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Sample records for adult teleost fish

  1. Orexin system in teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Kouhei; Azuma, Morio; Kang, Ki Sung

    2012-01-01

    Orexin is a neuropeptide distributed widely among vertebrates. In mammals, orexin and its receptor system are involved in the regulation of food intake, locomotion, and psychomotor activities including the sleep/wakefulness cycle. With regard to nonmammalian vertebrates, there has also been intensive study aimed at the identification and functional characterization of orexin and its receptor, and recent investigations of the role of orexin have revealed that it exerts behavioral effects in teleost fish. Goldfish and zebrafish are excellent teleost fish models, and in these species it has been demonstrated that orexin increases food consumption as an orexigenic factor and enhances locomotor activity, as well as being involved in the regulation of active and rest status (circadian rhythmicity and the sleep/wakefulness cycle), as is the case in mammals. This chapter reviews current knowledge of orexin derived from studies of teleost fish, as representative nonmammals, focusing particularly on the role of the orexin system, and examines its significance from a comparative viewpoint.

  2. The Mucosal Immune System of Teleost Fish

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Irene

    2015-01-01

    Teleost fish possess an adaptive immune system associated with each of their mucosal body surfaces. Evidence obtained from mucosal vaccination and mucosal infection studies reveal that adaptive immune responses take place at the different mucosal surfaces of teleost. The main mucosa-associated lymphoid tissues (MALT) of teleosts are the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), skin-associated lymphoid tissue (SALT), the gill-associated lymphoid tissue (GIALT) and the recently discovered nasopharynx-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT). Teleost MALT includes diffuse B cells and T cells with specific phenotypes different from their systemic counterparts that have co-evolved to defend the microbe-rich mucosal environment. Both B and T cells respond to mucosal infection or vaccination. Specific antibody responses can be measured in the gills, gut and skin mucosal secretions of teleost fish following mucosal infection or vaccination. Rainbow trout studies have shown that IgT antibodies and IgT+ B cells are the predominant B cell subset in all MALT and respond in a compartmentalized manner to mucosal infection. Our current knowledge on adaptive immunity in teleosts is limited compared to the mammalian literature. New research tools and in vivo models are currently being developed in order to help reveal the great intricacy of teleost mucosal adaptive immunity and help improve mucosal vaccination protocols for use in aquaculture. PMID:26274978

  3. Small teleost fish provide new insights into human skeletal diseases.

    PubMed

    Witten, P E; Harris, M P; Huysseune, A; Winkler, C

    2017-01-01

    Small teleost fish such as zebrafish and medaka are increasingly studied as models for human skeletal diseases. Efficient new genome editing tools combined with advances in the analysis of skeletal phenotypes provide new insights into fundamental processes of skeletal development. The skeleton among vertebrates is a highly conserved organ system, but teleost fish and mammals have evolved unique traits or have lost particular skeletal elements in each lineage. Several unique features of the skeleton relate to the extremely small size of early fish embryos and the small size of adult fish used as models. A detailed analysis of the plethora of interesting skeletal phenotypes in zebrafish and medaka pushes available skeletal imaging techniques to their respective limits and promotes the development of new imaging techniques. Impressive numbers of zebrafish and medaka mutants with interesting skeletal phenotypes have been characterized, complemented by transgenic zebrafish and medaka lines. The advent of efficient genome editing tools, such as TALEN and CRISPR/Cas9, allows to introduce targeted deficiencies in genes of model teleosts to generate skeletal phenotypes that resemble human skeletal diseases. This review will also discuss other attractive aspects of the teleost skeleton. This includes the capacity for lifelong tooth replacement and for the regeneration of dermal skeletal elements, such as scales and fin rays, which further increases the value of zebrafish and medaka models for skeletal research.

  4. MicroRNA in Teleost Fish

    PubMed Central

    Bizuayehu, Teshome Tilahun; Babiak, Igor

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulators involved in nearly all known biological processes in distant eukaryotic clades. Their discovery and functional characterization have broadened our understanding of biological regulatory mechanisms in animals and plants. They show both evolutionary conserved and unique features across Metazoa. Here, we present the current status of the knowledge about the role of miRNA in development, growth, and physiology of teleost fishes, in comparison to other vertebrates. Infraclass Teleostei is the most abundant group among vertebrate lineage. Fish are an important component of aquatic ecosystems and human life, being the prolific source of animal proteins worldwide and a vertebrate model for biomedical research. We review miRNA biogenesis, regulation, modifications, and mechanisms of action. Specific sections are devoted to the role of miRNA in teleost development, organogenesis, tissue differentiation, growth, regeneration, reproduction, endocrine system, and responses to environmental stimuli. Each section discusses gaps in the current knowledge and pinpoints the future directions of research on miRNA in teleosts. PMID:25053657

  5. Individual differences in cognition among teleost fishes.

    PubMed

    Lucon-Xiccato, Tyrone; Bisazza, Angelo

    2017-01-23

    Individual differences in cognitive abilities have been thoroughly investigated in humans and to a lesser extent in other mammals. Despite the growing interest in studying cognition in other taxonomic groups, data on individual differences are scarce for non-mammalian species. Here, we review the literature on individual differences in cognitive abilities in teleost fishes. Relatively few studies have directly addressed this topic and have provided evidence of consistent and heritable individual variation in cognitive abilities in fish. We found much more evidence of individual cognitive differences in other research areas, namely sex differences, personality differences, cerebral lateralisation and comparison between populations. Altogether, these studies suggest that individual differences in cognition are as common in fish as in warm-blooded vertebrates. Based on the example of research on mammals, we suggest directions for future investigation in fish.

  6. Age-related changes in stem cell dynamics, neurogenesis, apoptosis, and gliosis in the adult brain: a novel teleost fish model of negligible senescence.

    PubMed

    Traniello, Ian M; Sîrbulescu, Ruxandra F; Ilieş, Iulian; Zupanc, Günther K H

    2014-05-01

    Adult neurogenesis, the generation of new neurons in the adult central nervous system, is a reported feature of all examined vertebrate species. However, a dramatic decline in the rates of cell proliferation and neuronal differentiation occurs in mammals, typically starting near the onset of sexual maturation. In the present study, we examined possible age-related changes associated with adult neurogenesis in the brain of brown ghost knifefish (Apteronotus leptorhynchus), a teleost fish distinguished by its enormous neurogenic potential. Contrary to the well-established alterations in the mammalian brain during aging, in the brain of this teleostean species we could not find evidence for any significant age-related decline in the absolute levels of stem/progenitor cell proliferation, neuronal and glial differentiation, or long-term survival of newly generated cells. Moreover, there was no indication that the amount of glial fibrillary acidic protein or the number of apoptotic cells in the brain was altered significantly over the course of adult life. We hypothesize that this first demonstration of negligible cellular senescence in the vertebrate brain is related to the continued growth of this species and to the lack of reproductive senescence during adulthood. The establishment of the adult brain of this species as a novel model of negligible senescence provides new opportunities for the advancement of our understanding of the biology of aging and the fundamental mechanisms that underlie senescence in the brain.

  7. Endocrine control of osmoregulation in teleost fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCormick, S.D.

    2001-01-01

    SYNOPSIS. As the primary link between environmental change and physiological response, the neuroendocrinesystem is a critical part of osmoregulatory adaptations. Cortisol has been viewpd as 'the' seawater-adapting hormone in fish and prolactin as 'the' fresh water adapting hormone. Recent evidence indicates that the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor I axis is also important in seawater adaptation in several teleosts of widely differing evolutionary lineages. In salmonids, growth hormone acts in synergy with cortisol to increase seawater tolerance, at least partly through the upregulation of gill cortisol receptors. Cortisol under some conditions may promote ion uptake and interacts with prolactin during acclimation to fresh water. The osmoregulatory actions of growth hormone and prolactin are antagonistic. In some species, thyroid hormones support the action of growth hormone and cortisol in promoting seawater acclimation. Although a broad generalization that holds for all teleosts is unlikely, our current understanding indicates that growth hormone promotes acclimation to seawater, prolactin promotes acclimation to fresh water, and cortisol interacts with both of these hormones thus having a dual osmoregulatory function.

  8. Steroids in teleost fishes: A functional point of view.

    PubMed

    Tokarz, Janina; Möller, Gabriele; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; Adamski, Jerzy

    2015-11-01

    Steroid hormones are involved in the regulation of a variety of processes like embryonic development, sex differentiation, metabolism, immune responses, circadian rhythms, stress response, and reproduction in vertebrates. Teleost fishes and humans show a remarkable conservation in many developmental and physiological aspects, including the endocrine system in general and the steroid hormone related processes in particular. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge about steroid hormone biosynthesis and the steroid hormone receptors in teleost fishes and compares the findings to the human system. The impact of the duplicated genome in teleost fishes on steroid hormone biosynthesis and perception is addressed. Additionally, important processes in fish physiology regulated by steroid hormones, which are most dissimilar to humans, are described. We also give a short overview on the influence of anthropogenic endocrine disrupting compounds on steroid hormone signaling and the resulting adverse physiological effects for teleost fishes. By this approach, we show that the steroidogenesis, hormone receptors, and function of the steroid hormones are reasonably well understood when summarizing the available data of all teleost species analyzed to date. However, on the level of a single species or a certain fish-specific aspect of physiology, further research is needed.

  9. A window into domain amplification through Piccolo in teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Nonet, Michael L

    2012-11-01

    I describe and characterize the extensive amplification of the zinc finger domain of Piccolo selectively in teleost fish. Piccolo and Bassoon are partially functionally redundant and play roles in regulating the pool of neurotransmitter-filled synaptic vesicles present at synapses. In mice, each protein contains two N-terminal zinc finger domains that have been implicated in interacting with synaptic vesicles. In all teleosts examined, both the Bassoon and Piccolo genes are duplicated. Both teleost bassoon genes and one piccolo gene show very similar domain structure and intron-exon organization to their mouse homologs. In contrast, in piccolo b a single exon that encodes a zinc finger domain is amplified 8 to 16 times in different teleost species. Analysis of the amplified exons suggests they were added and/or deleted from the gene as individual exons in rare events that are likely the result of unequal crossovers between homologous sequences. Surprisingly, the structure of the repeats from cod and zebrafish suggest that amplification of this exon has occurred independently multiple times in the teleost lineage. Based on the structure of the exons, I propose a model in which selection for high sequence similarity at the 5' and 3' ends of the exon drives amplification of the repeats and diversity in repeat length likely promotes the stability of the repeated exons by minimizing the likelihood of mispairing of adjacent repeat sequences. Further analysis of piccolo b in teleosts should provide a window through which to examine the process of domain amplification.

  10. Apoptosis in thymus of teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Romano, Nicla; Ceccarelli, Giuseppina; Caprera, Cecilia; Caccia, Elisabetta; Baldassini, Maria Rosaria; Marino, Giovanna

    2013-08-01

    The presence and distribution of apoptotic cells during thymus development and in adult were studied by in situ end-labelling of fragmented DNA in three temperate species carp (Cyprinus carpio), sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) and dusky grouper (Epinephelus marginatus) and in the adult thymus of three Antarctic species belonging to the genus Trematomus spp. During thymus development some few isolated apoptotic cell (AC) firstly appeared in the central-external part of the organ (carp: 5 days ph; sea bass: 35 days ph grouper: 43 days ph). Initially the cells were isolated and then increased in number and aggregated in small groups in the outer-cortical region of the thymus larvae. The high density of apoptotic cells was observed in the junction between cortex and medulla from its appearance (border between cortex and medulla, BCM). ACs decreased in number in juveniles and adult as well as the ACs average diameter. In late juveniles and in adulthood, the apoptosis were restricted to the cortex. In Antarctic species the thymus is highly adapted to low temperature (high vascularisation to effort the circulation of glycoproteins enriched plasma and strongly compact parenchyma). The apoptosis process was more extended (4-7 fold) as compare with the thymus of temperate species, even if the distribution of ACs was similar in all examined species. Data suggested a common process of T lymphocyte negative-selection in BCM of thymus during the ontogeny. The selection process seems to be still active in adult polar fish, but restricted mainly in the cortex zone.

  11. Comparative genomic analysis of teleost fish bmal genes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Han

    2009-05-01

    Bmal1 (Brain and muscle ARNT like 1) gene is a key circadian clock gene. Tetrapods also have the second Bmal gene, Bmal2. Fruit fly has only one bmal1/cycle gene. Interrogation of the five teleost fish genome sequences coupled with phylogenetic and splice site analyses found that zebrafish have two bmal1 genes, bmal1a and bmal1b, and bmal2a; Japanese pufferfish (fugu), green spotted pufferfish (tetraodon) and Japanese medaka fish each have two bmal2 genes, bmal2a and bmal2b, and bmal1a; and three-spine stickleback have bmal1a and bmal2b. Syntenic analysis further indicated that zebrafish bmal1a/bmal1b, and fugu, tetraodon and medaka bmal2a/bmal2b are ancient duplicates. Although the dN/dS ratios of these four fish bmal duplicates are all <1, implicating they have been under purifying selection, the Tajima relative rate test showed that fugu, tetraodon and medaka bmal2a/bmal2b have asymmetric evolutionary rates, suggesting that one of these duplicates have been subject to positive selection or relaxed functional constraint. These results support the notion that teleost fish bmal genes were derived from the fish-specific genome duplication (FSGD), divergent resolution following the duplication led to retaining different ancient bmal duplicates in different fishes, which could have shaped the evolution of the complex teleost fish timekeeping mechanisms.

  12. Inter-specific differences in numerical abilities among teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Agrillo, Christian; Miletto Petrazzini, Maria Elena; Tagliapietra, Christian; Bisazza, Angelo

    2012-01-01

    Adults, infants and non-human primates are thought to possess similar non-verbal numerical systems, but there is considerable debate regarding whether all vertebrates share the same numerical abilities. Despite an abundance of studies, cross-species comparison remains difficult because the methodology employed and the context of species examination vary considerably across studies. To fill this gap, we used the same procedure, stimuli, and numerical contrasts to compare quantity abilities of five teleost fish: redtail splitfin, guppies, zebrafish, Siamese fighting fish, and angelfish. Subjects were trained to discriminate between two sets of geometrical figures using a food reward. Fish initially were trained on an easy numerical ratio (5 vs. 10 and 6 vs. 12). Once they reached the learning criterion, they were subjected to non-reinforced probe trials in which the set size was constant but numerical ratios varied (8 vs. 12 and 9 vs. 12). They also were subjected to probe trials in which the ratio was constant, but the total set size was increased (25 vs. 50) or decreased (2 vs. 4). Overall, fish generalized to numerosities with a 0.67 ratio, but failed with a 0.75 ratio; they generalized to a smaller set size, but not to a larger one. Only minor differences were observed among the five species. However, in one species, zebrafish, the proportion of individuals reaching the learning criterion was much smaller than in the others. In a control experiment, zebrafish showed a similar lower performance in shape discrimination, suggesting that the observed difference resulted from the zebrafish's difficulty in learning this procedure rather than from a cross-species variation in the numerical domain.

  13. Inter-Specific Differences in Numerical Abilities Among Teleost Fish

    PubMed Central

    Agrillo, Christian; Miletto Petrazzini, Maria Elena; Tagliapietra, Christian; Bisazza, Angelo

    2012-01-01

    Adults, infants and non-human primates are thought to possess similar non-verbal numerical systems, but there is considerable debate regarding whether all vertebrates share the same numerical abilities. Despite an abundance of studies, cross-species comparison remains difficult because the methodology employed and the context of species examination vary considerably across studies. To fill this gap, we used the same procedure, stimuli, and numerical contrasts to compare quantity abilities of five teleost fish: redtail splitfin, guppies, zebrafish, Siamese fighting fish, and angelfish. Subjects were trained to discriminate between two sets of geometrical figures using a food reward. Fish initially were trained on an easy numerical ratio (5 vs. 10 and 6 vs. 12). Once they reached the learning criterion, they were subjected to non-reinforced probe trials in which the set size was constant but numerical ratios varied (8 vs. 12 and 9 vs. 12). They also were subjected to probe trials in which the ratio was constant, but the total set size was increased (25 vs. 50) or decreased (2 vs. 4). Overall, fish generalized to numerosities with a 0.67 ratio, but failed with a 0.75 ratio; they generalized to a smaller set size, but not to a larger one. Only minor differences were observed among the five species. However, in one species, zebrafish, the proportion of individuals reaching the learning criterion was much smaller than in the others. In a control experiment, zebrafish showed a similar lower performance in shape discrimination, suggesting that the observed difference resulted from the zebrafish’s difficulty in learning this procedure rather than from a cross-species variation in the numerical domain. PMID:23162517

  14. Mucosal immunoglobulins and B cells of teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Salinas, Irene; Zhang, Yong-An; Sunyer, J Oriol

    2011-12-01

    As physical barriers that separate teleost fish from the external environment, mucosae are also active immunological sites that protect them against exposure to microbes and stressors. In mammals, the sites where antigens are sampled from mucosal surfaces and where stimulation of naïve T and B lymphocytes occurs are known as inductive sites and are constituted by mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT). According to anatomical location, the MALT in teleost fish is subdivided into gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), skin-associated lymphoid tissue (SALT), and gill-associated lymphoid tissue (GIALT). All MALT contain a variety of leukocytes, including, but not limited to, T cells, B cells, plasma cells, macrophages and granulocytes. Secretory immunoglobulins are produced mainly by plasmablasts and plasma cells, and play key roles in the maintenance of mucosal homeostasis. Until recently, teleost fish B cells were thought to express only two classes of immunoglobulins, IgM and IgD, in which IgM was thought to be the only one responding to pathogens both in systemic and mucosal compartments. However, a third teleost immunoglobulin class, IgT/IgZ, was discovered in 2005, and it has recently been shown to behave as the prevalent immunoglobulin in gut mucosal immune responses. The purpose of this review is to summarise the current knowledge of mucosal immunoglobulins and B cells of fish MALT. Moreover, we attempt to integrate the existing knowledge on both basic and applied research findings on fish mucosal immune responses, with the goal to provide new directions that may facilitate the development of novel vaccination strategies that stimulate not only systemic, but also mucosal immunity.

  15. Mucosal immunoglobulins and B cells of Teleost fish

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Irene; Zhang, Yong-An; Sunyer, J. Oriol

    2012-01-01

    As physical barriers that separate teleost fish from the external environment, mucosae are also active immunological sites that protect them against exposure to microbes and stressors. In mammals, the sites where antigens are sampled from mucosal surfaces and where stimulation of naive T and B lymphocytes occurs are known as inductive sites and are constituted by mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT). According to anatomical location, the MALT in teleost fish is subdivided into gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), skin-associated lymphoid tissue (SALT), and gill-associated lymphoid tissue (GIALT). All MALT contain a variety of leukocytes, including, but not limited to, T cells, B cells, plasma cells, macrophages and granulocytes. Secretory immunoglobulins are produced mainly by plasmablasts and plasma cells, and play key roles in the maintenance of mucosal homeostasis. Until recently, teleost fish B cells were thought to express only two classes of immunoglobulins, IgM and IgD, in which IgM was thought to be the only one responding to pathogens both in systemic and mucosal compartments. However, a third teleost immunoglobulin class, IgT/IgZ, was discovered in 2005, and it has recently been shown to behave as the prevalent immunoglobulin in gut mucosal immune responses. The purpose of this review is to summarise the current knowledge of mucosal immunoglobulins and B cells of fish MALT. Moreover, we attempt to integrate the existing knowledge on both basic and applied research findings on fish mucosal immune responses, with the goal to provide new directions that may facilitate the development of novel vaccination strategies that stimulate not only systemic, but also mucosal immunity. PMID:22133710

  16. A Window into Domain Amplification Through Piccolo in Teleost Fish

    PubMed Central

    Nonet, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    I describe and characterize the extensive amplification of the zinc finger domain of Piccolo selectively in teleost fish. Piccolo and Bassoon are partially functionally redundant and play roles in regulating the pool of neurotransmitter-filled synaptic vesicles present at synapses. In mice, each protein contains two N-terminal zinc finger domains that have been implicated in interacting with synaptic vesicles. In all teleosts examined, both the Bassoon and Piccolo genes are duplicated. Both teleost bassoon genes and one piccolo gene show very similar domain structure and intron-exon organization to their mouse homologs. In contrast, in piccolo b a single exon that encodes a zinc finger domain is amplified 8 to 16 times in different teleost species. Analysis of the amplified exons suggests they were added and/or deleted from the gene as individual exons in rare events that are likely the result of unequal crossovers between homologous sequences. Surprisingly, the structure of the repeats from cod and zebrafish suggest that amplification of this exon has occurred independently multiple times in the teleost lineage. Based on the structure of the exons, I propose a model in which selection for high sequence similarity at the 5′ and 3′ ends of the exon drives amplification of the repeats and diversity in repeat length likely promotes the stability of the repeated exons by minimizing the likelihood of mispairing of adjacent repeat sequences. Further analysis of piccolo b in teleosts should provide a window through which to examine the process of domain amplification. PMID:23173084

  17. miRNAs associated with immune response in teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Andreassen, Rune; Høyheim, Bjørn

    2017-02-28

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been identified as important post transcriptional regulators of gene expression. In higher vertebrates, a subset of miRNAs has been identified as important regulators of a number of key genes in immune system gene networks, and this paper review recent studies on miRNAs associated with immune response in teleost fish. Challenge studies conducted in several species have identified differently expressed miRNAs associated with viral or bacterial infection. The results from these studies point out several miRNAs that are likely to have evolutionary conserved functions that are related to immune response in teleost fish. Changed expression levels of mature miRNAs from the five miRNA genes miRNA-462, miRNA-731, miRNA-146, miRNA-181 and miRNA-223 are observed following viral as well as bacterial infection in several teleost fish. Furthermore, significant changes in expression of mature miRNAs from the five genes miRNA-21, miRNA-155, miRNA-1388, miRNA-99 and miRNA-100 are observed in multiple studies of virus infected fish while changes in expression of mature miRNA from the three genes miRNA-122, miRNA-192 and miRNA-451 are observed in several studies of fish with bacterial infections. Interestingly, some of these genes are not present in higher vertebrates. The function of the evolutionary conserved miRNAs responding to infection depends on the target gene(s) they regulate. A few target genes have been identified while a large number of target genes have been predicted by in silico analysis. The results suggest that many of the targets are genes from the host's immune response gene networks. We propose a model with expected temporal changes in miRNA expression if they target immune response activators/effector genes or immune response inhibitors, respectively. The best way to understand the function of a miRNA is to identify its target gene(s), but as the amount of genome resources for teleost fish is limited, with less well characterized genomes

  18. Retinal Processing: Polarization Vision in Teleost Fishes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-26

    a po- Shashar N, Rutledge PS, Cronin TW (1996) Polarization vision in tential channel for communication. Curr Biol 9:755-758 cuttlefish - a concealed...223 McFarland WN, Loew ER (1994) Ultraviolet visual pigments in Shashar N, Hagan R, Boald JG, Hanlon RT (2000) Cuttlefish use marine fishes of the

  19. Teleost fish scales amongst the toughest collagenous materials.

    PubMed

    Khayer Dastjerdi, A; Barthelat, F

    2015-12-01

    Fish scales from modern teleost fish are high-performance materials made of cross-plies of collagen type I fibrils reinforced with hydroxyapatite. Recent studies on this material have demonstrated the remarkable performance of this material in tension and against sharp puncture. Although it is known that teleost fish scales are extremely tough, actual measurements of fracture toughness have so far not been reported because it is simply not possible to propagate a crack in this material using standard fracture testing configurations. Here we present a new fracture test setup where the scale is clamped between two pairs of miniature steel plates. The plates transmit the load uniformly, prevent warping of the scale and ensure a controlled crack propagation. We report a toughness of 15 to 18kJm(-2) (depending on the direction of crack propagation), which confirms teleost fish scales as one of the toughest biological material known. We also tested the individual bony layers, which we found was about four times less tough than the collagen layer because of its higher mineralization. The mechanical response of the scales also depends on the cohesion between fibrils and plies. Delamination tests show that the interface between the collagen fibrils is three orders of magnitude weaker than the scale, which explains the massive delamination and defibrillation observed experimentally. Finally, simple fracture mechanics models showed that process zone toughening is the principal source of toughening for the scales, followed by bridging by delaminated fibrils. These findings can guide the design of cross-ply composites and engineering textiles for high-end applications. This study also hints on the fracture mechanics and performance of collagenous materials with similar microstructures: fish skin, lamellar bone or tendons.

  20. Whole-Genome Duplication and the Functional Diversification of Teleost Fish Hemoglobins

    PubMed Central

    Opazo, Juan C.; Butts, G. Tyler; Nery, Mariana F.; Storz, Jay F.; Hoffmann, Federico G.

    2013-01-01

    Subsequent to the two rounds of whole-genome duplication that occurred in the common ancestor of vertebrates, a third genome duplication occurred in the stem lineage of teleost fishes. This teleost-specific genome duplication (TGD) is thought to have provided genetic raw materials for the physiological, morphological, and behavioral diversification of this highly speciose group. The extreme physiological versatility of teleost fish is manifest in their diversity of blood–gas transport traits, which reflects the myriad solutions that have evolved to maintain tissue O2 delivery in the face of changing metabolic demands and environmental O2 availability during different ontogenetic stages. During the course of development, regulatory changes in blood–O2 transport are mediated by the expression of multiple, functionally distinct hemoglobin (Hb) isoforms that meet the particular O2-transport challenges encountered by the developing embryo or fetus (in viviparous or oviparous species) and in free-swimming larvae and adults. The main objective of the present study was to assess the relative contributions of whole-genome duplication, large-scale segmental duplication, and small-scale gene duplication in producing the extraordinary functional diversity of teleost Hbs. To accomplish this, we integrated phylogenetic reconstructions with analyses of conserved synteny to characterize the genomic organization and evolutionary history of the globin gene clusters of teleosts. These results were then integrated with available experimental data on functional properties and developmental patterns of stage-specific gene expression. Our results indicate that multiple α- and β-globin genes were present in the common ancestor of gars (order Lepisoteiformes) and teleosts. The comparative genomic analysis revealed that teleosts possess a dual set of TGD-derived globin gene clusters, each of which has undergone lineage-specific changes in gene content via repeated duplication and

  1. A Phylogenetic Perspective on the Evolution of Mediterranean Teleost Fishes

    PubMed Central

    Meynard, Christine N.; Mouillot, David; Mouquet, Nicolas; Douzery, Emmanuel J. P.

    2012-01-01

    The Mediterranean Sea is a highly diverse, highly studied, and highly impacted biogeographic region, yet no phylogenetic reconstruction of fish diversity in this area has been published to date. Here, we infer the timing and geographic origins of Mediterranean teleost species diversity using nucleotide sequences collected from GenBank. We assembled a DNA supermatrix composed of four mitochondrial genes (12S ribosomal DNA, 16S ribosomal DNA, cytochrome c oxidase subunit I and cytochrome b) and two nuclear genes (rhodopsin and recombination activating gene I), including 62% of Mediterranean teleost species plus 9 outgroups. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian phylogenetic and dating analyses were calibrated using 20 fossil constraints. An additional 124 species were grafted onto the chronogram according to their taxonomic affinity, checking for the effects of taxonomic coverage in subsequent diversification analyses. We then interpreted the time-line of teleost diversification in light of Mediterranean historical biogeography, distinguishing non-endemic natives, endemics and exotic species. Results show that the major Mediterranean orders are of Cretaceous origin, specifically ∼100–80 Mya, and most Perciformes families originated 80–50 Mya. Two important clade origin events were detected. The first at 100–80 Mya, affected native and exotic species, and reflects a global diversification period at a time when the Mediterranean Sea did not yet exist. The second occurred during the last 50 Mya, and is noticeable among endemic and native species, but not among exotic species. This period corresponds to isolation of the Mediterranean from Indo-Pacific waters before the Messinian salinity crisis. The Mediterranean fish fauna illustrates well the assembly of regional faunas through origination and immigration, where dispersal and isolation have shaped the emergence of a biodiversity hotspot. PMID:22590545

  2. Diversity of trypanorhynch metacestodes in teleost fishes from coral reefs off eastern Australia and New Caledonia

    PubMed Central

    Beveridge, Ian; Bray, Rodney A.; Cribb, Thomas H.; Justine, Jean-Lou

    2014-01-01

    Trypanorhynch metacestodes were examined from teleosts from coral reefs in eastern Australia and from New Caledonia. From over 12,000 fishes examined, 33 named species of trypanorhynchs were recovered as well as three species of tentacularioids which are described but not named. Host-parasite and parasite-host lists are provided, including more than 100 new host records. Lacistorhynchoid and tentacularioid taxa predominated with fewer otobothrioid and gymnorhynchoids. Five species, Callitetrarhynchus gracilis, Floriceps minacanthus, Pseudotobothrium dipsacum, Pseudolacistorhynchus heroniensis and Ps. shipleyi, were particularly common and exhibited low host specificity. Limited data suggested a higher diversity of larval trypanorhynchs in larger piscivorous fish families. Several fish families surveyed extensively (Blenniidae, Chaetodontidae, Gobiidae, Kyphosidae and Scaridae) yielded no trypanorhynch larvae. The overall similarity between the fauna of the Great Barrier Reef and New Caledonia was 45%. Where available, information on the adult stages in elasmobranchs has been included. PMID:25402635

  3. Diversity of trypanorhynch metacestodes in teleost fishes from coral reefs off eastern Australia and New Caledonia.

    PubMed

    Beveridge, Ian; Bray, Rodney A; Cribb, Thomas H; Justine, Jean-Lou

    2014-01-01

    Trypanorhynch metacestodes were examined from teleosts from coral reefs in eastern Australia and from New Caledonia. From over 12,000 fishes examined, 33 named species of trypanorhynchs were recovered as well as three species of tentacularioids which are described but not named. Host-parasite and parasite-host lists are provided, including more than 100 new host records. Lacistorhynchoid and tentacularioid taxa predominated with fewer otobothrioid and gymnorhynchoids. Five species, Callitetrarhynchus gracilis, Floriceps minacanthus, Pseudotobothrium dipsacum, Pseudolacistorhynchus heroniensis and Ps. shipleyi, were particularly common and exhibited low host specificity. Limited data suggested a higher diversity of larval trypanorhynchs in larger piscivorous fish families. Several fish families surveyed extensively (Blenniidae, Chaetodontidae, Gobiidae, Kyphosidae and Scaridae) yielded no trypanorhynch larvae. The overall similarity between the fauna of the Great Barrier Reef and New Caledonia was 45%. Where available, information on the adult stages in elasmobranchs has been included.

  4. Comparative phylogenomic analyses of teleost fish Hox gene clusters: lessons from the cichlid fish Astatotilapia burtoni

    PubMed Central

    Hoegg, Simone; Boore, Jeffrey L; Kuehl, Jennifer V; Meyer, Axel

    2007-01-01

    Background Teleost fish have seven paralogous clusters of Hox genes stemming from two complete genome duplications early in vertebrate evolution, and an additional genome duplication during the evolution of ray-finned fish, followed by the secondary loss of one cluster. Gene duplications on the one hand, and the evolution of regulatory sequences on the other, are thought to be among the most important mechanisms for the evolution of new gene functions. Cichlid fish, the largest family of vertebrates with about 2500 species, are famous examples of speciation and morphological diversity. Since this diversity could be based on regulatory changes, we chose to study the coding as well as putative regulatory regions of their Hox clusters within a comparative genomic framework. Results We sequenced and characterized all seven Hox clusters of Astatotilapia burtoni, a haplochromine cichlid fish. Comparative analyses with data from other teleost fish such as zebrafish, two species of pufferfish, stickleback and medaka were performed. We traced losses of genes and microRNAs of Hox clusters, the medaka lineage seems to have lost more microRNAs than the other fish lineages. We found that each teleost genome studied so far has a unique set of Hox genes. The hoxb7a gene was lost independently several times during teleost evolution, the most recent event being within the radiation of East African cichlid fish. The conserved non-coding sequences (CNS) encompass a surprisingly large part of the clusters, especially in the HoxAa, HoxCa, and HoxDa clusters. Across all clusters, we observe a trend towards an increased content of CNS towards the anterior end. Conclusion The gene content of Hox clusters in teleost fishes is more variable than expected, with each species studied so far having a different set. Although the highest loss rate of Hox genes occurred immediately after whole genome duplications, our analyses showed that gene loss continued and is still ongoing in all teleost

  5. Species-specific patterns of hyperostosis in marine teleost fishes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith-Vaniz, William F.; Kaufman, L.S.; Glowacki, J.

    1995-01-01

    The occurrence of swollen or hyperostotic bones in skeletal preparations, preserved museum material or whole fresh specimens of marine teleost fishes was identified in 92 species belonging to 22 families. Patterns of hyperostotic skeletal growth were typically consistent and often species-specific in all individuals larger than a certain size. The taxonomic distribution of hyperostosis in diverse phylogenetic groups suggests that it has arisen independently many times. Selected bones from two species of the family Carangidae, horse-eye jack Caranx latus Agassiz and crevalle jackCaranx hippos (Linnaeus), were examined in detail by light and electron microscopy. Nonhyperostotic bone contained osteoid-producing osteoblasts, resorbing osteoclasts, occasional osteocytes, and a rich vascular network, all characteristics of cellular bone. Thus, these fishes have a spatial juxtaposition of cellular and acellular bone tissues in adjacent and often serially homologous bone sites. The functional significance of hyperostosis is unknown, but it is a predictable manifestation of bone growth and development for the many taxa in which it occurs.

  6. Comparative analysis of teleost fish genomes reveals preservation of different ancient clock duplicates in different fishes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Han

    2008-06-01

    Clock (Circadian locomotor output cycle kaput) was the first vertebrate circadian clock gene identified in a mouse forward genetics mutagenesis screen. It encodes a bHLH-PAS protein that is highly conserved throughout evolution. Tetrapods also have the second Clock gene, Clock2 or Npas2 (Neuronal PAS domain protein 2). Conversely, the fruit fly, an invertebrate, has only one clock gene. Interrogation of the five teleost fish genome databases revealed that the zebrafish and the Japanese pufferfish (fugu) each have three clock genes, whereas the green spotted pufferfish (tetraodon), the Japanese medaka fish and the three-spine stickleback each have two clock genes. Phylogenetic and splice site analyses indicated that zebrafish and fugu each have two clock1 genes, clock1a and clock1b and one clock2; tetraodon also have clock1a and clock1b but do not have clock2; and medaka and stickleback each have clock1b and one clock2. Genome neighborhood analysis further showed that clock1a/clock1b in zebrafish, fugu and tetraodon is an ancient duplicate. While the dN/dS ratios of these three fish clock duplicates are all <1, indicating that purifying selection has acted upon them; the Tajima relative rate test showed that all three fish clock duplicates have asymmetric evolutionary rates, implicating that one of these duplicates have been under positive selection or relaxed functional constraint. These results support the view that teleost fish clock genes were generated from an ancient genome-wide duplication, and differential gene loss after the duplication resulted in retention of different ancient duplicates in different teleost fishes, which could have contributed to the evolution of the distinct fish circadian clock mechanisms.

  7. The fight between the teleost fish immune response and aquatic viruses.

    PubMed

    Workenhe, Samuel T; Rise, Matthew L; Kibenge, Molly J T; Kibenge, Frederick S B

    2010-10-01

    Teleost fish represent a transition point on the phylogenetic spectrum between invertebrates that depend only on innate immunity and mammals that heavily depend on adaptive immunity. The major mechanisms of the teleost fish innate immune response are suggested to be similar to mammals, although fine details of the process require further studies. Within the innate immune response the type I interferon (IFN) system is an essential innate antiviral component that protects fish from some virus infections. The current progress of cloning and functional characterization of fish antiviral genes is promising in further elucidation of the fish antiviral response. The adaptive immune system of fish utilizes cellular components more or less similar to mammals. Teleost fish produce IgM as a primary antibody response and lack isotype switching to mount virus-specific antibodies during the infection process. Despite this, the development of successful fish rhabdoviral vaccines suggest that vaccination may prove to be an effective way of promoting fish adaptive immune responses to viruses. This paper reviews the bony fish antiviral response with specific discussion on the evolutionary mechanisms that allow aquatic viruses to co-exist with their host. Detailed aspects of the teleost type I IFN system are also addressed.

  8. Dermal morphogenesis controls lateral line patterning during postembryonic development of teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Wada, Hironori; Ghysen, Alain; Satou, Chie; Higashijima, Shin-Ichi; Kawakami, Koichi; Hamaguchi, Satoshi; Sakaizumi, Mitsuru

    2010-04-15

    The lateral line system displays highly divergent patterns in adult teleost fish. The mechanisms underlying this variability are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that the lateral line mechanoreceptor, the neuromast, gives rise to a series of accessory neuromasts by a serial budding process during postembryonic development in zebrafish. We also show that accessory neuromast formation is highly correlated to the development of underlying dermal structures such as bones and scales. Abnormalities in opercular bone morphogenesis, in endothelin 1-knockdown embryos, are accompanied by stereotypic errors in neuromast budding and positioning, further demonstrating the tight correlation between the patterning of neuromasts and of the underlying dermal bones. In medaka, where scales form between peridermis and opercular bones, the lateral line displays a scale-specific pattern which is never observed in zebrafish. These results strongly suggest a control of postembryonic neuromast patterns by underlying dermal structures. This dermal control may explain some aspects of the evolution of lateral line patterns.

  9. Neuronal Organization of Deep Brain Opsin Photoreceptors in Adult Teleosts

    PubMed Central

    Hang, Chong Yee; Kitahashi, Takashi; Parhar, Ishwar S.

    2016-01-01

    Biological impacts of light beyond vision, i.e., non-visual functions of light, signify the need to better understand light detection (or photoreception) systems in vertebrates. Photopigments, which comprise light-absorbing chromophores bound to a variety of G-protein coupled receptor opsins, are responsible for visual and non-visual photoreception. Non-visual opsin photopigments in the retina of mammals and extra-retinal tissues of non-mammals play an important role in non-image-forming functions of light, e.g., biological rhythms and seasonal reproduction. This review highlights the role of opsin photoreceptors in the deep brain, which could involve conserved neurochemical systems that control different time- and light-dependent physiologies in in non-mammalian vertebrates including teleost fish. PMID:27199680

  10. Asymmetric evolution in two fish-specifically duplicated receptor tyrosine kinase paralogons involved in teleost coloration.

    PubMed

    Braasch, Ingo; Salzburger, Walter; Meyer, Axel

    2006-06-01

    The occurrence of a fish-specific genome duplication (FSGD) in the lineage leading to teleost fishes is widely accepted, but the consequences of this event remain elusive. Teleosts, and the cichlid fishes from the species flocks in the East African Great Lakes in particular, evolved a unique complexity and diversity of body coloration and color patterning. Several genes involved in pigment cell development have been retained in duplicate copies in the teleost genome after the FSGD. Here we investigate the evolutionary fate of one of these genes, the type III receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (csf1r). We isolated and shotgun sequenced two paralogous csf1r genes from a bacterial artificial chromosome library of the cichlid fish Astatotilapia burtoni that are both linked to paralogs of the pdgfr beta gene, another type III RTK. Two pdgfr beta-csf1r paralogons were also identified in the genomes of pufferfishes and medaka, and our phylogenetic analyses suggest that the pdgfr beta-csf1r locus was duplicated during the course of the FSGD. Comparisons of teleosts and tetrapods suggest asymmetrical divergence at different levels of genomic organization between the teleost-specific pdgfr beta-csf1r paralogons, which seem to have evolved as coevolutionary units. The high-evolutionary rate in the teleost B-paralogon, consisting of csf1rb and pdgfr betab, further suggests neofunctionalization by functional divergence of the extracellular, ligand-binding region of these cell-surface receptors. Finally, we hypothesize that genome duplications and the associated expansion of the RTK family might be causally linked to the evolution of coloration in vertebrates and teleost fishes in particular.

  11. Ancient vertebrate conserved noncoding elements have been evolving rapidly in teleost fishes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Alison P; Kerk, Sze Yen; Tan, Yue Ying; Brenner, Sydney; Venkatesh, Byrappa

    2011-03-01

    Vertebrate genomes contain thousands of conserved noncoding elements (CNEs) that often function as tissue-specific enhancers. In this study, we have identified CNEs in human, dog, chicken, Xenopus, and four teleost fishes (zebrafish, stickleback, medaka, and fugu) using elephant shark, a cartilaginous vertebrate, as the base genome and investigated the evolution of these ancient vertebrate CNEs (aCNEs) in bony vertebrate lineages. Our analysis shows that aCNEs have been evolving at different rates in different bony vertebrate lineages. Although 78-83% of CNEs have diverged beyond recognition ("lost") in different teleost fishes, only 24% and 40% have been lost in the chicken and mammalian lineages, respectively. Relative rate tests of substitution rates in CNEs revealed that the teleost fish CNEs have been evolving at a significantly higher rate than those in other bony vertebrates. In the ray-finned fish lineage, 68% of aCNEs were lost before the divergence of the four teleosts. This implicates the "fish-specific" whole-genome duplication in the accelerated evolution and the loss of a large number of both copies of duplicated CNEs in teleost fishes. The aCNEs are rich in tissue-specific enhancers and thus many of them are likely to be evolutionarily constrained cis-regulatory elements. The rapid evolution of aCNEs might have affected the expression patterns driven by them. Transgenic zebrafish assay of some human CNE enhancers that have been lost in teleosts has indicated instances of conservation or changes in trans-acting factors between mammals and fishes.

  12. Evolution and Expression of Paxillin Genes in Teleost Fish

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Andrew E.; Turner, Christopher E.; Amack, Jeffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Paxillin family proteins regulate intracellular signaling downstream of extracellular matrix adhesion. Tissue expression patterns and cellular functions of Paxillin proteins during embryo development remain poorly understood. Additionally, the evolution of this gene family has not been thoroughly investigated. Results This report characterizes the evolution and expression of a novel Paxillin gene, called Paxillin-b, in Teleosts. Alignments indicate that Teleost Paxillin-a and Paxillin-b proteins are highly homologous to each other and to human Paxillin. Phylogenetic and synteny analyses suggest that these genes originated from the duplication of an ancestral Paxillin gene that was in a common ancestor of Teleosts and Tetrapods. Analysis of the spatiotemporal expression profiles of Paxillin-a and Paxillin-b using zebrafish revealed both overlapping and distinct domains for Paxillin-a and Paxillin-b during embryo development. Localization of zebrafish Paxillin orthologs expressed in mammalian cells demonstrated that both proteins localize to focal adhesions, similar to mammalian Paxillin. This suggests these proteins regulate adhesion-dependent processes in their endogenous tissues. Conclusion Paxillin-a and Paxillin-b were generated by duplication in Teleosts. These genes likely play similar roles as Paxillin genes in other organisms. This work provides a framework for functional investigation of Paxillin family members during development using the zebrafish as an in vivo model system. PMID:27806088

  13. Vertebrate Osmoregulation: A Student Laboratory Exercise Using Teleost Fish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boily P.; Rees, B. B.; Williamson, L. A. C.

    2007-01-01

    Here, we describe a laboratory experiment as part of an upper-level vertebrate physiology course for biology majors to investigate the physiological response of vertebrates to osmoregulatory challenges. The experiment involves measuring plasma osmolality and Na[superscript +] -K[superscript +] -ATPase activity in gill tissue of teleost fish…

  14. Divergent evolution of two corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) genes in teleost fishes

    PubMed Central

    Grone, Brian P.; Maruska, Karen P.

    2015-01-01

    Genome duplication, thought to have happened twice early in vertebrate evolution and a third time in teleost fishes, gives rise to gene paralogs that can evolve subfunctions or neofunctions via sequence and regulatory changes. To explore the evolution and functions of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), we searched sequenced teleost genomes for CRH paralogs. Our phylogenetic and synteny analyses indicate that two CRH genes, crha and crhb, evolved via duplication of crh1 early in the teleost lineage. We examined the expression of crha and crhb in two teleost species from different orders: an African cichlid, Burton's mouthbrooder, (Astatotilapia burtoni; Order Perciformes) and zebrafish (Danio rerio; Order Cypriniformes). Furthermore, we compared expression of the teleost crha and crhb genes with the crh1 gene of an outgroup to the teleost clade: the spotted gar (Lepisosteus oculatus). In situ hybridization for crha and crhb mRNA in brains and eyes revealed distinct expression patterns for crha in different teleost species. In the cichlid, crha mRNA was found in the retina but not in the brain. In zebrafish, however, crha mRNA was not found in the retina, but was detected in the brain, restricted to the ventral hypothalamus. Spotted gar crh1 was found in the retina as well as the brain, suggesting that the ancestor of teleost fishes likely had a crh1 gene expressed in both retina and brain. Thus, genome duplication may have freed crha from constraints, allowing it to evolve distinct sequences, expression patterns, and likely unique functions in different lineages. PMID:26528116

  15. Rapid evolution of piRNA pathway in the teleost fish: implication for an adaptation to transposon diversity.

    PubMed

    Yi, Minhan; Chen, Feng; Luo, Majing; Cheng, Yibin; Zhao, Huabin; Cheng, Hanhua; Zhou, Rongjia

    2014-05-19

    The Piwi-interacting RNA (piRNA) pathway is responsible for germline specification, gametogenesis, transposon silencing, and genome integrity. Transposable elements can disrupt genome and its functions. However, piRNA pathway evolution and its adaptation to transposon diversity in the teleost fish remain unknown. This article unveils evolutionary scene of piRNA pathway and its association with diverse transposons by systematically comparative analysis on diverse teleost fish genomes. Selective pressure analysis on piRNA pathway and miRNA/siRNA (microRNA/small interfering RNA) pathway genes between teleosts and mammals showed an accelerated evolution of piRNA pathway genes in the teleost lineages, and positive selection on functional PAZ (Piwi/Ago/Zwille) and Tudor domains involved in the Piwi-piRNA/Tudor interaction, suggesting that the amino acid substitutions are adaptive to their functions in piRNA pathway in the teleost fish species. Notably five piRNA pathway genes evolved faster in the swamp eel, a kind of protogynous hermaphrodite fish, than the other teleosts, indicating a differential evolution of piRNA pathway between the swamp eel and other gonochoristic fishes. In addition, genome-wide analysis showed higher diversity of transposons in the teleost fish species compared with mammals. Our results suggest that rapidly evolved piRNA pathway in the teleost fish is likely to be involved in the adaption to transposon diversity.

  16. Comparative study of enzymatic antioxidants in muscle of elasmobranch and teleost fishes.

    PubMed

    Vélez-Alavez, Marcela; De Anda-Montañez, Juan A; Galván-Magaña, Felipe; Zenteno-Savín, Tania

    2015-09-01

    Exercise may cause an imbalance between pro-oxidants and antioxidants. In skeletal muscle, oxygen flow can increase considerably during vigorous exercise. The antioxidant system in athletes contributes to neutralize the concomitant rise in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. The objective of this study was to compare the antioxidant system in muscle of three species of elasmobranchs and teleosts, considering differences in swimming capacity among species within each group and evolutionary differences between the two groups. Muscle samples were collected from elasmobranchs (Isurus oxyrinchus, Prionace glauca, Mustelus henlei) and teleosts (Totoaba macdonaldi, Kajikia audax and Coryphaena hippurus) in the coast of the Baja California peninsula, Mexico. The enzymatic activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) was determined by spectrophotometry. The activity of the antioxidant enzymes CAT, GPx and GST was higher in elasmobranchs, as a group, than in teleosts. In fish species with high swimming capacities, P. glauca, K. audax and C. hippurus, antioxidant enzyme activity was higher in comparison with species with lower swimming capacities, M. henlei and T. macdonaldi. It is possible that antioxidant enzymes, particularly SOD, GPx and GST, contribute to avoidance of oxidative damage in teleost and elasmobranch species with higher swimming capacities. The antioxidant enzyme activities in fish appear to depend mainly on their swimming capacity and life style rather than the evolutionary group (elasmobranchs, teleosts).

  17. Spatial distribution and cellular composition of adult brain proliferative zones in the teleost, Gymnotus omarorum

    PubMed Central

    Olivera-Pasilio, Valentina; Peterson, Daniel A.; Castelló, María E.

    2014-01-01

    Proliferation of stem/progenitor cells during development provides for the generation of mature cell types in the CNS. While adult brain proliferation is highly restricted in the mammals, it is widespread in teleosts. The extent of adult neural proliferation in the weakly electric fish, Gymnotus omarorum has not yet been described. To address this, we used double thymidine analog pulse-chase labeling of proliferating cells to identify brain proliferation zones, characterize their cellular composition, and analyze the fate of newborn cells in adult G. omarorum. Short thymidine analog chase periods revealed the ubiquitous distribution of adult brain proliferation, similar to other teleosts, particularly Apteronotus leptorhynchus. Proliferating cells were abundant at the ventricular-subventricular lining of the ventricular-cisternal system, adjacent to the telencephalic subpallium, the diencephalic preoptic region and hypothalamus, and the mesencephalic tectum opticum and torus semicircularis. Extraventricular proliferation zones, located distant from the ventricular-cisternal system surface, were found in all divisions of the rombencephalic cerebellum. We also report a new adult proliferation zone at the caudal-lateral border of the electrosensory lateral line lobe. All proliferation zones showed a heterogeneous cellular composition. The use of short (24 h) and long (30 day) chase periods revealed abundant fast cycling cells (potentially intermediate amplifiers), sparse slow cycling (potentially stem) cells, cells that appear to have entered a quiescent state, and cells that might correspond to migrating newborn neural cells. Their abundance and migration distance differed among proliferation zones: greater numbers and longer range and/or pace of migrating cells were associated with subpallial and cerebellar proliferation zones. PMID:25249943

  18. Physical biochemical properties of IgM from a teleost fish.

    PubMed Central

    Mochida, K; Lou, Y H; Hara, A; Yamauchi, K

    1994-01-01

    Teleost fish are able to produce IgM class antibody, as are other vertebrates. When the teleost fish Oreochromis niloticus was immunized with bovine serum albumin (BSA), it produced antibody to BSA with an average avidity of 7.4 x 10(8)/M. Thus, dissociation of antigen-antibody complexes only occurred at conditions of < pH 2.5, > pH 11, > 4M NaI or > 4M urea, demonstrating high stability of the complex. Western blot analyses further showed the high specificity of the antibody to BSA. In contrast to mammals, when the fish was challenged with multiple protein antigens, it produced antibody only to the major component but not to others. The antibody generated to a specific antigen accounted for up to 1.1% of whole serum protein or 7.0% of whole immunoglobulin. We conclude (1) the systemic antibody response in teleost fish may be an 'all or nothing' response, which is different from that in mammals; (2) the quality (specificity and affinity) of the antibody produced is similar to that of mammals. The findings not only reveal a quite different strategy of immune response in fish, but also raise the possibility of technical application. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7875748

  19. Alternative splicing in teleost fish genomes: same-species and cross-species analysis and comparisons.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jianguo; Peatman, Eric; Wang, Wenqi; Yang, Qing; Abernathy, Jason; Wang, Shaolin; Kucuktas, Huseyin; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2010-06-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is a mechanism by which the coding diversity of the genome can be greatly increased. Rates of AS are known to vary according to the complexity of eukaryotic species potentially explaining the tremendous phenotypic diversity among species with similar numbers of coding genes. Little is known, however, about the nature or rate of AS in teleost fish. Here, we report the characteristics of AS in teleost fish and classification and frequency of five canonical AS types. We conducted both same-species and cross-species analysis utilizing the Genome Mapping and Alignment Program (GMAP) and an AS pipeline (ASpipe) to study AS in four genome-enabled species (Danio rerio, Oryzias latipes, Gasterosteus aculeatus, and Takifugu rubripes) and one species lacking a complete genome sequence, Ictalurus punctatus. AS frequency was lowest in the highly duplicated genome of zebrafish (17% of mapped genes). The compact genome of the pufferfish showed the highest occurrence of AS (approximately 43% of mapped genes). An inverse correlation between AS frequency and genome size was consistent across all analyzed species. Cross-species comparisons utilizing zebrafish as the reference genome allowed the identification of additional putative AS genes not revealed by zebrafish transcripts. Approximately, 50% of AS genes identified by same-species comparisons were shared among two or more species. A searchable website, the Teleost Alternative Splicing Database, was created to allow easy identification and visualization of AS transcripts in the studied teleost genomes. Our results and associated database should further our understanding of alternative splicing as an important functional and evolutionary mechanism in the genomes of teleost fish.

  20. Deiodinases and thyroid metabolism disruption in teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Jarque, Sergio; Piña, Benjamin

    2014-11-01

    Many xenobiotic compounds with endocrine disrupting activity have been described since the late eighties. These compounds are able to interact with natural hormone systems and potentially induce deleterious effects in wildlife, notably piscine species. However, while the characterization of endocrine disruptors with "dioxin-like", estrogenic or androgenic activities is relatively well established, little is known about environmentally relevant pollutants that may act at thyroid system level. Iodothyronine deiodinases, the key enzymes in the activation and inactivation of thyroid hormones, have been suggested as suitable biomarkers for thyroid metabolism disruption. The present article reviews the biotic and abiotic factors that are able to modulate deiodinases in teleosts, a representative model organism for vertebrates. Data show that deiodinases are highly sensitive to several physiological and physical variables, so they should be taken into account to establish natural basal deiodination patterns to further understand responses under chemical exposure. Among xenobiotic compounds, brominated flame retardants are postulated as chemicals of major concern because of their similar structure shared with thyroid hormones. More ambiguous results are shown for the rest of compounds, i.e. polychlorinated biphenyls, perfluorinated chemicals, pesticides, metals and synthetic drugs, in part due to the limited information available. The different mechanisms of action still remain unknown for most of those compounds, although several hypothesis based on observed effects are discussed. Future tasks are also suggested with the aim of moving forward in the full characterization of chemical compounds with thyroid disrupting activity.

  1. Estrogen regulation of gene expression in the teleost fish immune system.

    PubMed

    Burgos-Aceves, Mario Alberto; Cohen, Amit; Smith, Yoav; Faggio, Caterina

    2016-11-01

    Elucidating the mechanisms of estrogens-induced immunomodulation in teleost fish is of great importance due to the observed worldwide continuing decrease in pristine environments. However, little is know about the immunotoxicological consequences of exposure to these chemicals in fish, or of the mechanisms through which these effects are mediated. In this review, we summarize the results showing estrogens (natural or synthetic) acting through estrogen receptors and regulating specific target genes, also through microRNAs (miRNAs), leading to modulation of the immune functioning. The identification and characterization of miRNAs will provide new opportunities for functional genome research on teleost immune system and can also be useful when screening for novel molecule biomarkers for environmental pollution.

  2. Identification, Phylogeny, and Function of fabp2 Paralogs in Two Non-Model Teleost Fish Species.

    PubMed

    Kaitetzidou, Elisavet; Chatzifotis, Stavros; Antonopoulou, Efthimia; Sarropoulou, Elena

    2015-10-01

    Intestinal fatty-acid-binding protein (IFABP or FABP2) is a cytosolic transporter of long-chain fatty acids, which is mainly expressed in cells of intestinal tissue. Fatty acids in teleosts are an important source of energy for growth, reproduction, and swimming and a main ingredient in the yolk sac of embryos and larvae. The fabp2 paralogs, fabp2a and fabp2b, were identified for 26 teleost fish species including the paralogs for the two non-model teleost fish species, namely the gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) and the European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax). Despite the high similarity of fabp2 paralogs, as well as the identical organization in four exons, paralogs were mapped to different chromosomes/linkage groups supporting the hypothesis that the identified transcripts are true paralogs originating from a single ancestor gene after genome duplication. This was also confirmed by phylogenetic analysis using fabp2 sequences of 26 teleosts and by synteny analysis carried out with ten teleosts. Differential expression analysis of the gilthead sea bream and European sea bass fabp2 paralogs in the intestine after fasting and refeeding experiment further revealed their altered implication in metabolism. Additional expression studies in seven developmental stages of the two species detected fabp2 paralogs relatively early in the embryonic development as well as possible complementary or separated roles of the paralogs. The identification and characterization of the two fabp2 paralogs will contribute significantly to the understanding of the fabp2 evolution as well as of the divergences in fatty acid metabolism.

  3. Corticosteroids: Friends or foes of teleost fish reproduction?

    PubMed

    Milla, S; Wang, N; Mandiki, S N M; Kestemont, P

    2009-07-01

    Reproduction in vertebrates is controlled by the Hypothalamus-Pituitary-Gonad axis and the main hormone actions have been extensively described. Still, despite the scattered information in fish, accumulating evidence strongly indicates that corticosteroids play essential roles in reproductive mechanisms. An integrative approach is important for understanding these implications. Animal husbandry and physiological studies at molecular to organismal levels have revealed that these corticosteroids are regulators of fish reproductive processes. But their involvements appear strongly contrasted. Indeed, for both sexes, corticosteroids present either deleterious or positive effects on fish reproduction. In this review, the authors will attempt to gather and clarify the available information about these physiological involvements. The authors will also suggest future ways to prospect corticosteroid roles in fish reproduction.

  4. Multiple Hepcidins in a Teleost Fish, Dicentrarchus labrax: Different Hepcidins for Different Roles.

    PubMed

    Neves, João V; Caldas, Carolina; Vieira, Inês; Ramos, Miguel F; Rodrigues, Pedro N S

    2015-09-15

    Teleost fish rely heavily on their innate immunity for an adequate response against pathogens and environmental challenges, with the production of antimicrobial peptides being one of their first lines of defense. Among those is hepcidin, a small cysteine-rich antimicrobial peptide that is also the key regulator of iron metabolism. Although most mammals possess a single hepcidin gene, with a dual role in both iron metabolism regulation and antimicrobial response, many teleost fish present multiple copies of hepcidin, most likely because of genome duplications and positive Darwinian selection, suggesting that different hepcidins may perform different functions. To study the roles of hepcidin in teleost fish, we have isolated and characterized several genes in the European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) and evaluated variations in their expression levels in response to different experimental conditions. Although several hepcidin genes were found, after phylogenetic analysis they could be clustered in two groups: hamp1-like, with a single isoform similar to mammalian hepcidins, and hamp2-like, with several isoforms. Under experimental conditions, hamp1 was upregulated in response to iron overload and infection and downregulated during anemia and hypoxic conditions. Hamp2 did not respond to either iron overload or anemia but was highly upregulated during infection and hypoxia. In addition, Hamp2 synthetic peptides exhibited a clear antimicrobial activity against several bacterial strains in vitro. In conclusion, teleost fish that present two hepcidin types show a degree of subfunctionalization of its functions, with hamp1 more involved in the regulation of iron metabolism and hamp2 mostly performing an antimicrobial role.

  5. Thrash, flip, or jump: the behavioral and functional continuum of terrestrial locomotion in teleost fishes.

    PubMed

    Gibb, Alice C; Ashley-Ross, Miriam A; Hsieh, S Tonia

    2013-08-01

    Moving on land versus in water imposes dramatically different requirements on the musculoskeletal system. Although many limbed vertebrates, such as salamanders and prehistoric tetrapodomorphs, have an axial system specialized for aquatic locomotion and an appendicular system adapted for terrestrial locomotion, diverse extant teleosts use the axial musculoskeletal system (body plus caudal fin) to move in these two physically disparate environments. In fact, teleost fishes living at the water's edge demonstrate diversity in natural history that is reflected in a variety of terrestrial behaviors: (1) species that have only incidental contact with land (such as largemouth bass, Micropterus) will repeatedly thrash, which can roll an individual downhill, but cannot produce effective overland movements, (2) species that have occasional contact with land (like Gambusia, the mosquitofish, which evade predators by stranding themselves) will produce directed terrestrial movement via a tail-flip jump, and (3) species that spend more than half of their lives on land (like the mudskipper, Periopthalmus) will produce a prone-jump, a behavior that allows the fish to anticipate where it will land at the end of the flight phase. Both tail-flip and prone jumps are characterized by a two-phase movement consisting of body flexion followed by extension-a movement pattern that is markedly similar to the aquatic fast-start. Convergence in kinematic pattern between effective terrestrial behaviors and aquatic fast starts suggests that jumps are an exaptation of a neuromuscular system that powers unsteady escape behaviors in the water. Despite such evidence that terrestrial behaviors evolved from an ancestral behavior that is ubiquitous among teleosts, some teleosts are unable to move effectively on land-possibly due to morphological trade-offs, wherein specialization for one environment comes at a cost to performance in the other. Indeed, upon emergence onto land, gravity places an

  6. Comparative genomic organization and tissue-specific transcription of the duplicated fabp7 and fabp10 genes in teleost fishes.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Manoj B; Wright, Jonathan M

    2013-11-01

    A whole-genome duplication (WGD) early in the teleost fish lineage makes fish ideal organisms to study the fate of duplicated genes and underlying evolutionary trajectories that have led to the retention of ohnologous gene duplicates in fish genomes. Here, we compare the genomic organization and tissue-specific transcription of the ohnologous fabp7 and fabp10 genes in medaka, three-spined stickleback, and spotted green pufferfish to the well-studied duplicated fabp7 and fabp10 genes of zebrafish. Teleost fabp7 and fabp10 genes contain four exons interrupted by three introns. Polypeptide sequences of Fabp7 and Fabp10 show the highest sequence identity and similarity with their orthologs from vertebrates. Orthology was evident as the ohnologous Fabp7 and Fabp10 polypeptides of teleost fishes each formed distinct clades and clustered together with their orthologs from other vertebrates in a phylogenetic tree. Furthermore, ohnologous teleost fabp7 and fabp10 genes exhibit conserved gene synteny with human FABP7 and chicken FABP10, respectively, which provides compelling evidence that the duplicated fabp7 and fabp10 genes of teleost fishes most likely arose from the well-documented WGD. The tissue-specific distribution of fabp7a, fabp7b, fabp10a, and fabp10b transcripts provides evidence of diverged spatial transcriptional regulation between ohnologous gene duplicates of fabp7 and fabp10 in teleost fishes.

  7. Osmoregulation and epithelial water transport: lessons from the intestine of marine teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Whittamore, Jonathan M

    2012-01-01

    For teleost fish living in seawater, drinking the surrounding medium is necessary to avoid dehydration. This is a key component of their osmoregulatory strategy presenting the challenge of excreting excess salts while achieving a net retention of water. The intestine has an established role in osmoregulation, and its ability to effectively absorb fluid is crucial to compensating for water losses to the hyperosmotic environment. Despite this, the potential for the teleost intestine to serve as a comparative model for detailed, integrative experimental studies on epithelial water transport has so far gone largely untapped. The following review aims to present an assessment of the teleost intestine as a fluid-transporting epithelium. Beginning with a brief overview of marine teleost osmoregulation, emphasis shifts to the processing of ingested seawater by the gastrointestinal tract and the characteristics of intestinal ion and fluid transport. Particular attention is given to acid-base transfers by the intestine, specifically bicarbonate secretion, which creates the distinctly alkaline gut fluids responsible for the formation of solid calcium carbonate precipitates. The respective contributions of these unique features to intestinal fluid absorption, alongside other recognised ion transport processes, are then subsequently considered within the wider context of the classic physiological problem of epithelial water transport.

  8. Hepatic steatosis associated with microsporidiosis in teleost fishes from Marajó Island, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Videira, Marcela; Velasco, Michele; Matos, Patrícia; Clemente, Sérgio C de São; Sanches, Osimar; Santos, Patrícia; Matos, Edilson

    2014-09-01

    A total of 40 specimens of the teleost fish Gobioides grahamae Palmer & Wheeler, 1955 were obtained from the municipality of Salvaterra on Marajó Island in the Brazilian state of Pará. Their livers were removed and processed for light microscopy. Overall, 90% of the specimens presented some degree of steatosis of the liver, which was invariably associated with the presence of Microsporidium sp. The present study confirms the occurrence of steatosis in G. grahamae associated with parasitic infections by Microsporidium. The findings indicate that the condition of otherwise healthy fishes in their natural environment may be affected negatively by parasites.

  9. Hepatic steatosis associated with microsporidiosis in teleost fishes from Marajó Island, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Videira, Marcela; Velasco, Michele; Matos, Patrícia; Clemente, Sérgio C DE São; Sanches, Osimar; Santos, Patrícia; Matos, Edilson

    2014-08-29

    A total of 40 specimens of the teleost fish Gobioides grahamae Palmer & Wheeler, 1955 were obtained from the municipality of Salvaterra on Marajó Island in the Brazilian state of Pará. Their livers were removed and processed for light microscopy. Overall, 90% of the specimens presented some degree of steatosis of the liver, which was invariably associated with the presence of Microsporidium sp. The present study confirms the occurrence of steatosis in G. grahamae associated with parasitic infections by Microsporidium. The findings indicate that the condition of otherwise healthy fishes in their natural environment may be affected negatively by parasites.

  10. Severe hypoxia impairs lateralization in a marine teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Lucon-Xiccato, Tyrone; Nati, Julie J H; Blasco, Felipe Rocco; Johansen, Jacob L; Steffensen, John F; Domenici, Paolo

    2014-12-01

    In intertidal environments, the recurring hypoxic condition at low tide is one of the main factors affecting fish behaviour, causing broad effects on ecological interactions. We assessed the effects of hypoxia on lateralization (e.g. the tendency to turn left or right), a behaviour related to brain functional asymmetry, which is thought to play a key role in several life history aspects of fish. Using staghorn sculpin (Leptocottus armatus), a benthic fish that typically inhabits the intertidal zone, we found that hypoxia affects behavioural lateralization at the population level. On average, staghorn sculpins showed a distinct preference for right turns under normoxic conditions (>90% oxygen saturation), but an equal probability of turning right or left after exposure to hypoxia for 2 h (20% oxygen saturation). The specific turning preference observed in the staghorn sculpin control population is likely to have an adaptive value, for example in predator-prey interactions by enhancing attack success or survival from predatory attacks. Therefore the alteration of lateralization expressed by staghorn sculpins under hypoxic conditions may have far-reaching implications for species ecology and trophic interactions. Moreover, our work raises the need to study this effect in other species, in which a hypoxia-driven disruption of lateralization could affect a wider range of behaviours, such as social interactions and schooling.

  11. Horizontal transfers of Tc1 elements between teleost fishes and their vertebrate parasites, lampreys.

    PubMed

    Kuraku, Shigehiro; Qiu, Huan; Meyer, Axel

    2012-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) has been recognized to be an important mechanism that shaped the evolution and genomes of prokaryotes and unicellular eukaryotes. However, HGT is regarded to be exceedingly rare among eukaryotes. We discovered massive transfers of a DNA transposon, a Tc1 element encoding a transposase, between multiple teleost fishes and lampreys that last shared a common ancestor over 500 Ma. Members of this group of Tc1 elements were found to exhibit a mosaic phylogenetic distribution, yet their sequences were highly similar even between distantly related lineages (95%-99% identity). Our molecular phylogenetic analyses suggested that horizontal transfers of this element happened repeatedly, involving multiple teleost fishes that are phylogenetically only distantly related. Interestingly, almost all the affected teleost lineages are also known to be subject to lamprey parasitism, suggesting that the horizontal transfers between vertebrates might have occurred through parasite-host interaction. The genomes of several northern hemisphere lamprey species, including that of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus), were found to contain thousands of copies of the foreign elements. Impact of this event is discussed in relation to other peculiar genomic features of lampreys.

  12. Phylogenetic analysis of vertebrate CXC chemokines reveals novel lineage specific groups in teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Xu, Qiaoqing; Wang, Tiehui; Collet, Bertrand; Corripio-Miyar, Yolanda; Bird, Steve; Xie, Ping; Nie, Pin; Secombes, Christopher J; Zou, Jun

    2013-10-01

    In this study, we have identified 421 molecules across the vertebrate spectrum and propose a unified nomenclature for CXC chemokines in fish, amphibians and reptiles based on phylogenetic analysis. Expanding on earlier studies in teleost fish, lineage specific CXC chemokines that have no apparent homologues in mammals were confirmed. Furthermore, in addition to the two subgroups of the CXCL8 homologues known in teleost fish, a third group was identified (termed CXCL8_L3), as was a further subgroup of the fish CXC genes related to CXCL11. Expression of the CXC chemokines found in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, was studied in response to stimulation with inflammatory and antiviral cytokines, and bacterial. Tissue distribution analysis revealed distinct expression profiles for these trout CXC chemokines. Lastly three of the trout chemokines, including two novel fish specific CXC chemokines containing three pairs of cysteines, were produced as recombinant proteins and their effect on trout leucocyte migration studied. These molecules increased the relative expression of CD4 and MCSFR in migrated cells in an in vitro chemotaxis assay.

  13. The Teleost Intramandibular Joint: A mechanism That Allows Fish to Obtain Prey Unavailable to Suction Feeders.

    PubMed

    Gibb, Alice C; Staab, Katie; Moran, Clinton; Ferry, Lara A

    2015-07-01

    Although the majority of teleost fishes possess a fused lower jaw (or mandible), some lineages have acquired a secondary joint in the lower jaw, termed the intramandibular joint (IMJ). The IMJ is a new module that formed within the already exceptionally complex teleost head, and disarticulation of two bony elements of the mandible potentially creates a "double-jointed" jaw. The apparent independent acquisition of this new functional module in divergent lineages raises a suite of questions. (1) How many teleostean lineages contain IMJ-bearing species? (2) Does the IMJ serve the same purpose in all teleosts? (3) Is the IMJ associated with altered feeding kinematics? (4) Do IMJ-bearing fishes experience trade-offs in other aspects of feeding performance? (5) Is the IMJ used to procure prey that are otherwise unavailable? The IMJ is probably under-reported, but has been documented in at least 10 lineages within the Teleostei. Across diverse IMJ-bearing lineages, this secondary joint in the lower jaw serves a variety of functions, including: generating dynamic out-levers that allow fish to apply additional force to a food item during jaw closing; allowing fish to "pick" individual prey items with pincer-like jaws; and facilitating contact with the substrate by altering the size and orientation of the gape. There are no consistent changes in feeding kinematics in IMJ-bearing species relative to their sister taxa; however, some IMJ-bearing taxa produce very slow movements during the capture of food, which may compromise their ability to move prey into the mouth via suction. Despite diversity in behavior, all IMJ-bearing lineages have the ability to remove foods that are physically attached to the substrate or to bite off pieces from sessile organisms. Because such prey cannot be drawn into the mouth by suction, the IMJ provides a new mechanism that enables fish to obtain food that otherwise would be unavailable.

  14. Evolution of the immune system influences speciation rates in teleost fishes.

    PubMed

    Malmstrøm, Martin; Matschiner, Michael; Tørresen, Ole K; Star, Bastiaan; Snipen, Lars G; Hansen, Thomas F; Baalsrud, Helle T; Nederbragt, Alexander J; Hanel, Reinhold; Salzburger, Walter; Stenseth, Nils C; Jakobsen, Kjetill S; Jentoft, Sissel

    2016-10-01

    Teleost fishes constitute the most species-rich vertebrate clade and exhibit extensive genetic and phenotypic variation, including diverse immune defense strategies. The genomic basis of a particularly aberrant strategy is exemplified by Atlantic cod, in which a loss of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) II functionality coincides with a marked expansion of MHC I genes. Through low-coverage genome sequencing (9-39×), assembly and comparative analyses for 66 teleost species, we show here that MHC II is missing in the entire Gadiformes lineage and thus was lost once in their common ancestor. In contrast, we find that MHC I gene expansions have occurred multiple times, both inside and outside this clade. Moreover, we identify an association between high MHC I copy number and elevated speciation rates using trait-dependent diversification models. Our results extend current understanding of the plasticity of the adaptive immune system and suggest an important role for immune-related genes in animal diversification.

  15. A comparison of myocardial beta-adrenoreceptor density and ligand binding affinity among selected teleost fishes.

    PubMed

    Olsson, H I; Yee, N; Shiels, H A; Brauner, C; Farrell, A P

    2000-11-01

    This study quantified the cell surface beta-adrenoreceptor density and ligand binding affinity in the ventricular tissue of seven teleost species; skipjack tuna (Katsowonus pelamis), yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares), Pacific mackerel (Scomber japonicus), mahimahi (dolphin fish; Coryphaena hippurus), sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and an Antarctic nototheniid (Trematomus bernacchii). Beta-Adrenoreceptor density varied by almost fourfold among these species, being highest for the athletic fish: sockeye salmon among the salmonids and skipjack tuna among the scombrids. Beta-Adrenoreceptor density was lowest for the Antarctic icefish. Beta-Adrenoreceptor binding affinity varied by almost threefold. We conclude that there is a significant species-specific variability in myocardial beta-adrenoreceptor density and binding affinity and these interspecific differences cannot be attributed to temperature even though intraspecifically cold temperature can stimulate an increase in myocardial beta-adrenoreceptor density. Instead, we suggest that interspecifically myocardial beta-adrenoreceptor density is highest in fish that inhabit tropical water.

  16. The role of Amh signaling in teleost fish--Multiple functions not restricted to the gonads.

    PubMed

    Pfennig, Frank; Standke, Andrea; Gutzeit, Herwig O

    2015-11-01

    This review summarizes the important role of Anti-Müllerian hormone (Amh) during gonad development in fishes. This Tgfβ-domain bearing hormone was named after one of its known functions, the induction of the regression of Müllerian ducts in male mammalian embryos. Later in development it is involved in male and female gonad differentiation and extragonadal expression has been reported in mammals as well. Teleosts lack Müllerian ducts, but they have amh orthologous genes. amh expression is reported from 21 fish species and possible regulatory interactions with further factors like sex steroids and gonadotropic hormones are discussed. The gonadotropin Fsh inhibits amh expression in all fish species studied. Sex steroids show no consistent influence on amh expression. Amh is produced in male Sertoli cells and female granulosa cells and inhibits germ cell proliferation and differentiation as well as steroidogenesis in both sexes. Therefore, Amh might be a central player in gonad development and a target of gonadotropic Fsh. Furthermore, there is evidence that an Amh-type II receptor is involved in germ cell regulation. Amh and its corresponding type II receptor are also present in brain and pituitary, at least in some teleosts, indicating additional roles of Amh effects in the brain-pituitary-gonadal axis. Unraveling Amh signaling is important in stem cell research and for reproduction as well as for aquaculture and in environmental science.

  17. A RAD-tag genetic map for the platyfish (Xiphophorus maculatus) reveals mechanisms of karyotype evolution among teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Amores, Angel; Catchen, Julian; Nanda, Indrajit; Warren, Wesley; Walter, Ron; Schartl, Manfred; Postlethwait, John H

    2014-06-01

    Mammalian genomes can vary substantially in haploid chromosome number even within a small taxon (e.g., 3-40 among deer alone); in contrast, teleost fish genomes are stable (24-25 in 58% of teleosts), but we do not yet understand the mechanisms that account for differences in karyotype stability. Among perciform teleosts, platyfish (Xiphophorus maculatus) and medaka (Oryzias latipes) both have 24 chromosome pairs, but threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) and green pufferfish (Tetraodon nigroviridis) have just 21 pairs. To understand the evolution of teleost genomes, we made a platyfish meiotic map containing 16,114 mapped markers scored on 267 backcross fish. We tiled genomic contigs along the map to create chromosome-length genome assemblies. Genome-wide comparisons of conserved synteny showed that platyfish and medaka karyotypes remained remarkably similar with few interchromosomal translocations but with numerous intrachromosomal rearrangements (transpositions and inversions) since their lineages diverged ∼120 million years ago. Comparative genomics with platyfish shows how reduced chromosome numbers in stickleback and green pufferfish arose by fusion of pairs of ancestral chromosomes after their lineages diverged from platyfish ∼195 million years ago. Zebrafish and human genomes provide outgroups to root observed changes. These studies identify likely genome assembly errors, characterize chromosome fusion events, distinguish lineage-independent chromosome fusions, show that the teleost genome duplication does not appear to have accelerated the rate of translocations, and reveal the stability of syntenies and gene orders in teleost chromosomes over hundreds of millions of years.

  18. A RAD-Tag Genetic Map for the Platyfish (Xiphophorus maculatus) Reveals Mechanisms of Karyotype Evolution Among Teleost Fish

    PubMed Central

    Amores, Angel; Catchen, Julian; Nanda, Indrajit; Warren, Wesley; Walter, Ron; Schartl, Manfred; Postlethwait, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian genomes can vary substantially in haploid chromosome number even within a small taxon (e.g., 3–40 among deer alone); in contrast, teleost fish genomes are stable (24–25 in 58% of teleosts), but we do not yet understand the mechanisms that account for differences in karyotype stability. Among perciform teleosts, platyfish (Xiphophorus maculatus) and medaka (Oryzias latipes) both have 24 chromosome pairs, but threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) and green pufferfish (Tetraodon nigroviridis) have just 21 pairs. To understand the evolution of teleost genomes, we made a platyfish meiotic map containing 16,114 mapped markers scored on 267 backcross fish. We tiled genomic contigs along the map to create chromosome-length genome assemblies. Genome-wide comparisons of conserved synteny showed that platyfish and medaka karyotypes remained remarkably similar with few interchromosomal translocations but with numerous intrachromosomal rearrangements (transpositions and inversions) since their lineages diverged ∼120 million years ago. Comparative genomics with platyfish shows how reduced chromosome numbers in stickleback and green pufferfish arose by fusion of pairs of ancestral chromosomes after their lineages diverged from platyfish ∼195 million years ago. Zebrafish and human genomes provide outgroups to root observed changes. These studies identify likely genome assembly errors, characterize chromosome fusion events, distinguish lineage-independent chromosome fusions, show that the teleost genome duplication does not appear to have accelerated the rate of translocations, and reveal the stability of syntenies and gene orders in teleost chromosomes over hundreds of millions of years. PMID:24700104

  19. How predation shaped fish: the impact of fin spines on body form evolution across teleosts

    PubMed Central

    Price, S. A.; Friedman, S. T.; Wainwright, P. C.

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that predators can induce morphological changes in some fish: individuals exposed to predation cues increase body depth and the length of spines. We hypothesize that these structures may evolve synergistically, as together, these traits will further enlarge the body dimensions of the fish that gape-limited predators must overcome. We therefore expect that the orientation of the spines will predict which body dimension increases in the presence of predators. Using phylogenetic comparative methods, we tested this prediction on the macroevolutionary scale across 347 teleost families, which display considerable variation in fin spines, body depth and width. Consistent with our predictions, we demonstrate that fin spines on the vertical plane (dorsal and anal fins) are associated with a deeper-bodied optimum. Lineages with spines on the horizontal plane (pectoral fins) are associated with a wider-bodied optimum. Optimal body dimensions across lineages without spines paralleling the body dimension match the allometric expectation. Additionally, lineages with longer spines have deeper and wider body dimensions. This evolutionary relationship between fin spines and body dimensions across teleosts reveals functional synergy between these two traits and a potential macroevolutionary signature of predation on the evolutionary dynamics of body shape. PMID:26559954

  20. Quantitative proteomics in teleost fish: insights and challenges for neuroendocrine and neurotoxicology research.

    PubMed

    Martyniuk, Christopher J; Popesku, Jason T; Chown, Brittany; Denslow, Nancy D; Trudeau, Vance L

    2012-05-01

    Neuroendocrine systems integrate both extrinsic and intrinsic signals to regulate virtually all aspects of an animal's physiology. In aquatic toxicology, studies have shown that pollutants are capable of disrupting the neuroendocrine system of teleost fish, and many chemicals found in the environment can also have a neurotoxic mode of action. Omics approaches are now used to better understand cell signaling cascades underlying fish neurophysiology and the control of pituitary hormone release, in addition to identifying adverse effects of pollutants in the teleostean central nervous system. For example, both high throughput genomics and proteomic investigations of molecular signaling cascades for both neurotransmitter and nuclear receptor agonists/antagonists have been reported. This review highlights recent studies that have utilized quantitative proteomics methods such as 2D differential in-gel electrophoresis (DIGE) and isobaric tagging for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) in neuroendocrine regions and uses these examples to demonstrate the challenges of using proteomics in neuroendocrinology and neurotoxicology research. To begin to characterize the teleost neuroproteome, we functionally annotated 623 unique proteins found in the fish hypothalamus and telencephalon. These proteins have roles in biological processes that include synaptic transmission, ATP production, receptor activity, cell structure and integrity, and stress responses. The biological processes most represented by proteins detected in the teleost neuroendocrine brain included transport (8.4%), metabolic process (5.5%), and glycolysis (4.8%). We provide an example of using sub-network enrichment analysis (SNEA) to identify protein networks in the fish hypothalamus in response to dopamine receptor signaling. Dopamine signaling altered the abundance of proteins that are binding partners of microfilaments, integrins, and intermediate filaments, consistent with data suggesting dopaminergic

  1. Allometric growth of the trunk leads to the rostral shift of the pelvic fin in teleost fishes.

    PubMed

    Murata, Yumie; Tamura, Mika; Aita, Yusuke; Fujimura, Koji; Murakami, Yasunori; Okabe, Masataka; Okada, Norihiro; Tanaka, Mikiko

    2010-11-01

    The pelvic fin position among teleost fishes has shifted rostrally during evolution, resulting in diversification of both behavior and habitat. We explored the developmental basis for the rostral shift in pelvic fin position in teleost fishes using zebrafish (abdominal pelvic fins) and Nile tilapia (thoracic pelvic fins). Cell fate mapping experiments revealed that changes in the distribution of lateral plate mesodermal cells accompany the trunk-tail protrusion. Presumptive pelvic fin cells are originally located at the body wall adjacent to the anterior limit of hoxc10a expression in the spinal cord, and their position shifts rostrally as the trunk grows. We then showed that the differences in pelvic fin position between zebrafish and Nile tilapia were not due to changes in expression or function of gdf11. We also found that hox-independent motoneurons located above the pelvic fins innervate into the pelvic musculature. Our results suggest that there is a common mechanism among teleosts and tetrapods that controls paired appendage positioning via gdf11, but in teleost fishes the position of prospective pelvic fin cells on the yolk surface shifts as the trunk grows. In addition, teleost motoneurons, which lack lateral motor columns, innervate the pelvic fins in a manner independent of the rostral-caudal patterns of hox expression in the spinal cord.

  2. Spongiosis hepatis: chemical induction, pathogenesis, and possible neoplastic fate in a teleost fish model.

    PubMed

    Couch, J A

    1991-01-01

    Spongiosis hepatis (SH), first reported as a distinct lesion associated with certain forms of hepatic neoplasia in rats, has also been induced with chemicals, in a predictable fashion, in small teleost fishes being studied as carcinogenesis research models. The sheepshead minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus), exposed to N-nitrosodiethylamine (DENA) in sea water, provided the model for this study. The fish developed SH and presented a spectrum of developmental or progressive stages of the lesion over a 140 week holding period following a 6 week exposure to / 57 mg/L DENA. The origin of SH in the fish model is homologous to that in the rat model, both species having the perisinusoidal cell (stellate cells of Ito) in the space of Disse as the cell of origin. Light (LM) and electron microscopy (EM) studies characterized the different pathogenetic stages of SH in liver of the sheepshead minnow and revealed a possible late transition of SH to putative polymorphic cell neoplasms. The possible preneoplastic or neoplastic nature of SH from its time of origin in chemically exposed fish to time of appearance of associated presumptive neoplasms is discussed. SH may be a bioindicator of exposure to certain chemicals in some vertebrate species, from fishes to mammals.

  3. Patterns of Parental Investment and Sexual Selection in Teleost Fishes: Do They Support Bateman's Principles?

    PubMed

    Rios-Cardenas, Oscar

    2005-11-01

    Bateman demonstrated differences in variance for fertility and mating success between the sexes, with males usually having a greater variance than females. Thus in general, male reproductive success increases with number of mates acquired. These results have been referred to as "Bateman's principles" and taken together with other parameters (e.g., relative parental investment) have been proposed to estimate a component of sexual selection. For this review I examine patterns of parental care and sexual selection in teleost fishes (substrate brooding and with internal fertilization). I present data for the pumpkinseed sunfish Lepomis gibbosus, in which I estimated cost of paternal care and compared direct measures of the intensity of selection on possible sexually selected traits to measures of sexual selection based on Bateman's principles.Despite high levels of paternal care in substrate brooding fishes, sexual selection tends to act more strongly on males than on females, which suggests that maternal investment is higher than paternal investment and that parental care does not limit the reproductive rate for males. In pumpkinseed sunfish, selection favors parents with high levels of defense that may exclude predators more effectively and, as suggested by Bateman's measures, alternative reproductive strategies may decrease the opportunity for sexual selection within the parental strategy. In teleost fishes with internal fertilization, patterns of parental investment and intensity of sexual selection seem to support Bateman's principles, but further studies using these systems and these measures of selection will improve the understanding of factors affecting the intensity of sexual selection and its relation to mating systems.

  4. Hepcidin-Dependent Regulation of Erythropoiesis during Anemia in a Teleost Fish, Dicentrarchus labrax

    PubMed Central

    Caldas, Carolina; Ramos, Miguel F.; Rodrigues, Pedro N. S.

    2016-01-01

    Anemia is a common disorder, characterized by abnormally low levels of red blood cells or hemoglobin. The mechanisms of anemia development and response have been thoroughly studied in mammals, but little is known in other vertebrates, particularly teleost fish. In this study, different degrees of anemia were induced in healthy European sea bass specimens (Dicentrarchus labrax) and at pre-determined time points hematological parameters, liver iron content and the expression of genes involved in iron homeostasis and hematopoiesis, with particular attention on hepcidins, were evaluated. The experimental anemia prompted a decrease in hamp1 expression in all tested organs, in accordance to an increased need for iron absorption and mobilization, with slight increases in hamp2 in the kidney and intestine. The liver was clearly the major organ involved in iron homeostasis, decreasing its iron content and showing a gene expression profile consistent with an increased iron release and mobilization. Although both the spleen and head kidney are involved in erythropoiesis, the spleen was found to assume a more preponderant role in the recovery of erythrocyte levels. The intestine was also involved in the response to anemia, through the increase of iron transporting genes. Administration of Hamp1 or Hamp2 mature peptides showed that only Hamp1 affects hematological parameters and liver iron content. In conclusion, the molecular mechanisms of response to anemia present in sea bass are similar to the ones described for mammals, with these results indicating that the two hepcidin types from teleosts assume different roles during anemia. PMID:27100629

  5. Phylogenetic perspectives on the evolution of functional hermaphroditism in teleost fishes.

    PubMed

    Erisman, Brad E; Petersen, Christopher W; Hastings, Philip A; Warner, Robert R

    2013-10-01

    Hermaphroditism is taxonomically widespread among teleost fishes and takes on many forms including simultaneous, protogynous, and protandrous hermaphroditism, bidirectional sex change, and androdioecy. The proximate mechanisms that influence the timing, incidence, and forms of hermaphroditism in fishes are supported by numerous theoretical and empirical studies on their mating systems and sexual patterns, but few have examined aspects of sex-allocation theory or the evolution of hermaphroditism for this group within a strict phylogenetic context. Fortunately, species-level phylogenetic reconstructions of the evolutionary history of many lineages of fishes have emerged, providing opportunities for understanding fine-scale evolutionary pathways and transformations of sex allocation. Examinations of several families of fishes with adequate data on phylogeny, patterns of sex allocation, mating systems, and with some form of hermaphroditism reveal that the evolution and expression of protogyny and other forms of sex allocation show little evidence of phylogenetic inertia within specific lineages but rather are associated with particular mating systems in accordance with prevalent theories about sex allocation. Transformations from protogyny to gonochorism in groupers (Epinephelidae), seabasses (Serranidae), and wrasses and parrotfishes (Labridae) are associated with equivalent transformations in the structure of mating groups from spawning of pairs to group spawning and related increases in sperm competition. Similarly, patterns of protandry, androdioecy, simultaneous hermaphroditism, and bidirectional sex change in other lineages (Aulopiformes, Gobiidae, and Pomacentridae) match well with particular mating systems in accordance with sex-allocation theory. Unlike other animals and plants, we did not find evidence that transitions between hermaphroditism and gonochorism required functional intermediates. Two instances in which our general conclusions might not hold

  6. Locomotor function of the dorsal fin in teleost fishes: experimental analysis of wake forces in sunfish.

    PubMed

    Drucker, E G; Lauder, G V

    2001-09-01

    A key evolutionary transformation of the locomotor system of ray-finned fishes is the morphological elaboration of the dorsal fin. Within Teleostei, the dorsal fin primitively is a single midline structure supported by soft, flexible fin rays. In its derived condition, the fin is made up of two anatomically distinct portions: an anterior section supported by spines, and a posterior section that is soft-rayed. We have a very limited understanding of the functional significance of this evolutionary variation in dorsal fin design. To initiate empirical hydrodynamic study of dorsal fin function in teleost fishes, we analyzed the wake created by the soft dorsal fin of bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) during both steady swimming and unsteady turning maneuvers. Digital particle image velocimetry was used to visualize wake structures and to calculate in vivo locomotor forces. Study of the vortices generated simultaneously by the soft dorsal and caudal fins during locomotion allowed experimental characterization of median-fin wake interactions. During high-speed swimming (i.e. above the gait transition from pectoral- to median-fin locomotion), the soft dorsal fin undergoes regular oscillatory motion which, in comparison with analogous movement by the tail, is phase-advanced (by 30% of the cycle period) and of lower sweep amplitude (by 1.0 cm). Undulations of the soft dorsal fin during steady swimming at 1.1 bodylength s(-1) generate a reverse von Kármán vortex street wake that contributes 12% of total thrust. During low-speed turns, the soft dorsal fin produces discrete pairs of counterrotating vortices with a central region of high-velocity jet flow. This vortex wake, generated in the latter stage of the turn and posterior to the center of mass of the body, counteracts torque generated earlier in the turn by the anteriorly positioned pectoral fins and thereby corrects the heading of the fish as it begins to translate forward away from the turning stimulus. One

  7. Comparison of structural, architectural and mechanical aspects of cellular and acellular bone in two teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Liat; Dean, Mason; Shipov, Anna; Atkins, Ayelet; Monsonego-Ornan, Efrat; Shahar, Ron

    2012-06-01

    The histological diversity of the skeletal tissues of fishes is impressive compared with that of other vertebrate groups, yet our understanding of the functional consequences of this diversity is limited. In particular, although it has been known since the mid-1800s that a large number of fish species possess acellular bones, the mechanical advantages and consequences of this structural characteristic - and therefore the nature of the evolution of this feature - remain unclear. Although several studies have examined the material properties of fish bone, these have used a variety of techniques and there have been no direct contrasts of acellular and cellular bone. We report on a comparison of the structural and mechanical properties of the ribs and opercula between two freshwater fish - the common carp Cyprinus carpio (a fish with cellular bone) and the tilapia Oreochromis aureus (a fish with acellular bone). We used light microscopy to show that the bones in both fish species exhibit poor blood supply and possess discrete tissue zones, with visible layering suggesting differences in the underlying collagen architecture. We performed identical micromechanical testing protocols on samples of the two bone types to determine the mechanical properties of the bone material of opercula and ribs. Our data support the consensus of literature values, indicating that Young's moduli of cellular and acellular bones are in the same range, and lower than Young's moduli of the bones of mammals and birds. Despite these similarities in mechanical properties between the bone tissues of the fish species tested here, cellular bone had significantly lower mineral content than acellular bone; furthermore, the percentage ash content and bone mineral density values (derived from micro-CT scans) show that the bone of these fishes is less mineralized than amniote bone. Although we cannot generalize from our data to the numerous remaining teleost species, the results presented here suggest

  8. Five gonadotrophin-releasing hormone receptors in a teleost fish: isolation, tissue distribution and phylogenetic relationships.

    PubMed

    Moncaut, Natalia; Somoza, Gustavo; Power, Deborah M; Canário, Adelino V M

    2005-06-01

    Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is the main neurohormone controlling gonadotrophin release in all vertebrates, and in teleost fish also of growth hormone and possibly of other adenohypophyseal hormones. Over 20 GnRHs have been identified in vertebrates and protochoordates and shown to bind cognate G-protein couple receptors (GnRHR). We have searched the puffer fish, Fugu rubripes, genome sequencing database, identified five GnRHR genes and proceeded to isolate the corresponding complementary DNAs in European sea bass, Dicentrachus labrax. Phylogenetic analysis clusters the European sea bass, puffer fish and all other vertebrate receptors into two main lineages corresponding to the mammalian type I and II receptors. The fish receptors could be subdivided in two GnRHR1 (A and B) and three GnRHR2 (A, B and C) subtypes. Amino acid sequence identity within receptor subtypes varies between 70 and 90% but only 50-55% among the two main lineages in fish. All European sea bass receptor mRNAs are expressed in the anterior and mid brain, and all but one are expressed in the pituitary gland. There is differential expression of the receptors in peripheral tissues related to reproduction (gonads), chemical senses (eye and olfactory epithelium) and osmoregulation (kidney and gill). This is the first report showing five GnRH receptors in a vertebrate species and the gene expression patterns support the concept that GnRH and GnRHRs play highly diverse functional roles in the regulation of cellular functions, besides the "classical" role of pituitary function regulation.

  9. The teleost fish medaka ( Oryzias latipes) as genetic model to study gravity dependent bone homeostasis in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, T. U.; Renn, J.; Riemensperger, T.; Volff, J.-N.; Köster, R. W.; Goerlich, R.; Schartl, M.; Winkler, C.

    2003-10-01

    Long-term space flight and microgravity result in bone loss that can be explained by reduced activity of bone-forming cells (osteoblasts) and/or an increase in activity of bone resorbing cells (osteoclasts). Osteoprotegerin (OPG) has been shown to regulate the balance between osteoblast and osteoclast cell numbers and is involved in maintaining constant bone mass under normal gravitational conditions. The small bony fish medaka ( Oryzias latipes) has attracted increasing attention as a genetic model system to study normal embryonic developmental and pathological processes. To analyze the molecular mechanisms of bone formation in this small vertebrate, we have isolated two opg genes, opgl and opg2, from medaka. Our phylogenetic analysis reveals that both genes originated from a common ancestor by fish-specific gene duplication and represent the orthologs of the mammalian opg gene. Both opg genes are differentially expressed during embryonic and larval development, in adult tissues and in cultured primary osteoblast-like cells. Furthermore, we have characterized the opg2 promoter region and identified consensus binding sites for the transcription factor core-binding-factor-1A (CBFA1). In mammals, CBFA1 has been shown to be a regulator of opg expression and to be essential for several steps during osteoblast differentiation. Here we show that sequence and expression domains of opg, cbfal and a member of the dlx gene family are highly conserved between medaka and higher vertebrates. This suggests that not only single genes but entire genetic networks for bone formation are conserved between teleosts and mammals. These findings will open medaka fish as a genetic model to monitor bone formation under different gravity conditions in a living whole animal allowing the identification of novel factors involved in bone homeostasis.

  10. The teleost fish medaka (Oryzias latipes) as genetic model to study gravity dependent bone homeostasis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wagner, T U; Renn, J; Riemensperger, T; Volff, J-N; Köster, R W; Goerlich, R; Schartl, M; Winkler, C

    2003-01-01

    Long-term space flight and microgravity result in bone loss that can be explained by reduced activity of bone-forming cells (osteoblasts) and/or an increase in activity of bone resorbing cells (osteoclasts). Osteoprotegerin (OPG) has been shown to regulate the balance between osteoblast and osteoclast cell numbers and is involved in maintaining constant bone mass under normal gravitational conditions. The small bony fish medaka (Oryzias latipes) has attracted increasing attention as a genetic model system to study normal embryonic developmental and pathological processes. To analyze the molecular mechanisms of bone formation in this small vertebrate, we have isolated two opg genes, opgl and opg2, from medaka. Our phylogenetic analysis reveals that both genes originated from a common ancestor by fish-specific gene duplication and represent the orthologs of the mammalian opg gene. Both opg genes are differentially expressed during embryonic and larval development, in adult tissues and in cultured primary osteoblast-like cells. Furthermore, we have characterized the opg2 promoter region and identified consensus binding sites for the transcription factor core-binding-factor-1A (CBFA1). In mammals, CBFA1 has been shown to be a regulator of opg expression and to be essential for several steps during osteoblast differentiation. Here we show that sequence and expression domains of opg, cbfal and a member of the dlx gene family are highly conserved between medaka and higher vertebrates. This suggests that not only single genes but entire genetic networks for bone formation are conserved between teleosts and mammals. These findings will open medaka fish as a genetic model to monitor bone formation under different gravity conditions in a living whole animal allowing the identification of novel factors involved in bone homeostasis.

  11. Identification and characterization of a second CD4-like gene in teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Dijkstra, Johannes Martinus; Somamoto, Tomonori; Moore, Lindsey; Hordvik, Ivar; Ototake, Mitsuru; Fischer, Uwe

    2006-02-01

    In fish, T cell subdivision is not well studied, although CD8 and CD4 homologues have been reported. This study describes a second teleost CD4-like gene, CD4-like 2 (CD4L-2). Two rainbow trout copies of this gene were found, -2a and -2b, encoding molecules sharing 81% aa identity. The 2a/2b duplication may be related to tetraploid ancestry of salmonid fishes. In the Fugu genome CD4L-2 lies head to tail with an earlier reported, very different CD4-like gene [Suetake, H., Araki, K., Suzuki, Y., 2004. Cloning, expression, and characterization of fugu CD4, the first ectothermic animal CD4. Immunogenetics 56, 368-374], which was designated CD4L-1 in the present article. The flanking genes of the Fugu CD4L-1 and CD4L-2 are reminiscent of the genes surrounding CD4 and LAG-3 in mammals. However, neither synteny nor phylogenetic analysis could decide between CD4 and LAG-3 identity for the fish CD4L genes. CD4L-1 and CD4L-2 share a tyrosine protein kinase p56(lck) binding motif in the cytoplasmic tail with CD4 but not with LAG-3. Trout CD4L-2 expression is highest in the thymus, similar to mammalian and chicken CD4, whereas Fugu CD4L-1 expression was highest in the spleen. However, CD4L-2 encodes only two IG-like domains, whereas CD4L-1, CD4 and LAG-3 encode four. The CD4-like genes 1 and 2 in fish apparently went through an evolution different from that of LAG-3 and CD4 in higher vertebrates.

  12. Ecomorphological selectivity among marine teleost fishes during the end-Cretaceous extinction.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Matt

    2009-03-31

    Despite the attention focused on mass extinction events in the fossil record, patterns of extinction in the dominant group of marine vertebrates-fishes-remain largely unexplored. Here, I demonstrate ecomorphological selectivity among marine teleost fishes during the end-Cretaceous extinction, based on a genus-level dataset that accounts for lineages predicted on the basis of phylogeny but not yet sampled in the fossil record. Two ecologically relevant anatomical features are considered: body size and jaw-closing lever ratio. Extinction intensity is higher for taxa with large body sizes and jaws consistent with speed (rather than force) transmission; resampling tests indicate that victims represent a nonrandom subset of taxa present in the final stage of the Cretaceous. Logistic regressions of the raw data reveal that this nonrandom distribution stems primarily from the larger body sizes of victims relative to survivors. Jaw mechanics are also a significant factor for most dataset partitions but are always less important than body size. When data are corrected for phylogenetic nonindependence, jaw mechanics show a significant correlation with extinction risk, but body size does not. Many modern large-bodied, predatory taxa currently suffering from overexploitation, such billfishes and tunas, first occur in the Paleocene, when they appear to have filled the functional space vacated by some extinction victims.

  13. Spatial memory and hippocampal pallium through vertebrate evolution: insights from reptiles and teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, F; López, J C; Vargas, J P; Broglio, C; Gómez, Y; Salas, C

    The forebrain of vertebrates shows great morphological variation and specialized adaptations. However, an increasing amount of neuroanatomical and functional data reveal that the evolution of the vertebrate forebrain could have been more conservative than previously realized. For example, the pallial region of the teleost telencephalon contains subdivisions presumably homologous with various pallial areas in amniotes, including possibly a homologue of the medial pallium or hippocampus. In mammals and birds, the hippocampus is critical for encoding complex spatial information to form map-like cognitive representations of the environment. Here, we present data showing that the pallial areas of reptiles and fish, previously proposed as homologous to the hippocampus of mammals and birds on an anatomical basis, are similarly involved in spatial memory and navigation by map-like or relational representations of the allocentric space. These data suggest that early in vertebrate evolution, the medial pallium of an ancestral fish group that gave rise to the extant vertebrates became specialized for processing and encoding complex spatial information, and that this functional trait has been retained through the evolution of each independent vertebrate lineage.

  14. Conservation of toll-like receptor signaling pathways in teleost fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Purcell, M.K.; Smith, K.D.; Aderem, A.; Hood, L.; Winton, J.R.; Roach, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    In mammals, toll-like receptors (TLR) recognize ligands, including pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), and respond with ligand-specific induction of genes. In this study, we establish evolutionary conservation in teleost fish of key components of the TLR-signaling pathway that act as switches for differential gene induction, including MYD88, TIRAP, TRIF, TRAF6, IRF3, and IRF7. We further explore this conservation with a molecular phylogenetic analysis of MYD88. To the extent that current genomic analysis can establish, each vertebrate has one ortholog to each of these genes. For molecular tree construction and phylogeny inference, we demonstrate a methodology for including genes with only partial primary sequences without disrupting the topology provided by the high-confidence full-length sequences. Conservation of the TLR-signaling molecules suggests that the basic program of gene regulation by the TLR-signaling pathway is conserved across vertebrates. To test this hypothesis, leukocytes from a model fish, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), were stimulated with known mammalian TLR agonists including: Diacylated and triacylated forms of lipoprotein, flagellin, two forms of LPS, synthetic double-stranded RNA, and two imidazoquinoline compounds (loxoribine and R848). Trout leukocytes responded in vitro to a number of these agonists with distinct patterns of cytokine expression that correspond to mammalian responses. Our results support the key prediction from our phylogenetic analyses that strong selective pressure of pathogenic microbes has preserved both TLR recognition and signaling functions during vertebrate evolution. ?? 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Eye movements are coordinated with pectoral fin beats during locomotion in a marine teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Mandecki, Joanna L; Domenici, Paolo

    2015-04-15

    Animals must simultaneously engage multiple functional systems in order to navigate, feed and survive in complex environments. Nearly all vertebrates perform rapid gaze-shifting eye movements called saccades, but we know little about the behaviour of saccades during rhythmic locomotion. This study examined how saccades are coordinated with locomotor movements in a pectoral-fin-propelled teleost fish, Cymatogaster aggregata, the shiner surfperch. Individual fish were filmed swimming in a flow tank at 10 cm s(-1), and timing data were analysed using circular statistics. The results reveal that C. aggregata generates saccades non-uniformly throughout the pectoral fin cycle. Saccades primarily occur during fin abduction, when a large amount of thrust is produced, and rarely occur during the thrust-free refractory phase. Because vision is known to be impaired during saccades, we hypothesize that C. aggregata synchronizes saccades with periods of high acceleration in order to stabilize retinal images during low-acceleration phases, which are nearly saccade-free.

  16. Rapid genome reshaping by multiple-gene loss after whole-genome duplication in teleost fish suggested by mathematical modeling

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Yukuto; Tsukamoto, Katsumi; Nishida, Mutsumi

    2015-01-01

    Whole-genome duplication (WGD) is believed to be a significant source of major evolutionary innovation. Redundant genes resulting from WGD are thought to be lost or acquire new functions. However, the rates of gene loss and thus temporal process of genome reshaping after WGD remain unclear. The WGD shared by all teleost fish, one-half of all jawed vertebrates, was more recent than the two ancient WGDs that occurred before the origin of jawed vertebrates, and thus lends itself to analysis of gene loss and genome reshaping. Using a newly developed orthology identification pipeline, we inferred the post–teleost-specific WGD evolutionary histories of 6,892 protein-coding genes from nine phylogenetically representative teleost genomes on a time-calibrated tree. We found that rapid gene loss did occur in the first 60 My, with a loss of more than 70–80% of duplicated genes, and produced similar genomic gene arrangements within teleosts in that relatively short time. Mathematical modeling suggests that rapid gene loss occurred mainly by events involving simultaneous loss of multiple genes. We found that the subsequent 250 My were characterized by slow and steady loss of individual genes. Our pipeline also identified about 1,100 shared single-copy genes that are inferred to have become singletons before the divergence of clupeocephalan teleosts. Therefore, our comparative genome analysis suggests that rapid gene loss just after the WGD reshaped teleost genomes before the major divergence, and provides a useful set of marker genes for future phylogenetic analysis. PMID:26578810

  17. Rapid genome reshaping by multiple-gene loss after whole-genome duplication in teleost fish suggested by mathematical modeling.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Jun; Sato, Yukuto; Sinclair, Robert; Tsukamoto, Katsumi; Nishida, Mutsumi

    2015-12-01

    Whole-genome duplication (WGD) is believed to be a significant source of major evolutionary innovation. Redundant genes resulting from WGD are thought to be lost or acquire new functions. However, the rates of gene loss and thus temporal process of genome reshaping after WGD remain unclear. The WGD shared by all teleost fish, one-half of all jawed vertebrates, was more recent than the two ancient WGDs that occurred before the origin of jawed vertebrates, and thus lends itself to analysis of gene loss and genome reshaping. Using a newly developed orthology identification pipeline, we inferred the post-teleost-specific WGD evolutionary histories of 6,892 protein-coding genes from nine phylogenetically representative teleost genomes on a time-calibrated tree. We found that rapid gene loss did occur in the first 60 My, with a loss of more than 70-80% of duplicated genes, and produced similar genomic gene arrangements within teleosts in that relatively short time. Mathematical modeling suggests that rapid gene loss occurred mainly by events involving simultaneous loss of multiple genes. We found that the subsequent 250 My were characterized by slow and steady loss of individual genes. Our pipeline also identified about 1,100 shared single-copy genes that are inferred to have become singletons before the divergence of clupeocephalan teleosts. Therefore, our comparative genome analysis suggests that rapid gene loss just after the WGD reshaped teleost genomes before the major divergence, and provides a useful set of marker genes for future phylogenetic analysis.

  18. A unique mode of tissue oxygenation and the adaptive radiation of teleost fishes.

    PubMed

    Randall, D J; Rummer, J L; Wilson, J M; Wang, S; Brauner, C J

    2014-04-15

    Teleost fishes constitute 95% of extant aquatic vertebrates, and we suggest that this is related in part to their unique mode of tissue oxygenation. We propose the following sequence of events in the evolution of their oxygen delivery system. First, loss of plasma-accessible carbonic anhydrase (CA) in the gill and venous circulations slowed the Jacobs-Stewart cycle and the transfer of acid between the plasma and the red blood cells (RBCs). This ameliorated the effects of a generalised acidosis (associated with an increased capacity for burst swimming) on haemoglobin (Hb)-O2 binding. Because RBC pH was uncoupled from plasma pH, the importance of Hb as a buffer was reduced. The decrease in buffering was mediated by a reduction in the number of histidine residues on the Hb molecule and resulted in enhanced coupling of O2 and CO2 transfer through the RBCs. In the absence of plasma CA, nearly all plasma bicarbonate ultimately dehydrated to CO2 occurred via the RBCs, and chloride/bicarbonate exchange was the rate-limiting step in CO2 excretion. This pattern of CO2 excretion across the gills resulted in disequilibrium states for CO2 hydration/dehydration reactions and thus elevated arterial and venous plasma bicarbonate levels. Plasma-accessible CA embedded in arterial endothelia was retained, which eliminated the localized bicarbonate disequilibrium forming CO2 that then moved into the RBCs. Consequently, RBC pH decreased which, in conjunction with pH-sensitive Bohr/Root Hbs, elevated arterial oxygen tensions and thus enhanced tissue oxygenation. Counter-current arrangement of capillaries (retia) at the eye and later the swim bladder evolved along with the gas gland at the swim bladder. Both arrangements enhanced and magnified CO2 and acid production and, therefore, oxygen secretion to those specialised tissues. The evolution of β-adrenergically stimulated RBC Na(+)/H(+) exchange protected gill O2 uptake during stress and further augmented plasma disequilibrium states

  19. CRTAC1 homolog proteins are conserved from cyanobacteria to man and secreted by the teleost fish pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Redruello, Begoña; Louro, Bruno; Anjos, Liliana; Silva, Nádia; Greenwell, Roger S; Canario, Adelino V M; Power, Deborah M

    2010-05-15

    Cartilage acidic protein 1 (CRTAC1) gene expression is used as a marker for chondrocyte differentiation in stem cell-based tissue engineering. It is also transcribed outside the skeleton where at least two different transcripts are expressed in lung and brain. In the pituitary gland of the teleost fish sea bream Sparus auratus, we have found a transcript with a high degree of sequence identity to CRTAC1 family members but lacking the EGF-like calcium-binding domain encoding sequence of CRTAC1 and designated it as CRTAC2. Database searches revealed many previously unidentified members of the CRTAC1 and CRTAC2 in phylogenetically distant organisms, such as cyanobacteria, bryophyta, lancelets, and diverse representatives of vertebrates. Phylogenetic analyses showed that the genes encoding CRTAC1 and CRTAC2 proteins coexist in teleost fish genomes. Structural prediction analysis identified the N-terminal region of the CRTAC1/CRTAC2 family members as a potential seven-bladed beta-propeller structure, closely related to those of integrin alpha chains and glycosylphosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase D1 protein families. This relationship is confirmed by phylogenetic analysis with the N-terminal domain of sea bream CRTAC2 as the most divergent sequence. Because teleost fishes are the only phylogenetic group where both CRTAC1 and CRTAC2 genes are present, they occupy a pivotal position in studies of the mechanisms governing the specific expression patterns of each gene/protein subfamily. This will be essential to elucidate their respective biological roles.

  20. TELEOST FISH (Solea solea): A NOVEL MODEL FOR ECOTOXICOLOGICAL ASSAY OF CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    PubMed Central

    Ribecco, C; Hardiman, G; Sásik, R; Vittori, S; Carnevali, O

    2012-01-01

    Chemical analysis of sediment is not indicative of the downstream biological effects on aquatic organisms. In this study, the biological effects of sediment were examined using: Teleost fish, (Solea solea), Artemia and rotifers. Although chemicals levels were below the limits permissible by Italian law, S. solea juveniles exposed to sediment (0.3% w/v) for 96 hours, revealed significant induction in the expression levels of HSP70, ERα, TRα, RXRα, PPARα, β, CYP4501A1 and CYP3A mRNAs, suggesting the utility of this species as a novel biosensor. The bio-toxicity of the sediment was further validated by exposing Artemia and rotifers to concentrations of elutriate (derived from the sediment) from 10 to 100 % v/v (with a 50% mortality rate). These results suggest that sediment defined as moderately contaminated, solely on the basis of the chemical profile, may in fact cause harmful effects to aquatic organisms. This study highlights the need for biological approaches in the establishment of sediment toxicity levels. PMID:22217502

  1. Ecomorphological selectivity among marine teleost fishes during the end-Cretaceous extinction

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Matt

    2009-01-01

    Despite the attention focused on mass extinction events in the fossil record, patterns of extinction in the dominant group of marine vertebrates—fishes—remain largely unexplored. Here, I demonstrate ecomorphological selectivity among marine teleost fishes during the end-Cretaceous extinction, based on a genus-level dataset that accounts for lineages predicted on the basis of phylogeny but not yet sampled in the fossil record. Two ecologically relevant anatomical features are considered: body size and jaw-closing lever ratio. Extinction intensity is higher for taxa with large body sizes and jaws consistent with speed (rather than force) transmission; resampling tests indicate that victims represent a nonrandom subset of taxa present in the final stage of the Cretaceous. Logistic regressions of the raw data reveal that this nonrandom distribution stems primarily from the larger body sizes of victims relative to survivors. Jaw mechanics are also a significant factor for most dataset partitions but are always less important than body size. When data are corrected for phylogenetic nonindependence, jaw mechanics show a significant correlation with extinction risk, but body size does not. Many modern large-bodied, predatory taxa currently suffering from overexploitation, such billfishes and tunas, first occur in the Paleocene, when they appear to have filled the functional space vacated by some extinction victims. PMID:19276106

  2. Opposite effects of nonapeptide antagonists on paternal behavior in the teleost fish Amphiprion ocellaris.

    PubMed

    DeAngelis, Ross; Gogola, Joseph; Dodd, Logan; Rhodes, Justin S

    2017-03-17

    The nonapeptides isotocin (IT) and arginine vasotocin (AVT), along with their mammalian homologs oxytocin and arginine vasopressin, are well known regulators of social behaviors across vertebrate taxa. However, little is known about their involvement in paternal care. Here, we measured the effect of an IT and an AVT V1a receptor antagonist on paternal behaviors in the primarily paternal teleost Amphiprion ocellaris. We also measured the effect of the IT receptor antagonist on aggression in dyadic contests between two non-reproductive fish to assess specificity of the effect on paternal behaviors. Individual differences in levels of paternal behaviors (nips, fanning the eggs, and proportion of the time in the nest) were consistent across spawning cycles when no treatments were administered. The IT receptor antagonist severely reduced paternal behaviors but had no effect on aggression, whereas the AVT V1a receptor antagonist increased paternal behaviors. These results support the idea that IT signaling is crucial for the expression of paternal behavior in A. ocellaris. Based on a previous study showing that the AVT V1a antagonist decreases aggression in dyadic contests, we hypothesize that the antagonist enhances paternal behavior indirectly by reducing vigilance and aggression, thereby alleviating effort directed towards other competing behaviors and allowing for the increased expression of paternal behaviors.

  3. Temperature-dependent modification of muscle precursor cell behaviour is an underlying reason for lasting effects on muscle cellularity and body growth of teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Steinbacher, Peter; Marschallinger, Julia; Obermayer, Astrid; Neuhofer, Alois; Sänger, Alexandra M; Stoiber, Walter

    2011-06-01

    Temperature is an important factor influencing teleost muscle growth, including a lasting ('imprinted') influence of embryonic thermal experience throughout all further life. However, little is known about the cellular processes behind this phenomenon. The study reported here used digital morphometry and immunolabelling for Pax7, myogenin and H3P to quantitatively examine the effects of thermal history on muscle precursor cell (MPC) behaviour and muscle growth in pearlfish (Rutilus meidingeri) until the adult stage. Fish were reared at three different temperatures (8.5, 13 and 16°C) until hatching and subsequently kept under the same (ambient) thermal conditions. Cellularity data were combined with a quantitative analysis of Pax7+ MPCs including those that were mitotically active (Pax7+/H3P+) or had entered differentiation (Pax7+/myogenin+). The results demonstrate that at hatching, body lengths, fast and slow muscle cross-sectional areas and fast fibre numbers are lower in fish reared at 8.5 and 13°C than at 16°C. During the larval period, this situation changes in the 13°C-fish, so that these fish are finally the largest. The observed effects can be related to divergent cellular mechanisms at the MPC level that are initiated in the embryo during the imprinting period. Embryos of 16°C-fish have reduced MPC proliferation but increased differentiation, and thus give rise to larger hatchlings. However, their limited MPC reserves finally lead to smaller adults. By contrast, embryos of 13°C-fish and, to a lesser extent, 8.5°-fish, show enhanced MPC proliferation but reduced differentiation, thus leading to smaller hatchlings but allowing for a larger MPC pool that can be used for enhanced post-hatching growth, finally resulting in larger adults.

  4. Regulation of natural killer enhancing factor (NKEF) genes in teleost fish, gilthead seabream and European sea bass.

    PubMed

    Esteban, María A; Chaves-Pozo, Elena; Arizcun, Marta; Meseguer, José; Cuesta, Alberto

    2013-10-01

    Peroxiredoxins (Prx) are a family of antioxidant proteins also involved in inflammation and innate immunity. Prx1 and Prx2 are also known as natural killer enhancing factor (NKEF)-A and NKEF-B, respectively, by their ability to prime the mammalian NK-cells activity. In teleost fish, NKEF genes have been isolated but their regulation has been scarcely evaluated. We have identified orthologues of the NKEF-A and NKEF-B genes in the teleost European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) which showed constitutive expression and wide distribution in their tissues. In vitro, the gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata) and sea bass NKEFs were slightly up-regulated in head-kidney leucocytes after stimulation with unmethylated CpG oligodeoxynucleotides, poly I:C or pathogenic bacteria. In vivo, seabream and sea bass infection with nodavirus up-regulated the expression of NKEF genes in the brain (target tissue for nodavirus) and head-kidney at different infection times. Although further studies are necessary to ascertain their role as antioxidant proteins and in the immune response in teleost fish, our results suggest a primary role of seabream and sea bass NKEFs in the innate immune response against bacterial and viral agents.

  5. Particularities of reproduction and oogenesis in teleost fish compared to mammals.

    PubMed

    Jalabert, Bernard

    2005-01-01

    Compared to mammals, teleost reproduction presents many original features. Reproductive strategies of species are diversified into numerous adaptations to a large variety of aquatic environments. This diversity may concern sexuality, spawning and parental behaviour, sensitivity to environmental factors, and specific features of gametogenesis such as the duration of vitellogenesis, and egg morphology. Sexuality presents a variety of natural modalities, from gonochorism to hermaphrodism. The absence of definitive arrest of body growth in the adult of most species gives a particular interest to the practical control of growth-reproduction interactions. Vitellogenesis, which represents an important metabolic effort for the maternal organism, involves the synthesis of vitellogenin, a specific glycolipo-phosphoprotein produced in the liver under estradiol stimulation, and its incorporation into oocytes by a receptor mediated process. Both estradiol synthesis in follicle cells and vtg uptake by vitellogenic follicles appear to be mainly controlled by FSH. Oocyte maturation is directly triggered by a progestin, or MIS (maturation inducing steroid) synthesised in follicle cells mainly under LH control, and acting through the non-genomic activation of a membrane receptor. Practical applications of some of these particularities result mainly from the external character of the fertilisation process and of embryonic development, which allows manipulating respectively egg chromosome stocks and sex differentiation. Moreover, the sensitivity of sex differentiation to exogenous factors favours the development of practical methods to control the sex of farmed populations. Finally, the sensitivity of reproductive mechanisms to xenobiotics has led to various kinds of bioassays for putative pollutants.

  6. The isolation, purification and amino-acid sequence of insulin from the teleost fish Cottus scorpius (daddy sculpin).

    PubMed

    Cutfield, J F; Cutfield, S M; Carne, A; Emdin, S O; Falkmer, S

    1986-07-01

    Insulin from the principal islets of the teleost fish, Cottus scorpius (daddy sculpin), has been isolated and sequenced. Purification involved acid/alcohol extraction, gel filtration, and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography to yield nearly 1 mg pure insulin/g wet weight islet tissue. Biological potency was estimated as 40% compared to porcine insulin. The sculpin insulin crystallised in the absence of zinc ions although zinc is known to be present in the islets in significant amounts. Two other hormones, glucagon and pancreatic polypeptide, were copurified with the insulin, and an N-terminal sequence for pancreatic polypeptide was determined. The primary structure of sculpin insulin shows a number of sequence changes unique so far amongst teleost fish. These changes occur at A14 (Arg), A15 (Val), and B2 (Asp). The B chain contains 29 amino acids and there is no N-terminal extension as seen with several other fish. Presumably as a result of the amino acid substitutions, sculpin insulin does not readily form crystals containing zinc-insulin hexamers, despite the presence of the coordinating B10 His.

  7. A novel GH secretagogue, A233, exhibits enhanced growth activity and innate immune system stimulation in teleosts fish.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Rebeca; Ubieta, Kenia; Herrera, Fidel; Forellat, Alina; Morales, Reynold; de la Nuez, Ania; Rodriguez, Rolando; Reyes, Osvaldo; Oliva, Ayme; Estrada, Mario P

    2012-09-01

    In teleosts fish, secretion of GH is regulated by several hypothalamic factors that are influenced by the physiological state of the animal. There is an interaction between immune and endocrine systems through hormones and cytokines. GH in fish is involved in many physiological processes that are not overtly growth related, such as saltwater osmoregulation, antifreeze synthesis, and the regulation of sexual maturation and immune functions. This study was conducted to characterize a decapeptide compound A233 (GKFDLSPEHQ) designed by molecular modeling to evaluate its function as a GH secretagogue (GHS). In pituitary cell culture, the peptide A233 induces GH secretion and it is also able to increase superoxide production in tilapia head-kidney leukocyte cultures. This effect is blocked by preincubation with the GHS receptor antagonist [d-Lys(3)]-GHRP6. Immunoneutralization of GH by addition of anti-tilapia GH monoclonal antibody blocked the stimulatory effect of A233 on superoxide production. These experiments propose a GH-mediated mechanism for the action of A233. The in vivo biological action of the decapeptide was also demonstrated for growth stimulation in goldfish and tilapia larvae (P<0.001). Superoxide dismutase levels, antiprotease activity, and lectin titer were enhanced in tilapia larvae treated with this novel molecule. The decapeptide A233 designed by molecular modeling is able to function as a GHS in teleosts and enhance parameters of the innate immune system in the fish larvae.

  8. Müller glia: Stem cells for generation and regeneration of retinal neurons in teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Lenkowski, Jenny R; Raymond, Pamela A

    2014-05-01

    Adult zebrafish generate new neurons in the brain and retina throughout life. Growth-related neurogenesis allows a vigorous regenerative response to damage, and fish can regenerate retinal neurons, including photoreceptors, and restore functional vision following photic, chemical, or mechanical destruction of the retina. Müller glial cells in fish function as radial-glial-like neural stem cells. During adult growth, Müller glial nuclei undergo sporadic, asymmetric, self-renewing mitotic divisions in the inner nuclear layer to generate a rod progenitor that migrates along the radial fiber of the Müller glia into the outer nuclear layer, proliferates, and differentiates exclusively into rod photoreceptors. When retinal neurons are destroyed, Müller glia in the immediate vicinity of the damage partially and transiently dedifferentiate, re-express retinal progenitor and stem cell markers, re-enter the cell cycle, undergo interkinetic nuclear migration (characteristic of neuroepithelial cells), and divide once in an asymmetric, self-renewing division to generate a retinal progenitor. This daughter cell proliferates rapidly to form a compact neurogenic cluster surrounding the Müller glia; these multipotent retinal progenitors then migrate along the radial fiber to the appropriate lamina to replace missing retinal neurons. Some aspects of the injury-response in fish Müller glia resemble gliosis as observed in mammals, and mammalian Müller glia exhibit some neurogenic properties, indicative of a latent ability to regenerate retinal neurons. Understanding the specific properties of fish Müller glia that facilitate their robust capacity to generate retinal neurons will inform and inspire new clinical approaches for treating blindness and visual loss with regenerative medicine.

  9. Gap Junction in the Teleost Fish Lineage: Duplicated Connexins May Contribute to Skin Pattern Formation and Body Shape Determination

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Masakatsu

    2017-01-01

    Gap junctions are intercellular channels that allow passage of ions and small molecules between adjacent cells. Gap junctions in vertebrates are composed of connexons, which are an assembly of six proteins, connexins. Docking of two connexons on the opposite cell surfaces forms a gap junction between the cytoplasm of two neighboring cells. Connexins compose a family of structurally related four-pass transmembrane proteins. In mammals, there are ~20 connexins, each of which contributes to unique permeability of gap junctions, and mutations of some connexin-encoding genes are associated with human diseases. Zebrafish has been predicted to contain 39 connexin-encoding genes; the high number can be attributed to gene duplication during fish evolution, which resulted in diversified functions of gap junctions in teleosts. The determination of body shapes and skin patterns in animal species is an intriguing question. Mathematical models suggest principle mechanisms explaining the diversification of animal morphology. Recent studies have revealed the involvement of gap junctions in fish morphological diversity, including skin pattern formation and body shape determination. This review focuses on connexins in teleosts, which are integrated in the mathematical models explaining morphological diversity of animal skin patterns and body shapes. PMID:28271062

  10. Influence of the cholinergic system on the immune response of teleost fishes: potential model in biomedical research.

    PubMed

    Toledo-Ibarra, G A; Rojas-Mayorquín, A E; Girón-Pérez, M I

    2013-01-01

    Fishes are the phylogenetically oldest vertebrate group, which includes more than one-half of the vertebrates on the planet; additionally, many species have ecological and economic importance. Fish are the first evolved group of organisms with adaptive immune mechanisms; consequently, they are an important link in the evolution of the immune system, thus a potential model for understanding the mechanisms of immunoregulation. Currently, the influence of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) on the cells of the immune system is widely studied in mammalian models, which have provided evidence on ACh production by immune cells (the noncholinergic neuronal system); however, these neuroimmunomodulation mechanisms in fish and lower vertebrates are poorly studied. Therefore, the objective of this review paper was to analyze the influence of the cholinergic system on the immune response of teleost fish, which could provide information concerning the possibility of bidirectional communication between the nervous and immune systems in these organisms and provide data for a better understanding of basic issues in neuroimmunology in lower vertebrates, such as bony fishes. Thus, the use of fish as a model in biomedical research may contribute to a better understanding of human diseases and diseases in other animals.

  11. Influence of the Cholinergic System on the Immune Response of Teleost Fishes: Potential Model in Biomedical Research

    PubMed Central

    Toledo-Ibarra, G. A.; Rojas-Mayorquín, A. E.; Girón-Pérez, M. I.

    2013-01-01

    Fishes are the phylogenetically oldest vertebrate group, which includes more than one-half of the vertebrates on the planet; additionally, many species have ecological and economic importance. Fish are the first evolved group of organisms with adaptive immune mechanisms; consequently, they are an important link in the evolution of the immune system, thus a potential model for understanding the mechanisms of immunoregulation. Currently, the influence of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) on the cells of the immune system is widely studied in mammalian models, which have provided evidence on ACh production by immune cells (the noncholinergic neuronal system); however, these neuroimmunomodulation mechanisms in fish and lower vertebrates are poorly studied. Therefore, the objective of this review paper was to analyze the influence of the cholinergic system on the immune response of teleost fish, which could provide information concerning the possibility of bidirectional communication between the nervous and immune systems in these organisms and provide data for a better understanding of basic issues in neuroimmunology in lower vertebrates, such as bony fishes. Thus, the use of fish as a model in biomedical research may contribute to a better understanding of human diseases and diseases in other animals. PMID:24324508

  12. Structural conservation in the template/pseudoknot domain of vertebrate telomerase RNA from teleost fish to human

    PubMed Central

    Yesselman, Joseph D.; Zhang, Qi; Kang, Mijeong; Feigon, Juli

    2016-01-01

    Telomerase is an RNA–protein complex that includes a unique reverse transcriptase that catalyzes the addition of single-stranded telomere DNA repeats onto the 3′ ends of linear chromosomes using an integral telomerase RNA (TR) template. Vertebrate TR contains the template/pseudoknot (t/PK) and CR4/5 domains required for telomerase activity in vitro. All vertebrate pseudoknots include two subdomains: P2ab (helices P2a and P2b with a 5/6-nt internal loop) and the minimal pseudoknot (P2b–P3 and associated loops). A helical extension of P2a, P2a.1, is specific to mammalian TR. Using NMR, we investigated the structures of the full-length TR pseudoknot and isolated subdomains in Oryzias latipes (Japanese medaka fish), which has the smallest vertebrate TR identified to date. We determined the solution NMR structure and studied the dynamics of medaka P2ab, and identified all base pairs and tertiary interactions in the minimal pseudoknot. Despite differences in length and sequence, the structure of medaka P2ab is more similar to human P2ab than predicted, and the medaka minimal pseudoknot has the same tertiary interactions as the human pseudoknot. Significantly, although P2a.1 is not predicted to form in teleost fish, we find that it forms in the full-length pseudoknot via an unexpected hairpin. Model structures of the subdomains are combined to generate a model of t/PK. These results provide evidence that the architecture for the vertebrate t/PK is conserved from teleost fish to human. The organization of the t/PK on telomerase reverse transcriptase for medaka and human is modeled based on the cryoEM structure of Tetrahymena telomerase, providing insight into function. PMID:27531956

  13. Phylogenetic position of tetraodontiform fishes within the higher teleosts: Bayesian inferences based on 44 whole mitochondrial genome sequences.

    PubMed

    Yamanoue, Yusuke; Miya, Masaki; Matsuura, Keiichi; Yagishita, Naoki; Mabuchi, Kohji; Sakai, Harumi; Katoh, Masaya; Nishida, Mutsumi

    2007-10-01

    Tetraodontiformes includes approximately 350 species assigned to nine families, sharing several reduced morphological features of higher teleosts. The order has been accepted as a monophyletic group by many authors, although several alternative hypotheses exist regarding its phylogenetic position within the higher teleosts. To date, acanthuroids, zeiforms, and lophiiforms have been proposed as sister-groups of the tetraodontiforms. The monophyly and sister-group status was investigated using whole mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) sequences from 44 purposefully-chosen species (26 sequences newly-determined during the study) that fully represent the major tetraodontiform lineages plus all the groups that have been hypothesized as being close relatives. Partitioned Bayesian analyses were conducted with the three datasets that comprised concatenated nucleotide sequences from 13 protein-coding genes (with and without, or with RY-coding, 3rd codon positions), plus 22 transfer RNA and two ribosomal RNA genes. The resultant trees were well resolved and largely congruent, with most internal branches being supported by high posterior probabilities. Mitogenomic data strongly supported the monophyly of tetraodontiform fishes, placing them as a sister-group of either Lophiiformes plus Caproidei or Caproidei only. The sister-group relationship between Acanthuroidei and Tetraodontiformes was statistically rejected using Bayes factors. These results were confirmed by a reanalysis of the previously published nuclear RAG1 gene sequences using the Bayesian method. Within the Tetraodontiformes, however, monophylies of the three superfamilies were not recovered and further taxonomic sampling and subsequent efforts should clarify these relationships.

  14. Manipulation of Fgf and Bmp signaling in teleost fishes suggests potential pathways for the evolutionary origin of multicuspid teeth

    PubMed Central

    Jackman, William R; Davies, Shelby H; Lyons, David B; Stauder, Caitlin K; Denton-Schneider, Benjamin R; Jowdry, Andrea; Aigler, Sharon R; Vogel, Scott A; Stock, David W

    2014-01-01

    Teeth with two or more cusps have arisen independently from an ancestral unicuspid condition in a variety of vertebrate lineages, including sharks, teleost fishes, amphibians, lizards, and mammals. One potential explanation for the repeated origins of multicuspid teeth is the existence of multiple adaptive pathways leading to them, as suggested by their different uses in these lineages. Another is that the addition of cusps required only minor changes in genetic pathways regulating tooth development. Here we provide support for the latter hypothesis by demonstrating that manipulation of the levels of Fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) or Bone morphogenetic protein (Bmp) signaling produces bicuspid teeth in the zebrafish (Danio rerio), a species lacking multicuspid teeth in its ancestry. The generality of these results for teleosts is suggested by the conversion of unicuspid pharyngeal teeth into bicuspid teeth by similar manipulations of the Mexican Tetra (Astyanax mexicanus). That these manipulations also produced supernumerary teeth in both species supports previous suggestions of similarities in the molecular control of tooth and cusp number. We conclude that despite their apparent complexity, the evolutionary origin of multicuspid teeth is positively constrained, likely requiring only slight modifications of a pre-existing mechanism for patterning the number and spacing of individual teeth. PMID:25098636

  15. The glucocorticoid stress response is attenuated but unrelated to reproductive investment during parental care in a teleost fish.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Constance M; Yick, Claire Y; Gilmour, Kathleen M; Van Der Kraak, Glen; Cooke, Steven J

    2011-01-15

    We investigated whether circulating glucocorticoids and androgens are correlated with reproductive investment in smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu), a teleost fish with sole paternal care. Circulating cortisol and androgens prior to and 25 min following a standardized 3 min emersion stressor were quantified for non-reproductive and parental fish across the parental care period. To experimentally investigate the influence of reproductive investment on endocrine parameters, we manipulated brood size (reduced, enlarged, sham-treated, or unmanipulated) 24h prior to sampling parental fish. We predicted that fish guarding offspring would exhibit increased androgens and baseline cortisol levels, and an attenuated cortisol response to the stressor when compared with non-reproductive individuals. We further predicted that these effects would scale with reproductive investment. As predicted, parental care-providing fish exhibited lower post-stress plasma cortisol concentrations than non-reproductive fish. This difference was strongest early during parental care. However, no differences in baseline or post-stress cortisol concentrations were detected among parents guarding offspring with varying brood sizes. There was, however, a trend for parental fish to exhibit an increased cortisol response following brood manipulation, regardless of the direction of change in brood size, a response that likely reflected disturbance. No differences were found in baseline cortisol concentrations. Circulating androgens were found to be highest during early parental care, and no differences were found among parents guarding manipulated broods. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that the endocrine stress response is affected by reproductive status, but the response in this model species does not appear to be scaled according to reproductive investment as predicted by life-history theory.

  16. Are coping styles consistent in the teleost fish Sparus aurata through sexual maturation and sex reversal?

    PubMed

    Castanheira, Maria Filipa; Martínez Páramo, Sonia; Figueiredo, F; Cerqueira, Marco; Millot, Sandie; Oliveira, Catarina C V; Martins, Catarina I M; Conceição, Luís E C

    2016-10-01

    Individual differences in behaviour and physiological responses to stress are associated with evolutionary adaptive variation and thus raw material for evolution. In farmed animals, the interest in consistent trait associations, i.e. coping styles, has increased dramatically over the last years. However, one of limitations of the available knowledge, regarding the temporal consistency, is that it refers always to short-term consistency (usually few weeks). The present study used an escape response during a net restraining test, previously shown to be an indicative of coping styles in seabream, to investigate long-term consistency of coping styles both over time and during different life history stages. Results showed both short-term (14 days) consistency and long-term (8 months) consistency of escape response. However, we did not found consistency in the same behaviour after sexual maturation when the restraining test was repeated 16, 22 and 23 months after the first test was performed. In conclusion, this study showed consistent behaviour traits in seabream when juveniles, and a loss of this behavioural traits when adults. Therefore, these results underline that adding a life story approach to data interpretation as an essential step forward towards coping styles foreground. Furthermore, a fine-tuning of aquaculture rearing strategies to adapt to different coping strategies may need to be adjusted differently at early stages of development and adults to improve the welfare of farmed fish.

  17. Phylogeny of immunoglobulin structure and function. VII. Monomeric and tetrameric immunoglobulins of the margate, a marine teleost fish.

    PubMed Central

    Clem, L W; McLean, W E

    1975-01-01

    The margate, a marine teleost fish, was found to contain both high (16S) and low (7S) molecular weight antibodies 17 days after initial immunization. The 16S antibodies were detectable with both haemagglutination and antigen-binding assays, whereas the 7S antibodies were only detected by the latter technique. Margate 16S (molecular weight approximately 700,000) and 7S (molecular weight approximately 175,000) immunoglobulins were isolated and shown to be antigenically indistinguishable. They therefore appear to belong to the same immunoglobulin class and to have a tetramer--monomer relationship. Experiments with stored sera indicated the 7S protein is probably not an in vitro degradation product of the 16S molecule. Images FIG. 3 FIG. 4 PMID:1184121

  18. A role for specific collagen motifs during wound healing and inflammatory response of fibroblasts in the teleost fish gilthead seabream.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Briceño, Patricia; Bihan, Dominique; Nilges, Michael; Hamaia, Samir; Meseguer, José; García-Ayala, Alfonsa; Farndale, Richard W; Mulero, Victoriano

    2011-03-01

    Specific sites and sequences in collagen to which cells can attach, either directly or through protein intermediaries, were identified using Toolkits of 63-amino acid triple-helical peptides and specific shorter GXX'GEX″ motifs, which have different intrinsic affinity for integrins that mediate cell adhesion and migration. We have previously reported that collagen type I (COL-I) was able to prime in vitro the respiratory burst and induce a specific set of immune- and extracellular matrix-related molecules in phagocytes of the teleost fish gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata L.). It was also suggested that COL-I would provide an intermediate signal during the early inflammatory response in gilthead seabream. Since fibroblasts are highly involved in the initiation of wound repair and regeneration processes, in the present study SAF-1 cells (gilthead seabream fibroblasts) were used to identify the binding motifs in collagen by end-point and real-time cell adhesion assays using the collagen peptides and Toolkits. We identified the collagen motifs involved in the early magnesium-dependent adhesion of these cells. Furthermore, we found that peptides containing the GFOGER and GLOGEN motifs (where O is hydroxyproline) present high affinity for SAF-1 adhesion, expressed as both cell number and surface covering, while in cell suspensions, these motifs were also able to induce the expression of the genes encoding the proinflammatory molecules interleukin-1β and cyclooxygenase-2. These data suggest that specific collagen motifs are involved in the regulation of the inflammatory and healing responses of teleost fish.

  19. Water homeostasis in the fish oocyte: new insights into the role and molecular regulation of a teleost-specific aquaporin.

    PubMed

    Cerdà, J; Zapater, C; Chauvigné, F; Finn, R N

    2013-02-01

    The discovery of the role of a teleost-specific aquaporin (Aqp1ab) during the process of oocyte hydration in marine fish producing pelagic (floating) eggs, recently confirmed by molecular approaches, has revealed that this mechanism is more sophisticated than initially thought. Recent phylogenetic and genomic studies suggest that Aqp1ab likely evolved by tandem duplication from a common ancestor and further neofunctionalized in oocytes for water transport. Investigations into the regulation of Aqp1ab during oogenesis indicate that the mRNA and protein product are highly accumulated during early oocyte growth, possibly through the transcriptional activation of the aqp1ab promoter by the classical nuclear progesterone receptor and perhaps by Sry-related high mobility group [HMG]-box (Sox) transcription factors. During oocyte growth and maturation, Aqp1ab intracellular trafficking may be regulated by phosphorylation and/or dephosphorylation of specific C-terminal residues in Aqp1ab, as well as by signal-mediated sorting processes. These mechanisms possibly regulate the temporal insertion of Aqp1ab into the oocyte plasma membrane during oocyte hydration, although the intracellular signaling pathways involved are yet unknown. Interestingly, in some freshwater species that spawn partially hydrated eggs, high accumulation of transcripts encoding functional Aqp1ab channels have also been found in the ovary. These findings suggest that the Aqp1ab-mediated mechanism for oocyte hydration is likely conserved in teleosts. The tight regulation of Aqp1ab during oogenesis, at both the transcriptional and posttranslational levels, highlights the essential physiological role of this water channel and opens new research avenues for understanding the molecular basis of egg formation in fish.

  20. Fractional rate of change of swim-bladder volume is reliably related to absolute depth during vertical displacements in teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Graham K; Holbrook, Robert Iain; de Perera, Theresa Burt

    2010-09-06

    Fish must orient in three dimensions as they navigate through space, but it is unknown whether they are assisted by a sense of depth. In principle, depth can be estimated directly from hydrostatic pressure, but although teleost fish are exquisitely sensitive to changes in pressure, they appear unable to measure absolute pressure. Teleosts sense changes in pressure via changes in the volume of their gas-filled swim-bladder, but because the amount of gas it contains is varied to regulate buoyancy, this cannot act as a long-term steady reference for inferring absolute pressure. In consequence, it is generally thought that teleosts are unable to sense depth using hydrostatic pressure. Here, we overturn this received wisdom by showing from a theoretical physical perspective that absolute depth could be estimated during fast, steady vertical displacements by combining a measurement of vertical speed with a measurement of the fractional rate of change of swim-bladder volume. This mechanism works even if the amount of gas in the swim-bladder varies, provided that this variation occurs over much longer time scales than changes in volume during displacements. There is therefore no a priori physical justification for assuming that teleost fish cannot sense absolute depth by using hydrostatic pressure cues.

  1. Characterization and anions inhibition studies of an α-carbonic anhydrase from the teleost fish Dicentrarchus labrax.

    PubMed

    Ekinci, Deniz; Ceyhun, Saltuk Buğrahan; Sentürk, Murat; Erdem, Deryanur; Küfrevioğlu, Omer İrfan; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2011-01-15

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA; EC 4.2.1.1) was purified from the gill of the teleost fish Dicentrarchus labrax (European seabass). The purification procedure consisted of a single step affinity chromatography on Sepharose 4B-tyrosine-sulfanilamide. The enzyme was purified 84.9-fold with a yield of 58%, and a specific activity of 838.9 U/mg proteins. It has an optimum pH at 8.0; an optimum temperature at 10°C. The kinetic parameters of this enzyme were determined for its esterase activity, with 4-nitrophenyl acetate (NPA) as substrate. The following anions, H₂NSO₃⁻, I⁻, SCN⁻, NO₃⁻, NO₂⁻, N₃⁻, Br⁻, Cl⁻, SO₄²⁻, and F⁻ showed inhibitory effects on the enzyme. Sulfamic acid, iodide, and thiocyanate exhibited the strongest inhibitory action, in the micromolar range (K(i)s of 87-187 μM). NO₃⁻, NO₂⁻ and N₃⁻ were moderate inhibitors, whereas other anions showed only weak actions. All tested anions inhibited the enzyme in a competitive manner. Our findings indicate that these anions inhibit the fish enzyme in a similar manner to other α-CAs from mammals investigated earlier, but the susceptibility to various anions differs significantly between the fish and mammalian CAs.

  2. The Astonishing Diversity of Ig Classes and B Cell Repertoires in Teleost Fish

    PubMed Central

    Fillatreau, Simon; Six, Adrien; Magadan, Susanna; Castro, Rosario; Sunyer, J. Oriol; Boudinot, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    With lymphoid tissue anatomy different than mammals, and diverse adaptations to all aquatic environments, fish constitute a fascinating group of vertebrate to study the biology of B cell repertoires in a comparative perspective. Fish B lymphocytes express immunoglobulin (Ig) on their surface and secrete antigen-specific antibodies in response to immune challenges. Three antibody classes have been identified in fish, namely IgM, IgD, and IgT, while IgG, IgA, and IgE are absent. IgM and IgD have been found in all fish species analyzed, and thus seem to be primordial antibody classes. IgM and IgD are normally co-expressed from the same mRNA through alternative splicing, as in mammals. Tetrameric IgM is the main antibody class found in serum. Some species of fish also have IgT, which seems to exist only in fish and is specialized in mucosal immunity. IgM/IgD and IgT are expressed by two different sub-populations of B cells. The tools available to investigate B cell responses at the cellular level in fish are limited, but the progress of fish genomics has started to unravel a rich diversity of IgH and immunoglobulin light chain locus organization, which might be related to the succession of genome remodelings that occurred during fish evolution. Moreover, the development of deep sequencing techniques has allowed the investigation of the global features of the expressed fish B cell repertoires in zebrafish and rainbow trout, in steady state or after infection. This review provides a description of the organization of fish Ig loci, with a particular emphasis on their heterogeneity between species, and presents recent data on the structure of the expressed Ig repertoire in healthy and infected fish. PMID:23408183

  3. Seasonal carryover effects following the administration of cortisol to a wild teleost fish.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Constance M; Gilmour, Kathleen M; Arlinghaus, Robert; Hasler, Caleb T; Philipp, David P; Cooke, Steven J

    2010-01-01

    Stress can have sublethal effects that are manifested either immediately or at spatial or temporal scales that are removed from the stress event (i.e., carryover effects). We tested whether a short-term elevation of plasma cortisol would result in seasonal carryover effects in wild largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides. Using exogenous hormone implants, we raised circulating cortisol concentrations in a group of wild fish for approximately 5 d in October 2007. We then compared activity (velocity, distance traveled) of cortisol-treated animals with that of sham-treated and control animals throughout the winter using an automated acoustic telemetry array. Immediately following treatment, the cortisol-treated fish showed increased activity relative to controls. However, this difference disappeared following the cessation of the elevation of circulating cortisol. During the winter of 2007 to 2008, the lake experienced a nearly complete winterkill event, providing insight into how a transient stress response can influence the response of wild animals to subsequent challenges. Most fish carrying acoustic transmitters succumbed during this winterkill event, but cortisol-treated fish died earlier than fish in other groups and showed a decrease in activity relative to controls and sham-treated fish before mortality. This study provides preliminary evidence of seasonal carryover effects in wild fish and yields insight into the ecological consequences of stress across broad temporal scales.

  4. Leukocyte proliferation mediated by protein kinase C in the marine teleost fish, Sciaenops ocellatus.

    PubMed

    Burnett, K G; Schwarz, L K

    1994-01-01

    A major route of signal transduction in mammalian lymphocytes is the phosphatidyl inositol (PI) pathway. As previously demonstrated in the channel catfish, and confirmed in the present work with the red drum, modulators of the PI pathway such as phorbol ester and calcium ionophore acted synergistically to stimulate proliferation of teleost peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL). Red drum PBL also proliferated strongly in response to phorbol ester alone, at doses which were not mitogenic for catfish PBL. Cell depletion studies suggested that macrophage-derived cytokines probably played a role in supporting the mitogenic response to phorbol ester alone. Dose titration studies with a panel of kinase inhibitors suggested that mitogenic and synergistic doses of phorbol ester primarily targeted an enzyme activity similar to protein kinase C (PKC). However, in the same inhibitor studies, the target enzyme was insensitive to staurosporine, suggesting the involvement of an unusual form of PKC. Similarly, cell proliferation stimulated by phorbol ester was suppressed, but not eliminated by a calcium channel blocker Verapamil. Thus, while the synergistic action of phorbol ester and calcium ionophore appeared to be mediated by a PI pathway, these studies have suggested that PKC isoforms and membrane ion pumps unique to the lower vertebrates may participate in regulation of the cell cycle.

  5. Lipid droplet biology and evolution illuminated by the characterization of a novel perilipin in teleost fish

    PubMed Central

    Granneman, James G; Kimler, Vickie A; Zhang, Huamei; Ye, Xiangqun; Luo, Xixia; Postlethwait, John H; Thummel, Ryan

    2017-01-01

    Perilipin (PLIN) proteins constitute an ancient family important in lipid droplet (LD) formation and triglyceride metabolism. We identified an additional PLIN clade (plin6) that is unique to teleosts and can be traced to the two whole genome duplications that occurred early in vertebrate evolution. Plin6 is highly expressed in skin xanthophores, which mediate red/yellow pigmentation and trafficking, but not in tissues associated with lipid metabolism. Biochemical and immunochemical analyses demonstrate that zebrafish Plin6 protein targets the surface of pigment-containing carotenoid droplets (CD). Protein kinase A (PKA) activation, which mediates CD dispersion in xanthophores, phosphorylates Plin6 on conserved residues. Knockout of plin6 in zebrafish severely impairs the ability of CD to concentrate carotenoids and prevents tight clustering of CD within carotenoid bodies. Ultrastructural and functional analyses indicate that LD and CD are homologous structures, and that Plin6 was functionalized early in vertebrate evolution for concentrating and trafficking pigment. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21771.001 PMID:28244868

  6. Immunochemical detection of parathyroid hormone-related protein in the saccus vasculosus of a teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Devlin, A J; Danks, J A; Faulkner, M K; Power, D M; Canario, A V; Martin, T J; Ingleton, P M

    1996-01-01

    Using antisera to regions of human parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) the saccus vasculosus (SV) of the sea bream (Sparus aurata) has been shown to contain immunoreactive PTHrP. By immunohistochemistry (IHC) the epithelial coronet cells in fixed and wax-embedded SV tissue reacted with antisera to the prepro region of human PTHrP (-13 to +2), the N-terminus PTHrP (1-16), and the midmolecule PTHrP (50-69). Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of saccus extracts and incubation media contained two major proteins of 14.3 and 15 kDa. By Western blotting these two proteins both reacted with the three antisera used for IHC, suggesting that they are immunochemically similar to human PTHrP (1-84). Ultrastructurally the coronet cells of Sparus saccus vasculosus resembled coronet cells described for other teleosts, with an abundant smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER) which was more highly organized in the coronets. IHC at EM level showed reaction mainly with the membranes of the SER. These results suggest that S. aurata saccus vasculosus may produce a PTHrP-like molecule similar to human PTHrP.

  7. Damage and partitioned mortality of teleosts discarded from two Australian penaeid fishing gears.

    PubMed

    Uhlmann, Sebastian S; Broadhurst, Matt K

    2007-07-16

    Six field experiments were perfromed to (1) quantify the scale loss and partitioned (immediate and short-term) mortality of key teleosts discarded from a penaeid seiner and trawler operating in 2 estuaries in southeastern Australia, and (2) assess the utility of modified operational and/or onboard handling procedures for maximising survival. For both gears, several non-target species were caught, handled and discarded according to 2 general categories of treatment ('mild' and 'extreme') representing the plausible limits of severity of commercial operations. The mild treatments involved the shortest conventional deployments of the gears followed by the immediate sorting of catches in water-filled trays, while the extreme treatments comprised the longest conventional deployments and sorting in dry trays. Discards were examined for immediate mortalities and scale loss before sorting onboard, while live individuals of key species, along with appropriate numbers of controls, were released into sea cages and monitored for mortalities up to 5 d. For both gears, there was a trend of higher percentages of immediate mortalities in the extreme treatments, and more scale loss from dead than live seined and trawled silver biddy Gerres subfasciatus, seined tarwhine Rhabdosargus sarba and trawled yellowfin bream Acanthopagrus australis. Despite considerable interspecific variabilities, few intraspecific differences were detected between treatments for the short-term mortalities of live discards; however, for all species, these deaths were greater than those incurred by the controls (most of which survived). The partitioned mortality estimates were combined to provide a range of total mortalities for seined (95.97 and 99.07%, respectively) and trawled (71.74 and 97.64%) G. subfasciatus, seined R. sarba (23.95 and 100%) and trawled southern herring Herklotsichthys castelnaui (100%) and A. australis (3.40 and 35.01%). Because most deaths occurred irrespective of onboard handling

  8. Physiological and behavioral consequences of long-term artificial selection for vulnerability to recreational angling in a teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Steven J; Suski, Cory D; Ostrand, Kenneth G; Wahl, David H; Philipp, David P

    2007-01-01

    Few studies have examined the physiological and behavioral consequences of fisheries-induced selection. We evaluated how four generations of artificial truncation selection for vulnerability to recreational angling (i.e., stocks selected for high and low vulnerability [HVF and LVF, respectively]) affected cardiovascular physiology and parental care behavior in the teleost fish largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides. Where possible, we compared artificially selected fish to control fish (CF) collected from the wild. Although, compared to control fish, resting cardiac activity was approximately 18% lower for LVF and approximately 20% higher for HVF, maximal values did not vary among treatments. As a result, the HVF had less cardiac scope than either LVF or CF. Recovery rates after exercise were similar for HVF and CF but slower for LVF. When engaged in parental care activities, nesting male HVF were captured more easily than male LVF. During parental care, HVF also had higher turning rates and pectoral and caudal fin beat rates, increased vigilance against predators, and higher in situ swimming speeds. Energetics simulations indicated that to achieve the same level of growth, the disparity in metabolic rates would require HVF to consume approximately 40% more food than LVF. Selection for angling vulnerability resulted in clear differences in physiological and energetic attributes. Not only is vulnerability to angling a heritable trait, but high vulnerability covaries with factors including higher metabolic rates, reduced metabolic scope, and increased parental care activity. Despite these energetically costly differences, HVF and LVF of the same age were of similar size, suggesting that heightened food consumption in HVF compensated for added costs in experimental ponds. Ultimately, angling vulnerability appears to be a complex interaction of numerous factors leading to selection for very different phenotypes. If HVF are selectively harvested from a population, the

  9. Is there a trade-off between peak performance and performance breadth across temperatures for aerobic scope in teleost fishes?

    PubMed Central

    Lindström, Jan; Killen, Shaun S.

    2016-01-01

    The physiology and behaviour of ectotherms are strongly influenced by environmental temperature. A general hypothesis is that for performance traits, such as those related to growth, metabolism or locomotion, species face a trade-off between being a thermal specialist or a thermal generalist, implying a negative correlation between peak performance and performance breadth across a range of temperatures. Focusing on teleost fishes, we performed a phylogenetically informed comparative analysis of the relationship between performance peak and breadth for aerobic scope (AS), which represents whole-animal capacity available to carry out simultaneous oxygen-demanding processes (e.g. growth, locomotion, reproduction) above maintenance. Literature data for 28 species indicate that peak aerobic capacity is not linked to thermal performance breadth and that other physiological factors affecting thermal tolerance may prevent such a trade-off from emerging. The results therefore suggest that functional links between peak and thermal breadth for AS may not constrain evolutionary responses to environmental changes such as climate warming. PMID:27677812

  10. Explosive morphological diversification of spiny-finned teleost fishes in the aftermath of the end-Cretaceous extinction

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Matt

    2010-01-01

    The spiny-finned teleost fishes (Acanthomorpha) include nearly one-third of all living vertebrate species and assume a bewildering array of bodyplans, but the macroevolutionary assembly of modern acanthomorph biodiversity remains largely unexplored. Here, I reconstruct the trajectory of morphological diversification in this major radiation from its first appearance in the Late Cretaceous to the Miocene using a geometric morphometric database comprising more than 600 extinct species known from complete body fossils. The anatomical diversity (disparity) of acanthomorphs is low throughout the Cretaceous, increases sharply and significantly in the wake of the Cretaceous–Palaeogene (K–P) extinction, and shows little change throughout subsequent Cenozoic intervals. This pattern of morphological diversification appears robust to two potential biasing factors: the ‘Lagerstätten effect’, and the non-random segregation of rare and common taxa along phenotypic axes. Dissecting the trajectory of acanthomorph radiation along phylogenetic lines reveals that the abrupt post-extinction increase in disparity is driven largely by the proliferation of trophically diverse modern groups within Percomorpha, a spiny-fin subclade containing more than 15 000 living species and identified as showing a substantially elevated diversification rate relative to background vertebrate levels. A major component of the Palaeogene acanthomorph radiation reflects colonization of morphospace previously occupied by non-acanthomorph victims of the K–P. However, other aspects of morphological diversification cannot be explained by this simple ecological release model, suggesting that multiple factors contributed to the prolific anatomical radiation of acanthomorphs. PMID:20133356

  11. The Müller-Lyer illusion in the teleost fish Xenotoca eiseni.

    PubMed

    Sovrano, Valeria Anna; da Pos, Osvaldo; Albertazzi, Liliana

    2016-01-01

    In the Müller-Lyer illusion, human subjects usually see a line with two inducers at its ends facing outwards as longer than an identical line with inducers at its ends facing inwards. We investigate the tendency for fish to perceive, in suitable conditions, line length according to the Müller-Lyer illusion. Redtail splitfins (Xenotoca eiseni, family Goodeidae) were trained to discriminate between two lines of different length. After reaching the learning criterion, the fish performed test trials, in which they faced two lines (black or red) of identical length, differing only in the context in terms of arrangement of the inducers, which were positioned at the ends of the line, either inward, outward, or perpendicular. Fish chose the stimulus that appear to humans as either longer or shorter, in accordance with the prediction of the Müller-Lyer illusion, consistently with the condition of the training. These results show that redtail splitfins tend to be subject to this particular illusion. The results of the study are discussed with reference to similar studies concerning the same illusion as recently observed in fish. Contrasting results are presented. The significance of the results in light of their possible evolutionary implications is also discussed.

  12. Developmental biotechnology for aquaculture, with special reference to surrogate production in teleost fishes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaha, Etsuro; Saito, Taiju; Goto-Kazeto, Rie; Arai, Katsutoshi

    2007-07-01

    This review introduces surrogate production as a new technique for fish-seed production in aquaculture. Surrogate production in fish is a technique used to obtain the gametes of a certain genotype through the gonad of another genotype. It is achieved by inducing germ-line chimerism between different species during early development. Primordial germ cells (PGCs) are the key material of this technique to induce germ-line chimera. In several species, it has been reported that PGCs differentiated from the blastomeres inherited some maternally supplied mRNA located in the terminal regions of the early cleavage furrows. PGCs from donor species (or strains) are isolated and transplanted into host species to induce the germ-line chimera. Four methods for inducing germ-line chimera are described: blastomere transplantation, blastoderm-graft transplantation, transplantation of PGC from the genital ridge, and transplantation visualised PGC with GFP fluorescence. Several problems preventing the successful induction of germ-line chimera in various fish species are discussed. Surrogate production, however, opens the possibility of efficient fish-seed production and effective breeding and transfer of biodiversity to an aquaculture strain. Conservation and efficient utilisation of genetic resources will be achieved through surrogate production combined with the cryopreservation of PGCs.

  13. A teleost complement factor Ba possesses antimicrobial activity and inhibits bacterial infection in fish.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue-Peng; Sun, Li

    2017-01-24

    Complement factor B (Bf) is a component of the complement system. Following activation of the alternative pathway of the complement system, factor B is cleaved into Ba and Bb fragments. In fish, the Bf of rainbow trout is known to act as a C3 convertase, but the function of the Ba fragment is essentially unknown. In this study, we examined the expression patterns of tongue sole Cynoglossus semilaevis Bf (named CsBf) and the biological activity of the Ba fragment of CsBf (named CsBa). CsBf possesses the conserved domains of Bf and shares 39.9%-56.4% sequence identities with other fish Bf. CsBf expression was high in liver, muscle, and heart, and low in intestine, blood, and kidney. Bacterial infection significantly induced CsBf expression in kidney, spleen, and liver in a time-dependent manner. Recombinant CsBa (rCsBa) exhibited apparent binding capacities to bacteria and tongue sole peripheral blood leukocytes, and binding of rCsBa to bacteria inhibited bacterial growth. When overexpressed in tongue sole, CsBa significantly reduced bacterial dissemination in fish tissues. Together these results indicate for the first time that a fish Ba possesses antibacterial effect as well as immune cell-binding capacity, and thus probably plays a role in host immune defense against bacterial infection.

  14. Skin and scales of teleost fish: Simple structure but high performance and multiple functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernerey, Franck J.; Barthelat, Francois

    2014-08-01

    Natural and man-made structural materials perform similar functions such as structural support or protection. Therefore they rely on the same types of properties: strength, robustness, lightweight. Nature can therefore provide a significant source of inspiration for new and alternative engineering designs. We report here some results regarding a very common, yet largely unknown, type of biological material: fish skin. Within a thin, flexible and lightweight layer, fish skins display a variety of strain stiffening and stabilizing mechanisms which promote multiple functions such as protection, robustness and swimming efficiency. We particularly discuss four important features pertaining to scaled skins: (a) a strongly elastic tensile behavior that is independent from the presence of rigid scales, (b) a compressive response that prevents buckling and wrinkling instabilities, which are usually predominant for thin membranes, (c) a bending response that displays nonlinear stiffening mechanisms arising from geometric constraints between neighboring scales and (d) a robust structure that preserves the above characteristics upon the loss or damage of structural elements. These important properties make fish skin an attractive model for the development of very thin and flexible armors and protective layers, especially when combined with the high penetration resistance of individual scales. Scaled structures inspired by fish skin could find applications in ultra-light and flexible armor systems, flexible electronics or the design of smart and adaptive morphing structures for aerospace vehicles.

  15. Activities of enzymes of fat and ketone-body metabolism and effects of starvation on blood concentrations of glucose and fat fuels in teleost and elasmobranch fish

    PubMed Central

    Zammit, Victor A.; Newsholme, Eric A.

    1979-01-01

    1. Activities of 3-oxo acid CoA-transferase and carnitine palmitoyltransferase together with tri- and di-acylglycerol lipase were present in red and heart muscles of the teleost fish. However, d-3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase activity was not detectable. These results suggest that the heart and red muscles of the teleosts should be able to utilize the fat fuels triacylglycerol, fatty acids or acetoacetate, but not hydroxybutyrate. The muscles from the elasmobranchs differed in that d-3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase and 3-oxo acid CoA-transferase activities were present, but carnitine palmitoyltransferase activity was not detectable. This suggests that ketone bodies are the most important fat fuels in elasmobranchs. 2. The concentrations of acetoacetate, 3-hydroxybutyrate, glycerol, non-esterified fatty acids and triacylglycerols were measured in blood or plasma of several species of fish (teleosts and elasmobranchs) in the fed state. Teleosts have a 10-fold higher concentration of plasma non-esterified fatty acids, but a lower blood concentration of ketone bodies; both acetoacetate and 3-hydroxybutyrate are present in blood of elasmobranchs, whereas 3-hydroxybutyrate is absent from that of the teleosts. 3. The effects of starvation (up to 150 days) on the concentrations of blood metabolites were studied in a teleost (bass) and an elasmobranch (dogfish). In the bass there was a 60% decrease in blood glucose after 100 and 150 days starvation. In dogfish there was a large increase in the concentration of ketone bodies, whereas in bass the concentration of acetoacetate (the only ketone body present) remained low (<0.04mm) throughout the period of starvation. The concentration of plasma non-esterified fatty acids increased in bass, but decreased in dogfish. These changes are consistent with the predictions based on the enzyme-activity data. 4. Starvation did not change the activities of ketone-body-utilizing enzymes or that of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in heart

  16. Exploring Androgen-Regulated Pathways in Teleost Fish Using Transcriptomics and Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Martyniuk, Christopher J.; Denslow, Nancy D.

    2012-01-01

    In the environment, there are aquatic pollutants that disrupt androgen signaling in fish. Laboratory and field-based experiments have utilized omics technologies to characterize the molecular mechanisms underlying androgen-receptor agonism/antagonism. Transcriptomics and proteomics studies with 17β-trenbolone, a growth-promoting pharmaceutical found in water systems surrounding cattle feed lots, and androgens such as 17α-methyltestosterone and 17α-methyldihydrotestosterone, have been conducted in ovary and liver of fish that include the fathead minnow (FHM) (Pimephales promelas), common carp (Cyprinus carpio), Qurt medaka (Oryzias latipes), and zebrafish (Danio rerio). In this mini-review, we survey recent omics studies in fish and reveal that, despite the diversity of species and tissues examined, there are common cellular responses that are observed with waterborne androgenic treatments. Recurring themes in gene ontology include apoptosis, transport and oxidation of lipids, synthesis and transport of hormones, immune response, protein metabolism, and cell proliferation. However, we also discuss other mechanisms other than androgen receptor (AR) activation, such as responses to toxicant stress, estrogen receptor agonism, aromatization of androgens into estrogens, and inhibitory feedback mechanisms by high levels of androgens that may also explain molecular responses in fish. To further explore androgen-responsive protein networks, a sub-network enrichment analysis was performed on protein data collected from the livers of female FHMs exposed to 17β-trenbolone. We construct a putative AR-regulated protein/cell process network in the liver that includes B-lymphocyte differentiation, xenobiotic clearance, low-density lipoprotein oxidation, proliferation of smooth muscle cells, and permeability of blood vessels. We demonstrate that construction of protein networks can offer insight into cell processes that are potentially regulated by androgens. PMID:22596056

  17. B Cell-Activating Factor Regulates Different Aspects of B Cell Functionality and Is Produced by a Subset of Splenic B Cells in Teleost Fish

    PubMed Central

    Tafalla, Carolina; González, Lucia; Castro, Rosario; Granja, Aitor G.

    2017-01-01

    In mammals, B cell functionality is greatly influenced by cytokines released by innate cells, such as macrophages or dendritic cells, upon the early recognition of common pathogen patterns through invariant receptors. B cell-activating factor (BAFF) is one of these innate B cell-helper signals and plays a key role in the survival and differentiation of B cells. Although, evolutionarily, teleost fish constitute the first animal group in which adaptive immunity based on Ig receptors is present, fish still rely greatly on innate responses. In this context, we hypothesized that BAFF would play a key role in the control of B cell responses in fish. Supporting this, our results show that teleost BAFF recapitulates mammalian BAFF stimulating actions on B cells, upregulating the expression of membrane MHC II, improving the survival of fish naïve B cells and antibody-secreting cells, and increasing the secretion of IgM. Surprisingly, we also demonstrate that BAFF is not only produced in fish by myeloid cells but is also produced by a subset of splenic B cells. Thus, if this B cell-produced BAFF proves to be actively regulating this same B cell subset, our findings point to an ancient mechanism to control B cell differentiation and survival in lower vertebrates, which has been silenced in mammals in physiological conditions, but reemerges under pathological conditions, such as B cell lymphomas and autoimmune diseases. PMID:28360916

  18. Some aspects of the taxonomy and biology of adult spirurine nematodes parasitic in fishes: a review.

    PubMed

    Moravec, Frantisek

    2007-11-01

    About 300 species belonging to four superfamilies (Gnathostomatoidea, Habronematoidea, Physalopteroidea and Thelazioidea) of the nematode suborder Spirurina are known as the adult parasites of freshwater, brackish-water and marine fishes. They are placed in four families, of which the Gnathostomatidae, including Echinocephalus with a few species and the monotypic Metaleptus, are parasites of elasmobranchs, whereas Ancyracanthus contains one species in teleosts; the Physalopteridae is represented in fish by four genera, Bulbocephalus, Heliconema, Paraleptus and Proleptus, each with several species in both elasmobranchs and teleosts. The majority of fish spirurines belongs to the Rhabdochonidae, which includes 10 genera (Beaninema, Fellicola, Hepatinema, Heptochona, Johnstonmawsonia, Megachona, Pancreatonema, Prosungulonema, Rhabdochona and Vasorhabdochona) of species parasitizing mainly teleosts, rarely elasmobranchs, and the Cystidicolidae with about 23 genera (Ascarophis, Caballeronema, Capillospirura, Comephoronema, Crenatobronema, Cristitectus, Ctenascarophis, Cyclozone, Cystidicola, Cystidicoloides, Johnstonmawsonoides, Metabronema, Moravecnema, Neoascarophis, Parascarophis, Prospinitectus, Pseudascarophis, Pseudoproleptus, Salvelinema, Similascarophis, Spinitectoides, Spinitectus, Sterliadochona), with many species parasitic in teleosts only. Because of difficulties in studying fish spirurines, associated with their morphological and biological peculiarities, most species of these parasites are poorly known. It is apparent that their present classification system does not reflect phylogenetic relationships and a taxonomic revision of this nematode group, based on detailed morphological (including SEM and TEM), life history and molecular studies of individual species, is quite necessary. In Cystidicolidae, several genera have been based on details in the cephalic structures visible only with the aid of SEM, but it will be evident whether or not these tiny

  19. The co-existence of two growth hormone receptors in teleost fish and their differential signal transduction, tissue distribution and hormonal regulation of expression in seabream.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Baowei; Huang, Xigui; Chan, Chi Bun; Zhang, Li; Wang, Deshou; Cheng, Christopher H K

    2006-02-01

    Two genomic contigs of putative growth hormone receptors (GHRs) were identified in fugu and zebrafish genomes by in silico analysis, suggesting the presence of two GHR subtypes in a single teleost species. We have tested this hypothesis by cloning the full-length cDNA sequence of a second GHR subtype from the black seabream in which the first GHR subtype had been previously reported by us. In addition, we had also cloned the sequences of both GHR subtypes from two other fish species, namely the Southern catfish and the Nile tilapia. Phylogenetic analysis of known GHR sequences from various vertebrates revealed that fish GHRs cluster into two distinct clades, viz. GHR1 and GHR2. One clade (GHR1), containing 6 to 7 extracellular cysteine residues, is structurally more akin to the non-teleost GHRs. The other clade (GHR2), containing only 4 to 5 extracellular cysteine residues, is unique to teleosts and is structurally more divergent from the non-teleost GHRs. In addition, we had examined the biological activities of both GHR subtypes from seabream using a number of reporter transcription assays in cultured eukaryotic cells and demonstrated that both of them were able to activate the Spi 2.1 and beta-casein promoters upon receptor stimulation in a ligand specific manner. In contrast, only GHR1 but not GHR2 in seabream could trigger the c-fos promoter activity, indicating that the two GHR subtypes possess some differences in their signal transduction mechanisms. Also, the expression of GHR2 is significantly higher than GHR1 in many tissues of the seabream including the gonad, kidney, muscle, pituitary and spleen. In vivo hormone treatment data indicated that cortisol upregulated hepatic GHR1 expression in seabream but not GHR2, whereas testosterone decreased hepatic GHR2 expression but not GHR1. On the other hand, hepatic expression of both GHR1 and GHR2 in seabream was decreased by estradiol treatment.

  20. Effects of methylphenidate on responses to novelty in a teleost fish (Poecilia reticulata).

    PubMed

    De Serrano, Alex R; Fong, Charmaine; Rodd, F Helen

    2016-04-01

    Novelty seeking, the willingness to explore novel stimuli, can have important fitness consequences. The neurotransmitter dopamine has been linked to this behavior in studies on lab animals including rodents and fish; however, few studies have investigated this association in individuals from natural populations. Trinidadian guppies (Poecilia reticulata) show variation in willingness to explore novel objects and environments, and females tend to show a preference for novel males. In this study, we asked whether we could enhance interest in several types of novel stimuli in lab-reared, female Trinidadian guppies by administering methylphenidate hydrochloride, a stimulant known to increase dopamine levels. We scored their responses to three different types of novelty: novel environments, objects, and males. Treated females showed enhanced exploratory behavior: they traversed relatively more inner squares of the novel environment (open-field test); they spent more time inspecting a novel object; and they showed greater interest in the second male guppy to which they were exposed than control fish. We also found a positive association between our metrics of exploration in the open field and novel object tests. Our other assays suggest that these differences were not the result of increased activity or reduced levels of stress. Therefore, our results suggest that dopamine plays a role in the responsiveness of guppies to novelty; this opens the door to studies of behavioral mechanisms in natural populations.

  1. Caspase-1 and IL-1β processing in a teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Reis, Marta I R; do Vale, Ana; Pereira, Pedro J B; Azevedo, Jorge E; Dos Santos, Nuno M S

    2012-01-01

    Interleukine-1β (IL-1β) is the most studied pro-inflammatory cytokine, playing a central role in the generation of systemic and local responses to infection, injury, and immunological challenges. In mammals, IL-1β is synthesized as an inactive 31 kDa precursor that is cleaved by caspase-1 generating a 17.5 kDa secreted active mature form. The caspase-1 cleavage site strictly conserved in all mammalian IL-1β sequences is absent in IL-1β sequences reported for non-mammalian vertebrates. Recently, fish caspase-1 orthologues have been identified in sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) and sea bream (Sparus aurata) but very little is known regarding their processing and activity. In this work it is shown that sea bass caspase-1 auto-processing is similar to that of the human enzyme, resulting in active p24/p10 and p20/p10 heterodimers. Moreover, the presence of alternatively spliced variants of caspase-1 in sea bass is reported. The existence of caspase-1 isoforms in fish and in mammals suggests that they have been evolutionarily maintained and therefore are likely to play a regulatory role in the inflammatory response, as shown for other caspases. Finally, it is shown that sea bass and avian IL-1β are specifically cleaved by caspase-1 at different but phylogenetically conserved aspartates, distinct from the cleavage site of mammalian IL-1β.

  2. Short-term storage of oocytes from the neotropical teleost fish Prochilodus marggravii.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Elizete; Godinho, Hugo Pereira; Sato, Yoshimi

    2003-10-01

    The loss of oocyte viability after ovulation is one of the limiting factors in controlled reproduction of several fish species. Experiments were performed with 15 feral Prochilodus marggravii female fish induced to spawn with crude carp pituitary extract to evaluate the viability of oocytes retained within the ovarian cavity (in situ storage) and outside of the ovarian cavity (ex situ storage). Because fertility rates rapidly declined after ovulation, simultaneously with an increase in the number of deformed larvae, P. marggravii oocytes could only be successfully stored for 1 h ex situ at room temperature ( approximately 26 degrees C). There was a highly negative correlation (r = -0.82) between fertilization and deformed larvae during in situ storage at approximately 26 degrees C. Ex situ cooling (18 degrees C) caused a drastic reduction in fertilization rates as compared with storage at approximately 26 degrees C. Oocyte structure was preserved during 2 h storage and the cortical reaction was induced before spawning. Since the micropylar apparatus remained open, it was not the primary cause for the loss of oocyte fertility. The cytoskeleton of the oocyte appeared to be affected since ooplasmic segregation was altered after 2 h storage.

  3. Structural Diversity in the Inner Ear of Teleost Fishes: Implications for Connections to the Mauthner Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popper, Arthur N.; Edds-Walton, Peggy L.

    1995-01-01

    A body of literature suggests that the Mauthner cell startle response can be elicited by stimulation of the ear. While we know that there are projections to the M-cell from the ear, the specific endorgan(s) of the ear projecting to the M-cell are not known. Moreover, there are many reasons to question whether there is one pattern of inner ear to M-cell connection or whether the endorgan(s) projection to the M-cell varies in species that have different hearing capabilities of hearing structures. In this paper, we briefly review the structure of fish ears, with an emphasis on structural regionalization within the ear. We also review the central projections of the ear, along with a discussion of the limited data on projections to the M-cell.

  4. A field based study of swimbladder adjustment in a physostomous teleost fish

    PubMed Central

    Michou, Stella; Nunes, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    The present study assesses swimbladder dynamics in natural occurring sardine, Sardina pilchardus, populations with the aim to examine whether this is affected by bathymetric positioning and the physiological state of the individuals. To do so, swimbladder size and shape were modeled in relation to catch depth and the size of various visceral compartments such as gonad, liver, fat and stomach. Swimbladder size was shown to be related to depth in a way that individuals with smaller swimbladders occurred at larger depths. Moreover, evidence is provided that the swimbladder in sardine might have a functional relationship both with the reproductive and the feeding state of individuals, since none of the fish with hydrated gonads and/or large stomachs displayed distended swimbladders. PMID:25870779

  5. A field based study of swimbladder adjustment in a physostomous teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Ganias, Kostas; Michou, Stella; Nunes, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    The present study assesses swimbladder dynamics in natural occurring sardine, Sardina pilchardus, populations with the aim to examine whether this is affected by bathymetric positioning and the physiological state of the individuals. To do so, swimbladder size and shape were modeled in relation to catch depth and the size of various visceral compartments such as gonad, liver, fat and stomach. Swimbladder size was shown to be related to depth in a way that individuals with smaller swimbladders occurred at larger depths. Moreover, evidence is provided that the swimbladder in sardine might have a functional relationship both with the reproductive and the feeding state of individuals, since none of the fish with hydrated gonads and/or large stomachs displayed distended swimbladders.

  6. Temperature sensitivity of calcium binding for parvalbumins from Antarctic and temperate zone teleost fishes.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Jeffrey R; Sidell, Bruce D; Moerland, Timothy S

    2005-02-01

    Parvalbumin (PV) is a soluble calcium-binding protein that is especially abundant in fast-twitch muscles of fish and other lower vertebrates. Despite its prevalence in ectothermic taxa, few data address the effects of temperature on PV binding function. In this study, calcium dissociation constants (KD) were measured as a function of temperature (0-25 degrees C) for PV from two Antarctic (Gobionotothen gibberifrons and Chaenocephalus aceratus) and two temperate zone fish species (Cyprinus carpio and Micropterus salmoides). Measurements by fluorometric competitive binding assay show that KD values for PVs from the Antarctic species were significantly higher at all assay temperatures and were less sensitive to temperature relative to carp and bass. However, estimates of KD are fundamentally similar for PVs from the Antarctic and temperate zone species when examined at their native physiological temperature. Variation in pH and ionic strength within a physiologically relevant range had only modest effects on KD. Thermodynamics of calcium binding to PV from G. gibberifrons and C. carpio was measured by isothermal microcalorimetry. When measured at 15 degrees C, the Gibbs free energy change (deltaG) was significantly greater for calcium binding to PV from G. gibberifrons than from carp (-43.4+/-1.5 kJ mol(-1) and -46.6+/-3.0 kJ mol(-1), respectively), and the relative contribution of entropy to deltaG for calcium binding to PV from the Antarctic species was about twice that of carp (deltaS=16.0+/-0.8 J degrees C(-1) mol(-1) for G. gibberifrons; deltaS=7.5+/-0.8 J degrees C(-1) mol(-1) for C. carpio).

  7. Diversity, Molecular Characterization and Expression of T Cell Receptor γ in a Teleost Fish, the Sea Bass (Dicentrarchus labrax, L)

    PubMed Central

    Buonocore, Francesco; Castro, Rosario; Randelli, Elisa; Lefranc, Marie-Paule; Six, Adrien; Kuhl, Heiner; Reinhardt, Richard; Facchiano, Angelo; Boudinot, Pierre; Scapigliati, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Two lineages of T cells, expressing either the αβ T cell receptor (TR) or the γδ TR, exist in Gnathostomes. The latter type of T cells account for 1–10 % of T cells in blood and up to 30 % in the small intestine. They may recognize unconventional antigens (phosphorylated microbial metabolites, lipid antigens) without the need of major histocompatibility class I (MH1) or class II (MH2) presentation. In this work we have described cloning and structural characterization of TR -chain (TRG) from the teleost Dicentrarchus labrax. Further, by means of quantitative PCR analysis, we analyzed TRG expression levels both in poly I:C stimulated leukocytes in vitro, and following infection with betanodavirus in vivo. Two full length cDNAs relative to TRG, with the highest peptide and nucleotide identity with Japanese flounder, were identified. A multiple alignment analysis showed the conservation of peptides fundamental for TRG biological functions, and of the FGXG motif in the FR4 region, typical of most TR and immunoglobulin light chains. A 3D structure consisting of two domains mainly folded as beta strands with a sandwich architecture for each domain was also reported. TRG CDR3 of 8–18 AA in length and diversity in the TRG rearrangements expressed in thymus and intestine for a given V/C combination were evidenced by junction length spectratyping. TRG mRNA expression levels were high in basal conditions both in thymus and intestine, while in kidney and gut leukocytes they were up-regulated after in vitro stimulation by poly I:C. Finally, in juveniles the TRG expression levels were up-regulated in the head kidney and down-regulated in intestine after in vivo infection with betanodavirus. Overall, in this study the involvement of TRG-bearing T cells during viral stimulation was described for the first time, leading to new insights for the identification of T cell subsets in fish. PMID:23133531

  8. Teleost fish models in membrane transport research: the PEPT1(SLC15A1) H+–oligopeptide transporter as a case study

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Alessandro; Barca, Amilcare; Storelli, Carlo; Verri, Tiziano

    2014-01-01

    Human genes for passive, ion-coupled transporters and exchangers are included in the so-called solute carrier (SLC) gene series, to date consisting of 52 families and 398 genes. Teleost fish genes for SLC proteins have also been described in the last two decades, and catalogued in preliminary SLC-like form in 50 families and at least 338 genes after systematic GenBank database mining (December 2010–March 2011). When the kinetic properties of the expressed proteins are studied in detail, teleost fish SLC transporters always reveal extraordinary ‘molecular diversity’ with respect to the mammalian counterparts, which reflects peculiar adaptation of the protein to the physiology of the species and/or to the environment where the species lives. In the case of the H+–oligopeptide transporter PEPT1(SLC15A1), comparative analysis of diverse teleost fish orthologs has shown that the protein may exhibit very eccentric properties in terms of pH dependence (e.g. the adaptation of zebrafish PEPT1 to alkaline pH), temperature dependence (e.g. the adaptation of icefish PEPT1 to sub-zero temperatures) and/or substrate specificity (e.g. the species-specificity of PEPT1 for the uptake of l-lysine-containing peptides). The revelation of such peculiarities is providing new contributions to the discussion on PEPT1 in both basic (e.g. molecular structure–function analyses) and applied research (e.g. optimizing diets to enhance growth of commercially valuable fish). PMID:23981715

  9. Evidence for an apical Na-Cl cotransporter involved in ion uptake in a teleost fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hiroi, J.; Yasumasu, S.; McCormick, S.D.; Hwang, P.-P.; Kaneko, T.

    2008-01-01

    Cation-chloride cotransporters, such as the Na+/K +/2Cl- cotransporter (NKCC) and Na+/Cl - cotransporter (NCC), are localized to the apical or basolateral plasma membranes of epithelial cells and are involved in active ion absorption or secretion. The objectives of this study were to clone and identify 'freshwater-type' and 'seawater-type' cation-chloride cotransporters of euryhaline Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) and to determine their intracellular localization patterns within mitochondria-rich cells (MRCs). From tilapia gills, we cloned four full-length cDNAs homologous to human cation-chloride cotransporters and designated them as tilapia NKCC1a, NKCC1b, NKCC2 and NCC. Out of the four candidates, the mRNA encoding NKCC1a was highly expressed in the yolk-sac membrane and gills (sites of the MRC localization) of seawater-acclimatized fish, whereas the mRNA encoding NCC was exclusively expressed in the yolk-sac membrane and gills of freshwater-acclimatized fish. We then generated antibodies specific for tilapia NKCC1a and NCC and conducted whole-mount immunofluorescence staining for NKCC1a and NCC, together with Na+/K+-ATPase, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and Na+/H+ exchanger 3 (NHE3), on the yolk-sac membrane of tilapia embryos acclimatized to freshwater or seawater. The simultaneous quintuple-color immunofluorescence staining allowed us to classify MRCs clearly into four types: types I, II, III and IV. The NKCC1a immunoreactivity was localized to the basolateral membrane of seawater-specific type-IV MRCs, whereas the NCC immunoreactivity was restricted to the apical membrane of freshwater-specific type-II MRCs. Taking account of these data at the level of both mRNA and protein, we deduce that NKCC1a is the seawater-type cotransporter involved in ion secretion by type-IV MRCs and that NCC is the freshwater-type cotransporter involved in ion absorption by type-II MRCs. We propose a novel ion-uptake model by MRCs in

  10. Carbofuran-induced histophysiological changes in thyroid of the teleost fish, Channa punctatus (Bloch)

    SciTech Connect

    Ram, R.N.

    1988-10-01

    The long-term toxic effects of continuous exposure for 6 months, from January to June, to a safe dose (4.5 ppm) of a commercial carbamate pesticide, carbofuran, on the histophysiology of thyroid in adult and young (yearling) Channa punctatus, are described in this investigation. In both the experimental groups, thyroid histology exhibited various abnormalities, including hypertrophy, hyperplasia and degeneration of follicular epithelial cells, and reduction in colloid content. Apart from this, in young experimentals, fibrosis of thyroid components, formation of cystic cellular masses, and rupture of blood vessels resulting in hemorrhage can also be seen and suggest direct action of this pesticide on the thyroid. On the other hand, in both treated groups, retardation of thyroid function was also evidenced by significantly reduced thyroidal radioiodine (/sup 131/I) uptake and CR (conversion ratio of PB/sup 131/I in blood serum in relation to total serum /sup 131/I uptake) values. Apparently, these histopathological and physiological changes were markedly pronounced in young experimentals, suggesting greater susceptibility of this group to chronic toxicity of carbofuran than that of adults. Thus, on the basis of these results, it can be inferred that carbofuran pesticide, which is washed into water systems in small quantities, induces adverse histophysiological alterations in thyroid, in an age- and size-dependent manner, possibly by acting directly on thyroid and/or through the hypothalamo-pituitary-thyroid axis, in this species.

  11. Holding visual attention for 400millionyears: A model of tectum and torus longitudinalis in teleost fishes.

    PubMed

    Northmore, David P M

    2017-02-01

    Only ray-finned fishes possess a torus longitudinalis (TL), a paired, elongated body attached to the medial margins of the optic tectum. Its granule cells project large numbers of fine fibers running laterally over adjacent tectum, synapsing excitatorily on the spiny dendrites of pyramidal cells. Sustained TL activity is evoked visuotopically by dark stimuli; TL bursting is a corollary discharge of saccadic eye movements. To suggest a function for this ancient structure, neural network models were constructed to show that: (1) pyramidal cells could form an attentional locus, selecting one out of several moving objects to track, but rapid image shifts caused by saccades disrupt tracking; (2) TL could supply both the pre-saccade position of a locus, and the shift predicted from a saccade so as to prime pyramidal dendrites at the target location, ensuring the locus stays with the attended object; (3) that the specific pattern of synaptic connections required for such predictive priming could be learned by an unsupervised rule; (4) temporal and spatial filtering of visual pattern input to TL allows learning from a complex scene. The principles thus evinced could apply to trans-saccadic attention and visual stability in other species.

  12. Salinity Preference in the Estuarine Teleost Fish Mummichog (Fundulus heteroclitus): Halocline Behavior.

    PubMed

    Marshall, W S; Tait, J C; Mercer, E W

    2016-01-01

    Mummichogs prefer seawater (SW) but have wide ability to acclimate to extreme temperatures and salinities. In the field, minnow trapping revealed that mummichogs move progressively into low-salinity warmer water during early spring after ice melt and show significant aversion to colder temperatures and high salinity. First appearance in estuarine shallows occurred above 10°C, and catch increased to 21°C over 4 wk. Three-spine sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) also preferred warmer low-salinity locations but preferred slowing streams, whereas mummichogs preferred tidal ponds. In the laboratory, artificial haloclines tested isothermal salinity preference, between 28‰ full-strength SW (below) and 10% SW (3.0‰; above). Mummichogs of both sexes acclimated to 5°C in SW strongly preferred SW. Freshwater (0% SW)-acclimated mummichogs at 21°C also preferred SW, but of sexually mature fish acclimated to 21°C SW, only the males preferred SW; the females showed no significant preference for SW, meaning they freely entered low salinity. SW preference was manifested by a stereotypic passive aversion to the dilute upper layer at the halocline. We conclude that the overall movement of mummichogs into summer breeding grounds of low salinity is driven by maturation of females and their preference for warmer water regardless of salinity.

  13. Sexual dimorphic expression of genes in gonads during early differentiation of a teleost fish, the Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus.

    PubMed

    Ijiri, Shigeho; Kaneko, Hiroyo; Kobayashi, Tohru; Wang, De-Shou; Sakai, Fumie; Paul-Prasanth, Bindhu; Nakamura, Masaru; Nagahama, Yoshitaka

    2008-02-01

    The Nile tilapia, a gonochoristic teleost fish with an XX/XY sex-determining system, provides an excellent model for studying gonadal sex differentiation because genetic all-females and all-males are available. In this study, we used quantitative real-time RT-PCR to determine the precise timing of the gonadal expression of 17 genes thought to be associated with gonadal sex differentiation in vertebrates. Gonads were isolated from all-female and all-male tilapia before (5-15 days after hatching [dah]) and after (25-70 dah) morphological sex differentiation. The transcript of aromatase (cyp19a1a), an enzyme responsible for producing estradiol-17beta, was expressed only in XX gonads at 5 dah, with a marked elevation in expression thereafter. In contrast, mRNA expression of steroid 11beta-hydroxylase (cyp11b2), an enzyme responsible for the synthesis of 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT, a potent androgen in fish), was found in XY gonads from 35 dah only. These results, combined with the presence of transcripts for other steroidogenic enzymes and estrogen receptors in XX gonads at 5-7 dah, are consistent with our earlier suggestion that estradiol-17beta plays a critical role in ovarian differentiation in tilapia, whereas a role for 11-KT in testicular differentiation is questionable. A close relationship between the expression of foxl2, but not nr5a1 (Ad4BP/SF-1), and that of cyp19a1a in XX gonads suggests an important role for Foxl2 in the transcriptional regulation of cyp19a1a. Dmrt1 exhibited a male-specific expression in XY gonads from 6 dah onward, suggesting an important role for Dmrt1 in testicular differentiation. Sox9 and amh (anti-Mullerian hormone) showed a testis-specific expression, being evident only in the later stages of testicular differentiation. It is concluded that the sex-specific expression of foxl2 and cyp19a1a in XX gonads and dmrt1 in XY gonads during early gonadal differentiation (5-6 dah) is critical for undifferentiated gonads to differentiate into

  14. UREA TRANSPORT BY HEPATOCYTES AND RED BLOOD CELLS OF SELECTED ELASMOBRANCH AND TELEOST FISHES

    PubMed

    Walsh; Wood; Perry; Thomas

    1994-08-01

    Although urea transport is receiving increased attention in mammalian systems, very little is known about urea transport in fish tissues. This study examined mechanisms of urea transport in red blood cells and hepatocytes from the lesser spotted dogfish (Scyliorhinus canicula), Atlantic stingray (Dasyatis sabina), turbot (Scopthalmus maximus), redfish (Scianops ocellatus), gulf toadfish (Opsanus beta) and oyster toadfish (Opsanus tau). Urea appeared to be passively distributed in both tissues (i.e. there was no difference between plasma and tissue urea concentrations). Additionally, a number of in vitro experiments examining [14C]urea flux were performed. In red blood cells from all species except redfish, urea transport occurred via simple passive diffusion, but redfish red blood cells showed a small (25 %) phloretin-sensitive uptake component. In hepatocytes of the two elasmobranch species (dogfish and stingray), urea efflux was also by simple passive diffusion. However, urea efflux in toadfish (both O. beta and O. tau) hepatocytes exhibited a marked phloretin-sensitivity, and O. beta hepatocytes were used in further experiments with other inhibitors and treatments. Urea transport in O. beta had a relatively high specificity for urea compared with the urea analogues acetamide, thiourea and N-methylurea, was unaffected by phloridzin and extracellular Na+ removal, and was not inhibited by physiological levels of glucose (0.5­10 mmol l-1). A phloretin-sensitive glucose transport, that was not inhibited by physiological levels of urea, was discovered in O. beta hepatocytes. The results are discussed in terms of patterns of species distribution and similarities between urea and glucose transport.

  15. Saturable triiodothyronine-binding sites in the pituitary nuclei of salmonid teleost fish

    SciTech Connect

    Bres, O.; Eales, J.G. )

    1990-01-01

    High-affinity, limited-capacity, 3,5,3'-triiodo-L-thyronine (T3)-binding sites were established by in vitro saturation analysis in cell nuclei of the pituitary gland of arctic charr. The sites were extracted from the purified nuclei using 0.4 M NaCl and incubated with ({sup 125}I)T3 in the presence of 0.2 M NaCl. T3 saturable binding attained equilibrium after 18-24 hr of incubation at 4 degrees. The association constant ranged from 6.7 to 20.1 liters.mol-1 x 10(9), indicating a T3 affinity greater than that for T3-binding sites in rainbow trout liver. The maximal binding capacity ranged from 0.93 to 2.05 10(-13) mol.mg DNA-1, representing a mean site abundance corresponding to 60% of that for nuclei from trout liver. Thyroxine (T4) completely displaced ({sup 125}I)T3 in the pituitary nuclei of arctic charr and T3 completely displaced ({sup 125}I)T4 in the pituitary nuclei of rainbow trout, suggesting that in salmonids both T4 and T3 bind to the same single class of sites. However, the site affinity for T4 was approximately 20-50x less than that for T3. The possible roles of these sites in pituitary function as well as their relationship to other nuclear T3-binding sites in salmonid fish are discussed.

  16. Costimulatory receptors in a teleost fish: Typical CD28, elusive CTLA4

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bernard, D.; Riteau, B.; Hansen, J.D.; Phillips, R.B.; Michel, F.; Boudinot, P.; Benmansour, A.

    2006-01-01

    T cell activation requires both specific recognition of the peptide-MHC complex by the TCR and additional signals delivered by costimulatory receptors. We have identified rainbow trout sequences similar to CD28 (rbtCD28) and CTLA4 (rbtCTLA4). rbtCD28 and rbtCTLA4 are composed of an extracellular Ig-superfamily V domain, a transmembrane region, and a cytoplasmic tail. The presence of a conserved ligand binding site within the V domain of both molecules suggests that these receptors likely recognize the fish homologues of the B7 family. The mRNA expression pattern of rbtCD28 and rbtCTLA4 in naive trout is reminiscent to that reported in humans and mice, because rbtCTLA4 expression within trout leukocytes was quickly up-regulated following PHA stimulation and virus infection. The cytoplasmic tail of rbtCD28 possesses a typical motif that is conserved in mammalian costimulatory receptors for signaling purposes. A chimeric receptor made of the extracellular domain of human CD28 fused to the cytoplasmic tail of rbtCD28 promoted TCR-induced IL-2 production in a human T cell line, indicating that rbtCD28 is indeed a positive costimulator. The cytoplasmic tail of rtrtCTLA4 lacked obvious signaling motifs and accordingly failed to signal when fused to the huCD28 extracellular domain. Interestingly, rbtCTLA4 and rbtCD28 are not positioned on the same chromosome and thus do not belong to a unique costimulatory cluster as in mammals. Finally, oar results raise questions about the origin and evolution of positive and negative costimulation in vertebrate immune systems. Copyright ?? 2006 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  17. Tissue distribution and thyroid hormone effects on mRNA abundance for membrane transporters Mct8, Mct10, and organic anion-transporting polypeptides (Oatps) in a teleost fish

    PubMed Central

    Muzzio, Amanda M.; Noyes, Pamela D.; Stapleton, Heather M.; Lema, Sean C.

    2014-01-01

    Many of the actions of thyroid hormones (THs) occur via TH binding to intracellular receptors. Although it was long thought that THs diffused passively across plasma membranes, it is now recognized that cellular entry is mediated by a variety of membrane transporter proteins. In this study, we identified cDNAs encoding the TH transporters monocarboxylate transferase 8 (mct8) and 10 (mct10) as well as eight distinct organic anion-transporting polypeptide (oatp) proteins from fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). Analysis of the tissue distribution of transporter mRNAs revealed that mct8 and mct10 transcripts were both abundant in liver, but also present at lower levels in brain, gonad and other tissues. Transcripts encoding oatp1c1 were highly abundant in brain, liver and gonad, and exhibited significant sex differences in the liver and gonad. Treatment of adult male minnows with 3,5,3′-triiodothyronine (T3) or the goitrogen methimazole altered gene transcript abundance for several transporters. Fish given exogenous T3 had reduced mct8 and oapt1c1 mRNA levels in the liver compared to methimazole-treated fish. In the brain, transcripts for mct8, mct10, oatp2b1, and oatp3a1 were each reduced in abundance in fish with elevated T3. As a whole, these results provide evidence that TH status influences the transcriptional dynamics of mct8, mct10 and several Oatp genes including oatp1c1 in teleost fish. PMID:24113777

  18. Tissue distribution and thyroid hormone effects on mRNA abundance for membrane transporters Mct8, Mct10, and organic anion-transporting polypeptides (Oatps) in a teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Muzzio, Amanda M; Noyes, Pamela D; Stapleton, Heather M; Lema, Sean C

    2014-01-01

    Many of the actions of thyroid hormones (THs) occur via TH binding to intracellular receptors. Although it was long thought that THs diffused passively across plasma membranes, it is now recognized that cellular entry is mediated by a variety of membrane transporter proteins. In this study, we identified cDNAs encoding the TH transporters monocarboxylate transferases 8 (mct8) and 10 (mct10) as well as eight distinct organic anion-transporting polypeptide (oatp) proteins from fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). Analysis of the tissue distribution of transporter mRNAs revealed that mct8 and mct10 transcripts were both abundant in liver, but also present at lower levels in brain, gonad and other tissues. Transcripts encoding oatp1c1 were highly abundant in brain, liver and gonad, and exhibited significant sex differences in the liver and gonad. Treatment of adult male minnows with 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3) or the goitrogen methimazole altered gene transcript abundance for several transporters. Fish given exogenous T3 had reduced mct8 and oapt1c1 mRNA levels in the liver compared to methimazole-treated fish. In the brain, transcripts for mct8, mct10, oatp2b1, and oatp3a1 were each reduced in abundance in fish with elevated T3. As a whole, these results provide evidence that TH status influences the transcriptional dynamics of mct8, mct10 and several Oatp genes including oatp1c1 in teleost fish.

  19. Growth differentiation factor 9 (Gdf9) was localized in the female as well as male germ cells in a protogynous hermaphroditic teleost fish, ricefield eel Monopterus albus.

    PubMed

    He, Zhi; Wu, Yangsheng; Xie, Jun; Wang, Taixin; Zhang, Lihong; Zhang, Weimin

    2012-09-01

    Growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF9) is a member of the transforming growth factor beta (TGFb) superfamily. As an oocyte-derived growth factor, GDF9 plays key roles in regulating follicle development. In the present study, we identified a gdf9 homologue from the ovary of ricefield eel, and analyzed its expression both at the mRNA and protein levels. Ricefield eel Gdf9 showed high homologies with those of other teleosts, especially perciformes fish. RT-PCR analysis revealed that ricefield eel gdf9 was expressed exclusively in the ovary and testis. The mRNA levels of gdf9 in the ovary were increased significantly at the pre-vitellogenic (PV) stage and then decreased significantly along with vitellogenesis. During the natural sex change, expression of ricefield eel gdf9 was peaked at the intersexual stages. The immunoreactivity for Gdf9 was localized exclusively in the cytoplasm of the oocytes in the ovary, particularly the oocytes at early stages, but not in the oogonia. Interestingly, strong immunoreactive signals were also detected in the degenerating oocytes in the intersexual gonad. Furthermore, the Gdf9 immunoreactivity was demonstrated for the first time to be localized in the cytoplasm of spermatogonia and spermatocytes of ricefield eel, a teleost fish. Taken together, the results of present study suggested that Gdf9 may play important roles in the folliculogenesis as well as spermatogenesis in ricefield eels.

  20. Rapid method for the measurement of circulating thyroid hormones in low volumes of teleost fish plasma by LC-ESI/MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Noyes, Pamela D; Lema, Sean C; Roberts, Simon C; Cooper, Ellen M; Stapleton, Heather M

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormones are critical regulators of normal development and physiological functioning in all vertebrates. Radioimmunoassay (RIA) approaches have been the method of choice for measuring circulating levels of thyroid hormones in vertebrates. While sensitive, RIA-based approaches only allow for a single analyte measurement per assay, can lack concordance across platforms and laboratories, and can be prone to analytical interferences especially when used with fish plasma. Ongoing advances in liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) have led to substantial decreases in detection limits for thyroid hormones and other biomolecules in complex matrices, including human plasma. Despite these advances, current analytical approaches do not allow for the measurement of native thyroid hormone in teleost fish plasma by mass spectrometry and continue to rely on immunoassay. In this study, we developed a new method that allows for the rapid extraction and simultaneous measurement of total T4 (TT4) and total T3 (TT3) in low volumes (50 μL) of fish plasma by LC/MS/MS. Methods were optimized initially in plasma from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and applied to plasma from other teleost fishes, including fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas), mummichogs (Fundulus heteroclitus), sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), and coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). Validation of method performance with T4- and T3-spiked rainbow trout plasma at 2 and 4 ng/mL produced mean recoveries ranging from 82 to 95 % and 97 to 105 %, respectively. Recovery of (13)C12-T4 internal standard in plasma extractions was: 99 ± 1.8 % in rainbow trout, 85 ± 11 % in fathead minnow, 73 ± 5.0 % in mummichog, 73 ± 1.7 % in sockeye salmon, and 80 ± 8.4 % in coho salmon. While absolute levels of thyroid hormones measured in identical plasma samples by LC/MS/MS and RIA varied depending on the assay used, T4/T3 ratios were generally consistent across both

  1. Rapid method for the measurement of circulating thyroid hormones in low volumes of teleost fish plasma by LC-ESI/MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Noyes, Pamela D.; Lema, Sean C.; Roberts, Simon C.; Cooper, Ellen M.

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormones are critical regulators of normal development and physiological functioning in all vertebrates. Radioimmunoassay (RIA) approaches have been the method of choice for measuring circulating levels of thyroid hormones in vertebrates. While sensitive, RIA-based approaches only allow for a single analyte measurement per assay, can lack concordance across platforms and laboratories, and can be prone to analytical interferences especially when used with fish plasma. Ongoing advances in liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) have led to substantial decreases in detection limits for thyroid hormones and other biomolecules in complex matrices, including human plasma. Despite these advances, current analytical approaches do not allow for the measurement of native thyroid hormone in teleost fish plasma by mass spectrometry and continue to rely on immunoassay. In this study, we developed a new method that allows for the rapid extraction and simultaneous measurement of total T4 (TT4) and total T3 (TT3) in low volumes (50 μL) of fish plasma by LC/MS/MS. Methods were optimized initially in plasma from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and applied to plasma from other teleost fishes, including fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas), mummichogs (Fundulus heteroclitus), sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), and coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). Validation of method performance with T4- and T3-spiked rainbow trout plasma at 2 and 4 ng/mL produced mean recoveries ranging from 82 to 95 % and 97 to 105 %, respectively. Recovery of 13C12-T4 internal standard in plasma extractions was: 99±1.8 % in rainbow trout, 85±11 % in fathead minnow, 73±5.0 % in mummichog, 73±1.7 % in sockeye salmon, and 80±8.4 % in coho salmon. While absolute levels of thyroid hormones measured in identical plasma samples by LC/MS/MS and RIA varied depending on the assay used, T4/T3 ratios were generally consistent across both techniques. Less variability was measured among

  2. A molecule in teleost fish, related with human MHC-encoded G6F, has a cytoplasmic tail with ITAM and marks the surface of thrombocytes and in some fishes also of erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Ken; Takizawa, Fumio; Tokumaru, Norihiro; Nakayasu, Chihaya; Toda, Hideaki; Fischer, Uwe; Moritomo, Tadaaki; Hashimoto, Keiichiro; Nakanishi, Teruyuki; Dijkstra, Johannes Martinus

    2010-08-01

    In teleost fish, a novel gene G6F-like was identified, encoding a type I transmembrane molecule with four extracellular Ig-like domains and a cytoplasmic tail with putative tyrosine phosphorylation motifs including YxN and an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM). G6F-like maps to a teleost genomic region where stretches corresponding to human chromosomes 6p (with the MHC), 12p (with CD4 and LAG-3), and 19q are tightly linked. This genomic organization resembles the ancestral "Ur-MHC" proposed for the jawed vertebrate ancestor. The deduced G6F-like molecule shows sequence similarity with members of the CD4/LAG-3 family and with the human major histocompatibility complex-encoded thrombocyte marker G6F. Despite some differences in molecular organization, teleost G6F-like and tetrapod G6F seem orthologous as they map to similar genomic location, share typical motifs in transmembrane and cytoplasmic regions, and are both expressed by thrombocytes/platelets. In the crucian carps goldfish (Carassius auratus auratus) and ginbuna (Carassius auratus langsdorfii), G6F-like was found expressed not only by thrombocytes but also by erythrocytes, supporting that erythroid and thromboid cells in teleost fish form a hematopoietic lineage like they do in mammals. The ITAM-bearing of G6F-like suggests that the molecule plays an important role in cell activation, and G6F-like expression by erythrocytes suggests that these cells have functional overlap potential with thrombocytes.

  3. Discovery of a unique Ig heavy-chain (IgT) in rainbow trout: Implications for a distinctive B cell developmental pathway in teleost fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, J.D.; Landis, E.D.; Phillips, R.B.

    2005-01-01

    During the analysis of Ig superfamily members within the available rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) EST gene index, we identified a unique Ig heavy-chain (IgH) isotype. cDNAs encoding this isotype are composed of a typical IgH leader sequence and a VDJ rearranged segment followed by four Ig superfamily C-1 domains represented as either membrane-bound or secretory versions. Because teleost fish were previously thought to encode and express only two IgH isotypes (IgM and IgD) for their humoral immune repertoire, we isolated all three cDNA isotypes from a single homozygous trout (OSU-142) to confirm that all three are indeed independent isotypes. Bioinformatic and phylogenetic analysis indicates that this previously undescribed divergent isotype is restricted to bony fish, thus we have named this isotype "IgT" (??) for teleost fish. Genomic sequence analysis of an OSU-142 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clone positive for all three IgH isotypes revealed that IgT utilizes the standard rainbow trout VH families, but surprisingly, the IgT isotype possesses its own exclusive set of DH and JH elements for the generation of diversity. The IgT D and J segments and ?? constant (C) region genes are located upstream of the D and J elements for IgM, representing a genomic IgH architecture that has not been observed in any other vertebrate class. All three isotypes are primarily expressed in the spleen and pronephros (bone marrow equivalent), and ontogenically, expression of IgT is present 4 d before hatching in developing embryos. ?? 2005 by The National Academy of Sciences of the USA.

  4. Effects of the xenoestrogen bisphenol A in diencephalic regions of the teleost fish Coris julis occur preferentially via distinct somatostatin receptor subtypes.

    PubMed

    Alo', Raffaella; Facciolo, Rosa Maria; Madeo, Maria; Giusi, Giuseppina; Carelli, Antonio; Canonaco, Marcello

    2005-04-15

    The xenoestrogen bisphenol A, a contaminant used in the manufacturing of polymers for many consumer products, has been shown to mimic estrogenic actions. This xenoestrogen regulates secretion and expression of pituitary lactotrophs plus morphological and structural features of estrogen target tissues in rodents. Recently, ecological hazards produced by bisphenol A have drawn interests towards the effects of this environmental chemical on neurobiological functions of aquatic vertebrates of which little is known. In this study, the effects of bisphenol A on the distribution of the biologically more active somatostatin receptor subtypes in diencephalic regions of the teleost fish Coris julis were assessed using nonpeptide agonists (L-779, 976 and L-817, 818) that are highly selective for subtype(2) and subtype(5), respectively. Bisphenol A proved to be responsible for highly significant increased binding levels of subtype(2) in hypothalamic areas, while markedly decreased levels of subtype(5) were found in these diencephalic areas, as well as in the medial preglomerular nucleus. The extensive distribution of somatostatin receptor subtype(2) and subtype(5) in the teleost diencephalic areas suggests that, like in mammals, this receptor system may not only be involved in enhanced hypophysiotropic neurohormonal functions but might also promote neuroplasticity events.

  5. Reproductive history and nest environment are correlated with circulating androgen and glucocorticoid concentrations in a parental care-providing teleost fish.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Constance M; Barthel, Brandon L; Gilmour, Kathleen M; Philipp, David P; Van Der Kraak, Glen; Cooke, Steven J

    2012-01-01

    Using a long-term study population of wild smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieu in a connected river-lake system, we investigated whether circulating glucocorticoid (cortisol) and androgen (testosterone) concentrations are influenced by reproductive investment and nesting environment in fish providing nest-guarding paternal care. For all individuals, we collected measures of reproductive history and the value of current parental care. We assessed nest environment and monitored individuals to quantify seasonal reproductive success. Finally, we measured circulating cortisol concentrations following a standardized stressor and circulating testosterone concentrations. Using general linear models, we found that poststress circulating cortisol concentrations were positively related to water temperature and were higher in fish nesting in the river than in the lake. Circulating testosterone concentrations were negatively related to water temperature and were higher in reproductively experienced fish. When considering the factors that influence reproductive success, we found that only parental size was positively related to current nest success. In summary, the results demonstrate that nesting environment is correlated with parental stress responses during parental care, while reproductive history and nesting environment are correlated with circulating androgen concentrations. Collectively, these results offer insight into the roles of both glucocorticoid and androgen steroid hormones during parental care in teleost fish.

  6. Cross talk between germ cells and gonadal somatic cells is critical for sex differentiation of the gonads in the teleost fish, medaka (Oryzias latipes).

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Minoru; Saito, Daisuke; Morinaga, Chikako; Kurokawa, Hiromi

    2008-05-01

    To evaluate the possible role of germ cells on sex differentiation of the gonads in vertebrates, the teleost fish, medaka (Oryzias latipes), was used to generate a gonad without germ cells. The germ cell-deficient medaka reveals multiple effects of germ cells on the process of sex differentiation. The previously isolated mutant medaka, hotei, with the excessive number of germ cells may support the contention that the proliferation of germ cells is related to feminization of the gonad. Futhermore, we show that two modes of proliferation for either maintenance of germ cells or commitment to gametogenesis are important components of the sex differentiation of medaka developing gonads. An intimate cross talk between germ cells and gonadal somatic cells during the sex differentiation will be discussed.

  7. Actions of sex steroids on kisspeptin expression and other reproduction-related genes in the brain of the teleost fish European sea bass.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, M V; Servili, A; Molés, G; Gueguen, M M; Carrillo, M; Kah, O; Felip, A

    2016-11-01

    Kisspeptins are well known as mediators of the coordinated communication between the brain-pituitary axis and the gonads in many vertebrates. To test the hypothesis that gonadal steroids regulate kiss1 and kiss2 mRNA expression in European sea bass (a teleost fish), we examined the brains of gonad-intact (control) and castrated animals, as well as castrated males (GDX) and ovariectomized females (OVX) that received testosterone (T) and estradiol (E2) replacement, respectively, during recrudescence. In GDX males, low expression of kiss1 mRNA is observed by in situ hybridization in the caudal hypothalamus (CH) and the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH), although hypothalamic changes in kiss1 mRNA levels were not statistically different among the groups, as revealed by real-time PCR. However, T strongly decreased kiss2 expression levels in the hypothalamus, which was documented in the MBH and the nucleus of the lateral recess (NRLd) in GDX T-treated sea bass males. Conversely, it appears that E2 evokes low kiss1 mRNA in the CH, while there were cells expressing kiss2 in the MBH and NRLd in these OVX females. These results demonstrate that kisspeptin neurons are presumably sensitive to the feedback actions of sex steroids in the sea bass, suggesting that the MBH represents a major site for sex steroid actions on kisspeptins in this species. Also, recent data provide evidence that both positive and negative actions occur in key factors involved in sea bass reproductive function, including changes in the expression of gnrh-1/gonadotropin, cyp19b, er and ar genes and sex steroid and gonadotropin plasma levels in this teleost fish.

  8. Evolution of the CD4 family: teleost fish possess two divergent forms of CD4 in addition to lymphocyte activation gene-3

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laing, K.J.; Zou, J.J.; Purcell, M.K.; Phillips, R.; Secombes, C.J.; Hansen, J.D.

    2006-01-01

    The T cell coreceptor CD4 is a transmembrane glycoprotein belonging to the Ig superfamily and is essential for cell-mediated immunity. Two different genes were identified in rainbow trout that resemble mammalian CD4. One (trout CD4) encodes four extracellular Ig domains reminiscent off mammalian CD4, whereas the other (CD4REL) codes for two Ig domains. Structural motifs within the amino acid sequences suggest that the two Ig domains of CD4REL duplicated to generate the four-domain molecule of CD4 and the related gene, lymphocyte activation gene-3. Here we present evidence that both of these molecules in trout are homologous to mammalian CD4 and that teleosts encode an additional CD4 family member, lymphocyte activation gene-3, which is a marker for activated T cells. The syntenic relationships of similar genes in other teleost and non-fish genomes provide evidence for the likely evolution of CD4-related molecules in vertebrates, with CD4REL likely representing the primordial form in fish. Expression of both CD4 genes is highest in the thymus and spleen, and mRNA expression of these genes is limited to surface IgM- lymphocytes, consistent with a role for T cell functionality. Finally, the intracellular regions of both CD4 and CD4REL possess the canonical CXC motif involved in the interaction off CD4 with p56LCK, implying that similar mechanisms for CD4 + T cell activation are present in all vertebrates. Our results therefore raise new questions about T cell development and functionality in lower vertebrates that cannot be answered by current mammalian models and, thus, is of fundamental importance for understanding the evolution of cell-mediated immunity in gnathosomes. Copyright ?? 2006 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  9. A unique swim bladder-inner ear connection in a teleost fish revealed by a combined high-resolution microtomographic and three-dimensional histological study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In most modern bony fishes (teleosts) hearing improvement is often correlated with a close morphological relationship between the swim bladder or other gas-filled cavities and the saccule or more rarely with the utricle. A connection of an accessory hearing structure to the third end organ, the lagena, has not yet been reported. A recent study in the Asian cichlid Etroplus maculatus provided the first evidence that a swim bladder may come close to the lagena. Our study was designed to uncover the swim bladder-inner ear relationship in this species. We used a new approach by applying a combination of two high-resolution techniques, namely microtomographic (microCT) imaging and histological serial semithin sectioning, providing the basis for subsequent three-dimensional reconstructions. Prior to the morphological study, we additionally measured auditory evoked potentials at four frequencies (0.5, 1, 2, 3 kHz) to test the hearing abilities of the fish. Results E. maculatus revealed a complex swim bladder-inner ear connection in which a bipartite swim bladder extension contacts the upper as well as the lower parts of each inner ear, a condition not observed in any other teleost species studied so far. The gas-filled part of the extension is connected to the lagena via a thin bony lamella and is firmly attached to this bony lamella with connective material. The second part of the extension, a pad-like structure, approaches the posterior and horizontal semicircular canals and a recessus located posterior to the utricle. Conclusions Our study is the first detailed report of a link between the swim bladder and the lagena in a teleost species. We suggest that the lagena has an auditory function in this species because the most intimate contact exists between the swim bladder and this end organ. The specialized attachment of the saccule to the cranial bone and the close proximity of the swim bladder extension to the recessus located posterior to the utricle

  10. Thermosensitive ion channel TRPV1 is endogenously expressed in the sperm of a fresh water teleost fish (Labeo rohita) and regulates sperm motility.

    PubMed

    Majhi, Rakesh Kumar; Kumar, Ashutosh; Yadav, Manoj; Swain, Nirlipta; Kumari, Shikha; Saha, Ashish; Pradhan, Avinash; Goswami, Luna; Saha, Somdatta; Samanta, Luna; Maity, Apratim; Nayak, Tapas Kumar; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Rajakuberan, Chitra; Kumar, Abhishek; Goswami, Chandan

    2013-01-01

    Sperm cells exhibit extremely high sensitivity in response to slight changes in temperature, osmotic pressure and/or presence of various chemical stimuli. In most cases throughout the evolution, these physico-chemical stimuli trigger Ca (2+)-signaling and subsequently alter structure, cellular function, motility and survival of the sperm cells. Few reports have recently demonstrated the presence of Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) channels in the sperm cells from higher eukaryotes, mainly from higher mammals. In this work, we have explored if the sperm cells from lower vertebrates can also have thermo-sensitive TRP channels. In this paper, we demonstrate the endogenous presence of one specific thermo-sensitive ion channel, namely Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid family member sub type 1 (TRPV1) in the sperm cells collected from fresh water teleost fish, Labeo rohita. By using western blot analysis, fluorescence assisted cell sorting (FACS) and confocal microscopy; we confirm the presence of this non-selective cation channel. Activation of TRPV1 by an endogenous activator NADA significantly increases the quality as well as the duration of fish sperm movement. The sperm cell specific expression of TRPV1 matches well with our in silico sequence analysis. The results demonstrate that TRPV1 gene is conserved in various fishes, ranging from 1-3 in copy number, and it originated by fish-specific duplication events within the last 320 million years (MY). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating the presence of any thermo-sensitive TRP channels in the sperm cells of early vertebrates as well as of aquatic animals, which undergo external fertilization in fresh water. This observation may have implications in the aquaculture, breeding of several fresh water and marine fish species and cryopreservation of fish sperms.

  11. Retrograde labeling of regenerated electromotor neurons with HRP in a teleost fish, Sternarchus albifrons: relation to cell death.

    PubMed

    Anderson, M J; Fong, H L; Waxman, S G

    1985-01-01

    Back-labeling of regenerated electromotor neurons in the teleost Sternarchus albifrons was performed to test the hypothesis that, in regenerated spinal cord, incorrectly located electromotor neurons are eliminated because their axons do not reach the correct target area (electric organ). In each cross section examined, all of the regenerated electromotor neurons ipsilateral to the implantation site were labeled with horseradish peroxidase, including those ectopic cells located at the edge of the cord, which are later eliminated by selective cell death. Retrograde labeling of these ectopic neurons demonstrates that their axons do extend into the correct target area (the regenerated electric organ). Thus total misdirection of the axons cannot be the cause of their subsequent cell death. We conclude that selective neuronal death in this system does not reflect the absence of axonal projection to the correct target area.

  12. Evolution of cytokine responses: IL-1beta directly affects intracellular Ca2+ concentration of teleost fish leukocytes through a receptor-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, S; Randelli, E; Buonocore, F; Zou, J; Secombes, C J; Scapigliati, G

    2006-04-01

    In this work we studied the biological activities of recombinant IL-1beta from the teleosts sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) by investigating the effects induced on intracellular Ca2+ concentrations ([Ca2+]i) of spleen leucocytes. Splenocytes were loaded with the Ca2+-permeant Fura-2AM, and then stimulated with rIL-1beta. The emitted fluorescence was read for 5 min at 1 min intervals on a dual excitation fluorescence fluorimeter. Results showed that rIL-1beta induced in both species a rise in [Ca2+]i, and a subsequent decrease until 5 min after stimulation. The stimulating effect was dose-dependent in both species reaching a plateau at 200 ng/ml of rIL-1beta, was abolished by heat-treatment of rIL-1beta, and affected in a dose-dependent fashion by treatment of leucocytes with trypsin. These features suggested a functional IL-1 receptor was involved in the binding. The observed rise in [Ca2+]i was not detected in human PBMC and was species-specific, since rIL-1beta from sea bass, trout, and human were unable to interfere each other in the assay. Moreover, incubation of splenocytes with rIL-1beta induced a rapid tyrosine phosphorylation of a 24 kDa polypeptide in both species. This work represents the first evidence of a direct effect on [Ca2+]i induced by IL-1beta and suggests that in the evolution of IL-1 activities, teleost fishes display a peculiar IL-1-associated behaviour that is lacking in mammals.

  13. The phylogenetic significance of colour patterns in marine teleost larvae

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Carole C

    2013-01-01

    Ichthyologists, natural-history artists, and tropical-fish aquarists have described, illustrated, or photographed colour patterns in adult marine fishes for centuries, but colour patterns in marine fish larvae have largely been neglected. Yet the pelagic larval stages of many marine fishes exhibit subtle to striking, ephemeral patterns of chromatophores that warrant investigation into their potential taxonomic and phylogenetic significance. Colour patterns in larvae of over 200 species of marine teleosts, primarily from the western Caribbean, were examined from digital colour photographs, and their potential utility in elucidating evolutionary relationships at various taxonomic levels was assessed. Larvae of relatively few basal marine teleosts exhibit erythrophores, xanthophores, or iridophores (i.e. nonmelanistic chromatophores), but one or more of those types of chromatophores are visible in larvae of many basal marine neoteleosts and nearly all marine percomorphs. Whether or not the presence of nonmelanistic chromatophores in pelagic marine larvae diagnoses any major teleost taxonomic group cannot be determined based on the preliminary survey conducted, but there is a trend toward increased colour from elopomorphs to percomorphs. Within percomorphs, patterns of nonmelanistic chromatophores may help resolve or contribute evidence to existing hypotheses of relationships at multiple levels of classification. Mugilid and some beloniform larvae share a unique ontogenetic transformation of colour pattern that lends support to the hypothesis of a close relationship between them. Larvae of some tetraodontiforms and lophiiforms are strikingly similar in having the trunk enclosed in an inflated sac covered with xanthophores, a character that may help resolve the relationships of these enigmatic taxa. Colour patterns in percomorph larvae also appear to diagnose certain groups at the interfamilial, familial, intergeneric, and generic levels. Slight differences in generic

  14. Two types of TNF-α exist in teleost fish: phylogeny, expression, and bioactivity analysis of type-II TNF-α3 in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Hong, Suhee; Li, Ronggai; Xu, Qiaoqing; Secombes, Chris J; Wang, Tiehui

    2013-12-15

    TNF-α is a cytokine involved in systemic inflammation and regulation of immune cells. It is produced chiefly by activated macrophages as a membrane or secreted form. In rainbow trout, two TNF-α molecules were described previously. In this article, we report a third TNF-α (TNF-α3) that has only low identities to known trout molecules. Phylogenetic tree and synteny analyses of trout and other fish species suggest that two types (named I and II) of TNF-α exist in teleost fish. The fish type-II TNF-α has a short stalk that may impact on its enzymatic release or restrict it to a membrane-bound form. The constitutive expression of trout TNF-α3 was generally lower than the other two genes in tissues and cell lines, with the exception of the macrophage RTS-11 cell line, in which expression was higher. Expression of all three TNF-α isoforms could be modulated by crude LPS, peptidoglycan, polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid, and rIFN-γ in cell lines and primary macrophages, as well as by bacterial and viral infections. TNF-α3 is the most responsive gene at early time points post-LPS stimulation and can be highly induced by the T cell-stimulant PHA, suggesting it is a particularly important TNF-α isoform. rTNF-α3 produced in CHO cells was bioactive in different cell lines and primary macrophages. In the latter, it induced the expression of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17C, and TNF-αs), negative regulators (SOCS1-3, TGF-β1b), antimicrobial peptides (cathelicidin-1 and hepcidin), and the macrophage growth factor IL-34, verifying its key role in the inflammatory cytokine network and macrophage biology of fish.

  15. Mitochondria in teleost spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Ulloa-Rodríguez, Patricio; Figueroa, Elías; Díaz, Rommy; Lee-Estevez, Manuel; Short, Stefania; Farías, Jorge G

    2017-01-06

    There is an extraordinary diversity of reproductive modes in teleost and this variability is related to the phylogenetic relationships and adaption to very different biotopes. As in all vertebrates, sperm is produced as the end product of the process of spermatogenesis, and regarding teleost the spermatozoa lack an acrosome in almost all species and motility is activated as a response to osmolarity and ion content of the aquatic medium where the sperm is released. In this context, mitochondria possess a fundamental role for fish spermatozoa motility and integrity, hence, fertilizing potential; they are the energy supplier that allows flagellar movement and their dysfunction could play a main role in structural and functional damage to the spermatozoa. The ATP production through oxidative phosphorylation provides not only energy for cell activities, which includes Na(+)/K(+) ATPase pump, endocytosis, protein synthesis and many other cell processes; but also produces reactive oxygen species, that under mitochondrial dysfunction causes oxidative stress. The assessment of mitochondrial function (e.g. through measurement of mitochondrial membrane potential) as well as ATP content (mostly supplied by mitochondrial respiration) can be useful as quality markers of fish spermatozoa. Also quantification of ROS and antioxidant status, strongly influenced by mitochondria, are used as complementary measurements. There is much information about sperm mitochondria and their function but studies of these aspects on fish reproduction are still required for applications in aquaculture. The real role of fish sperm mitochondria under short and long term storage and in vitro manipulation is not fully understood yet. Thus future research should focus on these matters.

  16. Duplication of Dio3 genes in teleost fish and their divergent expression in skin during flatfish metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Alves, R N; Cardoso, J C R; Harboe, T; Martins, R S T; Manchado, M; Norberg, B; Power, D M

    2017-01-03

    Deiodinase 3 (Dio3) plays an essential role during early development in vertebrates by controlling tissue thyroid hormone (TH) availability. The Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus) possesses duplicate dio3 genes (dio3a and dio3b). Expression analysis indicates that dio3b levels change in abocular skin during metamorphosis and this suggests that this enzyme is associated with the divergent development of larval skin to the juvenile phenotype. In larvae exposed to MMI, a chemical that inhibits TH production, expression of dio3b in ocular skin is significantly up-regulated suggesting that THs normally modulate this genes expression during this developmental event. The molecular basis for divergent dio3a and dio3b expression and responsiveness to MMI treatment is explained by the multiple conserved TREs in the proximal promoter region of teleost dio3b and their absence from the promoter of dio3a. We propose that the divergent expression of dio3 in ocular and abocular skin during halibut metamorphosis contributes to the asymmetric pigment development in response to THs.

  17. Sexual dimorphism of gonadal structure and gene expression in germ cell-deficient loach, a teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Takafumi; Nishimura, Toshiya; Goto-Kazeto, Rie; Kawakami, Yutaka; Yamaha, Etsuro; Arai, Katsutoshi

    2010-10-05

    Germ cell-deficient fish usually develop as phenotypic males. Thus, the presence of germ cells is generally considered to be essential for female gonadal differentiation or the maintenance of ovarian structure. However, little is known of the role of germ cells in the determination of the sexual fate of gonadal somatic cells. We have established an inducible germ cell deficiency system in the loach (Misgurnus anguillicaudatus, Cypriniformes: Cobitidae), a small freshwater fish, using knockdown of the dead end gene with a morpholino antisense oligonucleotide. Interestingly, loach lacking germ cells could develop as either phenotypic males or females, as characterized morphologically by the presence or absence of bony plates in the pectoral fins, respectively. The phenotypic males and females had testicular and ovarian structures, respectively, but lacked germ cells. Gene expression patterns in these male and female germ cell-deficient gonads were essentially the same as those in gonads of normal fish. Our observations indicate that sexually dimorphic gonads can develop in germ cell-deficient loach. In contrast to the situation in other model fish species, the gonadal somatic cells in phenotypic females autonomously differentiated into ovarian tissues and also played a role in the maintenance of gonadal structure. On the basis of our observations, we propose two possible models to explain the role of germ cells in sex determination in fish.

  18. Pressure and particle motion detection thresholds in fish: a re-examination of salient auditory cues in teleosts.

    PubMed

    Radford, Craig A; Montgomery, John C; Caiger, Paul; Higgs, Dennis M

    2012-10-01

    The auditory evoked potential technique has been used for the past 30 years to evaluate the hearing ability of fish. The resulting audiograms are typically presented in terms of sound pressure (dB re. 1 μPa) with the particle motion (dB re. 1 m s(-2)) component largely ignored until recently. When audiograms have been presented in terms of particle acceleration, one of two approaches has been used for stimulus characterisation: measuring the pressure gradient between two hydrophones or using accelerometers. With rare exceptions these values are presented from experiments using a speaker as the stimulus, thus making it impossible to truly separate the contribution of direct particle motion and pressure detection in the response. Here, we compared the particle acceleration and pressure auditory thresholds of three species of fish with differing hearing specialisations, goldfish (Carassius auratus, weberian ossicles), bigeye (Pempheris adspersus, ligamentous hearing specialisation) and a third species with no swim bladder, the common triplefin (Forstergyian lappillum), using three different methods of determining particle acceleration. In terms of particle acceleration, all three fish species have similar hearing thresholds, but when expressed as pressure thresholds goldfish are the most sensitive, followed by bigeye, with triplefin the least sensitive. It is suggested here that all fish have a similar ability to detect the particle motion component of the sound field and it is their ability to transduce the pressure component of the sound field to the inner ear via ancillary hearing structures that provides the differences in hearing ability. Therefore, care is needed in stimuli presentation and measurement when determining hearing ability of fish and when interpreting comparative hearing abilities between species.

  19. A genomic view of the NOD-like receptor family in teleost fish: Identification of a novel NLR subfamily in zebrafish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laing, K.J.; Purcell, M.K.; Winton, J.R.; Hansen, J.D.

    2008-01-01

    Background. A large multigene family of NOD-like receptor (NLR) molecules have been described in mammals and implicated in immunity and apoptosis. Little information, however, exists concerning this gene family in non-mammalian taxa. This current study, therefore, provides an in-depth investigation of this gene family in lower vertebrates including extensive phylogenetic comparison of zebrafish NLRs with orthologs in tetrapods, and analysis of their tissue-specific expression. Results. Three distinct NLR subfamilies were identified by mining genome databases of various non-mammalian vertebrates; the first subfamily (NLR-A) resembles mammalian NODs, the second (NLR-B) resembles mammalian NALPs, while the third (NLR-C) appears to be unique to teleost fish. In zebrafish, NLR-A and NLR-B subfamilies contain five and six genes respectively. The third subfamily is large, containing several hundred NLR-C genes, many of which are predicted to encode a C-terminal B30.2 domain. This subfamily most likely evolved from a NOD3-like molecule. Gene predictions for zebrafish NLRs were verified using sequence derived from ESTs or direct sequencing of cDNA. Reverse-transcriptase (RT)-PCR analysis confirmed expression of representative genes from each subfamily in selected tissues. Conclusion. Our findings confirm the presence of multiple NLR gene orthologs, which form a large multigene family in teleostei. Although the functional significance of the three major NLR subfamilies is unclear, we speculate that conservation and abundance of NLR molecules in all teleostei genomes, reflects an essential role in cellular control, apoptosis or immunity throughout bony fish. ?? 2008 Laing et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  20. Stress, nutrition and parental care in a teleost fish: exploring mechanisms with supplemental feeding and cortisol manipulation.

    PubMed

    Zolderdo, A J; Algera, D A; Lawrence, M J; Gilmour, K M; Fast, M D; Thuswaldner, J; Willmore, W G; Cooke, S J

    2016-04-15

    Parental care is an essential life-history component of reproduction for many animal species, and it entails a suite of behavioural and physiological investments to enhance offspring survival. These investments can incur costs to the parent, reducing their energetic and physiological condition, future reproductive capabilities and survival. In fishes, relatively few studies have focused on how these physiological costs are mediated. Male smallmouth bass provide parental care for developing offspring until the brood reaches independence. During this energetically demanding life stage, males cease active foraging as they vigorously defend their offspring. Experimental manipulation of cortisol levels (via implantation) and food (via supplemental feeding) in parental males was used to investigate the fitness consequences of parental care. Improving the nutritional condition of nest-guarding males increased their reproductive success by reducing premature nest abandonment. However, supplemental feeding and cortisol treatment had no effect on parental care behaviours. Cortisol treatment reduced plasma lymphocyte numbers, but increased neutrophil and monocyte concentrations, indicating a shift in immune function. Supplemental feeding improved the physiological condition of parental fish by reducing the accumulation of oxidative injury. Specifically, supplemental feeding reduced the formation of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) on DNA nucleotides. Increasing the nutritional condition of parental fish can reduce the physiological cost associated with intensive parental activity and improve overall reproductive success, illustrating the importance of nutritional condition as a key modulator of parental fitness.

  1. Identification and quantification of 5α-dihydrotestosterone in the teleost fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Margiotta-Casaluci, Luigi; Courant, Frédérique; Antignac, Jean-Philippe; Le Bizec, Bruno; Sumpter, John P

    2013-09-15

    The steroid hormone 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) is one of the most physiologically important androgens in male vertebrates, with the exception of teleost fish, in which it is generally assumed that DHT does not play any major physiological role. However, this assumption is challenged by the fact that all the components involved in DHT biosynthesis and action are present and evolutionary conserved in teleost fish. In fact, testosterone (T) is converted into DHT by two isoforms of the enzyme steroid-5-alpha-reductase (5αR), and both 5αRs gene expression and enzymatic activity have been detected in several tissues of different teleost species, which also have an androgen receptor with high binding affinity to DHT. This body of evidence strongly suggest that DHT is synthesised by teleost fish. We investigated this hypothesis using the cyprinid fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) as the experimental model. The study of the evolutionary and functional conservation of 5αRs in teleost fish was used to support the experimental approach, based on an ultrasensitive gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) method to identify and measure simultaneously T and DHT in fathead minnow biological fluids and tissues. The analyses were performed using plasma samples collected from both male and female adult fish and samples of testicular tissue collected from sexually mature males. Both T and DHT were identified and quantified in all the samples analysed, and in particular, the high concentrations of DHT quantified in the testes suggested that these organs are a likely site of synthesis of DHT in the teleost fathead minnow, as they are in mammals. These results may represent the basis for future studies aimed at elucidating the physiological role, if any, of DHT in teleost fish.

  2. Developmental expression of the G protein-coupled receptor 54 and three GnRH mRNAs in the teleost fish cobia.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, J Shaik; Benninghoff, Abby D; Holt, G Joan; Khan, Izhar A

    2007-02-01

    The cDNAs of the G protein-coupled receptor 54 (GPR54) and three prepro-gonadotropin-releasing hormones, GnRH-I (seabream GnRH), GnRH-II (chicken GnRH-II), and GnRH-III (salmon GnRH) were isolated and cloned from the brain of the teleost fish cobia, Rachycentron canadum. The cobia GPR54 cDNA was 95 and 51-56% identical to those of tilapia and mammalian models respectively. The GnRH cDNA sequences of cobia showed strong identities to those of tilapia, Atlantic croaker, red drum, and the seabass and seabream species. The real-time quantitative RT-PCR methods allowed detection of all three GnRH mRNAs on the first day after hatching (DAH). The GnRH-I mRNA levels, which were the lowest among the three GnRHs, increased gradually with two distinct peaks in larvae at 3 and 4 DAH. On the other hand, GnRH-II and GnRH-III mRNAs were significantly higher in larvae at 2 and 6 DAH compared with those on the preceding days. In addition, significant peaks of all the three GnRH mRNAs were observed in the brains of 26-day-old fish. The finding of higher GnRH-I and GnRH-II mRNAs in males than females at 153 DAH may be related to early puberty observed during the first year in laboratory-reared male cobia. Moreover, this study demonstrates for the first time the expression of GPR54 mRNA during larval development in a vertebrate species. The concomitant expression patterns of GPR54 and GnRH mRNAs during different stages of larval and juvenile developments, and during early puberty in male cobia suggest a potential relationship between GPR54 and multiple GnRHs during these stages of development consistent with the role of GPR54 in controlling GnRH release in mammals. The increase in GPR54 and GnRH mRNAs observed during early puberty in cobia is consistent with a similar change reported in pubertal rats. This finding together with the localization of GPR54 mRNAs on GnRH neurons in fish and mammals suggests that the GPR54-GnRH interactions may be conserved in different vertebrate groups.

  3. T cell transcripts and T cell activities in the gills of the teleost fish sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax).

    PubMed

    Nuñez Ortiz, N; Gerdol, M; Stocchi, V; Marozzi, C; Randelli, E; Bernini, C; Buonocore, F; Picchietti, S; Papeschi, C; Sood, N; Pallavicini, A; Scapigliati, G

    2014-12-01

    The gills of fish are a mucosal tissue that contains T cells involved in the recognition of non-self and pathogens, and in this work we describe some features of gill-associated T cells of European sea bass, a marine model species. A whole transcriptome was obtained by deep sequencing of RNA from unstimulated gills that has been analyzed for the presence of T cell-related transcripts. Of the putative expressed sequences identified in the transcriptome, around 30 were related to main functions related to T cells including Th1/Th2/Th17/Treg cell subpopulations, thus suggesting their possible presence in the branchial epithelium. The number of T cells in the gills of sea bass, measured with the specific T cell mAb DLT15 range from 10% to 20%, and IHC analysis shows their abundance and distribution in the epithelium. Leukocytes from gills are able to proliferate in the presence of lectins ConA and PHA, as measured by flow cytometry using CFSE fluorescence incorporation, and during proliferation the number of T cells counted by immunofluorescence increased. In lectin-proliferating cells the expression of T cell-related genes TRβ, TRγ, CD4, CD8α, CD45 and IL-10 increased dramatically. Our data represent a first analysis on T cell genes and on basic T cell activities of fish gills, and suggest the presence of functionally active subpopulations of T lymphocytes in this tissue.

  4. [Helminths of Antarctic fishes].

    PubMed

    Rocka, Anna

    2008-01-01

    Antarctic fishes are represented by sharks, skates (Chondrichthyes) and bony fishes (Teleostei). Teleosts play an important role in the completion of life cycles of many helminth species. They serve as either definitive or intermediate and paratenic hosts. Chondrichthyes are definitive hosts only. Seventy three helminth species occur as the adult stage in fishes: Digenea (45), Cestoda (14), Nematoda (6), Acanthocephala (8), Also, 11 larval stages of Cestoda (7) and Nematoda (4) are known, together with 7 species of Acanthocephala in the cystacanth stage. One digenean species, Otodistomum cestoides, matures in skates. Among cestodes maturing in fishes only one, Parabothriocephalus johnstoni, occurs in a bony fish, Macrourus whitsoni. Antarctic Chondrichthyes are not infected with nematodes and acanthocephalans. Cestode larvae from teleosts belong to Tetraphyllidea (parasites of skates), and Tetrabothriidae and Diphyllobothriidae (parasites of birds and mammals). Larval nematodes represent Anisakidae, parasites of fishes, birds and mammals. Acanthocephalan cystacanths mature in pinnipeds and birds. The majority of parasites maturing in Antarctic fishes are endemics. Only 4 digenean and one nematode species, Hysterothylacium aduncum, are cosmopolitan. All acanthocephalans, almost all digeneans, the majority of cestodes and some nematodes occur mainly or exclusively in benthic fishes. Specificity of the majority of helminths utilizing teleosts as intermediate and/or paratenic hosts is low. Among parasites using fishes as definitive hosts, all Cestoda, most Digenea and Nematoda, and almost all Acanthocephala have a range of hosts restricted to one order or even to 1-2 host species.

  5. Spermiogenesis and spermatozoon ultrastructure of the bothriocephalidean cestode Clestobothrium crassiceps (Rudolphi, 1819), a parasite of the teleost fish Merluccius merluccius (Gadiformes: Merlucciidae).

    PubMed

    Marigo, Adji Mama; Delgado, Eulàlia; Torres, Jordi; Bâ, Cheikh Tidiane; Miquel, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    Spermiogenesis and the ultrastructure of the spermatozoon of the bothriocephalidean cestode Clestobothrium crassiceps (Rudolphi, 1819), a parasite of the teleost fish Merluccius merluccius (Linnaeus, 1758), have been studied by means of transmission electron microscopy. Spermiogenesis involves firstly the formation of a differentiation zone. It is characterized by the presence of two centrioles associated with striated rootlets, an intercentriolar body and an electron-dense material in the apical region of this zone. Later, two flagella develop from the centrioles, growing orthogonally in relation to the median cytoplasmic process. Flagella then undergo a rotation of 90° until they become parallel to the median cytoplasmic process, followed by the proximodistal fusion of the flagella with the median cytoplasmic process. The nucleus elongates and afterwards it migrates along the spermatid body. Spermiogenesis finishes with the appearance of the apical cone surrounded by the single helical crested body at the base of the spermatid. Finally, the narrowing of the ring of arched membranes detaches the fully formed spermatozoon. The mature spermatozoon of C. crassiceps is filiform and contains two axonemes of the 9 + "1" trepaxonematan pattern, a parallel nucleus, parallel cortical microtubules, and electron-dense granules of glycogen. The anterior extremity of the gamete exhibits a short electron-dense apical cone and one crested body, which turns once around the sperm cell. The first axoneme is surrounded by a ring of thick cortical microtubules that persist until the appearance of the second axoneme. Later, these thick cortical microtubules disappear and thus, the mature spermatozoon exhibits two bundles of thin cortical microtubules. The posterior extremity of the male gamete presents only the nucleus. Results are discussed and compared particularly with the available ultrastructural data on the former "pseudophyllideans". Two differences can be established

  6. Toxicological perspective on the osmoregulation and ionoregulation physiology of major ions by freshwater animals: Teleost fish, crustacea, aquatic insects, and Mollusca.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Michael B

    2017-03-01

    Anthropogenic sources increase freshwater salinity and produce differences in constituent ions compared with natural waters. Moreover, ions differ in physiological roles and concentrations in intracellular and extracellular fluids. Four freshwater taxa groups are compared, to investigate similarities and differences in ion transport processes and what ion transport mechanisms suggest about the toxicity of these or other ions in freshwater. Although differences exist, many ion transporters are functionally similar and may belong to evolutionarily conserved protein families. For example, the Na(+) /H(+) -exchanger in teleost fish differs from the H(+) /2Na(+) (or Ca(2+) )-exchanger in crustaceans. In osmoregulation, Na(+) and Cl(-) predominate. Stenohaline freshwater animals hyperregulate until they are no longer able to maintain hypertonic extracellular Na(+) and Cl(-) concentrations with increasing salinity and become isotonic. Toxic effects of K(+) are related to ionoregulation and volume regulation. The ionic balance between intracellular and extracellular fluids is maintained by Na(+) /K(+) -adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase), but details are lacking on apical K(+) transporters. Elevated H(+) affects the maintenance of internal Na(+) by Na(+) /H(+) exchange; elevated HCO3(-) inhibits Cl(-) uptake. The uptake of Mg(2+) occurs by the gills or intestine, but details are lacking on Mg(2+) transporters. In unionid gills, SO4(2-) is actively transported, but most epithelia are generally impermeant to SO4(2-) . Transporters of Ca(2+) maintain homeostasis of dissolved Ca(2+) . More integration of physiology with toxicology is needed to fully understand freshwater ion effects. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:576-600. Published 2016 Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of SETAC. This article is a US government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America.

  7. Aromatase activity in hindbrain vocal control region of a teleost fish: divergence amoung males with alternative reproductive tactics

    PubMed Central

    Schlinger, B. A.; Greco, C.; Bass, A. H.

    1999-01-01

    Type I male midshipman fish acoustically court females, whereas type II males do not but instead sneak or satellite spawn to compete with type I males for fertilizations. 'Singing' type I males diverge from type II males and females in the organization of an expansive hindbrain pacemaker–motoneuron circuit that establishes the physical attributes of vocalizations. Here, levels of aromatase activity were determined in homogenates of brain by measuring the conversion of 3H-androstenedione (AE) to 3H-oestrone (E1) and 3H-oestradiol (E2). Levels were highest in the telencephalon–preoptic area and similar for all morphs. Lower levels were in a region including the diencephalon, midbrain and cerebellum, although levels were significantly higher in females compared with type I males. In the vocal hindbrain region, aromatase levels were three- to five-fold higher in type II males and females than in type I males, and in castrated type II males than in castrated type I males. Conversion of testosterone to oestrogen in type II males and females may effectively prevent testosterone-induced maturation of the vocal system that characterizes type I males. Aromatase may thus be a key enzyme regulating the expression of individual-specific brain circuitry and behaviours among members of one sex.

  8. Heavy metals produce toxicity, oxidative stress and apoptosis in the marine teleost fish SAF-1 cell line.

    PubMed

    Morcillo, Patricia; Esteban, María Á; Cuesta, Alberto

    2016-02-01

    The use of cell lines to test the toxicity of aquatic pollutants is a valuable alternative to fish bioassays. In this study, fibroblast SAF-1 cells from the marine gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata L.) were exposed for 24 h to the heavy metals Cd, Hg, MeHg (Methylmercury), As or Pb and the resulting cytotoxicity was assessed. Neutral red (NR), MTT-tetrazolio (MTT), crystal violet (CV) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) viability tests showed that SAF-1 cells exposed to the above heavy metals produced a dose-dependent reduction in the number of viable cells. Methylmercury showed the highest toxicity (EC50 = 0.01 mM) followed by As, Cd, Hg and Pb. NR was the most sensitive method followed by MTT, CV and LDH. SAF-1 cells incubated with each of the heavy metals also exhibited an increase in the production of reactive oxygen species and apoptosis cell death. Moreover, the corresponding gene expression profiles pointed to the induction of the metallothionein protective system, cellular and oxidative stress and apoptosis after heavy metal exposure for 24 h. This report describes and compares tools for evaluating the potential effects of marine contamination using the SAF-1 cell line.

  9. Saccular Transcriptome Profiles of the Seasonal Breeding Plainfin Midshipman Fish (Porichthys notatus), a Teleost with Divergent Sexual Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Faber-Hammond, Joshua; Samanta, Manoj P.; Whitchurch, Elizabeth A.; Manning, Dustin; Sisneros, Joseph A.; Coffin, Allison B.

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic communication is essential for the reproductive success of the plainfin midshipman fish (Porichthys notatus). During the breeding season, type I males use acoustic cues to advertise nest location to potential mates, creating an audible signal that attracts reproductive females. Type II (sneaker) males also likely use this social acoustic signal to find breeding pairs from which to steal fertilizations. Estrogen-induced changes in the auditory system of breeding females are thought to enhance neural encoding of the advertisement call, and recent anatomical data suggest the saccule (the main auditory end organ) as one possible target for this seasonal modulation. Here we describe saccular transcriptomes from all three sexual phenotypes (females, type I and II males) collected during the breeding season as a first step in understanding the mechanisms underlying sexual phenotype-specific and seasonal differences in auditory function. We used RNA-Seq on the Ion Torrent platform to create a combined transcriptome dataset containing over 79,000 assembled transcripts representing almost 9,000 unique annotated genes. These identified genes include several with known inner ear function and multiple steroid hormone receptors. Transcripts most closely matched to published genomes of nile tilapia and large yellow croaker, inconsistent with the phylogenetic relationship between these species but consistent with the importance of acoustic communication in their life-history strategies. We then compared the RNA-Seq results from the saccules of reproductive females with a separate transcriptome from the non-reproductive female phenotype and found over 700 differentially expressed transcripts, including members of the Wnt and Notch signaling pathways that mediate cell proliferation and hair cell addition in the inner ear. These data constitute a valuable resource for furthering our understanding of the molecular basis for peripheral auditory function as well as a range of

  10. Saccular Transcriptome Profiles of the Seasonal Breeding Plainfin Midshipman Fish (Porichthys notatus), a Teleost with Divergent Sexual Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Faber-Hammond, Joshua; Samanta, Manoj P; Whitchurch, Elizabeth A; Manning, Dustin; Sisneros, Joseph A; Coffin, Allison B

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic communication is essential for the reproductive success of the plainfin midshipman fish (Porichthys notatus). During the breeding season, type I males use acoustic cues to advertise nest location to potential mates, creating an audible signal that attracts reproductive females. Type II (sneaker) males also likely use this social acoustic signal to find breeding pairs from which to steal fertilizations. Estrogen-induced changes in the auditory system of breeding females are thought to enhance neural encoding of the advertisement call, and recent anatomical data suggest the saccule (the main auditory end organ) as one possible target for this seasonal modulation. Here we describe saccular transcriptomes from all three sexual phenotypes (females, type I and II males) collected during the breeding season as a first step in understanding the mechanisms underlying sexual phenotype-specific and seasonal differences in auditory function. We used RNA-Seq on the Ion Torrent platform to create a combined transcriptome dataset containing over 79,000 assembled transcripts representing almost 9,000 unique annotated genes. These identified genes include several with known inner ear function and multiple steroid hormone receptors. Transcripts most closely matched to published genomes of nile tilapia and large yellow croaker, inconsistent with the phylogenetic relationship between these species but consistent with the importance of acoustic communication in their life-history strategies. We then compared the RNA-Seq results from the saccules of reproductive females with a separate transcriptome from the non-reproductive female phenotype and found over 700 differentially expressed transcripts, including members of the Wnt and Notch signaling pathways that mediate cell proliferation and hair cell addition in the inner ear. These data constitute a valuable resource for furthering our understanding of the molecular basis for peripheral auditory function as well as a range of

  11. Plate-like permanent dental laminae of upper jaw dentition in adult gobiid fish, Sicyopterus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Keita; Watanabe, Shun; Iida, Midori; Sahara, Noriyuki

    2010-04-01

    Sicyopterus japonicus (Teleostei, Gobiidae) possesses a unique upper jaw dentition different from that known for any other teleosts. In the adults, many (up to 30) replacement teeth, from initiation to attachment, are arranged orderly in a semicircular-like strand within a capsule of connective tissue on the labial side of each premaxillary bone. We have applied histological, ultrastructural, and three-dimensional imaging from serial sections to obtain insights into the distribution and morphological features of the dental lamina in the upper jaw dentition of adult S. japonicus. The adult fish has numerous permanent dental laminae, each of which is an infolding of the oral epithelium at the labial side of the functional tooth and forms a thin plate-like structure with a wavy contour. All replacement teeth of a semicircular-like strand are connected to the plate-like dental lamina by the outer dental epithelium and form a tooth family; neighboring tooth families are completely separated from each other. The new tooth germ directly buds off from the ventro-labial margin of the dental lamina, whereas no distinct free end of the dental lamina is present, even adjacent to this region. Cell proliferation concentrated at the ventro-labial margin of the dental lamina suggests that this region is the site for repeated tooth initiation. During tooth development, the replacement tooth migrates along a semicircular-like strand and eventually erupts through the dental lamina into the oral epithelium at the labial side of the functional tooth. This unique thin plate-like permanent dental lamina and the semicircular-like strand of replacement teeth in the upper jaw dentition of adult S. japonicus probably evolved as a dental adaptation related to the rapid replacement of teeth dictated by the specialized feeding habit of this algae-scraping fish.

  12. Dietary Butyrate Helps to Restore the Intestinal Status of a Marine Teleost (Sparus aurata) Fed Extreme Diets Low in Fish Meal and Fish Oil

    PubMed Central

    Estensoro, Itziar; Ballester-Lozano, Gabriel; Benedito-Palos, Laura; Grammes, Fabian; Martos-Sitcha, Juan Antonio; Mydland, Liv-Torunn; Calduch-Giner, Josep Alvar; Fuentes, Juan; Karalazos, Vasileios; Ortiz, Álvaro; Øverland, Margareth; Pérez-Sánchez, Jaume

    2016-01-01

    There is a constant need to find feed additives that improve health and nutrition of farmed fish and lessen the intestinal inflammation induced by plant-based ingredients. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of adding an organic acid salt to alleviate some of the detrimental effects of extreme plant-ingredient substitution of fish meal (FM) and fish oil (FO) in gilthead sea bream diet. Three experiments were conducted. In a first trial (T1), the best dose (0.4%) of sodium butyrate (BP-70 ®NOREL) was chosen after a short (9-weeks) feeding period. In a second longer trial (T2) (8 months), four diets were used: a control diet containing 25% FM (T2-D1) and three experimental diets containing 5% FM (T2-D2, T2-D3, T2-D4). FO was the only added oil in D1, while a blend of plant oils replaced 58% and 84% of FO in T2-D2, and T2-D3 and T2-D4, respectively. The latter was supplemented with 0.4% BP-70. In a third trial (T3), two groups of fish were fed for 12 and 38 months with D1, D3 and D4 diets of T2. The effects of dietary changes were studied using histochemical, immunohistochemical, molecular and electrophysiological tools. The extreme diet (T2-D3) modified significantly the transcriptomic profile, especially at the anterior intestine, up-regulating the expression of inflammatory markers, in coincidence with a higher presence of granulocytes and lymphocytes in the submucosa, and changing genes involved in antioxidant defences, epithelial permeability and mucus production. Trans-epithelial electrical resistance (Rt) was also decreased (T3-D3). Most of these modifications were returned to control values with the addition of BP-70. None of the experimental diets modified the staining pattern of PCNA, FABP2 or ALPI. These results further confirm the potential of this additive to improve or reverse the detrimental effects of extreme fish diet formulations. PMID:27898676

  13. Dietary Butyrate Helps to Restore the Intestinal Status of a Marine Teleost (Sparus aurata) Fed Extreme Diets Low in Fish Meal and Fish Oil.

    PubMed

    Estensoro, Itziar; Ballester-Lozano, Gabriel; Benedito-Palos, Laura; Grammes, Fabian; Martos-Sitcha, Juan Antonio; Mydland, Liv-Torunn; Calduch-Giner, Josep Alvar; Fuentes, Juan; Karalazos, Vasileios; Ortiz, Álvaro; Øverland, Margareth; Sitjà-Bobadilla, Ariadna; Pérez-Sánchez, Jaume

    2016-01-01

    There is a constant need to find feed additives that improve health and nutrition of farmed fish and lessen the intestinal inflammation induced by plant-based ingredients. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of adding an organic acid salt to alleviate some of the detrimental effects of extreme plant-ingredient substitution of fish meal (FM) and fish oil (FO) in gilthead sea bream diet. Three experiments were conducted. In a first trial (T1), the best dose (0.4%) of sodium butyrate (BP-70 ®NOREL) was chosen after a short (9-weeks) feeding period. In a second longer trial (T2) (8 months), four diets were used: a control diet containing 25% FM (T2-D1) and three experimental diets containing 5% FM (T2-D2, T2-D3, T2-D4). FO was the only added oil in D1, while a blend of plant oils replaced 58% and 84% of FO in T2-D2, and T2-D3 and T2-D4, respectively. The latter was supplemented with 0.4% BP-70. In a third trial (T3), two groups of fish were fed for 12 and 38 months with D1, D3 and D4 diets of T2. The effects of dietary changes were studied using histochemical, immunohistochemical, molecular and electrophysiological tools. The extreme diet (T2-D3) modified significantly the transcriptomic profile, especially at the anterior intestine, up-regulating the expression of inflammatory markers, in coincidence with a higher presence of granulocytes and lymphocytes in the submucosa, and changing genes involved in antioxidant defences, epithelial permeability and mucus production. Trans-epithelial electrical resistance (Rt) was also decreased (T3-D3). Most of these modifications were returned to control values with the addition of BP-70. None of the experimental diets modified the staining pattern of PCNA, FABP2 or ALPI. These results further confirm the potential of this additive to improve or reverse the detrimental effects of extreme fish diet formulations.

  14. Linking adults and immatures of South African marine fishes.

    PubMed

    Steinke, Dirk; Connell, Allan D; Hebert, Paul D N

    2016-11-01

    The early life-history stages of fishes are poorly known, impeding acquisition of the identifications needed to monitor larval recruitment and year-class strength. A comprehensive database of COI sequences, linked to authoritatively identified voucher specimens, promises to change this situation, representing a significant advance for fisheries science. Barcode records were obtained from 2526 early larvae and pelagic eggs of fishes collected on the inshore shelf within 5 km of the KwaZulu-Natal coast, about 50 km south of Durban, South Africa. Barcodes were also obtained from 3215 adults, representing 946 South African fish species. Using the COI reference library on BOLD based on adults, 89% of the immature fishes could be identified to a species level; they represented 450 species. Most of the uncertain sequences could be assigned to a genus, family, or order; only 92 specimens (4%) were unassigned. Accumulation curves based on inference of phylogenetic diversity indicate near-completeness of the collecting effort. The entire set of adult and larval fishes included 1006 species, representing 43% of all fish species known from South African waters. However, this total included 189 species not previously recorded from this region. The fact that almost 90% of the immatures gained a species identification demonstrates the power and completeness of the DNA barcode reference library for fishes generated during the 10 years of FishBOL.

  15. Are we missing a mineralocorticoid in teleost fish? Effects of cortisol, deoxycorticosterone and aldosterone on osmoregulation, gill Na+,K+-ATPase activity and isoform mRNA levels in Atlantic salmon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCormick, S.D.; Regish, A.; O'Dea, M. F.; Shrimpton, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    It has long been held that cortisol, acting through a single receptor, carries out both glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid actions in teleost fish. The recent finding that fish express a gene with high sequence similarity to the mammalian mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) suggests the possibility that a hormone other than cortisol carries out some mineralocorticoid functions in fish. To test for this possibility, we examined the effect of in vivo cortisol, 11-deoxycorticosterone (DOC) and aldosterone on salinity tolerance, gill Na+,K+-ATPase (NKA) activity and mRNA levels of NKA α1a and α1b in Atlantic salmon. Cortisol treatment for 6–14 days resulted in increased, physiological levels of cortisol, increased gill NKA activity and improved salinity tolerance (lower plasma chloride after a 24 h seawater challenge), whereas DOC and aldosterone had no effect on either NKA activity or salinity tolerance. NKA α1a and α1b mRNA levels, which increase in response to fresh water and seawater acclimation, respectively, were both upregulated by cortisol, whereas DOC and aldosterone were without effect. Cortisol, DOC and aldosterone had no effect on gill glucocorticoid receptor GR1, GR2 and MR mRNA levels, although there was some indication of possible upregulation of GR1 by cortisol (p = 0.07). The putative GR blocker RU486 inhibited cortisol-induced increases in salinity tolerance, NKA activity and NKA α1a and α1b transcription, whereas the putative MR blocker spironolactone had no effect. The results provide support that cortisol, and not DOC or aldosterone, is involved in regulating the mineralocorticoid functions of ion uptake and salt secretion in teleost fish.

  16. Testing the acceptability of liquid fish oil in older adults.

    PubMed

    Yaxley, Alison; Miller, Michelle D; Fraser, Robert J; Cobiac, Lynne; Crotty, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory conditions likely to benefit from fish oil therapy are prevalent in older adults however acceptability in this group is uncertain. This study aimed to assess the palatability of a range of liquid fish oil concentrations, the frequency and extent of side effects, and to summarise any effects on adherence to fish oil therapy in older adults. One hundred patients (>=60 years) completed a randomised, single-blind palatability study, conducted in two parts. In part one, 50 subjects, blinded to random sample order, consumed multiple liquid fish oil samples (2x10%, 40% and 100%). In part two, 50 subjects tasted one concentration, or 100% extra light olive oil (control). Pleasantness of taste was scored on a 5-point Likert scale. Side effects were recorded 24-hr post-tasting. Results of part one showed that 9/50 participants reported increasingly unpleasant taste with increasing fish oil concentration. 14/50 reported unpleasant taste for 100% fish oil vs 7/50 for 10%. 14/50 reported side effects which would not affect compliance with therapy. For part two, 1/12 reported unpleasant taste for 100% vs 0/13 for 10% fish oil or control. 4/50 reported side effects and 2/4 indicated these would prevent ongoing fish oil therapy. The authors conclude that taste itself is not a deterrent to fish oil therapy. Furthermore, reported adverse effects may not be a true reaction to fish oil, or dissuade patients from compliance. Liquid fish oil supplements are acceptable to older adults, therefore should be investigated as a therapy for geriatric conditions.

  17. The teleost intervertebral region acts as a growth center of the centrum: in vivo visualization of osteoblasts and their progenitors in transgenic fish.

    PubMed

    Inohaya, Keiji; Takano, Yoshiro; Kudo, Akira

    2007-11-01

    The vertebral column is a defined feature of vertebrates. In birds and mammals, the sclerotome yields cartilaginous material for the vertebral column. In teleosts, however, it remains uncertain whether the sclerotome participates in vertebral column formation. To investigate osteoblast development in the teleost, we established transgenic systems that allow in vivo observation of osteoblasts and their progenitors marked by fluorescence of DsRed and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), respectively. In twist-EGFP transgenic medaka, EGFP-positive cells first appeared in the ventromedial portion of respective somites corresponding to the sclerotome, migrated dorsally around the notochord, and concentrated in the intervertebral regions. Ultrastructural analysis of the intervertebral regions revealed that some of these cells were directly located on the osteoidal surface of the perichordal centrum, and enriched with rough endoplasmic reticulum in their cytoplasm. By using the double transgenic medaka of twist-EGFP and osteocalcin-DsRed, we clarified that the EGFP-positive cells in the intervertebral region differentiated into mature osteoblasts expressing the DsRed. In vivo bone labeling in fact confirmed active matrix formation and mineralization of the perichordal centrum exclusively in the intervertebral region of zebrafish larvae as well as medaka larvae. These findings strongly suggest that the teleost intervertebral region acts as a growth center of the perichordal centrum, where the sclerotome-derived cells differentiate into osteoblasts.

  18. Little evidence for enhanced phenotypic evolution in early teleosts relative to their living fossil sister group

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, John T.; Lloyd, Graeme T.; Friedman, Matt

    2016-01-01

    Since Darwin, biologists have been struck by the extraordinary diversity of teleost fishes, particularly in contrast to their closest “living fossil” holostean relatives. Hypothesized drivers of teleost success include innovations in jaw mechanics, reproductive biology and, particularly at present, genomic architecture, yet all scenarios presuppose enhanced phenotypic diversification in teleosts. We test this key assumption by quantifying evolutionary rate and capacity for innovation in size and shape for the first 160 million y (Permian–Early Cretaceous) of evolution in neopterygian fishes (the more extensive clade containing teleosts and holosteans). We find that early teleosts do not show enhanced phenotypic evolution relative to holosteans. Instead, holostean rates and innovation often match or can even exceed those of stem-, crown-, and total-group teleosts, belying the living fossil reputation of their extant representatives. In addition, we find some evidence for heterogeneity within the teleost lineage. Although stem teleosts excel at discovering new body shapes, early crown-group taxa commonly display higher rates of shape evolution. However, the latter reflects low rates of shape evolution in stem teleosts relative to all other neopterygian taxa, rather than an exceptional feature of early crown teleosts. These results complement those emerging from studies of both extant teleosts as a whole and their sublineages, which generally fail to detect an association between genome duplication and significant shifts in rates of lineage diversification. PMID:27671652

  19. The forebrain-midbrain acts as functional endocrine signaling pathway of Kiss2/Gnrh1 system controlling the gonadotroph activity in the teleost fish European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax).

    PubMed

    Espigares, Felipe; Carrillo, Manuel; Gómez, Ana; Zanuy, Silvia

    2015-03-01

    Some teleost species, including European sea bass, harbor two different kisspeptin coding genes: kiss1 and kiss2. Both genes are expressed in the brain, but their differential roles in the central control of fish reproduction are only beginning to be elucidated. In this study, we have examined the effects of intracerebroventricular injections of the highly active sea bass peptides Kiss1-15 and Kiss2-12 on spermiating male sea bass. Physiological saline, Kiss1-15, or Kiss2-12 was injected into the third ventricle. To establish the gene expression cascade involved in the action of kisspeptins, the expression of the two sea bass kisspeptin receptor genes (kiss1r and kiss2r) and the three sea bass Gnrh genes (gnrh1, gnrh2, and gnrh3) were analyzed in the forebrain-midbrain and the hypothalamus. In addition, the protein levels of hypothalamic and pituitary Gnrh1 were measured. Blood samples were collected at different times after injection to analyze the effects of kisspeptins on the release of gonadotropins (Lh and Fsh) and androgens (testosterone and 11-ketotestosterone). The present results provide the first evidence that the effects of Kiss2 on central regulation of reproductive function involve the neuroendocrine areas of the forebrain-midbrain in teleost fish. The marked effect of Kiss2 on kiss2r and gnrh1 expression in the forebrain-midbrain and on Gnrh1 release suggest that this neuronal system is involved in the neuroendocrine regulation of gonadotroph activity. This hypothesis was confirmed by a surge of plasma Lh in response to Kiss2, which presumably has a strong stimulatory effect on testosterone release, and thus on sperm quality parameters.

  20. The effects of calcitonin on plasma calcium levels and bone metabolism in the fresh water teleost Channa punctatus.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Dola; Sen, Utpal; Bhattacharyya, S P; Mukherjee, Dilip

    2004-08-01

    Administration of salmon calcitonin (sCT) caused significant reduction in total and ultrafiltrable plasma calcium content in the plasma of a fresh water female teleost Channa punctatus. A time-bound analysis on the effect of sCT showed a highly significant short duration reduction in total and ultrafiltrable plasma calcium content in fish kept in normal tap water and low-calcium water and a moderate hypocalcemia in fish kept in high-calcium water. Sexually immature adult fish showed a greater response than the sexually mature ones. Using tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRACP) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities in plasma and hydroxyproline (HYP) excretion in urine, the effect of sCT on the inhibition of bone calcium resorption were examined. In both sexually mature and immature adult fish, kept in normal tap water, sCT significantly suppressed TRACP and ALP activities in plasma and excretion of HYP in urine within 2-6 h with a maximum at 4 h after injection. Salmon CT treatment to sexually immature adult fish caused significant increase in skeletal bone calcium concentration. Taken together, all this information indicates that CT in a fresh water female teleost is an effective regulator of plasma calcium levels, and its action, at least in part, operates through inhibition of bone calcium resorption.

  1. Molecular characterization and transcriptional regulation of the Na +/K+ ATPase α subunit isoforms during development and salinity challenge in a teleost fish, the Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis).

    PubMed

    Armesto, Paula; Campinho, Marco A; Rodríguez-Rúa, Ana; Cousin, Xavier; Power, Deborah M; Manchado, Manuel; Infante, Carlos

    2014-09-01

    In the present work, five genes encoding different Na(+),K(+) ATPase (NKA) α-isoforms in the teleost Solea senegalensis are described for the first time. Sequence analysis of predicted polypeptides revealed a high degree of conservation across teleosts and mammals. Phylogenetic analysis clustered the five genes into three main clades: α1 (designated atp1a1a and atp1a1b), α2 (designated atp1a2) and α3 (designated atp1a3a and atp1a3b) isoforms. Transcriptional analysis in larvae showed distinct expression profiles during development. In juvenile tissues, the atp1a1a gene was highly expressed in osmoregulatory organs, atp1a2 in skeletal muscle, atp1a1b in brain and heart and atp1a3a and atp1a3b mainly in brain. Quantification of mRNA abundance after a salinity challenge showed that atp1a1a transcript levels increased significantly in the gill of soles transferred to high salinity water (60 ppt). In contrast, atp1a3a transcripts increased at low salinity (5 ppt). In situ hybridization (ISH) analysis revealed that the number of ionocytes expressing atp1a1a transcripts in the primary gill filaments was higher at 35 and 60 ppt than at 5 ppt and remained undetectable or at very low levels in the lamellae at 5 and 35 ppt but increased at 60 ppt. Immunohistochemistry showed a higher number of positive cells in the lamellae. Whole-mount analysis of atp1a1a mRNA in young sole larvae revealed that it was localized in gut, pronephric tubule, gill, otic vesicle, yolk sac ionocytes and chordacentrum. Moreover, atp1a1a mRNAs increased at mouth opening (3 DPH) in larvae incubated at 36 ppt with a greater signal in gills.

  2. High transcript level of fatty acid-binding protein 11 but not of very low-density lipoprotein receptor is correlated to ovarian follicle atresia in a teleost fish (Solea senegalensis).

    PubMed

    Agulleiro, Maria J; André, Michèle; Morais, Sofia; Cerdà, Joan; Babin, Patrick J

    2007-09-01

    Transcripts encoding a fatty acid-binding protein (FABP), Fabp11, and two isoforms of very low-density lipoprotein receptor (Vldlr; vitellogenin receptor) were characterized from the ovary of Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis). Phylogenetic analyses of vertebrate FABPs demonstrated that Senegalese sole Fabp11, as zebrafish (Danio rerio) homologous sequences, is part of a newly defined teleost fish FABP subfamily that is a sister clade of tetrapod FABP4/FABP5/FABP8/FABP9. RT-PCR revealed high levels of vldlr transcript splicing variants in the ovaries and, to a lesser extent, in somatic tissues, whereas fabp11 was highly expressed in the ovaries, liver, and adipose tissue. In situ hybridization analysis showed vldlr and fabp11 mRNAs in previtellogenic oocytes, whereas no hybridization signals were detected in the larger vitellogenic oocytes. Transcript expression of fabp11 was strongly upregulated in somatic cells surrounding atretic follicles. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated that ovarian transcript levels of vldlr and fabp11 had a significant positive correlation with the percentage of follicles in previtellogenesis and atresia, respectively. These results suggest that the expression level of vldlr transcripts may be used as a precocious functional marker to quantify the number of oocytes recruited for vitellogenesis and that fabp11 mRNA may be a very useful molecular marker for determining cellular events and environmental factors that regulate follicular atresia in fish.

  3. Microglia of teleosts: facing a challenge in neurobiology.

    PubMed

    Cuoghi, B; Mola, Lucrezia

    2007-01-01

    This review is concerned with recent literature on teleost fish CNS microglia. It covers not only various aspects of these cells, notably comparing them with mammalian microglia, but also points out the several potentialities neural tissue of teleosts exhibits in neurobiological research. The relationships between neurons and glial cells are considered in fish, aiming at an integrated picture of the complex ways neurons and glia communicate and collaborate in normal and injured neural tissues. In addition, attention has been paid to different teleost models according to their availability, easy maintenance in experimental conditions, possibilities of embryos manipulation and sequenced genome. The recent setting up of successful protocols for fish glia and mixed neuron-glia cultures, together with the molecular facilities offered from genome knowledge, should provide a new boost to studies about microglia and neuron-microglia relationships.

  4. Frequency of Fish Intake and Diabetes among Adult Indians

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Sutapa; Millett, Christopher; Subramanian, S. V.; Ebrahim, Shah

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Recent studies have shown that the choice of foods plays a role in diabetes prevention. However, little empirical evidence on this association exists in developing countries. We aimed to examine the association between frequency of fish intake and self-reported diabetes status among adult men and women in India. Methods: Analysis of cross-sectional data from participants in India's third National Family Health Survey conducted during 2005–2006 was performed. Associations between fish intake, determined by frequency of consumption (daily, weekly, occasionally, and never), and self-reported diabetes were estimated using multivariable-adjusted models in 99,574 women, 56,742 men, and 39,257 couples aged 20–49 years after adjusting for frequency of consumption of other food items, body mass index (BMI) status, tobacco smoking, alcohol drinking, watching television, age, education, living standard of the household, and place of residence. Results: After adjustment for other dietary, lifestyle, and socioeconomic and demographic characteristics, odds of diabetes were 2 times higher (odds ratio [OR]: 2.02; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.59–2.57; p < 0.0001) among those who reported consuming fish daily compared to those who never consumed fish. Weekly fish intake was also associated with a higher odds of having diabetes (OR: 1.55; 95% CI, 1.25–1.93; p < 0.0001). The adjusted effect of daily fish intake on diabetes was greater among men (OR: 2.46; 95% CI, 1.66–3.65) than among women (OR: 1.72; 95% CI, 1.26–2.33). In cross-spousal sensitivity analysis, the odds of a husband having diabetes was also associated with wife's daily/weekly consumption of fish (OR: 1.36; 95% CI, 0.92–2.01) and the odds of a wife having diabetes was also associated with husband's daily/weekly consumption of fish (OR: 1.21; 95% CI, 0.87–1.68). Conclusions: In a large nationally representative sample of adult men and women in India, daily or weekly fish intake was

  5. Evidence that the inhibitory effects of stress on reproduction in teleost fish are not mediated by the action of cortisol on ovarian steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pankhurst, N W; Van der Kraak, G; Peter, R E

    1995-09-01

    Ovarian follicles of goldfish, common carp, and the sparid Pagrus auratus (New Zealand snapper) were incubated in vitro to assess the effects of cortisol (F) on ovarian steroidogenesis. Unstimulated goldfish follicles produced little testosterone (T) or 17 beta-estradiol (E2), whereas both carp and snapper follicles spontaneously produced E2 and to a lesser extent T. Goldfish follicles produced increased amounts of E2 in response to treatment with human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), whereas carp and snapper follicles did not. However, stimulation of carp follicles with maturational carp gonadotropin (cGTH-II) resulted in dose-dependent increases in production of E2. Treatment of follicles of all three species with T resulted in E2 production to levels as high as or higher than those following treatment with hCG or cGtH-II. Cotreatment of follicles with T and hCG or cGTH-II did not result in higher E2 production than treatment with T alone. Goldfish follicles treated with 25-hydroxycholesterol showed increases in E2 production that were similar to those occurring following treatment with T. Treatment of follicles with F at a range of doses up to 1 microgram.ml-1 had no inhibitory effect on T or E2 production in any treatment combination in any of the species examined. In several cases, follicles incubated with T and/or hCG produced more E2 in the presence of F than they did without F. The results suggest either that the observed inhibitory effects of stress in a range of teleost species are not mediated by F or that they arise higher in the endocrine pathway than at the level of ovarian steroidogenesis.

  6. Rh versus pH: the role of Rhesus glycoproteins in renal ammonia excretion during metabolic acidosis in a freshwater teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Wright, Patricia A; Wood, Chris M; Wilson, Jonathan M

    2014-08-15

    Increased renal ammonia excretion in response to metabolic acidosis is thought to be a conserved response in vertebrates. We tested the hypothesis that Rhesus (Rh) glycoproteins in the kidney of the freshwater common carp, Cyprinus carpio, play a crucial role in regulating renal ammonia excretion during chronic metabolic acidosis. Exposure to water pH 4.0 (72 h) resulted in a classic metabolic acidosis with reduced plasma arterial pH and [HCO3(-)], no change in PCO2 and large changes in renal function. Urine [NH4(+)] as well as [titratable acidity-HCO3(-)] rose significantly over the acid exposure, but the profound reduction (fivefold) in urine flow rates eliminated the expected elevations in renal ammonia excretion. Low urine flow rates may be a primary strategy to conserve ions, as urinary excretion rates of Na(+), Cl(-) and Ca(2+) were significantly lower during the acid exposure relative to the control period. Interestingly, renal Rhcg1 mRNA and protein levels were elevated in acid-exposed relative to control groups, along with mRNA levels of several ion transporters, including the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger, H(+)-ATPase and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed a strong apical Rhcg1 signal in distal tubules. Taken together, these data show that renal Rh glycoproteins and associated ion transporters are responsive to metabolic acidosis, but conservation of ions through reduced urine flow rates takes primacy over renal acid-base regulation in the freshwater C. carpio. We propose that an 'acid/base-ion balance' compromise explains the variable renal responses to metabolic acidosis in freshwater teleosts.

  7. Hox genes of the Japanese eel Anguilla japonica and Hox cluster evolution in teleosts.

    PubMed

    Guo, Baocheng; Gan, Xiaoni; He, Shunping

    2010-03-15

    Compared with other diploid teleosts (2n=48), anguilloid fish have a specialized karyotype (2n=38) and remarkable morphological variation, and represent one basal group species of teleosts. To investigate the Hox gene/cluster inventory in basal teleosts, a PCR-based survey of Hox genes in the Japanese eel (Anguilla japonica) was conducted with both gene-specific and homeobox-targeted degenerate primers. Our data provide evidence that at least 34 distinct Hox genes exist in the Japanese eel genome and that they represent eight Hox clusters. Duplication of Hox genes in the Japanese eel appears to be the result of the fish-specific genome duplication (FSGD) event. The Japanese eel shared the FSGD event with other teleosts such as zebrafish and pufferfish. A member of Hox paralog group one (HoxA1b) was preserved in the Japanese eel but was lost in other teleosts. Available Hox data revealed that the Hox cluster evolved distinctly in different teleost lineages. All duplicated Hox clusters were retained after the FSGD event in basal teleosts like in the Japanese eel, whereas crown teleosts lost one cluster (HoxCb or HoxDb). Based on current teleostean phylogeny, the HoxDb cluster was lost independently in the teleost lineages Otocephala and Euteleostei.

  8. A recombinant CHSE-214 cell line expressing an Mx1 promoter-reporter system responds to both interferon type I and type II from salmonids and represents a versatile tool to study the IFN-system in teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Jorunn B; Johansen, Audny; Hegseth, Marit N; Zou, Jun; Robertsen, Børre; Collet, Bertrand; Secombes, Christopher J

    2007-12-01

    A transgenic cell line for the detection of salmon interferons (IFNs) has been established. It is based on a CHSE-214 cell line containing a reporter construct expressing firefly luciferase under the control of the rainbow trout promoter for the IFN-induced Mx1 gene. This cell line, named CHSE-Mx10, showed IFN-induced luciferase expression after more than 80 passages, confirming the stability of this cell line. Interestingly, the Mx promoter was shown to respond to both salmon IFN-alpha/beta and trout IFN-gamma in a dose-dependent manner, while there was no response to TNF-alpha and IL-1beta. IFN-alpha/beta activity could be measured at a range of 9-150 U/ml, and IFN-gamma showed activity between 10 and 100 ng/ml. The reproducibility of both responses was good. The CHSE-Mx10 reporter system constitutes a versatile tool to study the induction and regulation of IFN signaling in teleost fish. A preliminary study presented herein suggests that both infectious pancreas necrosis virus (IPNV) and salmon pancreas disease virus (SPDV) may block activation of the Mx promoter in CHSE-Mx10 stimulated with IFN-alpha/beta.

  9. In vitro effects of metals on isolated head-kidney and blood leucocytes of the teleost fish Sparus aurata L. and Dicentrarchus labrax L.

    PubMed

    Morcillo, Patricia; Meseguer, José; Esteban, M Ángeles; Cuesta, Alberto

    2016-07-01

    The in vitro use of fish leucocytes to test the toxicity of aquatic pollutants, and particularly the immutoxicological effects, could be a valuable alternative to fish bioassays but has received little attention. In this study, head-kidney and peripheral blood leucocytes (HKLs and PBLs, respectively) from gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata L.) and European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax L.) specimens were exposed to Cd, MeHg (methylmercury), Pb or As for 24 h being evaluated the resulting cytotoxicity. Exposure to metals produced a dose-dependent reduction in the viability, and MeHg showed the highest toxicity followed by Cd, As and Pb. Interestingly, leucocytes from European sea bass are more resistant to metal exposure than those from gilthead seabream. Similarly, HKLs are always more sensitive than those isolated from blood from the same fish species. Moreover, fish leucocytes incubated with metals exhibited alterations in gene expression profiles that were more pronounced in the HKLs in general, being Pb the metal provoking less effects. Concretely, genes related to cellular protection (metallothionein), stress (heat shock protein 70) and oxidative stress (superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione reductase) were, in general, down-regulated in seabream HKLs but up-regulated in seabream PBLs and sea bass HKLs and PBLs. In addition, this profile leads to the increase of expression in genes related to apoptosis (Bcl2 associated X protein and caspase 3). Finally, transcription of genes involved in immunity (interleukin-1β and immunoglobulin M) was down-regulated, mainly in seabream leucocytes. This study points to the benefits for evaluating the toxicological mechanisms of marine pollution using fish leucocytes in vitro and insight into the mechanisms at gene level.

  10. Structural and Kinetic Basis of Steroid 17α,20-Lyase Activity in Teleost Fish Cytochrome P450 17A1 and Its Absence in Cytochrome P450 17A2*

    PubMed Central

    Pallan, Pradeep S.; Nagy, Leslie D.; Lei, Li; Gonzalez, Eric; Kramlinger, Valerie M.; Azumaya, Caleigh M.; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Waterman, Michael R.; Guengerich, F. Peter; Egli, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 (P450) 17A enzymes play a critical role in the oxidation of the steroids progesterone (Prog) and pregnenolone (Preg) to glucocorticoids and androgens. In mammals, a single enzyme, P450 17A1, catalyzes both 17α-hydroxylation and a subsequent 17α,20-lyase reaction with both Prog and Preg. Teleost fish contain two 17A P450s; zebrafish P450 17A1 catalyzes both 17α-hydroxylation and lyase reactions with Prog and Preg, and P450 17A2 is more efficient in pregnenolone 17α-hydroxylation but does not catalyze the lyase reaction, even in the presence of cytochrome b5. P450 17A2 binds all substrates and products, although more loosely than P450 17A1. Pulse-chase and kinetic spectral experiments and modeling established that the two-step P450 17A1 Prog oxidation is more distributive than the Preg reaction, i.e. 17α-OH product dissociates more prior to the lyase step. The drug orteronel selectively blocked the lyase reaction of P450 17A1 but only in the case of Prog. X-ray crystal structures of zebrafish P450 17A1 and 17A2 were obtained with the ligand abiraterone and with Prog for P450 17A2. Comparison of the two fish P450 17A-abiraterone structures with human P450 17A1 (DeVore, N. M., and Scott, E. E. (2013) Nature 482, 116–119) showed only a few differences near the active site, despite only ∼50% identity among the three proteins. The P450 17A2 structure differed in four residues near the heme periphery. These residues may allow the proposed alternative ferric peroxide mechanism for the lyase reaction, or residues removed from the active site may allow conformations that lead to the lyase activity. PMID:25533464

  11. Social Opportunity Rapidly Regulates Expression of CRF and CRF Receptors in the Brain during Social Ascent of a Teleost Fish, Astatotilapia burtoni

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Russ E.; Maruska, Karen P.; Becker, Lisa; Fernald, Russell D.

    2014-01-01

    In social animals, hierarchical rank governs food availability, territorial rights and breeding access. Rank order can change rapidly and typically depends on dynamic aggressive interactions. Since the neuromodulator corticotrophin releasing factor (CRF) integrates internal and external cues to regulate the hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis, we analyzed the CRF system during social encounters related to status. We used a particularly suitable animal model, African cichlid fish, Astatotilapia burtoni, whose social status regulates reproduction. When presented with an opportunity to rise in rank, subordinate A. burtoni males rapidly change coloration, behavior, and their physiology to support a new role as dominant, reproductively active fish. Although changes in gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH1), the key reproductive molecular actor, have been analyzed during social ascent, little is known about the roles of CRF and the HPA axis during transitions. Experimentally enabling males to ascend in social rank, we measured changes in plasma cortisol and the CRF system in specific brain regions 15 minutes after onset of social ascent. Plasma cortisol levels in ascending fish were lower than subordinate conspecifics, but similar to levels in dominant animals. In the preoptic area (POA), where GnRH1 cells are located, and in the pituitary gland, CRF and CRF1 receptor mRNA levels are rapidly down regulated in ascending males compared to subordinates. In the Vc/Vl, a forebrain region where CRF cell bodies are located, mRNA coding for both CRFR1 and CRFR2 receptors is lower in ascending fish compared to stable subordinate conspecifics. The rapid time course of these changes (within minutes) suggests that the CRF system is involved in the physiological changes associated with shifts in social status. Since CRF typically has inhibitory effects on the neuroendocrine reproductive axis in vertebrates, this attenuation of CRF activity may allow rapid activation of the

  12. Evaluation of Juvenile Fish Bypass and Adult Fish Facilities at Water Diversions in the Umatilla River; 1992 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, Suzanne M.

    1993-03-01

    We report on our progress from October 1991 through September 1992 in evaluating juvenile fish bypass facilities at Three Mile Falls and Westland dams on the Umatilla River. We also report on our progress from October 1991 through June 1992 in evaluating adult fish passage in the lower Umatilla River and adult fish passage facilities at Three Mile Falls Dam. The study is a cooperative effort by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR). These are the study objectives addressed by ODFW and CTUIR: (1) Report A (ODFW): To evaluate the juvenile fish bypass facility in the West Extension Irrigation District Canal at Three Mile Falls Dam and document juvenile salmonid passage through the juvenile fish bypass facility and east-bank adult fish ladder. To measure velocity and develop trap designs at Westland Dam. (2) Report B (CTUIR): To examine the passage of adult salmonids at Three Mile Falls Dam. The study is part of a program to rehabilitate anadromous fish stocks in the Umatilla River Basin, including restoration of coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) and chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), as well as enhancement of summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

  13. Isolation and characterisation of mRNA encoding the salmon- and chicken-II type gonadotrophin-releasing hormones in the teleost fish Rutilus rutilus (Cyprinidae).

    PubMed

    Penlington, M C; Williams, M A; Sumpter, J P; Rand-Weaver, M; Hoole, D; Arme, C

    1997-12-01

    The complementary DNAs (cDNA) encoding the [Trp7,Leu8]-gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (salmon-type GnRH; sGnRH:GeneBank accession no. u60667) and the [His5,Trp7,Tyr8]-GnRH (chicken-II-type GnRH; cGnRH-II: GeneBank accession no. u60668) precursor in the roach (Rutilus rutilus) were isolated and sequenced following reverse transcription and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The sGnRH and cGnRH-II precursor cDNAs consisted of 439 and 628 bp, and included open reading frames of 282 and 255 bp respectively. The structures of the encoded peptides were the same as GnRHs previously identified in other vertebrates. The sGnRH and cGnRH-II precursor cDNAs, including the non-coding regions, had 88.6 and 79.9% identity respectively, to those identified in goldfish (Carassius auratus). However, significant similarity was not observed between the non-coding regions of the GnRH cDNAs of Cyprinidae and other fish. The presumed third exon, encoding partial sGnRH associated peptide (GAP) of roach, demonstrated significant nucleotide and amino acid similarity with the appropriate regions in the goldfish, but not with other species, and this may indicate functional differences of GAP between different families of fish. cGnRH-II precursor cDNAs from roach had relatively high nucleotide similarity across this GnRH variant. Cladistic analysis classified the sGnRH and cGnRH-II precursor cDNAs into three and two groups respectively. However, the divergence between nucleotide sequences within the sGnRH variant was greater than those encoding the cGnRH-II precursors. Consistent with the consensus developed from previous studies, Northern blot analysis demonstrated that expression of sGnRH and cGnRH-II was restricted to the olfactory bulbs and midbrain of roach respectively. This work forms the basis for further study on the mechanisms by which the tapeworm, Ligula intestinalis, interacts with the pituitary-gonadal axis of its fish host.

  14. Teleost IgSF immunoregulatory receptors.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Benjamin C; Cortes, Herman D; Mewes-Ares, Jacqueline; Verheijen, Karlijn; Stafford, James L

    2011-12-01

    In all animals innate immunity is the first line of immune defense from invading pathogens. The prototypical innate cellular responses such as phagocytosis, degranulation, and cellular cytotoxicity are elicited by leukocytes in a diverse range of animals including fish, amphibians, birds and mammals reinforcing the importance of such primordial defense mechanisms. In mammals, these responses are intricately controlled and coordinated at the cellular level by distinct subsets of immunoregulatory receptors. Many of these surface proteins belong to the immunoglobulin superfamily and in mammals elaborate immunoregulatory receptor networks play a major role in the control of infectious diseases. Recent examination of teleost immunity has begun to further illustrate the complexities of these receptor networks in lower vertebrates. However, little is known about the mechanisms that control how immunoregulatory receptors influence cellular decision making in ectothermic vertebrates. This review focuses on several families of recently discovered immunoglobulin superfamily members in fish that share structural, phylogenetic and in some cases functional relationships with mammalian immunoregulatory receptors. Further characterization of these teleost innate immune receptor families will provide detailed information regarding the conservation and importance of innate immune defense strategies throughout vertebrate evolution.

  15. In Vivo Molecular Responses of Fast and Slow Muscle Fibers to Lipopolysaccharide in a Teleost Fish, the Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    PubMed Central

    Magnoni, Leonardo J.; Roher, Nerea; Crespo, Diego; Krasnov, Aleksei; Planas, Josep V.

    2015-01-01

    The physiological consequences of the activation of the immune system in skeletal muscle in fish are not completely understood. To study the consequences of the activation of the immune system by bacterial pathogens on skeletal muscle function, we administered lipopolysaccharide (LPS), an active component of Gram-negative bacteria, in rainbow trout and performed transcriptomic and proteomic analyses in skeletal muscle. We examined changes in gene expression in fast and slow skeletal muscle in rainbow trout at 24 and 72 h after LPS treatment (8 mg/kg) by microarray analysis. At the transcriptional level, we observed important changes in metabolic, mitochondrial and structural genes in fast and slow skeletal muscle. In slow skeletal muscle, LPS caused marked changes in the expression of genes related to oxidative phosphorylation, while in fast skeletal muscle LPS administration caused major changes in the expression of genes coding for glycolytic enzymes. We also evaluated the effects of LPS administration on the fast skeletal muscle proteome and identified 14 proteins that were differentially induced in LPS-treated trout, primarily corresponding to glycolytic enzymes. Our results evidence a robust and tissue-specific response of skeletal muscle to an acute inflammatory challenge, affecting energy utilization and possibly growth in rainbow trout. PMID:25658438

  16. Spermiogenesis and biflagellate spermatozoon of the teleost fish Lampanyctus crocodilus (Myctophiformes, Myctophidae): ultrastructure and characterisation of its sperm basic nuclear proteins.

    PubMed

    Ribes, E; Cheema, M; González-Romero, R; Lloris, D; Ausió, J; Saperas, N

    2015-08-01

    We undertook an ultrastructural study of the spermiogenesis of the lanternfish Lampanyctus crocodilus (Myctophiformes, Myctophidae) with special emphasis on the condensation of chromatin and the biochemical characterisation of its sperm nuclear basic proteins (SNBPs). The round head of the early spermatid of L. crocodilus develops into a curved conical-shaped head in the spermatozoon. Two flagella, present even in the spermatid, are inserted laterally at the convex side of the sperm head. Both flagella possess an axoneme with a 9 + 0 instead of the typical 9 + 2 axonemal structure. Mitochondria undergo a characteristic redistribution during spermiogenesis. A reduced number of them are present lying away from the centrioles at both ends of the concave side of the sperm head. During the chromatin condensation stages in spermiogenesis, fibrogranular structures with granules of 25 ± 5 and 50 ± 5 nm can be observed in the early spermatid and develop into larger granules of about 150 ± 50 nm in the middle spermatid. The latter granules coalesce during the transition to the advanced spermatid and spermatozoon giving rise to highly condensed chromatin in the sperm cell. Protamines are the main SNBPs associated with this chromatin; however, they are unusually large and correspond to the largest protamines described in fish to date. Small stoichiometric amounts of histones and other basic proteins coexist with these protamines in the spermatozoon.

  17. Leptin stimulates hepatic growth hormone receptor and insulin-like growth factor gene expression in a teleost fish, the hybrid striped bass.

    PubMed

    Won, Eugene T; Douros, Jonathan D; Hurt, David A; Borski, Russell J

    2016-04-01

    Leptin is an anorexigenic peptide hormone that circulates as an indicator of adiposity in mammals, and functions to maintain energy homeostasis by balancing feeding and energy expenditure. In fish, leptin tends to be predominantly expressed in the liver, another important energy storing tissue, rather than in fat depots as it is in mammals. The liver also produces the majority of circulating insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), which comprise the mitogenic component of the growth hormone (GH)-IGF endocrine growth axis. Based on similar regulatory patterns of leptin and IGFs that we have documented in previous studies on hybrid striped bass (HSB: Morone saxatilis×Morone chrysops), and considering the co-localization of these peptides in the liver, we hypothesized that leptin might regulate the endocrine growth axis in a manner that helps coordinate somatic growth with energy availability. Using a HSB hepatocyte culture system to simulate autocrine or paracrine exposure that might occur within the liver, this study examines the potential for leptin to modulate metabolism and growth through regulation of IGF gene expression directly, or indirectly through the regulation of GH receptors (GHR), which mediate GH-induced IGF expression. First, we verified that GH (50nM) has a classical stimulatory effect on IGF-1 and additionally show it stimulates IGF-2 transcription in hepatocytes. Leptin (5 and/or 50nM) directly stimulated in vitro GHR2 gene expression within 8h of exposure, and both GHR1 and GHR2 as well as IGF-1 and IGF-2 gene expression after 24h. Cells were then co-incubated with submaximal concentrations of leptin and GH (25nM each) to test if they had a synergistic effect on IGF gene expression, possibly through increased GH sensitivity following GHR upregulation by leptin. In combination, however, the treatments only had an additive effect on stimulating IGF-1 mRNA despite their capacity to increase GHR mRNA abundance. This suggests that leptin's stimulatory

  18. Novel morphological and molecular data for Corynosoma hannae Zdzitowiecki, 1984 (Acanthocephala: Polymorphidae) from teleosts, fish-eating birds and pinnipeds from New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Orts, Jesús S; Smales, Lesley R; Pinacho-Pinacho, Carlos D; García-Varela, Martín; Presswell, Bronwen

    2017-02-01

    The polymorphid acanthocephalan, Corynosoma hannae Zdzitowiecki, 1984 is characterised on the basis of newly collected material from a New Zealand sea lion, Phocarctos hookeri (Gray), and long-nosed fur seal, Arctophoca forsteri (Lesson) (definitive hosts), and from Stewart Island shags, Leucocarbo chalconotus (Gray), spotted shags, Phalacrocorax punctatus (Sparrman) and yellow-eyed penguins, Megadyptes antipodes (Hombron & Jacquinot) (non-definitive hosts) from New Zealand. Specimens are described in detail and scanning electron micrographs for C. hannae are provided. Additionally, cystacanths of C. hannae are reported and described for the first time from the body cavity and mesenteries of New Zealand brill, Colistium guntheri (Hutton) and from New Zealand sole, Peltorhamphus novaezeelandiae Günther from Kaka Point, Otago in New Zealand. Partial sequence data for the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase 1 gene (cox1) for adults, immature specimens and cystacanths of C. hannae were obtained. Phylogenetic analyses of the newly-generated sequences and for available cox1 sequences of Corynosoma spp. revealed a close relationship between C. hannae and C. australe Johnston, 1937, both species infecting pinnipeds in the Southern Hemisphere. However, a morphological comparison of the species suggests that C. hannae mostly closely resembles C. evae Zdzitowiecki, 1984 and C. semerme (Forssell, 1904), the latter of which occurs in pinnipeds in the Northern Hemisphere.

  19. Modular development of the teleost trunk along the dorsoventral axis and zic1/zic4 as selector genes in the dorsal module.

    PubMed

    Kawanishi, Toru; Kaneko, Takuya; Moriyama, Yuuta; Kinoshita, Masato; Yokoi, Hayato; Suzuki, Tohru; Shimada, Atsuko; Takeda, Hiroyuki

    2013-04-01

    Teleost fish exhibit remarkable diversity in morphology, such as fins and coloration, particularly on the dorsal side. These structures are evolutionary adaptive because their back is highly visible to other individuals. However, owing to the late phenotypic appearance (from larva to adult) and lack of appropriate mutants, the genetic mechanisms that regulate these dorsoventrally asymmetric external patterns are largely unknown. To address this, we have analyzed the spontaneous medaka mutant Double anal fin (Da), which exhibits a mirror-image duplication of the ventral half across the lateral midline from larva to adult. Da is an enhancer mutant for zic1 and zic4 in which their expression in dorsal somites is lost. We show that the dorsoventral polarity in Da somites is lost and then demonstrate using transplantation techniques that somites and their derived tissues globally determine the multiple dorsal-specific characteristics of the body (fin morphology and pigmentation) from embryo to adult. Intriguingly, the zic1/zic4 expression in the wild type persists throughout life in the dorsal parts of somite derivatives, i.e. the myotome, dermis and vertebrae, forming a broad dorsal domain in the trunk. Comparative analysis further implies a central role for zic1/zic4 in morphological diversification of the teleost body. Taken together, we propose that the teleost trunk consists of dorsal/ventral developmental modules and that zic1/zic4 in somites function as selector genes in the dorsal module to regulate multiple dorsal morphologies.

  20. Evaluation of Juvenile Fish Bypass and Adult Fish Passage Facilities at Water Diversions in the Umatilla River; 1993 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, Suzanne M.

    1994-03-01

    This report presents progress from October 1992 through September 1993 in evaluating juvenile fish bypass facilities at Three Mile Falls, Maxwell, Westland, and Feed Canal dams on the Umatilla River, and in evaluating adult fish passage in the lower Umatilla River. Also reported is an effort to evaluate delayed mortality and stress responses of juvenile salmonids resulting from trapping and transport at high temperatures. These studies are part of a program to rehabilitate anadromous fish stocks in the matilla River Basin, including restoration of coho salmon and chinook salmon, as well as enhancement of summer steelhead.

  1. B cells and their role in the teleost gut

    PubMed Central

    Korytář, Tomáš; Takizawa, Fumio

    2016-01-01

    Mucosal surfaces are the main route of entry for pathogens in all living organisms. In the case of teleost fish, mucosal surfaces cover the vast majority of the animal. As these surfaces are in constant contact with the environment, fish are perpetually exposed to a vast number of pathogens. Despite the potential prevalence and variety of pathogens, mucosal surfaces are primarily populated by commensal non-pathogenic bacteria. Indeed, a fine balance between these two populations of microorganisms is crucial for animal survival. This equilibrium, controlled by the mucosal immune system, maintains homeostasis at mucosal tissues. Teleost fish possess a diffuse mucosa-associated immune system in the intestine, with B cells being one of the main responders. Immunoglobulins produced by these lymphocytes are a critical line of defense against pathogens and also prevent the entrance of commensal bacteria into the epithelium. In this review we will summarize recent literature regarding the role of B-lymphocytes and immunoglobulins in gut immunity in teleost fish, with specific focus on immunoglobulin isotypes and the microorganisms, pathogenic and non-pathogenic that interact with the immune system. PMID:26995768

  2. Brain derived neurotrophic factor in the retina of the teleost N. furzeri.

    PubMed

    Gatta, Claudia; Castaldo, Luciana; Cellerino, Alessandro; de Girolamo, Paolo; Lucini, Carla; D'Angelo, Livia

    2014-07-01

    BDNF plays an important role in the development and maintenance of visual circuitries in the retina and brain visual centers. In adulthood, BDNF signaling is involved in neural protection and regeneration of retina. In this survey, we investigated the expression of BDNF in the retina of adult Nothobranchius furzeri, a teleost fish employed for age research. After describing the retina of N. furzeri and confirming that the structure is organized in layers as in all vertebrates, we have studied the localization of BDNF mRNA and protein throughout the retinal layers. BDNF mRNA is detectable in all layers, whereas the protein is lacking in the photoreceptors. The occurrence of BDNF provides new insights on its role in the retina, particularly in view of age-related disease of retina.

  3. Gonads directly regulate growth in teleosts.

    PubMed

    Bhatta, Sandip; Iwai, Toshiharu; Miura, Chiemi; Higuchi, Masato; Shimizu-Yamaguchi, Sonoko; Fukada, Haruhisa; Miura, Takeshi

    2012-07-10

    In general, there is a relationship between growth and reproduction, and gonads are known to be important organs for growth, but direct evidence for their role is lacking. Here, using a fish model, we report direct evidence that gonads are endocrine organs equal to the pituitary in controlling body growth. Gonadal loss of function, gain of function, and rescue of growth were investigated in tilapia. Gonadectomy experiments were carried out in juvenile males and females. Gonadectomy significantly retarded growth compared with controls; however, this retardation was rescued by the implantation of extirpated gonads. Because gonads express growth hormone, it is possible that gonads control body growth through the secretion of growth hormone and/or other endocrine factors. We propose that gonads are integral players in the dynamic regulation of growth in teleosts.

  4. Genome-wide identification and divergent transcriptional expression of StAR-related lipid transfer (START) genes in teleosts.

    PubMed

    Teng, Huajing; Cai, Wanshi; Zeng, Kun; Mao, Fengbiao; You, Mingcong; Wang, Tao; Zhao, Fangqing; Sun, Zhongsheng

    2013-04-25

    The lipid transfer reactions and the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR)-related lipid transfer (START) genes have a major role in lipid metabolism. However, START genes and their physiological functions in teleost fishes are relatively unknown. Through genome-wide screening, we identified and annotated 91 START genes in 5 teleost species. Although START domain-containing proteins are augmented in teleost genomes relative to tetrapod genomes, a similar number of genes are shared between them. Asymmetry of paralogous gene loss within the teleost START family and an extra copy of some START genes in teleosts resulting from fish-specific genome duplication have been demonstrated. A distinct transcriptional expression pattern within members of some START groups under different developmental stages suggests divergent functions within the same group in the developmental process. In addition, an asymmetric molecular evolution rate deviating from the neutral expectation has been observed in 7 of 14 teleost fish extra-duplicated pairs. The present study provides valuable information for increasing our understanding of the evolution and gene expression divergence under developmental stages of the START gene family in teleost fishes.

  5. Fish consumption pattern among adults of different ethnics in Peninsular Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Nurul Izzah; Wan Mahiyuddin, Wan Rozita; Tengku Mohamad, Tengku Rozaina; Ling, Cheong Yoon; Daud, Siti Fatimah; Hussein, Nasriyah Che; Abdullah, Nor Aini; Shaharudin, Rafiza; Sulaiman, Lokman Hakim

    2016-01-01

    Background Understanding different patterns of fish consumption is an important component for risk assessment of contaminants in fish. A few studies on food consumption had been conducted in Malaysia, but none of them focused specifically on fish consumption. The objectives of this study were to document the meal pattern among three major ethnics in Malaysia with respect to fish/seafood consumption, identify most frequently consumed fish and cooking method, and examine the influence of demographic factors on pattern of fish consumption among study subjects. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted between February 2008 and May 2009 to investigate patterns of fish consumption among Malaysian adults in Peninsular Malaysia. Adults aged 18 years and above were randomly selected and fish consumption data were collected using a 3-day prospective food diary. Results A total of 2,675 subjects, comprising male (44.2%) and female (55.7%) participants from major ethnics (Malays, 76.9%; Chinese, 14.7%; Indians, 8.3%) with a mean age of 43.4±16.2 years, were involved in this study. The results revealed 10 most frequently consumed marine fish in descending order: Indian mackerel, anchovy, yellowtail and yellow-stripe scads, tuna, sardines, torpedo scad, Indian and short-fin scads, pomfret, red snapper, and king mackerel. Prawn and squid were also among the most preferred seafood by study subjects. The most frequently consumed freshwater fish were freshwater catfish and snakehead. The most preferred cooking style by Malaysians was deep-fried fish, followed by fish cooked in thick and/or thin chili gravy, fish curry, and fish cooked with coconut milk mixed with other spices and flavorings. Overall, Malaysians consumed 168 g/day fish, with Malay ethnics’ (175±143 g/day) consumption of fish significantly (p<0.001) higher compared with the other two ethnic groups (Chinese=152±133 g/day, Indians=136±141 g/day). Conclusion Fish consumption was significantly associated with

  6. Savannah River Aquatic Ecology Program. Volume I. Adult fish. Annual report, November 1983-August 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Paller, M.; Osteen, D.V.

    1985-05-01

    A multipurpose study on the fish community of the Savannah River near the Savannah River Plant was conducted between September 1983 and August 1984. The major portion of this study examined the abundance and distribution of fishes near the Savannah River Plant in relation to the thermal discharges into the river, creeks and the floodplain swamp. Another portion of the study examined the rates of impingement of juvenile and adult fishes onto the river water intake screens in order to assess the potential influence of this plant operation on the fish community. 24 refs., 13 figs., 23 tabs.

  7. Structure of the tail fin in teleosts.

    PubMed

    Becerra, J; Montes, G S; Bexiga, S R; Junqueira, L C

    1983-01-01

    A morphologic study of the structure of the tail fin in eight species of teleosts was performed by aid of the Picrosirius-polarization method, which is a specific histochemical method for the detection of collagen in tissue sections. This structure is composed mainly of skeletal elements, the fin rays, covered by skin. Fin rays are bound to each other and to the surrounding tissues by a series of collagenous ligaments forming a complex, highly pliable and resistant structure. Although the general structural pattern of tail fins was consistent in all species studied, the comparative aspects reported in this paper show that variations in the form and size of their components are responsible for the morphologic diversities which are closely related to specific functional adaptations. Morphometric data on the number and size of actinotrichia in normal adult specimens are presented.

  8. Connectivity of vertebrate genomes: Paired-related homeobox (Prrx) genes in spotted gar, basal teleosts, and tetrapods□

    PubMed Central

    Braasch, Ingo; Guiguen, Yann; Loker, Ryan; Letaw, John H.; Ferrara, Allyse; Bobe, Julien; Postlethwait, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Teleost fish are important models for human biology, health, and disease. Because genome duplication in a teleost ancestor (TGD) impacts the evolution of teleost genome structure and gene repertoires, we must discriminate gene functions that are shared and ancestral from those that are lineage-specific in teleosts or tetrapods to accurately apply inferences from teleost disease models to human health. Generalizations must account both for the TGD and for divergent evolution between teleosts and tetrapods after the likely two rounds of genome duplication shared by all vertebrates. Progress in sequencing techniques provides new opportunities to generate genomic and transcriptomic information from a broad range of phylogenetically informative taxa that facilitate detailed understanding of gene family and gene function evolution. We illustrate here the use of new sequence resources from spotted gar (Lepisosteus oculatus), a rayfin fish that diverged from teleosts before the TGD, as well as RNA-Seq data from gar and multiple teleost lineages to reconstruct the evolution of the Paired-related homeobox (Prrx) transcription factor gene family, which is involved in the development of mesoderm and neural crest-derived mesenchyme. We show that for Prrx genes, the spotted gar genome and gene expression patterns mimic mammals better than teleosts do. Analyses force the seemingly paradoxical conclusion that regulatory mechanisms for the limb expression domains of Prrx genes existed before the evolution of paired appendages. Detailed evolutionary analyses like those reported here are required to identify fish species most similar to the human genome to optimally connect fish models to human gene functions in health and disease. PMID:24486528

  9. Oogenesis in teleosts: how eggs are formed.

    PubMed

    Lubzens, Esther; Young, Graham; Bobe, Julien; Cerdà, Joan

    2010-02-01

    One of the major objectives of the aquaculture industry is the production of a large number of viable eggs with high survival. Major achievements have been made in recent years in improving protocols for higher efficiency of egg production and viability of progeny. Main gaps remain, however, in understanding the dynamic processes associated with oogenesis, the formation of an egg, from the time that germ cells turn into oogonia, until the release of ova during spawning in teleosts. Recent studies on primordial germ-cells, yolk protein precursors and their processing within the developing oocyte, the deposition of vitamins in eggs, structure and function of egg envelopes and oocyte maturation processes, further reveal the complexity of oogenesis. Moreover, numerous circulating endocrine and locally-acting paracrine and autocrine factors regulate the various stages of oocyte development and maturation. Though it is clear that the major regulators during vitellogenesis and oocyte maturation are the pituitary gonadotropins (LH and FSH) and sex steroids, the picture emerging from recent studies is of complex hormonal cross-talk at all stages between the developing oocyte and its surrounding follicle layers to ensure coordination of the various processes that are involved in the production of a fertilizable egg. In this review we aim at highlighting recent advances on teleost fish oocyte differentiation, maturation and ovulation, including those involved in the degeneration and reabsorption of ovarian follicles (atresia). The role of blood-borne and local ovarian factors in the regulation of the key steps of development reveal new aspects associated with egg formation.

  10. MHC and Evolution in Teleosts

    PubMed Central

    Grimholt, Unni

    2016-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules are key players in initiating immune responses towards invading pathogens. Both MHC class I and class II genes are present in teleosts, and, using phylogenetic clustering, sequences from both classes have been classified into various lineages. The polymorphic and classical MHC class I and class II gene sequences belong to the U and A lineages, respectively. The remaining class I and class II lineages contain nonclassical gene sequences that, despite their non-orthologous nature, may still hold functions similar to their mammalian nonclassical counterparts. However, the fact that several of these nonclassical lineages are only present in some teleost species is puzzling and questions their functional importance. The number of genes within each lineage greatly varies between teleost species. At least some gene expansions seem reasonable, such as the huge MHC class I expansion in Atlantic cod that most likely compensates for the lack of MHC class II and CD4. The evolutionary trigger for similar MHC class I expansions in tilapia, for example, which has a functional MHC class II, is not so apparent. Future studies will provide us with a more detailed understanding in particular of nonclassical MHC gene functions. PMID:26797646

  11. Electric fish: new insights into conserved processes of adult tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Unguez, Graciela A

    2013-07-01

    Biology is replete with examples of regeneration, the process that allows animals to replace or repair cells, tissues and organs. As on land, vertebrates in aquatic environments experience the occurrence of injury with varying frequency and to different degrees. Studies demonstrate that ray-finned fishes possess a very high capacity to regenerate different tissues and organs when they are adults. Among fishes that exhibit robust regenerative capacities are the neotropical electric fishes of South America (Teleostei: Gymnotiformes). Specifically, adult gymnotiform electric fishes can regenerate injured brain and spinal cord tissues and restore amputated body parts repeatedly. We have begun to identify some aspects of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of tail regeneration in the weakly electric fish Sternopygus macrurus (long-tailed knifefish) with a focus on regeneration of skeletal muscle and the muscle-derived electric organ. Application of in vivo microinjection techniques and generation of myogenic stem cell markers are beginning to overcome some of the challenges owing to the limitations of working with non-genetic animal models with extensive regenerative capacity. This review highlights some aspects of tail regeneration in S. macrurus and discusses the advantages of using gymnotiform electric fishes to investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms that produce new cells during regeneration in adult vertebrates.

  12. Electric fish: new insights into conserved processes of adult tissue regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Unguez, Graciela A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Biology is replete with examples of regeneration, the process that allows animals to replace or repair cells, tissues and organs. As on land, vertebrates in aquatic environments experience the occurrence of injury with varying frequency and to different degrees. Studies demonstrate that ray-finned fishes possess a very high capacity to regenerate different tissues and organs when they are adults. Among fishes that exhibit robust regenerative capacities are the neotropical electric fishes of South America (Teleostei: Gymnotiformes). Specifically, adult gymnotiform electric fishes can regenerate injured brain and spinal cord tissues and restore amputated body parts repeatedly. We have begun to identify some aspects of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of tail regeneration in the weakly electric fish Sternopygus macrurus (long-tailed knifefish) with a focus on regeneration of skeletal muscle and the muscle-derived electric organ. Application of in vivo microinjection techniques and generation of myogenic stem cell markers are beginning to overcome some of the challenges owing to the limitations of working with non-genetic animal models with extensive regenerative capacity. This review highlights some aspects of tail regeneration in S. macrurus and discusses the advantages of using gymnotiform electric fishes to investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms that produce new cells during regeneration in adult vertebrates. PMID:23761473

  13. Using passive acoustic telemetry to infer mortality events in adult herbivorous coral reef fishes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, J. A.; Welsh, J. Q.; Bellwood, D. R.

    2016-06-01

    Mortality is considered to be an important factor shaping the structure of coral reef fish communities, but data on the rate and nature of mortality of adult coral reef fishes are sparse. Mortality on coral reefs is intrinsically linked with predation, with most evidence suggesting that predation is highest during crepuscular periods. We tested this hypothesis using passive acoustic telemetry data to determine the time of day of potential mortality events (PMEs) of adult herbivorous reef fishes. A total of 94 fishes were tagged with acoustic transmitters, of which 43 exhibited a PME. Furthermore, we identified five categories of PMEs based on the nature of change in acoustic signal detections from tagged fishes. The majority of PMEs were characterised by an abrupt stop in detections, possibly as a result of a large, mobile predator. Overall, mortality rates were estimated to be approximately 59 % per year using passive acoustic telemetry. The time of day of PMEs suggests that predation was highest during the day and crepuscular periods and lowest at night, offering only partial support for the crepuscular predation hypothesis. Visually oriented, diurnal and crepuscular predators appear to be more important than their nocturnal counterparts in terms of predation on adult reef fishes. By timing PMEs, passive acoustic telemetry may offer an important new tool for investigating the nature of predation on coral reefs.

  14. Nocturnal relocation of adult and juvenile coral reef fishes in response to reef noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, S. D.; Jeffs, A.; Montgomery, J. C.; McCauley, R. D.; Meekan, M. G.

    2008-03-01

    Juvenile and adult reef fishes often undergo migration, ontogenic habitat shifts, and nocturnal foraging movements. The orientation cues used for these behaviours are largely unknown. In this study, the use of sound as an orientation cue guiding the nocturnal movements of adult and juvenile reef fishes at Lizard Island, Great Barrier Reef was examined. The first experiment compared the movements of fishes to small patch reefs where reef noise was broadcast, with those to silent reefs. No significant responses were found in the 79 adults that were collected, but the 166 juveniles collected showed an increased diversity each morning on the reefs with broadcast noise, and significantly greater numbers of juveniles from three taxa (Apogonidae, Gobiidae and Pinguipedidae) were collected from reefs with broadcast noise. The second experiment compared the movement of adult and juvenile fishes to reefs broadcasting high (>570 Hz), or low (<570 Hz) frequency reef noise, or to silent reefs. Of the 122 adults collected, the highest diversity was seen at the low frequency reefs; and adults from two families (Gobiidae and Blenniidae) preferred these reefs. A similar trend was observed in the 372 juveniles collected, with higher diversity at the reefs with low frequency noises. This preference was seen in the juvenile apogonids; however, juvenile gobiids were attracted to both high and low sound treatments equally, and juvenile stage Acanthuridae preferred the high frequency noises. This evidence that juvenile and adult reef fishes orientate with respect to the soundscape raises important issues for management, conservation and the protection of sound cues used in natural behaviour.

  15. Antimicrobial Peptides as Mediators of Innate Immunity in Teleosts

    PubMed Central

    Katzenback, Barbara A.

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been identified throughout the metazoa suggesting their evolutionarily conserved nature and their presence in teleosts is no exception. AMPs are short (18–46 amino acids), usually cationic, amphipathic peptides. While AMPs are diverse in amino acid sequence, with no two AMPs being identical, they collectively appear to have conserved functions in the innate immunity of animals towards the pathogens they encounter in their environment. Fish AMPs are upregulated in response to pathogens and appear to have direct broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity towards both human and fish pathogens. However, an emerging role for AMPs as immunomodulatory molecules has become apparent—the ability of AMPs to activate the innate immune system sheds light onto the multifaceted capacity of these small peptides to combat pathogens through direct and indirect means. Herein, this review focuses on the role of teleost AMPs as modulators of the innate immune system and their regulation in response to pathogens or other exogenous molecules. The capacity to regulate AMP expression by exogenous factors may prove useful in modulating AMP expression in fish to prevent disease, particularly in aquaculture settings where crowded conditions and environmental stress pre-dispose these fish to infection. PMID:26426065

  16. Vulnerability and diet breadth predict larval and adult parasite diversity in fish of the Bothnian Bay.

    PubMed

    Locke, Sean A; Marcogliese, David J; Valtonen, E Tellervo

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies of aquatic food webs show that parasite diversity is concentrated in nodes that likely favour transmission. Various aspects of parasite diversity have been observed to be correlated with the trophic level, size, diet breadth, and vulnerability to predation of hosts. However, no study has attempted to distinguish among all four correlates, which may have differential importance for trophically transmitted parasites occurring as larvae or adults. We searched for factors that best predict the diversity of larval and adult endoparasites in 4105 fish in 25 species studied over a three-year period in the Bothnian Bay, Finland. Local predator-prey relationships were determined from stomach contents, parasites, and published data in 8,229 fish in 31 species and in seals and piscivorous birds. Fish that consumed more species of prey had more diverse trophically transmitted adult parasites. Larval parasite diversity increased with the diversity of both prey and predators, but increases in predator diversity had a greater effect. Prey diversity was more strongly associated with the diversity of adult parasites than with that of larvae. The proportion of parasite species present as larvae in a host species was correlated with the diversity of its predators. There was a notable lack of association with the diversity of any parasite guild and fish length, trophic level, or trophic category. Thus, diversity is associated with different nodal properties in larval and adult parasites, and association strengths also differ, strongly reflecting the life cycles of parasites and the food chains they follow to complete transmission.

  17. Evaluation of Juvenile Fish Bypass and Adult Fish Passage Facilities at Water Diversions on the Umatilla River; 1994 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, Suzanne M.

    1995-01-01

    We report on our progress from October 1993 through September 1994 in evaluating juvenile salmonid bypass facilities and juvenile salmonid passage through ladder facilities, and investigating passage conditions for juvenile fish at diversion dam facilities on the lower Umatilla River in northeastern Oregon. We also report on our progress in evaluating adult salmonid passage at and between dams on the lower Umatilla River and upriver migration using radio telemetry. Two principal studies are also included. Report A (ODFW): To evaluate the juvenile salmonid bypass facilities a Feed and Furnish canals, juvenile salmonid passage through fish ladders at Stanfield, Feed Canal, Westland, and Three Mile Falls dams, and the juvenile salmonid trap and haul procedures at Westland Canal. To investigate passage conditions at all passage facilities. Report B (CTUIR): To examine the passage of adult salmonids past diversions in the lower Umatilla River and their movement in the upper river after transport, using radio telemetry, and to assess factors for successful homing. These studies are part of a program to rehabilitate anadromous fish stocks in the Umatilla River Basin, including restoration of coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) and chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), as well as enhancement of summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

  18. Fish intake is associated with slower cognitive decline in Chinese older adults.

    PubMed

    Qin, Bo; Plassman, Brenda L; Edwards, Lloyd J; Popkin, Barry M; Adair, Linda S; Mendez, Michelle A

    2014-10-01

    Modifiable lifestyle changes, including dietary changes, could translate into a great reduction in the global burden of cognitive impairment and dementia. Few studies evaluated the benefits of fish intake for delaying cognitive decline, and no studies were conducted in a Chinese population, which may differ with respect to types, amounts, and correlates of fish consumption compared with Western populations. We hypothesized that higher consumption of fish would predict slower decline in cognitive function, independent of a wide range of potential confounders. This prospective cohort study comprised 1566 community-dwelling adults aged ≥ 55 y who completed a cognitive screening test at ≥2 waves of the China Health and Nutrition Survey in 1997, 2000, or 2004, with a mean follow-up of 5.3 y [age at entry (mean ± SD): 63 ± 6 y]. Diet was measured by 3-d 24-h recalls at baseline. Outcomes included repeated measures of global cognitive scores (baseline mean ± SD: 19 ± 6 points), composite cognitive Z-scores (standardized units), and standardized verbal memory scores (standardized units). Multivariable-adjusted linear mixed-effects models were used to evaluate the relation of fish intake with changes in cognitive scores. Age was found to significantly modify the association between fish consumption and cognitive change (P = 0.007). Among adults aged ≥ 65 y, compared with individuals who consumed <1 serving/wk (i.e., 100 g) fish, the mean annual rate of global cognitive decline was reduced by 0.35 point (95% CI: 0.13, 0.58) among those consuming ≥ 1 serving/wk, equivalent to the disparity associated with 1.6 y of age. Fish consumption was also associated with a slower decline in composite and verbal memory scores. No associations were observed among adults aged 55-64 y. Our findings suggest a potential role of fish consumption as a modifiable dietary factor to reduce the rate of cognitive decline in later life.

  19. Evolution and development of the homocercal caudal fin in teleosts.

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Yuuta; Takeda, Hiroyuki

    2013-10-01

    The vertebrate caudal skeleton is one of the most innovative structures in vertebrate evolution and has been regarded as an excellent model for functional morphology, a discipline that relates a structure to its function. Teleosts have an internally-asymmetrical caudal fin, called the homocercal caudal fin, formed by the upward bending of the caudal-most portion of the body axis, the ural region. This homocercal type of the caudal fin ensures powerful and complex locomotion and is thought to be one of the most important evolutionary innovations for teleosts during adaptive radiation in an aquatic environment. In this review, we summarize the past and present research of fish caudal skeletons, especially focusing on the homocercal caudal fin seen in teleosts. A series of studies with a medaka spontaneous mutant have provided important insight into the evolution and development of the homocercal caudal skeleton. By comparing developmental processes in various vertebrates, we propose a scenario for acquisition and morphogenesis of the homocercal caudal skeleton during vertebrate evolution.

  20. Estimating mortality rates of adult fish from entrainment through the propellers of river towboats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gutreuter, S.; Dettmers, J.M.; Wahl, David H.

    2003-01-01

    We developed a method to estimate mortality rates of adult fish caused by entrainment through the propellers of commercial towboats operating in river channels. The method combines trawling while following towboats (to recover a fraction of the kills) and application of a hydrodynamic model of diffusion (to estimate the fraction of the total kills collected in the trawls). The sampling problem is unusual and required quantifying relatively rare events. We first examined key statistical properties of the entrainment mortality rate estimators using Monte Carlo simulation, which demonstrated that a design-based estimator and a new ad hoc estimator are both unbiased and converge to the true value as the sample size becomes large. Next, we estimated the entrainment mortality rates of adult fishes in Pool 26 of the Mississippi River and the Alton Pool of the Illinois River, where we observed kills that we attributed to entrainment. Our estimates of entrainment mortality rates were 2.52 fish/km of towboat travel (80% confidence interval, 1.00-6.09 fish/km) for gizzard shad Dorosoma cepedianum, 0.13 fish/km (0.00-0.41) for skipjack herring Alosa chrysochloris, and 0.53 fish/km (0.00-1.33) for both shovelnose sturgeon Scaphirhynchus platorynchus and smallmouth buffalo Ictiobus bubalus. Our approach applies more broadly to commercial vessels operating in confined channels, including other large rivers and intracoastal waterways.

  1. The brain-pituitary-gonad axis in male teleosts, with special emphasis on flatfish (Pleuronectiformes).

    PubMed

    Weltzien, Finn-Arne; Andersson, Eva; Andersen, Øivind; Shalchian-Tabrizi, Kamran; Norberg, Birgitta

    2004-03-01

    The key component regulating vertebrate puberty and sexual maturation is the endocrine system primarily effectuated along the brain-pituitary-gonad (BPG) axis. By far most investigations on the teleost BPG axis have been performed on salmonids, carps, catfish and eels. Accordingly, earlier reviews on the BPG axis in teleosts have focused on these species, and mainly on females (e.g. 'Fish Physiology, vol. IXA. Reproduction (1983) pp. 97'; 'Proceedings of the Fourth International Symposium on the Reproductive Physiology of Fish. FishSymp91, Sheffield, UK, 1991, pp. 2'; 'Curr. Top. Dev. Biol. 30 (1995) pp. 103'; 'Rev. Fish Biol. Fish. 7 (1997) pp. 173'; 'Proceedings of the Sixth International Symposium on the Reproductive Physiology of Fish. John Grieg A/S, Bergen, Norway, 2000, pp. 211'). However, in recent years new data have emerged on the BPG axis in flatfish, especially at the level of the brain and pituitary. The evolutionarily advanced flatfishes are important model species both from an evolutionary point of view and also because many are candidates for aquaculture. The scope of this paper is to review the present status on the male teleost BPG axis, with an emphasis on flatfish. In doing so, we will first discuss the present understanding of the individual constituents of the axis in the best studied teleost models, and thereafter discuss available data on flatfish. Of the three constituents of the BPG axis, we will focus especially on the pituitary and gonadotropins. In addition to reviewing recent information on flatfish, we present some entirely new information on the phylogeny and molecular structure of teleost gonadotropins.

  2. Remarkable vertical shift in residence depth links pelagic larval and demersal adult jellynose fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiao, Jen-Chieh; Sui, Tsung-Da; Chang, Ni-Na; Chang, Chih-Wei

    2017-03-01

    Deep-sea fish show diverse migratory behaviors across depths at different life stages. The historical residence depths of jellynose fish Ateleopus japonicus and Ijimaia dofleini (Ateleopodidae) were reconstructed from otolith microstructures and isotopic compositions. δ18O values in the otolith core areas ranged from -0.5 to -1.3‰ among individuals, suggesting that larval and post-larval stages lived in the mixed layer (50-200 m). Otolith growth increment widths surged for 10-30 rings around 300-600 μm from the core, indicating a fast-growth phase during the early post-larval stage. Fish then migrated downward to 350-800 m depth at about 2 months of age, possibly during the post-larval metamorphosis to the juvenile. Otolith growth increments became narrower and otolith δ13C values increased from -5 to -1‰, suggesting a lower growth and metabolic rate when the fish experienced colder water during the downward migration. After arrival at the deepest waters, the fish then migrated upward to the continental margin or upper slopes where the adults persistently resided. A translucent otolith zone was formed after the residence depth shift from the deepest waters to shallower depths, indicating a transition from pelagic to bathydemersal life on the continental shelf or break. The down-and-up shift in residence depth of jellynose fish represents an indirect settlement process to the adult residence depth, which might be associated with a unique post-larval stage moving offshore before the downward migration. The results filled the gap of vertical distributions of jellynose fish from pelagic larvae near the sea surface to the bathydemersal adult dwelling on the continental shelf break.

  3. Effects of a Novel Fish Transport System on the Health of Adult Fall Chinook Salmon

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, David R.; Colotelo, Alison H.; Linley, Timothy J.; Wagner, Katie A.; Miracle, Ann L.

    2016-12-01

    Movement past hydroelectric dams and related in-river structures has important implications for habitat connectivity and population persistence in migratory fish. A major problem is that many of these structures lack effective fish passage facilities, which can fragment spawning and rearing areas and negatively impact recruitment. While traditional fish passage facilities (e.g., ladders, trap and haul) can effectively enable fish to pass over barriers, their capital or operational costs can be significant. We evaluated the utility of a novel transport device that utilizes a flexible tube with differential internal air pressure to pass fish around in-river barriers. Three treatments and a control group were tested. In two of the treatments, adult fall Chinook Salmon nearing maturation were transported through the device via two lengths of tube (12 or 77 m) and their injury, stress, and immune system responses and reproductive function were compared to a third treatment where fish were moved by a standard trap and haul method and also to a control group. We observed no significant differences among the treatment or control groups in post-treatment adult survival, injury or stress. Indicators of immune system response and reproductive readiness were also not significantly different among the four groups. Egg survival was significantly different among the groups, but the differences were highly variable within groups and not consistent with the duration of treatment or degree of handling. Taken together, the results suggest the device did not injure or alter normal physiological functioning of adult fall Chinook Salmon nearing maturation and may provide an effective method for transporting such fish around in-river barriers during their spawning migration. Keywords: Whooshh, transport, in-stream barriers, hydropower

  4. Alternative Splicing of Toll-Like Receptor 9 Transcript in Teleost Fish Grouper Is Regulated by NF-κB Signaling via Phosphorylation of the C-Terminal Domain of the RPB1 Subunit of RNA Polymerase II

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Frank Fang-Yao; Hui, Cho-Fat; Chang, Tien-Hsien; Chiou, Pinwen Peter

    2016-01-01

    Similar to its mammalian counterparts, teleost Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) recognizes unmethylated CpG DNA presented in the genome of bacteria or DNA viruses and initiates signaling pathway(s) for immune responses. We have previously shown that the TLR9 pathway in grouper, an economically important teleost, can be debilitated by an inhibitory gTLR9B isoform, whose production is mediated by RNA alternative splicing. However, how does grouper TLR9 (gTLR9) signaling impinge on the RNA splicing machinery to produce gTlr9B is unknown. Here we show that the gTlr9 alternative splicing is regulated through ligand-induced phosphorylation of the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (Pol II). We first observed that ligand-activated NF- κB pathway biased the production of the gTlr9B isoform. Because NF- κB is known to recruit p-TEFb kinase, which phosphorylates the Pol II CTD at Ser2 residues, we examined p-TEFb’s role in alternative splicing. We found that promoting p-TEFb kinase activity significantly favored the production of the gTlr9B isoform, whereas inhibiting p-TEFb yielded an opposite result. We further showed that p-TEFb-mediated production of the gTlr9B isoform down-regulates its own immune responses, suggesting a self-limiting mechanism. Taken together, our data indicate a feedback mechanism of the gTLR9 signaling pathway to regulate the alternative splicing machinery, which in turn produces an inhibitor to the pathway. PMID:27658294

  5. Physiological responses of adult rainbow trout experimentally released through a unique fish conveyance device

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mesa, Matthew G.; Gee, Lisa P.; Weiland, Lisa K.; Christiansen, Helena E.

    2013-01-01

    We assessed the physiological stress responses (i.e., plasma levels of cortisol, glucose, and lactate) of adult Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss at selected time intervals after they had passed a distance of 15 m through a unique fish conveyance device (treatment fish) or not (controls). This device differs from traditional fish pumps in two important ways: (1) it transports objects in air, rather than pumping them from and with water; and (2) it uses a unique tube for transport that has a series of soft, deformable baffles spaced evenly apart and situated perpendicular within a rigid, but flexible outer shell. Mean concentrations of the plasma constituents never differed (P > 0.05) between control and treatment fish at 0, 1, 4, 8, or 24 h after passage, and only minor differences were apparent between the different time intervals within a group. We observed no obvious injuries on any of our fish. Our results indicate that passage through this device did not severely stress or injure fish and it may allow for the rapid and safe movement of fish at hatcheries, sorting or handling facilities, or passage obstacles.

  6. Geographic coupling of juvenile and adult habitat shapes spatial population dynamics of a coral reef fish.

    PubMed

    Huijbers, Chantal M; Nagelkerken, Ivan; Debrot, Adolphe O; Jongejans, Eelke

    2013-08-01

    Marine spatial population dynamics are often addressed with a focus on larval dispersal, without taking into account movement behavior of individuals in later life stages. Processes occurring during demersal life stages may also drive spatial population dynamics if habitat quality is perceived differently by animals belonging to different life stages. In this study, we used a dual approach to understand how stage-structured habitat use and dispersal ability of adults shape the population of a marine fish species. Our study area and focal species provided us with the unique opportunity to study a closed island population. A spatial simulation model was used to estimate dispersal distances along a coral reef that surrounds the island, while contributions of different nursery bays were determined based on otolith stable isotope signatures of adult reef fish. The model showed that adult dispersal away from reef areas near nursery bays is limited. The results further show that different bays contributed unequally to the adult population on the coral reef, with productivity of juveniles in bay nursery habitat determining the degree of mixing among local populations on the reef and with one highly productive area contributing most to the island's reef fish population. The contribution of the coral reef as a nursery habitat was minimal, even though it had a much larger surface area. These findings indicate that the geographic distribution of nursery areas and their productivity are important drivers for the spatial distribution patterns of adults on coral reefs. We suggest that limited dispersal of adults on reefs can lead to a source-sink structure in the adult stage, where reefs close to nurseries replenish more isolated reef areas. Understanding these spatial population dynamics of the demersal phase of marine animals is of major importance for the design and placement of marine reserves, as nursery areas contribute differently to maintain adult populations.

  7. Fine-scale population structure in a deep-sea teleost (orange roughy, Hoplostethus atlanticus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsson, Jens; Shephard, Samuel; Coughlan, James; Trueman, Clive N.; Rogan, Emer; Cross, Tom F.

    2011-06-01

    Microsatellite and otolith chemistry variability were analysed to assess fine scale genetic structure in the deep-sea teleost orange roughy ( Hoplostethus atlanticus). The Porcupine Bank located on the continental shelf west of Ireland, comprises a complex system of mounds and flat areas that are broken up by canyons. Orange roughy form spawning aggregations on mounds and flat areas, and were heavily fished until the resource was depleted. By analysing adults in spawning condition and juvenile orange roughy from six mounds and one flat area, shallow but significant genetic population structure was evident ( FST=0.0031, Dest across loci=0.0306 and G-test). Most of the structure was accounted for by inclusion of a sample from the flats (six of ten significant pairwise FST estimates and G-tests, and five of the highest Dest estimates included the flat sample). While the flat sample contributed most to the genetic structure, there was still significant (albeit weaker) structure among mound samples. The observed structure was supported by otolith analyses. Fish caught as late juveniles in either the flat or mound areas showed consistent differences in chemistry at the otolith core throughout the initial 10 years of growth, which could indicate site fidelity. We hypothesise that seafloor topographic structures (mounds and flats) may provide discrete spawning areas for orange roughy and that the limited gene flow between these spawning areas is insufficient to counteract genetic drift.

  8. Tidal management sffects sub-adult fish assemblages in impounded South Carolina Marshes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carswell, Ben L.; Peterson, James T.; Jennings, Cecil A.

    2015-01-01

    In coastal South Carolina, most impounded marshes are managed for waterfowl; fewer are managed for fishes. Tidal control is central to each strategy but raises concerns that nursery function could be impaired. This research examined the assemblage composition of fishes during early-life stages. We sampled two impoundments of each management type monthly in 2008 and 2009. We used light traps to collect 61,527 sub-adult fish representing 21 species and 16 families and push nets to collect 12,670 sub-adult fish representing 13 species and 11 families. The effective number of species detected at larval stage in “fish” impoundments (summer mean = 2.52 ± 0.20, winter mean = 2.02 ± 0.66) was greater than in “waterfowl” impoundments (summer mean = 1.27 ± 0.14, winter mean = 1.06 ± 0.09); CI = 90 %. Species richness did not differ between management types, but hierarchical linear models predicted differences in assemblage composition. These findings underscore the importance of frequent water exchange for maintaining diverse assemblages of early-life-stage fishes in marsh impoundments.

  9. Evaluation of Juvenile Fish Bypass and Adult Fish Passage Facilities at Three-Mile Falls Dam; Umatilla River, Oregon, 1989 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Nigro, Anthony A.

    1990-09-01

    We report on our progress from October 1989 through September 1990 on evaluating juvenile fish bypass and adult fish passage facilities at Three Mile Falls Dam on the Umatilla River. The study is a cooperative effort by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR). Study objectives addressed by ODFW and CTUIR are: (1) ODFW (Report A): Operate and evaluate the juvenile fish bypass system in the West Extension Irrigation District canal at Three Mile Falls Dam; and (2) CTUIR (Report 8): Examine the passage of adult salmonids at Three Mile Falls Dam. The study is part of a program to rehabilitate anadromous fish stocks in the Umatilla River Basin that includes restorations of coho salmon Oncorhynchus Wsutch and chinook salmon 0. tshawytscha and enhancement of summer steelhead 0. mytiss.

  10. High intake of fatty fish, but not of lean fish, affects serum concentrations of TAG and HDL-cholesterol in healthy, normal-weight adults: a randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Ingrid V; Helland, Anita; Bratlie, Marianne; Brokstad, Karl A; Rosenlund, Grethe; Sveier, Harald; Mellgren, Gunnar; Gudbrandsen, Oddrun A

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine whether high intake of lean or fatty fish (cod and farmed salmon, respectively) by healthy, normal-weight adults would affect risk factors of type 2 diabetes and CVD when compared with lean meat (chicken). More knowledge is needed concerning the potential health effects of high fish intake (>300 g/week) in normal-weight adults. In this randomised clinical trial, thirty-eight young, healthy, normal-weight participants consumed 750 g/week of lean or fatty fish or lean meat (as control) for 4 weeks at dinner according to provided recipes to ensure similar ways of preparations and choices of side dishes between the groups. Energy and macronutrient intakes at baseline and end point were similar in all groups, and there were no changes in energy and macronutrient intakes within any of the groups during the course of the study. High intake of fatty fish, but not lean fish, significantly reduced TAG and increased HDL-cholesterol concentrations in fasting serum when compared with lean meat intake. When compared with lean fish intake, fatty fish intake increased serum HDL-cholesterol. No differences were observed between lean fish, fatty fish and lean meat groups regarding fasting and postprandial glucose regulation. These findings suggest that high intake of fatty fish, but not of lean fish, could beneficially affect serum concentrations of TAG and HDL-cholesterol, which are CVD risk factors, in healthy, normal-weight adults, when compared with high intake of lean meat.

  11. Osmoregulatory actions of the GH/IGF axis in non-salmonid teleosts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mancera, J.M.; McCormick, S.D.

    1998-01-01

    Salmonid fishes provided the first findings on the influence of the growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) axis on osmoregulation in teleost fishes. Recent studies on non-salmonid species, however, indicate that this physiological action of the GH/IGF-I axis is not restricted to salmonids or anadromous fishes. GH-producing cells in the pituitary of fish acclimated to different salinities show different degrees of activation depending on the species studied. Plasma GH levels either increase or do not change after transfer of fish from freshwater to seawater. Treatment with GH or IGF-I increases salinity tolerance and/or increases gill Na+,K+-ATPase activity of killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus), tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus and Oreochromis niloticus) and striped bass (Morone saxatilis). As in salmonids, a positive interaction between GH and cortisol for improving hypoosmoregulatory capacity has been described in tilapia (O. mossambicus). Research on the osmoregulatory role of the GH/IGF-I axis is derived from a small number of teleost species. The study of more species with different osmoregulary patterns will be necessary to fully clarify the osmoregulatory role of GH/IGF-I axis in fish. The available data does suggest, however, that the influence of the GH/IGF-I axis on osmoregulation may be a common feature of euryhalinity in teleosts. Copyright (C) 1998 Elsevier Science Inc.

  12. Recent findings on the structure and function of teleost IgT

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong-An; Salinas, Irene; Sunyer, J. Oriol

    2011-01-01

    As key effector molecules of jawed vertebrate’s adaptive immune system, immunoglobulins are produced by B lymphocytes, either as a secretory form (antibody) or as a membrane form (B cell receptor). Until recently, teleost fish B cells were thought to express only two classes of immunoglobulins, IgM and IgD. In addition, IgM in these species was thought to be the only immunoglobulin isotype responding to pathogens both in systemic or mucosal compartments. However, the unexpected discovery of IgT, a new teleost immunoglobulin unearthed in 2005, has provided for new opportunities to analyze further roles of teleost immunoglobulins in these two physiologically distinct compartments. The smoke about the potential function of IgT has cleared recently with the finding that this immunoglobulin appears to be specialized in gut mucosal immunity. Significantly, the new capability of measuring not only IgM but also IgT responses will greatly facilitate the evaluation and understanding of fish immune responses as well as the protective effects of fish vaccines. The purpose of this review is to summarize the molecular characterization of new IgT orthologs and subtypes in teleosts, as well as to describe the new findings concerning the protein structure of IgT, the B cells producing it, and its role in mucosal immunity. PMID:21466854

  13. Identification of sturgeon IgD bridges the evolutionary gap between elasmobranchs and teleosts.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lin; Yan, Zhenxin; Feng, Mengyang; Peng, Dezhi; Guo, Ying; Hu, Xiaoxiang; Ren, Liming; Sun, Yi

    2014-02-01

    IgD has been found in almost all jawed vertebrates, including cartilaginous and teleost fish. However, IgD is missing in acipenseriformes, a branch that is evolutionarily positioned between elasmobranchs and teleost fish. Here, by analyzing transcriptome data, we identified a transcriptionally active IgD-encoding gene in the Siberian sturgeon (Acipenser baerii). Phylogenetic analysis indicated that it is orthologous to mammalian IgD and closely related to the IgD of other fish. The lengths of sturgeon membrane-bound IgD transcripts ranged from 1.2kb to 6.2kb, encoding 3-19 CH domains. As in teleosts, the first CH domain of the sturgeon IgD transcript is also derived from μCH1 by RNA splicing. However, the variable region of the expressed sturgeon IgD shows limited V(D)J usage. In addition to IgD, three IgM variants were also identified in this species, whereas no IgT/Z-encoding genes were observed. This study bridges the gap in Ig evolution between elasmobranchs and teleosts and provides significant insight into the early evolution of immunoglobulins.

  14. Evidence for multiple protein kinase C isoforms in the leukocytes of a marine teleost, Sciaenops ocellatus.

    PubMed

    Mericko, P A; Burnett, K G

    1998-05-01

    The protein kinase C (PKC) family of isozymes mediates a diverse range of cellular functions, including activation of vertebrate lymphocytes through membrane-bound antigen receptors. The complex role of PKC in mammalian cells may be orchestrated in part by the presence of multiple isoforms, each of which displays a distinctive tissue distribution, substrate specificity and pattern of regulation. In the present study, PKC isoforms were identified in peripheral blood leukocytes of the marine teleost fish Sciaenops ocellatus by immunoprecipitation and Western blot using antibodies to mammalian isoforms. Functional activity was monitored by evaluating translocation of the teleost isoforms from membrane to cytosol in response to phorbol ester treatment. Teleost conventional isoforms PKC alpha and PKC beta (82 kDa) completely translocated out of the cytosol in response to phorbol ester. Phorbol ester did not induce translocation of teleost atypical isoform PKC zeta (67 kDa), as has been shown for its mammalian homologue. Although their identity as distinct isoforms is less clear, proposed teleost novel PKC delta (84, 86 kDa) and PKC eta (83, 85 kDa) also translocated out of the cytosol. The presence of multiple isoforms representing each of the three major classes of PKC in red drum leukocytes implies that the complexity of signal transduction pathways in vertebrates is highly conserved.

  15. The spotted gar genome illuminates vertebrate evolution and facilitates human-teleost comparisons.

    PubMed

    Braasch, Ingo; Gehrke, Andrew R; Smith, Jeramiah J; Kawasaki, Kazuhiko; Manousaki, Tereza; Pasquier, Jeremy; Amores, Angel; Desvignes, Thomas; Batzel, Peter; Catchen, Julian; Berlin, Aaron M; Campbell, Michael S; Barrell, Daniel; Martin, Kyle J; Mulley, John F; Ravi, Vydianathan; Lee, Alison P; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Chalopin, Domitille; Fan, Shaohua; Wcisel, Dustin; Cañestro, Cristian; Sydes, Jason; Beaudry, Felix E G; Sun, Yi; Hertel, Jana; Beam, Michael J; Fasold, Mario; Ishiyama, Mikio; Johnson, Jeremy; Kehr, Steffi; Lara, Marcia; Letaw, John H; Litman, Gary W; Litman, Ronda T; Mikami, Masato; Ota, Tatsuya; Saha, Nil Ratan; Williams, Louise; Stadler, Peter F; Wang, Han; Taylor, John S; Fontenot, Quenton; Ferrara, Allyse; Searle, Stephen M J; Aken, Bronwen; Yandell, Mark; Schneider, Igor; Yoder, Jeffrey A; Volff, Jean-Nicolas; Meyer, Axel; Amemiya, Chris T; Venkatesh, Byrappa; Holland, Peter W H; Guiguen, Yann; Bobe, Julien; Shubin, Neil H; Di Palma, Federica; Alföldi, Jessica; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Postlethwait, John H

    2016-04-01

    To connect human biology to fish biomedical models, we sequenced the genome of spotted gar (Lepisosteus oculatus), whose lineage diverged from teleosts before teleost genome duplication (TGD). The slowly evolving gar genome has conserved in content and size many entire chromosomes from bony vertebrate ancestors. Gar bridges teleosts to tetrapods by illuminating the evolution of immunity, mineralization and development (mediated, for example, by Hox, ParaHox and microRNA genes). Numerous conserved noncoding elements (CNEs; often cis regulatory) undetectable in direct human-teleost comparisons become apparent using gar: functional studies uncovered conserved roles for such cryptic CNEs, facilitating annotation of sequences identified in human genome-wide association studies. Transcriptomic analyses showed that the sums of expression domains and expression levels for duplicated teleost genes often approximate the patterns and levels of expression for gar genes, consistent with subfunctionalization. The gar genome provides a resource for understanding evolution after genome duplication, the origin of vertebrate genomes and the function of human regulatory sequences.

  16. The spotted gar genome illuminates vertebrate evolution and facilitates human-to-teleost comparisons

    PubMed Central

    Braasch, Ingo; Gehrke, Andrew R.; Smith, Jeramiah J.; Kawasaki, Kazuhiko; Manousaki, Tereza; Pasquier, Jeremy; Amores, Angel; Desvignes, Thomas; Batzel, Peter; Catchen, Julian; Berlin, Aaron M.; Campbell, Michael S.; Barrell, Daniel; Martin, Kyle J.; Mulley, John F.; Ravi, Vydianathan; Lee, Alison P.; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Chalopin, Domitille; Fan, Shaohua; Wcisel, Dustin; Cañestro, Cristian; Sydes, Jason; Beaudry, Felix E. G.; Sun, Yi; Hertel, Jana; Beam, Michael J.; Fasold, Mario; Ishiyama, Mikio; Johnson, Jeremy; Kehr, Steffi; Lara, Marcia; Letaw, John H.; Litman, Gary W.; Litman, Ronda T.; Mikami, Masato; Ota, Tatsuya; Saha, Nil Ratan; Williams, Louise; Stadler, Peter F.; Wang, Han; Taylor, John S.; Fontenot, Quenton; Ferrara, Allyse; Searle, Stephen M. J.; Aken, Bronwen; Yandell, Mark; Schneider, Igor; Yoder, Jeffrey A.; Volff, Jean-Nicolas; Meyer, Axel; Amemiya, Chris T.; Venkatesh, Byrappa; Holland, Peter W. H.; Guiguen, Yann; Bobe, Julien; Shubin, Neil H.; Di Palma, Federica; Alföldi, Jessica; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Postlethwait, John H.

    2016-01-01

    To connect human biology to fish biomedical models, we sequenced the genome of spotted gar (Lepisosteus oculatus), whose lineage diverged from teleosts before the teleost genome duplication (TGD). The slowly evolving gar genome conserved in content and size many entire chromosomes from bony vertebrate ancestors. Gar bridges teleosts to tetrapods by illuminating the evolution of immunity, mineralization, and development (e.g., Hox, ParaHox, and miRNA genes). Numerous conserved non-coding elements (CNEs, often cis-regulatory) undetectable in direct human-teleost comparisons become apparent using gar: functional studies uncovered conserved roles of such cryptic CNEs, facilitating annotation of sequences identified in human genome-wide association studies. Transcriptomic analyses revealed that the sum of expression domains and levels from duplicated teleost genes often approximate patterns and levels of gar genes, consistent with subfunctionalization. The gar genome provides a resource for understanding evolution after genome duplication, the origin of vertebrate genomes, and the function of human regulatory sequences. PMID:26950095

  17. Trunk exoskeleton in teleosts is mesodermal in origin

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Atsuko; Kawanishi, Toru; Kaneko, Takuya; Yoshihara, Hiroki; Yano, Tohru; Inohaya, Keiji; Kinoshita, Masato; Kamei, Yasuhiro; Tamura, Koji; Takeda, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    The vertebrate mineralized skeleton is known to have first emerged as an exoskeleton that extensively covered the fossil jawless fish. The evolutionary origin of this exoskeleton has long been attributed to the emergence of the neural crest, but experimental evaluation for this is still poor. Here we determine the embryonic origin of scales and fin rays of medaka (teleost trunk exoskeletons) by applying long-term cell labelling methods, and demonstrate that both tissues are mesodermal in origin. Neural crest cells, however, fail to contribute to these tissues. This result suggests that the trunk neural crest has no skeletogenic capability in fish, instead highlighting the dominant role of the mesoderm in the evolution of the trunk skeleton. This further implies that the role of the neural crest in skeletogenesis has been predominant in the cephalic region from the early stage of vertebrate evolution. PMID:23535660

  18. Cellular and molecular processes of regeneration, with special emphasis on fish fins.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Yuki; Kawakami, Atsushi; Kudo, Akira

    2007-02-01

    The phenomenon of 'epimorphic regeneration', a complete reformation of lost tissues and organs from adult differentiated cells, has been fascinating many biologists for many years. While most vertebrate species including humans do not have a remarkable ability for regeneration, the lower vertebrates such as urodeles and fish have exceptionally high regeneration abilities. In particular, the teleost fish has a high ability to regenerate a variety of tissues and organs including scales, muscles, spinal cord and heart among vertebrate species. Hence, an understanding of the regeneration mechanism in teleosts will provide an essential knowledge base for rational approaches to tissue and organ regeneration in mammals. In the last decade, small teleost fish such as the zebrafish and medaka have emerged as powerful animal models in which a variety of developmental, genetic and molecular approaches are applicable. In addition, rapid progress in the development of genome resources such as expressed sequence tags and genome sequences has accelerated the speed of the molecular analysis of regeneration. This review summarizes the current status of our understanding of the cellular and molecular basis of regeneration, particularly that regarding fish fins.

  19. Educating and Training out of Poverty? Adult Provision and the Informal Sector in Fishing Communities, South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, Carolyn

    2007-01-01

    This paper looks at access to adult education and vocational education and training (VET) provision in fishing communities in the Western Cape, South Africa. Fishing communities are being disadvantaged due to geographical and socio-political marginalisation, and the predominance of informal sector employment in the context of worldwide marine…

  20. Evolution history of duplicated smad3 genes in teleost: insights from Japanese flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xinxin; Liu, Yuezhong; Liu, Jinxiang; Zhang, Quanqi

    2016-01-01

    Following the two rounds of whole-genome duplication (WGD) during deuterosome evolution, a third genome duplication occurred in the ray-fined fish lineage and is considered to be responsible for the teleost-specific lineage diversification and regulation mechanisms. As a receptor-regulated SMAD (R-SMAD), the function of SMAD3 was widely studied in mammals. However, limited information of its role or putative paralogs is available in ray-finned fishes. In this study, two SMAD3 paralogs were first identified in the transcriptome and genome of Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus). We also explored SMAD3 duplication in other selected species. Following identification, genomic structure, phylogenetic reconstruction, and synteny analyses performed by MrBayes and online bioinformatic tools confirmed that smad3a/3b most likely originated from the teleost-specific WGD. Additionally, selection pressure analysis and expression pattern of the two genes performed by PAML and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) revealed evidence of subfunctionalization of the two SMAD3 paralogs in teleost. Our results indicate that two SMAD3 genes originate from teleost-specific WGD, remain transcriptionally active, and may have likely undergone subfunctionalization. This study provides novel insights to the evolution fates of smad3a/3b and draws attentions to future function analysis of SMAD3 gene family. PMID:27703851

  1. The Teleost Anatomy Ontology: Anatomical Representation for the Genomics Age

    PubMed Central

    Dahdul, Wasila M.; Lundberg, John G.; Midford, Peter E.; Balhoff, James P.; Lapp, Hilmar; Vision, Todd J.; Haendel, Melissa A.; Westerfield, Monte; Mabee, Paula M.

    2010-01-01

    The rich knowledge of morphological variation among organisms reported in the systematic literature has remained in free-text format, impractical for use in large-scale synthetic phylogenetic work. This noncomputable format has also precluded linkage to the large knowledgebase of genomic, genetic, developmental, and phenotype data in model organism databases. We have undertaken an effort to prototype a curated, ontology-based evolutionary morphology database that maps to these genetic databases (http://kb.phenoscape.org) to facilitate investigation into the mechanistic basis and evolution of phenotypic diversity. Among the first requirements in establishing this database was the development of a multispecies anatomy ontology with the goal of capturing anatomical data in a systematic and computable manner. An ontology is a formal representation of a set of concepts with defined relationships between those concepts. Multispecies anatomy ontologies in particular are an efficient way to represent the diversity of morphological structures in a clade of organisms, but they present challenges in their development relative to single-species anatomy ontologies. Here, we describe the Teleost Anatomy Ontology (TAO), a multispecies anatomy ontology for teleost fishes derived from the Zebrafish Anatomical Ontology (ZFA) for the purpose of annotating varying morphological features across species. To facilitate interoperability with other anatomy ontologies, TAO uses the Common Anatomy Reference Ontology as a template for its upper level nodes, and TAO and ZFA are synchronized, with zebrafish terms specified as subtypes of teleost terms. We found that the details of ontology architecture have ramifications for querying, and we present general challenges in developing a multispecies anatomy ontology, including refinement of definitions, taxon-specific relationships among terms, and representation of taxonomically variable developmental pathways. PMID:20547776

  2. The Release Rate of Environmental DNA from Juvenile and Adult Fish

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Atsushi; Nakamura, Keisuke; Yamanaka, Hiroki; Kondoh, Michio; Minamoto, Toshifumi

    2014-01-01

    The environmental DNA (eDNA) technique is expected to become a powerful, non-invasive tool for estimating the distribution and biomass of organisms. This technique was recently shown to be applicable to aquatic vertebrates by collecting extraorganismal DNA floating in the water or absorbed onto suspended particles. However, basic information on eDNA release rate is lacking, despite it being essential for practical applications. In this series of experiments with bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus), we examined the effect of fish developmental stage on eDNA release rate. eDNA concentration reached equilibrium 3 days after the individual fish were introduced into the separate containers, enabling calculation of the eDNA release rate (copies h−1) from individual fish on the assumption that the number of eDNA released from the fish per unit time equals total degradation in the container (copies h−1). The eDNA release rate was 3–4 times higher in the adult (body weight: 30–75 g) than in the juvenile group (0.5–2.0 g). Such positive relationship between fish size and eDNA release rate support the possibility of biomass rather than density estimation using eDNA techniques. However, the eDNA release rate per fish body weight (copies h−1 g−1) was slightly higher in the juvenile than the adult group, which is likely because of the ontogenetic reduction in metabolic activity. Therefore, quantitative eDNA data should be carefully interpreted to avoid overestimating biomass when the population is dominated by juveniles, because the age structure of the focal population is often variable and unseen in the field. eDNA degradation rates (copies l−1 h−1), calculated by curve fitting of time-dependent changes in eDNA concentrations after fish removal, were 5.1–15.9% per hour (half-life: 6.3 h). This suggests that quantitative eDNA data should be corrected using a degradation curve attained in the target field. PMID:25479160

  3. Adult and larval traits as determinants of geographic range size among tropical reef fishes

    PubMed Central

    Luiz, Osmar J.; Allen, Andrew P.; Robertson, D. Ross; Floeter, Sergio R.; Kulbicki, Michel; Vigliola, Laurent; Becheler, Ronan; Madin, Joshua S.

    2013-01-01

    Most marine organisms disperse via ocean currents as larvae, so it is often assumed that larval-stage duration is the primary determinant of geographic range size. However, empirical tests of this relationship have yielded mixed results, and alternative hypotheses have rarely been considered. Here we assess the relative influence of adult and larval-traits on geographic range size using a global dataset encompassing 590 species of tropical reef fishes in 47 families, the largest compilation of such data to date for any marine group. We analyze this database using linear mixed-effect models to control for phylogeny and geographical limits on range size. Our analysis indicates that three adult traits likely to affect the capacity of new colonizers to survive and establish reproductive populations (body size, schooling behavior, and nocturnal activity) are equal or better predictors of geographic range size than pelagic larval duration. We conclude that adult life-history traits that affect the postdispersal persistence of new populations are primary determinants of successful range extension and, consequently, of geographic range size among tropical reef fishes. PMID:24065830

  4. Global warming may disproportionately affect larger adults in a predatory coral reef fish.

    PubMed

    Messmer, Vanessa; Pratchett, Morgan S; Hoey, Andrew S; Tobin, Andrew J; Coker, Darren J; Cooke, Steven J; Clark, Timothy D

    2016-11-03

    Global warming is expected to reduce body sizes of ectothermic animals. Although the underlying mechanisms of size reductions remain poorly understood, effects appear stronger at latitudinal extremes (poles and tropics) and in aquatic rather than terrestrial systems. To shed light on this phenomenon, we examined the size dependence of critical thermal maxima (CTmax) and aerobic metabolism in a commercially important tropical reef fish, the leopard coral grouper (Plectropomus leopardus) following acclimation to current-day (28.5 °C) vs. projected end-of-century (33 °C) summer temperatures for the northern Great Barrier Reef (GBR). CTmax declined from 38.3 to 37.5 °C with increasing body mass in adult fish (0.45-2.82 kg), indicating that larger individuals are more thermally sensitive than smaller conspecifics. This may be explained by a restricted capacity for large fish to increase mass-specific maximum metabolic rate (MMR) at 33 °C compared with 28.5 °C. Indeed, temperature influenced the relationship between metabolism and body mass (0.02-2.38 kg), whereby the scaling exponent for MMR increased from 0.74 ± 0.02 at 28.5 °C to 0.79 ± 0.01 at 33 °C, and the corresponding exponents for standard metabolic rate (SMR) were 0.75 ± 0.04 and 0.80 ± 0.03. The increase in metabolic scaling exponents at higher temperatures suggests that energy budgets may be disproportionately impacted in larger fish and contribute to reduced maximum adult size. Such climate-induced reductions in body size would have important ramifications for fisheries productivity, but are also likely to have knock-on effects for trophodynamics and functioning of ecosystems.

  5. Molecular epizootiology: Assessment of exposure to genotoxic compounds in teleosts

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, J.E.; Reichert, W.L.; Varanasi, U.

    1994-12-01

    The recent development of techniques to measure levels of carcinogens covalently bound to DNA provides the opportunity to use DNA adducts as molecular dosimeters of exposure to environmental carcinogens and mutagens. This is especially important because epizootiologic studies have shown a positive association between environmental carcinogens, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and increased prevalence of neoplasms and related lesions, primarily in liver, of benthic fish species from a wide range of urban and industrialized areas. In studies with wild fish and mammalian species the {sup 32}P-postlabeling assay, as developed for aromatic compounds, has been used most extensively because of its high sensitivity and ability to detect structurally uncharacterized adducts. The results to date of field and laboratory studies show that hepatic DNA adducts detected in fish are associated with increased exposure to environmental polycyclic aromatic compounds in the preponderance of species examined, whereas in the limited studies with wild mammals, such a relationship is equivocal at present. The findings with fish suggest that DNA adducts, as measured by {sup 32}P-postlabeling, have the potential to be effective molecular dosimeters of exposure to environmental carcinogenic aromatic compounds and thereby may lead to an improved understanding of the etiology of neoplasia in wild teleosts. 38 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Saccular potentials of the vocal plainfin midshipman fish, Porichthys notatus.

    PubMed

    Sisneros, Joseph A

    2007-04-01

    The plainfin midshipman fish, Porichthys notatus, is a vocal species of teleost fish that generates acoustic signals for intraspecific communication during social and reproductive behaviors. All adult morphs (females and males) produce single short duration grunts important for agonistic encounters, but only nesting males produce trains of grunts and growls in agonistic contexts and long duration multiharmonic advertisement calls to attract gravid females for spawning. The midshipman fish uses the saccule as the main acoustic endorgan for hearing to detect and locate vocalizing conspecifics. Here, I examined the response properties of evoked potentials from the midshipman saccule to determine the frequency response and auditory threshold sensitivity of saccular hair cells to behaviorally-relevant single tone stimuli. Saccular potentials were recorded from the rostral, medial and caudal regions of the saccule while sound was presented by an underwater speaker. Saccular potentials of the midshipman, like other teleosts, were evoked greatest at a frequency that was twice the stimulus frequency. Results indicate that midshipman saccular hair cells of non-reproductive adults had a peak frequency sensitivity that ranged from 75 (lowest frequency tested) to 145 Hz and were best suited to detect the low frequency components (

  7. Saccular potentials of the vocal plainfin midshipman fish, Porichthys notatus

    PubMed Central

    Sisneros, Joseph A.

    2008-01-01

    The plainfin midshipman fish, Porichthys notatus, is a vocal species of teleost fish that generates acoustic signals for intraspecific communication during social and reproductive behaviors. All adult morphs (females and males) produce single short duration grunts important for agonistic encounters, but only nesting males produce trains of grunts and growls in agonistic contexts and long duration multiharmonic advertisement calls to attract gravid females for spawning. The midshipman fish uses the saccule as the main acoustic endorgan for hearing to detect and locate vocalizing conspecifics. Here, I examined the response properties of evoked potentials from the midshipman saccule to determine the frequency response and auditory threshold sensitivity of saccular hair cells to behaviorally-relevant single tone stimuli. Saccular potentials were recorded from the rostral, medial and caudal regions of the saccule while sound was presented by an underwater speaker. Saccular potentials of the midshipman, like other teleosts, were evoked greatest at a frequency that was twice the stimulus frequency. Results indicate that midshipman saccular hair cells of non-reproductive adults had a peak frequency sensitivity that ranged from 75 (lowest frequency tested) to 145 Hz and were best suited to detect the low frequency components (≤105 Hz) of midshipman vocalizations. PMID:17143623

  8. Electrocommunication signals alone are sufficient to increase neurogenesis in the brain of adult electric fish, Apteronotus leptorhynchus.

    PubMed

    Dunlap, Kent D; McCarthy, Elizabeth A; Jashari, Denisa

    2008-10-01

    Social interaction can have profound influences on the structure of the adult brain, but little is known about the precise stimulus feature found within social interaction that induces such brain plasticity. We examined the effects of social stimuli on cell addition and radial glial fiber formation in the brains of adult electric fish. These fish communicate primarily through weak, quasi-sinusoidal electric signals. Fish were housed in isolation, paired with another fish or exposed to only the electrocommunication signals of another fish for 7 days. After 3 days of exposure to these stimulus conditions, fish were injected with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to mark newborn cells. We sacrificed the fish 4 days after BrdU injection and used immunohistochemistry to measure cell addition (BrdU+), the fraction of added cells that differentiated into neurons (BrdU+/NeuroTrace+) and the density of radial glia fibers (vimentin+) in the periventricular zone of the diencephalon. Fish that were exposed only to the electrocommunication signals of another fish and no other social stimuli had equivalent levels of cell addition and radial glial fiber density to fish that were housed with full social interaction and higher levels than fish housed in isolation. About 60% of the added cells differentiated into neurons; this fraction did not differ among treatment groups. Artificial sine wave electrical stimuli that mimicked electrocommunication signals were ineffective in increasing cell addition and glia fiber formation above those found in isolated fish. Thus, stimuli through a single modality are sufficient for inducing this brain plasticity, but the waveform or dynamic features of communication signals are crucial for the effect.

  9. Pesticide- and sex steroid analogue-induced endocrine disruption differentially targets hypothalamo-hypophyseal-gonadal system during gametogenesis in teleosts - A review.

    PubMed

    Senthilkumaran, Balasubramanian

    2015-08-01

    Pesticide-induced endocrine disruption often mimics sex steroidal action resulting in physiological functional disarray of hypothalamo-hypophyseal-gonadal (HHG) system at multiple levels. Among various group of pesticides, organochlorine and organophosphate family of pesticides are known to impart sex steroidal mimicking activity with slightly higher resemblance to estrogens when compared to androgenic action. This review will highlight the effects of organochlorine (for e.g. endosulfan) and organophosphate (for e.g. malathion) pesticides in comparison with sex-steroid analogue-induced changes on HHG axis during gametogenesis in few teleost fish models. Interestingly, the effects of these compounds have produced differential effects in juveniles and adults which also vary based on exposure dosage and duration. Further, the treatments had caused at times sexually dimorphic effects indicating that the action of these compounds bring out serious implications in sexual development. A comprehensive overview has been provided by considering all these aspects to recognize the adverse impacts of pesticide-induced endocrine disruption with special reference to endosulfan and malathion as those had been applied even today or used before for controlling agricultural pests in several Asian countries including India. This review also compares the effects of sex-steroid analogues where in sex reversal to reproductive dysfunction is evident, which may imply the extent of sexual plasticity in teleosts compared to other vertebrates.

  10. A randomised study on the effects of fish protein supplement on glucose tolerance, lipids and body composition in overweight adults.

    PubMed

    Vikøren, Linn A; Nygård, Ottar K; Lied, Einar; Rostrup, Espen; Gudbrandsen, Oddrun A

    2013-02-28

    The popularity of high-protein diets for weight reduction is immense. However, the potential benefits from altering the source of dietary protein rather than the amount is scarcely investigated. In the present study, we examined the effects of fish protein supplement on glucose and lipid metabolism in overweight adults. A total of thirty-four overweight adults were randomised to 8 weeks' supplementation with fish protein or placebo tablets (controls). The intake of fish protein supplement was 3 g/d for the first 4 weeks and 6 g/d for the last 4 weeks. In this study, 8 weeks of fish protein supplementation resulted in lower values of fasting glucose (P< 0·05), 2 h postprandial glucose (P< 0·05) and glucose-area under the curve (AUC) (five measurements over 2 h, P< 0·05) after fish protein supplementation compared to controls. Glucose-AUC was decreased after 8 weeks with fish protein supplement compared to baseline (P< 0·05), concomitant with increased 30 min and decreased 90 min and 2 h insulin C-peptide level (P< 0·05), and reduced LDL-cholesterol (P< 0·05). Body muscle % was increased (P< 0·05) and body fat % was reduced (P< 0·05) after 4 weeks' supplementation. Physical activity and energy and macronutrients intake did not change during the course of the study. In conclusion, short-term daily supplementation with a low dose of fish protein may have beneficial effects on blood levels of glucose and LDL-cholesterol as well as glucose tolerance and body composition in overweight adults. The long-term effects of fish protein supplementation is of interest in the context of using more fish as a protein source in the diet, and the effects of inclusion of fish in the diet of individuals with low glucose tolerance should be evaluated.

  11. Calcium uptake in the skin of a freshwater teleost.

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, S D; Hasegawa, S; Hirano, T

    1992-01-01

    The skin, particularly the opercular membrane of some teleosts, contains mitochondrion-rich "chloride" cells and has been widely used as a model to study branchial salt-extrusion mechanisms in seawater fish. Skin isolated from the operculum of the freshwater Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) can transport Ca2+ against an ionic and electrical gradient. Adaptation of Nile tilapia to a low-Ca2+ environment increased the capacity of the opercular membrane to transport Ca2+. The density of mitochondrion-rich cells increased in parallel with Ca2+ transport capacity. The results demonstrate net Ca2+ uptake by vertebrate skin and strongly implicate mitochondrion-rich cells as the site of Ca2+ uptake in fresh water. Images PMID:1565659

  12. Morphometric analysis of Mauthner axon cytoskeletal components in adult and subadult fish.

    PubMed

    Alfei, L; Medolago-Albani, L; Zezze, G M; Stefanelli, A

    1992-01-01

    A previous cytoskeletal analysis on trout MA during developmental stages demonstrated, during the subadult stages, neurofilaments (NF) as main components as expressed by the high values of neurofilament to microtubules (MT) ratio which was found to be of the order of 300:1. Since the MA cytoskeletal composition is not known in the adult fish, the MA cytoskeletal composition has been compared to other axons of much smaller diameter of the fasciculus longitudinalis medialis (flm) among which the MA run in the ventral spinal cord. The following parameters were measured on conventional electron microscopy in MA and flm axons cross sections micrographs by means of a computer linked graphic tablet (Apple II): axonal caliber, number of microtubules (MT), microtubular (MT/microns2) and neurofilament (NF/microns2) densities. The analysis of these parameters demonstrated that neurofilaments are the main architectural components in the adult and subadult fish MA and flm axons. However, MA cytoskeletal composition differs from the other flm axons because of its particular very high ratio of neurofilaments to microtubules. The inverse relationship of axonal caliber to microtubular density, previously found in the trout during developmental stages and suggested also for many other vertebrate species, was further confirmed for flm axons which, with calibers 10 times smaller than MA, exhibit a microtubular density 10 times larger.

  13. p53 Mutation suppresses adult neurogenesis in medaka fish (Oryzias latipes)

    SciTech Connect

    Isoe, Yasuko; Okuyama, Teruhiro; Taniguchi, Yoshihito; Kubo, Takeo; Takeuchi, Hideaki

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Progenitor migration is accompanied by an increase in their numbers in the adult brain. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer p53 Mutation suppressed an increase in the number of the migrated progenitors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The decreased progenitor number is not due to enhanced cell death. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer p53 Mutation did not affect proliferation of stem cells. -- Abstract: Tumor suppressor p53 negatively regulates self-renewal of neural stem cells in the adult murine brain. Here, we report that the p53 null mutation in medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) suppressed neurogenesis in the telencephalon, independent of cell death. By using 5-bromo-29-deoxyuridine (BrdU) immunohistochemistry, we identified 18 proliferation zones in the brains of young medaka fish; in situ hybridization showed that p53 was expressed selectively in at least 12 proliferation zones. We also compared the number of BrdU-positive cells present in the whole telencephalon of wild-type (WT) and p53 mutant fish. Immediately after BrdU exposure, the number of BrdU-positive cells did not differ significantly between them. One week after BrdU-exposure, the BrdU-positive cells migrated from the proliferation zone, which was accompanied by an increased number in the WT brain. In contrast, no significant increase was observed in the p53 mutant brain. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (dUTP) nick end-labeling revealed that there was no significant difference in the number of apoptotic cells in the telencephalon of p53 mutant and WT medaka, suggesting that the decreased number of BrdU-positive cells in the mutant may be due to the suppression of proliferation rather than the enhancement of neural cell death. These results suggest that p53 positively regulates neurogenesis via cell proliferation.

  14. Gene duplications and losses within the cyclooxygenase family of teleosts and other chordates.

    PubMed

    Havird, Justin C; Miyamoto, Michael M; Choe, Keith P; Evans, David H

    2008-11-01

    Cyclooxygenase (COX) produces prostaglandins in animals via the oxidation and reduction of arachidonic acid. Different types and numbers of COX genes have been found in corals, sea squirts, fishes, and tetrapods, but no study has used a comparative phylogenetic approach to investigate the evolutionary history of this complex gene family. Therefore, to examine COX evolution in the teleosts and chordates, 9 novel COX sequences (possessing residues and domains critical to COX function) were acquired from the euryhaline killifish, longhorn sculpin, sea lamprey, Atlantic hagfish, and amphioxus using standard polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and cloning methods. Phylogenetic analyses of these and other COX sequences show a complicated history of COX duplications and losses. There are three main lineages of COX in the chordates corresponding to the three subphyla in the phylum Chordata, with each lineage representing an independent COX duplication. Hagfish and lamprey most likely have traditional COX-1/2 genes, suggesting that these genes originated with the first round of genome duplication in the vertebrates according to the 2R hypothesis and are not exclusively present in the gnathostomes. All teleosts examined have three COX genes due to a teleost-specific genome duplication followed by variable loss of a COX-1 (in the zebrafish and rainbow trout) or COX-2 gene (in the derived teleosts). Future studies should examine the functional ramifications of these differential gene losses.

  15. Whole genome sequencing data and de novo draft assemblies for 66 teleost species

    PubMed Central

    Malmstrøm, Martin; Matschiner, Michael; Tørresen, Ole K.; Jakobsen, Kjetill S.; Jentoft, Sissel

    2017-01-01

    Teleost fishes comprise more than half of all vertebrate species, yet genomic data are only available for 0.2% of their diversity. Here, we present whole genome sequencing data for 66 new species of teleosts, vastly expanding the availability of genomic data for this important vertebrate group. We report on de novo assemblies based on low-coverage (9–39×) sequencing and present detailed methodology for all analyses. To facilitate further utilization of this data set, we present statistical analyses of the gene space completeness and verify the expected phylogenetic position of the sequenced genomes in a large mitogenomic context. We further present a nuclear marker set used for phylogenetic inference and evaluate each gene tree in relation to the species tree to test for homogeneity in the phylogenetic signal. Collectively, these analyses illustrate the robustness of this highly diverse data set and enable extensive reuse of the selected phylogenetic markers and the genomic data in general. This data set covers all major teleost lineages and provides unprecedented opportunities for comparative studies of teleosts. PMID:28094797

  16. Origin and evolution of GATA2a and GATA2b in teleosts: insights from tongue sole, Cynoglossus semilaevis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinxiang; Jiang, Jiajun; Wang, Zhongkai; He, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background. Following the two rounds of whole-genome duplication that occurred during deuterostome evolution, a third genome duplication occurred in the lineage of teleost fish and is considered to be responsible for much of the biological diversification within the lineage. GATA2, a member of GATA family of transcription factors, is an important regulator of gene expression in hematopoietic cell in mammals, yet the role of this gene or its putative paralogs in ray-finned fishes remains relatively unknown. Methods. In this study, we attempted to identify GATA2 sequences from the transcriptomes and genomes of multiple teleosts using the bioinformatic tools MrBayes, MEME, and PAML. Following identification, comparative analysis of genome structure, molecular evolution rate, and expression by real-time qPCR were used to predict functional divergence of GATA2 paralogs and their relative transcription in organs of female and male tongue soles (Cynoglossus semilaevis). Results. Two teleost GATA2 genes were identified in the transcriptomes of tongue sole and Japanese flounder (Paralichthysolivaceus). Synteny and phylogenetic analysis confirmed that the two genes likely originated from the teleost-specific genome duplication . Additionally, selection pressure analysis predicted these gene duplicates to have undergone purifying selection and possible divergent new functions. This was supported by differential expression pattern of GATA2a and GATA2b observed in organs of female and male tongue soles. Discussion. Our results indicate that two GATA2 genes originating from the first teleost-specific genome duplication have remained transcriptionally active in some fish species and have likely undergone neofunctionalization. This knowledge provides novel insights into the evolution of the teleost GATA2 genes and constituted important groundwork for further research on the GATA gene family. PMID:27019782

  17. Mycobacteria in adult salmonid fishes returning to national fish hatcheries in Washington, Oregon and California in 1958-59

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ross, A.J.

    1963-01-01

    Incidence of acid-fast bacillus infections in salmonid fishes at West Coast hatcheries was determined for 1957-59. No evidence was obtained which would indicate a definite trend towards either increased or decreased rates of infection. It is apparent that the incidence of infection is higher in hatchery-marked fish than in unmarked fish. Only one hatchery was found free of infection during the 3 years covered by the investigation. This installation had never used raw salmon products in diet.

  18. Proliferation zones in the brain of adult fish Austrolebias (Cyprinodontiform: Rivulidae): a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Fernández, A S; Rosillo, J C; Casanova, G; Olivera-Bravo, S

    2011-08-25

    In contrast with mammals, adult fish brains exhibit an enormous potential to produce new cells. Proliferation zones, however, have been described in only a few species, hindering comparisons among genuses and orders. Here we analyzed brain cell proliferation in annual teleostean fishes Austrolebias (Cyprinodontiform: Rivulidae). Immunocytochemistry against 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) was quantitated and mapped 24 h after injection in three species with different phylogenetic positions or habitats. All species had similar brain anatomy and total volume, but olfactory bulbs, torus longitudinalis and cerebellum were of different sizes in different species. Cell proliferation was found throughout the brain. Three-D reconstructions provided evidence for contiguity along the rostro-caudal axis and concentration in the vicinity of the ventricles. Brain regions analyzed exhibited high mitotic activity, and the torus longitudinalis had the highest volume-normalized proliferation index. A. affinis exhibited the highest normalized proliferation indexes in visual regions but the lowest in olfactory bulb. A. reicherti showed an inverse pattern, suggesting that these species have a different hierarchy of sensorial modalities that could be related to phylogeny or habitat. Double immunostaining against BrdU and cell-type specific markers was performed to determine the fate of proliferating cells. A widespread gliogenesis was evidenced. Few cells positive for both BrdU and the neuronal marker HuC/D were found in the brain of the three species, demonstrating neurogenesis in the adult Austrolebias brain. Summarizing, adult members of the three species showed similar brain anatomy and cell proliferation patterns. Among species, volume-normalized proliferation indexes varied in regions involved in different sensory modalities. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing proliferating cells with neuronal markers as earlier as 24 h after BrdU injection.

  19. Diploidized eggs reprogram adult somatic cell nuclei to pluripotency in nuclear transfer in medaka fish (Oryzias latipes).

    PubMed

    Bubenshchikova, Ekaterina; Kaftanovskaya, Elena; Motosugi, Nami; Fujimoto, Takafumi; Arai, Katsutoshi; Kinoshita, Masato; Hashimoto, Hisashi; Ozato, Kenjiro; Wakamatsu, Yuko

    2007-12-01

    Reprogramming of adult somatic cell nuclei to pluripotency has been unsuccessful in non-mammalian animals, primarily because of chromosomal aberrations in nuclear transplants, which are considered to be caused by asynchrony between the cell cycles of the recipient egg and donor nucleus. In order to normalize the chromosomal status, we used diploidized eggs by retention of second polar body release, instead of enucleated eggs, as recipients in nuclear transfer of primary culture cells from the caudal fin of adult green fluorescent protein gene (GFP) transgenic medaka fish (Oryzias latipes). We found that 2.7% of the reconstructed embryos grew into adults that expressed GFP in various tissues in the same pattern as in the donor fish. Moreover, these fish were diploid, fertile and capable of passing the marker gene to the next generation in Mendelian fashion. We hesitate to call these fish 'clones' because we used non-enucleated eggs as recipients; in effect, they may be chimeras consisting of cells derived from diploid recipient nuclei and donor nuclei. In either case, fish adult somatic cell nuclei were reprogrammed to pluripotency and differentiated into a variety of cell types including germ cells via the use of diploidized recipient eggs.

  20. Long-Term Changes in the Distributions of Larval and Adult Fish in the Northeast U.S. Shelf Ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have documented long-term changes in adult marine fish distributions and linked these changes to climate change and multi-decadal climate variability. Most marine fish, however, have complex life histories with morphologically distinct stages, which use different habitats. Shifts in distribution of one stage may affect the connectivity between life stages and thereby impact population processes including spawning and recruitment. Specifically, many marine fish species have a planktonic larval stage, which lasts from weeks to months. We compared the spatial distribution and seasonal occurrence of larval fish in the Northeast U.S. Shelf Ecosystem to test whether spatial and temporal distributions changed between two decades. Two large-scale ichthyoplankton programs sampled using similar methods and spatial domain each decade. Adult distributions from a long-term bottom trawl survey over the same time period and spatial area were also analyzed using the same analytical framework to compare changes in larval and adult distributions between the two decades. Changes in spatial distribution of larvae occurred for 43% of taxa, with shifts predominately northward (i.e., along-shelf). Timing of larval occurrence shifted for 49% of the larval taxa, with shifts evenly split between occurring earlier and later in the season. Where both larvae and adults of the same species were analyzed, 48% exhibited different shifts between larval and adult stages. Overall, these results demonstrate that larval fish distributions are changing in the ecosystem. The spatial changes are largely consistent with expectations from a changing climate. The temporal changes are more complex, indicating we need a better understanding of reproductive timing of fishes in the ecosystem. These changes may impact population productivity through changes in life history connectivity and recruitment, and add to the accumulating evidence for changes in the Northeast U.S. Shelf Ecosystem with

  1. Long-Term Changes in the Distributions of Larval and Adult Fish in the Northeast U.S. Shelf Ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Harvey J; Richardson, David E; Marancik, Katrin E; Hare, Jonathan A

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have documented long-term changes in adult marine fish distributions and linked these changes to climate change and multi-decadal climate variability. Most marine fish, however, have complex life histories with morphologically distinct stages, which use different habitats. Shifts in distribution of one stage may affect the connectivity between life stages and thereby impact population processes including spawning and recruitment. Specifically, many marine fish species have a planktonic larval stage, which lasts from weeks to months. We compared the spatial distribution and seasonal occurrence of larval fish in the Northeast U.S. Shelf Ecosystem to test whether spatial and temporal distributions changed between two decades. Two large-scale ichthyoplankton programs sampled using similar methods and spatial domain each decade. Adult distributions from a long-term bottom trawl survey over the same time period and spatial area were also analyzed using the same analytical framework to compare changes in larval and adult distributions between the two decades. Changes in spatial distribution of larvae occurred for 43% of taxa, with shifts predominately northward (i.e., along-shelf). Timing of larval occurrence shifted for 49% of the larval taxa, with shifts evenly split between occurring earlier and later in the season. Where both larvae and adults of the same species were analyzed, 48% exhibited different shifts between larval and adult stages. Overall, these results demonstrate that larval fish distributions are changing in the ecosystem. The spatial changes are largely consistent with expectations from a changing climate. The temporal changes are more complex, indicating we need a better understanding of reproductive timing of fishes in the ecosystem. These changes may impact population productivity through changes in life history connectivity and recruitment, and add to the accumulating evidence for changes in the Northeast U.S. Shelf Ecosystem with

  2. Gonadal development in fish.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Toshiya; Tanaka, Minoru

    2014-01-01

    Vertebrate reproduction depends on the function of 2 distinct gametes, sperm and eggs, which develop in 2 different organs, the testis and the ovary. Testes and ovaries are composed of germ cells, supporting cells and interstitial cells. In this review, we describe the origin and the fate of these cell lineages and how they interact with each other to form sexually dimorphic reproductive organs in medaka. We delineate how the temporally different association and establishment of these lineages contribute to a variety of seemingly different sex differentiation processes among teleost fish. Thus, teleosts represent an intriguing group in which to study the fundamental processes of gonadal development through comparing conserved and unique mechanisms.

  3. Indirect effects of impoundment on migrating fish: temperature gradients in fish ladders slow dam passage by adult Chinook salmon and steelhead.

    PubMed

    Caudill, Christopher C; Keefer, Matthew L; Clabough, Tami S; Naughton, George P; Burke, Brian J; Peery, Christopher A

    2013-01-01

    Thermal layering in reservoirs upstream from hydroelectric dams can create temperature gradients in fishways used by upstream migrating adults. In the Snake River, Washington, federally-protected adult salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.) often encounter relatively cool water in dam tailraces and lower ladder sections and warmer water in the upstream portions of ladders. Using radiotelemetry, we examined relationships between fish passage behavior and the temperature difference between the top and bottom of ladders (∆T) at four dams over four years. Some spring Chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) experienced ∆T ≥ 0.5 °C. Many summer and fall Chinook salmon and summer steelhead (O. mykiss) experienced ∆T ≥ 1.0 °C, and some individuals encountered ΔT > 4.0°C. As ΔT increased, migrants were consistently more likely to move down fish ladders and exit into dam tailraces, resulting in upstream passage delays that ranged from hours to days. Fish body temperatures equilibrated to ladder temperatures and often exceeded 20°C, indicating potential negative physiological and fitness effects. Collectively, the results suggest that gradients in fishway water temperatures present a migration obstacle to many anadromous migrants. Unfavorable temperature gradients may be common at reservoir-fed fish passage facilities, especially those with seasonal thermal layering or stratification. Understanding and managing thermal heterogeneity at such sites may be important for ensuring efficient upstream passage and minimizing stress for migratory, temperature-sensitive species.

  4. Indirect Effects of Impoundment on Migrating Fish: Temperature Gradients in Fish Ladders Slow Dam Passage by Adult Chinook Salmon and Steelhead

    PubMed Central

    Caudill, Christopher C.; Keefer, Matthew L.; Clabough, Tami S.; Naughton, George P.; Burke, Brian J.; Peery, Christopher A.

    2013-01-01

    Thermal layering in reservoirs upstream from hydroelectric dams can create temperature gradients in fishways used by upstream migrating adults. In the Snake River, Washington, federally-protected adult salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.) often encounter relatively cool water in dam tailraces and lower ladder sections and warmer water in the upstream portions of ladders. Using radiotelemetry, we examined relationships between fish passage behavior and the temperature difference between the top and bottom of ladders (∆T) at four dams over four years. Some spring Chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) experienced ∆T ≥ 0.5 °C. Many summer and fall Chinook salmon and summer steelhead (O. mykiss) experienced ∆T ≥ 1.0 °C, and some individuals encountered ΔT > 4.0°C. As ΔT increased, migrants were consistently more likely to move down fish ladders and exit into dam tailraces, resulting in upstream passage delays that ranged from hours to days. Fish body temperatures equilibrated to ladder temperatures and often exceeded 20°C, indicating potential negative physiological and fitness effects. Collectively, the results suggest that gradients in fishway water temperatures present a migration obstacle to many anadromous migrants. Unfavorable temperature gradients may be common at reservoir-fed fish passage facilities, especially those with seasonal thermal layering or stratification. Understanding and managing thermal heterogeneity at such sites may be important for ensuring efficient upstream passage and minimizing stress for migratory, temperature-sensitive species. PMID:24392020

  5. Pigment patterns in adult fish result from superimposition of two largely independent pigmentation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ceinos, Rosa M; Guillot, Raúl; Kelsh, Robert N; Cerdá-Reverter, José M; Rotllant, Josep

    2015-03-01

    Dorso-ventral pigment pattern differences are the most widespread pigmentary adaptations in vertebrates. In mammals, this pattern is controlled by regulating melanin chemistry in melanocytes using a protein, agouti-signalling peptide (ASIP). In fish, studies of pigment patterning have focused on stripe formation, identifying a core striping mechanism dependent upon interactions between different pigment cell types. In contrast, mechanisms driving the dorso-ventral countershading pattern have been overlooked. Here, we demonstrate that, in fact, zebrafish utilize two distinct adult pigment patterning mechanisms - an ancient dorso-ventral patterning mechanism, and a more recent striping mechanism based on cell-cell interactions; remarkably, the dorso-ventral patterning mechanism also utilizes ASIP. These two mechanisms function largely independently, with resultant patterns superimposed to give the full pattern.

  6. Rapid Diversification of FoxP2 in Teleosts through Gene Duplication in the Teleost-Specific Whole Genome Duplication Event

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xiaowei; Wang, Yajun; Tang, Yezhong

    2013-01-01

    As one of the most conserved genes in vertebrates, FoxP2 is widely involved in a number of important physiological and developmental processes. We systematically studied the evolutionary history and functional adaptations of FoxP2 in teleosts. The duplicated FoxP2 genes (FoxP2a and FoxP2b), which were identified in teleosts using synteny and paralogon analysis on genome databases of eight organisms, were probably generated in the teleost-specific whole genome duplication event. A credible classification with FoxP2, FoxP2a and FoxP2b in phylogenetic reconstructions confirmed the teleost-specific FoxP2 duplication. The unavailability of FoxP2b in Danio rerio suggests that the gene was deleted through nonfunctionalization of the redundant copy after the Otocephala-Euteleostei split. Heterogeneity in evolutionary rates among clusters consisting of FoxP2 in Sarcopterygii (Cluster 1), FoxP2a in Teleostei (Cluster 2) and FoxP2b in Teleostei (Cluster 3), particularly between Clusters 2 and 3, reveals asymmetric functional divergence after the gene duplication. Hierarchical cluster analyses of hydrophobicity profiles demonstrated significant structural divergence among the three clusters with verification of subsequent stepwise discriminant analysis, in which FoxP2 of Leucoraja erinacea and Lepisosteus oculatus were classified into Cluster 1, whereas FoxP2b of Salmo salar was grouped into Cluster 2 rather than Cluster 3. The simulated thermodynamic stability variations of the forkhead box domain (monomer and homodimer) showed remarkable divergence in FoxP2, FoxP2a and FoxP2b clusters. Relaxed purifying selection and positive Darwinian selection probably were complementary driving forces for the accelerated evolution of FoxP2 in ray-finned fishes, especially for the adaptive evolution of FoxP2a and FoxP2b in teleosts subsequent to the teleost-specific gene duplication. PMID:24349554

  7. Consumption dynamics of the adult piscivorous fish community in Spirit Lake, Iowa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liao, H.; Pierce, C.L.; Larscheid, J.G.

    2004-01-01

    At Spirit Lake, one of Iowa's most important fisheries, walleye Sander vitreus (formerly Stizostedion vitreum) is one of the most popular species with anglers. Despite a century of walleye stocking and management in Spirit Lake, walleye growth rate, size structure, and angler harvest continue to decline. Our purpose was to determine the magnitude and dynamics of walleye population consumption relative to those of other piscivorous species in Spirit Lake, which would allow managers to judge the feasibility of increasing the abundance, growth rate, and size structure of the walleye population. We quantified food consumption by the adult piscivorous fish community in Spirit Lake over a 3-year period. Data on population dynamics, diet, energy density, and water temperature from 1995 to 1997 were used in bioenergetics models to estimate total consumption by walleye, yellow perch Perca flavescens, smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieu, largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides, black crappie Pomoxis nigromaculatus, and northern pike Esox lucius. Estimated annual consumption by the piscivorous community varied roughly fourfold, ranging from 154,752 kg in 1995 to 662,776 kg in 1997. Walleyes dominated total consumption, accounting for 68, 73, and 90% (1995-1997, respectively) of total food consumption. Walleyes were also the dominant consumers of fish, accounting for 76, 86, and 97% of piscivorous consumption; yellow perch followed, accounting for 16% of piscivorous consumption in 1995 and 12% in 1996. Yellow perch were the predominant fish prey species in all 3 years, accounting for 68, 52, and 36% of the total prey consumed. Natural reproduction is weak, so high walleye densities are maintained by intensive stocking. Walleye stocking drives piscivorous consumption in Spirit Lake, and yearly variation in the cannibalism of stocked walleye fry may be an important determinant of walleye year-class strength and angler success. Reducing walleye stocking intensity, varying stocking

  8. Diet dynamics of the adult piscivorous fish community in Spirit Lake, Iowa, USA 1995-1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liao, H.; Pierce, C.L.; Larscheid, J.G.

    2002-01-01

    Diets of adults of six important piscivorous fish species, black crappie Pomoxis nigromaculatus, largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides, northern pike Esox lucius, smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieui, walleye Stizostedion vitreum, and yellow perch Perca flavescens were quantified in Spirit Lake, Iowa, USA from May to October in 1995-1997. Forty-one prey taxa were found in the diets of these species, including 19 species of fish. The most important prey taxa overall were yellow perch, amphipods and dipterans. Diets of northern pike and walleye were dominated by yellow perch. Largemouth bass diets included large percentages of both yellow perch and black bullhead Ameiurus melas. Smallmouth bass diets included large percentages of both yellow perch and crayfish. Black crappie and yellow perch diets were dominated by invertebrates, primarily amphipods and dipterans. There were pronounced differences in diets among species, among size classes within species and over time. Most of the dominant prey taxa we documented in the diets of piscivorous species were in accordance with previous studies, but a few deviated significantly from expectations. Many of the temporal diet changes were asynchronous among piscivorous species and size classes, suggesting different responses to common prey resources over time.

  9. Challenges in current adult fish laboratory reproductive tests: suggestions for refinement using a mummichog (Fundulus heteroclitus) case study.

    PubMed

    Bosker, Thijs; Munkittrick, Kelly R; MacLatchy, Deborah L

    2009-11-01

    Concerns about screening endocrine-active contaminants have led to the development of a number of short-term fish reproductive tests. A review conducted of 62 published adult fish reproductive papers using various fish species found low samples sizes (mean of 5.7 replicates with a median of 5 replicates) and high variance (an average coefficient of variance of 43.8%). The high variances and low sample sizes allow only relatively large differences to be detected with the current protocols; the average significant difference detected was a 68.7% reduction in egg production, while only differences above 50% were detected with confidence. This result indicates low power to detect more subtle differences and a high probability of type II errors in interpretation. The present study identifies several ways to increase the power of the adult fish reproductive test in the mummichog (Fundulus heteroclitus). By identifying the peak timing of egg production (before and after the new moon), extending the duration of the experiment (increased from 7 to 14 d), and determining that a sample size of eight replicate tanks per treatment accurately predicts variance in the sample population (based on pre-exposure variation calculations of replicate tanks), the power of the test has been significantly increased. The present study demonstrates that weaknesses in the current adult fish reproductive tests can easily be addressed by focusing on improved understanding of the reproductive behavior of the test species and developing study designs that include calculating desired variability levels and increasing replicates.

  10. Teleost microbiomes: the state of the art in their characterization, manipulation and importance in aquaculture and fisheries

    PubMed Central

    Llewellyn, Martin S.; Boutin, Sébastien; Hoseinifar, Seyed Hossein; Derome, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Indigenous microbiota play a critical role in the lives of their vertebrate hosts. In human and mouse models it is increasingly clear that innate and adaptive immunity develop in close concert with the commensal microbiome. Furthermore, several aspects of digestion and nutrient metabolism are governed by intestinal microbiota. Research on teleosts has responded relatively slowly to the introduction of massively parallel sequencing procedures in microbiomics. Nonetheless, progress has been made in biotic and gnotobiotic zebrafish models, defining a core microbiome and describing its role in development. However, microbiome research in other teleost species, especially those important from an aquaculture perspective, has been relatively slow. In this review, we examine progress in teleost microbiome research to date. We discuss teleost microbiomes in health and disease, microbiome ontogeny, prospects for successful microbiome manipulation (especially in an aquaculture setting) and attempt to identify important future research themes. We predict an explosion in research in this sector in line with the increasing global demand for fish protein, and the need to find sustainable approaches to improve aquaculture yield. The reduced cost and increasing ease of next generation sequencing technologies provides the technological backing, and the next 10 years will be an exciting time for teleost microbiome research. PMID:24917852

  11. Prolactin and teleost ionocytes: new insights into cellular and molecular targets of prolactin in vertebrate epithelia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breves, Jason P.; McCormick, Stephen D.; Karlstrom, Rolf O.

    2014-01-01

    The peptide hormone prolactin is a functionally versatile hormone produced by the vertebrate pituitary. Comparative studies over the last six decades have revealed that a conserved function for prolactin across vertebrates is the regulation of ion and water transport in a variety of tissues including those responsible for whole-organism ion homeostasis. In teleost fishes, prolactin was identified as the “freshwater-adapting hormone”, promoting ion-conserving and water-secreting processes by acting on the gill, kidney, gut and urinary bladder. In mammals, prolactin is known to regulate renal, intestinal, mammary and amniotic epithelia, with dysfunction linked to hypogonadism, infertility, and metabolic disorders. Until recently, our understanding of the cellular mechanisms of prolactin action in fishes has been hampered by a paucity of molecular tools to define and study ionocytes, specialized cells that control active ion transport across branchial and epidermal epithelia. Here we review work in teleost models indicating that prolactin regulates ion balance through action on ion transporters, tight-junction proteins, and water channels in ionocytes, and discuss recent advances in our understanding of ionocyte function in the genetically and embryonically accessible zebrafish (Danio rerio). Given the high degree of evolutionary conservation in endocrine and osmoregulatory systems, these studies in teleost models are contributing novel mechanistic insight into how prolactin participates in the development, function, and dysfunction of osmoregulatory systems across the vertebrate lineage.

  12. Community-Based Adult Education for the Fisherwomen of Rajapalyam Fishing Village in Tuticorin, Southeast Coast of India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Jamila; Linden, Eva; Bierbrier, Christin; Lofgren, Inger; Edward, J. K. Patterson

    2008-01-01

    Rajapalyam village is located in the Tuticorin district along the biodiversity rich Gulf of Mannar coast in southeastern India. The people of this village are economically backward and most of the men are engaged in fishing. The fisherwomen of this village are less literate than the men, or illiterate. Adult education has been introduced to the…

  13. Empowerment of Fisher Women of Siluvaipatti Fishing Village of Tuticorin, Southeast Coast of India through Adult Education and ICT Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Jamila; Linden, Eva; Bierbrier, Christin; Lofgren, Inger; Wilhelmsson, Dan; Edward, J. K. Patterson

    2008-01-01

    This paper focuses on adult education and information and communication technologies (ICT) training to fisherwomen of Siluvaipatti fishing village in Tuticorin district of Tamil Nadu State, southeastern India. The total families in this village are 209 with population 899 (Male: 442; Female: 457). The education level is generally good in…

  14. Defensive responses of cuttlefish to different teleost predators.

    PubMed

    Staudinger, Michelle D; Buresch, Kendra C; Mäthger, Lydia M; Fry, Charlie; McAnulty, Sarah; Ulmer, Kimberly M; Hanlon, Roger T

    2013-12-01

    We evaluated cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) responses to three teleost predators: bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix), summer flounder (Paralichthys dentatus), and black seabass (Centropristis striata). We hypothesized that the distinct body shapes, swimming behaviors, and predation tactics exhibited by the three fishes would elicit markedly different antipredator responses by cuttlefish. Over the course of 25 predator-prey behavioral trials, 3 primary and 15 secondary defense behaviors of cuttlefish were shown to predators. In contrast, secondary defenses were not shown during control trials in which predators were absent. With seabass-a benthic, sit-and-pursue predator-cuttlefish used flight and spent more time swimming in the water column than with other predators. With bluefish-an active, pelagic searching predator-cuttlefish remained closely associated with the substrate and relied more on cryptic behaviors. Startle (deimatic) displays were the most frequent secondary defense shown to seabass and bluefish, particularly the Dark eye ring and Deimatic spot displays. We were unable to evaluate secondary defenses by cuttlefish to flounder-a lie-and-wait predator-because flounder did not pursue cuttlefish or make attacks. Nonetheless, cuttlefish used primary defense during flounder trials, alternating between cryptic still and moving behaviors. Overall, our results suggest that cuttlefish may vary their behavior in the presence of different teleost predators: cryptic behaviors may be more important in the presence of active searching predators (e.g., bluefish), while conspicuous movements such as swimming in the water column and startle displays may be more prevalent with relatively sedentary, bottom-associated predators (e.g., seabass).

  15. Stellate Cell Networks in the Teleost Pituitary

    PubMed Central

    Golan, Matan; Hollander-Cohen, Lian; Levavi-Sivan, Berta

    2016-01-01

    The folliculostellate cells of the mammalian pituitary are non-endocrine cells that are implicated in long-distance communication and paracrine signaling, but to date, these cells have yet to be characterized in teleosts. We found that the stellate cells of the teleost pituitary share many common attributes with mammalian folliculostellate cells. By labeling of stellate cells in live preparations of tilapia pituitaries we investigated their distribution, association with other endocrine cells and their anatomical and functional coupling. In the pars intermedia, stellate cells were arranged around neuronal bundles and their processes extended into the pars distalis. Within the pars distalis, stellate cells formed close associations with FSH cells and, to a lesser degree, with GH and LH cells, suggesting differential paracrine regulation of the two gonadotrope populations. The production of follistatin by stellate cells further corroborates the notion of a paracrine role on FSH release. We also found stellate cells to form gap junctions that enabled dye transfer to neighboring stellate cells, implicating that these cells form a large-scale network that connects distant parts of the pituitary. Our findings represent the first wide-scale study of stellate cells in teleosts and provide valuable information regarding their functional roles in pituitary function. PMID:27086978

  16. Cognitive performance in older adults is inversely associated with fish consumption but not erythrocyte membrane n-3 fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Danthiir, Vanessa; Hosking, Diane; Burns, Nicholas R; Wilson, Carlene; Nettelbeck, Ted; Calvaresi, Eva; Clifton, Peter; Wittert, Gary A

    2014-03-01

    Higher n-3 (ω-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and fish intake may help maintain cognitive function in older age. However, evidence is inconsistent; few studies have examined the relation in cognitively healthy individuals across numerous cognitive domains, and none to our knowledge have considered lifetime fish intake. We examined associations between multiple domains of cognition and erythrocyte membrane n-3 PUFA proportions and historical and contemporary fish intake in 390 normal older adults, analyzing baseline data from the Older People, Omega-3, and Cognitive Health trial. We measured n-3 PUFA in erythrocyte membranes, and we assessed historical and contemporary fish intake by food-frequency questionnaires. We assessed cognitive performance on reasoning, working memory, short-term memory, retrieval fluency, perceptual speed, simple/choice reaction time, speed of memory-scanning, reasoning speed, inhibition, and psychomotor speed. Cognitive outcomes for each construct were factor scores from confirmatory factor analysis. Multiple linear regression models controlled for a number of potential confounding factors, including age, education, sex, apolipoprotein E-ε 4 allele, physical activity, smoking, alcohol intake, socioeconomic variables, and other health-related variables. Higher erythrocyte membrane eicosapaentonoic acid proportions predicted slower perceptual and reasoning speed in females, which was attenuated once current fish intake was controlled. No other associations were present between n-3 PUFA proportions and cognitive performance. Higher current fish consumption predicted worse performance on several cognitive speed constructs. Greater fish consumption in childhood predicted slower perceptual speed and simple/choice reaction time. We found no evidence to support the hypothesis that higher proportions of long-chain n-3 fatty acids or fish intake benefits cognitive performance in normal older adults.

  17. Genome Evolution and Meiotic Maps by Massively Parallel DNA Sequencing: Spotted Gar, an Outgroup for the Teleost Genome Duplication

    PubMed Central

    Amores, Angel; Catchen, Julian; Ferrara, Allyse; Fontenot, Quenton; Postlethwait, John H.

    2011-01-01

    Genomic resources for hundreds of species of evolutionary, agricultural, economic, and medical importance are unavailable due to the expense of well-assembled genome sequences and difficulties with multigenerational studies. Teleost fish provide many models for human disease but possess anciently duplicated genomes that sometimes obfuscate connectivity. Genomic information representing a fish lineage that diverged before the teleost genome duplication (TGD) would provide an outgroup for exploring the mechanisms of evolution after whole-genome duplication. We exploited massively parallel DNA sequencing to develop meiotic maps with thrift and speed by genotyping F1 offspring of a single female and a single male spotted gar (Lepisosteus oculatus) collected directly from nature utilizing only polymorphisms existing in these two wild individuals. Using Stacks, software that automates the calling of genotypes from polymorphisms assayed by Illumina sequencing, we constructed a map containing 8406 markers. RNA-seq on two map-cross larvae provided a reference transcriptome that identified nearly 1000 mapped protein-coding markers and allowed genome-wide analysis of conserved synteny. Results showed that the gar lineage diverged from teleosts before the TGD and its genome is organized more similarly to that of humans than teleosts. Thus, spotted gar provides a critical link between medical models in teleost fish, to which gar is biologically similar, and humans, to which gar is genomically similar. Application of our F1 dense mapping strategy to species with no prior genome information promises to facilitate comparative genomics and provide a scaffold for ordering the numerous contigs arising from next generation genome sequencing. PMID:21828280

  18. A phylogenetic analysis of egg size, clutch size, spawning mode, adult body size, and latitude in reef fishes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasimatis, Katja; Riginos, Cynthia

    2016-06-01

    Theoretical treatments of egg size in fishes suggest that constraints on reproductive output should create trade-offs between the size and number of eggs produced per spawn. For marine reef fishes, the observation of distinct reproductive care strategies (demersal guarding, egg scattering, and pelagic spawning) has additionally prompted speculation that these strategies reflect alternative fitness optima with selection on egg size differing by reproductive mode and perhaps latitude. Here, we aggregate data from 278 reef fish species and test whether clutch size, reproductive care, adult body size, and latitudinal bands (i.e., tropical, subtropical, and temperate) predict egg size, using a statistically unified framework that accounts for phylogenetic correlations among traits. We find no inverse relationship between species egg size and clutch size, but rather that egg size differs by reproductive mode (mean volume for demersal eggs = 1.22 mm3, scattered eggs = 0.18 mm3, pelagic eggs = 0.52 mm3) and that clutch size is strongly correlated with adult body size. Larger eggs were found in temperate species compared with tropical species in both demersal guarders and pelagic spawners, but this difference was not strong when accounting for phylogenetic correlations, suggesting that differences in species composition underlies regional differences in egg size. In summary, demersal guarders are generally small fishes with small clutch sizes that produce large eggs. Pelagic spawners and egg scatterers are variable in adult and clutch size. Although pelagic spawned eggs are variable in size, those of scatterers are consistently small.

  19. DIAGNOSTIC CRITERIA FOR PROLIFERATIVE THYROID LESIONS IN BONY FISHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Criteria for distinguishing hyperplastic thyroid lesions from thyroid neoplasia in bony fishes have long been debated by scientists. Confusion exists because the thyroid tissue in most teleosts is unencapsulated, is occasionally found in ectopic sites, and is frequently predispos...

  20. Cortisol receptor blockade and seawater adaptation in the euryhaline teleost Fundulus heteroclitus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marshall, W.S.; Cozzi, R.R.F.; Pelis, R.M.; McCormick, S.D.

    2005-01-01

    To examine the role of cortisol in seawater osmoregulation in a euryhaline teleost, adult killifish were acclimated to brackish water (10???) and RU486 or vehicle was administered orally in peanut oil daily for five days at low (40 mg.kg-1) or high dose (200 mg.kg-1). Fish were transferred to 1.5 x seawater (45???) or to brackish water (control) and sampled at 24 h and 48 h after transfer, when Cl- secretion is upregulated. At 24 h, opercular membrane Cl- secretion rate, as Isc, was increased only in the high dose RU486 group. Stimulation of membranes by 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine and cAMP increased Isc in vehicle treated controls but those from RU486-treated animals were unchanged and membranes from brackish water animals showed a decrease in Isc. At 48 h, Isc increased and transepithelial resistance decreased in vehicle and RU486 groups, compared to brackish water controls. Plasma cortisol increased in all groups transferred to high salinity, compared to brackish water controls. RU486 treated animals had higher cortisol levels compared to vehicle controls. Vehicle treated controls had lower cortisol levels than untreated or RU486 treated animals, higher stimulation of Isc, and lower hematocrit at 24 h, beneficial effects attributed to increased caloric intake from the peanut oil vehicle. Chloride cell density was significantly increased in the high dose RU486 group at 48 hours, yet Isc was unchanged, suggesting a decrease in Cl- secretion per cell. Thus cortisol enhances NaCl secretion capacity in chloride cells, likely via glucocorticoid type receptors. ?? 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Regenerating Fish Optic Nerves and a Regeneration-Like Response in Injured Optic Nerves of Adult Rabbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, M.; Belkin, M.; Harel, A.; Solomon, A.; Lavie, V.; Hadani, M.; Rachailovich, I.; Stein-Izsak, C.

    1985-05-01

    Regeneration of fish optic nerve (representing regenerative central nervous system) was accompanied by increased activity of regeneration-triggering factors produced by nonneuronal cells. A graft of regenerating fish optic nerve, or a ``wrap-around'' implant containing medium conditioned by it, induced a response associated with regeneration in injured optic nerves of adult rabbits (representing a nonregenerative central nervous system). This response was manifested by an increase of general protein synthesis and of selective polypeptides in the retinas and by the ability of the retina to sprout in culture.

  2. First Known Feeding Trace of the Eocene Bottom-Dwelling Fish Notogoneus osculus and Its Paleontological Significance

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Anthony J.; Vazquez-Prokopec, Gonzalo M.; Page, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Background The Green River Formation (early Eocene, about 42–53 Ma) at and near Fossil Butte National Monument in Wyoming, USA, is world famous for its exquisitely preserved freshwater teleost fish in the former Fossil Lake. Nonetheless, trace fossils attributed to fish interacting with the lake bottom are apparently rare, and have not been associated directly with any fish species. Here we interpret the first known feeding and swimming trace fossil of the teleost Notogoneus osculus Cope (Teleostei: Gonorynchidae), which is also represented as a body fossil in the same stratum. Methodology/Principal Findings A standard description of the trace fossil, identified as Undichna cf. U. simplicatas, was augmented by high-resolution digital images and spatial and mathematical analyses, which allowed for detailed interpretations of the anatomy, swimming mode, feeding behavior, and body size of the tracemaker. Our analysis indicates that the tracemaker was about 45 cm long; used its caudal, anal, and pelvic fins (the posterior half of its body) to make the swimming traces; and used a ventrally oriented mouth to make overlapping feeding marks. We hypothesize that the tracemaker was an adult Notogoneus osculus. Conclusions/Significance Our results are the first to link a specific teleost tracemaker with a trace fossil from the Green River Formation, while also interpreting the size and relative age of the tracemaker. The normal feeding and swimming behaviors indicated by the trace fossil indicate temporarily oxygenated benthic conditions in the deepest part of Fossil Lake, counter to most paleoecological interpretations of this deposit. Lastly, our spatial and mathematical analyses significantly update and advance previous approaches to the study of teleost trace fossils. PMID:20463969

  3. Principal function of mineralocorticoid signaling suggested by constitutive knockout of the mineralocorticoid receptor in medaka fish

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Tatsuya; Yoshiki, Madoka; Takahashi, Hideya; Yoshida, Masayuki; Ogino, Yukiko; Ikeuchi, Toshitaka; Nakamachi, Tomoya; Konno, Norifumi; Matsuda, Kouhei; Sakamoto, Hirotaka

    2016-01-01

    As in osmoregulation, mineralocorticoid signaling is implicated in the control of brain-behavior actions. Nevertheless, the understanding of this role is limited, partly due to the mortality of mineralocorticoid receptor (MR)-knockout (KO) mice due to impaired Na+ reabsorption. In teleost fish, a distinct mineralocorticoid system has only been identified recently. Here, we generated a constitutive MR-KO medaka as the first adult-viable MR-KO animal, since MR expression is modest in osmoregulatory organs but high in the brain of adult medaka as for most teleosts. Hyper- and hypo-osmoregulation were normal in MR-KO medaka. When we studied the behavioral phenotypes based on the central MR localization, however, MR-KO medaka failed to track moving dots despite having an increase in acceleration of swimming. These findings reinforce previous results showing a minor role for mineralocorticoid signaling in fish osmoregulation, and provide the first convincing evidence that MR is required for normal locomotor activity in response to visual motion stimuli, but not for the recognition of these stimuli per se. We suggest that MR potentially integrates brain-behavioral and visual responses, which might be a conserved function of mineralocorticoid signaling through vertebrates. Importantly, this fish model allows for the possible identification of novel aspects of mineralocorticoid signaling. PMID:27897263

  4. Deep sexual dimorphism in adult medaka fish liver highlighted by multi-omic approach

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Qin; Le Manach, Séverine; Sotton, Benoit; Huet, Hélène; Duvernois-Berthet, Evelyne; Paris, Alain; Duval, Charlotte; Ponger, Loïc; Marie, Arul; Blond, Alain; Mathéron, Lucrèce; Vinh, Joelle; Bolbach, Gérard; Djediat, Chakib; Bernard, Cécile; Edery, Marc; Marie, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Sexual dimorphism describes the features that discriminate between the two sexes at various biological levels. Especially, during the reproductive phase, the liver is one of the most sexually dimorphic organs, because of different metabolic demands between the two sexes. The liver is a key organ that plays fundamental roles in various physiological processes, including digestion, energetic metabolism, xenobiotic detoxification, biosynthesis of serum proteins, and also in endocrine or immune response. The sex-dimorphism of the liver is particularly obvious in oviparous animals, as the female liver is the main organ for the synthesis of oocyte constituents. In this work, we are interested in identifying molecular sexual dimorphism in the liver of adult medaka fish and their sex-variation in response to hepatotoxic exposures. By developing an integrative approach combining histology and different high-throughput omic investigations (metabolomics, proteomics and transcriptomics), we were able to globally depict the strong sexual dimorphism that concerns various cellular and molecular processes of hepatocytes comprising protein synthesis, amino acid, lipid and polysaccharide metabolism, along with steroidogenesis and detoxification. The results of this work imply noticeable repercussions on the biology of oviparous organisms environmentally exposed to chemical or toxin issues. PMID:27561897

  5. Metformin Exposure at Environmentally Relevant Concentrations Causes Potential Endocrine Disruption in Adult Male Fish

    PubMed Central

    Niemuth, Nicholas J; Jordan, Renee; Crago, Jordan; Blanksma, Chad; Johnson, Rodney; Klaper, Rebecca D

    2015-01-01

    Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) are emerging contaminants that have been found ubiquitously in wastewater and surface waters around the world. A major source of these compounds is incomplete metabolism in humans and subsequent excretion in human waste, resulting in discharge into surface waters by wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent. One pharmaceutical found in particularly high abundance in recent WWTP effluent and surface water studies is metformin, one of the world's most widely prescribed antidiabetic drugs. Interactions between insulin signaling and steroidogenesis suggest potential endocrine-disrupting effects of metformin found in the aquatic environment. Adult fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) were chronically exposed to metformin for 4 wk, at 40 µg/L, a level similar to the average found in WWTP effluent in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA. Genetic endpoints related to metabolism and endocrine function as well as reproduction-related endpoints were examined. Metformin treatment induced significant up-regulation of messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) encoding the egg-protein vitellogenin in male fish, an indication of endocrine disruption. The present study, the first to study the effects of environmentally relevant metformin exposure in fathead minnows, demonstrates the need for further study of the endocrine-disrupting effects of metformin in aquatic organisms. Environ Toxicol Chem 2014;9999:1–6. © 2014 The Authors. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of SETAC. PMID:25358780

  6. Metformin exposure at environmentally relevant concentrations causes potential endocrine disruption in adult male fish.

    PubMed

    Niemuth, Nicholas J; Jordan, Renee; Crago, Jordan; Blanksma, Chad; Johnson, Rodney; Klaper, Rebecca D

    2015-02-01

    Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) are emerging contaminants that have been found ubiquitously in wastewater and surface waters around the world. A major source of these compounds is incomplete metabolism in humans and subsequent excretion in human waste, resulting in discharge into surface waters by wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent. One pharmaceutical found in particularly high abundance in recent WWTP effluent and surface water studies is metformin, one of the world's most widely prescribed antidiabetic drugs. Interactions between insulin signaling and steroidogenesis suggest potential endocrine-disrupting effects of metformin found in the aquatic environment. Adult fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) were chronically exposed to metformin for 4 wk, at 40 µg/L, a level similar to the average found in WWTP effluent in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA. Genetic endpoints related to metabolism and endocrine function as well as reproduction-related endpoints were examined. Metformin treatment induced significant up-regulation of messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) encoding the egg-protein vitellogenin in male fish, an indication of endocrine disruption. The present study, the first to study the effects of environmentally relevant metformin exposure in fathead minnows, demonstrates the need for further study of the endocrine-disrupting effects of metformin in aquatic organisms.

  7. Deep sexual dimorphism in adult medaka fish liver highlighted by multi-omic approach.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Qin; Le Manach, Séverine; Sotton, Benoit; Huet, Hélène; Duvernois-Berthet, Evelyne; Paris, Alain; Duval, Charlotte; Ponger, Loïc; Marie, Arul; Blond, Alain; Mathéron, Lucrèce; Vinh, Joelle; Bolbach, Gérard; Djediat, Chakib; Bernard, Cécile; Edery, Marc; Marie, Benjamin

    2016-08-26

    Sexual dimorphism describes the features that discriminate between the two sexes at various biological levels. Especially, during the reproductive phase, the liver is one of the most sexually dimorphic organs, because of different metabolic demands between the two sexes. The liver is a key organ that plays fundamental roles in various physiological processes, including digestion, energetic metabolism, xenobiotic detoxification, biosynthesis of serum proteins, and also in endocrine or immune response. The sex-dimorphism of the liver is particularly obvious in oviparous animals, as the female liver is the main organ for the synthesis of oocyte constituents. In this work, we are interested in identifying molecular sexual dimorphism in the liver of adult medaka fish and their sex-variation in response to hepatotoxic exposures. By developing an integrative approach combining histology and different high-throughput omic investigations (metabolomics, proteomics and transcriptomics), we were able to globally depict the strong sexual dimorphism that concerns various cellular and molecular processes of hepatocytes comprising protein synthesis, amino acid, lipid and polysaccharide metabolism, along with steroidogenesis and detoxification. The results of this work imply noticeable repercussions on the biology of oviparous organisms environmentally exposed to chemical or toxin issues.

  8. Pelvic fins in teleosts: structure, function and evolution.

    PubMed

    Yamanoue, Y; Setiamarga, D H E; Matsuura, K

    2010-10-01

    The pelvic fins of teleosts are paired appendages that are considered to be homologous to the hind limbs of tetrapods. Because they are less important for swimming, their morphology and function can be flexibly modified, and such modifications have probably facilitated the adaptations of teleosts to various environments. Recently, among these modifications, pelvic-fin loss has gained attention in evolutionary developmental biology. Pelvic-fin loss, however, has only been investigated in a few model species, and various biological aspects of pelvic fins in teleosts in general remain poorly understood. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge regarding pelvic fins, such as their structure, function and evolution, to elucidate their contribution to the considerable diversity of teleosts. This information could be invaluable for future investigations into various aspects of pelvic fins, which will provide clues to understanding the evolution, diversity and adaptations of teleosts.

  9. Antarctic teleost immunoglobulins: more extreme, more interesting.

    PubMed

    Coscia, Maria Rosaria; Varriale, Sonia; Giacomelli, Stefano; Oreste, Umberto

    2011-11-01

    We have investigated the immunoglobulin molecule and the genes encoding it in teleosts living in the Antarctic seas at the constant temperature of -1.86 °C. The majority of Antarctic teleosts belong to the suborder Notothenioidei (Perciformes), which includes only a few non-Antarctic species. Twenty-one Antarctic and two non-Antarctic Notothenioid species were included in our studies. We sequenced immunoglobulin light chains in two species and μ heavy chains, partially or totally, in twenty species. In the case of heavy chain, genomic DNA and the cDNA encoding the secreted and the membrane form were analyzed. From one species, Trematomus bernacchii, a spleen cDNA library was constructed to evaluate the diversity of VH gene segments. T. bernacchii IgM, purified from the serum and bile, was characterized. Homology Modelling and Molecular Dynamics were used to determine the molecular structure of T. bernacchii and Chionodraco hamatus immunoglobulin domains. This paper sums up the previous results and broadens them with the addition of unpublished data.

  10. Assessment of spermatogenesis and plasma sex steroids in a seasonal breeding teleost: a comparative study in an area of influence of a tributary, downstream from a hydroelectric power dam, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Domingos, Fabricio F T; Thomé, Ralph G; Arantes, Fabio P; Castro, Antonio Carlos S; Sato, Yoshimi; Bazzoli, Nilo; Rizzo, Elizete

    2012-12-01

    River damming and building of hydroelectric power plants interrupt the reproductive migration routes and change the major physicochemical parameters of water quality, with drastic consequences for populations of migratory fishes. The goal of this study was to evaluate proliferation and cell death during spermatogenesis and serum profiles of sex steroids in Prochilodus argenteus, from the São Francisco River, downstream from the Três Marias Dam. A total of 257 adult males were caught quarterly during a reproductive cycle in two sites: the first 34 km of the river after the dam (site 1) and the second 34-54 km after the dam (site 2), after the confluence with a tributary, the Abaeté River. Seasonal changes in the testicular activity associated with morphometric analyses of germ cells as well as proliferation and testicular apoptosis support a more active spermatogenesis in fish from site 2, where higher levels of sex steroids and gonadosomatic index (GSI) were also found. In site 1, fish presented low serum levels of testosterone, 17β-estradiol and 17α-hydroxyprogesterone and a low GSI during gonadal maturation. Spermatogonial proliferation (PCNA) and apoptosis (TUNEL) were more elevated in fish from site 1, but spermatocytes were mainly labelled in fish from site 2. Overall, these data demonstrate changes in testicular activity and plasma sex steroids in a neotropical teleost fish living downstream from a hydroelectric dam, supplying new data on fish reproduction in regulated rivers. Moreover, morphometric analyses associated with sex steroids profiles provide reliable tools to assess fish spermatogenesis under environmental stress conditions.

  11. Pharyngeal odontoma in an adult walleye (Sander vitreus).

    PubMed

    Coffee, L L; Bogdanovic, L B; Cushing, T L; Bowser, P R

    2013-05-01

    An adult walleye (Sander vitreus) was submitted to Cornell University for evaluation of a hard pale-tan pharyngeal mass attached to the gill arches. Dozens of hard white conical structures radiated from the surface. Microscopically, conical structures were identified as denticles and rested on plates of dysplastic orthodentine, cementum, and acellular bone. A diagnosis of compound odontoma was made based upon the presence of proliferative epithelial and mesenchymal odontogenic tissues that recapitulated tooth structures normally present on gill rakers. Odontomas are classified as hamartomas and typically develop in immature diphyodont mammals. The pharyngeal location and lifelong regeneration of teeth in fish, however, both qualify the present diagnosis in the pharyngeal region of an adult teleost. Ontogenic and morphologic differences between mammalian and piscine dentition and differentials for tooth-bearing tumors in fish are presented within the context of a developmental anomaly.

  12. Floriceps saccatus plerocerci (Trypanorhyncha, Lacistorhynchidae) as parasites of dolphin fish (Coryphaena hippurus L.) and pompano dolphin (Coryphaena equiselis L.) in western Mediterranean and eastern Atlantic waters. Ecological and biological aspects.

    PubMed

    Carbonell, E; Castro, J J; Massutí, E

    1998-10-01

    A study of the plerocerci of Floriceps saccatus from the abdominal cavity of dolphin fish (Coryphaena hippurus) and pompano dolphin (Coryphaena equiselis) was conducted. In all, 565 dolphin fishes were collected from Majorcan waters (Balearic Islands, western Mediterranean) during 3 summer and autumn seasons (1990, 1991, and 1995). From the Canary Islands (eastern Atlantic), 41 specimens of dolphin fish were caught during 1994 and 49 specimens of pompano dolphin during 1995. Cysts of different shapes and sizes appeared in the conjunctive tissues of the abdomen and viscera, mainly in the liver, gonads, and pancreas. A larva was found inside every cyst examined. Small, medium size, and large larvae were found. The largest larvae correspond to Floriceps saccatus plerocercoids. Stomach contents indicated that crustaceans and fish larvae were the main prey items of juvenile C. hippurus, whereas teleosts and cephalopods were the only food found in adult dolphin fishes. Infection of F. saccatus plerocercoids takes place in preadult dolphin fishes. Prevalence increases as fishes grow and change to a diet of teleosts. Coryphaena equiselis was not infected.

  13. 17α-Ethinyl estradiol affects anxiety and shoaling behavior in adult male zebra fish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Reyhanian, Nasim; Volkova, Kristina; Hallgren, Stefan; Bollner, Tomas; Olsson, Per-Erik; Olsén, Håkan; Hällström, Inger Porsch

    2011-09-01

    Ethinyl estradiol is a potent endocrine disrupting compound in fish and ubiquitously present in the aquatic environment. In this study, we exposed adult zebra fish (Danio rerio) males to 0, 5 or 25 ng Ethinyl estradiol/L for 14 days and analyzed the effects on non-reproductive behavior. Effects of treatment of the exposed males was shown by vitellogenin induction, while brain aromatase (CYP 19B) activity was not significantly altered. Both concentrations of Ethinyl estradiol significantly altered the behavior in the Novel tank test, where anxiety is determined as the tendency to stay at the bottom when introduced into an unfamiliar environment. The effects were, however, opposite for the two concentrations. Fish that were exposed to 5 ng/L had longer latency before upswim, fewer transitions to the upper half and shorter total time spent in the upper half compared with control fish, while 25 ng Ethinyl estradiol treatment resulted in shorter latency and more and longer visits to the upper half. The swimming activity of 25, but not 5 ng-exposed fish were slightly but significantly reduced, and these fish tended to spend a lot of time at the surface. We also studied the shoaling behavior as the tendency to leave a shoal of littermates trapped behind a Plexiglas barrier at one end of the test tank. The fish treated with Ethinyl estradiol had significantly longer latency before leaving shoal mates and left the shoal fewer times. Further, the fish exposed to 5 ng/L also spent significantly less time away from shoal than control fish. Fertilization frequency was higher in males exposed to 5 ng/L Ethinyl estradiol when compared with control males, while no spawning was observed after treatment with 25 ng/L. The testes from both treatment groups contained a normal distribution of spermatogenesis stages, and no abnormality in testis morphology could be observed. In conclusion, we have observed effects on two behaviors not related to reproduction in zebra fish males after

  14. AgRP and POMC Neurons Are Hypophysiotropic and Coordinately Regulate Multiple Endocrine Axes in a Teleost

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Forlano, Paul M.; Cone, Roger D.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Plasticity in growth and reproductive behavior is found in many vertebrate species, but is common in male teleost fish. Typically, “bourgeois” males are considerably larger and defend breeding territories while “parasitic” variants are small and use opportunistic breeding strategies. The P locus mediates this phenotypic variation in Xipophorus and encodes variant alleles of the melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R). However, deletion of the MC4R has modest effects on somatic growth and reproduction in mammals, suggesting a fundamental difference in the neuroendocrine function of central melanocortin signaling in teleosts. Here we show in a teleost that the hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin and AgRP neurons are hypophysiotropic, projecting to the pituitary to coordinately regulate multiple pituitary hormones. Indeed, AgRP-mediated suppression of MC4R appears essential for early larval growth. This identifies the mechanism by which the central melanocortin system coordinately regulates growth and reproduction in teleosts, and suggests it is an important anatomical substrate for evolutionary adaptation. PMID:22245570

  15. Effect of prehatching weightlessness on adult fish behavior in dynamic environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, R. B.; Salinas, G. A.; Boyd, J. F.; Baky, A. A.; Von Baumgarten, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    At 16-17 months of age, three groups of fish from the embryonated eggs in the ASTP killifish experiment were subjected to postflight tests consisting of rapidly changing environments. It was found that the group of fish with the least amount of development at orbital insertion (A-32) had a decreased rheotropism for both the moving background and the rotating water current tests when compared to ground control fish. Exposure to parabolic aircraft flight conditions revealed that the A-32 fish were less disoriented during zero gravity periods and were hypersensitive to high-gravity periods. These results suggested a modified vestibular competency due to a 9-d prehatching weightlessness exposure.

  16. Fish 'tails' result from outgrowth and reduction of two separate ancestral tails.

    PubMed

    Sallan, Lauren

    2016-12-05

    The symmetrical, flexible teleost fish 'tail' has been a prime example of recapitulation - evolutionary change (phylogeny) mirrored in development (ontogeny). Paleozoic ray-finned fishes (Actinopterygii), relatives of teleosts, exhibited ancestral scale-covered tails curved over their caudal fins. For over 150 years, this arrangement was thought to be retained in teleost larva and overgrown, mirroring an ancestral transformation series. New ontogenetic data for the 350-million-year-old teleost relative Aetheretmon overturns this long-held hypothesis. The ancestral state consists of two outgrowths with distinct organizers and growth trajectories; a lower median fin turned caudal fin, and an upper vertebrae-bearing tail, equivalent to that of tetrapods. These two tails appear at a shared developmental stage in Aetheretmon, teleosts and all living actinopterygians. Ontogeny does not recapitulate phylogeny; instead, differential outgrowth determines final morphology. In Aetheretmon and other Paleozoic fishes, the vertebrae-bearing tail continues to grow beyond the caudal fin. In teleosts, and some others, a stunted tail is eclipsed by the upward-expanding caudal fin, rendering a once ventral body margin as the terminus. The double tail likely reflects the ancestral state for bony fishes. Many tetrapods and non-teleost actinopterygians have undergone body elongation through tail outgrowth extension, by mechanisms likely shared with distal limbs. Teleosts have gone to the other extreme; losing tail outgrowth for functional reasons. Recognition of the tail as a limb-like outgrowth has important implications for the evolution of vertebrate form.

  17. Tribute to P. L. Lutz: respiratory ecophysiology of coral-reef teleosts.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Göran E; Hobbs, Jean-Paul A; Ostlund-Nilsson, Sara

    2007-05-01

    One of the most diverse vertebrate communities is found on tropical coral reefs. Coral-reef fishes are not only remarkable in color and shape, but also in several aspects of physiological performance. Early in life, at the end of the pelagic larval stage, coral-reef fishes are the fastest swimmers of all fishes in relation to body size, and show the highest specific rates of maximum oxygen uptake. Upon settling on the reef, coral-reef fishes have to adopt a demersal lifestyle, which involves coping with a habitat that can become severely hypoxic, and some fishes may even have to rely on air breathing when their coral homes become air exposed. Oxygen availability appears to be a major ambient selection pressure, making respiratory function a key factor for survival on coral reefs. Consequently, hypoxia tolerance is widespread among coral-reef fishes. Hypoxia can even be a factor to gamble with for those fishes that are mouthbrooders, or a factor that the coral inhabitants may actively seek to reduce by sleep-swimming at night. Here, we summarize the present knowledge of the respiratory ecophysiology of coral-reef teleosts. From an ecophysiological perspective, the coral reef is an exciting and largely unexplored system for testing existing hypotheses and making new discoveries.

  18. The Teleost Octavolateralis System: Structure and Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popper, Arthur N.

    1996-01-01

    This paper considers the detection of vibrational signals (including sound) by the two components of the octavolateralis system, the ear and mechanosensory lateral line. Together, these systems provide fishes with a good deal of information about their surrounding environment, and enable fishes to detect both predators and prey. While the mechanisms by which fishes and zooplankton produce and detect signals may differ, it is clear that the physical principles underlying the signals themselves are identical, no matter whether we are dealing with fish or zooplankton. Thus, an understanding of signal production and detection mechanisms by fishes can be of significant help in understanding how similar systems would function in zooplankton.

  19. CsBAFF, a Teleost B Cell Activating Factor, Promotes Pathogen-Induced Innate Immunity and Vaccine-Induced Adaptive Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yun; Sun, Li

    2015-01-01

    B cell activating factor (BAFF) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor family that is known to play an important role in B cell activation, proliferation, and differentiation in mammals. However, studies of BAFF in teleosts are very limited and its function, in particular that under in vivo conditions, is essentially unknown. In this study, we conducted in vivo as well as in vitro functional analyses of a BAFF homologue (CsBAFF) from the teleost fish tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis). CsBAFF is composed of 261 residues and shares moderate sequence identities with known BAFFs of other teleosts. CsBAFF expression was most abundant in immune organs and was upregulated during bacterial infection. Purified recombinant CsBAFF (rCsBAFF) bound to tongue sole lymphocytes and promoted cellular proliferation and survival. The results of an in vivo study showed that CsBAFF overexpression in tongue sole significantly enhanced macrophage activation and reduced bacterial infection in fish tissues, whereas knockdown of CsBAFF expression resulted in increased bacterial dissemination and colonization in fish tissues. Furthermore, vaccination studies showed that CsBAFF enhanced the immunoprotection of a DNA vaccine and augmented the production of specific serum antibodies. Taken together, these results provide the first in vivo evidence to indicate that teleost BAFF is an immunostimulator that significantly contributes to the innate antibacterial immune response and vaccine-induced adaptive immune response. PMID:26295165

  20. Evidence for the possible existence of a remnant L-gulono-gamma-lactone oxidase (GULO) gene in a teleost genome.

    PubMed

    Ocalewicz, Konrad; Dabrowski, Konrad; Mambrini, Muriel

    2010-01-01

    DNA fragments related to the cloudy catshark Scyliorhinus torazame L-gulono-gamma-lactone oxidase (GULO) cDNA were detected in a distant fish species. Although the Southern hybridization pattern was more distinct in species with active GULO, DNA fragments related to the GULO gene were also discovered in the common carp Cyprinus carpio. Additionally, in the common carp, inter-individual variation of the hybridization pattern was observed. Regular screening of available teleost fish gene libraries did not reveal GULO related DNA sequences.

  1. Non-stressful temperature effect on oxidative balance and life history traits in adult fish (Oryzias latipes).

    PubMed

    Hemmer-Brepson, C; Replumaz, L; Romestaing, C; Voituron, Y; Daufresne, M

    2014-01-15

    Temperature is well known to affect many biological and ecological traits, especially in ectotherms. From a physiological point of view, temperature is also positively correlated to metabolism and is often associated with an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. It has recently been suggested that ROS play a role in lifespan and resource allocation. However, only a few authors have attempted to explore the relationships between temperature, resource allocation and oxidative balance in ectotherms. Here, we measured the effect of temperature on growth, reproductive effort, offspring quantity and quality, hatching and survival rates, and the associated proximal costs, which were evaluated through the quantification of oxidative balance elements. We reared adult fish (Oryzias latipes) at two non-stressful temperatures (20 and 30°C) during a relatively long period (4 months, approximately the entire adult life). The results show a trade-off between reproduction and maintenance because investment toward growth could be neglected at the adult stage (confirmed by our results). Intriguingly, ROS-dependent damages did not differ between the two groups, probably because of the higher rate of activation of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase for warm-acclimated fish. The allocation toward antioxidant defences is associated with an earlier reproduction and a lower quality of offspring. These interesting results bring new perspectives in terms of the prediction of the impact of global warming on biota through the use of ecological theories based on oxidative balance and metabolism.

  2. Sublethal exposure to crude oil during embryonic development alters cardiac morphology and reduces aerobic capacity in adult fish

    PubMed Central

    Hicken, Corinne E.; Linbo, Tiffany L.; Baldwin, David H.; Willis, Maryjean L.; Myers, Mark S.; Holland, Larry; Larsen, Marie; Stekoll, Michael S.; Rice, Stanley D.; Collier, Tracy K.; Scholz, Nathaniel L.; Incardona, John P.

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to high concentrations of crude oil produces a lethal syndrome of heart failure in fish embryos. Mortality is caused by cardiotoxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), ubiquitous components of petroleum. Here, we show that transient embryonic exposure to very low concentrations of oil causes toxicity that is sublethal, delayed, and not counteracted by the protective effects of cytochrome P450 induction. Nearly a year after embryonic oil exposure, adult zebrafish showed subtle changes in heart shape and a significant reduction in swimming performance, indicative of reduced cardiac output. These delayed physiological impacts on cardiovascular performance at later life stages provide a potential mechanism linking reduced individual survival to population-level ecosystem responses of fish species to chronic, low-level oil pollution. PMID:21482755

  3. The Function of Fish Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Jun; Secombes, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    What is known about the biological activity of fish cytokines is reviewed. Most of the functional studies performed to date have been in teleost fish, and have focused on the induced effects of cytokine recombinant proteins, or have used loss- and gain-of-function experiments in zebrafish. Such studies begin to tell us about the role of these molecules in the regulation of fish immune responses and whether they are similar or divergent to the well-characterised functions of mammalian cytokines. This knowledge will aid our ability to determine and modulate the pathways leading to protective immunity, to improve fish health in aquaculture. PMID:27231948

  4. Tri-iodothyronine alters superoxide dismutase expression in a teleost Anabas testudineus.

    PubMed

    Sreejith, P; Oommen, O V

    2008-12-01

    The effect of tri-iodothyronine (T3) on superoxide dismutase (SOD) expression was evaluated in a teleost Anabas testudineus (cuthyroid fish) by native gel eletrophoresis and Western blot analysis. SOD is an essential enzyme for the survival of oxygen-utilizing organisms. Its expression is altered by the stress, presumably due to the increase in concentration of superoxide radical in cells. Variations of thyroid honnone levels are the major physiological modulators of cellular oxidative stress. T3 administration generates an oxidative stress, which to some extent is neutralized by the changed activity of enzymes like SOD. T3 treatment decreased CuZn SOD density in liver and brain of A. testudineus. The activity of CuZn SOD in liver and brain was confirmed by native gel analysis. The different physiological states of thyroid influenced the CuZn SOD activity. Western blot analysis further confirmed that liver and brain CuZn SOD decreased after T3 treatment. From these findings, it was clear that T3 treatment in euthyroid fish created an oxidative stress condition and thyroid hormone effectively maintained antioxidant status to overcome this situation in teleosts.

  5. Triiodothyronine and melatonin influence antioxidant defense mechanism in a teleost Anabas testudineus (Bloch): in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Sreejith, P; Beyo, R S; Divya, L; Vijayasree, A S; Manju, M; Oommen, O V

    2007-06-01

    The effect of the hormones triiodothyronine (T3) and melatonin on antioxidant defense system was studied in 6-propyl thiouracil (6-PTU)-treated or photoperiod-exposed teleost Anabas testudineus. 6-PTU (2 microg/g) treatment or photoperiod exposure (24 h) increased malondialdehyde (MDA) and conjugated dienes (CD) concentrations, indicating increased lipid peroxidation (LPO) in the experimental conditions. T3 or melatonin (10(-6) M) treatment for 15 min in vitro in PTU-treated fish reversed the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase and glutathione content. T3-treated group showed no change in glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, whereas melatonin treatment decreased its activity. T3 inhibited glutathione reductase (GR) activity. Photoperiod exposure (physiological pinealotomy) induced a stressful situation in this teleost, as evidenced by LPO products and antioxidant enzyme activities. Melatonin and T3 treatment for 15 min in vitro also reversed the effect of photoperiod on peroxidation products and the SOD and catalase activities. GR activity decreased in photoperiod-exposed group and melatonin and T3 treatment reversed the activities. The antioxidant enzymes responded to the stress situation after 6-PTU treatment and photoperiod exposure by altering their activities. The study suggested an independent effect of T3 and melatonin on antioxidant defence mechanism in different physiological situations in fish.

  6. The Consumption of Breakfast, Fish and/or Caffeine does not Predict Study Progress in Adult Distance Education.

    PubMed

    Gijselaers, Hieronymus J M; Kirschner, Paul A; de Groot, Renate H M

    2016-10-06

    Consumption of breakfast, fish, or caffeine are each separately often investigated in relation to learning performance in traditional education, but not in distance education (DE). The objective of this study was to investigate whether the relations between the consumption of breakfast, fish, and/or caffeine on the one hand and learning performance on the other are also found in DE students. This population is different from traditional students and characterized by a different profile in terms of age, personal and work responsibilities as well as other demographics. In an observational longitudinal study, the consumption of breakfast, fish, and caffeine of 1157 DE students (18-76 years old, mean 35.8±11.1 years) was used to predict learning performance using multiple regression analysis. In an online digital survey, university students provided information about their consumption of these nutritional measures and on important covariates. Learning performance, measured as study progress (i.e., the number of successfully completed modules), was evaluated objectively after 14 months. Results showed that adding the consumption of breakfast, fish, and caffeine to the covariate model did not fit the data better, χ(2) (3, N = 1155) = 3.287, p = 0.35. This means that neither the consumption of breakfast nor fish nor caffeine predicted study progress in adults participating in DE. This study is important as it is the first to report on these relations in this specific age group and educational setting, which is increasingly important due to the increased preference for this type of education.

  7. Exploring a Nonmodel Teleost Genome Through RAD Sequencing-Linkage Mapping in Common Pandora, Pagellus erythrinus and Comparative Genomic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Manousaki, Tereza; Tsakogiannis, Alexandros; Taggart, John B; Palaiokostas, Christos; Tsaparis, Dimitris; Lagnel, Jacques; Chatziplis, Dimitrios; Magoulas, Antonios; Papandroulakis, Nikos; Mylonas, Constantinos C; Tsigenopoulos, Costas S

    2015-12-29

    Common pandora (Pagellus erythrinus) is a benthopelagic marine fish belonging to the teleost family Sparidae, and a newly recruited species in Mediterranean aquaculture. The paucity of genetic information relating to sparids, despite their growing economic value for aquaculture, provides the impetus for exploring the genomics of this fish group. Genomic tool development, such as genetic linkage maps provision, lays the groundwork for linking genotype to phenotype, allowing fine-mapping of loci responsible for beneficial traits. In this study, we applied ddRAD methodology to identify polymorphic markers in a full-sib family of common pandora. Employing the Illumina MiSeq platform, we sampled and sequenced a size-selected genomic fraction of 99 individuals, which led to the identification of 920 polymorphic loci. Downstream mapping analysis resulted in the construction of 24 robust linkage groups, corresponding to the karyotype of the species. The common pandora linkage map showed varying degrees of conserved synteny with four other teleost genomes, namely the European seabass (Dicentrarchus labrax), Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus), and medaka (Oryzias latipes), suggesting a conserved genomic evolution in Sparidae. Our work exploits the possibilities of genotyping by sequencing to gain novel insights into genome structure and evolution. Such information will boost the study of cultured species and will set the foundation for a deeper understanding of the complex evolutionary history of teleosts.

  8. Exploring a Nonmodel Teleost Genome Through RAD Sequencing—Linkage Mapping in Common Pandora, Pagellus erythrinus and Comparative Genomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Manousaki, Tereza; Tsakogiannis, Alexandros; Taggart, John B.; Palaiokostas, Christos; Tsaparis, Dimitris; Lagnel, Jacques; Chatziplis, Dimitrios; Magoulas, Antonios; Papandroulakis, Nikos; Mylonas, Constantinos C.; Tsigenopoulos, Costas S.

    2015-01-01

    Common pandora (Pagellus erythrinus) is a benthopelagic marine fish belonging to the teleost family Sparidae, and a newly recruited species in Mediterranean aquaculture. The paucity of genetic information relating to sparids, despite their growing economic value for aquaculture, provides the impetus for exploring the genomics of this fish group. Genomic tool development, such as genetic linkage maps provision, lays the groundwork for linking genotype to phenotype, allowing fine-mapping of loci responsible for beneficial traits. In this study, we applied ddRAD methodology to identify polymorphic markers in a full-sib family of common pandora. Employing the Illumina MiSeq platform, we sampled and sequenced a size-selected genomic fraction of 99 individuals, which led to the identification of 920 polymorphic loci. Downstream mapping analysis resulted in the construction of 24 robust linkage groups, corresponding to the karyotype of the species. The common pandora linkage map showed varying degrees of conserved synteny with four other teleost genomes, namely the European seabass (Dicentrarchus labrax), Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus), and medaka (Oryzias latipes), suggesting a conserved genomic evolution in Sparidae. Our work exploits the possibilities of genotyping by sequencing to gain novel insights into genome structure and evolution. Such information will boost the study of cultured species and will set the foundation for a deeper understanding of the complex evolutionary history of teleosts. PMID:26715088

  9. Fish oil–derived n–3 PUFA therapy increases muscle mass and function in healthy older adults1

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Gordon I; Julliand, Sophie; Reeds, Dominic N; Sinacore, David R; Klein, Samuel; Mittendorfer, Bettina

    2015-01-01

    Background: Age-associated declines in muscle mass and function are major risk factors for an impaired ability to carry out activities of daily living, falls, prolonged recovery time after hospitalization, and mortality in older adults. New strategies that can slow the age-related loss of muscle mass and function are needed to help older adults maintain adequate performance status to reduce these risks and maintain independence. Objective: We evaluated the efficacy of fish oil–derived n–3 (ω-3) PUFA therapy to slow the age-associated loss of muscle mass and function. Design: Sixty healthy 60–85-y-old men and women were randomly assigned to receive n–3 PUFA (n = 40) or corn oil (n = 20) therapy for 6 mo. Thigh muscle volume, handgrip strength, one-repetition maximum (1-RM) lower- and upper-body strength, and average power during isokinetic leg exercises were evaluated before and after treatment. Results: Forty-four subjects completed the study [29 subjects (73%) in the n–3 PUFA group; 15 subjects (75%) in the control group]. Compared with the control group, 6 mo of n–3 PUFA therapy increased thigh muscle volume (3.6%; 95% CI: 0.2%, 7.0%), handgrip strength (2.3 kg; 95% CI: 0.8, 3.7 kg), and 1-RM muscle strength (4.0%; 95% CI: 0.8%, 7.3%) (all P < 0.05) and tended to increase average isokinetic power (5.6%; 95% CI: −0.6%, 11.7%; P = 0.075). Conclusion: Fish oil–derived n–3 PUFA therapy slows the normal decline in muscle mass and function in older adults and should be considered a therapeutic approach for preventing sarcopenia and maintaining physical independence in older adults. This study was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01308957. PMID:25994567

  10. Fish under exercise.

    PubMed

    Palstra, Arjan P; Planas, Josep V

    2011-06-01

    Improved knowledge on the swimming physiology of fish and its application to fisheries science and aquaculture (i.e., farming a fitter fish) is currently needed in the face of global environmental changes, high fishing pressures, increased aquaculture production as well as increased concern on fish well-being. Here, we review existing data on teleost fish that indicate that sustained exercise at optimal speeds enhances muscle growth and has consequences for flesh quality. Potential added benefits of sustained exercise may be delay of ovarian development and stimulation of immune status. Exercise could represent a natural, noninvasive, and economical approach to improve growth, flesh quality as well as welfare of aquacultured fish: a FitFish for a healthy consumer. All these issues are important for setting directions for policy decisions and future studies in this area. For this purpose, the FitFish workshop on the Swimming Physiology of Fish ( http://www.ub.edu/fitfish2010 ) was organized to bring together a multidisciplinary group of scientists using exercise models, industrial partners, and policy makers. Sixteen international experts from Europe, North America, and Japan were invited to present their work and view on migration of fishes in their natural environment, beneficial effects of exercise, and applications for sustainable aquaculture. Eighty-eight participants from 19 different countries contributed through a poster session and round table discussion. Eight papers from invited speakers at the workshop have been contributed to this special issue on The Swimming Physiology of Fish.

  11. Role of serotonin in fish reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Parvathy; Ogawa, Satoshi; Parhar, Ishwar S.

    2015-01-01

    The neuroendocrine mechanism regulates reproduction through the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis which is evolutionarily conserved in vertebrates. The HPG axis is regulated by a variety of internal as well as external factors. Serotonin, a monoamine neurotransmitter, is involved in a wide range of reproductive functions. In mammals, serotonin regulates sexual behaviors, gonadotropin release and gonadotropin-release hormone (GnRH) secretion. However, the serotonin system in teleost may also play unique role in the control of reproduction as the mechanism of reproductive control in teleosts is not always the same as in the mammalian models. In fish, the serotonin system is also regulated by natural environmental factors as well as chemical substances. In particular, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are commonly detected as pharmaceutical contaminants in the natural environment. Those factors may influence fish reproductive functions via the serotonin system. This review summarizes the functional significance of serotonin in the teleosts reproduction. PMID:26097446

  12. Role of serotonin in fish reproduction.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Parvathy; Ogawa, Satoshi; Parhar, Ishwar S

    2015-01-01

    The neuroendocrine mechanism regulates reproduction through the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis which is evolutionarily conserved in vertebrates. The HPG axis is regulated by a variety of internal as well as external factors. Serotonin, a monoamine neurotransmitter, is involved in a wide range of reproductive functions. In mammals, serotonin regulates sexual behaviors, gonadotropin release and gonadotropin-release hormone (GnRH) secretion. However, the serotonin system in teleost may also play unique role in the control of reproduction as the mechanism of reproductive control in teleosts is not always the same as in the mammalian models. In fish, the serotonin system is also regulated by natural environmental factors as well as chemical substances. In particular, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are commonly detected as pharmaceutical contaminants in the natural environment. Those factors may influence fish reproductive functions via the serotonin system. This review summarizes the functional significance of serotonin in the teleosts reproduction.

  13. Origins of adult pigmentation: diversity in pigment stem cell lineages and implications for pattern evolution

    PubMed Central

    Spiewak, Jessica E.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Teleosts comprise about half of all vertebrate species and exhibit an extraordinary diversity of adult pigment patterns that function in shoaling, camouflage and mate choice and have played important roles in speciation. Here, we review recent studies that have identified several distinct neural crest lineages, with distinct genetic requirements, that give rise to adult pigment cells in fishes. These lineages include post-embryonic, peripheral nerve associated stem cells that generate black melanophores and iridescent iridophores, cells derived directly from embryonic neural crest cells that generate yellow-orange xanthophores, and bipotent stem cells that generate both melanophores and xanthophores. This complexity in adult chromatophore lineages has implications for our understanding of adult traits, melanoma, and the evolutionary diversification of pigment cell lineages and patterns. PMID:25421288

  14. Origins of adult pigmentation: diversity in pigment stem cell lineages and implications for pattern evolution.

    PubMed

    Parichy, David M; Spiewak, Jessica E

    2015-01-01

    Teleosts comprise about half of all vertebrate species and exhibit an extraordinary diversity of adult pigment patterns that function in shoaling, camouflage, and mate choice and have played important roles in speciation. Here, we review studies that have identified several distinct neural crest lineages, with distinct genetic requirements, that give rise to adult pigment cells in fishes. These lineages include post-embryonic, peripheral nerve-associated stem cells that generate black melanophores and iridescent iridophores, cells derived directly from embryonic neural crest cells that generate yellow-orange xanthophores, and bipotent stem cells that generate both melanophores and xanthophores. This complexity in adult chromatophore lineages has implications for our understanding of adult traits, melanoma, and the evolutionary diversification of pigment cell lineages and patterns.

  15. CCR7 is mainly expressed in teleost gills, where it defines an IgD+IgM- B lymphocyte subset.

    PubMed

    Castro, Rosario; Bromage, Erin; Abós, Beatriz; Pignatelli, Jaime; González Granja, Aitor; Luque, Alfonso; Tafalla, Carolina

    2014-02-01

    Chemokine receptor CCR7, the receptor for both CCL19 and CCL21 chemokines, regulates the recruitment and clustering of circulating leukocytes to secondary lymphoid tissues, such as lymph nodes and Peyer's patches. Even though teleost fish do not have either of these secondary lymphoid structures, we have recently reported a homolog to CCR7 in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). In the present work, we have studied the distribution of leukocytes bearing extracellular CCR7 in naive adult tissues by flow cytometry, observing that among the different leukocyte populations, the highest numbers of cells with membrane (mem)CCR7 were recorded in the gill (7.5 ± 2% CCR7(+) cells). In comparison, head kidney, spleen, thymus, intestine, and peripheral blood possessed <5% CCR7(+) cells. When CCR7 was studied at early developmental stages, we detected a progressive increase in gene expression and protein CCR7 levels in the gills throughout development. Surprisingly, the majority of the CCR7(+) cells in the gills were not myeloid cells and did not express membrane CD8, IgM, nor IgT, but expressed IgD on the cell surface. In fact, most IgD(+) cells in the gills expressed CCR7. Intriguingly, the IgD(+)CCR7(+) population did not coexpress memIgM. Finally, when trout were bath challenged with viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus, the number of CCR7(+) cells significantly decreased in the gills while significantly increased in head kidney. These results provide evidence of the presence of a novel memIgD(+)memIgM(-) B lymphocyte subset in trout that expresses memCCR7 and responds to viral infections. Similarities with IgD(+)IgM(-) subsets in mammals are discussed.

  16. Flow management and fish density regulate salmonid recruitment and adult size in tailwaters across western North America.

    PubMed

    Dibble, Kimberly L; Yackulic, Charles B; Kennedy, Theodore A; Budy, Phaedra

    2015-12-01

    Rainbow and brown trout have been intentionally introduced into tailwaters downriver of dams globally and provide billions of dollars in economic benefits. At the same time, recruitment and maximum length of trout populations in tailwaters often fluctuate erratically, which negatively affects the value of fisheries. Large recruitment events may increase dispersal downriver where other fish species may be a priority (e.g., endangered species). There is an urgent need to understand the drivers of trout population dynamics in tailwaters, in particular the role of flow management. Here, we evaluate how flow, fish density, and other physical factors of the river influence recruitment and mean adult length in tailwaters across western North America, using data from 29 dams spanning 1-19 years. Rainbow trout recruitment was negatively correlated with high annual, summer, and spring flow and dam latitude, and positively correlated with high winter flow, subadult brown trout catch, and reservoir storage capacity. Brown trout recruitment was negatively correlated with high water velocity and daily fluctuations in flow (i.e., hydropeaking) and positively correlated with adult rainbow trout catch. Among these many drivers, rainbow trout recruitment was primarily correlated with high winter flow combined with low spring flow, whereas brown trout recruitment was most related to high water velocity. The mean lengths of adult rainbow and brown trout were influenced by similar flow and catch metrics. Length in both species was positively correlated with high annual flow but declined in tailwaters with high daily fluctuations in flow, high catch rates of conspecifics, and when large cohorts recruited to adult size. Whereas brown trout did not respond to the proportion of water allocated between seasons, rainbow trout length increased in rivers that released more water during winter than in spring. Rainbow trout length was primarily related to high catch rates of conspecifics

  17. Contrasting environmental drivers of adult and juvenile growth in a marine fish: implications for the effects of climate change

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Joyce Jia Lin; Nicholas Rountrey, Adam; Jane Meeuwig, Jessica; John Newman, Stephen; Zinke, Jens; Gregory Meekan, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Many marine fishes have life history strategies that involve ontogenetic changes in the use of coastal habitats. Such ontogenetic shifts may place these species at particular risk from climate change, because the successive environments they inhabit can differ in the type, frequency and severity of changes related to global warming. We used a dendrochronology approach to examine the physical and biological drivers of growth of adult and juvenile mangrove jack (Lutjanus argentimaculatus) from tropical north-western Australia. Juveniles of this species inhabit estuarine environments and adults reside on coastal reefs. The Niño-4 index, a measure of the status of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) had the highest correlation with adult growth chronologies, with La Niña years (characterised by warmer temperatures and lower salinities) having positive impacts on growth. Atmospheric and oceanographic phenomena operating at ocean-basin scales seem to be important correlates of the processes driving growth in local coastal habitats. Conversely, terrestrial factors influencing precipitation and river runoff were positively correlated with the growth of juveniles in estuaries. Our results show that the impacts of climate change on these two life history stages are likely to be different, with implications for resilience and management of populations. PMID:26052896

  18. Contrasting environmental drivers of adult and juvenile growth in a marine fish: implications for the effects of climate change.

    PubMed

    Ong, Joyce Jia Lin; Rountrey, Adam Nicholas; Meeuwig, Jessica Jane; Newman, Stephen John; Zinke, Jens; Meekan, Mark Gregory

    2015-06-08

    Many marine fishes have life history strategies that involve ontogenetic changes in the use of coastal habitats. Such ontogenetic shifts may place these species at particular risk from climate change, because the successive environments they inhabit can differ in the type, frequency and severity of changes related to global warming. We used a dendrochronology approach to examine the physical and biological drivers of growth of adult and juvenile mangrove jack (Lutjanus argentimaculatus) from tropical north-western Australia. Juveniles of this species inhabit estuarine environments and adults reside on coastal reefs. The Niño-4 index, a measure of the status of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) had the highest correlation with adult growth chronologies, with La Niña years (characterised by warmer temperatures and lower salinities) having positive impacts on growth. Atmospheric and oceanographic phenomena operating at ocean-basin scales seem to be important correlates of the processes driving growth in local coastal habitats. Conversely, terrestrial factors influencing precipitation and river runoff were positively correlated with the growth of juveniles in estuaries. Our results show that the impacts of climate change on these two life history stages are likely to be different, with implications for resilience and management of populations.

  19. Marine medaka ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily and new insight into teleost Abch nomenclature

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Chang-Bum; Kim, Bo-Mi; Kang, Hye-Min; Choi, Ik-Young; Rhee, Jae-Sung; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2015-01-01

    The ABC gene family is recognized as one of the largest gene families in all kingdoms of life. Although many genes involved in the ABC superfamily have been annotated from several fish species, information on large sets of the ABC superfamily and their evolutionary characterization are still unclear. In the marine medaka Oryzias melastigma, 50 ABC transporters were identified with bioinformatics-aided in silico analyses, and their full-length cDNA sequences were characterized. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that they could be classified into the eight subfamilies (A–H) that include all members of all ABC subfamilies. Interestingly, several teleosts’ Abcg members were closely clustered with Abch members in a distinctive clade. The abch gene was also observed in the coelacanth and the spotted gar, suggesting that this gene was retained from a bilaterian ancestor and that a gene loss event recently occurred in the tetrapod lineage. In teleosts, the nomenclature of previously annotated abcg genes should be considered carefully, as they form a distinctive clade with the marine medaka abch subfamily and other teleost abch genes, but not with the members of the Abcg subfamily. PMID:26472499

  20. Characterization of the CCR3 and CCR9 genes in miiuy croaker and different selection pressures imposed on different domains between mammals and teleosts.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhihuang; Wang, Rixin; Ren, Liping; Xu, Tianjun

    2013-12-01

    The innate immune system can recognize non-self through pattern recognition receptors and provides a first line of antimicrobial host defense. Thus innate immunity plays a very important role in resistance against major bacterial disease in vertebrates. In the innate immune responses, the chemokine receptors act as the main receptors of chemokines which are released at the sites of infection, inflammation and injury. In this study, the Miichthys miiuy CCR3 and CCR9 genes were cloned and characterized, showing that MIMI-CCR3 possesses a highly conserved DRYLA motif similar to that of other fishes. MIMI-CCR3 and CCR9 were ubiquitously expressed in all tested tissues and the expressions were significantly up-regulated after infection with Vibrio anguillarum except that of CCR9 in spleen. Evolutionary analysis showed that all the ancestral lineages of CCR3 and CCR9 in mammals and teleosts underwent positive selection, indicating that the ancestor of terrestrial animals further evolved to adapt to terrestrial environments and the continuous intrusion of microbes stimulated the evolution of CCR genes in the ancestor of teleost. Multiple ML methods were used to detect the robust candidates for sites under positive selection. In total, 11 and 8 positively selected sites were found in the subsets of current mammal and teleost CCR3 genes, and 3 and 2 sites were detected in the subsets of current mammals and teleosts in CCR9. Interestingly, for mammal CCR3 and CCR9 genes, the robust candidates of positively selected sites were mainly located in the extracellular domains which were the ligand binding and pathogen interaction regions. For teleost CCR3 and CCR9 genes, the positively selected sites were not only located in the extracellular domains but also in the C-terminal and intracellular domains, indicating mammals and teleosts experienced different selection pressures upon their N-terminus, C-terminus and intracellular loops of CCRs.

  1. Tonic fibres in axial muscle of cyprinid fish larvae: their definition, possible origins and functional importance.

    PubMed

    Stoiber, W; Haslett, J R; Steinbacher, P; Freimüller, M; Sänger, A M

    2002-05-01

    Teleost fish are known to develop small populations of muscle fibres that are assumed to be tonic in nature although their contractile properties and many other characteristics remain unknown. Here we attempt to resolve some of the ambiguity and confusions surrounding the definition and functional role of tonic fibres in teleosts and provide new information on their ontogeny. We investigate the differentiation of tonic muscle fibres in three species of cyprinid fish using electron microscopy, histochemistry, immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. The fine structure of the fibres defined as tonic in the larvae used in this study complies with patterns known from studies in teleost adults. This allows formal definition of tonic fibres in cyprinid larvae. The tonic fibres may be recognized by a variety of features: (1) by their characteristic position along the medial confines of the red muscle insertion at the horizontal septum, (2) their fine structure, including solid clusters of irregularly cleaved myofibrils, thick and wavy Z-lines, and T-tubules at the A-band/I-band transitions, (3) their histochemical features, specifically weak but obvious staining for mATPase after alkaline preincubation, and lack of SDH activity in the more advanced larval stages, (4) their unique immunological properties, being the only fibre type in the myotome that reacts with a serum against chicken tonic myosin (anti- T2). Expression of tonic characters usually begins within a few fibres in the dorsal domain of the superficial red muscle insertion at the horizontal septum and hence involves a high degree of dorso-ventral polarity. The present evidence indicates that tonic fibres arise from separate myogenic stem cells rather than by transdifferentiation from existing red fibres. First appearance of tonic fibres during ontogeny correlates closely with the onset of free swimming and exogeneous feeding. We use this fact to argue that tonic fibres are probably a prerequisite for

  2. Marine Forage Fishes in Puget Sound

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    authors and liaison with the NST and PMT. We also thank the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Public Affairs Staff — Patricia Grasser, Dick Devlin , Nola...the teleost fish, Ammodytes hexapterus, in relation to its burrowing behavior. Comparative Biochemistry and Physi- ology 97(A):57-61. Rice, C.A. 2006

  3. Potential mechanisms of influence of the Leeuwin Current eddy system on teleost recruitment to the Western Australian continental shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaughan, Daniel J.

    2007-04-01

    waters, the general larval feeding conditions in the WC eddy were inferior to those on the shelf. Any larvae that escaped from the eddy that were able to orientate towards the shelf and had sustained swimming capabilities would incur significant energetic penalties when attempting to return to the shelf. Furthermore, flow of the LC onto the shelf could dilute the concentrations of phytoplankton and zooplankton, negatively impacting feeding conditions for larvae that remain on the shelf. Clarification of the timing and geographical locations of interactions between the LC and shelf waters relative to spawning behaviour of shelf teleosts is required before the potential negative impacts on recruitment can be adequately quantified. However, because fisheries management issues cannot (always) await detailed understanding of biophysical effects on recruitment, the conceptual model of potential effects was developed here to provide immediate improvements for interpretation of stock assessment information, for which recruitment variability is often a key uncertainty. Finally, an improved understanding of the effects of mesoscale oceanography on fish stocks will increase the ability for fisheries managers to discuss climate-change implications with stakeholders.

  4. Gene map of large yellow croaker (Larimichthys crocea) provides insights into teleost genome evolution and conserved regions associated with growth.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shijun; Wang, Panpan; Zhang, Yan; Fang, Lujing; Liu, Yang; Li, Jiong-Tang; Wang, Zhi-Yong

    2015-12-22

    The genetic map of a species is essential for its whole genome assembly and can be applied to the mapping of important traits. In this study, we performed RNA-seq for a family of large yellow croakers (Larimichthys crocea) and constructed a high-density genetic map. In this map, 24 linkage groups comprised 3,448 polymorphic SNP markers. Approximately 72.4% (2,495) of the markers were located in protein-coding regions. Comparison of the croaker genome with those of five model fish species revealed that the croaker genome structure was closer to that of the medaka than to the remaining four genomes. Because the medaka genome preserves the teleost ancestral karyotype, this result indicated that the croaker genome might also maintain the teleost ancestral genome structure. The analysis also revealed different genome rearrangements across teleosts. QTL mapping and association analysis consistently identified growth-related QTL regions and associated genes. Orthologs of the associated genes in other species were demonstrated to regulate development, indicating that these genes might regulate development and growth in croaker. This gene map will enable us to construct the croaker genome for comparative studies and to provide an important resource for selective breeding of croaker.

  5. Comparison of three tissue fixatives on the immunoreactivity of mammalian P-glycoprotein antibodies to teleost tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmer, M.J. |; Courtney, L.A.; Benson, W.H.

    1994-12-31

    Mammalian P-glycoprotein is a highly conserved integral membrane protein functioning as an energy dependent plasma membrane efflux pump which decreases the concentration of certain lipophilic aromatic compounds entering the cell by diffusion. Studies indicate that P-glycoprotein is capable of increased expression in response to certain chemical stressors and has demonstrated the ability to transport xenobiotic contaminants. Expression of a xenobiotic transporter in teleost species could play a significant role in conferring resistance to fish populations exposed to xenobiotic stressors and may serve as a potential indicator of species at risk to environmental contaminants. Past studies demonstrated a strong correlation between corresponding mammalian and teleost tissues showing immunoreactivity to specific mammalian P-glycoprotein antibodies. In this study, comparisons of staining pattern, intensity, and tissue specificity between Lillie`s, Bouin`s and Dietrich`s fixed tissues was determined in the sheepshead minnow, Cyprinodon variegatus, using monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) C219, C494 and JSB-1. Immunoreactivity of the mAbs was found to be fixative-dependent and results are presented illustrating the differential staining patterns and tissue specificity observed for each tissue, fixative, and antibody combination. These data indicate tissue fixation has a significant impact on P-glycoprotein immunoreactivity in teleost tissues and must be considered in the comparison and interpretation of results.

  6. Modulation of Aromatase Activity as a Mode of Action for Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals in a Marine Fish

    EPA Science Inventory

    The steroidogenic enzyme aromatase catalyzes the conversion of androgens (androstenedione and testosterone) to estrogens (estrone and estradiol) and therefore plays a central role in reproduction. In contrast to most vertebrates, teleost fish have two distinct forms of aromatase....

  7. Effects of Low-Dose Aspirin and Fish Oil on Platelet Function and NF-kappaB in Adults with Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Block, Robert C; Abdolahi, Amir; Smith, Brian; Meednu, N; Thevenet-Morrison, Kelly; Cai, Xueya; Cui, Huadong; Mousa, Shaker; Brenna, J. Thomas; Georas, S

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Introduction Many diabetics are insensitive to aspirin’s platelet anti-aggregation effects. The possible modulating effects of coadministration of aspirin and fish oil in subjects with diabetes are poorly characterized. Participants and Methods Thirty adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus were treated with aspirin 81 mg/d for 7 days, then with fish oil 4g/day for 28 days, then the combination of fish oil and aspirin for another 7 days. Results Aspirin alone and in combination with fish oil reduced platelet aggregation in most participants. Five of 7 participants classified as aspirin insensitive 1 week after daily aspirin ingestion were sensitive after the combination. Although some platelet aggregation measures correlated positively after aspirin and fish oil ingestion alone and (in combination) in all individuals, correlation was only observed in those who were aspirin insensitive after ingestion of the combination. Conclusions Co-adminstration of aspirin and fish oil may reduce platelet aggregation more than aspirin alone in adults with diabetes mellitus. PMID:23664596

  8. Role of Aquaporins during Teleost Gametogenesis and Early Embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Chauvigné, François; Zapater, Cinta; Cerdà, Joan

    2011-01-01

    Aquaporins are believed to be involved in homeosmotic mechanisms of marine teleosts. Increasing data suggest that these molecular water channels play critical roles associated with the adaptation of gametes and early embryos to the external spawning environment. In this mini-review, we discuss recent studies suggesting the function of aquaporin-mediated fluid homeostasis during spermatozoa activation and egg formation in teleosts. In addition, we address the potential role of water channels in osmosensing and cell migration during early embryonic development. PMID:21994496

  9. Forssman-like activity of different teleost and anuran erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chuba, J. V.; Kuhns, W. J.; Nigrelli, R. F.

    1971-01-01

    The comparative agglutination of sheep, teleost and anuran erythrocytes with selected human sera was studied before and after absorption with boiled guinea-pig kidney antigen. Among frogs of the Rana genus, only bullfrog (R. catesbiana) erythrocytes displayed Forssman-like activity. The previously unstudied erythrocytes of several species of teleosts also displayed Forssman-like activity. The concept is advanced that haptenic heteroraccharides with varying degrees of structural similarity and `blood group' activity are ubiquitously distributed among the cell-membrane receptors of phylogenetically diverse species of animals. PMID:5553070

  10. The Asian arowana (Scleropages formosus) genome provides new insights into the evolution of an early lineage of teleosts

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Chao; Hu, Yinchang; Ravi, Vydianathan; Kuznetsova, Inna S.; Shen, Xueyan; Mu, Xidong; Sun, Ying; You, Xinxin; Li, Jia; Li, Xiaofeng; Qiu, Ying; Tay, Boon-Hui; Thevasagayam, Natascha May; Komissarov, Aleksey S.; Trifonov, Vladimir; Kabilov, Marsel; Tupikin, Alexey; Luo, Jianren; Liu, Yi; Song, Hongmei; Liu, Chao; Wang, Xuejie; Gu, Dangen; Yang, Yexin; Li, Wujiao; Polgar, Gianluca; Fan, Guangyi; Zeng, Peng; Zhang, He; Xiong, Zijun; Tang, Zhujing; Peng, Chao; Ruan, Zhiqiang; Yu, Hui; Chen, Jieming; Fan, Mingjun; Huang, Yu; Wang, Min; Zhao, Xiaomeng; Hu, Guojun; Yang, Huanming; Wang, Jian; Wang, Jun; Xu, Xun; Song, Linsheng; Xu, Gangchun; Xu, Pao; Xu, Junmin; O’Brien, Stephen J.; Orbán, László; Venkatesh, Byrappa; Shi, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    The Asian arowana (Scleropages formosus), one of the world’s most expensive cultivated ornamental fishes, is an endangered species. It represents an ancient lineage of teleosts: the Osteoglossomorpha. Here, we provide a high-quality chromosome-level reference genome of a female golden-variety arowana using a combination of deep shotgun sequencing and high-resolution linkage mapping. In addition, we have also generated two draft genome assemblies for the red and green varieties. Phylogenomic analysis supports a sister group relationship between Osteoglossomorpha (bonytongues) and Elopomorpha (eels and relatives), with the two clades together forming a sister group of Clupeocephala which includes all the remaining teleosts. The arowana genome retains the full complement of eight Hox clusters unlike the African butterfly fish (Pantodon buchholzi), another bonytongue fish, which possess only five Hox clusters. Differential gene expression among three varieties provides insights into the genetic basis of colour variation. A potential heterogametic sex chromosome is identified in the female arowana karyotype, suggesting that the sex is determined by a ZW/ZZ sex chromosomal system. The high-quality reference genome of the golden arowana and the draft assemblies of the red and green varieties are valuable resources for understanding the biology, adaptation and behaviour of Asian arowanas. PMID:27089831

  11. Fundulus as the Premier Teleost Model in Environmental Biology: Opportunities for New Insights Using Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, Karen G.; Bain, Lisa J.; Baldwin, William S.; Callard, Gloria V.; Cohen, Sarah; Di Giulio, Richard T.; Evans, David H.; Gómez-Chiarri, Marta; Hahn, Mark E.; Hoover, Cindi A.; Karchner, Sibel I.; Katoh, Fumi; MacLatchy, Deborah L.; Marshall, William S.; Meyer, Joel N.; Nacci, Diane E.; Oleksiak, Marjorie F.; Rees, Bernard B.; Singer, Thomas D.; Stegeman, John J.; Towle, David W.; Van Veld, Peter A.; Vogelbein, Wolfgang K.; Whitehead, Andrew; Winn, Richard N.; Crawford, Douglas L.

    2007-01-01

    A strong foundation of basic and applied research documents that the estuarine fish Fundulus heteroclitus and related species are unique laboratory and field models for understanding how individuals and populations interact with their environment. In this paper we summarize an extensive body of work examining the adaptive responses of Fundulus species to environmental conditions, and describe how this research has contributed importantly to our understanding of physiology, gene regulation, toxicology, and ecological and evolutionary genetics of teleosts and other vertebrates. These explorations have reached a critical juncture at which advancement is hindered by the lack of genomic resources for these species. We suggest that a more complete genomics toolbox for F. heteroclitus and related species will permit researchers to exploit the power of this model organism to rapidly advance our understanding of fundamental biological and pathological mechanisms among vertebrates, as well as ecological strategies and evolutionary processes common to all living organisms. PMID:18071578

  12. The Genomic and Genetic Toolbox of the Teleost Medaka (Oryzias latipes)

    PubMed Central

    Kirchmaier, Stephan; Naruse, Kiyoshi; Wittbrodt, Joachim; Loosli, Felix

    2015-01-01

    The Japanese medaka, Oryzias latipes, is a vertebrate teleost model with a long history of genetic research. A number of unique features and established resources distinguish medaka from other vertebrate model systems. A large number of laboratory strains from different locations are available. Due to a high tolerance to inbreeding, many highly inbred strains have been established, thus providing a rich resource for genetic studies. Furthermore, closely related species native to different habitats in Southeast Asia permit comparative evolutionary studies. The transparency of embryos, larvae, and juveniles allows a detailed in vivo analysis of development. New tools to study diverse aspects of medaka biology are constantly being generated. Thus, medaka has become an important vertebrate model organism to study development, behavior, and physiology. In this review, we provide a comprehensive overview of established genetic and molecular-genetic tools that render medaka fish a full-fledged vertebrate system. PMID:25855651

  13. Proteomic approach to skin regeneration in a marine teleost: modulation by oestradiol-17β.

    PubMed

    Ibarz, Antoni; Pinto, Patricia I S; Power, Deborah M

    2013-12-01

    Skin and scale formation and regeneration in teleosts have mainly been described from a morphological perspective, and few studies of the underlying molecular events exist. The present study evaluates (1) the change in the skin proteome during its regeneration in a marine teleost fish (gilthead sea bream, Sparus aurata) and (2) the impact of oestradiol-17β (Ε2) on regeneration and the involvement of oestrogen receptor (ER) isoforms. Thirty-five candidate proteins were differentially expressed (p < 0.05) between intact and regenerated skin proteome 5 days after scale removal, and 27 proteins were differentially expressed after E2 treatment. Agglomerative hierarchical clustering of the skin proteome revealed that the skin treated with E2 clustered most closely to intact skin, while regenerating untreated skin formed an independent cluster. Gene Ontology classification associated the differentially expressed proteins in E2-treated skin with developmental processes and cellular morphogenesis. The proteins modified during skin regeneration suggest a balance exists between immune response and anatomical repair. Overall, the results indicate that, even after 5 days regeneration, the composition of mature skin is not attained, and endocrine factors, in particular E2, can accelerate wound repair acting possibly via ERβs expressed in the skin-scales. Several candidate proteins probably involved in scale development, osteoglycin, lipocalin2 and lamin A and the transcription factors PHD and grainyhead were identified. Future studies of fish skin regeneration will be required to provide further insight into this multistage process, and the present study indicates it will be useful to explore immune adaptations of epithelia permanently exposed to an aqueous environment.

  14. The optic tectum of gymnotiform teleosts Eigenmannia virescens and Apteronotus leptorhynchus: a Golgi study.

    PubMed

    Sas, E; Maler, L

    1986-05-01

    Golgi, Nissl, Bielschowsky and cholinesterase techniques have been used to analyze the optic tectum of the weakly electric teleost fish Eigenmannia virescens and Apteronotus leptorhynchus. Six layers are readily distinguished: a fairly thick stratum marginale, a narrow stratum opticum and stratum fibrosum et griseum superficiale, a well-developed stratum griseum centrale, a stratum album centrale and a compact stratum periventriculare. Fifty-six neuronal types are present. In regard to comparative aspects of tectal organization, it became apparent that although most neuronal types are similar to those reported in other teleostean fish, there are certain obvious differences such as: pyramidal cell somata not confined to stratum fibrosum et griseum superficiale, but also clustered in the adjacent stratum opticum, presenting stratified or diffuse basilar dendritic arbors; and a change from vertical to oblique and almost horizontal neuronal orientation in the ventral and caudal tectum. The presence of pyramidal cells with aligned and misaligned apical and basal dendritic fields. A cell of stratum griseum centrale with an ascending axon to stratum opticum. A special projection type of fusiform cell of stratum griseum centrale, with an efferent axon of somatic origin. A cell rich stratum griseum centrale, with a wider variety of multipolar and bipolar cell population than reported in other teleosts. Fourteen types of pyriform cells are present, four of which are efferent. Our observations are suggestive of regional differences in regard to the caudalmost tectum in Apteronotus: presumably this is related to the extremely sparse retinal input to this part of the tectum. A close functional correlation has been found between some multipolar and pyriform cells identified in our material with similar cells reported by Rose and Heiligenberg as multisensory cells, following recordings and horseradish peroxidase fillings of these cells. Based on the observation of patchy torus

  15. Early Activation of Teleost B Cells in Response to Rhabdovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Abós, Beatriz; Castro, Rosario; González Granja, Aitor; Havixbeck, Jeffrey J.; Barreda, Daniel R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT To date, the response of teleost B cells to specific pathogens has been only scarcely addressed. In this work, we have demonstrated that viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV), a fish rhabdovirus, has the capacity to infect rainbow trout spleen IgM-positive (IgM+) cells, although the infection is not productive. Consequently, we have studied the effects of VHSV on IgM+ cell functionality, comparing these effects to those elicited by a Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) ligand, poly(I·C). We found that poly(I·C) and VHSV significantly upregulated TLR3 and type I interferon (IFN) transcription in spleen and blood IgM+ cells. Further effects included the upregulated transcription of the CK5B chemokine. The significant inhibition of some of these effects in the presence of bafilomycin A1 (BAF), an inhibitor of endosomal acidification, suggests the involvement of an intracellular TLR in these responses. In the case of VHSV, these transcriptional effects were dependent on viral entry into B cells and the initiation of viral transcription. VHSV also provoked the activation of NF-κB and the upregulation of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) cell surface expression on IgM+ cells, which, along with the increased transcription of the costimulatory molecules CD80/86 and CD83, pointed to VHSV-induced IgM+ cell activation toward an antigen-presenting profile. Finally, despite the moderate effects of VHSV on IgM+ cell proliferation, a consistent effect on IgM+ cell survival was detected. IMPORTANCE Innate immune responses to pathogens established through their recognition by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) have been traditionally ascribed to innate cells. However, recent evidence in mammals has revealed that innate pathogen recognition by B lymphocytes is a crucial factor in shaping the type of immune response that is mounted. In teleosts, these immediate effects of viral encounter on B lymphocytes have not been addressed to date. In our study, we

  16. Efficient regeneration by activation of neurogenesis in homeostatically quiescent regions of the adult vertebrate brain.

    PubMed

    Berg, Daniel A; Kirkham, Matthew; Beljajeva, Anna; Knapp, Dunja; Habermann, Bianca; Ryge, Jesper; Tanaka, Elly M; Simon, András

    2010-12-01

    In contrast to mammals, salamanders and teleost fishes can efficiently repair the adult brain. It has been hypothesised that constitutively active neurogenic niches are a prerequisite for extensive neuronal regeneration capacity. Here, we show that the highly regenerative salamander, the red spotted newt, displays an unexpectedly similar distribution of active germinal niches with mammals under normal physiological conditions. Proliferation zones in the adult newt brain are restricted to the forebrain, whereas all other regions are essentially quiescent. However, ablation of midbrain dopamine neurons in newts induced ependymoglia cells in the normally quiescent midbrain to proliferate and to undertake full dopamine neuron regeneration. Using oligonucleotide microarrays, we have catalogued a set of differentially expressed genes in these activated ependymoglia cells. This strategy identified hedgehog signalling as a key component of adult dopamine neuron regeneration. These data show that brain regeneration can occur by activation of neurogenesis in quiescent brain regions.

  17. Influence of long-term hyper-gravity on the reactivity of succinic acid dehydrogenase and NADPH-diaphorase in the central nervous system of fish: a histochemical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anken, R. H.; Rahmann, H.

    In the course of a densitometric evaluation, the histochemically demonstrated reactivity of succinic acid dehydrogenase (SDH) and of NADPH-diaphorase (NADPHD) was determined in different brain nuclei of two teleost fish (cichlid fish Oreochromis mossambicus, swordtail fish Xiphophorus helleri), which had been kept under 3g hyper-gravity for 8 days. SDH was chosen since it is a rate limiting enzyme of the Krebs cycle and therefore it is regarded as a marker for metabolic and neuronal activity. NADPHD reactivity reflects the activity of nitric oxide synthase. Nitric oxide (NO) is a gaseous intercellular messenger that has been suggested to play a major role in several different in vivo models of neuronal plasticity including learning. Within particular vestibulum-connected brain centers, significant effects of hyper-gravity were obtained, e.g., in the magnocellular nucleus, a primary vestibular relay ganglion of the brain stem octavolateralis area, in the superior rectus subdivision of the oculomotoric nucleus and within cerebellar eurydendroid cells, which in teleosts possibly resemble the deep cerebellar nucleus of higher vertebrates. Non-vestibulum related nuclei did not respond to hypergravity in a significant way. The effect of hyper-gravity found was much less distinct in adult animals as compared to the circumstances seen in larval fish (Anken et al., Adv. Space Res. 17, 1996), possibly due to a development correlated loss of neuronal plasticity.

  18. Investigation of Head Burns in Adult Salmonids : Phase 1, Examination of Fish at Lookingglass Hatchery in 1996 : Addendum to Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Groberg, Warren J.

    1996-11-01

    This information is an addendum to the report 'Investigation of Head Burns in Adult Salmonids, Phase 1: Examination of Fish at Lower Granite Dam, July 2, 1996' by Ralph Elston because there may be relevant observations included here. The author of this document participated in the examinations at Lower Granite Dam described in that report. Because of Endangered Species Act issues, the Rapid River stock of spring chinook salmon reared at Lookingglass Hatchery on the Grande Ronde River in northeastern Oregon are annually being captured as returning adults at Lower Granite Dam on the Snake River and trucked to Lookingglass. During the peak migration period they are held in an adult holding facility at Lower Granite for as long as 72 hours and then transported by truck to Lookingglass for holding in an adult pond for spawning. In 1996 a total of 572 adults were transported from Lower Granite Dam between May 3 and August 6. Two-hundred eighty-one of these were later transported from Lookingglass to Wallowa Hatchery for artificial spawning and the remaining 291 were held for spawning at Lookingglass. On May 21, 24, 30 and June 2, 1996 hatchery personnel identified a total of 32 off-loaded fish with lesions on the dorsal area of the head they described as having the appearance of blisters (Robert Lund personal communication). By date these are shown in Table 1 (fish with similar lesions were also observed on May 27 but the number of these was not recorded). Such lesions were not observed on fish offloaded on any other dates. On May 24, 1996 hatchery personnel took photographs of fish with these lesions but do to light-meter problems the photographs did not turn out. On June 28, 1996 personnel of the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) Fish Pathology laboratory in La Grande were notified by James Lauman, ODFW Northeast Region supervisor, of discussions and concerns of head burn on returning adult chinook while he was on a visitation to Lower Granite Dam. That led

  19. Resolution of ray-finned fish phylogeny and timing of diversification.

    PubMed

    Near, Thomas J; Eytan, Ron I; Dornburg, Alex; Kuhn, Kristen L; Moore, Jon A; Davis, Matthew P; Wainwright, Peter C; Friedman, Matt; Smith, W Leo

    2012-08-21

    Ray-finned fishes make up half of all living vertebrate species. Nearly all ray-finned fishes are teleosts, which include most commercially important fish species, several model organisms for genomics and developmental biology, and the dominant component of marine and freshwater vertebrate faunas. Despite the economic and scientific importance of ray-finned fishes, the lack of a single comprehensive phylogeny with corresponding divergence-time estimates has limited our understanding of the evolution and diversification of this radiation. Our analyses, which use multiple nuclear gene sequences in conjunction with 36 fossil age constraints, result in a well-supported phylogeny of all major ray-finned fish lineages and molecular age estimates that are generally consistent with the fossil record. This phylogeny informs three long-standing problems: specifically identifying elopomorphs (eels and tarpons) as the sister lineage of all other teleosts, providing a unique hypothesis on the radiation of early euteleosts, and offering a promising strategy for resolution of the "bush at the top of the tree" that includes percomorphs and other spiny-finned teleosts. Contrasting our divergence time estimates with studies using a single nuclear gene or whole mitochondrial genomes, we find that the former underestimates ages of the oldest ray-finned fish divergences, but the latter dramatically overestimates ages for derived teleost lineages. Our time-calibrated phylogeny reveals that much of the diversification leading to extant groups of teleosts occurred between the late Mesozoic and early Cenozoic, identifying this period as the "Second Age of Fishes."

  20. Endocrine and Local IGF-I in the Bony Fish Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Franz, Anne-Constance; Faass, Oliver; Köllner, Bernd; Shved, Natallia; Link, Karl; Casanova, Ayako; Wenger, Michael; D’Cotta, Helena; Baroiller, Jean-François; Ullrich, Oliver; Reinecke, Manfred; Eppler, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    A role for GH and IGF-I in the modulation of the immune system has been under discussion for decades. Generally, GH is considered a stimulator of innate immune parameters in mammals and teleost fish. The stimulatory effects in humans as well as in bony fish often appear to be correlated with elevated endocrine IGF-I (liver-derived), which has also been shown to be suppressed during infection in some studies. Nevertheless, data are still fragmentary. Some studies point to an important role of GH and IGF-I particularly during immune organ development and constitution. Even less is known about the potential relevance of local (autocrine/paracrine) IGF-I within adult and developing immune organs, and the distinct localization of IGF-I in immune cells and tissues of mammals and fish has not been systematically defined. Thus far, IGF-I has been localized in different mammalian immune cell types, particularly macrophages and granulocytes, and in supporting cells, but not in T-lymphocytes. In the present study, we detected IGF-I in phagocytic cells isolated from rainbow trout head kidney and, in contrast to some findings in mammals, in T-cells of a channel catfish cell line. Thus, although numerous analogies among mammals and teleosts exist not only for the GH/IGF-system, but also for the immune system, there are differences that should be further investigated. For instance, it is unclear whether the primarily reported role of GH/IGF-I in the innate immune response is due to the lack of studies focusing on the adaptive immune system, or whether it truly preferentially concerns innate immune parameters. Infectious challenges in combination with GH/IGF-I manipulations are another important topic that has not been sufficiently addressed to date, particularly with respect to developmental and environmental influences on fish growth and health. PMID:26821056

  1. Endocrine and Local IGF-I in the Bony Fish Immune System.

    PubMed

    Franz, Anne-Constance; Faass, Oliver; Köllner, Bernd; Shved, Natallia; Link, Karl; Casanova, Ayako; Wenger, Michael; D'Cotta, Helena; Baroiller, Jean-François; Ullrich, Oliver; Reinecke, Manfred; Eppler, Elisabeth

    2016-01-26

    A role for GH and IGF-I in the modulation of the immune system has been under discussion for decades. Generally, GH is considered a stimulator of innate immune parameters in mammals and teleost fish. The stimulatory effects in humans as well as in bony fish often appear to be correlated with elevated endocrine IGF-I (liver-derived), which has also been shown to be suppressed during infection in some studies. Nevertheless, data are still fragmentary. Some studies point to an important role of GH and IGF-I particularly during immune organ development and constitution. Even less is known about the potential relevance of local (autocrine/paracrine) IGF-I within adult and developing immune organs, and the distinct localization of IGF-I in immune cells and tissues of mammals and fish has not been systematically defined. Thus far, IGF-I has been localized in different mammalian immune cell types, particularly macrophages and granulocytes, and in supporting cells, but not in T-lymphocytes. In the present study, we detected IGF-I in phagocytic cells isolated from rainbow trout head kidney and, in contrast to some findings in mammals, in T-cells of a channel catfish cell line. Thus, although numerous analogies among mammals and teleosts exist not only for the GH/IGF-system, but also for the immune system, there are differences that should be further investigated. For instance, it is unclear whether the primarily reported role of GH/IGF-I in the innate immune response is due to the lack of studies focusing on the adaptive immune system, or whether it truly preferentially concerns innate immune parameters. Infectious challenges in combination with GH/IGF-I manipulations are another important topic that has not been sufficiently addressed to date, particularly with respect to developmental and environmental influences on fish growth and health.

  2. Development and aging of the teleost pituitary: qualitative and quantitative observations in the annual cyprinodont Cynolebias whitei.

    PubMed

    Ruijter, J M

    1987-01-01

    The rapidly aging annual cyprinodont Cynolebias whitei (maximum age under natural conditions: approximately six months) was used to study the histology and growth of the pituitary gland throughout the entire lifespan of a teleost fish. Immunoreactive prolactin and corticotropic cells were present in the prehatching larvae. Somatotropic cells and pars intermedia could be distinguished by histological staining in five days old fish. After three weeks basophilic, GTH-immunoreactive, cells could be observed in the proximal pars distalis while in five weeks old fish PAS-positive and melanotropic cells could be distinguished in the pars intermedia. A weakly chromophilic and GTH-immunoreactive cell type appeared in the proximal pars distalis of 6 weeks old fish. These cells were identified as thyrotropic cells. In fish older than four months cysts and haemorrhagia appeared in all parts of the pituitary gland. Allometric (log-log) plots of fish length and pituitary volume revealed two inflections in the slope of the regression line. Such inflections indicate stanzas (stages or periods) in fish growth. Both inflections found in this study reflect an increased rate of pituitary growth in relation to the growth rate of body length in the subsequent stanzas. The first inflection occurs at about three weeks, coincides with the appearance of GTH-immunoreactive cells and probably represents the onset of maturation. The second inflection occurs at four months and is followed by pituitary hyperplasia and histological deteriorations. This inflection is considered to reflect the onset of aging.

  3. The toxicological application of transcriptomics and epigenomics in zebrafish and other teleosts.

    PubMed

    Williams, Tim D; Mirbahai, Leda; Chipman, J Kevin

    2014-03-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio) is one of a number of teleost fish species frequently employed in toxicology. Toxico-genomics determines global transcriptomic responses to chemical exposures and can predict their effects. It has been applied successfully within aquatic toxicology to assist in chemical testing, determination of mechanisms and environmental monitoring. Moreover, the related field of toxico-epigenomics, that determines chemical-induced changes in DNA methylation, histone modifications and micro-RNA expression, is emerging as a valuable contribution to understanding mechanisms of both adaptive and adverse responses. Zebrafish has proven a useful and convenient model species for both transcriptomic and epigenetic toxicological studies. Despite zebrafish's dominance in other areas of fish biology, alternative fish species are used extensively in toxico-genomics. The main reason for this is that environmental monitoring generally focuses on species native to the region of interest. We are starting to see advances in the integration of high-throughput screening, omics techniques and bioinformatics together with more traditional indicator endpoints that are relevant to regulators. Integration of such approaches with high-throughput testing of zebrafish embryos, leading to the discovery of adverse outcome pathways, promises to make a major contribution to ensuring the safety of chemicals in the environment.

  4. Global assessment of molecularly identified Anisakis Dujardin, 1845 (Nematoda: Anisakidae) in their teleost intermediate hosts.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Thomas; Hailer, Frank; Palm, Harry W; Klimpel, Sven

    2013-05-01

    Here, we present the ITS ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequence data on 330 larvae of nematodes of the genus Anisakis Dujardin, 1845 collected from 26 different bony fish species from 21 sampling locations and different climatic zones. New host records are provided for Anisakis simplex (Rudolphi, 1809) sensu stricto (s.s.) and A. pegreffli Campana-Rouget et Biocca, 1955 from Anoplopoma fimbria (Pallas) (Santa Barbara, East Pacific), A. typica (Diesing, 1860) from Caesio cuning (Bloch), Lepturacanthus savala (Cuvier) and Katsuwonus pelamis (Linnaeus) (Indonesia, West Pacific), A. simplex s.s. from Cololabis saira (Brevoort) (Hawaii, Central Pacific), A. simplex C of Nascetti et al. (1986) from Sebastolobus alascanus Bean (Santa Barbara, East Pacific) and A. physeteris Baylis, 1923 from Synaphobranchus kaupii Johnson (Namibia, East Atlantic). Comparison with host records from 60 previous molecular studies of Anisakis species reveals the teleost host range so far recorded for the genus. Perciform (57 species) and gadiform (21) fishes were the most frequently infected orders, followed by pleuronectiforms (15) and scorpaeniforms (15). Most commonly infected fish families were Scombridae (12), Gadidae (10), Carangidae (8) and Clupeidae (7), with Merluccius merluccius (Linnaeus) alone harbouring eight Anisakis species. Different intermediate host compositions implicate differing life cycles for the so far molecularly identified Anisakis sibling species.

  5. Sarcopenia and piscines: the case for indeterminate-growing fish as unique genetic model organisms in aging and longevity research

    PubMed Central

    Froehlich, Jacob M.; Fowler, Zachary G.; Galt, Nicholas J.; Smith Jr., Daniel L.; Biga, Peggy R.

    2013-01-01

    Sarcopenia and dynapenia pose significant problems for the aged, especially as life expectancy rises in developed countries. Current therapies are marginally efficacious at best, and barriers to breakthroughs in treatment may result from currently employed model organisms. Here, we argue that the use of indeterminate-growing teleost fish in skeletal muscle aging research may lead to therapeutic advancements not possible with current mammalian models. Evidence from a comparative approach utilizing the subfamily Danioninae suggests that the indeterminate growth paradigm of many teleosts arises from adult muscle stem cells with greater proliferative capacity, even in spite of smaller progenitor populations. We hypothesize that paired-box transcription factors, Pax3/7, are involved with this enhanced self-renewal and that prolonged expression of these factors may allow some fish species to escape, or at least forestall, sarcopenia/dynapenia. Future research efforts should focus on the experimental validation of these genes as key factors in indeterminate growth, both in the context of muscle stem cell proliferation and in prevention of skeletal muscle senescence. PMID:23967015

  6. Diagnosis of adults Xp11.2 translocation renal cell carcinoma by immunohistochemistry and FISH assays: clinicopathological data from ethnic Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Yuanyuan; Gu, Chengyuan; Wang, Hongkai; Chang, Kun; Yang, Xiaoqun; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Dai, Bo; Zhu, Yao; Shi, Guohai; Zhang, Hailiang; Ye, Dingwei

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the utility of transcription factor E3 (TFE3) break-apart fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assay in diagnosis of Xp11.2 translocation renal cell carcinoma (Xp11.2 RCC) and to compare the clinicopathological features between adult Xp11.2 RCC and non-Xp11.2 RCC. 76 pathologically suspected Xp11.2 RCCs were recruited from our institution. Both TFE3 immunohistochemistry (IHC) and TFE3 FISH assay were performed for the entire cohort. The progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) curves were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. FISH analysis confirmed 30 Xp11.2 RCCs, including 28 cases with positive TFE3 immunostaining and 2 cases with negative immunostaining. The false-positive and false-negative rates were 6.7% (2/30) and 4.3% (2/46), respectively, for TFE3 IHC compared with FISH assay. Xp11.2 RCC was significantly associated with higher pathological stage and Fuhrman nuclear grade compared with non-Xp11.2 RCC (P < 0.05). The median PFS and OS for TFE3 FISH-positive group were 13.0 months (95% CI, 8.4–17.6 months) and 50.0 months (95% CI, 27.6–72.4 months), respectively, while the median PFS and OS had not been reached for TFE3 FISH-negative group. In conclusion, TFE3 break-apart FISH assay is a highly useful and standard diagnostic method for Xp11.2 RCC. Adult Xp11.2 RCC is clinically aggressive and often presents at advanced stage with poor prognosis. PMID:26880493

  7. Early warning signs of endocrine disruption in adult fish from the ingestion of polyethylene with and without sorbed chemical pollutants from the marine environment.

    PubMed

    Rochman, Chelsea M; Kurobe, Tomofumi; Flores, Ida; Teh, Swee J

    2014-09-15

    Plastic debris is associated with several chemical pollutants known to disrupt the functioning of the endocrine system. To determine if the exposure to plastic debris and associated chemicals promotes endocrine-disrupting effects in fish, we conducted a chronic two-month dietary exposure using Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) and environmentally relevant concentrations of microplastic (<1mm) and associated chemicals. We exposed fish to three treatments: a no-plastic (i.e. negative control), virgin-plastic (i.e. virgin polyethylene pre-production pellets) and marine-plastic treatment (i.e. polyethylene pellets deployed in San Diego Bay, CA for 3 months). Altered gene expression was observed in male fish exposed to the marine-plastic treatment, whereas altered gene expression was observed in female fish exposed to both the marine- and virgin-plastic treatment. Significant down-regulation of choriogenin (Chg H) gene expression was observed in males and significant down-regulation of vitellogenin (Vtg I), Chg H and the estrogen receptor (ERα) gene expression was observed in females. In addition, histological observation revealed abnormal proliferation of germ cells in one male fish from the marine-plastic treatment. Overall, our study suggests that the ingestion of plastic debris at environmentally relevant concentrations may alter endocrine system function in adult fish and warrants further research.

  8. Evaluation of Juvenile Fish Bypass and Adult Fish Passage Facilities at Water Diversions in the Umatilla River; 1990-1991 Progress Reports

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, Suzanne M.

    1992-06-01

    We report on our effort from October 1990 through March 1991 to prepare for the evaluation of the juvenile fish bypass facility in the West Extension Irrigation District Canal at Three Mile Falls Dam on the Umatilla River. We also report on our preliminary activities to prepare for future evaluations at Maxwell and Westland diversion dams. A detailed sampling plan was written to guide our efforts in the evaluation process and associated preparatory activities were conducted. In the sampling plan, we developed experimental designs for evaluating the passage of juvenile salmonids through the bypass system including the evaluation at design flow of injury and mortality rates, and passage of juvenile salmonids through and over the screens. We designed and fabricated fish nets for screen leakage tests, and holding facilities for test fish. Modifications to improve evaluation activities were incorporated into the collection facility, and our sampling gear. We designed and fabricated collection systems for the juvenile fish bypass facilities at Maxwell and Westland diversion dams. Preliminary monitoring of system operation was performed at Westland Diversion Dam. We offer recommendations for improving preparations and designs of future evaluations, and also recommend that a detailed evaluation of the Maxwell and Westland juvenile facilities, including evaluation of fish condition and fish passage through or over the screens, be conducted.

  9. Successful treatment of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease in an adult by use of a fish oil-based lipid source.

    PubMed

    Venecourt-Jackson, Esra; Hill, Simon J; Walmsley, Russell S

    2013-01-01

    Liver disease occurs in 15% to 40% of adults on long-term parenteral nutrition, with steatosis being more common than cholestasis in the adult population. This problem has been well reported in the pediatric population, but we describe the case of a man who became profoundly jaundiced after being on parenteral nutrition for 3 y and responded rapidly to a change in lipid source from soybean and olive oil-based emulsion (ClinOleic) to a fish oil-based lipid emulsion (Omegaven).

  10. No Association between Fish Intake and Depression in over 15,000 Older Adults from Seven Low and Middle Income Countries–The 10/66 Study

    PubMed Central

    Albanese, Emiliano; Lombardo, Flavia L.; Dangour, Alan D.; Guerra, Mariella; Acosta, Daisy; Huang, Yueqin; Jacob, K. S.; Llibre Rodriguez, Juan de Jesus; Salas, Aquiles; Schönborn, Claudia; Sosa, Ana Luisa; Williams, Joseph; Prince, Martin J.; Ferri, Cleusa P.

    2012-01-01

    Background Evidence on the association between fish consumption and depression is inconsistent and virtually non-existent from low- and middle-income countries. Using a standard protocol, we aim to assess the association of fish consumption and late-life depression in seven low- and middle-income countries. Methodology/Findings We used cross-sectional data from the 10/66 cohort study and applied two diagnostic criteria for late-life depression to assess the association between categories of weekly fish consumption and depression according to ICD-10 and the EURO-D depression symptoms scale scores, adjusting for relevant confounders. All-catchment area surveys were carried out in Cuba, Dominican Republic, Venezuela, Peru, Mexico, China, and India, and over 15,000 community-dwelling older adults (65+) were sampled. Using Poisson models the adjusted association between categories of fish consumption and ICD-10 depression was positive in India (p for trend = 0.001), inverse in Peru (p = 0.025), and not significant in all other countries. We found a linear inverse association between fish consumption categories and EURO-D scores only in Cuba (p for trend  = 0.039) and China (p<0.001); associations were not significant in all other countries. Between-country heterogeneity was marked for both ICD-10 (I2>61%) and EURO-D criteria (I2>66%). Conclusions The associations of fish consumption with depression in large samples of older adults varied markedly across countries and by depression diagnosis and were explained by socio-demographic and lifestyle variables. Experimental studies in these settings are needed to confirm our findings. PMID:22723900

  11. Systematic variation in the pattern of gene paralog retention between the teleost superorders Ostariophysi and Acanthopterygii.

    PubMed

    Garcia de la Serrana, Daniel; Mareco, Edson A; Johnston, Ian A

    2014-04-01

    Teleost fish underwent whole-genome duplication around 450 Ma followed by diploidization and loss of 80-85% of the duplicated genes. To identify a deep signature of this teleost-specific whole-genome duplication (TSGD), we searched for duplicated genes that were systematically and uniquely retained in one or other of the superorders Ostariophysi and Acanthopterygii. TSGD paralogs comprised 17-21% of total gene content. Some 2.6% (510) of TSGD paralogs were present as pairs in the Ostariophysi genomes of Danio rerio (Cypriniformes) and Astyanax mexicanus (Characiformes) but not in species from four orders of Acanthopterygii (Gasterosteiformes, Gasterosteus aculeatus; Tetraodontiformes, Tetraodon nigroviridis; Perciformes, Oreochromis niloticus; and Beloniformes, Oryzias latipes) where a single copy was identified. Similarly, 1.3% (418) of total gene number represented cases where TSGD paralogs pairs were systematically retained in the Acanthopterygian but conserved as a single copy in Ostariophysi genomes. We confirmed the generality of these results by phylogenetic and synteny analysis of 40 randomly selected linage-specific paralogs (LSPs) from each superorder and completed with the transcriptomes of three additional Ostariophysi species (Ictalurus punctatus [Siluriformes], Sinocyclocheilus species [Cypriniformes], and Piaractus mesopotamicus [Characiformes]). No chromosome bias was detected in TSGD paralog retention. Gene ontology (GO) analysis revealed significant enrichment of GO terms relative to the human GO SLIM database for "growth," "Cell differentiation," and "Embryo development" in Ostariophysi and for "Transport," "Signal Transduction," and "Vesicle mediated transport" in Acanthopterygii. The observed patterns of paralog retention are consistent with different diploidization outcomes having contributed to the evolution/diversification of each superorder.

  12. Systematic Variation in the Pattern of Gene Paralog Retention between the Teleost Superorders Ostariophysi and Acanthopterygii

    PubMed Central

    Garcia de la serrana, Daniel; Mareco, Edson A.; Johnston, Ian A.

    2014-01-01

    Teleost fish underwent whole-genome duplication around 450 Ma followed by diploidization and loss of 80–85% of the duplicated genes. To identify a deep signature of this teleost-specific whole-genome duplication (TSGD), we searched for duplicated genes that were systematically and uniquely retained in one or other of the superorders Ostariophysi and Acanthopterygii. TSGD paralogs comprised 17–21% of total gene content. Some 2.6% (510) of TSGD paralogs were present as pairs in the Ostariophysi genomes of Danio rerio (Cypriniformes) and Astyanax mexicanus (Characiformes) but not in species from four orders of Acanthopterygii (Gasterosteiformes, Gasterosteus aculeatus; Tetraodontiformes, Tetraodon nigroviridis; Perciformes, Oreochromis niloticus; and Beloniformes, Oryzias latipes) where a single copy was identified. Similarly, 1.3% (418) of total gene number represented cases where TSGD paralogs pairs were systematically retained in the Acanthopterygian but conserved as a single copy in Ostariophysi genomes. We confirmed the generality of these results by phylogenetic and synteny analysis of 40 randomly selected linage-specific paralogs (LSPs) from each superorder and completed with the transcriptomes of three additional Ostariophysi species (Ictalurus punctatus [Siluriformes], Sinocyclocheilus species [Cypriniformes], and Piaractus mesopotamicus [Characiformes]). No chromosome bias was detected in TSGD paralog retention. Gene ontology (GO) analysis revealed significant enrichment of GO terms relative to the human GO SLIM database for “growth,” “Cell differentiation,” and “Embryo development” in Ostariophysi and for “Transport,” “Signal Transduction,” and “Vesicle mediated transport” in Acanthopterygii. The observed patterns of paralog retention are consistent with different diploidization outcomes having contributed to the evolution/diversification of each superorder. PMID:24732281

  13. Aromatase, estrogen receptors and brain development in fish and amphibians.

    PubMed

    Coumailleau, Pascal; Pellegrini, Elisabeth; Adrio, Fátima; Diotel, Nicolas; Cano-Nicolau, Joel; Nasri, Ahmed; Vaillant, Colette; Kah, Olivier

    2015-02-01

    Estrogens affect brain development of vertebrates, not only by impacting activity and morphology of existing circuits, but also by modulating embryonic and adult neurogenesis. The issue is complex as estrogens can not only originate from peripheral tissues, but also be locally produced within the brain itself due to local aromatization of androgens. In this respect, teleost fishes are quite unique because aromatase is expressed exclusively in radial glial cells, which represent pluripotent cells in the brain of all vertebrates. Expression of aromatase in the brain of fish is also strongly stimulated by estrogens and some androgens. This creates a very intriguing positive auto-regulatory loop leading to dramatic aromatase expression in sexually mature fish with elevated levels of circulating steroids. Looking at the effects of estrogens or anti-estrogens in the brain of adult zebrafish showed that estrogens inhibit rather than stimulate cell proliferation and newborn cell migration. The functional meaning of these observations is still unclear, but these data suggest that the brain of fish is experiencing constant remodeling under the influence of circulating steroids and brain-derived neurosteroids, possibly permitting a diversification of sexual strategies, notably hermaphroditism. Recent data in frogs indicate that aromatase expression is limited to neurons and do not concern radial glial cells. Thus, until now, there is no other example of vertebrates in which radial progenitors express aromatase. This raises the question of when and why these new features were gained and what are their adaptive benefits. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Nuclear receptors in animal development.

  14. Myostatin (MSTN) gene duplications in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar): evidence for different selective pressure on teleost MSTN-1 and -2.

    PubMed

    Ostbye, Tone-Kari K; Wetten, Ola F; Tooming-Klunderud, Ave; Jakobsen, Kjetill S; Yafe, Anat; Etzioni, Shulamit; Moen, Thomas; Andersen, Oivind

    2007-11-15

    Whereas the negative muscle regulator myostatin (MSTN) in mammals is almost exclusively expressed in the muscle by a single encoding gene, teleost fish possess at least two MSTN genes which are differentially expressed in both muscular and non-muscular tissues. Duplicated MSTN-1 genes have previously been identified in the tetraploid salmonid genome. From Atlantic salmon we succeeded in isolating the paralogous genes of MSTN-2, which shared about 70% identity with MSTN-1a and -1b. The salmon MSTN-2a cDNA encoded a predicted protein of 363 residues and included the conserved C-terminal bioactive domain. MSTN-2a seemed to be primarily expressed in the brain, and a functional role of teleost MSTN-2 in the neurogenesis similar to the inhibitory action of the closely related GDF-11 in the mammalian brain was proposed. In contrast, a frame-shift mutation in exon 1 of salmon MSTN-2b would lead to the synthesis of a putatively non-functional truncated protein. The absence of processed MSTN-2b mRNA in the examined tissues indicated that this gene has become a non-functional pseudogene. The differential, but partially overlapping, expression patterns of salmon MSTN-2a, -1a and -1b in muscular and non-muscular tissues are probably due to the different arrangement of the potential cis-acting regulatory elements identified in their putative promoter regions. Single and paired E-boxes in the MSTN-1b promoter were shown to bind both homo-and hetero-dimers of the myogenic regulatory factor MyoD and E47 in vitro of importance for initiating the myogenic program. Analyses of nucleotide substitution patterns indicated that the teleost MSTNs essentially have evolved under purifying selection, but a subset of amino acid sites under positive selective pressure were identified within the MSTN1 branch. The results may reflect the evolutionary forces related to adoption of the different functional roles proposed for the teleost MSTN isoforms. The phylogenetic analysis of multiple

  15. A New and Fast Technique to Generate Offspring after Germ Cells Transplantation in Adult Fish: The Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) Model

    PubMed Central

    Lacerda, Samyra M. S. N.; Batlouni, Sergio R.; Costa, Guilherme M. J.; Segatelli, Tânia M.; Quirino, Bruno R.; Queiroz, Bruno M.; Kalapothakis, Evanguedes; França, Luiz R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Germ cell transplantation results in fertile recipients and is the only available approach to functionally investigate the spermatogonial stem cell biology in mammals and probably in other vertebrates. In the current study, we describe a novel non-surgical methodology for efficient spermatogonial transplantation into the testes of adult tilapia (O. niloticus), in which endogenous spermatogenesis had been depleted with the cytostatic drug busulfan. Methodology/Principal Findings Using two different tilapia strains, the production of fertile spermatozoa with donor characteristics was demonstrated in adult recipient, which also sired progeny with the donor genotype. Also, after cryopreservation tilapia spermatogonial cells were able to differentiate to spermatozoa in the testes of recipient fishes. These findings indicate that injecting germ cells directly into adult testis facilitates and enable fast generation of donor spermatogenesis and offspring compared to previously described methods. Conclusion Therefore, a new suitable methodology for biotechnological investigations in aquaculture was established, with a high potential to improve the production of commercially valuable fish, generate transgenic animals and preserve endangered fish species. PMID:20505774

  16. Insulin regulates ionic metabolism in a fresh water teleost, anabas testudineus (bloch).

    PubMed

    Vijayasree, A S; Divya, L; Sreejith, P; Cyril, J; Smita, M; Oommen, O V

    2005-08-01

    Short term effects of insulin on total brain and branchial Na+K+ ATPase, Ca2+ ATPase and Na+, K+ and Ca2+ ions were investigated in A. testudineus. The increase in brain Ca2+ ATPase after alloxan treatment may account for an increased amount of intracellular calcium required for biochemical events taking place inside the cells. Branchial Na+K+ATPase was significantly stimulated while Ca2+ ATPase significantly inhibited after alloxan treatment. This suggests that alloxan exerts its inhibitory effect on the ATP-driven Ca2+ transport via; its action on the Ca2+ pump protein rather than the membrane permeability to Ca2+. The increased activity of brain Na+K+ ATPase at 3 and 24 hr by insulin to alloxan pretreated fish may account for the stimulated co-transport of glucose and its utilization for energy requirements and the excitatory action on neurons in the brain. The elevated brain Ca2+ ATPase may be due to the role of calcium as a second messenger in hormone action. At 24 hr, the activity of branchial Na+K+ ATPase and Ca2+ ATPase in alloxan pretreated specimens was significantly stimulated by insulin. This may be due to increased synthesis of these enzyme units. Administration of insulin (lU/fish) in normal fish significantly inhibited the activity of brain and branchial Na+K+ ATPase while brain Ca2+ ATPase showed a stimulatory effect at 3 and 24 hr compared to control. Inhibition of total branchial Ca2+ ATPase activity by insulin may be due to increased Ca2+ concentration. Higher plasma glucose level in alloxan treated groups confirms the diabetic effect of alloxan. Insulin reverses this effect. The possible mechanism by which insulin controls Na+K+ ATPase activity appears to be tissue specific. The results seem to be the first report on the effect of insulin on ATPase activity in a teleost. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that insulin performs a role in hydro mineral regulation in freshwater teleosts.

  17. Development and specification of cerebellar stem and progenitor cells in zebrafish: from embryo to adult

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Teleost fish display widespread post-embryonic neurogenesis originating from many different proliferative niches that are distributed along the brain axis. During the development of the central nervous system (CNS) different cell types are produced in a strict temporal order from increasingly committed progenitors. However, it is not known whether diverse neural stem and progenitor cell types with restricted potential or stem cells with broad potential are maintained in the teleost fish brain. Results To study the diversity and output of neural stem and progenitor cell populations in the zebrafish brain the cerebellum was used as a model brain region, because of its well-known architecture and development. Transgenic zebrafish lines, in vivo imaging and molecular markers were used to follow and quantify how the proliferative activity and output of cerebellar progenitor populations progress. This analysis revealed that the proliferative activity and progenitor marker expression declines in juvenile zebrafish before they reach sexual maturity. Furthermore, this correlated with the diminished repertoire of cell types produced in the adult. The stem and progenitor cells derived from the upper rhombic lip were maintained into adulthood and they actively produced granule cells. Ventricular zone derived progenitor cells were largely quiescent in the adult cerebellum and produced a very limited number of glia and inhibitory inter-neurons. No Purkinje or Eurydendroid cells were produced in fish older than 3 months. This suggests that cerebellar cell types are produced in a strict temporal order from distinct pools of increasingly committed stem and progenitor cells. Conclusions Our results in the zebrafish cerebellum show that neural stem and progenitor cell types are specified and they produce distinct cell lineages and sub-types of brain cells. We propose that only specific subtypes of brain cells are continuously produced throughout life in the teleost fish

  18. Evolutionary history of the ABCB2 genomic region in teleosts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Palti, Y.; Rodriguez, M.F.; Gahr, S.A.; Hansen, J.D.

    2007-01-01

    Gene duplication, silencing and translocation have all been implicated in shaping the unique genomic architecture of the teleost MH regions. Previously, we demonstrated that trout possess five unlinked regions encoding MH genes. One of these regions harbors ABCB2 which in all other vertebrate classes is found in the MHC class II region. In this study, we sequenced a BAC contig for the trout ABCB2 region. Analysis of this region revealed the presence of genes homologous to those located in the human class II (ABCB2, BRD2, ??DAA), extended class II (RGL2, PHF1, SYGP1) and class III (PBX2, Notch-L) regions. The organization and syntenic relationships of this region were then compared to similar regions in humans, Tetraodon and zebrafish to learn more about the evolutionary history of this region. Our analysis indicates that this region was generated during the teleost-specific duplication event while also providing insight about potential MH paralogous regions in teleosts. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Central Pathways Integrating Metabolism and Reproduction in Teleosts

    PubMed Central

    Shahjahan, Md.; Kitahashi, Takashi; Parhar, Ishwar S.

    2014-01-01

    Energy balance plays an important role in the control of reproduction. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms connecting the two systems are not well understood especially in teleosts. The hypothalamus plays a crucial role in the regulation of both energy balance and reproduction, and contains a number of neuropeptides, including gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), orexin, neuropeptide-Y, ghrelin, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide, α-melanocyte stimulating hormone, melanin-concentrating hormone, cholecystokinin, 26RFamide, nesfatin, kisspeptin, and gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone. These neuropeptides are involved in the control of energy balance and reproduction either directly or indirectly. On the other hand, synthesis and release of these hypothalamic neuropeptides are regulated by metabolic signals from the gut and the adipose tissue. Furthermore, neurons producing these neuropeptides interact with each other, providing neuronal basis of the link between energy balance and reproduction. This review summarizes the advances made in our understanding of the physiological roles of the hypothalamic neuropeptides in energy balance and reproduction in teleosts, and discusses how they interact with GnRH, kisspeptin, and pituitary gonadotropins to control reproduction in teleosts. PMID:24723910

  20. Immunoglobulin light chain isotypes in the teleost Trematomus bernacchii.

    PubMed

    Coscia, Maria Rosaria; Giacomelli, Stefano; De Santi, Concetta; Varriale, Sonia; Oreste, Umberto

    2008-06-01

    Three immunoglobulin light chain (IgL) isotypes TrbeL1, TrbeL2, and TrbeL3 were identified in the Antarctic teleost Trematomus bernacchii by immunoscreening a cDNA expression library, and using RT-PCR, and 5' RACE. One of them was distinguished in two subisotypes TrbeL1A and TrbeL1B. Real-time PCR experiments showed that the different isotypes were expressed in similar ratios in the various tissues analyzed. Interestingly, the expression level of TrbeL1A isotype was very high in all tissues. Molecular models of the CH1-CL domain pairings were built and minimized for the different isotypes. Several differences were identified in the superimposable structures mainly in the loops. In addition, the isotype-specific residues determined a different distribution of the charges on the external CL domain surface. Phylogenetic trees of 43 isotype representative sequences of CL domain from teleost species, built by different methods, indicated that all teleost light chain isotypes are distributed into three groups. Furthermore, the split of the group IgL1 into two subgroups, one of them carrying a micro-satellite DNA insertion, may have occurred in the Acanthopterygean ancestor.

  1. T Cells in Fish

    PubMed Central

    Nakanishi, Teruyuki; Shibasaki, Yasuhiro; Matsuura, Yuta

    2015-01-01

    Cartilaginous and bony fish are the most primitive vertebrates with a thymus, and possess T cells equivalent to those in mammals. There are a number of studies in fish demonstrating that the thymus is the essential organ for development of T lymphocytes from early thymocyte progenitors to functionally competent T cells. A high number of T cells in the intestine and gills has been reported in several fish species. Involvement of CD4+ and CD8α+ T cells in allograft rejection and graft-versus-host reaction (GVHR) has been demonstrated using monoclonal antibodies. Conservation of CD4+ helper T cell functions among teleost fishes has been suggested in a number studies employing mixed leukocyte culture (MLC) and hapten/carrier effect. Alloantigen- and virus-specific cytotoxicity has also been demonstrated in ginbuna and rainbow trout. Furthermore, the important role of cell-mediated immunity rather than humoral immunity has been reported in the protection against intracellular bacterial infection. Recently, the direct antibacterial activity of CD8α+, CD4+ T-cells and sIgM+ cells in fish has been reported. In this review, we summarize the recent progress in T cell research focusing on the tissue distribution and function of fish T cells. PMID:26426066

  2. Do reefs drive diversification in marine teleosts? Evidence from the pufferfishes and their allies (Order Tetraodontiformes).

    PubMed

    Alfaro, Michael E; Santini, Francesco; Brock, Chad D

    2007-09-01

    A major challenge in evolutionary biology lies in explaining patterns of high species numbers found in biodiversity hot spots. Tropical coral reefs underlie most marine hot spots and reef-associated fish faunas represent some of the most diverse assemblages of vertebrates on the planet. Although the standing diversity of modern reef fish clades is usually attributed to their ecological association with corals, untangling temporal patterns of codiversification has traditionally proved difficult. In addition, owing to uncertainty in higher-level relationships among acanthomorph fish, there have been few opportunities to test the assumption that reef-association itself leads to higher rates of diversification compared to other habitats. Here we use relaxed-clock methods in conjunction with statistical measures of species accumulation and phylogenetic comparative methods to clarify the temporal pattern of diversification in reef and nonreef-associated lineages of tetraodontiforms, a morphologically diverse order of teleost fish. We incorporate 11 fossil calibrations distributed across the tetraodontiform tree to infer divergence times and compare results from models of autocorrelated and uncorrelated evolutionary rates. All major tetraodontiform reef crown groups have significantly higher rates of diversification than the order as a whole. None of the nonreef-associated families show this pattern with the exception of the aracanid boxfish. Independent contrasts analysis also reveals a significantly positive relationship between diversification rate and proportion of reef-associated species within each family when aracanids are excluded. Reef association appears to have increased diversification rate within tetraodontiforms. We suggest that both intrinsic factors of reef habitat and extrinsic factors relating to the provincialization and regionalization of the marine biota during the Miocene (about 23-5 MY) played a role in shaping these patterns of diversity.

  3. Organization of a β and α globin gene set in the teleost Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua.

    PubMed

    Halldórsdóttir, Katrín; Árnason, Einar

    2009-12-01

    Developmental globin gene expression and gene switching in vertebrates have been extensively studied. Globin gene regions have been characterized in some fish species and show linked α and β loci. Understanding coordinated expression between α and β globin genes in fish is of importance for further insights into globin gene regulation in teleosts and higher vertebrates. We characterize linked β and α globin genes in Atlantic cod, pulled from the Atlantic cod genome with a PCR research strategy, by screening a genomic λ library and primer walking. The genes are oriented tail-to-head (5'-3'), differing from the head-to-head orientation in transcriptional polarity characteristic of teleostean globin genes. Four tandem repeats are found in an intergenic region of 1500 base pairs. One microsatellite, which consists primarily of atg tandem repeats, has an open reading frame. The globin genes and open reading frame have a CCAAT promoter element and TATA boxes. The promoters of the open reading frame and the β gene share an 89-bp block (with 100% identity) that probably regulates transcription.

  4. Foamy-like endogenous retroviruses are extensive and abundant in teleosts

    PubMed Central

    Ruboyianes, Ryan; Worobey, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Recent discoveries indicate that the foamy virus (FV) (Spumavirus) ancestor may have been among the first retroviruses to appear during the evolution of vertebrates, demonstrated by foamy endogenous retroviruses present within deeply divergent hosts including mammals, coelacanth, and ray-finned fish. If they indeed existed in ancient marine environments hundreds of millions of years ago, significant undiscovered diversity of foamy-like endogenous retroviruses might be present in fish genomes. By screening published genomes and by applying PCR-based assays of preserved tissues, we discovered 23 novel foamy-like elements in teleost hosts. These viruses form a robust, reciprocally monophyletic sister clade with sarcopterygian host FV, with class III mammal endogenous retroviruses being the sister group to both clades. Some of these foamy-like retroviruses have larger genomes than any known retrovirus, exogenous or endogenous, due to unusually long gag-like genes and numerous accessory genes. The presence of genetic features conserved between mammalian FV and these novel retroviruses attests to a foamy-like replication biology conserved for hundreds of millions of years. We estimate that some of these viruses integrated recently into host genomes; exogenous forms of these viruses may still circulate. PMID:28058112

  5. The introduced Asian parasitic copepod Neoergasilus japonicus (Harada) (Cyclopoida: Ergasilidae) from endangered cichlid teleosts in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Morales, Eduardo; Paredes-Trujillo, Amelia; González-Solís, David

    2010-11-01

    The cyclopoid copepod Neoergasilus japonicus ( Harada, 1930 ) is recorded from three endangered or threatened fish species from southeast Mexico: the tailbar cichlid Vieja hartwegi (Taylor and Miller, 1980); the Angostura cichlid V. breidohri (Werner and Stawikowski, 1987); and the sieve cichlid C. grammodes (Taylor and Miller, 1980). This ectoparasitic copepod is considered, together with most other members of Neoergasilus, an Eastern Asian form. N. japonicus is one of the most widespread parasitic Asian copepods, as it has rapidly invaded Europe and North America, including Mexico. We estimated the prevalence, mean abundance, and intensity of infection of N. japonicus in these cichlid teleosts; our data agree with previous works stating the high prevalence of this ectoparasite. This copepod has a wide range of hosts among freshwater fish taxa, but this is only the second published report from cichlids in the Neotropical region. The three cichlids surveyed, V. hartwegi, V. breidohri, and C. grammodes, are new hosts of this copepod. Its occurrence in Mexico is attributed to different events of introduction by human agency. This is the southernmost record of N. japonicus in continental America. It is a matter of concern that this copepod is parasitizing endangered or threatened endemic cichlids in the Neotropical region. Because its high infective efficiency and ability to shift hosts, this Asian parasite is expected to spread farther southwards into Central and South America.

  6. A proteinaceous organic matrix regulates carbonate mineral production in the marine teleost intestine

    PubMed Central

    Schauer, Kevin L.; LeMoine, Christophe M. R.; Pelin, Adrian; Corradi, Nicolas; Warren, Wesley C.; Grosell, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Marine teleost fish produce CaCO3 in their intestine as part of their osmoregulatory strategy. This precipitation is critical for rehydration and survival of the largest vertebrate group on earth, yet the molecular mechanisms that regulate this reaction are unknown. Here, we isolate and characterize an organic matrix associated with the intestinal precipitates produced by Gulf toadfish (Opsanus beta). Toadfish precipitates were purified using two different methods, and the associated organic matrix was extracted. Greater than 150 proteins were identified in the isolated matrix by mass spectrometry and subsequent database searching using an O. beta transcriptomic sequence library produced here. Many of the identified proteins were enriched in the matrix compared to the intestinal fluid, and three showed no substantial homology to any previously characterized protein in the NCBI database. To test the functionality of the isolated matrix, a micro-modified in vitro calcification assay was designed, which revealed that low concentrations of isolated matrix substantially promoted CaCO3 production, where high concentrations showed an inhibitory effect. High concentrations of matrix also decreased the incorporation of magnesium into the forming mineral, potentially providing an explanation for the variability in magnesium content observed in precipitates produced by different fish species. PMID:27694946

  7. A proteinaceous organic matrix regulates carbonate mineral production in the marine teleost intestine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schauer, Kevin L.; Lemoine, Christophe M. R.; Pelin, Adrian; Corradi, Nicolas; Warren, Wesley C.; Grosell, Martin

    2016-10-01

    Marine teleost fish produce CaCO3 in their intestine as part of their osmoregulatory strategy. This precipitation is critical for rehydration and survival of the largest vertebrate group on earth, yet the molecular mechanisms that regulate this reaction are unknown. Here, we isolate and characterize an organic matrix associated with the intestinal precipitates produced by Gulf toadfish (Opsanus beta). Toadfish precipitates were purified using two different methods, and the associated organic matrix was extracted. Greater than 150 proteins were identified in the isolated matrix by mass spectrometry and subsequent database searching using an O. beta transcriptomic sequence library produced here. Many of the identified proteins were enriched in the matrix compared to the intestinal fluid, and three showed no substantial homology to any previously characterized protein in the NCBI database. To test the functionality of the isolated matrix, a micro-modified in vitro calcification assay was designed, which revealed that low concentrations of isolated matrix substantially promoted CaCO3 production, where high concentrations showed an inhibitory effect. High concentrations of matrix also decreased the incorporation of magnesium into the forming mineral, potentially providing an explanation for the variability in magnesium content observed in precipitates produced by different fish species.

  8. Transgenic medaka fish as models to analyze bone homeostasis under micro-gravity conditions in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, C.; Wagner, T.; Renn, J.; Goerlich, R.; Schartl, M.

    Long-term space flight and microgravity results in bone loss that can be explained by reduced activity of bone-forming osteoblast cells and/or an increase in activity of bone resorbing osteoclast cells. Osteoprotegerin (OPG), a secreted protein of 401 amino acids, has been shown to regulate the balance between osteoblast and osteoclast formation and thereby warrants constant bone mass under normal gravitational conditions. Consistent with this, earlier reports using transgenic mice have shown that increased activation of OPG leads to exc essive bone formation (osteopetrosis), while inactivation of OPG leads to bone loss (osteoporosis). Importantly, it has recently been reported that expression of murine OPG is regulated by vector averaged gravity (Kanematsu et al., 2002, Bone 30, p553). The small bony fish medaka (Oryzias latipes ) has attracted increasing attention as genetic model system to study developmental and pathological processes. To analyze the molecular mechanisms of bone formation in this small vertebrate, we have isolated two related genes, opr-1 and opr -2, from medaka. Our phylogenetic analysis revealed that both genes originated from a common ancestor by fish-specific gene duplication and represent the orthologs of the mammalian OPG gene. Both opr genes are differentially expressed during embryonic and larval development, in adult tissues and in cultured primary osteoblast cells. We have characterized their promoter regions and identified consensus binding sites for transcription factors of the bone-morphogenetic-protein (BMP) p thway and for core-binding-factor-1Aa (cbfa1). Cbfa1 has been shown to be the key regulator of OPG expression during several steps of osteoblast differentiation in mammals. This opens the possibility that the mechanisms controlling bone formation in teleost fish and higher vertebrates are regulated by related mechanisms. We are currently generating transgenic medakafish expressing a GFP reporter gene under control of the

  9. Postnatal brain development of the pulse type, weakly electric gymnotid fish Gymnotus omarorum.

    PubMed

    Iribarne, Leticia; Castelló, María E

    2014-01-01

    Teleosts are a numerous and diverse group of fish showing great variation in body shape, ecological niches and behaviors, and a correspondent diversity in brain morphology, usually associated with their functional specialization. Weakly electric fish are a paradigmatic example of functional specialization, as these teleosts use self-generated electric fields to sense the nearby environment and communicate with conspecifics, enabling fish to better exploit particular ecological niches. We analyzed the development of the brain of the pulse type gymnotid Gymnotus omarorum, focusing on the brain regions involved directly or indirectly in electrosensory information processing. A morphometric analysis has been made of the whole brain and of brain regions of interest, based on volumetric data obtained from 3-D reconstructions to study the growth of the whole brain and the relative growth of brain regions, from late larvae to adulthood. In the smallest studied larvae some components of the electrosensory pathway appeared to be already organized and functional, as evidenced by tract-tracing and in vivo field potential recordings of electrosensory-evoked activity. From late larval to adult stages, rombencephalic brain regions (cerebellum and electrosensory lateral line lobe) showed a positive allometric growth, mesencephalic brain regions showed a negative allometric growth, and the telencephalon showed an isometric growth. In a first step towards elucidating the role of cell proliferation in the relative growth of the analyzed brain regions, we also studied the spatial distribution of proliferation zones by means of pulse type BrdU labeling revealed by immunohistochemistry. The brain of G. omarorum late larvae showed a widespread distribution of proliferating zones, most of which were located at the ventricular-cisternal lining. Interestingly, we also found extra ventricular-cisternal proliferation zones at in the rombencephalic cerebellum and electrosensory lateral line

  10. Phylogeny of nucleus medianus of the posterior tubercle in rayfinned fishes.

    PubMed

    Northcutt, R Glenn

    2009-03-01

    The brains of ray-finned fishes form a morphocline of increasing complexity, from cladistians through teleosts. This is particularly apparent in the posterior tubercle of the diencephalon. In cladistians, the posterior tubercle consists of a periventricular nucleus and a migrated nucleus medianus that is fused across the midline. In more advanced ray-finned fishes, such as gars and bowfins, the posterior tubercle comprises numerous additional migrated nuclei, termed the preglomerular complex, in addition to a more well developed nucleus medianus. In teleosts, the most derived ray-finned fishes, there is an even more elaborate preglomerular complex, but there is no recognizable nucleus medianus. In an attempt to explain the variation in the posterior tubercle of the diencephalon in ray-finned fishes, the immunohistochemistry and connections of nucleus medianus were examined in cladistians, gars and bowfins. In each of these taxa, nucleus medianus exhibits large numbers of calretinin-positive neurons and has ascending projections that terminate in several divisions of the pallium. Although teleosts, such as goldfish, also exhibit numerous cell groups in the posterior tubercle that are rich in calretinin, none of these cell groups has connections that are comparable to those of nucleus medianus in non-teleost ray-finned fishes. It is possible, therefore, that nucleus medianus was lost with the origin of teleosts.

  11. Effects unrelated to anti-inflammation of lipid emulsions containing fish oil in parenteral nutrition for adult patients.

    PubMed

    Mateu de Antonio, Javier; Florit-Sureda, Marta

    2017-02-01

    Several reviews and meta-analyses on modulated inflammatory and immunologic responses after the administration of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in different diseases and conditions have been published. However, omega-3 PUFAs exert several other actions which are not directly related to immunologic or inflammatory responses. The aim of this paper was to review the effects which are not directly related to immunologic and inflammatory responses of intravenous lipid emulsions (IVLEs) containing fish oil (FO) in parenteral nutrition (PN) for adult patients. IVLEs containing FO could have a role in the prevention of alterations in liver enzyme tests (LETs) or PN-associated liver disease (PNALD). Studies using FO doses of ≥ 0.150 mg/kg/day or IVLEs with high FO concentration reported more positive results than those with lower doses. Once PNALD was developed, the use of IVLEs exclusively composed of FO at doses of 0.25-1 g of FO/kg/day for several weeks could attenuate or even eradicate cholestasis and liver alteration. IVLEs containing FO seemed to have faster blood clearance, and this could be beneficial for some patients. Some studies also suggested a possible improvement of respiratory function by the administration of these IVLEs. In general, IVLEs containing FO were safe. Their use did not increase oxidative stress but, in contrast, increased plasma tocopherol content. They did not alter insulin sensitivity or glycemic control, and studies have found no relevant clinical effect on platelet aggregation or hemostasis. In conclusion, the use of IVLEs containing FO in PN may be beneficial with regard to older IVLEs, in addition to the modulation of systemic inflammation response.

  12. Differences in nutrient composition and choice of side dishes between red meat and fish dinners in Norwegian adults

    PubMed Central

    Myhre, Jannicke Borch; Løken, Elin Bjørge; Wandel, Margareta; Andersen, Lene Frost

    2016-01-01

    Background Food-based dietary guidelines often recommend increased consumption of fish and reduced intake of red and processed meat. However, little is known about how changing the main protein source from red meat to fish may influence the choice of side dishes. Objective To investigate whether side dish choices differed between red meat and fish dinners. Moreover, to compare intakes of macronutrients and selected micronutrients in red meat and fish dinners and to see whether whole-day intakes of these nutrients differed between days with red meat dinners and days with fish dinners. Design Data were collected in a cross-sectional nationwide Norwegian dietary survey using two non-consecutive telephone-administered 24-h recalls. The recalls were conducted approximately 4 weeks apart. In total, 2,277 dinners from 1,517 participants aged 18–70 were included in the analyses. Results Fish dinners were more likely to include potatoes and carrots than red meat dinners, whereas red meat dinners more often contained bread, tomato sauce, and cheese. Red meat dinners contained more energy and iron; had higher percentages of energy (E%) from fat, saturated fat, and monounsaturated fat; and a lower E% from protein and polyunsaturated fat than fish dinners. Fish dinners contained more vitamin D, β-carotene, and folate than red meat dinners. Similar differences were found when comparing whole-day intakes of the same nutrients on days with red meat versus fish dinners. Conclusion Fish dinners were accompanied by different side dishes than red meat dinners. With regard to nutrient content, fish dinners generally had a healthier profile than red meat dinners. However, iron intake was higher for red meat dinners. Information about associated foods will be useful both for developing public health guidelines and when studying associations between dietary factors and health outcomes. PMID:26781818

  13. Ontogenetic improvement of visual function in the medaka Oryzias latipes based on an optomotor testing system for larval and adult fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carvalho, Paulo S. M.; Noltie, Douglas B.; Tillitt, D.E.

    2002-01-01

    We developed a system for evaluation of visual function in larval and adult fish. Both optomotor (swimming) and optokinetic (eye movement) responses were monitored and recorded using a system of rotating stripes. The system allowed manipulation of factors such as width of the stripes used, rotation speed of the striped drum, and light illuminance levels within both the scotopic and photopic ranges. Precise control of these factors allowed quantitative measurements of visual acuity and motion detection. Using this apparatus, we tested the hypothesis that significant posthatch ontogenetic improvements in visual function occur in the medaka Oryzias latipes, and also that this species shows significant in ovo neuronal development. Significant improvements in the acuity angle alpha (ability to discriminate detail) were observed from approximately 5 degrees at hatch to 1 degree in the oldest adult stages. In addition, we measured a significant improvement in flicker fusion thresholds (motion detection skills) between larval and adult life stages within both the scotopic and photopic ranges of light illuminance. Ranges of flicker fusion thresholds (X?? ?? SD) at log I=1.96 (photopic) varied from 37.2 ?? 1.6 cycles/s in young adults to 18.6 ?? 1.6 cycles/s in young larvae 10 days posthatch. At log I= - 2.54 (scotopic), flicker fusion thresholds varied from 5.8 ?? 0.7 cycles/s in young adults to 1.7 ?? 0.4 cycles/s in young larvae 10 days posthatch. Light sensitivity increased approximately 2.9 log units from early hatched larval stages to adults. The demonstrated ontogenetic improvements in visual function probably enable the fish to explore new resources, thereby enlarging their fundamental niche. ?? 2002 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Transducin Duplicates in the Zebrafish Retina and Pineal Complex: Differential Specialisation after the Teleost Tetraploidisation

    PubMed Central

    Lagman, David; Callado-Pérez, Amalia; Franzén, Ilkin E.

    2015-01-01

    Gene duplications provide raw materials that can be selected for functional adaptations by evolutionary mechanisms. We describe here the results of 350 million years of evolution of three functionally related gene families: the alpha, beta and gamma subunits of transducins, the G protein involved in vision. Early vertebrate tetraploidisations resulted in separate transducin heterotrimers: gnat1/gnb1/gngt1 for rods, and gnat2/gnb3/gngt2 for cones. The teleost-specific tetraploidisation generated additional duplicates for gnb1, gnb3 and gngt2. We report here that the duplicates have undergone several types of subfunctionalisation or neofunctionalisation in the zebrafish. We have found that gnb1a and gnb1b are co-expressed at different levels in rods; gnb3a and gnb3b have undergone compartmentalisation restricting gnb3b to the dorsal and medial retina, however, gnb3a expression was detected only at very low levels in both larvae and adult retina; gngt2b expression is restricted to the dorsal and medial retina, whereas gngt2a is expressed ventrally. This dorsoventral distinction could be an adaptation to protect the lower part of the retina from intense light damage. The ontogenetic analysis shows earlier onset of expression in the pineal complex than in the retina, in accordance with its earlier maturation. Additionally, gnb1a but not gnb1b is expressed in the pineal complex, and gnb3b and gngt2b are transiently expressed in the pineal during ontogeny, thus showing partial temporal subfunctionalisation. These retina-pineal distinctions presumably reflect their distinct functional roles in vision and circadian rhythmicity. In summary, this study describes several functional differences between transducin gene duplicates resulting from the teleost-specific tetraploidisation. PMID:25806532

  15. Transducin duplicates in the zebrafish retina and pineal complex: differential specialisation after the teleost tetraploidisation.

    PubMed

    Lagman, David; Callado-Pérez, Amalia; Franzén, Ilkin E; Larhammar, Dan; Abalo, Xesús M

    2015-01-01

    Gene duplications provide raw materials that can be selected for functional adaptations by evolutionary mechanisms. We describe here the results of 350 million years of evolution of three functionally related gene families: the alpha, beta and gamma subunits of transducins, the G protein involved in vision. Early vertebrate tetraploidisations resulted in separate transducin heterotrimers: gnat1/gnb1/gngt1 for rods, and gnat2/gnb3/gngt2 for cones. The teleost-specific tetraploidisation generated additional duplicates for gnb1, gnb3 and gngt2. We report here that the duplicates have undergone several types of subfunctionalisation or neofunctionalisation in the zebrafish. We have found that gnb1a and gnb1b are co-expressed at different levels in rods; gnb3a and gnb3b have undergone compartmentalisation restricting gnb3b to the dorsal and medial retina, however, gnb3a expression was detected only at very low levels in both larvae and adult retina; gngt2b expression is restricted to the dorsal and medial retina, whereas gngt2a is expressed ventrally. This dorsoventral distinction could be an adaptation to protect the lower part of the retina from intense light damage. The ontogenetic analysis shows earlier onset of expression in the pineal complex than in the retina, in accordance with its earlier maturation. Additionally, gnb1a but not gnb1b is expressed in the pineal complex, and gnb3b and gngt2b are transiently expressed in the pineal during ontogeny, thus showing partial temporal subfunctionalisation. These retina-pineal distinctions presumably reflect their distinct functional roles in vision and circadian rhythmicity. In summary, this study describes several functional differences between transducin gene duplicates resulting from the teleost-specific tetraploidisation.

  16. Olfactory toxicity in fishes.

    PubMed

    Tierney, Keith B; Baldwin, David H; Hara, Toshiaki J; Ross, Peter S; Scholz, Nathaniel L; Kennedy, Christopher J

    2010-01-21

    Olfaction conveys critical environmental information to fishes, enabling activities such as mating, locating food, discriminating kin, avoiding predators and homing. All of these behaviors can be impaired or lost as a result of exposure to toxic contaminants in surface waters. Historically, teleost olfaction studies have focused on behavioral responses to anthropogenic contaminants (e.g., avoidance). More recently, there has been a shift towards understanding the underlying mechanisms and functional significance of contaminant-mediated changes in fish olfaction. This includes a consideration of how contaminants affect the olfactory nervous system and, by extension, the downstream physiological and behavioral processes that together comprise a normal response to naturally occurring stimuli (e.g., reproductive priming or releasing pheromones). Numerous studies spanning several species have shown that ecologically relevant exposures to common pollutants such as metals and pesticides can interfere with fish olfaction and disrupt life history processes that determine individual survival and reproductive success. This represents one of the pathways by which toxic chemicals in aquatic habitats may increasingly contribute to the decline and at-risk status of many commercially and ecologically important fish stocks. Despite our emerging understanding of the threats that pollution poses for chemical communication in aquatic communities, many research challenges remain. These include: (1) the determination of specific mechanisms of toxicity in the fish olfactory sensory epithelium; (2) an understanding of the impacts of complex chemical mixtures; (3) the capacity to assess olfactory toxicity in fish in situ; (4) the impacts of toxins on olfactory-mediated behaviors that are still poorly understood for many fish species; and (5) the connections between sublethal effects on individual fish and the long-term viability of wild populations. This review summarizes and integrates

  17. Does Fish Oil Have an Anti-Obesity Effect in Overweight/Obese Adults? A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Du, Shichun; Jin, Jie; Fang, Wenjun; Su, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Context Accumulating evidence has suggested favorable effects of fish oil on weight loss in animal experiments; however, findings remain inconsistent in humans. Objects The meta-analysis was performed to investigate the influence of fish oil on some parameters of body composition in overweight/obese adults. Design Human randomized, placebo-controlled trials were identified by a systematic search of Embase, PubMed, the Cochrane Library, web of science and reference lists of related reviews and articles. The random-effects model was used to estimate the calculated results. Results In total, 21 studies with 30 study arms were included in this analysis. Calculated results of the meta-analysis demonstrated that fish oil had no effect on reducing body weight (overall SMD = -0.07, 95% CI -0.21 to 0.07, P = 0.31) and BMI (overall SMD = -0.09, 95% CI -0.22 to 0.03, P = 0.14) whether alone or combined with life modification intervention in overweight/obese subjects. However, waist circumference was significantly reduced (SMD = -0.23, 95% CI -0.40 to -0.06, P = 0.008) in those with fish oil supplementation combined with life modification intervention. Waist hip ratio (WHR) was significantly reduced (overall SMD = -0.52 95% CI -0.76 to -0.27, P < 0.0005) in fish oil supplemented individuals with or without combination life modification intervention. Conclusion Current evidence cannot support an exact anti-obesity role of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in overweight/obese subjects. However, these subjects may benefit from reducing abdominal fat with fish oil supplementation especially when combined with life modification intervention. Further large-scale and long-term clinical trials are needed to gain definite conclusions. PMID:26571503

  18. Validation of a refined short-term adult fish reproductive test with improved power for mummichog (Fundulus heteroclitus) to test complex effluents.

    PubMed

    Bosker, Thijs; Hewitt, L Mark; Munkittrick, Kelly R; MacLatchy, Deborah L

    2010-10-01

    Short-term adult fish reproductive tests are widely used to assess the toxicity of chemicals and waste streams. However, these tests often have low power to detect differences in egg production among treatments, due to high variance and small sample sizes, limiting their effectiveness for informing regulatory decisions. A protocol for a fish reproductive test using mummichog (Fundulus heteroclitus) was refined to increase statistical power. Three studies using the original protocol were compared with three studies using the refined protocol. Tank pre-selection and sample size increased the a priori power from 11.2% to 85.7%. After exposure, average power levels were 62.0%, a more than five-fold increase compared to studies that used the original protocol (power of 15.0%). There was a high level of consistency compared to the original protocol; differences >33% in female and male gonad size and egg production could be detected among treatments. This study demonstrates that a refinement process can address shortcomings in short-term adult fish reproductive protocols, creating a solid foundation for further standardization and possible regulatory use.

  19. Fish T cells: recent advances through genomics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laing, Kerry J.; Hansen, John D.

    2011-01-01

    This brief review is intended to provide a concise overview of the current literature concerning T cells, advances in identifying distinct T cell functional subsets, and in distinguishing effector cells from memory cells. We compare and contrast a wealth of recent progress made in T cell immunology of teleost, elasmobranch, and agnathan fish, to knowledge derived from mammalian T cell studies. From genome studies, fish clearly have most components associated with T cell function and we can speculate on the presence of putative T cell subsets, and the ability to detect their differentiation to form memory cells. Some recombinant proteins for T cell associated cytokines and antibodies for T cell surface receptors have been generated that will facilitate studying the functional roles of teleost T cells during immune responses. Although there is still a long way to go, major advances have occurred in recent years for investigating T cell responses, thus phenotypic and functional characterization is on the near horizon.

  20. Evolution of pigment synthesis pathways by gene and genome duplication in fish

    PubMed Central

    Braasch, Ingo; Schartl, Manfred; Volff, Jean-Nicolas

    2007-01-01

    Background Coloration and color patterning belong to the most diverse phenotypic traits in animals. Particularly, teleost fishes possess more pigment cell types than any other group of vertebrates. As the result of an ancient fish-specific genome duplication (FSGD), teleost genomes might contain more copies of genes involved in pigment cell development than tetrapods. No systematic genomic inventory allowing to test this hypothesis has been drawn up so far for pigmentation genes in fish, and almost nothing is known about the evolution of these genes in different fish lineages. Results Using a comparative genomic approach including phylogenetic reconstructions and synteny analyses, we have studied two major pigment synthesis pathways in teleost fish, the melanin and the pteridine pathways, with respect to different types of gene duplication. Genes encoding three of the four enzymes involved in the synthesis of melanin from tyrosine have been retained as duplicates after the FSGD. In the pteridine pathway, two cases of duplicated genes originating from the FSGD as well as several lineage-specific gene duplications were observed. In both pathways, genes encoding the rate-limiting enzymes, tyrosinase and GTP-cyclohydrolase I (GchI), have additional paralogs in teleosts compared to tetrapods, which have been generated by different modes of duplication. We have also observed a previously unrecognized diversity of gchI genes in vertebrates. In addition, we have found evidence for divergent resolution of duplicated pigmentation genes, i.e., differential gene loss in divergent teleost lineages, particularly in the tyrosinase gene family. Conclusion Mainly due to the FSGD, teleost fishes apparently have a greater repertoire of pigment synthesis genes than any other vertebrate group. Our results support an important role of the FSGD and other types of duplication in the evolution of pigmentation in fish. PMID:17498288

  1. Characterization of two paralogous StAR genes in a teleost, Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiangguo; Wu, Limin; Xie, Lang; Yang, Shijie; Charkraborty, Tapas; Shi, Hongjuan; Wang, Deshou; Zhou, Linyan

    2014-07-05

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) transports cholesterol, the substrate for steroid synthesis, to the inner membranes of mitochondria. It is well known that estrogen is essential for female sex determination/differentiation in fish. However, no reports showed that the conventional StAR, which was supposed to be essential for estrogen production, was expressed in female gonads during the critical timing of sex determination/differentiation. In this study, two different StAR isoforms, named as StAR1 and StAR2, were characterized from the gonads of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). Phylogenetic and synteny analysis revealed that two StAR genes existed in teleosts, Xenopus and chicken indicating that the duplication event occurred before the divergence of teleosts and tetrapods. Real-time PCR revealed that StAR1 was dominantly expressed in the testis, head kidney and kidney; while StAR2 was expressed exclusively in the gonads. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry demonstrated that StAR1 was expressed in the interrenal cells of the head kidney and Leydig cells of the testis; while StAR2 was expressed in the Leydig cells of the testis and the interstitial cells of the ovary. Ontogenic analysis demonstrated that StAR2 was expressed abundantly from 5 days after hatching (dah) in the somatic cells in XX gonads, whereas in XY gonads, both StARs could be detected from 30 dah until adulthood. Intraperitoneal injection of human chorionic gonadotropin experiments showed that expression of StAR1 and 2 was significantly elevated at 8h and persisted until 24h after injection in the testis. Taken together, our data suggested that StAR1 is likely to be required for cortisol production in the head kidney, and StAR2 is probably involved in estrogen production during early sex differentiation in XX gonads. In contrast, both StARs might be required for androgen production in testes. For the first time, our data demonstrated that two fish StARs might be involved

  2. Immunity to fish rhabdoviruses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Laing, Kerry J.; Winton, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Members of the family Rhabdoviridae are single-stranded RNA viruses and globally important pathogens of wild and cultured fish and thus relatively well studied in their respective hosts or other model systems. Here, we review the protective immune mechanisms that fish mount in response to rhabdovirus infections. Teleost fish possess the principal components of innate and adaptive immunity found in other vertebrates. Neutralizing antibodies are critical for long-term protection from fish rhabdoviruses, but several studies also indicate a role for cell-mediated immunity. Survival of acute rhabdoviral infection is also dependent on innate immunity, particularly the interferon (IFN) system that is rapidly induced in response to infection. Paradoxically, rhabdoviruses are sensitive to the effects of IFN but virulent rhabdoviruses can continue to replicate owing to the abilities of the matrix (M) protein to mediate host-cell shutoff and the non-virion (NV) protein to subvert programmed cell death and suppress functional IFN. While many basic features of the fish immune response to rhabdovirus infections are becoming better understood, much less is known about how factors in the environment affect the ecology of rhabdovirus infections in natural populations of aquatic animals.

  3. The influence of dietary fish oil vs. sunflower oil on the fatty acid composition of plasma cholesteryl-esters in healthy, adult cats.

    PubMed

    Plantinga, E A; Beynen, A C

    2003-12-01

    The question addressed was whether the fatty acid composition of plasma cholesteryl esters (CEs) in cats reflects the intake of fatty acids. Diets containing either fish oil or sunflower oil were fed to six healthy, adult cats in a cross-over trial. The dry cat foods contained approximately 18.5% crude fat, of which two-third was in the form of the variable oil. Blood samples were collected at the end of each 4-week feeding period, and the fatty acid composition of plasma CEs and plasma concentrations of lipoproteins were determined. Consumption of the diet with fish oil was associated with significantly greater proportions of eicosapentaenoic acid, arachidonic acid, alpha-linolenic acid, oleic acid, palmitic acid and myristic acid in plasma CEs. The intake of fish oil instead of sunflower oil reduced the percentage of linoleic acid in CEs. The plasma concentrations of total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, phospholipids and triglycerides were not affected by fish oil vs. sunflower oil feeding.

  4. Sensory Cells of the Fish Ear: A Hairy Enigma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popper, A. N.; Saidel, W. M.

    1995-01-01

    Analysis of the structure of the ears in teleost fishes has led to the tentative suggestion that otolithic endorgans may function differently, in different species. Recently, evidence has demonstrated different 'types' of sensory hair cells can be found in the ears of teleost fishes, and individual hair cell types are found in discrete regions of individual sensory, epithelia. The presence of multiple hair cell types in fishes provides strong support to the hypothesis of regional differences in the responses of individual otolithic sensory epithelia. The finding of hair cell types in fishes that closely resemble those found in amniote vestibular endorgans also suggests that hair cell heterogeneity arose earlier in the evolution of the vertebrate ear than previously thought.

  5. Novel method for the nuclear transfer of adult somatic cells in medaka fish (Oryzias latipes): use of diploidized eggs as recipients.

    PubMed

    Wakamatsu, Yuko

    2008-08-01

    Until recently, the nuclear transfer of adult somatic cell nuclei in fish has been unsuccessful. This is primarily because of chromosomal aberrations in nuclear transplants, which are thought to arise due to asynchrony between the cell cycles of the recipient egg and donor nucleus. We recently succeeded in circumventing this difficulty by using a new nuclear transfer method in medaka fish (Oryzias latipes). Instead of enucleated eggs, the method uses non-enucleated and diploidized eggs, obtained by retention of the second polar body release, as recipients in the nuclear transfer of primary culture cells from the caudal fin of an adult green fluorescent protein gene (GFP)-transgenic strain. We found that 2.7% of the reconstructed embryos grew into diploid and fertile adults exhibiting donor expression characteristics and transmission of the GFP marker gene to progeny. The mechanism underlying the generation of nuclear transplants using this method is unknown at present; however, analyses of donor and recipient nuclei behavior and the cytoskeletal mechanisms involved in the early developmental stages, as well as the special ability of diploidized eggs to facilitate reprogramming of the donor nuclei will result in elucidation of the mechanism.

  6. Effects of supplemental fish oil on resting metabolic rate, body composition, and salivary cortisol in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To determine the effects of supplemental fish oil (FO) on resting metabolic rate (RMR), body composition, and cortisol production in healthy adults. Methods A total of 44 men and women (34 ± 13y, mean+SD) participated in the study. All testing was performed first thing in the morning following an overnight fast. Baseline measurements of RMR were measured using indirect calorimetry using a facemask, and body composition was measured using air displacement plethysmography. Saliva was collected via passive drool and analyzed for cortisol concentration using ELISA. Following baseline testing, subjects were randomly assigned in a double blind manner to one of two groups: 4 g/d of Safflower Oil (SO); or 4 g/d of FO supplying 1,600 mg/d eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and 800 mg/d docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). All tests were repeated following 6 wk of treatment. Pre to post differences were analyzed using a treatment X time repeated measures ANOVA, and correlations were analyzed using Pearson's r. Results Compared to the SO group, there was a significant increase in fat free mass following treatment with FO (FO = +0.5 ± 0.5 kg, SO = -0.1 ± 1.2 kg, p = 0.03), a significant reduction in fat mass (FO = -0.5 ± 1.3 kg, SO = +0.2 ± 1.2 kg, p = 0.04), and a tendency for a decrease in body fat percentage (FO = -0.4 ± 1.3% body fat, SO = +0. 3 ± 1.5% body fat, p = 0.08). No significant differences were observed for body mass (FO = 0.0 ± 0.9 kg, SO = +0.2 ± 0.8 kg), RMR (FO = +17 ± 260 kcal, SO = -62 ± 184 kcal) or respiratory exchange ratio (FO = -0.02 ± 0.09, SO = +0.02 ± 0.05). There was a tendency for salivary cortisol to decrease in the FO group (FO = -0.064 ± 0.142 μg/dL, SO = +0.016 ± 0.272 μg/dL, p = 0.11). There was a significant correlation in the FO group between change in cortisol and change in fat free mass (r = -0.504, p = 0.02) and fat mass (r = 0.661, p = 0.001). Conclusion 6 wk of supplementation with FO significantly increased lean mass and

  7. Fish out of water: terrestrial jumping by fully aquatic fishes.

    PubMed

    Gibb, Alice C; Ashley-Ross, Miriam A; Pace, Cinnamon M; Long, John H

    2011-12-01

    Many teleosts that live at the water's edge will voluntarily strand themselves to evade predators or escape poor conditions-this behavior has been repeatedly observed in the field for killifishes (Cyprinodontiformes). Although most killifishes are considered fully aquatic and possess no obvious morphological specializations to facilitate terrestrial locomotion, individuals from several different species have been observed moving across land via a "tail flip" behavior that generates a terrestrial jump. Like aquatic fast starts, terrestrial jumps are produced by high-curvature lateral flexion of the body (stage one), followed by contralateral flexion of the posterior body (stage two). Here, terrestrial jumps and aquatic fast starts are quantified for two littoral teleosts: Gambusia affinis (a killifish, Cyprinodontiformes) and Danio rerio (a small carp, Cypriniformes) to determine if the tail flip is produced by other (non-killifish) teleosts and to test the null hypothesis that the tail flip is a fast start behavior, performed on land. Both Danio and Gambusia produce tail flip-driven terrestrial jumps, which are kinematically distinct from aquatic escapes and characterized by (1) a prolonged stage one, during which the fish bends, lifting and rolling the center of mass over the caudal peduncle, and (2) a relatively brief stage two, wherein the caudal peduncle pushes against the substrate to launch the fish into the aerial phase. The ability of these fully aquatic fishes to employ the same structure to produce distinct kinematic patterns in disparate environments suggests that a new behavior has evolved to facilitate movement on land and that anatomical novelty is not a prerequisite for effective terrestrial locomotion.

  8. Biology of Bony Fish Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Hodgkinson, Jordan W.; Grayfer, Leon; Belosevic, Miodrag

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are found across all vertebrate species, reside in virtually all animal tissues, and play critical roles in host protection and homeostasis. Various mechanisms determine and regulate the highly plastic functional phenotypes of macrophages, including antimicrobial host defenses (pro-inflammatory, M1-type), and resolution and repair functions (anti-inflammatory/regulatory, M2-type). The study of inflammatory macrophages in immune defense of teleosts has garnered much attention, and antimicrobial mechanisms of these cells have been extensively studied in various fish models. Intriguingly, both similarities and differences have been documented for the regulation of lower vertebrate macrophage antimicrobial defenses, as compared to what has been described in mammals. Advances in our understanding of the teleost macrophage M2 phenotypes likewise suggest functional conservation through similar and distinct regulatory strategies, compared to their mammalian counterparts. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms governing teleost macrophage functional heterogeneity, including monopoetic development, classical macrophage inflammatory and antimicrobial responses as well as alternative macrophage polarization towards tissues repair and resolution of inflammation. PMID:26633534

  9. Conserved and variant molecular and functional features of multiple egg yolk precursor proteins (vitellogenins) in white perch (Morone americana) and other teleosts.

    PubMed

    Reading, Benjamin J; Hiramatsu, Naoshi; Sawaguchi, Sayumi; Matsubara, Takahiro; Hara, Akihiko; Lively, Mark O; Sullivan, Craig V

    2009-01-01

    Three complete cDNAs encoding different forms of vitellogenin (Vtg) were isolated from a white perch (Morone americana) liver cDNA library and characterized with respect to immunobiochemical and functional features of the three Vtgs and their product yolk proteins (YPs) in this species and in the congeneric striped bass (Morone saxatilis). The two longest cDNAs encoded Vtgs with a complete suite of yolk protein domains that, based on comparisons with vtg sequences from other species, were categorized as VtgAa and VtgAb using the current nomenclature for multiple teleost Vtgs. The shorter cDNA encoded a Vtg that lacked a phosvitin domain, had a shortened C-terminus, and was categorized as VtgC. Mapping of peptide sequences from the purified Vtgs and their derived YPs to Vtg sequences deduced from the cDNAs definitively identified the white perch VtgAa, VtgAb, and VtgC proteins. Detailed comparisons of the primary structures of each Vtg with partial or complete sequences of Morone yolk proteins or of Vtgs from other fishes revealed conserved and variant structural elements of teleost Vtgs with functional significance, including, as examples, signal peptide cleavage sites, dimerization sites, cathepsin D protease recognition sites, and receptor-binding domains. These comparisons also yielded an interim revision of the classification scheme for multiple teleost Vtgs.

  10. Diversification of the expanded teleost-specific toll-like receptor family in Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Toll-like receptors (Tlrs) are major molecular pattern recognition receptors of the innate immune system. Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) is the first vertebrate known to have lost most of the mammalian Tlr orthologues, particularly all bacterial recognising and other cell surface Tlrs. On the other hand, its genome encodes a unique repertoire of teleost-specific Tlrs. The aim of this study was to investigate if these duplicate Tlrs have been retained through adaptive evolution to compensate for the lack of other cell surface Tlrs in the cod genome. Results In this study, one tlr21, 12 tlr22 and two tlr23 genes representing the teleost-specific Tlr family have been cloned and characterised in cod. Phylogenetic analysis grouped all tlr22 genes under a single clade, indicating that the multiple cod paralogues have arisen through lineage-specific duplications. All tlrs examined were transcribed in immune-related tissues as well as in stomach, gut and gonads of adult cod and were differentially expressed during early development. These tlrs were also differentially regulated following immune challenge by immersion with Vibrio anguillarum, indicating their role in the immune response. An increase in water temperature from 4 to 12°C was associated with a 5.5-fold down-regulation of tlr22d transcript levels in spleen. Maximum likelihood analysis with different evolution models revealed that tlr22 genes are under positive selection. A total of 24 codons were found to be positively selected, of which 19 are in the ligand binding region of ectodomain. Conclusion Positive selection pressure coupled with experimental evidence of differential expression strongly support the hypothesis that teleost-specific tlr paralogues in cod are undergoing neofunctionalisation and can recognise bacterial pathogen-associated molecular patterns to compensate for the lack of other cell surface Tlrs. PMID:23273344

  11. The influence of density on adults and juveniles of the estuarine fish, the sheepshead minnow (cyprinodon variegatus)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The relationship between population density and demographic rates (e.g. survival, reproduction, growth) is critical to understand population dynamics and has been widely studied in fishes. Estuarine species are regularly exposed to dramatic changes in density with daily, monthly,...

  12. Investigation of Head Burns in Adult Salmonids : Phase 1 : Examination of Fish at Lower Granite Dam, July 2, 1996. Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Elston, Ralph

    1996-08-01

    Head burn is a descriptive clinical term used by fishery biologists to describe exfoliation of skin and underlying connective tissue of the jaw and cranial region of salmonids, observed at fish passage facilities on the Columbia and Snake Rivers. The observations are usually made on upstream migrant adult salmon or steelhead. An expert panel, convened in 1996, to evaluate the risk and severity of gas bubble disease (GBD) in the Snake and Columbia River system believed that, while head burns appeared to be distinct from GBD, the relationship between dissolved gas saturation in the rivers and head burns was uncertain.

  13. Molecular cloning, sequencing and tissue expression of vasotocin and isotocin precursor genes from Ostariophysian catfishes: phylogeny and evolutionary considerations in teleosts

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Putul; Chaube, Radha; Joy, Keerikkattil P.

    2015-01-01

    Basic and neutral neurohypophyseal (NH) nonapeptides have evolved from vasotocin (VT) by a gene duplication at the base of the gnathostome lineage. In teleosts, VT and IT are the basic and neutral peptides, respectively. In the present study, VT and IT precursor genes of Heteropneustes fossilis and Clarias batrachus (Siluriformes, Ostariophysi) were cloned and sequenced. The channel catfish Icatalurus punctatus NH precursor sequences were obtained from EST database. The catfish NH sequences were used along with the available Acanthopterygii and other vertebrate NH precursor sequences to draw phylogenetic inference on the evolutionary history of the teleost NH peptides. Synteny analysis of the NH gene loci in various teleost species was done to complement the phylogenetic analysis. In H. fossilis, the NH transcripts were also sequenced from the ovary. The cloned genes and the deduced precursor proteins showed conserved characteristics of the NH nonapeptide precursors. The genes are expressed in brain and ovary (follicular envelope) of H. fossilis with higher transcript abundance in the brain. The addition of the catfish sequences in the phylogenetic analysis revealed that the VT and IT precursors of the species-rich superorders of teleosts have a distinct phylogenetic history with the Acanthopterygii VT and IT precursors sharing a less evolutionary distance and the Ostariophysi VT and IT having a greater evolutionary distance. The genomic location of VT and IT precursors, and synteny analysis of the NH loci lend support to the phylogenetic inference and suggest a footprint of fish- specific whole genome duplication (3R) and subsequent diploidization in the NH loci. The VT and IT precursor genes are most likely lineage-specific paralogs resulting from differential losses of the 3R NH paralogs in the two superorders. The independent yet consistent retention of VT and IT in the two superorders might be directed by a stringent ligand-receptor selectivity. PMID:26029040

  14. Binding kinetics and sequencing of hepatic alpha1-adrenergic receptors in two marine teleosts, mackerel (Scomber scombrus) and anchovy (Engraulis encrasicolus).

    PubMed

    Fabbri, Elena; Chen, Xi; Capuzzo, Antonio; Moon, Thomas W

    2008-03-01

    Liver alpha(1)-adrenoceptors (ARs) are demonstrated, or at least hypothesized, in freshwater and brackish-water teleosts, whereas no data are available for marine teleosts. This study evaluates the presence of alpha(1)-ARs in the liver of two marine teleosts, the anchovy Engraulis encrasicolus and the mackerel Scomber scombrus, and examines on a broad scale the possibility that habitats posing different challenges also influence phenotypic trait selection. Binding assays were performed also on liver membranes from the carp Cyprinus carpio as a direct comparison with a freshwater species. Scatchard analysis of [(3)H]prazosin binding to purified liver membranes from anchovy, mackerel and carp resulted in K(d) values of 1.51+/-0.085, 1.26+/-0.098, and 2.61+/-0.22 nM, and B(max) values of 87.4+/-9.12, 77+/-8.29, and 115.22+/-3.31 fmol/mg protein, respectively. Thus, alpha(1)-ARs of the two marine teleosts showed higher [(3)H]prazosin affinity compared with those of the freshwater/brackish-water fish studied thus far, whereas the number of liver binding sites did not differ significantly from that of carp, eel or trout. A preliminary phylogeny based on amino acid sequence analysis indicated the presence of at least an alpha(1A)-AR in mackerel and an alpha(1D)-AR in both anchovy and mackerel. This is the first indication of alpha(1)-AR subtypes in any marine species, but further studies are needed to ascertain the physiological role of these alpha(1)-ARs in these two marine species.

  15. Nocturnality constrains morphological and functional diversity in the eyes of reef fishes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Ambient light levels are often considered to drive the evolution of eye form and function. Diel activity pattern is the main mechanism controlling the visual environment of teleost reef fish, with day-active (diurnal) fish active in well-illuminated conditions, whereas night-active (nocturnal) fish cope with dim light. Physiological optics predicts several specific evolutionary responses to dim-light vision that should be reflected in visual performance features of the eye. Results We analyzed a large comparative dataset on morphological traits of the eyes in 265 species of teleost reef fish in 43 different families. The eye morphology of nocturnal reef teleosts is characterized by a syndrome that indicates better light sensitivity, including large relative eye size, high optical ratio and large, rounded pupils. Improved dim-light image formation comes at the cost of reduced depth of focus and reduction of potential accommodative lens movement. Diurnal teleost reef fish, released from the stringent functional requirements of dim-light vision have much higher morphological and optical diversity than nocturnal species, with large ranges of optical ratio, depth of focus, and lens accommodation. Conclusions Physical characteristics of the environment are an important factor in the evolution and diversification of the vertebrate eye. Both teleost reef fish and terrestrial amniotes meet the functional requirements of dim-light vision with a similar evolutionary response of morphological and optical modifications. The trade-off between improved dim-light vision and reduced optical diversity may be a key factor in explaining the lower trophic diversity of nocturnal reef teleosts. PMID:22098687

  16. Effects of prolactin and growth hormone on strategies of hypoosmotic adaptation in a marine teleost, Sparus sarba.

    PubMed

    Kelly, S P; Chow, I N; Woo, N Y

    1999-01-01

    Silver seabream (Sparus sarba) held in seawater (33 per thousand) or acclimated to a hypoosmotic environment of 6 per thousand were given intraperitoneal injections of saline (0.8% NaCl), recombinant bream growth hormone (rbGH, 1 microg/g), or ovine prolactin (oPRL, 6microg/g) for 7 consecutive days. Serum Na+ levels were unaffected by hypoosmotic acclimation and rbGH and oPRL treatment. Treatment of seawater fish with oPRL resulted in hyperchloremia. In 6 per thousand, saline-treated fish exhibited elevated branchial chloride cell (CC) numbers and exposure indices, all of which were markedly reduced by oPRL. CC numbers and morphometrics were unaffected by oPRL in seawater fish. In contrast, rbGH treatment of seawater fish resulted in elevated CC numbers, apical area, and fractional area and, in 6 per thousand fish, elevated CC fractional area and exposure numbers. Branchial Na+-K+-ATPase activity reduced in saline-treated fish adapted to 6% but was unaffected by rbGH regardless of salinity. oPRL reduced activity in both seawater and 6 per thousand-adapted fish. Neither hypoosmotic adaptation nor oPRL had any effect on renal Na+-K+-ATPase activity whereas rbGH reduced activity in both 33 and 6 per thousand. Saline-treated fish adapted to 6 per thousand exhibited reduced Na+-K+-ATPase activity in most regions of the intestine. Treatment with rbGH did not change intestinal Na+-K+-ATPase activity of seawater fish but elevated activity in the anterior regions (esophagus and stomach) of 6 per thousand-adapted fish. Treatment with oPRL elevated Na+-K+-ATPase activity throughout the gastrointestinal tract of seawater fish and in the anterior reaches of 6 per thousand-adapted fish. The data indicated that the as yet uncharacterized osmoregulatory roles of PRL and GH in seabream may warrant further attention as the present study connoted differing responses to that of other teleosts studied.

  17. Establishment of a new teleost brain cell line (DLB-1) from the European sea bass and its use to study metal toxicology.

    PubMed

    Morcillo, Patricia; Chaves-Pozo, Elena; Meseguer, José; Esteban, M Ángeles; Cuesta, Alberto

    2017-02-01

    In teleost fish, there are no commercial cell lines for the European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax). Thus, we have established the sea bass brain (DLB-1) cell line, using a fish retrovirus for immortalization, which resemble epithelial cells and express glial cells markers. Exposure to metals [Cd, methylmercury (MeHg), Pb or As] produces cytotoxicity and induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Interestingly, cell cycle analysis of DLB-1 cells shows that exposure to metals alters it significantly. Moreover, all the metals induce apoptosis as indicated by sub-Go/G1 population and annexin V binding. Finally, exposure of DLB-1 cells to metals also produces significant alterations at gene expression level, which confirm the above functional results. This is the first study in which metal cytotoxicity has been evaluated in a fish brain cell line and results seem to support that DLB-1 cells are suitable for toxicological studies.

  18. Phagocytosis in Teleosts. Implications of the New Cells Involved

    PubMed Central

    Esteban, María Ángeles; Cuesta, Alberto; Chaves-Pozo, Elena; Meseguer, José

    2015-01-01

    Phagocytosis is the process by which cells engulf some solid particles to form internal vesicles known as phagosomes. Phagocytosis is in fact a specific form of endocytosis involving the vesicular interiorization of particles. Phagocytosis is essentially a defensive reaction against infection and invasion of the body by foreign substances and, in the immune system, phagocytosis is a major mechanism used to remove pathogens and/or cell debris. For these reasons, phagocytosis in vertebrates has been recognized as a critical component of the innate and adaptive immune responses to pathogens. Furthermore, more recent studies have revealed that phagocytosis is also crucial for tissue homeostasis and remodeling. Professional phagocytes in teleosts are monocyte/macrophages, granulocytes and dendritic cells. Nevertheless, in recent years phagocytic properties have also been attributed to teleost lymphocytes and thrombocytes. The possible implications of such cells on this important biological process, new factors affecting phagocytosis, evasion of phagocytosis or new forms of phagocytosis will be considered and discussed. PMID:26690236

  19. Development of mandibular, hyoid and hypobranchial muscles in the zebrafish: homologies and evolution of these muscles within bony fishes and tetrapods

    PubMed Central

    Diogo, Rui; Hinits, Yaniv; Hughes, Simon M

    2008-01-01

    Background During vertebrate head evolution, muscle changes accompanied radical modification of the skeleton. Recent studies have suggested that muscles and their innervation evolve less rapidly than cartilage. The freshwater teleostean zebrafish (Danio rerio) is the most studied actinopterygian model organism, and is sometimes taken to represent osteichthyans as a whole, which include bony fishes and tetrapods. Most work concerning zebrafish cranial muscles has focused on larval stages. We set out to describe the later development of zebrafish head muscles and compare muscle homologies across the Osteichthyes. Results We describe one new muscle and show that the number of mandibular, hyoid and hypobranchial muscles found in four day-old zebrafish larvae is similar to that found in the adult. However, the overall configuration and/or the number of divisions of these muscles change during development. For example, the undivided adductor mandibulae of early larvae gives rise to the adductor mandibulae sections A0, A1-OST, A2 and Aω, and the protractor hyoideus becomes divided into dorsal and ventral portions in adults. There is not always a correspondence between the ontogeny of these muscles in the zebrafish and their evolution within the Osteichthyes. All of the 13 mandibular, hyoid and hypobranchial muscles present in the adult zebrafish are found in at least some other living teleosts, and all except the protractor hyoideus are found in at least some extant non-teleost actinopterygians. Of these muscles, about a quarter (intermandibularis anterior, adductor mandibulae, sternohyoideus) are found in at least some living tetrapods, and a further quarter (levator arcus palatini, adductor arcus palatini, adductor operculi) in at least some extant sarcopterygian fish. Conclusion Although the zebrafish occupies a rather derived phylogenetic position within actinopterygians and even within teleosts, with respect to the mandibular, hyoid and hypobranchial muscles it

  20. The channel catfish genome sequence provides insights into the evolution of scale formation in teleosts

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhanjiang; Liu, Shikai; Yao, Jun; Bao, Lisui; Zhang, Jiaren; Li, Yun; Jiang, Chen; Sun, Luyang; Wang, Ruijia; Zhang, Yu; Zhou, Tao; Zeng, Qifan; Fu, Qiang; Gao, Sen; Li, Ning; Koren, Sergey; Jiang, Yanliang; Zimin, Aleksey; Xu, Peng; Phillippy, Adam M.; Geng, Xin; Song, Lin; Sun, Fanyue; Li, Chao; Wang, Xiaozhu; Chen, Ailu; Jin, Yulin; Yuan, Zihao; Yang, Yujia; Tan, Suxu; Peatman, Eric; Lu, Jianguo; Qin, Zhenkui; Dunham, Rex; Li, Zhaoxia; Sonstegard, Tad; Feng, Jianbin; Danzmann, Roy G.; Schroeder, Steven; Scheffler, Brian; Duke, Mary V.; Ballard, Linda; Kucuktas, Huseyin; Kaltenboeck, Ludmilla; Liu, Haixia; Armbruster, Jonathan; Xie, Yangjie; Kirby, Mona L.; Tian, Yi; Flanagan, Mary Elizabeth; Mu, Weijie; Waldbieser, Geoffrey C.

    2016-01-01

    Catfish represent 12% of teleost or 6.3% of all vertebrate species, and are of enormous economic value. Here we report a high-quality reference genome sequence of channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus), the major aquaculture species in the US. The reference genome sequence was validated by genetic mapping of 54,000 SNPs, and annotated with 26,661 predicted protein-coding genes. Through comparative analysis of genomes and transcriptomes of scaled and scaleless fish and scale regeneration experiments, we address the genomic basis for the most striking physical characteristic of catfish, the evolutionary loss of scales and provide evidence that lack of secretory calcium-binding phosphoproteins accounts for the evolutionary loss of scales in catfish. The channel catfish reference genome sequence, along with two additional genome sequences and transcriptomes of scaled catfishes, provide crucial resources for evolutionary and biological studies. This work also demonstrates the power of comparative subtraction of candidate genes for traits of structural significance. PMID:27249958

  1. Comparative analysis of a teleost skeleton transcriptome provides insight into its regulation.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Florbela A; Thorne, M A S; Stueber, K; Darias, M; Reinhardt, R; Clark, M S; Gisbert, E; Power, D M

    2013-09-15

    An articulated endoskeleton that is calcified is a unifying innovation of the vertebrates, however the molecular basis of the structural divergence between terrestrial and aquatic vertebrates, such as teleost fish, has not been determined. In the present study long-read next generation sequencing (NGS, Roche 454 platform) was used to characterize acellular perichondral bone (vertebrae) and chondroid bone (gill arch) in the gilthead sea bream (Sparus auratus). A total of 15.97 and 14.53Mb were produced, respectively from vertebrae and gill arch cDNA libraries and yielded 32,374 and 28,371 contigs (consensus sequences) respectively. 10,455 contigs from vertebrae and 10,625 contigs from gill arches were annotated with gene ontology terms. Comparative analysis of the global transcriptome revealed 4249 unique transcripts in vertebrae, 4201 unique transcripts in the gill arches and 3700 common transcripts. Several core gene networks were conserved between the gilthead sea bream and mammalian skeleton. Transcripts for putative endocrine factors were identified in acellular gilthead sea bream bone suggesting that in common with mammalian bone it can act as an endocrine tissue. The acellular bone of the vertebra, in contrast to current opinion based on histological analysis, was responsive to a short fast and significant (p<0.05) down-regulation of several transcripts identified by NGS, osteonectin, osteocalcin, cathepsin K and IGFI occurred. In gill arches fasting caused a significant (p<0.05) down-regulation of osteocalcin and up-regulation of MMP9.

  2. An indirect telencephalo-cerebellar pathway and its relay nucleus in teleosts.

    PubMed

    Ito, H; Murakami, T; Morita, Y

    1982-10-07

    In order to clarify telencephalo-cerebellar connections in teleosts, horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was injected into the telencephalon and the corpus cerebelli of 6 species which belong to Cyprinidae, Holocentridae, Scorpaenidae and Balistidae. In fishes belonging to Holocentridae, Scorpaenidae, and Balistidae, some fibers of the telencephalo-tectal tract were observed to terminate ipsilaterally in a longitudinal nucleus, which is located dorsolaterally to the posterior commissure, while the remaining fibers terminated in the tectum. Because the nucleus has not been identified as an independent cell-group or nucleus in previous papers, it was named the nucleus paracommissuralis in the present study. HRP injections into the ipsilateral side of the corpus cerebelli resulted in labeled cells in the nucleus paracommissuralis. Fibers from the nucleus pass through the tractus mesencephalo-cerebellaris anterior. Cytoarchitecture of the nucleus paracommissuralis was studied by means of the Bodian, Nissl and Golgi-Cox methods. The telencephalo-cerebellar fiber system could not be identified in cyprinoid species. Other orthograde- and retrograde-labeled areas were also reported following telencephalic and cerebellar injections with respect to the species difference.

  3. Mitochondrial aquaporin-8-mediated hydrogen peroxide transport is essential for teleost spermatozoon motility

    PubMed Central

    Chauvigné, François; Boj, Mónica; Finn, Roderick Nigel; Cerdà, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), particularly hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), cause oxidative cell damage and inhibit sperm function. In most oviparous fishes that spawn in seawater (SW), spermatozoa may be exposed to harmful ROS loads associated with the hyperosmotic stress of axonemal activation and ATP synthesis from mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. However, it is not known how marine spermatozoa can cope with the increased ROS levels to maintain flagellar motility. Here, we show that a marine teleost orthologue of human aquaporin-8, termed Aqp8b, is rapidly phosphorylated and inserted into the inner mitochondrial membrane of SW-activated spermatozoa, where it facilitates H2O2 efflux from this compartment. When Aqp8b intracellular trafficking and mitochondrial channel activity are immunologically blocked in activated spermatozoa, ROS levels accumulate in the mitochondria leading to mitochondrial membrane depolarisation, the reduction of ATP production, and the progressive arrest of sperm motility. However, the decreased sperm vitality underlying Aqp8b loss of function is fully reversed in the presence of a mitochondria-targeted antioxidant. These findings reveal a previously unknown detoxification mechanism in spermatozoa under hypertonic conditions, whereby mitochondrial Aqp8b-mediated H2O2 efflux permits fuel production and the maintenance of flagellar motility. PMID:25586329

  4. Mitochondrial aquaporin-8-mediated hydrogen peroxide transport is essential for teleost spermatozoon motility.

    PubMed

    Chauvigné, François; Boj, Mónica; Finn, Roderick Nigel; Cerdà, Joan

    2015-01-14

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), particularly hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), cause oxidative cell damage and inhibit sperm function. In most oviparous fishes that spawn in seawater (SW), spermatozoa may be exposed to harmful ROS loads associated with the hyperosmotic stress of axonemal activation and ATP synthesis from mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. However, it is not known how marine spermatozoa can cope with the increased ROS levels to maintain flagellar motility. Here, we show that a marine teleost orthologue of human aquaporin-8, termed Aqp8b, is rapidly phosphorylated and inserted into the inner mitochondrial membrane of SW-activated spermatozoa, where it facilitates H2O2 efflux from this compartment. When Aqp8b intracellular trafficking and mitochondrial channel activity are immunologically blocked in activated spermatozoa, ROS levels accumulate in the mitochondria leading to mitochondrial membrane depolarisation, the reduction of ATP production, and the progressive arrest of sperm motility. However, the decreased sperm vitality underlying Aqp8b loss of function is fully reversed in the presence of a mitochondria-targeted antioxidant. These findings reveal a previously unknown detoxification mechanism in spermatozoa under hypertonic conditions, whereby mitochondrial Aqp8b-mediated H2O2 efflux permits fuel production and the maintenance of flagellar motility.

  5. Precision of age estimates from different ageing structures in selected freshwater teleosts.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shahista; Khan, M Afzal; Miyan, Kaish; Lone, Faisal Ahmad

    2015-03-01

    The present study was undertaken with a view to compare the precision of age readings obtained from different ageing structures of some important freshwater teleosts viz., Hypophthalmichthys molitrix, Mastacembelus armatus and Ompok pabda. Standard procedures were followed to study the ageing structures. Based on the highest percent agreement and lowest average percentage of error and coefficient of variation values, precise age estimates were exhibited by opercular bones in H. molitrix and vertebrae in the remaining two fish, M. armatus and O. pabda. When precise age estimates were compared among the age estimates of other ageing structures, highest percent agreement and lowest average percent error and coefficient of variation values were exhibited by vertebrae (versus opercular bones) in H. molitrix and opercular bones (versus vertebrae) in both M. armatus and O. pabda. When mean age estimates from different ageing structures were compared, vertebrae and opercular bones exhibited comparable values in H. molitrix. In M. armatus, mean values of precise age estimates from vertebrae were significantly different from the values of other ageing structures. However, in O. pabda, vertebrae as well as opercular bones showed insignificantly different age readings.

  6. Preference of the herbivorous marine teleost Siganus canaliculatus for different macroalgae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Cuihong; Zeng, Fangui; Wang, Shuqi; Li, Yuanyou

    2014-06-01

    The decomposition of a large amount of unexploited macroalgal resource along the coast of China often results in heavy environmental pollution. In order to pave a way of using macroalgae as the dietary ingredient of rabbitfish Siganus canaliculatus, one of a few farmed herbivorous marine teleosts in China, its preference (feeding selectivity) for different macroalgae was determined in this study. Seven seaweed species abundantly inhabiting the coast of east Guangdong Province were exposed simultaneously to rabbitfish juveniles in laboratory (multiple-choice feeding) with their content and absolute intake assayed. It was found that the most preferred algae were Ulva prolifera, Gracilaria lemaneiformis and Chaetomorpha linum, less preferred algae were U. pertusa and Porphyra haitanensis, and least preferred ones were Sargassum fusiforme and Corallina sessilis. Such an order did not change when one to four relatively preferred seaweeds were removed. The preferred seaweeds were richer in protein and soluble sugar thus higher in energy than the least preferred. In addition, this fish was found to favor filamentous and flat algae rather than calcified ones. Accordingly, the richness of nutrients and morphological characteristics determined the preference of S. canaliculatus for tested macroalgae.

  7. Ovarian cysteine proteinases in the teleost Fundulus heteroclitus: molecular cloning and gene expression during vitellogenesis and oocyte maturation.

    PubMed

    Fabra, Mercedes; Cerdà, Joan

    2004-03-01

    The cysteine proteinases cathepsins B and L are members of the multigene family of lysosomal proteases that have been implicated in the processing of yolk proteins (YPs) in teleost oocytes. However, the full identification of the type of cathepsins expressed in fish ovarian follicles and embryos, as well as their regulatory mechanisms and specific function(s), are not yet elucidated. In this study, cDNAs encoding cathepsins B, L, F, K, S, Z, C, and H have been isolated from the teleost Fundulus heteroclitus, and the analysis of their deduced amino acid sequences revealed highly similar structural features to vertebrate orthologs, and confirmed in this species the existence of cathepsin L-like, cathepsin B-like, and cathepsin F-like subfamilies of cysteine proteinases. While all identified cathepsins were expressed in ovarian follicles, the corresponding mRNAs showed different temporal expression patterns. Thus, similar mRNA levels of cathepsins L, F, S, B, C, and Z were found throughout the oocyte growth or vitellogenesis period, whereas those for cathepsin H and K appeared to decrease as vitellogenesis advanced. During oocyte maturation, a transient accumulation of cathepsins L, S, H, and F mRNAs, approximately a 3-, 1.5-, 1.6-, and 6-fold increase, respectively, was detected in ovarian follicles within the 20-25 hr after hormone stimulation, coincident with the maximum proteolysis of the oocyte major YPs. The specific temporal pattern of expression of these genes may indicate a potential role of cathepsin L-like and cathepsin F proteases in the YP processing events occurring during fish oocyte maturation and/or early embryogenesis.

  8. A protocol for adult somatic cell nuclear transfer in medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) with a high rate of viable clone formation.

    PubMed

    Bubenshchikova, Ekaterina; Kaftanovskaya, Elena; Adachi, Tomoko; Hashimoto, Hisashi; Kinoshita, Masato; Wakamatsu, Yuko

    2013-12-01

    Previously, we successfully generated fully grown, cloned medaka (the Japanese rice fish, Oryzias latipes) using donor nuclei from primary culture cells of adult caudal fin tissue and nonenucleated recipient eggs that were heat shock-treated to induce diploidization of the nuclei. However, the mechanism of clone formation using this method is unknown, and the rate of adult clone formation is not high enough for studies in basic and applied sciences. To gain insight into the mechanism and increase the success rate of this method of clone formation, we tested two distinct nuclear transfer protocols. In one protocol, the timing of transfer of donor nuclei was changed, and in the other, the size of the donor cells was changed; each protocol was based on our original methodology. Ultimately, we obtained an unexpectedly high rate of adult clone formation using the protocol that differed with respect to the timing of donor nuclei transfer. Specifically, 17% of the transplants that developed to the blastula stage ultimately developed into adult clones. The success rate with this method was 13 times higher than that obtained using the original method. Analyses focusing on the reasons for this high success rate of clone formation will help to elucidate the mechanism of clone formation that occurs with this method.

  9. Prolactin receptor mRNA is upregulated in discus fish (Symphysodon aequifasciata) skin during parental phase.

    PubMed

    Khong, Hou-Keat; Kuah, Meng-Kiat; Jaya-Ram, Annette; Shu-Chien, Alexander Chong

    2009-05-01

    Prolactin (PRL) has been shown to directly influence parental-care associated behavior in many vertebrate species. The discus fish (Symphysodon aequifasciata) displays extensive parental care behavior through utilization of epidermal mucosal secretion to raise free-swimming fry. Here, we cloned the full-length cDNA sequence of the S. aequifasciata prolactin receptor (dfPRLR) and investigated the mRNA expression pattern in several adult tissues. Bioinformatic analysis showed the dfPRLR shared rather high identity (79 and 67%) with the Nile tilapia PRLR 1 and black seabream PRLR 1, respectively. The presence of dfPRLR in several osmoregulatory tissues including kidney, gill and intestine is consistent with the known role of PRL in mediating hydromineral balance in teleosts. In addition, upregulated expression of PRLR mRNA was observed in skin of parental fish compared to non-parental fish, indicating possibility of a role of the PRL hormonal signaling in regulation of mucus production in relation to parental care behaviour.

  10. Cytochrome P450IA1 induction and localization in endothelium of vertebrate (teleost) heart.

    PubMed

    Stegeman, J J; Miller, M R; Hinton, D E

    1989-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that high levels of cytochrome P450 can occur in cardiac microsomes of vertebrates [Mol. Pharmacol. 21:517-526, (1982)]. Here we identify the dominant cardiac P450 in the marine fish scup as P450E, a teleost representative of P450IA1, and we describe its restricted cellular localization in the heart. Treatment of scup with beta-naphthoflavone produced an unusually strong (10-fold) induction of spectrally measured P450 in cardiac microsomes, with specific content reaching levels (0.5 nmol/mg) similar to those induced in scup liver. Microsomal ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase and aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase activities, catalytic functions of scup P450E, were induced in parallel with P450 content. Similar induction was seen in both atrium and ventricle. Immunoblot analysis with monoclonal antibody 1-12-3, specific to scup P450E and other vertebrate P450IA1 proteins, showed that this hydrocarbon-inducible P450 is the dominant and possibly sole P450 form in heart microsomes of experimentally induced animals. Immunohistochemical analysis of scup heart sections (2-4-microns) with monoclonal antibody 1-12-3 revealed that P450E was detectable only in endothelial cells of the endocardium and of the coronary vasculature. A similar endothelial cell localization of the monoclonal antibody 1-12-3 epitope was observed in heart of rainbow trout, induced with beta-naphthoflavone, indicating a general nature for the endothelial localization of induced cardiac P450. Morphometric analysis showed that endothelium could constitute 8-9% of the volume of teleost heart, from which we calculate that P450IA1 could account for as much as 25% of the endothelial cell microsomal protein. Heart microsomes of untreated animals from contaminated environments also contained high levels of P450E, indicating that induction like that caused by beta-naphthoflavone could occur with chemicals in the environment. Strongly induced P450E (P450IA1) in endothelium could play a critical

  11. Reproductive biomarkers responses induced by xenoestrogens in the characid fish Astyanax fasciatus inhabiting a South American reservoir: an integrated field and laboratory approach.

    PubMed

    Prado, Paula S; Pinheiro, Ana Paula B; Bazzoli, Nilo; Rizzo, Elizete

    2014-05-01

    Field studies evaluating the effects of endocrine disruption chemicals (EDCs) on the fish reproduction are scarce worldwide. The goal of this study was to assess hepatic levels of vitellogenin (Vtg), zona radiata proteins (Zrp) and insulin-like growth factors (IGF-I and IGF-II), and relating them to reproductive endpoints in a wild fish population habiting a reservoir that receive domestic sewage, agricultural and industrial residues. Adult fish Astyanax fasciatus were sampled during the reproductive season in five sites from the Furnas Reservoir, Grande River, and Paraguay-Paraná basin. As a control to field data, fish were experimentally exposed via dietary intake, to oestradiol benzoate (OB) for 7 days. Fish from site with little anthropogenic interference showed hepatic levels of Vtg, Zrp and IGF-I and IGF-II similar to those from the non-treated experimental group. In sites located immediately downstream from the municipal wastewater discharges, the water total oestrogen was >120 ng/l, and male fish displayed increased Vtg and Zrp and decreased IGF-I levels similar to OB treated fish. In females, levels of Vtg, Zrp, IGF-I and IGF-II suggest an impairment of final oocyte maturation and spawning, as also detected by frequency of over-ripening, follicular atresia and fecundity. At the sites that receive agricultural and industrial residues, the water total oestrogen was <50 ng/l and females showed decreased Zrp and increased IGF-II levels associated to reduced diameter of vitellogenic follicles, indicating an inhibition of oocyte growth. Overall, the current study reports oestrogenic contamination impairing the reproduction of a wild fish from a hydroeletric reservoir and, the data contribute to improving the current knowledge on relationship between hepatic Vtg, Zrp and IGF-I and IGF-II, and reproductive endpoints in a teleost fish. In addition, our data point out novel reproductive biomarkers (IGF-I, IGF-II and over-ripening) to assessing xenoestrogenic

  12. Genetics of Sexual Development: An Evolutionary Playground for Fish

    PubMed Central

    Heule, Corina; Salzburger, Walter; Böhne, Astrid

    2014-01-01

    Teleost fishes are the most species-rich clade of vertebrates and feature an overwhelming diversity of sex-determining mechanisms, classically grouped into environmental and genetic systems. Here, we review the recent findings in the field of sex determination in fish. In the past few years, several new master regulators of sex determination and other factors involved in sexual development have been discovered in teleosts. These data point toward a greater genetic plasticity in generating the male and female sex than previously appreciated and implicate novel gene pathways in the initial regulation of the sexual fate. Overall, it seems that sex determination in fish does not resort to a single genetic cascade but is rather regulated along a continuum of environmental and heritable factors. PMID:24653206

  13. Ultimobranchial gland respond in a different way in male and female fresh water teleost Mastacembelus armatus (Lacepede) during reproductive cycle.

    PubMed

    Verma, Sushant Kumar; Alim, Abdul

    2015-05-01

    The present study was carried out to analyze the differences in the activity of ultimobranchial gland (UBG) between male and female fresh water teleost Mastacembelus armatus during reproductive cycle. Considerable variations in the nuclear diameter of UBG cells and plasma calcitonin (CT) levels during different reproductive phases of testicular and ovarian cycle suggested that the activity of the UBG depends upon the sexual maturity of fishes. A positive correlation was observed between plasma CT and sex steroid levels and the gonadosomatic index in both sexes which further confirmed the involvement of UBG in the processes related to gonadal development in fishes irrespective of the sex. Sudden increase in the level of plasma CT and nuclear diameter of UBG cells after administration of 17 α-methyltestosterone in males and 17 β-estradiol in females during resting phase of the reproductive cycle clearly showed that UBG becomes hyperactive with increases in the level of sex steroids. Plasma calcium level was also found to be positively correlated with gonadal maturation in females. However no such change in plasma calcium level in relation to testicular cycle was observed. Thus it can be concluded that UBG becomes hyperactive during gonadal maturation but its role differs between male and female fishes. In females it may involved in both gonadal maturation and plasma calcium regulation while in males its involvement in calcium regulation was not justified. Variations in the level of CT during various phases of testicular cycle evidenced its involvement in gonadal maturation only.

  14. Effects of GH, prolactin and cortisol on hepatic heat shock protein 70 expression in a marine teleost Sparus sarba.

    PubMed

    Deane, E E; Kelly, S P; Lo, C K; Woo, N Y

    1999-06-01

    Heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) expression was assessed in hepatic tissue of a marine teleost Sparus sarba after exogenous hormone administration. Using a PCR-amplified, homologous HSP70 cDNA clone, as a probe in Northern analysis, we detected a 2.3 kb transcript which was elevated after exposure to a temperature 7 degrees C above the ambient. For our studies on hormonal effects on HSP70 expression, groups of fish were administered recombinant bream GH (rbGH), ovine prolactin (oPRL) or cortisol daily over a 7-day period. Quantification of hepatic HSP70 transcript revealed that the administration of GH and PRL significantly reduced HSP70 mRNA abundance by 42% and 54% from saline-injected fish respectively. Also hepatic HSP70 levels were reduced by 76% and 64% as determined by immunoblotting after rbGH and oPRL treatment respectively. The administration of exogenous cortisol did not alter hepatic HSP70 mRNA or protein levels in S. sarba. The results obtained in this study are the first evidence for hormonal modulation of heat shock protein expression in fish. The significance of these results is discussed within the context of current knowledge on the roles of these hormones in teleostean stress response.

  15. Seasonal Dynamics of Fish Assemblages on Breakwaters and Natural Rocky Reefs in a Temperate Estuary: Consistent Assemblage Differences Driven by Sub-Adults

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Ashley M.; Booth, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Development of infrastructure around cities is rapidly increasing the amount of artificial substrate (termed artificial reef, ‘AR’) in coastal marine habitats. However, effects of ARs on marine communities remain unknown, because it is unclear whether ARs can maintain similar communities to natural reefs. We investigated whether well-established (> 30 years old) breakwaters could consistently approximate fish assemblages on interspersed rocky reefs in a temperate estuary over 6 consecutive seasons using regular visual surveys between June 2009 (winter) and November 2010 (spring). We examined whether assemblage differences between reef types were driven by differences in juvenile recruitment, or were related to differences in older life-stages. Assemblages on both reef types were dominated by juveniles (61% of individuals) and sub-adults (34% of individuals). Seasonal fluctuations in assemblage parameters (species richness, diversity, sub-adult abundance) were similar between reef types, and levels of species diversity and assemblage composition were generally comparable. However, abundance and species richness were consistently higher (1.9-7.6 and 1.3-2.6 times, respectively) on breakwaters. These assemblage differences could not be explained by differences in juvenile recruitment, with seasonal patterns of recruitment and juvenile species found to be similar between reef types. In contrast, abundances of sub-adults were consistently higher (1.1-12 times) at breakwaters, and assemblage differences appeared to be driven by this life-stage. Our results indicate that breakwaters in temperate estuaries are capable of supporting abundant and diverse fish assemblages with similar recruitment process to natural reefs. However, breakwaters may not approximate all aspects of natural assemblage structure, with differences maintained by a single-life stage in some cases. PMID:24086634

  16. Seasonal dynamics of fish assemblages on breakwaters and natural rocky reefs in a temperate estuary: consistent assemblage differences driven by sub-adults.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Ashley M; Booth, David J

    2013-01-01

    Development of infrastructure around cities is rapidly increasing the amount of artificial substrate (termed artificial reef, 'AR') in coastal marine habitats. However, effects of ARs on marine communities remain unknown, because it is unclear whether ARs can maintain similar communities to natural reefs. We investigated whether well-established (> 30 years old) breakwaters could consistently approximate fish assemblages on interspersed rocky reefs in a temperate estuary over 6 consecutive seasons using regular visual surveys between June 2009 (winter) and November 2010 (spring). We examined whether assemblage differences between reef types were driven by differences in juvenile recruitment, or were related to differences in older life-stages. Assemblages on both reef types were dominated by juveniles (61% of individuals) and sub-adults (34% of individuals). Seasonal fluctuations in assemblage parameters (species richness, diversity, sub-adult abundance) were similar between reef types, and levels of species diversity and assemblage composition were generally comparable. However, abundance and species richness were consistently higher (1.9-7.6 and 1.3-2.6 times, respectively) on breakwaters. These assemblage differences could not be explained by differences in juvenile recruitment, with seasonal patterns of recruitment and juvenile species found to be similar between reef types. In contrast, abundances of sub-adults were consistently higher (1.1-12 times) at breakwaters, and assemblage differences appeared to be driven by this life-stage. Our results indicate that breakwaters in temperate estuaries are capable of supporting abundant and diverse fish assemblages with similar recruitment process to natural reefs. However, breakwaters may not approximate all aspects of natural assemblage structure, with differences maintained by a single-life stage in some cases.

  17. The novel finding of four distinct prepro-IGF-I E domains in a perciform fish, Sciaenops ocellatus, during ontogeny.

    PubMed

    Faulk, Cynthia K; Pérez-Domínguez, Rafael; Webb, Kenneth A; Holt, G Joan

    2010-10-01

    In fishes, insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) stimulates growth and differentiation but also plays a role in a number of other processes including osmoregulation, metabolism, immune response and reproduction. This study presents the cDNA encoding multiple prepro-IGF-I transcripts obtained from red drum, Sciaenopsocellatus, and examines differential expression in select adult tissues and during ontogeny. Four distinct transcripts were sequenced which were identical in the coding region for the signal (132 bp) and mature (204 bp) peptides but differed in the coding region of the E peptide by the exclusion of 117 (Ea-1), 81 (Ea-2) or 36 (Ea-3) bp compared to the 222 bp present in Ea-4. Analysis of the pertinent portion of the genomic sequence of this gene suggests that the transcripts are a result of alternative splicing. This is the first report of the expression of all four known prepro-IGF-I transcripts in a teleost other than a salmonid. The deduced amino acid sequences exhibited 70-95% identity with teleosts and somewhat lower identity to other vertebrates (60-75%). Three of the 4 transcripts (Ea-2, Ea-3, Ea-4) were expressed in the liver, ovary, spleen, gall bladder, brain, red muscle, pancreas and spinal cord of adults. Only the Ea-4 transcript was expressed in adult stomach tissue while no signal was detected in pituitary, retina, intestine, adipose or white muscle. In contrast, all 4 transcripts were expressed throughout ontogeny. The apparent expression of the Ea-1 transcript only during the larval stage may indicate a developmental role for this E peptide in red drum.

  18. The contribution of the swimbladder to buoyancy in the adult zebrafish (Danio rerio): a morphometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Robertson, George N; Lindsey, Benjamin W; Dumbarton, Tristan C; Croll, Roger P; Smith, Frank M

    2008-06-01

    Many teleost fishes use a swimbladder, a gas-filled organ in the coelomic cavity, to reduce body density toward neutral buoyancy, thus minimizing the locomotory cost of maintaining a constant depth in the water column. However, for most swimbladder-bearing teleosts, the contribution of this organ to the attainment of neutral buoyancy has not been quantified. Here, we examined the quantitative contribution of the swimbladder to buoyancy and three-dimensional stability in a small cyprinid, the zebrafish (Danio rerio). In aquaria during daylight hours, adult animals were observed at mean depths from 10.1 +/- 6.0 to 14.2 +/- 5.6 cm below the surface. Fish mass and whole-body volume were linearly correlated (r(2) = 0.96) over a wide range of body size (0.16-0.73 g); mean whole-body density was 1.01 +/- 0.09 g cm(-3). Stereological estimations of swimbladder volume from linear dimensions of lateral X-ray images and direct measurements of gas volumes recovered by puncture from the same swimbladders showed that results from these two methods were highly correlated (r(2) = 0.85). The geometric regularity of the swimbladder thus permitted its volume to be accurately estimated from a single lateral image. Mean body density in the absence of the swimbladder was 1.05 +/- 0.04 g cm(-3). The swimbladder occupied 5.1 +/- 1.4% of total body volume, thus reducing whole-body density significantly. The location of the centers of mass and buoyancy along rostro-caudal and dorso-ventral axes overlapped near the ductus communicans, a constriction between the anterior and posterior swimbladder chambers. Our work demonstrates that the swimbladder of the adult zebrafish contributes significantly to buoyancy and attitude stability. Furthermore, we describe and verify a stereological method for estimating swimbladder volume that will aid future studies of the functions of this organ.

  19. Resolution of ray-finned fish phylogeny and timing of diversification

    PubMed Central

    Near, Thomas J.; Eytan, Ron I.; Dornburg, Alex; Kuhn, Kristen L.; Moore, Jon A.; Davis, Matthew P.; Wainwright, Peter C.; Friedman, Matt; Smith, W. Leo

    2012-01-01

    Ray-finned fishes make up half of all living vertebrate species. Nearly all ray-finned fishes are teleosts, which include most commercially important fish species, several model organisms for genomics and developmental biology, and the dominant component of marine and freshwater vertebrate faunas. Despite the economic and scientific importance of ray-finned fishes, the lack of a single comprehensive phylogeny with corresponding divergence-time estimates has limited our understanding of the evolution and diversification of this radiation. Our analyses, which use multiple nuclear gene sequences in conjunction with 36 fossil age constraints, result in a well-supported phylogeny of all major ray-finned fish lineages and molecular age estimates that are generally consistent with the fossil record. This phylogeny informs three long-standing problems: specifically identifying elopomorphs (eels and tarpons) as the sister lineage of all other teleosts, providing a unique hypothesis on the radiation of early euteleosts, and offering a promising strategy for resolution of the “bush at the top of the tree” that includes percomorphs and other spiny-finned teleosts. Contrasting our divergence time estimates with studies using a single nuclear gene or whole mitochondrial genomes, we find that the former underestimates ages of the oldest ray-finned fish divergences, but the latter dramatically overestimates ages for derived teleost lineages. Our time-calibrated phylogeny reveals that much of the diversification leading to extant groups of teleosts occurred between the late Mesozoic and early Cenozoic, identifying this period as the “Second Age of Fishes.” PMID:22869754

  20. Antimicrobial mechanisms of fish leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Rieger, Aja M; Barreda, Daniel R

    2011-12-01

    Early activation and coordination of innate defenses are critical for effective responses against infiltrating pathogens. Rapid engagement of immune cells provides a critical first line of defense soon after pathogen infiltration. Activation leads to a well-orchestrated set of events that sees the induction and regulation of intracellular and extracellular antimicrobial defenses. An array of regulatory mediators, highly toxic soluble molecules, degradative enzymes and antimicrobial peptides provides maximal protection against a wide range of pathogens while limiting endogenous damage to host tissues. In this review we highlight recent advances in our understanding of innate cellular antimicrobial responses of teleost fish and discuss their implications to cell survival, immunomodulation and death. The evolutionary conservation of these responses is a testament to their effectiveness against pathogen infiltration and their commitment to effective maintenance of host homeostasis. Importantly, recent developments in teleost fish systems have identified novel host defense strategies that may be unique to this lower vertebrate group or may point to previously unknown innate mechanisms that also play a significant role in higher vertebrate host immunity.

  1. Light-induced degeneration and microglial response in the retina of an epibenthonic pigmented teleost: age-dependent photoreceptor susceptibility to cell death.

    PubMed

    Bejarano-Escobar, Ruth; Blasco, Manuel; Martín-Partido, Gervasio; Francisco-Morcillo, Javier

    2012-11-01

    Constant intense light causes apoptosis of photoreceptors in the retina of albino fish. However, very few studies have been performed on pigmented species. Tench (Tinca tinca) is a teleost inhabiting dimly lit environments that has a predominance of rods within the photoreceptor layer. To test the hypothesis that constant high intensity light can result in retinal damage in such pigmented epibenthonic teleost species, photodegeneration of the retina was investigated in the larvae and in juveniles of tench to assess whether any damage may also be dependent on fish age. We exposed both groups of animals to 5 days of constant darkness, followed by 4 days of constant 20,000 lx light, and then by 6 days of recovery in a 14 h light:10 h dark cycle. The results showed that the retina of the larvae group exhibited abundant photoreceptor cell apoptosis during the time of exposition to intense light, whereas that of juveniles was indifferent to it. Damaged retinas showed a strong TUNEL signal in photoreceptor nuclei, and occasionally a weak cytoplasmic TUNEL signal in Müller glia. Specific labelling of microglial cells with Griffonia simplicifolia lectin (GSL) histochemistry revealed that photoreceptor cell death alerts microglia in the degenerating retina, leading to local proliferation, migration towards the injured outer nuclear layer (ONL), and enhanced phagocytosis of photoreceptor debris. During the first days of intense light treatment, Müller cells phagocytosed dead photoreceptor cells but, once microglial cells became activated, there was a progressive increase in the phagocytic capacity of the microglia.

  2. Annotated checklist of fish cestodes from South America

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Philippe V.; de Chambrier, Alain; Scholz, Tomáš; Luque, José L.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract An exhaustive literature search supplemented by a critical examination of records made it possible to present an annotated checklist of tapeworms (Cestoda) that, as adults or larvae (metacestodes), parasitize freshwater, brackish water and marine fishes, i.e. cartilaginous and bony fishes, in South America. The current knowledge of their species diversity, host associations and geographical distribution is reviewed. Taxonomic problems are discussed based on a critical evaluation of the literature and information on DNA sequences of individual taxa is provided to facilitate future taxonomic and phylogenetic studies. As expected, the current knowledge is quite uneven regarding the number of taxa and host-associations reported from the principal river basins and marine ecoregions. These differences may not only reflect the actual cestode richness but may also be due to the research effort that has been devoted to unravelling the diversity of these endoparasitic helminths in individual countries. A total of 297 valid species, 61 taxa identified to the generic level, in addition to unidentified cestodes, were recorded from 401 species of fish hosts. Among the recognized cestode orders, 13 have been recorded in South America, with the Onchoproteocephalidea displaying the highest species richness, representing c. 50% of all species diversity. The majority of records include teleost fish hosts (79%) that harbour larval and adult stages of cestodes, whereas stingrays (Myliobatiformes) exhibit the highest proportion of records (39%) among the elasmobranch hosts. Fish cestodes are ubiquitous in South America, being mostly recorded from the Warm Temperate Southeastern Pacific (WTSP; 31%) for marine hosts and the Amazon River basin (45%) for freshwater ones. The following problems were detected during the compilation of literary data: (i) unreliability of many records; (ii) poor taxonomic resolution, i.e. identification made only to the genus or even family level; (iii

  3. Mercury levels and estimated total daily intakes for children and adults from an electronic waste recycling area in Taizhou, China: Key role of rice and fish consumption.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wei; Cheng, Jinping; Zhao, Wenchang; Wang, Wenhua

    2015-08-01

    In order to assess the potential health risks of Hg pollution, total mercury (T-Hg) and methyl mercury (MeHg) concentrations were determined in air, dust, surface soil, crops, poultry, fish and human hair samples from an electronic waste (e-waste) recycling area in Taizhou, China. High concentrations of T-Hg and MeHg were found in these multiple matrices, and the mean concentration was 30.7 ng/m(3) of T-Hg for atmosphere samples, 3.1 μg/g of T-Hg for soil, 37.6 μg/g of T-Hg for dust, 20.3 ng/g of MeHg for rice and 178.1 ng/g of MeHg for fish, suggesting that the e-waste recycling facility was a significant source of Hg. The inorganic Hg (I-Hg) levels (0.84 μg/g) in hair samples of e-waste workers were much higher than that in the reference samples. Pearson's correlation coefficients showed that strong positive correlations (p<0.01) between hair I-Hg and time staying in industrial area (r=0.81) and between MeHg and fish consumption frequency (r=0.91), imply that workers were mainly exposed to Hg vapor through long-time inhalation of contaminated air and dust, while other population mainly exposed to MeHg through high-frequency fish consumption. The estimated daily intakes of Hg showed that dietary intake was the major Hg exposure source, and Hg intakes from rice and fish were significantly higher than from any other foods. The estimated total daily intakes (TDIs) of MeHg for both children (696.8 ng/(kg·day)) and adults (381.3 ng/(kg·day)) greatly exceeded the dietary reference dose (RfD) of 230 ng/(kg·day), implying greater health risk for humans from Hg exposures around e-waste recycling facilities.

  4. Stage-specific biomass overcompensation by juveniles in response to increased adult mortality in a wild fish population.

    PubMed

    Ohlberger, Jan; Langangen, Øystein; Edeline, Eric; Claessen, David; Winfield, Ian J; Stenseth, Nils Chr; Vøllestad, L Asbjørn

    2011-12-01

    Recently developed theoretical models of stage-structured consumer-resource systems have shown that stage-specific biomass overcompensation can arise in response to increased mortality rates. We parameterized a stage-structured population model to simulate the effects of increased adult mortality caused by a pathogen outbreak in the perch (Perca fluviatilis) population of Windermere (UK) in 1976. The model predicts biomass overcompensation by juveniles in response to increased adult mortality due to a shift in food-dependent growth and reproduction rates. Considering cannibalism between life stages in the model reinforces this compensatory response due to the release from predation on juveniles at high mortality rates. These model predictions are matched by our analysis of a 60-year time series of scientific monitoring of Windermere perch, which shows that the pathogen outbreak induced a strong decrease in adult biomass and a corresponding increase in juvenile biomass. Age-specific adult fecundity and size at age were higher after than before the disease outbreak, suggesting that the pathogen-induced mortality released adult perch from competition, thereby increasing somatic and reproductive growth. Higher juvenile survival after the pathogen outbreak due to a release from cannibalism likely contributed to the observed biomass overcompensation. Our findings have general implications for predicting population- and community-level responses to increased size-selective mortality caused by exploitation or disease outbreaks.

  5. Flow management and fish density regulate salmonid recruitment and adult size in tailwaters across western North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dibble, Kimberly L.; Yackulic, Charles B.; Kennedy, Theodore A.; Budy, Phaedra E.

    2015-01-01

    The mean lengths of adult rainbow and brown trout were influenced by similar flow and catch metrics. Length in both species was positively correlated with high annual flow but declined in tailwaters with high daily fluctuations in flow, high catch rates of conspecifics, and when large cohorts recruited to adult size. Whereas brown trout did not respond to the proportion of water allocated between seasons, rainbow trout length increased in rivers that released more water during winter than in spring. Rainbow trout length was primarily related to high catch rates of conspecifics, whereas brown trout length was mainly related to large cohorts recruiting to the adult size class. Species-specific responses to flow management are likely attributable to differences in seasonal timing of key life history events such as spawning, egg hatching, and fry emergence.

  6. Effect of taurine supplementation on hepatic metabolism and alleviation of cadmium toxicity and bioaccumulation in a marine teleost, red sea bream, Pagrus major.

    PubMed

    Hano, Takeshi; Ito, Katsutoshi; Kono, Kumiko; Ito, Mana; Ohkubo, Nobuyuki; Mochida, Kazuhiko

    2017-02-01

    This study was performed to unravel the mechanism of the beneficial action of taurine on marine teleost fish, red sea bream (Pagrus major), by analyzing the hepatic metabolism. Moreover, the ameliorative effects of the nutrient against cadmium toxicity and bioaccumulation were further evaluated. The fish were fed a diet containing 0 % (TAU0 %), 0.5 % (TAU0.5 %), or 5.0 % (TAU5.0 %) taurine for 40-55 days (d) and subjected to cadmium acute toxicity and bioaccumulation tests. Taurine deficiency in feed severely affected growth and the hepatic metabolic profiles of the fish, including a remarkable increase in myo-inositol, aspartate, and ß-alanine in the TAU0 % group, which indicates a complementary physiological response to taurine deficiency. For the acute toxicity test, fish were fed the test diets for 55 d and were then exposed to different dose of cadmium ranging from 0 to 5.6 mg/L for 96 h. Fish fed taurine had a higher tolerance to cadmium than those not fed taurine. For the bioaccumulation test, fish were fed the test diets for 40 d and then were chronically exposed to 0.2 mg/L of cadmium for 28 d followed by depuration for 21 d. Cadmium concentrations in the liver and muscle of fish fed TAU5.0 % were significantly lower than those of fish fed TAU0 % for the first 7 d of exposure and the first 7 d of elimination. Our findings suggest a possible mechanism for the beneficial role played by taurine and that the inclusion of taurine in fish aquaculture feed may reduce cadmium contamination of fish intended for human consumption.

  7. Dietary exposure to perfluoroalkyl acids of specific French adult sub-populations: high seafood consumers, high freshwater fish consumers and pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Yamada, A; Bemrah, N; Veyrand, B; Pollono, C; Merlo, M; Desvignes, V; Sirot, V; Marchand, P; Berrebi, A; Cariou, R; Antignac, J P; Le Bizec, B; Leblanc, J C

    2014-09-01

    Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are globally found in various media, including food and especially fishery products. In the present study, the dietary exposure to 15 perfluoroalkyl acids was assessed for 3 French adult populations, namely high seafood consumers, high freshwater fish consumers, and pregnant women. Purified food extracts were analysed by LC-MS/MS and PFBA, PFPA, PFHxA, PFHpA, PFOA, PFNA, PFDA, PFUnA, PFTrDA, PFTeDA, PFBS, PFHxS, PFHpS, PFOS and PFDS were monitored and quantified according to the isotope dilution principle. Under lower bound (LB) hypothesis (i.e. contamination valuesfish consumers appear as the most exposed to PFOS (7.5 ng.kg(-1) bw.d(-1)), PFUnA (1.3 ng.kg(-1) bw.d(-1)), PFDA (0.4 ng.kg(-1) bw.d(-1)) and PFHpS (0.03 ng.kg(-1) bw.d(-1)) while high seafood consumers appear as the most exposed to PFOA (1.2 ng.kg(-1) bw.d(-1)), PFNA (0.2 ng.kg(-1) bw.d(-1)) and PFHxS (0.06 ng.kg(-1) bw.d(-1)). For all considered populations, the major exposure contributors are fish, seafood and water under LB hypothesis, while dairy products, bread and crispbread are the main contributors under upper bound (UB) hypothesis. Besides this food exposure assessment, further studies are needed to assess the more global PFAA exposure, taking into account indoor and outdoor air, dust and cutaneous contact, which could be other important contributors for this particular class of chemicals.

  8. Characterization of the 5'-to-5'linked adult alpha- and beta-globin genes from three sciaenid fish species (Pseudosciaena crocea, Sciaenops ocellatus, Nibea miichthioides).

    PubMed

    Chu, Wuying; Wei, Yongwei; Qian, Ronghua; Yu, Xiameng; Yu, Lian

    2006-09-01

    Recently, we cloned the adult alpha-globin genes from large yellow croaker Pseudosciaena crocea, cuneate drum Nibea miichthioides and red drum Sciaenops ocellatus. All these alpha-globins have a unique Gly insertion at the 47th residue. In this paper, the three sciaenid globin complexes were identified and compared in detail. Linkage analysis indicated that the sciaenid alpha- and beta-globin genes were oriented head-to-head relative to each other. The sciaenid intergenic regions between the linked alpha- and beta-globin genes were the smallest in reported fish globin gene complexes to date. Classical promoter elements were condensed and the CCAAT box unstable duplication was found in these regions. The promoter function of the intergenic region from large yellow croaker was tested by transient expression of EGFP in Vero cells. We also described a method for studying luciferase reporter gene transient expression in primary fish erythrocytes. We used the method to assess the promoter strength of the three intergenic regions between the sciaen