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Sample records for adult thalassemic patients

  1. A thalassemic child becomes adult.

    PubMed

    Galanello, Renzo

    2003-03-01

    In the last decades, treatment of patients with beta-thalassemia has changed considerably, with advances in red cell transfusion and the introduction of iron chelation therapy. This progress has greatly increased the probability for a thalassemic child to reach adult age with a good quality of life. At present, the prognosis for thalassemia major patients is "open-ended". Compliance with the conventional treatment and psychological support are critical to obtain good results. The expectancy of a long survival of good quality encourages the patients to plan their future life, having a job, a family and often children. Optimal treatment of thalassemia major is expensive and for this reason, unfortunately, available only for a minority of patients in the world. Despite the significant advances, other progresses are expected to further improve survival and quality of life. The major aim is the cure of the disease, increasing the possibility of bone marrow transplantation using HLA-matched unrelated donors, and hopefully, in the future, gene therapy. However, even the conventional treatment and in particular iron chelation is expected to improve. Efforts should be made by the Western countries, and by the international health and economic organizations to provide continuous and concrete support for achieving a high standard of management for thalassemia in all places of the world.

  2. Bone turnover and mineral density in adult thalassemic patients: relationships with growth hormone secretory status and circulating somatomedins.

    PubMed

    Scacchi, Massimo; Danesi, Leila; Cattaneo, Agnese; Sciortino, Giovanna; Radin, Raffaella; Ambrogio, Alberto Giacinto; Vitale, Giovanni; D'Angelo, Emanuela; Mirra, Nadia; Zanaboni, Laura; Arvigo, Marica; Boschetti, Mara; Ferone, Diego; Marzullo, Paolo; Baldini, Marina; Cassinerio, Elena; Cappellini, Maria Domenica; Persani, Luca; Cavagnini, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    Previous evidence supports a role for growth hormone (GH)-insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I deficiency in the pathophysiology of osteopenia/osteoporosis in adult thalassemia. Moreover, serum IGF-II has never been studied in this clinical condition. Thus, we elected to study the GH secretory status and the levels of circulating somatomedins, correlating these parameters with bone mineral density (BMD) and biochemical markers of bone turnover. A hundred and thirty-nine normal weight adult thalassemic patients (72 men and 67 women) were studied. Lumbar and femoral neck BMD were measured in 106/139 patients. Sixty-eight patients underwent growth hormone releasing hormone plus arginine testing. Measurement of baseline IGF-I and IGF-II was performed in all patients, while osteocalcin, C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (CTx), and urinary cross-linked N-telopeptides of type I collagen (NTx) were assayed in 95 of them. Femoral and lumbar osteoporosis/Z score below the expected range for age were documented in 61.3 and in 56.6 % of patients, respectively. Severe GH deficiency (GHD) was demonstrated in 27.9 % of cases, whereas IGF-I SDS was low in 86.3 %. No thalassemic patients displayed circulating levels of IGF-II below the reference range. GH peaks were positively correlated with femoral, but not lumbar, Z score. No correlations were found between GH peaks and osteocalcin, CTx and NTx. GH peaks were positively correlated with IGF-I values, which in their turn displayed a positive correlation with osteocalcin, CTx, and NTx. No correlations emerged between IGF-I values and either femoral or lumbar Z scores. No correlations were found between IGF-II and any of the following parameters: GH peaks, osteocalcin, CTx, NTx, femoral Z score, and lumbar Z score. Our study, besides providing for the first time evidence of a normal IGF-II production in thalassemia, contributes to a better understanding of the involvement of the somatotropin-somatomedin axis in the

  3. [Prevalence of hepatitis A antibodies in polytransfused thalassemic patients].

    PubMed

    Mangiagli, A

    1997-01-01

    Chronic liver disease in polytransfused thalassemic patients is an important cause of morbidity and mortality. The genesis is multiform: haemosiderosis and virus infections, resulting from repeated transfusions, may play an important role. Since HAV infection could make greatly worse the prognosis, in order to evaluate the opportunity of the HAV vaccination in polytransfused thalassemic patients, we studied the prevalence of HAV infection by detection of anti HAV antibodies (IgG) (enzyme immunoassay competitive technique) in 75 thalassemic patients (36 males, 39 females, aged 21.1 +/- 9.6, mean +/- SD). Fourty-two patients (56%) were HCV positive with persistent increase of transaminases. Eight patients were HAV antibodies positive (10.6%); the prevalence was 2.7% in patients aged 1 to 19 years, 11.4% in patients aged 20-39 years and 100% over 40 years of age. No differences were observed between sexes. Five out of fourty-two patients HCV positive were HAV antibodies positive (11.9%). In conclusion, in order to reduce further the incidence of liver infections in polytransfused thalassemic patients, we recommend an active immunization for HAV.

  4. Zinc in thalassemic patients and its relation with depression.

    PubMed

    Moafi, Alireza; Mobaraki, Gholamhossein; Taheri, Seyed Sadr; Heidarzadeh, Abtin; Shahabi, Iraj; Majidi, Farshad

    2008-01-01

    Studies have shown that there is a relationship between zinc levels and depression. Thalassemic patients are at risk of zinc deficiency due to various causes including Desferal injection. The aim of this study, therefore, is to investigate hair zinc levels in thalassemic patients and their association with depression. For the purposes of this survey, 50 patients with major thalassemia between 10-20 years old were selected randomly. The patients' hair zinc concentration was compared with a control group of similarly aged healthy individuals. Simultaneously, their psychological status was evaluated with either the "Beck" or "Marya Kovacs" test (according to age) so that the relation between depression and zinc concentration could be assessed. The mean hair zinc concentration in patients was more than the controls (193.96 +/- 92.4 ppm vs 149.6 +/- 72.21 ppm). Zinc deficiency was present in 10% of the patients, and 52% had some degree of depression. There was a reverse correlation between zinc deficiency and blood transfusion rate (p < 0.05). Also, while there were more incidences of depression among the zinc deficient patients, the difference was not significant. Regarding the high prevalence of depression and insignificant relation to the zinc deficiency in these thalassemic patients, this research suggests the need for further consideration concerning patients' psychological status, the risk factors of zinc deficiency, as well as extended assessment into other causes of depression.

  5. Cardiac iron overload in thalassemic patients: an endomyocardial biopsy study.

    PubMed

    Lombardo, T; Tamburino, C; Bartoloni, G; Morrone, M L; Frontini, V; Italia, F; Cordaro, S; Privitera, A; Calvi, V

    1995-09-01

    Secondary heart failure induced by organ siderosis is the main cause of death in patients affected by thalassemia major. At present it cannot be predicted whether heart siderosis is correlated with iron overload and little is known about the real cardiac histological pattern of post transfusional hemochromatosis in patients with thalassemia major and intermedia. The study aim was to evaluate cardiac iron overload by non invasive and invasive techniques. Fifteen thalassemic patients were investigated and endomyocardial biopsy performed in ten revealed different grades of endomyocardial iron overload with histochemical positivity. Non invasive techniques are not able to furnish an exact picture of the cardiac hemochromatosis. There was a significant correlation between serum ferritin and myocardial iron grade. Patients with elevated ferritin levels and poor compliance to chelating therapy are at high risk of severe heart hemochromatosis. It was seen that endomyocardial biopsy is a useful tool in studying myocardial iron.

  6. Prevalence of HTLV-1 Antibody among Major Thalassemic Patients in Gorgan (South East of Caspian Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, A.; Mansurian, A. R.; Ahmadi, A. R.; Ghaemi, E.; Kalavi, K. H.; Marjani, A.; Sanei Moghaddam, E.

    In this study, the prevalence of HTLV-1 infection among the thalassemic patients was investigated. 181 thalassemic patients whom referred to Talghani hospital during, Oct. 2004-Sep. 2005 were participated in this study. HTLV antibody was determined using ELISA technique. In this procedure (Diapron laboratory kit) HTLV, positive samples tested by HTLV-1 western blot (kit, 2.4) to confirm, ELISA positive samples and also to detect the HTLV types. From 181 thalassemic patients, 93 (51.4%) were males. The age rate of these ranged 1-25 years, (mean of 14.11±6.5). Of these subjects 169 patients (93.4%) were received packet cell at least one unite per month. 28(14.9%) of subjects were HTLV positive, while only 4.4% of them were confirmed by western blot and also for contamination with type-1 virus infection. Contamination with this virus increased, as the patients were getting older. The findings derived from this study indicated that among the thalassemic patients in Gorgan there were cases with HTLV-1, infection that was correlated with the other part of the country. It is therefore concluded; that further comprehensive studies are required to identify infected blood donations by blood donors in Gorgan.

  7. Ultrasound thyroid evaluation in thalassemic patients: correlation between the aspects of thyroidal stroma and function.

    PubMed

    Pitrolo, Lorella; Malizia, Graziella; Lo Pinto, Carmela; Malizia, Velia; Capra, Massimo

    2004-12-01

    Hypothyroidism is one of the most common endocrine complications in thalassemic patients, usually appearing in the second decade of life related to iron overload. Ultrasonography is one of the techniques most frequently used to evaluate the volume and structure of the gland. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the possible correlation between thyroid function and its appearance on ultrasound in 45 thalassemic patients. We found reduced antero-posterior diameter of the thyroid in 12 patients (26.6%), reduced echogenicity of the glandular tissue in 24 patients (46.6%), and diffuse spotty echogenicity in 15 patients (33.3%). In our opinion, these patterns may be useful to indicate the need for further diagnostic evaluation of thyroid function. Follow-up studies are necessary to confirm this hypothesis.

  8. Clinical outcomes of Torque teno virus-infected thalassemic patients with and without hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Alavi, Samin; Sharifi, Zohreh; Nourbakhsh, Kazem; Shamsian, Bibi Shahin; Arzanian, Mohammad Taghi; Safarisharari, Alieh; Navidinia, Masoumeh

    2011-01-01

    Background Although a marked proportion of thalassemic patients acquire Torque teno virus (TTV) through blood transfusion, its clinical importance is unclear. This study was designed to investigate the clinical importance of TTV infection in thalassemic patients with and without hepatitis C virus (HCV) co-infection in Iran. Methods In this case-control study, 107 thalassemic patients on chronic transfusion and 107 healthy individuals were selected. According to HCV and TTV infection status (detected by semi-nested PCR), patients were categorized into 4 groups: TTV and HCV negative, TTV positive, HCV positive, and TTV and HCV positive. Blood ferritin, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels in these 4 groups were assessed. Results Approximately half of the thalassemic patients (50.5%) and 27.1% of controls had TTV infection. Thalassemic patients had a greater chance of TTV infection compared to the control group with a sex-adjusted OR of 4.13 (95% CI=2.28-8.13). The increased levels of ALT, AST, and ferritin in the TTV and HCV-infected group were not significantly different from those in the TTV and HCV negative group. Co-infection with TTV and HCV did not significantly increase ALT, AST, and ferritin levels compared to infection with TTV alone. Conclusion Although common in thalassemic patients, TTV infection appears to have a negligible role in increasing the severity of liver disease, even when co-infection with HCV occurs. PMID:21747885

  9. Effect of iron overload on exercise capacity in thalassemic patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Mavrogeni, Sophie; Gotsis, Efstathios; Verganelakis, Dimitrios; Berdousis, Eleni; Dritsas, Athanasios; Kolovou, Genovefa; Toulas, Panagiotis; Ladis, Vassilios

    2009-12-01

    In b-thalassemia, myocardial iron overload contributes to heart failure, despite chelation treatment. We hypothesized that myocardial T2*, an index of iron overload, influences patients' physical activity. We assessed a thalassemic population by both cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) and ergospirometry test. Sixty-six thalassemic patients aged 27 (19-40) years, 30 without (NHF) and 36 with heart failure (HF), were studied. Cardiac T2* and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) were evaluated using a 1.5 T system. VO(2max), AT, Mets and duration of exercise by ergospirometry were also assessed. Myocardial T2* was lower in HF compared to NHF patients (14.7 +/- 6.6 vs. 39 +/- 2 ms, P < 0.001). LVEDV and LVESV were higher in HF group compared to NHF patients (139.9 +/- 16.3 vs. 124.6 +/- 20.86 ml, P < 0.01 and 94.9 +/- 24 vs. 38.3 +/- 10.1 ml, P < 0.001, respectively). Additionally, LVEF in HF was lower compared to NHF patients (21.3 +/- 6.1% vs. 69.6 +/- 3.7, P < 0.001, respectively). All exercise parameters were lower in HF compared to NHF patients (P < 0.001). Patients within the HF group were additionally analyzed according to T2* values (<10 ms). HF patients with T2* < 10 ms (n = 13) were considered as high iron overloaded (HF-H) and the rest of them (n = 23) as (HF-L). Although LVEDV, LVESV, LVEF were similar in the two subgroups, the exercise parameters were significantly lower in the HF-H group (P < 0.001). Heart T2* correlated with all exercise parameters (P < 0.001). HF thalassemic patients have reduced exercise indexes compared to non HF. Myocardial iron overload, expressed as T2*, has a direct influence on exercise capacity, independent of LV ejection fraction and functional class.

  10. Immunological response to hepatitis B vaccine in polytransfused thalassemic patients.

    PubMed

    Alavian, Seyed-Moayed; Tabatabaei, Seyed-Vahid

    2010-05-01

    Hepatitis B is an important infection in thalassemia patients and prevention by vaccination is needed. Immunological response to hepatitis B vaccine in polytransfused thalassmia patients needs more attention.

  11. [Hematological and clinical profile in sickle cell or thalassemic patients].

    PubMed

    Vilachá, Daniella; Salazar, Raquel

    2006-01-01

    Clinical and hematological characteristics of 14 patients with sickle cell anemia; one heterozygous AS, and 7, with diagnostic of microcytic hypochromic anemia were analyzed. Hemoglobin phenotypes were identified by electrophoresis, fetal hemoglobin was quantificated for alkaline denaturation and the HbA2 for ionic exchange chromatography; -alpha3,7 -thalassemia was detected by mutation identification using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). SS phenotype was confirmed in 10 patients, two were SSF increased, one was SSFincreasedA2increased, and one was ASFincreased (HbF = 2%). The patient diagnosed as AS was SSFincreased (HbF = 21%). AD-patients presented a moderate clinical course of the illness. Five microcytic hypochromic anemia patients were HbAA, one was HbAAA2increased and another HbAAFincreased; those patients present a high hematological and clinical variation. beta-thalassemia was 19%. -alpha3,7-thalassemia was not detected. Infection was most frequent clinical manifestation (respiratory tract infection and intestinal parasitism). These results shows that -alpha3,7-thalassemia are not modulator genetic factors of clinical and hematological manifestations of patients with microcytic hypochromic anemia and sickle cell anemia. We suggest that environmental factors such as respiratory tract infection and intestinal parasitism may be affect the course of illness.

  12. Post-transfusional human retrovirus infection in 41 Italian beta-thalassemic patients.

    PubMed

    Aglianò, A M; Vania, A; Gandini, O; Gradilone, A; Napolitano, M; Albonici, L; Falconieri, P; Digilio, G; Manzari, V; Frati, L

    1992-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that HTLV-I is present in Italy both in endemic form in Southern Apulia and in epidemic form among the population of intravenous drug addicts. In the present paper we intend to evaluate the risk for transfusional HTLV-I transmission in our country, as well as the already known risk for HIV1. A population of 41 polytransfused Italian beta-thalassemic patients was examined by serological methods and PCR (polymerase chain reaction) for human retrovirus infection. Genomic DNA from PBMCs was analyzed by PCR with primer pairs specific for the HTLV-I gag, pol and env regions, and the HTLV-II env region. Two patients were found to be weakly seroreactive to p19 and p24 HTLV-I/HTLV-II proteins by Western blot. The analysis of genomic DNA from PBMCs by PCR revealed sequence homology to HTLV-I only in these two patients. On the contrary, PCR with primer pairs specific for HTLV-II showed no beta-thalassemic patient was infected by this retrovirus. Surprisingly, Western blot analysis for detecting anti-HIV1 antibodies in these polytransfused subjects showed a seropositivity in two patients (not the same found to be infected with HTLV-I) in spite of a screening for HIV1 antibodies in the blood bank. These findings suggest that in Italy polytransfused people should still be considered at risk for HIV1 as well as HTLV-I infection, even if the incidence cannot be evaluated from such a small sample. The authors stress the importance of a through medical history of potential blood donors to eliminate possibly infected subjects.

  13. Immune and neural status of thalassemic patients receiving deferiprone or combined deferiprone and deferoxamine chelation treatment.

    PubMed

    Tourkantoni, Natalie; Athanassiou-Metaxa, Miranda; Zafiriou, Dimitrios; Tzimouli, Vassiliki; Economou, Marina; Taparkou, Antonia; Perifanis, Vassilios; Kanakoudi-Tsakalidou, Florendia

    2008-01-01

    Deferiprone (L1), has previously been reported to be associated with immunological abnormalities in iron loaded thalassemia patients. However, other factors may also have similar effects such as the level of iron overload, chronic immuno-stimulation due to transfusions, splenectomy and deferoxamine (DFO). During chelation therapy with DFO, several complications have been reported, which were due to pharmacological activity and high dose toxicity with regard to both acoustic and visual effects, as well as peripheral nerve disorders that were measured by nerve conduction velocities. The immune and neural status of 44 beta-thalassemic patients, aged 10-30 years (mean 19.4 +/- 4.9), receiving L1 as a monotherapy (n = 21), or in combination with DFO (n = 23), has been followed for 2 years by monitoring the level of immunoglobulins (IgG, IgM, IgA), the level of T and B lymphocytes (CD4/CD8), the auto antibodies: anti nuclear (ANA), anti-double-stranded (anti-ds DNA), anti reticulin (anti-R1), anti-extra nuclear (anti-ENA), anti histone (anti-AHA), anti liver-kidney-muscle (anti-LKM), anti-smooth muscle (anti-SMA), anti-thyroid (anti-ATA), anti-mitochondrial (anti-AMA) antibodies and the C-reactive protein. The percentage of patients with disorders of the immune and nervous system concerned very few cases. None of our patients with pathological findings in their immunological or neurophysiological examinations presented any signs or symptoms of involvement of the immune or nervous system. Further advantages have been identified for the oral use of L1 and its combination with DFO, including synergistic efficacy and lower dosing with limited toxicity.

  14. Clinical presentation of two β-thalassemic Indian patients with 1p36 deletion syndrome: Case report.

    PubMed

    De, Puspal; Chatterjee, Tridip; Chakravarty, Sudipa; Chakravarty, Amit

    2014-09-01

    Here, we present two thalassemic patients (one male and one female), having unusual clinical phenotypes. Both had mental retardation in which one was associated with microcephaly and other had congenital cataract. They were referred to our institute for clinical evaluation and cytogenetic testing. Both patients were tested for presence of abnormal hemoglobin by high performance liquid chromatography and found to be thalassemic. Their β-globin mutation was also determined by amplification refractory mutation system-polymerase chain reaction. The male patient was found to have intervening sequence 1-5 (G-C)/+, indicating β-thalassemia trait and the female was found to have Cod 26 (G-A)/IVS 1-5 (G-C), indicating hemoglobin E-β thalassemia. Their cytogenetic analysis of blood lymphocytes were studied with high-resolution GTG-banding analysis by using chromosome profiling (Cyto-vision software 3.6) on their chromosomes. Results revealed 46,XY,del(1)(p36.21) in the male and 46,XX,del(1)(p36.3) in the female. Their genotype variation showed (based on genome browser) significant gene loss which probably leads to marked phenotype variation. We believe, thalassemia with mental retardation associated with microcephaly and congenital cataract, both having loss in chromosome 1, p36 position, is reported probably first time from India. This report will definitely enlighten all concerns and add to the information in growing literature.

  15. Can homeopathy bring additional benefits to thalassemic patients on hydroxyurea therapy? Encouraging results of a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Antara; Chakrabarty, Sudipa Basu; Karmakar, Susanta Roy; Chakrabarty, Amit; Biswas, Surjyo Jyoti; Haque, Saiful; Das, Debarsi; Paul, Saili; Mandal, Biswapati; Naoual, Boujedaini; Belon, Philippe; Khuda-Bukhsh, Anisur Rahman

    2010-03-01

    Several homeopathic remedies, namely, Pulsatilla Nigricans (30th potency), Ceanothus Americanus (both mother tincture and 6th potency) and Ferrum Metallicum (30th potency) selected as per similia principles were administered to 38 thalassemic patients receiving Hydroxyurea (HU) therapy for a varying period of time. Levels of serum ferritin (SF), fetal hemoglobin (HbF), hemoglobin (Hb), platelet count (PC), mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), white blood cell (WBC) count, bilirubin content, alanine amino transferase (ALT), aspartate amino transferase (AST) and serum total protein content of patients were determined before and 3 months after administration of the homeopathic remedies in combination with HU to evaluate additional benefits, if any, derived by the homeopathic remedies, by comparing the data with those of 38 subjects receiving only HU therapy. Preliminary results indicated that there was a significant decrease in the SF and increase in HbF levels in the combined, treated subjects. Although the changes in other parameters were not so significant, there was a significant decrease in size of spleen in most patients with spleenomegaly and improvement in general health conditions along with an increased gap between transfusions in most patients receiving the combined homeopathic treatment. The homeopathic remedies being inexpensive and without any known side-effects seem to have great potentials in bringing additional benefits to thalassemic patients; particularly in the developing world where blood transfusions suffer from inadequate screening and fall short of the stringent safety standards followed in the developed countries. Further independent studies are encouraged.

  16. A cost-utility and budget impact analysis of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for severe thalassemic patients in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is the only curative treatment available to severe thalassemic patients. The treatment, however, is very costly, particularly in the context of low and middle income countries, and no studies have been carried out to explore its economic justifiability. This study aimed to estimate the cost-utility of HSCT compared with blood transfusions combined with iron chelating therapy (BT-ICT) for severe thalassemia in Thailand, and to investigate the affordability of HSCT using a budget impact analysis. Methods A Markov model was used to estimate the relevant costs and health outcomes over the patients' lifetimes taking a societal perspective as recommended by Thailand's health technology assessment guidelines. All future costs and outcomes were discounted at a rate of 3% per annum. Primary outcomes of interest were lifetime costs, quality adjusted life years (QALYs) gained, and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) in Thai baht (THB) per QALY gained. Results Compared to BT-ICT, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio increased with patient age from 80,700 to 183,000 THB per QALY gained for related HSCT and 209,000 to 953,000 THB per QALY gained for unrelated HSCT among patients aged 1 to 15 years (US$1= 34 THB). The governmental budget impact analysis showed that providing 200 related HSCT to patients aged 1 to 10 years, in accordance with the current infrastructure limitations, would initially require approximately 90 million additional THB per year. Conclusions At a societal willingness to pay of 100,000 THB per QALY gained, related HSCT was likely to be a cost-effective and affordable treatment for young children with severe thalassemia in Thailand. PMID:20633303

  17. Introducing a new histologic scoring system for iron deposition in liver of thalassemic patients, compared with atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tavassoli, Habib; Mahjoub, Fatemeh; Jahanzad, Eesa; Farahmand, Fatemeh; Izadyar, Mina; Sani, Mehri Najafi; Rashti, Mohammad Lamei; Aramli, Mohammad Sadegh

    2015-01-01

    Iron deposition in liver is a major finding in thalassemic patients and because of direct iron toxicity to liver it is associated with several consequences for example liver fibrosis. Liver biopsies from 63 patients were evaluated, 40 (63.5%) were male and 20 (36.5%) were female. The mean age of the patients was 8.01 ± 3.7 and the age range was from 1.8 to 15 years. Histologic grading and staging was performed for each case according to modified HAI (Hepatitis Activity Index) system. Iron scoring was performed according to Sindram & Marx and MTK1-3 scoring systems. The mean (SD) dry weight (dw) of liver specimens was 1.34 (0.11) mg (range 0.20 to 3.80 mg). The mean (SD) of hepatic iron concentration was 230.9 (121.2)μmol/g dry weight. The relationship between the variables HIC, HII (hepatic iron index) and all histological gradings of iron (S&M and MTK1-3) was very strong. The relationship between the HIC and staging by HAI method was good. Significant differences were identified between the mean HIC in scores 1&2 of all histological iron scorings (S&M and MTK1-3), but no significant differences identified between mean HIC in other adjacent scores in all histological iron scorings (S&M and MTK1, 2 and 3). New scoring system introduced by us in this study which considered size and density of iron granules as well as zone of iron deposition was very much the same as simple Sindram and Marx classification.

  18. High-dose intravenous desferrioxamine (DFO) delivery in four thalassemic patients allergic to subcutaneous DFO administration.

    PubMed

    Lombardo, T; Ferro, G; Frontini, V; Percolla, S

    1996-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that allergy to desferrioxamine is not an immunologic mechanism, but arises from a local effect on the dermal mast cell, we have treated four patients who were not receiving chelation therapy because of hypersensitivity to standard subcutaneous (SC) therapy, with high-dose desferrioxamine (DFO) by the intravenous (IV) route. Three patients had central venous access ports implanted on the anterior chest wall. The fourth patient had the therapy delivered by the peripheral vein route. All patients had the drug delivered via an elastomeric infusor. Intravenous therapy was successful for all patients. During one year of therapy no local or systemic allergic manifestations were noted. In addition, no impairment of hearing or vision or any catheter complications were reported. A very high level of patient compliance to the therapy resulted in dramatically decreased iron stores and ferritin levels (2,759 ng/ml to 717.5 ng/ml) and a significant improvement in the clinical status of all patients. The absence of allergic episodes in this patient group after 1 year of i.v. therapy would strongly support the hypothesis that SC DFO allergy is related to a direct effect on dermal mast cells and is not an immunological reaction. This study suggests that patients with severe allergy to SC DFO can therefore safely receive their chelation therapy via the i.v. route.

  19. Evidence for multidimensional resilience in adult patients with transfusion-dependent thalassemias: Is it more common than we think?

    PubMed

    Almahmoud, S Y; Coifman, K G; Ross, G S; Kleinert, D; Giardina, P

    2016-06-01

    Life expectancy of patients with transfusion-dependent thalassemias has increased with the development of improved treatment over the last few decades. However, β-thalassemia disorder still has considerable lifetime treatment demands and heightened risk of frequent complications due to transfusion-transmitted infections and iron overload, which may affect thalassemic patients' functioning in different domains. The vast majority of published studies on thalassemic patients have focused on children and adolescent functioning, and little research has examined adults. Hence, the current study was planned to examine the functioning and resilience of adult thalassemic patients in a comprehensive way. We examined multidimensional resilience and functioning across different domains (psychological adjustment, treatment adherence, social functioning and occupational functioning). We also examined demographic and medical variables that may relate to resilience and functioning. Participants were adult patients [n = 38; age M = 31·63, standard deviation (SD) = 7·72; 72% female] with transfusion-dependent thalassemia in treatment in a hospital in the northeastern United States. The results suggest that most adult thalassemic patients tend to be resilient, demonstrating good functioning in four main domains: psychological adjustment, treatment adherence, social functioning and occupational functioning. Despite the considerable demands of their illness, adult thalassemic patients appeared to be adapting well, demonstrating evidence of multidimensional resilience. © 2016 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  20. Reticulocyte hemoglobin equivalent to detect thalassemia and thalassemic hemoglobin variants.

    PubMed

    Sudmann, Å A; Piehler, A; Urdal, P

    2012-12-01

    Thalassemia and iron deficiency may both result in hypochromic microcytic anemia. Hematological algorithms that differentiate the two are mainly established in adult selected diagnostic groups. We aimed at creating an algorithm applicable in the presence of children, hemoglobin variants, and iron deficiency. Our study material constituted blood samples referred during 1 year for routine diagnostics of hemoglobinopathy. We included 443 samples, of which 37% were from children 3 months or older. We found β-thalassemia trait (n = 100), α-thalassemia (n = 75), combined α-/β-thalassemia (n = 14), hemoglobin variants (n = 42), and no-hemoglobinopathy (n = 207), of whom 107 had a ferritin at or below 20 μg/L. We included reticulocyte hemoglobin equivalent, ferritin, and erythrocyte count in our algorithm. Our algorithm differentiated β-thalassemia trait from no-hemoglobinopathy with a sensitivity of 99% at 83% specificity. It performed better than other published algorithms when applied to all patient samples, while equally or moderately better in the 63% adult samples. Our algorithm also detected the clinically significant α-thalassemias, and most of the combined α-/β-thalassemias and thalassemic hemoglobin variants. Our algorithm efficiently differentiated thalassemia and thalassemic hemoglobin variants from iron deficiency in children and adults. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Is ABO mismatch another risk factor for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in pediatric thalassemic patients?

    PubMed

    Atay, Didem; Erbey, Fatih; Akcay, Arzu; Ozturk, Gulyuz

    2015-09-01

    The ABO incompatibility between donor and recipient is not considered a barrier to successful allogeneic HSCT. Nevertheless, conflicting data still exist about the influence of ABO incompatibility on transplant outcome in pediatric patients with thalassemia. Fifty-one children with beta-thalassemia major who underwent allogeneic HSCT were enrolled this study. Twenty-three of them (45%) received an ABO-incompatible transplant [minor ABO mismatch: six (26%), major ABO mismatch: fourteen (61%), and bidirectional mismatch: three (13%)]. In this study, ABO incompatibility did not significantly impair GVHD, VOD, neutrophil and platelet engraftment, TRM, OS and TFS. Particularly in major and bidirectional ABO-mismatched patients, a delayed erythroid recovery was recorded as compared to the group receiving an ABO-compatible graft (median time, 31 and 38 days vs. 19.5 days; p: 0.02 and p: 0.03). Median time to red cell transfusion independence was significantly longer in major ABO-incompatible patients (median time, 87 days vs. 32 days; p: 0.001). Therefore, whenever feasible, major ABO-mismatched donors should be avoided in HSCT recipients, to prevent delayed erythroid recovery with prolonged RBC transfusion needs and impaired quality of life.

  2. [Thalassemic syndromes and anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Olivé, M; Mora, A; Ballvé, M; Cortés, C; Cabarrocas, E

    1992-01-01

    Thalassemic syndromes are produced by a quantitative defect in the synthesis of globin chains of hemoglobin. They are classified according to the severity of the clinical picture and to the type of globin chain that is affected. Physiopathology, clinical picture, and treatment of thalassemias are discussed in this work. Thalassemia minor does not create, in general, anesthetic problems. In cases of thalassemia major one should consider not only problems derived from the severity of the anemia it self, but also those related to transfusional therapy, and to bony malformations that may disturb tracheal intubation. Discussion on the management of homozygotic thalassemia during the pre, per, and postoperative phase completes this revision.

  3. Is Supplementation Efficacious in Maintaining Adequate Plasma Levels of Vitamin A and E for Thalassemic Patients Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation? A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Hajimahmoodi, Mannan; Hadjibabaie, Molouk; Hamidieh, Amir-Ali; Ahmadvand, Alireza; Kazempanah, Sahebeh; Sadeghi, Naficeh; Mansouri, Ava; Ghavamzadeh, Ardeshir

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Thalassemia along with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) can lead to major oxidative stress. Vitamins A and E are antioxidants which protect membrane from lipid peroxidation. We sought to determine for the first time, whether vitamins A and E supplementation is efficacious in maintaining or increasing plasma level of these vitamins in thalassemic children undergoing HSCT. Methods: A cross-sectional study was performed on 50 children with β-thalassemia major hospitalized for HSCT. Patients took a daily multivitamin. Plasma vitamins A and E levels were measured at four different times: on admission, HSCT day (day 0), day 7 and day 14 after HSCT. Findings : Plasma vitamin A and E were abnormal on admission in most patients (62.0% and 60.0% respectively). Ratio of patient with normal to abnormal plasma level of the vitamins improved from baseline to a peak on day 7 then deteriorated afterward until day 14. There was an increasingly positive correlation between daily oral intake and plasma vitamin A at different times, but plasma vitamin E showed inverse correlation at first which tended towards no correlation subsequently. In multivariate analysis, supplementation significantly changed plasma level of vitamin A at different measurement time (P=0.001) within study subjects. But, plasma level of vitamin E showed no significant difference (P=0.2). Conclusion: Our findings suggest that oral supplementation could have beneficial effects due to increasing plasma vitamin A level and preventing plasma vitamin E depletion. PMID:25793043

  4. Hypercoagulability in splenectomized thalassemic patients detected by whole-blood thromboelastometry, but not by thrombin generation in platelet-poor plasma

    PubMed Central

    Tripodi, Armando; Cappellini, Maria Domenica; Chantarangkul, Veena; Padovan, Lidia; Fasulo, Maria Rosaria; Marcon, Alessia; Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio

    2009-01-01

    Background The mechanisms responsible for the increased thrombotic risk associated with thalassemia are still unclear. They might be related to the effects of red blood cell or endothelial cell derangements, increased numbers of platelets as well as abnormal plasma coagulation. Design and Methods To evaluate the relative role played by cells and plasma we investigated 169 patients with thalassemia by means of thromboelastometry and thrombin generation tests. Thromboelastometry measures indices of the viscoelastic properties of whole blood after activation of coagulation and is characterized by the clotting time, which may be considered as a conventional coagulation time, clot formation time, defined as the time needed for the clot to reach a fixed firmness, and the maximum clot firmness, defined as the maximal amplitude of the tracing. Results All the thromboelastometry parameters determined in whole blood (including shortened clotting time and clot formation time, and increased maximum clot firmness), were consistent with hypercoagulability, especially in splenectomized patients. Conversely, thrombin generation as determined in platelet-poor plasma was not. Conclusions These findings point to blood cells and/or platelets rather than to plasma abnormalities as the most important determinants of the thrombotic risk observed in thalassemic patients who had been splenectomized. These results might have important diagnostic and therapeutic implications. PMID:19648162

  5. The Ability of Lumbar Spine DXA and Phalanx QUS to Detect Previous Fractures in Young Thalassemic Patients With Hypogonadism, Hypothyroidism, Diabetes, and Hepatitis-B: A 2-Year Subgroup Analysis From the Taranto Area of Apulia Region

    PubMed Central

    Neglia, Cosimo; Peluso, Angelo; di Rosa, Salvatore; Ferrarese, Antonio; Di Tanna, Gianluca; Caiaffa, Vincenzo; Benvenuto, Marco; Cozma, Alexandru; Chitano, Giovanna; Agnello, Nadia; Paladini, Daniele; Baldi, Nicola; Distante, Alessandro; Piscitelli, Prisco

    2013-01-01

    Background: Osteoporosis is a leading cause of morbidity in patients affected by β-thalassemia major or intermediate; we aimed to assess the association between demineralization observed in young thalassemic patients. Methods: A total of 88 patients with β-thalassemia were recruited at Microcitemia Center of Taranto Hospital under the Prevention Osteoporosis and Fractures research project from 2008 to 2010. All the patients were screened with both dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and quantitative ultrasound (QUS). T score and Z score values were obtained for each subject. Results: The overall prevalence of demineralization was 84% with DXA and 70% with QUS, whereas normality was found in 16% of patients screened with DXA and in 30% of cases with QUS. Hypogonadism, hypothyroidism, diabetes mellitus, hepatitis-B, and the presence of previous fragility fractures were significantly associated with the demineralization status (lower T scores values) both with DXA and QUS. Conclusion: Our data confirm that DXA and QUS examinations are both useful for detecting bone demineralization in thalassemic patients. PMID:23652868

  6. Study of behavioral problems in multi-transfused thalassemic children.

    PubMed

    Hongally, Chandrashekar; Benakappa, Asha D; Reena, Shankar

    2012-10-01

    Beta-thalassemia major is a chronic disorder of blood, having an extensive impact on the affected child. It involves lifelong therapeutic regime, with repeated blood transfusions. With improved life expectancy, due to improved medical management psychosocial aspects of thalassemia are gaining importance. To assess the behavioral problems in multi-transfused thalassemic children and psychosocial factors affecting them. The study was conducted in a tertiary care level hospital and research institute catering mainly to a population of low socioeconomic status. The study was a cross-sectional study involving 50 multi-transfused thalassemic children of age 5-10 years. Fifty multi-transfused thalassemic children, aged 5-10 years, not suffering from any other major medical illness, were included. Child Behavior Check List (Achenbach) (CBCL) was used to collect data from each parent regarding the child's behavior. Parental Attitude Scale (Rangaswamy 1989) was applied. Descriptive statistical analysis was used with analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Student's t test to find the significance of data. The CBCL total scores were high in 32% patients, indicating the presence of behavioral problems. Higher CBCL scores were found in children of older age group, those with poor school performance, whose mothers' education was more than eighth standard, had history of death of thalassemic relative in family, greater duration of diagnosed illness, poor pre-transfusion hemoglobin level, and who had longer periods of school absenteeism. Behavioral problems are common in multi-transfused thalassemic children. Early diagnosis and intervention of behavioral problems in these children would make them cope with thalassemia better.

  7. [Psychological problems of thalassemic subjects].

    PubMed

    Guasco, G; La Mantia, A; Cuniolo, A

    1987-01-01

    Analysis of psychological problems of the thalassemic subject shown with these following tests: Der Baumtest, drawing of the human figure. Moreover, we made meetings with all boys and their parents during their stay in the day-hospital. These tests have shown subjective conflicts (fear and uncertainty of future due to illness felt as aggression and fault, depressive moods and loneliness, problems of communication, hope in a magic recovery opposite to the constant discomfort of the therapeutic dependence) and relational conflicts (ambivalence towards parents, difficulties in becoming a part of the social and school environment).

  8. [Psychological problems of thalassemic subjects].

    PubMed

    Guasco, G; Gamalero, P C; Cuniolo, A

    1985-01-01

    Analysis of psychological problems of the thalassemic subject shown with these following tests: T.A.T., Rogers, Rosenzweig. Moreover, we made meetings with all boys and their parents during their stay in the day-hospital. These tests have shown subjective conflicts (fear and uncertainty of future due to the illness felt as aggression and fault, depressive moods and loneliness, problems of communication, hope in a magic recovery opposite to the constant discomfort of the therapeutic dependence) and relational conflicts (ambivalence towards parents, difficulties in becoming a part of the social and school environment).

  9. Thalassemic osteopathy: a new marker of bone deposition.

    PubMed

    Baldini, M; Forti, S; Orsatti, A; Marcon, A; Ulivieri, F M; Airaghi, L; Zanaboni, L; Cappellini, M D

    2014-01-01

    Osteopathy represents a prominent cause of morbidity in patients with beta-thalassemia major (TM) and manifests as osteopenia/osteoporosis. Biochemical turnover markers (BTMs) are considered a useful, non-invasive tool for the clinical follow-up of osteoporotic patients; they can provide a dynamic view of the remodeling process and give information on the metabolic activity of bone tissue as well as on the pathogenesis of bone loss. The amino-terminal pro-peptide of type I procollagen (P1NP) is a recently introduced marker that is considered the most sensitive index of bone formation. Although demonstrated in several categories of patients with bone disease, there is little information on the clinical usefulness of this bone formation index in thalassemic patients. We evaluated the P1NP levels of 53 adult patients with b-thalassemia major (21 males and 32 females, mean age 34.5 ± 5.7, range 22-46 years) and associated osteopathy. We investigated the correlation between P1NP and bone condition as examined by dual X-ray photon absorptiometry and with BTMs expressing bone resorption and bone mineralization (carboxyterminal collagen cross-linked (CTX) terminal regions of type I collagen and osteocalcin, respectively). P1NP serum levels were correlated with CTX levels (r=0.545, p<0.001); the results were unchanged when males and females, as well as osteoporotic and osteopenic subgroups, were considered separately. No correlation was demonstrated neither between OC and CTX (r=0.17, p=ns), nor between P1NP and OC levels (r=0.11, p=ns). No correlation was demonstrated among the P1NP/CTX ratio and age, OC or densitometric values and no difference was found in the same ratio between osteopenic (0.19 ± 0.16) and osteoporotic (0.15 ± 0.14) patients. Similar results were obtained for the OC/CTX ratio, as it was not correlated with age, P1NP or densitometric values. This is the first report of circulating P1NP in patients with TM-associated osteoporosis. P1NP and CTX assays

  10. Increased platelet adhesion under flow conditions is induced by both thalassemic platelets and red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Goldschmidt, Neta; Spectre, Galia; Brill, Alexander; Zelig, Orly; Goldfarb, Ada; Rachmilewitz, Eliezer; Varon, David

    2008-11-01

    Thromboembolic complications are not uncommon in thalassemia. Previous studies suggest increased platelet aggregation and a potential role of pathological changes in the red blood cell (RBC) lipid membrane, induced by oxidative stress. In the present study, platelet adhesion and the effect of thalassemic RBC on platelet adhesion under flow conditions were evaluated, using the Cone and Plate (let) Analyzer(CPA). Twenty-two beta-thalassemia patients and 22 blood type-matched healthy controls were studied. An increased platelet adhesion (% surface coverage, SC), was observed in patients as compared to controls (p < 0.05). When platelet count and haematocrit were normalized by autologous reconstitution, a significant increase in platelet aggregation (average size, AS) was observed (p < 0.05). Increased platelet adhesion (SC and AS), was demonstrated in six patients with a history of thrombosis as compared to 16 patients without any history of thrombosis (p < or = 0.007) and in 17 splenectomized patients as compared to five non-splenectomized patients (p = 0.003). In reconstitution studies, thalassemic RBC mixed with normal platelet-rich plasma significantly increased platelet adhesion compared to normal RBC (SC p < 0.03, AS p < 0.02). Thalassemic platelets reconstituted with normal RBC, had increased aggregation (AS, p < 0.004) in comparison with normal platelets. The results indicate that increased platelet adhesion in beta-thalassemia is induced by both platelets and RBC. Increased platelet adhesion correlated with clinical thrombotic events and thus may suggest a mechanism of thrombosis in thalassemic patients. The potential application of the CPA in identifying thalassemic patients with high risk for thrombosis should be studied prospectively in a larger cohort of patients.

  11. The Antioxidant Effect of Erythropoietin on Thalassemic Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Amer, Johnny; Dana, Mutaz; Fibach, Eitan

    2010-01-01

    Because of its stimulating effect on RBC production, erythropoietin (Epo) is used to treat anemia, for example, in patients on dialysis or on chemotherapy. In β-thalassemia, where Epo levels are low relative to the degree of anemia, Epo treatment improves the anemia state. Since RBC and platelets of these patients are under oxidative stress, which may be involved in anemia and thromboembolic complications, we investigated Epo as an antioxidant. Using flow-cytometry technology, we found that in vitro treatment with Epo of blood cells from these patients increased their glutathione content and reduced their reactive oxygen species, membrane lipid peroxides, and external phosphatidylserine. This resulted in reduced susceptibility of RBC to undergo hemolysis and phagocytosis. Injection of Epo into heterozygous (Hbbth3/+) β-thalassemic mice reduced the oxidative markers within 3 hours. Our results suggest that, in addition to stimulating RBC and fetal hemoglobin production, Epo might alleviate symptoms of hemolytic anemias as an antioxidant. PMID:21490911

  12. Mixed chimerism evolution is associated with T regulatory type 1 (Tr1) cells in a β-thalassemic patient after haploidentical haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Andreani, Marco; Gianolini, Monica Emma; Testi, Manuela; Battarra, MariaRosa; Tiziana, Galluccio; Morrone, Aldo; Sodani, Pietro; Lucarelli, Guido; Roncarolo, Maria-Grazia; Gregori, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    In a cohort of β-Thalassemia (β-Thal) transplanted with haploidentical-HSCT we identified one transplanted patient characterized by persistent mixed chimerism (PMC) for several months after HSCT. In this unique β-Thal patient we assessed the donor engraftment overtime after transplantation, the potential loss of the non-shared HLA haplotype, and the presence of CD49b+LAG-3+ T regulatory type 1 (Tr1) cells, previously demonstrated to be associated with PMC after HLA-related HSCT for β-Thal. The majority of the patient's erythrocytes were of donor origin, whereas T cells were initially mostly derived from the recipient, no HLA loss, but an increased frequency of circulating Tr1 cells were observed. For the first time, we showed that when the proportion of residual donor cells decreases, the frequency of CD49b+LAG-3+ Tr1 cells declines, reaching the levels present in healthy subjects. These findings confirm previous results obtained in transplant related settings for β-Thal, and supported the central role of Tr1 cells in promoting and maintaining PMC after allo-HSCT. PMID:26650878

  13. Growth hormone – insulin-like growth factor-I axis and bone mineral density in adults with thalassemia major

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Ashraf; De Sanctis, Vincenzo; Yassin, Mohamed; Abdelrahman, Mohamed O.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Bone disease and short stature are frequent clinical features of patients with beta-thalassaemia major. Dysfunction of the GH-IGF-1 axis has been described in many thalassemics children and adolescents with short stature and reduced growth velocity. Assessment of the GH-IGF-1 axis in short adults with TM after attainment of final height may be required to select those who are candidates for replacement therapy and to prevent the development of bone disease. The aim of our study was to investigate GH secretion in adult thalassemic patients in relation to their bone mineral density (BMD) and serum ferritin concentrations. Materials and Methods: We performed clonidine stimulation test in 30 thalassemic patients (18 males, 12 females) with a mean age of 31.5± 7.2 years. The cut-off level for GH response was set at 7ug/l, according to the literature. Serum ferritin, IGF-I, liver enzymes, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and type 1 Collagen Carboxy Telopeptide (CCT1) were also determined. Results: We diagnosed GH deficiency (GHD) in 12 patients (40%) and IGF-I deficiency (IGF-I SDS <-2) was diagnosed in 20 patients (67%). Adult patients with TM had significantly decreased IGF-I concentrations and bone mineral density (BMD) at the femur neck and lumbar spine compared to normal controls. Thalassemic patients with GHD and IGF-I deficiency had significantly lower BMD T score at the lumbar spine compared to patients with normal GH and IGF-I levels. Thalassemic patients had higher serum CCT1 concentrations compared to normal controls. Peak GH levels were correlated significantly with IGF- I concentrations and IGF-I levels were correlated significantly with the height SDS (HtSDS) of thalassemic patients. Neither GH peak nor IGF-I concentrations were correlated to serum ferritin concentrations. Conclusions: We conclude that GH status should be tested in adult thalassemic patients especially those with short stature and/or decreased BMD. Clonidine test appears to be

  14. Increased hepcidin in transferrin-treated thalassemic mice correlates with increased liver BMP2 expression and decreased hepatocyte ERK activation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huiyong; Choesang, Tenzin; Li, Huihui; Sun, Shuming; Pham, Petra; Bao, Weili; Feola, Maria; Westerman, Mark; Li, Guiyuan; Follenzi, Antonia; Blanc, Lionel; Rivella, Stefano; Fleming, Robert E; Ginzburg, Yelena Z

    2016-03-01

    Iron overload results in significant morbidity and mortality in β-thalassemic patients. Insufficient hepcidin is implicated in parenchymal iron overload in β-thalassemia and approaches to increase hepcidin have therapeutic potential. We have previously shown that exogenous apo-transferrin markedly ameliorates ineffective erythropoiesis and increases hepcidin expression in Hbb(th1/th1) (thalassemic) mice. We utilize in vivo and in vitro systems to investigate effects of exogenous apo-transferrin on Smad and ERK1/2 signaling, pathways that participate in hepcidin regulation. Our results demonstrate that apo-transferrin increases hepcidin expression in vivo despite decreased circulating and parenchymal iron concentrations and unchanged liver Bmp6 mRNA expression in thalassemic mice. Hepatocytes from apo-transferrin-treated mice demonstrate decreased ERK1/2 pathway and increased serum BMP2 concentration and hepatocyte BMP2 expression. Furthermore, hepatocyte ERK1/2 phosphorylation is enhanced by neutralizing anti-BMP2/4 antibodies and suppressed in vitro in a dose-dependent manner by BMP2, resulting in converse effects on hepcidin expression, and hepatocytes treated with MEK/ERK1/2 inhibitor U0126 in combination with BMP2 exhibit an additive increase in hepcidin expression. Lastly, bone marrow erythroferrone expression is normalized in apo-transferrin treated thalassemic mice but increased in apo-transferrin injected wild-type mice. These findings suggest that increased hepcidin expression after exogenous apo-transferrin is in part independent of erythroferrone and support a model in which apo-transferrin treatment in thalassemic mice increases BMP2 expression in the liver and other organs, decreases hepatocellular ERK1/2 activation, and increases nuclear Smad to increase hepcidin expression in hepatocytes.

  15. Molecular investigations of β-thalassemic children in Erbil governorate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Ahmad N.; Al-Attar, Mustafa S.

    2017-09-01

    The present work studies the molecular investigation of 40 thalassemic carriers using polymerase chain reaction. Forty thalassemic carriers who were registered and treated at Erbil thalassemic center and twenty apparently healthy children have been included in the present study. Ages of both groups ranged between 1-18 years. Four primers used to detect four different beta thalassemia mutations they were codon 8/9, codon 8, codon 41/42 and IVS-1-5. The two most common mutations detected among thalassemia group were Cd8/9 with 8 cases (20%) and Cd-8 with 6 cases (15%) followed by codon 41/42 with 4 cases (10%) which investigated and detected for the first time in Erbil governorate through the present study and finally IVS-1-5 with 3 cases (7.5%), while no any cases detected among control group.

  16. Therapeutic benefits in thalassemic mice transplanted with long term cultured bone marrow cells

    PubMed Central

    Hatada, Seigo; Walton, William; Hatada, Tomoko; Wofford, Anne; Fox, Raymond; Liu, Naiyou; Lill, Michael C.; Fair, Jeffery H.; Kirby, Suzanne L.; Smithies, Oliver

    2011-01-01

    Objective Autologous bone marrow (BM) cells with a faulty gene corrected by gene targeting could provide a powerful therapeutic option for patients with genetic blood diseases. Achieving this goal is hindered by the low abundance of therapeutically useful BM cells and the difficulty of maintaining them in tissue culture long enough for completing gene targeting without them differentiating. Our objective was to devise a simple long-term culture system, using unfractioned BM cells, that maintains and expands therapeutically useful cells for ≥4 weeks. Materials and Methods From 2 to 60 million BM cells from wild-type (WT) mice, or from mice carrying a truncated erythropoietin receptor transgene (tEpoR-tg), were plated with or without irradiated fetal-liver derived AFT024 stromal cells in 25 cm2 culture flasks. Four-week cultured cells were analyzed and transplanted into sublethally irradiated thalassemic mice (1 million cells / mouse). Results After 4 weeks, the cultures with AFT024 cells had extensive “cobblestone” areas. Optimum expansion of Sca-1 positive cells was 5.5-fold with 20 × 106 WT cells/flask and 27-fold with 2 × 106 tEpoR-tg cells. More than 85% of thalassemic mice transplanted with either type of cells had almost complete reversal of their thalassemic phenotype for at least 6 months, including blood smear dysmorphology, reticulocytosis, high ferritin plasma levels and hepatic/renal hemosiderosis. Conclusion When plated at high cell densities on irradiated fetal-liver derived stromal cells, BM cells from WT mice maintain their therapeutic potential for 4 weeks in culture, which is sufficient time for correction of a faulty gene by targeting. PMID:21184801

  17. Alloimmunization to red cells in thalassemics: emerging problem and future strategies.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Richa; Singh, Deepak Kumar; Singh, Bharat; Rusia, Usha

    2011-10-01

    To evaluate the magnitude of red cell alloimmunization in regularly transfused patients with thalassemia major and analyse factors responsible for development of antibodies. This cross sectional study was conducted on 116 thalassemics receiving regular transfusions. All the patients underwent antibody screening. Patients with positive antibody screen were further tested for antibody identification. The data was analysed to find out the frequency, pattern and factors influencing red cell alloimmunization secondary to multiple transfusions. Mean age of the patients was 14 years (range 1.5-27 years). Red cell alloantibodies were found in 11 patients (9.48%). In four (36%) patients first transfusion was given before 6 months of age and in seven (64%) patients, first transfusion was given after two years of age. The interval between consecutive transfusions varied from 18 to 35 days. The most common antibody was Anti-E found in 4 (36.4%) patients, followed by Anti-K (three patients, 27.2%), Anti-Kp(a) (two patients, 18.2%) and Anti-C(w) (two patients, 18.2%). The interval from first transfusion to antibody development varied from 1.5 to 14 years. None of the eight out of 116 patients, who underwent splenectomy showed any antibody development. The rate of red cell alloimmunization was found to be 9.48% in thalassemics receiving regular transfusions. The incidence of alloantibody development was higher if first transfusion was received at more than 2 years of age. Early institution of red cell transfusions and Rh and Kell phenotyping followed by provision of matched blood could prevent alloimmunization. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Desferrioxamine ototoxicity in an adult transfusion-dependent population.

    PubMed

    Chiodo, A A; Alberti, P W; Sher, G D; Francombe, W H; Tyler, B

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the incidence of hearing loss in a population of 75 adult (19-68 years old) transfusion-dependent patients with thalassemia major, sickle cell disease, Diamond-Blackfan anemia, and various other hematologic disorders treated with regular transfusion schedules. Ninety-three percent (70/75) of patients had a history of long-term subcutaneous or intravenous desferrioxamine therapy. The patients underwent routine otolaryngologic history and physical examination, along with standard pure-tone audiometry at 250, 500, 1000, 2000, 3000, 4000, 6000, and 8000 Hz, with hearing loss defined as 25 dB or greater at one or more frequencies. Hearing loss was present in 57% (43/75) of patients. More importantly, hearing loss attributable to desferrioxamine ototoxicity was present in 29% (22/75) of patients. Sixteen patients treated previously with desferrioxamine were switched to the experimental oral chelating agent, L1. Eight of these 16 patients had hearing loss attributable to desferrioxamine, with 5 of these patients worsening with the experimental oral chelating agent L1. Seventy-nine percent (59/75) of patients were thalassemic. Fifty-four percent (33/59) of these thalassemic patients had hearing loss. However, 35% (21/59) of the thalassemic patients had hearing loss attributable to desferrioxamine ototoxicity. All thalassemic patients with desferrioxamine ototoxicity had high-frequency sensorineural hearing loss, with 33% (7/21) having a notch at 6 kHz. In addition, 5% (1/21) had notching at 3 khz. Few of the hearing losses were disabling. Management of these patients requires proper dosing of desferrioxamine and transfusion therapy, along with regular monitoring of body iron burden and hemoglobin. In addition, regular otolaryngologic and audiometric follow-up with special care to include the frequencies of 3 and 6 kHz may help recognize and prevent permanent ototoxicity.

  19. [Growth velocity in thalassemic children receiving different protocols of chelating therapy].

    PubMed

    Elena, M G; Fedele, A; Gianino, P; Giordanino, S; Murru, P; Tosi, C; Vannelli, S

    1992-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare growth velocity in thalassemic children using two different treatment protocols. Thalassemic children were initially treated with high daily doses of desferrioxamine, obtaining a good rate of initial growth which then unexpectedly slowed down later. The introduction of a new treatment protocol reducing both the dose and frequency with which the drug was administered provoked a significant increase in the rate of growth greater than that observed in the group treated using the previous protocol.

  20. Hepcidin as a therapeutic tool to limit iron overload and improve anemia in β-thalassemic mice

    PubMed Central

    Gardenghi, Sara; Ramos, Pedro; Marongiu, Maria Franca; Melchiori, Luca; Breda, Laura; Guy, Ella; Muirhead, Kristen; Rao, Niva; Roy, Cindy N.; Andrews, Nancy C.; Nemeth, Elizabeta; Follenzi, Antonia; An, Xiuli; Mohandas, Narla; Ginzburg, Yelena; Rachmilewitz, Eliezer A.; Giardina, Patricia J.; Grady, Robert W.; Rivella, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    Excessive iron absorption is one of the main features of β-thalassemia and can lead to severe morbidity and mortality. Serial analyses of β-thalassemic mice indicate that while hemoglobin levels decrease over time, the concentration of iron in the liver, spleen, and kidneys markedly increases. Iron overload is associated with low levels of hepcidin, a peptide that regulates iron metabolism by triggering degradation of ferroportin, an iron-transport protein localized on absorptive enterocytes as well as hepatocytes and macrophages. Patients with β-thalassemia also have low hepcidin levels. These observations led us to hypothesize that more iron is absorbed in β-thalassemia than is required for erythropoiesis and that increasing the concentration of hepcidin in the body of such patients might be therapeutic, limiting iron overload. Here we demonstrate that a moderate increase in expression of hepcidin in β-thalassemic mice limits iron overload, decreases formation of insoluble membrane-bound globins and reactive oxygen species, and improves anemia. Mice with increased hepcidin expression also demonstrated an increase in the lifespan of their red cells, reversal of ineffective erythropoiesis and splenomegaly, and an increase in total hemoglobin levels. These data led us to suggest that therapeutics that could increase hepcidin levels or act as hepcidin agonists might help treat the abnormal iron absorption in individuals with β-thalassemia and related disorders. PMID:21099112

  1. Regenerative Endodontics for Adult Patients.

    PubMed

    He, Ling; Kim, Sahng G; Gong, Qimei; Zhong, Juan; Wang, Sainan; Zhou, Xuedong; Ye, Ling; Ling, Junqi; Mao, Jeremy J

    2017-09-01

    The goal of endodontics is to save teeth. Since inception, endodontic treatments are performed to obturate disinfected root canals with inert materials such as gutta-percha. Although teeth can be saved after successful endodontic treatments, they are devitalized and therefore susceptible to reinfections and fractures. The American Association of Endodontists (AAE) has made a tremendous effort to revitalize disinfected immature permanent teeth in children and adolescents with diagnoses including pulp necrosis or apical periodontitis. The American Dental Association (ADA) in 2011 issued several clinical codes for regenerative endodontic procedures or apical revascularization in necrotic immature permanent teeth in children and adolescents. These AAE and ADA initiatives have stimulated robust interest in devising a multitude of tissue engineering approaches for dental pulp and dentin regeneration. Can the concept of regenerative endodontics be extended to revitalize mature permanent teeth with diagnoses including irreversible pulpitis and/or pulp necrosis in adults? The present article was written not only to summarize emerging findings to revitalize mature permanent teeth in adult patients but also to identify challenges and strategies that focus on realizing the goal of regenerative endodontics in adults. We further present clinical cases and describe the biological basis of potential regenerative endodontic procedures in adults. This article explores the frequently asked question if regenerative endodontic therapies should be developed for dental pulp and/or dentin regeneration in adults, who consist of the great majority of endodontic patients. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A novel beta-Thalassemic allele due to a two nucleotide deletion: beta76 (-GC).

    PubMed

    Foulon, Karine; Rochette, Jacques; Cadet, Estelle

    2007-01-01

    We have identified and characterized a novel beta-thalassemic mutation in a North African adult. The molecular defect consists of a two nucleotide (nt) deletion in the beta-globin gene at codon 76 [beta76 (-GC), c.229-230delGC]. This frameshift mutation generates a TGA stop codon at position 89. The carrier presented with mild microcytic anemia (Hb 12.8 g/dL, MCV 60 fL), no detectable Hb F, an elevated Hb A2 level (5.5%) with no other mutation in the beta-globin gene and none of the more common known deletions in the alpha-globin cluster. No abnormal hemoglobin (Hb) was present in routine electrophoresis or in high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analyses. Pathologic inclusions were absent in both mature red cells and in reticulocytes. This observation reinforces the hypothesis that nonsense and frameshift mutations that result in a premature stop codon in exon 1 or exon 2 inherited in the heterozygous state do not generate dominant beta-thalassemia (thal). This is the first example of a premature stop codon at position 89.

  3. Therapeutic levels of fetal hemoglobin in erythroid progeny of β-thalassemic CD34+ cells after lentiviral vector-mediated gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Wilber, Andrew; Hargrove, Phillip W.; Kim, Yoon-Sang; Riberdy, Janice M.; Sankaran, Vijay G.; Papanikolaou, Eleni; Georgomanoli, Maria; Anagnou, Nicholas P.; Orkin, Stuart H.; Nienhuis, Arthur W.

    2011-01-01

    β-Thalassemia major results from severely reduced or absent expression of the β-chain of adult hemoglobin (α2β2;HbA). Increased levels of fetal hemoglobin (α2γ2;HbF), such as occurs with hereditary persistence of HbF, ameliorate the severity of β-thalassemia, raising the potential for genetic therapy directed at enhancing HbF. We used an in vitro model of human erythropoiesis to assay for enhanced production of HbF after gene delivery into CD34+ cells obtained from mobilized peripheral blood of normal adults or steady-state bone marrow from patients with β-thalassemia major. Lentiviral vectors encoding (1) a human γ-globin gene with or without an insulator, (2) a synthetic zinc-finger transcription factor designed to interact with the γ-globin gene promoters, or (3) a short-hairpin RNA targeting the γ-globin gene repressor, BCL11A, were tested. Erythroid progeny of normal CD34+ cells demonstrated levels of HbF up to 21% per vector copy. For β-thalassemic CD34+ cells, similar gene transfer efficiencies achieved HbF production ranging from 45% to 60%, resulting in up to a 3-fold increase in the total cellular Hb content. These observations suggest that both lentiviral-mediated γ-globin gene addition and genetic reactivation of endogenous γ-globin genes have potential to provide therapeutic HbF levels to patients with β-globin deficiency. PMID:21156846

  4. Multiple BM harvests in pediatric donors for thalassemic siblings: safety, efficacy and ethical issues.

    PubMed

    Biral, E; Chiesa, R; Cappelli, B; Roccia, T; Frugnoli, I; Noè, A; Soliman, C; Fiori, R; Cursi, L; Cattaneo, F; Evangelio, C; Miniero, R; Ciceri, F; Roncarolo, M G; Marktel, S

    2008-09-01

    Allogeneic BMT represents the only chance of cure for beta-thalassemia. Occasionally, two affected individuals from the same family share a matched healthy sibling. Moreover, a high incidence of transplant rejection is still observed in Pesaro class III patients, requiring a second BMT procedure. In these settings, one option is to perform a second BM harvest from the same donor. Although BM harvest is a safe procedure in children, ethical issues concerning this invasive practice still arise. Here, we describe our series of seven pediatric, healthy donors, who donated BM more than once in favor of their beta-thalassemic HLA-identical siblings between June 2005 and January 2008. Three donors donated BM twice to two affected siblings and four donors donated twice for the same sibling following graft rejection of the first BMT. All donors tolerated the procedures well and no relevant side effects occurred. There was no significant difference between the two harvests concerning cell yield and time to engraftment. Our experience shows that for pediatric donors, a second BM donation is safe and feasible and good cellularity can be obtained. We suggest that a second harvest of a pediatric donor can be performed when a strong indication for BMT exists.

  5. Molecular identification of rare FY*Null and FY*X alleles in Caucasian thalassemic family from Sardinia.

    PubMed

    Manfroi, Silvia; Scarcello, Antonio; Pagliaro, Pasqualepaolo

    2015-10-01

    Molecular genetic studies on Duffy blood group antigens have identified mutations underlying rare FY*Null and FY*X alleles. FY*Null has a high frequency in Blacks, especially from sub-Saharan Africa, while its frequency is not defined in Caucasians. FY*X allele, associated with Fy(a-b+w) phenotype, has a frequency of 2-3.5% in Caucasian people while it is absent in Blacks. During the project of extensive blood group genotyping in patients affected by hemoglobinopathies, we identified FY*X/FY*Null and FY*A/FY*Null genotypes in a Caucasian thalassemic family from Sardinia. We speculate on the frequency of FY*X and FY*Null alleles in Caucasian and Black people; further, we focused on the association of FY*X allele with weak Fyb antigen expression on red blood cells and its identification performing high sensitivity serological typing methods or genotyping.

  6. Effects of green tea on iron accumulation and oxidative stress in livers of iron-challenged thalassemic mice.

    PubMed

    Saewong, T; Ounjaijean, S; Mundee, Y; Pattanapanyasat, K; Fucharoen, S; Porter, J B; Srichairatanakool, S

    2010-03-01

    Liver is affected by secondary iron overload in transfusions dependent b-thalassemia patients. The redox iron can generate reactive oxidants that damage biomolecules, leading to liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. Iron chelators are used to treat thalassemias to achieve negative iron balance and relieve oxidant-induced organ dysfunctions. Green tea (GT) (Camellia sinensis) catechins exhibit anti-oxidation, the inhibition of carcinogenesis, the detoxification of CYP2E1-catalyzed HepG2 cells and iron chelation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of GT in iron-challenged thalassemic mice. Heterozygous BKO type-thalassemia (BKO) mice (C57BL/6) experienced induced iron overload by being fed a ferrocene-supplemented diet (Fe diet) for 8 weeks, and by orally being given GT extract (300 mg/kg) and deferiprone (DFP) (50 mg/kg) for a further 8 weeks. Liver iron content (LIC) was analyzed by TPTZ colorimetric and Perl's staining techniques. Concentrations of liver reduced glutathione (GSH), collagen and malondialdehyde (MDA) were also measured. Dosages of the GT extract and DFP lowered LIC in the Fe diet-fed BKO mice effectively. The extract did not change any concentrations of liver glutathione, collagen and MDA in the BKO mice. Histochemical examination showed leukocyte infiltration in the near by hepatic portal vein and high iron accumulation in the livers of the iron-loaded BKO mice, however GT treatment lowered the elevated iron deposition. In conclusion, green tea inhibits or delays the deposition of hepatic iron in regularly iron-loaded thalassemic mice effectively. This will prevent the iron-induced generation of free radicals via Haber-Weiss and Fenton reactions, and consequently liver damage and fibrosis. Combined chelation with green tea would be investigated in beta-thalassemia patients with iron overload.

  7. The efficacy of vitamin K2 and calcitriol combination on thalassemic osteopathy.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Mehmet A; Yilmaz, Kenan; Abdulrezzak, Ummuhan; Muhtaroglu, Sebahattin; Patiroglu, Turkan; Karakukcu, Musa; Unal, Ekrem

    2013-11-01

    Thalassemic osteopathy (TOSP) has emerged as a topic of interest, as the optimized transfusion regimens and iron chelations has markedly improved the survival of the patients suffering from thalassemia major (TM) and increased the life expectancy. The aim of this prospective monocentric pilot study was to investigate the effects of a dietary supplement with vitamin K2 (50 mcg menaquinone-7) and vitamin D (5 mcg calcitriol) on the patients with TOSP. Twenty children (12 girls, 8 boys; age varied from 3 to 18 y) with β TM, who underwent regular blood transfusion and iron chelation therapy, were enrolled in this study and investigated at the initial, sixth, and 12th month of the treatment. We detected a significant improvement in the bone mineral density and Z-score at the lumbar spine area of the patients at the sixth and 12th month of the treatment, especially in the prepubertal group. We also found a decrease in the ratio of undercarboxylated osteocalcin to carboxylated osteocalcin, however, this was not found to be significant. Although the natural course of TOSP is worsening or at least stabilizing, our pilot study demonstrated that vitamin K2 and calcitriol combination clearly has a positive effect on the bone mineral density of the children with TM during a 1-year period. Supplementation of menaquinone-7 instead of drugs is an augmented physiological intake and seems a beneficial alternative for the treatment of TOSP. Further studies on a large number of participants are necessary to highlight the effect of vitamin K2 on TOSP.

  8. Mitochondrial epilepsy in pediatric and adult patients.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, J; Zarrouk Mahjoub, S

    2013-09-01

    Few data are available about the difference between epilepsy in pediatric mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) and adult MIDs. This review focuses on the differences between pediatric and adult mitochondrial epilepsy with regard to seizure type, seizure frequency, and underlying MID. A literature search via Pubmed using the keywords 'mitochondrial', 'epilepsy', 'seizures', 'adult', 'pediatric', and all MID acronyms, was carried out. Frequency of mitochondrial epilepsy strongly depends on the type of MID included and is higher in pediatric compared to adult patients. In pediatric patients, mitochondrial epilepsy is more frequent due to mutations in nDNA-located than mtDNA-located genes and vice versa in adults. In pediatric patients, mitochondrial epilepsy is associated with a syndromic phenotype in half of the patients and in adults more frequently with a non-syndromic phenotype. In pediatric patients, focal seizures are more frequent than generalized seizures and vice versa in adults. Electro-clinical syndromes are more frequent in pediatric MIDs compared to adult MIDs. Differences between pediatric and adult mitochondrial epilepsy concern the onset of epilepsy, frequency of epilepsy, seizure type, type of electro-clinical syndrome, frequency of syndromic versus non-syndromic MIDs, and the outcome. To optimize management of mitochondrial epilepsy, it is essential to differentiate between early and late-onset forms. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  9. Cystic fibrosis lung disease in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Vender, Robert L

    2008-04-01

    As the longevity of all patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) continues to increase (median 2005 survival=36.8 years), more adult patients will be receiving their medical care from nonpediatric adult-care providers. Cystic fibrosis remains a fatal disease, with more than 80% of patients dying after the age of 18 years, and most deaths resulting from pulmonary disease. The changing epidemiology requires adult-care providers to become knowledgeable and competent in the clinical management of adults with CF. Physicians must understand the influence of specific genotype on phenotypic disease presentation and severity, the pathogenic factors determining lung disease onset and progression, the impact of comorbid disease factors such as CF-related diabetes and malnutrition upon lung disease severity, and the currently approved or standard accepted therapies used for chronic management of CF lung disease. This knowledge is critical to help alleviate morbidity and improve mortality for the rapidly expanding population of adults with CF.

  10. Annotated definition of BCL11A and HMIP-2 haplotypes through the analysis of sicilian β-thalassemia patients with high levels of fetal hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Buccheri, Maria A; Spina, Sonia; Ruberto, Concetta; Lombardo, Turi; Labie, Dominique; Ragusa, And Angela

    2013-01-01

    Fetal hemoglobin (Hb F) is the principal ameliorating factor of β-thalassemia (β-thal) and sickle cell disease. Persistent production in adult life is a quantitative trait regulated by loci inside or outside the β-globin gene cluster. From genome-wide association studies, principal quantitative trait loci (QTL) (accounting for 50.0% of Hb F variability in different populations) have been identified in the BCL11A gene, HBS1L-MYB intergenic polymorphism and the β-globin gene cluster itself. In this study, we analyzed quantitative trait haplotypes in two Sicilian families with extremely mild β-thal and unusually high Hb F expression, in order to examine possible genetic background variations in a similar β-thalassemic phenotype. This study redefines the linkage disequilibrium blocks at these loci, but also shows slight differences between probands in haplotype combinations which could reflect different mechanisms of high Hb F production in patients with β-thal. We proposed a haplotype-based approach as a useful tool for the understanding of β-thal phenotype variation in patients with similar β-thalassemic backgrounds in an attempt to answer the recurring question of why patients with the same β-thalassemic genotype show different phenotypes.

  11. Diagnosis of Adult Patients with Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Nick, Jerry A; Nichols, David P

    2016-03-01

    The diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF) is being made with increasing frequency in adults. Patients with CF diagnosed in adulthood typically present with respiratory complaints, and often have recurrent or chronic airway infection. At the time of initial presentation individuals may appear to have clinical manifestation limited to a single organ, but with subclinical involvement of the respiratory tract. Adult-diagnosed patients have a good response to CF center care, and newly available cystic fibrosis transmembrane receptor-modulating therapies are promising for the treatment of residual function mutation, thus increasing the importance of the diagnosis in adults with unexplained bronchiectasis.

  12. Bone microstructural defects and osteopenia in hemizygous βIVSII-654 knockin thalassemic mice: sex-dependent changes in bone density and osteoclast function.

    PubMed

    Thongchote, Kanogwun; Svasti, Saovaros; Teerapornpuntakit, Jarinthorn; Suntornsaratoon, Panan; Krishnamra, Nateetip; Charoenphandhu, Narattaphol

    2015-12-01

    β-Thalassemia, a hereditary anemic disorder, is often associated with skeletal complications that can be found in both males and females. The present study aimed to investigate the age- and sex-dependent changes in bone mineral density (BMD) and trabecular microstructure in β(IVSII-654) knockin thalassemic mice. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and computer-assisted bone histomorphometry were employed to investigate temporal changes in BMD and histomorphometric parameters in male and female mice of a β(IVSII-654) knockin mouse model of human β-thalassemia, in which impaired splicing of β-globin transcript was caused by hemizygous C→T mutation at nucleotide 654 of intron 2. Young, growing β(IVSII-654) mice (1 mo old) manifested shorter bone length and lower BMD than their wild-type littermates, indicating possible growth retardation and osteopenia, the latter of which persisted until 8 mo of age (adult mice). Interestingly, two-way analysis of variance suggested an interaction between sex and β(IVSII-654) genotype, i.e., more severe osteopenia in adult female mice. Bone histomorphometry further suggested that low trabecular bone volume in male β(IVSII-654) mice, particularly during a growing period (1-2 mo), was primarily due to suppression of bone formation, whereas both a low bone formation rate and a marked increase in osteoclast surface were observed in female β(IVSII-654) mice. In conclusion, osteopenia and trabecular microstructural defects were present in both male and female β(IVSII-654) knockin thalassemic mice, but the severity, disease progression, and cellular mechanism differed between the sexes. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Sustained and full fetal hemoglobin production after failure of bone marrow transplant in a patient homozygous for beta 0-thalassemia: a clinical remission despite genetic disease and transplant rejection.

    PubMed

    Paciaroni, Katia; Gallucci, Cristiano; De Angelis, Gioia; Alfieri, Cecilia; Roveda, Andrea; Lucarelli, Guido

    2009-06-01

    An adult patient affected by beta(0)-thalassemia major underwent allogeneic bone marrow transplant (BMT) from a matched related donor. Forty days after transplant, allogeneic engraftment failure and autologous beta(0)-thalassemic bone marrow recovery were documented. Red blood cell transfusions were required until 118 days post-transplant. Thereafter, the haemoglobin (Hb) levels stabilized over 11.8 gr/dl throughout the ongoing 34-month follow-up, abolishing the need for transfusion support. The Hb electrophoresis showed 100% Hb Fetal (HbF). This unexplained case suggests full HbF production may occur in an adult patient with beta(0)-thalassemia major.

  14. Population pharmacokinetics of micafungin in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Gumbo, Tawanda; Hiemenz, John; Ma, Lei; Keirns, James J; Buell, Donald N; Drusano, George L

    2008-03-01

    We performed population pharmacokinetic analysis of micafungin in adult patients treated with doses between 12.5 and 200 mg/day. Our analysis identified a breakpoint patient weight of 66.3 kg above which serum clearance increased by approximately 50%. Patients with weight >66.3 kg may need larger doses to achieve similar exposures to those <66.3 kg. However, the clinical implications are still unknown.

  15. The Adult Diabetic Patient: An Education Challenge

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-01

    finding that he/she, too, must care for sicker patients. To better prepare these patients for life after discharge, patient education must be initiated as...admitted, patient education often begins at the physicians’ office. This paper explores diabetes mellitus in relation to concepts of self-care and adult...betting foj.L eduuation and iio.w, wore ofteni, patient education and follow-up sercvices- a:leL beiny p~rovided on ani outpatient bcdtsis" (p. 36) . Thet

  16. Investigating the mental health and coping strategies of parents with major thalassemic children in Bandar Abbas.

    PubMed

    Dadipoor, Sakineh; Haghighi, Hamid; Madani, Abdoulhhossain; Ghanbarnejad, Amin; Shojaei, Fatemeh; Hesam, Aliakbar; Moradabadi, Ali Safari

    2015-01-01

    Major thalassemia is a hereditary, chronic blood disease caused by the synthesis deficiency of one or more polypeptide chains of globin during childhood. This leads to the rise of blood pressure and family tensions. Therefore, the coping strategies of the family could seriously affect and facilitate the thalassemic child's healthy growth. The present research sought to investigate the mental health and coping strategies of families with major thalassemic children in Bandar Abbas in 2013. This study is of a descriptive-analytical and cross-sectional type. Research population consisted of 140 parents of major thalassemic children who visited Shahid Mohammadi Hospital of Bandar Abbas. The instruments used were the 12-item General Health Questionnaire of Goldberg and Williams along with the coping strategies questionnaire. Nonprobabilistic, convenient sampling method was used. To analyze the data, Spearman's correlation coefficient, Chi-square and descriptive statistical tests were used. The significance level was set at P < 0.05. Data analysis showed that parents' mental health (32 ± 4.25) along with their coping strategy scores (45 ± 7.50) was about the average. The most prevalent coping strategies among the parents were represented as: "I trust in God in order to get my problems solved" (87%), "to get mentally and spiritually relieved, I would visit mosques and holy shrines" (53%), and "to overcome problems, I make harder attempts" (50.7%). A significant correlation was found between the parents' coping strategies and general health (P < 0.001). A significant correlation was also observed between mother's educational level (P = 0.044), age (P = 0.022) and general health. According to the results of this research, it is categorical for the ministry of health and medical education and those in charge to pay special and adequate attention to the social, spiritual, and mental health of these children and their families.

  17. Investigating the mental health and coping strategies of parents with major thalassemic children in Bandar Abbas

    PubMed Central

    Dadipoor, Sakineh; Haghighi, Hamid; Madani, Abdoulhhossain; Ghanbarnejad, Amin; Shojaei, Fatemeh; Hesam, Aliakbar; Moradabadi, Ali Safari

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Major thalassemia is a hereditary, chronic blood disease caused by the synthesis deficiency of one or more polypeptide chains of globin during childhood. This leads to the rise of blood pressure and family tensions. Therefore, the coping strategies of the family could seriously affect and facilitate the thalassemic child's healthy growth. The present research sought to investigate the mental health and coping strategies of families with major thalassemic children in Bandar Abbas in 2013. Materials and Methods: This study is of a descriptive-analytical and cross-sectional type. Research population consisted of 140 parents of major thalassemic children who visited Shahid Mohammadi Hospital of Bandar Abbas. The instruments used were the 12-item General Health Questionnaire of Goldberg and Williams along with the coping strategies questionnaire. Nonprobabilistic, convenient sampling method was used. To analyze the data, Spearman's correlation coefficient, Chi-square and descriptive statistical tests were used. The significance level was set at P < 0.05. Results: Data analysis showed that parents’ mental health (32 ± 4.25) along with their coping strategy scores (45 ± 7.50) was about the average. The most prevalent coping strategies among the parents were represented as: “I trust in God in order to get my problems solved” (87%), “to get mentally and spiritually relieved, I would visit mosques and holy shrines” (53%), and “to overcome problems, I make harder attempts” (50.7%). A significant correlation was found between the parents’ coping strategies and general health (P < 0.001). A significant correlation was also observed between mother's educational level (P = 0.044), age (P = 0.022) and general health. Discussion and Conclusion: According to the results of this research, it is categorical for the ministry of health and medical education and those in charge to pay special and adequate attention to the social, spiritual, and mental

  18. Adult Patients' Experiences of Nursing Care Dependence.

    PubMed

    Piredda, Michela; Matarese, Maria; Mastroianni, Chiara; D'Angelo, Daniela; Hammer, Marilyn J; De Marinis, Maria Grazia

    2015-09-01

    Care dependence can be associated with suffering and humiliation. Nurses' awareness of patients' perception of care dependence is crucial to enable them in helping the dependent persons. This study aimed to describe adult patients' experience of nursing care dependence. A metasynthesis was conducted to integrate qualitative findings from 18 studies published through December 2014 on adult patients' experiences of care dependency. Procedures included the Johanna Briggs Institute approach for data extraction, quality appraisal, and integration of findings. The experience of dependence revealed the concept of the embodied person, particularly in relation to care of the physical body. The relationship between the individual and nurses within the context of care had a major impact for dependent patients. When the care relation was perceived as positive, the experience led to the development of the person in finding new balances in life, but when it was perceived as negative, it increased patient' suffering. Care dependence is manifested mostly as bodily dependence and is consistent with its relational nature. The nurse-patient relationship is important to the dependent patients' experience. A greater understanding of patients' experiences of dependence is crucial to enable nurses in improving care and decreasing patient suffering. © 2015 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  19. The adult patient with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Baum, V C

    1996-02-01

    In adults with congenital heart disease who are confronted with noncardiac surgery, perioperative risks can be reduced, often appreciably, when problems inherent to this patient population are anticipated. The first necessity is to clarify the diagnosis and to be certain that appropriate information is obtained from a cardiologist with adequate knowledge of congenital heart disease in adults. Physiology and anatomy can vary significantly among patients who superficially carry identical diagnoses. Elective noncardiac surgery should be preceded by clinical assessment including review of clinical and laboratory data and securing the results of necessary diagnostic studies. Preoperative assessment should be performed far enough in advance of the anticipated date of surgery to allow critical assessment of the data and potential discussions with colleagues. Appropriate cardiovascular laboratory studies to be obtained or reviewed include electrocardiograms, chest radiographs, echocardiograms, and cardiac catheterization data, which may include specialized intracardiac electrophysiologic testing. Congenital heart disease in adults is a new and evolving area of special interest and expertise in cardiovascular medicine. Multidisciplinary centers for the care of these patients are being developed. The 22nd Bethesda Conference recommended that these centers include among their consultants anesthesiologists with special expertise in managing patients with congenital heart disease. These anesthesiologists can have the option of serving either as the attending anesthesiologists when patients require noncardiac surgery or as consultants and resource individuals to other anesthesiologists.

  20. Imaging adult patients with Fontan circulation.

    PubMed

    Ginde, Salil; Goot, Benjamin H; Frommelt, Peter C

    2017-09-01

    Survival after the Fontan procedure for palliation of single ventricle congenital heart disease has improved. However, adults with Fontan circulation are at risk for several complications including heart failure, thromboembolism, and protein-losing enteropathy. This review discusses the role of noninvasive imaging for surveillance and early detection of anatomic and functional abnormalities of the Fontan circulation that can impact the risk for Fontan failure over time. Echocardiography is the first-line imaging modality for the adult Fontan patient. Use of established techniques, such as tissue Doppler imaging, and newer techniques, such as myocardial deformation and three-dimensional imaging, has improved the ability of echocardiography to serially assess ventricular and valvular function in this population. Strain imaging, in particular, is effective for early detection of subclinical ventricular dysfunction, is reproducible and can be incorporated into a routine clinical echocardiography protocol. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging complements echocardiography and overcomes the limitation of poor acoustic windows in adult patients, especially with regards to visualizing the cavopulmonary anastomoses and pulmonary arteries. High resolution imaging with CMR provides reliable assessment of ventricular size and function. Novel techniques utilizing CMR, such as computational fluid dynamics, have provided important insights into Fontan fluid dynamics, and the impact of Fontan geometry on flow efficiency through the circulation. Recent advances in echocardiography and CMR have improved detection of structural and functional abnormalities in adults with Fontan circulation and are essential in monitoring for complications in this growing population.

  1. [Difficult situations in radiotherapy: agitated adult patients].

    PubMed

    Noël, S; Noël, G

    2013-10-01

    The causes of agitation in adult patients are numerous. Agitation may cause difficulty or impossibility to initiate the radiotherapy technique but also can lead to accidents harmful to patients. However, the decision to not irradiate agitated patients may lead to a loss of curability chance or chance to palliate symptoms. Before taking such a decision, thinking about the possibilities available to calm the patient should be undertaken with the patient and the referring practitioners to attempt to make this therapy if it is considered major in the management of cancer. In all cases, current adaptations of radiotherapy should be used to deliver an effective radiation of a suitable time and safely. It is notable that the medical literature is extremely rare on this subject. Copyright © 2013 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Ab interno trabeculectomy in the adult patient.

    PubMed

    SooHoo, Jeffrey R; Seibold, Leonard K; Kahook, Malik Y

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is a potentially blinding disease that affects millions of people worldwide. The mainstay of treatment is lowering of intraocular pressure (IOP) through the use of medications, laser and/or incisional surgery. The trabecular meshwork (TM) is thought to be the site of significant resistance to aqueous outflow in open angle glaucoma. Theoretically, an incision through TM or TM removal should decrease this resistance and lead to a significant reduction in IOP. This approach, commonly referred to as goniotomy or trabeculotomy, has been validated in the pediatric population and has been associated with long-term IOP control. In adults, however, removal of TM tissue has been historically associated with more limited and short-lived success. More recent evidence, reveals that even adult patients may benefit significantly from removal of diseased TM tissue and can lead to a significant reduction in IOP that is long-lasting and safe. In this review, we discuss current evidence and techniques for ab interno trabeculectomy using various devices in the adult patient.

  3. Ab Interno Trabeculectomy in the Adult Patient

    PubMed Central

    SooHoo, Jeffrey R.; Seibold, Leonard K.; Kahook, Malik Y.

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is a potentially blinding disease that affects millions of people worldwide. The mainstay of treatment is lowering of intraocular pressure (IOP) through the use of medications, laser and/or incisional surgery. The trabecular meshwork (TM) is thought to be the site of significant resistance to aqueous outflow in open angle glaucoma. Theoretically, an incision through TM or TM removal should decrease this resistance and lead to a significant reduction in IOP. This approach, commonly referred to as goniotomy or trabeculotomy, has been validated in the pediatric population and has been associated with long-term IOP control. In adults, however, removal of TM tissue has been historically associated with more limited and short-lived success. More recent evidence, reveals that even adult patients may benefit significantly from removal of diseased TM tissue and can lead to a significant reduction in IOP that is long-lasting and safe. In this review, we discuss current evidence and techniques for ab interno trabeculectomy using various devices in the adult patient. PMID:25624670

  4. Therapeutic hemoglobin levels after gene transfer in β-thalassemia mice and in hematopoietic cells of β-thalassemia and sickle cells disease patients.

    PubMed

    Breda, Laura; Casu, Carla; Gardenghi, Sara; Bianchi, Nicoletta; Cartegni, Luca; Narla, Mohandas; Yazdanbakhsh, Karina; Musso, Marco; Manwani, Deepa; Little, Jane; Gardner, Lawrence B; Kleinert, Dorothy A; Prus, Eugenia; Fibach, Eitan; Grady, Robert W; Giardina, Patricia J; Gambari, Roberto; Rivella, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Preclinical and clinical studies demonstrate the feasibility of treating β-thalassemia and Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) by lentiviral-mediated transfer of the human β-globin gene. However, previous studies have not addressed whether the ability of lentiviral vectors to increase hemoglobin synthesis might vary in different patients.We generated lentiviral vectors carrying the human β-globin gene with and without an ankyrin insulator and compared their ability to induce hemoglobin synthesis in vitro and in thalassemic mice. We found that insertion of an ankyrin insulator leads to higher, potentially therapeutic levels of human β-globin through a novel mechanism that links the rate of transcription of the transgenic β-globin mRNA during erythroid differentiation with polysomal binding and efficient translation, as reported here for the first time. We also established a preclinical assay to test the ability of this novel vector to synthesize adult hemoglobin in erythroid precursors and in CD34(+) cells isolated from patients affected by β-thalassemia and SCD. Among the thalassemic patients, we identified a subset of specimens in which hemoglobin production can be achieved using fewer copies of the vector integrated than in others. In SCD specimens the treatment with AnkT9W ameliorates erythropoiesis by increasing adult hemoglobin (Hb A) and concurrently reducing the sickling tetramer (Hb S).Our results suggest two major findings. First, we discovered that for the purpose of expressing the β-globin gene the ankyrin element is particularly suitable. Second, our analysis of a large group of specimens from β-thalassemic and SCD patients indicates that clinical trials could benefit from a simple test to predict the relationship between the number of vector copies integrated and the total amount of hemoglobin produced in the erythroid cells of prospective patients. This approach would provide vital information to select the best candidates for these clinical trials

  5. Therapeutic Hemoglobin Levels after Gene Transfer in β-Thalassemia Mice and in Hematopoietic Cells of β-Thalassemia and Sickle Cells Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Breda, Laura; Casu, Carla; Gardenghi, Sara; Bianchi, Nicoletta; Cartegni, Luca; Narla, Mohandas; Yazdanbakhsh, Karina; Musso, Marco; Manwani, Deepa; Little, Jane; Gardner, Lawrence B.; Kleinert, Dorothy A.; Prus, Eugenia; Fibach, Eitan; Grady, Robert W.; Giardina, Patricia J.; Gambari, Roberto; Rivella, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Preclinical and clinical studies demonstrate the feasibility of treating β-thalassemia and Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) by lentiviral-mediated transfer of the human β-globin gene. However, previous studies have not addressed whether the ability of lentiviral vectors to increase hemoglobin synthesis might vary in different patients. We generated lentiviral vectors carrying the human β-globin gene with and without an ankyrin insulator and compared their ability to induce hemoglobin synthesis in vitro and in thalassemic mice. We found that insertion of an ankyrin insulator leads to higher, potentially therapeutic levels of human β-globin through a novel mechanism that links the rate of transcription of the transgenic β-globin mRNA during erythroid differentiation with polysomal binding and efficient translation, as reported here for the first time. We also established a preclinical assay to test the ability of this novel vector to synthesize adult hemoglobin in erythroid precursors and in CD34+ cells isolated from patients affected by β-thalassemia and SCD. Among the thalassemic patients, we identified a subset of specimens in which hemoglobin production can be achieved using fewer copies of the vector integrated than in others. In SCD specimens the treatment with AnkT9W ameliorates erythropoiesis by increasing adult hemoglobin (Hb A) and concurrently reducing the sickling tetramer (Hb S). Our results suggest two major findings. First, we discovered that for the purpose of expressing the β-globin gene the ankyrin element is particularly suitable. Second, our analysis of a large group of specimens from β-thalassemic and SCD patients indicates that clinical trials could benefit from a simple test to predict the relationship between the number of vector copies integrated and the total amount of hemoglobin produced in the erythroid cells of prospective patients. This approach would provide vital information to select the best candidates for these clinical trials

  6. Thalassemic hemoglobinopathies.

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, M. H.; Adams, J. G.

    1983-01-01

    Hemoglobinopathies are due to changes in the normal amino acid sequence of globin. Thalassemias result from imbalance in the normal coordinated synthesis of the globin subunits that make up the hemoglobin tetramer. It is now apparent that a single globin gene can have coding region mutations which simultaneously produce a structural defect (hemoglobinopathy) and a biosynthetic defect (thalassemia). It is likely that two distinct mutations within the same gene can occur and produce a hemoglobinopathy with features of thalassemia. In this review the authors discuss such disorders and include the Hb Lepore and Constant Spring variants, hyper-unstable globins, mutations which create alternative sites for mRNA splicing, and amino acid substitutions likely to be associated with an additional thalassemia lesion within the same gene. PMID:6359893

  7. Trauma injury in adult underweight patients

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Ching-Hua; Lai, Wei-Hung; Wu, Shao-Chun; Chen, Yi-Chun; Kuo, Pao-Jen; Hsu, Shiun-Yuan; Hsieh, Hsiao-Yun

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the injury characteristics, severity, and outcome between underweight and normal-weight patients hospitalized for the treatment of all kinds of trauma injury. This study was based on a level I trauma center Taiwan. The detailed data of 640 underweight adult trauma patients with a body mass index (BMI) of <18.5 kg/m2 and 6497 normal-weight adult patients (25 > BMI ≥ 18.5 kg/m2) were retrieved from the Trauma Registry System between January 1, 2009, and December 31, 2014. Pearson's chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, and independent Student's t-test were performed to compare the differences. Propensity score matching with logistic regression was used to evaluate the effect of underweight on mortality. Underweight patients presented a different bodily injury pattern and a significantly higher rate of admittance to the intensive care unit (ICU) than did normal-weight patients; however, no significant differences in the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score, injury severity score (ISS), in-hospital mortality, and hospital length of stay were found between the two groups. However, further analysis of the patients stratified by two major injury mechanisms (motorcycle accident and fall injury) revealed that underweight patients had significantly lower GCS scores (13.8 ± 3.0 vs 14.5 ± 2.0, P = 0.020), but higher ISS (10.1 ± 6.9 vs 8.4 ± 5.9, P = 0.005), in-hospital mortality (odds ratio, 4.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.69–11.35; P = 0.006), and ICU admittance rate (24.1% vs 14.3%, P = 0.007) than normal-weight patients in the fall accident group, but not in the motorcycle accident group. However, after propensity score matching, logistic regression analysis of well-matched pairs of patients with either all trauma, motorcycle accident, or fall injury did not show a significant influence of underweight on mortality. Exploratory data analysis revealed that underweight patients

  8. Oxidative stress modulates heme synthesis and induces peroxiredoxin-2 as a novel cytoprotective response in β-thalassemic erythropoiesis

    PubMed Central

    De Franceschi, Lucia; Bertoldi, Mariarita; De Falco, Luigia; Santos Franco, Sara; Ronzoni, Luisa; Turrini, Franco; Colancecco, Alessandra; Camaschella, Clara; Cappellini, Maria Domenica; Iolascon, Achille

    2011-01-01

    Background β-thalassemic syndromes are inherited red cell disorders characterized by severe ineffective erythropoiesis and increased levels of reactive oxygen species whose contribution to β-thalassemic anemia is only partially understood. Design and Methods We studied erythroid precursors from normal and β-thalassemic peripheral CD34+ cells in two-phase liquid culture by proteomic, reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and immunoblot analyses. We measured intracellular reactive oxygen species, heme levels and the activity of δ-aminolevulinate-synthase-2. We exposed normal cells and K562 cells with silenced peroxiredoxin-2 to H2O2 and generated a recombinant peroxiredoxin-2 for kinetic measurements in the presence of H2O2 or hemin. Results In β-thalassemia the increased production of reactive oxygen species was associated with down-regulation of heme oxygenase-1 and biliverdin reductase and up-regulation of peroxiredoxin-2. In agreement with these observations in β-thalassemic cells we found decreased heme levels related to significantly reduced activity of the first enzyme of the heme pathway, δ-aminolevulinate synthase-2 without differences in its expression. We demonstrated that the activity of recombinant δ-aminolevulinate synthase-2 is inhibited by both reactive oxygen species and hemin as a protective mechanism in β-thalassemic cells. We then addressed the question of the protective role of peroxiredoxin-2 in erythropoiesis by exposing normal cells to oxidative stress and silencing peroxiredoxin-2 in human erythroleukemia K562 cells. We found that peroxiredoxin-2 expression is up-regulated in response to oxidative stress and required for K562 cells to survive oxidative stress. We then showed that peroxiredoxin-2 binds heme in erythroid precursors with high affinity, suggesting a possible multifunctional cytoprotective role of peroxiredoxin-2 in β-thalassemia. Conclusions In β-thalassemic erythroid cells the reduction of

  9. Thalassemia Major in Adults: Short Stature, Hyperpigmentation, Inadequate Chelation, and Transfusion-Transmitted Infections are Key Features

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Anupam; Aggarwal, Ramesh

    2012-01-01

    Background: Effective transfusion and chelation have prolonged the quality and longevity of life in thalassemics, who now survive into adulthood. Hence, adult physicians need to be aware of their clinical and laboratory profile and the problems faced by them. Aim: The present study was aimed to evaluate the clinical profile of adult thalassemics. Materials and Methods: Adult (>18 years) thalassemia major patients (n=19) were evaluated clinically and fasting pretransfusion blood samples were analyzed for complete blood counts, kidney and liver function tests, plasma glucose, serum ferritin, and thyroid hormone levels. Results: Average age was 21.65±2.47 years (range 19–28 years), 42.1% had Body mass index (BMI) <18.5. Splenectomy had been performed in 47.4% before reaching adulthood, males significantly outnumbered females (72% vs. 12.5%). Hemoglobin levels <8 g/dl were observed in 31.6% and none had serum ferritin levels in the recommended range suggesting inadequacy of both transfusion and chelation. Indirect hyperbilirubinemia was observed in 21.1% patients although kidney functions, serum protein, and albumin were normal in all patients. Electrocardiographic abnormalities, diabetes mellitus or hypothyroidism were absent. Five patients (26.3%) had contracted transfusion-transmitted viral infections – 21.1% and 5.3% respectively had antibodies to hepatitis C virus and HIV, while 5.3% were positive for Australia antigen. All patients were receiving chelation therapy – deferiprone alone (78.9%) or along with desferrioxamine (21.1%). Average dose of deferiprone being used was 95±8 mg/kg. Conclusion: Adult thalassemia major patients present with a distinct clinical profile having low BMI, generalized hyperpigmentation, most are splenectomized, have low hemoglobin, inadequate chelation and harbor transfusion-transmitted infections. Adult physician needs to be aware of this profile. PMID:22454828

  10. Clinical phenotypes in adult patients with bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Aliberti, Stefano; Lonni, Sara; Dore, Simone; McDonnell, Melissa J; Goeminne, Pieter C; Dimakou, Katerina; Fardon, Thomas C; Rutherford, Robert; Pesci, Alberto; Restrepo, Marcos I; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Chalmers, James D

    2016-04-01

    Bronchiectasis is a heterogeneous disease. This study aimed at identifying discrete groups of patients with different clinical and biological characteristics and long-term outcomes.This was a secondary analysis of five European databases of prospectively enrolled adult outpatients with bronchiectasis. Principal component and cluster analyses were performed using demographics, comorbidities, and clinical, radiological, functional and microbiological variables collected during the stable state. Exacerbations, hospitalisations and mortality during a 3-year follow-up were recorded. Clusters were externally validated in an independent cohort of patients with bronchiectasis, also investigating inflammatory markers in sputum.Among 1145 patients (median age 66 years; 40% male), four clusters were identified driven by the presence of chronic infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosaor other pathogens and daily sputum: "Pseudomonas" (16%), "Other chronic infection" (24%), "Daily sputum" (33%) and "Dry bronchiectasis" (27%). Patients in the four clusters showed significant differences in terms of quality of life, exacerbations, hospitalisations and mortality during follow-up. In the validation cohort, free neutrophil elastase activity, myeloperoxidase activity and interleukin-1β levels in sputum were significantly different among the clusters.Identification of four clinical phenotypes in bronchiectasis could favour focused treatments in future interventional studies designed to alter the natural history of the disease.

  11. Assisting sexually abused adults. Practical guide to interviewing patients.

    PubMed Central

    Leach, M. M.; Bethune, C.

    1996-01-01

    Millions of adults have been sexually abused. Patients often confide in their family physicians concerning their abuse. Physicians must understand their own issues surrounding sexual abuse and its sequelae before they attempt to treat sexually abused patients. The PLISSIT model offers a practical guide for assisting abused adult patients. PMID:8924817

  12. Lateral positioning for critically ill adult patients.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Nicky; Bucknall, Tracey; Faraone, Nardene M

    2016-05-12

    Critically ill patients require regular body position changes to minimize the adverse effects of bed rest, inactivity and immobilization. However, uncertainty surrounds the effectiveness of lateral positioning for improving pulmonary gas exchange, aiding drainage of tracheobronchial secretions and preventing morbidity. In addition, it is unclear whether the perceived risk levied by respiratory and haemodynamic instability upon turning critically ill patients outweighs the respiratory benefits of side-to-side rotation. Thus, lack of certainty may contribute to variation in positioning practice and equivocal patient outcomes. To evaluate effects of the lateral position compared with other body positions on patient outcomes (mortality, morbidity and clinical adverse events) in critically ill adult patients. (Clinical adverse events include hypoxaemia, hypotension, low oxygen delivery and global indicators of impaired tissue oxygenation.) We examined single use of the lateral position (i.e. on the right or left side) and repeat use of the lateral position (i.e. lateral positioning) within a positioning schedule. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2015, Issue 5), MEDLINE (1950 to 23 May 2015), the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) (1937 to 23 May 2015), the Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED) (1984 to 23 May 2015), Latin American Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (LILACS) (1901 to 23 May 2015), Web of Science (1945 to 23 May 2015), Index to Theses in Great Britain and Ireland (1950 to 23 May 2015), Trove (2009 to 23 May 2015; previously Australasian Digital Theses Program (1997 to December 2008)) and Proquest Dissertations and Theses (2009 to 23 May 2015; previously Proquest Digital Dissertations (1980 to 23 May 2015)). We handsearched the reference lists of potentially relevant reports and two nursing journals. We included randomized and quasi-randomized trials examining effects of

  13. Dietary intake and nutritional status in cancer patients; comparing adults and older adults.

    PubMed

    Gómez Valiente da Silva, Henyse; Fonseca de Andrade, Camila; Bello Moreira, Annie Seixas

    2014-04-01

    Evaluate the nutrient intake and nutritional status of food in cancer patients admitted to a university hospital, with comparison of adult and older adult age category. Cross-sectional study. This study involved cancer patients admitted to a hospital in 2010. Dietary habits were collected using a Brazilian food frequency questionnaire. Participants were divided in two groups: adults or older adults and in 4-cancer category: hematologic, lung, gastrointestinal and others. Body Mass Index evaluated nutritional status. A total of 86 patients with a mean age of 56.5 years, with 55% males and 42% older adults were evaluated. The older adult category had a higher frequency of being underweight (24.4% vs 16.3%, p < 0.01) and a lower frequency of being overweight (7% vs. 15.1%, p < 0.01) than adults. Both, adult and older adults had a high frequency of smoking, alcohol consumption and physical inactivity. The older adults had lower consumption of calories, intake of iron and folic acid. Inadequacy of vitamin intake was observed in both groups; respectively, 52%, 43%, 95%, 76% and 88% for Vitamin A, C, D, E and folic acid. The older adults had a higher folic acid and calcium inadequacy than the adults (97% vs 82%, p <0.01; 88% vs 72%, p < 0.01). There was no association of micronutrient intake with cancer, nor with nutritional status. The food intake, macro and micronutrients ingestion is insufficient among cancer individuals. Food intake of older adults was inferior, when compared to the adult category. There was a high prevalence of BMI excess in the adult group and a worst nutritional status in the older adult category. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  14. The New Self-Inactivating Lentiviral Vector for Thalassemia Gene Therapy Combining Two HPFH Activating Elements Corrects Human Thalassemic Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Papanikolaou, Eleni; Georgomanoli, Maria; Stamateris, Evangelos; Panetsos, Fottes; Karagiorga, Markisia; Tsaftaridis, Panagiotis; Graphakos, Stelios

    2012-01-01

    Abstract To address how low titer, variable expression, and gene silencing affect gene therapy vectors for hemoglobinopathies, in a previous study we successfully used the HPFH (hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin)-2 enhancer in a series of oncoretroviral vectors. On the basis of these data, we generated a novel insulated self-inactivating (SIN) lentiviral vector, termed GGHI, carrying the Aγ-globin gene with the −117 HPFH point mutation and the HPFH-2 enhancer and exhibiting a pancellular pattern of Aγ-globin gene expression in MEL-585 clones. To assess the eventual clinical feasibility of this vector, GGHI was tested on CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells from nonmobilized peripheral blood or bone marrow from 20 patients with β-thalassemia. Our results show that GGHI increased the production of γ-globin by 32.9% as measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (p=0.001), with a mean vector copy number per cell of 1.1 and a mean transduction efficiency of 40.3%. Transduced populations also exhibited a lower rate of apoptosis and resulted in improvement of erythropoiesis with a higher percentage of orthochromatic erythroblasts. This is the first report of a locus control region (LCR)-free SIN insulated lentiviral vector that can be used to efficiently produce the anticipated therapeutic levels of γ-globin protein in the erythroid progeny of primary human thalassemic hematopoietic stem cells in vitro. PMID:21875313

  15. Extracorporeal respiratory support in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Romano, Thiago Gomes; Mendes, Pedro Vitale; Park, Marcelo; Costa, Eduardo Leite Vieira

    2017-01-01

    In patients with severe respiratory failure, either hypoxemic or hypercapnic, life support with mechanical ventilation alone can be insufficient to meet their needs, especially if one tries to avoid ventilator settings that can cause injury to the lungs. In those patients, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), which is also very effective in removing carbon dioxide from the blood, can provide life support, allowing the application of protective lung ventilation. In this review article, we aim to explore some of the most relevant aspects of using ECMO for respiratory support. We discuss the history of respiratory support using ECMO in adults, as well as the clinical evidence; costs; indications; installation of the equipment; ventilator settings; daily care of the patient and the system; common troubleshooting; weaning; and discontinuation. RESUMO Em pacientes com insuficiência respiratória grave (hipoxêmica ou hipercápnica), o suporte somente com ventilação mecânica pode ser insuficiente para suas necessidades, especialmente quando se tenta evitar o uso de parâmetros ventilatórios que possam causar danos aos pulmões. Nesses pacientes, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO, oxigenação extracorpórea por membrana), que também é muito eficaz na remoção de dióxido de carbono do sangue, pode manter a vida, permitindo o uso de ventilação pulmonar protetora. No presente artigo de revisão, objetivamos explorar alguns dos aspectos mais relevantes do suporte respiratório por ECMO. Discutimos a história do suporte respiratório por ECMO em adultos; evidências clínicas; custos; indicações; instalação do equipamento; parâmetros ventilatórios; cuidado diário do paciente e do sistema; solução de problemas comuns; desmame e descontinuação.

  16. [Clinical features of patients with juvenile and adult dermatomyositis].

    PubMed

    Szalmás, Orsolya; Nagy-Vince, Melinda; Dankó, Katalin; Farkas, Flóra

    2015-09-13

    Juvenile and adult dermatomysitis are chronic, immune-mediated inflammatory myopathies characterized by progressive proximal muscle weakness and typical skin symptoms. To compare the symptoms, laboratory and serological findings, treatment and disease course in children and adults suffering from dermatomyositis. In this retrospective study, juvenile and adult dermatomyositis groups were formed. There were 27 patients with juvenile dermatomyositis (mean age, 8.7 years; mean follow-up time: 104.6 months) and 30 adult patients (mean age, 50.3; mean follow-up time: 58.1 months). In patients with juvenile dermatomyositis, treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin and cyclosporine A were more frequent as compared to adult patients. Acute onset of the disease was more frequent in adult patients than in those with juvenile disease. In children symptoms of the disease developed gradually. The findings confirm previously published data showing that there are differences between juvenile and adult patients with dermatomyositis. The authors recommend to follow the patients regularly after reaching remission to avoid bad patient compliance and decrease the number and severity of relapses.

  17. Exploring Adult Care Experiences and Barriers to Transition in Adult Patients with Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bemrich-Stolz, CJ; Halanych, JH; Howard, TH; Hilliard, LM; Lebensburger, JD

    2015-01-01

    Background Young adults with sickle cell anemia are at high risk for increased hospitalization and death at the time of transition to adult care. This may be related to failure of the transition system to prepare young adults for the adult healthcare system. This qualitative study was designed to identify factors related to transition that may affect the health of adults with sickle cell anemia. Procedure Ten patients currently treated in an adult hematology clinic participated in semi-structured qualitative interviews to describe their experience transitioning from pediatric to adult care and differences in adult and pediatric healthcare systems. Results Participants were generally unprepared for the adult healthcare system. Negative issues experienced by participants included physician mistrust, difficulty with employers, keeping insurance, and stress in personal relationships. Positive issues experienced by participants included improved self efficacy with improved self care and autonomy. Conclusions In the absence of a formalized transition program, adults with sickle cell anemia experience significant barriers to adult care. In addition to medical history review and identification of an adult provider, transition programs should incorporate strategies to navigate the adult medical system, insurance and relationships as well as encouraging self efficacy. PMID:26900602

  18. Future orientation and life expectations of adolescents and young adults with thalassemia major.

    PubMed

    Bush, S; Mandel, F S; Giardina, P J

    1998-06-30

    Until recently, Thalassemia Major was considered a fatal disease and patients did not usually live into adulthood. Advances in the medical management of the disease have greatly increased the life expectancy of these patients. The present study aims to evaluate the future orientation and other aspects of psychosocial functioning of thalassemics compared to healthy controls. Thirty patients and 33 healthy subjects of similar age, ethnicity, education, and geographic area were compared on measures of future expectations, perceived social support, life orientation, health locus of control and hopelessness. Results show no significant differences between thalassemics and controls on all measures except for higher levels of internal health locus of control among the patient group. Results and implications of perceptions of thalassemics' future orientation relevant to patient care are discussed.

  19. Physical and psychosocial challenges in adult hemophilia patients with inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    duTreil, Sue

    2014-01-01

    Numerous challenges confront adult hemophilia patients with inhibitors, including difficulty in controlling bleeding episodes, deterioration of joints, arthritic pain, physical disability, emotional turmoil, and social issues. High-intensity treatment regimens often used in the treatment of patients with inhibitors also impose significant scheduling, economic, and emotional demands on patients and their families or primary caregivers. A comprehensive multidisciplinary assessment of the physical, emotional, and social status of adult hemophilia patients with inhibitors is essential for the development of treatment strategies that can be individualized to address the complex needs of these patients. PMID:25093002

  20. Approximate Quantification in Young, Healthy Older Adults', and Alzheimer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gandini, Delphine; Lemaire, Patrick; Michel, Bernard Francois

    2009-01-01

    Forty young adults, 40 healthy older adults, and 39 probable AD patients were asked to estimate small (e.g., 25) and large (e.g., 60) collections of dots in a choice condition and in two no-choice conditions. Participants could choose between benchmark and anchoring strategies on each collection of dots in the choice condition and were required to…

  1. Approximate Quantification in Young, Healthy Older Adults', and Alzheimer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gandini, Delphine; Lemaire, Patrick; Michel, Bernard Francois

    2009-01-01

    Forty young adults, 40 healthy older adults, and 39 probable AD patients were asked to estimate small (e.g., 25) and large (e.g., 60) collections of dots in a choice condition and in two no-choice conditions. Participants could choose between benchmark and anchoring strategies on each collection of dots in the choice condition and were required to…

  2. Brain abscess caused by Ureaplasma urealyticum in an adult patient.

    PubMed

    Deetjen, Philipp; Maurer, Christoph; Rank, Andreas; Berlis, Ansgar; Schubert, Sören; Hoffmann, Reinhard

    2014-02-01

    Ureaplasma urealyticum is a fastidious bacterium usually residing in the female genitourinary tract. We present an exceedingly complicated case of a brain abscess secondary to mastoiditis by U. urealyticum in an adult hypogammaglobulinemic patient after rituximab treatment 3 years earlier.

  3. Patient-centered care in adult trauma intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Hasse, Gwendolyn L

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to discover unique aspects of caring for adult trauma intensive care unit patients with respect to implementing patient-centered care. The concept of patient-centered care has been discussed since 2000, but the actual implementation is currently becoming the focus of health care. The Institute of Medicine defined patient-centered care as "providing care that is respectful of and responsive to individual patient preferences, needs, and values, and ensuring that patient values guide all clinical decisions" in the 2001 Crossing the Quality Chasm report. Discussion and documentation of patient centered-care of the intensive care trauma patient population are limited and yield no results for publication search. This article explores the concept of delivering patient-centered care specifically in a trauma adult intensive care unit.

  4. Intensive care of the adult patient with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Allan, Catherine K

    2011-01-01

    Prevalence of congenital heart disease in the adult population has increased out of proportion to that of the pediatric population as survival has improved, and adult congenital heart disease patients make up a growing percentage of pediatric and adult cardiac intensive care unit admissions. These patients often develop complex multiorgan system disease as a result of long-standing altered cardiac physiology, and many require reoperation during adulthood. Practitioners who care for these patients in the cardiac intensive care unit must have a strong working knowledge of the pathophysiology of complex congenital heart disease, and a full team of specialists must be available to assist in the care of these patients. This chapter will review some of the common multiorgan system effects of long-standing congenital heart disease (eg, renal and hepatic dysfunction, coagulation abnormalities, arrhythmias) as well as some of the unique cardiopulmonary physiology of this patient population.

  5. Psychosocial impact of cancer on adult patients.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Yasmin Abdul; Ghafoor, Zahra Abdul; Masood, Nehal; Mehmood, Talha; Awan, Safia; Ansar, Tooba; Mirza, Murtaza; Rashid, Uzma Abdul

    2012-09-01

    To explore the effects of cancer on psychosocial aspects of Pakistani patients and their families, assessing the need for interventions to improve their quality of life. A prospective, Cross-sectional study was performed on 200 patients visiting the oncology outpatient facility of AKUH from December 2010 to May 2011 through an interview. Responses were recorded on pre-designed questionnaires including FACT-G QOL (Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General Quality Of Life) component. Out of the 200 patients 52 (26%) were males and 148 (74%) were females. Mean age was 51.8 +/- 14.2 years. Breast cancer accounted for the commonest cancer in females 116 (58%) and lung in males 30 (15%), 100 (50%) patients were currently undergoing chemotherapy. In all 148 (74%) patients were well aware of their diagnosis and were able to cope better and 142 (71%) were well supported by families (majority being financially stable). Major financial impact was found in 42 (21%) cases. Religious/spiritual help was sought by 138 (69%) patients predominantly females- 113 (76%) and 22 (11%) patients consulted a psychiatrist; 20 (94%) subjects of this group felt this intervention was helpful. Responses regarding effect on the patient's sexual life were poor and 126 (63%) denied answering the question. In our study one third of cancer patients were found to be depressed mainly affecting those who were receiving multimodality treatment or facing financial issues. Religious help was the main coping strategy for them.

  6. Adult-onset amenorrhea: a study of 262 patients.

    PubMed

    Reindollar, R H; Novak, M; Tho, S P; McDonough, P G

    1986-09-01

    A series of 262 patients with amenorrhea of adult onset are reported. Hypothalamic suppression followed by inappropriate positive feedback, and then hyperprolactinemia and ovarian failure are the most frequently encountered etiologies. Other etiologies are diverse and numerically less frequent. Amenorrhea after use of oral contraceptives, or postpill amenorrhea, occurred in 77 (29%) of all patients. The average age of presentation, prior menstrual history, associated morbidity, and subsequent reproductive potential of each diagnostic group are reported. Adult-onset amenorrhea has a less significant impact on future wellbeing than was reported for a similar-sized group of patients whose amenorrhea developed as a result of pubertal aberrancy.

  7. [Bacterial parotitis in an immunocompromised patient in adult ICU].

    PubMed

    Vassal, O; Bernet, C; Wallet, F; Friggeri, A; Piriou, V

    2013-09-01

    Bacterial parotitis is a common childhood disease with a favorable outcome. Staphylococcus aureus is the most frequently involved pathogen. Clinical presentation in adult patients can be misleading, Onset occurs in patients with multiple comorbidities, making diagnosis difficult--particularly in ICU. Different pathogens are found in adults with worse outcomes observed. We report here the case of a critically ill patient and discuss diagnosis and management of bacterial parotitis. Copyright © 2013 Société française d’anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Patient-Centered Outcomes in Older Adults with Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Wendy R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Older adults have the highest incidence of new-onset epilepsy, yet there is a lack of self-management interventions to ensure that this population achieves desirable outcomes. In order to develop patient-centered interventions for older adults with epilepsy, self-management outcomes of importance to these patients must first be explored. The purpose of this study was to describe what outcomes older adults diagnosed with epilepsy late in life hope to achieve in self-managing their condition. Method Qualitative description was used. 20 older adults took part in semi-structured interviews. Data were analyzed using conventional content analysis. Results Six themes emerged--Maintaining Normalcy, We Want to be Involved, Well-Equipped, Seizure Freedom, Fitting Epilepsy in with Other Conditions, Incongruence with Provider Goals. Conclusion These results add to the extant literature, and provide knowledge on which patient-centered epilepsy self-management interventions can be developed. In addition, these results can inform the development of a patient-centered outcome measure for older adults with epilepsy. Such a measure could be used in conjunction with existing measures related to disease status (seizure frequency, etc.) to ensure that outcomes pertinent to both patients and providers are targeted and measured. PMID:24838071

  9. Low bone mineral density in adult patients with coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Szymczak, Jadwiga; Bohdanowicz-Pawlak, Anna; Waszczuk, Ewa; Jakubowska, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    Calcium and vitamin D malabsorption in coeliac disease (CD) predispose to skeletal demineralisation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of bone mineral density (BMD) and calcium deficiencies in adult patients with CD and assess whether a gluten-free diet is sufficiently effective for BMD restoration. BMD and biochemical parameters of bone and mineral metabolism were measured in 35 adult CD patients receiving (19) or not receiving (16) a gluten-free diet (GFD) and in 36 controls. Then the CD patients were treated with a GFD and calcium (1.0 g/day) plus alfacalcidol (0.25-1 μg/day) for one year. Reduced BMD was diagnosed in 57-77% of the patients. Mean calcaemia, calciuria, and 25(OH) vitamin D were lower, but serum PTH and bone-turnover markers (ALP, osteocalcin, ICTP) were significantly higher in the CD patients than in the controls. In the patients on the diet (GFD(+)), BMD was higher than in the GFD(-) patients, but lower than in the controls. The biochemical parameters were normal in the GFD(+) patients except for diminished calciuria. Mean BMD after one year of treatment significantly increased (p < 0.05), mostly in the lumbar spine (mean: 7.3%), but decreased in five patients who did not strictly adhere to the GFD. Deficiencies in calcium, vitamin D, and BMD are very common in adult CD patients. Gluten avoidance increased BMD, although the values remained markedly lower in several patients. Because of chronic calcium deficiency despite GFD, calcium and vitamin D supplementation in most adult CD patients is proposed.

  10. [Cystic fibrosis in adults: study of 111 patients].

    PubMed

    de Gracia, Javier; Alvarez, Antonio; Mata, Fernando; Guarner, Luisa; Vendrell, Montserrat; Gadtner, Silvia; Cobos, Nicolás

    2002-11-09

    Our goal was to establish the clinical and genetic characteristics of patients diagnosed with adult-onset cystic fibrosis (CF). This was a retrospective observational descriptive comparative study of CF patients according to their age at the time of diagnosis. All adult patients (> 16 years old) attended in our CF Unit until November 2001 were included in the study. Those patients diagnosed of CF at their childhood (< 16 years old) were categorized as Group A patients, and those diagnosed in adulthood (>= 16 years old) were categorized as group B patients. Anthropometric parameters, respiratory and digestive clinical abnormalities, chest and abdominal radiological exams, sputum bacteriology, respiratory function and genetic tests were evaluated. Statistical analysis between groups was performed by comparing chi square test for qualitative values and the Student t test for quantitative values. One hundred and eleven patients (60 women, mean age 28, range 16-69 years) out of a total sample of 245 (45.3%) patients attended at the CF unit were enrolled in the study. Group A included 61 patients (32 women; mean age 23) and group B included 50 patients (28 women; mean age 32). The comparative study between both groups showed that patients in group B were older, had a higher weight and less incidence of initial digestive abnormalities, pancreatic insufficiency, malnutrition, hepatic disease, chronic bronchial colonization by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, admissions, lung transplantation and deaths due to CF. On the contrary, these patients had a higher incidence of pancreatitis, allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis at diagnosis and better respiratory function test parameters. The sweat test was negative in 4 patients of group B and 1 of group A. The genetic study showed 31 different CF mutations, from which only 10 were observed in group B. CF can also be diagnosed in adult age. Patients diagnosed in adulthood have less digestive abnormalities, better lung function and

  11. Assessment of motivation and psychological characteristics of adult orthodontic patients.

    PubMed

    Pabari, Sona; Moles, David R; Cunningham, Susan J

    2011-12-01

    In recent years, the demand for adult orthodontic treatment has grown rapidly; yet there is a paucity of information on this subgroup of patients. It is well known that understanding the psychological characteristics and motives of any patient is fundamental and that these factors might affect patient satisfaction and adherence with treatment. There is therefore a need for clinicians to improve their understanding of this subgroup to enhance the patient's experience of treatment delivery and to increase the potential for a successful treatment outcome. The aim of this study was to develop a measure for the assessment of motivating factors and psychological characteristics of adults seeking orthodontic treatment. This study involved the qualitative development of a valid patient-centered questionnaire to assess motivating factors for adults seeking orthodontic treatment. This was achieved through semi-structured in-depth interviews; key themes were identified and used to construct a questionnaire assessing motivation for treatment. This was then combined with 3 previously validated questionnaires to measure self-esteem, anxiety or depression, and body image and facial body image. The questionnaire was distributed to 172 adult orthodontic patients at different stages of treatment in a large teaching hospital in the United Kingdom. In addition, the self-esteem, body image, and facial body image scores were compared with data on orthognathic patients from the same hospital and with data from members of the general public. Desire to straighten the teeth and improve the smile were the key motivating factors for the adult group studied. Other motives included to improve the bite, improve facial appearance, and close (dental) spacing. With respect to the psychological characteristics of self-esteem, body image, and facial body image, the adult orthodontic group was comparable with the general public. However, differences were noted when comparing data from the adult

  12. Acne in the adult female patient: a practical approach.

    PubMed

    Kamangar, Faranak; Shinkai, Kanade

    2012-10-01

    Acne vulgaris is a common reason why adult women present to dermatologists and can be a clinical challenge to treat. It may also be an important sign of an underlying endocrine disease such as Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS). Although standard acne therapies can be successfully used to treat acne in adult female patients, hormonal treatment is a safe and effective therapeutic option that may provide an opportunity to better target acne in this population, even when other systemic therapies have failed. In this article, a practical approach to the adult female patient with acne will be reviewed to enhance the dermatologist's ability to use hormonal acne therapies and to better identify and evaluate patients with acne in the setting of a possible endocrine disorder.

  13. Crisis homes for adult psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Aagaard, Jørgen; Freiesleben, Michael; Foldager, Leslie

    2008-05-01

    Inspired by the Crisis Home programme in Madison, we have adapted and evaluated the programme at the Community Mental Health (CMH) Centre in Tønder, Denmark. Procedures and schedules from the Crisis Home programme were applied in this open trial. Questionnaire data concerning satisfaction with the stay and registration data concerning the admissions and bed days two years before and two years after the first stay were obtained. During four years, 52 different patients had a total of 187 stays in a crisis home. Twenty (38.5%) of the patients were attached to the ACT team. The average duration of the stays was 4.0 days. The number of readmissions and bed days after the first stay showed a significant downward tendency for the subgroup of patients with a more severe mental disorder, but not for the whole group. The patients, the crisis homes families and the referrers were very satisfied with the programme and the treatment. Crisis home stays represent a quality improvement in the treatment package, especially for patients with a more severe mental disorder. Further documentation will require a controlled study.

  14. Lifetime Increased Risk of Adult Onset Atopic Dermatitis in Adolescent and Adult Patients with Food Allergy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hsu-Sheng; Tu, Hung-Pin; Hong, Chien-Hui; Lee, Chih-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Food allergy can result in life-threatening anaphylaxis. Atopic dermatitis (AD) causes intense itching and impaired quality of life. Previous studies have shown that patients with classical early-onset AD tend to develop food allergy and that 10% of adults with food allergies have concomitant AD. However, it is not known whether late-onset food allergy leads to adult-onset AD, a recently recognized disease entity. Using an initial cohort of one-million subjects, this study retrospectively followed-up 2851 patients with food allergy (age > 12 years) for 14 years and compared them with 11,404 matched controls. While 2.8% (81) of the 2851 food allergy patients developed AD, only 2.0% (227) of the 11,404 controls developed AD. Multivariate regression analysis showed that food allergy patients were more likely to develop AD (adjusted hazard ratio = 2.49, p < 0.0001). Controls had a 1.99% risk of developing AD, while food allergy patients had a significantly higher risk (7.18% and 3.46% for patients with ≥3 and <3 food allergy claims, respectively) of developing adult-onset AD. This is the first study to describe the chronological and dose-dependent associations between food allergy in adolescence and the development of adult-onset AD. PMID:28035995

  15. Participation of family members and quality of patient care - the perspective of adult surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Gröndahl, Weronica; Katajisto, Jouko; Nurminen, Matti; Suhonen, Riitta

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the participation of family members in the care of Finnish adult surgical patients and the connection of the participation with the quality of patient care as perceived by surgical patients. The family members of adult surgical patients are important. Earlier studies vary concerning the nature of participation, its meaning and the connection of participation with patient-centred quality of care. In this study, we aim to produce new knowledge about adult surgical patients whose family members have participated in their care. This was a cross-sectional descriptive survey study. The data were collected among adult surgical patients (N = 481) before being discharged home from hospital with two instruments: the Good Nursing Care scale and the Received Knowledge of Hospital Patients. Based on the results, most adult surgical patients report that family members participate in their care. Participation was connected with received knowledge and preconditions of care, which are components of the quality of patient care. In future, testing of different solutions for improving the participation of surgical patients' family members in patient care should be implemented. Furthermore, the preconditions of family members' participation in care and the concept of participation should be analysed to emphasise the active role of family members. The results emphasised the importance of family members for the patients in surgical care. Family members' participation is connected with the quality of patient care. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Dreaming during anaesthesia in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Kate; Skrzypek, Hannah

    2007-09-01

    Dreaming during anaesthesia is defined as any recalled experience (excluding awareness) that occurred between induction of anaesthesia and the first moment of consciousness upon emergence. Dreaming is a commonly-reported side-effect of anaesthesia. The incidence is higher in patients who are interviewed immediately after anaesthesia (approximately 22%) than in those who are interviewed later (approximately 6%). A minority of dreams, which include sensory perceptions obtained during anaesthesia, provide evidence of near-miss awareness. These patients may have risk factors for awareness and this type of dreaming may be prevented by depth of anaesthesia monitoring. Most dreaming however, occurs in younger, fitter patients, who have high home dream recall, who receive propofol-based anaesthesia and who emerge rapidly from anaesthesia. Their dreams are usually short and pleasant, are related to work, family and recreation, are not related to inadequate anaesthesia and probably occur during recovery. Dreaming is a common, fascinating, usually pleasant and harmless phenomenon.

  17. The immunocompromised adult patient and surgery.

    PubMed

    Littlewood, Keith E

    2008-09-01

    The perioperative management of immunosuppressed patients remains relatively unsophisticated. Rational management involves understanding the normal immune response to injury as modified by the preexisting or imposed abnormalities that immunosuppressed patients manifest on the basis of their disease and/or treatment. Patients with cancer, infected with human immunodeficiency virus, and having had an organ transplant are extreme examples of disordered immunity and it is important to understand the effects of their diseases and treatments. In the future, however, more appropriate management will require anticipation and appreciation of frequent preoperative immunotherapy, a more complete understanding of the immunological response to anesthesia and surgery, the ability to assess immune reserve and stratify risk within the context of that profile, and a better knowledge of the immunological effect of anesthetic agents.

  18. [ADHD: Burden of Disease According to Subtypes in Adult Patients].

    PubMed

    Retz-Junginger, Petra; Rösler, Michael; Giesen, Lisa Katharina; Philipp-Wiegmann, Florence; Römer, Konstanze; Zinnow, Toivo; Retz, Wolfgang

    2016-07-01

    In consideration of ADHD subtype we assessed burden of disease of adult ADHD patients and neuroticism. 511 adult ADHD patients were enrolled in the study. We measured ADHD symptoms categorically and dimensionally by the "Homburger ADHS-Skalen für Erwachsene (HASE)". All participants rated their ADHD associated level of suffering. To assess personality traits, the psychometric instrument NEO-PI-R was used. In patients with higher levels of neuroticism, there was no significant difference in the level of suffering between the ADHD subtypes. In the group of ADHD patients which scored low on the neuroticism scale, ADHD combined patients are significant more affected compared to the predominantly hyperactive-impulsive or the predominantly inattentive type. These results underline the hypothesis that the burden of disease is not only related to the level of ADHD symptoms and subtype but also moderated by neuroticism. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Resveratrol accelerates erythroid maturation by activation of FoxO3 and ameliorates anemia in beta-thalassemic mice

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Sara Santos; De Falco, Luigia; Ghaffari, Saghi; Brugnara, Carlo; Sinclair, David A.; Matte’, Alessandro; Iolascon, Achille; Mohandas, Narla; Bertoldi, Mariarita; An, Xiuli; Siciliano, Angela; Rimmelé, Pauline; Cappellini, Maria Domenica; Michan, Shaday; Zoratti, Elisa; Anne, Janin; De Franceschi, Lucia

    2014-01-01

    Resveratrol, a polyphenolic-stilbene, has received increased attention in the last decade due to its wide range of biological activities. Beta(β)-thalassemias are inherited red cell disorders, found worldwide, characterized by ineffective erythropoiesis and red cell oxidative damage with reduced survival. We evaluated the effects of low-dose-resveratrol (5 μM) on in vitro human erythroid differentiation of CD34+ from normal and β-thalassemic subjects. We found that resveratrol induces accelerated erythroid-maturation, resulting in the reduction of colony-forming units of erythroid cells and increased intermediate and late erythroblasts. In sorted colony-forming units of erythroid cells resveratrol activates Forkhead-box-class-O3, decreases Akt activity and up-regulates anti-oxidant enzymes as catalase. In an in vivo murine model for β-thalassemia, resveratrol (2.4 mg/kg) reduces ineffective erythropoiesis, increases hemoglobin levels, reduces reticulocyte count and ameliorates red cell survival. In both wild-type and β-thalassemic mice, resveratrol up-regulates scavenging enzymes such as catalase and peroxiredoxin-2 through Forkhead-box-class-O3 activation. These data indicate that resveratrol inhibits Akt resulting in FoxO3 activation with upregulation of cytoprotective systems enabling the pathological erythroid precursors to resist the oxidative damage and continue to differentiate. Our data suggest that the dual effect of resveratrol on erythropoiesis through activation of FoxO3 transcriptional factor combined with the amelioration of oxidative stress in circulating red cells may be considered as a potential novel therapeutic strategy in treating β-thalassemia. PMID:23975182

  20. Adipsic diabetes insipidus in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Cuesta, Martín; Hannon, Mark J; Thompson, Christopher J

    2017-06-01

    Adipsic diabetes insipidus (ADI) is a very rare disorder, characterized by hypotonic polyuria due to arginine vasopressin (AVP) deficiency and failure to generate the sensation of thirst in response to hypernatraemia. As the sensation of thirst is the key homeostatic mechanism that prevents hypernatraemic dehydration in patients with untreated diabetes insipidus (DI), adipsia leads to failure to respond to aquaresis with appropriate fluid intake. This predisposes to the development of significant hypernatraemia, which is the typical biochemical manifestation of adipsic DI. A literature search was performed to review the background, etiology, management and associated complications of this rare condition. ADI has been reported to occur in association with clipping of an anterior communicating artery aneurysm following subarachnoid haemorrhage, major hypothalamic surgery, traumatic brain injury and toluene exposure among other conditions. Management is very difficult and patients are prone to marked changes in plasma sodium concentration, in particular to the development of severe hypernatraemia. Associated hypothalamic disorders, such as severe obesity, sleep apnoea and thermoregulatory disorders are often observed in patients with ADI. The management of ADI is challenging and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Prognosis is variable; hypothalamic complications lead to early death in some patients, but recent reports highlight the possibility of recovery of thirst.

  1. [Diabetes education in adult diabetic patients].

    PubMed

    Weitgasser, Raimund; Clodi, Martin; Cvach, Sarah; Grafinger, Peter; Lechleitner, Monika; Howorka, Kinga; Ludvik, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    Diabetes education and self management has gained a critical role in diabetes care. Patient empowerment aims to actively influence the course of the disease by self-monitoring and treatment modification, as well as integration of diabetes in patients' daily life to achieve changes in lifestyle accordingly.Diabetes education has to be made accessible for all patients with the disease. To be able to provide a structured and validated education program adequate personal as well as space, organizational and financial background are required. Besides an increase in knowledge about the disease it has been shown that structured diabetes education is able to improve diabetes outcome measured by parameters like blood glucose, HbA1c, blood pressure and body weight in follow-up evaluations. Modern education programs emphasize the ability of patients to integrate diabetes in everyday life and stress physical activity besides healthy eating as a main component of lifestyle therapy and use interactive methods in order to increase the acceptance of personal responsibility.

  2. Intravenous lipids in adult surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Klek, Stanislaw; Waitzberg, Dan L

    2015-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition is considered an essential element of the perioperative management of surgical patients. It is recommended in patients who require nutritional therapy but in whom the enteral route is contraindicated, not recommended or non-feasible. The new generation of lipid emulsions (LEs) based on olive and fish oils are safe and may improve clinical outcome in surgical patients. The increased provision of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in fish oil-containing LEs seems to be associated with fewer infectious complications and shorter ICU and hospital stays following major abdominal surgery. Increased provision of olive oil in the absence of fish oil may also exert beneficial effects, but a clear conclusion on this is limited due to the low number of available studies. Hence, at the moment, the evidence supports the use of n-3-polyunsaturated fatty acid-enriched LEs as a part of the parenteral nutrition regimen for selected groups of patients, such as those with major surgical trauma or those undergoing extended resections or liver transplantation.

  3. Body Composition in Adult Patients with Thalassemia Major

    PubMed Central

    Alexiou, Evangelos; Thriskos, Paschalis; Fezoulidis, Ioannis; Vassiou, Katerina

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To assess body composition in adult male and female patients with thalassemia major by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and to compare the findings with a group of healthy age-matched controls. Methods. Our study group included sixty-two patients (27 males, mean age 36 years, and 35 females, mean age 36.4 years) and fifteen age-matched healthy controls. All patients had an established diagnosis of thalassemia major and followed a regular blood transfusion scheme since childhood and chelation treatment. Fat, lean, and bone mineral density (BMD) were assessed with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Ferritin levels and body mass index of all patients and controls were also recorded. Student t-test and Wilcoxon test were performed and statistical significance was set at p < 0.05. Results. BMD and whole body lean mass are lower in both male and female adult patients compared with controls (p < 0.01 in both groups), whereas whole body fat mass was found to have no statistically significant difference compared to controls. Regional trunk fat around the abdomen was found to be lower in male patients compared to controls (p = 0.02). Conclusion. Severe bone loss and diminished lean mass are expected in adult male and female patients with thalassemia major. Fat changes seem to affect mainly male patients. PMID:27956899

  4. Body Composition in Adult Patients with Thalassemia Major.

    PubMed

    Vlychou, Marianna; Alexiou, Evangelos; Thriskos, Paschalis; Fezoulidis, Ioannis; Vassiou, Katerina

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To assess body composition in adult male and female patients with thalassemia major by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and to compare the findings with a group of healthy age-matched controls. Methods. Our study group included sixty-two patients (27 males, mean age 36 years, and 35 females, mean age 36.4 years) and fifteen age-matched healthy controls. All patients had an established diagnosis of thalassemia major and followed a regular blood transfusion scheme since childhood and chelation treatment. Fat, lean, and bone mineral density (BMD) were assessed with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Ferritin levels and body mass index of all patients and controls were also recorded. Student t-test and Wilcoxon test were performed and statistical significance was set at p < 0.05. Results. BMD and whole body lean mass are lower in both male and female adult patients compared with controls (p < 0.01 in both groups), whereas whole body fat mass was found to have no statistically significant difference compared to controls. Regional trunk fat around the abdomen was found to be lower in male patients compared to controls (p = 0.02). Conclusion. Severe bone loss and diminished lean mass are expected in adult male and female patients with thalassemia major. Fat changes seem to affect mainly male patients.

  5. Intellectual functioning of adolescent and adult patients with eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Schilder, Christina M T; van Elburg, Annemarie A; Snellen, Wim M; Sternheim, Lot C; Hoek, Hans W; Danner, Unna N

    2017-05-01

    Intelligence is a known vulnerability marker in various psychiatric disorders. In eating disorders (ED) intelligence has not been studied thoroughly. Small-scale studies indicate that intelligence levels might be above general population norms, but larger scale studies are lacking. The aim of this study was to determine intellectual functioning in ED patients and associations with severity of the disorder. Wechsler's Full scale IQ (FSIQ), Verbal IQ (VIQ) and Performance IQ (PIQ) of 703 adolescent and adult ED patients were compared with population norms. Exploratory analyzes were performed on associations between IQ and both somatic severity (BMI and duration of the disorder) and psychological/behavioral severity (Eating Disorder Inventory [EDI-II] ratings) of the ED. Mean IQ's were significantly higher than population means and effect-sizes were small-to-medium (d = .28, .16 and .23 for VIQ, PIQ, and FSIQ). No linear associations between IQ and BMI were found, but the most severely underweight adult anorexia nervosa (AN) patients (BMI ≤ 15) had higher VIQ (107.7) than the other adult AN patients (VIQ 102.1). In adult AN patients PIQ was associated with psychological/behavioral severity of the ED. Our findings suggest that, in contrast with other severe mental disorders where low intelligence is a risk factor, higher than average intelligence might increase the vulnerability to develop an ED. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.(Int J Eat Disord 2017; 50:481-489). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Clinical profile of patients with adult-onset eosinophilic asthma.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Jantina C; Storm, Huib; Amelink, Marijke; de Nijs, Selma B; Eichhorn, Edwin; Reitsma, Bennie H; Bel, Elisabeth H D; Ten Brinke, Anneke

    2016-04-01

    Adult-onset eosinophilic asthma is increasingly recognised as a severe and difficult-to-treat subtype of asthma. In clinical practice, early recognition of patients with this asthma subtype is important because it may have treatment implications. Therefore, physicians need to know the distinct characteristics of this asthma phenotype. The objective of the present study was to determine the characteristic profile of patients with adult-onset eosinophilic asthma. 130 patients with adult-onset (>18 years of age) asthma and high blood eosinophil counts (≥0.3×10(9) L(-1)) were compared with 361 adult-onset asthma patients with low (<0.3×10(9) L(-1)) blood eosinophils. Measurements included a series of clinical, functional and imaging parameters. Patients with high blood eosinophils were more often male, had less well controlled asthma and higher exacerbation rates, despite the use of higher doses of inhaled corticosteroids. They had higher levels of total IgE without more sensitisation to common inhaled allergens. In addition, these patients had worse lung function, and more often showed fixed airflow limitation, air trapping, nasal polyposis and abnormalities on sinus computed tomography scanning. Chronic rhinosinusitis, air trapping and male sex were three independent factors associated with blood eosinophilia (adjusted OR 3.8 (95% CI 1.7-8.1), 3.0 (95% CI 1.1-8.1) and 2.4 (95% CI 1.3-4.4), respectively). Patients with adult-onset asthma with elevated blood eosinophils exhibit a distinct profile, which can readily be recognised in clinical practice.

  7. Clinical profile of patients with adult-onset eosinophilic asthma

    PubMed Central

    Storm, Huib; Amelink, Marijke; de Nijs, Selma B.; Eichhorn, Edwin; Reitsma, Bennie H.; Bel, Elisabeth H.D.; ten Brinke, Anneke

    2016-01-01

    Adult-onset eosinophilic asthma is increasingly recognised as a severe and difficult-to-treat subtype of asthma. In clinical practice, early recognition of patients with this asthma subtype is important because it may have treatment implications. Therefore, physicians need to know the distinct characteristics of this asthma phenotype. The objective of the present study was to determine the characteristic profile of patients with adult-onset eosinophilic asthma. 130 patients with adult-onset (>18 years of age) asthma and high blood eosinophil counts (≥0.3×109 L−1) were compared with 361 adult-onset asthma patients with low (<0.3×109 L−1) blood eosinophils. Measurements included a series of clinical, functional and imaging parameters. Patients with high blood eosinophils were more often male, had less well controlled asthma and higher exacerbation rates, despite the use of higher doses of inhaled corticosteroids. They had higher levels of total IgE without more sensitisation to common inhaled allergens. In addition, these patients had worse lung function, and more often showed fixed airflow limitation, air trapping, nasal polyposis and abnormalities on sinus computed tomography scanning. Chronic rhinosinusitis, air trapping and male sex were three independent factors associated with blood eosinophilia (adjusted OR 3.8 (95% CI 1.7–8.1), 3.0 (95% CI 1.1–8.1) and 2.4 (95% CI 1.3–4.4), respectively). Patients with adult-onset asthma with elevated blood eosinophils exhibit a distinct profile, which can readily be recognised in clinical practice. PMID:27730197

  8. Hemispherectomy in adults patients with severe unilateral epilepsy and hemiplegia.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shuli; Zhang, Guojun; Li, Yunlin; Ding, Chengyun; Yu, Tao; Wang, Xiaofei; Zhang, Zhiwen; Jiang, Hong; Zhang, Shaohui; He, Sailin

    2013-09-01

    To study postoperative seizure control of hemispherectomy in adults with epilepsy and evaluate changes of movement and speech function, intelligence quotient (IQ) and quality of life (QOL) after hemispherectomy. We retrospectively analyzed 25 adults who presented severe unilateral epilepsy and hemiplegia and underwent anatomic or functional hemispherectomy in between 2006 and 2011. Surgical outcomes, including seizure-control at last follow-up, changes of aphasia quotient, hemiplegic side motor function, IQ and QOL from pre-operative to 2 years follow-up, were investigated. Results were statistically analyzed with SPSS 18.0. Nine functional hemispherectomies and 16 anatomic hemispherectomies were performed. Ninety-two percent of patients were seizure-free and 8% displayed Engel II grade seizure control after the procedure. Impaired movement function was present in 9 (36%) adults' upper limbs and 5 (20%) patients' lower limbs. The patients with age at seizure onset <3 years showed improvement in mean motor function of the upper limbs. Impaired speech was seen in 7 patients with left hemispherectomies. There was an overall improvement in the mean aphasia quotient and significant difference was found in amount of change in aphasia quotients between patients with different ages of onset. All of the patients' postoperative scores of overall QOL, full IQ, verbal IQ and performance IQ improved compared with pretreatment scores and those improvements were not associated with patient's age at seizure onset or surgical approach. However, significant difference was found in change of verbal IQ between patients with right hemispherectomies and those with left hemispherectomies. Surgical complications included a single case of hydrocephalus, and 6 transient complications. Hemispherectomy presented good seizure control and improvement in QOL and IQ, and impairment on motor and speech function were mild. Furthermore, patients with early seizure onset could maintain movement

  9. Monogenic autoinflammatory diseases: General concepts and presentation in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Rodríguez, José; Ruiz-Ortiz, Estíbaliz; Yagüe, Jordi

    2017-09-15

    Monogenic autoinflammatory diseases (AIFD) are rare disorders characterized by an uncontrolled increase of the systemic inflammatory response, which is caused by mutations in genes involved in inflammatory pathways. Over the last few years, new genes and proteins responsible for new monogenic AIFD have been identified and a substantial improvement in their treatment has been achieved. Monogenic AIFD manifestations typically begin during childhood, but they can also occur in adults. Compared to pediatric patients, adults usually present with a less severe disease and fewer long-term complications. In addition, patients with adult-onset disease carry low-penetrance mutations more often than pathogenic variants. A late-onset of AIFD may be occasionally associated with the presence of somatic mutations. In this study, we review the most frequent monogenic AIFD, and others recently described, which may occur during adulthood. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Movement disorders in adult patients with classical galactosemia.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Agusti, Ignacio; Carecchio, Miryam; Bhatia, Kailash P; Kojovic, Maja; Parees, Isabel; Chandrashekar, Hoskote S; Footitt, Emma J; Burke, Derek; Edwards, Mark J; Lachmann, Robin H L; Murphy, Elaine

    2013-06-01

    Classical galactosemia is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism leading to toxic accumulation of galactose and derived metabolites. It presents with acute systemic complications in the newborn. Galactose restriction resolves these symptoms, but long-term complications, such as premature ovarian failure and neurological problems including motor dysfunction, may occur despite adequate treatment. The objective of the current study was to determine the frequency and phenotype of motor problems in adult patients with classical galactosemia. In this cross-sectional study, adult patients with a biochemically confirmed diagnosis of galactosemia attending our clinic were assessed with an interview and neurological examination and their notes retrospectively reviewed. Patients were classified according to the presence/absence of motor dysfunction on examination. Patients with motor dysfunction were further categorized according to the presence/absence of reported motor symptoms. Forty-seven patients were included. Thirty-one patients showed evidence of motor dysfunction including: tremor (23 patients), dystonia (23 patients), cerebellar signs (6 patients), and pyramidal signs (4 patients). Tremor and dystonia were often combined (16 patients). Thirteen patients reported motor symptoms, with 8 describing progressive worsening. Symptomatic treatment was effective in 4 of 5 patients. Nonmotor neurological features (cognitive, psychiatric, and speech disorders) and premature ovarian failure were more frequent in patients with motor dysfunction. Motor dysfunction is a common complication of classical galactosemia, with tremor and dystonia the most frequent findings. Up to one third of patients report motor symptoms and may benefit from appropriate treatment. Progressive worsening is not uncommon and may suggest ongoing brain damage in a subset of patients.

  11. Nutritional profile of adult patients with celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Abenavoli, L; Delibasic, M; Peta, V; Turkulov, V; De Lorenzo, A; Medić-Stojanoska, M

    2015-11-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic immune-mediated gluten dependent enteropathy induced by ingestion of gluten, characterized by intestinal malabsorption and subtotals or total atrophy of intestinal villi. The predominant consequence of CD in untreated patients, is malnutrition as a result of malabsorption. Moreover, several and increasing extra-intestinal clinical manifestations have been described in the CD patients. Strict adherence to a gluten-free diet (GFD) improves nutritional status, inducing an increase in fat and bone compartments, but does not completely normalize body composition and nutritional deficiencies. An early and accurate evaluation of nutritional status can be of the pivotal step in the clinical management of the adult CD patients. The aim of this review is to present the most important and recent data on nutritional and metabolic features in the CD adult patients, the related implications and the effects of the GFD on these conditions.

  12. High-flow nasal cannula therapy for adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Lin, Ling; Pan, Konghan; Zhou, Jiancang

    2016-01-01

    High-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) oxygen therapy has several physiological advantages over traditional oxygen therapy devices, including decreased nasopharyngeal resistance, washing out of the nasopharyngeal dead space, generation of positive pressure in the pharynx, increasing alveolar recruitment in the lungs, humidification of the airways, increased fraction of inspired oxygen and improved mucociliary clearance. Recently, the use of HFNC in treating adult critical illness patients has significantly increased, and it is now being used in many patients with a range of different disease conditions. However, there are no established guidelines to direct the safe and effective use of HFNC for these patients. This review article summarizes the available published literature on the positive physiological effects, mechanisms of action, and the clinical applications of HFNC, compared with traditional oxygen therapy devices. The available literature suggests that HFNC oxygen therapy is an effective modality for the early treatment of critically adult patients. PMID:27698207

  13. Patient-specific FDG dosimetry for adult males, adult females, and very low birth weight infants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niven, Erin

    Fluorodeoxyglucose is the most commonly used radiopharmaceutical in Positron Emission Tomography, with applications in neurology, cardiology, and oncology. Despite its routine use worldwide, the radiation absorbed dose estimates from FDG have been based primarily on data obtained from two dogs studied in 1977 and 11 adults (most likely males) studied in 1982. In addition, the dose estimates calculated for FDG have been centered on the adult male, with little or no mention of variations in the dose estimates due to sex, age, height, weight, nationality, diet, or pathological condition. Through an extensive investigation into the Medical Internal Radiation Dose schema for calculating absorbed doses, I have developed a simple patient-specific equation; this equation incorporates the parameters necessary for alterations to the mathematical values of the human model to produce an estimate more representative of the individual under consideration. I have used this method to determine the range of absorbed doses to FDG from the collection of a large quantity of biological data obtained in adult males, adult females, and very low birth weight infants. Therefore, a more accurate quantification of the dose to humans from FDG has been completed. My results show that per unit administered activity, the absorbed dose from FDG is higher for infants compared to adults, and the dose for adult women is higher than for adult men. Given an injected activity of approximately 3.7 MBq kg-1, the doses for adult men, adult women, and full-term newborns would be on the order of 5.5, 7.1, and 2.8 mSv, respectively. These absorbed doses are comparable to the doses received from other nuclear medicine procedures.

  14. A Future for Adult Educators in Patient Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Jean E.

    2014-01-01

    Adult education in healthcare comes in several forms: degree and certificate programs aimed at preparing better academic and clinical educators; and community education programs aimed at wellness, rehabilitation, or learning to live with chronic diseases. Patient-centered healthcare, however, is part of something new: coordinated and transitional…

  15. Improvement with Duloxetine in an Adult ADHD Patient

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tourjman, Smadar Valerie; Bilodeau, Mathieu

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common and disabling disorder among adults and is treated with stimulant and non stimulant medication. Objective: To report the case of a patient with ADHD showing good clinical response to duloxetine, a selective serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SSNRI). Case…

  16. A Future for Adult Educators in Patient Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Jean E.

    2014-01-01

    Adult education in healthcare comes in several forms: degree and certificate programs aimed at preparing better academic and clinical educators; and community education programs aimed at wellness, rehabilitation, or learning to live with chronic diseases. Patient-centered healthcare, however, is part of something new: coordinated and transitional…

  17. Autism and behavior in adult patients with Dravet syndrome (DS).

    PubMed

    Berkvens, J J L; Veugen, I; Veendrick-Meekes, M J B M; Snoeijen-Schouwenaars, F M; Schelhaas, H J; Willemsen, M H; Tan, I Y; Aldenkamp, A P

    2015-06-01

    Autism and behavioral characteristics in adults with Dravet syndrome (DS) have rarely been systematically studied. Three scales were used to assess the outcomes of DS in adulthood in terms of autism and behavior. All the adult patients with DS, nine male and four female, aged between 18 and 60 years, living at the Epilepsy Center Kempenhaeghe in The Netherlands were included in the study. In addition, the past medical history of each patient was systematically screened for diagnoses like autism, Pervasive Development Disorder-Not Otherwise Specified (PDD-NOS), autism spectrum disorder (ASD), hyperactivity, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), and self-mutilation. Information concerning past and current use of psychoactive drugs was also evaluated. Eight patients (61.5%) were classified as having autism spectrum disorder (ASD) according to the AVZ-R or according to the medical record. Self-mutilation was seen in four patients (30.8%), hyperactivity in none. Three patients (23.1%) currently used psychoactive drugs. Autism spectrum disorders persist in adult patients with DS, while certain characteristics associated with behavioral problems, such as hyperactivity or use of psychoactive medication, seem to be less prominent than in childhood. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Food hypersensitivity among adult patients: epidemiological and clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Castillo, R; Delgado, J; Quiralte, J; Blanco, C; Carrillo, T

    1996-01-01

    Food hypersensitivity (FH) is lesser frequent among adult patients than in childhood. Foods implicated in hypersensitivity reactions vary with sociocultural and diet habits from a geographic place to other. We studied 142 adult patients sensitized to foods, among 7698 patients visited at our Outpatient Clinic. Hundred and twenty patients referred clinical symptoms after consumption of one or more foods consistently. From the latest, 107 patients (89.2%) were atopics (92 of them sensitizes to dust mites) and 54 (45%) referred atopic familiar background. Most frequent recorded symptoms were: urticaria/angioedema 84 cases (70%), oral syndrome 65 (54%), asthma 48 (37%) and anaphylaxis 33 patients (27.5%). Shellfish sensitization occurred in 50 patients, fresh fruits in 33 and nuts in 29 cases. Shrimp (48 patients), squid (33), kiwi (14), papaya (14), avocado (13) and banana (12 cases) were the most frequent causes of FH. Significant statistical association between foods and inhalants was observed for fresh fruits and latex (p < 0.001), fresh fruits and pollens (p < 0.01), and shellfish and Blatta germanica (p < 0.001). Prevalence of FH among patients at our Area is around 1.6%. Tropical fruits, as other kind of fruits, seem to share common IgE-epitopes to pollens. High prevalence of shellfish and cockroach hypersensitivity could be more easily developed by previous domestic mites sensitization.

  19. Neuropsychological profile of adult patients with nonsymptomatic occipital lobe epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Bilo, Leonilda; Santangelo, Gabriella; Improta, Ilaria; Vitale, Carmine; Meo, Roberta; Trojano, Luigi

    2013-02-01

    To explore the neuropsychological and neurobehavioral profile in adult patients affected by nonsymptomatic (cryptogenic and idiopathic) occipital lobe epilepsy (OLE), with normal intelligence, we enrolled 20 adult patients with nonsymptomatic OLE and 20 age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy subjects. All participants underwent neuropsychiatric assessment scales, and standardized neuropsychological tests tapping memory, executive functions, constructional, visuospatial and visuoperceptual skills. After Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons, patients performed significantly worse than controls on several tests tapping complex visuospatial skills and frontal lobe functions. The analysis of single patients' performance revealed that a significantly higher number of OLE patients achieved age- and education-adjusted pathological scores on three tests (Benton Judgment of Line Orientation Test, Freehand Copying of Drawings Test, color-word interference task of Stroop test) with respect to controls. Patients did not differ from control subjects on neuropsychiatric aspects. The direct comparison between OLE subtypes showed that cryptogenetic OLE patients tended to achieve lower scores than idiopathic OLE patients on most tests, but no difference between the two groups was fully significant. In summary, patients with nonsymptomatic OLE can be affected by clinically relevant impairments in selected neuropsychological domains: complex visuospatial skills and executive functions. It could be speculated that frontal and visuospatial cognitive deficits might be the result of epileptic activity spreading within a neural network that includes structures far beyond the occipital lobe.

  20. [Diagnosis and therapy of adult patients with facial asymmetry].

    PubMed

    Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko; Kuroda, Shingo

    2009-09-01

    The goal of orthodontic treatment is to improve the patient's life by enhancing dental and jaw functions and dentofacial esthetics [Graber TM, et al., Orthodontics current principles and techniques. 4(e) ed. St Louis: Elsevier, 2005.]. Harmonious occlusion is achieved following improvements of malocclusion via orthodontic treatment [Ehmer U and Broll P, Int J Adult Orthod Orthognath Surg 1992;7:153-159. Throckmorton GS, et al., J Prosthet Dent 1984;51:252-261.]. Perfect facial symmetry is extremely rare, and normal faces have a degree of asymmetry. Patients with dentofacial deformity more frequently have asymmetry of the face and jaws. There was a relationship between the type of malocclusion and the prevalence of asymmetry; 28% of the Class III group, but 40% to 42% of the Class I, Class II and long face groups respectively, were asymmetric [Severt TR and Proffit WR, Int J Adult Orthod Orthogn Surg 1997;12:171-176.]; therefore, facial asymmetry is a common complaint among orthodontic patients. Treatment of severe facial asymmetry in adults consists mainly of surgically repositioning the maxilla or the mandible [Bardinet E, et al., Orthod Fr 2002;73:243-315. Guyuron B, Clin Plast Surg 1989;16:795-801. Proffit WR, et al., Contemporary treatment of dentofacial deformity. 2003. St Louis: Mosby, 2003:574-644.], however, new methods, i.e. orthodontic tooth movement with implant anchorage, have recently been introduced [Costa A, et al., Int J Adult Orthod Orthognath Surg 1998;3:201-209. Creekmore TD and Eklund MK, J Clin Orthod 1983;17:266-269. Miyawaki S,et al., Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop 2003;124:373-378. Park HS, et al., J Clin Orthod 2001;35:417-422. Roberts WE, et al., Angle Orthod 1989;59:247-256.], and various treatment options can be chosen in patients with facial asymmetry. In this article, we describe the diagnosis and treatment of adult patients with facial asymmetry.

  1. Alpha-1-antitrypsin phenotypes in adult liver disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Alempijevic, Tamara; Milutinovic, Aleksandra Sokic; Kovacevic, Nada

    2009-01-01

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) is an important serine protease inhibitor in humans. Hereditary alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) affects lungs and liver. Liver disease caused by AATD in paediatric patients has been previously well documented. However, the association of liver disease with alpha-1-antitrypsin gene polymorphisms in adults is less clear. Therefore, we aimed to study AAT polymorphisms in adults with liver disease. We performed a case-control study. AAT polymorphisms were investigated by isoelectric focusing in 61 patients with liver cirrhosis and 9 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. The control group consisted of 218 healthy blood donors. A significant deviation of observed and expected frequency of AAT phenotypes from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (chi-square = 34.77, df 11, P = 0.000) in the patient group was caused by a higher than expected frequency of Pi ZZ homozygotes (f = 0.0143 and f = 0.0005, respectively, P = 0.000). In addition, Pi M homozygotes were more frequent in patients than in controls (63% and 46%, respectively, P = 0.025). Our study results show that Pi ZZ homozygosity in adults could be associated with severe liver disease. Presence of Pi M homozygosity could be associated with liver disease via some mechanism different from Z allele-induced liver damage through accumulation of AAT polymers. PMID:19961268

  2. Pneumococci Can Persistently Colonize Adult Patients with Chronic Respiratory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Domenech, A.; Balsalobre, L.; Marti, S.; Calatayud, L.; De la Campa, A. G.; Brueggemann, A. B.; Liñares, J.

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae plays an important role in causing acute exacerbations in patients with chronic respiratory disease. However, few data are available regarding pneumococcal persistence in adult patients with chronic respiratory diseases. Fifty pneumococci recovered from sputum samples (1995 to 2010) from 13 adult patients with ≥3 episodes of acute exacerbation or pneumonia, with the same serotype and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) pattern, were studied. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) loci, penicillin-binding protein (PBP) genes (pbp2x, pbp1a, pbp2b), and the quinolone-resistant determining regions (QRDRs) of parC, parE, and gyrA were PCR amplified and sequenced. The average time between the first and last episode was 582 days (standard deviation [SD], ±362). All but two patients received multiple courses of β-lactam treatment, and all persistent strains were resistant to penicillin; however, the PBP sequences were stable over time apart from one variable nucleotide in pbp2x, observed among pneumococci isolated from three patients. In contrast, 7/11 patients treated with fluoroquinolones had fluoroquinolone-resistant pneumococci. In three patients, the initially fluoroquinolone-susceptible strain developed resistance after fluoroquinolone therapy, and in the remaining four patients, the persistent strain was fluoroquinolone resistant from the first episode. QRDR changes involved in fluoroquinolone resistance were frequently observed in persistent strains after fluoroquinolone treatment; however, the PBP sequences and MLST genotypes of these strains were stable over time. PMID:23052300

  3. [Eye contact in adult patients with Asperger syndrome].

    PubMed

    Roy, M; Wolfgang, D

    2015-05-01

    It is unclear if individuals with autism spectrum disorders rarely hold direct eye contact because eyes are unimportant for them, or if it is actively avoided. The aim of the current investigation was to gain a better understanding for their views on direct eye contact by exploring adult patients with Asperger syndrome. 63 adult patients with Asperger syndrome (28 females, 35 males, 21 - 62 years old) were explored about using and sensing direct eye contact by means of a standardised questionnaire. 87 % of investigated patients depict direct eye contact as being disagreeable. They describe it as arduous and distracting. Therefore they mostly actively avoid direct eye contact. The here gained knowledge about aversion towards direct eye contact in individuals with autism should lead to a stronger understanding and acceptance of this problem in the non-autistic population. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Optimal serum phenylalanine for adult patients with phenylketonuria.

    PubMed

    Okano, Yoshiyuki; Nagasaka, Hironori

    2013-12-01

    High serum phenylalanine in adult patients with phenylketonuria (PKU) causes neuropsychological and psychosocial problems that can be resolved by phenylalanine-restricted diet. Therefore, PKU patients must continue to adhere to phenylalanine-restricted diet for life, although the optimal serum phenylalanine level in later life has yet to be established. The purpose of this review was to establish the optimal serum phenylalanine level in later life of PKU patients. We evaluated oxidative stress status, nitric oxide metabolism, cholesterol-derived oxysterols, vitamin D and bone status, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in adult PKU patients according to serum phenylalanine level. Oxidative stress increased markedly at serum phenylalanine of 700-800 μmol/L. Serum phenylalanine higher than 700-850 μmol/L correlated with the disturbance of nitric oxide regulatory system. Adult PKU patients had poor vitamin D status and exhibited predominance of bone resorption over bone formation. In the brain, the levels of 24S-hydroxycholesterol, a marker of brain cholesterol elimination, were low at serum phenylalanine levels exceeding 650 μmol/L. MRI studies showed high signal intensity in deep white matter on T2-weighted and FLAIR images of PKU patients with serum phenylalanine greater than 500 μmol/L, with decreased apparent diffusion coefficients. Changes in most parameters covering the entire body organs in adult PKU were almost acceptable below 700-800 μmol/L of phenylalanine level. However, the optimal serum phenylalanine level should be 500 μmol/L or less in later life for the brain to be safe. © 2013.

  5. Amelogenesis imperfecta - lifelong management. Restorative management of the adult patient.

    PubMed

    Patel, M; McDonnell, S T; Iram, S; Chan, M F W-Y

    2013-11-08

    The biggest challenge restorative dentists face in rehabilitating patients with amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is trying to restore aesthetics, function and occlusal stability while keeping the treatment as conservative as possible. The goals of treatment should be to prolong the life of the patient's own teeth and avoid or delay the need for extractions and subsequent replacement with conventional fixed, removable or implant retained prostheses. In order to achieve these goals a stepwise approach to treatment planning is required starting with the most conservative but aesthetically acceptable treatment. This article discusses the management of AI and presents the various treatment options available for restoring the adult patient who presents to the dentist with AI.

  6. Coronary Arteriovenous Fistulas in Adult Patients: Surgical Management and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Albeyoglu, Sebnem; Aldag, Mustafa; Ciloglu, Ufuk; Sargin, Murat; Oz, Tugba Kemaloglu; Kutlu, Hakan; Dagsali, Sabri

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to describe the demographic, clinical and anatomic characteristics of coronary arteriovenous fistulas in adult patients who underwent open cardiac surgery and to review surgical management and outcomes. Methods Twenty-one adult patients (12 female, 9 male; mean age: 56.1±7.9 years) who underwent surgical treatment for coronary arteriovenous fistulas were retrospectively included in this study. Coronary angiography, chest X-ray, electrocardiography and transthoracic echocardiography were preoperatively performed in all patients. Demographic and clinical data were also collected. Postoperative courses of all patients were monitored and postoperative complications were noted. Results A total of 25 coronary arteriovenous fistulas were detected in 21 patients; the fistulas originated mainly from left anterior descending artery (n=9, 42.8%). Four (19.4%) patients had bilateral fistulas originating from both left anterior descending and right coronary artery. The main drainage site of coronary arteriovenous fistulas was the pulmonary artery (n=18, 85.7%). Twelve (57.1%) patients had isolated coronary arteriovenous fistulas and 4 (19.4%), concomitant coronary artery disease. Twenty (95.3%) of all patients were symptomatic. Seventeen patients were operated on with and 4 without cardiopulmonary bypass. There was no mortality. Three patients had postoperative atrial fibrillation. One patient had pericardial effusion causing cardiac tamponade who underwent reoperation. Conclusion The decision of surgical management should be made on the size and the anatomical location of coronary arteriovenous fistulas and concomitant cardiac comorbidities. Surgical closure with ligation of coronary arteriovenous fistulas can be performed easily with on-pump or off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting, even in asymptomatic patients to prevent fistula related complications with very low risk of mortality and morbidity.

  7. Unique medical issues in adult patients with mucopolysaccharidoses.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, John; Berger, Kenneth I; Borgo, Andrea; Braunlin, Elizabeth A; Burton, Barbara K; Ghotme, Kemel A; Kircher, Susanne G; Molter, David; Orchard, Paul J; Palmer, James; Pastores, Gregory M; Rapoport, David M; Wang, Raymond Y; White, Klane

    2016-10-01

    The mucopolysaccharidoses are a group of inherited metabolic diseases caused by deficiencies in enzymes involved in the sequential degradation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) leading to substrate accumulation in various tissues and organs. GAG accumulation can cause growth retardation and progressive damage to respiratory, cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, nervous, gastrointestinal, auditory, and visual systems. In the past, few people with severe phenotypic mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) reached adulthood. However, better methods for diagnosis, multi-disciplinary care, and new therapies have extended lifespan, leading to an increasing number of patients surviving beyond childhood. The growing number of adult MPS patients poses significant challenges for clinicians who may not be familiar with the clinical manifestations of MPS. In addition, as new interventions have changed the natural history of these disorders, it is difficult to anticipate both the impact on life expectancy and other complications that may occur as these patients age. Because the MPS disorders are multi-organ diseases, their management requires a coordinated multi-disciplinary approach. Here we discuss the unique pattern of medical issues and multi-organ involvement in adult patients with MPS and identify the challenges that are associated with management of MPS. This review is based on information from an expert investigator meeting with MPS specialists held October 2-4, 2014 in Dublin, Ireland, as well as on current literature searches focusing on MPS and adults.

  8. Neuropsychological Assessment of Adult Patients with Shunted Hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Bakar, Emel Erdogan

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study is planned to determine the neurocognitive difficulties of hydrocephalic adults. Methods The research group contained healthy adults (control group, n : 15), and hydrocephalic adults (n : 15). Hydrocephalic group consisted of patients with idiopathic aquaduct stenosis and post-meningitis hydrocephalus. All patients were followed with shunted hydrocephalus and not gone to shunt revision during last two years. They were chosen from either asymptomatic or had only minor symptoms without motor and sensorineural deficit. A neuropsychological test battery (Raven Standart Progressive Matrices, Bender-Gestalt Test, Cancellation Test, Clock Drawing Test, Facial Recognition Test, Line Orientation Test, Serial Digit Learning Test, Stroop Color Word Interference Test-TBAG Form, Verbal Fluency Test, Verbal Fluency Test, Visual-Aural Digit Span Test-B) was applied to all groups. Results Neuropsychological assessment of hydrocephalic patients demonstrated that they had poor performance on visual, semantic and working memory, visuoconstructive and frontal functions, reading, attention, motor coordination and executive function of parietal lobe which related with complex and perseverative behaviour. Eventually, these patients had significant impairment on the neurocognitive functions of their frontal, parietal and temporal lobes. On the other hand, the statistical analyses performed on demographic data showed that the aetiology of the hydrocephalus, age, sex and localization of the shunt (frontal or posterior parietal) did not affect the test results. Conclusion This prospective study showed that adult patients with hydrocephalus have serious neuropsychological problems which might be directly caused by the hydrocephalus; and these problems may cause serious adaptive difficulties in their social, cultural, behavioral and academic life. PMID:20379471

  9. ACG Clinical Guideline: Nutrition Therapy in the Adult Hospitalized Patient.

    PubMed

    McClave, Stephen A; DiBaise, John K; Mullin, Gerard E; Martindale, Robert G

    2016-03-01

    The value of nutrition therapy for the adult hospitalized patient is derived from the outcome benefits achieved by the delivery of early enteral feeding. Nutritional assessment should identify those patients at high nutritional risk, determined by both disease severity and nutritional status. For such patients if they are unable to maintain volitional intake, enteral access should be attained and enteral nutrition (EN) initiated within 24-48 h of admission. Orogastric or nasogastric feeding is most appropriate when starting EN, switching to post-pyloric or deep jejunal feeding only in those patients who are intolerant of gastric feeds or at high risk for aspiration. Percutaneous access should be used for those patients anticipated to require EN for >4 weeks. Patients receiving EN should be monitored for risk of aspiration, tolerance, and adequacy of feeding (determined by percent of goal calories and protein delivered). Intentional permissive underfeeding (and even trophic feeding) is appropriate temporarily for certain subsets of hospitalized patients. Although a standard polymeric formula should be used routinely in most patients, an immune-modulating formula (with arginine and fish oil) should be reserved for patients who have had major surgery in a surgical ICU setting. Adequacy of nutrition therapy is enhanced by establishing nurse-driven enteral feeding protocols, increasing delivery by volume-based or top-down feeding strategies, minimizing interruptions, and eliminating the practice of gastric residual volumes. Parenteral nutrition should be used in patients at high nutritional risk when EN is not feasible or after the first week of hospitalization if EN is not sufficient. Because of their knowledge base and skill set, the gastroenterologist endoscopist is an asset to the Nutrition Support Team and should participate in providing optimal nutrition therapy to the hospitalized adult patient.

  10. Hypernatraemia in an adult in-patient population.

    PubMed Central

    Long, C. A.; Marin, P.; Bayer, A. J.; Shetty, H. G.; Pathy, M. S.

    1991-01-01

    We report a retrospective study of hypernatraemia (serum sodium concentration greater than 150 mmol/l) in an adult in-patient population of a health district during one year. The incidence was 0.3% with at least 60% of cases developing after hospital admission, mainly in elderly patients. Dehydration appeared to be the major cause, with the use of diuretics, depressed conscious level or febrile illness implicated in a majority. Most patients had more than one contributory factor and iatrogenic causes were common. Associated illnesses were often severe and the in-hospital mortality was high (54%) regardless of age. Hypernatraemia in hospitalized patients should be largely avoidable and there is a need for greater awareness of the importance of active maintenance of hydration in susceptible patients. PMID:1924049

  11. Ebstein's anomaly in adult patients over 50 years of age.

    PubMed

    Aoyagi, Shigeaki; Yoshitake, Kiyonobu; Matsuo, Atsutoshi; Tayama, Kei-Ichiro; Hida, Satoru; Mito, Takahiro

    2014-01-01

    Ebstein's anomaly (EA) is a rare congenital heart disease of the tricuspid valve, and less than 5% of patients with EA survive beyond the age of 50. We report two unoperated cases of EA in adult patients aged over 50 years. Two patients, a 70-year-old Japanese woman and a 59-year-old Chinese woman, were referred to us for tachyarrhythmias. Transthoracic echocardiography demonstrated apical displacement (>8 mm/m(2) body surface area) of the septal leaflet of the tricuspid valve from the atrioventricular ring with tricuspid regurgitation in both patients. The former suddenly expired 20 months later after suffering from repetitive supraventricular tachyarrhythmias and/or heart failure, and the latter is alive with minimal signs of heart failure 12 months after the diagnosis of EA. Although the natural history of EA is extremely variable, these two patients are exceptional in that they tolerated EA well for over 50 years without any surgical intervention.

  12. Managing body image difficulties of adult cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Cororve Gingeret, Michelle; Teo, Irene; Epner, Daniel E

    2014-03-01

    Body image is a critical psychosocial issue for patients with cancer because they often undergo significant changes to appearance and functioning. The primary purpose of this review article was to identify empirically-supported approaches to treat body image difficulties of adult cancer patients that can be incorporated into high-quality comprehensive cancer care. An overview was provided of theoretical models of body image relevant to cancer patients, and findings were presented from published literature on body image and cancer from 2003 to 2013. These data were integrated with information from the patient-doctor communication literature to delineate a practical approach for assessing and treating body image concerns of adult cancer patients. Body image difficulties were found across patients with diverse cancer sites, and were most prevalent in the immediate postoperative and treatment period. Age, body mass index, and specific cancer treatments have been identified as potential risk factors for body image disturbance in cancer patients. Current evidence supports the use of time-limited cognitive behavioral therapy interventions for addressing these difficulties. Other intervention strategies also show promise but require further study. Potential indicators of body image difficulties were identified to alert health care professionals when to refer patients for psychosocial care, and a framework was proposed for approaching conversations about body image that can be used by the oncologic treatment team. Body image issues affect a wide array of cancer patients. Providers can use available evidence combined with information from the health care communication literature to develop practical strategies for treating body image concerns of patients with cancer. © 2013 American Cancer Society.

  13. Emotional deficits in adult ADHD patients: an ERP study.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Martin J; Schreppel, Theresa; Biehl, Stefanie C; Jacob, Christian; Heine, Monika; Boreatti-Hümmer, Andrea; Mühlberger, Andreas; Fallgatter, Andreas J

    2009-12-01

    This study examined general deficits in positive stimuli evaluation in adults with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). We investigated the event-related potentials to positive, negative and neutral pictures in 32 adults with ADHD and 32 control subjects. For this study we measured 21 electrodes placed in accordance with the international 10-20 system and calculated the early posterior negativity (EPN), which physiologically is characterized by more negative values for emotional as compared to neutral stimuli. We found significantly reduced EPN values for the ADHD patients compared to the healthy controls, but only in the positive stimuli condition, without any significant differences in the negative stimuli condition. Our data indicate that ADHD patients show less reactivity to positive visual stimuli which might be relevant in the context of described dysfunctions of the motivational-reward system in ADHD.

  14. Infective Dermatitis in an Adult Patient With HTLV-1

    PubMed Central

    Riveros, Rosalba; Medina, Raquel; Morel, Maida

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Infective dermatitis is a chronic exudative eczematous eruption presenting in human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)–infected people. It presents with relapsing erythematous, scaly, and crusted lesions affecting simultaneously the scalp, external ear, retroauricular area, eyelid, paranasal skin, neck axilla, and groin. Superimposed Staphylococcus and Streptococcus infection are common. It mainly affects children and exceptionally adults, and there are only a few published cases. The authors present the first reported case in Paraguay of an adult patient who had symptoms of human T-lymphotropic virus type 1–associated progressive tropical spastic paraparesis, and 6 years after the onset of the neurological symptoms, the patient developed infective dermatitis lesions on the skin, with frequent exacerbations since then. PMID:26588341

  15. [Pulmonary arterial hypertension in adult patients with congenital heart disease].

    PubMed

    Serino, G; Giacomazzi, F

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary Hypertension (PH) is definited by a mean pulmonary artery pressure (PAPm) >25 mmHg at rest. The Dana Point 2008 Revised Classification System represents the most recent classification system update with respect of various etiologies of PH. About 10 % of adolescents or adults with uncorrected congenital heart disease (CHD) with left-to-right shunt and high pulmonary blood flow develop Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH) . Progressive vascular remodeling and increase in pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) may ultimately lead to reversal of the shunt (pulmonary to systemic) causing cyanosis and determining the so-called Eisenmenger Syndrome (ES). Recent advances in the early diagnosis and medical targeted treatment of adult patients with CHD-PAH and ES can improve PAP, PVR and exercise tolerance, together with NYHA Class and survival, and may potentially reverse the vascular remodeling process in selected patients.

  16. A framework for transitioning patients from pediatric to adult health settings for patients with neurogenic bladder.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Jennifer; Frimberger, Dominic; Haddad, Emily; Slobodov, Gennady

    2017-04-01

    Adolescents with neurogenic bladder are a vulnerable population that severely lacks consistent transitional care from pediatric to adult urology settings. Our practice determined that 100 patients with spina bifida and other neurogenic bladder conditions were not appropriately transferred to the adult setting once reaching adulthood. We initiated a transitional program to establish a dedicated and formal process for adolescent patients to transition to adult urology. The REACH clinic implements a formalized staging framework to facilitate migration of adolescents and young adults to the adult health setting. A social worker was incorporated to act as a patient advocate, behavioral health consultant, and resource specialist. To date 45 patients have been enrolled in the transition program. We have identified and categorized according to the appropriate stage. The REACH clinic has appropriately outlined the goals and mission of the program and resources utilized are financially practical and feasible by conducting a monthly combined clinic. The program has been instrumental in improving tracking and monitoring of these patients through their transition period. Through the efforts of the pediatric and adult urology teams, the REACH program is a dedicated framework that provides structure for transition of the adolescent patient. The addition of a social worker has resulted in enriched rapport and will likely result in improved compliance. This program allows for surveillance and evaluation of patient outcome indicators in this patient population. We believe that early introduction and frequent encounters with the adult urologic team is crucial to successful transitions. Neurourol. Urodynam. 36:973-978, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. [Treatment of Adult Schizophrenic Patients With Depot Antipsychotics].

    PubMed

    Jaramillo González, Luis Eduardo; Gómez Restrepo, Carlos; García Valencia, Jenny; de la Hoz Bradford, Ana María; Ávila-Guerra, Mauricio; Bohórquez Peñaranda, Adriana

    2014-01-01

    To determine the indications of long-acting antipsychotic injection and what its effectiveness and safety in adult patients with schizophrenia during the treatment maintenance phase. A clinical practice guideline was elaborated under the parameters of the Methodological Guide of the Ministerio de Salud y Protección Social to identify, synthesize and evaluate the evidence and make recommendations about the treatment and follow-up of adult patients with schizophrenia. The evidence of NICE guide 82 was adopted and updated. The evidence was presented to the Guideline Developing Group and recommendations, employing the GRADE system, were produced. The literature review shows that the evidence has moderate to low quality. 8 articles were used. The risk of relapse was lower with depot risperidone and paliperidone palmitate when compared with placebo. For the risk of hospitalizations comparing depot antipsychotics (APD) versus oral AP, the result is inconclusive. Globally the second-generation APD had a lower risk of discontinuation when compared with placebo. The second generation AP had higher risk of extrapyramidal syndromes than placebo, as in the use of antiparkinsonian. The comparison of second-generation AP injections versus placebo showed an increased risk of early weight gain. The use of depot antipsychotics in the maintenance phase of adult patients diagnosed with schizophrenia is recommended if there is no adherence to oral antipsychotics as the patient's preference. It is not recommended depot antipsychotics in the acute phase of schizophrenia in adults. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  18. Correlates of Neuropsychological Impairment in Older Adult Pain Clinic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Karp, Jordan F.; Reynolds, Charles F.; Butters, Meryl; Dew, Mary Amanda; Mazumdar, Sati; Begley, Amy E.; Lenze, Eric; Weiner, Debra K.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Persistent pain and cognitive impairment are common in older adults. Memory and mental flexibility are cognitive domains which may be vulnerable in the aging brain. We were interested in examining the effects of persistent pain and opioid use on cognition in community dwelling, non-demented older adults. Setting Older Adult Pain Management Program. Design 57 new patients (mean age 76.1) were recruited to describe 1) rates of persistent pain conditions and pain intensity, 2) cognition (memory and mental flexibility), 3) rates and severity of depression, and 4) sleep quality. All patients had non-malignant pain for at least 3 months. Pain intensity was measured with the McGill Pain Questionnaire. Diagnosis of depression was via the Patient Health Questionnaire and depression severity assessed with the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression. Cognition was assessed with: 1) Mini Mental State Examination, 2) number-letter-switching and motor speed trail-making subtests, 3) Digit Symbol Subtest of the WAIS-R, and 4) free and paired recall of the WAIS-R. To determine which variables predicted poorer outcomes on mental flexibility tests, these variables were entered into a multiple regression. Results Pain severity was associated with impaired number-letter switching (r = −0.42, p = 0.002). Multiple regression showed pain severity was associated with impaired mental flexibility (parameter estimate = −0.29 (t = −2.00), p = 0.05). Patients taking opioids had worse memory (t = 2.17, df = 39, p = 0.04). Conclusions In community-dwelling older adults, pain severity is associated with impaired mental flexibility. In addition, opioids may increase memory problems. PMID:17014605

  19. Hypohidrosis induced by topiramate in an adult patient.

    PubMed

    Karachristianou, Styliani; Papamichalis, Evangelos; Sarantopoulos, Alexandros; Boura, Panagiota; Georgiadis, George

    2013-06-01

    Hypohidrosis is an uncommon and reversible side effect of topiramate treatment, reported mainly in children. This report presents an adult patient with complex partial seizures who was treated with topiramate and developed hypohidrosis coupled with hyperthermia, related to high environmental temperature and physical exercise. Reduced sweat response was confirmed using the Neuropad test. Signs and symptoms ceased after drug discontinuation. During topiramate treatment, it is important to recognise this side effect, although the exact causal mechanism has not yet been clarified.

  20. Modified Fontan Conversion: An Alternative Technique for Adult Patients.

    PubMed

    González-López, María-Teresa; Pita-Fernández, Ana-María; Gil-Jaurena, Juan-Miguel; Pérez-Caballero-Martínez, Ramón; Sánchez-Valenzuela, Diego; Las, Cynthia-Jahavee

    2015-07-01

    A need persists for Fontan conversion that provides alternative approaches for the individual anatomical challenges occurring in these unusual and complex adult patients. The pulmonary arteries present unique variations and the surgical technique needs to be intraoperatively addressed. We describe a technique for Fontan conversion for performing the distal anastomosis of the extracardiac conduit, allowing adequate matching to the pulmonary arteries and preserving an optimal flow into the Fontan circuit.

  1. Microsurgical Posterolateral Foraminotomy on Patients with Adult Isthmic Spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Han Soo

    2017-04-01

    The standard surgical treatment for adult isthmic spondylolisthesis consists of various techniques of arthrodesis supplemented with instrumentation. However, the superiority of this strategy has not been irrefutably proved. Considering the risk associated with the instrumentation surgery, examining a less invasive approach is justified. We describe a series of 9 patients with adult isthmic spondylolisthesis, in whom we microsurgically decompressed the responsible nerve root in the intervertebral foramen through the posterolateral intermuscular approach. Technical details specific to isthmic spondylolisthesis were reviewed. The 2-year outcome was assessed with Short Form 36 and visual analog scale scores. The mean age of the patients was 68 ± 7 years (standard deviation [SD]). The mean slip rate of spondylolisthesis measured on the preoperative lumbar radiography was 20% ± 12% (SD). All patients successfully underwent the procedure without complications. All the examined scores remained significantly better than the preoperative values 2 years after surgery; the mean visual analog scale score decreased from 7.8 ± 2.8 (SD) preoperatively to 2.8 ± 1.4 (SD) at 2 years (P = 0.008), average physical score of Short Form 36 improved from 33.1 ± 9.7 to 52.5 ± 9.4 (P = 0.001), and the bodily pain score improved from 28.0 ± 13.5 to 55.1 ± 9.7 (P = 0.001). Microsurgical decompression through the posterolateral intermuscular approach was effective in producing good 2-year outcome in patients with adult isthmic spondylolisthesis. This procedure may be considered as a less invasive alternative in the surgical treatment of adult isthmic spondylolisthesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Multicenter study on caries risk assessment in Japanese adult patients.

    PubMed

    Arino, Masumi; Ataru, Ito; Fujiki, Shozo; Sugiyama, Seiichi; Hayashi, Mikako

    2015-10-01

    This study was conducted to identify significant risk factors for the onset and the accumulation of new caries in adult patients undergoing regular preventive therapy. The data of 732 patients from nine Japanese general dental practices were retrospectively analyzed. Classification and regression tree (CART) analysis was applied to develop a caries prediction model using the following patient parameters: age, number of teeth with caries experience (DMFT), levels of mutans streptococci (SM) and lactobacilli (LB), saliva flow rate and buffer capacity, and compliance with a preventive program. Poisson regression analysis was conducted to identify factors affecting caries accumulation within three years. CART analysis identified patients at high risk for primary caries with an odds ratio of 3.08 (95%CI, 1.55-5.79; p=0.0018) according to SM levels and compliance; and those for secondary caries with an odds ratio of 3.69 (95%CI, 2.29-5.91; p<0.0001) according to LB and SM levels. Poisson regression analyses showed that accumulation of primary caries was affected by compliance (p<0.001), SM (p<0.001) and LB (p=0.013). Accumulation of secondary caries was affected by DMFT (p<0.001), SM (p<0.001) and LB (p<0.001). CART is an important tool in identifying the risk of caries development in individual adult patients. Cariogenic bacteria are important factors for both the onset and accumulation of primary and secondary caries. Participation in a regular preventive program limits the onset and the accumulation of primary caries in adult patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Premonitory urges for tics in adult patients with Tourette syndrome.

    PubMed

    Crossley, Eleanor; Seri, Stefano; Stern, Jeremy S; Robertson, Mary M; Cavanna, Andrea E

    2014-01-01

    Patients with Tourette syndrome (TS) often report characteristic sensory experiences, also called premonitory urges (PUs), which precede tic expression and have high diagnostic relevance. This study investigated the usefulness of a scale developed and validated in children and adolescents-the Premonitory Urge for Tics Scale (PUTS, Woods et al., 2005 [13])-for the assessment of PUs in adult patients with TS. Standard statistical methods were applied to test the psychometric properties of the PUTS in 102 adult TS outpatients recruited from two specialist clinics in the United Kingdom. The PUTS showed good acceptability and endorsement rates, with evenly distributed scores and low floor and ceiling effects. Item-total correlations were moderate to strong; PUTS total scores were significantly correlated with quantitative measures of TS severity. The PUTS showed excellent internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's alpha=0.85) and Spearman's correlations demonstrated satisfactory convergent and discriminant validity. Although originally devised to assess urges to tic in young patients with TS, the PUTS demonstrated good psychometric properties in a large sample of adults recruited at specialist TS clinics. This instrument is therefore recommended for use across the life span as a valid and reliable self-report measure of sensory experiences accompanying tic expression. Copyright © 2013 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Relationship of Hemoglobin Concentration in Adult Asthmatic Patients.

    PubMed

    Nasreen, S; Nessa, A; Islam, M F; Husain, M F; Khatun, N; Wahed, F; Zannat, M R; Tajkia, T

    2016-10-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways, in which many cells and cellular elements play a role. Asthma is one of the most common diseases globally and currently affects 300 million people. The epidemic rise in anemia, asthma, and related allergic disease is a common major public health problem worldwide. Asthma and anemia associated with acute infections occur both in children and adults. This descriptive type of cross sectional study was done to find out the levels of hemoglobin concentration in adult asthmatic patients and carried out in the Department of Physiology, Mymensingh Medical College, Mymensingh, Bangladesh from July 2014 to January 2016. Fifty (50) male and 50 (fifty) female adult asthmatic patients aged 18-60 years were included in the study group. They are enrolled from the Department of Medicine, Mymensingh Medical College, Mymensingh, Bangladesh and also from locality. For comparison age matched 50 male and 50 female apparently healthy persons were also studied as control. Hemoglobin concentration was estimated by Cyanmethemoglobin method. For statistical analysis unpaired student's 't' test was used. Mean hemoglobin concentration was significantly decreased in study group in comparison to control group and the result was statistically significant (p<0.001). The study findings showed a high prevalence of anemia among asthmatic patients than non asthmatic healthy persons.

  5. Lipoprotein(a) concentrations in adult congenital heart disease patients.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Quintana, Efrén; Rodríguez-González, Fayna

    2014-01-01

    Lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)) contributes to the formation to atherosclerosis, promotes inflammation and stimulates prothrombotic processes. One hundred seventeen adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) patients and 152 controls were studied to compare serum Lp(a) concentrations in different subgroups of congenital heart abnormalities. Analytically, Lp(a), total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, and C-reactive protein (CRP) were studied. In congenital heart disease patients, N-terminal-pro-B-type natriuretic peptide levels were also determined. Thirty-nine (25.6%) patients in the control group and 33 (28.2) ACHD patients (2 hypoxemic and 31 nonhypoxemic) had a Lp(a) concentration higher than 30 mg/dL. No significant differences were seen between patients with Lp(a) concentration ≤30 or >30 mg/dL after performing a binary logistic regression multivariate analysis including as covariates all the variables that showed significance (P < .001) between the case and control groups (age, gender, CRP, and total, LDL, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol) besides being congenital or not. Similarly, no significant differences were found between ACHD patients with Lp(a) concentration lower and higher than 30 mg/dL after performing a multivariate analysis in which age, sex, body mass index, LDL-cholesterol levels, and being or not hypoxemic were included as covariates. Pearson's correlation showed a significant positive correlation (0.27) between LDL-cholesterol and Lp(a) concentrations (P = .004) and between CRP and N-terminal-pro-B-type natriuretic peptide levels (0.19) in ACHD patients (P = .035). Adult congenital heart disease patients showed lower serum total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol levels than no-congenital patients although no significant differences were seen in Lp(a) concentrations between both groups. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Stepping to stability and fall prevention in adult psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Emory, Sara L; Silva, Susan G; Christopher, Eric J; Edwards, Pamela B; Wahl, Leanne E

    2011-12-01

    Fall prevention is a major area of concern in inpatient settings. This article reports on the feasibility of implementing a daily exercise program that features line dancing to promote stability, balance, and flexibility in adult psychiatric patients and describes the impact of that program. Six hundred sixty-five patient charts drawn from before and after the practice change were reviewed. The fall rate after the introduction of line dancing was 2.8% compared with 3.2% before implementation. In a setting that treats both men and women of many ages and with varying levels of mobility, line dancing offers a viable approach to exercise in a secure setting.

  7. Vaccination of Adult Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus in Portugal

    PubMed Central

    Moraes-Fontes, Maria Francisca; Antunes, Ana Margarida; Gruner, Heidi; Riso, Nuno

    2016-01-01

    In the wake of the Portuguese vaccination program 50th anniversary it seems appropriate to review vaccination in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Controversial issues as regards the association between autoimmune diseases, infections, and vaccines are discussed as well as vaccine safety and efficacy issues as regards chronic immunosuppressant (IS) drug therapy. After a brief overview of national policies, specific recommendations are made as regards vaccination for adult patients with SLE with a particular focus on current IS therapy and unmet needs. PMID:27069477

  8. [Nursing diagnosis in adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    de Souza, Luccas Melo; Gorini, Maria Isabel Pinto Coelho

    2006-09-01

    This case study aimed at identifying Nursing Diagnosis (ND) in adult patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia, with the purpose of contributing to the Systematization of Nurse Care. Interviews and observation were used for data collection, in addition to Nursing Process application. During the three months of data collection, other NDs were obtained by searching the files of the 6 patients. The 32 ND found in this study were grouped according to Maslow's hierarchy of needs. Out of these 32 ND, 15 corresponded to changes in Physiological Needs, and 10 to changes in Protection and Safety Needs.

  9. Organ doses to adult patients for chest CT

    SciTech Connect

    Huda, Walter; Sterzik, Alexander; Tipnis, Sameer; Schoepf, U. Joseph

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to estimate organ doses for chest CT examinations using volume computed tomography dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) data as well as accounting for patient weight. Methods: A CT dosimetry spreadsheet (ImPACT CT patient dosimetry calculator) was used to compute organ doses for a 70 kg patient undergoing chest CT examinations, as well as volume computed tomography dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) in a body CT dosimetry phantom at the same CT technique factors. Ratios of organ dose to CTDI{sub vol} (f{sub organ}) were generated as a function of anatomical location in the chest for the breasts, lungs, stomach, red bone marrow, liver, thyroid, liver, and thymus. Values of f{sub organ} were obtained for x-ray tube voltages ranging from 80 to 140 kV for 1, 4, 16, and 64 slice CT scanners from two vendors. For constant CT techniques, we computed ratios of dose in water phantoms of differing diameter. By modeling patients of different weights as equivalent water cylinders of different diameters, we generated factors that permit the estimation of the organ doses in patients weighing between 50 and 100 kg who undergo chest CT examinations relative to the corresponding organ doses received by a 70 kg adult. Results: For a 32 cm long CT scan encompassing the complete lungs, values of f{sub organ} ranged from 1.7 (thymus) to 0.3 (stomach). Organs that are directly in the x-ray beam, and are completely irradiated, generally had f{sub organ} values well above 1 (i.e., breast, lung, heart, and thymus). Organs that are not completely irradiated in a total chest CT scan generally had f{sub organ} values that are less than 1 (e.g., red bone marrow, liver, and stomach). Increasing the x-ray tube voltage from 80 to 140 kV resulted in modest increases in f{sub organ} for the heart (9%) and thymus (8%), but resulted in larger increases for the breast (19%) and red bone marrow (21%). Adult patient chests have been modeled by water cylinders with diameters between

  10. Complications of nonbreast tissue expansion: 9 Years experience with 44 adult patients and 119 pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Adler, Neta; Elia, Jhonatan; Billig, Allan; Margulis, Alexander

    2015-09-01

    Tissue expansion is a common reconstructive technique that has been associated with significant complications since its inception. However, the existing literature mostly focuses on complications associated with pediatric tissue expansion only or describes a combined population of adult and pediatric patients, including breast tissue expansion; despite the fact that each of these groups of patients has different characteristics that may affect tissue expansion. In this study we present a critical review of our experience with complications of nonbreast tissue expansion in adult and pediatric patients and compare between these groups. The charts of patients who underwent nonbreast tissue expansion at Hadassah Medical Center between January 2003 and July 2012 were reviewed. Data were collected including the age of the patient, anatomical site of the expansion, indication and complications. A total of 202 expansion procedures were performed on 119 pediatric patients (<16 years) and 56 expansion procedures on 44 adult patients. The overall complication rate was 18.2%, with 40 pediatric procedures having complications (19.8%) and 7 adult procedures (12.5%). The difference in complication rates between the two groups was not found to be statistically significant. There was no statistically significant difference in complication rate between the different anatomical areas of expansion in both adult and pediatric patients or between the indications for operation. Most (68%) of the cases with complications underwent subsequent successful reconstruction. Despite the consistent high complication rate, tissue expansion can be used as a good reconstructive method in both adult and pediatric patients in all anatomic areas and for different indications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Pyridoxine deficiency in adult patients with status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Dave, Hina N; Eugene Ramsay, Richard; Khan, Fawad; Sabharwal, Vivek; Irland, Megan

    2015-11-01

    An 8-year-old girl treated at our facility for superrefractory status epilepticus was found to have a low pyridoxine level at 5 μg/L. After starting pyridoxine supplementation, improvement in the EEG for a 24-hour period was seen. We decided to look at the pyridoxine levels in adult patients admitted with status epilepticus. We reviewed the records on patients admitted to the neurological ICU for status epilepticus (SE). Eighty-one adult patients were identified with documented pyridoxine levels. For comparison purposes, we looked at pyridoxine levels in outpatients with epilepsy (n=132). Reported normal pyridoxine range is >10 ng/mL. All but six patients admitted for SE had low normal or undetectable pyridoxine levels. A selective pyridoxine deficiency was seen in 94% of patients with status epilepticus (compared to 39.4% in the outpatients) which leads us to believe that there is a relationship between status epilepticus and pyridoxine levels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Quality of life of adult patients with severe burns.

    PubMed

    Elsherbiny, Ola Ebrahim Ebrahim; Salem, Maha Adel; El-Sabbagh, Ahmed Hassan; Elhadidy, Mohamed Radwan; Eldeen, Sanaa Mohamed Alaa

    2011-08-01

    Burns are one of the most significant health problems throughout the world, leading to prolonged hospitalisation and hence increased expense for the patients, their families and society. Today, the prognosis of patients with burns is dependent, apart from adequate treatment, upon the health-care system and health-care professionals, regarding not only survival, but also lifelong quality of life. This study aims to assess quality of life of adult patients with severe burns. This study was conducted on 100 adult patients with severe burns in the burn outpatient clinic (male and female) at Mansoura University Hospital. Parameters of burn and Burn Specific Health Scale (BSHS-B) were used to assess quality of life following burns. The study revealed that burns has negative impact on most dimensions of the quality of life of patients with burns. The quality of life for people who have sustained a burns should be recognised and valued by the burn team in all phases of burn care. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  13. Intussusception in traditional pediatric, nontraditional pediatric, and adult patients.

    PubMed

    Cochran, Alexis A; Higgins, George L; Strout, Tania D

    2011-06-01

    We sought to determine the rate of intussusception in 3 age groups (traditional pediatric-age [T], nontraditional pediatric-age [N], and adult-age [A]) and to compare group characteristics. We conducted a retrospective records review for patients discharged with diagnosis of intussusception between October 1999 and June 2008. Ninety-five cases of intussusception were diagnosed as follows: 61 T (64%), 12 N (13%), and 22 A (23%). Bloody stool was more common in T patients (P = .016). Air contrast enema (36%) and ultrasound (33%) were the most common diagnostic tests in T, whereas computed tomography was most common in N (83%) and A (68%) patients. Bowel resection occurred more often in older (T) patients (P = .001). The most frequent causative pathologic conditions were adenitis (T), Peutz-Jeghers polyp (N), and carcinoma (A) and prior gastric bypass in 10 A patients. The incidence of intussusception is substantially higher in nontraditional age groups than previously reported. Symptoms, management strategies, and causative pathologic conditions varied with age. All adults with intussusception require definitive diagnostic testing to determine the cause, given the concerning list of possibilities we observed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [The definition of the medical clown's role with adult patients].

    PubMed

    Scheyer, Rachel; Nuttman-Shwartz, Orit; Ziyoni, Herzel

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, the healthcare system has grown increasingly aware of the need to develop and adopt new models and intervention methods aimed at improving patients' quality of life. As part of this perception, medical clowns have been integrated into hospitals, primarily in work with children. Recently, there have been attempts to integrate clowns into work with adult patients in emergency rooms, but this intervention method has not yet been systematically implemented and studied. This article describes and examines the definition of the medical clown's role as an intervention strategy with adult outpatients suffering from chronic and life-threatening illnesses. The study is qualitative and based on a content analysis of the documentation of the work of two medical clowns over two years. The dominant theme arising from this analysis involves the definition of the clown's role within the medical space of the hospital and includes perspectives on his integration into the hospital's multidisciplinary medical staff and his impact on the staff and on patients and their families. The findings indicate that, from the clowns' point of view, integrated medical clowns as part of the medical team, would contribute to the functioning of both patients and staff. This is in accord with additional studies conducted recently in medical centers around the world. Since this is a pioneering study, there is room to further probe and research the medical clown's contribution to assisting and improving patients' and staff's quality of life and to develop ways of increasing his integration and professionalism.

  15. Assessing nutritional status in chronically critically ill adult patients.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Patricia A; Daly, Barbara J; Lipson, Amy R; Guo, Su-Er

    2006-03-01

    Numerous methods are used to measure and assess nutritional status of chronically critically ill patients. To discuss the multiple methods used to assess nutritional status in chronically critically ill patients, describe the nutritional status of chronically critically ill patients, and assess the relationship between nutritional indicators and outcomes of mechanical ventilation. A descriptive, longitudinal design was used to collect weekly data on 360 adult patients who required more than 72 hours of mechanical ventilation and had a hospital stay of 7 days or more. Data on body mass index and biochemical markers of nutritional status were collected. Patients' nutritional intake compared with physicians' orders, dieticians' recommendations, and indirect calorimetry and physicians' orders compared with dieticians' recommendations were used to assess nutritional status. Relationships between nutritional indicators and variables of mechanical ventilation were determined. Inconsistencies among nurses' implementation, physicians' orders, and dieticians' recommendations resulted in wide variations in patients' calculated nutritional adequacy. Patients received a mean of 83% of the energy intake ordered by their physicians (SD 33%, range 0%-200%). Patients who required partial or total ventilator support upon discharge had a lower body mass index at admission than did patients with spontaneous respirations (Mann-Whitney U = 8441, P = .001). In this sample, the variability in weaning progression and outcomes most likely reflects illness severity and complexity rather than nutritional status or nutritional therapies. Further studies are needed to determine the best methods to define nutritional adequacy and to evaluate nutritional status.

  16. Clofarabine in Adult Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-04

    Solid Tumors; Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute, Pediatric; Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute, Adult; Leukemia, Myelocytic, Acute, Pediatric; Leukemia, Myelocytic, Acute, Adult; Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Adult

  17. Problematic hospital experiences among adult patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Lattimer, Lakshmi; Haywood, Carlton; Lanzkron, Sophie; Ratanawongsa, Neda; Bediako, Shawn M; Beach, Mary Catherine

    2010-11-01

    Adults with sickle cell disease (SCD) have often reported difficulties obtaining care during vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC) in qualitative studies. We measured the experiences of 45 SCD patients who received in-hospital care for VOC using the Picker Patient Experience Questionnaire (PPE-15), and used the one sample binomial test to compare with national norms. Most SCD patients reported that they were insufficiently involved in decisions (86%), staff gave conflicting information (64%), it wasn't easy to find someone to discuss concerns (61%), doctors' answers to questions were not clear (58%), nurses' answers to questions were not clear (56%), doctors did not always discuss fears and anxieties (53%), and nurses did not always discuss fears and anxieties (52%). A greater percentage of SCD patients than the U.S. sample in 9 of 12 areas reported problems. Further research is needed to determine the consequences of and potential interventions to improve these poor experiences.

  18. Study of inhaler technique in asthma patients: differences between pediatric and adult patients.

    PubMed

    Manríquez, Pablo; Acuña, Ana María; Muñoz, Luis; Reyes, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    Inhaler technique comprises a set of procedures for drug delivery to the respiratory system. The oral inhalation of medications is the first-line treatment for lung diseases. Using the proper inhaler technique ensures sufficient drug deposition in the distal airways, optimizing therapeutic effects and reducing side effects. The purposes of this study were to assess inhaler technique in pediatric and adult patients with asthma; to determine the most common errors in each group of patients; and to compare the results between the two groups. This was a descriptive cross-sectional study. Using a ten-step protocol, we assessed inhaler technique in 135 pediatric asthma patients and 128 adult asthma patients. The most common error among the pediatric patients was failing to execute a 10-s breath-hold after inhalation, whereas the most common error among the adult patients was failing to exhale fully before using the inhaler. Pediatric asthma patients appear to perform most of the inhaler technique steps correctly. However, the same does not seem to be true for adult patients.

  19. Study of inhaler technique in asthma patients: differences between pediatric and adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Manríquez, Pablo; Acuña, Ana María; Muñoz, Luis; Reyes, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Inhaler technique comprises a set of procedures for drug delivery to the respiratory system. The oral inhalation of medications is the first-line treatment for lung diseases. Using the proper inhaler technique ensures sufficient drug deposition in the distal airways, optimizing therapeutic effects and reducing side effects. The purposes of this study were to assess inhaler technique in pediatric and adult patients with asthma; to determine the most common errors in each group of patients; and to compare the results between the two groups. Methods: This was a descriptive cross-sectional study. Using a ten-step protocol, we assessed inhaler technique in 135 pediatric asthma patients and 128 adult asthma patients. Results: The most common error among the pediatric patients was failing to execute a 10-s breath-hold after inhalation, whereas the most common error among the adult patients was failing to exhale fully before using the inhaler. Conclusions: Pediatric asthma patients appear to perform most of the inhaler technique steps correctly. However, the same does not seem to be true for adult patients. PMID:26578130

  20. Fibromyalgia in 300 adult index patients with primary immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Barton, James C; Bertoli, Luigi F; Barton, Jackson C; Acton, Ronald T

    2017-01-01

    We sought to determine the prevalence and clinical and laboratory associations of fibromyalgia in adults with primary immunodeficiency (immunoglobulin (Ig) G subclass deficiency (IgGSD) and common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). We performed a retrospective analysis of these observations in 300 non-Hispanic white adult index patients with recurrent/severe respiratory tract infections and IgGSD or CVID: age; sex; IgGSD; fibromyalgia; chronic fatigue; autoimmune conditions (ACs); interstitial cystitis (IC); diabetes; body mass index; serum Ig isotypes; blood lymphocytes and subsets; and human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A and -B types and haplotypes. We performed univariate comparisons, logistic multivariable regressions, and an analysis of covariance. Mean age was 49 ± 12 (standard deviation) y. There were 246 women (82.0%). IgGSD was diagnosed in 276 patients (92.0%). Fifty-six patients had fibromyalgia (18.7%; female:male 13:1). Other characteristics included: chronic fatigue, 63.0%; aggregate ACs, 35.3%; Sjögren's syndrome, 8.0%; IC, 3.0%; diabetes, 10.3%; and HLA-A*29, B*44 positivity, 9.7%. Prevalences of female sex; chronic fatigue; IC; and HLA-A*29, B*44 positivity were greater in patients with fibromyalgia. Logistic regression on fibromyalgia revealed three positive associations: chronic fatigue (p=0.0149; odds ratio 2.6 [95% confidence interval 1.2, 5.6]); Sjögren's syndrome (p=0.0004; 5.2 [2.1, 13.2]); and IC (p=0.0232; 5.7 [1.3, 25.7]). In an analysis of covariance, there were significant interactions of chronic fatigue, Sjögren's syndrome, and interstitial cystitis on fibromyalgia. Fibromyalgia is common in non-Hispanic white adult index patients with primary immunodeficiency, especially women. Chronic fatigue, Sjögren's syndrome, and IC are significantly associated with fibromyalgia after adjustment for other independent variables.

  1. Factors related to orthodontic treatment time in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Melo, Ana Camila Esteves de Oliveira; Carneiro, Lilianne Oliveira Thiers; Pontes, Luana Farias; Cecim, Rodolpho Lobão; de Mattos, José Nazareno Rufino; Normando, David

    2013-01-01

    The length of time that it takes an orthodontist to treat adult patients varies widely. The aim of this study was to investigate how different variables influence treatment time. Seventy clinical case reports of successfully treated adult patients were examined. The patients were selected from 4,723 records held by three experienced orthodontists. The influence exerted by the following variables on treatment time was assessed: age, sex, facial pattern, severity of malocclusion (measured by the PAR index), sagittal relationship of canines, type of brackets (ceramic or metal), tooth extractions, missed appointments and orthodontic appliance issues/breakages, the latter being the dependent variable. Assessment was performed by multiple linear regression analysis, followed by the stepwise method with p < 0.05. The number of times a patient missed their appointment (no-show) (R² = 14.4%, p < 0.0001) and the number of appliance issues/breakages (R² = 29.71%, p = 0.0037) significantly affected variability in treatment time, and these two variables together can predict 43.75% (R² total) of the overall variability in treatment time. Other factors, such as canine relationship at the beginning of treatment, bracket type (metal or ceramic), tooth extractions, age at start of treatment, severity of the initial malocclusion, sex and facial pattern had no significant bearing on treatment time. The duration of orthodontic treatment in adults, when performed by experienced orthodontists, is mainly influenced by factors related to patient compliance. However, several factors which were not included in this study may contribute to variability in orthodontic treatment time.

  2. Contact topical anesthesia for strabismus surgery in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Vallés-Torres, J; García-Martín, E; Peña-Calvo, P; Sanjuan-Villarreal, A; Gil-Arribas, L M; Fernández-Tirado, F J

    2015-05-01

    To analyze the effectiveness and usefulness of contact topical anesthesia in strabismus surgery in adult patients. A prospective study was conducted on 20 patients undergoing strabismus surgery using contact topical anesthesia and sedation with remifentanil. The intensity of pain was recorded using a numeric pain rating scale at the time of anesthesia implementation, during the surgical procedure, 30 min afterwards, and during the first postoperative day. The incidence of oculocardiac reflex, postoperative nausea and vomiting, corneal ulcers, patient satisfaction (numerically from 0 to 10) and the degree of residual ocular deviation were also assessed. The operation was performed successfully in all patients. Average pain intensity was 1.40 ± 1.73 during anesthesia implementation, 4.20 ± 2.57 during the surgical procedure, 2.50 ± 2.54 30 min after surgery, and 3.55 ± 2.89 during the first postoperative day. Oculocardiac reflex was observed in 7 patients (35%), postoperative nausea and vomiting in 4 (20%), and corneal ulcer in 4 (20%). The patient satisfaction was 9.53 ± 2.51. More than two-thirds (70%) of patients had a residual ocular deviation less than 10 prism diopters. Contact topical anesthesia is a safe and effective alternative for strabismus surgery in adult patients. Contact topical anesthesia provides adequate pain control, lower incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting and oculocardiac reflex, and optimal setting of ocular alignment. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. In vivo correction of anaemia in β-thalassemic mice by γPNA-mediated gene editing with nanoparticle delivery

    PubMed Central

    Bahal, Raman; Ali McNeer, Nicole; Quijano, Elias; Liu, Yanfeng; Sulkowski, Parker; Turchick, Audrey; Lu, Yi-Chien; Bhunia, Dinesh C.; Manna, Arunava; Greiner, Dale L.; Brehm, Michael A.; Cheng, Christopher J.; López-Giráldez, Francesc; Ricciardi, Adele; Beloor, Jagadish; Krause, Diane S.; Kumar, Priti; Gallagher, Patrick G.; Braddock, Demetrios T.; Mark Saltzman, W.; Ly, Danith H.; Glazer, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    The blood disorder, β-thalassaemia, is considered an attractive target for gene correction. Site-specific triplex formation has been shown to induce DNA repair and thereby catalyse genome editing. Here we report that triplex-forming peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) substituted at the γ position plus stimulation of the stem cell factor (SCF)/c-Kit pathway yielded high levels of gene editing in haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in a mouse model of human β-thalassaemia. Injection of thalassemic mice with SCF plus nanoparticles containing γPNAs and donor DNAs ameliorated the disease phenotype, with sustained elevation of blood haemoglobin levels into the normal range, reduced reticulocytosis, reversal of splenomegaly and up to 7% β-globin gene correction in HSCs, with extremely low off-target effects. The combination of nanoparticle delivery, next generation γPNAs and SCF treatment may offer a minimally invasive treatment for genetic disorders of the blood that can be achieved safely and simply by intravenous administration. PMID:27782131

  4. Experimental identification of potential falls in older adult hospital patients.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, Aimee; Yang, James; Pati, Debajyoti; Valipoor, Shabboo

    2016-05-03

    Patient falls within hospitals have been identified as serious but largely preventable incidents, particularly among older adult patients. Previous literature has explored intrinsic factors associated with patient falls, but literature identifying possible extrinsic or situational factors related to falls is lacking. This study seeks to identify patient motions and activities along with associated environmental design factors in a patient bathroom and clinician zone setting that may lead to falls. A motion capture experiment was conducted in a laboratory setting on 27 subjects over the age of seventy using scripted tasks and mockups of the bathroom and clinician zone of a patient room. Data were post-processed using Cortex and Visual3D software. A potential fall was characterized by a set of criteria based on the jerk of the upper body׳s center of mass (COM). Results suggest that only motion-related factors, particularly turning, pushing, pulling, and grabbing, contribute most significantly to potential falls in the patient bathroom, whereas only pushing and pulling contribute significantly in the clinician zone. Future work includes identifying and changing precise environmental design factors associated with these motions for an updated patient room and performing motion capture experiments using the new setup.

  5. The epidemiology of adult Rapid Response Team patients in Australia.

    PubMed

    Jones, D

    2014-03-01

    Rapid Response Teams (RRT) are specialised teams that review deteriorating ward patients in an attempt to prevent morbidity and mortality. Most studies have assessed the effect of implementing an RRT into a hospital. There is much less literature on the characteristics and outcomes of RRT patients themselves. This article reviews the epidemiology of adult RRT patients in Australia and proposes three models of RRT syndromes. The number of RRT calls varies considerably in Australian hospitals from 1.35 to 71.3/1000 hospital admissions. Common causes of RRT calls include sepsis, atrial fibrillation, seizures and pulmonary oedema. Approximately 20% of patients to whom an RRT has responded have more than one RRT call, and up to one-third have issues around end-of-life care. Calls are least common overnight. Between 10 to 25% of patients are admitted to a critical care area after the call. The in-hospital mortality for RRT patients is approximately 25% overall but only 15% in patients without a limitation of medical therapy. RRT syndromes can be conceptually described by the trigger for the call (e.g. hypotension) or the clinical condition causing the call (e.g. sepsis). Alternatively, the RRT call can be described by the major theme of the call: "end-of-life care", "requiring critical care" and "stable enough to initially remain on the ward". Based on these themes, education strategies and quality improvement initiatives may be developed to reduce the incidence of RRT calls, further improving patient outcome.

  6. Patients' experiences of technology and care in adult intensive care.

    PubMed

    Stayt, Louise Caroline; Seers, Kate; Tutton, Elizabeth

    2015-09-01

    To investigate patients' experiences of technology in an adult intensive care unit. Technology is fundamental to support physical recovery from critical illness in Intensive Care Units. As well as physical corollaries, psychological disturbances are reported in critically ill patients at all stages of their illness and recovery. Nurses play a key role in the physical and psychological care of patients;, however, there is a suggestion in the literature that the presence of technology may dehumanise patient care and distract the nurse from attending to patients psychosocial needs. Little attention has been paid to patients' perceptions of receiving care in a technological environment. This study was informed by Heideggerian phenomenology. The research took place in 2009-2011 in a university hospital in England. Nineteen participants who had been patients in ICU were interviewed guided by an interview topic prompt list. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using Van Manen's framework. Participants described technology and care as inseparable and presented their experiences as a unified encounter. The theme 'Getting on with it' described how participants endured technology by 'Being Good' and 'Being Invisible'. 'Getting over it' described why participants endured technology by 'Bowing to Authority' and viewing invasive technologies as a 'Necessary Evil'. Patients experienced technology and care as a series of paradoxical relationships: alienating yet reassuring, uncomfortable yet comforting, impersonal yet personal. By maintaining a close and supportive presence and providing personal comfort and care nurses may minimize the invasive and isolating potential of technology. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Approach to the patient: the adult with congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Auchus, Richard J; Arlt, Wiebke

    2013-07-01

    The most common form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia is steroid 21-hydroxylase deficiency (21OHD). When the nonclassical (mild) form is included, 21OHD is the most common genetic disease in human beings. With the advent of pharmaceutical preparation of glucocorticoids starting in the 1960s and newborn screening starting in the 1990s, the majority of children with 21OHD are reaching adulthood, which has yielded a cohort of patients with, in essence, a new disease. Only recently have some data emerged from cohorts of adults with 21OHD, and in some centers, experience with the management of these patients is growing. These patients suffer from poor health, infertility, characteristic tumors in the adrenal glands and gonads, and consequences of chronic glucocorticoid therapy. Their care is fragmented and inconsistent, and many stop taking their medications out of frustration. Internal medicine residents and endocrinology fellows receive little training in their care, which further discourages their seeking medical attention. Adults with 21OHD have a different physiology from patients with Addison's disease or other androgen excess states, and their needs are different than those of young children with 21OHD. Consequently, their care requires unorthodox treatment and monitoring strategies foreign to most endocrine practitioners. Our goal for this article is to review their physiology, complications, and needs in order to develop rational and effective treatment and monitoring strategies.

  8. Approach to the Patient: The Adult With Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Arlt, Wiebke

    2013-01-01

    The most common form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia is steroid 21-hydroxylase deficiency (21OHD). When the nonclassical (mild) form is included, 21OHD is the most common genetic disease in human beings. With the advent of pharmaceutical preparation of glucocorticoids starting in the 1960s and newborn screening starting in the 1990s, the majority of children with 21OHD are reaching adulthood, which has yielded a cohort of patients with, in essence, a new disease. Only recently have some data emerged from cohorts of adults with 21OHD, and in some centers, experience with the management of these patients is growing. These patients suffer from poor health, infertility, characteristic tumors in the adrenal glands and gonads, and consequences of chronic glucocorticoid therapy. Their care is fragmented and inconsistent, and many stop taking their medications out of frustration. Internal medicine residents and endocrinology fellows receive little training in their care, which further discourages their seeking medical attention. Adults with 21OHD have a different physiology from patients with Addison's disease or other androgen excess states, and their needs are different than those of young children with 21OHD. Consequently, their care requires unorthodox treatment and monitoring strategies foreign to most endocrine practitioners. Our goal for this article is to review their physiology, complications, and needs in order to develop rational and effective treatment and monitoring strategies. PMID:23837188

  9. Modified ultrafiltration in adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Zakkar, Mustafa; Guida, Gustavo; Angelini, Gianni D

    2015-03-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was the impact of modified ultrafiltration on adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery in terms of inflammatory and metabolic changes, blood loss and early clinical outcomes. A total of 155 papers were identified using the search as described below. Of these, six papers presented the best evidence to answer the clinical question as they reported data to reach conclusions regarding the issues of interest for this review. The author, date and country of publication, patient group, study type and weaknesses and relevant outcomes were tabulated. Modified ultrafiltration in adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery seems to attenuate the levels of inflammatory molecules associated with surgery, reduces blood loss and blood transfusion and improves cardiac output, index and systemic vascular resistance. However, this was not translated in any reduction in length of stay in intensive care unit or hospital. Most studies were single-centre prospective non-blinded trials that included a small cohort of elective coronary artery bypass grafting patients, which makes it underpowered to provide unbiased evidence regarding clinical outcomes. Properly designed and conducted prospective randomized studies are required to answer whether the beneficial effect of modified ultrafiltration on systemic inflammatory molecules associated with surgery can translate with improvement in clinical outcome.

  10. Motor Activity in Adult Patients with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Mjeldheim, Kristin; Førland, Wenche; Hansen, Anita L.; Dilsaver, Steven; Oedegaard, Ketil J.; Berle, Jan Øystein

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hyperactivity is a core symptom of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), but limited information is available on analysis of activity patterns in this disorder. The aim of the study was to analyze motor activity during daily living in adult patients with ADHD. Methods Patients (n=76) from the private psychiatric practice of two of the authors were recruited, and were compared to patients with other psychiatric disorders and to normal controls. Actigraphs were used to record motor activity for six days, with one minute intervals, and data were analysed using linear and non-linear mathematical methods. Results For short recording periods (300 minutes) the activity levels of ADHD patients do not differ from normal controls, but the autocorrelation (lag 1) is lower and Fourier analysis shows higher power in the high frequency range, corresponding to the period from 2-8 min. During recordings for six days there are no significant differences between ADHD patients and the control groups. The combined and inattentive subgroups differ only in the six days recordings. The Fourier analyses show that the combined type has lower power in the high frequency range, corresponding to the period from 4-8 hours, and in the analysis of rhythms the intra-daily variability is lower, compared to the inattentive type. Conclusion Adult ADHD patients do not show evidence of hyperactivity, but have levels of activity similar to normal controls. However, on several measures ADHD patients display altered activity patterns, indicating that the regulation of motor activity in this disorder is different from controls. PMID:26508958

  11. Outcomes of thoracic endovascular aortic repair in adult coarctation patients.

    PubMed

    Lala, Salim; Scali, Salvatore T; Feezor, Robert J; Chandrekashar, Satish; Giles, Kristina A; Fatima, Javairiah; Berceli, Scott A; Back, Martin R; Huber, Thomas S; Beaver, Thomas M; Beck, Adam W

    2017-09-22

    Aortic coarctation (AC) is most commonly identified in pediatric patients; however, adults can present with late sequelae of untreated coarctation or complications of prior open repair. To date, there are limited data about the role of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in this group of patients. The purpose of this analysis was to describe our experience with management of adult coarctation patients using TEVAR. All TEVAR patients treated for primary coarctation or late sequelae of previous open repair (eg, pseudoaneurysm, recurrent coarctation or anastomotic stenosis related to index open coarctation repair) were reviewed. Demographics, comorbidities, procedure-related variables, postoperative outcomes, and reintervention were recorded. Computed tomography centerline assessments of endograft morphology were completed to delineate stent anatomy at the coarctation site. Survival and reintervention were estimated using life-table analysis. A total of 21 patients were identified (median age, 46 years [range, 33-71 years]; 67% male [n = 14]). Nine patients (43%) were treated for symptomatic primary (n = 6) or recurrent (n = 3) coarctation. Other indications included degenerative thoracic aneurysm (n = 6), pseudoaneurysm (n = 4), and dissection (n = 2). Technical success was 100% (95% confidence interval [CI], 84%-100%). No 30-day mortality or paraplegia events occurred; however, two patients (10%) experienced postoperative nondisabling stroke. In primary or recurrent coarctation patients with available computed tomography imaging (n = 8 of 9), nominal stent graft diameters were achieved proximal and distal to the coarctation (range, -0.4 to -1.2 mm of desired final stent diameter). Specific to the coarctation site, there was a significant increase in aortic diameter after TEVAR (before stenting, 11.5 [95% CI, 6.8-12.3] mm; after stenting, 15 [95% CI, 13.7-15.7] mm; P = .004). Concurrently, systolic arterial blood pressure at time of discharge was

  12. [Maintenance Treatment With Antipsychotics for Adult Patients Diagnosed With Schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos; Bohórquez Peñaranda, Adriana Patricia; de la Hoz Bradford, Ana María; Tamayo Martínez, Nathalie; García Valencia, Jenny; Jaramillo González, Luis Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    To determine the effectiveness and security of the antipsychotics available for the management of adult patients with schizophrenia in the maintenance phase. To develop recommendations of treatment for the maintenance phase of the disease. A clinical practice guideline was elaborated under the parameters of the Methodological Guide of the Ministerio de Salud y Protección Social to identify, synthesize and evaluate the evidence and make recommendations about the treatment and follow-up of adult patients with schizophrenia. The evidence of NICE guide 82 was adopted and updated. The evidence was presented to the Guideline Developing Group and recommendations, employing the GRADE system, were produced. 18 studies were included to evaluate the effectiveness and / or safety of different antipsychotic drugs first and second generation. Overall, antipsychotics (AP) showed superiority over placebo in relapse rate over 12 months (RR 0.59 95% CI 0.42, 0.82) and hospitalization rate over 24 months of follow-up (RR 0.38 95% 0.27, 0.55); its use is associated with increased risk of treatment dropout (RR 0.53 95% CI 0.46, 0.61) and adverse events such as weight gain, dystonia, extrapyramidal symptoms and sedation. There was no difference in the outcome of re hospitalizations, comparisons on quality of life, negative symptoms or weight gain between AP first and second generation. Continuous or standard dose regimens appear to be superior to intermittent or low doses in reducing the risk of abandonment of treatment regimes. Adult patients diagnosed with schizophrenia should receive maintenance treatment with antipsychotics. The medication of choice will depend on the management of the acute phase, the patient's tolerance to it and the presentation of adverse events. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  13. Secondary bacteraemia in adult patients with prolonged dengue fever.

    PubMed

    Premaratna, R; Dissanayake, D; Silva, F H D S; Dassanayake, M; de Silva, H J

    2015-03-01

    Although dengue management guidelines do not advice on use of antibiotics in dengue shock syndrome, unrecognised bactraemia is likely to contribute to morbidity and mortality. To assess the occurance of secondary bacteraemia in adult patients with prolonged dengue fever. A prospective study was conducted recruiting patients with confirmed acute dengue infection who had prolonged fever (>5 days). Two sets of blood cultures were taken in such patients prior to institution of antibiotic therapy. Demographic, clinical, haematological and biochemical parameters were recorded. Development of ascites and pleural effusions were detected using ultrasonography. Fourty patients (52.5% males) with a mean age of 29.8 years (SD 13.6) were studied. The average duration of fever was 7.9 days (SD 1.8). Ten patients (25%) had bacterial isolates in their blood cultures; Staphylococcus aureus (n=2), coliforms (n=3), pseudomonas (n=1) and 4 had mixed growths. The culture positive group had severe body aches at admission and higher fever, third space fluid accumulation, a significant drop in platelets and a higher CRP. A quarter of dengue patients with prolonged fever had a bacterial isolate. Culture positive patients appeared more ill with body aches and had higher degrees of fever during the latter part of the illness. Increased vascular permeability may predispose to bacterial seepage into blood. Although white cell count is not helpful in detecting bacteraemia, low platelet count and elevation of CRP seem to be helpful.

  14. Dry mouth: a critical topic for older adult patients.

    PubMed

    Han, Phuu; Suarez-Durall, Piedad; Mulligan, Roseann

    2015-01-01

    Diminished salivary flow, or dry mouth impacts the oral health of many older adults, dentate and edentulous. As a result typical oral conditions can prove more challenging to both the patient's comfort and home care and the treatment selected by the clinician. This paper will review issues of dry mouth from a clinical and symptomatic perspective and will include the condition's causes, treatment and prevention. We performed a review of PubMed using the words: older adults, dry mouth, xerostomia, radiation-induced xerostomia, and salivary gland hypofunction. We selected 90 articles with a clinical application perspective. When it comes to treatment of dry mouth conditions, either objective or subjective, there are no easy answers as to the best course of action for a specific individual. While most of the cited studies have examined the most difficult cases of dry mouth (e.g., Sjögren's syndrome, and that seen during and post head and neck cancer treatments), there are many older adults who demonstrate dry mouth from the use of multiple medications. This paper presents a summary of the etiology, diagnosis, prevention, and pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment of dry mouth (salivary hypofunction and xerostomia in older adults). It is important to understand the causes of dry mouth and to educate our patients. Starting a prevention program as early as possible considering the most practical, cost effective and efficient treatments with the best risk-benefit ratio will help to diminish dry mouth symptoms and sequelae. Copyright © 2014 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [POMPE DISEASE - GUIDELINES FOR DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT OF ADULT PATIENTS].

    PubMed

    Pećin, Ivan; Muačević-Katanec, Diana; Šimić, Iveta; Fumić, Ksenija; Potočki, Kristina; Šućur, Nediljko; Reiner, Željko

    2015-01-01

    These guidelines provide a short summary of recommendations on Pompe disease, how to diagnose this disease, management of adult patients with this disease, follow-up of the patients and recommendations on therapy and genetic testing. Early diagnosis and management of patients with Pompe disease requires a multidisciplinary approach of several different experts. These guidelines were produced by the Division of Metabolic Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital Center Zagreb which is a Referral expert center for rare and metabolic diseases of the Ministry of Health of the Republic of Croatia. They were endorsed by the Croatian Society for Rare Diseases, Croatian Medical Association.These are the first guidelines published in Croatia on diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of Pompe disease.

  16. Hypoalbuminaemia predicts outcome in adult patients with congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Kempny, Aleksander; Diller, Gerhard-Paul; Alonso-Gonzalez, Rafael; Uebing, Anselm; Rafiq, Isma; Li, Wei; Swan, Lorna; Hooper, James; Donovan, Jackie; Wort, Stephen J; Gatzoulis, Michael A; Dimopoulos, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Background In patients with acquired heart failure, hypoalbuminaemia is associated with increased risk of death. The prevalence of hypoproteinaemia and hypoalbuminaemia and their relation to outcome in adult patients with congenital heart disease (ACHD) remains, however, unknown. Methods Data on patients with ACHD who underwent blood testing in our centre within the last 14 years were collected. The relation between laboratory, clinical or demographic parameters at baseline and mortality was assessed using Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. Results A total of 2886 patients with ACHD were included. Mean age was 33.3 years (23.6–44.7) and 50.1% patients were men. Median plasma albumin concentration was 41.0 g/L (38.0–44.0), whereas hypoalbuminaemia (<35 g/L) was present in 13.9% of patients. The prevalence of hypoalbuminaemia was significantly higher in patients with great complexity ACHD (18.2%) compared with patients with moderate (11.3%) or simple ACHD lesions (12.1%, p<0.001). During a median follow-up of 5.7 years (3.3–9.6), 327 (11.3%) patients died. On univariable Cox regression analysis, hypoalbuminaemia was a strong predictor of outcome (HR 3.37, 95% CI 2.67 to 4.25, p<0.0001). On multivariable Cox regression, after adjusting for age, sodium and creatinine concentration, liver dysfunction, functional class and disease complexity, hypoalbuminaemia remained a significant predictor of death. Conclusions Hypoalbuminaemia is common in patients with ACHD and is associated with a threefold increased risk of risk of death. Hypoalbuminaemia, therefore, should be included in risk-stratification algorithms as it may assist management decisions and timing of interventions in the growing ACHD population. PMID:25736048

  17. Hypoalbuminaemia predicts outcome in adult patients with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Kempny, Aleksander; Diller, Gerhard-Paul; Alonso-Gonzalez, Rafael; Uebing, Anselm; Rafiq, Isma; Li, Wei; Swan, Lorna; Hooper, James; Donovan, Jackie; Wort, Stephen J; Gatzoulis, Michael A; Dimopoulos, Konstantinos

    2015-05-01

    In patients with acquired heart failure, hypoalbuminaemia is associated with increased risk of death. The prevalence of hypoproteinaemia and hypoalbuminaemia and their relation to outcome in adult patients with congenital heart disease (ACHD) remains, however, unknown. Data on patients with ACHD who underwent blood testing in our centre within the last 14 years were collected. The relation between laboratory, clinical or demographic parameters at baseline and mortality was assessed using Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. A total of 2886 patients with ACHD were included. Mean age was 33.3 years (23.6-44.7) and 50.1% patients were men. Median plasma albumin concentration was 41.0 g/L (38.0-44.0), whereas hypoalbuminaemia (<35 g/L) was present in 13.9% of patients. The prevalence of hypoalbuminaemia was significantly higher in patients with great complexity ACHD (18.2%) compared with patients with moderate (11.3%) or simple ACHD lesions (12.1%, p<0.001). During a median follow-up of 5.7 years (3.3-9.6), 327 (11.3%) patients died. On univariable Cox regression analysis, hypoalbuminaemia was a strong predictor of outcome (HR 3.37, 95% CI 2.67 to 4.25, p<0.0001). On multivariable Cox regression, after adjusting for age, sodium and creatinine concentration, liver dysfunction, functional class and disease complexity, hypoalbuminaemia remained a significant predictor of death. Hypoalbuminaemia is common in patients with ACHD and is associated with a threefold increased risk of risk of death. Hypoalbuminaemia, therefore, should be included in risk-stratification algorithms as it may assist management decisions and timing of interventions in the growing ACHD population. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  18. Care of the adult patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Perino, B; Trevisan, A; Falchetti, A; Gaia, E; Petrarulo, M

    1993-12-01

    Although no therapeutic breakthrough has taken place, the life expectancy of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) has dramatically increased in the last 20 yrs. Nowadays, more than 80% of the patients outlive 18 yrs of age, with a mean survival age approaching 28 yrs. These favourable results are due mainly to early diagnosis and continuous treatment in specialized centres. The main therapeutic items are: prevention and early treatment of lung infections, mainly due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, drainage of bronchial secretions (postural drainage, forced expiratory techniques, positive-expiratory-pressure mask, autogenic drainage,...), substitutive therapy with pancreatic enzymes and hypercaloric diet. Thus cystic fibrosis is increasingly a disease which involves adults, with many related problems, which span from the difficulties of prescribing an effective antibiotic therapy in cases with multiple resistances, to combining the need for a long daily physiotherapy schedule with school or a working life. Sexual problems and related psychological troubles are an important issue in the management of cystic fibrosis in adult patients, and are accordingly treated.

  19. Acute Myocardial Infarction in Adult Congenital Patients with Bodily Isomerism.

    PubMed

    Loomba, Rohit S; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Buelow, Matthew; Nijhawan, Karan; Gupta, Navdeep; Alla, Venkata; Arora, Rohit R

    2016-12-01

    Children born with congenital malformations of the heart are increasingly surviving into adulthood. This population of patients possesses lesion-specific complication risks while still being at risk for common illnesses. Bodily isomerism or heterotaxy, is a unique clinical entity associated with congenital malformations of the heart which further increases the risk for future cardiovascular complications. We aimed to investigate the frequency of myocardial infarction in adults with bodily isomerism. We utilized the 2012 iteration of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample to identify adult inpatient admissions associated with acute myocardial infarction in patients with isomerism. Data regarding demographics, comorbidities and various procedures were collected and compared between those with and without isomerism. A total of 6,907,109 admissions were analyzed with a total of 172,394 admissions being associated with an initial encounter for acute myocardial infarction. The frequency of myocardial infarction did not differ between those with and without isomerism and was roughly 2% in both groups. Similarly, the number of procedures and in-hospital mortality did not differ between the two groups. The frequency and short-term prognosis of acute myocardial infarction is similar in patients with and without isomerism. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Thyroid gland diseases in adult patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Vondra, K; Vrbikova, J; Dvorakova, K

    2005-12-01

    This review concerns the relation between most frequent thyroid gland diseases and diabetes mellitus in adult patients. Special attention is paid to autoimmune thyroiditis, Graves' disease, thyroid autoimmunity in pregnant diabetic women, and iodine metabolism. We focused on mechanisms leading to coexistence of both endocrine disorders, and on distinctions in the prevalence, diagnosis, clinical course and treatment of thyroid diseases in diabetic patients. The prevalence of thyroid diseases in diabetic patients is 2-3 times higher than in nondiabetic subjects; it raises with age, and is strongly influenced by female gender and autoimmune diabetes. Clinical relevance of thyroid diseases, especially in diabetic patients, significantly increases if it is associated with deteriorated function, which always cause a number problems with metabolic compensation of diabetes. Most serious consequences are increased frequency of hypoglycaemia in hypothyroidism and development of potentially life-threatening ketoacidosis in thyrotoxicosis. In spite of that, little attention is paid to the diagnosis of thyroid diseases in diabetics, as they are diagnosed in only about half of the patients. At the end, we provide recommendations for the thyroid disease screening and diagnosis in patients with diabetes mellitus based on our experience.

  1. Musical ear syndrome in adult cochlear implant patients.

    PubMed

    Low, W-K; Tham, C A; D'Souza, V-D; Teng, S-W

    2013-09-01

    Except for a single case report, musical ear syndrome in cochlear implantees has not been studied. We aimed to study the prevalence and nature of musical ear syndrome among adult cochlear implant patients, as well as the effect on their emotional well-being. STUDY DESIGN, PATIENTS AND INTERVENTION: A cross-sectional survey of patients aged 18 years and above who had received cochlear implants for profound hearing loss between 1997 and 2010. Of the 82 patients studied, 18 (22 per cent) were found to have experienced musical ear syndrome. Seven and 11 patients had musical ear syndrome prior to and after cochlear implantation, respectively. The character of musical ear syndrome symptoms was described as instrumental music (n = 2), singing (6) or both (10). Fourteen patients reported an adverse emotional effect, with three expressing ‘intolerance’. In this study, 22 per cent of cochlear implantees experienced musical ear syndrome. These symptoms affected patients’ emotional state, but most coped well. Musical ear syndrome can occur prior to and after cochlear implantation.

  2. Updates in vaccination: Recommendations for adult inflammatory bowel disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Chaudrey, Khadija; Salvaggio, Michelle; Ahmed, Aftab; Mahmood, Sultan; Ali, Tauseef

    2015-01-01

    Treatment regimens for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) incorporate the use of a variety of immunosuppressive agents that increase the risk of infections. Prevention of many of these infections can be achieved by the timely and judicious use of vaccinations. IBD patients tend to be under-immunized. Some of the contributing factors are lack of awareness regarding the significance of vaccinating IBD patients, misperception about safety of vaccinations in immunocompromised patients, ambiguity about the perceived role of the gastroenterologist in contrast to the primary care physician and unavailability of vaccination guidelines focused on IBD population. In general, immunocompetent IBD patients can be vaccinated using standard vaccination recommendations. However there are special considerations for IBD patients receiving immunosuppressive therapy, IBD travelers and pregnant women with IBD. This review discusses current vaccination recommendations with updates for adult IBD patients. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 2013 vaccination guidelines with 2014 updates and the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommendations have been highlighted as a primary source of recommendations. PMID:25805924

  3. Group B streptococcal necrotizing pneumonia in a diabetic adult patient.

    PubMed

    Pacha, Andrea; Luna Cian, Ramiro; Bonofiglio, Laura; Solari, Melisa; Strada, Virginia; Suárez, Mariana; Vigliarolo, Laura; Tersigni, Carina; Mollerach, Marta; Lopardo, Horacio

    2017-03-18

    The aim of this report is to describe a rare case of necrotizing pneumonia due to group B Streptococcus serotype III in a relatively young male adult (48 years old) suffering from diabetes. The organism was isolated from his pleural fluid and was only resistant to tetracycline. The patient first received ceftazidime (2g/8h i.v.)+clindamycin (300mg/8h) for 18 days and then he was discharged home and orally treated with amoxicillin clavulanic acid (1g/12h) for 23 days with an uneventful evolution. As in the cases of invasive infection by Streptococcus pyogenes, clindamycin could prevent streptococcal toxic shock syndrome.

  4. Factors affecting ventriculoperitoneal shunt survival in adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Farid; Rehman, Abdul; Shamim, Muhammad S.; Bari, Muhammad E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt insertion remains the mainstay of treatment for hydrocephalus despite a high rate of complications. The predictors of shunt malfunction have been studied mostly in pediatric patients. In this study, we report our 11-year experience with VP shunts in adult patients with hydrocephalus. We also assess the various factors affecting shunt survival in a developing country setting. Methods: A retrospective chart analysis was conducted for all adult patients who had undergone shunt placement between the years 2001 and 2011. Kaplan–Meier curves were used to determine the duration from shunt placement to first malfunction and log-rank (Cox–Mantel) tests were used to determine the factors affecting shunt survival. Results: A total of 227 patients aged 18–85 years (mean: 45.8 years) were included in the study. The top four etiologies of hydrocephalus included post-cranial surgery (23.3%), brain tumor or cyst (22.9%), normal pressure hydrocephalus (15%), and intracranial hemorrhage (13.7%). The overall incidence of shunt malfunction was 15.4% with the median time to first shunt failure being 120 days. Etiology of hydrocephalus (P = 0.030) had a significant association with the development of shunt malfunction. Early shunt failure was associated with age (P < 0.001), duration of hospital stay (P < 0.001), Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score less than 13 (P = 0.010), excision of brain tumors (P = 0.008), and placement of extra-ventricular drains (P = 0.033). Conclusions: Patients with increased age, prolonged hospital stay, GCS score of less than 13, extra-ventricular drains in situ, or excision of brain tumors were more likely to experience early shunt malfunction. PMID:25722930

  5. Is visualising ureter before pyeloplasty necessary in adult patients?

    PubMed

    Cakan, M; Yalçinkaya, F; Demirel, F; Satir, A

    2000-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to detect whether or not visualising ureter and ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) preoperatively is necessary in adult patients who have primer UPJ obstruction. Between January 1995 to June 1999, 46 renal units in 45 patients with primer UPJ obstruction were evaluated. The patients were separated into 2 groups. In group 1, intravenous pyelography (IVP) and renal scintigraphy were performed to 17 renal units preoperatively. In group 2, in addition to these methods, either retrograde pyelography (RGP) or antegrade pyelography (AGP) were performed to 29 renal units. Renal/bladder sonogram was used in patients with poor renal function in IVP or in renal scintigraphy. All the operations were performed through a flank incision. In group 2, additional information was gained for 8 (27.5%) of the renal units preoperatively. No additional information for this group found intraoperatively. In group 1, we found additional information in 4 (23.53%) of the units intraoperatively. All the pathologies in both groups were corrected intraoperatively. Double-J (D-J) stent was used in 6 (35.29%) of the units in group 1 and 8 (27.58%) of the units in group 2 intraoperatively (p > 0.05). In group 2, 4 (13.79%) preoperative complications were seen due to RGP and they were treated either medically or conservatively. In the early postoperative period, a complication observed in 1 (5.88%) of the patients in group 1 and 1 of the patients in group 2 (3.44%) (p > 0.05). The first patient was treated with inserting D-J and the latter one was treated conservatively. In the 3rd postoperative month, success rate was found to be 94.11% in group 1 and 96.55% in group 2 (p > 0.05). Additional pathologies in adult patients with primer UPJ obstruction can be corrected intraoperatively through a flank incision. Therefore, imaging of ureter and UPJ may not be necessary in these patients.

  6. Immunoglobulin levels, opsonic activity and phagocytic power in Egyptian thalassemic children.

    PubMed

    Khalifa, A S; Fattah, S A; Maged, Z; Sabry, F; Mohamed, H A

    1983-01-01

    Serum IgG, IgM and IgA were determined in 25 patients with homozygous beta thalassemia and 7 with the trait. The levels were increased in homozygous patients and increased further after splenectomy. Serum opsonic activity against Salmonella typhi and staphylococci was impaired in homozygous patients. Splenectomy caused more impairment against salmonella only. Similarly, phagocytic power against both organisms was lower in beta thalassemia. Further decrease against salmonella occurred after splenectomy. Patients with thalassemia trait did not differ from normal controls.

  7. Patient-reported neuropathic pain in adolescent and young adult cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Acquazzino, Melissa A; Igler, Eva C; Dasgupta, Mahua; Simpson, Pippa; Browning, Meghen B; Brandow, Amanda M

    2017-03-01

    Neuropathic pain, a known complication of cancer and its treatments, negatively impacts quality of life. There are limited data using screening tools to aid in the diagnosis of neuropathic pain in cancer patients. Our primary objective was to determine the proportion of adolescent and young adult cancer patients reporting neuropathic pain on a patient-completed, neuropathic pain screening tool. This prospective, cohort study enrolled patients 14-39 years of age who were receiving therapy for primary cancer diagnosis, cancer relapse, or had recently completed treatment. The painDETECT, a patient-completed, neuropathic pain screening tool used down to age 14, was administered a maximum of three times in on-therapy patients and once in off-therapy patients. Provider documentation of neuropathic pain at the corresponding visit was abstracted from the medical record. Seventy-eight patients participated. Median (interquartile range) age at study enrollment was 18.1 (16-19.4) years and 47% were female. Cancer diagnoses included 41% leukemia, 26% solid tumor, 23% lymphoma, and 10% central nervous system tumor. The proportion of patients reporting neuropathic pain was 26% (95% confidence interval [CI] 16-40%) in on-therapy patients and 11% (95% CI 3-27%) in off-therapy patients. In patients reporting neuropathic pain, only 26% had a clinical diagnosis of neuropathic pain documented in the medical record at the corresponding visit. Neuropathic pain occurs in one in four adolescents and young adults receiving cancer therapy. Use of screening tools may increase the detection of neuropathic pain in adolescents and young adults receiving cancer therapy and could ultimately improve pain treatment. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Ileal function in patients with untreated adult coeliac disease.

    PubMed Central

    Silk, D B; Kumar, P J; Webb, J P; Lane, A E; Clark, M L; Dawson, A M

    1975-01-01

    A double-lumen perfusion technique has been used to investigate jejunal and ileal absorption of glucose, water, and electrolytes in a group of patients with untreated adult coeliac disease. Correct positioning of the tube was confirmed by measuring the differential jejunal and ileal handling of bicarbonate. Eight control subjects and eight patients with coeliac disease were perfused with an isotonic electrolyte solution containing 50 mM glucose and 25 mM bicarbonate. The group of coeliac patients had impaired jejunal absorption of glucose (P less than 0.001), water (P less than 0.01), sodium (P less than 0.02), and chloride (P greater than 0.05) compared with the control group. In contrast the group of coeliac patients had normal ileal glucose and water absorption and increased ileal sodium (P greater than 0.01) and chloride (P greater than 0.05) absorption compared with the controls. Evidence for ileal adaptation was found in three individual patients who had absorptive values outside 2SD of the normal mean. The results indicate that the distal small intestine in coeliac disease has the ability to adopt to the damage and loss of absorptive capacity in the proximal small intestine. PMID:1132801

  9. A comprehensive Fabry-related pain questionnaire for adult patients.

    PubMed

    Üçeyler, Nurcan; Magg, Barbara; Thomas, Phillip; Wiedmann, Silke; Heuschmann, Peter; Sommer, Claudia

    2014-11-01

    Pain may be the earliest symptom in Fabry disease and presents with a distinct phenotype including triggerable pain attacks, evoked pain, pain crises, and chronic pain. Current pain questionnaires do not reflect the special phenotype of Fabry disease-associated pain, which hampers its systematic evaluation as the basis of correct diagnosis and effective treatment. A questionnaire specifically designed to assess Fabry disease-associated pain is thus urgently needed. At the Würzburg Fabry Center for Interdisciplinary Therapy (FAZIT), Germany, we developed and validated the first face-to-face Fabry Pain Questionnaire (FPQ) for adult patients. The initial version of the FPQ was tested in a pilot study with 20 consecutive Fabry disease patients. The performance of the revised FPQ was assessed in a first (n=56) and second (n=20) validation phase in consecutive Fabry disease patients. For this, patients were interviewed at baseline and 2 weeks later. We determined the test-retest reliability and validity of the FPQ in comparison to data obtained with the Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory. The FPQ contains 15 questions on the 4 pain phenotypes of Fabry disease (pain attacks, pain crises, evoked pain, chronic pain) in childhood and adulthood, on pain development during life with and without enzyme replacement therapy, and on everyday life impairment due to pain. This first disease-specific questionnaire is a valuable tool for baseline and follow-up assessment of pain in Fabry disease patients and may guide treatment in this distinct pain phenotype.

  10. Clinical relevance of rhinovirus infections among adult hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Fica, Alberto; Dabanch, Jeannette; Andrade, Winston; Bustos, Patricia; Carvajal, Ita; Ceroni, Carolina; Triantafilo, Vjera; Castro, Marcelo; Fasce, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    Human rhinovirus (HRV) is an emerging viral pathogen. To characterize a group of patients admitted due to infection by this agent in a general hospital in Chile. Cases were identified by RT-PCR for 1 year through active surveillance of patients admitted with severe respiratory illness. Diagnosis was not available during hospitalization. Thirty-two cases were identified, 90% were ≥60 years old or had co-morbid conditions. Human rhinovirus-related admissions represented 23.7% of hospitalization due to severe acute respiratory infections among adults and ranked second to influenza (37.8%). Patients presented with pneumonia (68.8%), decompensated chronic lung conditions (21.9%), heart failure or influenza-like illness (6.3% each). Admission to intensive or intermediate care units was required by 31.2% and in-hospital mortality reached 12.5%. A CURB-65 score ≥3 was significantly associated to in-hospital mortality (p<0.05). Most patients received antibiotics (90%). Human rhinovirus infections in elderly patients with co-morbid conditions are associated with hospitalizations, requiring critical or semi-critical antibiotics use. A high CURB-65 score was associated to in-hospital mortality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  11. Unexplained lymphadenopathies: autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome in an adult patient.

    PubMed

    Leal-Seabra, Fatima; Costa, Gonçalo Sarmento; Coelho, Henrique Pereira; Oliveira, Agripino

    2016-12-15

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is characterised by massive enlargement of the lymphoid organs, autoimmune cytopenias and a predisposition to develop lymphoid malignancies. The basic defect is a disturbance of the lymphocyte apoptosis, and a high number of circulating TCRab CD3(+)CD4(-)CD8(-) T-cells (double-negative T cells (DNT cells)). We describe a case of a 41-year-old man with fever, hepatosplenomegaly, multiple lymphadenopathy, autoimmune haemolytic anaemia and severe thrombocytopenia. Peripheral blood immunophenotyping revealed elevation of the characteristic DNT cells in 8% and high levels of interleukin 10. Histopathological analysis of lymph nodes showed lymphadenitis with paracortical hyperplasia. It was assumed as a probable diagnosis of ALPS, and the procedure was to medicate the patient with steroids. As a result, a significant clinical improvement was achieved, and he has been in remission for 2 years. To our knowledge, this is the first case reported in a Portuguese adult patient.

  12. Unexplained lymphadenopathies: autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome in an adult patient

    PubMed Central

    Leal-Seabra, Fatima; Costa, Gonçalo Sarmento; Coelho, Henrique Pereira; Oliveira, Agripino

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is characterised by massive enlargement of the lymphoid organs, autoimmune cytopenias and a predisposition to develop lymphoid malignancies. The basic defect is a disturbance of the lymphocyte apoptosis, and a high number of circulating TCRab CD3+CD4−CD8− T-cells (double-negative T cells (DNT cells)). We describe a case of a 41-year-old man with fever, hepatosplenomegaly, multiple lymphadenopathy, autoimmune haemolytic anaemia and severe thrombocytopenia. Peripheral blood immunophenotyping revealed elevation of the characteristic DNT cells in 8% and high levels of interleukin 10. Histopathological analysis of lymph nodes showed lymphadenitis with paracortical hyperplasia. It was assumed as a probable diagnosis of ALPS, and the procedure was to medicate the patient with steroids. As a result, a significant clinical improvement was achieved, and he has been in remission for 2 years. To our knowledge, this is the first case reported in a Portuguese adult patient. PMID:27979843

  13. Adult acral cutaneous myofibromas in a patient with generalized morphea.

    PubMed

    English, Joseph C; Derdeyn, Amalie S; Smith, Paula D; Patterson, James W

    2002-06-01

    Myofibroma is the term for a group of solitary or generalized soft tissue tumors that may be located in the skin or within skeletal muscle, bone, and viscera. These tumors occur most commonly in children. However, examples of myofibroma have been reported in adults, in whom they usually present as solitary lesions of the head and neck, trunk, and extremities. "Cutaneous nodules" have been reported in both localized and systemic scleroderma, but to our knowledge, there are no specific reports of myofibromas developing in this patient population. We report a case of acral myofibromas in a patient with generalized cutaneous morphea. This occurrence is of interest in view of the possible role of myofibroblasts in the pathogenesis of scleroderma.

  14. Recommended vaccinations for asplenic and hyposplenic adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Grazzini, Maddalena; Niccolai, Giuditta; Paolini, Diana; Varone, Ornella; Bartoloni, Alessandro; Bartalesi, Filippo; Santini, Maria Grazia; Baretti, Simonetta; Bonito, Carlo; Zini, Paola; Mechi, Maria Teresa; Niccolini, Fabrizio; Magistri, Lea; Pulci, Maria Beatrice; Bechini, Angela

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Asplenic or hyposplenic (AH) individuals are particularly vulnerable to invasive infections caused by encapsulated bacteria. Such infections have often a sudden onset and a fulminant course. Infectious diseases (IDs) incidence in AH subjects can be reduced by preventive measures such as vaccination. The aim of our work is to provide updated recommendations on prevention of infectious diseases in AH adult patients, and to supply a useful and practical tool to healthcare workers for the management of these subjects, in hospital setting and in outpatients consultation. A systematic literature review on evidence based measures for the prevention of IDs in adult AH patients was performed in 2015. Updated recommendations on available vaccines were consequently provided. Vaccinations against S. pneumoniae, N. meningitidis, H. influenzae type b and influenza virus are strongly recommended and should be administered at least 2 weeks before surgery in elective cases or at least 2 weeks after the surgical intervention in emergency cases. In subjects without evidence of immunity, 2 doses of live attenuated vaccines against measles-mumps-rubella and varicella should be administered 4–8 weeks apart from each other; a booster dose of tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis vaccine should be administered also to subjects fully vaccinated, and a 3-dose primary vaccination series is recommended in AH subjects with unknown or incomplete vaccination series (as in healthy people). Evidence based prevention data support the above recommendations to reduce the risk of infection in AH individuals. PMID:27929751

  15. [Psychological alterations in patients with adult celiac disease].

    PubMed

    Martínez Cerezo, Francisco J; Castillejo, Gemma; Guillen, Núria; Morente, Vanessa; Simó, Josep M; Tena, Francisco J; Marsal, Joan; Pascual, Domingo

    2014-04-01

    Patients with recently-diagnosed adult celiac disease were evaluated with the Gastrointestinal Symptom rating Scale (GSRS) and Psychological General Well-Being Index (PGWBI) to evaluate their psychological alterations, the association between any alterations and gastrointestinal symptoms, and their outcome after starting a gluten-free diet. The patients underwent nutritional assessment and then started a gluten-free diet; they were reassessed 6 months later. Quantitative variables are expressed as the median and 25th-75th percentiles. We included 21 patients, 17 women and 4 mena, with a mean age of 43 years (31-47). The results of histological analysis were compatible with Marsh I lesions in 6 patients, Marsh IIIa in 6 and Marsh IIIb in 9. At baseline, 8 patients showed severe psychological distress, 4 showed moderate distress and 9 showed no distress. The GSRS score was 34 (17-43) and the PGWBI was 64 (48-87), with a significant correlation between the 2 indexes (rho=-.58, P=.006). At 6 months, 3 patients had severe psychological distress, 5 had moderate distress, 9 showed no distress and 4 showed psychological well-being. The GSRS score at 6 months was 13 (8-17) and the PGWBI was 83 (68-95) (P<.05 compared with baseline data for the 3 indicators). The 6 axes of the PGWBI showed significant improvement. At 6 months, no correlation was found between the GSRS and PGWBI. Patients with celiac disease have psychological alterations whose intensity is related to gastrointestinal symptoms. These symptoms improve after the start of a gluten-free diet. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  16. Anomalous systemic arterial supply of pulmonary sequestration in adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Xiaomeng; Li, Ji; Li, Jing; Cai, Baiqiang

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study described the characteristics of the systemic arterial supply of pulmonary sequestration (PS) in an attempt to better distinguish PS from other acquired lesions. METHODS: We identified 25 patients hospitalized at the Peking Union Medical College Hospital during January 2013 to December 2015 with the assistance of medical catalogers. Twenty-three patients with a definite diagnosis of “pulmonary sequestration” clinically or pathologically were included in the study. The medical records, imaging information, and pathological data were reviewed retrospectively. The general characteristics of the patients and the features of the anomalous arteries were summarized. RESULTS: Aberrant arterial supply of PS was found in all 23 (100%) cases. Among them, twenty patients received surgery, including 14 (70%) with aberrant arterial supply found before surgery, and the other 6 (30%) found during surgery. Nineteen (82.6%) patients had a single systematic arterial supply, with a median diameter of 8 mm. More than one arterial supplies were found in four (17.4%) cases. In 21 (91.3%) cases, the anomalous systemic artery originated from the descending thoracic aorta just adjacent to the sequestrated lung which it supplied, without the presence of accompanying bronchi. In twenty (87.0%) patients who received the surgical intervention, samples of 12 (85.7%) were proved to have elastic vessel walls, out of the 14 samples in which the anomalous systemic arteries were available for analysis. CONCLUSIONS: There are no certain pathology diagnostic criteria for the diagnosis of PS. The detecting of the aberrant systematic artery and distinguishing it from the bronchial arteries corresponded to certain lung abnormalities are the keys to the accurate diagnosis of pulmonary sequestration in adult patients. We propose that the characteristic features of the anomalous arteries include: Originating from aorta and its main branches, adjacent to the sequestrated area

  17. Fever of unknown origin: Most frequent causes in adults patients.

    PubMed

    Popovska-Jovicić, Biljana; Canović, Predrag; Gajović, Olgica; Raković, Ivana; Mijailović, Zeljko

    2016-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of fever of unknown origin (FUO) includes more than 200 different diseases and conditions. The aim of this study was to identify the most frequent causes of FUO among adult patients according to gender and age. The study included 74 patients examined from June 2010 to June 2013 at the Infectious Disease Clinic, Clinical Center Kragujevac in Serbia, according to the defined criteria for FUO. The patients were divided according to the diagnosis into four groups: infectious, malignant, rheumatic and "other diseases". A cause of febricity could not be estabilshed in a portion of subjects, and they comprised the group of undiagnosed cases. Infectious diseases were dominant in the study, followed by rheumatic diseases, which were most frequently found in women and the elderly. The diseases recognised as the most common causes of febricity were subacute thyroiditis, subacute endocarditis, Still's disease, rheumatic polymyalgia with or without temporal arteritis, and cytomegalovirus infection. In 44% of the patients, the final diagnosis was composed of only six clinical entities. The importance of establishing the diagnosis of rheumatic disease is especially emphasised, in line with other authors' research indicating the number of these diseases is on the rise. The diagnostic approach to FUO should always be directed to the known frequency of diseases.

  18. Supraventricular Arrhythmias in Patients with Adult Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Potpara, Tatjana S; Malmborg, Helena

    2017-01-01

    An increasing number of patients with congenital heart disease survive to adulthood; such prolonged survival is related to a rapid evolution of successful surgical repairs and modern diagnostic techniques. Despite these improvements, corrective atrial incisions performed at surgery still lead to subsequent myocardial scarring harbouring a potential substrate for macro-reentrant atrial tachycardia. Macroreentrant atrial tachycardias are the most common (75 %) type of supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) in patients with adult congenital heart disease (ACHD). Patients with ACHD, atrial tachycardias and impaired ventricular function – important risk factors for sudden cardiac death (SCD) – have a 2–9 % SCD risk per decade. Moreover, ACHD imposes certain considerations when choosing antiarrhythmic drugs from a safety aspect and also when considering catheter ablation procedures related to the inherent cardiac anatomical barriers and required expertise. Expert recommendations for physicians managing these patients are therefore mandatory. This review summarises current evidence-based developments in the field, focusing on advances in and general recommendations for the management of ACHD, including the recently published recommendations on management of SVT by the European Heart Rhythm Association. PMID:28835834

  19. Respiratory pattern in an adult population of dystrophic patients.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, M G; Romei, M; Lo Mauro, A; Marchi, E; Gandossini, S; Bonato, S; Comi, G P; Magri, F; Turconi, A C; Pedotti, A; Bresolin, N; Aliverti, A

    2011-07-15

    We studied respiratory function and Chest Wall kinematics in a large population of adult patients affected by slow course muscular dystrophies such as Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy (LGMD, n=38), Becker Muscular Dystrophy (BMD, n=20) and Facio-Scapulo Humeral Dystrophy (FSHD, n=30), through standard spirometry and through the Optoelectronic Plethysmography, to measure the thoraco-abdominal motion during Quiet Breathing and Slow Vital Capacity maneuvers. Within the restrictive pulmonary syndrome characterizing LGMD and FSHD, several different thoraco-abdominal patterns compared to those of healthy subjects were present in the more advanced stages of the disease. These differences were present in the seated position, during the execution of a maximal maneuver such as Slow Vital Capacity. A global respiratory (both inspiratory and expiratory) muscle involvement was more pronounced in the LGMD and FSHD than in the BMD patients, and a significant reduction of abdominal contribution in wheelchair bound patients was observed. In conclusion, OEP technique is able to reveal mild initial modifications in the respiratory muscles in FSHD and LGMD patients, which could be helpful for functional and new therapeutic strategy evaluation.

  20. Interpretation of multiple isolate urine cultures in adult male patients.

    PubMed Central

    Khalifa, M. A.; Abdoh, A. A.; Silva, F. G.; Flournoy, D. J.

    1995-01-01

    A retrospective analytical study examined the records of 220 adult males (mean age 64.9 years) to determine the relative probability that multiple urine culture isolates (MUI) represent urinary tract infection (UTI) versus contamination or colonization. Nonculture laboratory data were used to determine the likelihood of UTI. Patients were classified into three categories: group 1 (those with single isolate cultures; n = 110), group 2 (those with MUI and either symptomatic UTI or an underlying pathologic condition; n = 71) and group 3 (those with MUI and either surgically altered urinary passages or absence of UTI symptoms; n = 39). Nonculture laboratory data suggested UTI in 48.2% of patients in group 1, 46.5% in group 2, and 23.1% in group 3. Patients in groups 1 or 2 with cultures yielding isolate counts of 10(5) colony forming units/mL were 6.2 times more likely to be classified as having a UTI (by nonculture laboratory data) compared with patients having only one or more of these two criteria. This study proposes a more objective approach to interpretation of MUI cultures using the results of nonculture laboratory data, clinical profiles, and colony counts. PMID:7897687

  1. Are Adult Patients More Tolerant of Treatment Risks Than Parents of Juvenile Patients?

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, F. Reed; Özdemir, Semra; Mansfield, Carol; Hass, Steven; Siegel, Corey A.; Sands, Bruce E.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding patient-specific differences in risk tolerance for new treatments that offer improved efficacy can assist in making difficult regulatory and clinical decisions for new treatments that offer both the potential for greater effectiveness in relieving disease symptoms, but also risks of disabling or fatal side effects. The aim of this study is to elicit benefit-risk trade-off preferences for hypothetical treatments with varying efficacy and risk levels using a stated-choice (SC) survey. We derive estimates of “maximum acceptable risk” (MAR) that can help decisionmakers identify welfare-enhancing alternatives. In the case of children, parent caregivers are responsible for treatment decisions and their risk tolerance may be quite different than adult patients' own tolerance for treatment-related risks. We estimated and compared the willingness of Crohn's disease (CD) patients and parents of juvenile CD patients to accept serious adverse event (SAE) risks in exchange for symptom relief. The analyzed data were from 345 patients over the age of 18 and 150 parents of children under the age of 18. The estimation results provide strong evidence that adult patients and parents of juvenile patients are willing to accept tradeoffs between treatment efficacy and risks of SAEs. Parents of juvenile CD patients are about as risk tolerant for their children as adult CD patients are for themselves for improved treatment efficacy. SC surveys provide a systematic method for eliciting preferences for benefit-risk tradeoffs. Understanding patients' own risk perceptions and their willingness to accept risks in return for treatment benefits can help inform risk management decision making. PMID:18826414

  2. Laser in situ keratomileusis in adult patients with anisometropic amblyopia

    PubMed Central

    Agca, Alper; Özgürhan, Engin Bilge; Baz, Ökkeş; Bozkurt, Ercüment; Ozkaya, Abdullah; Yaşa, Dilek; Demirok, Ahmet

    2013-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the increase in corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA) after laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) in adults with anisometropic amblyopia. METHODS The medical records of consecutive patients diagnosed with anisometropic amblyopia at the time of refractive evaluation who underwent LASIK were retrospectively reviewed. Patients with at least a two-line difference of visual acuity (VA) between the eyes with a spherical refractive error difference of at least 3.00 diopters (D) or an astigmatic difference of at least 2.00D were included. Patients with any other possible reason for amblyopia other than anisometropia or those who had undergone previous amblyopia treatment were excluded. Amblyopic eyes with myopia or myopic astigmatism were considered as group 1, hypermetropia or hypermetropic astigmatism constituted group 2, and mixed astigmatism patients comprised group 3. Uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA), subjective manifest refraction, and CDVA were analyzed at 1 week and 1 month, 3, and 6 months. RESULTS The study included 57 eyes of 57 patients. There were 33 eyes in group 1, 12 eyes in group 2, and 12 eyes in group 3. The preoperative mean values for spherical equivalent of subjective manifest refraction (SE) in groups 1, 2, and 3 were (-4.66±1.97)D, (4.40±1.00)D, and (0.15±1.05)D, respectively. Mean CDVA improved 0.1 log units (1 line LogMAR) at 6 months (P<0.05). Sixteen eyes (28%) exhibited an improvement in CDVA in week 1. Fourteen eyes (25%) experienced two or more lines of CDVA improvement at month 6. There were no statistically significant differences among the groups in terms of CDVA (P>0.05). Moreover, age, the amount of preoperative refractive error, and the levels of preoperative corrected and UDVA had no effect on postoperative CDVA improvement (P>0.05). CONCLUSION Correction of refractive errors with LASIK produced significant CDVA improvement in adult patients with anisometropic amblyopia and no previous amblyopia treatment

  3. Phemenological aspects of personality disorders in adult psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Benedik, Emil; Dobnik, Sana Coderl

    2014-06-01

    Many empirical studies give evidence of co-occurrence of mental and personality disorders (PDs). On the other hand theoretical models explain the relationship between personality and mental disorders from different perspectives. This research studied the phemenological aspects of PDs in adult psychiatric patients with different mental disorders according to cognitive and psychoanalytic criteria for personality pathology. In order to study personality pathology in different diagnostic groups we constructed a self-report Questionnaire of Personality Disorders (VMO-2) on the basis of the DSM-IV-TR classification of PD (APA 2000), Beck's theory of dysfunctional beliefs (Beck et al. 2004) and psychoanalytic theories of personality (Kernberg 1986). The content of items in VMO-2 reflected the phenomenology of PDs and is focused on the basic experience of self and others in specific personality types. The questionnaire consists of 193 items which are divided into 11 clinical scales (Histrionic, Obsessive-compulsive, Avoidant, Dependent, Depressive, Narcissistic, Borderline, Antisocial, Paranoid, Schizoid and Schizotypal PD scale) and a validity (Lie) scale. The sample of 642 adult patients with different mental disorders and 477 healthy controls of both genders served as subjects in the study. All groups of patients reached higher scores on VMO-2 and revealed more personality pathology as compared to the control group. There were differences in specific personality scales between patients of different diagnostic groups. The schizotypal PD scale discriminated significantly between patients with schizophrenia and the majority of other diagnostic groups. The group of patients with opioid dependence disorder reached the highest mean score on the scale for antisocial PD. Our results on VMO-2 show partial support for psychodynamic and cognitive theories of personality pathology. Results are also in accordance with other empirical studies which show that some characteristics of

  4. Systematic review of surgical treatment techniques for adult and pediatric patients with pectus excavatum

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This compares outcome measures of current pectus excavatum (PEx) treatments, namely the Nuss and Ravitch procedures, in pediatric and adult patients. Original investigations that stratified PEx patients based on current treatment and age (pediatric = 0–21; adult 17–99) were considered for inclusion. Outcome measures were: operation duration, analgesia duration, blood loss, length of stay (LOS), outcome ratings, complications, and percentage requiring reoperations. Adult implant patients (18.8%) had higher reoperation rates than adult Nuss or Ravitch patients (5.3% and 3.3% respectively). Adult Nuss patients had longer LOS (7.3 days), more strut/bar displacement (6.1%), and more epidural analgesia (3 days) than adult Ravitch patients (2.9 days, 0%, 0 days). Excluding pectus bar and strut displacements, pediatric and adult Nuss patients tended to have higher complication rates (pediatric - 38%; adult - 21%) compared to pediatric and adult Ravitch patients (12.5%; 8%). Pediatric Ravitch patients clearly had more strut displacements than adult Ravitch patients (0% and 6.4% respectively). These results suggest significantly better results in common PEx surgical repair techniques (i.e. Nuss and Ravitch) than uncommon techniques (i.e. Implants and Robicsek). The results suggest slightly better outcomes in pediatric Nuss procedure patients as compared with all other groups. We recommend that symptomatic pediatric patients with uncomplicated PEx receive the Nuss procedure. We suggest that adult patients receive the Nuss or Ravitch procedure, even though the long-term complication rates of the adult Nuss procedure require more investigation. PMID:24506826

  5. Orthodontics in the adult patient, with special reference to the periodontally compromised patient.

    PubMed

    Johal, A; Ide, M

    1999-04-01

    There is increasing demand from adult patients for orthodontic treatment, either purely for aesthetics, to improve aesthetics or function following previous disease, or to facilitate the stabilization, restoration or replacement of teeth. Orthodontics may have a major role in the rehabilitation of patients suffering the effects of advanced periodontal disease, but there are a number of important factors to be considered in the management of such patients if the optimal outcome is to be obtained. This paper summarizes important aspects of treatment and the potential complications and how to avoid them.

  6. Preference for One or Two Hearing Aids among Adult Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Robyn M; Schwartz, Kathryn S.; Noe, Colleen M.; Alexander, Genevieve C.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Most practitioners believe that use of two hearing aids is the ideal fitting for adults with bilateral symmetrical hearing loss. However, previous research has consistently shown that a substantial proportion of these patients actually prefer to use only one hearing aid. The current study explored whether this pattern of preferences is seen with technologically advanced hearing aids. In addition, a selection of variables that were available pre-fitting were used to attempt to predict which patients will prefer one hearing aid rather than two. Design The study was designed as a 12-week field trial including structured and unstructured use of one and two hearing aids. Ninety-four subjects with mild to moderate bilaterally symmetrical hearing loss were bilaterally fit with 2005-2007 era hearing aids. Potential predictors included demographic, audiometric, auditory lifestyle, personality, and binaural processing variables. After the field trial, each subject stated his/her preference for one or two hearing aids and completed three self-report outcome questionnaires for their preferred fitting. Results Previous research was confirmed with modern technology hearing aids: after the field trial 46% of the subjects preferred to use one hearing aid rather than two. Subjects who preferred two hearing aids tended to report better real-world outcomes than those who preferred one. Subjects who reported more hearing problems in daily life, who experienced more binaural loudness summation, and whose ears were more equivalent in dichotic listening were more likely to prefer to use two hearing aids. Contrary to conventional wisdom (ideas that are generally accepted as true), audiometric hearing loss and auditory lifestyle were not predictive of aiding preference. However, the best predictive approach from these data yielded accurate predictions for only two-thirds of subjects. Conclusions Evidence-based practice calls for a conscientious melding of current evidence

  7. Protein C levels in beta-thalassemia major patients in the east Nile delta of Egypt.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Tamer H; Elbehedy, Rabab M; Youssef, Doaa M; Amr, Ghada E

    2010-01-01

    Thalassemic patients have an increased risk for thromboembolic complications. To determine if this might be due to a deficiency in protein C, we investigated the status of the protein C anticoagulant pathway in thalassemia major patients and its relationship to the hypercoagulable state. Fifty patients with beta-thalassemia major (30 non-splenectomized and 20 splenectomized) and 20 healthy children as a control group were tested for levels of serum ferritin, liver enzymes, serum albumin, fibrinogen, protein C and protein S, thrombin antithrombin complex (TAT) and D-dimer. Thalassemic patients had lower levels of protein C and S and higher levels of D-dimer and TAT than the control group. These findings were more obvious in splenectomized patients and in those with infrequent blood transfusion. Protein C plays a major role in the hypercoagulable state in thalassemic patients. These findings raise the issue as to whether it would be cost-beneficial to recommend prophylactic antithrombotic therapy in high-risk thalassemic patients. A wider prospective study is necessary to delineate under which circumstances therapy might be needed, and at what level of protein C deficiency to start prophylactic antithrombotic therapy.

  8. Scrotal tuberculosis in adult patients: a 10-year clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ing-Kit; Yang, Wen-Chou; Liu, Jien-Wei

    2007-10-01

    Twenty-nine adults (mean age, 59.9 +/- 13.5 years) with scrotal tuberculosis (TB) were retrospectively analyzed. The mean interval from emergence of symptoms suggestive of scrotal TB to diagnosis established was 142.44 +/- 227.66 days. Scrotal TB was initially suspected in only five (17.2%) patients, and infection caused by bacteria other than Mycobacterium tuberculosis (55.2%) was the leading presumptive diagnosis. Of 28 patients with chest radiographs available, 7 (25%) disclosed active pulmonary TB, and 9 (32.1%) showed a TB scar. All patients received anti-TB chemotherapy; 20 (69%) additionally underwent surgery. Pathologic examination of resected tissue at therapeutic surgery, biopsy, or polymerase chain reaction assay of urine led to rapid diagnosis of scrotal TB. Although evidence of scrotal TB was easily obtainable, the lack of alertness made clinicians avert from the appropriate diagnostic approaches and rendered a delayed diagnosis. Our report underscores the urgent need for improving clinicians' awareness of scrotal TB.

  9. Cephalometric appraisal of posttreatment vertical changes in adult orthodontic patients.

    PubMed

    Ahn, J G; Schneider, B J

    2000-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate vertical facial changes in adult orthodontic patients and to evaluate the stability of these changes. Thirty-three patients (8 males and 25 females) were examined. The patients had been treated with full fixed edgewise appliance mechanics and exhibited at least 1.0 degrees of clockwise rotation of the mandible during treatment. Mandibular rotation was determined by the angular change in the Y-axis to the Frankfort plane. Twelve angular and 14 linear skeletal and dental measurements and 3 skeletal ratios were derived from pretreatment (T1), posttreatment (T2), and postretention (T3) cephalometric radiographs. Paired t tests were used to compare vertical changes that occurred as a result of orthodontic treatment and their stability or relapse tendency during the retention and postretention periods. Twenty-five percent (P <.001) of the opening rotation of the mandible recovered during the posttreatment period, resulting in a significant overall rotation that was maintained. Both treatment and posttreatment changes in the Y-axis angle showed a high correlation with the horizontal position of pogonion (r = -0.797 and -0.889, respectively). Only overjet showed a low correlation between treatment changes and posttreatment changes in the Y-axis angle. Stepwise regression analysis of pretreatment variables and treatment changes failed to predict the behavior of the Y-axis angle change.

  10. Staphylococcus aureus isolated from tonsillectomized adult patients with recurrent tonsillitis.

    PubMed

    Katkowska, Marta; Garbacz, Katarzyna; Stromkowski, Józef

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the prevalence and antibiotic resistance of Staphylococcus aureus strains from 118 tonsillectomized adults due to recurrent tonsillitis (RT). The study included strains isolated from the tonsillar surface prior to tonsillectomy, recovered from the tonsillar core at the time of surgery, and from the posterior throat 2-4 weeks after the procedure. Susceptibility of isolates to 19 antibiotics was tested in line with the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute recommendations. Irrespective of the stage, the most commonly isolated bacteria were gram-positive cocci, and among them S. aureus. The tonsillar core was the most common site of S. aureus isolation (30.5%), followed by the tonsillar surface (10.8%) and the posterior pharynx (5.9%). This difference turned out to be statistically significant (p < 0.001). Beta-hemolytic streptococci, most often Streptococcus pyogenes (5.1%), were isolated from 2.5% to 10.2% of patients. Staphylococcal isolates were susceptible to most tested antibiotics (except from penicillin and ampicillin) and rarely showed methicillin resistance (n = 1). Staphylococcus aureus seems to be the most common pathogen isolated from patients tonsillectomized due to RT. Staphylococcal isolates associated with RT are present mostly within the tonsillar core and susceptible to most antibiotics. They are typically isolated from patients between 21 and 30 years of age. Tonsillectomy results in less frequent isolation of S. aureus strains.

  11. Adult patients with Fontan circulation: What we know and how to manage adults with Fontan circulation?

    PubMed

    Ohuchi, Hideo

    2016-09-01

    Most of patients after the Fontan operation can reach their adulthood, however, the management strategy for this complex pathophysiology has not been yet established. In general, elevated central venous pressure (CVP) and low cardiac output (CO) due to impaired ventricular preload characterize the Fontan circulation and the ideal hemodynamics could be a combination of a lower CVP with a higher CO. Thus, preserved functional systemic ventricle with low pulmonary artery resistance is thought to be crucial for better long-term outcome. However, on the other hand, because of the unique hemodynamics, these patients have significantly higher incidence of complications, sequelae, and even mortality. The major complications are supraventricular arrhythmias, heart failure, and Fontan-related problems, including protein-losing enteropathy and pulmonary arteriovenous fistulae, both of which are refractory to the treatments, and most of these "Fontan inconveniences" increase as patients age. In addition, one of the recent emerging problems is Fontan-associated liver disease that includes liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Furthermore, women with Fontan circulation also reach childbearing age and there have been increasing numbers of reports showing a high incidence of pregnancy-associated complications. All these problems may be a part of "Fontan inconveniences" because most of the current Fontan patients are still "young" i.e. in their twenties or thirties and it may be not surprising that more new Fontan-associated pathophysiology emerges as patients age. Recent evidence reminds us of the concept that adult Fontan pathophysiology is not just a cardiovascular disease, rather, a multiorgan disease with many interactions between cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular organs. Therefore, a multidisciplinary approach is mandatory to take care of and anticipate the better long-term outcome. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Ablation of Arrhythmias in Patients with Adult Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Rodrigo Gallardo; Griffith, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Arrhythmias in adults with congenital heart disease, most commonly related to previous surgical procedures, are a frequent comorbidity in this growing population thanks to the improved outcome of surgical techniques. Re-entrant circuits around areas of scarring and natural barriers, combined with abnormal haemodynamics and the underlying anatomy, are the most common cause for these arrhythmias. They are often poorly tolerated and medical treatment is frequently inadequate. In recent years, catheter ablation has emerged as a successful therapeutic option. New advanced techniques such as the use of modern three-dimensional (3D) navigation systems have contributed to better understanding of the arrhythmia mechanisms and higher success rates of the ablation procedures. In this article we briefly summarise the characteristics of the most common arrhythmias in this patient population and some key aspects in their treatment by catheter ablation. PMID:26835063

  13. Humidification during Mechanical Ventilation in the Adult Patient

    PubMed Central

    Al Ashry, Haitham S.; Modrykamien, Ariel M.

    2014-01-01

    Humidification of inhaled gases has been standard of care in mechanical ventilation for a long period of time. More than a century ago, a variety of reports described important airway damage by applying dry gases during artificial ventilation. Consequently, respiratory care providers have been utilizing external humidifiers to compensate for the lack of natural humidification mechanisms when the upper airway is bypassed. Particularly, active and passive humidification devices have rapidly evolved. Sophisticated systems composed of reservoirs, wires, heating devices, and other elements have become part of our usual armamentarium in the intensive care unit. Therefore, basic knowledge of the mechanisms of action of each of these devices, as well as their advantages and disadvantages, becomes a necessity for the respiratory care and intensive care practitioner. In this paper, we review current methods of airway humidification during invasive mechanical ventilation of adult patients. We describe a variety of devices and describe the eventual applications according to specific clinical conditions. PMID:25089275

  14. Adherence to airway clearance therapies by adult cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Flores, Josani Silva; Teixeira, Fernanda Ângela; Rovedder, Paula Maria Eidt; Ziegler, Bruna; Dalcin, Paulo de Tarso Roth

    2013-02-01

    Airway clearance therapy (ACT) is critical in cystic fibrosis (CF). To determine rates of self-reported adherence to ACT by patients treated in an adult CF program, to identify patient characteristics associated with poor adherence, to typify adherence according to ACT technique, and to indicate reasons for poor adherence. Our cross-sectional study included CF subjects age 16 years and older. Enrollees were evaluated via general structured questionnaire, adherence questionnaire, clinical assessment, spirometry, and S(pO(2)) values. Each was stratified by self-reporting protocol as high, moderate, or poor adherence to ACT. Concordance between physiotherapist recommended ACT technique and self-reported subject adherence was subjected to agreement analysis. Of the 63 subjects studied, 38 (60%) qualified as high adherence, 12 (19%) as moderate adherence, and 13 (21%) as poor adherence. Logistic regression identified education level (less than high school) as an independent factor associated with poor adherence (odds ratio 10.2, 95% CI 1.23-84.7, P = .03). Positive expiratory pressure (κ = 0.87) and flutter device (κ = 0.63) usage both corresponded with a high level of agreement, while active cycle of breathing technique (κ = 0.40) and autogenic drainage (κ = 0.39) each showed moderate agreement. Agreement was low for percussion and postural drainage (κ = 0.23). Reasons given most frequently for poor adherence to ACT were "not enough time to do ACT" (28%), "cannot be bothered" (16%), and "do not enjoy ACT technique" (8%). Many (32%) provided no reason. Study outcomes showed a high rate of ACT adherence in adult CF subjects. Lower level of education was the most important factor in poor adherence to ACT. Self-reported adherence and treatment recommendations were in best agreement with positive expiratory pressure and flutter device techniques. © 2013 Daedalus Enterprises.

  15. Skeletal health in adult patients with classic galactosemia.

    PubMed

    Batey, L A; Welt, C K; Rohr, F; Wessel, A; Anastasoaie, V; Feldman, H A; Guo, C-Y; Rubio-Gozalbo, E; Berry, G; Gordon, C M

    2013-02-01

    This study evaluated bone health in adults with galactosemia. Associations between bone mineral density (BMD) and nutritional and biochemical variables were explored. Calcium level predicted hip and spine BMD, and gonadotropin levels were inversely associated with spinal BMD in women. These results afford insights into management strategies for these patients. Bone loss is a complication of galactosemia. Dietary restriction, primary ovarian insufficiency in women, and disease-related alterations of bone metabolism may contribute. This study examined relationships between clinical factors and BMD in patients with galactosemia. This cross-sectional sample included 33 adults (16 women) with classic galactosemia, mean age 32.0 ± 11.8 years. BMD was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and was correlated with age, height, weight, fractures, nutritional factors, hormonal status, and bone biomarkers. There was a significant difference in hip BMD between women and men (0.799 vs. 0.896 g/cm(2), p = 0.014). The percentage of subjects with BMD-Z <-2.0 was also greater for women than men [33 vs. 18 % (spine), 27 vs. 6 % (hip)], and more women reported sustaining fractures. Bivariate analyses yielded correlations between BMI and BMD-Z [at the hip in women (r = 0.58, p < 0.05) and spine in men (r = 0.53, p < 0.05)]. In women, weight was also correlated with BMD-Z (r = 0.57, p < 0.05 at hip), and C-telopeptides (r = -0.59 at spine and -0.63 hip, p < 0.05) and osteocalcin (r = -0.71 at spine and -0.72 hip, p < 0.05) were inversely correlated with BMD-Z. In final regression models, higher gonadotropin levels were associated with lower spinal BMD in women (p = 0.017); serum calcium was a significant predictor of hip (p = 0.014) and spine (p = 0.013) BMD in both sexes. Bone density in adults with galactosemia is low, indicating the potential for increased fracture risk, the etiology of which appears to be

  16. Population Pharmacokinetics of Benznidazole in Adult Patients with Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aldasoro, E.; Guerrero, L.; Posada, E.; Serret, N.; Mejía, T.; Urbina, J. A.; Gascón, J.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to build a population pharmacokinetic (popPK) model to characterize benznidazole (BNZ) pharmacokinetics in adults with chronic Chagas disease. This study was a prospective, open-label, single-center clinical trial approved by the local ethics committee. Patients received BNZ at 2.5 mg/kg of body weight/12 h (Abarax, Elea Laboratory, Argentina) for 60 days. Plasma BNZ samples were taken several times during the study and analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography with UV-visible detection (HPLC-UV). The popPK analysis was done with NONMEMv.7.3. Demographic and biological data were tested as covariates. Intraindividual, interoccasion, and residual variabilities were modeled. Internal and external validations were completed to assess the robustness of the model. Later on, simulations were performed to generate BNZ concentration-time course profiles for different dosage regimens. A total of 358 plasma BNZ concentrations from 39 patients were included in the analysis. A one-compartment PK model characterized by clearance (CL/F) and the apparent volume of distribution (V/F), with first-order absorption (Ka) and elimination, adequately described the data (CL/F, 1.73 liters/h; V/F, 89.6 liters; and Ka, 1.15 h−1). No covariates were found to be significant for CL/F and V/F. Internal and external validations of the final model showed adequate results. Data from simulations revealed that a dose of 2.5 mg/kg/12 h might lead to overexposure in most patients. A lower dose (2.5 mg/kg/24 h) was able to achieve trough BNZ plasma concentrations within the accepted therapeutic range of 3 to 6 mg/liter. In summary, we developed a population PK model for BNZ in adults with chronic Chagas disease. Dosing simulations showed that a BNZ dose of 2.5 mg/kg/24 h will adequately keep BNZ trough plasma concentrations within the recommended target range for the majority of patients. (This study has been registered at EudraCT under number 2011

  17. Early maladaptive schemas in adult patients with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Philipsen, Alexandra; Lam, Alexandra P; Breit, Sigrid; Lücke, Caroline; Müller, Helge H; Matthies, Swantje

    2017-06-01

    The main purpose of this study was to examine whether adult patients with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) demonstrate sets of dysfunctional cognitive beliefs and behavioural tendencies according to Jeffrey Young's schema-focused therapy model. Sets of dysfunctional beliefs (maladaptive schemas) were assessed with the Young Schema Questionnaire (YSQ-S2) in 78 adult ADHD patients and 80 control subjects. Patients with ADHD scored significantly higher than the control group on almost all maladaptive schemas. The 'Failure', 'Defectiveness/Shame', 'Subjugation' and 'Emotional Deprivation' schemas were most pronounced in adult ADHD patients, while only 'Vulnerability to Harm or Illness' did not differ between the two groups. The schemas which were most pronounced in adult patients with ADHD correspond well with their learning histories and core symptoms. By demonstrating the existence of early maladaptive schemas in adults suffering from ADHD, this study suggests that schema theory may usefully be applied to adult ADHD therapy.

  18. Adult patient perspectives on clinical trial result reporting: A survey of cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Elzinga, Kate E; Khan, Omar F; Tang, Andrew R; Fernandez, Conrad V; Elzinga, Christine L; Heng, Daniel Yc; Vickers, Michael M; Truong, Tony H; Tang, Patricia A

    2016-12-01

    The provision of study results to research participants is supported by pediatric and adult literature. This study assessed adult cancer patient preferences surrounding aggregate result disclosure to study participants. A 46-item questionnaire was given to 250 adult cancer patients who had participated in oncology trials at a single center. Respondents answered questions surrounding their preferences for timing, content, and modality of communication for dissemination of study results. Questionnaire completion rate was 76% (189/250). Most patients (92%) strongly felt a right to know study results. Patients preferred result dissemination via letter for trials with positive outcomes, but preferred in-person clinic visits for negative outcomes. Despite this, a majority of participants (59%) found letters acceptable to inform participants of negative results. Only a minority (36%) of the participants found Internet-based disclosure acceptable for negative trial results. Unfortunately, very few patients (8%) recalled having received the results for a study they participated in, and of these patients, less than half fully understood the results they were given. Most clinical trial participants feel they have a right to study result disclosure, regardless of trial outcome. In-person visits are preferred for negative results, but more feasible alternatives such as letters were still acceptable for the majority of participants. However, Internet-based disclosure was not acceptable to most participants in oncology trials. Time and cost allocations for result disclosure should be considered during grant and ethics board applications, and clear guidelines are required to help researchers share the results with patients. © The Author(s) 2016.

  19. Psychiatric disorders in adolescent and young adult patients with phenylketonuria.

    PubMed

    Manti, Filippo; Nardecchia, Francesca; Chiarotti, Flavia; Carducci, Claudia; Carducci, Carla; Leuzzi, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Psychiatric symptoms are a challenging aspect in adolescent and adult early treated phenylketonuric (ETPKU) patients. To assess the occurrence of psychiatric disorders we explored the presence of symptoms requiring intervention and further investigated the link between psychiatric disorders, the quality of biochemical control and cognitive functioning. Forty-six ETPKU patients (aged 12 to 44) and 30 age-matched healthy controls were subjected to cognitive and psychiatric assessment by means of self-report questionnaires and psychiatric interview. Psychiatric diagnoses, if detected, were made according to DSM-5 criteria. Concomitant IQ, historical and concurrent biochemical metabolic controls were included in the statistical analysis. Twenty-five out of 46 ETPKUs showed clinical scores on at least one scale of the psychiatric assessment (7/30 in controls); anxiety and withdrawal were the most frequent self-reported symptoms. Seventeen patients (and no controls) met criteria for a psychiatric diagnosis, most of them belonging to the Anxiety Disorders category. The occurrence of psychiatric symptoms was not associated with the life-long and concurrent quality of metabolic control but patients with good metabolic control (≤ 500 μM) in the first 11 years of life showed higher frequency of psychiatric diagnosis (Fisher's exact p=.0300). ETPKUs show a higher than normal vulnerability to psychiatric disorders, which cannot be explained by the usual biochemical alterations influencing intellectual outcome. Our data support the hypothesis that the burden of the disease acts as psychological stress for children and their families. Possible involvement of neuromediators in the pathogenesis of these complex symptoms requires further investigation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Two new beta0-thalassemic mutations: a deletion (-CC) at codon 142 or overlapping codons 142-143, and an insertion (+T) at codon 45 or overlapping codons 44-45/45-46 of the beta-globin gene.

    PubMed

    Lacan, Philippe; Aubry, Martine; Couprie, Nicole; Francina, Alain

    2007-01-01

    We report here two new beta(0)-thalassemic mutations. In the first case, a deletion of two nucleotides (-CC) at codon 142 was found in a French Caucasian woman. In the second case, an insertion of a single nucleotide (+T) at codon 45 was found in a Turkish girl. In both cases, no dominant thalassemia-like phenotype was observed.

  1. Reconstruction of the thumb with a modified wrap-around flap in a patient suffering from β-thalassemia minor.

    PubMed

    Galeano, M; Checcucci, G; Ceruso, M

    2011-01-01

    Thalassemia is a congenital hemolytic disorder caused by a partial or complete deficiency of α- or β-globin chain synthesis. It has been seen that thalassemic patients exhibit an increased frequency of thrombotic events. The article presents the first case of thumb reconstruction with a modified wrap-around flap in a patient suffering from β-thalassemia minor.

  2. Comparison of patient satisfaction and self-reports of pain in adult burn-injured patients.

    PubMed

    Carrougher, Gretchen J; Ptacek, J T; Sharar, Sam R; Wiechman, Shelley; Honari, Shari; Patterson, David R; Heimbach, David M

    2003-01-01

    Procedural and background pain scores were assessed prospectively and compared with treatment goals and satisfaction scores in 84 adult (67 men and 17 women) burn-injured patients treated at a single, tertiary care medical center. We hypothesized that patient satisfaction with pain management plans would be highest among those patients who were experiencing the least pain and also among patients whose experiences most closely matched their treatment analgesic goals. Twice-weekly patient self-reports of worst and average procedural pain, background pain, treatment goals (the level of procedural pain and background pain patients reported that they would be satisfied as experiencing), and overall satisfaction with pain management plans were assessed using 10-point Graphic Rating Scales. Data concerning adjunctive treatments were also obtained. Opioid equivalents, representing pain medications administered, were compared. The majority of patients perceived that "no pain" during burn wound care was an unrealistic goal, a perception that was consistent throughout hospitalization. As hypothesized, average procedural pain levels demonstrated a negative association with patient satisfaction, indicating that patients with the highest levels of procedural pain also reported the lowest level of satisfaction. Opioid analgesic dosing was not significantly associated with ratings of procedural pain or treatment goals. Our findings support the hypothesis that patient satisfaction with pain management is highest in those who experience the least amount of burn care pain and do not support the hypothesis that satisfaction is highest in those whose pain experiences most closely match treatment analgesic goals.

  3. RSE prediction by EEG patterns in adult GCSE patients.

    PubMed

    Tian, Fei; Su, Yingying; Chen, Weibi; Gao, Ran; Zhang, Yunzhou; Zhang, Yan; Ye, Hong; Gao, Daiquan

    2013-07-01

    Electroencephalogram (EEG) can predict mortality in status epilepticus (SE) patients. However, we consider that the prediction for refractory status epilepticus (RSE) after SE initial treatment is more significant than long-term prognosis of SE. The objective of this study is to detect some predictive EEG patterns for RSE. Pooled data derived from two randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were prospectively analyzed in adult generalized convulsive status epilepticus (GCSE) patients. Etiology, GCSE duration and EEG patterns are three factors which were statistically different between non-RSE and RSE groups. However, when we introduced these factors into multivariable logistic regression model, only EEG pattern was an independent risk factor for RSE prediction. Comparing with rhythmic fast activities background (RFAB) pattern, there were positive correlations between interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs), periodic epileptic discharges/subtle status epilepticus (PEDs/subtle SE) patterns and RSE incidence respectively. There was an increased risk of RSE incidence accompanied with IEDs and PEDs/subtle SE patterns appearance. Clinicians should adjust anti-epileptic strategies with the aid of these EEG patterns in order to reduce RSE incidence. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. [Hematological Evaluation and Monitoring in Adult Patients Diagnosed With Schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Tamayo Martínez, Nathalie; Bohórquez Peñaranda, Adriana Patricia; García Valencia, Jenny; Jaramillo González, Luis Eduardo; Ávila, Mauricio J; Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos; Arenas González, María Luisa

    2015-01-01

    To guide the clinician in taking decisions on the best strategies for assessing and monitoring the risk of blood disorders in adults diagnosed with schizophrenia in pharmacological treatment. A clinical practice guideline was developed following the guidelines of the Methodological Guide of the Ministry of Social Protection to collect evidence and grade recommendations. De novoliterature researchwas performed. With the use of antipsychotics there isriskofreducción in the leukocyte count and the risk of agranulocytosis,the later associated with the use of clozapine, although it is a rare event(0.8%) can be fatal; this effect occurs most frequently in the first twelve weeks of treatment and the risk is maintained aroundthe first year of it. The recommendations were considered strongin all hematologic related monitoring.A blood count should be taken at the start of pharmacological treatment. If the patient is started on clozapine one shouldbe taken weekly during the first three months, monthly until completing one year and every six months thereafter. If there is a decrease in white blood cell count the patient should be monitored regularly, stopping if is a less than 3,500 cells/mm(3) and consider referral if is less than 2,000 cells/mm(3). Copyright © 2014 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  5. Genetic risk factors of cisplatin induced ototoxicity in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Talach, T; Rottenberg, J; Gal, B; Kostrica, R; Jurajda, M; Kocak, I; Lakomy, R; Vogazianos, E

    2016-01-01

    Ototoxicity is an important adverse effect of using Cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum) (CDDP) as a form of chemotherapy. The clinical picture of CDDP induced ototoxicity includes perceptive hearing impairment (reversible or permanent) and tinnitus. Ototoxicity manifests with considerable variability between patients. The objective of this prospective study was to investigate a possible genetic background to this variability. We assessed ototoxicity induced by therapeutic doses of CDDP in adult patients with germinative testicular tumors, or other tumors treated with an identical CDDP dosage scheme. Audiological examination before, during and after the treatment has shown deterioration in hearing; first in the high-frequencies and with increased CDDP cumulative doses, impairment in other frequencies as well. Occurrence of tinnitus was not dependent on the administered dose of CDDP, or the other risk factors examined in this study. The association of CDDP induced ototoxicity with genetic polymorphisms in candidate genes was examined. Our study has demonstrated an association of early onset of CDDP induced ototoxicity with the presence of two copies of GSTT1 gene (p=0,009) and with T allele of rs9332377 polymorphism in COMT gene (p=0,001).

  6. Metabolic aspects of adult patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Abenavoli, Ludovico; Milic, Natasa; Di Renzo, Laura; Preveden, Tomislav; Medić-Stojanoska, Milica; De Lorenzo, Antonino

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a major cause of chronic liver disease and it encompasses a spectrum from simple steatosis to steatohepatitis, fibrosis, or cirrhosis. The mechanisms involved in the occurrence of NAFLD and its progression are probably due to a metabolic profile expressed within the context of a genetic predisposition and is associated with a higher energy intake. The metabolic syndrome (MS) is a cluster of metabolic alterations associated with an increased risk for the development of cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. NAFLD patients have more than one feature of the MS, and now they are considered the hepatic components of the MS. Several scientific advances in understanding the association between NAFLD and MS have identified insulin resistance (IR) as the key aspect in the pathophysiology of both diseases. In the multi parallel hits theory of NAFLD pathogenesis, IR was described to be central in the predisposition of hepatocytes to be susceptible to other multiple pathogenetic factors. The recent knowledge gained from these advances can be applied clinically in the prevention and management of NAFLD and its associated metabolic changes. The present review analyses the current literature and highlights the new evidence on the metabolic aspects in the adult patients with NAFLD. PMID:27610012

  7. Relationship between perceived sleep and polysomnography in older adult patients

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos Silva, Mayra; Bazzana, Caroline Moreira; de Souza, Altay Lino; Ramos, Luiz Roberto; Tufik, Sergio; Lucchesi, Lígia M.; Lopes, Guiomar Silva

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims Aging is a multifactorial process that elicits changes in the duration and quality of sleep. Polysomnography is considered to be the standard examination for the analysis of sleep and consists of the simultaneous recording of selected physiological variables during sleep. Objective The objective of this study was to use polysomnography to compare sleep reported by senior citizens. Methods We selected 40 patients, both male and female, with ages ranging from 64 to 89 years from the Center for the Study of Aging at the Federal University of São Paulo. Patients answered questions about sleep on the Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment and underwent polysomnography. Results The results were compared, and agreement between perceived sleep and polysomnography was found in several areas. There was an association between difficulty sleeping and sleep onset latency (p=0.015), waking up at night with sleep onset latency (p=0.005), total sleep time with daytime sleepiness (0.005) and snoring (0.027), sleep efficiency with sleepiness (0.004), snoring (0.033) and pause in breathing (p=0.024), awakenings with snoring (p=0.012) and sleep apnea with pauses in breathing (p=0.001). Conclusion These results suggest that the older adult population have a good perception of their sleep. The questionnaires aimed at this population should be used as an alternative to polysomnography. PMID:26483948

  8. Patient knowledge and pulmonary medication adherence in adult patients with cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ann Hsu-An; Kendrick, Jennifer G; Wilcox, Pearce G; Quon, Bradley S

    2017-01-01

    Background and objectives Patient knowledge of lung function (ie, forced expiratory volume in 1 s [FEV1]% predicted) and the intended benefits of their prescribed pulmonary medications might play an important role in medication adherence, but this relationship has not been examined previously in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Methods All patients diagnosed with CF and without prior lung transplantation were invited to complete knowledge and self-reported medication adherence questionnaires during routine outpatient visits to the Adult CF Clinic, St Paul’s Hospital, Vancouver, Canada from June 2013 to August 2014. Results A total of 142 out of 167 (85%) consecutive adults attending CF clinic completed patient knowledge and medication adherence survey questionnaires. Sixty-four percent of the patients recalled their last FEV1% predicted value within 5%, and 70% knew the intended benefits of all their prescribed medications. Self-reported adherence rates were highest for inhaled antibiotics (81%), azithromycin (87%), and dornase alpha (76%) and lowest for hypertonic saline (47%). Individuals who knew their FEV1% predicted value within 5% were more likely to self-report adherence to dornase alpha (84% vs 62%, P=0.06) and inhaled antibiotics (88% vs 64%, P=0.06) compared to those who did not, but these associations were not statistically significant. There were no significant associations observed between patient knowledge of intended medication benefits and self-reported medication adherence. Conclusion Contrary to our hypothesis, disease- and treatment-related knowledge was not associated with self-reported medication adherence. This suggests other barriers to medication adherence should be targeted in future studies aiming to improve medication adherence in adults with CF. PMID:28408806

  9. Clinical characterization of dystonia in adult patients with Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    van de Zande, N A; Massey, T H; McLauchlan, D; Pryce Roberts, A; Zutt, R; Wardle, M; Payne, G C; Clenaghan, C; Tijssen, M A J; Rosser, A E; Peall, K J

    2017-09-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant, neurodegenerative movement disorder, typically characterized by chorea. Dystonia is also recognized as part of the HD motor phenotype, although little work detailing its prevalence, distribution, severity and impact on functional capacity has been published to date. Patients (>18 years of age) were recruited from the Cardiff (UK) HD clinic, each undergoing a standardized videotaped clinical examination and series of functional assessment questionnaires (Unified Huntington's Disease Rating Scale, Burke-Fahn-Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale and modified version of the Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale). The presence and severity of dystonia were scored by four independent neurologists using the Burke-Fahn-Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale and Unified Huntington's Disease Rating Scale. Statistical analysis included Fisher's exact test, Wilcoxon test, anova and calculation of correlation coefficients where appropriate. Forty-eight patients [91% (48/53)] demonstrated evidence of dystonia, with the highest prevalence in the left upper limb (n = 44, 83%), right upper limb most severely affected and eyes least affected. Statistically significant positive correlations (P < 0.05) were observed between dystonia severity and increasing HD disease stage and motor disease duration. Deterioration in functional capacity also correlated with increasing dystonia severity. No significant relationship was observed with age at motor symptom onset or CAG repeat length. We report a high prevalence of dystonia in adult patients with HD, with worsening dystonia severity with increasing HD disease stage and motor disease duration. The recognition and management of dystonic symptoms in routine clinical practice will aid overall symptomatic treatment and functional improvement. © 2017 EAN.

  10. [Some aspects of the orthodontic-prosthetic approach for adult patients. A case report].

    PubMed

    Fábián, G; Gáspár, J; Fábián, T K

    2000-08-01

    Authors present a case report of an adult patient treated with the combination of orthodontic and prosthetic treatment methods. The importance of periodontal and psychological management of such patients is pointed out.

  11. Warming up Improves Speech Production in Patients with Adult Onset Myotonic Dystrophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Swart, B.J.M.; van Engelen, B.G.M.; Maassen, B.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    This investigation was conducted to study whether warming up decreases myotonia (muscle stiffness) during speech production or causes adverse effects due to fatigue or exhaustion caused by intensive speech activity in patients with adult onset myotonic dystrophy. Thirty patients with adult onset myotonic dystrophy (MD) and ten healthy controls…

  12. Rasch Measurement in the Assessment of Growth Hormone Deficiency in Adult Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prieto, Luis; Roset, Montse; Badia, Xavier

    2001-01-01

    Tested the metric properties of a Spanish version of the Assessment of Growth Hormone Deficiency in Adults (AGHDA) questionnaire through Rasch analysis with a sample of 356 adult patients in Spain. Results suggest that the Spanish AGHDA could be a useful complement of the clinical evaluation of growth hormone deficiency patients at group and…

  13. Warming up Improves Speech Production in Patients with Adult Onset Myotonic Dystrophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Swart, B.J.M.; van Engelen, B.G.M.; Maassen, B.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    This investigation was conducted to study whether warming up decreases myotonia (muscle stiffness) during speech production or causes adverse effects due to fatigue or exhaustion caused by intensive speech activity in patients with adult onset myotonic dystrophy. Thirty patients with adult onset myotonic dystrophy (MD) and ten healthy controls…

  14. Hypothyroidism in patients with thalassemia syndromes.

    PubMed

    Magro, S; Puzzonia, P; Consarino, C; Galati, M C; Morgione, S; Porcelli, D; Grimaldi, S; Tancrè, D; Arcuri, V; De Santis, V

    1990-01-01

    Sixty transfusion-dependent thalassemic patients were studied by simultaneous measurement of circulating thyroid hormones, basal thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and TSH response to thyrotropin-releasing hormone with the aim of evaluating the frequency of hypothyroidism in such patients, and the relationship between hypothyroidism and compliance with treatment and iron overload. Thyroid failure was present in 31 of the 60 patients. A correlation was found between impairment of thyroid functions, duration of chronic hypoxia and the activities of various transaminases. The results of this study emphasize the importance of early evaluation of thyroid function in thalassemic patients and suggest that anemia and hypoxia may potentiate the toxicity of iron deposition in endocrine glands.

  15. Antibiotic prophylaxis against infective endocarditis in adult and child patients

    PubMed Central

    Al-Fouzan, Afnan F.; Al-Shinaiber, Rafif M.; Al-Baijan, Refal S.; Al-Balawi, Mohammed M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate dentists’ knowledge regarding the prevention of infective endocarditis in Saudi Arabia and their implementation of the 2007 American Heart Association guidelines. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, in March 2014, 801 dentists who practice in different regions of Saudi Arabia completed a questionnaire regarding the need for antibiotic prophylaxis for specific cardiac conditions and specific dental procedures, prophylaxis regimens in adults and children, and recommendations for patients on chronic antibiotics, and in dental emergencies. The data were analyzed using one-way analyses of variance (ANOVAs) and independent t-tests, and a p-value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The total knowledge level regarding antibiotic prophylaxis among all participants was 52.2%, with a significant difference between dentists who graduated before and after 2007. Comparing the level of knowledge among different dental specialists, surgeons and periodontists had the highest level of knowledge regarding the use of antibiotic prophylaxis. Amoxicillin was prescribed as the drug of choice by 63.9% of the participants. Conclusion: This study emphasized the need for continuous education and for formal inclusion of the guidelines in the students’ curriculum, as well as for strategic placement of the guidelines in locations throughout dental clinics. PMID:25935175

  16. Localized Tetanus in an Adult Patient: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Gulamhussein, Mohamed Amirali; Li, Yueyang; Guha, Abhijit

    2016-01-01

    Tetanus is a severe and potentially fatal infection caused by the bacterium Clostridium tetani. Of all the cases described in literature, generalized tetanus is by far the most common presentation, but it may also present as neonatal tetanus, cephalic tetanus, and localized tetanus, the latter two being much rarer. In this case report, we present the rare form of this disease, i.e., localized tetanus in an adult male with a history of minimal trauma as well as a late, unusual mode of presentation. A 35-year-old Caucasian male presented with an acutely painful, swollen right thumb associated with a small superficial collection on the dorsal aspect of the base of the thumb. A formal wound exploration and washout were carried out in theater, however, at the time of tourniquet inflation, the right hand went into a carpopedal spasm and remained in that position until an infusion of a muscle relaxant was given. The findings were consistent with a case of localized tetanus. The patient was treated with human immunoglobulin and tetanus toxoid and safely discharged home 48 h later without any complications. This case report emphasizes the importance of the recognition of a rare form of this fatal infectious disease, which may present with prodromal symptoms before the generalized form shows its clinical effects. Moreover, the astute clinician should be aware of the variable presentations of this infectious disease, with early identification greatly reducing the associated risks of morbidity and mortality.

  17. Localized Tetanus in an Adult Patient: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Gulamhussein, Mohamed Amirali; Li, Yueyang; Guha, Abhijit

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Tetanus is a severe and potentially fatal infection caused by the bacterium Clostridium tetani. Of all the cases described in literature, generalized tetanus is by far the most common presentation, but it may also present as neonatal tetanus, cephalic tetanus, and localized tetanus, the latter two being much rarer. In this case report, we present the rare form of this disease, i.e., localized tetanus in an adult male with a history of minimal trauma as well as a late, unusual mode of presentation. Case Report: A 35-year-old Caucasian male presented with an acutely painful, swollen right thumb associated with a small superficial collection on the dorsal aspect of the base of the thumb. A formal wound exploration and washout were carried out in theater, however, at the time of tourniquet inflation, the right hand went into a carpopedal spasm and remained in that position until an infusion of a muscle relaxant was given. The findings were consistent with a case of localized tetanus. The patient was treated with human immunoglobulin and tetanus toxoid and safely discharged home 48 h later without any complications. Conclusion: This case report emphasizes the importance of the recognition of a rare form of this fatal infectious disease, which may present with prodromal symptoms before the generalized form shows its clinical effects. Moreover, the astute clinician should be aware of the variable presentations of this infectious disease, with early identification greatly reducing the associated risks of morbidity and mortality. PMID:28164065

  18. Reliability of Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy in Pediatric Patients: Comparison of Complications With Those in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Erturhan, Sakip; Seckiner, Ilker; Baturu, Muharrem; Basmaci, Ismail; Erbagci, Ahmet

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To assess the reliability of percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) in pediatric patients by comparing complications between pediatric patients and adults by use of the modified Clavien grading system. Materials and Methods The data of 74 pediatric (0 to 16 years) and 535 adult (17 years and older) patients who underwent PNL owing to kidney stone disease between January 2005 and December 2011 were analyzed retrospectively. The complications in the pediatric and adult patients were classified in five grades according to the modified Clavien system. Results The most frequent cause of grade I complications was fever requiring antipyretics, which was seen in 4 pediatric patients (5.4%) and 30 adult patients (5.6%). Grade II complications (blood transfusions, <12 hours urinary leakage) were observed in 11 pediatric patients (14.8%) and 80 adult patients (14.9%). Grade III complications were also seen in 6 pediatric patients (8.1%) (grade IIIb; D-J catheter implantation under general anesthesia) and 78 adult patients (14.5%) (grade IIIa; D-J catheter implantation and angio-embolization under local anesthesia). There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups in terms of grade I, II, or III complications (p>0.05). Colonic injury occured in one patient (1.3%) in the pediatric group (grade IVa). In the adult group, one patient (0.2%) died as the result of myocardial infarction (grade V). Conclusions Thanks to technological developments and minimalization of the equipment used, when indicated, pediatric patients can be safely treated with PNL with low complication rates similar to those in adult patients. PMID:23789047

  19. Mental health care Monitor Older adults (MEMO): monitoring patient characteristics and outcome in Dutch mental health services for older adults.

    PubMed

    Veerbeek, Marjolein; Oude Voshaar, Richard; Depla, Marja; Pot, Anne Margriet

    2013-06-01

    Information on which older adults attend mental health care and whether they profit from the care they receive is important for policy-makers. To assess this information in daily practice, the "Mental health care Monitor Older adults" (MEMO) was developed in the Netherlands. The aim of this paper is to describe MEMO and the older adults who attend outpatient mental health care regarding their predisposing and enabling characteristics and need for care. In MEMO all patients referred to the division of old age psychiatry of the participating mental health care organisations are assessed at baseline and monitored at 4, 8 and 12-month follow-up. Primary outcomes are mental and social functioning, consumer satisfaction, and type of treatment provided (MEMO Basic). Over the years, MEMO Basic is repeated. In each cycle, additional information on specific patient groups is added (e.g. mood disorders). Data collection is supported by a web-based system for clinicians, including direct feedback to monitor patients throughout treatment. First results at baseline showed that the majority of patients that entered the division of old age psychiatry was female (69%), had low education (83%), lived alone (53%), was depressed (42%) and had a comorbid condition (82%). It seemed that older immigrants were not sufficiently reached. The current study is the first in the Netherlands to evaluate patient characteristics and outcome in mental health care provided for older adults in day-to-day practice. If MEMO works out successfully, the method should be extended to other target groups.

  20. The effectiveness of patient navigation programs for adult cancer patients undergoing treatment: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Tho, Poh Chi; Ang, Emily

    2016-02-01

    Advancements in technology and medical treatment have made cancer care treatment more complex. With the current trend of sub-specialization in health care, cancer patients commonly receive care from multiple specialists and have wider treatment options. In view of this, there is a need to coordinate care and integrate information to enhance care and quality of outcomes for patients. Since the successful implementation of programs for increasing the survival rate of breast cancer patients at Harlem Hospital Center, New York, USA, patient navigation programs have been widely introduced in healthcare settings. Some literature has identified nurses as a primary candidate in assuming the role of a navigator. However, there is a need to further explore the effectiveness of patient navigation programs for their effectiveness in improving quality of life, and patient satisfaction and outcomes during the commencement of cancer treatment. The objective of this review was to synthesize the best available evidence on the effectiveness of patient navigation programs in adult cancer patients undergoing treatments such as radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy. This review considered studies that included adults aged 18 years and over, diagnosed with any type of cancer and undergoing treatment in an acute care hospital setting, including inpatient and outpatient/ambulatory care.This review considered studies that evaluated nurse-led patient navigation programs versus no patient navigation program or non-structured care coordination.A patient navigation program includes patient education, psychosocial support, and care coordination.This review considered randomized controlled trials and quasi-experimental studies.The review focused on the effects of patient navigator program clinical/patient outcomes. The review included studies on patient wellbeing and clinical outcomes, but excluded studies that had examined the impact of these programs on efficiency-related outcomes, such as length

  1. Personality Traits and Common Psychiatric Conditions in Adult Patients with Acne Vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Çölgeçen, Emine

    2015-01-01

    Background We believe that instances of neuroticism and common psychiatric disorders are higher in adults with acne vulgaris than the normal population. Objective Instances of acne in adults have been increasing in frequency in recent years. The aim of this study was to investigate personality traits and common psychiatric conditions in patients with adult acne vulgaris. Methods Patients who visited the dermatology outpatient clinic at Bozok University Medical School with a complaint of acne and who volunteered for this study were included. The Symptom Checklist 90-Revised (SCL 90-R) Global Symptom Index (GSI), somatization, depression, and anxiety subscales and the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Revised Short Form (EPQ-RSF) were administered to 40 patients who fulfilled the inclusion criteria before treatment. The results were compared with those of a control group. Results Of the 40 patients included in this study, 34 were female and 6 were male. The GSI and the somatization, depression, and anxiety subscales of the SCL 90-R were evaluated. Patients with adult acne had statistically significant higher scores than the control group on all of these subscales. In addition, patients with adult acne had statistically significantly higher scores on the neuroticism subscale of the EPQ-RSF. Conclusion Our results show that common psychiatric conditions are frequent in adult patients with acne. More importantly, neurotic personality characteristics are observed more frequently in these patients. These findings suggest that acne in adults is a disorder that has both medical and psychosomatic characteristics and requires a multi-disciplinary approach. PMID:25673931

  2. Psychosocial Functioning of Adult Epileptic and MS Patients and Adult Normal Controls on the WPSI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Siang-Yang

    1986-01-01

    Psychosocial functioning of adult epileptic outpatients as assessed by the Washington Psychosocial Seizure Inventory (WPSI) was compared to that of adult multiple sclerosis (MS) outpatients and normal subjects. When only valid WPSI profiles were considered, the only significant finding was that the epilepsy group and the MS group had more…

  3. Asperger Syndrome: a frequent comorbidity in first diagnosed adult ADHD patients?

    PubMed

    Roy, Mandy; Ohlmeier, Martin D; Osterhagen, Lasse; Prox-Vagedes, Vanessa; Dillo, Wolfgang

    2013-06-01

    Because adult ADHD is often accompanied by psychiatric comorbidities, the diagnostic process should include a thorough investigation for comorbid disorders. Asperger-Syndrome is rarely reported in adult ADHD and commonly little attention is paid to this possible comorbidity. We investigated 53 adult ADHD-patients which visited our out patient clinic for first ADHD-diagnosis (17 females, 36 males; range of age: 18-56 years) for the frequency of a comorbid Asperger-Syndrome. Diagnosis of this autism-spectrum disorder was confirmed by applying the appropriate DSM-IV-criteria. Additionally we tested the power of the two screening-instruments "Autism-spectrum quotient" (AQ) and "Empathy quotient" (EQ) by Baron-Cohen for screening Asperger-Syndrome in adult ADHD. Eight ADHD-patients were diagnosed with a comorbid Asperger-Syndrome (15.1%). The difference in AQ- and EQ-scores between pure ADHD-patients and comorbid patients was analysed, showing significantly higher scores in AQ and significant lower scores in EQ in comorbid patients. Results show that the frequency of Asperger-Syndrome seems to be substantially increased in adult ADHD (versus the prevalence of 0.06% in the general population), indicating that investigators of adult ADHD should also be attentive to autism-spectrum disorders. Especially the AQ seems to be a potential screening instrument for Asperger-Syndrome in adult ADHD-patients.

  4. [The prevalence of Yersinia infection in adult patients with acute right lower quadrant pain].

    PubMed

    Jung, Jun Young; Park, Young Sook; Baek, Dae Hyun; Choi, Jeoung Ho; Jo, Yun Ju; Kim, Seong Hwan; Son, Byoung Kwan; Chae, Jeong Don; Kim, Dong Hee; Jung, Yoon Young

    2011-01-01

    Clinical manifestations of intestinal yersiniosis include enterocolitis, mesenteric adenitis, and terminal ileitis presenting with fever, right lower quadrant pain, and leukocytosis. According to a previous Korean study in 1997, Yersinia was revealed in two among 15 adult patients with mesenteric adenitis (13%). However, recent reports on the prevalence of Yersinia infection in adult patients are few. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of Yersinia infection in adult patients with acute right lower quadrant pain. Adult patients (>18 years) who visited Eulji medical center, due to acute right lower quadrant pain were enrolled prospectively from December 2007 to July 2009. Abdominal CT, stool culture, serologic test for Yersinia, and Widal test were performed. Among 115 patients, 5 patients were excluded due to positive Widal test or salmonella culture. In 110 patients, abdominal CT showed right colitis in 20 (18.2%), terminal ileitis in 16 (14.5%), mesenteric adenitis in 13 (11.8%), acute appendicitis in 10 (9.1%), acute diverticulitis in 7 (6.4%), non specific mucosal edema in 36 (32.7%) and no specific lesion in 8 (7.3%). Two (1.8%) of the 110 patients had antibodies to Yersinia. One patient showed acute enteritis and the other patient was diagnosed with acute appendicitis and underwent appendectomy. No Yersinia species were grown on stool or tissue culture. Nowadays, among adult Korean patients presenting with acute right lower quadrant pain, there have been few incidences of Yersinia infection.

  5. Occupational Outcome in Adult ADHD: Impact of Symptom Profile, Comorbid Psychiatric Problems, and Treatment--A Cross-Sectional Study of 414 Clinically Diagnosed Adult ADHD Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halmoy, Anne; Fasmer, Ole Bernt; Gillberg, Christopher; Haavik, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effects of symptom profile, comorbid psychiatric problems, and treatment on occupational outcome in adult ADHD patients. Method: Adult ADHD patients (N = 414) responded to questionnaires rating past and present symptoms of ADHD, comorbid conditions, treatment history, and work status. Results: Of the patients, 24%…

  6. Occupational Outcome in Adult ADHD: Impact of Symptom Profile, Comorbid Psychiatric Problems, and Treatment--A Cross-Sectional Study of 414 Clinically Diagnosed Adult ADHD Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halmoy, Anne; Fasmer, Ole Bernt; Gillberg, Christopher; Haavik, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effects of symptom profile, comorbid psychiatric problems, and treatment on occupational outcome in adult ADHD patients. Method: Adult ADHD patients (N = 414) responded to questionnaires rating past and present symptoms of ADHD, comorbid conditions, treatment history, and work status. Results: Of the patients, 24%…

  7. Pharmacological interventions for pruritus in adult palliative care patients.

    PubMed

    Siemens, Waldemar; Xander, Carola; Meerpohl, Joerg J; Buroh, Sabine; Antes, Gerd; Schwarzer, Guido; Becker, Gerhild

    2016-11-16

    This is an update of the original Cochrane review published in 2013 (Issue 6). Pruritus occurs in patients with disparate underlying diseases and is caused by different pathologic mechanisms. In palliative care patients, pruritus is not the most prevalent but is one of the most puzzling symptoms. It can cause considerable discomfort and affects patients' quality of life. To assess the effects of different pharmacological treatments for preventing or treating pruritus in adult palliative care patients. For this update, we searched CENTRAL (the Cochrane Library), and MEDLINE (OVID) up to 9 June 2016 and Embase (OVID) up to 7 June 2016. In addition, we searched trial registries and checked the reference lists of all relevant studies, key textbooks, reviews and websites, and we contacted investigators and specialists in pruritus and palliative care regarding unpublished data. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effects of different pharmacological treatments, compared with a placebo, no treatment, or an alternative treatment, for preventing or treating pruritus in palliative care patients. Two review authors independently assessed the identified titles and abstracts, performed data extraction and assessed the risk of bias and methodological quality. We summarised the results descriptively and quantitatively (meta-analyses) according to the different pharmacological interventions and the diseases associated with pruritus. We assessed the evidence using GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) and created 10 'Summary of findings' tables. In total, we included 50 studies and 1916 participants in the review. We added 10 studies with 627 participants for this update. Altogether, we included 39 different treatments for pruritus in four different patient groups.The overall risk of bias profile was heterogeneous and ranged from high to low risk. However, 48 studies (96%) had a high risk of bias due to low sample size

  8. Fast-track cardiac care for adult cardiac surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fang; Lee, Anna; Chee, Yee Eot

    2012-10-17

    Fast-track cardiac care is a complex intervention involving several components of care during cardiac anaesthesia and in the postoperative period, all with the ultimate aim of early extubation after surgery, to reduce the length of stay in the intensive care unit and in the hospital. Safe and effective fast-track cardiac care may reduce hospital costs. This is an update of a Cochrane review published in 2003. To update the evidence on the safety and effectiveness of fast-track cardiac care compared to conventional (not fast-track) care in adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2012, Issue 3), MEDLINE (January 1966 to April 2012), EMBASE (January 1980 to April 2012), CINAHL (January 1982 to April 2012), and ISI Web of Science (January 2003 to April 2012). We searched reference lists of articles and contacted experts in the field. All randomized controlled trials of adult cardiac surgical patients (coronary artery bypass grafts, aortic valve replacement, mitral valve replacement) that compared fast-track cardiac care and conventional (not fast-track) care groups were included. We focused on the following fast-track interventions that were designed for early extubation after surgery, administration of low-dose opioid based general anaesthesia during cardiac surgery and the use of a time-directed extubation protocol after surgery. The primary outcome was the risk of mortality. Secondary outcomes included postoperative complications, reintubation within 24 hours of surgery, time to extubation, length of stay in the intensive care unit and in the hospital, quality of life after surgery and hospital costs. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted the data. Study authors were contacted for additional information. We used a random-effects model and reported relative risk (RR), mean difference (MD) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Twenty-five trials involving 4118

  9. Aortic valve prosthesis-patient mismatch and exercise capacity in adult patients with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    van Slooten, Ymkje J; van Melle, Joost P; Freling, Hendrik G; Bouma, Berto J; van Dijk, Arie Pj; Jongbloed, Monique Rm; Post, Martijn C; Sieswerda, Gertjan T; Huis In 't Veld, Anna; Ebels, Tjark; Voors, Adriaan A; Pieper, Petronella G

    2016-01-01

    To report the prevalence of aortic valve prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) in an adult population with congenital heart disease (CHD) and its impact on exercise capacity. Adults with congenital heart disease (ACHD) with a history of aortic valve replacement may outgrow their prosthesis later in life. However, the prevalence and clinical consequences of aortic PPM in ACHD are presently unknown. From the national Dutch Congenital Corvitia (CONCOR) registry, we identified 207 ACHD with an aortic valve prosthesis for this cross-sectional cohort study. Severe PPM was defined as an indexed effective orifice area ≤0.65 cm2/m2 and moderate PPM as an indexed orifice area ≤0.85 cm2/m2 measured using echocardiography. Exercise capacity was reported as percentage of predicted exercise capacity (PPEC). Of the 207 patients, 68% was male, 71% had a mechanical prosthesis and mean age at inclusion was 43.9 years ±11.4. The prevalence of PPM was 42%, comprising 23% severe PPM and 19% moderate PPM. Prevalence of PPM was higher in patients with mechanical prostheses (p<0.001). PPM was associated with poorer exercise capacity (mean PPEC 84% vs. 92%; p=0.048, mean difference =-8.3%, p=0.047). Mean follow-up was 2.6±1.1 years during which New York Heart Association (NYHA) class remained stable in most patients. PPM showed no significant effect on death or hospitalisation during follow-up (p=0.218). In this study we report a high prevalence (42%) of PPM in ACHD with an aortic valve prosthesis and an independent association of PPM with diminished exercise capacity. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  10. Reduced Capacity in a Dichotic Memory Test for Adult Patients with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dige, Niels; Maahr, Eija; Backenroth-Ohsako, Gunnel

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate whether a dichotic memory test would reveal deficits in short-term working-memory recall and long-term memory recall in a group of adult patients with ADHD. Methods: A dichotic memory test with ipsilateral backward speech distraction in an adult ADHD group (n = 69) and a control group (n = 66) is used to compare performance…

  11. Fast-track cardiac care for adult cardiac surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Wong, Wai-Tat; Lai, Veronica Kw; Chee, Yee Eot; Lee, Anna

    2016-09-12

    Fast-track cardiac care is a complex intervention involving several components of care during cardiac anaesthesia and in the postoperative period, with the ultimate aim of early extubation after surgery, to reduce length of stay in the intensive care unit and in the hospital. Safe and effective fast-track cardiac care may reduce hospital costs. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2003, updated in 2012 and updated now in 2016. To determine the safety and effectiveness of fast-track cardiac care compared with conventional (not fast-track) care in adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Fast-track cardiac care intervention includes administration of low-dose opioid-based general anaesthesia or use of a time-directed extubation protocol, or both. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2015, Issue 5), MEDLINE (January 2012 to May 2015), Embase (January 2012 to May 2015), the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL; January 2012 to May 2015) and the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Web of Science (January 2012 to May 2015), along with reference lists of articles, to identify additional trials. We applied no language restrictions. We included all randomized controlled trials of adult cardiac surgical patients (coronary artery bypass grafts, aortic valve replacement, mitral valve replacement) that compared fast-track cardiac care and conventional (not fast-track) care groups. We focused on the following fast-track interventions, which were designed for early extubation after surgery: administration of low-dose opioid-based general anaesthesia during cardiac surgery and use of a time-directed extubation protocol after surgery. The primary outcome was risk of mortality. Secondary outcomes included postoperative complications, reintubation within 24 hours of surgery, time to extubation, length of stay in the intensive care unit and in the hospital, quality of life after surgery and

  12. Symptoms and socio-economic impact of ependymoma on adult patients: results of the Adult Ependymoma Outcomes Project 2.

    PubMed

    Walbert, Tobias; Mendoza, Tito R; Vera-Bolaños, Elizabeth; Acquaye, Alvina; Gilbert, Mark R; Armstrong, Terri S

    2015-01-01

    Ependymoma is a rare central nervous system tumor of adults. Reports of patient symptoms, interference patterns and costs encountered by patients and families are limited. Adult ependymoma patients completed the online Ependymoma Outcomes Questionnaire II. The survey assesses disease and functional status as well as socio-economic factors. Descriptive statistics were used to report disease characteristics as well as economic and social impact. Independent samples t test was used to test if differences exist between high- and low-income groups in terms of symptom severity. Correlations were calculated between symptoms and cost estimates. 86 international patients participated (male = 50 %). The economic analysis focused on 78 respondents from the US. 48 % were employed and 55 % earned ≥$60,000. Tumors were located in the brain (44 %), spine (44 %) or both (12 %). Spine patients compared to brain patients reported significantly worse pain (4.4 versus 2.2, p < .003), numbness (5.3 versus 2.2, p < .001), fatigue (5.1 versus 3.6, p < .03), changes in bowel patterns (3.8 versus 1.4, p < .003) and weakness (4.2 versus 2.1, p < .006). Brain patients compared with spine patients had increased lack of appetite (.4 versus 2, p < .014). Patients with lower income (≤$59,999) had more problems concentrating (p < .024) and worse cognitive module severity scores (p < .024). Estimated average monthly out-of-pocket spending was $168 for medical co-pays and $59 for prescription medication. Patients with ependymoma are highly affected by their symptoms. Spinal patients report higher severity of symptoms. Patients in the lower income group report significantly higher severity of cognitive symptoms independent of disease site.

  13. Fractures in pituitary adenoma patients from the Dutch National Registry of Growth Hormone Treatment in Adults.

    PubMed

    van Varsseveld, N C; van Bunderen, C C; Franken, A A M; Koppeschaar, H P F; van der Lely, A J; Drent, M L

    2016-08-01

    The effects of growth hormone (GH) replacement therapy on fracture risk in adult GH deficient (GHD) patients with different etiologies of pituitary GHD are not well known, due to limited data. The aim of this study was to investigate characteristics and fracture occurrence at start of (baseline) and during long-term GH replacement therapy in GHD adults previously treated for Cushing's disease (CD) or acromegaly, compared to patients with previous nonfunctioning pituitary adenoma (NFPA). From the Dutch National Registry of Growth Hormone Treatment in Adults, a nationwide surveillance study in severe GHD adults, all patients using ≥30 days of GH replacement therapy with previous NFPA (n = 783), CD (n = 180) and acromegaly (n = 65) were selected. Patient characteristics, fractures and potential influencing factors were investigated. At baseline, patients with previous CD were younger, more often female and had more often a history of osteopenia or osteoporosis, whereas patients with previous acromegaly had more often received cranial radiotherapy and a longer duration between treatment of their pituitary tumor and start of adult GH replacement therapy. During follow-up, a fracture occurred in 3.8 % (n = 39) of all patients. Compared to patients with previous NFPA, only patients with previous acromegaly had an increased fracture risk after 6 years of GH replacement therapy. During GH replacement therapy, an increased fracture risk was observed in severe GHD adult patients previously treated for acromegaly, but not in those previously treated for CD, compared to severe GHD adult patients using GH replacement therapy because of previous NFPA. Further studies are needed to confirm these findings and to elucidate potential underlying mechanisms.

  14. Surgical and prosthetic rehabilitation of edentulous adult cleft palate patients by dental implants.

    PubMed

    Güven, Orhan; Gürbüz, Ayhan; Baltali, Evre; Yilmaz, Burak; Hatipoğlu, Murat

    2010-09-01

    Adult patients who did not receive proper treatment for cleft palate are challenging for clinicians in terms of prosthetic rehabilitation. Moreover, during the late stages of adulthood when patients become edentulous, prosthetic reconstruction becomes even more challenging. This clinical report describes the prosthetic rehabilitation of 2 edentulous geriatric patients with unrepaired cleft palate by placement of dental implants after closure of the oronasal communications.

  15. Laparoscopic excision of the choledochal cyst in adult patients: An experience.

    PubMed

    Nag, Hirdaya Hulas; Sisodia, Kshitij; Sheetal, Pushap; Govind, Hari; Chandra, Som

    2017-01-01

    Laparoscopic choledochal cyst excision (LCCE) in adult patients is not common. The aim is to report our experience of LCCE in adult patients. This study includes a retrospective review of twenty adult patients (age >18 years) with choledochal cyst (CC) who underwent LCCE by a single surgical team from February 2011 to April 2016. The mean age was 45.5 years. Nineteen (95%) patients had Type-I CC, and one patient (5%) had Type-IV CC (Todani's classification). Fifteen patients (75%) presented with pain in the abdomen, and five patients (25%) presented with jaundice and/or cholangitis. LCCE was successful in 16 (80%) patients, whereas four patients (20%) required conversion to open method. The reason for conversion was technical difficulty due to the initial learning curve, adhesion and inflammation. The mean blood loss, operation time and post-operative stay were 117.5 ml, 299.5 min and 8.15 days, respectively. Bilioenteric anastomosis leak and formation of pseudoaneurysm occurred in one patient (5%); this patient later died due to uncontrolled intra-abdominal haemorrhage. There were no remote complications during a mean follow-up of 17.2 months. LCCE in adult patients is safe and feasible, but bilioenteric anastomosis leak may have fatal consequences.

  16. Joint effusions and purpura in multiply-transfused adult beta-thalassemia- clinical pointers to diagnosis of scurvy.

    PubMed

    Prakash, A; Pandey, A K

    2013-01-01

    Periodic transfusions and effective chelation have ensured that thalassemics survive in to adulthood but their life is punctuated by peculiar problems in adulthood. Three cases of scurvy are being reported presenting uniquely as purpura, right hip joint effusion and right knee joint effusion with haemorrhage in prepatellar and retropatellar bursae, respectively over an 18 month period (2009-2010). The first two cases did give a history of gum bleed. None had any coagulation disturbance or transfusion-transmitted infections or connective tissue disorder. All the three cases responded dramatically to vitamin C supplementation. It is imperative to keep in mind that recurrent blood transfusions are associated with a state of subclinical vitamin C deficiency and overt scurvy may manifest as cumulative number of transfusions increase, as in adult thalassemics.

  17. Variation in insurance status by patient demographics and tumor site among nonelderly adult patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Grant, Stephen R; Walker, Gary V; Guadagnolo, B Ashleigh; Koshy, Matthew; Allen, Pamela K; Mahmood, Usama

    2015-06-15

    In the United States, an estimated 48 million individuals live without health insurance. The purpose of the current study was to explore the Variation in insurance status by patient demographics and tumor site among nonelderly adult patients with cancer. A total of 688,794 patients aged 18 to 64 years who were diagnosed with one of the top 25 incident cancers (representing 95% of all cancer diagnoses) between 2007 and 2010 in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database were analyzed. Patient characteristics included age, race, sex, marital status, and rural or urban residence. County-level demographics included percent poverty level. Insurance status was defined as having non-Medicaid insurance, Medicaid coverage, or no insurance. On multivariate logistic regression analyses, younger age, male sex, nonwhite race, being unmarried, residence in counties with higher levels of poverty, and rural residence were associated with being uninsured versus having non-Medicaid insurance (all P <.001). The highest rates of non-Medicaid insurance were noted among patients with prostate cancer (92.3%), melanoma of the skin (92.5%), and thyroid cancer (89.5%), whereas the lowest rates of non-Medicaid insurance were observed among patients with cervical cancer (64.2%), liver cancer (67.9%), and stomach cancer (70.9%) (P <.001). Among uninsured individuals, the most prevalent cancers were lung cancer (14.9%), colorectal cancer (12.1%), and breast cancer (10.2%) (P <.001). Lung cancer caused the majority of cancer mortality in all insurance groups. Rates of insurance coverage vary greatly by demographics and by cancer type. The expansion of health insurance coverage would be expected to disproportionally benefit certain demographic populations and cancer types. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  18. Optimizing Management of Patients with Adult T Cell Leukemia-Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Yared, Jean A.; Kimball, Amy S.

    2015-01-01

    Adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma is a rare disease with a high mortality rate, and is challenging for the clinician. Early allogeneic stem cell transplant can confer durable remission. As novel therapeutic agents become available to treat T cell malignancies, it is increasingly important that medical oncologists, hematologists, and hematopathologists recognize and accurately diagnose adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma. There is no uniform standard of treatment of adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma, and clinical trials remain critical to improving outcomes. Here we present one management approach based on the recent advances in treatment for adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma patients. PMID:26610571

  19. Optimizing Management of Patients with Adult T Cell Leukemia-Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Yared, Jean A; Kimball, Amy S

    2015-11-25

    Adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma is a rare disease with a high mortality rate, and is challenging for the clinician. Early allogeneic stem cell transplant can confer durable remission. As novel therapeutic agents become available to treat T cell malignancies, it is increasingly important that medical oncologists, hematologists, and hematopathologists recognize and accurately diagnose adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma. There is no uniform standard of treatment of adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma, and clinical trials remain critical to improving outcomes. Here we present one management approach based on the recent advances in treatment for adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma patients.

  20. Comparative characteristics of primary hyperparathyroidism in pediatric and young adult patients.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Kristina J; McCoy, Kelly L; Witchel, Selma F; Stang, Michael T; Carty, Sally E; Yip, Linwah

    2016-10-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism is rare in pediatric patients. Our study aim was to compare primary hyperparathyroidism in pediatric (<19 years) and young adult (19-29 years) patients. A prospectively collected database from a single, high-volume institution was queried for all patients age <30 years who had initial parathyroidectomy for primary hyperparathyroidism yielding 126/4,546 (2.7%) primary hyperparathyroidism patients representing 39 pediatric and 87 young adult patients. Presenting symptoms, operative data, and postoperative course were compared for patients age 0-19 years and 20-29 years. Sporadic primary hyperparathyroidism was present in 81.7% and occurred less often in pediatric patients than young adult patients (74.4% vs 86.2%, P = .12). Among patients with hereditary primary hyperparathyroidism, multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 was the most common type. Multiglandular disease was common in both pediatric (30.7%) and young adult (21.8%) patients. Following parathyroidectomy, 3 (2.3%) patients had permanent hypoparathyroidism and none had permanent recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis. Biochemical cure at 6 months was equally likely in pediatric and young adult patients (97.1% vs 93.6%, P = .44) with comparable follow-up (78.4 months vs 69.1 months, P = .66) and rates of recurrent disease (5.9% vs 10.3%, P = .46). Recurrence was due to multiple endocrine neoplasia 1-related primary hyperparathyroidism in all cases. Although primary hyperparathyroidism is sporadic in most patients <19 years, they are more likely to have multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1-associated primary hyperparathyroidism (23%). Parathyroidectomy for primary hyperparathyroidism can be performed safely in pediatric patients with a high rate of cure. Follow-up for patients with hereditary disease is necessary. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Focal Epileptogenic Lesions in Adult Patients with Epilepsy and Generalized Epileptiform Discharges

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong Wook; Lee, Seo-Young; Lee, Sang Kun

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose There are reports of successful resective epilepsy surgery for pediatric patients with epilepsy and generalized epileptiform discharges when they had focal epileptogenic lesions identified by MRI. However, there is limited information regarding adult patients with epilepsy who have both generalized epileptiform discharges and focal epileptogenic lesions. Methods To investigate the incidence and characteristics of adult patients who have both generalized epileptiform discharges and potentially epileptogenic lesions, we retrospectively analyzed data of clinical features and results of EEG and MRI of all patients with adult-onset epilepsy in a tertiary referral hospital. Results While 1315 patients were classified as having partial seizures, 207 patients were classified as having generalized seizures. Five of 207 patients (2.4%) with generalized seizures had potentially epileptogenic lesions. All the epileptogenic lesions were congenital or acquired during early life, such as focal cortical dysplasia, dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumor, and cerebromalacic change because of perinatal injury. Conclusions The presence of epileptogenic lesions in adult patients with generalized epileptiform discharges may be an incidental finding, but it has been suggested that some adult-onset epilepsy with generalized epileptiform discharges may actually have focal onset, which may have significant clinical implications for the choice of appropriate treatment. PMID:28101478

  2. Adult Day Care for Alzheimer's Patients and Their Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sands, Dan; Suzuki, Thelma

    1983-01-01

    Harbor Area Adult Day Care Center has operated for two years with a primary purpose of providing respite care to families caring for a relative with Alzheimer's disease or related disorders. The rationale, history, program, staffing, funding, and experience for the first two years of the project are provided. (Author/RC)

  3. Influence of Marital Status on the Quality of Life of Chinese Adult Patients with Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fu-Li; Gu, Xiang-Min; Hao, Bao-Yun; Wang, Shan; Chen, Ze-Jie; Ding, Cheng-Yun

    2017-01-01

    Background: Epilepsy is a chronic disorder characterized by recurrent seizures and has significant psychological and social consequence for everyday living. Epilepsy affects various aspects of ones’ social life. The present study aimed to investigate the influence of marital status on the quality of life of adult Chinese patients with epilepsy. Methods: This study surveyed 805 Chinese adults who have been clinically diagnosed with epilepsy for longer than 1 year in 11 hospitals in Beijing. In this survey, 532 (66.1%) participants were married. All of them completed the case report form with enquiries on demographic data, social factors, and illness. The marriage status of adult epileptic quality of life was the dependent variable, and demographic data and clinical data were independent variables, analyzed through the multiple linear regression analysis methods. The patients’ quality of life was assessed using the Quality of Life in patients with Epilepsy-31 items (QOLIE-31) questionnaire, the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 items (PHQ-9), and the Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 items (GAD-7). Results: The PHQ-9 and GAD-7 scores in the unmarried group (PHQ-9 = 6.0 and GAD-7 = 5.0) were significantly higher than that of the married group (PHQ-9 = 4.0 and GAD-7 =3.0). The scores of married adult patients with epilepsy on QOLIE (61.8 ± 15.3) and social function (70.9 ± 22.7) were higher than the scores of the unmarried patients aged between 20 and 44 years. The scores of married adult epileptics on the QOLIE (58.4 ± 14.6) and the energy/fatigue (62.1 ± 20.4) were higher than the scores of the unmarried patients (QOLIE = 58.4 ± 14.6 and the energy/fatigue = 62.1 ± 20.4) aged between 45 and 59 years. For the adult epilepsy patients, depression, anxiety, seizures within the last year, disease course, medical expense category, and marriage* age are negatively correlated with the quality of life. Occupation, educational level, and average monthly income are closely

  4. Eating disorders and eating pathology in young adult and adult patients with ESSENCE.

    PubMed

    Karjalainen, Louise; Gillberg, Christopher; Råstam, Maria; Wentz, Elisabet

    2016-04-01

    Little is known about the prevalence and incidence of traditional eating disorders (EDs, e.g., anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder (BED)) in individuals with childhood onset neuropsychiatric disorders, including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The aim of the present study was to examine the prevalence of EDs and eating pathology in young adults and adults with ADHD and/or ASD, and to investigate the relationship between EDs and associated symptoms, on the one hand, and other psychiatric disorders, intelligence, and BMI, on the other hand, in this population. In an outpatient setting, 228 consecutively referred adults were neuropsychiatrically evaluated and assessed with regard to intelligence (WAIS-III), psychiatric comorbidities (SCID-I), personality disorders (SCID-II), eating disorders (SCID-I) and eating pathology (Eating Attitudes Test (EAT)). For the entire sample, a total of 18 individuals (7.9%) had a current or previous eating disorder, with AN and BED being the most frequent. The male:female ratio was 1:2.5. According to EAT, 10.1% of the individuals scored within the range of severely disturbed eating behavior, and 13% moderately disturbed eating behavior. Individuals with ADHD more often affirmed eating pathology such as focusing on thoughts of calories and body dissatisfaction compared to individuals with ASD. Eating disorder symptomatology seems to be overrepresented in adults with neuropsychiatric disorders compared with the general population. The gender ratio for EDs in adults with neuropsychiatric disorders is not nearly as skewed as in the general population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Aerobic physical exercise for adult patients with haematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Bergenthal, Nils; Will, Andrea; Streckmann, Fiona; Wolkewitz, Klaus-Dieter; Monsef, Ina; Engert, Andreas; Elter, Thomas; Skoetz, Nicole

    2014-11-11

    Although people with haematological malignancies have to endure long phases of therapy and immobility which is known to diminish their physical performance level, the advice to rest and avoid intensive exercises is still common practice. This recommendation is partly due to the severe anaemia and thrombocytopenia from which many patients suffer. The inability to perform activities of daily living restricts them, diminishes their quality of life and can influence medical therapy. To evaluate the efficacy, safety and feasibility of aerobic physical exercise for adults suffering from haematological malignancies. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, 2014, Issue 1) and MEDLINE (1950 to January 2014) as well as conference proceedings for randomised controlled trials (RCTs). We included RCTs comparing an aerobic physical exercise intervention, intending to improve the oxygen system, in addition to standard care with standard care only for adults suffering from haematological malignancies. We also included studies that evaluated aerobic exercise in addition to strength training. We excluded studies that investigated the effect of training programmes that were composed of yoga, tai chi chuan, qigong or similar types of exercise. We also excluded studies exploring the influence of strength training without additive aerobic exercise. Additionally, we excluded studies assessing outcomes without any clinical impact. Two review authors independently screened search results, extracted data and assessed the quality of trials. We used risk ratios (RRs) for adverse events and 100-day survival, standardised mean differences for quality of life (QoL), fatigue, and physical performance, and mean differences for anthropometric measurements. Our search strategies identified 1518 potentially relevant references. Of these, we included nine RCTs involving 818 participants. The potential risk of bias in these trials is unclear, due

  6. Patient-centred audiological rehabilitation: perspectives of older adults who own hearing aids.

    PubMed

    Grenness, Caitlin; Hickson, Louise; Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane; Davidson, Bronwyn

    2014-02-01

    Patient-centred care is a term frequently associated with quality health care. Despite extensive literature from a range of health-care professions that provide description and measurement of patient-centred care, a definition of patient-centredness in audiological rehabilitation is lacking. The current study aimed to define patient-centred care specific to audiological rehabilitation from the perspective of older adults who have owned hearing aids for at least one year. Research interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of older adults concerning their perceptions of patient-centredness in audiological rehabilitation, and qualitative content analysis was undertaken. The participant sample included ten adults over the age of 60 years who had owned hearing aids for at least one year. Data analysis revealed three dimensions to patient-centred audiological rehabilitation: the therapeutic relationship, the players (audiologist and patient), and clinical processes. Individualised care was seen as an overarching theme linking each of these dimensions. This study reported two models: the first model describes what older adults with hearing aids believe constitutes patient-centred audiological rehabilitation. The second provides a guide to operationalised patient-centred care. Further research is required to address questions pertaining to the presence, nature, and impact of patient-centred audiological rehabilitation.

  7. Transcranial color Doppler in stroke-free adult patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Graziadei, G; Casoni, F M; Annoni, F; Cortinovis, I; Ridolfi, P; Gandolfi, I; Marcon, A; Di Pierro, E; Cappellini, M D

    2017-09-01

    The threshold velocity ≥200 cm/s at transcranial Doppler (TCD) evaluation is a useful cut-off for preventing the stroke (STOP trial) in pediatric patients with sickle cell disease (SCD), term including different types of sickle genotypes. Scanty data are available for adult SCD patients. We compared intracranial blood flow velocities between adult SCD patients and controls using transcranial color Doppler (TCCD), measuring the peak of systolic velocity (PSV) with the insonation angle correction and the pulsatility index (PI), an indicator of endothelial elasticity. Fifty-three adult SCD patients (aged >18 years) were enrolled (15 sickle cell anemia, 26 sickle cell thalassemia, and 12 HbS/HbC). None of the patients presented neurological signs. PSVs in middle cerebral artery (MCA) were higher in SCD patients than in controls (p = 0.001). In sickle cell anemia patients, PSVs were higher when compared to HbS/βThal (p < 0.0060) and HbS/HbC patients (p < 0.0139). PI was within the lower range of normality in SCD patients compared to controls. Moreover, MCA-PSV was higher with lower Hb levels and higher HbS%; PI did not change with variation of Hb levels and HbS%.PSV and PI in SCD adult patients could be a relevant index to indicate the abnormal cerebral blood flow and to detect the sickle endothelial damage, in order to prevent cerebrovascular accidents.

  8. Low Literacy Levels in Adults: Implications for Patient Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Evelyn

    1999-01-01

    Health-education materials often require reading levels higher than that of many patients. Nurses need awareness of the prevalence of low literacy and the ability to assess reading levels so they can develop appropriate patient-education materials. (SK)

  9. Rules for improving pharmacotherapy in older adult patients: part 1 (rules 1-5).

    PubMed

    Wooten, James M

    2015-02-01

    The population of older adult patients in the United States is growing each year. Appropriate pharmacotherapy has allowed many older patients to live longer and maintain healthy lives. Unfortunately, the inappropriate utilization of medications can be harmful to older adult patients. Inappropriate pharmacotherapy may lead to overusing medications and polypharmacy. Polypharmacy can contribute to a higher incidence of adverse effects, increase the risk of dangerous drug interactions, cause noncompliance with appropriate medication use, and significantly increase the cost of health care. The polypharmacy issue with geriatric patients has been described as an epidemic and this issue must be addressed. This review provides objective rules that may help prevent polypharmacy. Consideration of these rules when prescribing, dispensing, and caring for older adult patients will improve the overall pharmacotherapy regimens instituted by healthcare providers.

  10. Rules for improving pharmacotherapy in older adult patients: part 2 (rules 6-10).

    PubMed

    Wooten, James M

    2015-03-01

    The population of older adult patients in the United States is growing each year. Appropriate pharmacotherapy has allowed many older patients to live longer and maintain healthy lives. Unfortunately, the inappropriate utilization of medications can be harmful to older adult patients. Inappropriate pharmacotherapy may lead to overusing medications and polypharmacy. Polypharmacy can contribute to a higher incidence of adverse effects, increase the risk of dangerous drug interactions, cause noncompliance with appropriate medication use, and significantly increase the cost of health care. The polypharmacy issue with geriatric patients has been described as an epidemic and this issue must be addressed. This review provides objective rules that may help prevent polypharmacy. Consideration of these rules when prescribing, dispensing, and caring for older adult patients will improve the overall pharmacotherapy regimens instituted by healthcare providers.

  11. Prothrombotic genetic risk factors in stroke: a possible different role in pediatric and adult patients.

    PubMed

    Djordjevic, Valentina; Stankovic, Marija; Brankovic-Sreckovic, Vesna; Rakicevic, Ljiljana; Damnjanovic, Tatjana; Antonijevic, Nebojsa; Radojkovic, Dragica

    2012-11-01

    The role of thrombophilia in the pathogenesis of stroke is still controversial, especially in the pediatric stroke. In order to examine the role of common thrombophilic mutations in children and adults with stroke, a case-control study was carried out in a group of 80 children and 73 younger adult patients. The control groups encompassed 100 healthy children and 120 healthy blood donors. Our results showed no significant differences in the frequency of factor V (FV) Leiden, FII G20210A, and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T variants between patient groups and corresponding controls. According to our results, carriers of 677CT genotype have 3.62 higher risks to develop stroke in children than in adults (P < .001). The obtained data indicate that heterozygosity for MTHFR C677T variant represents a possible important risk factor for pediatric stroke and suggest a different role of this gene variant in etiology of stroke in pediatric and adult patients.

  12. Efficacy of mizoribine and prednisolone combination therapy in adult patients with IgA vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Mima, Akira

    2017-03-02

    Immunoglobulin (Ig)A vasculitis (IgAV), formerly known as Henoch-Schönlein purpura, is one of the most common vasculitis caused by an IgA-mediated immune complex. It occurs most frequently in childhood and less commonly in adulthood. As for the treatment of IgAV in adults, there are few studies dealing with the administration and efficacy of intravenous pulse steroid therapy or combination therapy using prednisolone (PSL) and immunosuppressive drugs. Mizoribine (MZB) is a newly developed immunosuppressive drug with few adverse effects; however, there are currently few studies using MZB in adult patients with IgAV. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of MZB combined with a course of PSL in adult patients with IgAV. Five patients with adult onset IgAV were enrolled in the study. All patients received oral PSL (initial dose 30-50 mg/day), and MZB was administered orally at a single morning dose of 150 mg. We investigated the clinical manifestations and prognosis of these patients receiving the combination therapy of MZB and PSL retrospectively. All patients showed complete or partial remission of proteinuria and microscopic hematuria with the combination therapy of MZB and PSL. Furthermore, no significant adverse effects were observed. Although this study had an uncontrolled small group, our results indicate that the combination of MZB with PSL could be a possible new treatment for adult patients with IgAV.

  13. Advances in the management of acute myeloid leukemia in older adult patients.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Barbara B

    2010-05-01

    To update oncology nurses on new developments in the care of older adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Clinical trial data, published guidelines, review articles, and conference proceedings. Therapies for older adult patients with AML include cytarabine-based intensive-induction chemotherapy, investigational therapy, and supportive care. Nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation may provide the best opportunity for cure following remission if a human leukocyte antigen-matched hematopoietic stem cell donor is available. Careful assessment of patient- and disease-related factors is critical in determining the appropriate treatment modality for individuals. Assessment tools and algorithms may identify patients likely to be intolerant of intensive therapies. Supportive care may improve treatment tolerance and quality of life. Survival outcomes have not improved significantly for older adult patients with AML. Novel therapies, coupled with better understanding of prognostic factors, may allow more highly individualized care. Performance status or comorbidity score may provide insights regarding outcome, particularly when combined with age, cytogenetic risk, or molecular markers. Efforts to improve transplantation safety may increase use in the older adult patient population. Nurses provide disease and treatment information, manage adverse effects, and offer emotional support. Knowledge of the key management issues for older adult patients with AML is critical in fulfilling this role.

  14. Metabolic Characteristics and Risks Associated with Stone Recurrence in Korean Young Adult Stone Patients.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ho Won; Seo, Sung Pil; Kim, Won Tae; Kim, Yong-June; Yun, Seok-Joong; Kim, Wun-Jae; Lee, Sang-Cheol

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the metabolic characteristics and risks of stone recurrence in young adult stone patients in Korea. The medical records of 1532 patients presenting with renal or ureteric stones at our stone clinic between 1994 and 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were grouped according to age (young adult, 18-29 years; intermediate onset, 30-59 years; old age, ≥60 years) at first presentation, and measurements of clinicometabolic characteristics and risks of stone recurrence were compared. Overall, excretion of urinary stone-forming substances was highest in the intermediate onset group, followed by the young adult and old age groups. Importantly, excretion of urinary citrate was lowest in the young adult group. Kaplan-Meier analyses identified a significant difference between the three age groups in terms of stone recurrence (log rank test, p < 0.001). Multivariate Cox regression analyses revealed that age at first stone presentation was an independent risk factor for stone recurrence. Urinary citrate excretion was an independent risk factor for stone recurrence in young adult stone patients. Younger age (18-29 years) at first stone presentation was a significant risk factor for stone recurrence, and urinary citrate excretion was an independent risk factor affecting recurrence in this group. Metabolic evaluation and potassium citrate therapy should be considered for young adult stone patients to prevent recurrence.

  15. Adult Comorbidity Evaluation 27 score as a predictor of survival in endometrial cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Binder, Pratibha S; Peipert, Jeffrey F; Kallogjeri, D; Brooks, Rebecca A; Massad, L Stewart; Mutch, David G; Powell, Matthew A; Thaker, Premal H; McCourt, Carolyn K

    2016-12-01

    The incidence of endometrial cancer increases with age and is associated with medical comorbidities such as obesity and diabetes. Although a few cohort studies of <500 patients showed an association between comorbidity and survival in patients with endometrial cancer, the degree of association must be better described. The Adult Comorbidity Evaluation 27 is a validated comorbidity instrument that provides a score of 0-3 based on the number of and severity of medical comorbidities. This study was performed to explore the association between medical comorbidities and survival of patients with endometrial cancer. Patients who were diagnosed with endometrial cancer from 2000-2012 were identified from the prospectively maintained Siteman Cancer Center tumor registry. Patients who underwent primary surgical treatment for endometrioid, serous, and clear cell endometrial carcinoma were included. Patients who primarily were treated with radiation, chemotherapy, or hormone therapy were excluded. Patients with uterine sarcomas or neuroendocrine tumors were excluded. Patients with missing Adult Comorbidity Evaluation 27 scores were also excluded from analysis. Information that included patient demographics, Adult Comorbidity Evaluation 27 score, tumor characteristics, adjuvant treatment, and survival data were extracted from the database. The association of Adult Comorbidity Evaluation 27 and overall and recurrence-free survival was explored in a multivariable Cox regression analysis after being controlled for variables that have been found to be associated significantly with survival in univariable analysis. A total of 2073 patients with a median age of 61 years (range, 20-94 years) at diagnosis were identified. The Adult Comorbidity Evaluation 27 score was 0, 1, 2, and 3 in 22%, 38%, 28%, and 12% of patients, respectively. Stage distribution was I (73%), II (5%), III (15%), and IV (7%), and grade distribution was 1 (52%), 2 (23%), and 3 (25%). Most patients had endometrioid

  16. Functional outcome in adult patients following Bernese periacetabular osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Badra, Mohammad I; Anand, Ashish; Straight, Joseph J; Sala, Debra A; Ruchelsman, David E; Feldman, David S

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated functional outcome following Bernese periacetabular osteotomy. In 24 patients with mean follow-up of 3.5 years, mean dysfunction score was 15.23 on the Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment. Eighteen patients (75%) scored = or <20, indicating a high functional level. Irrespective of preoperative Shenton line continuity, most patients demonstrated a high functional level. However, a trend toward a poorer outcome was observed in patients with preoperative noncongruent joints and Tonnis osteoarthritis grade 3. These results suggest patients with less than optimal presentation may still benefit from this surgery, delaying or eliminating the need for total hip arthroplasty.

  17. [Adults tired of vaccines. Ask your patients about vaccine protection!].

    PubMed

    Jilg, W

    2001-11-15

    In general, vaccinations can be divided into standard and indication-related vaccinations. The former, which are mandatory for adults too, include tetanus and diphtheria, and those against influenza and pneumococci in people older than 60. The term indication vaccinations is used to describe those that are recommended in certain situations, for example, in the presence of a particular occupational risk, in certain underlying diseases, or particular situations, e.g. women of childbearing age, people living in regions endemic for meningoencephalitis, and drug addicts. Since the vaccination rate in the case of adults leaves much to be desired, all physicians should be required to ensure that "gaps" are closed and immunization protection is maintained.

  18. Conservative and surgical management of pancreatic trauma in adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Menahem, Benjamin; Lim, Chetana; Lahat, Eylon; Salloum, Chady; Osseis, Michael; Lacaze, Laurence; Compagnon, Philippe; Pascal, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Background The management of pancreatic trauma is complex. The aim of this study was to report our experience in the management of pancreatic trauma. Methods All patients hospitalized between 2005 and 2013 for pancreatic trauma were included. Traumatic injuries of the pancreas were classified according to the American Association for Surgery of Trauma (AAST) in five grades. Mortality and morbidity were analyzed. Results A total of 30 patients were analyzed (mean age: 38±17 years). Nineteen (63%) patients had a blunt trauma and 12 (40%) had pancreatic injury ≥ grade 3. Fifteen patients underwent exploratory laparotomy and the other 15 patients had nonoperative management (NOM). Four (13%) patients had a partial pancreatectomy [distal pancreatectomy (n=3) and pancreaticoduodenectomy (n=1)]. Overall, in hospital mortality was 20% (n=6). Postoperative mortality was 27% (n=4/15). Mortality of NOM group was 13% (n=2/15) in both cases death was due to severe head injury. Among the patients who underwent NOM, three patients had injury ≥ grade 3, one patient had a stent placement in the pancreatic duct and two patients underwent endoscopic drainage of a pancreatic pseudocyst. Conclusions Operative management of pancreatic trauma leads to a higher mortality. This must not be necessarily related to the pancreas injury alone but also to the associated injuries including liver, spleen and vascular trauma which may cause impaired outcome more than pancreas injury. PMID:28124001

  19. Potential adult Medicaid beneficiaries under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act compared with current adult Medicaid beneficiaries.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tammy; Davis, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Under health care reform, states will have the opportunity to expand Medicaid to millions of uninsured US adults. Information regarding this population is vital to physicians as they prepare for more patients with coverage. Our objective was to describe demographic and health characteristics of potentially eligible Medicaid beneficiaries. We performed a cross-sectional study using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2007-2010) to identify and compare adult US citizens potentially eligible for Medicaid under provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) with current adult Medicaid beneficiaries. We compared demographic characteristics (age, sex, race/ethnicity, education) and health measures (self-reported health status; measured body mass index, hemoglobin A1c level, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, depression screen [9-item Patient Health Questionnaire], tobacco smoking, and alcohol use). Analyses were based on an estimated 13.8 million current adult non-elderly Medicaid beneficiaries and 13.6 million nonelderly adults potentially eligible for Medicaid. Potentially eligible individuals are expected to be more likely male (49.2% potentially eligible vs 33.3% current beneficiaries; P <.001), to be more likely white and less likely black (58.8% white, 20.0% black vs 49.9% white, 25.2% black; P = .02), and to be statistically indistinguishable in terms of educational attainment. Overall, potentially eligible adults are expected to have better health status (34.8% "excellent" or "very good," 40.4% "good") than current beneficiaries (33.5% "excellent" or "very good," 31.6% "good"; P <.001). The proportions obese (34.5% vs 42.9%; P = .008) and with depression (15.5% vs 22.3%; P = .003) among potentially eligible individuals are significantly lower than those for current beneficiaries, while there are no significant differences in the expected prevalence of diabetes or hypertension. Current tobacco smoking (49.2% vs

  20. Propranolol Dosing Practices in Adult Burn Patients: Implications for Safety and Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Brown, David A; Gibbons, Janet; Honari, Shari; Klein, Matthew B; Pham, Tam N; Gibran, Nicole S

    2016-01-01

    Studies in children with burn injuries have demonstrated that propranolol improves metabolism and reduces muscle protein wasting. However, safety and efficacy in adults are less well established than in children. The purpose of this study was to determine safety of propranolol use in adult patients with burn injuries. Medical records were reviewed for burn-injured adults receiving propranolol. Patients between 18 and 65 years old and with ≥20% TBSA burn were included. Fifty-four patients met the criteria with mean age of 37 years and mean burn size of 38% TBSA. Propranolol dosages ranged from 0.1 to 3.8 mg/kg/day, with an average maximum dosage of 0.61 mg/kg/day. Mean heart rate decreased by 25% during 4 weeks. Seventy-two percent of patients experienced at least one episode of hypotension and 15% experienced bradycardia. Propranolol doses were most frequently held for low blood pressure; 32% of patients had at least one dose held for hypotension. This retrospective analysis suggests that modest dosing of propranolol results in frequent episodes of hypotension or bradycardia. Our data suggest that adults do not tolerate the higher doses reported in a pediatric population. Despite potential beneficial anti-catabolic effects of propranolol, burn care providers must recognize potential iatrogenic hemodynamic effects of this intervention. Our data support the need for prospective multicenter studies to delineate the safety and efficacy of propranolol in adult burn-injured patients.

  1. Central nervous system involvement in adult patients with invasive infection caused by Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Oyanguren, B; Esteban, L; Guillán, M; de Felipe, A; Alonso Cánovas, A; Navas, E; Quereda, C; Corral, I

    2015-04-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae is frequently an asymptomatic coloniser and a cause of neonatal and puerperal sepsis. Infections in nonpregnant adults are uncommon. The frequency of neurological complications caused by invasive infection with this microorganism in adults remains unknown. Here, we study the frequency and characteristics of central nervous system (CNS) involvement in adults with invasive S. agalactiae infection. Review of all adults with invasive S. agalactiae infection between 2003 and 2011 in a tertiary hospital. S. agalactiae was isolated from blood, CSF or synovial fluid in 75 patients. Among them, 7 (9,3%) displayed neurological involvement: 5 men and 2 nonpregnant women, aged between 20 and 62 years. Diagnoses were spinal epidural abscess due to spondylodiscitis with spinal cord compression; acute bacterial meningitis; ischemic stroke as presentation of bacterial endocarditis (2 patients each); and meningoventriculitis after neurosurgery and ventricular shunting. One patient with endocarditis caused by S. agalactiae and S. aureus died in the acute phase, and another died 3 months later from metastatic cancer. The other patients recovered without sequelae. All patients had systemic predisposing factors for infection and 5 (71,4%) had experienced disruption of the mucocutaneous barrier as a possible origin of the infection. CNS involvement is not uncommon in adult patients with invasive infection caused by S. agalactiae. Isolating S. agalactiae, especially in cases of meningitis, should lead doctors to search for predisposing systemic disease and causes of mucocutaneous barrier disruption. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Renal concentration capacity in adult patients with urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Sterner, G

    1991-01-01

    The maximal urine concentration capacity was studied in patients with acute pyelonephritis and in patients with clinically diagnosed acute cystitis. In the former group renal concentration ability was reduced in 16 of 22 patients and improved in all but two patients. Among patients with symptoms of acute cystitis 6 of 22 had a concentration capacity below 2 SD of normal values. Several of these patients had raised acute phase proteins and increased their urine osmolality at follow-up indicating that cases of acute pyelonephritis could have been included. It is concluded that the wide overlap between the groups makes the maximal urinary concentration capacity a method of limited value for level diagnosis in acute UTI infection. The test should be reserved for follow-up to reveal permanent renal damage.

  3. Venous Thromboembolism Risk Assessment and Prophylaxis Use in Pediatric, Adolescent, and Young Adult Hematology Oncology Patients.

    PubMed

    Bell, Alison D; Hockenberry, Marilyn; Landier, Wendy; Ewing, Nadia

    2015-08-01

    No widely accepted method exists to evaluate pediatric hematology oncology patients for the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) and the need for prophylaxis. The use of a VTE risk-assessment tool and standardized guidelines for prophylaxis could increase the use of appropriate prophylaxis and reduce the number of VTEs in patients, thereby decreasing morbidity, mortality, hospitalization, and cost. The purpose of this project was to implement and assess the compliance of a pediatric-specific VTE risk-assessment tool in hospitalized pediatric, adolescent, and young adult hematology oncology patients. From the 114 pediatric, adolescent, and young adult patients requiring assessment, 91 (80%) VTE assessments were completed and 87 (96%) were completed accurately. Eighty percent of the at-risk patients were ordered VTE prophylaxis. The use of a VTE risk-assessment tool in pediatric hematology oncology patients is a feasible way to assess patients for their risk of developing a VTE.

  4. Intensive care outcomes in adult hematopoietic stem cell transplantation patients.

    PubMed

    Bayraktar, Ulas D; Nates, Joseph L

    2016-02-10

    Although outcomes of intensive care for patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) have improved in the last two decades, the short-term mortality still remains above 50% among allogeneic HSCT patients. Better selection of HSCT patients for intensive care, and consequently reduction of non-beneficial care, may reduce financial costs and alleviate patient suffering. We reviewed the studies on intensive care outcomes of patients undergoing HSCT published since 2000. The risk factors for intensive care unit (ICU) admission identified in this report were primarily patient and transplant related: HSCT type (autologous vs allogeneic), conditioning intensity, HLA mismatch, and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). At the same time, most of the factors associated with ICU outcomes reported were related to the patients' functional status upon development of critical illness and interventions in ICU. Among the many possible interventions, the initiation of mechanical ventilation was the most consistently reported factor affecting ICU survival. As a consequence, our current ability to assess the benefit or futility of intensive care is limited. Until better ICU or hospital mortality prediction models are available, based on the available evidence, we recommend practitioners to base their ICU admission decisions on: Patient pre-transplant comorbidities, underlying disease status, GVHD diagnosis/grade, and patients' functional status at the time of critical illness.

  5. Prescriber compliance with black box warnings in older adult patients.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Judith R; Coulen, Charmaine; Berger, Jan E; Moore, Marsha C; McQueen, Angela; Jan, Saira A

    2009-11-01

    Patients prescribed medications with US Food and Drug Administration-issued black box warnings (BBWs) warrant additional vigilance by prescribers because these drugs can cause serious adverse drug events. Seniors are at greater risk for adverse drug events due to increased medication burden and greater health vulnerability. To improve our understanding of the prescribing and patient-monitoring practices of physicians prescribing medications with a BBW to patients age >or=65 years in an ambulatory care setting. A retrospective cohort study of administrative pharmacy and medical claims identified 58,190 patients age >or=65 years in the Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Jersey beneficiary population with >or=1 claim for >or=1 of the 8 targeted medications between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2005. Medications included carbamazepine, amiodarone, ketoconazole, loop diuretics, methotrexate, cyclosporine, metformin and combinations, and cilostazol. Patients were followed 12 months from the index prescription date to evaluate prescriber compliance with BBWs using operationalized definitions of compliance. Patients prescribed drugs with a drug-laboratory warning had lower rates of prescriber BBW compliance (0.7%-24.9%) than patients prescribed drugs with a drug-disease warning (84.7%-90.2%). Administrative claims analysis identified low rates of prescriber compliance with BBWs in managing patients age >or=65 years. Claims analysis may be a cost-effective strategy to monitor prescriber compliance with BBWs in older patients at higher risk.

  6. Cigarette Smoking, Desire to Quit, and Tobacco-Related Counseling Among Patients at Adult Health Centers

    PubMed Central

    Lebrun-Harris, Lydie A.; Fiore, Michael C.; Tomoyasu, Naomi; Ngo-Metzger, Quyen

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We determined cigarette smoking prevalence, desire to quit, and tobacco-related counseling among a national sample of patients at health centers. Methods. Data came from the 2009 Health Center Patient Survey and the 2009 National Health Interview Survey. The analytic sample included 3949 adult patients at health centers and 27 731 US adults. Results. Thirty-one percent of health center patients were current smokers, compared with 21% of US adults in general. Among currently smoking health center patients, 83% desired to quit and 68% received tobacco counseling. In multivariable models, patients had higher adjusted odds of wanting to quit if they had indications of severe mental illness (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 3.26; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.19, 8.97) and lower odds if they had health insurance (AOR = 0.43; 95% CI = 0.22, 0.86). Patients had higher odds of receiving counseling if they had 2 or more chronic conditions (AOR = 2.05; 95% CI = 1.11, 3.78) and lower odds if they were Hispanic (AOR = 0.57; 95% CI = 0.34, 0.96). Conclusions. Cigarette smoking prevalence is substantially higher among patients at health centers than US adults in general. However, most smokers at health centers desire to quit. Continued efforts are warranted to reduce tobacco use in this vulnerable group. PMID:24625147

  7. The prognostic factors of adult patients with hepatic portal venous gas in the ED.

    PubMed

    Seak, Chen-June; Hsu, Kuang-Hung; Wong, Yon-Cheong; Ng, Chip-Jin; Yen, David Hung-Tsang; Seak, Joanna Chen-Yeen; Seak, Chen-Ken

    2014-09-01

    This study aimed to investigate the prognostic factors of adult patients with hepatic portal venous gas (HPVG) in the emergency department (ED) to facilitate clinical decision making by emergency physicians. Data from adult patients with HPVG who visited our ED between December 2009 and December 2013 were analyzed. The computed tomographic scan images were reviewed, and the presence of HPVG with or without pneumatosis intestinalis (PI) was confirmed by a certified radiologist. The study end point was mortality or survival upon discharge. The factors associated with mortality were specifically analyzed with multiple logistic regression models. Among the total of 50 HPVG patients, the overall mortality rate was 56%. No deaths were observed among the patients with neither shock nor PI in the ED. Shock (odds ratio, 17.02; 95% confidence interval, 3.36-86.22) and PI (odds ratio, 5.14; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-25.67) were determined to be significant predictors of patient mortality after adjusting for age and sex. The mortality of the patients with both shock and PI was very high (84%). Early resuscitation should be initiated for the prevention of shock in adult patients with HPVG in the ED. To enhance the chance for survival, the prompt consultation of surgeons for emergency operations should be considered for adult ED patients exhibiting both shock and PI, which may indicate true ischemic bowel disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of neurofeedback on adult patients with psychiatric disorders in a naturalistic setting.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Eun-Jin; Koo, Bon-Hoon; Seo, Wan-Seok; Lee, Jun-Yeob; Choi, Joong-Hyeon; Song, Shin-Ho

    2015-03-01

    Few well-controlled studies have considered neurofeedback treatment in adult psychiatric patients. In this regard, the present study investigates the characteristics and effects of neurofeedback on adult psychiatric patients in a naturalistic setting. A total of 77 adult patients with psychiatric disorders participated in this study. Demographic data and neurofeedback states were retrospectively analyzed, and the effects of neurofeedback were evaluated using clinical global impression (CGI) and subjective self-rating scales. Depressive disorders were the most common psychiatric disorders (19; 24.7 %), followed by anxiety disorders (18; 23.4 %). A total of 69 patients (89.6 %) took medicine, and the average frequency of neurofeedback was 17.39 ± 16.64. Neurofeedback was applied to a total of 39 patients (50.6 %) more than 10 times, and 48 patients (62.3 %) received both β/SMR and α/θ training. The discontinuation rate was 33.8 % (26 patients). There was significant difference between pretreatment and posttreatment CGI scores (<.001), and the self-rating scale also showed significant differences in depressive symptoms, anxiety, and inattention (<.001). This is a naturalistic study in a clinical setting, and has several limitations, including the absence of a control group and a heterogenous sample. Despite these limitations, the study demonstrates the potential of neurofeedback as an effective complimentary treatment for adult patients with psychiatric disorders.

  9. Clinical presentation of metabolic alkalosis in an adult patient with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Sweetser, Lisel J; Douglas, James A; Riha, Renata L; Bell, Scott C

    2005-03-01

    In subtropical and tropical climates, dehydration is common in cystic fibrosis patients with respiratory exacerbations. This may lead to a clinical presentation of metabolic alkalosis with associated hyponatraemia and hypochloraemia. An adult cystic fibrosis patient who presented with a severe respiratory exacerbation accompanied by metabolic alkalosis is presented and the effects of volume correction are reported.

  10. Non-motor symptoms in patients with adult-onset focal dystonia: Sensory and psychiatric disturbances.

    PubMed

    Conte, Antonella; Berardelli, Isabella; Ferrazzano, Gina; Pasquini, Massimo; Berardelli, Alfredo; Fabbrini, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Dystonia is characterized by the presence of involuntary muscle contractions that cause abnormal movements and posture. Adult onset focal dystonia include cervical dystonia, blepharospasm, arm dystonia and laryngeal dystonia. Besides motor manifestations, patients with focal dystonia frequently also display non-motor signs and symptoms. In this paper, we review the evidence of sensory and psychiatric disturbances in adult patients with focal dystonia. Clinical studies and neurophysiological investigations consistently show that the sensory system is involved in dystonia. Several studies have also demonstrated that neuropsychiatric disorders, particularly depression and anxiety, are more frequent in patients with focal dystonia, whereas data on obsessive compulsive disorders are more contrasting.

  11. Vitamin D Deficiency in Adult Sickle Cell Patients.

    PubMed

    Boettger, Peter C; Knupp, Charles L; Liles, Darla K; Walker, Kaitlyn

    2017-01-01

    Vitamin D levels in adult black Americans with sickle cell disease (SCD) are comparatively lower than those found in the general population of black Americans. The objectives of this study were to examine the prevalence of Vitamin D deficiency (VDD) in adults with various subtypes of sickle cell disease and identify risk factors for vitamin D deficiency. In a retrospective study serum Vitamin D25(OH)D and/or VitaminD1,25(OH)2D levels were obtained in 120 subjects with sickle cell disease. Baseline studies also included LFTs, total protein, albumin, total bilirubin, and creatinine levels. In a portion of subjects that were treated with oral ergocalciferol vitamin D levels and chemistries were obtained within 6 months of treatment. Data was statistically analyzed with Welch two sample t-tests and individual simple linear regressions (including logarithmic values) for each variable. Vitamin D25(OH)D levels were found to be significantly lower in a group of subjects with Hgb SS disease, than in a group with other subtypes of sickle cell disease. In both groups combined, significant (p = 0.05) and clinically suggestive negative correlations with Vitamin D25(OH)D were seen for total bilirubin and total protein, respectively. When total bilirubin and total protein levels were compared between the Hgb SS and HgbS/other groups, t-test revealed these levels were significantly higher in the Hgb SS group levels at p < 0.001 and p = 0.005, respectively. Low total Vitamin D25(OH)D levels in adults with sickle cell disease may be a reflection of chronic inflammation and overall disease severity. Copyright © 2016 National Medical Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Childhood sexual abuse in adult patients with borderline personality disorder

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Preethi; Chaudhari, Bhushan; Saldanha, Daniel; Devabhaktuni, Spandana; Bhattacharya, Labanya

    2016-01-01

    Background: Researchers have found elevated rates of childhood sexual abuse (CSA) in borderline personality disorder (BPD) patients. They have also implicated the role of CSA later in BPD. However, there has been a scarcity of studies regarding this in Indian population. Objectives: To profile the occurrence of CSA and its parameters in BPD patients and to document symptomatology of BPD associated with CSA. Materials and Methods: Thirty-six consecutive patients with BPD were administered with a two-staged semi-structured interview by different interviewers with the first stage for collecting sociodemographic details and confirming BPD diagnosis and the second stage for collecting information about CSA. Results: Of 36 BPD patients, 16 (44.44%) reported a history of definite CSA. The majority of CSA associated with BPD were having characteristics of onset at 7–12 years, <10 occasions of abuse, perpetrator being a close relative or a close acquaintance and genital type of CSA. Identity disturbances (P = 0.0354), recurrent suicidal/self-harm behavior (P = 0.0177), and stress-related paranoid/dissociative symptoms (P = 0.0177) were significantly associated with the presence of CSA while unstable interpersonal relationships (P = 0.001) were significantly associated with the absence of CSA. Conclusion: Significant proportion of BPD patients reported CSA. The specific symptom profile of BPD patients can be used to predict the presence of CSA in these patients, which has a direct implication in the treatment of these patients. PMID:28163415

  13. Transition of respiratory technology dependent patients from pediatric to adult pulmonology care.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Amit; Willis, Denise; Tang, Xinyu; Bauer, Martin; Berlinski, Ariel; Com, Gulnur; Ward, Wendy L; Carroll, John L

    2015-12-01

    Recent advances in medicine have allowed children with chronic life-threatening disorders to survive longer than ever before with the use of complex medical device technology (e.g., mechanical ventilation, dialysis, etc.). The care of children with chronic pulmonary disorders and respiratory-technology dependence is often complex, involving a high level of ongoing interaction between caregivers and the health care team. Unmanaged, non-standardized transition of respiratory technology dependent (RTD) patients to adult care potentially increases the risk of adverse outcomes. Pediatric Pulmonary programs at US children's hospitals were surveyed to ascertain whether a standardized process is utilized for transitioning RTD patients from pediatric to adult subspecialty pulmonology care. Pediatric pulmonology programs with Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education certification were invited to participate in an electronic survey inquiring about practices and processes used to transition RTD patients from pediatric to adult pulmonology. The majority of respondents, 78.1% (25/32), reported that they do not utilize a standard protocol for transition while 41.4% (12/29) have no process in place. No program surveyed uses a designated transition leader. Referral to an adult pulmonologist within the same health system occurs more frequently than referral to private practice. Forty-three percent are not satisfied with involvement from the adult pulmonology care team. Coordination of care with other specialty services such as adult otolaryngology is provided by 31% of respondents. Of respondents, 13.8% assessed "readiness to transition" to adult pulmonary for RTD patients. Pediatric pulmonary providers are not satisfied with their current practices or involvement from the adult team, and only 24% track the transition process until the first visit with the adult pulmonologist. The survey results highlight a lack of standardized transition programs at US children

  14. Laparoscopic Nephroureterectomy for Adult Patient with Primary Obstructive Megaureter

    PubMed Central

    Makiyama, Kazuhide; Ohtake, Shinji; Yamanaka, Hiroyuki; Sano, Futoshi; Nakaigawa, Noboru; Kubota, Yoshinobu

    2013-01-01

    A 29-year-old female with a complaint of abdominal distension was referred to our hospital. She had a history of being treated for pyelonephritis three times. By computed tomography and retrograde pyelography, she was diagnosed with adult left primary megaureter. Her left renal function was severely deteriorated. She hoped for surgical intervention before becoming pregnant. Laparoscopic nephroureterectomy for megaureters seems to be difficult due to the large size. By sucking urine from an inserted ureteral catheter and setting trocar positions, we successfully performed laparoscopic nephroureterectomy for megaureter. PMID:24455395

  15. Benefits of preoperative education for adult elective surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Kruzik, Nancy

    2009-09-01

    Patient education is a major concern for perioperative nurses in an ambulatory surgery setting. It has proven difficult to develop formal preoperative teaching programs in this environment, but research has shown that preoperative education can improve patient outcomes and satisfaction with the surgical experience. Typical patient education consists of pamphlets that are given to the patient before surgery and verbal instructions from the physicians and nurses on the day of surgery. Ideally, preoperative patient education should begin in the surgeon's office, continue through preadmission testing, and be completed at admission. Having a well-designed preoperative education program enables perioperative nurses in ambulatory surgery centers to provide a thoughtful approach to perioperative teaching in a limited time. AORN J 90 (September 2009) 381-387. (c) AORN, Inc, 2009.

  16. Need for Prophylactic Treatment in Adult Haemophilia A Patients

    PubMed Central

    Siegmund, Berthold; Richter, Heinrich; Pollmann, Hartmut

    2009-01-01

    Summary Background and Methods A single centre study including 52 German patients aged ≥16 years with severe haemophilia A was performed to compare the amount of clotting factor and outcome between on-demand therapy (26 patients) and continuous prophylaxis (26 patients) over 1 year. Results Prophylaxis reduced the number of bleeds significantly. Compared to on-demand treatment (20.5 ± 3.0 bleeds/year/patient), under prophylaxis 7.8 ± 1.3 bleeds/year/patient were observed. Joint bleeds were reduced from 12.2 ± 1.5 to 4.7 ± 1.0/year/ patient. In the on-demand group 38% of the patients suffered from more than 2 bleeds/month, whereas in the prophylaxis group no patient was found with more than 2 bleeds/month. Mean annual factor VIII (FVIII) consumption increased from 767 ± 110 IU/kg body weight under on-demand treatment to 2,841 ± 341 IU/kg body weight under continuous prophylaxis, displaying a nearly fourfold increase in FVIII consumption. Furthermore, prophylaxis implies a more than four-fold increase in treatment days which escalated from a mean weekly injection rate of 0.56 ± 0.08 FVIII injections/week when bleeds were treated on demand to 2.52 ± 0.30 FVIII injections/week during prophylaxis. Conclusion Even though the results reflect a benefit also for prophylactically treated patients regarding their bleeding frequency, one has to take into account a substantial increase of the costs for coagulation concentrates when all patients with severe haemophilia A switch to continuous prophylaxis. PMID:20877667

  17. Executive functions in patients with Alzheimer's disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus patients and cognitively healthy older adults.

    PubMed

    Redondo, María Teresa; Beltrán-Brotóns, José Luís; Reales, José Manuel; Ballesteros, Soledad

    2016-10-01

    The present study investigated whether the performance on executive function tasks of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is as impaired as that of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and to compare their performance with that of a group of cognitively healthy older adults. We also investigated whether glycosylated hemoglobin levels (HbA1c, a measure of glucose regulation) are related to performance on executive control tasks. Three groups of participants (AD, T2DM, and healthy older adults) completed medical and psychological evaluations and performed a series of computerized tasks, including processing speed (simple and choice reaction time) tasks, verbal and visuospatial working memory (WM) updating (n-back) tasks, and the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), to assess processing speed and executive functioning. As expected, the results showed that AD patients performed significantly worse than the healthy older adult group in all tasks. Executive functions deteriorated in the two groups of patients but more in the AD group. The T2DM group differed from healthy older controls but not from AD patients in the percentage of perseverations and the percentage of perseverative errors (WCST). These findings revealed working memory (updating and maintenance) and executive control declines in the T2DM compared to healthy older controls but smaller than that suffered by the AD patients. The impairment of executive processing of T2DM patients despite the glycosylated hemoglobin control suggests that these patients are at risk of developing AD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [Surgical management of orthopedic problems in adult patients with cerebral palsy].

    PubMed

    Yalçin, Selim; Kocaoğlu, Bariş; Berker, Nadire; Erol, Bülent

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated the results of surgical treatment for orthopedic problems in adult patients with cerebral palsy. Nine adult patients with cerebral palsy (4 females, 5 males; mean age 22 years; range 19 to 29 years) were managed surgically to lessen pain, correct deformities and contractures, and enhance their mobilization potential. Seven patients underwent bilateral multiple-level tendinous and/or musculotendinous release procedures involving the lower extremities, of whom two patients underwent additional triple arthrodesis, and one patient underwent extension osteotomy in the knee. One patient was treated with proximal femoral and distal tibial derotation osteotomies and bilateral hamstring release for knee flexion contractures. Finally, one patient was treated with posterior fusion with instrumentation for thoracolumbar scoliosis. Before surgery, four patients were community ambulators, and one patient could walk only with the aid of bilateral crutches. Four patients with total body involvement could not walk, but they could sit without support except for one patient with scoliosis. The mean follow-up was 25 months (range 8 to 49 months). On final evaluations, eight patients could walk without support, and one patient who could not sit preoperatively managed to sit without support. Three patients developed bilateral, five patients developed unilateral superficial skin wounds at the back of the heels associated with cast/brace use, and deep wound infection was encountered in the patient with scoliosis. All the wounds healed with early debridements and antibiotic therapy, together with the modifications made in cast/brace applications, without the need for implant removal. Surgical treatment of orthopedic problems in adult patients with cerebral palsy is of substantial importance in enhancing their sitting and walking capacities, and in restoring their community-based relations and activities.

  19. The challenges with brain death determination in adult patients on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Muralidharan, RajaNandini; Mateen, Farrah J; Shinohara, Russell T; Schears, Gregory J; Wijdicks, Eelco F M

    2011-06-01

    To identify a reliable method of performing apnea testing as part of brain death determination in adult patients who develop loss of brainstem reflexes while receiving extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). ECMO provides extracirculatory support to patients in cardiorespiratory failure who would otherwise be expected to die. Many studies have reported brain death as a potential complication of adult ECMO, but none have cited how apnea testing was performed in these patients. This retrospective review identified adults 15 years or older treated with ECMO at our institution (2002-2010) and the method of determination of brain death when complete loss of brainstem reflexes occurred. Loss of all brainstem reflexes was identified in three cases (3/87, 3.4%). The apnea test was not performed since it was deemed "difficult," leading to withdrawal of ECMO and intensive care. Ancillary tests such as cerebral flow studies were not used because they may not document absent cerebral arterial flow due to the ischemic nature of the injury. We propose the use of an oxygenated apnea test on ECMO using continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) through the ventilator or anesthesia bag, with an inline manometer and an end tidal CO(2) device. Apnea testing is essential in the determination of brain death, but may not be employed in ECMO-treated adult patients. Apnea testing using the above protocol may assist in better decision making for adult ECMO patients at risk of brain death.

  20. Aspirin and concomitant idiosyncrasies in adult asthmatic patients.

    PubMed

    Spector, S L; Wangaard, C H; Farr, R S

    1979-12-01

    The nasal and respiratory symptoms observed after oral challenge to aspirin (ASA), tartrazine, and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory substances are best described as idiosyncratic reactions. A positive response to oral challenge, defined as a 20% fall in forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1) from baseline for up to 4 hr, occurred in 44 of 230 patients with ASA, 11 of 277 with tartrazine, 2 of 93 with sodium salicylate, and 2 of 69 with acetaminophen. No one had a positive response to tartrazine, sodium salicylate, or acetaminophen who was not also positive to ASA. The dose of ASA causing a positive response was less than 5 grains in 95% of the patients. Of 50 patients with a suspicious history studied in detail, 96% of those with ASA idiosyncrasy had sinusitis and 71% had nasal polyps. Methacholine challenges and random circulating and sputum eosinophils did not differentiate patients with a negative challenge from those with a positive challenge. However, patients with a positive history and positive challenge had significantly more random nasal eosinophils than those with negative aspirin challenges. The term "aspirin triad" has outlived its usefulness since ASA idiosyncrasy can exist in patients lacking certain components of the triad. ASA idiosyncrasy is unsuspected in many patients and possibly overdiagnosed in others.

  1. The Italian multiregional thalassemia registry: Centers characteristics, services, and patients' population.

    PubMed

    Conte, Rosa; Ruggieri, Lucia; Gambino, Arianna; Bartoloni, Franco; Baiardi, Paola; Bonifazi, Donato; Bonifazi, Fedele; Felisi, Mariagrazia; Giannuzzi, Viviana; Padula, Rosa; Pepe, Alessia; Putti, Maria Caterina; Del Vecchio, Giovanni Carlo; Maggio, Aurelio; Filosa, Aldo; Iacono, Angela; Mangiarini, Laura; Ceci, Adriana

    2016-08-01

    The prognosis of beta-Thalassemia major and other congenital hemoglobinopathies has profoundly changed over the last decades. Moreover, only few countries in Europe provide dedicated services and the description of the measures for patients monitoring and treatment is overall very scarce. The HTA-Thal project is aimed to identify the services available in Italy and to collect epidemiological and clinical data on the thalassemic population (HTA-Thal Registry). A map of the existing centers was created and two electronic questionnaires were completed with information on the services and patients. On 182 centers identified, 60 completed the two questionnaires. Centers resulted to be extremely heterogeneous in terms of size, age of patients in care, and services availability. The transition of pediatric patients to adult centers was not guaranteed. Thousand eight hundred and seventy-three beta-Thalassemia major patients (of which 259 pediatrics), regularly transfused, were registered. Deferasirox is the most used chelator as monotherapy (616 patients) and its use prevails in younger patients. A higher number of patients (847 patients) use Deferoxamine, either alone (448 patients) or in combination with DFP (399 patients), while 782 patients use Deferiprone alone (383 patients) or in combination (399 patients). 31.6 and 66.6% of centers were not equipped for specialized visits or local MRI, respectively. Centers with 30-80 patients show the high percentage of patients appropriately monitored when compared to smaller or bigger centers. This analysis confirms the importance of patients' registries for the collection of large datasets and the need for dedicated 'specialized centers' equipped to provide the best standard treatment to patients.

  2. [Identification of microorganisms related to chronic rhinosinusitis in adult patients with variable common immunodeficiency].

    PubMed

    Angulo-Pérez, Gabriela; Vivar-Acevedo, Eulalio; Herrera-Sánchez, Diana Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of chronic rhinosinusitis in adult patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is 52%. The patients with CVID show higher incidence of chronic rhinosinusitis, which is an inflammatory disease that affects the lining of one or more paranasal sinuses and nasal cavity. To identify the microorganisms in the middle meatus secretion obtained by endoscopy associated with chronic rhinosinusitis in adult patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). A descriptive, cross-sectional study, which included adult patients with CVID, from whom a sample endoscopic middle meatus secretion from both nostrils was obtained and sent to culture for aerobic, anaerobic bacteria and fungi. Informed consent of all patients was obtained. 29 patients were studied: 18 women and 11 men with a mean age of 40±13 years. The results were: 2 samples showed no microbial growth, 24 showed growth of aerobic bacteria, 3 cases had fungal growth without development of anaerobic bacteria. Our results show that the most common microorganisms associated with CSR in adult patients are: Moraxella catarrhalis, Staphylococcus, Sphingomonas paucimobilis and Citrobacter koseri, and associated fungal agents were: Candida albicans and Aspergillus fumigatus.

  3. Parental substance abuse, reports of chronic pain and coping in adult patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Christopher; Whitfield, Keith; Sudhakar, Shiv; Pearce, Michele; Byrd, Goldie; Wood, Mary; Feliu, Miriam; Leach-Beale, Brittani; DeCastro, Laura; Whitworth, Elaine; Abrams, Mary; Jonassaint, Jude; Harrison, M. Ojinga; Mathis, Markece; Scott, Lydia; Johnson, Stephanie; Durant, Lauren; Holmes, Anita; Presnell, Katherine; Bennett, Gary; Shelby, Rebecca; Robinson, Elwood

    2006-01-01

    There is increasing interest from a social learning perspective in understanding the role of parental factors on adult health behaviors and health outcomes. Our review revealed no studies, to date, that have evaluated the effects of parental substance abuse on reports of chronic pain and coping in adult patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). We explored the effects of parental substance (alcohol or drug) abuse on reports of the sensory, affective and summary indices of pain in 67 adult patients, mean age 38.9 (13.5), with SCD. We also explored the effects of parental substance abuse on psychopathology associated with pain and active coping. Twenty-four percent of patients reported that their parent(s) abused substances. Patients whose parent(s) were characterized as substance abusers reported greater sensory (p=0.02), affective (p=0.01) and summary (VAS; p=0.02) indices of pain as compared to their counterparts, whose parent(s) were not characterized as substance abusers. Patients did not differ in average age, education or the propensity to respond in a socially acceptable manner. There was a significant trend towards patients who characterized their parents as abusers scoring higher than their counterparts on active coping. We propose a Social Learning Theory to explain the current findings and suggest a need for additional prospective research to simultaneously explore biological (genetic) and social factors that influence the interpretation, experience and reporting of chronic pain in adult patients with chronic disease. PMID:16573309

  4. [Preoperative tests recommendations in adult patients for ambulatory surgery].

    PubMed

    Zaballos, M; López-Álvarez, S; Argente, P; López, A

    2015-01-01

    Anesthetic assessment traditionally included a series of laboratory tests intended to detect undiagnosed diseases, and to ensure that the patient undergoes surgery following safety criteria. These tests, without a specific clinical indication, are expensive, of questionable diagnostic value and often useless. In the context of outpatient surgery, recent evidence suggests that patients of any age without significant comorbidity, ASA physical status gradei and grade ii, do not need additional preoperative tests routinely. The aim of the present recommendations is to determine the general indications in which these tests should be performed in ASA gradei and grade ii patients undergoing ambulatory surgery.

  5. Optimizing Survival Outcomes For Adult Patients With Nontraumatic Cardiac Arrest.

    PubMed

    Jung, Julianna

    2016-10-01

    Patient survival after cardiac arrest can be improved significantly with prompt and effective resuscitative care. This systematic review analyzes the basic life support factors that improve survival outcome, including chest compression technique and rapid defibrillation of shockable rhythms. For patients who are successfully resuscitated, comprehensive postresuscitation care is essential. Targeted temperature management is recommended for all patients who remain comatose, in addition to careful monitoring of oxygenation, hemodynamics, and cardiac rhythm. Management of cardiac arrest in circumstances such as pregnancy, pulmonary embolism, opioid overdose and other toxicologic causes, hypothermia, and coronary ischemia are also reviewed.

  6. [Acute cerebral ischemia: an unusual clinical presentation of isolated left ventricular noncompaction in an adult patient].

    PubMed

    Fiorencis, Andrea; Quadretti, Laura; Bacich, Daniela; Chiodi, Elisabetta; Mele, Donato; Fiorencis, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Isolated left ventricular noncompaction in adults is uncommon. The most frequent clinical manifestations are heart failure due to left ventricular systolic dysfunction and supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias, which may be sustained and associated with sudden death. Thromboembolic complications are also possible. We report the case of an adult patient with isolated left ventricular noncompaction who came to our observation because of acute cerebral ischemia, an initial presentation of the disease only rarely described.

  7. Influence of striatal dopamine transporter availability on the response to methylphenidate in adult patients with ADHD.

    PubMed

    Krause, Johanna; la Fougere, Christian; Krause, Klaus-Henning; Ackenheil, Manfred; Dresel, Stefan H

    2005-12-01

    In this study, we investigated whether availability of striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) may have an influence on the response of adult patients with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) on methylphenidate (MPH). In 18 non-smoking and non-medicated adult patients with ADHD, availability of DAT was measured with [(99m)Tc] TRODAT-1 SPECT. Then, the patients received methylphenidate (MPH), individually titrated up to 60 mg per day. Ten weeks later, clinical improvement was rated by Clinical Global Impressions scale. In all, 6 patients were classified as non-responders, and 12 responded to MPH. From the non-responders, 5 presented with a DAT availability below that of normal controls of the same age, whereas in the group of responders all patients had elevated DAT availability. There was a significant negative correlation between values for global clinical improvement and striatal DAT availability. In conclusion, ADHD patients with low DAT availability seem not to respond to therapy with MPH.

  8. Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 3 inhibitor diminishes hepcidin-enhanced duodenal calcium transport in hemizygous β-globin knockout thalassemic mice.

    PubMed

    Charoenphandhu, Narattaphol; Kraidith, Kamonshanok; Lertsuwan, Kornkamon; Sripong, Chanakarn; Suntornsaratoon, Panan; Svasti, Saovaros; Krishnamra, Nateetip; Wongdee, Kannikar

    2017-03-01

    Recent investigation has shown that the liver-derived iron-regulating hormone, hepcidin, can potentiate intestinal calcium absorption in hemizygous β-globin knockout thalassemic (BKO) mice. Since the upregulation of Fe(2+) and H(+) cotransporter, divalent metal transporter (DMT)-1, has been shown to correlate with thalassemia-induced intestinal calcium absorption impairment, the inhibition of the apical Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (NHE)-3 that is essential for cytoplasmic pH regulation and transepithelial sodium absorption was hypothesized to negatively affect hepcidin action. Herein, the positive effect of hepcidin on the duodenal calcium transport was evaluated using Ussing chamber technique. The results showed that BKO mice had lower absorptive surface area and duodenal calcium transport than wild-type mice. Besides, paracellular transport of zinc in BKO mice was compromised. Hepcidin administration completely restored calcium transport. Since this hepcidin action was totally abolished by inhibitors of the basolateral calcium transporters, Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX1) and plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase (PMCA1b), the enhanced calcium flux potentially occurred through the transcellular pathway rather than paracellular pathway. Interestingly, the selective NHE3 inhibitor, 100 nM tenapanor, markedly inhibited hepcidin-enhanced calcium transport. Accordingly, hepcidin is one of the promising therapeutic agents for calcium malabsorption in β-thalassemia. It mainly stimulates the transcellular calcium transport across the duodenal epithelium in an NHE3-dependent manner.

  9. Aesthetic auricular reconstruction with autologous rib cartilage grafts in adult microtia patients.

    PubMed

    Han, So-Eun; Lim, So-Young; Pyon, Jai-Kyung; Bang, Sa-ik; Mun, Goo-Hyun; Oh, Kap Sung

    2015-08-01

    Cartilage calcification is an important factor in aesthetic auricular reconstruction using autologous rib cartilage grafts in adults, a technique that involves difficult manipulation and unexpected absorption. As a result, artificial implants or prosthetics are considered for auricular reconstruction in adult patients despite the limitations of artificial material. In this article, we present our experience with auricular reconstruction using autologous rib cartilage grafts in adult microtia patients with reliable aesthetic results and minimal complications. A retrospective chart review was performed for 84 microtia patients ranging in age from 21 to 56 (average: 29.9) years who underwent auricular reconstruction using autologous rib cartilage grafts from March 2001 to March 2013. To validate our acceptable reconstructive results, two independent observers performed postoperative photographic evaluation of two groups (adults and children) using non-inferiority tests in addition to patient questionnaires. The mean operation time for rib cartilage grafts was 3 h and 53 min, and the follow-up time for all patients ranged from 6 months to 8 years. Surgery-related complications occurred in only three cases. On objective photographic evaluation, the adult group was not inferior to the child group in auricular shape, location, or symmetry. The subjective patient satisfaction evaluation reported a high satisfaction rate. As this study shows, aesthetic auricular reconstruction using rib cartilage grafts in adult microtia patients is possible even in cases with advanced cartilage calcification. Modification of the fabricating framework, well-preserved flap vascularity, and complete understanding of physiological aspects of rib cartilage are essential for aesthetic auricular reconstruction. Copyright © 2015 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Analyses of demographical and injury characteristics of adult and pediatric patients injured in Syrian civil war.

    PubMed

    Er, Erhan; Çorbacıoğlu, Şeref Kerem; Güler, Sertaç; Aslan, Şahin; Seviner, Meltem; Aksel, Gökhan; Bekgöz, Burak

    2017-01-01

    Aimed to analyze demographical data and injury characteristics of patients who were injured in the Syrian Civil War (SCW) and to define differences in injury characteristics between adult and pediatric patients. Patients who were injured in the SCW and transferred to our emergency department were retrospectively analyzed in this study during the 15-month period between July 2013 and October 2014. During the study period, 1591 patients who were the victims of the SCW and admitted to our emergency department due to war injury enrolled in the study. Of these patients, 285 were children (18%). The median of the injury severity score was 16 (interquartile range [IQR]: 9-25) in all patients. The most frequent mechanism of injury was blunt trauma (899 cases, 55%), and the most frequently-injured region of the body was the head (676 cases, 42.5%). Head injury rates among the children's group were higher than those of the adult group (P < .001). In contrast, injury rates for the abdomen and extremities in the children's group were lower than those in the adult group (P < .001, P < .001). The majority of patients were adults, and the most frequent mechanism of injury was blunt trauma. Similarly, the children were substantially affected by war. Although the injury severity score values and mortality rates of the child and adult groups were similar, it was determined that the number of head injuries was higher, but the number of abdomen and extremity injuries was lower in the children's group than in the adult group. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Screening for adult attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder in high-dose benzodiazepine dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Tamburin, Stefano; Federico, Angela; Morbioli, Laura; Faccini, Marco; Casari, Rebecca; Zamboni, Lorenzo; Briguglio, Giuseppe; Lugoboni, Fabio

    2017-09-01

    Adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is frequent in patients with substance use disorders (SUD), but information on its prevalence in high-dose benzodiazepine (BZD) dependence is lacking. We estimated the prevalence of adult ADHD in a group of treatment-seeking high-dose BZD dependent patients according to a valid screening tool, and explored the demographic and clinical characteristics of patients that screened positive for ADHD (ADHD+) in comparison to those that screened negative (ADHD-). We prospectively recruited 167 consecutive patients with high-dose BZD dependence and screened them for adult ADHD with the World Health Organization Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale version 1.1 (ASRS-v1.1) Symptom Checklist Part A. We compared demographic and clinical characteristics in ADHD+ and ADHD- groups. Fifty-three patients (31.7% of the sample) were positive to adult ADHD screening. ADHD+ patients showed a significantly larger prevalence of poly-drug abuse than ADHD- ones. BZD formulation and active principle significantly differed between the two groups. The other clinical variables, including psychiatric comorbidity, as well as the demographic ones, did not differ in ADHD+ versus ADHD- comparison. Adult ADHD may be common in treatment-seeking high-dose BZD dependent patients according to ASRS-v1.1 Symptom Checklist Part A. Screening for ADHD in this type of SUD with this questionnaire is quick and may offer useful information for prognosis and treatment. (Am J Addict 2017;26:610-614). © 2017 American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  12. Caring for adult patients who require nasogastric feeding tubes.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Kristine

    Nasogastric tubes provide a safe means of delivering nutrition support to many patients in hospital and the community. Insertion and care of these tubes will be familiar to many nurses. Evidence has shown that misplaced tubes, either on insertion or during use, can cause serious harm or even death to patients. This article explores the safety challenges posed during the insertion and maintenance of nasogastric tubes. Guidance and evidence should provide nurses with the knowledge, skills and reassurance to manage these tubes safely.

  13. Preoperative Assessment of Adult Patients for Intracranial Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sivanaser, Vanitha; Manninen, Pirjo

    2010-01-01

    The preoperative assessment of the patient for neurosurgical and endovascular procedures involves the understanding of the neurological disease and its systemic presentation, and the requirements of the procedure. There is a wide spectrum of different neurosurgical disorders and procedures. This article provides an overview of the preoperative evaluation of these patients with respect to general principles of neuroanesthesia, and considerations for specific intracranial and vascular neurosurgical and interventional neuroradiological procedures. PMID:20700431

  14. Sabril® registry 5-year results: Characteristics of adult patients treated with vigabatrin.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Gregory; Faught, Edward; Foroozan, Rod; Pellock, John M; Sergott, Robert C; Shields, W Donald; Ziemann, Adam; Dribinsky, Yekaterina; Lee, Deborah; Torri, Sarah; Othman, Feisal; Isojarvi, Jouko

    2016-03-01

    Vigabatrin (Sabril®), approved in the US in 2009, is currently indicated as adjunctive therapy for refractory complex partial seizures (rCPS) in patients ≥ 10 years old who have responded inadequately to several alternative treatments and as monotherapy for infantile spasms (IS) in patients 1 month to 2 years of age. Because of reports of vision loss following vigabatrin exposure, FDA approval required a risk evaluation mitigation strategy (REMS) program. Vigabatrin is only available in the US through Support, Help, And Resources for Epilepsy (SHARE), which includes a mandated registry. This article describes 5 years of demographic and treatment exposure data from adult patients (≥ 17 years old) in the US treated with vigabatrin and monitored in the ongoing Sabril® registry. Registry participation is mandatory for all US Sabril® prescribers and patients. A benefit-risk assessment must be documented by the physician for a patient to progress to maintenance therapy, defined as 1 month of vigabatrin treatment for patients with IS and 3 months for patients with rCPS. Ophthalmologic assessments must be documented during and after completion of therapy. As of August 26, 2014, a total of 6823 patients were enrolled in the registry, of which 1200 were adults at enrollment. Of these patients, 1031 (86%) were naïve to vigabatrin. The majority of adult patients (n=783, 65%) had previously been prescribed ≥ 4 AEDs, and 719 (60%) were receiving ≥ 3 concomitant AEDs at vigabatrin initiation. Prescribers submitted an initial ophthalmological assessment form for 863 patients; an ophthalmologic exam was not completed for 300 (35%) patients and thus, were considered exempted from vision testing. Of these patients, 128 (43%) were exempted for neurologic disabilities. Clinicians discontinued treatment in 8 patients because of visual field deficits (VFD) (5 patients naïve to vigabatrin and 3 patients previously exposed). Based on Kaplan-Meier survival estimates, it is

  15. Transition Readiness in Adolescents and Emerging Adults with Diabetes: The Role of Patient-Provider Communication

    PubMed Central

    Hilliard, Marisa; Sweenie, Rachel; Riekert, Kristin

    2013-01-01

    Transition from pediatric to adult care represents a high risk period for adolescents and emerging adults with diabetes. Fundamental differences between pediatric and adult care delivery models may contribute to increased risk for poor health outcomes. This review provides a brief overview of models of care in pediatric and adult settings and focuses on patient-provider communication content and quality as potential points of intervention to improve transition-related outcomes. This review also highlights disparities in transition and communication for adolescents and emerging adults from racial/ethnic minority groups and discusses recent changes in health care legislation that have significant implications for the transition process. Intervention opportunities include programs to enhance developmentally-appropriate patient-provider interactions and increased attention to promoting transition readiness skills. Improving patient-provider communication may hasten the development of vital self-advocacy skills needed in adult health care systems and, thus, help establish a lasting pattern of positive diabetes self-care. PMID:24014075

  16. Use of Patient Portals for Personal Health Information Management: The Older Adult Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Anne M.; Osterhage, Katie; Hartzler, Andrea; Joe, Jonathan; Lin, Lorelei; Kanagat, Natasha; Demiris, George

    2015-01-01

    The personal health information management (PHIM) practices and needs of older adults are poorly understood. We describe initial results from the UW SOARING project (Studying Older Adults & Researching Information Needs and Goals), a participatory design investigation of PHIM in older adults (60 years and older). We conducted in-depth interviews with older adults (n=74) living in a variety of residential settings about their management of personal health information. A surprising 20% of participants report using patient portals and another 16% reported prior use or anticipated use of portals in the future. Participants cite ease of access to health information and direct communication with providers as valuable portal features. Barriers to the use of patient portals include a general lack of computer proficiency, high internet costs and security concerns. Design features based on consideration of needs and practices of older adults will facilitate appeal and maximize usability; both are elements critical to adoption of tools such as patient portals that can support older adults and PHIM. PMID:26958263

  17. Fulminant VZV infection in an adult AIDS patient treated with steroids: a case report.

    PubMed

    Grilli, E; Baiocchini, A; Del Nonno, F; Petrosillo, N; Galati, V

    2014-05-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) typically causes a benign disease in childhood. However, VZV can lead to severe complication in immunocompromised patients, involving skin and nearly every organ system, with significant morbidity and mortality. VZV infection occurs more frequently in patients treated with steroids. Herein, we describe a case of rapidly fatal disseminated VZV infection with cutaneous and visceral involvement in an adult AIDS patient treated with steroids. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Molecular epidemiology of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in adult patients with cystic fibrosis in Northern Ireland.

    PubMed

    Clarke, L; Moore, J E; Millar, B C; Crowe, M; Xu, J; Goldsmith, C E; Murphy, R G; Dooley, J S G; Rendall, J; Elborn, J S

    2008-01-01

    Isolates (n = 51) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa obtained from the sputa of 29 adult patients attending the Regional Cystic Fibrosis Centre in Northern Ireland were compared using an enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequence (ERIC2) primer in a random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Resulting banding patterns showed a high degree of genetic heterogeneity among all isolates from the patients examined, suggesting a non-clonal relationship between isolates from these patients, when employing this genotyping technique.

  19. [Perspectives in the management of congenital heart defects in adult patients].

    PubMed

    Hartyánszky, István; Varga, Sándor; Havasi, Kálmán; Babik, Barna; Katona, Márta; Bogáts, Gábor

    2015-01-18

    Due to improving results in congenital heart surgery, the number of adult patients with congenital heart defect is increasing. The question is: what kind of problems can be managed in this patient-group? The authors review the different problems of management of congenital heart defects in adults based on national and international literature data. Simple defects recognised in adults, postoperative residual problems, changing of small grafts and valves, correction of primary or operated coarctation aortae can be usually managed without problems. A very close follow-up is necessary to establish the correct period for heart transplantation in patients with transposition of great arteries with Senning/Mustard operation, and univentricular heart corrected with "Fontan-circulation" type surgical procedure. The authors conclude that although the number of patients increases, only a few congenital heart diseases may cause problems. It seems important (1) to monitor asymptomatic patient who underwent operation (Fallot-IV, Ross procedure, etc.), (2) follow up regularly patients who underwent Senning/Mustard procedure (magnetic resonance imaging, echocardiography, brain natriuretic peptide measurement), (3) define the proper period of preparation for heart transplantation of patients with a univentricular heart, with special attention to the possibility of multiorgan (lung, liver, etc.) failure. Due to the improvement of foetal diagnosis of congenital heart defects, the number of patients with complex congenital heart defects is decreasing. The standard management of these patients could be primary heart transplantation in infancy.

  20. Long-term needs of adult patients with organic acidaemias: outcome and prognostic factors.

    PubMed

    Martín-Hernández, E; Lee, P J; Micciche, A; Grunewald, S; Lachmann, R H

    2009-08-01

    With improvements in the treatment of children with organic acidaemias (OA), the number surviving to adulthood is increasing. To plan appropriate services for their care it is important to know what their needs are. To describe the clinical and social problems affecting adult patients with OA. We reviewed the medical records of 15 adult patients diagnosed with OA. Social attainment (housing, schooling and occupation) was analysed. Nutritional status was evaluated by body mass index (BMI) and laboratory studies. Neurological and visceral complications were noted. Cognitive outcome was evaluated by psychometric testing and/or educational attainment. Seven had methylmalonic acidaemia (MMA), 4 isovaleric acidaemia (IVA) and 4 propionic acidaemia (PA). Ten were female, and median age was 23.5 years (range 18-48). All but three had late-onset disease. Two patients became pregnant during follow up. Four patients had obtained university degrees and were working. Three-quarters of the patients required some kind of social support. All had a good nutritional status. Height was normal in IVA and 3 PA patients. Osteoporosis was present in 2 out of 8 patients assessed. A variety of neurocognitive or visceral complications were seen in two-thirds of the patients. Metabolic decompensations were unusual. The approach to adult patients with OA has to be multidisciplinary, with the clinician and dietician as the core of the team, but with the collaboration of clinical nurses specialists, social workers and other specialist services and the support of a biochemical and molecular laboratory.

  1. Symptomatic central nervous system involvement in adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Alakel, Nael; Stölzel, Friedrich; Mohr, Brigitte; Kramer, Michael; Oelschlägel, Uta; Röllig, Christoph; Bornhäuser, Martin; Ehninger, Gerhard; Schaich, Markus

    2017-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) rarely involves the central nervous system (CNS). Little is known about the clinical course in adult AML patients since most studies examined pediatric patients. Therefore, this study analyzed the data of patients treated in three prospective trials of the "Study Alliance Leukemia" (SAL) study group for CNS involvement. In all, 3,261 AML patients included in the prospective AML96, AML2003, and AML60+ trials of the SAL study group were analyzed. Symptomatic patients underwent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) puncture and CNS involvement was diagnosed depending on morphology and/or flow cytometry of the CSF. Cytogenetic, molecular, clinical, and laboratory parameters were analyzed in order to identify risk factors. A total of 55 patients had proven symptomatic CNS involvement. Significantly more patients revealed CNS involvement at relapse (34 patients, 2.9%) compared with first diagnosis (21 patients, 0.6%), p<0.001. CNS involvement at initial diagnosis had a significantly higher frequency in patients with complex aberrant karyotypes, high serum lactate dehydrogenase activity, French-American-British M5 subtype, FLT3-internal tandem duplication (ITD) mutations alone, and co-occurrence of a FLT3-ITD and NPM1 mutation. Furthermore, AML patients with CNS involvement at diagnosis had an inferior outcome compared with patients without CNS involvement even if treated with intrathecal chemotherapy with an overall survival of 11% versus 30% at 5 years, p=0.004. This study analyzed the largest data set of adult AML patients with proven CNS involvement reported so far. The data demonstrated very low prevalence of CNS involvement at initial diagnosis in adult patients with AML, and described new risk factors. In patients with risk factors, intense diagnostic and treatment strategies should be employed in the future.

  2. Anaphylaxis: lack of hospital doctors' knowledge of adrenaline (epinephrine) administration in adults could endanger patients' safety.

    PubMed

    Droste, J; Narayan, N

    2012-06-01

    Adrenaline (epinephrine) is the first line drug to be given in anaphylaxis and can save patients' lives. Conversely, incorrect administration of adrenaline in anaphylaxis has caused patients serious harm, including death. We compared the survey results of doctors' knowledge of adrenaline administration in adults of two District General Hospitals Trusts in England and found, that from 284 Hospital Doctors, 14.4% (n = 41) would administer adrenaline as recommended by published anaphylaxis guidelines. This survey comparison shows that a significant number of hospital doctors, regardless of seniority and specialty, have an educational deficit regarding correct administration of adrenaline (epinephrine) administration in adults with anaphylaxis. Multilevel strategies to educate doctors and prevent patient harm are needed. We propose a mnemonic for remembering the recommended treatment for anaphylaxis in the adult: "A Thigh 500" forAdrenaline into the antero-lateral thigh, 500 micrograms.

  3. Adherence to pressure garment therapy in adult burn patients.

    PubMed

    Ripper, S; Renneberg, B; Landmann, C; Weigel, G; Germann, G

    2009-08-01

    Pressure garment therapy (PGT) is a generally accepted procedure to prevent hypertrophic scarring after severe burns. Wearing pressure garments is uncomfortable and challenging for the patient and, consequently adherence is low. In order to improve adherence, precise knowledge about the advantages and disadvantages of PGT is necessary. In this study we investigated specific aspects which inhibit or reinforce the application of PGT on the patients' part. Twenty-one patients participated in a semi-structured interview concerning their experiences with PGT. The complaints most frequently mentioned were 'physical and functional limitations' caused by the garments, 'additional effort' created by the need to care for garments and 'perceived deficiencies' of the treatment. At the same time, most of the patients reported coping strategies used to persevere with the therapy. Coping can be categorised into 'behavioural' and 'cognitive coping strategies'. Besides the 'expectation of success', 'emotional' as well as 'practical support' and experiencing 'good outcome' were motivating factors for the patients. Based on the analyses of limitations and resources, recommendations for future interventions enhancing adherence are outlined.

  4. Investigation of attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder in adult patients with atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Cicek, Demet; Kandi, Basak; Dertlioglu, Selma Bakar; Gunay, Sennur; Halisdemir, Nurhan; Turgay, Atilla; Colak, Cemil

    2009-01-01

    Background. Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common chronic inflammatory disease that is associated with significant psychosocial morbidity and a decrease in health-related quality of life. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder may be present in atopic dermatitis patients. Objective. The present study aims to investigate the co-presence of ADHD in adult patients with AD. Material and method. The study registered 60 adult patients with AD (48 females and 12 males) and 50 non-atopic control subjects (38 females and 12 males). The AD patient group and the control group were assessed using the Turgay adult Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADD/ADHD) DSM-IV-Based Diagnostic Screening and Rating Scale (Turkish Version), which was studied by a team of psychologists and psychiatrists in Turkey for validity, reliability and norms. The scale covers three dimensions of the disease, namely inattention, hyperactivity and impulsivity, and associated features of ADHD. The groups were compared and contrasted in terms of their similarities and differences in ADD/ADHD symptoms. Results. Three sub-dimensions of ADD/ADHD scale (Attention Deficit, Hyperactivity/ Impulsivity and Problem subdivisions) in AD patients were found statistically significantly elevated relative to controls (P<0.001, P<0.001, P<0.001, respectively). Conclusions. In conclusion we established the co-presence of ADHD in AD patients in the adult age group.

  5. Problems in the organization of care for patients with adult congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Meijboom, Folkert; Mulder, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of congenital heart disease among adults in Europe, or in any country in Europe, is not known. This is due to a lack of agreement on the incidence of congenital heart disease, with estimations varying from four per 1000 births to 50 per 1000 births, and it is not known how many patients with congenital heart disease have died. Based on several studies that estimated and calculated the number of adult patients with congenital heart disease, the number of patients should be much higher than the number of patients that are actually seen in specialized centres throughout Europe. This implies that either a large proportion of adult patients with congenital heart disease do not receive appropriate medical care, or that the calculations and estimations are grossly wrong. A combination of the two is also possible. A substantial expansion of the number and size of specialized centres for adult congenital heart disease is advocated, but since setting up (and running) a service for this disease is a costly affair, and because uncertainty remains about the actual number of patients needing specialized care, this has been difficult to realize in most European countries in the past few years.

  6. Towards a new conceptualization of depression in older adult cancer patients: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Saracino, Rebecca M; Rosenfeld, Barry; Nelson, Christian J

    2016-12-01

    Identifying depression in older adults with cancer presents a set of unique challenges, as it combines the confounding influences of cancer and its treatment with the developmental changes associated with aging. This paper reviews the phenomenology of depression in older adults, and individuals diagnosed with cancer. PsychInfo, PubMed, Web of Science, and Google Scholar databases were searched for English-language studies addressing the phenomenology, symptoms, or assessment of depression in older adults and those with cancer. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders (DSM) criteria that appear to be relevant to both older adults and cancer patients are anhedonia, concentration difficulties, sleep disturbances, psychomotor retardation/agitation, and loss of energy. Possible alternative criteria that may be important considerations included constructs such as loss of purpose, loneliness, and irritability in older adults. Among cancer patients, tearfulness, social withdrawal, and not participating in treatment despite ability to do so were identified as potentially important symptoms. Current DSM criteria may not adequately assess depression in older cancer patients and alternative criteria may be important to inform the understanding and identification of depression in this population. Enhancing diagnostic accuracy of depression is important as both the over-diagnosis and under-diagnosis is accompanied with significant costs. Thus, continued research exploring the phenomenology and identifying effective indicators of depression in older cancer patients is needed.

  7. Towards a new conceptualization of depression in older adult cancer patients: a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Saracino, Rebecca M.; Rosenfeld, Barry; Nelson, Christian J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Identifying depression in older adults with cancer presents a set of unique challenges, as it combines the confounding influences of cancer and its treatment with the developmental changes associated with aging. This paper reviews the phenomenology of depression in older adults, and individuals diagnosed with cancer. Method PsychInfo, PubMed, Web of Science, and Google Scholar databases were searched for English-language studies addressing the phenomenology, symptoms, or assessment of depression in older adults and those with cancer. Results The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders (DSM) criteria that appear to be relevant to both older adults and cancer patients are anhedonia, concentration difficulties, sleep disturbances, psychomotor retardation/agitation, and loss of energy. Possible alternative criteria that may be important considerations included constructs such as loss of purpose, loneliness, and irritability in older adults. Among cancer patients, tearfulness, social withdrawal, and not participating in treatment despite ability to do so were identified as potentially important symptoms. Conclusions Current DSM criteria may not adequately assess depression in older cancer patients and alternative criteria may be important to inform the understanding and identification of depression in this population. Enhancing diagnostic accuracy of depression is important as both the over-diagnosis and under-diagnosis is accompanied with significant costs. Thus, continued research exploring the phenomenology and identifying effective indicators of depression in older cancer patients is needed. PMID:26312455

  8. Symptoms and aetiology of delirium: a comparison of elderly and adult patients.

    PubMed

    Grover, S; Agarwal, M; Sharma, A; Mattoo, S K; Avasthi, A; Chakrabarti, S; Malhotra, S; Kulhara, P; Bas, D

    2013-06-01

    OBJECTIVE. To compare the symptoms of delirium as assessed by the Delirium Rating Scale-Revised-98 (DRS-R-98) and associated aetiologies in adult and elderly patients seen in a consultation-liaison service. METHODS. A total of 321 consecutive patients with a DSM-IV-TR diagnosis of delirium were assessed on the DRS-R-98 and a study-specific aetiology checklist. RESULTS. Of the 321 patients, 245 (76%) aged 18 to 64 years formed the adult group, while 76 (24%) formed the elderly group (≥ 65 years). The prevalence and severity of various symptoms of delirium as assessed using the DRS-R-98 were similar across the 2 groups, except for the adult group having statistically higher prevalence and severity scores for thought process abnormalities and lability of affect. For both groups and the whole sample, factor analysis yielded a 3-factor model for the phenomenology. In the 2 groups, the DRS-R-98 item loadings showed subtle differences across various factors. The 2 groups were similar for the mean number of aetiologies associated with delirium, the mean number being 3. However, the 2 groups differed with respect to hepatic derangement, substance intoxication, withdrawal, and postpartum causes being more common in the adult group, in contrast lung disease and cardiac abnormalities were more common in the elderly group. CONCLUSION. Adult and elderly patients with delirium are similar with respect to the distribution of various symptoms, motor subtypes, and associated aetiologies.

  9. Oral Impacts on Quality of Life in Adult Patients with Class I, II and III Malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Javed, Omair; Bernabé, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    To compare the social impact of malocclusion on quality of life between adult patients with Angle Class I, II and III malocclusion. A total of 222 adult patients (139, 42 and 41 with Angle Class I, II and III malocclusion, respectively) were recruited voluntarily from those attending the Orthodontic Clinic of Khyber College of Dentistry in Pesh awar, Pakistan. Participants were asked to complete the Urdu version of the short form of the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14), which was previously validated for this study. Multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) was used to compare the seven OHIP-14 domains scores and the total score between patients with malocclusion Class I, II and III. Adults with Class III malocclusion had a significantly higher OHIP-14 total score than those with Class I malocclusion (a mean difference of 5 units between groups), but there were no differences between other Angle malocclusion groups. In addition, adults with Class III malocclusion reported greater impacts on the three OHIP-14 disability domains (physical, psychological and social) than those with Class I malocclusion. No significant interactions with sex and age were found. These findings suggest that adult patients with Class III malocclusion had a poorer quality of life than those with Class I malocclusion. Differences were mainly found in the physical, psychological and social disability domains of the OHIP-14 instrument.

  10. Cluster Analysis on Longitudinal Data of Patients with Adult-Onset Asthma.

    PubMed

    Ilmarinen, Pinja; Tuomisto, Leena E; Niemelä, Onni; Tommola, Minna; Haanpää, Jussi; Kankaanranta, Hannu

    Previous cluster analyses on asthma are based on cross-sectional data. To identify phenotypes of adult-onset asthma by using data from baseline (diagnostic) and 12-year follow-up visits. The Seinäjoki Adult Asthma Study is a 12-year follow-up study of patients with new-onset adult asthma. K-means cluster analysis was performed by using variables from baseline and follow-up visits on 171 patients to identify phenotypes. Five clusters were identified. Patients in cluster 1 (n = 38) were predominantly nonatopic males with moderate smoking history at baseline. At follow-up, 40% of these patients had developed persistent obstruction but the number of patients with uncontrolled asthma (5%) and rhinitis (10%) was the lowest. Cluster 2 (n = 19) was characterized by older men with heavy smoking history, poor lung function, and persistent obstruction at baseline. At follow-up, these patients were mostly uncontrolled (84%) despite daily use of inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) with add-on therapy. Cluster 3 (n = 50) consisted mostly of nonsmoking females with good lung function at diagnosis/follow-up and well-controlled/partially controlled asthma at follow-up. Cluster 4 (n = 25) had obese and symptomatic patients at baseline/follow-up. At follow-up, these patients had several comorbidities (40% psychiatric disease) and were treated daily with ICS and add-on therapy. Patients in cluster 5 (n = 39) were mostly atopic and had the earliest onset of asthma, the highest blood eosinophils, and FEV1 reversibility at diagnosis. At follow-up, these patients used the lowest ICS dose but 56% were well controlled. Results can be used to predict outcomes of patients with adult-onset asthma and to aid in development of personalized therapy (NCT02733016 at ClinicalTrials.gov). Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Listening to older adults: elderly patients' experience of care in residency and practicing physician outpatient clinics.

    PubMed

    Hess, Brian J; Lynn, Lorna A; Conforti, Lisa N; Holmboe, Eric S

    2011-05-01

    The population of people aged 65 and older is rapidly growing. Research has demonstrated significant quality gaps in the clinical care of older patients in the United States, especially in training programs. Little is known about how older patients' experience with care delivered in residency clinics compares with that delivered by practicing physicians. Using patient surveys from the American Board of Internal Medicine Care of the Vulnerable Elderly Practice Improvement Module, the quality of care provided to adults aged 65 and older by 52 internal medicine and family medicine residency clinics and by a group of 144 practicing physicians was studied. The residency clinics received 2,213 patient surveys, and the practicing physicians received 4,204. Controlling for age and overall health status, patients from the residency clinic sample were less likely to report receiving guidance and interventions for important aspects of care for older adults than patients from the practicing physician sample. The largest difference was observed in providing ways to help patients prevent falls or treat problems with balance or walking (42.1% vs 61.8%, P<.001). Patients from the residency clinic sample were less likely to rate their overall care as high (77.5% vs 88.8%, P<.001). Patient surveys reveal important deficiencies in processes of care that are more pronounced for patients cared for in residency clinics. Quality of patient experience and communication are vital aspects of overall quality of care, especially for older adults. Physician education at all levels, faculty development, and practice system redesign are needed to ensure that the care needs of older adults are met. © 2011, Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2011, The American Geriatrics Society.

  12. Patient safety in the rehabilitation of the adult with an amputation.

    PubMed

    Latlief, Gail; Elnitsky, Christine; Hart-Hughes, Stephanie; Phillips, Samuel L; Adams-Koss, Laurel; Kent, Robert; Highsmith, M Jason

    2012-05-01

    This article reviews and summarizes the literature on patient safety issues in the rehabilitation of adults with an amputation. Safety issues in the following areas are discussed; the prosthesis, falls, wound care, pain, and treatment of complex patients. Specific recommendations for further research and implementation strategies to prevent injury and improve safety are also provided. Communication between interdisciplinary team members and patient and caregiver education are crucial to executing a safe treatment plan. The multidisciplinary rehabilitation team members should feel comfortable discussing safety issues with patients and be able to recommend preventive approaches to patients as appropriate.

  13. Social Anxiety Level in Adult Patients With Epilepsy and Their First-Degree Cohabiting Relatives.

    PubMed

    Altintas, Ebru; Yerdelen, V Deniz; Taskintuna, Nilgün

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy affects not only the patient but also the patient's cohabiting relatives, to various degrees. This study investigated state and trait anxiety, depression, and social fear and avoidance levels in 48 adult patients with epilepsy and 48 family members, compared with 43 healthy control subjects, using the Beck Anxiety Inventory, the Beck Depression Inventory, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale. The results suggested that the patients and their first-degree relatives had higher levels of depression, state and trait anxiety, and avoidance compared with healthy subjects. The mothers of patients with epilepsy had the highest level of depression and anxiety.

  14. Perioperative Hemoglobin Trajectory in Adult Cardiac Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Scott, David A.; Tung, Hon-Ming Andrew; Slater, Reuben

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Preoperative anemia and nadir hemoglobin (Hb) during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) have been identified as significant risk factors for blood transfusion during cardiac surgery. The aim of this study was to confirm the association between preoperative anemia, perioperative fluid management, and blood transfusion. In addition, the proportion of elective cardiac surgery patients presenting for surgery with anemia was identified to examine whether the opportunity exists for timely diagnosis and intervention. Data from referral until hospital discharge were comprehensively reviewed over a 12-month period for all nonemergency cardiac surgical patients operated on in our institution. Of the 342 patients identified, elective cases were referred a median of 35 days before preoperative clinic and operated on a median of 14 days subsequently. Subacute cases had a median of 3 days from referral to surgery. As per the World Health Organization (WHO) criteria for anemia, 24.2% of elective and 29.6% of subacute patients were anemic. Blood transfusion was administered to 46.2% of patients during their admission. Transfusion was more likely in patients who were female (odds ratio [OR]: 2.45, 95%confidence interval [CI]: 1.28–4.70), had a low body mass index (BMI) (OR: .89, 95% CI: .84–.94), preoperative anemia (OR: 5.15, 95% CI: 2.59–10.24), or renal impairment (OR: 5.44, 95% CI: 2.42–12.22). Hemodilution minimization strategies reduced the Hb fall during CPB, but not transfusion rates. This study identifies a high prevalence of preoperative anemia with sufficient time for elective referrals to undergo appropriate diagnosis and interventions. It also confirms that low red cell mass (anemia and low BMI) and renal impairment are predictors of perioperative blood transfusion. Perfusion strategies to reduce hemodilution are effective at minimizing the intraoperative fall in Hb concentration but did not influence transfusion rate. PMID:26543251

  15. Underdiagnosis of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in Adult Patients: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Quintero, Javier; Anand, Ernie; Casillas, Marta; Upadhyaya, Himanshu P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To raise awareness of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) as an underdiagnosed, undertreated, often comorbid, and debilitating condition in adults. Data Sources: PubMed was searched using combinations of keywords, including ADHD, adult, diagnosis, identify, prevalence, and comorbid, to find articles published between 1976 and 2013. Study Selection: In total, 99 articles were selected for inclusion on the basis of their relevance to the objective and importance to and representation of ADHD research, including international guidelines for adults with ADHD. Results: In a large proportion of children with ADHD, symptoms persist into adulthood. However, although adults with ADHD often experience chaotic lifestyles, with impaired educational and vocational achievement and higher risks of substance abuse and imprisonment, many remain undiagnosed and/or untreated. ADHD is usually accompanied by other psychiatric comorbidities (such as major depressive disorder, anxiety disorder, and alcohol abuse). Indeed, adults with ADHD are more likely to present to a psychiatric clinic for treatment of their comorbid disorders than for ADHD, and their ADHD symptoms are often mistaken for those of their comorbidities. Untreated ADHD in adults with psychiatric comorbidities leads to poor clinical and functional outcomes for the patient even if comorbidities are treated. Effective treatment of adults’ ADHD improves symptoms, emotional lability, and patient functioning, often leading to favorable outcomes (eg, safer driving, reduced criminality). A few medications have now been approved for use in adults with ADHD, while a multimodal approach involving psychotherapy has also shown promising results. Conclusions General psychiatrists should familiarize themselves with the symptoms of ADHD in adults in order to diagnose and manage ADHD and comorbidities appropriately in these patients. PMID:25317367

  16. Similarities and differences between pediatric and adult patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Tarr, T; Dérfalvi, B; Győri, N; Szántó, A; Siminszky, Z; Malik, A; Szabó, A J; Szegedi, G; Zeher, M

    2015-07-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multifactorial autoimmune disease with highest prevalence among women of childbearing age. However, children younger than 16 years also can develop SLE (childhood-onset lupus/juvenile-type SLE). The aim of our study was to compare the clinical course of adult and pediatric-onset SLE. Data from 342 adult patients followed at the University of Debrecen, Hungary, and 79 children documented in the Hungarian National Pediatric SLE registry were analyzed using hospital medical records. Organ manifestations, laboratory parameters, and immunoserological characteristics were reviewed and the results were evaluated using SPSS for Windows software.Gender distribution was not significantly different between groups with disease starting in childhood vs adulthood. The prevalence of the following manifestations was significantly higher for pediatric than for adult-onset disease including: lupus nephritis (43% pediatric vs 26.4% for adult-onset), hematological disorders (57% vs 36.4%), photosensitivity (20% vs 9%), butterfly rash (61% vs 35.5%) and mucosal ulceration (11.4% vs 4%). For adult-onset SLE, neurological symptoms (30% vs 6%) and polyarthritis (86% vs 68%) occurred significantly more frequently than in children. Anti-SSA, anti-SSB and antiphospholipid antibodies were detected at significantly higher levels in adult-onset patients compared to those in pediatrics. Children were more commonly given high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin treatment (6.3% vs 0.6%) and mycophenolate mofetil (15.2% vs 5.3%) than adults.These results suggest that pediatric and adult-onset SLE differ in multiple aspects, and it is important to recognize these differences for optimal treatment and prognosis of these patients.

  17. Clinical relevance of multiple respiratory virus detection in adult patients with acute respiratory illness.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seong-Ho; Chung, Jin-Won; Kim, Hye Ryoun

    2015-04-01

    Because increasing numbers of nasopharyngeal swab specimens from adult patients with acute respiratory illness (ARI) are being tested by respiratory virus (RV) multiplex reverse transcriptase PCR (RVM-RT-PCR), multiple RV detection (MRVD) is being encountered more frequently. However, the clinical relevance of MRVD in adult patients has rarely been evaluated. The clinical characteristics of hospitalized adult patients with ARI and MRVD by RVM-RT-PCR tests were compared to those of patients with single RV detection (SRVD) during a single year at a tertiary care center. MRVD was observed in 26 of the 190 adult patients (13.7%). The patients with MRVD had a higher incidence of chronic lung disease than the patients with SRVD (34.6% versus 15.9%, crude odds ratio [OR]=2.81, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.13 to 6.98, P=0.03). Although the former were more likely than the latter to receive mechanical ventilation (19.2% versus 6.7%, crude OR=3.31, 95% CI=1.05 to 10.47, P=0.049), the length of hospital stay (median, 7 versus 6.5 days; P=0.66), and the in-hospital mortality rate (7.7% versus 4.3%, crude OR=1.87, 95% CI=0.37 to 9.53, P=0.35) were not different between the two groups. In multivariate analysis, chronic lung disease was associated with MRVD (adjusted OR=3.08, 95% CI=1.12 to 8.46, P=0.03). In summary, it was not uncommon to encounter adult patients with ARI and MRVD by RVM-RT-PCR tests of nasopharyngeal swab specimens. MRVD was associated with chronic lung disease rather than the severity of the ARI.

  18. Percutaneous Endovascular Treatment of Hepatic Artery Stenosis in Adult and Pediatric Patients After Liver Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Maruzzelli, Luigi; Miraglia, Roberto Caruso, Settimo; Milazzo, Mariapina; Mamone, Giuseppe; Gruttadauria, Salvatore; Spada, Marco; Luca, Angelo; Gridelli, Bruno

    2010-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of percutaneous endovascular techniques for the treatment of hepatic artery stenosis (HAS) occurring after liver transplantation (LT) in adult and pediatrics patients. From February 2003 to March 2009, 25 patients (15 adults and 10 children) whose developed HAS after LT were referred to our interventional radiology unit. Technical success was achieved in 96% (24 of 25) of patients. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) was performed in 13 patients (7 children), and stenting was performed in 11 patients (2 children). After the procedure, all patients were followed-up with liver function tests, Doppler ultrasound, and/or computed tomography. Mean follow-up was 15.8 months (range 5 days to 58 months). Acute hepatic artery thrombosis occurred immediately after stent deployment in 2 patients and was successfully treated with local thrombolysis. One patient developed severe HA spasm, which reverted after 24 h. After the procedure, mean trans-stenotic pressure gradient decreased from 30.5 to 6.2 mmHg. Kaplan-Meyer curve of HA primary patency was 77% at 1 and 2 years. During the follow-up period, 5 patients (20%) had recurrent stenosis, and 2 patients (8.3%) had late thrombosis. Two of 7 patients with stenosis/thrombosis underwent surgical revascularization (n = 1) and liver retransplantation (n = 1). Six (25%) patients died during follow-up, but overall mortality was not significantly different when comparing patients having patent hepatic arteries with those having recurrent stenosis/thrombosis. There were no significant differences in recurrent stenosis/thrombosis and mortality comparing patients treated by PTA versus stenting and comparing adult versus pediatric status. Percutaneous interventional treatment of HAS in LT recipients is safe and effective and decreases the need for surgical revascularization and liver retransplantation. However, the beneficial effects for survival are not clear, probably because

  19. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation in adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Marks, David I; Alonso, Laura; Radia, Rohini

    2014-12-01

    This review discusses the use of prognostic factors, patient and donor selection, choice of conditioning regimens, and timing of transplant. It also describes the management of Philadelphia-positive acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) and central nervous system disease. All aggressively treated adults with ALL should be considered for allogeneic transplantation and tissue typed at diagnosis. We further suggest that eligible patients be entered into clinical trials (that incorporate transplantation); these unselected prospective outcome data are essential to evaluate the true value of allogeneic transplantation in adults with ALL.

  20. Simultaneous premaxillary repositioning and cheiloplasty in adult patients with unrepaired bilateral cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ui-Lyong; Cho, Jun-Bum; Choung, Pill-Hoon

    2013-03-01

    Primary cheiloplasty in adult patients with unrepaired complete bilateral cleft lip and palate is quite challenging due to severe premaxillary anterior projection. To get the best repair results, the author carried out repositioning of the premaxilla and repair of the lip deformity in a single stage. Positive results for the primary lip repair and appropriate repositioning of the premaxilla were achieved. No avascular necrosis of the premaxilla was observed. Repositioning of the premaxilla and repair of the lip deformity in a single operation appears to be a reliable method for treating adult patients with previously unrepaired or poorly repaired bilateral cleft lip and palate.

  1. [Choosing an appliance adapted to each adult stoma patient].

    PubMed

    Chaumier, Danièle

    2011-09-01

    A stoma, following a surgical procedure, is the connection of a section of the digestive or urinary system to the skin. It requires the patient to wear a collection device, appliance of which several types exist and which can be adapted to the stoma, the peristomal skin, the type of waste and the morphology of the person.

  2. Getting Patients Walking: A Pilot Study of Mobilizing Older Adult Patients via a Nurse-Driven Intervention.

    PubMed

    King, Barbara J; Steege, Linsey M; Winsor, Katie; VanDenbergh, Shelly; Brown, Cynthia J

    2016-10-01

    To develop a system-based intervention including five components that target barriers to nurse-initiated patient ambulation. Pilot study of Mobilizing Older adult patients VIa a Nurse-driven intervention (MOVIN). Twenty-six bed general medical unit. Nursing staff (registered nurses and certified nursing assistants) were recruited to participate in focus groups. Information on frequency and distance patients ambulated and nursing staff documentation of patient ambulation were retrieved from the electronic medical record. Regression discontinuity analysis was used to determine a difference between the preintervention and intervention periods in ambulation occurrence, ambulation distance, and percentage of numeric documentation of ambulation. Thematic analysis was used to analyze focus group interviews. A statistically significant increase in number of occurrences (t = 4.18, P = .001) and total distance (t = 2.75, P = .01) and a significantly higher positive slope in percentage of numeric documentation was found during the intervention than before the intervention. Thematic analysis identified three central categories (shifting ownership, feeling supported, making ambulation visible) that describe the effect of MOVIN on nursing staff behaviors and perceptions of the intervention. Decreasing loss of independent ambulation in hospitalized older adults requires new and innovative approaches to addressing barriers that prevent nurse-initiated patient ambulation. MOVIN is a promising system-based intervention to promoting patient ambulation and improving outcomes for hospitalized older adults. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  3. Yoga in adult cancer: an exploratory, qualitative analysis of the patient experience.

    PubMed

    McCall, Marcy; Thorne, Sally; Ward, Alison; Heneghan, Carl

    2015-07-22

    Some patients receiving treatment in conventional health care systems access therapeutic yoga outside their mainstream care to improve cancer symptoms. Given the current knowledge gap around patient preferences and documented experiences of yoga in adult cancer, this study aimed to describe patient-reported benefits, barriers and characteristics of programming for yoga practice during conventional treatment. In depth semi-structured interviews (n=10) were conducted in men and women recruited from cancer care clinics in Vancouver, Canada using a purposive sampling technique. The exploratory interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed and analyzed using Interpretive Description methodology and constant comparative analysis methods. Four themes emerged from the data to address our research objectives: patient-perceived benefits of yoga, reasons and motivations for practising yoga, hurdles and barriers to practising yoga, and advice for effective yoga program delivery in adult cancer. Several patients reported yoga reduced stress and other symptoms associated with cancer treatment. Thematic analysis found the social dimension of group yoga was important, as well as yoga's ability to encourage personal empowerment and awareness of physical body and self. Barriers to yoga adherence from the patient perspective included lack of time, scheduling conflicts and worries about financial burden. This small, diverse sample of patients reported positive experiences and no adverse effects following yoga practice for management of cancer and its symptoms. Results of this qualitative study identified patient-reported preferences, barriers and characteristics of yoga intervention optimal during adult cancer treatment.

  4. A snapshot of the adult spina bifida patient – high incidence of urologic procedures

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Joceline S.; Greiman, Alyssa; Casey, Jessica T.; Mukherjee, Shubhra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction To describe the urologic outcomes of contemporary adult spina bifida patients managed in a multidisciplinary clinic. Material and methods A retrospective chart review of patients seen in our adult spina bifida clinic from January 2004 to November 2011 was performed to identify urologic management, urologic surgeries, and co-morbidities. Results 225 patients were identified (57.8% female, 42.2% male). Current median age was 30 years (IQR 27, 36) with a median age at first visit of 25 years (IQR 22, 30). The majority (70.7%) utilized clean intermittent catheterization, and 111 patients (49.3%) were prescribed anticholinergic medications. 65.8% had urodynamics performed at least once, and 56% obtained appropriate upper tract imaging at least every other year while under our care. 101 patients (44.9%) underwent at least one urologic surgical procedure during their lifetime, with a total of 191 procedures being performed, of which stone procedures (n = 51, 26.7%) were the most common. Other common procedures included continence procedures (n = 35, 18.3%) and augmentation cystoplasty (n = 29, 15.2%). Only 3.6% had a documented diagnosis of chronic kidney disease and 0.9% with end-stage renal disease. Conclusions Most adult spina bifida patient continue on anticholinergic medications and clean intermittent catheterization. A large percentage of patients required urologic procedures in adulthood. Patients should be encouraged to utilize conservative and effective bladder management strategies to reduce their risk of renal compromise. PMID:27123330

  5. Adult patients' adjustability to orthodontic appliances. Part I: a comparison between Labial, Lingual, and Invisalign™.

    PubMed

    Shalish, Miri; Cooper-Kazaz, Rena; Ivgi, Inbal; Canetti, Laura; Tsur, Boaz; Bachar, Eytan; Chaushu, Stella

    2012-12-01

    This prospective study examined the adult patient's perception of recovery after insertion of three types of orthodontic appliances: Buccal, Lingual and Invisalign. The sample consisted of sixty-eight adult patients (45 females and 23 males) who comprised three groups: 28 Buccal, 19 Lingual, and 21 Invisalign patients. After appliance insertion, patients completed a Health-Related Quality of Life questionnaire daily for the first week and again on day 14, in order to assess patients' perception of pain and analgesic consumption. In addition, four areas of dysfunction were assessed: oral dysfunction, eating disturbances, general activity parameters, and oral symptoms. Lingual appliance was associated with more severe pain and analgesic consumption, the greatest oral and general dysfunction, and the most difficult and longest recovery. The Invisalign patients complained of relatively high levels of pain in the first days after insertion; however this group was characterized by the lowest level of oral symptoms and by a similar level of general activity disturbances and oral dysfunction compared to the Buccal appliance. Many Lingual and some Buccal patients did not reach a full recovery from their eating difficulties by the end of the study period. The present study provides information to adult patients and clinicians assisting them in choosing the most appropriate treatment modality in relation to Health-Related Quality of Life parameters.

  6. Ventriculoperitoneal shunt surgery outcome in adult transition patients with pediatric-onset hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Reddy, G Kesava; Bollam, Papireddy; Caldito, Gloria; Guthikonda, Bharat; Nanda, Anil

    2012-02-01

    Ventriculoperitoneal shunting remains the most widely used neurosurgical procedure for the management of hydrocephalus, albeit with many complications. To review and assess the long-term clinical outcome of ventriculoperitoneal shunt surgery in adult transition patients with pediatric-onset hydrocephalus. Patients 17 years or older who underwent ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement for hydrocephalus during their pediatric years (younger than 17 years) were included. Medical charts, operative reports, imaging studies, and clinical follow- up evaluations were reviewed and analyzed retrospectively. A total of 105 adult patients with pediatric-onset hydrocephalus were included. The median age of the patients was 25.9 years. The median age at the time of the initial ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement was 1.0 year. The median follow-up time for all patients was 17.7 years. The incidence of shunt failure at 6 months was 15.2%, and the overall incidence of shunt failure was 82.9%. Single shunt revision occurred in 26.7% of the patients, and 56.2% had multiple shunt revisions. The cause of hydrocephalus was significantly associated with shunt survival for patients who had shunt failure before the age of 17 years. Being pediatric at first shunt revision, infection, proximal shunt complication, and other causes were independently associated with multiple shunt failures. The findings of this retrospective study show that the long-term ventriculoperitoneal shunt survival remains low in adult transition patients with pediatric-onset hydrocephalus.

  7. [Quality of life in adult patient (Tunisian) with severe OSA].

    PubMed

    Kacem, I; Kalboussi, H; Ben Salem, H; Maoua, M; El Guedri, S; Laayouni, M; Abdelghani, A; Boughattas, W; Brahem, A; Debbabi, F; El Maalel, O; Chatti, S; Benzarti, M; Mrizak, N

    2017-09-01

    The negative impact of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) on quality of life of affected individuals is a central consequence of this disease. The recognition of the quality of life as a therapeutic target is a relatively new concept. To evaluate the quality of life and its determinants in patients with OSA. We conducted a cross-sectional study during the period from 1st July 2012 to 30th June 2013. The target population was patients with OSA and in employment examined in consultations of pneumology in the teaching hospital Farhat-Hached in Sousse (Tunisia). This study was based on a generic questionnaire (SF-36) to assess the quality of life. The study population included 103 cases with a mean age of 55.15±11.4years and a sex ratio of 0.71. Our patients were obese in 95.1 % of cases with an average BMI of 39.13±7.19kg/m(2). The majority of our patients had an impaired quality of life with an average score of 44.76 (SF36) and extremes of 22 and 70. There was a positive linear relationship between physical and mental components of the SF-36 and gender, age, BMI, and anxiety and depressive disorders. The OSA is a demanding disease whose impact on the quality of life seems important and requires special attention. The management of this disease should not be limited to controlling the disease but aspire to overall patient satisfaction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Suicide attempts and self-injurious behaviours in adolescent and adult patients with borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Marianne; Tomas, Irene Alvarez; Temes, Christina M; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M; Aguirre, Blaise A; Zanarini, Mary C

    2017-08-01

    Prevalence data on self-mutilation and suicide attempts for adolescent borderline personality disorder (BPD) are currently not available. The purpose of this paper was to determine the frequency and methods of two forms of physically self-destructive acts (i.e. self-mutilation and suicide attempts) reported by adolescent borderline inpatients in one of the largest samples to date and to compare these results with a similarly diagnosed and assessed group of adult borderline inpatients. A total of 104 adolescent inpatients with BPD and 290 adult inpatients with BPD were interviewed about their lifetime history of physically self-destructive acts. The overall rates of self-mutilation (about 90%) and suicide attempts (about 75%) were similar during index admission for both adolescent and adult borderline patients. However, adolescents reported significantly higher rates of extreme levels of lifetime self-mutilation (e.g. >25 and >50 episodes) and cutting in particular, as compared with adult BPD. In contrast, borderline adults were significantly more likely to report a history of numerous (five or more) suicide attempts than adolescents with BPD. Self-mutilation and suicide attempts among adolescent borderline patients are prevalent and serious. Taken together, these results suggest that extreme levels of self-mutilation distinguish adolescent BPD from adults with BPD. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome in 41 adults: the illness, the patients, and problems of management

    PubMed Central

    Fleisher, David R; Gornowicz, Blake; Adams, Kathleen; Burch, Richard; Feldman, Edward J

    2005-01-01

    Background Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome (CVS) is a disorder characterized by recurrent, stereotypic episodes of incapacitating nausea, vomiting and other symptoms, separated by intervals of comparative wellness. This report describes the clinical features, co-morbidities and problems encountered in management of 41 adult patients who met the diagnostic criteria for CVS. Methods This is a retrospective study of adults with CVS seen between 1994 and 2003. Follow-up data were obtained by mailed questionnaires. Results Age of onset ranged from 2 to 49 years. The duration of CVS at the time of consultation ranged from less than 1 year to 49 years. CVS episodes were stereotypic in respect of their hours of onset, symptomatology and length. Ninety-three percent of patients had recognizable prodromes. Half of the patients experienced a constellation of symptoms consisting of CVS episodes, migraine diathesis, inter-episodic dyspeptic nausea and a history of panic attacks. Deterioration in the course of CVS is indicated by coalescence of episodes in time. The prognosis of CVS is favorable in the majority of patients. Conclusion CVS is a disabling disorder affecting adults as well as children. Because its occurrence in adults is little known, patients experience delayed or mis-diagnosis and ineffectual, sometimes inappropriately invasive management. PMID:16368014

  10. 22q11.2 deletion syndrome lowers seizure threshold in adult patients without epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Wither, Robert G; Borlot, Felippe; MacDonald, Alex; Butcher, Nancy J; Chow, Eva W C; Bassett, Anne S; Andrade, Danielle M

    2017-06-01

    Previous studies examining seizures in patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) have focused primarily on children and adolescents. In this study we investigated the prevalence and characteristics of seizures and epilepsy in an adult 22q11.2DS population. The medical records of 202 adult patients with 22q11.2DS were retrospectively reviewed for documentation of seizures, electroencephalography (EEG) reports, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. Epilepsy status was assigned in accordance with 2010 International League Against Epilepsy Classification. Of 202 patients, 32 (15.8%) had a documented history of seizure. Of these 32, 23 (71.8%) had acute symptomatic seizures, usually associated with hypocalcemia and/or antipsychotic or antidepressant use. Nine patients (9/32, 28%; 9/202, 4%) met diagnostic criteria for epilepsy. Two patients had genetic generalized epilepsy; two patients had focal seizures of unknown etiology; two had epilepsy due to malformations of cortical development; in two the epilepsy was due to acquired structural changes; and in one patient the epilepsy could not be further classified. Similarly to children, the prevalence of epilepsy and acute symptomatic seizures in adults with 22q11.2DS is higher than in the general population. Hypocalcemia continues to be a risk factor for adults, but differently from kids, the main cause of seizures in adults with 22q11.2DS is exposure to antipsychotics and antidepressants. Further prospective studies are warranted to investigate how 22q11.2 microdeletion leads to an overall decreased seizure threshold. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  11. Health Status of Adults with Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia: A Cohort Study of 203 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Arlt, Wiebke; Willis, Debbie S.; Wild, Sarah H.; Krone, Nils; Doherty, Emma J.; Hahner, Stefanie; Han, Thang S.; Carroll, Paul V.; Conway, Gerry S.; Rees, D. Aled; Stimson, Roland H.; Walker, Brian R.; Connell, John M. C.; Ross, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    Context: No consensus exists for management of adults with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) due to a paucity of data from cohorts of meaningful size. Objective: Our objective was to establish the health status of adults with CAH. Design and Setting: We conducted a prospective cross-sectional study of adults with CAH attending specialized endocrine centers across the United Kingdom. Patients: Participants included 203 CAH patients (199 with 21-hydroxylase deficiency): 138 women, 65 men, median age 34 (range 18–69) years. Main Outcome Measures: Anthropometric, metabolic, and subjective health status was evaluated. Anthropometric measurements were compared with Health Survey for England data, and psychometric data were compared with appropriate reference cohorts. Results: Glucocorticoid treatment consisted of hydrocortisone (26%), prednisolone (43%), dexamethasone (19%), or a combination (10%), with reverse circadian administration in 41% of patients. Control of androgens was highly variable with a normal serum androstenedione found in only 36% of patients, whereas 38% had suppressed levels suggesting glucocorticoid overtreatment. In comparison with Health Survey for England participants, CAH patients were significantly shorter and had a higher body mass index, and women with classic CAH had increased diastolic blood pressure. Metabolic abnormalities were common, including obesity (41%), hypercholesterolemia (46%), insulin resistance (29%), osteopenia (40%), and osteoporosis (7%). Subjective health status was significantly impaired and fertility compromised. Conclusions: Currently, a minority of adult United Kingdom CAH patients appear to be under endocrine specialist care. In the patients studied, glucocorticoid replacement was generally nonphysiological, and androgen levels were poorly controlled. This was associated with an adverse metabolic profile and impaired fertility and quality of life. Improvements in the clinical management of adults with CAH are

  12. Nutritional Recommendations for Adult Bariatric Surgery Patients: Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Sherf Dagan, Shiri; Goldenshluger, Ariela; Globus, Inbal; Schweiger, Chaya; Kessler, Yafit; Kowen Sandbank, Galit; Ben-Porat, Tair; Sinai, Tali

    2017-03-01

    Bariatric surgery is currently the most effective treatment for morbid obesity and its associated metabolic complications. To ensure long-term postoperative success, patients must be prepared to adopt comprehensive lifestyle changes. This review summarizes the current evidence and expert opinions with regard to nutritional care in the perioperative and long-term postoperative periods. A literature search was performed with the use of different lines of searches for narrative reviews. Nutritional recommendations are divided into 3 main sections: 1) presurgery nutritional evaluation and presurgery diet and supplementation; 2) postsurgery diet progression, eating-related behaviors, and nutritional therapy for common gastrointestinal symptoms; and 3) recommendations for lifelong supplementation and advice for nutritional follow-up. We recognize the need for uniform, evidence-based nutritional guidelines for bariatric patients and summarize recommendations with the aim of optimizing long-term success and preventing complications.

  13. Modern treatment of adult short bowel syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Efsen, E; Jeppesen, P B

    2011-12-01

    By definition, intestinal failure prevails when oral compensation is no longer feasible and parenteral support is necessary to maintain nutritional equilibrium. In the past, conventional treatment has mainly focused on "making the most of what the short bowel syndrome patient still had" by optimizing remnant intestinal function through dietary interventions, antidiarrheals and antisecretory agents. However, modern treatment options are in the near horizon, and the increased understanding of the mediators for intestinal adaptation will lead to the expansion of the limited treatment armamentarium in short bowel syndrome patients with intestinal failure. The clinical meaningfulness and implications of the observed effects of growth hormone, glutamine, glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) and the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 degradation resistant analog, teduglutide, is presented in this review and balanced against treatment related adverse events and possible unfavourable effects of long-term, possibly lifelong, treatments.

  14. Enterocolitis without diarrhoea in an adult patient: a clinical dilemma.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Gaurang Nandkishor; Sharma, Amit; Khorasani-Zadeh, Arman; John, Savio

    2014-03-04

    Campylobacter jejuni is one of the most common causes of bloody diarrhoea in the USA. We report a case of a young woman who presented with a clinical picture reminiscent of acute appendicitis. Ultrasonography and CT of the abdomen performed subsequently revealed evidence of colitis. Quite unexpectedly, she had no symptoms of diarrhoea and the stool Gram stain and culture were negative. Nevertheless, due to high clinical suspicion of infectious colitis, appendectomy was deferred. Blood culture was later reported positive for Campylobacter species and the patient responded to quinolones. With this case report we try to highlight one of the unusual presentations of C jejuni infection, closely mimicking acute appendicitis in the absence of classical symptoms of bacterial enteritis. In such cases, a high index of suspicion, astute history taking skills and the proper use of imaging studies can save the patient from the surgical knife.

  15. [Fabry disease: An overlooked diagnosis in adult cardiac patients].

    PubMed

    Kayıkçıoğlu, Meral; Şimşek, Evrim; Kalkan Uçar, Sema; Bayraktaroğlu, Selen; Onay, Hüseyin; Sözmen, Eser; Çoker, Mahmut

    2017-09-01

    Fabry disease is a rare, X-linked, lysosomal glycosphingolipid storage disorder. A deficiency of the enzyme alpha-galactosidase results in intracellular accumulation of globotriaosylceramide in multiple cell types, such as those of the nerves, kidneys, cardiac, and cutaneous tissues, leading to a multisystem disease. Male patients are more severely affected; however, heterozygous female patients may also be afflicted, though often the symptoms develop later. Cardiac involvement can include left ventricular hypertrophy, conduction abnormalities, arrhythmias, valvular abnormalities, and heart failure. A variant of the disease affects only cardiac tissue and mostly manifests as unexplained ventricular hypertrophy. Presently described are 2 cases of Fabry disease and the signs and symptoms of cardiac involvement, as well as the importance of early diagnosis to start enzyme replacement therapy before the development of irreversible tissue damage.

  16. Mediastinal lesions across the age spectrum: a clinicopathological comparison between pediatric and adult patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tingting; Al-Kzayer, Lika'a Fasih Y; Xie, Xiao; Fan, Hua; Sarsam, Shamil Naji; Nakazawa, Yozo; Chen, Lei

    2017-08-29

    The objective of this study was to identify the differences in histopathological distribution and clinical features of mediastinal lesions (MLs) across the age spectrum in Chinese series of patients and to compare with the available literature. A total of 409 cases of MLs, including 137 pediatric and 272 adult patients from a single institution, was reviewed and categorized into groups according to age. Among the 409 cases, the age showed a bimodal distribution with an increased incidence of MLs among (< 10 year) and (60-< 70 year) age groups. Thymic lesions, neurogenic tumors, and cysts made up 57% of MLs among the 409 cases. A significantly higher frequency was found for neurogenic tumors, germ cell tumors, mesenchymal tumors, and lymphatic lesions, (p < 0.01) for all, in pediatric population compared to adults. On the contrary, frequencies of thymic lesions and metastatic carcinomas were significantly higher in adults compared to pediatric category, (p < 0.01) for both. Overall, 41.6% were asymptomatic, however, pediatric patients showed a significantly higher incidence of cough and fever, (p < 0.01) for both, and dyspnea (p = 0.02), than adults. Whereas adult subset showed a significantly higher incidence of chest pain (p = 0.02), or oppression (p < 0.01), than pediatric counterpart. In conclusion, the age spectrum was the factor that influenced the histopathological distribution and the clinical presentation of MLs in Chinese series of patients. Such differences might be considered in the differential diagnosis and therapeutic approach for adult as well as pediatric patients with MLs. Furthermore, our study was comparable to the literature in terms of MLs frequencies.

  17. Comparison of human growth hormone products' cost in pediatric and adult patients. A budgetary impact model.

    PubMed

    Bazalo, Gary R; Joshi, Ashish V; Germak, John

    2007-09-01

    We assessed the economic impact to the United States payer of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) utilization, comparing the relative dosage efficiency of marketed pen-based and vial-based products in a pediatric and in an adult population. A budgetary impact model calculated drug costs based on product waste and cost. Waste was the difference between prescribed dose, based on patient weight, and actual delivered dose, based on dosing increments and maximum deliverable dose for pens and a fixed-percent waste as derived from the literature for vials. Annual wholesale acquisition costs were calculated based upon total milligrams delivered, using a daily dose of 0.03 mg/kg for pediatric patients and 0.016 mg/kg for adults. Total annual drug costs were compared for two scenarios: 1) a product mix based on national market share and 2) restricting use to the product with lowest waste. Based on the literature, waste for each vial product was 23 percent. Among individual pens, waste was highest for Humatrope 24 mg (19.5 percent pediatric, 14.3 percent adult) and lowest for Norditropin Nordi-Flex 5 mg (1.1 percent pediatric, 1 percent adult). Restricting use to the brand with least waste (Norditropin), compared to national product share mix, resulted in a 10.2 percent reduction in annual pediatric patient cost from $19,026 to $17,089 and an 8 percent reduction in annual adult patient cost from $24,099 to $22,161. We concluded that pen delivery systems result in less waste than vial and syringe. Considering all approved delivery systems, Norditropin resulted in the least product waste and lower annual patient cost for both pediatric and adult populations.

  18. Facilitators and Barriers of Electronic Health Record Patient Portal Adoption by Older Adults: A Literature Study.

    PubMed

    Wildenbos, Gaby Anne; Peute, Linda; Jaspers, Monique

    2017-01-01

    Patient portal usage by older adults, patients aged 50 years old and above, is intended to improve their access and quality of care. Acceptance of patient portals by this target group is low. This paper discusses the results of a literature review to determine the facilitators and barriers that drive or inhibit older patients to adopt patient portals. Articles were included when they described an acceptance, adoption or usability evaluation study of a patient portal. From a total of 245 potentially relevant articles, 8 articles were finally included. We used the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) as a classification model to analyze factors influencing older adults' acceptance of patient portals. Main facilitators for acceptance were 'performance expectancy' and 'voluntariness of use' related to a higher level of education and experienced health. Main barriers were limited health literacy and motivation related to involuntariness to use a patient portal. Poor facilitation conditions (limited technology access and no prior knowledge on existence of a patient portal) hampered access to a portal. More thorough insight into the latter is needed to improve the reach and effectiveness of patient portals among older patients.

  19. Dysnatremias and Survival in Adult Burn Patients: A Retrospective Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-11

    significantly associated with mortality. However, this relationship has not been well described in the burn population. Methods : Ad- missions to the burn...institution. Methods After approval from the institutional review board, we retro- spectively reviewed all admissions to our burn center from Janu- ary...were recorded from these sources. The ISS is a validated method for describing patients with multiple traumatic injuries [13] . Acute kidney injury

  20. [Obesity in adult patients: check up and treatment].

    PubMed

    Daubressse, J C; Cadière, G B; Sternon, J

    2005-02-01

    Obesity is now one of the major health problems in industrial countries as well as in developing world. Excess caloric intake and reduction of the physical activity are the main causes of obesity. This epidemic precedes a tremendous increase of type 2 diabetes, which is generally linked to weight excess. Obesity and type 2 diabetes are associated with morbidity and mortality and are very expensive for the social security. The important point is to define the risks linked to obesity taking into account the Body Mass Index and the importance of visceral obesity evaluated by waist measurement. After medical check up, a strategy will be discussed with the patient, including moderate caloric restriction and increased physical activity. Our patients and also some doctors suggest "popular diets" whose efficacy has not been demonstrated as superior. On a short time basis, low carbohydrate and high protein diets have some advantages, which can help our obese subjects but on long term, only hypocaloric and equilibrated diets are advisable. Drugs that proved their efficacy and tolerance may be prescribed in case of failure. Three drugs are presented, orlistat, sibutramine and metformine: their efficacy, secondary effects, interactions and finally their positioning. Bariatric surgery will be proposed to highly selected patients presenting morbid obesity.

  1. Vaccination recommendations for adult patients with autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Bühler, Silja; Eperon, Gilles; Ribi, Camillo; Kyburz, Diego; van Gompel, Fons; Visser, Leo G; Siegrist, Claire-Anne; Hatz, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    The number of individuals with autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic diseases (AIIRDs) treated with immunosuppressive drugs is increasing steadily. The variety of immunosuppressive drugs and, in particular, biological therapies is also rising. The immunosuppressants, as well as the AIIRD itself, increase the risk of infection in this population. Thus, preventing infections by means of vaccination is of utmost importance. New Swiss vaccination recommendations for AIIRD patients were initiated by the Swiss Federal Office of Public Health and prepared by a working group of the Federal Commission for Vaccination Issues as well as by consultation of international experts. A literature search was performed in electronic databases (Cochrane, Medline, PubMed, Embase). In addition, unpublished literature was identified through a targeted website search of relevant organisations and international conferences dealing with vaccination, infectious diseases and rheumatology. Although data are scarce, the following main points were retrieved from the literature. Inactivated vaccines are safe, but their immunogenicity may be reduced in AIIRD patients, especially if they are under immunosuppressive therapy. Rituximab and abatacept appear to reduce significantly immune responses after vaccination. Live vaccines are generally contraindicated under immunosuppressive therapy owing to safety concerns. Specific exceptions, as well as time intervals for the administration of live vaccines after interruption of an immunosuppressive therapy, have been formulated in this article. More evidence regarding the immunogenicity and safety of vaccinations in AIIRD patients under various therapies is needed. Vaccination recommendations should be updated on a regular basis, as more scientific data will become available.

  2. Comparison of the Phenotype and Approach to Pediatric Versus Adult Patients with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nobili, V; Alisi, A; Newton, Kimberly P.; Schwimmer, Jeffrey B.

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the main chronic non-communicable diseases in westernized societies; its worldwide prevalence has doubled during the last 20 years. NAFLD has serious health implications not only for adults, but also for children. However, pediatric NAFLD is not only an important global problem in itself, but it is likely to be associated with increases in comorbidities such as metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular diseases. There are several differences between NAFLD in children and adults and it is not clear whether the disease observed in children is the initial phase of a process that progresses with age. The increasing prevalence of pediatric NAFLD has serious implications for the future adult population requiring appropriate action. Studies of NAFLD progression, pathogenesis, and management should evaluate disease phenotypes in children and follow these over patient lifetimes. We review the similarities and differences of NAFLD between children and adults. PMID:27003600

  3. [Home parenteral nutrition. A six-year combined program (adult and pediatric patients)].

    PubMed

    Moreno, J M; Gomis, P; Valero, M A; León-Sanz, M

    2000-04-29

    To describe the outcomes of an adult-pediatric home parenteral nutrition (HPN) program. Retrospective protocol between 1993 and 1999. Sixteen adults (average 45.7 years) and eight children (3.1 years) were included in the program. Mean length of parenteral nutrition was 507 (SD: 624) and 155 (SD: 129) days respectively. Total follow-up time was 8,119 days for adults and 1,242 for children. Cancer was the main diagnosis in adults and intractable diarrhea in children. Central venous catheter related infections were the most usual complication (0.63 and 1.2 episodes/patient/year). There were no deceases due to the HPN in the period of study. HPN is an effective and safe technique, although prevalence and incidence in Spain are low.

  4. Loss of olfactory function and nutritional status in vital older adults and geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Toussaint, Nicole; de Roon, Margot; van Campen, Jos P C M; Kremer, Stefanie; Boesveldt, Sanne

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to assess the association of olfactory function and nutritional status in vital older adults and geriatric patients. Three hundred forty-five vital (mean age 67.1 years) and 138 geriatric older adults (mean age 80.9 years) were included. Nutritional status was assessed using the mini nutritional assessment-short form. The Sniffin' Sticks was used to measure olfactory function. Eleven percentage of the vital older adults were at risk of malnutrition, whereas 60% of the geriatric participants were malnourished or at risk. Only 2% of the vital older adults were anosmic, compared with 46% of the geriatric participants. Linear regression demonstrated a significant association (P = 0.015) between olfactory function and nutritional status in the geriatric subjects. However, this association became insignificant after adjustment for confounders. Both crude and adjusted analysis in the vital older adults did not show a significant association. The results indicate that, in both groups of elderly, there is no direct relation between olfactory function and nutritional status. We suggest that a decline in olfactory function may still be considered as one of the risk-factors for malnutrition in geriatric patients-once co-occurring with other mental and/or physical problems that are more likely to occur in those patients experience.

  5. Multidimensional Clinical Phenotyping of an Adult Cystic Fibrosis Patient Population

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Douglas J.; Bailey, Barbara A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is a multi-systemic disease resulting from mutations in the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator (CFTR) gene and has major manifestations in the sino-pulmonary, and gastro-intestinal tracts. Clinical phenotypes were generated using 26 common clinical variables to generate classes that overlapped quantiles of lung function and were based on multiple aspects of CF systemic disease. Methods The variables included age, gender, CFTR mutations, FEV1% predicted, FVC% predicted, height, weight, Brasfield chest xray score, pancreatic sufficiency status and clinical microbiology results. Complete datasets were compiled on 211 subjects. Phenotypes were identified using a proximity matrix generated by the unsupervised Random Forests algorithm and subsequent clustering by the Partitioning around Medoids (PAM) algorithm. The final phenotypic classes were then characterized and compared to a similar dataset obtained three years earlier. Findings Clinical phenotypes were identified using a clustering strategy that generated four and five phenotypes. Each strategy identified 1) a low lung health scores phenotype, 2) a younger, well-nourished, male-dominated class, 3) various high lung health score phenotypes that varied in terms of age, gender and nutritional status. This multidimensional clinical phenotyping strategy identified classes with expected microbiology results and low risk clinical phenotypes with pancreatic sufficiency. Interpretation This study demonstrated regional adult CF clinical phenotypes using non-parametric, continuous, ordinal and categorical data with a minimal amount of subjective data to identify clinically relevant phenotypes. These studies identified the relative stability of the phenotypes, demonstrated specific phenotypes consistent with published findings and identified others needing further study. PMID:25822311

  6. Characteristics of Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder in a Cohort of Adult Patients.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Yoshikatsu; Nin, Kazuko; Noma, Shun'ichi; Teramukai, Satoshi; Wonderlich, Stephen A

    2016-11-01

    To assess and compare clinical symptoms and psychometric analysis of adult patients with avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID) with those with anorexia nervosa (AN). We completed a retrospective review of adult patients with a feeding and eating disorder assessed between 1990 and 2005 that qualified for a diagnosis of ARFID. Patients with ARFID were compared with those with AN, with respect to the demographics, clinical symptoms and psychometric analysis. Using the criteria of the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, 95 (9.2%) of 1029 patients with a feeding and eating disorder met the criteria for ARFID. All patients with ARFID were women. The ARFID group had a significantly shorter duration of illness, lower rates of hospital admission history and less severe psychopathology than the AN group. Adult patients with ARFID in this study were clinically distinct from those with AN and somewhat different from paediatric patients with ARFID in previous studies. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  7. Is the medical home for adult patients with sickle cell disease a reality or an illusion?

    PubMed

    Ballas, Samir K; Vichinsky, Elliott P

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) emerged as a viable method to improve delivery of medical care. Due to all the promotion about the effectiveness of the PCMH, patients with sickle cell disease, their families and the community hoped that this could be a possible solution to the problems that arise in the treatment of adult patients with sickle cell disease. Review of the literature and review of the criteria for the establishment of a PCMH show that the PCMH is not an ideal model for patients with sickle cell disease because finding a personal physician, which is the first criteria of a functional PCMH, is a major problem in the process of transitioning the care of patients with sickle cell disease from pediatrics to adult care. Moreover, garnering hospital support to defray the initial costs to establish a PCMH for adults with sickle cell disease is unlikely given the already high costs of care for patients with sickle cell disease. Moreover, recent studies have shown insufficient evidence to determine the presumed beneficial effects of the PCMH, especially in patients with chronic disease.

  8. Use of caries preventive agents on adult patients compared to pediatric patients by general practitioners: findings from The Dental Practice-Based Research Network

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Joseph L.; Gordan, Valeria V.; Rindal, D. Brad; Fellows, Jeffrey L.; Williams, O. Dale; Ritchie, Lloyd K.; Gilbert, Gregg H.

    2010-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests that caries prevention reduces caries in adults. This study tested the frequency of recommended caries prevention agents for children compared to adult patients. Methods This study surveyed 467 Dental Practice-Based Research Network general dentists who practice within the United States and treat both pediatric and adult patients. Dentists were asked the percentage of their patients who are administered or recommended dental sealants, in-office and at-home fluoride, chlorhexidine rinse, and xylitol gum. Results Adults were less likely to receive in-office caries preventive agents compared to pediatric patients. However, the rate of recommendation for at-home preventive regimens was very similar. Dentists with a conservative approach to caries treatment were the most likely to use caries prevention at similar rates in adults as in children. In addition, practices with a greater number of patients with dental insurance were significantly less likely to provide in-office fluoride or sealants to adult patients than to their pediatric patients. Conclusion In-office caries prevention agents are more commonly used by general dentists for their pediatric patients compared to their adult patients. Practice Implications Some general dentists should consider providing additional in-office prevention agents for their adult patients who are at increased risk for dental caries. PMID:20516100

  9. Potential Adult Medicaid Beneficiaries Under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act Compared With Current Adult Medicaid Beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Tammy; Davis, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE Under health care reform, states will have the opportunity to expand Medicaid to millions of uninsured US adults. Information regarding this population is vital to physicians as they prepare for more patients with coverage. Our objective was to describe demographic and health characteristics of potentially eligible Medicaid beneficiaries. METHODS We performed a cross-sectional study using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2007–2010) to identify and compare adult US citizens potentially eligible for Medicaid under provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) with current adult Medicaid beneficiaries. We compared demographic characteristics (age, sex, race/ethnicity, education) and health measures (self-reported health status; measured body mass index, hemoglobin A1c level, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, depression screen [9-item Patient Health Questionnaire], tobacco smoking, and alcohol use). RESULTS Analyses were based on an estimated 13.8 million current adult non-elderly Medicaid beneficiaries and 13.6 million nonelderly adults potentially eligible for Medicaid. Potentially eligible individuals are expected to be more likely male (49.2% potentially eligible vs 33.3% current beneficiaries; P <.001), to be more likely white and less likely black (58.8% white, 20.0% black vs 49.9% white, 25.2% black; P = .02), and to be statistically indistinguishable in terms of educational attainment. Overall, potentially eligible adults are expected to have better health status (34.8% “excellent” or “very good,” 40.4% “good”) than current beneficiaries (33.5% “excellent” or “very good,” 31.6% “good”; P <.001). The proportions obese (34.5% vs 42.9%; P = .008) and with depression (15.5% vs 22.3%; P = .003) among potentially eligible individuals are significantly lower than those for current beneficiaries, while there are no significant differences in the expected prevalence of diabetes or

  10. Diaphragm plication following phrenic nerve injury: a comparison of paediatric and adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Simansky, D; Paley, M; Refaely, Y; Yellin, A

    2002-01-01

    Background: A study was undertaken to evaluate whether adults differ from children in the indications and outcome of diaphragmatic plication following phrenic nerve injury. Methods: A retrospective study was performed of 21 patients, 10 below the age of 5 and 11 older than 37 years. The indication for surgery for all the children was failure to wean from ventilatory support. The indications for surgery in the adult group were ventilator dependency (n=4) and symptomatic dyspnoea (n=7). All patients had at least one imaging study confirming diaphragmatic paralysis. The American Thoracic Society (ATS) dyspnoea scale, pulmonary function tests, and quantitative pulmonary perfusion scans were used as evaluation parameters. At surgery the diaphragm was centrally plicated. Results: One child died immediately after surgery due to irreversible heart failure and two children died within 2 months of surgery from ongoing complications of their original condition. These three patients were considered as selection failures. Seven children were weaned from ventilatory support within a median of 4 days (range 2–140). Only one of four ventilated adults was successfully weaned. Seven adults who underwent surgery for chronic symptoms had a marked subjective improvement of 2–3 levels in the ATS dyspnoea scale. Pulmonary function studies in the seven symptomatic adults showed a 40% improvement above baseline. Severely asymmetrical perfusion scans reverted to a normal pattern after plication. Conclusions: Diaphragmatic plication offers a significant benefit to children with diaphragmatic paralysis and should be performed early to facilitate weaning from mechanical ventilation. While plication is of limited benefit in weaning ventilated adults, it results in significant subjective and objective lifetime improvement in non-ventilated symptomatic adults. PMID:12096205

  11. Relationship between anxiety, depression, and morbidity in adult asthma patients

    PubMed Central

    Rimington, L; Davies, D; Lowe, D; Pearson, M

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Symptoms of disease reported by patients reflect the effects of the disease process within the individual and the person's physical and mental ability to tolerate or otherwise cope with the limitations on their functioning. This study examines the relationship between asthma symptoms, disease severity, and psychological status in patients being managed in routine primary healthcare settings.
METHODS—One hundred and fourteen subjects from four GP practices, two inner city and two suburban, were studied. Symptoms were assessed by means of the Asthma Quality of Life questionnaire (AQLQ) and a locally devised Q score, and psychological status with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) scale. Spirometric values and details of current asthma treatment (BTS asthma guidelines treatment step) were recorded as markers of asthma severity.
RESULTS—Symptoms as measured by AQLQ correlated with peak expiratory flow (rS = 0.40) and with BTS guidelines treatment step (rS =0.25). Similarly, the Q score correlated with peak expiratory flow (rS = 0.44) and with BTS guidelines treatment step (rS =0.42). Similar levels of correlation of forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) with symptoms were reported. HAD anxiety and depression scores also correlated to a similar extent with these two symptom scores, but there was hardly any correlation with lung function. Logistic regression analysis showed that HAD scores help to explain symptom scores over and above the effects of lung function and BTS guidelines treatment step. Symptoms, depression, and anxiety were higher for inner city patients while little difference was observed in objective measures of asthma.
CONCLUSIONS—Asthma guidelines suggest that changing levels of symptoms should be used to monitor the effectiveness of treatment. These data suggest that reported symptoms may be misleading and unreliable because they may reflect non-asthma factors that cannot be expected to respond to changes in

  12. Upper and Lower Urinary Tract Outcomes in Adult Myelomeningocele Patients: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Veenboer, Paul W.; Bosch, J. L. H. Ruud; van Asbeck, Floris W. A.; de Kort, Laetitia M. O.

    2012-01-01

    Background The introduction of sophisticated treatment of bladder dysfunction and hydrocephalus allows the majority of SB patients to survive into adulthood. However, no systematic review on urological outcome in adult SB patients is available and no follow-up schemes exist. Objectives To systematically summarize the evidence on outcome of urinary tract functioning in adult SB patients. Methods A literature search in PubMed and Embase databases was done. Only papers published in the last 25 years describing patients with open SB with a mean age >18 years were included. We focused on finding differences in the treatment strategies, e.g., clean intermittent catheterization and antimuscarinic drugs versus early urinary diversion, with regard to long-term renal and bladder outcomes. Results A total of 13 articles and 5 meeting abstracts on urinary tract status of adult SB patients were found describing a total of 1564 patients with a mean age of 26.1 years (range 3–74 years, with a few patients <18 years). All were retrospective cohort studies with relatively small and heterogeneous samples with inconsistent reporting of outcome; this precluded the pooling of data and meta-analysis. Total continence was achieved in 449/1192 (37.7%; range 8–85%) patients. Neurological level of the lesion and hydrocephalus were associated with incontinence. Renal function was studied in 1128 adult patients. In 290/1128 (25.7%; range 3–81.8%) patients some degree of renal damage was found and end-stage renal disease was seen in 12/958 (1.3%) patients. Detrusor-sphincter dyssynergy and detrusor-overactivity acted as adverse prognostic factors for the development of renal damage. Conclusions These findings should outline follow-up schedules for SB patients, which do not yet exist. Since renal and bladder deterioration continues beyond adolescence, follow-up of these individuals is needed. We recommend standardization in reporting the outcome of urinary tract function in adult SB

  13. Giant Intradural Mucocele in a Patient with Adult Onset Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Kechagias, E.; Georgakoulias, N.; Ioakimidou, C.; Kyriazi, S.; Kontogeorgos, G.; Seretis, A.

    2009-01-01

    A rare case of mucopyocele in a patient who presented with epileptic seizures is reported. The computed tomography scan (CT) and the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed an intradural extension of a giant fronto-ethmoidal mucopyocele, eroding the cribriform plate and compressing both frontal lobes. The lesion was removed by craniotomy with elimination of the mass effect and reconstruction of the anterior skull base. An intracranial-intradural mucopyocele is an extremely rare cause of generalized convulsion as a presenting symptom, with only 6 cases reported in the literature. The total removal of the lesion associated with anterior fossa reconstruction is the treatment of choice. PMID:20847833

  14. [Diagnosis and treatment of urea cycle disorders in adult patients].

    PubMed

    Maillot, F; Blasco, H; Lioger, B; Bigot, A; Douillard, C

    2016-10-01

    Urea cycle disorders (UCDs) are inborn errors of metabolism in which the clinical picture is mostly due to ammonia intoxication. UCD onset may be observed at any age. Acute decompensations of UCDs include neuro-psychiatric symptoms such as headache, confusion, convulsions, ataxia, agitation or delirium, as well as digestive symptoms, namely nausea and vomiting along with abdominal pain. Acute decompensations may lead to an irreversible coma in the absence of specific therapy. The first step is to measure promptly ammonemia in such patients, and start appropriate therapy on an emergency basis.

  15. Monitoring consciousness in the pediatric patient: not just a small adult.

    PubMed

    Uezono, Shoichi; Mio, Yasushi

    2006-03-01

    Intraoperative awareness, defined as postoperative memory for intraoperative events, is believed to occur about 0.2% of the time in a general adult surgical population. A recent large-scale prospective study from a single institution revealed a strikingly high incidence (0.8%) of intraoperative awareness in children aged 5-12 years although the sequelae of awareness during surgery in children were reported to be relatively minor. This contrasts with awareness in adult patients, for whom this complication often causes psychological trauma, thus having medico-legal implications. Various monitors to detect intraoperative awareness have been used with varying success in adults. To date, however, no monitor has been shown to be effective in detecting intraoperative awareness during surgery in pediatric patients. Further research is required to clarify the rates of intraoperative awareness in the pediatric population as well as the need for monitoring this event during the clinical practice of pediatric anesthesiology.

  16. Clinical Trials of Adult Stem Cell Therapy in Patients with Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Bang, Oh Young

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell therapy is considered a potential regenerative strategy for patients with neurologic deficits. Studies involving animal models of ischemic stroke have shown that stem cells transplanted into the brain can lead to functional improvement. With current advances in the understanding regarding the effects of introducing stem cells and their mechanisms of action, several clinical trials of stem cell therapy have been conducted in patients with stroke since 2005, including studies using mesenchymal stem cells, bone marrow mononuclear cells, and neural stem/progenitor cells. In addition, several clinical trials of the use of adult stem cells to treat ischemic stroke are ongoing. This review presents the status of our understanding of adult stem cells and results from clinical trials, and introduces ongoing clinical studies of adult stem cell therapy in the field of stroke.

  17. Caries and Candida colonisation in adult patients in Basque Country (Spain).

    PubMed

    De-la-Torre, Janire; Marichalar-Mendia, Xabier; Varona-Barquin, Aketza; Marcos-Arias, Cristina; Eraso, Elena; Aguirre-Urizar, José Manuel; Quindós, Guillermo

    2016-01-12

    Candida albicans is one of the most frequent pathogens of the oral cavity, as a major cause of opportunistic disease. Moreover, Candida could be a cofactor of common oral diseases, such as dental caries. The aim of this study was to analyse the oral yeast colonisation in adults with dental caries and to evaluate its relationship with this clinical entity. We studied 190 patients distributed into controls (58 patients) and patients with caries (132 patients). Oral samples were collected by oral rinse and cultured in a chromogenic agar. C. albicans was the most prevalent species isolated from oral specimens in both groups. Patients with caries had a greater Candida colonisation (74 patients, 56.1%), than persons without caries (18 patients, 31%, P < 0.01). Patients with caries were significantly more colonised by non-C. albicans species than individuals without caries (P = 0.006). Moreover, the diversity of Candida species was richer in patients suffering from caries. The odds ratio of the colonisation of patients with caries was 3.144 (95% CI 1.525-5.478). There is a significant clinical correlation between dental caries and oral Candida colonisation in adults. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  18. Structural empowerment and patient safety culture among registered nurses working in adult critical care units.

    PubMed

    Armellino, Donna; Quinn Griffin, Mary T; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J

    2010-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship between structural empowerment and patient safety culture among staff level Registered Nurses (RNs) within adult critical care units (ACCU). There is literature to support the value of RNs' structurally empowered work environments and emerging literature towards patient safety culture; the link between empowerment and patient safety culture is being discovered. A sample of 257 RNs, working within adult critical care of a tertiary hospital in the United States, was surveyed. Instruments included a background data sheet, the Conditions of Workplace Effectiveness and the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture. Structural empowerment and patient safety culture were significantly correlated. As structural empowerment increased so did the RNs' perception of patient safety culture. To foster patient safety culture, nurse leaders should consider providing structurally empowering work environments for RNs. This study contributes to the body of knowledge linking structural empowerment and patient safety culture. Results link structurally empowered RNs and increased patient safety culture, essential elements in delivering efficient, competent, quality care. They inform nursing management of key factors in the nurses' environment that promote safe patient care environments. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Readability of online patient education materials on adult reconstruction Web sites.

    PubMed

    Polishchuk, Daniil L; Hashem, Jenifer; Sabharwal, Sanjeev

    2012-05-01

    Recommended readability of patient education materials is sixth-grade level or lower. Readability of 212 patient education materials pertaining to adult reconstruction topics available from the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons, and 3 other specialty and private practitioner Web sites was assessed using the Flesch-Kincaid grade formula. The mean Flesch-Kincaid score was 11.1 (range, 3-26.5). Only 5 (2%) articles had a readability level of sixth grade or lower. Readability of most of the articles for patient education on adult reconstruction Web sites evaluated may be too advanced for a substantial portion of patients. Further studies are needed to assess the optimal readability level of health information on the Internet. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Design Considerations for Patient Portal Adoption by Low-Income, Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Latulipe, Celine; Gatto, Amy; Nguyen, Ha T.; Miller, David P.; Quandt, Sara A.; Bertoni, Alain G.; Smith, Alden; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the results of an interview study investigating facilitators and barriers to adoption of patient portals among low-income, older adults in rural and urban populations in the southeastern United States. We describe attitudes of this population of older adults and their current level of technology use and patient portal use. From qualitative analysis of 36 patient interviews and 16 caregiver interviews within these communities, we derive themes related to benefits of portals, barriers to use, concerns and desired features. Based on our initial findings, we present a set of considerations for designing the patient portal user experience, aimed at helping healthcare clinics to meet U.S. federally-mandated ‘meaningful use’ requirements. PMID:27077140

  1. Management of Parenteral Nutrition in Hospitalized Adult Patients [Formula: see text].

    PubMed

    Mundi, Manpreet S; Nystrom, Erin M; Hurley, Daniel L; McMahon, M Molly

    2017-05-01

    Despite the high prevalence of malnutrition in adult hospitalized patients, surveys continue to report that many clinicians are undertrained in clinical nutrition, making targeted nutrition education for clinicians essential for best patient care. Clinical practice models also continue to evolve, with more disciplines prescribing parenteral nutrition (PN) or managing the cases of patients who are receiving it, further adding to the need for proficiency in general PN skills. This tutorial focuses on the daily management of adult hospitalized patients already receiving PN and reviews the following topics: (1) PN basics, including the determination of energy and volume requirements; (2) PN macronutrient content (protein, dextrose, and intravenous fat emulsion); (3) PN micronutrient content (electrolytes, minerals, vitamins, and trace elements); (4) alteration of PN for special situations, such as obesity, hyperglycemia, hypertriglyceridemia, refeeding, and hepatic/renal disease; (5) daily monitoring and adjustment of PN formula; and (6) PN-related complications (PN-associated liver disease and catheter-related complications).

  2. Patient Priority-Directed Decision Making and Care for Older Adults with Multiple Chronic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Tinetti, Mary E; Esterson, Jessica; Ferris, Rosie; Posner, Philip; Blaum, Caroline S

    2016-05-01

    Older adults with multiple conditions receive care that is often fragmented, burdensome, and of unclear benefit. An advisory group of patients, caregivers, clinicians, health system engineers, health care system leaders, payers, and others identified three modifiable contributors to this fragmented, burdensome care: decision making and care focused on diseases, not patients; inadequate delineation of roles and responsibilities and accountability among clinicians; and lack of attention to what matters to patients and caregivers (ie, their health outcome goals and care preferences). The advisory group identified patient priority-directed care as a feasible, sustainable approach to addressing these modifiable factors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [Diagnosis and treatment of opportunistic infections in HIV/AIDS adult patients].

    PubMed

    Lasso B, Martín

    2011-10-01

    The following guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of opportunistic infections (OI) in adult HIV/AIDS patients represent the first approach to standardize the management of this patient group in Chile. The guidelines are based on scientific evidence. They intend to serve as a practical and easy-to-use tool for physicians during the process of selecting appropriate diagnostic tests and effective treatments for their patients. They also include the local experience in Chile related to OI in HIV/AIDS patients. Regular up-dates to include new scientific knowledge are proposed.

  4. General anaesthesia in an adult patient with Morquio syndrom with emphasis on airway issues.

    PubMed

    Kadic, Lajla; Driessen, Jacques J

    2012-05-01

    Patients with Morquio syndrome possess a number of characteristics which may complicate an anaesthetic procedure. The most important is that a deposition of mucopolysaccharides in the soft tissues of the oro-pharynx distorts the airway, making the airway management difficult, while the atlanto-axial instability puts these patients at risk of subluxation and quadriparesis. As the endotracheal intubation in Morquio syndrome patients may be difficult or even impossible, we recommend the technique of awake fiberoptic intubation to be considered. Our approach to awake fiberoptic intubation in an adult patient is described in this case report.

  5. [Low oxygen saturation during early postoperative period in adult patients receiving opioids by intravenous patient-controlled analgesia].

    PubMed

    Sato, Chiyo; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Kawamoto, Masashi; Yuge, Osafumi; Ogawa, Ryo

    2004-06-01

    Patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) provides effective postoperative analgesia. However, there are few reports concerning the adverse outcome of respiratory depression. We measured arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2) continuously during early postoperative period in 38 adult patients receiving opioids by intravenous PCA. We assessed the severity and incidence of desaturation, defined as SpO2 below 90% for more than 10 seconds. Nine patients showed desaturation and were studied after the surgery of the extremities, body surfaces, thorax or abdomen. Two patients showed desaturation with combination of surgery of long duration and obesity. Six patients, all of whom with liver cirrhosis, underwent thoracic and abdominal procedures, and showed desaturation because of respiratory dysfunction and hypoxemia caused by the surgery itself. One patient showed respiratory depression due to the opioids. We conclude that careful monitoring with a pulse oximeter and giving oxygen are essential to prevent desaturation during early postoperative period.

  6. Epidemiology of adult-onset hydrocephalus: institutional experience with 2001 patients.

    PubMed

    Bir, Shyamal C; Patra, Devi Prasad; Maiti, Tanmoy K; Sun, Hai; Guthikonda, Bharat; Notarianni, Christina; Nanda, Anil

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE Adult-onset hydrocephalus is not commonly discussed in the literature, especially regarding its demographic distribution. In contrast to pediatric hydrocephalus, which is related to a primary CSF pathway defect, its development in adults is often secondary to other pathologies. In this study, the authors investigated the epidemiology of adult-onset hydrocephalus as it pertains to different etiologies and in reference to age, sex, and race distributions. METHODS The authors retrospectively reviewed the clinical notes of 2001 patients with adult-onset hydrocephalus who presented to Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center within a 25-year span. Significant differences between the groups were analyzed by a chi-square test; p < 0.05 was considered significant. RESULTS The overall mean (± SEM) incidence of adult hydrocephalus in this population was 77 ± 30 per year, with a significant increase in incidence in the past decade (55 ± 3 [1990-2003] vs 102 ± 6 [2004-2015]; p < 0.0001). Hydrocephalus in a majority of the patients had a vascular etiology (45.5%) or was a result of a tumor (30.2%). The incidence of hydrocephalus in different age groups varied according to various pathologies. The incidence was significantly higher in males with normal-pressure hydrocephalus (p = 0.03) or head injury (p = 0.01) and higher in females with pseudotumor cerebri (p < 0.0001). In addition, the overall incidence of hydrocephalus was significantly higher in Caucasian patients (p = 0.0002) than in those of any other race. CONCLUSIONS Knowledge of the demographic variations in adult-onset hydrocephalus is helpful in achieving better risk stratification and better managing the disease in patients. For general applicability, these results should be validated in a large-scale meta-analysis based on a national population database.

  7. [Respiratory virus infections in adult patients hospitalized in an internal medicine unit].

    PubMed

    Riquelme, Raúl; Rioseco, María Luisa; Agüero, Yasna; Ubilla, Daniela; Mechsner, Pamela; Inzunza, Carlos; Riquelme, Mauricio

    2014-06-01

    Respiratory viral infections (RVi) can be associated with a wide range of clinical manifestations. To investigate the frequency and clinical manifestations of RVi among adult patients during winter hospitalizations. All patients admitted to the hospital with flu like disease and those with fever or exacerbation of any underlying disease during hospitalization without an evident cause, were prospectively enrolled. A direct immunofluorescence (DIF) of nasopharyngeal aspirate for influenza A (IA) and B, parainfluenza 1, 2 and 3, adenovirus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and metapneumovirus, was performed. Epidemiological and clinical data were recorded. Between May and September 2012, 975 adults were admitted to the Internal Medicine Unit of Puerto Montt Hospital and in 128 (13%) patients, DIF was carried out. DIF was positive in 44 patients (34%) aged 65 ± 20 years, 68.2% females, corresponding to 4.5% of total hospitalizations. Eighty six percent of the latter had at least one co-morbidity, mainly asthma and chronic respiratory diseases in 34.1%, diabetes in 29.5%, cardiac problems in 25% and congestive heart failure in 20.5%. The most common RVi were RSV (n = 21, 48%) and IA (n = 17, 39%). Six patients had a nosocomial RVi. Patients infected with IA had a significantly higher frequency of fever and bronchial hyper reactivity than those infected with RSV. RVi were associated with exacerbation of underlying disease in 62% of cases and pneumonia in 27%. Two patients had a viral pericarditis. RVi are an important cause of adult morbidity and their detection should be routine in adult patients hospitalized during winter.

  8. Are daily routine chest radiographs necessary after pulmonary surgery in adult patients?

    PubMed Central

    Reeb, Jeremie; Falcoz, Pierre-Emmanuel; Olland, Anne; Massard, Gilbert

    2013-01-01

    A best evidence topic was constructed according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether daily routine (DR) chest radiographs (CXRs) are necessary after pulmonary surgery in adult patients. Of the 66 papers found using a report search, seven presented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. Four of these seven studies specifically addressed post-cardiothoracic adult patients. Three of these seven studies addressed intensive care unit (ICU) patients and included post-cardiothoracic adult patients in well-designed studies. Six of these seven studies compared the DR CXRs strategy to the clinically indicated, on-demand (OD) CXRs strategy. Another study analysed the clinical impact of ceasing to perform the DR, postoperative, post-chest tubes removal CXRs. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, study type, group studied, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are given. We conclude that, on the whole, the seven studies are unanimously in favour of forgoing DR CXRs after lung resection and advocate OD CXRs. One study suggested that hypoxic patients could benefit from a DR CXRs strategy, while other studies failed to identify any subgroup for whom performing DR CXRs was beneficial. Indeed, DR CXRs, commonly taken after thoracic surgery, have poor diagnostic and therapeutic value. Eliminating them for adult patients having undergone thoracic surgery significantly decreases the number of CXRs per patient without increasing mortality rates, length of hospital stays (LOSs), readmission rates and adverse events. Hence, current evidence shows that DR CXRs could be forgone after lung resection because OD CXRs, recommended by clinical monitoring, have a better impact on management and have not been proved to negatively affect patient outcomes. Moreover, an OD CXRs strategy lowers the cost of care. Nevertheless, an OD CXRs strategy requires close clinical monitoring by experienced surgeons and dedicated intensivists. However

  9. Evaluating patient-centered care: feasibility of electronic data collection in hospitalized older adults.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Joanne R; Kooken, Wendy Carter; Wolverton, Cheryl L; Weaver, Michael T

    2012-01-01

    Evaluating patient-centered care (PCC) is crucial to its improvement. This pilot study tested the feasibility of an electronic format to assess PCC during hospitalization. Using a validated indicator of PCC embedded on a mobile device, 86 older adults evaluated its delivery by registered nurses. Patients older than 85 years rated PCC poorer than those who were younger (r = -0.22; P = .04). The electronic format was appraised as feasible; it performed well and took on average 30 minutes to complete.

  10. Sexual health discussions with older adult patients during periodic health exams.

    PubMed

    Ports, Katie A; Barnack-Tavlaris, Jessica L; Syme, Maggie L; Perera, Robert A; Lafata, Jennifer Elston

    2014-04-01

    Sexual health is an integral part of overall health across the lifespan. In order to address sexual health issues, such as sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and sexual functioning, the sexual history of adult patients should be incorporated as a routine part of the medical history throughout life. Physicians and health-care professionals cite many barriers to attending to and assessing the sexual health needs of older adult patients, underscoring the importance of additional research to improve sexual history taking among older patients. The purpose of this article is to explore the content and context of physician-patient sexual health discussions during periodic health exams (PHEs) with adults aged 50-80 years. Patients completed a pre-visit telephone survey and attended a scheduled PHE with their permission to audio-record the exam. Transcribed audio recordings of 483 PHEs were analyzed according to the principles of qualitative content analysis. Frequency of sexual history taking components as observed in transcripts of PHEs. Physician characteristics were obtained from health system records and patient characteristics were obtained from the pre-visit survey. Analyses revealed that approximately one-half of the PHEs included some discussion about sexual health, with the majority of those conversations initiated by physicians. A two-level logistic regression model revealed that patient-physician gender concordance, race discordance, and increasing physician age were significantly associated with sexual health discussions. Interventions should focus on increasing physician self-efficacy for assessing sexual health in gender discordant and race/ethnicity concordant patient interactions. Interventions for older adults should increase education about sexual health and sexual risk behaviors, as well as empower individuals to seek information from their health-care providers. © 2014 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  11. Epidemiological and clinical profile of adult patients with Blastocystis sp. infection in Barcelona, Spain.

    PubMed

    Salvador, Fernando; Sulleiro, Elena; Sánchez-Montalvá, Adrián; Alonso, Carmen; Santos, Javier; Fuentes, Isabel; Molina, Israel

    2016-10-14

    Blastocystis spp. are among the most frequently observed intestinal parasites in humans. Despite the discovery of Blastocystis approximately 100 years ago, limited information is available regarding its pathogenesis, genetic diversity, and available treatment options. The aim of this study was to describe the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of patients with Blastocystis sp. infections diagnosed at Vall d'Hebron University Hospital (Barcelona, Spain). A retrospective observational study was performed which included all adult patients who attended Vall d'Hebron University Hospital from February 2009 to March 2014 that had Blastocystis sp. detected in their stool. Four hundred eighteen patients were included, the median age was 36 (18-86) years and 236 (56.5 %) were men. Regarding patient symptoms, 234 (56 %) patients were completely asymptomatic, 92 (22 %) patients had symptoms, and 92 (22 %) patients had symptoms that could be attributed to other causes. Of the 92 patients with symptoms not attributable to other etiologies except for Blastocystis infection, the most frequent symptoms were diarrhea (61 patients, 66.3 %) and abdominal pain (34 patients, 37 %). Additionally, nine (9.8 %) patients had cutaneous manifestations. Thirty-one (7.4 %) patients received specific treatment for Blastocystis infection. The clinical response of treated patients was varied. Five patients experienced complete resolution of symptoms, 12 patients reported improvement of clinical symptoms, eight patients described no clinical improvement, and information was unavailable for six patients. Blastocystis infection was detected in 418 patients, most of them foreign-born. Although the vast majority of patients were asymptomatic, 22 % of patients had gastrointestinal symptoms or cutaneous manifestations in the absence of other causes. Despite the scarce information available, given the safety of antiparasitic treatment, and the percentage of patients who experienced

  12. An Examination of Intimate Partner Violence and Psychological Stressors in Adult Abortion Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ely, Gretchen E.; Otis, Melanie D.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe an exploratory study examining the relationship between intimate partner violence and psychological stressors in a sample of 188 adult abortion patients. Results indicate the almost 15% of respondents report a history of abuse by the coconceiving partner. In addition, women who reported having had one or…

  13. Long term renal toxicity of ifosfamide in adult patients--5 year data.

    PubMed

    Farry, James K; Flombaum, Carlos D; Latcha, Sheron

    2012-06-01

    Ifosfamide is indicated as first line treatment in a variety of solid tumours in adults. It is known to be nephrotoxic and is often used following therapy with, or as concomitant therapy with other potent nephrotoxins. To date, there are sparse case reports on the incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI) or chronic kidney disease (CKD) in adults exposed to ifosfamide. The available data on the long term renal complications for patients exposed to ifosfamide are thus based entirely on the paediatric population. The aim of this study was to assess the long term effects of ifosfamide exposure on renal function in an adult population and to determine if there are any treatment or patient specific factors that contribute to long term nephrotoxicity. The mean decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) following the first cycle of ifosfamide was 15 ml/min/1.73 m(2). Thereafter, there was a slower but steady decline in eGFR. No patient progressed to end stage renal disease (ESRD). Patient age and concomitant exposure to carboplatin were the only two factors which significantly affected eGFR. This represents the only long term study on the nephrotoxicity of ifosfamide in adults.

  14. The relationships among separation anxiety disorder, adult attachment style and agoraphobia in patients with panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Pini, Stefano; Abelli, Marianna; Troisi, Alfonso; Siracusano, Alberto; Cassano, Giovanni B; Shear, Katherine M; Baldwin, David

    2014-12-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that separation anxiety disorder occurs more frequently in adults than children. It is unclear whether the presence of adult separation anxiety disorder (ASAD) is a manifestation of anxious attachment, or a form of agoraphobia, or a specific condition with clinically significant consequences. We conducted a study to examine these questions. A sample of 141 adult outpatients with panic disorder participated in the study. Participants completed standardized measures of separation anxiety, attachment style, agoraphobia, panic disorder severity and quality of life. Patients with ASAD (49.5% of our sample) had greater panic symptom severity and more impairment in quality of life than those without separation anxiety. We found a greater rate of symptoms suggestive of anxious attachment among panic patients with ASAD compared to those without ASAD. However, the relationship between ASAD and attachment style is not strong, and adult ASAD occurs in some patients who report secure attachment style. Similarly, there is little evidence for the idea that separation anxiety disorder is a form of agoraphobia. Factor analysis shows clear differentiation of agoraphobic and separation anxiety symptoms. Our data corroborate the notion that ASAD is a distinct condition associated with impairment in quality of life and needs to be better recognized and treated in patients with panic disorder. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Adults Living with Limited Literacy and Chronic Illness: Patient Education Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Judy; Taylor, Maurice C.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how Canadian adults living with limited literacy and chronic illness made meaning of their patient education experiences. The study used a hermeneutic phenomenological research design and employed three data sources over a nine-month period. Data was interpreted and analyzed as it was collected,…

  16. Successful treatment of ileocolic intussusception with air enema reduction in an adult patient.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Satoshi; Kanemura, Takashi; Yokouchi, Yukako; Kamiichi, Hideo; Kiriu, Nobuaki; Koike, Yuji

    2014-05-01

    Intussusception is a rare condition in adults, representing only 1% of all bowel obstructions. In adult cases, operative explorations are recommended to treat the bowel obstruction and to diagnose underlying diseases. The objective of the current case report was to describe the successful treatment of ileocolic intussusception with air enema reduction in an adult patient. A previously healthy 21-year-old woman had a 20-hour history of colicky abdominal pain and vomiting and was diagnosed as having idiopathic ileocolic intussusception by abdominal computed tomography. We treated the patient with air enema reduction under fluoroscopic guidance instead of an operative procedure. She received oxygen and intravenous midazolam to provide some degree of pain relief. Air was carefully pumped manually into the rectum, and the air pressure was monitored with a manometer. Because of air leakage from the rectum through the void to the outside the body, we continued to provide air to maintain the air pressure between 40 and 60 mm Hg. Three minutes after initiation of the air enema, when the patient experienced increasing abdominal pain and vomiting, the pressure was temporarily increased to greater than 100 mm Hg, and the air reached the terminal ileum. We considered the reduction successful and confirmed it with an abdominal ultrasound examination. We believe that air enema reduction is effective for treating idiopathic intussusception within 24 hours of symptom onset in young, previously healthy adult patients.

  17. A Case of Giant Cowper's Gland Syringocele in an Adult Male Patient

    PubMed Central

    Surana, Santosh; Elshazly, Mohamed; Allam, Adel; Jayappa, Sateesh; AlRefai, Deena

    2015-01-01

    Cowper's gland syringocele is an uncommon, underdiagnosed cystic dilatation of Cowper's gland ducts showing various radiological patterns. Herein we report a rare case of giant Cowper's gland syringocele in an adult male patient, with description of MRI findings and management outcome. PMID:26413368

  18. The contribution of adult attachment and perceived social support to depressive symptoms in patients with HIV.

    PubMed

    Hinnen, Chris; Schreuder, Imke; Jong, Eefje; van Duijn, Miranda; Dahmen, Rutger; van Gorp, Eric C M

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated the relationship between adult attachment style and depressive symptomatology in patients with HIV. Moreover, perceived social support was investigated as a potential mediator between adult attachment and depressive symptoms. A sample of 233 HIV-infected patients (90% male) completed questionnaires assessing adult attachment style (Relationship Questionnaire), depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory), and perceived social support (Medical Outcomes Study Social Support Survey). After controlling for demographic and medical variables, an insecure adult attachment style was found to be strongly related with depressive symptoms. Half of the insecurely attached patients reported clinically elevated levels of distress, while one in nine securely attached patients reported elevated levels of distress (χ(2)=32.25, p=0.001). Moreover, the association between attachment style and depressive symptomatology was found to be partly mediated through perceived social support. This study strongly supports the notion that an insecure attachment style is a vulnerability factor for developing depressive symptoms that would warrant clinical attention when confronted with a chronic illness such as HIV. The clinical implications of these findings are discussed.

  19. Lessons Learned While Providing Group Counseling for Adult Patients with Metastatic Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Jack A.; Cumbia, Gilbert G.

    1987-01-01

    Provides a review of lessons learned in dealing with unique problems encountered while providing group counseling for adult patients with metastatic cancer. Discusses problems, institutional policies, personal biases, and logistics associated with forming, establishing, maintaining, conducting and assessing the outcomes of group counseling with…

  20. Adults Living with Limited Literacy and Chronic Illness: Patient Education Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Judy; Taylor, Maurice C.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how Canadian adults living with limited literacy and chronic illness made meaning of their patient education experiences. The study used a hermeneutic phenomenological research design and employed three data sources over a nine-month period. Data was interpreted and analyzed as it was collected,…

  1. Adult/Patient Nutrition Education Materials. January 1982-October 1989. Quick Bibliography Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Updegrove, Natalie A.

    This publication contains abstracts of books, articles, and research studies on the subject of adult patient nutrition. The materials offer dietary guidelines for mature individuals with a variety of ailments. The citations in this bibliography were entered in the "Agricola" database between January, 1979 and October, 1989. (JD)

  2. An Examination of Intimate Partner Violence and Psychological Stressors in Adult Abortion Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ely, Gretchen E.; Otis, Melanie D.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe an exploratory study examining the relationship between intimate partner violence and psychological stressors in a sample of 188 adult abortion patients. Results indicate the almost 15% of respondents report a history of abuse by the coconceiving partner. In addition, women who reported having had one or…

  3. Abnormalities in blood coagulation, fibrinolysis, and platelet activation in adult patients after the Fontan procedure.

    PubMed

    Tomkiewicz-Pajak, Lidia; Hoffman, Piotr; Trojnarska, Olga; Lipczyńska, Magdalena; Podolec, Piotr; Undas, Anetta

    2014-04-01

    Thrombosis occurs in up to 30% of patients with various forms of congenital single ventricle after the Fontan procedure. We investigated hemostatic abnormalities in adult Fontan patients. Forty-eight Fontan patients between ages 18 and 40 years, including 10 (21%) patients with previous thromboembolism 5 to 15 years after surgery, and 35 control subjects matched for age and sex were studied. Coagulation factors and inhibitors, together with markers of fibrinolysis, platelets, and endothelial activation, were determined in peripheral venous blood plasma. Compared with control subjects, Fontan patients showed lower, although mostly within normal ranges, values of all coagulation factors, as well as reduced free protein S, in association with higher antithrombin and free tissue factor pathway inhibitor levels. Thrombin generation, reflected by prothrombin fragment 1.2, and platelet activation markers were increased in Fontan patients. The plasma clot lysis time was prolonged in Fontan patients, which was associated with an increased activity of thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor. Fontan patients with previous thromboembolism had lower oxygen saturation, coagulation factors V and VIII, and free protein S, and increased von Willebrand factor, soluble CD40 ligand, and P-selectin. Other laboratory or clinical parameters were not associated with prior thrombotic episodes. Adult Fontan patients are characterized by enhanced platelet activation and endothelial injury, heightened thrombin formation, and impaired fibrinolysis. Patients showed reduced free protein S levels, increased platelet activation, and endothelial damage after thromboembolic events observed late after Fontan surgery. Our findings indicate novel prothrombotic mechanisms in adult Fontan patients, which might help to optimize thromboprophylaxis. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Center of gravity and radiographic posture analysis: a preliminary review of adult volunteers and adult patients affected by scoliosis.

    PubMed

    El Fegoun, Abdelkrim Benchikh; Schwab, Frank; Gamez, Lorenzo; Champain, Nicolas; Skalli, Wafa; Farcy, Jean-Pierre

    2005-07-01

    This is a prospective radiographic and force plate analysis involving adult volunteer and patients with scoliosis. To assess accurately the center of pressure in standing volunteers and patients with scoliosis, and correlate these finding with radiographic data. A simple and commonly applied parameter of global balance is the plumbline offset. This radiographic measurement refers to the center of C2 (or C7) drawn vertically downward. Although this measurement is simple, it may not accurately reflect the balance of the spine. This study included adult volunteers (n = 41) and patients with scoliosis (n = 45). Full-length, freestanding spine radiographs were obtained with subjects on a force plate. Simultaneous assessment of the radiologic spinal posture and the floor projection of the center of pressure (gravity line) was possible. The latter was projected on the full spine images and correlated to common radiographic parameters. The position of the gravity line differed significantly from the plumbline in frontal and sagittal planes (P < 0.001). This difference was maintained in both study populations. The mean frontal plane alignment of the gravity line was consistently to the right of the plumbline. The mean sagittal plane alignment of the gravity in relation to the plumbline revealed an offset anteriorly. The data analysis of offsets between the gravity line and radiographic parameters revealed a frontal plane mean displacement of the gravity line to the right. In the sagittal plane, a highly significant lack of correlation between the gravity line and plumbline was noted. The plumbline represents a common and convenient visual display of apparent sagittal plane imbalance, but its value as a marker of true postural balance must be questioned.

  5. [Benefits and risks of urologic laparoscopic surgery in adult patients].

    PubMed

    Safarík, L; Novák, K; Závada, J; Bízová, S; Stolz, J; Sedlácek, J; Dvorácek, J; Vraný, M

    2003-12-01

    The paper describes the advantages and disadvantages of the laparoscopic operations, the number of which steadily rises in urology. The laparoscopic surgery is considered to be a benefit regarding the short postoperative hospital stay, painless postoperative course, and virtually non-existing postoperative paralytic ileus. As disadvantage are deemed the long learning curve for the operating personal, and high economical costs, which could be cut down only if short off-work period in productive population is included. In the paper, the pathophysiological guidelines are outlined and emphasized during the laparoscopic operation, which the surgical and anesthesiological teams have to have in mind. On the own cohort of patients, the numbers and types of operations are described, which have been done at our department.

  6. Clinical approach to renal tubular acidosis in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Reddy, P

    2011-03-01

    Renal tubular acidosis (RTA) is a group of disorders observed in patients with normal anion gap metabolic acidosis. There are three major forms of RTA: A proximal (type II) RTA and two types of distal RTAs (type I and type IV). Proximal (type II) RTA originates from the inability to reabsorb bicarbonate normally in the proximal tubule. Type I RTA is associated with inability to excrete the daily acid load and may present with hyperkalaemia or hypokalaemia. The most prominent abnormality in type IV RTA is hyperkalaemia caused by hypoaldosteronism. This article extensively reviews the mechanism of hydrogen ion generation from metabolism of normal diet and various forms of RTA leading to disruptions of normal acid-base handling by the kidneys.

  7. Healthcare needs of adults with congenital heart disease: study of the patient perspective.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Jeanine L; Silversides, Candice K; Oechslin, Erwin N; Kovacs, Adrienne H

    2011-01-01

    More than 90% of infants born with congenital heart disease reach adulthood. International medical recommendations outline patient care needs in an effort to optimize patient health. There are, however, limited data focusing on the patient perspective. This study investigated adult congenital heart disease patient-reported (1) barriers to medical care, (2) healthcare behaviors, and (3) concerns regarding medical, psychosocial, and lifestyle matters. In this cross-sectional study, a questionnaire was distributed to all patients who attended a patient education conference. There were 123 adult congenital heart disease participants (58% female; mean age, 37 [SD, 13] years). The most common self-reported cardiac diagnoses were tetralogy of Fallot and transposition of the great arteries. Most patients did not report transportation or financial barriers to care, but did report the following: not wanting further surgery even if it was recommended (18%), not liking to think or talk about one's heart (17%), and not understanding doctors' information; 8% of patients inaccurately considered themselves to be "cured." With regard to healthcare behaviors, more than 80% of patients reported annual family physician and dentist visits, but 34% of patients were unaware when to seek urgent medical attention. Patients reported moderate to extreme concern about the following medical topics: heart rhythm problems (82%), infections (74%), and understanding treatment options (71%). Patients most often reported moderate to extreme concern about the following lifestyle and psychosocial topics: physical activity (77%), insurance (72%), assuming increased health responsibility (73%), diet (71%), mental health (60%), and death and dying (57%). This study provides important information about 3 specific areas. First, there are potential barriers to care beyond financial and transportation challenges. Second, many patients require education regarding when to seek urgent medical attention. Third

  8. Dietary Intake In Adult Female Coeliac Disease Patients In Slovenia

    PubMed Central

    Mičetić-Turk, Dušanka

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives The aim of the study was to assess dietary intake of coeliac disease (CD) patients and to determine if they are meeting the dietary reference values for a balanced diet. Subjects/Methods 40 women with CD, aged from 23 to 76 participated in our study. Total daily intake was assessed by a three-day food diary. Resting metabolic rate (RMR) was calculated using Harris-Benedict equation. Considering physical activity level (PAL) 1.4, the recommended total energy expenditure (TEE) value was determined. The data was evaluated with professional evaluation software Prodi and statistically analysed. Results 40 participants returned the food diary. The average energy intake was significantly too low to ensure the meeting of all-day energy needs (p<0.05). The meals contained a recommended proportion of protein, but a statistically significantly higher proportion of fat (p<0.05), lower proportion of carbohydrates and a significantly lower intake of dietary fibre (p<0.05). Regarding macro-, micro- elements and vitamins, there was a significant lack in the intake of calcium and iodine, folic acid, vitamin D and vitamin A (p<0.05), meanwhile iron intake was at the lower limit of the recommended intake, whereas zinc, potassium and vitamin K intake were significantly higher according to the recommended values, but were comparable with the intake of the general population in the Central European area. Conclusion Even in subjects with adequate or low daily energy intake, their meals contained too much fat, too few carbohydrates and dietary fibre as well as inorganic substances. The patients with CD should get regular nutritional monitoring and education on the quality and balance of a gluten-free diet. PMID:27284377

  9. Primary Care Providers' Perspectives on Screening Older Adult Patients for Food Insecurity.

    PubMed

    Pooler, Jennifer A; Hoffman, Vanessa A; Karva, Fata J

    2017-08-02

    Food insecurity has been associated with poor health and health outcomes among older adults, yet food assistance resources are available and underutilized. Routine screening and referral for food insecurity in primary care is one avenue to connect food-insecure older adults with available resources. This qualitative study aims to better understand the beliefs of primary care providers (PCPs) about food security screening and referrals in a primary care setting and perceived barriers to implementation. PCPs (n = 16) who have older adult patients but do not routinely screen for food insecurity were interviewed by phone. PCPs recognize the importance of food security for older patients and discuss nutrition and food access with patients under certain circumstances. Concerns emerged with regard to implementing a systematic screening and referral process: limited time to meet with patients, a lack of resources for addressing food insecurity, and prioritizing food insecurity at both the health system and the patient levels. Despite perceived challenges, PCPs are receptive to the idea of systematically screening and referring patients to external resources for food assistance and support. Barriers could be addressed by health systems prioritizing food insecurity as a health concern and public and private payers providing reimbursement for screening.

  10. Best Practices in Adolescent and Young Adult Patients with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Focus on Asparaginase.

    PubMed

    Boissel, Nicolas; Sender, Leonard S

    2015-09-01

    The inclusion of asparaginase in chemotherapy regimens to treat acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has had a positive impact on survival in pediatric patients. Historically, asparaginase has been excluded from most treatment protocols for adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients because of perceived toxicity in this population, and this is believed to have contributed to poorer outcomes in these patients. However, retrospective analyses over the past 12 years have shown that 2-, 5-, and 7-year overall survival of AYA patients is significantly improved with pediatric versus adult protocols. The addition of asparaginase to adult protocols yielded high rates of first remission and improved survival. However, long-term survival remains lower compared with what has been seen in pediatrics. The notion that asparaginase is poorly tolerated by AYA patients has been challenged in multiple studies. In some, but not all, studies, the incidences of hepatic and pancreatic toxicities were higher in AYA patients, whereas the rates of hypersensitivity reactions did not appear to differ with age. There is an increased risk of venous thromboembolic events, and management with anti-coagulation therapy is recommended. Overall, the risk of therapy-related mortality is low. Together, this suggests that high-intensity pediatric protocols offer an effective and tolerable approach to treating ALL in the AYA population.

  11. Changes in Quality of Life in 7 Older Adult Patients Receiving Activator Methods Chiropractic Technique

    PubMed Central

    Russell, David G.; Kimura, Melissa N.; Cowie, Harriet R.; de Groot, Caroline M.M.; McMinn, Elise A.P.; Sherson, Matthew W.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case series is to report on symptomatic and quality of life (QoL) changes in 7 older adult chiropractic patients who were receiving care using Activator Methods Chiropractic Technique (AMCT). Clinical Features Seven patients were selected from 2 chiropractic offices in Auckland, New Zealand. Patients were included if they were older adults receiving AMCT care and for whom at least 2 QoL assessments had been performed. The patients, aged 69-80 years, primarily received care for a variety of musculoskeletal complaints. Intervention and Outcomes The patients reported improvements in their presenting complaints as well as a number of nonmusculoskeletal symptoms. Each patient demonstrated clinical improvements in their RAND 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) results. The average improvement in QoL measured using a SF-36 questionnaire was 8.0 points in the physical component and 4.1 points in the mental component. Four cases had a second progress evaluation using the SF-36 and showed an overall improvement of 5.2 in the physical and 9.8 in the mental components from baseline. Conclusion This case series describes an improvement in QoL, as measured by the SF-36 instrument, as well as subjectively reported improvements in both musculoskeletal and nonmusculoskeletal symptoms in 7 older adults receiving chiropractic care. PMID:27069434

  12. Splenic Doppler resistive index for early detection of occult hemorrhagic shock after polytrauma in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Corradi, Francesco; Brusasco, Claudia; Garlaschi, Alessandro; Santori, Gregorio; Vezzani, Antonella; Moscatelli, Paolo; Pelosi, Paolo

    2012-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate whether direct assessment of splenic circulation by splenic Doppler resistive index (Doppler RI) is a clinically useful noninvasive method for an early detection of occult hemorrhagic shock after polytrauma in adult patients. Splenic Doppler RI was measured in 49 hemodynamically stable adult patients admitted to the emergency department because of polytrauma. Renal Doppler RI was also determined in 20 patients. Spleen size, Injury Severity Score, systolic blood pressure, heart rate, blood lactate, standard base excess, pH, hemoglobin, and inferior vena cava diameter values were recorded at admission and at 24 h. Patients were grouped according to whether signs of hemorrhagic shock did (n = 22) or did not (n = 27) occur within the first 24 h from admission. Patients who developed hemorrhagic shock had significantly higher splenic and renal Doppler RI, higher Injury Severity Score, and lower standard base excess at admission. By multivariate logistic regression, splenic Doppler RI resulted to be a predictor of hemorrhagic shock development within the first 24 h from admission. Splenic Doppler RI may represent a clinically useful noninvasive method for early detection of occult hemorrhagic shock and persistent occult hypoperfusion after polytrauma in adult patients.

  13. Basilar impression of the skull in patients with adult coeliac disease and after gastric surgery.

    PubMed

    Hurwitz, L J; Banerji, N K

    1972-02-01

    Chamberlain's, McGregor's and Bull's angle measurements for basilar impression of the skull were made on 22 adult patients with idiopathic steatorrhoea (probable gluten enteropathy), 24 patients who had had previous gastric surgery, and 48 control subjects. For each of the three measurements a value greater than the mean plus two standard deviations was taken as the upper limit of normal. In seven patients with adult steatorrhoea all three measurements were abnormal suggesting basilar impression, while basilar impression was probable in only one patient who had gastric surgery. The trend towards abnormal measurements was significant in the steatorrhoea patients but not in those who had gastric surgery. Basilar impression also was present in patients who did not have rickets or present evidence of osteomalacia. It was argued that this study could support a hypothesis that some cases of primary basilar impression of the skull are secondary to bone softening associated with malabsorption in early life, the evidence of which may have disappeared in adult life.

  14. Does cognitive decline decrease health utility value in older adult patients with cancer?

    PubMed

    Akechi, Tatsuo; Aiki, Sayo; Sugano, Koji; Uchida, Megumi; Yamada, Atsuro; Komatsu, Hirokazu; Ishida, Takashi; Kusumoto, Shigeru; Iida, Shinsuke; Okuyama, Toru

    2017-05-01

    Cognitive decline is common among older adults with cancer. The present study aimed to investigate the impact of cognitive decline on health utility value in older adults suffering from cancer. Consecutive patients aged 65 years or older with a primary diagnosis of malignant lymphoma or multiple myeloma were recruited. Patients were asked to complete the EuroQoL-5 (EQ-5D) scale to measure health utility and the Mini-Mental State Examination to assess cognitive decline. The potential impact of cognitive decline was investigated with univariate analysis. A multivariate regression analysis was conducted to control for potential confounding factors. Complete data were obtained from 87 patients, 29% of whom had cognitive decline. The mean ± SE EQ-5D score for patients with cognitive decline was significantly lower than that for those without cognitive decline (0.67 ± 0.04 vs 0.79 ± 0.03, t = 2.38, P = 0.02). However, multiple regression analysis showed that cognitive decline was not significantly associated with EQ-5D scores. Female sex and lower performance scores (worse physical condition) were significantly associated with EQ-5D scores. Cognitive decline may be involved in decreased health utility value in older adult patients with cancer. However, this effect does not seem to be independent, and the patient's physical condition may be a relevant confounding factor. © 2016 The Authors. Psychogeriatrics © 2016 Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.

  15. Outcomes for adult scoliosis patients receiving chiropractic rehabilitation: a 24-month retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Morningstar, Mark W.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to retrospectively report the results of patients who completed an exercise-based chiropractic program and its potential to alter the natural progression of adult scoliosis at 24 months after the clinic portion of treatment was concluded. Methods A retrospective chart review was conducted at 2 spine clinics in Michigan, USA. Each clinic uses the same chiropractic rehabilitation program to treat patients with adult scoliosis. Multidimensional patient outcomes included radiographic, respiratory, disability, and pain parameters. Outcomes were measured at baseline, at end of active treatment, and at long-term follow-up. Results A total of 28 patients fit the inclusion criteria for the study. The average beginning primary Cobb angle was 44° ± 6°. Patients received the same chiropractic rehabilitation program for approximately 6 months. At the end of active treatment, improvements were recorded in Cobb angle, pain scores, spirometry, and disability rating. All radiographic findings were maintained at 24-month follow-up. Conclusion This report is among the first to demonstrate sustained radiographic, self-rated, and physiologic benefits after treatment ceased. After completion of a multimodal chiropractic rehabilitation treatment, a retrospective cohort of 28 adult scoliosis patients reported improvements in pain, Cobb angle, and disability immediately following the conclusion of treatment and 24 months later. PMID:22014907

  16. Successful management without protective colostomy in an adult patient with anorectal mal-formation.

    PubMed

    Tavusbay, Cengiz; Genç, Hüdai; Karaca, İrfan; Atahan, Kemal; Hacıyanlı, Mehmet; Türk, Erdal

    2017-01-01

    Anorectal malformations are rare occurrences characterized by the absence or abnormal localization of the anus. Clinical manifestations can vary from mild forms that require only minor surgery to more complicated cases that must be managed with multi-staged surgery. In this report, our aim is to present the clinical characteristics, management, and treatment outcome of an adult patient with an anorectal malformation with a vestibular fistula that was successfully repaired by posterior sagittal anorectoplasty (PSARP) and to discuss the case in the light of the relevant literature. We also would like to underline the fact that primary anorectal malformations can, although rarely, be observed in adult patients. A 26-year-old female patient presented with an imperforate anus and constipation with feces passing through a fistula located at the distal part of her vagina. She was continent for solid feces, but had leakage of flatus and fecal soiling. She also had concurrent left renal agenesis. A posterior sagittal anorectoplasty was successfully performed without a colostomy. The patient was discharged uneventfully on the postoperative 8th day. The patient was fully continent during a control visit after seven years of follow-up. Posterior sagittal anorectoplasty is a technique that can be successfully used in adult patients with anorectal malformations.

  17. Selective dorsal rhizotomy for spastic diplegia secondary to stroke in an adult patient

    PubMed Central

    Eppinger, Melissa Ann; Berman, Casey Melissa; Mazzola, Catherine Anne

    2015-01-01

    Background: Selective dorsal rhizotomy (SDR) is often recommended for children with spastic paraparesis and cerebral palsy. SDR reduces spasticity in the lower extremities for these children with spastic paraplegia. However, SDR is infrequently recommended for adults with spasticity. Spastic diplegia in adult patients can be due to stroke, brain or spinal cord injury from trauma, infection, toxic-metabolic disorders, and other causes. Although rarely considered, SDR is an option for adult patients with spastic diplegia as well. Case Description: The authors describe a patient who underwent a SDR with a successful postoperative outcome. This man suffered a hypertensive and hemorrhagic stroke secondary to intravenous drug abuse at age 46. A SDR was performed after two failed intrathecal baclofen pump placements due to recurrent infections, likely resulting from his immunocompromised status. The patient underwent lumbar laminectomies and dorsal rhizotomies at levels L1-S1 bilaterally. Postoperatively, the patient's spasticity was significantly reduced. His Ashworth spasticity score decreased from 4/5 to 1/5, and the reduction in tone has been durable over 3 years. Conclusion: SDR in older patients with spastic paraparesis may be considered as a treatment option. PMID:26167363

  18. General practitioners' use of caries-preventive agents in adult patients versus pediatric patients: findings from the dental practice-based research network.

    PubMed

    Riley, Joseph L; Gordan, Valeria V; Rindal, D Brad; Fellows, Jeffrey L; Williams, O Dale; Ritchie, Lloyd K; Gilbert, Gregg H

    2010-06-01

    In this study, the authors tested the frequency of dentists' recommendations for and use of caries-preventive agents for children as compared with adults. The authors surveyed 467 general dentists in the Dental Practice-Based Research Network who practice within the United States and treat both pediatric and adult patients. They asked dentists to identify the percentage of their patients for whom they had administered or recommended dental sealants, in-office and at-home fluoride, chlorhexidine rinse and xylitol gum. Dentists were less likely to provide adult patients than pediatric patients with in-office caries-preventive agents. However, the rate at which they recommended at-home preventive regimens for the two groups of patients was similar. Dentists with a conservative approach to caries treatment were the most likely to use and recommend the use of caries-preventive agents at similar rates in adults as in children. In addition, dentists in practices with a greater number of patients who had dental insurance were significantly more likely to provide in-office fluoride or sealants to adult patients than to pediatric patients. General dentists use in-office caries-preventive agents more commonly with their pediatric patients than with their adult patients. General dentists should consider providing additional in-office caries-preventive agents for their adult patients who are at increased risk of experiencing dental caries.

  19. Assessment of the nutritional status of adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia during induction chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Deluche, Elise; Girault, Stephane; Jesus, Pierre; Monzat, Sophie; Turlure, Pascal; Leobon, Sophie; Abraham, Julie; Daly, Nathalie; Dauriac, Olivia; Bordessoule, Dominique

    2017-09-01

    To the best of our knowledge, few studies have evaluated the nutritional status in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) during induction treatment. The aim of this retrospective study was to describe nutritional status of newly diagnosed adult patients with AML at admission and during induction chemotherapy. We included consecutive newly diagnosed adult patients with AML who were admitted to the Department of Hematology (Limoges University Hospital) from April 2010 to January 2014. Nutritional assessment included body mass index (BMI) and weight loss to diagnose undernutrition. Weekly laboratory tests were collected and total energy expenditure was calculated to adapt food intake. Of 95 patients, 14 (15%) presented with undernutrition at admission: low BMI values (P < 0.001) and weight loss >5% for 9.5% patients. After chemotherapy induction, 17 patients (18%) were undernutrition (P = 0.05). Patients without undernutrition had a significantly lower median weight, BMI, and serum albumin level at discharge compared with their admission values (P < 0.05); whereas their serum transthyretin levels were higher (P = 0.03). They also had shorter hospital stays than patients with undernutrition (31 versus 39 d; P = 0.03) and longer survival at 12 mo (89.9 versus 58.3%; P = 0.002). Patients with AML with good nutritional status undergoing induction chemotherapy have shorter hospital stays and longer survival. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Comorbidity of Adult Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder in Bipolar and Unipolar Patients

    PubMed Central

    HARMANCI, Hatice; ÇAM ÇELİKEL, Feryal; ETİKAN, İlker

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The co-occurrence of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in affective disorder patients is considerably high. The aims of the present study were to search for the frequency and impact of ADHD co-occurrence on the clinical features of affective disorders and to examine the relationship between the dominant affective temperaments and ADHD. Methods In total, 100 patients with bipolar disorder (BD), 100 patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), and 100 healthy controls (HC) were included. All diagnoses were assigned according to DSM-IV-TR criteria. The Adult Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Self-Report Scale (ASRS); Wender Utah Rating Scale (WURS); and Temperament Evaluation of Memphis, Pisa, Paris, and San Diego Autoquestionnaire (TEMPS-A) were applied to all participants. Results The percentage of BD patients meeting the criteria for a diagnosis of current ADHD was 48% compared with the percentage of MDD patients and HCC subjects, i.e., 25% and 12%, respectively. ADHD was significantly more frequent in bipolar adults than in not only HC but also depressive patients. In the BD group, patients with a comorbid ADHD diagnosis had significantly more suicidal history than those without ADHD. The scores of the temperament traits, namely depressive, cyclothymic, irritable, and anxious, were significantly higher in subjects with ADHD in all groups, including in HC. Conclusion The most important findings of the present study were the observations that (1) the frequency of ADHD is considerably high among bipolar patients; (2) the frequency of suicide attempts is high in the bipolar patient group with comorbid ADHD; and (3) depressive, cyclothymic, irritable, and anxious temperaments are significantly associated with ADHD comorbidity in bipolar and depressive patients as well as in HC. The high comorbidity and chronic course of ADHD and its possible negative influence on the course of both disorders increase the importance of screening for adult

  1. Molecular Diagnostic Experience of Whole-Exome Sequencing in Adult Patients

    PubMed Central

    Posey, Jennifer E.; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; James, Regis A.; Bainbridge, Matthew; Niu, Zhiyv; Wang, Xia; Dhar, Shweta; Wiszniewski, Wojciech; Akdemir, Zeynep H.C.; Gambin, Tomasz; Xia, Fan; Person, Richard E.; Walkiewicz, Magdalena; Shaw, Chad A.; Sutton, V. Reid; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Muzny, Donna; Eng, Christine M.; Yang, Yaping; Gibbs, Richard A.; Lupski, James R.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Plon, Sharon E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Whole exome sequencing (WES) is increasingly used as a diagnostic tool in medicine, but prior reports focus on predominantly pediatric cohorts with neurologic or developmental disorders. We describe the diagnostic yield and characteristics of whole exome sequencing in adults. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of consecutive WES reports for adults from a diagnostic laboratory. Phenotype composition was determined using Human Phenotype Ontology terms. Results Molecular diagnoses were reported for 17.5% (85/486) of adults, lower than a primarily pediatric population (25.2%; p=0.0003); the diagnostic rate was higher (23.9%) in those 18–30 years of age compared to patients over 30 years (10.4%; p=0.0001). Dual Mendelian diagnoses contributed to 7% of diagnoses, revealing blended phenotypes. Diagnoses were more frequent among individuals with abnormalities of the nervous system, skeletal system, head/neck, and growth. Diagnostic rate was independent of family history information, and de novo mutations contributed to 61.4% of autosomal dominant diagnoses. Conclusion Early WES experience in adults demonstrates molecular diagnoses in a substantial proportion of patients, informing clinical management, recurrence risk and recommendations for relatives. A positive family history was not predictive, consistent with molecular diagnoses often revealed by de novo events, informing the Mendelian basis of genetic disease in adults. PMID:26633545

  2. Anaesthesia for thymectomy in adult and juvenile myasthenic patients.

    PubMed

    Sungur, Zerrin; Sentürk, Mert

    2016-02-01

    Myasthenia gravis, a chronic disease of the neuromuscular junction, is associated with an interaction with neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBAs). As thymectomy is often the method of choice for its treatment, anaesthetic management requires meticulous preoperative evaluation, careful monitoring, and adequate dose titration. The frequency of video-assisted thoracoscopic extended thymectomy (VATET) is also increasing, making the use of NMBA obligatory. The number of cases of the juvenile form has also increased over years; airway management in juvenile one-lung ventilation is another challenge. Sugammadex appears to be a safe choice to avoid prolonged action of NMBA also in patients with myasthenia gravis, although this information has to be confirmed in further series. The number of VATETs is increasing so that the experience with sugammadex will also increase in time. In non-VATET operations, use of NMBA should and can be avoided as much as possible. New scoring systems are defined to predict a postoperative myasthenic crisis. For VATET in juvenile cases, blockers can be a good option for the airway management. Anaesthetic management of thymectomy in myasthenia gravis requires experience concerning different approaches. Sugammadex should be considered as a possible further step toward postoperative safety.

  3. Urinary tract infections in adult general practice patients.

    PubMed Central

    Hummers-Pradier, Eva; Kochen, Michael M

    2002-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are symptomatic infections of the urinary tract, mainly caused by the bacterium Escherichia coli. One in two women suffers from a UTI at least once in her life. The young and sexually active are particulaly affected, but it is also seen in elderly, postmenopausal women. The likelihood of recurrence is high. Diagnosis is made with regard to typical complaints and the presence of leucocytes and nitrites in the urine. A culture is unnecessary in most cases. Uncomplicated UTI should be distinguished from complicated UTI, which has a risk of severe illness. The treatment of choice--short-term therapy with trimethoprim or nitrofurantoin--is successful in over 80% of the cases. Co-trimoxazol fluoroquinolones or cephalsporins are not considered first-choice drugs. There are indications that general practitioners' (GPs') management of UTI is not always optimal, specifically concerning diagnostic tests, the application of second-choice antibiotics, and the length of prescribed treatment courses. Many points relevant to GPs requirefurther research, such as epidemiology and resistance of urinary pathogens in the community and natural history of UTI, as well as optimal management in elderly or complicated patients and men. PMID:12236281

  4. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act dependent coverage expansion: Disparities in impact among young adult oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Elysia M; Keegan, Theresa H; Johnston, Emily E; Haile, Robert; Sanders, Lee; Wise, Paul H; Saynina, Olga; Chamberlain, Lisa J

    2017-09-22

    Private health insurance is associated with improved outcomes in patients with cancer. However, to the authors' knowledge, little is known regarding the impact of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act Dependent Coverage Expansion (ACA-DCE), which extended private insurance to young adults (to age 26 years) beginning in 2010, on the insurance status of young adults with cancer. The current study was a retrospective, population-based analysis of hospitalized young adult oncology patients (aged 22-30 years) in California during 2006 through 2014 (11,062 patients). Multivariable regression analyses examined factors associated with having private insurance. Results were presented as adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. A difference-in-difference analysis examined the influence of the ACA-DCE on insurance coverage by race/ethnicity and federal poverty level. Multivariable regression demonstrated that patients of black and Hispanic race/ethnicity were less likely to have private insurance before and after the ACA-DCE, compared with white patients. Younger age (22-25 years) was associated with having private insurance after implementation of the ACA-DCE (odds ratio, 1.20; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-1.35). In the difference-in-difference analysis, private insurance increased among white patients aged 22 to 25 years who were living in medium-income (2006-2009: 64.6% vs 2011-2014: 69.1%; P = .003) and high-income (80.4% vs 82%; P = .043) zip codes and among Asians aged 22 to 25 years living in high-income zip codes (73.2 vs 85.7%; P = .022). Private insurance decreased for all Hispanic patients aged 22 to 25 years between the 2 time periods. The ACA-DCE provision increased insurance coverage, but not among all patients. Private insurance increased for white and Asian patients in higher income neighborhoods, potentially widening social disparities in private insurance coverage among young adults with cancer. Cancer 2017. © 2017 American Cancer

  5. Giardia Assemblages A and B in Diarrheic Patients: A Comparative Study in Egyptian Children and Adults.

    PubMed

    El Basha, Noussa R; Zaki, Mayssa M; Hassanin, Omayma M; Rehan, Mohamed K; Omran, Dalia

    2016-02-01

    Giardia duodenalis is considered the most common intestinal parasite in humans worldwide. Children are especially affected, with more severe consequences than adults. The present study was designed to determine the distribution of assemblages A and B Giardia infection in children and adults, with the use of light microscopy and polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) as diagnostic procedures, and to investigate its associations with clinical and epidemiological data collected from children and adult groups. This cross-sectional study was conducted from October 2012 to October 2013 by collecting fecal samples from 200 children and 200 adults complaining of diarrhea. Samples were subjected to parasitological examination by direct wet smear and formol-ether methods. Genotyping of G. doudenalis samples was conducted by PCR-RFLP analysis. Giardia duodenalis infection caused by assemblages A and B was identified in 60 samples, 34 from children and 26 from adults. Assemblage B was detected in 38 patients (63.34%), and assemblage A was detected in 22 patients (36.66%). Assemblage A was significantly more frequent in children with age range 2-8 yr, and assemblage B was higher in children with age range 6-16 yr old. Diarrhea frequency/day and recurrences per month affected patients infected with assemblage A (P value < 0.001) more frequently. Children infected with assemblage A presented significantly more severe diarrhea and dehydration than those infected with assemblage B (P value < 0.001). Although both Giardia assemblages A and B were identified in children and adults, assemblage A infected younger children more frequently and was more closely related to severe clinical manifestations than assemblage B.

  6. Dysnatremias and survival in adult burn patients: a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Ian J; Morrow, Benjamin D; Tilley, Molly A; Snow, Brian D; Gisler, Christopher; Kramer, Keith W; Aden, James K; Renz, Evan M; Chung, Kevin K

    2013-01-01

    Dysnatremias have been evaluated in many populations and have been found to be significantly associated with mortality. However, this relationship has not been well described in the burn population. Admissions to the burn center at our institution from January 2003 to December 2008 were examined. Independent variables included gender, age, percentage total body surface area burned (%TBSA), percentage of third-degree burn, inhalation injury, injury severity score (ISS), Acute Kidney Injury Network (AKIN) stage, hypernatremia, and hyponatremia. They were examined via Cox proportional hazard regression models against death. Moderate to severe hypo- and hypernatremia were defined as serum sodium <130 and >150 mmol/l, respectively. In 1,969 subjects with a mean age of 36.3 ± 16.4 years, a median %TBSA of 9 (interquartile range 4-20) and a median ISS of 5 (interquartile range 1-16) hypernatremia occurred in 9.9% (n = 194), while hyponatremia occurred in 6.8% (n = 134) with mortality rates of 33.5 and 13.8%, respectively. Patients without a dysnatremia had a mortality rate of 4.3%. On Cox proportional hazard regression age, %TBSA, ISS, and AKIN stage were found to be significant predictors of mortality. Hypernatremia (HR 2.00, 95% CI 1.212-3.31; p = 0.0066), but not hyponatremia (HR 1.72, 95% CI 0.89-3.34; p = 0.1068) was associated with mortality. In the burn population, hypernatremia, but not hyponatremia, is an independent predictor of mortality.

  7. Role of allogeneic stem cell transplantation in adult patients with Ph-negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dhédin, Nathalie; Huynh, Anne; Maury, Sébastien; Tabrizi, Reza; Beldjord, Kheira; Asnafi, Vahid; Thomas, Xavier; Chevallier, Patrice; Nguyen, Stéphanie; Coiteux, Valérie; Bourhis, Jean-Henri; Hichri, Yosr; Escoffre-Barbe, Martine; Reman, Oumedaly; Graux, Carlos; Chalandon, Yves; Blaise, Didier; Schanz, Urs; Lhéritier, Véronique; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Dombret, Hervé; Ifrah, Norbert

    2015-04-16

    Because a pediatric-inspired Group for Research on Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (GRAALL) protocol yielded a markedly improved outcome in adults with Philadelphia chromosome-negative ALL, we aimed to reassess the role of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) in patients treated in the GRAALL-2003 and GRAALL-2005 trials. In all, 522 patients age 15 to 55 years old and presenting with at least 1 conventional high-risk factor were candidates for SCT in first complete remission. Among these, 282 (54%) received a transplant in first complete remission. At 3 years, posttransplant cumulative incidences of relapse, nonrelapse mortality, and relapse-free survival (RFS) were estimated at 19.5%, 15.5%, and 64.7%, respectively. Time-dependent analysis did not reveal a significant difference in RFS between SCT and no-SCT cohorts. However, SCT was associated with longer RFS in patients with postinduction minimal residual disease (MRD) ≥10(-3) (hazard ratio, 0.40) but not in good MRD responders. In B-cell precursor ALL, SCT also benefitted patients with focal IKZF1 gene deletion (hazard ratio, 0.42). This article shows that poor early MRD response, in contrast to conventional ALL risk factors, is an excellent tool to identify patients who may benefit from allogeneic SCT in the context of intensified adult ALL therapy. Trial GRAALL-2003 was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00222027; GRAALL-2005 was registered as #NCT00327678.

  8. Social Media and the Adolescent and Young Adult (AYA) Patient with Cancer.

    PubMed

    Perales, Miguel-Angel; Drake, Emily K; Pemmaraju, Naveen; Wood, William A

    2016-12-01

    Over 70,000 adolescent and young adults (AYA) aged 15 to 39 years are diagnosed with cancer each year in the US. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) has identified AYA cancer patients as a unique population. The most common cancers in this age group include tumors typically seen in pediatric patients such as acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and brain tumors, as well as cancers more typically seen in adult patients such as breast cancer and melanoma. In addition, some cancers have their highest incidence in AYA patients, such as Hodgkin Lymphoma, testicular cancer, and bone tumors. AYA patients face additional unique issues due to their age, not just questions about treatment choices due to lack of data but also questions about fertility, relationships, loss of autonomy, and interruptions in school/work with potentially significant financial complications. This age group also has very high rates of social media usage with up to 90 % of adults aged 18 to 29 using social networking sites. In this review, we will describe the use of social media in AYAs with cancer and highlight some of the online resources for AYAs.

  9. A survey on patient perception of reduced-intensity transplantation in adults with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, S; Bareford, D

    2007-04-01

    The development of reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) and the success of BMT for paediatric sickle cell disease (SCD) have raised the possibility of revisiting this prospect in adults as well. In a chronic debilitating disorder managed with supportive therapy, the patients' perception is critical in the advancement of any potential curative therapy. To explore this aspect, we undertook a questionnaire-based survey on 30 adults with SCD. Sixty two per cent of the patients were ready to accept a transplant-related mortality (TRM) >10%; 30% of them a TRM >30%. A risk of graft failure (GF) >10% was acceptable to 64%, with a risk >30% acceptable to 41%. Infertility was acceptable to only 50%. Chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) was unacceptable to the majority (80%). Seventy six per cent% of patients had a full sibling and 60% were willing to participate in a clinical trial of RIC transplantation. This survey suggests that the majority of adults with SCD might be willing to consider a curative option such as RIC transplantation even with a high TRM or GF. The major concerns relate to chronic GVHD and infertility. There is an urgent need to explore RIC transplants in SCD patients within the framework of a clinical trial, considering patient perception regarding cure and complications.

  10. Intensive care outcome of adult patients operated on for congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Jacquet, Luc; Vancaenegem, Olivier; Rubay, Jean; Laarbaui, Fatima; Goffinet, Céline; Lovat, Robin; Noirhomme, Philippe; El Khoury, Gebrine

    2007-03-01

    To describe the ICU outcome and the most frequent complications observed in adult patients operated on for a congenital heart disease. Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data and chart review in an adult cardiovascular ICU of a university hospital. 156 patients older than 15 years with congenital heart disease undergoing cardiac surgery between June 2001 and June 2005. According to the initial cardiac malformation, patients were divided in four groups with different operative risk based on the Euroscore: those diagnosed bicuspid aortic valve (n = 73) had a score of 5, those with tetralogy of Fallot (n = 33) 5.5, those with simple cardiac defect (n = 26) 3, and those with complex malformations (n = 24) 6. Only two patients (one with tetralogy of Fallot and one with complex malformations) died during the hospitalization (1.2%). Euroscore clearly overestimates the risk of surgery in this population of adults with congenital heart disease. Mortality and morbidity were low in those diagnosed bicuspid aortic valve, tetralogy of Fallot, or simple cardiac defect, justifying early surgery for incipient complications. Patients with complex congenital defect require prolonged ICU stay, sometimes with mechanical cardiac support, but their overall good outcome justifies these efforts.

  11. Factors associated with mortality in adult hospitalized burn patients in Tehran.

    PubMed

    Zarei, Mohammad Reza; Dianat, Seyedsaied; Eslami, Vahid; Harirchi, Iraj; Boddouhi, Nosratollah; Zandieh, Ali; Rasouli, Mohammad R

    2011-01-01

    The mortality rate following burn is an important outcome parameter. This study aimed to identify factors associated with mortality in adult hospitalized burn patients in Tehran, Iran. This cross-sectional study was performed during a one-year period in two referral burn centers in Tehran. During the study period, 1321 adult (> 15 years) hospitalized burn patients were enrolled. Univariate and multivariate (logistic regression) analyses were performed to identify factors associated with mortality. The mean age of the patients was 33.1 ± 14.9 years. By far, the majority of burns were accidental (n = 1076, 81.5%). Regarding the mechanism of burn, burn with petroleum products was the most frequent. Mean percent burned total body surface area (TBSA) was 39.9% ± 25.8%. The mortality rate was 33%. Sepsis was the most common cause of mortality. The results of the present study indicated that non work-related burns, burned TBSA and body surface area affected by second- or third-degree burns were independent determinants of mortality among adult hospitalized burn patients. The present study showed a high mortality rate in the studied burn centers. Patients with identified risk factors should be categorized as high risk at the time of admission and need special attention and care during hospitalization.

  12. The effects of health coaching on adult patients with chronic diseases: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kivelä, Kirsi; Elo, Satu; Kyngäs, Helvi; Kääriäinen, Maria

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to describe the effects of health coaching on adult patients with chronic diseases. The reviewers searched electronic databases and performed a manual search for studies published from 2009 to 2013. The inclusion criteria covered health coaching for adults with chronic diseases by health care professionals. The studies were original, randomized controlled trials or quasi-experimental designs. Thirteen studies were selected using the inclusion criteria. The results indicate that health coaching produces positive effects on patients' physiological, behavioral and psychological conditions and on their social life. In particular, statistically significant results revealed better weight management, increased physical activity and improved physical and mental health status. Health coaching improves the management of chronic diseases. Further research into the cost-effectiveness of health coaching and its long-term effectiveness for chronic diseases is needed. Practice implications Health care professionals play key roles in promoting healthy behavior and motivating good care for adults with chronic diseases. Health coaching is an effective patient education method that can be used to motivate and take advantage of a patient's willingness to change their life style and to support the patient's home-based self-care. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Comorbidities and inhibitors in adult patients with haemophilia: issues, costs and management strategies.

    PubMed

    Berntorp, Erik; Mauser-Bunschoten, Evelien; Jiménez-Yuste, Víctor; Spears, Jeffrey B

    2015-11-01

    Along with greater life expectancy in patients with haemophilia has been an increase in associated haemophilia-related (arthropathy, osteoporosis, viral infections) and age-related (cardiovascular disease, renal disease, cancer and others) comorbidities, many of which are only just emerging as the population ages. At present, experience in managing these comorbidities is limited. As the demographic shift continues, haemophilia care centres can expect to encounter more patients with greater levels of complexity. In the absence of evidence-based information to guide the management of adult patients with haemophilia, it is important that the scientific position be reviewed on a regular basis. To this end, several topics relevant to the clinical management of adult patients with haemophilia were examined in a symposium entitled Comorbidities and inhibitors in adult patients with haemophilia: issues, costs and management strategies held on 11 February 2015 in Helsinki, Finland, in conjunction with the 8th Annual Congress of the European Association for Haemophilia and Allied Disorders. This article is a summary of that event.

  14. Serum adipocytokine profile and metabolic syndrome in young adult female dermatomyositis patients.

    PubMed

    Silva, Marilda Guimarães; Borba, Eduardo Ferreira; Mello, Suzana Beatriz Veríssimo de; Shinjo, Samuel Katsuyuki

    2016-12-01

    To analyse the frequency of metabolic syndrome in young adult female dermatomyositis patients and its possible association with clinical and laboratory dermatomyositis-related features and serum adipocytokines. This cross-sectional study included 35 dermatomyositis patients and 48 healthy controls. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the 2009 Joint Interim Statement. Patient age was comparable in the dermatomyositis and control groups, and the median disease duration was 1.0 year. An increased prevalence of metabolic syndrome was detected in the dermatomyositis group (34.3% vs. 6.3%; p=0.001). In addition, increased serum adiponectin and resistin levels were noted in contrast to lower leptin levels. In dermatomyositis patients, adipocytokine levels were correlated with the levels of total cholesterol, low-density cholesterol, triglycerides and muscle enzymes. A comparison of dermatomyositis patients with (n=12) and without (n=23) syndrome metabolic revealed that adipocytokine levels were also correlated with age, and that dermatomyositis patients with metabolic syndrome tended to have more disease activity despite similar adipocytokine levels. Metabolic syndrome is highly prevalent in young adult female dermatomyositis patients and is related to age and disease activity. Moreover, increased serum adiponectin and resistin levels were detected in dermatomyositis patients, but lower serum leptin levels were observed.

  15. Assessment of coagulation profile by thromboelastometry in adult patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Rupa-Matysek, Joanna; Trojnarska, Olga; Gil, Lidia; Szczepaniak-Chicheł, Ludwina; Wojtasińska, Ewelina; Tykarski, Andrzej; Grajek, Stefan; Komarnicki, Mieczysław

    2016-01-01

    Patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD) have an increased risk of bleeding and thrombotic complications. Prolonged conventional coagulation screening parameters, such as activated partial thromboplastin time or prothrombin time, are reported in less than 20% of CCHD patients. The aim of this study was to determine the haemostatic abnormalities in 32 adult patients with CCHD by rotation thromboelastometry (ROTEM) with assessment of coagulation dynamic properties, as a guide for perioperative prophylaxis or haemostatic therapy. The control group consisted of 35 healthy subjects. Our results suggest that CCHD patients, in comparison to healthy controls, had a tendency to hypocoagulate with delayed activation of haemostasis and clot formation, initiated by both intrinsic and extrinsic activators. The growth of the clot was slower and the clot firmness was decreased, which may additionally contribute to bleeding diathesis. Moreover, the clot lysis readings suggest higher clot stability in the CCHD group. All velocity parameters were markedly lower in the CCHD patients, indicating a decreased rate of clot formation. Although coagulation tests and platelet count were normal, the usefulness of rotation thromboelastometry in monitoring or guiding therapy in CCHD patients is demonstrated. In conclusion, our results provide new insights into the data on hypocoagulation with impaired clot lysis in adult CCHD patients as determined by ROTEM. Our findings may assist in determining the optimal management of patients with CCHD undergoing surgery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Photorefractive keratectomy in the management of refractive accommodative esotropia in young adult patients.

    PubMed

    Pacella, Elena; Abdolrahimzadeh, Solmaz; Mollo, Roberto; Mazzeo, Luigi; Pacella, Fernanda; Mazzeo, Francesco; Gabrieli, Corrado Balacco

    2009-11-01

    To evaluate the visual, motor, and sensory outcomes of photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) in the treatment of purely refractive accommodative esotropia in young adult patients. Policlinico Umberto I, Department of Ophthalmology, Rome, Italy. This prospective study comprised patients with hyperopia and purely accommodative hyperopic esotropia. A complete ophthalmologic examination was performed preoperatively and 1, 3, and 12 months postoperatively. The examination included uncorrected (UDVA) and corrected (CDVA) distance visual acuities and orthoptic and sensory tests. All patients also had keratometry, pachymetry, and corneal topography assessment before and after treatment. Treatment was performed using a Technolas 217 excimer laser. Thirty eyes of 15 patients (mean age 30.8 years) were treated. Preoperatively, the CDVA was 20/30 or better in all eyes and the mean cycloplegic spherical equivalent (SE) was +3.50 diopters (D). One year postoperatively, the UDVA was 20/30 or better in all eyes and the mean SE was -0.01 D. The mean esotropic deviation for distance vision without correction preoperatively was 8.7 prism diopters. At 1 year of follow-up, 12 patients achieved orthophoria and 3 patients had a reduction in the angle of deviation. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications. Stereopsis was unaffected by treatment in all patients. Photorefractive keratectomy was effective in the treatment of purely accommodative esotropia in young adult patients at a follow-up of 1 year. There were no cases of visual acuity loss or complications from the laser treatment.

  17. Serum adipocytokine profile and metabolic syndrome in young adult female dermatomyositis patients

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Marilda Guimarães; Borba, Eduardo Ferreira; de Mello, Suzana Beatriz Veríssimo; Shinjo, Samuel Katsuyuki

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To analyse the frequency of metabolic syndrome in young adult female dermatomyositis patients and its possible association with clinical and laboratory dermatomyositis-related features and serum adipocytokines. METHOD: This cross-sectional study included 35 dermatomyositis patients and 48 healthy controls. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the 2009 Joint Interim Statement. RESULTS: Patient age was comparable in the dermatomyositis and control groups, and the median disease duration was 1.0 year. An increased prevalence of metabolic syndrome was detected in the dermatomyositis group (34.3% vs. 6.3%; p=0.001). In addition, increased serum adiponectin and resistin levels were noted in contrast to lower leptin levels. In dermatomyositis patients, adipocytokine levels were correlated with the levels of total cholesterol, low-density cholesterol, triglycerides and muscle enzymes. A comparison of dermatomyositis patients with (n=12) and without (n=23) syndrome metabolic revealed that adipocytokine levels were also correlated with age, and that dermatomyositis patients with metabolic syndrome tended to have more disease activity despite similar adipocytokine levels. CONCLUSIONS: Metabolic syndrome is highly prevalent in young adult female dermatomyositis patients and is related to age and disease activity. Moreover, increased serum adiponectin and resistin levels were detected in dermatomyositis patients, but lower serum leptin levels were observed. PMID:28076515

  18. Pneumococcal vaccination among HIV-infected adult patients in the era of combination antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kuan-Yeh; Tsai, Mao-Song; Kuo, Kuang-Che; Tsai, Jen-Chih; Sun, Hsin-Yun; Cheng, Aristine C; Chang, Sui-Yuan; Lee, Chen-Hsiang; Hung, Chien-Ching

    2014-01-01

    HIV-infected patients remain at higher risk for pneumococcal disease than the general population despite immune reconstitution and suppression of HIV replication with combination antiretroviral therapy. Vaccination with 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) composed of T-cell-independent antigens has been recommended to reduce the risk of pneumococcal disease in HIV-infected adults. However, given the heterogeneity of study design, execution and subjects enrolled, studies examining serological responses to PPV23 yielded conflicting results and observational studies of clinical effectiveness only provided moderate evidence to support the routine use of PPV23 in HIV-infected adults. Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV), with conjugation of the capsular polysaccharide to a protein carrier, is more immunogenic than PPV23 and has been demonstrated to protect against pneumococcal disease in HIV-infected children and recurrent invasive pneumococcal disease in HIV-infected adolescents and adults. Guidelines have recently been revised to recommend that HIV-infected patients aged 19 y or older receive one dose of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) followed by a booster vaccination with PPV23. In this paper, we review the studies using different vaccination strategies to improve immunogenicity among HIV-infected adult patients. PMID:25483681

  19. Bone mineral density and body composition in adult patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Grey, A B; Ames, R W; Matthews, R D; Reid, I R

    1993-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Cystic fibrosis is a multisystem disease characterised by chronic pulmonary sepsis and malnutrition. To ascertain whether osteoporosis is a feature of cystic fibrosis in adult patients, total body and regional bone mineral density (BMD) was measured in a group of eight men and eight women aged 17-42 years. METHODS--Total body and regional BMD (lumbar spine L2-L4, femoral neck, trochanteric, and Ward's triangle), as well as total body fat and lean mass, were measured by dual energy x ray absorptiometry. A range of biochemical, lifestyle, and anthropometric variables was also assessed. RESULTS--Patients with cystic fibrosis had significantly reduced bone density at all sites compared with normal young adults. The mean reductions ranged from 7% at Ward's triangle to 13% at the trochanter. Body mass index (BMI) was positively correlated with BMD at four sites and disease severity negatively correlated with BMD at two sites. Other biochemical and anthropometric variables were not predictive of bone density. Total body fat mass was reduced by 30% compared with normal young adults. CONCLUSIONS--Bone density is decreased in adult patients with cystic fibrosis and BMI and disease severity are independent predictors of bone density. PMID:8346485

  20. Collateral Weight Loss in Children Living with Adult Bariatric Surgery Patients: A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Annemarie G.; Wood, G. Craig; Bailey-Davis, Lisa; Lent, Michelle R.; Gerhard, Glenn S.; Still, Christopher D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the impact of adult bariatric surgery on the Body Mass Index (BMI) of children living in the same household. Design and Methods A retrospective case-control study. Case dyads (n=128) were composed of one adult who had bariatric surgery and one child at the same address. Control dyads (n=384) were composed of an adult with obesity but no bariatric surgery and a child at the same address. We used a two-sample t-test to determine whether the differences between actual and expected BMI at follow-up (post-surgery) differed between children in the case and control dyads. Results Among boys who were overweight, boys who lived with a surgery patient had a lower than expected BMI post-surgery, while boys who did not live with a surgery patient had a higher than expected BMI at follow-up (p=0.045). Differences between actual and expected BMIs of children were not significantly different between cases and controls in girls or in children in other weight classes. Conclusions Overweight boys who lived with an adult bariatric surgery patient had a lower than expected BMI after surgery as compared to controls. Future studies may be warranted to determine the mechanisms by which these children experience collateral weight loss. PMID:24989939

  1. Fertility preservation in pediatric, adolescent and young adult female cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Ayensu-Coker, Leslie; Bauman, Dvora; Lindheim, Steven R; Breech, Lesley

    2012-11-01

    Advancements in chemotherapy and radiation therapies have increased survival rates in cancer patients. Late effects of therapy, including infertility, become increasingly more important with increased survival. High dose alkylating agents, total body irradiation and radiation to the gonads have the greatest effect on fertility. Fertility preservation therapies improve the reproductive potential of adolescent and young adult cancer patients receiving cancer therapies. Gonadal shielding, ovarian transposition and embryo cryopreservation are standard fertility preserving therapies. Oocyte and ovarian tissue cryopreservation have proven successful and the latter may be implemented under IRB approval. Gonadal suppression with gonadotropin releasing hormone agonist (GnRH) therapy has yielded conflicting results and larger prospective trials in both adolescents and adults are necessary. A team approach involving oncology, gynecology and reproductive endocrinology and infertility provides the best outcome for patients.

  2. Theory of mind deficit in adult patients with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Chiavarino, Claudia; Bianchino, Claudia; Brach-Prever, Silvia; Riggi, Chiara; Palumbo, Luigi; Bara, Bruno G; Bosco, Francesca M

    2015-10-01

    This article provides the first assessment of theory of mind, that is, the ability to reason about mental states, in adult patients with congenital heart disease. Patients with congenital heart disease and matched healthy controls were administered classical theory of mind tasks and a semi-structured interview which provides a multidimensional evaluation of theory of mind (Theory of Mind Assessment Scale). The patients with congenital heart disease performed worse than the controls on the Theory of Mind Assessment Scale, whereas they did as well as the control group on the classical theory-of-mind tasks. These findings provide the first evidence that adults with congenital heart disease may display specific impairments in theory of mind.

  3. Following up adult patients with tetralogy of fallot: The role of echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Daraban, Ana Maria; Jurcuţ, Ruxandra; Bădilă, Elisabeta; Bartoş, Daniela; Dan, Gheorghe Andrei

    2017-02-01

    Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) is one of the most common cyanotic congenital heart diseases. With surgical repair and the advances in postoperative care, contemporary mortality has dramatically improved and an increasing number of patients survive into adulthood, leading to a growing number of adult TOF. However, residual anatomic and hemodynamic abnormalities are encountered in nearly all patients, making follow-up mandatory. Furthermore, mortality starts to increase 25 years after surgery, emphasizing that, in adult TOF, closer monitoring is necessary. We review here the role of echocardiography in the follow-up of the TOF patients, emphasizing the role of multiple echocardiographic techniques. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Clin Ultrasound 45:79-95, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Associations between adult attachment characteristics, medical burden, and life satisfaction among older primary care patients.

    PubMed

    Kirchmann, Helmut; Nolte, Tobias; Runkewitz, Kristin; Bayerle, Lisa; Becker, Simone; Blasczyk, Verena; Lindloh, Julia; Strauss, Bernhard

    2013-12-01

    We investigated whether attachment security, measured by the Adult Attachment Prototype Rating (AAPR), was correlated with life satisfaction, independent of sociodemographic characteristics, medical burden, and age-related coping strategies in a sample of 81 patients (69-73 years) recruited from the register of a general primary care practice. Furthermore, we examined whether patients classified as AAPR-secure reported better adjustment to medical burden in terms of higher life satisfaction than did insecure patients. Attachment security was independently related to life satisfaction. Moreover, the association between medical burden and lower life satisfaction was significantly stronger for insecure than for secure participants. Our findings indicate that interventions to improve attachment security or coping processes related to attachment could help older adults retain life satisfaction.

  5. Differential diagnosis and treatment planning for the adult nonsurgical orthodontic patient.

    PubMed

    Alexander, R G; Sinclair, P M; Goates, L J

    1986-02-01

    Increasing numbers of adult patients are seeking orthodontic care and some, despite significant skeletal malocclusions, elect not to have combined orthodontic-surgical treatment. The purpose of this article is to outline some of the diagnostic and therapeutic principles that can be used in the adult nonsurgical orthodontic patient. The importance of realistic goal setting in the face of compromised occlusions is emphasized. Diagnosis should include evaluation of all three dimensions and recognize the limitations of therapy in each dimension for the nongrowing patient. Periodontal considerations, extraction decisions, and retention regimens are of vital importance to the achievement and maintenance of an optimum result. Clinical records will demonstrate four commonly seen problems and their resolution.

  6. MRI in adult patients with aortic coarctation: diagnosis and follow-up.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, B; Abbas, A; McParland, P; Fitzsimmons, S; Shambrook, J; Peebles, C; Brown, I; Harden, S

    2015-04-01

    Aortic coarctation is a disease that usually presents in infancy; however, a proportion of patients present for the first time in adulthood. These lesions generally require repair with either surgery or interventional techniques. The success of these techniques means that increasing numbers of patients are presenting for follow-up imaging in adulthood, whether their coarctation was initially repaired in infancy or as adults. Thus, the adult presenting to the radiologist for assessment of possible coarctation or follow-up of coarctation repair is not an uncommon scenario. In this review, we present details of the MRI protocols and MRI findings in these patients so that a confident and accurate assessment can be made.

  7. Gender differences among young adult cancer patients: a study of blogs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bora; Gillham, David

    2015-01-01

    The Internet has increasing relevance and practical use as a tool to support cancer care. For example, health support Web sites are now widely used to connect specific groups of patients who may otherwise have remained isolated, and understanding their health-related online behaviors will help in the development of more effective health support Web sites. This article examined blogs written by young adults affected by cancer and in particular examined the gender differences in these blog entries through content analysis. The results showed there is little difference in blog content between genders. This suggests that the blog environment could lessen the gender-typical behaviors often expected by society and may provide an outlet for young adult cancer patients to more freely share their cancer-related experiences, at the same time providing an opportunity for social connection. This is particularly significant for male patients who are known to inhibit their emotions as well as the expression of their health concerns.

  8. Concomitant therapies (glucocorticoids and sex hormones) in adult patients with growth hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Scaroni, C; Ceccato, F; Rizzati, S; Mantero, F

    2008-09-01

    Adult-onset GH deficiency (GHD), mostly due to organic lesions of the pituitary-hypothalamic region, is frequently associated with multiple anterior pituitary deficiencies that need long-term substitutive treatment. The GH-IGF-I axis may play an important role in modulating peripheral metabolism of hormones (adrenal, thyroid, and sex hormones) and these interactions may have clinically significant implications on the phenotypes of adult GHD patients and on the effects of the combined replacement hormonal treatment of this condition. By accelerating the peripheral metabolism of cortisol, GH therapy may precipitate adrenal insufficiency in susceptible hypopituitary patients; estrogen replacement blunts the response to GH in women whereas in men with androgen substitution the responsivity increases over time. Endocrinologists should be mindful of these phenomena when starting patients with hypopituitarism on GH replacement therapy.

  9. What Matters Most: A Perspective From Adult Spinal Muscular Atrophy Patients.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Michael; Heatwole, Chad; Luebbe, Elizabeth; Johnson, Nicholas E

    2016-08-30

    There are multiple symptoms that affect adults with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). The extent of these symptoms and their impact on individuals' lives is not fully known. We interviewed 15 adults with genetically confirmed SMA. Participants were asked to identify issues that have significant impact on their lives. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, coded, and analyzed. Participants provided 1045 direct quotes. 177 potential symptoms of importance were identified. Symptoms were grouped by like topics into fourteen symptomatic themes. The symptoms and issues identified by SMA patients alter their physical, mental, and social health and may be amendable to therapeutic intervention.

  10. Multiple pathogens in adult patients admitted with community-acquired pneumonia: a one year prospective study of 346 consecutive patients.

    PubMed Central

    Lieberman, D.; Schlaeffer, F.; Boldur, I.; Lieberman, D.; Horowitz, S.; Friedman, M. G.; Leiononen, M.; Horovitz, O.; Manor, E.; Porath, A.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to assess the causes of community-acquired pneumonia in adult patients admitted to hospital. METHODS: A prospective study was performed on 346 consecutive adult patients (54% men) of mean (SD) 49.3 (19.5) years (range 17-94) admitted to a university affiliated regional hospital in southern Israel with community-acquired pneumonia over a period of one year. Convalescent serum samples were obtained from 308 patients (89%). The aetiological diagnosis for community-acquired pneumonia was based on positive blood cultures and/or significant changes in antibody titres to Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, respiratory viruses, Coxiella burnetii, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumoniae, and Legionella sp. RESULTS: The aetiology of community-acquired pneumonia was identified in 279 patients (80.6%). The distribution of causal agents was as follows: S pneumoniae, 148 patients (42.8%); M pneumoniae, 101 (29.2%); C pneumoniae, 62 (17.9%); Legionella sp, 56 (16.2%); respiratory viruses, 35 (10.1%); C burnetii, 20 (5.8%); H influenzae 19 (5.5%); and other causes, 21 patients (6.0%). In patients above the age of 55 years C pneumoniae was the second most frequent aetiological agent (25.5%). In 133 patients (38.4%) more than one causal agent was found. CONCLUSIONS: The causal agents for community-acquired pneumonia in Israel are different from those described in other parts of the world. In many of the patients more than one causal agent was found. In all these patients treatment should include a macrolide antibiotic, at least in the first stage of their illness. PMID:8711652