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Sample records for adult striped bass

  1. Posttournament survival and dispersal of adult striped bass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Young, S.P.; Isely, J.J.

    2006-01-01

    We conducted a telemetry study from November 2004 to June 2005 at J. Strom Thurmond Reservoir in South Carolina and Georgia to quantify posttournament survival of striped bass and their dispersal from tournament weigh-in sites. During November-December 2004, 30 adult striped bass weighing 1.0-10.0 kg were angled, held in "striped bass tube" live-holding systems for 2-5 h, transported to a predetermined weigh-in and release site, and surgically implanted with telemetry transmitters. All striped bass survived transport, recovered from the surgical procedure, and were immediately released. The postrelease survival rate after 120 d was 87%. Surviving striped bass dispersed from the release site within 2-9 d. Fifty-four percent returned to their capture sites. Capture, holding, displacement, and weigh-in appeared to have no long-term adverse affects on behavior. Live release of striped bass may now be a viable option after tournaments during periods of cool water temperatures. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2006.

  2. The fundamental thermal niche of adult landlocked striped bass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bettoli, P.W.

    2005-01-01

    Researchers have described the temperatures selected by landlocked striped bass Morone saxatilis in different locales throughout the USA. However, seasonally low concentrations of dissolved oxygen (DO) in many systems prevented striped bass from using the cool waters (<22??C) they may have preferred. In Melton Hill Reservoir, a 92-km-long impoundment on the Clinch River in east Tennessee, 15 adult striped bass were tagged with temperature-sensing radio tags and tracked for an average of 418 d in 1999-2000. Cold, hypolimnetic discharges from an upstream dam and heated discharge from a steam-generating electric facility near the midpoint of this run-of-the-river reservoir provided a broad range of temperatures in most seasons, and hypoxic habitats were uncommon even during stratification. The mean temperature occupied by striped bass varied seasonally (repeated-measures analysis of variance, P < 0.0001) and was highest in summer (17.5??C), intermediate in spring and fall (15.4-16.9??C), and lowest in winter (13.0??C). The mean and modal temperatures occupied during the growing season (May-October 1999) were 17.5??C and 19.0??C, respectively; 30% of the observations were between 9??C and 15??C. These data indicate that the fundamental thermal niche of adult landlocked striped bass may be lower than literature estimates. These results also represent the first unbiased field estimates of the influence of season on the thermal ecology of adult striped bass. The thermal characteristics of habitats considered optimal in habitat suitability index models for adult landlocked striped bass (i.e., 18-24??C) should be revised to include cooler waters. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2005.

  3. Temperature, hypoxia, and mycobacteriosis: effects on adult striped bass Morone saxatilis metabolic performance.

    PubMed

    Lapointe, Dominique; Vogelbein, Wolfgang K; Fabrizio, Mary C; Gauthier, David T; Brill, Richard W

    2014-02-19

    Mycobacteriosis, a chronic bacterial disease of fishes, is prevalent in adult striped bass from Chesapeake Bay (USA). Although environmental factors may play a role in disease expression, the interaction between the disease and environmental stress remains unexplored. We therefore examined the individual and interactive effects of elevated temperature, hypoxia, and mycobacteriosis on the metabolism of wild-caught adult striped bass from Chesapeake Bay using respirometry. Because the spleen is the primary target organ of mycobacteriosis in striped bass, we hypothesized that the disease interferes with the ability of fish to increase their hematocrit in the face of increasing oxygen demands. We determined standard metabolic rate (SMR), maximum metabolic rate under normoxia (MMRN), critical oxygen saturation (S(crit)), and MMR under hypoxia (3 mg O(2) l-1: MMR(H)) for healthy and visibly diseased fish (i.e. exhibiting skin lesions indicative of mycobacteriosis). Measurements were taken at a temperature within the preferred thermal range (20°C) and at an elevated temperature (28°C) considered stressful to striped bass. In addition, we calculated aerobic scope (AS(N) = MMR(N) - SMR, AS(H) = MMR(H) - SMR) and factorial scope (FS(N) = MMR(N) SMR-1, FS(H) = MMR(H) SMR-1). SMR increased with increasing temperature, and hypoxia reduced MMR, AS, and FS. Mycobacteriosis alone did not affect either MMR(N) or MMR(H). However, elevated temperature affected the ability of diseased striped bass to tolerate hypoxia (S(crit)). Overall, our data indicate that striped bass performance under hypoxia is impaired, and that elevated water temperatures, hypoxia, and severe mycobacteriosis together reduce aerobic scope more than any of these stressors acting alone. We conclude that the scope for activity of diseased striped bass in warm hypoxic waters is significantly compromised. PMID:24553417

  4. Temperature, hypoxia, and mycobacteriosis: effects on adult striped bass Morone saxatilis metabolic performance.

    PubMed

    Lapointe, Dominique; Vogelbein, Wolfgang K; Fabrizio, Mary C; Gauthier, David T; Brill, Richard W

    2014-02-19

    Mycobacteriosis, a chronic bacterial disease of fishes, is prevalent in adult striped bass from Chesapeake Bay (USA). Although environmental factors may play a role in disease expression, the interaction between the disease and environmental stress remains unexplored. We therefore examined the individual and interactive effects of elevated temperature, hypoxia, and mycobacteriosis on the metabolism of wild-caught adult striped bass from Chesapeake Bay using respirometry. Because the spleen is the primary target organ of mycobacteriosis in striped bass, we hypothesized that the disease interferes with the ability of fish to increase their hematocrit in the face of increasing oxygen demands. We determined standard metabolic rate (SMR), maximum metabolic rate under normoxia (MMRN), critical oxygen saturation (S(crit)), and MMR under hypoxia (3 mg O(2) l-1: MMR(H)) for healthy and visibly diseased fish (i.e. exhibiting skin lesions indicative of mycobacteriosis). Measurements were taken at a temperature within the preferred thermal range (20°C) and at an elevated temperature (28°C) considered stressful to striped bass. In addition, we calculated aerobic scope (AS(N) = MMR(N) - SMR, AS(H) = MMR(H) - SMR) and factorial scope (FS(N) = MMR(N) SMR-1, FS(H) = MMR(H) SMR-1). SMR increased with increasing temperature, and hypoxia reduced MMR, AS, and FS. Mycobacteriosis alone did not affect either MMR(N) or MMR(H). However, elevated temperature affected the ability of diseased striped bass to tolerate hypoxia (S(crit)). Overall, our data indicate that striped bass performance under hypoxia is impaired, and that elevated water temperatures, hypoxia, and severe mycobacteriosis together reduce aerobic scope more than any of these stressors acting alone. We conclude that the scope for activity of diseased striped bass in warm hypoxic waters is significantly compromised.

  5. Distribution and habitat selection of adult striped bass, Morone saxatilis (Walbaum), in Watts Bar Reservoir, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Cheek, T.E.; Van den Avyle, M.J.; Coutant, C.C.

    1983-09-01

    Biotelemetry was used to determine seasonal distribution patterns and habitat preferences and to evaluate factors affecting movements of adult striped bass (Morone saxatilis) in Watts Bar Reservoir, Tennessee. Distribution and movement of striped bass were strongly influenced by water temperature. Mean distances moved per day during spring and winter were similar but significantly higher than rates for summer and fall. During spring, striped bass moved into headwater areas as water temperatures approached those associated with spawning (15/sup 0/ to 19/sup 0/C). Brief habitation of the main body of the reservoir was noted during summer prior to movement to cool-water refuges located in the Clinch River and Tennessee River arms. No striped bass were located in the main body of the reservoir in early fall when temperatures ranged from 24/sup 0/ to 25/sup 0/C. Fish were located in thermal refuges during this period and occupied water temperatures averaging 20.5/sup 0/C. The only extended period of striped bass habitation of the main body of the reservoir occurred in winter, when the fish occupied a mean water temperature of 11/sup 0/C. Although distribution was restricted during warmer seasons, individual fish moved freely throughout the 116-km-long reservoir at other times, indicating that subpopulations did not exist. 64 references.

  6. Diel behavior of adult striped bass using tailwater habitat as summer refuge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Young, S.P.; Isely, J.J.

    2007-01-01

    General patterns of summer diel distribution and movement were identified for adult striped bass Morone saxatilis using tailwater habitat influenced by the diel operation cycle of a hydroelectric dam during the summers of 2003 and 2004. Striped bass distribution within the tailwater was similar during each diel-tracking event and across both summers. The majority of fish remained within the tailwater the entire summer; however, some made periodic excursions to and from the tailwater throughout the summer. Further, most striped bass were located within 0.5 km of Richard B. Russell Dam during all stages of operation on all occasions - probably because of the constant availability of optimal habitat during all three stages of operation on all diel-tracking events. The diel cycle of dam operation, which included pumped storage during each summer, did not degrade tailwater habitat below optimal conditions, according to summer habitat suitability index values for inland adult striped bass. Movement was significantly higher during hydroelectric generation operations than during no-generation and pumped storage periods in summer 2003; this difference was not apparent during summer 2004. Mean absolute movement peaked during hydroelectric generation on six of eight diel-tracking events. During both summers, movement was directed up-reservoir during no-generation and generation periods and down-reservoir during pumped storage. Mean total daily movement rates ranged from 0.59 to 4.04 km/d and were greater than those previously estimated from bimonthly sampling for this population. Total daily movement rate peaked during the first tracking event each summer and then declined as summer progressed. These findings suggest that hydroelectric discharges affect adult striped bass behavior, but the effects are not adverse as long as habitat is not degraded by hydroelectric facility operations. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2007.

  7. Temporal and spatial estimates of adult striped bass mortality from telemetry and transmitter return data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Young, S.P.; Isely, J.J.

    2004-01-01

    Estimates of total mortality, fishing mortality, and natural mortality in the fishery for the adult striped bass Morone saxatilis in J. Strom Thurmond Reservoir, South Carolina-Georgia, were determined from long-term radiotelemetry data and high-reward radio transmitter return data using catch curve analyses. Annual total mortality rates were 0.81 ?? 0.06 (mean ?? SE) for year 1 (July 1999-June 2000) and 0.42 ?? 0.04 for year 2 (July 2000-June 2001). We observed that the force of fishing was much greater than the force of natural death on total mortality in this fishery. Total exploitation of all implanted striped bass over the 2-year study period was 48%. Fishing mortality rates were 0.67 ?? 0.04 for year 1 and 0.33 ?? 0.02 for year 2, and natural mortality rates were 0.14 ?? 0.02 for year 1 and 0.09 ?? 0.02 for year 2. We also identified seasonal increases in total and fishing mortality rates from July to September. Fishing mortality was highest temporally and spatially during late spring and late summer near the tailrace below Richard B. Russell Dam owing to high angling pressure for striped bass while the fish were congregated in summer refugia. Natural mortality occurred only during mid to late summer in the middle section of the reservoir. These deaths were attributed to striped bass's becoming trapped in unsuitable summer habitat in the lower and middle sections of the reservoir. Mean postsurgery growth from 15 harvested study fish at large for a mean of 1.16 ?? 0.81 years was estimated to be 1.71 ?? 0.73 kg/year. Internal implantation of telemetry devices appeared to have no negative effect on long-term growth, health, and survival of adult striped bass and did not bias mortality and survival estimates.

  8. Mycobacteriosis in striped bass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Panek, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Mycobacteriosis is a bacterial disease in which striped bass (rockfish) may be disfigured as a result of skin ulcers and internal lesions. The bass may also be skinny or in extremely poor condition due to the chronic nature of this wasting disease. Stripers are a highly prized target species for both recreational anglers and commercial fishermen. As such, the economic impact of diseased and devalued fish could be significant. In addition, some of the mycobacteria that commonly infect fishes can cause infections in people and therefore are a human health concern. The total extent to which the disease is occurring along the Eastern seaboard is unknown but the disease has been reported from stripers taken from North Carolina to New York. During 1998-99, skin ulcers attributed to mycobacterial infection were observed in up to 28% of the striped bass from some Virginia tributaries of the Chesapeake Bay. Data obtained during 2002—2003 from fish harvested in Virginia and Maryland waters indicated that, at least in some areas, over 80% of striped bass may be infected with the mycobacteria that are associated with the disease. Given the persistence over the last 8 years of this mycobacteriosis outbreak, this does not appear to be a short-term problem.

  9. Distribution and migration of adult striped bass in Lake Whitney, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farquhar, B.W.; Gutreuter, S.

    1989-01-01

    Thirty adult (3.2a??8.6 kg) striped bass Morone saxatilis were tagged with ultrasonic transmitters and tracked for up to 475 d in 9,510-hectare Lake Whitney, a Texas reservoir, to determine seasonal distribution, migration patterns, and water temperatures occupied. Striped bass distribution in summer was limited to an area near the dam, where they survived temperatures as high as 29.0A?C. Tagged fish generally were found in the coolest water available (27.0a??29.0A?C) that contained adequate dissolved oxygen (>4.0 mg/L) in summer and occupied the warmest water (7.4a??8.8A?C) in winter. For the rest of the year, the fish were distributed throughout available water temperatures. Beginning in autumn, most striped bass moved up the reservoir to and into the main tributaries and remained there until spring, when they returned to the main reservoir. No spawning run up main tributaries was observed in either of the two study years, possibly due to low inflows. Individual fish displayed a preference for certain areas to which they returned yearly.

  10. Environmental quality for striped bass

    SciTech Connect

    Coutant, C. C.

    1980-01-01

    Effects of environmental changes on the quality of life for striped bass populations can be evaluated objectively with modern procedures of environmental risk analysis. Such analysis requires knowledge of the sources of risk in the context of environmental requirements of the species. A prime environmental requirement of striped bass appears to be a suitable thermal structure that accommodates the hereditary thermal niche, which changes with age. Strong thermal preferences had promoted striped bass survival in the pristine natural estuaries of eastern North America, but they may increase risks to the species in some new environments and in native ones that are altered by man. The magnitude and likelihood of risks for striped bass from many pollutants and physical changes (structures or water flow, for example) depend upon the fish's thermally controlled distribution. The importance of a species' thermal niche and of the thermal structure of aquatic environments for population success is only beginning to be recognized and included in risk assessments.

  11. Benzocaine as an anesthetic for striped bass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gilderhus, Philip A.; Lemm, Carol A.; Woods, L. Curry, III

    1991-01-01

    Benzocaine was tested as an anesthetic on juvenile and mature adult striped bass (Morone saxatilis ). Concentrations of 55 mg/L at 22 degree C to 80 mg/L at 11 degree C effectively anesthetized fish in about 3 min. Recovery was more rapid as temperature increased. Fish survived concentrations of twice the effective concentration and exposure times up to 60 min at the effective concentration. Striped bass required higher concentrations for anesthetization than had been previously demonstrated for salmonid fishes, but safety margins for both concentration and exposure time were wider than for the salmonids.

  12. Maryland striped bass: recruitment declining below replacement

    SciTech Connect

    Goodyear, C.P.; Cohen, J.E.; Christensen, S.W.

    1985-01-01

    A mathematical technique was developed to examined interrelationships among first-year survival rates, adult fecundity, and adult survival of striped bass Morone saxatilis based on indices of year-class strength. Application of this technique to striped bass in Maryland waters of the Chesapeake Bay provided evidence for reduced survival in the life cycle. If adult fecundity and survival have remained constant, first-year survival declined significantly from 1969 to 1983, and averaged less than that needed for replacement for the last 10 years. Treatment of the individual spawning grounds separately indicated that the downward trend in survival for the pooled data was the result of declines in the upper bay and, to a lesser extent, in the Choptank River. Alternatively, if first-year survival and adult fecundity were assumed to have remained constant, an annual decline of about 1.9% in adult survival would have been required to produce the observed trend in the pooled year-class data. This would be consistent with increased fishing mortality and implies declining recruitment because of declining stock size. Continuing declines in first-year or adult survival would eliminate the Maryland striped bass stock and the fishery it supports. Conversely, an increase in adult survival could offset of the unknown factor or factors responsible for the apparent decline in first-year survival. 25 references, 1 figure, 1 table.

  13. Transcriptome annotation and marker discovery in white bass (Morone chrysops) and striped bass (Morone saxatilis)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Striped bass and white bass are the parental species of the hybrid striped bass (white bass, Morone chrysops X striped bass, M. saxatilis), which is a major U.S. aquaculture species. Currently, genomic resources for striped bass/white bass and its hybrid lag behind those of other aquaculture species...

  14. Major diseases of striped bass and redfish.

    PubMed

    Plumb, J A

    1991-01-01

    Diseases of striped bass, their hybrids, and redfish (red drum) are important constraints to the culture of these two species. Since striped bass have been cultured for years the organisms that cause most diseases of these fish are well known, but very little specific disease information exists for redfish. However, it appears that the organisms that cause diseases of striped bass and redfish do not differ greatly from those of other fishes. The most significant viral disease is lymphocystis, but infectious pancreatic necrosis has occurred in striped bass. Vibriosis (Vibrio sp.) and motile Aeromonas septicemia (Aeromonas hydrophila) are the most frequently encountered bacterial diseases. Both species of fish are affected by fungi (usually Saprolegnia) when the fish are injured or stressed. Amyloodinium ocellatum is the most serious protozoan that infects striped bass and redfish, but the other common protozoans (Trichodina, Ichthyophthirius, Cryptocaron, etc.) have also been reported. Treatment of any of these diseases is a problem because of the absence of approved drugs or chemicals for use on striped bass or redfish. The most common therapeutics used on striped bass and redfish are copper sulfate, formalin, salt (in freshwater) and Terramycin.

  15. Spatial and temporal diet patterns of subadult and small adult striped bass in Massachusetts estuaries: Data, a synthesis, and trends across scales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ferry, K.H.; Mather, Martha E.

    2012-01-01

    Subadult and small adult (375–475 mm total length) striped bass Morone saxatilis are abundant and represent an important component of the recovered U.S. Atlantic coast stocks. However, little is known about these large aggregations of striped bass during their annual foraging migrations to New England. A quantitative understanding of trends in the diets of subadult and small adult migrants is critical to research and management. Because of the complexity of the Massachusetts coast, we were able to compare diets at multiple spatial, temporal, and taxonomic scales and evaluate which of these provided the greatest insights into the foraging patterns of this size of fish. Specifically, during spring through autumn, we quantified the diets of 797 migratory striped bass collected from 13 Massachusetts estuaries distributed among three geographic regions in two biogeographic provinces. Our data provided three useful results. First, subadult and young adult striped bass ate a season-specific mixture of fish and invertebrates. For example, more juvenile Atlantic herring Clupea harengus were eaten in spring than in summer or autumn, more juvenile Atlantic menhaden Brevoortia tyrannus were eaten in autumn than in spring or summer, amphipods were eaten primarily in the southern biogeographic province, and shrimp Crangon sp. were eaten in all locations and seasons. Second, examining diets by season was essential because of the temporal variability in striped bass prey. Grouping prey by fish and invertebrates revealed the potential for predictable differences in growth across geographic locations and seasons, based on the output from simple bioenergetics simulations. Third, of the three spatial scales examined, region provided the most quantitative and interpretable ecological trends. Our results demonstrate the utility of comparing multiple scales to evaluate the best way to depict diet trends in a migrating predator that seasonally uses different geographic locations.

  16. Striped bass and the management of cooling lakes. [Morone saxatilis

    SciTech Connect

    Coutant, C.C.

    1981-01-01

    Striped bass, Morone saxatilis, is being introduced to freshwater reservoirs, some of which are used for power plant cooling. The thermal niche of this fish species changes with age and greatly influences its success. Juveniles, which prefer and grow optimally near 24 to 26/sup 0/C (75-80/sup 0/F), may thrive in cooling lakes. However, adults, which seek temperatures near 20/sup 0/C (68/sup 0/F) and exhibit poor growth and survival above 22/sup 0/C (72/sup 0/F), may not survive summer conditions. Striped bass management in cooling lakes should be guided by these thermal requirements.

  17. Striped bass: environmental risks in fresh and salt water

    SciTech Connect

    Coutant, C.C.

    1985-01-01

    At the 112th Annual meeting of the American Fisheries Society (AFS) at Hilton Head Island, South Carolina, the society held a 1-day symposium Striped Bass: Environmental Risks in Fresh and Salt Water. This issue of the Transactions contains some of the papers from that symposium. This symposium explored several hypotheses about sources of environmental risks that could cause problems for striped bass populations: (1) habitat squeeze on adults stemming from their thermal and dissolved oxygen requirements; (2) stress from toxic materials; and (3) meteorological controls of living space and food. A nonenvironmental factor, fishing pressure, also was raised as an alternative hypothesis.

  18. Testing the thermal-niche oxygen-squeeze hypothesis for estuarine striped bass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kraus, Richard T.; Secor, D.H.; Wingate, Rebecca L.

    2015-01-01

    In many stratified coastal ecosystems, conceptual and bioenergetics models predict seasonal reduction in quality and quantity of fish habitat due to high temperatures and hypoxia. We tested these predictions using acoustic telemetry of 2 to 4 kg striped bass (Morone saxatilis Walbaum) and high-resolution spatial water quality sampling in the Patuxent River, a sub-estuary of the Chesapeake Bay, during 2008 and 2009. Striped bass avoided hypoxic (dissolved oxygen ≤2 mg·l−1) subpycnocline waters, but frequently occupied habitats with high temperatures (>25 °C) in the summer months, as cooler habitats were typically not available. Using traditional concepts of the seasonal thermal-niche oxygen-squeeze, most of the Patuxent estuary would beconsidered unsuitable habitat for adult striped bass during summer. Application of a bioenergetics model revealed that habitats selected by striped bass during summer would support positive growth rates assuming fish could feed at one-half ofmaximum consumption. Occupancy of the estuary during summer by striped bass in this study was likely facilitated by sufficient prey and innate tolerance of high temperatures by sub-adult fish of the size range that we tagged. Our results help extend the thermalniche oxygen-squeeze hypothesis to native populations of striped bass in semi-enclosed coastal systems. Tolerance of for supraoptimal temperatures in our study supports recent suggestions by others that the thermal-niche concept for striped bass should be revised to include warmer temperatures.

  19. Sensitivity of juvenile striped bass to chemicals used in aquaculture

    SciTech Connect

    Bills, T.D.; Marking, L.L.; Howe, G.E.

    1993-01-01

    Efforts to restore anadromous striped bass (Morone saxatilis) populations by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and other agencies over the past 20 years have concentrated on hatchery culture to supplement dwindling natural reproduction. Adult fish captured for artificial spawning are stressed by handling and crowding in rearing ponds and are often exposed to therapeutants, anesthetics, disinfectants, and herbicides used in fish culture. The authors determined the toxicity of 17 fishery chemicals (chloramine-T, erythromycin, formalin, Hyamine 3500, Roccal, malachite green, sulfamerazine, benzocaine, etomidate, Finquel (MS-222), metomidate, quinaldine sulfate, chlorine, potassium permanganate, Aquazine, copper sulfate, and Rodeo) to striped bass fry (average weight = 1 g) in reconstituted water (total hardness 40 mg/L) at 12 degrees C. The 96-h LC50's (concentration calculated to produce 50% mortality in a population) ranged from 0.129 mg/L for malachite green to 340 mg/L for erythromycin.

  20. Diversity in destinations, routes and timing of small adult and sub-adult striped bass Morone saxatilis on their southward autumn migration.

    PubMed

    Mather, M E; Finn, J T; Pautzke, S M; Fox, D; Savoy, T; Brundage, H M; Deegan, L A; Muth, R M

    2010-12-01

    Almost three-quarters of the 46 young adult and sub-adult striped bass Morone saxatilis that were acoustically tagged in Plum Island Estuary, Massachusetts, U.S.A., in the summer of 2006 were detected in one or more southern coastal arrays during their autumn migration. On the basis of the trajectories along which these M. saxatilis moved from feeding to overwintering areas, three migratory groups emerged. After leaving Plum Island Estuary, about half of the fish were detected only in a mid-latitude array, Long Island Sound. The other half of the tagged fish were detected during autumn and winter in a more southern array, the Delaware Estuary. This latter group of fish may have used two routes. Some travelled to the Delaware Estuary through Long Island Sound while other fish may have taken a second, more direct, coastal route that did not include Long Island Sound. Consequently, a seemingly homogeneous group of fish tagged at the same time in the same non-natal feeding location exhibited a diversity of southward movement patterns that could affect population-level processes. These three groups that differed in overwintering location and migration route could be movement contingents with migratory connectivity. PMID:21155786

  1. Diversity in destinations, routes and timing of small adult and sub-adult striped bass Morone saxatilis on their southward autumn migration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mather, Martha E.; Finn, John T.; Pautzke, Sarah M.; Fox, Dewayne A.; Savoy, Tom; Brundage, Harold M.; Deegan, Linda A.; Muth, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    Almost three-quarters of the 46 young adult and sub-adult striped bass Morone saxatilis that were acoustically tagged in Plum Island Estuary, Massachusetts, U.S.A., in the summer of 2006 were detected in one or more southern coastal arrays during their autumn migration. On the basis of the trajectories along which these M. saxatilis moved from feeding to overwintering areas, three migratory groups emerged. After leaving Plum Island Estuary, about half of the fish were detected only in a mid-latitude array, Long Island Sound. The other half of the tagged fish were detected during autumn and winter in a more southern array, the Delaware Estuary. This latter group of fish may have used two routes. Some travelled to the Delaware Estuary through Long Island Sound while other fish may have taken a second, more direct, coastal route that did not include Long Island Sound. Consequently, a seemingly homogeneous group of fish tagged at the same time in the same non-natal feeding location exhibited a diversity of southward movement patterns that could affect population-level processes. These three groups that differed in overwintering location and migration route could be movement contingents with migratory connectivity.

  2. Feeding activity and spawning time of striped bass in the Colorado River Inlet, Lake Powell, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Persons, William R.; Bulkly, R.V.

    1982-01-01

    Striped bass, Morone saxatilis, from Lake Powell, Utah spawned in or near the mixing zone of the reservoir and the Colorado River in 1980 and 1981. The fish did not move through Cataract Canyon rapids just above the reservoir in either year. Of 321 adult striped bass stomachs examined, 30% contained food and 28% contained threadfin shad, Dorosoma petenense. No stomachs contained native threatened or endangered Colorado River fishes.

  3. Sensitivity of juvenile striped bass to chemicals used in aquaculture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bills, Terry D.; Marking, Leif L.; Howe, George E.

    1993-01-01

    Efforts to restore anadromous striped bass (Morone saxatilis) populations by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and other agencies over the past 20 years have concentrated on hatchery culture to supplement dwindling natural reproduction. Adult fish captured for artificial spawning are stressed by handling and crowding in rearing ponds and are often exposed to therapeutants, anesthetics, disinfectants, and herbicides used in fish culture. We determined the toxicity of 17 fishery chemicals (chloramine-T, erythromycin, formalin, Hyamine 3500, Roccal, malachite green, sulfamerazine, benzocaine, etomidate, Finquel (MS-222) , metomidate, quinaldine sulfate, chlorine, potassium permanganate, Aquazine, copper sulfate, and Rodeo) to striped bass fry (average weight = 1 g) in reconstituted water (total hardness 40 mg/L) at 12 degree C. The 96-h LC50's (concentration calculated to produce 50% mortality in a population) ranged from 0.129 mg/L for malachite green to 340 mg/L for erythromycin. We also determined the effects of selected levels of water temperature, hardness, and pH on the toxicity of chloramine-T, formalin, malachite green, and Roccal. There were no differences in toxicity for any of the chemicals at any water quality variable tested except for chloramine-T, which was about 25 times more toxic in soft, acid water than in soft, alkaline water. Our data show that the striped bass is as sensitive to fishery chemicals as rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), but is generally less resistant than bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) and channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus).

  4. Quantitative comparison of the stress response of striped bass (Morone saxatilis) and hybrid striped bass (Morone saxatilis x Morone chrysops and Morone saxatilis x Morone americana).

    PubMed

    Noga, E J; Kerby, J H; King, W; Aucoin, D P; Giesbrecht, F

    1994-03-01

    Striped bass (Morone saxatilis) exposed to a standardized confinement stress had markedly different clinical and endocrinologic responses, compared with hybrid striped bass exposed to the same stress. Plasma cortisol concentration increased at a faster rate and appeared to reach a higher value in striped bass than in hybrid bass. Mean plasma cortisol concentration was 742 +/- 43 ng/ml in striped bass, compared with 490 +/- 37 and 531 +/- 40 ng/ml in striped bass x white perch (M americana) and striped bass x white bass (M chrysops) hybrids, respectively, after a 45-minute net confinement. Plasma cortisol concentration also remained significantly (P = 0.003) higher in striped bass for at least 48 hours after the net confinement. These hormonal differences were associated with a markedly lower survival and resistance to infection in striped bass, compared with the hybrids.

  5. Transcriptome annotation and marker discovery in white bass (Morone chrysops) and striped bass (Morone saxatilis).

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Beck, Benjamin H; Fuller, S Adam; Peatman, Eric

    2014-12-01

    Striped bass (Morone saxatilis) and white bass (Morone chrysops) are the parental species of the hybrid striped bass, a major U.S. aquaculture species. Currently, genomic resources for striped bass, white bass, and their hybrid lag behind those of other aquaculture species. Current resources consist of a medium-density genetic linkage map and a well-annotated ovarian transcriptome. A well-annotated transcriptome from across striped bass and white bass tissues is needed to advance both broad-based RNA-seq studies of gene expression as well as aid in more targeted studies of important genes and pathways critical for reproductive physiology and immunity. Here, we carried out Illumina-based transcriptome sequencing and annotation in both species utilizing the trinity and trinotate packages. The assembled Moronid reference transcriptomes and identified SSRs and SNPs should advance ongoing studies of reproduction, physiology, and immunology in these species and provide markers for broodstock management and selection. PMID:25160849

  6. Transcriptome annotation and marker discovery in white bass (Morone chrysops) and striped bass (Morone saxatilis).

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Beck, Benjamin H; Fuller, S Adam; Peatman, Eric

    2014-12-01

    Striped bass (Morone saxatilis) and white bass (Morone chrysops) are the parental species of the hybrid striped bass, a major U.S. aquaculture species. Currently, genomic resources for striped bass, white bass, and their hybrid lag behind those of other aquaculture species. Current resources consist of a medium-density genetic linkage map and a well-annotated ovarian transcriptome. A well-annotated transcriptome from across striped bass and white bass tissues is needed to advance both broad-based RNA-seq studies of gene expression as well as aid in more targeted studies of important genes and pathways critical for reproductive physiology and immunity. Here, we carried out Illumina-based transcriptome sequencing and annotation in both species utilizing the trinity and trinotate packages. The assembled Moronid reference transcriptomes and identified SSRs and SNPs should advance ongoing studies of reproduction, physiology, and immunology in these species and provide markers for broodstock management and selection.

  7. Seasonal movement and habitat use by striped bass in the Combahee River, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bjorgo, K.A.; Isely, J.J.; Thomason, C.S.

    2000-01-01

    Adult striped bass Morone saxatilis (N = 30, 656-906 mm total length) were captured by electrofishing during January-March 1998 in the Combahee River, South Carolina, and fitted with radio transmitters. Their exact locations were recorded biweekly through December. From January to early April, striped bass were located in the tidally influenced lower region of the river in water temperatures ranging from 9??C to 18??C. The fish then moved an average of 38.5 km upstream from late April to the end of May when water temperatures ranged from 18??C to 26??C. Striped bass remained in the upper region of the river from late May to September when water temperatures were as much as 5??C lower than in the river's lower regions. Striped bass began to move downstream and were spread throughout the river during September and October in water temperatures ranging from 19??C to 27??C. Combahee River striped bass appear to follow a migratory pattern typical of other southern striped bass stocks. Habitat preference appears to be strongly influenced by temperature. Combahee River temperatures are stable and remain close to the preferred temperatures of striped bass during summer extremes. Therefore, unlike northern populations, southern populations are more likely to remain within riverine habitat during the summer months. Discrete thermal refugia, such as springs, apparently are not used or are absent in the Combahee River. It is possible that striped bass in the Combahee River depend on the entire upper region of the river as a thermal refuge.

  8. Effects of historic PCB exposures on the reproductive success of the Hudson River striped bass population.

    PubMed

    Barnthouse, Lawrence W; Glaser, David; Young, John

    2003-01-15

    Scientists and regulatory agencies have expressed concern that exposures to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) might be contributing to reductions in the abundance of fish populations exposed to these chemicals. The specific effects of concern involve impairment of fish reproduction, including both reduced egg production and decreased viability of eggs and larvae. We tested hypotheses concerning the effects of PCBs on fish populations using long-term data sets available for the striped bass population of the Hudson River, NY, a population that has long been a subject of regulatory concern because of potential effects of PCB exposures. The data sets examined include both measurements of PCB concentrations in adult female striped bass over the period from 1976 through 1997 and estimates of the numbers of striped bass eggs, larvae, and juveniles produced annually during this same period. We found strong correlations between estimates of the abundance of spawners and the number of eggs and larvae produced by those spawners and also between independent estimates of year-class strength derived from different sampling programs. However, we found no relationships between PCB exposure and any measure of striped bass abundance or reproduction. Although inconsistent with the expected effects of PCB exposures, trends in all measures of striped bass abundance and reproductive success were consistent with the expected effects of striped bass harvest restrictions that were imposed during the 1980s. Our results demonstrate a need for caution in inferring risks to populations in nature from effects observed in laboratory studies.

  9. Hooking mortality and physiological responses of striped bass angled in freshwater and held in live-release tubes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bettinger, J.M.; Tomasso, J.R.; Isely, J.J.

    2005-01-01

    Mortality and physiological responses of adult striped bass Morone saxatilis angled from Lake Murray, South Carolina, and held in live-release tubes were evaluated during the spring and summer of 2003. To estimate mortality, we attached external ultrasonic transmitters to 59 striped bass (mean total length [TL] = 585 mm). Striped bass were caught with angling gear, tagged, and immediately released or held in live-release tubes for 2, 4, or 6 h prior to release. No mortality of striped bass was observed during spring. Overall mortality during summer was 83%. Mortality of summer-caught striped bass was not related to tube residence time, fish TL, depth of capture, or surface water temperature. To characterize physiological stress, we measured the plasma cortisol, glucose, lactate, and osmolality levels of 62 additional striped bass (mean TL = 563 mm) that were angled and immediately released or angled and held in live-release tubes. Plasma cortisol, glucose, lactate, and osmolality were positively related to tube residence time. When the hematological characteristics were considered only in relation to tube residence time, responses indicative of physiological stress continued for about 150 min, after which blood chemistry began to return to normal. Live-release tubes appear to be useful for keeping striped bass alive when they are angled from cool water, but they are not effective for striped bass angled from warm water. The high summer mortality of striped bass suggests a need for restrictive fishing regulations during the summer for the Lake Murray striped bass fishery. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2005.

  10. Immunological discrimination of Atlantic striped bass stocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schill, W.B.; Dorazio, R.M.

    1990-01-01

    Stocks of Atlantic striped bass Morone saxatilis that were assumed to be geographically isolated during spawning showed strong antigenic differences in blood serum albumin. A discriminant function was estimated from the immunologic responses of northern (Canadian and Hudson River) and southern (Chesapeake Bay and Roanoke River) stocks to two reference antisera. The function correctly classified 92% of the northern and 95% of the southern fish in the training set. Cross-validation revealed similar percentages of correct classification for fish that were of known origin but not used to estimate the discriminant function. Monte Carlo experiments were used to evaluate the ability of the discriminant function to predict the relative contribution of northern fish in samples of various size and stock composition. Averages of predicted proportions of northern fish in the samples agreed well with actual proportions. Coefficients of variation (100 × SD/mean) in the predicted proportions ranged from 1.5 to 36% for samples of 50–400 fish that contained at least 10% northern stock. In samples that contained only 2% northern stock, however, at least 1,600 fish were required to achieve similar levels of precision.

  11. Experimental mycobacteriosis in striped bass Morone saxatilis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gauthier, David T.; Rhodes, M.W.; Vogelbein, W.K.; Kator, H.; Ottinger, C.A.

    2003-01-01

    Striped bass Morone saxatilis were infected intraperitoneally with approximately 105 Mycobacterium marinum, M. shottsii sp. nov., or M. gordonae. Infected fish were maintained in a flow-through freshwater system at 18 to 21??C, and were examined histologically and bacteriologically at 2, 4, 6, 8, 17, 26, 36 and 45 wk post-infection (p.i.). M. marinum caused acute peritonitis, followed by extensive granuloma development in the mesenteries, spleen and anterior kidney. Granulomas in these tissues underwent a temporal progression of distinct morphological stages, culminating in well-circumscribed lesions surrounded by normal or healing tissue. Mycobacteria were cultured in high numbers from splenic tissue at all times p.i. Standard Ziehl-Neelsen staining, however, did not demonstrate acid-fast rods in most early inflammatory foci and granulomas. Large numbers of acid-fast rods were present in granulomas beginning at 8 wk p.i. Between 26 and 45 wk p.i., reactivation of disease was observed in some fish, with disintegration of granulomas, renewed inflammation, and elevated splenic bacterial densities approaching 109 colony-forming units g-1. Infection with M. shottsii or M. gordonae did not produce severe pathology. Mild peritonitis was followed by granuloma formation in the mesenteries, but, with 1 exception, granulomas were not observed in the spleen or anterior kidney. M. shottsii and M. gordonae both established persistent infections in the spleen, but were present at densities at least 2 orders of magnitude less than M. marinum at all time points observed. Granulomas in the mesenteries of M. shottsii- and M. gordonae-infected fish resolved over time, and no reactivation of disease was observed.

  12. Interactions between striped bass and other gamefish in reservoirs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miranda, Leandro E.; Raborn, Scott W.

    2013-01-01

    Competitive interactions among reservoir fishes may be pronounced because fish assemblages in these artificial environments have had little time to develop niche-partitioning strategies that alleviate negative interspecific interactions. Such interactions may at times have been intensified by introductions of predators such as striped bass Morone saxatilis, introduced to create additional fisheries and control pelagic clupeids. Possible interactions between existing fish assemblages and striped bass include predation and competition. While there is a perception among angler groups that predation by striped bass on co-existing game fish is significant, most studies have reported little or no predation on game fish my striped bass and have considered predation rare and inconsequential. Moreover, predation that occurs will likely be compensatory and fail to reduce overall game fish survival. Any indirect effect of striped bass predation by restricting prey-sized game fish to limited refuge sites remains unknown. Exploitative competition may be more common. Although infrequently, introduced striped bass have depleted prey resources shared with other piscivores, particularly when stocking rates have been high, when there is a high rate of natural reproduction, or when prey supply has plunged in response to environmental fluxes. Fluctuation in prey supply, associated with ordinary environmental variability, and associated time lages in prey supply and predator demand, preclude adjusting predator densities to exactly balance demand with supply. The frequency of low supply-demand rations varies across systems and exhibits seasonal trends. Nevertheless, chronic supply-demand imbalances are manageable where the predator assemblage is at least partially controlled through stocking, harvest regulations, or both. Because of the poor state of knowledge concerning the parameters defining balance and because uncontrollable annual fluctuations preclude exact management of

  13. TROPHIC DYNAMICS OF STRIPED BASS IN SMITH MOUNTAIN LAKE, VIRGINIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the adequacy of the forage base to meet demand of striped bass in Smith Mountain Lake, Virginia. In regards to prey supply, mean alewife biomass from 1993-1998 was 37 kg/ha and mean gizzard shad biomass from 1990-1997 was 112 kg/ha. Mean annual alewife surplus produ...

  14. STABLE ISOTOPE RATIOS IN ARCHIVED STRIPED BASS SCALES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In recent years fishermen and scientists have noted that striped bass caught along the East Coast of the United States have reduced weight to length ratios with many of the fish caught in Chesapeake Bay exhibiting skin lesions. Several theories have been suggested to explain thes...

  15. The effect of freezing rate on the quality of striped bass sperm.

    PubMed

    Frankel, T E; Theisen, D D; Guthrie, H D; Welch, G R; Woods, L C

    2013-04-01

    Several studies have been conducted in an attempt to determine the optimal freezing rate for cryopreservation of striped bass (Morone saxatilis) sperm. In this study, the effects of freezing rate (-10 °C, -15 °C, -20 °C, and -40 °C/min) on gamete quality was examined, using Sybr-14 and propidium iodide to determine viability (sperm cell membrane integrity), ATP concentration using a luciferin-luciferase bioluminescence assay, and a CEROS computer-assisted sperm analysis system to characterize striped bass sperm motion. Adult male striped bass (N = 12) were sampled once a week for 5 weeks. Collected samples were extended, cryoprotected using a 7.5% (vol/vol) dimethyl sulfoxide final concentration solution, and frozen using a Planer Kryosave controlled-rate freezer. Samples were stored in liquid nitrogen for 49 days, and sperm quality was re-evaluated after thaw (same methods). Sperm cryopreserved at -40 °C/min resulted in means for total motility (10.06%), progressive motility (7.14%), ATP concentration (0.86 pmol/10(6) cells), and sperm viability (56.5%) that were greater (P < 0.05) than those for slower cooling rates. Therefore, -40 °C/min was the optimal freezing rate (among those tested) for cryopreservation of striped bass sperm. PMID:23427940

  16. The effect of freezing rate on the quality of striped bass sperm.

    PubMed

    Frankel, T E; Theisen, D D; Guthrie, H D; Welch, G R; Woods, L C

    2013-04-01

    Several studies have been conducted in an attempt to determine the optimal freezing rate for cryopreservation of striped bass (Morone saxatilis) sperm. In this study, the effects of freezing rate (-10 °C, -15 °C, -20 °C, and -40 °C/min) on gamete quality was examined, using Sybr-14 and propidium iodide to determine viability (sperm cell membrane integrity), ATP concentration using a luciferin-luciferase bioluminescence assay, and a CEROS computer-assisted sperm analysis system to characterize striped bass sperm motion. Adult male striped bass (N = 12) were sampled once a week for 5 weeks. Collected samples were extended, cryoprotected using a 7.5% (vol/vol) dimethyl sulfoxide final concentration solution, and frozen using a Planer Kryosave controlled-rate freezer. Samples were stored in liquid nitrogen for 49 days, and sperm quality was re-evaluated after thaw (same methods). Sperm cryopreserved at -40 °C/min resulted in means for total motility (10.06%), progressive motility (7.14%), ATP concentration (0.86 pmol/10(6) cells), and sperm viability (56.5%) that were greater (P < 0.05) than those for slower cooling rates. Therefore, -40 °C/min was the optimal freezing rate (among those tested) for cryopreservation of striped bass sperm.

  17. Influences of water quality on distribution of striped bass in a Tennessee River impoundment

    SciTech Connect

    Cheek, T.E.; van den Avyle, M.J.; Coutant, C.C.

    1985-01-01

    Telemetry techniques were used to evaluate relationships between water quality and distribution of adult striped bass Morone saxatilis during an 18-month period in Watts Bar Reservoir, Tennessee. Distribution and movements of fish were influenced by water temperature and dissolved oxygen concentration. During winter and early spring, temperature was vertically and horizontally uniform, and striped bass were relatively mobile and occurred in both tributary arms as well as in the main body of the reservoir. As the reservoir warmed in summer, fish were less mobile and progressively limited to areas in the tributary arms where temperature was less than 24 C and dissolved oxygen exceeded 4 mg/liter. Parts of the tributary arms of Watts Bar Reservoir provided such areas due to hypolimnetic discharges from upstream impoundments and groundwater inflows. Striped bass were restricted to these areas until late fall, when the entire reservoir cooled and again was nearly isothermal. Knowledge of relationships between striped bass habitat use and water quality is useful for fishery management and resource protection for reservoirs; an example is provided for Watts Bar Reservoir. 35 references, 3 figures.

  18. Comparative cost analysis of hybrid striped bass fingerling production in ponds and tanks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Year-round production of hybrid striped bass (female white bass Morone chrysops×male striped bass M. saxatilis) fingerlings would allow food fish growers to sell their product throughout the year, which would improve the consistency of market supply and cash flow for the farm. However, pond producti...

  19. Aspects of the population dynamics of striped bass (Morone saxatilis) spawning in Maryland tributaries of the Chesapeake Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Kohlenstein, L.C.

    1980-02-01

    This is a study of mortality and migration processes that influence the population structure and harvest of adult striped bass spawned in the Maryland tributaries of the Chesapeake Bay and an examination of the influence of stock size on the reproductive success of the population. A model of the adult stock was developed that incorporates the age and sex specific nature of Striped Bass migratory patterns and mortality rates. The model was used to address a number of resource management issues including estimating the effects of a 14 inch minimum size limit in Maryland and the consequences of a reduction in year class strength through power plant operations.

  20. Striped bass stocks and concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fabrizio, Mary C.; Sloan, Ronald J.; O'Brien, John F.

    1991-01-01

    Harvest restrictions on striped bass Morone saxatilis fisheries in Atlantic coastal states were relaxed in 1990, but consistent, coastwide regulations of the harvest have been difficult to implement because of the mixed-stock nature of the fisheries and the recognized contamination of Hudson River fish by polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). We examined PCB concentrations and stock of origin of coastal striped bass to better understand the effects of these two factors on the composition of the harvest. The probability of observing differences in PCB concentration among fish from the Hudson River stock and the 'southern' group (Chesapeake Bay and Roanoke River stocks combined) was investigated with the logit model (a linear model for analysis of categorical data). Although total PCB concentrations were highly variable among fish from the two groups, striped bass classified as Hudson River stock had a significantly greater probability of having PCB concentrations equal to or greater than 2.00 mg/kg than did fish belonging to the southern group for all age- and size-classes examined. There was a significantly greater probability of observing total PCB concentrations equal to or exceeding 2.00 mg/kg in fish that were 5, 6, and 7 or more years old, and this probability increased linearly with age. We observed similar results when we examined the effect of size on total PCB concentration. The minimum-size limit estimated to permit escapement of fish to sustain stock production is 610 mm total length. Unless total PCB concentrations decrease in striped bass, it is likely that many harvestable fish will have concentrations that exceed the tolerance limit set by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

  1. Temperature selection by juvenile striped bass in laboratory and field

    SciTech Connect

    Coutant, C.C.; Zachman, K.L.; Cox, D.K.; Pearman, B.L.

    1984-01-01

    Juvenile striped bass Morone saxatilis, 80-300 mm in total length and acclimated to 22-24 C, generally selected temperatures in the range 24-27 C during spring and summer in laboratory horizontal temperature gradients and electronic shuttleboxes and in exploratory telemetry trials at a freshwater quarry lake. During autumn, preferred temperatures in laboratory gradients declined to 20-25 C. 35 references, 2 tables.

  2. Prey selectivity and diet of striped bass in Western Albemarle Sound, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rudershausen, P.J.; Tuomikoski, J.E.; Buckel, J.A.; Hightower, J.E.

    2005-01-01

    We collected 1,399 striped bass Morone saxatilis from western Albemarle Sound, North Carolina, during May through October of 2002 and 2003 to characterize diet, prey type selectivity, and prey size selectivity. Herrings Alosa spp., Atlantic menhaden Brevoortia tyrannus, bay anchovy Anchoa mitchilli, silversides Menidia spp., and yellow perch Perca flavescens dominated the diets of age-1 striped bass, while Atlantic menhaden dominated the diets of older striped bass. Selectivity was calculated for three categories of striped bass (ages 1, 2, and 3 + [3-7]) based on fish prey collections from a 61-m beach seine and a 76-m purse seine. Striped bass of all ages primarily consumed fish prey regardless of the month or year. Each age category of striped bass selected for one or more species of prey from the suborder Clupeoidei. Age-1 striped bass selectivity of Alosa spp. generally increased with the progression of each sampling season, whereas selectivity for Atlantic menhaden, Menidia spp., and yellow perch decreased over time within each season. Striped bass of all ages displayed strong selection for Atlantic menhaden and strong selection against spiny-rayed fish prey. Striped bass displayed selection for specific prey, although the mechanisms responsible for selection appear to vary through time and may differ for different prey types. Striped bass either displayed neutral size selectivity or selected for relatively small prey. The mean and maximum sizes of fish prey increased with increases in striped bass size, but the minimum prey size changed little. Our results of seasonal and age-specific changes in selectivity will be valuable for modeling the impact of striped bass predation on resource prey species. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2005.

  3. Plasma corticosteroid and electrolyte dynamics of hybrid striped bass (white bass x striped bass) during netting and hauling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tomasso J. R., Davis; Parker, N.C.

    1980-01-01

    Striped bass hybrids (Morone chrysops female x Morone saxatilis male) confined in a net for 10 minutes had significantly elevated corticosteroid levels (24.2 † 5.4 μg/100 ml) and significant hyperchloremia (150.02 † 2.7 meq/liter), in comparison with baseline levels of 0.8 † 0.1 μg/100 ml and 132.6 † 1.5 meq/liter, respectively. Hauling hybrids for 2 hours in freshwater significantly elevated corticosteroid levels (12.2 † 1.2 μg/100 ml) and reduced chloride levels (119.8 † 1.4 meq/liter). Corticosteroid levels remained high and hypochloremia developed within 24 hours after both netting and hauling. Although netting and hauling in 25 mg/liter MS-2223 or 10 g/liter NaCl prevented chloride depletion during the stress, hypochloremia developed within 72 hours after the fish were transferred to freshwater. The development of hypochloremia several hours after handling indicates that hybrid bass that survive the initial stress do not necessarily recover, but may die in the days following handling. Fish anesthetized in 50 mg/liter MS-222 for 15 minutes prior to handling followed by hauling in water containing a combination of 25 mg/liter MS-222 and 10 g/liter NaCl did not develop hypochloremia within 72 hours after hauling; plasma corticosteroids were elevated during transport, but returned to nearly normal levels within 24 hours. This combination of 25 mg/liter MS-222 and 10 g/liter salt was the most successful handling medium tested.

  4. Retention of internal anchor tags by juvenile striped bass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Den Avyle, M.J.; Wallin, J.E.

    2001-01-01

    We marked hatchery-reared striped bass Morone saxatilis (145-265 mm total length) with internal anchor tags and monitored retention for 28 months after stocking in the Savannah River, Georgia and South Carolina. Anchor tags (with an 18-mm, T-shaped anchor and 42-mm streamer) were surgically implanted ventrally, and coded wire tags (1 mm long and 0.25 mm in diameter) were placed into the cheek muscle to help identify subsequent recaptures. The estimated probability of retention (SD) of anchor tags was 0.94 (0.05) at 4 months, 0.64 (0.13) at 16 months, and 0.33 (0.19) at 28 months. Of 10 fish recaptured with only coded wire tags, 5 showed an externally visible wound or scar near the point of anchor tag insertion. The incidence of wounds or scars, which we interpreted as evidence of tag shedding, increased to 50% in recaptures taken at 28 months (three of six fish). Our estimates for retention of anchor tags were generally lower than those in other studies of striped bass, possibly because of differences in the style of anchor or sizes of fish used. Because of its low rate of retention, the type of anchor tag we used may not be suitable for long-term assessments of stock enhancement programs that use striped bass of the sizes we evaluated.

  5. Summer habitat selection by striped bass, Morone Saxatilis, in Cherokee Reservoir, Tennessee, 1977

    SciTech Connect

    Waddle, H.R.; Coutant, C.C.; Wilson, J.L.

    1980-02-01

    Summer habitat selection patterns of 18 adult striped bass (Morone saxatilis) in Cherokee Reservoir were monitored with externally attached temperature-sensing acoustic or radio transmitters from June through September 1977. Mortalities of adult striped bass in this reservoir were hypothesized to be related to high summer temperatures and low dissolved oxygen (DO). The inhabited areas or refuges differed from noninhabited areas by maintaining temperatures less than or equal to 22 C and DO concentrations greater than 5 mg/liter. Total water hardness, pH, and water transparency were not significantly different among refuges and noninhabited areas. Movement of fish outside refuges occurred more frequently and for longer periods during June when the summer pattern of high temperatures and low DO was less severe. Fish experienced temperatures between 15 and 27 C with mean temperatures of individuals ranging from 18.5 to 22.0 C. Several tagged fish migrated outside the refuges and selected the lowest available temperature, generally near 21 C, even though DO concentrations at these temperatures were 3 mg/liter or less. Long-term survival of tagged and nontagged fish outside refuges was undetermined because no fish were tracked outside a refuge for more than 12 days without being lost. This study indicates that temperature strongly influences the behavior of striped bass and that adults of this species may have a thermal preferendum of approximately 21 C.

  6. Genetic population structure of US atlantic coastal striped bass (Morone saxatilis).

    PubMed

    Gauthier, David T; Audemard, Corinne A; Carlsson, Jeanette E L; Darden, Tanya L; Denson, Michael R; Reece, Kimberly S; Carlsson, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Genetic population structure of anadromous striped bass along the US Atlantic coast was analyzed using 14 neutral nuclear DNA microsatellites. Young-of-the-year and adult striped bass (n = 1114) were sampled from Hudson River, Delaware River, Chesapeake Bay, North Carolina, and South Carolina. Analyses indicated clear population structure with significant genetic differentiation between all regions. Global multilocus F ST was estimated at 0.028 (P < 0.001). Population structure followed an isolation-by-distance model and temporal sampling indicated a stable population structure more than 2 years at all locations. Significant structure was absent within Hudson River, whereas weak but significant genetic differences were observed between northern and southern samples in Chesapeake Bay. The largest and smallest effective striped bass population sizes were found in Chesapeake Bay and South Carolina, respectively. Coalescence analysis indicated that the highest historical gene flow has been between Chesapeake Bay and Hudson River populations, and that exchange has not been unidirectional. Bayesian analysis of contemporary migration indicated that Chesapeake Bay serves as a major source of migrants for Atlantic coastal regions from Albemarle Sound northward. In addition to examining population genetic structure, the data acquired during this project were capable of serving as a baseline for assigning fish with unknown origin to source region. PMID:23682125

  7. Genetic population structure of US atlantic coastal striped bass (Morone saxatilis).

    PubMed

    Gauthier, David T; Audemard, Corinne A; Carlsson, Jeanette E L; Darden, Tanya L; Denson, Michael R; Reece, Kimberly S; Carlsson, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Genetic population structure of anadromous striped bass along the US Atlantic coast was analyzed using 14 neutral nuclear DNA microsatellites. Young-of-the-year and adult striped bass (n = 1114) were sampled from Hudson River, Delaware River, Chesapeake Bay, North Carolina, and South Carolina. Analyses indicated clear population structure with significant genetic differentiation between all regions. Global multilocus F ST was estimated at 0.028 (P < 0.001). Population structure followed an isolation-by-distance model and temporal sampling indicated a stable population structure more than 2 years at all locations. Significant structure was absent within Hudson River, whereas weak but significant genetic differences were observed between northern and southern samples in Chesapeake Bay. The largest and smallest effective striped bass population sizes were found in Chesapeake Bay and South Carolina, respectively. Coalescence analysis indicated that the highest historical gene flow has been between Chesapeake Bay and Hudson River populations, and that exchange has not been unidirectional. Bayesian analysis of contemporary migration indicated that Chesapeake Bay serves as a major source of migrants for Atlantic coastal regions from Albemarle Sound northward. In addition to examining population genetic structure, the data acquired during this project were capable of serving as a baseline for assigning fish with unknown origin to source region.

  8. STABLE ISOPTOPE RATIOS IN ARCHIVED STRIPED BASS SCALES SUGGEST CHANGES IN TROPHIC STRUCTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stable carbon isotope ratios were measured in archived striped bass, Morone saxatilis (Walbaum), scales to identify changes in the feeding behaviour of this species over time. Striped bass tissue and scale samples were collected from Rhode Island coastal waters during 1996 and ar...

  9. Assessing Fishers' Support of Striped Bass Management Strategies.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Robert D; Scyphers, Steven B; Grabowski, Jonathan H

    2015-01-01

    Incorporating the perspectives and insights of stakeholders is an essential component of ecosystem-based fisheries management, such that policy strategies should account for the diverse interests of various groups of anglers to enhance their efficacy. Here we assessed fishing stakeholders' perceptions on the management of Atlantic striped bass (Morone saxatilis) and receptiveness to potential future regulations using an online survey of recreational and commercial fishers in Massachusetts and Connecticut (USA). Our results indicate that most fishers harbored adequate to positive perceptions of current striped bass management policies when asked to grade their state's management regime. Yet, subtle differences in perceptions existed between recreational and commercial fishers, as well as across individuals with differing levels of fishing experience, resource dependency, and tournament participation. Recreational fishers in both states were generally supportive or neutral towards potential management actions including slot limits (71%) and mandated circle hooks to reduce mortality of released fish (74%), but less supportive of reduced recreational bag limits (51%). Although commercial anglers were typically less supportive of management changes than their recreational counterparts, the majority were still supportive of slot limits (54%) and mandated use of circle hooks (56%). Our study suggests that both recreational and commercial fishers are generally supportive of additional management strategies aimed at sustaining healthy striped bass populations and agree on a variety of strategies. However, both stakeholder groups were less supportive of harvest reductions, which is the most direct measure of reducing mortality available to fisheries managers. By revealing factors that influence stakeholders' support or willingness to comply with management strategies, studies such as ours can help managers identify potential stakeholder support for or conflicts that may

  10. Mycobacterial infections in striped bass from Delaware Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ottinger, C.A.; Brown, J.J.; Densmore, Christine L.; Starliper, C.E.; Blazer, V.S.; Weyers, H.S.; Beauchamp, K.A.; Rhodes, M.W.; Kator, H.; Gauthier, David T.; Vogelbein, W.K.

    2007-01-01

    Eighty striped bass Morone saxatilis were obtained from Delaware Bay using commercial gill nets set adjacent to Woodland Beach (n = 70) and Bowers Beach (n = 10) in December 2003. Fish were examined for gross lesions. Total lengths (TLs) and eviscerated weights were determined to calculate condition factors (K). Portions of spleens were aseptically harvested for bacterial culture, and portions of spleens, kidneys (anterior and posterior), livers, and gonads were obtained for histological examination. The size distribution of the striped bass was relatively homogeneous; the mean TL was about 600 mm for all samples. Mean K exceeded 0.95 in all samples and was not significantly different (P > 0.05) among samples. Significant differences in mycobacterial infection prevalence (P ??? 0.05) were observed among samples; samples obtained at Woodland Beach (WB) on December 10 (53.8%, n = 13) and December 17 (7.1%, n = 42) exhibited the most striking differences in prevalence. Mycobacterial infection intensity ranged from 1 ?? 102 to 1 ?? 107 colony-forming units per gram of spleen. Acanthocephalan infection prevalence and intensity, non-acid-fast bacterial infection prevalence, and fish sex ratio were also significantly different among the samples (P ??? 0.05). Similar to the mycobacterial infections, differences in sex ratio, acanthocephalan infection, and non-acid-fast bacterial infection were observed between the WB samples taken on December 10 and 17. However, no significant associations (P > 0.05) were observed between sex ratio or these infections and mycobacterial infection. The differences in bacterial and parasite infection prevalence and intensity and fish sex ratio in some samples indicate that these fish had a different history and that the epizootiology of mycobacterial infection in striped bass from Delaware Bay may be relatively complex. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2007.

  11. Assessing Fishers' Support of Striped Bass Management Strategies.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Robert D; Scyphers, Steven B; Grabowski, Jonathan H

    2015-01-01

    Incorporating the perspectives and insights of stakeholders is an essential component of ecosystem-based fisheries management, such that policy strategies should account for the diverse interests of various groups of anglers to enhance their efficacy. Here we assessed fishing stakeholders' perceptions on the management of Atlantic striped bass (Morone saxatilis) and receptiveness to potential future regulations using an online survey of recreational and commercial fishers in Massachusetts and Connecticut (USA). Our results indicate that most fishers harbored adequate to positive perceptions of current striped bass management policies when asked to grade their state's management regime. Yet, subtle differences in perceptions existed between recreational and commercial fishers, as well as across individuals with differing levels of fishing experience, resource dependency, and tournament participation. Recreational fishers in both states were generally supportive or neutral towards potential management actions including slot limits (71%) and mandated circle hooks to reduce mortality of released fish (74%), but less supportive of reduced recreational bag limits (51%). Although commercial anglers were typically less supportive of management changes than their recreational counterparts, the majority were still supportive of slot limits (54%) and mandated use of circle hooks (56%). Our study suggests that both recreational and commercial fishers are generally supportive of additional management strategies aimed at sustaining healthy striped bass populations and agree on a variety of strategies. However, both stakeholder groups were less supportive of harvest reductions, which is the most direct measure of reducing mortality available to fisheries managers. By revealing factors that influence stakeholders' support or willingness to comply with management strategies, studies such as ours can help managers identify potential stakeholder support for or conflicts that may

  12. Assessing Fishers' Support of Striped Bass Management Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Robert D.; Scyphers, Steven B.; Grabowski, Jonathan H.

    2015-01-01

    Incorporating the perspectives and insights of stakeholders is an essential component of ecosystem-based fisheries management, such that policy strategies should account for the diverse interests of various groups of anglers to enhance their efficacy. Here we assessed fishing stakeholders’ perceptions on the management of Atlantic striped bass (Morone saxatilis) and receptiveness to potential future regulations using an online survey of recreational and commercial fishers in Massachusetts and Connecticut (USA). Our results indicate that most fishers harbored adequate to positive perceptions of current striped bass management policies when asked to grade their state’s management regime. Yet, subtle differences in perceptions existed between recreational and commercial fishers, as well as across individuals with differing levels of fishing experience, resource dependency, and tournament participation. Recreational fishers in both states were generally supportive or neutral towards potential management actions including slot limits (71%) and mandated circle hooks to reduce mortality of released fish (74%), but less supportive of reduced recreational bag limits (51%). Although commercial anglers were typically less supportive of management changes than their recreational counterparts, the majority were still supportive of slot limits (54%) and mandated use of circle hooks (56%). Our study suggests that both recreational and commercial fishers are generally supportive of additional management strategies aimed at sustaining healthy striped bass populations and agree on a variety of strategies. However, both stakeholder groups were less supportive of harvest reductions, which is the most direct measure of reducing mortality available to fisheries managers. By revealing factors that influence stakeholders’ support or willingness to comply with management strategies, studies such as ours can help managers identify potential stakeholder support for or conflicts that

  13. The diet of Chesapeake Bay striped bass in the late 1950s

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffin, J.C.; Margraf, F.J.

    2003-01-01

    The diet of Chesapeake Bay striped bass, (Morone saxatilis) Walbaum, based on unpublished stomach content data from 916 fish collected between 1955 and 1959 was described. The diet in the late 1950s, quantified using an index of relative importance (IRI), was dominated by Atlantic menhaden, Brevoortia tyrannus Latrobe. Atlantic menhaden (66%) and bay anchovy, Anchoa mitchilli Valenciennes, (19%) had the highest IRI value overall. Small striped bass ( <600 mm total length) ate predominantly bay anchovy (IRI = 67%). Large striped bass (??? 600 mm total length) ate predominantly Atlantic menhaden (IRI = 93%). Since 1990 small striped bass rely more on invertebrate prey and larger fish now rely more on small pelagic prey, such as bay anchovy and 0-age clupeids. Analysis of historical data using current techniques provided a valuable tool for comparison to help in understanding the current striped bass predator-prey relationship in Chesapeake Bay.

  14. Food and feeding habits of larval striped bass: an analysis of larval striped bass stomachs from 1976 Potomac Estuary collections. Potomac River fisheries program. Final report. [Morone saxatilis

    SciTech Connect

    Beaven, M.; Mihursky, J.

    1980-01-01

    The stomachs of 605 striped bass (Morone saxatilis) larvae collected from the Potomac River Estuary during the spring of 1976 were examined, and food organisms identified to species when possible. Copepods, cladocerans, and rotifers were the most abundant organisms found. Electivity indices indicated positive selection for the larger stages of copepods and cladocerans, and negative selection for copepod nauplii and most rotifer species, regardless of the size or stage of striped bass larvae.

  15. Comparative severity of experimentally induced mycobacteriosis in striped bass Morone saxatilis and hybrid tilapia Oreochromis spp.

    PubMed

    Wolf, J C; Smith, S A

    1999-11-30

    Twenty striped bass Morone saxatilis and 20 hybrid tilapia Oreochromis niloticus x O. mossambicus x O. aureus each received a single intramuscular injection of 1.6 x 10(6) colony forming units per gram body weight of Mycobacterium marinum. Striped bass manifested significantly greater clinical and microscopic disease compared to tilapia. Whereas all the striped bass had died or were clinically ill by Day 8 post-infection, there was no apparent disruption of normal behaviour, physical appearance, or growth in any of the sacrificed or surviving tilapia. Histologically, granulomas in striped bass were generally larger and less discrete, with a higher proportion of heavily vacuolated macrophages, and large cores of necrotic cells. Visceral granulomas in tilapia were smaller, with a higher proportion of epithelioid macrophages, more pigment-containing cells, more peripheral lymphocytes, and virtually no central necrosis. Visceral granulomas were 18-fold more numerous in striped bass than in tilapia. Based upon histomorphometric data, mean proportions of acid-fast bacteria within pronephros granulomas were 4-fold greater in striped bass than tilapia, and striped bass granulomas averaged more than twice as large as tilapia granulomas. In the anterior kidney of striped bass, a positive correlation existed between mean mycobacterial proportions and mean necrosis scores. In tilapia, mean mycobacterial proportions correlated negatively with mean granuloma numbers, whereas there was no correlation between these parameters in striped bass. Results suggest that intrinsic functional differences in the immunologic systems of striped bass and hybrid tilapia may contribute to inter-species variation in mycobacteriosis susceptibility.

  16. Comparative severity of experimentally induced mycobacteriosis in striped bass Morone saxatilis and hybrid tilapia Oreochromis spp.

    PubMed

    Wolf, J C; Smith, S A

    1999-11-30

    Twenty striped bass Morone saxatilis and 20 hybrid tilapia Oreochromis niloticus x O. mossambicus x O. aureus each received a single intramuscular injection of 1.6 x 10(6) colony forming units per gram body weight of Mycobacterium marinum. Striped bass manifested significantly greater clinical and microscopic disease compared to tilapia. Whereas all the striped bass had died or were clinically ill by Day 8 post-infection, there was no apparent disruption of normal behaviour, physical appearance, or growth in any of the sacrificed or surviving tilapia. Histologically, granulomas in striped bass were generally larger and less discrete, with a higher proportion of heavily vacuolated macrophages, and large cores of necrotic cells. Visceral granulomas in tilapia were smaller, with a higher proportion of epithelioid macrophages, more pigment-containing cells, more peripheral lymphocytes, and virtually no central necrosis. Visceral granulomas were 18-fold more numerous in striped bass than in tilapia. Based upon histomorphometric data, mean proportions of acid-fast bacteria within pronephros granulomas were 4-fold greater in striped bass than tilapia, and striped bass granulomas averaged more than twice as large as tilapia granulomas. In the anterior kidney of striped bass, a positive correlation existed between mean mycobacterial proportions and mean necrosis scores. In tilapia, mean mycobacterial proportions correlated negatively with mean granuloma numbers, whereas there was no correlation between these parameters in striped bass. Results suggest that intrinsic functional differences in the immunologic systems of striped bass and hybrid tilapia may contribute to inter-species variation in mycobacteriosis susceptibility. PMID:10686670

  17. Modeling the Effects of Potential Salinity Shifts on the Recovery of Striped Bass in the Savannah River Estuary, Georgia-South Carolina, United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinert, Thomas R.; Peterson, James T.

    2008-05-01

    Increased salinity in spawning and nursery grounds in the Savannah River estuary was cited as the primary cause of a 97% decrease in adult striped bass ( Morone saxatilis) and a concomitant 96% decrease in striped bass egg production. Restoration efforts focused on environmental remediation and stock enhancement have resulted in restored salinity patterns and increased egg and adult abundances. However, future water needs or harbor development may preclude further recovery by reducing freshwater inflow or increasing salinity intrusion. To assess the effect of potential changes in the salinity regime, we developed models relating discharge, tidal phase, and salinity to striped bass egg and early larval survival and re-cast these in a quantitative Bayesian belief network. The model indicated that a small upstream shift (≤1.67 km) in the salinity regime would have the least impact on striped bass early life history survival, whereas shifts >1.67 km would have progressively larger impacts, with a 8.33-km shift potentially reducing our estimated survival probability by >28%. Such an impact could have cumulative and long-term detrimental effects on the recovery of the Savannah River striped bass population. The available salinity data were collected during average and low flows, so our model represents some typical and some extreme conditions during a striped bass spawning season. Our model is a relatively simplistic, “first-order” attempt at evaluating potential effects of changes in the Savannah River estuarine salinity regime and points to areas of concern and potential future research.

  18. Assessment of potential impact of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant thermal effluent on the Watts Bar Reservoir striped bass population

    SciTech Connect

    Heuer, J H; McIntosh, D; Ostrowski, P; Tomljanovich, D A

    1983-11-01

    This report is an assessment of potential adverse impact to striped bass (Morone saxatilis) in Watts Bar Reservoir caused by thermal effluent from operation of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP). The Clinch River arm of Watts Bar Reservoir is occupied by adult striped bass during the warmest months of the year. Concern was raised that operation of the CRBRP, specifically thermal discharges, could conflict with management of striped bass. In all cases examined the thermal plume becomes nearly imperceptible within a short distance from the discharge pipe (about 30 ft (10 m)) compared to river width (about 630 ft (190 m)). Under worst case conditions any presence of the plume in the main channel (opposite side of the river from the discharge) will be confined to the surface layer of the water. An ample portion of river cross sections containing ambient temperature water for passage or residence of adult striped bass will always be available in the vicinity of this thermal effluent. Although a small portion of river cross section would exceed the thermal tolerance of striped bass, the fish would naturally avoid this area and seek out adjacent cooler water. Therefore, it is concluded the CRBRP thermal effluent will not significantly affect the integrity of the striped bass thermal refuge in the Clinch River arm of Watts Bar Reservoir. At this time there is no need to consider alternative diffuser designs and thermal modeling. 8 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  19. Modeling the effects of potential salinity shifts on the recovery of striped bass in the Savannah River estuary, Georgia-South Carolina, United States.

    PubMed

    Reinert, Thomas R; Peterson, James T

    2008-05-01

    Increased salinity in spawning and nursery grounds in the Savannah River estuary was cited as the primary cause of a 97% decrease in adult striped bass (Morone saxatilis) and a concomitant 96% decrease in striped bass egg production. Restoration efforts focused on environmental remediation and stock enhancement have resulted in restored salinity patterns and increased egg and adult abundances. However, future water needs or harbor development may preclude further recovery by reducing freshwater inflow or increasing salinity intrusion. To assess the effect of potential changes in the salinity regime, we developed models relating discharge, tidal phase, and salinity to striped bass egg and early larval survival and re-cast these in a quantitative Bayesian belief network. The model indicated that a small upstream shift (< or =1.67 km) in the salinity regime would have the least impact on striped bass early life history survival, whereas shifts >1.67 km would have progressively larger impacts, with a 8.33-km shift potentially reducing our estimated survival probability by >28%. Such an impact could have cumulative and long-term detrimental effects on the recovery of the Savannah River striped bass population. The available salinity data were collected during average and low flows, so our model represents some typical and some extreme conditions during a striped bass spawning season. Our model is a relatively simplistic, "first-order" attempt at evaluating potential effects of changes in the Savannah River estuarine salinity regime and points to areas of concern and potential future research.

  20. The dietary lysine requirement of juvenile hybrid striped bass.

    PubMed

    Griffin, M E; Brown, P B; Grant, A L

    1992-06-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the dietary lysine requirement of juvenile hybrid striped bass (Morone saxatilis x M. chrysops). In both experiments the diets contained 35 g crude protein/100 g diet (10 g crude protein supplied by casein and gelatin and 25 g crude protein supplied by crystalline L-amino acids) and contained graded levels of L-lysine.HCl resulting in eight dietary treatments. Diets were fed to triplicate groups of fish and ranged in dietary lysine concentration from 1.2 to 2.6 g/100 g of the dry diet in Experiment 1 and from 0.8 to 2.2 g/100 g of the dry diet in Experiment 2. Weight gain and food efficiency data from Experiment 1 indicated the dietary lysine requirement to be between 1.2 and 1.4 g/100 g of the dry diet. Weight gain, food efficiency and serum lysine data from Experiment 2 confirmed the requirement to be between 1.2 and 1.4 g/100 g of the dry diet. Broken-line analysis of weight gain and food efficiency data from Experiment 2 indicated the dietary lysine requirement to be 1.4 +/- 0.2% of the dry diet, or 4.0 g/100 g of the dietary protein. Changes in the relative proportions of dietary lipid and carbohydrate between the two experiments, although maintaining similar gross energy levels, did not alter the lysine requirement estimate of juvenile hybrid striped bass.

  1. Ultrastructure of Mycobacterium marinum granuloma in striped bass Morone saxatilis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gauthier, David T.; Vogelbein, W.K.; Ottinger, C.A.

    2004-01-01

    An emerging epizootic of mycobacteriosis currently threatens striped bass Morone saxatilis populations in Chesapeake Bay, USA. Several species of mycobacteria, including Mycobacterium marinum, species resembling M. avium, M. gordonae, M. peregrinum, M. scrofulaceum and M. terrae, and the new species M. shottsii have been isolated from diseased and healthy bass. In this study, we describe the ultrastructure of developing M. marinum granulomas in experimentally infected bass over a period of 45 wk. The primary host response to injected mycobacteria was formation of large macrophage aggregations containing phagocytosed bacilli, M. marinum were always contained within phagosomes. Close association of lysosomes with mycobacterial phagosomes, as well as the presence of electron-opaque material within phagosomes, suggested phagolysosomal fusion. Development of granulomas involved epithelioid transformation of macrophages, followed by appearance of central necrosis. Desmosomes were present between mature epithelioid cells. The necrotic core region of M. marinum granulomas was separated from overlying epithelioid cells by several layers of flattened, electron-opaque spindle-shaped cells. These cells appeared to be formed by compression of epithelioid cells and, aside from a flattened nucleus, did not possess recognizable organelles. Following the development of well-defined, paucibacillary granulomas, secondary disease was observed. Recrudescence was marked by bacterial replication followed by disruption of granuloma architecture, including loss of epithelioid and spindle cell layers. In advanced recrudescent lesions, normal tissue was replaced by macrophages, fibroblasts, and other inflammatory leukocytes. Large numbers of mycobacteria were observed, both intracellular and suspended in cellular debris.

  2. Species profiles: Life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (Pacific Southwest): Striped bass

    SciTech Connect

    Hassler, T.J.

    1988-03-01

    Species profiles are literature summaries of the taxonomy, morphology, range, life history, and environmental requirements of coastal aquatic species. They are designed to assist in environmental impact assessment. The striped bass supports one of the most important sport fisheries in the Pacific Southwest. The only population of striped bass of consequence in the Pacific Southwest is in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Estuary and Pacific Ocean within 40 km of San Francisco Bay. Males mature at age 2 or 3 and females at ages 4 to 7. Striped bass are anadromous and spawn in fresh- or nearly fresh-water from April to June in the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers and the Delta area formed by the rivers. The semibuoyant eggs require a minimum current of 30.5 cm/s during development to keep them from settling to the bottom and dying. Year-class size of striped bass in the estuary has been correlated with survival during early life. The abundance of young bass, mean FL 38 mm, has been associated with river outflow from the Delta and the percentage of the river inflow diverted. The abundance of striped bass in the estuary has steadily declined since the 1960's; the decline is believed to be related to a combination of toxic substances and entrainment of young bass. Temperature, salinity, and river discharge are also important environmental factors affecting the survival of striped bass. 109 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  3. Striped Bass Spawning in Non-Estuarine Portions of the Savannah River

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, D.; Paller, M.

    2007-04-17

    Historically, the estuarine portions of the Savannah River have been considered to be the only portion of the river in which significant amounts of striped bass (Morone saxatilis) spawning normally occur. A reexamination of data from 1983 through 1985 shows a region between River Kilometers 144 and 253 where significant numbers of striped bass eggs and larvae occur with estimated total egg production near that currently produced in the estuarine reaches. It appears possible that there are two separate spawning populations of striped bass in the Savannah River.

  4. Apparent genetic homogeneity of spawning striped bass in the upper Chesapeak Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Sidell, B.D.; Otto, R.G.; Powers, D.A. Karweit, M.; Smith, J.

    1980-01-01

    The possible existence of genetically distinct populations of spawning striped bass (Morone saxatilis) in the river systems of the upper Chesapeake Bay was investigated by a biochemical genetic approach. Samples of blood and liver from adult fish were obtained during the 1976 spawning runs from the Rappanhannock (Virginia), Potomac, Choptank, Sassafras, Bohemia, and Elk rivers (Maryland), and Maryland waters of the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal. Samples were analyzed for frequency of occurrence of a polymorphic liver enzyme, glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and variable serum proteins which were not correlated with age or sex. Multivariate and Bayesian analyses of these data indicate apparent genetic homogeneity of spawning bass within the upper Chesapeake Bay. If natal stream homing occurs, a sufficient number of wanderers may provide significant gene flow among river systems. The results suggest that long-term management of the fishery need not be totally on the basis of separate river units.

  5. Striped Bass, morone saxatilis, egg incubation in large volume jars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harper, C.J.; Wrege, B.M.; Jeffery, Isely J.

    2010-01-01

    The standard McDonald jar was compared with a large volume jar for striped bass, Morone saxatilis, egg incubation. The McDonald jar measured 16 cm in diameter by 45 cm in height and had a volume of 6 L. The experimental jar measured 0.4 m in diameter by 1.3 m in height and had a volume of 200 L. The hypothesis is that there is no difference in percent survival of fry hatched in experimental jars compared with McDonald jars. Striped bass brood fish were collected from the Coosa River and spawned using the dry spawn method of fertilization. Four McDonald jars were stocked with approximately 150 g of eggs each. Post-hatch survival was estimated at 48, 96, and 144 h. Stocking rates resulted in an average egg loading rate (??1 SE) in McDonald jars of 21.9 ?? 0.03 eggs/mL and in experimental jars of 10.9 ?? 0.57 eggs/mL. The major finding of this study was that average fry survival was 37.3 ?? 4.49% for McDonald jars and 34.2 ?? 3.80% for experimental jars. Although survival in experimental jars was slightly less than in McDonald jars, the effect of container volume on survival to 48 h (F = 6.57; df = 1,5; P > 0.05), 96 h (F = 0.02; df = 1, 4; P > 0.89), and 144 h (F = 3.50; df = 1, 4; P > 0.13) was not statistically significant. Mean survival between replicates ranged from 14.7 to 60.1% in McDonald jars and from 10.1 to 54.4% in experimental jars. No effect of initial stocking rate on survival (t = 0.06; df = 10; P > 0.95) was detected. Experimental jars allowed for incubation of a greater number of eggs in less than half the floor space of McDonald jars. As hatchery production is often limited by space or water supply, experimental jars offer an alternative to extending spawning activities, thereby reducing labor and operations cost. As survival was similar to McDonald jars, the experimental jar is suitable for striped bass egg incubation. ?? Copyright by the World Aquaculture Society 2010.

  6. Thermal mortality prediction equations for entrainable striped bass

    SciTech Connect

    Kellogg, R.J.; Ligotino, R.J.; Jinks, S.M.

    1984-11-01

    Thermal mortality prediction equations based on a logistic regression model were developed for eggs, for yolk-sac larvae, and for postyolk-sac larvae plus early juveniles of striped bass Morone saxatilis. Exposure temperature, exposure duration, acclimation temperature, and fish size were important explanatory variables. Mortality increased as test temperature and exposure duration increased and decreased as acclimation temperature and size increased. In addition to these main variables, interaction terms significantly improved the performance of the equations for yolk-sac larvae and for postyolk-sac larvae plus early juveniles. These mortality models can be used to make predictive assessments of the thermal component of entrainment mortality or to help determine power plant operating conditions that minimize the entrainment impact. 23 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  7. Dietary choline requirement of juvenile hybrid striped bass.

    PubMed

    Griffin, M E; Wilson, K A; White, M R; Brown, P B

    1994-09-01

    Two experiments were conducted to estimate the dietary choline requirement and to determine the effects of dietary choline on liver lipid deposition in juvenile hybrid striped bass (Monrone saxatilis x M. chrysops). Experimental diets contained 0.73 g total sulfur amino acids/100 g diet (0.47 g methionine + 0.26 g cyst(e)ine/100 g diet), thus meeting, but not exceeding, the requirement. Graded levels of choline bitartrate in Experiment 1 and choline chloride in Experiment 2 were added to the basal diet, resulting in eight dietary treatments in each experiment. Dietary treatments were 0, 250, 500, 1000, 2000, 4000, 6000 and 8000 mg choline/kg dry diet. Diets were fed for 12 and 10 wk in Experiments 1 and 2, respectively. Dietary choline concentrations significantly affected weight gain, feed efficiency, survival and total liver lipid concentrations in each experiment. Weight gain and feed efficiency were greatest in fish fed 500 mg choline/kg dry diet as choline bitartrate. Total liver lipid concentrations were variable but tended to be lowest in fish fed diets containing at least 2000 mg choline/kg diet. Survival was significantly lower in the group of fish fed 8000 mg choline/kg diet supplied by choline bitartrate. Weight gain and feed efficiency were greatest and total liver lipid concentration was lowest in groups of fish fed at least 500 mg choline/kg diet as choline chloride; survival was unaffected by dietary treatment. Therefore, choline chloride seems to be a better source of dietary choline than choline bitartrate and 500 mg choline/kg diet is adequate for maximum weight gain and prevention of increased liver lipid concentration in juvenile hybrid striped bass.

  8. Mycobacterium-Inducible Nramp in Striped Bass (Morone saxatilis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burge, E.J.; Gauthier, David T.; Ottinger, C.A.; Van Veld, P.A.

    2004-01-01

    In mammals, the natural resistance-associated macrophage protein 1 gene, Nramp1, plays a major role in resistance to mycobacterial infections. Chesapeake Bay striped bass (Morone saxatilis) is currently experiencing an epizootic of mycobacteriosis that threatens the health of this ecologically and economically important species. In the present study, we characterized an Nramp gene in this species and obtained evidence that there is induction following Mycobacterium exposure. The striped bass Nramp gene (MsNramp) and a 554-amino-acid sequence contain all the signal features of the Nramp family, including a topology of 12 transmembrane domains (TM), the transport protein-specific binding-protein-dependent transport system inner membrane component signature, three N-linked glycosylation sites between TM 7 and TM 8, sites of casein kinase and protein kinase C phosphorylation in the amino and carboxy termini, and a tyrosine kinase phosphorylation site between TM 6 and TM 7. Phylogenetic analysis most closely grouped MsNramp with other teleost Nramp genes and revealed high sequence similarity with mammalian Nramp2. MsNramp expression was present in all tissues assayed by reverse transcription-PCR. Within 1 day of injection of Mycobacterium marinum, MsNramp expression was highly induced (17-fold higher) in peritoneal exudate (PE) cells compared to the expression in controls. The levels of MsNramp were three- and sixfold higher on days 3 and 15, respectively. Injection of Mycobacterium shottsii resulted in two-, five-, and threefold increases in gene expression in PE cells over the time course. This report is the first report of induction of an Nramp gene by mycobacteria in a poikilothermic vertebrate.

  9. Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis of Atlantic Coast striped bass.

    PubMed

    Bielawski, J P; Pumo, D E

    1997-01-01

    Atlantic Coast striped bass exhibit exceptionally low levels of genetic variation. The ability of the randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) method to uncover genetic variation in this highly conserved species was investigated. Sufficient levels of variation were detected to allow a population genetic analysis of the four migratory populations of Atlantic Coast striped bass. Lynch's analogue of Wright's FST (F'ST) suggests that Atlantic Coast striped bass are genetically subdivided (F'ST for pooled Atlantic samples = 0.44). Significant heterogeneity was detected in the frequencies of 32 per cent of surveyed RAPD markers. A modification of Slatkin's conditional average frequency method suggests that gene flow is present among the sampled Atlantic Coast striped bass. Results of the RAPD analysis suggest that gene flow is sufficient to prevent fixation of alternate genetic markers, but not sufficient to prevent the development of significant divergence in frequencies of these markers.

  10. Striped bass annual site fidelity and habitat utilization in J. Strom Thurmond Reservoir, South Carolina-Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Young, S.P.; Isely, J.J.

    2002-01-01

    Forty-eight adult striped bass Morone saxatilis (3.2-19.1 kg) were captured by electrofishing in the tailrace of Richard B. Russell Dam and in the upper reaches of two major tributaries; they were implanted with temperature-sensitive radio transmitters and tracked approximately bimonthly for 20 months. As J. Strom Thurmond Reservoir downstream from the dam became thermally stratified in May, fish vacated the tributaries. From June to October, all striped bass were found within the reservoir's historical Savannah River channel. By August, most of the instrumented fish were found in the upper section of the reservoir, where optimal habitat was available throughout the summer owing to cool, artificially oxygenated hypolimnetic discharges from Richard B. Russell Dam. In mid-October the reservoir destratified, and fish dispersed from their up-reservoir summering areas and redistributed themselves throughout the reservoir. During early winter, the striped bass returned to tributary habitat or down-reservoir areas and generally used these locations throughout the winter. The fish exhibited a high degree of site fidelity to their summering areas, source tributaries (after fall dispersal and throughout the winter), and spring spawning areas. Mean movement rates were highest in the spring and fall, corresponding to the migration from tributaries in May and the return migration after fall dispersal. Mean movement rates were lowest in summer and winter, corresponding to the periods of high fidelity to summering and wintering areas. The average monthly temperatures and dissolved oxygen concentrations in areas used by striped bass were 19.0-20.4??C and 4.86-6.44 mg/L during May-October, which corresponded to average monthly habitat suitability index values of 0.76-0.98. Striped bass avoided temperatures above 25.1??C and dissolved oxygen concentrations less than 2.3 mg/L.

  11. Zooplankton variability and larval striped bass foraging: Evaluating potential match/mismatch regulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chick, J.H.; Van Den Avyle, M.J.

    1999-01-01

    We quantified temporal and spatial variability of zooplankton in three potential nursery sites (river, transition zone, lake) for larval striped bass (Morone saxatilis) in Lake Marion, South Carolina, during April and May 1993-1995. In two of three years, microzooplankton (rotifers and copepod nauplii) density was significantly greater in the lake site than in the river or transition zone. Macrozooplankton (>200 ??m) composition varied among the three sites in all years with adult copepods and cladocerans dominant at the lake, and juvenile Corbicula fluminea dominant at the river and transition zone. Laboratory feeding experiments, simulating both among-site (site treatments) and within-site (density treatments) variability, were conducted in 1995 to quantify the effects of the observed zooplankton variability on foraging success of larval striped bass. A greater proportion of larvae fed in the lake than in the river or transition-zone treatments across all density treatments: mean (x), 10x and 100x. Larvae also ingested significantly more dry mass of prey in the lake treatment in both the mean and 10x density treatments. Field zooplankton and laboratory feeding data suggest that both spatial and temporal variability of zooplankton influence larval striped bass foraging. Prey density levels that supported successful foraging in our feeding experiments occurred in the lake during late April and May in 1994 and 1995 but were never observed in the river or transition zone. Because the rivers flowing into Lake Marion are regulated, it may be possible to devise flow management schemes that facilitate larval transport to the lake and thereby increase the proportion of larvae matched to suitable prey resources.

  12. Linking habitat use of Hudson River striped bass to accumulation of polychlorinated biphenyl congeners

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, J.T.F.; Secor, D.H.; Zlokovitz, E.; Wales, S.Q.; Baker, J.E.

    2000-03-15

    Since 1976, the commercial striped bass fishery in the Hudson River (NY) has been closed due to total polychlorinated biphenyl (t-PCB) concentrations that exceed the US Food and Drug Administration's advisory level of 2 {micro}g/g-wet weight. Extensive monitoring of Hudson River striped bass demonstrated much more variability in t-PCB levels among individual striped bass than could be explained by their age, sex, or lipid contents. To investigate the possible role of differential habitat use among subpopulations of striped bass in controlling their PCB exposures, 70 fish collected throughout the Hudson River estuary and Long Island Sound in 1994--1995 were analyzed for PCB congeners, and their lifetime migration behaviors were estimated by otolith microchemistry. The mean salinity encountered during the fish's last growth season prior to capture was inversely correlated with the t-PCB body burden. Striped bass permanently residing in fresh and oligohaline portions of the estuary adjacent to known PCB sources had elevated t-PCB levels and congeneric patterns with higher proportions of di-, tri-, and tetrachlorobiphenyls. Conversely, fish spending the majority of their life in more saline waters of the estuary or migrating frequently throughout the salinity gradient contained lower PCB levels composed of more highly chlorinated congeners. The approach used in this study allows habitat use to be incorporated into exposure assessments for anadromous fish species such as striped bass.

  13. Use of diets formulated for summer water temperatures in pond production of hybrid striped bass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elevated water temperatures are common in hybrid striped bass or Sunshine bass (HSB; Morone chrysops x M. saxatilis) production ponds during summer months in the southern US. Median daily water temperatures often exceed 30 C from June through September. This experiment was conducted to extend and re...

  14. Hepatic transcriptomic and metabolic responses of hybrid striped bass to acute and chronic hypoxic insult

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Striped bass (Morone saxatilis), white bass (Morone chrysops), and their hybrid are an important group of recreational and farmed species in the United States. Regardless of habitat, it is not uncommon for fish of the genus Morone to encounter and cope with conditions of scarce oxygen availability....

  15. Dietary arginine requirement of juvenile hybrid striped bass.

    PubMed

    Griffin, M E; Wilson, K A; Brown, P B

    1994-06-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the dietary arginine requirement of juvenile hybrid striped bass (Morone saxatilis x M. chrysops); a third experiment evaluated the interaction of lysine and arginine. Diets in Experiments 1 and 2 were supplemented with graded concentrations of L-arginine-HCl, resulting in eight dietary treatments. Dietary arginine concentrations ranged from 1.0 to 2.4 g/100 g diet in Experiment 1 and from 0.6 to 2.0 g/100 g diet in Experiment 2. Weight gain was not affected by dietary treatments in Experiment 1. Feed efficiency was significantly affected by dietary arginine concentrations, and the data, when subjected to broken-line analysis, resulted in a requirement estimate of 1.53 +/- 0.20 g/100 g diet. Weight gain and feed efficiency were both significantly affected by dietary arginine concentrations in Experiment 2. Broken-line analyses of weight gain and feed efficiency data indicated the dietary arginine requirement to be 1.55 +/- 0.10 and 1.45 +/- 0.12 g/100 g diet, respectively. Diets in Experiment 3 contained lysine and arginine in ratios of 1:1, 1:1.5, 1:2 and 1:2.5 for the previously estimated requirements for both lysine:arginine and arginine:lysine. No differences were observed in weight gain or feed efficiency for fish fed various lysine:arginine ratios, but serum lysine was significantly different among treatment groups.

  16. US Atlantic coast striped bass: Issues with a recovered population

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hartman, K.J.; Margraf, F.J.

    2003-01-01

    Striped bass, Morone saxatilis (Walbaum), is an anadromous species naturally occurring along the US Atlantic coast, which historically supported valuable commercial and recreational fisheries. In response to a near order-of-magnitude decline in landings, the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission enacted a management plan in 1981 protecting fish until they could spawn at least once. By 1989, recruitment increased in natal rivers and regulations were relaxed, permitting limited fisheries by 1990. By 1995, the stock was declared fully recovered. Since the recovery, concern has increased over the health of the stocks. In the 1990s, fish in poor physical condition with dermal lesions became common in Chesapeake Bay. Pathogens of most concern in cultures from fish include the genus Mycobacterium. Coincident with declines in fish health were changes in diets, declines of preferred prey, and reduced growth and condition. Theories were suggested linking declines in condition to reductions in forage base or pathogens. Diets have changed since the 1950s and while many Chesapeake fish are infected with mycobacteria, it is still not known how or if these factors are linked. The highest priorities for research were considered to be: linking numerous local and regional studies to provide a coast-wide perspective; continuation of investigations linking population health to the prey-base; determination of the cause-effect of mycobacteria infections; and formulation of management options.

  17. Environmental contaminant effects on juvenile striped bass in the San Francisco Estuary, California, USA.

    PubMed

    Spearow, Jimmy L; Kota, Rama S; Ostrach, David J

    2011-02-01

    The decline of pelagic organisms in the San Francisco Estuary (SFE) (California, USA) is attributed to several factors, including water diversions, invasive species, and exposure to environmental toxicants. The present study evaluated the effects of environmental contaminants on liver vitellogenin, metallothionein, 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD), and benzyloxyresorufin O-deethylase (BROD) activity in juvenile striped bass (Morone saxitilis) in the SFE. Analysis of juvenile striped bass liver extracts revealed site-specific elevations of vitellogenin, metallothionein, and EROD biomarkers across the estuary. Although some striped bass in the estuary showed EROD activity similar to unhandled hatchery controls, several sites in the estuary showed significantly higher EROD activity that was in the range of beta-naphthoflavone (BNF)-injected, positive controls. Overall, EROD activity averaged 283% higher in estuary fish than in hatchery controls. Chemical analyses of extracts from semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) deployed in the estuary for one month showed elevated polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) levels. Semipermeable membrane devices extract injections-induced metallothionein and BROD in striped bass livers. These data show that environmental exposures are impacting EROD and other biomarkers in the SFE striped bass population. Previous studies in our laboratory have associated poor larval development with maternal transfer of environmental contaminants. Further studies are needed to monitor contaminant exposures by the use of biomarkers and to integrate them into a more effective pelagic species recovery plan in the SFE. PMID:21038432

  18. Seasonal use of a New England estuary by foraging contingents of migratory striped bass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mather, Martha E.; Pautzke, Sarah M.; Finn, John T.; Deegan, Linda A.; Muth, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    Using acoustic telemetry on migratory striped bass Morone saxatilis in Plum Island Estuary (PIE), Massachusetts, we found that striped bass (335–634 mm total length) tagged in the spring and summer of 2005 (n = 14) and 2006 (n = 46) stayed in the estuary for an average of 66.0 d in 2005 and 72.2 d in 2006. Striped bass spent the most time in two specific reaches: middle Plum Island Sound and lower Rowley River. In both years, three different use-groups of striped bass were observed in PIE. Short-term visitors (n = 24) stayed in the estuary only briefly (range = 5–20 d). Two groups of seasonal residents stayed for more than 30 d, either in the Rowley River (n = 14) or in Plum Island Sound (n = 22). Within PIE, the two seasonal-resident use-groups may be foraging contingents that learn how to feed efficiently in specific parts of the estuary. These distinct within-estuary use patterns could have different implications for striped bass condition and prey impact.

  19. Major histocompatibility complex class II A gene polymorphism in the striped bass

    SciTech Connect

    Hardee, J.J.; Godwin, U.; Benedetto, R.; McConnell, T.J.

    1995-02-01

    Adaptions of the polymerase chain reaction were used to isolate cDNA sequences encoding the Major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) class II A gene(s) of the striped bass (Morone saxatilis). Four complete Mhc class II A genes were cloned and sequenced from a specimen originating on the Roanoke River, North Carolina, and another three A genes from a specimen originating from the Santee-Cooper Reservoir, South Carolina, identifying a total of seven unique sequences. The sequence suggests the presence of at least two Mhc class II A loci. The extensive sequence variability observed between the seven different Mhc class II clones was concentrated in the {alpha}1 encoding domain. The encoded {alpha}2, transmembrane, and cytoplasmic regions of all seven striped bass genes correlated well with those of known vertebrate Mhc class II proteins. Overall, the striped bass sequences showed greatest similarity to the Mhc class II A genes of the zebrafish. Southern blot analysis demonstrated extensive polymorphism in the Mhc class II A genes in members of a Roanoke river-caught population of striped bass versus a lesser degree of polymorphism in an aquacultured Santee-Cooper population of striped bass. 55 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Physiological responses of hybrid striped bass to aqueous copper in freshwater and saltwater.

    PubMed

    Bielmyer, G K; Tomasso, J; Klaine, S J

    2006-05-01

    Copper (Cu) is an abundant trace metal, and although essential at low levels, it is also potentially toxic to aquatic organisms. Mechanisms of toxicity and consequences of exposure vary depending on ionoregulatory status (acclimated to freshwater or salt water). The goal of this research was to examine the responses of hybrid striped bass (Morone chrysops x Morone saxatilis) exposed to Cu in freshwater and 15 g/L salt water. In freshwater, a general dose- and time-dependent pattern of increasing Cu accumulation in gill tissue was evident in fish exposed to aqueous Cu (220 and 447 mg/L) for up to 96 hours. The 96-hour acute median lethal concentration for freshwater-acclimated hybrid striped bass exposed to Cu was 94 mg/L (confidence interval = 62 to 144 mg/L). Plasma osmolality and Na(+) concentrations decreased in Cu-exposed fish. Freshwater-acclimated hybrid striped bass exposed to aqueous Cu (60 mg/L) for 3 weeks decreased in mass and accumulated Cu in gill, intestine, and liver. In salt water, no mortality occurred, and there were no statistical differences in growth, tissue Cu, or plasma ion concentrations in hybrid striped bass exposed to Cu compared with control fish. Freshwater-acclimated hybrid striped bass were very sensitive to Cu exposure and exhibited responses typical of commonly tested teleost fishes; however, the same sensitivity was not observed in salt water-acclimated fish.

  1. Major histocompatibility complex class II A gene polymorphism in the striped bass.

    PubMed

    Hardee, J J; Godwin, U; Benedetto, R; McConnell, T J

    1995-01-01

    Adaptions of the polymerase chain reaction were used to isolate cDNA sequences encoding the Major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) class II A gene(s) of the striped bass (Morone saxatilis). Four complete Mhc class II A genes were cloned and sequenced from a specimen originating in the Roanoke River, North Carolina, and another three A genes from a specimen originating from the Santee-Cooper Reservoir, South Carolina, identifying a total of seven unique sequences. The sequence suggests the presence of at least two Mhc class II A loci. The extensive sequence variability observed between the seven different Mhc class II clones was concentrated in the alpha 1 encoding domain. The encoded alpha 2, transmembrane, and cytoplasmic regions of all seven striped bass genes correlated well with those of known vertebrate Mhc class II proteins. Overall, the striped bass sequences showed greatest similarity to the Mhc class II A genes of the zebrafish. Southern blot analysis demonstrated extensive polymorphism in the Mhc class II A genes in members of a Roanoke river-caught population of striped bass versus a lesser degree of polymorphism in an aquacultured Santee-Cooper population of striped bass.

  2. Apolipoprotein A-I from striped bass (Morone saxatilis) demonstrates antibacterial activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Johnston, L Danielle; Brown, Gwynne; Gauthier, David; Reece, Kimberly; Kator, Howard; Van Veld, Peter

    2008-10-01

    HDL and apolipoprotein A-I from teleostean fishes demonstrate in vitro activity against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. In this study, we purified ApoA-1 from striped bass (Morone saxatilis) plasma and examined its in vitro antibacterial activity against Streptococcus sp., Escherichia coli, and Mycobacterium marinum. In addition, we obtained sequence for a putative striped bass ApoA-1 gene, which when translated contained the identical sequence generated from N-terminal sequencing of the purified ApoA-1. The predicted secondary and tertiary structures contained the characteristic proline residues and high alpha-helical content conserved between mammals and fishes. Purified ApoA-1 exhibited antibacterial activity against the bacteria assayed. Concentrations of 125 microg/mL for E. coli, 250 microg/mL for Streptococcus sp., and 250 microg/mL for M. marinum, inhibited bacterial growth by 50% compared to control. ApoA-1 plasma concentrations in experimental and wild fish ranged from undetectable levels to greater than 5 mg/mL, indicating that striped bass ApoA-1 is an effective antibacterial agent at concentrations below the range of physiological concentrations in striped bass plasma. We therefore conclude that ApoA-1 could play a role in innate defense against bacterial pathogens in striped bass.

  3. Environmental contaminant effects on juvenile striped bass in the San Francisco Estuary, California, USA.

    PubMed

    Spearow, Jimmy L; Kota, Rama S; Ostrach, David J

    2011-02-01

    The decline of pelagic organisms in the San Francisco Estuary (SFE) (California, USA) is attributed to several factors, including water diversions, invasive species, and exposure to environmental toxicants. The present study evaluated the effects of environmental contaminants on liver vitellogenin, metallothionein, 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD), and benzyloxyresorufin O-deethylase (BROD) activity in juvenile striped bass (Morone saxitilis) in the SFE. Analysis of juvenile striped bass liver extracts revealed site-specific elevations of vitellogenin, metallothionein, and EROD biomarkers across the estuary. Although some striped bass in the estuary showed EROD activity similar to unhandled hatchery controls, several sites in the estuary showed significantly higher EROD activity that was in the range of beta-naphthoflavone (BNF)-injected, positive controls. Overall, EROD activity averaged 283% higher in estuary fish than in hatchery controls. Chemical analyses of extracts from semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) deployed in the estuary for one month showed elevated polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) levels. Semipermeable membrane devices extract injections-induced metallothionein and BROD in striped bass livers. These data show that environmental exposures are impacting EROD and other biomarkers in the SFE striped bass population. Previous studies in our laboratory have associated poor larval development with maternal transfer of environmental contaminants. Further studies are needed to monitor contaminant exposures by the use of biomarkers and to integrate them into a more effective pelagic species recovery plan in the SFE.

  4. Mortality estimates of striped bass caught in Albemarle Sound and Roanoke River, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dorazio, Robert M.

    1996-01-01

    A statistical analysis of the age composition of striped bass Morone saxatilis harvested in Albemarle Sound and the Roanoke River, North Carolina. indicated that in 1988–1992 the population experienced a relatively high rate of total mortality. Age-3 and older fish were estimated to have been fully vulnerable to fishing mortality and to have experienced a total instantaneous mortality rate of 1.04/year, which equals about 65% annually. Legal size limits in directed striped bass fisheries appear to have provided some protection to age-2 fish, which were only partially vulnerable to fishing mortality. The portion of total mortality due to fishing could not be estimated unconditionally because the numbers of striped bass taken in fisheries not directed at striped bass were unknown. An eggs-per-recruit model was developed to provide a conceptual framework for comparing the effects of fishery management options, such as reductions in hycatch or fishing mortality. on the striped bass population.

  5. Modeling the effects of potential salinity shifts on the recovery of striped bass in the Savannah River estuary, Georgia-South Carolina, United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reinert, T.R.; Peterson, J.T.

    2008-01-01

    Increased salinity in spawning and nursery grounds in the Savannah River estuary was cited as the primary cause of a 97% decrease in adult striped bass (Morone saxatilis) and a concomitant 96% decrease in striped bass egg production. Restoration efforts focused on environmental remediation and stock enhancement have resulted in restored salinity patterns and increased egg and adult abundances. However, future water needs or harbor development may preclude further recovery by reducing freshwater inflow or increasing salinity intrusion. To assess the effect of potential changes in the salinity regime, we developed models relating discharge, tidal phase, and salinity to striped bass egg and early larval survival and re-cast these in a quantitative Bayesian belief network. The model indicated that a small upstream shift (???1.67 km) in the salinity regime would have the least impact on striped bass early life history survival, whereas shifts >1.67 km would have progressively larger impacts, with a 8.33-km shift potentially reducing our estimated survival probability by >28%. Such an impact could have cumulative and long-term detrimental effects on the recovery of the Savannah River striped bass population. The available salinity data were collected during average and low flows, so our model represents some typical and some extreme conditions during a striped bass spawning season. Our model is a relatively simplistic, "first-order" attempt at evaluating potential effects of changes in the Savannah River estuarine salinity regime and points to areas of concern and potential future research. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  6. Age-related changes in hematology and plasma chemistry values of hybrid striped bass (Morone chrysops X Morone saxatilis).

    PubMed

    Hrubec, Terry C.; Smith, Stephen A.; Robertson, John L.

    2001-01-01

    Hybrid striped bass (Morone chrysops X Morone saxatilis ) are an important aquaculture species yet there are few diagnostic tools available to assess their health. Hematology and clinical chemistry analyses are not used extensively in fish medicine due to the lack of reference intervals for various fish species, and because factors such as age can affect blood values. There is little published information regarding age-related changes in blood values of juvenile fish. It is important to evaluate juvenile fish, as this is the time they are raised in aquaculture settings. Determining age-related changes in the blood values of fishes would further develop clinical pathology as a diagnostic tool, enhancing both fish medicine and the aquaculture industry. The results of standard hematology and clinical chemistry analysis were evaluated in juvenile hybrid striped bass at 4, 6, 9, 15, and 19 months of age. Values for PCV and RBC indices were significantly lower, and plasma protein concentration was significantly higher in younger fish. Total WBC and lymphocyte counts were significantly higher in fish at 6 and 9 months of age, while neutrophil and monocyte counts were higher at 6, 9, and 15 months. Eosinophil counts were significantly higher in 9-month-old fish. The majority of hematologic values fell within previously established reference intervals, indicating that only slight modification to the intervals is necessary for evaluating hematologic results of hybrid striped bass at different ages. The following analytes deviated sufficiently from adult reference intervals to warrant separate reference values: plasma protein concentration at 4 months, WBC and lymphocyte counts at 15 and 19 months, and thrombocyte-like-cells at 9 months of age. Values for most biochemical analytes were significantly different among age groups except for creatinine and potassium concentrations. Comparisons with reference intervals were not made for biochemical analytes, because established

  7. Atlantic coast feeding habits of striped bass: A synthesis supporting a coast-wide understanding of trophic biology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walter, J. F.; Overton, A.S.; Ferry, K.H.; Mather, M. E.

    2003-01-01

    The recent increase in the Atlantic coast population of striped bass, Morone saxatilis (Walbaum), prompted managers to re-evaluate their predatory impact. Published and unpublished diet data for striped bass on the Atlantic Coast of North America were examined for geographical, ontogenetic and seasonal patterns in the diet and to assess diet for this species. Diets of young-of-the-year (YOY) striped bass were similar across the Upper Atlantic (UPATL), Chesapeake and Delaware Bays (CBDEL) and North Carolina (NCARO) areas of the Atlantic coast where either fish or mysid shrimp dominate the diet. For age one and older striped bass, cluster analysis partitioned diets based on predominance of either Atlantic menhaden, Brevoortia tyrannus (Latrobe), characteristic of striped bass from the CBDEL and NCARO regions, or non-menhaden fishes or invertebrates, characteristic of fish from the UPATL, in the diet. The predominance of invertebrates in the diets of striped bass in the UPATL region can be attributed to the absence of several important species groups in Northern waters, particularly sciaenid fishes, and to the sporadic occurrences of Atlantic menhaden to UPATL waters. In all regions, across most seasons and in most size classes of striped bass, the clupeiod fishes; menhaden, anchovies (Anchoa spp.) and river herrings (Alosa spp,) and Atlantic herring, Clupea harengus L., dominated the diets of striped bass above the first year of life.

  8. A microsatellite linkage map of striped bass (Morone saxatilis) reveals conserved synteny with the hree-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: The striped bass (Morone saxatilis) and its relatives (genus Morone) are of great importance to fisheries and aquaculture in North America. As part of a collaborative effort to employ molecular genetic technologies in striped bass breeding programs, nearly 500 microsatellite markers were...

  9. Toxic materials, fishing, and environmental variation: simulated effects on striped bass population trends

    SciTech Connect

    Goodyear, C.P.

    1985-01-01

    Decreased survival of larval striped bass Morone saxatilis resulting from toxic chemicals in the environment and decreased survival of adults caused by fishing both are suspected as agents contributing to the decline in the Chesapeake Bay stock since the mid-1970s. The relative power of each type of mortality to cause population declines was evaluated with simulation techniques. Equivalent levels of added mortality induced qualitatively identical and quantitatively similar trends in population simulations for all conditions examined except if strong density-dependent mortality preceded the contaminant toxicity. In this case the contaminant effect caused a greater reduction in yield, but the population did not tend toward extinction. The results indicate that the observed downward trend in the Chesapeake Bay population can be halted or reversed by a reduction in fishing mortality, even if contaminant toxicity is the proximate cause for the decline. 28 references, 1 figure, 1 table.

  10. Short-term infection of striped bass Morone saxatilis with Mycobacterium marinum.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Soo Jin; Gonsalves, Lonnie C; Jacobs, John M; Rhodes, Matt; Councilman, Jimmy; Baya, Ana; May, Eric B; Fast, Mark D

    2011-04-01

    Striped bass Morone saxatilis were studied in order to characterize their immune responses over the short term following challenge with Mycobacterium marinum. The expression of immunity-related genes (IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, Nramp and TGF-beta) quickly increased following infection with M. marinum, but these genes were subsequently down-regulated despite the fact that bacterial counts remained high. The number of monocytes and neutrophils also initially increased at 1 d postinfection. This confirms the importance of these types of cells in initial inflammation and mycobacterial infection in striped bass. The phagocytic index of splenic leukocytes over these same time frames did not change significantly following infection. The discrete window in which inflammatory mechanisms were stimulated in striped bass may be related to the intracellular nature of this pathogen. PMID:21648240

  11. Tag recovery estimates of migration of striped bass from spawning areas of the Chesapeake Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dorazio, R.M.; Hattala, K.A.; McCollough, C.B.; Skjeveland, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    In 1988–1991 striped bass Morone saxatilis were collected for tagging from various spawning areas within the Hudson River (New York) and the Chesapeake Bay (Maryland). The fish were tagged and released during traditional periods of spawning and recovered by commercial and recreational fishermen. The proportion of fish that migrated in spring–fall from spawning areas in Chesapeake Bay to more northern waters of mid-Atlantic and New England states was estimated from the geographically stratified tag returns. Most of the tagged fish were 40–100 cm total length (TL). The estimated proportion of migrant striped bass increased with body size, and nearly all fish larger than 100 cm TL left the bay during the spring–fall migration. Sex-specific differences in migration appear to be associated with the differences in body size of mature males and females, thus lending support to previously hypothesized patterns of striped bass migration.

  12. Effects of five metals on susceptibility of striped bass to Flexibacter columnaris

    SciTech Connect

    MacFarlane, R.D.; Bullock, G.L.; McLaughlin, J.J.A.

    1986-03-01

    Exposure of young striped bass Morone saxatilis (weight, 8.5-34 g) to a mixture of arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, and selenium at 4 and 10 times the verage environmental concentrations of 1-3 ..mu..g/L protected the fish from experimental infection with Flexibacter columnaris, the causal organism of columnaris disease. In four trials, all striped bass died within 7 d after a 2-min exposure to 5 x 10/sup 6/ F. columnaris cells in untreated water. In contrast, no fish died after a single day's exposure to the metal mixture followed by infection with F. columnaris and a second exposure to the metals for seven more days. When striped bass were exposed 5 d to individual metals, copper protected against infection and cadmium offered marginal protection but was slightly toxic after 2 d exposure. Arsenic increased susceptibility to infection, and lead and selenium were without an apparent effect.

  13. Short-term infection of striped bass Morone saxatilis with Mycobacterium marinum.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Soo Jin; Gonsalves, Lonnie C; Jacobs, John M; Rhodes, Matt; Councilman, Jimmy; Baya, Ana; May, Eric B; Fast, Mark D

    2011-04-01

    Striped bass Morone saxatilis were studied in order to characterize their immune responses over the short term following challenge with Mycobacterium marinum. The expression of immunity-related genes (IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, Nramp and TGF-beta) quickly increased following infection with M. marinum, but these genes were subsequently down-regulated despite the fact that bacterial counts remained high. The number of monocytes and neutrophils also initially increased at 1 d postinfection. This confirms the importance of these types of cells in initial inflammation and mycobacterial infection in striped bass. The phagocytic index of splenic leukocytes over these same time frames did not change significantly following infection. The discrete window in which inflammatory mechanisms were stimulated in striped bass may be related to the intracellular nature of this pathogen.

  14. Slow growth did not decouple the otolith size-fish size relationship in striped bass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dickey, C.L.; Isely, J.J.; Tomasso, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    Eight-day-old striped bass Morone saxatilis (6.17-6.22 mm, total length) were fed twice daily at three feeding rates to produce three growth rates. Fish were sampled once per week for 4 weeks to determine total length and otolith radius. Feed ration treatments resulted in discrete size-classes of striped bass after 4 weeks with a 27% difference in mean length between the low and high feed ration treatments. No significant differences in slope or intercept for the regression of fish length on otolith radius were observed among treatments, suggesting that slow growth alone may not be sufficient to result in decoupling of the otolith size-fish size relationship in striped bass.

  15. The effects of bupropion on hybrid striped bass brain chemistry and predatory behavior.

    PubMed

    Sweet, Lauren E; Bisesi, Joseph H; Lei, E N Y; Lam, Michael H W; Klaine, Stephen J

    2016-08-01

    Increased use of antidepressants has led to an increase in their detection in final treated wastewater effluents and receiving streams. Antidepressants are intended to modify human behavior by altering brain chemistry, and because of the high functional conservation of antidepressant target receptors in vertebrates, aquatic organisms may be at risk. The antidepressant bupropion is designed to alter brain norepinephrine and dopamine concentrations in humans. The objective of the present study was to understand if alteration of dopaminergic neurotransmitter concentrations in the hybrid striped bass (Morone saxatilis × Morone chrysops) brain by bupropion would alter this predator's ability to capture prey. The authors exposed hybrid striped bass to bupropion in a static system for 6 d, followed by a 6-d recovery period. During the present study's 12-d experiment, each hybrid striped bass was fed 4 unexposed fathead minnows every 3 d, and the time it took the hybrid striped bass to consume each of those 4 fathead minnows was quantified. After each feeding event, hybrid striped bass brains were harvested and analyzed for changes in several brain neurotransmitter concentrations, including serotonin, norepinephrine, dopamine, and many of their metabolites. Although bupropion altered the concentration of dopamine and many of the dopaminergic neurotransmitter metabolite concentrations in the brains on day 3 of the exposure, it did not alter the time to capture prey. This suggests that alteration of dopaminergic neurotransmitter concentrations in the hybrid striped bass brain does not alter a predator's ability to capture prey. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2058-2065. © 2016 SETAC. PMID:26748934

  16. The effects of bupropion on hybrid striped bass brain chemistry and predatory behavior.

    PubMed

    Sweet, Lauren E; Bisesi, Joseph H; Lei, E N Y; Lam, Michael H W; Klaine, Stephen J

    2016-08-01

    Increased use of antidepressants has led to an increase in their detection in final treated wastewater effluents and receiving streams. Antidepressants are intended to modify human behavior by altering brain chemistry, and because of the high functional conservation of antidepressant target receptors in vertebrates, aquatic organisms may be at risk. The antidepressant bupropion is designed to alter brain norepinephrine and dopamine concentrations in humans. The objective of the present study was to understand if alteration of dopaminergic neurotransmitter concentrations in the hybrid striped bass (Morone saxatilis × Morone chrysops) brain by bupropion would alter this predator's ability to capture prey. The authors exposed hybrid striped bass to bupropion in a static system for 6 d, followed by a 6-d recovery period. During the present study's 12-d experiment, each hybrid striped bass was fed 4 unexposed fathead minnows every 3 d, and the time it took the hybrid striped bass to consume each of those 4 fathead minnows was quantified. After each feeding event, hybrid striped bass brains were harvested and analyzed for changes in several brain neurotransmitter concentrations, including serotonin, norepinephrine, dopamine, and many of their metabolites. Although bupropion altered the concentration of dopamine and many of the dopaminergic neurotransmitter metabolite concentrations in the brains on day 3 of the exposure, it did not alter the time to capture prey. This suggests that alteration of dopaminergic neurotransmitter concentrations in the hybrid striped bass brain does not alter a predator's ability to capture prey. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2058-2065. © 2016 SETAC.

  17. Uptake, retention, and elmination of PCB (Aroclor 1254) by larval striped bass (Morone saxatilis)

    SciTech Connect

    Califano, R.J.; O'Conner, J.M.; Peters, L.S.

    1980-03-01

    Research report:Experiments to determine the rates of uptake and clearance of the PCB Aroclor 1254 in larvae of striped bass (Morone saxatilus) from the Hudson River in New York are described. Larval striped bass removed Aroclor 1254 from Hudson River water rapidly and nearly completely. More than 80% of the final Aroclor concentration was attained during the first 12 hr of exposure to contaminated water. However, Aroclor elimination from the fish was slow; less than 1% of the total Aroclor was released after 24 hr. (14 references, 1 table)

  18. Effect of dissolved oxygen concentration on growth of fingerling hybrid striped bass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Management of dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration in production ponds is important because fish growth and yield are greater in ponds with higher DO concentrations. The purpose of this study was to evaluate growth and metabolic responses of hybrid striped bass (Morone chrysops x M. saxatilis; HSB) f...

  19. S-oxygenation of eptam in hepatic microsomes from fresh- and saltwater striped bass (Morone saxatilis).

    PubMed

    Cashman, J R; Olsen, L D; Young, G; Bern, H

    1989-01-01

    The in vitro liver microsomal oxidation of eptam (ethyl N,N-dipropylthiocarbamate) in the presence of freshwater and salt water adapted striped bass liver microsomes was investigated. In freshwater hepatic microsomes from striped bass, eptam is S-oxygenated in a process consistent with the involvement of monooxygenase activity. In contrast, both eptam S-oxide and eptam sulfone are formed in microsomes from salt water adapted striped bass microsomes in a process that is independent of monooxygenase activity and consistent with a role of cooxidation by hydroperoxy fatty acids. The mechanism of oxidation of eptam by hydroperoxy fatty acids may involve radical species. Both eptam S-oxide and eptam sulfone are efficient carbamylating agents toward thiol nucleophiles and react with substituted thiophenols to produce thiocarbamates while eptam itself is relatively stable to trans thiocarbamylation. Monooxygenase-catalyzed S-oxygenation of eptam in freshwater striped bass hepatic microsomes may represent a bioactivation route, which may explain the toxicity of thiocarbamate herbicides such as eptam toward freshwater fish.

  20. Nested polymerase chain reaction assay for detection of Mycobacterium shottsii and M. pseudoshottsii in striped bass.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, D T; Vogelbein, W K; Rhodes, M W; Reece, K S

    2008-12-01

    Wild striped bass Morone saxatilis in Chesapeake Bay are experiencing a high prevalence of mycobacteriosis, which produces granulomatous lesions of the skin and visceral organs. Culture-based studies have indicated that the newly described species Mycobacterium shottsii and M. pseudoshottsii are the dominant isolates from diseased fish. The classical fish pathogen M. marinum is also found, albeit at much lower frequencies. Both M. shottsii and M. pseudoshottsii are extremely slow-growing on standard selective media, and up to 12 months may be required for isolation and characterization. Epidemiological studies of mycobacteriosis in Chesapeake Bay would therefore benefit from rapid molecular assays with which to detect these species in fish. In this paper, we describe the development of polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assays capable of detecting M. shottsii, M. pseudoshottsii, and, in most instances, coinfections thereof in striped bass tissues. In addition, PCR-RFLP assays were designed to detect M. marinum and other as-yet-undescribed Mycobacterium spp. present in Chesapeake Bay striped bass. Comparison of these molecular assays with culture-based techniques using splenic tissue from wild striped bass yielded generally concordant results and demonstrated the applicability of these techniques to the study of wild fish.

  1. Use of non-natal estuaries by migratory striped bass (Morone saxatilis) in summer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mather, M. E.; Finn, John T.; Ferry, K.H.; Deegan, Linda A.; Nelson, G.A.

    2009-01-01

    For most migratory fish, little is known about the location and size of foraging areas or how long individuals remain in foraging areas, even though these attributes may affect their growth, survival, and impact on local prey. We tested whether striped bass (Morone saxatilis Walbaum), found in Massachusetts in summer, were migratory, how long they stayed in non-natal estuaries, whether observed spatial patterns differed from random model predictions, whether fish returned to the same area across multiple years, and whether fishing effort could explain recapture patterns. Anchor tags were attached to striped bass that were caught and released in Massachusetts in 1999 and 2000, and recaptured between 1999 and 2007. In fall, tagged striped bass were caught south of where they were released in summer, confirming that fish were coastal migrants. In the first summer, 77% and 100% of the recaptured fish in the Great Marsh and along the Massachusetts coast, respectively, were caught in the same place where they were released. About two thirds of all fish recaptured near where they were released were caught 2-7 years after tagging. Our study shows that smaller (400-500 mm total length) striped bass migrate hundreds of kilometers along the Atlantic Ocean coast, cease their mobile lifestyle in summer when they use a relatively localized area for foraging (<20 km2), and return to these same foraging areas in subsequent years.

  2. Responses of hybrid striped bass to waterborne and dietary copper in freshwater and saltwater.

    PubMed

    Bielmyer, Gretchen K; Gatlin, Delbert; Isely, J Jeffrey; Tomasso, Joseph; Klaine, Stephen J

    2005-01-01

    Mechanisms of copper toxicity and consequences of exposure vary due to uptake route and ionoregulatory status. The goal of this research was to develop a model fish system to assess the influence of different Cu exposure routes (waterborne or dietary) on bioavailability, uptake, and effects in hybrid striped bass (Morone chrysops x Morone saxatilis) acclimated to fresh- or saltwater. Initially, hybrid striped bass were exposed to dietary Cu concentrations of 571, 785, and 1013 mug Cu/g, along with a control (approximately 5 microg Cu/g), for 14 days in saltwater. Intestinal and liver Cu accumulated in a dose-dependent manner in fish exposed to increasing levels of dietary Cu. Chronic (42 days) experiments were then conducted to determine sub-lethal effects of aqueous, dietary, and combined aqueous and dietary Cu exposures to both freshwater- and saltwater-acclimated hybrid striped bass. Growth and Cu accumulation in the gill, intestine, and liver were measured. Although no significant effects were observed in fish exposed to waterborne Cu, those exposed through the diet accumulated significant liver and intestinal Cu but showed no significant change in growth. Overall, these results suggest that at the levels tested, exposure to elevated waterborne Cu did not cause significant long-term tissue Cu accumulation, whereas dietary Cu exposure caused significant liver and intestinal Cu accumulation in hybrid striped bass which was comparable in both freshwater and saltwater (15 g/L).

  3. Responses of hybrid striped bass to waterborne and dietary copper in freshwater and saltwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bielmyer, G.K.; Gatlin, D.; Isely, J.J.; Tomasso, J.; Klaine, S.J.

    2005-01-01

    Mechanisms of copper toxicity and consequences of exposure vary due to uptake route and ionoregulatory status. The goal of this research was to develop a model fish system to assess the influence of different Cu exposure routes (waterborne or dietary) on bioavailability, uptake, and effects in hybrid striped bass (Morone chrysops??Morone saxatilis) acclimated to fresh- or saltwater. Initially, hybrid striped bass were exposed to dietary Cu concentrations of 571, 785, and 1013 ??g Cu/g, along with a control (??? 5 ??g Cu/g), for 14 days in saltwater. Intestinal and liver Cu accumulated in a dose-dependent manner in fish exposed to increasing levels of dietary Cu. Chronic (42 days) experiments were then conducted to determine sub-lethal effects of aqueous, dietary, and combined aqueous and dietary Cu exposures to both freshwater- and saltwater-acclimated hybrid striped bass. Growth and Cu accumulation in the gill, intestine, and liver were measured. Although no significant effects were observed in fish exposed to waterborne Cu, those exposed through the diet accumulated significant liver and intestinal Cu but showed no significant change in growth. Overall, these results suggest that at the levels tested, exposure to elevated waterborne Cu did not cause significant long-term tissue Cu accumulation, whereas dietary Cu exposure caused significant liver and intestinal Cu accumulation in hybrid striped bass which was comparable in both freshwater and saltwater (15 g/L). ?? 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Bioaccumulation of PCB and the effects of supplemented diets in striped bass (Morone saxatilis)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.S.

    1992-01-01

    Bioaccumulation of PCBs (Aroclor 1254) from contaminated water (1.0 0.1 ppB) and Artemia (1.0 0.1 ppB) was studied using striped bass (Morone saxatilis) larvae. After 10 and 20 days exposure, striped bass were transferred to PCB-free environments for depuration examination. Results showed that striped bass can significantly accumulate PCBs in either 10- or 20-day exposures. When fed contaminated water and Artemia together to striped bass resulted higher PCB body burdens than when fed either contaminated water or Artemia. Among these treatments, 1.0 ppB water and 1.0 ppB treated Artemia caused the highest PCB residues, 323.62 ppB and 647.90 ppB, in 10- and 20-day exposures, respectively. A diet containing 0.1 ppB PCB contaminated Artemia accounted for 10--27% of the total body burden in this experiment. The percent body burden due to dietary contaminants increased when striped bass were fed 1.0 ppB contaminated Artemia. This suggests that a higher feeding dose could elevate the percent contribution of the total PCB uptake in aquatic food chains. The percent of PCBs remaining in striped bass when transferred to PCB-free environments is less in the 20-day depuration period than in 10-day period. In an effort to culture this valuable fish species, experiments were conducted by adding protease, attractants and protein hydrolysates to striped bass diet for the purpose of elevating growth and survival of this fish species through feeding trials. No significant difference was found for the growth and survival between protease supplemented diet and basal diet (19.0%). The combination of sucrose, glutamic acid and glycine for the 0.5% supplemented diet produced a final fish weight close to values obtained by feeding the basal diet. Live Artemia nauplii diet fed to the larvae gave the best performance in both growth and survival.

  5. Partial replacement of menhaden oil with Alaskan pollack viceral meal in striped bass Morone saxatilis and sunshine bass M. chrysops X M. saxatilis diets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The recovery of waste by-products from the Alaskan fishery and use in fish feeds can potentially reduce pressure on fish harvested for animal feed applications. However, little data exist evaluating these by-products in moronid diets. Striped bass and sunshine bass growth, body composition, and imm...

  6. Measurement error affects risk estimates for recruitment to the Hudson River stock of striped bass.

    PubMed

    Dunning, Dennis J; Ross, Quentin E; Munch, Stephan B; Ginzburg, Lev R

    2002-06-01

    We examined the consequences of ignoring the distinction between measurement error and natural variability in an assessment of risk to the Hudson River stock of striped bass posed by entrainment at the Bowline Point, Indian Point, and Roseton power plants. Risk was defined as the probability that recruitment of age-1+ striped bass would decline by 80% or more, relative to the equilibrium value, at least once during the time periods examined (1, 5, 10, and 15 years). Measurement error, estimated using two abundance indices from independent beach seine surveys conducted on the Hudson River, accounted for 50% of the variability in one index and 56% of the variability in the other. If a measurement error of 50% was ignored and all of the variability in abundance was attributed to natural causes, the risk that recruitment of age-1+ striped bass would decline by 80% or more after 15 years was 0.308 at the current level of entrainment mortality (11%). However, the risk decreased almost tenfold (0.032) if a measurement error of 50% was considered. The change in risk attributable to decreasing the entrainment mortality rate from 11 to 0% was very small (0.009) and similar in magnitude to the change in risk associated with an action proposed in Amendment #5 to the Interstate Fishery Management Plan for Atlantic striped bass (0.006)--an increase in the instantaneous fishing mortality rate from 0.33 to 0.4. The proposed increase in fishing mortality was not considered an adverse environmental impact, which suggests that potentially costly efforts to reduce entrainment mortality on the Hudson River stock of striped bass are not warranted.

  7. Bioaccumulation of PCBs in young-of-the-year striped bass: A nine month time series

    SciTech Connect

    Brownawell, B.J.; Malloy, T.A.; LeBlanc, L.A.; Thomann, R.V.

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this study was to determine uptake of PCBs in rapidly growing young-of-the-year (YOY) striped bass (Morone saxatilis) in the Hudson River Estuary and to compare the data to predictions from both steady-state and time-dependent food-chain bioaccumulation modeling. Striped bass in the Hudson are spawned in freshwater, enter the upper estuary in early summer, and overwinter in the lower estuary. The authors have determined that their PCB exposure in water varies little over this time. Striped bass life history, prey composition, and bioenergetics have been determined in prior or ongoing projects. High and relatively uniform PCB water concentrations (10--28 ng/L) in the Hudson Estuary make it an excellent model ecosystem to study PCB bioaccumulation. YOY fish were collected at approximately one month intervals from the upper Hudson River Estuary on ten dates beginning on July 1, 1994 (average wet of 0.3 g) and ending on April 4, 1995 (wet weights of 100--150 g). Striped bass and zooplankton prey (determined by gut contents) were analyzed for PCBs and lipids. PCB concentrations generally increased over the first three months with a stronger time dependence for more highly chlorinated homologues. Lipid-based PCB concentrations decreased in the late fall, likely due to a seasonal increase in storage lipids, Consistent with steady-state food-chain model predictions, bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) were highly correlated with K{sub ow} and lipid-based BAFs were above those estimated by lipid-based equilibrium with water. In the presentation they discuss the results of fully time-dependent BAF calculations and will show how the implications of steady-stale assumptions on bioaccumulation modeling become apparent when considering rapidly growing organisms like YOY striped bass.

  8. Modelling Kepone in the striped bass food chain of the James River estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, John P.; Tonelli, Rosella

    1985-03-01

    A mathematical model that computes the accumulation of Kepone in the striped bass food chain of the James River estuary was developed. The purpose of the model was to help understand the relationship of Kepone levels in important fish species to sediment and water column Kepone concentrations and then to address the question of why these levels still exceed Food and Drug Administration limits eight years after discharge ceased. The model considers exposure through diet and respiration at rates based on species bioenergetics. It was successfully calibrated to the Kepone concentrations observed in the period 1976 through 1982 in striped bass, white perch, and Atlantic croaker. The model indicates that for the upper levels of the food chain, diet is the major route of contamination, accounting for 87-88% of the observed concentration in croaker and white perch and 91% of the observed concentration in striped bass. The two Kepone sources; sediment and water column, contribute approximately equally to the croaker and white perch. The water column is more significant for striped bass, being the original source for approximately 60% of the observed body burdens. It was estimated that a criterion requiring Kepone concentrations in fish to be at or below 0·3 μg g -1 would require dissolved water column and sediment Kepone concentrations to be reduced to somewhere between 3 and 9 ng l -1 and 13-39 ng g -1, respectively, depending on the species. Striped bass require the greatest reductions in dissolved water column and sediment Kepone concentrations to somewhere between 3 and 5 ng l -1 and 13 and 24 ng g -1, respectively.

  9. Effects of salinity on striped bass eggs and larvae from the Savannah River, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winger, P.V.; Lasier, P.J.

    1994-01-01

    Operation of a tide gate installed in the Savannah River by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to reduce dredging activities increased salinities upstream in important spawning habitat for striped bass Morone saxatilis. To assess the effects of salinity on survival and growth of striped bass at early life stages, newly fertilized eggs and 48-h-posthatch were exposed to serial dilutions of seawater, with salinities ranging from 0 to 33 permill (g/L) in increments of 3 permill in addition, older larvae (5-d posthatch) were exposed to salinities of 0, 6, 12, 18, and 24 permill. Eggs were exposed until 24 h posthatch, 48-h-posthatch larvae were exposed for 10 d, and 5-d-posthatch larvae were exposed for 6 d. Eggs died within 24 h in salinities greater than 18 permill. Both survival and total length of larvae hatched from eggs exposed to salinities of 15 permill or higher were reduced. Percent mortality and mean total lengths of newly hatched larvae followed the same pattern for each of three sets of salinity regimes (i.e., changes in salinities over time) that striped bass eggs might encounter during passage downstream in the Savannah River. Hardening eggs in freshwater did not increase survival or length of hatched larvae over that shown by eggs hardened in saline water. The 5-d-posthatch larvae were less sensitive to salinity than the 48-h-posthatch larvae. Survival of larvae was negatively con-elated with both salinity and exposure time. For 48-h-posthatch larvae, the 10-d LC50 (the salinity lethal to 50% of the test fish within 10 d) was 10 permill. Probabilities of survival for larval striped bass exposed to different salinities for different amounts of time can be estimated from curves generated from models of survival analysis. Salinities judged to be critical to Savannah River striped bass eggs and larvae are those greater than 9 permill.

  10. Early osteological development of white perch and striped bass with emphasis on identification of their larvae. [Morone saxatilis; Morone americana

    SciTech Connect

    Fritzsche, R.A.; Johnson, G.D.

    1980-07-01

    A cartilage and bone straining technique was employed to study the developmental osteology of the striped bass (Morone saxatilis) and white perch (Morone americana). Special attention was given to those osteological characters that appeared to be unique to the larvae of each species. Larval striped bass and white perch exhibited diagnostic differences in the position and shape of the median ethmoid, predorsal bones, dorsal- and anal-fin pterygiophores, vertebral column, and caudal skeleton. These differences were discernible at the earliest appearance of these elements as cartilage, and allow identification of striped bass and white perch larvae above a length of about 7.5 mm.

  11. A microsatellite linkage map of striped bass (Morone saxatilis) reveals conserved synteny with the three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus).

    PubMed

    Liu, Sixin; Rexroad, Caird E; Couch, Charlene R; Cordes, Jan F; Reece, Kimberly S; Sullivan, Craig V

    2012-04-01

    The striped bass (Morone saxatilis) and its relatives (genus Morone) are of great importance to fisheries and aquaculture in North America. As part of a collaborative effort to employ molecular genetics technologies in striped bass breeding programs, we previously developed nearly 500 microsatellite markers. The objectives of this study were to construct a microsatellite linkage map of striped bass and to examine conserved synteny between striped bass and three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus). Of 480 microsatellite markers screened for polymorphism, 289 informative markers were identified and used to genotype two half-sib mapping families. Twenty-six linkage groups were assembled, and only two markers remain unlinked. The sex-averaged map spans 1,623.8 cM with an average marker density of 5.78 cM per marker. Among 287 striped bass microsatellite markers assigned to linkage groups, 169 (58.9%) showed homology to sequences on stickleback chromosomes or scaffolds. Comparison between the stickleback genome and the striped bass linkage map revealed conserved synteny between these two species. This is the first linkage map for any of the Morone species. This map will be useful for molecular mapping and marker-assisted selection of genes of interest in striped bass breeding programs. The conserved synteny between striped bass and stickleback will facilitate fine mapping of genome regions of interest and will serve as a new resource for comparative mapping with other Perciform fishes such as European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax), gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata), and tilapia (Oreochromis ssp.). PMID:21968826

  12. A microsatellite linkage map of striped bass (Morone saxatilis) reveals conserved synteny with the three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus).

    PubMed

    Liu, Sixin; Rexroad, Caird E; Couch, Charlene R; Cordes, Jan F; Reece, Kimberly S; Sullivan, Craig V

    2012-04-01

    The striped bass (Morone saxatilis) and its relatives (genus Morone) are of great importance to fisheries and aquaculture in North America. As part of a collaborative effort to employ molecular genetics technologies in striped bass breeding programs, we previously developed nearly 500 microsatellite markers. The objectives of this study were to construct a microsatellite linkage map of striped bass and to examine conserved synteny between striped bass and three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus). Of 480 microsatellite markers screened for polymorphism, 289 informative markers were identified and used to genotype two half-sib mapping families. Twenty-six linkage groups were assembled, and only two markers remain unlinked. The sex-averaged map spans 1,623.8 cM with an average marker density of 5.78 cM per marker. Among 287 striped bass microsatellite markers assigned to linkage groups, 169 (58.9%) showed homology to sequences on stickleback chromosomes or scaffolds. Comparison between the stickleback genome and the striped bass linkage map revealed conserved synteny between these two species. This is the first linkage map for any of the Morone species. This map will be useful for molecular mapping and marker-assisted selection of genes of interest in striped bass breeding programs. The conserved synteny between striped bass and stickleback will facilitate fine mapping of genome regions of interest and will serve as a new resource for comparative mapping with other Perciform fishes such as European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax), gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata), and tilapia (Oreochromis ssp.).

  13. Tetrachlorodibenzo-P-dioxins and tetrachlorodibenzofurans in Atlantic Coast striped bass and in selected Hudson River fish, waterfowl and sediments

    SciTech Connect

    O'Keefe, P.; Hilker, D.; Meyer, C.; Aldous, K.; Shane, L.; Donnelly, R.; Smith, R.; Sloan, R.; Skinner, L.; Horn, E.

    1984-01-01

    In striped bass samples from the lower Hudson River and its estuary 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (2,3,7,8-TCDD) was found at concentrations from 16 to 120 pg/g (ppt). Striped bass from two other locations (Rhode Island coastal waters and Chesapeake Bay, Maryland) had <5 ppt, 2,3,7,8-TCDD. The contaminant, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran (2,3,7,8-TCDF), was found in striped bass from all three locations with concentrations varying from 6 ppt in Chesapeake Bay to 78 ppt in the Hudson River. Results from a limited number of non-migratory fish (carp and goldfish) and sediments suggest that the upper Hudson River is not a source for 2,3,7,8-TCDD/2,3,7,8-TCDF contamination of striped bass.

  14. Molecular cloning and sequence analysis of striped bass (Morone saxatilis) gonadotrophin-I and -II subunits.

    PubMed

    Hassin, S; Elizur, A; Zohar, Y

    1995-08-01

    Two types of cDNA, each encoding a different beta-subunit of striped bass (Morone saxatilis, Teleostei) gonadotrophins (GTH-I beta and GTH-II beta), as well as the glycoprotein alpha-subunit, were cloned by screening a striped bass pituitary cDNA library. The probes used for screening the library were cloned cDNA fragments, generated by PCR amplification of reverse-transcribed mRNA obtained from two pituitaries. The nucleotide sequences of the alpha-subunit, GTH-I beta and GTH-II beta are 626, 524 and 580 bases long, encoding peptides of 117, 120 and 147 amino acids respectively. Striped bass GTH-I beta and GTH-II beta share a sequence identity of 48% at the nucleic acid level, and 30% at the amino acid level. A cluster analysis of vertebrate pituitary glycoprotein beta-subunits suggests that teleost GTH-II beta is more closely related to tetrapod LH than to FSH. Administration of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone analogue ([D-Ala6,Pro9Net]-LHRH) to juvenile striped resulted in ten-, two- and fivefold increases in the expression of the alpha-subunit, GTH-I beta and GTH-II beta respectively. These results suggest that each of the GTH subunits is differentially regulated, and further corroborate the functional duality of teleost gonadotrophins.

  15. Species profiles: life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (Mid-Atlantic). Striped Bass

    SciTech Connect

    Fay, C.W.; Neves, R.J.; Pardue, G.B.

    1983-10-01

    Species profiles are literature summaries on the taxonomy, morphology, range, life history, and environmental requirements of coastal aquatic species. The striped bass (Morone saxatilis) is a highly valued recreational and commercial fish species and is surpassed in total recreational catch (weight) only by bluefish and Atlantic mackerel on the Atlantic coast. Males mature at age 2 or 3, and females at age 4 or 5. Striped bass are anadromous, spawning in fresh or nearly fresh water, from April through June in the Mid-Atlantic region. Upper Chesapeake Bay, its major tributaries, and the Chesapeake-Delaware Canal are the most important spawning grounds on the Atlantic coast. Eggs are semibuoyant, and require a minimum current velocity of 30.5 cm/s during development to keep them from settling and smothering on the bottom. Environmental conditions during the larval stage are considered most crucial in terms of future year class strength. Juveniles remain in or near areas of origin for 2 or 3 years, at which time a portion of the juveniles may join coastal migratory stocks, moving north in spring and summer and south in fall and winter. Temperature, salinity, current velocity, and turbidity are important environmental factors for striped bass. Eggs require water temperatures between 14/sup 0/C and 23/sup 0/C, salinities between 0 and 10 ppt, water currents of at least 30.5 cm/s, and turbidities less than 1000 mg/l for successful development and hatching. Larvae require temperatures between 10/sup 0/C and 25/sup 0/C, salinities between 0 and 15 ppt, and turbidities less than 500 mg/1 for survival. Juvenile and adult tolerances are generally wider. 171 references, 4 figures, 9 tables.

  16. Habitat use by striped bass in relation to seasonal changes in water quality in a southern reservoir

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaffler, James J.; Isely, J.J.; Hayes, W.E.

    2002-01-01

    Adult striped bass Morone saxatilis (n = 61; 597-914 mm total length) were captured by hook and line throughout Lake Murray, South Carolina, and by electrofishing in the Greenwood Dam tailrace and upper Saluda River above Lake Murray, implanted with temperature-sensitive radio transmitters, and tracked biweekly. During late winter-early spring, striped bass were concentrated in the upstream portions of the reservoir. By midsummer, they were primarily located in the lower embayment of the reservoir, but several fish remained in the tailrace of the upstream dam as well as in a thermal refuge in the Saluda River. After the reservoir began to cool in fall, fish dispersed from the lower embayment and moved upstream toward the headwaters of the reservoir, where they had been captured the previous spring. Several fish returned to locations within 10 m of their original capture locations. Mean movement rates were lowest in winter and summer and highest in spring and fall. Low movement rates in summer were associated with a severe reduction of suitable habitat. In addition to the standard biweekly sampling, a 7.5-km2 section of the lower embayment of Lake Murray was searched every 2 h over a continuous 48-h period from 10 to 12 August 2000. During this period, striped bass were observed to use the same areas on a seasonal basis as they did on a diel basis. However, mean hourly rates of movement were greater than the movement rates calculated for the normal 2-week interval between samples. Changes in location between biweekly samples may not indicate displacement but rather only randomly chosen locations in normal use areas.

  17. Differential expression of hoxa2a and hoxa2b genes during striped bass embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Scemama, Jean-Luc; Vernon, Jamie L; Stellwag, Edmund J

    2006-10-01

    Here, we report the cloning and expression analysis of two previously uncharacterized paralogs group 2 Hox genes, striped bass hoxa2a and hoxa2b, and the developmental regulatory gene egr2. We demonstrate that both Hox genes are expressed in the rhombomeres of the developing hindbrain and the pharyngeal arches albeit with different spatio-temporal distributions relative to one another. While both hoxa2a and hoxa2b share the r1/r2 anterior boundary of expression characteristic of the hoxa2 paralog genes of other species, hoxa2a gene expression extends throughout the hindbrain, whereas hoxa2b gene expression is restricted to the r2-r5 region. Egr2, which is used in this study as an early developmental marker of rhombomeres 3 and 5, is expressed in two distinct bands with a location and spacing typical for these two rhombomeres in other species. Within the pharyngeal arches, hoxa2a is expressed at higher levels in the second pharyngeal arch, while hoxa2b is more strongly expressed in the posterior arches. Further, hoxa2b expression within the arches becomes undetectable at 60hpf, while hoxa2a expression is maintained at least up until the beginning of chondrogenesis. Comparison of the striped bass HoxA cluster paralog group 2 (PG2) genes to their orthologs and trans-orthologs shows that the striped bass hoxa2a gene expression pattern is similar to the overall expression pattern described for the hoxa2 genes in the lobe-finned fish lineage and for the hoxa2b gene from zebrafish. It is notable that the pharyngeal arch expression pattern of the striped bass hoxa2a gene is more divergent from its sister paralog, hoxa2b, than from the zebrafish hoxa2b gene. Overall, our results suggest that differences in the Hox PG2 gene complement of striped bass and zebrafish affects both their rhombomeric and pharyngeal arch expression patterns and may account for the similarities in pharyngeal arch expression between striped bass hoxa2a and zebrafish hoxa2b.

  18. Mycobacteriosis-associated mortality in wild striped bass (Morone saxatilis) from Chesapeake Bay, U.S.A.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, D T; Latour, R J; Heisey, D M; Bonzek, C F; Gartland, J; Burge, E J; Vogelbein, W K

    2008-10-01

    The striped bass (Morone saxatilis) is an economically and ecologically important finfish species along the Atlantic seaboard of the United States. Recent stock assessments in Chesapeake Bay (U.S.A.) indicate that non-fishing mortality in striped bass has increased since 1999, concomitant with very high (>50%) prevalence of visceral and dermal disease caused by Mycobacterium spp. Current fishery assessment models do not differentiate between disease and other components of non-fishing mortality (e.g., senescence, predation); therefore, disease impact on the striped bass population has not been established. Specific measurement of mortality associated with mycobacteriosis in wild striped bass is complicated because the disease is chronic and mortality is cryptic. Epidemiological models have been developed to estimate disease-associated mortality from cross-sectional prevalence data and have recently been generalized to represent disease processes more realistically. Here, we used this generalized approach to demonstrate disease-associated mortality in striped bass from Chesapeake Bay. To our knowledge this is the first demonstration of cryptic mortality associated with a chronic infectious disease in a wild finfish. This finding has direct implications for management and stock assessment of striped bass, as it demonstrates population-level negative impacts of a chronic disease. Additionally, this research provides a framework by which disease-associated mortality may be specifically addressed within fisheries models for resource management.

  19. Characterization of striped bass growth hormone receptors by disulfide-bond reduction and cross-linking studies.

    PubMed

    Gray, E S; Tsai, R W

    1994-05-01

    Growth hormone (GH) receptors were analyzed in striped bass (Morone saxatilis) by addition of disulfide-bond reducing agents to radioreceptor assays and by cross-linking both striped bass and coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) crude membrane preparations to radiolabeled hormone. Dithiothreitol (DTT) caused a dose-dependent increase in specific binding of 125I-tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) GH to striped bass membrane preparations. Maximal enhancement of 3.4-fold was obtained with 1 mM DTT and 0.03 trypsin inhibitor units/ml of aprotinin. Addition of N-ethylmaleimide (NEM), which binds covalently to free sulfhydryl groups, decreased specific binding. Scatchard analysis of striped bass membrane preparations indicated a single class of GH receptors. Addition of DTT with aprotinin increased GH-binding site concentration from 278 to 507 fmol/mg, while the dissociation constant of 0.56 nM remained unchanged. Cross-linking 125I-tilapia GH to striped bass hepatic membrane preparations and 125I-salmon GH to coho salmon membrane preparations yielded two to three specifically labeled proteins on sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Endoglycosidase H treatment was without effect on specifically labeled proteins from either species. Following digestion with N-glycosidase F, relative molecular weights of specifically labeled 125I-GH complexes were reduced, suggesting that hepatic GH-binding proteins in striped bass and salmon are N-linked glycoproteins.

  20. Assimilation and retention of selenium and other trace elements from crustacean food by juvenile striped bass (Morone saxatilis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baines, Stephen B.; Fisher, Nicholas S.; Stewart, Robin

    2002-01-01

     Estimates of the assimilation and retention of trace elements from food by fish are useful for linking toxicity with the biogeochemical cycling of these elements through aquatic food webs. Here we use pulse-chase radiotracer techniques to estimate the assimilation and retention of Se and four trace metals, Ag, Am, Zn, and Cd, by 43- and 88-d-old juvenile striped bass, Morone saxatilis, from crustacean food. Brine shrimp nauplii, Artemia franciscana, or adult copepods,Acartia tonsa, were fed radiolabeled diatoms and then fed to juvenile striped bass. Assimilation efficiencies (AEs ± SD) for 43-d-old fish were 18 ± 2%, 6 ± 1%, 23 ± 4%, 33 ± 3%, and 23 ± 2% for Ag, Am, Cd, Se, and Zn, respectively. For 88-d-old fish, the AEs were 28 ± 1%, 42 ± 5%, and 40 ± 5% for Cd, Se, and Zn, respectively. The higher AEs in the older fish may result from longer gut passage times for larger fish. The 44-d-old fish excreted 5 ± 0.8%, 4 ± 2.0%, 7 ± 0.3%, 9 ± 0.4%, and 1.3 ± 0.9% of the Ag, Am, Cd, Se, and Zn, respectively, they ingested from food per day, whereas the 88-d-old fish excreted 3 ± 1.0%, 8 ± 0.5%, and 3 ± 0.5% of the assimilated Cd, Se, and Zn per day, respectively. Predictions of steady state Se concentrations in juvenile striped bass tissues made using a biokinetic model and the measured AE and efflux rates ranged from 1.8 to 3.0 mg Se g-1dry wt for muscle tissue and 6.8 to 11.6 mg Se g-1 dry wt for gut tissue. These predictions agreed well with average values of 2.1 and 13 mg Se g-1 dry wt measured independently in North San Francisco Bay, where elevated Se concentrations are of concern. The model results imply that the planktonic food web, including juvenile striped bass, does not transfer Se as efficiently to top consumers as does the benthic food web.

  1. Temperatures occupied by ten ultrasonic-tagged striped bass in freshwater lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Coutant, C.C.; Carroll, D.S.

    1980-03-01

    Subadult striped bass, Morone saxatilis, tagged with temperature-sensing ultrasonic transmitters in April-October and monitored in freshwater lakes generally occupied waters of 20 to 24/sup 0/C, when these temperatures were available. When they were not (spring and fall), fish occupied nearly the warmest water available at depths > 1.5 m. Excursions of less than 2 minutes duration to warmer and to cooler water than was generally occupied were common in spring and summer. A thermal niche for subadult striped bass of 20 to 24/sup 0/C centering near 22/sup 0/C, as suggested by these results, would have important implications for managing this species in fresh water.

  2. Striped bass, temperature, and dissolved oxygen: a speculative hypothesis for environmental risk

    SciTech Connect

    Coutant, C.C.

    1985-01-01

    Striped bass Morone saxatilis has a paradoxical record of distribution and abundance, including population declines in coastal waters and variable success of freshwater introductions. This record is analyzed for consistency with a hypothesis that striped bass are squeezed between their thermal and dissolved oxygen preferences or requirements. A commonality among diverse field and laboratory observations supports an inherent thermal niche for the species that changes to lower temperatures as fish age. This shift can cause local conditions, especially warm surface strata and deoxygenated deep water, to be incompatible with the success of large fish. Crowding due to temperature preferences alone or coupled with avoidance of low oxygen concentrations can lead to pathology and overfishing, which may contribute to population declines. Through a mixture of evidence and conjecture, the thermal niche-dissolved oxygen hypothesis is proposed as a unified perspective of the habitat requirements of the species that can aid in its study and management. 139 references, 12 figures.

  3. Growth hormone- and prolactin-producing cells in the pituitary gland of striped bass (Morone saxatilis): immunocytochemical characterization at different life stages.

    PubMed

    Huang, L; Specker, J L

    1994-05-01

    The striped bass (Morone saxatilis) is a seasonally breeding, long-lived, anadromous fish of growing economic importance. To describe the apparent activities of growth hormone (GH)- and prolactin (PRL)-producing cells, pituitaries were collected from captive juveniles and from wild adult fish in late spring off the Rhode Island coast during their coastal migration and in the Hudson River during the spawning migration. GH and PRL were separated by reversed-phase HPLC of pituitary extracts from captive adults and characterized as having apparent molecular masses of 23 kDa (GH) and 26 kDa (PRL) by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Antisera generated in rabbits against synthetic fragments of GH and PRL188 from tilapia were shown by Western blot analysis of reversed-phase HPLC-purified striped bass GH and PRL and of striped bass pituitary extract to be specific for the appropriate hormone and were used to localize GH and PRL cells. GH cells and PRL cells lie in the proximal pars distalis and the rostral pars distalis, respectively. Small clusters of GH- and PRL-immunoreactive cells were found at ectopic sites within the pituitary. There were many intensely labeled GH cells in the pituitaries of juvenile and adult striped bass, whereas the immunoreactivity of GH cells in the pituitaries of spawning fish decreased. PRL cells in juvenile fish kept in fresh water had big, round-nuclei, and were heavily labeled, indicating that they were active. PRL cells in adult fish from seawater were also intensely labeled, but had kidney-shaped nuclei, indicating inactivity. PRL cells in fish from the spawning ground had polymorphic nuclei, appearing as round, indented or kidney-shaped forms, and they were unevenly and lightly labeled, suggesting highly variable stages of activity. No difference was found between males and females. The apparent activities of GH- and PRL-producing cells differ among these life stages, suggesting changing roles for the hormones.

  4. Behavioral and biochemical responses of hybrid striped bass during and after fluoxetine exposure.

    PubMed

    Gaworecki, Kristen M; Klaine, Stephen J

    2008-07-30

    Environmental contaminants, including pharmaceuticals, can alter behavior and possibly impact population and community structures. One important behavior that could be impacted is the ability to capture prey. We hypothesized that sublethal fluoxetine exposure may lead to feeding behavior abnormalities in hybrid striped bass (Morone saxatilis x M. chrysops). Fluoxetine is an antidepressant that acts as a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI). A change in serotonin levels affects multiple behaviors including feeding, which is an important aspect in ecological fitness. This research characterized the impact of sublethal fluoxetine exposures on the ability of hybrid striped bass to capture fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Bass were exposed to fluoxetine (0.0 microg/l, 23.2+/-6.6, 51.4+/-10.9 and 100.9+/-18.6 microg/l,) for 6 days, followed by a 6-day recovery period in clean water. Brain serotonin activity and the ability of bass to capture prey were measured every third day. Exposed fish exhibited a concentration- and duration-dependent decrease in ability to capture prey. Increased time to capture prey also correlated with decreases in brain serotonin activity. Serotonin activity also decreased in an exposure time- and concentration-dependent manner, maximally inhibited 23.7, 28.0, and 49.1% of control in the low, medium, and high treatments, respectively. Serotonin levels in exposed fish did not recover to control levels during the 6-day recovery period. These results suggest that sublethal exposure to fluoxetine decreases the ability of hybrid striped bass to capture prey and that serotonin can be used as a biomarker of exposure and effect.

  5. Activation of sperm motility in striped bass via a cAMP-independent pathway.

    PubMed

    He, Shuyang; Jenkins-Keeran, Karen; Woods, L Curry

    2004-05-01

    The objective of the present study was to identify the effect of osmolality, ions (K+, H+, Ca2+, Mg2+) and cAMP on the initiation of sperm motility in striped bass (Morone saxatilis). Striped bass spermatozoa remained motile in solutions isotonic to seminal plasma (350 mOsm/kg) until osmolality reached 600 mOsm/kg. K+ (0-100 mM) had no effect ( p>0.05 ) on sperm motility, and sperm displayed a high percentage of motility over a wide range of pH (6.0-8.5). Sperm motility could be initiated in Ca2+-free solutions. In contrast, sperm motility was inhibited (P<0.01) by solutions containing > or =10 mM Ca2+, and sperm could not be reactivated by a Ca2+-free solution. This Ca2+ inhibition was not affected by verapamil, a Ca2+ channel blocker. However, if sperm motility was first initiated in a Ca2+-free solution, the addition of Ca2+ solutions, up to 80 mM, failed to inhibit sperm motility, suggesting that Ca2+ inhibited the initiation of motility, but had no control of motile spermatozoa. Mg2+ solutions had similar inhibitory effects on sperm motility as Ca2+ solutions. Therefore, initiation of motility in striped bass sperm may be related to voltage-gated channels across the cell's plasma membrane. Membrane permeable cAMP did not initiate motility of quiescent, intact striped bass spermatozoa, and motility of demembranated sperm could be activated in the absence of cAMP.

  6. Zinc and cadmium residues in striped bass from Cherokee, Norris, and Watts Bar reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Tisa, M.S.; Strange, R.J.

    1981-10-01

    Zinc and cadmium concentrations in muscle, liver, and kidney were measured in striped bass (Morone saxatilis) from Cherokee, Norris, and Watts Bar reservoirs in East Tennessee to determine if these metals had contributed to fish kills observed in Cherokee during the 1970's. The range of mean concentrations of zinc from collections of Cherokee striped bass (muscle 11-14, liver 98-106, kidney 88-105 mg Zn/kg dry weight) were comparable to ranges in fish from Norris and Watts Bar (muscle 12-13, liver 83-132, kidney 96-108 mg/kg dry weight). With the exception of concentrations in the kidneys of one collection, cadmium residues from Cherokee striped bass (muscle 0.02-0.09, liver 0.3-0.7, kidney 0.2-4.0 mg Cd/kg dry weight) were also similar to residues from Norris and Watts Bar fish (muscle 0.05-0.13, liver 0.3-2.1, kidney 0.3-0.5 mg Cd/kg dry weight). There were significant differences in tissue residues among seasons (summer 1979, spring 1980, summer 1980) in Cherokee Reservoir, as well as significant differences among the three reservoirs (Cherokee, Norris, Watts Bar) during the same season (spring 1980). All concentrations, however, were well below those reported for fish exposed to the maximum non-harmful concentrations of zinc and the lowest potentially harmful concentration of cadmium and moreover, were within the range typically reported for fish tissues. It is, therefore, believed that in at least the last two years, zinc and cadmium in the tissues of striped bass from Cherokee Reservoir have not been harmful to the fish.

  7. Temperature and salinity effects on development of striped bass eggs and larvae

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, R.P. II; Rasin, V.J. Jr.; Copp, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    Responses of eggs and larvae of striped bass, Morone saxatilis, to a series of temperature-salinity combinations were measured as percent hatch, percent survival of larvae 24 hours after hatch, and larva length for the temperature range of 10 to 28 C and the salinity range of 0 to 10%. Optimal temperature was 18 C, and optimal salinity varied, for the majority of these variables.

  8. Dissolved oxygen concentration affects hybrid striped bass growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Management of dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration in ponds at night during the growing season is important because fish growth and yield are greater in ponds with higher nightly DO concentrations. Three studies were conducted to quantify performance traits and metabolic responses of hybrid striped b...

  9. Characterization of photochromogenic Mycobacterium spp. from Chesapeake Bay striped bass Morone saxatilis.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, D T; Helenthal, A M; Rhodes, M W; Vogelbein, W K; Kator, H I

    2011-06-16

    A large diversity of Mycobacterium spp. has been isolated from striped bass Morone saxatilis in Chesapeake Bay, USA. The new species M. shottsii and M. pseudoshottsii are the dominant isolates, while the classical fish pathogen M. marinum is found much less frequently. M. fortuitum and M. chelonae, other Mycobacterium spp. known to commonly infect fishes, have not yet been aseptically isolated from striped bass within Chesapeake Bay. While M. pseudoshottsii and M. shottsii have been phenotypically and genotypically characterized, other less common mycobacterial isolates have not. In the present study, we describe 17 photochromogenic isolates from Chesapeake Bay striped bass using phenotypic characterization and multilocus sequencing of 16S rRNA, hsp65 and rpoB genes. Genetic characterization reveals that these isolates are related to widely divergent portions of the mycobacterial phylogeny; however, some interesting trends are observed, such as a majority of isolates (10/17) belonging to the M. simiae-related grouping. Five additional isolates were assigned to the slow-growing mycobacteria (including 2 identified as M. marinum), while 2 are clearly shown to belong genetically to the fast-growing mycobacteria. PMID:21848119

  10. Influence of nitrite and chloride concentrations on survival and hematological profiles of striped bass

    SciTech Connect

    Mazik, P.M.; Parker, N.C. ); Hinman, M.L.; Winkelmann, D.A.; Klaine, S.J.; Simco, B.A. )

    1991-03-01

    The 24-h median lethal concentration of nitrite (NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}) for striped bass Morone saxatilis was 163 mg/L in static toxicity tests. Exogenous chloride ions increased the tolerance of the fish for NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}; CaCl{sub 2} was more than twice as effective as NaCl. Plasma NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}, cortisol, and methemoglobin were correlated positively with environmental NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}. Plasma NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}} and methemoglobin were correlated negatively with environmental Cl{sup {minus}}, but cortisol was not reduced by the presence of environmental Cl{sup {minus}}. Striped bass maintained NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}} in the plasma (0-45 mg NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}/L) at concentrations below those in the environment (0-250 mg NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}/L). However, striped bass were sensitive to NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}} that entered the plasma; methemoglobin levels greater than 60% and plasma NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}} levels greater than 70 mg/L resulted in significant mortalities.

  11. Temporal trends of PCBs in sediments and striped bass from the Hudson River and estuary

    SciTech Connect

    Chillrud, S.N.; Simpson, H.J.; Bopp, R.F.; Sloan, R.N.

    1995-12-31

    Chlorinated hydrocarbon chronologies of fine-grained sediments in NY Harbor indicate that decreasing concentration trends of total polychlorinated biphenyls which began in the late 1960s and early 1970s continued through the late 1980s. 1994 core top samples are currently being analyzed. This recent decline in total-PCB levels in NY harbor sediments can be described by a two component exponential function with separate terms representing the two primary sources of PCBs to this area. According to this function, transport from the Upper Hudson River dominated total PCB loading to NY Harbor in the 1970s, while local urban influxes were more important by the mid 1980s. The rate of decline in the geometric mean of lipid-based total-PCB concentrations in striped bass collected throughout the lower Hudson estuary between 1978 and 1990 is very similar to the trends observed in NY Harbor sediments. This similarity is consistent with the hypotheses that striped bass caught in the estuary obtain a significant fraction of their PCB burden in the NY Harbor area and contiguous estuarine waters and indicates that analyses of a relatively small number of dated sediment samples can provide an excellent indication of likely future trends of PCB levels in striped bass populations.

  12. Characterization of photochromogenic Mycobacterium spp. from Chesapeake Bay striped bass Morone saxatilis.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, D T; Helenthal, A M; Rhodes, M W; Vogelbein, W K; Kator, H I

    2011-06-16

    A large diversity of Mycobacterium spp. has been isolated from striped bass Morone saxatilis in Chesapeake Bay, USA. The new species M. shottsii and M. pseudoshottsii are the dominant isolates, while the classical fish pathogen M. marinum is found much less frequently. M. fortuitum and M. chelonae, other Mycobacterium spp. known to commonly infect fishes, have not yet been aseptically isolated from striped bass within Chesapeake Bay. While M. pseudoshottsii and M. shottsii have been phenotypically and genotypically characterized, other less common mycobacterial isolates have not. In the present study, we describe 17 photochromogenic isolates from Chesapeake Bay striped bass using phenotypic characterization and multilocus sequencing of 16S rRNA, hsp65 and rpoB genes. Genetic characterization reveals that these isolates are related to widely divergent portions of the mycobacterial phylogeny; however, some interesting trends are observed, such as a majority of isolates (10/17) belonging to the M. simiae-related grouping. Five additional isolates were assigned to the slow-growing mycobacteria (including 2 identified as M. marinum), while 2 are clearly shown to belong genetically to the fast-growing mycobacteria.

  13. Biotelemetry study of spring and summer habitat selection by striped bass in Cherokee Reservoir, Tennessee, 1978. [Morone saxatilis

    SciTech Connect

    Schaich, B.A.; Coutant, C.C.

    1980-08-01

    Habitat selection of 31 adult striped bass was monitored by temperature sensing ultrasonic and radio transmitters in Cherokee Reservoir, Tennessee, from March through October 1978. This study sought to corroborate summer data obtained by Waddle (1979) in 1977 and to examine mechanisms of habitat selection by observing establishment of the summer distribution. During the spring and early summer months the striped bass ranged throughout the study area in the downstream half of the reservoir. Fish stayed near the bottom at the preferred temperatures throughout the whole study, and no individuals were observed in open water. Movement rates of up to 2.6 km/day were estimated, and rates of 1 km/day were common in the spring. By late July they were apparently avoiding low dissolved oxygen (D.O.) concentrations (<3 mg/l) near the bottom of the main reservoir and epilimnion temperatures greater than 22/sup 0/C, and they moved into cool, oxygenated spring or creek channels (refuges). Low movement rates of 0 to 25 m/day within these refuges occurred. The rates of the few migrations between refuges could not be estimated. Tagged fish moved out of the refuges 3 to 4 weeks after the fall overturn when reservoir temperatures approximated 22 to 24/sup 0/C.

  14. Maturation and fecundity of a stock-enhanced population of striped bass in the Savannah River Estuary, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Will, T.A.; Reinert, T.R.; Jennings, C.A.

    2002-01-01

    The striped bass Morone saxatilis population in the Savannah River (south-eastern U.S.A.) collapsed in the 1980s, and recent efforts to restore the population have resulted in increased catch-per-unit-effort (CPUE) of striped bass in the Savannah River Estuary (SRE). The abundance of eggs and larvae, however, remain well below historic levels. The primary cause of the population decline was remedied, and environmental conditions seem suitable for striped bass spawning. Regression analysis of data derived from ultrasonic imaging of 31 striped bass resulted in a statistical model that predicted ovary volume well (r2=0.95). The enumeration of oocytes from ovarian tissue samples and the prediction of ovary volume allowed fecundity to be estimated without sacrificing the fish. Oocyte maturation in Savannah River striped bass seemed to progress normally, with oocytes developing to final stages of maturity in larger fish (>750 mm LT). Additionally, fecundity estimates were comparable to a neighbouring striped bass population. The environmental cues needed to trigger development and release of striped bass oocytes into the SRE appeared to be present. If most of the striped bass females in the SRE are still young (<7 years), the ability to produce large numbers of eggs will be limited. As these young fish mature, egg production probably will increase and the density of striped bass eggs eventually will approach historic levels, provided suitable habitat and water quality are maintained. ?? 2002 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  15. High density culture of white bass X striped bass fingerlings in raceways using power plant heated effluent

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, C.M.; Burton, G.L.; Schweinforth, R.L.

    1983-06-01

    White bass (Morone chrysops) X striped bass (M. saxatilis) hybrids weighing 1691/lb were initially stocked in five 24 ft/sup 3/ floating screen cages for 20 days. Hybrids averaging one inch in total length and 361 fish/lb were released in four 614 ft/sup 3/ concrete raceways. Two stocking densities, 2.6 and 5.1 fish/ft/sup 3/, were evaluated in the 94-day study using a flow rate of 300 gpm/raceway. Water temperatures averaged 79/sup 0/F and water quality was adequate throughout the production period. Fish were hand fed to satiation daily. Columnaris and Aeromonas hydrophila caused the most serious disease problems. Gas supersaturation was suspect in high mortality levels during cage culture of hybrid bass fry. Cannibalism may have been responsible for unaccountable losses prior to raceway stocking and at harvest. The study yielded 5773 hybrids weighing 658 lb. The high density treatment showed greater weight gain, average weight, average length and percent survival as well as improved food conversion. Results suggest that higher stocking densities and periodic grading may increase production and suppress cannibalism. 10 references, 3 figures, 3 tables.

  16. Recovery of barotrauma injuries resulting from exposure to pile driving sound in two sizes of hybrid striped bass.

    PubMed

    Casper, Brandon M; Halvorsen, Michele B; Matthews, Frazer; Carlson, Thomas J; Popper, Arthur N

    2013-01-01

    The effects of loud sounds on fishes, such as those produced during impulsive pile driving, are an increasing concern in the management of aquatic ecosystems. However, very little is known about such effects. Accordingly, a High Intensity Controlled Impedance Fluid Filled wave Tube (HICI-FT) was used to investigate the effects of sounds produced by impulsive pile driving on two size groups of hybrid striped bass (white bass Moronechrysops x striped bass Moronesaxatilis). The larger striped bass (mean size 17.2 g) had more severe injuries, as well as more total injuries, than the smaller fish (mean size 1.3 g). However, fish in each size group recovered from most injuries within 10 days of exposure. A comparison with different species from previously published studies show that current results support the observation that fishes with physoclistous swim bladders are more susceptible to injury from impulsive pile driving than are fishes with physostomous swim bladders.

  17. Recovery of barotrauma injuries resulting from exposure to pile driving sound in two sizes of hybrid striped bass.

    PubMed

    Casper, Brandon M; Halvorsen, Michele B; Matthews, Frazer; Carlson, Thomas J; Popper, Arthur N

    2013-01-01

    The effects of loud sounds on fishes, such as those produced during impulsive pile driving, are an increasing concern in the management of aquatic ecosystems. However, very little is known about such effects. Accordingly, a High Intensity Controlled Impedance Fluid Filled wave Tube (HICI-FT) was used to investigate the effects of sounds produced by impulsive pile driving on two size groups of hybrid striped bass (white bass Moronechrysops x striped bass Moronesaxatilis). The larger striped bass (mean size 17.2 g) had more severe injuries, as well as more total injuries, than the smaller fish (mean size 1.3 g). However, fish in each size group recovered from most injuries within 10 days of exposure. A comparison with different species from previously published studies show that current results support the observation that fishes with physoclistous swim bladders are more susceptible to injury from impulsive pile driving than are fishes with physostomous swim bladders. PMID:24040089

  18. Recovery of Barotrauma Injuries Resulting from Exposure to Pile Driving Sound in Two Sizes of Hybrid Striped Bass

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Frazer; Carlson, Thomas J.; Popper, Arthur N.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of loud sounds on fishes, such as those produced during impulsive pile driving, are an increasing concern in the management of aquatic ecosystems. However, very little is known about such effects. Accordingly, a High Intensity Controlled Impedance Fluid Filled wave Tube (HICI-FT) was used to investigate the effects of sounds produced by impulsive pile driving on two size groups of hybrid striped bass (white bass Moronechrysops x striped bass Moronesaxatilis). The larger striped bass (mean size 17.2 g) had more severe injuries, as well as more total injuries, than the smaller fish (mean size 1.3 g). However, fish in each size group recovered from most injuries within 10 days of exposure. A comparison with different species from previously published studies show that current results support the observation that fishes with physoclistous swim bladders are more susceptible to injury from impulsive pile driving than are fishes with physostomous swim bladders. PMID:24040089

  19. Effect of salinity on expression of branchial ion transporters in striped bass (Morone saxatilis).

    PubMed

    Tipsmark, Christian Kølbaek; Madsen, Steffen Søndergaard; Borski, Russell John

    2004-12-01

    The time course of osmoregulatory adjustments and expressional changes of three key ion transporters in the gill were investigated in the striped bass during salinity acclimations. In three experiments, fish were transferred from fresh water (FW) to seawater (SW), from SW to FW, and from 15-ppt brackish water (BW) to either FW or SW, respectively. Each transfer induced minor deflections in serum [Na+] and muscle water content, both being corrected rapidly (24 hr). Transfer from FW to SW increased gill Na+,K+-ATPase activity and Na+,K+,2Cl- co-transporter expression after 3 days. Abundance of Na+,K+-ATPase alpha-subunit mRNA and protein was unchanged. Changes in Na+,K+,2Cl- co-transporter protein were preceded by increased mRNA expression after 24 hr. Expression of V-type H+-ATPase mRNA decreased after 3 days. Transfer from SW to FW induced no change in expression of gill Na+,K+-ATPase. However, Na+,K+,2Cl- co-transporter mRNA and protein levels decreased after 24 hr and 7 days, respectively. Expression of H+-ATPase mRNA increased in response to FW after 7 days. In BW fish transferred to FW and SW, gill Na+,K+-ATPase activity was stimulated by both challenges, suggesting both a hyper- and a hypo-osmoregulatory response of the enzyme. Acclimation of striped bass to SW occurs on a rapid time scale. This seems partly to rely on the relative high abundance of gill Na+,K+-ATPase and Na+,K+,2Cl- co-transporter in FW fish. In a separate study, we found a smaller response to SW in expression of these ion transport proteins in striped bass when compared with the less euryhaline brown trout. In both FW and SW, NEM-sensitive gill H+-ATPase activity was negligible in striped bass and approximately 10-fold higher in brown trout. This suggests that in striped bass Na+-uptake in FW may rely more on a relatively high abundance/activity of Na+,K+-ATPase compared to trout, where H+-ATPase is critical for establishing a thermodynamically favorable gradient for Na+-uptake.

  20. Valuation and the consequences of multiple sources of environmental deterioration: The case of the New York striped bass fishery

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, J.R. ); Buerger, R.B. )

    1994-03-01

    This paper examines two sources of environmental degradation in the New York striped bass fishery. The first is the decline in environmental quality in the Chesapeake Bay, the spawning ground for the majority of fish in New York waters. The second is the PCB contamination of striped bass from the Hudson River, the other primary spawning ground for striped bass in New York waters. The paper develops methodologies for examining loss in economic value, when the loss stems from two sources. The estimates resulting from the application of these methodologies suggest that the general deterioration of the Chesapeake Bay generated 2[center dot]3 to 7[center dot]7 million dollars in annual losses to the New York striped bass fishery, and that the annual losses from PCB contamination of the Hudson striped bass are between 0[center dot]745 and 3[center dot]7 million dollars. The paper also discusses how the dual sources of degradation generate barriers to the formation of effective management policy, and develops policy recommendations based on the estimated losses. 9 refs., 8 figs., 8 tabs.

  1. Tag-based estimates of annual fishing mortality of a mixed atlantic coastal stock of striped bass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welsh, S.A.; Smith, D.R.; Laney, R.W.; Tipton, R.C.

    2007-01-01

    Tag-based estimates of annual survival and fishing mortality rates supplement annual stock assessments of migratory striped bass Morone saxatilis in the interjurisdictional fishery along the Atlantic coast. We estimated a 17-year time series of annual survival and fishing mortality (F) rates for striped bass (>711 mm) tagged during winter trawl studies (1988-2004) off the coasts of North Carolina and Virginia. The geographic and temporal distributions of tag recoveries were consistent with published patterns of striped bass migration and indicated that this southern overwintering aggregate of striped bass is composed of mixed stocks. Incremental increases in bias-adjusted annual fishing mortality rates (from 0.00-0.26) and decreases in the proportion of fish released alive (from 0.762-0.198) coincided with periods of regulatory change during the 17-year time frame. Our estimates of F fall below the current management triggers and should be considered along with other estimates of F within the striped bass management process.

  2. User's manual for STRIPE: a computer code for simulating striped bass young-of-the-year population in the Hudson River. [Morone saxatilis

    SciTech Connect

    Eraslan, A.H.; Sharp, R.D.; Van Winkle, W.

    1982-01-01

    The structure and operational features of the main program and subroutines of the STRIPE computer code are described. All the necessary information and instructions are presented for implementing the computer code in simulating the daily variations and the longitudinal distributions of the various life stages of the young-of-the-year striped bass population in the Hudson River. Complete samples of input data and output results are given for 1973 conditions.

  3. A large volume striped bass egg incubation chamber: design and comparison with a traditional method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harper, C.J.

    2009-01-01

    I conducted a comparative study of a new jar design (experimental chamber) with a standard egg incubation vessel (McDonald jar). Experimental chambers measured 0.4 m in diameter by 1.3 m in height and had a volume of 200 L. McDonald hatching jars measured 16 cm in diameter by 45 cm in height and had a volume of 6 L. Post-hatch survival was estimated at 48, 96 and 144 h. Stocking rates resulted in an average egg density of 21.9 eggs ml-1 (range = 21.6 – 22.1) for McDonald jars and 10.9 eggs ml-1 (range = 7.0 – 16.8) for experimental chambers. I was unable to detect an effect of container type on survival to 48, 96 or 144 h. At 144 h striped bass fry survival averaged 37.3% for McDonald jars and 34.2% for experimental chambers. Survival among replicates was significantly different. Survival of striped bass significantly decreased between 96 and 144 h. Mean survival among replicates ranged from 12.4 to 57.3%. I was unable to detect an effect of initial stocking density on survival. Experimental jars allow for incubation of a larger number of eggs in a much smaller space. As hatchery production is often limited by space or water supply, experimental chambers offer an alternative to extending spawning activities, thereby reducing manpower and cost. However, the increase in the number of eggs per rearing container does increase the risk associated with catastrophic loss of a production unit. I conclude the experimental chamber is suitable for striped bass egg incubation.

  4. An empirical comparison of stock identification techniques applied to striped bass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waldman, John R.; Richards, R. Anne; Schill, W. Bane; Wirgin, Isaac; Fabrizio, Mary C.

    1997-01-01

    Managers of migratory striped bass stocks that mix along the Atlantic coast of the USA require periodic estimates of the relative contributions of the individual stocks to coastal mixed- stock fisheries; however, to date, a standard approach has not been adopted. We compared the performances of alternative stock identification approaches, using samples taken from the same sets of fish. Reference (known) samples were collected from three Atlantic coast spawning systems: the Hudson River, Chesapeake Bay, and the Roanoke River. Striped bass of mixed-stock origin were collected from eastern Long Island, New York, and were used as test (unknown) samples. The approaches applied were discriminant analysis of morphometric data and of meristic data, logistic regression analysis of combined meristic and morphometric data, discriminant analysis of scale-shape features, discriminant analysis of immunoassay data, and mixed-stock analysis of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) data. Overall correct classification rates of reference samples ranged from 94% to 66% when just the Hudson and Chesapeake stocks were considered and were comparable when the Chesapeake and Roanoke stocks were grouped as the ''southern'' stock. When all three stocks were treated independently, correct classification rates ranged from 82% to 49%. Despite the moderate range in correct classification rates, bias due to misallocation was relatively low for all methods, suggesting that resulting stock composition estimates should be fairly accurate. However, relative contribution estimates for the mixed-stock sample varied widely (e.g., from 81% to 47% for the Hudson River stock, when only the Hudson River and Chesapeake Bay stocks were considered). Discrepancies may be related to the reliance by all of these approaches (except mtDNA) on phenotypic features. Our results support future use of either a morphometrics-based approach (among the phenotypic methods) or a genotypic approach based on mtDNA analysis. We further

  5. Osmoregulatory effects of hypophysectomy and homologous prolactin replacement in hybrid striped bass.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Leslie F; McCormick, Stephen D; Madsen, Steffen S; Swanson, Penny; Sullivan, Craig V

    2005-02-01

    The effects of ovine prolactin (oPRL) and striped bass prolactin (sbPRL; Morone saxatilis) on plasma osmolality, electrolyte balance, and gill Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity were investigated in hypophysectomized (Hx), freshwater (FW)-acclimated, hybrid striped bass (M. saxatilisxMorone chrysops). They were kept in dilute (isoosmotic) seawater for about 10 days after surgery. Seven days after transfer to FW, Hx fish had lower plasma osmolality and lower levels of Na(+), Cl(-), and Ca(2+) than sham-operated and intact fish. Fish were injected four times with oPRL (1, 5, or 20 microg/g body mass), sbPRL (10 or 100 ng/g), or hormone vehicle (0.9% NaCl) at 48-h intervals (days 0, 2, 4, and 6) in FW and then sampled for blood plasma 24 h after the fourth injection (day 7). In Hx fish, oPRL (5 and 20 microg/g) and sbPRL (10 and 100 ng/g) were effective in maintaining plasma osmolality and levels of Na(+), Cl(-), and Ca(2+) above values seen in saline-injected controls. Hypophysectomy did not affect branchial Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity, but enzyme activity was significantly reduced in Hx fish receiving oPRL (20 mug/g) or sbPRL (10 or 100 ng/g). These results indicate that PRL acts to maintain plasma osmotic and ionic balance in FW-adapted hybrid striped bass, and that this may involve downregulation of branchial Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity.

  6. Isolation and characterization of mycobacteria from striped bass Morone saxatilis from the Chesapeake Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rhodes, M.W.; Kator, H.; Kaattari, I.; Gauthier, D.; Vogelbein, W.; Ottinger, C.A.

    2004-01-01

    Mycobacteriosis in striped bass Morone saxatilis of Chesapeake Bay, USA, was first diagnosed in 1997 based on the presence of granulomatous inflammation and acid-fast bacteria in skin and spleen. To confirm histopathology, bacteriological detection and identification of mycobacteria were begun using splenic tissue from fish with and without skin ulcerations. On the basis of initial studies using a variety of selective and nonselective media, decontamination, homogenization and incubation conditions, a simple and quantitative recovery method using aseptic necropsy of splenic tissue was developed. Optimal recovery was obtained by spread-plating homogenates on Middlebrook 7H10 agar with incubation for 3 mo at 23??C. Mycobacteria were recovered from 76% (n = 149/196) of fish examined. Mycobacterial densities exceeded 104 colony forming units??g tissue-1 in 38% of samples (n = 63/168) that were examined using a quantitative approach. The most frequently recovered mycobacterium, present in 57% (n = 109/192) of characterized samples, was the recently named new species Mycobacterium shottsii. Polyinfections of M. shottsii and other mycobacteria were observed in 25% of samples (n = 47/192) with densities of M. shottsii usually 1 or more orders of magnitude higher than co-isolate(s). Other mycobacteria recovered included isolates that, based on phenotypic traits, resembled M. interjectum, M. marinum, M. scrofulaceum, M. szulgai and M. triplex. M. marinum, commonly associated with fish mycobacteriosis and human disease, was recovered infrequently (3%, n = 6/192). The presence of multiple mycobacterial types occurring at high densities suggests that a variety of mycobacteria could be causative agents of mycobacteriosis in striped bass from the Chesapeake Bay. Striped bass is the major recreational fish species in the Chesapeake Bay, and the significance of the current epizootic to human health and the potential adverse effects on fish stocks are not known.

  7. Hypoxia tolerance variance between swimming and resting striped bass Morone saxatilis.

    PubMed

    Nelson, J A; Lipkey, G K

    2015-08-01

    Individual striped bass Morone saxatilis were each exposed in random order to aquatic hypoxia (10% air saturation) either while swimming at 50% of their estimated critical swimming speed (Ucrit ) or while at rest until they lost equilibrium. Individuals were always less tolerant of hypoxia when swimming (P < 0.01); the average fish was over five times more tolerant to the same hypoxia exposure when not swimming. There was no relationship between an individual's rank order of hypoxia tolerance (HT) under the two flow regimes, suggesting that different factors determine an individual's HT when at rest than when swimming. PMID:26184582

  8. Striped Bass Habitat use in the San Francisco Estuary Determined Using Otolith Microchemistry Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillis, C. C.; Ostrach, D. J.; Weber, P. K.; Ingram, B. L.; Zinkl, J. G.

    2005-12-01

    Habitat use has been shown to be an important factor in the bioaccumulation of contaminants in striped bass ( Morone saxatilis). This study explores techniques to determine migration in striped bass as part of a larger study investigating maternal transfer of xenobiotics to progeny in the San Francisco Estuary. The timing of movement of fish between salt and fresh water can easily be determined using a number of chemical markers in otoliths. Determining movement within estuaries, however, is a more difficult problem because mesohaline geochemical signatures approach the marine end member at very low salinities. Two tracers were used to reconstruct the migration history of striped bass in the San Francisco Estuary: Sr/Ca (measured by electron microprobe and LA-ICP-MS) and Sr isotope ratio (measured by LA-MC-ICP-MS). Both tracers can be used to map the salinity the fish is exposed to at the time of otolith increment deposition. Salinity, in turn, is mapped to location within the San Francisco Bay estuary based on monthly salinity surveys. The two methods have their respective benefits. Sr/Ca can be measured with higher spatial resolution (<10 microns). Sr isotope ratios are not modulated by metabolism. Sr isotope measurements were made to check the Sr/Ca results. In the San Francisco Estuary, low 87Sr/86Sr (0.706189) river water mixes with high 87Sr/86Sr (0.709168) marine water to 80% of the marine signal (0.7085) when the salinity is only 5% (1.8 ppt) seawater, and 95% of the marine signal (0.7090) at salinities of 20% (6.6 ppt) seawater (Ingram and Sloan, 1992). This salinity model should map directly to the otolith because there is no biological fractionation of Sr isotopes. The Sr/Ca otolith and salinity models predict a similar response. For both models, calculated otolith salinity is mapped to location within the San Francisco Estuary based on monthly salinity surveys. Using previously published salinity models, the otolith Sr/Ca and Sr isotope results are

  9. Hypoxia tolerance variance between swimming and resting striped bass Morone saxatilis.

    PubMed

    Nelson, J A; Lipkey, G K

    2015-08-01

    Individual striped bass Morone saxatilis were each exposed in random order to aquatic hypoxia (10% air saturation) either while swimming at 50% of their estimated critical swimming speed (Ucrit ) or while at rest until they lost equilibrium. Individuals were always less tolerant of hypoxia when swimming (P < 0.01); the average fish was over five times more tolerant to the same hypoxia exposure when not swimming. There was no relationship between an individual's rank order of hypoxia tolerance (HT) under the two flow regimes, suggesting that different factors determine an individual's HT when at rest than when swimming.

  10. A novel method to develop an otolith microchemistry model to determine striped bass habitat use in the San Francisco Estuary

    SciTech Connect

    Phillis, C C; Ostrach, D J; Gras, M; Yin, Q; Ingram, B L; Zinkl, J G; Weber, P K

    2006-06-14

    Otolith Sr/Ca has become a popular tool for hind casting habitat utilization and migration histories of euryhaline fish. It can readily identify habitat shifts of diadromous fish in most systems. Inferring movements of fish within estuarine habitat, however, requires a model of that accounts of the local water chemistry and the response of individual species to that water chemistry, which is poorly understood. Modeling is further complicated by the fact that high marine Sr and Ca concentrations results in a rapid, nonlinear increase in water Sr/Ca and {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr between fresh and marine waters. Here we demonstrate a novel method for developing a salinity-otolith Sr/Ca model for the purpose of reconstructing striped bass (Morone saxatilis) habitat use in the San Francisco Bay estuary. We used correlated Sr/Ca and {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios measurements from adult otoliths from striped bass that experienced a range of salinities to infer striped bass otolith Sr/Ca response to changes in salinity and water Sr/Ca ratio. Otolith {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr can be assumed to accurately record water {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr because there is no biological fractionation of Sr isotopes. Water {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr can in turn be used to estimate water salinity based on the mixing of fresh and marine water with known {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios. The relationship between adjacent analyses on otoliths of Sr/Ca and {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr by LA-ICP-MS and MC-ICP-MS (r{sup 2} = 0.65, n = 66) is used to predict water salinity from a measured Sr/Ca ratio. The nature of this non-linear model lends itself well to identifying residence in the Delta and to a lesser extent Suisun Bay, but does not do well locating residence within the more saline bays west of Carquinez Strait. An increase in the number of analyses would improve model confidence, but ultimately the precision of the model is limited by the variability in the response of individual fish to water Sr/Ca.

  11. Age-at-maturity estimates for Atlantic coast female striped bass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berlinsky, David L.; Fabrizio, Mary C.; O'Brien, John F.; Specker, Jennifer L.

    1995-01-01

    This study was undertaken to estimate the percentage of mature female striped bass Morone saxatilis present in each age-class during annual coastal feeding migration. Migratory striped bass (N = 302) were sampled in coastal Rhode Island waters during spring (May-June) and fall (September-November) from 1985 to 1987. Stocks were identified by analysis of morphometric characters and isoelectric focusing of eye-lens proteins. Histological sections of ovarian tissue were used to categorize maturity state. Fish were considered mature if a class of oocytes measuring at least 150 μm and containing cytoplasmic inclusions was found in the ovarian sections. All females whose age at next potential spawning was 7 and older were mature. Our empirical observations indicated that 12% of fish in age-class 4, 34% of fish in age-class 5, and 77% of fish in age-class 6 were mature. The estimate of the proportion of mature fish in age-class 5 differs significantly from that of Merriman (1941), who also examined coastal migrants. No significant differences were found in maturity estimates of fish from stocks of different origin.

  12. Temperature-oxygen habitat for freshwater and coastal striped bass in a changing climate

    SciTech Connect

    Coutant, C.C.

    1988-01-01

    Habitat space for a fish species is normally constrained by extreme temperatures and low dissolved oxygen concentrations that the fish avoid. Both latitudinal limits to a species' distribution over a large area and availability of suitable habitat on the local scale may be altered by climate change. Average temperatures are expected to rise globally, and rainfall is expected to decrease in middle and increase in high latitudes in the next century. This paper uses the anadromous and landlocked stocks of striped bass to illustrate the possible effects of climate change on fish distribution. The tenuous existence of striped bass along the northern coast of the Gulf of Mexico and in Florida will likely be jeopardized by regional warming and reduced streamflow in the rivers in which these fish reside. In many freshwater lakes, reservoirs, and estuaries, the existing summer constriction of suitable habitat by high temperatures and low oxygen concentrations may be aggravated by warming, altered streamflow, and increased hypoxia. An expansion of the species' range around Nova Scotia and in the Gulf of St. Lawrence may occur, although the cold Labrador Current may strengthen and cancel any potential water temperature increases. Our understanding of the habitat requirements of highly visible fish species exceeds our confidence in climate models, but will allow forecasts of changes in regional and local habitat suitability as climate understanding and forecasting improve. 45 refs., 7 figs.

  13. Relative stock composition of the Atlantic Coast striped bass population: further analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Van Winkle, W.; Kumar, K.D.

    1982-06-01

    Fourteen variables derive from thirteen morphological characters were used in a stepwise discriminant analysis and a maximum likelihood analysis to estimate the relative contribution of striped bass (Morone saxatilis) stocks from the Hudson River and Chesapeake Bay to the coastal striped bass population. The analyses made use of the spawning-stock data and ocean data collected by Texas Instruments in 1975, although deletions were made to simplify the data to focus on relative contribution north of Chesapeake Bay and on sex and year-class differences. The discriminant function method misclassified approximately 20% of the spawning-stock fish. Errors in estimates of relative conbribution for the spawning stock data were similar for the two methods of analysis. Estimates of relative contribution of the Hudson stock to the coastal population varied considerably among year classes. In particular, the estimated relative contribution for the 1965 year class was between 40 and 50%, while the relative contributions for the 1966, 1968, and 1969 year classes were approximately 10% or less. The relative contribution of males was greater than that of females. The two methods of analysis gave similar estimates of relative contribution of the Hudson stock to the coastal population.

  14. Physiology of seawater acclimation in the striped bass, Morone saxatilis (Walbaum).

    PubMed

    Madsen, S S; McCormick, S D; Young, G; Endersen, J S; Nishioka, R S; Bern, H A

    1994-05-01

    Several experiments were performed to investigate the physiology of seawater acclimation in the striped bass, Morone saxatilis. Transfer of fish from fresh water (FW) to seawater (SW; 31-32 ppt) induced only a minimal disturbance of osmotic homeostasis. Ambient salinity did not affect plasma thyroxine, but plasma cortisol remained elevated for 24h after SW transfer. Gill and opercular membrane chloride cell density and Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity were relatively high and unaffected by salinity. Average chloride cell size, however, was slightly increased (16%) in SW-acclimated fish. Gill succinate dehydrogenase activity was higher in SW-acclimated fish than in FW fish. Kidney Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity was slightly lower (16%) in SW fish than in FW fish. Posterior intestinal Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity and water transport capacity (Jv) did not change upon SW transfer, whereas middle intestinal Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity increased 35% after transfer and was correlated with an increase in Jv (110%). As salinity induced only minor changes in the osmoregulatory organs examined, it is proposed that the intrinsic euryhalinity of the striped bass may be related to a high degree of "preparedness" for hypoosmoregulation that is uncommon among teleosts studied to data. PMID:24203266

  15. Multiple vitellogenins and product yolk proteins in striped bass, Morone saxatilis: molecular characterization and processing during oocyte growth and maturation.

    PubMed

    Williams, V N; Reading, B J; Hiramatsu, N; Amano, H; Glassbrook, N; Hara, A; Sullivan, C V

    2014-04-01

    The multiple vitellogenin (Vtg) system of striped bass, a perciform species spawning nearly neutrally buoyant eggs in freshwater, was investigated. Vitellogenin cDNA cloning, Western blotting of yolk proteins (YPs) using Vtg and YP type-specific antisera, and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) of the YPs revealed the complex mechanisms of yolk formation and maturation in this species. It was discovered that striped bass possesses a tripartite Vtg system (VtgAa, VtgAb, and VtgC) in which all three forms of Vtg make a substantial contribution to the yolk. The production of Vtg-derived YPs is generally similar to that described for other perciforms. However, novel amino-terminal labeling of oocyte YPs prior to MS/MS identified multiple alternative sites for cleavage of these proteins from their parent Vtg, revealing a YP mixture far more complex than reported previously. This approach also revealed that the major YP product of each form of striped bass Vtg, lipovitellin heavy chain (LvH), undergoes limited degradation to smaller polypeptides during oocyte maturation, unlike the case in marine fishes spawning buoyant eggs in which LvHAa undergoes extensive proteolysis to osmotically active free amino acids. These differences likely reflect the lesser need for hydration of pelagic eggs spawned in freshwater. The detailed characterization of Vtgs and their proteolytic fate(s) during oocyte growth and maturation establishes striped bass as a freshwater model for investigating teleost multiple Vtg systems. PMID:24005815

  16. Transforming growth factor-beta response to mycobacterial infection in striped bass Morone saxatilis and hybrid tilapia Oreochromis spp.

    PubMed

    Harms, Craig A; Howard, Kristina E; Wolf, Jeffrey C; Smith, Stephen A; Kennedy-Stoskopf, Suzanne

    2003-10-15

    Striped bass (Morone saxatilis) and hybrid tilapia (Oreochromis spp.) were experimentally infected with Mycobacterium marinum. Splenic mononuclear cell transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) mRNA was measured by reverse transcription quantitative-competitive PCR (RT-qcPCR). In histologic sections of liver and anterior kidney, the area of each section that was occupied by granulomas and the total area of each section were measured by computer-assisted image analysis and compared as a proportion (the granuloma proportion). Infected striped bass splenic mononuclear cell TGF-beta mRNA expression was significantly lower than uninfected controls, while for tilapia there was no significant difference between infected and control fish. Mycobacterial granuloma proportion of liver and anterior kidney sections was significantly greater for infected striped bass than tilapia. Three (of 10) infected tilapia with the most pronounced inflammatory response displayed a decrease in TGF-beta mRNA expression, similar to the overall striped bass response to mycobacterium challenge. Downregulation of TGF-beta and failure to modulate the immune response may be related to excessive inflammatory damage to organs observed in mycobacteria-sensitive fish species.

  17. In vitro response of the striped bass natural resistance-associated macrophage protein, Nramp, to LPS and Mycobacterium marinum exposure.

    PubMed

    Burge, Erin J; Gauthier, David T; Van Veld, Peter A

    2004-07-01

    Mycobacteriosis in Chesapeake Bay (USA) striped bass Morone saxatilis is an ongoing disease problem with important economic implications for a large commercial and recreational fishery. Additionally, striped bass serve as a reservoir of potential mycobacterial zoonoses. Recently, we described a striped bass gene homolog of the natural resistance-associated macrophage protein family (MsNramp), which is responsible for resistance to mycobacterial infections in mice. Striped bass MsNramp is strongly induced in peritoneal exudate cells (PE) in vivo after intraperitoneal injection with Mycobacterium spp. The purpose of the present study was to investigate short-term in vitro MsNramp expression and reactive oxygen intermediate (ROI) production in primary cultures of adherent PE after exposure to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), or live- or heat-killed (HK) Mycobacterium marinum. PE expressed significantly higher levels of MsNramp at 4 and 24 h post-treatment with live and HK M. marinum. MsNramp response to LPS was dose-dependent in these cells, with maximum expression at 4 h and 20 microg/ml LPS. Treatment of PE with LPS resulted in increased intracellular superoxide anion levels, whereas treatment with live M. marinum caused a significant depression. This study is the first report of induction of a teleost Nramp in vitro by mycobacteria, and supports findings of teleost Nramp induction by LPS.

  18. S-oxygenation of thiobencarb (Bolero) in hepatic preparations from striped bass (Morone saxatilis) and mammalian systems.

    PubMed

    Cashman, J R; Olsen, L D; Nishioka, R S; Gray, E S; Bern, H A

    1990-01-01

    The in vitro S-oxygenation of thiobencarb (Bolero; p-chlorobenzyl N,N-diethylthiocarbamate) in the presence of hepatic microsomes from freshwater- and seawater-adapted striped bass was investigated. Thiobencarb S-oxide was the principal metabolite and accounted for 98% of the total thiobencarb metabolized by striped bass liver microsomes. Studies on the biochemical mechanisms for striped bass hepatic S-oxygenation suggest that this reaction is catalyzed largely by the flavin-containing monooxygenase and to a lesser extent by cytochromes P-450. Following the short incubation period used, no thiobencarb sulfone was detected and no evidence was found for a contribution of cooxidation in the S-oxidation of thiobencarb. This conclusion was supported by studies with microsomes and purified mammalian monooxygenases which also metabolized thiobencarb without cooxidizing factors. Highly purified cytochrome P-450IIB-1 S-oxygenated thiobencarb more efficiently than highly purified hog liver flavin-containing monoxygenase. Thiobencarb S-oxide and thiobencarb sulfone were efficient carbamylating agents and reacted with thiol and amine nucleophiles, whereas thiobencarb itself was relatively stable to transthiocarbamylation. Monooxygenase-catalyzed S-oxygenation of thiobencarb by striped bass liver microsomes may represent a bioactivation process which could explain the known toxicity of thiobencarb in fish.

  19. Multiple vitellogenins and product yolk proteins in striped bass, Morone saxatilis: molecular characterization and processing during oocyte growth and maturation.

    PubMed

    Williams, V N; Reading, B J; Hiramatsu, N; Amano, H; Glassbrook, N; Hara, A; Sullivan, C V

    2014-04-01

    The multiple vitellogenin (Vtg) system of striped bass, a perciform species spawning nearly neutrally buoyant eggs in freshwater, was investigated. Vitellogenin cDNA cloning, Western blotting of yolk proteins (YPs) using Vtg and YP type-specific antisera, and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) of the YPs revealed the complex mechanisms of yolk formation and maturation in this species. It was discovered that striped bass possesses a tripartite Vtg system (VtgAa, VtgAb, and VtgC) in which all three forms of Vtg make a substantial contribution to the yolk. The production of Vtg-derived YPs is generally similar to that described for other perciforms. However, novel amino-terminal labeling of oocyte YPs prior to MS/MS identified multiple alternative sites for cleavage of these proteins from their parent Vtg, revealing a YP mixture far more complex than reported previously. This approach also revealed that the major YP product of each form of striped bass Vtg, lipovitellin heavy chain (LvH), undergoes limited degradation to smaller polypeptides during oocyte maturation, unlike the case in marine fishes spawning buoyant eggs in which LvHAa undergoes extensive proteolysis to osmotically active free amino acids. These differences likely reflect the lesser need for hydration of pelagic eggs spawned in freshwater. The detailed characterization of Vtgs and their proteolytic fate(s) during oocyte growth and maturation establishes striped bass as a freshwater model for investigating teleost multiple Vtg systems.

  20. Quantitative genetics and differential performance and gene expression of half-sib families of hybrid striped bass in communal ponds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The US is one of the world’s largest importers of seafood. A major constraint in producing hybrid striped bass is suboptimal production efficiency due to large performance variation of fish from undomesticated brooders. The objectives of this first-year study were to determine the genetic basis of p...

  1. The dietary branched chain amino acid requirements of hybrid striped bass(Morone chrysops x M. saxatilis)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The requirements for branched chain amino acids (BCAAs) are unknown in hybrid striped bass and necessary for formulating efficient and nutritious diets. Moreover, the dietary balance among these three amino acids can substantially influence the performance of meat animals fed those diets. The diet...

  2. Transforming growth factor-beta response to mycobacterial infection in striped bass Morone saxatilis and hybrid tilapia Oreochromis spp.

    PubMed

    Harms, Craig A; Howard, Kristina E; Wolf, Jeffrey C; Smith, Stephen A; Kennedy-Stoskopf, Suzanne

    2003-10-15

    Striped bass (Morone saxatilis) and hybrid tilapia (Oreochromis spp.) were experimentally infected with Mycobacterium marinum. Splenic mononuclear cell transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) mRNA was measured by reverse transcription quantitative-competitive PCR (RT-qcPCR). In histologic sections of liver and anterior kidney, the area of each section that was occupied by granulomas and the total area of each section were measured by computer-assisted image analysis and compared as a proportion (the granuloma proportion). Infected striped bass splenic mononuclear cell TGF-beta mRNA expression was significantly lower than uninfected controls, while for tilapia there was no significant difference between infected and control fish. Mycobacterial granuloma proportion of liver and anterior kidney sections was significantly greater for infected striped bass than tilapia. Three (of 10) infected tilapia with the most pronounced inflammatory response displayed a decrease in TGF-beta mRNA expression, similar to the overall striped bass response to mycobacterium challenge. Downregulation of TGF-beta and failure to modulate the immune response may be related to excessive inflammatory damage to organs observed in mycobacteria-sensitive fish species. PMID:12963276

  3. Hypoxia affects performance traits and body composition of juvenile hybrid striped bass (Morone chrysops x M. saxatilis)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Performance traits and body composition of juvenile hybrid striped bass (Morone chrysops x M. saxatilis) in response to hypoxia were evaluated in replicate tanks maintained at constant dissolved oxygen concentrations that averaged 23.0 +/- 2.3%, 39.7 +/- 3.0%, and 105.5 +/- 9.5% dissolved oxygen sat...

  4. Methods to assess impacts on Hudson River striped bass: report for the period October 1, 1977 to September 30, 1979. [Entrainment

    SciTech Connect

    Barnthouse, L.W.; Christensen, S.W.; Kirk, B.L.; Kumar, K.D.; Van Winkle, W.

    1980-06-01

    The overall objective of this project is to develop and apply quantitative methods for assessing the effects of power plant entrainment and impingement on the Hudson River striped bass population. During the two years covered in this reporting period, our work dealt with five interrelated aspects of this assessment problem: (1) young-of-the year models, (2) mortality of entrained eggs, larvae, and juveniles, (3) projection of long-term impacts using stock recruitment models, (4) relative contribution of the Hudson River stock to the Atlantic coastal striped bass population, and (5) distribution of entrainable striped bass life stages in the immediate vicinity of power plant intakes.

  5. Uptake, retention, and elimination of PCB (Aroclor 1254) by larval striped bass (Morone saxatilis)

    SciTech Connect

    Califano, R.J.; O'Connor, J.M.; Peters, L.S.

    1980-03-01

    Larval striped bass removed PCB from Hudson River water rapidly and nearly completely. The final whole-body concentration resulting from 48 h exposure to a single dose of /sup 14/C-Aroclor 1254 was 5.9 ..mu..g g/sup -1/ dry weight (HRW) and 5.0 ..mu..g g/sup -1/ dry weight (FHRW). Final concentrations in fish exposed to PCB in HRW and FHRW were not significantly different (p > 0.05). The transfer of PCB from water to fish was at a maximum at 48 h in HRW, at which time the fish had accumulated about 60% of the PCB available in the system (600 ng).

  6. Effects of dechlorinated industrial effluent on striped bass 'Morone saxatilis' ichthyoplankton. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, L.W. Jr.; Burton, D.T.; Graves, W.C.; Margrey, S.L.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of sulfur dioxide (SO2) dechlorination on estuarine striped bass, Morone saxatilis, eggs and larvae were evaluated by exposing the organisms to the following conditions: (1) total residual chlorine (TRC); (2) SO2; (3) TRC-SO2 dechlorination, and (4) control. Continuous exposure to TRC concentrations ranging from 0.06 to 2.0 mg/L were lethal to both life stages over a 96-h exposure period. The same range of SO2 (sulfite) concentrations caused an effect on the eggs after 36 h; however, percent mortality did not increase with concentration of SO2. Dechlorination caused significant reductions in TRC toxicity at all exposure periods less than 36 and 96 h for eggs and larvae, respectively.

  7. Growth dynamics of juvenile striped bass as functions of temperature and ration

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, D.K.; Coutant, C.C.

    1981-03-01

    Growth dynamics of juvenile striped bass Morone saxatilis were determined at constant temperatures (12 to 34.5 C), at fluctuating temperatures (+- 4 C around means of 18, 24, and 30 C), and at ration levels of 100, 60, 30 and 0% of satiation at each temperature regime. At constant temperatures, both maximum growth for 100% ration and minimum maintenance ration occurred near 24 C; zero growth occurred at 33.5 C. Reduced ration lowered growth rates and shifted the point of zero growth to lower temperatures, but it did not significantly shift the temperature of optimum growth. The greatest bioenergetic efficiency in fluctuating temperature regimes was in the range 14 to 22 C (mean, 18 C).

  8. Methods to assess impacts on Hudson River striped bass: final report

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, S.W.; Vaughan, D.S.; Van Winkle, W.; Barnthouse, L.W.; DeAngelis, D.L.; Kumar, K.D.; Yoshiyama, R.M.

    1982-06-01

    Two-young-of-the-year entrainment models and one impingement model are described. Several quantitative methods for evaluating entrainment mortality factors are presented, including methods for estimating the probability of mortality, for evaluating biases in such estimates, for detecting mortality and deriving confidence intervals, and for treating sublethal effects and indirect mortality. Biological compensation was a key issure in the hearings. A critique of the Lawler, Matusky and Skelly (LMS) compensation function, the development of a new stock-recruitment model which combines two classical models, a technique for validating stock-recruitment curve fits, and a regression analysis of stock-recruitment relationships in three fish populations are discussed. The use of discriminant analysis to estimate the relative contribution of the Hudson River striped bass population to Atlantic fisheries is described. An appendix documents the FORTRAN version of the Empirical Transport Model.

  9. Evaluation of an electronic fry counter with striped bass embryos and larvae

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lemarie, D.P.; Weller, D.A.; Theisen, D.D.; Woods, L. Curry

    1997-01-01

    We evaluated an electronic fry counter (Jensorter, Inc., model FC-2) for accuracy. precision, and effects on embryo hatchability and larval survival of striped bass Morone saxatilis. Hatching success of embryos and 96-h survival of 5-d larvae passed through the counter did not differ significantly (P > 0.05) from controls. Mean electronic counts of embryos and larvae differed from hand counts by -5.2% and -9.7%, respectively. Precision was estimated by the coefficient of variation of repeated counts and ranged as high as 4.43% for embryos and 8.62% for larvae. Site- and species-specific factors may have increased variability that re suited in the reduced levels of accuracy and precision. The advantages of greatly increased speed of counting and ease of use, as well as potentially better performance under other conditions, warrant further evaluation of this counter with other species and water supplies.

  10. Effects of parental and dietary PCBs on survival, growth, and body burdens of larval striped bass

    SciTech Connect

    Westin, D.T.; Olney, C.E.; Rogers, B.A.

    1983-01-01

    The relative contribution of parental and dietary sources of PCBs on the effects on survival and growth of striped bass larvae during their first month of life was investigated. Larvae of known PCBs body burden were fed for 20 days on ARTEMIA diets containing high and low concentrations of PCBs. The inherited and dietary concentrations had no effect on survival and growth after yolk absorption. Residue analysis of eggs and larvae showed a consistent reduction of PCBs concentration over time regardless of the PCBs level in the diet. The reduction in total PCBs reflects dilution of PCB from paretal sources by the accretion of relatively uncontaminated tissue during the period of rapid larval growth. (JMT)

  11. PCBs in striped bass collected from the Hudson River, New York, during Fall, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.J.; Kim, H.T.; Kim, J.S.

    1985-06-01

    Previous results have been based on the use of the standard filet (edible portion), and levels of PCBs were determined by pattern matching, which estimates individual Aroclor mixtures. Concentrations are determined by assigning unique PCB congeners to the individual Aroclor mixtures. It has been established that many PCBs are not retained by a living organism; thus, reported levels may be high due to pattern matching. This study reports levels quantified on a peak to peak basis. The objectives of the present study were to determine the levels of polychlorinated biphenyls in striped bass, to compare these with levels estimated by pattern matching, to determine any association of concentration to length, and to investigate the effects on measured levels of trimming and edible portion.

  12. Striped bass, temperature, and eutrophication: a speculative hypothesis for environmental risk

    SciTech Connect

    Coutant, C.C.

    1982-01-01

    The paradoxical record of striped bass distribution and abundance, including population declines in coastal waters and variable success of freshwater introductions, is analyzed for consistency with a thermal niche-dissolved oxygen-squeeze hypothesis. A commonality among diverse field and laboratory observations supports a genetic-based thermal niche for the species that changes to lower temperatures as fish age. This shift can cause local conditions, especially warm surface strata and deoxygenated deep water, to be incompatible with the success of large fish. Crowding due to temperature preferences and avoidance of low oxygen concentrations can lead to pathological symptoms and over fishing, which may contribute to population declines. Through a mixture of evidence and conjecture, the thermal niche-dissolved oxygen hypothesis is proposed as a unified perspective of the habitat requirements of the species that can aid in its study and management. 141 references, 13 figures.

  13. Cytochrome P4501A mRNA and protein induction in striped bass (Morone saxatilis).

    PubMed

    Durieux, Eric D H; Connon, Richard E; Werner, Inge; D'Abronzo, Leandro S; Fitzgerald, Patrick S; Spearow, Jimmy L; Ostrach, David J

    2012-08-01

    The striped bass (Morone saxatilis) supports a valuable recreational fishery and is among the most important piscivorous fish of the San Francisco Estuary. This species has suffered a significant decline in numbers over the past decades, and there is indication that contaminants are important contributors. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polyhalogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (PHAHs) including PCBs and dioxins are widespread in the estuary, they typically bioaccumulate through trophic levels, reaching highest levels in top predators and are known to affect the fish health and development. The aim of this study was to investigate the dynamics of cytochrome P4501A (Cyp1a) induction simultaneously at different levels of biological organization (RNA transcription and protein synthesis) as a biomarker of exposure to PAHs and PHAHs. We utilized β-naphthoflavone (BNF) as a model PAH to induce Cyp1a responses in juvenile striped bass in both dose-response and time-response assessments and determined Cyp1a mRNA and protein levels. Significant responses were measured in both systems at 10 mg ΒΝF kg⁻¹, a concentration used for time-response studies. Messenger RNA levels peaked at 6 h post-injection, while protein levels increased progressively with time, significantly peaking at 96 h post-injection; both remaining elevated throughout the duration of the test (8 days). Our data suggest that rapid induction of gene transcription following exposure and subsequent cumulative protein synthesis could provide a useful means of identifying temporal variants in exposure to Cyp1a inducers in Morone saxatilis. The potential application of this combined Cyp1a gene and protein biomarker in this species for field studies is discussed. PMID:22252335

  14. Cytochrome P4501A mRNA and protein induction in striped bass (Morone saxatilis).

    PubMed

    Durieux, Eric D H; Connon, Richard E; Werner, Inge; D'Abronzo, Leandro S; Fitzgerald, Patrick S; Spearow, Jimmy L; Ostrach, David J

    2012-08-01

    The striped bass (Morone saxatilis) supports a valuable recreational fishery and is among the most important piscivorous fish of the San Francisco Estuary. This species has suffered a significant decline in numbers over the past decades, and there is indication that contaminants are important contributors. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polyhalogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (PHAHs) including PCBs and dioxins are widespread in the estuary, they typically bioaccumulate through trophic levels, reaching highest levels in top predators and are known to affect the fish health and development. The aim of this study was to investigate the dynamics of cytochrome P4501A (Cyp1a) induction simultaneously at different levels of biological organization (RNA transcription and protein synthesis) as a biomarker of exposure to PAHs and PHAHs. We utilized β-naphthoflavone (BNF) as a model PAH to induce Cyp1a responses in juvenile striped bass in both dose-response and time-response assessments and determined Cyp1a mRNA and protein levels. Significant responses were measured in both systems at 10 mg ΒΝF kg⁻¹, a concentration used for time-response studies. Messenger RNA levels peaked at 6 h post-injection, while protein levels increased progressively with time, significantly peaking at 96 h post-injection; both remaining elevated throughout the duration of the test (8 days). Our data suggest that rapid induction of gene transcription following exposure and subsequent cumulative protein synthesis could provide a useful means of identifying temporal variants in exposure to Cyp1a inducers in Morone saxatilis. The potential application of this combined Cyp1a gene and protein biomarker in this species for field studies is discussed.

  15. Requirement of hybrid striped bass for dietary (n-3) highly unsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Nematipour, G R; Gatlin, D M

    1993-04-01

    A feeding trial was conducted to quantify the requirement of hybrid striped bass (Morone chrysops female x M. saxatilis male) for dietary (n-3) highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFA), specifically eicosapentaenoic [20:5(n-3)] and docosahexaenoic [22:6(n-3)] acids. Graded levels of (n-3) HUFA as ethyl esters were substituted for part or all of the 5 g olive oil/100 g diet in the semipurified basal diet. Total amount of 20:5(n-3) plus 22:6(n-3) in the experimental diets was 0.5, 1.1, 1.5, 2.0 or 3.2 g/100 g dry wt. Control fish received a diet containing menhaden fish oil at 5 g/100 g. Each diet was fed to triplicate groups of hybrids (with an initial average weight of 13.0 g/fish) in aquaria for 10 wk. Significantly (P < 0.05) higher relative weight gain as well as more efficient food and protein utilization were observed for fish fed the diets with 0.5, 1.1, 1.5 or 2.0% (n-3) HUFA or 5% menhaden fish oil as compared with those fed the basal diet. These responses generally reached a plateau between 1.1 and 1.5% (n-3) HUFA, but the lowest values were observed for fish fed the diet with 3.2% (n-3) HUFA. Fatty acid composition of body lipids (total lipid of intraperitoneal fat and polar lipids of muscle and liver) was affected by diet and indicated some elongation and desaturation of octadecatetraenoic acid [18:4(n-3)] and 20:5 (n-3) to 22:6(n-3). These data indicated that 20:5(n-3) and 22:6(n-3) are essential for hybrid striped bass, and the minimum requirement is approximately 1% of diet or 20% of dietary lipid.

  16. Spawning migration of telemetered striped bass in the Roanoke River, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carmichael, J.T.; Haeseker, S.L.; Hightower, J.E.

    1998-01-01

    The spring spawning migration is a key period for effective management of anadromous populations of striped bass Morone saxatilis. Information on migratory behavior is needed in order to develop appropriate harvest regulations and to conduct effective surveys while fish are on the spawning grounds. We used ultrasonic telemetry to estimate the timing and duration of the upriver spawning migration for the Roanoke River, North Carolina, population and to evaluate whether a short-term fluctuation in temperature or flow would alter the distribution of telemetered fish on the spawning grounds. Seventy-eight fish implanted with transmitters were released during 1993 and 1994. Twenty-nine telemetered fish migrated upriver in 1994, and 14 telemetered fish entered the river in 1995. Migration of telemetered fish began in mid- to late April when water temperatures in the lower river reached 17-18??C. Males began their spawning migration significantly earlier than females in 1994; the difference was not significant in 1995. The 165-km upriver migration took about a week, as did the downriver migration after the spawning season. In 1994 and 1995 respectively, males remained on the spawning grounds for averages of 22 and 21 d, females for 8 and 11 d. Because of shorter residency times only about half the telemetered females were on the spawning grounds at any one time during the peak of the spawning season. Striped bass remained on the spawning grounds during a short-term temperature decrease of about 4??C (over 5 d) and an increase in flow from about 190 to 390 m3/s (over 1 d).

  17. Superficial neuromasts facilitate non-visual feeding by larval striped bass (Morone saxatilis).

    PubMed

    Sampson, Julia A; Duston, Jim; Croll, Roger P

    2013-09-15

    To investigate whether mechanoreception is used in non-visual feeding in larval striped bass (Morone saxatilis), the ontogeny of superficial neuromasts along the lateral line was described using the vital stain FM1-43FX and fluorescent microscopy. The number of neuromasts visible along one flank increased from 11 at first feeding [5 to 7 days post-hatch (dph)] to >150 by the juvenile stage (27 dph). A neomycin dose response (0, 1, 2 and 5 mmol l(-1)) was evaluated for neuromast ablation of bass aged 10, 13, 17 and 20 dph. Using these same age groups, the ability of bass to catch Artemia salina prey in both dark and light tank-based feeding trials was compared between larvae with neuromasts ablated using neomycin (5 mmol l(-1)) and controls. Neomycin significantly reduced the incidence of feeding in the light and dark. Among larvae that fed, those in the dark treated with neomycin caught fewer Artemia (~5 prey h(-1); P<0.05) than controls (16 prey h(-1) at 10 dph; 72 prey h(-1) at 20 dph). In the light, by contrast, neomycin treatment had no significant effect on prey capture by larvae age 13 to 20 dph, but did inhibit feeding of 10 dph larvae. Verification that neomycin was specifically ablating the hair cells of superficial neuromasts and not affecting either neuromast innervation, olfactory pits, or taste cells was achieved by a combination of staining with FM1-43FX and immunocytochemistry for tubulin and the calcium binding proteins, S100 and calretinin. PMID:23737563

  18. Superficial neuromasts facilitate non-visual feeding by larval striped bass (Morone saxatilis).

    PubMed

    Sampson, Julia A; Duston, Jim; Croll, Roger P

    2013-09-15

    To investigate whether mechanoreception is used in non-visual feeding in larval striped bass (Morone saxatilis), the ontogeny of superficial neuromasts along the lateral line was described using the vital stain FM1-43FX and fluorescent microscopy. The number of neuromasts visible along one flank increased from 11 at first feeding [5 to 7 days post-hatch (dph)] to >150 by the juvenile stage (27 dph). A neomycin dose response (0, 1, 2 and 5 mmol l(-1)) was evaluated for neuromast ablation of bass aged 10, 13, 17 and 20 dph. Using these same age groups, the ability of bass to catch Artemia salina prey in both dark and light tank-based feeding trials was compared between larvae with neuromasts ablated using neomycin (5 mmol l(-1)) and controls. Neomycin significantly reduced the incidence of feeding in the light and dark. Among larvae that fed, those in the dark treated with neomycin caught fewer Artemia (~5 prey h(-1); P<0.05) than controls (16 prey h(-1) at 10 dph; 72 prey h(-1) at 20 dph). In the light, by contrast, neomycin treatment had no significant effect on prey capture by larvae age 13 to 20 dph, but did inhibit feeding of 10 dph larvae. Verification that neomycin was specifically ablating the hair cells of superficial neuromasts and not affecting either neuromast innervation, olfactory pits, or taste cells was achieved by a combination of staining with FM1-43FX and immunocytochemistry for tubulin and the calcium binding proteins, S100 and calretinin.

  19. A study of the striped bass in the marine district of New York State. Completion report 1 Apr 76-31 Mar 79

    SciTech Connect

    Young, B.H.

    1980-05-01

    Between April of 1976 and March of 1979, a total of 9,791 striped bass were netted from western Long Island Sound, the Hudson River and the heated plume at the Northport Power Station using beach seines and gill nets. Of these, 1,854 striped bass were collected in western Long Island Sound, 1,701 of which were tagged and released. Most of these fish were less than two years old. In the Hudson River, 7,920 young-of-the-year and yearling striped bass were collected; 1,017 of this collection were tagged and released. In addition, 17 striped bass were collected, tagged and released in the heated plume at the Northport Power Station.

  20. Tissue essential fatty acid composition and competitive response to dietary manipulations in white bass (Morone chrysops), striped bass (M. saxatilis) and hybrid striped bass (M. chrysopsxM. saxatilis).

    PubMed

    Harel, Moti; Place, Allen R

    2003-05-01

    The effects of wide changes in dietary levels of docosahexaenoic (DHA) or arachidonic (ArA) acids on growth, survival and fatty acid composition in body tissues of Morone larvae were examined. White bass (WB, Morone chrysops), striped bass (SB, Morone saxatilis) and sunshine hybrid bass (HSB, M. chrysopsxM. saxatilis) larvae (day 24-46) were fed Artemia nauplii enriched with algal sources of varying proportions of DHA and ArA (from 0 to over 20% of total fatty acids). WB larvae fed DHA-deficient Artemia diet retarded over 50% of their potential growth, however, increasing dietary DHA/ArA ratios were associated with a significant growth improvement. The highest proportion of polyunsaturated fatty acids was found in WB neural tissue (approx. 50% of total fatty acids), while HSB neural tissue contained the highest proportion of saturated fatty acids (approx. 35% of total fatty acids). Within the neural tissues of all Morone larvae, both DHA and ArA were generally the most dominant as well as the most responding fatty acids to dietary manipulations (except in WB fed DHA or ArA deficient diets). HSB neural tissue was particularly efficient in retaining a significant amount of DHA in the face of dietary deficiency. However, WB neural tissue was the most responsive to dietary increase in DHA, accumulating a significantly higher amount of DHA (P<0.05) than SB or HSB. Results demonstrate significant differences in fatty acid composition and growth responsiveness to dietary manipulations between Morone larvae species and within specific tissues. WB weight gain and neural tissue composition was affected most by dietary changes in both DHA and ArA whereas SB and HSB tissue compositions were generally less affected by dietary manipulations.

  1. Disparate effects of constant and annually-cycling daylength and water temperature on reproductive maturation of striped bass (Morone saxatilis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, R.W.; Henderson-Arzapalo, A.; Sullivan, C.V.

    2005-01-01

    Adult striped bass (Morone saxatilis) were exposed to various combinations of constant or anually-cycling daylength and water temperature. Constant conditions (15 h days, 18??C) were those normally experienced at spawning and cycling conditions simulated natural changes at Chesapeake Bay latitude. Females exposed to constant long (15 h) days and cycling water temperature (TEMPERATURE group) had blood plasma levels of sex steroids (testosterone [T] and estradiol-17?? [E2]) and vitellogenin (Vg), and profiles of oocyte growth, that were nearly identical to those of females held under a natural photothermal cycle (CONTROL group). Several fish from these two groups were induced to spawn fertile eggs. Females constantly exposed to warm water (18??C), with or without a natural photoperiod cycle (PHOTOPERIOD and STATIC groups, respectively), had diminished circulating levels of gonadal steroid hormones and Vg, impaired deposition of yolk granules in their ooplasm, and decreased oocyte growth, and they underwent premature ovarian atresia. Males exposed to cycling water temperature (CONTROL and TEMPERATURE groups) spermiated synchronously during the natural breeding season, at which time they also had had high plasma androgen (T and 11-ketotestosterone [11-KT]) levels. The timing of spermiation was highly asynchronous among males in groups of fish held constantly at 18??C (STATIC and PHOTOPERIOD groups) and this asynchrony was associated with diminished plasma androgen levels. Termination of spermiation by males exposed to cycling water temperature coincided with a sharp decline in levels of plasma androgens about a month after water temperature rose above 18??C. In contrast, most males held constantly at 18??C sustained intermediate levels of plasma androgens and spermiated until the end of the study in late July. The annual cycle of water temperature clearly plays a prominent role in the initiation, maintenance, and termination of the striped bass reproductive cycle. In

  2. Waste-heat mariculture of striped bass for population enhancement and food production. Final report on Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Van Olst, J.C.; Carlberg, J.M.

    1983-04-01

    Biological and economic data were obtained to determine whether the culture of striped bass (Morona saxatilis) in power plant thermal effluent could be a cost-effective means of utilizing an otherwise wasted energy resource to provide additional supplies of high-quality seafood. Experiments were conducted to provide some of the data necessary to predict tank-carrying capacity, food-conversion efficiency, and water flow requirements for striped bass cultured at high density in future commercial-scale operations. Computer models were developed for several modes of operation of a theoretical commercial production facility, and return-on-investment calculations were made which indicated that substantial profits are possible. At these sites, no heating or pumping of water would be required, and an annual return-on-operating costs of 103% was estimated.

  3. Effect of calcium on cadmium uptake and toxicity in larvae and juveniles of striped bass (Morone saxatillis)

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, D.A.; Meteyer, M.J.; Martin, F.D.

    1985-02-01

    A number of studies have shown that water hardness may have a sparing action on cadmium toxicity in freshwater fish and in the estuarine environment several investigators have stressed the role of calcium in an overall salinity effect of cadmium toxicity. Recent data on striped bass obtained by the US Fish and Wildlife Service indicate that the toxicity of cadmium to this species is higher in freshwater than in salt water. The current study was undertaken to elucidate the role of calcium in modifying cadmium toxicity in striped bass larvae and juveniles. Toxicity data were obtained from one-day-old, one-week-old and six-weeks-old animals from a single larval batch. In both fish and crustaceans there is evidence to suggest that cadmium may alter calcium metabolism. In one-week-old larvae calcium uptake was followed for 5 days in cadmium-exposed and cadmium free conditions and at two different calcium levels.

  4. Methods to assess impacts on Hudson River striped bass. Report for the period October 1, 1977-September 30, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Barnthouse, L.W.; Christensen, S.W.; Kirk, B.L.; Kumar, K.D.; Van Winkle, W.; Vaughan, D.S.

    1980-05-01

    The results obtained during this period were used in a detailed assessment of the impact of entrainment and impingement on the Hudson River striped bass population. Most of these results were incorporated in testimony written for ongoing adjudicatory hearings on the Hudson River Power Case, US Environmental Protection Agency, Region II (USEPA, Region II). This testimony will be published as a three-volume NUREG report during FY80.

  5. Reconciling nuclear microsatellite and mitochondrial marker estimates of population structure: breeding population structure of Chesapeake Bay striped bass (Morone saxatilis).

    PubMed

    Brown, K M; Baltazar, G A; Hamilton, M B

    2005-06-01

    Comparative analyses of nuclear and organelle genetic markers may help delineate evolutionarily significant units or management units, although population differentiation estimates from multiple genomes can also conflict. Striped bass (Morone saxatilis) are long-lived, highly migratory anadromous fish recently recovered from a severe decline in population size. Previous studies with protein, nuclear DNA and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) markers produced discordant results, and it remains uncertain if the multiple tributaries within Chesapeake Bay constitute distinct management units. Here, 196 young-of-the-year (YOY) striped bass were sampled from Maryland's Choptank, Potomac and Nanticoke Rivers and the north end of Chesapeake Bay in 1999 and from Virginia's Mataponi and Rappahannock Rivers in 2001. A total of 10 microsatellite loci exhibited between two and 27 alleles per locus with observed heterozygosities between 0.255 and 0.893. The 10-locus estimate of R(ST) among the six tributaries was -0.0065 (95% confidence interval -0.0198 to 0.0018). All R(ST) and all but one theta estimates for pairs of populations were not significantly different from zero. Reanalysis of Chesapeake Bay striped bass mtDNA data from two previous studies estimated population differentiation between theta=-0.002 and 0.160, values generally similar to mtDNA population differentiation predicted from microsatellite R(ST) after adjusting for reduced effective population size and uniparental inheritance in organelle genomes. Based on mtDNA differentiation, breeding sex ratios or gene flow may have been slightly male biased in some years. The results reconcile conflicting past studies based on different types of genetic markers, supporting a single Chesapeake Bay management unit encompassing a panmictic striped bass breeding population.

  6. Ecological risk assessment methodology for species exposed to contaminant mixtures with application to Chesapeake Bay striped bass

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, D.T.; Wilson, H.T.

    1995-12-31

    This report is on the development of a new methodology to assess potential risks to natural populations exposed to contaminant mixtures. The purpose of this project was to develop an objective and quantitative methodology that could help ChesapeakeBay environmental managers assess the potential risks that mixtures of chemical contaminants might pose to resource species. Application of the method was to be demonstrated on Chesapeake Bay striped bass populations to the extent that available data allowed.

  7. Dynamics of polychlorinated biphenyls in striped bass from the Hudson river. III. tissue disposition and routes for elimination

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, J.M.; Pizza, J.C. )

    1987-03-01

    Striped bass were exposed to {sup 14}C-polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) in single-dose and multiple-dose experiments. Samples were analyzed to determine rate constants for PCB elimination from individual tissues, PCB concentration in tissues, the proportion of the PCB burden retained and the proportion of the cumulative dose retained by each tissue at various times after exposure. An experiment was also conducted to determine both the potential for secondary PCB uptake in dietary exposure studies and the relative tissue disposition of PCBs assimilated from dietary sources as compared to direct water uptake. PCBs were present in the tissues of striped bass within 6 h after administration of a single dose. Certain tissue compartments, such as the liver/gall bladder, accumulated PCBs over a period of 48 h even though the whole-body burden had decreased between 24 and 48 h. Except for the gills, elimination rate constants for all tissues were similar and were to the whole body elimination rate constant. Elimination during the first few hours following exposure to PCBs may be due to equilibrium partitioning from the gill to the environment. The multiple-dose study showed that PCB burdens in striped bass continued to increase with dosing. However, tissue-specific rate constants for PCB elimination led to an increased flux of PCB out of tissues, and an overall decline in the percent of the cumulative dose remaining in the body 48 h after administration of each dose. The most likely route for PCB elimination from striped bass was from tissues to the liver and thence to the intestine via the bile. These were no differences in the tissue disposition of PCB related to route of exposure.

  8. San Francisco Estuary Striped Bass Migration History Determined by Electron-microprobe Analysis of Otolith Sr/Ca Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Ostrach, D J; Phillis, C C; Weber, P K; Ingram, B L; Zinkl, J G

    2004-09-17

    Habitat use has been shown to be an important factor in the bioaccumulation of contaminants in striped bass. This study examines migration in striped bass as part of a larger study investigating bioaccumulation and maternal transfer of xenobiotics to progeny in the San Francisco Estuary system. Habitat use, residence time and spawning migration over the life of females (n = 23) was studied. Female striped bass were collected between Knights Landing and Colusa on the Sacramento River during the spawning runs of 1999 and 2001. Otoliths were removed, processed and aged via otolith microstructure. Subsequently, otoliths were analyzed for strontium/calcium (Sr/Ca) ratio using an electron-microprobe to measure salinity exposure and to distinguish freshwater, estuary, and marine habitat use. Salinity exposure during the last year before capture was examined more closely for comparison of habitat use by the maternal parent to contaminant burden transferred to progeny. Results were selectively confirmed by ion microprobe analyses for habitat use. The Sr/Ca data demonstrate a wide range of migratory patterns. Age of initial ocean entry differs among individuals before returning to freshwater, presumably to spawn. Some fish reside in freshwater year-round, while others return to more saline habitats and make periodic migrations to freshwater. Frequency of habitat shifts and residence times differs among fish, as well as over the lifetime of individual fish. While at least one fish spent its final year in freshwater, the majority of spawning fish spent their final year in elevated salinity. However, not all fish migrated to freshwater to spawn in the previous year. Results from this investigation concerning migration history in striped bass can be combined with contaminant and histological developmental analyses to better understand the bioaccumulation of contaminants and the subsequent effects they and habitat use have on fish populations in the San Francisco Estuary system.

  9. Infections with Philometra sp. associated with mortalities in wild-hatched captive-raised striped bass, Morone saxatilis (Walbaum).

    PubMed

    Séguin, G; Bouchard, F; Measures, L N; Uhland, C F; Lair, S

    2011-06-01

    The striped bass, Morone saxatilis (Walbaum), once represented an important resource for fisheries in the St Lawrence River (Quebec, Canada). A restoration programme, involving captive propagation, was implemented with the objective of restocking the population, which had disappeared in the late 1960s. An unusually high rate of mortality was observed during the winter of 2006 in captive-raised fingerlings that were originally collected from the Miramichi River (New Brunswick, Canada) the previous summer. Post-mortem examinations revealed extensive granulomatous and hyperplastic peritonitis associated with numerous nematodes of the genus Philometra. Given the severity of the lesions, high intensity of infection by Philometra sp. was presumed to be the primary factor in the unusual mortalities reported that winter. Observations suggest that this nematode, which was acquired in the wild, cannot establish itself in a captive environment, most likely because of the absence of the obligate intermediate host. Examination of archived specimens of striped bass showed that this parasite was probably present in the St Lawrence River population prior to its extirpation. Consequently, the introduction of infected fish into this ecosystem should not be a concern. Nevertheless, infection-related mortalities of fingerlings might affect dynamics of wild striped bass populations. PMID:21545441

  10. Infections with Philometra sp. associated with mortalities in wild-hatched captive-raised striped bass, Morone saxatilis (Walbaum).

    PubMed

    Séguin, G; Bouchard, F; Measures, L N; Uhland, C F; Lair, S

    2011-06-01

    The striped bass, Morone saxatilis (Walbaum), once represented an important resource for fisheries in the St Lawrence River (Quebec, Canada). A restoration programme, involving captive propagation, was implemented with the objective of restocking the population, which had disappeared in the late 1960s. An unusually high rate of mortality was observed during the winter of 2006 in captive-raised fingerlings that were originally collected from the Miramichi River (New Brunswick, Canada) the previous summer. Post-mortem examinations revealed extensive granulomatous and hyperplastic peritonitis associated with numerous nematodes of the genus Philometra. Given the severity of the lesions, high intensity of infection by Philometra sp. was presumed to be the primary factor in the unusual mortalities reported that winter. Observations suggest that this nematode, which was acquired in the wild, cannot establish itself in a captive environment, most likely because of the absence of the obligate intermediate host. Examination of archived specimens of striped bass showed that this parasite was probably present in the St Lawrence River population prior to its extirpation. Consequently, the introduction of infected fish into this ecosystem should not be a concern. Nevertheless, infection-related mortalities of fingerlings might affect dynamics of wild striped bass populations.

  11. Stocking of hatchery-reared striped bass in the Patuxent River, Maryland: survival, relative abundance, and cost-effectiveness

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dorazio, R.M.; Florence, B.M.; Wooley, C.M.

    1991-01-01

    Hatchery-reared fingerlings of striped bass Morone saxatilis were tagged, stocked, and recovered in the Patuxent River, Maryland, to estimate their survival and abundance relative to wild young of the year and to compare the costs and benefits of stocking phase-I (35–50 mm, total length) and phase-II (150–200 mm) fish. About 100,000 phase-I fingerlings were tagged and released each year during midsummer 1988 and 1989. Both tagged and untagged (wild) young of the year were recovered by alongshore seining in the river through 80 d poststocking. Mortality rates of wild and hatchery-reared young of the year were not significantly different-about 3%/d. Wild young of the year were more abundant in 1989 than in 1988. In 1988, phase-I fingerlings composed 56% of all young-of-the-year striped bass in the river. In 1989 wild young-of-the-year striped bass outnumbered hatchery-reared fingerlings by about 11 to 1. Whether phase-I or phase-II stocking was more cost-effective depended on the relative magnitudes of fingerling survival and on hatchery production costs. The range of phase-II survival (5–50%) observed among different hatcheries and years of production was too broad to support generalizations about cost-effectiveness, given the fivefold difference in the unit costs of phase-I and phase-II production.

  12. Dynamics of polychlorinated biphenyls in striped bass from the hudson river. 3. Tissue disposition and routes for elimination

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, J.M.; Pizza, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    Striped bass were exposed to /sup 14/C-polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) in single-dose and multiple-dose experiments. Samples were analyzed to determine rate constants for PCB elimination from individual tissues, PCB concentration in tissues, the proportion of the PCB burden retained and the proportion of the cumulative dose retained by each tissue at various times after exposure. An experiment was also conducted to determine both the potential for secondary PCB uptake in dietary exposure studies and the relative tissue disposition of PCBs assimilated from dietary sources as compared to direct water uptake. PCBs were present in the tissues of striped bass within 6 h after administration of a single dose. Certain tissue compartments, such as the liver/gall bladder, accumulated PCBs over a period of 48 h even though the whole-body burden had decreased between 24 and 48 h. The most-likely route for PCB elimination from striped bass was from tissues to the liver and thence to the intestine via the bile. There were no differences in the tissue disposition of PCB related to route of exposure.

  13. Mycobacterium shottsii sp. nov., a slowly growing species isolated from Chesapeake Bay striped bass (Morone saxatilis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rhodes, M.W.; Kator, H.; Kotob, S.; van Berkum, P.; Kaattari, I.; Vogelbein, W.; Quinn, F.; Floyd, M.M.; Butler, W.R.; Ottinger, C.A.

    2003-01-01

    Slowly growing, non-pigmented mycobacteria were isolated from striped bass (Morone saxatilis) during an epizootic of mycobacteriosis in the Chesapeake Bay. Growth characteristics, acid-fastness and results of 16S rRNA gene sequencing were consistent with those of the genus Mycobacterium. A unique profile of biochemical reactions was observed among the 21 isolates. A single cluster of eight peaks identified by analysis of mycolic acids (HPLC) resembled those of reference patterns but differed in peak elution times from profiles of reference species of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. One isolate (M175T) was placed within the slowly growing mycobacteria by analysis of aligned 16S rRNA gene sequences and was proximate in phylogeny to Mycobacterium ulcerans and Mycobacterium marinum. However, distinct nucleotide differences were detected in the 16S rRNA gene sequence among M175T, M. ulcerans and M. marinum (99.2% similarity). Isolate M175T could be differentiated from other slowly growing, non-pigmented mycobacteria by its inability to grow at 37??C, production of niacin and urease, absence of nitrate reductase and resistance to isoniazid (1 ??g ml-1), thiacetazone and thiophene-2-carboxylic hydrazide. Based upon these genetic and phenotypic differences, isolate M175T (= ATCC 700981T = NCTC 13215T) is proposed as the type strain of a novel species, Mycobacterium shottsii sp. nov.

  14. Dynamics of the striped bass (Morone saxatilis) ovary proteome reveal a complex network of the translasome.

    PubMed

    Reading, Benjamin J; Williams, Valerie N; Chapman, Robert W; Williams, Taufika Islam; Sullivan, Craig V

    2013-04-01

    We evaluated changes in the striped bass (Morone saxatilis) ovary proteome during the annual reproductive cycle using label-free quantitative mass spectrometry and a novel machine learning analysis based on K-means clustering and support vector machines. Modulated modularity clustering was used to group co-variable proteins into expression modules and Gene Ontology (GO) biological process and KEGG pathway enrichment analyses were conducted for proteins within those modules. We discovered that components of the ribosome along with translation initiation and elongation factors generally decrease as the annual ovarian cycle progresses toward ovulation, concomitant with a slight increase in components of the 26S-proteasome. Co-variation within more than one expression module of components from these two multi-protein complexes suggests that they are not only co-regulated, but that co-regulation occurs through more than one sub-network. These components also co-vary with subunits of the TCP-1 chaperonin system and enzymes of intermediary metabolic pathways, suggesting that protein folding and cellular bioenergetic state play important roles in protein synthesis and degradation. We provide further evidence to suggest that protein synthesis and degradation are intimately linked, and our results support function of a proteasome-ribosome supercomplex known as the translasome. PMID:23414552

  15. Effects of an antidepressant mixture on the brain serotonin and predation behavior of hybrid striped bass.

    PubMed

    Bisesi, Joseph H; Sweet, Lauren E; van den Hurk, Peter; Klaine, Stephen J

    2016-04-01

    Antidepressants have been found in measurable concentrations in final treated wastewater effluent and receiving waters throughout the world. Studies have shown that these concentrations are typically not overtly toxic, but the psychotropic mode of action of these chemicals warrants examination of their behavioral effects. Exposure of hybrid striped bass to the antidepressants fluoxetine or venlafaxine alone has been shown to cause decreased brain serotonin levels and increased time to capture prey at concentrations typically 1 to 2 orders of magnitude higher than environmentally relevant concentrations. In the present study, equally effective doses of fluoxetine and venlafaxine were used to perform a mixture study, using a toxic unit approach to determine whether these antidepressants may act in an additive manner at lower concentrations. The results indicated that mixtures of these antidepressants caused decreased brain serotonin and increased time to capture prey at concentrations lower than reported in previous studies. Low concentration mixtures caused an additive effect on brain serotonin levels and time to capture prey, whereas higher concentrations were less than additive. The results were consistent with the dose addition concept, with higher concentration mixtures potentially saturating the effects on serotonin in the brain. Results from the present study indicate that antidepressants have the potential to be additive on the biochemical and individual scale, which necessitates more robust analysis of antidepressant mixtures and their potential to act together in low concentration scenarios. PMID:26076900

  16. Structure and specificity of a binary tandem domain F-lectin from striped bass (Morone saxatilis).

    PubMed

    Bianchet, Mario A; Odom, Eric W; Vasta, Gerardo R; Amzel, L Mario

    2010-08-13

    The plasma of the striped bass Morone saxatilis contains a fucose-specific lectin (MsaFBP32) that consists of two F-type carbohydrate recognition domains (CRDs) in tandem. The crystal structure of the complex of MsaFBP32 with l-fucose reported here shows a cylindrical 81-A-long and 60-A-wide trimer divided into two globular halves: one containing N-terminal CRDs (N-CRDs) and the other containing C-terminal CRDs (C-CRDs). The resulting binding surfaces at the opposite ends of the cylindrical trimer have the potential to cross-link cell surface or humoral carbohydrate ligands. The N-CRDs and C-CRDs of MsaFBP32 exhibit significant structural differences, suggesting that they recognize different glycans. Analysis of the carbohydrate binding sites provides the structural basis for the observed specificity of MsaFBP32 for simple carbohydrates and suggests that the N-CRD recognizes more complex fucosylated oligosaccharides and with a relatively higher avidity than the C-CRD. Modeling of MsaFBP32 complexed with fucosylated glycans that are widely distributed in prokaryotes and eukaryotes rationalizes the observation that binary tandem CRD F-type lectins function as opsonins by cross-linking "non-self" carbohydrate ligands and "self" carbohydrate ligands, such as sugar structures displayed by microbial pathogens and glycans on the surface of phagocytic cells from the host.

  17. Dynamics of the striped bass (Morone saxatilis) ovary proteome reveal a complex network of the translasome.

    PubMed

    Reading, Benjamin J; Williams, Valerie N; Chapman, Robert W; Williams, Taufika Islam; Sullivan, Craig V

    2013-04-01

    We evaluated changes in the striped bass (Morone saxatilis) ovary proteome during the annual reproductive cycle using label-free quantitative mass spectrometry and a novel machine learning analysis based on K-means clustering and support vector machines. Modulated modularity clustering was used to group co-variable proteins into expression modules and Gene Ontology (GO) biological process and KEGG pathway enrichment analyses were conducted for proteins within those modules. We discovered that components of the ribosome along with translation initiation and elongation factors generally decrease as the annual ovarian cycle progresses toward ovulation, concomitant with a slight increase in components of the 26S-proteasome. Co-variation within more than one expression module of components from these two multi-protein complexes suggests that they are not only co-regulated, but that co-regulation occurs through more than one sub-network. These components also co-vary with subunits of the TCP-1 chaperonin system and enzymes of intermediary metabolic pathways, suggesting that protein folding and cellular bioenergetic state play important roles in protein synthesis and degradation. We provide further evidence to suggest that protein synthesis and degradation are intimately linked, and our results support function of a proteasome-ribosome supercomplex known as the translasome.

  18. Effects of dechlorination on early life stages of striped bass (Morone saxatilis)

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, L.W. Jr.; Burton, D.T.; Graves, W.C.; Margerey, S.L.

    1981-05-01

    Effects of sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) dechlorination on estuarine striped bass (Monroe saxatilis) eggs and larvae were evaluated by exposing the organisms to the following conditions: total residual chlorine (TRC); SO/sub 2/'; TRC-SO/sub 2/ dechlorination, and control. Continuous exposure to TRC concentrations ranging from 0.06 to 2.0 mg/L were lethal to both life stages over a 96-h exposure period. The same range of SO/sub 2/ (sulfite) concentrations caused an effect on the eggs after 36 h; however, percent mortality did not increase with concentration of SO/sub 2/. Few mortalities occurred at exposures less than 36 h. Mortality of larvae was higher than the controls at all SO/sub 2/ conditions after 96 h although the mean mortality at all concentrations was only 20% greater than the controls. Minimal mortality occurred at shorter exposure intervals. Mean mortality of test organisms exposed to TRC-SO/sub 2/ dechlorination conditions was only 11% higher for eggs (36 h) and 22% higher for larvae (96 h) than controls. Dechlorination caused significant reductions in TRC toxicity at all exposure periods less than 36 and 96 h for eggs and larvae, respectively.

  19. Effects of an antidepressant mixture on the brain serotonin and predation behavior of hybrid striped bass.

    PubMed

    Bisesi, Joseph H; Sweet, Lauren E; van den Hurk, Peter; Klaine, Stephen J

    2016-04-01

    Antidepressants have been found in measurable concentrations in final treated wastewater effluent and receiving waters throughout the world. Studies have shown that these concentrations are typically not overtly toxic, but the psychotropic mode of action of these chemicals warrants examination of their behavioral effects. Exposure of hybrid striped bass to the antidepressants fluoxetine or venlafaxine alone has been shown to cause decreased brain serotonin levels and increased time to capture prey at concentrations typically 1 to 2 orders of magnitude higher than environmentally relevant concentrations. In the present study, equally effective doses of fluoxetine and venlafaxine were used to perform a mixture study, using a toxic unit approach to determine whether these antidepressants may act in an additive manner at lower concentrations. The results indicated that mixtures of these antidepressants caused decreased brain serotonin and increased time to capture prey at concentrations lower than reported in previous studies. Low concentration mixtures caused an additive effect on brain serotonin levels and time to capture prey, whereas higher concentrations were less than additive. The results were consistent with the dose addition concept, with higher concentration mixtures potentially saturating the effects on serotonin in the brain. Results from the present study indicate that antidepressants have the potential to be additive on the biochemical and individual scale, which necessitates more robust analysis of antidepressant mixtures and their potential to act together in low concentration scenarios.

  20. Structure and Specificity of a Binary Tandem Domain F-Lectin from Striped Bass (Morone saxatilis)

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchet, M.; Odom, E; Vasta, J; Amzel, M

    2010-01-01

    The plasma of the striped bass Morone saxatilis contains a fucose-specific lectin (MsaFBP32) that consists of two F-type carbohydrate recognition domains (CRDs) in tandem. The crystal structure of the complex of MsaFBP32 with l-fucose reported here shows a cylindrical 81-A-long and 60-A-wide trimer divided into two globular halves: one containing N-terminal CRDs (N-CRDs) and the other containing C-terminal CRDs (C-CRDs). The resulting binding surfaces at the opposite ends of the cylindrical trimer have the potential to cross-link cell surface or humoral carbohydrate ligands. The N-CRDs and C-CRDs of MsaFBP32 exhibit significant structural differences, suggesting that they recognize different glycans. Analysis of the carbohydrate binding sites provides the structural basis for the observed specificity of MsaFBP32 for simple carbohydrates and suggests that the N-CRD recognizes more complex fucosylated oligosaccharides and with a relatively higher avidity than the C-CRD. Modeling of MsaFBP32 complexed with fucosylated glycans that are widely distributed in prokaryotes and eukaryotes rationalizes the observation that binary tandem CRD F-type lectins function as opsonins by cross-linking 'non-self' carbohydrate ligands and 'self' carbohydrate ligands, such as sugar structures displayed by microbial pathogens and glycans on the surface of phagocytic cells from the host.

  1. Preparation and characterization of a complex microencapsulated diet for striped bass Morone saxatilis larvae.

    PubMed

    Ozkizilcik, S; Chu F-L

    1996-01-01

    The nutritional requirements of marine fish larvae are not well understood, primarily due to the lack of biochemically defined diets acceptable by the larvae. This study describes the methodology for the preparation and the characterization of a complex protein-walled microcapsule (CPWC) containing lipid-walled capsules (LWC). The CPWC were prepared by atomizing a mixture of casein, LWC and other dietary materials into a cyclohexane solution containing 1% (v/v) cross-linking reagent, adipoyl chloride. The primary purpose of complex microencapsulation was to allow the gradual release of low molecular weight phagostimulants and nutrients from the cross-linked protein wall. To determine the release kinetics of low molecular weight compounds from the complex diet, a solution of the amino acid, lysine, was encapsulated in LWC and its leaching rate from CPWC was assessed. A batch of conventional protein-walled capsules (PWC) were also prepared by mixing lysine with casein. The release of lysine from CPWC was significantly lower than that measured from conventional PWC (p < 0.05). Nearly 45% of the total lysine leached out of freeze-dried PWC within 5 min of hydration, reaching 100% after 2 h. CPWC, on the other hand, efficiently retained encapsulated lysine, releasing only 25% after 2 h. In-vitro experiments indicated that CPWC were readily digested by the crude enzyme extract from striped bass larvae and purified porcine pepsin and trypsin.

  2. Influence of nutritional state on the progression and severity of mycobacteriosis in striped bass Morone saxatilis.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, John M; Rhodes, Matt R; Baya, Ana; Reimschuessel, Renate; Townsend, Howard; Harrell, Reginal M

    2009-12-01

    Challenge studies with Mycobacterium marinum clearly demonstrate that a poor diet affects the progression and severity of mycobacteriosis in striped bass Morone saxatilis. Fish (n = 512 total, wt = 65 +/- 15 g) were inoculated intraperitoneally with 10(4) colony-forming units (CFU) g(-1) body weigth (BW) or a physiological saline solution (controls) and evaluated for 8 mo. Inoculated fish fed a low-ration diet (0.15% BW d(-1)) developed a severe, systemic infection characterized by a high bacterial load (>10(8) CFU g(-1) spleen) and poor granuloma formation, which commonly progressed to mortality by 6 wk. In contrast, inoculated fish fed an adequate ration diet (1% BW d(-1)) developed classic granulomatous inflammation of reduced severity and total body energy similar to that found in uninoculated controls (p > 0.05). After 4 wk, fish fed adequate rations maintained an equilibrium state throughout the study period, even though 10(6) CFU g(-1) spleen mycobacteria were consistently cultured. In a second study, reactivation of an acute inflammatory state was demonstrated by placing previously infected fish on reducing diets (0.073% BW d(-1)). In both studies, the energetic demand of this disease was only appreciable when associated with active, severe, inflammatory states. To our knowledge, this study is the first to demonstrate the interaction of diet and mycobacteriosis in fish.

  3. Safety of oxytetracycline (Terramycin TM-100F) administered in feed to hybrid striped bass, walleyes, and yellow perch

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gaikowski, M.P.; Wolf, J.C.; Schleis, S.M.; Gingerich, W.H.

    2003-01-01

    Oxytetracycline (Terramycin TM-100F, a medicated premix containing oxytetracycline at 220 g/kg) is approved in the United States to control certain systemic bacterial diseases of salmon and catfish when fed at a rate of 55-82.5 mg per kilogram of bodyweight per day for 10 d. Although oxytetracycline may also control certain systemic bacterial infections in coolwater or scaled warmwater fish, no safety data for such species are available. Our objective was to determine the safety of oxytetracycline administered in feed at nominal doses of 0, 82.5, 248, or 413 mg??kg-1??d-1 to yellow perch Perca flavescens and hybrid striped bass (striped bass Morone saxatilis x white bass M. chrysops) for 10 d and to walleye Sander vitreus (formerly Stizostedion vitreum) for 20 d. Yellow perch and hybrid striped bass consumed 50% to 100% of the diet, whereas walleye feed consumption was occasionally less than 50% of the diet. Feed or fecal material was present in the gastrointestinal tract of all necropsied walleyes except for one control fish. The single growth effect was that hybrid striped bass offered a nominal dose of 413 mg??kg-1??d-1 were significantly smaller than untreated controls. Oxytetracycline-related histopathological findings were limited to walleyes and were of low severity. The histopathological findings included decreased hematopoietic-lymphopoietic (H&L) tissue in the anterior kidneys, diffuse hyperplasia of the gill filament epithelium, and a decreased prevalence of fish with eosinophilic droplets in their renal tubular epithelial cells. Although the incidence of decreased H&L tissue tended to increase in proportion to oxytetracycline dose, this finding was statistically significant only for fish that received a nominal dose of 413 mg??kg-1??d-1. Given the pathogenicity of the types of bacteria that are controlled by oxytetracycline treatment and the long history of its use in major aquaculture species, the relative risk of the minor oxytetracycline

  4. Chemical contamination and the annual summer die-off of striped bass (Morone saxatilis) in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta.

    PubMed

    Cashman, J R; Maltby, D A; Nishioka, R S; Bern, H A; Gee, S J; Hammock, B D

    1992-01-01

    In 1987, striped bass (Morone saxatilis) that were nearly dead (moribund) were captured by hand net, and apparently healthy striped bass were caught by hook and line from adjacent waters in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta or, alternatively, caught by hook and line from the Pacific Ocean. The livers of these three groups of striped bass were examined for chemical contamination by gas chromatography, by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and by immunoassay. Moribund striped bass livers were greatly contaminated by chemicals compared to healthy fish caught in the Delta and the Pacific Ocean. The types of contaminant encountered suggested that industrial, agricultural, and urban pollutants were present in the livers of moribund fish. Although the variability in the amount of hepatic contaminants observed among the groups of fish does not provide direct proof of causation, the large amount of pollutants suggests that chemical contamination (possibly acting as multiple stressors) contributes to the hepatotoxic condition of the moribund striped bass and may lead to an explanation of the die-off in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta region.

  5. Use of stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes to trace the larval striped bass food chain in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Estuary, California, April to September 1985

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rast, Walter; Sutton, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    To assess one potential cause for the decline of the striped bass fishery in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Estuary, stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios were used to examine the trophic structures of the larval striped bass food chain, and to trace the flux of these elements through the food chain components. Study results generally confirm a food chain consisting of the elements, phytoplankton/detritus-->zooplankton/Neomysis shrimp-->larval striped bass. The stable isotope ratios generally become more positive as one progresses from the lower to the higher trophic level food chain components, and no unusual trophic structure was found in the food chain. However, the data indicate an unidentified consumer organism occupying an intermediate position between the lower and higher trophic levels of the larval striped bass food chain. Based on expected trophic interactions, this unidentified consumer would have a stable carbon isotope ratio of about 28/mil and a stable nitrogen isotope ratio of about 8/mi. Three possible feeding stages for larval striped bass also were identified, based on their lengths. The smallest length fish seem to subsist on their yolk sac remnants, and the largest length fish subsist on Neomysis shrimp and zooplankton. The intermediate-length fish represent a transition stage between primary food sources and/or use of a mixture of food sources. (USGS)

  6. Individual-based model of young-of-the-year striped bass population dynamics. II. Factors affecting recruitment in the Potomac River, Maryland

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, J.H. ); Rose, K.A. ); Rutherford, E.S.; Houde, E.D. )

    1993-05-01

    An individual-based model of the population dynamics of young-of-the-year striped bass Morone saxatilis in the Potomac River, Maryland, was used to test the hypothesis that historically high recruitment variability can be explained by changes in environmental and biological factors that result in relatively small changes in growth and mortality rates of striped bass larvae. The four factors examined were (1) size distribution of female parents, (2) zooplankton prey density during the development of striped bass larvae, (3) density of completing larval white perch M. americana, and (4) temperature during larval development. Simulation results suggest that variations in female size and in prey for larvae alone could cause 10-fold variability in recruitment. But no single factor alone caused changes in vital rates of age-0 fish that could account for the 145-fold variability in the Potomac River index of juvenile recruitment. However, combined positive or negative effects of two or more factors resulted in more than a 150-fold simulated recruitment variability, suggesting that combinations of factors can account for the high observed annual variability in striped bass recruitment success. Higher cumulative mortality of feeding larvae and younger life stages than of juveniles was common to all simulations. supporting the contention that striped bass year-class strength is determined prior to metamorphosis. 76 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Regional variation in morphology of vertebral centra and intervertebral joints in striped bass, Morone saxatilis.

    PubMed

    Nowroozi, B N; Harper, C J; De Kegel, B; Adriaens, D; Brainerd, E L

    2012-04-01

    The vertebral column of fishes has traditionally been divided into just two distinct regions, abdominal and caudal. Recently, however, developmental, morphological, and mechanical investigations have brought this traditional regionalization scheme into question. Alternative regionalization schema advocate the division of the abdominal vertebrae into cervical, abdominal, and in some cases, transitional regions. Here, we investigate regional variation at the level of the vertebrae and intervertebral joint (IVJ) tissues in the striped bass, Morone saxatilis. We use gross dissection, histology, and polarized light imaging to quantify vertebral height, width, length, IVJ length, IVJ tissue volume and cross-sectional area, and vertical septum fiber populations, and angles of insertion. Our results reveal regional differences between the first four (most rostral) abdominal vertebrae and IVJs and the next six abdominal vertebrae and IVJs, supporting the recognition of a distinct cervical region. We found significant variation in vertebral length, width, and height from cranial to caudal. In addition, we see a significant decline in the volume of notochordal cells and the cross-sectional area of the fibrous sheath from cranial to caudal. Further, polarized light imaging revealed four distinct fiber populations within the vertical septum in the cervical and abdominal regions in contrast with just one fiber population found in the caudal region. Measurement of the insertion angles of these fiber populations revealed significant differences between the cervical and abdominal regions. Differences in vertebral, IVJ, and vertical septum morphology all predict greater range of motion and decreased stiffness in the caudal region of the fish compared with the cervical and abdominal regions. PMID:22109664

  8. Regional variation in morphology of vertebral centra and intervertebral joints in striped bass, Morone saxatilis.

    PubMed

    Nowroozi, B N; Harper, C J; De Kegel, B; Adriaens, D; Brainerd, E L

    2012-04-01

    The vertebral column of fishes has traditionally been divided into just two distinct regions, abdominal and caudal. Recently, however, developmental, morphological, and mechanical investigations have brought this traditional regionalization scheme into question. Alternative regionalization schema advocate the division of the abdominal vertebrae into cervical, abdominal, and in some cases, transitional regions. Here, we investigate regional variation at the level of the vertebrae and intervertebral joint (IVJ) tissues in the striped bass, Morone saxatilis. We use gross dissection, histology, and polarized light imaging to quantify vertebral height, width, length, IVJ length, IVJ tissue volume and cross-sectional area, and vertical septum fiber populations, and angles of insertion. Our results reveal regional differences between the first four (most rostral) abdominal vertebrae and IVJs and the next six abdominal vertebrae and IVJs, supporting the recognition of a distinct cervical region. We found significant variation in vertebral length, width, and height from cranial to caudal. In addition, we see a significant decline in the volume of notochordal cells and the cross-sectional area of the fibrous sheath from cranial to caudal. Further, polarized light imaging revealed four distinct fiber populations within the vertical septum in the cervical and abdominal regions in contrast with just one fiber population found in the caudal region. Measurement of the insertion angles of these fiber populations revealed significant differences between the cervical and abdominal regions. Differences in vertebral, IVJ, and vertical septum morphology all predict greater range of motion and decreased stiffness in the caudal region of the fish compared with the cervical and abdominal regions.

  9. Problems of stock definition in estimating relative contributions of Atlantic striped bass to the coastal fishery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waldman, John R.; Fabrizio, Mary C.

    1994-01-01

    Stock contribution studies of mixed-stock fisheries rely on the application of classification algorithms to samples of unknown origin. Although the performance of these algorithms can be assessed, there are no guidelines regarding decisions about including minor stocks, pooling stocks into regional groups, or sampling discrete substocks to adequately characterize a stock. We examined these questions for striped bass Morone saxatilis of the U.S. Atlantic coast by applying linear discriminant functions to meristic and morphometric data from fish collected from spawning areas. Some of our samples were from the Hudson and Roanoke rivers and four tributaries of the Chesapeake Bay. We also collected fish of mixed-stock origin from the Atlantic Ocean near Montauk, New York. Inclusion of the minor stock from the Roanoke River in the classification algorithm decreased the correct-classification rate, whereas grouping of the Roanoke River and Chesapeake Bay stock into a regional (''southern'') group increased the overall resolution. The increased resolution was offset by our inability to obtain separate contribution estimates of the groups that were pooled. Although multivariate analysis of variance indicated significant differences among Chesapeake Bay substocks, increasing the number of substocks in the discriminant analysis decreased the overall correct-classification rate. Although the inclusion of one, two, three, or four substocks in the classification algorithm did not greatly affect the overall correct-classification rates, the specific combination of substocks significantly affected the relative contribution estimates derived from the mixed-stock sample. Future studies of this kind must balance the costs and benefits of including minor stocks and would profit from examination of the variation in discriminant characters among all Chesapeake Bay substocks.

  10. Puncture resistance of the scaled skin from striped bass: collective mechanisms and inspiration for new flexible armor designs.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Deju; Szewciw, Lawrence; Vernerey, Franck; Barthelat, Francois

    2013-08-01

    The structure and mechanics of fish scales display unusual and attractive features which could inspire new protective materials and systems. This natural material is therefore attracting attention over the past few years, and recent work demonstrated the remarkable performance of individual fish scales. A puncture event as would occur from a predator's attack however involves more than one scale, and in this article we therefore investigate collective mechanisms occurring within the scaled skin of a fish in the event of a predator's attack. We first demonstrate that in striped bass (Morone saxatilis), the scales increase by four to five times the force required to puncture the skin. We show that individual scales from striped bass provide a remarkable barrier against sharp puncture, regardless of the stiffness of the substrate. The scalation pattern in striped bass is such that three scales overlap at any point on the surface of the fish, which we show effectively multiplies the puncture force by three. We determined that the friction between scales is negligible and therefore it does not contribute to increasing puncture force. Likewise, we found that the local arrangement of the scales had little effect on the puncture performance. Interestingly, because the scales are several orders of magnitude stiffer than the substrate, indenting a few isolated scales results in "sinking" of the scales into the substrate. The high local deflections and strain within the soft tissue may then result in blunt injury before the sharp indenter penetrates the scales. Stereo-imaging and image correlation performed around a puncture site in fish reveal that the surrounding scales collectively contribute to redistributing the puncture force over large volume, limiting local deflections and strains in the soft tissues. The structure and mechanisms of natural fish scales therefore offer an effective protection against several types of threat, and may inspire novel versatile protective

  11. Puncture resistance of the scaled skin from striped bass: collective mechanisms and inspiration for new flexible armor designs.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Deju; Szewciw, Lawrence; Vernerey, Franck; Barthelat, Francois

    2013-08-01

    The structure and mechanics of fish scales display unusual and attractive features which could inspire new protective materials and systems. This natural material is therefore attracting attention over the past few years, and recent work demonstrated the remarkable performance of individual fish scales. A puncture event as would occur from a predator's attack however involves more than one scale, and in this article we therefore investigate collective mechanisms occurring within the scaled skin of a fish in the event of a predator's attack. We first demonstrate that in striped bass (Morone saxatilis), the scales increase by four to five times the force required to puncture the skin. We show that individual scales from striped bass provide a remarkable barrier against sharp puncture, regardless of the stiffness of the substrate. The scalation pattern in striped bass is such that three scales overlap at any point on the surface of the fish, which we show effectively multiplies the puncture force by three. We determined that the friction between scales is negligible and therefore it does not contribute to increasing puncture force. Likewise, we found that the local arrangement of the scales had little effect on the puncture performance. Interestingly, because the scales are several orders of magnitude stiffer than the substrate, indenting a few isolated scales results in "sinking" of the scales into the substrate. The high local deflections and strain within the soft tissue may then result in blunt injury before the sharp indenter penetrates the scales. Stereo-imaging and image correlation performed around a puncture site in fish reveal that the surrounding scales collectively contribute to redistributing the puncture force over large volume, limiting local deflections and strains in the soft tissues. The structure and mechanisms of natural fish scales therefore offer an effective protection against several types of threat, and may inspire novel versatile protective

  12. Effects of salinity on aldicarb toxicity in juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and striped bass (Morone saxatilis x chrysops).

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Grisle, S; Schlenk, D

    2001-12-01

    Fluctuations in several environmental variables, such as salinity, can influence the interactions between organisms and pollutants in aquatic organisms, and, therefore, affect the toxicity of xenobiotics. In this study, after 2 species of fish, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and hybrid striped bass (Morone saxatilis x chrysops) were acclimated to 4 salinity regimens of 1.5, 7, 14, and 21 ppt for 1 week and then exposed to 0.5 mg/l aldicarb. Mortality, brain, and muscle cholinesterase levels were measured after 96 h. Rates of (14)C-aldicarb sulfoxide formation were determined in kidney (trout only), liver, and gill microsomes from each species acclimated to the 4 salinity regimens. Salinity significantly enhanced aldicarb toxicity, cholinesterase inhibition, and (14)C-aldicarb sulfoxide formation in rainbow trout but not in striped bass. In vitro incubations with (14)C-aldicarb and the cytochrome P450 (CYP) inhibitor, N-benzylimidazole, did not significantly alter aldicarb sulfoxide formation in tissue microsomes from either species of fish, indicating CYP did not contribute to aldicarb sulfoxidation. Salinity increased flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) mRNA expression and catalytic activities in microsomes of liver, gill, and kidney of rainbow trout, which was consistent with the salinity-induced enhancement of aldicarb toxicity. Salinity did not alter FMO mRNA expression and catalytic activities in striped bass, which was also consistent with the lack of an effect of salinity on aldicarb toxicity in this species. These results suggest that salinity-mediated enhancement of aldicarb toxicity is species-dependent, and at least partially due to the salinity-related upregulation of FMOs, which, in turn, increases the bioactivation of aldicarb to aldicarb sulfoxide, which is a more potent inhibitor of cholinesterase than aldicarb.

  13. Largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) and striped mullet (Mugil cephalus) as vectors of contaminants to human consumers in northwest Florida.

    PubMed

    Karouna-Renier, Natalie K; Snyder, Richard A; Lange, Ted; Gibson, Suzanne; Allison, Jeffrey G; Wagner, Matthew E; Ranga Rao, K

    2011-09-01

    The health benefits of regular consumption of fish and seafood have been espoused for many years. However, fish are also a potential source of environmental contaminants that have well known adverse effects on human health. We investigated the consumption risks for largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides; n = 104) and striped mullet (Mugil cephalus; n = 170), two commonly harvested and consumed fish species inhabiting fresh and estuarine waters in northwest Florida. Skinless fillets were analyzed for total mercury, inorganic arsenic, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDD/F), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and organochlorine pesticides. Contaminant levels were compared to screening values (SV) calculated using U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recommendations for establishing consumption advisories. Largemouth bass were found to contain high levels of total mercury at all sampling locations (0.37-0.89 ug/g) and one location exhibited elevated total PCBs (39.4 ng/g). All of the samples exceeded Florida fish consumption advisory trigger levels for total mercury and one location exceeded the U.S. EPA SV for total PCBs. As a result of the high mercury levels, the non-cancer health risks (hazard index-HI) for bass were above 1 for all locations. Striped mullet from several locations with known point sources contained elevated levels of PCBs (overall range 3.4-59.3 ng/g). However, total mercury levels in mullet were low. Eight of the 16 mullet sampling locations exceeded the U.S. EPA SV for total PCBs and two locations exceeded an HI of 1 due to elevated PCBs. Despite the elevated levels of total PCBs in some samples, only two locations exceeded the acceptable cancer risk range and therefore cancer health risks from consumption of bass and mullet were determined to be low at most sampling locations. PMID:21764437

  14. Largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) and striped mullet (Mugil cephalus) as vectors of contaminants to human consumers in northwest Florida.

    PubMed

    Karouna-Renier, Natalie K; Snyder, Richard A; Lange, Ted; Gibson, Suzanne; Allison, Jeffrey G; Wagner, Matthew E; Ranga Rao, K

    2011-09-01

    The health benefits of regular consumption of fish and seafood have been espoused for many years. However, fish are also a potential source of environmental contaminants that have well known adverse effects on human health. We investigated the consumption risks for largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides; n = 104) and striped mullet (Mugil cephalus; n = 170), two commonly harvested and consumed fish species inhabiting fresh and estuarine waters in northwest Florida. Skinless fillets were analyzed for total mercury, inorganic arsenic, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDD/F), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and organochlorine pesticides. Contaminant levels were compared to screening values (SV) calculated using U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recommendations for establishing consumption advisories. Largemouth bass were found to contain high levels of total mercury at all sampling locations (0.37-0.89 ug/g) and one location exhibited elevated total PCBs (39.4 ng/g). All of the samples exceeded Florida fish consumption advisory trigger levels for total mercury and one location exceeded the U.S. EPA SV for total PCBs. As a result of the high mercury levels, the non-cancer health risks (hazard index-HI) for bass were above 1 for all locations. Striped mullet from several locations with known point sources contained elevated levels of PCBs (overall range 3.4-59.3 ng/g). However, total mercury levels in mullet were low. Eight of the 16 mullet sampling locations exceeded the U.S. EPA SV for total PCBs and two locations exceeded an HI of 1 due to elevated PCBs. Despite the elevated levels of total PCBs in some samples, only two locations exceeded the acceptable cancer risk range and therefore cancer health risks from consumption of bass and mullet were determined to be low at most sampling locations.

  15. Largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) and striped mullet (Mugil cephalus) as vectors of contaminants to human consumers in northwest Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karouna-Renier, Natalie K.; Snyder, Richard A.; Lange, Ted; Gibson, Suzanne; Allison, Jeffrey G.; Wagner, Matthew E.; Rao, K. Ranga

    2011-01-01

    The health benefits of regular consumption of fish and seafood have been espoused for many years. However, fish are also a potential source of environmental contaminants that have well known adverse effects on human health. We investigated the consumption risks for largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides; n = 104) and striped mullet (Mugil cephalus; n = 170), two commonly harvested and consumed fish species inhabiting fresh and estuarine waters in northwest Florida. Skinless fillets were analyzed for total mercury, inorganic arsenic, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDD/F), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and organochlorine pesticides. Contaminant levels were compared to screening values (SV) calculated using U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recommendations for establishing consumption advisories. Largemouth bass were found to contain high levels of total mercury at all sampling locations (0.37-0.89 ug/g) and one location exhibited elevated total PCBs (39.4 ng/g). All of the samples exceeded Florida fish consumption advisory trigger levels for total mercury and one location exceeded the U.S. EPA SV for total PCBs. As a result of the high mercury levels, the non-cancer health risks (hazard index-HI) for bass were above 1 for all locations. Striped mullet from several locations with known point sources contained elevated levels of PCBs (overall range 3.4-59.3 ng/g). However, total mercury levels in mullet were low. Eight of the 16 mullet sampling locations exceeded the U.S. EPA SV for total PCBs and two locations exceeded an HI of 1 due to elevated PCBs. Despite the elevated levels of total PCBs in some samples, only two locations exceeded the acceptable cancer risk range and therefore cancer health risks from consumption of bass and mullet were determined to be low at most sampling locations.

  16. Age structured stochastic recruitment model for assessment of power plant impact. [Simulation of striped bass population dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, P.J.; Swartzman, G.L.

    1984-03-01

    The dynamics of the Hudson river striped bass (Morone saxatilis) stock were analyzed using a stochastic age structured model. The effect of river flow on recruitment was combined with the mortality due to fishing and power plant water uptake to obtain an overall effect of these variables on the fishery. Model equations and parameters were documented and their underlying assumptions presented. Preliminary model runs resulted in yields well below those actually observed. Calibration of model parameters brought these values closer to the observed yields, but stock values proved inexact. The influence of power plant mortality on fishery yield was evident, but the simulation results remain inconclusive. 11 references, 4 figures, 6 tables.

  17. Plasma gonadotropin II, sex steroids, and thyroid hormones in wild striped bass (Morone saxatilis) during spermiation and final oocyte maturation.

    PubMed

    Mylonas, C C; Scott, A P; Zohar, Y

    1997-11-01

    The blood levels of gonadotropin II (GtH II), sex-steroid hormones, and thyroid hormones were determined in wild spermiating male striped bass (Morone saxatilis) in males and in females at various stages of final oocyte maturation (FOM), captured on their spawning grounds. The progression of spermiation was associated with increases in plasma GtH II and decreases in plasma testosterone (T), 11-ketotestosterone, and thyroxine (T4). Plasma triiodothyronine (T3) remained at high and relatively unchanged levels. Plasma levels of 17,20beta-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one (17,20beta-P) and 17,20beta, 21-trihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one (17,20beta,21-P), the proposed maturation-inducing steroids (MIS) in striped bass, were low and unchanged during the same period. It was concluded that low progestogen levels are adequate to induce spermiation in striped bass, and that higher levels may be associated with spawning behavior. In the females, based on the profiles of the studied hormones, FOM was separated into two phases. Early FOM, which included germinal vesicle (GV) migration and lipid-droplet coalescence, was associated with elevations in plasma GtH II, T, and estradiol 17beta. Late FOM, which included GV breakdown and yolk-globule coalescence, was associated with a further surge in plasma GtH II, increases in the levels of the two MIS, mainly 17, 20beta-P, and a drop in T4. Plasma T3 levels did not change during FOM. Examination of conjugated steroids demonstrated, in the males, a reduction in conjugated androgens at the peak of the spawning season and, in the females, a small increase in conjugated 17, 20beta-dihydroxylated and 5beta-reduced,3alpha-hydroxylated steroids after spawning. This is the most comprehensive report, to date, on the endocrine regulation of gonadal maturation in wild striped bass, demonstrating that a two-stage process of FOM is regulated by different endocrine signals, providing further evidence for the involvement of 17,20beta-P as a MIS in the females

  18. A recombinant vaccine expressing a mammalian Mycobacterium sp. antigen is immunostimulatory but not protective in striped bass.

    PubMed

    Pasnik, David J; Vemulapalli, Ramesh; Smith, Stephen A; Schurig, Gerhardt G

    2003-09-15

    A recombinant vaccine was constructed for piscine mycobacteriosis utilizing a Brucella abortus strain RB51 vector expressing a mammalian Mycobacterium sp. 85A antigen. Juvenile striped bass were inoculated with the resulting construct at doses equivalent to 10(6), 10(7), 10(8), 10(9), and 10(10) colony-forming units/fish. Blood and tissue samples from these fish demonstrated significant specific humoral and cell-mediated immune responses towards the 85A antigen in a dose-dependent manner. However, survival studies determined that inoculated fish failed to demonstrate cross-protective responses after live Mycobacterium marinum challenge 70 days post-inoculation.

  19. Occurrence and distribution of organochlorine compounds in sediment and livers of striped bass (Morone saxatilis) from the San Francisco Bay-Delta Estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pereira, W.E.; Hostettler, F.D.; Cashman, J.R.; Nishioka, R.S.

    1994-01-01

    A preliminary assessment was made in 1992 of chlorinated organic compounds in sediments and in livers of striped bass from the San Francisco Bay-Delta Estuary. Samples of sediment and striped bass livers contained DDT (ethane, 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis (p-chlorophenyl)-) and its degradation products, DDD (ethane, 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)-) and DDE (ethylene, 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis (p-chlorophenyl)-); PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls); alpha and gamma chlordane, and cis and trans nonachlor. In addition, the livers of striped bass contained small concentrations of DCPA (dimethyl tetrachloroterephthalate), a pre-emergent herbicide. Agricultural run-off from the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers, as well as atmospheric deposition, are probably responsible for a low chronic background of DDT in sediments throughout San Francisco Bay. Larger concentrations of DDT in sediment near Richmond in the Central Bay, and Coyote Creek in the South Bay may be derived from point sources. Ratios of pentachloro isomers of PCBs to hexachloro isomers in the South Bay sediments were different from those in the Central and North Bay, suggesting either differences in microbial activity in the sediments or different source inputs of PCBs. Concentrations of alpha chlordane in livers of striped bass were greater than those of gamma chlordane, which suggests a greater environmental stability and persistence of alpha chlordane. Trans nonachlor, a minor component of technical chlorodane, was present in greater concentrations than alpha and gamma chlordane and cis nonachlor. Trans nonachlor is more resistant to metabolism than alpha and gamma chlordane and cis nonachlor, and serves as an environmentally stable marker compound of chlordane contamination in the estuary. Chlorinated organic compounds have bioaccumulated in the livers of striped bass. These compounds may contribute to the decline of the striped bass in San Francisco Bay-Delta Estuary.

  20. Mycobacteria, but not mercury, induces metallothionein (MT) protein in striped bass, Morone saxitilis, phagocytes, while both stimuli induce MT in channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, phagocytes.

    PubMed

    Regala, R P; Rice, C D

    2004-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular immunology indicate that the expression of inducible pro-inflammatory proteins is increased in vertebrates in response to both infectious disease agents and various xenobiotics. For example, iNOS, COX-2, and CYP1A are induced by both inflammation and AhR ligands. Moreover, the expression of these proteins in response to stimuli varies among individuals within populations. Little is known of the differences among fish in the inducibility of proinflammatory proteins in response to both infectious agents and xenobiotics. Through random screening of a striped bass, Morone saxitilis, peritoneal macrophage cDNA library, a full length metallothionein (MT) gene was cloned and sequenced. MT is a low-molecular weight (6-8 kDa), cysteine-rich metal binding protein. Metals are required by pathogenic bacteria for growth, and by the host defense system by serving as a catalyst for the generation of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs) by phagocytes. A recombinant striped bass MT (rMT) was expressed and purified, then used to generate a specific mAb (MT-16). MT protein expression was followed in freshly isolated striped bass and channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, phagocytes after in vitro exposure to the naturally occurring intracellular pathogen Mycobacteria fortuitum or to 0.1 and 1 microM mercury (Hg), as HgCl(2). MT expression was increased by 24 h in both channel catfish and striped bass phagocytes as a result of exposure to M. fortuitum cells. On the other hand, MT was induced by Hg in channel catfish cells, but not those of striped bass. These results indicate that metal homeostasis in phagocytes is different between catfish and striped bass. In addition, these data suggest that care should be taken to distinguish between inflammation-induced vs. metal-induced MT when using MT expression as a biomarker of metal exposure.

  1. Potential effects of maternal contribution on egg and larva population dynamics of striped bass: Integrated individual-based model and directed field sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, J.H., Jr. . Chesapeake Biological Lab.); Rose, K.A. )

    1991-01-01

    We have used a bioenergetically-driven, individual-based model (IBM) of striped bass as a framework for synthesizing available information on population biology and quantifying, in a relative sense, factors that potentially affect year class success. The IBM has been configured to simulate environmental conditions experienced by several striped bass populations; i.e., in the Potomac River, MD; in Hudson River, NY; in the Santee-Cooper River System, SC, and; in the San Joaquin-Sacramento River System CA. These sites represent extremes in the geographic distribution and thus, environmental variability of striped bass spawning. At each location, data describing the physio-chemical and biological characteristics of the spawning population and nursery area are being collected and synthesized by means of a prioritized, directed field sampling program that is organized by the individual-based recruitment model. Here, we employ the striped bass IBM configured for the Potomac River, MD from spawning into the larval period to evaluate the potential for maternal contribution to affect larva survival and growth. Model simulations in which the size distribution and spawning day of females are altered indicate that larva survival is enhanced (3.3-fold increase) when a high fraction of females in the spawning population are large. Larva stage duration also is less ({bar X} = 18.4 d and 22.2 d) when large and small females, respectively, are mothers in simulations. Although inconclusive, these preliminary results for Potomac River striped bass suggest that the effects of female size, timing of spawning nad maternal contribution on recruitment dynamics potentially are important and illustrate our approach to the study of recruitment in striped bass. We hope to use the model, field collections and management alternatives that vary from site to site, in an iterative manner for some time to come. 54 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  2. An evaluation of introgression of Atlantic coast striped bass mitochondrial DNA in a Gulf of Mexico population using formalin-preserved museum collections.

    PubMed

    Wirgin, I; Maceda, L; Stabile, J; Mesing, C

    1997-10-01

    Striped bass Morone saxatilis populations in drainages along the Gulf of Mexico coast (Gulf) were depleted in the 1950s and 1960s, probably because of anthropogenic influences. It is believed that only the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (A-C-F) river system continually supported a naturally reproducing population of Gulf lineage. Striped bass juveniles of Atlantic coast (Atlantic) ancestry were introduced to restore population abundances in the A-C-F from the late 1960s to the mid 1970s and in many other Gulf rivers from the 1960s to the present. We previously identified mtDNA polymorphisms that were unique to approximately 60% of striped bass from the A-C-F and which confirmed the continued successful natural reproduction of striped bass of Gulf maternal ancestry within the system. However, the genetic relatedness of the extant A-C-F population to 'pure' Gulf striped bass was not addressed. In this study, we determined the frequency of a diagnostic mtDNA XbaI polymorphism in samples of 'pure' Gulf striped bass that were collected from the A-C-F prior to the introduction of Atlantic fish, that were obtained from museum collections, and that were originally preserved in formalin. PCR primers were developed that allowed for amplification of a 191-bp mtDNA fragment that contained the diagnostic XbaI restriction site. Using RFLP and direct sequence analyses of the PCR amplicons, we found no significant differences in mtDNA XbaI genotype frequencies between the archived samples and extant A-C-F samples collected over a 15-year period. This indicates that significant maternally mediated introgression of Atlantic mtDNA genomes into the A-C-F gene pool has not occurred. Additionally, we found no evidence of the unique Gulf mtDNA genotype in striped bass from extant populations in Texas, Louisiana and the Mississippi River. These results highlight the importance of the A-C-F as a repository of striped bass to restore extirpated Gulf populations and the potential use of

  3. Seasonal changes in dissolved-gas supersaturation in the Sacramento River and possible effects on striped bass

    SciTech Connect

    Colt, J.

    1984-09-01

    Dissolved-gad supersaturation levels were monitored in the Sacramento River system in central California during 1981-1982. Gas supersaturation was highest in the spring when temperature and flow were increasing rapidly, and was caused primarily by inflows of highly supersaturated water from the American and Feather rivers. During high runoff, air entrained by falls and rapids can produce supersaturation. Rapid heating can produce gas supersaturation because the solubility of gases is reduced at higher temperatures. Entrainment of air at dams does not appear to be responsible for gas supersaturation in these two rivers, although the dams may have an influence on dissolved gas levels in the Sacramento River. Gas supersaturation in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River system may adversely affect the eggs and larvae of wild striped bass Morone saxatilis and salmonids in hatcheries. The siting of salmonid hatcheries below large dams insures that hatchery fish will be exposed to high levels of gas supersaturation. Because larval striped bass are positively phototactic, they are at greater risk than fish that are found lower in the water column. 48 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

  4. Dietary source of stearidonic acid promotes higher muscle DHA concentrations than linolenic acid in hybrid striped bass.

    PubMed

    Bharadwaj, Anant S; Hart, Steven D; Brown, Billie J; Li, Yong; Watkins, Bruce A; Brown, Paul B

    2010-01-01

    Rapid expansion of aquacultural production is placing increasing demand on fish oil supplies and intensified the search for alternative lipid sources. Many of the potential alternative sources contain low concentrations of long chain n-3 fatty acids and the conversion of dietary linolenic acid to longer chain highly unsaturated fatty acids is a relatively inefficient process in some species. A 6-week study was conducted to compare tissue fatty acid (FA) concentrations in hybrid striped bass fed either 18:3n-3 (alpha-linolenic acid; ALA) or 18:4n-3 (stearidonic acid; SDA). Hybrid striped bass were fed either a control diet containing fish oil, or diets containing ALA or SDA at three different levels (0.5, 1 and 2% of the diet). There were no significant differences in whole animal responses between fish fed ALA or SDA. Liver and muscle concentrations of ALA and SDA were responsive to dosages fed. However, only 22:6n-3 concentrations in muscle were significantly affected by dietary source of 18 carbon precursors. Muscle 22:6n-3 concentrations were significantly higher in fish fed SDA compared to fish fed ALA. Based on these data, it appears that feeding SDA can increase long chain n-3 fatty acid concentrations in fish muscle.

  5. Effects of dietary conjugated linoleic acids on hepatic and muscle lipids in hybrid striped bass.

    PubMed

    Twibell, R G; Watkins, B A; Rogers, L; Brown, P B

    2000-02-01

    Conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) are the focus of numerous studies, yet the effects of these isomers of octadecadienoic acids have not been evaluated in many species of fish. In this study, graded amounts of CLA--0, 0.5, 0.75, or 1.0% of the diet--were fed to juvenile hybrid striped bass for 8 wk. Dietary treatments were fed to apparent satiation twice daily to triplicate groups of fish initially weighing 13.4 g/fish. Feed intake and weight gain of fish fed 1.0% CLA were significantly reduced compared to fish fed no CLA. Fish fed 0.5 and 0.75% CLA exhibited reduced feed intake similar to fish fed 1.0% CLA, but had growth rates that were not significantly different from those of fish fed no CLA. Feed efficiency improved significantly in fish as dietary CLA concentrations increased. Total liver lipid concentrations were significantly reduced in fish fed the diets containing CLA compared to those of fish fed the control diet, and intraperitoneal fat ratio was significantly lower in fish fed 1.0% CLA compared to fish fed no CLA. Fish fed dietary CLA exhibited significant increases in hepatosomatic index and moisture content of muscle and carcass. The CLA isomers were detected in liver and muscle of fish fed the diets containing CLA, while a low concentration of one isomer was detected in liver and muscle of fish fed the control diet. Dietary CLA resulted in a significant increase in 18:2(c-9,c-12) concentration in liver and muscle, but a significant reduction in 18:1n-7 in these tissues. Furthermore, feeding CLA resulted in a significant increase in the concentration of 20:5n-3 and 22:6n-3 in liver, but a reduction of these fatty acids in muscle. This study showed that feeding CLA elevated tissue concentrations of these fatty acid isomers, reduced tissue lipid contents, improved feed efficiency, and altered fatty acid concentrations in liver and muscle of fish.

  6. Immune and histopathologic responses of DNA-vaccinated hybrid striped bass Morone saxatilis x M. chrysops after acute Mycobacterium marinum infection.

    PubMed

    Pasnik, David J; Smith, Stephen A

    2006-11-21

    The post-challenge immune and histopathologic responses of hybrid striped bass vaccinated with a DNA vaccine encoding the Mycobacterium marinum Ag85A gene and subsequently challenged with M. marinum were investigated. Juvenile hybrid striped bass Morone saxatilis x M. chrysops were injected intramuscularly with 25 or 50 microg DNA plasmid and developed significant specific protective responses to live bacterial challenge 120 d post-vaccination. Both vaccine groups demonstrated increased survival, reduced splenic bacterial counts, and reduced granuloma formation compared to the control groups 14 d after challenge with approximately 8 x 10(5) cfu M. marinum g(-1) fish body wt. The vaccine groups also developed more rapidly and significantly increased antibody and lymphoproliferative responses post-challenge compared to control groups, and these post-challenge immune responses appear to be vital against M. marinum infection in vaccinated hybrid striped bass. No significant differences in immune responses were recognized between the 25 and 50 microg vaccination groups, and these groups eventually experienced mortalities, splenic bacterial counts, and granuloma formation 28 d post-challenge comparable to those of the control groups at 14 d post-challenge. Therefore, vaccination of hybrid striped bass with a DNA vaccine encoding the M. marinum Ag85A gene provided significant but limited duration of protection against an acute high-dose M. marinum challenge.

  7. Lysine supplementation of commercial fishmeal-free diet in hybrid striped bass Morone chrysops x M. saxatilis affects expression of growth related genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our recent results in hybrid striped bass (HSB) concluded that ideal protein theory accurately predicts first-limiting amino acids in commercial diet formulations if accurate amino acid availability data are used and that appropriate levels of supplemental lysine are needed in order to improve fish ...

  8. Effects of hypothermic storage of striped bass (Morone saxatilis) sperm on intracellular calcium, reactive oxygen species formation, mitochondrial function, motility, and viability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Experiments were conducted to determine the effect of hypothermic 24 h storage of striped bass sperm cells on viability, intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i), mitochondrial membrane potential (D'm), and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation (oxidation of hydroethidine to ethidium) as determined by flow cy...

  9. Effects of hypothermic storage of striped bass (Morone saxatilis) sperm on intracellular calcium, reactive oxygen species formation, mitochondrial function, motility, and viability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Experiments were conducted to determine the effect of hypothermic 24 h storage of striped bass sperm cells (Morone saxatilis) on viability, intracellular Ca2+ [Ca2+]i, mitochondrial membrane potential (''m), and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation as determined by flow cytometry; motion activati...

  10. Marker residue determination of tritium-labeled ivermectin in the muscle of aquacultured largemouth bass, hybrid striped bass, and yellow perch following oral treatment.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Badar; Rummel, Nathan; Yu, Donglei; Gieseker, Charles; Evans, Eric; Hasbrouck, Nicholas; Reimschuessel, Renate

    2012-05-01

    The residue depletion profiles of tritium-labeled ivermectin and its metabolites in the muscle of aquacultured largemouth bass (LMB), hybrid striped bass (HSB), and yellow perch (YP) following oral treatment are reported. Fish were administered ³H-ivermectin at the dose level of 0.1 mg/kg body weight (7-9 μCi) in a gel capsule via stomach tube. At each postdose withdrawal time, six fish of each species were sedated with buffered MS-222 and blood samples taken. Fish were then euthanized, and fillets with adhering skin (scales removed) and bile samples were collected. The muscle fillets were homogenized in dry ice to a fine powder. Aliquots of tissue, plasma, and bile were assayed for total radioactive residue (TRR). The homogenized muscle was extracted in acetonitrile or methanol followed by high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) analysis to determine the presence of parent ivermectin and its potential metabolites. The highest TRR concentrations (ivermectin equivalents) of 53, 45, and 44 ng/g (ppb) were obtained on postdose day 1 for HSB, LMB, and YP, respectively. The TRR depleted most slowly in HSB to 25 ppb at day 91, followed by YP to 19 ppb at day 42 and then by LMB to 22 ppb at day 35. The total residue of ivermectin and its metabolites by HPLC analysis followed the same depletion pattern in the three species. Additionally, the depletion rate of TRR of ³H-ivermectin in the three species followed the pattern bile > plasma > muscle. The results further indicate that one of the polar metabolites of ivermectin could serve as a potential marker residue as an indication of use, rather than the parent ivermectin. PMID:22452736

  11. Marker residue determination of tritium-labeled ivermectin in the muscle of aquacultured largemouth bass, hybrid striped bass, and yellow perch following oral treatment.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Badar; Rummel, Nathan; Yu, Donglei; Gieseker, Charles; Evans, Eric; Hasbrouck, Nicholas; Reimschuessel, Renate

    2012-05-01

    The residue depletion profiles of tritium-labeled ivermectin and its metabolites in the muscle of aquacultured largemouth bass (LMB), hybrid striped bass (HSB), and yellow perch (YP) following oral treatment are reported. Fish were administered ³H-ivermectin at the dose level of 0.1 mg/kg body weight (7-9 μCi) in a gel capsule via stomach tube. At each postdose withdrawal time, six fish of each species were sedated with buffered MS-222 and blood samples taken. Fish were then euthanized, and fillets with adhering skin (scales removed) and bile samples were collected. The muscle fillets were homogenized in dry ice to a fine powder. Aliquots of tissue, plasma, and bile were assayed for total radioactive residue (TRR). The homogenized muscle was extracted in acetonitrile or methanol followed by high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) analysis to determine the presence of parent ivermectin and its potential metabolites. The highest TRR concentrations (ivermectin equivalents) of 53, 45, and 44 ng/g (ppb) were obtained on postdose day 1 for HSB, LMB, and YP, respectively. The TRR depleted most slowly in HSB to 25 ppb at day 91, followed by YP to 19 ppb at day 42 and then by LMB to 22 ppb at day 35. The total residue of ivermectin and its metabolites by HPLC analysis followed the same depletion pattern in the three species. Additionally, the depletion rate of TRR of ³H-ivermectin in the three species followed the pattern bile > plasma > muscle. The results further indicate that one of the polar metabolites of ivermectin could serve as a potential marker residue as an indication of use, rather than the parent ivermectin.

  12. X-ray motion analysis of the vertebral column during the startle response in striped bass, Morone saxatilis.

    PubMed

    Nowroozi, B N; Brainerd, E L

    2013-08-01

    Whole-body stiffness has a substantial impact on propulsive wave speed during axial undulatory locomotion in fishes. The connective tissues of the vertebral column may contribute to body stiffness, but without mechanical and kinematic analysis it is unclear whether the in vivo range of motion of intervertebral joints (IVJs) is great enough to stress IVJ tissues, thus generating stiffness. The present study used 2D videoradiography and 3D X-ray reconstruction of moving morphology (XROMM) to quantify vertebral kinematics during the startle response in striped bass (Morone saxatilis). X-ray video revealed two distinct patterns of bending: pattern I begins in the abdominal region and then proceeds to maximum IVJ angles in the caudal region, whereas pattern II begins in the cervical region and proceeds to maximum IVJ angles in the abdominal and then the caudal joints. In pattern II bends, the cervical joints exhibit a greater in vivo range of motion than previously reported in other species. XROMM analysis of caudal IVJs suggests primarily lateral bending: mean axial and dorsoventral rotations were less than 2 deg and inconsistent across 51 sequences analyzed from five individuals, whereas mean maximum lateral bending angles were 10.4±3.57 deg. These angles, combined with previous investigations of mechanical properties, reveal that the maximum angles all occur within the neutral zone of bending, indicating that little stress is experienced about the joint. This suggests that the IVJs of striped bass are quite compliant and likely do not contribute significantly to whole-body stiffness or elastic recoil during swimming in vivo. PMID:23842627

  13. Selenium and other elements in juvenile striped bass from the San Joaquin Valley and San Francisco Estuary, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saiki, Michael K.; Palawski, Donald U.

    1990-01-01

    Concentrations of selenium and other trace elements were determined in 55 whole body samples of juvenile anadromous striped bass (Morone saxatilis) from the San Joaquin Valley and San Francisco Estuary, California. The fish (≤1 yr old—the predominant life stage in the San Joaquin Valley) were collected in September–December 1986 from 19 sites in the Valley and 3 sites in the Estuary, and analyzed for the following elements: aluminum (Al), arsenic (As), boron (B), barium (Ba), beryllium (Be), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), mercury (Hg), magnesium (Mg), molybdenum (Mo), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), selenium (Se), strontium (Sr), vanadium (V), and zinc (Zn). When compared to concentrations in whole freshwater fish measured by surveys from other waters, a few samples contained higher levels, of As, Cd, Cu, Pb, and Se. The median concentrations of Al, As, Cu, Fe, Mg, Se, and Sr also differed significantly (P⩽0.05) among sites. However, only Se concentrations were highest (up to 7.9 μg/g dry weight) in samples from Valley sites exposed to agricultural subsurface (tile) drainwater; concentrations were lower in samples collected elsewhere. Water quality variables—especially those strongly influenced by tile drainwater (conductivity, total dissolved solids, total alkalinity, and total hardness)—were also significantly correlated (P⩽0.05) with Se concentrations in fish. Selenium concentrations in striped bass from the Estuary were only one-fourth to one-half the concentrations measured in the most contaminated fish from the San Joaquin River.

  14. X-ray motion analysis of the vertebral column during the startle response in striped bass, Morone saxatilis.

    PubMed

    Nowroozi, B N; Brainerd, E L

    2013-08-01

    Whole-body stiffness has a substantial impact on propulsive wave speed during axial undulatory locomotion in fishes. The connective tissues of the vertebral column may contribute to body stiffness, but without mechanical and kinematic analysis it is unclear whether the in vivo range of motion of intervertebral joints (IVJs) is great enough to stress IVJ tissues, thus generating stiffness. The present study used 2D videoradiography and 3D X-ray reconstruction of moving morphology (XROMM) to quantify vertebral kinematics during the startle response in striped bass (Morone saxatilis). X-ray video revealed two distinct patterns of bending: pattern I begins in the abdominal region and then proceeds to maximum IVJ angles in the caudal region, whereas pattern II begins in the cervical region and proceeds to maximum IVJ angles in the abdominal and then the caudal joints. In pattern II bends, the cervical joints exhibit a greater in vivo range of motion than previously reported in other species. XROMM analysis of caudal IVJs suggests primarily lateral bending: mean axial and dorsoventral rotations were less than 2 deg and inconsistent across 51 sequences analyzed from five individuals, whereas mean maximum lateral bending angles were 10.4±3.57 deg. These angles, combined with previous investigations of mechanical properties, reveal that the maximum angles all occur within the neutral zone of bending, indicating that little stress is experienced about the joint. This suggests that the IVJs of striped bass are quite compliant and likely do not contribute significantly to whole-body stiffness or elastic recoil during swimming in vivo.

  15. Aquatic Francisella-like bacterium associated with mortality of intensively cultured hybrid striped bass Morone chrysops x M. saxatilis.

    PubMed

    Ostland, V E; Stannard, J A; Creek, J J; Hedrick, R P; Ferguson, H W; Carlberg, J M; Westerman, M E

    2006-10-17

    The present study identifies an emerging disease associated with an aquatic Francisella-like bacterium that can cause mortality in hybrid striped bass Morone chrysops x M. saxatilis reared intensively in freshwater. Clinically affected fish were lethargic, had scattered haemorrhagic cutaneous lesions and diffuse gill pallor. The head kidney and spleen were markedly swollen and contained numerous interstitial granulomas; histological examination revealed small, pleomorphic Gram-negative coccobacilli within vacuolated cells. The bacterium could not be cultured from head kidney homogenates either with standard or enriched microbiological media or following inoculation of a Chinook salmon embryo (CHSE)-214 cell line. No amplification product was obtained from head kidney DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay using Piscirickettsia salmonis-specific primers. PCR analysis of infected head kidney homogenate with primers designed for the eubacterial 16S rRNA produced a single amplicon. Phylogenetic analysis of this DNA sequence demonstrated that the sequence aligned most closely with members of the genus Francisella, identified from tilapia Oreochromis spp. in Taiwan and an aquatic Francisella species that was recently isolated from the three-line grunt Parapristipoma trilineatum in Japan. This Francisella-like disease was transmitted to naive hybrid striped bass fingerlings by intraperitoneal injection of tissue homogenates prepared from a natural outbreak. All fish developed gross and histological lesions identical to those from natural outbreaks. Intracellular Gram-negative bacteria were observed within the cytoplasm of cells (presumably macrophages) within the granulomas, but bacteria were not recovered. The 16S DNA sequence of the bacterium obtained from tissues of experimentally infected fish was identical to that obtained from the fish used as infected donor tissue. PMID:17140136

  16. Hepatic transcriptomic and metabolic responses of hybrid striped bass (Morone saxatilis×Morone chrysops) to acute and chronic hypoxic insult.

    PubMed

    Beck, Benjamin H; Fuller, S Adam; Li, Chao; Green, Bartholomew W; Zhao, Honggang; Rawles, Steven D; Webster, Carl D; Peatman, Eric

    2016-06-01

    Striped bass (Morone saxatilis), white bass (Morone chrysops), and their hybrid are an important group of fish prized for recreational angling in the United States, and there and abroad as a high-value farmed fish. Regardless of habitat, it is not uncommon for fish of the genus Morone to encounter and cope with conditions of scarce oxygen availability. Previously, we determined that hybrid striped bass reared under conditions of chronic hypoxia exhibited reduced feed intake, lower lipid and nutrient retention, and poor growth. To better understand the molecular mechanisms governing these phenotypes, in the present study, we examined the transcriptomic profiles of hepatic tissue in hybrid striped bass exposed to chronic hypoxia (90days at 25% oxygen saturation) and acute hypoxia (6h at 25% oxygen saturation). Using high-throughput RNA-seq, we found that over 1400 genes were differentially expressed under disparate oxygen conditions, with the vast majority of transcriptional changes occurring in the acute hypoxia treatment. Gene pathway and bioenergetics analyses revealed hypoxia-mediated perturbation of genes and gene networks related to lipid metabolism, cell death, and changes in hepatic mitochondrial content and cellular respiration. This study offers a more comprehensive view of the temporal and tissue-specific transcriptional changes that occur during hypoxia, and reveals new and shared mechanisms of hypoxia tolerance in teleosts. PMID:26851735

  17. Hepatic transcriptomic and metabolic responses of hybrid striped bass (Morone saxatilis×Morone chrysops) to acute and chronic hypoxic insult.

    PubMed

    Beck, Benjamin H; Fuller, S Adam; Li, Chao; Green, Bartholomew W; Zhao, Honggang; Rawles, Steven D; Webster, Carl D; Peatman, Eric

    2016-06-01

    Striped bass (Morone saxatilis), white bass (Morone chrysops), and their hybrid are an important group of fish prized for recreational angling in the United States, and there and abroad as a high-value farmed fish. Regardless of habitat, it is not uncommon for fish of the genus Morone to encounter and cope with conditions of scarce oxygen availability. Previously, we determined that hybrid striped bass reared under conditions of chronic hypoxia exhibited reduced feed intake, lower lipid and nutrient retention, and poor growth. To better understand the molecular mechanisms governing these phenotypes, in the present study, we examined the transcriptomic profiles of hepatic tissue in hybrid striped bass exposed to chronic hypoxia (90days at 25% oxygen saturation) and acute hypoxia (6h at 25% oxygen saturation). Using high-throughput RNA-seq, we found that over 1400 genes were differentially expressed under disparate oxygen conditions, with the vast majority of transcriptional changes occurring in the acute hypoxia treatment. Gene pathway and bioenergetics analyses revealed hypoxia-mediated perturbation of genes and gene networks related to lipid metabolism, cell death, and changes in hepatic mitochondrial content and cellular respiration. This study offers a more comprehensive view of the temporal and tissue-specific transcriptional changes that occur during hypoxia, and reveals new and shared mechanisms of hypoxia tolerance in teleosts.

  18. Cloning and characterization of leptin in a Perciform fish, the striped bass (Morone saxatilis): control of feeding and regulation by nutritional state.

    PubMed

    Won, Eugene T; Baltzegar, David A; Picha, Matthew E; Borski, Russell J

    2012-08-01

    In mammals, leptin is an anorexigenic peptide hormone that regulates energy homeostasis. It is produced predominantly by white adipose tissue and circulates as an endocrine indicator of energy reserves. Teleost leptin has been characterized in a few fish species, but its regulation is not well understood, particularly in response to nutritional status. In this study, we cloned a putative leptin in striped bass (Morone saxatilis) and report the first characterization of leptin in a Perciforme, the largest and most diverse order of fish. The striped bass leptin coding sequence was 65% homologous with pufferfish, 52% with Atlantic salmon, and 46% with human. PCR showed that leptin mRNA was exclusively expressed in the liver, and not adipose or other tissues. The leptin coding sequence of striped bass and the more widely cultured hybrid striped bass variety (HSB; Morone chrysops, white bass×M. saxatilis) were identical. We then evaluated whether the metabolic status of HSB might alter leptin gene expression. Juvenile HSB were subjected to 3weeks feed deprivation followed by 3weeks of refeeding. Quantitative PCR showed that fasting for 3weeks reduced hepatic leptin mRNA levels relative to fed controls. Leptin mRNA levels then increased upon refeeding, albeit levels were not completely restored to those seen in control fish fed throughout the experiment. Intraperitoneal injection of human leptin suppressed appetite in HSB. In as much as hepatic HSB leptin mRNA is regulated by nutritional state and has a corresponding anorexigenic effect, our results suggest that leptin may play a role in energy homeostasis in these advanced Perciformes. PMID:22569172

  19. Cloning and characterization of leptin in a Perciform fish, the striped bass (Morone saxatilis): control of feeding and regulation by nutritional state.

    PubMed

    Won, Eugene T; Baltzegar, David A; Picha, Matthew E; Borski, Russell J

    2012-08-01

    In mammals, leptin is an anorexigenic peptide hormone that regulates energy homeostasis. It is produced predominantly by white adipose tissue and circulates as an endocrine indicator of energy reserves. Teleost leptin has been characterized in a few fish species, but its regulation is not well understood, particularly in response to nutritional status. In this study, we cloned a putative leptin in striped bass (Morone saxatilis) and report the first characterization of leptin in a Perciforme, the largest and most diverse order of fish. The striped bass leptin coding sequence was 65% homologous with pufferfish, 52% with Atlantic salmon, and 46% with human. PCR showed that leptin mRNA was exclusively expressed in the liver, and not adipose or other tissues. The leptin coding sequence of striped bass and the more widely cultured hybrid striped bass variety (HSB; Morone chrysops, white bass×M. saxatilis) were identical. We then evaluated whether the metabolic status of HSB might alter leptin gene expression. Juvenile HSB were subjected to 3weeks feed deprivation followed by 3weeks of refeeding. Quantitative PCR showed that fasting for 3weeks reduced hepatic leptin mRNA levels relative to fed controls. Leptin mRNA levels then increased upon refeeding, albeit levels were not completely restored to those seen in control fish fed throughout the experiment. Intraperitoneal injection of human leptin suppressed appetite in HSB. In as much as hepatic HSB leptin mRNA is regulated by nutritional state and has a corresponding anorexigenic effect, our results suggest that leptin may play a role in energy homeostasis in these advanced Perciformes.

  20. Bioaccumulation and trophic transfer of mercury in striped bass (Morone saxatilis) and tautog (Tautoga onitis) from the Narragansett Bay (Rhode Island, USA).

    PubMed

    Piraino, Maria N; Taylor, David L

    2009-04-01

    We examined the bioaccumulation and trophic transfer of mercury in two marine finfish species, striped bass (Morone saxatilis) and tautog (Tautoga onitis), collected from the Narragansett Bay (Rhode Island, USA). For each of these target fish, white muscle tissue was analyzed for total mercury (Hg) and results were evaluated relative to fish age, body size, and Hg content of preferred prey. Dietary and stable isotope analysis was also used to elucidate the effect of trophic processes on Hg concentrations in fish. The Hg content of muscle tissue was positively correlated with fish age and length for both species, although striped bass accumulated Hg faster than tautog. Accelerated Hg bioaccumulation in striped bass is consistent with its high trophic level (trophic level = 4.07) and Hg-enriched prey (forage fish and macrocrustaceans; mean Hg content = 0.03 mg Hg kg wet wt(-1)). In contrast, tautog maintain a lower trophic status (trophic level=3.51) and consume prey with lower Hg levels (mussels and crabs; mean Hg content = 0.02 mg Hg kg wet wt(-1)). Despite differences in Hg bioaccumulation between target fish, the mean Hg concentration of tautog exceeded levels in striped bass (0.24 and 0.16 mg Hg kg wet wt(-1), respectively) due to a disparity in age-at-catch between sampled groups (mean age of tautog and bass = 11.3 and 4.3 yr, respectively). Taking into account legal minimum catch lengths further revealed that 75.0% of legal-size striped bass (>70.2 cm TL; n = 4) and 44.8% of tautog (> 40.6 cm TL; n = 29) had Hg levels beyond the US EPA regulatory threshold of 0.3 mg Hg kg wet wt(-1). Moreover, Hg-length relationships suggest that each target fish meets this threshold near their minimum legal catch length. Our findings reiterate the value of species ecology to improve predictions of fish Hg and permit better management of human contamination by this important dietary source.

  1. Depletion of the chloramine-T marker residue, para-toluenesulfonamide, from skin-on fillet tissue of hybrid striped bass, rainbow trout, and yellow perch

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meinertz, J.R.; Stehly, G.R.; Greseth, Shari L.; Gaikowski, M.P.; Gingerich, W.H.

    2004-01-01

    Waterborne exposure to n-sodium-n-chloro-p-toluenesulfonamide (chloramine-T) is an effective treatment for controlling fish mortalities caused by bacterial gill disease (BGD). Currently, data are being generated to gain United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for the use of chloramine-T in aquaculture. As part of the data required for an approval, depletion of the chloramine-T marker residue (para-toluenesulfonamide [p-TSA]) from the edible fillet tissue of exposed fish must be determined. Hybrid striped bass (Morone saxatilis??Morone chrysops; mean weight 357 g), rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss; mean weight 457 g), and yellow perch (Perca flavescens; mean weight 144 g) were exposed to 20 mg/l of chloramine-T for 60 min on 4 consecutive days (the most aggressive treatment expected for approved use in the United States). Groups of fish (n=15 or 19) were sampled immediately after the last treatment and periodically through 48 or 168 h after the treatment phase. Duplicate subsamples of skin-on fillet tissue from each fish were analyzed for p-TSA. Mean p-TSA concentrations in fillet tissue from fish sampled immediately after the last treatment were 142 ng/g (hybrid striped bass), 97 ng/g (rainbow trout), and 150 ng/g (yellow perch). Mean p-TSA concentrations at terminal sample times were 94 (168 h; hybrid striped bass), 74 (48 h; rainbow trout), and 35 ng/g (168 h; yellow perch). The half-lives of p-TSA in fillet tissue from fish near or at market size were 11.4 (hybrid striped bass), 4.3 (rainbow trout), and 3.2 days (yellow perch).

  2. Effect of low-head lock and dam structures on migration and spawning of American shad and striped bass in the Cape Fear River, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Joseph A.; Hightower, Joseph E.

    2012-01-01

    Anadromous fish populations within the Cape Fear River, North Carolina, have declined substantially since the late 1800s. Three low-head lock-and-dam (LD) structures on the river (LD-1–3) contributed to this decline by limiting access to upstream spawning habitat. We used egg sampling and sonic telemetry to examine the effects of the LD structures on migration and spawning activity of American shad Alosa sapidissima and striped bassMorone saxatilis. Egg distribution and stage of development suggested that most of the American shad spawning took place downstream from the lowermost structure, LD-1. The predicted mean density of stage-1 American shad eggs at a water temperature of 21°C was 895 eggs/1,000 m3 (95% credible interval [CI] = 800–994) below LD-1; 147 eggs/1,000 m3 (95% CI = 103–197) below LD-2; and 32 eggs/1,000 m3 (95% CI = 17–49) below the uppermost structure, LD-3. The probability of capturing a stage-1 American shad egg was strongly dependent on water temperature and hour of egg collection. Transmitter detections for 20 sonic-tagged American shad and 20 striped bass in 2008 showed that for both species, the majority of fish moved upstream of LD-1; 35% of American shad and 25% of striped bass migrated upstream of LD-3. Based on passage rates at the three LD structures, American shad would be expected to be most abundant downstream of LD-1 and upstream of LD-3. For striped bass, the river section between LD-2 and LD-3 had the highest egg collections and highest predicted proportion of the run. In combination, these results demonstrate that the locking program provides some access to historical spawning habitat, although further improvements in fish passage could benefit both species.

  3. Effect of daily minimum pond dissolved oxygen concentration on hybrid striped bass fingerling yield

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Management of dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration in ponds at night during the growing season is important because fish growth and yield are greater in ponds with higher nightly DO concentrations. The purpose of this study was to quantify the production and water quality responses of hybrid striped ...

  4. Blood plasma levels of sex steroid hormones and vitellogenin in striped bass (morone saxatilis) exposed to 3,3{prime}, 4,4{prime}-Tetrachlorobiphenyl (TCB)

    SciTech Connect

    Monosson, E.; Fleming, W.J.; Sullivan, C.V.

    1996-05-01

    Exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) can impair reproductive processes in fish. Laboratory studies have demonstrated adverse effects in several different fish species. Evidence also exits for an association between exposure to PCBs and related compounds and impaired reproduction in wild fish. Although the mechanism of reproductive toxicity of PCBs is unclear, it appears that PCBs act of several different levels of the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis (HPG). Because of their structural similarity to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (dioxin), planar PCB congengers (e.g. 3,3`,4,4`-tetrachlorobiphenyl (TCB)) are among the most toxic PCBs. Both TCB and dioxon are reproductive toxicants in fish. TCB exposure (via intraperitoneal injections) impaired maturation in adult female white perch (Monroe americana) and reduced egg deposition in killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus). Larval or fry survival was also reduced following either maternal exposure to TCB for white perch or injections of TCB into fertilized eggs of rainbow trout. This study investigate the effects of exposure to TCB on reproductive processes in female striped bass. 12 refs., 2 tabs.

  5. A receptor for the oocyte maturation-inducing hormone 17alpha,20beta,21-trihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one on ovarian membranes of striped bass.

    PubMed

    King, W; Ghosh, S; Thomas, P; Sullivan, C V

    1997-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that blood plasma levels of 17alpha, 20beta-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one (DHP) and 17alpha, 20beta, 21-trihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one (20beta-S) increase in striped bass (Morone saxatilis) undergoing final oocyte maturation (FOM). Both hormones are produced by ovarian fragments undergoing hCG-induced germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) in vitro. In the present study, we investigated binding of DHP and 20beta-S to ovarian membranes from striped bass undergoing FOM. Saturable binding sites for DHP were not detected. Saturation of 20beta-S binding sites with 5 nM [3H]20beta-S occurred within 40 min at 0 degrees C (at 3 min, half of the maximum specific binding of steroid was calculated to have occurred), and the binding was pH-dependent. Scatchard analyses revealed the presence of a single class of high-affinity (dissociation constant [Kd] = 1.4 +/- 0.2 nM), limited-capacity (estimated concentration [Bmax] = 2.7 +/- 0.3 pmol/g ovary) 20beta-S binding sites on membranes from striped bass ovaries undergoing FOM. In contrast, only low levels of specific binding (Bmax < 0.04 pmol/g tissue) were detected on membranes from testes, liver, brain, and muscle. Ovarian membranes prepared from vitellogenic females also had low levels (Bmax < 0.1 pmol/g ovary) of specific 20beta-S binding, less than 5% of that found during FOM. Results of competition assays showed that DHP was approximately 250 times less effective than 20beta-S for displacing 20beta-S from ovarian membranes. In contrast, 20beta, 21-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one was a very effective competitor, although it is only a weak inducer of oocyte GVBD in vitro. Of several other steroids tested, only progesterone showed affinity for the 20beta-S binding site within a physiological range of concentrations. Taken together with previous studies of striped bass FOM, these findings indicate that 20beta-S is the oocyte maturation-inducing steroid hormone in striped bass.

  6. Relation of adult size to movements and distribution of smallmouth bass in a central Maine Lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cole, M.B.; Moring, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    Forty-four smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieu of three size-classes were radiotracked in Green Lake, Maine, during summer 1993 (10 June-1 September) to determine whether adult size influenced distribution and movement. Large smallmouth bass (>406 mm) used deep water (>8 m) more often than did small (248-279 mm) or medium-sized (305-356 mm) smallmouth bass during the late summer (15 July-1 September). Large smallmouth bass also were found at middepths (4-8 m) significantly more often than were small individuals during late summer. Small fish used cover more frequently than large ones during early summer (10 June-13 July). Both small and medium-sized individuals were associated with cover more frequently than large smallmouth bass were during the late summer. Small smallmouth bass exhibited significantly smaller summer total ranges than did large individuals, and mean active displacement differed among all three size-classes.

  7. Effects of antenna placement and antibiotic treatment on loss of simulated transmitters and mortality in hybrid striped bass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Isely, J.J.; Young, S.P.; Jones, T.A.; Schaffler, James J.

    2002-01-01

    We compared the effects of two antenna placements (trailing and nontrailing) and antibiotic treatments (treated and nontreated) on mortality and transmitter loss in hybrid striped bass Morone saxatilis ?? M. chrysops (364 ?? 28 mm total length, 645 ?? 129 g [mean ?? SD]) implanted with simulated transmitters and held in the laboratory for 90 d. Although antibiotic treatment significantly increased the time to first mortality in fish surgically implanted with simulated transmitters (by an average of 14 d), we did not detect an effect on cumulative mortality. We also did not detect an effect of antenna type on the time to first mortality, but cumulative mortality was higher in the trailing antenna groups (50%) than in the nontrailing antenna groups (12%). Three transmitters were expelled during the study, all from trailing-antenna treatment groups, indicating a significant effect of antenna placement on the level of transmitter expulsion. Antibiotic treatment appears to be effective in preventing initial postsurgical infection; however, the antenna may serve as a continuous source of irritation and route of infection into the body cavity. The potential for infection and mortality in experimental animals must be weighed against the improved performance of transmitters with trailing antennas.

  8. Natural factors to consider when using acetylcholinesterase activity as neurotoxicity biomarker in Young-Of-Year striped bass (Morone saxatilis).

    PubMed

    Durieux, Eric D H; Farver, Thomas B; Fitzgerald, Patrick S; Eder, Kai J; Ostrach, David J

    2011-03-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity is one of the most common biomarkers of neurotoxicity used in aquatic organisms. However, compared to its extensive use as biomarker, the effects of natural factors on AChE activity remain unclear especially in estuarine fishes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of natural factors on AChE activity of striped bass (Morone saxatilis) juveniles. Brain AChE activity was measured in YOY (Young-Of-Year) individuals collected monthly from August 2007 to January 2008 at 12 different sites in the San Francisco Estuary system. The spatio-temporal variability of AChE was analyzed relative to water temperature and salinity as well as fish size. AChE activity was highly positively correlated with water temperature and to a lesser extent negatively with fish size while no relationship was detected with salinity. Taking into account these natural factors when using AChE as a biomarker will help to determine and understand the effects of neurotoxic contaminants on fish in estuarine systems.

  9. Effects of implantation method and temperature on mortality and loss of simulated transmitters in hybrid striped bass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walsh, M.G.; Bjorgo, K.A.; Isely, J.J.

    2000-01-01

    To determine the effects of surgical implantation method and temperature on mortality and transmitter loss, we compared two antenna placements (trailing antenna versus shielded needle) and two suture materials (absorbable versus nonabsorbable) in hybrid striped bass Morone saxitilis x Morone chrysops (227-410 mm total length) that had been surgically implanted with simulated transmitters and held at high (22-29??C) and low (12-18??C) temperatures for 120 d. Fish were individually examined after 7, 30, 60. 90. and 120 d to evaluate suture and wound condition as well as transmitter loss. Neither suture material nor antenna placement affected transmitter loss, mortality, or growth at either high or low temperatures. Absorbable sutures were lost more quickly than were nonabsorbable sutures, but they persisted beyond incision closure at both high and low temperatures. At high temperatures, 50% suture loss occurred by 30 d for absorbable sutures and by 60 d for nonabsorbable sutures. Mortality occurred only at high temperatures but was delayed and was likely caused by peritoneal infection. Transmitter loss was not significant; it occurred only in the low-temperature trial and was caused by pressure necrosis at the incision rather than by suture failure. Temperature significantly affected all responses examined in this study. Significant irritation, infection, and mortality occurred in all treatment groups at high temperatures.

  10. Evaluation of Streptococcus iniae killed bacterin and live attenuated vaccines in hybrid striped bass through injection and bath immersion.

    PubMed

    Locke, Jeffrey B; Vicknair, Mike R; Ostland, Vaughn E; Nizet, Victor; Buchanan, John T

    2010-03-01

    Streptococcus iniae poses a serious threat to finfish aquaculture operations worldwide. Stringent regulatory standards limit the use of antibiotics to treat S. iniae infections; improved vaccination strategies are thus of great interest. We investigated the potential for efficient, non-injectable batch vaccination via the use of live attenuated vaccines. Three attenuated S. iniae strains with genetic mutations eliminating the production of virulence factors--capsular polysaccharide (delta cpsD), M-like protein (delta simA), and phosphoglucomutase (delta pgmA)--were evaluated in parallel with an adjuvanted, formalin-killed, whole-cell S. iniae bacterin. Juvenile hybrid striped bass (HSB; Morone chrysops x M. saxatilis) were vaccinated through intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection or bath immersion and held for 800 degree-days prior to challenge with a lethal dose of the virulent wild-type (WT) S. iniae parent strain. The delta cpsD, delta pgmA, and bacterin vaccines provided the highest level of vaccination safety (0% mortality), whereas the delta simA mutant, although it caused 12 to 16% vaccination-related mortality, was the only vaccine candidate to provide 100% protection in both i.p. and immersion delivery models. Our studies demonstrate the efficacy of live attenuated vaccines for prevention of S. iniae infection, and identify immersion delivery of live vaccines as an attractive option for use in commercial aquaculture settings.

  11. Mycobacterium pseudoshottsii sp. nov., a slowly growing chromogenic species isolated from Chesapeake Bay striped bass (Morone saxatilis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rhodes, M.W.; Kator, H.; McNabb, A.; Deshayes, C.; Reyrat, J.-M.; Brown-Elliott, B. A.; Wallace, R.; Trott, K.A.; Parker, J.M.; Lifland, B.; Osterhout, G.; Kaattari, I.; Reece, K.; Vogelbein, W.; Ottinger, C.A.

    2005-01-01

    A group of slowly growing photochromogenic mycobacteria was isolated from Chesapeake Bay striped bass (Morone saxatilis) during an epizootic of mycobacteriosis. Growth characteristics, acid-fastness and 16S rRNA gene sequencing results were consistent with those of the genus Mycobacterium. Biochemical reactions, growth characteristics and mycolic acid profiles (HPLC) resembled those of Mycobacterium shottsii, a non-pigmented mycobacterium also isolated during the same epizootic. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA genes, the gene encoding the exported repeated protein (erp) and the gene encoding the 65 kDa heat-shock protein (hsp65) and restriction enzyme analysis of the hsp65 gene demonstrated that this group of isolates is unique. Insertion sequences associated with Mycobacterium ulcerans, IS2404 and IS2606, were detected by PCR. These isolates could be differentiated from other slowly growing pigmented mycobacteria by their inability to grow at 37 ??C, production of niacin and urease, absence of nitrate reductase, negative Tween 80 hydrolysis and resistance to isoniazid (1 ??g ml-1), p-nitrobenzoic acid, thiacetazone and thiophene-2-carboxylic hydrazide. On the basis of this polyphasic study, it is proposed that these isolates represent a novel species, Mycobacterium pseudoshottsii sp. nov. The type strain, L15T, has been deposited in the American Type Culture Collection as ATCC BAA-883T and the National Collection of Type Cultures (UK) as NCTC 13318T. ?? 2005 IUMS.

  12. Seasonal, locational and size variations in mercury and selenium levels in striped bass (Morone saxatilis) from New Jersey.

    PubMed

    Gochfeld, Michael; Burger, Joanna; Jeitner, Christian; Donio, Mark; Pittfield, Taryn

    2012-01-01

    We examined total mercury and selenium levels in muscle of striped bass (Morone saxatilis) collected from 2005 to 2008 from coastal New Jersey. Of primary interest was whether there were differences in mercury and selenium levels as a function of size and location, and whether the legal size limits increased the exposure of bass consumers to mercury. We obtained samples mainly from recreational anglers, but also by seine and trawl. For the entire sample (n=178 individual fish), the mean (±standard error) for total mercury was 0.39±0.02 μg/g (=0.39 ppm, wet weight basis) with a maximum of 1.3 μg/g (=1.3 ppm wet weight). Mean selenium level was 0.30±0.01 μg/g (w/w) with a maximum of 0.9 μg/g). Angler-caught fish (n=122) were constrained by legal size limits to exceed 61 cm (24 in.) and averaged 72.6±1.3 cm long; total mercury averaged 0.48±0.021 μg/g and selenium averaged 0.29±0.01 μg/g. For comparable sizes, angler-caught fish had significantly higher mercury levels (0.3 vs 0.21 μg/g) than trawled fish. In both the total and angler-only samples, mercury was strongly correlated with length (Kendall tau=0.37; p<0.0001) and weight (0.38; p<0.0001), but was not correlated with condition or with selenium. In the whole sample and all subsamples, total length yielded the highest r(2) (up to 0.42) of any variable for both mercury and selenium concentrations. Trawled fish from Long Branch in August and Sandy Hook in October were the same size (68.9 vs 70.1cm) and had the same mercury concentrations (0.22 vs 0.21 ppm), but different selenium levels (0.11 vs 0.28 ppm). The seined fish (all from Delaware Bay) had the same mercury concentration as the trawled fish from the Atlantic coast despite being smaller. Angler-caught fish from the North (Sandy Hook) were larger but had significantly lower mercury than fish from the South (mainly Cape May). Selenium levels were high in small fish, low in medium-sized fish, and increased again in larger fish, but overall

  13. Seasonal, locational and size variations in mercury and selenium levels in striped bass (Morone saxatilis) from New Jersey.

    PubMed

    Gochfeld, Michael; Burger, Joanna; Jeitner, Christian; Donio, Mark; Pittfield, Taryn

    2012-01-01

    We examined total mercury and selenium levels in muscle of striped bass (Morone saxatilis) collected from 2005 to 2008 from coastal New Jersey. Of primary interest was whether there were differences in mercury and selenium levels as a function of size and location, and whether the legal size limits increased the exposure of bass consumers to mercury. We obtained samples mainly from recreational anglers, but also by seine and trawl. For the entire sample (n=178 individual fish), the mean (±standard error) for total mercury was 0.39±0.02 μg/g (=0.39 ppm, wet weight basis) with a maximum of 1.3 μg/g (=1.3 ppm wet weight). Mean selenium level was 0.30±0.01 μg/g (w/w) with a maximum of 0.9 μg/g). Angler-caught fish (n=122) were constrained by legal size limits to exceed 61 cm (24 in.) and averaged 72.6±1.3 cm long; total mercury averaged 0.48±0.021 μg/g and selenium averaged 0.29±0.01 μg/g. For comparable sizes, angler-caught fish had significantly higher mercury levels (0.3 vs 0.21 μg/g) than trawled fish. In both the total and angler-only samples, mercury was strongly correlated with length (Kendall tau=0.37; p<0.0001) and weight (0.38; p<0.0001), but was not correlated with condition or with selenium. In the whole sample and all subsamples, total length yielded the highest r(2) (up to 0.42) of any variable for both mercury and selenium concentrations. Trawled fish from Long Branch in August and Sandy Hook in October were the same size (68.9 vs 70.1cm) and had the same mercury concentrations (0.22 vs 0.21 ppm), but different selenium levels (0.11 vs 0.28 ppm). The seined fish (all from Delaware Bay) had the same mercury concentration as the trawled fish from the Atlantic coast despite being smaller. Angler-caught fish from the North (Sandy Hook) were larger but had significantly lower mercury than fish from the South (mainly Cape May). Selenium levels were high in small fish, low in medium-sized fish, and increased again in larger fish, but overall

  14. Seasonal, locational and size variations in mercury and selenium levels in striped bass (Morone saxatilis) from New Jersey

    PubMed Central

    Gochfeld, Michael; Burger, Joanna; Jeitner, Christian; Donio, Mark; Pittfield, Taryn

    2014-01-01

    We examined total mercury and selenium levels in muscle of striped bass (Morone saxatilis) collected from 2005 to 2008 from coastal New Jersey. Of primary interest was whether there were differences in mercury and selenium levels as a function of size and location, and whether the legal size limits increased the exposure of bass consumers to mercury. We obtained samples mainly from recreational anglers, but also by seine and trawl. For the entire sample (n = 178 individual fish), the mean (± standard error) for total mercury was 0.39 ± 0.02 μg/g (= 0.39 ppm, wet weight basis) with a maximum of 1.3 μg/g (= 1.3 ppm wet weight). Mean selenium level was 0.30 ± 0.01 μg/g (w/w) with a maximum of 0.9 μg/g). Angler-caught fish (n = 122) were constrained by legal size limits to exceed 61 cm (24 in.) and averaged 72.6 ± 1.3 cm long; total mercury averaged 0.48 ± 0.021 μg/g and selenium averaged 0.29 ± 0.01 μg/g. For comparable sizes, angler-caught fish had significantly higher mercury levels (0.3 vs 0.21 μg/g) than trawled fish. In both the total and angler-only samples, mercury was strongly correlated with length (Kendall tau = 0.37; p < 0.0001) and weight (0.38; p < 0.0001), but was not correlated with condition or with selenium. In the whole sample and all subsamples, total length yielded the highest r2 (up to 0.42) of any variable for both mercury and selenium concentrations. Trawled fish from Long Branch in August and Sandy Hook in October were the same size (68.9 vs 70.1 cm) and had the same mercury concentrations (0.22 vs 0.21 ppm), but different selenium levels (0.11 vs 0.28 ppm). The seined fish (all from Delaware Bay) had the same mercury concentration as the trawled fish from the Atlantic coast despite being smaller. Angler-caught fish from the North (Sandy Hook) were larger but had significantly lower mercury than fish from the South (mainly Cape May). Selenium levels were high in small fish, low in medium-sized fish, and increased again in larger

  15. Ovary transcriptome profiling via artificial intelligence reveals a transcriptomic fingerprint predicting egg quality in striped bass, Morone saxatilis.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Robert W; Reading, Benjamin J; Sullivan, Craig V

    2014-01-01

    Inherited gene transcripts deposited in oocytes direct early embryonic development in all vertebrates, but transcript profiles indicative of embryo developmental competence have not previously been identified. We employed artificial intelligence to model profiles of maternal ovary gene expression and their relationship to egg quality, evaluated as production of viable mid-blastula stage embryos, in the striped bass (Morone saxatilis), a farmed species with serious egg quality problems. In models developed using artificial neural networks (ANNs) and supervised machine learning, collective changes in the expression of a limited suite of genes (233) representing <2% of the queried ovary transcriptome explained >90% of the eventual variance in embryo survival. Egg quality related to minor changes in gene expression (<0.2-fold), with most individual transcripts making a small contribution (<1%) to the overall prediction of egg quality. These findings indicate that the predictive power of the transcriptome as regards egg quality resides not in levels of individual genes, but rather in the collective, coordinated expression of a suite of transcripts constituting a transcriptomic "fingerprint". Correlation analyses of the corresponding candidate genes indicated that dysfunction of the ubiquitin-26S proteasome, COP9 signalosome, and subsequent control of the cell cycle engenders embryonic developmental incompetence. The affected gene networks are centrally involved in regulation of early development in all vertebrates, including humans. By assessing collective levels of the relevant ovarian transcripts via ANNs we were able, for the first time in any vertebrate, to accurately predict the subsequent embryo developmental potential of eggs from individual females. Our results show that the transcriptomic fingerprint evidencing developmental dysfunction is highly predictive of, and therefore likely to regulate, egg quality, a biologically complex trait crucial to reproductive

  16. Proportional accumulation of yolk proteins derived from multiple vitellogenins is precisely regulated during vitellogenesis in striped bass (Morone saxatilis).

    PubMed

    Williams, Valerie N; Reading, Benjamin J; Amano, Haruna; Hiramatsu, Naoshi; Schilling, Justin; Salger, Scott A; Islam Williams, Taufika; Gross, Kevin; Sullivan, Craig V

    2014-07-01

    We quantified three vitellogenins (VtgAa, VtgAb, VtgC) or their derived yolk proteins (YPs) in the liver, plasma, and ovary during pre-vitellogenic (PreVG), mid-vitellogenic (MVG), and late-vitellogenic (LVG) oocyte growth and during post-vitellogenesis (PostVG) in the striped bass (Morone saxatilis) using label-free quantitative mass spectrometry (MS). Western blotting of the samples using antisera raised against gray mullet (Mugil cephalus) lipovitellins derived from VtgAa, VtgAb, and VtgC confirmed the MS results. Semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) revealed liver as the primary site of expression for all three Vtgs, with extra-hepatic transcription weakly detected in ovary, foregut, adipose tissue, and brain. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR confirmed vtgAb to be primarily expressed in liver and VtgAb proteins were predominant in liver and plasma from MVG to PostVG. However, the primary period of deposition into oocytes of VtgAb occurred up until MVG, whereas VtgAa was primarily deposited from MVG to LVG. The VtgC was gradually taken up by oocytes throughout vitellogenesis and was detected at trace levels in plasma. The ratio of yolk proteins derived from VtgAa, VtgAb, VtgC (YPAa/YPAb/YPC) in PostVG ovary is 1.4:1.4:1, which differs from ratios previously reported for other fish species in that YPC comprises a greater proportion of the egg yolk. Our results indicate that proportional accumulation of multiple Vtgs in the yolk may depend both on the precise rates of their hepatic secretion and specific uptake by oocytes. Furthermore, composition of the Vtg-derived yolk may vary among Acanthomorph fishes, perhaps reflecting their different early life histories and reproductive strategies. PMID:24648375

  17. Accumulation and tissue distribtion of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBS) in early life stages of the striped bass, Morone saxatilis

    SciTech Connect

    Califano, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    Accumulation and tissue distribution of the PCB mixture, Aroclor 1254, in larval and young-of-year striped bass was studied following simulated environmental and dietary exposures. Fish exposed to /sup 14/C-Aroclor 1254 (/sup 14/C-PCB) in water (larvae and young) and sorbed to suspended particles and sediments (larvae) in static systems for periods up to 48 hours accumulated wholebody PCB burdens within 1 hour. Accumulation rates were linear during the first 24 hours. Larvae exposed to /sup 14/C-PCB sorbed to sediment accumulated PCB at a slow, linear rate. All but the least polar component of the /sup 14/C-PCB were accumulated, Continual desorption of sediment-bound PCB and maintenance of solubility equilibrium with the water was indicated. Greater than 98% of the /sup 14/C-PCB was still in the sediment after 48 hours. Body burdens were accumulated in young fish exposed to 0.11 ..mu..g I-/sup 114/C-PCB in water. PCB was distributed to the gills, liver, gastrointestinal tract, muscle and remaining carcass within one hour; peak concentrations were reached in all tissues except carcass after 24 hours. The linear relationship (C/sub fish/ = -0.70 + 11.65 C/sub water/ r/sup 2/ = 0.95 between initial PCB concentration in water and accumulated PCB in fish in each environment suggested that accumulation resulted from equilibrium partitioning between water and fish; the dominant route of PCB uptake was via the gills. Estimated ventilation volumes of larval fish indicated that accumulated PCB burdens likely resulted from diffusion across gill surfaces as PCB-laden water was passed over the gills.

  18. Proportional accumulation of yolk proteins derived from multiple vitellogenins is precisely regulated during vitellogenesis in striped bass (Morone saxatilis).

    PubMed

    Williams, Valerie N; Reading, Benjamin J; Amano, Haruna; Hiramatsu, Naoshi; Schilling, Justin; Salger, Scott A; Islam Williams, Taufika; Gross, Kevin; Sullivan, Craig V

    2014-07-01

    We quantified three vitellogenins (VtgAa, VtgAb, VtgC) or their derived yolk proteins (YPs) in the liver, plasma, and ovary during pre-vitellogenic (PreVG), mid-vitellogenic (MVG), and late-vitellogenic (LVG) oocyte growth and during post-vitellogenesis (PostVG) in the striped bass (Morone saxatilis) using label-free quantitative mass spectrometry (MS). Western blotting of the samples using antisera raised against gray mullet (Mugil cephalus) lipovitellins derived from VtgAa, VtgAb, and VtgC confirmed the MS results. Semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) revealed liver as the primary site of expression for all three Vtgs, with extra-hepatic transcription weakly detected in ovary, foregut, adipose tissue, and brain. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR confirmed vtgAb to be primarily expressed in liver and VtgAb proteins were predominant in liver and plasma from MVG to PostVG. However, the primary period of deposition into oocytes of VtgAb occurred up until MVG, whereas VtgAa was primarily deposited from MVG to LVG. The VtgC was gradually taken up by oocytes throughout vitellogenesis and was detected at trace levels in plasma. The ratio of yolk proteins derived from VtgAa, VtgAb, VtgC (YPAa/YPAb/YPC) in PostVG ovary is 1.4:1.4:1, which differs from ratios previously reported for other fish species in that YPC comprises a greater proportion of the egg yolk. Our results indicate that proportional accumulation of multiple Vtgs in the yolk may depend both on the precise rates of their hepatic secretion and specific uptake by oocytes. Furthermore, composition of the Vtg-derived yolk may vary among Acanthomorph fishes, perhaps reflecting their different early life histories and reproductive strategies.

  19. Ovary transcriptome profiling via artificial intelligence reveals a transcriptomic fingerprint predicting egg quality in striped bass, Morone saxatilis.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Robert W; Reading, Benjamin J; Sullivan, Craig V

    2014-01-01

    Inherited gene transcripts deposited in oocytes direct early embryonic development in all vertebrates, but transcript profiles indicative of embryo developmental competence have not previously been identified. We employed artificial intelligence to model profiles of maternal ovary gene expression and their relationship to egg quality, evaluated as production of viable mid-blastula stage embryos, in the striped bass (Morone saxatilis), a farmed species with serious egg quality problems. In models developed using artificial neural networks (ANNs) and supervised machine learning, collective changes in the expression of a limited suite of genes (233) representing <2% of the queried ovary transcriptome explained >90% of the eventual variance in embryo survival. Egg quality related to minor changes in gene expression (<0.2-fold), with most individual transcripts making a small contribution (<1%) to the overall prediction of egg quality. These findings indicate that the predictive power of the transcriptome as regards egg quality resides not in levels of individual genes, but rather in the collective, coordinated expression of a suite of transcripts constituting a transcriptomic "fingerprint". Correlation analyses of the corresponding candidate genes indicated that dysfunction of the ubiquitin-26S proteasome, COP9 signalosome, and subsequent control of the cell cycle engenders embryonic developmental incompetence. The affected gene networks are centrally involved in regulation of early development in all vertebrates, including humans. By assessing collective levels of the relevant ovarian transcripts via ANNs we were able, for the first time in any vertebrate, to accurately predict the subsequent embryo developmental potential of eggs from individual females. Our results show that the transcriptomic fingerprint evidencing developmental dysfunction is highly predictive of, and therefore likely to regulate, egg quality, a biologically complex trait crucial to reproductive

  20. Ovary Transcriptome Profiling via Artificial Intelligence Reveals a Transcriptomic Fingerprint Predicting Egg Quality in Striped Bass, Morone saxatilis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Inherited gene transcripts deposited in oocytes direct early embryonic development in all vertebrates, but transcript profiles indicative of embryo developmental competence have not previously been identified. We employed artificial intelligence to model profiles of maternal ovary gene expression and their relationship to egg quality, evaluated as production of viable mid-blastula stage embryos, in the striped bass (Morone saxatilis), a farmed species with serious egg quality problems. In models developed using artificial neural networks (ANNs) and supervised machine learning, collective changes in the expression of a limited suite of genes (233) representing <2% of the queried ovary transcriptome explained >90% of the eventual variance in embryo survival. Egg quality related to minor changes in gene expression (<0.2-fold), with most individual transcripts making a small contribution (<1%) to the overall prediction of egg quality. These findings indicate that the predictive power of the transcriptome as regards egg quality resides not in levels of individual genes, but rather in the collective, coordinated expression of a suite of transcripts constituting a transcriptomic “fingerprint”. Correlation analyses of the corresponding candidate genes indicated that dysfunction of the ubiquitin-26S proteasome, COP9 signalosome, and subsequent control of the cell cycle engenders embryonic developmental incompetence. The affected gene networks are centrally involved in regulation of early development in all vertebrates, including humans. By assessing collective levels of the relevant ovarian transcripts via ANNs we were able, for the first time in any vertebrate, to accurately predict the subsequent embryo developmental potential of eggs from individual females. Our results show that the transcriptomic fingerprint evidencing developmental dysfunction is highly predictive of, and therefore likely to regulate, egg quality, a biologically complex trait crucial to

  1. The effects of prebiotics on the digestive enzymes and gut histomorphology of red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) and hybrid striped bass (Morone chrysops × M. saxatilis).

    PubMed

    Anguiano, Maritza; Pohlenz, Camilo; Buentello, Alejandro; Gatlin, Delbert M

    2013-02-28

    The effects of four prebiotics (fructo-oligosaccharide, Bio-MOS, transgalacto-oligosaccharide and GroBiotic-A) on digestive enzymes and intestinal morphology were studied in juvenile hybrid striped bass (Morone chrysops × M. saxatilis) and red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) using two separate 8-week feeding trials. Red drum were fed experimental diets with the four prebiotics each individually supplemented at 1% and hybrid striped bass were fed diets supplemented with GroBiotic-A at 1 and 2%. Both trials were conducted with each diet fed to apparent satiation twice per d to three replicate groups of fifteen juvenile fish. For histomorphological analysis, gastrointestinal tract (GIT) samples from three randomly selected fish per tank were taken at 4 and 8 weeks for hybrid striped bass and at 8 weeks for red drum. For both trials, GIT samples from two randomly selected fish per tank were taken at 4 and 8 weeks and analysed for pepsin, trypsin, chymotrypsin, aminopeptidase, α-amylase, lipase, and both acid and alkaline phosphatase activities. The results of the histological evaluation indicated that the inclusion of prebiotics was adequate to elicit structural changes in the GIT of both species. On the other hand, no significant changes in the enzyme activities were detected at week 8 in both species. However, there was a transient effect of Bio-MOS supplementation on the activities of aminopeptidase, α-amylase and alkaline phosphatase at week 4 in red drum only. Thus, previously observed improvements in nutrient digestibility by these fish in response to prebiotic supplementation appear to be mostly related to changes in GIT structure as opposed to the enhancement of digestive enzyme activity. PMID:22716899

  2. Effects of osmolality on inner mitochondrial transmembrane potential and ATP content in spermatozoa recovered from the testes of striped bass (Morone saxatilis).

    PubMed

    Guthrie, H D; Woods, L C; Long, J A; Welch, G R

    2008-05-01

    The objective was to determine the effects of osmolality on the energy status of testicular spermatozoa of striped bass incubated in a TRIS free base-NaCl medium (pH 8) adjusted to either 300 (T300) or 600 mOsm/kg (T600) with NaCl. High mitochondrial inner transmembrane potential (DeltaPsim) was assessed (flow cytometry) with the mitochondrial probe 5, 5', 6, 6'-tetrachloro-1, 1', 3, 3'-tetraethylbenzimidazolyl- carbocyanine iodide (JC-1) and ATP was measured with a luciferin-luciferase assay. Spermatozoa maintained on ice were equally viable (>95% for T300 and T600) for up to 80 min, whereas sperm viability in artificial fresh water (FW) at 27 mOsm/kg decreased (P<0.05) to 67% after 5 min, with only 3.5% viability at 25 min. After 20 min of staining, more spermatozoa (P<0.05) maintained a high DeltaPsim in T300 than in T600 (80 and 50%, respectively). Sperm JC-1 aggregate (Jagg) fluorescence intensity was also greater (P<0.05) in T300 than in T600 (10 and 5 channel number). The Jagg fluorescence was a function of oxidative phosphorylation; the percentage of cells containing Jagg fluorescence decreased to 3% in the presence of carbonyl cyanide 3-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), an uncoupler of cell respiration and oxidative phosphorylation. After incubation for 30 min in the absence of CCCP, sperm ATP concentration was greater (P<0.05) in T300 than in T600 (2.0 vs. 0.2 pmol/10(6) cells), but was below detectability in the presence of CCCP in either medium. In conclusion, we developed a unique approach to assess the energetic status of striped bass spermatozoa during storage and after activation, and concluded that the effects of osmolality must be considered in the design of activating and storage extenders to maintain striped bass sperm motility, viability, and fertility in vitro.

  3. Gonadotropin-I and -II subunit gene expression of male striped bass (Morone saxatilis) after gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogue injection: quantitation using an optimized ribonuclease protection assay.

    PubMed

    Hassin, S; Gothilf, Y; Blaise, O; Zohar, Y

    1998-05-01

    In fish, both gonadotropin (GtH)-I and -II are involved in the spermatogenic process, but the differential regulation of these hormones by GnRH is still poorly understood. To gain further insight into the GnRH regulation of GtH-I and -II gene expression in the male striped bass, we have developed and optimized a ribonuclease protection assay for the simultaneous measurement of all GtH subunit mRNAs in a single pituitary gland. The RNA extraction protocol enables the determination of GtH protein content in the same sample, thus enhancing the power of the method. Maturing striped bass males were injected intramuscularly with [D-Ala6,Pro9Net]-LHRH (GnRHa) and sampled at 6 and 24 h postinjection. The mRNA levels of the alpha subunit and GtH-IIbeta increased after 6 h (4- and 6-fold, respectively), while the GtH-Ibeta mRNA levels increased only 2-fold after 24 h. Interestingly, GnRHa stimulation caused a significant increase in beta-actin mRNA levels. GnRHa treatment also resulted in a 2-fold decrease in pituitary GtH-II content, associated with a dramatic increase of plasma GtH-II levels from undetectable levels (< 0.2 ng/ml) to 13+/-2 ng/ml after 6 h. These results demonstrate that both GtH-Ibeta and -Ilbeta are expressed during striped bass spermatogenesis and that the two genes are subjected to differential regulation by GnRHa.

  4. Dietary oligonucleotides from yeast RNA influence immune responses and resistance of hybrid striped bass (Morone chrysops x Morone saxatilis) to Streptococcus iniae infection.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Lewis, Donald H; Gatlin, Delbert M

    2004-05-01

    Three feeding trials were conducted to evaluate potential immunomodulatory effects of nucleotides in the diet of hybrid striped bass. A basal diet was formulated from menhaden fish meal to contain 40% crude protein and 10% lipid. An oligonucleotide product (Ascogen P) from brewer's yeast was added to the basal formulation at the manufacturer's recommended rate of 0.5% to produce the experimental diet. Each diet was fed to four replicate groups of juvenile hybrid striped bass for seven or eight weeks in two separate trials. After Trials 1 and 2, a Streptococcus iniae bath challenge was executed to test the effects of diet on disease resistance. No significant difference in growth performance was observed between fish fed the basal and experimental diets. Body composition of whole fish, hematocrit and serum lysozyme levels were observed to be within normal ranges and not influenced by dietary nucleotides. Neutrophil oxidative radical production of fish fed the nucleotide-supplemented diet was significantly (P=0.011) higher than in fish fed the basal diet. Significantly (P<0.05) enhanced survival after exposure to S. iniae also was generally observed in fish fed the nucleotide-supplemented diet. In addition, fish fed the nucleotide-supplemented diet tended to have a higher antibody response based on microtitration agglutination; however, the difference was not statistically significant because of high variation between individual fish. Long-term (16 weeks) administration of oligonucleotides in Trial 3 failed to show enhancement of immune responses between treatments. It is concluded that dietary oligonucleotides positively influenced immune responses and resistance of juvenile hybrid striped bass to S. iniae infection.

  5. The effects of prebiotics on the digestive enzymes and gut histomorphology of red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) and hybrid striped bass (Morone chrysops × M. saxatilis).

    PubMed

    Anguiano, Maritza; Pohlenz, Camilo; Buentello, Alejandro; Gatlin, Delbert M

    2013-02-28

    The effects of four prebiotics (fructo-oligosaccharide, Bio-MOS, transgalacto-oligosaccharide and GroBiotic-A) on digestive enzymes and intestinal morphology were studied in juvenile hybrid striped bass (Morone chrysops × M. saxatilis) and red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) using two separate 8-week feeding trials. Red drum were fed experimental diets with the four prebiotics each individually supplemented at 1% and hybrid striped bass were fed diets supplemented with GroBiotic-A at 1 and 2%. Both trials were conducted with each diet fed to apparent satiation twice per d to three replicate groups of fifteen juvenile fish. For histomorphological analysis, gastrointestinal tract (GIT) samples from three randomly selected fish per tank were taken at 4 and 8 weeks for hybrid striped bass and at 8 weeks for red drum. For both trials, GIT samples from two randomly selected fish per tank were taken at 4 and 8 weeks and analysed for pepsin, trypsin, chymotrypsin, aminopeptidase, α-amylase, lipase, and both acid and alkaline phosphatase activities. The results of the histological evaluation indicated that the inclusion of prebiotics was adequate to elicit structural changes in the GIT of both species. On the other hand, no significant changes in the enzyme activities were detected at week 8 in both species. However, there was a transient effect of Bio-MOS supplementation on the activities of aminopeptidase, α-amylase and alkaline phosphatase at week 4 in red drum only. Thus, previously observed improvements in nutrient digestibility by these fish in response to prebiotic supplementation appear to be mostly related to changes in GIT structure as opposed to the enhancement of digestive enzyme activity.

  6. Effects of frozen and liquid hypothermic storage and extender type on calcium homeostasis in relation to viability and ATP content in striped bass (Morone saxatilis) sperm.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, H D; Welch, G R; Woods, L C

    2014-05-01

    The effect of hypothermic storage on striped bass sperm calcium homeostasis was determined by Fluo-3 flow cytometry. Calcium homeostasis was defined as the ability of cells to maintain a low concentration of intracellular free calcium as measured by Fluo-3 fluorescence. Sperm were stored frozen in striped bass extender (SBE) and Tris-NaCl medium (T350) modified with 50 mM glycine and 7.5% dimethylsulfoxide and in nonfrozen form diluted 1:3 (vol/vol) in SBE and T350 for 1, 24, and 48 hours at 4 °C in an oxygen atmosphere. Fluo-3 fluorescence was detected in less than 5% of fresh viable sperm cells indicating maintenance of calcium homeostasis. In contrast to sperm in fresh semen, frozen-thawed and nonfrozen sperm cells lost to a considerable extent the ability to maintain low intracellular free calcium even in the absence of exogenous calcium; positive Fluo-3 fluorescence was found in 26% and 39% of thawed sperm frozen in SBE- and T350-based freezing diluents, respectively, and increased (P < 0.05) to 67% during nonfrozen storage in SBE and T350 at 24 and 48 hours. Sperm viability measured by exclusion of propidium iodide by flow cytometry was 99% in fresh milt and maintained at 86% (P > 0.05) in SBE after 48 hours of nonfrozen storage but decreased (P < 0.05) to 55.7% after 48 hours in T350. Energy status in terms of ATP content, determined by luciferin-luciferase bioluminescence assay, was higher (P < 0.05) in sperm frozen in SBE than in T350 during the first 5 minutes post-thaw and decreased to essentially zero by 15 minutes post-thaw and did not differ among nonfrozen storage treatments. In conclusion, sperm cells impervious to propidium iodide after frozen or nonfrozen storage were unable to maintain low intracellular calcium content. SBE is a better medium than T350 for frozen or nonfrozen storage of striped bass sperm. The inability to regulate intracellular calcium in striped bass sperm may be associated with poor activation of motility after 4 °C storage

  7. Effects of frozen and liquid hypothermic storage and extender type on calcium homeostasis in relation to viability and ATP content in striped bass (Morone saxatilis) sperm.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, H D; Welch, G R; Woods, L C

    2014-05-01

    The effect of hypothermic storage on striped bass sperm calcium homeostasis was determined by Fluo-3 flow cytometry. Calcium homeostasis was defined as the ability of cells to maintain a low concentration of intracellular free calcium as measured by Fluo-3 fluorescence. Sperm were stored frozen in striped bass extender (SBE) and Tris-NaCl medium (T350) modified with 50 mM glycine and 7.5% dimethylsulfoxide and in nonfrozen form diluted 1:3 (vol/vol) in SBE and T350 for 1, 24, and 48 hours at 4 °C in an oxygen atmosphere. Fluo-3 fluorescence was detected in less than 5% of fresh viable sperm cells indicating maintenance of calcium homeostasis. In contrast to sperm in fresh semen, frozen-thawed and nonfrozen sperm cells lost to a considerable extent the ability to maintain low intracellular free calcium even in the absence of exogenous calcium; positive Fluo-3 fluorescence was found in 26% and 39% of thawed sperm frozen in SBE- and T350-based freezing diluents, respectively, and increased (P < 0.05) to 67% during nonfrozen storage in SBE and T350 at 24 and 48 hours. Sperm viability measured by exclusion of propidium iodide by flow cytometry was 99% in fresh milt and maintained at 86% (P > 0.05) in SBE after 48 hours of nonfrozen storage but decreased (P < 0.05) to 55.7% after 48 hours in T350. Energy status in terms of ATP content, determined by luciferin-luciferase bioluminescence assay, was higher (P < 0.05) in sperm frozen in SBE than in T350 during the first 5 minutes post-thaw and decreased to essentially zero by 15 minutes post-thaw and did not differ among nonfrozen storage treatments. In conclusion, sperm cells impervious to propidium iodide after frozen or nonfrozen storage were unable to maintain low intracellular calcium content. SBE is a better medium than T350 for frozen or nonfrozen storage of striped bass sperm. The inability to regulate intracellular calcium in striped bass sperm may be associated with poor activation of motility after 4 °C storage

  8. In vitro manipulations of vitamin C and vitamin E concentrations alter intracellular O2- production of hybrid striped bass (Morone chrysops x Morone saxatilis) head-kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Sealey, Wendy M; Gatlin, Delbert M

    2002-02-01

    To examine the mechanism by which vitamins C and E alter phagocyte function, a series of in vitro manipulations were conducted with cells isolated from the head-kidney of hybrid striped bass (average weight 680 g) fed a diet supplemented with minimum requirement levels of vitamins C and E for 2 weeks. Head-kidney phagocytes were cultured in media containing physiologically deficient (23 microM, adequate (45 microM) or excessive (182 microM) concentrations of vitamin C, and physiologically deficient (5 microM), adequate (9 microM) or excessive (32 microM) concentrations of vitamin E for 18 h. Following culture and stimulation, levels of reactive oxygen intermediates and hydrogen peroxide were determined. There were no effects of vitamin C or vitamin E concentrations on hydrogen peroxide or extracellular O2- generation. Intracellular O2- production, however, was significantly (P < or = 0.05) affected. When vitamin C was supplied at deficient levels to the medium, vitamin E elevated O2- production to levels not different from those of cells incubated with requirement levels of both vitamins. Similarly, when vitamin E was deficient in the media, vitamin C supplementation at requirement levels normalised intracellular O2- production. This data provides support for the presence of a vitamin C and vitamin E sparing mechanism in phagocytic head-kidney cells of hybrid striped bass and yield some insight into the mechanisms by which vitamin C and vitamin E function in immunomodulation.

  9. Stable Oxygen isotopes in otoliths to reconstruct salmon and striped bass habitat use within the San Francisco Bay estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malamud-Roam, F.; Phillis, C.; Ingram, B. L.; Schmitt, A. K.; Weber, P. K.

    2008-12-01

    Understanding the habitat use of anadromous fish species within major riverine and estuarine settings can provide useful information for protecting these fish populations. The inner ear bone, or otolith, of these fish is an accretionary carbonate structure that contains a high-resolution record of the life history of the fish, including certain chemical properties of the ambient waters occupied by the fish. Stable isotopes measured in the daily-accreting otolith layers can provide highly-resolved histories of habitat occupation. For the salmon, the juvenile phase is a critical life history period and researchers, as well as agencies charged with protecting these fish, seek detailed information about habitat use during this phase. We have measured isotopic ratios of 18O/16O (δ18O permil) in the otoliths of Chinook Salmon and striped bass, sampling along the growth axis, to produce a history of habitat use by these fish. The 18O/16O ratios of the carbonate otolith samples are primarily influenced by the 18O/16O ratio of the surrounding waters (which range from ~0 permil near the Golden Gate to -11 permil for river water), modified by temperature (- 0.326 permil/°C, so a range of approximately 1.6 permil over the course of a year. We have modeled the expected values for carbonate samples for locations throughout the estuary based upon seasonally averaged salinity and temperature values for these locations; for example, we expect delta 18O values of about -7.5 permil in otoliths for fish at the entrance to the estuary and about 2.7 permil in the ocean. We find good agreement between the δ18O data and 87/86Sr data collected earlier on the same fish samples (which also varies as a function of salinity). The value of the oxygen isotope data is that they provide great dynamic range in the brackish to saline portion of the estuary. The combined data provide a record of where the fish spent significant portions of their lives.

  10. Apparent digestibility of Asian carp and common carp-derived fish meals in feeds for hybrid striped bass Morone saxatilis female x M. chrysops male and rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Apparent digestibility coefficients (ADCs) of nutrients (crude protein, amino acids, crude lipid, fatty acids, and minerals) were determined for fish meals derived from menhaden, Asian carp (combination of silver and bighead carps), and common carp in feeds for hybrid striped bass and rainbow trout....

  11. The Jossey-Bass Reader on Contemporary Issues in Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merriam, Sharan B., Ed.; Grace, Andre P., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    With contributions from leading experts in the field, The Jossey-Bass Reader on Contemporary Issues in Adult Education collects in one volume the best previously published literature on the issues and trends affecting adult education today. The volume includes influential pieces from foundational authors in the profession such as Eduard C.…

  12. Cross-sectional study of hepatic CYP1A and CYP3A enzymes in hybrid striped bass, channel catfish and Nile tilapia following oxytetracycline treatment.

    PubMed

    Topic Popovic, N; Howell, T; Babish, J G; Bowser, P R

    2012-04-01

    Terramycin for Fish® (oxytetracycline, OTC) is one of three approved drugs for therapeutic treatment of fish in the United States. Nothing is known, however, of the effects of this therapeutic on drug metabolizing enzymes in fish post-treatment. The main purpose of the study was to examine whether the fish CYP1A and CYP3A enzymes would cross-react with antibodies to known mammalian cytochrome P-450 forms (CYP1A1 and CYP3A). Observational feeding studies of OTC effects were conducted in hybrid striped bass, channel catfish and Nile tilapia. Oxytetracycline was mixed into the feed to achieve a daily dose of 82.8 mg per kg body weight at a feeding rate of 1% body weight per day. Hepatic microsomes of each fish were prepared and Western blotting of CYP1A1 and CYP3A4 and enzyme assays of CYP1A2 and CYP3A4 were performed prior to OTC treatment and on post-treatment days 1, 6, 11 and 21. Both goat anti-rat CYP1A1 and rabbit anti-human CYP3A4 showed good cross-reactivity with all three species in this study. All three species exhibited distinct perturbations in one or more of the variables examined on day 1 post-treatment. Immediately following the 10-day medication period, relative liver weight (RLW) of hybrid striped bass was increased 44% and remained elevated through post-treatment day 21. Increased CYP3A4 enzyme activity and protein abundance were noted in channel catfish and Nile tilapia, respectively. This observational approach demonstrated species differences both in control activities and in the timing and extent of hepatic responses to OTC. The unique perturbations of hepatic CYP450 enzymes in different fish species to OTC treatment observed in this study may have relevance for the use of additional antibiotics or other therapeutics used in aquaculture. PMID:21458012

  13. The glutathione-dependent system of antioxidant defense is not modulated by temperature acclimation in muscle tissues from striped bass, Morone saxatilis.

    PubMed

    Grim, Jeffrey M; Simonik, Elizabeth A; Semones, Molly C; Kuhn, Donald E; Crockett, Elizabeth L

    2013-02-01

    Cold temperature generally induces an enhancement of oxidative capacities, a greater content of intracellular lipids, and a remodeling of lipids in biological membranes. These physiological responses may pose a heightened risk of lipid peroxidation (LPO), while warm temperature could result in greater risk of LPO since rates involving reactive oxygen species and LPO will be elevated. The current study examines responses of the glutathione system of antioxidant defense after temperature acclimation. We measured total glutathione (tGSH), and protein levels of GPx1, GPx4, and GST (cardiac and skeletal muscles), and enzymatic activity (skeletal muscle) of glutathione-dependent antioxidants (GPx, GPx4, and GST) in tissues from striped bass (Morone saxatilis) acclimated for six weeks to 7 °C or 25 °C. tGSH of cardiac muscle from cold-acclimated animals was 1.2-times higher than in warm-bodied counterparts, but unchanged with temperature acclimation in skeletal muscle. A second low molecular weight antioxidant, ascorbate was 1.4- and 1.5-times higher in cardiac and skeletal muscle, respectively in warm- than cold-acclimated animals. Despite 1.2-times higher oxidative capacities (as indicated by citrate synthase activity), in skeletal muscle from cold- versus warm-acclimated fish, levels and activities of antioxidant enzymes were similar between acclimation groups. Lipid peroxidation products (as indicated by TBARS), normalized to tissue wet weight, were more than 2-times higher in skeletal muscle from cold- than warm-acclimated animals, however, when normalized to phospholipid content there was no statistical difference between acclimation groups. Our results demonstrate that the physiological changes, associated with acclimation to low temperature in the eurythermal striped bass, are not accompanied by an enhanced antioxidant defense in the glutathione-dependent system. PMID:23202656

  14. The glutathione-dependent system of antioxidant defense is not modulated by temperature acclimation in muscle tissues from striped bass, Morone saxatilis.

    PubMed

    Grim, Jeffrey M; Simonik, Elizabeth A; Semones, Molly C; Kuhn, Donald E; Crockett, Elizabeth L

    2013-02-01

    Cold temperature generally induces an enhancement of oxidative capacities, a greater content of intracellular lipids, and a remodeling of lipids in biological membranes. These physiological responses may pose a heightened risk of lipid peroxidation (LPO), while warm temperature could result in greater risk of LPO since rates involving reactive oxygen species and LPO will be elevated. The current study examines responses of the glutathione system of antioxidant defense after temperature acclimation. We measured total glutathione (tGSH), and protein levels of GPx1, GPx4, and GST (cardiac and skeletal muscles), and enzymatic activity (skeletal muscle) of glutathione-dependent antioxidants (GPx, GPx4, and GST) in tissues from striped bass (Morone saxatilis) acclimated for six weeks to 7 °C or 25 °C. tGSH of cardiac muscle from cold-acclimated animals was 1.2-times higher than in warm-bodied counterparts, but unchanged with temperature acclimation in skeletal muscle. A second low molecular weight antioxidant, ascorbate was 1.4- and 1.5-times higher in cardiac and skeletal muscle, respectively in warm- than cold-acclimated animals. Despite 1.2-times higher oxidative capacities (as indicated by citrate synthase activity), in skeletal muscle from cold- versus warm-acclimated fish, levels and activities of antioxidant enzymes were similar between acclimation groups. Lipid peroxidation products (as indicated by TBARS), normalized to tissue wet weight, were more than 2-times higher in skeletal muscle from cold- than warm-acclimated animals, however, when normalized to phospholipid content there was no statistical difference between acclimation groups. Our results demonstrate that the physiological changes, associated with acclimation to low temperature in the eurythermal striped bass, are not accompanied by an enhanced antioxidant defense in the glutathione-dependent system.

  15. Cross-sectional study of hepatic CYP1A and CYP3A enzymes in hybrid striped bass, channel catfish and Nile tilapia following oxytetracycline treatment.

    PubMed

    Topic Popovic, N; Howell, T; Babish, J G; Bowser, P R

    2012-04-01

    Terramycin for Fish® (oxytetracycline, OTC) is one of three approved drugs for therapeutic treatment of fish in the United States. Nothing is known, however, of the effects of this therapeutic on drug metabolizing enzymes in fish post-treatment. The main purpose of the study was to examine whether the fish CYP1A and CYP3A enzymes would cross-react with antibodies to known mammalian cytochrome P-450 forms (CYP1A1 and CYP3A). Observational feeding studies of OTC effects were conducted in hybrid striped bass, channel catfish and Nile tilapia. Oxytetracycline was mixed into the feed to achieve a daily dose of 82.8 mg per kg body weight at a feeding rate of 1% body weight per day. Hepatic microsomes of each fish were prepared and Western blotting of CYP1A1 and CYP3A4 and enzyme assays of CYP1A2 and CYP3A4 were performed prior to OTC treatment and on post-treatment days 1, 6, 11 and 21. Both goat anti-rat CYP1A1 and rabbit anti-human CYP3A4 showed good cross-reactivity with all three species in this study. All three species exhibited distinct perturbations in one or more of the variables examined on day 1 post-treatment. Immediately following the 10-day medication period, relative liver weight (RLW) of hybrid striped bass was increased 44% and remained elevated through post-treatment day 21. Increased CYP3A4 enzyme activity and protein abundance were noted in channel catfish and Nile tilapia, respectively. This observational approach demonstrated species differences both in control activities and in the timing and extent of hepatic responses to OTC. The unique perturbations of hepatic CYP450 enzymes in different fish species to OTC treatment observed in this study may have relevance for the use of additional antibiotics or other therapeutics used in aquaculture.

  16. A low-molecular-weight (25-kDa) IGF-binding protein is increased with growth inhibition in the fasting striped bass, Morone saxatilis.

    PubMed

    Siharath, K; Kelley, K M; Bern, H A

    1996-06-01

    The effect of fasting on circulating IGFBPs in the striped bass was assessed in relation to changes in growth and metabolism. Thirty-day-fasted (30DF) and 60-day-fasted (60DF) fish, and 60DF fish refed for 14 additional days (REFED), were compared with control, fed fish. Growth and metabolic status of each animal were assessed by determining body length (BL) and body weight (BW) changes, hepatosomatic index (HSI), condition factor (CF), and serum glucose concentration, and by assaying for incorporation of [35S]sulfate (proteoglycan synthetic activity) and [3H]thymidine (mitotic activity) in ceratobranchial cartilage explants in vitro. Serum IGFBP concentrations were assessed by a Western ligand blot procedure using 125I-labeled human IGF-I tracer. Both 30DF and 60DF fish exhibited hypoglycemia and reduced HSI and CF, and their BL and BW growth rates were significantly inhibited. Strongly correlated with the inhibited body growth indices were significantly depressed levels of cartilage [35S]sulfate incorporation in both 30DF and 60DF animals. The 60DF group also exhibited reduced [3H]thymidine incorporation. Associated with this growth inhibition was a dramatic increase in the serum levels of a 25-kDa IGFBP (sbIGFBP-1). A 35-kDa IGFBP (sbIGFBP-3), on the other hand, was not significantly altered with fasting. All fasting-induced changes in growth, metabolism, and IGFBP levels were restored in the REFED group. These results demonstrate that an IGFBP of low molecular weight is increased with growth inhibition in the fasting striped bass, suggesting that a teleost fish counterpart to mammalian IGFBP-1 may exist.

  17. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of the prebiotics GroBiotic-A, inulin, mannanoligosaccharide, and galactooligosaccharide on the digestive microbiota and performance of hybrid striped bass (Morone chrysops x Morone saxatilis).

    PubMed

    Burr, Gary; Hume, Michael; Ricke, Steven; Nisbet, David; Gatlin, Delbert

    2010-01-01

    Two separate experiments were conducted with hybrid striped bass to evaluate four potential prebiotics: GroBiotic-A (partially autolyzed brewer's yeast, dairy ingredient components, and fermentation products), mannanoligosaccharide (MOS), galactooligosaccharide (GOS), and inulin. In the in vitro experiment, intestinal contents were incubated with the individual prebiotics (0.5% by weight) at 25 degrees C for 24 and 48 h. Analysis of volatile fatty acids in the supernatant showed that GroBiotic-A, MOS, and GOS tended to produce lower acetate levels but higher butyrate levels at 48 h compared to diet alone. However, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis failed to detect any differences in the composition of the microbial community among treatments. DNA sequencing of a common band for all inoculated samples revealed close similarity to the anaerobic Fusobacteria bacterium. An 8-week feeding trial also was conducted to evaluate the four prebiotics looking at growth performance; weight gain, feed efficiency ratio, protein efficiency ratio, whole-body ash, moisture, and lipid did not vary among fish fed the various diets. However, DGGE analysis revealed that all prebiotics produced a different type of microbial community in the intestinal tract of hybrid striped bass compared to fish fed the basal diet. Thus, GroBiotic-A, FOS, GOS, and MOS exhibited prebiotic effects in hybrid striped bass.

  18. A comparison of mercury burdens between St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge and St. Andrew Bay, Florida: Evaluation of fish body burdens and physiological responses in largemouth bass, spotted seatrout, striped mullet, and sunfish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huge, D.H.; Rauschenberger, R.H.; Wieser, F.M.; Hemming, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Musculature from the dorsal region of 130 largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides), 140 sunfish (Lepomis sp.), 41 spotted seatrout (Cynoscion nebulosus) and 67 striped mullet (Mugil cephalus) were collected from five estuarine and five freshwater sites within the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge and two estuarine and two freshwater sites from St. Andrew Bay, Florida, United States of America. Musculature was analyzed for total mercury content, sagittal otoliths were removed for age determination and physiological responses were measured. Largemouth bass and sunfish from the refuge had higher mercury concentrations in musculature than those from the bay. Male spotted seatrout, male striped mullet, male and female sunfish and female largemouth bass had mercury burdens positively correlated with length. The majority of all four species of fish from both study areas contained mercury levels below 1.5 part per million, the limit for safe consumption recommended the Florida Department of Health. In comparison, a significant percentage of largemouth bass and sunfish from several sampled sites, most notably Otter Lake and Lake Renfroe within St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge, had mercury levels consistent with the health department's guidelines of 'limited consumption' or 'no consumption guidelines.'

  19. Piscidin-1, an antimicrobial peptide from fish (hybrid striped bass morone saxatilis x M. chrysops), induces apoptotic and necrotic activity in HT1080 cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Heng-Ju; Huang, Tsui-Chin; Muthusamy, Sasikala; Lee, Jheng-Fong; Duann, Yeh-Fang; Lin, Cheng-Hui

    2012-05-01

    Piscidin-1, a 22-residue cationic peptide isolated from mast cells of a hybrid striped bass, has potent antimicrobial activities against both gram-positive and -negative bacteria. To date, there is no report of its antitumor activity on any tumor cell lines. In this study, we examined the antitumor activity of a synthetic piscidin-1 peptide against several human cancer cell lines using an MTS assay and soft-agar colony-formation assay. We found that a low dose of piscidin induces both apoptosis and necrosis in HT1080 cells, as shown by annexin-V/propidium iodide and acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining, and triggers a necrotic cell death pathway in a short period with high-dose treatment. The destruction of cell membranes by piscidin-1 was demonstrated by transmission electron microscopy. Furthermore, piscidin-1 also inhibits the migration of HT1080 cells in a dose-dependent manner. This study provides the first evidence of the anticancer activity of the antimicrobial peptide, piscidin-1, with potential implications for the treatment of cancer. PMID:22559967

  20. Low prevalence of splenic mycobacteriosis in migratory striped bass Morone saxatilis from North Carolina and Chesapeake Bay, U.S.A.

    PubMed

    Matsche, Mark A; Overton, Anthony; Jacobs, John; Rhodes, Matt R; Rosemary, Kevin M

    2010-07-01

    Mycobacteriosis is a chronic bacterial disease causing an ongoing epizootic in striped bass Morone saxatilis in Chesapeake Bay, U.S.A. Prevalence of disease is high in pre-migratory fish, and multiple species of Mycobacterium spp. have been isolated. However, prevalence of mycobacteriosis in the coastal migratory population is unknown and is of concern to multiple coastal states, as disease-related mortality may impact the long-term health of the population. Histological examinations of spleens collected from fish caught by recreational anglers during the winter fishery in coastal North Carolina (2005-2006, n=249) and during the spring fishery in Chesapeake Bay (2006, n=120) indicated a low prevalence of mycobacteriosis (6.8% of all fish examined) in comparison to smaller, pre-migratory Chesapeake Bay fish. Genus-level PCR and subsequent sequencing of the 16-23S intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) region revealed that all bacteria were phylogenetically related, but species is unknown. Location of survey, gender of fish, and total length of fish had no significant effect on prevalence of mycobacteriosis, parasitic granulomas, or the density of splenic granulomas (p > 0.05). These results may indicate that either granulomas resolve after Chesapeake Bay fish enter the coastal migratory population, or that there is disease-related mortality among pre-migratory Chesapeake Bay fish. PMID:20815326

  1. Piscidin-1, an antimicrobial peptide from fish (hybrid striped bass morone saxatilis x M. chrysops), induces apoptotic and necrotic activity in HT1080 cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Heng-Ju; Huang, Tsui-Chin; Muthusamy, Sasikala; Lee, Jheng-Fong; Duann, Yeh-Fang; Lin, Cheng-Hui

    2012-05-01

    Piscidin-1, a 22-residue cationic peptide isolated from mast cells of a hybrid striped bass, has potent antimicrobial activities against both gram-positive and -negative bacteria. To date, there is no report of its antitumor activity on any tumor cell lines. In this study, we examined the antitumor activity of a synthetic piscidin-1 peptide against several human cancer cell lines using an MTS assay and soft-agar colony-formation assay. We found that a low dose of piscidin induces both apoptosis and necrosis in HT1080 cells, as shown by annexin-V/propidium iodide and acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining, and triggers a necrotic cell death pathway in a short period with high-dose treatment. The destruction of cell membranes by piscidin-1 was demonstrated by transmission electron microscopy. Furthermore, piscidin-1 also inhibits the migration of HT1080 cells in a dose-dependent manner. This study provides the first evidence of the anticancer activity of the antimicrobial peptide, piscidin-1, with potential implications for the treatment of cancer.

  2. Low prevalence of splenic mycobacteriosis in migratory striped bass Morone saxatilis from North Carolina and Chesapeake Bay, U.S.A.

    PubMed

    Matsche, Mark A; Overton, Anthony; Jacobs, John; Rhodes, Matt R; Rosemary, Kevin M

    2010-07-01

    Mycobacteriosis is a chronic bacterial disease causing an ongoing epizootic in striped bass Morone saxatilis in Chesapeake Bay, U.S.A. Prevalence of disease is high in pre-migratory fish, and multiple species of Mycobacterium spp. have been isolated. However, prevalence of mycobacteriosis in the coastal migratory population is unknown and is of concern to multiple coastal states, as disease-related mortality may impact the long-term health of the population. Histological examinations of spleens collected from fish caught by recreational anglers during the winter fishery in coastal North Carolina (2005-2006, n=249) and during the spring fishery in Chesapeake Bay (2006, n=120) indicated a low prevalence of mycobacteriosis (6.8% of all fish examined) in comparison to smaller, pre-migratory Chesapeake Bay fish. Genus-level PCR and subsequent sequencing of the 16-23S intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) region revealed that all bacteria were phylogenetically related, but species is unknown. Location of survey, gender of fish, and total length of fish had no significant effect on prevalence of mycobacteriosis, parasitic granulomas, or the density of splenic granulomas (p > 0.05). These results may indicate that either granulomas resolve after Chesapeake Bay fish enter the coastal migratory population, or that there is disease-related mortality among pre-migratory Chesapeake Bay fish.

  3. Tag return models allowing for harvest and catch and release: Evidence of environmental and management impacts on striped bass fishing and natural mortality rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jiang, H.; Pollock, K.H.; Brownie, C.; Hoenig, J.M.; Latour, R.J.; Wells, B.K.; Hightower, J.E.

    2007-01-01

    Catch-and-release fisheries have become very important in the management of overexploited recreational fish stocks. Tag return studies, where the tag is removed regardless of fish disposition, have been used to assess the effectiveness of restoration efforts for these fisheries. We extend the instantaneous rate formulation of tag return models to allow for catch and release as well as harvest. The key point of our methods is that, given an estimate of the tag reporting rate, the fishing mortality rate (F) is separated into two components: the mortality on harvested fish and the "mortality" on tags (because the lags are removed) of fish released alive. The total fishing mortality rate for untagged fish is the sum of the Fs due to harvest and hooking mortality suffered by fish released alive. Natural mortality rates can also be estimated. Both age-independent models and age-dependent models are constructed, and the age-dependent models are illustrated by application to data from a study of striped bass Morone saxatilis in Chesapeake Bay from 1991 to 2003 by the Maryland Department of Natural Resources. By fitting models of the natural mortality rate with limited age and year dependence, we demonstrate an overall decrease in natural mortality rates as fish age and provide evidence of an increase in natural mortality beginning in the late 1990s, when an outbreak of the disease mycobacteriosis is thought to have begun. Our results indicate that fishing mortality is age dependent; selectivity increases up to age 6, when fish appear to be fully recruited to the fishery. There is also evidence of an increase in fishing mortality since 1995, when regulations were relaxed. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2007.

  4. Mercury concentrations in water and hybrid striped bass (Morone saxatilis × M. chrysops) muscle tissue samples collected from the Ohio River, USA.

    PubMed

    Emery, Erich B; Spaeth, John P

    2011-04-01

    We report on long-term aqueous mercury (Hg) measurements collected at fixed locations along the Ohio River, offer insights into patterns of water and fish tissue Hg levels, and calculate site-specific bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) along an extensive longitudinal basis. We examined the relationship between total recoverable Hg concentrations in water and fish samples collected from 12 locations on the mainstem Ohio River. Water samples were collected on a bimonthly basis from each location over a 6-year period preceding the collection of fish tissue samples. This abundance of data enabled us to calculate the long-term average aqueous Hg concentrations and approximate the lifetime aqueous Hg exposure experienced by fish, enabling the calculation of appropriate BAFs. Hybrid striped bass (HSB; Morone saxatilis × M. chrysops) were collected from the Ohio River, composited (three fish), and analyzed for Hg in muscle tissue from each location. Concentrations ranged from 0.2 to 0.4 mg/kg and 41.7% of all samples collected were higher than the US Environmental Protection Agency regulatory threshold of 0.3 mg Hg/kg wet weight. Hg levels generally increased with fish weight, length, and age. However, Hg concentration in the water was the strongest predictor of tissue concentrations. We found that both water and tissue concentrations increased with drainage area, albeit at different rates. This discrepancy in spatial patterns revealed that the bioaccumulation rate of methylmercury might not be consistent throughout the Ohio River mainstem. BAFs calculated at each location supported this finding, as values decreased with increasing drainage area. Our study serves to fill critical, previously identified data gaps and provides decision-makers with the information necessary to develop more appropriate BAF development and risk-management strategies.

  5. Histology and Ultrastructure of Transitional Changes in Skin Morphology in the Juvenile and Adult Four-Striped Mouse (Rhabdomys pumilio)

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Eranée; Ajao, Moyosore Salihu

    2013-01-01

    The four-striped mouse has a grey to brown coloured coat with four characteristic dark stripes interspersed with three lighter stripes running along its back. The histological differences in the skin of the juvenile and adult mouse were investigated by Haematoxylin and Eosin and Masson Trichrome staining, while melanocytes in the skin were studied through melanin-specific Ferro-ferricyanide staining. The ultrastructure of the juvenile skin, hair follicles, and melanocytes was also explored. In both the juvenile and adult four-striped mouse, pigment-containing cells were observed in the dermis and were homogeneously dispersed throughout this layer. Apart from these cells, the histology of the skin of the adult four-striped mouse was similar to normal mammalian skin. In the juvenile four-striped mouse, abundant hair follicles of varying sizes were observed in the dermis and hypodermis, while hair follicles of similar size were only present in the dermis of adult four-striped mouse. Ultrastructural analysis of juvenile hair follicles revealed that the arrangement and differentiation of cellular layers were typical of a mammal. This study therefore provides unique transition pattern in the four-striped mouse skin morphology different from the textbook description of the normal mammalian skin. PMID:24288469

  6. Identification and mapping of adult plant stripe rust resistance in soft red winter wheat cultivar ‘USG 3555’

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known about the extent or diversity of resistance in soft red winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) to stripe rust, caused by the fungal pathogen Puccinia striiformis f.sp. tritici. The soft red winter (SRW) wheat cultivar ‘USG 3555’ has effective adult-plant resistance to stripe rust, which...

  7. Identification and mapping of adult-plant stripe rust resistance in soft red winter wheat cultivar ‘USG 3555'

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known about the extent or diversity of resistance in soft red winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) to stripe rust, caused by the fungal pathogen Puccinia striiformis f.sp. tritici. The soft red winter (SRW) wheat cultivar ‘USG 3555’ has effective adult-plant resistance to stripe rust, which...

  8. Effects of hypothermic storage on intracellular calcium, reactive oxygen species formation, mitochondrial function, motility, and plasma membrane integrity in striped bass (Morone saxatilis) sperm.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, H D; Welch, G R; Theisen, D D; Woods, L C

    2011-03-15

    Experiments were conducted to determine the effect of hypothermic 24 h storage on striped bass sperm cell plasma membrane integrity, free intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)](i)), mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ(m)), and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation (oxidation of hydroethidine to ethidium) as determined by flow cytometry; motion activation and ATP concentration as determined by Luciferin-Luciferase bioluminescence assay. Semen was stored for 1 or 24 h at 4 °C in an O(2) atmosphere undiluted or diluted (one volume semen with 3 volumes diluent) with T350 (20 mM TRIS base-NaCl, 350 mOsm/mL, pH 8) or with seminal plasma in the presence of various treatments. Viability (% cells excluding propidium iodide) approached 100% after 1 h storage in undiluted or diluted semen. After 1 h of storage the [Ca(2+)](i) marker, Fluo-3, was detected in only 3% of sperm cells in undiluted or diluted semen. In contrast to storage for 1 h, after 24 h the incidence Fluo-3 fluorescence intensity was increased (P < 0.05) in > 50% of the viable cells in undiluted and diluted semen along with increased cell death; the presence of 1 mM ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA) blocked CaCl(2)-induced Fluo-3 fluorescence and cell death. Activation of sperm motility was 82% after 1 h in T350 and decreased (P < 0.05) to 30% after 24 h. However, motility activation failed in the presence of EGTA at 1 or 24 h. During storage ΔΨ(m) was not affected by storage time or treatment. In contrast, sperm ATP was greater (P < 0.05) at 1 h than at 24 h and was greater in sperm stored in diluted than undiluted form. While ROS formation was induced by menadione treatment, there was no evidence of storage-induced ROS formation in the absence of menadione. The increased [Ca(2+)](i) found after 24 h indicates a storage induced defect in the maintenance of cellular calcium homeostasis which may be detrimental to sperm activation. PMID:21247623

  9. Effects of hypothermic storage on intracellular calcium, reactive oxygen species formation, mitochondrial function, motility, and plasma membrane integrity in striped bass (Morone saxatilis) sperm.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, H D; Welch, G R; Theisen, D D; Woods, L C

    2011-03-15

    Experiments were conducted to determine the effect of hypothermic 24 h storage on striped bass sperm cell plasma membrane integrity, free intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)](i)), mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ(m)), and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation (oxidation of hydroethidine to ethidium) as determined by flow cytometry; motion activation and ATP concentration as determined by Luciferin-Luciferase bioluminescence assay. Semen was stored for 1 or 24 h at 4 °C in an O(2) atmosphere undiluted or diluted (one volume semen with 3 volumes diluent) with T350 (20 mM TRIS base-NaCl, 350 mOsm/mL, pH 8) or with seminal plasma in the presence of various treatments. Viability (% cells excluding propidium iodide) approached 100% after 1 h storage in undiluted or diluted semen. After 1 h of storage the [Ca(2+)](i) marker, Fluo-3, was detected in only 3% of sperm cells in undiluted or diluted semen. In contrast to storage for 1 h, after 24 h the incidence Fluo-3 fluorescence intensity was increased (P < 0.05) in > 50% of the viable cells in undiluted and diluted semen along with increased cell death; the presence of 1 mM ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA) blocked CaCl(2)-induced Fluo-3 fluorescence and cell death. Activation of sperm motility was 82% after 1 h in T350 and decreased (P < 0.05) to 30% after 24 h. However, motility activation failed in the presence of EGTA at 1 or 24 h. During storage ΔΨ(m) was not affected by storage time or treatment. In contrast, sperm ATP was greater (P < 0.05) at 1 h than at 24 h and was greater in sperm stored in diluted than undiluted form. While ROS formation was induced by menadione treatment, there was no evidence of storage-induced ROS formation in the absence of menadione. The increased [Ca(2+)](i) found after 24 h indicates a storage induced defect in the maintenance of cellular calcium homeostasis which may be detrimental to sperm activation.

  10. Identification of adult plant resistance to stripe rust in the wheat cultivar Cappelle-Desprez.

    PubMed

    Agenbag, G M; Pretorius, Z A; Boyd, L A; Bender, C M; Prins, R

    2012-06-01

    Following the appearance of stripe rust in South Africa in 1996, efforts have been made to identify new sources of durable resistance. The French cultivar Cappelle-Desprez has long been considered a source of durable, adult plant resistance (APR) to stripe rust. As Cappelle-Desprez contains the seedling resistance genes Yr3a and Yr4a, wheat lines were developed from which Yr3a and Yr4a had been removed, while selecting for Cappelle-Desprez derived APR effective against South African pathotypes of the stripe rust fungus, Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici. Line Yr16DH70, adapted to South African wheat growing conditions, was selected and crossed to the stripe rust susceptible cultivar Palmiet to develop a segregating recombinant inbred line mapping population. A major effect QTL, QYr.ufs-2A was identified on the short arm of chromosome 2A derived from Cappelle-Desprez, along with three QTL of smaller effect, QYr.ufs-2D, QYr.ufs-5B and QYr.ufs-6D. QYr.ufs-2D was located within a region on the short arm of chromosome 2D believed to be the location of the stripe rust resistance gene Yr16. An additional minor effect QTL, QYr.ufs-4B, was identified in the cv. Palmiet. An examination of individual RILs carrying single or combinations of each QTL indicated significant resistance effects when QYr.ufs-2A was combined with the three minor QTL from Cappelle-Desprez, and between QYr.ufs-2D and QYr.ufs-5B.

  11. Race-Specific Adult-Plant Resistance in Winter Wheat to Stripe Rust and Characterization of Pathogen Virulence Patterns.

    PubMed

    Milus, Eugene A; Moon, David E; Lee, Kevin D; Mason, R Esten

    2015-08-01

    Stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, is an important disease of wheat in the Great Plains and southeastern United States. Growing resistant cultivars is the preferred means for managing stripe rust, but new virulence in the pathogen population overcomes some of the resistance. The objectives of this study were to characterize the stripe rust resistance in contemporary soft and hard red winter wheat cultivars, to characterize the virulence of P. striiformis f. sp. tritici isolates based on the resistances found in the cultivars, and to determine wheat breeders' perceptions on the importance and methods for achieving stripe rust resistance. Seedlings of cultivars were susceptible to recent isolates, indicating they lacked effective all-stage resistance. However, adult-plants were resistant or susceptible depending on the isolate, indicating they had race-specific adult-plant resistance. Using isolates collected from 1990 to 2013, six major virulence patterns were identified on adult plants of twelve cultivars that were selected as adult-plant differentials. Race-specific adult-plant resistance appears to be the only effective type of resistance protecting wheat from stripe rust in eastern United States. Among wheat breeders, the importance of incorporating stripe rust resistance into cultivars ranged from high to low depending on the frequency of epidemics in their region, and most sources of stripe rust resistance were either unknown or already overcome by virulence in the pathogen population. Breeders with a high priority for stripe rust resistance made most of their selections based on adult-plant reactions in the field, whereas breeders with a low priority for resistance based selections on molecular markers for major all-stage resistance genes. PMID:25775226

  12. Race-Specific Adult-Plant Resistance in Winter Wheat to Stripe Rust and Characterization of Pathogen Virulence Patterns.

    PubMed

    Milus, Eugene A; Moon, David E; Lee, Kevin D; Mason, R Esten

    2015-08-01

    Stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, is an important disease of wheat in the Great Plains and southeastern United States. Growing resistant cultivars is the preferred means for managing stripe rust, but new virulence in the pathogen population overcomes some of the resistance. The objectives of this study were to characterize the stripe rust resistance in contemporary soft and hard red winter wheat cultivars, to characterize the virulence of P. striiformis f. sp. tritici isolates based on the resistances found in the cultivars, and to determine wheat breeders' perceptions on the importance and methods for achieving stripe rust resistance. Seedlings of cultivars were susceptible to recent isolates, indicating they lacked effective all-stage resistance. However, adult-plants were resistant or susceptible depending on the isolate, indicating they had race-specific adult-plant resistance. Using isolates collected from 1990 to 2013, six major virulence patterns were identified on adult plants of twelve cultivars that were selected as adult-plant differentials. Race-specific adult-plant resistance appears to be the only effective type of resistance protecting wheat from stripe rust in eastern United States. Among wheat breeders, the importance of incorporating stripe rust resistance into cultivars ranged from high to low depending on the frequency of epidemics in their region, and most sources of stripe rust resistance were either unknown or already overcome by virulence in the pathogen population. Breeders with a high priority for stripe rust resistance made most of their selections based on adult-plant reactions in the field, whereas breeders with a low priority for resistance based selections on molecular markers for major all-stage resistance genes.

  13. Establishment of long term cultures of neural stem cells from adult sea bass, Dicentrarchus labrax.

    PubMed

    Servili, Arianna; Bufalino, Mary Rose; Nishikawa, Ryuhei; Sanchez de Melo, Ivan; Muñoz-Cueto, Jose A; Lee, Lucy E J

    2009-02-01

    Long term cell cultures could be obtained from brains of adult sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) up to 5 days post mortem. On three different occasions, sea bass brain tissues were dissected, dispersed and cultured in Leibovitz's L-15 media supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum. The resulting cellular preparations could be passaged within 2 or 3 weeks of growth. The neural cells derived from the first trial (SBB-W1) have now been passaged over 24 times within two years. These cells have been cryopreserved and thawed successfully. SBB-W1 cells are slow growing with doubling times requiring at least 7 days at 22 degrees C. These long term cell cultures could be grown in suspension as neurospheres that were immunopositive for nestin, a marker for neural stem cells, or grown as adherent monolayers displaying both glial and neural morphologies. Immunostaining with anti-glial fibrillary acidic protein (a glial marker) and anti-neurofilament (a neuronal marker), yielded positive staining in most cells, suggesting their possible identity as neural stem cells. Furthermore, Sox 2, a marker for neural stem cells, could be detected from these cell extracts as well as proliferating cell nuclear antigen, a marker for proliferating cells. SBB-W1 could be transfected using pEGFP-N1 indicating their viability and suitability as convenient models for neurophysiological or neurotoxicological studies.

  14. Hybrid striped bass feeds based on fish oil, beef tallow, and eicosapentaenoic acid/docosahexaenoic acid supplements: Insight regarding fish oil sparing and demand for -3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Bowzer, J; Jackson, C; Trushenski, J

    2016-03-01

    Previous research suggests that saturated (SFA) and monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA) rich lipids, including beef tallow, can make utilization or diet-to-tissue transfer of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA) more efficient. We hypothesized that using beef tallow as an alternative to fish oil may effectively reduce the LC-PUFA demand of hybrid striped bass × and allow for greater fish oil sparing. Accordingly, we evaluated growth performance and tissue fatty acid profiles of juvenile fish (23.7 ± 0.3 g) fed diets containing menhaden fish oil (considered an ideal source of LC-PUFA for this taxon), beef tallow (BEEF ONLY), or beef tallow amended with purified sources of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and/or docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) to achieve levels corresponding to 50 or 100% of those observed in the FISH ONLY feed. Diets were randomly assigned to quadruplicate tanks of fish ( = 4; 10 fish/tank), and fish were fed assigned diets to apparent satiation once daily for 10 wk. Survival (98-100%) was equivalent among treatments, but weight gain (117-180%), specific growth rate (1.1-1.5% BW/d), feed intake (1.4-1.8% BW/d), thermal growth coefficient (0.50-0.70), and feed conversion ratio (FCR; 1.1-1.4, DM basis) varied. Except for FCR, no differences were observed between the FISH ONLY and BEEF ONLY treatments, but performance was generally numerically superior among fish fed the diets containing beef tallow supplemented with DHA at the 100% or both EPA and DHA at the 50% or 100% level. Tissue fatty acid composition was significantly distorted in favor among fish fed the beef tallow-based feeds; however, profile distortion was most overt in peripheral tissues. Results suggest that beef tallow may be used as a primary lipid source in practical diets for hybrid striped bass, but performance may be improved by supplementation with LC-PUFA, particularly DHA. Furthermore, our results suggest that -3 LC-PUFA requirements reported for hybrid striped bass may not be

  15. Hybrid striped bass feeds based on fish oil, beef tallow, and eicosapentaenoic acid/docosahexaenoic acid supplements: Insight regarding fish oil sparing and demand for -3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Bowzer, J; Jackson, C; Trushenski, J

    2016-03-01

    Previous research suggests that saturated (SFA) and monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA) rich lipids, including beef tallow, can make utilization or diet-to-tissue transfer of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA) more efficient. We hypothesized that using beef tallow as an alternative to fish oil may effectively reduce the LC-PUFA demand of hybrid striped bass × and allow for greater fish oil sparing. Accordingly, we evaluated growth performance and tissue fatty acid profiles of juvenile fish (23.7 ± 0.3 g) fed diets containing menhaden fish oil (considered an ideal source of LC-PUFA for this taxon), beef tallow (BEEF ONLY), or beef tallow amended with purified sources of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and/or docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) to achieve levels corresponding to 50 or 100% of those observed in the FISH ONLY feed. Diets were randomly assigned to quadruplicate tanks of fish ( = 4; 10 fish/tank), and fish were fed assigned diets to apparent satiation once daily for 10 wk. Survival (98-100%) was equivalent among treatments, but weight gain (117-180%), specific growth rate (1.1-1.5% BW/d), feed intake (1.4-1.8% BW/d), thermal growth coefficient (0.50-0.70), and feed conversion ratio (FCR; 1.1-1.4, DM basis) varied. Except for FCR, no differences were observed between the FISH ONLY and BEEF ONLY treatments, but performance was generally numerically superior among fish fed the diets containing beef tallow supplemented with DHA at the 100% or both EPA and DHA at the 50% or 100% level. Tissue fatty acid composition was significantly distorted in favor among fish fed the beef tallow-based feeds; however, profile distortion was most overt in peripheral tissues. Results suggest that beef tallow may be used as a primary lipid source in practical diets for hybrid striped bass, but performance may be improved by supplementation with LC-PUFA, particularly DHA. Furthermore, our results suggest that -3 LC-PUFA requirements reported for hybrid striped bass may not be

  16. Leptin stimulates hepatic growth hormone receptor and insulin-like growth factor gene expression in a teleost fish, the hybrid striped bass.

    PubMed

    Won, Eugene T; Douros, Jonathan D; Hurt, David A; Borski, Russell J

    2016-04-01

    Leptin is an anorexigenic peptide hormone that circulates as an indicator of adiposity in mammals, and functions to maintain energy homeostasis by balancing feeding and energy expenditure. In fish, leptin tends to be predominantly expressed in the liver, another important energy storing tissue, rather than in fat depots as it is in mammals. The liver also produces the majority of circulating insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), which comprise the mitogenic component of the growth hormone (GH)-IGF endocrine growth axis. Based on similar regulatory patterns of leptin and IGFs that we have documented in previous studies on hybrid striped bass (HSB: Morone saxatilis×Morone chrysops), and considering the co-localization of these peptides in the liver, we hypothesized that leptin might regulate the endocrine growth axis in a manner that helps coordinate somatic growth with energy availability. Using a HSB hepatocyte culture system to simulate autocrine or paracrine exposure that might occur within the liver, this study examines the potential for leptin to modulate metabolism and growth through regulation of IGF gene expression directly, or indirectly through the regulation of GH receptors (GHR), which mediate GH-induced IGF expression. First, we verified that GH (50nM) has a classical stimulatory effect on IGF-1 and additionally show it stimulates IGF-2 transcription in hepatocytes. Leptin (5 and/or 50nM) directly stimulated in vitro GHR2 gene expression within 8h of exposure, and both GHR1 and GHR2 as well as IGF-1 and IGF-2 gene expression after 24h. Cells were then co-incubated with submaximal concentrations of leptin and GH (25nM each) to test if they had a synergistic effect on IGF gene expression, possibly through increased GH sensitivity following GHR upregulation by leptin. In combination, however, the treatments only had an additive effect on stimulating IGF-1 mRNA despite their capacity to increase GHR mRNA abundance. This suggests that leptin's stimulatory

  17. Leptin stimulates hepatic growth hormone receptor and insulin-like growth factor gene expression in a teleost fish, the hybrid striped bass.

    PubMed

    Won, Eugene T; Douros, Jonathan D; Hurt, David A; Borski, Russell J

    2016-04-01

    Leptin is an anorexigenic peptide hormone that circulates as an indicator of adiposity in mammals, and functions to maintain energy homeostasis by balancing feeding and energy expenditure. In fish, leptin tends to be predominantly expressed in the liver, another important energy storing tissue, rather than in fat depots as it is in mammals. The liver also produces the majority of circulating insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), which comprise the mitogenic component of the growth hormone (GH)-IGF endocrine growth axis. Based on similar regulatory patterns of leptin and IGFs that we have documented in previous studies on hybrid striped bass (HSB: Morone saxatilis×Morone chrysops), and considering the co-localization of these peptides in the liver, we hypothesized that leptin might regulate the endocrine growth axis in a manner that helps coordinate somatic growth with energy availability. Using a HSB hepatocyte culture system to simulate autocrine or paracrine exposure that might occur within the liver, this study examines the potential for leptin to modulate metabolism and growth through regulation of IGF gene expression directly, or indirectly through the regulation of GH receptors (GHR), which mediate GH-induced IGF expression. First, we verified that GH (50nM) has a classical stimulatory effect on IGF-1 and additionally show it stimulates IGF-2 transcription in hepatocytes. Leptin (5 and/or 50nM) directly stimulated in vitro GHR2 gene expression within 8h of exposure, and both GHR1 and GHR2 as well as IGF-1 and IGF-2 gene expression after 24h. Cells were then co-incubated with submaximal concentrations of leptin and GH (25nM each) to test if they had a synergistic effect on IGF gene expression, possibly through increased GH sensitivity following GHR upregulation by leptin. In combination, however, the treatments only had an additive effect on stimulating IGF-1 mRNA despite their capacity to increase GHR mRNA abundance. This suggests that leptin's stimulatory

  18. Differential effects of cortisol and 11-deoxycorticosterone on ion transport protein mRNA levels in gills of two euryhaline teleosts, Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) and striped bass (Morone saxatilis).

    PubMed

    Kiilerich, Pia; Tipsmark, Christian K; Borski, Russell J; Madsen, Steffen S

    2011-04-01

    The role of cortisol as the only corticosteroid in fish osmoregulation has recently been challenged with the discovery of a mineralocorticoid-like hormone, 11-deoxycorticosterone (DOC), and necessitates new studies of the endocrinology of osmoregulation in fish. Using an in vitro gill explant incubation approach, DOC-mediated regulation of selected osmoregulatory target genes in the gill was investigated and compared with that of cortisol in two euryhaline teleosts, Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) and striped bass (Morone saxatilis). The effects were tested in gills from both fresh water (FW)- and seawater (SW)-acclimated fish. Both cortisol and DOC caused an up-regulation of the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase α1 subunit in SW-acclimated tilapia but had no effect in FW-acclimated fish. Cortisol conferred an increase in Na(+),K(+),2Cl(-) cotransporter (NKCC) isoform 1a transcript levels in FW- and SW-acclimated tilapia, whereas DOC had a stimulatory effect only in SW-acclimated fish. Cortisol had no effect on NKCC isoform 1b mRNA levels at both salinities, while DOC stimulated this isoform in SW-acclimated fish. In striped bass, cortisol conferred an up-regulation of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase α1 and NKCC transcript levels in FW- and SW-acclimated fish, whereas DOC resulted in down-regulation of these transcripts in FW-acclimated fish. It was also found that both corticosteroids may rapidly (30 min) alter the mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling pathway in gill, inducing phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 (ERK1) and ERK2 in a salinity-dependent manner. The study shows a disparate organisation of corticosteroid signalling mechanisms involved in ion regulation in the two species and adds new evidence to a role of DOC as a mineralocorticoid hormone in teleosts. PMID:21282254

  19. Differential effects of cortisol and 11-deoxycorticosterone on ion transport protein mRNA levels in gills of two euryhaline teleosts, Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) and striped bass (Morone saxatilis).

    PubMed

    Kiilerich, Pia; Tipsmark, Christian K; Borski, Russell J; Madsen, Steffen S

    2011-04-01

    The role of cortisol as the only corticosteroid in fish osmoregulation has recently been challenged with the discovery of a mineralocorticoid-like hormone, 11-deoxycorticosterone (DOC), and necessitates new studies of the endocrinology of osmoregulation in fish. Using an in vitro gill explant incubation approach, DOC-mediated regulation of selected osmoregulatory target genes in the gill was investigated and compared with that of cortisol in two euryhaline teleosts, Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) and striped bass (Morone saxatilis). The effects were tested in gills from both fresh water (FW)- and seawater (SW)-acclimated fish. Both cortisol and DOC caused an up-regulation of the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase α1 subunit in SW-acclimated tilapia but had no effect in FW-acclimated fish. Cortisol conferred an increase in Na(+),K(+),2Cl(-) cotransporter (NKCC) isoform 1a transcript levels in FW- and SW-acclimated tilapia, whereas DOC had a stimulatory effect only in SW-acclimated fish. Cortisol had no effect on NKCC isoform 1b mRNA levels at both salinities, while DOC stimulated this isoform in SW-acclimated fish. In striped bass, cortisol conferred an up-regulation of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase α1 and NKCC transcript levels in FW- and SW-acclimated fish, whereas DOC resulted in down-regulation of these transcripts in FW-acclimated fish. It was also found that both corticosteroids may rapidly (30 min) alter the mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling pathway in gill, inducing phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 (ERK1) and ERK2 in a salinity-dependent manner. The study shows a disparate organisation of corticosteroid signalling mechanisms involved in ion regulation in the two species and adds new evidence to a role of DOC as a mineralocorticoid hormone in teleosts.

  20. Dietary vitamin C and vitamin E interact to influence growth and tissue composition of juvenile hybrid striped bass (Morone chrysops (female) x M. saxatilis (male)) but have limited effects on immune responses.

    PubMed

    Sealey, Wendy M; Gatlin, Delbert M

    2002-04-01

    Juvenile hybrid striped bass (initially 12.0 g) were fed diets containing deficient, adequate or excessive amounts of vitamin C and/or vitamin E in a factorial arrangement to investigate potential nutritional interaction and effects on immune responses. Nine semipurified diets were supplemented with 0, 25 or 2500 mg vitamin C/kg and 0, 30 or 300 mg vitamin E/kg and fed to fish in triplicate aquaria for 10 wk. Weight gain, feed efficiency, mortality and tissue vitamin levels were significantly (P < or = 0.05) affected by dietary vitamin levels. In addition, a significant interaction between vitamin C and vitamin E was observed. At inclusion levels of 25 and 2500 mg/kg, dietary vitamin C improved feed efficiency and protected fish fed vitamin E-deficient diets from growth depression and mortality. At inclusion levels of 30 and 300 mg/kg, vitamin E prevented mortality in fish fed vitamin C-deficient diets; however, 300 mg vitamin E/kg was necessary to prevent growth depression in vitamin C-deficient fish but was unable to improve feed efficiency. Lysozyme, bacterial killing ability, as well as plasma protein and total immunoglobulin levels of fish were not affected by dietary vitamin levels, whereas respiratory burst activity increased with vitamin E supplementation. Thus, interactions between vitamin C and vitamin E were observed in hybrid striped bass. These interactions may be due to the ability of vitamin C to regenerate vitamin E to its functional form but also suggest an ability of vitamin E to spare vitamin C.

  1. Effect of contrasting agents on survival, performance, and condition of larval hybrid striped bass Morone chrysops x M. saxatilis in tanks.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Turbidity is important in the tank culture of larval cannibalistic fish. The principal goal of these studies were to characterize the utility and feasibility of select contrasting agents, either algae or inert soil, at improving sunshine bass survival and uniformity of size at time of weaning to an ...

  2. Identification and mapping of adult plant stripe rust resistance in soft red winter wheat VA00W-38

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Virginia Tech experimental wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) line VA00W-38 has adult plant resistance to race PST-100, which was the predominant race of stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici) in the United States from 2003 to 2006. Resistance was characterized in a cross between VA00W-38 a...

  3. Impact of entrainment and impingement on fish populations in the Hudson River Estuary. Volume II. Impingement impact analyses, evaluations of alternative screening devices, and critiques of utility testimony relating to density-dependent growth, the age-composition of the striped bass spawning stock, and the LMS real-time life cycle model

    SciTech Connect

    Barnthouse, L. W.; Van Winkle, W.; Golumbek, J.; Cada, G. F.; Goodyear, C. P.; Christensen, S. W.; Cannon, J. B.; Lee, D. W.

    1982-04-01

    This volume includes a series of four exhibits relating to impacts of impingement on fish populations, together with a collection of critical evaluations of testimony prepared for the utilities by their consultants. The first exhibit is a quantitative evaluation of four sources of bias (collection efficiency, reimpingement, impingement on inoperative screens, and impingement survival) affecting estimates of the number of fish killed at Hudson River power plants. The two following exhibits contain, respectively, a detailed assessment of the impact of impingement on the Hudson River white perch population and estimates of conditional impingement mortality rates for seven Hudson River fish populations. The fourth exhibit is an evaluation of the engineering feasibility and potential biological effectiveness of several types of modified intake structures proposed as alternatives to cooling towers for reducing impingement impacts. The remainder of Volume II consists of critical evaluations of the utilities' empirical evidence for the existence of density-dependent growth in young-of-the-year striped bass and white perch, of their estimate of the age-composition of the striped bass spawning stock in the Hudson River, and of their use of the Lawler, Matusky, and Skelly (LMS) Real-Time Life Cycle Model to estimate the impact of entrainment and impingement on the Hudson River striped bass population.

  4. Summer movements of sub-adult brook trout, landlocked Atlantic salmon, and smallmouth bass in the Rapid River, Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jackson, Casey A. L.; Zydlewski, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    Summer movement patterns and spatial overlap of native sub-adult brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis), non-native landlocked Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), and non-native smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu) in the Rapid River, Maine, were investigated with radio telemetry in 2005. Fishes were captured by angling, surgically implanted with radio transmitters, and tracked actively from June through September. Most brook trout (96%) and landlocked salmon (72%) displayed long distance movements (>1 km) to open water bodies (28 June to 4 July) followed by periods of time spent in presumed thermal refigia (5 July to 16 September). Summer water temperature rose above 25 °C, near the reported lethal limits for these coldwater species. In contrast, the majority of smallmouth bass (68%), a warrnwater species, did not make long distance movements from areas of initial capture, remaining in mainstem sections of the river (28 June to 16 September). Spatial overlap of smallmouth bass and brook trout in the summer is unlikely because brook trout presumably move to thermal rehgia during this time. However, interspecific competition between brook trout and landlocked salmon may occur since they select similar habitats June through September.

  5. Gene networks and toxicity pathways induced by acute cadmium exposure in adult largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides).

    PubMed

    Mehinto, Alvine C; Prucha, Melinda S; Colli-Dula, Reyna C; Kroll, Kevin J; Lavelle, Candice M; Barber, David S; Vulpe, Christopher D; Denslow, Nancy D

    2014-07-01

    Cadmium is a heavy metal that can accumulate to toxic levels in the environment leading to detrimental effects in animals and humans including kidney, liver and lung injuries. Using a transcriptomics approach, genes and cellular pathways affected by a low dose of cadmium were investigated. Adult largemouth bass were intraperitoneally injected with 20μg/kg of cadmium chloride (mean exposure level - 2.6μg of cadmium per fish) and microarray analyses were conducted in the liver and testis 48h after injection. Transcriptomic profiles identified in response to cadmium exposure were tissue-specific with the most differential expression changes found in the liver tissues, which also contained much higher levels of cadmium than the testis. Acute exposure to a low dose of cadmium induced oxidative stress response and oxidative damage pathways in the liver. The mRNA levels of antioxidants such as catalase increased and numerous transcripts related to DNA damage and DNA repair were significantly altered. Hepatic mRNA levels of metallothionein, a molecular marker of metal exposure, did not increase significantly after 48h exposure. Carbohydrate metabolic pathways were also disrupted with hepatic transcripts such as UDP-glucose, pyrophosphorylase 2, and sorbitol dehydrogenase highly induced. Both tissues exhibited a disruption of steroid signaling pathways. In the testis, estrogen receptor beta and transcripts linked to cholesterol metabolism were suppressed. On the contrary, genes involved in cholesterol metabolism were highly increased in the liver including genes encoding for the rate limiting steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and the catalytic enzyme 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase. Integration of the transcriptomic data using functional enrichment analyses revealed a number of enriched gene networks associated with previously reported adverse outcomes of cadmium exposure such as liver toxicity and impaired reproduction. PMID:24794047

  6. Gene networks and toxicity pathways induced by acute cadmium exposure in adult largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides).

    PubMed

    Mehinto, Alvine C; Prucha, Melinda S; Colli-Dula, Reyna C; Kroll, Kevin J; Lavelle, Candice M; Barber, David S; Vulpe, Christopher D; Denslow, Nancy D

    2014-07-01

    Cadmium is a heavy metal that can accumulate to toxic levels in the environment leading to detrimental effects in animals and humans including kidney, liver and lung injuries. Using a transcriptomics approach, genes and cellular pathways affected by a low dose of cadmium were investigated. Adult largemouth bass were intraperitoneally injected with 20μg/kg of cadmium chloride (mean exposure level - 2.6μg of cadmium per fish) and microarray analyses were conducted in the liver and testis 48h after injection. Transcriptomic profiles identified in response to cadmium exposure were tissue-specific with the most differential expression changes found in the liver tissues, which also contained much higher levels of cadmium than the testis. Acute exposure to a low dose of cadmium induced oxidative stress response and oxidative damage pathways in the liver. The mRNA levels of antioxidants such as catalase increased and numerous transcripts related to DNA damage and DNA repair were significantly altered. Hepatic mRNA levels of metallothionein, a molecular marker of metal exposure, did not increase significantly after 48h exposure. Carbohydrate metabolic pathways were also disrupted with hepatic transcripts such as UDP-glucose, pyrophosphorylase 2, and sorbitol dehydrogenase highly induced. Both tissues exhibited a disruption of steroid signaling pathways. In the testis, estrogen receptor beta and transcripts linked to cholesterol metabolism were suppressed. On the contrary, genes involved in cholesterol metabolism were highly increased in the liver including genes encoding for the rate limiting steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and the catalytic enzyme 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase. Integration of the transcriptomic data using functional enrichment analyses revealed a number of enriched gene networks associated with previously reported adverse outcomes of cadmium exposure such as liver toxicity and impaired reproduction.

  7. QTL mapping of adult-plant resistances to stripe rust and leaf rust in Chinese wheat cultivar Bainong 64.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yan; Li, Zaifeng; He, Zhonghu; Wu, Ling; Bai, Bin; Lan, Caixia; Wang, Cuifen; Zhou, Gang; Zhu, Huazhong; Xia, Xianchun

    2012-10-01

    Stripe rust and leaf rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis Westend. f. sp. tritici Erikss. and P. triticina, respectively, are devastating fungal diseases of common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Chinese wheat cultivar Bainong 64 has maintained acceptable adult-plant resistance (APR) to stripe rust, leaf rust and powdery mildew for more than 10 years. The aim of this study was to identify quantitative trait loci/locus (QTL) for resistance to the two rusts in a population of 179 doubled haploid (DH) lines derived from Bainong 64 × Jingshuang 16. The DH lines were planted in randomized complete blocks with three replicates at four locations. Stripe rust tests were conducted using a mixture of currently prevalent P. striiformis races, and leaf rust tests were performed with P. triticina race THTT. Leaf rust severities were scored two or three times, whereas maximum disease severities (MDS) were recorded for stripe rust. Using bulked segregant analysis (BSA) and simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers, five independent loci for APR to two rusts were detected. The QTL on chromosomes 1BL and 6BS contributed by Bainong 64 conferred resistance to both diseases. The loci identified on chromosomes 7AS and 4DL had minor effects on stripe rust response, whereas another locus, close to the centromere on chromosome 6BS, had a significant effect only on leaf rust response. The loci located on chromosomes 1BL and 4DL also had significant effects on powdery mildew response. These were located at the same positions as the Yr29/Lr46 and Yr46/Lr67 genes, respectively. The multiple disease resistance locus for APR on chromosome 6BS appears to be new. All three genes and their closely linked molecular markers could be used in breeding wheat cultivars with durable resistance to multiple diseases.

  8. Polychlorinated biphenyls in adult black bass and yellow perch were not associated with their reproductive success in the upper Hudson River, New York, USA.

    PubMed

    Maceina, Michael J; Sammons, Steven M

    2013-07-01

    Although production and use of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) ceased nearly 35 yr ago, questions still remain concerning the potential chronic effects these compounds may have on wild fish, including their reproductive success. In the upper Hudson River, New York, USA, fish were exposed to PCBs primarily from 2 manufacturing plants located approximately 320 km upstream of New York City, New York, from the 1940s to 1977. The authors collected yellow perch (Perca flavescens), smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu), and largemouth bass (M. salmoides) using electrofishing, measured PCBs in these adults, and estimated abundance and size of their offspring at age 1 yr (age-1 fish). Fish were collected annually from 2004 to 2009 from 1 control site upstream of the PCB discharge sites and from 2 sites downstream from where PCBs were released. These sites (pools) are separated by a series of dams, locks, and canals. Muscle tissue wet weight PCB and lipid-based PCB concentrations in adults in the 2 PCB exposure pools averaged approximately 1 to 3 µg/g and 100 to 500 µg/g, respectively. Age-1 abundances were not related to adult PCB concentrations but were inversely related to river flow. Size of age-1 fish was slightly greater at the PCB-exposure sites. Levels of PCBs in yellow perch, largemouth bass, and smallmouth bass in the upper Hudson River did not impair or reduce recruitment or reproductive success. PMID:23440915

  9. Polychlorinated biphenyls in adult black bass and yellow perch were not associated with their reproductive success in the upper Hudson River, New York, USA.

    PubMed

    Maceina, Michael J; Sammons, Steven M

    2013-07-01

    Although production and use of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) ceased nearly 35 yr ago, questions still remain concerning the potential chronic effects these compounds may have on wild fish, including their reproductive success. In the upper Hudson River, New York, USA, fish were exposed to PCBs primarily from 2 manufacturing plants located approximately 320 km upstream of New York City, New York, from the 1940s to 1977. The authors collected yellow perch (Perca flavescens), smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu), and largemouth bass (M. salmoides) using electrofishing, measured PCBs in these adults, and estimated abundance and size of their offspring at age 1 yr (age-1 fish). Fish were collected annually from 2004 to 2009 from 1 control site upstream of the PCB discharge sites and from 2 sites downstream from where PCBs were released. These sites (pools) are separated by a series of dams, locks, and canals. Muscle tissue wet weight PCB and lipid-based PCB concentrations in adults in the 2 PCB exposure pools averaged approximately 1 to 3 µg/g and 100 to 500 µg/g, respectively. Age-1 abundances were not related to adult PCB concentrations but were inversely related to river flow. Size of age-1 fish was slightly greater at the PCB-exposure sites. Levels of PCBs in yellow perch, largemouth bass, and smallmouth bass in the upper Hudson River did not impair or reduce recruitment or reproductive success.

  10. Egg saprolegniasis in a commercial sunshine bass hatchery: Control regime developed using copper sulfate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An obstacle to sunshine bass (female white bass Morone chrysops × male striped bass M. saxatilis) larval production is fungal growth on eggs caused by the water-mold Saprolegnia spp. Copper sulfate (CuSO4) is commonly used for fungus control in troughs of catfish hatcheries, but the effectiveness o...

  11. Use of copper sulfate to control Saprolegniasis at a commercial sunshine bass hatchery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An obstacle to sunshine bass (female white bass Morone chrysops × male striped bass M. saxatilis) larval production is fungal growth on eggs caused by the water-mold Saprolegnia spp. Copper sulfate (CuSO4) is commonly used for fungus control in troughs of catfish hatcheries, but the effectiveness o...

  12. Plasma ghrelin and growth hormone regulation in response to metabolic state in hybrid striped bass: effects of feeding, ghrelin and insulin-like growth factor-I on in vivo and in vitro GH secretion.

    PubMed

    Picha, Matthew E; Strom, Christina N; Riley, Larry G; Walker, Alicia A; Won, Eugene T; Johnstone, William M; Borski, Russell J

    2009-05-01

    The regulation of growth hormone (GH) secretion by ghrelin during variable metabolic states is poorly understood. We examined plasma GH and ghrelin in hybrid striped bass (HSB) undergoing seasonally-based feeding and temperature manipulations. Fasting for 21 days (d) at 24 degrees C resulted in catabolism and up-regulation of plasma GH and ghrelin relative to fed controls. Continued fasting during cold-banking (14 degrees C, 90 d) resulted in a further 43-fold increase in ghrelin while GH remained elevated. A subsequent 19 day refeeding period at 24 degrees C elicited hyperphagic and compensatory growth responses, accompanied by declines in ghrelin and GH. We then tested the role of ghrelin in stimulating GH release in vivo and in vitro. Intraperitoneal injections of ghrelin resulted in dose-dependent increases in plasma GH after 6 hours (h). Ghrelin also increased GH release from HSB pituitaries during 6h incubations. Lastly, we assessed how metabolic state, ghrelin and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) affect in vitro pituitary GH release. Spontaneous GH release was 5.2-fold higher from pituitaries of fasted compared with fed animals. Ghrelin was equally effective in stimulating GH release from pituitaries of fed and starved animals, while it was ineffective in enhancing GH release from pituitaries of starved (21 d) then refed (4d) HSB. Incubation with IGF-I inhibited GH release regardless of metabolic state. These studies are the first to show that seasonally-based periods of feed deprivation and low temperature yield sustained increases in GH secretion that are likely mediated, at least partially, through elevated ghrelin, reduced IGF-I negative feedback and fasting-induced spontaneous GH release.

  13. QTL mapping for adult-plant resistance to stripe rust in Italian common wheat cultivars Libellula and Strampelli.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yaming; Lan, Caixia; Liang, Shanshan; Zhou, Xiangchun; Liu, Di; Zhou, Gang; Lu, Qinglin; Jing, Jinxue; Wang, Meinan; Xia, Xianchun; He, Zhonghu

    2009-11-01

    Italian common wheat cultivars Libellula and Strampelli, grown for over three decades in Gansu province of China, have shown effective resistance to stripe rust. To elucidate the genetic basis of the resistance, F(3) populations were developed from crosses between the two cultivars and susceptible Chinese wheat cultivar Huixianhong. The F(3) lines were evaluated for disease severity in Beijing, Gansu and Sichuan from 2005 to 2008. Joint- and single-environment analyses by composite interval mapping identified five quantitative trait loci (QTLs) in Libellula for reduced stripe rust severity, designated QYr.caas-2DS, QYr.caas-4BL, QYr.caas-5BL.1, QYr.caas-5BL.2 and QYr.caas-7DS, and explained 8.1-12.4, 3.6-5.1, 3.4-8.6, 2.6 and 14.6-35.0%, respectively, of the phenotypic variance across four environments. Six interactions between different pairs of QTLs explained 3.2-7.1% of the phenotypic variance. The QTLs QYr.caas-4BL, QYr.caas-5BL.1 and QYr.caas-7DS were also detected in Strampelli, explaining 4.5, 2.9-5.5 and 17.1-39.1% of phenotypic variance, respectively, across five environments. Three interactions between different pairs of QTLs accounted for 6.1-35.0% of the phenotypic variance. The QTL QYr.caas-7DS flanked by markers csLV34 and Xgwm295 showed the largest effect for resistance to stripe rust. Sequence analyses confirmed that the lines with the QYr.caas-7DS allele for resistance carried the resistance allele of the Yr18/Lr34 gene. Our results indicated that the adult-plant resistance gene Yr18 and several minor genes confer effective durable resistance to stripe rust in Libellula and Strampelli.

  14. Genome-Wide Association Mapping for Seedling and Adult Plant Resistance to Stripe Rust in Synthetic Hexaploid Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Makdis, Farid; Badebo, Ayele; Ogbonnaya, Francis C.

    2014-01-01

    Use of genetic diversity from related wild and domesticated species has made a significant contribution to improving wheat productivity. Synthetic hexaploid wheats (SHWs) exhibit natural genetic variation for resistance and/or tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses. Stripe rust caused by (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici; Pst), is an important disease of wheat worldwide. To characterise loci conferring resistance to stripe rust in SHWs, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) with a panel of 181 SHWs using the wheat 9K SNP iSelect array. The SHWs were evaluated for their response to the prevailing races of Pst at the seedling and adult plant stages, the latter in replicated field trials at two sites in Ethiopia in 2011. About 28% of the SHWs exhibited immunity at the seedling stage while 56% and 83% were resistant to Pst at the adult plant stage at Meraro and Arsi Robe, respectively. A total of 27 SNPs in nine genomic regions (1BS, 2AS, 2BL, 3BL, 3DL, 5A, 5BL, 6DS and 7A) were linked with resistance to Pst at the seedling stage, while 38 SNPs on 18 genomic regions were associated with resistance at the adult plant stage. Six genomic regions were commonly detected at both locations using a mixed linear model corrected for population structure, kinship relatedness and adjusted for false discovery rate (FDR). The loci on chromosome regions 1AS, 3DL, 6DS and 7AL appeared to be novel QTL; our results confirm that resynthesized wheat involving its progenitor species is a rich source of new stripe (yellow) rust resistance that may be useful in choosing SHWs and incorporating diverse yellow rust (YR) resistance loci into locally adapted wheat cultivars. PMID:25153126

  15. Genome-wide association mapping for seedling and adult plant resistance to stripe rust in synthetic hexaploid wheat.

    PubMed

    Zegeye, Habtemariam; Rasheed, Awais; Makdis, Farid; Badebo, Ayele; Ogbonnaya, Francis C

    2014-01-01

    Use of genetic diversity from related wild and domesticated species has made a significant contribution to improving wheat productivity. Synthetic hexaploid wheats (SHWs) exhibit natural genetic variation for resistance and/or tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses. Stripe rust caused by (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici; Pst), is an important disease of wheat worldwide. To characterise loci conferring resistance to stripe rust in SHWs, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) with a panel of 181 SHWs using the wheat 9 K SNP iSelect array. The SHWs were evaluated for their response to the prevailing races of Pst at the seedling and adult plant stages, the latter in replicated field trials at two sites in Ethiopia in 2011. About 28% of the SHWs exhibited immunity at the seedling stage while 56% and 83% were resistant to Pst at the adult plant stage at Meraro and Arsi Robe, respectively. A total of 27 SNPs in nine genomic regions (1 BS, 2 AS, 2 BL, 3 BL, 3 DL, 5A, 5 BL, 6DS and 7A) were linked with resistance to Pst at the seedling stage, while 38 SNPs on 18 genomic regions were associated with resistance at the adult plant stage. Six genomic regions were commonly detected at both locations using a mixed linear model corrected for population structure, kinship relatedness and adjusted for false discovery rate (FDR). The loci on chromosome regions 1 AS, 3 DL, 6 DS and 7 AL appeared to be novel QTL; our results confirm that resynthesized wheat involving its progenitor species is a rich source of new stripe (yellow) rust resistance that may be useful in choosing SHWs and incorporating diverse yellow rust (YR) resistance loci into locally adapted wheat cultivars.

  16. Interaction of bass tapeworm, Proteocephalus ambloplitis, and Neoechinorhynchus sp. (Acanthocephala) in largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides.

    PubMed

    Durborow, R M; Rogers, W A; Klesius, P H

    1988-12-01

    The number of plerocercoids of the bass tapeworm, Proteocephalus ambloplitis, in wild largemouth bass was negatively correlated (r = -0.94) with the number of Neoechinorhynchus sp. Competitive inhibition between the 2 parasites appeared to exist. Similarly, the numbers of Neoechinorhynchus sp. in wild bass decreased when adult bass tapeworms were present in the intestine. Proteocephalus ambloplitis plerocercoids used to challenge bass vaccinated with either P. ambloplitis adult or Neoechinorhynchus sp. antigens were smaller (P less than 0.05) when recovered than those used to challenge control bass. Based on preliminary results, both antigens might have enabled the bass to limit growth and/or development of the invading bass tapeworm, plerocercoids. Cross-protective immunity may be the reason for this occurrence, in which case, it could offer an explanation for competitive inhibition existing between P. ambloplitis and Neoechinorhynchus sp.

  17. Discordant regulation of hepatic IGF-I mRNA and circulating IGF-I during compensatory growth in a teleost, the hybrid striped bass (Morone chrysopsxMorone saxatilis).

    PubMed

    Picha, Matthew E; Silverstein, Jeffrey T; Borski, Russell J

    2006-06-01

    Compensatory growth (CG) is a period of growth that exceeds normal rates after animals are alleviated of certain growth-stunting conditions. Little is known, however, about the endocrine control of CG in teleosts. So, our aim was to induce CG in juvenile hybrid striped bass (HSB, Morone chrysopsxMorone saxatilis) through manipulations in feeding regimen, and then determine whether changes in circulating insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and hepatic IGF-I gene expression accompany the CG response. A considerable catabolic state was induced in HSB fed a total of two times over 4 weeks (once each in the 2nd and 3rd week). Negative energy balance was evidenced through weight loss (-3.4% BW) and a significant drop in hepatosomatic index (HSI) from a value of 3.71 to 1.46. Upon realimentation, in which HSB were fed ad libitum 2x/day, a significant CG response was observed over a 4-week period. The CG response was characterized by an elevated specific growth rate, hyperphagia, restoration of the HSI and an improvement in feed conversion, all relative to controls that were fed ad libitum 2x/day throughout the experiment. Moreover, the CG response and catabolic state preceding it were marked by a discordant regulation in the expression of hepatic IGF-I mRNA and plasma IGF-I levels, the latter parameter paralleling changes in growth (r(2)=0.56, P<001). The catabolic state was accompanied by an 82% increase in hepatic IGF-I mRNA while levels of plasma IGF-I were significantly depressed relative to controls. During the subsequent CG response, however, hepatic IGF-I mRNA decreased by 61% while plasma IGF-I increased by 86%. The underlying mechanisms for this inverse regulation of hepatic IGF-I mRNA and circulating IGF-I are uncertain, but may reflect alterations in hepatic IGF-I mRNA production, stability, and translation such that hepatic IGF-I mRNA is accumulated during periods of catabolism and then rapidly translated and released into circulation when conditions improve

  18. Influence of stripe rust infection on the photosynthetic characteristics and antioxidant system of susceptible and resistant wheat cultivars at the adult plant stage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yang-Er; Cui, Jun-Mei; Su, Yan-Qiu; Yuan, Shu; Yuan, Ming; Zhang, Huai-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Wheat stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, Pst), is one of the most serious diseases of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) worldwide. To gain a better understanding of the protective mechanism against stripe rust at the adult plant stage, the differences in photosystem II and antioxidant enzymatic systems between susceptible and resistant wheat in response to stripe rust disease (P. striiformis) were investigated. We found that chlorophyll fluorescence and the activities of the antioxidant enzymes were higher in resistant wheat than in susceptible wheat after stripe rust infection. Compared with the susceptible wheat, the resistant wheat accumulated a higher level of D1 protein and a lower level of reactive oxygen species after infection. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that D1 and light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) phosphorylation are involved in the resistance to stripe rust in wheat. The CP29 protein was phosphorylated under stripe rust infection, like its phosphorylation in other monocots under environmental stresses. More extensive damages occur on the thylakoid membranes in the susceptible wheat compared with the resistant wheat. The findings provide evidence that thylakoid protein phosphorylation and antioxidant enzyme systems play important roles in plant responses and defense to biotic stress.

  19. Influence of stripe rust infection on the photosynthetic characteristics and antioxidant system of susceptible and resistant wheat cultivars at the adult plant stage

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yang-Er; Cui, Jun-Mei; Su, Yan-Qiu; Yuan, Shu; Yuan, Ming; Zhang, Huai-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Wheat stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, Pst), is one of the most serious diseases of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) worldwide. To gain a better understanding of the protective mechanism against stripe rust at the adult plant stage, the differences in photosystem II and antioxidant enzymatic systems between susceptible and resistant wheat in response to stripe rust disease (P. striiformis) were investigated. We found that chlorophyll fluorescence and the activities of the antioxidant enzymes were higher in resistant wheat than in susceptible wheat after stripe rust infection. Compared with the susceptible wheat, the resistant wheat accumulated a higher level of D1 protein and a lower level of reactive oxygen species after infection. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that D1 and light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) phosphorylation are involved in the resistance to stripe rust in wheat. The CP29 protein was phosphorylated under stripe rust infection, like its phosphorylation in other monocots under environmental stresses. More extensive damages occur on the thylakoid membranes in the susceptible wheat compared with the resistant wheat. The findings provide evidence that thylakoid protein phosphorylation and antioxidant enzyme systems play important roles in plant responses and defense to biotic stress. PMID:26442087

  20. Characterization of a major QTL for adult plant resistance to stripe rust in US soft red winter wheat.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yuanfeng; Chen, Zhenbang; Wang, Yingying; Bland, Dan; Buck, James; Brown-Guedira, Gina; Johnson, Jerry

    2011-12-01

    Stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, is an important disease of soft red winter wheat in the eastern region of the USA. Pioneer 26R61 has provided effective resistance to stripe rust for 10 years. To elucidate the genetic basis of the resistance, a mapping population of 178 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) was developed using single-seed descent from a cross between Pioneer 26R61 and the susceptible cultivar AGS 2000. A genetic map with 895 markers covering all 21 chromosomes was used for QTL analysis. One major QTL was detected, explaining up to 56.0% of the mean phenotypic variation, flanked by markers Xbarc124 and Xgwm359, and assigned to the distal 22% of the short arm of wheat chromosome 2A. Evidence showed that it was different from Yr17 derived from Ae. ventricosa, the only formally named Yr gene in 2AS, and the QTL was temporarily designated as YrR61. In addition, a minor QTL, QYr.uga-6AS, probably conditioned high-temperature adult plant resistance. The QTL explained 6-7% of the trait variation. Preliminary test of the flanking markers for YrR61, in two cultivars and two promising breeding lines with Pioneer 26R61 in their pedigree, indicated that YrR61 was present in these cultivars and lines, and these markers could therefore be used in marker-assisted selection.

  1. Mortality of Palmetto bass following catch-and-release angling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petersen, M.J.; Bettoli, Phillip William

    2013-01-01

    Palmetto bass (Striped Bass Morone saxatilis x White Bass M. chrysops) have been stocked into reservoirs in the southeastern USA since the late 1960s and have gained widespread acceptance as a sport fish. These fisheries are growing in popularity and catch-and-release (CR) fishing is commonplace; however, there is a dearth of information on CR mortality of palmetto bass. We experimentally angled palmetto bass (n = 56; >373-mm TL) in a Tennessee reservoir using traditional angling gear in water temperatures ranging from 13 °C to 32 °C. Ultrasonic transmitters equipped with floats were externally attached to fish, which were released immediately and tracked multiple times within 10 d of release. Mortality was negligible (3.6%) in fall and spring at cool water temperatures but was high (39.3%) in summer when water temperatures exceeded 26 °C. The best logistic regression model based on Akaike's information criterion for small sample sizes scores relied on water temperature alone to predict CR mortality of palmetto bass; there was little support for other models that included all possible combinations of the six other predictor variables we tested. Palmetto bass in our study experienced lower CR mortality than Striped Bass in other systems, but CR mortality rates for palmetto bass that approach or exceed 40% during summer are still problematic if the goal is to maintain fishing quality.

  2. Developing Adult Learners: Strategies for Teachers and Trainers. First Edition. The Jossey-Bass Higher and Adult Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Kathleen; Marienau, Catherine; Fiddler, Morris

    This book is designed to influence adult educators to make more intentional choices toward developmental growth in their work with adult learners. Part 1 provides a rationale for attending to developmental growth of adult learners and a framework of intentions to encourage such development. Chapter 1 describes characteristics of adult learners and…

  3. The Design of Education. Second Edition. Jossey-Bass Higher and Adult Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houle, Cyril O.

    This book, which is intended primarily for specialists in the field of adult education (AE) who wish to improve their performance, presents a systematic plan for designing, establishing, and evaluating successful programs for adult learners. The following topics are among those discussed in the book's six chapters: credos and systems (growth of…

  4. Anoplastie périnéale simple pour le traitement des malformations anorectales basses chez l'adulte, à propos de deux cas

    PubMed Central

    Echchaoui, Abdelmoughit; Benyachou, Malika; Hafidi, Jawad; Fathi, Nahed; Mohammadine, Elhamid; ELmazouz, Samir; Gharib, Nour-eddine; Abbassi, Abdellah

    2014-01-01

    Les malformations anorectales chez l'adulte sont des anomalies congénitales rares du tube digestif qui prédominent chez le sexe féminin. Notre étude porte sur deux observations de malformation anorectale basses vues et traitées au stade adulte par les 2 équipes (plasticiens et viscéralistes) à l'Hôpital Avicenne à Rabat. Il s'agit d'un homme de 24 ans avec une dyschésie anale l'autre cas est une femme de 18 ans avec une malformation anovulvaire Les caractéristiques cliniques combinées avec les imageries radiologiques (lavement baryté, et la manométrie anorectale) ont confirmé qu'il s'agit d'une malfomation anorectale basse. Les deux cas sont corrigés par une reconstruction sphinctérienne, réimplantation anale avec anoplastie périnéale. Les suites opératoires étaient simples, pas de souffrance cutanée ou nécrose, avec changement de pansement gras chaque jour. Le résultat fonctionnel (la continence) était favorable pour les 2 patients. La présentation des MAR à l’âge adulte est rare, d’étiologie mal connu, elles apparaissent selon le mode sporadique. Les caractéristiques cliniques, couplées à l'imagerie (lavement baryté, IRM pelvienne), l'endoscopie et la manométrie anorectale, permettent de confirmer le diagnostic et classer ces anomalies en 3 types: basses, intermédiaires, et hautes. Les formes basses sont traités d'emblée par une réimplantation anale et anoplastie périnéale simple tels nos deux cas, elles peuvent être traités dans certains cas par un abaissement anorectale associé à une plastie V-Y permettant ainsi un emplacement anatomique correct de l'anus; alors que les formes hautes ou intermédiaires relèvent d'une chirurgie complexe avec souvent une dérivation digestive transitoire. Contrairement aux autres formes, Les formes basses ont un pronostic fonctionnel favorable. PMID:25667689

  5. Planning Responsibly for Adult Education. A Guide to Negotiating Power and Interests. Jossey-Bass Higher and Adult Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cervero, Ronald M.; Wilson, Arthur L.

    This practical guide to the process of planning educational programs for adults explains the key challenges of planning in the real world of conflicting interests and power relations. Part 1 draws attention to the importance of program planning practice in adult education (Chapter 1) and offers a model of what adult educators actually do when…

  6. Offshore Habitat Preference of Overwintering Juvenile and Adult Black Sea Bass, Centropristis striata, and the Relationship to Year-Class Success.

    PubMed

    Miller, Alicia S; Shepherd, Gary R; Fratantoni, Paula S

    2016-01-01

    Black sea bass (Centropristis striata) migrations are believed to play a role in overwinter survival and connectivity between juvenile and adult populations. This study investigated oceanographic drivers of winter habitat choice and regional differences between populations of juvenile and adult black sea bass. Trends in cohort strength, as a result of juvenile survival, were also identified. Oceanographic and fisheries survey data were analyzed using generalized additive models. Among the oceanographic variables investigated, salinity was the main driver in habitat selection with an optimal range of 33-35 practical salinity units (PSU) for both juveniles and adults. Preferred temperature ranges varied between juveniles and adults, but held a similar minimum preference of >8°C. Salinity and temperature ranges also differed by regions north and south of Hudson Canyon. Shelf water volume had less of an effect than temperature or salinity, but showed an overall negative relationship with survey catch. The effect of winter conditions on juvenile abundance was also observed across state and federal survey index trends. A lack of correlation observed among surveys in the fall paired with a strong correlation in the spring identifies the winter period as a factor determining year-class strength of new recruits to the population. A rank order analysis of spring indices identified three of the largest year classes occurring during years with reduced shelf water volumes, warmer winter shelf waters, and a 34 PSU isohaline aligned farther inshore. While greater catches of black sea bass in the northwest Atlantic Ocean remain south of Hudson Canyon, the species' range has expanded north in recent years. PMID:26824350

  7. Offshore Habitat Preference of Overwintering Juvenile and Adult Black Sea Bass, Centropristis striata, and the Relationship to Year-Class Success

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Alicia S.; Shepherd, Gary R.; Fratantoni, Paula S.

    2016-01-01

    Black sea bass (Centropristis striata) migrations are believed to play a role in overwinter survival and connectivity between juvenile and adult populations. This study investigated oceanographic drivers of winter habitat choice and regional differences between populations of juvenile and adult black sea bass. Trends in cohort strength, as a result of juvenile survival, were also identified. Oceanographic and fisheries survey data were analyzed using generalized additive models. Among the oceanographic variables investigated, salinity was the main driver in habitat selection with an optimal range of 33–35 practical salinity units (PSU) for both juveniles and adults. Preferred temperature ranges varied between juveniles and adults, but held a similar minimum preference of >8°C. Salinity and temperature ranges also differed by regions north and south of Hudson Canyon. Shelf water volume had less of an effect than temperature or salinity, but showed an overall negative relationship with survey catch. The effect of winter conditions on juvenile abundance was also observed across state and federal survey index trends. A lack of correlation observed among surveys in the fall paired with a strong correlation in the spring identifies the winter period as a factor determining year-class strength of new recruits to the population. A rank order analysis of spring indices identified three of the largest year classes occurring during years with reduced shelf water volumes, warmer winter shelf waters, and a 34 PSU isohaline aligned farther inshore. While greater catches of black sea bass in the northwest Atlantic Ocean remain south of Hudson Canyon, the species’ range has expanded north in recent years. PMID:26824350

  8. Annual Review of Adult Learning and Literacy. Volume 1. The Jossey-Bass Higher and Adult Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comings, John, Ed.; Garner, Barbara, Ed.; Smith, Cristine, Ed.

    This book contains eight papers on adult learning and literacy. "The Year 1998 in Review" (Fran Tracy-Mumford) examines educational legislation and policy and developments in adult education program development, program accountability, strategic alliances and partnerships, and instructional methodologies and technologies. "Lessons from 'Preventing…

  9. The Profession and Practice of Adult Education: An Introduction. The Jossey-Bass Higher and Adult Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merriam, Sharan B.; Brockett, Ralph G.

    This book provides an overview of major dimensions of the adult education field and raises awareness of the critical issues and tensions inherent in its practice. Chapter 1 sketches the broad outlines of the field in terms of its definitions, major concepts, goals, and purposes. Chapter 2 explores the philosophical foundations of adult education.…

  10. Transcriptome Analysis Provides Insights into the Mechanisms Underlying Wheat Plant Resistance to Stripe Rust at the Adult Plant Stage.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yingbin; Wang, Ting; Wang, Kang; Wang, Xiaojie; Fu, Yanping; Huang, Lili; Kang, Zhensheng

    2016-01-01

    Stripe rust (or yellow rust), which is caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), is one of the most devastating wheat diseases worldwide. The wheat cultivar Xingzi 9104 (XZ) is an elite wheat germplasm that possesses adult plant resistance (APR), which is non-race-specific and durable. Thus, to better understand the mechanism underlying APR, we performed transcriptome sequencing of wheat seedlings and adult plants without Pst infection, and a total of 157,689 unigenes were obtained as a reference. In total, 2,666, 783 and 2,587 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were found to be up- or down-regulated after Pst infection at 24, 48 and 120 hours post-inoculation (hpi), respectively, based on a comparison of Pst- and mock-infected plants. Among these unigenes, the temporal pattern of the up-regulated unigenes exhibited transient expression patterns during Pst infection, as determined through a Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis. In addition, a Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis showed that many biological processes, including phenylpropanoid biosynthesis, reactive oxygen species, photosynthesis and thiamine metabolism, which mainly control the mechanisms of lignification, reactive oxygen species and sugar, respectively, are involved in APR. In particular, the continuous accumulation of reactive oxygen species may potentially contribute to the ability of the adult plant to inhibit fungal growth and development. To validate the bioinformatics results, 6 candidate genes were selected for further functional identification using the virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) system, and 4 candidate genes likely contribute to plant resistance against Pst infection. Our study provides new information concerning the transcriptional changes that occur during the Pst-wheat interaction at the adult stage and will help further our understanding of the detailed mechanisms underlying APR to Pst.

  11. Transcriptome Analysis Provides Insights into the Mechanisms Underlying Wheat Plant Resistance to Stripe Rust at the Adult Plant Stage

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Yingbin; Wang, Ting; Wang, Kang; Wang, Xiaojie; Fu, Yanping; Huang, Lili; Kang, Zhensheng

    2016-01-01

    Stripe rust (or yellow rust), which is caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), is one of the most devastating wheat diseases worldwide. The wheat cultivar Xingzi 9104 (XZ) is an elite wheat germplasm that possesses adult plant resistance (APR), which is non–race-specific and durable. Thus, to better understand the mechanism underlying APR, we performed transcriptome sequencing of wheat seedlings and adult plants without Pst infection, and a total of 157,689 unigenes were obtained as a reference. In total, 2,666, 783 and 2,587 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were found to be up- or down-regulated after Pst infection at 24, 48 and 120 hours post-inoculation (hpi), respectively, based on a comparison of Pst- and mock-infected plants. Among these unigenes, the temporal pattern of the up-regulated unigenes exhibited transient expression patterns during Pst infection, as determined through a Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis. In addition, a Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis showed that many biological processes, including phenylpropanoid biosynthesis, reactive oxygen species, photosynthesis and thiamine metabolism, which mainly control the mechanisms of lignification, reactive oxygen species and sugar, respectively, are involved in APR. In particular, the continuous accumulation of reactive oxygen species may potentially contribute to the ability of the adult plant to inhibit fungal growth and development. To validate the bioinformatics results, 6 candidate genes were selected for further functional identification using the virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) system, and 4 candidate genes likely contribute to plant resistance against Pst infection. Our study provides new information concerning the transcriptional changes that occur during the Pst-wheat interaction at the adult stage and will help further our understanding of the detailed mechanisms underlying APR to Pst. PMID:26991894

  12. Transcriptome Analysis Provides Insights into the Mechanisms Underlying Wheat Plant Resistance to Stripe Rust at the Adult Plant Stage.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yingbin; Wang, Ting; Wang, Kang; Wang, Xiaojie; Fu, Yanping; Huang, Lili; Kang, Zhensheng

    2016-01-01

    Stripe rust (or yellow rust), which is caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), is one of the most devastating wheat diseases worldwide. The wheat cultivar Xingzi 9104 (XZ) is an elite wheat germplasm that possesses adult plant resistance (APR), which is non-race-specific and durable. Thus, to better understand the mechanism underlying APR, we performed transcriptome sequencing of wheat seedlings and adult plants without Pst infection, and a total of 157,689 unigenes were obtained as a reference. In total, 2,666, 783 and 2,587 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were found to be up- or down-regulated after Pst infection at 24, 48 and 120 hours post-inoculation (hpi), respectively, based on a comparison of Pst- and mock-infected plants. Among these unigenes, the temporal pattern of the up-regulated unigenes exhibited transient expression patterns during Pst infection, as determined through a Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis. In addition, a Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis showed that many biological processes, including phenylpropanoid biosynthesis, reactive oxygen species, photosynthesis and thiamine metabolism, which mainly control the mechanisms of lignification, reactive oxygen species and sugar, respectively, are involved in APR. In particular, the continuous accumulation of reactive oxygen species may potentially contribute to the ability of the adult plant to inhibit fungal growth and development. To validate the bioinformatics results, 6 candidate genes were selected for further functional identification using the virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) system, and 4 candidate genes likely contribute to plant resistance against Pst infection. Our study provides new information concerning the transcriptional changes that occur during the Pst-wheat interaction at the adult stage and will help further our understanding of the detailed mechanisms underlying APR to Pst. PMID:26991894

  13. Identification of Yr59 conferring high-temperature adult-plant resistance to stripe rust in wheat germplasm PI 178759

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, is one of the most widespread and destructive wheat diseases worldwide. Resistant cultivars are the preferred means of control. The spring wheat germplasm ‘PI 178759’ originating from Iraq showed effective resistance to stripe rust in fie...

  14. Women as Learners: The Significance of Gender in Adult Learning. The Jossey-Bass Higher and Adult Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Elisabeth; Flannery, Daniele D.

    This book is intended to address the need for information and understanding about adult women's learning and education. It gathers knowledge about women and their learning and places women's learning experiences in the contexts of where women live. The book also promotes an understanding of women's diversity and makes recommendations for future…

  15. QTL mapping of adult-plant resistance to stripe rust in a population derived from common wheat cultivars Naxos and Shanghai 3/Catbird.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yan; He, Zhonghu; Li, Jia; Lillemo, Morten; Wu, Ling; Bai, Bin; Lu, Qiongxian; Zhu, Huazhong; Zhou, Gang; Du, Jiuyuan; Lu, Qinglin; Xia, Xianchun

    2012-10-01

    Stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis Westend. f. sp. tritici Erikss., is a severe foliar disease of common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) worldwide. Use of adult-plant resistance (APR) is an efficient approach to provide long-term protection of crops from the disease. The German spring wheat cultivar Naxos showed a high level of APR to stripe rust in the field. To identify the APR genes in this cultivar, a mapping population of 166 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) was developed from a cross between Naxos and Shanghai 3/Catbird (SHA3/CBRD), a moderately susceptible line developed by CIMMYT. The RILs were evaluated for maximum disease severity (MDS) in Sichuan and Gansu in the 2009-2010 and 2010-2011 cropping seasons. Composite interval mapping (CIM) identified four QTL, QYr.caas-1BL.1RS, QYr.caas-1DS, QYr.caas-5BL.3 and QYr.caas-7BL.1, conferring stable resistance to stripe rust across all environments, each explaining 1.9-27.6, 2.1-5.8, 2.5-7.8 and 3.7-9.1 % of the phenotypic variance, respectively. QYr.caas-1DS flanked by molecular markers XUgwm353-Xgdm33b was likely a new QTL for APR to stripe rust. Because the interval between flanking markers for each QTL was less than 6.5 cM, these QTL and their closely linked markers are potentially useful for improving resistance to stripe rust in wheat breeding.

  16. Genome-Wide Linkage Mapping of QTL for Adult-Plant Resistance to Stripe Rust in a Chinese Wheat Population Linmai 2 × Zhong 892.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jindong; He, Zhonghu; Wu, Ling; Bai, Bin; Wen, Weie; Xie, Chaojie; Xia, Xianchun

    2015-01-01

    Stripe rust is one of the most devastating diseases of wheat (Triticum aestivum) worldwide. Adult-plant resistance (APR) is an efficient approach to provide long-term protection of wheat from the disease. The Chinese winter wheat cultivar Zhong 892 has a moderate level of APR to stripe rust in the field. To determine the inheritance of the APR resistance in this cultivar, 273 F6 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) were developed from a cross between Linmai 2 and Zhong 892. The RILs were evaluated for maximum disease severity (MDS) in two sites during the 2011-2012, 2012-2013 and 2013-2014 cropping seasons, providing data for five environments. Illumina 90k SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) chips were used to genotype the RILs and their parents. Composite interval mapping (CIM) detected eight QTL, namely QYr.caas-2AL, QYr.caas-2BL.3, QYr.caas-3AS, QYr.caas-3BS, QYr.caas-5DL, QYr.caas-6AL, QYr.caas-7AL and QYr.caas-7DS.1, respectively. All except QYr.caas-2BL.3 resistance alleles were contributed by Zhong 892. QYr.caas-3AS and QYr.caas-3BS conferred stable resistance to stripe rust in all environments, explaining 6.2-17.4% and 5.0-11.5% of the phenotypic variances, respectively. The genome scan of SNP sequences tightly linked to QTL for APR against annotated proteins in wheat and related cereals genomes identified two candidate genes (autophagy-related gene and disease resistance gene RGA1), significantly associated with stripe rust resistance. These QTL and their closely linked SNP markers, in combination with kompetitive allele specific PCR (KASP) technology, are potentially useful for improving stripe rust resistances in wheat breeding.

  17. Genome-Wide Linkage Mapping of QTL for Adult-Plant Resistance to Stripe Rust in a Chinese Wheat Population Linmai 2 × Zhong 892.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jindong; He, Zhonghu; Wu, Ling; Bai, Bin; Wen, Weie; Xie, Chaojie; Xia, Xianchun

    2015-01-01

    Stripe rust is one of the most devastating diseases of wheat (Triticum aestivum) worldwide. Adult-plant resistance (APR) is an efficient approach to provide long-term protection of wheat from the disease. The Chinese winter wheat cultivar Zhong 892 has a moderate level of APR to stripe rust in the field. To determine the inheritance of the APR resistance in this cultivar, 273 F6 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) were developed from a cross between Linmai 2 and Zhong 892. The RILs were evaluated for maximum disease severity (MDS) in two sites during the 2011-2012, 2012-2013 and 2013-2014 cropping seasons, providing data for five environments. Illumina 90k SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) chips were used to genotype the RILs and their parents. Composite interval mapping (CIM) detected eight QTL, namely QYr.caas-2AL, QYr.caas-2BL.3, QYr.caas-3AS, QYr.caas-3BS, QYr.caas-5DL, QYr.caas-6AL, QYr.caas-7AL and QYr.caas-7DS.1, respectively. All except QYr.caas-2BL.3 resistance alleles were contributed by Zhong 892. QYr.caas-3AS and QYr.caas-3BS conferred stable resistance to stripe rust in all environments, explaining 6.2-17.4% and 5.0-11.5% of the phenotypic variances, respectively. The genome scan of SNP sequences tightly linked to QTL for APR against annotated proteins in wheat and related cereals genomes identified two candidate genes (autophagy-related gene and disease resistance gene RGA1), significantly associated with stripe rust resistance. These QTL and their closely linked SNP markers, in combination with kompetitive allele specific PCR (KASP) technology, are potentially useful for improving stripe rust resistances in wheat breeding. PMID:26714310

  18. Characterization and molecular mapping of Yr52 for high-temperature adult-plant resistance to stripe rust in spring wheat germplasm PI 183527.

    PubMed

    Ren, R S; Wang, M N; Chen, X M; Zhang, Z J

    2012-09-01

    Stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, is one of the most destructive diseases of wheat worldwide. Resistance is the best approach to control the disease. High-temperature adult-plant (HTAP) stripe rust resistance has proven to be race non-specific and durable. However, genes conferring high-levels of HTAP resistance are limited in number and new genes are urgently needed for breeding programs to develop cultivars with durable high-level resistance to stripe rust. Spring wheat germplasm PI 183527 showed a high-level of HTAP resistance against stripe rust in our germplasm evaluations over several years. To elucidate the genetic basis of resistance, we crossed PI 183527 and susceptible wheat line Avocet S. Adult plants of parents, F(1), F(2) and F(2:3) progeny were tested with selected races under the controlled greenhouse conditions and in fields under natural infection. PI 183527 has a single dominant gene conferring HTAP resistance. Resistance gene analog polymorphism (RGAP) and simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers in combination with bulked segregant analysis (BSA) were used to identify markers linked to the resistance gene. A linkage map consisting of 4 RGAP and 7 SSR markers was constructed for the resistance gene using data from 175 F(2) plants and their derived F(2:3) lines. Amplification of nulli-tetrasomic, ditelosomic and deletion lines of Chinese Spring with three RGAP markers mapped the gene to the distal region (0.86-1.0) of chromosome 7BL. The molecular map spanned a genetic distance of 27.3 cM, and the resistance gene was narrowed to a 2.3-cM interval flanked by markers Xbarc182 and Xwgp5258. The polymorphism rates of the flanking markers in 74 wheat lines were 74 and 30 %, respectively; and the two markers in combination could distinguish the alleles at the resistance locus in 82 % of tested genotypes. To determine the genetic relationship between this resistance gene and Yr39, a gene also on 7BL conferring HTAP resistance in

  19. Identifying QTL for high-temperature adult-plant resistance to stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici) in the spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivar ‘Louise’

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Over time, many single, all-stage resistance genes to stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici) in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) are circumvented by race changes in the pathogen. In contrast, high-temperature, adult-plant resistance (HTAP), which only is expressed during the adult-plant stag...

  20. Cloning and sequencing hybrid striped bass (Morone saxatilis x M. chrysops) transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), and development of a reverse transcription quantitative competitive polymerase chain reaction (RT-qcPCR) assay to measure TGF-beta mRNA of teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Harms, C A; Kennedy-Stoskopf, S; Horne, W A; Fuller, F J; Tompkins, W A

    2000-01-01

    A transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta was isolated and cloned from hybrid striped bass (Morone saxatilis x M. chrysops) anterior kidney mononuclear cells. This isolate (Genbank accession number AF140363) contains an open reading frame of 1146 bases coding for a 382 amino acid protein most similar to rainbow trout TGF-beta (57.3 and 78.6% identity with precursor and active protein, respectively) and rat TGF-beta 1 (41.1 and 68.8% identity with precursor and active protein, respectively). Consensus primers were demonstrated to amplify specifically by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), a TGF-beta segment from 14 species of teleost fish comprising 10 taxonomic families in 7 orders. A reverse transcription quantitative competitive polymerase chain reaction (RT-qcPCR) assay was devised to measure TGF-beta mRNA expression in teleost fish. Higher levels of TGF-beta mRNA expression were detected in mononuclear cells of peripheral blood than from spleen or anterior kidney.

  1. Holographic stripes.

    PubMed

    Rozali, Moshe; Smyth, Darren; Sorkin, Evgeny; Stang, Jared B

    2013-05-17

    We construct inhomogeneous asymptotically anti-de Sitter black hole solutions corresponding to the spontaneous breaking of translational invariance and the formation of striped order in the boundary field theory. We find that the system undergoes a second-order phase transition in both the fixed density and fixed chemical potential ensembles, for sufficiently large values of the axion coupling. We investigate the phase structure as a function of the temperature, axion coupling, and the stripe width. The bulk solutions have striking geometrical features related to a magnetoelectric effect associated with the existence of a near-horizon topological insulator. At low temperatures, the horizon becomes highly inhomogeneous and tends to pinch off. PMID:25167395

  2. Monodehydroascorbate reductase gene, regulated by the wheat PN-2013 miRNA, contributes to adult wheat plant resistance to stripe rust through ROS metabolism.

    PubMed

    Feng, Hao; Wang, Xiaojie; Zhang, Qiong; Fu, Yanping; Feng, Chuanxin; Wang, Bing; Huang, Lili; Kang, Zhensheng

    2014-01-01

    Wheat stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), is one of the most destructive wheat diseases worldwide. Varieties with adult plant resistance (APR) maintain effective and durable disease resistance. APR to stripe rust in wheat cultivar XZ9104 (XZ) is associated with extensive hypersensitive cell death and production of reactive oxygen species in the host. MDHAR is an important gene in the AsA-GSH cycle, and it plays an important role in maintaining the reduced pool of AsA scavenging hydrogen peroxide. microRNAs (miRNAs) were shown to engage in post-transcriptional regulation by degrading target mRNAs or repressing gene translation in plants responding to abiotic/biotic stresses. Previously, two novel miRNAs (1136-P3 and PN-2013) were isolated in wheat and the target gene of them was determined using degradome sequencing technology. In this study, the target gene was isolated and characterized as TaMDHAR, a monodehydroascorbate reductase gene. We first demonstrated that the target gene could be cleaved by these two miRNAs in tobacco leaves experimentally. However, TaMDHAR was regulated by PN-2013, not 1136-P3, in wheat-Pst adult incompatible interaction according to the expression patterns. The TaMDHAR knockdown resulted in improved wheat resistance to Pst at the seedling stage, with no influence on 1136-P3 and PN-2013 expression. The TaMDHAR knockdown resulted in a much greater H2O2 accumulation and lower APX and CAT activities together with higher expression in several PR genes. We deduced that TaMDHAR could contribute to the APR of XZ through ROS metabolism as regulated by the AsA-GSH cycle.

  3. Quantitative trait loci for non-race-specific, high-temperature adult-plant resistance to stripe rust in wheat cultivar Express.

    PubMed

    Lin, F; Chen, X M

    2009-02-01

    Wheat cultivar Express has durable, high-temperature adult-plant (HTAP) resistance to stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici). To elucidate the genetic basis of the resistance, Express was crossed with 'Avocet Susceptible' (AVS). A mapping population of 146 F(5) recombinant inbred lines (RILs) was developed using single-seed descent. The RILs were evaluated at two sites near Pullman in eastern Washington and one site near Mount Vernon in western Washington in 2005, and were evaluated near Pullman in 2006 under natural stripe rust infection of predominant races virulent on seedlings of Express. Infection type (IT) and disease severity (DS) were recorded three times for each line during each growing season. The DS data were used to calculate relative area under the disease progress curve (rAUDPC) values. Both IT and rAUDPC data showed continuous distributions, indicating that the Express HTAP resistance was controlled by quantitative trait loci (QTL). Resistance gene analog polymorphism (RGAP) and simple sequence repeat (SSR) techniques were used to map the HTAP resistance QTL. Three QTL were detected with significant additive effects, explaining 49.5-69.6% of the phenotypic variation for rAUDPC. Two of the QTL explained 30.8-42.7% of the phenotypic variation for IT. The three QTL were mapped to wheat chromosomes 6AS, 3BL and 1BL, and were designated as QYrex.wgp-6AS, QYrex.wgp-3BL and QYrex.wgp-1BL, respectively. QYrex.wgp-6AS and QYrex.wgp-3BL, which had higher effects than QYrex.wgp-1BL, were different from previously reported QTL/genes for adult-plant resistance. Markers Xgwm334-Xwgp56 and Xgwm299-Xwgp66 flanking the two major QTL were highly polymorphic in various wheat genotypes, suggesting that these markers are useful in marker-assisted selection.

  4. Evaluation of growth, nutrient retention, health, and resistance to bacterial challenge in sunshine bass fed diets with new varieties of non-genetically modified soybeans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluated the effects of meals made from new strains of soybeans with high protein and reduced anti-nutritional factors (ANFs) on hybrid striped bass ("Sunshine bass", Morone chrysops x M. saxatilis) nutrient availability, growth rates, nutrient retention, gut histology, non-specific immune respo...

  5. Striped tape arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drapeau, Ann L.; Katz, Randy H.

    1992-01-01

    A growing number of applications require high capacity, high throughput tertiary storage systems. How data striping ideas apply to arrays of magnetic tape drives is investigated. Data striping increases throughput and reduces response time for large accesses to a storage system. Striped magnetic tape systems are particularly appealing because many inexpensive magnetic tape drives have low bandwidth; striping may offer dramatic performance improvements for these systems. There are several important issues in designing striped tape systems: the choice of tape drives and robots, whether to stripe within or between robots, and the choice of the best scheme for distributing data on cartridges. One of the most troublesome problems in striped tape arrays is the synchronization of transfers across tape drives. Another issue is how improved devices will affect the desirability of striping in the future. The results of simulations comparing the performance of striped tape systems to non-striped systems are presented.

  6. Identification and mapping QTL for high-temperature adult-plant resistance to stripe rust in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivar 'Stephens'.

    PubMed

    Santra, D K; Chen, X M; Santra, M; Campbell, K G; Kidwell, K K

    2008-09-01

    High-temperature adult-plant (HTAP) resistance from the winter wheat (Triticum aestivum) cultivar 'Stephens' has protected wheat crops from stripe rust caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici for 30 years. The objectives of this study were to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) for HTAP resistance in Stephens through genetic linkage analysis and identify DNA markers linked to the QTL for use in marker-assisted breeding. Mapping populations consisted of 101 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) through single-seed descent from 'Stephens' (resistant) x 'Michigan Amber' (susceptible). F(5), F(6) and F(7) RILs were evaluated for stripe rust resistance at Pullman, WA in 1996, 1997 and 1998, respectively, whereas F(8) RILs were evaluated at Mt Vernon, WA, USA in 2005. The 101 F(8) RILs were evaluated with 250 resistance gene analog polymorphism (RGAP), 245 simple sequence repeat (SSR) and 1 sequence tagged site (STS) markers for genetic linkage map construction. Two QTL, which explained 48-61% of the total phenotypic variation of the HTAP resistance in Stephens, were identified. QYrst.wgp-6BS.1 was within a 3.9-cM region flanked by Xbarc101 and Xbarc136. QYrst.wgp-6BS.2 was mapped in a 17.5-cM region flanked by Xgwm132 and Xgdm113. Both two QTL were physically mapped to the short arm of chromosome 6B, but in different bins. Validation and polymorphism tests of the flanking markers in 43 wheat genotypes indicated that the molecular markers associated with these QTL should be useful in marker-assisted breeding programs to efficiently incorporate HTAP resistance into new wheat cultivars.

  7. An introgression on wheat chromosome 4DL in RL6077 (Thatcher*6/PI 250413) confers adult plant resistance to stripe rust and leaf rust (Lr67).

    PubMed

    Hiebert, Colin W; Thomas, Julian B; McCallum, Brent D; Humphreys, D Gavin; DePauw, Ronald M; Hayden, Matthew J; Mago, Rohit; Schnippenkoetter, Wendelin; Spielmeyer, Wolfgang

    2010-10-01

    Adult plant resistance (APR) to leaf rust and stripe rust derived from the wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) line PI250413 was previously identified in RL6077 (=Thatcher*6/PI250413). The leaf rust resistance gene in RL6077 is phenotypically similar to Lr34 which is located on chromosome 7D. It was previously hypothesized that the gene in RL6077 could be Lr34 translocated to another chromosome. Hybrids between RL6077 and Thatcher and between RL6077 and 7DS and 7DL ditelocentric stocks were examined for first meiotic metaphase pairing. RL6077 formed chain quadrivalents and trivalents relative to Thatcher and Chinese Spring; however both 7D telocentrics paired only as heteromorphic bivalents and never with the multivalents. Thus, chromosome 7D is not involved in any translocation carried by RL6077. A genome-wide scan of SSR markers detected an introgression from chromosome 4D of PI250413 transferred to RL6077 through five cycles of backcrossing to Thatcher. Haplotype analysis of lines from crosses of Thatcher × RL6077 and RL6058 (Thatcher*6/PI58548) × RL6077 showed highly significant associations between introgressed markers (including SSR marker cfd71) and leaf rust resistance. In a separate RL6077-derived population, APR to stripe rust was also tightly linked with cfd71 on chromosome 4DL. An allele survey of linked SSR markers cfd71 and cfd23 on a set of 247 wheat lines from diverse origins indicated that these markers can be used to select for the donor segment in most wheat backgrounds. Comparison of RL6077 with Thatcher in field trials showed no effect of the APR gene on important agronomic or quality traits. Since no other known Lr genes exist on chromosome 4DL, the APR gene in RL6077 has been assigned the name Lr67.

  8. Characterization of two adult-plant stripe rust resistance genes on chromosomes 3BS and 4BL in soft red winter wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, is an important foliar disease of soft red winter wheat (SRWW) in the eastern U.S. However, very few resistance genes have been characterized in the SRWW germplasm pool. The SRWW line VA96W-270 is known to be resistant to stripe rust race P...

  9. Planning Programs for Adult Learners: A Practical Guide for Educators, Trainers, and Staff Developers. Second Edition. The Jossey-Bass Higher and Adult Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caffarella, Rosemary S.

    This how-to guide and resource book is designed to help in planning educational and training programs for adults in settings from the corporate sector to educational organizations. Chapters 1-3 lay the groundwork for the rest of the guide by introducing the 12-component Interactive Model of Program Planning. Chapter 1 describes adult programs and…

  10. Learning To Listen, Learning To Teach: The Power of Dialogue in Educating Adults. Revised Edition. The Jossey-Bass Higher and Adult Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vella, Jane

    This book, based on the work of a teacher and community development expert with many years of teaching adult education in numerous developing countries all over the world, provides a process for teaching and learning with adults. The book is illustrated with stories from the author's experience and examples that show how to begin, set up, carry…

  11. Adult Education in the American Experience from the Colonial Period to the Present. The Jossey-Bass Higher and Adult Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stubblefield, Harold W.; Keane, Patrick

    This book offers a comprehensive history of adult education in the United States from the colonial period to the present day. Chapter 1 discusses definitions of adult education and explores formative influences. Chapters 2-3 on the colonial and post-Revolutionary periods trace an Atlantic information network, rise of a literate culture, Puritan…

  12. Hierarchical Bass model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tashiro, Tohru

    2014-03-01

    We propose a new model about diffusion of a product which includes a memory of how many adopters or advertisements a non-adopter met, where (non-)adopters mean people (not) possessing the product. This effect is lacking in the Bass model. As an application, we utilize the model to fit the iPod sales data, and so the better agreement is obtained than the Bass model.

  13. An epizootic of Edwardsiella tarda in largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides).

    PubMed

    Francis-Floyd, R; Reed, P; Bolon, B; Estes, J; McKinney, S

    1993-04-01

    Edwardsiella tarda, an opportunistic bacterial pathogen, was isolated from dying largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) during an epizootic in a eutrophic lake system, Lochloosa Lake, Florida, USA. Approximately 1,500 adult fish died over a 6-wk period during the late summer and early fall of 1991. A mixed population of aerobic bacteria (E. tarda, Aeromonas hydrophila, and Pseudomonas sp.) was isolated from deep cutaneous ulcers and intestines of moribund bass. However, E. tarda in pure culture was the only bacterium isolated from several viscera of several fish; E. tarda may be the etiologic agent responsible for some episodes of seasonal mortality in largemouth bass.

  14. The Importance of Bass Ensemble.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bitz, Michael

    1997-01-01

    States that bass players should be allowed to play chamber music because it is an essential component to all string students' musical development. Expounds that bassists can successfully enjoy chamber music through participation in a bass ensemble. Gives suggestions on how to form a bass ensemble and on the repertoire of music. (CMK)

  15. Power in Practice: Adult Education and the Struggle for Knowledge and Power in Society. The Jossey-Bass Higher and Adult Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cervero, Ronald M.; Wilson, Arthur L.

    This book contains 14 papers on adult education and the struggle for knowledge and power in society. The following papers are included: "At the Heart of Practice: The Struggle for Knowledge and Power" (Ronald M. Cervero, Arthur L. Wilson); "The Power of Economic Globalization: Deskilling Immigrant Women through Training" (Shahrzad Mojab); "Silent…

  16. Planning Programs for Adult Learners: A Practical Guide for Educators, Trainers, and Staff Developers. The Jossey-Bass Higher and Adult Education Series. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caffarella, Rosemary S.

    This guide for developing programs for adult learners is called "interactive" because it involves cooperation among planners, organizational sponsors, and program participants. The following are among the topics covered in the guide's 14 chapters: understanding the program planning enterprise (who plans programs and how); using the interactive…

  17. Production of hybrid striped bass stockers in a biofloc system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High yields can be obtained from an outdoor biofloc technology (BFT) production system in response to high stocking and feeding rates because a complex of living organisms, including phytoplankton and bacteria, closely associated with particulate organic matter that is maintained in suspension in th...

  18. Minimizing use of fish meal in sunshine bass diets using standard and new varieties of non-genetically modified soybeans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improved plant ingredients are needed to support sustainable culture of carnivorous fish, such as hybrid striped bass (HSB). We are evaluating meals made from new strains of non-genetically-modified soybeans (non-GMO) with high protein and reduced anti-nutritional factors (ANFs) on HSB nutrient dige...

  19. Identification and mapping of adult plant stripe rust resistance in soft red winter wheat VA00W-38, Pioneer brand 26R46, and Coker 9553

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since 2000, many of the previously effective wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) seedling stripe rust (pathogen Puccinia striiformis Westend. f.sp. tritici Eriks) resistance genes have become ineffective to the new more aggressive races of the pathogen. Because seedling resistance genes work on a gene for...

  20. Expression of high-temperature adult-plant (HTAP) resistance against stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici) in wheat landraces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, Pst) is an important disease of wheat in the United States and Pakistan. Genetic resistance in wheat is a cost-effective and convenient control measure. In the present study, resistance testing of 115 wheat landraces from Pakistan was carried out ini...

  1. Hybridization between introduced spotted bass and smallmouth bass in reservoirs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pierce, P.C.; Van Den Avyle, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    Introductions of black basses Micropterus spp. beyond their native ranges have led to hybridization within the genus. In the southeastern USA, the potential for hybridization appears high because species introductions have been common in reservoirs. We determined the extent of hybridization between smallmouth bass M. dolomieu and spotted bass M. punctulatus in reservoirs in which introductions of either species into the native range of the other species had occurred. Three allozyme loci were used to distinguish the two species and their hybrids. Significant hybridization occurred in two of three reservoirs where introductions had been reported. In Lake Chatuge, Georgia-North Carolina, where the Alabama subspecies of spotted bass M.p. henshalli was introduced, 77 of 276 fish had hybrid genotypes, and only 2 fish had genotypes of the native smallmouth bass. In Thurlow Reservoir, Alabama, where smallmouth bass were introduced and Alabama spotted bass were native, 3 of 17 fish had hybrid genotypes. Only I fish with a possible hybrid genotype was identified in two reservoirs containing native smallmouth bass and northern spotted bass M.p. punctulatus.

  2. Cardiac tamponade in largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides).

    PubMed

    Petty, Barbara D; Terrell, Scott P

    2011-06-01

    A public aquarium with a 4-mo history of occasional fish mortalities submitted for necropsy an adult female largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) that died unexpectedly. Gross necropsy revealed that the pericardial cavity was markedly distended with partially coagulated blood. Examination of the heart revealed multiple nodular masses in the area of the atrium and two small perforations on the surface of one of the nodular masses. Histopathologic exam of the atrium revealed severe fibrinonecrotic endocarditis and transmural myocarditis with intralesional bacteria. A pure culture of Edwardsiella tarda was obtained from culture of posterior kidney and spleen. An area of stagnant water that may serve as the source of E. tarda was identified, and steps to rectify this problem were taken. Low-level supersaturation was also a significant stressor; the source of the supersaturation was not identified. To our knowledge, this is the first report of cardiac tamponade in a largemouth bass.

  3. Effects of variation in streamflow and channel structure on smallmouth bass habitat in an alluvial stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jason, Remshardt W.; Fisher, W.L.

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of streamflow-related changes in channel shape and morphology on the quality, quantity, availability and spatial distribution of young-of-year and adult smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieu habitat in an alluvial stream, the Baron Fork of the Illinois River, Oklahoma. We developed Habitat Suitability Criteria (HSC) for young-of-year and adult smallmouth bass to assess changes in available smallmouth bass habitat between years, and compare predicted smallmouth bass Weighted Usable Area (WUA) with observed WUA measured the following year. Following flood events between 1999 and 2000, including a record flood, changes in transect cross-sectional area ranged from 62.5% to 93.5% and channel mesohabitat overlap ranged from 29.5% to 67.0% in study three study reaches. Using Physical HABitat SIMulation (PHABSIM) system analysis, we found that both young-of-year and adult smallmouth bass habitat were differentially affected by intra- and inter-annual streamflow fluctuations. Maximum WUA for young-of-year and adults occurred at streamflows of 1.8 and 2.3m3 s-1, respectively, and WUA declined sharply for both groups at lower streamflows. For most microhabitat variables, habitat availability was similar between years. Habitat suitability criteria developed in 1999 corresponded well with observed fish locations in 2000 for adult smallmouth bass but not for young-of-year fish. Our findings suggest that annual variation in habitat availability affects the predictive ability of habitat models for young-of-year smallmouth bass more than for adult smallmouth bass. Furthermore, our results showed that despite the dynamic nature of the gravel-dominated, alluvial Baron Fork, HSC for smallmouth bass were consistent and transferable between years.

  4. The function of zebra stripes.

    PubMed

    Caro, Tim; Izzo, Amanda; Reiner, Robert C; Walker, Hannah; Stankowich, Theodore

    2014-04-01

    Despite over a century of interest, the function of zebra stripes has never been examined systematically. Here we match variation in striping of equid species and subspecies to geographic range overlap of environmental variables in multifactor models controlling for phylogeny to simultaneously test the five major explanations for this infamous colouration. For subspecies, there are significant associations between our proxy for tabanid biting fly annoyance and most striping measures (facial and neck stripe number, flank and rump striping, leg stripe intensity and shadow striping), and between belly stripe number and tsetse fly distribution, several of which are replicated at the species level. Conversely, there is no consistent support for camouflage, predator avoidance, heat management or social interaction hypotheses. Susceptibility to ectoparasite attack is discussed in relation to short coat hair, disease transmission and blood loss. A solution to the riddle of zebra stripes, discussed by Wallace and Darwin, is at hand.

  5. Chronic exogenous kisspeptin administration accelerates gonadal development in basses of the genus Morone.

    PubMed

    Beck, Benjamin H; Fuller, S Adam; Peatman, Eric; McEntire, Matthew E; Darwish, Ahmed; Freeman, Donald W

    2012-07-01

    The present study assesses the effects of chronic administration of peptides to fish, termed kisspeptins, which are the products of the KISS1 and KISS2 genes, and have been shown to control the development of puberty in animals. Using ecologically and commercially important species (white bass, Morone chrysops, striped bass, Morone saxatilis, and their hybrid) as comparative models, we determined that repeated bi-weekly injections (over 7 weeks) differentially accelerate puberty, as evidenced by increases in the prevalence of spermatozoa in the testes of juvenile fish. Moreover, in sexually mature fish, kisspeptin treatment led to increased gonad weight, gonadosomatic index, and spermatocrit in some white and striped bass. Additionally, mature white bass treated with kisspeptins showed an advancement in oocyte development as determined by histological examination. These gonadal changes occurred in the absence of any photothermal manipulation or hormone injections. To date, this is the first description of kisspeptin-mediated pubertal initiation in fish, and the first evidence that kisspeptins could modulate gonad maturation. Although it remains to be determined how kisspeptins may best be utilized in practice, our findings are a basis for future studies to characterize the molecular underpinnings of the KISS system in various fish species. PMID:22497780

  6. Stripe sensor tomography.

    PubMed

    Barbic, Mladen; Vltava, Lvcian; Barrett, Christopher P; Emery, Teresa H; Scherer, Axel

    2008-03-01

    We introduce a general concept of tomographic imaging for the case of an imaging sensor that has a stripelike shape. We first show that there is no difference, in principle, between two-dimensional tomography using conventional electromagnetic or particle radiation and tomography where a stripe sensor is mechanically scanned over a sample at a sequence of different angles. For a single stripe detector imaging, linear motion and angular rotation are required. We experimentally demonstrate single stripe sensor imaging principle using an elongated inductive coil detector. By utilizing an array of parallel stripe sensors that can be individually addressed, two-dimensional imaging can be performed with rotation only, eliminating the requirement for linear motion, as we also experimentally demonstrate with parallel coil array. We conclude that imaging with a stripe-type sensor of particular width and thickness (where the width is much larger than the thickness) is resolution limited only by the thickness (smaller parameter) of the sensor. We give examples of multiple sensor families where this imaging technique may be beneficial such as magnetoresistive, inductive, superconducting quantum interference device, and Hall effect sensors, and, in particular, discuss the possibilities of the technique in the field of magnetic resonance imaging.

  7. Tamper resistant magnetic stripes

    DOEpatents

    Naylor, Richard Brian; Sharp, Donald J.

    1999-01-01

    This invention relates to a magnetic stripe comprising a medium in which magnetized particles are suspended and in which the encoded information is recorded by actual physical rotation or alignment of the previously magnetized particles within the flux reversals of the stripe which are 180.degree. opposed in their magnetic polarity. The magnetized particles are suspended in a medium which is solid, or physically rigid, at ambient temperatures but which at moderately elevated temperatures, such as 40.degree. C., is thinable to a viscosity permissive of rotation of the particles therein under applications of moderate external magnetic field strengths within acceptable time limits.

  8. Tessellation of a stripe.

    PubMed

    Garstecki, Piotr; Whitesides, George M

    2006-03-01

    This paper describes enumeration of a class of topologically distinct periodic divisions of a stripe. Optimization of the geometry of these periodic tilings--optimization that yields minimum total perimeter of the tiles--gives a set of physically plausible periodic structures of monodisperse, two-dimensional foams bounded by two parallel walls. Evaluation of the minimum total perimeters of the lattices that we enumerated suggests two possible lower bounds for the mean perimeter of tiles forming periodic coverings of a stripe. PMID:16605533

  9. Mercury accumulation in largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) in a Florida lake.

    PubMed

    Lange, T R; Royals, H E; Connor, L L

    1994-11-01

    Rates of mercury accumulation were examined in male and female largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) from Lake Tohopekaliga, Florida, to establish methods for fish consumption advisories for the protection of human health. In addition, concentrations were determined in five lower trophic level fish species. Total mercury concentrations in adult largemouth bass muscle tissue ranged from 0.16 to 1.10 micrograms/g (fresh weight) and increased as fish increased in size and age. Whole-body mercury concentrations of 1990 year-class largemouth bass increased from 0.05 microgram/g at 20 mm and to 0.32 microgram/g at 320 mm (age 2). Significant differences were found in the rates of accumulation between sexes for length and weight, but not for age. Therefore, standardized mercury concentrations were determined using bass age to make comparisons among sampling dates. Although there were significant differences in adjusted mean mercury concentrations among two sampling dates, mercury content of standard-age bass remained relatively constant over time. Largemouth bass exceed the Florida Health Advisory level for limited consumption of fish (0.50 microgram Hg/g) based on a mean concentration of 0.59 microgram/g for 64 bass. Advisories based on fish morphological characteristics (i.e., length, weight) or age are not possible for Lake Tohopekaliga due to differences in mercury accumulation in male and female bass. Lower trophic level species of sport fish did not exceed the limited consumption level.

  10. Striped holographic superconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Flauger, Raphael; Pajer, Enrico; Papanikolaou, Stefanos

    2011-03-15

    We study inhomogeneous solutions of a 3+1-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell-scalar theory. Our results provide a holographic model of superconductivity in the presence of a charge density wave sourced by a modulated chemical potential. We find that below a critical temperature T{sub c} superconducting stripes develop. We show that they are thermodynamically favored over the normal state by computing the grand canonical potential. We investigate the dependence of T{sub c} on the modulation's wave vector, which characterizes the inhomogeneity. We find that it is qualitatively similar to that expected for a weakly coupled Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieer theory, but we point out a quantitative difference. Finally, we use our solutions to compute the conductivity along the direction of the stripes.

  11. Conjugation of 4-hydroxynonenal by largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) glutathione S-transferases.

    PubMed

    Pham, Robert T; Gardner, James L; Gallagher, Evan P

    2002-01-01

    The glutathione S-transferases (GST) are a major group of conjugative enzymes involved in the detoxification of electrophilic compounds and products of oxidative stress. We have previously described the kinetics of hepatic GST conjugation in largemouth bass using a variety of synthetic GST reference substrates. In the present study, we investigated the ability of largemouth bass hepatic GSTs to conjugate 4-hydroxynon-2-enal (4HNE), a mutagenic and cytotoxic alpha-beta-unsaturated aldehyde produced during oxidative injury. Hepatic cytosolic fractions from largemouth bass rapidly catalyzed GSH-dependent 4HNE conjugation, with the rate of GST-4HNE conjugation in bass liver exceeding those of several other mammalian and aquatic species. No apparent sex-related differences in GST-4HNE activity were observed among adult bass. SDS-PAGE and Western blotting analysis of GSH affinity-purified bass liver cytosolic GST revealed the presence of two major GST subunits of approximately 30 and 27 KDa that exhibited slight cross-reactivity when probed with a rat alpha class GST antibody, but not to rat mu, pi or theta class GST. The rapid conjugation of 4HNE by hepatic GST suggests an important role for GSTs in protecting against peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids in bass liver.

  12. Improving File System Performance by Striping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, Terance L.; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    This document discusses the performance and advantages of striped file systems on the SGI AD workstations. Performance of several striped file system configurations are compared and guidelines for optimal striping are recommended.

  13. A field and laboratory investigation of acid effects on largemouth bass, rock bass, black crappie, and yellow perch

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, J.G.; McCormick, J.H. ); Swenson, W.A. ); Simonson, T.D. ); Jensen, K.M. )

    1992-09-01

    One-half of Little Rock Lake, a small seepage lake in north-central Wisconsin, was gradually acidified by additions of sulfuric acid between August 1983 and November 1990. The ambient pH (6.1) of the lake was reduced at successive 2-year intervals to pH 5.6, 5.1, and 4.7. Responses of largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides, rock bass Ambloplites rupestris, black crappie Pomoxis nigromaculatus, and yellow perch Perca flavescens populations to the pH reductions were recorded and compared to the responses of these species during in situ bioassays and laboratory toxicity tests on embryos and larvae. Laboratory results obtained for largemouth bass and rock bass underestimated, black crappie results overestimated, and yellow perch results were similar to effects observed in field studies. In situ bioassays predicted field responses better than did laboratory toxicity tests. Laboratory results showed that monomeric Al concentrations of approximately 50 [mu]g/L, which were comparable to Al concentrations in the acidified half of the lake, altered low-pH toxicity. Reduced recruitment was observed in field populations at higher pH than that at which adult mortality was observed. The results indicate that laboratory toxicity tests with early life stages may not accurately predict field population responses and that results from laboratory tests should be field-validated whenever possible. 42 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  14. Field and laboratory investigation of acid effects on largemouth bass, rock bass, black crappie, and yellow perch

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, J.G.; Swenson, W.A.; McCormick, J.H.; Simonson, T.D.; Jensen, K.M.

    1992-01-01

    One-half of Little Rock Lake, a small seepage lake in north-central Wisconsin, was gradually acidified by additions of sulfuric acid between August 1983 and November 1990. The ambient pH (6.1) of the lake was reduced at successive 2-year intervals to pH 5.6, 5.1, and 4.7. Responses of largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides, rock bass Ambloplites rupestris, black crappie Pomoxis nigromaculatus, and yellow perch Perca flavescens populations to the pH reductions were recorded and compared to the responses of these species during in situ bioassays and laboratory toxicity tests on embryos and larvae. Laboratory results obtained for largemouth bass and rock bass underestimated, black crappie results overestimated, and yellow perch results were similar to effects observed in field studies. In situ bioassays predicted field responses better than did laboratory toxicity tests. Laboratory results showed that monomeric Al concentrations of approximately 50 microgram/l, which were comparable to Al concentrations in the acidified half of the lake, altered low-pH toxicity. Reduced recruitment was observed in field populations at higher pH than that at which adult mortality was observed. The results indicate that laboratory toxicity tests with early life stages may not accurately predict field population responses and that results from laboratory tests should be field-validated whenever possible.

  15. Distribution and abundance of black bass in Skiatook Lake, Oklahoma, after introduction of smallmouth bass and a liberalized harvest regulation on spotted bass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Long, James M.; Fisher, William L.

    2005-01-01

    We conducted a 3-year study to examine the trends in abundance and distribution of three sympatric black bass species (Micropterus) in an Oklahoma reservoir after implementation of a differential harvest regulation to reduce the abundance of spotted bass M. punctulatus and after stocking nonnative smallmouth bass M. dolomieu. Largemouth bass M. salmoides were stocked in Skiatook Lake, Oklahoma, immediately after its creation in 1984 to supplement the existing population in the watershed. Nonnative smallmouth bass were stocked in 1990, and their abundance and distribution have increased ever since. Native spotted bass, which have less fishery value than the other two black bass species, increased fivefold in abundance in 1994, became the predominant black bass species by at least 1996, and appeared to displace largemouth bass from many habitats. From boat-mounted electrofishing sampling conducted in April and May 1997–1999, we found that spotted bass abundance (proportion and catch per hour) had decreased while smallmouth bass abundance and distribution within the reservoir steadily increased. Largemouth bass abundance did not change among years. Throughout our study period, spotted bass was always the most abundant black bass species where differences in abundance were found. Our results suggest that the continually expanding smallmouth bass population is displacing spotted bass from many of their formerly used habitats, much like spotted bass had displaced largemouth bass by 1996.

  16. LMFBR thermal-striping evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Brunings, J.E.

    1982-10-01

    Thermal striping is defined as the fluctuating temperature field that is imposed on a structure when fluid streams at different temperatures mix in the vicinity of the structure surface. Because of the uncertainty in structural damage in LMFBR structures subject to thermal striping, EPRI has funded an effort for the Rockwell International Energy Systems Group to evaluate this problem. This interim report presents the following information: (1) a Thermal Striping Program Plan which identifies areas of analytic and experimental needs and presents a program of specific tasks to define damage experienced by ordinary materials of construction and to evaluate conservatism in the existing approach; (2) a description of the Thermal Striping Test Facility and its operation; and (3) results from the preliminary phase of testing to characterize the fluid environment to be applied in subsequent thermal striping damage experiments.

  17. Exploding Stars and Stripes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-03-01

    The discovery of a pattern of X-ray "stripes" in the remains of an exploded star may provide the first direct evidence that a cosmic event can accelerate particles to energies a hundred times higher than achieved by the most powerful particle accelerator on Earth. This result comes from a very long observation of the Tycho supernova remnant with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. It could explain how some of the extremely energetic particles bombarding the Earth, called cosmic rays, are produced. "We've seen lots of intriguing structures in supernova remnants, but we've never seen stripes before," said Kristoffer Eriksen, a postdoctoral researcher at Rutgers University who led the study. "This made us think very hard about what's happening in the blast wave of this powerful explosion." This latest study from Chandra provides support for a theory about how magnetic fields can be dramatically amplified in such blast waves. In this theory, the magnetic fields become highly tangled and the motions of the particles very turbulent near the expanding supernova shock wave at the front edge of the supernova remnant. High-energy charged particles can bounce back and forth across the shock wave repeatedly, gaining energy with each crossing. Theoretical models of the motion of the most energetic particles -- which are mostly protons -- are predicted to leave a messy network of holes and dense walls corresponding to weak and strong regions of magnetic fields, respectively. The X-ray stripes discovered by the Chandra researchers are thought to be regions where the turbulence is greater and the magnetic fields more tangled than surrounding areas, and may be the walls predicted by the theory. Electrons become trapped in these regions and emit X-rays as they spiral around the magnetic field lines. However, the regular and almost periodic pattern of the X-ray stripes was not predicted by the theory. "It was a big surprise to find such a neatly arranged set of stripes," said co

  18. Exploding Stars and Stripes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-03-01

    The discovery of a pattern of X-ray "stripes" in the remains of an exploded star may provide the first direct evidence that a cosmic event can accelerate particles to energies a hundred times higher than achieved by the most powerful particle accelerator on Earth. This result comes from a very long observation of the Tycho supernova remnant with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. It could explain how some of the extremely energetic particles bombarding the Earth, called cosmic rays, are produced. "We've seen lots of intriguing structures in supernova remnants, but we've never seen stripes before," said Kristoffer Eriksen, a postdoctoral researcher at Rutgers University who led the study. "This made us think very hard about what's happening in the blast wave of this powerful explosion." This latest study from Chandra provides support for a theory about how magnetic fields can be dramatically amplified in such blast waves. In this theory, the magnetic fields become highly tangled and the motions of the particles very turbulent near the expanding supernova shock wave at the front edge of the supernova remnant. High-energy charged particles can bounce back and forth across the shock wave repeatedly, gaining energy with each crossing. Theoretical models of the motion of the most energetic particles -- which are mostly protons -- are predicted to leave a messy network of holes and dense walls corresponding to weak and strong regions of magnetic fields, respectively. The X-ray stripes discovered by the Chandra researchers are thought to be regions where the turbulence is greater and the magnetic fields more tangled than surrounding areas, and may be the walls predicted by the theory. Electrons become trapped in these regions and emit X-rays as they spiral around the magnetic field lines. However, the regular and almost periodic pattern of the X-ray stripes was not predicted by the theory. "It was a big surprise to find such a neatly arranged set of stripes," said co

  19. Identification, Molecular Cloning of IL-1β and Its Expression Profile during Nocardia seriolae Infection in Largemouth Bass, Micropterus salmoides

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Ping-Yueh; Byadgi, Omkar; Wang, Pei-Chyi; Tsai, Ming-An; Liaw, Li-Ling; Chen, Shih-Chu

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, IL-1β cDNA was identified and analyzed from largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Full length IL-1β mRNA was obtained using Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE), which contains 78 bp 3′-UTR, a 455 bp 5′-UTR, and an open reading frame (ORF) of 702 bp coding for 233 amino acid residues. The molecular weight and theoretical isoelectric point of largemouth bass IL-1β protein was predicted to be 26.7 kDa and 6.08 respectively. A largemouth bass IL-1β phylogenetic analysis showed a close relation to the IL-1βs of striped trumpeter (Latris lineata), Chinese perch (Siniperca chuatsi), and Japanese sea bass (Lateolabrax japonicus). Peptidoglycan upregulated IL-1β in the spleen and head kidney, while lipopolysaccharide upregulated detectable levels of IL-1β in the spleen only. Largemouth bass, challenged with Nocardia seriolae (1.0 × 106 cfu/mL), showed a significant increase in IL-1β at 3 and 5 days post infection (dpi) in the spleen, while in the head kidney significant expression was found at 2 and 3 dpi, peaking at 3 dpi. Furthermore, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) showed significantly higher expression in the spleen at 3 and 5 dpi, and in the head kidney at 1 and 3 dpi, with expression decreasing at 5 dpi in both tissues. PMID:27706080

  20. Vibrio lentus protects gnotobiotic sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax L.) larvae against challenge with Vibrio harveyi.

    PubMed

    Schaeck, M; Duchateau, L; Van den Broeck, W; Van Trappen, S; De Vos, P; Coulombet, C; Boon, N; Haesebrouck, F; Decostere, A

    2016-03-15

    Due to the mounting awareness of the risks associated with the use of antibiotics in aquaculture, treatment with probiotics has recently emerged as the preferred environmental-friendly prophylactic approach in marine larviculture. However, the presence of unknown and variable microbiota in fish larvae makes it impossible to disentangle the efficacy of treatment with probiotics. In this respect, the recent development of a germ-free culture model for European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax L.) larvae opened the door for more controlled studies on the use of probiotics. In the present study, 206 bacterial isolates, retrieved from sea bass larvae and adults, were screened in vitro for haemolytic activity, bile tolerance and antagonistic activity against six sea bass pathogens. Subsequently, the harmlessness and the protective effect of the putative probiotic candidates against the sea bass pathogen Vibrio harveyi were evaluated in vivo adopting the previously developed germ-free sea bass larval model. An equivalence trial clearly showed that no harmful effect on larval survival was elicited by all three selected probiotic candidates: Bacillus sp. LT3, Vibrio lentus and Vibrio proteolyticus. Survival of Vibrio harveyi challenged larvae treated with V. lentus was superior in comparison with the untreated challenged group, whereas this was not the case for the larvae supplemented with Bacillus sp. LT3 and V. proteolyticus. In this respect, our results unmistakably revealed the protective effect of V. lentus against vibriosis caused by V. harveyi in gnotobiotic sea bass larvae, rendering this study the first in its kind.

  1. Riparian shading and groundwater enhance growth potential for smallmouth bass in Ozark streams.

    PubMed

    Whitledge, Gregory W; Rabeni, Charles F; Annis, Gust; Sowa, Scott P

    2006-08-01

    Moderation of stream temperatures by riparian shading and groundwater are known to promote growth and survival of salmonid fishes, but effects of riparian shade and groundwater on to be growth of warmwater stream fishes are poorly understood or assumed to be negligible. We used stream temperature models to relate shading from riparian vegetation and groundwater inflow to summer water temperatures in Missouri Ozark streams and evaluated effects of summer water temperatures on smallmouth bass, Micropterus dolomieu, growth using a bioenergetics model. Bioenergetics model simulations revealed that adult smallmouth bass in non-spring-fed streams have lower growth potential during summer than fish in spring-fed streams, are subject to mass loss when stream temperatures exceed 27 degrees C, and will likely exhibit greater interannual variation in growth during summer if all growth-influencing factors, other than temperature, are identical between the two stream types. Temperature models indicated that increased riparian shading will expand the longitudinal extent of thermal habitat capable of supporting adult smallmouth bass growth in spring-fed stream reaches when mean daily air temperatures exceed 27 degrees C. Optimum growth temperature (22 degrees C) will be present only in spring-fed streams under these conditions. Potential for increasing shade through riparian restoration is greatest for streams <5 m wide and along north-south reaches of larger streams. However, temperature models also indicated that restoring riparian shading to maximum levels throughout a watershed would increase the total stream mileage capable of supporting positive growth of adult smallmouth bass by only 1-6% when air temperatures are at or near average summer maxima; increases in suitable thermal habitat would be greatest in watersheds with higher spring densities. Riparian management for maintenance or restoration of the thermal habitat of adult smallmouth bass during summer should be

  2. Reduction in recruitment of white bass in Lake Erie after invasion of white perch

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madenjian, Charles P.; Knight, Roger L.; Bur, Michael; Forney, John L.

    2000-01-01

    Recruitment to the adult population of white bass Morone chrysops in Lake Erie sharply declined during the early 1980s. To explain this phenomenon, we formulated the following four hypotheses: (1) the biological characteristics of adult spawners changed during the early 1980s, so that the ability to produce eggs decreased; (2) the decrease in phosphorus loadings to Lake Erie during the 1970s resulted in a lower abundance of crustacean zooplankton and thus in reduced survival of age-0 white bass; (3) the increase in the population of adult walleyes Stizostedion vitreum in Lake Erie during the 1970s and 1980s led to reduced survival of age-0 white bass; and (4) establishment of the white perch Morone americana population in Lake Erie during the early 1980s led to reduced survival of the early life stages of white bass. The growth, maturity, and fecundity of adults during the period 1981-1997 were compared with the same characteristics found by earlier studies. The mean length, weight, and condition factors that we calculated were higher than those reported for Lake Erie in 1927-1929 for all age groups examined, and white bass in Lake Erie matured at an earlier age during 1981-1997 than during 1927-1929. Fecundity estimates ranged from 128,897 to 1,049,207 eggs/female and were similar to estimates from other populations. Therefore, the first hypothesis was rejected. With respect to the second hypothesis, zooplankton surveys conducted during 1970 and 1983-1987 indicated that the abundance of crustacean zooplankton in Lake Erie did not change between the two time periods. However, these results were not conclusive because only a single-year survey was conducted before 1980. Based on walleye diet studies and estimates of walleye population size, walleye predation pressure on age-0 white bass in Lake Erie during 1986-1988 was just slightly higher than that during 1979-1981. Thus, such pressure can explain only a minor portion of the reduction in white bass recruitment. To

  3. 33 CFR 117.588 - Bass River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bass River. 117.588 Section 117.588 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Massachusetts § 117.588 Bass River. The Hall Whitaker...

  4. Clinical and pathological effects of the polyopisthocotylean monogenean, Gamacallum macroura in white bass.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Elsburgh O; Harms, Craig A; Law, J McHugh; Flowers, James R; Williams, Valerie N; Ring, Brad D; McGinty, Andrew S; Hopper, Michael; Sullivan, Craig V

    2012-12-01

    An aquaculture research facility experienced high mortality rates in white bass Morone chrysops associated with a monogenean infestation of the gills, but not in striped bass Morone saxatilis in the same facility. All mortalities had pale gills. Monogeneans, identified as Gamacallum macroura (MacCallum and MacCallum 1913) Unnithan 1971, were found on the gills. Pale-gilled and healthy white bass were selected with no particular attention to condition for venipuncture and euthanasia for postmortem examination, including parasite counts from gills. The median packed cell volume (PCV) of fish with gill pallor was 12.5% (range 9-37%) while PVC of fish with more normal color was 30% (27-33%). Association between the PCV and gill pallor score was statistically significant, as was the association between PCV and the number of monogeneans found on the gills of each fish. Median estimated white blood cell count of fish with gill pallor, at 12.05 × 10(3/)μL (range 3.8-24.7), was significantly lower than of apparently healthy fish: 24.7 × 10(3)/μL (17.3-31.5). Histopathology of the gill arches of pale-gilled fish revealed multifocal moderate to severe branchitis, focal areas of dilated hyperplastic lamellae occluded by fibrin, and monogeneans attached to the lamellae. Fish that were apparently healthy had grossly similar histologic lesions, but at lower frequency and severity.

  5. Clinical and pathological effects of the polyopisthocotylean monogenean, Gamacallum macroura in white bass.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Elsburgh O; Harms, Craig A; Law, J McHugh; Flowers, James R; Williams, Valerie N; Ring, Brad D; McGinty, Andrew S; Hopper, Michael; Sullivan, Craig V

    2012-12-01

    An aquaculture research facility experienced high mortality rates in white bass Morone chrysops associated with a monogenean infestation of the gills, but not in striped bass Morone saxatilis in the same facility. All mortalities had pale gills. Monogeneans, identified as Gamacallum macroura (MacCallum and MacCallum 1913) Unnithan 1971, were found on the gills. Pale-gilled and healthy white bass were selected with no particular attention to condition for venipuncture and euthanasia for postmortem examination, including parasite counts from gills. The median packed cell volume (PCV) of fish with gill pallor was 12.5% (range 9-37%) while PVC of fish with more normal color was 30% (27-33%). Association between the PCV and gill pallor score was statistically significant, as was the association between PCV and the number of monogeneans found on the gills of each fish. Median estimated white blood cell count of fish with gill pallor, at 12.05 × 10(3/)μL (range 3.8-24.7), was significantly lower than of apparently healthy fish: 24.7 × 10(3)/μL (17.3-31.5). Histopathology of the gill arches of pale-gilled fish revealed multifocal moderate to severe branchitis, focal areas of dilated hyperplastic lamellae occluded by fibrin, and monogeneans attached to the lamellae. Fish that were apparently healthy had grossly similar histologic lesions, but at lower frequency and severity. PMID:23126589

  6. Effectiveness of aquaflor (50% florfenicol) to control mortality associated with Streptococcus iniae in freshwater-reared subadult sunshine bass.

    PubMed

    Bowker, James D; Ostland, Vaughn E; Carty, Daniel; Bowman, Molly P

    2010-12-01

    We conducted a field trial to evaluate the effectiveness of Aquaflor (50% florfenicol) for controlling mortality associated with Streptococcus iniae in freshwater-reared subadult sunshine bass (female white bass Morone chrysops X male striped bass M. saxatilis). Bacterial samples collected from moribund fish representing a reference population were presumptively identified microbiologically and were later confirmed to be S. iniae by biochemical characterization and polymerase chain reaction. The trial comprised a 1-d acclimation period, 10-d treatment period, and 14-d posttreatment period. During the treatment period, Aquaflor-medicated feed was administered to treated tanks (N = 3) at a target dose of 10 mg of florfenicol x kg of fish(-1) x d(-1), and nonmedicated feed was administered to control tanks (N = 3). At the end of the posttreatment period, mean (+/- SD) cumulative mortality in treated tanks (9 +/- 11%) was significantly (P = 0.040) less than that in control tanks (52 +/- 13%). Analysis of medicated feed samples revealed that treated tanks had received an actual dose of 8.3 mg florfenicol x kg fish(-1) x d(-1) (83% of target). No florfenicol was detected in control feed samples. Although the actual florfenicol dose administered to treated tanks was less than the target dose, the trial was accepted by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Center for Veterinary Medicine as demonstrating the efficacy of Aquaflor to control mortality associated with S. iniae in cultured sunshine bass populations. PMID:21413510

  7. Striped Electrodes for Solid-Electrolyte Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, R.

    1983-01-01

    Striped thick-film platinum electrodes help insure lower overall cell resistance by permitting free flow of gases in gaps between stripes. Thickfilm stripes are also easier to fabricate than porous thin-film electrodes that cover entire surface. Possible applications for improved cells include oxygen production from carbon dioxide, extraction of oxygen from air, small fluidic pumping, sewage treatment, and fuel cells.

  8. Molecular characterization of a ranavirus isolated from largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides.

    PubMed

    Mao, J; Wang, J; Chinchar, G D; Chinchar, V G

    1999-07-30

    An iridovirus, isolated from largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides following a die-off among adult fish and provisionally designated largemouth bass virus (LMBV), was characterized by analysis of viral protein synthesis in infected cells, viral DNA restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP), and sequence determination of the major capsid protein and viral DNA methyltransferase genes. All 3 approaches yielded results consistent with the suggestion that LMBV was a member of the genus Ranavirus. Moreover, LMBV was nearly identical to 2 isolates from Southeast Asia which had been previously detected in imported ornamental fish. It remains to be determined whether infection of largemouth bass resulted from exposure to an imported virus, or whether the presence of similar viruses in southeast Asia and the southeastern United States indicates that iridovirus species are not geographically limited as suggested earlier, but rather globally distributed.

  9. Comparison of electrofishing and rotenone for sampling largemouth bass in vegetated areas of two Florida lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tate, W.B.; Allen, M.S.; Myers, R.A.; Estes, J.R.

    2003-01-01

    We compared the sampling precision and efficiency of electrofishing and rotenone for assessing populations of largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides in vegetated portions of two Florida lakes. Sampling was conducted at Lochloosa and Orange lakes in north-central Florida from 1990 to 1999. Significant differences in length frequencies were determined between the two methods in 5 of 9 years for each lake. In years where differences existed, electrofishing collected larger fish than did rotenone. The maximum deviation between cumulative relative length frequencies for the two methods was not related to total vegetation, native emergent vegetation, or hydrilla Hydrilla verticallata coverage at either lake. Sampling precision was greater for electrofishing than for rotenone; electrofishing also required less sampling effort to detect changes in the abundance of juvenile and adult largemouth bass. Electrofishing was a more precise and cost-effective method than rotenone for estimating largemouth bass abundance.

  10. Effects of reservoir hydrology on reproduction by largemouth bass and spotted bass in Normandy Reservoir, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sammons, S.M.; Dorsey, L.G.; Bettoli, P.W.; Fiss, F.C.

    1999-01-01

    Age-O largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides and spotted bass M. punctulatus were collected from Normandy Reservoir, Tennessee, 1992-1996, to evaluate effects of reservoir hydrology and hatching of shad Dorosoma spp. on hatching and first-year growth and survival of these two species. Fish were collected in cove rotenone samples in early August and electrofishing samples biweekly throughout the summer; hatch dates and age-specific growth for both species were determined from cove samples with sagittal otoliths. Hatching of both species ranged from early April to early June. Initiation of largemouth bass spawning, but not spotted bass spawning, was positively related to the first day water levels achieved full pool. Mean hatch dates of both species were positively related to the first day of full pool. Timing of spawning for both species was not related to water temperature, Largemouth bass exhibited bimodal length-frequency distributions by midsummer in two wet years and length frequencies were unimodal in dry years; spotted bass always formed unimodal length-frequency distributions. When largemouth bass exhibited bimodal length distributions, earlier hatched fish grew faster than later hatched fish. Spotted bass grew at similar rates, regardless of hatch date, every year except during 1992 when later hatched fish grew faster than earlier hatched fish. Weekly survival of largemouth bass in their first summer was positively related to reservoir water level. First-year growth of both species was not directly affected by the timing of threadfin shad D. petenense or gizzard shad D. cepedianum hatching.

  11. Laboratory efficacy of florfenicol against Streptococcus iniae infection in sunshine bass.

    PubMed

    Darwish, Ahmed M

    2007-03-01

    An experimental feeding trial was performed to evaluate the efficacy of florfenicol (FFC) in controlling Streptococcus iniae infection in sunshine bass (female white bass Morone chrysops x male striped bass M. saxatilis). Five dosage levels of FFC in medicated feed were administered daily: 0, 5, 10, 15, and 30 mg of active ingredient/kg of fish body weight. Treatment was started within 22-24 h postchallenge by waterborne exposure to virulent S. iniae. The FFC medication was continued for 10 consecutive days, followed by a 25-d posttreatment observation. At the conclusion of the experiment, FFC treatment significantly increased the survival of S. iniae-challenged sunshine bass from 4.2% in the nonmedicated (positive control) group to 69.2% in the 5-mg/kg dosage group, 86.7% in the 10-mg/kg group, and 94.2% in the 15- and 30-mg/kg groups. Survival was significantly higher in the 15- and 30-mg/kg treatment groups than in the 5-mg/kg treatment group; differences among the 10-mg/kg and higher dosage groups were not significant. Survival curve analysis using a log-rank test indicated no significant difference between curves for the 10- and 15-mg/kg groups but a significant difference between curves for the 5- and 10-mg/kg groups. At the end of the experiment, no carriers were detected in any challenged group receiving an FFC-medicated diet, but the bacterium was recovered from the nonmedicated challenged survivors of the infection. The results of the experiment suggest that the optimum therapeutic daily dose of FFC is between 10 and 15 mg/kg body weight for 10 d.

  12. 33 CFR 117.588 - Bass River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Massachusetts § 117.588 Bass River. The Hall Whitaker Bridge... according to the provisions of § 118.160 of this chapter. (c) That the drawspan for the Hall...

  13. Endothelin signalling in iridophore development and stripe pattern formation of zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Krauss, Jana; Frohnhöfer, Hans Georg; Walderich, Brigitte; Maischein, Hans-Martin; Weiler, Christian; Irion, Uwe; Nüsslein-Volhard, Christiane

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Colour patterns of adult fish are composed of several different types of pigment cells distributing in the skin during juvenile development. The zebrafish, Danio rerio, displays a striking pattern of dark stripes of melanophores interspersed with light stripes of xanthophores. A third cell type, silvery iridophores, contributes to both stripes and plays a crucial role in adult pigment pattern formation. Several mutants deficient in iridophore development display similar adult phenotypes with reduced numbers of melanophores and defects in stripe formation. This indicates a supporting role of iridophores for melanophore development and maintenance. One of these mutants, rose (rse), encodes the Endothelin receptor b1a. Here we describe a new mutant in zebrafish, karneol (kar), which has a phenotype similar to weak alleles of rse with a reduction in iridophore numbers and defects of adult pigment patterning. We show that, unlike rse, kar is not required in iridophores. The gene defective in the kar mutant codes for an endothelin-converting enzyme, Ece2, which activates endothelin ligands by proteolytic cleavage. By morpholino-mediated knockdown, we identify Endothelin 3b (Edn3b) as the ligand for endothelin receptor signalling in larval iridophores. Thus, Endothelin signalling is involved in iridophore development, proliferation and stripe morphogenesis in larvae as well as adult zebrafish. In mammals the pathway is required for melanocyte development; therefore, our results indicate a previously unrecognized close evolutionary relationship between iridophores in zebrafish and melanocytes in mammals. PMID:24857848

  14. Reproductive and biochemical biomarkers in largemouth bass sampled downstream of a pulp and paper mill in Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sepulveda, M.S.; Gallagher, E.P.; Wieser, C.M.; Gross, T.S.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of bleached/unbleached kraft mill effluents (B/UKME) on the reproductive parameters of free-ranging Florida largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides floridanus). The reproductive parameters measured included gonadosomatic index (GSI), histological evaluation of gonads, and plasma concentrations of vitellogenin (VTG), 17??-estradiol, and 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT). Hepatic ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity was measured as a marker of exposure to cytochrome P450-inducing agents in these effluents. Endpoints were compared among adult bass sampled from tributary and mainstream effluent-contaminated and reference sites. Females sampled from the site closest to the mill outfall had a significant five-fold increase in EROD activity compared to bass sampled from reference streams. Although sex hormones were significantly reduced in bass from exposed sites, there were no differences in VTG and GSI across sites. The absence of organism-level responses was probably not related to a lack of sensitivity, as previous studies in our laboratory have shown that bass exposed to these effluents exhibit changes in GSI and in other measures associated with reproductive success. In females, inverse relationships were observed between VTG and GSI and EROD activity. These relationship, however, were not consistent within all of the sites studied. Collectively, our findings indicate that hepatic EROD induction is an effective marker of B/UKME exposure in largemouth bass and that it might be associated with antiestrogenic effects in this species. ?? 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Zebra: A striped network file system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, John H.; Ousterhout, John K.

    1992-01-01

    The design of Zebra, a striped network file system, is presented. Zebra applies ideas from log-structured file system (LFS) and RAID research to network file systems, resulting in a network file system that has scalable performance, uses its servers efficiently even when its applications are using small files, and provides high availability. Zebra stripes file data across multiple servers, so that the file transfer rate is not limited by the performance of a single server. High availability is achieved by maintaining parity information for the file system. If a server fails its contents can be reconstructed using the contents of the remaining servers and the parity information. Zebra differs from existing striped file systems in the way it stripes file data: Zebra does not stripe on a per-file basis; instead it stripes the stream of bytes written by each client. Clients write to the servers in units called stripe fragments, which are analogous to segments in an LFS. Stripe fragments contain file blocks that were written recently, without regard to which file they belong. This method of striping has numerous advantages over per-file striping, including increased server efficiency, efficient parity computation, and elimination of parity update.

  16. Physiological disturbances and overwinter mortality of largemouth bass from different latitudes.

    PubMed

    VanLandeghem, Matthew M; Wagner, Curtis P; Wahl, David H; Suski, Cory D

    2013-01-01

    Thermal conditions associated with winter can influence the distribution of a species. Because winter severity varies along latitudes, populations of temperate fish located along a latitudinal gradient may display variation in both sublethal and lethal responses to cold stressors. Sublethal physiological disturbances were quantified in age 1 largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) from populations originating from Alabama and Illinois but raised in a common environment. Fish were exposed to 6 h of rapid cold shock from 20° to 8°C (controls were held at 20°C) and then sampled for white muscle, whole blood, and plasma. After cold shock, glucose concentrations were elevated in Alabama but not Illinois fish. Sodium was lower and chloride was higher in Alabama largemouth bass, but fish from Illinois had a greater propensity for potassium loss during cold shock. In Illinois ponds, Alabama largemouth bass exhibited lower overwinter survival (adult: 10%; age 0: 22%) than did those from Illinois (adult: 80%; age 0: 82%). Latitudinal variation in physiological responses to cold stressors may therefore influence overwinter survival of largemouth bass and the ability of a fish species to exist over large geographic areas. PMID:24241068

  17. Physiological disturbances and overwinter mortality of largemouth bass from different latitudes.

    PubMed

    VanLandeghem, Matthew M; Wagner, Curtis P; Wahl, David H; Suski, Cory D

    2013-01-01

    Thermal conditions associated with winter can influence the distribution of a species. Because winter severity varies along latitudes, populations of temperate fish located along a latitudinal gradient may display variation in both sublethal and lethal responses to cold stressors. Sublethal physiological disturbances were quantified in age 1 largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) from populations originating from Alabama and Illinois but raised in a common environment. Fish were exposed to 6 h of rapid cold shock from 20° to 8°C (controls were held at 20°C) and then sampled for white muscle, whole blood, and plasma. After cold shock, glucose concentrations were elevated in Alabama but not Illinois fish. Sodium was lower and chloride was higher in Alabama largemouth bass, but fish from Illinois had a greater propensity for potassium loss during cold shock. In Illinois ponds, Alabama largemouth bass exhibited lower overwinter survival (adult: 10%; age 0: 22%) than did those from Illinois (adult: 80%; age 0: 82%). Latitudinal variation in physiological responses to cold stressors may therefore influence overwinter survival of largemouth bass and the ability of a fish species to exist over large geographic areas.

  18. Sublethal responses of largemouth bass to parasites and organochlorines

    SciTech Connect

    MacRury, N.K.; Johnson, B.M.

    1999-05-01

    Largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) at the Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge (RMA) experience chronic organochlorine exposures and parasitism by nematodes (Contracaecum spiculigerum) and digenean flukes (Posthodiplostomum minimum centrarchi). The authors investigated the influences of nematode intensity, fluke intensity, and whole-body organochlorine concentrations on growth of juvenile RMA bass. Lifetime growth, or age-specific lengths, of bass in three RMA lakes were within the range observed for bass in five reference lakes. However, interlake comparisons can be confounded by differing environmental conditions. Therefore, they conducted mesocosm and laboratory studies to compare growth, consumption, and feeding behavior between RMA bass and bass that had little contaminant or parasite exposure. Mean growth rates of RMA bass were 45% lower compared with hatchery bass in experimental ponds. However, regression analysis revealed that parasite and organochlorine burdens were not negatively associated with either short-term growth or age-specific lengths of RMA bass. Hatchery bass growth was likely higher due to their experience with culture pond conditions. In feeding trials, RMA bass exhibited similar food conversion efficiency and consumption rates and significantly elevated feeding activity compared with hatchery bass. This research demonstrates that current parasite and organochlorine loads had benign influences on growth of juvenile RMA bass.

  19. Widespread occurrence of intersex in black basses (Micropterus spp.) from U.S. rivers, 1995-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinck, J.E.; Blazer, V.S.; Schmitt, C.J.; Papoulias, D.M.; Tillitt, D.E.

    2009-01-01

    largemouth bass older than five years and was most common in 1-3-year-old male largemouth bass. The cause(s) of intersex in these species is also unknown, and it remains to be determined whether the intersex we observed in largemouth and smallmouth bass developed during sex differentiation in early life stages, during exposure to environmental factors during adult life stages, or both.

  20. Striped ratio grids for scatter estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Scott S.; Wang, Adam S.; Star-Lack, Josh

    2016-03-01

    Striped ratio grids are a new concept for scatter management in cone-beam CT. These grids are a modification of conventional anti-scatter grids and consist of stripes which alternate between high grid ratio and low grid ratio. Such a grid is related to existing hardware concepts for scatter estimation such as blocker-based methods or primary modulation, but rather than modulating the primary, the striped ratio grid modulates the scatter. The transitions between adjacent stripes can be used to estimate and subtract the remaining scatter. However, these transitions could be contaminated by variation in the primary radiation. We describe a simple nonlinear image processing algorithm to estimate scatter, and proceed to validate the striped ratio grid on experimental data of a pelvic phantom. The striped ratio grid is emulated by combining data from two scans with different grids. Preliminary results are encouraging and show a significant reduction of scatter artifact.

  1. 50 CFR 648.143 - Black sea bass Accountability Measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Black sea bass Accountability Measures... Management Measures for the Black Sea Bass Fishery § 648.143 Black sea bass Accountability Measures. (a..., from a subsequent single fishing year recreational sector ACT. (c) Non-landing accountability...

  2. 50 CFR 648.143 - Black sea bass Accountability Measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Black sea bass Accountability Measures... Management Measures for the Black Sea Bass Fishery § 648.143 Black sea bass Accountability Measures. (a..., from a subsequent single fishing year recreational sector ACT. (c) Non-landing accountability...

  3. Lysine supplementation of commercial fishmeal-free diet in hybrid striped bass affect growth expression genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Substitution of fishmeal with alternate proteins in aquafeeds often results in dietary imbalances of first-limiting essential amino acids (EAA) and poorer fish performance. Previously, we conducted a growth trial to test the hypothesis that ideal protein theory accurately predicts first-limiting ami...

  4. Using copper sulfate on hybrid striped bass eggs to control fungus and increase survival

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A major obstacle in fish hatcheries is the inevitable fungal growth on eggs. Copper sulfate (CuSO4) is commonly used for fungus control in channel catfish hatcheries that use troughs, but effectiveness on fish eggs hatched using different systems has only recently been investigated. Fish were spawn...

  5. Using copper sulfate on hybrid striped bass eggs to control fungus and increase survival

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A major obstacle in fish hatcheries is reduced hatch rates due to fungal growth on eggs. Copper sulfate (CuSO4) is commonly used for fungus control in catfish hatcheries that use troughs, but effectiveness on other species of fish eggs in different hatching systems has only recently been investigat...

  6. Relations between habitat variability and population dynamics of bass in the Huron River, Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bovee, Ken D.; Newcomb, Tammy J.; Coon, Thomas G.

    1994-01-01

    One of the assumption of the Instream Flow Incremental Methodology (IFIM) is that the dynamics of fish populations are directly or indirectly related to habitat availability. Because this assumption has not been successfully tested in coolwater streams, questions arise regarding the validity of the methodology in such streams. The purpose of our study was to determine whether relations existed between habitat availability and population dynamics of smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu) and rock bass (Ambloplites rupestris) in a 16-km reach of the Huron River in southeastern Michigan. Both species exhibited strong to moderate carryover of year classes from age 0 through age 2, indicating that adult populations were related to factors affecting recruitment. Year-class strength and subsequent numbers of yearling bass were related to the availability of young-of-year habitat during the first growing season for a cohort. Number of age-0, age-1, and adult smallmouth bass were related to the average length at age 0 for the cohort. Length at age 0 was associated with young-of-year habitat and thermal regime during the first growing season. Rock bass populations exhibited similar associations among age classes and habitat variables. Compared to smallmouth bass, the number of age-2 rock bass was associated more closely with their length at age 0 than with year-class strength. Length at age 0 and year-class strength of rock bass were associated with the same habitat variables as those related to age-0 smallmouth bass. We hypothesize that an energetic mechanism linked thermal regime to length at age 0 and that increased growth resulted in higher survival rates from age 0 to age 1. We also postulate that young-of-year habitat provided protection from predators, higher production of food resources, and increased foraging efficiency. We conclude that the IFIM is a valid methodology for instream flow investigations of coolwater streams. The results for our study support the

  7. Riblets for Stars and Stripes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Stars and Stripes racing yacht brought the American's Cup back to the United States. Originating from NASA's drag reduction technology, the boats "secret weapon" was that the hull's underside was coated with riblets. Riblets are small, barely visible grooves on the surface of an airplane intended to reduce skin friction by smoothing the turbulent airflow next to the skin. Grooves are V-shaped with the angle pointing in the direction of the airflow. No deeper than a scratch, they have a pronounced beneficial influence on air turbulence. *No longer commercially available.

  8. Synthesizing Evidence to Assess the Causes of Smallmouth Bass Declines at the Susquehanna and Juniata Rivers, Pennsylvania, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Unusual mortality events of smallmouth bass (SMB) have been observed in the Susquehanna River Basin annually since 2005 and have coincided with a decline in recruitment of young-of-year fish into the adult SMB population. In 2014, the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Pro...

  9. Stripe phases in high-temperature superconductors

    PubMed Central

    Emery, V. J.; Kivelson, S. A.; Tranquada, J. M.

    1999-01-01

    Stripe phases are predicted and observed to occur in a class of strongly correlated materials describable as doped antiferromagnets, of which the copper-oxide superconductors are the most prominent representatives. The existence of stripe correlations necessitates the development of new principles for describing charge transport and especially superconductivity in these materials. PMID:10430848

  10. Stripe-shaped apertures in confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shuhao; Zhu, Bingzhao; Zheng, Yao; Gong, Wei; Si, Ke

    2016-09-20

    We have theoretically verified that, compared with the aperture shapes of previous research, combining two stripe-shaped apertures in a confocal microscope with a finite-sized pinhole improves the axial resolution to a certain extent. Because different stripe shapes cause different effects, we also investigated the relationships among resolution, shapes, pinhole size, and the signal-to-background ratio.

  11. White bass Morone chrysops is less susceptible than its hybrid to experimental infection with Flavobacterium columnare.

    PubMed

    Fuller, S Adam; Farmer, Bradley D; Beck, Benjamin H

    2014-04-23

    Hybrid striped bass (HSB) and white bass (WB) were evaluated for their susceptibility to Flavobacterium columnare, the causative agent of columnaris disease, in 3 fundamental studies. In the first experiment, we determined whether columnaris disease could be developed by experimental challenge in HSB. This challenge consisted of 3 levels of F. columnare (10, 30, and 60 ml volumes) determined to be 2.25 × 10(7), 6.75 × 10(7), and 1.35 × 10(8) CFU ml(-1), respectively. Each treatment group exhibited significantly different survival rates: 0, 3.3, and 13.3% in the 60, 30, and 10 ml groups, respectively. In Expt 2, using the 30 ml dose, both HSB and WB had a 0% survival rate, with WB taking significantly longer to reach 100% mortality. In Expt 3, using the 10 ml dose, no HSB survived, whereas 33% of WB survived (p < 0.0001). Compared to controls, HSB treated with 10 ml showed extensive gill damage at 24 h, which could have contributed to the higher mortality observed in HSB; in contrast, WB gills showed noticeably less damage. From these series of experiments, it is clear that HSB are more sensitive to F. columnare, having lower survival and more extensive histological damage compared to WB following challenge. PMID:24781793

  12. White bass Morone chrysops is less susceptible than its hybrid to experimental infection with Flavobacterium columnare.

    PubMed

    Fuller, S Adam; Farmer, Bradley D; Beck, Benjamin H

    2014-04-23

    Hybrid striped bass (HSB) and white bass (WB) were evaluated for their susceptibility to Flavobacterium columnare, the causative agent of columnaris disease, in 3 fundamental studies. In the first experiment, we determined whether columnaris disease could be developed by experimental challenge in HSB. This challenge consisted of 3 levels of F. columnare (10, 30, and 60 ml volumes) determined to be 2.25 × 10(7), 6.75 × 10(7), and 1.35 × 10(8) CFU ml(-1), respectively. Each treatment group exhibited significantly different survival rates: 0, 3.3, and 13.3% in the 60, 30, and 10 ml groups, respectively. In Expt 2, using the 30 ml dose, both HSB and WB had a 0% survival rate, with WB taking significantly longer to reach 100% mortality. In Expt 3, using the 10 ml dose, no HSB survived, whereas 33% of WB survived (p < 0.0001). Compared to controls, HSB treated with 10 ml showed extensive gill damage at 24 h, which could have contributed to the higher mortality observed in HSB; in contrast, WB gills showed noticeably less damage. From these series of experiments, it is clear that HSB are more sensitive to F. columnare, having lower survival and more extensive histological damage compared to WB following challenge.

  13. Deconvolution of images with periodic striping noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zuoguan; Xu, Wujun; Fu, Yutian

    2008-03-01

    In this paper a new deconvolution algorithm is presented concerning images contaminated by periodic stripes. Inspired by the 2-D power spectrum distribution property of periodic stripes in the frequency domain, we construct a novel regularized inverse filter which allows the algorithm to suppress the amplification of striping noise in the Fourier inverse step and further get rid of most of them, and mirror-wavelet denoising is followed to remove the left colored noise. In simulations with striped images, this algorithm outperforms the traditional mirror-wavelet based deconvolution in terms of both visual effect and SNR comparison, only at the expense of slightly heavier computation load. The same idea about regularized inverse filter can also be used to improve other deconvolution algorithms, such as wavelet packets and wiener filters, when they are employed to images stained by periodic stripes.

  14. Aging of orientation fluctuations in stripe phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riesch, Christian; Radons, Günter; Magerle, Robert

    2014-11-01

    Stripe patterns, observed in a large variety of physical systems, often exhibit a slow nonequilibrium dynamics because ordering is impeded by the presence of topological defects. Using computer simulations based on a well-established model for stripe formation, we show that a slow dynamics and aging occur also in stripe patterns free of topological defects. For a wide range of noise strengths, the two-time orientation correlation function follows a scaling form that is typical for systems exhibiting a growing length scale. In our case, the underlying mechanism is the coarsening of orientation fluctuations, ultimately leading to power-law spatial correlations perpendicular to the stripes. Our results show that even for the smallest amount of noise, stripe phases without topological defects do not reach equilibrium. This constitutes an important aspect of the dynamics of modulated phases.

  15. Performance comparisons between diploid and triploid sunshine bass in fresh water ponds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kerby, J.H.; Everson, J.M.; Harrell, R.M.; Geiger, J.G.; Starling, C.C.; Revels, H.

    2002-01-01

    Diploid and triploid sunshine bass (white bass ??? x striped bass ???) were produced in 1990 at Florida's Richloam Fish Hatchery. Triploidy was induced with hydrostatic pressure. Fry were cultured to phase I in earthen ponds in Webster and Gainesville, FL, and transported to Leetown, WV, where they were held in circular flow-through fiberglass tanks. Ploidy of treated fish was determined with a Coulter counter and triploids were segregated from diploids. In April 1991, control diploid and triploid populations were graded to remove the largest and smallest individuals, and four 0.2-ha hypalon-lined ponds were stocked with 600 fish each; two ponds contained triploids and two contained diploids. Triploids and diploids were not significantly different in average fork length (FL) or weight at stocking. Triploids averaged 231 mm and 181.2 g, compared to diploid averages of 233 mm and 188.9 g. Monthly samples indicated that diploids grew faster than triploids; mean weights and lengths were both significantly different after 3 months. When harvested in October, triploids averaged 358 mm and 867.9 g, whereas diploids averaged 381 mm and 1153.5 g. Survival of triploids and diploids was 97.0% and 95.9%, respectively. Mean standing crop was 2496.3 kg/ha for triploids and 3280.6 kg/ha for diploids. Male diploids and most female diploids were sexually mature at 2 years of age. Sterility of triploids was confirmed as gonads remained reduced and dysfunctional at 5 years of age. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluating the potential for stock size to limit recruitment in largemouth bass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, Michael S.; Rogers, Mark W.; Catalano, Mathew J.; Gwinn, Daniel G.; Walsh, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    Compensatory changes in juvenile survival allow fish stocks to maintain relatively constant recruitment across a wide range of stock sizes (and levels of fishing), but few studies have experimentally explored recruitment compensation in fish populations. We evaluated the potential for recruitment compensation in largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides by stocking six 0.4-ha hatchery ponds with adult densities ranging from 6 to 40 fish over 2 years. Ponds were drained in October each year, and the age-0 fish densities were used as a measure of recruitment. We found no relationship between stock abundance and recruitment; ponds with low adult densities produced nearly as many recruits as the higher-density ponds in some cases. Both prey abundance and the growth of age-0 largemouth bass declined with age-0 fish density. Recruit abundance was highly variable both within and among the adult density groups, and thus we were unable to identify a clear stock–recruit relationship for largemouth bass. Our results indicate that reducing the number of effective spawners via angling practices would not reduce recruitment over a relatively large range in stock size.

  17. 33 CFR 117.703 - Bass River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bass River. 117.703 Section 117..., mile 2.6, at New Gretna, shall operate as follows: (a) The drawspan must open on signal if at least six... accordance with the provisions of § 118.160 of this chapter....

  18. 33 CFR 117.703 - Bass River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bass River. 117.703 Section 117..., mile 2.6, at New Gretna, shall operate as follows: (a) The drawspan must open on signal if at least six... accordance with the provisions of § 118.160 of this chapter....

  19. 33 CFR 117.703 - Bass River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bass River. 117.703 Section 117..., mile 2.6, at New Gretna, shall operate as follows: (a) The drawspan must open on signal if at least six... accordance with the provisions of § 118.160 of this chapter....

  20. 33 CFR 117.703 - Bass River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bass River. 117.703 Section 117..., mile 2.6, at New Gretna, shall operate as follows: (a) The drawspan must open on signal if at least six... accordance with the provisions of § 118.160 of this chapter....

  1. 33 CFR 117.588 - Bass River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ....588 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Massachusetts § 117.588 Bass River. The Hall Whitaker Bridge... as soon as possible. (b) The owners of this bridge shall provide and keep in good legible...

  2. 33 CFR 117.703 - Bass River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ....703 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.703 Bass River. The draw of the U.S. 9 bridge... possible. (b) The owners of this bridge shall provide and keep in good legible condition clearance...

  3. 33 CFR 117.588 - Bass River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ....588 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Massachusetts § 117.588 Bass River. The Hall Whitaker Bridge... as soon as possible. (b) The owners of this bridge shall provide and keep in good legible...

  4. 33 CFR 117.588 - Bass River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ....588 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Massachusetts § 117.588 Bass River. The Hall Whitaker Bridge... as soon as possible. (b) The owners of this bridge shall provide and keep in good legible...

  5. An Investigation of Double Bass Vibrato Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mick, James

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate and describe various vibrato characteristics of university double bass students. The primary objectives were: (1) to describe vibrato rate and width for commonly used fingers in first, fourth, and thumb positions; (2) to investigate whether students initiate vibrato in an upward or downward direction;…

  6. Sunshine bass fingerling production without rotifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previously reported protocol for culture of sunshine bass larvae to fingerling size in tanks involved an initial feeding of rotifers for several days before the larvae are weaned to feed on Artemia nauplii. Maintaining rotifer cultures requires space, time, equipment, supplies, trained culturists a...

  7. Behavior and Body Patterns of the Larger Pacific Striped Octopus.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Roy L; Ross, Richard; Rodaniche, Arcadio; Huffard, Christine L

    2015-01-01

    Over thirty years ago anecdotal accounts of the undescribed Larger Pacific Striped Octopus suggested behaviors previously unknown for octopuses. Beak-to-beak mating, dens shared by mating pairs, inking during mating and extended spawning were mentioned in publications, and enticed generations of cephalopod biologists. In 2012-2014 we were able to obtain several live specimens of this species, which remains without a formal description. All of the unique behaviors listed above were observed for animals in aquaria and are discussed here. We describe the behavior, body color patterns, and postures of 24 adults maintained in captivity. Chromatophore patterns of hatchlings are also shown.

  8. Behavior and Body Patterns of the Larger Pacific Striped Octopus

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, Roy L.; Ross, Richard; Rodaniche, Arcadio; Huffard, Christine L.

    2015-01-01

    Over thirty years ago anecdotal accounts of the undescribed Larger Pacific Striped Octopus suggested behaviors previously unknown for octopuses. Beak-to-beak mating, dens shared by mating pairs, inking during mating and extended spawning were mentioned in publications, and enticed generations of cephalopod biologists. In 2012–2014 we were able to obtain several live specimens of this species, which remains without a formal description. All of the unique behaviors listed above were observed for animals in aquaria and are discussed here. We describe the behavior, body color patterns, and postures of 24 adults maintained in captivity. Chromatophore patterns of hatchlings are also shown. PMID:26266543

  9. Behavior and Body Patterns of the Larger Pacific Striped Octopus.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Roy L; Ross, Richard; Rodaniche, Arcadio; Huffard, Christine L

    2015-01-01

    Over thirty years ago anecdotal accounts of the undescribed Larger Pacific Striped Octopus suggested behaviors previously unknown for octopuses. Beak-to-beak mating, dens shared by mating pairs, inking during mating and extended spawning were mentioned in publications, and enticed generations of cephalopod biologists. In 2012-2014 we were able to obtain several live specimens of this species, which remains without a formal description. All of the unique behaviors listed above were observed for animals in aquaria and are discussed here. We describe the behavior, body color patterns, and postures of 24 adults maintained in captivity. Chromatophore patterns of hatchlings are also shown. PMID:26266543

  10. Invasion of the striped mollusks

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    Introduced to this country only five years ago, the prolific zebra mussel has infested the Great Lakes and has already begun to move into fresh waters beyond the region. Dense populations in utility water systems have caused serious problems, reducing plant efficiency and blocking lines used for cooling and fire fighting. Experts say the striped mollusk has the potential to become the industry's worst biological problem, possibly affecting 70% of US power plants. While it appears that the invader is here to stay, EPRI and others continue to develop and refine techniques to control mussel growth. This article describes how the mollusk got here, reviews the problems it can cause and what is being done to mitigate the problems and control the growth and spread of the mollusk.

  11. Theory of the striped superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Erez; Fradkin, Eduardo; Kivelson, Steven A.

    2009-02-01

    We define a distinct phase of matter, a pair-density wave (PDW), in which the superconducting order parameter ϕ(r⃗,r⃗') varies periodically as a function of position such that when averaged over the center of mass position, (r⃗+r⃗')/2 , all components of ϕ vanish identically. Specifically, we study the simplest unidirectional PDW, the “striped superconductor,” which we argue may be at the heart of a number of spectacular experimental anomalies that have been observed in the failed high-temperature superconductor La2-xBaxCuO4 . We present a solvable microscopic model with strong electron-electron interactions which supports a PDW ground state. We also discuss, at the level of Landau theory, the nature of the coupling between the PDW and other order parameters and the origins and some consequences of the unusual sensitivity of this state to quenched disorder.

  12. STRIPES AND SUPERCONDUCTIVITY IN CUPRATE SUPERCONDUCTORS

    SciTech Connect

    TRANQUADA, J.M.

    2005-08-22

    One type of order that has been observed to compete with superconductivity in cuprates involves alternating charge and antiferromagnetic stripes. Recent neutron scattering studies indicate that the magnetic excitation spectrum of a stripe-ordered sample is very similar to that observed in superconducting samples. In fact, it now appears that there may be a universal magnetic spectrum for the cuprates. One likely implication of this universal spectrum is that stripes of a dynamic form are present in the superconducting samples. On cooling through the superconducting transition temperature, a gap opens in the magnetic spectrum, and the weight lost at low energy piles up above the gap; the transition temperature is correlated with the size of the spin gap. Depending on the magnitude of the spin gap with respect to the magnetic spectrum, the enhanced magnetic scattering at low temperature can be either commensurate or incommensurate. Connections between stripe correlations and superconductivity are discussed.

  13. Stripe states in photonic honeycomb ribbon

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sul-Ah; Son, Young-Woo; Ahn, Kang-Hun

    2015-01-01

    We reveal new stripe states in deformed hexagonal array of photonic wave guides when the array is terminated to have a ribbon-shaped geometry. Unlike the well-known zero energy edge modes of honeycomb ribbon, the new one-dimensional states are shown to originate from high-energy saddle-shaped photonic bands of the ribbon's two-dimensional counterpart. We find that the strain field deforming the ribbon generates pseudo-electric fields in contrast to pseudo-magnetic fields in other hexagonal crystals. Thus, the stripe states experience Bloch oscillation without any actual electric field so that the spatial distributions of stripes have a singular dependence on the strength of the field. The resulting stripe states are located inside the bulk and their positions depend on their energies. PMID:27547090

  14. Drawing a Stripe in Drosophila Imaginal Disks: Negative Regulation of Decapentaplegic and Patched Expression by Engrailed

    PubMed Central

    Sanicola, M.; Sekelsky, J.; Elson, S.; Gelbart, W. M.

    1995-01-01

    During development of the Drosophila adult appendage precursors, the larval imaginal disks, the decapentaplegic (dpp) gene is expressed in a stripe just anterior to the anterior/posterior (A/P) compartment boundary. Here, we investigate the genetic controls that lead to production of this stripe. We extend previous observations on leaky engrailed (en) mutations by showing that mutant clones completely lacking both en and invected (inv) activity ectopically express dpp-lacZ reporter genes in the posterior compartment, where dpp activity ordinarily is repressed. Similarly, patched (ptc) is also ectopically expressed in such posterior compartment en(-)inv(-) null clones. In contrast, these en(-)inv(-) clones exhibit loss of hedgehog (hh) expression. We suggest that the absence of dpp expression in the posterior compartment is due to direct repression by en. Ubiquitious expression of en in imaginal disks, produced by a hs-en construct, eliminates the expression of dpp-lacZ in its normal A/P boundary stripe. We identify three in vitro Engrailed binding sites in one of our dpp-lacZ reporter gene. Mutagenesis of these Engrailed binding sites results in ectopic expression of this reporter gene, but does not alter the normal stripe of expression at the A/P boundary. We propose that the en-hh-ptc regulatory loop that is responsible for segmental expression of wingless in the embryo is reutilized in imaginal disks to create a stripe of dpp expression along the A/P compartment boundary. PMID:7713429

  15. Multiple vitellogenins and product yolk proteins in European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax): Molecular characterization, quantification in plasma, liver and ovary, and maturational proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Ozlem; Prat, Francisco; Ibáñez, A Jose; Köksoy, Sadi; Amano, Haruna; Sullivan, Craig V

    2016-01-01

    Three complete vitellogenin (Vtg) polypeptides of European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax), an acanthomorph teleost spawning pelagic eggs in seawater, were deduced from cDNA and identified as VtgAa, VtgAb and VtgC based on current Vtg nomenclature and phylogeny. Label free quantitative mass spectrometry verified the presence of the three sea bass Vtgs or their product yolk proteins (YPs) in liver, plasma and ovary of postvitellogenic females. As evidenced by normalized spectral counts, VtgAb-derived protein was 2- to 5-fold more abundant, depending on sample type, than for VtgAa, while VtgC-derived protein was less abundant, albeit only 3-fold lower than for VtgAb in the ovary. Western blotting with Vtg type-specific antisera raised against corresponding gray mullet (Mugil cephalus) lipovitellins (Lvs) detected all three types of sea bass Vtg in the blood plasma of gravid females and/or estrogenized males and showed that all three forms of sea bass Lv undergo limited partial degradation during oocyte maturation. The comparatively high levels of VtgC-derived YPs in fully-grown oocytes and the maturational proteolysis of all three types of Lv differ from what has been reported for other teleosts spawning pelagic eggs in seawater but are similar to recent findings for two species of North American Moronidae, the striped bass (Morone saxatilis) and white perch (Morone americana), which spawn pelagic and demersal eggs, respectively in fresh water. Together with the high Vtg sequence homologies and virtually identical structural features of each type of Vtg between species, these findings indicate that the moronid multiple Vtg systems do not substantially vary with reproductive environment. PMID:26643259

  16. Multiple vitellogenins and product yolk proteins in European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax): Molecular characterization, quantification in plasma, liver and ovary, and maturational proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Ozlem; Prat, Francisco; Ibáñez, A Jose; Köksoy, Sadi; Amano, Haruna; Sullivan, Craig V

    2016-01-01

    Three complete vitellogenin (Vtg) polypeptides of European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax), an acanthomorph teleost spawning pelagic eggs in seawater, were deduced from cDNA and identified as VtgAa, VtgAb and VtgC based on current Vtg nomenclature and phylogeny. Label free quantitative mass spectrometry verified the presence of the three sea bass Vtgs or their product yolk proteins (YPs) in liver, plasma and ovary of postvitellogenic females. As evidenced by normalized spectral counts, VtgAb-derived protein was 2- to 5-fold more abundant, depending on sample type, than for VtgAa, while VtgC-derived protein was less abundant, albeit only 3-fold lower than for VtgAb in the ovary. Western blotting with Vtg type-specific antisera raised against corresponding gray mullet (Mugil cephalus) lipovitellins (Lvs) detected all three types of sea bass Vtg in the blood plasma of gravid females and/or estrogenized males and showed that all three forms of sea bass Lv undergo limited partial degradation during oocyte maturation. The comparatively high levels of VtgC-derived YPs in fully-grown oocytes and the maturational proteolysis of all three types of Lv differ from what has been reported for other teleosts spawning pelagic eggs in seawater but are similar to recent findings for two species of North American Moronidae, the striped bass (Morone saxatilis) and white perch (Morone americana), which spawn pelagic and demersal eggs, respectively in fresh water. Together with the high Vtg sequence homologies and virtually identical structural features of each type of Vtg between species, these findings indicate that the moronid multiple Vtg systems do not substantially vary with reproductive environment.

  17. Habitat Suitability Index Models: Largemouth bass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stuber, Robert J.; Gebhart, Glen; Maughan, O. Eugene

    1982-01-01

    This is one of a series of publications that provide information on the habitat requirements of selected fish and wildlife species. Literature describing the relationship between habitat variables related to life requisites and habitat suitability for the Largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) are synthesized. These data are subsequently used to develop Habitat Suitability (HIS) models. The HSI models are designed to provide information that can be used in impact assessment and habitat management.

  18. Genes for "Reverse" fruit striping in squash (Cucurbita pepo).

    PubMed

    Paris, Harry S

    2009-01-01

    Longitudinal striping is a common fruit color pattern in Cucurbita pepo and is conferred by any of several alleles at the light coloration-1 locus. Normally, dark stripes appear over the fruit surface areas between the 10 main subepidermal vein tracts with the lighter background color over and adjacent to these vein tracts. Less commonly, the striping is "reversed," that is, lighter than the background color. The present work was conducted to elucidate the mode of inheritance of reverse striping. The results indicated that reverse striping is conferred by the complementary interaction of an allele for striping with a heretofore unidentified allele at the light coloration-2 locus which is hereby designated l-2(R). Fruits of plants carrying an allele for striping and that are homozygous for l-2(R) have completely reversed striping, whereas those heterozygous for l-2(R) have striping that is completely normal or that is partially normal and partially reversed.

  19. Spatial simulation of smallmouth bass in streams

    SciTech Connect

    Jager, H.I.; Schmoyer, D.D.; Sale, M.J.; Van Winkle, W.; DeAngelis, D.L.; Sabo, M.J.

    1993-04-01

    The hydropower industry and its regulators are hampered by the inability to predict the relationship between alternative flow regimes and fish population response. We have developed a spatially explicit, individual-based model of populations of small-mouth bass in streams as part of the Compensatory Mechanisms in Fish Populations Program (see Sale and Otto 1991). In the model, the profitability of alternative stream locations varies in response to habitat depth and velocity through changes in the frequency of prey encounters and the metabolic costs experienced by fish. We conducted an evaluation of our hydraulic simulation at the scale of individual stream cells. The potential error in predictions for individual cell velocities suggests that larger-scale model predictions for the representative reach are most appropriate. At this scale, the model appears to produce realistic patterns in the growth and dispersal of young-of-year small-mouth bass. This verification step allows us to proceed with greater confidence in evaluating the original question of how small-mouth bass populations respond to alternative flow regimes.

  20. Spatial simulation of smallmouth bass in streams

    SciTech Connect

    Jager, H.I.; Schmoyer, D.D.; Sale, M.J.; Van Winkle, W.; DeAngelis, D.L. ); Sabo, M.J. . Dept. of Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences)

    1993-01-01

    The hydropower industry and its regulators are hampered by the inability to predict the relationship between alternative flow regimes and fish population response. We have developed a spatially explicit, individual-based model of populations of small-mouth bass in streams as part of the Compensatory Mechanisms in Fish Populations Program (see Sale and Otto 1991). In the model, the profitability of alternative stream locations varies in response to habitat depth and velocity through changes in the frequency of prey encounters and the metabolic costs experienced by fish. We conducted an evaluation of our hydraulic simulation at the scale of individual stream cells. The potential error in predictions for individual cell velocities suggests that larger-scale model predictions for the representative reach are most appropriate. At this scale, the model appears to produce realistic patterns in the growth and dispersal of young-of-year small-mouth bass. This verification step allows us to proceed with greater confidence in evaluating the original question of how small-mouth bass populations respond to alternative flow regimes.

  1. Smallmouth bass and largemouth bass predation on juvenile Chinook salmon and other salmonids in the Lake Washington basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tabor, R.A.; Footen, B.A.; Fresh, K.L.; Celedonia, M.T.; Mejia, F.; Low, D.L.; Park, L.

    2007-01-01

    We assessed the impact of predation by smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieu and largemouth bass M. salmoides on juveniles of federally listed Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and other anadromous salmonid populations in the Lake Washington system. Bass were collected with boat electrofishing equipment in the south end of Lake Washington (February-June) and the Lake Washington Ship Canal (LWSC; April-July), a narrow waterway that smolts must migrate through to reach the marine environment. Genetic analysis was used to identify ingested salmonids to obtain a more precise species-specific consumption estimate. Overall, we examined the stomachs of 783 smallmouth bass and 310 largemouth bass greater than 100 mm fork length (FL). Rates of predation on salmonids in the south end of Lake Washington were generally low for both black bass species. In the LWSC, juvenile salmonids made up a substantial part of bass diets; consumption of salmonids was lower for largemouth bass than for smallmouth bass. Smallmouth bass predation on juvenile salmonids was greatest in June, when salmonids made up approximately 50% of their diet. In the LWSC, overall black bass consumption of salmonids was approximately 36,000 (bioenergetics model) to 46,000 (meal turnover consumption model) juveniles, of which about one-third was juvenile Chinook salmon, one-third was coho salmon O. kisutch, and one-third was sockeye salmon O. nerka. We estimated that about 2,460,000 juvenile Chinook salmon (hatchery and wild sources combined) were produced in the Lake Washington basin in 1999; thus, the mortality estimates in the LWSC range from 0.5% (bioenergetics) to 0.6% (meal turnover). Black bass prey mostly on subyearlings of each salmonid species. The vulnerability of subyearlings to predation can be attributed to their relatively small size; their tendency to migrate when water temperatures exceed 15??C, coinciding with greater black bass activity; and their use of nearshore areas, where overlap

  2. Characterization of annual reproductive cycles for pond-reared Florida largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides floridanus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gross, T.S.; Wieser, C.M.; Sepulveda, M.S.; Wiebe, J.J.; Schoeb, T.R.; Denslow, N.D.

    2002-01-01

    The annual reproductive cycle of hatchery-raised largemouth bass (Florida subspecies Micropterus salmoides floridanus) was characterized over a one-year period. Largemouth bass have a distinct annual reproductive cycle with a spring spawning season (approximately between mid-January and mid-June). Cycle characterization focused on an evaluation of gonadal development and plasma concentrations of several sex steroids and vitellogenin (VTG). Adult largemouth bass (n = 20: 10 females and 10 males) were collected monthly from hatchery ponds for one full calendar year. Plasma samples were analyzed for estradiol-17?? (E2), 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT), testosterone (T), progesterone (P), and VTG. Gonadal tissues were weighed to calculate gonadosomatic index (GSI) and evaluated histologically to characterize reproductive stage. In both sexes, GSI began to increase in November, and peaked in February-March. Increases in gonad weights were correlated with maturation of gonads as evidenced by histological evaluations. Bass exhibited seasonal changes in plasma sex steroids and VTG. In males, 11-KT was the only sex steroid that showed strong seasonality, with highest values in February. In females, although E2 and T concentrations followed a similar annual cycle, with highest and lowest values in February and August, respectively, the strongest pattern was observed with E2. 11-KT concentrations were less variable across months, and values were about half of those observed in males. In females, P peaked two months after E2, with high values still in May and June and decreased thereafter, and VTG began to increase in October, but peaked a month prior to the observed peaked in E2. VTG was also detected in males but at concentrations that were about 1/12 that of females, and no seasonal pattern was evident. This study is the first to fully characterize the seasonal endocrine cycle for largemouth bass. These data will be useful when conducting reproductive evaluations of free

  3. Genetic monogamy and biparental care in an externally fertilizing fish, the largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides).

    PubMed

    DeWoody, J A; Fletcher, D E; Wilkins, S D; Nelson, W S; Avise, J C

    2000-12-01

    Breeding, male North American sunfish (Centrarchidae), are often brightly coloured and promiscuous. However, the largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) is sexually monomorphic in appearance and socially monogamous. Unlike some other nest-tending centrarchids in the genus Lepomis, largemouth bass have also been reported to provide biparental care to eggs and fry. Here we use microsatellite markers in order to test whether social monogamy predicts genetic monogamy in the largemouth bass. Offspring were collected from 26 nests each usually guarded by a pair of adults, many of which were also captured. Twenty-three of these progeny cohorts (88%) proved to be composed almost exclusively of full-sibs and were thus the product of monogamous matings. Cuckoldry by males was rare. The genetic data also revealed that some nests contain juveniles that were not the progeny of the guardian female, a finding that can be thought of as low-level 'female cuckoldry'. Overall, however, the data provide what may be the first genetic documentation of near-monogamy and biparental care in a vertebrate with external fertilization.

  4. 76 FR 14804 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Bass River, Beverly, MA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-18

    ... the Hall Whitaker Bridge at mile 0.6 across the Bass River ] at Beverly, Massachusetts. The deviation.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Hall Whitaker Bridge, across the Bass River at Beverly, Massachusetts, has a... this temporary deviation the Hall Whitaker Bridge may remain in the closed position from 6 p.m....

  5. Mapping stripe rust resistance in a BrundageXCoda winter wheat recombinant inbred line population.

    PubMed

    Case, Austin J; Naruoka, Yukiko; Chen, Xianming; Garland-Campbell, Kimberly A; Zemetra, Robert S; Carter, Arron H

    2014-01-01

    A recombinant inbred line (RIL) mapping population developed from a cross between winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars Coda and Brundage was evaluated for reaction to stripe rust (caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici). Two hundred and sixty eight RIL from the population were evaluated in replicated field trials in a total of nine site-year locations in the U.S. Pacific Northwest. Seedling reaction to stripe rust races PST-100, PST-114 and PST-127 was also examined. A linkage map consisting of 2,391 polymorphic DNA markers was developed covering all chromosomes of wheat with the exception of 1D. Two QTL on chromosome 1B were associated with adult plant and seedling reaction and were the most significant QTL detected. Together these QTL reduced adult plant infection type from a score of seven to a score of two reduced disease severity by an average of 25% and provided protection against race PST-100, PST-114 and PST-127 in the seedling stage. The location of these QTL and the race specificity provided by them suggest that observed effects at this locus are due to a complementation of the previously known but defeated resistances of the cultivar Tres combining with that of Madsen (the two parent cultivars of Coda). Two additional QTL on chromosome 3B and one on 5B were associated with adult plant reaction only, and a single QTL on chromosome 5D was associated with seedling reaction to PST-114. Coda has been resistant to stripe rust since its release in 2000, indicating that combining multiple resistance genes for stripe rust provides durable resistance, especially when all-stage resistance genes are combined in a fashion to maximize the number of races they protect against. Identified molecular markers will allow for an efficient transfer of these genes into other cultivars, thereby continuing to provide excellent resistance to stripe rust.

  6. Quantum depinning transition of quantum Hall stripes.

    PubMed

    Li, M-R; Fertig, H A; Côté, R; Yi, Hangmo

    2004-05-01

    We examine the effect of disorder on the electromagnetic response of quantum Hall stripes using an effective elastic theory to describe their low-energy dynamics, and replicas and the Gaussian variational method to handle disorder effects. Within our model we demonstrate the existence of a depinning transition at a critical partial Landau level filling factor Deltanu(c). For Deltanustripes show resonant peaks. These peaks shift to zero frequency as Deltanu-->Deltanu(c). For Deltanu> or =Deltanu(c), we find a partial RSB solution in which there is free sliding only along the stripe direction. The transition is analogous to the Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition.

  7. 75 FR 6586 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United; Black Sea Bass Fishery; 2010 Black Sea Bass Specifications...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-10

    ... fax to the attention of the Sustainable Fisheries Division. Include ``Comments on 2010 Black Sea Bass... black sea bass specifications was published in the Federal Register on December 22, 2009 (74 FR 67978...; 62 FR 44421) and finds the Council(s request meets both the criteria and justifications for...

  8. 75 FR 38935 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Black Sea Bass Fishery; 2010 Black Sea Bass...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-07

    ... December 22, 2009 (74 FR 67978), and became effective on January 1, 2010. The final rule implemented a 2.71... emergency rule to increase the 2010 black sea bass specifications on February 10, 2010 (75 FR 6586). The... (75 FR 6586), NMFS requested, and subsequently received, comments on the increased black sea bass...

  9. Zebrafish stripes as a model for vertebrate colour pattern formation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ajeet Pratap; Nüsslein-Volhard, Christiane

    2015-01-19

    Colour patterns are prominent features of many animals and have important functions in communication, such as camouflage, kin recognition and mate choice. As targets for natural as well as sexual selection, they are of high evolutionary significance. The molecular mechanisms underlying colour pattern formation in vertebrates are not well understood. Progress in transgenic tools, in vivo imaging and the availability of a large collection of mutants make the zebrafish (Danio rerio) an attractive model to study vertebrate colouration. Zebrafish display golden and blue horizontal stripes that form during metamorphosis as mosaics of yellow xanthophores, silvery or blue iridophores and black melanophores in the hypodermis. Lineage tracing revealed the origin of the adult pigment cells and their individual cellular behaviours during the formation of the striped pattern. Mutant analysis indicated that interactions between all three pigment cell types are required for the formation of the pattern, and a number of cell surface molecules and signalling systems have been identified as mediators of these interactions. The understanding of the mechanisms that underlie colour pattern formation is an important step towards deciphering the genetic basis of variation in evolution. PMID:25602311

  10. Biochemical genetics of largemouth bass. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Phillipp, D.P.; Childers, W.F.; Whitt, G.S.

    1982-10-01

    Distinct biochemical genetic differences exist among largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) populations from different geographic regions. The level of genetic variation at 28 enzyme loci was determined for 90 bass populations throughout the United States through the use of vertical starch gel electrophoretic analyses. Allelic polymorphism was observed at 17 of these enzyme loci. Marked differences in allele frequencies at six of these loci exist among populations from the different geographic areas studied. Allele frequencies at two of these loci (isocitrate dehydrogenase-B and aspartate aminotransferase-B) can be used to quantitatively determine the contributions by each of the two recognized subspecies, M. s. salmoides and M. s. floridanus to the total gene pool of any population of largemouth bass. The current range of each subspecies and the extent of the range of intergradation has been redescribed. Furthermore, distinct north-south clinal distributions of the alleles at four of these loci (malate dehydrogenase-B, superoxide dismutase-A, isocitrate dehydrogenase-B and aspartate aminotransferase-B) indicate a possible involvement of these enzymes in the determination of the thermal tolerance/preference limits for this species. In vitro analyses of the different allelic isozymes at the malate dehydrogenase-B locus representing the northern and the southern phenotypes have revealed kinetic differences at temperatures which are encountered routinely in the environment, suggesting a possible mechanism for the genetic determination of thermal requirements. The results of these genetic analyses clearly indicate the need for incorporating sound genetic principles into current and future management programs.

  11. Species profiles: Life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (South Atlantic): Black sea bass

    SciTech Connect

    Mercer, L.P.

    1989-07-01

    Species profiles are literature summaries on the taxonomy, morphology, range, life history, and environmental requirements of coastal aquatic species. They are designed to assist in environmental impact assessment. The black sea bass, Centropristis striata, is an abundant species associated with the inshore sponge-coral habitat in the South Atlantic Bight (Cape Hatteras to Cape Canaveral). It is a protogynous hermaphrodite (each individual is first a female and then a male) that spawns from January to June on the Continental shelf. Juveniles utilize estuaries, as well as offshore areas, for nurseries. It is a slow growing species with a life span of about 10 years. Juveniles and adults are bottom-feeding carnivores. Adults have been collected at temperatures as low as 6 /degree/C but are most abundant at temperatures of 8 to 10 /degree/C and above. Juveniles tolerate lower temperatures and greater salinity ranges than adults. Black sea bass are primarily harvested by the recreational hook and line fishery and the commercial trap fishery. Yield-per-recruit analyses indicate that the harvest of black sea bass is less than the maximum possible due to a combination of high fishing pressure and harvest of small fish. 58 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. Stripe rust resistance genes in the UK winter wheat cultivar Claire.

    PubMed

    Powell, N M; Lewis, C M; Berry, S T; Maccormack, R; Boyd, L A

    2013-06-01

    Stripe rust resistance in the winter wheat cultivar Claire had remained effective in the UK and Europe since its release in 1999 and consequently has been used extensively in wheat breeding programs. However, in 2012, reports indicated that this valuable resistance may now have been compromised. To characterise stripe rust resistance in Claire and determine which genes may still confer effective resistance a cross was made between Claire and the stripe rust susceptible cultivar Lemhi. A genetic linkage map, constructed using SSR, AFLP, DArT and NBS-AFLP markers had a total map length of 1,730 cM. To improve the definition of two quantitative trait loci (QTL) identified on the long arm of chromosome 2D further markers were developed from wheat EST. Stripe rust resistance was evaluated on adult plants under field and glasshouse conditions by measuring the extent of fungal growth and sporulation, percentage infection (Pi) and the necrotic/chlorotic responses of the plant to infection, infection type (IT). Four QTL contributing to stripe rust adult plant resistance (APR) were identified in Claire, QYr.niab-2D.1, QYr.niab-2D.2, QYr.niab-2B and QYr.niab-7B. For Pi QYr.niab-2D.1 explained up to 25.4 % of the phenotypic variation, QYr.niab-2D.2 up to 28.7 %, QYr.niab-2B up to 21.7 % and QYr.niab-7B up to 13.0 %. For IT the percentages of phenotypic variation explained were 23.4, 31.8, 17.2 and 12.6 %, respectively. In addition to the four QTL conferring APR in Claire, a race-specific, seedling expressed resistance gene was identified on chromosome 3B.

  13. Physiological, toxicological, and population responses of smallmouth bass to acidification

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus, M.D.; Gulley, D.D.; Christensen, S.W.; McDonald, D.G.; Van Winkle, W.; Mount, D.R.; Wood, C.M.; Bergman, H.L. . Dept. of Zoology and Physiology)

    1992-08-01

    The Lake Acidification and Fisheries (LAF) project examined effects of acidic water chemistries on four fish species. This report presents an overview of investigations on smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieui). Experiments conducted with this species included as many as 84 exposure combinations of acid, aluminum, and low calcium. In egg, fry, and juvenile stages of smallmouth bass, increased acid and aluminum concentrations increased mortality and decreased growth, while increased calcium concentrations often improved survival. Relative to the juvenile life stages of smallmouth bass tested, yolksac and swim-up fry were clearly more sensitive to stressful exposure conditions. While eggs appeared to be the most sensitive life stage, this conclusion was compromised by heavy mortalities of eggs due to fungal infestations during experimental exposures. As found in our earlier studies with brook and rainbow trout, acid-aluminum stressed smallmouth bass exhibited net losses of electrolytes across gills and increased accumulation of aluminum on gill tissues. Overall, our results indicated that smallmouth bass were generally more sensitive to increased exposure concentrations of aluminum than to increased acidities. Compared to toxicology results from earlier LAF project studies, smallmouth bass were more sensitive than brook trout and slightly less sensitive than rainbow trout when exposed to water quality conditions associated with acidification.An example application of the LAF modeling framework shows how different liming scenarios can improve survival probabilities for smallmouth bass in a set of lakes sensitive to acidification.

  14. Stripe glasses in ferromagnetic thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Principi, Alessandro; Katsnelson, Mikhail I.

    2016-02-01

    Domain walls in magnetic multilayered systems can exhibit a very complex and fascinating behavior. For example, the magnetization of thin films of hard magnetic materials is in general perpendicular to the thin-film plane, thanks to the strong out-of-plane anisotropy, but its direction changes periodically, forming an alternating spin-up and spin-down stripe pattern. The latter is stabilized by the competition between the ferromagnetic coupling and dipole-dipole interactions, and disappears when a moderate in-plane magnetic field is applied. It has been suggested that such a behavior may be understood in terms of a self-induced stripe glassiness. In this paper we show that such a scenario is compatible with the experimental findings. The strong out-of-plane magnetic anisotropy of the film is found to be beneficial for the formation of both stripe-ordered and glassy phases. At zero magnetic field the system can form a glass only in a narrow interval of fairly large temperatures. An in-plane magnetic field, however, shifts the glass transition towards lower temperatures, therefore enabling it at or below room temperature. In good qualitative agreement with the experimental findings, we show that a moderate in-plane magnetic field of the order of 50 mT can lead to the formation of defects in the stripe pattern, which sets the onset of the glass transition.

  15. Stripe glasses in ferromagnetic thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Principi, Alessandro; Katsnelson, Mikhail

    Domain walls in magnetic multilayered systems can exhibit a very complex and fascinating behavior. The magnetization of thin films of hard magnetic materials is in general perpendicular to the thin-film plane, but its direction changes periodically, forming an alternating spin-up and spin-down stripe pattern. The latter is stabilized by the competition between the ferromagnetic coupling and dipole-dipole interactions, and disappears when a moderate in-plane magnetic field is applied. It has been suggested that such a behavior may be understood in terms of a self-induced stripe glassiness. In this paper we show that such a scenario is compatible with the experimental findings. The strong out-of-plane magnetic anisotropy of the film is found to be beneficial for the formation of both the stripe-ordered and glassy phases. At zero magnetic field the system can form a glass only in a narrow interval of fairly large temperatures. An in-plane magnetic field, however, shifts the glass transition towards lower temperatures, therefore enabling it at or below room temperature. In good qualitative agreement with the experimental findings, we show that a moderate in-plane magnetic field of the order of 30 mT can lead to the formation of defects in the stripe pattern.

  16. A reservoir landscape for age-0 largemouth bass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Irwin, E.R.; Jackson, J.R.; Noble, R.L.

    2002-01-01

    Landscape ecology is concerned with how ecological processes are affected by spatial patterns. Identification of heterogeneity in littoral zones has expanded the conceptual framework of aquatic landscapes. Long-term study of a reservoir largemouth bass population indicated that the amount and arrangement of habitat regulated the population processes. The distribution of age-0 largemouth bass was quantified in relation to littoral habitat and relations between landscape features and population parameters on scales from embayment to microhabitat were determined. At the embayment scale, shoreline slope and amount of gravel substratum predicted fivefold variability in abundance among four reservoir embayments. Within an embayment, these habitat features explained between 37 and 88 percent of variation in shoreline distribution of age-0 largemouth bass. At the microhabitat scale, age-0 largemouth bass exhibited patchy distributions in relation to gravel substratum at 40 percent of sites. These results indicate that the landscape scale domain for young largemouth bass is large; whereas, specific patterns explained processes across multiple scales. Distributions of age-0 largemouth bass in relation to habitat, however, were apparent on a fine scale (10 m) and these data, coupled with limited movement behavior of young largemouth bass, indicate that the ecological neighborhood of this life stage is small. Our data also suggested that some habitats may be source habitats because embayments with hypothesized higher source/sink ratios were more productive. Although patch arrangement critical to young largemouth bass ecology was not quantified, it was apparent that embayments with more complex habitats likely provided the extent of the landscape for age-0 largemouth bass in Jordan Lake. Identification of scale of patchiness (of fish distributions and habitats) for this life stage will assist in making inferences regarding complex ecological processes that can affect year

  17. Survival of foul-hooked largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pope, K.L.; Wilde, G.R.

    2010-01-01

    We conducted a field experiment to determine the survival rate of foul-hooked (hooked external to the oral cavity) largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) caught and released by recreational anglers. Of 42 largemouth bass caught with hard-plastic baits containing three treble hooks, 15 were hooked only within the mouth and 27 had at least one hook penetrating the external surface of the fish (i.e., foul-hooked). There was no difference in survival of mouth-hooked (100%), foul-hooked (100%), or control (100%) largemouth bass.

  18. Intersex condition of shoal bass in the Flint River, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Ingram, Dallas R; Miller, Debra L; Ingram, Travis R; Tannehill, Josh E

    2011-12-01

    We examined male shoal bass Micropterus cataractae from the Flint River, Georgia, to determine the prevalence of intersex. During March and April 2010, we sampled 61 shoal bass from six sites along the Flint River. Testes were examined histologically and classified as intersex if the presence of oocytes was noted. Using a severity index, we compared samples collected on different dates and from different locations according to age and testis weight. No significant variations were noted among any of the groupings. Further investigation is needed to determine whether the intersex condition in shoal bass is severe enough to warrant concern and whether it is a natural phenomenon.

  19. Maternally transferred mercury in wild largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides.

    PubMed

    Sackett, Dana K; Aday, D Derek; Rice, James A; Cope, W Gregory

    2013-07-01

    Maternal transfer of mercury in fish represents a potential route of elimination for adult females and a risk to developing embryos. To better quantify maternal transfer, we measured Hg in female largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) muscle and eggs from six waterbodies. Mercury in eggs from two waterbodies exceeded a US federal screening level (0.3 μg g(-1)) and was likely high enough to cause adverse reproductive effects. We found a curvilinear relationship between female and egg Hg. Fish with <0.37 μg g(-1) Hg had low levels of Hg in eggs; those with Hg >0.37 μg g(-1) showed a direct relationship between egg and muscle Hg (Log10 egg Hg = -1.03 + 1.18 * log10 muscle tissue Hg + 2.15 * (log10 muscle tissue Hg + 0.35)(2)). We also report higher maternal transfer (0.2-13.2%) and higher ratios of egg to muscle tissue Hg (4-52%) and egg to whole body Hg concentrations (7-116%) than previously observed for teleost fish. PMID:23597802

  20. Maternally transferred mercury in wild largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides.

    PubMed

    Sackett, Dana K; Aday, D Derek; Rice, James A; Cope, W Gregory

    2013-07-01

    Maternal transfer of mercury in fish represents a potential route of elimination for adult females and a risk to developing embryos. To better quantify maternal transfer, we measured Hg in female largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) muscle and eggs from six waterbodies. Mercury in eggs from two waterbodies exceeded a US federal screening level (0.3 μg g(-1)) and was likely high enough to cause adverse reproductive effects. We found a curvilinear relationship between female and egg Hg. Fish with <0.37 μg g(-1) Hg had low levels of Hg in eggs; those with Hg >0.37 μg g(-1) showed a direct relationship between egg and muscle Hg (Log10 egg Hg = -1.03 + 1.18 * log10 muscle tissue Hg + 2.15 * (log10 muscle tissue Hg + 0.35)(2)). We also report higher maternal transfer (0.2-13.2%) and higher ratios of egg to muscle tissue Hg (4-52%) and egg to whole body Hg concentrations (7-116%) than previously observed for teleost fish.

  1. Book review: Black bass diversity: Multidisciplinary science for conservation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jelks, Howard

    2016-01-01

    Review info: Black bass diversity: Multidisciplinary science for conservation. Edited by Michael D. Tringali, James M. Long, Timothy W. Birdsong, and Michael S. Allen, 2015. ISBN: 978-1-934874-40-0, 685 pp.

  2. Nasitrema sp.-associated encephalitis in a striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba) stranded in the Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Shea, Thomas J.; Homer, Bruce L.; Greiner, Ellis C.; Layton, A. William

    1991-01-01

    An immature female striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba) found dead on a northwestern Florida beach in 1988 exhibited severe inflammation bilaterally in the dorsal and mid-thalamus in association with adult trematodes (Nasitrema sp.) and trematode eggs. Numerous specimens of Nasitrema sp. also were present in the pterygoid sinuses. Pneumonia in association with a heavy growth of Vibrio damsela was observed also. This report confirms the occurrence of Nasitrema sp.-associated encephalitis in striped dolphins and in small cetaceans from the Gulf of Mexico.

  3. STRIPE: Remote Driving Using Limited Image Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kay, Jennifer S.

    1997-01-01

    Driving a vehicle, either directly or remotely, is an inherently visual task. When heavy fog limits visibility, we reduce our car's speed to a slow crawl, even along very familiar roads. In teleoperation systems, an operator's view is limited to images provided by one or more cameras mounted on the remote vehicle. Traditional methods of vehicle teleoperation require that a real time stream of images is transmitted from the vehicle camera to the operator control station, and the operator steers the vehicle accordingly. For this type of teleoperation, the transmission link between the vehicle and operator workstation must be very high bandwidth (because of the high volume of images required) and very low latency (because delayed images can cause operators to steer incorrectly). In many situations, such a high-bandwidth, low-latency communication link is unavailable or even technically impossible to provide. Supervised TeleRobotics using Incremental Polyhedral Earth geometry, or STRIPE, is a teleoperation system for a robot vehicle that allows a human operator to accurately control the remote vehicle across very low bandwidth communication links, and communication links with large delays. In STRIPE, a single image from a camera mounted on the vehicle is transmitted to the operator workstation. The operator uses a mouse to pick a series of 'waypoints' in the image that define a path that the vehicle should follow. These 2D waypoints are then transmitted back to the vehicle, where they are used to compute the appropriate steering commands while the next image is being transmitted. STRIPE requires no advance knowledge of the terrain to be traversed, and can be used by novice operators with only minimal training. STRIPE is a unique combination of computer and human control. The computer must determine the 3D world path designated by the 2D waypoints and then accurately control the vehicle over rugged terrain. The human issues involve accurate path selection, and the

  4. Benthic Acoustic Stress Sensor (BASS): Electronics Check-Out Procedures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martini, Marinna A.; Williams, Albert

    1993-01-01

    Summary The procedures described here are presented so that a technician with limited experience with BASS can perform basic tests which, when executed properly, should be a thorough evaluation of the health of the system. This is not intended as an in depth explanation of how BASS works. Should any significant problems be found, it is suggested that you contact the manufacturer, Oceanographic Instrument Systems, North Falmouth, MA. The Tattletale controller is manufactured by the Onset Computer Corporation, Cataumet, MA.

  5. Structure, molecular evolution, and hydrolytic specificities of largemouth bass pepsins.

    PubMed

    Miura, Yoko; Suzuki-Matsubara, Mieko; Kageyama, Takashi; Moriyama, Akihiko

    2016-02-01

    The nucleotide sequences of largemouth bass pepsinogens (PG1, 2 and 3) were determined after molecular cloning of the respective cDNAs. Encoded PG1, 2 and 3 were classified as fish pepsinogens A1, A2 and C, respectively. Molecular evolutionary analyses show that vertebrate pepsinogens are classified into seven monophyletic groups, i.e. pepsinogens A, F, Y (prochymosins), C, B, and fish pepsinogens A and C. Regarding the primary structures, extensive deletion was obvious in S'1 loop residues in fish pepsin A as well as tetrapod pepsin Y. This deletion resulted in a decrease in hydrophobic residues in the S'1 site. Hydrolytic specificities of bass pepsins A1 and A2 were investigated with a pepsin substrate and its variants. Bass pepsins preferred both hydrophobic/aromatic residues and charged residues at the P'1 sites of substrates, showing the dual character of S'1 sites. Thermodynamic analyses of bass pepsin A2 showed that its activation Gibbs energy change (∆G(‡)) was lower than that of porcine pepsin A. Several sites of bass pepsin A2 moiety were found to be under positive selection, and most of them are located on the surface of the molecule, where they are involved in conformational flexibility. The broad S'1 specificity and flexible structure of bass pepsin A2 are thought to cause its high proteolytic activity. PMID:26627128

  6. Potential of largemouth bass as vectors of 137Cs dispersal.

    PubMed

    Paller, M H; Fletcher, D E; Jones, T; Dyer, S A; Isely, J J; Littrell, J W

    2005-01-01

    We conducted a radio telemetry study on the movements of potentially contaminated largemouth bass between Steel Creek, a restricted access (137)Cs contaminated stream on the Savannah River Site (located in South Carolina, USA), and the publicly accessible Savannah River. Largemouth bass were relatively mobile in lower Steel Creek and the portion of the Savannah River near Steel Creek, and there was considerable movement between these two habitats. Largemouth bass had home ranges of about 500 linear meters of shoreline in the Savannah River but sometimes moved long distances. Such movements occurred primarily during the spawning season, largely upstream, and increased when water levels were changing or elevated. However, approximately 90% of the largemouth bass observations were within 10 km of Steel Creek. The total quantity of (137)Cs transported into the Savannah River by largemouth bass was much less than transported by water and suspended sediments discharged from Steel Creek. We conclude that largemouth bass from the Savannah River Site are unlikely to be responsible for long distance dispersal of substantial radiological contamination in the Savannah River.

  7. Overcompensatory response of a smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu) population to harvest: Release from competition?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zipkin, E.F.; Sullivan, P.J.; Cooch, E.G.; Kraft, C.E.; Shuter, B.J.; Weidel, B.C.

    2008-01-01

    An intensive seven-year removal of adult, juvenile, and young-of-the-year smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu) from a north temperate lake (Little Moose Lake, New York, USA) resulted in an increase in overall population abundance, primarily due to increased abundance of immature individuals. We developed a density-dependent, stage-structured model to examine conditions under which population control through harvest could result in the increase of a targeted species. Parameter values were derived from a 54-year data set collected from another north temperate lake (Lake Opeongo, Ontario, Canada) smallmouth bass population. Sensitivity analyses identified the demographic conditions that could lead to increased abundance in response to harvest. An increase in population abundance with harvest was most likely to occur when either (i) per capita recruitment at low levels of spawner abundance was large, juvenile survivorship was high, and maturation of age-4 and older juveniles was moderately high or (ii) per capita recruitment at low levels of spawner abundance was slightly lower, yet the maturation rate of age-3 juveniles and adult survivorship were high. Our modeling results together with empirical evidence further demonstrate the importance of overcompensation as a substantial factor to consider in efforts to regulate population abundance through harvest. ?? 2008 NRC.

  8. Genetic Architecture of Resistance to Stripe Rust in a Global Winter Wheat Germplasm Collection.

    PubMed

    Bulli, Peter; Zhang, Junli; Chao, Shiaoman; Chen, Xianming; Pumphrey, Michael

    2016-08-09

    Virulence shifts in populations of Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), the causal pathogen of wheat stripe rust, are a major challenge to resistance breeding. The majority of known resistance genes are already ineffective against current races of Pst, necessitating the identification and introgression of new sources of resistance. Germplasm core collections that reflect the range of genetic and phenotypic diversity of crop species are ideal platforms for examining the genetic architecture of complex traits such as resistance to stripe rust. We report the results of genetic characterization and genome-wide association analysis (GWAS) for resistance to stripe rust in a core subset of 1175 accessions in the National Small Grains Collection (NSGC) winter wheat germplasm collection, based on genotyping with the wheat 9K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) iSelect assay and phenotyping of seedling and adult plants under natural disease epidemics in four environments. High correlations among the field data translated into high heritability values within and across locations. Population structure was evident when accessions were grouped by stripe rust reaction. GWAS identified 127 resistance loci that were effective across at least two environments, including 20 with significant genome-wide adjusted P-values. Based on relative map positions of previously reported genes and QTL, five of the QTL with significant genome-wide adjusted P-values in this study represent potentially new loci. This study provides an overview of the diversity of Pst resistance in the NSGC winter wheat germplasm core collection, which can be exploited for diversification of stripe rust resistance in breeding programs.

  9. Genetic Architecture of Resistance to Stripe Rust in a Global Winter Wheat Germplasm Collection.

    PubMed

    Bulli, Peter; Zhang, Junli; Chao, Shiaoman; Chen, Xianming; Pumphrey, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Virulence shifts in populations of Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), the causal pathogen of wheat stripe rust, are a major challenge to resistance breeding. The majority of known resistance genes are already ineffective against current races of Pst, necessitating the identification and introgression of new sources of resistance. Germplasm core collections that reflect the range of genetic and phenotypic diversity of crop species are ideal platforms for examining the genetic architecture of complex traits such as resistance to stripe rust. We report the results of genetic characterization and genome-wide association analysis (GWAS) for resistance to stripe rust in a core subset of 1175 accessions in the National Small Grains Collection (NSGC) winter wheat germplasm collection, based on genotyping with the wheat 9K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) iSelect assay and phenotyping of seedling and adult plants under natural disease epidemics in four environments. High correlations among the field data translated into high heritability values within and across locations. Population structure was evident when accessions were grouped by stripe rust reaction. GWAS identified 127 resistance loci that were effective across at least two environments, including 20 with significant genome-wide adjusted P-values. Based on relative map positions of previously reported genes and QTL, five of the QTL with significant genome-wide adjusted P-values in this study represent potentially new loci. This study provides an overview of the diversity of Pst resistance in the NSGC winter wheat germplasm core collection, which can be exploited for diversification of stripe rust resistance in breeding programs. PMID:27226168

  10. Genetic Architecture of Resistance to Stripe Rust in a Global Winter Wheat Germplasm Collection

    PubMed Central

    Bulli, Peter; Zhang, Junli; Chao, Shiaoman; Chen, Xianming; Pumphrey, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Virulence shifts in populations of Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), the causal pathogen of wheat stripe rust, are a major challenge to resistance breeding. The majority of known resistance genes are already ineffective against current races of Pst, necessitating the identification and introgression of new sources of resistance. Germplasm core collections that reflect the range of genetic and phenotypic diversity of crop species are ideal platforms for examining the genetic architecture of complex traits such as resistance to stripe rust. We report the results of genetic characterization and genome-wide association analysis (GWAS) for resistance to stripe rust in a core subset of 1175 accessions in the National Small Grains Collection (NSGC) winter wheat germplasm collection, based on genotyping with the wheat 9K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) iSelect assay and phenotyping of seedling and adult plants under natural disease epidemics in four environments. High correlations among the field data translated into high heritability values within and across locations. Population structure was evident when accessions were grouped by stripe rust reaction. GWAS identified 127 resistance loci that were effective across at least two environments, including 20 with significant genome-wide adjusted P-values. Based on relative map positions of previously reported genes and QTL, five of the QTL with significant genome-wide adjusted P-values in this study represent potentially new loci. This study provides an overview of the diversity of Pst resistance in the NSGC winter wheat germplasm core collection, which can be exploited for diversification of stripe rust resistance in breeding programs. PMID:27226168

  11. Geysers from the Tiger Stripes of Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-10-01

    Enceladus, the sixth-largest moon of Saturn, is a cold, icy world but its also remarkably active. Recent studies have charted over a hundred geysers venting gas and dust into space from Enceladus south polar region. New research addresses the question of how the moons extreme surface terrain influences the locations and behavior of these geysers.Active PlumesEnceladus orbiting within Saturns E ring. Enceladus plumes probably created this ring. [NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute]A decade ago, scientists discovered that Enceladus south polar region is home to a prominent set of four fractures known as the tiger stripes. This region was found to contain roughly 100 geyser jets, which form plumes of gas and dust venting into space at a combined rate of ~200 kilograms per second! These plumes are probably the source of the material in Saturns E ring, in which Enceladus orbits.Recently, Carolyn Porco (UC Berkeley and CICLOPS Space Science Institute) led a study that analyzed 6.5 years of Cassini data, surveying the locations and orientations of 101 geysers. The outcome was peculiar: the geysers are distributed along the tiger stripes, but their directions are not all pointing vertically from the surface (see the video below!).Now, Paul Helfenstein (Cornell University) has teamed up with Porco to examine whether the surface terrain surrounding the geysers affects where the jets erupt, what direction they point, and even when theyre active.Surface InfluenceHelfenstein and Porco demonstrate that the locations and behavior of the geysers are very likely influenced by Enceladus surface features in this region. In particular, they find:The spacing of the geyser jets on Enceladus is not random.The jets are roughly uniformly distributed along the three most active tiger stripes, spaced about 5 kilometers apart. This fixed spacing might be due to shear fractures produced by fault motion along the tiger stripes cutting across the stripes at regular intervals and providing

  12. High spectral resolution image of 'Stripe'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Another early target for the full-color capability of the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was the rock Stripe, named for the vertical, red band on its face. Regions with different color properties include the rock face (blue), bright soil in the background (green), darker intermediate colored soil in front of the rock (red), and the vertical stripe.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  13. Filarial dermatitis in a striped skunk.

    PubMed

    Saito, E K; Little, S E

    1997-10-01

    A striped skunk (Mephitis mephitis) from Kansas (USA) with severe diffuse dermatitis characterized by extensive alopecic areas, thickened skin, and multiple, scattered cutaneous abscesses on the dorsal aspect of the head, neck, and trunk was submitted for diagnostic evaluation. More than 50 nematodes identified as Filaria taxideae were found in the dorsal subcutaneous tissue. Histologic examination of the skin revealed multifocal pyogranulomatous inflammation with intralesional larvated nematode eggs, moderate orthokeratotic hyperkeratosis, and mild acanthosis. The lesions resemble those reported from badgers (Taxidea taxus) and a lesser panda (Ailurus fulgens) with dermatitis caused by Filaria taxideae. Although F. taxideae has been previously collected from skunks, this is the first report of filarid dermatitis caused by this nematode in a striped skunk.

  14. Parallel Vegetation Stripe Formation Through Hydrologic Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yiwei; Stieglitz, Marc; Turk, Greg; Engel, Victor

    2010-05-01

    It has long been a challenge to theoretical ecologists to describe vegetation pattern formations such as the "tiger bush" stripes and "leopard bush" spots in Niger, and the regular maze patterns often observed in bogs in North America and Eurasia. To date, most of simulation models focus on reproducing the spot and labyrinthine patterns, and on the vegetation bands which form perpendicular to surface and groundwater flow directions. Various hypotheses have been invoked to explain the formation of vegetation patterns: selective grazing by herbivores, fire, and anisotropic environmental conditions such as slope. Recently, short distance facilitation and long distance competition between vegetation (a.k.a scale dependent feedback) has been proposed as a generic mechanism for vegetation pattern formation. In this paper, we test the generality of this mechanism by employing an existing, spatially explicit, advection-reaction-diffusion type model to describe the formation of regularly spaced vegetation bands, including those that are parallel to flow direction. Such vegetation patterns are, for example, characteristic of the ridge and slough habitat in the Florida Everglades and which are thought to have formed parallel to the prevailing surface water flow direction. To our knowledge, this is the first time that a simple model encompassing a nutrient accumulation mechanism along with biomass development and flow is used to demonstrate the formation of parallel stripes. We also explore the interactive effects of plant transpiration, slope and anisotropic hydraulic conductivity on the resulting vegetation pattern. Our results highlight the ability of the short distance facilitation and long distance competition mechanism to explain the formation of the different vegetation patterns beyond semi-arid regions. Therefore, we propose that the parallel stripes, like the other periodic patterns observed in both isotropic and anisotropic environments, are self-organized and form

  15. Evaluation of Pakistan wheat germplasms for stripe rust resistance using molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Sobia, Tabassum; Muhammad, Ashraf; Chen, XianMing

    2010-09-01

    Wheat production in Pakistan is seriously constrained due to rust diseases and stripe rust (yellow) caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, which could limit yields. Thus development and cultivation of genetically diverse and resistant varieties is the most sustainable solution to overcome these diseases. The first objective of the present study was to evaluate 100 Pakistan wheat cultivars that have been grown over the past 60 years. These cultivars were inoculated at the seedling stage with two virulent stripe rust isolates from the United States and two from Pakistan. None of the wheat cultivars were resistant to all tested stripe rust isolates, and 16% of cultivars were susceptible to the four isolates at the seedling stage. The data indicated that none of the Pakistan wheat cultivars contained either Yr5 or Yr15 genes that were considered to be effective against most P. striiformis f. sp. tritici isolates from around the world. Several Pakistan wheat cultivars may have gene Yr10, which is effective against isolate PST-127 but ineffective against PST-116. It is also possible that these cultivars may have other previously unidentified genes or gene combinations. The second objective was to evaluate the 100 Pakistan wheat cultivars for stripe rust resistance during natural epidemics in Pakistan and Washington State, USA. It was found that a higher frequency of resistance was present under field conditions compared with greenhouse conditions. Thirty genotypes (30% of germplasms) were found to have a potentially high temperature adult plant (HTAP) resistance. The third objective was to determine the genetic diversity in Pakistan wheat germplasms using molecular markers. This study was based on DNA fingerprinting using resistance gene analog polymorphism (RGAP) marker analysis. The highest polymorphism detected with RGAP primer pairs was 40%, 50% and 57% with a mean polymorphism of 36%. A total of 22 RGAP markers were obtained in this study. RGAP, simple

  16. Motion camouflage induced by zebra stripes.

    PubMed

    How, Martin J; Zanker, Johannes M

    2014-06-01

    The functional significance of the zebra coat stripe pattern is one of the oldest questions in evolutionary biology, having troubled scientists ever since Charles Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace first disagreed on the subject. While different theories have been put forward to address this question, the idea that the stripes act to confuse or 'dazzle' observers remains one of the most plausible. However, the specific mechanisms by which this may operate have not been investigated in detail. In this paper, we investigate how motion of the zebra's high contrast stripes creates visual effects that may act as a form of motion camouflage. We simulated a biologically motivated motion detection algorithm to analyse motion signals generated by different areas on a zebra's body during displacements of their retinal images. Our simulations demonstrate that the motion signals that these coat patterns generate could be a highly misleading source of information. We suggest that the observer's visual system is flooded with erroneous motion signals that correspond to two well-known visual illusions: (i) the wagon-wheel effect (perceived motion inversion due to spatiotemporal aliasing); and (ii) the barber-pole illusion (misperceived direction of motion due to the aperture effect), and predict that these two illusory effects act together to confuse biting insects approaching from the air, or possibly mammalian predators during the hunt, particularly when two or more zebras are observed moving together as a herd. PMID:24368147

  17. Motion camouflage induced by zebra stripes.

    PubMed

    How, Martin J; Zanker, Johannes M

    2014-06-01

    The functional significance of the zebra coat stripe pattern is one of the oldest questions in evolutionary biology, having troubled scientists ever since Charles Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace first disagreed on the subject. While different theories have been put forward to address this question, the idea that the stripes act to confuse or 'dazzle' observers remains one of the most plausible. However, the specific mechanisms by which this may operate have not been investigated in detail. In this paper, we investigate how motion of the zebra's high contrast stripes creates visual effects that may act as a form of motion camouflage. We simulated a biologically motivated motion detection algorithm to analyse motion signals generated by different areas on a zebra's body during displacements of their retinal images. Our simulations demonstrate that the motion signals that these coat patterns generate could be a highly misleading source of information. We suggest that the observer's visual system is flooded with erroneous motion signals that correspond to two well-known visual illusions: (i) the wagon-wheel effect (perceived motion inversion due to spatiotemporal aliasing); and (ii) the barber-pole illusion (misperceived direction of motion due to the aperture effect), and predict that these two illusory effects act together to confuse biting insects approaching from the air, or possibly mammalian predators during the hunt, particularly when two or more zebras are observed moving together as a herd.

  18. The influence of logjams on largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) concentrations on the lower Roanoke River, a large sand-bed river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schenk, Edward R.; McCargo, Jeremy W.; Moulin, Bertrand; Hupp, Cliff R.; Richter, Jean M.

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the relation between logjams and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) on the alluvial sand-bed lower Roanoke River. Disparate data sets from previous bank erosion, fisheries, and large wood studies were used to compare the distribution of largemouth bass with logjam frequency. Logjams are related to the frequency of bank mass wasting increasing from near an upstream dam to the middle reach of the study segment and then decreasing as the river approaches sea level. The highest concentration of largemouth bass and logjams was in the middle reach (110 fish per hour and 21 jams per km). Another measure of largemouth bass distribution, fish biomass density (g h1 ), had a similar trend with logjams and was a better predictor of fish distribution versus logjams (R2= 0.6 and 0.8 and p = 0.08 and 0.02 for fish per hour and g h1 versus logjam, respectively). We theorize that the preference for adult bass to congregate near logjams indicates the use of the jams as feeding areas. The results of a principal component analysis indicate that fish biomass concentration is much more related to logjam frequency than channel geometry (width, depth, and bank height), bed grain size, bank erosion, or turbidity. The results of this research support recent studies on in-channel wood and fisheries: Logjams appear to be important for maintaining, or increasing, both largemouth bass numbers and total biomass of fish in large eastern North American rivers. Persistent logjams, important as habitat, exist where relatively undisturbed river reaches allow for bank erosion inputs of wood and available anchoring locations. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  19. Improving Oral Hygiene Skills by Computer-Based Training: A Randomized Controlled Comparison of the Modified Bass and the Fones Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Harnacke, Daniela; Mitter, Simona; Lehner, Marc; Munzert, Jörn; Deinzer, Renate

    2012-01-01

    Background Gingivitis and other plaque-associated diseases have a high prevalence in western communities even though the majority of adults report daily oral hygiene. This indicates a lack of oral hygiene skills. Currently, there is no clear evidence as to which brushing technique would bring about the best oral hygiene skills. While the modified Bass technique is often recommended by dentists and in textbooks, the Fones technique is often recommended in patient brochures. Still, standardized comparisons of the effectiveness of teaching these techniques are lacking. Methodology/Principal Findings In a final sample of n = 56 students, this multidisciplinary, randomized, examiner-blinded, controlled study compared the effects of parallel and standardized interactive computer presentations teaching either the Fones or the modified Bass technique. A control group was taught the basics of tooth brushing alone. Oral hygiene skills (remaining plaque after thorough oral hygiene) and gingivitis were assessed at baseline and 6, 12, and 28 weeks after the intervention. We found a significant group×time interaction for gingivitis (F(4/102) = 3.267; p = 0.016; ε = 0.957; η2 = 0.114) and a significant main effect of group for oral hygiene skills (F(2/51) = 7.088; p = 0.002; η2 = 0.218). Fones was superior to Bass; Bass did not differ from the control group. Group differences were most prominent after 6 and 12 weeks. Conclusions/Significance The present trial indicates an advantage of teaching the Fones as compared to the modified Bass technique with respect to oral hygiene skills and gingivitis. Future studies are needed to analyze whether the disadvantage of teaching the Bass technique observed here is restricted to the teaching method employed. Trial Registration German Clinical Trials Register DRKS00003488 PMID:22629353

  20. Recurrence, mortality, and dispersal of prairie striped skunks, Mephitis mephitis, and implications to rabies epizootiology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sargeant, A.B.; Greenwood, R.J.; Piehl, J.L.; Bicknell, W.B.

    1982-01-01

    Detailed study of radio-equipped individuals of the Striped Skunk (Mephitis mephitis) in a North Dakota population provided insight into possible mechanisms for spread of rabies during spring and summer. Annual recurrence rates of 138 skunks marked on a study area averaged 11% for adult males, 43% for adult females and 9% for kits. Population changes were from mortality (including rabies) and dispersal. Five instances of adult dispersal (four by males) were recorded; maximum straight-line distance was 119 km. Some males initiated dispersal in spring. Communal denning by adults occurred rarely after whelping began but resulted in intraspecific conflict. Evidence of intraspecific and interspecific strife leading to kit mortality and some adult mortality was found at dens of 9 of 40 litters studied.

  1. The Na+/K+/2Cl- cotransporter in the sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax during ontogeny: involvement in osmoregulation.

    PubMed

    Lorin-Nebel, Catherine; Boulo, Viviane; Bodinier, Charlotte; Charmantier, Guy

    2006-12-01

    This study combines a cellular and molecular analysis of the Na(+)/K(+)/2Cl(-) cotransporter (NKCC) to determine the osmoregulatory role of this protein in different tissues during the ontogeny of the sea bass. We have characterized the complete sequence of the NKCC1 isoform isolated from the sea bass gills and have identified, by immunofluorescence, NKCC1, and other isoforms, within the epithelium of the major osmoregulatory organs. Different (absorptive and secretory) functions have been attributed to this protein according to the tissue and salinity. The effects of short- (1-4 days), medium- (7-21 days) and long (6 months)-term freshwater (FW) adaptations were investigated, in comparison with seawater (SW)-maintained sea bass. In adult sea bass after long-term adaptation to FW and SW, the gills had the highest expression of NKCC mRNA compared with the median/posterior kidney and to the posterior intestine. Expression of NKCC mRNA in the kidney was 95% (SW) and 63% (FW) lower, and in the intestine 98% (SW) and 77% (FW) lower. Compared to SW-maintained sea bass, long-term FW adaptation induced a significant 5.6-fold decrease in the branchial NKCC gene expression whereas the intestinal and renal expressions did not vary significantly. The cells of the intestine and collecting ducts as well as a part of the epithelium lining the urinary bladder expressed NKCC apically. Within the gill chloride cells, NKCC was found basolaterally in SW-acclimated fish; some apically stained cells were detected after 7 days of FW exposure and their relative number increased progressively following FW acclimation. The appearance of FW-type chloride cells induces a functional shift of the gills from a secretory to an absorptive epithelium, which was only completed after long-term exposure to FW. Short- and medium-term exposure to FW induced a progressive decrease in total NKCC content and an increase in functionally different branchial chloride cells. During development, the

  2. Hybridization threatens shoal bass populations in the Upper Chattahoochee River Basin: Chapter 37

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dakin, Elizabeth E; Porter, Brady A.; Freeman, Byron J.; Long, James M.; Tringali, Michael D.; Long, James M.; Birdsong, Timothy W.; Allen, Micheal S.

    2015-01-01

    Shoal bass are native only to the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint river system of Georgia, Alabama, and Florida, and are vulnerable to extinction as a result of population fragmentation and introduction of non-native species. We assessed the genetic integrity of isolated populations of shoal bass in the upper Chattahoochee River basin (above Lake Lanier, Big Creek, and below Morgan Falls Dam) and sought to identify rates of hybridization with non-native, illegally stocked smallmouth bass and spotted bass.

  3. European sea bass, Dicentrarchus labrax, in a changing ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, E. C.; Ellis, R. P.; Scolamacchia, M.; Scolding, J. W. S.; Keay, A.; Chingombe, P.; Shields, R. J.; Wilcox, R.; Speirs, D. C.; Wilson, R. W.; Lewis, C.; Flynn, K. J.

    2014-05-01

    Ocean acidification, caused by rising concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2), is widely considered to be a major global threat to marine ecosystems. To investigate the potential effects of ocean acidification on the early life stages of a commercially important fish species, European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax), 12 000 larvae were incubated from hatch through metamorphosis under a matrix of two temperatures (17 and 19 °C) and two seawater pCO2 levels (ambient and 1,000 μatm) and sampled regularly for 42 days. Calculated daily mortality was significantly affected by both temperature and pCO2, with both increased temperature and elevated pCO2 associated with lower daily mortality and a significant interaction between these two factors. There was no significant pCO2 effect noted on larval morphology during this period but larvae raised at 19 °C possessed significantly larger eyes and lower carbon:nitrogen ratios at the end of the study compared to those raised under 17 °C. Similarly, when the incubation was continued to post-metamorphic (juvenile) animals (day 67-69), fish raised under a combination of 19 °C and 1000 μatm pCO2 were significantly heavier. However, juvenile D. labrax raised under this combination of 19 °C and 1000 μatm pCO2 also exhibited lower aerobic scopes than those incubated at 19 °C and ambient pCO2. Most studies investigating the effects of near-future oceanic conditions on the early life stages of marine fish have used incubations of relatively short durations and suggested that these animals are resilient to ocean acidification. Whilst the increased survival and growth observed in this study supports this view, we conclude that more work is required to investigate whether the differences in juvenile physiology observed in this study manifest as negative impacts in adult fish.

  4. Lysine optimization of a commercial fishmeal-free diet for hybrid striped bass (Morone chrysops x M. saxatilis)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Substitution of fishmeal with alternate proteins in aquafeeds often results in dietary imbalances of first-limiting essential amino acids (EAA) and poorer fish performance. This 12-week growth trial was undertaken to test the hypothesis that ideal protein theory accurately predicts first-limiting am...

  5. Individual-based modeling of environmental quality effects on early life stages of fish: A case study using striped bass

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, K.A. ); Cowan, J.H. Jr. . Dept. of Marine Sciences); Houde, E.D. . Chesapeake Biological Lab.); Coutant, C.C. )

    1992-01-01

    We demonstrate an individual-based approach to population modeling to evaluate environmental quality effects on early life stages of fishes. We believe that, regardless of the modeling approach, environmental quality effects ultimately must be evaluated at the population level. Determining population-level consequences of changes in environmental quality is critical because the population is the relevant endpoint of interest with respect to success of the species and its availability for harvest. It offers a common metric upon which to compare among different environmental factors, effects, and life stages.

  6. DIFFERENTIAL EFFECTS OF BREVETOXIN AND B-NAPHTHOFLAVONE ON XENOBIOTIC METABOLIZING ENZYMES IN STRIPED BASS (MORONE SAXATILIS). (R825433)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  7. Individual-based modeling of environmental quality effects on early life stages of fish: A case study using striped bass

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, K.A.; Cowan, J.H. Jr.; Houde, E.D.; Coutant, C.C.

    1992-11-01

    We demonstrate an individual-based approach to population modeling to evaluate environmental quality effects on early life stages of fishes. We believe that, regardless of the modeling approach, environmental quality effects ultimately must be evaluated at the population level. Determining population-level consequences of changes in environmental quality is critical because the population is the relevant endpoint of interest with respect to success of the species and its availability for harvest. It offers a common metric upon which to compare among different environmental factors, effects, and life stages.

  8. Hepatic transcriptomic and metabolic responses of hybrid striped bass (Morone chrysops) to acute and chronic hypoxic insult

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hypoxia is a state of oxygen deficiency that can lead to impairment of organismal function or in extreme cases, death. Irrespective of their environment, at some point in their life cycle farmed fish will likely experience varying degrees of hypoxia, particularly during summer months. The temperat...

  9. 50 CFR 648.146 - Black sea bass recreational fishing season.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Black sea bass recreational fishing season. 648.146 Section 648.146 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL... Management Measures for the Black Sea Bass Fishery § 648.146 Black sea bass recreational fishing...

  10. 50 CFR 648.146 - Black sea bass recreational fishing season.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Black sea bass recreational fishing season. 648.146 Section 648.146 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL... Management Measures for the Black Sea Bass Fishery § 648.146 Black sea bass recreational fishing...

  11. 50 CFR 648.146 - Black sea bass recreational fishing season.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Black sea bass recreational fishing season. 648.146 Section 648.146 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL... Management Measures for the Black Sea Bass Fishery § 648.146 Black sea bass recreational fishing...

  12. 50 CFR 648.147 - Black sea bass minimum fish sizes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Black sea bass minimum fish sizes. 648... Measures for the Black Sea Bass Fishery § 648.147 Black sea bass minimum fish sizes. (a) Moratorium... all vessels issued a moratorium permit under § 648.4(a)(7) that fish for, possess, land or...

  13. 50 CFR 648.147 - Black sea bass minimum fish sizes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Black sea bass minimum fish sizes. 648... Measures for the Black Sea Bass Fishery § 648.147 Black sea bass minimum fish sizes. (a) Moratorium... all vessels issued a moratorium permit under § 648.4(a)(7) that fish for, possess, land or...

  14. 50 CFR 648.149 - Black sea bass framework adjustments to management measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Black sea bass framework adjustments to management measures. 648.149 Section 648.149 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT... UNITED STATES Management Measures for the Black Sea Bass Fishery § 648.149 Black sea bass...

  15. 50 CFR 648.149 - Black sea bass framework adjustments to management measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Black sea bass framework adjustments to management measures. 648.149 Section 648.149 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT... UNITED STATES Management Measures for the Black Sea Bass Fishery § 648.149 Black sea bass...

  16. 50 CFR 648.149 - Black sea bass framework adjustments to management measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Black sea bass framework adjustments to management measures. 648.149 Section 648.149 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT... UNITED STATES Management Measures for the Black Sea Bass Fishery § 648.149 Black sea bass...

  17. 50 CFR 648.149 - Black sea bass framework adjustments to management measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Black sea bass framework adjustments to management measures. 648.149 Section 648.149 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT... UNITED STATES Management Measures for the Black Sea Bass Fishery § 648.149 Black sea bass...

  18. Growth of the rock bass, Ambloplites rupestris (Rafinesque), in five lakes of northeastern Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hile, Ralph

    1942-01-01

    Rock bass of corresponding length from Allequash, Silver, and Trout Lakes were so nearly of the same weight that one curve described the length-weight relationship of the three stocks. Muskellunge Lake rock bass were considerably lighter than fish of the same length from these three lakes, and Nebish Lake rock bass were somewhat lighter than those from Muskellunge Lake.

  19. Development and characterization of a largemouth bass cell line.

    PubMed

    Getchell, Rodman G; Groocock, Geoffrey H; Cornwell, Emily R; Schumacher, Vanessa L; Glasner, Lindsay I; Baker, Barry J; Frattini, Stephen A; Wooster, Gregory A; Bowser, Paul R

    2014-09-01

    Abstract The development and characterization of a new cell line, derived from the ovary of Largemouth Bass Micropterus salmoides, is described. Gonad tissue was collected from Largemouth Bass that were electrofished from Oneida Lake, New York. The tissue was processed and grown in culture flasks at approximately 22°C for more than 118 passages during an 8-year period from 2004 to 2011. The identity of these cells as Largemouth Bass origin was confirmed by sequencing a portion of the cytochrome b gene. Growth rate at three different temperatures was documented. The cell line was susceptible to Largemouth Bass virus (LMBV) and its replication was compared with that of Bluegill Lepomis macrochirus fry (BF-2), one of the cell lines recommended for LMBV isolation by the American Fisheries Society Fish Health Section Blue Book. Quantitative PCR results from the replication trial showed the BF-2 cell line produced approximately 10-fold more LMBV copies per cell than the new Largemouth Bass cell line after 6 d, while the titration assay showed similar quantities in each cell line after 1 week. Received February 18, 2014; accepted April 16, 2014. PMID:25229492

  20. Development and characterization of a largemouth bass cell line.

    PubMed

    Getchell, Rodman G; Groocock, Geoffrey H; Cornwell, Emily R; Schumacher, Vanessa L; Glasner, Lindsay I; Baker, Barry J; Frattini, Stephen A; Wooster, Gregory A; Bowser, Paul R

    2014-09-01

    Abstract The development and characterization of a new cell line, derived from the ovary of Largemouth Bass Micropterus salmoides, is described. Gonad tissue was collected from Largemouth Bass that were electrofished from Oneida Lake, New York. The tissue was processed and grown in culture flasks at approximately 22°C for more than 118 passages during an 8-year period from 2004 to 2011. The identity of these cells as Largemouth Bass origin was confirmed by sequencing a portion of the cytochrome b gene. Growth rate at three different temperatures was document