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Sample records for adult stroke patients

  1. Clinical Trials of Adult Stem Cell Therapy in Patients with Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Bang, Oh Young

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell therapy is considered a potential regenerative strategy for patients with neurologic deficits. Studies involving animal models of ischemic stroke have shown that stem cells transplanted into the brain can lead to functional improvement. With current advances in the understanding regarding the effects of introducing stem cells and their mechanisms of action, several clinical trials of stem cell therapy have been conducted in patients with stroke since 2005, including studies using mesenchymal stem cells, bone marrow mononuclear cells, and neural stem/progenitor cells. In addition, several clinical trials of the use of adult stem cells to treat ischemic stroke are ongoing. This review presents the status of our understanding of adult stem cells and results from clinical trials, and introduces ongoing clinical studies of adult stem cell therapy in the field of stroke.

  2. Correlations between the sequelae of stroke and physical activity in Korean adult stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki-Jong; Kim, Hwang-Yong; Chun, In-Ae

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] The present study investigated a wide range of stroke patients living in South Korea using the Korean Community Health Survey raw data to determine the correlation between stroke and physical activity. [Subjects and Methods] This study used raw data from the 2012 Korean Community Health Survey. The total number of participants was 228,921; of the 4,475 stroke patients who had been diagnosed by a medical doctor or an oriental medical doctor, the data for 4,460 patients, excluding 15 whose amount of physical activity was unclear, were used in the analysis. [Results] The amount of physical activity performed by patients who had sequelae was significantly lower than that performed by patients who no longer had sequelae. Similarly, for the type of sequelae, palsy in the arms and legs, facial palsy, communication disability, swallowing or eating disability, and visual disability were associated with lower physical activity. Furthermore, as the number of sequelae increased, patients performed significantly less physical activity. [Conclusion] The findings suggest that when decisions on national policies and budgets are made, methods for increasing the physical activity of patients with a history of stroke should be considered. PMID:27390446

  3. Correlations between the sequelae of stroke and physical activity in Korean adult stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki-Jong; Kim, Hwang-Yong; Chun, In-Ae

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The present study investigated a wide range of stroke patients living in South Korea using the Korean Community Health Survey raw data to determine the correlation between stroke and physical activity. [Subjects and Methods] This study used raw data from the 2012 Korean Community Health Survey. The total number of participants was 228,921; of the 4,475 stroke patients who had been diagnosed by a medical doctor or an oriental medical doctor, the data for 4,460 patients, excluding 15 whose amount of physical activity was unclear, were used in the analysis. [Results] The amount of physical activity performed by patients who had sequelae was significantly lower than that performed by patients who no longer had sequelae. Similarly, for the type of sequelae, palsy in the arms and legs, facial palsy, communication disability, swallowing or eating disability, and visual disability were associated with lower physical activity. Furthermore, as the number of sequelae increased, patients performed significantly less physical activity. [Conclusion] The findings suggest that when decisions on national policies and budgets are made, methods for increasing the physical activity of patients with a history of stroke should be considered. PMID:27390446

  4. Strokes in young adults: epidemiology and prevention

    PubMed Central

    Smajlović, Dževdet

    2015-01-01

    Strokes in young adults are reported as being uncommon, comprising 10%–15% of all stroke patients. However, compared with stroke in older adults, stroke in the young has a disproportionately large economic impact by leaving victims disabled before their most productive years. Recent publications report an increased incidence of stroke in young adults. This is important given the fact that younger stroke patients have a clearly increased risk of death compared with the general population. The prevalence of standard modifiable vascular risk factors in young stroke patients is different from that in older patients. Modifiable risk factors for stroke, such as dyslipidemia, smoking, and hypertension, are highly prevalent in the young stroke population, with no significant difference in geographic, climatic, nutritional, lifestyle, or genetic diversity. The list of potential stroke etiologies among young adults is extensive. Strokes of undetermined and of other determined etiology are the most common types among young patients according to TOAST (Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment) criteria. Prevention is the primary treatment strategy aimed at reducing morbidity and mortality related to stroke. Therefore, primary prevention is very important with regard to stroke in young adults, and aggressive treatment of risk factors for stroke, such as hypertension, smoking, and dyslipidemia, is essential. The best form of secondary stroke prevention is directed toward stroke etiology as well as treatment of additional risk factors. However, there is a lack of specific recommendations and guidelines for stroke management in young adults. In conclusion, strokes in young adults are a major public health problem and further research, with standardized methodology, is needed in order to give us more precise epidemiologic data. Given the increasing incidence of stroke in the young, there is an objective need for more research in order to reduce this burden. PMID:25750539

  5. Correlation between brain injury and dysphagia in adult patients with stroke

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Maria Cristina de Alencar; Jurkiewicz, Ari Leon; Santos, Rosane Sampaio; Furkim, Ana Maria; Massi, Giselle; Pinto, Gisele Sant Ana; Lange, Marcos Christiano

    2012-01-01

    Summary Introduction: In the literature, the incidence of oropharyngeal dysphagia in patients with cerebrovascular accident (AVE) ranges 20–90%. Some studies correlate the location of a stroke with dysphagia, while others do not. Objective: To correlate brain injury with dysphagia in patients with stroke in relation to the type and location of stroke. Method: A prospective study conducted at the Hospital de Clinicas with 30 stroke patients: 18 women and 12 men. All patients underwent clinical evaluation and swallowing nasolaryngofibroscopy (FEES®), and were divided based on the location of the injury: cerebral cortex, cerebellar cortex, subcortical areas, and type: hemorrhagic or transient ischemic. Results: Of the 30 patients, 18 had ischemic stroke, 10 had hemorrhagic stroke, and 2 had transient stroke. Regarding the location, 10 lesions were in the cerebral cortex, 3 were in the cerebral and cerebellar cortices, 3 were in the cerebral cortex and subcortical areas, and 3 were in the cerebral and cerebellar cortices and subcortical areas. Cerebral cortex and subcortical area ischemic strokes predominated in the clinical evaluation of dysphagia. In FEES®, decreased laryngeal sensitivity persisted following cerebral cortex and ischemic strokes. Waste in the pharyngeal recesses associated with epiglottic valleculae predominated in the piriform cortex in all lesion areas and in ischemic stroke. A patient with damage to the cerebral and cerebellar cortices from an ischemic stroke exhibited laryngeal penetration and tracheal aspiration of liquid and honey. Conclusion: Dysphagia was prevalent when a lesion was located in the cerebral cortex and was of the ischemic type. PMID:25991951

  6. Strokes in adults.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lynne

    2016-06-15

    Essential facts There are two types of stroke - around 85% are ischaemic and 15% are haemorrhagic. According to the Stroke Association's State of the Nation report, published in January 2016, stroke occurs around 152,000 times a year in the UK. It is the fourth largest cause of death in the UK and one of the largest causes of disability. PMID:27305230

  7. SMART syndrome (stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy) in adult and pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Amy E; Gillan, Eileen; DiMario, Francis Joseph

    2014-03-01

    SMART syndrome (stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy) is a rare condition that involves complex migraines with focal neurologic findings in patients following cranial irradiation for central nervous system malignancies. Little is known about the mechanisms behind the disorder, making successful treatment challenging. We report 2 new cases of SMART syndrome in pediatric patients as well as review all documented cases of the syndrome. Each of our 2 pediatric patients suffered multiple episodes. Attacks were characterized by severe headache, visual disturbance, aphasia, and weakness. Recovery occurred over several days to weeks. The data from all documented reports of SMART syndrome indicate a greater prevalence for male gender. An age-dependent pattern of onset was also observed, with a greater variability of syndrome onset in patients who received cranial irradiation at a younger age. SMART appears to be a reversible, recurrent long-term complication of radiation therapy with possible age- and gender-related influences.

  8. Does the rectus femoris nerve block improve knee recurvatum in adult stroke patients? A kinematic and electromyographic study.

    PubMed

    Gross, R; Delporte, L; Arsenault, L; Revol, P; Lefevre, M; Clevenot, D; Boisson, D; Mertens, P; Rossetti, Y; Luauté, J

    2014-02-01

    Knee recurvatum (KR) during gait is common in hemiplegic patients. Quadriceps spasticity has been postulated as a cause of KR in this population. The aim of this study was to assess the role of rectus femoris spasticity in KR by using selective motor nerve blocks of the rectus femoris nerve in hemiparetic stroke patients. The data from six adult, post-stroke hemiplegic patients who underwent a rectus femoris nerve block for a stiff-knee gait were retrospectively analyzed. An extensive clinical and functional evaluation was performed and gait was assessed by motion analysis (kinematic, kinetic and electromyographic parameters) before and during the block realized using 2% lidocaine injected under a neurostimulation and ultrasonographic targeting procedure. The main outcome measures were the peak knee extension in stance and peak knee extensor moment obtained during gait analysis. No serious adverse effect of the nerve block was observed. The block allowed a reduction of rectus femoris overactivity in all patients. Peak knee extension and extensor moment in stance did not improve in any patient, but peak knee flexion during the swing phase was significantly higher after block (mean: 31.2° post, 26.4 pre, p < 0.05). Our results provide arguments against the hypothesis that the spasticity of the rectus femoris contributes to KR. PMID:24286615

  9. The reliability of repeated TMS measures in older adults and in patients with subacute and chronic stroke.

    PubMed

    Schambra, Heidi M; Ogden, R Todd; Martínez-Hernández, Isis E; Lin, Xuejing; Chang, Y Brenda; Rahman, Asif; Edwards, Dylan J; Krakauer, John W

    2015-01-01

    The reliability of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) measures in healthy older adults and stroke patients has been insufficiently characterized. We determined whether common TMS measures could reliably evaluate change in individuals and in groups using the smallest detectable change (SDC), or could tell subjects apart using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). We used a single-rater test-retest design in older healthy, subacute stroke, and chronic stroke subjects. At twice daily sessions on two consecutive days, we recorded resting motor threshold, test stimulus intensity, recruitment curves, short-interval intracortical inhibition, and facilitation, and long-interval intracortical inhibition. Using variances estimated from a random effects model, we calculated the SDC and ICC for each TMS measure. For all TMS measures in all groups, SDCs for single subjects were large; only with modest group sizes did the SDCs become low. Thus, while these TMS measures cannot be reliably used as a biomarker to detect individual change, they can reliably detect change exceeding measurement noise in moderate-sized groups. For several of the TMS measures, ICCs were universally high, suggesting that they can reliably discriminate between subjects. TMS measures should be used based on their reliability in particular contexts. More work establishing their validity, responsiveness, and clinical relevance is still needed.

  10. The reliability of repeated TMS measures in older adults and in patients with subacute and chronic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Schambra, Heidi M.; Ogden, R. Todd; Martínez-Hernández, Isis E.; Lin, Xuejing; Chang, Y. Brenda; Rahman, Asif; Edwards, Dylan J.; Krakauer, John W.

    2015-01-01

    The reliability of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) measures in healthy older adults and stroke patients has been insufficiently characterized. We determined whether common TMS measures could reliably evaluate change in individuals and in groups using the smallest detectable change (SDC), or could tell subjects apart using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). We used a single-rater test-retest design in older healthy, subacute stroke, and chronic stroke subjects. At twice daily sessions on two consecutive days, we recorded resting motor threshold, test stimulus intensity, recruitment curves, short-interval intracortical inhibition, and facilitation, and long-interval intracortical inhibition. Using variances estimated from a random effects model, we calculated the SDC and ICC for each TMS measure. For all TMS measures in all groups, SDCs for single subjects were large; only with modest group sizes did the SDCs become low. Thus, while these TMS measures cannot be reliably used as a biomarker to detect individual change, they can reliably detect change exceeding measurement noise in moderate-sized groups. For several of the TMS measures, ICCs were universally high, suggesting that they can reliably discriminate between subjects. TMS measures should be used based on their reliability in particular contexts. More work establishing their validity, responsiveness, and clinical relevance is still needed. PMID:26388729

  11. Young adult stroke: neuropsychological dysfunction and recovery.

    PubMed

    Ferro, J M; Crespo, M

    1988-08-01

    Etiology, neuropsychological deficits, aphasia type, and recovery were retrospectively studied in 254 young adults with stroke. Cardiac embolism was the most common cause of stroke in patients younger than 40, while atherosclerosis was the most frequent etiology among those aged 41-50 years. In 166 aphasic patients, Broca's aphasia was the most common while Wernicke's and transcortical aphasias were rare. Compared with an older aphasic population, young patients had significantly more nonfluent aphasias and fewer comprehension deficits. These differences were related to stroke localization: the majority of infarcts localized by computed tomography in 37 patients involved either the entire middle cerebral artery territory or its superior or deep branches, explaining the preponderance of nonfluent aphasia. Prognosis of aphasia in our patients was better than has been reported for non-age-selected aphasia populations. Roughly one third of our patients recovered completely, one third improved, and one third had an unresolved language deficit. Complete recovery and significant improvement were observed even greater than 6 months after stroke. In some patients, recovery was much better than might have been predicted from lesion site and size depicted on computed tomograms. PMID:2456633

  12. [Spanish translation and validation of the Postural Assessment Scale for Stroke Patients (PASS) to assess balance and postural control in adult post-stroke patients].

    PubMed

    Cabanas-Valdés, Rosa; Girabent-Farrés, Monserrat; Cánovas-Vergé, David; Caballero-Gómez, Fernanda M; Germán-Romero, Ana; Bagur-Calafat, Caritat

    2015-02-16

    Introduccion. En los ultimos años, la Postural Assessment Scale for Stroke Patients (PASS) se ha convertido en la escala mas utilizada para valorar el equilibrio y el control postural en pacientes adultos que han sufrido un ictus, especialmente en la fase aguda y subaguda. Objetivo. Traducir y validar la PASS para la poblacion española como instrumento de valoracion del equilibrio y el control postural en pacientes adultos postictus. Pacientes y metodos. Se tradujo al español la version original francesa de la PASS; dicha version fue consensuada por un equipo de expertos. Posteriormente se hizo una retrotraduccion al frances y se envio al autor de la escala, el cual aprobo dicha version. Seguidamente se evaluo la fiabilidad intra e interobservador; para ello se llevaron a cabo cuatro mediciones a 60 pacientes postictus, a partir de una videograbacion. Dos de estas mediciones fueron realizadas por el mismo observador, y la tercera y cuarta, por un segundo y tercer observadores. Resultados. Los valores obtenidos referidos a la puntuacion total de la escala reflejan un indice de fiabilidad del 0,999; tambien muestran una fiabilidad superior a 0,90 en cada uno de los items, tanto en las comparaciones intraobservador como interobservador, y una consistencia interna del 0,94. Conclusion. La version española de la PASS es valida y fiable para valorar el equilibrio y el control postural en pacientes adultos postictus.

  13. Adult Stem Cell Therapy for Stroke: Challenges and Progress

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Oh Young; Kim, Eun Hee; Cha, Jae Min; Moon, Gyeong Joon

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of death and physical disability among adults. It has been 15 years since clinical trials of stem cell therapy in patients with stroke have been conducted using adult stem cells like mesenchymal stem cells and bone marrow mononuclear cells. Results of randomized controlled trials showed that adult stem cell therapy was safe but its efficacy was modest, underscoring the need for new stem cell therapy strategies. The primary limitations of current stem cell therapies include (a) the limited source of engraftable stem cells, (b) the presence of optimal time window for stem cell therapies, (c) inherited limitation of stem cells in terms of growth, trophic support, and differentiation potential, and (d) possible transplanted cell-mediated adverse effects, such as tumor formation. Here, we discuss recent advances that overcome these hurdles in adult stem cell therapy for stroke. PMID:27733032

  14. HIV, antiretroviral treatment, hypertension, and stroke in Malawian adults

    PubMed Central

    Corbett, Elizabeth L.; Connor, Myles D.; Mzinganjira, Henry; Kampondeni, Sam; Choko, Augustine; Hopkins, Mark; Emsley, Hedley C.A.; Bryer, Alan; Faragher, Brian; Heyderman, Robert S.; Allain, Theresa J.; Solomon, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate HIV, its treatment, and hypertension as stroke risk factors in Malawian adults. Methods: We performed a case-control study of 222 adults with acute stroke, confirmed by MRI in 86%, and 503 population controls, frequency-matched for age, sex, and place of residence, using Global Positioning System for random selection. Multivariate logistic regression models were used for case-control comparisons. Results: HIV infection (population attributable fraction [PAF] 15%) and hypertension (PAF 46%) were strongly linked to stroke. HIV was the predominant risk factor for young stroke (≤45 years), with a prevalence of 67% and an adjusted odds ratio (aOR) (95% confidence interval) of 5.57 (2.43–12.8) (PAF 42%). There was an increased risk of a stroke in patients with untreated HIV infection (aOR 4.48 [2.44–8.24], p < 0.001), but the highest risk was in the first 6 months after starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) (aOR 15.6 [4.21–46.6], p < 0.001); this group had a lower median CD4+ T-lymphocyte count (92 vs 375 cells/mm3, p = 0.004). In older participants (HIV prevalence 17%), HIV was associated with stroke, but with a lower PAF than hypertension (5% vs 68%). There was no interaction between HIV and hypertension on stroke risk. Conclusions: In a population with high HIV prevalence, where stroke incidence is increasing, we have shown that HIV is an important risk factor. Early ART use in immunosuppressed patients poses an additional and potentially treatable stroke risk. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome may be contributing to the disease mechanisms. PMID:26683649

  15. AGE AND GENDER DIFFERENCES IN ACUTE STROKE HOSPITAL PATIENTS.

    PubMed

    Kes, Vanja Bašić; Jurašić, Miljenka-Jelena; Zavoreo, Iris; Lisak, Marijana; Jelec, Vjekoslav; Matovina, Lucija Zadro

    2016-03-01

    Stroke is the second leading cause of death and the most important cause of adult disability worldwide and in Croatia. In the past, stroke was almost exclusively considered to be a disease of the elderly; however, today the age limit has considerably lowered towards younger age. The aim of this study was to determine age and gender impact on stroke patients in a Croatian urban area during one-year survey. The study included all acute stroke patients admitted to our Department in 2004. A compiled stroke questionnaire was fulfilled during hospitalization by medical personnel on the following items: stroke risk factors including lifestyle habits (smoking and alcohol), pre-stroke physical ability evaluation, stroke evolution data, laboratory and computed tomography findings, outcome data and post-stroke disability assessment. Appropriate statistical analysis of numerical and categorical data was performed at the level of p < 0.05. Analysis was performed on 396 patients, 24 of them from the younger adult stroke group. Older stroke patients had worse disability at hospital discharge and women had worse disabilities at both stroke onset and hospital discharge, probably due to older age at stroke onset. Younger patients recovered better, while older patients had to seek secondary medical facilities more often, as expected. The most important in-hospital laboratory findings in young stroke patients were elevated lipid levels, while older patients had elevated serum glucose and C-reactive protein. Stroke onset in younger patients most often presented with sudden onset headache; additionally, onset seizure was observed more frequently than expected. Stroke risk factor analysis showed that women were more prone to hypertension, chronic heart failure and atrial fibrillation, whereas men had carotid disease more frequently, were more often smokers and had higher alcohol intake. Additionally, age analysis showed that heart conditions and smoking were more prevalent among older

  16. Education in stroke: strategies to improve stroke patient care.

    PubMed

    Gompertz, Patrick; Slack, Andrew; Vogel, Mira; Burrows, Sharon; Clark, Philippa

    2002-07-01

    'Stroke units save lives', but organized care requires expert staff and regular training to be effective. However, the quality of inpatient care for stroke remains poor, and stroke education is often fragmented between the health-care professions. This review describes some national and local strategies aimed at ensuring that all patients are cared for by expert staff.

  17. Depression Increases Stroke Hospitalization Cost: An Analysis of 17,010 Stroke Patients in 2008 by Race and Gender

    PubMed Central

    Husaini, Baqar; Levine, Robert; Sharp, Linda; Cain, Van; Novotny, Meggan; Hull, Pamela; Orum, Gail; Sampson, Uchechukwu; Moonis, Majaz

    2013-01-01

    Objective. This analysis focuses on the effect of depression on the cost of hospitalization of stroke patients. Methods. Data on 17,010 stroke patients (primary diagnosis) were extracted from 2008 Tennessee Hospital Discharge Data System. Three groups of patients were compared: (1) stroke only (SO, n = 7,850), (2) stroke + depression (S+D, n = 3,965), and (3) stroke + other mental health diagnoses (S+M, n = 5,195). Results. Of all adult patients, 4.3% were diagnosed with stroke. Stroke was more prevalent among blacks than whites (4.5% versus 4.2%, P < 0.001) and among males than females (5.1% versus 3.7%, P < 0.001). Nearly one-quarter of stroke patients (23.3%) were diagnosed with depression/anxiety. Hospital stroke cost was higher among depressed stroke patients (S+D) compared to stroke only (SO) patients ($77,864 versus $47,790, P < 0.001), and among S+D, cost was higher for black males compared to white depressed males ($97,196 versus $88,115, P < 0.001). Similar racial trends in cost emerged among S+D females. Conclusion. Depression in stroke patients is associated with increased hospitalization costs. Higher stroke cost among blacks may reflect the impact of comorbidities and the delay in care of serious health conditions. Attention to early detection of depression in stroke patients might reduce inpatient healthcare costs. PMID:23555070

  18. Recognition and management of stroke in young adults and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Biller, José; Elkind, Mitchell S.; Fullerton, Heather J.; Jauch, Edward C.; Kittner, Steven J.; Levine, Deborah A.; Levine, Steven R.

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 15% of all ischemic strokes (IS) occur in young adults and adolescents. To date, only limited prior public health and research efforts have specifically addressed stroke in the young. Early diagnosis remains challenging because of the lack of awareness and the relative infrequency of stroke compared with stroke mimics. Moreover, the causes of IS in the young are heterogeneous and can be relatively uncommon, resulting in uncertainties about diagnostic evaluation and cause-specific management. Emerging data have raised public health concerns about the increasing prevalence of traditional vascular risk factors in young individuals, and their potential role in increasing the risk of IS, stroke recurrence, and poststroke mortality. These issues make it important to formulate and enact strategies to increase both awareness and access to resources for young stroke patients, their caregivers and families, and health care professionals. The American Academy of Neurology recently convened an expert panel to develop a consensus document concerning the recognition, evaluation, and management of IS in young adults and adolescents. The report of the consensus panel is presented herein. PMID:23946297

  19. Long-Term Prognosis of Ischemic Stroke in Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Varona, Jose F.

    2011-01-01

    There is limited information about long-term prognosis of ischemic stroke in young adults. Giving the potentially negative impact in physical, social, and emotional aspects of an ischemic stroke in young people, providing early accurate long-term prognostic information is very important in this clinical setting. Moreover, detection of factors associated with bad outcomes (death, recurrence, moderate-to-severe disability) help physicians in optimizing secondary prevention strategies. The present paper reviews the most relevant published information concerning long-term prognosis and predictors of unfavorable outcomes of ischemic stroke affecting young adults. As a summary, we can conclude that, in the long term, stroke in the young adult increases slightly the risk of mortality, implies higher risk of future cardiovascular events, and determines functional limitations in a significant percentage of patients. Nevertheless, in every individual case the prognosis has to be considered depending on several factors (stroke subtype, initial severity, cardiovascular risk factors) that determine the long-term outcomes. PMID:21197408

  20. Evaluation of Patent Foramen Ovale in Young Adults with Cryptogenic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Hamzeaie Moghadam, Akbar; Aredestani, Esmaeel

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Stroke is a leading cause of death and long-term disability worldwide. Although a minority of ischemic strokes in the community affect younger adults, up to 40% of acute ischemic strokes in young adults are cryptogenic in nature, that is, no cause is determined. Underlying pathologies of stroke of unknown cause are multiple, including patent foramen ovale (PFO). The PFO is the most common defect of atrial septum of the heart. This study evaluated the frequency of PFO in brain stroke with unknown etiology in patients younger than 50 years of age in Kerman. METHODS This cross-sectional study was done in Shafa Medical Center of Kerman University of Medical Sciences in 2008. For detection of the PFO, we used agitated saline test with transcranial Doppler sonography in brain stroke patients with unknown etiology and also a control group (normal persons). RESULTS PFO was found in 53% of patients. No significant difference was observed between sexes. The rate in the control group was 20%. Patients with large PFO had 2 or more attacks of stroke. Subjects in the control group did not have large PFO. CONCLUSION One of the most important underlying causes in young adults with cryptogenic stroke is PFO. It is better to prescribe antiplatelet drugs in patients with the first attack of stroke, but as for patients with recurrent stroke, closure of PFO must be considered. PMID:22577450

  1. Occupational Therapy Interventions for Adults With Stroke.

    PubMed

    Nilsen, Dawn; Gillen, Glen; Arbesman, Marian; Lieberman, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Evidence Connection articles provide a clinical application of systematic reviews developed in conjunction with the American Occupational Therapy Association's (AOTA's) Evidence-Based Practice project. The clinical condition discussed in this inaugural Evidence Connection article is adults with stroke. Findings from the systematic reviews on this topic were published in the January/February 2015 issue of the American Journal of Occupational Therapy and in AOTA's Occupational Therapy Practice Guidelines for Adults With Stroke (Wolf & Nilsen, 2015). Each article in this series will summarize the evidence from the published reviews on a given topic and presents an application of the evidence to a related clinical case. Evidence Connection articles illustrate how the research evidence from the reviews can be used to inform and guide clinical decision making.

  2. The excess burden of stroke in hospitalized adults with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Strouse, John J; Jordan, Lori C; Lanzkron, Sophie; Casella, James F

    2009-09-01

    This report compares the relative rates and risk factors associated with stroke in adults versus children with sickle cell disease (SCD) in the United States over the last decade. We identified incident strokes in patients with SCD using ICD-9 codes for acute stroke and SCD and the California Patient Discharge Databases. We estimated SCD prevalence by using the incidence of SCD at birth with adjustment for early mortality from SCD. We identified 255 acute strokes (70 primary hemorrhagic and 185 ischemic) among 69,586 hospitalizations for SCD-related complications from 1998 to 2007. The rate of stroke in children [<18 years old (310/100,000 person-years)] was similar to young adults [18-34 years old (360/100,000 person-years)], but much higher in middle-aged [35-64 years old (1,160/100,000 person-years)] and elderly adults [> or =65 years old (4,700/100,000 person-years)]. Stroke was associated with hypertension in children and hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, atrial fibrillation, and renal disease in adults. Most acute strokes (75%) and in-hospital deaths from stroke (91%) occurred in adults. Our results suggest that the rate of stroke in SCD peaks in older adults and is three-fold higher than rates previously reported in African-Americans of similar age (35-64 years) without SCD. Stroke in SCD is associated with several known adult risk factors for ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. Studies for the primary and secondary prevention of stroke in adults with SCD are urgently needed.

  3. Examining Factors Associated with Pre-Admission to Discharge of Stroke Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuan, Shao-Ping; Chen, Chiu-Mei; Liao, Hung-Chang; Chou, Ming-Jen

    2012-01-01

    Stroke is the second leading cause of death and a major cause of adult disability in Taiwan. This research established correlations between pre-admission and discharge data in stroke patients to promote education of the general public, prevention, treatment and high standards of chronic care. A total of 790 stroke patients at Chung Shan Medical…

  4. Patient's Guide to Antithrombotic Therapy in Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... have had ischemic strokes. 5. How important is aspirin for a new stroke? ! Aspirin is a drug that “thins” the blood by ... cases, it is recommended that patients start taking aspirin within 48 hours of an ischemic stroke. While ...

  5. Detection of metals and metalloproteins in the plasma of stroke patients by mass spectrometry methods.

    PubMed

    Kodali, Phanichand; Chitta, Karnakar R; Landero Figueroa, Julio A; Caruso, Joseph A; Adeoye, Opeolu

    2012-10-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of adult disability, worldwide. Metalloproteins and metals play key roles in epigenetic events in living organisms, including hypertension, the most important modifiable risk factor for stroke. Thus, metalloproteins may be important target biomarkers for disease diagnosis. The primary goal of this study was to assess metal containing proteins in blood plasma, detected by ICP-MS, followed by ESIMS for peptide/protein identification. We then compared the relative concentration differences between samples from patients with ischemic stroke, hemorrhagic stroke and stroke mimics. In 29 plasma samples (10 stroke mimics, 10 ischemic stroke and 9 hemorrhagic stroke patients) previously collected from patients who presented to the University of Cincinnati Emergency Department within 12 hours of symptom onset for a plasma banking project. For the metal associated protein study, Mg, Mn, Cu, Se concentrations were statistically different when compared between stroke mimics vs. ischemic stroke patients and ischemic stroke patients vs. hemorrhagic stroke patients. Pb concentrations were statistically different when compared between stroke mimics vs. ischemic stroke patients and Mo levels were statistically the same among the three groups. In addition, we also report concentration levels and preliminary correlation studies for total elemental analysis among the three sets of patients. This pilot study demonstrates that mass spectrometry methods may be highly valuable in detecting novel stroke biomarkers in blood plasma. Expanded studies are warranted to confirm these findings.

  6. Heart Disease, Stroke, or Other Cardiovascular Disease and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease, Stroke, or Other Cardiovascular Disease and Adult Vaccination Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... more about health insurance options. Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Heart Disease, ...

  7. Painting as Language for a Stroke Patient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carmi, Shulamit; Mashiah, Tonni

    1996-01-01

    Painting may provide an outlet for self-expression for stroke patients experiencing physical, emotional, and social difficulties during rehabilitation. A case study of a stroke patient demonstrates the value of the artistic process as a vehicle for integration and communication. (LSR)

  8. Hemodynamic findings in patients with brain stroke

    PubMed Central

    Siebert, Janusz; Molisz, Andrzej; Trzeciak, Bartosz; Nyka, Walenty

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Standard procedures carried out at a stroke department in patients after a cerebral event may prove insufficient for monitoring hemodynamic indices. Impedance cardiography enables hemodynamic changes to be monitored non-invasively. The aim of the work was to describe hemodynamic parameters in patients with acute phase of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke and to analyse the correlation between the type of hemodynamic response and long-term prognosis. Material and methods The 45 consecutive subjects with ischemic stroke and 16 with a hemorrhagic stroke were examined additionally with impedance cardiography during the first day of hospitalization. The heart contractility, pump performance, afterload and preload indices were recorded and calculated automatically and the data analyzed in terms of 6-month mortality. Results We found a significant association between the systemic vascular resistance index, Heather index, stroke index, heart rate, systolic and diastolic and mean arterial blood pressure and mortality in patients with ischemic stroke (p = 0.002, p = 0.008, p = 0.012, p = 0.005, p = 0.007, p = 0.009, p = 0.002 respectively). Logistic regression analysis identified the thoracic fluid content as the most significant variable correlating with the non-survival of the patients with ischemic stroke and in the whole group (ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke). The significant parameters were also mean arterial pressure and stroke index in ischemic stroke (the correct answer ratio was 86.67%) and heart rate in the whole group (the correct answer ratio was 80.33%). There were no significant associations in hemorrhagic stroke. Conclusions The hemodynamic parameters correlate with long term prognosis in patients with ischemic brain stroke. PMID:22662014

  9. Role of echocardiography in patients with stroke.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Koki; Homma, Shunichi

    2016-08-01

    Investigation of potential embolic source is an important diagnostic step in treating patients with ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack. Cardiogenic embolism has been estimated to be the causative factor in 15-30% of all cases of ischemic stroke. Cardioembolic strokes are generally severe and recurrence and mortality rate high. Various cardiac disorders including atrial fibrillation, ventricular thrombus, valvular heart disease, cardiac tumors, and structural heart defects can cause cardioembolic stroke. Although the aortic arch is not a cardiac structure, it is usually considered under source of cardiac embolism (cardioaortic source) and is reviewed in this article. Echocardiography (both transthoracic and transesophageal) is a widely used and versatile technique that can provide comprehensive information of thromboembolic risk in patients with stroke. This article reviews potential cardiac sources of stroke and discusses the role of echocardiography in clinical practice. PMID:27256218

  10. Clinical study of 222 patients with pure motor stroke.

    PubMed

    Arboix, A; Padilla, I; Massons, J; García-Eroles, L; Comes, E; Targa, C

    2001-08-01

    The objective was to assess the frequency of pure motor stroke caused by different stroke subtypes and to compare demographic, clinical, neuroimaging, and outcome data of pure motor stroke with those of patients with other lacunar stroke as well as with those of patients with non-lacunar stroke. Data from 2000 patients with acute stroke (n=1761) or transient ischaemic attack (n=239) admitted consecutively to the department of neurology of an acute care 350 bed teaching hospital were prospectively collected in the Sagrat Cor Hospital of Barcelona stroke registry over a 10 year period. For the purpose of the study 222 (12.7%) patients with pure motor stroke were selected. The other study groups included 218 (12.3%) patients with other lacunar strokes and 1321 (75%) patients with non-lacunar stroke. In relation to stroke subtype, lacunar infarcts were found in 189 (85%) patients, whereas ischaemic lacunar syndromes not due to lacunar infarcts occurred in 23 (10.4%) patients (atherothrombotic stroke in 12, cardioembolic stroke in seven, infarction of undetermined origin in three, and infarction of unusual aetiology in one) and haemorrhagic lacunar syndromes in 10 (4.5%). Patients with pure motor stroke showed a better outcome than patients with non-lacunar stroke with a significantly lower number of complications and in hospital mortality rate, shorter duration of hospital stay, and a higher number of symptom free patients at hospital discharge. After multivariate analysis, hypertension, diabetes, obesity, hyperlipidaemia, non-sudden stroke onset, internal capsule involvement, and pons topography seemed to be independent factors of pure motor stroke in patients with acute stroke. In conclusion, about one of every 10 patients with acute stroke had a pure motor stroke. Pure motor stroke was caused by a lacunar infarct in 85% of patients and by other stroke subtypes in 15%. Several clinical features are more frequent in patients with pure motor stroke than in patients

  11. Acute ischemic stroke in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Gorchynski, Julie; Herrick, John; Cortes, Edgar

    2008-11-01

    Acute ischemic stroke in a pediatric patient is a complex disease with a variety of etiologies that differ from adults. Though rare, they are a real phenomenon with potentially devastating consequences. Some treating institutions are using anti-thrombotic drug therapy with unclear benefits. Available literature, which is limited to case reports and retrospective reviews of databases, clouds this topic with both positive and negative outcomes. Emergency department management should focus on stabilization and resuscitation with immediate involvement of a pediatric neurologist and intensivist. The decision to use anti-thrombotic drug therapy, including anti-platelet drugs and thrombolytics, should be in consult with the specialists involved until randomized controlled trials determine their safety and efficacy in the pediatric population.

  12. Pneumonia in stroke patients: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Ding, R; Logemann, J A

    2000-01-01

    This is a retrospective study of 378 consecutive stroke patients who were referred between June 1994 and June 1997 for videofluorographic study of oropharyngeal swallow. Patients who had radiation therapy, brain tumor, brain surgery, head and/or spinal cord trauma, oral-pharyngeal disease or surgery, or other neurologic diseases in addition to the stroke were excluded from the study. Patients were assigned to two groups: one with pneumonia and one without pneumonia. One hundred one patients were included in the pneumonia group, and 277 patients were included in the nonpneumonia group. Within the pneumonia group, patients were assigned to an acute pneumonia group (pneumonia within 6 months poststroke) and a chronic pneumonia group (pneumonia more than 6 months poststroke). Variables examined in the study included patients' medical history and the findings from the videofluorographic studies. Pearson chi-square analysis was used to identify those variables that were significantly different between the pneumonia and nonpneumonia patient groups and between the acute and chronic pneumonia groups. Results showed that stroke patients who developed pneumonia had a significantly higher incidence of multiple-location and unspecified lesion strokes, chronic airway disease in their medical history, and aspiration during the videofluorographic studies when compared with patients who did not develop pneumonia. Within the pneumonia group, the acute pneumonia group was found to have a significantly higher incidence of hypertension and diabetes in their medical history and a significantly higher incidence of aspiration and reduced laryngeal elevation during the videofluorographic studies. Between 48% and 55% of all stroke patients in the study aspirated. Patients who suffered multiple strokes, brainstem stroke, or subcortical stroke had the greatest frequency of aspiration.

  13. Rhetoric and reality in stroke patient care.

    PubMed

    Pound, P; Ebrahim, S

    2000-11-01

    The aim of this study was to identify aspects of the process of care that might help explain the improved outcomes associated with stroke units. Three different care settings for stroke patients, an elderly care unit and general medical ward in an inner-city teaching hospital and a stroke unit in another teaching hospital in the same city, were compared using non-participant observational methods. Nurses on the stroke unit and general medical ward usually engaged in standardised and functional interaction with patients, while nurses on the elderly care unit were observed to adopt a more personal and attentive approach with patients. Rehabilitation nursing was rarely observed on the stroke unit, never on the general medical ward but always on the elderly care unit. There was evidence of effective communication between nurses and therapists on the elderly care unit but this was not observed on the stroke unit. On the elderly care unit the team appeared divided, with therapists and nurses on one side and medicine on the other, while on the stroke unit the divide was between doctors and therapists on one hand and nurses the other. On the general medical ward there was no team working. The observed lack of rehabilitation nursing, nurses' disengagement from the team and nurses' observed lack of warmth towards patients on the stroke unit were all surprising findings. Further research needs to examine whether such findings would be reproduced in stroke units elsewhere. If so, it might be that the better outcomes achieved on stroke units are despite rather than because of the nursing they receive there. PMID:11077948

  14. Aspirin resistant patients with recent ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Castilla-Guerra, L; Navas-Alcántara, M S; Fernández-Moreno, M C

    2014-04-01

    Some patients with a recent ischemic stroke who are being treated with aspirin as an antiaggregant suffer a new ischemic stroke. These patients (15-25%) have been called unresponsive to aspirin or aspirin resistant. The aspirin-resistant patients have a four-time greater risk of suffering a stroke. Furthermore, these strokes are generally more severe, with increased infarct volume and greater risk of recurrence. There is currently no ideal laboratory test to detect the resistance to the antiaggregant effect of aspirin. The study of resistance to aspirin would only be indicated in selected cases. In these patients, one should first rule out any "pseudo-resistance" to aspirin (lack of compliance, concomitant treatments that interfere with the action of the aspirin). PMID:24211052

  15. Ultrasonographic Measurement of Transverse Abdominis in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Dong; Han, Nami; Eom, Mi Ja; Kim, Jong Gil

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare transverse abdominis (TrA) contractility in stroke patients with hemiparesis and healthy adults using musculoskeletal ultrasonography. Methods Forty-seven stroke patients with hemiparesis and 25 age-matched healthy control subjects participated in this study. Stroke patients were divided into three groups on the basis of their degree of ambulation. Group A consisted of 9 patients with wheelchair ambulation, group B of 23 patients with assisted ambulation, and group C of 15 patients with independent ambulation. Inter-rater reliability regarding ultrasonographic measurement of abdominal muscle thickness in the control group was assessed by two examiners. The TrA contraction ratio (TrA contracted thickness/TrA resting thickness) was measured during abdominal drawing-in maneuver and was compared between the patients and the control group and between the ambulation groups. Results The inter-rater reliability ranged from 0.900 to 0.947. The TrA contraction ratio was higher in the non-paretic side than in the paretic side (1.40±0.62 vs. 1.14±0.35, p<0.01). The TrA contraction ratio of the patient group was lower in the non-paretic side as well as in the paretic side than that of the control group (right 1.85±0.29, left 1.92±0.42; p<0.001). No difference was found between the ambulation regarding the TrA contraction ratio. Conclusion The TrA contractility in hemiparetic stroke patients is significantly decreased in the non-paretic side as well as in the paretic side compared with that of healthy adults. Ultrasonographic measurement can be clinically used in the evaluation of deep abdominal muscles in stroke patients. PMID:25024954

  16. Language, Literacy, and Characterization of Stroke Among Patients Taking Warfarin for Stroke Prevention: Implications for Health Communication

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Margaret C.; Panguluri, Praveen; Machtinger, Edward L.; Schillinger, Dean

    2009-01-01

    Objective Warfarin is a medication commonly prescribed to prevent strokes associated with certain medical conditions such as atrial fibrillation; however, little is known about how people taking warfarin perceive the goal of therapy and how they describe strokes. We assessed the stroke-related health literacy of anticoagulated patients to inform ways in which to improve health communication among people taking warfarin. Methods We conducted a mixed-methods study of an ethnically and linguistically diverse sample of people taking warfarin to prevent stroke (N=183) and measured literacy using the short-form Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults. We asked participants to (1) describe their indication for warfarin, and (2) describe a stroke. Transcribed answers were coded as concordant or discordant with established indications for warfarin and definitions of stroke. Results Forty-three percent of participants provided a discordant response when describing their indication for warfarin. Only 9.3% reported that the purpose of taking warfarin was to prevent stroke. Not speaking English [OR = 2.4 (1.1–5.6)] and less than a college education [OR = 3.3 (1.4–7.3)] were independently associated with discordant answers about warfarin. Nearly 40% of subjects had inaccurate perceptions of stroke, and only one-third of subjects described a symptom or sign of stroke. Among English and Spanish-speaking participants, inadequate literacy was strongly associated with discordant responses about stroke [OR = 5.8 (2.1–15.6)]. Conclusion Among high risk people taking warfarin to prevent stroke, significant gaps in stroke-related health literacy exist. These gaps likely represent mismatches in the ways clinicians teach and patients learn. Practice implications Since stroke risk awareness and early recognition of the signs and symptoms of stroke are critical aspects of stroke prevention and treatment, clinicians should more strongly link warfarin therapy to stroke prevention

  17. The Migraine-Ischemic Stroke Relation in Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Pezzini, Alessandro; Del Zotto, Elisabetta; Giossi, Alessia; Volonghi, Irene; Costa, Paolo; Dalla Volta, Giorgio; Padovani, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    In spite of the strong epidemiologic evidence linking migraine and ischemic stroke in young adults, the mechanisms explaining this association remain poorly understood. The observation that stroke occurs more frequently during the interictal phase of migraine prompts to speculation that an indirect relation between the two diseases might exist. In this regard, four major issues might be considered which may be summarized as follows: (1) the migraine-ischemic stroke relation is influenced by specific risk factors such as patent foramen ovale or endothelial dysfunction and more frequent in particular conditions like spontaneous cervical artery dissection; (2) migraine is associated with an increased prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors; (3) the link is caused by migraine-specific drugs; (4) migraine and ischemic vascular events are linked via a genetic component. In the present paper, we will review epidemiological studies, discuss potential mechanisms of migraine-induced stroke and comorbid ischemic stroke, and pose new research questions. PMID:21197470

  18. Acupuncture therapy for stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Wang, Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Acupuncture is one of the most important parts of Traditional Chinese Medicine, has been used for more than 3000 years as prevention and treatment for various diseases in China as well as in adjacent regions, and is widely accepted in western countries in recent years. More and more clinical trials revealed that acupuncture shows positive effect in stroke, not only as a complementary and alternative medicine for poststroke rehabilitation but also as a preventive strategy which could induce cerebral ischemic tolerance, especially when combined with modern electrotherapy. Acupuncture has some unique characteristics, which include acupoint specificity and parameter-dependent effect. It also involves complicated mechanism to exert the beneficial effect on stroke. Series of clinical trials have shown that acupuncture primarily regulates the release of neurochemicals, hemorheology, cerebral microcirculation, metabolism, neuronal activity, and the function of specific brain region. Animal studies showed that the effects of acupuncture therapy on stroke were possibly via inhibition of postischemic inflammatory reaction, stimulation of neurogenesis and angiogenesis, and influence on neural plasticity. Mechanisms for its preconditioning effect include activity enhancement of antioxidant, regulation of the endocannabinoid system, and inhibition of apoptosis. Although being controversial, acupuncture is a promising preventive and treatment strategy for stroke, but further high-quality clinical trials would be needed to provide more confirmative evidence.

  19. Factor V Leiden does not have a role in cryptogenic ischemic stroke among Iranian young adults

    PubMed Central

    Kheradmand, Ehsan; Pourhossein, Meraj; Amini, Gilda; Saadatnia, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Different risk factors have been suggested for ischemic stroke in young adults. In a group of these patients despite of extensive diagnostic work-up, the primary cause remains unknown. Coagulation tendency is accounted as a possible cause in these patients. Previous studies on factor V Leiden (FVL) as the main cause of inherited thrombophilia for clarifying the role of FVL in stroke have resulted in controversial findings. The current study investigates the role of this factor in ischemic stroke among Iranians. Materials and Methods: This case-control study was performed between September 2007 and December 2008 in Isfahan, Iran. The case group comprised of 22 patients of which 15 were males and 7 were females with age range of ≤50 years, diagnosed as ischemic stroke without classic risk factors and the control group consisted of 54 healthy young adults. After filling consent form, venous blood samples were obtained and sent to the laboratory for genetic examination. Results: No FVL mutation was found in the case group. There was one carrier of the mutation as heterozygous in the control group (relative frequency = 1.85%). Conclusions: Based on our study, FVL might not be considered as an independent risk factor for ischemic stroke in Iranian individuals who are not suffering from other risk factors of ischemic stroke. PMID:24761388

  20. Ischemic stroke following abuse of Marijuana in a Nigerian adult male.

    PubMed

    Oyinloye, Olalekan; Nzeh, Donald; Yusuf, Ayodeji; Sanya, Emmanuel

    2014-10-01

    Cannabis is the most widely used illicit drug among adolescents and young adults. Despite its widespread use, only a few reports exist on the association of cannabis use and stroke. A 26-year-old Nigerian male, developed right-sided ischemic stroke few hours after smoking three wraps of cannabis. He had smoked cannabis consistently for the past 4 years prior to the development of the stroke. Known stroke etiology and abuse of other illicit drugs were ruled out from history and investigations. Neuroimaging studies of the brain revealed infarcts in basal ganglia secondary to occlusion of blood flow in the left anterior and middle cerebral arteries. The mechanism of stroke in this patient was thought to be a cannabis-induced vasculopathy. Many cases of stroke in the young are increasingly being seen in hospitals in resource scarce countries. There seems to be a predilection for the basal ganglia in ischemic stroke following cannabis abuse. Therefore, cannabis abuse should be considered in young adults with basal ganglia infarcts, after excluding other known etiologies. PMID:25288854

  1. Cognitive impairment and stroke in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Lo Coco, Daniele; Lopez, Gianluca; Corrao, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    We reviewed current knowledge about the interaction between stroke and vascular risk factors and the development of cognitive impairment and dementia. Stroke is increasingly recognized as an important cause of cognitive problems and has been implicated in the development of both Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia. The prevalence of cognitive impairment after stroke is high, and their combined effects significantly increase the cost of care and health resource utilization, with reflections on hospital readmissions and increased mortality rates. There is also substantial evidence that vascular risk factors (such as hypertension, diabetes, obesity, dyslipidemia, and tobacco smoking) are independently associated with an increased risk of cognitive decline and dementia. Thus, a successful management of these factors, as well as optimal acute stroke management, might have a great impact on the development of cognitive impairment. Notwithstanding, the pathological link between cognitive impairment, stroke, and vascular risk factors is complex and still partially unclear so that further studies are needed to better elucidate the boundaries of this relationship. Many specific pharmacological treatments, including anticholinergic drugs and antihypertensive medications, and nonpharmacological approaches, such as diet, cognitive rehabilitation, and physical activity, have been studied for patients with vascular cognitive impairment, but the optimal care is still far away. Meanwhile, according to the most recent knowledge, optimal stroke care should also include cognitive assessment in the short and long term, and great efforts should be oriented toward a multidisciplinary approach, including quality-of-life assessment and support of caregivers. PMID:27069366

  2. Cognitive impairment and stroke in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Lo Coco, Daniele; Lopez, Gianluca; Corrao, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    We reviewed current knowledge about the interaction between stroke and vascular risk factors and the development of cognitive impairment and dementia. Stroke is increasingly recognized as an important cause of cognitive problems and has been implicated in the development of both Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia. The prevalence of cognitive impairment after stroke is high, and their combined effects significantly increase the cost of care and health resource utilization, with reflections on hospital readmissions and increased mortality rates. There is also substantial evidence that vascular risk factors (such as hypertension, diabetes, obesity, dyslipidemia, and tobacco smoking) are independently associated with an increased risk of cognitive decline and dementia. Thus, a successful management of these factors, as well as optimal acute stroke management, might have a great impact on the development of cognitive impairment. Notwithstanding, the pathological link between cognitive impairment, stroke, and vascular risk factors is complex and still partially unclear so that further studies are needed to better elucidate the boundaries of this relationship. Many specific pharmacological treatments, including anticholinergic drugs and antihypertensive medications, and nonpharmacological approaches, such as diet, cognitive rehabilitation, and physical activity, have been studied for patients with vascular cognitive impairment, but the optimal care is still far away. Meanwhile, according to the most recent knowledge, optimal stroke care should also include cognitive assessment in the short and long term, and great efforts should be oriented toward a multidisciplinary approach, including quality-of-life assessment and support of caregivers.

  3. Cognitive impairment and stroke in elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    Lo Coco, Daniele; Lopez, Gianluca; Corrao, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    We reviewed current knowledge about the interaction between stroke and vascular risk factors and the development of cognitive impairment and dementia. Stroke is increasingly recognized as an important cause of cognitive problems and has been implicated in the development of both Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia. The prevalence of cognitive impairment after stroke is high, and their combined effects significantly increase the cost of care and health resource utilization, with reflections on hospital readmissions and increased mortality rates. There is also substantial evidence that vascular risk factors (such as hypertension, diabetes, obesity, dyslipidemia, and tobacco smoking) are independently associated with an increased risk of cognitive decline and dementia. Thus, a successful management of these factors, as well as optimal acute stroke management, might have a great impact on the development of cognitive impairment. Notwithstanding, the pathological link between cognitive impairment, stroke, and vascular risk factors is complex and still partially unclear so that further studies are needed to better elucidate the boundaries of this relationship. Many specific pharmacological treatments, including anticholinergic drugs and antihypertensive medications, and nonpharmacological approaches, such as diet, cognitive rehabilitation, and physical activity, have been studied for patients with vascular cognitive impairment, but the optimal care is still far away. Meanwhile, according to the most recent knowledge, optimal stroke care should also include cognitive assessment in the short and long term, and great efforts should be oriented toward a multidisciplinary approach, including quality-of-life assessment and support of caregivers. PMID:27069366

  4. [Stroke].

    PubMed

    Luft, A R; Weller, M

    2009-11-01

    Ischemic stroke is a very frequent neurological disorder. It's incidence is increasing as western societies are aging. Effective therapies that reduce mortality and increase the chances of living symptom-free or, at least, in independence are available. Intravenous or intraarterial thrombolysis is an effective treatment with a number needed to treat of 6 if given within 4.5 hours after symptom onset. The safe use of thrombolysis requires an effective and repeatedly trained workflow established within a team of a neurologist and specialized nursing staff in an optimized environment (admission, imaging facility, laboratory, stroke unit). After peracute treatment, the patient should be transferred to a stroke unit. This unit is a spatially defined intermediate care unit with specifically trained personnel (physicians, nurses, therapists). Treating the patient in a stroke unit is as effective in improving outcome as thrombolysis and also reduces the length of hospital stay. In contrast to thrombolysis, which can be provided, on average, to only 5% of stroke patients, stroke unit care is applicable to most. The organization of medical care in most European countries and in Switzerland separate the acute phase from subacute rehabilitation and chronic stroke treatment. This can be highly confusing for the patient who, during the course of the disease, meets different physicians, nurses and therapists with often diverging opinions about prognosis and therapies. Consistent treatment approaches and patient/caregiver information is necessary and can only be implemented by providing a homogeneous pathway for continuous stroke care. PMID:20029781

  5. Activated Protein C Resistance Does Not Increase Risk for Recurrent Stroke or Death in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Thaler, Christoph; Sonntag, Natalie; Schleef, Michael; Rondak, Ina-Christine; Poppert, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Background Activated protein C (APC) resistance is the most common inherited prothrombotic disorder. The role of APC resistance in ischemic stroke is controversially discussed. Objectives The aim of this single center follow up study was to investigate the effect of APC resistance on stroke recurrence and survival in stroke patients. Patients/Methods We retrospectively identified 966 patients who had had an ischemic stroke or transitory ischemic attack (TIA) and in whom laboratory tests for APC resistance had been conducted. These patients were contacted to determine the primary outcomes of recurrent ischemic stroke or death. Results A total of 858 patients with an average follow up time of 8.48 years were included. APC resistance did not influence cumulative incidence functions for stroke free and total survival. In multivariate analyses, crude and adjusted hazard ratios for recurrent stroke as well as for death where not significantly increased in patients with APC resistance. This also applies to the subgroups of young patients, patients with cryptogenic stroke and patients with atrial fibrillation. Conclusion APC-resistance is not a risk factor for subsequent stroke or death in patients with a first ischemic stroke or TIA. Testing for APC-resistance in stroke patients therefore cannot be routinely recommended. PMID:27508300

  6. Adiposity and stroke among older adults of low socioeconomic status: the Chicago Stroke Study.

    PubMed Central

    DiPietro, L; Ostfeld, A M; Rosner, G L

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that overall and truncal adiposity increase the risk of stroke independent of their association with cardiovascular disease risk factors and other preexisting illnesses. METHODS. Analyses were conducted of longitudinal data from a poor, biracial cohort of noninstitutionalized adults 65 to 74 years of age who participated in the Chicago Stroke Study from 1965 to 1970. RESULTS. Ponderal index (cm/kg1/3) and chest skinfold were significantly associated with systolic and diastolic blood pressure, serum cholesterol and triglycerides, plasma glucose, and smoking. Ponderal index was also associated with diabetes and risk of stroke. After potential confounders were controlled, the following variables showed significant independent associations with risk of stroke: Black race, female gender, and age 70+; hypertensive heart disease; and diabetes. Neither adiposity variable was associated with risk of stroke in the presence of these powerful predictors. CONCLUSIONS. Control of hypertension and diabetes continues to be important among older adults. Since excess adiposity seems to influence risk of stroke through its association with these disorders and other cardiovascular disease risk factors, control of weight and fat remains an important concern as well. PMID:8279605

  7. Clinical study of 222 patients with pure motor stroke

    PubMed Central

    Arboix, A; Padilla, I; Massons, J; Garcia-Eroles, L; Comes, E; Targa, C

    2001-01-01

    The objective was to assess the frequency of pure motor stroke caused by different stroke subtypes and to compare demographic, clinical, neuroimaging, and outcome data of pure motor stroke with those of patients with other lacunar stroke as well as with those of patients with non-lacunar stroke.
Data from 2000 patients with acute stroke (n=1761) or transient ischaemic attack (n=239) admitted consecutively to the department of neurology of an acute care 350 bed teaching hospital were prospectively collected in the Sagrat Cor Hospital of Barcelona stroke registry over a 10 year period. For the purpose of the study 222 (12.7%) patients with pure motor stroke were selected. The other study groups included 218 (12.3%) patients with other lacunar strokes and 1321 (75%) patients with non-lacunar stroke.
In relation to stroke subtype, lacunar infarcts were found in 189 (85%) patients, whereas ischaemic lacunar syndromes not due to lacunar infarcts occurred in 23 (10.4%) patients (atherothrombotic stroke in 12, cardioembolic stroke in seven, infarction of undetermined origin in three, and infarction of unusual aetiology in one) and haemorrhagic lacunar syndromes in 10 (4.5%). Patients with pure motor stroke showed a better outcome than patients with non-lacunar stroke with a significantly lower number of complications and in hospital mortality rate, shorter duration of hospital stay, and a higher number of symptom free patients at hospital discharge. After multivariate analysis, hypertension, diabetes, obesity, hyperlipidaemia, non-sudden stroke onset, internal capsule involvement, and pons topography seemed to be independent factors of pure motor stroke in patients with acute stroke.
In conclusion, about one of every 10 patients with acute stroke had a pure motor stroke. Pure motor stroke was caused by a lacunar infarct in 85% of patients and by other stroke subtypes in 15%. Several clinical features are more frequent in patients with pure motor stroke than in

  8. Reduced Resting Metabolic Rate in Adults with Hemiparetic Chronic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Monica C; Hafer-Macko, Charlene E; Ryan, Alice S

    2016-01-01

    Objective Resting metabolic rate (RMR) is the component of energy expenditure that explains the largest proportion of total daily energy requirements. Since RMR is determined largely by fat-free mass and a low RMR predicts weight gain in healthy adults, identifying the role of muscle atrophy following stroke on RMR may help identify ways to mitigate the development of obesity post-stroke. Methods Thirty-nine stroke survivors with chronic hemiparesis (mean ± SEM: age: 61 ± 1 years, latency from stroke: 107 ± 40 months, BMI: 31 ± 3 kg/m2) underwent DXA scans for measurement of body composition, including total, paretic, and non-paretic leg lean mass and fasted, 30-min indirect calorimetry for measurement of RMR. Result Predicted RMR was calculated by the Mifflin-St Jeor equation, which considers weight, height, and age for both men and women. RMR was 14% lower than predicted (1438 ± 45 vs. 1669 ± 38 kcals/24 hrs; P<0.01). Total (r=0.73, P<0.01), paretic (r=0.72, P<0.01) and non-paretic (r=0.67, P<0.01) leg lean mass predicted RMR. Conclusion These data indicate that muscle atrophy post stroke may lead to a reduced RMR. This substantiates the need to attenuate the loss of lean mass after a stroke to prevent declines in RMR and possible weight gain common post-stroke. PMID:26973796

  9. Treatment of hyperglycaemia in patients with acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Castilla-Guerra, L; Fernández-Moreno, M C; Hewitt, J

    2016-03-01

    The proportion of diabetic patients who are hospitalised for stroke has been increasing in recent years, currently reaching almost a third of all cases of stroke. In addition, about half of patients with acute stroke present hyperglycaemia in the first hours of the stroke. Although hyperglycaemia in the acute phase of stroke is associated with a poor prognosis, its treatment is currently a topic of debate. There is no evidence that the adminstration of intravenous insulin to these patients offers benefits in terms of the evolution of the stroke. New studies in development, such as the SHINE study (Stroke Hyperglycemia Insulin Network Effort), may contribute to clarifying the role of intensive control of glycaemia during the acute phase of the stroke. Ultimately, patients who have presented with stroke should be screened for diabetes. PMID:26189890

  10. Importance and Repercussions of Renal and Cardiovascular Pathology on Stroke in Young Adults: An Anatomopathologic Study of 52 Clinical Necropsies

    PubMed Central

    Arismendi-Morillo, Gabriel; Fernández-Abreu, Mary; Cardozo-Duran, José; Vilchez-Barrios, Gustavo

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Stroke in young adults has seldom been studied in a necropsy series. The objective of the present clinical necropsy-based investigation was to analyze stroke and its relationship with cardiovascular and renal pathology in young adults. MATERIALS AND METHODS The protocols of 52 clinical necropsies with diagnoses of stroke in patients aged 18 – 49 years, performed between the years 1990–2006, were reviewed. RESULTS Hemorrhagic stroke was diagnosed in 36 patients (69.3%), whereas the remaining 16 (30.7%) had ischemic stroke. Hypertensive cardiopathy was evident in 88.4% of the cases. Chronic renal pathology, directly or indirectly related to hypertension, was observed in 55.7% of the patients. Ischemic stroke as a result of occlusive atherosclerotic disease was seen in 50% of cases. Cardiogenic emboli were found in 25% of the cadavers. Hemorrhagic stroke was associated with hypertension in 43% of the cases, with ruptured vascular malformations in 29%, and coagulopathies in 17% of the cases. Hypertensive cardiopathy was present in patients with either ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke (81.2% and 91.6%, respectively). The most frequently observed renal ailments were chronic pyelonephritis (23%) and nephrosclerosis (21.1%). These were associated with ischemic stroke in 43.7%, and 12.5% of the cases, respectively, and with 13.8% and 25% of the hemorrhagic stroke cases. DISCUSSION Hypertensive cardiopathy, occlusive atherosclerotic disease, chronic pyelonephritis and nephrosclerosis are among the pathophysiologycal mechanisms that apparently and eventually interact to induce a significant number of cases of stroke in young adults. A chronic systemic inflammatory state appears to be an important related condition because it possibly constitutes an accelerant of the pathophysiologycal process. PMID:18297202

  11. Comparison of provision of stroke care in younger and older patients: findings from the South london stroke register.

    PubMed

    Crichton, Siobhan L; Wolfe, Charles D A; Rudd, Anthony G; McKevitt, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Background. Evidence-based stroke care should be available to all patients. However, evidence exists of inequalities according to age. This study compared access to care for younger adults to that for over 65s. Methods. Using population-based data from 4229 patients with first-ever stroke between 1995 and 2010, associations between age and 21 care indicators were investigated using multivariable logistic regression. Results. Age was not associated with stroke unit admission for ischaemic stroke (P = 0.666). Younger PICH patients were least likely to be admitted to stroke units (P = 0.001), instead treated on neurosurgical or ICU wards. Younger age was also associated with admission to neurosurgery or ICU after SAH (P = 0.006), increased occupational or physiotherapy at 1 year (P = 0.043), and contact with a GP 3 months after stroke (P < 0.001). Conclusion. Younger patients have equal or greater access to evidence-based care. However, there is a need to ensure that services meet the needs of this group. PMID:22593833

  12. [Regenerative therapy for post-stroke patients].

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Toru; Abe, Koji

    2016-04-01

    Cell replacement therapy is attractive as a novel strategy for stroke patients. To realize this therapy, safer and more effective cell resources are now required. Since both embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can retain high replication competence and pluripotency when they differentiate into various kinds of cells, they are regarded as a promising cell source for cell replacement therapy. Recent progress includes the combination of novel transcriptional factors that can convert somatic cells to various kinds of mature neuronal cells and neural stem cells without requiring embryonic stem fate. In this paper, we would like to discuss the advantage, issues, and possibility of clinical application of these cells for cell replacement therapy for post-stroke patient. PMID:27333756

  13. Migraine and risk of stroke in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Gardener, Hannah; Rundek, Tatjana; Elkind, Mitchell S.V.; Sacco, Ralph L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To examine the association between migraine and stroke/vascular outcomes in a racially/ethnically diverse, older cohort. Methods: Participants from the Northern Manhattan Study, a population-based cohort study of stroke incidence, were assessed for migraine symptoms using a self-report questionnaire based on criteria from the International Classification of Headache Disorders, second edition. We estimated the association between migraine and combined vascular events including stroke and stroke only over a mean follow-up of 11 years, using Cox models adjusted for sociodemographic and vascular risk factors. Results: Of 1,292 participants (mean age 68 ± 9 years) with migraine data followed prospectively for vascular events, 262 patients (20%) had migraine and 75 (6%) had migraine with aura. No association was found between migraine (with or without aura) and risk of either stroke or combined cardiovascular events. There was an interaction between migraine and current smoking (p = 0.02 in relation to stroke and p = 0.03 for combined vascular events), such that those with migraine and smoking were at an increased risk. The hazard ratio of stroke for migraine among current smokers was 3.17 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.13–8.85) and among current nonsmokers was 0.77 (95% CI 0.44–1.35). In relation to combined vascular events, the hazard ratio for migraine vs no migraine among current smokers was 1.83 (95% CI 0.89–3.75) and among current nonsmokers was 0.63 (95% CI 0.43–0.94). Conclusion: In our racially/ethnically diverse population-based cohort, migraine was associated with an increased risk of stroke among active smokers but not among nonsmokers. PMID:26203088

  14. Research Opportunities in the Area of Adults With Stroke.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    The American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) Evidence-Based Practice Project has developed a table summarizing the research opportunities on adults with stroke. The table provides an overview of the state of current available evidence on interventions within the scope of occupational therapy practice and is based on the systematic reviews from the AOTA Evidence-Based Practice Guidelines Series. Researchers, students, and clinicians can use this information in developing innovative research to answer important questions within the occupational therapy field.

  15. Screening post-stroke depression in Chinese older adults using the hospital anxiety and depression scale.

    PubMed

    Tang, W K; Ungvari, G S; Chiu, H F K; Sze, K H; Yu, A Chan Shiu; Leung, T Lai Fong

    2004-09-01

    Little is known about the performance of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) in screening post-stroke depression (PSD) in Chinese older adult patients. One hundred Chinese geriatric patients with first-ever stroke, consecutively admitted to a rehabilitation facility, were assessed by occupational therapists using the depression subscale of the HADS. Psychiatric diagnoses, which served as the benchmark for judging the usefulness of HADS in screening PSD, were made using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-III-R (SCID-DSM-III-R) supplemented by all available clinical information. The optimal cut-off point of HADS was 6/7. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value of the HADS, and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, were 88%, 53%, 0.28, 0.96 and 0.75, respectively. The HADS does not appear to be a useful tool in screening for PSD in Chinese older adults.

  16. META-ANALYSIS OF FACTOR V LEIDEN AND ISCHEMIC STROKE IN YOUNG ADULTS: THE IMPORTANCE OF CASE ASCERTAINMENT

    PubMed Central

    Hamedani, Ali G.; Cole, John W.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Kittner, Steven J.

    2010-01-01

    The Factor V Leiden mutation is associated with ischemic stroke in children, but not in adults. Whether it is associated with ischemic stroke in young adults, however, is uncertain. To address this issue, we performed a meta-analysis of 18 case-control studies of ischemic stroke in adults ≤ 50 years of age published before June 2009. Across all studies, Factor V Leiden was detected in 154 of 2,045 cases (7.5%) and 217 of 5,307 controls (4.1%), yielding a fixed effect odds ratio of 2.00 (95% CI: 1.59–2.51). However, further analyses revealed substantial heterogeneity among these studies (p=0.005 for Q-test of heterogeneity). Hypothesizing that this heterogeneity could be related to differences among studies in case selection criteria, we stratified the meta-analysis into studies for which case samples were enriched or not enriched to include cases having an increased likelihood of prothrombotic genetic involvement (“selected” ischemic stroke studies, n = 9) and those that recruited cases from consecutive neurology referrals or hospitalizations (“unselected” ischemic stroke studies, n = 8). Among the nine “selected” ischemic stroke studies, Factor V Leiden was more strongly associated with stroke [OR = 2.73 (95% CI: 1.98–3.75)], whereas among the eight “unselected” ischemic stroke studies, the association between Factor V Leiden and stroke was substantially weaker [OR=1.40 (95% CI: 0.998–1.95)]. This difference was found to be statistically significant (p = 0.003 for Woolf’s test for heterogeneity). We conclude that Factor V Leiden is associated with ischemic stroke in young adults, particularly in patient populations where there is an increased clinical suspicion of prothrombotic state. PMID:20616326

  17. New pooled cohort risk equations: Application to a recent stroke patient population

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-Ho; Kwon, Hyung-Min; Ovbiagele, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Background Recently, Pooled Cohort Risk (PCR) equations, which incorporates new sex- and race-specific estimates of the 10-year risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) including stroke, for ASCVD-free adults was introduced. Given the importance of secondary stroke prevention and benefit of a potential tool to readily identify stroke patients at high intermediate-term vascular risk for appropriate treatment, we evaluated the prediction and discrimination of the PCR and Framingham Cardiovascular Risk (FCR) equations after a recent stroke. Method We conducted an analysis of Vitamin Intervention for Stroke Prevention dataset of 3555 recent non-cardioembolic stroke patients aged ≥35 years and followed for 2 years. ≥ Subjects were categorized as having low-PCR/low-FCR (<%), high-PCR/high-FCR (≥), and known-ASCVD. Independent associations of high-PCR/high-FCR with recurrent stroke (primary outcome) and stroke/coronary heart disease (CHD)/vascular death (secondary outcomes) were assessed. Results Both PCR and FCR were independently related to both outcomes: compared with low-PCR, high-PCR was associated with stroke (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.25–2.57) and stroke/CHD/vascular death (2.05; 1.55–2.70). Compared with low-FCR, high-FCR was associated with stroke (2.06; 1.34–3.16) and stroke/CHD/vascular death (1.57; 1.12–2.20). The c-statistic of PCR/FCR as a continuous variable for stroke was 0.56 (95% CI, 0.54–0.58) and 0.56 (0.54–0.57), respectively and for stroke/CHD/vascular death was 0.62 (0.60–0.63) and 0.61 (0.59–0.63), respectively. Conclusions Both PCR and FCR are significant predictors of recurrent vascular events among patients after a recent non-cardioembolic stroke, but neither one of them is an optimal model for discriminating intermediate-term ASCVD prediction among stroke patients already receiving secondary stroke prevention. PMID:25510378

  18. Neurorickettsioses: A Rare Presentation with Stroke in a Young Adult

    PubMed Central

    K, Pramod

    2014-01-01

    Acute stroke-like presentations due to rickettsial infections have been sparsely reported in literature. We report a young patient who presented with high grade fever and acute encephalopathy with right hemiplegia. CT head showed left cerebral, bilateral thalamic and midbrain infarcts. The stroke in young work-up for conventional and non-conventional risk factors including few infections known to cause cerebral vasculitis was negative. He did not respond to empirical antimalarials and antibiotics. With a high index of suspicion of his ‘febrile cerebrovasculitis’ like presentation, serological test for rickettsia was done and found to be positive. He responded to doxycycline. This case expands the spectrum of presentation of neurorickettsioses and highlights the importance of considering rickettsial vasculitis as one of the potentially treatable causes of infections causing stroke. PMID:25478386

  19. Audiological findings in aphasic patients after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Onoue, Solange Satie; Ortiz, Karin Zazo; Minett, Thaís Soares Cianciarullo; Borges, Alda Christina Lopes de Carvalho

    2014-01-01

    Objective To outline the audiological findings of aphasic patients after cerebrovascular accidents. Methods This is a cross-sectional study performed between March 2011 and August 2012 in the Speech, Language, and Hearing Pathology Department of the Universidade Federal de São Paulo. A total of 43 aphasic subjects (27 men) were referred for audiological evaluation after stroke, with mean age of 54.48 years. Basic audiological evaluation tests were performed, including pure tone audiometry, speech audiometry (speech recognition threshold and word recognition score), immittance measures (tympanometry and contralateral acoustic reflex), and transient otoacoustic emissions. Results Sensorineural hearing loss was prevalent (78.6%). Speech recognition threshold and word recognition score were not obtained in some patients because they were unable to perform the task. Hearing loss was a common finding in this population. Conclusion Comprehension and/or oral emission disruptions in aphasic patients after stroke compromised conventional speech audiometry, resulting in the need for changes in the evaluation procedures for these patients. PMID:25628193

  20. Increased Risk of Stroke in Patients With Fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Chun-Hung; Chen, Jiunn-Horng; Wang, Yu-Chiao; Lin, Ming-Chia; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Neuropsychiatric diseases might enhance stroke development, possibly through inflammation and atherosclerosis. Approximately 25% to 40% of patients with stroke, largely younger patients, are not associated with any conventional stroke risk factors. In this research, we explored whether fibromyalgia (FM), a neuropsychosomatic disorder, increases stroke risk. From a claims dataset with one million enrollees sourced of the Taiwan National Health Insurance database, we selected 47,279 patients with FM and randomly selected 189,112 age- and sex-matched controls within a 3-year period from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2002. Stroke risk was assessed using Cox proportional hazards regression. Comorbidities associated with increased stroke risk, such as hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, coronary heart disease, irritable bowel syndrome, and interstitial cystitis, were more prevalent in patients with FM and high stroke risk than in the controls. The overall stroke risk was 1.25-fold (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.21–1.30) higher in the FM group than in the non-FM group. Even without comorbidities, stroke risk was higher in patients with FM than in the controls (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] = 1.44, 95% CI: 1.35–1.53, P < 0.001). The relative risk of stroke was 2.26-fold between FM and non-FM groups in younger patients (age <35 years, 95% CI: 1.86–2.75). This is the first investigation associating FM with an increased risk of stroke development. The outcomes imply that FM is a significant risk factor for stroke and that patients with FM, particularly younger patients, require close attention and rigorous measures for preventing stroke. PMID:26937918

  1. Risk of sudden sensorineural hearing loss in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Chin-Lung; Shiao, An-Suey; Wang, Shuu-Jiun; Chang, Wei-Pin; Lin, Yung-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Poststroke sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) can hinder communication between patients and healthcare professionals, thereby restricting participation in rehabilitation programs and limiting improvements in physical performance. However, the relationship between stroke and SSNHL remains unclear. This study employed a nationwide population-based dataset to investigate the relationship between stroke and SSNHL. The Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database was used to compile data from 11,115 stroke patients and a comparison cohort of 33,345 matched nonstroke enrollees. Each patient was followed for 5 years to identify new-onset SSNHL. Stratified Cox proportional-hazard regression analysis was used to examine the association of stroke with subsequent SSNHL. Among the 44,460 patients, 66 patients (55,378 person-years) from the stroke cohort and 105 patients (166,586 person-years) from the comparison cohort were diagnosed with SSNHL. The incidence of SSNHL was approximately twice as high among stroke patients than among nonstroke patients (1.19 and 0.63/1000 person-years, respectively). Stroke patients had a 71% increased risk of SSNHL, compared with nonstroke patients (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 1.71, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.24–2.36). We also observed a remarkable increase in risk of SSNHL in stroke patients within 1-year of follow-up (adjusted HR 5.65, 95% CI 3.07–10.41) or under steroid therapy during hospitalization (adjusted HR 5.14, 95% CI 2.08–12.75). Patients with stroke had a higher risk of subsequent SSNHL compared with patients without stroke. In particular, stroke patients within 1-year follow-up and those undergoing steroid therapy during hospitalization should be treated with the utmost caution, considering that the risk of SSNHL increases by more than 5-fold. PMID:27603402

  2. [Current aspects of rehabilitation of stroke patients].

    PubMed

    Koval'chuk, V V; Bogatyreva, M D; Minullin, T I

    2014-01-01

    Based on the review of literature, the key aspects of stroke rehabilitation (medical, physical, psychological, professional and social) were singled out. Main principles of medical aspects were defined as following: early rehabilitation, systemic and long term measures, their complicity and disciplinary, adequacy of rehabilitation measures and providing the conditions for the active participation of the patient and his/her close friends and relatives. Measures directed to motor, speech and cognitive function recovery are considered. In conclusion, attention is drawn to pharmacological drugs, in particular nicergoline (sermion).

  3. High-quality Health Information Provision for Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Du, Hong-Sheng; Ma, Jing-Jian; Li, Mu

    2016-01-01

    Objective: High-quality information provision can allow stroke patients to effectively participate in healthcare decision-making, better manage the stroke, and make a good recovery. In this study, we reviewed information needs of stroke patients, methods for providing information to patients, and considerations needed by the information providers. Data Sources: The literature concerning or including information provision for patients with stroke in English was collected from PubMed published from 1990 to 2015. Study Selection: We included all the relevant articles on information provision for stroke patients in English, with no limitation of study design. Results: Stroke is a major public health concern worldwide. High-quality and effective health information provision plays an essential role in helping patients to actively take part in decision-making and healthcare, and empowering them to effectively self-manage their long-standing chronic conditions. Different methods for providing information to patients have their relative merits and suitability, and as a result, the effective strategies taken by health professionals may include providing high-quality information, meeting patients’ individual needs, using suitable methods in providing information, and maintaining active involvement of patients. Conclusions: It is suggested that to enable stroke patients to access high-quality health information, greater efforts need to be made to ensure patients to receive accurate and current evidence-based information which meets their individual needs. Health professionals should use suitable information delivery methods, and actively involve stroke patients in information provision. PMID:27569241

  4. The Crisis of Stroke: Experiences of Patients and Their Family Caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, Barbara J.; Young, Mary Ellen; Cox, Kim J.; Martz, Crystal; Creasy, Kerry Rae

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Approximately 4.8 million stroke survivors are living in the community with some level of disability requiring the assistance of family caregivers. Stroke family caregivers are often unprepared for the demands required of them. The purpose of this grounded theory study was to explore the needs of stroke patients and their family caregivers as they transitioned through the stroke care continuum from acute care to inpatient rehabilitation to home. Methods Thirty-eight participants, 19 recovering stroke patients (11 male, 8 female), 15 primary family caregivers (14 spouses, 1 mother), and 4 adult children were interviewed during their stay at a rehabilitation facility and within 6 months of discharge. Interview questions were loosely structured and focused on the stroke experience and how patients and caregivers were managing postdischarge. Data were analyzed using dimensional and comparative analysis. Results Findings were organized in a conceptual framework illustrating the trajectory of the crisis of stroke. Stroke survivors and their caregivers faced enormous challenges as they moved through 3 phases of the trajectory: the stroke crisis, expectations for recovery, and the crisis of discharge. Findings from this study suggest that as caregivers move through the phases of the trajectory, they do not have a good understanding of the role to which they are committing, and they are often underprepared to take on even the basic tasks to meet the patients’ needs on discharge. Conclusion Stroke survivors and their caregivers do not have adequate time to deal with the shock and crisis of the stroke event, let alone the crisis of discharge and all of the new responsibilities with which they must deal. PMID:22436315

  5. Attention deficits in stroke patients with aphasia.

    PubMed

    Korda, R J; Douglas, J M

    1997-08-01

    Attentional capacity and sustained attention were investigated in 21 aphasic stroke patients and 21 non-brain-damaged patients. Attentional capacity was assessed using a series of reaction time (RT) tasks. The aphasic patients demonstrated impaired attentional capacity as shown by slower processing speed than the non-brain-damaged group (p < .01) and greater increases in RT with increased processing load (p < .05). Similar patterns were found for both verbal and spatial material. There was no significant relationship between severity of auditory comprehension deficits and attentional capacity. Sustained attention was assessed using a cognitive vigilance task requiring identification of a target letter presented infrequently over 32 minutes. Both the aphasic and the non-brain-damaged group demonstrated a decline in performance with time on task as shown by a steady increase in RTs (p < .0001), but the decline was equivalent across the groups. Thus, the aphasic group did not show a specific deficit in the ability to sustain attention. PMID:9342688

  6. Acupuncture treatment for ischaemic stroke in young adults: protocol for a randomised, sham-controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lifang; Fang, Jianqiao; Jin, Xiaoming; Keeler, Crystal Lynn; Gao, Hong; Fang, Zhen; Chen, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Stroke in young adults is not uncommon. Although the overall incidence of stroke has been recently declining, the incidence of stroke in young adults is increasing. Traditional vascular risk factors are the main cause of young ischaemic stroke. Acupuncture has been shown to benefit stroke rehabilitation and ameliorate the risk factors for stroke. The aims of this study were to determine whether acupuncture treatment will be effective in improving the activities of daily living (ADL), motor function and quality of life (QOL) in patients of young ischaemic stroke, and in preventing stroke recurrence by controlling blood pressure, lipids and body weight. Methods and analysis In this randomised, sham-controlled, participant-blinded and assessor-blinded clinical trial, 120 patients between 18 and 45 years of age with a recent (within 1 month) ischaemic stroke will be randomised for an 8-week acupuncture or sham acupuncture treatment. The primary outcome will be the Barthel Index for ADL. The secondary outcomes will include the Fugl-Meyer Assessment for motor function; the World Health Organization Quality of Life BREF (WHOQOL-BREF) for QOL; and risk factors that are measured by ambulatory blood pressure, the fasting serum lipid, body mass index and waist circumference. Incidence of adverse events and long-term mortality and recurrence rate during a 10-year and 30-year follow-up will also be investigated. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval was obtained from the Ethics Committee of The Third Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang Chinese Medical University. Protocol V.3 was approved in June 2013. The results will be disseminated in a peer-reviewed journal and presented at international congresses. The results will also be disseminated to patients by telephone during follow-up calls enquiring on the patient's post-study health status. Trial registration number ChiCTR-TRC- 13003317; Pre-results. PMID:26739742

  7. Numbers of Stroke Patients and Stroke Subtypes According to Highest and Lowest Daily Temperatures in Seoul

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Dong-Won; Yoon, Jee-Eun; Hwang, Hye-Won; Kim, Ji-Sun; Park, Sukh-Que; Roh, Hakjae; Ahn, Moo-Young

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose There is conflicting evidence for whether or not the incidence of stroke is influenced by the daily temperature. The association between daily temperature and incidence of stroke is largely unknown in Korea. This study attempted to evaluate whether the maximum or minimum daily temperature is associated with increased numbers of strokes and stroke subtypes among Seoul residents. Methods We obtained the maximum and minimum daily temperatures in Seoul from the Korean Meteorological Administration between January 2005 and December 2014. Consecutive patients with acute stroke were registered who visited the emergency room or outpatient clinic in Soonchunhyang University Hospital, Seoul. The residential addresses of cases were restricted to within a 2-kilometer radius of this hospital. The stroke events were prospectively recorded with onset time, and were classified by subtypes. The categories of daily temperature were divided by 10℃ from the mean temperature. The mean daily number of strokes was calculated during the study period. One-way analysis of variance and Duncan's post-hoc test were applied to compare the number of strokes among the temperature groups. Results In total, 2,313 acute strokes were identified during the period: 1,643 ischemic strokes and 670 hemorrhagic strokes. The number of cases was significantly higher when the maximum daily temperature was >32℃ or ≤3℃ (p=0.048) or the minimum daily temperature was ≤-11.0℃ (p=0.020). The lowest maximum daily temperature was associated with increased instances of intracerebral hemorrhage (p=0.029) and small-vessel occlusion (p=0.013), while the highest maximum daily temperature was associated with an increased instance of large-artery atherosclerosis (p=0.045). Conclusions The daily temperature had measurable and different associations with the number of strokes and strokes subtypes in Seoul, Korea.

  8. Serum Uric Acid Level among Acute Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Mohsin, M; Das, S N; Haque, M F; Shikha, S S; Bhuiyan, A S; Saha, P L; Das, B R; Chowdhury, M; Jahan, M K; Rahman, M M

    2016-04-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of death and disability in developed as well as developing countries like Bangladesh. Elevated serum uric acid levels may predict an increased risk for cerebro-vascular (CV) events including stroke. Aim of the study was to measure the serum uric acid level among stroke patients and determine the relationship between serum uric acid level and stroke. This descriptive, cross-sectional study was carried out in Department of Medicine, Mymensingh Medical College Hospital, Mymensingh, Bangladesh to measure serum uric acid level among 102 stroke patients in a period of one year by using non-probability sampling procedure. Finally, collected data were analyzed using SPSS software Version 17.0. It was observed that the mean age of patients was 60.87±8.05 years, of them 80(78.43%) patients were male and the rest 22(21.57%) were female. About 66(64.70%) of respondents were in age group 60 years and above, while 36(35.30%) were in age group 59 years and below. At least 23(22.55%) of stroke patients had elevated serum uric acid with a mean serum uric acid level of 5.18mg/dl and standard deviation 1.26mg/dl. About 23(27.38%) patients in ischemic stroke had elevated serum uric acid whereas 18(100%) patients in hemorrhagic stroke had normal uric acid level. Uric acid level was elevated in ischemic stroke than haemorrhagic stroke patients (p<0.001). High uric acid level may be considered as a risk factor in patients with acute ischemic stroke. PMID:27277350

  9. Imaging Recommendations for Acute Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wintermark, Max; Sanelli, Pina C.; Albers, Gregory W.; Bello, Jacqueline A.; Derdeyn, Colin P.; Hetts, Steven W.; Johnson, Michele H.; Kidwell, Chelsea S.; Lev, Michael H.; Liebeskind, David S.; Rowley, Howard A.; Schaefer, Pamela W.; Sunshine, Jeffrey L.; Zaharchuk, Greg; Meltzer, Carolyn C.

    2014-01-01

    In the article entitled “Imaging Recommendations for Acute Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack Patients: A Joint Statement by the American Society of Neuroradiology, the American College of Radiology and the Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery”, we are proposing a simple, pragmatic approach that will allow the reader to develop an optimal imaging algorithm for stroke patients at their institution. PMID:23948676

  10. Why are patients with acute stroke admitted to hospital?

    PubMed Central

    Bamford, J; Sandercock, P; Warlow, C; Gray, M

    1986-01-01

    Data on 515 consecutive patients registered with the Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project were used to compare the characteristics of those patients who were admitted to hospital within one month after their first stroke with those who remained in the community during that time. Twenty eight patients had their stroke while in hospital for other conditions, and of the remaining 487, 266 were admitted. Though patients with a severe neurological deficit were significantly more likely to be admitted, 47 out of 202 such patients were managed in the community. In a substudy of 162 consecutive patients the general practitioners' reasons for either arranging admission to hospital or continuing with community care in the first week after the stroke were ascertained. Sixty patients were admitted. The only reason for admission was diagnostic uncertainty in five cases (though this was a contributing factor in 25) and to provide nursing or general, non-medical care in 25. Patients who lived alone were more likely to be admitted. All 12 patients who presented directly to the casualty department were admitted, though only five had had a severe stroke. A stroke service that provides a facility for rapid outpatient and domiciliary diagnosis as well as a rapidly acting domiciliary nursing team might reduce the number of patients with stroke admitted to hospital without adversely affecting the quality of patient care: this should be properly evaluated. PMID:3085852

  11. Increased risk of ischemic stroke in patients with pneumoconiosis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuan-Yang; Hsu, Kuo-Hsuan; Chen, Yi-Huei; Lin, Ching-Heng

    2015-02-01

    Although past studies have confirmed that chronic dust exposure is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, the relationship between it and cerebrovascular disease is still unclear. We aimed to determine whether pneumoconiosis is related to increased incidence of ischemic stroke in the following 5 to 11 years. We selected 1238 patients with pneumoconiosis from Taiwan's National Health Insurance database as our study cohort. After matching for age, sex and the date of ambulatory care visit, another 4952 patients without pneumoconiosis were selected as the comparison cohort. Each patient was individually followed up until the end of 2010 to track the incidence of stroke, and Cox proportional hazard regression analysis was performed to compute the relative hazard ratio of stroke. Our results showed 19.6% of pneumoconiosis patients and 15.8% of non-pneumoconiosis patients developed stroke. After statistically adjusting for age, sex, and medical comorbidities, the hazard of developing stroke was 1.36 times greater for those with pneumoconiosis compared to those without. Even in those with pneumoconiosis excluding chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, the hazard of developing stroke was still 1.31 times greater than those without pneumoconiosis. Our study revealed that pneumoconiosis patients are at a higher risk of ischemic stroke, and primary prevention of stroke is particularly important in this group of patients.

  12. Health, function and disability in stroke patients in the community

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho-Pinto, Bárbara P. B.; Faria, Christina D. C. M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Stroke patients commonly have impairments associated with reduction in functionality. Among these impairments, the motor impairments are the most prevalent. The functional profile of these patients living in the community who are users of the primary health-care services in Brazil has not yet been established Objective To describe the functional profile of stroke patients who are users of the primary health-care services in Brazil, looking at one health-care unit in the city of Belo Horizonte, Brazil. Method From medical records and home visits, data were collected regarding health status, assistance received following the stroke, personal and environmental contextual factors, function and disability, organized according to the conceptual framework of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Test and instruments commonly applied in the assessment of stroke patients were used. Results Demographic data from all stroke patients who were users of the health-care unit (n=44, age: 69.23±13.12 years and 67±66.52 months since the stroke) participated of this study. Most subjects presented with disabilities, as changes in emotional function, muscle strength, and mobility, risks of falling during functional activities, negative self-perception of quality of life, and perception of the environment factors were perceived as obstacles. The majority of the patients used the health-care unit to renew drug prescriptions, and did not receive any information on stroke from health professionals, even though patients believed it was important for patients to receive information and to provide clarifications. Conclusion Stroke patients who used primary health-care services in Brazil have chronic disabilities and health needs that require continuous health attention from rehabilitation professionals. All of these health needs should be considered by health professionals to provide better management as part of the integral care

  13. Evaluation of migraine in patients with ischaemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Taheri, M; Valipour, E; Rasuli, S; Sayad, A; Movafagh, A; Mahdi Eftekharian, M; Mazdeh, M

    2015-12-01

    An association between migraine and ischaemic stroke has been observed for many years, but the exact mechanisms by which migraine can lead to stroke are still unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of migraine headaches in patients with ischaemic stroke. In this prospective cohort study, we assessed 323 patients with ischaemic stroke; these diagnoses were assigned based on the International Headache Society criteria for migraine with or without aura. Patients were recruited without major risk factors such as stroke, hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, diabetes, taking oral contraceptive pills, history of drug abuse and trauma in issue of their Stroke. Data were collected via a written questionnaire upon admission and were analysed with SPSS version 16 software. Comparisons were performed using Mann-Whitney's U test and chi-square and t-test. Migraine headache was present in 11.2% (36 of 323) of patients, 8.1% of women and 3.1% of men. Migraine prevalence was highest in the age over 60  years. There was a history of migraine without aura for over 2  years in 6.2% of patients with ischaemic stroke. Also, we found no significant correlation between migraine headache and location of the lesion in patients with ischaemic stroke.

  14. Complexity of Heart Rate Variability Can Predict Stroke-In-Evolution in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Hao; Huang, Pei-Wen; Tang, Sung-Chun; Shieh, Jiann-Shing; Lai, Dar-Ming; Wu, An-Yu; Jeng, Jiann-Shing

    2015-12-01

    About one-third of acute stroke patients may experience stroke-in-evolution, which is often associated with a worse outcome. Recently, we showed that multiscale entropy (MSE), a non-linear method for analysis of heart rate variability (HRV), is an early outcome predictor in non-atrial fibrillation (non-AF) stroke patients. We aimed to further investigate MSE as a predictor of SIE. We included 90 non-AF ischemic stroke patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). Nineteen (21.1%) patients met the criteria of SIE, which was defined as an increase in the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score of ≥2 points within 3 days of admission. The MSE of HRV was analyzed from 1-hour continuous ECG signals during the first 24 hours of admission. The complexity index was defined as the area under the MSE curve. Compared with patients without SIE, those with SIE had a significantly lower complexity index value (21.3 ± 8.5 vs 26.5 ± 7.7, P = 0.012). After adjustment for clinical variables, patients with higher complexity index values were significantly less likely to have SIE (odds ratio = 0.897, 95% confidence interval 0.818-0.983, P = 0.020). In summary, early assessment of HRV by MSE can be a potential predictor of SIE in ICU-admitted non-AF ischemic stroke patients.

  15. Renal Dysfunction in Post-Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Król, Ewa; Wierucki, Łukasz; Kozera, Grzegorz; Sobolewski, Piotr; Nyka, Walenty M.; Zdrojewski, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Background The presence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an indicator of a worse long-term prognosis in patients with ischemic stroke (IS). Unfortunately, not much is known about renal function in the population of post-IS subjects. The aim of our study was to assess the prevalence of renal damage and impaired renal function (IRF) in the population of post-IS subjects. Methods This prospective analysis concerned 352 consecutive post-IS survivors hospitalized in Pomeranian stroke centers (Poland) in 2009. In this group estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) according to MDRD (modification of diet in renal diseases) and CKD-EPI (Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration) formulas and urine albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR) were determined. Results Among survivors decreased eGFR (<60 mL/min./1.73m2 according to MDRD or CKD-EPI) or ACR≥30mg/g were detected in 40.38% (23.07% Men, 55.32% Women; P<0.01). The highest prevalence of IRF was noted in post-IS subjects with atheromatic and lacunar IS. In multivariate analysis the ACR≥30mg/g was predicted by older age, diabetes mellitus (DM) and physical disability (modified Rankin scale 3–5 pts.). The association with reduced eGFR was proved for sex (female), DM and physical disability. Conclusions CKD is a frequently occurring problem in the group of post-IS subjects, especially after lacunar and atheromatic IS. Post-IS patients, mainly the elderly women, with physical disability and diabetes mellitus, should be regularly screened for CKD. This could reduce the risk of further cardiovascular events and delay the progression of IRF. PMID:27575370

  16. Differences Between US and UK Adults in Stroke Preparedness

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Gary A.; Morgenstern, Lewis B.; White, Martin; Sniehotta, Falko F.; Mackintosh, Joan E.; Gellert, Paul; Skolarus, Lesli E.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose— Although time-dependent treatment is available, most people delay contacting emergency medical services for stroke. Given differences in the healthcare system and public health campaigns, exploring between-country differences in stroke preparedness may identify novel ways to increase acute stroke treatment. Methods— A survey was mailed to population-based samples in Ingham County, Michigan, US (n=2500), and Newcastle upon Tyne, UK (n=2500). Surveys included stroke perceptions and stroke/nonstroke scenarios to assess recognition and response to stroke. Between-country differences and associations with stroke preparedness were examined using t tests and linear mixed models. Results— Overall response rate was 27.4%. The mean age of participants was 55 years, and 58% were female. US participants were better in recognizing stroke (70% versus 63%, d=0.27) and were more likely to call emergency medical services (55% versus 52%, d=0.11). After controlling for demographics and comorbidities, US participants remained more likely to recognize stroke but were not more likely to respond appropriately. A greater belief that medical treatment can help with stroke and understanding of stroke was associated with improved stroke recognition and response. Conclusions— Overall, stroke recognition and response were moderate. US participants were modestly better at recognizing stroke, although there was little difference in response to stroke. Future stroke awareness interventions could focus more on stroke outcome expectations and developing a greater understanding of stroke among the public. PMID:26419968

  17. Stroke symptoms with absence of recognized stroke are associated with cognitive impairment and depressive symptoms in older adults with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Passler, Jesse S.; Clay, Olivio J.; Wadley, Virginia G.; Ovalle, Fernando; Crowe, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Self-reported stroke symptoms may represent unrecognized cerebrovascular events leading to poorer cognitive and mental health. We examined relationships between stroke symptoms, cognitive impairment, and depressive symptoms in a high-risk sample: 247 adults age ≥65 with diabetes. Stroke symptoms were assessed using the Questionnaire for Verifying Stroke-free Status, cognitive impairment was measured with the modified Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status, and depressive symptoms were measured using the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale. In 206 participants without history of stroke/TIA, 27.7% reported stroke symptoms, with sudden loss of comprehension most frequently reported (11.7%). Having >1 vs. 0 stroke symptoms was associated with greater odds of cognitive impairment (OR=3.04, 95% CI, 1.15–8.05) and more depressive symptoms (b =2.60, p<.001) while controlling for age, race, gender, education, diabetes duration, diabetes severity, and cardiovascular comorbidities. Better recognition and treatment of cerebrovascular problems in older adults with diabetes may lead to improved cognition and mental health. PMID:26801916

  18. Stroke Symptoms With Absence of Recognized Stroke Are Associated With Cognitive Impairment and Depressive Symptoms in Older Adults With Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Passler, Jesse S; Clay, Olivio J; Wadley, Virginia G; Ovalle, Fernando; Crowe, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Self-reported stroke symptoms may represent unrecognized cerebrovascular events leading to poorer cognitive and mental health. We examined relationships between stroke symptoms, cognitive impairment, and depressive symptoms in a high-risk sample: 247 adults aged ≥65 with diabetes. Stroke symptoms were assessed using the Questionnaire for Verifying Stroke-free Status, cognitive impairment was measured with the modified Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status, and depressive symptoms were measured using the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale. In 206 participants without history of stroke/transient ischemic attack, 27.7% reported stroke symptoms, with sudden loss of comprehension most frequently reported (11.7%). Having >1 versus 0 stroke symptoms was associated with greater odds of cognitive impairment (odds ratio = 3.04, 95% confidence interval 1.15-8.05) and more depressive symptoms (b= 2.60,P< .001) while controlling for age, race, gender, education, diabetes duration, diabetes severity, and cardiovascular comorbidities. Better recognition and treatment of cerebrovascular problems in older adults with diabetes may lead to improved cognition and mental health.

  19. Association of glycerol to dexamethasone in treatment of stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Albizzati, M G; Candelise, L; Capitani, E; Colombo, A; Spinnler, H

    1979-08-01

    A prospective study of 93 acute stroke patients randomly selected by type of antiedema treatment given (hypertonic glicerol infusion plus dexamethasone versus dexamethasone alone) failed to elicit any statistically significant difference between the two treatments on survival rates and quality of survival 7 and 30 days after the stroke. PMID:495045

  20. Assessing the Cognitive Regulation of Emotion in Depressed Stroke Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Margaret A.; Andrewes, David G.

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the psychometric properties of a simple scale for measuring positive interpersonal attitudes of depressed stroke patients, with regard to their cognitive limitations. Two versions of the Attitudes Towards Relationships Scale were developed and administered to depressed stroke (n = 48) and control rheumatic/orthopaedic (n = 45)…

  1. Determinants of Length of Stay in Stroke Patients: A Geriatric Rehabilitation Unit Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atalay, Ayce; Turhan, Nur

    2009-01-01

    The objective was to identify the predictors of length of stay--the impact of age, comorbidity, and stroke subtype--on the outcome of geriatric stroke patients. One hundred and seventy stroke patients (129 first-ever ischemic, 25 hemorrhagic, and 16 ischemic second strokes) were included in the study. The Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project…

  2. Embolic Stroke in Cardiomyopathy: Should Patients be Anticoagulated?

    PubMed

    Narang, Akhil; Lang, Roberto M

    2016-05-01

    Despite advances in the treatment of patients with heart failure, mortality is still substantial. Part of this mortality is explained by cardioembolic stroke. Patients with heart failure are predisposed to developing cardioembolic strokes owing to abnormalities in Virchow's triad (endothelial function, relative hypercoagulable state, and static blood flow). Several randomized controlled trials have addressed whether patients with heart failure benefit from anticoagulation. Overall, the results suggest the risk of bleeding with anticoagulation outweighs any small benefit conferred by anticoagulation. PMID:27150169

  3. Post-stroke movement disorders: report of 56 patients

    PubMed Central

    Alarcon, F; Zijlmans, J; Duenas, G; Cevallos, N

    2004-01-01

    Background: Although movement disorders that occur following a stroke have long been recognised in short series of patients, their frequency and clinical and imaging features have not been reported in large series of patients with stroke. Methods: We reviewed consecutive patients with involuntary abnormal movements (IAMs) following a stroke who were included in the Eugenio Espejo Hospital Stroke Registry and they were followed up for at least one year after the onset of the IAM. We determined the clinical features, topographical correlations, and pathophysiological implications of the IAMs. Results: Of 1500 patients with stroke 56 developed movement disorders up to one year after the stroke. Patients with chorea were older and the patients with dystonia were younger than the patients with other IAMs. In patients with isolated vascular lesions without IAMs, surface lesions prevailed but patients with deep vascular lesions showed a higher probability of developing abnormal movements. One year after onset of the IAMs, 12 patients (21.4%) completely improved their abnormal movements, 38 patients (67.8%) partially improved, four did not improve (7.1%), and two patients with chorea died. In the nested case–control analysis, the patients with IAMs displayed a higher frequency of deep lesions (63% v 33%; OR 3.38, 95% CI 1.64 to 6.99, p<0.001). Patients with deep haemorrhagic lesions showed a higher probability of developing IAMs (OR 4.8, 95% CI 0.8 to 36.6). Conclusions: Chorea is the commonest movement disorder following stroke and appears in older patients. Involuntary movements tend to persist despite the functional recovery of motor deficit. Deep vascular lesions are more frequent in patients with movement disorders. PMID:15489389

  4. Cardiovascular disease is the main cause of long-term excess mortality after ischemic stroke in young adults.

    PubMed

    Rutten-Jacobs, Loes C A; Arntz, Renate M; Maaijwee, Noortje A M; Schoonderwaldt, Hennie C; Dorresteijn, Lucille D; van Dijk, Ewoud J; de Leeuw, Frank-Erik

    2015-03-01

    Adults with stroke at a young age (18-50 years) remain at an increased risk of death for decades. It is unclear what cause underlies this long-term excess mortality and whether this is sex and time specific. Therefore, we investigated sex-specific temporal changes in cause of death after transient ischemic attack or ischemic stroke in young adults aged 18 to 50 years. We included all 845 consecutive 30-day survivors, of a first-ever transient ischemic attack (n=261) or ischemic stroke (n=584), admitted to our hospital between 1980 and 2010. Survival status was assessed at April 1, 2013. Observed cause-specific mortality was compared with expected mortality, derived from mortality rates in the general population with similar age, sex, and calendar-year characteristics. During a median follow-up of 9.2 years, 146 patients (17.3%) died, such that 29 years of life was lost by each individual. For all causes of death, observed mortality exceeded expected mortality. The absolute excess risk of death was for 74% attributable to a vascular cause (absolute excess risk, 2.8 per 1000 person-years [95% confidence interval, 1.8-4.1] for stroke and absolute excess risk, 4.3 per 1000 person-years [95% confidence interval, 2.9-5.9] for other vascular causes). The absolute excess risk was highest between 10 and 15 years after stroke and this peak was most pronounced in men and mainly attributable to vascular death. Long-term excess death after stroke in young adults is mainly attributable to a vascular cause and most pronounced in men. Attempts to reduce the risk of vascular disease after stroke in young adults should extend beyond the acute phase into the long term.

  5. Management of Acute Hypertensive Response in Patients With Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Adnan I.

    2016-01-01

    High blood pressure (BP) >140/90 mm Hg is seen in 75% of patients with acute ischemic stroke and in 80% of patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhages and is independently associated with poor functional outcome. While BP reduction in patients with chronic hypertension remains one of the most important factors in primary and secondary stroke prevention, the proper management strategy for acute hypertensive response within the first 72 hours of acute ischemic stroke has been a matter of debate. Recent guidelines recommend clinical trials to ascertain whether antihypertensive therapy in the acute phase of stroke is beneficial. This review summarizes the current data on acute hypertensive response or elevated BP management during the first 72 hours after an acute ischemic stroke. Based on the potential deleterious effect of lowering BP observed in some clinical trials in patients with acute ischemic stroke and because of the lack of convincing evidence to support acute BP lowering in those situations, aggressive BP reduction in patients presenting with acute ischemic stroke is currently not recommended. While the early use of angiotensin receptor antagonists may help reduce cardiovascular events, this benefit is not necessarily related to BP reduction. PMID:27366297

  6. Neuroimaging Findings in Cryptogenic Stroke Patients with and without PFO

    PubMed Central

    Thaler, David E.; Ruthazer, Robin; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Di Tullio, Marco R.; Donovan, Jennifer S.; Elkind, Mitchell S. V.; Griffith, John; Homma, Shunichi; Jaigobin, Cheryl; Mas, Jean-Louis; Mattle, Heinrich P.; Michel, Patrik; Mono, Marie-Luise; Nedeltchev, Krassen; Papetti, Federica; Serena, Joaquín; Weimar, Christian; Kent, David M.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Patent foramen ovale (PFO) and cryptogenic stroke (CS) are commonly associated but some PFOs are incidental. Specific radiological findings associated with PFO may be more likely to indicate a PFO-related etiology. We examined whether specific radiological findings are associated with PFO among subjects with CS and known PFO status. METHODS We analyzed the Risk of Paradoxical Embolism (RoPE) database of subjects with CS and known PFO status, for associations between PFO and: 1) index stroke seen on imaging, 2) index stroke size, 3) index stroke location, 4) multiple index strokes, and 5) prior stroke on baseline imaging. We also compared imaging with purported “high risk” echocardiographic features. RESULTS Subjects (n=2680) were significantly more likely to have a PFO if their index stroke was large (OR 1.36, p=0.0025), seen on index imaging (OR 1.53, p=0.003), and superficially located (OR 1.54, p<0.0001). A prior stroke on baseline imaging was associated with not having a PFO (OR 0.66, p<0.0001). Finding multiple index strokes was unrelated to PFO status (OR 1.21, p=0.161). No echocardiographic variables were related to PFO status. CONCLUSIONS This is the largest study to report the radiological characteristics of patients with CS and known PFO status. Strokes that were large, radiologically apparent, superficially located, or unassociated with prior radiological infarcts were more likely to be PFO associated than were unapparent, smaller, or deep strokes, and those accompanied by chronic infarcts. There was no association between PFO and multiple acute strokes nor between specific echocardiographic PFO features with neuroimaging findings. PMID:23339957

  7. Progress in sensorimotor rehabilitative physical therapy programs for stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia-Ching; Shaw, Fu-Zen

    2014-08-16

    Impaired motor and functional activity following stroke often has negative impacts on the patient, the family and society. The available rehabilitation programs for stroke patients are reviewed. Conventional rehabilitation strategies (Bobath, Brunnstrom, proprioception neuromuscular facilitation, motor relearning and function-based principles) are the mainstream tactics in clinical practices. Numerous advanced strategies for sensory-motor functional enhancement, including electrical stimulation, electromyographic biofeedback, constraint-induced movement therapy, robotics-aided systems, virtual reality, intermittent compression, partial body weight supported treadmill training and thermal stimulation, are being developed and incorporated into conventional rehabilitation programs. The concept of combining valuable rehabilitative procedures into "a training package", based on the patient's functional status during different recovery phases after stroke is proposed. Integrated sensorimotor rehabilitation programs with appropriate temporal arrangements might provide great functional benefits for stroke patients. PMID:25133141

  8. A Retrospective Cohort Study Comparing Stroke Recurrence Rate in Ischemic Stroke Patients With and Without Acupuncture Treatment.

    PubMed

    Shih, Chun-Chuan; Liao, Chien-Chang; Sun, Mao-Feng; Su, Yi-Chang; Wen, Chi-Pang; Morisky, Donald E; Sung, Fung-Chang; Hsu, Chung Y; Lin, Jaung-Geng

    2015-09-01

    Little was known about the effects of acupuncture on stroke recurrence. The aim of this study is to investigate whether ischemic stroke patients receiving acupuncture treatment have a decreased risk of stroke recurrence. A retrospective cohort study of 30,058 newly diagnosed cases of ischemic stroke in 2000 to 2004 was conducted based on the claims of Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. The use of acupuncture treatment and stroke recurrence were identified during the follow-up period from 2000 to 2009. This study compared the risk of stroke recurrence between ischemic stroke cohorts with and without acupuncture treatment by calculating adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of acupuncture associated with stroke recurrence in the Cox proportional hazard model. The stroke recurrence rate per 1000 person-years decreased from 71.4 without to 69.9 with acupuncture treatment (P < 0.001). Acupuncture treatment was associated with reduced risk of stroke recurrence (HR 0.88; 95% CI 0.84-0.91). The acupuncture effect was noted in patients with or without medical treatment for stroke prevention but its impact decreased with aging of stroke patients. Compared with stroke patients without acupuncture treatment and medication therapy, the hazard ratios of stroke recurrence for those had medication therapy only, acupuncture only, and both were 0.42 (95% CI 0.38-0.46), 0.50 (95% CI 0.43-0.57), and 0.39 (95% CI 0.35-0.43), respectively. This study raises the possibility that acupuncture might be effective in lowering stroke recurrence rate even in those on medications for stroke prevention. Results suggest the need of prospective sham-controlled and randomized trials to establish the efficacy of acupuncture in preventing stroke. PMID:26426630

  9. Systematic Review of Hospital Readmissions in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Barrow, Emily; Vuik, Sabine; Darzi, Ara; Aylin, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Background. Previous evidence on factors and causes of readmissions associated with high-impact users of stroke is scanty. The aim of the study was to investigate common causes and pattern of short- and long-term readmissions stroke patients by conducting a systematic review of studies using hospital administrative data. Common risk factors associated with the change of readmission rate were also examined. Methods. The literature search was conducted from 15 February to 15 March 2016 using various databases, such as Medline, Embase, and Web of Science. Results. There were a total of 24 studies (n = 2,126,617) included in the review. Only 4 studies assessed causes of readmissions in stroke patients with the follow-up duration from 30 days to 5 years. Common causes of readmissions in majority of the studies were recurrent stroke, infections, and cardiac conditions. Common patient-related risk factors associated with increased readmission rate were age and history of coronary heart disease, heart failure, renal disease, respiratory disease, peripheral arterial disease, and diabetes. Among stroke-related factors, length of stay of index stroke admission was associated with increased readmission rate, followed by bowel incontinence, feeding tube, and urinary catheter. Conclusion. Although risk factors and common causes of readmission were identified, none of the previous studies investigated causes and their sequence of readmissions among high-impact stroke users. PMID:27668120

  10. Systematic Review of Hospital Readmissions in Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Rao, Ahsan; Barrow, Emily; Vuik, Sabine; Darzi, Ara; Aylin, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Background. Previous evidence on factors and causes of readmissions associated with high-impact users of stroke is scanty. The aim of the study was to investigate common causes and pattern of short- and long-term readmissions stroke patients by conducting a systematic review of studies using hospital administrative data. Common risk factors associated with the change of readmission rate were also examined. Methods. The literature search was conducted from 15 February to 15 March 2016 using various databases, such as Medline, Embase, and Web of Science. Results. There were a total of 24 studies (n = 2,126,617) included in the review. Only 4 studies assessed causes of readmissions in stroke patients with the follow-up duration from 30 days to 5 years. Common causes of readmissions in majority of the studies were recurrent stroke, infections, and cardiac conditions. Common patient-related risk factors associated with increased readmission rate were age and history of coronary heart disease, heart failure, renal disease, respiratory disease, peripheral arterial disease, and diabetes. Among stroke-related factors, length of stay of index stroke admission was associated with increased readmission rate, followed by bowel incontinence, feeding tube, and urinary catheter. Conclusion. Although risk factors and common causes of readmission were identified, none of the previous studies investigated causes and their sequence of readmissions among high-impact stroke users. PMID:27668120

  11. Systematic Review of Hospital Readmissions in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Barrow, Emily; Vuik, Sabine; Darzi, Ara; Aylin, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Background. Previous evidence on factors and causes of readmissions associated with high-impact users of stroke is scanty. The aim of the study was to investigate common causes and pattern of short- and long-term readmissions stroke patients by conducting a systematic review of studies using hospital administrative data. Common risk factors associated with the change of readmission rate were also examined. Methods. The literature search was conducted from 15 February to 15 March 2016 using various databases, such as Medline, Embase, and Web of Science. Results. There were a total of 24 studies (n = 2,126,617) included in the review. Only 4 studies assessed causes of readmissions in stroke patients with the follow-up duration from 30 days to 5 years. Common causes of readmissions in majority of the studies were recurrent stroke, infections, and cardiac conditions. Common patient-related risk factors associated with increased readmission rate were age and history of coronary heart disease, heart failure, renal disease, respiratory disease, peripheral arterial disease, and diabetes. Among stroke-related factors, length of stay of index stroke admission was associated with increased readmission rate, followed by bowel incontinence, feeding tube, and urinary catheter. Conclusion. Although risk factors and common causes of readmission were identified, none of the previous studies investigated causes and their sequence of readmissions among high-impact stroke users.

  12. Locomotor Trajectories of Stroke Patients during Oriented Gait and Turning

    PubMed Central

    Van Hamme, Angele; Bensmail, Djamel

    2016-01-01

    Background The Timed Up and Go (TUG) test is widely used to assess locomotion in patients with stroke and is considered to predict the risk of falls. The analysis of locomotor trajectories during the TUG appears pertinent in stroke patients. The aims of this study were i) to analyze locomotor trajectories in patients with stroke during the walking and turning sub-tasks of the TUG, and to compare them with healthy subjects, ii) to determine whether trajectory parameters provide additional information to that provided by the conventional measure (performance time), iii) to compare the trajectory parameters of fallers and non-fallers with stroke and of patients with right and left hemisphere stroke, and iv) to evaluate correlations between trajectory parameters and Berg Balance Scale scores. Methods 29 patients with stroke (mean age 54.2±12.2 years, 18 men, 8 fallers) and 25 healthy subjects (mean age 51.6±8.7 years, 11 men) underwent three-dimensional analysis of the TUG. The trajectory of the center of mass was analyzed by calculation of the global trajectory length, Hausdorff distance and Dynamic Time Warping. The parameters were compared with a reference trajectory during the total task and each sub-task (Go, Turn, Return) of the TUG. Results Values of trajectory parameters were significantly higher for the stroke group during the total TUG and the Go and Turn sub-tasks (p<0.05). Moreover, logistic regression indicated that these parameters better discriminated stroke patients and healthy subjects than the conventional timed performance during the Go sub-task. In addition, fallers were distinguished by higher Dynamic Time Warping during the Go (p<0.05). There were no differences between patients with right and left hemisphere stroke. Discussion and Conclusion The trajectories of the stroke patients were longer and more deviated during the turn and the preceding phase. Trajectory parameters provided additional information to timed performance of this locomotor

  13. The Importance of Patient Involvement in Stroke Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the perceived needs for health services by persons with stroke within the first year after rehabilitation, and associations between perceived impact of stroke, involvement in decisions regarding care/treatment, and having health services needs met. Method Data was collected, through a mail survey, from patients with stroke who were admitted to a university hospital in 2012 and had received rehabilitation after discharge from the stroke unit. The rehabilitation lasted an average of 2 to 4.6 months. The Stroke Survivor Needs Survey Questionnaire was used to assess the participants' perceptions of involvement in decisions on care or treatment and needs for health services in 11 problem areas: mobility, falls, incontinence, pain, fatigue, emotion, concentration, memory, speaking, reading, and sight. The perceived impact of stroke in eight areas was assessed using the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) 3.0. Eleven logistic regression models were created to explore associations between having health services needs met in each problem area respectively (dependent variable) and the independent variables. In all models the independent variables were: age, sex, SIS domain corresponding to the dependent variable, or stroke severity in cases when no corresponding SIS domain was identified, and involvement in decisions on care and treatment. Results The 63 participants who returned the questionnaires had a mean age of 72 years, 33 were male and 30 were female. Eighty percent had suffered a mild stroke. The number of participants who reported problems varied between 51 (80%, mobility) and 24 (38%, sight). Involvement in decisions on care and treatment was found to be associated with having health services needs met in six problem areas: falls, fatigue, emotion, memory, speaking, and reading. Conclusions The results highlight the importance of involving patients in making decisions on stroke rehabilitation, as it appears to be associated with meeting their health

  14. Effects of a Web-Based Stroke Education Program on Recurrence Prevention Behaviors among Stroke Patients: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Jae-Il; Lee, Sook; Kim, Jung-Hee

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of methods to prevent stroke recurrence and of education focusing on learners' needs has not been fully explored. The aims of this study were to assess the effects of such interventions among stroke patients and their primary caregivers and to evaluate the feasibility of a web-based stroke education program. The participants were…

  15. Abnormalities in the fatty-acid composition of the serum phospholipids of stroke patients.

    PubMed Central

    Glew, Robert H.; Okolie, Henry; Huang, Yung-Sheng; Chuang, Lu-Te; Suberu, Ojo; Crossey, Michael; VanderJagt, Dorothy J.

    2004-01-01

    The incidence of cardiovascular diseases, stroke, and myocardial infarction is increasing in sub-Saharan Africa. Since dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are protective of the cardiovascular system in humans, we were interested in the question of the PUFA status of adults in northern Nigeria who had experienced a recent stroke. We collected blood from 21 consecutive admissions for stroke (15 male patients, mean age 39.3 years and six females, mean age 40.7 years) to the Federal Medical Centre in Gombe, Nigeria and analyzed the fatty-acid composition of the serum phospholipids. Blood was collected from 30 healthy controls for comparison. The contribution palmitic acid made to the fatty-acid total was greatly decreased in the phospholipids of the stroke patients (29.2% versus 37.2 %, p < 0.001). However, the phospholipids of the stroke patients had significantly higher percentages of 20-, 22-, and 24-carbon saturated fatty acids, as well as higher proportions of the omega-6 fatty-acid, arachidonic acid (11.4 versus 8.14%, p < 0.001), and the omega-3 fatty-acid, docosahexaenoic acid (3.21 versus 1.80%, p < 0.001). Using the percentages and melting points of the individual fatty acids, we estimated that the acyl chains of the serum phospholipids of the stroke patients had a lower mean melting point than the controls (27.8 versus 34.6 degrees C, p < 0.001). Assuming that serum phospholipids are surrogates for tissue phospholipids, we conclude that the tissue membranes of the stroke patients may be considerably more fluid than those of the controls. PMID:15233494

  16. Comparing language outcomes in monolingual and bilingual stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Parker Jones, ‘Ōiwi; Grogan, Alice; Crinion, Jenny; Rae, Johanna; Ruffle, Louise; Leff, Alex P.; Seghier, Mohamed L.; Price, Cathy J.; Green, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Post-stroke prognoses are usually inductive, generalizing trends learned from one group of patients, whose outcomes are known, to make predictions for new patients. Research into the recovery of language function is almost exclusively focused on monolingual stroke patients, but bilingualism is the norm in many parts of the world. If bilingual language recruits qualitatively different networks in the brain, prognostic models developed for monolinguals might not generalize well to bilingual stroke patients. Here, we sought to establish how applicable post-stroke prognostic models, trained with monolingual patient data, are to bilingual stroke patients who had been ordinarily resident in the UK for many years. We used an algorithm to extract binary lesion images for each stroke patient, and assessed their language with a standard tool. We used feature selection and cross-validation to find ‘good’ prognostic models for each of 22 different language skills, using monolingual data only (174 patients; 112 males and 62 females; age at stroke: mean = 53.0 years, standard deviation = 12.2 years, range = 17.2–80.1 years; time post-stroke: mean = 55.6 months, standard deviation = 62.6 months, range = 3.1–431.9 months), then made predictions for both monolinguals and bilinguals (33 patients; 18 males and 15 females; age at stroke: mean = 49.0 years, standard deviation = 13.2 years, range = 23.1–77.0 years; time post-stroke: mean = 49.2 months, standard deviation = 55.8 months, range = 3.9–219.9 months) separately, after training with monolingual data only. We measured group differences by comparing prediction error distributions, and used a Bayesian test to search for group differences in terms of lesion-deficit associations in the brain. Our models distinguish better outcomes from worse outcomes equally well within each group, but tended to be over-optimistic when predicting bilingual language outcomes: our bilingual patients tended to have poorer language skills

  17. Comparing language outcomes in monolingual and bilingual stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Hope, Thomas M H; Parker Jones, 'Ōiwi; Grogan, Alice; Crinion, Jenny; Rae, Johanna; Ruffle, Louise; Leff, Alex P; Seghier, Mohamed L; Price, Cathy J; Green, David W

    2015-04-01

    Post-stroke prognoses are usually inductive, generalizing trends learned from one group of patients, whose outcomes are known, to make predictions for new patients. Research into the recovery of language function is almost exclusively focused on monolingual stroke patients, but bilingualism is the norm in many parts of the world. If bilingual language recruits qualitatively different networks in the brain, prognostic models developed for monolinguals might not generalize well to bilingual stroke patients. Here, we sought to establish how applicable post-stroke prognostic models, trained with monolingual patient data, are to bilingual stroke patients who had been ordinarily resident in the UK for many years. We used an algorithm to extract binary lesion images for each stroke patient, and assessed their language with a standard tool. We used feature selection and cross-validation to find 'good' prognostic models for each of 22 different language skills, using monolingual data only (174 patients; 112 males and 62 females; age at stroke: mean = 53.0 years, standard deviation = 12.2 years, range = 17.2-80.1 years; time post-stroke: mean = 55.6 months, standard deviation = 62.6 months, range = 3.1-431.9 months), then made predictions for both monolinguals and bilinguals (33 patients; 18 males and 15 females; age at stroke: mean = 49.0 years, standard deviation = 13.2 years, range = 23.1-77.0 years; time post-stroke: mean = 49.2 months, standard deviation = 55.8 months, range = 3.9-219.9 months) separately, after training with monolingual data only. We measured group differences by comparing prediction error distributions, and used a Bayesian test to search for group differences in terms of lesion-deficit associations in the brain. Our models distinguish better outcomes from worse outcomes equally well within each group, but tended to be over-optimistic when predicting bilingual language outcomes: our bilingual patients tended to have poorer language skills than expected

  18. Post-stroke bacteriuria among stroke patients attending a physiotherapy clinic in Ghana: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Donkor, Eric S; Akumwena, Amos; Amoo, Philip K; Owolabi, Mayowa O; Aspelund, Thor; Gudnason, Vilmundur

    2016-01-01

    Background Infections are known to be a major complication of stroke patients. In this study, we evaluated the risk of community-acquired bacteriuria among stroke patients, the associated factors, and the causative organisms. Methods This was a cross-sectional study involving 70 stroke patients and 83 age- and sex-matched, apparently healthy controls. Urine specimens were collected from all the study subjects and were analyzed by standard microbiological methods. Demographic and clinical information was also collected from the study subjects. For stroke patients, the information collected also included stroke parameters, such as stroke duration, frequency, and subtype. Results Bacteriuria was significantly higher among stroke patients (24.3%, n=17) than among the control group (7.2%, n=6), with a relative risk of 3.36 (confidence interval [CI], 1.40–8.01, P=0.006). Among the control group, all six bacteriuria cases were asymptomatic, whereas the 17 stroke bacteriuria cases comprised 15 cases of asymptomatic bacteriuria and two cases of symptomatic bacteriuria. Female sex (OR, 3.40; CI, 1.12–10.30; P=0.03) and presence of stroke (OR, 0.24; CI, 0.08–0.70; P=0.009) were significantly associated with bacteriuria. The etiology of bacteriuria was similar in both study groups, and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp. were the most predominant organisms isolated from both stroke patients (12.9%) and the control group (2.4%). Conclusion Stroke patients in the study region have a significantly higher risk of community-acquired bacteriuria, which in most cases is asymptomatic. Community-acquired bacteriuria in stroke patients appears to have little or no relationship with clinical parameters of stroke such as stroke subtype, duration and frequency. PMID:27051289

  19. Tai Chi Chuan for the Primary Prevention of Stroke in Middle-Aged and Elderly Adults: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Guohua; Liu, Feiwen; Li, Shuzhen; Tao, Jing; Chen, Lidian

    2015-01-01

    Background. Stroke is a major healthcare problem with serious long-term disability and is one of the leading causes of death in the world. Prevention of stroke is considered an important strategy. Methods. Seven electronic databases were searched. Results. 36 eligible studies with a total of 2393 participants were identified. Primary outcome measures, TCC exercise combined with other intervention had a significant effect on decreasing the incidence of nonfatal stroke (n = 185, RR = 0.11, 95% CI 0.01 to 0.85, P = 0.03) and CCD (n = 125, RR = 0.33, 95% CI 0.11 to 0.96, P = 0.04). For the risk factors of stroke, pooled analysis demonstrated that TCC exercise was associated with lower body weight, BMI, FBG level, and decreasing SBP, DBP, plasma TC, and LDL-C level regardless of the intervention period less than half a year or more than one year and significantly raised HDL-C level in comparison to nonintervention. Compared with other treatments, TCC intervention on the basis of the same other treatments in patients with chronic disease also showed the beneficial effect on lowering blood pressure. Conclusion. The present systematic review indicates that TCC exercise is beneficially associated with the primary prevention of stroke in middle-aged and elderly adults by inversing the high risk factors of stroke. PMID:25784950

  20. Increased Risk of Ischemic Stroke in Young Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ching-Chih; Su, Yu-Chieh; Ho, Hsu-Chueh; Hung, Shih-Kai; Lee, Moon-Sing; Chiou, Wen-Yen; Chou, Pesus; Huang, Yung-Sung

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Radiation/chemoradiotherapy-induced carotid stenosis and cerebrovascular events in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) can cause severe disability and even death. This study aimed to estimate the risk of ischemic stroke in this patient population over more than 10 years of follow-up. Methods and Materials: The study cohorts consisted of all patients hospitalized with a principal diagnosis of NPC (n = 1094), whereas patients hospitalized for an appendectomy during 1997 and 1998 (n = 4376) acted as the control group and surrogate for the general population. Cox proportional hazard model was performed as a means of comparing the stroke-free survival rate between the two cohorts after adjusting for possible confounding and risk factors. Results: Of the 292 patients with ischemic strokes, 62 (5.7%) were from the NPC cohort and 230 (5.3%) were from the control group. NPC patients ages 35-54 had a 1.66 times (95% CI, 1.16-2.86; p = 0.009) higher risk of ischemic stroke after adjusting for patient characteristics, comorbidities, geographic region, urbanization level of residence, and socioeconomic status. There was no statistical difference in ischemic stroke risk between the NPC patients and appendectomy patients ages 55-64 years (hazard ratio = 0.87; 95% CI, 0.56-1.33; p = 0.524) after adjusting for other factors. Conclusions: Young NPC patients carry a higher risk for ischemic stroke than the general population. Besides regular examinations of carotid duplex, different irradiation strategies or using new technique of radiotherapy, such as intensity modulated radiation therapy or volumetric modulated arc therapy, should be considered in young NPC patients.

  1. Insular and caudate lesions release abnormal yawning in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Krestel, Heinz; Weisstanner, Christian; Hess, Christian W; Bassetti, Claudio L; Nirkko, Arto; Wiest, Roland

    2015-03-01

    Abnormal yawning is an underappreciated phenomenon in patients with ischemic stroke. We aimed at identifying frequently affected core regions in the supratentorial brain of stroke patients with abnormal yawning and contributing to the anatomical network concept of yawning control. Ten patients with acute anterior circulation stroke and ≥3 yawns/15 min without obvious cause were analyzed. The NIH stroke scale (NIHSS), Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), symptom onset, period with abnormal yawning, blood oxygen saturation, glucose, body temperature, blood pressure, heart rate, and modified Rankin scale (mRS) were assessed for all patients. MRI lesion maps were segmented on diffusion-weighted images, spatially normalized, and the extent of overlap between the different stroke patterns was determined. Correlations between the period with abnormal yawning and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in the overlapping regions, total stroke volume, NIHSS and mRS were performed. Periods in which patients presented with episodes of abnormal yawning lasted on average for 58 h. Average GCS, NIHSS, and mRS scores were 12.6, 11.6, and 3.5, respectively. Clinical parameters were within normal limits. Ischemic brain lesions overlapped in nine out of ten patients: in seven patients in the insula and in seven in the caudate nucleus. The decrease of the ADC within the lesions correlated with the period with abnormal yawing (r = -0.76, Bonferroni-corrected p = 0.02). The stroke lesion intensity of the common overlapping regions in the insula and the caudate nucleus correlates with the period with abnormal yawning. The insula might be the long sought-after brain region for serotonin-mediated yawning.

  2. Use of Antithrombotic Medications among Elderly Ischemic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lichtman, Judith H.; Naert, Lisa; Allen, Norrina B.; Watanabe, Emi; Jones, Sara B.; Barry, Lisa C.; Bravata, Dawn M.; Goldstein, Larry B.

    2011-01-01

    Background The use of antithrombotic medications after ischemic stroke is recommended for deep vein thrombosis (DVT) prophylaxis and secondary stroke prevention. We assessed the rate of receipt of these therapies among eligible ischemic stroke patients aged ≥65 years and determined the effects of age and other patient characteristics on treatment. Methods and Results The analysis included Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries discharged with ischemic stroke (ICD-9 433, 434, 436) randomly selected for inclusion in the Medicare Health Care Quality Improvement Program’s National Stroke Project 1998–1999, 2000–2001. Patients discharged from non-acute facilities, transferred, or terminally ill were excluded. Receipt of in-hospital pharmacological DVT prophylaxis, antiplatelet medication, anticoagulants for atrial fibrillation, and antithrombotic medications at discharge were assessed in eligible patients, stratified by age (65–74, 75–84, 85+ yrs). Descriptive models identified characteristics associated with treatment. Among 31,554 patients, 14.9% of those eligible received pharmacologic DVT prophylaxis, 83.9% antiplatelet drugs, 82.8% anticoagulants for atrial fibrillation, and 74.2% were discharged on an antithrombotic medication. Rates of treatment decreased with age, and were lowest for patients aged 85 years or older. Admission from a skilled nursing facility and functional dependence were associated with lower treatment rates. Conclusions There was substantial underuse of antithrombotic therapies among elderly ischemic stroke patients, particularly among the very elderly, those admitted from skilled nursing facilities, and patients with functional dependence. The reasons for low use of antithrombotic therapies, including the apparent underuse of DVT prophylaxis in otherwise eligible patients, require further investigation. PMID:21098780

  3. Blood-brain barrier permeability is increased after acute adult stroke but not neonatal stroke in the rat.

    PubMed

    Fernández-López, David; Faustino, Joel; Daneman, Richard; Zhou, Lu; Lee, Sarah Y; Derugin, Nikita; Wendland, Michael F; Vexler, Zinaida S

    2012-07-11

    The immaturity of the CNS at birth greatly affects injury after stroke but the contribution of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to the differential response to stroke in adults and neonates is poorly understood. We asked whether the structure and function of the BBB is disrupted differently in neonatal and adult rats by transient middle cerebral artery occlusion. In adult rats, albumin leakage into injured regions was markedly increased during 2-24 h reperfusion but leakage remained low in the neonates. Functional assays employing intravascular tracers in the neonates showed that BBB permeability to both large (70 kDa dextran) and small (3 kDa dextran), gadolinium (III)-diethyltriaminepentaacetic acid tracers remained largely undisturbed 24 h after reperfusion. The profoundly different functional integrity of the BBB was associated with the largely nonoverlapping patterns of regulated genes in endothelial cells purified from injured and uninjured adult and neonatal brain at 24 h (endothelial transcriptome, 31,042 total probe sets). Within significantly regulated 1266 probe sets in injured adults and 361 probe sets in neonates, changes in the gene expression of the basal lamina components, adhesion molecules, the tight junction protein occludin, and matrix metalloproteinase-9 were among the key differences. The protein expression of collagen-IV, laminin, claudin-5, occludin, and zonula occludens protein 1 was also better preserved in neonatal rats. Neutrophil infiltration remained low in acutely injured neonates but neutralization of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant-1 in the systemic circulation enhanced neutrophil infiltration, BBB permeability, and injury. The markedly more integrant BBB in neonatal brain than in adult brain after acute stroke may have major implications for the treatment of neonatal stroke. PMID:22787045

  4. Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... emergency. Strokes happen when blood flow to your brain stops. Within minutes, brain cells begin to die. There are two kinds ... blocks or plugs a blood vessel in the brain. The other kind, called hemorrhagic stroke, is caused ...

  5. [Investigation on acute stroke patients being admitted to hospital].

    PubMed

    Zi, X; Song, Z; Fan, X

    1999-01-01

    One hundred and twelve patients with acute stroke were studied. The results revealed that about 42 percent of 112 patients could get to hospital within 6 hours after onset, in which included 60.4 percent of the hemorrhagic group and 28.1 percent of the infarction group. Comparatively, among 30.3 percent of 112 patients CT scan was carried out within 6 hours, which included 41.7 percent of the hemorrhagic group and 21.8 percent of the infarction group. Linear correlation analysis was studied between admission time(AT) and the assessment of neural function defect(ANFD). The results showed that there was significant negative correlation between AT and ANFD in stroke patients. After analysing the serial reasons of delaying hospitalization, the authors have found that the key factor is the ignorance of the importance of stroke in early stage. PMID:12080684

  6. Community stroke rehabilitation helps patients return to work.

    PubMed

    Pearn, John; O'Connor, Rory J

    2013-09-01

    Around 150,000 people experience a stroke every year in the UK. Nearly one million people in England are living with the effects of a stroke; one third of whom are moderately to severely disabled. A quarter of stroke survivors are under the age of 65 meaning that many are in work and/or have responsibility for caring for children or elderly parents. With a comprehensive rehabilitation team, patients with more complex or severe disability can be rehabilitated in the community providing that the home environment can be suitably adapted. All patients will require regular review by their own doctor and some of these reviews will focus on standardised assessments of risk factors for stroke and implementation of appropriate secondary prevention. The GP has a role in identifying the emotional impact of stroke on the patient and the impact that the stroke has on relatives and carers. The core components of the community-based programme can be broadly defined as improving emotional wellbeing, communication, cognitive function and physical independence and supporting return to work. Antidepressants are effective in reducing emotional lability. Cognitive functions such as memory, attention, perception and planning are often affected by stroke. Assessment and treatment by the occupational therapy team and clinical psychologist can reduce the impact of these impairments. Speech and language therapy is instrumental in facilitating recovery as is training carers in supportive communication and providing aphasia-friendly information. NICE recommends that patients receive 45 minutes of each relevant therapy five times a week. Each therapy needs to be provided at an intensity that will produce a functional change. Most patients will be able to drive again if there is no significant visual field loss or uncontrolled epilepsy. Graded return to work programmes are more successful as people are gradually accustomed to the workplace. PMID:24383153

  7. Pediatric Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials News About Neurology Image Library Search The Internet Stroke Center Patients & Families About Stroke Stroke Diagnosis ... UT Southwestern Medical Center. Copyright © 1997-2016 - The Internet Stroke Center. All rights reserved. The information contained ...

  8. Effects of Physical Exercise on Working Memory and Prefrontal Cortex Function in Post-Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Moriya, M; Aoki, C; Sakatani, K

    2016-01-01

    Physical exercise enhances prefrontal cortex activity and improves working memory performance in healthy older adults, but it is not clear whether this remains the case in post-stroke patients. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the acute effect of physical exercise on prefrontal cortex activity in post-stroke patients using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). We studied 11 post-stroke patients. The patients performed Sternberg-type working memory tasks before and after moderate intensity aerobic exercise (40 % of maximal oxygen uptake) with a cycling ergometer for 15 min. We measured the NIRS response at the prefrontal cortex during the working memory task. We evaluated behavioral performance (response time and accuracy) of the working memory task. It was found that physical exercise improved behavioral performance of the working memory task compared with the control condition (p < 0.01). In addition, NIRS analysis indicated that physical exercise enhanced prefrontal cortex activation, particularly in the right prefrontal cortex (p < 0.05), during the working memory task compared with the control condition. These findings suggest that the moderate-intensity aerobic exercise enhances prefrontal cortex activity and improves working memory performance in post-stroke patients. PMID:27526144

  9. Effects of Physical Exercise on Working Memory and Prefrontal Cortex Function in Post-Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Moriya, M; Aoki, C; Sakatani, K

    2016-01-01

    Physical exercise enhances prefrontal cortex activity and improves working memory performance in healthy older adults, but it is not clear whether this remains the case in post-stroke patients. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the acute effect of physical exercise on prefrontal cortex activity in post-stroke patients using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). We studied 11 post-stroke patients. The patients performed Sternberg-type working memory tasks before and after moderate intensity aerobic exercise (40 % of maximal oxygen uptake) with a cycling ergometer for 15 min. We measured the NIRS response at the prefrontal cortex during the working memory task. We evaluated behavioral performance (response time and accuracy) of the working memory task. It was found that physical exercise improved behavioral performance of the working memory task compared with the control condition (p < 0.01). In addition, NIRS analysis indicated that physical exercise enhanced prefrontal cortex activation, particularly in the right prefrontal cortex (p < 0.05), during the working memory task compared with the control condition. These findings suggest that the moderate-intensity aerobic exercise enhances prefrontal cortex activity and improves working memory performance in post-stroke patients.

  10. Recovery of slow-5 oscillations in a longitudinal study of ischemic stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    La, C.; Nair, V.A.; Mossahebi, P.; Stamm, J.; Birn, R.; Meyerand, M.E.; Prabhakaran, V.

    2016-01-01

    Functional networks in resting-state fMRI are identified by characteristics of their intrinsic low-frequency oscillations, more specifically in terms of their synchronicity. With advanced aging and in clinical populations, this synchronicity among functionally linked regions is known to decrease and become disrupted, which may be associated with observed cognitive and behavioral changes. Previous work from our group has revealed that oscillations within the slow-5 frequency range (0.01–0.027 Hz) are particularly susceptible to disruptions in aging and following a stroke. In this study, we characterized longitudinally the changes in the slow-5 oscillations in stroke patients across two different time-points. We followed a group of ischemic stroke patients (n = 20) and another group of healthy older adults (n = 14) over two visits separated by a minimum of three months (average of 9 months). For the stroke patients, one visit occurred in their subacute window (10 days to 6 months after stroke onset), the other took place in their chronic window (> 6 months after stroke). Using a mid-order group ICA method on 10-minutes eyes-closed resting-state fMRI data, we assessed the frequency distributions of a component's representative time-courses for differences in regards to slow-5 spectral power. First, our stroke patients, in their subacute stage, exhibited lower amplitude slow-5 oscillations in comparison to their healthy counterparts. Second, over time in their chronic stage, those same patients showed a recovery of those oscillations, reaching near equivalence to the healthy older adult group. Our results indicate the possibility of an eventual recovery of those initially disrupted network oscillations to a near-normal level, providing potentially a biomarker for stroke recovery of the cortical system. This finding opens new avenues in infra-slow oscillation research and could serve as a useful biomarker in future treatments aimed at recovery. PMID:27077023

  11. Factors Related to Gait Function in Post-stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Ki Hun; Lee, Joo Young; Lee, Kun Jae; Kang, Eun Kyoung

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] Gait function after a stroke is an important factor for determining a patient’s ability to independently perform activities of daily living (ADL). The objective of this study was to elucidate the factors associated with gait function in post-stroke patients. [Subjects] Thirty-nine stroke patients (16 females and 23 males; average age 67.82 ± 10.96 years; post-onset duration: 200.18 ± 27.14 days) participated in this study. [Methods] Their gait function, motor function (Manual Muscle Test [MMT] and Brünnstrom stage), level of cognition (Mini-Mental State Examination score [MMSE], and the Loewenstein Occupational Therapy Cognitive Assessment for the Geriatric Population [LOTCA-G]), and ADL (Korean modified Barthel index [K-MBI]) were assessed. [Results] The degree of gait function showed significant positive correlations with the following variables: MMT of the elbow, knee, ankle and wrist; Brünnstrom stage; MMSE; LOTCA-G subscores except motor praxis; K-MBI. Stepwise linear regression analysis revealed the Brünnstrom stage was the only explanatory variable closely associated with gait level. [Conclusion] Gait function of post-stroke patients was related to motor function, cognition, and ADL. In particular, there is a significant association between gait level and the Brünnstrom stages, reflecting the importance of monitoring the motor recovery of gait function in post-stroke patients. PMID:25540503

  12. Neuronal replacement from endogenous precursors in the adult brain after stroke.

    PubMed

    Arvidsson, Andreas; Collin, Tove; Kirik, Deniz; Kokaia, Zaal; Lindvall, Olle

    2002-09-01

    In the adult brain, new neurons are continuously generated in the subventricular zone and dentate gyrus, but it is unknown whether these neurons can replace those lost following damage or disease. Here we show that stroke, caused by transient middle cerebral artery occlusion in adult rats, leads to a marked increase of cell proliferation in the subventricular zone. Stroke-generated new neurons, as well as neuroblasts probably already formed before the insult, migrate into the severely damaged area of the striatum, where they express markers of developing and mature, striatal medium-sized spiny neurons. Thus, stroke induces differentiation of new neurons into the phenotype of most of the neurons destroyed by the ischemic lesion. Here we show that the adult brain has the capacity for self-repair after insults causing extensive neuronal death. If the new neurons are functional and their formation can be stimulated, a novel therapeutic strategy might be developed for stroke in humans. PMID:12161747

  13. Persistent production of neurons from adult brain stem cells during recovery after stroke.

    PubMed

    Thored, Pär; Arvidsson, Andreas; Cacci, Emanuele; Ahlenius, Henrik; Kallur, Therése; Darsalia, Vladimer; Ekdahl, Christine T; Kokaia, Zaal; Lindvall, Olle

    2006-03-01

    Neural stem cells in the subventricular zone of adult rodents produce new striatal neurons that may replace those that have died after stroke; however, the neurogenic response has been considered acute and transient, yielding only small numbers of neurons. In contrast, we show herein that striatal neuroblasts are generated without decline at least for 4 months after stroke in adult rats. Neuroblasts formed early or late after stroke either differentiate into mature neurons, which survive for several months, or die through caspase-mediated apoptosis. The directed migration of the new neurons toward the ischemic damage is regulated by stromal cell-derived factor-1alpha and its receptor CXCR4. These results show that endogenous neural stem cells continuously supply the injured adult brain with new neurons, which suggests novel self-repair strategies to improve recovery after stroke. PMID:16210404

  14. Enhanced effective connectivity in mild occipital stroke patients with hemianopia.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoli; Jin, Zheng; Feng, Xinyang; Tong, Shanbao

    2014-11-01

    Plasticity-based spontaneous recovery and rehabilitation intervention of stroke-induced hemianopia have drawn great attention in recent years. However, the underlying neural mechanism remains unknown. This study aims to investigate brain network disruption and reorganization in hemianopia patients due to mild occipital stroke. Resting-state networks were constructed from 12 hemianopia patients with right occipital infarct by partial directed coherence analysis of multi-channel electroencephalograms. Compared with control subjects, the patients presented enhanced connectivity owing to newly formed connections. Compensational connections mostly originated from the peri-infarct area and targeted contralesional frontal, central, and parietal cortices. These new ipsilesional-to-contralesional inter-hemispheric connections coordinately presented significant correlation with the extent of vision loss. The enhancement of connectivity might be the neural substrate for brain plasticity in stroke-induced hemianopia and may shed light on plasticity-based recovery or rehabilitation. PMID:24876132

  15. Guideline clinical nutrition in patients with stroke.

    PubMed

    Wirth, Rainer; Smoliner, Christine; Jäger, Martin; Warnecke, Tobias; Leischker, Andreas H; Dziewas, Rainer

    2013-12-01

    Stroke is regularly accompanied by dysphagia and other factors associated with decreased nutritional intake. Dysphagia with aspiration pneumonia and insufficient nutritional intake lead to worse outcome after stroke.This guideline is the first chapter of the guideline "Clinical Nutrition in Neurology" of the German Society for Clinical Nutrition (DGEM) which itself is one part of a comprehensive guideline about all areas of Clinical Nutrition. The thirty-one recommendations of the guideline are based on a systematic literature search and review, last updated December 31, 2011. All recommendations were discussed and consented at several consensus conferences with the entire DGEM guideline group. The recommendations underline the importance of an early screening and assessment of dysphagia and give advice for an evidence based and comprehensive nutritional management to avoid aspiration, malnutrition and dehydration.

  16. Disability Assessment for Patients with Stroke.

    PubMed

    Jette, A M

    1997-01-01

    This review focuses on six prominent disability instruments designed and used in stroke research. The strengths and limitations of each are reviewed against four criteria which should be considered in selecting among existing instruments: the conceptual scope; the scaling method; its psychometric properties; and the instrument's feasibility. Outcomes measurement is an active area of investigation and the clinical researcher should follow the rehabilitation literature closely to keep abreast of the latest developments. PMID:27620373

  17. Stroke Increases Neural Stem Cells and Angiogenesis in the Neurogenic Niche of the Adult Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui Lan; Chopp, Michael; Roberts, Cynthia; Liu, Xianshuang; Wei, Min; Nejad-Davarani, Siamak P.; Wang, Xinli; Zhang, Zheng Gang

    2014-01-01

    The unique cellular and vascular architecture of the adult ventricular-subventricular zone (V/SVZ) neurogenic niche plays an important role in regulating neural stem cell function. However, the in vivo identification of neural stem cells and their relationship to blood vessels within this niche in response to stroke remain largely unknown. Using whole-mount preparation of the lateral ventricle wall, we examined the architecture of neural stem cells and blood vessels in the V/SVZ of adult mouse over the course of 3 months after onset of focal cerebral ischemia. Stroke substantially increased the number of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) positive neural stem cells that are in contact with the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) via their apical processes at the center of pinwheel structures formed by ependymal cells residing in the lateral ventricle. Long basal processes of these cells extended to blood vessels beneath the ependymal layer. Moreover, stroke increased V/SVZ endothelial cell proliferation from 2% in non-ischemic mice to 12 and 15% at 7 and 14 days after stroke, respectively. Vascular volume in the V/SVZ was augmented from 3% of the total volume prior to stroke to 6% at 90 days after stroke. Stroke-increased angiogenesis was closely associated with neuroblasts that expanded to nearly encompass the entire lateral ventricular wall in the V/SVZ. These data indicate that stroke induces long-term alterations of the neural stem cell and vascular architecture of the adult V/SVZ neurogenic niche. These post-stroke structural changes may provide insight into neural stem cell mediation of stroke-induced neurogenesis through the interaction of neural stem cells with proteins in the CSF and their sub-ependymal neurovascular interaction. PMID:25437857

  18. Prevention of recurrent stroke in patients with patent foramen ovale.

    PubMed

    Wessler, Benjamin S; Kent, David M

    2015-05-01

    Patent foramen ovale (PFO) is common and only rarely related to stroke. The high PFO prevalence in healthy individuals makes for difficult decision making when a PFO is found in the setting of a cryptogenic stroke, because the PFO may be an incidental finding. Recent clinical trials of device-based PFO closure have had negative overall summary results; these trials have been limited by low recurrence rates. The optimal antithrombotic strategy for these patients is also unknown. Recent work has identified a risk score that estimates PFO-attributable fractions based on individual patient characteristics, although whether this score can help direct therapy is unclear.

  19. Effects of Music Therapy on Mood in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong Soo; Choi, Jung Hwa; Im, Sang-Hee; Jung, Kang Jae; Cha, Young A; Jung, Chul Oh; Yoon, Yeo Hoon

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effects of music therapy on depressive mood and anxiety in post-stroke patients and evaluate satisfaction levels of patients and caregivers. Materials and Methods Eighteen post-stroke patients, within six months of onset and mini mental status examination score of over 20, participated in this study. Patients were divided into music and control groups. The experimental group participated in the music therapy program for four weeks. Psychological status was evaluated with the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) before and after music therapy. Satisfaction with music therapy was evaluated by a questionnaire. Results BAI and BDI scores showed a greater decrease in the music group than the control group after music therapy, but only the decrease of BDI scores were statistically significant (p=0.048). Music therapy satisfaction in patients and caregivers was affirmative. Conclusion Music therapy has a positive effect on mood in post-stroke patients and may be beneficial for mood improvement with stroke. These results are encouraging, but further studies are needed in this field. PMID:22028163

  20. Strategies of Daily Living Rehabilitative Activities for Post Stroke Patients at Minia University Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaky, Hend Elham Mohamed; EL-Lateef Mohammad, Zienab Abd; EL-Labban, Abdou Saad Taha; Ahmed, Gahen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Stroke is a leading cause of disability. Rehabilitation aims to hasten and maximize recovery from stroke by treating the disabilities caused by the stroke. Therefore, the aim of this study determine the post stroke patients' knowledge and practices in relation to disease and activities of daily living before the implementation of…

  1. Movement disorders in ischemic stroke: clinical study of 22 patients.

    PubMed

    D'Olhaberriague, L; Arboix, A; Martí-Vilalta, J L; Moral, A; Massons, J

    1995-12-01

    Movement disorders (bemichorea-hemiballismus, hemidystonia and isolated tremor) are an uncommon clinical manifestation in ischemic stroke (IS), and their anatomical basis is poorly understood. We analyzed the clinical and neuroimaging characteristics of 22 consecutive patients who bad movement disorders associated with cerebral infarction (MDCI), studied at four institutions over 8 years. In one institution (from the La Alianza-Central Hospital of Barcelona Stroke Registry) nine patients with MDCI were identified among 1099 consecutive first ever stroke patients (0.8%) (908 with IS, 1%). Fifteen out of 22 patients (68%) had hemichorea-hemiballismus, five (23%) hemidystonia and two (9%) isolated tremor. MDCI were more often left sided (n = 15, 68%), being bilateral in one patient (4.5%). A lesion was found on neuroimaging (CT and/or MRI) in 15 patients (68%), in the territory of the posterior cerebral artery (n = 8) and middle cerebral artery (six deep and one superficial). The most commonly involved structure was the thalamus (n = 8, 36.5%). IS subtypes were; presumed lacunar infarcts in 14 patients (64%), atherothrombotic infarcts in two patients (9%), cardioembolic infarcts in two patients (9%) and infarcts of unknown etiology in four patients (18%). Hemichorea-hemiballismus was the most common type of MDCI in our study, usually being the result of a thalamic infarction. The thalamus was the most frequently damaged structure underlying all types of MDCI. There was a striking propensity of MDCI which resulted from nondominant deep hemispheric small vessel infarctions.

  2. Predictors of Functional Outcome Among Stroke Patients in Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Abanto, Carlos; Ton, Thanh G.N.; Tirschwell, David L.; Montano, Silvia; Quispe, Yrma; Gonzales, Isidro; Valencia, Ana; Calle, Pilar; Garate, Arturo; Zunt, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Background Due to the aging population in low- and middle-income countries, cerebrovascular disease is expected to remain a leading cause of death. Little has been published about stroke in Peru. Aims We conducted a retrospective cohort study of hospitalized stroke patients at a referral center hospital in Lima, Peru to explore factors associated with functional outcome among stroke patients. Methods We identified 579 patients hospitalized for ischemic stroke or intracerebral hemorrhage stroke at the National Institute of Neurologic Sciences in Lima, Peru in 2008 and 2009. A favorable outcome was defined as a modified Rankin score of ≤2 at discharge. Results The mean age was 63.3 years; 75.6% had ischemic stroke; the average length of stay was 17.3 days. At hospital discharge, 231 (39.9%) had a favorable outcome. The overall mortality rate was 5.2%. In multivariate models, the likelihood of having a favorable outcome decreased linearly with increasing age (p=0.02) and increasing NIHSS (p=0.02). Favorable outcome was also associated with male gender (relative risk [RR]=1.2; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.0, 1.5) and divorced status (RR=1.3, 95% CI: 1.1, 1.7). Patients on Salud Integral de Salud (public assistance-type insurance, SIS) (RR=0.7, 95% CI: 0.5,1.0) were also less likely to have a favorable outcome. Conclusions Favorable outcome after stroke was independently associated with younger age, lower NIHSS score, male gender, being divorced, and not being on SIS insurance. These findings suggest further study of worse functional outcomes in patients with SIS insurance and confirm the importance of risk adjustment for age, stroke severity (NIHSS) and other socioeconomic factors in outcomes studies. Future studies should preferentially assess outcome at 30-days and 6-months to provide more reliable comparisons and allow additional study of Peruvian end-of-life decision-making and care. PMID:23352681

  3. Improving Balance in Subacute Stroke Patients: A Randomized Controlled Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goljar, Nika; Burger, Helena; Rudolf, Marko; Stanonik, Irena

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the efficacy of balance training in a balance trainer, a newly developed mechanical device for training balance, with conventional balance training in subacute stroke patients. This was a randomized controlled study. Fifty participants met the inclusion criteria and 39 finished the study. The participants were…

  4. Somatosensory Findings of Pusher Syndrome in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Hwa; Kim, Sang Beom; Lee, Kyeong Woo

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the somatosensory findings of pusher syndrome in stroke patients. Methods Twelve pusher patients and twelve non-pusher patients were enrolled in this study. Inclusion criteria were unilateral stroke, sufficient cognitive abilities to understand and follow instructions, and no visual problem. Patients were evaluated for pusher syndrome using a standardized scale for contraversive pushing. Somatosensory finding was assessed by the Cumulative Somatosensory Impairment Index (CSII) and somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) at 1 and 14 weeks after the stroke onset. Data of SEPs with median and tibial nerve stimulation were classified into the normal, abnormal, and no response group. Results In the baseline characteristics (sex, lesion character, and side) of both groups, significant differences were not found. The score of CSII decreased in both groups at 14 weeks (p<0.05), but there were no significant differences in the CSII scores between the two groups at 1 and 14 weeks. There were no significant differences in SEPs between the two groups at 1 and 14 weeks after the stroke onset. Conclusion It appears that somatosensory input plays a relatively minor role in pusher syndrome. Further study will be required to reveal the mechanism of pusher syndrome. PMID:23525623

  5. The Recovery of Walking in Stroke Patients: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jang, Sung Ho

    2010-01-01

    We reviewed the literature on walking recovery of stroke patients as it relates to the following subjects: epidemiology of walking dysfunction, recovery course of walking, and recovery mechanism of walking (neural control of normal walking, the evaluation methods for leg motor function, and motor recovery mechanism of leg). The recovery of walking…

  6. Anti-Nogo-A Immunotherapy Does Not Alter Hippocampal Neurogenesis after Stroke in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Daniel J.; Tsai, Shih-Yen; O'Brien, Timothy E.; Farrer, Robert G.; Kartje, Gwendolyn L.

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is a leading cause of adult disability, including cognitive impairment. Our laboratory has previously shown that treatment with function-blocking antibodies against the neurite growth inhibitory protein Nogo-A promotes functional recovery after stroke in adult and aged rats, including enhancing spatial memory performance, for which the hippocampus is critically important. Since spatial memory has been linked to hippocampal neurogenesis, we investigated whether anti-Nogo-A treatment increases hippocampal neurogenesis after stroke. Adult rats were subject to permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion followed 1 week later by 2 weeks of antibody treatment. Cellular proliferation in the dentate gyrus was quantified at the end of treatment, and the number of newborn neurons was determined at 8 weeks post-stroke. Treatment with both anti-Nogo-A and control antibodies stimulated the accumulation of new microglia/macrophages in the dentate granule cell layer, but neither treatment increased cellular proliferation or the number of newborn neurons above stroke-only levels. These results suggest that anti-Nogo-A immunotherapy does not increase post-stroke hippocampal neurogenesis. PMID:27803646

  7. Predictors of stroke in patients undergoing cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Handerson Nunes; Magedanz, Ellen Hettwer; Guaragna, João Carlos Vieira da Costa; dos Santos, Natalia Nunes; Albuquerque, Luciano Cabral; Goldani, Marco Antonio; Petracco, João Batista; Bodanese, Luiz Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the risk factors related to the development of stroke in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Methods A historical cohort study. We included 4626 patients aged > 18 years who underwent coronary artery bypass surgery, heart valve replacement surgery alone or heart valve surgery combined with coronary artery bypass grafting between January 1996 and December 2011. The relationship between risk predictors and stroke was assessed by logistic regression model with a significance level of 0.05. Results The incidence of stroke was 3% in the overall sample. After logistic regression, the following risk predictors for stroke were found: age 50-65 years (OR=2.11 - 95% CI 1.05-4.23 - P=0.036) and age >66 years (OR=3.22 - 95% CI 1.6-6.47 - P=0.001), urgent and emergency surgery (OR=2.03 - 95% CI 1.20-3.45 - P=0.008), aortic valve disease (OR=2.32 - 95% CI 1.18-4.56 - P=0.014), history of atrial fibrillation (OR=1.88 - 95% CI 1.05-3.34 - P=0.032), peripheral artery disease (OR=1.81 - 95% CI 1.13-2.92 - P=0.014), history of cerebrovascular disease (OR=3.42 - 95% CI 2.19-5.35 - P<0.001) and cardiopulmonary bypass time > 110 minutes (OR=1.71 - 95% CI 1.16-2.53 - P=0.007). Mortality was 31.9% in the stroke group and 8.5% in the control group (OR=5.06 - 95% CI 3.5-7.33 - P<0.001). Conclusion The study identified the following risk predictors for stroke after cardiac surgery: age, urgent and emergency surgery, aortic valve disease, history of atrial fibrillation, peripheral artery disease, history of cerebrovascular disease and cardiopulmonary bypass time > 110 minutes. PMID:25140462

  8. Prognostic Significance of Uric Acid Levels in Ischemic Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xia; Huang, Zhi-Chao; Lu, Tao-Sheng; You, Shou-Jiang; Cao, Yong-Jun; Liu, Chun-Feng

    2016-01-01

    The importance and function of serum uric acid (UA) levels in patients with cardiovascular disease or stroke are unclear. We sought to evaluate the appropriate UA levels for stroke patients and the association between endogenous UA levels and clinical outcomes in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients, particularly regarding the possible interaction between gender and UA levels with respect to AIS prognosis. We examined 303 patients who had an onset of ischemic stroke within 48 h. Of those, 101 patients received thrombolytic treatment. Serum UA (μmol/L) levels were measured the second morning after admission. Patient prognosis was evaluated 90 days after clinical onset by modified Rankin Scale. Patients were divided into four groups according to serum UA quartiles. A binary multivariate logistic regression model was used to assess clinical relevance in regard to functional outcome and endogenous UA levels. Analysis of subgroups by gender and normal glomerular filtration rate were also been done. Poor functional outcome was associated with older age, history of atrial fibrillation, or higher baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores. After adjustment for potential confounders, patients with higher UA levels (>380 μmol/L) or lower UA levels (≤250 μmol/L) were 2-3 times more likely to have a poor outcome (OR 2.95, 95% CI 1.14-7.61; OR 2.78, 95% CI 1.02-7.58, respectively) compared to the baseline group (UA level 316-380 μmol/L). The same results were observed in thrombolyzed patients. Patients with high and low UA levels were 9-18 times more likely to having poor outcomes compared to the baseline group (UA level: 316-380 μmol/L; OR 18.50, 95% CI: 2.041-167.67; OR 9.66, 95% CI 1.42-65.88, respectively). In men, patients with high UA levels were 6 times more likely to have poor outcomes compared to the baseline group (UA level: 279-334 μmol/L; OR 6.10, 95% CI 1.62-22.93). However, female patients with UA level 271-337 μmol/L were seven times more

  9. Rehabilitation needs for older adults with stroke living at home: perceptions of four populations

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Claude; Deaudelin, Isabelle; Robichaud, Line; Rousseau, Jacqueline; Viscogliosi, Chantal; Talbot, Lise R; Desrosiers, Johanne

    2007-01-01

    Background Many people who have suffered a stroke require rehabilitation to help them resume their previous activities and roles in their own environment, but only some of them receive inpatient or even outpatient rehabilitation services. Partial and unmet rehabilitation needs may ultimately lead to a loss of functional autonomy, which increases utilization of health services, number of hospitalizations and early institutionalization, leading to a significant psychological and financial burden on the patients, their families and the health care system. The aim of this study was to explore partially met and unmet rehabilitation needs of older adults who had suffered a stroke and who live in the community. The emphasis was put on needs that act as obstacles to social participation in terms of personal factors, environmental factors and life habits, from the point of view of four target populations. Methods Using the focus group technique, we met four types of experts living in three geographic areas of the province of Québec (Canada): older people with stroke, caregivers, health professionals and health care managers, for a total of 12 groups and 72 participants. The audio recordings of the meetings were transcribed and NVivo software was used to manage the data. The process of reducing, categorizing and analyzing the data was conducted using themes from the Disability Creation Process model. Results Rehabilitation needs persist for nine capabilities (e.g. related to behaviour or motor activities), nine factors related to the environment (e.g. type of teaching, adaptation and rehabilitation) and 11 life habits (e.g. nutrition, interpersonal relationships). The caregivers and health professionals identified more unmet needs and insisted on an individualized rehabilitation. Older people with stroke and the health care managers had a more global view of rehabilitation needs and emphasized the availability of resources. Conclusion Better knowledge of partially met or

  10. Stroke warning campaigns: delivering better patient outcomes? A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Mellon, Lisa; Doyle, Frank; Rohde, Daniela; Williams, David; Hickey, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Background Patient delay in presenting to hospital with stroke symptoms remains one of the major barriers to thrombolysis treatment, leading to its suboptimal use internationally. Educational interventions such as mass media campaigns and community initiatives aim to reduce patient delays by promoting the signs and symptoms of a stroke, but no consistent evidence exists to show that such interventions result in appropriate behavioral responses to stroke symptoms. Methods A systematic literature search and narrative synthesis were conducted to examine whether public educational interventions were successful in the reduction of patient delay to hospital presentation with stroke symptoms. Three databases, MEDLINE, CINAHL, and PsycINFO, were searched to identify quantitative studies with measurable behavioral end points, including time to hospital presentation, thrombolysis rates, ambulance use, and emergency department (ED) presentations with stroke. Results Fifteen studies met the inclusion criteria: one randomized controlled trial, two time series analyses, three controlled before and after studies, five uncontrolled before and after studies, two retrospective observational studies, and two prospective observational studies. Studies were heterogeneous in quality; thus, meta-analysis was not feasible. Thirteen studies examined prehospital delay, with ten studies reporting a significant reduction in delay times, with a varied magnitude of effect. Eight studies examined thrombolysis rates, with only three studies reporting a statistically significant increase in thrombolysis administration. Five studies examined ambulance usage, and four reported a statistically significant increase in ambulance transports following the intervention. Three studies examining ED presentations reported significantly increased ED presentations following intervention. Public educational interventions varied widely on type, duration, and content, with description of intervention development

  11. Bringing the Hospital to the Patient: First Treatment of Stroke Patients at the Emergency Site

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Silke; Kostpopoulos, Panagiotis; Haass, Anton; Helwig, Stefan; Keller, Isabel; Licina, Tamara; Schlechtriemen, Thomas; Roth, Christian; Papanagiotou, Panagiotis; Zimmer, Anna; Vierra, Julio; Körner, Heiko; Schmidt, Kathrin; Romann, Marie-Sophie; Alexandrou, Maria; Yilmaz, Umut; Grunwald, Iris; Kubulus, Darius; Lesmeister, Martin; Ziegeler, Stephan; Pattar, Alexander; Golinski, Martin; Liu, Yang; Volk, Thomas; Bertsch, Thomas; Reith, Wolfgang; Fassbender, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Background Early treatment with rt-PA is critical for favorable outcome of acute stroke. However, only a very small proportion of stroke patients receive this treatment, as most arrive at hospital too late to be eligible for rt-PA therapy. Methods and Findings We developed a “Mobile Stroke Unit”, consisting of an ambulance equipped with computed tomography, a point-of-care laboratory system for complete stroke laboratory work-up, and telemedicine capabilities for contact with hospital experts, to achieve delivery of etiology-specific and guideline-adherent stroke treatment at the site of the emergency, well before arrival at the hospital. In a departure from current practice, stroke patients could be differentially treated according to their ischemic or hemorrhagic etiology even in the prehospital phase of stroke management. Immediate diagnosis of cerebral ischemia and exclusion of thrombolysis contraindications enabled us to perform prehospital rt-PA thrombolysis as bridging to later intra-arterial recanalization in one patient. In a complementary patient with cerebral hemorrhage, prehospital diagnosis allowed immediate initiation of hemorrhage-specific blood pressure management and telemedicine consultation regarding surgery. Call-to-therapy-decision times were 35 minutes. Conclusion This preliminary study proves the feasibility of guideline-adherent, etiology-specific and causal treatment of acute stroke directly at the emergency site. PMID:21060800

  12. Systematic review of head cooling in adults after traumatic brain injury and stroke.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, B; Andrews, P J D; Murray, G D; Forbes, J; Moseley, O

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Brain injuries resulting from trauma and stroke are common and costly. Cooling therapy may reduce damage and potentially improve outcome. Head cooling targets the site of injury and may have fewer side effects than systemic cooling, but there has been no systematic review and the evidence base is unclear. OBJECTIVE To assess the effect of non-invasive head cooling after traumatic brain injury (TBI) and stroke on intracranial and/or core body temperature, functional outcome and mortality, determine adverse effects and evaluate cost-effectiveness. REVIEW METHODS Search strategy Major international databases [including MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Web of Science, the British Library's Electronic Table of Contents (Zetoc)], The Cochrane Library, trial registers, country-specific databases (including China, Japan), Google Scholar, hypothermia conference reports and reference lists of papers were searched with no publication or language restrictions. The searches were conducted from March 2010 to April 2011, with no back date restriction. Selection criteria For formal analysis of effect of head cooling on functional outcome and mortality: randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of non-invasive head cooling in TBI or stroke in adults (aged ≥ 18 years). RCT prespecified in protocol to include adequate randomisation and blinded outcome assessment. For assessment of effect on temperature and adverse effects of cooling methods/devices: studies of any type in TBI, stroke, cardiac arrest and neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy (adverse effects only). Data collection and analysis A study assessment and data collection form was developed and piloted. Data on functional outcome, mortality, temperature change and adverse effects of devices were sought and extracted. Two authors independently assessed RCTs for quality using the Cochrane Renal Group checklist. RESULTS Out of 46 head-cooling studies in TBI and stroke

  13. Variations in kinematics during clinical gait analysis in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Boudarham, Julien; Roche, Nicolas; Pradon, Didier; Bonnyaud, Céline; Bensmail, Djamel; Zory, Raphael

    2013-01-01

    In addition to changes in spatio-temporal and kinematic parameters, patients with stroke exhibit fear of falling as well as fatigability during gait. These changes could compromise interpretation of data from gait analysis. The aim of this study was to determine if the gait of hemiplegic patients changes significantly over successive gait trials. Forty two stroke patients and twenty healthy subjects performed 9 gait trials during a gait analysis session. The mean and variability of spatio-temporal and kinematic joint parameters were analyzed during 3 groups of consecutive gait trials (1-3, 4-6 and 7-9). Principal component analysis was used to reduce the number of variables from the joint kinematic waveforms and to identify the parts of the gait cycle which changed during the gait analysis session. The results showed that i) spontaneous gait velocity and the other spatio-temporal parameters significantly increased, and ii) gait variability decreased, over the last 6 gait trials compared to the first 3, for hemiplegic patients but not healthy subjects. Principal component analysis revealed changes in the sagittal waveforms of the hip, knee and ankle for hemiplegic patients after the first 3 gait trials. These results suggest that at the beginning of the gait analysis session, stroke patients exhibited phase of adaptation,characterized by a "cautious gait" but no fatigue was observed.

  14. Effect of IQoro® training on impaired postural control and oropharyngeal motor function in patients with dysphagia after stroke.

    PubMed

    Hägg, Mary; Tibbling, Lita

    2016-07-01

    Conclusion All patients with dysphagia after stroke have impaired postural control. IQoro® screen (IQS) training gives a significant and lasting improvement of postural control running parallel with significant improvement of oropharyngeal motor dysfunction (OPMD). Objectives The present investigation aimed at studying the frequency of impaired postural control in patients with stroke-related dysphagia and if IQS training has any effect on impaired postural control in parallel with effect on OPMD. Method A prospective clinical study was carried out with 26 adult patients with stroke-related dysphagia. The training effect was compared between patients consecutively investigated at two different time periods, the first period with 15 patients included in the study more than half a year after stroke, the second period with 11 patients included within 1 month after stroke. Postural control tests and different oropharyngeal motor tests were performed before and after 3 months of oropharyngeal sensorimotor training with an IQS, and at a late follow-up (median 59 weeks after end of training). Result All patients had impaired postural control at baseline. Significant improvement in postural control and OPMD was observed after the completion of IQS training in both intervention groups. The improvements were still present at the late follow-up.

  15. Regulation of stroke-induced neurogenesis in adult brain--recent scientific progress.

    PubMed

    Kokaia, Zaal; Thored, Pär; Arvidsson, Andreas; Lindvall, Olle

    2006-07-01

    Stroke induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion in adult rodents induces the formation of new neurons in the damaged striatum, a region that normally does not show neurogenesis. Here we describe recent findings on the regulation of neurogenesis after stroke, in particular regarding the duration of the neurogenic response and the influence of age, as well as the molecular mechanisms influencing migration and survival of the new neurons. We also discuss some crucial issues that need to be addressed in the further exploration of this potential self-repair mechanism after damage to the adult brain. PMID:16766702

  16. Laryngeal Elevation Velocity and Aspiration in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Zhou, Yun; Wei, Na; Yang, Bo; Wang, Anxin; Zhou, Hai; Zhao, Xingquan; Wang, Yongjun; Liu, Liping; Ouyoung, Melody; Villegas, Brenda; Groher, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Aspiration after stroke has been associated with aspiration pneumonia, which contributes to increased mortality of stroke. Laryngeal elevation is a core mechanism for protection from aspiration. Few studies have explored the predictive value of laryngeal elevation velocity for aspiration after stroke. This study aimed to explore the ability of laryngeal elevation velocity to predict aspiration in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Methods This was a prospective cohort study that included consecutive acute ischemic stroke patients treated at a teaching hospital during a 10-month period. Patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to confirm the diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke. Patients who were at risk of aspiration and could swallow 5 ml of diluted barium (40%, w/v) for a videofluoroscopic swallowing (VFS) study were included. The association between abnormal indices in the oral and pharyngeal phase of the VFS study and aspiration was examined using univariate analyses. These indices included the lip closure, tongue movement and control, laryngeal elevation velocity and range, the latency of pharyngeal swallowing, pharyngeal transit time (PTT), abnormal epiglottis tilt, residual barium in the pharynx, and the duration of upper esophageal sphincter (UES) opening. The laryngeal elevation velocity (%/s) was calculated as the range of laryngeal elevation (%) from the resting position to the maximum superior position or to the position where the laryngeal vestibule is fully closed divided by the corresponding duration of laryngeal elevation. The range of laryngeal elevation (%) was the percentage calculated as the distance between the resting laryngeal position and the maximum superior excursion position or position where the laryngeal vestibule is fully closed divided by the distance between the resting laryngeal position and the lowest edge of the mandible. A logistic regression analysis was used to determine the predictive value for aspiration

  17. A Survey of Caregivers' Knowledge About Caring for Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyeong Woo; Kim, Sang Beom; Lee, Jong Hwa; Lee, Sook Joung

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate how much formal caregivers know about caring for stroke patients, and whether they adequately provide it. Methods Formal caregivers, who worked for stroke patients at 8 hospitals (including 4 university hospitals, 2 rehabilitation hospitals, and 2 convalescent hospitals) participated in this study. The survey was based on a self-report questionnaire, with 6 categories containing a total of 48 questions about the specific care of stroke patients: the demographic characteristics of the caregivers, bed positioning, the provision of meals, position changes and transfers, the range of motion exercises, and caregiver training. Results A total of 217 caregivers were surveyed, and they were distributed as follows: 41% came from the university hospitals, 35% came from the rehabilitation hospitals, and 24% came from the convalescent hospitals. The percentages of correct answers were distributed as follows: 64.3% for bed positioning, 74.3% for providing meals, and 62.4% for position change and transfer. The total and subscale scores of the caregivers working at convalescent hospitals were significantly lower than those of the caregivers working at the other types of hospitals (p<0.05). Only 7.8% of the total participants received training on a regular basis. The caregivers obtained most of the information from caregiver associations (58.1%), and the majority of the caregivers (65.4%) were willing to receive training. Conclusion About one third (33.8%) of caregivers did not have adequate knowledge of how to properly care for stroke patients; in fact, a significant number of caregivers demonstrated inappropriate and insufficient knowledge in several areas. It is assumed that the provision of regular training, by rehabilitation experts, will improve the professionalism and knowledge of the caregivers, and positively affect patient outcomes. PMID:26605179

  18. Teaching the adult ostomy patient.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, H S

    2001-01-01

    Ostomy education is based on principles of adult learning, including assessment of the learners' readiness, ability, and need to learn. Such teaching incorporates specific strategies designed to promote cognitive, affective, and psychomotor learning and strategies to overcome potential cultural barriers. In addition, modifications may be included to meet the needs of aged or disabled patients who have cognitive deficits or low literacy skills. Finally, ostomy education must include an evaluation of its effectiveness. This article reviews general guidelines for planning, implementing, and evaluating patient education for adult patients with ostomies.

  19. Family History and Functional Outcome in Korean Stroke Patients: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hee Jung; Kim, Tae Uk; Hyun, Jung Keun

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association of family history of stroke with functional outcomes in stroke patients in Korea. Methods A case-control study was conducted. A total of 170 patients who were admitted to a rehabilitation unit were included. Risk factors for stroke such as age, sex, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, atrial fibrillation, smoking, high blood cholesterol and homocysteine level, obesity, and family history of stroke were taken into account. Stroke subtypes were the following: large vessel infarct, small vessel infarct, embolic infarct, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and intracranial hemorrhage. Stroke severity as assessed with the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), functional outcomes using the Korean version of the Modified Barthel index (K-MBI), Functional Independence Measurement (FIM), and cognitive function using the Korean version of Mini-Mental State Examination (K-MMSE) were assessed at admission and discharge. Results Subjects with a family history of stroke were more likely to have an ischemic stroke (90.7%) than were those without a family history (70.9%). The K-MBI, FIM, NIHSS, and K-MMSE scores did not show significant differences between patients with or without family history. Conclusion Family history of stroke was significantly associated with ischemic stroke, but not with functional outcomes. Other prognostic factors of stroke were not distributed differently between patients included in this study with or without a family history of stroke. PMID:26798613

  20. Attributing heart attack and stroke to "Old Age": Implications for subsequent health outcomes among older adults.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Tara L; Chipperfield, Judith G; Perry, Raymond P; Hamm, Jeremy M

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed the extent to which older adults attribute a recent heart attack/stroke to "old age," and examined consequences for subsequent lifestyle behavior and health-care service utilization. Community-dwelling adults (N = 57, ages 73-98 years) were interviewed about their heart attack/stroke, and an objective health registry provided data on health-care utilization over a 3-year period. Endorsement of "old age" as a cause of heart attack/stroke negatively predicted lifestyle behavior change, and positively predicted frequency of physician visits and likelihood of hospitalization over the subsequent 3 years. Findings suggest the importance of considering "old age" attributions in the context of cardiovascular health events.

  1. Declining Patient Functioning and Caregiver Burden/Health: The Minnesota Stroke Survey-Quality of Life after Stroke Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Melissa M.; Smith, Maureen A.; Martinson, Brian C.; Kind, Amy; Luepker, Russell V.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Caregivers of stroke patients may adapt to changes in patient functioning over time. If adaptation occurs, then caregiver burden and health may be influenced more by worsening in patient functioning than by static levels of functioning. This study examines the relationship between patients' baseline and changes in functioning and…

  2. Somatosensory evoked magnetic fields in patients with stroke.

    PubMed

    Maclin, E L; Rose, D F; Knight, J E; Orrison, W W; Davis, L E

    1994-12-01

    We used magnetoencephalography to evaluate areas of sensory cortex in patients with ischemic strokes involving the somatomotor system. We measured somatosensory evoked magnetic fields using a 7-channel neuromagnetometer and estimated the location of cortical responses to median nerve stimulation in 5 patients with cortical or subcortical strokes involving the somatomotor system. All patients underwent quantitative neurological examinations and a high resolution volumetric magnetic resonance imaging. The estimated current dipoles were localized onto the patient's own MRI scan in all patients with measurable responses. The location of the estimated dipole was always in non-infarcted tissue in the anatomical region of the somatosensory cortex. In 1 patient the somatosensory dipole localized to a peninsula of cortex flanked by infarcted tissue. Single photon emission computed tomography found the localized area of cortex to have significant blood flow. The estimated current dipole strengths of somatosensory evoked fields from median nerve stimulation correlated significantly (r = 0.95, P < 0.02) with the patient's ability to recognize numbers written on the involved palm (graphesthesia). The combination of evoked magnetic field recording and magnetic resonance imaging is a promising non-invasive technology for studying brain function in patients with cerebrovascular disease.

  3. Independent and Joint Effect of Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity and Blood Pressure Control on Incident Stroke in Hypertensive Adults.

    PubMed

    Song, Yun; Xu, Benjamin; Xu, Richard; Tung, Renee; Frank, Eric; Tromble, Wayne; Fu, Tong; Zhang, Weiyi; Yu, Tao; Zhang, Chunyan; Fan, Fangfang; Zhang, Yan; Li, Jianping; Bao, Huihui; Cheng, Xiaoshu; Qin, Xianhui; Tang, Genfu; Chen, Yundai; Yang, Tianlun; Sun, Ningling; Li, Xiaoying; Zhao, Lianyou; Hou, Fan Fan; Ge, Junbo; Dong, Qiang; Wang, Binyan; Xu, Xiping; Huo, Yong

    2016-07-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) has been shown to influence the effects of antihypertensive drugs in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Data are limited on whether PWV is an independent predictor of stroke above and beyond hypertension control. This longitudinal analysis examined the independent and joint effect of brachial-ankle PWV (baPWV) with hypertension control on the risk of first stroke. This report included 3310 hypertensive adults, a subset of the China Stroke Primary Prevention Trial (CSPPT) with baseline measurements for baPWV. During a median follow-up of 4.5 years, 111 participants developed first stroke. The risk of stroke was higher among participants with baPWV in the highest quartile than among those in the lower quartiles (6.3% versus 2.4%; hazard ratio, 1.66; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-2.60). Similarly, the participants with inadequate hypertension control had a higher risk of stroke than those with adequate control (5.1% versus 1.8%; hazard ratio, 2.32; 95% confidence interval, 1.49-3.61). When baPWV and hypertension control were examined jointly, participants in the highest baPWV quartile and with inadequate hypertension control had the highest risk of stroke compared with their counterparts (7.5% versus 1.3%; hazard ratio, 3.57; 95% confidence interval, 1.88-6.77). There was a significant and independent effect of high baPWV on stroke as shown among participants with adequate hypertension control (4.2% versus 1.3%; hazard ratio, 2.29, 95% confidence interval, 1.09-4.81). In summary, among hypertensive patients, baPWV and hypertension control were found to independently and jointly affect the risk of first stroke. Participants with high baPWV and inadequate hypertension control had the highest risk of stroke compared with other groups. PMID:27217412

  4. A framework of counseling for patients with stroke in nursing: a narrative literature review.

    PubMed

    Oikarinen, Anne; Kääriäinen, Maria; Kyngäs, Helvi

    2014-10-01

    Stroke is a major cause of death in developed countries. Its prevalence and disability burden are expected to increase in the future because of an aging population. The consequences of stroke are specific to the individual. Whereas some patients experience long-term functional and cognitive deficits, others may recover completely and be discharged quickly. Counseling is needed to help patients and their families cope with the effects of stroke after discharge. This is a systematic literature review with a narrative analysis. The purpose was to describe the content and characteristics of stroke patients' counseling. A review of studies published between January 2000 and February 2013 describing stroke patients' counseling was conducted by CINAHL and Medline databases. Studies were selected based on inclusion criteria, and the quality of the included studies was assessed. The final data (n = 33) were extracted and synthesized. Seven prominent themes were identified in the literature relating to (a) information about the disease and concerns regarding stroke, (b) the aims of counseling, (c) counseling methods, (d) interaction as a method for counseling, (e) the stroke nurse as a counselor, (f) emotional support, and (g) decision making in patients' care. The results of the review show that stroke patients' counseling is a multifaceted phenomenon with distinctive characteristics. The findings of the review can be used to develop counseling for patients with stroke and their families. In addition, the review can be used when educating stroke nurses for stroke units. PMID:25188689

  5. Suicidal ideation and attempts in patients with stroke: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jae Ho; Kim, Jung Bin; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2016-10-01

    Stroke is known to be associated with an increase in the risk for suicide. However, there are very few population-based studies investigating the risk of suicidal ideation and attempts in patients with stroke. The purpose of this study was to compare the risk of suicidal ideation and attempts between patients with stroke and population without stroke using nationwide survey data. Individual-level data were obtained from 228,735 participants (4560 with stroke and 224,175 without stroke) of the 2013 Korean Community Health Survey. Demographic characteristics, socioeconomic status, physical health status, and mental health status were compared between patients with stroke and population without stroke. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to investigate the independent effects of the stroke on suicidal ideation and attempts. Stroke patients had more depressive mood (12.6 %) than population without stroke (5.7 %, p < 0.001). Stroke patients experienced more suicidal ideation (24.4 %) and attempts (1.3 %) than population without stroke (9.8 and 0.4 %, respectively; both p < 0.001). Stroke was found to increase the risk for suicidal ideation (OR 1.65, 95 % CI 1.52-1.79) and suicidal attempts (OR 1.64, 95 % CI 1.21-2.22), adjusting for demographics, socioeconomic factors, and physical health and mental health factors. We found that stroke increased the risk for suicidal ideation and attempts, independent of other factors that are known to be associated with suicidality, suggesting that stroke per se may be an independent risk factor for suicidality.

  6. Awareness of heart attack and stroke symptoms among Hispanic male adults living in the United States.

    PubMed

    Lutfiyya, May Nawal; Bardales, Ricardo; Bales, Robert; Aguero, Carlos; Brady, Shelly; Tobar, Adriana; McGrath, Cynthia; Zaiser, Julia; Lipsky, Martin S

    2010-10-01

    There is evidence that Hispanic men are a high risk group for treatment delay for both heart attack and stroke. More targeted research is needed to elucidate this specific population's knowledge of warning signs for these acute events. This study sought to describe within-group disparities in Hispanic men's knowledge of heart attack and stroke symptomology. Multivariate techniques were used to analyze a multi-year Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Heart and Stroke module database. The data were cross-sectional and focused on health risk factors and behaviors. The research participants were U.S. male Hispanic adults aged 18-99. The main outcome measure for the study was heart attack and stroke symptom knowledge score. Multivariate logistic regression analysis yielded that Hispanic men aged >or=18 years who earned low scores on the composite heart attack and stroke knowledge questions (range 0-8 points) were more likely to: have less than a high school education, have deferred medical care because of cost, not have an identified health care provider, and be uninsured. There were significant within-group differences. Targeting educational efforts toward older (>or=55 years) Hispanic men with less than high school education, those who do not have an identified health care provider or health insurance, and who defer health care because of cost could be ways to improve the outcome of acute vascular events among the U.S. Hispanic adult male population.

  7. Stroke pharmacogenomics.

    PubMed

    Billeci, Antonia M R; Agnelli, Giancarlo; Caso, Valeria

    2009-12-01

    Circulatory disease accounts for fifteen million deaths each year, of which stroke accounts for four and a half million- with an estimated nine million stroke survivors annually. The overall incidence rate of stroke is 2 to 2.5 per thousand adults with an approximate prevalence of 5 per thousand and an estimated 5-year risk of stroke recurrence of 15 to 40 percent. Conventional risk factors for stroke include: increasing age, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking, increased body mass index, ischemic heart disease, heart failure, atrial fibrillation and lack of physical activity. Age is the strongest risk factor for both ischemic and haemorrhagic stroke with its incidence doubling for each successive decade after the age of fifty-five years. However, there is a substantial portion of patients with significant cerebrovascular disease who do not have any of these stroke risk-factors, leading to the speculation that there are other factors that have not been identified yet So as to improve diagnosis and treatment strategies, as well as to reduce the related public health burden, it could be helpful to successfully identify its extremely complex genetic determinants (polygenic, multiple genes play a role). Pharmacogenetics is the field of pharmacology that deals with the influence of genetic variation on drug response by correlating gene expression and gene variants with the efficacy or toxicity of drugs. The principle drugs in stroke medicine are antithrombotics. The aim of this paper was to review the most commonly used drugs for stroke such as rtPA in the acute phase as well as antiplatelets and wafarin for secondary prophylaxis. PMID:19925046

  8. Bipolar Disorder after Stroke in an Elderly Patient

    PubMed Central

    de Melo, Raquel Calvão; Lopes, Rui; Alves, José Carlos

    2014-01-01

    The onset of bipolar disorder (BD) secondary to a stroke event is a rare clinical entity. Although it may be related to specific regions of the brain, several other factors have been linked to its expression such as subcortical atrophy or chronic vascular burden. While precise locations and cerebral circuits involved in the bipolarity expression after stroke still need to be determined, their investigation represents an opportunity to study brain function and BD etiopathogenesis. We present a BD secondary to multiple subcortical biparietal lacunar infarctions, a lacunar infarction in left putamen and an ischemic lesion at the cerebral trunk evolving the right median portion, in a 65-year-old male patient who experienced manic, hypomanic, and depressive episodes, after 6, 10, and 16 months, respectively, of the cerebrovascular events. PMID:24991445

  9. An intelligent rollator for mobility impaired persons, especially stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Hellström, Thomas; Lindahl, Olof; Bäcklund, Tomas; Karlsson, Marcus; Hohnloser, Peter; Bråndal, Anna; Hu, Xiaolei; Wester, Per

    2016-07-01

    An intelligent rollator (IRO) was developed that aims at obstacle detection and guidance to avoid collisions and accidental falls. The IRO is a retrofit four-wheeled rollator with an embedded computer, two solenoid brakes, rotation sensors on the wheels and IR-distance sensors. The value reported by each distance sensor was compared in the computer to a nominal distance. Deviations indicated a present obstacle and caused activation of one of the brakes in order to influence the direction of motion to avoid the obstacle. The IRO was tested by seven healthy subjects with simulated restricted and blurred sight and five stroke subjects on a standardised indoor track with obstacles. All tested subjects walked faster with intelligence deactivated. Three out of five stroke patients experienced more detected obstacles with intelligence activated. This suggests enhanced safety during walking with IRO. Further studies are required to explore the full value of the IRO. PMID:27078084

  10. Anosognosia for obvious visual field defects in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Baier, Bernhard; Geber, Christian; Müller-Forell, Wiebke; Müller, Notger; Dieterich, Marianne; Karnath, Hans-Otto

    2015-01-01

    Patients with anosognosia for visual field defect (AVFD) fail to recognize consciously their visual field defect. There is still unclarity whether specific neural correlates are associated with AVFD. We studied AVFD in 54 patients with acute stroke and a visual field defect. Nineteen percent of this unselected sample showed AVFD. By using modern voxelwise lesion-behaviour mapping techniques we found an association between AVFD and parts of the lingual gyrus, the cuneus as well as the posterior cingulate and corpus callosum. Damage to these regions appears to induce unawareness of visual field defects and thus may play a significant role for conscious visual perception.

  11. The Relation Between GABA and L-Arginine Levels With Some Stroke Risk Factors in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hosinian, Mohsen; Qujeq, Durdi; Ahmadi Ahangar, Alijan

    2016-01-01

    Changes in extra and intracellular neurotransmitter amino acids concentration in the early stage of acute cerebral ischemia have been reported. In this the study, serum level of gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) and L-Arginine in acute ischemic stroke patients was assessed. 60 patients with acute ischemic stroke and sixthy healthy volunteers as a control group were assessed. Serum GABA was measured with modified enzymatic method and serum L- Arginine was measured by modified Sakaguchi method. Serum GABA level in stroke cases was lower than that of the control group. There was no relationship between GABA level and age or gender. Also, no significant correlation was observed between GABA levels with ischemic stroke risk factors such as smoking, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension. Serum L- Arginine level in patients was slightly increased in comparison with control group. There was a positive relationship between serum L- Arginine level and acute ischemic stroke risk factors. Serum GABA level was reduced in patients and had no correlation with acute ischemic stroke risk factors. PMID:27478806

  12. Association of age and admission mean arterial blood pressure in patients with stroke-data from a national stroke registry.

    PubMed

    Eizenberg, Yoav; Koton, Silvia; Tanne, David; Grossman, Ehud

    2016-05-01

    Elevated blood pressure (BP) upon admission is common in patients with ischemic stroke (IS) and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Older patients have a higher prevalence of stroke, but data on admission mean arterial pressure (MAP) patterns in older patients with stroke are scarce. All 6060 patients with IS (72%), ICH (8%) and transient ischemic attack (TIA; 20%) with data on BP and hypertension status on admission in the National Acute Stroke Israeli Registry were included. Admission MAP in the emergency department was studied by age group (<60, 60-74 and ⩾75 years) and stroke type. Linear regression models for admission MAP were produced, including age group, gender, hypertension status and stroke severity as covariates. Interactions between hypertension and age were assessed. Lower MAP (s.d.) was associated with older ages in hypertensive patients (113 (18) mm Hg for age <60 years, 109 (17) for age 60-74 years and 108 (19) for age ⩾75 years, P<0.0001) but not in non-hypertensive IS patients. Among patients with ICH and TIA, a significant negative association of MAP with age was observed for hypertensive patients (P=0.015 and P=0.023, respectively), whereas a significant positive association with age was found in non-hypertensive patients (P=0.023 and P=0.038, respectively). In adjusted regression models, MAP was significantly associated with hypertension in IS, ICH and TIA patients. The interaction between hypertension and age was significantly associated with MAP in IS and ICH patients. In hypertensive patients, the average admission MAP was lower in persons at older ages.

  13. Denial and Self-Image in Stroke, Lung Cancer, and Heart Disease Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Jacob; Zigler, Edward

    1975-01-01

    Stroke, lung cancer, and heart disease patients were found to employ denial, as indicated by the relatively small difference between their real and ideal selves before and after the onset of illness. The greatest amount of denial was found for stroke patients. Cancer patients displayed more denial than did heart patients. (Author)

  14. The Effects of POWER Training in Young and Older Adults after Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Aaron, Stacey E.; Embry, Aaron E.; Cence, Brian; Morgan, Patrick; Gregory, Chris M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Approximately 35,000 strokes occur annually in adults below the age of 40, and there is disappointingly little data describing their responses to rehabilitation. The purpose of this analysis was to determine the effects of Poststroke Optimization of Walking using Explosive Resistance (POWER) training in young (<40 years) and older (>60 years) adults and to describe relationships between training-induced improvements in muscular and locomotor function. Methods. Data was analyzed from 16 individuals with chronic stroke who participated in 24 sessions of POWER training. Outcomes included muscle power generation, self-selected walking speed (SSWS), 6-minute walk test, Fugl-Meyer motor assessment, Berg Balance Scale, and Dynamic Gait Index. Results. There were no significant differences between groups at baseline. Within-group comparisons revealed significant improvements in paretic and nonparetic knee extensor muscle power generation in both groups. Additionally, young participants significantly improved SSWS. Improvements in SSWS were more strongly associated with improvements in power generation on both sides in young versus older participants. Conclusions. Younger adults after stroke seem to preferentially benefit from POWER training, particularly when increasing gait speed is a rehabilitation goal. Future research should aim to further understand age-related differences in response to training to provide optimal treatments for all individuals following stroke. PMID:27493828

  15. The Effects of POWER Training in Young and Older Adults after Stroke.

    PubMed

    Hunnicutt, Jennifer L; Aaron, Stacey E; Embry, Aaron E; Cence, Brian; Morgan, Patrick; Bowden, Mark G; Gregory, Chris M

    2016-01-01

    Background. Approximately 35,000 strokes occur annually in adults below the age of 40, and there is disappointingly little data describing their responses to rehabilitation. The purpose of this analysis was to determine the effects of Poststroke Optimization of Walking using Explosive Resistance (POWER) training in young (<40 years) and older (>60 years) adults and to describe relationships between training-induced improvements in muscular and locomotor function. Methods. Data was analyzed from 16 individuals with chronic stroke who participated in 24 sessions of POWER training. Outcomes included muscle power generation, self-selected walking speed (SSWS), 6-minute walk test, Fugl-Meyer motor assessment, Berg Balance Scale, and Dynamic Gait Index. Results. There were no significant differences between groups at baseline. Within-group comparisons revealed significant improvements in paretic and nonparetic knee extensor muscle power generation in both groups. Additionally, young participants significantly improved SSWS. Improvements in SSWS were more strongly associated with improvements in power generation on both sides in young versus older participants. Conclusions. Younger adults after stroke seem to preferentially benefit from POWER training, particularly when increasing gait speed is a rehabilitation goal. Future research should aim to further understand age-related differences in response to training to provide optimal treatments for all individuals following stroke. PMID:27493828

  16. [Elements of system semiotics of the brain and head with cranial vessels of patients with stroke and with risk of stroke development].

    PubMed

    Makomela, N M

    2007-01-01

    By means of a multispiral computer and magnetic resonance tomography 211 patients with an ischemic stroke, 109 patients with hemorrhagic stroke, 41 patients with an arterial hypertensia, 43 patients with aneurism, 58 patients with discirculation encephalopathy, 125 patients with ischemic illness of heart, practically healthy 62 have been observed. The author found high frequency of pathological deformations of carotid and vertebral arteries of not closed arterial circle, calcification of the pineal body and vascular plexus of lateral ventricles. cysts of maxillary sinuses of patients with stroke in comparison with patients at risk of the development of stroke and practically healthy subjects.

  17. Development, Implementation, and Evaluation of a Telemedicine Service for the Treatment of Acute Stroke Patients: TeleStroke

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Health care service based on telemedicine can reduce both physical and time barriers in stroke treatments. Moreover, this service connects centers specializing in stroke treatment with other centers and practitioners, thereby increasing accessibility to neurological specialist care and fibrinolytic treatment. Objective Development, implementation, and evaluation of a care service for the treatment of acute stroke patients based on telemedicine (TeleStroke) at Virgen del Rocío University Hospital. Methods The evaluation phase, conducted from October 2008 to January 2011, involved patients who presented acute stroke symptoms confirmed by the emergency physician; they were examined using TeleStroke in two hospitals, at a distance of 16 and 110 kilometers from Virgen del Rocío University Hospital. We analyzed the number of interconsultation sheets, the percentage of patients treated with fibrinolysis, and the number of times they were treated. To evaluate medical professionals’ acceptance of the TeleStroke system, we developed a web-based questionnaire using a Technology Acceptance Model. Results A total of 28 patients were evaluated through the interconsultation sheet. Out of 28 patients, 19 (68%) received fibrinolytic treatment. The most common reasons for not treating with fibrinolysis included: clinical criteria in six out of nine patients (66%) and beyond the time window in three out of nine patients (33%). The mean “onset-to-hospital” time was 69 minutes, the mean time from admission to CT image was 33 minutes, the mean “door-to-needle” time was 82 minutes, and the mean “onset-to-needle” time was 150 minutes. Out of 61 medical professionals, 34 (56%) completed a questionnaire to evaluate the acceptability of the TeleStroke system. The mean values for each item were over 6.50, indicating that respondents positively evaluated each item. This survey was assessed using the Cronbach alpha test to determine the reliability of the

  18. Patient- and Hospital-Level Determinants of Rehabilitation for In-Patient Stroke Care

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tsung-Tai; Chen, Chia-Pei; Kuang, Shao-Hua; Wang, Vinchi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract During acute stroke care, rehabilitation usage may be influenced by patient- and hospital-related factors. We would like to identify patient- and hospital-level determinants of population-level inpatient rehabilitation usage associated with acute stroke care. From data obtained from the claim information from the National Health Insurance Administration (NHIA) in Taiwan (2009–2011), we enrolled 82,886 stroke patients with intracerebral hemorrhage and cerebral infarction from 207 hospitals. A generalized linear mixed model (GLMM) analyses with patient-level factors specified as random effects were conducted (for cross-level interactions). The rate of rehabilitation usage was 51% during acute stroke care. The hospital-related factors accounted for a significant amount of variability (intraclass correlation, 50%). Hospital type was the only significant hospital-level variable and can explain the large amount of variability (58%). Patients treated in smaller hospitals experienced few benefits of rehabilitation services, and those with surgery in a smaller hospital used fewer rehabilitation services. All patient-level variables were significant. With GLMM analyses, we identified the hospital type and its cross-level interaction, and explained a large portion of variability in rehabilitation for stroke patients in Taiwan. PMID:27175671

  19. Ancrod causes rapid thrombolysis in patients with acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Pollak, V E; Glas-Greenwalt, P; Olinger, C P; Wadhwa, N K; Myre, S A

    1990-05-01

    Clot lysis is desirable in patients with thrombi in arteries and arterioles by a safe rapidly-acting thrombolytic agent. Ancrod cleaves fibrinogen; the resulting circulating ancrod-fibrin stimulates fibrinolysis. Ancrod action and effect were studied in 20 patients with acute developing stroke in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Patients were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups, and received either normal saline or ancrod 0.5 mu/kg in normal saline administered as a constant-rate intravenous infusion over 6 hours. Subsequent doses of ancrod (or saline placebo) were determined daily thereafter for a total treatment period of 7 days. Neither bleeding nor re-thrombosis occurred within the 90 day follow-up period. That ancrod acted rapidly was shown by a significant decrease in functional plasminogen activator inhibitor (PA-I) within 60 minutes, and by significant elevations of fibrin(ogen) degradation products (FDP) and D-dimer within 3 and 4 hours. The biological effect of fibrinolysis in ancrod infused patients was demonstrated by a greater improvement in stroke score when compared to those infused with saline. PMID:2186630

  20. Guidelines for the prevention of stroke in patients with stroke and transient ischemic attack: a guideline for healthcare professionals from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    PubMed

    Kernan, Walter N; Ovbiagele, Bruce; Black, Henry R; Bravata, Dawn M; Chimowitz, Marc I; Ezekowitz, Michael D; Fang, Margaret C; Fisher, Marc; Furie, Karen L; Heck, Donald V; Johnston, S Claiborne Clay; Kasner, Scott E; Kittner, Steven J; Mitchell, Pamela H; Rich, Michael W; Richardson, DeJuran; Schwamm, Lee H; Wilson, John A

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this updated guideline is to provide comprehensive and timely evidence-based recommendations on the prevention of future stroke among survivors of ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack. The guideline is addressed to all clinicians who manage secondary prevention for these patients. Evidence-based recommendations are provided for control of risk factors, intervention for vascular obstruction, antithrombotic therapy for cardioembolism, and antiplatelet therapy for noncardioembolic stroke. Recommendations are also provided for the prevention of recurrent stroke in a variety of specific circumstances, including aortic arch atherosclerosis, arterial dissection, patent foramen ovale, hyperhomocysteinemia, hypercoagulable states, antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, sickle cell disease, cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, and pregnancy. Special sections address use of antithrombotic and anticoagulation therapy after an intracranial hemorrhage and implementation of guidelines.

  1. Increased Risk of Stroke in Patients With Fibromyalgia: A Population-BASED Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Chun-Hung; Chen, Jiunn-Horng; Wang, Yu-Chiao; Lin, Ming-Chia; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-02-01

    Neuropsychiatric diseases might enhance stroke development, possibly through inflammation and atherosclerosis. Approximately 25% to 40% of patients with stroke, largely younger patients, are not associated with any conventional stroke risk factors. In this research, we explored whether fibromyalgia (FM), a neuropsychosomatic disorder, increases stroke risk.From a claims dataset with one million enrollees sourced of the Taiwan National Health Insurance database, we selected 47,279 patients with FM and randomly selected 189,112 age- and sex-matched controls within a 3-year period from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2002. Stroke risk was assessed using Cox proportional hazards regression.Comorbidities associated with increased stroke risk, such as hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, coronary heart disease, irritable bowel syndrome, and interstitial cystitis, were more prevalent in patients with FM and high stroke risk than in the controls. The overall stroke risk was 1.25-fold (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.21-1.30) higher in the FM group than in the non-FM group. Even without comorbidities, stroke risk was higher in patients with FM than in the controls (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] = 1.44, 95% CI: 1.35-1.53, P < 0.001). The relative risk of stroke was 2.26-fold between FM and non-FM groups in younger patients (age <35 years, 95% CI: 1.86-2.75).This is the first investigation associating FM with an increased risk of stroke development. The outcomes imply that FM is a significant risk factor for stroke and that patients with FM, particularly younger patients, require close attention and rigorous measures for preventing stroke.

  2. Is the rate of cerebral hemorrhages declining among stroke patients in South America?

    PubMed

    Del Brutto, Oscar H; Del Brutto, Victor J

    2014-02-01

    Recent stroke registries suggest that the rate of cerebral hemorrhages is declining among stroke patients in South America. High rates of cerebral hemorrhages (approaching 40% of stroke cases) reported in pioneer registries during the 1990s have not been duplicated in more recent studies. In contrast, almost all studies recruiting patients from 2003 on, reported less than 20% of cerebral hemorrhages among their stroke patients. Intermediate rates of hemorrhagic strokes (from 25% to 27%) were noted among registries recruiting patients by the end of the 20th century and the start of the new Millennium. We also noted a significant declining rate of hemorrhagic stroke over the past 20 years at our Institution. In a series of 651 consecutive first-ever stroke patients included in the Hospital-Clínica Kennedy stroke registry (Guayaquil), cerebral hemorrhages accounted for 26·3% of patients recruited between 1990 and 1994 but for only 16·5% of those seen between 2005 and 2009 (P = 0·03). More longitudinal studies are needed to confirm these findings and to determine whether the reported declining rate of hemorrhagic strokes in South America is related to increase life expectancy of the population, or to changes in lifestyle, dietary habits, or some other specific stroke risk factors not well evaluated so far.

  3. Delayed intramuscular human neurotrophin-3 improves recovery in adult and elderly rats after stroke.

    PubMed

    Duricki, Denise A; Hutson, Thomas H; Kathe, Claudia; Soleman, Sara; Gonzalez-Carter, Daniel; Petruska, Jeffrey C; Shine, H David; Chen, Qin; Wood, Tobias C; Bernanos, Michel; Cash, Diana; Williams, Steven C R; Gage, Fred H; Moon, Lawrence D F

    2016-01-01

    There is an urgent need for a therapy that reverses disability after stroke when initiated in a time frame suitable for the majority of new victims. We show here that intramuscular delivery of neurotrophin-3 (NT3, encoded by NTF3) can induce sensorimotor recovery when treatment is initiated 24 h after stroke. Specifically, in two randomized, blinded preclinical trials, we show improved sensory and locomotor function in adult (6 months) and elderly (18 months) rats treated 24 h following cortical ischaemic stroke with human NT3 delivered using a clinically approved serotype of adeno-associated viral vector (AAV1). Importantly, AAV1-hNT3 was given in a clinically-feasible timeframe using a straightforward, targeted route (injections into disabled forelimb muscles). Magnetic resonance imaging and histology showed that recovery was not due to neuroprotection, as expected given the delayed treatment. Rather, treatment caused corticospinal axons from the less affected hemisphere to sprout in the spinal cord. This treatment is the first gene therapy that reverses disability after stroke when administered intramuscularly in an elderly body. Importantly, phase I and II clinical trials by others show that repeated, peripherally administered high doses of recombinant NT3 are safe and well tolerated in humans with other conditions. This paves the way for NT3 as a therapy for stroke.

  4. Delayed intramuscular human neurotrophin-3 improves recovery in adult and elderly rats after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Duricki, Denise A.; Hutson, Thomas H.; Kathe, Claudia; Soleman, Sara; Gonzalez-Carter, Daniel; Petruska, Jeffrey C.; Shine, H. David; Chen, Qin; Wood, Tobias C.; Bernanos, Michel; Cash, Diana; Williams, Steven C. R.; Gage, Fred H.

    2016-01-01

    There is an urgent need for a therapy that reverses disability after stroke when initiated in a time frame suitable for the majority of new victims. We show here that intramuscular delivery of neurotrophin-3 (NT3, encoded by NTF3) can induce sensorimotor recovery when treatment is initiated 24 h after stroke. Specifically, in two randomized, blinded preclinical trials, we show improved sensory and locomotor function in adult (6 months) and elderly (18 months) rats treated 24 h following cortical ischaemic stroke with human NT3 delivered using a clinically approved serotype of adeno-associated viral vector (AAV1). Importantly, AAV1-hNT3 was given in a clinically-feasible timeframe using a straightforward, targeted route (injections into disabled forelimb muscles). Magnetic resonance imaging and histology showed that recovery was not due to neuroprotection, as expected given the delayed treatment. Rather, treatment caused corticospinal axons from the less affected hemisphere to sprout in the spinal cord. This treatment is the first gene therapy that reverses disability after stroke when administered intramuscularly in an elderly body. Importantly, phase I and II clinical trials by others show that repeated, peripherally administered high doses of recombinant NT3 are safe and well tolerated in humans with other conditions. This paves the way for NT3 as a therapy for stroke. PMID:26614754

  5. Incidence of Stroke Before and After Dialysis Initiation in Older Patients

    PubMed Central

    Seliger, Stephen; Lakshminarayan, Kamakshi; Herzog, Charles A.; Solid, Craig A.

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of stroke is substantially higher among hemodialysis patients than among patients with earlier stages of CKD, but to what extent the initiation of dialysis accelerates the risk for stroke is not well understood. In this cohort study, we analyzed data from incident hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis patients in 2009 who were at least 67 years old and had Medicare as primary payer. We noted whether each of the 20,979 hemodialysis patients initiated dialysis as an outpatient (47%) or inpatient (53%). One year before initiation, the baseline stroke rate was 0.15%–0.20% of patients per month (ppm) for both outpatient and inpatient initiators. Among outpatient initiators, stroke rates began rising approximately 90 days before initiation, reached 0.5% ppm during the 30 days before initiation, and peaked at 0.7% ppm (8.4% per patient-year) during the 30 days after initiation. The pattern was similar among inpatient initiators, but the stroke rate peaked at 1.5% ppm (18% per patient-year). For both hemodialysis groups, stroke rates rapidly declined by 1–2 months after initiation, fluctuated, and stabilized at approximately twice the baseline rate by 1 year. Among the 620 peritoneal dialysis patients, stroke rates were slightly lower and variable, but approximately doubled after initiation. In conclusion, these data suggest that the process of initiating dialysis may cause strokes. Further studies should evaluate methods to mitigate the risk for stroke during this high-risk period. PMID:23620399

  6. Incidence of stroke before and after dialysis initiation in older patients.

    PubMed

    Murray, Anne M; Seliger, Stephen; Lakshminarayan, Kamakshi; Herzog, Charles A; Solid, Craig A

    2013-06-01

    The incidence of stroke is substantially higher among hemodialysis patients than among patients with earlier stages of CKD, but to what extent the initiation of dialysis accelerates the risk for stroke is not well understood. In this cohort study, we analyzed data from incident hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis patients in 2009 who were at least 67 years old and had Medicare as primary payer. We noted whether each of the 20,979 hemodialysis patients initiated dialysis as an outpatient (47%) or inpatient (53%). One year before initiation, the baseline stroke rate was 0.15%-0.20% of patients per month (ppm) for both outpatient and inpatient initiators. Among outpatient initiators, stroke rates began rising approximately 90 days before initiation, reached 0.5% ppm during the 30 days before initiation, and peaked at 0.7% ppm (8.4% per patient-year) during the 30 days after initiation. The pattern was similar among inpatient initiators, but the stroke rate peaked at 1.5% ppm (18% per patient-year). For both hemodialysis groups, stroke rates rapidly declined by 1-2 months after initiation, fluctuated, and stabilized at approximately twice the baseline rate by 1 year. Among the 620 peritoneal dialysis patients, stroke rates were slightly lower and variable, but approximately doubled after initiation. In conclusion, these data suggest that the process of initiating dialysis may cause strokes. Further studies should evaluate methods to mitigate the risk for stroke during this high-risk period.

  7. Incidence of stroke before and after dialysis initiation in older patients.

    PubMed

    Murray, Anne M; Seliger, Stephen; Lakshminarayan, Kamakshi; Herzog, Charles A; Solid, Craig A

    2013-06-01

    The incidence of stroke is substantially higher among hemodialysis patients than among patients with earlier stages of CKD, but to what extent the initiation of dialysis accelerates the risk for stroke is not well understood. In this cohort study, we analyzed data from incident hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis patients in 2009 who were at least 67 years old and had Medicare as primary payer. We noted whether each of the 20,979 hemodialysis patients initiated dialysis as an outpatient (47%) or inpatient (53%). One year before initiation, the baseline stroke rate was 0.15%-0.20% of patients per month (ppm) for both outpatient and inpatient initiators. Among outpatient initiators, stroke rates began rising approximately 90 days before initiation, reached 0.5% ppm during the 30 days before initiation, and peaked at 0.7% ppm (8.4% per patient-year) during the 30 days after initiation. The pattern was similar among inpatient initiators, but the stroke rate peaked at 1.5% ppm (18% per patient-year). For both hemodialysis groups, stroke rates rapidly declined by 1-2 months after initiation, fluctuated, and stabilized at approximately twice the baseline rate by 1 year. Among the 620 peritoneal dialysis patients, stroke rates were slightly lower and variable, but approximately doubled after initiation. In conclusion, these data suggest that the process of initiating dialysis may cause strokes. Further studies should evaluate methods to mitigate the risk for stroke during this high-risk period. PMID:23620399

  8. Mirror therapy enhances upper extremity motor recovery in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Mirela Cristina, Luca; Matei, Daniela; Ignat, Bogdan; Popescu, Cristian Dinu

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of mirror therapy program in addition with physical therapy methods on upper limb recovery in patients with subacute ischemic stroke. 15 subjects followed a comprehensive rehabilitative treatment, 8 subjects received only control therapy (CT) and 7 subjects received mirror therapy (MT) for 30 min every day, five times a week, for 6 weeks in addition to the conventional therapy. Brunnstrom stages, Fugl-Meyer Assessment (upper extremity), the Ashworth Scale, and Bhakta Test (finger flexion scale) were used to assess changes in upper limb motor recovery and motor function after intervention. After 6 weeks of treatment, patients in both groups showed significant improvements in the variables measured. Patients who received MT showed greater improvements compared to the CT group. The MT treatment results included: improvement of motor functions, manual skills and activities of daily living. The best results were obtained when the treatment was started soon after the stroke. MT is an easy and low-cost method to improve motor recovery of the upper limb.

  9. Incremental Value of Left Atrial Global Longitudinal Strain for Prediction of Post Stroke Atrial Fibrillation in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Darae; Cho, In Jeong; Kim, Young Dae; Nam, Hyo Suk; Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Hong, Geu-Ru; Ha, Jong-Won; Heo, Ji Hoe; Chung, Namsik

    2016-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a well-established risk factor for stroke. Interestingly, ischemic stroke increases risk of incident AF in patients without prior diagnosed AF. For better risk stratification for post-stroke AF, we studied left atrial (LA) size and mechanical function using two-dimensional (2D) speckle tracking imaging in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Methods A total of 227 patients (132 males, age 67 ± 12) with acute ischemic stroke without a history of AF underwent 2D transthoracic echocardiography and speckle tracking imaging for the assessment of LA volume index and global LA longitudinal strain (LALS). From clinical variables, the CHA2DS2-VASc score and National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) were calculated in each patient. Post-stroke AF was defined as newly diagnosed AF during the course after ischemic stroke. Results Post-stroke AF occurred in 25 patients (11%). Patients with post-stroke AF were older and showed a higher tendency of CHA2DS2-VASc score, significantly higher log NIHSS, larger LA volume index and lower global LALS than those without. In multivariate analysis, global LALS was an independent predictor for post-stroke AF (hazard ratio 0.90, 95% confidence interval 0.83.0.97, p < 0.01) after controlling for confounding factors. Furthermore, global LALS provided incremental predictive value for post-stroke AF over the CHA2DS2-VASc score, NIHSS, and LA volume index. The global LALS < 14.5% better distinguished post-stroke AF (area under the curve 0.837, sensitivity 60%, specificity 95%, p < 0.01) than CHA2DS2-VASc score. Conclusion Global LALS as a marker of LA mechanical function has incremental predictive value for post-stroke AF in patients with acute ischemic stroke. PMID:27081440

  10. Coping with stroke: psychological and social dimensions in U.S. patients.

    PubMed

    Popovich, Judith M; Fox, Patricia G; Bandagi, Ram

    2007-05-01

    Stroke is the third-leading cause of death in the world, affecting 3 million women and 2.5 million men annually. The success of rehabilitation efforts for stroke patients is often measured in terms of physical functioning. However, the literature suggests that the effects of stroke and subsequent adaptation include psychological and social dimensions as well. The purpose of this study was to investigate how patients in the United States perceived their stroke experiences by examining their coping strategies and hopes for recovery. In addition, factors that inspired hope during recovery were identified. Sixty participants with a diagnosis of embolic or ischemic stroke were interviewed during their initial hospitalization. Tape-recorded interviews were coded and categories of data identified. Findings suggested that stroke patients experience a range of physical symptoms and emotions surrounding their stroke experience, and that stroke often interfered with daily functioning. Coping strategies included maintaining a positive attitude and asserting independence, as much as possible, during the acute stroke experience. Many patients expressed general hopes for recovery while some admitted fear of getting worse. Hopefulness was often inspired by interaction with family and spiritual beliefs and practices. The findings will hopefully enhance nurses' understanding of patients' perceptions of the stroke experience and increase their ability to provide interventions that will aid in promoting effective coping strategies.

  11. Clinical factors associated with statins prescription in acute ischemic stroke patients: findings from the Lombardia Stroke Registry

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Statins, due to their well-established pleiotropic effects, have noteworthy benefits in stroke prevention. Despite this, a significant proportion of high-risk patients still do not receive the recommended therapeutic regimens, and many others discontinue treatment after being started on them. The causes of non-adherence to current guidelines are multifactorial, and depend on both physicians and patients. The aim of this study is to identify the factors influencing statin prescription at Stroke Unit (SU) discharge. Methods This study included 12,750 patients enrolled on the web-based Lombardia Stroke Registry (LRS) from July 2009 to April 2012 and discharged alive, with a diagnosis of ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) and without contra-indication to statin therapy. By logistic regression analysis and classification trees, we evaluated the impact of demographic data, risk factors, tPA treatment, in-hospital procedures and complications on statin prescription rate at discharge. Results We observed a slight increase in statins prescription during the study period (from 39.1 to 43.9%). Lower age, lower stroke severity and prestroke disability, the presence of atherothrombotic/lacunar risk factors, a diagnosis of non-cardioembolic stroke, tPA treatment, the absence of in-hospital complications, with the sole exception of hypertensive fits and hyperglycemia, were the patient-related predictors of adherence to guidelines by physicians. Overall, dyslipidemia appears as the leading factor, while TOAST classification does not reach statistical significance. Conclusions In our region, Lombardia, adherence to guidelines in statin prescription at Stroke Unit discharge is very different from international goals. The presence of dyslipidemia remains the main factor influencing statin prescription, while the presence of well-defined atherosclerotic etiopathogenesis of stroke does not enhance statin prescription. Some uncertainties about the risk

  12. Reduced Numbers and Impaired Function of Regulatory T Cells in Peripheral Blood of Ischemic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ruhnau, Johanna; Schulze, Juliane; von Sarnowski, Bettina; Heinrich, Marie; Langner, Sönke; Wilden, Anika; Kessler, Christof; Bröker, Barbara M.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been suggested to modulate stroke-induced immune responses. However, analyses of Tregs in patients and in experimental stroke have yielded contradictory findings. We performed the current study to assess the regulation and function of Tregs in peripheral blood of stroke patients. Age dependent expression of CD39 on Tregs was quantified in mice and men. Methods. Total FoxP3+ Tregs and CD39+FoxP3+ Tregs were quantified by flow cytometry in controls and stroke patients on admission and on days 1, 3, 5, and 7 thereafter. Treg function was assessed by quantifying the inhibition of activation-induced expression of CD69 and CD154 on T effector cells (Teffs). Results. Total Tregs accounted for 5.0% of CD4+ T cells in controls and <2.8% in stroke patients on admission. They remained below control values until day 7. CD39+ Tregs were most strongly reduced in stroke patients. On day 3 the Treg-mediated inhibition of CD154 upregulation on CD4+ Teff was impaired in stroke patients. CD39 expression on Treg increased with age in peripheral blood of mice and men. Conclusion. We demonstrate a loss of active FoxP3+CD39+ Tregs from stroke patient's peripheral blood. The suppressive Treg function of remaining Tregs is impaired after stroke. PMID:27073295

  13. Cryptogenic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Yaghi, Shadi

    2014-01-01

    Summary Cryptogenic, or unexplained, stroke is present in about 30%–40% of ischemic stroke patients. Pursuing a stroke mechanism is important in such patients to better choose therapy to reduce the stroke recurrence risk. Intracranial vessel imaging and cardiac evaluation with transesophageal echocardiogram and outpatient cardiac monitoring may help identify the stroke mechanism. This article highlights the diagnostic yield of various tests in identifying a stroke mechanism in stroke patients whose initial diagnostic evaluation is negative, and the implications for treatment. PMID:25317376

  14. Atrial fibrillation is a predictor of in-hospital mortality in ischemic stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Cheung-Ter; Wong, Yi-Sin; Wu, Chi-Shun; Su, Yu-Hsiang

    2016-01-01

    Background/purpose In-hospital mortality rate of acute ischemic stroke patients remains between 3% and 18%. For improving the quality of stroke care, we investigated the factors that contribute to the risk of in-hospital mortality in acute ischemic stroke patients. Materials and methods Between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2011, 2,556 acute ischemic stroke patients admitted to a stroke unit were included in this study. Factors such as demographic characteristics, clinical characteristics, comorbidities, and complications related to in-hospital mortality were assessed. Results Of the 2,556 ischemic stroke patients, 157 received thrombolytic therapy. Eighty of the 2,556 patients (3.1%) died during hospitalization. Of the 157 patients who received thrombolytic therapy, 14 (8.9%) died during hospitalization. History of atrial fibrillation (AF, P<0.01) and stroke severity (P<0.01) were independent risk factors of in-hospital mortality. AF, stroke severity, cardioembolism stroke, and diabetes mellitus were independent risk factors of hemorrhagic transformation. Herniation and sepsis were the most common complications of stroke that were attributed to in-hospital mortality. Approximately 70% of in-hospital mortality was related to stroke severity (total middle cerebral artery occlusion with herniation, basilar artery occlusion, and hemorrhagic transformation). The other 30% of in-hospital mortality was related to sepsis, heart disease, and other complications. Conclusion AF is associated with higher in-hospital mortality rate than in patients without AF. For improving outcome of stroke patients, we also need to focus to reduce serious neurological or medical complications. PMID:27418830

  15. Physical Exercise Preserves Adult Visual Plasticity in Mice and Restores it after a Stroke in the Somatosensory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Kalogeraki, Evgenia; Pielecka-Fortuna, Justyna; Hüppe, Janika M.; Löwel, Siegrid

    2016-01-01

    The primary visual cortex (V1) is widely used to study brain plasticity, which is not only crucial for normal brain function, such as learning and memory, but also for recovery after brain injuries such as stroke. In standard cage (SC) raised mice, experience-dependent ocular dominance (OD) plasticity in V1 declines with age and is compromised by a lesion in adjacent and distant cortical regions. In contrast, mice raised in an enriched environment (EE), exhibit lifelong OD plasticity and are protected from losing OD plasticity after a stroke-lesion in the somatosensory cortex. Since SC mice with an access to a running wheel (RW) displayed preserved OD plasticity during aging, we investigated whether physical exercise might also provide a plasticity promoting effect after a cortical stroke. To this end, we tested if adult RW-raised mice preserved OD plasticity after stroke and also if short-term running after stroke restored OD plasticity to SC mice. Indeed, unlike mice without a RW, adult RW mice continued to show OD plasticity even after stroke, and a 2 weeks RW experience after stroke already restored lost OD plasticity. Additionally, the experience-enabled increase of the spatial frequency and contrast threshold of the optomotor reflex of the open eye, normally lost after a stroke, was restored in both groups of RW mice. Our data suggest that physical exercise alone can not only preserve visual plasticity into old age, but also restore it after a cortical stroke. PMID:27708575

  16. Risk of sudden sensorineural hearing loss in stroke patients: A 5-year nationwide investigation of 44,460 patients.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chin-Lung; Shiao, An-Suey; Wang, Shuu-Jiun; Chang, Wei-Pin; Lin, Yung-Yang

    2016-09-01

    Poststroke sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) can hinder communication between patients and healthcare professionals, thereby restricting participation in rehabilitation programs and limiting improvements in physical performance. However, the relationship between stroke and SSNHL remains unclear. This study employed a nationwide population-based dataset to investigate the relationship between stroke and SSNHL.The Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database was used to compile data from 11,115 stroke patients and a comparison cohort of 33,345 matched nonstroke enrollees. Each patient was followed for 5 years to identify new-onset SSNHL. Stratified Cox proportional-hazard regression analysis was used to examine the association of stroke with subsequent SSNHL.Among the 44,460 patients, 66 patients (55,378 person-years) from the stroke cohort and 105 patients (166,586 person-years) from the comparison cohort were diagnosed with SSNHL. The incidence of SSNHL was approximately twice as high among stroke patients than among nonstroke patients (1.19 and 0.63/1000 person-years, respectively). Stroke patients had a 71% increased risk of SSNHL, compared with nonstroke patients (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 1.71, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.24-2.36). We also observed a remarkable increase in risk of SSNHL in stroke patients within 1-year of follow-up (adjusted HR 5.65, 95% CI 3.07-10.41) or under steroid therapy during hospitalization (adjusted HR 5.14, 95% CI 2.08-12.75).Patients with stroke had a higher risk of subsequent SSNHL compared with patients without stroke. In particular, stroke patients within 1-year follow-up and those undergoing steroid therapy during hospitalization should be treated with the utmost caution, considering that the risk of SSNHL increases by more than 5-fold. PMID:27603402

  17. Risk of sudden sensorineural hearing loss in stroke patients: A 5-year nationwide investigation of 44,460 patients.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chin-Lung; Shiao, An-Suey; Wang, Shuu-Jiun; Chang, Wei-Pin; Lin, Yung-Yang

    2016-09-01

    Poststroke sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) can hinder communication between patients and healthcare professionals, thereby restricting participation in rehabilitation programs and limiting improvements in physical performance. However, the relationship between stroke and SSNHL remains unclear. This study employed a nationwide population-based dataset to investigate the relationship between stroke and SSNHL.The Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database was used to compile data from 11,115 stroke patients and a comparison cohort of 33,345 matched nonstroke enrollees. Each patient was followed for 5 years to identify new-onset SSNHL. Stratified Cox proportional-hazard regression analysis was used to examine the association of stroke with subsequent SSNHL.Among the 44,460 patients, 66 patients (55,378 person-years) from the stroke cohort and 105 patients (166,586 person-years) from the comparison cohort were diagnosed with SSNHL. The incidence of SSNHL was approximately twice as high among stroke patients than among nonstroke patients (1.19 and 0.63/1000 person-years, respectively). Stroke patients had a 71% increased risk of SSNHL, compared with nonstroke patients (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 1.71, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.24-2.36). We also observed a remarkable increase in risk of SSNHL in stroke patients within 1-year of follow-up (adjusted HR 5.65, 95% CI 3.07-10.41) or under steroid therapy during hospitalization (adjusted HR 5.14, 95% CI 2.08-12.75).Patients with stroke had a higher risk of subsequent SSNHL compared with patients without stroke. In particular, stroke patients within 1-year follow-up and those undergoing steroid therapy during hospitalization should be treated with the utmost caution, considering that the risk of SSNHL increases by more than 5-fold.

  18. Predictors of diagnostic neuroimaging delays among adults presenting with symptoms suggestive of acute stroke in Ontario: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Kirsteen R.; Kapral, Moira K.; Li, Shudong; Fang, Jiming; Moody, Alan R.; Krahn, Murray; Laupacis, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many studies have examined the timeliness of thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke, but less is known about door-to-imaging time. We conducted a prospective cohort study to assess the timing of neuroimaging among patients with suspected acute stroke in the province of Ontario, Canada, and to examine factors associated with delays in neuroimaging. Methods: We included all patients 18 years and older with suspected acute stroke seen at hospitals with neuroimaging capacity within the Ontario Stroke Registry between Apr. 1, 2010, and Mar. 31, 2011. We used a hierarchical, multivariable Cox proportional hazards model to evaluate the association between patient and hospital factors and the likelihood of receiving timely neuroimaging (≤ 25 min) after arrival in the emergency department. Results: A total of 13 250 patients presented to an emergency department with stroke-like symptoms during the study period. Of the 3984 who arrived within 4 hours after symptom onset, 1087 (27.3%) had timely neuroimaging. The factors independently associated with an increased likelihood of timely neuroimaging were less time from symptom onset to presentation, more severe stroke, male sex, no history of stroke or transient ischemic attack, arrival to hospital from a setting other than home and presentation to a designated stroke centre or an urban hospital. Interpretation: A minority of patients with stroke-like symptoms who presented within the 4-hour thrombolytic treatment window received timely neuroimaging. Neuroimaging delays were influenced by various patient and hospital factors, some of which are modifiable. PMID:27398382

  19. Do empowered stroke patients perform better at self-management and functional recovery after a stroke? A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Sit, Janet WH; Chair, Sek Ying; Choi, Kai Chow; Chan, Carmen WH; Lee, Diana TF; Chan, Aileen WK; Cheung, Jo LK; Tang, Siu Wai; Chan, Po Shan; Taylor-Piliae, Ruth E

    2016-01-01

    Background Self-management after a stroke is a challenge because of multifaceted care needs and complex disabling consequences that cause further hindrance to patient participation. A 13-week stroke patient empowerment intervention (Health Empowerment Intervention for Stroke Self-management [HEISS]) was developed to enhance patients’ ability to participate in self-management. Purpose To examine the effects of the empowerment intervention on stroke patients’ self-efficacy, self-management behavior, and functional recovery. Methods This is a single-blind randomized controlled trial with stroke survivors assigned to either a control group (CG) receiving usual ambulatory rehabilitation care or the HEISS in addition to usual care (intervention group [IG]). Outcome data were collected at baseline (T0), 1 week (T1), 3 months (T2), and 6 months (T3) postintervention. Data were analyzed on the intention-to-treat principle. The generalized estimating equation model was used to assess the differential change of self-efficacy in illness management, self-management behaviors (cognitive symptom management, communication with physician, medication adherence, and self-blood pressure monitoring), and functional recovery (Barthel and Lawton indices) across time points (baseline = T0, 1 week = T1, 3 months = T2, and 6 months = T3 postintervention) between the two groups. Results A total of 210 (CG =105, IG =105) Hong Kong Chinese stroke survivors (mean age =69 years, 49% women, 72% ischemic stroke, 89% hemiparesis, and 63% tactile sensory deficit) were enrolled in the study. Those in IG reported better self-efficacy in illness management 3-month (P=0.011) and 6-month (P=0.012) postintervention, along with better self-management behaviors at all follow-up time points (all P<0.05), apart from medication adherence (P>0.05). Those in IG had significantly better functional recovery (Barthel, all P<0.05; Lawton, all P<0.001), compared to CG. The overall dropout rate was 16

  20. Platelets Proteomic Profiles of Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Baykal, Ahmet Tarik; Sener, Azize

    2016-01-01

    Platelets play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of stroke and antiplatelet agents exist for its treatment and prevention. Through the use of LC-MS based protein expression profiling, platelets from stroke patients were analyzed and then correlated with the proteomic analyses results in the context of this disease. This study was based on patients who post ischemic stroke were admitted to hospital and had venous blood drawn within 24 hrs of the incidence. Label-free protein expression analyses of the platelets’ tryptic digest was performed in triplicate on a UPLC-ESI-qTOF-MS/MS system and ProteinLynx Global Server (v2.5, Waters) was used for tandem mass data extraction. The peptide sequences were searched against the reviewed homo sapiens database (www.uniprot.org) and the quantitation of protein variation was achieved through Progenesis LC-MS software (V4.0, Nonlinear Dynamics). These Label-free differential proteomics analysis of platelets ensured that 500 proteins were identified and 83 of these proteins were found to be statistically significant. The differentially expressed proteins are involved in various processes such as inflammatory response, cellular movement, immune cell trafficking, cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, hematological system development and function and nucleic acid metabolism. The expressions of myeloperoxidase, arachidonate 12-Lipoxygenase and histidine-rich glycoprotein are involved in cellular metabolic processes, crk-like protein and ras homolog gene family member A involved in cell signaling with vitronectin, thrombospondin 1, Integrin alpha 2b, and integrin beta 3 involved in cell adhesion. Apolipoprotein H, immunoglobulin heavy constant gamma 1 and immunoglobulin heavy constant gamma 3 are involved in structural, apolipoprotein A-I, and alpha-1-microglobulin/bikunin precursor is involved in transport, complement component 3 and clusterin is involved in immunity proteins as has been discussed. Our data provides an insight

  1. Platelets Proteomic Profiles of Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Cevik, Ozge; Baykal, Ahmet Tarik; Sener, Azize

    2016-01-01

    Platelets play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of stroke and antiplatelet agents exist for its treatment and prevention. Through the use of LC-MS based protein expression profiling, platelets from stroke patients were analyzed and then correlated with the proteomic analyses results in the context of this disease. This study was based on patients who post ischemic stroke were admitted to hospital and had venous blood drawn within 24 hrs of the incidence. Label-free protein expression analyses of the platelets' tryptic digest was performed in triplicate on a UPLC-ESI-qTOF-MS/MS system and ProteinLynx Global Server (v2.5, Waters) was used for tandem mass data extraction. The peptide sequences were searched against the reviewed homo sapiens database (www.uniprot.org) and the quantitation of protein variation was achieved through Progenesis LC-MS software (V4.0, Nonlinear Dynamics). These Label-free differential proteomics analysis of platelets ensured that 500 proteins were identified and 83 of these proteins were found to be statistically significant. The differentially expressed proteins are involved in various processes such as inflammatory response, cellular movement, immune cell trafficking, cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, hematological system development and function and nucleic acid metabolism. The expressions of myeloperoxidase, arachidonate 12-Lipoxygenase and histidine-rich glycoprotein are involved in cellular metabolic processes, crk-like protein and ras homolog gene family member A involved in cell signaling with vitronectin, thrombospondin 1, Integrin alpha 2b, and integrin beta 3 involved in cell adhesion. Apolipoprotein H, immunoglobulin heavy constant gamma 1 and immunoglobulin heavy constant gamma 3 are involved in structural, apolipoprotein A-I, and alpha-1-microglobulin/bikunin precursor is involved in transport, complement component 3 and clusterin is involved in immunity proteins as has been discussed. Our data provides an insight into

  2. Platelets Proteomic Profiles of Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Cevik, Ozge; Baykal, Ahmet Tarik; Sener, Azize

    2016-01-01

    Platelets play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of stroke and antiplatelet agents exist for its treatment and prevention. Through the use of LC-MS based protein expression profiling, platelets from stroke patients were analyzed and then correlated with the proteomic analyses results in the context of this disease. This study was based on patients who post ischemic stroke were admitted to hospital and had venous blood drawn within 24 hrs of the incidence. Label-free protein expression analyses of the platelets' tryptic digest was performed in triplicate on a UPLC-ESI-qTOF-MS/MS system and ProteinLynx Global Server (v2.5, Waters) was used for tandem mass data extraction. The peptide sequences were searched against the reviewed homo sapiens database (www.uniprot.org) and the quantitation of protein variation was achieved through Progenesis LC-MS software (V4.0, Nonlinear Dynamics). These Label-free differential proteomics analysis of platelets ensured that 500 proteins were identified and 83 of these proteins were found to be statistically significant. The differentially expressed proteins are involved in various processes such as inflammatory response, cellular movement, immune cell trafficking, cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, hematological system development and function and nucleic acid metabolism. The expressions of myeloperoxidase, arachidonate 12-Lipoxygenase and histidine-rich glycoprotein are involved in cellular metabolic processes, crk-like protein and ras homolog gene family member A involved in cell signaling with vitronectin, thrombospondin 1, Integrin alpha 2b, and integrin beta 3 involved in cell adhesion. Apolipoprotein H, immunoglobulin heavy constant gamma 1 and immunoglobulin heavy constant gamma 3 are involved in structural, apolipoprotein A-I, and alpha-1-microglobulin/bikunin precursor is involved in transport, complement component 3 and clusterin is involved in immunity proteins as has been discussed. Our data provides an insight into

  3. Application of acute stroke imaging: selecting patients for revascularization therapy.

    PubMed

    Shang, Tiesong; Yavagal, Dileep R

    2012-09-25

    Due to the dynamic and versatile characteristics of ischemic penumbra, selecting the right acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients for revascularization therapy (RT) based on initial available imaging can be challenging. The main patient selection criterion for RT is the size of the mismatch between the potentially salvageable tissue (penumbra) and the irreversibly damaged tissue (core). The goal of revascularization RT is to "freeze" the core and prevent it from extending to the penumbral tissue. Penumbral imaging selection of AIS patients for RT, using magnetic resonance or CT-based studies, may provide more clinical benefit to the appropriate patients, although direct evidence is pending. Not all penumbra-core mismatches beyond 3 hours are equal and need treatment, and defining which mismatches to target for RT is the current goal of ongoing clinical trials. In addition to "penumbral"-based imaging, large vessel occlusion and clot length estimation based on CT angiography and noncontrasted ultrathin CT scan has been used to identify patients who are refractory to systemic thrombolysis and may be eligible for endovascular therapy. The application of various imaging modalities in selecting and triaging AIS patients for RT is discussed in this review. Larger prospective randomized trials are needed to better understand the role of various imaging modalities in selecting AIS patients for RT and to understand its influence on clinical outcome.

  4. Stroke Patients Communicating Their Healthcare Needs in Hospital: A Study within the ICF Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Halloran, Robyn; Worrall, Linda; Hickson, Louise

    2012-01-01

    Background: Previous research has identified that many patients admitted into acute hospital stroke units have communication-related impairments such as hearing, vision, speech, language and/or cognitive communicative impairment. However, no research has identified how many patients in acute hospital stroke units have difficulty actually…

  5. Poststroke Shoulder Pain in Turkish Stroke Patients: Relationship with Clinical Factors and Functional Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barlak, Aysegul; Unsal, Sibel; Kaya, Kurtulus; Sahin-Onat, Sule; Ozel, Sumru

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the possible causes of hemiplegic shoulder pain (HSP) in Turkish patients with stroke, to identify the correlation between HSP and clinical factors, and to review the effects of HSP on functional outcomes. A total of 187 consecutive patients with stroke were evaluated for the presence of HSP and for the…

  6. Optimal Scoring Methods of Hand-Strength Tests in Patients with Stroke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Sheau-Ling; Hsieh, Ching-Lin; Lin, Jau-Hong; Chen, Hui-Mei

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the optimal scoring methods for measuring strength of the more-affected hand in patients with stroke by examining the effect of reducing measurement errors. Three hand-strength tests of grip, palmar pinch, and lateral pinch were administered at two sessions in 56 patients with stroke. Five scoring methods…

  7. Associations and Dissociations of Transitive and Intransitive Gestures in Left and Right Hemisphere Stroke Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stamenova, Vessela; Roy, Eric A.; Black, Sandra E.

    2010-01-01

    The study investigated performance on pantomime and imitation of transitive and intransitive gestures in 80 stroke patients, 42 with left (LHD) and 38 with right (RHD) hemisphere damage. Patients were also categorized in two groups based on the time that has elapsed between their stroke and the apraxia assessment: acute-subacute (n = 42) and…

  8. Characteristics of Dysphagia in Severe Traumatic Brain Injury Patients: A Comparison With Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Won Kyung; Yeom, Jiwoon; Lee, Woo Hyung; Seo, Han Gil; Oh, Byung-Mo

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the swallowing characteristics of dysphagic patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) with those of dysphagic stroke patients. Methods Forty-one patients with TBI were selected from medical records (between December 2004 to March 2013) and matched to patients with stroke (n=41) based on age, sex, and disease duration. Patients' swallowing characteristics were analyzed retrospectively using a videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) and compared between both groups. Following thorough review of medical records, patients who had a history of diseases that could affect swallowing function at the time of the study were excluded. Dysphagia characteristics and severity were evaluated using the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association National Outcome Measurement System swallowing scale, clinical dysphagia scale, and the videofluoroscopic dysphagia scale. Results There was a significant difference in radiological lesion location (p=0.024) between the two groups. The most common VFSS finding was aspiration or penetration, followed by decreased laryngeal elevation and reduced epiglottis inversion. Swallowing function, VFSS findings, or quantified dysphagia severity showed no significant differences between the groups. In a subgroup analysis of TBI patients, the incidence of tube feeding was higher in patients with surgical intervention than in those without (p=0.011). Conclusion The swallowing characteristics of dysphagic patients after TBI were comparable to those of dysphagic stroke patients. Common VFSS findings comprised aspiration or penetration, decreased laryngeal elevation, and reduced epiglottis inversion. Patients who underwent surgical intervention after TBI were at high risk of tube feeding requirement. PMID:27446779

  9. Acute free-floating carotid artery thrombus causing stroke in a young patient: unique etiology and management using endovascular approach.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ai Peng; Taneja, Manish; Seah, Boon Heng; Leong, Hoe Nam; Venketasubramanian, Narayanaswamy

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerotic disease accounts for 20%-30% of strokes in the general population. In young adults, it is an unexpected event and its causes involve diverse pathologies. Herein, we describe a unique case of acute embolic stroke in a young adult patient due to the presence of a large clot in the right common and internal carotid arteries, as a result of an extrinsic cause. Surgical clot retrieval was considered unsafe at that point in time in view of the active inflammatory changes surrounding the affected vessels. This was eventually treated with a novel endovascular technique, a unique alternative to open surgery, with excellent clinical outcome. To our knowledge, the penumbra system has never been used for thrombus removal in a nonacute setting. PMID:25440371

  10. Effect of the a circuit training program using obstacles on the walking and balance abilities of stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ki-Tae; Kim, Hyun-Joo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of a circuit training program on the walking and balance abilities of stroke patients using an up-to-date walking analysis device. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 12 adults who were diagnosed with stroke. Evaluation was conducted using the Smart Step test for walking ability; (BBS) for balance ability; and the Timed Up and Go test (TUG) for functional mobility and movement ability. The 12 stroke patients were randomly recruited and divided into two groups; an experimental group which performed circuit training with obstacles, and a control group which performed flat gait training). [Results] Between-group comparison of the change in the 10-m walking speed found a statistically significant difference between the two groups. Between-group comparison of the changes in BBS and TUG found statistically significant differences between the two groups. [Conclusion] The circuit training program using obstacles had a positive effect on the gait and balance abilities of the stroke patients. PMID:27190452

  11. Effect of the a circuit training program using obstacles on the walking and balance abilities of stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Park, Ki-Tae; Kim, Hyun-Joo

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of a circuit training program on the walking and balance abilities of stroke patients using an up-to-date walking analysis device. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 12 adults who were diagnosed with stroke. Evaluation was conducted using the Smart Step test for walking ability; (BBS) for balance ability; and the Timed Up and Go test (TUG) for functional mobility and movement ability. The 12 stroke patients were randomly recruited and divided into two groups; an experimental group which performed circuit training with obstacles, and a control group which performed flat gait training). [Results] Between-group comparison of the change in the 10-m walking speed found a statistically significant difference between the two groups. Between-group comparison of the changes in BBS and TUG found statistically significant differences between the two groups. [Conclusion] The circuit training program using obstacles had a positive effect on the gait and balance abilities of the stroke patients.

  12. Motor recovery monitoring using acceleration measurements in post acute stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Stroke is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality. Its recovery and treatment depends on close clinical monitoring by a clinician especially during the first few hours after the onset of stroke. Patients who do not exhibit early motor recovery post thrombolysis may benefit from more aggressive treatment. Method A novel approach for monitoring stroke during the first few hours after the onset of stroke using a wireless accelerometer based motor activity monitoring system is developed. It monitors the motor activity by measuring the acceleration of the arms in three axes. In the presented proof of concept study, the measured acceleration data is transferred wirelessly using iMote2 platform to the base station that is equipped with an online algorithm capable of calculating an index equivalent to the National Institute of Health Stroke Score (NIHSS) motor index. The system is developed by collecting data from 15 patients. Results We have successfully demonstrated an end-to-end stroke monitoring system reporting an accuracy of calculating stroke index of more than 80%, highest Cohen’s overall agreement of 0.91 (with excellent κ coefficient of 0.76). Conclusion A wireless accelerometer based ‘hot stroke’ monitoring system is developed to monitor the motor recovery in acute-stroke patients. It has been shown to monitor stroke patients continuously, which has not been possible so far with high reliability. PMID:23590690

  13. Left Atrial Appendage Volume Increased in More Than Half of Patients with Cryptogenic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Taina, Mikko; Vanninen, Ritva; Hedman, Marja; Jäkälä, Pekka; Kärkkäinen, Satu; Tapiola, Tero; Sipola, Petri

    2013-01-01

    Background Ischemic strokes without a well-defined etiology are labeled as cryptogenic, and account for 30–40% of strokes in stroke registries. The left atrial appendage (LAA) is the most typical origin for intracardiac thrombus formation when associated with atrial fibrillation. Here, we examined whether increased LAA volume detected with cardiac computed tomography (cCT) constitutes a risk factor in cryptogenic stroke patients. Methods This study included 82 stroke/TIA patients (57 males; mean age, 58 years) with a diagnosis of cryptogenic stroke after extensive radiological and cardiological investigations. Cases were classified using the TOAST criteria modified by European Association of Echocardiography recommendations for defining cardiac sources of embolism. Forty age- and gender-matched control subjects without cardiovascular diseases were selected for pair-wise comparisons (21 males; mean age, 54 years). LAA volume adjusted for body surface area was measured three dimensionally by tracing the LAA borders on electrocardiogram-gated CT slices. Results In control subjects, mean LAA volume was 3.4±1.1 mL/m2. Mean+2SD, which was considered the upper limit for normal LAA volume was 5.6 mL/m2. In paired Student t-test between the patient group and matched controls, LAA volume was 67% larger in cryptogenic stroke/TIA patients (5.7±2.0 mL/m2 vs. 3.4±1.1 mL/m2; P<0.001). Forty-five (55%) patients with cryptogenic stroke/TIA had enlarged LAA. Conclusion LAA is significantly enlarged in more than half of patients with cryptogenic stroke/TIA. LAA thrombosis may contribute to the pathogenesis of stroke in patients considered to have cryptogenic stroke after conventional evaluation. PMID:24223960

  14. Evaluation of patients' attitudes towards stroke prevention and bleeding risk in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Lahaye, S; Regpala, S; Lacombe, S; Sharma, M; Gibbens, S; Ball, D; Francis, K

    2014-03-01

    Patient's values and preferences regarding the relative importance of preventing strokes and avoiding bleeding are now recognised to be of great importance in deciding on therapy for the prevention of stroke due to atrial fibrillation (SPAF). We used an iPad questionnaire to determine the minimal clinically important difference (Treatment Threshold) and the maximum number of major bleeding events that a patient would be willing to endure in order to prevent one stroke (Bleeding Ratio) for the initiation of antithrombotic therapy in 172 hospital in-patients with documented non-valvular atrial fibrillation in whom anticoagulant therapy was being considered. Patients expressed strong opinions regarding SPAF. We found that 12% of patients were "medication averse" and were not willing to consider antithrombotic therapy; even if it was 100% effective in preventing strokes. Of those patients who were willing to consider antithrombotic therapy, 42% were identified as "risk averse" and 15% were "risk tolerant". Patients required at least a 0.8% (NNT=125) annual absolute risk reduction and 15% relative risk reduction in the risk of stroke in order to agree to initiate antithrombotic therapy, and patients were willing to endure 4.4 major bleeds in order to prevent one stroke. In conclusion, there was a substantial amount of inter-patient variability, and often extreme differences in opinion regarding tolerance of bleeding risk in the context of stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation. These findings highlight the importance of considering patient preferences when deciding on SPAF therapy.

  15. Ischemic stroke in patients with gliomas at The University of Texas-M.D. Anderson Cancer Center.

    PubMed

    Kamiya-Matsuoka, Carlos; Cachia, David; Yust-Katz, Shlomit; Rodriguez, Yvo A; Garciarena, Pedro; Rodarte, Elsa M; Tremont-Lukats, Ivo W

    2015-10-01

    Patients with gliomas are at risk of cerebrovascular accidents (CVA) with potential consequences on survival, function, and local tumor control. Our objective was to provide information about CVA in patients with gliomas and to estimate survival in this group. We reviewed all adult glioma patients with ischemic CVA at the University of Texas-M.D. Anderson Cancer Center from 2003 through 2014. We extracted demographic, clinical, imaging, treatment and outcome data. We used descriptive summary data and estimated or compared survival rates where appropriate. 60 of 6500 patients (0.1%) with high-grade (HGG, n = 47) or low-grade glioma (LGG, n = 13) had ischemic CVA Thirty-two (53%) patients had postoperative strokes, and 20 (33%) had CVA after 2 weeks of surgery. Forty-one patients (68%) had gross total resection. For HGG and CVA, the poststroke median overall survival was 17 months versus 61 months in LGG and CVA (P = 0.03; hazard ratio (HR): 2.8; 95% CI 1.07-4.60). Survival stratified by modified Rankin Scale grade was significant (X(2) = 9.8, P = 0.007). Five patients received bevacizumab before stroke onset; none responded to antiangiogenic therapy. There was no stroke-related death. At our institution for 10 years, ischemic CVA in glioma patients was a rare complication, clearly associated in half of cases to surgery, and with a variable negative impact on performance status and neurologic function. In this group, patients with more neurological deficits lived less. The survival difference between and within subgroups was most likely due to tumor grade. More research is necessary to improve prevention of postoperative stroke in glioma patients.

  16. Language-specific dysgraphia in Korean patients with right brain stroke: influence of unilateral spatial neglect.

    PubMed

    Jang, Dae-Hyun; Kim, Min-Wook; Park, Kyoung Ha; Lee, Jae Woo

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the relationship between Korean language-specific dysgraphia and unilateral spatial neglect in 31 right brain stroke patients. All patients were tested for writing errors in spontaneous writing, dictation, and copying tests. The dysgraphia was classified into visuospatial omission, visuospatial destruction, syllabic tilting, stroke omission, stroke addition, and stroke tilting. Twenty-three (77.4%) of the 31 patients made dysgraphia and 18 (58.1%) demonstrated unilateral spatial neglect. The visuospatial omission was the most common dysgraphia followed by stroke addition and omission errors. The highest number of errors was made in the copying and the least was in the spontaneous writing test. Patients with unilateral spatial neglect made a significantly higher number of dysgraphia in the copying test than those without. We identified specific dysgraphia features such as a right side space omission and a vertical stroke addition in Korean right brain stroke patients. In conclusion, unilateral spatial neglect influences copy writing system of Korean language in patients with right brain stroke. PMID:25729257

  17. Language-specific dysgraphia in Korean patients with right brain stroke: influence of unilateral spatial neglect.

    PubMed

    Jang, Dae-Hyun; Kim, Min-Wook; Park, Kyoung Ha; Lee, Jae Woo

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the relationship between Korean language-specific dysgraphia and unilateral spatial neglect in 31 right brain stroke patients. All patients were tested for writing errors in spontaneous writing, dictation, and copying tests. The dysgraphia was classified into visuospatial omission, visuospatial destruction, syllabic tilting, stroke omission, stroke addition, and stroke tilting. Twenty-three (77.4%) of the 31 patients made dysgraphia and 18 (58.1%) demonstrated unilateral spatial neglect. The visuospatial omission was the most common dysgraphia followed by stroke addition and omission errors. The highest number of errors was made in the copying and the least was in the spontaneous writing test. Patients with unilateral spatial neglect made a significantly higher number of dysgraphia in the copying test than those without. We identified specific dysgraphia features such as a right side space omission and a vertical stroke addition in Korean right brain stroke patients. In conclusion, unilateral spatial neglect influences copy writing system of Korean language in patients with right brain stroke.

  18. Plasma growth differentiation factor 15 predicts first-ever stroke in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaojian; Zhu, Ling; Wu, Yan; Sun, Kai; Su, Ming; Yu, Liping; Chen, Jingzhou; Li, Weiju; Yang, Jing; Yuan, Zuyi; Hui, Rutai

    2016-07-01

    Growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF-15) is a relatively new biomarker that predicts adverse stroke outcomes. However, the association of GDF-15 with first-ever stroke in hypertensive patients has not yet been evaluated. The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical implications of plasma GDF-15 on the development of first-ever stroke in patients with hypertension.In total, 254 patients with hypertension without a history of stroke were included from March 2010 to August 2010 and followed up until June 2013. The baseline circulating GDF-15 was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays.During a follow-up of 3.0 ± 0.6 years, 22 (8.7%) first-ever strokes were identified, including 12 ischemic strokes and 10 intracerebral hemorrhages (ICH). According to tertiles of GDF-15, survival free of first-ever stroke was lower in the highest tertile of GDF-15 (log-rank P = 0.001). By backward stepwise Cox-regression analysis, adjusted for age, gender, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, hypertension stage, body mass index, cigarette smoking, anti-hypertensive drugs, and uric acid, every 100 pg/mL-increase in plasma of GDF-15 predicted an 11% greater risk of first-ever stroke (hazard ratios [HR]: 1.11, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.03-1.20, P = 0.010) and an 18% increase in ischemic stroke risk (HR: 1.18, 95% CI: 1.07-1.30, P = 0.001). Receiver operating characteristic analysis indicated that GDF-15 had reasonable accuracy to predict first-ever stroke (area under curve = 0.73, 95% CI: 0.62-0.83, P < 0.001).This study identifies that GDF-15 is an independent predictor of first-ever stroke, especially for ischemic stroke in the patients with hypertension. PMID:27472718

  19. Best practices for stroke patient and family education in the acute care setting: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Vanessa

    2013-01-01

    After a stroke, patients and families face many changes--physical, mental, and emotional. It is imperative that the nurse is able to appropriately educate the patient and family in preparation for discharge from the acute care center.

  20. Heart Attacks, Strokes, and Peripheral Artery Disease in Patients With Giant-Cell Arteritis

    MedlinePlus

    Annals of Internal Medicine Summaries for Patients Heart Attacks, Strokes, and Peripheral Artery Disease in Patients With Giant-Cell Arteritis The full report is titled “Risk for Cardiovascular Disease Early and Late ...

  1. New Electrical Stimulation Therapy Can Help Stroke Patients Move Paralyzed Hand

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stroke Patients Move Paralyzed Hand With help of sensor-laden glove, good hand used to regain some ... Reserve University School of Medicine in Cleveland. A sensor-laden glove worn on the patient's good hand ...

  2. Association Between Ischemic Stroke and Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitor Therapy in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Low, Audrey S. L.; Lunt, Mark; Mercer, Louise K.; Watson, Kath D.; Dixon, William G.; Symmons, Deborah P. M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are at an increased risk of ischemic stroke. Tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFi) may influence risk and mortality after ischemic stroke by reducing inflammation. This study was undertaken to examine the association of TNFi with the risk of incident ischemic stroke and with 30‐day and 1‐year mortality after ischemic stroke. Methods Patients with RA starting therapy with TNFi and a biologics‐naive comparator group treated with synthetic disease‐modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) only were recruited to the British Society for Rheumatology Biologics Register for Rheumatoid Arthritis from 2001 to 2009. Patients were followed up via clinical and patient questionnaires as well as the national death register. Incident strokes were classified as ischemic if brain imaging reports suggested ischemia or if ischemic stroke was reported as the underlying cause of death on a death certificate. Patients with a previous stroke were excluded. Risk of ischemic stroke was compared between patients receiving synthetic DMARDs only and those ever‐exposed to TNFi using a Cox proportional hazards regression model adjusted for potential confounders. Mortality after ischemic stroke was compared between synthetic DMARD–treated patients and TNFi‐treated patients using logistic regression, adjusted for age and sex. Results To April 2010, 127 verified incident ischemic strokes (21 in 3,271 synthetic DMARD–treated patients and 106 in 11,642 TNFi‐treated patients) occurred during 11,973 and 61,226 person‐years of observation, respectively (incidence rate 175 versus 173 per 100,000 person‐years). After adjustment for confounders, there was no association between ever‐exposure to TNFi and ischemic stroke (hazard ratio 0.99 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.54–1.81]). Mortality 30 days or 1 year after ischemic stroke was not associated with concurrent TNFi exposure (odds ratio 0.18 [95% CI 0.03–1.21] and 0.60 [95

  3. Early acute ischaemic stroke in two patients with acute type B aortic dissection: an unusual complication.

    PubMed

    AlGhamdi, Abdullah; Alqahtani, Saeed; Ricketti, Meagan; Aziz, Salim

    2015-01-01

    Aortic thoracic dissection (AD) is a serious cardiovascular disease. According to the Stanford classification; type A involves the ascending aorta and type B the descending distal to the left subclavian artery. Neurological complications secondary to AD are devastating. Ischaemic stroke and hypoxic encephalopathy are early-recognised complications of type A as the arch vessels can be involved AD. Although, late ischaemic stroke had been reported in 1.4-5% of patients with type B dissection, early stroke is very unusual as it cannot be simply explained by AD anatomical pathogenesis. We report two patients who presented with type B AD complicated by early ischaemic strokes. Work-up revealed significant cardiomyopathies in both patients but with left ventricle thrombus in one. In both patients the strokes were felt to be of cardioembolic origin. PMID:26243540

  4. The correlation between occupational performance and well-being in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Chae, Gang-Seok; Chang, Moonyoung

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] This study was performed to evaluate the occupational performance of stroke patients and their environment by occupational self-assessment and to investigate the relationship between occupational performance and well-being. [Subjects and Methods] This study enrolled ninety-two stroke patients who were receiving occupational therapy at a general hospital, a rehabilitation hospital, or a community welfare center in the cities of Busan and Gimhae, Republic of Korea. Occupational performance and well-being were investigated with Occupational Self-Assessment Version 2.2 and the Personal Well-being Index-Adult. [Results] Analysis of the correlation between occupational performance as assessed by the "Myself" and "My Environment" sections of Occupational Self-Assessment Version 2.2 and well-being revealed moderate positive correlation for both sections. [Conclusion] The relationship between occupational performance and well-being was identified. Further studies are needed to reveal whether improvement of occupational performance could affect well-being in various dimensions.

  5. Delayed and chronic treatment with growth hormone after endothelin-induced stroke in the adult rat.

    PubMed

    Pathipati, Praneeti; Surus, Andrzej; Williams, Christopher Edward; Scheepens, Arjan

    2009-12-01

    We investigated the effects of a neurorestorative treatment paradigm using long-term, central delivery of growth hormone (GH) starting 4 days after stroke. It has been shown previously that a neural GH axis is activated after stroke, that GH is neuroprotective, and can have direct trophic actions on neurons and stem cells. First, we developed and validated a buffer that kept rat GH bioactive for 2 weeks at body temperature. Implanted minipumps were used to chronically infuse GH into the lateral ventricle of unilateral stroke injured adult rats. Initially, a dose ranging pilot study was used to characterize the neuroendocrine effects and distribution of the infused GH. Next, a 6-week treatment trial starting 4 days after induction of the stroke was performed and the animals allowed to recover for a further 6 weeks. Behavioural and endocrinological measures were taken. We found that the infused GH localized to cells within the ipsilateral; subventricular zone, white matter tract, lesion and penumbral regions. GH treatment accelerated recovery of one out of three tests of motor function (P<0.001) and improved spatial memory on the Morris water maze test at the end of the study (P<0.05), with no effect on learning. We also found that GH treatment was associated with a reversible increase in body weight (P<0.01) whilst circulating IGF-1 (insulin-like growth factor 1) levels were halved (P<0.001). Delayed and chronic treatment of stroke with central GH may accelerate some aspects of functional recovery and improve spatial memory in the long-term.

  6. Recurrent stroke: what have we learnt?

    PubMed

    Rabia, K; Khoo, Em

    2007-01-01

    Stroke is the third leading cause of death, a major cause of disability in adults, and is frequently more disabling than fatal. With a decline in mortality from initial cerebral infarction and an increase in the life expectancy of the population, the number of patients with recurrent stroke and ensuing cardiovascular events will become greater. Thus it is important to find out those patients at high risk of stroke recurrence. This case report illustrates the process of recurrent stroke and the resulting disabilities and morbidities in a 42-year- old man. The role of integrated stroke rehabilitation programme is described. PMID:25606084

  7. Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy for Rehabilitation of Arm Dysfunction After Stroke in Adults

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The purpose of this evidence-based analysis is to determine the effectiveness and cost of CIMT for persons with arm dysfunction after a stroke. Clinical Need: Condition and Target Population A stroke is a sudden loss of brain function caused by the interruption of blood flow to the brain (ischemic stroke) or the rupture of blood vessels in the brain (hemorrhagic stroke). A stroke can affect any number of areas including the ability to move, see, remember, speak, reason, and read and write. Stroke is the leading cause of adult neurological disability in Canada; 300,000 people or 1% of the population live with its effects. Up to 85% of persons experiencing a complete stroke have residual arm dysfunction which will interfere with their ability to live independently. Rehabilitation interventions are the cornerstone of care and recovery after a stroke. Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy Constraint-Induced Movement (CIMT) is a behavioural approach to neurorehabilitation based on the principle of ‘learned non-use’. The term is derived from studies in nonhuman primates in which somatosensory deafferentation of a single forelimb was performed and after which the animal then failed to use that limb. This failure to use the limb was deemed ‘learned non-use’. The major components of CIMT include: i) intense repetitive task-oriented training of the impaired limb ii) immobilization of the unimpaired arm, and iii) shaping. With regard to the first component, persons may train the affected arm for several hours a day for up to 10-15 consecutive days. With immobilization, the unaffected arm may be restrained for up to 90% of waking hours. And finally, with shaping, the difficulty of the training tasks is progressively increased as performance improves and encouraging feedback is provided immediately when small gains are achieved. Research Question What is the effectiveness and cost of CIMT compared with physiotherapy and/or occupational therapy

  8. Therapeutic Effects of Mechanical Horseback Riding on Gait and Balance Ability in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jun Young; Kim, Shin Kyoung; Chung, Jin Sang; Lee, Hyun-Cheol; Lim, Jae Kuk; Lee, Jiwon; Park, Kawn Yong

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the therapeutic effects of mechanical horseback riding for gait and balance parameters in post-stroke patients. Method This study was a non randomized prospective positive-controlled trial over a 12 week period. From May 2011 to October 2011, 37 stroke patients were recruited from our outpatient clinic and divided into two groups. The control group received the conventional physiotherapy while the intervention group received the conventional physiotherapy along with mechanical horseback riding therapy for 12 weeks. Outcome measurements of gait included the Functional Ambulation Category (FAC) and gait part of the Performance Oriented Mobility Assessment (G-POMA) while those of balance included the Berg Balance Scale (BBS) and the balance part of the Performance Oriented Mobility Assessment (B-POMA). These measurements were taken before and after treatment. Results There were no significant differences in the baseline characteristics and initial values between the two groups. When comparing baseline and 12 weeks post treatment in each group, the intervention group showed significant improvement on BBS (39.9±5.7 → 45.7±4.8, p=0.001) and B-POMA (10.4±2.6 → 12.6±2.1, p=0.001), but significant improvement on gait parameters. When comparing the groups, the dynamic balance category of BBS in post treatment showed significant difference (p=0.02). Conclusion This study suggests that mechanical horseback riding therapy may be an effective treatment tool for enhancing balance in adults with stroke. PMID:23342307

  9. Perception of longitudinal body axis in patients with stroke: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Barra, J; Chauvineau, V; Ohlmann, T; Gresty, M; Pérennou, D

    2007-01-01

    Background and aims To investigate the hypothesis that patients with a hemisphere stroke may perceive their longitudinal body axis (LBA) rotated in the frontal plane. This error in an egocentric frame of reference could be detrimental to posture, as tilted LBA would imply an unequal distribution of body mass about the true vertical. Method 26 healthy subjects matched in age with 18 patients living with stroke participated in the study. The 18 patients were tested on average 80 days after a first left (n = 8) or right (n = 10) hemisphere stroke. Participants perceived their LBA by adjustments of the orientation of a luminous rod pivoting around a dorsonavel axis to the subjective direction of LBA. Participants were studied in the supine position to dissociate somaesthetic cues from graviceptive cues. Results Patients with stroke perceived their LBA rotated to the contralesional side in comparison with controls (p = 0.004). For all controls and 10 patients with stroke, the perceived LBA was very close to true LBA (mean (SD) 0.24° (1.31°)). For eight patients with stroke (six right stroke, two left stroke), the perceived LBA was rotated from true body orientation in the direction opposite to the lesioned side (range 3–9.5°, mean 5.2°). These eight patients provided similar estimates by tactile manipulation of the rod (without vision). The rotation of perceived LBA was more pronounced for right‐hemisphere strokes. The magnitudes of perceptual rotations correlated with sensory loss, signs of spatial neglect and the degree of postural and gait disability. Conclusion This is the first study showing that certain patients with a hemisphere stroke perceive their LBA rotated to the contralesional side. The consequences for perceptuomotor coordination have implications for their postural disorders. PMID:16868067

  10. Stroke in young women: An interpretative phenomenological analysis.

    PubMed

    Leahy, Dorothy M; Desmond, Deirdre; Coughlan, Tara; O'Neill, Des; Collins, D Rónán

    2016-05-01

    Stroke among adults of working age is increasing. We aimed to explore the experience of stroke among young women in Ireland. In total, 12 women (aged between 18 and 50 years) participated in semi-structured interviews. Data were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Four super-ordinate themes were identified: stroke as an illness of later life ('obviously it's for older people'), post-stroke selves, a desire for peer support and the impact of stroke on relationships. Findings indicate the importance of addressing the specific needs of younger stroke patients from admission to recovery through provision of inclusive all-age acute stroke services with tailored rehabilitation.

  11. Predictors of Depressive Mood in Patients With Isolated Cerebellar Stroke: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify predictive factors of depressive mood in patients with isolated cerebellar stroke. Methods A retrospective chart review was performed in patients who had experienced their first isolated cerebellar stroke during 2002–2014. The patients were classified into two groups by the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) (non-depressive group, 0≤GDS≤16; depressive group, 17≤GDS≤30). Data on demographic and socioeconomic factors, comorbidities, functional level, cognitive and linguistic function, and stroke characteristics were collected. Significant variables in univariate analysis were analyzed using logistic regression. Results Fifty-two patients were enrolled, of whom 55.8% had depressive mood, were older (p=0.021), and had higher hypertension rates (p=0.014). Cognitive and linguistic functions did not differ between the two groups. The depressive group had higher ischemic stroke rates (p=0.035) and showed a dominant right posterior cerebellar hemisphere lesion (p=0.028), which was independently associated with depressive mood in the multiple logistic regression analysis (odds ratio, 5.081; 95% confidence interval, 1.261–20.479). Conclusion The risk of depressive mood after cerebellar stroke was increased in patients at old age, with a history of hypertension, ischemic stroke, and lesion of the right posterior cerebellar hemisphere. The most significant determining factor was stroke lesion of the right posterior cerebellar hemisphere. Early detection of risk factors is important to prevent and manage depressive mood after cerebellar stroke. PMID:27446777

  12. Left atrial size and risk of stroke in patients in sinus rhythm. A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Overvad, Thure Filskov; Nielsen, Peter Brønnum; Larsen, Torben Bjerregaard; Søgaard, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Little is known about the risk of stroke associated with left atrial enlargement in patients in sinus rhythm, and whether such patients may have an unmet need for thromboprophylaxis. In this systematic review we summarise the existing evidence concerning left atrial size and risk of stroke in patients in sinus rhythm. Nine cohort studies were identified, analysing a total of 67,875 participants and 3,093 stroke outcomes. Rates of stroke per 100 person-years in patients with left atrial enlargement and in sinus rhythm ranged from 0.59 in a population-based cohort to 2.06 in patients referred for echocardiography. All studies reported a higher risk of stroke with larger/enlarged left atrium compared to smaller/normal sized left atrium. Two studies found indications of modification by sex, with only positive associations observed in women. Left atrial enlargement may represent an important predictor of stroke across a variety of patient populations in sinus rhythm. The underlying aetiology explaining this observed higher risk is likely to be multifactorial and not confined to a potential direct effect of left atrial enlargement on thromboembolic risk. Formal stroke risk stratification among patients with left atrial enlargement may further help identify patients who stand to gain from preventive antithrombotic therapy.

  13. Comparative Effectiveness of Blood Pressure-lowering Drugs in Patients who have Already Suffered From Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei-Ting; You, Li-Kai; Chiang, Chern-En; Sung, Shih-Hsien; Chuang, Shao-Yuan; Cheng, Hao-Min; Chen, Chen-Huan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hypertension is the most important risk factor for stroke and stroke recurrence. However, the preferred blood pressure (BP)-lowering drug class for patients who have suffered from a stroke has yet to be determined. To investigate the relative effects of BP-lowering therapies [angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI), angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB), β blockers, calcium channel blockers (CCBs), diuretics, and combinations of these drugs] in patients with a prior stroke history, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis using both traditional frequentist and Bayesian random-effects models and meta-regression of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the outcomes of recurrent stroke, coronary heart disease (CHD), and any major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (MACCE). Trials were identified from searches of published hypertension guidelines, electronic databases, and previous systematic reviews. Fifteen RCTs composed of 39,329 participants with previous stroke were identified. Compared with the placebo, only ACEI along with diuretics significantly reduced recurrent stroke events [odds ratio (OR) = 0.54, 95% credibility interval (95% CI) 0.33–0.90]. On the basis of the distribution of posterior probabilities, the treatment ranking consistently identified ACEI along with diuretics as the preferred BP-lowering strategy for the reduction of recurrent stroke and CHD (31% and 35%, respectively). For preventing MACCE, diuretics appeared to be the preferred agent for stroke survivors (34%). Moreover, the meta-regression analysis failed to demonstrate a statistical significance between BP reduction and all outcomes (P = 0.1618 for total stroke, 0.4933 for CHD, and 0.2411 for MACCE). Evidence from RCTs supports the use of diuretics-based treatment, especially when combined with ACEI, for the secondary prevention of recurrent stroke and any vascular events in patients who have suffered from stroke. PMID:27082571

  14. Pediatric Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Goun; Lim, Byung Chan

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric stroke is relatively rare but may lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Along with the advance of brain imaging technology and clinical awareness, diagnosis of pediatric stroke is increasing wordwide. Pediatric stroke differs from adults in variable risk factor/etiologies, diverse and nonspecific clinical presentation depending on ages. This review will be discussed pediatric stroke focusing on their clinical presentations, diagnosis and etiologies/risk factors. PMID:26180605

  15. Mortality, Recurrence, and Dependency Rates Are Higher after Acute Ischemic Stroke in Elderly Patients with Diabetes Compared to Younger Patients.

    PubMed

    Long, Xue; Lou, Yongzhong; Gu, Hongfei; Guo, Xiaofei; Wang, Tao; Zhu, Yanxia; Zhao, Wenjuan; Ning, Xianjia; Li, Bin; Wang, Jinghua; An, Zhongping

    2016-01-01

    Stroke has a greater effect on the elderly than on younger patients. However, the long-term outcomes associated with stroke among elderly patients with diabetes are unknown. We aimed to assess the differences in long-term outcomes between young and elderly stroke patients with diabetes. A total of 3,615 acute ischemic stroke patients with diabetes were recruited for this study between 2006 and 2014. Outcomes at 12 and 36 months after stroke (including mortality, recurrence, and dependency) were compared between younger (age <75 years) and elderly (age ≥75 years) patients. The elderly group included 692 patients (19.1%) overall. Elderly patients were more likely than younger patients to have a Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment classification of stroke due to cardioembolism, moderate and severe stroke, and atrial fibrillation, but less likely to have hypertension and dyslipidemia, current smokers, and alcohol consumers. Mortality, dependency, and recurrence rates at 12 months after stroke were 19.0, 48.5, and 20.9% in the elderly group and 7.4, 30.9, and 15.4% in the younger group, respectively (all P < 0.05). Corresponding rates at 36 months after stroke were 35.4, 78.7, and 53.8% in the elderly group and 13.7, 61.7, and 43.0% in the younger group, respectively (all P < 0.001). The mortality, dependency, and recurrence rates at 12 and 36 months after stroke were significantly higher in the elderly group than in the younger group after adjusting for stroke subtypes, stroke severity, and risk factors. Odds ratios (95% confidence interval) at 12 and 36 months after stroke were 2.18 (1.64-2.89) and 3.10 (2.35-4.08), respectively, for mortality, all P < 0.001; 1.81 (1.49-2.20) and 2.04 (1.57-2.34), respectively, for dependency, all P < 0.001; and 1.37 (1.06-1.76) and 1.40 (1.07-1.85), respectively, for recurrence, P = 0.016. The findings from this study suggest that management and secondary prevention should be emphasized in elderly patients with diabetes in

  16. Mortality, Recurrence, and Dependency Rates Are Higher after Acute Ischemic Stroke in Elderly Patients with Diabetes Compared to Younger Patients

    PubMed Central

    Long, Xue; Lou, Yongzhong; Gu, Hongfei; Guo, Xiaofei; Wang, Tao; Zhu, Yanxia; Zhao, Wenjuan; Ning, Xianjia; Li, Bin; Wang, Jinghua; An, Zhongping

    2016-01-01

    Stroke has a greater effect on the elderly than on younger patients. However, the long-term outcomes associated with stroke among elderly patients with diabetes are unknown. We aimed to assess the differences in long-term outcomes between young and elderly stroke patients with diabetes. A total of 3,615 acute ischemic stroke patients with diabetes were recruited for this study between 2006 and 2014. Outcomes at 12 and 36 months after stroke (including mortality, recurrence, and dependency) were compared between younger (age <75 years) and elderly (age ≥75 years) patients. The elderly group included 692 patients (19.1%) overall. Elderly patients were more likely than younger patients to have a Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment classification of stroke due to cardioembolism, moderate and severe stroke, and atrial fibrillation, but less likely to have hypertension and dyslipidemia, current smokers, and alcohol consumers. Mortality, dependency, and recurrence rates at 12 months after stroke were 19.0, 48.5, and 20.9% in the elderly group and 7.4, 30.9, and 15.4% in the younger group, respectively (all P < 0.05). Corresponding rates at 36 months after stroke were 35.4, 78.7, and 53.8% in the elderly group and 13.7, 61.7, and 43.0% in the younger group, respectively (all P < 0.001). The mortality, dependency, and recurrence rates at 12 and 36 months after stroke were significantly higher in the elderly group than in the younger group after adjusting for stroke subtypes, stroke severity, and risk factors. Odds ratios (95% confidence interval) at 12 and 36 months after stroke were 2.18 (1.64–2.89) and 3.10 (2.35–4.08), respectively, for mortality, all P < 0.001; 1.81 (1.49–2.20) and 2.04 (1.57–2.34), respectively, for dependency, all P < 0.001; and 1.37 (1.06–1.76) and 1.40 (1.07–1.85), respectively, for recurrence, P = 0.016. The findings from this study suggest that management and secondary prevention should be emphasized in elderly patients with

  17. Mortality, Recurrence, and Dependency Rates Are Higher after Acute Ischemic Stroke in Elderly Patients with Diabetes Compared to Younger Patients.

    PubMed

    Long, Xue; Lou, Yongzhong; Gu, Hongfei; Guo, Xiaofei; Wang, Tao; Zhu, Yanxia; Zhao, Wenjuan; Ning, Xianjia; Li, Bin; Wang, Jinghua; An, Zhongping

    2016-01-01

    Stroke has a greater effect on the elderly than on younger patients. However, the long-term outcomes associated with stroke among elderly patients with diabetes are unknown. We aimed to assess the differences in long-term outcomes between young and elderly stroke patients with diabetes. A total of 3,615 acute ischemic stroke patients with diabetes were recruited for this study between 2006 and 2014. Outcomes at 12 and 36 months after stroke (including mortality, recurrence, and dependency) were compared between younger (age <75 years) and elderly (age ≥75 years) patients. The elderly group included 692 patients (19.1%) overall. Elderly patients were more likely than younger patients to have a Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment classification of stroke due to cardioembolism, moderate and severe stroke, and atrial fibrillation, but less likely to have hypertension and dyslipidemia, current smokers, and alcohol consumers. Mortality, dependency, and recurrence rates at 12 months after stroke were 19.0, 48.5, and 20.9% in the elderly group and 7.4, 30.9, and 15.4% in the younger group, respectively (all P < 0.05). Corresponding rates at 36 months after stroke were 35.4, 78.7, and 53.8% in the elderly group and 13.7, 61.7, and 43.0% in the younger group, respectively (all P < 0.001). The mortality, dependency, and recurrence rates at 12 and 36 months after stroke were significantly higher in the elderly group than in the younger group after adjusting for stroke subtypes, stroke severity, and risk factors. Odds ratios (95% confidence interval) at 12 and 36 months after stroke were 2.18 (1.64-2.89) and 3.10 (2.35-4.08), respectively, for mortality, all P < 0.001; 1.81 (1.49-2.20) and 2.04 (1.57-2.34), respectively, for dependency, all P < 0.001; and 1.37 (1.06-1.76) and 1.40 (1.07-1.85), respectively, for recurrence, P = 0.016. The findings from this study suggest that management and secondary prevention should be emphasized in elderly patients with diabetes in

  18. Why Is It Difficult to Predict Language Impairment and Outcome in Patients with Aphasia after Stroke?

    PubMed Central

    Kasselimis, Dimitrios; Varkanitsa, Maria; Selai, Caroline; Potagas, Constantin; Evdokimidis, Ioannis

    2014-01-01

    One of the most devastating consequences of stroke is aphasia. Communication problems after stroke can severely impair the patient's quality of life and make even simple everyday tasks challenging. Despite intense research in the field of aphasiology, the type of language impairment has not yet been localized and correlated with brain damage, making it difficult to predict the language outcome for stroke patients with aphasia. Our primary objective is to present the available evidence that highlights the difficulties of predicting language impairment after stroke. The different levels of complexity involved in predicting the lesion site from language impairment and ultimately predicting the long-term outcome in stroke patients with aphasia were explored. Future directions and potential implications for research and clinical practice are highlighted. PMID:24829592

  19. Incidence, Causative Mechanisms, and Anatomic Localization of Stroke in Pituitary Adenoma Patients Treated With Postoperative Radiation Therapy Versus Surgery Alone

    SciTech Connect

    Sattler, Margriet G.A.; Vroomen, Patrick C.; Sluiter, Wim J.; Schers, Henk J.; Berg, Gerrit van den; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.R.; Bergh, Alphons C.M. van den; Beek, André P. van

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To assess and compare the incidence of stroke and stroke subtype in pituitary adenoma patients treated with postoperative radiation therapy (RT) and surgery alone. Methods and Materials: A cohort of 462 pituitary adenoma patients treated between 1959 and 2008 at the University Medical Center Groningen in The Netherlands was studied. Radiation therapy was administered in 236 patients. The TOAST (Trial of ORG 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment) and the Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project classification methods were used to determine causative mechanism and anatomic localization of stroke. Stroke incidences in patients treated with RT were compared with that observed after surgery alone. Risk factors for stroke incidence were studied by log–rank test, without and with stratification for other significant risk factors. In addition, the stroke incidence was compared with the incidence rate in the general Dutch population. Results: Thirteen RT patients were diagnosed with stroke, compared with 12 surgery-alone patients. The relative risk (RR) for stroke in patients treated with postoperative RT was not significantly different compared with surgery-alone patients (univariate RR 0.62, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.28-1.35, P=.23). Stroke risk factors were coronary or peripheral artery disease (univariate and multivariate RR 10.4, 95% CI 4.7-22.8, P<.001) and hypertension (univariate RR 3.9, 95% CI 1.6-9.8, P=.002). There was no difference in TOAST and Oxfordshire classification of stroke. In this pituitary adenoma cohort 25 strokes were observed, compared with 16.91 expected (standard incidence ratio 1.48, 95% CI 1.00-1.96, P=.049). Conclusions: In pituitary adenoma patients, an increased incidence of stroke was observed compared with the general population. However, postoperative RT was not associated with an increased incidence of stroke or differences in causative mechanism or anatomic localization of stroke compared with surgery alone. The primary stroke risk

  20. Description of Functional Disability among Younger Stroke Patients: Exploration of Activity and Participation and Environmental Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snogren, Maria; Sunnerhagen, Katharina Stibrant

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study is to describe disability among younger stroke patients by analyzing activity and participation and the environmental aspect as well as to compare assessed and self-perceived problems after stroke. International Classification of Functioning and Health (ICF) is a tool that provides a scientific basis for understanding and…

  1. Association between acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and risk of stroke in patients with dementia

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi-Ting; Wu, Ping-Hsun; Chen, Cheng-Sheng; Yang, Yi-Hsin; Yang, Yuan-Han

    2016-01-01

    Patients with dementia are at increased risk of stroke. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs) have endothelial function protection effects and anti-inflammatory properties. We investigated the ischemic stroke risk in AChEIs use in dementia patients without stroke history. Using Taiwan National Health Insurance Database from 1999 to 2008, 37,352 dementia patients over 50 years old without stroke history were eligible. The results were analyzed by propensity score–matched Cox proportional hazard models with competing risk adjustment. AChEIs users had lower incidence of ischemic stroke (160.3/10,000 person-years), compared to the propensity score–matched reference (240.8/10,000 person-years). The adjusted hazard ratio for ischemic stroke based on propensity score–matched Cox proportional hazard model was 0.508 (95% confidence interval, 0.434–0.594; P < 0.001). There was no significant difference in all-cause mortality between AChEIs users and nonusers. In conclusion, among dementia patients without previous ischemic stroke history, AChEIs treatment was associated with a decreased risk of ischemic stroke but not greater survival. PMID:27377212

  2. The Relationship between Mood State, Interpersonal Attitudes and Psychological Distress in Stroke Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Margaret A.; Andrewes, David G.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated whether increasing positive mood improved interpersonal attitudes and relieved depression in depressed stroke patients despite levels of cognitive and emotional dysfunction. Depressed stroke (n = 30) and rheumatic/orthopaedic controls (n = 30) were compared on the effect of verbal and nonverbal positive and neutral mood…

  3. Postacute Stroke Rehabilitation Utilization: Are There Differences between Rural-Urban Patients and Taxonomies?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jia, Huanguang; Cowper, Diane C.; Tang, Yuhong; Litt, Eric; Wilson, Lauren

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the association between Veterans Affairs (VA) stroke patients' poststroke rehabilitation utilization and their residential settings by using 2 common rural-urban taxonomies. Methods: This retrospective study included all VA stroke inpatients in 2001 and 2002. Rehabilitation utilization referred to rehabilitation therapy received…

  4. Abnormal EEG Complexity and Functional Connectivity of Brain in Patients with Acute Thalamic Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuang; Guo, Jie; Meng, Jiayuan; Wang, Zhijun; Yao, Yang; Yang, Jiajia; Qi, Hongzhi; Ming, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic thalamus stroke has become a serious cardiovascular and cerebral disease in recent years. To date the existing researches mostly concentrated on the power spectral density (PSD) in several frequency bands. In this paper, we investigated the nonlinear features of EEG and brain functional connectivity in patients with acute thalamic ischemic stroke and healthy subjects. Electroencephalography (EEG) in resting condition with eyes closed was recorded for 12 stroke patients and 11 healthy subjects as control group. Lempel-Ziv complexity (LZC), Sample Entropy (SampEn), and brain network using partial directed coherence (PDC) were calculated for feature extraction. Results showed that patients had increased mean LZC and SampEn than the controls, which implied the stroke group has higher EEG complexity. For the brain network, the stroke group displayed a trend of weaker cortical connectivity, which suggests a functional impairment of information transmission in cortical connections in stroke patients. These findings suggest that nonlinear analysis and brain network could provide essential information for better understanding the brain dysfunction in the stroke and assisting monitoring or prognostication of stroke evolution. PMID:27403202

  5. Direct oral anticoagulants: key considerations for use to prevent stroke in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Ment, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia worldwide. Strokes that occur as a complication of AF are usually more severe and associated with a higher disability or morbidity and mortality rate compared with non-AF-related strokes. The risk of stroke in AF is dependent on several risk factors; AF itself acts as an independent risk factor for stroke. The combination of effective anticoagulation therapy, risk stratification (based on stroke risk scores, such as CHADS2 and CHA2DS2-VASc), and recommendations provided by guidelines is essential for decreasing the risk of stroke in patients with AF. Although effective in preventing the occurrence of stroke, vitamin K antagonists (VKAs; eg, warfarin) are associated with several limitations. Therefore, direct oral anticoagulants, such as apixaban, dabigatran etexilate, edoxaban, and rivaroxaban, have emerged as an alternative to the VKAs for stroke prevention in patients with nonvalvular AF. Compared with the VKAs, these agents have more favorable pharmacological characteristics and, unlike the VKAs, they are given at fixed doses without the need for routine coagulation monitoring. It remains important that physicians use these direct oral anticoagulants responsibly to ensure optimal safety and effectiveness. This article provides an overview of the existing data on the direct oral anticoagulants, focusing on management protocols for aiding physicians to optimize anticoagulant therapy in patients with nonvalvular AF, particularly in special patient populations (eg, those with renal impairment) and other specific clinical situations. PMID:26089678

  6. Management of patients with stroke: is it time to expand treatment options?

    PubMed

    Adams, Harold P; Nudo, Randolph J

    2013-07-01

    Approximately 700,000 people in the United States have an ischemic stroke annually. Substantial research has tested therapies for the very early treatment of ischemic stroke but, to date, only intravenous thrombolysis and intra-arterial measures to restore perfusion have shown success. Despite a 15-year effort to increase the use of these therapies, only approximately 5% of patients with stroke are currently being treated. Although most patients with stroke have some neurological recovery, more than half of stroke survivors have residual impairments that lead to disability or long-term institutionalized care. Laboratory research has demonstrated several mechanisms that help the brain to recover after a stroke. New pharmacological and cell-based approaches that are known to promote brain plasticity are emerging from laboratory studies and may soon expand the window for stroke treatment to restore function. It is time to build on this knowledge and to translate the understanding of recovery after stroke into the clinical setting. Measures that might augment recovery should become a major focus of clinical research in stroke in the 21st century.

  7. Transcranial magnetic stimulation in patients with cerebellar stroke.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Martínez, A; Arpa, J

    1997-01-01

    Conduction time of the central motor pathways (CMCT) by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was performed within the first two weeks in 7 patients with isolated hemicerebellar lesions after stroke. Cerebellar infarcts were small (< 2 cm in diameter) in 5 patients and no brainstem structure was involved in CT studies. The threshold (3 cases) and CMCT (4 cases) were abnormal or asymmetric by stimulation of the motor cortex contralateral to the impaired hemicerebellum. The follow-up study in 2 patients revealed electrophysiological improvement closely related to clinical cerebellar recovery rate. CMCT was significantly longer by cortex stimulation contralateral to the impaired hemicerebellum than by ipsilateral stimulation. Prolonged CMCT was significantly correlated with the rated severity of cerebellar signs. Increased threshold may be due to depressed facilitating action of the deep cerebellar nuclei on contralateral motor cortex. Abnormal CMCT might result in reduced size and increased dispersion of the efferent volleys. Recovery of electrophysiological results could represent in part true potentially reversible functional deficit. Whichever the pathophysiological mechanisms involved, our results demonstrate that the cerebellum dysfunction plays a role in the abnormalities of CMCT elicited by TMS.

  8. Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... fibrillation: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on practice guidelines ... Council on Peripheral Vascular Disease; Council on Clinical Cardiology. Guidelines for the early management of patients with ...

  9. Left Atrial Appendage Morphology in Patients with Suspected Cardiogenic Stroke without Known Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Korhonen, Miika; Muuronen, Antti; Arponen, Otso; Mustonen, Pirjo; Hedman, Marja; Jäkälä, Pekka; Vanninen, Ritva; Taina, Mikko

    2015-01-01

    The left atrial appendage (LAA) is the typical origin for intracardiac thrombus formation. Whether LAA morphology is associated with increased stroke/TIA risk is controversial and, if it does, which morphological type most predisposes to thrombus formation. We assessed LAA morphology in stroke patients with cryptogenic or suspected cardiogenic etiology and in age- and gender-matched healthy controls. LAA morphology and volume were analyzed by cardiac computed tomography in 111 patients (74 males; mean age 60 ± 11 years) with acute ischemic stroke of cryptogenic or suspected cardiogenic etiology other than known atrial fibrillation (AF). A subgroup of 40 patients was compared to an age- and gender-matched control group of 40 healthy individuals (21 males in each; mean age 54 ± 9 years). LAA was classified into four morphology types (Cactus, ChickenWing, WindSock, CauliFlower) modified with a quantitative qualifier. The proportions of LAA morphology types in the main stroke group, matched stroke subgroup, and control group were as follows: Cactus (9.0%, 5.0%, 20.0%), ChickenWing (23.4%, 37.5%, 10.0%), WindSock (47.7%, 35.0%, 67.5%), and CauliFlower (19.8%, 22.5%, 2.5%). The distribution of morphology types differed significantly (P<0.001) between the matched stroke subgroup and control group. The proportion of single-lobed LAA was significantly higher (P<0.001) in the matched stroke subgroup (55%) than the control group (6%). LAA volumes were significantly larger (P<0.001) in both stroke study groups compared to controls patients. To conclude, LAA morphology differed significantly between stroke patients and controls, and single-lobed LAAs were overrepresented and LAA volume was larger in patients with acute ischemic stroke of cryptogenic or suspected cardiogenic etiology. PMID:25751618

  10. Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents increase the risk of acute stroke in patients with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Seliger, Stephen L.; Zhang, Amy D.; Weir, Matthew R.; Walker, Loreen; Hsu, Van Doren; Parsa, Afshin; Diamantidis, Clarissa; Fink, Jeffrey C.

    2013-01-01

    Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) are effective in ameliorating anemia in chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, a recent trial in diabetic CKD patients suggested a greater stroke risk associated with full correction of anemia using ESAs. We performed a case-control study examining the association of incident ESA use with acute stroke in CKD patients, using national Veterans Affairs data. Patients with eGFR<60 cc/min/1.73m2 and outpatient hemoglobin (Hb)<12g/dL were included. Acute hospitalized stroke cases (N=2071) were identified using diagnosis codes and matched 1:5 to controls without stroke. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate the association of ESA use with stroke, adjusting for potential confounders. After multivariate adjustment, ESA use (N=1026, 8.3%) was associated with 30% greater odds of stroke (odds ratio[OR]=1.30, 95% confidence interval[CI]: 1.06, 1.58). There was significant interaction (p=.015) between ESA use and cancer; ESA use was associated with 85% greater odds of stroke in cancer patients (95% CI: 1.26, 2.65), but not associated with stroke in patients without cancer (OR=1.07, 95% CI: 0.85, 1.35). ESA-treated patients with cancer received a median initial dose 2.5 to 4 times greater than ESA patients without cancer, but pre-ESA Hb and rate of Hb change did not differ between groups. Among a large national sample of anemic CKD patients, ESA treatment is associated with an increased risk of acute stroke, with the greatest effect among patients with cancer. PMID:21389972

  11. Atrial Septal Aneurysm and Patent Foramen Ovale as Risk Factors for Cryptogenic Stroke in Patients Less Than 55 Years of Age: A Study using Transesophageal Echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabanes, L.; Mas, J. L.; Cohen, A.; Amarenco, P.; Cabanes, P. A.; Oubary, P.; Chedru, F.; Guerin, F.; Bousser, M. G.; deRecondo, J.

    1993-01-01

    Background and Purpose: An association between atrial septal aneurysm and embolic events has been suggested. Atrial septal aneurysm has been shown to be associated with patent foramen ovale and,.in some reports, with mitral valve prolapse. These two latter cardiac disorder; have been identified as potential risk factors for ischemic stroke. The aim of this prospective study was to assess the role of atrial septal aneurysm as an independent risk factor for stroke, especially for cryptogenic stroke. Methods: We studied the prevalence of atrial septal aneurysm, patent foramen ovale, and mitral valve prolapse in 100 consecutive patients <55 years of age with ischemic stroke who underwent extensive etiological investigations. We compared these results with those in a control group of 50 consecutive patients. The diagnosis of atrial septal aneurysm and patent foramen ovale relied on transesophageal echocardiography with a contrast study and that of mitral valve prolapse, on two-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography. Results: Stepwise logistic regression analysis showed that atrial septal aneurysm (odds ratio, 4.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.3 to 14.6; P=.01) and patent foramen ovale (odds ratio, 3.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.5 to 10; P=.003) but not mitral valve prolapse were significantly associated with the diagnosis of cryptogenic stroke. The stroke odds of a patient with both atrial septal aneurysm and patent foramen ovale were 33.3 times (95% confidence interval, 4.1 to 270) the stroke odds of a patient with neither of these cardiac disorders. For a patient with atrial septal aneurysm of >lo-mm excursion, the stroke odds were approximately 8 times the stroke odds of a patient with atrial septal aneurysm of <10 mm. Conclusions: This study shows that atrial septal aneurysm and patent foramen ovale are both significantly associated with cryptogenic stroke and that their association has a marked synergistic effect. Atrial septal aneurysms of >lo-mm excursion are

  12. [Comparison of efficacy of different neurometabolic and vasoactive medicines in ischemic stroke patients's rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Galkin, A S; Koval'chuk, V V; Gusev, A O

    2011-01-01

    The aim of present investigation is research of influence of vasoactive and neurometabolic medicines in stroke patients's rehabilitation. We had analysed 280 stroke patients. The degree of rehabilitation had been defined with the help of Barthel and Lindmark scales. The degree of cognitive functions's rehabilitation had been defined with the help of MMSE scale. For every medicine coefficients of efficiency were calculated. As the result of the present investigation the medicine's efficiency was found out. The most efficient medicines in ischaemic stroke patients's rehabilitation among the investigated ones are the medicines which activate the neuronal metabolism, first of all,--ceraxon (citicoline).

  13. [Dynamics of intracranial pressure in patients with massive ischemic stroke after decompressive craniotomy].

    PubMed

    Nikitin, A S; Burov, S A; Petrikov, S S; Asratian, S A; Gorshkov, K M; Krylov, V V

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the study was assessment of the value of ICP monitoring in patients with massive ischemic stroke after decompressive craniotomy. 12 patients with massive ischemic stroke were performed ICP monitoring after decompressive craniotomy. We identified 3 types of ICP dynamics: a) normal ICP, which no need to treat; b) ICP elevation to 20 mm Hg and more in postoperative period, which can be treated by nonsurgical therapy; c) refractory to therapy ICP elevation to 20 mm Hg and more with development of intracranial hypertension. We consider that ICP monitoring in patients with massive ischemic stroke after decompressive craniotomy can be useful for optimization of the therapy and correction of intracranial hypertension.

  14. Systematic review and network meta-analysis of stroke prevention treatments in patients with atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Tawfik, Amy; Bielecki, Joanna M; Krahn, Murray; Dorian, Paul; Hoch, Jeffrey S; Boon, Heather; Husereau, Don; Pechlivanoglou, Petros

    2016-01-01

    Background In the last 4 years, four novel oral anticoagulants have been developed as alternatives to warfarin and antiplatelet agents for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients. The objective of this review was to estimate the comparative effectiveness of all antithrombotic treatments for AF patients. Materials and methods Data sources were Medline Ovid (1946 to October 2015), Embase Ovid (1980 to October 2015), and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, Issue 9, 2015). Randomized controlled trials of AF patients were selected if they compared at least two of the following: placebo, aspirin, aspirin and clopidogrel combination therapy, adjusted-dose warfarin (target international normalized ratio 2.0–3.0), dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban. Bayesian network meta-analyses were conducted for outcomes of interest (all stroke, ischemic stroke, myocardial infarction, overall mortality, major bleeding, and intracranial hemorrhage). Results Based on 16 randomized controlled trials of 96,826 patients, all oral anticoagulants were more effective than antiplatelet agents at reducing the risk of ischemic stroke and all strokes. Compared to warfarin, dabigatran 150 mg (rate ratio 0.65, 95% credible interval 0.52–0.82) and apixaban (rate ratio 0.82, 95% credible interval 0.69–0.97) reduced the risk of all strokes. Dabigatran 150 mg was also more effective than warfarin at reducing ischemic stroke risk (rate ratio 0.76, 95% credible interval 0.59–0.99). Aspirin, apixaban, dabigatran 110 mg, and edoxaban were associated with less major bleeding than warfarin. Conclusion All oral anticoagulants reduce the risk of stroke in AF patients. Some novel oral anticoagulants are associated with a lower stroke and/or major bleeding risk than warfarin. In addition to the safety and effectiveness of drug therapy, as reported in this study, individual treatment recommendations should also consider the patient’s underlying stroke

  15. Optimal Combination Treatment and Vascular Outcomes in Recent Ischemic Stroke Patients by Premorbid Risk Level

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-Ho; Ovbiagele, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Background Optimal combination of secondary stroke prevention treatment including antihypertensives, antithrombotic agents, and lipid modifiers is associated with reduced recurrent vascular risk including stroke. It is unclear whether optimal combination treatment has a differential impact on stroke patients based on level of vascular risk. Methods We analyzed a clinical trial dataset comprising 3680 recent non-cardioembolic stroke patients aged ≥35 years and followed for 2 years. Patients were categorized by appropriateness level 0 to III depending on the number of the drugs prescribed divided by the number of drugs potentially indicated for each patient (0=none of the indicated medications prescribed and III=all indicated medications prescribed [optimal combination treatment]). High-risk was defined as having a history of stroke or coronary heart disease (CHD) prior to the index stroke event. Independent associations of medication appropriateness level with a major vascular event (stroke, CHD, or vascular death), ischemic stroke, and all-cause death were analyzed. Results Compared with level 0, for major vascular events, the HR of level III in the low-risk group was 0.51 (95% CI: 0.20–1.28) and 0.32 (0.14–0.70) in the high-risk group; for stroke, the HR of level III in the low-risk group was 0.54 (0.16–1.77) and 0.25 (0.08–0.85) in the high-risk group; and for all-cause death, the HR of level III in the low-risk group was 0.66 (0.09–5.00) and 0.22 (0.06–0.78) in the high-risk group. Conclusion Optimal combination treatment is related to a significantly lower risk of future vascular events and death among high-risk patients after a recent non-cardioembolic stroke. PMID:26044963

  16. Constraint-induced movement therapy promotes brain functional reorganization in stroke patients with hemiplegia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenqing; Wang, Aihui; Yu, Limin; Han, Xuesong; Jiang, Guiyun; Weng, Changshui; Zhang, Hongwei; Zhou, Zhiqiang

    2012-11-15

    Stroke patients with hemiplegia exhibit flexor spasms in the upper limb and extensor spasms in the lower limb, and their movement patterns vary greatly. Constraint-induced movement therapy is an upper limb rehabilitation technique used in stroke patients with hemiplegia; however, studies of lower extremity rehabilitation are scarce. In this study, stroke patients with lower limb hemiplegia underwent conventional Bobath therapy for 4 weeks as baseline treatment, followed by constraint-induced movement therapy for an additional 4 weeks. The 10-m maximum walking speed and Berg balance scale scores significantly improved following treatment, and lower extremity motor function also improved. The results of functional MRI showed that constraint-induced movement therapy alleviates the reduction in cerebral functional activation in patients, which indicates activation of functional brain regions and a significant increase in cerebral blood perfusion. These results demonstrate that constraint-induced movement therapy promotes brain functional reorganization in stroke patients with lower limb hemiplegia.

  17. Constraint-induced movement therapy promotes brain functional reorganization in stroke patients with hemiplegia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenqing; Wang, Aihui; Yu, Limin; Han, Xuesong; Jiang, Guiyun; Weng, Changshui; Zhang, Hongwei; Zhou, Zhiqiang

    2012-01-01

    Stroke patients with hemiplegia exhibit flexor spasms in the upper limb and extensor spasms in the lower limb, and their movement patterns vary greatly. Constraint-induced movement therapy is an upper limb rehabilitation technique used in stroke patients with hemiplegia; however, studies of lower extremity rehabilitation are scarce. In this study, stroke patients with lower limb hemiplegia underwent conventional Bobath therapy for 4 weeks as baseline treatment, followed by constraint-induced movement therapy for an additional 4 weeks. The 10-m maximum walking speed and Berg balance scale scores significantly improved following treatment, and lower extremity motor function also improved. The results of functional MRI showed that constraint-induced movement therapy alleviates the reduction in cerebral functional activation in patients, which indicates activation of functional brain regions and a significant increase in cerebral blood perfusion. These results demonstrate that constraint-induced movement therapy promotes brain functional reorganization in stroke patients with lower limb hemiplegia. PMID:25337108

  18. Constraint-induced movement therapy promotes brain functional reorganization in stroke patients with hemiplegia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenqing; Wang, Aihui; Yu, Limin; Han, Xuesong; Jiang, Guiyun; Weng, Changshui; Zhang, Hongwei; Zhou, Zhiqiang

    2012-11-15

    Stroke patients with hemiplegia exhibit flexor spasms in the upper limb and extensor spasms in the lower limb, and their movement patterns vary greatly. Constraint-induced movement therapy is an upper limb rehabilitation technique used in stroke patients with hemiplegia; however, studies of lower extremity rehabilitation are scarce. In this study, stroke patients with lower limb hemiplegia underwent conventional Bobath therapy for 4 weeks as baseline treatment, followed by constraint-induced movement therapy for an additional 4 weeks. The 10-m maximum walking speed and Berg balance scale scores significantly improved following treatment, and lower extremity motor function also improved. The results of functional MRI showed that constraint-induced movement therapy alleviates the reduction in cerebral functional activation in patients, which indicates activation of functional brain regions and a significant increase in cerebral blood perfusion. These results demonstrate that constraint-induced movement therapy promotes brain functional reorganization in stroke patients with lower limb hemiplegia. PMID:25337108

  19. A stroke patient with impairment of auditory sensory (echoic) memory.

    PubMed

    Kojima, T; Karino, S; Yumoto, M; Funayama, M

    2014-04-01

    A 42-year-old man suffered damage to the left supra-sylvian areas due to a stroke and presented with verbal short-term memory (STM) deficits. He occasionally could not recall even a single syllable that he had heard one second before. A study of mismatch negativity using magnetoencephalography suggested that the duration of auditory sensory (echoic) memory traces was reduced on the affected side of the brain. His maximum digit span was four with auditory presentation (equivalent to the 1st percentile for normal subjects), whereas it was up to six with visual presentation (almost within the normal range). He simply showed partial recall in the digit span task, and there was no self correction or incorrect reproduction. From these findings, reduced echoic memory was thought to have affected his verbal short-term retention. Thus, the impairment of verbal short-term memory observed in this patient was "pure auditory" unlike previously reported patients with deficits of the phonological short-term store (STS), which is the next higher-order memory system. We report this case to present physiological and behavioral data suggesting impaired short-term storage of verbal information, and to demonstrate the influence of deterioration of echoic memory on verbal STM.

  20. Factors Contributing to Patient Satisfaction with Rehabilitation Following Stroke.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, M. S.; Smith, D. S.

    1998-01-01

    A study that investigated the satisfaction of 60 Australian stroke survivors with their rehabilitative progress over 12 months found satisfaction with progress improved with time and was influenced by the return to previous lifestyle activities, depression, family functioning, understanding of stroke, and clarity of expectations on admission to…

  1. Patients' Experiences of Disruptions Associated with Post-Stroke Dysarthria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickson, Sylvia; Barbour, Rosaline S.; Brady, Marian; Clark, Alexander M.; Paton, Gillian

    2008-01-01

    Background: Post-stroke dysarthria rehabilitation should consider social participation for people with dysarthria, but before this approach can be adopted, an understanding of the psychosocial impact of dysarthria is required. Despite the prevalence of dysarthria as a result of stroke, there is a paucity of research into this communication…

  2. Molecular characteristics of pediatric patients with sickle cell anemia and stroke.

    PubMed

    Sarnaik, S A; Ballas, S K

    2001-07-01

    Cerebrovascular accidents (CVA) are serious complications of sickle cell anemia (SS) in children. Factors that predispose children to this complication are not well established. In an effort to elucidate the risk factors associated with CVA in SS, we have determined the alpha-globin genotype and the beta(S) haplotype of children with this complication. Among 700 children with SS followed at Children's Hospital of Michigan, 41 (6%) are on chronic transfusions because of stroke due to cerebral infarction. The mean age of patients with CVA at the time of stroke was 5.6 +/- 3.2 years (mean +/- SD). The male/female ratio was 2/3. Only 8 of 41 patients (19.5%) had one alpha-gene deletion, compared to the reported prevalence of 30% in African-Americans. None of the patients had two alpha-gene deletions, and two (5%) had five alpha-genes. These findings are different than those in our adult patients with SS, where the prevalence of -alpha/-alpha and alphaalphaalpha/alphaalpha is 4% and <2%, respectively. Ten different beta(S)-haplotypes were detected in the patients studied. The majority of the patients (31%) were doubly heterozygous for the Ben/CAR haplotypes followed by Ben/Ben, Ben/Sen, and CAR/CAR haplotypes, respectively. The prevalence of these haplotypes, with the exception of the CAR/CAR haplotype, was higher in females than males. All the patients with CAR/CAR haplotype were males, had four alpha-genes, and ranked third in prevalence. Three patients were heterozygous for the Cameron haplotype. The Cameron and atypical haplotypes were more prevalent than reported in patients with SS at large. The data suggest that CVA in children seems to occur more frequently in females and in patients with certain beta(S) haplotype. alpha-Gene deletion seems to offer a protective effect against this complication. Neonates with four or more alpha-genes whose beta(S) haplotype is Ben/CAR, atypical, or CAR/CAR seem to be at a higher risk for CAV than other patients. A prospective

  3. FACTOR V LEIDEN AND ISCHEMIC STROKE RISK: THE GENETICS OF EARLY ONSET STROKE (GEOS) STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Hamedani, Ali G.; Cole, John W.; Cheng, Yuching; Sparks, Mary J.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Stine, Oscar C.; Wozniak, Marcella A.; Stern, Barney J.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Kittner, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose Factor V Leiden (FVL) has been associated with ischemic stroke in children, but not in adults. Although the FVL mutation is associated with increased risk for venous thrombosis, its association with ischemic stroke in young adults remains uncertain. Therefore, we examined the association between FVL and ischemic stroke in participants of the Genetics of Early Onset Stroke (GEOS) Study. Methods A population-based case-control study identified 354 women and 476 men aged 15–49 years with first-ever ischemic stroke, and 907 controls. Participant-specific data included vascular risk factors, FVL genotype and, for cases, the ischemic stroke subtype by modified TOAST criteria. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios for the entire population and for subgroups stratified by risk factors and ischemic stroke subtype. Results The frequency of the FVL mutation was similar between ischemic stroke patients (3.6%, 95% CI: 2.5%–5.1%) and non-stroke controls (3.8%, 95% CI: 2.7%–5.2%). This frequency did not change significantly when cases were restricted to patients with stroke of undetermined etiology (4.1%, 95% CI: 2.6%–6.4%). Conclusions Among young adults, we found no evidence for an association between Factor V Leiden and either all ischemic stroke or the subgroup with stroke of undetermined etiology. PMID:22100829

  4. Rehabilitation approaches to stroke.

    PubMed

    Aichner, F; Adelwöhrer, C; Haring, H P

    2002-01-01

    This article describes the state of the science in stroke rehabilitation dealing with three main topics: (1) General approach to stroke rehabilitation (stroke services and stroke units), (2) Neurophysiological and pharmacological interventions (facilitation of brain repair mechanisms) and (3) Experimental approaches (neuronal transplantation). Stroke rehabilitation is an active process beginning during acute hospitalisation, progressing to a systematic program of rehabilitation services and continuing after the individual returns to the community. There is world-wide consensus that stroke patients should be treated at specialised stroke unit with specially trained medical and nursing staff, co-ordinated multidisciplinary rehabilitation and education programs for patients and their families. Stroke Unit has been shown to be associated with a long-term reduction of death and of the combined poor outcomes of death and dependency, independent of patients age, sex, or variations in stroke unit organisations. No study has clearly shown to what extent the beneficial effect is due to specific rehabilitation strategies. New imaging studies in stroke patients indicate altered post stroke activation patterns, which suggest some functional reorganisation. Reorganisation may be the principle process responsible for recovery after stroke. It is assumed that different post ischaemic interventions like physiotherapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy, electrical stimulation, etc. facilitates such changes. Scientific evidence demonstrating the values of specific rehabilitation interventions after stroke is limited. Comparisons between different methods in current use have so far mostly failed to show that any particular physiotherapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy or stroke rehabilitation strategy is superior to another. Clinical data are strongly in favour of early mobilisation and training. Pharmacological interventions in animals revealed that norepinephrine

  5. Risk of Stroke in Patients With Spontaneous Pneumothorax: A Nationwide, Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ching-Yuan; Yeh, Diana Yu-Wung; Lin, Cheng-Li; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-04-01

    The association between spontaneous pneumothorax (SP) and stroke has not been reported, and this study aimed to explore this association. We used the National Health Insurance Research Database for conducting a nationwide, population-based, retrospective cohort study of patients newly hospitalized for SP from 2000 to 2010. A total of 2541 patients with newly diagnosed SP were included and compared with patients without SP. We observed that patients with SP were at higher risk for developing stroke, with an adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of 1.56. In addition, these patients had a significantly higher risk of hemorrhagic stroke (adjusted HR = 2.22) than of ischemic stroke (adjusted HR = 1.48). The risk of stroke was the highest in the initial 4 months after hospitalization for SP (adjusted HR = 3.41, 95% confidence interval = 1.98-5.87). In conclusion, our study revealed a correlation between stroke and a history of SP, and the risk of stroke after SP was time sensitive.

  6. Changes in serum growth factors in stroke rehabilitation patients and their relation to hemiparesis improvement.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Hideto; Beppu, Hidehiko; Mizutani, Kenmei; Okamoto, Sayaka; Sonoda, Shigeru

    2014-07-01

    Predicting recovery from hemiparesis after stroke is important for rehabilitation. A few recent studies reported that the levels of some growth factors shortly after stroke were positively correlated with the clinical outcomes during the chronic phase. The aim of this study was to examine the relationships between the serum levels of growth factors (vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF], insulin-like growth factor-I [IGF-I], and hepatocyte growth factor [HGF]) and improvement in hemiparesis in stroke patients who received rehabilitation in a postacute rehabilitation hospital. Subjects were 32 stroke patients (cerebral infarction: 21 and intracerebral hemorrhage [ICH]: 11). We measured serum levels of VEGF, IGF-I, and HGF and 5 items of the Stroke Impairment Assessment Set (SIAS) for hemiparesis on admission and at discharge. Age-matched healthy subjects (n=15) served as controls. Serum levels of VEGF and HGF in cerebral infarct patients on admission were higher than those in control subjects, and the serum levels of IGF-I in stroke patients were lower than those in controls. The level of HGF in ICH patients on admission was negatively correlated with gains in SIAS, and higher outliers in HGF concentration were correlated with lower gains in SIAS. Focusing on the extremely high levels of these factors may be a predictor of the low recovery from hemiparesis after stroke.

  7. Twenty four hour pulse pressure predicts long term recurrence in acute stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Tsivgoulis, G; Spengos, K; Zakopoulos, N; Manios, E; Xinos, K; Vassilopoulos, D; Vemmos, K

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: The impact of different blood pressure (BP) components during the acute stage of stroke on the risk of recurrent stroke is controversial. The present study aimed to investigate by 24 hour BP monitoring a possible association between acute BP values and long term recurrence. Methods: A total of 339 consecutive patients with first ever acute stroke underwent 24 hour BP monitoring within 24 hours of ictus. Known stroke risk factors and clinical findings on admission were documented. Patients given antihypertensive medication during BP monitoring were excluded. The outcome of interest during the one year follow up was recurrent stroke. The Cox proportional hazard model was used to analyse association of casual and 24 hour BP recordings with one year recurrence after adjusting for stroke risk factors, baseline clinical characteristics, and secondary prevention therapies. Results: The cumulative one year recurrence rate was 9.2% (95% CI 5.9% to 12.3%). Multivariate Cox regression analyses revealed age, diabetes mellitus, and 24 hour pulse pressure (PP) as the only significant predictors for stroke recurrence. The relative risk for one year recurrence associated with every 10 mm Hg increase in 24 hour PP was 1.323 (95% CI 1.019 to 1.718, p = 0.036). Higher casual PP levels were significantly related to an increased risk of one year recurrence on univariate analysis, but not in the multivariate Cox regression model. Conclusions: Elevated 24 hour PP levels in patients with acute stroke are independently associated with higher risk of long term recurrence. Further research is required to investigate whether the risk of recurrent stroke can be reduced to a greater extent by decreasing the pulsatile component of BP in patients with acute stroke. PMID:16170077

  8. Maternal hypertension programs increased cerebral tissue damage following stroke in adult offspring.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Nicole M; Jin, Albert Y; Tse, M Yat; Peterson, Nichole T; Andrew, R David; Mewburn, Jeffrey D; Pang, Stephen C

    2015-10-01

    The maternal system is challenged with many physiological changes throughout pregnancy to prepare the body to meet the metabolic needs of the fetus and for delivery. Many pregnancies, however, are faced with pathological stressors or complications that significantly impact maternal health. A shift in this paradigm is now beginning to investigate the implication of pregnancy complications on the fetus and their continued influence on offspring disease risk into adulthood. In this investigation, we sought to determine whether maternal hypertension during pregnancy alters the cerebral response of adult offspring to acute ischemic stroke. Atrial natriuretic peptide gene-disrupted (ANP(-/-)) mothers exhibit chronic hypertension that escalates during pregnancy. Through comparison of heterozygote offspring born from either normotensive (ANP(+/-WT)) or hypertensive (ANP(+/-KO)) mothers, we have demonstrated that offspring exposed to maternal hypertension exhibit larger cerebral infarct volumes following middle cerebral artery occlusion. Observation of equal baseline cardiovascular measures, cerebrovascular structure, and cerebral blood volumes between heterozygote offspring suggests no added influences on offspring that would contribute to adverse cerebral response post-stroke. Cerebral mRNA expression of endothelin and nitric oxide synthase vasoactive systems demonstrated up-regulation of Et-1 and Nos3 in ANP(+/-KO) mice and thus an enhanced acute vascular response compared to ANP(+/-WT) counterparts. Gene expression of Na(+)/K(+) ATPase channel isoforms, Atp1a1, Atp1a3, and Atp1b1, displayed no significant differences. These investigations are the first to demonstrate a fetal programming effect between maternal hypertension and adult offspring stroke outcome. Further mechanistic studies are required to complement epidemiological evidence of this phenomenon in the literature. PMID:26169981

  9. Effect of educational television commercial on pre-hospital delay in patients with ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Nishijima, Haruo; Kon, Tomoya; Ueno, Tatsuya; Haga, Rie; Yamazaki, Keishi; Yagihashi, Kei; Funamizu, Yukihisa; Arai, Akira; Suzuki, Chieko; Nunomura, Jin-ichi; Baba, Masayuki; Tomiyama, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    Administering intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-tPA) within 4.5 h or endovascular procedures within 8 h of ischemic stroke onset may reduce the risk of disability. The effectiveness of media campaigns to raise stroke awareness and shorten pre-hospital delay is unclear. We studied 1144 consecutive ischemic stroke patients at Aomori Prefectural Central Hospital, Japan, between March 2010 and February 2014. From March 2012, the government sponsored an educational campaign based on a television commercial to improve knowledge of stroke symptoms and encourage ambulance calls for facial palsy, arm palsy, or speech disturbance. For the 544 and 600 patients admitted before and during the intervention, respectively, we recorded the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, stroke type, the time when patients or bystanders recognized stroke symptoms, and hospital arrival time. Pre-hospital delay, as the time interval from awareness of stroke to hospital arrival, was categorized as 0-3, 3-6, and 6+ h. The mean pre-hospital delay was shorter (12.0 vs 13.5 h; P = 0.0067), the proportion of patients arriving within 3 h was larger (55.7 vs 46.5 %; P = 0.0021), and the proportion arriving after 6 h was smaller (32.7 vs 39.5 %; P = 0.0162) in the intervention group than in the pre-intervention group. There was no significant difference in the proportion of patients treated with r-tPA (6 and 7.5 % of the intervention and pre-intervention groups, respectively). A television-based public education campaign potentially reduced pre-hospital delay for ischemic stroke patients, but the r-tPA treatment rate was unchanged.

  10. Oral anticoagulation in elderly patients as secondary prevention of cardioembolic strokes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Stroke incidence increases with age. Atrial fibrillation (AF) is an important risk factor for ischemic stroke and its incidence also increases with age. However oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT) tends to be underused in the elderly population. Methods Elderly patients (> = 80 years) with an ischemic stroke admitted in our department between 1/7/2003 and 31/6/2005 were prospectively evaluated. Baseline characteristics, risk factors, treatment and etiology according to TOAST criteria were recorded. Patients treated with OAT were followed up in order to assess any side effect and stroke recurrence. Mean follow-up was of 19.5 months (7-45) from discharge. Results Sixty four out of a hundred and fifty nine elderly patients (40.25%) were classified as cardioembolic; mean age was 84.5 years (80-97) and 64.6% were women. AF had been previously identified in 60% of them (16.9% were on OAT and 40.6% on antiplatelet therapy). At discharge, 32 patients (49.2%) were on OAT. In the follow-up 4 patients (12.5%) suffered systemic haemorrhages (3 urinary, 1 gastrointestinal bleeding), with no change in their functional status. Mean INR in this group was 5.9 [3-11] and, in 3 of them, OAT was cancelled. No brain haemorrhages were recorded. Ischemic stroke recurred in 4 patients (INR < 1.8 in 3 of them; the other, INR 2.35). Three patients had died at the end of the follow-up, one of them as a consequence of ischemic stroke recurrence. Discussion Twenty eight point eight of stroke patients admitted in the period of study were >80 years. The high proportion of cardioembolic strokes in this age segment contrasts with the general underuse of OAT as antithrombotic prophylaxis. Our study suggests that OAT is a safe strategy when carefully prescribed, even for elderly patients. PMID:20525389

  11. TimeSpan: Using Visualization to Explore Temporal Multi-dimensional Data of Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Loorak, Mona Hosseinkhani; Perin, Charles; Kamal, Noreen; Hill, Michael; Carpendale, Sheelagh

    2016-01-01

    We present TimeSpan, an exploratory visualization tool designed to gain a better understanding of the temporal aspects of the stroke treatment process. Working with stroke experts, we seek to provide a tool to help improve outcomes for stroke victims. Time is of critical importance in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke patients. Every minute that the artery stays blocked, an estimated 1.9 million neurons and 12 km of myelinated axons are destroyed. Consequently, there is a critical need for efficiency of stroke treatment processes. Optimizing time to treatment requires a deep understanding of interval times. Stroke health care professionals must analyze the impact of procedures, events, and patient attributes on time-ultimately, to save lives and improve quality of life after stroke. First, we interviewed eight domain experts, and closely collaborated with two of them to inform the design of TimeSpan. We classify the analytical tasks which a visualization tool should support and extract design goals from the interviews and field observations. Based on these tasks and the understanding gained from the collaboration, we designed TimeSpan, a web-based tool for exploring multi-dimensional and temporal stroke data. We describe how TimeSpan incorporates factors from stacked bar graphs, line charts, histograms, and a matrix visualization to create an interactive hybrid view of temporal data. From feedback collected from domain experts in a focus group session, we reflect on the lessons we learned from abstracting the tasks and iteratively designing TimeSpan.

  12. Impact of female gender on prognosis in type 2 diabetic patients with ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Arboix, Adrià; Milian, Manel; Oliveres, Montserrat; García-Eroles, Luís; Massons, Juan

    2006-01-01

    This study assessed gender differences in diabetic patients with ischemic stroke with respect to vascular risk factors, clinical features and early outcome. Ischemic stroke was diagnosed in 261 diabetic women and 300 diabetic men of 2,446 ischemic stroke patients included in a prospective stroke registry over 17 years. Mean +/- SD age was 77.5 +/- 8.3 years in women and 71.8 +/- 9.7 years in men (p < 0.021). Risk factors for stroke including hypertension, atrial fibrillation, congestive heart failure and valvular heart disease were significantly more common in women. Cardioembolic infarction occurred in 29.5% of women and 15.3% of men (p < 0.001), and lacunar stroke in 40.3% of men and 29.9% of women (p < 0.006). In-hospital mortality was 14.9% in diabetic women, and 8.3% in diabetic men (p < 0.02). After multivariate analysis, congestive heart failure (OR = 4.59), frontal lobe involvement (OR = 2.67), hypertension (OR = 1.62) and age were independent variables for ischemic stroke in diabetic women. Diabetic women had a poor prognosis, which may be due to differences in age, comorbidity and stroke subtype distribution.

  13. Lifetime risk of stroke and impact of hypertension: estimates from the adult health study in Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Ikuno; Geyer, Susan M; Nishi, Nobuo; Ohshita, Tomohiko; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Akahoshi, Masazumi; Fujiwara, Saeko; Kodama, Kazunori; Matsumoto, Masayasu

    2011-05-01

    Very few reports have been published on lifetime risk (LTR) of stroke by blood pressure (BP) group. This study included participants in the Radiation Effects Research Foundation Adult Health Study who have been followed up by biennial health examinations since 1958. We calculated the LTR of stroke for various BP-based groups among 7847 subjects who had not been diagnosed with stroke before the index age of 55 years using cumulative incidence analysis adjusting for competing risks. By 2003, 868 subjects had suffered stroke (512 (58.9%) were women and 542 (62.4%) experienced ischemic stroke). BP was a significant factor in determining risk of stroke for men and women, with distributions of cumulative risk for stroke significantly different across BP groups. The LTR of all-stroke for normotension (systolic BP/diastolic BP < 120/80 mm Hg), prehypertension (120-139/80-89 mm Hg), stage 1 hypertension (140-159/90-99 mm Hg) and stage 2 hypertension (> 160/100 mm Hg) were 13.8-16.9-25.8-25.8% in men and 16.0-19.9-24.0-30.5% in women, respectively (P < 0.001 among BP groups in both sexes). The estimates did not differ significantly (P = 0.16) between normotensive and prehypertensive subjects. One in five Japanese atomic bomb survivor subjects experienced stroke over their lifetime from the age of 55 years. Long-term stroke risks were elevated in those with hypertension (> 140/90 mm Hg) at any of the index ages of 45, 55, 65 and 75 years.

  14. Lifetime risk of stroke and impact of hypertension: estimates from the adult health study in Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Ikuno; Geyer, Susan M; Nishi, Nobuo; Ohshita, Tomohiko; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Akahoshi, Masazumi; Fujiwara, Saeko; Kodama, Kazunori; Matsumoto, Masayasu

    2011-05-01

    Very few reports have been published on lifetime risk (LTR) of stroke by blood pressure (BP) group. This study included participants in the Radiation Effects Research Foundation Adult Health Study who have been followed up by biennial health examinations since 1958. We calculated the LTR of stroke for various BP-based groups among 7847 subjects who had not been diagnosed with stroke before the index age of 55 years using cumulative incidence analysis adjusting for competing risks. By 2003, 868 subjects had suffered stroke (512 (58.9%) were women and 542 (62.4%) experienced ischemic stroke). BP was a significant factor in determining risk of stroke for men and women, with distributions of cumulative risk for stroke significantly different across BP groups. The LTR of all-stroke for normotension (systolic BP/diastolic BP < 120/80 mm Hg), prehypertension (120-139/80-89 mm Hg), stage 1 hypertension (140-159/90-99 mm Hg) and stage 2 hypertension (> 160/100 mm Hg) were 13.8-16.9-25.8-25.8% in men and 16.0-19.9-24.0-30.5% in women, respectively (P < 0.001 among BP groups in both sexes). The estimates did not differ significantly (P = 0.16) between normotensive and prehypertensive subjects. One in five Japanese atomic bomb survivor subjects experienced stroke over their lifetime from the age of 55 years. Long-term stroke risks were elevated in those with hypertension (> 140/90 mm Hg) at any of the index ages of 45, 55, 65 and 75 years. PMID:21326305

  15. Antithrombotic Treatments for Stroke Prevention in Elderly Patients With Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation: Drugs and Doses.

    PubMed

    Kilickap, Mustafa; Bosch, Jackie; Eikelboom, John W; Hart, Robert G

    2016-09-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common cardiac rhythm disturbance and is associated with a 5-fold increased risk of stroke. The most important risk factors for stroke in patients with AF are previous stroke and age ≥ 75 years. Canadian guidelines recommend anticoagulant therapy for patients with AF who are older than the age of 65 years, but the elderly often remain undertreated, primarily because of concerns regarding bleeding. Non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants appear to be safer, at least as efficacious, and more convenient than warfarin, and are a cost-effective alternative for elderly patients with AF. We review the evidence for the use of antithrombotic agents for stroke prevention in elderly patients (age ≥ 75 years) with nonvalvular AF. PMID:27568871

  16. Hypertension and Stroke in Patients with Left Ventricular Assist Devices (LVADs).

    PubMed

    Willey, Joshua Z; Boehme, Amelia K; Castagna, Francesco; Yuzefpolskaya, Melana; Garan, A Reshad; Topkara, Veli; Colombo, Paolo C

    2016-02-01

    Stroke is one of the most dreaded complications of left ventricular assist device therapy in patients with end-stage congestive heart failure. There is strong evidence linking anticoagulation and infection with ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes, though recent data has emerged regarding the importance of elevated blood pressure. In the recently completed Heartware Ventricular Assist Device studies, a mean arterial pressure greater than 90 mmHg was associated with greater stroke risk, particularly the hemorrhagic subtype. In this review, we discuss recent evidence regarding deleterious effects of uncontrolled hypertension in patients with left ventricular devices, and propose measurement and management strategies.

  17. [NDT-Bobath method used in the rehabilitation of patients with a history of ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Klimkiewicz, Paulina; Kubsik, Anna; Woldańska-Okońska, Marta

    2012-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is the third leading cause of death and disability in human. The vitally important problem after ischemic stroke is hemiparesis of the body. The most common methods used in improving the mobility of patients after ischemic stroke is a Bobath-NDT (Neuro-Developmental Treatment - Bobath), which initiated the Berta and Karel Bobath for children with cerebral palsy. It is a method designed to neurophysiological recovery of these vital functions that the patient was lost due to illness, and wants it back. PMID:23289255

  18. Use of APACHE II and SAPS II to predict mortality for hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Moon, Byeong Hoo; Park, Sang Kyu; Jang, Dong Kyu; Jang, Kyoung Sool; Kim, Jong Tae; Han, Yong Min

    2015-01-01

    We studied the applicability of the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) and Simplified Acute Physiology Score II (SAPS II) in patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) with acute stroke and compared the results with the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). We also conducted a comparative study of accuracy for predicting hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke mortality. Between January 2011 and December 2012, ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke patients admitted to the ICU were included in the study. APACHE II and SAPS II-predicted mortalities were compared using a calibration curve, the Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit test, and the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, and the results were compared with the GCS and NIHSS. Overall 498 patients were included in this study. The observed mortality was 26.3%, whereas APACHE II and SAPS II-predicted mortalities were 35.12% and 35.34%, respectively. The mean GCS and NIHSS scores were 9.43 and 21.63, respectively. The calibration curve was close to the line of perfect prediction. The ROC curve showed a slightly better prediction of mortality for APACHE II in hemorrhagic stroke patients and SAPS II in ischemic stroke patients. The GCS and NIHSS were inferior in predicting mortality in both patient groups. Although both the APACHE II and SAPS II systems can be used to measure performance in the neurosurgical ICU setting, the accuracy of APACHE II in hemorrhagic stroke patients and SAPS II in ischemic stroke patients was superior.

  19. An International Standard Set of Patient-Centered Outcome Measures After Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Joel; Sprinkhuizen, Sara M.; Ackerson, Teri; Bernhardt, Julie; Davie, Charlie; George, Mary G.; Gething, Stephanie; Kelly, Adam G.; Lindsay, Patrice; Liu, Liping; Martins, Sheila C.O.; Morgan, Louise; Norrving, Bo; Ribbers, Gerard M.; Silver, Frank L.; Smith, Eric E.; Williams, Linda S.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose— Value-based health care aims to bring together patients and health systems to maximize the ratio of quality over cost. To enable assessment of healthcare value in stroke management, an international standard set of patient-centered stroke outcome measures was defined for use in a variety of healthcare settings. Methods— A modified Delphi process was implemented with an international expert panel representing patients, advocates, and clinical specialists in stroke outcomes, stroke registers, global health, epidemiology, and rehabilitation to reach consensus on the preferred outcome measures, included populations, and baseline risk adjustment variables. Results— Patients presenting to a hospital with ischemic stroke or intracerebral hemorrhage were selected as the target population for these recommendations, with the inclusion of transient ischemic attacks optional. Outcome categories recommended for assessment were survival and disease control, acute complications, and patient-reported outcomes. Patient-reported outcomes proposed for assessment at 90 days were pain, mood, feeding, selfcare, mobility, communication, cognitive functioning, social participation, ability to return to usual activities, and health-related quality of life, with mobility, feeding, selfcare, and communication also collected at discharge. One instrument was able to collect most patient-reported subdomains (9/16, 56%). Minimum data collection for risk adjustment included patient demographics, premorbid functioning, stroke type and severity, vascular and systemic risk factors, and specific treatment/care-related factors. Conclusions— A consensus stroke measure Standard Set was developed as a simple, pragmatic method to increase the value of stroke care. The set should be validated in practice when used for monitoring and comparisons across different care settings. PMID:26604251

  20. [The role of neuroprotection in complex rehabilitation of patients with ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Hubenia, O V

    2012-01-01

    In this review we considered some questions of early rehabilitation in ischemic stroke. Rehabilitation tactics such patients provides non-medical (treatment status, developmental kinesitherapy, early vertical integration and activation of the patient), and medications (antiplatelet, nootropic, antioxidant and vascular therapy) methods. It was examined the data on the pathogenesis of acute ischemia and the role of neuroprotection in early rehabilitation. We analyzed the rationale for the use of citicoline in the most acute period of stroke.

  1. Risk of epilepsy in stroke patients receiving acupuncture treatment: a nationwide retrospective matched-cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Shu-Wen; Liao, Chien-Chang; Yeh, Chun-Chieh; Chen, Ta-Liang; Lane, Hsin-Long; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Shih, Chun-Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the risk of epilepsy in stroke patients receiving and not receiving acupuncture treatment. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting This study was based on Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database that included information on stroke patients hospitalised between 1 January 2000 and 31 December 2004. Participants We identified 42 040 patients hospitalised with newly diagnosed stroke who were aged 20 years and above. Primary and secondary outcome measures We compared incident epilepsy during the follow-up period until the end of 2009 in stroke patients who were and were not receiving acupuncture. The adjusted HRs and 95% CIs of epilepsy associated with acupuncture were calculated using multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression. Results Stroke patients who received acupuncture treatment (9.8 per 1000 person-years) experienced a reduced incidence of epilepsy compared to those who did not receive acupuncture treatment (11.5 per 1000 person-years), with an HR of 0.74 (95% CI 0.68 to 0.80) after adjustment for sociodemographic factors and coexisting medical conditions. Acupuncture treatment was associated with a decreased risk of epilepsy, particularly among stroke patients aged 20–69 years. The log-rank test probability curve indicated that stroke patients receiving acupuncture treatment had a reduced probability of epilepsy compared with individuals who did not receive acupuncture treatment during the follow-up period (p<0.0001). Conclusions Stroke patients who received acupuncture treatment had a reduced risk of epilepsy compared with those not receiving acupuncture treatment. However, the protective effects associated with acupuncture treatment require further validation in prospective cohort studies. PMID:27412100

  2. Motivating arm-hand use for stroke patients by serious games.

    PubMed

    Delbressine, Frank; Timmermans, Annick; Beursgens, Luuk; de Jong, Maaike; van Dam, Alexander; Verweij, David; Janssen, Maikel; Markopoulos, Panos

    2012-01-01

    We present a novel technology to support playful rehabilitation of arm-hand performance for stroke survivors. The system combines tangible tabletop interaction with wearable technology, to encourage stroke patients to train their arm-hand skills in a task-oriented manner, while a jacket supporting tilt-sensing and vibrotactile feedback guides patients regarding the correct execution of exercises and specifically to avoid compensatory movements. We present the iterative client centered development of this technology and its on going development.

  3. Adjuvant Chinese Herbal Products for Preventing Ischemic Stroke in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Muo, Chih-Hsin; Chiu, Hsienhsueh Elley; Liu, Chun-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Objective Chinese herbal products (CHPs) are widely used for atrial fibrillation (AF) in Taiwan. We investigated the effect of adjuvant CHPs in preventing ischemic stroke in patients with AF. Methods Taiwanese patients in the Health Insurance Database newly diagnosed with AF during 2000–2011 were enrolled. Medication treatment with/without CHPs was administered within 7 days after the AF diagnosis. The clinical endpoint was an ischemic stroke. The Chi-square test, Fisher’s exact test, and Student t test were used to examine differences between the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and non-TCM cohorts. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to assess the risk for ischemic stroke between two cohorts. Results Three hundred and eleven patients underwent TCM treatment and 1715 patients did not. Compared to non-TCM users, TCM users had a lower incidence of stroke (12.59% vs. 1.93%, respectively) and lower risk of stroke [CHA2DS2-VASc score = 0–2 (hazard ratio = 0.20; 95% confidence interval = 0.06–0.65)]. Compared to non-TCM users, the stroke risk was significantly lower in TCM users with AF who were female or younger than 65 years, but not in males, people more than 65 years old, or people with comorbidities. Compared to TCM users, non-TCM users who received conventional treatment had a higher ischemic stroke risk. The risk for AF-related hospitalization was significantly lower in TCM users (0.64%) than in non-TCM users (38.1%). Conclusions Users of TCM with AF have a lower risk of new-onset ischemic stroke. Therefore, adjuvant CHP therapy may have a protective effect and may be used in AF patients to prevent ischemic stroke. PMID:27428543

  4. MRI of the pharynx in ischemic stroke patients with and without obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Devin L.; Bapuraj, J. Rajiv; Mukherji, Suresh K.; Chervin, Ronald D.; Concannon, Maryann; Helman, Joseph I.; Lisabeth, Lynda D.

    2010-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is common after stroke and associated with poor stroke outcomes. Whether OSA after acute stroke is caused by anatomic, physiologic, or both etiologies has not been studied. We therefore used brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans to assess oropharyngeal anatomy in stroke patients with and without OSA. Methods Patients within 7 days of ischemic stroke underwent nocturnal polysomnography. Sagittal T1-weighted MRI performed for clinical purposes was used to measure retropalatal distance, soft palatal length, soft palatal thickness, retroglossal space, and tongue length. Nasopharyngeal area and high retropharyngeal area were measured from axial T2-weighted images, and lateral pharyngeal wall thickness from coronal T1-weighted images. Results Among 27 subjects, 18 (67%) had OSA (apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) ≥5). Demographics, vascular risk factors, and stroke severity were similar in the two groups. Median retropalatal distance was shorter in subjects with OSA (Wilcoxon rank-sum test, p= 0.03). Shorter retropalatal distance was associated with higher AHI (linear regression, p=0.04). None of the other morphological characteristics differed. Conclusions Anatomic difference between awake acute stroke patients with and without OSA shows that the sleep disorder cannot be attributed solely to sleep, sleeping position, or changes in neuromuscular control that are specific to the sleep state. PMID:20466584

  5. Early Sitting in Ischemic Stroke Patients (SEVEL): A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Herisson, Fanny; Godard, Sophie; Volteau, Christelle; Le Blanc, Emilie; Guillon, Benoit; Gaudron, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Background Extended immobility has been associated with medical complications during hospitalization. However no clear recommendations are available for mobilization of ischemic stroke patients. Objective As early mobilization has been shown to be feasible and safe, we tested the hypothesis that early sitting could be beneficial to stroke patient outcome. Methods This prospective multicenter study tested two sitting procedures at the acute phase of ischemic stroke, in a randomized controlled fashion (clinicaltrials.org registration number NCT01573299). Patients were eligible if they were above 18 years of age and showed no sign of massive infarction or any contra-indication for sitting. In the early-sitting group, patients were seated out of bed at the earliest possible time but no later than one calendar day after stroke onset, whereas the progressively-sitting group was first seated out of bed on the third calendar day after stroke onset. Primary outcome measure was the proportion of patients with a modified Rankin score [0–2] at 3 months post stroke. Secondary outcome measures were a.) prevalence of medical complications, b.) length of hospital stay, and c.) tolerance to the procedure. Results One hundred sixty seven patients were included in the study, of which 29 were excluded after randomization. Data from 138 patients, 63 in the early-sitting group and 75 in the progressively-sitting group were analyzed. There was no difference regarding outcome of people with stroke, with a proportion of Rankin [0–2] score at 3 months of 76.2% and 77.3% of patients in the early- and progressive-sitting groups, respectively (p = 0.52). There was also no difference between groups for secondary outcome measures, and the procedure was well tolerated in both arms. Conclusion Due to a slow enrollment, fewer patients than anticipated were available for analysis. As a result, we can only detect beneficial/detrimental effects of +/- 15% of the early sitting procedure on stroke

  6. Diffusion tensor imaging studies on arcuate fasciculus in stroke patients: a review.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sung Ho

    2013-01-01

    Aphasia is one of the most common and devastating sequelae of stroke. The arcuate fasciculus (AF), an important neural tract for language function, connects Broca's and Wernicke's areas. In this review article, previous diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies on the AF in stroke patients were reviewed with regard to the usefulness for diagnosis (seven studies), prediction of prognosis (two studies), and recovery of aphasia (three studies). Although scant studies on this topic have been conducted in stroke patients, DTI for the AF appears to provide useful information on the presence or severity of injury of the AF, prognosis prediction of aphasia, and recovery mechanisms of aphasia in stroke patients. Therefore, further DTI studies on these topics should be encouraged, especially studies on prognosis prediction and recovery mechanisms of aphasia. In addition, research on other neural tracts known to be involved in aphasia as well as the AF in both hemispheres should be encouraged. PMID:24198780

  7. The correlation between muscle activity of the quadriceps and balance and gait in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dae Jung; Park, Seung Kyu; Uhm, Yo Han; Park, Sam Heon; Chun, Dong Whan; Kim, Je Ho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the correlation between quadriceps muscle activity and balance and gait in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Fifty-five stroke patients (30 males 25 females; mean age 58.7 years; stroke duration 4.82 months; Korean mini-mental state examination score 26.4) participated in this study. MP100 surface electromyography, BioRescue, and LUKOtronic were used to measure the quadriceps muscle activity, balance, and gait, respectively. [Results] There was a significant correlation between quadriceps muscle activity (vastus lateralis % reference voluntary contraction, vastus medialis % reference voluntary contraction) and balance (limits of stability) and gait (gait velocity) but there was none between vastus lateralis % reference voluntary contraction, vastus medialis % reference voluntary contraction. [Conclusion] An increase in quadriceps muscle activity will improve balance and gait ability. To improve function in stroke patients, training is needed to strengthen the quadriceps muscles.

  8. The correlation between muscle activity of the quadriceps and balance and gait in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dae Jung; Park, Seung Kyu; Uhm, Yo Han; Park, Sam Heon; Chun, Dong Whan; Kim, Je Ho

    2016-08-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the correlation between quadriceps muscle activity and balance and gait in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Fifty-five stroke patients (30 males 25 females; mean age 58.7 years; stroke duration 4.82 months; Korean mini-mental state examination score 26.4) participated in this study. MP100 surface electromyography, BioRescue, and LUKOtronic were used to measure the quadriceps muscle activity, balance, and gait, respectively. [Results] There was a significant correlation between quadriceps muscle activity (vastus lateralis % reference voluntary contraction, vastus medialis % reference voluntary contraction) and balance (limits of stability) and gait (gait velocity) but there was none between vastus lateralis % reference voluntary contraction, vastus medialis % reference voluntary contraction. [Conclusion] An increase in quadriceps muscle activity will improve balance and gait ability. To improve function in stroke patients, training is needed to strengthen the quadriceps muscles. PMID:27630416

  9. The correlation between muscle activity of the quadriceps and balance and gait in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dae Jung; Park, Seung Kyu; Uhm, Yo Han; Park, Sam Heon; Chun, Dong Whan; Kim, Je Ho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the correlation between quadriceps muscle activity and balance and gait in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Fifty-five stroke patients (30 males 25 females; mean age 58.7 years; stroke duration 4.82 months; Korean mini-mental state examination score 26.4) participated in this study. MP100 surface electromyography, BioRescue, and LUKOtronic were used to measure the quadriceps muscle activity, balance, and gait, respectively. [Results] There was a significant correlation between quadriceps muscle activity (vastus lateralis % reference voluntary contraction, vastus medialis % reference voluntary contraction) and balance (limits of stability) and gait (gait velocity) but there was none between vastus lateralis % reference voluntary contraction, vastus medialis % reference voluntary contraction. [Conclusion] An increase in quadriceps muscle activity will improve balance and gait ability. To improve function in stroke patients, training is needed to strengthen the quadriceps muscles. PMID:27630416

  10. Bilateral Anterior Opercular Syndrome With Partial Kluver-Bucy Syndrome in a Stroke Patient: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Cho, Ah-Ra; Lim, Young-Ho; Chung, Sae-Hoon; Choi, Eun-Hi; Lim, Jong Youb

    2016-06-01

    Bilateral anterior opercular syndrome and partial Kluver-Bucy syndrome are associated with bilateral middle cerebral artery lesions. The combination of these two syndromes has only been reported in a child with limbic encephalitis. In this case, a 44-year-old woman with bilateral middle cerebral artery infarction, which occurred 2 years prior, could walk independently. However, she showed automatic-voluntary dissociation and anarthria with preserved writing skills. She also presented hypersexuality, hypermetamorphosis, and memory disturbances. Here, we report a case of an adult stroke patient who suffered from bilateral anterior opercular syndrome accompanied by partial Kluver-Bucy syndrome. PMID:27446793

  11. Bilateral Anterior Opercular Syndrome With Partial Kluver–Bucy Syndrome in a Stroke Patient: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Bilateral anterior opercular syndrome and partial Kluver–Bucy syndrome are associated with bilateral middle cerebral artery lesions. The combination of these two syndromes has only been reported in a child with limbic encephalitis. In this case, a 44-year-old woman with bilateral middle cerebral artery infarction, which occurred 2 years prior, could walk independently. However, she showed automatic-voluntary dissociation and anarthria with preserved writing skills. She also presented hypersexuality, hypermetamorphosis, and memory disturbances. Here, we report a case of an adult stroke patient who suffered from bilateral anterior opercular syndrome accompanied by partial Kluver–Bucy syndrome. PMID:27446793

  12. [Eprosartan mesylate in controlling of blood pressure in patients with ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Martynov, M Iu; Boĭko, A N; Petukhov, E B; Berezov, V P; Maskarov, A N; Gusev, E I

    2002-01-01

    In 20 patients with ischemic stroke and moderate or severe arterial hypertension the effectiveness of eprosartan mesilat (Teveten, Solway Farma, Germany) for a period of 6 months was studied. Patients received 600 mg of eprosartan mesilat daily and in 4 cases hydrochlortyaside was also added. Monotherapy with eprosartan mesilat was effective in all patients with moderate arterial hypertension and in 43.6% in patients with severe arterial hypertension. Therapy with eprosartan mesilat was associated with significant hypotensive effect (more evident in patients with high systolic blood pressure), improvement in 24-hour blood pressure profile and quality of life, and lower probability of secondary stroke. Side effects were not observed.

  13. Impact of a Pilot Intervention to Increase Physician-Patient Communication About Stroke Risk in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Williams, Pamela A; Prabandari, Yayi S; Burfeind, Chelsea; Lefebvre, R Craig; LaBresh, Kenneth A

    2016-12-01

    In Indonesia, where stroke is the leading cause of death, we designed and tested a brief intervention to increase physician-patient conversations about stroke prevention in community health centers. The pilot study used a quasi-experimental design involving repeated cross-sectional data collection over 15 weeks to compare pre- and during-intervention differences within four centers. We conducted exit interviews with 675 patients immediately following their medical appointments to assess whether physicians discussed stroke risks and provided recommendations to modify their risk behaviors. From pre-intervention to during intervention, patients reported more frequent physician recommendations to modify their stroke risk behaviors. We also conducted interviews with eight providers (physicians and nurses) after the intervention to get their feedback on its implementation. This study demonstrated that a brief intervention to motivate physician-patient conversations about stroke prevention may improve these conversations in community health centers. While interventions to reduce risk hold considerable promise for reducing stroke burden, barriers to physician-patient conversations identified through this study need to be addressed.

  14. Problems and limitations in thrombolysis of acute stroke patients at a tertiary care center

    PubMed Central

    Gurav, Sushma K.; Zirpe, Kapil G.; Wadia, R. S.; Pathak, Manishprasad K.; Deshmukh, Abhijeet M.; Sonawane, Rahul V.; Goli, Nikhil

    2015-01-01

    Aim: (1) To evaluate the number of patients thrombolysed within 1 h of arrival to emergency room (ER) (2) To identify reasons for delay in thrombolysis of acute stroke patients. Materials and Methods: All patients admitted to ER with symptoms suggestive of stroke from January 2011 to November 2013 were studied. Retrospective data were collected to evaluate ER to needle (door to needle time [DTNt]) time and reasons for delay in thrombolysis. The parameters studied (1) onset of symptoms to ER time, (2) ER to imaging time (door to imaging time [DTIt]), (4) ER to needle time (door to needle) and (5) contraindications for thrombolysis. Results: A total of 695 patients with suspected stroke were admitted during study period. 547 (78%) patients were out of window period. 148 patients (21%, M = 104, F = 44) arrived within window period (<4.5 h.). 104 (70.27%) were contraindicated for thrombolysis. Majority were intracerebral bleeds. 44 (29.7%) were eligible for thrombolysis. 7 (15.9%) were thrombolysed within 1 h. The mean time for arrival of patients from onset of symptoms to hospital (symptom to door) 83 min (median - 47). The mean door to neuro-physician time (DTPt) was 32 min (median - 15 min). The mean DTIt was 58 min (median - 50 min). The mean DTNt 104 (median - 100 min). Conclusion: Reasons for delay in thrombolysis are: Absence of stroke education program for common people. Lack of priority for triage and imaging for stroke patients. PMID:25983432

  15. Program to Diagnose Probability of Aspiration Pneumonia in Patients with Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Gisele; Zétola, Viviane; Lange, Marcos; Gomes, Guilherme; Nunes, Maria Cristina; Hirata, Gisela; Lagos-Guimarães, Hellen Nataly

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Stroke is a major cause of death and disability worldwide, with a strong economic and social impact. Approximately 40% of patients show motor, language, and swallowing disorders after stroke. Objective To evaluate the use of software to infer the probability of pneumonia in patients with ischemic stroke. Methods Prospective and cross-sectional study conducted in a university hospital from March 2010 to August 2012. After confirmation of ischemic stroke by computed axial tomography, a clinical and flexible endoscopic evaluation of swallowing was performed within 72 hours of onset of symptoms. All patients received speech therapy poststroke, and the data were subsequently analyzed by the software. The patients were given medical treatment and speech therapy for 3 months. Results The study examined 52 patients with a mean age of 62.05 ± 13.88 years, with 23 (44.2%) women. Of the 52 patients, only 3 (5.7%) had a probability of pneumonia between 80 and 100% as identified by the software. Of all patients, 32 (61.7%) had pneumonia probability between 0 and 19%, 5 (9.5%) between 20 and 49%, 3 (5.8%) between 50 and 79%, and 12 (23.0%) between 80 and 100%. Conclusion The computer program indicates the probability of patient having aspiration pneumonia after ischemic stroke. PMID:25992100

  16. Responsiveness of the Berg Balance Scale in patients early after stroke.

    PubMed

    Saso, Adam; Moe-Nilssen, Rolf; Gunnes, Mari; Askim, Torunn

    2016-05-01

    The Berg Balance Scale (BBS) has previously shown good measurement properties. However, its ability to detect important change in patients early after stroke is still unknown. The purpose of the present study was to determine the minimal important change (MIC) and its relation to the minimal detectable change (MDC) for BBS in patients early after stroke. This prospective follow-up study included patients within the first 2 weeks after onset of stroke. The BBS, Barthel Index, and Scandinavian Stroke Scale were obtained at inclusion and 1 month later. At the follow-up assessment, the Patient Global Impression of Change was obtained. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to calculate the cut-off value for the MIC. Fifty-two patients (mean age of 78.7, SD 8.5 years) were included. All measures showed a significant improvement from baseline to follow-up. The ROC analysis identified a MIC of ≥6 BBS points, while the MDC was 5.97 BBS points at the 80% confidence level. This study shows that a change of 6 BBS point or more can be considered an important change for patients in the sub-acute phase after stroke, which also represents an 80% probability of exceeding the measurement error. A total of 80% of unchanged patients would display random fluctuations within the bounds of MDC80, while 20% of unchanged patients would exceed MDC80. PMID:27253334

  17. Effects of DRG-based hospital payment in Poland on treatment of patients with stroke.

    PubMed

    Bystrov, Victor; Staszewska-Bystrova, Anna; Rutkowski, Daniel; Hermanowski, Tomasz

    2015-08-01

    A prospective payment system based on Diagnosis Related Groups (DRGs) presents strong financial incentives to healthcare providers. These incentives may have intended as well as unintended consequences for the healthcare system. In this paper we use administrative data on stroke admissions to Polish hospitals in order to demonstrate the response of hospitals to the incentives embedded in the design of stroke-related groups in Poland. The design was intended to motivate hospitals for the development of specialized stroke units by paying significantly higher tariffs for treatment of patients in these units. As a result, an extensive network of stroke units has emerged. However, as it is shown in the paper, there is no evidence that outcomes in hospitals with stroke units are significantly different from outcomes in hospitals without stroke units. It is also demonstrated that the reliance on the length of stay as a major grouping variable provides incentives for regrouping patients into more expensive groups by extending their length of stay in stroke units. The results of the study are limited by the incompleteness of the casemix data. There is a need to develop information and audit systems which would further inform a revision of the DRG system aimed to reduce the risk of regrouping and up-coding. PMID:26008985

  18. Correlates of the incidence of disability and mortality among older adult Brazilians with and without diabetes mellitus and stroke

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The combined effect of diabetes and stroke on disability and mortality remains largely unexplored in Brazil and Latin America. Previous studies have been based primarily on data from developed countries. This study addresses the empirical gap by evaluating the combined impact of diabetes and stroke on disability and mortality in Brazil. Methods The sample was drawn from two waves of the Survey on Health and Well-being of the Elderly, which followed 2,143 older adults in São Paulo, Brazil, from 2000 to 2006. Disability was assessed via measures of activities of daily living (ADL) limitations, severe ADL limitations, and receiving assistance to perform these activities. Logistic and multinomial regression models controlling for sociodemographic and health conditions were used to address the influence of diabetes and stroke on disability and mortality. Results By itself, the presence of diabetes did not increase the risk of disability or the need for assistance; however, diabetes was related to increased risks when assessed in combination with stroke. After controlling for demographic, social and health conditions, individuals who had experienced stroke but not diabetes were 3.4 times more likely to have ADL limitations than those with neither condition (95% CI 2.26-5.04). This elevated risk more than doubled for those suffering from a combination of diabetes and stroke (OR 7.34, 95% CI 3.73-14.46). Similar effects from the combination of diabetes and stroke were observed for severe ADL limitations (OR 19.75, 95% CI 9.81- 39.76) and receiving ADL assistance (OR 16.57, 95% CI 8.39-32.73). Over time, older adults who had experienced a stroke were at higher risk of remaining disabled (RRR 4.28, 95% CI 1.53,11.95) and of mortality (RRR 3.42, 95% CI 1.65,7.09). However, risks were even higher for those who had experienced both diabetes and stroke. Diabetes was associated with higher mortality. Conclusions Findings indicate that a combined history of stroke and

  19. Memory Loss, Dementia, and Stroke: Implications for Rehabilitation of Older Adults with Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Mary

    2008-01-01

    Older adults with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are not immune to the other diseases of aging. Although AMD is the leading cause of low vision in older Americans, stroke is the leading cause of disability, and dementias affect another 2.5 million older Americans. Each condition alone can significantly impair a person's ability to…

  20. Impact of a Home Leisure Educational Program for Older Adults Who Have Had a Stroke (Home Leisure Educational Program).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nour, Kareen; Desrosiers, Johanne; Gauthier, Pierre; Carbonneau, Helene

    2002-01-01

    Examined the effectiveness of leisure education for older adults having difficulty adjusting psychologically after a stroke. Participants received either an experimental home leisure education program (intervention group) or a friendly home visit (control group) after discharge from rehabilitation. The intervention group performed significantly…

  1. ERP correlates of word production before and after stroke in an aphasic patient.

    PubMed

    Laganaro, Marina; Morand, Stéphanie; Michel, Christoph M; Spinelli, Laurent; Schnider, Armin

    2011-02-01

    Changes in brain activity characterizing impaired speech production after brain damage have usually been investigated by comparing aphasic speakers with healthy subjects because prestroke data are normally not available. However, when interpreting the results of studies of stroke patients versus healthy controls, there is an inherent difficulty in disentangling the contribution of neuropathology from other sources of between-subject variability. In the present work, we had an unusual opportunity to study an aphasic patient with severe anomia who had incidentally performed a picture naming task in an ERP study as a control subject one year before suffering a left hemisphere stroke. The fortuitous recording of this patient's brain activity before his stroke allows direct comparison of his pre- and poststroke brain activity in the same language production task. The subject did not differ from other healthy subjects before his stroke, but presented major electrophysiological differences after stroke, both in comparison to himself before stroke and to the control group. ERP changes consistently appeared after stroke in a specific time window starting about 250 msec after picture onset, characterized by a single divergent but stable topographic configuration of the scalp electric field associated with a cortical generator abnormally limited to left temporal posterior perilesional areas. The patient's pattern of anomia revealed a severe lexical-phonological impairment and his ERP responses diverged from those of healthy controls in the time window that has previously been associated with lexical-phonological processes during picture naming. Given that his prestroke ERPs were indistinguishable from those of healthy controls, it seems highly likely that the change in his poststroke ERPs is due to changes in language production processes as a consequence of stroke. The patient's neurolinguistic deficits, combined with the ERPs results, provide unique evidence for the role of

  2. Effects of computer assisted cognitive rehabilitation on brain wave, memory and attention of stroke patients: a randomized control trial

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hwi-Young; Kim, Ki-Tae; Jung, Jin-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated brain wave, memory and attention changes in adult stroke patients using computer assisted cognitive rehabilitation (CACR). [Subjects] Twenty-five stroke patients were randomly allocated to either the CACR group (n=12) or the control group (n=13). [Methods] Two expert therapists provided the CACR group and the control group with traditional rehabilitation therapy in 30-minute sessions, semi-weekly, for 6 weeks. CACR was provided only to the CACR group. The control group received traditional rehabilitation therapy only. Before and after the 6 weeks of intervention, electroencephalography (EEG) and a computerized neurocognitive function test (CNT) were performed, and the results were analyzed. [Results] After the intervention, the CACR group showed significant differences in the frontal lobe (Fp1, Fp2, and F4) and in the parietal lobe (P3 and P4), and also showed significant differences in CNT memory (DST and VST forward/backward test) and attention (VCPT correct responses), but no notable changes were observed in the control group. [Conclusion] These results suggest that CACR is feasible and suitable for individuals with stroke. Detailed and diverse investigations should be performed considering the numbers and characteristics of subjects, and the limitations affecting the CACR training period. PMID:25995548

  3. The State-of-the-Science on Somatosensory Function and Its Impact on Daily Life in Adults and Older Adults, and Following Stroke: A Scoping Review.

    PubMed

    Carey, Leeanne M; Lamp, Gemma; Turville, Megan

    2016-04-01

    The aim was to identify and synthesize research evidence about how adults and older adults process somatosensory information in daily activities, and the interventions available to regain somatosensory function following stroke. We developed two interacting concept maps to address the research questions. The scoping review was conducted from 2005 to 2015 across Web of Science, AMED, CINAHL, Embase, Medline, and PsychInfo databases. Search terms included somatosensory, perception, performance, participation, older adult, stroke, intervention, discrimination, learning, and neuroplasticity. Contributions from 103 articles for Concept 1 and 14 articles for Concept 2 are reported. Measures of somatosensory processing, performance, and participation used are identified. Interventions available to treat somatosensory loss are summarized in relation to approach, outcome measures, and theory/mechanisms underlying. A gap exists in the current understanding of how somatosensory function affects the daily lives of adults. A multidisciplinary approach that includes performance and participation outcomes is recommended to advance the field.

  4. The State-of-the-Science on Somatosensory Function and Its Impact on Daily Life in Adults and Older Adults, and Following Stroke: A Scoping Review.

    PubMed

    Carey, Leeanne M; Lamp, Gemma; Turville, Megan

    2016-04-01

    The aim was to identify and synthesize research evidence about how adults and older adults process somatosensory information in daily activities, and the interventions available to regain somatosensory function following stroke. We developed two interacting concept maps to address the research questions. The scoping review was conducted from 2005 to 2015 across Web of Science, AMED, CINAHL, Embase, Medline, and PsychInfo databases. Search terms included somatosensory, perception, performance, participation, older adult, stroke, intervention, discrimination, learning, and neuroplasticity. Contributions from 103 articles for Concept 1 and 14 articles for Concept 2 are reported. Measures of somatosensory processing, performance, and participation used are identified. Interventions available to treat somatosensory loss are summarized in relation to approach, outcome measures, and theory/mechanisms underlying. A gap exists in the current understanding of how somatosensory function affects the daily lives of adults. A multidisciplinary approach that includes performance and participation outcomes is recommended to advance the field. PMID:27504989

  5. What Do Stroke Patients Look for in Game-Based Rehabilitation: A Survey Study.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ya-Xuan; Huang, Pei-Chen; Chen, Kuan-Ta; Chu, Woei-Chyn

    2016-03-01

    Stroke is one of the most common causes of physical disability, and early, intensive, and repetitive rehabilitation exercises are crucial to the recovery of stroke survivors. Unfortunately, research shows that only one third of stroke patients actually perform recommended exercises at home, because of the repetitive and mundane nature of conventional rehabilitation exercises. Thus, to motivate stroke survivors to engage in monotonous rehabilitation is a significant issue in the therapy process. Game-based rehabilitation systems have the potential to encourage patients continuing rehabilitation exercises at home. However, these systems are still rarely adopted at patients' places. Discovering and eliminating the obstacles in promoting game-based rehabilitation at home is therefore essential. For this purpose, we conducted a study to collect and analyze the opinions and expectations of stroke patients and clinical therapists. The study is composed of 2 parts: Rehab-preference survey - interviews to both patients and therapists to understand the current practices, challenges, and expectations on game-based rehabilitation systems; and Rehab-compatibility survey - a gaming experiment with therapists to elaborate what commercial games are compatible with rehabilitation. The study is conducted with 30 outpatients with stroke and 19 occupational therapists from 2 rehabilitation centers in Taiwan. Our surveys show that game-based rehabilitation systems can turn the rehabilitation exercises more appealing and provide personalized motivation for various stroke patients. Patients prefer to perform rehabilitation exercises with more diverse and fun games, and need cost-effective rehabilitation systems, which are often built on commodity hardware. Our study also sheds light on incorporating the existing design-for-fun games into rehabilitation system. We envision the results are helpful in developing a platform which enables rehab-compatible (i.e., existing, appropriately

  6. What Do Stroke Patients Look for in Game-Based Rehabilitation: A Survey Study.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ya-Xuan; Huang, Pei-Chen; Chen, Kuan-Ta; Chu, Woei-Chyn

    2016-03-01

    Stroke is one of the most common causes of physical disability, and early, intensive, and repetitive rehabilitation exercises are crucial to the recovery of stroke survivors. Unfortunately, research shows that only one third of stroke patients actually perform recommended exercises at home, because of the repetitive and mundane nature of conventional rehabilitation exercises. Thus, to motivate stroke survivors to engage in monotonous rehabilitation is a significant issue in the therapy process. Game-based rehabilitation systems have the potential to encourage patients continuing rehabilitation exercises at home. However, these systems are still rarely adopted at patients' places. Discovering and eliminating the obstacles in promoting game-based rehabilitation at home is therefore essential. For this purpose, we conducted a study to collect and analyze the opinions and expectations of stroke patients and clinical therapists. The study is composed of 2 parts: Rehab-preference survey - interviews to both patients and therapists to understand the current practices, challenges, and expectations on game-based rehabilitation systems; and Rehab-compatibility survey - a gaming experiment with therapists to elaborate what commercial games are compatible with rehabilitation. The study is conducted with 30 outpatients with stroke and 19 occupational therapists from 2 rehabilitation centers in Taiwan. Our surveys show that game-based rehabilitation systems can turn the rehabilitation exercises more appealing and provide personalized motivation for various stroke patients. Patients prefer to perform rehabilitation exercises with more diverse and fun games, and need cost-effective rehabilitation systems, which are often built on commodity hardware. Our study also sheds light on incorporating the existing design-for-fun games into rehabilitation system. We envision the results are helpful in developing a platform which enables rehab-compatible (i.e., existing, appropriately

  7. Arm Posturing in a Patient Following Stroke: Dystonia, Levitation, Synkinesis, or Spasticity?

    PubMed Central

    Irmady, Krithi; Jabbari, Bahman; Louis, Elan D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Post-stroke movement disorders occur in up to 4% of stroke patients. The movements can be complex and difficult to classify, which presents challenges when attempting to understand the clinical phenomenology and provide appropriate treatment. Case Report We present a 64-year-old male with an unusual movement in the arm contralateral to his ischemic stroke. The primary feature of the movement was an involuntary elevation of the arm, occurring only when he was walking. Discussion The differential diagnosis includes dystonia, spontaneous arm levitation, synkinesis, and spasticity. We discuss each of these diagnostic possibilities in detail. PMID:26682091

  8. Imaging-based management of acute ischemic stroke patients: current neuroradiological perspectives.

    PubMed

    Na, Dong Gyu; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Kim, Eung Yeop

    2015-01-01

    Advances in imaging-based management of acute ischemic stroke now provide crucial information such as infarct core, ischemic penumbra/degree of collaterals, vessel occlusion, and thrombus that helps in the selection of the best candidates for reperfusion therapy. It also predicts thrombolytic efficacy and benefit or potential hazards from therapy. Thus, radiologists should be familiar with various imaging studies for patients with acute ischemic stroke and the applicability to clinical trials. This helps radiologists to obtain optimal rapid imaging as well as its accurate interpretation. This review is focused on imaging studies for acute ischemic stroke, including their roles in recent clinical trials and some guidelines to optimal interpretation.

  9. The Mechanism of and Preventive Therapy for Stroke in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Hoon; Roh, Seung-Young

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is a major cardiac cause of stroke, and a pathogenesis involving thrombus formation in patients with atrial fibrillation is well established. A strategy for rhythm control that involves catheter ablation and anticoagulation therapy is evolving. A strategy for rhythm control that restores and maintains sinus rhythm should reduce the risk of ischemic stroke that is associated with atrial fibrillation; however, this is yet to be proven in large-scale randomized controlled trials. This paper reviews the emerging role of rhythm control therapy for atrial fibrillation to prevent stroke. PMID:27283277

  10. Art Therapy Outcomes in the Rehabilitation Treatment of a Stroke Patient: A Case Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Sun-Hyun; Kim, Min-Young; Lee, Jae-Hyuk; Chun, Sae-il

    2008-01-01

    This case report discusses the potential for art therapy to aid in the recovery of early-chronic stroke patients. The patient was diagnosed with having a subarachnoid hemorrhage from a cerebral aneurysm rupture 1 year prior to hospitalization. Therapies used as part of the patient's treatment included 10 weeks of art therapy conducted twice a…

  11. Inter-rater reliability of the Sødring Motor Evaluation of Stroke patients (SMES).

    PubMed

    Halsaa, K E; Sødring, K M; Bjelland, E; Finsrud, K; Bautz-Holter, E

    1999-12-01

    The Sødring Motor Evaluation of Stroke patients is an instrument for physiotherapists to evaluate motor function and activities in stroke patients. The rating reflects quality as well as quantity of the patient's unassisted performance within three domains: leg, arm and gross function. The inter-rater reliability of the method was studied in a sample of 30 patients admitted to a stroke rehabilitation unit. Three therapists were involved in the study; two therapists assessed the same patient on two consecutive days in a balanced design. Cohen's weighted kappa and McNemar's test of symmetry were used as measures of item reliability, and the intraclass correlation coefficient was used to express the reliability of the sumscores. For 24 out of 32 items the weighted kappa statistic was excellent (0.75-0.98), while 7 items had a kappa statistic within the range 0.53-0.74 (fair to good). The reliability of one item was poor (0.13). The intraclass correlation coefficient for the three sumscores was 0.97, 0.91 and 0.97. We conclude that the Sødring Motor Evaluation of Stroke patients is a reliable measure of motor function in stroke patients undergoing rehabilitation.

  12. The Taxonomy Statistic Uncovers Novel Clinical Patterns in a Population of Ischemic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tukiendorf, Andrzej; Kaźmierski, Radosław; Michalak, Sławomir

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a simple taxonomic approach for clinical data mining elaborated by Marczewski and Steinhaus (M-S), whose performance equals the advanced statistical methodology known as the expectation-maximization (E-M) algorithm. We tested these two methods on a cohort of ischemic stroke patients. The comparison of both methods revealed strong agreement. Direct agreement between M-S and E-M classifications reached 83%, while Cohen’s coefficient of agreement was κ = 0.766(P < 0.0001). The statistical analysis conducted and the outcomes obtained in this paper revealed novel clinical patterns in ischemic stroke patients. The aim of the study was to evaluate the clinical usefulness of Marczewski-Steinhaus’ taxonomic approach as a tool for the detection of novel patterns of data in ischemic stroke patients and the prediction of disease outcome. In terms of the identification of fairly frequent types of stroke patients using their age, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), and diabetes mellitus (DM) status, when dealing with rough characteristics of patients, four particular types of patients are recognized, which cannot be identified by means of routine clinical methods. Following the obtained taxonomical outcomes, the strong correlation between the health status at moment of admission to emergency department (ED) and the subsequent recovery of patients is established. Moreover, popularization and simplification of the ideas of advanced mathematicians may provide an unconventional explorative platform for clinical problems. PMID:23875000

  13. The evolving role of stroke prediction schemes for patients with atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Ha, Andrew; Healey, Jeff S

    2013-10-01

    Our approach to managing patients with atrial fibrillation has changed substantially over the past 10 years, as a result of numerous high-quality observation studies and randomized trials. In this article, we will provide practical guidance for the use of oral anticoagulation therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation. We will review the evolution of stroke and bleeding risk prediction schemes and discuss their role in patient care. Initially, stroke prediction schemes were used to identify patients with atrial fibrillation at the highest risk of stroke, in whom the use of oral anticoagulant therapy was believed to be the most important. However; with the advent of new, safer, and more convenient oral anticoagulant drugs, the role of these schemes has shifted to the identification of the lowest risk patients, representing the minority of patients with atrial fibrillation, in whom oral anticoagulant therapy is not recommended. At the same time, schemes were developed to predict bleeding, the major risk of oral anticoagulant therapy. However; use of these schemes has been limited by their complexity and significant correlation with stroke schemes. In general, it is advisable to base the decision to use oral anticoagulation on the patient's stroke risk and use bleeding schemes to identify absolute contraindications or modifiable risk factors for bleeding. Prediction schemes have been useful clinical tools, invaluable in the design of clinical trials, and have assisted greatly in economic analyses. However, the nature and role of such schemes is now adapting to the current era of novel oral anticoagulant agents.

  14. Therapeutic implications of transesophageal echocardiography after transthoracic echocardiography on acute stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    de Abreu, Tiago Tribolet; Mateus, Sonia; Carreteiro, Cecilia; Correia, Jose

    2008-01-01

    Background The role of transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) in the evaluation of acute stroke patients is still ill-defined. We conducted a prospective observational study to find the prevalence of TEE findings that indicate anticoagulation as beneficial, in acute ischemic stroke patients without indication for anticoagulation based on clinical, electrocardiographic and transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) findings. Methods We prospectively studied all patients referred to our laboratory for TTE and TEE. Patients were excluded if the diagnosis was not acute ischemic stroke or if they had an indication for anticoagulation based on clinical, electrocardiographic, or TTE data. Patients with TEE findings that might indicate anticoagulation as beneficial were identified. Results A total of 84 patients with acute ischemic stroke and without indication for anticoagulation based on clinical and electrocardiographic or TTE data were included in the study. Findings indicating anticoagulation as beneficial were found in 32.1%: spontaneous echo contrast (1.2%), complex aortic atheroma (27.4%), thrombus (8.3%), and simultaneous patent foramen ovale and atrial septal aneurysm (2.4%). Conclusions The results of our study show that TEE can have therapy implications in 32.1% of ischemic stroke patients in sinus rhythm and with TTE with no indication for anticoagulation. PMID:18629351

  15. Correlation between the Quality of Attention and Cognitive Competence with Motor Action in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Arsic, S.; Konstantinovic, Lj.; Eminovic, F.; Pavlovic, D.; Popovic, M. B.; Arsic, V.

    2015-01-01

    It is considered that cognitive function and attention could affect walking, motion control, and proper conduct during the walk. To determine whether there is a difference in the quality of attention and cognitive ability in stroke patients and patients without neurological damage of similar age and education and to determine whether the connection of attention and cognition affects motor skills, the sample consisted of 50 stroke patients tested with hemiparesis, involved in the process of rehabilitation, and 50 persons, randomly chosen, without neurological damage. The survey used the following tests: Trail Making (TMT A B) test for assessing the flexibility of attention; Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) for cognitive status; Functional Ambulation Category (FAC) test to assess the functional status and parameters of walk: speed, frequency, and length of stride; STEP test for assessing the precision of movement and balance. With stroke patients, relationship between age and performance on the MMSE test was marginally significant. The ratio of performance to TMT A B test and years does not indicate statistical significance, while statistical significance between the MMSE test performance and education exists. In stroke patients, performance on MMSE test is correlated with the frequency and length of stride walk. The quality of cognitive function and attention is associated with motor skills but differs in stroke patients and people without neurological damage of similar age. The significance of this correlation can supplement research in neurorehabilitation, improve the quality of medical rehabilitation, and contribute to efficient recovery of these patients. PMID:25961041

  16. Management of Stroke Prevention in Canadian Patients with Atrial Fibrillation at Moderate to High Risk of Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Semchuk, William M; Levac, Brandon; Lara, Muria; Shakespeare, Annabelle; Evers, Thomas; Bolt, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Background Many patients with atrial fibrillation who are at moderate to high risk of stroke do not receive anticoagulation with vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) in accordance with recommendations. Objective: To determine (1) why Canadian patients with atrial fibrillation who are potentially eligible for VKA do not receive this therapy, (2) why Canadian primary care physicians discontinue VKA therapy, and (3) why VKA therapy is perceived as difficult to manage. Methods: The study involved a chart review of 3 cohorts of patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation at moderate to high risk of stroke: patients who had never received VKA treatment (VKA-naive), those whose treatment had been discontinued, and those whose VKA treatment was considered difficult to manage. Results: Charts for 187 patients (mean age 78.4 years, standard deviation 8.9 years) treated at 39 primary care sites were reviewed (62 treatment-naive, 42 with therapy discontinued, and 83 whose therapy was considered difficult to manage). Atrial fibrillation was paroxysmal in 82 (44%) of the patients, persistent in 47 patients (25%), and permanent in 58 (31%). One patient in each of the 3 cohorts had experienced a stroke during the 6 months before study participation. Bleeding events were more frequent among patients who had discontinued VKA therapy than in the other 2 groups. Among those whose therapy was discontinued and those whose therapy was difficult to manage, the mean time in the therapeutic range was 46.3% and 56.4%, respectively. The most common reason for not initiating VKA therapy in treatment-naive patients was the transient nature of atrial fibrillation (25/62 [40%]). The most common reason for discontinuation of VKA therapy was a bleeding event (10/42 [24%]). The presence of a concomitant chronic disease was the most common reason that a patient’s therapy was considered difficult to manage (46/83 [55%]). Conclusions: VKA therapy was not initiated or was discontinued for various reasons

  17. Fractal dynamics of body motion in post-stroke hemiplegic patients during walking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akay, M.; Sekine, M.; Tamura, T.; Higashi, Y.; Fujimoto, T.

    2004-06-01

    In this paper, we quantify the complexity of body motion during walking in post-stroke hemiplegic patients. The body motion of patients and healthy elderly subjects was measured by using the accelerometry technique. The complexity of body motion was quantified using the maximum likelihood estimator (MLE-) based fractal analysis methods. Our results suggest that the fractal dimensions of the body motion in post-stroke hemiplegic patients at several Brunnstrom stages were significantly higher than those of healthy elderly subjects (p < 0.05). However, in the hemiplegic patients, the fractal dimensions were more related to Brunnstrom stages.

  18. Vertebrobasilar ectasia in patients with lacunar stroke: The SPS3 trial

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Makoto; Pearce, Lesly A.; Ohara, Nobuyuki; Field, Thalia S.; Bazan, Carlos; Anderson, David C.; Hart, Robert G.; Benavente, Oscar R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The clinical implications of vertebrobasilar ectasia (VBE) in patients with cerebral small artery disease are not well defined. We investigated whether VBE is associated with recurrent stroke, major hemorrhage, and death in a large cohort of patients with recent lacunar stroke. Materials and methods Maximum diameters of the vertebral and basilar arteries were measured by magnetic resonance angiography and computed tomographic angiography in 2621 participants in the Secondary Prevention of Small Subcortical Strokes (SPS3) trial. VBE was defined a priori as basilar artery >4.5 mm and/or vertebral artery >4.0 mm. Patient characteristics and risks of stroke recurrence and mortality during follow-up (median 3.5 years) were compared between patients with and without VBE. Results VBE affecting ≥1 artery was present in 200 (7.6%) patients. Patient features independently associated with VBE were increasing age, male sex, white race-ethnicity, hypertension, and higher baseline diastolic blood pressure. Baseline systolic blood pressure was inversely associated with VBE. After adjustment for other risk factors, VBE was not predictive of recurrent stroke (HR 1.3, 95% CI 0.85-1.9) or major hemorrhage (HR 1.5, CI 0.94-2.6), but was of death (HR 1.7, CI 1.1-2.7). Conclusion In this large well-characterized cohort of patients with recent lacunar stroke, VBE was predictive of death, but not recurrent stroke or major hemorrhage. In these exploratory analyses, the frequency of VBE was directly related to diastolic blood pressure but inversely related to systolic blood pressure. PMID:25817614

  19. Racial/ethnic disparities in emergency department waiting time for stroke patients in the United States.

    PubMed

    Karve, Sudeep J; Balkrishnan, Rajesh; Mohammad, Yousef M; Levine, Deborah A

    2011-01-01

    Emergency department waiting time (EDWT), the time from arrival at the ED to evaluation by an emergency physician, is a critical component of acute stroke care. We assessed racial/ethnic differences in EDWT in a national sample of patients with ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke. We identified 543 ED visits for ischemic stroke (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification [ICD-9-CM] codes 433.x1, 434.xx, and 436.xx) and hemorrhagic stroke (ICD-9-CM codes 430.xx, 431.xx, and 432.xx) in persons age ≥ 18 years representing 2.1 million stroke-related ED visits in the United States using the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey for years 1997-2000 and 2003-2005. Using linear regression (outcome, log-transformed EDWT) and logistic regression (outcome, EDWT > 10 minutes, based on National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke guidelines), we adjusted associations between EDWT and race/ethnicity (non-Hispanic whites [designated whites herein], non-Hispanic blacks [blacks], and Hispanics) for age, sex, region, mode of transportation, insurance, hospital characteristics, triage status, hospital admission, stroke type, and survey year. Compared with whites, blacks had a longer EDWT in univariate analysis (67% longer, P = .03) and multivariate analysis (62% longer, P = .03), but Hispanics had a similar EDWT in both univariate analysis (31% longer, P = .65) and multivariate analysis (5% longer, P = .91). Longer EDWT was also seen with nonambulance mode of arrival, urban hospitals, or nonemergency triage. Race was significantly associated with EDWT > 10 minutes (whites, 55% [referent]; blacks, 70% [P = .03]; Hispanics, 62% [P = .53]). These differences persisted after adjustment (blacks: odds ratio [OR] = 2.08, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.05-4.09; Hispanics: OR = 1.07, 95% CI = 0.52-2.22). Blacks, but not Hispanics, had significantly longer EDWT than whites. The longer EDWT in black stroke patients may lead to treatment

  20. A Process of Multidisciplinary Team Communication to Individualize Stroke Rehabilitation of an 84-Year-Old Stroke Patient.

    PubMed

    Hiragami, Fukumi; Hiragami, Shogo; Suzuki, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we have used a multidisciplinary team (MDT) approach to individualize rehabilitation of very old stroke patients as a means to establish intervention points for addressing impaired activities of daily living (ADL). However, this previous study was limited because of a lack in describing the communication process over time. This case study characterized the MDT communication process in the rehabilitation of an 84-year-old patient over the course of 15 weeks. The MDT consisted of 3 nurses, 1 doctor, 6 therapists, and the patient/families. Meetings (15 minutes each) were held at 4, 6, 8, and 15 weeks following the patient's admission. To individualize the rehabilitation, the communication process involved gaining knowledge about ADL impairments, sharing assessments, providing treatment options, and reflecting on desired treatment outcomes-a process termed KATR. The knowledge, assessment, treatment, and reflection (KATR) process established intervention points focusing on specific ADL impairments. The team members focused the interventions on the impaired ADL identified in the KATR process, and individualized rehabilitation was generated from the MDT information-sharing knowledge. In the initial meeting (Week 4), intervention points derived from the KATR process focused on rehabilitation of self-care impairments. These impairments improved by Week 15. By the last meeting, the MDT intervention points focused on mobility impairments. Having an organized communication process (i.e., KATR) facilitates individualization of rehabilitation without lengthy and frequent MDT meetings and enhances the quality of rehabilitation after a stroke. PMID:27298136

  1. Effects of Blood Pressure Targets in Patients with Recent Lacunar Stroke

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Lowering blood pressure (BP) prevents stroke, however optimal target levels of blood reduction to prevent stroke recurrence are lacking. We hypothesized that targeting systolic BP of <130 mmHg would reduce stroke recurrence in patients with recent lacunar stroke. METHODS The Secondary Prevention of Small Subcortical Strokes (SPS3) was a multi-center international trial, involving 3020 patients with recent symptomatic MRI-defined lacunar infarcts randomized to two target levels of systolic BP: a) higher group 130–149 mm Hg vs. b) lower group <130 mm Hg, and followed for a mean of 3.7 years. The primary outcome was all recurrent stroke (including ischemic strokes and intracranial hemorrhages). The study is registered, NCT 00059306. FINDINGS Mean participant age was 63 years; after 1 year mean systolic BP was 138 mm Hg (95% CI 137 to 139) in the higher group and 127 mm Hg (95% CI, 126 to 128) in the lower group. At last study visit, the difference in systolic BP between groups averaged 11 mm Hg (±SD 16). The annualized rate of recurrent stroke in the higher target group was 2.77% (n=152) compared with 2.25% (n=125) in the lower target group (HR 0.81, 95% CI 0.64, 1.03, p-value 0.08). Similar trends were observed for reductions in disabling/fatal stroke (HR 0.81, 95%CI 0.53, 1.23, p-value 0.32) and in the composite outcome of stroke, myocardial infarct or vascular death (HR 0.84, 95%CI 0.68,1.01, p-value 0.10). Intracerebral hemorrhage was reduced by 63% in those assigned to the lower target group (HR 0.37 95% CI, 0.14, 0.89, p-value 0.03). Serious complications of BP lowering were in frequent, and not significantly different in frequency between groups. INTERPRETATION In patients with recent lacunar stroke, targeting asystolic BP of< 130 mm Hg did not significantly reduce all stroke, but markedly reduced intracerebral hemorrhage. The lower target was safe and well tolerated. PMID:23726159

  2. Folic Acid Supplementation and Cardiac and Stroke Mortality among Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Leung, June; Larive, Brett; Dwyer, Johanna; Hibberd, Patricia; Jacques, Paul; Rand, William

    2010-01-01

    Objective To assess whether use of folic acid vitamin supplements reduces cardiac and stroke mortality in hemodialysis patients. Further, we examined whether consumption of folic acid from vitamin supplements greater than 1000 μg compared to standard 1000 μg, and 1000 μg compared to either lower dose or no consumption were associated with reduced cardiac and stroke mortality risk. Design Secondary analysis of data from the Hemodialysis (HEMO) Study, a randomized clinical trial examining dialysis treatment regimens over three years follow-up. Participants: One thousand eight hundred and forty-six hemodialysis patients previously participating in the HEMO study. Interventions None Main Outcome Measure Cardiac and stroke mortality. Results From time-dependent Cox proportional hazard regression models, folic acid consumption from vitamin supplements, above or below the standard 1000 μg dose was not associated with decrease or increase in cardiac mortality (P = 0.53 above vs. standard dose and P = 0.46, below vs. standard dose). There was also no association between folic acid consumption and mortality from stroke (P = 0.27, above vs. standard dose and P = 0.64, below vs. standard dose). Conclusion Consumption of higher than the standard 1000 μg prescribed dose of folic acid was not beneficial in reducing cardiac or stroke mortality in hemodialysis patients. Similarly, consumption of lower than standard dose was not associated with an increase in either cardiac or stroke mortality. PMID:20303789

  3. A questionnaire to measure satisfaction with community services for informal carers of stroke patients: construction and initial piloting.

    PubMed

    Simon, Chantal; Little, Paul; Birtwistle, Jon; Kendrick, Tony

    2003-03-01

    Stroke affects 120 000 people each year in the UK and is the most common cause of adult-onset disability. Most stroke patients are cared for at home by informal carers. Support for these carers is provided by the community services, but although single-item measures have shown that there is a relatively high level of dissatisfaction with those services, there is no specific satisfaction measurement instrument. The present study aimed to construct and initially validate a questionnaire to measure carers' satisfaction with community services for clinical and research purposes. Qualitative interviews with a purposive sample of informal carers of stroke patients identified via stroke unit discharge records gave information about content, context and language. Together with information from the carers' literature, this formed the basis of the questionnaire. A self-completion questionnaire proved unacceptable to carers with a very poor response rate (20%). Face-to-face interviews were more acceptable, with the questionnaire taking approximately 10 minutes to administer. All carers approached agreed to take part and only three carers dropped out from follow up, all because of reasons not related to the study. Initial validity and reliability testing with a sample of 44 carers identified through stroke groups and general practice showed good correlation with a single-item satisfaction measure (RHO = 0.797), test-retest reliability (RHO = 0.885) and inter-rater reliability (RHO = 0.868), and a high degree of internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.859). Further validation with larger and more diverse groups of informal carers is needed before the questionnaire can be considered to be a robust and reliable tool. Factor analysis revealed seven factors: information about community support and involving the carer; amount, appropriateness and coordination of services; information about stroke; speed of change and concern about the carer; listening to the carer and being heard

  4. Functional outcome in acute stroke patients with oropharyngeal Dysphagia after swallowing therapy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kun-Ling; Liu, Ting-Yuan; Huang, Yu-Chi; Leong, Chau-Peng; Lin, Wei-Che; Pong, Ya-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Dysphagia after stroke is associated with mortality and increased pulmonary complications. Swallowing therapies may decrease pulmonary complications and improve patients' quality of life after stroke. This study used clinical swallowing assessments and videofluoroscopy (VFS) to assess the functional recovery of acute stroke patients with dysphagia after different swallowing therapies. We enrolled 29 acute stroke patients with dysphagia and randomly divided them into 3 therapy groups: traditional swallowing (TS), oropharyngeal neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES), and combined NMES/TS. All patients were assessed using the clinical functional oral intake scale (FOIS), 8-point penetration-aspiration scale (PAS), and functional dysphagia scale (FDS) of VFS before and after treatment. There were no differences in the clinical parameters and swallowing results of the FOIS and VFS before swallowing treatment among the 3 groups (P > .05). TS therapy and combined therapy both had significant swallowing improvement after therapy according to the FOIS and 8-point PAS (P < .05). When comparing the results of the VFS among the 3 groups, we found significant improvements in patients eating cookies and thick liquid after combined NMES/TS therapy (P < .05). In acute stroke patients with dysphagia, combined NMES/TS therapy is the most effective swallowing therapy in taking solid diets and thick liquids.

  5. Relationship between physician specialty and the selection and outcome of ischemic stroke patients.

    PubMed Central

    Horner, R D; Matchar, D B; Divine, G W; Feussner, J R

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study compares the initial characteristics, in-hospital treatment, and outcomes of stroke patients managed by neurologists versus non-neurologists. DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING: An inception cohort of 146 patients hospitalized with their first stroke at a private, a university, or a Veterans Affairs hospital. STUDY DESIGN: A prospective, hospital-based, multisite cohort study design is used to ascertain the patients' initial 180-day in-hospital and postdischarge experience. DATA COLLECTION/EXTRACTION METHODS: Data were collected on patient demographics, disease severity, and risk factors for stroke; diagnostic tests and pharmacologic management; one-month and six-month all-cause and cause-specific mortality; and physical and functional impairment. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The 88 patients (60 percent) admitted to the neurology services of the study hospitals had better prognostic profiles, i.e., lower likelihood of having either completed stroke or cardiac comorbidity, and were less likely to die within one and six months of stroke onset. CONCLUSIONS: Substantial systematic differences in the types of patients managed by neurologists versus other specialists may preclude comparison of outcomes of care. PMID:7782215

  6. What Do Stroke Patients Look for in Game-Based Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Ya-Xuan; Huang, Pei-Chen; Chen, Kuan-Ta; Chu, Woei-Chyn

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Stroke is one of the most common causes of physical disability, and early, intensive, and repetitive rehabilitation exercises are crucial to the recovery of stroke survivors. Unfortunately, research shows that only one third of stroke patients actually perform recommended exercises at home, because of the repetitive and mundane nature of conventional rehabilitation exercises. Thus, to motivate stroke survivors to engage in monotonous rehabilitation is a significant issue in the therapy process. Game-based rehabilitation systems have the potential to encourage patients continuing rehabilitation exercises at home. However, these systems are still rarely adopted at patients’ places. Discovering and eliminating the obstacles in promoting game-based rehabilitation at home is therefore essential. For this purpose, we conducted a study to collect and analyze the opinions and expectations of stroke patients and clinical therapists. The study is composed of 2 parts: Rehab-preference survey – interviews to both patients and therapists to understand the current practices, challenges, and expectations on game-based rehabilitation systems; and Rehab-compatibility survey – a gaming experiment with therapists to elaborate what commercial games are compatible with rehabilitation. The study is conducted with 30 outpatients with stroke and 19 occupational therapists from 2 rehabilitation centers in Taiwan. Our surveys show that game-based rehabilitation systems can turn the rehabilitation exercises more appealing and provide personalized motivation for various stroke patients. Patients prefer to perform rehabilitation exercises with more diverse and fun games, and need cost-effective rehabilitation systems, which are often built on commodity hardware. Our study also sheds light on incorporating the existing design-for-fun games into rehabilitation system. We envision the results are helpful in developing a platform which enables rehab-compatible (i.e., existing

  7. Optimizing stroke clinical trial design: estimating the proportion of eligible patients

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Alexis; Castle, Amanda; Merino, José G.; Hsia, Amie; Kidwell, Chelsea S.; Warach, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose Clinical trial planning and site selection require an accurate estimate of the number of eligible patients at each site. In this study, we developed a tool to calculate the proportion of patients that would meet a specific trial's age, baseline severity and time to treatment inclusion criteria. Methods From a sample of 1322 consecutive patients with acute ischemic cerebrovascular syndromes, we developed regression curves relating the proportion of patients within each range of the three variables. We used half the patients to develop the model, and the other half to validate it by comparing predicted versus actual proportions that met the criteria for four current stroke trials. Results The predicted proportion of patients meeting inclusion criteria ranged from 6% to 28% among the different trials. The proportion of trial-eligible patients predicted from the first half of the data was within 0.4% to 1.4% of the actual proportion of eligible patients. This proportion increased logarithmically with NIHSS score and time from onset: lowering the baseline limits of the NIHSS score and the treatment window would have the greatest impact on the proportion of patients eligible for a stroke trial. Conclusions This model helps estimate the proportion of stroke patients eligible for a study based on different upper and lower limits for age, stroke severity and time to treatment, and may be a useful tool in clinical trial planning. PMID:20798375

  8. Flexor and extensor muscle tone evaluated using the quantitative pendulum test in stroke and parkinsonian patients.

    PubMed

    Huang, Han-Wei; Ju, Ming-Shaung; Lin, Chou-Ching K

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the flexor and extensor muscle tone of the upper limbs in patients with spasticity or rigidity and to investigate the difference in hypertonia between spasticity and rigidity. The two experimental groups consisted of stroke patients and parkinsonian patients. The control group consisted of age and sex-matched normal subjects. Quantitative upper limb pendulum tests starting from both flexed and extended joint positions were conducted. System identification with a simple linear model was performed and model parameters were derived. The differences between the three groups and two starting positions were investigated by these model parameters and tested by two-way analysis of variance. In total, 57 subjects were recruited, including 22 controls, 14 stroke patients and 21 parkinsonian patients. While stiffness coefficient showed no difference among groups, the number of swings, relaxation index and damping coefficient showed changes suggesting significant hypertonia in the two patient groups. There was no difference between these two patient groups. The test starting from the extended position constantly manifested higher muscle tone in all three groups. In conclusion, the hypertonia of parkinsonian and stroke patients could not be differentiated by the modified pendulum test; the elbow extensors showed a higher muscle tone in both control and patient groups; and hypertonia of both parkinsonian and stroke patients is velocity dependent.

  9. Outcome and periprocedural time management in referred versus directly admitted stroke patients treated with thrombectomy

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Ralph; Reimann, Gernot; Weimar, Christian; Winkler, Angela; Berger, Klaus; Nordmeyer, Hannes; Hadisurya, Jeffrie; Brassel, Friedhelm; Kitzrow, Martin; Krogias, Christos; Weber, Werner; Busch, Elmar W.; Eyding, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Background: After thrombectomy has shown to be effective in acute stroke patients with large vessel occlusion, the potential benefit of secondary referral for such an intervention needs to be validated. Aims: We aimed to compare consecutive stoke patients directly admitted and treated with thrombectomy at a neurointerventional centre with patients secondarily referred for such a procedure from hospitals with a stroke unit. Methods: Periprocedure times and mortality in 300 patients primarily treated in eight neurointerventional centres were compared with 343 patients referred from nine other hospitals in a prospective multicentre study of a German neurovascular network. Data on functional outcome at 3 months was available in 430 (76.4%) patients. Results: In-hospital mortality (14.8% versus 11.7%, p = 0.26) and 3 months mortality (21.9% versus 24.1%, p = 0.53) were not statistically different in both patient groups despite a significant shorter symptom to groin puncture time in directly admitted patients, which was mainly caused by a longer interfacility transfer time. We found a nonsignificant trend for better functional outcome at 3 months in directly admitted patients (modified Rankin Scale 0–2, 44.0% versus 35.7%, p = 0.08). Conclusions: Our results show that a drip-and-ship thrombectomy concept can be effectively organized in a metropolitan stroke network. Every effort should be made to speed up the emergency interfacility transfer to a neurointerventional centre in stroke patients eligible for thrombectomy after initial brain imaging. PMID:27006695

  10. Flexor and extensor muscle tone evaluated using the quantitative pendulum test in stroke and parkinsonian patients.

    PubMed

    Huang, Han-Wei; Ju, Ming-Shaung; Lin, Chou-Ching K

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the flexor and extensor muscle tone of the upper limbs in patients with spasticity or rigidity and to investigate the difference in hypertonia between spasticity and rigidity. The two experimental groups consisted of stroke patients and parkinsonian patients. The control group consisted of age and sex-matched normal subjects. Quantitative upper limb pendulum tests starting from both flexed and extended joint positions were conducted. System identification with a simple linear model was performed and model parameters were derived. The differences between the three groups and two starting positions were investigated by these model parameters and tested by two-way analysis of variance. In total, 57 subjects were recruited, including 22 controls, 14 stroke patients and 21 parkinsonian patients. While stiffness coefficient showed no difference among groups, the number of swings, relaxation index and damping coefficient showed changes suggesting significant hypertonia in the two patient groups. There was no difference between these two patient groups. The test starting from the extended position constantly manifested higher muscle tone in all three groups. In conclusion, the hypertonia of parkinsonian and stroke patients could not be differentiated by the modified pendulum test; the elbow extensors showed a higher muscle tone in both control and patient groups; and hypertonia of both parkinsonian and stroke patients is velocity dependent. PMID:26765753

  11. Low-Density-Lipoprotein Particle Size Predicts a Poor Outcome in Patients with Atherothrombotic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Song, Tae-Jin; Cho, Hyun-Ji; Chang, Yoonkyung; Youn, Minjung; Shin, Min-Jeong; Jo, Inho; Heo, Ji Hoe

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particle size is considered to be one of the more important cardiovascular risk factors, and small LDL particles are known to have atherogenic potential. The aim of this study was to determine whether LDL particle size is associated with stroke severity and functional outcome in patients with atherothrombotic stroke. Methods Between January 2009 and May 2011, 248 patients with first-episode cerebral infarction who were admitted to our hospital within 7 days after symptom onset were prospectively enrolled. LDL particle size was measured using the nondenaturing polyacrylamide gradient gel electrophoresis assay. Stroke severity was assessed by applying the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) at admission. Functional outcome was investigated at 3 months after the index stroke using the modified Rankin Scale (mRS), and poor functional outcome was defined as an mRS score of ≥3. Results The LDL particle size in the 248 patients was 25.9±0.9 nm (mean±SD). LDL particle size was inversely correlated with the degree of cerebral artery stenosis (p=0.010). Multinomial multivariate logistic analysis revealed that after adjustment for age, sex, and variables with p<0.1 in univariate analysis, LDL particle size was independently and inversely associated with stroke severity (NIHSS score ≥5; reference, NIHSS score 0-2; odds ratio=0.38, p=0.028) and poor functional outcome (odds ratio=0.44, p=0.038). Conclusions The results of this study demonstrate that small LDL particles are independently correlated with stroke outcomes. LDL particle size is thus a potential biomarker for the prognosis of atherothrombotic stroke. PMID:25628741

  12. ABCD2 score and BNP level in patients with TIA and cerebral stroke.

    PubMed

    Mortezabeigi, H R; Taghizadeh, A; Talebi, M; Amini, K; Goldust, M

    2013-11-01

    Scoring systems have been designed to help physicians in early prediction of cerebral stroke following Transitional Ischemic Attack (TIA). ABCD2 system is one of these scoring systems. Considering increase of brain natriuretic peptide following cerebral ischemic stroke, BNP level may be associated with incidence of ischemic stroke following TIA. The present study evaluates ABCD2 score, BNP level in patients with TIA and incidence of cerebral stroke. This cross sectional-analytical study evaluated 78 patients with TIA. ABCD2 score was calculated for all patients based on some criteria including age, blood pressure, clinical manifestations (speech/motor disorder), symptoms duration and diabetes. BNP level was measured at the reference laboratory when the patient referred to the treatment center. The patients were followed up for 6 months considering incidence of cerebral stroke and TIA. Mean age of the patients was 66.53 +/- 13.08 years and the sample was consisted of 62.8% male and 37.2% female patients. Mean BNP level and mean ABCD2 score was 611.31 +/- 125.61 and 4.61 +/- 10.99 in all patients, respectively. During follow-up period, TIA recurrence and cerebral stroke were, respectively seen in 11.5 and 3.8% of cases. Mortality was reported in 5.1% of the patients. BNP was significantly higher in cases with recursive TIA (p = 0.03). But, there was not any difference considering ABCD2 score (p = 0.38). BNP is capable of predicting TIA recurrence following first TIA and it can be used in this case. PMID:24511754

  13. The effects of eye movement training on gait function in patients with stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Kwon-Young; Yu, Kyung-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The present study examined the effects of eye movement training on gait function in patients with stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Fourteen patients with stroke were randomly assigned to either an experimental group or a control group. The experimental group underwent eye movement training while the control group underwent general gait training five times per week for six weeks. [Results] Patient walking speed, cadence, and step length were measured by ink-footprint. The experimental group exhibited significant changes in walking speed, cadence, and step length following training, while the control group exhibited no differences. [Conclusion] Findings indicate that eye movement training should be considered as part of a functional gait training program for patients with stroke. PMID:27390423

  14. The Effect of Repetitive Rhythmic Precision Grip Task-Oriented Rehabilitation in Chronic Stroke Patients: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dispa, Delphine; Lejeune, Thierry; Thonnard, Jean-Louis

    2013-01-01

    Most chronic stroke patients present with difficulty in the manipulation of objects. The aim of this study was to test whether an intensive program of precision grip training could improve hand functioning of patients at more than 6 months after a stroke. This was a cross-over study; hence, at inclusion, the patients were randomly divided into two…

  15. Effects of vibratory stimulation-induced kinesthetic illusions on the neural activities of patients with stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, Takayuki; Nakano, Hideki; Ohsugi, Hironori; Murata, Shin

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study evaluated the influence of vibratory stimulation-induced kinesthetic illusion on brain function after stroke. [Subjects] Twelve healthy individuals and 13 stroke patients without motor or sensory loss participated. [Methods] Electroencephalograms were taken at rest and during vibratory stimulation. As a neurophysiological index of brain function, we measured the μ-rhythm, which is present mainly in the kinesthetic cortex and is attenuated by movement or motor imagery and compared the data using source localization analyses in the Standardized Low Resolution Brain Electromagnetic Tomography (sLORETA) program. [Results] At rest, μ-rhythms appeared in the sensorimotor and supplementary motor cortices in both healthy controls and stroke patients. Under vibratory stimulation, no μ-rhythm appeared in the sensorimotor cortex of either group. Moreover, in the supplementary motor area, which stores the motor imagery required for kinesthetic illusions, the μ-rhythms of patients were significantly stronger than those of the controls, although the μ-rhythms of both groups were reduced. Thus, differences in neural activity in the supplementary motor area were apparent between the subject groups. [Conclusion] Kinesthetic illusions do occur in patients with motor deficits due to stroke. The neural basis of the supplementary motor area in stroke patients may be functionally different from that found in healthy controls. PMID:27065525

  16. Short-term effect of neck muscle vibration on postural disturbances in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Leplaideur, Stéphanie; Leblong, Emilie; Jamal, Karim; Rousseau, Chloé; Raillon, Annelise Moulinet; Coignard, Pauline; Damphousse, Mireille; Bonan, Isabelle

    2016-09-01

    Balance disorders after stroke have a particularly detrimental influence on recovery of autonomy and walking. The present study is aimed at assessing the effect of proprioceptive stimulation by neck muscle vibration (NMV) on the balance of patients with right hemispheric lesion (RHL) and left hemispheric lesion (LHL). Thirty-one (31) patients (15 RHL and 16 LHL), mean age 61.5 years (±10.6), mean delay 3.1 (±1.6) months after one hemispheric stroke were included in this prospective study. The mean position in mediolateral and anteroposterior plane of the CoP (center of pressure) and the surface were evaluated using a force platform at rest and immediately after 10 min of vibration on the contralesional dorsal neck muscle. NMV decreases the lateral deviation balance induced by the stroke. Twenty patients (64.5 %) experienced a visual illusion of light spot moving toward the side opposite stimulus. These patients showed more improvement by vibration than those without visual illusion. There was an interaction between sensitivity and side of stroke on the effect of NMV. Proprioceptive stimulation by NMV reduces postural asymmetry after stroke. This short-term effect of the vibration is more effective in patients susceptible to visual illusion. This result was consistent with a central effect of NMV on the structures involved in the elaboration of perception of body in space. PMID:27165509

  17. [Potential for intervention of private health insurers in discharge management using the example of stroke patients].

    PubMed

    Sterl, E; Böhme, J

    2016-06-01

    The study reveals that stroke patients today can still experience gaps in the provision of healthcare and fragmented therapy. This is often the case on transferral from the inpatient to outpatient sector, causing complications that could be avoided by means of good discharge management across all sectors. Private health insurance can actively support and positively influence the treatment process in the form of case management. Individual contact with stroke patients and their relatives allows for early planning and organisation of the next steps, and offers patients the support they need during a difficult phase of life. PMID:27483688

  18. Muscle tone changes in the lower limbs of stroke patients induced by trunk stabilization exercises

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Min-Hyung; Kim, Laurentius Jongsoon

    2015-01-01

    bstract. [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of trunk stabilization exercises on the spasticity of the lower limbs in stroke patients. [Subject] The subject of this study was a 38-year-old male patient who experienced a spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage, and had motor paralysis symptoms and spasticity on the left side. [Methods] The Hmax/Mmax ratio was measured before and after the trunk stabilization exercises, by using proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation techniques. [Results] The Hmax/Mmax ratio changed from 37% to 20%. [Conclusion] Trunk stabilization exercises help control the muscle tone in stroke patients. PMID:26357455

  19. Diagnosis of Adult Patients with Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Nick, Jerry A; Nichols, David P

    2016-03-01

    The diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF) is being made with increasing frequency in adults. Patients with CF diagnosed in adulthood typically present with respiratory complaints, and often have recurrent or chronic airway infection. At the time of initial presentation individuals may appear to have clinical manifestation limited to a single organ, but with subclinical involvement of the respiratory tract. Adult-diagnosed patients have a good response to CF center care, and newly available cystic fibrosis transmembrane receptor-modulating therapies are promising for the treatment of residual function mutation, thus increasing the importance of the diagnosis in adults with unexplained bronchiectasis.

  20. [An experience applying a spiritual care model to a first-time stroke patient].

    PubMed

    Yang, Ning-Chi; Yeh, Shu-Hui

    2012-06-01

    Patients with stroke-related disabilities are at risk of depression and social isolation. This can make it difficult for the patient to cope with his or her disease and increase caregiver burden. While good at dealing with physical illness, nurses are often poor at attending to patients' mental and spiritual needs. In this paper, the authors introduce their experience using a spiritual care model to care for a stroke patient. The patient, a 69 year-old retiree, was admitted to our hospital due to an acute stroke. During hospitalization, he suffered from acute confusion and persistent focal weakness. His disability resulted in physical dependence, which did not improve during rehabilitation. We used a model of spiritual care and in-depth evaluation to identify several underlying psychological issues. These included feelings of hopelessness and loss of control and motivation. The authors established trust through active listening. In addition to standard nursing education and physical care, we, in cooperation with the patient's children, provided encouragement and support to help the patient cope with his disease burden and actively participate in rehabilitation. We applied a multi-dimensional spiritual care approach to help the patient shift from hopelessness to hopefulness. This enhanced his motivation to participate in rehabilitation and improved his self-care abilities. We hope this case report on the application of a spiritual-care model is useful reference for nurses responsible to care for stroke patients. PMID:22661040

  1. Values of activities of daily living. A survey of stroke patients and their home therapists.

    PubMed

    Chiou, I I; Burnett, C N

    1985-06-01

    People's values influence their actions and efforts. Based on the assumption that a patient's values can be a guide to successful rehabilitation, the values of 15 activities of daily living as perceived by stroke patients and their home therapists were studied. Twenty-six stroke patients living at home and their 10 visiting occupational and physical therapists participated in the study. The study results indicated that the relative importance of each activity of daily living perceived by the patient group and by the therapist group was similar. Among the 29 therapist-patient pairs, however, only 1 pair showed significantly similar views regarding the values of these activities to the patient. Patients' age, gender, income level, duration since onset of stroke, impaired body side, and independence level in activities were significantly related to their values of certain activities of daily living. The relative value stroke patients living at home place on each activity of daily living could serve as a guide for sequencing learning steps during activities of daily living training in a hospital or rehabilitation setting. Determining patient rehabilitation goals as influenced by personal values may shorten rehabilitation time, be more cost-effective, and aid in the retention of gains made in the rehabilitation setting. PMID:4001168

  2. Early introduction of direct oral anticoagulants in cardioembolic stroke patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Cappellari, Manuel; Carletti, Monica; Danese, Alessandra; Bovi, Paolo

    2016-10-01

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are superior to warfarin in reduction of the intracranial bleeding risk. The aim of the present study was to assess whether early DOAC introduction (1-3 days after onset) in stroke patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (nVAF) may be safe and effective, compared with DOAC introduction after 4-7 days. We conducted a prospective analysis based on data collected from 147 consecutive nVAF patients who started DOAC within 7 days after stroke onset. In all patients, we performed pre-DOAC CT scan 24-36 h after onset and follow-up CT scan at 7 days after DOAC introduction. Outcome measures were post-DOAC intracranial bleeding (new any intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in patients with pre-DOAC infarct without hemorrhagic transformation (HT) or expansion of ICH in patients with pre-DOAC infarct with asymptomatic HT) and post-DOAC recurrent ischemic stroke (any new ischemic infarct) on follow-up CT scan. 97 patients started DOAC after 1-3 days and 50 patients started DOAC after 4-7 days. On pre-DOAC CT scan, 132 patients had an infarct without HT and 15 an infarct with asymptomatic HT. On follow-up CT scan, new any ICH was noted in seven patients (asymptomatic in 6) and asymptomatic expansion of ICH in one patient. We found no association between early DOAC introduction and intracranial bleeding. Large infarct remained the only independent predictor of post-DOAC intracranial bleeding. No patients suffered recurrent ischemic stroke after DOAC introduction. Early DOAC introduction might be safe in carefully selected patients with nVAF who experience small- and medium-sized cardioembolic ischemic strokes. Further investigation will be needed. PMID:27329483

  3. Impact of regional pre-hospital emergency medical services in treatment of patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Sozener, Cemal B; Barsan, William G

    2012-09-01

    Stroke is a major public health concern afflicting an estimated 795,000 Americans annually. The associated morbidity and mortality is staggering. Early treatment with thrombolytics is beneficial. The window for treatment is narrow and minimization of the time from symptom onset to treatment is vital. The general population is not well informed as to the warning signs or symptoms of stroke, leading to substantial delays in emergency medical services (EMS) activation. Ambulance transport of stroke patients to the hospital has demonstrated improvements in key benchmarks such as door to physician evaluation, door to CT initiation, and increased thrombolytic treatment. Pre-hospital notification of the impending arrival of a stroke patient allows for vital preparation in the treating emergency department, and improving timely evaluation and treatment upon arrival of the stroke patient. EMS systems are a vital component of the management of stroke patients, and resources used to improve these systems are beneficial. PMID:22994221

  4. The comparison of two physiotherapeutic approaches for gait improvement in sub-acute stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Krawczyk, Maciej; Szczerbik, Ewa; Syczewska, Małgorzata

    2014-01-01

    The functional gait problems encountered by stroke patients include impaired balance, abnormal gait pattern with marked asymmetry, pathological trunk and spinal motion. Many different methods of physiotherapy are used to improve functional ability (especially gait) in stroke patients, but their efficacy and outcome are often not objectively assessed. The goal of this paper is to compare two therapeutic programs: one that is traditionally used in our rehabilitation facilities (exercises in lying position, "open chain" exercises, isolated movements of extremities with trunk stabilization) and the new one (exercises in vertical position, sitting or standing, "closed chain" exercises involving whole paretic side of the body). Fifty one stroke patients, aged 34 to 79 years, participated in the study. Patients were randomly allocated to one of the two groups. Patients underwent clinical assessment (Fugl-Meyer, Rivermead Motor Assessment, Berg Balance Scale) and instrumented gait analysis (using six-camera VICON 460 system) simultaneously three times: prior to the beginning of the rehabilitation program, after 6 weeks of the program, and after another 6 weeks of physiotherapy, at the end of rehabilitation program. Results demonstrated that both rehabilitation programs improved the gait function and clinical status in patients suffering from stroke. Despite the differences between the two programs the progress achieved by the patients in locomotor function is similar. Two equivalent physiotherapy programs could be applied during rehabilitation process depending on the patient's individual preferences and needs, as the amount of functional improvement provided by them is comparable. PMID:24708038

  5. Efficiency of a Care Coordination Model: A Randomized Study with Stroke Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claiborne, Nancy

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: This study investigated the efficiency of a social work care coordination model for stroke patients. Care coordination addresses patient care and treatment resources across the health care system to reduce risk, improve clinical outcomes, and maximize efficiency. Method: A randomly assigned, pre-post experimental design measured…

  6. Ultrasonographic Measurement of the Femoral Cartilage Thickness in Hemiparetic Patients after Stroke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tunc, Hakan; Oken, Oznur; Kara, Murat; Tiftik, Tulay; Dogu, Beril; Unlu, Zeliha; Ozcakar, Levent

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the femoral cartilage thicknesses of hemiparetic patients after stroke using musculoskeletal ultrasonography and to determine whether there is any correlation between cartilage thicknesses and the clinical characteristics of the patients. Femoral cartilage thicknesses of both knees were measured in 87 (33…

  7. Occupational Therapy and Physiotherapy in Acute Stroke: Do Rural Patients Receive Less Therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Ashby, Samantha

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To assess whether acute stroke patients in rural hospitals receive less occupational therapy and physiotherapy than those in metropolitan hospitals. Design. Retrospective case-control study of health data in patients ≤10 days after stroke. Setting. Occupational therapy and physiotherapy services in four rural hospitals and one metropolitan hospital. Participants. Acute stroke patients admitted in one health district. Main Outcome Measures. Frequency and duration of face-to-face and indirect therapy sessions. Results. Rural hospitals admitted 363 patients and metropolitan hospital admitted 378 patients. Mean age was 73 years. Those in rural hospitals received more face-to-face (p > 0.0014) and indirect (p = 0.001) occupational therapy when compared to those in the metropolitan hospital. Face-to-face sessions lasted longer (p = 0.001). Patients admitted to the metropolitan hospital received more face-to-face (p > 0.000) and indirect (p > 0.000) physiotherapy when compared to those admitted to rural hospitals. Face-to-face sessions were shorter (p > 0.000). Almost all were seen within 24 hours of referral. Conclusions. Acute stroke patients in Australian rural hospital may receive more occupational therapy and less physiotherapy than those in metropolitan hospitals. The dose of therapy was lower than recommended, and the referral process may unnecessarily delay the time from admission to a patient's first therapy session. PMID:27752389

  8. New Oral Anticoagulants May Be Particularly Useful for Asian Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Oh Young; Hong, Keun-Sik; Heo, Ji Hoe; Koo, Jaseong; Kwon, Sun U.; Yu, Kyung-Ho; Bae, Hee-Joon; Lee, Byung-Chul; Yoon, Byung-Woo

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is an emerging epidemic in both high-income and low-income countries, mainly because of global population aging. Stroke is a major complication of AF, and AF-related ischemic stroke is more disabling and more fatal than other types of ischemic stroke. However, because of concerns about bleeding complications, particularly intracranial hemorrhage, and the limitations of a narrow therapeutic window, warfarin is underused. Four large phase III randomized controlled trials in patients with non-valvular AF (RE-LY, ROCKET-AF, ARISTOTLE, and ENGAGE-AF-TIMI 48) demonstrated that new oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are superior or non-inferior to warfarin as regards their efficacy in preventing ischemic stroke and systemic embolism, and superior to warfarin in terms of intracranial hemorrhage. Among AF patients receiving warfarin, Asians compared to non-Asians are at higher risk of stroke or systemic embolism and are also more prone to develop major bleeding complications, including intracranial hemorrhage. The extra benefit offered by NOACs over warfarin appears to be greater in Asians than in non-Asians. In addition, Asians are less compliant, partly because of the frequent use of herbal remedies. Therefore, NOACs compared to warfarin may be safer and more useful in Asians than in non-Asians, especially in stroke patients. Although the use of NOACs in AF patients is rapidly increasing, guidelines for the insurance reimbursement of NOACs have not been resolved, partly because of insufficient understanding of the benefit of NOACs and partly because of cost concerns. The cost-effectiveness of NOACs has been well demonstrated in the healthcare settings of developed countries, and its magnitude would vary depending on population characteristics as well as treatment cost. Therefore, academic societies and regulatory authorities should work together to formulate a scientific healthcare policy that will effectively reduce the burden of AF-related stroke in

  9. Intensity of Left Atrial Spontaneous Echo Contrast as a Correlate for Stroke Risk Stratification in Patients with Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuanping; Ji, Lijing; Liu, Jian; Wu, Juefei; Wang, Yan; Shen, Shuxin; Guo, Shengcun; Jian, Rong; Chen, Gangbin; Wei, Xuan; Liao, Wangjun; Kutty, Shelby; Liao, Yulin; Bin, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    The intensity of left atrial spontaneous echo contrast (LASEC) by transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) has been proposed as an important variable in the stratification of thromboembolic risk, particularly in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). We hypothesized that the quantification of LASEC by ultrasound will improve its utility in predicting subsequent stroke events in patients with NVAF. Patients (n = 206) with definite NVAF receiving TEE were included for this prospective cohort study. Baseline clinical risk factors of stroke, CHADS2 score and CHA2DS2-Vasc, left atrial thrombus (LAT), the five-grades of LASEC and video intensity (VI) value of LASEC were measured. During 2 years follow-up, 20 patients (9.7%) developed stroke. VI value of LASEC in the patients with stroke was higher compared to patients without stroke (25.30 ± 3.61 vs. 8.65 ± 0.81, p < 0.001). On logistic regression analysis, LAT, qualitative LASEC, graded LASEC, VI value of LASEC and CHADS2 and CHA2DS2-Vasc score were independent predictors of stroke. Among them, the highest area under the curve of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) in predicting stroke was VI value of LASEC (p < 0.05). These results show that quantification of LASEC by VI value is the most favorable predictor of stroke in patients with NVAF, and calls for improving the utility of LASEC in predicting subsequent stroke events. PMID:27277939

  10. Cheyne-stokes respiration in patients with first-ever lacunar stroke.

    PubMed

    Bonnin-Vilaplana, Marc; Arboix, Adrià; Parra, Olga; García-Eroles, Luis; Montserrat, Josep M; Massons, Joan

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this single-center prospective study was to assess the presence of Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR) and CSR-related variables in 68 consecutive patients with radiologically proven first-ever lacunar stroke undergoing a respiratory sleep study using a portable respiratory polygraph within the first 48 hours of stroke onset. CSR was diagnosed in 14 patients (20.6%). Patients with CSR as compared with those without CSR showed a significantly higher mean (standard deviation, SD) apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) (34.9 (21.7) versus 18.5 (14.4), P = 0.001) and central apnea index (13.1 (13.8) versus 1.8 (3.4), P = 0.0001) as well as higher scores of the Barthel index and the Canadian Neurological scale as a measure of stroke severity, and longer hospital stay. CSR was present in one of each five patients with lacunar stroke. The presence of CSR was associated with a trend towards a higher functional stroke severity and worse prognosis. PMID:23471518

  11. Cheyne-Stokes Respiration in Patients with First-Ever Lacunar Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Bonnin-Vilaplana, Marc; Arboix, Adrià; Parra, Olga; García-Eroles, Luis; Montserrat, Josep M.; Massons, Joan

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this single-center prospective study was to assess the presence of Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR) and CSR-related variables in 68 consecutive patients with radiologically proven first-ever lacunar stroke undergoing a respiratory sleep study using a portable respiratory polygraph within the first 48 hours of stroke onset. CSR was diagnosed in 14 patients (20.6%). Patients with CSR as compared with those without CSR showed a significantly higher mean (standard deviation, SD) apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) (34.9 (21.7) versus 18.5 (14.4), P = 0.001) and central apnea index (13.1 (13.8) versus 1.8 (3.4), P = 0.0001) as well as higher scores of the Barthel index and the Canadian Neurological scale as a measure of stroke severity, and longer hospital stay. CSR was present in one of each five patients with lacunar stroke. The presence of CSR was associated with a trend towards a higher functional stroke severity and worse prognosis. PMID:23471518

  12. Cheyne-stokes respiration in patients with first-ever lacunar stroke.

    PubMed

    Bonnin-Vilaplana, Marc; Arboix, Adrià; Parra, Olga; García-Eroles, Luis; Montserrat, Josep M; Massons, Joan

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this single-center prospective study was to assess the presence of Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR) and CSR-related variables in 68 consecutive patients with radiologically proven first-ever lacunar stroke undergoing a respiratory sleep study using a portable respiratory polygraph within the first 48 hours of stroke onset. CSR was diagnosed in 14 patients (20.6%). Patients with CSR as compared with those without CSR showed a significantly higher mean (standard deviation, SD) apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) (34.9 (21.7) versus 18.5 (14.4), P = 0.001) and central apnea index (13.1 (13.8) versus 1.8 (3.4), P = 0.0001) as well as higher scores of the Barthel index and the Canadian Neurological scale as a measure of stroke severity, and longer hospital stay. CSR was present in one of each five patients with lacunar stroke. The presence of CSR was associated with a trend towards a higher functional stroke severity and worse prognosis.

  13. Perioperative stroke in a patient undergoing surgery for oral cancer: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Sukegawa, Shintaro; Kanno, Takahiro; Kanai, Kengo; Mandai, Toshiko; Shibata, Akane; Takahashi, Yuka; Hirata, Yuji; Furuki, Yoshihiko

    2016-01-01

    Carotid artery stenosis is a significant risk factor for stroke. In elderly patients with carotid atherosclerosis and stenosis, it is not unusual for oral, head and neck cancer surgery to be performed. The present study describes a case of stroke that occurred during a neck dissection for the treatment of cervical lymph node metastasis of a left maxillary gingival carcinoma. The patient was an 84-year-old female who was considered to be at high risk of a stroke based on pre-operative head and neck computed tomography scans, which detected severe carotid atherosclerosis and stenosis. There was no possible stroke prophylaxis available during the performance of the neck dissection in the present case. However, if patients are evaluated to be high-risk pre-operatively, statin agents should be administered, the surgery should be carefully performed, adequate sedation should be maintained post-operatively and the patient should be followed up, aiming to achieve the early detection of a possible stroke. PMID:27698839

  14. Perioperative stroke in a patient undergoing surgery for oral cancer: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Sukegawa, Shintaro; Kanno, Takahiro; Kanai, Kengo; Mandai, Toshiko; Shibata, Akane; Takahashi, Yuka; Hirata, Yuji; Furuki, Yoshihiko

    2016-01-01

    Carotid artery stenosis is a significant risk factor for stroke. In elderly patients with carotid atherosclerosis and stenosis, it is not unusual for oral, head and neck cancer surgery to be performed. The present study describes a case of stroke that occurred during a neck dissection for the treatment of cervical lymph node metastasis of a left maxillary gingival carcinoma. The patient was an 84-year-old female who was considered to be at high risk of a stroke based on pre-operative head and neck computed tomography scans, which detected severe carotid atherosclerosis and stenosis. There was no possible stroke prophylaxis available during the performance of the neck dissection in the present case. However, if patients are evaluated to be high-risk pre-operatively, statin agents should be administered, the surgery should be carefully performed, adequate sedation should be maintained post-operatively and the patient should be followed up, aiming to achieve the early detection of a possible stroke.

  15. Let's Talk About Sex! - Improving sexual health for patients in stroke rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Meiqi; Bosnyak, Stephanie; Bontempo, Tiziana; Enns, Amie; Fourie, Candice; Ismail, Farooq; Lo, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Sexual health contributes greatly to quality of life. Research shows that stroke survivors want to learn and talk about sexual health, but are not given information. In keeping with the Canadian Best Practice Recommendations for Stroke Care, this project aimed to provide all stroke rehabilitation inpatients with the opportunity to discuss sexual health concerns with healthcare providers at West Park Healthcare Centre, a rehabilitation and complex continuing care centre in Toronto. Gap analysis conducted via staff member interviews and retrospective chart reviews showed that close to no patients were given the opportunity to discuss sexual health concerns at baseline. Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) methodology was used as the project framework. The changes implemented included a reminder system, standardization of care processes for sexual health, patient-centred time points for the delivery of sexual health discussions, and the development of a sexual health supported conversation tool for patients with aphasia. By the end of the ten month project period and after three PDSA cycles, the percentage of patients provided with the opportunity to discuss sexual health during inpatient rehabilitation increased to 80%. This quality improvement project successfully implemented the Canadian Best Practice Recommendations for Stroke Care with respect to sexual health. Lessons learned included the importance of early baseline data collection and advance planning for tools used in QI projects. Future projects may focus on improving the discussion of sexual health concerns during outpatient stroke rehabilitation.

  16. Postdischarge quality of care: do age disparities exist among Department of Veterans Affairs ischemic stroke patients?

    PubMed

    Chumbler, Neale R; Jia, Huanguang; Phipps, Michael S; Li, Xinli; Ordin, Diana; Williams, Linda S; Myers, Laura J; Bravata, Dawn M

    2013-01-01

    This study examined whether age disparities existed across postdischarge quality indicators (QIs) for veterans with ischemic stroke who received care at Department of Veterans Affairs medical centers (VAMCs). This retrospective cohort included a national sample of 3,196 veterans who were diagnosed with ischemic stroke and received acute and postdischarge stroke care at 127 VAMCs in fiscal year 2007 (10/1/06 through 9/30/07). Data included an assessment of postdischarge stroke QIs in the outpatient setting during the 6 mo postdischarge. The QIs included measurement of and goal achievement for (1) blood pressure, (2) serum international normalized ratio (INR) for all patients discharged on warfarin, (3) cholesterol (low-density lipoprotein [LDL]) levels, (4) serum glycosylated hemoglobin, and (5) depression treatment. The mean age for the 3,196 veterans included in this study was 67.2 +/- 11.3 yr. Before risk adjustment, there were age differences in (1) depression screening/treatment, (2) blood pressure goals, and (3) LDL levels. After we adjusted for patient sociodemographic, clinical, and facility-level characteristics by using hierarchical linear mixed modeling, none of these differences remained significant but INR goals for patients discharged on warfarin differed significantly by age. After we adjusted for patient and facility characteristics, fewer age differences were found in the postdischarge stroke QIs. Clinical trial registration was not required. PMID:23761007

  17. Let's Talk About Sex! - Improving sexual health for patients in stroke rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Meiqi; Bosnyak, Stephanie; Bontempo, Tiziana; Enns, Amie; Fourie, Candice; Ismail, Farooq; Lo, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Sexual health contributes greatly to quality of life. Research shows that stroke survivors want to learn and talk about sexual health, but are not given information. In keeping with the Canadian Best Practice Recommendations for Stroke Care, this project aimed to provide all stroke rehabilitation inpatients with the opportunity to discuss sexual health concerns with healthcare providers at West Park Healthcare Centre, a rehabilitation and complex continuing care centre in Toronto. Gap analysis conducted via staff member interviews and retrospective chart reviews showed that close to no patients were given the opportunity to discuss sexual health concerns at baseline. Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) methodology was used as the project framework. The changes implemented included a reminder system, standardization of care processes for sexual health, patient-centred time points for the delivery of sexual health discussions, and the development of a sexual health supported conversation tool for patients with aphasia. By the end of the ten month project period and after three PDSA cycles, the percentage of patients provided with the opportunity to discuss sexual health during inpatient rehabilitation increased to 80%. This quality improvement project successfully implemented the Canadian Best Practice Recommendations for Stroke Care with respect to sexual health. Lessons learned included the importance of early baseline data collection and advance planning for tools used in QI projects. Future projects may focus on improving the discussion of sexual health concerns during outpatient stroke rehabilitation. PMID:26734449

  18. The effects of combined hyperbaric oxygen therapy on patients with post-stroke depression.

    PubMed

    Yan, Dong; Shan, Jin; Ze, Yu; Xiao-Yan, Zeng; Xiao-Hua, Hu

    2015-05-01

    [Purpose] To observe the effect of combined hyperbaric oxygen therapy on patients with post-stroke depression. [Subjects] Ninety patients with post-stroke depression were randomly divided into 3 groups: fluoxetine treatment group (n = 30), hyperbaric oxygen therapy group (n = 30), and hyperbaric oxygen combined treatment group (n = 30). [Methods] Fluoxetine treatment group received anti-depression drugs (fluoxetine, 20 mg/day), hyperbaric oxygen therapy group received hyperbaric oxygen (once a day, 5 days/week), hyperbaric oxygen combined treatment group received fluoxetine and hyperbaric oxygen treatments as described above. All patients received routine rehabilitation therapy. Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD), and Scandinavian Stroke Scale (SSS) scores were evaluated before and at the end of 4th week. The total effective rate of depression release between the 3 groups was also compared at the end of study. [Results] The end scores of HAMD and SSS in the 3 groups were significantly lower than those before treatment. The total effective rate of combined hyperbaric oxygen therapy group after treatment was higher than the other two groups. [Conclusions] Combined hyperbaric oxygen therapy plays an important role in the treatment of patients with post-stroke depression. The total effective rate of combined hyperbaric oxygen therapy was higher than other routine anti post-stroke depression treatments.

  19. Incidence and Risk Factors for Acute Kidney Injury Following Mannitol Infusion in Patients With Acute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shin-Yi; Tang, Sung-Chun; Tsai, Li-Kai; Yeh, Shin-Joe; Shen, Li-Jiuan; Wu, Fe-Lin Lin; Jeng, Jiann-Shing

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mannitol, an osmotic diuretic, is commonly used to treat patients with acute brain edema, but its use also increases the risk of developing acute kidney injury (AKI). In this study, we investigated the incidence and risk factors of mannitol-related AKI in acute stroke patients. A total of 432 patients (ischemic stroke 62.3%) >20 years of age who were admitted to the neurocritical care center in a tertiary hospital and received mannitol treatment were enrolled in this study. Clinical parameters including the scores of National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) at admission, vascular risk factors, laboratory data, and concurrent nephrotoxic medications were registered. Acute kidney injury was defined as an absolute elevation in the serum creatinine (Scr) level of ≥0.3 mg/dL from the baseline or a ≥50% increase in Scr. The incidence of mannitol-related AKI was 6.5% (95% confidence interval, 4.5%–9.3%) in acute stroke patients, 6.3% in patients with ischemic stroke, and 6.7% in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage. Multivariate analysis revealed that diabetes, lower estimated glomerular filtration rate at baseline, higher initial NIHSS score, and concurrent use of diuretics increased the risk of mannitol-related AKI. When present, the combination of these elements displayed an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.839 (95% confidence interval, 0.770–0.909). In conclusion, mannitol-related AKI is not uncommon in the treatment of acute stroke patients, especially in those with vulnerable risk factors. PMID:26632702

  20. A rehabilitation device to improve the hand grasp function of stroke patients using a patient-driven approach.

    PubMed

    Park, Wanjoo; Jeong, Wookjin; Kwon, Gyu-Hyun; Kim, Yun-Hee; Kim, Laehyun

    2013-06-01

    This paper proposes a robotic hand rehabilitation device for grasp training. The device is designed for stroke patients to train and recover their hand grasp function in order to undertake activities of daily living (ADL). The device consists of a control unit, two small actuators, an infrared (IR) sensor, and pressure sensors in the grasp handle. The advantages of this device are that it is small in size, inexpensive, and available for use at home without specialist's supervision. In addition, a novel patient-driven strategy based on the patient's movement intention detected by the pressure sensors without bio-signals is introduced. Once the system detects a patient's movement intention, it triggers the robotic device to move the patient's hand to form the normal grasping behavior. This strategy may encourage stroke patients to participate in rehabilitation training to recover their hand grasp function and it may also enhance neural plasticity. A user study was conducted in order to investigate the usability, acceptability, satisfaction, and suggestions for improvement of the proposed device. The results of this survey included positive reviews from therapists and a stroke patient. In particular, therapists expected that the proposed patient-driven mode can motivate patients for their rehabilitation training and it can be effective to prevent a compensational strategy in active movements. It is expected that the proposed device will assist stroke patients in restoring their grasp function efficiently.

  1. Effect of lumbar stabilization exercises on the balance ability of patients with stroke: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ko, Dae-Sik; Jung, Dae-In; Bae, Sang-Yeol

    2014-12-01

    [Purpose] This study performed a systematic literature review of the ability of lumbar stabilization exercises (LSE) to improve the balance ability of stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] A systematic review was conducted of four databases. The papers retrieved were evaluated based on the following inclusion criteria: 1) design, a controlled clinical trial; 2) intervention, LSE; 3) outcome, change in balance ability; and 4) year of publication, 2000 to 2013. [Results] The findings of 6 papers were compared to determine the effects of lumbar stabilization exercises on stroke patients' balance abilities. The papers had methodological quality scores of 5-8 on the PEDro scale. [Conclusion] Lumbar stabilization exercises have a positive influence on stroke patients' balance abilities.

  2. Cost - effectiveness analysis of the antiplatelet treatment administered on ischemic stroke patients using goal programming approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendran, Rasvini; Zainuddin, Zaitul Marlizawati; Idris, Badrisyah

    2014-09-01

    There are numerous ways to prevent or treat ischemic stroke and each of these competing alternatives is associated with a different effectiveness and a cost. In circumstances where health funds are budgeted and thus fixed, cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) can provide information on how to comprehend the largest health gains with that limited fund as CEA is used to compare different strategies for preventing or treating a single disease. The most common medications for ischemic stroke are the anti-platelet drugs. While some drugs are more effective than others, they are also more expensive. This paper will thus assess the CEA of anti-platelet drug available for ischemic stroke patients using goal programming (GP) approach subject to in-patients days and patients' quality-of-life. GP presents a way of striving towards several objectives simultaneously whereby in this case we will consider minimizing the cost and maximizing the effectiveness.

  3. The Effect of Underwater Gait Training on Balance Ability of Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seok Woo; Lee, Kyoung Jin; Shin, Doo Chul; Shin, Seung Ho; Lee, Myung Mo; Song, Chang Ho

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of underwater treadmill gait training on the balance ability of stroke patients. [Subjects] Twenty-two patients with stroke were randomly assigned to an underwater treadmill group (n =11) or a control group (n =11). [Methods] Both groups received general rehabilitation for 30 min per session, 5 times per week, over a 4-week period. The underwater treadmill group received additional underwater gait training for 30 min per session, 5 times per week, over the same 4-week period. Static and dynamic balances were evaluated before and after the intervention. [Results] The means of static and dynamic balance ability increased significantly in both groups, but there was no significant difference between the two groups. [Conclusion] Compared to the general rehabilitation program, underwater treadmill gait training was not more effective at improving the balance ability of stroke patients than land-based training. PMID:25013292

  4. Effect of thoracic and cervical joint mobilization on pulmonary function in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Sang-Hun; Bang, Hyun-Soo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to conduct thoracic and cervical mobilization in stroke patients and determine its effects on respiratory function. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-one stroke patients were studied. Subjects were divided into a control group (control group, n=11) who did not undergo thoracic and cervical joint mobilization, and an experimental group (thoracic and cervical mobilization group, n=10) who underwent thoracic and cervical joint mobilization. Forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in the first second, well-known indicators of respiratory capabilities, were measured. Peak cough flow was measured as an indicator of cough capability. [Results] After the exercise, respiratory function in the thoracic and cervical mobilization group showed statistically significant improvements demonstrated by increases in forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in the first second, and peak cough flow. [Conclusion] The findings indicate that thoracic and cervical mobilization can improve the thoracic movements of stroke patients resulting in improved pulmonary function. PMID:26957769

  5. Clinical indicators of 'caregiver role strain' in caregivers of stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Ana Railka de Souza; Rodrigues, Rebeca Cordeiro; de Sousa, Vanessa Emille Carvalho; Costa, Alice Gabrielle de Sousa; Lopes, Marcos Venícios de Oliveira; de Araujo, Thelma Leite

    2013-06-01

    The main objectives of this study were to investigate the prevalence of the nursing diagnosis caregiver role strain (CRS) in caregivers of patients with stroke and to identify the accuracy of this diagnosis's clinical indicators. A total of 42 stroke patient caregivers who provided in-home care services in a city in north-eastern Brazil. The sensitivity, specificity, and predictive value of clinical indicators of nursing diagnosis 'CRS' were analyzed. Study participants were mostly female, married and the daughters of stroke patients. CRS was present in 73.8% of caregivers. The presence of the clinical indicators, specifically, lack of time to meet personal needs (p = 0.011), increased emotional lability (p = 0.001), withdrawal from social life (p = 0.002), and changes in leisure activities (p = 0.002), presented high values for statistical measures of diagnostic accuracy.

  6. Comparison of Gait Aspects According to FES Stimulation Position Applied to Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Mun, Byeong-Mu; Kim, Tae-Ho; Lee, Jin-Hwan; Lim, Jin-Youg; Seo, Dong-Kwon; Lee, Dong-Jin

    2014-04-01

    [Purpose] This study sought to identify the gait aspects according to the FES stimulation position in stroke patients during gait training. [Subjects and Methods] To perform gait analysis, ten stroke patients were grouped based on 4 types of gait conditions: gait without FES stimulation (non-FES), gait with FES stimulation on the tibialis anterior (Ta), gait with FES stimulation on the tibialis anterior and quadriceps (TaQ), and gait with FES stimulation on the tibialis anterior and gluteus medius (TaGm). [Results] Based on repeated measures analysis of variance of measurements of gait aspects comprised of gait speed, gait cycle, and step length according to the FES stimulation position, the FES stimulation significantly affected gait aspects. [Conclusion] In conclusion, stimulating the tibialis anterior and quadriceps and stimulating the tibialis anterior and gluteus medius are much more effective than stimulating only the tibialis anterior during gait training in stroke patients using FES.

  7. The effects of trunk kinesio taping on balance ability and gait function in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yang Jin; Kim, Ji Young; Kim, Seong Yoel; Kim, Kyung Hoon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Kinesio taping is a therapeutic method used in the treatment of various musculoskeletal and neuromuscular deficits, but there is limited evidence of the effects of trunk kinesio taping in neurologic patients. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the effects of trunk kinesio taping on balance ability and gait function in persons after a stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-five post-stroke patients were included in this study. Kinesio tape was applied to four trunk muscles. Before and after the taping, in all subjects, the balance ability was measured using the Wii Balance Board, and gait function was assessed using the GAITRite system. [Results] The difference in gait function before and after trunk taping was not statistically significant. However, a variability of balance ability showed statistically significant differences. [Conclusion] These results suggest that taping may be a helpful method during rehabilitation programs for stroke patients. Its application to the trunk muscles is especially useful for improving balance ability.

  8. The effects of trunk kinesio taping on balance ability and gait function in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yang Jin; Kim, Ji Young; Kim, Seong Yoel; Kim, Kyung Hoon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Kinesio taping is a therapeutic method used in the treatment of various musculoskeletal and neuromuscular deficits, but there is limited evidence of the effects of trunk kinesio taping in neurologic patients. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the effects of trunk kinesio taping on balance ability and gait function in persons after a stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-five post-stroke patients were included in this study. Kinesio tape was applied to four trunk muscles. Before and after the taping, in all subjects, the balance ability was measured using the Wii Balance Board, and gait function was assessed using the GAITRite system. [Results] The difference in gait function before and after trunk taping was not statistically significant. However, a variability of balance ability showed statistically significant differences. [Conclusion] These results suggest that taping may be a helpful method during rehabilitation programs for stroke patients. Its application to the trunk muscles is especially useful for improving balance ability. PMID:27630439

  9. The effects of trunk kinesio taping on balance ability and gait function in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yang Jin; Kim, Ji Young; Kim, Seong Yoel; Kim, Kyung Hoon

    2016-08-01

    [Purpose] Kinesio taping is a therapeutic method used in the treatment of various musculoskeletal and neuromuscular deficits, but there is limited evidence of the effects of trunk kinesio taping in neurologic patients. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the effects of trunk kinesio taping on balance ability and gait function in persons after a stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-five post-stroke patients were included in this study. Kinesio tape was applied to four trunk muscles. Before and after the taping, in all subjects, the balance ability was measured using the Wii Balance Board, and gait function was assessed using the GAITRite system. [Results] The difference in gait function before and after trunk taping was not statistically significant. However, a variability of balance ability showed statistically significant differences. [Conclusion] These results suggest that taping may be a helpful method during rehabilitation programs for stroke patients. Its application to the trunk muscles is especially useful for improving balance ability.

  10. Effects of Lower-Leg Kinesiology Taping on Balance Ability in Stroke Patients with Foot Drop

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Young-Hyeon; Kim, Hyeong Geun; Min, Kyung Sam; Lee, Suk Min

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to observe the effects of lower-leg kinesiology taping on balance ability in stroke patients with foot drop. Design. Randomized controlled trial study. Method. Thirty stroke patients with foot drop were randomly divided into two groups. The experimental group underwent kinesiology taping, and the control group underwent placebo taping. Balance ability was assessed before and after taping in both groups. Results. No difference was observed over time in the Berg Balance Scale score between the two groups, and a significant difference in the Berg Balance Scale score was observed only in the experimental group. Additionally, there were significant differences in the center of pressure area and limits of stability over time. Conclusion. Kinesiology taping temporarily improved static balance ability in stroke patients. However, its effect on dynamic balance was not verified. Therefore, further research on the influence of long-term kinesiology taping on dynamic balance and gait ability is suggested. PMID:26579200

  11. Effects of visual feedback with a mirror on balance ability in patients with stroke

    PubMed Central

    In, Tae-Sung; Cha, Yu-Ri; Jung, Jin-Hwa; Jung, Kyoung-Sim

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to examine the effects of a visual feedback obtained from a mirror on balance ability during quiet standing in patients with stroke. [Subjects] Fifteen patients with stroke (9 males, 6 females) enrolled in the study. [Methods] Experimental trials (duration, 20s) included three visual conditions (eyes closed, eyes open, and mirror feedback) and two support surface conditions (stable, and unstable). Center of pressure (COP) displacements in the mediolateral and anteroposterior directions were recorded using a force platform. [Results] No effect of condition was observed along all directions on the stable surface. An effect of condition was observed on the unstable surface, with a smaller mediolateral COP distance in the mirror feedback as compared to the other two conditions. Similar results were observed for the COP speed. [Conclusion] Visual feedback from a mirror is beneficial for improving balance ability during quiet standing on an unstable surface in patients with stroke. PMID:26957753

  12. Effects of Hippotherapy on Recovery of Gait and Balance Ability in Patients with Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chae-Woo; Kim, Seong Gil; Yong, Min Sik

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the the effects of hippotherapy on gait and balance ability in patients with stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty stroke patients were randomly divided into a hippotherapy group and a treadmill group and they conducted exercise for eight weeks. [Results] Berg Balance Scale score, gait velocity, and step length asymmetry ratio were significantly improved in the group receiving hippotherapy training. However, in the group receiving treadmill training, only step length asymmetry ratio was significantly improved. In the comparison between the hippotherapy group and treadmill group, there was no significant difference in Berg Balance Scale score, but a significant difference was found in gait velocity and step length asymmetry ratio. [Conclusion] The results of this study indicated that hippotherapy is a helpful treatment for stroke patients. PMID:24648655

  13. The Effects of Horseback Riding Simulator Exercise on Postural Balance of Chronic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jungseo; Lee, Sangyong; Lee, Jiyeun; Lee, Daehee

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the effects of horseback riding simulator exercise on postural balance of chronic stroke patients. [Subjects] A total of 67 stroke patients were assigned either to a horseback riding simulator exercise group (HEG, n=34) or a mat exercise group (MEG, n=33). [Methods] The subjects exercised three times per week for 8 weeks. Static balance ability was determined by eyes open balance (EOB) and eyes closed balance (ECB), which was measured using a Kinesthetic Ability Trainer Balance system. Dynamic balance was evaluated using the Berg balance scale (BBS). [Results] EOB and ECB significantly decreased and BBS had significantly increased after the intervention in the HEG and the MEG, and ECB decreased and BBS increased significantly more in the HEG than in the MEG. [Conclusion] Horseback riding simulator exercise is more effective than mat exercise for improving the ECB and BBS of stroke patients. PMID:24259938

  14. Effects of hippotherapy on recovery of gait and balance ability in patients with stroke.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chae-Woo; Kim, Seong Gil; Yong, Min Sik

    2014-02-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the the effects of hippotherapy on gait and balance ability in patients with stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty stroke patients were randomly divided into a hippotherapy group and a treadmill group and they conducted exercise for eight weeks. [Results] Berg Balance Scale score, gait velocity, and step length asymmetry ratio were significantly improved in the group receiving hippotherapy training. However, in the group receiving treadmill training, only step length asymmetry ratio was significantly improved. In the comparison between the hippotherapy group and treadmill group, there was no significant difference in Berg Balance Scale score, but a significant difference was found in gait velocity and step length asymmetry ratio. [Conclusion] The results of this study indicated that hippotherapy is a helpful treatment for stroke patients.

  15. The effect of underwater gait training on balance ability of stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Park, Seok Woo; Lee, Kyoung Jin; Shin, Doo Chul; Shin, Seung Ho; Lee, Myung Mo; Song, Chang Ho

    2014-06-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of underwater treadmill gait training on the balance ability of stroke patients. [Subjects] Twenty-two patients with stroke were randomly assigned to an underwater treadmill group (n =11) or a control group (n =11). [Methods] Both groups received general rehabilitation for 30 min per session, 5 times per week, over a 4-week period. The underwater treadmill group received additional underwater gait training for 30 min per session, 5 times per week, over the same 4-week period. Static and dynamic balances were evaluated before and after the intervention. [Results] The means of static and dynamic balance ability increased significantly in both groups, but there was no significant difference between the two groups. [Conclusion] Compared to the general rehabilitation program, underwater treadmill gait training was not more effective at improving the balance ability of stroke patients than land-based training.

  16. Effects of hippotherapy on recovery of gait and balance ability in patients with stroke.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chae-Woo; Kim, Seong Gil; Yong, Min Sik

    2014-02-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the the effects of hippotherapy on gait and balance ability in patients with stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty stroke patients were randomly divided into a hippotherapy group and a treadmill group and they conducted exercise for eight weeks. [Results] Berg Balance Scale score, gait velocity, and step length asymmetry ratio were significantly improved in the group receiving hippotherapy training. However, in the group receiving treadmill training, only step length asymmetry ratio was significantly improved. In the comparison between the hippotherapy group and treadmill group, there was no significant difference in Berg Balance Scale score, but a significant difference was found in gait velocity and step length asymmetry ratio. [Conclusion] The results of this study indicated that hippotherapy is a helpful treatment for stroke patients. PMID:24648655

  17. Effects of Lower-Leg Kinesiology Taping on Balance Ability in Stroke Patients with Foot Drop.

    PubMed

    Bae, Young-Hyeon; Kim, Hyeong Geun; Min, Kyung Sam; Lee, Suk Min

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to observe the effects of lower-leg kinesiology taping on balance ability in stroke patients with foot drop. Design. Randomized controlled trial study. Method. Thirty stroke patients with foot drop were randomly divided into two groups. The experimental group underwent kinesiology taping, and the control group underwent placebo taping. Balance ability was assessed before and after taping in both groups. Results. No difference was observed over time in the Berg Balance Scale score between the two groups, and a significant difference in the Berg Balance Scale score was observed only in the experimental group. Additionally, there were significant differences in the center of pressure area and limits of stability over time. Conclusion. Kinesiology taping temporarily improved static balance ability in stroke patients. However, its effect on dynamic balance was not verified. Therefore, further research on the influence of long-term kinesiology taping on dynamic balance and gait ability is suggested.

  18. Combining transcranial ultrasound with intelligent communication methods to enhance the remote assessment and management of stroke patients: Framework for a technology demonstrator.

    PubMed

    Mort, Alasdair; Eadie, Leila; Regan, Luke; Macaden, Ashish; Heaney, David; Bouamrane, Matt-Mouley; Rushworth, Gordon; Wilson, Philip

    2016-09-01

    With over 150,000 strokes in the United Kingdom every year, and more than 1 million living survivors, stroke is the third most common cause of death and the leading cause of severe physical disability among adults. A major challenge in administering timely treatment is determining whether the stroke is due to vascular blockage (ischaemic) or haemorrhage. For patients with ischaemic stroke, thrombolysis (i.e. pharmacological 'clot-busting') can improve outcomes when delivered swiftly after onset, and current National Health Service Quality Improvement Scotland guidelines are for thrombolytic therapy to be provided to at least 80 per cent of eligible patients within 60 min of arrival at hospital. Thrombolysis in haemorrhagic stroke could severely compound the brain damage, so administration of thrombolytic therapy currently requires near-immediate care in a hospital, rapid consultation with a physician and access to imaging services (X-ray computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging) and intensive care services. This is near impossible in remote and rural areas, and stroke mortality rates in Scotland are 50 per cent higher than in London. We here describe our current project developing a technology demonstrator with ultrasound imaging linked to an intelligent, multi-channel communication device - connecting to multiple 2G/3G/4G networks and/or satellites - in order to stream live ultrasound images, video and two-way audio streams to hospital-based specialists who can guide and advise ambulance clinicians regarding diagnosis. With portable ultrasound machines located in ambulances or general practices, use of such technology is not confined to stroke, although this is our current focus. Ultrasound assessment is useful in many other immediate care situations, suggesting potential wider applicability for this remote support system. Although our research programme is driven by rural need, the ideas are potentially applicable to urban areas where access to

  19. Conditional Granger Causality Analysis of Effective Connectivity during Motor Imagery and Motor Execution in Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Zhang, Jingna; Zhang, Ye; Yan, Rubing; Liu, Hongliang; Qiu, Mingguo

    2016-01-01

    Aims. Motor imagery has emerged as a promising technique for the improvement of motor function following stroke, but the mechanism of functional network reorganization in patients during this process remains unclear. The aim of this study is to evaluate the cortical motor network patterns of effective connectivity in stroke patients. Methods. Ten stroke patients with right hand hemiplegia and ten normal control subjects were recruited. We applied conditional Granger causality analysis (CGCA) to explore and compare the functional connectivity between motor execution and motor imagery. Results. Compared with the normal controls, the patient group showed lower effective connectivity to the primary motor cortex (M1), the premotor cortex (PMC), and the supplementary motor area (SMA) in the damaged hemisphere but stronger effective connectivity to the ipsilesional PMC and M1 in the intact hemisphere during motor execution. There were tighter connections in the cortical motor network in the patients than in the controls during motor imagery, and the patients showed more effective connectivity in the intact hemisphere. Conclusions. The increase in effective connectivity suggests that motor imagery enhances core corticocortical interactions, promotes internal interaction in damaged hemispheres in stroke patients, and may facilitate recovery of motor function. PMID:27200373

  20. Conditional Granger Causality Analysis of Effective Connectivity during Motor Imagery and Motor Execution in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Zhang, Jingna; Zhang, Ye; Yan, Rubing; Liu, Hongliang; Qiu, Mingguo

    2016-01-01

    Aims. Motor imagery has emerged as a promising technique for the improvement of motor function following stroke, but the mechanism of functional network reorganization in patients during this process remains unclear. The aim of this study is to evaluate the cortical motor network patterns of effective connectivity in stroke patients. Methods. Ten stroke patients with right hand hemiplegia and ten normal control subjects were recruited. We applied conditional Granger causality analysis (CGCA) to explore and compare the functional connectivity between motor execution and motor imagery. Results. Compared with the normal controls, the patient group showed lower effective connectivity to the primary motor cortex (M1), the premotor cortex (PMC), and the supplementary motor area (SMA) in the damaged hemisphere but stronger effective connectivity to the ipsilesional PMC and M1 in the intact hemisphere during motor execution. There were tighter connections in the cortical motor network in the patients than in the controls during motor imagery, and the patients showed more effective connectivity in the intact hemisphere. Conclusions. The increase in effective connectivity suggests that motor imagery enhances core corticocortical interactions, promotes internal interaction in damaged hemispheres in stroke patients, and may facilitate recovery of motor function. PMID:27200373

  1. How a Stroke Is Diagnosed

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials News About Neurology Image Library Search The Internet Stroke Center Patients & Families About Stroke Stroke Diagnosis ... UT Southwestern Medical Center. Copyright © 1997-2016 - The Internet Stroke Center. All rights reserved. The information contained ...

  2. Timing Matters? Learning of Complex Spatiotemporal Sequences in Left-hemisphere Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Dovern, Anna; Fink, Gereon R; Timpert, David C; Saliger, Jochen; Karbe, Hans; Weiss, Peter H; Koch, Iring

    2016-02-01

    During rehabilitation after stroke motor sequence learning is of particular importance because considerable effort is devoted to (re)acquiring lost motor skills. Previous studies suggest that implicit motor sequence learning is preserved in stroke patients but were restricted to the spatial dimension, although the timing of single action components is as important as their spatial order. As the left parietal cortex is known to play a critical role in implicit timing and spatiotemporal integration, in this study we applied an adapted version of the SRT task designed to assess both spatial (different stimulus locations) and temporal (different response-stimulus intervals) aspects of motor learning to 24 right-handed patients with a single left-hemisphere (LH) stroke and 24 age-matched healthy controls. Implicit retrieval of sequence knowledge was tested both at Day 1 and after 24 hr (Day 2). Additionally, voxel-based lesion symptom mapping was used to investigate the neurobiological substrates of the behavioral effects. Although LH stroke patients showed a combined spatiotemporal learning effect that was comparable to that observed in controls, LH stroke patients did not show learning effects for the learning probes in which only one type of sequence information was maintained whereas the other one was randomized. Particularly on Day 2, patients showed significantly smaller learning scores for these two learning probes than controls. Voxel-based lesion symptom mapping analyses revealed for all learning probes that diminished learning scores on Day 2 were associated with lesions of the striatum. This might be attributed to its role in motor chunking and offline consolidation as group differences occurred on Day 2 only. The current results suggest that LH stroke patients rely on multimodal information (here: temporal and spatial information) when retrieving motor sequence knowledge and are very sensitive to any disruption of the learnt sequence information as they seem

  3. The Multidisciplinary Swallowing Team Approach Decreases Pneumonia Onset in Acute Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Shiro; Hirayama, Junko; Nakamori, Masahiro; Yoshikawa, Mineka; Nezu, Tomohisa; Kubo, Satoshi; Nagano, Yuka; Nagao, Akiko; Yamane, Naoya; Nishikawa, Yuichi; Takamoto, Megumi; Ueno, Hiroki; Ochi, Kazuhide; Maruyama, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Hiromi; Matsumoto, Masayasu

    2016-01-01

    Dysphagia occurs in acute stroke patients at high rates, and many of them develop aspiration pneumonia. Team approaches with the cooperation of various professionals have the power to improve the quality of medical care, utilizing the specialized knowledge and skills of each professional. In our hospital, a multidisciplinary participatory swallowing team was organized. The aim of this study was to clarify the influence of a team approach on dysphagia by comparing the rates of pneumonia in acute stroke patients prior to and post team organization. All consecutive acute stroke patients who were admitted to our hospital between April 2009 and March 2014 were registered. We analyzed the difference in the rate of pneumonia onset between the periods before team organization (prior period) and after team organization (post period). Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed using a Cox proportional hazards model to determine the predictors of pneumonia. We recruited 132 acute stroke patients from the prior period and 173 patients from the post period. Pneumonia onset was less frequent in the post period compared with the prior period (6.9% vs. 15.9%, respectively; p = 0.01). Based on a multivariate analysis using a Cox proportional hazards model, it was determined that a swallowing team approach was related to pneumonia onset independent from the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score on admission (adjusted hazard ratio 0.41, 95% confidence interval 0.19–0.84, p = 0.02). The multidisciplinary participatory swallowing team effectively decreased the pneumonia onset in acute stroke patients. PMID:27138162

  4. A Model for Predicting Persistent Elevation of Factor VIII among Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Samai, Alyana A.; Boehme, Amelia K.; Shaban, Amir; George, Alexander J.; Dowell, Lauren; Monlezun, Dominique J.; Leissinger, Cindy; Schluter, Laurie; El Khoury, Ramy; Martin-Schild, Sheryl

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Elevated levels of coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) may persist independent of the acute-phase response; however, this relationship has not been investigated relative to acute ischemic stroke (AIS). We examined the frequency and predictors of persistently elevated FVIII in AIS patients. Methods AIS patients admitted between July 2008 and May 2014 with elevated baseline FVIII levels and repeat FVIII levels drawn for more than 7 days postdischarge were included. The patients were dichotomized by repeat FVIII level for univariate analysis at 150% and 200% activity thresholds. An adjusted model was developed to predict the likelihood of persistently elevated FVIII levels. Results Among 1616 AIS cases, 98 patients with elevated baseline FVIII had repeat FVIII levels. Persistent FVIII elevation was found in more than 75% of patients. At the 150% threshold, the prediction score ranged from 0 to 7 and included black race, female sex, prior stroke, hyperlipidemia, smoking, baseline FVIII > 200%, and baseline von Willebrand factor (vWF) level greater than 200%. At the 200% threshold, the prediction score ranged from 0–5 and included female sex, prior stroke, diabetes mellitus, baseline FVIII level greater 200%, and baseline vWF level greater than 200%. For each 1-point increase in score, the odds of persistent FVIII at both the 150% threshold (odds ratio [OR] = 10.4, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.63–66.9, P = .0134) and 200% threshold (OR = 10.2, 95% CI 1.82–57.5, P = .0083) increased 10 times. Conclusion Because an elevated FVIII level confers increased stroke risk, our model for anticipating a persistently elevated FVIII level may identify patients at high risk for recurrent stroke. FVIII may be a target for secondary stroke prevention. PMID:26777556

  5. Detailed Analysis of Peri-Procedural Strokes in Patients Undergoing Intracranial Stenting in SAMMPRIS

    PubMed Central

    Fiorella, David; Derdeyn, Colin P; Lynn, Michael J; Barnwell, Stanley L; Hoh, Brian L.; Levy, Elad I.; Harrigan, Mark R.; Klucznik, Richard P.; McDougall, Cameron G.; Pride, G. Lee; Zaidat, Osama O.; Lutsep, Helmi L.; Waters, Michael F.; Hourihane, J. Maurice; Alexandrov, Andrei V.; Chiu, David; Clark, Joni M.; Johnson, Mark D.; Torbey, Michel T.; Rumboldt, Zoran; Cloft, Harry J.; Turan, Tanya N.; Lane, Bethany F.; Janis, L. Scott; Chimowitz, Marc I.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose Enrollment in the SAMMPRIS trial was halted due to the high risk of stroke or death within 30 days of enrollment in the percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting (PTAS) arm relative to the medical arm. This analysis focuses on the patient and procedural factors that may have been associated with peri-procedural cerebrovascular events in the trial. Methods Bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed to evaluate whether patient and procedural variables were associated with cerebral ischemic or hemorrhagic events occurring within 30 days of enrollment (termed peri-procedural) in the PTAS arm. Results Of 224 patients randomized to PTAS, 213 underwent angioplasty alone (n=5) or with stenting (n=208). Of these, 13 had hemorrhagic strokes (7 parenchymal, 6 subarachnoid), 19 had ischemic stroke, and 2 had cerebral infarcts with temporary signs (CITS) within the peri-procedural period. Ischemic events were categorized as perforator occlusions (13), embolic (4), mixed perforator and embolic (2), and delayed stent occlusion (2). Multivariate analyses showed that higher percent stenosis, lower modified Rankin score, and clopidogrel load associated with an activated clotting time above the target range were associated (p ≤ 0.05) with hemorrhagic stroke. Non-smoking, basilar artery stenosis, diabetes, and older age were associated (p ≤ 0.05) with ischemic events. Conclusions Peri-procedural strokes in SAMMPRIS had multiple causes with the most common being perforator occlusion. Although risk factors for peri-procedural strokes could be identified, excluding patients with these features from undergoing PTAS to lower the procedural risk would limit PTAS to a small subset of patients. Moreover, given the small number of events, the present data should be used for hypothesis generation rather than to guide patient selection in clinical practice. PMID:22984008

  6. Timing Matters? Learning of Complex Spatiotemporal Sequences in Left-hemisphere Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Dovern, Anna; Fink, Gereon R; Timpert, David C; Saliger, Jochen; Karbe, Hans; Weiss, Peter H; Koch, Iring

    2016-02-01

    During rehabilitation after stroke motor sequence learning is of particular importance because considerable effort is devoted to (re)acquiring lost motor skills. Previous studies suggest that implicit motor sequence learning is preserved in stroke patients but were restricted to the spatial dimension, although the timing of single action components is as important as their spatial order. As the left parietal cortex is known to play a critical role in implicit timing and spatiotemporal integration, in this study we applied an adapted version of the SRT task designed to assess both spatial (different stimulus locations) and temporal (different response-stimulus intervals) aspects of motor learning to 24 right-handed patients with a single left-hemisphere (LH) stroke and 24 age-matched healthy controls. Implicit retrieval of sequence knowledge was tested both at Day 1 and after 24 hr (Day 2). Additionally, voxel-based lesion symptom mapping was used to investigate the neurobiological substrates of the behavioral effects. Although LH stroke patients showed a combined spatiotemporal learning effect that was comparable to that observed in controls, LH stroke patients did not show learning effects for the learning probes in which only one type of sequence information was maintained whereas the other one was randomized. Particularly on Day 2, patients showed significantly smaller learning scores for these two learning probes than controls. Voxel-based lesion symptom mapping analyses revealed for all learning probes that diminished learning scores on Day 2 were associated with lesions of the striatum. This might be attributed to its role in motor chunking and offline consolidation as group differences occurred on Day 2 only. The current results suggest that LH stroke patients rely on multimodal information (here: temporal and spatial information) when retrieving motor sequence knowledge and are very sensitive to any disruption of the learnt sequence information as they seem

  7. A study of bone densitometry in patients with complex regional pain syndrome after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, V; Kalita, J; Gujral, R; Sharma, V; Misra, U

    2001-01-01

    INTRODUCTION—This study was undertaken to evaluate the bone mineral density (BMD) in patients with complex regional pain syndrome type-I (CRPS-I) after stroke, and to correlate it with various clinical and neurophysiological parameters.
PATIENTS AND METHODS—Twenty patients with CRPS-I after stroke were included and a detailed neurological evaluation was carried out. The severity of CRPS-I was graded on the basis of shoulder hand syndrome score. All the patients underwent bone mineral densitometry of paralysed and non-paralysed forearm by dual energy x ray absorptiometry. The BMD of paralysed forearm was also compared with that of age matched healthy controls. Neurophysiological tests included sympathetic skin response in both upper and lower limbs and median somatosensory evoked potentials.
RESULTS—The mean age of patients was 57.2 (45-75) years and eight were females. Eight patients had severe weakness and 12 had moderate weakness of grade 2 on the hemiplegic side. There was significant reduction in BMD in the patients compared with controls (p<0.01). The bone density reduction correlated well with duration of illness (r = −0.673, p<0.01), shoulder hand syndrome score (r = −0.804, p<0.01), and Canadian neurological scale score (r = −0.738 p<0.01). Sympathetic skin response was not recordable bilaterally in all patients. Median somatosensory evoked potentials were not recordable in seven out of 20 patients who also had higher grade of CRPS-I.
CONCLUSION—Our results show significant reduction of BMD in patients with CRPS-I after stroke. The reduction in BMD correlates with the severity of shoulder hand syndrome score, degree of weakness, duration of hemiplegia, and the severity of stroke.


Keywords: stroke; complex regional pain syndrome type I; bone mineral density PMID:11470933

  8. Association between mental health conditions and rehospitalization, mortality, and functional outcomes in patients with stroke following inpatient rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Limited evidence exists regarding the association of pre-existing mental health conditions in patients with stroke and stroke outcomes such as rehospitalization, mortality, and function. We examined the association between mental health conditions and rehospitalization, mortality, and functional outcomes in patients with stroke following inpatient rehabilitation. Methods Our observational study used the 2001 VA Integrated Stroke Outcomes database of 2162 patients with stroke who underwent rehabilitation at a Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Separate models were fit to our outcome measures that included 6-month rehospitalization or death, 6-month mortality post-discharge, and functional outcomes post inpatient rehabilitation as a function of number and type of mental health conditions. The models controlled for patient socio-demographics, length of stay, functional status, and rehabilitation setting. Results Patients had an average age of 68 years. Patients with stroke and two or more mental health conditions were more likely to be readmitted or die compared to patients with no conditions (OR: 1.44, p = 0.04). Depression and anxiety were associated with a greater likelihood of rehospitalization or death (OR: 1.33, p = 0.04; OR:1.47, p = 0.03). Patients with anxiety were more likely to die at six months (OR: 2.49, p = 0.001). Conclusions Patients with stroke with pre-existing mental health conditions may need additional psychotherapy interventions, which may potentially improve stroke outcomes post-hospitalization. PMID:22085779

  9. Efficacy of Oral Anticoagulation in Stroke Prevention among Sinus-Rhythm Patients Who Lack Left Atrial Mechanical Contraction after Cryoablation.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Comendador, José; Gualis, Javier; Marcos-Vidal, José Miguel; Buber, Jonnatan; Martín, Carlos Esteban; Gomez-Plana, Jesús; Rodríguez, Miguel Angel; Iglesias-Garriz, Ignacio; Alonso, David; Soria, Carlos; Miguélez, Eva Higuera; Castaño, Mario

    2015-10-01

    The customary recommendation is that oral anticoagulation be withdrawn a few months after cryoablation for atrial fibrillation, independently of left atrial mechanical contraction in patients in sinus rhythm. Recently, a 5-fold increase in stroke has been described in sinus-rhythm patients who lack atrial mechanical contraction. One aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of oral anticoagulation in preventing postoperative stroke in such patients. This prospective study divided 154 sinus-rhythm patients into 2 groups, depending on the presence (108 patients) or absence (46 patients) of left atrial mechanical contraction at 6 months after surgery, and monitored them annually for 5 years. Those without left atrial contraction were maintained on acenocumarol. The primary endpoint was the occurrence of ischemic stroke. The median follow-up period was 29 ± 16 months; 4 patients (2.5%), all belonging to the group with preserved atrial contraction, had ischemic stroke; the group of patients without left atrial contraction had no episodes of stroke during follow-up. Logistic binary regression analyses showed no evidence of factors independently predictive of stroke. Among anticoagulated patients in sinus rhythm without left atrial contraction, we found the incidence of stroke to be zero. In a small, nonrandomized group such as this, we cannot discount the element of chance, yet we suggest that maintaining anticoagulation might lower the incidence of stroke in this population.

  10. Rasch analysis of the London Handicap Scale in stroke patients: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although activity and participation are the target domains in stroke rehabilitation interventions, there is insufficient evidence available regarding the validity of participation measurement. The purpose of this study was to investigate the psychometric properties of the London Handicap Scale in community-dwelling stroke patients, using Rasch analysis. Methods Participants were 170 community-dwelling stroke survivors. The data were analyzed using Winsteps (version 3.62) with the Rasch model to determine the unidimensionality of item fit, the distribution of item difficulty, and the reliability and suitability of the rating process for the London Handicap Scale. Results Data of 16 participants did not fit the Rasch model and there were no misfitting items. The person separation value was 2.42, and the reliability was .85; furthermore, the rating process for the London Handicap Scale was found to be suitable for use with stroke patients. Conclusions This was the first trial to investigate the psychometric properties of the London Handicap Scale using Rasch analysis; the results supported the suitability of this scale for use with stroke patients. PMID:25077991

  11. The Effects of Shoulder Slings on Balance in Patients With Hemiplegic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Min Kyun; Jee, Sung Ju; Hwang, Pyoungsik; Jeon, Yumi

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of a shoulder sling on balance in patients with hemiplegia. Methods Twenty-seven hemiplegic stroke patients (right 13, left 14) were enrolled in this study. The subjects' movement in their centers of gravity (COGs) during their static and dynamic balance tests was measured with their eyes open in each sling condition-without a sling, with Bobath's axillary support (Bobath sling), and with a simple arm sling. The percent times in quadrant, overall, anterior/posterior, and medial/lateral stability indexes were measured using a posturography platform (Biodex Balance System SD). Functional balance was evaluated using the Berg Balance Scale and the Trunk Impairment Scale. All balance tests were performed with each sling in random order. Results The COGs of right hemiplegic stroke patients and all hemiplegic stroke patients shifted to, respectively, the right and posterior quadrants during the static balance test without a sling (p<0.05). This weight asymmetry pattern did not improve with either the Bobath or the simple arm sling. There was no significant improvement in any stability index during either the static or the dynamic balance tests in any sling condition. Conclusion The right and posterior deviations of the hemiplegic stroke patients' COGs were maintained during the application of the shoulder slings, and there were no significant effects of the shoulder slings on the patients' balance in the standing still position. PMID:26798614

  12. Dietary Habits in Patients with Ischemic Stroke: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Campello, Ana; Jiménez-Conde, Jordi; Ois, Ángel; Cuadrado-Godia, Elisa; Giralt-Steinhauer, Eva; Schroeder, Helmut; Romeral, Gemma; Llop, Mireia; Soriano-Tárraga, Carolina; Garralda-Anaya, Montserrat; Roquer, Jaume

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Diet appears to have some role in stroke development. The objective of our study was to describe the dietary habits in patients admitted with acute ischemic stroke and compare selected dietary components with healthy controls. Adherence to healthy diet behaviors was also assessed. Methods A case-control study of consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke admitted to the Neurology Department of Hospital del Mar from 2007 to 2010. Patients were matched by age and sex with control subjects. A previously validated nutritional survey was administered to patients and controls. Demographic data, vascular risk factors, caloric intake and dietary nutrients were evaluated. Intention to follow a healthy diet was also assessed in both groups. Results A total of 300 acute ischemic stroke patients and 300 controls with evaluation of dietary habits. No differences were observed in vascular risk factors, except smoking habit, diabetes and ischemic heart disease. Stroke patients reported a higher caloric intake: 2444.8(1736.8–3244.5) vs 2208.7(1753.1–2860.7) Kcal, p = 0.001. After adjusting for energy intake, patients had higher intake of proteins (p<0.001; OR 1.02), total cholesterol (p = 0.001; OR 1.04), and breaded foods (p = 0.001; OR 1.94) and lower consumption of probiotic yogurt (p = 0.002; OR 0.88). Compared to patients, control participants indicated greater intention to eat vegetables (p = 0.002; OR 1.5) and whole foods (p = 0.000; OR 2.4) and reduce their intake of salt (p = 0.002; OR 1.7), fat (p = 0.000; OR 3.7) and sweets (p = 0.004; OR 1.7) than patients. Conclusion We observed different dietary patterns between stroke patients and controls. Stroke patients have a higher caloric intake and are less concerned about maintaining healthy nutritional habits. PMID:25506934

  13. Diffusion tensor and volumetric magnetic resonance imaging using an MR-compatible hand-induced robotic device suggests training-induced neuroplasticity in patients with chronic stroke

    PubMed Central

    LAZARIDOU, ASIMINA; ASTRAKAS, LOUKAS; MINTZOPOULOS, DIONYSSIOS; KHANICHEH, AZADEH; SINGHAL, ANEESH B.; MOSKOWITZ, MICHAEL A.; ROSEN, BRUCE; TZIKA, ARIA A.

    2013-01-01

    Stroke is the third leading cause of mortality and a frequent cause of long-term adult impairment. Improved strategies to enhance motor function in individuals with chronic disability from stroke are thus required. Post-stroke therapy may improve rehabilitation and reduce long-term disability; however, objective methods for evaluating the specific impact of rehabilitation are rare. Brain imaging studies on patients with chronic stroke have shown evidence for reorganization of areas showing functional plasticity after a stroke. In this study, we hypothesized that brain mapping using a novel magnetic resonance (MR)-compatible hand device in conjunction with state-of-the-art magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can serve as a novel biomarker for brain plasticity induced by rehabilitative motor training in patients with chronic stroke. This hypothesis is based on the premises that robotic devices, by stimulating brain plasticity, can assist in restoring movement compromised by stroke-induced pathological changes in the brain and that these changes can then be monitored by advanced MRI. We serially examined 15 healthy controls and 4 patients with chronic stroke. We employed a combination of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and volumetric MRI using a 3-tesla (3T) MRI system using a 12-channel Siemens Tim coil and a novel MR-compatible hand-induced robotic device. DTI data revealed that the number of fibers and the average tract length significantly increased after 8 weeks of hand training by 110% and 64%, respectively (p<0.001). New corticospinal tract (CST) fibers projecting progressively closer to the motor cortex appeared during training. Volumetric data analysis showed a statistically significant increase in the cortical thickness of the ventral postcentral gyrus areas of patients after training relative to pre-training cortical thickness (p<0.001). We suggest that rehabilitation is possible for a longer period of time after stroke than previously thought, showing that

  14. Searching for patent foramen ovale in a 44-year-old female patient after ischemic stroke – diagnostic problems

    PubMed Central

    Kralisz, Paweł; Bachórzewska-Gajewska, Hanna; Dobrzycki, Sławomir

    2016-01-01

    Patent foramen ovale (PFO) is associated with the occurrence of cryptogenic strokes in young patients. Transesophageal echocardiography with contrast is the established standard in PFO diagnostics. We present the case of a 44-year-old female patient after ischemic stroke, in whom PFO was not detected by echocardiography; the defect was ultimately diagnosed by right heart catheterization. PMID:27516797

  15. [Glial fibrillary acidic protein in patients with symptoms of acute stroke: diagnostic marker of cerebral hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Foerch, C; Pfeilschifter, W; Zeiner, P; Brunkhorst, R

    2014-08-01

    Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) is a highly brain-specific protein that is expressed in large quantities in astrocytes and has important functions in terms of maintaining and stabilizing the cytoskeleton. Acute intracerebral hemorrhage leads to an immediate mechanical destruction of astroglial cells with the subsequent release of GFAP into the extracellular space and the bloodstream. On the other hand, necrosis, cytolysis and GFAP release does not occur before 6-12 h after symptom onset in ischemic stroke. Thus, in the early hours after stroke increased GFAP values could indicate intracerebral hemorrhage. This review article describes the underlying pathophysiology of the test and guides the reader through the available data. Potential implications regarding the prehospital triage of acute stroke patients are discussed, including the possibility to initiate hyperacute treatment, such as blood pressure reduction in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage. Other areas of interest for a potential GFAP test include traumatic brain injury and malignant gliomas.

  16. Improving oral healthcare: improving the quality of life for patients after a stroke.

    PubMed

    Tran, Phuong; Mannen, Jana

    2009-01-01

    With the increase in the elderly population, the prevalence of systemic diseases such as strokes and heart attacks will also increase. Persons who have had a stroke will be more susceptible to mistreatment, neglect, abuse, and aspiration pneumonia. The expansion of the elderly population will make the training of professional healthcare workers and other auxiliaries extremely important. Quality of life can be maintained if poor oral health is reduced through better daily oral hygiene practices. Informing others about the known association between oral health and systemic diseases will increase the awareness of the need for good oral hygiene in order to reduce the risk of systemic diseases. Healthcare professionals must also be able to recognize, document, and report to Adult Protective Services suspected abuse such as physical and dental neglect. The networking of healthcare providers with Adult Protective Services and other professional disciplines will provide a collaborative approach to assure successful integration of healthcare protocols for the elderly population.

  17. Effect of Heparin on Recanalization in Acute Stroke Patients with Intra-Arterial Thrombi

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Bijal K.; Kamal, Haris; McMurtray, Aaron; Shafie, Mohammed; Li, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Anticoagulant use, such as heparin, is usually contraindicated in acute stroke patients. We present a study of patients, who were treated with intravenous heparin after a stroke that were also found to have an intraluminal thrombus. Prior studies imply that recanalization is achieved with heparin; however heparin should only prevent thrombus propagation. Therefore it is unclear whether and how IV heparin can achieve recanalization of intraluminal thrombi in acute stroke patients. A retrospective review of all acute stroke patients from a single stroke center who received a therapeutic IV heparin infusion from 5/2006 to 9/2011 were included in the study. We compared patients who had complete/partial recanalization and/or improved flow versus those that did not, with both these groups on a standard intravenous heparin infusion protocol. Demographic data was compared between the groups. Average partial thromboplastin time (PTT) during heparin infusion, time between computed tomography angiographies (CTAs), time from stroke onset to receiving IV heparin, and vessel occluded were also compared between groups. Forty-one patients (19 female, 22 male) were included in the study with a total of 55 vessels (either carotid, middle cerebral artery, anterior cerebral artery, posterior cerebral artery/posterior circulation) having intraluminal thrombi; 31 patients had 41 vessels with either partial or complete recanalization of effected vessels, while 10 patients had 14 vessels that did not have at least one vessel recanalize while on heparin. Using t-test we noted that the average PTT between the vessels that had partial/complete recanalization group (61.74) and nonrecanalization group (66.30) was not statistical significantly different (P=0.37).The average time in days on heparin between vascular imaging studies (CTA/conventional angiogram) in the group of vessels with partial/complete recanalization (7.12 days) and the ones with no change (6.11 days) was not significantly

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography in emergency assessment of patients with suspected acute stroke: a prospective comparison

    PubMed Central

    Chalela, Julio A; Kidwell, Chelsea S; Nentwich, Lauren M; Luby, Marie; Butman, John A; Demchuk, Andrew M; Hill, Michael D; Patronas, Nicholas; Latour, Lawrence; Warach, Steven

    2007-01-01

    Summary Background Although the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the diagnosis of acute stroke is increasing, this method has not proved more effective than computed tomography (CT) in the emergency setting. We aimed to prospectively compare CT and MRI for emergency diagnosis of acute stroke. Methods We did a single-centre, prospective, blind comparison of non-contrast CT and MRI (with diffusion-weighted and susceptibility weighted images) in a consecutive series of patients referred for emergency assessment of suspected acute stroke. Scans were independently interpreted by four experts, who were unaware of clinical information, MRI-CT pairings, and follow-up imaging. Results 356 patients, 217 of whom had a final clinical diagnosis of acute stroke, were assessed. MRI detected acute stroke (ischaemic or haemorrhagic), acute ischaemic stroke, and chronic haemorrhage more frequently than did CT (p<0.0001, for all comparisons). MRI was similar to CT for the detection of acute intracranial haemorrhage. MRI detected acute ischaemic stroke in 164 of 356 patients (46%; 95% CI 41-51%), compared with CT in 35 of 356 patients (10%; 7-14%). In the subset of patients scanned within 3 h of symptom onset, MRI detected acute ischaemic stroke in 41 of 90 patients (46%; 35-56%); CT in 6 of 90 (7%; 3-14%). Relative to the final clinical diagnosis, MRI had a sensitivity of 83% (181 of 217; 78-88%) and CT of 26% (56 of 217; 20-32%) for the diagnosis of any acute stroke. Interpretation MRI is better than CT for detection of acute ischaemia, and can detect acute and chronic haemorrhage; therefore it should be the preferred test for accurate diagnosis of patients with suspected acute stroke. Because our patient sample encompassed the range of disease that is likely to be encountered in emergency cases of suspected stroke, our results are directly applicable to clinical practice. PMID:17258669

  19. Energy expenditure in chronic stroke patients playing Wii Sports: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Stroke is one of the leading causes of long-term disability in modern western countries. Stroke survivors often have functional limitations which might lead to a vicious circle of reduced physical activity, deconditioning and further physical deterioration. Current evidence suggests that routine moderate- or vigorous-intensity physical activity is essential for maintenance and improvement of health among stroke survivors. Nevertheless, long-term participation in physical activities is low among people with disabilities. Active video games, such as Nintendo Wii Sports, might maintain interest and improve long-term participation in physical activities; however, the intensity of physical activity among chronic stroke patients while playing Wii Sports is unknown. We investigated the energy expenditure of chronic stroke patients while playing Wii Sports tennis and boxing. Methods Ten chronic (≥ 6 months) stroke patients comprising a convenience sample, who were able to walk independently on level ground, were recruited from a rehabilitation centre. They were instructed to play Wii Sports tennis and boxing in random order for 15 minutes each, with a 10-minute break between games. A portable gas analyzer was used to measure oxygen uptake (VO2) during sitting and during Wii Sports game play. Energy expenditure was expressed in metabolic equivalents (METs), calculated as VO2 during Wii Sports divided by VO2 during sitting. We classified physical activity as moderate (3-6 METs) or vigorous (> 6 METs) according to the American College of Sports Medicine and the American Heart Association Guidelines. Results Among the 10 chronic stroke patients, 3 were unable to play tennis because they had problems with timing of hitting the ball, and 2 were excluded from the boxing group because of a technical problem with the portable gas analyzer. The mean (± SD) energy expenditure during Wii Sports game play was 3.7 (± 0.6) METs for tennis and 4.1 (± 0.7) METs for boxing

  20. A tailored treatment strategy: a modern approach for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Lip, G Y H; Potpara, T; Boriani, G; Blomström-Lundqvist, C

    2016-05-01

    The main priority in atrial fibrillation (AF) management is stroke prevention, following which decisions about rate or rhythm control are focused on the patient, being primarily for management of symptoms. Given that AF is commonly associated with various comorbidities, risk factors such as hypertension, heart failure, diabetes mellitus and sleep apnoea should be actively looked for and managed in a holistic approach to AF management. The objective of this review is to provide an overview of modern AF stroke prevention with a focus on tailored treatment strategies. Biomarkers and genetic factors have been proposed to help identify 'high-risk' patients to be targeted for oral anticoagulation, but ultimately their use must be balanced against that of more simple and practical considerations for everyday use. Current guidelines have directed focus on initial identification of 'truly low-risk' patients with AF, that is those patients with a CHA2 DS2 -VASc [congestive heart failure, hypertension, age ≥75 years (two points), diabetes mellitus, stroke (two points), vascular disease, age 65-74 years, sex category] score of 0 (male) or 1 (female), who do not need any antithrombotic therapy. Subsequently, patients with ≥1 stroke risk factors can be offered effective stroke prevention, that is oral anticoagulation. The SAMe-TT2 R2 [sex female, age <60 years, medical history (>2 comorbidities), treatment (interacting drugs), tobacco use (two points), race non-Caucasian (two points)] score can help physicians make informed decisions on those patients likely to do well on warfarin (SAMe-TT2 R2 score 0-2) or those who are likely to have a poor time in therapeutic range (SAMe-TT2 R2 score >2). A clinically focused tailored approach to assessment and stroke prevention in AF with the use of the CHA2 DS2 VASc, HAS-BLED [hypertension, abnormal renal/liver function (one or two points), stroke, bleeding history or predisposition, labile international normalized ratio, elderly (>65

  1. The Relationship Between Sleep Disturbance and Functional Status in Mild Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinil; Kim, Yuntae; Yang, Kwang Ik; Kim, Doh-eui

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the sleep state of mild stroke patients and relationship between sleep disturbance and functional status. Methods A total of 80 acute stroke patients were enrolled in this study. The criteria for inclusion in the study was as following: 1) first stroke, 2) cognitive function preserved enough to perform the test (Mini Mental State Examination ≥24), 3) good functional levels (Modified Rankin Scale ≤3), 4) upper extremity motor function preserved enough to perform occupational tests (hand strength test, Purdue pegboard test, 9-hole peg test, and Medical Research Council score ≥3), and 5) less than 2 weeks between the stroke and the assessment. Quality of sleep was assessed by using Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), and Stanford Sleepiness Scale (SSS). Activities of daily living was assessed by using the Modified Barthel Index (MBI) and depressed mood was assessed by using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Gross and fine motor function of the upper extremity was assessed by using hand strength test (Jamar dynamometer), Purdue pegboard test, and the 9-hole peg test. Results The results of the occupational assessment were fine in the good sleepers. The PSQI, ESS, and ISI were correlated with some of the assessment tools (BDI, MBI, Purdue pegboard, 9-hole peg, and hand strength). Conclusion In conclusion, this study emphasizes that sleep disturbance can affect the functional status in mild acute stroke patients. Therefore, clinicians must consider sleep status in stroke patients and need to work to control it. PMID:26361590

  2. Altered resting-state network connectivity in stroke patients with and without apraxia of speech

    PubMed Central

    New, Anneliese B.; Robin, Donald A.; Parkinson, Amy L.; Duffy, Joseph R.; McNeil, Malcom R.; Piguet, Olivier; Hornberger, Michael; Price, Cathy J.; Eickhoff, Simon B.; Ballard, Kirrie J.

    2015-01-01

    Motor speech disorders, including apraxia of speech (AOS), account for over 50% of the communication disorders following stroke. Given its prevalence and impact, and the need to understand its neural mechanisms, we used resting state functional MRI to examine functional connectivity within a network of regions previously hypothesized as being associated with AOS (bilateral anterior insula (aINS), inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), and ventral premotor cortex (PM)) in a group of 32 left hemisphere stroke patients and 18 healthy, age-matched controls. Two expert clinicians rated severity of AOS, dysarthria and nonverbal oral apraxia of the patients. Fifteen individuals were categorized as AOS and 17 were AOS-absent. Comparison of connectivity in patients with and without AOS demonstrated that AOS patients had reduced connectivity between bilateral PM, and this reduction correlated with the severity of AOS impairment. In addition, AOS patients had negative connectivity between the left PM and right aINS and this effect decreased with increasing severity of non-verbal oral apraxia. These results highlight left PM involvement in AOS, begin to differentiate its neural mechanisms from those of other motor impairments following stroke, and help inform us of the neural mechanisms driving differences in speech motor planning and programming impairment following stroke. PMID:26106568

  3. Intelligent data analysis of instrumented gait data in stroke patients-a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Wikström, Jakob; Georgoulas, George; Moutsopoulos, Thucydides; Seferiadis, Aris

    2014-08-01

    Instrumented gait analysis (GA) may be used to analyze the causes of gait deviation in stroke patients but generates a large amount of complex data. The task of transforming this data into a comprehensible report is cumbersome. Intelligent data analysis (IDA) refers to the use of computational methods in order to analyze quantitative data more effectively. The purpose of this review was to identify and appraise the available IDA methods for handling GA data collected from patients with stroke using the standard equipment of a gait lab (3D/2D motion capture, force plates, EMG). Eleven databases were systematically searched and fifteen studies that employed some type of IDA method for the analysis of kinematic and/or kinetic and/or EMG data in populations involving stroke patients were identified. Four categories of IDA methods were employed for the analysis of sensor-acquired data in these fifteen studies: classification methods, dimensionality reduction methods, clustering methods and expert systems. The methodological quality of these studies was critically appraised by examining sample characteristics, measurements and IDA properties. Three overall methodological shortcomings were identified: (1) small sample sizes and underreported patient characteristics, (2) testing of which method is best suited to the analysis was neglected and (3) lack of stringent validation procedures. No IDA method for GA data from stroke patients was identified that can be directly applied to clinical practice. Our findings suggest that the potential provided by IDA methods is not being fully exploited.

  4. Baclofen for stroke patients with persistent hiccups: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The results of preclinical studies suggest that baclofen may be useful in the treatment of stroke patients with persistent hiccups. This study was aimed to assess the possible efficacy of baclofen for the treatment of persistent hiccups after stroke. Methods In total, 30 stroke patients with persistent hiccups were randomly assigned to receive baclofen (n = 15) or a placebo (n = 15) in a double-blind, parallel-group trial. Participants in the baclofen group received 10 mg baclofen 3 times daily for 5 days. Participants assigned to the placebo group received 10 mg placebo 3 times daily for 5 days. The primary outcome measure was cessation of hiccups. Secondary outcome measures included efficacy in the two groups and adverse events. Results All 30 patients completed the study. The number of patients in whom the hiccups completely stopped was higher in the baclofen group than in the placebo group (relative risk, 7.00; 95% confidence interval, 1.91–25.62; P = 0.003). Furthermore, efficacy was higher in the baclofen group than in the placebo group (P < 0.01). No serious adverse events were documented in either group. One case each of mild transient drowsiness and dizziness was present in the baclofen group. Conclusions Baclofen was more effective than a placebo for the treatment of persistent hiccups in stroke patients. Trial registration Chinese Clinical Trials Register: ChiCTR-TRC-13004554 PMID:25052238

  5. Real world effectiveness of warfarin among ischemic stroke patients with atrial fibrillation: observational analysis from Patient-Centered Research into Outcomes Stroke Patients Prefer and Effectiveness Research (PROSPER) study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jingjing; O’Brien, Emily C; Fonarow, Gregg C; Olson, DaiWai M; Schwamm, Lee H; Bhatt, Deepak L; Smith, Eric E; Suter, Robert E; Hannah, Deidre; Lindholm, Brianna; Maisch, Lesley; Greiner, Melissa A; Lytle, Barbara L; Pencina, Michael J; Peterson, Eric D; Hernandez, Adrian F

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the association between warfarin treatment and longitudinal outcomes after ischemic stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation in community practice. Design Observational study. Setting Hospitals (n=1487) participating in the Get With The Guidelines (GWTG)-Stroke program in the United States, from 2009 to 2011. Participants 12 552 warfarin naive atrial fibrillation patients admitted to hospital for ischemic stroke and treated with warfarin compared with no oral anticoagulant at discharge, linked to Medicare claims for longitudinal outcomes. Main outcome measures Major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) and home time, a patient centered outcomes measure defined as the total number of days free from institutional care after discharge. A propensity score inverse probability weighting method was used to account for all differences in observed characteristics between treatment groups. Results Among 12 552 survivors of stroke, 11 039 (88%) were treated with warfarin at discharge. Warfarin treated patients were slightly younger and less likely to have a history of previous stroke or coronary artery disease but had similar severity of stroke as measured by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale. Relative to those not treated, patients treated with warfarin had more days at home (as opposed to institutional care) during the two years after discharge (adjusted home time difference 47.6 days, 99% confidence interval 26.9 to 68.2). Patients discharged on warfarin treatment also had a reduced risk of MACE (adjusted hazard ratio 0.87, 99% confidence interval 0.78 to 0.98), all cause mortality (0.72, 0.63 to 0.84), and recurrent ischemic stroke (0.63, 0.48 to 0.83). These differences were consistent among clinically relevant subgroups by age, sex, stroke severity, and history of previous coronary artery disease and stroke. Conclusions Among ischemic stroke patients with atrial fibrillation, warfarin treatment was associated with improved long

  6. Old benefit as much as young patients with stroke from high-intensity neurorehabilitation: cohort analysis

    PubMed Central

    Knecht, Stefan; Roßmüller, Jens; Unrath, Michael; Stephan, Klaus-Martin; Berger, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Background and objective In current clinical practice, old patients with stroke are less frequently admitted to neurorehabilitation units following acute care than younger patients based on an assumption that old age negatively impacts the benefit obtained from high-intensity neurorehabilitation. Our objective was to test this assumption empirically in a large sample of patients with stroke. Methods Functional recovery during 4 weeks of inpatient neurorehabilitation was assessed with the Barthel Index (BI) in 422 middle-aged (<65 years), 1399 old (65–80 years) and 473 very old (>80 years) patients with stroke. Overall functional recovery, recovery patterns and the relationship between therapy intensity and recovery were statistically compared between the three age groups. Results Overall functional recovery was statistically equivalent in middle-aged, old and very old patients (average improvement in BI total score: middle-aged: 15 points; old: 15 points; very old: 14 points). A novel item-wise logistic regression analysis (see Pedersen, Severinsen & Nielsen, 2014, Neurorehabil Neural Repair) revealed that this was true for 9 of the 10 everyday functions assessed by the BI. Furthermore, functional recovery was predicted by the amount of therapy (R=0.14; p=0.0001), and age did not moderate this relationship between therapy intensity and recovery (p=0.70). Conclusions Old and even very old patients with stroke benefit from specialised inpatient neurorehabilitation and high amounts of therapy in the same degree as younger patients. Contrary to current clinical practice, old age should not be a criterion against admission to a neurorehabilitation unit following acute stroke treatment. PMID:26069298

  7. Predictors of stroke associated with coronary artery bypass grafting in patients with diabetes mellitus and multivessel coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Domanski, Michael J; Farkouh, Michael E; Zak, Victor; Feske, Steven; Easton, Donald; Weinberger, Jesse; Hamon, Martial; Escobedo, Jorge; Shrader, Peter; Siami, Flora S; Fuster, Valentin

    2015-05-15

    This study assesses demographic and clinical variables associated with perioperative and late stroke in diabetes mellitus patients after multivessel coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Future Revascularization Evaluation in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus: Optimal Management of Multivessel Disease (FREEDOM) is the largest randomized trial of diabetic patients undergoing multivessel CABG. FREEDOM patients had improved survival free of death, myocardial infarction, or stroke and increased overall survival after CABG compared to percutaneous intervention. However, the stroke rate was greater following CABG than percutaneous intervention. We studied predictors of stroke in CABG-treated patients analyzing separately overall, perioperative (≤30 days after surgery), and late (>30 days after surgery) stroke. For long-term outcomes (overall stroke and late stroke), Cox proportional hazards regression was used, accounting for time to event, and logistic regression was used for perioperative stroke. Independent perioperative stroke predictors were previous stroke (odds ratio [OR] 6.96, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.43 to 33.96; p = 0.02), warfarin use (OR 10.26, 95% CI 1.10 to 96.03; p = 0.02), and surgery outside the United States or Canada (OR 9.81, 95% CI 1.28 to 75.40; p = 0.03). Independent late stroke predictors: renal insufficiency (hazard ratio [HR] 3.57, 95% CI 1.01 to 12.64; p = 0.048), baseline low-density lipoprotein ≥105 mg/dl (HR 3.28, 95% CI 1.19 to 9.02; p = 0.02), and baseline diastolic blood pressure (each 1 mm Hg increase reduces stroke hazard by 5%; HR 0.95, 95% CI 0.91 to 0.99; p = 0.03). There was no overlap between predictors of perioperative versus late stroke. In conclusion, late post-CABG strokes were associated with well-described risk factors. Nearly half of the strokes were perioperative. Independent risk factors for perioperative stroke: previous stroke, previous warfarin use, and CABG performed outside the United States or Canada.

  8. Vascular Pathology in the Extracranial Vertebral Arteries in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Bentsen, L.; Nygård, A.; Ovesen, C.; Christensen, A.; Rosenbaum, S.; Havsteen, I.; Christensen, H.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Vascular pathology in the extracranial vertebral arteries remains among the possible causes in cryptogenic stroke. However, the diagnosis is challenged by the great variety in the anatomy of the vertebral arteries, clinical symptoms and difficulties in the radiological assessments. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of CT angiography (CTA)-detected pathological findings in the extracranial vertebral arteries in an acute stroke population and secondly to determine the frequency of posterior pathology as probable cause in patients with otherwise cryptogenic stroke. Method The analysis was based on 657 consecutive patients with symptoms of acute stroke and a final diagnosis of ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack. On admission, a noncontrast CT cerebrum and CTA were performed. A senior consultant neuroradiologist, blinded to clinical data, reviewed all CTA scans systematically, assessing the four segments of the extracranial vertebral arteries. First, the frequency of pathological findings including stenosis, plaques, dissection, kinked artery and coiling was assessed. Subsequently, we explored the extent of the pathological findings that were the most plausible causes of stroke, namely either a possible dissection or a kinked artery. Results Findings in the extracranial vertebral arteries included significant stenosis (0.8%), atherosclerotic plaque types (3.8%), possible dissections (2.6%), kinked arteries (2.6%) and coiling (32.0%). Eighteen patients (2.8%) with pathological findings had an unknown cause of stroke, likely posterior symptoms and no clinical stroke symptoms from the anterior circuit. Of these, 3 cases were kinked arteries (0.5%) and 15 cases (2.3%) were possible dissections. Conclusion We found that in approximately 3% of the study population, the most plausible cause of the cryptogenic strokes was due to a pathological finding in the posterior extracranial vertebral arteries, being either a possible dissection or

  9. Atherosclerotic adult Moya-Moya disease in a patient with hyperhomocysteinaemia.

    PubMed

    Cerrato, P; Grasso, M; Lentini, A; Destefanis, E; Bosco, G; Caprioli, M; Bradac, G B; Bergui, M

    2007-03-01

    Moya-Moya is a rare cerebrovascular occlusive disease characterized by bilateral stenosis or occlusion at the terminal portion of the internal carotid artery and abnormal vascular network at the base of the brain, named "moya-moya". In children, Moya-Moya disease usually presents with ischemic cerebrovascular events, mainly TIA or lacunar stroke, leading to mental deterioration. In adults, especially in females, it presents with intracranial haemorrhages. We describe the case of an adult patient with an atherosclerotic Moya-Moya disease which presented with a cerebral borderzone infarction.

  10. Change in response time of stroke patients and controls during rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Korner-Bitensky, N; Mayo, N E; Kaizer, F

    1990-02-01

    In this study we investigated motor response times of stroke patients at admission to a rehabilitation hospital and again after 6 wk of hospitalization. A prospective comparative study was carried out on 164 stroke patients; 48 hospitalized patients served as controls. Mean motor response times to visual stimuli presented in the left and right visual fields and to centrally presented stimuli were studied. The principle finding was that stroke patients improved significantly in their response times from initial to final evaluation. While at initial assessment they performed significantly more slowly than controls, by final assessment the response times of the two groups did not differ. Visual hemineglect influenced change in response time differentially depending on side of lesion: right hemisphere lesion patients with neglect improved, whereas left hemisphere lesion patients with neglect actually deteriorated. The presence of depression influenced right hemisphere lesion patients' response times and change in response times but it did not have any influence for left hemisphere lesion patients. The findings that response time generally improved during rehabilitation has important implications for the treatment of individuals with brain injury. It will be important to identify therapeutic practices which will be effective in the remediation of response time for all patients. Ultimately the goal of intervening in slow response time is to improve performance of functional activities which are influenced by an individual's ability to respond to visual stimuli.

  11. Risk factors, quality of care and prognosis in South Asian, East Asian and White patients with stroke

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Stroke has emerged as a significant and escalating health problem for Asian populations. We compared risk factors, quality of care and risk of death or recurrent stroke in South Asian, East Asian and White patients with acute ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. Methods Retrospective analysis was performed on consecutive patients with ischemic stroke or intracerebral hemorrhage admitted to 12 stroke centers in Ontario, Canada (July 2003-March 2008) and included in the Registry of the Canadian Stroke Network database. The database was linked to population-based administrative databases to determine one-year risk of death or recurrent stroke. Results The study included 253 South Asian, 513 East Asian and 8231 White patients. East Asian patients were more likely to present with intracerebral hemorrhage (30%) compared to South Asian (17%) or White patients (15%) (p<0.001). Time from stroke to hospital arrival was similarly poor with delays >2 hours for more than two thirds of patients in all ethnic groups. Processes of stroke care, including thrombolysis, diagnostic imaging, antithrombotic medications, and rehabilitation services were similar among ethnic groups. Risk of death or recurrent stroke at one year after ischemic stroke was similar for patients who were White (27.6%), East Asian (24.7%, aHR 0.97, 95% CI 0.78-1.21 vs. White), or South Asian (21.9%, aHR 0.91, 95% CI 0.67-1.24 vs. White). Although risk of death or recurrent stroke at one year after intracerebral hemorrhage was higher in East Asian (35.5%) and White patients (47.9%) compared to South Asian patients (30.2%) (p=0.002), these differences disappeared after adjustment for age, sex, stroke severity and comorbid conditions (aHR 0.89 [0.67-1.19] for East Asian vs White and 0.99 [0.54-1.81] for South Asian vs. White). Conclusion After stratification by stroke type, stroke care and outcomes are similar across ethnic groups in Ontario. Enhanced health promotion is needed to reduce delays to hospital

  12. Relationship Between Grip and Pinch Strength and Activities of Daily Living in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jung Hyun; Seo, Kyung Mook; Kim, Don-Kyu; Shin, Hyun Iee; Shin, Hye Eun

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between grip and pinch strength and independence in activities of daily living (ADL) in stroke patients. Methods Medical records of 577 stroke patients from January 2010 to February 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients' grip and pinch strength of both hemiplegic and non-hemiplegic hands and the Korean version of Modified Barthel Index (K-MBI) score were collected. These patients were divided into three groups: group A (onset duration: ≤3 months), group B (onset duration: >3 months and <2 years), and group C (onset duration: ≥2 years). The correlation between grip and pinch strength and the K-MBI score was analyzed. Results In group A (95 patients), the K-MBI score was significantly (p<0.05) correlated with the grip and pinch strength of both hands in patients with right hemiplegia. Significant (p<0.05) correlation between the K-MBI score and the grip and pinch strength of the hemiplegic hand was shown in patients with left hemiplegia. In group B (69 patients) and group C (73 patients), the K-MBI score was significantly (p<0.05) correlated with the grip and pinch strength of the hemiplegic hand. Conclusion Stroke patients in subacute stage mainly performed activities of daily living using their dominant hand. However, independence in ADL was associated with the strength of the affected dominant hand. For stroke patients in chronic and late chronic stages, their hand power of the affected hand was associated with independence in ADL regardless whether the dominant hand was affected. PMID:26605173

  13. Meteorological Factors Related to Emergency Admission of Elderly Stroke Patients in Shanghai: Analysis with a Multilayer Perceptron Neural Network

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Guilin; Tan, Yan; Fang, Min; Yang, Hongyan; Liu, Xueyuan; Zhao, Yanxin

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to predict the emergency admission of elderly stroke patients in Shanghai by using a multilayer perceptron (MLP) neural network. Material/Methods Patients (>60 years) with first-ever stroke registered in the Emergency Center of Neurology Department, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, from January 2012 to June 2014 were enrolled into the present study. Daily climate records were obtained from the National Meteorological Office. MLP was used to model the daily emergency admission into the neurology department with meteorological factors such as wind level, weather type, daily maximum temperature, lowest temperature, average temperature, and absolute temperature difference. The relationships of meteorological factors with the emergency admission due to stroke were analyzed in an MLP model. Results In 886 days, 2180 first-onset elderly stroke patients were enrolled, and the average number of stroke patients was 2.46 per day. MLP was used to establish a model for the prediction of dates with low stroke admission (≤4) and those with high stroke admission (≥5). For the days with low stroke admission, the absolute temperature difference accounted for 40.7% of admissions, while for the days with high stroke admission, the weather types accounted for 73.3%. Conclusions Outdoor temperature and related meteorological parameters are associated with stroke attack. The absolute temperature difference and the weather types have adverse effects on stroke. Further study is needed to determine if other meteorological factors such as pollutants also play important roles in stroke attack. PMID:26590182

  14. Prognostic value of FMRI in recovery of hand function in subcortical stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Loubinoux, Isabelle; Dechaumont-Palacin, S; Castel-Lacanal, E; De Boissezon, X; Marque, Philippe; Pariente, Jérémie; Albucher, Jean-François; Berry, Isabelle; Chollet, François

    2007-12-01

    The first objective of the study was to determine whether functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signal was correlated with motor performance at different stages of poststroke recovery. The second objective was to assess the existence of prognostic factors for recovery in early functional MR images. Eight right-handed patients with pure motor deficit secondary to a first lacunar infarct localized on the pyramidal tract were included. This study concerned moderately impaired patients and recovery of handgrip strength and finger-tapping speed. The fMRI task was a calibrated flexion-extension movement. Ten healthy subjects served as a control group. The intensity of the activation in the "classical" motor network (ipsilesional S1M1, ipsilesional ventral premotor cortex [BA 6], contralesional cerebellum) 20 days after stroke was indicative of the performance (positive correlation). The cluster in M1 was posterior and circumscribed to BA 4p. No area was associated with bad performance (negative correlation). No correlation was found 4 and 12 months after stroke. Prognosis factors were evidenced. The higher early the activation in the ipsilesional M1 (BA 4p), S1, and insula, the better the recovery 1 year after stroke. Although the lesions partly deefferented the primary motor cortex, patients who activated the posterior primary motor cortex early had a better recovery of hand function. This suggests that there is benefit in increasing ipsilesional M1 activity shortly after stroke as a rehabilitative approach in mildly impaired patients. PMID:17389628

  15. The effect of olfactory stimuli on the balance ability of stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Gim, Mi-Na; Lee, Sang-bin; Yoo, Kyung-Tae; Bae, Ji-Young; Kim, Mi-Kyoung; Choi, Jung-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The present study attempted to identify the effect of olfactory stimulation on the balance ability of stroke patients. [Subjects] Thirty-three (33 males) stroke patients participated in the study. The stroke patients were divided into three groups: a black pepper oil (BPO) group (n=11), lavender oil (LVO) group (n=11), and distilled water (DW) group (n=11). [Methods] Two sessions (control trial/stimulus trial) of Romberg’s test (eyes open 1 min/eyes closed 1 min) were conducted on a force platform to measure the data for the COP (center of pressure). Olfactory stimulation was provided at as a stimulus. [Results] With the eyes open, a statistically significant difference was found in average anterior posterior displacement (Ymean) and average medial lateral displacement (Xmean) among the three groups when comparing the groups before and after stimulation. The comparison between the eyes open and eyes closed conditions in each group showed a significant difference in the area of the 95% confidence ellipse (area) and Xmean of the BPO group and in the area of the LVO group (area, Xmean). [Conclusion] The findings indicate that the interaction of brain areas activated by the olfactory stimulation exerts an influence on the balance ability of stroke patients. PMID:25642050

  16. Cathodal Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation of the Right Wernicke's Area Improves Comprehension in Subacute Stroke Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    You, Dae Sang; Kim, Dae-Yul; Chun, Min Ho; Jung, Seung Eun; Park, Sung Jong

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have shown the appearance of right-sided language-related brain activity in right-handed patients after a stroke. Non-invasive brain stimulation such as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) have been shown to modulate excitability in the brain. Moreover, rTMS and…

  17. Changes in Muscle Activation after Reach Training with Gravity Compensation in Chronic Stroke Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prange, Gerdienke B.; Krabben, Thijs; Renzenbrink, Gerbert J.; Ijzerman, Maarten J.; Hermens, Hermie J.; Jannink, Michiel J. A.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the effect of gravity compensation training on reaching and underlying changes in muscle activation. In this clinical trial, eight chronic stroke patients with limited arm function received 18 sessions (30 min) of gravity-compensated reach training (during 6 weeks) in combination with a rehabilitation…

  18. Correlation between mobility assessed by the Modified Rivermead Mobility Index and physical function in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Gi-Tae; Kim, Mihyun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between mobility assessed by the Modified Rivermead Mobility Index and variables associated with physical function in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] One hundred stroke patients (35 males and 65 females; age 58.60 ± 13.91 years) participated in this study. Modified Rivermead Mobility Index, muscle strength (manual muscle test), muscle tone (Modified Ashworth Scale), range of motion of lower extremity, sensory function (light touch and proprioception tests), and coordination (heel to shin and lower-extremity motor coordination tests) were assessed. [Results] The Modified Rivermead Mobility Index was correlated with all the physical function variables assessed, except the degree of knee extension. In addition, stepwise linear regression analysis revealed that coordination (heel to shin test) was the explanatory variable closely associated with mobility in stroke patients. [Conclusion] The Modified Rivermead Mobility Index score was significantly correlated with all the physical function variables. Coordination (heel to shin test) was closely related to mobility function. These results may be useful in developing rehabilitation programs for stroke patients. PMID:27630440

  19. Costing hospital resources for stroke patients using phase-type models.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Jennifer; McClean, Sally; Scotney, Bryan; Garg, Lalit; Barton, Maria; Fullerton, Ken

    2011-09-01

    Optimising resources in healthcare facilities is essential for departments to cope with the growing population's requirements. An aspect of such performance modelling involves investigating length of stay, which is a key performance indicator. Stroke disease costs the United Kingdom economy seven billion pounds a year and stroke patients are known to occupy long periods of time in acute and long term beds in hospital as well as requiring support from social services. This may be viewed as an inefficient use of resources. Thrombolysis is a therapy which uses a clot-dispersing drug which is known to decrease the institutionalisation of eligible stroke patients if administered 3 h after incident but it is costly to administer to patients. In this paper we model the cost of treating stroke patients within a healthcare facility using a mixture of Coxian phase type model with multiple absorbing states. We also discuss the potential benefits of increasing the usage of thrombolysis and if these benefits balance the expense of administering the drug. PMID:21695521

  20. Correlation between mobility assessed by the Modified Rivermead Mobility Index and physical function in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Park, Gi-Tae; Kim, Mihyun

    2016-08-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between mobility assessed by the Modified Rivermead Mobility Index and variables associated with physical function in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] One hundred stroke patients (35 males and 65 females; age 58.60 ± 13.91 years) participated in this study. Modified Rivermead Mobility Index, muscle strength (manual muscle test), muscle tone (Modified Ashworth Scale), range of motion of lower extremity, sensory function (light touch and proprioception tests), and coordination (heel to shin and lower-extremity motor coordination tests) were assessed. [Results] The Modified Rivermead Mobility Index was correlated with all the physical function variables assessed, except the degree of knee extension. In addition, stepwise linear regression analysis revealed that coordination (heel to shin test) was the explanatory variable closely associated with mobility in stroke patients. [Conclusion] The Modified Rivermead Mobility Index score was significantly correlated with all the physical function variables. Coordination (heel to shin test) was closely related to mobility function. These results may be useful in developing rehabilitation programs for stroke patients. PMID:27630440

  1. Effect of Horseback Riding Simulation Machine Training on Trunk Balance and Gait of Chronic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyungguen; Her, Jin Gang; Ko, Jooyeon

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of horseback riding simulation machine training on trunk balance and gait of patients with chronic stroke. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 20 patients hospitalized for treatment after being diagnosed with stroke. Horseback riding simulation training was provided for 30 minutes, 5 times a week, for 6 weeks. Trunk balance was assessed using the Trunk Impairment Scale (TIS) and a balance measuring device (Biorescue, RM ingenierie, France), and gait ability was measured using the Functional Gait Assessment (FGA) and a gait analyzer (GAITRite, CIR system Inc., USA). [Results] There were significant changes in movement area, distance and velocity of body sway as measured by the TIS and the balance measuring device, and in gait velocity, cadence, stride length and double limb support as measured by the FGA and gait analyzer. [Conclusion] Horseback riding simulation training improved the trunk balance and gait of chronic stroke patients. This present study provides preliminary objective data for future research, and useful clinical information for physical therapists using horseback riding simulation machines as a treatment modality for patients with chronic stroke. PMID:24567670

  2. Correlation between mobility assessed by the Modified Rivermead Mobility Index and physical function in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Park, Gi-Tae; Kim, Mihyun

    2016-08-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between mobility assessed by the Modified Rivermead Mobility Index and variables associated with physical function in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] One hundred stroke patients (35 males and 65 females; age 58.60 ± 13.91 years) participated in this study. Modified Rivermead Mobility Index, muscle strength (manual muscle test), muscle tone (Modified Ashworth Scale), range of motion of lower extremity, sensory function (light touch and proprioception tests), and coordination (heel to shin and lower-extremity motor coordination tests) were assessed. [Results] The Modified Rivermead Mobility Index was correlated with all the physical function variables assessed, except the degree of knee extension. In addition, stepwise linear regression analysis revealed that coordination (heel to shin test) was the explanatory variable closely associated with mobility in stroke patients. [Conclusion] The Modified Rivermead Mobility Index score was significantly correlated with all the physical function variables. Coordination (heel to shin test) was closely related to mobility function. These results may be useful in developing rehabilitation programs for stroke patients.

  3. Correlation between mobility assessed by the Modified Rivermead Mobility Index and physical function in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Gi-Tae; Kim, Mihyun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between mobility assessed by the Modified Rivermead Mobility Index and variables associated with physical function in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] One hundred stroke patients (35 males and 65 females; age 58.60 ± 13.91 years) participated in this study. Modified Rivermead Mobility Index, muscle strength (manual muscle test), muscle tone (Modified Ashworth Scale), range of motion of lower extremity, sensory function (light touch and proprioception tests), and coordination (heel to shin and lower-extremity motor coordination tests) were assessed. [Results] The Modified Rivermead Mobility Index was correlated with all the physical function variables assessed, except the degree of knee extension. In addition, stepwise linear regression analysis revealed that coordination (heel to shin test) was the explanatory variable closely associated with mobility in stroke patients. [Conclusion] The Modified Rivermead Mobility Index score was significantly correlated with all the physical function variables. Coordination (heel to shin test) was closely related to mobility function. These results may be useful in developing rehabilitation programs for stroke patients.

  4. Correlation between balance and gait according to pelvic displacement in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Seon Woong; Jeong, Yeon Woo; Kim, Jin Young

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlations of balance and gait according to pelvic displacement in stroke patients. [Subjects] The subjects of this study were 58 stroke patients who had been admitted to a hospital. [Methods] A Global Postural System was used to measure pelvic displacement. To measure the balance ability, a Tetrax balance system was used to measure the weight distribution index and stability index. Gait ability was measured during the 10-Meter Walking Test and Figure-of-8 Walk Test. [Results] The results of this study showed that was significant positive correlation between the anterior superior iliac spine height difference in pelvic displacement and the weight distribution index and significant positive correlation between the posterior superior iliac spine height difference and the stability index in the normal position with the eyes closed. Statistically significant positive correlation also was found between the anterior superior iliac spine height difference and the straight and curved gait ability. [Conclusion] The increased pelvic displacement in stroke patients results in a decrease in balance ability and gait speed. This suggests that control of pelvic displacement is necessary before functional training for patients with stroke. PMID:26311948

  5. Effects of eye movement with functional electrical stimulation on balance in stroke patients with neglect syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Park, Si-Eun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to determine whether eye movement in conjunction with functional electrical stimulation (FES) could improve balance ability in stroke patients with neglect syndrome. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects consisted of 15 stroke patients with neglect syndrome. The intervention was eye movement in conjunction with FES. The program was conducted 5 times per week, for 6 weeks. Static balance (eyes-open and eyes-closed) and dynamic balance were measured before and after testing. [Results] In measurement of static balance, subjects showed significant differences in sway length and sway area when examined in the eyes-open condition, but not the eyes-closed condition. In measurement of dynamic balance, the subjects showed significant differences in limit of stability (forward/backward and left/right). [Conclusion] These results indicate that eye movement in conjunction with FES had a positive effect on the static and dynamic balance in the eyes-open condition, but not in the eyes-closed condition of stroke patients with neglect syndrome. Further studies should therefore investigate various interventions in stroke patients with neglect syndrome. PMID:27313375

  6. The Effect of Virtual Reality Training on Unilateral Spatial Neglect in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong Mi; Yun, Gi Jeong; Song, Young Jin; Young, Han Eun

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of virtual reality training on unilateral spatial neglect in stroke patients. Method Twenty-four stroke patients (14 males and 10 females, mean age=64.7) who had unilateral spatial neglect as a result of right hemisphere stroke were recruited. All patients were randomly assigned to either the virtual reality (VR) group (n=12) or the control group (n=12). The VR group received VR training, which stimulated the left side of their bodies. The control group received conventional neglect therapy such as visual scanning training. Both groups received therapy for 30 minutes a day, five days per week for three weeks. Outcome measurements included star cancellation test, line bisection test, Catherine Bergego scale (CBS), and the Korean version of modified Barthel index (K-MBI). These measurements were taken before and after treatment. Results There were no significant differences in the baseline characteristics and initial values between the two groups. The changes in star cancellation test results and CBS in the VR group were significantly higher than those of the control group after treatment. The changes in line bisection test score and the K-MBI in the VR group were not statistically significant. Conclusion This study suggests that virtual reality training may be a beneficial therapeutic technique on unilateral spatial neglect in stroke patients. PMID:22506138

  7. The Additive Effects of Core Muscle Strengthening and Trunk NMES on Trunk Balance in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Eun Jae; Kim, Dae Yul; Yi, Jin Hwa; Kim, Won; Hong, Jayoung

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate an additive effect of core muscle strengthening (CMS) and trunk neuromuscular electrical stimulation (tNEMS) on trunk balance in stroke patients. Methods Thirty patients with acute or subacute stroke who were unable to maintain static sitting balance for >5 minutes were enrolled and randomly assigned to 3 groups, i.e., patients in the CMS (n=10) group received additional CMS program; the tNMES group (n=10) received additional tNMES over the posterior back muscles; and the combination (CMS and tNMES) group (n=10) received both treatments. Each additional treatment was performed 3 times per week for 20 minutes per day over 3 weeks. Korean version of Berg Balance Scale (K-BBS), total score of postural assessment scale for stroke patients (PASS), Trunk Impairment Scale (TIS), and Korean version of Modified Barthel Index (K-MBI) were evaluated before and after 3 weeks of therapeutic intervention. Results All 3 groups showed improvements in K-BBS, PASS, TIS, and K-MBI after therapeutic interventions, with some differences. The combination group showed more improvements in K-BBS and the dynamic sitting balance of TIS, as compared to the CMS group; and more improvement in K-BBS, as compared to the tNMES group. Conclusion The results indicated an additive effect of CMS and tNMES on the recovery of trunk balance in patients with acute or subacute stroke who have poor sitting balance. Simultaneous application of CMS and tNMES should be considered when designing a rehabilitation program to improve trunk balance in stroke patients. PMID:26949681

  8. Feasibility of assessing the needs of stroke patients after six months using the GM-SAT

    PubMed Central

    Boaden, Ruth; Bamford, David; Tyrrell, Pippa J

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the feasibility of administering the Greater Manchester Stroke Assessment Tool (GM-SAT), a structured evidence-based needs assessment tool, in a community setting and its acceptability to stroke patients and their carers. Setting: Community stroke services. Subjects: One hundred and thirty-seven stroke patients at six months post hospital discharge with no communication or cognitive difficulties residing in their own homes. Intervention: Patients’ needs were assessed by information, advice and support (IAS) coordinators from the UK Stroke Association using the GM-SAT. Main measures: Number and nature of unmet needs identified and actions required to address these; patient/carer feedback; and IAS coordinator feedback. Results: The mean number of unmet needs identified was 3 (min 0, max 14; SD 2.5). The most frequently identified unmet needs related to fatigue (34.3%), memory, concentration and attention (25.5%), secondary prevention non-lifestyle (21.9%) and depression (19.0%). It was found that 50.4% of unmet needs could be addressed through the provision of information and advice. Patients/carers found the assessment process valuable and IAS coordinators found the GM-SAT easy to use. Conclusions: Results demonstrate that the GM-SAT is feasible to administer in the community using IAS coordinators and is acceptable to patients and their carers, as well as staff undertaking the assessments. Further research is needed to determine whether the application of the GM-SAT at six months improves outcomes for patients. PMID:22952306

  9. Robotic neurorehabilitation in patients with chronic stroke: psychological well-being beyond motor improvement.

    PubMed

    Calabrò, Rocco S; De Cola, Maria C; Leo, Antonino; Reitano, Simone; Balletta, Tina; Trombetta, Giovanni; Naro, Antonino; Russo, Margherita; Bertè, Francesco; De Luca, Rosaria; Bramanti, Placido

    2015-09-01

    Although gait abnormality is one of the most disabling events following stroke, cognitive, and psychological impairments can be devastating. The Lokomat is a robotic that has been used widely for gait rehabilitation in several movement disorders, especially in the acute and subacute phases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of gait robotic rehabilitation in patients affected by chronic stroke. Psychological impact was also taken into consideration. Thirty patients (13 women and 17 men) affected by chronic stroke entered the study. All participants underwent neurological examination with respect to ambulation, Ashworth, Functional Independence Measure, and Tinetti scales to assess their physical status, and Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, Psychological General Well-being Index, and Coping Orientation to Problem Experienced to evaluate the Lokomat-related psychological impact before and after either a conventional treatment or the robotic training. During each rehabilitation period (separated by a no-treatment period), patients underwent a total of 40 1 h training sessions (i.e. five times a week for 8 weeks). After the conventional treatment, the patients did not achieve a significant improvement in the functional status, except balance (P<0.001) and walking ability (P<0.01), as per the Tinetti scale. Indeed, after the robotic rehabilitation, significant improvements were detected in almost all the motor and psychological scales that we investigated, particularly for Psychological General Well-being Index and Coping Orientation to Problem Experienced. Manual and robotic-assisted body weight-supported treadmill training optimizes the sensory inputs relevant to step training, repeated practice, as well as neuroplasticity. Several controlled trials have shown a superior effect of Lokomat treatment in stroke patients' walking ability and velocity in particular. Therefore, our preliminary results proved that active robotic training not only

  10. MELAS, an important consideration in the adult population presenting with unusual and recurrent stroke-like episodes.

    PubMed

    Corr, Alison; Gaughan, Maria; Moroney, Joan; Looby, Seamus

    2014-01-28

    A 48-year-old man was admitted for workup of stroke-like symptoms and generalised tonic-clonic seizures. History and examination revealed that the patient had background diagnoses of type 2 diabetes mellitus, epilepsy and had suffered a temporal lobe infarct 3 years ago. The unusual presentation and physical findings, along with subsequent MRI findings led to a diagnosis of mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS). MELAS is a mitochondrial disorder typified by the aforementioned symptoms, and is typically diagnosed in the first two decades of life.

  11. The involvement of audio-motor coupling in the music-supported therapy applied to stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Fornells, Antoni; Rojo, Nuria; Amengual, Julià L; Ripollés, Pablo; Altenmüller, Eckart; Münte, Thomas F

    2012-04-01

    Music-supported therapy (MST) has been developed recently to improve the use of the affected upper extremity after stroke. MST uses musical instruments, an electronic piano and an electronic drum set emitting piano sounds, to retrain fine and gross movements of the paretic upper extremity. In this paper, we first describe the rationale underlying MST, and we review the previous studies conducted on acute and chronic stroke patients using this new neurorehabilitation approach. Second, we address the neural mechanisms involved in the motor movement improvements observed in acute and chronic stroke patients. Third, we provide some recent studies on the involvement of auditory-motor coupling in the MST in chronic stroke patients using functional neuroimaging. Finally, these ideas are discussed and focused on understanding the dynamics involved in the neural circuit underlying audio-motor coupling and how functional connectivity could help to explain the neuroplastic changes observed after therapy in stroke patients. PMID:22524370

  12. The effects of a progressive resistance training program on walking ability in patients after stroke: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Park, Byoung-Sun; Kim, Mee-Young; Lee, Lim-Kyu; Yang, Seung-Min; Lee, Won-Deok; Noh, Ji-Woong; Shin, Yong-Sub; Kim, Ju-Hyun; Lee, Jeong-Uk; Kwak, Taek-Yong; Lee, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Ju-Young; Park, Jaehong; Kim, Junghwan

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a progressive resistance training (PRT) program on the walking ability of chronic stroke patients with hemiparesis following chronic stroke. [Subjects and Methods] The participants of this study were fifteen hemiplegic patients. The main outcomes measured for this study were the peak torque of the knee extensor; the gait ability as measured by electric gait analysis of walking speed, walking cycle, affected side stance phase, affected side stride length, symmetry index of stance phase, and symmetry index of stride length; and 10-m walking speed; and the Berg balance scale test. [Results] Walking speed and affected side stride length significantly increased after the PRT program, and 10-m walking time significantly decreased after RPT in stroke patients. [Conclusion] These results suggest that the progressive resistance training program may, in part, improve the stride of the affected side leg of stroke patients after stroke and also positively impact walking speed. PMID:26504305

  13. The effects of a progressive resistance training program on walking ability in patients after stroke: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Byoung-Sun; Kim, Mee-Young; Lee, Lim-Kyu; Yang, Seung-Min; Lee, Won-Deok; Noh, Ji-Woong; Shin, Yong-Sub; Kim, Ju-Hyun; Lee, Jeong-Uk; Kwak, Taek-Yong; Lee, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Ju-Young; Park, Jaehong; Kim, Junghwan

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a progressive resistance training (PRT) program on the walking ability of chronic stroke patients with hemiparesis following chronic stroke. [Subjects and Methods] The participants of this study were fifteen hemiplegic patients. The main outcomes measured for this study were the peak torque of the knee extensor; the gait ability as measured by electric gait analysis of walking speed, walking cycle, affected side stance phase, affected side stride length, symmetry index of stance phase, and symmetry index of stride length; and 10-m walking speed; and the Berg balance scale test. [Results] Walking speed and affected side stride length significantly increased after the PRT program, and 10-m walking time significantly decreased after RPT in stroke patients. [Conclusion] These results suggest that the progressive resistance training program may, in part, improve the stride of the affected side leg of stroke patients after stroke and also positively impact walking speed. PMID:26504305

  14. The Role of Nonvitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants (NOACs) in Stroke Prevention in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Sofya; Barcelona, Robert; Josephson, Richard A; Mohan, Sri K Madan

    2016-05-01

    Anticoagulation is important in stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation. Until recently, heparins and vitamin K antagonists were the only available therapy for stroke reduction in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients. Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) including direct thrombin inhibitor (dabigatran) and direct factor Xa inhibitors (rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban) are now available and offer new options for stroke prevention. This article reviews the available data on the use of NOACs for primary and secondary stroke prevention in AF patients and describes specific patient populations to guide clinician in making the informed decision regarding appropriate use of those agents. It also addresses the use of NOACs early after acute stroke and use of thrombolysis while on NOAC. PMID:27023335

  15. Walking gait changes after stepping-in-place training using a foot lifting device in chronic stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Kanichirou; Asai, Hitoshi; Inaoka, Pleiades Tiharu; Nakaizumi, Dai

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The goal of this study was to investigate the efficacy of stepping-in-place training using a foot lifting assist device on the walking gait of chronic hemiparetic stroke patients. [Subjects] Seven patients with chronic hemiplegic stroke (age 80.9±4.9 years) who were attending a local adult daycare facility participated in this study. [Methods] The participants had 2 or 16 weeks of intervention after a baseline period of 2 weeks. Evaluations were performed before the baseline period and before and after the intervention period. The evaluation consisted of a two-dimensional motion analysis of walking and stepping-in-place exercises and a clinical evaluation. [Results] Walking speed increased in three participants after 2 or 16 weeks of intervention. The swing phase percentage increased in the paretic gait cycle, and the time from non-paretic heel contact to paretic heel off decreased during stepping-in-place in these participants. [Conclusion] Given that the transition from the support phase support to the swing phase was shortened after the intervention, the stepping-in-place exercise using the device designed for this study may improve the muscle strength of the lower limb and coordination in the pre-swing phase of the paretic limb. PMID:27190449

  16. Left ventricular geometry and white matter lesions in ischemic stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Butenaerts, Demian; Chrzanowska-Wasko, Joanna; Slowik, Agnieszka; Dziedzic, Tomasz

    2016-06-01

    Abnormal left ventricular (LV) geometry is associated with extracardiac organ damage in patients with hypertension. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between LV geometry and white matter lesions (WMLs) in ischemic stroke patients. We retrospectively analyzed data from 155 patients (median age 62; 49.8% male) with mild ischemic stroke (median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score 4) who underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging and echocardiography. Patients were categorized into four groups: normal LV geometry, concentric remodeling, eccentric left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) and concentric LVH. WMLs were graded using the Fazekas scale on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images. Extensive WMLs were defined as a Fazekas score > 2. Extensive WMLs were more prevalent in patients with concentric LVH, eccentric LVH and concentric remodeling than in those with normal LV geometry. After adjusting for hypertension, age, diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, glomerular filtration rate and ischemic heart disease, patients with concentric remodeling [odds ratio (OR) 3.94, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.26-12.31, p = 0.02] and those with concentric LVH (OR 3.69, 95% CI 1.24-10.95, p = 0.02), but not patients with eccentric LVH (OR 2.44, 95% CI 0.72-8.29, p = 0.15), had higher risk of extensive WMLs than patients with normal LV geometry.

  17. Evaluation of dysphagia in early stroke patients by bedside, endoscopic, and electrophysiological methods.

    PubMed

    Umay, Ebru Karaca; Unlu, Ece; Saylam, Guleser Kılıc; Cakci, Aytul; Korkmaz, Hakan

    2013-09-01

    We aimed in this study to evaluate dysphagia in early stroke patients using a bedside screening test and flexible fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FFEES) and electrophysiological evaluation (EE) methods and to compare the effectiveness of these methods. Twenty-four patients who were hospitalized in our clinic within the first 3 months after stroke were included in this study. Patients were evaluated using a bedside screening test [including bedside dysphagia score (BDS), neurological examination dysphagia score (NEDS), and total dysphagia score (TDS)] and FFEES and EE methods. Patients were divided into normal-swallowing and dysphagia groups according to the results of the evaluation methods. Patients with dysphagia as determined by any of these methods were compared to the patients with normal swallowing based on the results of the other two methods. Based on the results of our study, a high BDS was positively correlated with dysphagia identified by FFEES and EE methods. Moreover, the FFEES and EE methods were positively correlated. There was no significant correlation between NEDS and TDS levels and either EE or FFEES method. Bedside screening tests should be used mainly as an initial screening test; then FFEES and EE methods should be combined in patients who show risks. This diagnostic algorithm may provide a practical and fast solution for selected stroke patients.

  18. Sporadic Carney complex without PRKAR1A mutation in a young patient with ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Aguiar de Sousa, Diana; Gouveia, Ana Isabel; Wessling, Ana; Geraldes, Ruth; Canhão, Patrícia

    2015-03-01

    We describe a 29-year-old male, with a previous history of testicular tumor, who presented with a posterior circulation ischemic stroke associated to an atrial myxoma. Dermatologic observation disclosed spotty skin and mucosal pigmentation (lentigines), and a cutaneous myxoma was histopathologically confirmed. Although there was no family history of any of the Carney complex (CNC) features and no mutations in the PRKAR1A gene were found, these findings lead to the diagnosis of CNC. We emphasize the importance of recognizing this entity in young patients with stroke. PMID:25576349

  19. Human adult bone marrow-derived somatic cell therapy results in functional recovery and axonal plasticity following stroke in the rat.

    PubMed

    Andrews, E M; Tsai, S-Y; Johnson, S C; Farrer, J R; Wagner, J P; Kopen, G C; Kartje, G L

    2008-06-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of adult disability in the United States. To date there is no satisfactory treatment for stroke once neuronal damage has occurred. Human adult bone marrow-derived somatic cells (hABM-SC) represent a homogenous population of CD49c/CD90 co-positive, non-hematopoietic cells that have been shown to secrete therapeutically relevant trophic factors and to support axonal growth in a rodent model of spinal cord injury. Here we demonstrate that treatment with hABM-SC after ischemic stroke in adult rats results in recovery of forelimb function on a skilled motor test, and that this recovery is positively correlated with increased axonal outgrowth of the intact, uninjured corticorubral tract. While the complete mechanism of repair is still unclear, we conclude that enhancement of structural neuroplasticity from uninjured brain areas is one mechanism by which hABM-SC treatment after stroke leads to functional recovery. PMID:18440506

  20. Aphasic Dystextia as Presenting Feature of Ischemic Stroke in a Pediatric Patient

    PubMed Central

    Sachdeva, Alok; Mahajan, Supriya; Bass, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Aphasia is an important presenting symptom of acute stroke. With increasing reliance on electronic communication, incoherent texting or “dystextia,” which is a subset of aphasia that is reflected in text messages, can be a useful tool for symptom recognition and analysis. It can be a red flag for the family and therefore can help in early identification of an acute neurological deficit. It is also useful for providers to reliably analyze the deficit as well as establish a timeline of evolution of symptoms. There have been case reports where dystextia has been the presenting feature of stroke or complicated migraine and in one case of meningioma. We present the case of a teenage patient that in our knowledge is the youngest reported case of dystextia, whose aphasia recorded in a text message assisted with stroke localization. This also adds to the literature of dystextia which so far has only seven other cases reported. PMID:27579197

  1. Left atrial appendage dysfunction in a patient with premature ventricular contractions - a risk factor for stroke?

    PubMed

    Patel, Sandeep M; Ackerman, Michael J; Asirvatham, Samuel J

    2013-01-01

    A 16-year-old female with ventricular dysfunction and frequent ventricular arrhythmia presented with a cardioembolic stroke. Prior electrophysiology study and ablation was performed for ventricular tachycardia (VT). For remaining ventricular ectopy, the patient was maintained on carvedilol and mexiletine. After one year on this regimen, she presented with an acute stroke. Transesophageal echocardiography revealed no evidence of an intracardiac or ventricular thrombus but demonstrated markedly decreased left atrial appendage (LAA) flow velocity worsened during frequent premature ventricular contractions (PVC). In the absence of atrial fibrillation (AF), the LAA dysfunction was considered secondary to the frequent PVCs and was thought to be the underlying cause for the stroke. We present this case to highlight a potential under recognized association between LAA dysfunction and ventricular arrhythmia, similar to that observed with atrioventricular dyssynchronous pacing. PMID:24086095

  2. Aphasic Dystextia as Presenting Feature of Ischemic Stroke in a Pediatric Patient.

    PubMed

    Lakhotia, Arpita; Sachdeva, Alok; Mahajan, Supriya; Bass, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Aphasia is an important presenting symptom of acute stroke. With increasing reliance on electronic communication, incoherent texting or "dystextia," which is a subset of aphasia that is reflected in text messages, can be a useful tool for symptom recognition and analysis. It can be a red flag for the family and therefore can help in early identification of an acute neurological deficit. It is also useful for providers to reliably analyze the deficit as well as establish a timeline of evolution of symptoms. There have been case reports where dystextia has been the presenting feature of stroke or complicated migraine and in one case of meningioma. We present the case of a teenage patient that in our knowledge is the youngest reported case of dystextia, whose aphasia recorded in a text message assisted with stroke localization. This also adds to the literature of dystextia which so far has only seven other cases reported. PMID:27579197

  3. [The fetal proteins in prognosis of development of pneumonia in patients with ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Arkhipkin, A A; Liang, O V; Kochetov, A G

    2014-12-01

    The searching of laboratory predictors of pneumonia in patients with ischemic stroke is an actual issue. The fetal proteins can be such biomarkers. The study was carried out to determine significance of such fetal proteins as alpha-fetoprotein, cancerous embryonic antigen, CA 19-9, CA 125, CA 15-3, CA 72-4, CYFRA 21-1 for prognosis of development of pneumonia in patients with ischemic stroke. The study included sampling of 216 patients in acute period of ischemic stroke. All patients were measured level of fetal proteins in first day from onset of disease using electrochemiluminescence immunoassay. It is demonstrated that CA 72-4 has the most significance for prognosis of development of pneumonia from all analyzed proteins and complications of ischemic stroke. The probability ratio relatively to other fetal proteins added up to 0.460 (CL 95% 0.267-0.791, p=0.011), to other complications--0.629 (CL 95% 0.433-0.913, p=0.015). The threshold value of CA 72-4 for development of pneumonia added up to 0.82 (CL 95% 0.68-0.96, p=0.011) U/ml. Under lower level of CA 72-4 the risk of development of pneumonia increases. Under higher level of CA 72-4 there is statistical probability of absence of developmnent of pneumonia. The threshold value was lower than reference interval which in the study added up to 0.85-1.42 U/ml. The detection of level of CA 72-4 on first day after onset of stroke in patients can be recommended for establishing of group of high risk of development of pneumonia and implementation of therapeutic activities. PMID:25872261

  4. Cystatin C, creatinine, estimated glomerular filtration, and long-term mortality in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Hojs Fabjan, Tanja; Penko, Meta; Hojs, Radovan

    2014-02-01

    Renal dysfunction is associated with mortality in patients after ischemic stroke. Cystatin C is a potentially superior marker of renal function compared to creatinine and estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR). In our observational cohort study, 390 Caucasian patients suffered from acute ischemic stroke (mean age 70.9 years; 183 women and 207 men) were included and prospectively followed up to maximal 56 months. Serum creatinine and cystatin C were measured at admission to the hospital; GFR was estimated according to CKD-EPI creatinine and CKD-EPI creatinine/cystatin equations. According to values of serum creatinine, estimated GFR and serum cystatin C patients were divided into quintiles. In the follow-up period, 191 (49%) patients died. For serum cystatin C and estimated GFR based on creatinine and cystatin C, the mortality and the hazard ratios for long-term mortality increased from the first to the fifth quintile nearly linearly. The associations of serum creatinine and estimated GFR categories based on creatinine with long-term mortality were J-shaped. As compared with lowest quintile of serum cystatin C, the fifth quintile was associated with long-term mortality significantly also after multivariate adjustment (age, gender, initial stroke severity, known risk factors for stroke mortality). In contrast, in adjusted analysis serum creatinine and estimated GFR (CKD-EPI creatinine and CKD-EPI creatinine/cystatin) were not associated with long-term mortality. In summary, serum cystatin C was independently and better associated with the risk of long-term mortality in patients suffering from ischemic stroke than were creatinine and estimated GFR using both CKD-EPI equations.

  5. [Delayed Anesthesia due to Heat Stroke Developing in an Elderly Patient].

    PubMed

    Muratani, Tadatoshi

    2015-12-01

    We report a case of rhabdomyolysis caused by heat stroke leading to delayed surgery. An 83-year-old woman living by herself was found lying on the floor, approximately one hour after a fall, and then transferred. She was hospitalized for first degree heat stroke and a left humeral transcondylar fracture and scheduled to undergo surgery. Preoperative examinations revealed a high creatine phosphokinase (CPK) value of 3,956 IU · l(-1). She was diagnosed with rhabdomyolysis caused by heat stroke, and surgery was delayed. She underwent surgery later, and perioperative management was completed. More than 80% of deaths caused by heat stroke are elderly cases, due to both physical and environmental factors. Surgery and anesthesia with elevated blood CPK can cause acute renal disorder. There are no certain criteria for identifying acute renal disorder associated with blood CPK elevation, making this condition difficult to assess. In this case, however, perioperative management was safely performed. The number of elderly cases with heat stroke is tending to increase, and we should treat these patients carefully. PMID:26790335

  6. Beyond Neglect: Preliminary Evidence of Retrospective Time Estimation Abnormalities in Non-Neglect Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack Patients

    PubMed Central

    Low, Essie; Crewther, Sheila G.; Perre, Diana L.; Ben Ong; Laycock, Robin; Tu, Hans; Wijeratne, Tissa

    2016-01-01

    Perception of the passage of time is essential for safe planning and navigation of everyday activities. Findings from the literature have demonstrated a gross underestimation of time interval in right-hemisphere damaged neglect patients, but not in non-neglect unilaterally-damaged patients, compared to controls. This study aimed to investigate retrospective estimation of the duration of a target detection task over two occasions, in 30 stroke patients (12 left-side stroke 15 right-side stroke, and 3 right-side stroke with neglect) and 10 transient ischemic attack patients, relative to 31 age-matched controls. Performances on visual short-term and working memory tasks were also examined to investigate the associations between timing abilities with residual cognitive functioning. Initial results revealed evidence of perceptual time underestimation, not just in neglect patients, but also in non-neglect unilaterally-damaged stroke patients and transient ischemic attack patients. Three months later, underestimation of time persisted only in left-side stroke and right-side stroke with neglect patients, who also demonstrated reduced short-term and working memory abilities. Findings from this study suggest a predictive role of residual cognitive impairments in determining the prognosis of perceptual timing abnormalities. PMID:26940859

  7. Poststroke shoulder pain in Turkish stroke patients: relationship with clinical factors and functional outcomes.

    PubMed

    Barlak, Aysegul; Unsal, Sibel; Kaya, Kurtulus; Sahin-Onat, Sule; Ozel, Sumru

    2009-12-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the possible causes of hemiplegic shoulder pain (HSP) in Turkish patients with stroke, to identify the correlation between HSP and clinical factors, and to review the effects of HSP on functional outcomes. A total of 187 consecutive patients with stroke were evaluated for the presence of HSP and for the possible causes. Each patient was evaluated by clinical, radiographic, and ultrasonographic examination. Daily living activities were assessed using the Functional Independence Measure at admission and at discharge. Patients were divided into two groups, one comprising patients with shoulder pain and the other comprising patients without shoulder pain. They were then compared with respect to clinical characteristics, radiologic findings, and Functional Independence Measure scores. Shoulder pain was present in 114 (61%) patients. Of the 114 patients with pain, 71 patients showed various grades of glenohumeral joint subluxation, 70 patients had complex regional pain syndrome-type I, 70 patients had impingement syndrome, 68 patients had spasticity, 49 patients had adhesive capsulitis, and 10 patients had thalamic pain. No correlation was found between shoulder pain and clinical factors (sex, hemiplegic side, hand dominance, etiologic cause, comorbidities). The relationship between shoulder pain and adhesive capsulitis was significant (P=0.01) and also complex regional pain syndrome-type I was statistically significant (P=0.001). The group without HSP showed significantly more improvement than the group with HSP in functional outcomes (P=0.01) and the hospitalization period was significantly shorter (P=0.03). Shoulder pain is a frequent problem in patients with stroke. It is, however, often difficult to isolate a specific cause and it causes a prolonged hospitalization period and can have a negative effect on functional outcomes.

  8. Impact of baseline characteristics on outcomes of carotid artery stenting in acute ischemic stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Cheng-Sheng; Lin, Chih-Ming; Liu, Chi-Kuang; Lu, Henry Horng-Shing

    2016-01-01

    Carotid artery stenting is an effective treatment for ischemic stroke patients with moderate-to-severe carotid artery stenosis. However, the midterm outcome for patients undergoing this procedure varies considerably with baseline characteristics. To determine the impact of baseline characteristics on outcomes following carotid artery stenting, data from 107 eligible patients with a first episode of ischemic stroke were collected by retrospective chart review. A modified Rankin Scale (mRS) was used to divide patients into two baseline groups, mRS ≤2 and mRS >2. A three-step decision-tree statistical analysis was conducted. After weighting the decision-tree parameters, the following impact hierarchy was obtained: admission low-density lipoprotein, gouty arthritis, chronic kidney disease, ipsilateral common carotid artery resistance index, contralateral ophthalmic artery resistance index, sex, and dyslipidemia. The finite-state machine model demonstrated that, in patients with baseline mRS ≤2, 46% had an improved mRS score at follow-up, whereas 54% had a stable mRS score. In patients with baseline mRS >2, a stable mRS score was observed in 75%, improved score in 23%, and a poorer score in 2%. Admission low-density lipoprotein was the strongest predictive factor influencing poststenting outcome. In addition, our study provides further evidence that carotid artery stenting can be of benefit in first-time ischemic stroke patients with baseline mRS scores >2. PMID:27099508

  9. Domiciliary occupational therapy for patients with stroke discharged from hospital: randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Gilbertson, Louise; Langhorne, Peter; Walker, Andrew; Allen, Ann; Murray, Gordon D

    2000-01-01

    Objective To establish if a brief programme of domiciliary occupational therapy could improve the recovery of patients with stroke discharged from hospital. Design Single blind randomised controlled trial. Setting Two hospital sites within a UK teaching hospital. Subjects 138 patients with stroke with a definite plan for discharge home from hospital. Intervention Six week domiciliary occupational therapy or routine follow up. Main outcome measures Nottingham extended activities of daily living score and “global outcome” (deterioration according to the Barthel activities of daily living index, or death). Results By eight weeks the mean Nottingham extended activities of daily living score in the intervention group was 4.8 points (95% confidence interval −0.5 to 10.0, P=0.08) greater than that of the control group. Overall, 16 (24%) intervention patients had a poor global outcome compared with 30 (42%) control patients (odds ratio 0.43, 0.21 to 0.89, P=0.02). These patterns persisted at six months but were not statistically significant. Patients in the intervention group were more likely to report satisfaction with a range of aspects of services. Conclusion The functional outcome and satisfaction of patients with stroke can be improved by a brief occupational therapy programme carried out in the patient's home immediately after discharge. Major benefits may not, however, be sustained. PMID:10698876

  10. Robotics and other devices in the treatment of patients recovering from stroke.

    PubMed

    Volpe, Bruce T; Ferraro, Mark; Lynch, Daniel; Christos, Paul; Krol, Jennifer; Trudell, Christine; Krebs, Hermano I; Hogan, Neville

    2005-11-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of permanent disability in the United States despite advances in prevention and novel interventional treatments. Randomized controlled studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of specialized post-stroke rehabilitation units, but administrative orders have severely limited the length of stay, so novel approaches to the treatment of recovery need to be tested in outpatients. Although the mechanisms of stroke recovery depend on multiple factors, a number of techniques that concentrate on enhanced exercise of the paralyzed limb have demonstrated effectiveness in reducing the motor impairment. For example, interactive robotic devices are new tools for therapists to deliver enhanced sensorimotor training for the paralyzed upper limb, which can potentially improve patient outcome and increase patient productivity. New data support the idea that for some post-stroke patients and for some aspects of training-induced recovery, timing of the training may be less important than the quality and intensity of the training. The positive outcome that resulted in the interactive robotic trials contrasts with the failure to find a beneficial result in trials that used a noninteractive device that delivered continuous passive motion only. New pilot data from novel devices to move the wrist demonstrate benefit and suggest that successive improvement of the function of the arm progressing to the distal muscles may eventually lead to significant disability reduction. These data from robotic trials continue to contribute to the emerging scientific basis of neuro-rehabilitation. PMID:16263058

  11. Non-Vitamin K Oral Anticoagulants in Stroke Patients: Practical Issues

    PubMed Central

    Diener, Hans-Christoph; Kleinschnitz, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Non-vitamin-K oral anticoagulants (NOACs) represent a major advance in the prevention of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), offering a similar, if not superior, efficacy and safety profile and several practical advantages over oral vitamin K antagonists (VKAs). The rapid onset of action of the NOACs, their relatively short half-live, and the availability of specific reversal agents may be advantageous when managing acute ischemic strokes, and in the post-stroke, post-transient ischemic attack, and post-intracranial hemorrhage settings. In this review article, we offer practical guidance on the use of NOACs in these settings, focusing on managing the acute event and on initiating or resuming anticoagulation for secondary prevention. We also assess the use of NOACs to prevent stroke and bleeding in patients with AF who have chronic kidney disease, are elderly, or cognitively impaired, and we offer guidance on optimizing the use of NOACs and VKAs in these patient groups in the absence of evidence-based guidelines. PMID:27165264

  12. Ocular–visual defect and visual neglect in stroke patients – A report from Kathmandu, Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Gauri Shankar; Upadhyaya, Suraj; Sharma, Ananda Kumar; Gajurel, Bikram Prasad

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To find out the type of visual defects, ocular defects or visual neglect occurring in patients with stroke. Methods In this cross-sectional study including 40 subjects diagnosed as stroke, assessment included visual acuity with the Sheridan-Gardner chart, objective and subjective refraction, duction and version eye movement, cover test at distance and near, anterior segment examination with the slit lamp, posterior segment examination after pupil dilatation, color vision test with the Farnsworth D-15 test, diplopia charting, the Hess charting, and visual field examination on Goldmann perimetry. 33 subjects (82.5%) having stroke underwent star cancellation test for visual neglect evaluation. Chi-square test with Yate's correction was performed to evaluate associations between visual neglect and neurological findings. Results The mean age of the subjects was 52.1 ± 15.7 years with male/female ratio of 0.7. Neurological findings included hemiplegia/hemiparesis in 84.8%, ischemic stroke in 80%, left hemisphere involvement in 60%, and cortical area involvement in 65%. Ocular finding included extraocular muscle palsy in 17.5%, exotropia in 12.5%, and ptosis in 7.5%. Co-morbid ocular findings such as cataract, retinopathy, and age-related macular degeneration were also reported. Visual neglect was present in 54.5% subjects predominantly affecting the left side. Conclusion This study reports the relationship between ocular–visual disorders and stroke. There should be a formal screening for visual problems in stroke patients in hospital and rehabilitation settings.

  13. Optimal scoring methods of hand-strength tests in patients with stroke.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sheau-Ling; Hsieh, Ching-Lin; Lin, Jau-Hong; Chen, Hui-Mei

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the optimal scoring methods for measuring strength of the more-affected hand in patients with stroke by examining the effect of reducing measurement errors. Three hand-strength tests of grip, palmar pinch, and lateral pinch were administered at two sessions in 56 patients with stroke. Five scoring methods were used to present the strength scores. The smallest real difference was used to provide information on the measurement error. The smallest real difference percentage was used to compare the effect on minimizing the error. Using mean score of tests for nonspastic patients carried out at least twice was found to be advisable to minimize measurement errors in the grip, palmar pinch, and lateral pinch tests. However, the use of hand-strength tests for patients with spasticity is limited because of the relatively high measurement errors.

  14. [Patients with ischemic stroke are taken care quickly in São Paulo Hospital].

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Lilia Fumie; Fukujima, Marcia Maiumi; Granitoff, Nina; do Prado, Gilmar Fernandes

    2004-03-01

    We observed inpatients with the diagnosis of ischemic stroke hospitalized at least 24 hours. We investigated the reasons for early or late arrival to the Emergency Room, the time span from arrival to computed tomography (CT) scanning, factors associated to hospitalization time, and patients outcome. We concluded that people who are cared for by São Paulo Hospital now get to the hospital sooner than they did 3 years ago (47% arrived in 3 hours or less) and that the patient flow inside the hospital became much faster, once any stroke patient is considered now a medical emergency by the hospital staff. Infections were the main complications presented by our patients, which is leading us to optimize protocols to improve emergency care by all the staff. PMID:15122441

  15. [Noopept in the treatment of mild cognitive impairment in patients with stroke].

    PubMed

    Amelin, A V; Iliukhina, A Iu; Shmonin, A A

    2011-01-01

    Noopept is a neuroprotector and nootropics. Literature data revealed the treatment effect of noopept on mild cognitive impairment in patients with discirculatory encephalopathy. The present open prospective study included 60 patients with stroke treated with noopept during 12 months. Cognitive functions were assessed before and after treatment using neuropsychological tests. An analysis of MMSE scores and lateral and categorical associations revealed the significant improvement of cognitive functions after 2 months in patients of the main group compared to the controls. The global assessment of efficacy revealed the mild improvement in the main group while no changes were found in the control group. The results have demonstrated that noopept, used in dose 20 mg daily during 2 months, improves cognitive functions in stroke patients and has a high level of safety. PMID:22500312

  16. Positive Emotion following a Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Ostir, Glenn V.; Berges, Ivonne; Ottenbacher, Margaret; Graham, James E.; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES As populations age, interest in exploring the emotional health of adults has increased. In the current study we were interested in investigating the positive emotion of adults with stroke at discharge from in-patient medical rehabilitation and 3 months post discharge. DESIGN A longitudinal study using information from the Stroke Recovery in Underserved Patients database. SETTING Information was collected during in-patient medical rehabilitation stay and approximately 3 months post discharge. PARTICIPANTS The study included 856 persons aged 55 or older with stroke admitted to in-patient medical rehabilitation in the U.S. MEASUREMENTS Positive emotion. RESULTS The average age was 72.5 years, 78.7% were non-Hispanic white and 51.9% were women. The average length of in-patient hospital stay was 20.2 (SD 10.1) days. More than a third (35.6%) reported higher positive emotion over the 3 month follow-up, while 29.7% reported lower positive emotion. In addition to discharge positive emotion, three factors including depression (b = −0.05, SE .02, p = .0001), level of education (b = 0.08, SE .04, p = .04) and functional status (b = 0.04, SE .006, p = .001) significantly predicted higher positive emotion at 3 month follow-up. CONCLUSION A large percentage of adults report high positive emotion in the initial months following a stroke. This finding adds to work on stroke recovery and indicates the resilience of adults when faced with a health challenge. Understanding the role of positive emotion in persons living with stroke may provide critical insight into long-term recovery. PMID:18509564

  17. Safety and Efficacy of Acute Clopidogrel Load in Patients with Moderate and Severe Ischemic Strokes

    PubMed Central

    Monlezun, Dominique J.; Rincon, Natalia; Tiu, Jonathan; Valmoria, Melisa

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To study the safety and efficacy of a clopidogrel loading dose in patients with moderate and severe acute ischemic strokes. Background. The safety of clopidogrel loading has been extensively investigated in patients with minor strokes and transient ischemic attacks. Methods. Acute ischemic stroke patients presenting consecutively to our center from 07/01/08 to 07/31/13 were screened. Clopidogrel loading was defined as at least 300 mg dose (with or without aspirin) given within 6 hours of admission. We compared outcomes in patients with baseline NIHSS > 3 with and without clopidogrel loading. Results. Inclusion criteria were met for 1011 patients (43.6% females, 69.1% black, median age 63). Patients with clopidogrel loading had lower baseline NIHSS than patients who were not loaded (8 versus 9, p = 0.005). The two groups had similar risk for hemorrhagic transformation (p = 0.918) and symptomatic hemorrhage (p = 0.599). Patients who were loaded had a lower rate of neurological worsening (38.9% versus 48.3%, p = 0.031) and less in-hospital mortality (4.3% versus 13.4%, p = 0.001) compared to those who were not loaded. The likelihood of having a poor functional outcome did not differ between the two groups after adjusting for NIHSS on admission (OR = 0.71, 95% CI 0.4633–1.0906, p = 0.118). Conclusion. Clopidogrel loading dose was not associated with increased risk for hemorrhagic transformation or symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage in our retrospective study and was associated with reduced rates of neuroworsening following moderate and severe stroke.

  18. Cognitive performance following lacunar stroke in Spanish-speaking patients: Results from the SPS3 trial

    PubMed Central

    Jacova, Claudia; Pearce, Lesly A.; Roldan, Ana M.; Arauz, Antonio; Tapia, Jorge; Costello, Raymond; McClure, Leslie A.; Hart, Robert G.; Benavente, Oscar R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cognitive impairment is frequent in lacunar stroke patients. The prevalence and pattern of among Spanish-speaking patients (SSP) are unknown and have not been compared across regions or to English-speaking patients (ESP). Aims To characterize cognitive impairment in SSP and compare to ESP. Methods The baseline neuropsychological test (NPT) performance and the prevalence of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), defined as a z score ≤ −1.5 on memory and/or non-memory tests, were evaluated in SSP in the Secondary Prevention of Small Subcortical Strokes (SPS3) trial. Results Out of 3020 participants, 1,177 were SSP residing in Latin America (n=693), the US (n=121) and Spain (n=363). Low education (0-8 years) was frequent in SSP (49-57%). Latin American SSP had frequent post-stroke upper extremity motor impairment (83%). Compared to ESP, all SSP groups had smaller memory deficits and larger non-memory/motor deficits, with Latin American SSP showing the largest deficits (median z-score 0.6 to −1.3 for non-memory tests; ≥ −5.0 grooved pegboard; −0.4 to −0.7 memory tests). The prevalence of MCI was high and comparable to ESP in the US and Latin American SSP but not Spanish group: ESP=47%, Latin American SSP=51%, US SSP=40%, Spanish SSP=29%, with >50% characterized as non-amnestic in SSP groups. Older age (OR per 10-y =1.52, CI=1.35-1.71), lower education (OR 0-4-y=1.23, CI=0.90-1.67), being a Latin American resident (OR=1.31, CI=0.87-1.98), and post-stroke disability (OR Barthel Index<95=1.89, CI-1.43-2.50) were independently associated with MCI. Conclusions Mild cognitive impairment in SPS3 Spanish-speaking patients with recent lacunar stroke is highly prevalent but has a different pattern to that observed in English-speaking patients. A combination of socio-demographics, stroke biology, and stroke care may account for these differences. PMID:25973704

  19. Cerebral microbleeds and white matter hyperintensities in cardioembolic stroke patients due to atrial fibrillation: single-centre longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Charidimou, Andreas; Inamura, Shigeru; Nomura, Tatsufumi; Kanno, Aya; Kim, Sang Nyon; Imaizumi, Toshio

    2016-10-15

    Cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) are a potential predictor of future stroke risk with clinical relevance for antithrombotic treatments, especially in ischaemic stroke patients with atrial fibrillation. However, prospective data on CMBs and risk of stroke in this particular stroke population remain scarce. We therefore performed a single centre longitudinal study to investigate CMBs and white matter hyperintensities (WMH) and the risk of future stroke. Consecutive acute stroke patients, admitted during 2008-2012 for presumed cardioembolic stroke due to non-valvular atrial fibrillation with available follow-up for the occurrence of recurrent stroke were included in our study. The rate of future stroke between patients with vs. without CMBs and moderate to severe WMH at baseline MRI was compared in separate survival and multivariable Cox regression analyses. A total of 119 cardioembolic stroke patients (49% female, median age: 76; IQR: 68-82years) were included. CMBs were found at baseline in 26/119 (21.8%; 95% CI: 14.8-30.4%) patients. Moderate to severe WMH were present in 27/119 (22.7%; 95% CI: 15.5-31.3%) cases. During a median follow-up time of 17months (IQR: 3-50months), 17 of 119 patients experienced a symptomatic stroke: 14 patients had an ischaemic stoke and 3 had intracerebral haemorrhage. The overall incidence rate for ischaemic stroke and intracerebral haemorrhage was 4.2 (95% CI: 2.3-7.1) and 0.9 (95% CI: 0.5-2.6) per 1000 patient-year of follow-up respectively. In multivariable Cox regression analysis the hazard ratio for total CMB number and the risk of stroke during follow-up was 1.05 (95% CI: 0.99-1.11; p=0.137, per each additional CMB increase), after adjusting for CHAD2S. A similar regression analysis demonstrated that moderate to severe WMHs were independently associated with increased risk of symptomatic stroke at follow-up, after adjusting for CHAD2S (HR: 2.99; 95% CI: 1.01-8.30; p=0.036). Despite the small sample size, our study provides useful data

  20. Cycling exercise with functional electrical stimulation improves postural control in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Lo, Hsin-Chang; Hsu, Yung-Chun; Hsueh, Ya-Hsin; Yeh, Chun-Yu

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study is to determine whether short term functional electrical stimulation (FES)-assisted cycling training can affect the postural control of stroke patients, and whether the application of FES can enhance the effect of cycling training. 20 stroke patients were randomly assigned to the FES-cycling group (FES-CG) or the cycling group (CG). Measurements were completed before and immediately after each 20 min training sessions. The measurements included a balance test (to quantify the postural control ability), a Hoffmann's reflex/motor response ratio (H/M ratio) test and a pendulum test (to quantify the muscle tone). In the balance test, some parameters in all directions exhibited significant intervention effects between the FES-CG group and the CG group. The H/M ratios (p=.014; .005, FES-CG and CG respectively) and relaxation index (p=.005; .047, FES-CG and CG respectively) revealed significant difference between FES-CG and CG group. The change ratios of directional control in the forward direction and H/M ratio revealed significant difference (p=.022; .015) between FES-CG and CG among subjects with higher muscle tone. The stroke subjects' postural control was improved while their muscle tone was reduced after the 20 min cycling training program both with and without FES. We conclude that cycling training, with or without FES may reduce spasticity in stroke patients. The application of FES in cycling exercise was shown to be more effective in stroke patients with higher muscle tone.

  1. Cycling exercise with functional electrical stimulation improves postural control in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Lo, Hsin-Chang; Hsu, Yung-Chun; Hsueh, Ya-Hsin; Yeh, Chun-Yu

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study is to determine whether short term functional electrical stimulation (FES)-assisted cycling training can affect the postural control of stroke patients, and whether the application of FES can enhance the effect of cycling training. 20 stroke patients were randomly assigned to the FES-cycling group (FES-CG) or the cycling group (CG). Measurements were completed before and immediately after each 20 min training sessions. The measurements included a balance test (to quantify the postural control ability), a Hoffmann's reflex/motor response ratio (H/M ratio) test and a pendulum test (to quantify the muscle tone). In the balance test, some parameters in all directions exhibited significant intervention effects between the FES-CG group and the CG group. The H/M ratios (p=.014; .005, FES-CG and CG respectively) and relaxation index (p=.005; .047, FES-CG and CG respectively) revealed significant difference between FES-CG and CG group. The change ratios of directional control in the forward direction and H/M ratio revealed significant difference (p=.022; .015) between FES-CG and CG among subjects with higher muscle tone. The stroke subjects' postural control was improved while their muscle tone was reduced after the 20 min cycling training program both with and without FES. We conclude that cycling training, with or without FES may reduce spasticity in stroke patients. The application of FES in cycling exercise was shown to be more effective in stroke patients with higher muscle tone. PMID:22153770

  2. Intravenous Autologous Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cell Transplantation for Stroke: Phase1/2a Clinical Trial in a Homogeneous Group of Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Akihiko; Sakai, Chiaki; Soma, Toshihiro; Kasahara, Yukiko; Stern, David M; Kajimoto, Katsufumi; Ihara, Masafumi; Daimon, Takashi; Yamahara, Kenichi; Doi, Kaori; Kohara, Nobuo; Nishimura, Hiroyuki; Matsuyama, Tomohiro; Naritomi, Hiroaki; Sakai, Nobuyuki; Nagatsuka, Kazuyuki

    2015-10-01

    The goal of this clinical trial was to assess the feasibility and safety of transplanting autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells into patients suffering severe embolic stroke. Major inclusion criteria included patients with cerebral embolism, age 20-75 years, National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score displaying improvement of ≤ 5 points during the first 7 days after stroke, and NIHSS score of ≥ 10 on day 7 after stroke. Bone marrow aspiration (25 or 50 mL; N = 6 patients in each case) was performed 7-10 days poststroke, and bone marrow mononuclear cells were administrated intravenously. Mean total transplanted cell numbers were 2.5 × 10(8) and 3.4 × 10(8) cells in the lower and higher dose groups, respectively. No apparent adverse effects of administering bone marrow cells were observed. Compared with the lower dose, patients receiving the higher dose of bone marrow cells displayed a trend toward improved neurologic outcomes. Compared with 1 month after treatment, patients receiving cell therapy displayed a trend toward improved cerebral blood flow and metabolic rate of oxygen consumption 6 months after treatment. In comparison with historical controls, patients receiving cell therapy had significantly better neurologic outcomes. Our results indicated that intravenous transplantation of autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells is safe and feasible. Positive results and trends favoring neurologic recovery and improvement in cerebral blood flow and metabolism by cell therapy underscore the relevance of larger scale randomized controlled trials using this approach.

  3. Help Desk Answers: Do novel oral anticoagulants safely prevent stroke in patients with nonvalvular A-fib?

    PubMed

    Siewert, Ryan; Hostetter, Jeff

    2016-06-01

    Yes. Dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and apixaban are safe and effective compared with warfarin for preventing stroke in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. These novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are noninferior in reducing the number of strokes and systemic emboli and in lowering all-cause mortality while not increasing major bleeding complications and hemorrhagic events. PMID:27474824

  4. Accelerated development of cerebral small vessel disease in young stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Arntz, Renate M.; van den Broek, Steffen M.A.; van Uden, Inge W.M.; Ghafoorian, Mohsen; Platel, Bram; Rutten-Jacobs, Loes C.A.; Maaijwee, Noortje A.M.; Schaapsmeerders, Pauline; Schoonderwaldt, Hennie C.; van Dijk, Ewoud J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To study the long-term prevalence of small vessel disease after young stroke and to compare this to healthy controls. Methods: This prospective cohort study comprises 337 patients with an ischemic stroke or TIA, aged 18–50 years, without a history of TIA or stroke. In addition, 90 age- and sex-matched controls were included. At follow-up, lacunes, microbleeds, and white matter hyperintensity (WMH) volume were assessed using MRI. To investigate the relation between risk factors and small vessel disease, logistic and linear regression were used. Results: After mean follow-up of 9.9 (SD 8.1) years, 337 patients were included (227 with an ischemic stroke and 110 with a TIA). Mean age of patients was 49.8 years (SD 10.3) and 45.4% were men; for controls, mean age was 49.4 years (SD 11.9) and 45.6% were men. Compared with controls, patients more often had at least 1 lacune (24.0% vs 4.5%, p < 0.0001). In addition, they had a higher WMH volume (median 1.5 mL [interquartile range (IQR) 0.5–3.7] vs 0.4 mL [IQR 0.0–1.0], p < 0.001). Compared with controls, patients had the same volume WMHs on average 10–20 years earlier. In the patient group, age at stroke (β = 0.03, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.02–0.04) hypertension (β = 0.22, 95% CI 0.04–0.39), and smoking (β = 0.18, 95% CI 0.01–0.34) at baseline were associated with WMH volume. Conclusions: Patients with a young stroke have a higher burden of small vessel disease than controls adjusted for confounders. Cerebral aging seems accelerated by 10–20 years in these patients, which may suggest an increased vulnerability to vascular risk factors. PMID:27521431

  5. The therapeutic effect of Xueshuan Xinmai tablets on memory injury and brain activity in post-stroke patients: a pilot placebo controlled fMRI study

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Dongfeng; Lv, Chenlong; Zhang, Junying; Peng, Dantao; Hu, Liangping; Zhang, Zhanjun; Wang, Yongyan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of Xueshuan Xinmai tablets (XXMT) for the treatment of cognition, brain activation in the rehabilitation period of ischemic stroke patients. Methods: 28 adults patients, aged 50-80 years, in the rehabilitation period of ischemic stroke were divided into XXMT treatment group and placebo control group. Patients received 3 months treatment (oral 0.8 g, 3 times per day). Before and after treatment, all patients were evaluated by a series of neuropsychological tests followed by resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Results: In the XXMT treatment group, the patients’ episodic memory showed significant improvement. The resting-state fMRI analysis indicated that a significant decline in the fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation value was observed in the bilateral middle cingulate gyrus. Conclusions: Yiqi Huoxue effect under XXMT administration has a favorable mediation on episodic memory, consequently suppresses the activation of the cingulate gyrus in the rehabilitation period of ischemic stroke patients. PMID:26221294

  6. Multidisciplinary recording and continuity of care for stroke patients with eating difficulties.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, Eva; Ehnfors, Margareta; Ehrenberg, Anna

    2010-05-01

    Eating difficulties after stroke are common and can, in addition to being a risk for serious medical complications, impair functional capability, social life and self-image. Stroke unit care entails systematic multidisciplinary teamwork and continuity of care. The purpose of this study was to describe (i) multidisciplinary stroke care as represented in patient records for patients with eating difficulties, and (ii) the written information that was transferred from hospital to elderly care. Data from 59 patient records were analysed with descriptive statistics and by categorization of phrases. Signs of multidisciplinary collaboration to manage eating problems were scarce in the records. While two notes from physiotherapists were found, nurses contributed with 78% of all notes (n = 358). Screening of swallowing and body weight was documented for most patients, whereas data on nutritional status and eating were largely lacking. The majority of notes represented patients' handling of food in the mouth, swallowing and lack of energy. Care plans were unstructured and few contained steps for managing eating. Discharge summaries held poor information on care related to eating difficulties. The language of all professionals was mostly unspecific. However, notes from speech-language therapists were comprehensive and entailed information on follow-up and patient participation. PMID:20178426

  7. Abnormal sensory integration affects balance control in hemiparetic patients within the first year after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Clarissa B.; Medeiros, Ítalo R. T.; Greters, Mario G.; Frota, Norberto A. F.; Tavares Lucato, Leandro; Scaff, Milberto; Conforto, Adriana B.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Impairments in balance can be a consequence of changes in the motor, sensory, and integrative aspects of motor control. Abnormal sensory reweighting, i.e., the ability to select the most appropriate sensory information to achieve postural stability, may contribute to balance impairment. The Sensory Organization Test is a component of Computerized Dynamic Posturography that evaluates the impact of visual, vestibular, and somatosensory inputs, as well as sensory reweighting, under conditions of sensory conflict. The aim of this study is to compare balance control in hemiparetic patients during the first year post-stroke and in age-matched neurologically normal subjects using the Berg Balance Scale and Computerized Dynamic Posturography. METHODS: We compared the Berg Balance Scale and Sensory Organization Test scores in 21 patients with hemiparesis after first-ever ischemic stroke and in 21 age-matched, neurologically normal subjects. An equilibrium score was defined for each Sensory Organization Test condition. RESULTS: Berg Balance Scale scores were significantly lower in the patients than in the neurologically normal subjects. Equilibrium scores were significantly lower in the patients than in the neurologically normal subjects for those Sensory Organization Test conditions that did not provide appropriate somatosensory information and under conditions of sensory conflict. A history of falls was more frequent in patients with lower equilibrium scores. CONCLUSION: During the first year after a stroke, defective sensory reweighting significantly impacts balance control in hemiparetic patients. These results are important for the planning of effective rehabilitation interventions. PMID:22189728

  8. The effect of modified bridge exercise on balance ability of stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Song, Gui-Bin; Heo, Ju-Young

    2015-12-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to verify the effects of a modified bridging exercise on stroke patients with improvement in weight bearing on the affected side in standing and static balancing ability. [Subjects] Thirty patients who had a stroke were randomly allocated into a supine bridge exercise group (SBG, n=10), a supine bridge exercise on a TOGU balance pad group (SBTG, n=10), and a unilateral bridge exercise group (UBG, n=10). [Methods] The SBG patients underwent supine bridge exercise, the SBTG patients underwent supine bridge exercise with a TOGU balance pad, and the UBG patients underwent unilateral bridge exercise. All groups received 20 minutes of training per day, five times per week, for four weeks. [Results] All groups showed significant changes in weight bearing in a standing position after the intervention. The SBTG and UBG groups showed significant changes in balance ability. [Conclusion] According to the results of this study, bridge exercise was effective in improving weight bearing in a standing position and improving balance on stroke patients. The bridge exercise with a TOGU balance pad and the unilateral bridge exercise were especially more effective in anterior, posterior length in limit of stability following on standing. PMID:26834357

  9. The effect of modified bridge exercise on balance ability of stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Song, Gui-bin; Heo, Ju-young

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to verify the effects of a modified bridging exercise on stroke patients with improvement in weight bearing on the affected side in standing and static balancing ability. [Subjects] Thirty patients who had a stroke were randomly allocated into a supine bridge exercise group (SBG, n=10), a supine bridge exercise on a TOGU balance pad group (SBTG, n=10), and a unilateral bridge exercise group (UBG, n=10). [Methods] The SBG patients underwent supine bridge exercise, the SBTG patients underwent supine bridge exercise with a TOGU balance pad, and the UBG patients underwent unilateral bridge exercise. All groups received 20 minutes of training per day, five times per week, for four weeks. [Results] All groups showed significant changes in weight bearing in a standing position after the intervention. The SBTG and UBG groups showed significant changes in balance ability. [Conclusion] According to the results of this study, bridge exercise was effective in improving weight bearing in a standing position and improving balance on stroke patients. The bridge exercise with a TOGU balance pad and the unilateral bridge exercise were especially more effective in anterior, posterior length in limit of stability following on standing. PMID:26834357