious only to northern flying squirrels. As a result, S. robustus could be a critical determinant of flying squirrel population characteristics in at least some areas of sympatry. However, cold weather could potentially limit the distribution of S. robustus in northern climates. Therefore, we assessed fecal samples from both flying squirrel species to determine the presence of the nematode in Wisconsin. Strongyloides robustus was found in 12 flying squirrel scat samples and infected 52% of southern flying squirrels and 11% of northern flying squirrels. Prevalence of S. robustus infection for northern flying squirrels was substantially lower than previously reported from more southern regions. This is the northernmost documentation of S. robustus in flying squirrels and the first documentation of S. robustus parasitizing flying squirrels in Wisconsin. PMID:15465730

  4. Videos of conspecifics elicit interactive looking patterns and facial expressions in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Mosher, Clayton P; Zimmerman, Prisca E; Gothard, Katalin M

    2011-08-01

    A broader understanding of the neural basis of social behavior in primates requires the use of species-specific stimuli that elicit spontaneous, but reproducible and tractable behaviors. In this context of natural behaviors, individual variation can further inform about the factors that influence social interactions. To approximate natural social interactions similar to those documented by field studies, we used unedited video footage to induce in viewer monkeys spontaneous facial expressions and looking patterns in the laboratory setting. Three adult male monkeys (Macaca mulatta), previously behaviorally and genetically (5-HTTLPR) characterized, were monitored while they watched 10 s video segments depicting unfamiliar monkeys (movie monkeys) displaying affiliative, neutral, and aggressive behaviors. The gaze and head orientation of the movie monkeys alternated between "averted" and "directed" at the viewer. The viewers were not reinforced for watching the movies, thus their looking patterns indicated their interest and social engagement with the stimuli. The behavior of the movie monkey accounted for differences in the looking patterns and facial expressions displayed by the viewers. We also found multiple significant differences in the behavior of the viewers that correlated with their interest in these stimuli. These socially relevant dynamic stimuli elicited spontaneous social behaviors, such as eye-contact induced reciprocation of facial expression, gaze aversion, and gaze following, that were previously not observed in response to static images. This approach opens a unique opportunity to understanding the mechanisms that trigger spontaneous social behaviors in humans and nonhuman primates.

  5. Trapping, care, and laboratory management of the silvered leaf monkey (Presbytis cristatus).

    PubMed

    Palmieri, J R; Van Dellen, A F; Tirtokusumo, S; Masbar, S; Rusch, J; Connor, D H

    1984-04-01

    The silvered leaf monkey (Presbytis cristatus) from South Kalimantan ( Borneo ), Indonesia is a natural host for a variety of filarial nematodes including Brugia malayi and Wuchereria kalimantani . Experimental studies show that it is host for W. bancrofti, a filarial nematode causing elephantiasis in man. Presbytis cristatus is a gregarious primate of primary and secondary forests, roaming in troops of 20-30 members. Primarily a fruit and leaf eater under natural conditions, this monkey can adapt to a laboratory diet of commercial monkey chow supplemented with fruits and vegetables. Troops, led by an alpha male, immediately respond to protect their young during stressful or dangerous situations. Infants are born singly and are bright orange. Transition to the adult grey and black coloration begins three to five months after birth. Silvered leaf monkeys can be readily trapped. Initially they are aggressive and will attack but become tractable several days after capture. Reaching upward is an important feeding behavior of the silvered leaf monkey and they will not feed from the floor of the cage. In the laboratory they are nonaggressive and lend themselves to various procedures such as blood drawing and examination. Silvered leaf monkeys travel well in commercial animal transport cages. In the United Stages they are not an endangered species and can be readily imported. In Indonesia they are not protected by law and can be exported.

  6. Increased Na+/Ca2+ exchanger activity promotes resistance to excitotoxicity in cortical neurons of the ground squirrel (a Hibernator).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Juan-Juan; Gao, Shan; Jing, Jun-Zhan; Zhu, Ming-Yue; Zhou, Chen; Chai, Zhen

    2014-01-01

    Ground squirrel, a hibernating mammalian species, is more resistant to ischemic brain stress than rat. Gaining insight into the adaptive mechanisms of ground squirrels may help us design treatment strategies to reduce brain damage in patients suffering ischemic stroke. To understand the anti-stress mechanisms in ground squirrel neurons, we studied glutamate toxicity in primary cultured neurons of the Daurian ground squirrel (Spermophilus dauricus). At the neuronal level, for the first time, we found that ground squirrel was more resistant to glutamate excitotoxicity than rat. Mechanistically, ground squirrel neurons displayed a similar calcium influx to the rat neurons in response to glutamate or N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) perfusion. However, the rate of calcium removal in ground squirrel neurons was markedly faster than in rat neurons. This allows ground squirrel neurons to maintain lower level of intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) upon glutamate insult. Moreover, we found that Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX) activity was higher in ground squirrel neurons than in rat neurons. We also proved that overexpression of ground squirrel NCX2, rather than NCX1 or NCX3, in rat neurons promoted neuron survival against glutamate toxicity. Taken together, our results indicate that ground squirrel neurons are better at maintaining calcium homeostasis than rat neurons and this is likely achieved through the activity of ground squirrel NCX2. Our findings not only reveal an adaptive mechanism of mammalian hibernators at the cellular level, but also suggest that NCX2 of ground squirrel may have therapeutic value for suppressing brain ischemic damage.

  7. Extraocular Muscle Motor Units Characterized By Spike-Triggered Averaging In Alert Monkey

    PubMed Central

    Gamlin, Paul D.; Miller, Joel M.

    2011-01-01

    Single-unit recording in macaque monkeys has been widely used to study extraocular motoneuron behavior during eye movements. However, primate extraocular motor units have only been studied using electrical stimulation in anesthetized animals. To study motor units in alert, behaving macaques, we combined chronic muscle force transducer (MFT) and single-unit extracellular motoneuron recordings. During steady fixation with low motoneuron firing rates, we used motoneuron spike-triggered averaging of MFT signals (STA-MFT) to extract individual motor unit twitches, thereby characterizing each motor unit in terms of twitch force and dynamics. It is then possible, as in conventional studies, to determine motoneuron activity during eye movements, but now with knowledge of underlying motor unit characteristics. We demonstrate the STA-MFT technique for medial rectus motor units. Recordings from 33 medial rectus motoneurons in three animals identified 20 motor units, which had peak twitch tensions of 0.5 – 5.25 mg, initial twitch delays averaging 2.4ms, and time to peak contraction averaging 9.3ms. These twitch tensions are consistent with those reported in unanesthetized rabbits, and with estimates of the total number of medial rectus motoneurons and twitch tension generated by whole-nerve stimulation in monkey, but are substantially lower than those reported for lateral rectus motor units in anesthetized squirrel monkey. Motor units were recruited in order of twitch tension magnitude with stronger motor units reaching threshold further in the muscle’s ON-direction, showing that, as in other skeletal muscles, medial rectus motor units are recruited according to the “size principle”. PMID:22108141

  8. Intranasal exposure of the Richardson's ground squirrel to Western equine encephalomyelitis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Leung, M K; McLintock, J; Iversen, J

    1978-01-01

    Adult Richardson's ground squirrels were infected with western equine encephalomyelitis virus by intranasal instillation. Mortality followed the instillation of a minimum threshold of 4.7 logs of virus while infection was produced by a dosage of 2.3 logs. The incubation period was from four to seven days, being preceded by a viremic phase. Signs were depression, ataxia and paralysis of the limbs. Highest titres of virus were recovered from the brain and histopathological changes involving the central nervous system included meningitis, vasculitis, perivascular cuffing, gliosis, neuronophagia and neuronal degeneration. The virus was also found in a variety of extraneural tissues. Lesions in extraneural tissues included necrosis of brown fat and an apparent increase in number of Kupffer's cells in the liver. The lymphoid tissue was involved indicating a possible source for viremia. The duration and magnitude of viremia were ample enough to provide virus source for arthropods. The potential for transmission of the virus independent of arthropods was discussed in view of the pathogenesis demonstrated in the experimental infections. PMID:667706

  9. A shortage of males causes female reproductive failure in yellow ground squirrels

    PubMed Central

    Vasilieva, Nina; Tchabovsky, Andrey

    2015-01-01

    Sexual conflict theory suggests that female breeding success is strongly influenced by individual life history and environmental conditions and is much less affected by mate availability. Female mating failure due to a shortage of males remains poorly studied and understood. We present data on the effects of male availability on female breeding success in a wild colony of yellow ground squirrels (Spermophilus fulvus). A female’s probability of breeding increased with the local density of males and was higher with higher male-biased operational sex ratio (OSR) but was independent of local female density, female age, and body condition, which are factors commonly assumed to influence female reproduction. The positive effect of male availability (as measured by OSR) on female breeding success was consistent across the years, and we conclude that male limitation contributes to female mating failure. This pattern, which is not commonly recorded in species with conventional sex roles, can be explained by a combination of sociodemographic and life history traits (sex differences in age of maturation, female-skewed adult sex ratio and seasonally varying OSR, solitary living at low population density, and low mobility of females combined with mate-searching tactics of males) that are not confined to S. fulvus. Our findings indicate that the role of female mating failure (due to a shortage of males) in shaping mammalian life history may be underestimated. PMID:26601284

  10. Stereotypy in monkeys and humans.

    PubMed

    Ridley, R M; Baker, H F

    1982-02-01

    Stereotyped movements are described in monkeys and humans and are classified as arising from constraint, sensory deprivation in infancy, amphetamine treatment or psychotic states. It is argued that, with the exception of cage stereotypies, stereotyped behaviour is evidence of abnormality in the nervous system consequent upon distorted maturational processes, organic defect or biochemical disturbance. Stereotypy is associated with a state of cognitive inflexibility and social and sensory isolation in humans and monkeys. It is suggested that, while no simple biochemical disturbance in the brain can describe these various occurrences of stereotypy, the cross-species occurrence of a syndrome of isolation, cognitive inflexibility and stereotypy implies a related mechanism mediating these divergent effects. If stereotypy is regarded as a consequence of failure to use sensory input to direct behaviour, therapeutic regimes designed to stimulate responsive behaviours and social interactions are more likely to be effective in the long run than direct attempts to suppress stereotypy.

  11. Animal behaviour: fair refusal by capuchin monkeys.

    PubMed

    Wynne, Clive D L

    2004-03-11

    Brosnan and de Waal report that capuchin monkeys show evidence of a sense of fairness or 'inequity aversion' because they rejected a less preferred reward when they saw a partner monkey receive a preferred reward for the same task. However, this does not show that monkeys are averse to inequity, only that they reject a lesser reward when better rewards are available. There are risks inherent in seeking anthropomorphic explanations for non-human behaviour.

  12. Mandible shape and dwarfism in squirrels (Mammalia, Rodentia): interaction of allometry and adaptation.

    PubMed

    Hautier, Lionel; Fabre, Pierre-Henri; Michaux, Jacques

    2009-06-01

    Squirrels include several independent lineages of dwarf forms distributed into two ecological groups: the dwarf tree and flying squirrels. The mandible of dwarf tree squirrels share a highly reduced coronoid process and a condylar process drawn backwards. Dwarf flying squirrels on the other hand, have an elongated coronoid process and a well-differentiated condylar process. To interpret such a difference, Elliptic Fourier Transform was used to evaluate how mandible shape varies with dwarfism in sciurids. The results obtained show that this clear-cut difference cannot be explained by a simple allometric relationship in relation with size decrease. We concluded that the retention of anteriorly positioned eye sockets, in relation with distance estimation, allowed the conservation of a well-differentiated coronoid process in all flying species, despite the trend towards its reduction observed among sciurids as their size decreases. PMID:19288073

  13. Space use and foraging movements in the American red squirrel (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus).

    PubMed

    Benhamou, S

    1996-09-01

    This study deals with the movements of two American red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus) in their home ranges from late spring to early autumn in a deciduous-coniferous forest in Québec. During 70 six-hour tracking sessions, the type of behaviour exhibited at any place, and its terrestrial or arboreal occurrence, were recorded. Spatio-temporal structure of the squirrels' home ranges were analysed in relation to vegetation type and food availability. Although American red squirrels are known to be mainly adapted to coniferous forests, they also exploit deciduous areas when these areas become productive. Half of the squirrels' activity time was devoted to feeding or to searching for food, and a third was devoted to moving about. Movements were performed mainly on the ground, with a rate of about 0.5 km per activity hour, and appeared to be mainly organized around the locations of food caches and food-providing sites. PMID:24897435

  14. Mandible shape and dwarfism in squirrels (Mammalia, Rodentia): interaction of allometry and adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hautier, Lionel; Fabre, Pierre-Henri; Michaux, Jacques

    2009-06-01

    Squirrels include several independent lineages of dwarf forms distributed into two ecological groups: the dwarf tree and flying squirrels. The mandible of dwarf tree squirrels share a highly reduced coronoid process and a condylar process drawn backwards. Dwarf flying squirrels on the other hand, have an elongated coronoid process and a well-differentiated condylar process. To interpret such a difference, Elliptic Fourier Transform was used to evaluate how mandible shape varies with dwarfism in sciurids. The results obtained show that this clear-cut difference cannot be explained by a simple allometric relationship in relation with size decrease. We concluded that the retention of anteriorly positioned eye sockets, in relation with distance estimation, allowed the conservation of a well-differentiated coronoid process in all flying species, despite the trend towards its reduction observed among sciurids as their size decreases.

  15. Space use and foraging movements in the American red squirrel (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus).

    PubMed

    Benhamou, S

    1996-09-01

    This study deals with the movements of two American red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus) in their home ranges from late spring to early autumn in a deciduous-coniferous forest in Québec. During 70 six-hour tracking sessions, the type of behaviour exhibited at any place, and its terrestrial or arboreal occurrence, were recorded. Spatio-temporal structure of the squirrels' home ranges were analysed in relation to vegetation type and food availability. Although American red squirrels are known to be mainly adapted to coniferous forests, they also exploit deciduous areas when these areas become productive. Half of the squirrels' activity time was devoted to feeding or to searching for food, and a third was devoted to moving about. Movements were performed mainly on the ground, with a rate of about 0.5 km per activity hour, and appeared to be mainly organized around the locations of food caches and food-providing sites.

  16. Daily rhythmicity and hibernation in the Anatolian ground squirrel under natural and laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Kart Gür, Mutlu; Refinetti, Roberto; Gür, Hakan

    2009-02-01

    We studied daily rhythmicity of body temperature (T(b)) before and during hibernation in Anatolian ground squirrels (Spermophilus xanthoprymnus) under natural and laboratory conditions using surgically implanted temperature loggers. Under both conditions, robust daily T(b) rhythmicity with parameters comparable to those of other ground squirrel species was observed before but not during hibernation. Euthermic animals had robust daily T(b) rhythms with a mean of 37.0 degrees C and a range of excursion of approximately 4 degrees C. No T(b) rhythm was detected during torpor bouts, either because T(b) rhythmicity was absent or because the daily range of excursion was smaller than 0.2 degrees C. The general patterns of hibernation that we observed in Anatolian ground squirrels were similar to those previously observed by other investigators in other species of ground squirrels.

  17. Nutritional benefits of Crematogaster mimosae ants and Acacia drepanolobium gum for patas monkeys and vervets in Laikipia, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Isbell, Lynne A; Rothman, Jessica M; Young, Peter J; Rudolph, Kathleen

    2013-02-01

    Patas monkeys (Erythrocebus patas) are midsized primates that feed extensively on the gum of Acacia drepanolobium and the ants are housed in swollen thorns of this Acacia. Their diet resembles that expected more of smaller bodied primates. Patas monkeys are also more like smaller bodied primates in reproducing at high rates. We sought to better understand the convergence of patas monkeys with smaller bodied primates by comparing their feeding behavior on ants and gum with that of closely related, sympatric vervets (Chlorocebus pygerythrus), and analyzing the nutrient content of the gum of A. drepanolobium and of Crematogaster mimosae, the most common ant species eaten by patas monkeys in Laikipia, Kenya. All occurrences of feeding and moving during focal animal sampling revealed that 1) patas monkeys seek A. drepanolobium gum but vervets avoid it; 2) both species open swollen thorns most often in the morning when antsare less active; 3) patas monkeys continually feed onswollen thorns and gum while moving quickly throughout the day, whereas vervets reduce their consumption of these items and their travel rate at mid-day, and; 4) vervets eat young swollen thorns at a higher rate than patas monkeys. Patas monkeys are able to spend little time acquiring substantial amounts of energy, protein, and minerals from A. drepanolobium gum and C. mimosae ants each day. These findings, when coupled with evidence of causes of infant and adult female mortality, suggest that reproductive success of female patas monkeys is more immediately affected by illness, disease, interactions between adults and infants, and access to water than by food.

  18. Perception of place-of-articulation information by monkeys versus humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinnott, Joan M.; Gilmore, Casey S.

    2003-04-01

    Four monkeys and six humans representing five different native languages were compared in the ability to categorize natural CV tokens of /b/ vs /d/ produced by four talkers of American-English (two male; two female) in four vowel contexts /i,e,a,u/. A two-choice left/right procedure was used in which percent correct and response time data were compared between species. Both measures indicated striking vowel context effects for monkeys, but none for humans. Specifically, monkeys performed better for back vowels /a,u/ than front vowels /i,e/. Since back vowels have more distinctive F2 onset transitions differentiating /b/ vs /d/, these results imply that monkey perception is more dependent than human perception on the actual acoustic structure of the syllables. We conclude that humans do not use general mechanisms in place perception, rather they use some sort of special mechanism to eliminate vowel context effects. While monkeys do not provide accurate models of adult humans, they may be able to provide a model of the preverbal human infant before it learns a more speech-specific adult strategy of place information extraction. [Work supported by NIH.

  19. Simian virus 40-induced disease in rhesus monkeys with simian acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, C. J.; Simon, M. A.; Bergsagel, D. J.; Pauley, D. R.; King, N. W.; Garcea, R. L.; Ringler, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) disease was diagnosed in four rhesus monkeys that died with SIV-induced acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). One juvenile monkey seroconverted for SV40 6 months after inoculation with SIV and developed severe bilateral tubulointerstitial nephritis. In contrast, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) occurred in two adult monkeys that were seropositive for SV40 before SIV inoculation, as well as a third adult that was naturally infected with SIV and seropositive for SV40 5 years before death. Large intranuclear inclusions containing abundant polyomavirus particles were limited to either renal tubular epithelial cells or oligodendrocytes. In situ DNA hybridization for SV40 large T antigen further demonstrated that SV40 nucleic acid was localized to either kidney or brain tissue. By immunohistochemical analysis, areas of central nervous system inflammation and demyelination were shown to contain CD68+ macrophages (gitter cells), aggregates of CD8+ T lymphocytes, and numerous gemistocytic astrocytes that labeled for glial fibrillary acidic protein. These observations indicate that rhesus monkeys with SIV-induced AIDS are predisposed to polyomaviral disease, in which SV40 nucleic acid is observed in renal tissue in primary infections and brain tissue after viral reactivation. Furthermore, this organ-specific replication suggests that tissue-tropic strains of SV40 may develop in immunodeficient monkeys. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:1376560

  20. Endowment effect in capuchin monkeys.

    PubMed

    Lakshminaryanan, Venkat; Chen, M Keith; Santos, Laurie R

    2008-12-12

    In humans, the capacity for economically rational choice is constrained by a variety of preference biases: humans evaluate gambles relative to arbitrary reference points; weigh losses heavier than equally sized gains; and demand a higher price for owned goods than for equally preferred goods that are not yet owned. To date, however, fewer studies have examined the origins of these biases. Here, we review previous work demonstrating that human economic biases such as loss aversion and reference dependence are shared with an ancestrally related New World primate, the capuchin monkey (Cebus apella). We then examine whether capuchins display an endowment effect in a token-trading task. We identified pairs of treats (fruit discs versus cereal chunks) that were equally preferred by each monkey. When given a chance to trade away their owned fruit discs to obtain the equally valued cereal chunks (or vice versa), however, monkeys required a far greater compensation than the equally preferred treat. We show that these effects are not due to transaction costs or timing issues. These data suggest that biased preferences rely on cognitive systems that are more evolutionarily ancient than previously thought-and that common evolutionary ancestry shared by humans and capuchins may account for the occurrence of the endowment effect in both species. PMID:18840573

  1. Macaque monkeys experience visual crowding.

    PubMed

    Crowder, Erin A; Olson, Carl R

    2015-01-01

    In peripheral vision, objects that are easily discriminated on their own become less discriminable in the presence of surrounding clutter. This phenomenon is known as crowding.The neural mechanisms underlying crowding are not well understood. Better insight might come from single-neuron recording in nonhuman primates, provided they exhibit crowding; however, previous demonstrations of crowding have been confined to humans. In the present study, we set out to determine whether crowding occurs in rhesus macaque monkeys. We found that animals trained to identify a target letter among flankers displayed three hallmarks of crowding as established in humans. First, at a given eccentricity, increasing the spacing between the target and the flankers improved recognition accuracy. Second, the critical spacing, defined as the minimal spacing at which target discrimination was reliable, was proportional to eccentricity. Third, the critical spacing was largely unaffected by object size. We conclude that monkeys, like humans, experience crowding. These findings open the door to studies of crowding at the neuronal level in the monkey visual system.

  2. Endowment effect in capuchin monkeys.

    PubMed

    Lakshminaryanan, Venkat; Chen, M Keith; Santos, Laurie R

    2008-12-12

    In humans, the capacity for economically rational choice is constrained by a variety of preference biases: humans evaluate gambles relative to arbitrary reference points; weigh losses heavier than equally sized gains; and demand a higher price for owned goods than for equally preferred goods that are not yet owned. To date, however, fewer studies have examined the origins of these biases. Here, we review previous work demonstrating that human economic biases such as loss aversion and reference dependence are shared with an ancestrally related New World primate, the capuchin monkey (Cebus apella). We then examine whether capuchins display an endowment effect in a token-trading task. We identified pairs of treats (fruit discs versus cereal chunks) that were equally preferred by each monkey. When given a chance to trade away their owned fruit discs to obtain the equally valued cereal chunks (or vice versa), however, monkeys required a far greater compensation than the equally preferred treat. We show that these effects are not due to transaction costs or timing issues. These data suggest that biased preferences rely on cognitive systems that are more evolutionarily ancient than previously thought-and that common evolutionary ancestry shared by humans and capuchins may account for the occurrence of the endowment effect in both species.

  3. A test of object permanence in a new-world monkey species, cotton top tamarins (Saguinus oedipus).

    PubMed

    Neiworth, Julie J; Steinmark, Eric; Basile, Benjamin M; Wonders, Ryann; Steely, Frances; DeHart, Catherine

    2003-03-01

    Cotton top tamarins were tested in visible and invisible displacement tasks in a method similar to that used elsewhere to test squirrel monkeys and orangutans. All subjects performed at levels significantly above chance on visible ( n=8) and invisible ( n=7) displacements, wherein the tasks included tests of the perseverance error, tests of memory in double and triple displacements, and "catch" trials that tested for the use of the experimenter's hand as a cue for the correct cup. Performance on all nine tasks was significantly higher than chance level selection of cups, and tasks using visible displacements generated more accurate performance than tasks using invisible displacements. Performance was not accounted for by a practice effect based on exposure to successive tasks. Results suggest that tamarins possess stage 6 object permanence capabilities, and that in a situation involving brief exposure to tasks and foraging opportunities, tracking objects' movements and responding more flexibly are abilities expressed readily by the tamarins. PMID:12658533

  4. Genetic analysis of captive proboscis monkeys.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Mitsuaki; Seino, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    Information on the genetic relationships of captive founders is important for captive population management. In this study, we investigated DNA polymorphisms of four microsatellite loci and the mitochondrial control region sequence of five proboscis monkeys residing in a Japanese zoo as captive founders, to clarify their genetic relationship. We found that two of the five monkeys appeared to be genetically related. Furthermore, the haplotypes of the mitochondrial control region of the five monkeys were well differentiated from the haplotypes previously reported from wild populations from the northern area of Borneo, indicating a greater amount of genetic diversity in proboscis monkeys than previously reported. PMID:25266590

  5. Steroid metabolism by monkey and human spermatozoa

    SciTech Connect

    Rajalakshmi, M.; Sehgal, A.; Pruthi, J.S.; Anand-Kumar, T.C.

    1983-05-01

    Freshly ejaculated spermatozoa from monkey and human were washed and incubated with tritium labelled androgens or estradiol to study the pattern of spermatozoa steroid metabolism. When equal concentrations of steroid substrates were used for incubation, monkey and human spermatozoa showed very similar pattern of steroid conversion. Spermatozoa from both species converted testosterone mainly to androstenedione, but reverse conversion of androstenedione to testosterone was negligible. Estradiol-17 beta was converted mainly to estrone. The close similarity between the spermatozoa of monkey and men in their steroid metabolic pattern indicates that the rhesus monkey could be an useful animal model to study the effect of drugs on the metabolic pattern of human spermatozoa.

  6. Periodic eye tracking in the monkey

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, A. F.

    1967-01-01

    1. Eye movements were measured in monkeys trained for visual tracking. 2. In response to periodic square wave target movements, monkeys do not show a significant reduction in the latency of saccadic movements. 3. Under similar conditions, human beings subconsciously reduce their latency and after several cycles are in step with the target. 4. In response to sinusoidal targets, monkeys show a latency or phase lag which increases monotonically with frequency starting at 0·3 c/s. Human beings can remain in phase with the target at frequencies up to 1·0 c/s. 5. Hence, monkeys do not exhibit the human predictive tracking response. PMID:16992282

  7. Genetic analysis of captive proboscis monkeys.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Mitsuaki; Seino, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    Information on the genetic relationships of captive founders is important for captive population management. In this study, we investigated DNA polymorphisms of four microsatellite loci and the mitochondrial control region sequence of five proboscis monkeys residing in a Japanese zoo as captive founders, to clarify their genetic relationship. We found that two of the five monkeys appeared to be genetically related. Furthermore, the haplotypes of the mitochondrial control region of the five monkeys were well differentiated from the haplotypes previously reported from wild populations from the northern area of Borneo, indicating a greater amount of genetic diversity in proboscis monkeys than previously reported.

  8. Will Arctic ground squirrels impede or accelerate climate-induced vegetation changes to the Arctic tundra?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, J.; Flower, C. E.; Brown, J.; Gonzalez-Meler, M. A.; Whelan, C.

    2014-12-01

    Considerable attention has been given to the climate feedbacks associated with predicted vegetation shifts in the Arctic tundra in response to global environmental change. However, little is known regarding the extent to which consumers can facilitate or respond to shrub expansion. Arctic ground squirrels, the largest and most northern ground squirrel, are abundant and widespread throughout the North American tundra. Their broad diet of seeds, flowers, herbage, bird's eggs and meat speaks to the need to breed, feed, and fatten in a span of some 12-16 weeks that separate their 8-9 month bouts of hibernation with the potential consequence to impact ecosystem dynamics. Therefore Arctic ground squirrels are a good candidate to evaluate whether consumers are mere responders (bottom-up effects) or drivers (top-down) of the observed and predicted vegetation changes. As a start towards this question, we measured the foraging intensity (giving-up densities) of Arctic ground squirrels in experimental food patches within which the squirrels experience diminishing returns as they seek the raisins and peanuts that we provided at the Toolik Lake field station in northern Alaska. If the squirrels show their highest feeding intensity in the shrubs, they may impede vegetation shifts by slowing the establishment and expansion of shrubs in the tundra. Conversely, if they show their lowest feeding intensity within shrub dominated areas, they may accelerate vegetation shifts. We found neither. Feeding intensity varied most among transects and times of day, and least along a tundra-to-shrub vegetation gradient. This suggests that the impacts of squirrels will be heterogeneous - in places responders and in others drivers. We should not be surprised then to see patches of accelerated and impeded vegetation changes in the tundra ecosystem. Some of these patterns may be predictable from the foraging behavior of Arctic ground squirrels.

  9. Quadrupedal locomotor performance in two species of arboreal squirrels: predicting energy savings of gliding.

    PubMed

    Flaherty, Elizabeth A; Ben-David, Merav; Smith, Winston P

    2010-10-01

    Gliding allows mammals to exploit canopy habitats of old-growth forests possibly as a means to save energy. To assess costs of quadrupedal locomotion for a gliding arboreal mammal, we used open-flow respirometry and a variable-speed treadmill to measure oxygen consumption and to calculate cost of transport, excess exercise oxygen consumption, and excess post-exercise oxygen consumption for nine northern flying squirrels (Glaucomys sabrinus) and four fox squirrels (Sciurus niger). Our results indicate that oxygen consumption during exercise by flying squirrels was 1.26-1.65 times higher than predicted based on body mass, and exponentially increased with velocity (from 0.84 ± 0.03 ml O(2) kg(-1) s(-1) at 0.40 m s(-1) to 1.55 ± 0.03 ml O(2) kg(-1) s(-1) at 0.67 m s(-1)). Also, cost of transport in flying squirrels increased with velocity, although excess exercise oxygen consumption and excess post-exercise oxygen consumption did not. In contrast, oxygen consumption during exercise for fox squirrels was similar to predicted, varying from 0.51 (±0.02) ml O(2) kg(-1) s(-1) at 0.63 m s(-1) to 0.54 (±0.03) ml O(2) kg(-1) s(-1) at 1.25 m s(-1). In addition, the cost of transport for fox squirrels decreased with velocity, while excess exercise oxygen consumption and excess post-exercise oxygen consumption did not. Collectively, these observations suggest that unlike fox squirrels, flying squirrels are poorly adapted to prolonged bouts of quadrupedal locomotion. The evolution of skeletal adaptations to climbing, leaping, and landing and the development of a gliding membrane likely has increased the cost of quadrupedal locomotion by >50% while resulting in energy savings during gliding and reduction in travel time between foraging patches. PMID:20361193

  10. Phospholipids of liver cell nuclei during hibernation of Yakutian ground squirrel.

    PubMed

    Lakhina, A A; Markevich, L N; Zakharova, N M; Afanasyev, V N; Kolomiytseva, I K; Fesenko, E E

    2016-07-01

    In hibernating Yakutian ground squirrels S. undulatus, the content of total phospholipids in the nuclei of liver increased by 40% compared to that in animals in summer. In torpid state, the amount of sphingomyelin increased almost 8 times; phosphatidylserine, 7 times; and cardiolipin, 4 times. In active "winter" ground squirrels, the amount of sphingomyelin, phosphatidylserine, and cardiolipin decreased compared to the hibernating individuals but remained high compared to the "summer" ones. The torpor state did not affect the amount of lysophosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylinositol.

  11. Seasonal and post-trauma remodeling in cone-dominant ground squirrel retina.

    PubMed

    Merriman, Dana K; Sajdak, Benjamin S; Li, Wei; Jones, Bryan W

    2016-09-01

    With a photoreceptor mosaic containing ∼85% cones, the ground squirrel is one of the richest known mammalian sources of these important retinal cells. It also has a visual ecology much like the human's. While the ground squirrel retina is understandably prominent in the cone biochemistry, physiology, and circuitry literature, far less is known about the remodeling potential of its retinal pigment epithelium, neurons, macroglia, or microglia. This review aims to summarize the data from ground squirrel retina to this point in time, and to relate them to data from other brain areas where appropriate. We begin with a survey of the ground squirrel visual system, making comparisons with traditional rodent models and with human. Because this animal's status as a hibernator often goes unnoticed in the vision literature, we then present a brief primer on hibernation biology. Next we review what is known about ground squirrel retinal remodeling concurrent with deep torpor and with rapid recovery upon re-warming. Notable here is rapidly-reversible, temperature-dependent structural plasticity of cone ribbon synapses, as well as pre- and post-synaptic plasticity throughout diverse brain regions. It is not yet clear if retinal cell types other than cones engage in torpor-associated synaptic remodeling. We end with the small but intriguing literature on the ground squirrel retina's remodeling responses to insult by retinal detachment. Notable for widespread loss of (cone) photoreceptors, there is surprisingly little remodeling of the RPE or Müller cells. Microglial activation appears minimal, and remodeling of surviving second- and third-order neurons seems absent, but both require further study. In contrast, traumatic brain injury in the ground squirrel elicits typical macroglial and microglial responses. Overall, the data to date strongly suggest a heretofore unrecognized, natural checkpoint between retinal deafferentiation and RPE and Müller cell remodeling events. As we

  12. Assessment of the Kania trap to humanely kill red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus) in enclosures.

    PubMed

    Proulx, G; Kolenosky, A J; Cole, P J

    1993-04-01

    The Kania trap equipped with side wings and baited with a pine cone quickly killed nine of nine red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus) in enclosures. Mean times to loss of consciousness and heartbeat were estimated at < or = 65 sec and < or = 91 sec, respectively, after firing the trap. Thus the Kania can be expected to render > or = 70% of captured red squirrels irreversibly unconscious in < or = 3 min (P < 0.05).

  13. Evidence for Motor Planning in Monkeys: Rhesus Macaques Select Efficient Grips when Transporting Spoons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Eliza L.; Berthier, Neil E.; Metevier, Christina M.; Novak, Melinda A.

    2011-01-01

    McCarty and colleagues (1999) developed the elevated spoon task to measure motor planning in human infants. In this task, a spoon containing food was placed on an elevated apparatus that supported both ends of the spoon. The handle was oriented to the left or right on different trials. We presented naive adult rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) with…

  14. Physiological studies in space with nonhuman primates using the monkey pod

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pace, N.; Rahlmann, D. F.; Kodama, A. M.; Mains, R. C.; Grunbaum, B. W.

    1977-01-01

    A completely enclosed module was constructed for continuously maintaining an unanesthetized adult 10-12 kg monkey in a physiologically stable state of comfortable restraint for periods of at least 10 days, either on the ground or in an orbiting spacecraft. Energy balance determinations made during three different tests using a giant rhesus (malaca nemestrina) are presented in charts and graphs.

  15. Nuclear DNA phylogeny of the squirrels (Mammalia: Rodentia) and the evolution of arboreality from c-myc and RAG1.

    PubMed

    Steppan, Scott J; Storz, Brian L; Hoffmann, Robert S

    2004-03-01

    Although the family Sciuridae is large and well known, phylogenetic analyses are scarce. We report on a comprehensive molecular phylogeny for the family. Two nuclear genes (c-myc and RAG1) comprising approximately 4500 bp of data (most in exons) are applied for the first time to rodent phylogenetics. Parsimony, likelihood, and Bayesian analyses of the separate gene regions and combined data reveal five major lineages and refute the conventional elevation of the flying squirrels (Pteromyinae) to subfamily status. Instead, flying squirrels are derived from one of the tree squirrel lineages. C-myc indels corroborate the sequence-based topologies. The common ancestor of extant squirrels appears to have been arboreal, confirming the fossil evidence. The results also reveal an unexpected clade of mostly terrestrial squirrels with African and Holarctic centers of diversity. We present a revised classification of squirrels. Our results demonstrate the phylogenetic utility of relatively slowly evolving nuclear exonic data even for relatively recent clades. PMID:15012949

  16. Green foliage losses from ponderosa pines induced by Abert squirrels and snowstorms: A comparison. [Sciurus aberti; Pinus pondersosa

    SciTech Connect

    Allred, W.S.; Gaud, W.S. )

    1993-01-01

    Abert squirrels (Sciurus aberti) are obligate herbivores on ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa). The inner bark of pine shoots is considered one of the predominant food resources obtained by foraging squirrels. As squirrels forage for this resource they induce green needle losses from chosen feed trees. Amounts of induced green needle losses appear to vary according to the availability of alternative foods and squirrel population densities. Weather also induces green needle losses to ponderosa pines. Results of this study indicate that, at least in some years, heavy snowstorms can induce greater amounts of green needle losses than squirrels. Squirrel herbivory was not indicated as a factor in any tree mortality. However, losses due to snowstorms are more severe since they may cause the actual depletion of trees in the forest because of the tree mortality they inflict.

  17. Rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) map number onto space.

    PubMed

    Drucker, Caroline B; Brannon, Elizabeth M

    2014-07-01

    Humans map number onto space. However, the origins of this association, and particularly the degree to which it depends upon cultural experience, are not fully understood. Here we provide the first demonstration of a number-space mapping in a non-human primate. We trained four adult male rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) to select the fourth position from the bottom of a five-element vertical array. Monkeys maintained a preference to choose the fourth position through changes in the appearance, location, and spacing of the vertical array. We next asked whether monkeys show a spatially-oriented number mapping by testing their responses to the same five-element stimulus array rotated ninety degrees into a horizontal line. In these horizontal probe trials, monkeys preferentially selected the fourth position from the left, but not the fourth position from the right. Our results indicate that rhesus macaques map number onto space, suggesting that the association between number and space in human cognition is not purely a result of cultural experience and instead has deep evolutionary roots.

  18. Trypanosoma (Herpetosoma) kuseli sp. n. (Protozoa: Kinetoplastida) in Siberian flying squirrels (Pteromys volans).

    PubMed

    Sato, H; Al-Adhami, B H; Une, Y; Kamiya, H

    2007-07-01

    All trypanosome species classified in the subgenus Herpetosoma in sciurid hosts have been recorded from ground and tree squirrels to date, but not from any flying squirrels. We describe in this paper a novel trypanosome species, Trypanosoma (Herpetosoma) kuseli sp. n., from Siberian flying squirrels (Pteromys volans) imported from China, and compare it with T. (H.) otospermophili in Richardson's ground squirrels (Spermophilus richardsonii) and Columbian ground squirrels (Spermophilus columbianus) from the USA. Due to a short free flagellum, the new species appeared stumpy compared with T. otospermophili (length of free flagellum 7.0 +/- 0.8 microm, total length 32.1 +/- 0.8 microm, n = 13 and length of free flagellum 15.5 +/- 1.6 microm, total length 35.9 +/- 1.0 microm, n = 13, respectively). Another conspicuous morphological feature of the new species was an anteriorly positioned kinetoplast, found approximately at the midpoint between the nucleus and the posterior end. These characters have not been recorded from any squirrel Herpetosoma trypanosome species. Comparison of the nucleotide sequences of the small and large subunit rRNA genes indicated that T. kuseli sp. n. was more homologous to T. otospermophili than murid Herpetosoma species, such as T. grosi, T. lewisi, T. musculi, T. microti and T. evotomys. PMID:17334786

  19. Monitoring interactions between red-cockaded woodpeckers and southern flying squirrels.

    SciTech Connect

    Risch, Thomas S.; Loeb, Susan C.

    2004-12-31

    Risch, Thomas S., and Susan C. Loeb. 2004. Monitoring interactions between red-cockaded woodpeckers and southern flying squirrels. In: Red-cockaded woodpecker; Road to Recovery. Proceedings of the 4th Red-cockaded woodpecker Symposium. Ralph Costa and Susan J. Daniels, eds. Savannah, Georgia. January, 2003. Chapter 8. Cavities, Cavity Trees, and Cavity Communities. Pp 504-505. Abstract: Although several studies have suggested that southern flying squirrels (Glaucomys volans) may have a significant negative impact on red-cockades woodpeckers (Picoides borealsi) (Loeb and Hooper 1997, Laves and Loeb 1999), the nature of the interactions between the species remains unclear. Particularly lacking are data that address if southern flying squirrels directly usurp red-cockaded woodpecker s from cavities, or simply occupy cavities previously abandoned by red-cockaded woodpeckers. Ridley et al. (1997) observed the displacement of a red-cockaded woodpecker by a southern flying squirrel that was released after being captured. Observations of nocturnal displacements of red-cockaded woodpeckers by flying squirrels, however, are lacking. Due to the difficulty of observing interspecific interactions, determining the mechanisims by which flying squirrels impact red-cockaded woodpeckers is problematic.

  20. Status and habitat relationships of northern flying squirrels on Mount Desert Island, Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Connell, A.F.; Servello, F.; Higgins, J.; Halteman, W.

    2001-01-01

    Northern (Glaucomys sabrinus) and southern (G. volans) flying squirrels occur in Maine, but there is uncertainty about range overlap in southcentral Maine where the southern flying squirrel reaches its geographic range limit. We surveyed flying squirrels on Mount Desert Island (MDI), located along the central Maine coast, to update the current status and distribution of these species. We captured only northern flying squirrels, and populations (> 2 individuals) were located in two conifer stands and one mixed conifer-hardwood stand. All three stands were located in relatively older forests, outside a large area burned in a 1947 fire. Tree diameters were similar between trap stations with and without captures, under-story density was low overall, and there was a trend of higher seedling density at capture locations. Low understory density may allow squirrels more effective gliding movements between trees, which may enhance predator avoidance. Although the southern flying squirrel was reported from MDI numerous times during the 20th century, no voucher specimens exist, and species identification and localities have been poorly documented. Future surveys on MDI should consider collection of voucher specimens to validate subsequent survey efforts and effectively document changes in local biodiversity.

  1. Ca2+ cycling in heart cells from ground squirrels: adaptive strategies for intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Chen; Wei, Ling; Zhang, Guang-Qin; Bai, Zai-Ling; Hu, Ying-Ying; Zhou, Peng; Bai, Shu-Hua; Chai, Zhen; Lakatta, Edward G; Hao, Xue-Mei; Wang, Shi-Qiang

    2011-01-01

    Heart tissues from hibernating mammals, such as ground squirrels, are able to endure hypothermia, hypoxia and other extreme insulting factors that are fatal for human and nonhibernating mammals. This study was designed to understand adaptive mechanisms involved in intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis in cardiomyocytes from the mammalian hibernator, ground squirrel, compared to rat. Electrophysiological and confocal imaging experiments showed that the voltage-dependence of L-type Ca(2+) current (I(Ca)) was shifted to higher potentials in ventricular myocytes from ground squirrels vs. rats. The elevated threshold of I(Ca) did not compromise the Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release, because a higher depolarization rate and a longer duration of action potential compensated the voltage shift of I(Ca). Both the caffeine-sensitive and caffeine-resistant components of cytosolic Ca(2+) removal were more rapid in ground squirrels. Ca(2+) sparks in ground squirrels exhibited larger amplitude/size and much lower frequency than in rats. Due to the high I(Ca) threshold, low SR Ca(2+) leak and rapid cytosolic Ca(2+) clearance, heart cells from ground squirrels exhibited better capability in maintaining intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis than those from rats and other nonhibernating mammals. These findings not only reveal adaptive mechanisms of hibernation, but also provide novel strategies against Ca(2+) overload-related heart diseases. PMID:21935466

  2. Genetic variation in natural and translocated populations of the endangered Delmarva fox squirrel (Sciurus niger cinereus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lance, S.L.; Maldonado, J.E.; Bocetti, C.I.; Pattee, O.H.; Ballou, J.D.; Fleischer, R.C.

    2003-01-01

    The Delmarva fox squirrel, Sciurus niger cinereus, is a federally listed endangered subspecies whose range has been reduced by 90%. In an attempt to increase both population size and range, translocation sites were established beginning in the 1960's by moving squirrels from the natural range to sites outside the current range. Although translocations have served as the primary component of the DFS recovery program, there has been very little post-release examination of the genetics of the translocation sites. In this study, we developed ten microsatellite loci, screened the three polymorphic loci, and sequenced a 330 bp fragment of the mitochondrial control region in order to assess levels of genetic variation in natural and translocated regions of Delmarva fox squirrels and to compare them to Southeastern fox squirrels (S. n. niger). Although we found low levels of microsatellite polymorphism, there were no differences in heterozygosity between natural and translocated regions, or between Delmarva and Southeastern fox squirrels. We found high levels of polymorphism in the mitochondrial control region. Our patterns of haplotype diversity suggest incomplete lineage sorting of the two subspecies. In general, our data suggest that the current levels of genetic variation in the translocated sites are representative of those found in the natural population, and we encourage the continued use of translocations as a major component of Delmarva fox squirrel recovery.

  3. FLOTAC for diagnosis of endo-parasites in pet squirrels in southern Italy.

    PubMed

    d'Ovidio, D; Rinaldi, L; Ianniello, D; Donnelly, T M; Pepe, P; Capasso, M; Cringoli, G

    2014-02-24

    The present study investigated the occurrence of endoparasites in pet squirrels in southern Italy. Fresh fecal samples were collected from 50 asymptomatic pet squirrels belonging to five different species (Callosciurus finlaysonii, n=6, C. prevosti, n=6; Tamias striatus, n=26, T. sibiricus, n=10; Sciurus carolinensis, n=2) housed both in pet shops and/or in private residences. All fecal samples were processed using the FLOTAC pellet technique to identify and count helminth eggs/larvae and protozoan cysts/oocysts. In addition, to detect Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia spp. the samples were analyzed by the Remel Xpect(®) immunoassay. Helminth eggs were detected in 9 out of 50 squirrels. Specifically, eggs of Dicrocoelium dendriticum were found in 5 squirrels (C. finlaysonii, n=2; C. prevosti, n=2; T. striatus, n=1); eggs of the pinworm Syphacia spp. in 3 squirrels (C. prevosti, n=2; T. striatus, n=1); and eggs of gastrointestinal nematoda (Nippostrongylus-like) were found in 1 subject (C. prevosti). Finally, two squirrels (C. prevosti) had multiple parasitic infections with D. dendriticum and Capillaria hepatica, and with D. dendriticum and Strongyloides spp., respectively. None of the samples were positive for Cryptosporidium spp. or Giardia spp. or any other protozoa (e.g. Eimeria). To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of a D. dendriticum natural infection in pet rodents.

  4. Movements of northern flying squirrels in different-aged forest stands of western Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, K.J.; Anthony, R.G.

    1999-01-01

    In western Oregon, northern flying squirrels (Glaucomys sabrinus) are the primary prey species for northern spotted owls (Strix occidentalis caurina), an old-growth associated species. To assess differences between old-growth and second-growth habitat, we livetrapped and radiotagged 39 northern flying squirrels to estimate their home range sizes and describe movements in 2 old-growth and 2 second-growth conifer forest stands in the Cascade Mountains of central Oregon. Sampling periods were summer and fall of 1991-92. Home range sizes averaged 4.9 ha and did not differ (P > 0.30) between the 2 stand types. Male northern flying squirrels had larger (P ??? 0.03) mean home ranges (5.9 ?? 0.8 ha; ?? ?? SE; n = 20) than females (3.9 ?? 0.4 ha; n = 19). Northern flying squirrel movement distances between successive, noncorrelated telemetry locations averaged 71 m (n = 1,090). No correlation was found between distances moved and stand type or sex. Northern flying squirrel's home range sizes, movements, and densities were similar between the 2 stand types. We suggest abundance and movements of northern flying squirrels are not influencing the preferential selection of oldgrowth forests by northern spotted owls.

  5. Membrane lipids and morphology of brain cortex synaptosomes isolated from hibernating Yakutian ground squirrel.

    PubMed

    Kolomiytseva, Iskra K; Perepelkina, Natalia I; Zharikova, Alevtina D; Popov, Victor I

    2008-12-01

    Synaptosomes were isolated from Yakutian ground squirrel brain cortex of summer and winter hibernating animals in active and torpor states. Synaptosomal membrane cholesterol and phospholipids were determined. The seasonal changes of synaptosomal lipid composition were found. Synaptosomes isolated from hibernating Yakutian ground squirrel brain cortex maintained the cholesterol sphingomyelin, phosphatidylethanolamine, lysophosphatidylcholine, cardiolipin, phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylserine contents 2.5, 1.8, 2.6, 1.8, 1.6, and 1.3 times less, respectively, and the content of phosphatidylcholine twice as much as the one in summer season. The synaptosomal membrane lipid composition of summer animals was shown to be markedly different from that as hibernating ground squirrels and non-hibernating rodents. It is believed that phenotypic changes of synaptosomal membrane lipid composition in summer Yakutian ground squirrel are the important preparation step for hibernation. The phosphatidylethanolamine content was increased in torpor state compared with winter-active state and the molar ratio of cholesterol/phospholipids in synaptosomal membrane of winter torpor ground squirrels was lower than that in active winter and summer animals. These events were supposed to lead to increase of the synaptosomal membrane fluidity during torpor. Synaptosomes isolated from torpor animals have larger sizes and contain a greater number of synaptic vesicles on the synaptosomal profile area. The synaptosomal membrane lipid composition and synaptosome morphology were involved in phenotypic adaptation of Yakutian ground squirrel to hibernation.

  6. Use of burrow entrances to indicate densities of Townsend's ground squirrels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Horne, Beatrice; Schooley, R.L.; Knick, Steven T.; Olson, G.S.; Burnham, K.P.

    1997-01-01

    Counts of burrow entrances have been positively correlated with densities of semi-fossorial rodents and used as an index of densities. We evaluated their effectiveness in indexing densities of Townsend's ground squirrels (Spermophilus townsendii) in the Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area (SRBOPNCA), Idaho, by comparing burrow entrance densities to densities of ground squirrels estimated from livetrapping in 2 consecutive years over which squirrel populations declined by >75%. We did not detect a consistent relation between burrow entrance counts and ground squirrel density estimates within or among habitat types. Scatter plots indicated that burrow entrances had little predictive power at intermediate densities. Burrow entrance counts did not reflect the magnitude of a between-year density decline. Repeated counts of entrances late in the squirrels' active season varied in a manner that would be difficult to use for calibration of transects sampled only once during this period. Annual persistence of burrow entrances varied between habitats. Trained observers were inconsistent in assigning active-inactive status to entrances. We recommend that burrow entrance counts not be used as measures or indices of ground squirrel densities in shrubsteppe habitats, and that the method be verified thoroughly before being used in other habitats.

  7. Intensity-amplitude relationships in monkey event-related potentials: parallels to human augmenting-reducing responses.

    PubMed

    Pineda, J A; Holmes, T C; Foote, S L

    1991-06-01

    In human, the amplitudes of specific event-related potential (ERP) components can increase or decrease in response to increasing stimulus intensity depending on the location of the recording site. Large increases characterize components presumably generated by modality-specific sites, while smaller increases or even decreases are associated with those originating in associational areas. Comparable data from non-human primates, which would permit invasive studies of the neural substrates underlying these intensity-amplitude differences, are limited. To more fully characterize these relationships, auditory ERPs were recorded from chronically implanted epidural electrodes in 5 squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) in response to tones (500 Hz, 300 msec duration) of varying intensities (50, 60, 70, 80 dB SPL). Squirrel monkey ERPs recorded at Fz exhibited 3 peaks during the 200 msec post-stimulus interval. These peaks included a positivity (P1), followed by a negativity (N1), and then another positivity (P2). At posterior sites, the frontal P1-N1 configuration was recorded as an N1-P1 complex. At these sites, a small negativity (N2) preceded the last positive peak (P2). Changes in polarity were independent of reference site and posterior N1-P1 peaks exhibited latencies similar to those of the frontal P1-N1 components. Amplitudes at Fz, Cz, and Pz increased substantially with increasing stimulus intensity ('augmenting'). In contrast, only small increases or even decreases in amplitude ('reducing') were evident at T3 and T4. On the other hand, peak latencies decreased with higher stimulus intensities at most sites. The site-specific amplitude responses exhibited considerable temporal stability. In one subject, for example, similar 'augmenting' profiles were recorded at Fz in 8 sessions over a 6-month period. The topography of monkey intensity-amplitude response profiles, their temporal stability, and peak latency shifts resemble observations made in humans. The data show

  8. The potential role of strongyloides robustus on parasite-mediated competition between two species of flying squirrels (Glaucomys).

    PubMed

    Krichbaum, Kristle; Mahan, Carolyn G; Steele, Michael A; Turner, Gregory; Hudson, Peter J

    2010-01-01

    There is growing evidence that populations of the northern flying squirrel (Glaucomys sabrinus) are declining in the eastern United States, perhaps due to competition with the southern flying squirrel (Glaucomys volans). Potential causes include parasite-mediated or apparent competition from the shared intestinal nematode, Strongyloides robustus, which has been shown to detrimentally affect the northern flying squirrel but not the southern flying squirrel. To investigate this hypothesis, we conducted a preliminary study on the parasite community of both flying squirrel species from sites in Pennsylvania where the two species occur sympatrically and where G. sabrinus is now considered endangered at the state level. We compared these parasite communities with those from northern flying squirrels from northern New York where the southern flying squirrel is absent. We found eight species of gastrointestinal parasites (Pterygodermatites peromysci, Lemuricola sciuri, Syphacia thompsoni, Syphacia spp., Capillaria spp., Citellinema bifurcatum, Strogyloides robustus, and an unidentifiable cestode species) in both species of flying squirrels examined for our study. The parasite-mediated competition hypothesis was partially supported. For example, in Pennsylvania, S. robustus was overdispersed in southern flying squirrels, such that a small proportion of the hosts carried a large proportion of the worm population. In addition, we found S. robustus to be present in northern flying squirrels when the species were sympatric, but not where southern flying squirrels were absent in New York. However, there was no association between S. robustus and the body condition of flying squirrels. We detected a potential parasite community interaction, as S. robustus abundance was positively associated with P. peromysci. PMID:20090036

  9. Epidemic typhus in the United States associated with flying squirrels.

    PubMed

    Duma, R J; Sonenshine, D E; Bozeman, F M; Veazey, J M; Elisberg, B L; Chadwick, D P; Stocks, N I; McGill, T M; Miller, G B; MacCormack, J N

    1981-06-12

    Between July 1977 and January 1980, seven cases of sporadic, nonepidemic "epidemic" typhus (Rickettsia prowazekii) were discovered in Virginia, West Virginia, and North Carolina. The reservoir seemed to be the southern flying squirrel (Glaucomys volans), an animal indigenous to the eastern United States; however, the vector or mode of acquisition was not evident. Diagnosis was established principally through complement fixation, indirect immunofluorescence, and toxin neutralization tests. Patients' ages were 11 to 81 years. Most were white women. Six had abrupt onset of illness. Headaches, fever, myalgias, and exanthems were among the presenting complaints. The disease seemed milder than classic louse-born epidemic typhus, but in some instances, it was life-threatening. All patients responded to tetracycline or chloramphenicol. This entity probably is more common than reported, is difficult to recognize, and is produced by an organism seemingly identical to that producing louse-born epidemic typhus. PMID:6785459

  10. Do rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) perceive illusory motion?

    PubMed Central

    Agrillo, Christian; Gori, Simone; Beran, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    During the last decade, visual illusions have been used repeatedly to understand similarities and differences of visual perception of human and non-human animals. However, nearly all studies have focused only on illusions not related to motion perception and, to date, it is unknown whether non-human primates perceive any kind of motion illusion. In the present study we investigated whether rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) perceived one of the most popular motion illusions in humans, the Rotating Snake illusion (RSI). To this purpose, we set up four experiments. In Experiment 1 subjects initially were trained to discriminate static vs. dynamic arrays. Once reaching the learning criterion, they underwent probe trials in which we presented the RSI and a control stimulus identical in overall configuration with the exception that the order of the luminance sequence was changed in a way that no apparent motion is perceived by humans. The overall performance of monkeys indicated that they spontaneously classified RSI as a dynamic array. Subsequently, we tested adult humans in the same task with the aim of directly comparing the performance of human and non-human primates (Experiment 2). In Experiment 3 we found that monkeys can be successfully trained to discriminate between the RSI and a control stimulus. Experiment 4 showed that a simple change in luminance sequence in the two arrays could not explain the performance reported in Exp. 3. These results suggest that some rhesus monkeys display a human-like perception of this motion illusion, raising the possibility that the neurocognitive systems underlying motion perception may be similar between human and non-human primates. PMID:25812828

  11. Radiation response of the monkey kidney following contralateral nephrectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, M.E.C.; Stephens, L.C.; Gray, K.N.

    1994-09-30

    The long-term functional and morphologic responses of the hypertrophied monkey kidney after unilateral nephrectomy to fractionated irradiation were assessed. The right kidney of 13 adult female rhesus monkeys was removed. Twelve weeks after unilateral nephrectomy (UN) the remaining kidney received fractionated doses of {gamma}-rays ranging from 35.2 Gy/16 fractions (F) up to 44 Gy/20 F. Glomerular filtration rate, effective renal plasma flow, blood urea nitrogen, serum creatinine, and hematocrit values were measured up to 107 weeks postirradiation (PI). The monkeys were killed and the remaining kidneys were removed 107 weeks PI or earlier when end-stage renal failure was exhibited. Glomeruli were scored for the presence/absence of several pathologic features including increased intercapillary eosinophilic material (ICE), ecstatic capillaries, and thrombi. The relative proportion of renal cortex occupied by glomeruli, interstitium, normal tubules or abnormal tubules was determined using a Chalkley point grid. These quantal dose response data were analyzed using a logistic regression model. Irradiation of the remaining kidney in UN monkeys resulted in a dose-dependent reduction in renal function and anemia. Glomerular dysfunction preceded tubular dysfunction. Animals receiving 44 Gy all manifested progressive clinical renal failure. Conversely, those receiving {le} 39.6 Gy showed stable, albeit impaired, renal function for the duration of the observation period of 107 weeks. Morphologically, the incidence of ICE, ecstatic glomerular capillaries, thrombi, and periglomerular fibrosis was significantly dose-related (p < 0.005). A significant (p < 0.001) dose-related increase in the relative proportion of renal cortex occupied by abnormal tubules was indicative of tubular injury. A highly significant (p < 0.001) dose-dependent increase in the proportion of abnormal to normal tubules was also seen. 27 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Sexing the Sciuridae: a simple and accurate set of molecular methods to determine sex in tree squirrels, ground squirrels and marmots.

    PubMed

    Gorrell, Jamieson C; Boutin, Stan; Raveh, Shirley; Neuhaus, Peter; Côté, Steeve D; Coltman, David W

    2012-09-01

    We determined the sequence of the male-specific minor histocompatibility complex antigen (Smcy) from the Y chromosome of seven squirrel species (Sciuridae, Rodentia). Based on conserved regions inside the Smcy intron sequence, we designed PCR primers for sex determination in these species that can be co-amplified with nuclear loci as controls. PCR co-amplification yields two products for males and one for females that are easily visualized as bands by agarose gel electrophoresis. Our method provides simple and reliable sex determination across a wide range of squirrel species.

  13. [Phylogeny of genus Spermophilus and position of Alashan ground squirrel (Spermophilus alashanicus, Buchner, 1888) on phylogenetic tree of Paleartic short-tailed ground squirrels].

    PubMed

    Kapustina, S Yu; Brandler, O V; Adiya, Ya

    2015-01-01

    Phylogenetic relationships within a group of Paleartic short tailed ground squirrels (Spermophilus), recently defined as genus, are not sufficiently clear and need a critical revision. Interspecies hybridization, found in Eurasian Spermophilus, can affect the results of reconstruction of molecular phylogeny. Alashan ground squirrel position on the phylogenetic tree needs clarification. We analyzed eight nucleotide sequences of cytb gene of S. alashanicus and 127 sequences of other Spermophilus species form GenBank. S.alashanicus and S. dauricus close phylogenetic relationship, and their affinity to ancestral forms of the group are revealed. Monophyly of Colobotis subgenus was confirmed. Paraphyly of eastern and western forms of S. relictus was shown.

  14. A comparison of parasitic helminths and arthropods from two subspecies of fox squirrels (Sciurus niger) in Florida.

    PubMed

    Coyner, D F; Wooding, J B; Forrester, D J

    1996-07-01

    The faunas of parasitic helminths and arthropods of 87 Sherman's fox squirrels (Sciurus niger shermani) and 32 Big Cypress fox squirrels (Sciurus niger avicennia) collected from Florida (USA) over a 6-yr period (1988 to 1993) were compared. One acanthocephalan, one cestode, nine nematodes, one flea, three sucking lice, three mites, one tick, and one dipteran larva were identified. Citellinema bifurcatum and Physaloptera massino were new records for Florida and Gongylonema pulchrum, Neotrombicula whartoni, and Eushoengastia diversa were new host records. Three core species of nematodes (distributed widely, highly host specific, and very prevalent) were identified from Sherman's fox squirrels. These included Strongyloides robustus, Heligmodendrium hassalli, and C. bifurcatum, which were higher in prevalence and intensity in Sherman's fox squirrels than in Big Cypress fox squirrels. One core species of cestode (Raillietina bakeri) was collected from 32% of Sherman's fox squirrels, but was not observed in Big Cypress fox squirrels. The number of species, prevalences, intensities, and abundances of parasites from Sherman's fox squirrels were greater than those from Big Cypress fox squirrels.

  15. Inter-individual relationships in proboscis monkeys: a preliminary comparison with other non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Ikki; Tuuga, Augustine; Bernard, Henry; Furuichi, Takeshi

    2012-01-01

    This is the first report on inter-individual relationships within a one-male group of proboscis monkeys (Nasalis larvatus) based on detailed identification of individuals. From May 2005 to 2006, focal and ad libitum data of agonistic and grooming behaviour were collected in a forest along the Menanggul River, Sabah, Malaysia. During the study period, we collected over 1,968 h of focal data on the adult male and 1,539 h of focal data on the six females. Their social interactions, including agonistic and grooming behaviour, appeared to follow typical patterns reported for other colobines: the incidence of social interaction within groups is low. Of 39 agonistic events, 26 were displacement from sleeping places along the river, 6 were the α male threatening other monkeys to mediate quarrels between females and between females and juveniles, and 7 were displacement from feeding places. Although the agonistic behaviour matrix based on the 33 intra-group agonistic events (excluding events between adults and juveniles and between adults and infants) was indicative of non-significant linearity, there were some specific dominated individuals within the group of proboscis monkeys. Nonetheless, grooming behaviour among adult females within a group were not affected by the dominance hierarchy. This study also conducted initial comparisons of grooming patterns among proboscis monkeys and other primate species. On the basis of comparison of their grooming networks, similar grooming patterns among both-sex-disperse and male-philopatric/female-disperse species were detected. Because adult females in these species migrate to groups repeatedly, it may be difficult to establish the firm grooming exchange relationship for particular individuals within groups, unlike in female-philopatric/male-disperse species. However, grooming distribution patterns within groups among primate species were difficult to explain solely on the basis of their dispersal patterns. Newly immigrated females

  16. Demography of northern flying squirrels informs ecosystem management of western interior forests.

    PubMed

    Lehmkuhl, John F; Kistler, Keith D; Begley, James S; Boulanger, John

    2006-04-01

    We studied northern flying squirrel (Glaucomys sabrinus) demography in the eastern Washington Cascade Range to test hypotheses about regional and local abundance patterns and to inform managers of the possible effects of fire and fuels management on flying squirrels. We quantified habitat characteristics and squirrel density, population trends, and demography in three typical forest cover types over a four-year period. We had 2034 captures of flying squirrels over 41 000 trap nights from 1997 through 2000 and marked 879 squirrels for mark-recapture population analysis. Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forest appeared to be poorer habitat for flying squirrels than young or mature mixed-conifer forest. About 35% fewer individuals were captured in open pine forest than in dry mixed-conifer Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and grand fir (Abies grandis) forests. Home ranges were 85% larger in pine forest (4.6 ha) than in mixed-conifer forests (2.5 ha). Similarly, population density (Huggins estimator) in ponderosa pine forest was half (1.1 squirrels/ha) that of mixed-conifer forest (2.2 squirrels/ha). Tree canopy cover was the single best correlate of squirrel density (r = 0.77), with an apparent threshold of 55% canopy cover separating stands with low- from high-density populations. Pradel estimates of annual recruitment were lower in open pine (0.28) than in young (0.35) and mature (0.37) forest. High recruitment was most strongly associated with high understory plant species richness and truffle biomass. Annual survival rates ranged from 45% to 59% and did not vary among cover types. Survival was most strongly associated with understory species richness and forage lichen biomass. Maximum snow depth had a strong negative effect on survival. Rate of per capita increase showed a density-dependent response. Thinning and prescribed burning in ponderosa pine and dry mixed conifer forests to restore stable fire regimes and forest structure might reduce flying squirrel

  17. Chimpanzee counting and rhesus monkey ordinality judgments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumbaugh, Duane M.; Washburn, David A.; Hopkins, William D.; Savage-Rumbaugh, E. S.

    1991-01-01

    An investigation is conducted to address the questions of whether chimpanzees can count and whether rhesus monkeys can differentiate written numbers. One investigation demonstrates the capacity of a chimpanzee to produce a quantity of responses appropriate to a given Arabic numeral. Rhesus monkeys are shown to have the capability for making fine differentiations between quantities of pellets and Arabic numerals.

  18. Test monkeys anesthetized by routine procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Test monkeys are safely anesthetized for five minutes by confining them for less than six minutes in enclosures containing a controlled volume of ether. Thus the monkeys can be properly and safely positioned on test couches and fitted with electrodes or other devices prior to physiological tests.

  19. Metacognition in Monkeys during an Oculomotor Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middlebrooks, Paul G.; Sommer, Marc A.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated whether rhesus monkeys show evidence of metacognition in a reduced, visual oculomotor task that is particularly suitable for use in fMRI and electrophysiology. The 2-stage task involved punctate visual stimulation and saccadic eye movement responses. In each trial, monkeys made a decision and then made a bet. To earn…

  20. Prototype Abstraction by Monkeys ("Macaca Mulatta")

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, J. David; Redford, Joshua S.; Haas, Sarah M.

    2008-01-01

    The authors analyze the shape categorization of rhesus monkeys ("Macaca mulatta") and the role of prototype- and exemplar-based comparison processes in monkeys' category learning. Prototype and exemplar theories make contrasting predictions regarding performance on the Posner-Homa dot-distortion categorization task. Prototype theory--which…

  1. On Loss Aversion in Capuchin Monkeys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silberberg, Alan; Roma, Peter G.; Huntsberry, Mary E.; Warren-Boulton, Frederick R.; Sakagami, Takayuki; Ruggiero, Angela M.; Suomi, Stephen J.

    2008-01-01

    Chen, Lakshminarayanan, and Santos (2006) claim to show in three choice experiments that monkeys react rationally to price and wealth shocks, but, when faced with gambles, display hallmark, human-like biases that include loss aversion. We present three experiments with monkeys and humans consistent with a reinterpretation of their data that…

  2. Development of a rhesus monkey lung geometry model and application to particle deposition in comparison to humans

    SciTech Connect

    Asgharian, Bahman; Price, Owen; McClellan, Gene; Corley, Rick; Einstein, Daniel R.; Jacob, Richard E.; Harkema, Jack; Carey, Stephan A.; Schelegle, Edward; Hyde, Dallas; Kimbell, Julia S.; Miller, Frederick J.

    2012-11-01

    The exposure-dose-response characterization of an inhalation hazard established in an animal species needs to be translated to an equivalent characterization in humans relative to comparable doses or exposure scenarios. Here, the first geometry model of the conducting airways for rhesus monkeys is developed based upon CT images of the conducting airways of a 6-month-old male, rhesus monkey. An algorithm was developed for adding the alveolar region airways using published rhesus morphometric data. The resultant lung geometry model can be used in mechanistic particle or gaseous dosimetry models. Such dosimetry models require estimates of the upper respiratory tract volume of the animal and the functional residual capacity, as well as of the tidal volume and breathing frequency of the animal. The relationship of these variables to rhesus monkeys of differing body weights was established by synthesizing and modeling published data as well as modeling pulmonary function measurements on 121 rhesus control animals. Deposition patterns of particles up to 10 µm in size were examined for endotracheal and and up to 5 µm for spontaneous breathing in infant and young adult monkeys and compared to those for humans. Deposition fraction of respirable size particles was found to be higher in the conducting airways of infant and young adult rhesus monkeys compared to humans. Due to the filtering effect of the conducting airways, pulmonary deposition in rhesus monkeys was lower than that in humans. Finally, future research areas are identified that would either allow replacing assumptions or improving the newly developed lung model.

  3. Faecal egg counts from field experiment reveal density dependence in helminth fecundity: Strongyloides robustus infecting grey squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis).

    PubMed

    Romeo, Claudia; Wauters, L A; Cauchie, S; Martinoli, A; Matthysen, E; Saino, N; Ferrari, N

    2014-09-01

    Investigation of endo-macroparasite infections in living animals relies mostly on indirect methods aimed to detect parasite eggs in hosts' faeces. However, faecal flotation does not provide quantitative information on parasite loads, whereas faecal egg count (FEC) techniques may not give reliable estimates of parasite intensity, since egg production may be affected by density-dependent effects on helminth fecundity. We addressed this issue using Eastern grey squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis) and their gastrointestinal nematode Strongyloides robustus to assess the performance of coprological techniques and to investigate factors affecting parasite fecundity. We compared results of gut examination, flotation and McMaster FECs in 65 culled grey squirrels. Sensitivity and specificity of flotation were 81.2% (Confidence Interval, CI 54.3-95.9%) and 85.7% (CI 72.7-94.1%), respectively, resulting in low positive predictive values when infection prevalence is low. Individual parasite fecundity (no. of eggs/adult female worm) was negatively affected by S. robustus intensity, leading to a non-linear relationship between parasite load and eggs/gram of faeces (EPG). As a consequence, whereas flotation may be a valid method to perform the first screening of infection status, FECs are not a reliable method to estimate S. robustus intensity, since diverse values of EPG may correspond to the same number of parasites. Neither the amount of analysed faeces nor the season had any effect on EPG, indicating that the observed reduction in helminth fecundity is likely caused exclusively by density-dependent processes such as competition among worms or host immune response.

  4. Thyroid status of female rhesus monkeys and preliminary information on impact of perchlorate administration.

    PubMed

    Ozpinar, Aysel; Golub, Mari S; Poppenga, Robert H; Blount, Benjamin C; Gillespie, Jerry R

    2011-07-01

    Thyroid status was assessed in adult female rhesus monkey breeders at the California National Primate Research Center at the beginning of the breeding season. The 95% confidence intervals for thyrotropin (TSH), thyroxine (T(4)) and triiodothyronine (T(3)) (n = 66-80) were similar to those previously reported in smaller samples of macaque monkeys. Based on human criteria, 10 of 80 monkeys (12%) were hypothyroid (TSH > 2.0 µIU/mL). Because hypothyroxinaemia can be a risk factor in pregnancy, T(4) status was compared with past breeding history, breeding outcome for that season and general health records in a subset of 42 breeders. Age, weight and parity did not differ between monkeys in the lowest T(4) quartile as compared with those in the upper three quartiles. However, T(4) concentrations were significantly associated with the number of missed menstrual cycles during the previous breeding season. In additional work, three healthy lactating rhesus monkeys were given three different doses of environmental contaminant and thyroid iodine uptake inhibitor, ammonium perchlorate (0.006, 0.34, 12.8 mg/kg/day, respectively) in food for two weeks. Thyroid status variables (TSH, T(4), T(3), thyroid radioactive iodine uptake) were then measured. In the monkey receiving the highest perchlorate dose, iodine uptake was suppressed relative to baseline. The study shows the availability of tools to study thyroid status in rhesus monkeys, the variability of thyroid status in the breeder colony and the potential ability of environmental factors to influence thyroid status. PMID:21669905

  5. Depression and altered serum lipids in cynomolgus monkeys consuming a Western diet.

    PubMed

    Chilton, Floyd H; Lee, Tammy C; Willard, Stephanie L; Ivester, Priscilla; Sergeant, Susan; Register, Thomas C; Shively, Carol A

    2011-08-01

    Research over the past 15 years has suggested a high comorbidity of depression and coronary heart disease (CHD). However the mechanisms responsible for this relationship are poorly understood. This study was designed to examine the relationships between depressive behaviors and concentrations of circulating lipids and lipid signaling molecules that may be common to both CHD and depression in a cohort of cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) consuming a 'Western' diet, enriched with saturated fat and cholesterol. Socially-housed adult female cynomolgus monkeys (n=36) were fed the Western diet for 27 months and depressive behavior was recorded weekly. Body weight, body mass index and circulating cholesterol profiles were measured in all animals, and fatty acids (FA) and FA-based signaling molecules were measured in the 6 least and 6 most depressed monkeys. Monkeys consuming the Western diet exhibited a broad range of percent time spent in depressive behavior. The percent time spent depressed was positively correlated with total plasma and LDL cholesterol and negatively correlated with HDL cholesterol. Despite being leaner, depressed monkeys had higher concentrations of monounsaturated fats (C16:1 and C17:1), a higher ω6/ω3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) ratio and higher concentrations of omega-6 (ω6) PUFAs, particularly C18:2ω6 and C20:3ω6. FA ratios suggest that stearoyl CoA desaturase 1 activity was increased in depressed monkeys. Depressed female cynomolgus monkeys had elevated concentrations of serum lipids and lipid signaling molecules that are typically associated with obesity, insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease, which may account in part for the comorbidity of depression and CHD.

  6. The squirrel as a rodent model of the human visual system.

    PubMed

    Van Hooser, Stephen D; Nelson, Sacha B

    2006-01-01

    Over the last 50 years, studies of receptive fields in the early mammalian visual system have identified many classes of response properties in brain areas such as retina, lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN), and primary visual cortex (V1). Recently, there has been significant interest in understanding the cellular and network mechanisms that underlie these visual responses and their functional architecture. Small mammals like rodents offer many advantages for such studies, because they are appropriate for a wide variety of experimental techniques. However, the traditional rodent models, mice and rats, do not rely heavily on vision and have small visual brain areas. Squirrels are highly visual rodents that may be excellent model preparations for understanding mechanisms of function and disease in the human visual system. They use vision for navigating in their environment, predator avoidance, and foraging for food. Visual brain areas such as LGN, V1, superior colliculus, and pulvinar are particularly large and well elaborated in the squirrel, and the squirrel has several extrastriate cortical areas lateral to V1. Unlike many mammals, most squirrel species are diurnal with cone-dominated retinas, similar to the primate fovea, and have excellent dichromatic color vision that is mediated by green and blue cones. Owing to their larger size, squirrels are physiologically more robust than mice and rats under anesthesia, and some hibernating species are particularly tolerant of hypoxia that occurs during procedures such as brain slicing. Finally, many basic anatomical and physiological properties in the early visual system of squirrel have now been described, permitting investigations of cellular mechanisms. In this article, we review four decades of anatomical, behavioral, and physiological studies in squirrel and make comparisons with other species. PMID:17020632

  7. Differential Estimates of Southern Flying Squirrel (Glaucomys volans) Population Structure Based on Capture Method.

    SciTech Connect

    Laves, Kevin S.; Loeb, Susan C.

    2006-01-01

    ABSTRACT.—It is commonly assumed that population estimates derived from trapping small mammals are accurate and unbiased or that estimates derived from different capture methods are comparable. We captured southern flying squirrels (Glaucomys volans) using two methods to study their effect on red-cockaded woodpecker (Picoides borealis) reproductive success. Southern flying squirrels were captured at and removed from 30 red-cockaded woodpecker cluster sites during March to July 1994 and 1995 using Sherman traps placed in a grid encompassing a red-cockaded woodpecker nest tree and by hand from red-cockaded woodpecker cavities. Totals of 195 (1994) and 190 (1995) red-cockaded woodpecker cavities were examined at least three times each year. Trappability of southern flying squirrels in Sherman traps was significantly greater in 1995 (1.18%; 22,384 trap nights) than in 1994 (0.42%; 20,384 trap nights), and capture rate of southern flying squirrels in cavities was significantly greater in 1994 (22.7%; 502 cavity inspections) than in 1995 (10.8%; 555 cavity inspections). However, more southern flying squirrels were captured per cavity inspection than per Sherman trap night in both years. Male southern flying squirrels were more likely to be captured from cavities than in Sherman traps in 1994, but not in 1995. Both male and female juveniles were more likely to be captured in cavities than in traps in both years. In 1994 males in reproductive condition were more likely to be captured in cavities than in traps and in 1995 we captured significantly more reproductive females in cavities than in traps. Our data suggest that population estimates based solely on one trapping method may not represent true population size or structure of southern flying squirrels.

  8. Regulation of glucokinase activity in liver of hibernating ground squirrel Spermophilus undulatus.

    PubMed

    Khu, L Ya; Storey, K B; Rubtsov, A M; Goncharova, N Yu

    2014-07-01

    The kinetic properties of glucokinase (GLK) from the liver of active and hibernating ground squirrels Spermophilus undulatus have been studied. Entrance of ground squirrels into hibernation from their active state is accompanied by a sharp decrease in blood glucose (Glc) level (from 14 to 2.9 mM) and with a significant (7-fold) decrease of GLK activity in the liver cytoplasm. Preparations of native GLK practically devoid of other molecular forms of hexokinase were obtained from the liver of active and hibernating ground squirrels. The dependence of GLK activity upon Glc concentration for the enzyme from active ground squirrel liver showed a pronounced sigmoid character (Hill coefficient, h=1.70 and S0.5=6.23 mM; the experiments were conducted at 25°C in the presence of enzyme stabilizers, K+ and DTT). The same dependence of enzyme activity on Glc concentration was found for GLK from rat liver. However, on decreasing the temperature to 2°C (simulation of hibernation conditions), this dependency became almost hyperbolic (h=1.16) and GLK affinity for substrate was reduced (S0.5=23 mM). These parameters for hibernating ground squirrels (body temperature 5°C) at 25°C were found to be practically equal to the corresponding values obtained for GLK from the liver of active animals (h=1.60, S0.5=9.0 mM, respectively); at 2°C sigmoid character was less expressed and affinity for Glc was drastically decreased (h=1.20, S0.5=45 mM). The calculations of GLK activity in the liver of hibernating ground squirrels based on enzyme kinetic characteristics and seasonal changes in blood Glc concentrations have shown that GLK activity in the liver of hibernating ground squirrels is decreased about 5500-fold.

  9. California ground squirrel (Spermophilus beecheyi) defenses against rattlesnake venom digestive and hemostatic toxins.

    PubMed

    Biardi, James E; Chien, David C; Coss, Richard G

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that some mammals are able to neutralize venom from snake predators. California ground squirrels (Spermophilus beecheyi) show variation among populations in their ability to bind venom and minimize damage from northern Pacific rattlesnakes (Crotalus oreganus), but the venom toxins targeted by resistance have not been investigated. Four California ground squirrel populations, selected for differences in local density or type of rattlesnake predators, were assayed for their ability to neutralize digestive and hemostatic effects of venom from three rattlesnake species. In Douglas ground squirrels (S. b. douglasii), we found that animals from a location where snakes are common showed greater inhibition of venom metalloprotease and hemolytic activity than animals from a location where snakes are rare. Effects on general proteolysis were not different. Douglas ground squirrels also reduced the metalloprotease activity of venom from sympatric northern Pacific rattlesnakes (C. o. oreganus) more than the activity of venom from allopatric western diamondback rattlesnakes (C. atrox), but enhanced the fibrinolysis of sympatric venom almost 1.8 times above baseline levels. Two Beechey ground squirrel (S. b. beecheyi) populations had similar inhibition of venoms from northern and southern Pacific rattlesnakes (C. o. helleri), despite differences between the populations in the locally prevalent predator. However, the venom toxins inhibited by Beechey squirrels varied among venom from Pacific rattlesnake subspecies, and between these venoms and venom from allopatric western diamondback rattlesnakes. Blood plasma from Beechey squirrels showed highest inhibition of metalloprotease activity of northern Pacific rattlesnake venom, general proteolytic activity and hemolysis of southern Pacific rattlesnake venom, and hemolysis by allopatric western diamondback venom. These results reveal previously cryptic variation in venom activity against resistant prey

  10. California ground squirrel (Spermophilus beecheyi) defenses against rattlesnake venom digestive and hemostatic toxins.

    PubMed

    Biardi, James E; Chien, David C; Coss, Richard G

    2005-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that some mammals are able to neutralize venom from snake predators. California ground squirrels (Spermophilus beecheyi) show variation among populations in their ability to bind venom and minimize damage from northern Pacific rattlesnakes (Crotalus oreganus), but the venom toxins targeted by resistance have not been investigated. Four California ground squirrel populations, selected for differences in local density or type of rattlesnake predators, were assayed for their ability to neutralize digestive and hemostatic effects of venom from three rattlesnake species. In Douglas ground squirrels (S. b. douglasii), we found that animals from a location where snakes are common showed greater inhibition of venom metalloprotease and hemolytic activity than animals from a location where snakes are rare. Effects on general proteolysis were not different. Douglas ground squirrels also reduced the metalloprotease activity of venom from sympatric northern Pacific rattlesnakes (Crotalus oreganus oreganus) more than the activity of venom from allopatric western diamondback rattlesnakes (C. atrox), but enhanced fibrinolysis of sympatric venom almost 1.8 times above baseline levels. Two Beechey ground squirrel (S. b. beecheyi) populations had similar inhibition of venoms from northern and southern Pacific rattlesnakes (C. o. helleri), despite differences between the populations in the locally prevalent predator. However, the venom toxins inhibited by Beechey squirrels did vary among venom from Pacific rattlesnake subspecies, and between these venoms and venom from allopatric western diamondback rattlesnakes. Blood plasma from Beechey squirrels showed highes