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Sample records for adult tissue repair

  1. Tissue repair

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    As living beings that encounter every kind of traumatic event from paper cut to myocardial infarction, we must possess ways to heal damaged tissues. While some animals are able to regrow complete body parts following injury (such as the earthworm who grows a new head following bisection), humans are sadly incapable of such feats. Our means of recovery following tissue damage consists largely of repair rather than pure regeneration. Thousands of times in our lives, a meticulously scripted but unseen wound healing drama plays, with cells serving as actors, extracellular matrix as the setting and growth factors as the means of communication. This article briefly reviews the cells involved in tissue repair, their signaling and proliferation mechanisms and the function of the extracellular matrix, then presents the actors and script for the three acts of the tissue repair drama. PMID:21220961

  2. Bone marrow stromal cell-mediated tissue sparing enhances functional repair after spinal cord contusion in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Ritfeld, Gaby J; Nandoe Tewarie, Rishi D S; Vajn, Katarina; Rahiem, Sahar T; Hurtado, Andres; Wendell, Dane F; Roos, Raymund A C; Oudega, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) transplantation has shown promise for repair of the spinal cord. We showed earlier that a BMSC transplant limits the loss of spinal nervous tissue after a contusive injury. Here, we addressed the premise that BMSC-mediated tissue sparing underlies functional recovery in adult rats after a contusion of the thoracic spinal cord. Our results reveal that after 2 months BMSCs had elicited a significant increase in spared tissue volumes and in blood vessel density in the contusion epicenter. A strong functional relationship existed between spared tissue volumes and blood vessel density. BMSC-transplanted rats exhibited significant improvements in motor, sensorimotor, and sensory functions, which were strongly correlated with spared tissue volumes. Retrograde tracing revealed that rats with BMSCs had twice as many descending brainstem neurons with an axon projecting beyond the contused spinal cord segment and these correlated strongly with the improved motor/sensorimotor functions but not sensory functions. Together, our data indicate that tissue sparing greatly contributes to BMSC-mediated functional repair after spinal cord contusion. The preservation/formation of blood vessels and sparing/regeneration of descending brainstem axons may be important mediators of the BMSC-mediated anatomical and functional improvements.

  3. Repair of tissues by adult stem/progenitor cells (MSCs): controversies, myths, and changing paradigms.

    PubMed

    Prockop, Darwin J

    2009-06-01

    Research on stem cells has progressed at a rapid pace and, as might be anticipated, the results have generated several controversies, a few myths and a change in a major paradigm. Some of these issues will be reviewed in this study with special emphasis on how they can be applied to the adult stem/progenitor cells from bone marrow, referred to as MSCs.

  4. Spinal Cord Repair with Engineered Nervous Tissue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    in order to minimize scarring and injected dissociated adult DRGs rostral to a dorsal column transection of the spinal cord. From the sensory... columns were dissected and post-fixed overnight in 4% paraformaldehyde, and then spinal cords were dissected from spinal columns and cryoprotected...AD______________ Award Number: W81XWH-10-1-0941 TITLE: Spinal Cord Repair with Engineered Nervous Tissue

  5. Nerves and Tissue Repair.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-07-01

    axolotl limbs are transected the concentration of transferrin in the distal limb tissue declines rapidly and limb regeneration stops. These results...transferrin binding and expression of the transferrin gene in cells of axolotl peripheral nerve indicate that both uptake and synthesis of this factor occur

  6. Neural repair in the adult brain

    PubMed Central

    Jessberger, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Acute or chronic injury to the adult brain often results in substantial loss of neural tissue and subsequent permanent functional impairment. Over the last two decades, a number of approaches have been developed to harness the regenerative potential of neural stem cells and the existing fate plasticity of neural cells in the nervous system to prevent tissue loss or to enhance structural and functional regeneration upon injury. Here, we review recent advances of stem cell-associated neural repair in the adult brain, discuss current challenges and limitations, and suggest potential directions to foster the translation of experimental stem cell therapies into the clinic. PMID:26918167

  7. The promise of perfect adult tissue repair and regeneration in mammals: Learning from regenerative amphibians and fish.

    PubMed

    Godwin, James

    2014-09-01

    Regenerative medicine promises to greatly impact on human health by improving repair outcomes in a range of tissues and injury contexts. Successful therapies will rely on identifying both intrinsic and extrinsic biological circuits that control wound healing, proliferation, cell survival, and developmental cell fate. Animals such as the zebrafish and the salamander display powerful examples of near-perfect regeneration and scar-free healing in a range of injury contexts not attained in mammals. By studying regeneration in a range of highly regenerative species that maintain regenerative potential throughout life, many instructive and permissive factors have been identified that could assist in the development of regenerative therapies. This review highlights some of the recent observations in immune regulation, epigenetic regulation, stem cell mobilization, and regenerative signatures that have improved our understanding of the regenerative process. Potential opportunities in harnessing this knowledge for future translation into the clinic are discussed.

  8. Engineered neural tissue for peripheral nerve repair.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, Melanie; Bunting, Stephen C J; Davies, Heather A; Loughlin, Alison J; Golding, Jonathan P; Phillips, James B

    2013-10-01

    A new combination of tissue engineering techniques provides a simple and effective method for building aligned cellular biomaterials. Self-alignment of Schwann cells within a tethered type-1 collagen matrix, followed by removal of interstitial fluid produces a stable tissue-like biomaterial that recreates the aligned cellular and extracellular matrix architecture associated with nerve grafts. Sheets of this engineered neural tissue supported and directed neuronal growth in a co-culture model, and initial in vivo tests showed that a device containing rods of rolled-up sheets could support neuronal growth during rat sciatic nerve repair (5 mm gap). Further testing of this device for repair of a critical-sized 15 mm gap showed that, at 8 weeks, engineered neural tissue had supported robust neuronal regeneration across the gap. This is, therefore, a useful new approach for generating anisotropic engineered tissues, and it can be used with Schwann cells to fabricate artificial neural tissue for peripheral nerve repair.

  9. Macrophages in tissue repair, regeneration, and fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Wynn, Thomas A.; Vannella, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory monocytes and resident tissue macrophages are key regulators of tissue repair, regeneration, and fibrosis. Following tissue injury, monocytes and macrophages undergo marked phenotypic and functional changes to play critical roles during the initiation, maintenance, and resolution phases of tissue repair. Disturbances in macrophage function can lead to aberrant repair, with uncontrolled inflammatory mediator and growth factor production, deficient generation of anti-inflammatory macrophages, or failed communication between macrophages and epithelial cells, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and stem or tissue progenitor cells all contributing to a state of persistent injury, which may lead to the development of pathological fibrosis. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms that instruct macrophages to adopt pro-inflammatory, pro-wound healing, pro-fibrotic, anti-inflammatory, anti-fibrotic, pro-resolving, and tissue regenerating phenotypes following injury, and highlight how some of these mechanisms and macrophage activation states could be exploited therapeutically. PMID:26982353

  10. Spinal Cord Repair with Engineered Nervous Tissue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    success of bridging a lateral hemisection in the rat spinal cord with engineered (“stretch-grown”) living nervous tissue constructs 2 . For the current...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-10-1-0941 TITLE: Spinal Cord Repair with Engineered...SUBTITLE Spinal Cord Repair with Engineered Nervous Tissue 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-10-1-0941 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6

  11. Spinal Cord Repair with Engineered Nervous Tissue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    funded grant, we demonstrated proof-of-concept success of bridging a lateral hemisection of the rat spinal cord with engineered (“stretch-grown...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-10-1-0941 TITLE: Spinal Cord Repair with Engineered...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Spinal Cord Repair with Engineered Nervous Tissue 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-10-1-0941 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR

  12. miRNA Control of Tissue Repair and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Chandan K.; Ghatak, Subhadip

    2016-01-01

    Tissue repair and regeneration rely on the function of miRNA, molecular silencers that enact post-transcriptional gene silencing of coding genes. Disruption of miRNA homeostasis is developmentally lethal, indicating that fetal tissue development is tightly controlled by miRNAs. Multiple critical facets of adult tissue repair are subject to control by miRNAs, as well. Sources of cell pool for tissue repair and regeneration are diverse and provided by processes including cellular dedifferentiation, transdifferentiation, and reprogramming. Each of these processes is regulated by miRNAs. Furthermore, induced pluripotency may be achieved by miRNA-based strategies independent of transcription factor manipulation. The observation that miRNA does not integrate into the genome makes miRNA-based therapeutic strategies translationally valuable. Tools to manipulate cellular and tissue miRNA levels include mimics and inhibitors that may be specifically targeted to cells of interest at the injury site. Here, we discuss the extraordinary importance of miRNAs in tissue repair and regeneration based on emergent reports and rapid advances in miRNA-based therapeutics. PMID:26056933

  13. Cell sheet transplantation for heart tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Katsuhisa; Haraguchi, Yuji; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Okano, Teruo

    2013-08-10

    Cell transplantation is attracting considerable attention as the next-generation therapy for treatment of cardiovascular diseases. We have developed cell sheet engineering as a type of scaffold-less tissue engineering for application in myocardial tissue engineering and the repair of injured heart tissue by cell transplantation. Various types of cell sheet transplantation have improved cardiac function in animal models and clinical settings. Furthermore, cell-based tissue engineering with human induced pluripotent stem cell technology is about to create thick vascularized cardiac tissue for cardiac grafts and heart tissue models. In this review, we summarize the current cardiac cell therapies for treating heart failure with cell sheet technology and cell sheet-based tissue engineering.

  14. Interface tissue engineering: next phase in musculoskeletal tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Sambit; Teh, Thomas Kh; He, Pengfei; Toh, Siew Lok; Goh, James Ch

    2011-05-01

    Increasing incidence of musculoskeletal injuries coupled with limitations in the current treatment options have necessitated tissue engineering and regenerative medicine- based approaches. Moving forward from engineering isolated musculoskeletal tissues, research strategies are now being increasingly focused on repairing and regenerating the interfaces between dissimilar musculoskeletal tissues with the aim to achieve seamless integration of engineered musculoskeletal tissues. This article reviews the state-of-the-art in the tissue engineering of musculoskeletal tissue interfaces with a focus on Singapore's contribution in this emerging field. Various biomimetic scaffold and cellbased strategies, the use of growth factors, gene therapy and mechanical loading, as well as animal models for functional validation of the tissue engineering strategies are discussed.

  15. Laparoscopic repair of adult Bochdalek's hernia

    PubMed Central

    Husain, Musharraf; Hajini, Firdoos Farooq; Ganguly, Pavitra; Bukhari, Syed

    2013-01-01

    Bochdalek's hernia is a type of congenital diaphragmatic hernia occurring in approximately 1 in 2200–12 500 live births. It is considered to be extremely rare in adults and poses a diagnostic challenge. We present a case of a young man who was diagnosed as a case of congenital Bochdalek's hernia and underwent laparoscopic mesh repair. PMID:23761496

  16. Cell-based and biomaterial approaches to connective tissue repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stalling, Simone Suzette

    Connective tissue injuries of skin, tendon and ligament, heal by a reparative process in adults, filling the wound site with fibrotic, disorganized scar tissue that poorly reflects normal tissue architecture or function. Conversely, fetal skin and tendon have been shown to heal scarlessly. Complete regeneration is not intrinsically ubiquitous to all fetal tissues; fetal diaphragmatic and gastrointestinal injuries form scars. In vivo studies suggest that the presence of fetal fibroblasts is essential for scarless healing. In the orthopaedic setting, adult anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) heals poorly; however, little is known about the regenerative capacity of fetal ACL or fetal ACL fibroblasts. We characterized in vitro wound healing properties of fetal and adult ACL fibroblasts demonstrating that fetal ACL fibroblasts migrate faster and elaborate greater quantities of type I collagen, suggesting the healing potential of the fetal ACL may not be intrinsically poor. Similar to fetal ACL fibroblasts, fetal dermal fibroblasts also exhibit robust cellular properties. We investigated the age-dependent effects of dermal fibroblasts on tendon-to-bone healing in rat supraspinatus tendon injuries, a reparative injury model. We hypothesized delivery of fetal dermal fibroblasts would increase tissue organization and mechanical properties in comparison to adult dermal fibroblasts. However, at 1 and 8 weeks, the presence of dermal fibroblasts, either adult or fetal, had no significant effect on tissue histology or mechanical properties. There was a decreasing trend in cross-sectional area of repaired tendons treated with fetal dermal fibroblasts in comparison to adult, but this finding was not significant in comparison to controls. Finally, we synthesized a novel polysaccharide, methacrylated methylcellulose (MA-MC), and fabricated hydrogels using a well-established photopolymerization technique. We characterized the physical and mechanical properties of MA-MC hydrogels in

  17. Aortic coarctation repair in the adult.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Goncalo; Abecasis, Miguel; Anjos, Rui; Marques, Marta; Koukoulis, Giovanna; Aguiar, Carlos; Neves, José Pedro

    2014-07-01

    Aortic coarctation can be repaired surgically or percutaneously. The decision should be made according to the anatomy and location of the coarctation, age of the patient, presence of other cardiac lesions, and other anatomic determinants (extensive collaterals or aortic calcification). This article reviews the different therapeutic options available, explaining the differences between children and adults, describing different approaches to the same disease, exemplified by three cases of nonclassic surgical approach and one percutaneous treatment.

  18. Bone tissue engineering and repair by gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Betz, Volker M; Betz, Oliver B; Harris, Mitchel B; Vrahas, Mark S; Evans, Christopher H

    2008-01-01

    Many clinical conditions require the stimulation of bone growth. The use of recombinant bone morphogenetic proteins does not provide a satisfying solution to these conditions due to delivery problems and high cost. Gene therapy has emerged as a very promising approach for bone repair that overcomes limitations of protein-based therapy. Several preclinical studies have shown that gene transfer technology has the ability to deliver osteogenic molecules to precise anatomical locations at therapeutic levels for sustained periods of time. Both in-vivo and ex-vivo transduction of cells can induce bone formation at ectopic and orthotopic sites. Genetic engineering of adult stem cells from various sources with osteogenic genes has led to enhanced fracture repair, spinal fusion and rapid healing of bone defects in animal models. This review describes current viral and non-viral gene therapy strategies for bone tissue engineering and repair including recent work from the author's laboratory. In addition, the article discusses the potential of gene-enhanced tissue engineering to enter widespread clinical use.

  19. Apparatus for enhancing tissue repair in mammals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor); Parker, Clayton R. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    An apparatus is disclosed for enhancing tissue repair in mammals, with the apparatus comprising: a sleeve for encircling a portion of a mammalian body part, said sleeve comprising an electrically conductive coil capable of generating an electromagnetic field when an electrical current is applied thereto, means for supporting the sleeve on the mammalian body part; and means for supplying the electrically conductive coil with a square wave time varying electrical current sufficient to create a time varying electromagnetic force of from approximately 0.05 gauss to 0.05 gauss within the interior of the coil in order that when the sleeve is placed on a mammalian body part and the time varying electromagnetic force of from approximately 0.05 gauss to 0.05 gauss is generated on the mammalian body part for an extended period of time, tissue regeneration within the mammalian body part is increased to a rate in excess of the normal tissue regeneration rate that would occur without application of the time varying electromagnetic force.

  20. Bioactive Polymeric Materials for Tissue Repair

    PubMed Central

    Bienek, Diane R.; Tutak, Wojtek; Skrtic, Drago

    2017-01-01

    Bioactive polymeric materials based on calcium phosphates have tremendous appeal for hard tissue repair because of their well-documented biocompatibility. Amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP)-based ones additionally protect against unwanted demineralization and actively support regeneration of hard tissue minerals. Our group has been investigating the structure/composition/property relationships of ACP polymeric composites for the last two decades. Here, we present ACP’s dispersion in a polymer matrix and the fine-tuning of the resin affects the physicochemical, mechanical, and biological properties of ACP polymeric composites. These studies illustrate how the filler/resin interface and monomer/polymer molecular structure affect the material’s critical properties, such as ion release and mechanical strength. We also present evidence of the remineralization efficacy of ACP composites when exposed to accelerated acidic challenges representative of oral environment conditions. The utility of ACP has recently been extended to include airbrushing as a platform technology for fabrication of nanofiber scaffolds. These studies, focused on assessing the feasibility of incorporating ACP into various polymer fibers, also included the release kinetics of bioactive calcium and phosphate ions from nanofibers and evaluate the biorelevance of the polymeric ACP fiber networks. We also discuss the potential for future integration of the existing ACP scaffolds into therapeutic delivery systems used in the precision medicine field. PMID:28134776

  1. Current options in inguinal hernia repair in adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Kulacoglu, H

    2011-01-01

    Inguinal hernia is a very common problem. Surgical repair is the current approach, whereas asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic hernias may be good candidate for watchful waiting. Prophylactic antibiotics can be used in centers with high rate of wound infection. Local anesthesia is a suitable and economic option for open repairs, and should be popularized in day-case setting. Numerous repair methods have been described to date. Mesh repairs are superior to "nonmesh" tissue-suture repairs. Lichtenstein repair and endoscopic/laparoscopic techniques have similar efficacy. Standard polypropylene mesh is still the choice, whereas use of partially absorbable lightweight meshes seems to have some advantages. PMID:22435019

  2. Laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernia in adults

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xue-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernia is mini-invasive and has confirmed effects. The procedures include intraperitoneal onlay mesh (IPOM) repair, transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) repair and total extraperitoneal (TEP) repair. These procedures have totally different anatomic point of view, process and technical key points from open operations. The technical details of these operations are discussed in this article, also the strategies of treatment for some special conditions. PMID:27867954

  3. Spinal Cord Repair with Engineered Nervous Tissue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    transplanted nervous tissue constructs on...recovery of motor function. Specific Aim 2: Evaluation of the survival and integration of transplanted living nervous tissue constructs and host... Nervous Tissue PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Douglas H. Smith, M.D. CONTRACTING

  4. Neural tissue transplantation, repair, and rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Dunnett, Stephen B

    2013-01-01

    Transplants of cells and tissues to the central nervous system of adult mammals can, under appropriate conditions, survive, integrate, and function. In particular, the grafted cells can sustain functional recovery in animal models of a range of neurodegenerative conditions including genetic and idiopathic neurodegenerative diseases of adulthood and aging, ischemic stroke, and brain and spinal cord trauma. In a restricted subset of such conditions, cell transplantation has progressed to application in humans in early-stage clinical trials. At the present stage of play, there is clear evidence of clinical efficacy of fetal cell transplants in Parkinson disease (notwithstanding a range of technical difficulties still to be fully resolved), and preliminary claims of promising outcomes in several other severe neurodegenerative conditions, including Huntington disease and stroke. Moreover, the experimental literature is increasingly suggesting that the experience and training of the graft recipient materially affects the functional outcome. For example, environmental enrichment, behavioral activity, and specific training can enhance the recovery process to maximize functional recovery. There are even circumstances where the grafted cells have been demonstrated to restore the neural substrate for new learning. Consequently, it is not sufficient to replace lost cells anatomically; rather, for the grafts to be effective, they need to be integrated functionally into the host circuitry, and the host animal requires training and rehabilitation to maximize function of the reconstructed graft-host circuitry. Such observations require reconsideration of the design of the next generation of clinical trials and subsequent service delivery, to include physiotherapists, cognitive therapists, and rehabilitation experts as core members of the transplant team, along with the neurologists and neurosurgeons that have conventionally led the field.

  5. Regulation of tissue repair and regeneration by electric fields.

    PubMed

    Wang, En-tong; Zhao, Min

    2010-02-01

    Endogenous electric fields (EFs) have been detected at wounds and damaged tissues. The potential roles of EFs in tissue repair and regeneration have been an intriguing topic for centuries. Recent researches have provided significant insights into how naturally occurring EFs may participate in the control of tissue repair and regeneration. Applied EFs equivalent to the size of fields measured in vivo direct cell migration, cell proliferation and nerve sprouting at wounds. More remarkably, physiological EFs are a guidance cue that directs cell migration which overrides other well accepted directional signals including initial injury stimulation, wound void, contact inhibition release, population pressure and chemotaxis. EFs activate many intracellular signaling pathways in a directional manner. Modulation of endogenous wound EFs affects epithelial cell migration, cell proliferation, and nerve growth at cornea wounds in vivo. Electric stimulation is being tested clinically for the treatments of bone fracture, wound healing and spinal cord injury. EFs thus may represent a novel type of signaling paradigm in tissue repair and regeneration. Combination of the electric stimulation and other well understood biochemical regulatory mechanisms may offer powerful and effective therapies for tissue repair and regeneration. This review introduces experimental evidence for the existence of endogenous EFs and discusses their roles in tissue repair and regeneration.

  6. Native tissue repair for central compartment prolapse: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Paz-Levy, Dorit; Yohay, David; Neymeyer, Joerg; Hizkiyahu, Ranit; Weintraub, Adi Y

    2017-02-01

    Central descent due to a level 1 defect is a main component in pelvic organ prolapse (POP) reconstructive surgery, whether for symptomatic apical prolapse or for the prolapse repair of other compartments. A recent growth in the rate of native tissue repair procedures for POP, following the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warnings regarding the safety and efficacy of synthetic meshes, requires a re-evaluation of these procedures. The safety, efficacy, and determination of the optimal surgical approach should be the center of attention. Functional outcome measures and patient-centered results have lately gained importance and received focus. A comprehensive literature review was performed to evaluate objective and subjective outcomes of apical prolapse native tissue repair, with a special focus on studies reporting impact on patients' functional outcomes, quality of life, and satisfaction. We performed a MEDLINE search for articles in the English language by using the following key words: apical prolapse, sacrospinous ligament fixation, uterosacral ligament suspension, sacral colpopexy, McCall culdoplasty, iliococcygeus vaginal fixation, and functional outcomes. We reviewed references as well. Despite a prominent shortage of studies reporting standardized prospective outcomes for native tissue repair interventions, we noted a high rate of safety and efficacy, with a low complication rate for most procedures and low recurrence or re-treatment rates. The objective and subjective results of different procedures are reviewed. Functional outcomes of native tissue repair procedures have not been studied sufficiently, though existing data present those procedures as favorable and not categorically inferior to sacrocolpopexy. Apical compartment prolapse repair using native tissue is not a compromise. Functional outcomes of native tissue repair procedures are favorable, have a high rate of success, improve women's quality of life (QoL), and result in high rates of

  7. Role of tissue repair in toxicologic interactions among hepatotoxic organics.

    PubMed Central

    Soni, M G; Mehendale, H M

    1998-01-01

    It is widely recognized that exposure to combinations or mixtures of chemicals may result in highly exaggerated toxicity even though individual chemicals might not be toxic at low doses. Chemical mixtures may also cause additive or less than additive toxicity. From the perspective of public health, highly exaggerated toxicity is of significant concern. Assessment of risk from exposure to chemical mixtures requires knowledge of the underlying mechanisms. Previous studies from this laboratory have shown that nontoxic doses of chlordecone (10 ppm, 15 days) and carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) (100 microliters/kg) interact at the biologic interface, resulting in potentiated liver injury and 67-fold amplification of CCl4 lethality. In contrast, although interaction between phenobarbital and CCl4 leads to even higher injury, animal survival is unaffected because of highly stimulated compensatory tissue repair. A wide variety of additional experimental evidence confirms the central role of stimulated tissue repair as a decisive determinant of the final outcome of liver injury inflicted by hepatotoxicants. These findings led us to propose a two-stage model of toxicity. In this model, tissue injury is inflicted in stage one by the well-described mechanisms of toxicity, whereas in stage two the ultimate toxic outcome is determined by whether timely and sufficient tissue repair response accompanies this injury. In an attempt to validate this model, dose-response relationships for injury and tissue repair as opposing responses have been developed for model hepatotoxicants. Results of these studies suggest that tissue repair increases in a dose-dependent manner, restraining injury up to a threshold dose, whereupon it is inhibited, allowing an unrestrained progression of injury. These findings indicate that tissue repair is a quantifiable response to toxic injury and that inclusion of this response in risk assessment may help in fine-tuning prediction of toxicity outcomes. Images

  8. Sox2-mediated regulation of adult neural crest precursors and skin repair.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Adam P W; Naska, Sibel; Jones, Karen; Jinno, Hiroyuki; Kaplan, David R; Miller, Freda D

    2013-01-01

    Nerve-derived neural crest cells are essential for regeneration in certain animals, such as newts. Here, we asked whether they play a similar role during mammalian tissue repair, focusing on Sox2-positive neural crest precursors in skin. In adult skin, Sox2 was expressed in nerve-terminal-associated neural crest precursor cells (NCPCs) around the hair follicle bulge, and following injury was induced in nerve-derived cells, likely dedifferentiated Schwann cell precursors. At later times postinjury, Sox2-positive cells were scattered throughout the regenerating dermis, and lineage tracing showed that these were all neural-crest-derived NCPCs. These Sox2-positive NCPCs were functionally important, since acute deletion of Sox2 prior to injury caused a decrease of NCPCs in the wound and aberrant skin repair. These data demonstrate that Sox2 regulates skin repair, likely by controlling NCPCs, and raise the possibility that nerve-derived NCPCs may play a general role in mammalian tissue repair.

  9. The role of DNA damage repair in aging of adult stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kenyon, Jonathan; Gerson, Stanton L

    2007-01-01

    DNA repair maintains genomic stability and the loss of DNA repair capacity results in genetic instability that may lead to a decline of cellular function. Adult stem cells are extremely important in the long-term maintenance of tissues throughout life. They regenerate and renew tissues in response to damage and replace senescent terminally differentiated cells that no longer function. Oxidative stress, toxic byproducts, reduced mitochondrial function and external exposures all damage DNA through base modification or mis-incorporation and result in DNA damage. As in most cells, this damage may limit the survival of the stem cell population affecting tissue regeneration and even longevity. This review examines the hypothesis that an age-related loss of DNA damage repair pathways poses a significant threat to stem cell survival and longevity. Normal stem cells appear to have strict control of gene expression and DNA replication whereas stem cells with loss of DNA repair may have altered patterns of proliferation, quiescence and differentiation. Furthermore, stem cells with loss of DNA repair may be susceptible to malignant transformation either directly or through the emergence of cancer-prone stem cells. Human diseases and animal models of loss of DNA repair provide longitudinal analysis of DNA repair processes in stem cell populations and may provide links to the physiology of aging.

  10. Repair of dense connective tissues via biomaterial-mediated matrix reprogramming of the wound interface.

    PubMed

    Qu, Feini; Pintauro, Michael P; Haughan, Joanne E; Henning, Elizabeth A; Esterhai, John L; Schaer, Thomas P; Mauck, Robert L; Fisher, Matthew B

    2015-01-01

    Repair of dense connective tissues in adults is limited by their intrinsic hypocellularity and is exacerbated by a dense extracellular matrix (ECM) that impedes cellular migration to and local proliferation at the wound site. Conversely, healing in fetal tissues occurs due in part to an environment conducive to cell mobility and division. Here, we investigated whether the application of a degradative enzyme, collagenase, could reprogram the adult wound margin to a more fetal-like state, and thus abrogate the biophysical impediments that hinder migration and proliferation. We tested this concept using the knee meniscus, a commonly injured structure for which few regenerative approaches exist. To focus delivery and degradation to the wound interface, we developed a system in which collagenase was stored inside poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) electrospun nanofibers and released upon hydration. Through a series of in vitro and in vivo studies, our findings show that partial digestion of the wound interface improves repair by creating a more compliant and porous microenvironment that expedites cell migration to and/or proliferation at the wound margin. This innovative approach of targeted manipulation of the wound interface, focused on removing the naturally occurring barriers to adult tissue repair, may find widespread application in the treatment of injuries to a variety of dense connective tissues.

  11. ECM-Chitosan Bandage for Tissue Repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauto, Antonio; Longo, Leonardo

    2010-05-01

    Extracellular matrices (ECMs) are currently applied in reconstructive surgery to enhance wound healing and tissue remodelling. Sutures and staples are usually employed to stabilize ECM on tissue although they may damage the matrix structure. In this investigation, a novel biocompatible bandage was developed to implant ECM on tissue without sutures. An adhesive film, based on chitosan, was integrated with small intestine submucosa (SIS) in a single bandage strip. This bandage was bonded to sheep small intestine upon laser irradiation of the chitosan film (P = 0.12 W, Fluence = 46±1 J/cm2) to assess tissue adhesion strength. Thermocouples were used to estimate temperatures under SIS during laser irradiation. The bandage successfully bonded to intestine achieving a shear stress of 9.6±1.6 kPa(n = 15). During laser irradiation, the temperature increased modestly to 31±2 0C(n = 14) beneath the ECM portion of the bandage. The SIS-chitosan bandage bonded effectively to tissue without sutures and preserved the ECM structure avoiding irreversible thermal denaturation of imbedded bioactive proteins.

  12. Regenerating functional heart tissue for myocardial repair

    PubMed Central

    Alcon, Andre; Bozkulak, Esra Cagavi; Qyang, Yibing

    2012-01-01

    Heart disease is one of the leading causes of death worldwide and the number of patients with the disease is likely to grow with the continual decline in health for most of the developed world. Heart transplantation is one of the only treatment options for heart failure due to an acute myocardial infarction, but limited donor supply and organ rejection limit its widespread use. Cellular cardiomyoplasty, or cellular implantation, combined with various tissue-engineering methods aims to regenerate functional heart tissue. This review highlights the numerous cell sources that have been used to regenerate the heart as well as cover the wide range of tissue-engineering strategies that have been devised to optimize the delivery of these cells. It will probably be a long time before an effective regenerative therapy can make a serious impact at the bedside. PMID:22388688

  13. Extracellular Matrices (ECM) for Tissue Repair.

    PubMed

    Polanco, Thais O; Xylas, Joanna; Lantis, John C

    2016-04-01

    Persistence of skin wounds due to underlying disease, bacterial contamination, and/or repeated trauma, causes a chronic condition where a functional extracellular matrix (ECM) cannot be established and the normal wound-healing cascade is unable to progress. These open chronic wounds leave the body susceptible to infection and present a major healthcare problem. To this end, a broad range of biologic ECM scaffolds have been developed that can provide other therapeutic options aside from traditional wound care approaches. These tissue engineered ECM scaffolds aim to facilitate the restoration of functional skin-like tissue by altering the chronic wound environment and facilitating cellular attachment, proliferation, and differentiation. This discussion will center on reviewing current ECM scaffolds and highlighting their properties and mechanism of action with respect to the clinical application in chronic, non-healing wounds.

  14. Decellularization technology in CNS tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Lin, Xian-Feng; Wang, Li-Ren; Lin, Yi-Qian; Wang, Jiang-Tao; Liu, Wen-Yue; Zhu, Gui-Qi; Braddock, Martin; Zhong, Ming; Zheng, Ming-Hua

    2015-05-01

    Decellularization methodologies have been successfully used in a variety of tissue engineering and regenerative technologies and methods of decellularization have been developed for target tissues and organs of interest. The technology to promote regeneration and functional recovery in the CNS, including brain and spinal cord, has, however, made slow progress mainly because the intrinsic regenerative potential of the CNS is regarded as low. To date, currently available therapies have been unable to provide significant functional recovery and successful therapies, which could provide functional restoration to the injured brain and spinal cord are controversial. In this review, the authors provide a critical analysis, comparing the advantages and limitations of the major decellularization methods and considering the effects of these methods upon the biologic scaffold material. The authors also review studies that supplement decellularized grafts with exogenous factors, such as stem cells and growth factors, to both promote and enhance regeneration through decellularized allografts.

  15. Host Responses in Tissue Repair and Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Duffield, Jeremy S.; Lupher, Mark; Thannickal, Victor J.

    2013-01-01

    Myofibroblasts accumulate in the spaces between organ structures and produce extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, including collagen I. They are the primary “effector” cells in tissue remodeling and fibrosis. Previously, leukocyte progenitors termed fibrocytes and myofibroblasts generated from epithelial cells through epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) were considered the primary sources of ECM-producing myofibroblasts in injured tissues. However, genetic fate mapping experiments suggest that mesenchyme-derived cells, known as resident fibroblasts, and pericytes are the primary precursors of scar-forming myofibroblasts, whereas epithelial cells, endothelial cells, and myeloid leukocytes contribute to fibrogenesis predominantly by producing key fibrogenic cytokines and by promoting cell-to-cell communication. Numerous cytokines derived from T cells, macrophages, and other myeloid cell populations are important drivers of myofibroblast differentiation. Monocyte-derived cell populations are key regulators of the fibrotic process: They act as a brake on the processes driving fibrogenesis, and they dismantle and degrade established fibrosis. We discuss the origins, modes of activation, and fate of myofibroblasts in various important fibrotic diseases and describe how manipulation of macrophage activation could help ameliorate fibrosis. PMID:23092186

  16. Micro- and Nanostructured Biomaterials for Sutureless Tissue Repair.

    PubMed

    Frost, Samuel J; Mawad, D; Hook, J; Lauto, Antonio

    2016-02-18

    Sutureless procedures for wound repair and closure have recently integrated nanostructured devices to improve their effectiveness and clinical outcome. This review highlights the major advances in gecko-inspired bioadhesives that relies mostly on van der Waals bonding forces. These are challenged by the moist environment of surgical settings that weaken adherence to tissue. The incorporation of nanoparticles in biomatrices and their role in tissue repair and drug delivery is also reviewed with an emphasis on procedures involving adhesives that are laser-activated. Nanostructured adhesive devices have the advantage of being minimally invasive to tissue, can seal wounds, and deliver drugs in situ. All these tasks are very difficult to accomplish by sutures or staples that are invasive to host organs and often cause scarring.

  17. Tissue Engineering a Biological Repair Strategy for Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Grace D.; Leach, J. Kent; Klineberg, Eric O.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The intervertebral disc is a critical part of the intersegmental soft tissue of the spinal column, providing flexibility and mobility, while absorbing large complex loads. Spinal disease, including disc herniation and degeneration, may be a significant contributor to low back pain. Clinically, disc herniations are treated with both nonoperative and operative methods. Operative treatment for disc herniation includes removal of the herniated material when neural compression occurs. While this strategy may have short-term advantages over nonoperative methods, the remaining disc material is not addressed and surgery for mild degeneration may have limited long-term advantage over nonoperative methods. Furthermore, disc herniation and surgery significantly alter the mechanical function of the disc joint, which may contribute to progression of degeneration in surrounding tissues. We reviewed recent advances in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine strategies that may have a significant impact on disc herniation repair. Our review on tissue engineering strategies focuses on cell-based and inductive methods, each commonly combined with material-based approaches. An ideal clinically relevant biological repair strategy will significantly reduce pain and repair and restore flexibility and motion of the spine. PMID:26634189

  18. Injectable Hydrogels for Cardiac Tissue Repair after Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Khattab, Ahmad; Islam, Mohammad Ariful; Hweij, Khaled Abou; Zeitouny, Joya; Waters, Renae; Sayegh, Malek; Hossain, Md Monowar; Paul, Arghya

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac tissue damage due to myocardial infarction (MI) is one of the leading causes of mortality worldwide. The available treatments of MI include pharmaceutical therapy, medical device implants, and organ transplants, all of which have severe limitations including high invasiveness, scarcity of donor organs, thrombosis or stenosis of devices, immune rejection, and prolonged hospitalization time. Injectable hydrogels have emerged as a promising solution for in situ cardiac tissue repair in infarcted hearts after MI. In this review, an overview of various natural and synthetic hydrogels for potential application as injectable hydrogels in cardiac tissue repair and regeneration is presented. The review starts with brief discussions about the pathology of MI, its current clinical treatments and their limitations, and the emergence of injectable hydrogels as a potential solution for post MI cardiac regeneration. It then summarizes various hydrogels, their compositions, structures and properties for potential application in post MI cardiac repair, and recent advancements in the application of injectable hydrogels in treatment of MI. Finally, the current challenges associated with the clinical application of injectable hydrogels to MI and their potential solutions are discussed to help guide the future research on injectable hydrogels for translational therapeutic applications in regeneration of cardiac tissue after MI. PMID:27668147

  19. Tissue-specific accelerated aging in nucleotide excision repair deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Niedernhofer, Laura J.

    2008-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a multi-step DNA repair mechanism that removes helix-distorting modified nucleotides from the genome. NER is divided into two subpathways depending on the location of DNA damage in the genome and how it is first detected. Global genome NER identifies and repairs DNA lesions throughout the genome. This subpathway of NER primarily protects against the accumulation of mutations in the genome. Transcription-coupled (TC) NER rapidly repairs lesions in the transcribed strand of DNA that block transcription by RNA polymerase II. TC-NER prevents cell death in response to stalled transcription. Defects in NER cause three distinct human diseases: xeroderma pigmentosum, Cockayne syndrome and trichothiodystrophy. Each of these syndromes is characterized by premature onset of pathologies that overlap with those associated with old age in humans. This reveals the contribution of DNA damage to multiple age-related diseases. Tissues affected include the skin, eye, bone marrow, nervous system and endocrine axis. This review emphasizes accelerated aging associated with xeroderma pigmentosum and discusses the cause of these pathologies, either mutation accumulation or cell death as a consequence of failure to repair DNA damage. PMID:18538374

  20. A normal tissue dose response model of dynamic repair processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alber, Markus; Belka, Claus

    2006-01-01

    A model is presented for serial, critical element complication mechanisms for irradiated volumes from length scales of a few millimetres up to the entire organ. The central element of the model is the description of radiation complication as the failure of a dynamic repair process. The nature of the repair process is seen as reestablishing the structural organization of the tissue, rather than mere replenishment of lost cells. The interactions between the cells, such as migration, involved in the repair process are assumed to have finite ranges, which limits the repair capacity and is the defining property of a finite-sized reconstruction unit. Since the details of the repair processes are largely unknown, the development aims to make the most general assumptions about them. The model employs analogies and methods from thermodynamics and statistical physics. An explicit analytical form of the dose response of the reconstruction unit for total, partial and inhomogeneous irradiation is derived. The use of the model is demonstrated with data from animal spinal cord experiments and clinical data about heart, lung and rectum. The three-parameter model lends a new perspective to the equivalent uniform dose formalism and the established serial and parallel complication models. Its implications for dose optimization are discussed.

  1. Extralinguistic Features in Conversational Repairs of Adult Second Language Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Joan

    Conversations between adult students of English as a second language were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed in order to establish principles of extralinguistic conversational repair technique among second language learners. A variety of gestural and kinesic features were discovered; these are described in detail and their use is contextualized…

  2. HYDROGEL-BASED NANOCOMPOSITES OF THERAPEUTIC PROTEINS FOR TISSUE REPAIR

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Suwei; Segura, Tatiana

    2014-01-01

    The ability to design artificial extracellular matrices as cell instructive scaffolds has opened the door to technologies capable of studying cell fates in vitro and to guide tissue repair in vivo. One main component of the design of artificial extracellular matrices is the incorporation of protein-based biochemical cues to guide cell phenotypes and multicellular organizations. However, promoting the long-term bioactivity, controlling the bioavailability and understanding how the physical presentations of these proteins impacts cellular fates are among the challenges of the field. Nanotechnolgy has advanced to meet the challenges of protein therapeutics. For example, the approaches to incorporating proteins into tissue repairing scaffolds have ranged from bulk encapsulations to smart nanodepots that protect proteins from degradations and allow opportunities for controlled release. PMID:24778979

  3. HYDROGEL-BASED NANOCOMPOSITES OF THERAPEUTIC PROTEINS FOR TISSUE REPAIR.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Suwei; Segura, Tatiana

    2014-05-01

    The ability to design artificial extracellular matrices as cell instructive scaffolds has opened the door to technologies capable of studying cell fates in vitro and to guide tissue repair in vivo. One main component of the design of artificial extracellular matrices is the incorporation of protein-based biochemical cues to guide cell phenotypes and multicellular organizations. However, promoting the long-term bioactivity, controlling the bioavailability and understanding how the physical presentations of these proteins impacts cellular fates are among the challenges of the field. Nanotechnolgy has advanced to meet the challenges of protein therapeutics. For example, the approaches to incorporating proteins into tissue repairing scaffolds have ranged from bulk encapsulations to smart nanodepots that protect proteins from degradations and allow opportunities for controlled release.

  4. Asymptomatic right ventricular dysfunction in surgically repaired adult tetralogy of fallot patients

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Krishna Kumar Mohanan; Ganapathi, Sanjay; Sasidharan, Bijulal; Thajudeen, Anees; Pillai, Harikrishnan Sivadasan; Tharakan, Jaganmohan; Titus, Thomas; Kumaran, Ajitkumar Valaparambil; Sivasubramonian, Sivasankaran; Krishnamoorthy, Kavassery Mahadevan

    2013-01-01

    Background: Right ventricular (RV) dysfunction after surgical repair of Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) is often asymptomatic and may be detected by tissue Doppler imaging (TDI). The severity of RV dysfunction is more after intracardiac repair with transannular patch (TAP). Methods: One hundred seventy-three adult patients who have undergone surgical repair for TOF were prospectively analyzed for RV function using 2D echocardiography and TDI. RV function was compared between patients who have undergone intracardiac repair with and without TAP. Results: In both the patient sub-groups, TDI derived myocardial performance index (MPI) and myocardial velocities were abnormal even when 2D echocardiography derived RV functional area change was normal. TDI derived MPI was significantly higher (0.5 ± 0.1 vs. 0.4 ± 0 P < 0.001) and Systolic tricuspid annular velocity (Sa) (9.2 ± 1.3 vs. 10.8 ± 1.6 P < 0.001) was significantly lower in the TAP group. Older age at surgery and severity of pulmonary regurgitation on follow-up were among the significant predictors of TDI derived MPI. Conclusions: Asymptomatic RV dysfunction in surgically repaired adult TOF atients can be detected by TDI. Extent of RV dysfunction was significantly greater with patients requiring TAP, in those operated at older age, and in patients with severe pulmonary regurgitation. PMID:23626431

  5. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition in tissue repair and fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Stone, Rivka C; Pastar, Irena; Ojeh, Nkemcho; Chen, Vivien; Liu, Sophia; Garzon, Karen I; Tomic-Canic, Marjana

    2016-09-01

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) describes the global process by which stationary epithelial cells undergo phenotypic changes, including the loss of cell-cell adhesion and apical-basal polarity, and acquire mesenchymal characteristics that confer migratory capacity. EMT and its converse, MET (mesenchymal-epithelial transition), are integral stages of many physiologic processes and, as such, are tightly coordinated by a host of molecular regulators. Converging lines of evidence have identified EMT as a component of cutaneous wound healing, during which otherwise stationary keratinocytes (the resident skin epithelial cells) migrate across the wound bed to restore the epidermal barrier. Moreover, EMT plays a role in the development of scarring and fibrosis, as the matrix-producing myofibroblasts arise from cells of the epithelial lineage in response to injury but are pathologically sustained instead of undergoing MET or apoptosis. In this review, we summarize the role of EMT in physiologic repair and pathologic fibrosis of tissues and organs. We conclude that further investigation into the contribution of EMT to the faulty repair of fibrotic wounds might identify components of EMT signaling as common therapeutic targets for impaired healing in many tissues. Graphical Abstract Model for injury-triggered EMT activation in physiologic wound repair (left) and fibrotic wound healing (right).

  6. Mechanotherapy: how physical therapists' prescription of exercise promotes tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Khan, K M; Scott, A

    2009-04-01

    Mechanotransduction is the physiological process where cells sense and respond to mechanical loads. This paper reclaims the term "mechanotherapy" and presents the current scientific knowledge underpinning how load may be used therapeutically to stimulate tissue repair and remodelling in tendon, muscle, cartilage and bone. The purpose of this short article is to answer a frequently asked question "How precisely does exercise promote tissue healing?" This is a fundamental question for clinicians who prescribe exercise for tendinopathies, muscle tears, non-inflammatory arthropathies and even controlled loading after fractures. High-quality randomised controlled trials and systematic reviews show that various forms of exercise or movement prescription benefit patients with a wide range of musculoskeletal problems.1(-)4 But what happens at the tissue level to promote repair and remodelling of tendon, muscle, articular cartilage and bone? The one-word answer is "mechanotransduction", but rather than finishing there and limiting this paper to 95 words, we provide a short illustrated introduction to this remarkable, ubiquitous, non-neural, physiological process. We also re-introduce the term "mechanotherapy" to distinguish therapeutics (exercise prescription specifically to treat injuries) from the homeostatic role of mechanotransduction. Strictly speaking, mechanotransduction maintains normal musculoskeletal structures in the absence of injury. After first outlining the process of mechanotransduction, we provide well-known clinical therapeutic examples of mechanotherapy-turning movement into tissue healing.

  7. Tissue engineering osteochondral implants for temporomandibular joint repair.

    PubMed

    Schek, R M; Taboas, J M; Hollister, S J; Krebsbach, P H

    2005-11-01

    Tissue engineering has provided an alternative to traditional strategies to repair and regenerate temporomandibular joints (TMJ). A successful strategy to engineer osteochondral tissue, such as that found in the TMJ, will produce tissue that is both biologically and mechanically functional. Image-based design (IBD) and solid free-form (SFF) fabrication can be used to generate scaffolds that are load bearing and match patient and defect site geometry. The objective of this study was to demonstrate how scaffold design, materials, and biological factors can be used in an integrated approach to regenerate a multi-tissue interface. IBD and SFF were first used to create biomimetic scaffolds with appropriate bulk geometry and microarchitecture. Biphasic composite scaffolds were then manufactured with the same techniques and used to simultaneously generate bone and cartilage in discrete regions and provide for the development of a stable interface between cartilage and subchondral bone. Poly-l-lactic acid/hydroxyapatite composite scaffolds were differentially seeded with fibroblasts transduced with an adenovirus expressing bone morphogenetic protein-7 in the ceramic phase and fully differentiated chondrocytes in the polymeric phase, and were subcutaneously implanted into mice. Following implantation in the ectopic site, the biphasic scaffolds promoted the simultaneous growth of bone, cartilage, and a mineralized interface tissue. Within the ceramic phase, the pockets of tissue generated included blood vessels, marrow stroma, and adipose tissue. This combination of IBD and SFF-fabricated biphasic scaffolds with gene and cell therapy is a promising approach to regenerate osteochondral defects and, ultimately, the TMJ.

  8. Apparatus and method for enhancing tissue repair in mammals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor); Parker, Clayton R. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An apparatus is introduced for the use of enhancing tissue repair in mammals. The apparatus includes a sleeve; an electrically conductive coil; a sleeve support; an electrical circuit configured to supply the coil with a square wave time varying electrical current sufficient to create approximately 0.05 gauss to 0.5 gauss. When in use, the sleeve of the apparatus is placed on a mammalian body part and the time varying electromagnetic force of from approximately 0.05 gauss to 0.5 gauss is generated on the mammalian body for an extended period of time so that the tissue is encouraged to be regenerated in the mammalian body part at a rate in excess of the normal tissue regeneration rate relative to regeneration without application of the time varying electromagnetic force.

  9. Cutaneous tissue repair following CO2 laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Kamat, B R; Carney, J M; Arndt, K A; Stern, R S; Rosen, S

    1986-08-01

    We studied the mechanism of repair following exposure of normal skin to the CO2 laser in a focused mode. Exposed areas were biopsied at 0, 24, 48 h; 1, 2 weeks; 1, 2 1/2 months (pulse width varying from 0.1 to 1.0 s) after irradiation. The initial pattern was a V-shaped zone of cauterized collagen with a central crevice, the depth of which correlated with the total energy applied. The epidermal changes consisted of transepidermal cauterization and basal vacuolar changes lateral to the site of impact. Over a period of 1 week, the wound crevice decreased in depth and width and the central margins of the zone of cauterized collagen approximated. The cauterized collagen was extruded and was noted in the epidermal crust; minimal granulation tissue was present. Biopsies at later time periods showed formation of granulation tissue and retention of small amounts of necrotic collagen; the process of collagen extrusion was largely prevented by suturing. These observations show that dermal contraction and necrotic collagen extrusion are important components of initial tissue repair following limited dermal destruction produced by CO2 irradiation.

  10. Use of NASA Bioreactor in Engineering Tissue for Bone Repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duke, Pauline

    1998-01-01

    This study was proposed in search for a new alternative for bone replacement or repair. Because the systems commonly used in repair of bony defects form bone by going through a cartilaginous phase, implantation of a piece of cartilage could enhance the healing process by having a more advanced starting point. However, cartilage has seldom been used to replace bone due, in part, to the limitations in conventional culture systems that did not allow production of enough tissue for implants. The NASA-developed bioreactors known as STLV (Slow Turning Lateral Vessel) provide homogeneous distribution of cells, nutrients, and waste products, with less damaging turbulence and shear forces than conventional systems. Cultures under these conditions have higher growth rates, viability, and longevity, allowing larger "tissue-like" aggregates to form, thus opening the possibilities of producing enough tissue for implantation, along with the inherent advantages of in vitro manipulations. To assure large numbers of cells and to eliminate the use of timed embryos, we proposed to use an immortalized mouse limb bud cell line as the source of cells.

  11. Macrophages: supportive cells for tissue repair and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Chazaud, Bénédicte

    2014-03-01

    Macrophages, and more broadly inflammation, have been considered for a long time as bad markers of tissue homeostasis. However, if it is indisputable that macrophages are associated with many diseases in a deleterious way, new roles have emerged, showing beneficial properties of macrophages during tissue repair and regeneration. This discrepancy is likely due to the high plasticity of macrophages, which may exhibit a wide range of phenotypes and functions depending on their environment. Therefore, regardless of their role in immunity, macrophages play a myriad of roles in the maintenance and recovery of tissue homeostasis. They take a major part in the resolution of inflammation. They also exert various effects of parenchymal cells, including stem and progenitor cell, of which they regulate the fate. In the present review, few examples from various tissues are presented to illustrate that, beyond their specific properties in a given tissue, common features have been described that sustain a role of macrophages in the recovery and maintenance of tissue homeostasis.

  12. Satellite-like cells contribute to pax7-dependent skeletal muscle repair in adult zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Berberoglu, Michael A; Gallagher, Thomas L; Morrow, Zachary T; Talbot, Jared C; Hromowyk, Kimberly J; Tenente, Inês M; Langenau, David M; Amacher, Sharon L

    2017-04-15

    Satellite cells, also known as muscle stem cells, are responsible for skeletal muscle growth and repair in mammals. Pax7 and Pax3 transcription factors are established satellite cell markers required for muscle development and regeneration, and there is great interest in identifying additional factors that regulate satellite cell proliferation, differentiation, and/or skeletal muscle regeneration. Due to the powerful regenerative capacity of many zebrafish tissues, even in adults, we are exploring the regenerative potential of adult zebrafish skeletal muscle. Here, we show that adult zebrafish skeletal muscle contains cells similar to mammalian satellite cells. Adult zebrafish satellite-like cells have dense heterochromatin, express Pax7 and Pax3, proliferate in response to injury, and show peak myogenic responses 4-5 days post-injury (dpi). Furthermore, using a pax7a-driven GFP reporter, we present evidence implicating satellite-like cells as a possible source of new muscle. In lieu of central nucleation, which distinguishes regenerating myofibers in mammals, we describe several characteristics that robustly identify newly-forming myofibers from surrounding fibers in injured adult zebrafish muscle. These characteristics include partially overlapping expression in satellite-like cells and regenerating myofibers of two RNA-binding proteins Rbfox2 and Rbfoxl1, known to regulate embryonic muscle development and function. Finally, by analyzing pax7a; pax7b double mutant zebrafish, we show that Pax7 is required for adult skeletal muscle repair, as it is in the mouse.

  13. Experiment K-7-29: Connective Tissue Studies. Part 3; Rodent Tissue Repair: Skeletal Muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stauber, W.; Fritz, V. K.; Burkovskaya, T. E.; Ilyina-Kakueva, E. I.

    1994-01-01

    Myofiber injury-repair was studied in the rat gastrocnemius following a crush injury to the lower leg prior to flight in order to understand if the regenerative responses of muscles are altered by the lack of gravitational forces during Cosmos 2044 flight. After 14 days of flight, the gastrocnemius muscle was removed from the 5 injured flight rodents and various Earth-based treatment groups for comparison. The Earth-based animals consisted of three groups of five rats with injured muscles from a simulated, tail-suspended, and vivarium as well as an uninjured basal group. The gastrocnemius muscle from each was evaluated by histochemical and immunohistochemical techniques to document myofiber, vascular, and connective tissue alterations following injury. In general the repair process was somewhat similar in all injured muscle samples with regard to extracellular matrix organization and myofiber regeneration. Small and large myofibers were present with a newly organized extracellular matrix indicative of myogenesis and muscle regeneration. In the tail-suspended animals, a more complete repair was observed with no enlarged area of non-muscle cells or matrix material visible. In contrast, the muscle samples from the flight animals were less well differentiated with more macrophages and blood vessels in the repair region but small myofibers and proteoglycans, nevertheless, were in their usual configuration. Thus, myofiber repair did vary in muscles from the different groups, but for the most part, resulted in functional muscle tissue.

  14. Transplanted human embryonic stem cells as biological 'catalysts' for tissue repair and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Heng, Boon Chin; Liu, Hua; Cao, Tong

    2005-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells have tremendous potential in the newly emerging field of regenerative medicine. Recently, it was demonstrated that the rescue of lethal cardiac defects in Id knockout mutant mouse embryos was not due to the transplanted cells giving rise to functional new tissues within the defective embryonic heart. Instead, there is indirect evidence that the observed therapeutic effect was due to various secreted factors emanating from the transplanted cells. This therefore, introduces the exciting prospect of utilizing human embryonic stem cells as biological 'catalysts' to promote tissue repair and regeneration in transplantation therapy. However, the immunological barrier against allogenic transplantation, as well as the teratogenic potential of human embryonic stem cells poses major technical challenges. A possible strategy to overcome the immunological barrier may be to impose a temporary regimen of immunosuppressive drugs followed by their gradual withdrawal, once adequate tissue regeneration has been achieved. Other more novel alternatives include the use of microencapsulation to block interaction with the transplant recipient's immune system, and co-transplantation with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, which have been demonstrated to possess immuno-suppressive properties. The teratogenic potential of human embryonic stem cells could possibly be alleviated by directing the differentiation of these cells to specific lineages prior to transplantation, or through mitotic inactivation (gamma irradiation or mitomycin C exposure). Co-transplantation with autologous adult stem cells may represent a novel strategy to further enhance the 'catalytic' effects of human embryonic stem cells. The various factors secreted by human embryonic stem cells could then have a concentrated localized effect on relatively large numbers of co-transplanted autologous adult stem cells, which may in turn lead to enhanced repair and regeneration of the damaged

  15. Monocyte and Macrophage Plasticity in Tissue Repair and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Das, Amitava; Sinha, Mithun; Datta, Soma; Abas, Motaz; Chaffee, Scott; Sen, Chandan K.; Roy, Sashwati

    2016-01-01

    Heterogeneity and high versatility are the characteristic features of the cells of monocyte-macrophage lineage. The mononuclear phagocyte system, derived from the bone marrow progenitor cells, is primarily composed of monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. In regenerative tissues, a central role of monocyte-derived macrophages and paracrine factors secreted by these cells is indisputable. Macrophages are highly plastic cells. On the basis of environmental cues and molecular mediators, these cells differentiate to proinflammatory type I macrophage (M1) or anti-inflammatory or proreparative type II macrophage (M2) phenotypes and transdifferentiate into other cell types. Given a central role in tissue repair and regeneration, the review focuses on the heterogeneity of monocytes and macrophages with current known mechanisms of differentiation and plasticity, including microenvironmental cues and molecular mediators, such as noncoding RNAs. PMID:26118749

  16. Method of tissue repair using a composite material

    DOEpatents

    Hutchens, Stacy A; Woodward, Jonathan; Evans, Barbara R; O'Neill, Hugh M

    2014-03-18

    A composite biocompatible hydrogel material includes a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa. A calcium comprising salt is disposed in at least some of the pores. The porous polymer matrix can comprise cellulose, including bacterial cellulose. The composite can be used as a bone graft material. A method of tissue repair within the body of animals includes the steps of providing a composite biocompatible hydrogel material including a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa, and inserting the hydrogel material into cartilage or bone tissue of an animal, wherein the hydrogel material supports cell colonization in vitro for autologous cell seeding.

  17. Method of tissue repair using a composite material

    DOEpatents

    Hutchens, Stacy A.; Woodward, Jonathan; Evans, Barbara R.; O'Neill, Hugh M.

    2016-03-01

    A composite biocompatible hydrogel material includes a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa. A calcium comprising salt is disposed in at least some of the pores. The porous polymer matrix can comprise cellulose, including bacterial cellulose. The composite can be used as a bone graft material. A method of tissue repair within the body of animals includes the steps of providing a composite biocompatible hydrogel material including a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa, and inserting the hydrogel material into cartilage or bone tissue of an animal, wherein the hydrogel material supports cell colonization in vitro for autologous cell seeding.

  18. Fibroblast growth factors as tissue repair and regeneration therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Kinnunen, Tarja K.

    2016-01-01

    Cell communication is central to the integration of cell function required for the development and homeostasis of multicellular animals. Proteins are an important currency of cell communication, acting locally (auto-, juxta-, or paracrine) or systemically (endocrine). The fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family contributes to the regulation of virtually all aspects of development and organogenesis, and after birth to tissue maintenance, as well as particular aspects of organism physiology. In the West, oncology has been the focus of translation of FGF research, whereas in China and to an extent Japan a major focus has been to use FGFs in repair and regeneration settings. These differences have their roots in research history and aims. The Chinese drive into biotechnology and the delivery of engineered clinical grade FGFs by a major Chinese research group were important enablers in this respect. The Chinese language clinical literature is not widely accessible. To put this into context, we provide the essential molecular and functional background to the FGF communication system covering FGF ligands, the heparan sulfate and Klotho co-receptors and FGF receptor (FGFR) tyrosine kinases. We then summarise a selection of clinical reports that demonstrate the efficacy of engineered recombinant FGF ligands in treating a wide range of conditions that require tissue repair/regeneration. Alongside, the functional reasons why application of exogenous FGF ligands does not lead to cancers are described. Together, this highlights that the FGF ligands represent a major opportunity for clinical translation that has been largely overlooked in the West. PMID:26793421

  19. The neonate versus adult mammalian immune system in cardiac repair and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Sattler, Susanne; Rosenthal, Nadia

    2016-07-01

    The immune system is a crucial player in tissue homeostasis and wound healing. A sophisticated cascade of events triggered upon injury ensures protection from infection and initiates and orchestrates healing. While the neonatal mammal can readily regenerate damaged tissues, adult regenerative capacity is limited to specific tissue types, and in organs such as the heart, adult wound healing results in fibrotic repair and loss of function. Growing evidence suggests that the immune system greatly influences the balance between regeneration and fibrotic repair. The neonate mammalian immune system has impaired pro-inflammatory function, is prone to T-helper type 2 responses and has an immature adaptive immune system skewed towards regulatory T cells. While these characteristics make infants susceptible to infection and prone to allergies, it may also provide an immunological environment permissive of regeneration. In this review we will give a comprehensive overview of the immune cells involved in healing and regeneration of the heart and explore differences between the adult and neonate immune system that may explain differences in regenerative ability. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel.

  20. Basal ganglia function, stuttering, sequencing, and repair in adult songbirds.

    PubMed

    Kubikova, Lubica; Bosikova, Eva; Cvikova, Martina; Lukacova, Kristina; Scharff, Constance; Jarvis, Erich D

    2014-10-13

    A pallial-basal-ganglia-thalamic-pallial loop in songbirds is involved in vocal motor learning. Damage to its basal ganglia part, Area X, in adult zebra finches has been noted to have no strong effects on song and its function is unclear. Here we report that neurotoxic damage to adult Area X induced changes in singing tempo and global syllable sequencing in all animals, and considerably increased syllable repetition in birds whose song motifs ended with minor repetitions before lesioning. This stuttering-like behavior started at one month, and improved over six months. Unexpectedly, the lesioned region showed considerable recovery, including immigration of newly generated or repaired neurons that became active during singing. The timing of the recovery and stuttering suggest that immature recovering activity of the circuit might be associated with stuttering. These findings indicate that even after juvenile learning is complete, the adult striatum plays a role in higher level organization of learned vocalizations.

  1. Improved repair of bone defects with prevascularized tissue-engineered bones constructed in a perfusion bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Li, De-Qiang; Li, Ming; Liu, Pei-Lai; Zhang, Yuan-Kai; Lu, Jian-Xi; Li, Jian-Min

    2014-10-01

    Vascularization of tissue-engineered bones is critical to achieving satisfactory repair of bone defects. The authors investigated the use of prevascularized tissue-engineered bone for repairing bone defects. The new bone was greater in the prevascularized group than in the non-vascularized group, indicating that prevascularized tissue-engineered bone improves the repair of bone defects. [Orthopedics. 2014; 37(10):685-690.].

  2. Hydrogel-delivered brain-derived neurotrophic factor promotes tissue repair and recovery after stroke.

    PubMed

    Cook, Douglas J; Nguyen, Cynthia; Chun, Hyun N; L Llorente, Irene; Chiu, Abraham S; Machnicki, Michal; Zarembinski, Thomas I; Carmichael, S Thomas

    2017-03-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of adult disability. Systemic delivery of candidate neural repair therapies is limited by the blood-brain barrier and off-target effects. We tested a bioengineering approach for local depot release of BDNF from the infarct cavity for neural repair in chronic periods after stroke. The brain release levels of a hyaluronic acid hydrogel + BDNF were tested in several stroke models in mouse (strains C57Bl/6, DBA) and non-human primate ( Macaca fascicularis) and tracked with MRI. The behavioral recovery effects of hydrogel + BDNF and the effects on tissue repair outcomes were determined. Hydrogel-delivered BDNF diffuses from the stroke cavity into peri-infarct tissue over 3 weeks in two mouse stroke models, compared with 1 week for direct BDNF injection. Hydrogel delivery of BDNF promotes recovery of motor function. Mapping of motor system connections indicates that hydrogel-BDNF induces axonal sprouting within existing cortical and cortico-striatal systems. Pharmacogenetic studies show that hydrogel-BDNF induces the initial migration of immature neurons into the peri-infarct cortex and their long-term survival. In chronic stroke in the non-human primate, hydrogel-released BDNF can be detected up to 2 cm from the infarct, a distance relevant to human functional recovery in stroke. The hydrogel can be tracked by MRI in mouse and primate.

  3. Preclinical validation and imaging of Wnt-induced repair in human 3D lung tissue cultures.

    PubMed

    Uhl, Franziska E; Vierkotten, Sarah; Wagner, Darcy E; Burgstaller, Gerald; Costa, Rita; Koch, Ina; Lindner, Michael; Meiners, Silke; Eickelberg, Oliver; Königshoff, Melanie

    2015-10-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterised by a progressive loss of lung tissue. Inducing repair processes within the adult diseased lung is of major interest and Wnt/β-catenin signalling represents a promising target for lung repair. However, the translation of novel therapeutic targets from model systems into clinical use remains a major challenge.We generated murine and patient-derived three-dimensional (3D) ex vivo lung tissue cultures (LTCs), which closely mimic the 3D lung microenvironment in vivo. Using two well-known glycogen synthase kinase-3β inhibitors, lithium chloride (LiCl) and CHIR 99021 (CT), we determined Wnt/β-catenin-driven lung repair processes in high spatiotemporal resolution using quantitative PCR, Western blotting, ELISA, (immuno)histological assessment, and four-dimensional confocal live tissue imaging.Viable 3D-LTCs exhibited preserved lung structure and function for up to 5 days. We demonstrate successful Wnt/β-catenin signal activation in murine and patient-derived 3D-LTCs from COPD patients. Wnt/β-catenin signalling led to increased alveolar epithelial cell marker expression, decreased matrix metalloproteinase-12 expression, as well as altered macrophage activity and elastin remodelling. Importantly, induction of surfactant protein C significantly correlated with disease stage (per cent predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 s) in patient-derived 3D-LTCs.Patient-derived 3D-LTCs represent a valuable tool to analyse potential targets and drugs for lung repair. Enhanced Wnt/β-catenin signalling attenuated pathological features of patient-derived COPD 3D-LTCs.

  4. [New challenge of tissue repair and regenerative medicine: to achieve a perfect repair and regeneration of multiple tissues in wound sites].

    PubMed

    Fu, X B

    2016-01-01

    Great achievements in the study of tissue repair and regeneration have been made, and many of these successes have been shown to be beneficial to the patients in recent years. However, perfect tissue repair and regeneration of damaged tissues and organs remain to be great challenges in the management of trauma and diseases. Based on the progress in developmental biology in animals and advances in stem cell biology, it is possible to attain the aim of perfect repair and regeneration by means of somatic cell reprogramming and different inducing techniques.

  5. Laparoscopic Repair of Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Satendra; Afaque, Yusuf; Bhartia, Abhishek Kumar; Bhartia, Vishnu Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background, Aims, and Objectives. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia typically presents in childhood but in adults is extremely rare entity. Surgery is indicated for symptomatic and asymptomatic patients who are fit for surgery. It can be done by laparotomy, thoracotomy, thoracoscopy, or laparoscopy. With the advent of minimal access techniques, the open surgical repair for this hernia has decreased and results are comparable with early recovery and less hospital stay. The aim of this study is to establish that laparoscopic repair of congenital diaphragmatic hernia is a safe and effective modality of surgical treatment. Materials and Methods. A retrospective study of laparoscopic diaphragmatic hernia repair done during May 2011 to Oct 2014. Total n = 13 (M/F: 11/2) cases of confirmed diaphragmatic hernia on CT scan, 4 cases Bochdalek hernia (BH), 8 cases of left eventration of the diaphragm (ED), and one case of right-sided eventration of the diaphragm (ED) were included in the study. Largest defect found on the left side was 15 × 6 cm and on the right side it was 15 × 8 cm. Stomach, small intestine, transverse colon, and omentum were contents in the hernial sac. The contents were reduced with harmonic scalpel and thin sacs were usually excised. The eventration was plicated and hernial orifices were repaired with interrupted horizontal mattress sutures buttressed by Teflon pieces. A composite mesh was fixed with nonabsorbable tackers. All patients had good postoperative recovery and went home early with normal follow-up and were followed up for 2 years. Conclusion. The laparoscopic repair is a safe and effective modality of surgical treatment for congenital diaphragmatic hernia in experienced hands. PMID:28074156

  6. An in vitro model of adult mammalian nerve repair.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Alka; Li, Zhaobo; Aspalter, Manuela; Feiner, Jeffrey; Hoke, Ahmet; Zhou, Chunhua; O'Daly, Andres; Abdullah, Madeel; Rohde, Charles; Brushart, Thomas M

    2010-05-01

    The role of pathway-derived growth factors in the support of peripheral axon regeneration remains elusive. Few appropriate knock-out mice are available, and gene silencing techniques are rarely 100% effective. To overcome these difficulties, we have developed an in vitro organotypic co-culture system that accurately models peripheral nerve repair in the adult mammal. Spinal cord sections from P4 mice that express YFP in their neurons are used to innervate segments of P4 peripheral nerve. This reconstructed ventral root is then transected and joined to a nerve graft. Growth of axons across the nerve repair and into the graft can be imaged repeatedly with fluorescence microscopy to define regeneration speed, and parent neurons can be labeled in retrograde fashion to identify contributing neurons. Nerve graft harvested from adult mice remains viable in culture by both morphologic and functional criteria. Motoneurons are supported with GDNF for the first week in culture, after which they survive axotomy, and are thus functionally adult. This platform can be modified by using motoneurons from any genetically modified mouse that can be bred to express XFP, by harvesting nerve graft from any source, or by treating the culture systemically with antibodies, growth factors, or pathway inhibitors. The regeneration environment is controlled to a degree not possible in vivo, and the use of experimental animals is reduced substantially. The flexibility and control offered by this technique should thus make it a useful tool for the study of regeneration biology.

  7. Advances and Perspectives on Tissue Repair and Healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinheiro, Antonio L. B.; Marques, Aparecida M. C.; de Sousa, Ana Paula C.; Aciole, Jouber M. S.; Soares, Luiz G. P.

    2011-08-01

    Wound healing involves local and systemic responses that reflect the etiology of the lesion, type of tissue, systemic condition and others. Despite being essentially the same for different wounds, the pattern of healing may change due to intrinsic and/or extrinsic factors. The type of tissue has also to be considered. Several therapeutic approaches have been used to improve healing including phototherapies such as Laser, LEDs and Lamps. Their effects on soft and mineralized tissues are well reported. The choice of appropriated parameters is essential for the results of the treatment and includes wavelength, power density, energy, duration and frequency of application and others. We studied the effects of different types of light on the healing of both soft and mineralized tissues using different models. We found that the use of Laser and polarized light are effective on improving the healing of diabetic and undernourished animals. We also found that Laser light is capable of improving the healing of drug-induced impairment and on increasing the survival rate of flaps on both diabetic and non-diabetic animals. We have also studied and shown the influence of the laser parameters on the healing of surgical and laser wounds. Lately we verified the positive effect of LEDs on healing. We used Laser/LED light for improving bone healing in conditions such as in dental implants, autologous grafts, biomaterials and fractures. From these reports and our own experience we have no doubt whatsoever that the use of phototherapies, carried out with appropriate parameters, promotes quicker tissue repair.

  8. Extracellular vesicles: small bricks for tissue repair/regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Taverna, Simona; Pucci, Marzia

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are nano-sized membrane vesicles involved in intercellular communication. EVs have pleiotropic actions in physiological and pathological conditions. The ability of EVs to transports proteins, drugs and nucleic acid, to target specific cells and to increase the stability of therapeutic cargo, make EVs interesting as new devices for the treatment of human disease. In a recently published issue of European journal of pharmaceutical sciences, Silva and colleagues reviewed the ability of EVs to modulate tissue repair and regeneration, focusing on their roles and therapeutic potential as immunomodulatory messengers. In this perspective, we discussed the open questions regarding the dual role of EVs in immune system, as well as the technical limitation of the procedure for EVs isolation and administration in clinical practices. EV-based therapies require further studies to consider EVs as promising candidate for a novel cell-free therapy in the context of regeneration medicine. PMID:28275628

  9. Neuroinflammation in Parkinson's disease: role in neurodegeneration and tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Vivekanantham, Sayinthen; Shah, Savan; Dewji, Rizwan; Dewji, Abbas; Khatri, Chetan; Ologunde, Rele

    2015-01-01

    Neuroinflammation in Parkinson's disease [PD] is a process that occurs alongside the loss of dopaminergic neurons, and is associated with alterations to many cell types, most notably microglia. This review examines the key evidence contributing to our understanding of the role of inflammation-mediated degeneration of the dopaminergic (DA) nigrostriatal pathway in PD. It will consider the potential role inflammation plays in tissue repair within the brain, inflammation linked gene products that are associated with sporadic Parkinsonian phenotypes (alpha-synuclein, Parkin and Nurr 1), and developing anti-inflammatory drug treatments in PD. With growing evidence supporting the key role of neuroinflammation in PD pathogenesis, new molecular targets are being found that could potentially prevent or delay nigrostriatal DA neuron loss. Hence, this creates the opportunity for disease modifying treatment, to currently what is an incurable disease.

  10. Adult stem cells in neural repair: Current options, limitations and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Mariano, Eric Domingos; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Marie, Suely Kazue Nagahashi; Lepski, Guilherme

    2015-03-26

    Stem cells represent a promising step for the future of regenerative medicine. As they are able to differentiate into any cell type, tissue or organ, these cells are great candidates for treatments against the worst diseases that defy doctors and researchers around the world. Stem cells can be divided into three main groups: (1) embryonic stem cells; (2) fetal stem cells; and (3) adult stem cells. In terms of their capacity for proliferation, stem cells are also classified as totipotent, pluripotent or multipotent. Adult stem cells, also known as somatic cells, are found in various regions of the adult organism, such as bone marrow, skin, eyes, viscera and brain. They can differentiate into unipotent cells of the residing tissue, generally for the purpose of repair. These cells represent an excellent choice in regenerative medicine, every patient can be a donor of adult stem cells to provide a more customized and efficient therapy against various diseases, in other words, they allow the opportunity of autologous transplantation. But in order to start clinical trials and achieve great results, we need to understand how these cells interact with the host tissue, how they can manipulate or be manipulated by the microenvironment where they will be transplanted and for how long they can maintain their multipotent state to provide a full regeneration.

  11. The 22nd annual meeting of the European Tissue Repair Society (ETRS) in Athens, Greece

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The 22nd Annual Meeting of the European Tissue Repair Society, Athens, Greece, October 4 to 5, 2012 informed about pathophysiological mechanisms in tissue repair and on the development of clinical treatments of chronic wounds, fibrosis, and cancer, considering recent advances in molecular biology and biotechnology. PMID:23374673

  12. Repair and tissue engineering techniques for articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Makris, Eleftherios A.; Gomoll, Andreas H.; Malizos, Konstantinos N.; Hu, Jerry C.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2015-01-01

    Chondral and osteochondral lesions due to injury or other pathology commonly result in the development of osteoarthritis, eventually leading to progressive total joint destruction. Although current progress suggests that biologic agents can delay the advancement of deterioration, such drugs are incapable of promoting tissue restoration. The limited ability of articular cartilage to regenerate renders joint arthroplasty an unavoidable surgical intervention. This Review describes current, widely used clinical repair techniques for resurfacing articular cartilage defects; short-term and long-term clinical outcomes of these techniques are discussed. Also reviewed is a developmental pipeline of regenerative biological products that over the next decade could revolutionize joint care by functionally healing articular cartilage. These products include cell-based and cell-free materials such as autologous and allogeneic cell-based approaches and multipotent and pluripotent stem-cell-based techniques. Central to these efforts is the prominent role that tissue engineering has in translating biological technology into clinical products; therefore, concomitant regulatory processes are also discussed. PMID:25247412

  13. Bioactive Nanocomposites for Tissue Repair and Regeneration: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Bramhill, Jane; Ross, Sukunya; Ross, Gareth

    2017-01-01

    This review presents scientific findings concerning the use of bioactive nanocomposites in the field of tissue repair and regeneration. Bioactivity is the ability of a material to incite a specific biological reaction, usually at the boundary of the material. Nanocomposites have been shown to be ideal bioactive materials due the many biological interfaces and structures operating at the nanoscale. This has resulted in many researchers investigating nanocomposites for use in bioapplications. Nanocomposites encompass a number of different structures, incorporating organic-inorganic, inorganic-inorganic and bioinorganic nanomaterials and based upon ceramic, metallic or polymeric materials. This enables a wide range of properties to be incorporated into nanocomposite materials, such as magnetic properties, MR imaging contrast or drug delivery, and even a combination of these properties. Much of the classical research was focused on bone regeneration, however, recent advances have enabled further use in soft tissue body sites too. Despite recent technological advances, more research is needed to further understand the long-term biocompatibility impact of the use of nanoparticles within the human body. PMID:28085054

  14. How Somatic Adult Tissues Develop Organizer Activity.

    PubMed

    Vogg, Matthias C; Wenger, Yvan; Galliot, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    The growth and patterning of anatomical structures from specific cellular fields in developing organisms relies on organizing centers that instruct surrounding cells to modify their behavior, namely migration, proliferation, and differentiation. We discuss here how organizers can form in adult organisms, a process of utmost interest for regenerative medicine. Animals like Hydra and planarians, which maintain their shape and fitness thanks to a highly dynamic homeostasis, offer a useful paradigm to study adult organizers in steady-state conditions. Beside the homeostatic context, these model systems also offer the possibility to study how organizers form de novo from somatic adult tissues. Both extracellular matrix remodeling and caspase activation play a key role in this transition, acting as promoters of organizer formation in the vicinity of the wound. Their respective roles and the crosstalk between them just start to be deciphered.

  15. Strategies to Optimize Adult Stem Cell Therapy for Tissue Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shan; Zhou, Jingli; Zhang, Xuan; Liu, Yang; Chen, Jin; Hu, Bo; Song, Jinlin; Zhang, Yuanyuan

    2016-06-21

    Stem cell therapy aims to replace damaged or aged cells with healthy functioning cells in congenital defects, tissue injuries, autoimmune disorders, and neurogenic degenerative diseases. Among various types of stem cells, adult stem cells (i.e., tissue-specific stem cells) commit to becoming the functional cells from their tissue of origin. These cells are the most commonly used in cell-based therapy since they do not confer risk of teratomas, do not require fetal stem cell maneuvers and thus are free of ethical concerns, and they confer low immunogenicity (even if allogenous). The goal of this review is to summarize the current state of the art and advances in using stem cell therapy for tissue repair in solid organs. Here we address key factors in cell preparation, such as the source of adult stem cells, optimal cell types for implantation (universal mesenchymal stem cells vs. tissue-specific stem cells, or induced vs. non-induced stem cells), early or late passages of stem cells, stem cells with endogenous or exogenous growth factors, preconditioning of stem cells (hypoxia, growth factors, or conditioned medium), using various controlled release systems to deliver growth factors with hydrogels or microspheres to provide apposite interactions of stem cells and their niche. We also review several approaches of cell delivery that affect the outcomes of cell therapy, including the appropriate routes of cell administration (systemic, intravenous, or intraperitoneal vs. local administration), timing for cell therapy (immediate vs. a few days after injury), single injection of a large number of cells vs. multiple smaller injections, a single site for injection vs. multiple sites and use of rodents vs. larger animal models. Future directions of stem cell-based therapies are also discussed to guide potential clinical applications.

  16. Strategies to Optimize Adult Stem Cell Therapy for Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shan; Zhou, Jingli; Zhang, Xuan; Liu, Yang; Chen, Jin; Hu, Bo; Song, Jinlin; Zhang, Yuanyuan

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell therapy aims to replace damaged or aged cells with healthy functioning cells in congenital defects, tissue injuries, autoimmune disorders, and neurogenic degenerative diseases. Among various types of stem cells, adult stem cells (i.e., tissue-specific stem cells) commit to becoming the functional cells from their tissue of origin. These cells are the most commonly used in cell-based therapy since they do not confer risk of teratomas, do not require fetal stem cell maneuvers and thus are free of ethical concerns, and they confer low immunogenicity (even if allogenous). The goal of this review is to summarize the current state of the art and advances in using stem cell therapy for tissue repair in solid organs. Here we address key factors in cell preparation, such as the source of adult stem cells, optimal cell types for implantation (universal mesenchymal stem cells vs. tissue-specific stem cells, or induced vs. non-induced stem cells), early or late passages of stem cells, stem cells with endogenous or exogenous growth factors, preconditioning of stem cells (hypoxia, growth factors, or conditioned medium), using various controlled release systems to deliver growth factors with hydrogels or microspheres to provide apposite interactions of stem cells and their niche. We also review several approaches of cell delivery that affect the outcomes of cell therapy, including the appropriate routes of cell administration (systemic, intravenous, or intraperitoneal vs. local administration), timing for cell therapy (immediate vs. a few days after injury), single injection of a large number of cells vs. multiple smaller injections, a single site for injection vs. multiple sites and use of rodents vs. larger animal models. Future directions of stem cell-based therapies are also discussed to guide potential clinical applications. PMID:27338364

  17. Multipotent adult progenitor cells on an allograft scaffold facilitate the bone repair process

    PubMed Central

    LoGuidice, Amanda; Houlihan, Alison; Deans, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Multipotent adult progenitor cells are a recently described population of stem cells derived from the bone marrow stroma. Research has demonstrated the potential of multipotent adult progenitor cells for treating ischemic injury and cardiovascular repair; however, understanding of multipotent adult progenitor cells in orthopedic applications remains limited. In this study, we evaluate the osteogenic and angiogenic capacity of multipotent adult progenitor cells, both in vitro and loaded onto demineralized bone matrix in vivo, with comparison to mesenchymal stem cells, as the current standard. When compared to mesenchymal stem cells, multipotent adult progenitor cells exhibited a more robust angiogenic protein release profile in vitro and developed more extensive vasculature within 2 weeks in vivo. The establishment of this vascular network is critical to the ossification process, as it allows nutrient exchange and provides an influx of osteoprogenitor cells to the wound site. In vitro assays confirmed the multipotency of multipotent adult progenitor cells along mesodermal lineages and demonstrated the enhanced expression of alkaline phosphatase and production of calcium-containing mineral deposits by multipotent adult progenitor cells, necessary precursors for osteogenesis. In combination with a demineralized bone matrix scaffold, multipotent adult progenitor cells demonstrated enhanced revascularization and new bone formation in vivo in an orthotopic defect model when compared to mesenchymal stem cells on demineralized bone matrix or demineralized bone matrix–only control groups. The potent combination of angiogenic and osteogenic properties provided by multipotent adult progenitor cells appears to create a synergistic amplification of the bone healing process. Our results indicate that multipotent adult progenitor cells have the potential to better promote tissue regeneration and healing and to be a functional cell source for use in orthopedic applications

  18. The less-often-traveled surface of stem cells: caveolin-1 and caveolae in stem cells, tissue repair and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells are an important resource for tissue repair and regeneration. While a great deal of attention has focused on derivation and molecular regulation of stem cells, relatively little research has focused on how the subcellular structure and composition of the cell membrane influences stem cell activities such as proliferation, differentiation and homing. Caveolae are specialized membrane lipid rafts coated with caveolin scaffolding proteins, which can regulate cholesterol transport and the activity of cell signaling receptors and their downstream effectors. Caveolin-1 is involved in the regulation of many cellular processes, including growth, control of mitochondrial antioxidant levels, migration and senescence. These activities are of relevance to stem cell biology, and in this review evidence for caveolin-1 involvement in stem cell biology is summarized. Altered stem and progenitor cell populations in caveolin-1 null mice suggest that caveolin-1 can regulate stem cell proliferation, and in vitro studies with isolated stem cells suggest that caveolin-1 regulates stem cell differentiation. The available evidence leads us to hypothesize that caveolin-1 expression may stabilize the differentiated and undifferentiated stem cell phenotype, and transient downregulation of caveolin-1 expression may be required for transition between the two. Such regulation would probably be critical in regenerative applications of adult stem cells and during tissue regeneration. We also review here the temporal changes in caveolin-1 expression reported during tissue repair. Delayed muscle regeneration in transgenic mice overexpressing caveolin-1 as well as compromised cardiac, brain and liver tissue repair and delayed wound healing in caveolin-1 null mice suggest that caveolin-1 plays an important role in tissue repair, but that this role may be negative or positive depending on the tissue type and the nature of the repair process. Finally, we also discuss how caveolin-1

  19. Informing future cartilage repair strategies: a comparative study of three different human cell types for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sushmita; Kirkham, Jennifer; Wood, David; Curran, Stephen; Yang, Xuebin B

    2013-06-01

    A major clinical need exists for cartilage repair and regeneration. Despite many different strategies having been pursued, the identification of an optimised cell type and of pre-treatment conditions remains a challenge. This study compares the cartilage-like tissue generated by human bone marrow stromal cells (HBMSCs) and human neonatal and adult chondrocytes cultured on three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds under various conditions in vitro and in vivo with the aim of informing future cartilage repair strategies based upon tissue-engineering approaches. After 3 weeks in vitro culture, all three cell types showed cartilage-like tissue formation on 3D poly (lactide-co-glycolide) acid scaffolds only when cultured in chondrogenic medium. After 6 weeks of chondro-induction, neonatal chondrocyte constructs revealed the most cartilage-like tissue formation with a prominent superficial zone-like layer, a middle zone-like structure and the thinnest fibrous capsule. HBMSC constructs had the thickest fibrous capsule formation. Under basal culture conditions, neonatal articular chondrocytes failed to form any tissue, whereas HBMSCs and adult chondrocytes showed thick fibrous capsule formation at 6 weeks. After in vivo implantation, all groups generated more compact tissues compared with in vitro constructs. Pre-culturing in chondrogenic media for 1 week before implantation reduced fibrous tissue formation in all cell constructs at week 3. After 6 weeks, only the adult chondrocyte group pre-cultured in chondrogenic media was able to maintain a more chondrogenic/less fibrocartilaginous phenotype. Thus, pre-culture under chondrogenic conditions is required to maintain a long-term chondrogenic phenotype, with adult chondrocytes being a more promising cell source than HBMSCs for articular cartilage tissue engineering.

  20. A radiation damage repair model for normal tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partridge, Mike

    2008-07-01

    A cellular Monte Carlo model describing radiation damage and repair in normal epithelial tissues is presented. The deliberately simplified model includes cell cycling, cell motility and radiation damage response (cell cycle arrest and cell death) only. Results demonstrate that the model produces a stable equilibrium system for mean cell cycle times in the range 24-96 h. Simulated irradiation of these stable equilibrium systems produced a range of responses that are shown to be consistent with experimental and clinical observation, including (i) re-epithelialization of radiation-induced lesions by a mixture of cell migration into the wound and repopulation at the periphery; (ii) observed radiosensitivity that is quantitatively consistent with both rate of induction of irreparable DNA lesions and, independently, with the observed acute oral and pharyngeal mucosal reactions to radiotherapy; (iii) an observed time between irradiation and maximum toxicity that is consistent with experimental data for skin; (iv) quantitatively accurate predictions of low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity; (v) Gomperzian repopulation for very small lesions (~2000 cells) and (vi) a linear rate of re-epithelialization of 5-10 µm h-1 for large lesions (>15 000 cells).

  1. Alternatively activated macrophages determine repair of the infarcted adult murine heart

    PubMed Central

    Shiraishi, Manabu; Shintani, Yasunori; Shintani, Yusuke; Ishida, Hidekazu; Saba, Rie; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Adachi, Hideo; Yashiro, Kenta

    2016-01-01

    Alternatively activated (also known as M2) macrophages are involved in the repair of various types of organs. However, the contribution of M2 macrophages to cardiac repair after myocardial infarction (MI) remains to be fully characterized. Here, we identified CD206+F4/80+CD11b+ M2-like macrophages in the murine heart and demonstrated that this cell population predominantly increases in the infarct area and exhibits strengthened reparative abilities after MI. We evaluated mice lacking the kinase TRIB1 (Trib1–/–), which exhibit a selective depletion of M2 macrophages after MI. Compared with control animals, Trib1–/– mice had a catastrophic prognosis, with frequent cardiac rupture, as the result of markedly reduced collagen fibril formation in the infarct area due to impaired fibroblast activation. The decreased tissue repair observed in Trib1–/– mice was entirely rescued by an external supply of M2-like macrophages. Furthermore, IL-1α and osteopontin were suggested to be mediators of M2-like macrophage–induced fibroblast activation. In addition, IL-4 administration achieved a targeted increase in the number of M2-like macrophages and enhanced the post-MI prognosis of WT mice, corresponding with amplified fibroblast activation and formation of more supportive fibrous tissues in the infarcts. Together, these data demonstrate that M2-like macrophages critically determine the repair of infarcted adult murine heart by regulating fibroblast activation and suggest that IL-4 is a potential biological drug for treating MI. PMID:27140396

  2. The effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on tissue repair: A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Aline Fernanda Perez; Santana, Eduardo Ferreira; Tacani, Pascale Mutti; Liebano, Richard Eloin

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) consists of a generic application of low-frequency, pulsed electrical currents transmitted by electrodes through the skin surface. It is a therapeutic modality that is nonpharmacological, noninvasive, inexpensive, easy to use and widely applied in clinical practice. OBJECTIVE: To narratively review the scientific evidence of the effects of TENS on tissue repair with respect to wound healing, skin flap viability and tendinous repair. METHODS: The study was conducted using the MEDLINE, Lilacs and Scielo databases, without limit to the period of publication, and was completed in November 2011. Inclusion criteria were randomized or nonrandomized, controlled or noncontrolled clinical trials, and experimental trials involving rats subjected to TENS for tissue repair. RESULTS: Thirty articles on tissue repair were found and, among these, 14 reported on wound healing, 14 reported on skin flaps and two analyzed tedinous repair. DISCUSSION: It was suggested that TENS stimulates skin wound healing and tendon repair, as well as the viability of random skin flaps. Such effects may be due to the release of substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide, which would increase blood flow and, consequently, hasten the events leading to tissue repair. CONCLUSIONS: Based on the scientific evidence regarding the effects of TENS on tissue repair, the findings of the present literature review were inconclusive because data from the randomized controlled clinical trials were insufficient to confirm such effects. PMID:24294017

  3. Tissue-engineering strategies to repair joint tissue in osteoarthritis: nonviral gene-transfer approaches.

    PubMed

    Madry, Henning; Cucchiarini, Magali

    2014-10-01

    Loss of articular cartilage is a common clinical consequence of osteoarthritis (OA). In the past decade, substantial progress in tissue engineering, nonviral gene transfer, and cell transplantation have provided the scientific foundation for generating cartilaginous constructs from genetically modified cells. Combining tissue engineering with overexpression of therapeutic genes enables immediate filling of a cartilage defect with an engineered construct that actively supports chondrogenesis. Several pioneering studies have proved that spatially defined nonviral overexpression of growth-factor genes in constructs of solid biomaterials or hydrogels is advantageous compared with gene transfer or scaffold alone, both in vitro and in vivo. Notably, these investigations were performed in models of focal cartilage defects, because advanced cartilage-repair strategies based on the principles of tissue engineering have not advanced sufficiently to enable resurfacing of extensively degraded cartilage as therapy for OA. These studies serve as prototypes for future technological developments, because they raise the possibility that cartilage constructs engineered from genetically modified chondrocytes providing autocrine and paracrine stimuli could similarly compensate for the loss of articular cartilage in OA. Because cartilage-tissue-engineering strategies are already used in the clinic, combining tissue engineering and nonviral gene transfer could prove a powerful approach to treat OA.

  4. Immune modulation by MANF promotes tissue repair and regenerative success in the retina.

    PubMed

    Neves, Joana; Zhu, Jie; Sousa-Victor, Pedro; Konjikusic, Mia; Riley, Rebeccah; Chew, Shereen; Qi, Yanyan; Jasper, Heinrich; Lamba, Deepak A

    2016-07-01

    Regenerative therapies are limited by unfavorable environments in aging and diseased tissues. A promising strategy to improve success is to balance inflammatory and anti-inflammatory signals and enhance endogenous tissue repair mechanisms. Here, we identified a conserved immune modulatory mechanism that governs the interaction between damaged retinal cells and immune cells to promote tissue repair. In damaged retina of flies and mice, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-like signaling induced mesencephalic astrocyte-derived neurotrophic factor (MANF) in innate immune cells. MANF promoted alternative activation of innate immune cells, enhanced neuroprotection and tissue repair, and improved the success of photoreceptor replacement therapies. Thus, immune modulation is required during tissue repair and regeneration. This approach may improve the efficacy of stem-cell-based regenerative therapies.

  5. Rational design of nanofiber scaffolds for orthopedic tissue repair and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Bing; Xie, Jingwei; Jiang, Jiang; Shuler, Franklin D; Bartlett, David E

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews recent significant advances in the design of nanofiber scaffolds for orthopedic tissue repair and regeneration. It begins with a brief introduction on the limitations of current approaches for orthopedic tissue repair and regeneration. It then illustrates that rationally designed scaffolds made up of electrospun nanofibers could be a promising solution to overcome the problems that current approaches encounter. The article also discusses the intriguing properties of electrospun nanofibers, including control of composition, structures, orders, alignments and mechanical properties, use as carriers for topical drug and/or gene sustained delivery, and serving as substrates for the regulation of cell behaviors, which could benefit musculoskeletal tissue repair and regeneration. It further highlights a few of the many recent applications of electrospun nanofiber scaffolds in repairing and regenerating various orthopedic tissues. Finally, the article concludes with perspectives on the challenges and future directions for better design, fabrication and utilization of nanofiber scaffolds for orthopedic tissue engineering. PMID:23987110

  6. Rational design of nanofiber scaffolds for orthopedic tissue repair and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ma, Bing; Xie, Jingwei; Jiang, Jiang; Shuler, Franklin D; Bartlett, David E

    2013-09-01

    This article reviews recent significant advances in the design of nanofiber scaffolds for orthopedic tissue repair and regeneration. It begins with a brief introduction on the limitations of current approaches for orthopedic tissue repair and regeneration. It then illustrates that rationally designed scaffolds made up of electrospun nanofibers could be a promising solution to overcome the problems that current approaches encounter. The article also discusses the intriguing properties of electrospun nanofibers, including control of composition, structures, orders, alignments and mechanical properties, use as carriers for topical drug and/or gene sustained delivery, and serving as substrates for the regulation of cell behaviors, which could benefit musculoskeletal tissue repair and regeneration. It further highlights a few of the many recent applications of electrospun nanofiber scaffolds in repairing and regenerating various orthopedic tissues. Finally, the article concludes with perspectives on the challenges and future directions for better design, fabrication and utilization of nanofiber scaffolds for orthopedic tissue engineering.

  7. Hematopoietic tissue repair under chronic low daily dose irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seed, T. M.

    The capacity of the hematopoietic system to repair constantly accruing cellular damage under chronic, low daily dose gamma irradiation is essential for the maintenance of a functional hematopoietic system, and, in turn, long term survival. In certain individuals, however, such continuous cycles of damage and repair provide an essential inductive environment for selected types of hematopathologies, e.g., myeloid leukemia (ML). In our laboratory we have been studying temporal and causal relationships between hematopoietic capacity, associated repair functions, and propensities for hematologic disease in canines under variable levels of chronic radiation stress (0.3-26.3 cGy d^-1). Results indicate that the maximum exposure rate tolerated by the hematopoietic system is highly individual-specific (three major responding subgroups identified) and is based largely on the degree to which repair capacity, and, in turn, hematopoietic restoration, is augmented under chronic exposure. In low-tolerance individuals (prone to aplastic anemia, subgroup 1), the failure to augment basic repair functions seemingly results in a progressive accumulation of genetic and cellular damage within vital progenitorial marrow compartments (particularly marked within erythroid compartments) that results in loss of reproductive capacity and ultimately in collapse of the hematopoietic system. The high-tolerance individuals (radioaccommodated and either prone- or not prone to ML, subgroup 2 & 3) appear to minimize the accumulating damage effect of daily exposures by extending repair functions, which preserves reproductive integrity and fosters regenerative hematopoietic responses. As the strength of the regenerative response manifests the extent of repair augmentation, the relatively strong response of high-tolerance individuals progressing to patent ML suggests an insufficiency of repair quality rather than repair quantity. The kinetics of these repair-mediated, regenerative hematopoietic

  8. Interspecies comparisons of tissues DNA damage, repair, fixation, and replication

    SciTech Connect

    Slaga, T.J.

    1988-04-01

    The many anatomical, physiological, and biochemical differences among various mammalian species make it difficult to extrapolate carcinogenic potency data from animals to humans. The process is further complicated by the multistep origin of most malignant tumors in animals and humans due to the interaction of target cells with both endogenous and exogenous factors. Species differences in these aspects of carcinogenesis must also be considered when attempting to evaluate the carcinogenic risks of chemicals to humans. Cancer development in animals involves at least three distinct stages: initiation, promotion, and progression. Intra- and interspecies differences in susceptibility to carcinogenesis may be related to any one or a combination of these stages. Variation in species susceptibility to tumor initiation may result from differences in the abilities of various species to metabolize a potential carcinogen to an ultimate carcinogenic form and/or to detoxify the carcinogen. Most comparative studies among species have only revealed subtle differences in metabolism. DNA adducts from several activated carcinogens have been found to be the same in a number of tissues from various species, including humans. Capacity for DNA repair is apparently a critical factor in the initiation of carcinogenesis in target cells of different species but is less critical among mice that differ in susceptibility to two-stage carcinogenesis of the skin and liver. Susceptibility variations among stocks and strains to such carcinogenesis appear to be related to alterations in tumor promotion. Additional comparative studies are critically needed on all aspects of carcinogenesis to permit effective extrapolation of carcinogenic potency data from animals to humans.

  9. Interspecies comparisons of tissue DNA damage, repair, fixation, and replication.

    PubMed Central

    Slaga, T J

    1988-01-01

    The many anatomical, physiological, and biochemical differences among various mammalian species make it difficult to extrapolate carcinogenic potency data from animals to humans. The process is further complicated by the multistep origin of most malignant tumors in animals and humans due to the interaction of target cells with both endogenous and exogenous factors. Species differences in these aspects of carcinogenesis must also be considered when attempting to evaluate the carcinogenic risks of chemicals to humans. Cancer development in animals involves at least three distinct stages: initiation, promotion, and progression. Intra- and interspecies differences in susceptibility to carcinogenesis may be related to any one or a combination of these stages. Variation in species susceptibility to tumor initiation may result from differences in the abilities of various species to metabolize a potential carcinogen to an ultimate carcinogenic form and/or to detoxify the carcinogen. Most comparative studies among species have only revealed subtle differences in metabolism. DNA adducts from several activated carcinogens have been found to be the same in a number of tissues from various species, including humans. Capacity for DNA repair is apparently a critical factor in the initiation of carcinogenesis in target cells of different species but is less critical among mice that differ in susceptibility to two-stage carcinogenesis of the skin and liver. Susceptibility variations among stocks and strains to such carcinogenesis appear to be related to alterations in tumor promotion. Additional comparative studies are critically needed on all aspects of carcinogenesis to permit effective extrapolation of carcinogenic potency data from animals to humans. PMID:3289910

  10. Self assembling bioactive materials for cell adhesion in tissue repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Julia J.

    This work involved the study of biodegradable and biocompatible materials that have the potential to modify tissue engineering scaffolds through self assembly, generating multiple layers that deliver bioactivity. Diblock biomaterials containing cholesteryl moieties and oligomers of lactic acid units were found to form single crystals when precipitated from hot ethanol and smectic liquid crystalline phases when cast as a film. Cell culture experiments on these films with 3T3 and 3T6 fibroblasts indicated that these ordered materials form surfaces with specific chemistries that favored cell adhesion, spreading, and proliferation suggesting the potential of mediating human tissue repair. The author believes the cholesteryl moieties found on the surface play a key role in determining cell behavior. Cholesteryl-(L-lactic acid) diblock molecules were then functionalized with moieties including vitamin Bx, cholesterol, and the anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin. An unstable activated ester between indomethacin and the diblock molecule resulted in the release of indomethacin into the culture medium which inhibited the proliferation of 3T3 fibroblasts. Finally, a series of molecules were designed to incorporate dendrons based on amino acids at the termini of the diblock structures. It was determined that lysine, a basic amino acid, covalently coupled to cholesteryl-(L-lactic acid) can promote cell adhesion and spreading while negatively charged and zwitterionic 2nd generation dendrons based on aspartic acid do not. Incorporation of the well known arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) sequence, which is found in many adhesive proteins, to the dendrons imparted integrin-mediated cell adhesion as evidenced by the formation of stress fibers. We also explored the capacity of integrin receptors to bind to ligands that are not the linear form of RGD, but have R, G, and D spatially positioned to mimic the linear RGD environments. For this purpose, the arms of the 2 nd generation

  11. Muscle regeneration by adipose tissue-derived adult stem cells attached to injectable PLGA spheres.

    PubMed

    Kim, MiJung; Choi, Yu Suk; Yang, Seung Hye; Hong, Hea-Nam; Cho, Sung-Woo; Cha, Sang Myun; Pak, Jhang Ho; Kim, Chan Wha; Kwon, Seog Woon; Park, Chan Jeoung

    2006-09-22

    The [corrected] use of adult stem cells for cell-based tissue engineering and regeneration strategies represents a promising approach for skeletal muscle repair. We have evaluated the combination of adipose tissue-derived adult stem cells (ADSCs) obtained from autologous liposuction and injectable poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) spheres for muscle regeneration. ADSCs attached to PLGA spheres and PLGA spheres alone were cultured in myogenic medium for 21 days and injected subcutaneously into the necks of nude mice. After 30 and 60 days, the mice were sacrificed, and newly formed tissues were analyzed by immunostaining, H and E staining, and RT-PCR. We found that ADSCs attached to PLGA spheres, but not PLGA spheres alone, were able to generate muscle tissue. These findings suggest that ADSCs and PLGA spheres are useful materials for muscle tissue engineering and that their combination can be used in clinical settings for muscle regeneration.

  12. Hematopoietic tissue repair under chronic low daily dose irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Seed, T.M.

    1994-12-01

    The capacity of the hematopoietic system to repair constantly accruing cellular damage under chronic, low daily dose gamma irradiation is essential for the maintenance of a functional hematopoietic system, and, in turn, long term survival. In certain individuals, however, such continuous cycles of damage and repair provide an essential inductive environment for selected types of hematopathologies, e.g., myeloid leukemia (ML). We have been studying temporal and causal relationships between hematopoietic capacity, associated repair functions, and propensities for hematologic disease in canines under variable levels of chronic radiation stress (0.3{minus}26.3 cGy d{sup {minus}1}). Results indicate that the maximum exposure rate tolerated by the hematopoietic system is highly individual-specific and is based largely on the degree to which repair capacity, and, in turn, hematopoietic restoration, is augmented under chronic exposure. In low-tolerance individuals (prone to aplastic anemia, subgroup (1), the failure to augment basic m-pair functions seemingly results in a progressive accumulation of genetic and cellular damage within vital progenitorial marrow compartments particularly marked within erythroid compartments. that results in loss of reproductive capacity and ultimately in collapse of the hematopoietic system. The high-tolerance individuals (radioaccomodated and either prone- or not prone to ML, subgroup 2 & 3 appear to minimize the accumulating damage effect of daily exposures by extending repair functions, which preserves reproductive integrity and fosters regenerative hematopoietic responses. As the strength of the regenerative response manifests the extent of repair augmentation, the relatively strong response of high- tolerance individuals progressing to patent ML suggests an insufficiency of repair quality rather than repair quantity.

  13. Delivery of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Chitosan/Collagen Microbeads for Orthopaedic Tissue Repair

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Limin; Rao, Rameshwar R.; Stegemann, Jan P.

    2013-01-01

    Microencapsulation and delivery of stem cells in biomaterials is a promising approach to repairing damaged tissue in a minimally invasive manner. An appropriate biomaterial niche can protect the embedded cells from the challenging environment in the host tissue, while also directing stem cell differentiation toward the desired lineage. In this study, adult human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) were embedded in hydrogel microbeads consisting of chitosan and Type I collagen using an emulsification process. Glyoxal and β-glycerophosphate were used as physical and chemical crosslinkers to initiate co-polymerization of the matrix materials. The average size and size distribution of the microbeads could be varied by controlling the emulsification conditions. Spheroidal microbeads ranging in diameter from 82±19 to 290±78 μm were produced. Viability staining showed that MSC survived the encapsulation process (>90% viability), and spread inside the matrix over a period of 9 days in culture. Induced osteogenic differentiation using medium supplements showed that MSC increased gene expression of osterix and osteocalcin over time in culture, and also deposited calcium mineral. Bone sialoprotein and Type I collagen gene expression were not affected. Delivery of microbeads through standard needles at practically relevant flow rates did not adversely affect cell viability, and microbeads also could be easily molded into prescribed geometries for delivery. Such protein-based microbeads may have utility in orthopaedic tissue regeneration by allowing minimally invasive delivery of progenitor cells in microenvironments that are both protective and instructive. PMID:23571151

  14. Platelets in tissue repair: control of apoptosis and interactions with regenerative cells.

    PubMed

    Gawaz, Meinrad; Vogel, Sebastian

    2013-10-10

    Besides mediating primary hemostasis and thrombosis, platelets play a critical role in tissue repair and regeneration. They regulate fundamental mechanisms involved in the healing process including cellular migration, proliferation, and angiogenesis. Control of apoptosis/cell survival and interaction with progenitor cells, which are clinically relevant but poorly understood aspects of platelets in tissue repair, will be highlighted in this review. Gaining deeper insight into the less well-characterized molecular mechanisms is necessary to develop new therapeutic platelet-based options.

  15. Pain in adults post surgical repair of congenital heart defects.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Louise; Rebeyka, Darlene; Urquhart, Gayle; Roschkov, Sylvia

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe pain in adults post surgical repair for congenital heart defects. What is the intensity, sensory, and affective dimensions of pain experienced post-operatively? What is the trend in pain experienced post-operatively over time? What is the effectiveness of post-operative pain management strategies? What factors influence the dimensions of post-operative pain experienced? A descriptive prospective repeated measures design was used with 30 adult congenital heart (ACH) post-operative patients. Pain assessments using the McGill Short Form Questionnaire (MSFQ), a visual analogue pain scale (VAP), and recordings of other variables (analgesic, anxiety, activity level, non-pharmacologic intervention) were performed three times daily until hospital discharge. Mean pain intensity scores ranged from 2.44 +/- 1.31 following extubation to 1.30 +/- 0.66 on post-operative day (POD) five (scale, 0-5). Mean MSFQ scores ranged from 9.26 +/- 7.21 following extubation to 4.40 +/- 5.22 on POD five (scale, 0-45). Mean VAP scores ranged from 50.77 +/- 25.79 following extubation to 18.76 +/- 18.50 on POD five (scale, 0-100). Mean number of narcotic doses per day ranged from 4.61 +/- 2.01 to 1.88 +/- 1.98 on PODs one and five, respectively. Anxiety predicted VAP and MSFQ scores on PODs one and two; anxiety and analgesia doses predicted VAP and MSFQ scores on POD three; analgesia doses predicted MSFQ scores, analgesia and anxiety predicted VAP scores on POD four; analgesia doses and anxiety predicted VAP and MSFQ scores on POD five. No relationships were found among pain and other demographic, treatment, or clinical variables. Overall, pain was reported as mild to moderate intensity, variable in sensations, decreased over time, and adequately managed.

  16. The Role of Tissue Engineering in Articular Cartilage Repair and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lijie; Hu, Jerry; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2011-01-01

    Articular cartilage repair and regeneration continue to be largely intractable due to the poor regenerative properties of this tissue. The field of articular cartilage tissue engineering, which aims to repair, regenerate, and/or improve injured or diseased articular cartilage functionality, has evoked intense interest and holds great potential for improving articular cartilage therapy. This review provides an overall description of the current state and progress in articular cartilage repair and regeneration. Traditional therapies and related problems are introduced. More importantly, a variety of promising cell sources, biocompatible tissue engineered scaffolds, scaffoldless techniques, growth factors, and mechanical stimuli used in current articular cartilage tissue engineering are reviewed. Finally, the technical and regulatory challenges of articular cartilage tissue engineering and possible future directions are discussed. PMID:20201770

  17. An acidic microenvironment sets the humoral pattern recognition molecule PTX3 in a tissue repair mode

    PubMed Central

    Doni, Andrea; Musso, Tiziana; Morone, Diego; Bastone, Antonio; Zambelli, Vanessa; Sironi, Marina; Castagnoli, Carlotta; Cambieri, Irene; Stravalaci, Matteo; Pasqualini, Fabio; Laface, Ilaria; Valentino, Sonia; Tartari, Silvia; Ponzetta, Andrea; Maina, Virginia; Barbieri, Silvia S.; Tremoli, Elena; Catapano, Alberico L.; Norata, Giuseppe D.; Bottazzi, Barbara; Garlanda, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Pentraxin 3 (PTX3) is a fluid-phase pattern recognition molecule and a key component of the humoral arm of innate immunity. In four different models of tissue damage in mice, PTX3 deficiency was associated with increased fibrin deposition and persistence, and thicker clots, followed by increased collagen deposition, when compared with controls. Ptx3-deficient macrophages showed defective pericellular fibrinolysis in vitro. PTX3-bound fibrinogen/fibrin and plasminogen at acidic pH and increased plasmin-mediated fibrinolysis. The second exon-encoded N-terminal domain of PTX3 recapitulated the activity of the intact molecule. Thus, a prototypic component of humoral innate immunity, PTX3, plays a nonredundant role in the orchestration of tissue repair and remodeling. Tissue acidification resulting from metabolic adaptation during tissue repair sets PTX3 in a tissue remodeling and repair mode, suggesting that matrix and microbial recognition are common, ancestral features of the humoral arm of innate immunity. PMID:25964372

  18. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... superficial (in subcutaneous tissue with no spread into connective tissue or muscle below) or deep (in the muscle ... superficial (in subcutaneous tissue with no spread into connective tissue or muscle below) or deep (in the muscle ...

  19. Treatment Options for Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... superficial (in subcutaneous tissue with no spread into connective tissue or muscle below) or deep (in the muscle ... superficial (in subcutaneous tissue with no spread into connective tissue or muscle below) or deep (in the muscle ...

  20. General Information about Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... superficial (in subcutaneous tissue with no spread into connective tissue or muscle below) or deep (in the muscle ... superficial (in subcutaneous tissue with no spread into connective tissue or muscle below) or deep (in the muscle ...

  1. Stages of Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... superficial (in subcutaneous tissue with no spread into connective tissue or muscle below) or deep (in the muscle ... superficial (in subcutaneous tissue with no spread into connective tissue or muscle below) or deep (in the muscle ...

  2. Leucine supplementation accelerates connective tissue repair of injured tibialis anterior muscle.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Marcelo G; Silva, Meiricris T; Carlassara, Eduardo O C; Gonçalves, Dawit A; Abrahamsohn, Paulo A; Kettelhut, Isis C; Moriscot, Anselmo S; Aoki, Marcelo S; Miyabara, Elen H

    2014-09-29

    This study investigated the effect of leucine supplementation on the skeletal muscle regenerative process, focusing on the remodeling of connective tissue of the fast twitch muscle tibialis anterior (TA). Young male Wistar rats were supplemented with leucine (1.35 g/kg per day); then, TA muscles from the left hind limb were cryolesioned and examined after 10 days. Although leucine supplementation induced increased protein synthesis, it was not sufficient to promote an increase in the cross-sectional area (CSA) of regenerating myofibers (p > 0.05) from TA muscles. However, leucine supplementation reduced the amount of collagen and the activation of phosphorylated transforming growth factor-β receptor type I (TβR-I) and Smad2/3 in regenerating muscles (p < 0.05). Leucine also reduced neonatal myosin heavy chain (MyHC-n) (p < 0.05), increased adult MyHC-II expression (p < 0.05) and prevented the decrease in maximum tetanic strength in regenerating TA muscles (p < 0.05). Our results suggest that leucine supplementation accelerates connective tissue repair and consequent function of regenerating TA through the attenuation of TβR-I and Smad2/3 activation. Therefore, future studies are warranted to investigate leucine supplementation as a nutritional strategy to prevent or attenuate muscle fibrosis in patients with several muscle diseases.

  3. Macrophage activation-induced thymosin beta 4 production: a tissue repair mechanism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Macrophages play significant role in immunity which not only kill pathogens, produce cytokines but also clear dead tissues at the site of inflammation and stimulate wound healing. Much less is known how these cells contribute to tissue repair process. In course of our studies comparing the peptide...

  4. The Application of Tissue Engineering Procedures to Repair the Larynx

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ringel, Robert L.; Kahane, Joel C.; Hillsamer, Peter J.; Lee, Annie S.; Badylak, Stephen F.

    2006-01-01

    The field of tissue engineering/regenerative medicine combines the quantitative principles of engineering with the principles of the life sciences toward the goal of reconstituting structurally and functionally normal tissues and organs. There has been relatively little application of tissue engineering efforts toward the organs of speech, voice,…

  5. The macrophage and its role in inflammation and tissue repair: mathematical and systems biology approaches.

    PubMed

    Dunster, Joanne L

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are central to the inflammatory response and its ability to resolve effectively. They are complex cells that adopt a range of subtypes depending on the tissue type and stimulus that they find themselves under. This flexibility allows them to play multiple, sometimes opposing, roles in inflammation and tissue repair. Their central role in the inflammatory process is reflected in macrophage dysfunction being implicated in chronic inflammation and poorly healing wounds. In this study, we discuss recent attempts to model mathematically and computationally the macrophage and how it partakes in the complex processes of inflammation and tissue repair. There are increasing data describing the variety of macrophage phenotypes and their underlying transcriptional programs. Dynamic mathematical and computational models are an ideal way to test biological hypotheses against experimental data and could aid in understanding this multi-functional cell and its potential role as an attractive therapeutic target for inflammatory conditions and tissue repair.

  6. Collagen Type IV and Laminin Expressions during Cartilage Repair and in Late Clinically Failed Repair Tissues from Human Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Foldager, Casper Bindzus; Toh, Wei Seong; Christensen, Bjørn Borsøe; Lind, Martin; Gomoll, Andreas H.; Spector, Myron

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify the collagen type IV (Col4) isoform in articular cartilage and to evaluate the expressions of Col4 and laminin in the pericellular matrix (PCM) in damaged cartilage and during cartilage repair. Design The Col4 isoform was determined in chondrocytes isolated from 6 patients cultured up to 6 days and in 21% O2 or 1% O2, and the gene expression of Col4 α-chains was investigated. The distribution of Col4 and laminin in traumatically damaged cartilage (n = 7) and clinically failed cartilage repair (microfracture, TruFit, autologous chondrocyte implantation; n = 11) were investigated using immunohistochemistry. Normal human cartilage was used as control (n = 8). The distribution during clinical cartilage repair procedures was investigated in a minipig model with 6-month follow-up (untreated chondral, untreated osteochondral, microfracture, autologous chondrocyte implantation; n = 10). Results The Col4 isoform in articular cartilage was characterized as α1α1α2, which is an isoform containing antiangiogenic domains in the NC1-terminals (arresten and canstatin). In normal cartilage, laminin and Col4 was exclusively found in the PCM. High amounts (>50%) of Col4 in the PCM significantly decreased in damaged cartilage (P = 0.004) and clinically failed repair tissue (P < 0.001). Laminin was only found with high expression (>50%) in 4/8 of the normal samples, which was not statistically significantly different from damaged cartilage (P = 0.15) or failed cartilage repair (P = 0.054). Conclusions Col4 in cartilage contain antiangiogenic domains and may play a role in the hypoxic environment in articular cartilage. Col4 and laminin was not found in the PCM of damaged and clinically failed repair. PMID:26958317

  7. Use of a tissue adhesive to repair fetal bodies after dissection.

    PubMed Central

    Gau, G S; Napier, K; Bhundia, J

    1991-01-01

    The repair of fetal bodies after dissection is extremely difficult because of the delicacy of the skin. A tissue adhesive, Histoacryl blue, was used to repair bodies that had been dissected either before or after immersion in formalin. The repairs were achieved rapidly and neatly. The technique was easy to learn and, providing the method of repair described was followed, there was no breakdown subsequently. The body cavities and reflected skin surfaces were lightly dried with absorbent paper towels and the body loosely packed with cotton wool. "Holding lines" of glue were made and a mid-line strip of glue was applied to the sternum, abdomen, and skull vault, allowing the skin edges to align neatly. Care must be taken to avoid using excess glue as this produces an exothermic reaction. It is recommended that if a fetus has to be repaired after dissection Histoacryl blue will give a good result. Images PMID:1918405

  8. Repair of articular cartilage defects with tissue-engineered osteochondral composites in pigs.

    PubMed

    Cui, Weiding; Wang, Qing; Chen, Gang; Zhou, Shixiang; Chang, Qing; Zuo, Qiang; Ren, Kewei; Fan, Weimin

    2011-04-01

    To compare the results of repair of knee cartilage defects with tissue-engineered osteochondral composites and tissue-engineered cartilage in pigs. Autologous chondrocytes and osteoblasts were seeded on scaffolds of polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) and tricalcium phosphate (TCP) to generate tissue-engineered cartilage and tissue-engineered bone, respectively. The tissue-engineered osteochondral composite was formed by a chondrocyte-PLGA construct sutured to an osteoblast-TCP construct with an absorbable suture. Cartilage defects were surgically created at the weightbearing surface of the bilateral femoral medial condyles of 12 mini-pigs. Thus, 24 defects in 12 pigs were randomly assigned to three treatment groups: tissue-engineered osteochondral composite group, tissue-engineered cartilage group, and blank control group. Six months after surgery, the regenerated cartilage was scored macroscopically and histologically. The compressive properties and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content of the cartilage were also assessed. The gross grading scale indicated that the mean scores of the tissue-engineered osteochondral composite group were significantly higher than those of the tissue-engineered cartilage group. According to the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) Visual Histological Assessment Scale, the scores of the osteochondral composite group were significantly better than those of the tissue-engineered cartilage group and blank control group. Assessment of compressive properties and GAG content showed better repair results in the osteochondral composite group than those of the tissue-engineered cartilage group. Using tissue-engineered osteochondral composites to repair cartilage defects was better than that of tissue-engineered cartilage.

  9. Adult tissue sources for new β cells.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Robert J; New, Connie; Annes, Justin P

    2014-04-01

    The diabetes pandemic incurs extraordinary public health and financial costs that are projected to expand for the foreseeable future. Consequently, the development of definitive therapies for diabetes is a priority. Currently, a wide spectrum of therapeutic strategies-from implantable insulin delivery devices to transplantation-based cell replacement therapy, to β-cell regeneration-focus on replacing the lost insulin-producing capacity of individuals with diabetes. Among these, β-cell regeneration remains promising but heretofore unproved. Indeed, recent experimental work has uncovered surprising biology that underscores the potential therapeutic benefit of β-cell regeneration. These studies have elucidated a variety of sources for the endogenous production of new β cells from existing cells. First, β cells, long thought to be postmitotic, have demonstrated the potential for regenerative capacity. Second, the presence of pancreatic facultative endocrine progenitor cells has been established. Third, the malleability of cellular identity has availed the possibility of generating β cells from other differentiated cell types. Here, we review the exciting developments surrounding endogenous sources of β-cell production and consider the potential of realizing a regenerative therapy for diabetes from adult tissues.

  10. Quantitative assessment of optical properties in healthy cartilage and repair tissue by optical coherence tomography and histology (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Sanne M. A.; Cernohorsky, Paul; de Bruin, Daniel M.; van der Pol, Edwin; Savci-Heijink, Cemile D.; Strackee, Simon D.; Faber, Dirk J.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.

    2016-02-01

    Quantification of the OCT signal is an important step toward clinical implementation of a diagnostic tool in cartilage imaging. Discrimination of structural cartilage differences in patients with osteoarthritis is critical, yet challenging. This study assesses the variation in the optical attenuation coefficient (μOCT) between healthy cartilage, repair tissue, bone and layers within repair tissue in a controlled setting. OCT and histology was used to assess goat talus articular surfaces in which central osteochondral defects were created. Exact matches of OCT and histology were selected for research. μOCT measurements were taken from healthy cartilage, repair tissue and bone. Measured μOCT in healthy cartilage was higher compared to both repair tissue and bone tissue. Two possible mechanisms for the difference in attenuation were investigated. We studied morphological parameters in terms of nucleus count, nucleus size and inter-nucleus distance. Collagen content in healthy cartilage and repair tissue was assessed using polarization microscopy. Quantitative analysis of the nuclei did not demonstrate a difference in nucleus size and count between healthy cartilage and repair tissue. In healthy cartilage, cells were spaced farther apart and had a lower variation in local nuclear density compared to repair tissue. Polarization microscopy suggested higher collagen content in healthy cartilage compared to repair tissue. μOCT measurements can distinguish between healthy cartilage, repair tissue and bone. Results suggest that cartilage OCT attenuation measurements could be of great impact in clinical diagnostics of osteoarthritis.

  11. Tissue Engineering for Rotator Cuff Repair: An Evidence-Based Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Maffulli, Nicola; Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Loppini, Mattia; Berton, Alessandra; Spiezia, Filippo; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to address the treatment of rotator cuff tears by applying tissue engineering approaches to improve tendon healing, specifically platelet rich plasma (PRP) augmentation, stem cells, and scaffolds. Our systematic search was performed using the combination of the following terms: “rotator cuff”, “shoulder”, “PRP”, “platelet rich plasma”, “stemcells”, “scaffold”, “growth factors”, and “tissue engineering”. No level I or II studies were found on the use of scaffolds and stem cells for rotator cuff repair. Three studies compared rotator cuff repair with or without PRP augmentation. All authors performed arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with different techniques of suture anchor fixation and different PRP augmentation. The three studies found no difference in clinical rating scales and functional outcomes between PRP and control groups. Only one study showed clinical statistically significant difference between the two groups at the 3-month follow up. Any statistically significant difference in the rates of tendon rerupture between the control group and the PRP group was found using the magnetic resonance imaging. The current literature on tissue engineering application for rotator cuff repair is scanty. Comparative studies included in this review suggest that PRP augmented repair of a rotator cuff does not yield improved functional and clinical outcome compared with non-augmented repair at a medium and long-term followup. PMID:25098365

  12. Composite tissue flap at perforating branches of saphenous artery: a new design for repairing composite tissue defects in anterior knee.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guangfeng; Nie, Kaiyu; Jin, Wenhu; Wei, Zairong; Qi, Jianping; Wang, Dali

    2015-01-01

    So far it has been difficult to repair and reconstruct the composite tissue defects in knee. Saphenous artery flap has been widely used to repair complex wounds, but the design and clinical application of composite tissue flap at perforating branches of saphenous artery were not reported. In this research, we design a new composite tissue flap by carrying fascial flap in the medial gastrocnemius muscle with perforators flap in saphenous artery to repair and reconstruct the composite tissue defects in knee. By anatomic observation and analysis, we find that there exists blood-supply in netty form among saphenous arteries, medial artery below the knee, intermuscular branch in high-order position of posterior tibial artery and perforating branch in medial artery of calf. We chose saphenous artery as blood-supplying artery; utilized the netty blood-supplying mode in middle-up and medial part of shank; cut the composite tissue flap at perforating branches of saphenous artery with fascial flap carried in the medial gastrocnemius muscle; reconstructed the ligamentum patellae using medial head of gastrocnemius muscle and Achilles's tendon; and covered the wounds at front side of knee with flap. Composite tissues were survived completely, free from infection at wounds and exosmosis of joint fluid. Motion function of knee-joint proved satisfactory, and ambulatory function was recovered. There was no complication in donor site. Composite tissue flap at perforating branches of saphenous artery with fascial flap carried in the medial gastrocnemius muscle is one of the most ideal solutions for repairing the composite tissue defects at front side of knee joint.

  13. Modulation of tissue repair by regeneration enhancer elements.

    PubMed

    Kang, Junsu; Hu, Jianxin; Karra, Ravi; Dickson, Amy L; Tornini, Valerie A; Nachtrab, Gregory; Gemberling, Matthew; Goldman, Joseph A; Black, Brian L; Poss, Kenneth D

    2016-04-14

    How tissue regeneration programs are triggered by injury has received limited research attention. Here we investigate the existence of enhancer regulatory elements that are activated in regenerating tissue. Transcriptomic analyses reveal that leptin b (lepb) is highly induced in regenerating hearts and fins of zebrafish. Epigenetic profiling identified a short DNA sequence element upstream and distal to lepb that acquires open chromatin marks during regeneration and enables injury-dependent expression from minimal promoters. This element could activate expression in injured neonatal mouse tissues and was divisible into tissue-specific modules sufficient for expression in regenerating zebrafish fins or hearts. Simple enhancer-effector transgenes employing lepb-linked sequences upstream of pro- or anti-regenerative factors controlled the efficacy of regeneration in zebrafish. Our findings provide evidence for 'tissue regeneration enhancer elements' (TREEs) that trigger gene expression in injury sites and can be engineered to modulate the regenerative potential of vertebrate organs.

  14. Hyaluronan and RHAMM in wound repair and the "cancerization" of stromal tissues.

    PubMed

    Tolg, Cornelia; McCarthy, James B; Yazdani, Arjang; Turley, Eva A

    2014-01-01

    Tumors and wounds share many similarities including loss of tissue architecture, cell polarity and cell differentiation, aberrant extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling (Ballard et al., 2006) increased inflammation, angiogenesis, and elevated cell migration and proliferation. Whereas these changes are transient in repairing wounds, tumors do not regain tissue architecture but rather their continued progression is fueled in part by loss of normal tissue structure. As a result tumors are often described as wounds that do not heal. The ECM component hyaluronan (HA) and its receptor RHAMM have both been implicated in wound repair and tumor progression. This review highlights the similarities and differences in their roles during these processes and proposes that RHAMM-regulated wound repair functions may contribute to "cancerization" of the tumor microenvironment.

  15. Hyaluronan and RHAMM in Wound Repair and the “Cancerization” of Stromal Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Tolg, Cornelia; McCarthy, James B.; Yazdani, Arjang; Turley, Eva A.

    2014-01-01

    Tumors and wounds share many similarities including loss of tissue architecture, cell polarity and cell differentiation, aberrant extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling (Ballard et al., 2006) increased inflammation, angiogenesis, and elevated cell migration and proliferation. Whereas these changes are transient in repairing wounds, tumors do not regain tissue architecture but rather their continued progression is fueled in part by loss of normal tissue structure. As a result tumors are often described as wounds that do not heal. The ECM component hyaluronan (HA) and its receptor RHAMM have both been implicated in wound repair and tumor progression. This review highlights the similarities and differences in their roles during these processes and proposes that RHAMM-regulated wound repair functions may contribute to “cancerization” of the tumor microenvironment. PMID:25157350

  16. Olfactory mucosa for transplant-mediated repair: a complex tissue for a complex injury?

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Susan L; Riddell, John S; Barnett, Susan C

    2010-01-15

    Damage to the brain and spinal cord leads to permanent functional disability because of the very limited capacity of the central nervous system (CNS) for repair. Transplantation of cells into regions of CNS damage represents one approach to enhancing this repair. At present, the ideal cell type for transplant-mediated repair has not been identified but autologous transplantation would be advantageous. Olfactory tissue, in part because of its capacity for regeneration, has emerged as a promising source of cells and several clinical centers are using olfactory cells or tissues in the treatment of CNS damage. Until now, the olfactory ensheathing cell, a specialized glial cell of the olfactory system has been the main focus of attention. Transplants of this cell have been shown to have a neuroprotective function, support axonal regeneration, and remyelinate demyelinated axons. However, the olfactory mucosa is a heterogeneous tissue, composed of a variety of cells supporting both its normal function and its regenerative capacity. It is therefore possible that it contains several cell types that could participate in CNS repair including putative stem cells as well as glia. Here we review the cellular composition of the olfactory tissue and the evidence that equivalent cell types exist in both rodent and human olfactory mucosa suggesting that it is potentially a rich source of autologous cells for transplant-mediated repair of the CNS.

  17. Long-term results with autogenous tissue repair of traumatic extremity vascular injuries.

    PubMed Central

    McCready, R A; Logan, N M; Daugherty, M E; Mattingly, S S; Crocker, C; Hyde, G L

    1987-01-01

    With extensive vascular injuries in which a vascular conduit is required, there is controversy as to whether an autogenous or prosthetic graft is preferable. The authors reviewed their experience with 91 extremity arterial injuries in which autogenous tissue was used to repair vascular injuries of the extremities. Twenty-two patients also had concomitant repair of associated venous injuries with autogenous vein grafts. Ten patients required amputations, despite patent grafts in five patients, because of severe muscle necrosis. Two patients had thrombosis of their vein grafts develop in the early postoperative period but did not require amputation. The authors identified only one late vein graft failure in a patient in whom an infected pseudoaneurysm developed. Three patients with extensive soft tissue injuries had infection develop in vein grafts, with subsequent massive bleeding that ultimately required arterial ligation. Among the 22 patients with repair of their venous injuries, occlusion of popliteal vein repairs was documented in two patients and suspected in three others. The remainder of patients had satisfactory results. The excellent results obtained in the vast majority of the authors' patients with extremity vascular injuries reinforces their preference for using autogenous tissue whenever a vascular conduit is required. Exceptions include patients with extensive soft tissue loss precluding adequate graft coverage, the repair of large vessels, and life-threatening emergencies when there is insufficient time to harvest and prepare a vein. PMID:3689017

  18. Roles of microglia in brain development, tissue maintenance and repair.

    PubMed

    Michell-Robinson, Mackenzie A; Touil, Hanane; Healy, Luke M; Owen, David R; Durafourt, Bryce A; Bar-Or, Amit; Antel, Jack P; Moore, Craig S

    2015-05-01

    The emerging roles of microglia are currently being investigated in the healthy and diseased brain with a growing interest in their diverse functions. In recent years, it has been demonstrated that microglia are not only immunocentric, but also neurobiological and can impact neural development and the maintenance of neuronal cell function in both healthy and pathological contexts. In the disease context, there is widespread consensus that microglia are dynamic cells with a potential to contribute to both central nervous system damage and repair. Indeed, a number of studies have found that microenvironmental conditions can selectively modify unique microglia phenotypes and functions. One novel mechanism that has garnered interest involves the regulation of microglial function by microRNAs, which has therapeutic implications such as enhancing microglia-mediated suppression of brain injury and promoting repair following inflammatory injury. Furthermore, recently published articles have identified molecular signatures of myeloid cells, suggesting that microglia are a distinct cell population compared to other cells of myeloid lineage that access the central nervous system under pathological conditions. Thus, new opportunities exist to help distinguish microglia in the brain and permit the study of their unique functions in health and disease.

  19. Tissue-Derived Extracellular Matrix Bioscaffolds: Emerging Applications in Cartilage and Meniscus Repair.

    PubMed

    Monibi, Farrah A; Cook, James L

    2017-03-07

    Musculoskeletal injuries are a common problem in orthopedic practice. Given the long-term consequences of unaddressed cartilage and meniscal pathology, a number of treatments have been attempted to stimulate repair or to replace the injured tissue. Despite advances in orthopedic surgery, effective treatments for cartilage and meniscus injuries remain a significant clinical challenge. Tissue engineering is a developing field that aims to regenerate injured tissues with a combination of cells, scaffolds, and signals. Many natural and synthetic scaffold materials have been developed and tested for the repair and restoration of a number of musculoskeletal tissues. Among these, biological scaffolds derived from cell and tissue-derived extracellular matrix (ECM) have shown great promise in tissue engineering given the critical role of the ECM for maintaining the biological and biomechanical properties, structure, and function of native tissues. This review article presents emerging applications for tissue-derived ECM scaffolds in cartilage and meniscus repair. We examine normal ECM composition and the current and future methods for potential treatment of articular cartilage and meniscal defects with decellularized scaffolds.

  20. [Radiotherapy of adult soft tissue sarcoma].

    PubMed

    Le Péchoux, C; Moureau-Zabotto, L; Llacer, C; Ducassou, A; Sargos, P; Sunyach, M P; Thariat, J

    2016-09-01

    Incidence of soft tissue sarcoma is low and requires multidisciplinary treatment in specialized centers. The objective of this paper is to report the state of the art regarding indications and treatment techniques of main soft tissue sarcoma localisations.

  1. Involvement of PPAR nuclear receptors in tissue injury and wound repair

    PubMed Central

    Michalik, Liliane; Wahli, Walter

    2006-01-01

    Tissue damage resulting from chemical, mechanical, and biological injury, or from interrupted blood flow and reperfusion, is often life threatening. The subsequent tissue response involves an intricate series of events including inflammation, oxidative stress, immune cell recruitment, and cell survival, proliferation, migration, and differentiation. In addition, fibrotic repair characterized by myofibroblast transdifferentiation and the deposition of ECM proteins is activated. Failure to initiate, maintain, or stop this repair program has dramatic consequences, such as cell death and associated tissue necrosis or carcinogenesis. In this sense, inflammation and oxidative stress, which are beneficial defense processes, can become harmful if they do not resolve in time. This repair program is largely based on rapid and specific changes in gene expression controlled by transcription factors that sense injury. PPARs are such factors and are activated by lipid mediators produced after wounding. Here we highlight advances in our understanding of PPAR action during tissue repair and discuss the potential for these nuclear receptors as therapeutic targets for tissue injury. PMID:16511592

  2. Morphological MRI and T2 mapping of cartilage repair tissue after mosaicplasty with tissue-engineered cartilage in a pig model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qichun; Zuo, Qiang; Hu, Qianqian; Feng, Yang; Cui, Weiding; Fan, Weimin; Zou, Yuefen

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of mosaicplasty with tissue-engineered cartilage for the treatment of osteochondral defects in a pig model with advanced MR technique. Eight adolescent miniature pigs were used. The right knee underwent mosaicplasty with tissue-engineered cartilage for treatment of focal osteochondral defects, while the left knee was repaired via single mosaicplasty as controls. At 6, 12, 18 and 26 weeks after surgery, repair tissue was evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with the cartilage repair tissue (MOCART) scoring system and T2 mapping. Then, the results of MRI for 26 weeks were compared with findings of macroscopic and histologic studies. The MOCART scores showed that the repaired tissue of the tissue-engineered cartilage group was statistically better than that of controls (P < 0.001). A significant correlation was found between macroscopic and MOCART scores (P < 0.001). Comparable mean T2 values were found between adjacent cartilage and repair tissue in the experimental group (P > 0.05). For zonal T2 value evaluation, there were no significant zonal T2 differences for repair tissue in controls (P > 0.05). For the experimental group, zonal T2 variation was found in repair tissue (P < 0.05). MRI, macroscopy and histology showed better repair results and bony incorporation in mosaicplasty with the tissue-engineered cartilage group than those of the single mosaicplasty group. Mosaicplasty with the tissue-engineered cartilage is a promising approach to repair osteochodndral defects. Morphological MRI and T2 mapping provide a non-invasive method for monitoring the maturation and integration of cartilage repair tissue in vivo.

  3. Using tissue adhesive for wound repair: a practical guide to dermabond.

    PubMed

    Bruns, T B; Worthington, J M

    2000-03-01

    Dermabond is a cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive that forms a strong bond across apposed wound edges, allowing normal healing to occur below. It is marketed to replace sutures that are 5-0 or smaller in diameter for incisional or laceration repair. This adhesive has been shown to save time during wound repair, to provide a flexible water-resistant protective coating and to eliminate the need for suture removal. The long-term cosmetic outcome with Dermabond is comparable to that of traditional methods of repair. Best suited for small, superficial lacerations, it may also be used with confidence on larger wounds where subcutaneous sutures are needed. This adhesive is relatively easy to use following appropriate wound preparation. Patients, especially children, readily accept the idea of being "glued" over traditional methods of repair.

  4. Process-induced extracellular matrix alterations affect the mechanisms of soft tissue repair and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hui; Sandor, Maryellen; Lombardi, Jared

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular matrices derived from animal tissues for human tissue repairs are processed by various methods of physical, chemical, or enzymatic decellularization, viral inactivation, and terminal sterilization. The mechanisms of action in tissue repair vary among bioscaffolds and are suggested to be associated with process-induced extracellular matrix modifications. We compared three non-cross-linked, commercially available extracellular matrix scaffolds (Strattice, Veritas, and XenMatrix), and correlated extracellular matrix alterations to in vivo biological responses upon implantation in non-human primates. Structural evaluation showed significant differences in retaining native tissue extracellular matrix histology and ultrastructural features among bioscaffolds. Tissue processing may cause both the condensation of collagen fibers and fragmentation or separation of collagen bundles. Calorimetric analysis showed significant differences in the stability of bioscaffolds. The intrinsic denaturation temperature was measured to be 51°C, 38°C, and 44°C for Strattice, Veritas, and XenMatrix, respectively, demonstrating more extracellular matrix modifications in the Veritas and XenMatrix scaffolds. Consequently, the susceptibility to collagenase degradation was increased in Veritas and XenMatrix when compared to their respective source tissues. Using a non-human primate model, three bioscaffolds were found to elicit different biological responses, have distinct mechanisms of action, and yield various outcomes of tissue repair. Strattice permitted cell repopulation and was remodeled over 6 months. Veritas was unstable at body temperature, resulting in rapid absorption with moderate inflammation. XenMatrix caused severe inflammation and sustained immune reactions. This study demonstrates that extracellular matrix alterations significantly affect biological responses in soft tissue repair and regeneration. The data offer useful insights into the rational design of

  5. Nucleotide excision repair is reduced in oral epithelial tissues compared with skin.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, David; Paniker, Lakshmi; Godar, Dianne

    2012-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure to internal tissues for diagnostic, therapeutic and cosmetic procedures has increased dramatically over the past decade. The greatest increase in UVR exposure of internal tissues occurs in the cosmetic industry where it is combined with oxidizing agents for teeth whitening, often in conjunction with indoor tanning. To address potential carcinogenic risks of these procedures, we analyzed the formation and repair of the DNA photoproducts associated with the signature mutations of UVR. Radioimmunoassay was used to quantify the induction and repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and pyrimidine(6-4)pyrimidone photoproducts in DNA purified from three reconstructed tissues, EpiDerm(TM) , EpiGingival(TM) and EpiOral(TM) . We observed comparable levels of DNA damage in all tissues immediately after UVR exposure. In contrast, repair was significantly reduced in both oral tissues compared with EpiDerm(TM) . Our data suggest that UVR exposure of oral tissues can result in accumulation of DNA damage and increase the risk for carcinoma and melanoma of the mouth. Because NER is a broad-spectrum defense against DNA damage caused by a variety of agents in addition to UVR, our data suggest that the relatively low NER efficiency observed in oral tissues may have wide-ranging consequences in this highly exposed environment.

  6. Adaptive growth factor delivery from a polyelectrolyte coating promotes synergistic bone tissue repair and reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nisarg J.; Hyder, Md. Nasim; Quadir, Mohiuddin A.; Dorval Courchesne, Noémie-Manuelle; Seeherman, Howard J.; Nevins, Myron; Spector, Myron; Hammond, Paula T.

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic wounds and congenital defects that require large-scale bone tissue repair have few successful clinical therapies, particularly for craniomaxillofacial defects. Although bioactive materials have demonstrated alternative approaches to tissue repair, an optimized materials system for reproducible, safe, and targeted repair remains elusive. We hypothesized that controlled, rapid bone formation in large, critical-size defects could be induced by simultaneously delivering multiple biological growth factors to the site of the wound. Here, we report an approach for bone repair using a polyelectrolye multilayer coating carrying as little as 200 ng of bone morphogenetic protein-2 and platelet-derived growth factor-BB that were eluted over readily adapted time scales to induce rapid bone repair. Based on electrostatic interactions between the polymer multilayers and growth factors alone, we sustained mitogenic and osteogenic signals with these growth factors in an easily tunable and controlled manner to direct endogenous cell function. To prove the role of this adaptive release system, we applied the polyelectrolyte coating on a well-studied biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) support membrane. The released growth factors directed cellular processes to induce bone repair in a critical-size rat calvaria model. The released growth factors promoted local bone formation that bridged a critical-size defect in the calvaria as early as 2 wk after implantation. Mature, mechanically competent bone regenerated the native calvaria form. Such an approach could be clinically useful and has significant benefits as a synthetic, off-the-shelf, cell-free option for bone tissue repair and restoration. PMID:25136093

  7. Acute ethanol exposure suppresses the repair of O6-methylguanine DNA lesions in castrated adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Wilson, D M; Tentler, J J; Carney, J P; Wilson, T M; Kelley, M R

    1994-10-01

    Alcohol has clearly been associated with an increase of cancers in numerous tissue, including the respiratory tract, colon, rectum, liver, but especially the esophagus, larynx, pharynx, and mouth. Alcohol alone has not been shown to be a mutagen until it is converted to acetaldehyde and, therefore, alcohol presumably acts as a cocarcinogen. Previous data has shown that alcohol concentrations of 2% or greater inhibits DNA repair, and in light of the widespread consumption of alcoholic beverages with alcohol contents ranging from 4 to 5% (beer and wine coolers) to 50% (whiskey), interest in determining the mechanism(s) responsible for alcohol-induced carcinogenesis has heightened. Although previous studies, in intact rats, have investigated the effects of chronic alcohol exposure on some aspects of DNA repair, we have begun to address the effects of acute or "binge" alcohol exposure on mammalian DNA repair. Toward this end, we report the inhibition of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) by a single intraperitoneal injection of 30% ethanol in adult male castrated rats. This inhibition lasted for at least 24 hr. We also observed a dose-response effect of ethanol on MGMT activity, again only in the castrated rats. The finding of ethanol's effect on MGMT activity in castrated and not intact rats implies a hormonal component of MGMT DNA repair response, which has only been alluded to in past research.

  8. Embryonic Wound Healing: A Primer for Engineering Novel Therapies for Tissue Repair

    PubMed Central

    Degen, Katherine E.; Gourdie, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Scar is the default tissue repair used by the body in response to most injuries–a response that occurs in wounds ranging in seriousness from minor skin cuts to complete severance of the spinal cord. By contrast, before the third trimester of pregnancy embryonic mammals tend to heal without scarring due to a variety of mechanisms and factors that are uniquely in operation during development in utero. The goal of tissue engineering is to develop safe and clinically effective biological substitutes that restore, maintain, or improve tissue function in patients. This review provides a comparative overview of wound healing during development and maturation and seeks to provide a perspective on just how much the embryo may be able teach us in the engineering of new therapies for tissue repair. PMID:23109321

  9. Monocytes and macrophages in tissue repair: Implications for immunoregenerative biomaterial design

    PubMed Central

    Segar, Claire E; Sridhar, Sraeyes; Botchwey, Edward A

    2016-01-01

    Monocytes and macrophages play a critical role in tissue development, homeostasis, and injury repair. These innate immune cells participate in guiding vascular remodeling, stimulation of local stem and progenitor cells, and structural repair of tissues such as muscle and bone. Therefore, there is a great interest in harnessing this powerful endogenous cell source for therapeutic regeneration through immunoregenerative biomaterial engineering. These materials seek to harness specific subpopulations of monocytes/macrophages to promote repair by influencing their recruitment, positioning, differentiation, and function within a damaged tissue. Monocyte and macrophage phenotypes span a continuum of inflammatory (M1) to anti-inflammatory or pro-regenerative cells (M2), and their heterogeneous functions are highly dependent on microenvironmental cues within the injury niche. Increasing evidence suggests that division of labor among subpopulations of monocytes and macrophages could allow for harnessing regenerative functions over inflammatory functions of myeloid cells; however, the complex balance between necessary functions of inflammatory versus regenerative myeloid cells remains to be fully elucidated. Historically, biomaterial-based therapies for promoting tissue regeneration were designed to minimize the host inflammatory response; although, recent appreciation for the roles that innate immune cells play in tissue repair and material integration has shifted this paradigm. A number of opportunities exist to exploit known signaling systems of specific populations of monocytes/macrophages to promote repair and to better understand the biological and pathological roles of myeloid cells. This review seeks to outline the characteristics of distinct populations of monocytes and macrophages, identify the role of these cells within diverse tissue injury niches, and offer design criteria for immunoregenerative biomaterials given the intrinsic inflammatory response to their

  10. Heterozygous Vangl2(Looptail) mice reveal novel roles for the planar cell polarity pathway in adult lung homeostasis and repair.

    PubMed

    Poobalasingam, Thanushiyan; Yates, Laura L; Walker, Simone A; Pereira, Miguel; Gross, Nina Y; Ali, Akmol; Kolatsi-Joannou, Maria; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Pekkanen, Juha; Papakrivopoulou, Eugenia; Long, David A; Griffiths, Mark; Wagner, Darcy; Königshoff, Melanie; Hind, Matthew; Minelli, Cosetta; Lloyd, Clare M; Dean, Charlotte H

    2017-02-24

    Lung diseases impose a huge economic and health burden worldwide. A key aspect of several adult lung diseases, such as Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and Chronic Obstructive pulmonary Disease (COPD), including emphysema, is aberrant tissue repair, which leads to an accumulation of damage and impaired respiratory function. Currently, there are few effective treatments available for these diseases and their incidence is rising.The Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) pathway is critical for the embryonic development of many organs, including kidney and lung. We have previously shown that perturbation of the PCP pathway impairs tissue morphogenesis, which disrupts the number and shape of epithelial tubes formed within these organs during embryogenesis. However, very little is known about the role of the PCP pathway beyond birth, partly due to the perinatal lethality of many PCP mouse mutant lines.Here we have investigated heterozygous Looptail (Lp) mice, in which a single copy of the core PCP gene, Vangl2, is disrupted. We show that these mice are viable but display severe airspace enlargement and impaired adult lung function. Underlying these defects, we find that Vangl2(Lp/+) lungs exhibit altered distribution of actin microfilaments and abnormal regulation of the actin modifying protein cofilin. In addition, we show that Vangl2(Lp/+) lungs exhibit many of the hallmarks of tissue damage including an altered macrophage population, abnormal elastin deposition and elevated levels of the elastin-modifying enzyme, Mmp12, all of which are observed in the lung disease, emphysema.In vitro, VANGL2 disruption impairs directed cell migration and reduces the rate of repair following scratch wounding of human alveolar epithelial cells. Moreover, using population data from a birth cohort of young adults, all aged 31, we found evidence of an interactive effect between VANGL2 and smoking (a tissue damaging insult) on lung function. Finally, we show that that PCP genes VANGL2 and

  11. Tissue repair response as a function of dose in thioacetamide hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Mangipudy, R S; Chanda, S; Mehendale, H M

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to establish a dose-response relationship for thioacetamide (TA), where tissue regeneration as well as liver injury were two simultaneous but opposing responses. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected intraperitioneally with a 12-fold dose range of TA, and both liver injury and tissue repair were measured. Liver injury was assessed by serum enzyme elevations. Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) elevation did not show any dose response over a 12-fold dose range up to 24 hr. A dramatic ALT elevation was evident after 24 hr and only for the highest dose (600 mg/kg). Tissue regeneration response was measured by 3H-thymidine (3H-T) incorporation into hepatocellular DNA and by proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) procedure during a time course (6, 12, 24, 36, 48, 72, and 96 hr). Tissue regeneration, as indicated by 3H-T incorporation, peaked at 36 hr after administration of a low dose of TA (50 mg/kg). With increasing doses, a greater but delayed stimulation of cell division was observed until a threshold was reached (300 mg/kg). Above the tissue repair threshold (600 mg/kg), because stimulated tissue repair as revealed by 3H-T incorporation in hepatonuclear DNA was significantly delayed and attenuated, injury assessed by serum enzyme elevations was remarkably accelerated, indicating unrestrained progression of injury leading to animal death. These findings suggest that, in addition to the magnitude of tissue repair response, the time at which this occurs is critical in restraining the progression of injury, thereby determining the ultimate outcome of toxicity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. A Figure 3. B Figure 3. C Figure 3. D Figure 3. E Figure 3. F Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. A Figure 6. B Figure 6. C Figure 7. A Figure 7. B Figure 7. C Figure 7. D Figure 7. E Figure 7. F PMID:7768227

  12. Present status and applications of bacterial cellulose-based materials for skin tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Fu, Lina; Zhang, Jin; Yang, Guang

    2013-02-15

    Bacterial cellulose (BC, also known as microbial cellulose, MC) is a promising natural polymer which is biosynthesized by certain bacteria. This review focused on BC-based materials which can be utilized for skin tissue repair. Firstly, it is illustrated that BC has unique structural and mechanical properties as compared with higher plant cellulose, and is thus expected to become a commodity material. Secondly, we summarized the basic properties and different types of BC, including self-assembled, oriented BC, and multiform BC. Thirdly, composites prepared by using BC in conjunction with other polymers are explored, and the research on BC for application in skin tissue engineering is addressed. Finally, experimental results and clinical treatments assessing the performance of wound healing materials based on BC were examined. With its superior mechanical properties, as well as its excellent biocompatibility, BC was shown to have great potential for biomedical application and very high clinical value for skin tissue repair.

  13. Tissue repair strength using chitosan adhesives with different physical-chemical characteristics.

    PubMed

    Barton, Matthew J; Morley, John W; Mahns, David A; Mawad, Damia; Wuhrer, Richard; Fania, David; Frost, Samuel J; Loebbe, Christian; Lauto, Antonio

    2014-11-01

    A range of chitosan-based biomaterials have recently been used to perform sutureless, laser-activated tissue repair. Laser-activation has the advantage of bonding to tissue through a non-contact, aseptic mechanism. Chitosan adhesive films have also been shown to adhere to sheep intestine strongly without any chemical modification to chitosan. In this study, we continue to investigate chitosan adhesive films and explore the impact on the tissue repair strength and tensile strength characteristics of four types of adhesive film based on chitosan with different molecular weight and degree of deacetylation. Results showed that adhesives based on chitosan with medium molecular weight achieved the highest bonding strength, tensile strength and E-modulus when compared to the other adhesives.

  14. The cellular and molecular mechanisms of tissue repair and regeneration as revealed by studies in Xenopus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jingjing; Zhang, Siwei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Survival of any living organism critically depends on its ability to repair and regenerate damaged tissues and/or organs during its lifetime following injury, disease, or aging. Various animal models from invertebrates to vertebrates have been used to investigate the molecular and cellular mechanisms of wound healing and tissue regeneration. It is hoped that such studies will form the framework for identifying novel clinical treatments that will improve the healing and regenerative capacity of humans. Amongst these models, Xenopus stands out as a particularly versatile and powerful system. This review summarizes recent findings using this model, which have provided fundamental knowledge of the mechanisms responsible for efficient and perfect tissue repair and regeneration. PMID:27800170

  15. Epimorphic regeneration approach to tissue replacement in adult mammals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Urodeles and fetal mammals are capable of impressive epimorphic regeneration in a variety of tissues, whereas the typical default response to injury in adult mammals consists of inflammation and scar tissue formation. One component of epimorphic regeneration is the recruitment of resident progenitor...

  16. Mending broken hearts: cardiac development as a basis for adult heart regeneration and repair.

    PubMed

    Xin, Mei; Olson, Eric N; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda

    2013-08-01

    As the adult mammalian heart has limited potential for regeneration and repair, the loss of cardiomyocytes during injury and disease can result in heart failure and death. The cellular processes and regulatory mechanisms involved in heart growth and development can be exploited to repair the injured adult heart through 'reawakening' pathways that are active during embryogenesis. Heart function has been restored in rodents by reprogramming non-myocytes into cardiomyocytes, by expressing transcription factors (GATA4, HAND2, myocyte-specific enhancer factor 2C (MEF2C) and T-box 5 (TBX5)) and microRNAs (miR-1, miR-133, miR-208 and miR-499) that control cardiomyocyte identity. Stimulating cardiomyocyte dedifferentiation and proliferation by activating mitotic signalling pathways involved in embryonic heart growth represents a complementary approach for heart regeneration and repair. Recent advances in understanding the mechanistic basis of heart development offer exciting opportunities for effective therapies for heart failure.

  17. Repair of articular cartilage defects by tissue-engineered cartilage constructed with adipose-derived stem cells and acellular cartilaginous matrix in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z J; An, R Z; Zhao, J Y; Zhang, Q; Yang, J; Wang, J B; Wen, G Y; Yuan, X H; Qi, X W; Li, S J; Ye, X C

    2014-06-18

    After injury, inflammation, or degeneration, articular cartilage has limited self-repair ability. We aimed to explore the feasibility of repair of articular cartilage defects with tissue-engineered cartilage constructed by acellular cartilage matrices (ACMs) seeded with adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs). The ADSCs were isolated from 3-month-old New Zealand albino rabbit by using collagenase and cultured and amplified in vitro. Fresh cartilage isolated from adult New Zealand albino rabbit were freeze-dried for 12 h and treated with Triton X-100, DNase, and RNase to obtain ACMs. ADSCs were seeded in the acellular cartilaginous matrix at 2x10(7)/mL, and cultured in chondrogenic differentiation medium for 2 weeks to construct tissue-engineered cartilage. Twenty-four New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into A, B, and C groups. Engineered cartilage was transplanted into cartilage defect position of rabbits in group A, group B obtained ACMs, and group C did not receive any transplants. The rabbits were sacrificed in week 12. The restored tissue was evaluated using macroscopy, histology, immunohistochemistry, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In the tissue-engineered cartilage group (group A), articular cartilage defects of the rabbits were filled with chondrocyte-like tissue with smooth surface. Immunohistochemistry showed type II-collagen expression and Alcian blue staining was positive. TEM showed chondrocytes in the recesses, with plenty of secretary matrix particles. In the scaffold group (group B), the defect was filled with fibrous tissue. No repaired tissue was found in the blank group (group C). Tissue-engineered cartilage using ACM seeded with ADSCs can help repair articular cartilage defects in rabbits.

  18. Experiment K-7-29: Connective Tissue Studies. Part 1; Rat Skin, Normal and Repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vailas, A. C.; Grindeland, R.; Ashman, R.; Choy, V.; Durnova, G.; Graf, B.; Griffith, P.; Kaplansky, A. S.; Kolis, S.; Martinez, D.; Rao, J. S.; Rayford, A. R.; Reddy, B. R.; Sears, J.; Thielke, R.; Ulm, M.; Vanderby, R.

    1994-01-01

    The skin repair studies started to be problematic for the following reasons: (1) It was very difficult to locate the wound and many lesions were not of the same dimensions. A considerable amount of time was devoted to the identification of the wound using polarized light. We understand that this experiment was added on to the overall project. Marking of the wound site and standard dimensions should be recommended for the next flight experiment. (2) The tissue was frozen, therefore thawing and fixation caused problems with some of the immunocytochemical staining for obtaining better special resolution with light microscopy image processing. Despite these problems, we were unable to detect any significant qualitative differences for the following wound markers: (1) Collagen Type 3, (2) Hematotoxylin and Eosin, and (3) Macrophage Factor 13. All protein markers were isolated from rat sources and antibodies prepared and tested for cross reactivity with other molecules at the University of Wisconsin Hybridoma Facility. However, rat skin from the non lesioned site 'normal' showed interesting biochemical results. Skin was prepared for the following measurements: (1) DNA content, (2) Collagen content by hydroxyproline, and (3) uronic acid content and estimation of ground substance. The results indicated there was a non-significant increase (10%) in the DNA concentration of skin from flight animals. However, the data expressed as a ratio DNA/Collagen estimates the cell or nuclear density that supports a given quantity of collagen showed a dramatic increase in the flight group (33%). This means flight conditions may have slowed down collagen secretion and/or increased cell proliferation in adult rat skin. Further biochemical tests are being done to determine the crosslinking of elastin which will enhance the insight to assessing changes in skin turnover.

  19. Dual growth factor delivery from bilayered, biodegradable hydrogel composites for spatially-guided osteochondral tissue repair

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Steven; Lam, Johnny; Trachtenberg, Jordan E.; Lee, Esther J.; Seyednejad, Hajar; van den Beucken, Jeroen J. J. P.; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Wong, Mark E.; Jansen, John A.; Mikos, Antonios G.; Kasper, F. Kurtis

    2014-01-01

    The present work investigated the use of biodegradable hydrogel composite scaffolds, based on the macromer oligo(poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate) (OPF), to deliver growth factors for the repair of osteochondral tissue in a rabbit model. In particular, bilayered OPF composites were used to mimic the structural layers of the osteochondral unit, and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) were loaded into gelatin microparticles and embedded within the OPF hydrogel matrix in a spatially controlled manner. Three different scaffold formations were implanted in a medial femoral condyle osteochondral defect: 1) IGF-1 in the chondral layer, 2) BMP-2 in the subchondral layer, and 3) IGF-1 and BMP-2 in their respective separate layers. The quantity and quality of osteochondral repair was evaluated at 6 and 12 weeks with histological scoring and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). While histological scoring results at 6 weeks showed no differences between experimental groups, micro-CT analysis revealed that the delivery of BMP-2 alone increased the number of bony trabecular islets formed, an indication of early bone formation, over that of IGF-1 delivery alone. At 12 weeks post-implantation, minimal differences were detected between the three groups for cartilage repair. However, the dual delivery of IGF-1 and BMP-2 had a higher proportion of subchondral bone repair, greater bone growth at the defect margins, and lower bone specific surface than the single delivery of IGF-1. These results suggest that the delivery of BMP-2 enhances subchondral bone formation and that, while the dual delivery of IGF-1 and BMP-2 in separate layers does not improve cartilage repair under the conditions studied, they may synergistically enhance the degree of subchondral bone formation. Overall, bilayered OPF hydrogel composites demonstrate potential as spatially-guided, multiple growth factor release vehicles for osteochondral tissue repair. PMID:25047629

  20. Dual growth factor delivery from bilayered, biodegradable hydrogel composites for spatially-guided osteochondral tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Lu, Steven; Lam, Johnny; Trachtenberg, Jordan E; Lee, Esther J; Seyednejad, Hajar; van den Beucken, Jeroen J J P; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Wong, Mark E; Jansen, John A; Mikos, Antonios G; Kasper, F Kurtis

    2014-10-01

    The present work investigated the use of biodegradable hydrogel composite scaffolds, based on the macromer oligo(poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate) (OPF), to deliver growth factors for the repair of osteochondral tissue in a rabbit model. In particular, bilayered OPF composites were used to mimic the structural layers of the osteochondral unit, and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) were loaded into gelatin microparticles and embedded within the OPF hydrogel matrix in a spatially controlled manner. Three different scaffold formulations were implanted in a medial femoral condyle osteochondral defect: 1) IGF-1 in the chondral layer, 2) BMP-2 in the subchondral layer, and 3) IGF-1 and BMP-2 in their respective separate layers. The quantity and quality of osteochondral repair was evaluated at 6 and 12 weeks with histological scoring and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). While histological scoring results at 6 weeks showed no differences between experimental groups, micro-CT analysis revealed that the delivery of BMP-2 alone increased the number of bony trabecular islets formed, an indication of early bone formation, over that of IGF-1 delivery alone. At 12 weeks post-implantation, minimal differences were detected between the three groups for cartilage repair. However, the dual delivery of IGF-1 and BMP-2 had a higher proportion of subchondral bone repair, greater bone growth at the defect margins, and lower bone specific surface than the single delivery of IGF-1. These results suggest that the delivery of BMP-2 enhances subchondral bone formation and that, while the dual delivery of IGF-1 and BMP-2 in separate layers does not improve cartilage repair under the conditions studied, they may synergistically enhance the degree of subchondral bone formation. Overall, bilayered OPF hydrogel composites demonstrate potential as spatially-guided, multiple growth factor release vehicles for osteochondral tissue repair.

  1. Role of Macrophages in the Repair Process during the Tissue Migrating and Resident Helminth Infections

    PubMed Central

    Faz-López, Berenice

    2016-01-01

    The Th1/Th2/Th17 balance is a fundamental feature in the regulation of the inflammatory microenvironment during helminth infections, and an imbalance in this paradigm greatly contributes to inflammatory disorders. In some cases of helminthiasis, an initial Th1 response could occur during the early phases of infection (acute), followed by a Th2 response that prevails in chronic infections. During the late phase of infection, alternatively activated macrophages (AAMs) are important to counteract the inflammation caused by the Th1/Th17 response and larval migration, limiting damage and repairing the tissue affected. Macrophages are the archetype of phagocytic cells, with the primary role of pathogen destruction and antigen presentation. Nevertheless, other subtypes of macrophages have been described with important roles in tissue repair and immune regulation. These types of macrophages challenge the classical view of macrophages activated by an inflammatory response. The role of these subtypes of macrophages during helminthiasis is a controversial topic in immunoparasitology. Here, we analyze some of the studies regarding the role of AAMs in tissue repair during the tissue migration of helminths. PMID:27648452

  2. Pharmacological targeting of kinases MST1 and MST2 augments tissue repair and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Fan, Fuqin; He, Zhixiang; Kong, Lu-Lu; Chen, Qinghua; Yuan, Quan; Zhang, Shihao; Ye, Jinjin; Liu, Hao; Sun, Xiufeng; Geng, Jing; Yuan, Lunzhi; Hong, Lixin; Xiao, Chen; Zhang, Weiji; Sun, Xihuan; Li, Yunzhan; Wang, Ping; Huang, Lihong; Wu, Xinrui; Ji, Zhiliang; Wu, Qiao; Xia, Ning-Shao; Gray, Nathanael S; Chen, Lanfen; Yun, Cai-Hong; Deng, Xianming; Zhou, Dawang

    2016-08-17

    Tissue repair and regenerative medicine address the important medical needs to replace damaged tissue with functional tissue. Most regenerative medicine strategies have focused on delivering biomaterials and cells, yet there is the untapped potential for drug-induced regeneration with good specificity and safety profiles. The Hippo pathway is a key regulator of organ size and regeneration by inhibiting cell proliferation and promoting apoptosis. Kinases MST1 and MST2 (MST1/2), the mammalian Hippo orthologs, are central components of this pathway and are, therefore, strong target candidates for pharmacologically induced tissue regeneration. We report the discovery of a reversible and selective MST1/2 inhibitor, 4-((5,10-dimethyl-6-oxo-6,10-dihydro-5H-pyrimido[5,4-b]thieno[3,2-e][1,4]diazepin-2-yl)amino)benzenesulfonamide (XMU-MP-1), using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-based high-throughput biochemical assay. The cocrystal structure and the structure-activity relationship confirmed that XMU-MP-1 is on-target to MST1/2. XMU-MP-1 blocked MST1/2 kinase activities, thereby activating the downstream effector Yes-associated protein and promoting cell growth. XMU-MP-1 displayed excellent in vivo pharmacokinetics and was able to augment mouse intestinal repair, as well as liver repair and regeneration, in both acute and chronic liver injury mouse models at a dose of 1 to 3 mg/kg via intraperitoneal injection. XMU-MP-1 treatment exhibited substantially greater repopulation rate of human hepatocytes in the Fah-deficient mouse model than in the vehicle-treated control, indicating that XMU-MP-1 treatment might facilitate human liver regeneration. Thus, the pharmacological modulation of MST1/2 kinase activities provides a novel approach to potentiate tissue repair and regeneration, with XMU-MP-1 as the first lead for the development of targeted regenerative therapeutics.

  3. Use of an in vitro model in tissue engineering to study wound repair and differentiation of blastema tissue from rabbit pinna.

    PubMed

    Hashemzadeh, Mohammad Reza; Mahdavi-Shahri, Nasser; Bahrami, Ahmad Reza; Kheirabadi, Masoumeh; Naseri, Fatemeh; Atighi, Mitra

    2015-08-01

    Rabbit ear wound repair is an accepted model for studies of tissue regeneration, leading to scar less wound repair. It is believed that a specific tissue, blastema, is responsible for such interesting capacity of tissue regeneration. To test this idea further and to elucidate the cellular events happening during the ear wound repair, we designed some controlled experiments in vitro. Small pieces of the ear were punched and washed immediately with normal saline. The tissues were then cultured in the Dulbecco's Modified Eagle(')s Medium, supplemented with fetal bovine serum in control group. As a treatment vitamin A and C was used to evaluate the differentiation potency of the tissue. These tissues were fixed, sectioned, stained, and microscopically studied. Micrographs of electron microscopy provided evidences revealing dedifferentiation of certain cells inside the punched tissues after incubation in tissue culture medium. The histological studies revealed that cells of the tissue (i) can undergo cellular proliferation, (ii) differentiate to epithelial, condrogenic, and osteogenic tissues, and (iii) regenerate the wounds. These results could be used for interpretation of the possible events happening during tissue engineering and wound repair in vitro. An important goal of this study is to create a tissue engineering and tissue banking model, so that in the future it could be used in further blastema tissue studies at different levels.

  4. A New Absorbable Synthetic Substitute With Biomimetic Design for Dural Tissue Repair.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhidong; Xu, Tao; Yuan, Yuyu; Deng, Kunxue; Liu, Man; Ke, Yiquan; Luo, Chengyi; Yuan, Tun; Ayyad, Ali

    2016-04-01

    Dural repair products are evolving from animal tissue-derived materials to synthetic materials as well as from inert to absorbable features; most of them lack functional and structural characteristics compared with the natural dura mater. In the present study, we evaluated the properties and tissue repair performance of a new dural repair product with biomimetic design. The biomimetic patch exhibits unique three-dimensional nonwoven microfiber structure with good mechanical strength and biocompatibility. The animal study showed that the biomimetic patch and commercially synthetic material group presented new subdural regeneration at 90 days, with low level inflammatory response and minimal to no adhesion formation detected at each stage. In the biological material group, no new subdural regeneration was observed and severe adhesion between the implant and the cortex occurred at each stage. In clinical case study, there was no cerebrospinal fluid leakage, and all the postoperation observations were normal. The biomimetic structure and proper rate of degradation of the new absorbable dura substitute can guide the meaningful reconstruction of the dura mater, which may provide a novel approach for dural defect repair.

  5. DNA damage and repair in tumour and non-tumour tissues of mice induced by nicotinamide.

    PubMed Central

    Olsson, A. R.; Sheng, Y.; Pero, R. W.; Chaplin, D. J.; Horsman, M. R.

    1996-01-01

    In vivo DNA damage and repair was induced by nicotinamide (NAM) in adenotype 12 virus-induced mouse sarcoma A12B3 and sarcoma F inoculated into CBA mice. DNA damage, NAM and NAD concentrations were measured after in vivo exposure to NAM, in tumours and spleens by alkaline elution and by HPLC analysis. Our results indicate that NAM between 100-1000 mg kg-1 causes a high level of in vivo DNA strand breaks in tumours and normal tissues in mice bearing the immunogenic sarcoma A12B3 but not in the non-immunogenic sarcoma F. The repair process was also delayed by the NAM treatment probably owing to inhibition of the DNA repair enzyme, poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase, as evidenced by accumulation of NAM and NAD. These data are consistent with NAM having a mechanism of action as a radiosensitiser at least in part by DNA repair inhibition. In addition, it should also be considered that high doses of NAM might cause considerable complications to normal tissue in tumour-bearing individuals. PMID:8695350

  6. Adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells for musculoskeletal repair in veterinary medicine

    PubMed Central

    Arnhold, Stefan; Wenisch, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Adipose tissue derived stem cells (ASCs) are mesenchymal stem cells which can be obtained from different adipose tissue sources within the body. It is an abundant cell pool, which is easy accessible and the cells can be obtained in large numbers, cultivated and expanded in vitro and prepared for tissue engineering approaches, especially for skeletal tissue repair. In the recent years this cell population has attracted a great amount of attention among researchers in human as well as in veterinary medicine. In the meantime ASCs have been well characterized and their use in regenerative medicine is very well established. This review focuses on the characterization of ASCs for their use for tissue engineering approaches especially in veterinary medicine and also highlights a selection of clinical trials on the basis of ASCs as the relevant cell source. PMID:25973326

  7. Nuss procedure for repair of pectus excavatum after failed Ravitch procedure in adults: indications and caveats

    PubMed Central

    Kocher, Gregor J.; Gstrein, Nathalie; Jaroszewski, Dawn E.; Ewais, Mennatallah M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Recurrence of pectus excavatum (PE) is not an uncommon problem after open repair using the Ravitch technique. The optimal approach for redo surgery is still under debate, especially in adults with less chest wall pliability. Aim of this study was to investigate the usefulness and efficacy of the minimally invasive Nuss technique for repair of recurrent PE after conventional open repair. Methods We performed a retrospective multicentre review of 20 adult patients from University Hospital Bern (n=6) and the US Mayo Clinic (n=14) who underwent minimally invasive repair of recurrent PE after unsuccessful prior Ravitch procedure. Results Mean patient age at primary open correction was 21 years, with recurrence being evident after a mean duration of 10.5 years (range, 0.25–47 years). Mean age at redo surgery using the Nuss technique was 31 years, with a mean Haller index of 4.7 before and 2.5 after final correction. Main reason for redo surgery was recurrent or persistent deformity (100%), followed by chest pain (75%) and exercise intolerance (75%). No major intraoperative or postoperative complications occurred and successful correction was possible in all patients. Conclusions Although the procedure itself is more challenging, the minimally invasive Nuss technique can be safely and successfully used for repair of recurrent PE after failed open surgery. In our series final results were good to excellent in the majority of patients without major complications or recurrence. PMID:27621850

  8. Laser-activated nano-biomaterials for tissue repair and controlled drug release

    SciTech Connect

    Matteini, P; Ratto, F; Rossi, F; Pini, R

    2014-07-31

    We present recent achievements of minimally invasive welding of biological tissue and controlled drug release based on laser-activated nano-biomaterials. In particular, we consider new advancements in the biomedical application of near-IR absorbing gold nano-chromophores as an original solution for the photothermal repair of surgical incisions and as nanotriggers of controlled drug release from hybrid biopolymer scaffolds. (laser biophotonics)

  9. The maturity of tissue-engineered cartilage in vitro affects the repairability for osteochondral defect.

    PubMed

    Jin, Cheng Zhe; Cho, Jae-Ho; Choi, Byung Hyune; Wang, Li Ming; Kim, Moon Suk; Park, So Ra; Yoon, Jeong Ho; Yun, Jung Ho; Oh, Hyun Ju; Min, Byoung-Hyun

    2011-12-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering using cells and biocompatible scaffolds has emerged as a promising approach to repair of cartilage damage. To date, however, no engineered cartilage has proven to be equivalent to native cartilage in terms of biochemical and compression properties, as well as histological features. An alternative strategy for cartilage engineering is to focus on the in vivo regeneration potential of immature engineered cartilage. Here, we used a rabbit model to evaluate the extent to which the maturity of engineered cartilage influenced the remodeling and integration of implanted extracellular matrix scaffolds containing allogenous chondrocytes. Full-thickness osteochondral defects were created in the trochlear groove of New Zealand white rabbits. Left knee defects were left untreated as a control (group 1), and right knee defects were implanted with tissue-engineered cartilage cultured in vitro for 2 days (group 2), 2 weeks (group 3), or 4 weeks (group 4). Histological, chemical, and compression assays of engineered cartilage in vitro showed that biochemical composition became more cartilagenous, and biomechanical property for compression gradually increased with culture time. In an in vivo study, gross imaging and histological observation at 1 and 3 months after implanting in vitro-cultured engineered cartilage showed that defects in groups 3 and 4 were repaired with hyaline cartilage-like tissue, whereas defects were only partially filled with fibrocartilage after 1 month in groups 1 and 2. At 3 months, group 4 showed striking features of hyaline cartilage tissue, with a mature matrix and a columnar arrangement of chondrocytes. Zonal distribution of type II collagen was most prominent, and the International Cartilage Repair Society score was also highest at this time. In addition, the subchondral bone was well ossified. In conclusion, in vivo engineered cartilage was remodeled when implanted; however, its extent to maturity varied with cultivation

  10. Adenosine Receptor Stimulation by Polydeoxyribonucleotide Improves Tissue Repair and Symptomology in Experimental Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Pallio, Giovanni; Bitto, Alessandra; Pizzino, Gabriele; Galfo, Federica; Irrera, Natasha; Squadrito, Francesco; Squadrito, Giovanni; Pallio, Socrate; Anastasi, Giuseppe P.; Cutroneo, Giuseppina; Macrì, Antonio; Altavilla, Domenica

    2016-01-01

    Activation of the adenosine receptor pathway has been demonstrated to be effective in improving tissue remodeling and blunting the inflammatory response. Active colitis is characterized by an intense inflammatory reaction resulting in extensive tissue damage. Symptomatic improvement requires both control of the inflammatory process and repair and remodeling of damaged tissues. We investigated the ability of an A2A receptor agonist, polydeoxyribonucleotide (PDRN), to restore tissue structural integrity in two experimental colitis models using male Sprague-Dawley rats. In the first model, colitis was induced with a single intra-colonic instillation of dinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (DNBS), 25 mg diluted in 0.8 ml 50% ethanol. After 6 h, animals were randomized to receive either PDRN (8 mg/kg/i.p.), or PDRN + the A2A antagonist [3,7-dimethyl-1-propargylxanthine (DMPX); 10 mg/kg/i.p.], or vehicle (0.8 ml saline solution) daily. In the second model, dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) was dissolved in drinking water at a concentration of 8%. Control animals received standard drinking water. After 24 h animals were randomized to receive PDRN or PDRN+DMPX as described above. Rats were sacrificed 7 days after receiving DNBS or 5 days after DSS. In both experimental models of colitis, PDRN ameliorated the clinical symptoms and weight loss associated with disease as well as promoted the histological repair of damaged tissues. Moreover, PDRN reduced expression of inflammatory cytokines, myeloperoxidase activity, and malondialdehyde. All these effects were abolished by the concomitant administration of the A2A antagonist DMPX. Our study suggests that PDRN may represent a promising treatment for improving tissue repair during inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:27601997

  11. Hyaluronic acid hydrogels with IKVAV peptides for tissue repair and axonal regeneration in an injured rat brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Y. T.; Tian, W. M.; Yu, X.; Cui, F. Z.; Hou, S. P.; Xu, Q. Y.; Lee, In-Seop

    2007-09-01

    A biocompatible hydrogel of hyaluronic acid with the neurite-promoting peptide sequence of IKVAV was synthesized. The characterization of the hydrogel shows an open porous structure and a large surface area available for cell interaction. Its ability to promote tissue repair and axonal regeneration in the lesioned rat cerebrum is also evaluated. After implantation, the polymer hydrogel repaired the tissue defect and formed a permissive interface with the host tissue. Axonal growth occurred within the microstructure of the network. Within 6 weeks the polymer implant was invaded by host-derived tissue, glial cells, blood vessels and axons. Such a hydrogel matrix showed the properties of neuron conduction. It has the potential to repair tissue defects in the central nervous system by promoting the formation of a tissue matrix and axonal growth by replacing the lost tissue.

  12. Reserve stem cells: Differentiated cells reprogram to fuel repair, metaplasia, and neoplasia in the adult gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Mills, Jason C; Sansom, Owen J

    2015-07-14

    It has long been known that differentiated cells can switch fates, especially in vitro, but only recently has there been a critical mass of publications describing the mechanisms adult, postmitotic cells use in vivo to reverse their differentiation state. We propose that this sort of cellular reprogramming is a fundamental cellular process akin to apoptosis or mitosis. Because reprogramming can invoke regenerative cells from mature cells, it is critical to the long-term maintenance of tissues like the pancreas, which encounter large insults during adulthood but lack constitutively active adult stem cells to repair the damage. However, even in tissues with adult stem cells, like the stomach and intestine, reprogramming may allow mature cells to serve as reserve ("quiescent") stem cells when normal stem cells are compromised. We propose that the potential downside to reprogramming is that it increases risk for cancers that occur late in adulthood. Mature, long-lived cells may have years of exposure to mutagens. Mutations that affect the physiological function of differentiated, postmitotic cells may lead to apoptosis, but mutations in genes that govern proliferation might not be selected against. Hence, reprogramming with reentry into the cell cycle might unmask those mutations, causing an irreversible progenitor-like, proliferative state. We review recent evidence showing that reprogramming fuels irreversible metaplastic and precancerous proliferation in the stomach and pancreas. Finally, we illustrate how we think reprogrammed differentiated cells are likely candidates as cells of origin for cancers of the intestine.

  13. Reserve stem cells: Reprogramming of differentiated cells fuels repair, metaplasia, and neoplasia in the adult gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Jason C.; Sansom, Owen J.

    2016-01-01

    It has long been known that differentiated cells can switch fates, especially in vitro, but only recently has there been a critical mass of publications describing the mechanisms adult, post-mitotic cells use in vivo to reverse their differentiation state. We propose that this sort of cellular reprogramming is a fundamental cellular process akin to apoptosis or mitosis. Because reprogramming can invoke regenerative cells from mature cells, it is critical to the longterm maintenance of tissues like the pancreas, which encounter large insults during adulthood but lack constitutively active adult stem cells to repair the damage. However, even in tissues with adult stem cells, like stomach and intestine, reprogramming may allow mature cells to serve as reserve (“quiescent”) stem cells when normal stem cells are compromised. We propose that the potential downside to reprogramming is that it increases risk for cancers that occur late in adulthood. Mature, long-lived cells may have years of exposure to mutagens. Mutations that affect the physiological function of differentiated, post-mitotic cells may lead to apoptosis, but mutations in genes that govern proliferation might not be selected against. Hence, reprogramming with reentry into the cell cycle might unmask those mutations, causing an irreversible progenitor-like, proliferative state. We review recent evidence showing that reprogramming fuels irreversible metaplastic and precancerous proliferations in stomach and pancreas. Finally, we illustrate how we think reprogrammed differentiated cells are likely candidates as cells of origin for cancers of the intestine. PMID:26175494

  14. Silk microfiber-reinforced silk hydrogel composites for functional cartilage tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Yodmuang, Supansa; McNamara, Stephanie L; Nover, Adam B; Mandal, Biman B; Agarwal, Monica; Kelly, Terri-Ann N; Chao, Pen-hsiu Grace; Hung, Clark; Kaplan, David L; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2015-01-01

    Cartilage tissue lacks an intrinsic capacity for self-regeneration due to slow matrix turnover, a limited supply of mature chondrocytes and insufficient vasculature. Although cartilage tissue engineering has achieved some success using agarose as a scaffolding material, major challenges of agarose-based cartilage repair, including non-degradability, poor tissue-scaffold integration and limited processing capability, have prompted the search for an alternative biomaterial. In this study, silk fiber-hydrogel composites (SF-silk hydrogels) made from silk microfibers and silk hydrogels were investigated for their potential use as a support material for engineered cartilage. We demonstrated the use of 100% silk-based fiber-hydrogel composite scaffolds for the development of cartilage constructs with properties comparable to those made with agarose. Cartilage constructs with an equilibrium modulus in the native tissue range were fabricated by mimicking the collagen fiber and proteoglycan composite architecture of native cartilage using biocompatible, biodegradable silk fibroin from Bombyx mori. Excellent chondrocyte response was observed on SF-silk hydrogels, and fiber reinforcement resulted in the development of more mechanically robust constructs after 42 days in culture compared to silk hydrogels alone. Thus, we demonstrate the versatility of silk fibroin as a composite scaffolding material for use in cartilage tissue repair to create functional cartilage constructs that overcome the limitations of agarose biomaterials, and provide a much-needed alternative to the agarose standard.

  15. In situ strategy for bone repair by facilitated endogenous tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jingdi; Zhang, Yujue; Pan, Panpan; Fan, Tiantang; Chen, Mingmao; Zhang, Qiqing

    2015-11-01

    Traditional tissue engineering procedures are expensive and time consuming. Facilitated endogenous tissue engineering (FETE) provides a solution that can avoid the ex vivo culture of autologous cells and initiate in situ reparative endogenous repair processes in vivo. This method involves fabricating a porous scaffold that mimics the environment present during the bone formation process, consisting of components that provide biomimetic interfacial interactions to cells. After the scaffold is implanted, progenitor cells provided by autologous bone marrow and surrounding tissues then differentiate to bone cells under the direction of the in situ scaffold. This paper reports a biomimetic method to prepare a hierarchically structured hybrid scaffold. Bone-like nano hydroxyapatite (HA) was crystallized from a collagen and chitosan (CC) matrix to form a porous scaffold. The in vivo study demonstrates that this nanohybrid scaffold supports excellent bone repair. This means that the FETE approach, in which the cell culture portion of traditional tissue engineering takes place in vivo, can promote the intrinsic regenerative potential of endogenous tissues.

  16. Drug delivery strategies to control macrophages for tissue repair and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Garash, Reham; Bajpai, Anamika; Marcinkiewicz, Brandon M

    2016-01-01

    Tissue repair and regeneration is a complex process. Our bodies have an excellent capacity to regenerate damaged tissues in many situations. However, tissue healing is impaired in injuries that exceed a critical size or are exacerbated by chronic inflammatory diseases like diabetes. In these instances, biomaterials and drug delivery strategies are often required to facilitate tissue regeneration by providing physical and biochemical cues. Inflammation is the body’s response to injury. It is critical for wound healing and biomaterial integration and vascularization, as long as the timing is well controlled. For example, chronic inflammation is well known to impair healing in chronic wounds. In this review, we highlight the importance of a well-controlled inflammatory response, primarily mediated by macrophages in tissue repair and regeneration and discuss various strategies designed to promote regeneration by controlling macrophage behavior. These strategies include temporally controlled delivery of anti-inflammatory drugs, delivery of macrophages as cellular therapy, controlled release of cytokines that modulate macrophage phenotype, and the design of nanoparticles that exploit the inherent phagocytic behavior of macrophages. A clear outcome of this review is that a deeper understanding of the role and timing of complex macrophage phenotypes or activation states is required to fully harness their abilities with drug delivery strategies. PMID:27190256

  17. Electric fish: new insights into conserved processes of adult tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Unguez, Graciela A

    2013-07-01

    Biology is replete with examples of regeneration, the process that allows animals to replace or repair cells, tissues and organs. As on land, vertebrates in aquatic environments experience the occurrence of injury with varying frequency and to different degrees. Studies demonstrate that ray-finned fishes possess a very high capacity to regenerate different tissues and organs when they are adults. Among fishes that exhibit robust regenerative capacities are the neotropical electric fishes of South America (Teleostei: Gymnotiformes). Specifically, adult gymnotiform electric fishes can regenerate injured brain and spinal cord tissues and restore amputated body parts repeatedly. We have begun to identify some aspects of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of tail regeneration in the weakly electric fish Sternopygus macrurus (long-tailed knifefish) with a focus on regeneration of skeletal muscle and the muscle-derived electric organ. Application of in vivo microinjection techniques and generation of myogenic stem cell markers are beginning to overcome some of the challenges owing to the limitations of working with non-genetic animal models with extensive regenerative capacity. This review highlights some aspects of tail regeneration in S. macrurus and discusses the advantages of using gymnotiform electric fishes to investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms that produce new cells during regeneration in adult vertebrates.

  18. Electric fish: new insights into conserved processes of adult tissue regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Unguez, Graciela A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Biology is replete with examples of regeneration, the process that allows animals to replace or repair cells, tissues and organs. As on land, vertebrates in aquatic environments experience the occurrence of injury with varying frequency and to different degrees. Studies demonstrate that ray-finned fishes possess a very high capacity to regenerate different tissues and organs when they are adults. Among fishes that exhibit robust regenerative capacities are the neotropical electric fishes of South America (Teleostei: Gymnotiformes). Specifically, adult gymnotiform electric fishes can regenerate injured brain and spinal cord tissues and restore amputated body parts repeatedly. We have begun to identify some aspects of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of tail regeneration in the weakly electric fish Sternopygus macrurus (long-tailed knifefish) with a focus on regeneration of skeletal muscle and the muscle-derived electric organ. Application of in vivo microinjection techniques and generation of myogenic stem cell markers are beginning to overcome some of the challenges owing to the limitations of working with non-genetic animal models with extensive regenerative capacity. This review highlights some aspects of tail regeneration in S. macrurus and discusses the advantages of using gymnotiform electric fishes to investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms that produce new cells during regeneration in adult vertebrates. PMID:23761473

  19. Evaluation of the effects of electrical stimulation on cartilage repair in adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Zuzzi, Denise Cristina; Ciccone, Carla de Campos; Neves, Lia Mara Grosso; Mendonça, Josué Sampaio; Joazeiro, Paulo Pinto; Esquisatto, Marcelo Augusto Marretto

    2013-08-01

    This study describes the organization of mature hyaline xiphoid cartilage during repair in animals submitted to electrical current stimulation. Twenty male Wistar rats, 90 days old, were divided into a control group (CG) and a treated group (TG). A cylindrical full-thickness cartilage defects were created with a 3-mm punch in anesthetized animals. After 24h, TG received daily applications of a continuous electrical current (1Hz/20μA) for 5min. The animals were sacrificed after 7, 21 and 35 days for structural analysis. In CG, the repair tissue presented fibrous characteristics, with fibroblastic cells being infiltrated and permeated by blood vessels. Basophilic foci of cartilage tissue were observed on day 35. In TG, the repair tissue also presented fibrous characteristics, but a larger number of thick collagen fibers were seen on day 21. A large number of cartilaginous nests were observed on day 35. Cell numbers were significantly higher in TG. Calcification points were detected in TG on day 35. There was no difference in elastic fibers between groups. Ultrastructural analysis revealed the presence of chondrocyte-like cells in CG at all time points, but only on days 21 and 35 in TG. The amount of cuprolinic blue-stained proteoglycans was higher in TG on day 35. Microcurrent stimulation accelerates the repair process in non-articular hyaline cartilage.

  20. A new osteonecrosis animal model of the femoral head induced by microwave heating and repaired with tissue engineered bone

    PubMed Central

    Han, Rui; Geng, Chengkui; Wang, Yongnian; Wei, Lei

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this research was to induce a new animal model of osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) by microwave heating and then repair with tissue engineered bone. The bilateral femoral heads of 84 rabbits were heated by microwave at various temperatures. Tissue engineered bone was used to repair the osteonecrosis of femoral heads induced by microwave heating. The roentgenographic and histological examinations were used to evaluate the results. The femoral heads heated at 55°C for ten minutes showed low density and cystic changes in X-ray photographs, osteonecrosis and repair occurred simultaneously in histology at four and eight weeks, and 69% femoral heads collapsed at 12 weeks. The ability of tissue engineered bone to repair the osteonecrosis was close to that of cancellous bone autograft. The new animal model of ONFH could be induced by microwave heating, and the tissue engineering technique will provide an effective treatment. PMID:18956184

  1. Prion diseases and adult neurogenesis: how do prions counteract the brain's endogenous repair machinery?

    PubMed

    Relaño-Ginés, Aroa; Lehmann, Sylvain; Crozet, Carole

    2014-01-01

    Scientific advances in stem cell biology and adult neurogenesis have raised the hope that neurodegenerative disorders could benefit from stem cell-based therapy. Adult neurogenesis might be part of the physiological regenerative process, however it might become impaired by the disease's mechanism and therefore contribute to neurodegeneration. In prion disorders this endogenous repair system has rarely been studied. Whether adult neurogenesis plays a role or not in brain repair or in the propagation of prion pathology remains unclear. We have recently investigated the status of adult neural stem cells isolated from prion-infected mice. We were able to show that neural stem cells accumulate and replicate prions thus resulting in an alteration of their neuronal destiny. We also reproduced these results in adult neural stem cells, which were infected in vitro. The fact that endogenous adult neurogenesis could be altered by the accumulation of misfolded prion protein represents another great challenge. Inhibiting prion propagation in these cells would thus help the endogenous neurogenesis to compensate for the injured neuronal system. Moreover, understanding the endogenous modulation of the neurogenesis system would help develop effective neural stem cell-based therapies.

  2. Prion diseases and adult neurogenesis: How do prions counteract the brain's endogenous repair machinery?

    PubMed Central

    Relaño-Ginés, Aroa; Lehmann, Sylvain; Crozet, Carole

    2014-01-01

    Scientific advances in stem cell biology and adult neurogenesis have raised the hope that neurodegenerative disorders could benefit from stem cell-based therapy. Adult neurogenesis might be part of the physiological regenerative process; however, it might become impaired by the disease's mechanism and therefore contribute to neurodegeneration. In prion disorders this endogenous repair system has rarely been studied. Whether adult neurogenesis plays a role or not in brain repair or in the propagation of prion pathology remains unclear. We have recently investigated the status of adult neural stem cells isolated from prion-infected mice. We were able to show that neural stem cells accumulate and replicate prions thus resulting in an alteration of their neuronal destiny. We also reproduced these results in adult neural stem cells, which were infected in vitro. The fact that endogenous adult neurogenesis could be altered by the accumulation of misfolded prion protein represents another great challenge. Inhibiting prion propagation in these cells would thus help the endogenous neurogenesis to compensate for the injured neuronal system. Moreover, understanding the endogenous modulation of the neurogenesis system would help develop effective neural stem cell-based therapies. PMID:24831876

  3. Silk microfiber-reinforced silk hydrogel composites for functional cartilage tissue repair

    PubMed Central

    Yodmuang, Supansa; McNamara, Stephanie L.; Nover, Adam B.; Mandal, Biman B.; Agarwal, Monica; Kelly, Terri-Ann N.; Chao, Pen-hsiu Grace; Hung, Clark; Kaplan, David L.; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2014-01-01

    Cartilage tissue lacks an intrinsic capacity for self-regeneration due to slow matrix turnover, a limited supply of mature chondrocytes and insufficient vasculature. Although cartilage tissue engineering has achieved some success using agarose as a scaffolding material, major challenges of agarose-based cartilage repair, including non-degradability, poor tissue–scaffold integration and limited processing capability, have prompted the search for an alternative biomaterial. In this study, silk fiber–hydrogel composites (SF–silk hydrogels) made from silk microfibers and silk hydrogels were investigated for their potential use as a support material for engineered cartilage. We demonstrated the use of 100% silk-based fiber–hydrogel composite scaffolds for the development of cartilage constructs with properties comparable to those made with agarose. Cartilage constructs with an equilibrium modulus in the native tissue range were fabricated by mimicking the collagen fiber and proteoglycan composite architecture of native cartilage using biocompatible, biodegradable silk fibroin from Bombyx mori. Excellent chondrocyte response was observed on SF–silk hydrogels, and fiber reinforcement resulted in the development of more mechanically robust constructs after 42 days in culture compared to silk hydrogels alone. Thus, we demonstrate the versatility of silk fibroin as a composite scaffolding material for use in cartilage tissue repair to create functional cartilage constructs that overcome the limitations of agarose biomaterials, and provide a much-needed alternative to the agarose standard. PMID:25281788

  4. Elastin-like protein matrix reinforced with collagen microfibers for soft tissue repair

    PubMed Central

    Caves, Jeffrey M.; Cui, Wanxing; Wen, Jing; Kumar, Vivek A.; Haller, Carolyn A.; Chaikof, Elliot L.

    2011-01-01

    Artificial composites designed to mimic the structure and properties of native extracellular matrix may lead to acellular materials for soft tissue repair and replacement, which display mechanical strength, stiffness, and resilience resembling native tissue. We describe the fabrication of thin lamellae consisting of continuous collagen microfiber embedded at controlled orientations and densities in a recombinant elastin-like protein polymer matrix. Multilamellar stacking affords flexible, protein-based composite sheets whose properties are dependent upon both the elastomeric matrix and collagen content and organization. Sheets are produced with properties that range over 13-fold in elongation to break (23 – 314%), six-fold in Young’s modulus (5.3 to 33.1 MPa), and more than two-fold in tensile strength (1.85 to 4.08 MPa), exceeding that of a number of native human tissues, including urinary bladder, pulmonary artery, and aorta. A sheet approximating the mechanical response of human abdominal wall fascia is investigated as a fascial substitute for ventral hernia repair. Protein-based composite patches prevent hernia recurrence in Wistar rats over an 8-week period with new tissue formation and sustained structural integrity. PMID:21550111

  5. Tissue adaptations to gravitational stress - Newborn versus adult giraffes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargens, Alan R; Gershuni, David H.; Danzig, Larry A.; Millard, Ronald W.; Pettersson, Knut

    1988-01-01

    Preliminary results on developmental alterations in load-bearing tissues of newborn and adult giraffes are presented. Attention is focused on vascular wall thickness in relation to local blood pressure, and on meniscal adaptations to increased load bearing in the developing giraffe. It is believed that the developing giraffe provides an excellent model for investigations of adaptive mechanisms of increased weight bearing.

  6. Thrombospondin1 in tissue repair and fibrosis: TGF-β-dependent and independent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Sweetwyne, Mariya T.; Murphy-Ullrich, Joanne E.

    2012-01-01

    Thrombospondin 1(TSP1) plays major roles in both physiologic and pathologic tissue repair. TSP1 through its type 1 repeats is a known regulator of latent TGF-β activation and plays a role in wound healing and fibrosis. Binding of the TSP N-terminal domain to cell surface calreticulin in complex with LDL-receptor related protein 1 stimulates intermediate cell adhesion, cell migration, anoikis resistance and collagen expression and matrix deposition in an in vivo model of the foreign body response. There is also emerging evidence that TSP EGF-like repeats alters endothelial cell-cell interactions and stimulate epithelial migration through transactivation of EGF receptors. The mechanisms underlying these functions of TSP1 and the implications for physiologic and pathologic wound repair and fibrosis will be discussed. PMID:22266026

  7. Current Concepts of Bone Tissue Engineering for Craniofacial Bone Defect Repair

    PubMed Central

    Fishero, Brian Alan; Kohli, Nikita; Das, Anusuya; Christophel, John Jared; Cui, Quanjun

    2014-01-01

    Craniofacial fractures and bony defects are common causes of morbidity and contribute to increasing health care costs. Successful regeneration of bone requires the concomitant processes of osteogenesis and neovascularization. Current methods of repair and reconstruction include rigid fixation, grafting, and free tissue transfer. However, these methods carry innate complications, including plate extrusion, nonunion, graft/flap failure, and donor site morbidity. Recent research efforts have focused on using stem cells and synthetic scaffolds to heal critical-sized bone defects similar to those sustained from traumatic injury or ablative oncologic surgery. Growth factors can be used to augment both osteogenesis and neovascularization across these defects. Many different growth factor delivery techniques and scaffold compositions have been explored yet none have emerged as the universally accepted standard. In this review, we will discuss the recent literature regarding the use of stem cells, growth factors, and synthetic scaffolds as alternative methods of craniofacial fracture repair. PMID:25709750

  8. Adult neurogenesis and its role in neuropsychiatric disease, brain repair and normal brain function.

    PubMed

    Braun, S M G; Jessberger, S

    2014-02-01

    Neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) in the mammalian brain retain the ability to generate new neurones throughout life in discrete brain regions, through a process called adult neurogenesis. Adult neurogenesis, a dramatic form of adult brain circuitry plasticity, has been implicated in physiological brain function and appears to be of pivotal importance for certain forms of learning and memory. In addition, failing or altered neurogenesis has been associated with a variety of brain diseases such as major depression, epilepsy and age-related cognitive decline. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of the basic biology underlying the neurogenic process in the adult brain, focusing on mechanisms that regulate quiescence, proliferation and differentiation of NSPCs. In addition, we discuss how neurogenesis influences normal brain function, and in particular its role in memory formation, as well as its contribution to neuropsychiatric diseases. Finally, we evaluate the potential of targeting endogenous NSPCs for brain repair.

  9. Experimental therapies for repair of the central nervous system: stem cells and tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Forraz, N; Wright, K E; Jurga, M; McGuckin, C P

    2013-07-01

    Several stem cell-based therapeutic tools are currently being investigated for the regeneration of central nervous system (CNS) injuries. This review focuses on innovative approaches for CNS tissue repair via the use of implantable cellular devices. These devices are supported by biopharmaceuticals and conventional physiotherapy for the restoration of lost neuronal circuits and CNS function. This paper further reviews new and promising tools currently in pre-clinical and clinical tests for the treatment of CNS diseases where substantial loss of cellular and extracellular components of neural tissue has occurred such as stroke, encephalopathy and traumatic neural injuries. We also discuss selected 3D bioscaffolds co-cultured with clinically applicable human mesenchymal stem cells. Recent advances in neural tissue engineering and stem cell differentiation methods have shown promise for their clinical application in treating yet incurable CNS deficits.

  10. Matrix immobilization enhances the tissue repair activity of growth factor gene therapy vectors.

    PubMed

    Doukas, J; Chandler, L A; Gonzalez, A M; Gu, D; Hoganson, D K; Ma, C; Nguyen, T; Printz, M A; Nesbit, M; Herlyn, M; Crombleholme, T M; Aukerman, S L; Sosnowski, B A; Pierce, G F

    2001-05-01

    Although growth factor proteins display potent tissue repair activities, difficulty in sustaining localized therapeutic concentrations limits their therapeutic activity. We reasoned that enhanced histogenesis might be achieved by combining growth factor genes with biocompatible matrices capable of immobilizing vectors at delivery sites. When delivered to subcutaneously implanted sponges, a platelet-derived growth factor B-encoding adenovirus (AdPDGF-B) formulated in a collagen matrix enhanced granulation tissue deposition 3- to 4-fold (p < or = 0.0002), whereas vectors encoding fibroblast growth factor 2 or vascular endothelial growth factor promoted primarily angiogenic responses. By day 8 posttreatment of ischemic excisional wounds, collagen-formulated AdPDGF-B enhanced granulation tissue and epithelial areas up to 13- and 6-fold (p < 0.009), respectively, and wound closure up to 2-fold (p < 0.05). At longer times, complete healing without excessive scar formation was achieved. Collagen matrices were shown to retain both vector and transgene products within delivery sites, enabling the transduction and stimulation of infiltrating repair cells. Quantitative PCR and RT-PCR demonstrated both vector DNA and transgene mRNA within wound beds as late as 28 days posttreatment. By contrast, aqueous formulations allowed vector seepage from application sites, leading to PDGF-induced hyperplasia in surrounding tissues but not wound beds. Finally, repeated applications of PDGF-BB protein were required for neotissue induction approaching equivalence to a single application of collagen-immobilized AdPDGF-B, confirming the utility of this gene transfer approach. Overall, these studies demonstrate that immobilizing matrices enable the controlled delivery and activity of tissue promoting genes for the effective regeneration of injured tissues.

  11. Robust homology-directed repair within mouse mammary tissue is not specifically affected by Brca2 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Kass, Elizabeth M.; Lim, Pei Xin; Helgadottir, Hildur R.; Moynahan, Mary Ellen; Jasin, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The mammary gland undergoes significant proliferative stages after birth, but little is known about how the developmental changes impact DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. Mutations in multiple genes involved in homology-directed repair (HDR), considered a particularly accurate pathway for repairing DSBs, are linked to breast cancer susceptibility, including BRCA2. Using reporter mice that express an inducible endonuclease, we find that HDR is particularly robust in mammary tissue during puberty and pregnancy, accounting for 34–40% of detected repair events, more than in other tissues examined. Brca2 hypomorphic mutation leads to HDR defects in mammary epithelium during puberty and pregnancy, including in different epithelial lineages. Notably, a similar dependence on Brca2 is observed in other proliferative tissues, including small intestine epithelium. Our results suggest that the greater reliance on HDR in the proliferating mammary gland, rather than a specific dependence on BRCA2, may increase its susceptibility to tumorigenesis incurred by BRCA2 mutation. PMID:27779185

  12. Pseudomonas aeruginosa lectin LecB inhibits tissue repair processes by triggering β-catenin degradation

    PubMed Central

    Cott, Catherine; Thuenauer, Roland; Landi, Alessia; Kühn, Katja; Juillot, Samuel; Imberty, Anne; Madl, Josef; Eierhoff, Thorsten; Römer, Winfried

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that induces severe lung infections such as ventilator-associated pneumonia and acute lung injury. Under these conditions, the bacterium diminishes epithelial integrity and inhibits tissue repair mechanisms, leading to persistent infections. Understanding the involved bacterial virulence factors and their mode of action is essential for the development of new therapeutic approaches. In our study we discovered a so far unknown effect of the P. aeruginosa lectin LecB on host cell physiology. LecB alone was sufficient to attenuate migration and proliferation of human lung epithelial cells and to induce transcriptional activity of NF-κB. These effects are characteristic of impaired tissue repair. Moreover, we found a strong degradation of β-catenin, which was partially recovered by the proteasome inhibitor lactacystin. In addition, LecB induced loss of cell–cell contacts and reduced expression of the β-catenin targets c-myc and cyclin D1. Blocking of LecB binding to host cell plasma membrane receptors by soluble l-fucose prevented these changes in host cell behavior and signaling, and thereby provides a powerful strategy to suppress LecB function. Our findings suggest that P. aeruginosa employs LecB as a virulence factor to induce β-catenin degradation, which then represses processes that are directly linked to tissue recovery. PMID:26862060

  13. Effect of porosities of bilayered porous scaffolds on spontaneous osteochondral repair in cartilage tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Jian; Ding, Jiandong

    2015-01-01

    Poly(lactide-co-glycolide)-bilayered scaffolds with the same porosity or different ones on the two layers were fabricated, and the porosity effect on in vivo repairing of the osteochondral defect was examined in a comparative way for the first time. The constructs of scaffolds and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells were implanted into pre-created osteochondral defects in the femoral condyle of New Zealand white rabbits. After 12 weeks, all experimental groups exhibited good cartilage repairing according to macroscopic appearance, cross-section view, haematoxylin and eosin staining, toluidine blue staining, immunohistochemical staining and real-time polymerase chain reaction of characteristic genes. The group of 92% porosity in the cartilage layer and 77% porosity in the bone layer resulted in the best efficacy, which was understood by more biomechanical mimicking of the natural cartilage and subchondral bone. This study illustrates unambiguously that cartilage tissue engineering allows for a wide range of scaffold porosity, yet some porosity group is optimal. It is also revealed that the biomechanical matching with the natural composite tissue should be taken into consideration in the design of practical biomaterials, which is especially important for porosities of a multi-compartment scaffold concerning connected tissues. PMID:26813511

  14. Nanoscale Surface Modifications of Medical Implants for Cartilage Tissue Repair and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, MF; Szarko, M; Seifailan, A; Butler, PE

    2016-01-01

    Background: Natural cartilage regeneration is limited after trauma or degenerative processes. Due to the clinical challenge of reconstruction of articular cartilage, research into developing biomaterials to support cartilage regeneration have evolved. The structural architecture of composition of the cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) is vital in guiding cell adhesion, migration and formation of cartilage. Current technologies have tried to mimic the cell’s nanoscale microenvironment to improve implants to improve cartilage tissue repair. Methods: This review evaluates nanoscale techniques used to modify the implant surface for cartilage regeneration. Results: The surface of biomaterial is a vital parameter to guide cell adhesion and consequently allow for the formation of ECM and allow for tissue repair. By providing nanosized cues on the surface in the form of a nanotopography or nanosized molecules, allows for better control of cell behaviour and regeneration of cartilage. Chemical, physical and lithography techniques have all been explored for modifying the nanoscale surface of implants to promote chondrocyte adhesion and ECM formation. Conclusion: Future studies are needed to further establish the optimal nanoscale modification of implants for cartilage tissue regeneration. PMID:28217208

  15. Current advances in tissue repair and regeneration: the future is bright

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The fifth EMBO conference on ‘The Molecular and Cellular Basis of Regeneration and Repair’ took place in the peaceful coastal town of Sant Feliu de Guixols (Spain) on September 2014. The meeting was organised by Emili Saló (U. Barcelona, Spain), Kimberly Mace (U. Manchester, UK), Patrizia Ferretti (University College London, UK) and Michael Brand (Centre for Regenerative Therapies Dresden, Germany) and received the generous support of Society for Developmental Biology, The Company of Biologists, Centre for Regenerative Therapies Dresden, Garland Science and the journals Regeneration and Cell Signalling. The natural surroundings provided an inspiring setting for 185 researchers from all over the world to share their latest findings and views on the field. The conference showcased the great diversity of model organisms used for studying regeneration and tissue repair, including invertebrate and vertebrate species (Fig. 1). Importantly, this diversity in animal models allowed for a global overview of the mechanisms that promote regeneration. In addition, it highlighted some of the unique aspects that confer differences in regenerative capacities among different species. These differences might lie in each of the different steps involved in performing regeneration, including triggering the regenerative response, controlling cellular plasticity, re‐stablishing the correct tissue patterns, as well as determining the roles of extrinsic factors, such as the role of inflammation in regeneration. A deeper understanding of these processes in the naturally regenerating species is a prerequisite for advancing the field of regenerative medicine and tissue repair in humans. PMID:27499870

  16. Aberrant repair of etheno-DNA adducts in leukocytes and colon tissue of colon cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Obtułowicz, Tomasz; Winczura, Alicja; Speina, Elzbieta; Swoboda, Maja; Janik, Justyna; Janowska, Beata; Cieśla, Jarosław M; Kowalczyk, Paweł; Jawien, Arkadiusz; Gackowski, Daniel; Banaszkiewicz, Zbigniew; Krasnodebski, Ireneusz; Chaber, Andrzej; Olinski, Ryszard; Nair, Jagadesaan; Bartsch, Helmut; Douki, Thierry; Cadet, Jean; Tudek, Barbara

    2010-09-15

    To assess the role of lipid peroxidation-induced DNA damage and repair in colon carcinogenesis, the excision rates and levels of 1,N(6)-etheno-2'-deoxyadenosine (epsilondA), 3,N(4)-etheno-2'-deoxycytidine (epsilondC), and 1,N(2)-etheno-2'-deoxyguanosine (1,N(2)-epsilondG) were analyzed in polymorphic blood leukocytes (PBL) and resected colon tissues of 54 colorectal carcinoma (CRC) patients and PBL of 56 healthy individuals. In PBL the excision rates of 1,N(6)-ethenoadenine (epsilonAde) and 3,N(4)-ethenocytosine (epsilonCyt), measured by the nicking of oligodeoxynucleotide duplexes with single lesions, and unexpectedly also the levels of epsilondA and 1,N(2)-epsilondG, measured by LC/MS/MS, were lower in CRC patients than in controls. In contrast the mRNA levels of repair enzymes, alkylpurine- and thymine-DNA glycosylases and abasic site endonuclease (APE1), were higher in PBL of CRC patients than in those of controls, as measured by QPCR. In the target colon tissues epsilonAde and epsilonCyt excision rates were higher, whereas the epsilondA and epsilondC levels in DNA, measured by (32)P-postlabeling, were lower in tumor than in adjacent colon tissue, although a higher mRNA level was observed only for APE1. This suggests that during the onset of carcinogenesis, etheno adduct repair in the colon seems to be under a complex transcriptional and posttranscriptional control, whereby deregulation may act as a driving force for malignancy.

  17. Exercise Performance in Children and Young Adults After Complete and Incomplete Repair of Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Rosenblum, Omer; Katz, Uriel; Reuveny, Ronen; Williams, Craig A; Dubnov-Raz, Gal

    2015-12-01

    Few previous studies have addressed exercise capacity in patients with corrected congenital heart disease (CHD) and significant anatomical residua. The aim of this study was to determine the aerobic fitness and peak cardiac function of patients with corrected CHD with complete or incomplete repairs, as determined by resting echocardiography. Children, adolescents and young adults (<40 years) with CHD from both sexes, who had previously undergone biventricular corrective therapeutic interventions (n = 73), and non-CHD control participants (n = 76) underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing. The CHD group was further divided according to the absence/presence of significant anatomical residua on a resting echocardiogram ("complete"/"incomplete" repair groups). Aerobic fitness and cardiac function were compared between groups using linear regression and analysis of covariance. Peak oxygen consumption, O2 pulse and ventilatory threshold were significantly lower in CHD patients compared with controls (all p < 0.01). Compared with the complete repair group, the incomplete repair group had a significantly lower mean peak work rate, age-adjusted O2 pulse (expressed as % predicted) and a higher VE/VCO2 ratio (all p ≤ 0.05). Peak oxygen consumption was comparable between the subgroups. Patients after corrected CHD have lower peak and submaximal exercise parameters. Patients with incomplete repair of their heart defect had decreased aerobic fitness, with evidence of impaired peak cardiac function and lower pulmonary perfusion. Patients that had undergone a complete repair had decreased aerobic fitness attributed only to deconditioning. These newly identified differences explain why in previous studies, the lowest fitness was seen in patients with the most hemodynamically significant heart malformations.

  18. In Vitro Spermatogenesis in Explanted Adult Mouse Testis Tissues.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takuya; Katagiri, Kumiko; Kojima, Kazuaki; Komeya, Mitsuru; Yao, Masahiro; Ogawa, Takehiko

    2015-01-01

    Research on in vitro spermatogenesis is important for elucidating the spermatogenic mechanism. We previously developed an organ culture method which can support spermatogenesis from spermatogonial stem cells up to sperm formation using immature mouse testis tissues. In this study, we examined whether it is also applicable to mature testis tissues of adult mice. We used two lines of transgenic mice, Acrosin-GFP and Gsg2-GFP, which carry the marker GFP gene specific for meiotic and haploid cells, respectively. Testis tissue fragments of adult GFP mice, aged from 4 to 29 weeks old, which express GFP at full extension, were cultured in medium supplemented with 10% KSR or AlbuMAX. GFP expression decreased rapidly and became the lowest at 7 to 14 days of culture, but then slightly increased during the following culture period. This increase reflected de novo spermatogenesis, confirmed by BrdU labeling in spermatocytes and spermatids. We also used vitamin A-deficient mice, whose testes contain only spermatogonia. The testes of those mice at 13-21 weeks old, showing no GFP expression at explantation, gained GFP expression during culturing, and spermatogenesis was confirmed histologically. In addition, the adult testis tissues of Sl/Sld mutant mice, which lack spermatogenesis due to Kit ligand mutation, were cultured with recombinant Kit ligand to induce spermatogenesis up to haploid formation. Although the efficiency of spermatogenesis was lower than that of pup, present results showed that the organ culture method is effective for the culturing of mature adult mouse testis tissue, demonstrated by the induction of spermatogenesis from spermatogonia to haploid cells.

  19. Linking the Primary Cilium to Cell Migration in Tissue Repair and Brain Development

    PubMed Central

    Veland, Iben Rønn; Lindbæk, Louise; Christensen, Søren Tvorup

    2014-01-01

    Primary cilia are unique sensory organelles that coordinate cellular signaling networks in vertebrates. Inevitably, defects in the formation or function of primary cilia lead to imbalanced regulation of cellular processes that causes multisystemic disorders and diseases, commonly known as ciliopathies. Mounting evidence has demonstrated that primary cilia coordinate multiple activities that are required for cell migration, which, when they are aberrantly regulated, lead to defects in organogenesis and tissue repair, as well as metastasis of tumors. Here, we present an overview on how primary cilia may contribute to the regulation of the cellular signaling pathways that control cyclic processes in directional cell migration. PMID:26955067

  20. Asymptomatic and isolated accessory mitral valve tissue in an adult.

    PubMed

    Hisatomi, Kazuki; Hashizume, Koji; Tanigawa, Kazuyoshi; Miura, Takashi; Matsukuma, Seiji; Yokose, Shogo; Sumi, Mizuki; Eishi, Kiyoyuki

    2016-02-01

    Accessory mitral valve (AMV) tissue is a congenital anomaly that occurs in association with other congenital anomalies, and is an uncommon cause of left ventricular outflow tract obstruction. It is usually detected in early childhood when accompanied by symptoms of obstruction of the left ventricular outflow tract, and is rarely diagnosed in adults. We present a case of a 53-year-old man who was referred to our institution for evaluation of a systolic heart murmur. Echocardiography disclosed a diagnosis of AMV tissue. This case was uncommon because of the lack of severe obstruction of left ventricular outflow, cardiac symptoms, or other cardiac anomalies. We were able to carry out surgical resection of AMV tissue to avert possible progression of aortic insufficiency and the risk of a cerebrovascular embolization. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful, and postoperative echocardiography showed no residual accessory mitral tissue.

  1. Use of tissue engineering strategies to repair joint tissues in osteoarthritis: viral gene transfer approaches.

    PubMed

    Cucchiarini, Magali; Madry, Henning

    2014-10-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a major chronic disease of the joints, affecting mostly the articular cartilage but also all the surrounding tissues including the subchondral bone, synovium, meniscus, tendons, and ligaments. Despite the availability in the clinic of a variety of therapeutic approaches, there is crucial need for improved treatment to protect and regenerate the cartilage with full integrity and function. In this regard, combining gene, cell, and tissue engineering-based procedures is an attractive concept for novel, effective therapy against AO, a slow, progressive, and irreversible disease. Here, we provide an overview of the treatment available for management of the progression of the OA phenotype and discuss current progress and remaining challenges for potential future treatment of patients.

  2. Mending broken hearts: cardiac development as a basis for adult heart regeneration and repair

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Mei; Olson, Eric N.; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda

    2013-01-01

    As the adult mammalian heart has limited potential for regeneration and repair, the loss of cardiomyocytes during injury and disease can result in heart failure and death. The cellular processes and regulatory mechanisms involved in heart growth and development can be exploited to repair the injured adult heart through ‘reawakening’ pathways that are active during embryogenesis. Heart function has been restored in rodents by reprogramming non-myocytes into cardiomyocytes, by expressing transcription factors (GATA4, HAND2, myocyte-specific enhancer factor 2C (MEF2C) and T-box 5 (TBX5)) and microRNAs (miR-1, miR-133, miR-208 and miR-499) that control cardiomyocyte identity. Stimulating cardiomyocyte dedifferentiation and proliferation by activating mitotic signalling pathways involved in embryonic heart growth represents a complementary approach for heart regeneration and repair. Recent advances in understanding the mechanistic basis of heart development offer exciting opportunities for effective therapies for heart failure. PMID:23839576

  3. A method to screen and evaluate tissue adhesives for joint repair applications

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Tissue adhesives are useful means for various medical procedures. Since varying requirements cause that a single adhesive cannot meet all needs, bond strength testing remains one of the key applications used to screen for new products and study the influence of experimental variables. This study was conducted to develop an easy to use method to screen and evaluate tissue adhesives for tissue engineering applications. Method Tissue grips were designed to facilitate the reproducible production of substrate tissue and adhesive strength measurements in universal testing machines. Porcine femoral condyles were used to generate osteochondral test tissue cylinders (substrates) of different shapes. Viability of substrates was tested using PI/FDA staining. Self-bonding properties were determined to examine reusability of substrates (n = 3). Serial measurements (n = 5) in different operation modes (OM) were performed to analyze the bonding strength of tissue adhesives in bone (OM-1) and cartilage tissue either in isolation (OM-2) or under specific requirements in joint repair such as filling cartilage defects with clinical applied fibrin/PLGA-cell-transplants (OM-3) or tissues (OM-4). The efficiency of the method was determined on the basis of adhesive properties of fibrin glue for different assembly times (30 s, 60 s). Seven randomly generated collagen formulations were analyzed to examine the potential of method to identify new tissue adhesives. Results Viability analysis of test tissue cylinders revealed vital cells (>80%) in cartilage components even 48 h post preparation. Reuse (n = 10) of test substrate did not significantly change adhesive characteristics. Adhesive strength of fibrin varied in different test settings (OM-1: 7.1 kPa, OM-2: 2.6 kPa, OM-3: 32.7 kPa, OM-4: 30.1 kPa) and was increasing with assembly time on average (2.4-fold). The screening of the different collagen formulations revealed a substance with significant higher adhesive

  4. Stem cell delivery in tissue-specific hydrogel enabled meniscal repair in an orthotopic rat model.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiaoning; Wei, Yiyong; Villasante, Aránzazu; Ng, Johnathan J D; Arkonac, Derya E; Chao, Pen-Hsiu Grace; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2017-04-04

    Interest in non-invasive injectable therapies has rapidly risen due to their excellent safety profile and ease of use in clinical settings. Injectable hydrogels can be derived from the extracellular matrix (ECM) of specific tissues to provide a biomimetic environment for cell delivery and enable seamless regeneration of tissue defects. We investigated the in situ delivery of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) in decellularized meniscus ECM hydrogel to a meniscal defect in a nude rat model. First, decellularized meniscus ECM hydrogel retained tissue-specific proteoglycans and collagens, and significantly upregulated expression of fibrochondrogenic markers by hMSCs versus collagen hydrogel alone in vitro. The meniscus ECM hydrogel in turn supported delivery of hMSCs for integrative repair of a full-thickness defect model in meniscal explants after in vitro culture and in vivo subcutaneous implantation. When applied to an orthotopic model of meniscal injury in nude rat, hMSCs in meniscus ECM hydrogel were retained out to eight weeks post-injection, contributing to tissue regeneration and protection from joint space narrowing, pathologic mineralization, and osteoarthritis development, as evidenced by macroscopic and microscopic image analysis. Based on these findings, we propose the use of tissue-specific meniscus ECM-derived hydrogel for the delivery of therapeutic hMSCs to treat meniscal injury.

  5. Cell and biomolecule delivery for tissue repair and regeneration in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Elliott Donaghue, Irja; Tam, Roger; Sefton, Michael V; Shoichet, Molly S

    2014-09-28

    Tissue engineering frequently involves cells and scaffolds to replace damaged or diseased tissue. It originated, in part, as a means of effecting the delivery of biomolecules such as insulin or neurotrophic factors, given that cells are constitutive producers of such therapeutic agents. Thus cell delivery is intrinsic to tissue engineering. Controlled release of biomolecules is also an important tool for enabling cell delivery since the biomolecules can enable cell engraftment, modulate inflammatory response or otherwise benefit the behavior of the delivered cells. We describe advances in cell and biomolecule delivery for tissue regeneration, with emphasis on the central nervous system (CNS). In the first section, the focus is on encapsulated cell therapy. In the second section, the focus is on biomolecule delivery in polymeric nano/microspheres and hydrogels for the nerve regeneration and endogenous cell stimulation. In the third section, the focus is on combination strategies of neural stem/progenitor cell or mesenchymal stem cell and biomolecule delivery for tissue regeneration and repair. In each section, the challenges and potential solutions associated with delivery to the CNS are highlighted.

  6. Harnessing the immunomodulatory and tissue repair properties of mesenchymal stem cells to restore β cell function

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Nicolynn E; Hamilton, Diana; Fontaine, Magali J

    2013-01-01

    Islet cell transplantation has therapeutic potential to cure type 1 diabetes (T1D), which is characterized by autoimmune-mediated destruction of insulin-producing β cells. However, current success rates are limited by long-term decline in islet graft function resulting partially from poor revascularization and immune destruction. MSCs have the potential to enhance islet transplantation and prevent disease progression by a multifaceted approach. MSCs have been shown to be effective at inhibiting inflammatory-mediated immune responses and at promoting tissue regeneration. The immunomodulatory and tissue repairing properties of MSCs may benefit β cell regeneration in the context of T1D. This review will elucidate how MSCs can minimize β cell damage by providing survival signals and simultaneously modulate the immune response by inhibiting activation and proliferation of several immune cell types. In addition, MSCs can enhance islet graft revascularization, maintaining long-term β cell viability and function. PMID:22869154

  7. The Treatment Efficacy of Bone Tissue Engineering Strategy for Repairing Segmental Bone Defects Under Osteoporotic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen Xing; Chen, Cheng; Zhou, Quan; Wang, Xian Song; Zhou, Guangdong; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Zhi-Yong; Cao, Yilin; Zhang, Wen Jie

    2015-09-01

    The potential of increasing bone mass and preventing fractures in osteoporosis using stem cell therapy is currently an area of intense focus. However, there are very little data available regarding the postfracture bony defect healing efficacy under osteoporotic conditions. This study aims to investigate whether critical-sized segmental bone defects in a rabbit model of osteoporosis could be repaired using an allogenic stem cell-based tissue engineering (TE) approach and to investigate the potential influence of osteoporosis on the treatment efficacy. Rabbit fetal bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) were harvested and expanded in vitro. Decalcified bone matrix (DBM) scaffolds were then seeded with allogenic fetal BMSCs and cultivated in osteogenic media to engineer BMSC/DBM constructs. Critical-sized radial defects were created in ovariectomized (OVX) rabbits and the defects were repaired either by insertion of BMSC/DBM constructs or by DBM scaffolds alone. Also, nonovariectomized age-matched (non-OVX) rabbits were served as control. At 3 months post-treatment under the osteoporotic condition (OVX rabbits), the BMSC/DBM constructs inserted within the defect generated significantly more bone tissue when compared to the DBM scaffold as demonstrated by the X-ray, microcomputed tomography, and histological analyses. In addition, when compared to a normal nonosteoporotic condition (age-matched non-OVX rabbits), the defect treatment efficacy was adversely affected by the osteoporotic condition with significantly less bone regeneration. This study demonstrated the potential of allogenic fetal BMSC-based TE strategy for repairing bone defects in an osteoporotic condition. However, the treatment efficacy could be considerably compromised in the OVX animals. Therefore, a more sophisticated strategy that addresses the complicated pathogenic conditions associated with osteoporosis is needed.

  8. Cartilage Repair in the Inflamed Joint: Considerations for Biological Augmentation Toward Tissue Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Scotti, Celeste; Gobbi, Alberto; Karnatzikos, Georgios; Martin, Ivan; Shimomura, Kazunori; Lane, John G; Peretti, Giuseppe Michele; Nakamura, Norimasa

    2016-04-01

    Cartilage repair/regeneration procedures (e.g., microfracture, autologous chondrocyte implantation [ACI]) typically result in a satisfactory outcome in selected patients. However, the vast majority of patients with chronic symptoms and, in general, a more diseased joint, do not benefit from these surgical techniques. The aims of this work were to (1) review factors negatively influencing the joint environment; (2) review current adjuvant therapies that can be used to improve results of cartilage repair/regeneration procedures in patients with more diseased joints, (3) outline future lines of research and promising experimental approaches. Chronicity of symptoms and advancing patient age appear to be the most relevant factors negatively affecting clinical outcome of cartilage repair/regeneration. Preliminary experience with hyaluronic acid, platelet-rich plasma, and mesenchymal stem cell has been positive but there is no strong evidence supporting the use of these products and this requires further assessment with high-quality, prospective clinical trials. The use of a Tissue Therapy strategy, based on more mature engineered tissues, holds promise to tackle limitations of standard ACI procedures. Current research has highlighted the need for more targeted therapies, and (1) induction of tolerance with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) or by preventing IL-6 downregulation; (2) combined IL-4 and IL-10 local release; and (3) selective activation of the prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) signaling appear to be the most promising innovative strategies. For older patients and for those with chronic symptoms, adjuvant therapies are needed in combination with microfracture and ACI.

  9. Construction of tissue-engineered osteochondral composites and repair of large joint defects in rabbit.

    PubMed

    Deng, Tianzheng; Lv, Jing; Pang, Jianliang; Liu, Bing; Ke, Jie

    2014-07-01

    In this study, a novel three-dimensional (3D) heterogeneous/bilayered scaffold was constructed to repair large defects in rabbit joints. The scaffold includes two distinct but integrated layers corresponding to the cartilage and bone components. The upper layer consists of gelatin, chondroitin sulphate and sodium hyaluronate (GCH), and the lower layer consists of gelatin and ceramic bovine bone (GCBB). The two form a 3D bilayered scaffold (GCH-GCBB), which mimics the natural osteochondral matrix for use as a scaffold for osteochondral tissue engineering. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of this novel scaffold, combined with chondrocytes and bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) to repair large defects in rabbit joints. Thirty-six large defects in rabbit femoral condyles were created; 12 defects were treated with the same scaffold combined with cells (group A); another 12 defects were treated with cell-free scaffolds (group B); the others were untreated (group C). At 6 and 12 weeks, in group A hyaline-like cartilage formation could be observed by histological examination; the newly formed cartilage, which stained for type II collagen, was detected by RT-PCR at high-level expression. Most of the GCBB was replaced by bone, while little remained in the underlying cartilage. At 36 weeks, GCBB was completely resorbed and a tidemark was observed in some areas. In contrast, groups B and C showed no cartilage formation but a great amount of fibrous tissue, with only a little bone formation. In summary, this study demonstrated that a novel scaffold, comprising a top layer of GCH, having mechanical properties comparable to native cartilage, and a bottom layer composed of GCBB, could be used to repair large osteochondral defects in joints.

  10. Wound dressings based on silver sulfadiazine solid lipid nanoparticles for tissue repairing.

    PubMed

    Sandri, Giuseppina; Bonferoni, Maria Cristina; D'Autilia, Francesca; Rossi, Silvia; Ferrari, Franca; Grisoli, Pietro; Sorrenti, Milena; Catenacci, Laura; Del Fante, Claudia; Perotti, Cesare; Caramella, Carla

    2013-05-01

    The management of difficult to heal wounds can considerably reduce the time required for tissue repairing and promote the healing process, minimizing the risk of infection. Silver compounds, especially silver sulfadiazine (AgSD), are often used to prevent or to treat wound colonization, also in presence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. However, AgSD has been shown to be cytotoxic in vitro toward fibroblasts and keratinocytes and consequently to retard wound healing in vivo. Recently, platelet lysate (PL) has been proposed in clinical practice for the healing of persistent lesions. The aim of the present work was the development of wound dressings based on AgSD loaded in solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs), to be used in association with PL for the treatment for skin lesions. SLN were based on chondroitin sulfate and sodium hyaluronate, bioactive polymers characterized by well-known tissue repairing properties. The encapsulation of AgSD in SLN aimed at preventing the cytotoxic effect of the drug on normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs) and at enabling the association of the drug with PL. SLN were loaded in wound dressings based on hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose (HPMC) or chitosan glutamate (CS glu). These polymers were chosen to obtain a sponge matrix with suitable elasticity and softness and, moreover, with good bioadhesive behavior on skin lesions. Dressings based on chitosan glutamate showed antimicrobial activity with and without PL. Even though further in vivo evaluation could be envisaged, chitosan based dressings demonstrated to be a suitable prototype for the treatment for skin lesions.

  11. A novel basalt fiber-reinforced polylactic acid composite for hard tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Li, Yan; Gu, Ning

    2010-08-01

    A basalt fiber (BF) was, for the first time, introduced into a poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) matrix as innovative reinforcement to fabricate composite materials for hard tissue repair. Firstly, BF/PLLA composites and pure PLLA were produced by the methods of solution blending and freeze drying. The results showed that basalt fibers can be uniformly dispersed in the PLLA matrix and significantly improve the mechanical properties and hydrophilicity of the PLLA matrix. The presence of basalt fibers may retard the polymer degradation rate and neutralize the acid degradation from PLLA. Osteoblasts were cultured in vitro to evaluate the cytocompatibility of the composite. An MTT assay revealed that osteoblasts proliferated well for 7 days and there was little difference found in their viability on both PLLA and BF/PLLA films, which was consistent with the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity results. A fluorescent staining observation showed that osteoblasts grew well on the composites. SEM images displayed that osteoblasts tended to grow along the fiber axis. The formation of mineralized nodules was observed on the films by Alizarin red S staining. These results suggest that the presence of basalt fibers does not noticeably affect osteoblastic behavior and the designed composites are osteoblast compatible. It is concluded that basalt fibers, as reinforcing fibers, may have promising applications in hard tissue repair.

  12. Polymorphisms in genes controlling inflammation and tissue repair in rheumatoid arthritis: a case control study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Various cytokines and inflammatory mediators are known to be involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We hypothesized that polymorphisms in selected inflammatory response and tissue repair genes contribute to the susceptibility to and severity of RA. Methods Polymorphisms in TNFA, IL1B, IL4, IL6, IL8, IL10, PAI1, NOS2a, C1INH, PARP, TLR2 and TLR4 were genotyped in 376 Caucasian RA patients and 463 healthy Caucasian controls using single base extension. Genotype distributions in patients were compared with those in controls. In addition, the association of polymorphisms with the need for anti-TNF-α treatment as a marker of RA severity was assessed. Results The IL8 781 CC genotype was associated with early onset of disease. The TNFA -238 G/A polymorphism was differentially distributed between RA patients and controls, but only when not corrected for age and gender. None of the polymorphisms was associated with disease severity. Conclusions We here report an association between IL8 781 C/T polymorphism and age of onset of RA. Our findings indicate that there might be a role for variations in genes involved in the immune response and in tissue repair in RA pathogenesis. Nevertheless, additional larger genomic and functional studies are required to further define their role in RA. PMID:21385363

  13. External longitudinal titanium support for the repair of complex pectus excavatum in adults.

    PubMed

    Puma, Francesco; Vannucci, Jacopo; Santoprete, Stefano

    2012-12-01

    Several techniques exist for the repair of complex pectus excavatum. The placement of retrosternal metal bars improves the results by reducing the recurrence rate, but entails several possible risks, complications and disadvantages. A new method, specifically conceived for the repair of severe, asymmetric forms in adult patients, is reported. The corrected bone is fixed in the proper position by two, patient-customized, titanium struts, externally screwed to the manubrium and sternal body. Any retrosternal bar is thus avoided, reducing possible complications, without hampering the chest wall dynamic. In this particularly difficult issue, this technique provides long-term good functional, mechanical and cosmetic results and does not entail a second surgery for struts removal.

  14. Tissue migration capability of larval and adult Brugia pahangi.

    PubMed

    Chirgwin, Sharon R; Coleman, Sharon U; Porthouse, Kristina H; Klei, Thomas R

    2006-02-01

    Infection with mosquito-born filarial nematodes occurs when hosts are bitten by a vector carrying the infective third stage larvae (L3) of the parasites. These larvae, deposited on the skin by the feeding mosquito, are presumed to enter the skin via the vector-induced puncture wound. Larvae of Brugia spp. must then migrate from the entry site, penetrate various skin layers, and locate a lymphatic vessel that leads to their lymphatic predilection site. We have recently established an intradermal (ID) infection model using B. pahangi and the Mongolian gerbil, allowing us to investigate the migratory capability ofB. pahangi. Larval and adult parasites recovered from the peritoneal cavities of gerbils were capable of establishing an infection following ID (larvae) or subcutaneous (adult) injection. Third and fourth stage larvae both migrated away from the injection site within hours, although data suggest they localize to different lymphatic tissues at 3 days postinfection (DPI). Immature adult (28 day) B. pahangi also migrated away from their SC inoculation site within 7 DPI. Mature (45 day) adult B. pahangi displayed little migration away from the SC infection site, suggesting tissue migration may be limited to developing stages of the parasite.

  15. Ultrasonic assessment of facial soft tissue thicknesses in adult Egyptians.

    PubMed

    El-Mehallawi, I H; Soliman, E M

    2001-03-01

    The production of a three-dimensional plastic face on an unknown human skull has been practiced sporadically since the latter part of the last century. In recent years, the technique has been revived and applied to forensic science cases. The morphometric method of forensic facial reconstruction rests heavily on the use of facial soft tissue depth measurements. Moreover, it has been established that measurements made on the living are of more value than those made on the dead. In view of the well-known genetic complexities of the Egyptians, and the lack of knowledge of average facial soft tissue depths of the Egyptians that makes facial reconstruction questionable, it was decided to set up a table of norms for facial tissue thicknesses in 204 adult Egyptians aged 20-35 years. Tissue depths at 17 established landmarks (according to Aulsebrook et al. [Forensic Sci. Int. 79 (1996) 83]) were obtained using ultrasonic probing. The study revealed a unique spectrum of measurements for the Egyptians that might be useful for facial reconstruction purposes with obvious sexual dimorphism in facial soft tissue thickness. Additionally, the study provided evidence for the presence of interpopulation differences in average facial soft tissue thicknesses as evidenced from the comparison of the present data of Egyptians with those previously reported for some other populations.

  16. Shouldice inguinal hernia repair in the male adult: the gold standard? A multicenter controlled trial in 1578 patients.

    PubMed Central

    Hay, J M; Boudet, M J; Fingerhut, A; Poucher, J; Hennet, H; Habib, E; Veyrières, M; Flamant, Y

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hernia repair is the second most frequently performed operation in France and in the United States, the prevalence being 36 for every 1000 males. Lowering the recurrence rate by 1% would mean 1000 fewer operations for hernia repair per year in France. METHODS: Between 1983 and 1989, 1578 adult males with a total of 1706 nonrecurrent inguinal hernias were prospectively and randomly allotted to undergo either a Bassini's repair, Cooper's ligament, or Shouldice repair with polypropylene or a Shouldice repair with stainless steel for determination of which technique was associated with the lowest recurrence rate. Fifty-nine hernia repairs were withdrawn after inclusion. Of the 1647 remaining hernias, 52.2% were indirect, 25.6% were direct, and 23.2% were combined. Patients were seen every 6 months for 3 years and then every year. Median follow-up was 5 years 8 months (range, 3 months-8.5 years). RESULTS: At 8.5 years, 5.6% of hernias were lost to follow-up. Ninety-seven hernia repairs failed, 50% during the first 2 years. The actuarial recurrence rate was 7.94% at 8.5 years. The Shouldice repair (stainless steel or polypropylene) was associated with fewer recurrences (6.1%) than either the Bassini's (8.6%) or Cooper's ligament repair (11.2%) technique (p < 0.001). This difference remained significant even when the maximal bias test was used. Fewer recurrences (5.9%) were observed with the stainless steel wire Shouldice repair than with polypropylene version (6.5%), but the difference was not significant. CONCLUSIONS: Shouldice hernia repair provides the patient with the best chances of nonrecurrence regardless of the anatomical type of hernia. The Shouldice hernia repair should be the gold standard for inguinal hernia repair in men and serves as the basis for comparison with all other techniques, be they prosthetic or laparoscopic. PMID:8526578

  17. Grade 3C open femur fractures with vascular repair in adults.

    PubMed

    Balci, Halil I; Saglam, Yavuz; Tunali, Onur; Akgul, Turgut; Aksoy, Murat; Dikici, Fatih

    2015-06-01

    Grade 3C open femur fractures are challenging injuries with higher rates of complications. This is a retrospective review of grade 3C open femur fractures with vascular repair between 2002 and 2012. Outcomes included initial MESS score, additional injuries, duration of operation, complications, secondary operations or amputations, and social life implications. Thirty-one of 39 total patients were selected for revascularization and fracture fixation based on soft tissue injury and MESS score. The intra-operative approach included temporary arterial shunt replacement, orthopedic fixation, arterial reconstruction venous and/or nerve repair and routine fasciotomies. An external fixation and reverse saphenous vein graft was used in a majority of the patients (respectively; 93.5%, 90.3%). The mean follow up was 5.4 years (range 2.2-10). The decision to amputate versus salvage should be left up to patients and their care teams after discussing options and future possibilities rather than using a scoring system.

  18. Concise review: The plasticity of stem cell niches: a general property behind tissue homeostasis and repair.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Ríos, Patricia; González-Reyes, Acaimo

    2014-04-01

    Stem cell activity is tightly regulated during development and in adult tissues through the combined action of local and systemic effectors. While stem cells and their microenvironments are capable of sustaining homeostasis in normal physiological circumstances, they also provide host tissues with a remarkable plasticity to respond to perturbations. Here, we review recent discoveries that shed light on the adaptive response of niches to systemic signals and aging, and on the ability of niches to modulate signaling upon local perturbations. These characteristics of stem cells and their niches give organs an essential advantage to deal with aging, injury or pathological conditions.

  19. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy in an Adult Woman With Repaired Tetralogy of Fallot.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Lan T; Schelbert, Erik B; Cook, Stephen C

    2016-05-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is a reversible form of cardiomyopathy rarely reported in the adult congenital patient. We describe a case of a 49-year-old woman with repaired tetralogy of Fallot who presented with acute dyspnea. A 12-lead electrocardiogram revealed diffuse anterolateral T-wave inversion suggestive of myocardial ischemia. Cardiac catheterization was performed, demonstrating angiographically normal coronary arteries. A cardiovascular magnetic resonance examination showed apical akinesis with associated myocardial edema, but no myocardial damage on late gadolinium enhancement imaging, which is a characteristic of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. The patient was treated medically. A follow-up echocardiogram demonstrated normalization of left ventricular systolic function and apical wall motion abnormalities.

  20. Surgical repair of chronic complete hamstring tendon rupture in the adult patient.

    PubMed

    Cross, M J; Vandersluis, R; Wood, D; Banff, M

    1998-01-01

    Complete rupture of the hamstring tendons in the adult is a rare injury. This report discusses complete rupture of the hamstring tendons in nine patients treated by late operative repair. All patients were referred from outside centers for a second opinion after failed nonoperative treatment. The diagnosis was made quite easily on clinical grounds and was confirmed at surgery. Surgical treatment in all cases consisted of reattachment of the hamstring tendons to the origin on the ischium, and in all cases it was necessary to perform neurolysis of the sciatic nerve. Good results were achieved in all cases, at follow-up all patients were satisfied with the surgery.

  1. Self-assembling peptide hydrogel fosters chondrocyte extracellular matrix production and cell division: Implications for cartilage tissue repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisiday, J.; Jin, M.; Kurz, B.; Hung, H.; Semino, C.; Zhang, S.; Grodzinsky, A. J.

    2002-07-01

    Emerging medical technologies for effective and lasting repair of articular cartilage include delivery of cells or cell-seeded scaffolds to a defect site to initiate de novo tissue regeneration. Biocompatible scaffolds assist in providing a template for cell distribution and extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulation in a three-dimensional geometry. A major challenge in choosing an appropriate scaffold for cartilage repair is the identification of a material that can simultaneously stimulate high rates of cell division and high rates of cell synthesis of phenotypically specific ECM macromolecules until repair evolves into steady-state tissue maintenance. We have devised a self-assembling peptide hydrogel scaffold for cartilage repair and developed a method to encapsulate chondrocytes within the peptide hydrogel. During 4 weeks of culture in vitro, chondrocytes seeded within the peptide hydrogel retained their morphology and developed a cartilage-like ECM rich in proteoglycans and type II collagen, indicative of a stable chondrocyte phenotype. Time-dependent accumulation of this ECM was paralleled by increases in material stiffness, indicative of deposition of mechanically functional neo-tissue. Taken together, these results demonstrate the potential of a self-assembling peptide hydrogel as a scaffold for the synthesis and accumulation of a true cartilage-like ECM within a three-dimensional cell culture for cartilage tissue repair.

  2. Epimorphic regeneration approach to tissue replacement in adult mammals.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Vineet; Johnson, Scott A; Reing, Janet; Zhang, Li; Tottey, Stephen; Wang, Gang; Hirschi, Karen K; Braunhut, Susan; Gudas, Lorraine J; Badylak, Stephen F

    2010-02-23

    Urodeles and fetal mammals are capable of impressive epimorphic regeneration in a variety of tissues, whereas the typical default response to injury in adult mammals consists of inflammation and scar tissue formation. One component of epimorphic regeneration is the recruitment of resident progenitor and stem cells to a site of injury. Bioactive molecules resulting from degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM) have been shown to recruit a variety of progenitor and stem cells in vitro in adult mammals. The ability to recruit multipotential cells to the site of injury by in vivo administration of chemotactic ECM degradation products in a mammalian model of digit amputation was investigated in the present study. Adult, 6- to 8-week-old C57/BL6 mice were subjected to midsecond phalanx amputation of the third digit of the right hind foot and either treated with chemotactic ECM degradation products or left untreated. At 14 days after amputation, mice treated with ECM degradation products showed an accumulation of heterogeneous cells that expressed markers of multipotency, including Sox2, Sca1, and Rex1 (Zfp42). Cells isolated from the site of amputation were capable of differentiation along neuroectodermal and mesodermal lineages, whereas cells isolated from control mice were capable of differentiation along only mesodermal lineages. The present findings demonstrate the recruitment of endogenous stem cells to a site of injury, and/or their generation/proliferation therein, in response to ECM degradation products.

  3. Hippocampal adult neurogenesis is maintained by Neil3-dependent repair of oxidative DNA lesions in neural progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Regnell, Christine Elisabeth; Hildrestrand, Gunn Annette; Sejersted, Yngve; Medin, Tirill; Moldestad, Olve; Rolseth, Veslemøy; Krokeide, Silje Zandstra; Suganthan, Rajikala; Luna, Luisa; Bjørås, Magnar; Bergersen, Linda H

    2012-09-27

    Accumulation of oxidative DNA damage has been proposed as a potential cause of age-related cognitive decline. The major pathway for removal of oxidative DNA base lesions is base excision repair, which is initiated by DNA glycosylases. In mice, Neil3 is the main DNA glycosylase for repair of hydantoin lesions in single-stranded DNA of neural stem/progenitor cells, promoting neurogenesis. Adult neurogenesis is crucial for maintenance of hippocampus-dependent functions involved in behavior. Herein, behavioral studies reveal learning and memory deficits and reduced anxiety-like behavior in Neil3(-/-) mice. Neural stem/progenitor cells from aged Neil3(-/-) mice show impaired proliferative capacity and reduced DNA repair activity. Furthermore, hippocampal neurons in Neil3(-/-) mice display synaptic irregularities. It appears that Neil3-dependent repair of oxidative DNA damage in neural stem/progenitor cells is required for maintenance of adult neurogenesis to counteract the age-associated deterioration of cognitive performance.

  4. Bone marrow-derived cells homing for self-repair of periodontal tissues: a histological characterization and expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Zhou, Lili; Li, Chen; Xie, Han; Lu, Yuwang; Wu, Ying; Liu, Hongwei

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis, a disease leads to the formation of periodontal defect, can result in tooth loss if left untreated. The therapies to repair/regenerate periodontal tissues have attracted lots of attention these years. Bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs), a group of cells containing heterogeneous stem/progenitor cells, are capable of homing to injured tissues and participating in tissue repair/regeneration. The amplification of autologous BMDCs' potential in homing for self-repair/regeneration, therefore, might be considered as an alternative therapy except for traditional cell transplantation. However, the knowledge of the BMDCs' homing and participation in periodontal repair/regeneration is still known little. For the purpose of directly observing BMDCs' involvement in periodontal repair, chimeric mouse models were established to make their bone marrow cells reconstituted with cells expressing green enhanced fluorescence protein (EGFP) in this study. One month after bone marrow transplantation, periodontal defects were made on the mesial side of bilateral maxillary first molars in chimeric mice. The green fluorescence protein-positive (GFP+) BMDCS in periodontal defect regions were examined by bioluminescent imaging and immunofluorescence staining. GFP+ BMDCs were found to aggregate in the periodontal defect regions and emerge in newly-formed bones or fibers. Some of them also co-expressed markers of fibroblasts, osteoblasts or vascular endothelial cells. These results indicated that BMDCs might contribute to the formation of new fibers, bones and blood vessels during periodontal repair. In conclusion, we speculated that autologous BMDCs were capable of negotiating into the surgical sites created by periodontal operation and participating in tissue repair.

  5. Bone marrow-derived cells homing for self-repair of periodontal tissues: a histological characterization and expression analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Zhou, Lili; Li, Chen; Xie, Han; Lu, Yuwang; Wu, Ying; Liu, Hongwei

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis, a disease leads to the formation of periodontal defect, can result in tooth loss if left untreated. The therapies to repair/regenerate periodontal tissues have attracted lots of attention these years. Bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs), a group of cells containing heterogeneous stem/progenitor cells, are capable of homing to injured tissues and participating in tissue repair/regeneration. The amplification of autologous BMDCs’ potential in homing for self-repair/regeneration, therefore, might be considered as an alternative therapy except for traditional cell transplantation. However, the knowledge of the BMDCs’ homing and participation in periodontal repair/regeneration is still known little. For the purpose of directly observing BMDCs’ involvement in periodontal repair, chimeric mouse models were established to make their bone marrow cells reconstituted with cells expressing green enhanced fluorescence protein (EGFP) in this study. One month after bone marrow transplantation, periodontal defects were made on the mesial side of bilateral maxillary first molars in chimeric mice. The green fluorescence protein-positive (GFP+) BMDCS in periodontal defect regions were examined by bioluminescent imaging and immunofluorescence staining. GFP+ BMDCs were found to aggregate in the periodontal defect regions and emerge in newly-formed bones or fibers. Some of them also co-expressed markers of fibroblasts, osteoblasts or vascular endothelial cells. These results indicated that BMDCs might contribute to the formation of new fibers, bones and blood vessels during periodontal repair. In conclusion, we speculated that autologous BMDCs were capable of negotiating into the surgical sites created by periodontal operation and participating in tissue repair. PMID:26722424

  6. Detection of abnormalities in the superficial zone of cartilage repaired using a tissue engineered construct derived from synovial stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ando, Wataru; Fujie, Hiromichi; Moriguchi, Yu; Nansai, Ryosuke; Shimomura, Kazunori; Hart, David A; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Nakamura, Norimasa

    2012-09-28

    The present study investigated the surface structure and mechanical properties of repair cartilage generated from a tissue engineered construct (TEC) derived from synovial mesenchymal stem cells at six months post-implantation compared to those of uninjured cartilage. TEC-mediated repair tissue was cartilaginous with Safranin O staining, and had comparable macro-scale compressive properties with uninjured cartilage. However, morphological assessments revealed that the superficial zone of TEC-mediated tissue was more fibrocartilage-like, in contrast to the middle or deep zones that were more hyaline cartilage-like with Safranin O staining. Histological scoring of the TEC-mediated tissue was significantly lower in the superficial zone than in the middle and deep zones. Scanning electron microscopy showed a thick tangential bundle of collagen fibres at the most superficial layer of uninjured cartilage, while no corresponding structure was detected at the surface of TEC-mediated tissue. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that PRG4 was localised in the superficial area of uninjured cartilage, as well as the TEC-mediated tissue. Friction testing showed that the lubrication properties of the two tissues was similar, however, micro-indentation analysis revealed that the surface stiffness of the TEC-repair tissue was significantly lower than that of uninjured cartilage. Permeability testing indicated that the TEC-mediated tissue exhibited lower water retaining capacity than did uninjured cartilage, specifically at the superficial zone. Thus, TEC-mediated tissue exhibited compromised mechanical properties at the superficial zone, properties which need improvement in the future for maintenance of long term repair cartilage integrity.

  7. Functional tissue engineering in articular cartilage repair: is there a role for electromagnetic biophysical stimulation?

    PubMed

    Fini, Milena; Pagani, Stefania; Giavaresi, Gianluca; De Mattei, Monica; Ongaro, Alessia; Varani, Katia; Vincenzi, Fabrizio; Massari, Leo; Cadossi, Matteo

    2013-08-01

    Hyaline cartilage lesions represent an important global health problem. Several approaches have been developed in the last decades to resolve this disability cause, including tissue engineering, but to date, there is not a definitive procedure that is able to promote a repair tissue with the same mechanical and functional characteristics of native cartilage, and to obtain its integration in the subchondral bone. The need of resolutive technologies to obtain a "more effective" tissue substitutes has led Butler to propose the "Functional Tissue Engineering" (FTE) paradigm, whose principles are outlined in a so-called FTE road map. It consists of a two-phase strategy: in vitro tissue engineering and clinically surgery evaluation. The first phase, based on construct development, should take into account not only the chondrocyte biology, as their sensitivity to biochemical and physical stimuli, the risk of dedifferentiation in culture, and the ability to produce extracellular matrix, but also the features of suitable scaffolds. The in vivo phase analyzes the inflammatory microenvironment where the construct will be placed, because the cytokines released by synoviocytes and chondrocytes could affect the construct integrity, and, in particular, cause matrix degradation. The use of pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) represents an innovative therapeutic approach, because it is demonstrated that this physical stimulus increases the anabolic activity of chondrocytes and cartilage explants with consequent increase of matrix synthesis, but, at the same time, PEMFs limit the catabolic effects of inflammatory cytokines, reducing the construct degradation inside the surgical microenvironment. PEMFs mediate an up-regulation of A2A adenosine receptors and a potentiation of their anti-inflammatory effects.

  8. Topical retinoic acid enhances the repair of ultraviolet damaged dermal connective tissue.

    PubMed

    Kligman, L H; Duo, C H; Kligman, A M

    1984-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation induces excessive accumulations of elastic fibers in animal and human skin. Collagen is damaged and glycosaminoglycans are vastly increased. Formerly considered an irreversible change, we recently showed, post-irradiation, that a band of normal connective tissue was laid down subepidermally . Because of its ability to stimulate fibroblasts and enhance healing of wounds, we thought it likely that retinoic acid (RA) would promote the formation of this subepidermal zone of reconstruction. Hairless mice were irradiated for 10 weeks with Westinghouse FS20 sunlamps for a total UV dose of 7 J/cm2. Then, 0.05% RA was applied for 5 and 10 weeks. Observations were made by light and electron microscopy. In contrast to controls treated with vehicle, the reconstruction zone was significantly wider in RA-treated mice. The enhanced repair was dose related. Histochemically and ultrastructurally, collagen was normal, fibroblasts were numerous and in a configuration of high metabolic activity.

  9. Immunohistochemical study of collagen types I and II and procollagen IIA in human cartilage repair tissue following autologous chondrocyte implantation.

    PubMed

    Roberts, S; Menage, J; Sandell, L J; Evans, E H; Richardson, J B

    2009-10-01

    This study has assessed the relative proportions of type I and II collagens and IIA procollagen in full depth biopsies of repair tissue in a large sample of patients treated with autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI). Sixty five full depth biopsies were obtained from knees of 58 patients 8-60 months after treatment by ACI alone (n=55) or in combination with mosaicplasty (n=10). In addition articular cartilage was examined from eight individuals (aged 10-50) as controls. Morphology and semi-quantitative immunohistochemistry for collagen types I and II and procollagen IIA in the repair tissue were studied. Repair cartilage thickness was 2.89+/-1.5 mm and there was good basal integration between the repair cartilage, calcified cartilage and subchondral bone. Sixty five percent of the biopsies were predominantly fibrocartilage (mostly type I collagen and IIA procollagen), 15% were hyaline cartilage (mostly type II collagen), 17% were of mixed morphology and 3% were fibrous tissue (mostly type I collagen). Type II collagen and IIA procollagen were usually found in the lower regions near the bone and most type II collagen was present 30-60 months after treatment. The presence of type IIA procollagen in the repair tissue supports our hypothesis that this is indicative of a developing cartilage, with the ratio of type II collagen:procollagen IIA increasing from <2% in the first two years post-treatment to 30% three to five years after treatment. This suggests that cartilage repair tissue produced following ACI treatment, is likely to take some years to mature.

  10. A biocompatible hybrid material with simultaneous calcium and strontium release capability for bone tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Almeida, J Carlos; Wacha, András; Gomes, Pedro S; Alves, Luís C; Fernandes, M Helena Vaz; Salvado, Isabel M Miranda; Fernandes, M Helena R

    2016-05-01

    The increasing interest in the effect of strontium in bone tissue repair has promoted the development of bioactive materials with strontium release capability. According to literature, hybrid materials based on the system PDMS-SiO2 have been considered a plausible alternative as they present a mechanical behavior similar to the one of the human bone. The main purpose of this study was to obtain a biocompatible hybrid material with simultaneous calcium and strontium release capability. A hybrid material, in the system PDMS-SiO2-CaO-SrO, was prepared with the incorporation of 0.05 mol of titanium per mol of SiO2. Calcium and strontium were added using the respective acetates as sources, following a sol-gel technique previously developed by the present authors. The obtained samples were characterized by FT-IR, solid-state NMR, and SAXS, and surface roughness was analyzed by 3D optical profilometry. In vitro studies were performed by immersion of the samples in Kokubo's SBF for different periods of time, in order to determine the bioactive potential of these hybrids. Surfaces of the immersed samples were observed by SEM, EDS and PIXE, showing the formation of calcium phosphate precipitates. Supernatants were analyzed by ICP, revealing the capability of the material to simultaneously fix phosphorus ions and to release calcium and strontium, in a concentration range within the values reported as suitable for the induction of the bone tissue repair. The material demonstrated to be cytocompatible when tested with MG63 osteoblastic cells, exhibiting an inductive effect on cell proliferation and alkaline phosphatase activity.

  11. Tissue repair genes: the TiRe database and its implication for skin wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Yanai, Hagai; Budovsky, Arie; Tacutu, Robi; Barzilay, Thomer; Abramovich, Amir; Ziesche, Rolf; Fraifeld, Vadim E.

    2016-01-01

    Wound healing is an inherent feature of any multicellular organism and recent years have brought about a huge amount of data regarding regular and abnormal tissue repair. Despite the accumulated knowledge, modulation of wound healing is still a major biomedical challenge, especially in advanced ages. In order to collect and systematically organize what we know about the key players in wound healing, we created the TiRe (Tissue Repair) database, an online collection of genes and proteins that were shown to directly affect skin wound healing. To date, TiRe contains 397 entries for four organisms: Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, Sus domesticus, and Homo sapiens. Analysis of the TiRe dataset of skin wound healing-associated genes showed that skin wound healing genes are (i) over-conserved among vertebrates, but are under-conserved in invertebrates; (ii) enriched in extracellular and immuno-inflammatory genes; and display (iii) high interconnectivity and connectivity to other proteins. The latter may provide potential therapeutic targets. In addition, a slower or faster skin wound healing is indicative of an aging or longevity phenotype only when assessed in advanced ages, but not in the young. In the long run, we aim for TiRe to be a one-station resource that provides researchers and clinicians with the essential data needed for a better understanding of the mechanisms of wound healing, designing new experiments, and the development of new therapeutic strategies. TiRe is freely available online at http://www.tiredb.org. PMID:27049721

  12. Evaluation of a new range of light-activated surgical adhesives for tissue repair in a porcine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Jill N.; Hodges, Diane E.; March, Keith L.; McNally-Heintzelman, Karen M.

    2001-05-01

    An in vitro study was conducted to determine the feasibility of using a new range of light-activated surgical adhesives for incision repair in a wide range of tissue types. Biodegradable polymer membranes of controlled porosity were fabricated with poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and salt particles using a solvent-casting and particulate- leaching technique. The porous membranes were doped with protein solder composed of 50%(w/v) bovine serum albumin solder and 0.5 mg/ml indocyanine green (ICG) dye mixed in deionized water. Tissue incisions were repaired using the surgical adhesive in conjunction with an 805-nm diode laser. Nine organs were tested ranging from skin to liver to the small intestine, as well as the coronary, pulmonary, carotid, femoral and splenetic arteries. Acute breaking strengths were measured and the data were analyzed by Student's T-test. Repairs formed on the small intestine were most successful followed by spleen, atrium, kidney, muscle and skin. The strongest vascular repairs were achieved in the carotid artery and femoral artery. The new surgical adhesive could possibly be used as a simple and effective method to stop bleeding and repair tissue quickly in an emergency situation, or as a substitute to mechanical staples or sutures in many clinical applications.

  13. Global endometrial transcriptomic profiling: transient immune activation precedes tissue proliferation and repair in healthy beef cows

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background All cows experience bacterial contamination and tissue injury in the uterus postpartum, instigating a local inflammatory immune response. However mechanisms that control inflammation and achieve a physiologically functioning endometrium, while avoiding disease in the postpartum cow are not succinctly defined. This study aimed to identify novel candidate genes indicative of inflammation resolution during involution in healthy beef cows. Previous histological analysis of the endometrium revealed elevated inflammation 15 days postpartum (DPP) which was significantly decreased by 30 DPP. The current study generated a genome-wide transcriptomic profile of endometrial biopsies from these cows at both time points using mRNA-Seq. The pathway analysis tool GoSeq identified KEGG pathways enriched by significantly differentially expressed genes at both time points. Novel candidate genes associated with inflammatory resolution were subsequently validated in additional postpartum animals using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Results mRNA-Seq revealed 1,107 significantly differentially expressed genes, 73 of which were increased 15 DPP and 1,034 were increased 30 DPP. Early postpartum, enriched immune pathways (adjusted P < 0.1) included the T cell receptor signalling pathway, graft-versus-host disease and cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction pathways. However 30 DPP, where the majority of genes were differentially expressed, the enrichment (adjusted P < 0.1) of tissue repair and proliferative activity pathways was observed. Nineteen candidate genes selected from mRNA-Seq results, were independently assessed by qRT-PCR in additional postpartum cows (5 animals) at both time points. SAA1/2, GATA2, IGF1, SHC2, and SERPINA14 genes were significantly elevated 30 DPP and are functionally associated with tissue repair and the restoration of uterine homeostasis postpartum. Conclusions The results of this study reveal an early activation of the immune

  14. Subchondral pre-solidified chitosan/blood implants elicit reproducible early osteochondral wound-repair responses including neutrophil and stromal cell chemotaxis, bone resorption and repair, enhanced repair tissue integration and delayed matrix deposition

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In this study we evaluated a novel approach to guide the bone marrow-driven articular cartilage repair response in skeletally aged rabbits. We hypothesized that dispersed chitosan particles implanted close to the bone marrow degrade in situ in a molecular mass-dependent manner, and attract more stromal cells to the site in aged rabbits compared to the blood clot in untreated controls. Methods Three microdrill hole defects, 1.4 mm diameter and 2 mm deep, were created in both knee trochlea of 30 month-old New Zealand White rabbits. Each of 3 isotonic chitosan solutions (150, 40, 10 kDa, 80% degree of deaceylation, with fluorescent chitosan tracer) was mixed with autologous rabbit whole blood, clotted with Tissue Factor to form cylindrical implants, and press-fit in drill holes in the left knee while contralateral holes received Tissue Factor or no treatment. At day 1 or day 21 post-operative, defects were analyzed by micro-computed tomography, histomorphometry and stereology for bone and soft tissue repair. Results All 3 implants filled the top of defects at day 1 and were partly degraded in situ at 21 days post-operative. All implants attracted neutrophils, osteoclasts and abundant bone marrow-derived stromal cells, stimulated bone resorption followed by new woven bone repair (bone remodeling) and promoted repair tissue-bone integration. 150 kDa chitosan implant was less degraded, and elicited more apoptotic neutrophils and bone resorption than 10 kDa chitosan implant. Drilled controls elicited a poorly integrated fibrous or fibrocartilaginous tissue. Conclusions Pre-solidified implants elicit stromal cells and vigorous bone plate remodeling through a phase involving neutrophil chemotaxis. Pre-solidified chitosan implants are tunable by molecular mass, and could be beneficial for augmented marrow stimulation therapy if the recruited stromal cells can progress to bone and cartilage repair. PMID:23324433

  15. The Tissue Fibrinolytic System Contributes to the Induction of Macrophage Function and CCL3 during Bone Repair in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kawao, Naoyuki; Tamura, Yukinori; Horiuchi, Yoshitaka; Okumoto, Katsumi; Yano, Masato; Okada, Kiyotaka; Matsuo, Osamu; Kaji, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages play crucial roles in repair process of various tissues. However, the details in the role of macrophages during bone repair still remains unknown. Herein, we examined the contribution of the tissue fibrinolytic system to the macrophage functions in bone repair after femoral bone defect by using male mice deficient in plasminogen (Plg–/–), urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA–/–) or tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA–/–) genes and their wild-type littermates. Bone repair of the femur was delayed in uPA–/– mice until day 6, compared with wild-type (uPA+/+) mice. Number of Osterix-positive cells and vessel formation were decreased in uPA–/– mice at the bone injury site on day 4, compared with those in uPA+/+ mice. Number of macrophages and their phagocytosis at the bone injury site were reduced in uPA–/– and Plg–/–, but not in tPA–/– mice on day 4. Although uPA or plasminogen deficiency did not affect the levels of cytokines, including TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-4 and IFN-γ mRNA in the damaged femur, the elevation in CCL3 mRNA levels was suppressed in uPA–/– and Plg–/–, but not in tPA–/– mice. Neutralization of CCL3 antagonized macrophage recruitment to the site of bone injury and delayed bone repair in uPA+/+, but not in uPA–/– mice. Our results provide novel evidence that the tissue fibrinolytic system contributes to the induction of macrophage recruitment and CCL3 at the bone injury site, thereby, leading to the enhancement of the repair process. PMID:25893677

  16. Tissue-engineered rhesus monkey nerve grafts for the repair of long ulnar nerve defects: similar outcomes to autologous nerve grafts

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Chang-qing; Hu, Jun; Xiang, Jian-ping; Zhu, Jia-kai; Liu, Xiao-lin; Luo, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Acellular nerve allografts can help preserve normal nerve structure and extracellular matrix composition. These allografts have low immunogenicity and are more readily available than autologous nerves for the repair of long-segment peripheral nerve defects. In this study, we repaired a 40-mm ulnar nerve defect in rhesus monkeys with tissue-engineered peripheral nerve, and compared the outcome with that of autograft. The graft was prepared using a chemical extract from adult rhesus monkeys and seeded with allogeneic Schwann cells. Pathomorphology, electromyogram and immunohistochemistry findings revealed the absence of palmar erosion or ulcers, and that the morphology and elasticity of the hypothenar eminence were normal 5 months postoperatively. There were no significant differences in the mean peak compound muscle action potential, the mean nerve conduction velocity, or the number of neurofilaments between the experimental and control groups. However, outcome was significantly better in the experimental group than in the blank group. These findings suggest that chemically extracted allogeneic nerve seeded with autologous Schwann cells can repair 40-mm ulnar nerve defects in the rhesus monkey. The outcomes are similar to those obtained with autologous nerve graft. PMID:28123431

  17. The adult brain tissue response to hollow fiber membranes of varying surface architecture with or without cotransplanted cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ning

    A variety of biomaterials have been chronically implanted into the central nervous system (CNS) for repair or therapeutic purposes. Regardless of the application, chronic implantation of materials into the CNS induces injury and elicits a wound healing response, eventually leading to the formation of a dense extracellular matrix (ECM)-rich scar tissue that is associated with the segregation of implanted materials from the surrounding normal tissue. Often this reaction results in impaired performance of indwelling CNS devices. In order to enhance the performance of biomaterial-based implantable devices in the CNS, this thesis investigated whether adult brain tissue response to implanted biomaterials could be manipulated by changing biomaterial surface properties or further by utilizing the biology of co-transplanted cells. Specifically, the adult rat brain tissue response to chronically implanted poly(acrylonitrile-vinylchloride) (PAN-PVC) hollow fiber membranes (HFMs) of varying surface architecture were examined temporally at 2, 4, and 12 weeks postimplantation. Significant differences were discovered in the brain tissue response to the PAN-PVC HFMs of varying surface architecture at 4 and 12 weeks. To extend this work, whether the soluble factors derived from a co-transplanted cellular component further affect the brain tissue response to an implanted HFM in a significant way was critically exploited. The cells used were astrocytes, whose ability to influence scar formation process following CNS injury by physical contact with the host tissue had been documented in the literature. Data indicated for the first time that astrocyte-derived soluble factors ameliorate the adult brain tissue reactivity toward HFM implants in an age-dependent manner. While immature astrocytes secreted soluble factors that suppressed the brain tissue reactivity around the implants, mature astrocytes secreted factors that enhanced the gliotic response. These findings prove the feasibility

  18. Dissecting DNA repair in adult high grade gliomas for patient stratification in the post-genomic era

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Christina; Agarwal, Devika; Abdel-Fatah, Tarek M.A.; Lourdusamy, Anbarasu; Grundy, Richard; Auer, Dorothee T.; Walker, David; Lakhani, Ravi; Scott, Ian S.; Chan, Stephen; Ball, Graham; Madhusudan, Srinivasan

    2014-01-01

    Deregulation of multiple DNA repair pathways may contribute to aggressive biology and therapy resistance in gliomas. We evaluated transcript levels of 157 genes involved in DNA repair in an adult glioblastoma Test set (n=191) and validated in ‘The Cancer Genome Atlas’ (TCGA) cohort (n=508). A DNA repair prognostic index model was generated. Artificial neural network analysis (ANN) was conducted to investigate global gene interactions. Protein expression by immunohistochemistry was conducted in 61 tumours. A fourteen DNA repair gene expression panel was associated with poor survival in Test and TCGA cohorts. A Cox multivariate model revealed APE1, NBN, PMS2, MGMT and PTEN as independently associated with poor prognosis. A DNA repair prognostic index incorporating APE1, NBN, PMS2, MGMT and PTEN stratified patients in to three prognostic sub-groups with worsening survival. APE1, NBN, PMS2, MGMT and PTEN also have predictive significance in patients who received chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. ANN analysis of APE1, NBN, PMS2, MGMT and PTEN revealed interactions with genes involved in transcription, hypoxia and metabolic regulation. At the protein level, low APE1 and low PTEN remain associated with poor prognosis. In conclusion, multiple DNA repair pathways operate to influence biology and clinical outcomes in adult high grade gliomas. PMID:25026297

  19. The small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycans in tissue repair and atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Hultgårdh-Nilsson, Anna; Borén, Jan; Chakravarti, Shukti

    2015-01-01

    Proteoglycans consist of a protein core with one or more covalently attached glycosaminoglycan (GAG) side chains, and have multiple roles in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. Here we discuss the potential and known functions of a group of small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycans (SLRPs) in atherosclerosis. We focus on five SLRPs, decorin, biglycan lumican, fibromodulin, and PRELP, because these have been detected in atherosclerotic plaques or demonstrated to have a role in animal models of atherosclerosis. Decorin and biglycan are modified post translationally by substitution with chondroitin/dermatan sulfate GAGs, whereas lumican, fibromodulin, and PRELP have keratan sulfate side chains, and the core proteins have leucine-rich repeat (LRR) motifs that are characteristic of the LRR superfamily. The chondroitin/dermatan sulfate GAG side chains have been implicated in lipid retention in atherosclerosis. The core proteins are discussed here in the context of: (i) interactions with collagens and their implications in tissue integrity, fibrosis, and wound repair; and (ii) interactions with growth factors, cytokines, pathogen-associated molecular patterns, and cell surface receptors that impact normal physiology and disease processes such as inflammation, innate immune responses, and wound healing (i.e processes that are all important in plaque development and progression). Thus, studies of these SLRPs in the context of wound healing are providing clues about their functions that may be important in early stages of atherosclerosis to plaque vulnerability and cardiovascular disease at later stages. Understanding of signal transduction pathways regulated by the core protein interactions is leading to novel roles and therapeutic potential for these proteins in wound repair and atherosclerosis. PMID:26477596

  20. A new concept of endometriosis and adenomyosis: tissue injury and repair (TIAR).

    PubMed

    Leyendecker, Gerhard; Wildt, Ludwig

    2011-03-01

    Pelvic endometriosis, deeply infiltrating endometriosis and uterine adenomyosis share a common pathophysiology and may be integrated into the physiological mechanism and new nosological concept of 'tissue injury and repair' (TIAR) and may, in this context, just represent the extreme of a basically physiological, estrogen-related mechanism that is pathologically exaggerated in an extremely estrogen-sensitive reproductive organ. The acronym TIAR describes a fundamental and apparently ubiquitous biological system that becomes operative in mesenchymal tissues following tissue injury and, upon activation, results in the local production of estradiol. Endometriosis and adenomyosis are caused by trauma. In the spontaneously developing disease, chronic uterine peristaltic activity or phases of hyperperistalsis induce, at the endometrial-myometrial interface near the fundo-cornual raphe, microtraumatisations, with activation of the TIAR mechanism. With ongoing traumatisations, such sites of inflammation might accumulate and the increasingly produced estrogens interfere in a paracrine fashion with ovarian control over uterine peristaltic activity, resulting in permanent hyperperistalsis and a self-perpetuation of the disease process. Overt autotraumatisation of the uterus with dislocation of fragments of basal endometrium into the peritoneal cavity and infiltration of basal endometrium into the depth of the myometrial wall ensues. In most cases of endometriosis/adenomyosis a causal event early in the reproductive period of life must be postulated, rapidly leading to archimetral hyperestrogenism and uterine hyperperistalsis. In late premenopausal adenomyosis such an event might not have occurred. However, as indicated by the high prevalence of the disease, it appears to be unavoidable that, with time, chronic normoperistalsis throughout the reproductive period of life accumulates to the same extent of microtraumatisation. With activation of the TIAR mechanism followed by

  1. Adult stem cells for cardiac repair: a choice between skeletal myoblasts and bone marrow stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lei; Haider, Husnain Kh; Sim, Eugene K W

    2006-01-01

    The real promise of a stem cell-based approach for cardiac regeneration and repair lies in the promotion of myogenesis and angiogenesis at the site of the cell graft to achieve both structural and functional benefits. Despite all of the progress and promise in this field, many unanswered questions remain; the answers to these questions will provide the much-needed breakthrough to harness the real benefits of cell therapy for the heart in the clinical perspective. One of the major issues is the choice of donor cell type for transplantation. Multiple cell types with varying potentials have been assessed for their ability to repopulate the infarcted myocardium; however, only the adult stem cells, that is, skeletal myoblasts (SkM) and bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMC), have been translated from the laboratory bench to clinical use. Which of these two cell types will provide the best option for clinical application in heart cell therapy remains arguable. With results pouring in from the long-term follow-ups of previously conducted phase I clinical studies, and with the onset of phase II clinical trials involving larger population of patients, transplantation of stem cells as a sole therapy without an adjunct conventional revascularization procedure will provide a deeper insight into the effectiveness of this approach. The present article discusses the pros and cons of using SkM and BMC individually or in combination for cardiac repair, and critically analyzes the progress made with each cell type.

  2. Reduced Activity of Double-Strand Break Repair Genes in Prostate Cancer Patients With Late Normal Tissue Radiation Toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Oorschot, Bregje van; Hovingh, Suzanne E.; Moerland, Perry D.; Medema, Jan Paul; Stalpers, Lukas J.A.; Vrieling, Harry; Franken, Nicolaas A.P.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate clinical parameters and DNA damage response as possible risk factors for radiation toxicity in the setting of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Clinical parameters of 61 prostate cancer patients, 34 with (overresponding, OR) and 27 without (non-responding, NR) severe late radiation toxicity were assembled. In addition, for a matched subset the DNA damage repair kinetics (γ-H2AX assay) and expression profiles of DNA repair genes were determined in ex vivo irradiated lymphocytes. Results: Examination of clinical data indicated none of the considered clinical parameters to be correlated with the susceptibility of patients to develop late radiation toxicity. Although frequencies of γ-H2AX foci induced immediately after irradiation were similar (P=.32), significantly higher numbers of γ-H2AX foci were found 24 hours after irradiation in OR compared with NR patients (P=.03). Patient-specific γ-H2AX foci decay ratios were significantly higher in NR patients than in OR patients (P<.0001). Consequently, NR patients seem to repair DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) more efficiently than OR patients. Moreover, gene expression analysis indicated several genes of the homologous recombination pathway to be stronger induced in NR compared with OR patients (P<.05). A similar trend was observed in genes of the nonhomologous end-joining repair pathway (P=.09). This is congruent with more proficient repair of DNA DSBs in patients without late radiation toxicity. Conclusions: Both gene expression profiling and DNA DSB repair kinetics data imply that less-efficient repair of radiation-induced DSBs may contribute to the development of late normal tissue damage. Induction levels of DSB repair genes (eg, RAD51) may potentially be used to assess the risk for late radiation toxicity.

  3. Poly-4-hydroxybutyrate (P4HB): a new generation of resorbable medical devices for tissue repair and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Williams, Simon F; Rizk, Said; Martin, David P

    2013-10-01

    Poly-4-hydroxybutyrate (P4HB) is a thermoplastic, linear polyester, produced by recombinant fermentation, that can be converted into a wide range of resorbable medical devices. P4HB fibers are exceptionally strong, and can be designed to provide prolonged strength retention in vivo. In 2007, the FDA cleared a monofilament suture made from P4HB for general soft tissue approximation and/or ligation. Subsequently, surgical mesh devices for hernia repair, tendon and ligament repair, and plastic and reconstructive surgery have been introduced for clinical use. This review describes the unique properties of P4HB, its clinical applications, and potential uses that are under development.

  4. Designer Dual Therapy Nanolayered Implant Coatings Eradicate Biofilms and Accelerate Bone Tissue Repair.

    PubMed

    Min, Jouha; Choi, Ki Young; Dreaden, Erik C; Padera, Robert F; Braatz, Richard D; Spector, Myron; Hammond, Paula T

    2016-04-26

    Infections associated with orthopedic implants cause increased morbidity and significant healthcare cost. A prolonged and expensive two-stage procedure requiring two surgical steps and a 6-8 week period of joint immobilization exists as today's gold standard for the revision arthroplasty of an infected prosthesis. Because infection is much more common in implant replacement surgeries, these issues greatly impact long-term patient care for a continually growing part of the population. Here, we demonstrate that a single-stage revision using prostheses coated with self-assembled, hydrolytically degradable multilayers that sequentially deliver the antibiotic (gentamicin) and the osteoinductive growth factor (BMP-2) in a time-staggered manner enables both eradication of established biofilms and complete and rapid bone tissue repair around the implant in rats with induced osteomyelitis. The nanolayered construct allows precise independent control of release kinetics and loading for each therapeutic agent in an infected implant environment. Antibiotics contained in top layers can be tuned to provide a rapid release at early times sufficient to eliminate infection, followed by sustained release for several weeks, and the underlying BMP-2 component enables a long-term sustained release of BMP-2, which induced more significant and mechanically competent bone formation than a short-term burst release. The successful growth factor-mediated osteointegration of the multilayered implants with the host tissue improved bone-implant interfacial strength 15-fold when compared with the uncoated one. These findings demonstrate the potential of this layered release strategy to introduce a durable next-generation implant solution, ultimately an important step forward to future large animal models toward the clinic.

  5. Ultrafine fibrous gelatin scaffolds with deep cell infiltration mimicking 3D ECMs for soft tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qiuran; Xu, Helan; Cai, Shaobo; Yang, Yiqi

    2014-07-01

    In this research, ultrafine fibrous scaffolds with deep cell infiltration and sufficient water stability have been developed from gelatin, aiming to mimic the extracellular matrices (ECMs) as three dimensional (3D) stromas for soft tissue repair. The ultrafine fibrous scaffolds produced from the current technologies of electrospinning and phase separation are either lack of 3D oriented fibrous structure or too compact to be penetrated by cells. Whilst electrospun scaffolds are able to emulate two dimensional (2D) ECMs, they cannot mimic the 3D ECM stroma. In this work, ultralow concentration phase separation (ULCPS) has been developed to fabricate gelatin scaffolds with 3D randomly oriented ultrafine fibers and loose structures. Besides, a non-toxic citric acid crosslinking system has been established for the ULCPS method. This system could endow the scaffolds with sufficient water stability, while maintain the fibrous structures of scaffolds. Comparing with electrospun scaffolds, the ULCPS scaffolds showed improved cytocompatibility and more importantly, cell infiltration. This research has proved the possibility of using gelatin ULCPS scaffolds as the substitutes of 3D ECMs.

  6. Immune Modulation to Improve Tissue Engineering Outcomes for Cartilage Repair in the Osteoarthritic Joint

    PubMed Central

    Fahy, Niamh; Farrell, Eric; Ritter, Thomas; Ryan, Aideen E.

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA), the most common form of arthritis, is a disabling degenerative joint disease affecting synovial joints and is associated with cartilage destruction, inflammation of the synovial membrane, and subchondral bone remodeling. Inflammation of the synovial membrane may arise secondary to degenerative processes in articular cartilage (AC), or may be a primary occurrence in OA pathogenesis. However, synovial inflammation plays a key role in the pathogenesis and disease progression of OA through the production of pro-inflammatory mediators, and is associated with cartilage destruction and pain. The triggers that initiate activation of the immune response in OA are unknown, but crosstalk between osteoarthritic chondrocytes, cartilage degradation products, and the synovium may act to perpetuate this response. Increasing evidence has emerged highlighting an important role for pro-inflammatory mediators and infiltrating inflammatory cell populations in the progression of the disease. Tissue engineering strategies hold great potential for the repair of damaged AC in an osteoarthritic joint. However, an in-depth understanding of how OA-associated inflammation impacts chondrocyte and progenitor cell behavior is required to achieve efficient cartilage regeneration in a catabolic osteoarthritic environment. In this review, we will discuss the role of inflammation in OA, and investigate novel immune modulation strategies that may prevent disease progression and facilitate successful cartilage regeneration for the treatment of OA. PMID:24950588

  7. Egr-1: new conductor for the tissue repair orchestra directs harmony (regeneration) or cacophony (fibrosis)

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Swati; Fang, Feng; Tourtellotte, Warren; Varga, John

    2014-01-01

    Fibroblasts and myofibroblasts are the key effector cells executing physiologic tissue repair leading to regeneration on one hand, and pathological fibrogenesis leading to chronic fibrosing conditions on the other. Recent studies identify the multifunctional transcription factor Early Growth Response-1(Egr-1) as an important mediator of fibroblast activation triggered by diverse stimuli. Egr-1 has potent stimulatory effects on fibrotic gene expression, and aberrant Egr-1 expression or function is associated with animal models of fibrosis and human fibrotic disorders including emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis, pulmonary hypertension and systemic sclerosis. Pharmacological suppression or genetic targeting of Egr-1 blocks fibrotic responses in vitro and ameliorates experimental fibrosis in the skin and lung. In contrast, Egr-1 appear to acts as a negative regulator of hepatic fibrosis in mouse models, suggesting a context-dependent role in fibrosis. The Egr-1-binding protein Nab2 is an endogenous inhibitor of Egr-1-mediated signaling, and abrogates the stimulation of fibrotic responses induced by transforming growth factor-ß (TGF-ß). Moreover, mice deficient in Nab2 show excessive collagen accumulation in the skin. These observations highlight a previously unsuspected fundamental physiologic function for the Egr-1/Nab2 signaling axis in regulating fibrogenesis, and suggest that Egr-1 may be a potential novel therapeutic target in human diseases complicated by fibrosis. This review summarizes recent advances in understanding the regulation and complex functional role of Egr-1 and its related proteins and inhibitors in pathological fibrosis. PMID:23132749

  8. 3D ultrasound biomicroscopy for assessment of cartilage repair tissue: volumetric characterisation and correlation to established classification systems.

    PubMed

    Schöne, M; Männicke, N; Somerson, J S; Marquaß, B; Henkelmann, R; Mochida, J; Aigner, T; Raum, K; Schulz, R M

    2016-02-08

    Objective and sensitive assessment of cartilage repair outcomes lacks suitable methods. This study investigated the feasibility of 3D ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) to quantify cartilage repair outcomes volumetrically and their correlation with established classification systems. 32 sheep underwent bilateral treatment of a focal cartilage defect. One or two years post-operatively the repair outcomes were assessed and scored macroscopically (Outerbridge, ICRS-CRA), by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, MOCART), and histopathology (O'Driscoll, ICRS-I and ICRS-II). The UBM data were acquired after MRI and used to reconstruct the shape of the initial cartilage layer, enabling the estimation of the initial cartilage thickness and defect volume as well as volumetric parameters for defect filling, repair tissue, bone loss and bone overgrowth. The quantification of the repair outcomes revealed high variations in the initial thickness of the cartilage layer, indicating the need for cartilage thickness estimation before creating a defect. Furthermore, highly significant correlations were found for the defect filling estimated from UBM to the established classification systems. 3D visualisation of the repair regions showed highly variable morphology within single samples. This raises the question as to whether macroscopic, MRI and histopathological scoring provide sufficient reliability. The biases of the individual methods will be discussed within this context. UBM was shown to be a feasible tool to evaluate cartilage repair outcomes, whereby the most important objective parameter is the defect filling. Translation of UBM into arthroscopic or transcutaneous ultrasound examinations would allow non-destructive and objective follow-up of individual patients and better comparison between the results of clinical trials.

  9. Preparation and Characterization of Biomimetic Hydroxyapatite-Resorbable Polymer Composites for Hard Tissue Repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiebner, Kristopher Robert

    Autografts are the orthopedic "gold standard" for repairing bone voids. Autografts are osteoconductive and do not elicit an immune response, but they are in short supply and require a second surgery to harvest the bone graft. Allografts are currently the most common materials used for the repair of segmental defects in hard tissue. Unlike autografts, allografts can cause an undesirable immune response and the possibility of disease transmission is a major concern. As an alternative to the above approaches, recent research efforts have focused on the use of composite materials made from hydroxyapatite (HA) and bioresorbable polymers, such as poly-L-lactide (PLLA). Recent results have shown that the surface hydroxides on HA can initiate the ring opening polymerization (ROP) of L-lactide and other lactones creating a composite with superior interfacial strength. This thesis demonstrates that the surface of porous biologically derived HA substrates, such as coralline HA and trabecular bone, can be used to initiate the ROP of L-lactide and other lactones from the vapor phase. This process increases the strength of the porous scaffold through the deposition of a thin, uniform polymer coating, while maintaining the porous structure. The kinetics of the chemical vapor deposition polymerization (CVDP) are described using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). The reaction temperature and monomer vapor pressure are found to affect the rate of the polymerization. Also described in this thesis is the preparation of a porous polymer scaffold that mimics the structure of demineralized bone matrix (DBM). This demineralized bone matrix simulant (DBMS) is created using anorganic bovine bone as a template to initiate the polymerization of various lactones, followed by the removal of the HA scaffold. This material retained its shape and exhibits mechanical properties superior to DBM. Finally it is shown that HA can be used to initiate the ROP of a-caprolactam and the biocompatibility

  10. Spred-2 expression is associated with neural repair of injured adult zebrafish brain.

    PubMed

    Lim, Fei Tieng; Ogawa, Satoshi; Parhar, Ishwar S

    2016-11-01

    Sprouty-related protein-2 (Spred-2) is a negative regulator of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) pathway, which is important for cell proliferation, neuronal differentiation, plasticity and survival. Nevertheless, its general molecular characteristics such as gene expression patterns and potential role in neural repair in the brain remain unknown. Thus, this study aimed to characterise the expression of spred-2 in the zebrafish brain. Digoxigenin-in situ hybridization showed spred-2 mRNA-expressing cells were mainly seen in the proliferative zones such as the olfactory bulb, telencephalon, optic tectum, cerebellum, and the dorsal and ventral hypothalamus, and most of which were neuronal cells. To evaluate the potential role of spred-2 in neuro-regeneration, spred-2 gene expression was examined in the dorsal telencephalon followed by mechanical-lesion. Real-time PCR showed a significant reduction of spred-2 mRNA levels in the telencephalon on 1-day till 2-days post-lesion and gradually increased to normal levels as compared with intact. Furthermore, to confirm involvement of Spred-2 signalling in the cell proliferation after brain injury, double-labelling of spred-2 in-situ hybridization with immunofluorescence of BrdU and phosphorylated-ERK1/2 (p-ERK1/2), a downstream of Spred-2 was performed. Increase of BrdU and p-ERK1/2 immunoreactive cells suggest that a decrease in spred-2 after injury might associated with activation of the ERK pathway to stimulate cell proliferation in the adult zebrafish brain. The present study demonstrates the possible role of Spred-2 signalling in cell proliferative phase during the neural repair in the injured zebrafish brain.

  11. Plasma Levels of High Sensitivity Cardiac Troponin T in Adults with Repaired Tetralogy of Fallot

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Clare T. M.; Wong, Sophia J.; Ip, Janice J. K.; Wong, Wai-keung; Tsang, Kwong-cheong; Lam, Wendy W. M.; Cheung, Yiu-fai

    2015-01-01

    Detectable low circulating level of cardiac troponin T (cTnT) may reflect subclinical myocardial injury. We tested the hypothesis that circulating levels of hs-cTnT are altered in adults with repaired tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) and associated with ventricular volume load and function. Eighty-eight TOF patients and 48 controls were studied. Plasma hs-cTnT levels were determined using a highly sensitive assay (hs-cTnT). The right (RV) and left ventricular (LV) volumes and ejection fraction (EF) were measured using 3D echocardiography and, in 52 patients, cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). The median (interquartile range) for male and female patients were 4.87 (3.83–6.62) ng/L and 3.11 (1.00–3.87) ng/L, respectively. Thirty percent of female but none of the male patients had increased hs-cTnT levels. Female patients with elevated hs-cTnT levels, compared to those without, had greater RV end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes and LV systolic dyssynchrony index (all p < 0.05). For patient cohort only, hs-cTnT levels correlated positively with CMR-derived RV end-diastolic volume and negatively with echocardiography-derived LV and RV EF (all p < 0.05). Multiple linear regression identified sex and RV EF as significant correlates of log-transformed hs-cTnT levels. Increased hs-cTnT levels occur in 30% of female patients after TOF repair, and are associated with greater RV volumes and worse RV EF. PMID:26360613

  12. Molecular Mechanisms of Soft Tissue Regeneration and Bone Formation in Mice: Implications in Fracture Repair and Wound Healing in Humans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    evaluate the conservation of this gene by examining the gene sequence in drosophila, c - elegans and zebrafish. The sequences of both Darc gene and Gas5... gene were blast searched with the whole genomes of Drosophila, C . elegans , as well as zebrafish, but no significant similarities were found with the... genes that are involved in soft tissue repair/regeneration using inbred strains of mice as model systems. C . Technical Objective 3: The goal of our

  13. Adult Stem Cells from the Hyaluronic Acid-Rich Node and Duct System Differentiate into Neuronal Cells and Repair Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung J.; Park, Sang H.; Kim, Yu I.; Hwang, Sunhee; Kwon, Patrick M.; Han, In S.

    2014-01-01

    The existence of a hyaluronic acid-rich node and duct system (HAR-NDS) within the lymphatic and blood vessels was demonstrated previously. The HAR-NDS was enriched with small (3.0–5.0 μm in diameter), adult stem cells with properties similar to those of the very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs). Sca-1+Lin−CD45− cells were enriched approximately 100-fold in the intravascular HAR-NDS compared with the bone marrow. We named these adult stem cells “node and duct stem cells (NDSCs).” NDSCs formed colonies on C2C12 feeder layers, were positive for fetal alkaline phosphatase, and could be subcultured on the feeder layers. NDSCs were Oct4+Nanog+SSEA-1+Sox2+, while VSELs were Oct4+Nanog+SSEA-1+Sox2−. NDSCs had higher sphere-forming efficiency and proliferative potential than VSELs, and they were found to differentiate into neuronal cells in vitro. Injection of NDSCs into mice partially repaired ischemic brain damage. Thus, we report the discovery of potential adult stem cells that may be involved in tissue regeneration. The intravascular HAR-NDS may serve as a route that delivers these stem cells to their target tissues. PMID:25027245

  14. Tissue adhesives for meniscus tear repair: an overview of current advances and prospects for future clinical solutions.

    PubMed

    Bochyńska, A I; Hannink, G; Grijpma, D W; Buma, P

    2016-05-01

    Menisci are crucial structures in the knee joint as they play important functions in load transfer, maintaining joint stability and in homeostasis of articular cartilage. Unfortunately, ones of the most frequently occurring knee injuries are meniscal tears. Particularly tears in the avascular zone of the meniscus usually do not heal spontaneously and lead to pain, swelling and locking of the knee joint. Eventually, after a (partial) meniscectomy, they will lead to osteoarthritis. Current treatment modalities to repair tears and by that restore the integrity of the native meniscus still carry their drawbacks and a new robust solution is desired. A strong tissue adhesive could provide such a solution and could potentially improve on sutures, which are the current gold standard. Moreover, a glue could serve as a carrier for biological compounds known to enhance tissue healing. Only few tissue adhesives, e.g., Dermabond(®) and fibrin glue, are already successfully used in clinical practice for other applications, but are not considered suitable for gluing meniscus tissue due to their sub-optimal mechanical properties or toxicity. There is a growing interest and research field focusing on the development of novel polymer-based tissue adhesives, but up to now, there is no material specially designed for the repair of meniscal tears. In this review, we discuss the current clinical gold standard treatment of meniscal tears and present an overview of new developments in this field. Moreover, we discuss the properties of different tissue adhesives for their potential use in meniscal tear repair. Finally, we formulate recommendations regarding the design criteria of material properties and adhesive strength for clinically applicable glues for meniscal tears.

  15. Host tissue response by the expression of collagen to cyanoacrylate adhesives used in implant fixation for abdominal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Gemma; Rodríguez, Marta; Pérez-Köhler, Bárbara; Mesa-Ciller, Claudia; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Mar; San Román, Julio; Bellón, Juan M

    2017-04-01

    The less traumatic use of surgical adhesives rather than sutures for mesh fixation in hernia repair has started to gain popularity because they induce less host tissue damage and provoke less postoperative pain. This study examines the host tissue response to a new cyanoacrylate (CA) adhesive (n-octyl, OCA). Partial defects (3 × 5 cm) created in the rabbit anterior abdominal wall were repaired by mesh fixation using OCA, Glubran2(®)(n-butyl-CA), Ifabond(®)(n-hexyl-CA) or sutures. Samples were obtained at 14/90 days for morphology, collagens qRT-PCR/immunofluorescence and biomechanical studies. All meshes were successfully fixed. Seroma was detected mainly in the Glubran group at 14 days. Meshes fixed using all methods showed good host tissue incorporation. No signs of degradation of any of the adhesives were observed. At 14 days, collagen 1 and 3 mRNA expression levels were greater in the suture and OCA groups, and lower in Ifabond, with levels varying significantly in the latter group with respect to the others. By 90 days, expression levels had fallen in all groups, except for collagen 3 mRNA in Ifabond. Collagen I and III protein expression was marked in the suture and OCA groups at 90 days, but lower in Ifabond at both time points. Tensile strengths were similar across groups. Our findings indicate the similar behavior of the adhesives to sutures in terms of good tissue incorporation of the meshes and optimal repair zone strength. The lower seroma rate and similar collagenization to controls induced by OCA suggests its improved behavior over the other two glues. This article deals with a preclinical study to examine different aspects of the repair process in the host of three alkyl cyanoacrylates (n-butyl (GLUBRAN 2), n-hexyl (IFABOND), and n-octyl cyanoacrylate (EVOBOND)) compared to sutures (control), in the fixation of surgical meshes for hernia repair. It goes into detail about collagen deposition in the repair zone at short and medium term. The

  16. Adult Tissue Sources for New β-cells

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Robert J.; New, Connie; Annes, Justin P.

    2014-01-01

    The diabetes pandemic incurs extraordinary public health and financial costs that are projected to expand for the foreseeable future. Consequently, the development of definitive therapies for diabetes is a priority. Currently, a wide spectrum of therapeutic strategies, from implantable insulin-delivery devices to transplantation-based cell replacement therapy, to β-cell regeneration, focus on replacing the lost insulin-production capacity of diabetics. Among these, β-cell regeneration remains promising but heretofore unproven. Indeed, recent experimental work has uncovered surprising biology that underscores the potential therapeutic benefit of β-cell regeneration. These studies have elucidated a variety of sources for the endogenous production of new β-cells from existing cells. First, β-cells, long thought to be post-mitotic, have demonstrate potential for regenerative capacity. Second, the presence of pancreatic facultative endocrine progenitor cells has been established. Third, the malleability of cellular identity has availed the possibility of generating β-cells from other differentiated cell types. Here, we will review the exciting developments surrounding endogenous sources of β-cell production and consider the potential of realizing a regenerative therapy for diabetes from adult tissues. PMID:24345765

  17. Tissue-type plasminogen activator deficiency delays bone repair: roles of osteoblastic proliferation and vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed

    Kawao, Naoyuki; Tamura, Yukinori; Okumoto, Katsumi; Yano, Masato; Okada, Kiyotaka; Matsuo, Osamu; Kaji, Hiroshi

    2014-08-01

    Further development in research of bone regeneration is necessary to meet the clinical demand for bone reconstruction. Recently, we reported that plasminogen is crucial for bone repair through enhancement of vessel formation. However, the details of the role of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) in the bone repair process still remain unknown. Herein, we examined the effects of plasminogen activators on bone repair after a femoral bone defect using tPA-deficient (tPA(-/-)) and uPA-deficient (uPA(-/-)) mice. Bone repair of the femur was delayed in tPA(-/-) mice, unlike that in wild-type (tPA(+/+)) mice. Conversely, the bone repair was comparable between wild-type (uPA(+/+)) and uPA(-/-) mice. The number of proliferative osteoblasts was decreased at the site of bone damage in tPA(-/-) mice. Moreover, the proliferation of primary calvarial osteoblasts was reduced in tPA(-/-) mice. Recombinant tPA facilitated the proliferation of mouse osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells. The proliferation enhanced by tPA was antagonized by the inhibition of endogenous annexin 2 by siRNA and by the inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 phosphorylation in MC3T3-E1 cells. Vessel formation as well as the levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) were decreased at the damaged site in tPA(-/-) mice. Our results provide novel evidence that tPA is crucial for bone repair through the facilitation of osteoblast proliferation related to annexin 2 and ERK1/2 as well as enhancement of vessel formation related to VEGF and HIF-1α at the site of bone damage.

  18. High-dose mode of mortality in Tribolium: A model system for study of radiation injury and repair in non-proliferative tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Chihing Christina.

    1989-01-01

    With appropriate doses of ionizing radiation, both the acute, or lethal-midlethal, dose-independent pattern of mortality, and the hyperacute, dose-dependent pattern, were demonstrated within a single insect genus (Tribolium). This demonstration provides resolution of apparently contradictory reports of insect radiation responses in terms of doses required to cause lethality and those based on survival time as a function of dose. A dose-dependent mortality pattern was elicited in adult Tribolium receiving high doses, viz., 300 Gy or greater; its time course was complete in 10 days, before the dose-independent pattern of mortality began. Visual observations of heavily-irradiated Tribolium suggested neural and/or neuromuscular damage, as had been previously proposed by others for lethally-irradiated wasps, flies, and mosquitoes. Results of experiments using fractionated high doses supported the suggestion that the hyperacute or high-dose mode of death is the result of damage to nonproliferative tissues. Relative resistance of a strain to the hyperacute or high-dose mode of death was not correlated with resistance to the midlethal mode, which is believed to be the result of damage to the proliferative cells of the midgut. Using the high-dose mode of death as a model of radiation damage to nonproliferative tissues, the effects of age, and of a moderate priming dose were assessed. Beetles showed age-related increase in sensitivity to the high-dose mode of death, suggesting a decline in capacity to repair radiation damage to postmitotic tissue. This correlated with a decrease (50%) in the amount of repair reflected in the sparing effect of dose-fractionation (SDF) between the age of 1 to 3 months. The age related increase in radiosensitivity was reduced by a moderate priming dose (40 or 65 Gy) given at a young age.

  19. Irradiation by pulsed Nd:YAG laser induces the production of extracellular matrix molecules by cells of the connective tissues: a tool for tissue repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monici, Monica; Basile, Venere; Cialdai, Francesca; Romano, Giovanni; Fusi, Franco; Conti, Antonio

    2008-04-01

    Many studies demonstrated that mechanical stress is a key factor for tissue homeostasis, while unloading induce loss of mass and impairment of function. Because of their physiological function, muscle, connective tissue, bone and cartilage dynamically interact with mechanical and gravitational stress, modifying their properties through the continuous modification of their composition. Indeed, it is known that mechanical stress increases the production of extracellular matrix (ECM) components by cells, but the mechanotransduction mechanisms and the optimal loading conditions required for an optimal tissue homeostasis are still unknown. Considering the importance of cell activation and ECM production in tissue regeneration, a proper use of mechanical stimulation could be a powerful tool in tissue repair and tissue engineering. Studies exploring advanced modalities for supplying mechanical stimuli are needed to increase our knowledge on mechanobiology and to develop effective clinical applications. Here we describe the effect of photomechanical stress, supplied by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser on ECM production by cells of connective tissues. Cell morphology, production of ECM molecules (collagens, fibronectin, mucopolysaccharides), cell adhesion and cell energy metabolism have been studied by using immunofluorescence and autofluorescence microscopy. The results show that photomechanical stress induces cytoskeleton remodelling, redistribution of membrane integrins, increase in production of ECM molecules. These results could be of consequence for developing clinical protocols for the treatment of connective tissue dideases by pulsed Nd:YAG laser.

  20. Temporal changes in tissue repair permit survival of diet-restricted rats from an acute lethal dose of thioacetamide.

    PubMed

    Ramaiah, S K; Bucci, T J; Warbritton, A; Soni, M G; Mehendale, H M

    1998-10-01

    Although, diet restriction (DR) has been shown to substantially increase longevity while reducing or delaying the onset of age-related diseases, little is known about the mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of DR on acute toxic outcomes. An earlier study (S. K. Ramaiah et al., 1998, Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol. 150, 12-21) revealed that a 35% DR compared to ad libitum (AL) feeding leads to a substantial increase in liver injury of thioacetamide (TA) at a low dose (50 mg/kg, i.p.). Higher liver injury was accompanied by enhanced survival. A prompt and enhanced tissue repair response in DR rats at the low dose (sixfold higher liver injury) occurred, whereas at equitoxic doses (50 mg/kg in DR and 600 mg/kg in AL rats) tissue repair in AL rats was substantially diminished and delayed. The extent of liver injury did not appear to be closely related to the extent of stimulated tissue repair response. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the time course (0-120 h) of liver injury and liver tissue repair at the high dose (600 mg TA/kg, i.p., lethal in AL rats) in AL and DR rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (225-275 g) were 35% diet restricted compared to their AL cohorts for 21 days and on day 22 they received a single dose of TA (600 mg/kg, i.p.). Liver injury was assessed by plasma ALT and by histopathological examination of liver sections. Tissue repair was assessed by [3H]thymidine incorporation into hepatonuclear DNA and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) immunohistochemistry during 0-120 h after TA injection. In AL-fed rats hepatic necrosis was evident at 12 h, peaked at 60 h, and persisted thereafter until mortality (3 to 6 days). Peak liver injury was approximately twofold higher in DR rats compared to that seen in AL rats. Hepatic necrosis was evident at 36 h, peaked at 48 h, persisted until 96 h, and returned to normal by 120 h. Light microscopy of liver sections revealed progression of hepatic injury in AL rats whereas injury regressed

  1. Loss of DNA mismatch repair imparts a selective advantage in planarian adult stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hollenbach, Jessica P; Resch, Alissa M; Palakodeti, Dasaradhi; Graveley, Brenton R; Heinen, Christopher D

    2011-01-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) leads to an increased risk of early-onset colorectal and other types of cancer and is caused by germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. Loss of MMR function results in a mutator phenotype that likely underlies its role in tumorigenesis. However, loss of MMR also results in the elimination of a DNA damage-induced checkpoint/apoptosis activation barrier that may allow damaged cells to grow unchecked. A fundamental question is whether loss of MMR provides pre-cancerous stem cells an immediate selective advantage in addition to establishing a mutator phenotype. To test this hypothesis in an in vivo system, we utilized the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea which contains a significant population of identifiable adult stem cells. We identified a planarian homolog of human MSH2, a MMR gene which is mutated in 38% of LS cases. The planarian Smed-msh2 is expressed in stem cells and some progeny. We depleted Smed-msh2 mRNA levels by RNA-interference and found a striking survival advantage in these animals treated with a cytotoxic DNA alkylating agent compared to control animals. We demonstrated that this tolerance to DNA damage is due to the survival of mitotically active, MMR-deficient stem cells. Our results suggest that loss of MMR provides an in vivo survival advantage to the stem cell population in the presence of DNA damage that may have implications for tumorigenesis.

  2. Disrupted G{sub 1} to S phase clearance via cyclin signaling impairs liver tissue repair in thioacetamide-treated type 1 diabetic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Devi, Sachin S.; Mehendale, Harihara M. . E-mail: mehendale@ulm.edu

    2005-09-01

    Previously we reported that a nonlethal dose of thioacetamide (TA, 300 mg/kg) causes 90% mortality in type 1 diabetic (DB) rats because of irreversible acute liver injury owing to inhibited hepatic tissue repair, primarily due to blockage of G{sub 0} to S phase progression of cell division cycle. On the other hand, DB rats receiving 30 mg TA/kg exhibited equal initial liver injury and delayed tissue repair compared to nondiabetic (NDB) rats receiving 300 mg TA/kg, resulting in a delay in recovery from liver injury and survival. The objective of the present study was to test the hypothesis that impaired cyclin-regulated progression of G{sub 1} to S phase of the cell cycle may explain inhibited liver tissue repair, hepatic failure, and death, contrasted with delayed liver tissue repair but survival observed in the DB rats receiving 300 in contrast to 30 mg TA/kg. In the TA-treated NDB rats sustained MAPKs and cyclin expression resulted in higher phosphorylation of retinoblastoma (pRb), explaining prompt tissue repair and survival. In contrast, DB rats receiving the same dose of TA (300 mg/kg) exhibited suppressed MAPKs and cyclin expression that led to inhibition of pRb, inhibited tissue repair, and death. On the other hand, DB rats receiving 30 mg TA/kg exhibited delayed up regulation of MAPK signaling that delayed the expression of CD1 and pRb, explaining delayed stimulation of tissue repair observed in this group. In conclusion, the hepatotoxicant TA has a dose-dependent adverse effect on cyclin-regulated pRb signaling: the lower dose causes a recoverable delay, whereas the higher dose inhibits it with corresponding effect on the ultimate outcomes on hepatic tissue repair; this dose-dependent adverse effect is substantially shifted to the left of the dose response curve in diabetes.

  3. Zone-specific integrated cartilage repair using a scaffold-free tissue engineered construct derived from allogenic synovial mesenchymal stem cells: Biomechanical and histological assessments.

    PubMed

    Fujie, Hiromichi; Nansai, Ryosuke; Ando, Wataru; Shimomura, Kazunori; Moriguchi, Yu; Hart, David A; Nakamura, Norimasa

    2015-11-26

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the zone-specific integration properties of articular cartilage defects treated in vivo with scaffold-free three-dimensional tissue-engineered constructs (TECs) derived from allogenic synovial mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in a porcine model. The TEC derived from the synovial MSCs was implanted into chondral defects in the medial femoral condyle of the knee. The integration boundary of repair tissue with the adjacent host cartilage was morphologically and biomechanically evaluated at 6 months post-implantation. Histological assessments showed that the repair tissue in each zone was well integrated with the adjacent host cartilage, with an apparent secure continuity of the extracellular matrix. There were no significant differences in histological scores between the integration boundary and the center of the repair tissue at every zone. Nonetheless, in all the specimens subjected to mechanical testing, failure occurred at the integration boundary. The average tensile strength of the integration boundary vs normal cartilage was 0.6 vs 4.9, 3.0 vs 12.6, and 5.5 vs 12.8MPa at the superficial, middle, and deep layers, respectively. Thus, these results indicate the most fragile point in the repair tissue remained at the integration boundary in spite of the apparent secure tissue continuity and equivalent histological quality with the center of the repair tissue. Such tissue vulnerability at the surface integration boundary could affect the long-term durability of the tissue repair, and thus, special consideration will be needed in the post-operative rehabilitation programming to enhance the longevity of such repair tissues in response to normal knee loading.

  4. A Tissue-Engineered Muscle Repair Construct for Functional Restoration of an Irrecoverable Muscle Injury in a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Machingal, Masood A.; Corona, Benjamin T.; Walters, Thomas J.; Kesireddy, Venu; Koval, Christine N.; Dannahower, Ashley; Zhao, Weixin; Yoo, James J.

    2011-01-01

    There are no effective clinical treatments for volumetric muscle loss (VML) resulting from traumatic injury, tumor excision, or other degenerative diseases of skeletal muscle. The goal of this study was to develop and characterize a more clinically relevant tissue-engineered muscle repair (TE-MR) construct for functional restoration of a VML injury in the mouse lattissimus dorsi (LD) muscle. To this end, TE-MR constructs developed by seeding rat myoblasts on porcine bladder acellular matrix were preconditioned in a bioreactor for 1 week and implanted in nude mice at the site of a VML injury created by excising 50% of the native LD. Two months postinjury and implantation of TE-MR, maximal tetanic force was ∼72% of that observed in native LD muscle. In contrast, injured LD muscles that were not repaired, or were repaired with scaffold alone, produced only ∼50% of native LD muscle force after 2 months. Histological analyses of LD tissue retrieved 2 months after implantation demonstrated remodeling of the TE-MR construct as well as the presence of desmin-positive myofibers, blood vessels, and neurovascular bundles within the TE-MR construct. Overall, these encouraging initial observations document significant functional recovery within 2 months of implantation of TE-MR constructs and provide clear proof of concept for the applicability of this technology in a murine VML injury model. PMID:21548710

  5. A distinct regulatory region of the Bmp5 locus activates gene expression following adult bone fracture or soft tissue injury.

    PubMed

    Guenther, Catherine A; Wang, Zhen; Li, Emma; Tran, Misha C; Logan, Catriona Y; Nusse, Roel; Pantalena-Filho, Luiz; Yang, George P; Kingsley, David M

    2015-08-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are key signaling molecules required for normal development of bones and other tissues. Previous studies have shown that null mutations in the mouse Bmp5 gene alter the size, shape and number of multiple bone and cartilage structures during development. Bmp5 mutations also delay healing of rib fractures in adult mutants, suggesting that the same signals used to pattern embryonic bone and cartilage are also reused during skeletal regeneration and repair. Despite intense interest in BMPs as agents for stimulating bone formation in clinical applications, little is known about the regulatory elements that control developmental or injury-induced BMP expression. To compare the DNA sequences that activate gene expression during embryonic bone formation and following acute injuries in adult animals, we assayed regions surrounding the Bmp5 gene for their ability to stimulate lacZ reporter gene expression in transgenic mice. Multiple genomic fragments, distributed across the Bmp5 locus, collectively coordinate expression in discrete anatomic domains during normal development, including in embryonic ribs. In contrast, a distinct regulatory region activated expression following rib fracture in adult animals. The same injury control region triggered gene expression in mesenchymal cells following tibia fracture, in migrating keratinocytes following dorsal skin wounding, and in regenerating epithelial cells following lung injury. The Bmp5 gene thus contains an "injury response" control region that is distinct from embryonic enhancers, and that is activated by multiple types of injury in adult animals.

  6. Effects of implantation of three-dimensional engineered bone tissue with a vascular-like structure on repair of bone defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Masanori; Matsumoto, Rena; Dong, Jian; Uemura, Toshimasa

    2012-12-01

    Previously, to create an implantable bone tissue associated with blood vessels, we co-cultured rabbit bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) with MSC-derived endothelial cells (ECs) within a porous polylactic acid-based scaffold utilizing a rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor. Here, this engineered tissue was orthotopically implanted into defects made in femurs of immunodeficient rats, and histological analysis were carried out to examine the repair of the damage and the formation of bone around the implant. The bone defects were better repaired in the implanted group than control group after 3 weeks. The results indicate that the engineered bone could repair bone defects.

  7. Assessment of DNA Damage and Repair in Adults Consuming AllylIsothiocyanate or Brassica Vegetables

    PubMed Central

    Charron, Craig S.; Clevidence, Beverly A.; Albaugh, George A.; Kramer, Matthew H.; Vinyard, Bryan T.; Milner, John A.; Novotny, Janet A.

    2012-01-01

    Allylisothiocyanate (AITC) is a dietary component with possible anti-cancer effects, though much information about AITC and cancer has been obtained from cell studies. To investigate the effect of AITC on DNA integrity in vivo, a crossover study was conducted. Adults (n=46) consumed AITC, AITC-rich vegetables (mustard and cabbage), or a control treatment with a controlled diet for 10 days each. On day 11, volunteers provided blood and urine before and after consuming treatments. Volunteers were characterized for genotype for GSTM1 and GSTT1 (glutathione S-transferases) and XPD (DNA repair). DNA integrity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was assessed by single cell gel electrophoresis. Urine was analyzed for 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2’-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) and creatinine. Ten day intake of neither AITC nor mustard/cabbage(M/C) resulted in statistically significant differences in DNA strand breaks (LS mean % DNA in tail ± SEM: 4.8 ± 0.6 for control, 5.7 ± 0.7 for AITC, 5.3 ± 0.6 for M/C) or urinary 8-oxodG (LS mean µg 8-oxodG/g creatinine ± SEM: 2.95 ± 0.09 for control, 2.88 ± 0.09 for AITC, 3.06 ± 0.09 for M/C). Both AITC and M/C increased DNA strand breaks 3h post-consumption (LS mean % DNA in tail ± SEM: 3.2 ± 0.7 for control, 8.3 ± 1.7 for AITC, 8.0 ± 1.7 for M/C), and this difference disappeared at 6h (4.2 ± 0.9 for control, 5.7 ± 1.2 for AITC, 5.5 ± 1.2 for M/C). Genotypes for GSTM1, GSTT1, and XPD were not associated with treatment effects. In summary, DNA damage appeared to be induced in the short term by AITC and AITC-rich products, but that damage disappeared quickly, and neither AITC nor AITC-rich products affected DNA base excision repair. PMID:22902324

  8. Interleukin-10–mediated regenerative postnatal tissue repair is dependent on regulation of hyaluronan metabolism via fibroblast-specific STAT3 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Balaji, Swathi; Wang, Xinyi; King, Alice; Le, Louis D.; Bhattacharya, Sukanta S.; Moles, Chad M.; Butte, Manish J.; de Jesus Perez, Vinicio A.; Liechty, Kenneth W.; Wight, Thomas N.; Crombleholme, Timothy M.; Bollyky, Paul L.; Keswani, Sundeep G.

    2017-01-01

    The cytokine IL-10 has potent antifibrotic effects in models of adult fibrosis, but the mechanisms of action are unclear. Here, we report a novel finding that IL-10 triggers a signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3)–dependent signaling pathway that regulates hyaluronan (HA) metabolism and drives adult fibroblasts to synthesize an HA-rich pericellular matrix, which mimics the fetal regenerative wound healing phenotype with reduced fibrosis. By using cre-lox–mediated novel, inducible, fibroblast-, keratinocyte-, and wound-specific STAT3-knockdown postnatal mice—plus syngeneic fibroblast cell-transplant models—we demonstrate that the regenerative effects of IL-10 in postnatal wounds are dependent on HA synthesis and fibroblast-specific STAT3-dependent signaling. The importance of IL-10–induced HA synthesis for regenerative wound healing is demonstrated by inhibition of HA synthesis in a murine wound model by administering 4-methylumbelliferone. Although IL-10 and STAT3 signaling were intact, the antifibrotic repair phenotype that is induced by IL-10 overexpression was abrogated in this model. Our data show a novel role for IL-10 beyond its accepted immune-regulatory mechanism. The opportunity for IL-10 to regulate a fibroblast-specific formation of a regenerative, HA-rich wound extracellular matrix may lead to the development of innovative therapies to attenuate postnatal fibrosis in organ systems or diseases in which dysregulated inflammation and HA intersect.—Balaji, S., Wang, X., King, A., Le, L. D., Bhattacharya, S. S., Moles, C. M., Butte, M. J., de Jesus Perez, V. A., Liechty, K. W., Wight, T. N., Crombleholme, T. M., Bollyky, P. L., Keswani, S. G. Interleukin-10–mediated regenerative postnatal tissue repair is dependent on regulation of hyaluronan metabolism via fibroblast-specific STAT3 signaling. PMID:27903619

  9. Single-walled carbon nanotubes chemically functionalized with polyethylene glycol promote tissue repair in a rat model of spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Roman, Jose A; Niedzielko, Tracy L; Haddon, Robert C; Parpura, Vladimir; Floyd, Candace L

    2011-11-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) induces tissue damage and results in the formation of a cavity that inhibits axonal regrowth. Filling this cavity with a growth-permissive substrate would likely promote regeneration and repair. Single-walled carbon nanotubes functionalized with polyethylene glycol (SWNT-PEG) have been shown to increase the length of selected neurites in vitro. We hypothesized that administration of SWNT-PEG after experimental SCI will promote regeneration of axons into the lesion cavity and functional recovery of the hindlimbs. To evaluate this hypothesis, complete transection SCI was induced at the T9 vertebral level in adult female rats. One week after transection, the epicenter of the lesion was injected with 25??L of either vehicle (saline), or 1??g/mL, 10??g/mL, or 100??g/mL of SWNT-PEG. Behavioral analysis was conducted before injury, before treatment, and once every 7 days for 28 days after treatment. At 28 days post-injection the rats were euthanized and spinal cord tissue was extracted. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the area of the cyst, the extent of the glial scar, and axonal morphology. We found that post-SCI administration of SWNT-PEG decreased lesion volume, increased neurofilament-positive fibers and corticospinal tract fibers in the lesion, and did not increase reactive gliosis. Additionally, post-SCI administration of SWNT-PEG induced a modest improvement in hindlimb locomotor recovery without inducing hyperalgesia. These data suggest that SWNT-PEG may be an effective material to promote axonal repair and regeneration after SCI.

  10. Alcohol-induced one-carbon metabolism impairment promotes dysfunction of DNA base excision repair in adult brain.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Anna-Kate; Hewetson, Aveline; Agrawal, Rajiv G; Dagda, Marisela; Dagda, Raul; Moaddel, Ruin; Balbo, Silvia; Sanghvi, Mitesh; Chen, Yukun; Hogue, Ryan J; Bergeson, Susan E; Henderson, George I; Kruman, Inna I

    2012-12-21

    The brain is one of the major targets of chronic alcohol abuse. Yet the fundamental mechanisms underlying alcohol-mediated brain damage remain unclear. The products of alcohol metabolism cause DNA damage, which in conditions of DNA repair dysfunction leads to genomic instability and neural death. We propose that one-carbon metabolism (OCM) impairment associated with long term chronic ethanol intake is a key factor in ethanol-induced neurotoxicity, because OCM provides cells with DNA precursors for DNA repair and methyl groups for DNA methylation, both critical for genomic stability. Using histological (immunohistochemistry and stereological counting) and biochemical assays, we show that 3-week chronic exposure of adult mice to 5% ethanol (Lieber-Decarli diet) results in increased DNA damage, reduced DNA repair, and neuronal death in the brain. These were concomitant with compromised OCM, as evidenced by elevated homocysteine, a marker of OCM dysfunction. We conclude that OCM dysfunction plays a causal role in alcohol-induced genomic instability in the brain because OCM status determines the alcohol effect on DNA damage/repair and genomic stability. Short ethanol exposure, which did not disturb OCM, also did not affect the response to DNA damage, whereas additional OCM disturbance induced by deficiency in a key OCM enzyme, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) in Mthfr(+/-) mice, exaggerated the ethanol effect on DNA repair. Thus, the impact of long term ethanol exposure on DNA repair and genomic stability in the brain results from OCM dysfunction, and MTHFR mutations such as Mthfr 677C→T, common in human population, may exaggerate the adverse effects of ethanol on the brain.

  11. Alcohol-induced One-carbon Metabolism Impairment Promotes Dysfunction of DNA Base Excision Repair in Adult Brain*

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Anna-Kate; Hewetson, Aveline; Agrawal, Rajiv G.; Dagda, Marisela; Dagda, Raul; Moaddel, Ruin; Balbo, Silvia; Sanghvi, Mitesh; Chen, Yukun; Hogue, Ryan J.; Bergeson, Susan E.; Henderson, George I.; Kruman, Inna I.

    2012-01-01

    The brain is one of the major targets of chronic alcohol abuse. Yet the fundamental mechanisms underlying alcohol-mediated brain damage remain unclear. The products of alcohol metabolism cause DNA damage, which in conditions of DNA repair dysfunction leads to genomic instability and neural death. We propose that one-carbon metabolism (OCM) impairment associated with long term chronic ethanol intake is a key factor in ethanol-induced neurotoxicity, because OCM provides cells with DNA precursors for DNA repair and methyl groups for DNA methylation, both critical for genomic stability. Using histological (immunohistochemistry and stereological counting) and biochemical assays, we show that 3-week chronic exposure of adult mice to 5% ethanol (Lieber-Decarli diet) results in increased DNA damage, reduced DNA repair, and neuronal death in the brain. These were concomitant with compromised OCM, as evidenced by elevated homocysteine, a marker of OCM dysfunction. We conclude that OCM dysfunction plays a causal role in alcohol-induced genomic instability in the brain because OCM status determines the alcohol effect on DNA damage/repair and genomic stability. Short ethanol exposure, which did not disturb OCM, also did not affect the response to DNA damage, whereas additional OCM disturbance induced by deficiency in a key OCM enzyme, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) in Mthfr+/− mice, exaggerated the ethanol effect on DNA repair. Thus, the impact of long term ethanol exposure on DNA repair and genomic stability in the brain results from OCM dysfunction, and MTHFR mutations such as Mthfr 677C→T, common in human population, may exaggerate the adverse effects of ethanol on the brain. PMID:23118224

  12. Enhanced potency of cell-based therapy for ischemic tissue repair using an injectable bioactive epitope presenting nanofiber support matrix.

    PubMed

    Tongers, Jörn; Webber, Matthew J; Vaughan, Erin E; Sleep, Eduard; Renault, Marie-Ange; Roncalli, Jerome G; Klyachko, Ekaterina; Thorne, Tina; Yu, Yang; Marquardt, Katja-Theres; Kamide, Christine E; Ito, Aiko; Misener, Sol; Millay, Meredith; Liu, Ting; Jujo, Kentaro; Qin, Gangjian; Losordo, Douglas W; Stupp, Samuel I; Kishore, Raj

    2014-09-01

    The translation of cell-based therapies for ischemic tissue repair remains limited by several factors, including poor cell survival and limited target site retention. Advances in nanotechnology enable the development of specifically designed delivery matrices to address these limitations and thereby improve the efficacy of cell-based therapies. Given the relevance of integrin signaling for cellular homeostasis, we developed an injectable, bioactive peptide-based nanofiber matrix that presents an integrin-binding epitope derived from fibronectin, and evaluated its feasibility as a supportive artificial matrix for bone marrow-derived pro-angiogenic cells (BMPACs) used as a therapy in ischemic tissue repair. Incubation of BMPACs with these peptide nanofibers in vitro significantly attenuated apoptosis while enhancing proliferation and adhesion. Pro-angiogenic function was enhanced, as cells readily formed tubes. These effects were, in part, mediated via p38, and p44/p42 MAP kinases, which are downstream pathways of focal adhesion kinase. In a murine model of hind limb ischemia, an intramuscular injection of BMPACs within this bioactive peptide nanofiber matrix resulted in greater retention of cells, enhanced capillary density, increased limb perfusion, reduced necrosis/amputation, and preserved function of the ischemic limb compared to treatment with cells alone. This self-assembling, bioactive peptide nanofiber matrix presenting an integrin-binding domain of fibronectin improves regenerative efficacy of cell-based strategies in ischemic tissue by enhancing cell survival, retention, and reparative functions.

  13. In-situ crosslinkable and self-assembling elastin-like polypeptide block copolymers for cartilage tissue repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Dong Woo

    This work describes the development of genetically engineered elastin-like polypeptide (ELP) block copolymers as in-situ gelling scaffolds for cartilage tissue repair. The central hypothesis underlying this work is that ELP based biopolymers can be exploited as injectable biomaterials by rapid chemical crosslinking. To prove this, gene libraries encoding ELP having different molecular weights and amino acid sequences, and ELP block copolymers composed of various ELP blocks having diverse amino acid composition, length, and phase transition behavior were synthesized by recursive directional ligation, expressed in E. Coli and purified by inverse transition cycling. Mannich-type condensation of hydroxymethylphosphines (HMPs) with primary- and secondary-amines of amino acids was developed as a new crosslinking method of polypeptides. Chemically crosslinked ELP hydrogels were formed rapidly in an aqueous solution by reaction of ELPs containing periodic lysine residues with HMPs. The crosslinking density and mechanical property of the ELP hydrogels were controlled at the sequence level by varying the Lys density in ELPs composed of mono-block as well as by segregation of the Lys residues within specific blocks of tri-block architectures. Fibroblasts embedded in ELP hydrogels survived the crosslinking process and were viable after in vitro culture for at least 3 days. The DNA content of fibroblasts within the tri-block gels was significantly higher than that in the mono-block gels at day 3. These results suggest that the HMP crosslinked ELP block copolymer hydrogels show finely tuned mechanical properties and different microenvironments for cell viability as well as potential as in-situ crosslinkable biopolymers for tissue repair applications with load-bearing environments. As an alternative, rheological behavior of the ELP block copolymers and ELP-grafted hyaluronic acids (HAs) as artificial extracellular matrices (ECMs) showed that they were thermally aggregated into

  14. Comparison of primary repair and patch plasty procedure on the P wave in adult atrial septal defect closure

    PubMed Central

    Ucak, Alper; Temizkan, Veysel; Ugur, Murat; Selcuk, Arif; Yilmaz, Ahmet Turan; Yedekci, Ahmet Erturk; Uz, Omer

    2016-01-01

    Summary Introduction: In this study we compared the effects of two different surgical procedures for closure of adult atrial septal defect (ASD) on postoperative P-wave changes. Methods: Patients who underwent cardiac surgery for secundum type ASD closure were evaluated retrospectively. Seventy-two patients with primary repair of ASD and 29 patients with pericardial patch plasty repair were compared according to Pmax, Pmin and P-wave dispersions (Pd). Results: In each group, the increases in postoperative maximum P-wave duration (Pmax) and minimum P-wave duration (Pmin) were statistically significant. There was no statistically significant difference between post- and pre-operative Pd values. In the comparison between group 1 and group 2 in terms of postoperative P-wave changes (Pmax, Pmin, Pd) there was no statistically significant difference. Conclusion: Comparing patch plasty and primary repair for the surgical closure of ASD in the early to mid-postoperative period, no difference was found and both surgical procedures can be performed in adult ASDs. PMID:27149297

  15. Repair of full-thickness tendon injury using connective tissue progenitors efficiently derived from human embryonic stem cells and fetal tissues.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Shahar; Leshansky, Lucy; Zussman, Eyal; Burman, Michael; Srouji, Samer; Livne, Erella; Abramov, Natalie; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph

    2010-10-01

    The use of stem cells for tissue engineering (TE) encourages scientists to design new platforms in the field of regenerative and reconstructive medicine. Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) have been proposed to be an important cell source for cell-based TE applications as well as an exciting tool for investigating the fundamentals of human development. Here, we describe the efficient derivation of connective tissue progenitors (CTPs) from hESC lines and fetal tissues. The CTPs were significantly expanded and induced to generate tendon tissues in vitro, with ultrastructural characteristics and biomechanical properties typical of mature tendons. We describe a simple method for engineering tendon grafts that can successfully repair injured Achilles tendons and restore the ankle joint extension movement in mice. We also show the CTP's ability to differentiate into bone, cartilage, and fat both in vitro and in vivo. This study offers evidence for the possibility of using stem cell-derived engineered grafts to replace missing tissues, and sets a basic platform for future cell-based TE applications in the fields of orthopedics and reconstructive surgery.

  16. Fan1 deficiency results in DNA interstrand cross-link repair defects, enhanced tissue karyomegaly, and organ dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Thongthip, Supawat; Bellani, Marina; Gregg, Siobhan Q.; Sridhar, Sunandini; Conti, Brooke A.; Chen, Yanglu; Seidman, Michael M.; Smogorzewska, Agata

    2016-01-01

    Deficiency of FANCD2/FANCI-associated nuclease 1 (FAN1) in humans leads to karyomegalic interstitial nephritis (KIN), a rare hereditary kidney disease characterized by chronic renal fibrosis, tubular degeneration, and characteristic polyploid nuclei in multiple tissues. The mechanism of how FAN1 protects cells is largely unknown but is thought to involve FAN1's function in DNA interstrand cross-link (ICL) repair. Here, we describe a Fan1-deficient mouse and show that FAN1 is required for cellular and organismal resistance to ICLs. We show that the ubiquitin-binding zinc finger (UBZ) domain of FAN1, which is needed for interaction with FANCD2, is not required for the initial rapid recruitment of FAN1 to ICLs or for its role in DNA ICL resistance. Epistasis analyses reveal that FAN1 has cross-link repair activities that are independent of the Fanconi anemia proteins and that this activity is redundant with the 5′–3′ exonuclease SNM1A. Karyomegaly becomes prominent in kidneys and livers of Fan1-deficient mice with age, and mice develop liver dysfunction. Treatment of Fan1-deficient mice with ICL-inducing agents results in pronounced thymic and bone marrow hypocellularity and the disappearance of c-kit+ cells. Our results provide insight into the mechanism of FAN1 in ICL repair and demonstrate that the Fan1 mouse model effectively recapitulates the pathological features of human FAN1 deficiency. PMID:26980189

  17. Dietary and genetic modulation of DNA repair in healthy human adults.

    PubMed

    Tyson, J; Mathers, J C

    2007-02-01

    The DNA in all cells of the human body is subject to damage continuously from exogenous agents, internal cellular processes and spontaneous decomposition. Failure to repair such damage is fundamental to the development of many diseases and to ageing. Fortunately, the vast majority of DNA damage is detected and repaired by one of five complementary DNA repair systems. However, recent studies have shown that even in healthy individuals there is a wide inter-individual variation in DNA repair capacity. Part of this variation can be accounted for by polymorphisms in the genes encoding DNA repair proteins. However, it is probable that environmental factors, including dietary exposure as well as diet-gene interactions, are also responsible for much of the difference in repair capacity between individuals. Whilst there is some evidence from human studies that generalised malnutrition or low intakes of specific nutrients may affect DNA repair, as yet there is limited understanding of the molecular mechanisms through which nutrients can modulate this key cellular process.

  18. Osteochondral repair using a scaffold-free tissue-engineered construct derived from synovial mesenchymal stem cells and a hydroxyapatite-based artificial bone.

    PubMed

    Shimomura, Kazunori; Moriguchi, Yu; Ando, Wataru; Nansai, Ryosuke; Fujie, Hiromichi; Hart, David A; Gobbi, Alberto; Kita, Keisuke; Horibe, Shuji; Shino, Konsei; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Nakamura, Norimasa

    2014-09-01

    For an ideal osteochondral repair, it is important to facilitate zonal restoration of the subchondral bone and the cartilage, layer by layer. Specifically, restoration of the osteochondral junction and secure integration with adjacent cartilage could be considered key factors. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the feasibility of a combined material comprising a scaffold-free tissue-engineered construct (TEC) derived from synovial mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and a hydroxyapatite (HA) artificial bone using a rabbit osteochondral defect model. Osteochondral defects were created on the femoral groove of skeletally mature rabbits. The TEC and HA artificial bone were hybridized to develop a combined implant just before use, which was then implanted into defects (N=23). In the control group, HA alone was implanted (N=18). Histological evaluation and micro-indentation testing was performed for the evaluation of repair tissue. Normal knees were used as an additional control group for biomechanical testing (N=5). At hybridization, the TEC rapidly attached onto the surface of HA artificial bone block, which was implantable to osteochondral defects. Osteochondral defects treated with the combined implants exhibited more rapid subchondral bone repair coupled with the development of cartilaginous tissue with good tissue integration to the adjacent host cartilage when assessed at 6 months post implantation. Conversely, the control group exhibited delayed subchondral bone repair. In addition, the repair cartilaginous tissue in this group had poor integration to adjacent cartilage and contained clustered chondrocytes, suggesting an early osteoarthritis (OA)-like degenerative change at 6 months post implantation. Biomechanically, the osteochondral repair tissue treated with the combined implants at 6 months restored tissue stiffness, similar to normal osteochondral tissue. The combined implants significantly accelerated and improved osteochondral repair

  19. Fast Absorbing Gut Suture versus Cyanoacrylate Tissue Adhesive in the Epidermal Closure of Linear Repairs Following Mohs Micrographic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, June; Cool, Alicia J.; Hanlon, Allison M.; Leffell, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cyanoacrylate topical adhesives and fast absorbing gut sutures are increasingly utilized by dermatologic surgeons as they provide satisfactory surgical outcomes while eliminating an additional patient visit for suture removal. To date, no head-to-head studies have compared the wound healing characteristics of these epidermal closure techniques in the repair of facial wounds after Mohs micrographic surgery. Objective: To compare the cosmetic outcome of epidermal closure by cyanoacrylate topical adhesive with fast absorbing gut suture in linear repairs of the face following Mohs micrographic surgery. Methods: Fourteen patients with wound length greater than 3cm who underwent Mohs micrographic surgery for nonmelanoma skin cancer of the face were enrolled in this randomized right-left comparative study. Following placement of dermal sutures, half of the wound was randomly selected for closure with cyanoacrylate and the contralateral side with fast absorbing gut suture. Using photographs from the three-month postoperative visit, six blinded individuals rated the overall cosmetic outcome. Results: The present study shows no significant difference in cosmetic outcomes between cyanoacrylate and fast absorbing gut suture for closure of linear facial wounds resulting from Mohs micrographic surgery. Cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive may not be as effective in achieving optimal cosmesis for wounds on the forehead or of longer repair lengths. The majority of patients did not have a preference for wound closure techniques, but when a preference was given, cyanoacrylate was significantly favored over sutures. Conclusion: Cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive and fast absorbing gut suture both result in comparable aesthetic outcomes for epidermal closure of linear facial wounds following Mohs micrographic surgery. Consideration should be given to factors such as need for eversion, hemostasis, and wound tension when selecting an epidermal wound closure method. (Clinical

  20. 3D printed complex tissue construct using stem cell-laden decellularized extracellular matrix bioinks for cardiac repair.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jinah; Park, Hun-Jun; Kim, Seok-Won; Kim, Heejin; Park, Ju Young; Na, Soo Jin; Kim, Hyeon Ji; Park, Moon Nyeo; Choi, Seung Hyun; Park, Sun Hwa; Kim, Sung Won; Kwon, Sang-Mo; Kim, Pum-Joon; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2017-01-01

    Stem cell therapy is a promising therapeutic method for the treatment of ischemic heart diseases; however, some challenges prohibit the efficacy after cell delivery due to hostile microenvironment of the injured myocardium. 3D printed pre-vascularized stem cell patch can enhance the therapeutic efficacy for cardiac repair through promotion of rapid vascularization after patch transplantation. In this study, stem cell-laden decellularized extracellular matrix bioinks are used in 3D printing of pre-vascularized and functional multi-material structures. The printed structure composed of spatial patterning of dual stem cells improves cell-to-cell interactions and differentiation capability and promotes functionality for tissue regeneration. The developed stem cell patch promoted strong vascularization and tissue matrix formation in vivo. The patterned patch exhibited enhanced cardiac functions, reduced cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis, increased migration from patch to the infarct area, neo-muscle and capillary formation along with improvements in cardiac functions. Therefore, pre-vascularized stem cell patch provides cardiac niche-like microenvironment, resulting in beneficial effects on cardiac repair.

  1. Injectable Sources of Locally Controlled Electrical Fields to Facilitate Tissue Repair

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    controlling the developmental growth deformities found in cleft lip & palate and craniofacial anomalies [2]. The requisite ’wiring’ of the wounds presents...representation of "Developmental Osteogenic Stimulation" [2] being used to direct and promote maxillary and palatal shelf growth following cleft lip ... palate repair. 4 each require a 0.8 V polarization. • The compliance voltage needed to generate the required current will thus be 0.8 + 0.8 + 0.4

  2. Liver Progenitors Isolated from Adult Healthy Mouse Liver Efficiently Differentiate to Functional Hepatocytes In Vitro and Repopulate Liver Tissue.

    PubMed

    Tanimizu, Naoki; Ichinohe, Norihisa; Ishii, Masayuki; Kino, Junichi; Mizuguchi, Toru; Hirata, Koichi; Mitaka, Toshihiro

    2016-12-01

    It has been proposed that tissue stem cells supply multiple epithelial cells in mature tissues and organs. However, it is unclear whether tissue stem cells generally contribute to cellular turnover in normal healthy organs. Here, we show that liver progenitors distinct from bipotent liver stem/progenitor cells (LPCs) persistently exist in mouse livers and potentially contribute to tissue maintenance. We found that, in addition to LPCs isolated as EpCAM(+) cells, liver progenitors were enriched in CD45(-) TER119(-) CD31(-) EpCAM(-) ICAM-1(+) fraction isolated from late-fetal and postnatal livers. ICAM-1(+) liver progenitors were abundant by 4 weeks (4W) after birth. Although their number decreased with age, ICAM-1(+) liver progenitors existed in livers beyond that stage. We established liver progenitor clones derived from ICAM-1(+) cells between 1 and 20W and found that those clones efficiently differentiated into mature hepatocytes (MHs), which secreted albumin, eliminated ammonium ion, stored glycogen, and showed cytochrome P450 activity. Even after long-term culture, those clones kept potential to differentiate to MHs. When ICAM-1(+) clones were transplanted into nude mice after retrorsine treatment and 70% partial hepatectomy, donor cells were incorporated into liver plates and expressed hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α, CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α, and carbamoylphosphate synthetase I. Moreover, after short-term treatment with oncostatin M, ICAM-1(+) clones could efficiently repopulate the recipient liver tissues. Our results indicate that liver progenitors that can efficiently differentiate to MHs exist in normal adult livers. Those liver progenitors could be an important source of new MHs for tissue maintenance and repair in vivo, and for regenerative medicine ex vivo. Stem Cells 2016;34:2889-2901.

  3. Modeling the functional repair of nervous tissue in spinal cord injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantila, Sara M.; Camp, Jon J.; Krych, Aaron J.; Robb, Richard A.

    2004-05-01

    Functional repair of traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is one of the most challenging goals in modern medicine. The annual incidence of SCI in the United States is approximately 11,000 new cases. The prevalence of people in the U.S. currently living with SCI is approximately 200,000. Exploring and understanding nerve regeneration in the central nervous system (CNS) is a critical first step in attempting to reverse the devastating consequences of SCI. At Mayo Clinic, a preliminary study of implants in the transected rat spinal cord model demonstrates potential for promoting axon regeneration. In collaborative research between neuroscientists and bioengineers, this procedure holds promise for solving two critical aspects of axon repair-providing a resorbable structural scaffold to direct focused axon repair, and delivery of relevant signaling molecules necessary to facilitate regeneration. In our preliminary study, regeneration in the rat's spinal cord was modeled in three dimensions utilizing an image processing software system developed in the Biomedical Imaging Resource at Mayo Clinic. Advanced methods for image registration, segmentation, and rendering were used. The raw images were collected at three different magnifications. After image processing the individual channels in the scaffold, axon bundles, and macrophages could be identified. Several axon bundles could be visualized and traced through the entire volume, suggesting axonal growth throughout the length of the scaffold. Such information could potentially allow researchers and physicians to better understand and improve the nerve regeneration process for individuals with SCI.

  4. Prognostic factors for a favorable outcome after varicocele repair in adolescents and adults.

    PubMed

    Samplaski, Mary K; Jarvi, Keith A

    2016-01-01

    The effect of varicocele repair on male fertility remains controversial. It would be helpful to determined which men would benefit most from varicocele repair, and target repair efforts at those individuals. A detailed review of the literature on prognostic factors for varicocele repair was performed using the PubMed NLM database. We found that the best predictor of postvaricocelectomy semen parameters is the preoperative semen parameters. The greatest improvements in semen parameters were found in men with larger varicoceles. While there is controversy, higher testosterone, younger age and larger testis size, in some studies predict for improvements in semen parameters postvaricocelectomy. A nomogram has been developed to predict the postvaricocelectomy semen parameters based on the preoperative semen parameters, varicocele grade and the age of the man (www.fertilitytreatmentresults.com). Limited data consistently demonstrates the greatest improvements in DNA fragmentation rates in men with higher baseline DNA fragmentation rates. With respect to reproductive outcomes, higher baseline sperm density consistently predicts for natural pregnancy or assisted reproductive technology (ART) pregnancy rates. In addition, varicocele repair does seem to reduce the need for more invasive modalities of ART. In conclusion, we can now start to use specific parameters such as baseline semen quality, varicocele grade and patient age to predict post-repair semen quality and fertility potential following varicocelectomy.

  5. Prognostic factors for a favorable outcome after varicocele repair in adolescents and adults

    PubMed Central

    Samplaski, Mary K; Jarvi, Keith A

    2016-01-01

    The effect of varicocele repair on male fertility remains controversial. It would be helpful to determined which men would benefit most from varicocele repair, and target repair efforts at those individuals. A detailed review of the literature on prognostic factors for varicocele repair was performed using the PubMed NLM database. We found that the best predictor of postvaricocelectomy semen parameters is the preoperative semen parameters. The greatest improvements in semen parameters were found in men with larger varicoceles. While there is controversy, higher testosterone, younger age and larger testis size, in some studies predict for improvements in semen parameters postvaricocelectomy. A nomogram has been developed to predict the postvaricocelectomy semen parameters based on the preoperative semen parameters, varicocele grade and the age of the man (www.fertilitytreatmentresults.com). Limited data consistently demonstrates the greatest improvements in DNA fragmentation rates in men with higher baseline DNA fragmentation rates. With respect to reproductive outcomes, higher baseline sperm density consistently predicts for natural pregnancy or assisted reproductive technology (ART) pregnancy rates. In addition, varicocele repair does seem to reduce the need for more invasive modalities of ART. In conclusion, we can now start to use specific parameters such as baseline semen quality, varicocele grade and patient age to predict post-repair semen quality and fertility potential following varicocelectomy. PMID:26732108

  6. Facial soft-tissue thicknesses in the adult male Zulu.

    PubMed

    Aulsebrook, W A; Becker, P J; Işcan, M Y

    1996-05-31

    The morphometric method of forensic facial reconstruction rests heavily on the use of facial soft tissue depth measurements. In reconstructing the Negroid face, much use has been made of the tables of soft tissue thickness of American Negroid cadavers. However, the genetic complexities of American blacks are well known. In addition it is felt that measurements made on the living are of more value than those made on the dead. In view of this it was decided to set up a table of norms for facial soft tissue depths of the living Zulu, an African Negroid who has remained relatively free from genetic admixture with other populations. The tightly controlled sample consisted of 55 healthy male Zulus, aged 20 to 35. Tissue depths at established landmarks were measured from lateral and oblique cephalometric radiographs. These were then combined with ultrasonic readings at other landmarks on the subject's face to yield a comprehensive set of tissue depth data. This paper presents a set of average facial soft tissue depth measurements from the Zulu face that results in the development of a new profile. It also provides a method for linking two systems of measurement.

  7. Debra-mediated Ci degradation controls tissue homeostasis in Drosophila adult midgut.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhouhua; Guo, Yueqin; Han, Lili; Zhang, Yan; Shi, Lai; Huang, Xudong; Lin, Xinhua

    2014-02-11

    Adult tissue homeostasis is maintained by resident stem cells and their progeny. However, the underlying mechanisms that control tissue homeostasis are not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that Debra-mediated Ci degradation is important for intestinal stem cell (ISC) proliferation in Drosophila adult midgut. Debra inhibition leads to increased ISC activity and tissue homeostasis loss, phenocopying defects observed in aging flies. These defects can be suppressed by depleting Ci, suggesting that increased Hedgehog (Hh) signaling contributes to ISC proliferation and tissue homeostasis loss. Consistently, Hh signaling activation causes the same defects, whereas depletion of Hh signaling suppresses these defects. Furthermore, the Hh ligand from multiple sources is involved in ISC proliferation and tissue homeostasis. Finally, we show that the JNK pathway acts downstream of Hh signaling to regulate ISC proliferation. Together, our results provide insights into the mechanisms of stem cell proliferation and tissue homeostasis control.

  8. Concise Review: Quiescence in Adult Stem Cells: Biological Significance and Relevance to Tissue Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Rumman, Mohammad; Dhawan, Jyotsna; Kassem, Moustapha

    2015-10-01

    Adult stem cells (ASCs) are tissue resident stem cells responsible for tissue homeostasis and regeneration following injury. In uninjured tissues, ASCs exist in a nonproliferating, reversibly cell cycle-arrested state known as quiescence or G0. A key function of the quiescent state is to preserve stemness in ASCs by preventing precocious differentiation, and thus maintaining a pool of undifferentiated ASCs. Recent evidences suggest that quiescence is an actively maintained state and that excessive or defective quiescence may lead to compromised tissue regeneration or tumorigenesis. The aim of this review is to provide an update regarding the biological mechanisms of ASC quiescence and their role in tissue regeneration.

  9. Cytotoxicity of Cyanoacrylate-Based Tissue Adhesives and Short-Term Preclinical In Vivo Biocompatibility in Abdominal Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Marta; Pérez-Köhler, Bárbara; Kühnhardt, Andreé; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Mar; San Román, Julio; Bellón, Juan Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Background Cyanoacrylate(CA)-based tissue adhesives, although not widely used, are a feasible option to fix a mesh during abdominal hernia repair, due to its fast action and great bond strength. Their main disadvantage, toxicity, can be mitigated by increasing the length of their alkyl chain. The objective was to assess the in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo biocompatibility in hernia repair of CAs currently used in clinical practice (Glubran(n-butyl) and Ifabond(n-hexyl)) and a longer-chain CA (OCA(n-octyl)), that has never been used in the medical field. Methods Formaldehyde release and cytotoxicity of unpolymerized(UCAs) and polymerized CAs(PCAs) were evaluated by macroscopic visual assessment, flow cytometry and Alamar Blue assays. In the preclinical evaluation, partial defects were created in the rabbit abdominal wall and repaired by fixing polypropylene prostheses using the CAs. At 14 days post-surgery, animals were euthanized for morphology, macrophage response and cell damage analyses. Results Formaldehyde release was lower as the molecular weight of the monomer increased. The longest side-chain CA(OCA) showed the highest cytotoxicity in the UCA condition. However, after polymerization, was the one that showed better behavior on most occasions. In vivo, all CAs promoted optimal mesh fixation without displacements or detachments. Seroma was evident with the use of Glubran, (four of six animals: 4/6) and Ifabond (2/6), but it was reduced with the use of OCA (1/6). Significantly greater macrophage responses were observed in groups where Glubran and Ifabond were used vs. sutures and OCA. TUNEL-positive cells were significantly higher in the Glubran and OCA groups vs. the suture group. Conclusions Although mild formaldehyde release occurred, OCA was the most cytotoxic during polymerization but the least once cured. The CAs promoted proper mesh fixation and have potential to replace traditional suturing techniques in hernia repair; the CAs exhibited good tissue

  10. Constitutive gene expression and specification of tissue identity in adult planarian biology

    PubMed Central

    Reddien, Peter W.

    2011-01-01

    Planarians are flatworms that constitutively maintain adult tissues through cell turnover and can regenerate entire organisms from tiny body fragments. In addition to requiring new cells (from neoblasts), these feats require mechanisms that specify tissue identity in the adult. Critical roles for Wnt and BMP signaling in regeneration and maintenance of the body axes have been uncovered, among other regulatory factors. Available data indicate that genes involved in positional identity regulation at key embryonic stages in other animals display persisting regionalized expression in adult planarians. These expression patterns suggest that a constitutively active gene expression map exists for maintenance of the planarian body. Planarians therefore present a fertile ground for identification of factors regulating regionalization of the metazoan body plan and for study of the attributes of these factors that can lead to maintenance and regeneration of adult tissues. PMID:21680047

  11. Redo sternotomy for extra-anatomical correction of aortic coarctation and mitral repair in an adult after failed endovascular treatment.

    PubMed

    Ozker, E; Saritas, B; Vuran, C; Yoruker, U; Kocyigit, O I; Turkoz, R

    2011-07-01

    Recently, extra-anatomical bypass surgery has been widely used in complicated adult aortic coarctation cases with concomitant intracardiac repair. Stent implantation has been widely used for primary aortic coarctation as well. The procedure has been shown to be effective with long term follow ups. However, failed stent implantations like stent fracture and dislodgement may complicate the clinical status and subsequent surgical procedure. Extra-anatomic bypass can provide effective results and lower morbidity in cases with concomitant intracardiac problems and stent failure. Here we present an adult aortic coarctation patient who had undergone a Bentall operation and two unsuccessful stent implantations for recurrent aortic coarctation. The patient then got an extra-anatomic bypass for aortic coarctation and concomitant mitral valve commissurotomy through median sternotomy.

  12. Transplantation of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells for repair of injured spiral ganglion neurons in deaf guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sujeong; Cho, Hyong-Ho; Kim, Song-Hee; Lee, Kyung-Hwa; Cho, Yong-Bum; Park, Jong-Seong; Jeong, Han-Seong

    2016-06-01

    Excessive noise, ototoxic drugs, infections, autoimmune diseases, and aging can cause loss of spiral ganglion neurons, leading to permanent sensorineural hearing loss in mammals. Stem cells have been confirmed to be able to differentiate into spiral ganglion neurons. Little has been reported on adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) for repair of injured spiral ganglion neurons. In this study, we hypothesized that transplantation of neural induced-human ADSCs (NI-hADSCs) can repair the injured spiral ganglion neurons in guinea pigs with neomycin-induced sensorineural hearing loss. NI-hADSCs were induced with culture medium containing basic fibroblast growth factor and forskolin and then injected to the injured cochleae. Guinea pigs that received injection of Hanks' balanced salt solution into the cochleae were used as controls. Hematoxylin-eosin staining showed that at 8 weeks after cell transplantation, the number of surviving spiral ganglion neurons in the cell transplantation group was significantly increased than that in the control group. Also at 8 weeks after cell transplantation, immunohistochemical staining showed that a greater number of NI-hADSCs in the spiral ganglions were detected in the cell transplantation group than in the control group, and these NI-hADSCs expressed neuronal markers neurofilament protein and microtubule-associated protein 2. Within 8 weeks after cell transplantation, the guinea pigs in the cell transplantation group had a gradually decreased auditory brainstem response threshold, while those in the control group had almost no response to 80 dB of clicks or pure tone burst. These findings suggest that a large amount of NI-hADSCs migrated to the spiral ganglions, survived for a period of time, repaired the injured spiral ganglion cells, and thereby contributed to the recovery of sensorineural hearing loss in guinea pigs.

  13. Nasolabial appearance in adults with repaired unilateral cleft lip and palate: Relation between professional and lay rating and patients' satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Mani, Maria R; Semb, Gunvor; Andlin-Sobocki, Anna

    2010-11-01

    The aim of the current study was to evaluate the relation between professional and lay rating and patients' satisfaction with nasolabial appearance in adults with repaired unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP). A cross-sectional population study, long-term follow-up with controls matched for age and sex was performed. All patients with complete UCLP born between 1960 and 1987 (n = 109), treated at Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden were invited and 83 (76%) agreed to participate. Follow-up was 20-47 years after primary lip surgery. An age- and sex-matched control group of 65 people were evaluated in the same way. Ratings from professional and lay panels of cropped photographs using a 5 point categorical scale for 4 features of the nasolabial appearance and the satisfaction with appearance questionnaire (SWA) for self-assessment were used. Professional and lay ratings correlated positively but the professionals consistently rated nasolabial appearance as better than did the lay panel (p < 0.001). Self-assessment of nasolabial appearance with the SWA (by patients and controls) did not correlate with the judgement of lay or professional panels. Judgement of nasolabial appearance in adults with repaired UCLP differs among professionals, lay people, and patients. This should be considered when deciding about secondary surgical treatment of signs of clefts.

  14. Signaling through ERK1/2 controls myelin thickness during myelin repair in the adult central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Fyffe-Maricich, Sharyl L; Schott, Alexandra; Karl, Molly; Krasno, Janet; Miller, Robert H

    2013-11-20

    Oligodendrocytes, the myelin-forming cells of the CNS, exquisitely tailor the thickness of individual myelin sheaths to the diameter of their target axons to maximize the speed of action potential propagation, thus ensuring proper neuronal connectivity and function. Following demyelinating injuries to the adult CNS, newly formed oligodendrocytes frequently generate new myelin sheaths. Following episodes of demyelination such as those that occur in patients with multiple sclerosis, however, the matching of myelin thickness to axon diameter fails leaving remyelinated axons with thin myelin sheaths potentially compromising function and leaving axons vulnerable to damage. How oligodendrocytes determine the appropriate thickness of myelin for an axon of defined size during repair is unknown and identifying the signals that regulate myelin thickness has obvious therapeutic implications. Here, we show that sustained activation of extracellular-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) in oligodendrocyte lineage cells results in accelerated myelin repair after injury, and is sufficient for the generation of thick myelin sheaths around remyelinated axons in the adult mouse spinal cord. Our findings suggest a model where ERK1/2 MAP kinase signaling acts as a myelin thickness rheostat that instructs oligodendrocytes to generate axon-appropriate quantities of myelin.

  15. A comparison of tissue engineering based repair of calvarial defects using adipose stem cells from normal and osteoporotic rats.

    PubMed

    Pei, Ming; Li, Jingting; McConda, David B; Wen, Sijin; Clovis, Nina B; Danley, Suzanne S

    2015-09-01

    Repairing large bone defects presents a significant challenge, especially in those people who have a limited regenerative capacity such as in osteoporotic (OP) patients. The aim of this study was to compare adipose stem cells (ASCs) from both normal (NORM) and ovariectomized (OVX) rats in osteogenic potential using both in vitro and in vivo models. After successful establishment of a rat OP model, we found that ASCs from OVX rats exhibited a comparable proliferation capacity to those from NORM rats but had significantly higher adipogenic and relatively lower osteogenic potential. Thirty-two weeks post-implantation with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) alone or PLGA seeded with osteogenic-induced ASCs for critical-size calvarial defects, the data from Herovici's collagen staining and micro-computed tomography suggested that the implantation of ASC-PLGA constructs exhibited a higher bone volume density compared to the PLGA alone group, especially in the NORM rat group. Intriguingly, the defects from OVX rats exhibited a higher bone volume density compared to NORM rats, especially for implantation of the PLGA alone group. Our results indicated that ASC based tissue constructs are more beneficial for the repair of calvarial defects in NORM rats while implantation of PLGA scaffold contributed to defect regeneration in OVX rats.

  16. A comparison of tissue engineering based repair of calvarial defects using adipose stem cells from normal and osteoporotic rats

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Ming; Li, Jingting; McConda, David B.; Wen, Sijin; Clovis, Nina B.; Danley, Suzanne S.

    2015-01-01

    Repairing large bone defects presents a significant challenge, especially in those people who have a limited regenerative capacity such as in osteoporotic (OP) patients. The aim of this study was to compare adipose stem cells (ASCs) from both normal (NORM) and ovariectomized (OVX) rats in osteogenic potential using both in vitro and in vivo models. After successful establishment of a rat OP model, we found that ASCs from OVX rats exhibited a comparable proliferation capacity to those from NORM rats but had significantly higher adipogenic and relatively lower osteogenic potential. Thirty-two weeks post-implantation with poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) alone or PLGA seeded with osteogenic-induced ASCs for critical-size calvarial defects, the data from Herovici’s collagen staining and micro-computed tomography suggested that the implantation of ASC-PLGA constructs exhibited a higher bone volume density compared to the PLGA alone group, especially in the NORM rat group. Intriguingly, the defects from OVX rats exhibited a higher bone volume density compared to NORM rats, especially for implantation of the PLGA alone group. Our results indicated that ASC based tissue constructs are more beneficial for the repair of calvarial defects in NORM rats while implantation of PLGA scaffold contributed to defect regeneration in OVX rats. PMID:25940459

  17. Degradability of injectable calcium sulfate/mineralized collagen-based bone repair material and its effect on bone tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zonggang; Kang, Lingzhi; Meng, Qing-Yuan; Liu, Huanye; Wang, Zhaoliang; Guo, Zhongwu; Cui, Fu-Zhai

    2014-12-01

    The nHAC/CSH composite is an injectable bone repair material with controllable injectability and self-setting properties prepared by introducing calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CSH) into mineralized collagen (nHAC). When mixed with water, the nHAC/CSH composites can be transformed into mineralized collagen/calcium sulfate dihydrate (nHAC/CSD) composites. The nHAC/CSD composites have good biocompatibility and osteogenic capability. Considering that the degradation behavior of bone repair material is another important factor for its clinical applications, the degradability of nHAC/CSD composites was studied. The results showed that the degradation ratio of the nHAC/CSD composites with lower nHAC content increased with the L/S ratio increase of injectable materials, but the variety of L/S ratio had no significant effect on the degradation ratio of the nHAC/CSD composites with higher nHAC content. Increasing nHAC content in the composites could slow down the degradation of nHAC/CSD composite. Setting accelerator had no significant effect on the degradability of nHAC/CSD composites. In vivo histological analysis suggests that the degradation rate of materials can match the growth rate of new mandibular bone tissues in the implanted site of rabbit. The regulable degradability of materials resulting from the special prescriptions of injectable nHAC/CSH composites will further improve the workability of nHAC/CSD composites.

  18. Low power laser irradiation stimulates cell proliferation via proliferating cell nuclear antigen and Ki-67 expression during tissue repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhu, Vijendra; Rao, Bola Sadashiva Satish; Mahato, Krishna Kishore

    2015-03-01

    Low power laser irradiation (LPLI) is becoming an increasingly popular and fast growing therapeutic modality in dermatology to treat various ailments without any reported side effects. In the present study an attempt was made to investigate the proliferative potential of red laser light during tissue repair in Swiss albino mice. To this end, full thickness excisional wounds of diameter 15 mm created on mice were exposed to single dose of Helium-Neon laser (632.8 nm; 7 mW; 4.02 mWcm-2; Linear polarization) at 2 Jcm-2 and 10 Jcm-2 along with un-illuminated controls. The granulation tissues from all the respective experimental groups were harvested on day 10 post-wounding following euthanization. Subsequently, tissue regeneration potential of these laser doses under study were evaluated by monitoring proliferating cell nuclear antigen and Ki-67 following the laser treatment and comparing it with the un-illuminated controls. The percentages of Ki-67 or PCNA positive cells were determined by counting positive nuclei (Ki-67/PCNA) and total nuclei in five random fields per tissue sections. Animal wounds treated with single exposure of the 2 Jcm-2 indicated significant elevation in PCNA (P<0.01) and Ki-67 (P<0.05 compared to un-illuminated control and P<0.01 compared to 10 Jcm-2) expression as compared to other tested experimental groups as evidenced by the microscopy results in the study. In summary, the findings of the present study have clearly demonstrated the regulation of cell proliferation by LPLI via PCNA and Ki-67 expression during tissue regeneration.

  19. Effects of Neural Stem Cell and Olfactory Ensheathing Cell Co-transplants on Tissue Remodelling After Transient Focal Cerebral Ischemia in the Adult Rat.

    PubMed

    Augestad, Ingrid Lovise; Nyman, Axel Karl Gottfrid; Costa, Alex Ignatius; Barnett, Susan Carol; Sandvig, Axel; Håberg, Asta Kristine; Sandvig, Ioanna

    2017-01-24

    Effective transplant-mediated repair of ischemic brain lesions entails extensive tissue remodeling, especially in the ischemic core. Neural stem cells (NSCs) are promising reparative candidates for stroke induced lesions, however, their survival and integration with the host-tissue post-transplantation is poor. In this study, we address this challenge by testing whether co-grafting of NSCs with olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs), a special type of glia with proven neuroprotective, immunomodulatory, and angiogenic effects, can promote graft survival and host tissue remodelling. Transient focal cerebral ischemia was induced in adult rats by a 60-min middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo) followed by reperfusion. Ischemic lesions were verified by neurological testing and magnetic resonance imaging. Transplantation into the globus pallidus of NSCs alone or in combination with OECs was performed at two weeks post-MCAo, followed by histological analyses at three weeks post-transplantation. We found evidence of extensive vascular remodelling in the ischemic core as well as evidence of NSC motility away from the graft and into the infarct border in severely lesioned animals co-grafted with OECs. These findings support a possible role of OECs as part of an in situ tissue engineering paradigm for transplant mediated repair of ischemic brain lesions.

  20. [Biodegradable polymer microparticles with entraped herbal extracts: preparation with supercritical carbon dioxide and use for tissue repair].

    PubMed

    Markvicheva, E A; Antonov, E N; Popova, A V; Bogorodskiĭ, S E; Likhareva, V V; Fel'dman, B M; Strukova, S M; Popov, V K; Rumsh, L D

    2009-01-01

    Biodegradable microparticles based on poly-D,L-lactide with entrapped mixture of herbal water-soluble extracts of Plantago major and Calendula officinalis were prepared. For preparation of these microparticles the previously developed method based on the usage of supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) was proposed. Microparticles were obtained by two techniques: 1) by preparing porous polymer monolith containing entrapped mixture of herbal extracts, which was then reduced to fine microparticles (ca. 0.1 mm) by dry ice grinding (called here as "monolithisation technique") and 2) by spraying of this polymer/extracts mixture through a jet (spray technique). In vitro release kinetic profile of herbal extract mixture was found to depend on the microparticle preparation technique, on the microparticle structure as well as on the initial ratio polymer/extracts (w/w). The microparticles were used for gastric ulcer treatment in a rat model. The extracts released from microparticles were found to accelerate tissue repair.

  1. A novel strategy to enhance mesenchymal stem cell migration capacity and promote tissue repair in an injury specific fashion.

    PubMed

    Xinaris, C; Morigi, M; Benedetti, V; Imberti, B; Fabricio, A S; Squarcina, E; Benigni, A; Gagliardini, E; Remuzzi, G

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) of bone marrow origin appear to be an attractive candidate for cell-based therapies. However, the major barrier to the effective implementation of MSC-based therapies is the lack of specific homing of exogenously infused cells and overall the inability to drive them to the diseased or damaged tissue. In order to circumvent these limitations, we developed a preconditioning strategy to optimize MSC migration efficiency and potentiate their beneficial effect at the site of injury. Initially, we screened different molecules by using an in vitro injury-migration setting, and subsequently, we evaluated the effectiveness of the different strategies in mice with acute kidney injury (AKI). Our results showed that preconditioning of MSCs with IGF-1 before infusion improved cell migration capacity and restored normal renal function after AKI. The present study demonstrates that promoting migration of MSCs could increase their therapeutic potential and indicates a new therapeutic paradigm for organ repair.

  2. Pivotal role for skin transendothelial radio-resistant anti-inflammatory macrophages in tissue repair

    PubMed Central

    Barreiro, Olga; Cibrian, Danay; Clemente, Cristina; Alvarez, David; Moreno, Vanessa; Valiente, Íñigo; Bernad, Antonio; Vestweber, Dietmar; Arroyo, Alicia G; Martín, Pilar; von Andrian, Ulrich H; Sánchez Madrid, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Heterogeneity and functional specialization among skin-resident macrophages are incompletely understood. In this study, we describe a novel subset of murine dermal perivascular macrophages that extend protrusions across the endothelial junctions in steady-state and capture blood-borne macromolecules. Unlike other skin-resident macrophages that are reconstituted by bone marrow-derived progenitors after a genotoxic insult, these cells are replenished by an extramedullary radio-resistant and UV-sensitive Bmi1+ progenitor. Furthermore, they possess a distinctive anti-inflammatory transcriptional profile, which cannot be polarized under inflammatory conditions, and are involved in repair and remodeling functions for which other skin-resident macrophages appear dispensable. Based on all their properties, we define these macrophages as Skin Transendothelial Radio-resistant Anti-inflammatory Macrophages (STREAM) and postulate that their preservation is important for skin homeostasis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15251.001 PMID:27304075

  3. Quantitation of two endogenous lactose-inhibitable lectins in embryonic and adult chicken tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Beyer, E.C.; Barondes, S.H.

    1982-01-01

    Two lactose-binding lectins from chicken tissues, chicken-lactose-lectin-I (CLL-I) and chicken-lactose-lectin-II (CLL-II) were quantified with a radioimmunoassay in extracts of a number of developing and adult chicken tissues. Both lectins could be measured in the same extract without separation, because they showed no significant immunological cross- reactivity. Many embryonic and adult tissues, including brain, heart, intestine, kidney, liver, lung, muscle, pancreas, and spleen, contained one or both lectins, although their concentrations differed markedly. For example, embryonic muscle, the richest source of CLL-I contained only traces of CLL-II whereas embryonic kidney, a very rich source of CLL-II contained substantial CLL-I. In both muscle and kidney, lectin levels in adulthood were much lower than in the embryonic state. In contrast, CLL-I in liver and CLL-II in intestine were 10-fold to 30-fold more concentrated in the adult than in the 15-d embryo. CLL-I and CLL-II from several tissues were purified by affinity chromatography and their identity in the various tissues was confirmed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, isoelectric focusing, and peptide mapping. The results suggest that these lectins might have different functions in the many developing and adult tissues in which they are found.

  4. Mechanical Properties of Mesh Materials Used for Hernia Repair and Soft Tissue Augmentation

    PubMed Central

    Pott, Peter P.; Schwarz, Markus L. R.; Gundling, Ralf; Nowak, Kai; Hohenberger, Peter; Roessner, Eric D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Hernia repair is the most common surgical procedure in the world. Augmentation with synthetic meshes has gained importance in recent decades. Most of the published work about hernia meshes focuses on the surgical technique, outcome in terms of mortality and morbidity and the recurrence rate. Appropriate biomechanical and engineering terminology is frequently absent. Meshes are under continuous development but there is little knowledge in the public domain about their mechanical properties. In the presented experimental study we investigated the mechanical properties of several widely available meshes according to German Industrial Standards (DIN ISO). Methodology/Principal Findings Six different meshes were assessed considering longitudinal and transverse direction in a uni-axial tensile test. Based on the force/displacement curve, the maximum force, breaking strain, and stiffness were computed. According to the maximum force the values were assigned to the groups weak and strong to determine a base for comparison. We discovered differences in the maximum force (11.1±6.4 to 100.9±9.4 N/cm), stiffness (0.3±0.1 to 4.6±0.5 N/mm), and breaking strain (150±6% to 340±20%) considering the direction of tension. Conclusions/Significance The measured stiffness and breaking strength vary widely among available mesh materials for hernia repair, and most of the materials show significant anisotropy in their mechanical behavior. Considering the forces present in the abdominal wall, our results suggest that some meshes should be implanted in an appropriate orientation, and that information regarding the directionality of their mechanical properties should be provided by the manufacturers. PMID:23071685

  5. Osteochondral Biopsy Analysis Demonstrates That BST-CarGel Treatment Improves Structural and Cellular Characteristics of Cartilage Repair Tissue Compared With Microfracture

    PubMed Central

    Méthot, Stéphane; Changoor, Adele; Tran-Khanh, Nicolas; Hoemann, Caroline D.; Stanish, William D.; Restrepo, Alberto; Shive, Matthew S.; Buschmann, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The efficacy and safety of BST-CarGel, a chitosan-based medical device for cartilage repair, was compared with microfracture alone at 1 year during a multicenter randomized controlled trial (RCT) in the knee. The quality of repair tissue of osteochondral biopsies collected from a subset of patients was compared using blinded histological assessments. Methods The international RCT evaluated repair tissue quantity and quality by 3-dimensional quantitative magnetic resonance imaging as co-primary endpoints at 12 months. At an average of 13 months posttreatment, 21/41 BST-CarGel and 17/39 microfracture patients underwent elective second look arthroscopies as a tertiary endpoint, during which ICRS (International Cartilage Repair Society) macroscopic scoring was carried out, and osteochondral biopsies were collected. Stained histological sections were evaluated by blinded readers using ICRS I and II histological scoring systems. Collagen organization was evaluated using a polarized light microscopy score. Results BST-CarGel treatment resulted in significantly better ICRS macroscopic scores (P = 0.0002) compared with microfracture alone, indicating better filling, integration, and tissue appearance. Histologically, BST-CarGel resulted in a significant improvement of structural parameters—Surface Architecture (P = 0.007) and Surface/Superficial Assessment (P = 0.042)—as well as cellular parameters—Cell Viability (P = 0.006) and Cell Distribution (P = 0.032). No histological parameters were significantly better for the microfracture group. BST-CarGel treatment also resulted in a more organized repair tissue with collagen stratification more similar to native hyaline cartilage, as measured by polarized light microscopy scoring (P = 0.0003). Conclusion Multiple and independent analyses in this biopsy substudy demonstrated that BST-CarGel treatment results in improved structural and cellular characteristics of repair tissue at 1 year posttreatment compared with

  6. Photographic-Based Optical Evaluation of Tissues and Biomaterials Used for Corneal Surface Repair: A New Easy-Applied Method

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Andrades, Miguel; Cardona, Juan de la Cruz; Ionescu, Ana Maria; Mosse, Charles A.; Brown, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Tissues and biomaterials used for corneal surface repair require fulfilling specific optical standards prior to implantation in the patient. However, there is not a feasible evaluation method to be applied in clinical or Good Manufacturing Practice settings. In this study, we describe and assess an innovative easy-applied photographic-based method (PBM) for measuring functional optical blurring and transparency in corneal surface grafts. Methods Plastic compressed collagen scaffolds (PCCS) and multilayered amniotic membranes (AM) samples were optically and histologically evaluated. Transparency and image blurring measures were obtained by PBM, analyzing photographic images of a standardized band pattern taken through the samples. These measures were compared and correlated to those obtained applying the Inverse Adding-Doubling (IAD) technique, which is the gold standard method. Results All the samples used for optical evaluation by PBM or IAD were histological suitable. PCCS samples presented transmittance values higher than 60%, values that increased with increasing wavelength as determined by IAD. The PBM indicated that PCCS had a transparency ratio (TR) value of 80.3±2.8%, with a blurring index (BI) of 50.6±4.2%. TR and BI obtained from the PBM showed a high correlation (ρ>|0.6|) with the diffuse transmittance and the diffuse reflectance, both determined using the IAD (p<0.005). The AM optical properties showed that there was a largely linear relationship between the blurring and the number of amnion layers, with more layers producing greater blurring. Conclusions This innovative proposed method represents an easy-applied technique for evaluating transparency and blurriness of tissues and biomaterials used for corneal surface repair. PMID:26566050

  7. Applications of In Vivo Functional Testing of the Rat Tibialis Anterior for Evaluating Tissue Engineered Skeletal Muscle Repair

    PubMed Central

    Mintz, Ellen L.; Passipieri, Juliana A.; Lovell, Daniel Y.; Christ, George J.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the regenerative capacity of skeletal muscle, permanent functional and/or cosmetic deficits (e.g., volumetric muscle loss (VML) resulting from traumatic injury, disease and various congenital, genetic and acquired conditions are quite common. Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine technologies have enormous potential to provide a therapeutic solution. However, utilization of biologically relevant animal models in combination with longitudinal assessments of pertinent functional measures are critical to the development of improved regenerative therapeutics for treatment of VML-like injuries. In that regard, a commercial muscle lever system can be used to measure length, tension, force and velocity parameters in skeletal muscle. We used this system, in conjunction with a high power, bi-phase stimulator, to measure in vivo force production in response to activation of the anterior crural compartment of the rat hindlimb. We have previously used this equipment to assess the functional impact of VML injury on the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle, as well as the extent of functional recovery following treatment of the injured TA muscle with our tissue engineered muscle repair (TEMR) technology. For such studies, the left foot of an anaesthetized rat is securely anchored to a footplate linked to a servomotor, and the common peroneal nerve is stimulated by two percutaneous needle electrodes to elicit muscle contraction and dorsiflexion of the foot. The peroneal nerve stimulation-induced muscle contraction is measured over a range of stimulation frequencies (1-200 Hz), to ensure an eventual plateau in force production that allows for an accurate determination of peak tetanic force. In addition to evaluation of the extent of VML injury as well as the degree of functional recovery following treatment, this methodology can be easily applied to study diverse aspects of muscle physiology and pathophysiology. Such an approach should assist with the more rational

  8. Minced Tissue in Compressed Collagen: A Cell-containing Biotransplant for Single-staged Reconstructive Repair.

    PubMed

    Chamorro, Clara I; Zeiai, Said; Reinfeldt Engberg, Gisela; Fossum, Magdalena

    2016-02-24

    Conventional techniques for cell expansion and transplantation of autologous cells for tissue engineering purposes can take place in specially equipped human cell culture facilities. These methods include isolation of cells in single cell suspension and several laborious and time-consuming events before transplantation back to the patient. Previous studies suggest that the body itself could be used as a bioreactor for cell expansion and regeneration of tissue in order to minimize ex vivo manipulations of tissues and cells before transplanting to the patient. The aim of this study was to demonstrate a method for tissue harvesting, isolation of continuous epithelium, mincing of the epithelium into small pieces and incorporating them into a three-layered biomaterial. The three-layered biomaterial then served as a delivery vehicle, to allow surgical handling, exchange of nutrition across the transplant, and a controlled degradation. The biomaterial consisted of two outer layers of collagen and a core of a mechanically stable and slowly degradable polymer. The minced epithelium was incorporated into one of the collagen layers before transplantation. By mincing the epithelial tissue into small pieces, the pieces could be spread and thereby the propagation of cells was stimulated. After the initial take of the transplants, cell expansion and reorganization would take place and extracellular matrix mature to allow ingrowth of capillaries and nerves and further maturation of the extracellular matrix. The technique minimizes ex vivo manipulations and allow cell harvesting, preparation of autograft, and transplantation to the patient as a simple one-stage intervention. In the future, tissue expansion could be initiated around a 3D mold inside the body itself, according to the specific needs of the patient. Additionally, the technique could be performed in an ordinary surgical setting without the need for sophisticated cell culturing facilities.

  9. [Congenital heart disease in adults: residua, sequelae, and complications of cardiac defects repaired at an early age].

    PubMed

    Oliver Ruiz, José María

    2003-01-01

    Nowadays, it is estimated that 85% of the infants born with congenital heart disease (CHD) will survive to adulthood, thanks mainly to surgical or therapeutic procedures performed during infancy or childhood. The clinical profile and disease pattern of adults with CHD is changing. The prevalence of certain adult CHDs, such as tetralogy of Fallot, transposition of the great arteries or univentricular heart, is rising, but these conditions have practically become new diseases as a result of therapy. Most surviving patients present residua, sequelae, or complications, which can progress during adult life. These disorders can present electrophysiological disturbances, valvular disease, persistent shunts, myocardial dysfunction, pulmonary or systemic vascular disease, problems caused by prosthetic materials, infectious complications, thromboembolic events, or extravascular disorders involving multiple organs or systems. In tetralogy of Fallot, the most striking problems that affect long-term prognosis are pulmonary valve regurgitation, right ventricle dysfunction, and atrial or ventricular arrhythmias. The main problems appearing after physiological atrial repair of transposition of the great arteries are related to right ventricular function, since it is structurally unprepared for systemic circulation, and atrial arrhythmias. Surgical repair of univentricular heart using Fontan techniques should be considered a palliative procedure that does not modify the underlying structural disorder and exposes the postoperative patient to severe complications and problems. The increase in the number of patients with CHD who will reach adulthood in the coming decades makes it necessary to carefully consider the new healthcare demands that are being generated, who should be responsible for them, and how and where solutions can be found.

  10. Sciatic nerve repair with tissue engineered nerve: Olfactory ensheathing cells seeded poly(lactic-co-glygolic acid) conduit in an animal model

    PubMed Central

    Tan, C W; Ng, M H; Ohnmar, H; Lokanathan, Y; Nur-Hidayah, H; Roohi, S A; Ruszymah, BHI; Nor-Hazla, M H; Shalimar, A; Naicker, A S

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aim: Synthetic nerve conduits have been sought for repair of nerve defects as the autologous nerve grafts causes donor site morbidity and possess other drawbacks. Many strategies have been investigated to improve nerve regeneration through synthetic nerve guided conduits. Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) that share both Schwann cell and astrocytic characteristics have been shown to promote axonal regeneration after transplantation. The present study was driven by the hypothesis that tissue-engineered poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) seeded with OECs would improve peripheral nerve regeneration in a long sciatic nerve defect. Materials and Methods: Sciatic nerve gap of 15 mm was created in six adult female Sprague-Dawley rats and implanted with PLGA seeded with OECs. The nerve regeneration was assessed electrophysiologically at 2, 4 and 6 weeks following implantation. Histopathological examination, scanning electron microscopic (SEM) examination and immunohistochemical analysis were performed at the end of the study. Results: Nerve conduction studies revealed a significant improvement of nerve conduction velocities whereby the mean nerve conduction velocity increases from 4.2 ΁ 0.4 m/s at week 2 to 27.3 ΁ 5.7 m/s at week 6 post-implantation (P < 0.0001). Histological analysis revealed presence of spindle-shaped cells. Immunohistochemical analysis further demonstrated the expression of S100 protein in both cell nucleus and the cytoplasm in these cells, hence confirming their Schwann-cell-like property. Under SEM, these cells were found to be actively secreting extracellular matrix. Conclusion: Tissue-engineered PLGA conduit seeded with OECs provided a permissive environment to facilitate nerve regeneration in a small animal model. PMID:24379458

  11. Autocrine and Paracrine Function of Angiotensin 1–7 in Tissue Repair During Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) cleaves angiotensin (Ang) II to generate Ang1–7, which mediates cellular actions through Mas receptors (MasR). Hypertension is accompanied by high or low circulating AngII levels and cardiac/renal injury. The purpose of this study is to explore (i) whether circulating AngII affects ACE2/MasR expressions in the hypertensive heart and kidney; and (ii) whether Ang1–7 regulates cardiac repair/remodeling responses through MasR during hypertension. METHODS In the first portion of the study, rats received either an AngII infusion (400ng/kg/min) for 4 weeks, leading to hypertension with high circulating AngII, or an aldosterone (ALDO, 0.75 μg/h) infusion for 4 weeks, leading to hypertension with low/normal circulating AngII. Cardiac and renal ACE2/MasR expressions were examined. We found that cardiac ACE2 was increased and MasR attenuated in both AngII and ALDO groups. However, renal ACE2 and MasR remained unchanged in both AngII- and ALDO-treated animals. RESULTS In the second portion, rats received AngII infusion with/without MasR antagonist (A779, 1mg/kg/day) for 4 weeks. The roles of MasR blockade in cardiac inflammation, fibrosis, apoptosis, and ventricular function were examined. Chronic AngII infusion caused scattered cardiac injuries, and A779 cotreatment exacerbated cardiac injury, resulting in aggravated inflammatory, fibrogenic, and apoptotic responses compared with the AngII group. Cardiac function, however, was unaltered in the AngII and A779 groups. CONCLUSIONS ACE2 and MasR expressions in the hypertensive heart and kidney are not regulated by circulating AngII levels. Ang1–7 is involved in multiple repair responses, suggesting that therapeutic strategies aimed at administering Ang1–7 hold potential for the management of cardiac remodeling. PMID:24429674

  12. Use of a biological reactor and platelet-rich plasma for the construction of tissue-engineered bone to repair articular cartilage defects

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huibo; Sun, Shui; Liu, Haili; Chen, Hua; Rong, Xin; Lou, Jigang; Yang, Yunbei; Yang, Yi; Liu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Articular cartilage defects are a major clinical burden worldwide. Current methods to repair bone defects include bone autografts, allografts and external fixation. In recent years, the repair of bone defects by tissue engineering has emerged as a promising approach. The present study aimed to assess a novel method using a biological reactor with platelet-rich plasma to construct tissue-engineered bone. Beagle bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) were isolated and differentiated into osteoblasts and chondroblasts using platelet-rich plasma and tricalcium phosphate scaffolds cultured in a bioreactor for 3 weeks. The cell scaffold composites were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and implanted into beagles with articular cartilage defects. The expression of osteogenic markers, alkaline phosphatase and bone γ-carboxyglutamate protein (BGLAP) were assessed using polymerase chain reaction after 3 months. Articular cartilage specimens were observed histologically. Adhesion and distribution of BMSCs on the β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) scaffold were confirmed by SEM. Histological examination revealed that in vivo bone defects were largely repaired 12 weeks following implantation. The expression levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and BGLAP in the experimental groups were significantly elevated compared with the negative controls. BMSCs may be optimum seed cells for tissue engineering in bone repair. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) provides a rich source of cytokines to promote BMSC function. The β-TCP scaffold is advantageous for tissue engineering due to its biocompatibility and 3D structure that promotes cell adhesion, growth and differentiation. The tissue-engineered bone was constructed in a bioreactor using BMSCs, β-TCP scaffolds and PRP and displayed appropriate morphology and biological function. The present study provides an efficient method for the generation of tissue-engineered bone for cartilage repair, compared with previously used

  13. Innate immune system and tissue regeneration in planarians: an area ripe for exploration.

    PubMed

    Peiris, T Harshani; Hoyer, Katrina K; Oviedo, Néstor J

    2014-08-01

    The immune system has been implicated as an important modulator of tissue regeneration. However, the mechanisms driving injury-induced immune response and tissue repair remain poorly understood. For over 200 years, planarians have been a classical model for studies on tissue regeneration, but the planarian immune system and its potential role in repair is largely unknown. We found through comparative genomic analysis and data mining that planarians contain many potential homologs of the innate immune system that are activated during injury and repair of adult tissues. These findings support the notion that the relationship between adult tissue repair and the immune system is an ancient feature of basal Bilateria. Further analysis of the planarian immune system during regeneration could potentially add to our understanding of how the innate immune system and inflammatory responses interplay with regenerative signals to induce scar-less tissue repair in the context of the adult organism.

  14. Innate immune system and tissue regeneration in Planarians: An area ripe for exploration

    PubMed Central

    Peiris, T. Harshani; Hoyer, Katrina K.; Oviedo, Néstor J.

    2014-01-01

    The immune system has been implicated as an important modulator of tissue regeneration. However, the mechanisms driving injury-induced immune response and tissue repair remain poorly understood. For over 200 years, planarians have been a classical model for studies on tissue regeneration, but the planarian immune system and its potential role in repair is largely unknown. We found through comparative genomic analysis and data mining that planarians contain many potential homologs of the innate immune system that are activated during injury and repair of adult tissues. These findings support the notion that the relationship between adult tissue repair and the immune system is an ancient feature of basal Bilateria. Further analysis of the planarian immune system during regeneration could potentially add to our understanding of how the innate immune system and inflammatory responses interplay with regenerative signals to induce scar-less tissue repair in the context of the adult organism. PMID:25082737

  15. Dietary cholesterol promotes repair of demyelinated lesions in the adult brain

    PubMed Central

    Berghoff, Stefan A.; Gerndt, Nina; Winchenbach, Jan; Stumpf, Sina K.; Hosang, Leon; Odoardi, Francesca; Ruhwedel, Torben; Böhler, Carolin; Barrette, Benoit; Stassart, Ruth; Liebetanz, David; Dibaj, Payam; Möbius, Wiebke; Edgar, Julia M.; Saher, Gesine

    2017-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory demyelinating disorder in which remyelination failure contributes to persistent disability. Cholesterol is rate-limiting for myelin biogenesis in the developing CNS; however, whether cholesterol insufficiency contributes to remyelination failure in MS, is unclear. Here, we show the relationship between cholesterol, myelination and neurological parameters in mouse models of demyelination and remyelination. In the cuprizone model, acute disease reduces serum cholesterol levels that can be restored by dietary cholesterol. Concomitant with blood-brain barrier impairment, supplemented cholesterol directly supports oligodendrocyte precursor proliferation and differentiation, and restores the balance of growth factors, creating a permissive environment for repair. This leads to attenuated axon damage, enhanced remyelination and improved motor learning. Remarkably, in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, cholesterol supplementation does not exacerbate disease expression. These findings emphasize the safety of dietary cholesterol in inflammatory diseases and point to a previously unrecognized role of cholesterol in promoting repair after demyelinating episodes. PMID:28117328

  16. Adipose tissue gene expression and metabolic health of obese adults

    PubMed Central

    Das, Swapan Kumar; Ma, Lijun; Sharma, Neeraj

    2014-01-01

    Obese subjects with a similar body mass index (BMI) exhibit substantial heterogeneity in gluco- and cardio-metabolic heath phenotypes. However, defining genes that underlie the heterogeneity of metabolic features among obese individuals and determining metabolically healthy and unhealthy phenotypes remain challenging. We conducted unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis of subcutaneous adipose tissue transcripts from 30 obese men and women ≥40 years old. Despite similar BMIs in all subjects, we found two distinct subgroups, one metabolically healthy (Group 1) and one metabolically unhealthy (Group 2). Subjects in Group 2 showed significantly higher total cholesterol (p=0.005), LDL cholesterol (p=0.006), 2h-Insulin during OGTT (p=0.015) and lower insulin sensitivity (SI, p=0.029) compared to Group 1. We identified significant up-regulation of 141 genes (e.g. MMP9 and SPP1) and down-regulation of 17 genes (e.g. NDRG4 and GINS3) in group 2 subjects. Intriguingly, these differentially expressed transcripts were enriched for genes involved in cardiovascular disease-related processes (p=2.81×10−11–3.74×10−02) and pathways involved in immune and inflammatory response (p=8.32×10−5–0.04). Two down-regulated genes, NDRG4 and GINS3, have been located in a genomic interval associated with cardiac repolarization in published GWASs and zebra fish knockout models. Our study provides evidence that perturbations in the adipose tissue gene expression network are important in defining metabolic health in obese subjects. PMID:25520251

  17. Using Stem Cells to Grow Artificial Tissue for Peripheral Nerve Repair

    PubMed Central

    Bhangra, Kulraj Singh; Busuttil, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury continues to pose a clinical hurdle despite its frequency and advances in treatment. Unlike the central nervous system, neurons of the peripheral nervous system have a greater ability to regenerate. However, due to a number of confounding factors, this is often both incomplete and inadequate. The lack of supportive Schwann cells or their inability to maintain a regenerative phenotype is a major factor. Advances in nervous system tissue engineering technology have led to efforts to build Schwann cell scaffolds to overcome this and enhance the regenerative capacity of neurons following injury. Stem cells that can differentiate along a neural lineage represent an essential resource and starting material for this process. In this review, we discuss the different stem cell types that are showing promise for nervous system tissue engineering in the context of peripheral nerve injury. We also discuss some of the biological, practical, ethical, and commercial considerations in using these different stem cells for future clinical application. PMID:27212954

  18. Thymosin β4 coated nanofiber scaffolds for the repair of damaged cardiac tissue

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    After a cardiac event, proper treatment and care of the damaged tissue is crucial in restoring optimal cardiac function and preventing future cardiac events. Recently, thymosin β4 has been found to play a vital role in cardiac cell health and development by regulating angiogenesis, inflammatory responses, and wound healing. We proposed that defined poly(ϵ-caprolactone) (PCL) nanoscaffolds coated with thymosin β4 could efficiently differentiate murine-derived cardiomyocytes into functioning cardiac tissue. PCL nanoscaffolds were developed through electrospinning technology, and subsequently coated with a thymosin β4 solution. Cardiomyocytes were seeded on coated and uncoated nanoscaffolds and observed for six days via fluorescent and electron microscopy. Our results demonstrated a robust growth and differentiation of cardiomyocytes on coated nanoscaffolds compared with uncoated, showing potential for nanoscaffold-mediated cardiac cell replacement in vivo after an MI or other cardiac event. PMID:24661328

  19. Induction of endometrial mesenchymal stem cells into tissue-forming cells suitable for fascial repair.

    PubMed

    Su, Kai; Edwards, Sharon L; Tan, Ker S; White, Jacinta F; Kandel, Shital; Ramshaw, John A M; Gargett, Caroline E; Werkmeister, Jerome A

    2014-12-01

    Pelvic organ prolapse is a major hidden burden affecting almost one in four women. It is treated by reconstructive surgery, often augmented with synthetic mesh. To overcome the growing concerns of using current synthetic meshes coupled with the high risk of reoperation, a tissue engineering strategy has been developed, adopting a novel source of mesenchymal stem cells. These cells are derived from the highly regenerative endometrial lining of the uterus (eMSCs) and will be delivered in vivo using a new gelatin-coated polyamide scaffold. In this study, gelatin properties were optimized by altering the gelatin concentration and extent of crosslinking to produce the desired gelation and degradation rate in culture. Following cell seeding of uncoated polyamide (PA) and gelatin-coated meshes (PA+G), the growth rate of eMSCs on the PA+G scaffolds was more than that on the PA alone, without compromising cell shape. eMSCs cultured on the PA+G scaffold retained their phenotype, as demonstrated by W5C5/SUSD2 (eMSC-specific marker) immunocytochemistry. Additionally, eMSCs were induced to differentiate into smooth muscle cells (SMC), as shown by immunofluorescence for smooth muscle protein 22 and smooth muscle myosin heavy chain. eMSCs also differentiated into fibroblast-like cells when treated with connective tissue growth factor with enhanced detection of Tenascin-C and collagen type I as well as new tissue formation, as seen by Masson's trichrome. In summary, it was demonstrated that the PA+G scaffold is an appropriate platform for eMSC delivery, proliferation and differentiation into SMC and fibroblasts, with good biocompatibility and the capacity to regenerate neo-tissue.

  20. Brain tissue pressure measurements in perinatal and adult rabbits.

    PubMed

    Hornig, G W; Lorenzo, A V; Zavala, L M; Welch, K

    1987-12-01

    Brain tissue pressure (BTP) in pre- and post-natal anesthetized rabbits, held in a stereotactic head holder, was measured with a fluid filled 23 gauge open-ended cannula connected distally to a pressure transducer. By advancing the cannula step wise through a hole in the cranium it was possible to sequentially measure pressure from the cranial subarachnoid space, cortex, ventricle and basal ganglia. Separate cannulas and transducers were used to measure CSFP from the cisterna magna and arterial and/or venous pressure. Pressure recordings obtained when the tip of the BTP cannula was located in the cranial subarachnoid space or ventricle exhibited respiratory and blood pressure pulsations equivalent to and in phase with CSF pulsations recorded from the cisterna magna. When the tip was advanced into brain parenchymal sites such pulsations were suppressed or non-detectable unless communication with a CSF compartment had been established inadvertently. Although CSF pressures in the three spinal fluid compartments were equivalent, in most animals BTP was higher than CSFP. However, after momentary venting of the system BTP equilibrated at a pressure below that of CSFP. We speculate that venting of the low compliance system (1.20 x 10(-5) ml/mmHg) relieves the isometric pressure build-up due to insertion of the cannula into brain parenchyma. Under these conditions, and at all ages examined, BTP in the rabbit is consistently lower than CSFP and, as with CSFP, it increases as the animal matures.

  1. Great promise of tissue-resident adult stem/progenitor cells in transplantation and cancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Mimeault, Murielle; Batra, Surinder K

    2012-01-01

    Recent progress in tissue-resident adult stem/progenitor cell research has inspired great interest because these immature cells from your own body can act as potential, easily accessible cell sources for cell transplantation in regenerative medicine and cancer therapies. The use of adult stem/progenitor cells endowed with a high self-renewal ability and multilineage differentiation potential, which are able to regenerate all the mature cells in the tissues from their origin, offers great promise in replacing non-functioning or lost cells and regenerating diseased and damaged tissues. The presence of a small subpopulation of adult stem/progenitor cells in most tissues and organs provides the possibility of stimulating their in vivo differentiation, or of using their ex vivo expanded progenies for cell-replacement and gene therapies with multiple applications in humans without a high-risk of graft rejection and major side effects. Among the diseases that could be treated by adult stem cell-based therapies are hematopoietic and immune disorders, multiple degenerative disorders such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases, Types 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus as well as skin, eye, liver, lung, tooth and cardiovascular disorders. In addition, a combination of the current cancer treatments with an adjuvant treatment consisting of an autologous or allogeneic adult stem/progenitor cell transplantation also represents a promising strategy for treating and even curing diverse aggressive, metastatic, recurrent and lethal cancers. In this chapter, we reviewed the most recent advancements on the characterization of phenotypic and functional properties of adult stem/progenitor cell types found in bone marrow, heart, brain and other tissues and discussed their therapeutic implications in the stem cell-based transplantation therapy.

  2. Minimally invasive repair of pectus excavatum (MIRPE) in adults: is it a proper choice?

    PubMed Central

    Demirkaya, Ahmet; Kılıç, Burcu; Kara, Hasan Volkan; Yakşi, Osman; Alizade, Nurlan; Demirhan, Özkan; Sayılgan, Cem; Turna, Akif; Kaynak, Kamil

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The Nuss procedure is suitable for prepubertal and early pubertal patients but can also be used in adult patients. Aim To determine whether the minimally invasive technique (MIRPE) can also be performed successfully in adults. Material and methods Between July 2006 and January 2016, 836 patients (744 male, 92 female) underwent correction of pectus excavatum with the MIRPE technique at our institution. The mean age was 16.8 years (2–45 years). There were 236 adult patients (28.2%) (> 18 years) – 20 female, 216 male. The mean age among the adult patients was 23.2 years (18–45 years). The recorded data included length of hospital stay, postoperative complications, number of bars used, duration of the surgical procedure and signs of pneumothorax on the postoperative chest X-ray. Results The MIRPE was performed in 236 adult patients. The average operative time was 44.4 min (25–90 min). The median postoperative stay was 4.92 ±2.81 days (3–21 days) in adults and 4.64 ±1.58 (2–13) in younger patients. The difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.637). Two or more bars were used in 36 (15.8%) adult patients and in 44 (7.5%) younger patients. The difference was not statistically significant either (p = 0.068). Regarding the overall complications, complication rates among the adult patients and younger patients were 26.2% and 11.8% respectively. The difference was statistically significant (p = 0.007). Conclusions MIRPE is a feasible procedure that produces good long-term results in the treatment of pectus excavatum in adults. PMID:27458490

  3. The effect of oxidative stress on nucleotide-excision repair in colon tissue of newborn piglets.

    PubMed

    Langie, Sabine A S; Kowalczyk, Pawel; Tudek, Barbara; Zabielski, Romuald; Dziaman, Tomasz; Oliński, Ryszard; van Schooten, Frederik J; Godschalk, Roger W L

    2010-01-01

    Nucleotide-excision repair (NER) is important for the maintenance of genomic integrity and to prevent the onset of carcinogenesis. Oxidative stress was previously found to inhibit NER in vitro, and dietary antioxidants could thus protect DNA not only by reducing levels of oxidative DNA damage, but also by protecting NER against oxidative stress-induced inhibition. To obtain further insight in the relation between oxidative stress and NER activity in vivo, oxidative stress was induced in newborn piglets by means of intra-muscular injection of iron (200mg) at day 3 after birth. Indeed, injection of iron significantly increased several markers of oxidative stress, such as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) levels in colon DNA and urinary excretion of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoGua). In parallel, the influence of maternal supplementation with an antioxidant-enriched diet was investigated in their offspring. Supplementation resulted in reduced iron concentrations in the colon (P=0.004) at day 7 and a 40% reduction of 8-oxodG in colon DNA (P=0.044) at day 14 after birth. NER capacity in animals that did not receive antioxidants was significantly reduced to 32% at day 7 compared with the initial NER capacity on day 1 after birth. This reduction in NER capacity was less pronounced in antioxidant-supplemented piglets (69%). Overall, these data indicate that NER can be reduced by oxidative stress in vivo, which can be compensated for by antioxidant supplementation.

  4. β-Catenin Activation in Muscle Progenitor Cells Regulates Tissue Repair.

    PubMed

    Rudolf, Anja; Schirwis, Elija; Giordani, Lorenzo; Parisi, Alice; Lepper, Christoph; Taketo, Makoto Mark; Le Grand, Fabien

    2016-05-10

    Skeletal muscle regeneration relies on a pool of resident muscle stem cells called satellite cells (MuSCs). Following injury-induced destruction of the myofibers, quiescent MuSCs are activated and generate transient amplifying progenitors (myoblasts) that will fuse to form new myofibers. Here, we focus on the canonical Wnt signaling pathway and find that either conditional β-catenin disruption or activation in adult MuSCs results in perturbation of muscle regeneration. Using both in vivo and in vitro approaches, we observed that myoblasts lacking β-catenin show delayed differentiation, whereas myoblasts with constitutively active β-catenin undergo precocious growth arrest and differentiation. Transcriptome analysis further demonstrated that Wnt/β-catenin signaling interacts with multiple pathways and, more specifically, TGF-β signaling. Indeed, exogenous TGF-β2 stimulation restores the regenerative potential of muscles with targeted β-catenin disruption in MuSCs. We conclude that a precise level of β-catenin activity is essential for regulating the amplification and differentiation of MuSC descendants during adult myogenesis.

  5. Analysis of photobiomodulation associated or not with platelet-rich plasma on repair of muscle tissue by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Guilherme Akio Tamura; Camargo, Regina Celi Trindade; Koike, Tatiana Emy; Garcia, Thiago Alves; Castoldi, Robson Chacon; Pereira, João Domingos Augusto Dos Santos; Constantino, Carlos José Leopoldo; Camargo Filho, José Carlos Silva

    2016-12-01

    Treatment of muscle injuries usually results in the interruption of sports practice; thus, studies aimed at accelerating the return to activity, with proper tissue repair, are important. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effects of photobiomodulation (PBM), associated or not with platelet-rich plasma (PRP), on the treatment of muscle injury. Thirty-five animals were used and divided into five groups (n = 7): control (C), control lesion (CL), lesion treated with low-level laser therapy (LLLT) (LLt), lesion treated with PRP (LP), and lesion treated with both techniques, LLLT and PRP (LLtP). Muscle injury was induced by stretching the gastrocnemius muscle, and the animals in the LLtP and LP groups received the application of PRP immediately following the injury. The LLLT was applied daily for 7 days. The animals were euthanized 7 days after the injury. Analysis of the NADH/NAD ratio and collagen was performed by Raman spectroscopy; in addition to which, histological analysis of the gastrocnemius muscle was performed. The LLtP group demonstrated a reduction in the area of injury, regenerating cells and a healthy appearance of muscle fibers. The Raman analyses showed a reduction in the NADH/NAD ratio in the CL group, demonstrating oxidative stress, and the collagen presented a reduction in the CL and LLt groups, when compared with the C group. It is concluded that either PBM or PRP, and the association of both, was able to reduce the oxidative stress promoted by injury and modulate collagen production at the site of the injury. Furthermore, although both treatments individually were effective for repairing the damage caused by muscle injury, the association of both demonstrated a better histological aspect.

  6. Repair of Segmental Bone Defect Using Totally Vitalized Tissue Engineered Bone Graft by a Combined Perfusion Seeding and Culture System

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Ya-Fei; Li, Xiang; Hu, Yun-Yu; Wang, Zhen; Ma, Zhen-Sheng; Lei, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Background The basic strategy to construct tissue engineered bone graft (TEBG) is to combine osteoblastic cells with three dimensional (3D) scaffold. Based on this strategy, we proposed the “Totally Vitalized TEBG” (TV-TEBG) which was characterized by abundant and homogenously distributed cells with enhanced cell proliferation and differentiation and further investigated its biological performance in repairing segmental bone defect. Methods In this study, we constructed the TV-TEBG with the combination of customized flow perfusion seeding/culture system and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) scaffold fabricated by Rapid Prototyping (RP) technique. We systemically compared three kinds of TEBG constructed by perfusion seeding and perfusion culture (PSPC) method, static seeding and perfusion culture (SSPC) method, and static seeding and static culture (SSSC) method for their in vitro performance and bone defect healing efficacy with a rabbit model. Results Our study has demonstrated that TEBG constructed by PSPC method exhibited better biological properties with higher daily D-glucose consumption, increased cell proliferation and differentiation, and better cell distribution, indicating the successful construction of TV-TEBG. After implanted into rabbit radius defects for 12 weeks, PSPC group exerted higher X-ray score close to autograft, much greater mechanical property evidenced by the biomechanical testing and significantly higher new bone formation as shown by histological analysis compared with the other two groups, and eventually obtained favorable healing efficacy of the segmental bone defect that was the closest to autograft transplantation. Conclusion This study demonstrated the feasibility of TV-TEBG construction with combination of perfusion seeding, perfusion culture and RP technique which exerted excellent biological properties. The application of TV-TEBG may become a preferred candidate for segmental bone defect repair in orthopedic and maxillofacial

  7. Tissue characteristics in tendon-to-bone healing change after rotator cuff repair using botulinumneurotoxin A for temporary paralysis of the supraspinatus muscle in rats.

    PubMed

    Ficklscherer, A; Scharf, M; Hartl, T K; Schröder, C; Milz, S; Roßbach, B P; Gülecyüz, M F; Pietschmann, M F; Müller, P E

    2014-04-01

    We hypothesized that botulinumneurotoxin A (BoNtA) positively influences tissue characteristics at the re-insertion site when used as an adjuvant prior to rotator cuff repair. One hundred and sixty Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to either a BoNtA or saline-injected control group. BoNtA or saline solution was injected into the supraspinatus muscle one week prior to repair of an artificially created supraspinatus tendon defect. Post-operatively, one subgroup was immobilized using a cast on the operated shoulder while the other had immediate mobilization. Histologically, the fibrocartilage transition zone was more prominent and better organized in the BoNtA groups when compared to the saline control group. In the immediately mobilized BoNtA groups significantly more collagen 2 at the insertion was detected than in the control groups (p<0.05). Fiber orientation of all BoNtA groups was better organized and more perpendicular to the epiphysis compared with control groups. Tendon stiffness differed significantly (p<0.05) between casted BoNtA and casted saline groups. Tendon viscoelasticity was significantly higher (p<0.05) in the immobilized saline groups no matter if repaired with increased or normal repair load. The results of this study suggest that reduction of load at the healing tendon-to-bone interface leads to improved repair tissue properties.

  8. Generation of a conditional mouse model to target Acvr1b disruption in adult tissues.

    PubMed

    Ripoche, Doriane; Gout, Johann; Pommier, Roxane M; Jaafar, Rami; Zhang, Chang X; Bartholin, Laurent; Bertolino, Philippe

    2013-02-01

    Alk4 is a type I receptor that belongs to the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) family. It takes part in the signaling of TGF-β ligands such as Activins, Gdfs, and Nodal that had been demonstrated to participate in numerous mechanisms ranging from early embryonic development to adult-tissue homeostasis. Evidences indicate that Alk4 is a key regulator of many embryonic processes, but little is known about its signaling in adult tissues and in pathological conditions where Alk4 mutations had been reported. Conventional deletion of Alk4 gene (Acvr1b) results in early embryonic lethality prior gastrulation, which has precluded study of Alk4 functions in postnatal and adult mice. To circumvent this problem, we have generated a conditional Acvr1b floxed-allele by flanking the fifth and sixth exons of the Acvr1b gene with loxP sites. Cre-mediated deletion of the floxed allele generates a deleted allele, which behaves as an Acvr1b null allele leading to embryonic lethality in homozygous mutant animals. A tamoxifen-inducible approach to target disruption of Acvr1b specifically in adult tissues was used and proved to be efficient for studying Alk4 functions in various organs. We report, therefore, a novel conditional model allowing investigation of biological role played by Alk4 in a variety of tissue-specific contexts.

  9. JH Biosynthesis by Reproductive Tissues and Corpora Allata in Adult Longhorned Beetles, Apriona germari

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report on juvenile hormone (JH) biosynthesis from long-chain intermediates by specific reproductive system tissues and the corpora allata (CA) prepared from adult longhorned beetles, Apriona germari. Testes, male accessory glands (MAGs), ovaries and CA contain the long-chain intermediates in the ...

  10. Bio-inspired Nanoparticulate Medical Glues for Minimally Invasive Tissue Repair

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yuhan; Xu, Chenjie; Sebastin, Monisha; Lee, Albert; Holwell, Nathan; Xu, Calvin; Miranda-Nieves, David; Mu, Luye; Lin, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Delivery of tissue glues through small-bore needles or trocars is critical for sealing holes, affixing medical devices, or attaching tissues together during minimally invasive surgeries. Inspired by the granule-packaged glue delivery system of sandcastle worms, we have developed a nanoparticulate formulation of a viscous hydrophobic light-activated adhesive based on poly(glycerol sebacate)-acrylate. Negatively charged alginate was used to stabilize the nanoparticulate surface to significantly reduce its viscosity and to maximize injectability through small-bore needles. The nanoparticulate glues can be concentrated to ~30w/v% dispersions in water that remain localized following injection. With the trigger of a positively charged polymer (e.g., protamine), the nanoparticulate glues can quickly assemble into a viscous glue that exhibits rheological, mechanical and adhesive properties resembling the native poly(glycerol sebacate)-acrylate based glues. This platform should be useful to enable the delivery of viscous glues to augment or replace sutures and staples during minimally invasive procedures. PMID:26227833

  11. Biomechanical regulation of in vitro cardiogenesis for tissue-engineered heart repair.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Wolfram-Hubertus

    2013-01-01

    The heart is a continuously pumping organ with an average lifespan of eight decades. It develops from the onset of embryonic cardiogenesis under biomechanical load, performs optimally within a defined range of hemodynamic load, and fails if acutely or chronically overloaded. Unloading of the heart leads to defective cardiogenesis in utero, but can also lead to a desired therapeutic outcome (for example, in patients with heart failure under left ventricular assist device therapy). In light of the well-documented relevance of mechanical loading for cardiac physiology and pathology, it is plausible that tissue engineers have integrated mechanical stimulation regimens into protocols for heart muscle construction. To achieve optimal results, physiological principles of beat-to-beat myocardial loading and unloading should be simulated. In addition, heart muscle engineering, in particular if based on pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes, may benefit from staggered tonic loading protocols to simulate viscoelastic properties of the prenatal and postnatal myocardial stroma. This review will provide an overview of heart muscle mechanics, summarize observations on the role of mechanical loading for heart development and postnatal performance, and discuss how physiological loading regimens can be exploited to advance myocardial tissue engineering towards a therapeutic application.

  12. Osteoconductivity of modified fluorcanasite glass-ceramics for bone tissue augmentation and repair.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay-Ghosh, S; Faria, P E P; Johnson, A; Felipucci, D N B; Reaney, I M; Salata, L A; Brook, I M; Hatton, P V

    2010-09-01

    Modified fluorcanasite glasses were fabricated by either altering the molar ratios of Na(2)O and CaO or by adding P(2)O(5) to the parent stoichiometric glass compositions. Glasses were converted to glass-ceramics by a controlled two-stage heat treatment process. Rods (2 mm x 4 mm) were produced using the conventional lost-wax casting technique. Osteoconductive 45S5 bioglass was used as a reference material. Biocompatibility and osteoconductivity were investigated by implantation into healing defects (2 mm) in the midshaft of rabbit femora. Tissue response was investigated using conventional histology and scanning electron microscopy. Histological and histomorphometric evaluation of specimens after 12 weeks implantation showed significantly more bone contact with the surface of 45S5 bioglass implants when compared with other test materials. When the bone contact for each material was compared between experimental time points, the Glass-Ceramic 2 (CaO rich) group showed significant difference (p = 0.027) at 4 weeks, but no direct contact at 12 weeks. Histology and backscattered electron photomicrographs showed that modified fluorcanasite glass-ceramic implants had greater osteoconductivity than the parent stoichiometric composition. Of the new materials, fluorcanasite glass-ceramic implants modified by the addition of P(2)O(5) showed the greatest stimulation of new mineralized bone tissue formation adjacent to the implants after 4 and 12 weeks implantation.

  13. Evaluation of cartilage, synovium and adipose tissue as cellular sources for osteochondral repair.

    PubMed

    Innes, J F; Gordon, C; Vaughan-Thomas, A; Rhodes, N P; Clegg, P D

    2013-09-01

    Osteochondral lesions are a major cause of pain and disability in several species including dogs, horses and human beings. The objective of this study was to assess three potential sources of canine cells for their osteochondral regenerative potential. Cartilage, synovium and adipose tissue cells were grown in pellet culture in chondrogenic or osteogenic media. Cartilage-derived pellets displayed the best chondrogenic differentiation as indicated by significantly higher COL2A1 and SOX9 mRNA expression, greater glycosaminoglycan content, and higher retention of Safranin-O stain compared to the synovium and adipose-derived cells. Following application of the osteogenic media, all three cell sources exhibited small areas of positive alizarin red staining. Poor intracellular alkaline phosphatase activity was found in all three cell types when stimulated although osteocalcin and RUNX2 expression were significantly increased. Cells isolated and cultured from canine articular cartilage retained their specific chondrocytic phenotype. Furthermore, canine adipocytes and synovial cells did not undergo chondrogenic differentiation and did not exhibit evidence of multipotency. Although osteogenic differentiation was initiated at a genomic level, phenotypic osteoblastic differentiation was not observed. The findings of this study suggest that cells isolated from canine adipose tissue and synovium are sub-optimal substitutes for chondrocytes when engineering articular cartilage in vitro.

  14. Regeneration and repair of tendon and ligament tissue using collagen fibre biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Kew, S J; Gwynne, J H; Enea, D; Abu-Rub, M; Pandit, A; Zeugolis, D; Brooks, R A; Rushton, N; Best, S M; Cameron, R E

    2011-09-01

    Collagen fibres are ubiquitous macromolecular assemblies in nature, providing the structures that support tensile mechanical loads within the human body. Aligned type I collagen fibres are the primary structural motif for tendon and ligament, and therefore biomaterials based on these structures are considered promising candidates for mediating regeneration of these tissues. However, despite considerable investigation, there remains no collagen-fibre-based biomaterial that has undergone clinical evaluation for this application. Recent research in this area has significantly enhanced our understanding of these complex and challenging biomaterials, and is reinvigorating interest in the development of such structures to recapitulate mechanical function. In this review we describe the progress to date towards a ligament or tendon regeneration template based on collagen fibre scaffolds. We highlight reports of particular relevance to the development of the underlying biomaterials science in this area. In addition, the potential for tailoring and manipulating the interactions between collagen fibres and biological systems, as hybrid biomaterial-biological ensembles, is discussed in the context of developing novel tissue engineering strategies for tendon and ligament.

  15. Repair of spinal cord injury by chitosan scaffold with glioma ECM and SB216763 implantation in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Jian, Rao; Yixu, Yang; Sheyu, Lin; Jianhong, Shen; Yaohua, Yan; Xing, Su; Qingfeng, Huang; Xiaojian, Lu; Lei, Zhang; Yan, Zhen; Fangling, Xiong; Huasong, Gao; Yilu, Gao

    2015-10-01

    The loss of spinal cord tissue and the cavity formation are major obstacles to the repair of spinal cord injury (SCI). In the study, the scaffold of chitosan+ECM+SB216763 was fabricated and used for the repair of injured spinal cord injury. First, the biocompatibility of the scaffold was analyzed and results showed that the scaffold had a good compatibility with the neural stem cells. Especially, the processes of differentiated neural stem cell embedded in the scaffold were found in the experiment. At the same time, we also investigated the effect of scaffold on the differentiation of neural stem cell. The results showed that the scaffold of chitosan+ECM+SB216763 could significantly promote the differentiation of neural stem cells into neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes relative to those in other groups. In order to probe the application of scaffold in vivo, the rat models of spinal cord hemisection were set up and scaffolds were implanted into transected gap. Then the electrophysiology and BBB score were evaluated and results showed that the amplitude, latency period and BBB score in chitosan+ECM+SB216763 group were dramatically better than those in other groups. In addition, the differentiation of neural stem cells into nerve cells was also assayed and the results revealed that the number of neural stem cells differentiating into neuron, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes in chitosan+ECM+SB216763 group was significantly bigger than those in other groups. All these data suggested that the scaffold of chitosan+ECM+SB216763 would be a promising medium for the repair of injured spinal cord.

  16. Effects of Bilingualism and Trilingualism in L2 Production: Evidence from Errors and Self-Repairs in Early Balanced Bilingual and Trilingual Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Hsiu-ling

    2014-01-01

    Through analyzing response latencies, errors, and self-repairs in Mandarin, this investigation explores how monolingual, bilingual, and trilingual adults process their speech production differently using cognitive control mechanisms. In this study we conducted two experiments involving speech production in Mandarin. In the two experiments, 81…

  17. Photochemical tissue bonding

    DOEpatents

    Redmond, Robert W [Brookline, MA; Kochevar, Irene E [Charlestown, MA

    2012-01-10

    Photochemical tissue bonding methods include the application of a photosensitizer to a tissue and/or tissue graft, followed by irradiation with electromagnetic energy to produce a tissue seal. The methods are useful for tissue adhesion, such as in wound closure, tissue grafting, skin grafting, musculoskeletal tissue repair, ligament or tendon repair and corneal repair.

  18. Primary and revision cleft lip repairs using octyl-2-cyanoacrylate.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Joshua M; Paige, Keith T

    2006-03-01

    The purpose of our retrospective review is to examine our method and outcomes for the application of octyl-2-cyanoacrylate for the repair of primary and revision cleft lips in both pediatric and adult patients. Records and photographs were reviewed and analyzed for patient age, type of cleft, revision or primary repair, complications, length of follow-up, and aesthetic outcomes. Eighteen patients, both children and adults, who underwent cleft lip repairs using tissue adhesive performed by a single surgeon between 1999 and 2003 were included. Twelve patients underwent primary repair and 6 patients underwent revision repair. Repairs were performed using the Millard rotation advancement technique and the Mohler variant. The lateral advancement flap was kept long and redundant in its transverse dimension to create a pressure fit everting the skin edges with minimal sutures to set up the closure for application of the tissue adhesive. Seventeen of eighteen patients had excellent cosmetic outcomes. One patient had minor necrosis of the tip of the advancement flap. No allergic reactions, wound infections, or dehiscences occurred. The use of octyl-2-cyanoacrylate for the skin closure of primary and revision cleft lip repairs in both children and adults results in excellent cosmetic outcomes. Employing our pressure-fit technique for skin eversion prior to application of the tissue adhesive may be advantageous. The lack of suture removal in the pediatric population and decreased operative time are additional benefits.

  19. The role of immunosuppression of mesenchymal stem cells in tissue repair and tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Han, Zhipeng; Jing, Yingying; Zhang, Shanshan; Liu, Yan; Shi, Yufang; Wei, Lixin

    2012-03-05

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have acquired great interests for their potential use in the clinical therapy of many diseases because of their functions including multiple lineage differentiation, low immunogenicity and immunosuppression. Many studies suggest that MSCs are strongly immunosuppressive in vitro and in vivo. MSCs exert a profound inhibitory effect on the proliferation of T cells, B cells, dendritic cells and natural killer cells. In addition, several soluble factors have been reported to involved in the immunosuppressive effects by MSCs such as TGF-β, HGF, PGE2, IDO and iNOS. These results suggest that MSCs can be used in the therapy of immune disorder diseases, prevention of organ transplantation rejection and tissue injury. In recent study, we demonstrated that MSCs in tumor inflammatory microenvironment might be elicited of immunosuppressive function. Thus, the application of MSCs in cancer therapy might have negative effect by helping tumor cells escaping from the immune surveillance.

  20. Serpina3n accelerates tissue repair in a diabetic mouse model of delayed wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, I; Parkinson, L G; Shen, Y; Toro, A; Brown, T; Zhao, H; Bleackley, R C; Granville, D J

    2014-01-01

    Chronic, non-healing wounds are a major complication of diabetes and are characterized by chronic inflammation and excessive protease activity. Although once thought to function primarily as a pro-apoptotic serine protease, granzyme B (GzmB) can also accumulate in the extracellular matrix (ECM) during chronic inflammation and cleave ECM proteins that are essential for proper wound healing, including fibronectin. We hypothesized that GzmB contributes to the pathogenesis of impaired diabetic wound healing through excessive ECM degradation. In the present study, the murine serine protease inhibitor, serpina3n (SA3N), was administered to excisional wounds created on the dorsum of genetically induced type-II diabetic mice. Wound closure was monitored and skin wound samples were collected for analyses. Wound closure, including both re-epithelialization and contraction, were significantly increased in SA3N-treated wounds. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses of SA3N-treated wounds revealed a more mature, proliferative granulation tissue phenotype as indicated by increased cell proliferation, vascularization, fibroblast maturation and differentiation, and collagen deposition. Skin homogenates from SA3N-treated wounds also exhibited greater levels of full-length intact fibronectin compared with that of vehicle wounds. In addition, GzmB-induced detachment of mouse embryonic fibroblasts correlated with a rounded and clustered phenotype that was prevented by SA3N. In summary, topical administration of SA3N accelerated wound healing. Our findings suggest that GzmB contributes to the pathogenesis of diabetic wound healing through the proteolytic cleavage of fibronectin that is essential for normal wound closure, and that SA3N promotes granulation tissue maturation and collagen deposition. PMID:25299783

  1. An evaluation of Admedus' tissue engineering process-treated (ADAPT) bovine pericardium patch (CardioCel) for the repair of cardiac and vascular defects.

    PubMed

    Strange, Geoff; Brizard, Christian; Karl, Tom R; Neethling, Leon

    2015-03-01

    Tissue engineers have been seeking the 'Holy Grail' solution to calcification and cytotoxicity of implanted tissue for decades. Tissues with all of the desired qualities for surgical repair of congenital heart disease (CHD) are lacking. An anti-calcification tissue engineering process (ADAPT TEP) has been developed and applied to bovine pericardium (BP) tissue (CardioCel, AdmedusRegen Pty Ltd, Perth, WA, Australia) to eliminate cytotoxicity, improve resistance to acute and chronic inflammation, reduce calcification and facilitate controlled tissue remodeling. Clinical data in pediatric patients, and additional pre-market authorized prescriber data demonstrate that CardioCel performs extremely well in the short term and is safe and effective for a range of congenital heart deformations. These data are supported by animal studies which have shown no more than normal physiologic levels of calcification, with good durability, biocompatibility and controlled healing.

  2. Non-Immunogenic Structurally and Biologically Intact Tissue Matrix Grafts for the Immediate Repair of Ballistic-Induced Vascular and Nerve Tissue Injury in Combat Casualty Care

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-12-01

    CLINICAL MEDICINE, FREEZE DRYING, REPAIR, ADVERSE CONDITIONS, CASUALTIES, ANIMALS , WOUNDS AND INJURIES, MEDICAL SERVICES, CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM, BIOMECHANICS, TRANSPLANTATION, VEINS, ARTERIES, SURGICAL TRANSPLANTATION.

  3. Cyanoacrylate tissue glue for wound repair in early posttrabeculectomy conjunctival bleb leak: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Haslinda, Abdul-Rahim; Azhany, Yaakub; Noor-Khairul, Rasid; Zunaina, Embong; Liza-Sharmini, Ahmad-Tajudin

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrated a noninvasive management of early bleb leak following trabeculectomy using cyanoacrylate tissue glue (CATG). Three patients who underwent augmented trabeculectomy with mitomycin C with early bleb leak between January 2009 and June 2010 were reviewed. Case 1 and Case 2 exhibited bleb leak on postoperative Day 1 and Case 3 showed leak on follow-up at postoperative Day 7. Case 1 was successfully sealed with CATG at postoperative Day 3, after failed pressure padding and bandage contact lens. Case 2 was successfully sealed with CATG at postoperative Day 3, after failed pressure padding and conjunctiva flap resuturing. In Case 3, the leaking conjunctival flap was managed with combined techniques of resuturing and applying CATG at postoperative Day 9, after failed pressure padding. During leakage, the intraocular pressure was low (6–8 mmHg) in all three cases, with shallow anterior chamber depth and absence of other complications such as choroidal detachment, hypotony maculopathy, or endophthalmitis. Foreign body sensation was the main complaint following the procedure. No clinical allergy reaction was documented. CATG may serve as a potential adjunctive and effective method in the management of posttrabeculectomy early bleb leak. PMID:26229511

  4. The alterations in the extracellular matrix composition guide the repair of damaged liver tissue.

    PubMed

    Klaas, Mariliis; Kangur, Triin; Viil, Janeli; Mäemets-Allas, Kristina; Minajeva, Ave; Vadi, Krista; Antsov, Mikk; Lapidus, Natalia; Järvekülg, Martin; Jaks, Viljar

    2016-06-06

    While the cellular mechanisms of liver regeneration have been thoroughly studied, the role of extracellular matrix (ECM) in liver regeneration is still poorly understood. We utilized a proteomics-based approach to identify the shifts in ECM composition after CCl4 or DDC treatment and studied their effect on the proliferation of liver cells by combining biophysical and cell culture methods. We identified notable alterations in the ECM structural components (eg collagens I, IV, V, fibronectin, elastin) as well as in non-structural proteins (eg olfactomedin-4, thrombospondin-4, armadillo repeat-containing x-linked protein 2 (Armcx2)). Comparable alterations in ECM composition were seen in damaged human livers. The increase in collagen content and decrease in elastic fibers resulted in rearrangement and increased stiffness of damaged liver ECM. Interestingly, the alterations in ECM components were nonhomogenous and differed between periportal and pericentral areas and thus our experiments demonstrated the differential ability of selected ECM components to regulate the proliferation of hepatocytes and biliary cells. We define for the first time the alterations in the ECM composition of livers recovering from damage and present functional evidence for a coordinated ECM remodelling that ensures an efficient restoration of liver tissue.

  5. The two faces of metal ions: From implants rejection to tissue repair/regeneration.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Daniel M; Santos, Susana G; Lamghari, Meriem; Barbosa, Mário A

    2016-04-01

    The paradigm of metallic ions as exclusive toxic agents is changing. During the last 60 years, knowledge about toxicological and immunological reactions to metal particles and ions has advanced considerably. Hip prostheses, namely metal-on-metal bearings, have prompted studies about excessive and prolonged exposure to prosthetic debris. In that context, the interactions of metal particles and ions with cells and tissues are mostly harmful, inducing immune responses that lead to osteolysis and implant failure. However, in the last decade, new strategies to promote immunomodulation and healing have emerged based on the unique properties of metallic ions. The atom-size and charge enable ions to interact with key macromolecules (e.g. proteins, nucleic acids) that affect cellular function. Moreover, these agents are inexpensive, stable and can be integrated in biomaterials, which may open new avenues for a novel generation of medical devices. Herein, orthopedic devices are discussed as models for adverse responses to metal ions, and debated together with the potential to use metal ions-based therapies, thus bridging the gap between unmet clinical needs and cutting-edge research. In summary, this review addresses the two "faces" of metallic ions, from pathological responses to innovative research strategies that use metal ions for regenerative medicine.

  6. Dedifferentiated fat cells convert to cardiomyocyte phenotype and repair infarcted cardiac tissue in rats.

    PubMed

    Jumabay, Medet; Matsumoto, Taro; Yokoyama, Shin-ichiro; Kano, Koichiro; Kusumi, Yoshiaki; Masuko, Takayuki; Mitsumata, Masako; Saito, Satoshi; Hirayama, Atsushi; Mugishima, Hideo; Fukuda, Noboru

    2009-11-01

    Adipose tissue-derived stem cells have been demonstrated to differentiate into cardiomyocytes and vascular endothelial cells. Here we investigate whether mature adipocyte-derived dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells can differentiate to cardiomyocytes in vitro and in vivo by establishing DFAT cell lines via ceiling culture of mature adipocytes. DFAT cells were obtained by dedifferentiation of mature adipocytes from GFP-transgenic rats. We evaluated the differentiating ability of DFAT cells into cardiomyocytes by detection of the cardiac phenotype markers in immunocytochemical and RT-PCR analyses in vitro. We also examined effects of the transplantation of DFAT cells into the infarcted heart of rats on cardiomyocytes regeneration and angiogenesis. DFAT cells expressed cardiac phenotype markers when cocultured with cardiomyocytes and also when grown in MethoCult medium in the absence of cardiomyocytes, indicating that DFAT cells have the potential to differentiate to cardiomyocyte lineage. In a rat acute myocardial infarction model, transplanted DFAT cells were efficiently accumulated in infarcted myocardium and expressed cardiac sarcomeric actin at 8 weeks after the cell transplantation. The transplantation of DFAT cells significantly (p<0.05) increased capillary density in the infarcted area when compared with hearts from saline-injected control rats. We demonstrated that DFAT cells have the ability to differentiate to cardiomyocyte-like cells in vitro and in vivo. In addition, transplantation of DFAT cells led to neovascuralization in rats with myocardial infarction. We propose that DFAT cells represent a promising candidate cell source for cardiomyocyte regeneration in severe ischemic heart disease.

  7. The alterations in the extracellular matrix composition guide the repair of damaged liver tissue

    PubMed Central

    Klaas, Mariliis; Kangur, Triin; Viil, Janeli; Mäemets-Allas, Kristina; Minajeva, Ave; Vadi, Krista; Antsov, Mikk; Lapidus, Natalia; Järvekülg, Martin; Jaks, Viljar

    2016-01-01

    While the cellular mechanisms of liver regeneration have been thoroughly studied, the role of extracellular matrix (ECM) in liver regeneration is still poorly understood. We utilized a proteomics-based approach to identify the shifts in ECM composition after CCl4 or DDC treatment and studied their effect on the proliferation of liver cells by combining biophysical and cell culture methods. We identified notable alterations in the ECM structural components (eg collagens I, IV, V, fibronectin, elastin) as well as in non-structural proteins (eg olfactomedin-4, thrombospondin-4, armadillo repeat-containing x-linked protein 2 (Armcx2)). Comparable alterations in ECM composition were seen in damaged human livers. The increase in collagen content and decrease in elastic fibers resulted in rearrangement and increased stiffness of damaged liver ECM. Interestingly, the alterations in ECM components were nonhomogenous and differed between periportal and pericentral areas and thus our experiments demonstrated the differential ability of selected ECM components to regulate the proliferation of hepatocytes and biliary cells. We define for the first time the alterations in the ECM composition of livers recovering from damage and present functional evidence for a coordinated ECM remodelling that ensures an efficient restoration of liver tissue. PMID:27264108

  8. Anesthetic management for repair of adult Bochdalek hernia by laparoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Takeyama, Kazuhide; Nakahara, Yumi; Ando, Satoko; Hasegawa, Keiichiro; Suzuki, Toshiyasu

    2005-01-01

    This report describes anesthetic management of a case (a 64-year-old man) who was originally diagnosed as paraesophageal hernia before surgery and later diagnosed as Bochdalek hernia during laparoscopic surgery. Anesthesia was started with oxygen, nitrous oxide, and sevoflurane, and respiration was managed using controlled mechanical ventilation. Although left pneumothorax was noticed during laparoscopic surgery (aeroperitonia pressure: 10 cmH2O), the surgery was performed using the same anesthesia procedure, because hardly any changes were observed on the monitor and vital signs were stable. The surgery was completed without incident. However, postoperative chest X-rays revealed the residual large pneumothorax. A chest drain tube was inserted immediately, after which the pneumothorax was improved. Pneumothorax is considered to be inevitable in cases of laparoscopic repair of Bochdalek hernia. To prevent exacerbation of pneumothorax, anesthetic management should consist of discontinuing the use of nitrous oxide and lowering the aeroperitonia pressure concomitently with the use of positive airway pressure.

  9. Wound healing in a fetal, adult, and scar tissue model: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Coolen, Neeltje A; Schouten, Kelly C W M; Boekema, Bouke K H L; Middelkoop, Esther; Ulrich, Magda M W

    2010-01-01

    Early gestation fetal wounds heal without scar formation. Understanding the mechanism of this scarless healing may lead to new therapeutic strategies for improving adult wound healing. The aims of this study were to develop a human fetal wound model in which fetal healing can be studied and to compare this model with a human adult and scar tissue model. A burn wound (10 x 2 mm) was made in human ex vivo fetal, adult, and scar tissue under controlled and standardized conditions. Subsequently, the skin samples were cultured for 7, 14, and 21 days. Cells in the skin samples maintained their viability during the 21-day culture period. Already after 7 days, a significantly higher median percentage of wound closure was achieved in the fetal skin model vs. the adult and scar tissue model (74% vs. 28 and 29%, respectively, p<0.05). After 21 days of culture, only fetal wounds were completely reepithelialized. Fibroblasts migrated into the wounded dermis of all three wound models during culture, but more fibroblasts were present earlier in the wound area of the fetal skin model. The fast reepithelialization and prompt presence of many fibroblasts in the fetal model suggest that rapid healing might play a role in scarless healing.

  10. Spontaneous myogenic differentiation of Flk-1-positive cells from adult pancreas and other nonmuscle tissues.

    PubMed

    Di Rocco, Giuliana; Tritarelli, Alessandra; Toietta, Gabriele; Gatto, Ilaria; Iachininoto, Maria Grazia; Pagani, Francesca; Mangoni, Antonella; Straino, Stefania; Capogrossi, Maurizio C

    2008-02-01

    At the embryonic or fetal stages, autonomously myogenic cells (AMCs), i.e., cells able to spontaneously differentiate into skeletal myotubes, have been identified from several different sites other than skeletal muscle, including the vascular compartment. However, in the adult animal, AMCs from skeletal muscle-devoid tissues have been described in only two cases. One is represented by thymic myoid cells, a restricted population of committed myogenic progenitors of unknown derivation present in the thymic medulla; the other is represented by a small subset of adipose tissue-associated cells, which we recently identified. In the present study we report, for the first time, the presence of spontaneously differentiating myogenic precursors in the pancreas and in other skeletal muscle-devoid organs such as spleen and stomach, as well as in the periaortic tissue of adult mice. Immunomagnetic selection procedures indicate that AMCs derive from Flk-1(+) progenitors. Individual clones of myogenic cells from nonmuscle organs are morphologically and functionally indistinguishable from skeletal muscle-derived primary myoblasts. Moreover, they can be induced to proliferate in vitro and are able to participate in muscle regeneration in vivo. Thus, we provide evidence that fully competent myogenic progenitors can be derived from the Flk-1(+) compartment of several adult tissues that are embryologically unrelated to skeletal muscle.

  11. Postprandial Responses to Lipid and Carbohydrate Ingestion in Repeated Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue Biopsies in Healthy Adults.

    PubMed

    Dordevic, Aimee L; Pendergast, Felicity J; Morgan, Han; Villas-Boas, Silas; Caldow, Marissa K; Larsen, Amy E; Sinclair, Andrew J; Cameron-Smith, David

    2015-07-01

    Adipose tissue is a primary site of meta-inflammation. Diet composition influences adipose tissue metabolism and a single meal can drive an inflammatory response in postprandial period. This study aimed to examine the effect lipid and carbohydrate ingestion compared with a non-caloric placebo on adipose tissue response. Thirty-three healthy adults (age 24.5 ± 3.3 year (mean ± standard deviation (SD)); body mass index (BMI) 24.1 ± 3.2 kg/m2, were randomised into one of three parallel beverage groups; placebo (water), carbohydrate (maltodextrin) or lipid (dairy-cream). Subcutaneous, abdominal adipose tissue biopsies and serum samples were collected prior to (0 h), as well as 2 h and 4 h after consumption of the beverage. Adipose tissue gene expression levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), interleukin 6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) increased in all three groups, without an increase in circulating TNF-α. Serum leptin (0.6-fold, p = 0.03) and adipose tissue leptin gene expression levels (0.6-fold, p = 0.001) decreased in the hours following the placebo beverage, but not the nutrient beverages. Despite increased inflammatory cytokine gene expression in adipose tissue with all beverages, suggesting a confounding effect of the repeated biopsy method, differences in metabolic responses of adipose tissue and circulating adipokines to ingestion of lipid and carbohydrate beverages were observed.

  12. Computational analysis of cartilage implants based on an interpenetrated polymer network for tissue repairing.

    PubMed

    Manzano, Sara; Poveda-Reyes, Sara; Ferrer, Gloria Gallego; Ochoa, Ignacio; Hamdy Doweidar, Mohamed

    2014-10-01

    distribution in healthy cartilage tissue. The obtained results show how the model predicts the permeability of the PEA-PHEA hydrogels and simulates the internal behaviour of the samples and shows the distribution and quantification of fluid flux.

  13. Soft-tissue cephalometric norms in Chinese adults with esthetic facial profiles.

    PubMed

    Lew, K K; Ho, K K; Keng, S B; Ho, K H

    1992-11-01

    Using a double selection process comprised of professional and lay judges, the cephalometric tracings on a final sample of 48 Chinese adults with esthetically pleasing profiles were analyzed. The soft-tissue cephalometric norms and standard deviations of two widely accepted soft-tissue analyses, the Legan and Burstone analysis and the Holdaway analysis, were determined. In comparison with white norms, the Chinese nose was less prominent (P < .01), the nasolabial angle was less obtuse (P < .01), both the upper and lower lips were more protrusive (P < .05), the upper lip curvature was greater (P < .01), and the soft-tissue chin thickness was less (P < .05). This variance between racial types emphasizes the need to recognize that soft-tissue lateral cephalometric norms are specific for the racial group and cannot always be applied across different racial types.

  14. Distribution of bisphenol A into tissues of adult, neonatal, and fetal Sprague-Dawley rats

    SciTech Connect

    Doerge, Daniel R.; Twaddle, Nathan C.; Vanlandingham, Michelle; Brown, Ronald P.; Fisher, Jeffrey W.

    2011-09-15

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an important industrial chemical used in the manufacture of polycarbonate plastic products and epoxy resin-based food can liners. The presence of BPA metabolites in urine of > 90% of Americans aged 6-60 suggests ubiquitous and frequent exposure in the range of 0.02-0.2 {mu}g/kg bw/d (25th-95th percentiles). The current study used LC/MS/MS to measure placental transfer and concentrations of aglycone (receptor-active) and conjugated (inactive) BPA in tissues from Sprague-Dawley rats administered deuterated BPA (100 {mu}g/kg bw) by oral and IV routes. In adult female rat tissues, the tissue/serum concentration ratios for aglycone BPA ranged from 0.7 in liver to 5 in adipose tissue, reflecting differences in tissue perfusion, composition, and metabolic capacity. Following IV administration to dams, placental transfer was observed for aglycone BPA into fetuses at several gestational days (GD), with fetal/maternal serum ratios of 2.7 at GD 12, 1.2 at GD 16, and 0.4 at GD 20; the corresponding ratios for conjugated BPA were 0.43, 0.65, and 3.7. These ratios were within the ranges observed in adult tissues and were not indicative of preferential accumulation of aglycone BPA or hydrolysis of conjugates in fetal tissue in vivo. Concentrations of aglycone BPA in GD 20 fetal brain were higher than in liver or serum. Oral administration of the same dose did not produce measurable levels of aglycone BPA in fetal tissues. Amniotic fluid consistently contained levels of BPA at or below those in maternal serum. Concentrations of aglycone BPA in tissues of neonatal rats decreased with age in a manner consistent with the corresponding circulating levels. Phase II metabolism of BPA increased with fetal age such that near-term fetus was similar to early post-natal rats. These results show that concentrations of aglycone BPA in fetal tissues are similar to those in other maternal and neonatal tissues and that maternal Phase II metabolism, especially following oral

  15. Adipose tissue α-linolenic acid is inversely associated with insulin resistance in adults1

    PubMed Central

    Sabaté, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is emerging evidence of the beneficial effects of n–3 (ω-3) fatty acids (FAs) on cardiometabolic risk factors. Nevertheless, not much is known about the association between adipose tissue α-linolenic acid (ALA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and insulin resistance. Objective: We determined the association between adipose tissue n–3 FAs (total n–3 FAs, ALA, and EPA plus DHA) and insulin resistance in healthy adults. Design: In this cross-sectional study, multivariable analyses were used to assess the association between adipose tissue FAs (ALA, EPA plus DHA, and total n–3 FAs) and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) in a subset of adult participants (n = 716; mean age: 58 y) from the Adventist Health Study-2 (AHS-2) cohort. Results: Compared with the lowest tertile, the third tertile (β = −0.13; 95% CI: −0.24, −0.01) of adipose tissue ALA was inversely associated with the HOMA-IR. When stratified by waist circumference, ALA continued to be inversely associated [third tertile: β = −0.17 (95% CI: −0.31, −0.02)] with the HOMA-IR in subjects with a waist circumference ≤88 cm in women or ≤102 cm in men but not in those with a larger waist circumference. No significant association was noted between adipose tissue EPA plus DHA and HOMA-IR. Conclusions: Higher adipose tissue ALA was inversely associated with insulin resistance in this cohort of healthy adult men and women. This finding appears to be more pronounced in individuals with a normal waist circumference. PMID:26912497

  16. The connective tissue of the adductor canal--a morphological study in fetal and adult specimens.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Flavia; de Vasconcellos Fontes, Ricardo Bragança; da Silva Baptista, Josemberg; Mayer, William Paganini; de Campos Boldrini, Silvia; Liberti, Edson Aparecido

    2009-03-01

    The adductor canal is a conical or pyramid-shaped pathway that contains the femoral vessels, saphenous nerve and a varying amount of fibrous tissue. It is involved in adductor canal syndrome, a claudication syndrome involving young individuals. Our objective was to study modifications induced by aging on the connective tissue and to correlate them to the proposed pathophysiological mechanism. The bilateral adductor canals and femoral vessels of four adult and five fetal specimens were removed en bloc and analyzed. Sections 12 microm thick were obtained and the connective tissue studied with Sirius Red, Verhoeff, Weigert and Azo stains. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) photomicrographs of the surfaces of each adductor canal were also analyzed. Findings were homogeneous inside each group. The connective tissue of the canal was continuous with the outer layer of the vessels in both groups. The pattern of concentric, thick collagen type I bundles in fetal specimens was replaced by a diffuse network of compact collagen bundles with several transversal fibers and an impressive content of collagen III fibers. Elastic fibers in adults were not concentrated in the thick bundles but dispersed in line with the transversal fiber system. A dynamic compression mechanism with or without an evident constricting fibrous band has been proposed previously for adductor canal syndrome, possibly involving the connective tissue inside the canal. The vessels may not slide freely during movement. These age-related modifications in normal individuals may represent necessary conditions for this syndrome to develop.

  17. The connective tissue of the adductor canal – a morphological study in fetal and adult specimens

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Flavia; de Vasconcellos Fontes, Ricardo Bragança; da Silva Baptista, Josemberg; Mayer, William Paganini; de Campos Boldrini, Silvia; Liberti, Edson Aparecido

    2009-01-01

    The adductor canal is a conical or pyramid-shaped pathway that contains the femoral vessels, saphenous nerve and a varying amount of fibrous tissue. It is involved in adductor canal syndrome, a claudication syndrome involving young individuals. Our objective was to study modifications induced by aging on the connective tissue and to correlate them to the proposed pathophysiological mechanism. The bilateral adductor canals and femoral vessels of four adult and five fetal specimens were removed en bloc and analyzed. Sections 12 µm thick were obtained and the connective tissue studied with Sirius Red, Verhoeff, Weigert and Azo stains. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) photomicrographs of the surfaces of each adductor canal were also analyzed. Findings were homogeneous inside each group. The connective tissue of the canal was continuous with the outer layer of the vessels in both groups. The pattern of concentric, thick collagen type I bundles in fetal specimens was replaced by a diffuse network of compact collagen bundles with several transversal fibers and an impressive content of collagen III fibers. Elastic fibers in adults were not concentrated in the thick bundles but dispersed in line with the transversal fiber system. A dynamic compression mechanism with or without an evident constricting fibrous band has been proposed previously for adductor canal syndrome, possibly involving the connective tissue inside the canal. The vessels may not slide freely during movement. These age-related modifications in normal individuals may represent necessary conditions for this syndrome to develop. PMID:19245505

  18. Head, Neck, Trunk and Pelvis Tissue Mass Predictions for Young Adults using Anthropometric Measures and DXA.

    PubMed

    Gyemi, Danielle L; Kahelin, Charles; George, Nicole C; Andrews, David M

    2017-03-24

    Accurate prediction of wobbling mass (WM), fat mass (FM), lean mass (LM) and bone mineral content (BMC) of living people using regression equations developed from anthropometric measures (lengths, circumferences, breadths, skinfolds) has previously been reported, but only for the extremities. Multiple linear stepwise regression was used to generate comparable equations for the head, neck, trunk and pelvis of young adults (38 males, 38 females). Equations were validated using actual tissue masses from an independent sample of 13 males and 13 females by manually segmenting full body Dual-energy X-ray Absorptiometry scans. Prediction equations exhibited adjusted R(2) values ranging from .249 to .940, with more explained variance for LM and WM than BMC and FM, especially for the head and neck. Mean relative errors between predicted and actual tissue masses ranged from -11.07% (trunk FM) to 7.61% (neck FM). Actual and predicted tissue masses from all equations were significantly correlated (R(2) = .329 to .937), except head BMC (R(2) = .046). These results show promise for obtaining in-vivo head, neck, trunk and pelvis tissue mass estimates in young adults. Further research is needed to improve head and neck FM and BMC predictions and develop tissue mass prediction equations for older populations.

  19. Effects of FGF-2 on human adipose tissue derived adult stem cells morphology and chondrogenesis enhancement in Transwell culture

    SciTech Connect

    Kabiri, Azadeh; Esfandiari, Ebrahim; Hashemibeni, Batool; Kazemi, Mohammad; Mardani, Mohammad; Esmaeili, Abolghasem

    2012-07-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated effects of FGF-2 on hADSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine changes in the level of gene expressions of SOX-9, aggrecan and collagen type II and type X. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FGF-2 induces chondrogenesis in hADSCs, which Bullet Increasing information will decrease quality if hospital costs are very different. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The result of this study may be beneficial in cartilage tissue engineering. -- Abstract: Injured cartilage is difficult to repair due to its poor vascularisation. Cell based therapies may serve as tools to more effectively regenerate defective cartilage. Both adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and human adipose derived stem cells (hADSCs) are regarded as potential stem cell sources able to generate functional cartilage for cell transplantation. Growth factors, in particular the TGF-b superfamily, influence many processes during cartilage formation, including cell proliferation, extracellular matrix synthesis, maintenance of the differentiated phenotype, and induction of MSCs towards chondrogenesis. In the current study, we investigated the effects of FGF-2 on hADSC morphology and chondrogenesis in Transwell culture. hADSCs were obtained from patients undergoing elective surgery, and then cultured in expansion medium alone or in the presence of FGF-2 (10 ng/ml). mRNA expression levels of SOX-9, aggrecan and collagen type II and type X were quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The morphology, doubling time, trypsinization time and chondrogenesis of hADSCs were also studied. Expression levels of SOX-9, collagen type II, and aggrecan were all significantly increased in hADSCs expanded in presence of FGF-2. Furthermore FGF-2 induced a slender morphology, whereas doubling time and trypsinization time decreased. Our results suggest that FGF-2 induces hADSCs chondrogenesis in Transwell culture, which may be beneficial in cartilage tissue engineering.

  20. Hereditary Connective Tissue Diseases in Young Adult Stroke: A Comprehensive Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Vanakker, Olivier M.; Hemelsoet, Dimitri; De Paepe, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Though the genetic background of ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke is often polygenetic or multifactorial, it can in some cases result from a monogenic disease, particularly in young adults. Besides arteriopathies and metabolic disorders, several connective tissue diseases can present with stroke. While some of these diseases have been recognized for decades as causes of stroke, such as the vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, others only recently came to attention as being involved in stroke pathogenesis, such as those related to Type IV collagen. This paper discusses each of these connective tissue disorders and their relation with stroke briefly, emphasizing the main clinical features which can lead to their diagnosis. PMID:21331163

  1. Identifying proteins in zebrafish embryos using spectral libraries generated from dissected adult organs and tissues.

    PubMed

    van der Plas-Duivesteijn, Suzanne J; Mohammed, Yassene; Dalebout, Hans; Meijer, Annemarie; Botermans, Anouk; Hoogendijk, Jordy L; Henneman, Alex A; Deelder, André M; Spaink, Herman P; Palmblad, Magnus

    2014-03-07

    Spectral libraries provide a sensitive and accurate method for identifying peptides from tandem mass spectra, complementary to searching genome-derived databases or sequencing de novo. Their application requires comprehensive libraries including peptides from low-abundant proteins. Here we describe a method for constructing such libraries using biological differentiation to "fractionate" the proteome by harvesting adult organs and tissues and build comprehensive libraries for identifying proteins in zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos and larvae (an important and widely used model system). Hierarchical clustering using direct comparison of spectra was used to prioritize organ selection. The resulting and publicly available library covers 14,164 proteins, significantly improved the number of peptide-spectrum matches in zebrafish developmental stages, and can be used on data from different instruments and laboratories. The library contains information on tissue and organ expression of these proteins and is also applicable for adult experiments. The approach itself is not limited to zebrafish but would work for any model system.

  2. Limited Accuracy of Colour Doppler Ultrasound Dynamic Tissue Perfusion Measurement in Diabetic Adults

    PubMed Central

    Stoperka, Felix; Karger, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic tissue perfusion measurement (DTPM) is a pre-described and available method in pediatric ultrasound to quantify tissue perfusion in renal Doppler ultrasound by particular video analysis software. This study evaluates DTPM during single and between repeated visits after 6 months, calibrates repeated DTPM within different region of interest (ROI) and compares DTPM with kidney function markers in adult patients with early diabetic nephropathy (n = 17). During repeated measurements, no association of readings at the same patients in the same (n = 3 readings) as well as repeated visit (n = 2 visits) could be retrieved. No association between DTPM, MDRD-GFR, albuminuria, age and duration of diabetes was observed. These negative results are presumably related to inconsistency of DTPM due to non-fixed ROI position as could be shown in calibrating series. Further development of the method should be performed to enable reproducible DTPM readings in adults. PMID:28033403

  3. An Overview of Notch Signaling in Adult Tissue Renewal and Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Chihiro; Zhao, Guojun; Ilagan, Ma. Xenia G.

    2015-01-01

    The Notch pathway is a critical mediator of short-range cell-cell communication that is reiteratively used to regulate a diverse array of cellular processes during embryonic development and the renewal and maintenance of adult tissues. Most Notch-dependent processes utilize a core signaling mechanism that is dependent on regulated intramembrane proteolysis: Upon ligand binding, Notch receptors undergo ectodomain shedding by ADAM metalloproteases, followed by γ-secretase-mediated intramembrane proteolysis. This releases the Notch intracellular domain, which translocates to the nucleus to activate transcription. In this review, we highlight the roles of Notch signaling particularly in self-renewing tissues in adults and several human diseases and raise some key considerations when targeting ADAMs and γ-secretase as disease-modifying strategies for Alzheimer's Disease. PMID:21605032

  4. Diabetic mice are protected from normally lethal nephrotoxicity of S-1,2-dichlorovinyl-L-cysteine (DCVC): role of nephrogenic tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Dnyanmote, Ankur V; Sawant, Sharmilee P; Lock, Edward A; Latendresse, John R; Warbritton, Alan A; Mehendale, Harihara M

    2006-03-01

    Streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic (DB) rats are protected from nephrotoxicity of gentamicin, cisplatin and mercuric chloride, although the mechanisms remain unclear. Ninety percent of DB mice receiving a LD90 dose (75 mg/kg, ip) of S-1,2-dichlorovinyl-l-cysteine (DCVC) survived in contrast to only 10% of the nondiabetic (NDB) mice surviving the same dose. We tested the hypothesis that the mechanism of protection is upregulated tissue repair. In the NDB mice, DCVC produced steep temporal increases in blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and plasma creatinine, which were associated with proximal tubular cell (PTC) necrosis, acute renal failure (ARF), and death within 48 h. In contrast, in the DB mice, BUN and creatinine increased less steeply, declining after 36 h to completely resolve by 96 h. HPLC analysis of plasma and urine revealed that DB did not alter the toxicokinetics of DCVC. Furthermore, activity of renal cysteine conjugate beta-lyase, the enzyme that bio-activates DCVC, was unaltered in DB mice, undermining the possibility of lower bioactivation of DCVC leading to lower injury. [3H]-thymidine pulse labeling and PCNA analysis indicated an early onset and sustained nephrogenic tissue repair in DCVC-treated DB mice. BRDU immunohistochemistry revealed a fourfold increase in the number of cells in S-phase in the DB kidneys even without exposure to DCVC. Blocking the entry of cells into S-phase by antimitotic intervention using colchicine abolished stimulated nephrogenic tissue repair and nephro-protection. These findings suggest that pre-placement of S-phase cells in the kidney due to diabetes is critical in mitigating the progression of DCVC-initiated renal injury by upregulation of tissue repair, leading to survival of the DB mice by avoiding acute renal failure.

  5. Diabetic mice are protected from normally lethal nephrotoxicity of S-1,2-dichlorovinyl-L-cysteine (DCVC): role of nephrogenic tissue repair

    SciTech Connect

    Dnyanmote, Ankur V.; Sawant, Sharmilee P.; Lock, Edward A.; Latendresse, John R.; Warbritton, Alan A.; Mehendale, Harihara M. . E-mail: mehendale@ulm.edu

    2006-03-01

    Streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic (DB) rats are protected from nephrotoxicity of gentamicin, cisplatin and mercuric chloride, although the mechanisms remain unclear. Ninety percent of DB mice receiving a LD90 dose (75 mg/kg, ip) of S-1,2-dichlorovinyl-L-cysteine (DCVC) survived in contrast to only 10% of the nondiabetic (NDB) mice surviving the same dose. We tested the hypothesis that the mechanism of protection is upregulated tissue repair. In the NDB mice, DCVC produced steep temporal increases in blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and plasma creatinine, which were associated with proximal tubular cell (PTC) necrosis, acute renal failure (ARF), and death within 48 h. In contrast, in the DB mice, BUN and creatinine increased less steeply, declining after 36 h to completely resolve by 96 h. HPLC analysis of plasma and urine revealed that DB did not alter the toxicokinetics of DCVC. Furthermore, activity of renal cysteine conjugate {beta}-lyase, the enzyme that bioactivates DCVC, was unaltered in DB mice, undermining the possibility of lower bioactivation of DCVC leading to lower injury. [3H]-thymidine pulse labeling and PCNA analysis indicated an early onset and sustained nephrogenic tissue repair in DCVC-treated DB mice. BRDU immunohistochemistry revealed a fourfold increase in the number of cells in S-phase in the DB kidneys even without exposure to DCVC. Blocking the entry of cells into S-phase by antimitotic intervention using colchicine abolished stimulated nephrogenic tissue repair and nephroprotection. These findings suggest that preplacement of S-phase cells in the kidney due to diabetes is critical in mitigating the progression of DCVC-initiated renal injury by upregulation of tissue repair, leading to survival of the DB mice by avoiding acute renal failure.

  6. Soft Tissue Deformations Contribute to the Mechanics of Walking in Obese Adults

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xiao-Yu; Zelik, Karl E.; Board, Wayne J.; Browning, Raymond C.; Kuo, Arthur D.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity not only adds to the mass that must be carried during walking, but also changes body composition. Although extra mass causes roughly proportional increases in musculoskeletal loading, less well understood is the effect of relatively soft and mechanically compliant adipose tissue. Purpose To estimate the work performed by soft tissue deformations during walking. The soft tissue would be expected to experience damped oscillations, particularly from high force transients following heel strike, and could potentially change the mechanical work demands for walking. Method We analyzed treadmill walking data at 1.25 m/s for 11 obese (BMI > 30 kg/m2) and 9 non-obese (BMI < 30 kg/m2) adults. The soft tissue work was quantified with a method that compares the work performed by lower extremity joints as derived using assumptions of rigid body segments, with that estimated without rigid body assumptions. Results Relative to body mass, obese and non-obese individuals perform similar amounts of mechanical work. But negative work performed by soft tissues was significantly greater in obese individuals (p= 0.0102), equivalent to about 0.36 J/kg vs. 0.27 J/kg in non-obese individuals. The negative (dissipative) work by soft tissues occurred mainly after heel strike, and for obese individuals was comparable in magnitude to the total negative work from all of the joints combined (0.34 J/kg vs. 0.33 J/kg for obese and non-obese adults, respectively). Although the joints performed a relatively similar amount of work overall, obese individuals performed less negative work actively at the knee. Conclusion The greater proportion of soft tissues in obese individuals results in substantial changes in the amount, location, and timing of work, and may also impact metabolic energy expenditure during walking. PMID:25380475

  7. The Effect of Continuous Sedation Therapy on Immunomodulation, Plasma Levels of Antioxidants, and Indicators of Tissue Repair in Post-Burn Sepsis Patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li; Meng, Ke; Su, Wei; Fu, Yanjie

    2015-11-01

    Our objective was to investigate the effect of continuous therapeutic sedation on the immune response, plasma levels of antioxidants, and tissue repair indicators in burn-induced sepsis patients. A total of 104 burn-induced sepsis patients hospitalized during March, 2008 to March, 2013 were selected for the study and randomly divided into the experimental and control groups, each with 53 cases. All of these patients received conventional treatment and the patients in the experimental group were given an additional therapy of continuous sedation. The number of T lymphocytes, plasma levels of tissue repair indicators, and antioxidants were measured before and after the treatment. Continuous midazolam treatment induced a significant increase in plasma levels of gelsolin, heat shock protein 70, nitric oxide, superoxide dismutase, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (p < 0.05). Likewise, the relative counts of CD3(+), CD4(+), CD8(+) T lymphocytes, T cells exhibiting HLA-DR and CD4(+)/CD8(+) ratio were significantly increased in the patients treated with midazolam. No adverse reaction including respiratory depression, midazolam resistance, or withdrawal syndrome was observed. Continuous sedation therapy was found to enhance immune response, increase the plasma levels of antioxidants, and tissue protective/repair mediators in burn-induced sepsis patients. This therapy caused no adverse reaction or over-inhibition of the oxidative stress suggesting its effectiveness in improving the prognosis without the risk of safety.

  8. Elucidating the cellular actions of demineralised dentine matrix extract on a clonal dental pulp stem cell population in orchestrating dental tissue repair

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chi P; Colombo, John S; Ayre, Wayne Nishio; Sloan, Alastair J

    2015-01-01

    Bioactive growth factors identified within the extracellular matrix of dentine have been proposed roles in regulating the naturally inherent regenerative dentine formation seen in teeth in response to trauma and infection, which may also be harnessed for novel clinical treatments in augmenting mineralised tissue repair. This study examined the specific biological action of demineralised dentine matrix extract on a clonal population of dental pulp stem cells in stimulating the prerequisite stages of wound healing associated with mineralised tissue repair. A clonal dental pulp stem cell population with sustained proliferative capacity and multi-potentiality towards osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic lineages was isolated from the pulp of human third molars. Dentine was collected from human healthy teeth, powdered and treated with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid to obtain a solubilised DDM protein extract. The influence of DDM on the DPSC clonal population was assessed in vitro. Exposure of cells to proteolytically degraded DDM or unsupplemented media served as controls. Compared to controls, DDM stimulated cell expansion, reduced apoptotic marker caspase 3, increased cell survival marker Akt1 and enhanced mineralised matrix deposition as determined by mineral deposition and increased expression of bone-related markers, alkaline phosphatase and osteopontin. Dental pulp stem cells successfully migrated into collagen gels supplemented with demineralised dentine matrix, with cells remaining viable and expanding in numbers over a 3-day period. Collectively, the results provide evidence that soluble proteins extracted from dentine matrix are able to exert a direct biological effect on dental pulp stem cells in promoting mineralised tissue repair mechanisms. PMID:26019808

  9. Chronic Wound Repair and Healing in Older Adults: Current Status and Future Research

    PubMed Central

    Gould, Lisa; Abadir, Peter; Brem, Harold; Carter, Marissa; Conner-Kerr, Teresa; Davidson, Jeff; DiPietro, Luisa; Falanga, Vincent; Fife, Caroline; Gardner, Sue; Grice, Elizabeth; Harmon, John; Hazzard, William R.; High, Kevin P.; Houghton, Pamela; Jacobson, Nasreen; Kirsner, Robert S.; Kovacs, Elizabeth J.; Margolish, David; McFarland Horne, Frances; Reed, May J.; Sullivan, Dennis H.; Thom, Stephen; Tomic-Canic, Marjana; Walston, Jeremy; Whitney, JoAnne; Williams, John; Zieman, Susan; Schmader, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of chronic wounds is increased among older adults, and the impact of chronic wounds on quality of life is particularly profound in this population. It is well established that wound healing slows with age. However, the basic biology underlying chronic wounds and the influence of age-associated changes on wound healing are poorly understood. Most studies have used in vitro approaches and various animal models, but observed changes translate poorly to human healing conditions. The impact of age and accompanying multi-morbidity on the effectiveness of existing and emerging treatment approaches for chronic wounds is also unknown, and older adults tend to be excluded from randomized clinical trials. Poorly defined outcomes and variables, lack of standardization in data collection, and variations in the definition, measurement, and treatment of wounds also hamper clinical studies. The Association of Specialty Professors, in conjunction with the National Institute on Aging and the Wound Healing Society, held a workshop, summarized in this paper, to explore the current state of knowledge and research challenges, engage investigators across disciplines, and identify key research questions to guide future study of age-associated changes in chronic wound healing. PMID:25486905

  10. Chronic Wound Repair and Healing in Older Adults: Current Status and Future Research

    PubMed Central

    Gould, Lisa; Abadir, Peter; Brem, Harold; Carter, Marissa; Conner-Kerr, Teresa; Davidson, Jeff; DiPietro, Luisa; Falanga, Vincent; Fife, Caroline; Gardner, Sue; Grice, Elizabeth; Harmon, John; Hazzard, William R.; High, Kevin P.; Houghton, Pamela; Jacobson, Nasreen; Kirsner, Robert S.; Kovacs, Elizabeth J.; Margolis, David; Horne, Frances McFarland; Reed, May J.; Sullivan, Dennis H.; Thom, Stephen; Tomic-Canic, Marjana; Walston, Jeremy; Whitney, Jo Anne; Williams, John; Zieman, Susan; Schmader, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Older adults are more likely to have chronic wounds than younger people, and the effect of chronic wounds on quality of life is particularly profound in this population. Wound healing slows with age, but the basic biology underlying chronic wounds and the influence of age-associated changes on wound healing are poorly understood. Most studies have used in vitro approaches and various animal models, but observed changes translate poorly to human healing conditions. The effect of age and accompanying multimorbidity on the effectiveness of existing and emerging treatment approaches for chronic wounds is also unknown, and older adults tend to be excluded from randomized clinical trials. Poorly defined outcomes and variables; lack of standardization in data collection; and variations in the definition, measurement, and treatment of wounds also hamper clinical studies. The Association of Specialty Professors, in conjunction with the National Institute on Aging and the Wound Healing Society, held a workshop, summarized in this article, to explore the current state of knowledge and research challenges, engage investigators across disciplines, and identify research questions to guide future study of age-associated changes in chronic wound healing. PMID:25753048

  11. Adult bone marrow-derived stem cells for organ regeneration and repair.

    PubMed

    Tögel, Florian; Westenfelder, Christof

    2007-12-01

    Stem cells have been recognized as a potential tool for the development of innovative therapeutic strategies. There are in general two types of stem cells, embryonic and adult stem cells. While embryonic stem cell therapy has been riddled with problems of allogeneic rejection and ethical concerns, adult stem cells have long been used in the treatment of hematological malignancies. With the recognition of additional, potentially therapeutic characteristics, bone marrow-derived stem cells have become a tool in regenerative medicine. The bone marrow is an ideal source of stem cells because it is easily accessible and harbors two types of stem cells. Hematopoietic stem cells give rise to all blood cell types and have been shown to exhibit plasticity, while multipotent marrow stromal cells are the source of osteocytes, chondrocytes, and fat cells and have been shown to support and generate a large number of different cell types. This review describes the general characteristics of these stem cell populations and their current and potential future applications in regenerative medicine.

  12. Aberrant Synaptic Integration in Adult Lamina I Projection Neurons Following Neonatal Tissue Damage

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; Kritzer, Elizabeth; Craig, Paige E.

    2015-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that neonatal tissue damage evokes alterations in spinal pain reflexes which persist into adulthood. However, less is known about potential concomitant effects on the transmission of nociceptive information to the brain, as the degree to which early injury modulates synaptic integration and membrane excitability in mature spinal projection neurons remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that neonatal surgical injury leads to a significant shift in the balance between synaptic excitation and inhibition onto identified lamina I projection neurons of the adult mouse spinal cord. The strength of direct primary afferent input to mature spino-parabrachial neurons was enhanced following neonatal tissue damage, whereas the efficacy of both GABAergic and glycinergic inhibition onto the same population was compromised. This was accompanied by reorganization in the pattern of sensory input to adult projection neurons, which included a greater prevalence of monosynaptic input from low-threshold A-fibers when preceded by early tissue damage. In addition, neonatal incision resulted in greater primary afferent-evoked action potential discharge in mature projection neurons. Overall, these results demonstrate that tissue damage during early life causes a long-term increase in the gain of spinal nociceptive circuits, and suggest that the prolonged consequences of neonatal trauma may not be restricted to the spinal cord but rather include excessive ascending signaling to supraspinal pain centers. PMID:25673839

  13. Synaptic pathology and therapeutic repair in adult retinoschisis mouse by AAV-RS1 transfer

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Jingxing; Vijayasarathy, Camasamudram; Ziccardi, Lucia; Chen, Shan; Zeng, Yong; Marangoni, Dario; Pope, Jodie G.; Bush, Ronald A.; Wu, Zhijian; Li, Wei; Sieving, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Strategies aimed at invoking synaptic plasticity have therapeutic potential for several neurological conditions. The human retinal synaptic disease X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) is characterized by impaired visual signal transmission through the retina and progressive visual acuity loss, and mice lacking retinoschisin (RS1) recapitulate human disease. Here, we demonstrate that restoration of RS1 via retina-specific delivery of adeno-associated virus type 8-RS1 (AAV8-RS1) vector rescues molecular pathology at the photoreceptor–depolarizing bipolar cell (photoreceptor-DBC) synapse and restores function in adult Rs1-KO animals. Initial development of the photoreceptor-DBC synapse was normal in the Rs1-KO retina; however, the metabotropic glutamate receptor 6/transient receptor potential melastatin subfamily M member 1–signaling (mGluR6/TRPM1-signaling) cascade was not properly maintained. Specifically, the TRPM1 channel and G proteins Gαo, Gβ5, and RGS11 were progressively lost from postsynaptic DBC dendritic tips, whereas the mGluR6 receptor and RGS7 maintained proper synaptic position. This postsynaptic disruption differed from other murine night-blindness models with an electronegative electroretinogram response, which is also characteristic of murine and human XLRS disease. Upon AAV8-RS1 gene transfer to the retina of adult XLRS mice, TRPM1 and the signaling molecules returned to their proper dendritic tip location, and the DBC resting membrane potential was restored. These findings provide insight into the molecular plasticity of a critical synapse in the visual system and demonstrate potential therapeutic avenues for some diseases involving synaptic pathology. PMID:26098217

  14. Nerves and Tissue Repair.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-21

    complete dependence on nerves. Organ culture of sciatic nerves, combined with an assay for axolotl transferrin developed earlier, allows quantitative study...axonal release of various unknown proteins. Combining this approach with the ELISA for quantitative measurement of axolotl transferrin developed with...light microscope autoradiographic analysis following binding of radiolabelled Tf. Studies of Tf synthesis will employ cDNA probes for axolotl Tf mRNA

  15. Pathology, physiologic parameters, tissue contaminants, and tissue thiamine in morbid and healthy central Florida adult American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Honeyfield, D.C.; Ross, J.P.; Carbonneau, D.A.; Terrell, S.P.; Woodward, A.R.; Schoeb, T.R.; Perceval, H.F.; Hinterkopf, J.P.

    2008-01-01

    An investigation of adult alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) mortalities in Lake Griffin, central Florida, was conducted from 1998-2004. Alligator mortality was highest in the months of April and May and annual death count peaked in 2000. Bacterial pathogens, heavy metals, and pesticides were not linked with the mortalities. Blood chemistry did not point to any clinical diagnosis, although differences between impaired and normal animals were noted. Captured alligators with signs of neurologic impairment displayed unresponsive and uncoordinated behavior. Three of 21 impaired Lake Griffin alligators were found to have neural lesions characteristic of thiamine deficiency in the telencephalon, particularly the dorsal ventricular ridge. In some cases, lesions were found in the thalamus, and parts of the midbrain. Liver and muscle tissue concentrations of thiamine (vitamin B"1) were lowest in impaired Lake Griffin alligators when compared to unimpaired alligators or to alligators from Lake Woodruff. The consumption of thiaminase-positive gizzard shad (Dorosoma cepedianum) is thought to have been the cause of the low tissue thiamine and resulting mortalities. ?? Wildlife Disease Association 2008.

  16. Pathology, physiologic parameters, tissue contaminants, and tissue thiamine in morbid and healthy central Florida adult American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis).

    PubMed

    Honeyfield, Dale C; Ross, J Perran; Carbonneau, Dwayne A; Terrell, Scott P; Woodward, Allan R; Schoeb, Trenton R; Perceval, H Franklin; Hinterkopf, Joy P

    2008-04-01

    An investigation of adult alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) mortalities in Lake Griffin, central Florida, was conducted from 1998-2004. Alligator mortality was highest in the months of April and May and annual death count peaked in 2000. Bacterial pathogens, heavy metals, and pesticides were not linked with the mortalities. Blood chemistry did not point to any clinical diagnosis, although differences between impaired and normal animals were noted. Captured alligators with signs of neurologic impairment displayed unresponsive and uncoordinated behavior. Three of 21 impaired Lake Griffin alligators were found to have neural lesions characteristic of thiamine deficiency in the telencephalon, particularly the dorsal ventricular ridge. In some cases, lesions were found in the thalamus, and parts of the midbrain. Liver and muscle tissue concentrations of thiamine (vitamin B(1)) were lowest in impaired Lake Griffin alligators when compared to unimpaired alligators or to alligators from Lake Woodruff. The consumption of thiaminase-positive gizzard shad (Dorosoma cepedianum) is thought to have been the cause of the low tissue thiamine and resulting mortalities.

  17. p38α MAPK regulates adult muscle stem cell fate by restricting progenitor proliferation during postnatal growth and repair.

    PubMed

    Brien, Patrick; Pugazhendhi, Dhamayanthi; Woodhouse, Samuel; Oxley, David; Pell, Jennifer M

    2013-08-01

    Stem cell function is essential for the maintenance of adult tissue homeostasis. Controlling the balance between self-renewal and differentiation is crucial to maintain a receptive satellite cell pool capable of responding to growth and regeneration cues. The mitogen-activated protein kinase p38α has been implicated in the regulation of these processes but its influence in adult muscle remains unknown. Using conditional satellite cell p38α knockout mice we have demonstrated that p38α restricts excess proliferation in the postnatal growth phase while promoting timely myoblast differentiation. Differentiation was still able to occur in the p38α-null satellite cells, however, but was delayed. An absence of p38α resulted in a postnatal growth defect along with the persistence of an increased reservoir of satellite cells into adulthood. This population was still capable of responding to cardiotoxin-induced injury, resulting in complete, albeit delayed, regeneration, with further enhancement of the satellite cell population. Increased p38γ phosphorylation accompanied the absence of p38α, and inhibition of p38γ ex vivo substantially decreased the myogenic defect. We have used genome-wide transcriptome analysis to characterize the changes in expression that occur between resting and regenerating muscle, and the influence p38α has on these expression profiles. This study provides novel evidence for the fundamental role of p38α in adult muscle homeostasis in vivo.

  18. Evaluating the repair of DNA derived from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues prior to genomic profiling by SNP-CGH analysis.

    PubMed

    Hosein, Abdel Nasser; Song, Sarah; McCart Reed, Amy E; Jayanthan, Janani; Reid, Lynne E; Kutasovic, Jamie R; Cummings, Margaret C; Waddell, Nic; Lakhani, Sunil R; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Simpson, Peter T

    2013-06-01

    Pathology archives contain vast resources of clinical material in the form of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue samples. Owing to the methods of tissue fixation and storage, the integrity of DNA and RNA available from FFPE tissue is compromized, which means obtaining informative data regarding epigenetic, genomic, and expression alterations can be challenging. Here, we have investigated the utility of repairing damaged DNA derived from FFPE tumors prior to single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays for whole-genome DNA copy number analysis. DNA was extracted from FFPE samples spanning five decades, involving tumor material obtained from surgical specimens and postmortems. Various aspects of the protocol were assessed, including the method of DNA extraction, the role of Quality Control quantitative PCR (qPCR) in predicting sample success, and the effect of DNA restoration on assay performance, data quality, and the prediction of copy number aberrations (CNAs). DNA that had undergone the repair process yielded higher SNP call rates, reduced log R ratio variance, and improved calling of CNAs compared with matched FFPE DNA not subjected to repair. Reproducible mapping of genomic break points and detection of focal CNAs representing high-level gains and homozygous deletions (HD) were possible, even on autopsy material obtained in 1974. For example, DNA amplifications at the ERBB2 and EGFR gene loci and a HD mapping to 13q14.2 were validated using immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, and qPCR. The power of SNP arrays lies in the detection of allele-specific aberrations; however, this aspect of the analysis remains challenging, particularly in the distinction between loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and copy neutral LOH. In summary, attempting to repair DNA that is damaged during fixation and storage may be a useful pretreatment step for genomic studies of large archival FFPE cohorts with long-term follow-up or for understanding rare cancer types, where

  19. Meningocele repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myelodysplasia repair; Spinal dysraphism repair; Meningomyelocele repair; Neural tube defect repair; Spina bifida repair ... If your child has hydrocephalus, a shunt (plastic tube) will be put in the child's brain to ...

  20. Tissue-specific mutation accumulation in human adult stem cells during life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blokzijl, Francis; de Ligt, Joep; Jager, Myrthe; Sasselli, Valentina; Roerink, Sophie; Sasaki, Nobuo; Huch, Meritxell; Boymans, Sander; Kuijk, Ewart; Prins, Pjotr; Nijman, Isaac J.; Martincorena, Inigo; Mokry, Michal; Wiegerinck, Caroline L.; Middendorp, Sabine; Sato, Toshiro; Schwank, Gerald; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E. S.; Verstegen, Monique M. A.; van der Laan, Luc J. W.; de Jonge, Jeroen; Ijzermans, Jan N. M.; Vries, Robert G.; van de Wetering, Marc; Stratton, Michael R.; Clevers, Hans; Cuppen, Edwin; van Boxtel, Ruben

    2016-10-01

    The gradual accumulation of genetic mutations in human adult stem cells (ASCs) during life is associated with various age-related diseases, including cancer. Extreme variation in cancer risk across tissues was recently proposed to depend on the lifetime number of ASC divisions, owing to unavoidable random mutations that arise during DNA replication. However, the rates and patterns of mutations in normal ASCs remain unknown. Here we determine genome-wide mutation patterns in ASCs of the small intestine, colon and liver of human donors with ages ranging from 3 to 87 years by sequencing clonal organoid cultures derived from primary multipotent cells. Our results show that mutations accumulate steadily over time in all of the assessed tissue types, at a rate of approximately 40 novel mutations per year, despite the large variation in cancer incidence among these tissues. Liver ASCs, however, have different mutation spectra compared to those of the colon and small intestine. Mutational signature analysis reveals that this difference can be attributed to spontaneous deamination of methylated cytosine residues in the colon and small intestine, probably reflecting their high ASC division rate. In liver, a signature with an as-yet-unknown underlying mechanism is predominant. Mutation spectra of driver genes in cancer show high similarity to the tissue-specific ASC mutation spectra, suggesting that intrinsic mutational processes in ASCs can initiate tumorigenesis. Notably, the inter-individual variation in mutation rate and spectra are low, suggesting tissue-specific activity of common mutational processes throughout life.

  1. Fetal and adult liver stem cells for liver regeneration and tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Fiegel, H C; Lange, Claudia; Kneser, U; Lambrecht, W; Zander, A R; Rogiers, X; Kluth, D

    2006-01-01

    For the development of innovative cell-based liver directed therapies, e.g. liver tissue engineering, the use of stem cells might be very attractive to overcome the limitation of donor liver tissue. Liver specific differentiation of embryonic, fetal or adult stem cells is currently under investigation. Different types of fetal liver (stem) cells during development were identified, and their advantageous growth potential and bipotential differentiation capacity were shown. However, ethical and legal issues have to be addressed before using fetal cells. Use of adult stem cells is clinically established, e.g. transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells. Other bone marrow derived liver stem cells might be mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). However, the transdifferentiation potential is still in question due to the observation of cellular fusion in several in vivo experiments. In vitro experiments revealed a crucial role of the environment (e.g. growth factors and extracellular matrix) for specific differentiation of stem cells. Co-cultured liver cells also seemed to be important for hepatic gene expression of MSC. For successful liver cell transplantation, a novel approach of tissue engineering by orthotopic transplantation of gel-immobilized cells could be promising, providing optimal environment for the injected cells. Moreover, an orthotopic tissue engineering approach using bipotential stem cells could lead to a repopulation of the recipients liver with healthy liver and biliary cells, thus providing both hepatic functions and biliary excretion. Future studies have to investigate, which stem cell and environmental conditions would be most suitable for the use of stem cells for liver regeneration or tissue engineering approaches.

  2. Dedifferentiated fat cells: an alternative source of adult multipotent cells from the adipose tissues

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jie-fei; Sugawara, Atsunori; Yamashita, Joe; Ogura, Hideo; Sato, Soh

    2011-01-01

    When adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) are retrieved from the stromal vascular portion of adipose tissue, a large amount of mature adipocytes are often discarded. However, by modified ceiling culture technique based on their buoyancy, mature adipocytes can be easily isolated from the adipose cell suspension and dedifferentiated into lipid-free fibroblast-like cells, named dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells. DFAT cells re-establish active proliferation ability and undertake multipotent capacities. Compared with ASCs and other adult stem cells, DFAT cells showed unique advantages in their abundance, isolation and homogeneity. In this concise review, the establishment and culture methods of DFAT cells are introduced and the current profiles of their cellular nature are summarized. Under proper induction culture in vitro or environment in vivo, DFAT cells could demonstrate adipogenic, osteogenic, chondrogenic and myogenic potentials. In angiogenic conditions, DFAT cells could exhibit perivascular characteristics and elicit neovascularization. Our preliminary findings also suggested the pericyte phenotype underlying such cell lineage, which supported a novel interpretation about the common origin of mesenchymal stem cells and tissue-specific stem cells within blood vessel walls. Current research on DFAT cells indicated that this alternative source of adult multipotent cells has great potential in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:21789960

  3. Dedifferentiated fat cells: an alternative source of adult multipotent cells from the adipose tissues.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jie-fei; Sugawara, Atsunori; Yamashita, Joe; Ogura, Hideo; Sato, Soh

    2011-07-01

    When adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) are retrieved from the stromal vascular portion of adipose tissue, a large amount of mature adipocytes are often discarded. However, by modified ceiling culture technique based on their buoyancy, mature adipocytes can be easily isolated from the adipose cell suspension and dedifferentiated into lipid-free fibroblast-like cells, named dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells. DFAT cells re-establish active proliferation ability and undertake multipotent capacities. Compared with ASCs and other adult stem cells, DFAT cells showed unique advantages in their abundance, isolation and homogeneity. In this concise review, the establishment and culture methods of DFAT cells are introduced and the current profiles of their cellular nature are summarized. Under proper induction culture in vitro or environment in vivo, DFAT cells could demonstrate adipogenic, osteogenic, chondrogenic and myogenic potentials. In angiogenic conditions, DFAT cells could exhibit perivascular characteristics and elicit neovascularization. Our preliminary findings also suggested the pericyte phenotype underlying such cell lineage, which supported a novel interpretation about the common origin of mesenchymal stem cells and tissue-specific stem cells within blood vessel walls. Current research on DFAT cells indicated that this alternative source of adult multipotent cells has great potential in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  4. Methylation of DNA in mouse early embryos, teratocarcinoma cells and adult tissues of mouse and rabbit.

    PubMed Central

    Singer, J; Roberts-Ems, J; Luthardt, F W; Riggs, A D

    1979-01-01

    The distribution and amount of 5-methylcytosine (5-MeCyt) in DNA was measured for early embryos of mouse strain CF1 (2 to 4 cell stage to blastocyst) and mouse teratocarcinoma cells. In each case, the pattern of methylation was examined by use of the restriction enzymes Hha I and HPA II HPA II, which cut DNA at the sites 5'GCGC and 5'CCGG respectively, when the cytosines at these sites are not methylated. Mouse embryo DNA was found to have the same level of methylation as adult mouse tissues, and no changes in methylation were seen during differentiation of the teratocarcinoma cells. The ratio of 5-MeCyt/Cyt in DNA was measured by high performance liquid chromatography for the differentiating teratocarcinoma cells and for several adult mouse and rabbit tissues. The variation between tissues or between teratocarcinoma cells at different stages of differentiation was less than 10 percent. These results are discussed in view of proposals that 5-MeCyt plays a role in differentiation. Images PMID:523320

  5. Repair of bone defects in vivo using tissue engineered hypertrophic cartilage grafts produced from nasal chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Bardsley, Katie; Kwarciak, Agnieska; Freeman, Christine; Brook, Ian; Hatton, Paul; Crawford, Aileen

    2017-01-01

    The regeneration of large bone defects remains clinically challenging. The aim of our study was to use a rat model to use nasal chondrocytes to engineer a hypertrophic cartilage tissue which could be remodelled into bone in vivo by endochondral ossification. Primary adult rat nasal chondrocytes were isolated from the nasal septum, the cell numbers expanded in monolayer culture and the cells cultured in vitro on polyglycolic acid scaffolds in chondrogenic medium for culture periods of 5-10 weeks. Hypertrophic differentiation was assessed by determining the temporal expression of key marker genes and proteins involved in hypertrophic cartilage formation. The temporal changes in the genes measured reflected the temporal changes observed in the growth plate. Collagen II gene expression increased 6 fold by day 7 and was then significantly downregulated from day 14 onwards. Conversely, collagen X gene expression was detectable by day 14 and increased 100-fold by day 35. The temporal increase in collagen X expression was mirrored by increases in alkaline phosphatase gene expression which also was detectable by day 14 with a 30-fold increase in gene expression by day 35. Histological and immunohistochemical analysis of the engineered constructs showed increased chondrocyte cell volume (31-45 μm), deposition of collagen X in the extracellular matrix and expression of alkaline phosphatase activity. However, no cartilage mineralisation was observed in in vitro culture of up to 10 weeks. On subcutaneous implantation of the hypertrophic engineered constructs, the grafts became vascularised, cartilage mineralisation occurred and loss of the proteoglycan in the matrix was observed. Implantation of the hypertrophic engineered constructs into a rat cranial defect resulted in angiogenesis, mineralisation and remodelling of the cartilage tissue into bone. Micro-CT analysis indicated that defects which received the engineered hypertrophic constructs showed 38.48% in bone volume

  6. 2-year postoperative evaluation of a patient with a symptomatic full-thickness patellar cartilage defect repaired with particulated juvenile cartilage tissue.

    PubMed

    Bonner, Kevin F; Daner, William; Yao, Jian Q

    2010-06-01

    This case report describes the early results of a 36-year-old man who underwent repair of a symptomatic full-thickness patellar cartilage defect with transplanted particulated juvenile articular cartilage. At 2 years postoperatively, the patient has experienced substantial clinical improvement in both pain and function when evaluated with both International Knee Documentation Committee subjective evaluation and Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score outcome measures. Two-year postoperative magnetic resonance imaging demonstrates fill of the defect with repair tissue and near complete resolution of preoperative subchondral bone edema. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this case report is the first to report clinical results of this new technique at 2 years postoperatively.

  7. Tissue damage drives co-localization of NF-κB, Smad3, and Nrf2 to direct Rev-erb sensitive wound repair in mouse macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Eichenfield, Dawn Z; Troutman, Ty Dale; Link, Verena M; Lam, Michael T; Cho, Han; Gosselin, David; Spann, Nathanael J; Lesch, Hanna P; Tao, Jenhan; Muto, Jun; Gallo, Richard L; Evans, Ronald M; Glass, Christopher K

    2016-01-01

    Although macrophages can be polarized to distinct phenotypes in vitro with individual ligands, in vivo they encounter multiple signals that control their varied functions in homeostasis, immunity, and disease. Here, we identify roles of Rev-erb nuclear receptors in regulating responses of mouse macrophages to complex tissue damage signals and wound repair. Rather than reinforcing a specific program of macrophage polarization, Rev-erbs repress subsets of genes that are activated by TLR ligands, IL4, TGFβ, and damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPS). Unexpectedly, a complex damage signal promotes co-localization of NF-κB, Smad3, and Nrf2 at Rev-erb-sensitive enhancers and drives expression of genes characteristic of multiple polarization states in the same cells. Rev-erb-sensitive enhancers thereby integrate multiple damage-activated signaling pathways to promote a wound repair phenotype. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13024.001 PMID:27462873

  8. Embryonic origin of adult stem cells required for tissue homeostasis and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Davies, Erin L; Lei, Kai; Seidel, Christopher W; Kroesen, Amanda E; McKinney, Sean A; Guo, Longhua; Robb, Sofia Mc; Ross, Eric J; Gotting, Kirsten; Alvarado, Alejandro Sánchez

    2017-01-10

    Planarian neoblasts are pluripotent, adult somatic stem cells and lineage-primed progenitors that are required for the production and maintenance of all differentiated cell types, including the germline. Neoblasts, originally defined as undifferentiated cells residing in the adult parenchyma, are frequently compared to embryonic stem cells yet their developmental origin remains obscure. We investigated the provenance of neoblasts during Schmidtea mediterranea embryogenesis, and report that neoblasts arise from an anarchic, cycling piwi-1+ population wholly responsible for production of all temporary and definitive organs during embryogenesis. Early embryonic piwi-1+ cells are molecularly and functionally distinct from neoblasts: they express unique cohorts of early embryo enriched transcripts and behave differently than neoblasts in cell transplantation assays. Neoblast lineages arise as organogenesis begins and are required for construction of all major organ systems during embryogenesis. These subpopulations are continuously generated during adulthood, where they act as agents of tissue homeostasis and regeneration.

  9. All-trans retinoic acid (RA) stimulates events in organ-cultured human skin that underlie repair. Adult skin from sun-protected and sun-exposed sites responds in an identical manner to RA while neonatal foreskin responds differently.

    PubMed Central

    Varani, J; Perone, P; Griffiths, C E; Inman, D R; Fligiel, S E; Voorhees, J J

    1994-01-01

    Adult human skin from a sun-protected site (hip) and from a sun-exposed site (forearm) was maintained in organ culture for 12 d in the presence of a serum-free, growth factor-free basal medium. Cultures were incubated under conditions optimized for keratinocyte growth (i.e., in 0.15 mM extracellular Ca2+) or for fibroblast growth (i.e., in 1.4 mM extracellular Ca2+). Treatment with all-trans retinoic acid (RA) induced histological changes in the organ-cultured skin under both conditions which were similar to the changes seen in intact skin after topical application. These included expansion of the viable portion of the epidermis and activation of cells in the dermis. In sun-damaged skin samples, which were characterized by destruction of normal connective tissue elements and presence of thick, dark-staining elastotic fibers, a zone of healthy connective tissue could be seen immediately below the dermo-epidermal junction. This zone was more prominent in RA-treated organ cultures than in matched controls. Associated with these histological changes was an increase in overall protein and extracellular matrix synthesis. In concomitant studies, it was found that RA treatment enhanced survival and proliferation of adult keratinocytes and adult dermal fibroblasts under both low- and high-Ca2+ conditions. In all of these assays, responses of sun-protected and sun-exposed skin were identical. In contrast, responses of neonatal foreskin to RA were similar to those of adult skin in the presence of low-Ca2+ culture medium, but under conditions of high extracellular Ca2+ RA provided little or no additional stimulus. Together these studies suggest that the ability of RA to enhance repair of sun-damaged skin (documented in previous studies) may reflect its ability to influence the behavior of skin in a manner that is age dependent but independent of sun-exposure status. Images PMID:7962521

  10. Low-intensity red and infrared lasers affect mRNA expression of DNA nucleotide excision repair in skin and muscle tissue.

    PubMed

    Sergio, Luiz Philippe S; Campos, Vera Maria A; Vicentini, Solange C; Mencalha, Andre Luiz; de Paoli, Flavia; Fonseca, Adenilson S

    2016-04-01

    Lasers emit light beams with specific characteristics, in which wavelength, frequency, power, fluence, and emission mode properties determine the photophysical, photochemical, and photobiological responses. Low-intensity lasers could induce free radical generation in biological tissues and cause alterations in macromolecules, such as DNA. Thus, the aim of this work was to evaluate excision repair cross-complementing group 1 (ERCC1) and excision repair cross-complementing group 2 (ERCC2) messenger RNA (mRNA) expression in biological tissues exposed to low-intensity lasers. Wistar rat (n = 28, 4 for each group) skin and muscle were exposed to low-intensity red (660 nm) and near-infrared (880 nm) lasers at different fluences (25, 50, and 100 J/cm(2)), and samples of these tissues were withdrawn for RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis, and gene expression evaluation by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Laser exposure was in continuous wave and power of 100 mW. Data show that ERCC1 and ERCC2 mRNA expressions decrease in skin (p < 0.001) exposed to near-infrared laser, but increase in muscle tissue (p < 0.001). ERCC1 mRNA expression does not alter (p > 0.05), but ERCC2 mRNA expression decreases in skin (p < 0.001) and increases in muscle tissue (p < 0.001) exposed to red laser. Our results show that ERCC1 and ERCC2 mRNA expression is differently altered in skin and muscle tissue exposed to low-intensity lasers depending on wavelengths and fluences used in therapeutic protocols.

  11. Localisation of embryonic prealbumin in formalin-fixed human fetal and adult tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Gallon, M E; Reid, W A; McHardie, G A; Hardman, R; Smith, G D; Horne, C H; Kalashnikov, V V; Tatarinov, Y S

    1981-01-01

    The presence of embryonic prealbumin (EPA) has been confirmed in fetal fibroblasts, chondrocytes, and distal tubular epithelial cells by an indirect immunoperoxidase technique. EPA has often been found also in the stromal cells of benign and malignant mesodermal tumours, but not in the epithelial cells of benign and malignant epithelial tumours. That EPA is not an exclusive product of neoplastic mesodermal cells is demonstrated by our finding of EPA in fibroblasts of granulation tissue, irradiated fibroblasts, and in distal tubular epithelial cells of miscellaneous adult kidneys. Images PMID:7021602

  12. Response properties of whisker-associated primary afferent neurons following infraorbital nerve transection with microsurgical repair in adult rats

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Bo; Zanoun, Rami R.; Carvell, George E.; Washington, Kia M.

    2016-01-01

    The rodent whisker/trigeminal system, characterized by high spatial and temporal resolution, provides an experimental model for developing new therapies for improving sensory functions of damaged peripheral nerves. Here, we use controlled whisker stimulation and single-unit recordings of trigeminal ganglion cells to examine in detail the nature and time course of functional recovery of mechanoreceptive afferents following nerve transection with microsurgical repair of the infraorbital nerve (ION) branch of the trigeminal nerve in adult rats. Response measures include rapid vs. slow adaptation, firing rate, interspike intervals, latency, and angular (directional) tuning. Whisker-evoked responses, readily observable by 3 wk post-transection, recover progressively for at least the next 5 wk. All cells in transected animals, as in control cases, responded to deflections of single whiskers only, but topography within the ganglion was clearly disrupted. The time course and extent of recovery of quantitative response measures were receptor dependent. Cells displaying slowly adapting (SA) properties recovered more quickly than rapidly adapting (RA) populations, and for some response measures—notably evoked firing rates—closely approached or attained control levels by 8 wk post-transection. Angular tuning of RA cells was slightly better than control units, whereas SA tuning did not differ from control values. Nerve conduction times and refractory periods, examined separately using electrical stimulation of the ION, were slower than normal in all transected animals and poorly reflected recovery of whisker-evoked response latencies and interspike intervals. Results underscore the need for multiple therapeutic strategies that target different aspects of functional restitution following peripheral nerve injury. PMID:26792886

  13. Fourier analysis of human soft tissue facial shape: sex differences in normal adults.

    PubMed Central

    Ferrario, V F; Sforza, C; Schmitz, J H; Miani, A; Taroni, G

    1995-01-01

    Sexual dimorphism in human facial form involves both size and shape variations of the soft tissue structures. These variations are conventionally appreciated using linear and angular measurements, as well as ratios, taken from photographs or radiographs. Unfortunately this metric approach provides adequate quantitative information about size only, eluding the problems of shape definition. Mathematical methods such as the Fourier series allow a correct quantitative analysis of shape and of its changes. A method for the reconstruction of outlines starting from selected landmarks and for their Fourier analysis has been developed, and applied to analyse sex differences in shape of the soft tissue facial contour in a group of healthy young adults. When standardised for size, no sex differences were found between both cosine and sine coefficients of the Fourier series expansion. This shape similarity was largely overwhelmed by the very evident size differences and it could be measured only using the proper mathematical methods. PMID:8586558

  14. [Primitive neuroectodermal tumour of soft tissue of the index finger in an adult. A case report].

    PubMed

    Berrada, N; Bellarbi, S; El Mannouar, M; Errihani, H

    2012-12-01

    The primitive neuroectodermal tumours (PNET) of soft tissues belong to the Ewing's tumors family and affects particularly the child. The localization of the disease at the extremities is very rare within the adult population and raises the problem of differential diagnosis with others tumors of the soft tissues. We report the case of a 48-year-old patient with a localized tumor, at the level of the second right finger, of six months evolution. The biopsy showed the infiltrating nature of the tumour; and the diagnosis of (PNET) was confirmed after the histological and immunohistochemical study. The extension assessment was negative and the patient had an amputation of the second and third rays of the right hand. Four years afterwards, the patient showed no recurrence or metastases.

  15. The role of microvesicles derived from mesenchymal stem cells in tissue regeneration; a dream for tendon repair?

    PubMed Central

    Tetta, Ciro; Consiglio, Anna Lange; Bruno, Stefania; Tetta, Emanuele; Gatti, Emanuele; Dobreva, Miryana; Cremonesi, Fausto; Camussi, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Summary Tendon injuries represent even today a challenge as repair may be exceedingly slow and incomplete. Regenerative medicine and stem cell technology have shown to be of great promise. Here, we will review the current knowledge on the mechanisms of the regenerative potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) obtained from different sources (bone marrow, fat, cord blood, placenta). More specifically, we will devote attention to the current use of MSCs that have been used experimentally and in limited numbers of clinical cases for the surgical treatment of subchondral-bone cysts, bone-fracture repair and cartilage repair. Based on the recently emerging role in regenerative mechanisms of soluble factors and of extracellular vesicles, we will discuss the potential of non-cellular therapies in horse tendon injuries. PMID:23738299

  16. Possible Muscle Repair in the Human Cardiovascular System.

    PubMed

    Sommese, Linda; Zullo, Alberto; Schiano, Concetta; Mancini, Francesco P; Napoli, Claudio

    2017-04-01

    The regenerative potential of tissues and organs could promote survival, extended lifespan and healthy life in multicellular organisms. Niches of adult stemness are widely distributed and lead to the anatomical and functional regeneration of the damaged organ. Conversely, muscular regeneration in mammals, and humans in particular, is very limited and not a single piece of muscle can fully regrow after a severe injury. Therefore, muscle repair after myocardial infarction is still a chimera. Recently, it has been recognized that epigenetics could play a role in tissue regrowth since it guarantees the maintenance of cellular identity in differentiated cells and, therefore, the stability of organs and tissues. The removal of these locks can shift a specific cell identity back to the stem-like one. Given the gradual loss of tissue renewal potential in the course of evolution, in the last few years many different attempts to retrieve such potential by means of cell therapy approaches have been performed in experimental models. Here we review pathways and mechanisms involved in the in vivo repair of cardiovascular muscle tissues in humans. Moreover, we address the ongoing research on mammalian cardiac muscle repair based on adult stem cell transplantation and pro-regenerative factor delivery. This latter issue, involving genetic manipulations of adult cells, paves the way for developing possible therapeutic strategies in the field of cardiovascular muscle repair.

  17. Efficient Cargo Delivery into Adult Brain Tissue Using Short Cell-Penetrating Peptides.

    PubMed

    Kizil, Caghan; Iltzsche, Anne; Thomas, Alvin Kuriakose; Bhattarai, Prabesh; Zhang, Yixin; Brand, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Zebrafish brains can regenerate lost neurons upon neurogenic activity of the radial glial progenitor cells (RGCs) that reside at the ventricular region. Understanding the molecular events underlying this ability is of great interest for translational studies of regenerative medicine. Therefore, functional analyses of gene function in RGCs and neurons are essential. Using cerebroventricular microinjection (CVMI), RGCs can be targeted efficiently but the penetration capacity of the injected molecules reduces dramatically in deeper parts of the brain tissue, such as the parenchymal regions that contain the neurons. In this report, we tested the penetration efficiency of five known cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and identified two- polyR and Trans - that efficiently penetrate the brain tissue without overt toxicity in a dose-dependent manner as determined by TUNEL staining and L-Plastin immunohistochemistry. We also found that polyR peptide can help carry plasmid DNA several cell diameters into the brain tissue after a series of coupling reactions using DBCO-PEG4-maleimide-based Michael's addition and azide-mediated copper-free click reaction. Combined with the advantages of CVMI, such as rapidness, reproducibility, and ability to be used in adult animals, CPPs improve the applicability of the CVMI technique to deeper parts of the central nervous system tissues.

  18. Efficient Cargo Delivery into Adult Brain Tissue Using Short Cell-Penetrating Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Alvin Kuriakose; Bhattarai, Prabesh; Zhang, Yixin; Brand, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Zebrafish brains can regenerate lost neurons upon neurogenic activity of the radial glial progenitor cells (RGCs) that reside at the ventricular region. Understanding the molecular events underlying this ability is of great interest for translational studies of regenerative medicine. Therefore, functional analyses of gene function in RGCs and neurons are essential. Using cerebroventricular microinjection (CVMI), RGCs can be targeted efficiently but the penetration capacity of the injected molecules reduces dramatically in deeper parts of the brain tissue, such as the parenchymal regions that contain the neurons. In this report, we tested the penetration efficiency of five known cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and identified two– polyR and Trans – that efficiently penetrate the brain tissue without overt toxicity in a dose-dependent manner as determined by TUNEL staining and L-Plastin immunohistochemistry. We also found that polyR peptide can help carry plasmid DNA several cell diameters into the brain tissue after a series of coupling reactions using DBCO-PEG4-maleimide-based Michael’s addition and azide-mediated copper-free click reaction. Combined with the advantages of CVMI, such as rapidness, reproducibility, and ability to be used in adult animals, CPPs improve the applicability of the CVMI technique to deeper parts of the central nervous system tissues. PMID:25894337

  19. UVA exposure of human skin reconstructed in vitro induces apoptosis of dermal fibroblasts: subsequent connective tissue repair and implications in photoaging.

    PubMed

    Bernerd, F; Asselineau, D

    1998-09-01

    The skin reconstructed in vitro has been previously shown to be a useful model to investigate the effects of UVB exposure (Bernerd and Asselineau, 1997). The present study describes the response to UVA irradiation. Major alterations were observed within the dermal compartment. Apoptosis of fibroblasts located in the superficial area of the dermal equivalent was observed as soon as 6 h after irradiation, leading to their disappearance after 48 h. This effect was obtained without major alterations of epidermal keratinocytes suggesting a differential cell type sensitivity to UVA radiations. In addition, collagenase I was secreted by dermal fibroblasts. The UVA dermal effects could be observed even after removal of the epidermis during the post irradiation period, demonstrating that they were independent of the keratinocyte response. The analysis of the tissue regeneration during the following 2 weeks revealed a connective tissue repair via fibroblasts proliferation, migration and active synthesis of extracellular matrix proteins such as fibronectin and procollagen I. This cellular recolonization of the superficial part of the dermal equivalent was due to activation of surviving fibroblasts located deeply in the dermal equivalent. The direct damage in the dermis and the subsequent connective tissue repair may contribute to the formation of UVA-induced dermal alterations.

  20. Effects of In Vitro Low Oxygen Tension Preconditioning of Adipose Stromal Cells on Their In Vivo Chondrogenic Potential: Application in Cartilage Tissue Repair

    PubMed Central

    Gauthier, Olivier; Lesoeur, Julie; Sourice, Sophie; Masson, Martial; Fellah, Borhane Hakim; Geffroy, Olivier; Lallemand, Elodie; Weiss, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Multipotent stromal cell (MSC)-based regenerative strategy has shown promise for the repair of cartilage, an avascular tissue in which cells experience hypoxia. Hypoxia is known to promote the early chondrogenic differentiation of MSC. The aim of our study was therefore to determine whether low oxygen tension could be used to enhance the regenerative potential of MSC for cartilage repair. Methods MSC from rabbit or human adipose stromal cells (ASC) were preconditioned in vitro in control or chondrogenic (ITS and TGF-β) medium and in 21 or 5% O2. Chondrogenic commitment was monitored by measuring COL2A1 and ACAN expression (real-time PCR). Preconditioned rabbit and human ASC were then incorporated into an Si-HPMC hydrogel and injected (i) into rabbit articular cartilage defects for 18 weeks or (ii) subcutaneously into nude mice for five weeks. The newly formed tissue was qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated by cartilage-specific immunohistological staining and scoring. The phenotype of ASC cultured in a monolayer or within Si-HPMC in control or chondrogenic medium and in 21 or 5% O2 was finally evaluated using real-time PCR. Results/Conclusions 5% O2 increased the in vitro expression of chondrogenic markers in ASC cultured in induction medium. Cells implanted within Si-HPMC hydrogel and preconditioned in chondrogenic medium formed a cartilaginous tissue, regardless of the level of oxygen. In addition, the 3D in vitro culture of ASC within Si-HPMC hydrogel was found to reinforce the pro-chondrogenic effects of the induction medium and 5% O2. These data together indicate that although 5% O2 enhances the in vitro chondrogenic differentiation of ASC, it does not enhance their in vivo chondrogenesis. These results also highlight the in vivo chondrogenic potential of ASC and their potential value in cartilage repair. PMID:23638053

  1. A hypothesis for an embryonic origin of pluripotent Oct-4(+) stem cells in adult bone marrow and other tissues.

    PubMed

    Ratajczak, M Z; Machalinski, B; Wojakowski, W; Ratajczak, J; Kucia, M

    2007-05-01

    Accumulating evidence demonstrates that adult tissues contain a population of stem cells that express early developmental markers such as stage-specific embryonic antigen and transcription factors Oct-4 and Nanog. These are the markers characteristic for embryonic stem cells, epiblast stem cells and primordial germ cells. The presence of these stem cells in adult tissues including bone marrow, epidermis, bronchial epithelium, myocardium, pancreas and testes supports the concept that adult tissues contain some population of pluripotent stem cells that is deposited in embryogenesis during early gastrulation. In this review we will discuss these data and present a hypothesis that these cells could be direct descendants of the germ lineage. The germ lineage in order to pass genes on to the next generations creates soma and thus becomes a 'mother lineage' for all somatic cell lineages present in the adult body.

  2. Next Generation Mesenchymal Stem Cell (MSC)–Based Cartilage Repair Using Scaffold-Free Tissue Engineered Constructs Generated with Synovial Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shimomura, Kazunori; Ando, Wataru; Moriguchi, Yu; Sugita, Norihiko; Yasui, Yukihiko; Koizumi, Kota; Fujie, Hiromichi; Hart, David A.; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Because of its limited healing capacity, treatments for articular cartilage injuries are still challenging. Since the first report by Brittberg, autologous chondrocyte implantation has been extensively studied. Recently, as an alternative for chondrocyte-based therapy, mesenchymal stem cell–based therapy has received considerable research attention because of the relative ease in handling for tissue harvest, and subsequent cell expansion and differentiation. This review summarizes latest development of stem cell therapies in cartilage repair with special attention to scaffold-free approaches. PMID:27340513

  3. Effect of Anti-Sclerostin Therapy and Osteogenesis Imperfecta on Tissue-level Properties in Growing and Adult Mice While Controlling for Tissue Age

    PubMed Central

    Sinder, Benjamin P.; Lloyd, William R.; Salemi, Joseph D.; Marini, Joan C.; Caird, Michelle S.; Morris, Michael D.; Kozloff, Kenneth M.

    2016-01-01

    Bone composition and biomechanics at the tissue-level are important contributors to whole bone strength. Sclerostin antibody (Scl-Ab) is a candidate anabolic therapy for the treatment of osteoporosis that increases bone formation, bone mass, and bone strength in animal studies, but its effect on bone quality at the tissue-level has received little attention. Pre-clinical studies of Scl-Ab have recently expanded to include diseases with altered collagen and material properties such as Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI). The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of Scl-Ab on bone quality by determining bone material composition and tissue-level mechanical properties in normal wild type (WT) tissue, as well as mice with a typical OI Gly→Cys mutation (Brtl/+) in type I collagen. Rapidly growing (3-week-old) and adult (6-month-old) WT and Brtl/+ mice were treated for 5 weeks with Scl-Ab. Fluorescent guided tissue-level bone composition analysis (Raman spectroscopy) and biomechanical testing (nanoindentation) were performed at multiple tissue ages. Scl-Ab increased mineral to matrix in adult WT and Brtl/+ at tissue ages of 2–4wks. However, no treatment related changes were observed in mineral to matrix levels at mid-cortex, and elastic modulus was not altered by Scl-Ab at any tissue age. Increased mineral-to-matrix was phenotypically observed in adult Brtl/+ OI mice (at tissue ages >3wk) and rapidly growing Brtl/+ (at tissue ages > 4wk) mice compared to WT. At identical tissue ages defined by fluorescent labels adult mice had generally lower mineral to matrix ratios and a greater elastic modulus than rapidly growing mice, demonstrating that bone matrix quality can be influenced by animal age and tissue age alike. In summary, these data suggest that Scl-Ab alters the matrix chemistry of newly formed bone while not affecting the elastic modulus, induces similar changes between Brtl/+ and WT mice, and provides new insight into the interaction between tissue age

  4. Effect of anti-sclerostin therapy and osteogenesis imperfecta on tissue-level properties in growing and adult mice while controlling for tissue age.

    PubMed

    Sinder, Benjamin P; Lloyd, William R; Salemi, Joseph D; Marini, Joan C; Caird, Michelle S; Morris, Michael D; Kozloff, Kenneth M

    2016-03-01

    Bone composition and biomechanics at the tissue-level are important contributors to whole bone strength. Sclerostin antibody (Scl-Ab) is a candidate anabolic therapy for the treatment of osteoporosis that increases bone formation, bone mass, and bone strength in animal studies, but its effect on bone quality at the tissue-level has received little attention. Pre-clinical studies of Scl-Ab have recently expanded to include diseases with altered collagen and material properties such as osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of Scl-Ab on bone quality by determining bone material composition and tissue-level mechanical properties in normal wild type (WT) tissue, as well as mice with a typical OI Gly➔Cys mutation (Brtl/+) in type I collagen. Rapidly growing (3-week-old) and adult (6-month-old) WT and Brtl/+ mice were treated for 5weeks with Scl-Ab. Fluorescent guided tissue-level bone composition analysis (Raman spectroscopy) and biomechanical testing (nanoindentation) were performed at multiple tissue ages. Scl-Ab increased mineral to matrix in adult WT and Brtl/+ at tissue ages of 2-4wks. However, no treatment related changes were observed in mineral to matrix levels at mid-cortex, and elastic modulus was not altered by Scl-Ab at any tissue age. Increased mineral-to-matrix was phenotypically observed in adult Brtl/+ OI mice (at tissue ages>3wks) and rapidly growing Brtl/+ (at tissue ages>4wks) mice compared to WT. At identical tissue ages defined by fluorescent labels, adult mice had generally lower mineral to matrix ratios and a greater elastic modulus than rapidly growing mice, demonstrating that bone matrix quality can be influenced by animal age and tissue age alike. In summary, these data suggest that Scl-Ab alters the matrix chemistry of newly formed bone while not affecting the elastic modulus, induces similar changes between Brtl/+ and WT mice, and provides new insight into the interaction between tissue age and

  5. Minireview: Mechano-Growth Factor: A Putative Product of IGF-I Gene Expression Involved in Tissue Repair and Regeneration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    Ec in humans) has been the topic of several research studies, particularly in skeletal muscle. It has been proposed that age-related sarcopenia results...from deficiency of a locally pro- duced Eb peptide? Would provision of Eb peptide prevent age-related sarcopenia or improve regeneration/repair af- ter

  6. Variations of midline facial soft tissue thicknesses among three skeletal classes in Central Anatolian adults.

    PubMed

    Gungor, Kahraman; Bulut, Ozgur; Hizliol, Ismail; Hekimoglu, Baki; Gurcan, Safa

    2015-11-01

    Facial reconstruction is a technique employed in a forensic investigation as a last resort to recreate an individual's facial appearance from his/her skull. Forensic anthropologists or artists use facial soft tissue thickness (FSTT) measurements as a guide in facial reconstructions. The aim of this study was to develop FSTT values for Central Anatolian adults, taking into consideration sex and skeletal classes; first, to achieve better results obtaining the likenesses of deceased individuals in two or three-dimensional forensic facial reconstructions and, second, to compare these values to existing databases. Lateral cephalograms were used to determine FSTT values at 10 midline facial landmarks of 167 adults. Descriptive statistics were calculated for these facial soft tissue thickness values, and these values were compared to those reported in two other comparable databases. The majority of the landmarks showed sex-based differences. Males were found to have significantly larger landmark values than female subjects. These results point not only to the necessity to present data in accordance with sexual dimorphism, but also the need to consider that individuals from different geographical areas have unique facial features and that, as a result, geographical population-specific FSTT values are required.

  7. Differences in tissue distribution of HBCD alpha and gamma between adult and developing mice.

    PubMed

    Szabo, David T; Diliberto, Janet J; Huwe, Janice K; Birnbaum, Linda S

    2011-09-01

    Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) is a mixture of three stereoisomers alpha (α), beta (β), and gamma (γ). γ-HBCD dominates the mixture (∼70%), and despite α-HBCD's minor contribution to global HBCD production and usage (∼10%), it is the dominant congener found in most biotic samples worldwide. Evidence of toxicity and lack of stereoisomer studies drives the importance of understanding HBCD toxicokinetics in potentially susceptible populations. The majority of public health concern has focused on hazardous effects resulting from exposure of infants and young children to HBCD due to reports on adverse developmental effects in rodent studies, in combination with human exposure estimates suggesting that nursing infants and young children have the highest exposure to HBCD. This study was designed to investigate differences in the disposition of both γ-HBCD and α-HBCD in infantile mice reported to be susceptible to the HBCD commercial mixture. The tissue distribution of α-[(14)C]HBCD- and γ-[(14)C]HBCD-derived radioactivity was monitored in C57BL/6 mice following a single oral dose of either compound (3 mg/kg) after direct gavage at postnatal day 10. Mice were held up to 7 days in shoebox cages after which pups were sacrificed, tissue collected, and internal dosimetry was measured. Developing mice exposed to α-HBCD had an overall higher body burden than γ-HBCD at every time point measured; at 4 days postexposure, they retained 22% of the α-HBCD administered dose, whereas pups exposed to γ-HBCD retained 10%. Total body burden in infantile mice after exposure to γ-HBCD was increased 10-fold as compared with adults. Similarly, after exposure to α-HBCD, infantile mice contained 2.5-fold higher levels than adult. These differences lead to higher concentrations of the HBCD diastereomers at target tissues during critical windows of development. The results indicate that the toxicokinetics of the two HBCD diastereomers differ between developing and adult mice

  8. Integrin α1β1 is involved in the differentiation into myofibroblasts in adult reactive tissues in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Alejandro; Karen, Jakob; Gardner, Humphrey; Gerdin, Bengt; Rubin, Kristofer; Sundberg, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Connective tissue cell activation is of importance during reactive conditions such as solid tumour growth, wound healing and pannus formation in rheumatoid arthritis. Here, we have compared connective tissue cells of mesenchymal origin in human tissues from these conditions and their normal counterparts using a panel of cell-type-specific markers. In particular, we investigated variations of integrin expression among connective tissue cell phenotypes. Connective tissue cell populations were defined based on their association with the microvasculature and their expression of activation markers. The phenotype of these cells varied according to the type of pathological connective tissue examined. Our morphological data from human tissues suggested that the α1β1 integrin, a collagen/laminin receptor, is involved in the differentiation of precursor cells into myofibroblasts. To mechanistically investigate this hypothesis, we employed experimental models for carcinoma growth and wound healing utilizing α1 integrin-deficient mice. The data confirmed that the α1β1 integrin is of importance not only for the differentiation of mesenchymal cells into myofibroblasts but also for the neovascularization and connective tissue organization and emphasize the importance of myofibroblasts in the pathophysiology of tissue repair, inflammation and tumour growth. PMID:19397781

  9. We Can Work it Out: The Importance of Rupture and Repair Processes in Infancy and Adult Life for Flourishing.

    PubMed

    Morton, Mary

    2016-06-01

    This paper argues that insights into infant emotional development, particularly the capacity to engage with rupture and repair, can be applied to the understanding and promotion of flourishing in later life, individually and socially. Starting with the Queen's visit to the Republic of Ireland as an example of successful social repair after rupture that enables flourishing, the paper goes on to outline some relevant psychological theory that undergirds this. It then considers some of the practical relevance and problems that apply to rupture and repair in the contemporary world, particularly the world of health care, Amidst the inevitable messiness of life, flourishing and growth can only be achieved with the kind of flexibility implied by creating repair in the face of rupture.

  10. Cranial irradiation induces bone marrow-derived microglia in adult mouse brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Okonogi, Noriyuki; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Suto, Nana; Suzue, Kazutomo; Kaminuma, Takuya; Nakano, Takashi; Hirai, Hirokazu

    2014-07-01

    Postnatal hematopoietic progenitor cells do not contribute to microglial homeostasis in adult mice under normal conditions. However, previous studies using whole-body irradiation and bone marrow (BM) transplantation models have shown that adult BM cells migrate into the brain tissue and differentiate into microglia (BM-derived microglia; BMDM). Here, we investigated whether cranial irradiation alone was sufficient to induce the generation of BMDM in the adult mouse brain. Transgenic mice that express green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of a murine stem cell virus (MSCV) promoter (MSCV-GFP mice) were used. MSCV-GFP mice express GFP in BM cells but not in the resident microglia in the brain. Therefore, these mice allowed us to detect BM-derived cells in the brain without BM reconstitution. MSCV-GFP mice, aged 8-12 weeks, received 13.0 Gy irradiation only to the cranium, and BM-derived cells in the brain were quantified at 3 and 8 weeks after irradiation. No BM-derived cells were detected in control non-irradiated MSCV-GFP mouse brains, but numerous GFP-labeled BM-derived cells were present in the brain stem, basal ganglia and cerebral cortex of the irradiated MSCV-GFP mice. These BM-derived cells were positive for Iba1, a marker for microglia, indicating that GFP-positive BM-derived cells were microglial in nature. The population of BMDM was significantly greater at 8 weeks post-irradiation than at 3 weeks post-irradiation in all brain regions examined. Our results clearly show that cranial irradiation alone is sufficient to induce the generation of BMDM in the adult mouse.

  11. Organ and tissue donation: a survey of nurse's knowledge and educational needs in an adult ITU.

    PubMed

    Collins, Timothy J

    2005-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the results of a survey that was undertaken to assess nurses' knowledge and educational needs towards organ donation within one adult general intensive care unit. The survey consists of 31 registered nurses who completed a confidential questionnaire that aimed to assess their existing knowledge and deficits in organ and tissue donation. The survey highlights the sample lacked confidence in approaching relatives for donation consent, deficits in brain stem death testing and donor criteria. It was also apparent that a significant number of nurses could not identify which tissues can be donated and the contraindications for tissue donation. A majority of the sample stated their knowledge of donation issues would improve if an educational programme were developed on organ donation. This is further supported by previous work by [Bidigare S, Oermann M, 1991. Attitudes and knowledge of nurses regarding organ procurement. Heart & lung 1:20-3; Smith-Brew S, Yanai L, 1996. The organ donation process through a review of the literature. Part 1. Accident & emergency nursing 4:5-11; Roark D, 2000. Overhauling the organ donation system. Am J Nurs 6:44-9] who suggest that educational programmes covering donation issues should enhance nurses' knowledge and confidence in the organ donation process and ultimately increase the number of potential donors.

  12. SpSM30 gene family expression patterns in embryonic and adult biomineralized tissues of the sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus.

    PubMed

    Killian, Christopher E; Croker, Lindsay; Wilt, Fred H

    2010-01-01

    The SpSM30 gene family of the sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, is comprised of six members, designated SpSM30A through SpSM30F (Livingston et al., 2006). The SpSM30 proteins are found uniquely in embryonic and adult mineralized tissues of the sea urchin. Previous studies have revealed that SpSM30 proteins are occluded within the embryonic endoskeleton and adult mineralized tissues (Killian and Wilt, 1996; Mann et al., 2008a,b; Urry et al., 2000). Furthermore, some of the SpSM30 proteins are among the most abundant of the approximately four-dozen integral matrix proteins of the larval spicule (Killian and Wilt, 1996). The amino acid sequence, protein domain architecture, and contiguity within the genome strongly support the supposition that the six genes constitute a gene family. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) is used in the present study to describe the time course of expression of the family members during embryonic development, and their expression in adult tissues. SpSM30A, B, C and E are expressed, albeit at different levels, during overt spicule deposition in the embryo with some differences in the precise timing of expression. SpSM30D is not expressed in the embryo, and SpSM30F is expressed transiently and at low levels just prior to overt spicule formation. Whole mount in situ hybridization studies show that SpSM30A, B, C, and E are expressed exclusively in primary mesenchyme (PMC) cells and their descendants. In addition, tissue fractionation studies indicate that SpSM30F expression is highly enriched in PMCs. Each adult tissue examined expresses a different cohort of the SpSM30 family members at varying levels: SpSM30A mRNA is not expressed in adult tissues. Its expression is limited to the embryo. Conversely, SpSM30D mRNA is not expressed in the embryo, but is expressed in adult spines and teeth. SpSM30B and SpSM30C are expressed at modest levels in all mineralized adult tissues; SpSM30E is expressed highly in tooth and

  13. From the Cover: Cell-replacement therapy for diabetes: Generating functional insulin-producing tissue from adult human liver cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapir, Tamar; Shternhall, Keren; Meivar-Levy, Irit; Blumenfeld, Tamar; Cohen, Hamutal; Skutelsky, Ehud; Eventov-Friedman, Smadar; Barshack, Iris; Goldberg, Iris; Pri-Chen, Sarah; Ben-Dor, Lya; Polak-Charcon, Sylvie; Karasik, Avraham; Shimon, Ilan; Mor, Eytan; Ferber, Sarah

    2005-05-01

    Shortage in tissue availability from cadaver donors and the need for life-long immunosuppression severely restrict the large-scale application of cell-replacement therapy for diabetic patients. This study suggests the potential use of adult human liver as alternate tissue for autologous beta-cell-replacement therapy. By using pancreatic and duodenal homeobox gene 1 (PDX-1) and soluble factors, we induced a comprehensive developmental shift of adult human liver cells into functional insulin-producing cells. PDX-1-treated human liver cells express insulin, store it in defined granules, and secrete the hormone in a glucose-regulated manner. When transplanted under the renal capsule of diabetic, immunodeficient mice, the cells ameliorated hyperglycemia for prolonged periods of time. Inducing developmental redirection of adult liver offers the potential of a cell-replacement therapy for diabetics by allowing the patient to be the donor of his own insulin-producing tissue. pancreas | transdifferentiation

  14. Adult stem cells, scaffolds for in vivo and in vitro myocardial tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Di Felice, Valentina; De Luca, Angela; Serradifalco, Claudia; Di Marco, Patrizia; Verin, Lucia; Motta, Antonella; Guercio, Annalisa; Zummo, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    The main goal in the last few years in cardiac research has been to isolate cardiac potential stem cells from adult myocardium and to demonstrate their differentiation potential. We have previously demonstrated that c-Kit positive cardiac stem cells are able to organize themselves into a tissue-like cell mass. In this 3D mass, they can produce a high concentration of natural extracellular matrix, can create vessels, a capsule and, with the help of an Open-pore Polylactic Acid scaffold, many cells can organize an elementary myocardium. Drawing from this background, we decided to design and use poly-lactic scaffolds and the model of the athymic Nude-Foxn1(nu) mouse to evaluate the extent of the myogenic vs endothelial differentiation in vivo, and to evaluate the presence or the absence of a foreign body reaction.

  15. The sequential tissue distribution of duck Tembusu virus in adult ducks.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li; Liu, Jinxiong; Chen, Pucheng; Jiang, Yongping; Ding, Leilei; Lin, Yuan; Li, Qimeng; He, Xijun; Chen, Qiusheng; Chen, Hualan

    2014-01-01

    In 2010, a novel Tembusu virus (TMUV) that caused a severe decrease in the egg production of ducks was isolated in southeast China. Given the novelty of this duck pathogen, little information is available regarding its pathogenesis. Here, we systematically investigated the replication kinetics of TMUV PTD2010 in adult male and female ducks. We found that PTD2010 was detectable in most of the parenchymatous organs as well as the oviduct and intestinal tract from days 1 to 7 after inoculation. Viral titers were maintained at high levels for at least 9 days in the spleen, kidney, bursa of Fabricius, brain, and ovary. No virus was detected in any of these organs or tissues at 18 days after inoculation. PTD2010, thus, causes systemic infections in male and female ducks; its replication kinetics show similar patterns in most organs, with the exception of the ovaries and testes.

  16. Transcription levels of sirtuin family in neural stem cells and brain tissues of adult mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, H F; Li, Q; Feng, R L; Wen, T Q

    2012-09-10

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) has been used as a well-known model to investigate apoptosis, differentiation, maintenance of stem cells status, and therapy of neurological disease. The C17.2 NSCs line was produced after v-myc transformation of neural progenitor from mouse cerebellar cortex. Sirtuin family plays important roles involved in neuronal differentiation, genomic stability, lifespan, cell survival. However, little is known about gene expression variation of sirtuin family in C17.2 NSCs, primary NSCs, and different brain tissues in adult mice. Here, we confirmed that the mRNA expression levels of sirt2, 3, 4, 5, and 7 in E14.5 NSCs were significantly higher than in C17.2 NSCs, whereas that sirt 6 displayed an opposing mode. Moreover, a higher mRNA level of sirtuin family was observed in the adult mouse brain compared to C17.2 NSCs. In addition, histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors nicotinamide and Trichostatin A (TSA) were used to explore differential changes at the transcriptional level of sirtuins. Results indicated that the expression of sirt1, sirt5 and sirt6 was significant downregulated by nicotinamide treatment. Whereas, a significant downregulation in sirt1 and sirt3 and a significant upregulation in sirt2, sirt4, sirt6, and sirt7 were observed in the treatment of TSA. Thus our studies indicate different sirtuin mRNA expression profiles between C17.2 NSCs, E14.5 NSCs and brain tissues, suggesting the transcriptional regulation of sirtuin family could be mediated by different histone acetylation.

  17. Osteodifferentiated mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow and adipose tissue express HLA-G and display immunomodulatory properties in HLA-mismatched settings: implications in bone repair therapy.

    PubMed

    Montespan, Florent; Deschaseaux, Frédéric; Sensébé, Luc; Carosella, Edgardo D; Rouas-Freiss, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells that can be obtained from several sources such as bone marrow and adipose tissue. Depending on the culture conditions, they can differentiate into osteoblasts, chondroblasts, adipocytes, or neurons. In this regard, they constitute promising candidates for cell-based therapy aimed at repairing damaged tissues. In addition, MSCs display immunomodulatory properties through the expression of soluble factors including HLA-G. We here analyse both immunogenicity and immunosuppressive capacity of MSCs derived from bone marrow and adipose tissue before and after osteodifferentiation. Results show that HLA-G expression is maintained after osteodifferentiation and can be boosted in inflammatory conditions mimicked by the addition of IFN-γ and TNF-α. Both MSCs and osteodifferentiated MSCs are hypoimmunogenic and exert immunomodulatory properties in HLA-mismatched settings as they suppress T cell alloproliferation in mixed lymphocyte reactions. Finally, addition of biomaterials that stimulate bone tissue formation did not modify MSC immune properties. As MSCs combine both abilities of osteoregeneration and immunomodulation, they may be considered as allogenic sources for the treatment of bone defects.

  18. Embryonic origin of adult stem cells required for tissue homeostasis and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Erin L; Lei, Kai; Seidel, Christopher W; Kroesen, Amanda E; McKinney, Sean A; Guo, Longhua; Robb, Sofia MC; Ross, Eric J; Gotting, Kirsten; Alvarado, Alejandro Sánchez

    2017-01-01

    Planarian neoblasts are pluripotent, adult somatic stem cells and lineage-primed progenitors that are required for the production and maintenance of all differentiated cell types, including the germline. Neoblasts, originally defined as undifferentiated cells residing in the adult parenchyma, are frequently compared to embryonic stem cells yet their developmental origin remains obscure. We investigated the provenance of neoblasts during Schmidtea mediterranea embryogenesis, and report that neoblasts arise from an anarchic, cycling piwi-1+ population wholly responsible for production of all temporary and definitive organs during embryogenesis. Early embryonic piwi-1+ cells are molecularly and functionally distinct from neoblasts: they express unique cohorts of early embryo enriched transcripts and behave differently than neoblasts in cell transplantation assays. Neoblast lineages arise as organogenesis begins and are required for construction of all major organ systems during embryogenesis. These subpopulations are continuously generated during adulthood, where they act as agents of tissue homeostasis and regeneration. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21052.001 PMID:28072387

  19. Targeted therapy for soft tissue sarcomas in adolescents and young adults

    PubMed Central

    Steppan, Diana A; Pratilas, Christine A; Loeb, David M

    2017-01-01

    Soft tissue sarcomas (STSs) are a heterogeneous group of tumors originating from the mesenchyme. Even though they affect individuals in all age groups, the prevalence of subtypes of STSs changes significantly from childhood through adolescence into adulthood. The mainstay of therapy is surgery, with or without the addition of chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy. These treatment modalities are associated, in many cases, with significant morbidity and, given the heterogeneity of tumor histologies encompassed by the term “STS”, have not uniformly improved outcomes. Moreover, some subgroups of STSs appear to be more, and others less, responsive to conventional chemotherapy agents. Over the last two decades, our understanding of the biology of STSs is slowly increasing, allowing for the development of more targeted therapies. We review the new treatment modalities that have been tested on patients with STSs, with a special focus on adolescents and young adults, a group of patients that is often underrepresented in clinical trials and has not received the dedicated attention it deserves, given the significant differences in biology and treatment response in comparison to children and adults.

  20. Cartilage Repair and Subchondral Bone Remodeling in Response to Focal Lesions in a Mini-Pig Model: Implications for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Matthew B.; Belkin, Nicole S.; Milby, Andrew H.; Henning, Elizabeth A.; Bostrom, Marc; Kim, Minwook; Pfeifer, Christian; Meloni, Gregory; Dodge, George R.; Burdick, Jason A.; Schaer, Thomas P.; Steinberg, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Preclinical large animal models are essential for evaluating new tissue engineering (TE) technologies and refining surgical approaches for cartilage repair. Some preclinical animal studies, including the commonly used minipig model, have noted marked remodeling of the subchondral bone. However, the mechanisms underlying this response have not been well characterized. Thus, our objective was to compare in-vivo outcomes of chondral defects with varied injury depths and treatments. Design: Trochlear chondral defects were created in 11 Yucatan minipigs (6 months old). Groups included an untreated partial-thickness defect (PTD), an untreated full-thickness defect (FTD), and FTDs treated with microfracture, autologous cartilage transfer (FTD-ACT), or an acellular hyaluronic acid hydrogel. Six weeks after surgery, micro-computed tomography (μCT) was used to quantitatively assess defect fill and subchondral bone remodeling. The quality of cartilage repair was assessed using the ICRS-II histological scoring system and immunohistochemistry for type II collagen. A finite element model (FEM) was developed to assess load transmission. Results: Using μCT, substantial bone remodeling was observed for all FTDs, but not for the PTD group. The best overall histological scores and greatest type II collagen staining was found for the FTD-ACT and PTD groups. The FEM confirmed that only the FTD-ACT group could initially restore appropriate transfer of compressive loads to the underlying bone. Conclusions: The bony remodeling observed in this model system appears to be a biological phenomena and not a result of altered mechanical loading, with the depth of the focal chondral defect (partial vs. full thickness) dictating the bony remodeling response. The type of cartilage injury should be carefully controlled in studies utilizing this model to evaluate TE approaches for cartilage repair. PMID:25318414

  1. Stimulating endogenous cardiac repair

    PubMed Central

    Finan, Amanda; Richard, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    The healthy adult heart has a low turnover of cardiac myocytes. The renewal capacity, however, is augmented after cardiac injury. Participants in cardiac regeneration include cardiac myocytes themselves, cardiac progenitor cells, and peripheral stem cells, particularly from the bone marrow compartment. Cardiac progenitor cells and bone marrow stem cells are augmented after cardiac injury, migrate to the myocardium, and support regeneration. Depletion studies of these populations have demonstrated their necessary role in cardiac repair. However, the potential of these cells to completely regenerate the heart is limited. Efforts are now being focused on ways to augment these natural pathways to improve cardiac healing, primarily after ischemic injury but in other cardiac pathologies as well. Cell and gene therapy or pharmacological interventions are proposed mechanisms. Cell therapy has demonstrated modest results and has passed into clinical trials. However, the beneficial effects of cell therapy have primarily been their ability to produce paracrine effects on the cardiac tissue and recruit endogenous stem cell populations as opposed to direct cardiac regeneration. Gene therapy efforts have focused on prolonging or reactivating natural signaling pathways. Positive results have been demonstrated to activate the endogenous stem cell populations and are currently being tested in clinical trials. A potential new avenue may be to refine pharmacological treatments that are currently in place in the clinic. Evidence is mounting that drugs such as statins or beta blockers may alter endogenous stem cell activity. Understanding the effects of these drugs on stem cell repair while keeping in mind their primary function may strike a balance in myocardial healing. To maximize endogenous cardiac regeneration, a combination of these approaches could ameliorate the overall repair process to incorporate the participation of multiple cellular players. PMID:26484341

  2. Rapid repair and regeneration of damaged rabbit sciatic nerves by tissue-engineered scaffold made from nano-silver and collagen type I.

    PubMed

    Ding, Tan; Luo, Zhuo-Jing; Zheng, Yan; Hu, Xue-Yu; Ye, Zheng-Xu

    2010-05-01

    A tissue-engineered scaffold with nano-silver and collagen type I was constructed and investigated for its ability to adsorb laminin and the usefulness in the repair and regeneration of damaged peripheral nerves in animals. The nano-silver scaffold displayed ideal microtubule structure under electronic microscope; even distribution of the nano-silver particles was also seen with energy spectrometry. After immersion in a laminin solution, the laminin-attached scaffolds were implanted into rabbits to repair a 10-mm injury of the sciatic nerve. At 30 days post-implantation, regeneration of the damaged nerve was evaluated by transmission electron microscopy, electrophysiological examination and fluoro-gold (FG) retrograde labelling. Compared with the control collagen-scaffold without nano-silver, the nano-silver-containing scaffold showed a higher rate of laminin adsorption, regenerated a nerve with a thicker myelin sheath and improved the nerve conduction velocity and nerve potential amplitude. FG retrograde labelled the newly grown axons in the spinal cord cortex anterior horn and the dorsal root ganglion. These results demonstrate the superior functionality of the nano-silver-collagen scaffold in the adsorption to laminin and subsequent regeneration of damaged peripheral nerves.

  3. Bone marrow cells migrate to the heart and skeletal muscle and participate in tissue repair after Trypanosoma cruzi infection in mice

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Bruno S d F; Azevedo, Carine M; Lima, Ricardo S d; Kaneto, Carla M; Vasconcelos, Juliana F; Guimarães, Elisalva T; dos Santos, Ricardo R; Soares, Milena B P

    2014-01-01

    Infection by Trypanosoma cruzi, the aetiological agent of Chagas disease, causes an intense inflammatory reaction in several tissues, including the myocardium. We have previously shown that transplantation of bone marrow cells (BMC) ameliorates the myocarditis in a mouse model of chronic Chagas disease. We investigated the participation of BMC in lesion repair in the heart and skeletal muscle, caused by T. cruzi infection in mice. Infection with a myotropic T. cruzi strain induced an increase in the percentage of stem cells and monocytes in the peripheral blood, as well as in gene expression of chemokines SDF-1, MCP1, 2, and 3 in the heart and skeletal muscle. To investigate the fate of BMC within the damaged tissue, chimeric mice were generated by syngeneic transplantation of green fluorescent protein (GFP+) BMC into lethally irradiated mice and infected with Trypanosoma cruzi. Migration of GFP+ BMC to the heart and skeletal muscle was observed during and after the acute phase of infection. GFP+ cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells were present in heart sections of chimeric chagasic mice. GFP+ myofibres were observed in the skeletal muscle of chimeric mice at different time points following infection. In conclusion, BMC migrate and contribute to the formation of new resident cells in the heart and skeletal muscle, which can be detected both during the acute and the chronic phase of infection. These findings reinforce the role of BMC in tissue regeneration. PMID:24976301

  4. Muse Cells: Nontumorigenic Pluripotent Stem Cells Present in Adult Tissues—A Paradigm Shift in Tissue Regeneration and Evolution

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Muse cells are a novel population of nontumorigenic pluripotent stem cells, highly resistant to cellular stress. These cells are present in every connective tissue and intrinsically express pluripotent stem markers such as Nanog, Oct3/4, Sox2, and TRA1-60. Muse cells are able to differentiate into cells from all three embryonic germ layers both spontaneously and under media-specific induction. Unlike ESCs and iPSCs, Muse cells exhibit low telomerase activity and asymmetric division and do not undergo tumorigenesis or teratoma formation when transplanted into a host organism. Muse cells have a high capacity for homing into damaged tissue and spontaneous differentiation into cells of compatible tissue, leading to tissue repair and functional restoration. The ability of Muse cells to restore tissue function may demonstrate the role of Muse cells in a highly conserved cellular mechanism related to cell survival and regeneration, in response to cellular stress and acute injury. From an evolutionary standpoint, genes pertaining to the regenerative capacity of an organism have been lost in higher mammals from more primitive species. Therefore, Muse cells may offer insight into the molecular and evolutionary bases of autonomous tissue regeneration and elucidate the molecular and cellular mechanisms that prevent mammals from regenerating limbs and organs, as planarians, newts, zebrafish, and salamanders do. PMID:28070194

  5. Isolation of pluripotent neural crest-derived stem cells from adult human tissues by connexin-43 enrichment.

    PubMed

    Pelaez, Daniel; Huang, Chun-Yuh Charles; Cheung, Herman S

    2013-11-01

    Identification and isolation of pluripotent stem cells in adult tissues represent an important advancement in the fields of stem cell biology and regenerative medicine. For several years, research has been performed on the identification of biomarkers that can isolate stem cells residing in neural crest (NC)-derived adult tissues. The NC is considered a good model in stem cell biology as cells from it migrate extensively and contribute to the formation of diverse tissues in the body during organogenesis. Migration of these cells is modulated, in part, by gap junction communication among the cell sheets. Here we present a study in which, selection of connexin 43 (Cx43) expressing cells from human adult periodontal ligament yields a novel pluripotent stem cell population. Cx43⁺ periodontal ligament stem cells express pluripotency-associated transcription factors OCT4, Nanog, and Sox2, as well as NC-specific markers Sox10, p75, and Nestin. When injected in vivo into an immunodeficient mouse model, these cells were capable of generating teratomas with tissues from the three embryological germ layers: endoderm, mesoderm, and ectoderm. Furthermore, the cells formed mature structures of tissues normally arising from the NC during embryogenesis such as eccrine sweat glands of the human skin, muscle, neuronal tissues, cartilage, and bone. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed the human origin of the neoplastic cells as well as the ectodermal and endodermal nature of some of the structures found in the tumors. These results suggest that Cx43 may be used as a biomarker to select and isolate the remnant NC pluripotent stem cells from adult human tissues arising from this embryological structure. The isolation of these cells through routine medical procedures such as wisdom teeth extraction further enhances their applicability to the regenerative medicine field.

  6. Ex-Vivo Tissues Engineering Modeling for Reconstructive Surgery Using Human Adult Adipose Stem Cells and Polymeric Nanostructured Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Morena, Francesco; Argentati, Chiara; Calzoni, Eleonora; Cordellini, Marino; Emiliani, Carla; D’Angelo, Francesco; Martino, Sabata

    2016-01-01

    The major challenge for stem cell translation regenerative medicine is the regeneration of damaged tissues by creating biological substitutes capable of recapitulating the missing function in the recipient host. Therefore, the current paradigm of tissue engineering strategies is the combination of a selected stem cell type, based on their capability to differentiate toward committed cell lineages, and a biomaterial, that, due to own characteristics (e.g., chemical, electric, mechanical property, nano-topography, and nanostructured molecular components), could serve as active scaffold to generate a bio-hybrid tissue/organ. Thus, effort has been made on the generation of in vitro tissue engineering modeling. Here, we present an in vitro model where human adipose stem cells isolated from lipoaspirate adipose tissue and breast adipose tissue, cultured on polymeric INTEGRA® Meshed Bilayer Wound Matrix (selected based on conventional clinical applications) are evaluated for their potential application for reconstructive surgery toward bone and adipose tissue. We demonstrated that human adipose stem cells isolated from lipoaspirate and breast tissue have similar stemness properties and are suitable for tissue engineering applications. Finally, the overall results highlighted lipoaspirate adipose tissue as a good source for the generation of adult adipose stem cells.

  7. A Digital Gene Expression-Based Bovine Gene Atlas Evaluating 92 Adult, Juvenile and Fetal Cattle Tissues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A comprehensive transcriptome survey, or “Gene Atlas,” provides information essential for a complete understanding of the genomic biology of an organism. Using a digital gene expression approach, we developed a Gene Atlas of RNA abundance in 92 adult, juvenile and fetal cattle tissues. The samples...

  8. Facial soft tissue thickness among various vertical facial patterns in adult Pakistani subjects.

    PubMed

    Jeelani, Waqar; Fida, Mubassar; Shaikh, Attiya

    2015-12-01

    Facial reconstruction techniques are used to obtain an approximation of an individual's appearance thus helping identification of unidentified decedents from their dried skeletal remains. Many of these techniques rely on the sets of average facial soft tissue thickness (FST) values at different anatomical landmarks provided by the previous studies. FST is influenced by the age, sex, ethnicity and the body mass index of the individual. Recent literature has shown that the anthropological variations of the skull may also affect FST at certain points. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of such variations in vertical skull morphology on FST as around one third of different population groups have either a long or short facial pattern as compared to the average facial pattern. Moreover, this study also provides a FST database for the adult Pakistani subjects that may have potential implications in the facial reconstruction of the local subjects. A retrospective analysis of 276 lateral cephalograms of adult subjects having normal sagittal facial pattern was performed. Subjects were categorized into three vertical facial patterns (long face=95, average face=102, short face=79) according to the vertical dimensions of the skull and the FST was measured at 11 midline points. To compare the FST between males and females Mann-Whitney U test was used. Kruskal-Wallis test was applied to compare FST among three vertical facial patterns. The results of our study revealed significant differences in FST at nine landmarks between males and females. These sex-based differences were more pronounced in the long and short facial patterns as compared to the average facial pattern. FST at stomion, pogonion, gnathion and menton was significantly greater in the short facial pattern as compared to the long facial pattern in both the sexes. The results of the present study highlight the importance of anthropological analysis of the skull and taking the vertical skeletal dimension

  9. Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Pediatric and Young Adult Nonrhabdomyosarcoma Soft-Tissue Sarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Kristy B.; Indelicato, Daniel J.; Knapik, Jacquelyn A.; Lagmay, Joanne P.; Morris, Christopher; Kirwan, Jessica M.; Zlotecki, Robert A.; Scarborough, Mark T.; Gibbs, C. Parker; Marcus, Robert B.

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the prognostic factors, outcomes, and complications in patients aged {<=}30 years with resectable nonrhabdomyosarcoma soft-tissue sarcoma treated at the University of Florida with radiotherapy (RT) during a 34-year period. Methods and Materials: A total of 95 pediatric or young adult patients with nonrhabdomyosarcoma soft-tissue sarcoma were treated with curative intent with surgery and RT at the University of Florida between 1973 and 2007. The most common histologic tumor subtypes were synovial sarcoma in 22 patients, malignant fibrous histiocytoma in 19, and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor in 11 patients. The mean age at RT was 22 years (range, 6-30). Of the 95 patients, 73 had high-grade tumors; 45 had undergone preoperative RT and 50 postoperative RT. The prognostic factors for survival, local recurrence, and distant recurrence were analyzed. Results: The median follow-up was 7.2 years (range, 0.4-30.5). The actuarial 5-year local control rate was 88%. A microscopically negative margin was associated with superior local control. Although 83% of local recurrence cases initially developed in the absence of metastases, all patients with local failure ultimately died of their disease. The actuarial estimate of 5-year overall survival and disease-free survival was 65% and 63%, respectively. Of all the deaths, 92% were disease related. An early American Joint Committee on Cancer stage, tumor <8 cm, and the absence of neurovascular invasion were associated with superior disease-free survival. The National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria, version 3, Grade 3-4 treatment complication rate was 9%. No secondary malignancies were observed. Conclusion: In the present large single-institution study, we found positive margins and locally advanced features to be poor prognostic factors for both local progression and survival. The results from the present study have helped to characterize the therapeutic ratio of RT in pediatric and young

  10. CD95/CD95L-mediated apoptosis of the hepatic stellate cell. A mechanism terminating uncontrolled hepatic stellate cell proliferation during hepatic tissue repair.

    PubMed Central

    Saile, B.; Knittel, T.; Matthes, N.; Schott, P.; Ramadori, G.

    1997-01-01

    During liver tissue repair, hepatic stellate cells (HSC), a pericyte-like mesenchymal liver cell population, transform from a "quiescent" status ("resting" HSC) into myofibroblast-like cells ("activated" HSC) with the latter representing the principle matrix synthesizing cell of the liver. Presently, the mechanisms that terminate HSC cell proliferation when tissue repair is concluded are poorly understood. Controlled cell death known as apoptosis could be a mechanism underlying this phenomenon. Therefore, apoptosis and its regulation were studied in HSC using an in vitro and in vivo approach. Spontaneous apoptosis became detectable in parallel with HSC activation because resting cells (2 days after isolation) displayed no sign of apoptosis, whereas apoptosis was present in 8% (+/- 5%) of "transitional" cells (day 4) and in 18% (+/- 8%) of fully activated cells (day 7). Both CD95 (APO-1/Fas) and CD95L (APO-1-/Fas-ligand) became increasingly expressed during the course of activation. Apoptosis could be fully blocked by CD95-blocking antibodies in normal cells and HSC already entering the apoptotic cycle. Using CD95-activating antibodies, transition of more than 95% cells into apoptosis was evident at each activation step. The apoptosis-regulating proteins Bcl-2 and p53 could not be detected in resting cells but were found in increasing amounts at days 4 and 7 of cultivation. Whereas p53 expression was induced by the CD95-activating antibody, no change was inducible in Bcl-2 expression. The Bcl-2-related protein bax could be found at days 2 and 4 in similar expression, was considerably up-regulated at day 7, but was not regulated by CD95-agonistic antibodies. In vivo, acute tissue damage was first accompanied by activation and proliferation of HSC displaying no sign of apoptosis. In the recovery phase, apoptotic HSC were detectable in parallel to a reduction in the total number of HSC present in the liver tissue. The data demonstrate that apoptosis becomes detectable

  11. New aspects in fenestrated capillary and tissue dynamics in the sensory circumventricular organs of adult brains.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) generally consists of endothelial tight junction barriers that prevent the free entry of blood-derived substances, thereby maintaining the extracellular environment of the brain. However, the circumventricular organs (CVOs), which are located along the midlines of the brain ventricles, lack these endothelial barriers and have fenestrated capillaries; therefore, they have a number of essential functions, including the transduction of information between the blood circulation and brain. Previous studies have demonstrated the extensive contribution of the CVOs to body fluid and thermal homeostasis, energy balance, the chemoreception of blood-derived substances, and neuroinflammation. In this review, recent advances have been discussed in fenestrated capillary characterization and dynamic tissue reconstruction accompanied by angiogenesis and neurogliogenesis in the sensory CVOs of adult brains. The sensory CVOs, including the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis (OVLT), subfornical organ (SFO), and area postrema (AP), have size-selective and heterogeneous vascular permeabilities. Astrocyte-/tanycyte-like neural stem cells (NSCs) sense blood- and cerebrospinal fluid-derived information through the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1, a mechanical/osmotic receptor, Toll-like receptor 4, a lipopolysaccharide receptor, and Nax, a Na-sensing Na channel. They also express tight junction proteins and densely and tightly surround mature neurons to protect them from blood-derived neurotoxic substances, indicating that the NSCs of the CVOs perform BBB functions while maintaining the capacity to differentiate into new neurons and glial cells. In addition to neurogliogenesis, the density of fenestrated capillaries is regulated by angiogenesis, which is accompanied by the active proliferation and sprouting of endothelial cells. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling may be involved in angiogenesis and neurogliogenesis, both of

  12. Directing and Potentiating Stem Cell-Mediated Angiogenesis and Tissue Repair by Cell Surface E-Selectin Coating.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhao-Jun; Daftarian, Pirouz; Kovalski, Letícia; Wang, Bo; Tian, Runxia; Castilla, Diego M; Dikici, Emre; Perez, Victor L; Deo, Sapna; Daunert, Sylvia; Velazquez, Omaida C

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell therapy has emerged as a promising approach for treatment of a number of diseases, including delayed and non-healing wounds. However, targeted systemic delivery of therapeutic cells to the dysfunctional tissues remains one formidable challenge. Herein, we present a targeted nanocarrier-mediated cell delivery method by coating the surface of the cell to be delivered with dendrimer nanocarriers modified with adhesion molecules. Infused nanocarrier-coated cells reach to destination via recognition and association with the counterpart adhesion molecules highly or selectively expressed on the activated endothelium in diseased tissues. Once anchored on the activated endothelium, nanocarriers-coated transporting cells undergo transendothelial migration, extravasation and homing to the targeted tissues to execute their therapeutic role. We now demonstrate feasibility, efficacy and safety of our targeted nanocarrier for delivery of bone marrow cells (BMC) to cutaneous wound tissues and grafted corneas and its advantages over conventional BMC transplantation in mouse models for wound healing and neovascularization. This versatile platform is suited for targeted systemic delivery of virtually any type of therapeutic cell.

  13. Directing and Potentiating Stem Cell-Mediated Angiogenesis and Tissue Repair by Cell Surface E-Selectin Coating

    PubMed Central

    Kovalski, Letícia; Wang, Bo; Tian, Runxia; Castilla, Diego M.; Dikici, Emre; Perez, Victor L.; Deo, Sapna; Daunert, Sylvia; Velazquez, Omaida C.

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell therapy has emerged as a promising approach for treatment of a number of diseases, including delayed and non-healing wounds. However, targeted systemic delivery of therapeutic cells to the dysfunctional tissues remains one formidable challenge. Herein, we present a targeted nanocarrier-mediated cell delivery method by coating the surface of the cell to be delivered with dendrimer nanocarriers modified with adhesion molecules. Infused nanocarrier-coated cells reach to destination via recognition and association with the counterpart adhesion molecules highly or selectively expressed on the activated endothelium in diseased tissues. Once anchored on the activated endothelium, nanocarriers-coated transporting cells undergo transendothelial migration, extravasation and homing to the targeted tissues to execute their therapeutic role. We now demonstrate feasibility, efficacy and safety of our targeted nanocarrier for delivery of bone marrow cells (BMC) to cutaneous wound tissues and grafted corneas and its advantages over conventional BMC transplantation in mouse models for wound healing and neovascularization. This versatile platform is suited for targeted systemic delivery of virtually any type of therapeutic cell. PMID:27104647

  14. Thromboxane A{sub 2} receptor signaling promotes liver tissue repair after toxic injury through the enhancement of macrophage recruitment

    SciTech Connect

    Minamino, Tsutomu; Ito, Yoshiya; Ohkubo, Hirotoki; Hosono, Kanako; Suzuki, Tatsunori; Sato, Takehito; Ae, Takako; Shibuya, Akitaka; Sakagami, Hiroyuki; Narumiya, Shuh; Koizumi, Wasaburo; Majima, Masataka

    2012-02-15

    It is thought that thromboxane A{sub 2} (TxA{sub 2}) contributes to the progression of inflammation during acute hepatic injury; however, it is still unknown whether TxA{sub 2} is involved in liver repair. The objective of the present study was to examine the role of TxA{sub 2} receptor (TP) signaling in liver injury and repair in response to toxic injury. Carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}) was used to induce liver injury in TP knockout (TP{sup −/−}) mice and wild-type (WT) mice. In WT mice, serum levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and the size of the necrotic area peaked at 24 and 48 h, respectively, and then declined. In TP{sup −/−} mice, the changes in ALT levels were similar to WT mice, but liver regeneration was impaired as evidenced by remained elevated levels of hepatic necrosis and by delayed hepatocyte proliferation, which was associated with the reduced expression of growth factors including interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). In TP{sup −/−} mice, the accumulation of hepatic CD11b{sup +}/F4/80{sup +} macrophages in injured livers was attenuated, and the hepatic expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2) and its receptor, the C―C chemokine receptor (CCR2), was reduced compared to WT. Additionally, the application of the TP receptor agonist, U-46619, enhanced the expression of MCP-1/CCL2 and CCR2 in peritoneal macrophages, which was associated with increased levels of IL-6, TNFα and HGF. These results suggested that TP receptor signaling facilitates liver recovery following CCl{sub 4}-induced hepatotoxicity by affecting the expression of hepatotrophic growth factors, and through the recruitment of macrophages mediated by MCP-1/CCL2-CCR2 expression. -- Highlights: ► TP enhances liver regeneration by CCl{sub 4}. ► TP accumulates macrophages. ► TP up-regulates MCP-1.

  15. A case of adult Langerhans cell histiocytosis showing successfully regenerated osseous tissue of the skull after chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takahiro; Izutsu, Koji; Kako, Shinichi; Ohta, Satoshi; Hangaishi, Akira; Kanda, Yoshinobu; Motokura, Toru; Chiba, Shigeru; Kurokawa, Mineo

    2008-04-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a proliferative disorder of Langerhans cells and extremely rare in adults. Adult LCH is often associated with osteolytic bone lesions, but large bone-defective lesions have been rarely reported. We report an adult case of LCH accompanied by large osteolytic lesions in the skull that successfully responded to chemotherapy. A 47-year-old woman with LCH who had multiple, large osteolytic areas of more than 3 cm in diameter in the skull was admitted to our hospital. She was treated with systemic chemotherapy consisting of prednisolone, vinblastine, and 6-mercaptopurine. Twelve months later, when she completed the treatment, osteolytic areas were covered with hard osseous tissue, and X-ray examination confirmed regeneration of the bone. This case indicates that chemotherapy can be effective even for the treatment of large osteolytic lesions in adult LCH patients.

  16. A mystery unraveled: nontumorigenic pluripotent stem cells in human adult tissues

    PubMed Central

    Simerman, Ariel A; Perone, Marcelo J; Gimeno, María L; Dumesic, Daniel A; Chazenbalk, Gregorio D

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells have emerged as the gold standard of pluripotent stem cells and the class of stem cell with the highest potential for contribution to regenerative and therapeutic application; however, their translational use is often impeded by teratoma formation, commonly associated with pluripotency. We discuss a population of nontumorigenic pluripotent stem cells, termed Multilineage Differentiating Stress Enduring (Muse) cells, which offer an innovative and exciting avenue of exploration for the potential treatment of various human diseases. Areas covered: This review discusses the origin of Muse cells, describes in detail their various unique characteristics, and considers future avenues of their application and investigation with respect to what is currently known of adult pluripotent stem cells in scientific literature. We begin by defining cell potency, then discuss both mesenchymal and various reported populations of pluripotent stem cells, and finally delve into Muse cells and the characteristics that set them apart from their contemporaries. Expert opinion: Muse cells derived from adipose tissue (Muse-AT) are efficiently, routinely and painlessly isolated from human lipoaspirate material, exhibit tripoblastic differentiation both spontaneously and under media-specific induction, and do not form teratomas. We describe qualities specific to Muse-AT cells and their potential impact on the field of regenerative medicine and cell therapy. PMID:24745973

  17. Cloning and study of adult-tissue-specific expression of Sox9 in Cyprinus carpio.

    PubMed

    Du, Qi-Yan; Wang, Feng-Yu; Hua, Hui-Ying; Chang, Zhong-Jie

    2007-08-01

    The Sox9 gene is one of the important transcription factors in the development of many tissues and organs, particularly in sex determination and chondrogenesis. We amplified the genomic DNA of Cyprinus carpio using degenerate primers, and found that there were two versions of Sox9 in this species: Sox9a and Sox9b, that differ in having an intron of different length (704 bp and 616 bp, respectively) in the conserved HMG box region that codes for identical amino acid sequences. We used a two-phase rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) for the isolation of full-length cDNA of Sox9b. Sequence analyses revealed a 2447-bp cDNA containing 233-bp 5' untranslated region, a 927-bp 3' untranslated region, including poly(A), and a 1287 bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding a protein of 428 amino acids. The HMG box of 79 amino acid motif was confirmed from positions 96-174. Sequence alignment showed that the identity of amino acids of Sox9 among ten animal species, including C. carpio, is 75%, indicating that the Sox9 gene is evolutionarily quite conserved. The expression level of Sox9b gene varied among several organs of adult C. carpio, with the level of expression being highest in the brain and testis.

  18. Porous polymer scaffold for on-site delivery of stem cells--Protects from oxidative stress and potentiates wound tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Geesala, Ramasatyaveni; Bar, Nimai; Dhoke, Neha R; Basak, Pratyay; Das, Amitava

    2016-01-01

    Wound healing by cell transplantation techniques often suffer setbacks due to oxidative stress encountered at injury sites. A porous polyethyleneglycol-polyurethane (PEG-PU) scaffold that facilitates cell delivery and boosts tissue repair was developed through semi-interpenetrating polymer network approach. The key physico-chemical properties assessed confirms these polymeric matrices are highly thermostable, barostable, degrade at an acidic pH (5.8), biodegradable, cytocompatible and possess excellent porosity. Mechanism of cellular penetration into porous polymer networks was evident by a ≥6 - fold increase in gene expression of MMP-13 and MMP-2 via activation of Akt and Erk. H2O2-induced apoptosis of mouse bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) was abrogated in presence of polymer networks indicating a protective effect from oxidative stress. Transplantation of BMSC + PEG-PU at murine excisional splint wound site depicted significant increase in fibroblast proliferation, collagen deposition, anti-oxidant enzyme activities of catalase, SOD and GPx. Furthermore it significantly decreased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-8, etc) with a concomitant increase in anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10, IL-13) at an early healing period of day 7. Finally, immunostaining revealed an enhanced engraftment and vascularity indicating an accelerated wound tissue closure. This pre-clinical study demonstrates the proof-of-concept and further necessitates their clinical evaluation as potential cell delivery vehicle scaffolds.

  19. A Regulatory miRNA–mRNA Network Is Associated with Tissue Repair Induced by Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Danilo Candido; Bassi, Ênio Jose; Azevedo, Hatylas; Anderson, Letícia; Origassa, Clarice Silvia Taemi; Cenedeze, Marcos Antônio; de Andrade-Oliveira, Vinicius; Felizardo, Raphael José Ferreira; da Silva, Reinaldo Correia; Hiyane, Meire Ioshie; Semedo, Patricia; dos Reis, Marlene Antônia; Moreira-Filho, Carlos Alberto; Verjovski-Almeida, Sergio; Pacheco-Silva, Álvaro; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) orchestrate tissue repair by releasing cell-derived microvesicles (MVs), which, presumably by small RNA species, modulate global gene expression. The knowledge of miRNA/mRNA signatures linked to a reparative status may elucidate some of the molecular events associated with MSC protection. Here, we used a model of cisplatin-induced kidney injury (acute kidney injury) to assess how MSCs or MVs could restore tissue function. MSCs and MVs presented similar protective effects, which were evidenced in vivo and in vitro by modulating apoptosis, inflammation, oxidative stress, and a set of prosurvival molecules. In addition, we observed that miRNAs (i.e., miR-880, miR-141, miR-377, and miR-21) were modulated, thereby showing active participation on regenerative process. Subsequently, we identified that MSC regulates a particular miRNA subset which mRNA targets are associated with Wnt/TGF-β, fibrosis, and epithelial–mesenchymal transition signaling pathways. Our results suggest that MSCs release MVs that transcriptionally reprogram injured cells, thereby modulating a specific miRNA–mRNA network. PMID:28096802

  20. Application potential of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (BMSCs) based tissue-engineering for spinal cord defect repair in rat fetuses with spina bifida aperta.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoshuai; Yuan, Zhengwei; Wei, Xiaowei; Li, Hui; Zhao, Guifeng; Miao, Jiaoning; Wu, Di; Liu, Bo; Cao, Songying; An, Dong; Ma, Wei; Zhang, Henan; Wang, Weilin; Wang, Qiushi; Gu, Hui

    2016-04-01

    Spina bifida aperta are complex congenital malformations resulting from failure of fusion in the spinal neural tube during embryogenesis. Despite surgical repair of the defect, most patients who survive with spina bifida aperta have a multiple system handicap due to neuron deficiency of the defective spinal cord. Tissue engineering has emerged as a novel treatment for replacement of lost tissue. This study evaluated the prenatal surgical approach of transplanting a chitosan-gelatin scaffold seeded with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) in the healing the defective spinal cord of rat fetuses with retinoic acid induced spina bifida aperta. Scaffold characterisation revealed the porous structure, organic and amorphous content. This biomaterial promoted the adhesion, spreading and in vitro viability of the BMSCs. After transplantation of the scaffold combined with BMSCs, the defective region of spinal cord in rat fetuses with spina bifida aperta at E20 decreased obviously under stereomicroscopy, and the skin defect almost closed in many fetuses. The transplanted BMSCs in chitosan-gelatin scaffold survived, grew and expressed markers of neural stem cells and neurons in the defective spinal cord. In addition, the biomaterial presented high biocompatibility and slow biodegradation in vivo. In conclusion, prenatal transplantation of the scaffold combined with BMSCs could treat spinal cord defect in fetuses with spina bifida aperta by the regeneration of neurons and repairmen of defective region.

  1. Linear rank tests for interval-censored data with application to PCB levels in adipose tissue of transformer repair workers

    SciTech Connect

    Self, S.G.; Grossman, E.A.

    1986-09-01

    Linear rank statistics are described for testing for differences between groups when the data are interval-censored. The statistics are closely related to those described by Prentice for right-censored data. Problems in calculating the statistics are discussed and several approaches to computation including estimation of the efficient rank scores are described. Results from a small simulation study are presented. The methods are applied to data from a study relating tissue levels of PCBs to occupational exposure.

  2. Periodontal repair in dogs: histologic observations of guided tissue regeneration with a prostaglandin E1 analog/methacrylate composite.

    PubMed

    Trombelli, L; Lee, M B; Promsudthi, A; Guglielmoni, P G; Wikesjö, U M

    1999-06-01

    This report describes observations of healing following guided tissue regeneration (GTR) including surgical implantation of the prostaglandin E1 analog misoprostol with calcium-layered methacrylate particles. Critical size, supra-alveolar periodontal defects were surgically created around the 3rd and 4th mandibular premolar teeth in 4 beagle dogs. Wound management included soaking with a 24 microg/ml misoprostol solution and implantation of the misoprostol/methacrylate composite. One jaw quadrant per animal was prepared for GTR using expanded polytetrafluoroethylene membranes. The gingival flaps were coronally advanced and sutured to submerge the teeth. The tissues covering the surgical sites daily received topical misoprostol in an oral adhesive over the 4-week healing interval. Upon euthanasia, tissue blocks were prepared for histometric analysis of regeneration of alveolar bone and cementum, root resorption and ankylosis. The defect area underneath the membrane and the density of methacrylate particles were recorded for the GTR defects. The methacrylate particles appeared encapsulated in a dense connective tissue without signs of an inflammatory reaction, some in contact to newly formed bone. Alveolar bone regeneration height averaged (+/-SD) 1.2+/-1.0 and 1.0+/-0.6 mm for GTR and non-GTR defects, respectively. Corresponding values for bone regeneration area were 1.3+/-1.0 and 0.7+/-0.5 mm2. Cementum regeneration was confined to the apical aspect of the defects. Small areas of root resorption and ankylosis were observed for all teeth. Bone regeneration area correlated positively to the defect area and negatively to the density of methacrylate particles in the GTR defects. The histologic observations suggest that the methacrylate composite has marginal potential to promote bone and cementum regeneration under provisions for GTR.

  3. Proteomic Analysis Profile of Engineered Articular Cartilage with Chondrogenic Differentiated Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells Loaded Polyglycolic Acid Mesh for Weight-Bearing Area Defect Repair

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Lunli; Zhou, Xiao; Wu, Yaohao; Zhang, Yun; Wang, Chen; Zhou, Heng; Guo, Fangfang

    2014-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the possibility of full-thickness defects repair in porcine articular cartilage (AC) weight-bearing area using chondrogenic differentiated autologous adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) with a follow-up of 3 and 6 months, which is successive to our previous study on nonweight-bearing area. The isolated ASCs were seeded onto the phosphoglycerate/polylactic acid (PGA/PLA) with chondrogenic induction in vitro for 2 weeks as the experimental group prior to implantation in porcine AC defects (8 mm in diameter, deep to subchondral bone), with PGA/PLA only as control. With follow-up time being 3 and 6 months, both neo-cartilages of postimplantation integrated well with the neighboring normal cartilage and subchondral bone histologically in experimental group, whereas only fibrous tissue in control group. Immunohistochemical and toluidine blue staining confirmed similar distribution of COL II and glycosaminoglycan in the regenerated cartilage to the native one. A vivid remolding process with repair time was also witnessed in the neo-cartilage as the compressive modulus significantly increased from 70% of the normal cartilage at 3 months to nearly 90% at 6 months, which is similar to our former research. Nevertheless, differences of the regenerated cartilages still could be detected from the native one. Meanwhile, the exact mechanism involved in chondrogenic differentiation from ASCs seeded on PGA/PLA is still unknown. Therefore, proteome is resorted leading to 43 proteins differentially identified from 20 chosen two-dimensional spots, which do help us further our research on some committed factors. In conclusion, the comparison via proteome provided a thorough understanding of mechanisms implicating ASC differentiation toward chondrocytes, which is further substantiated by the present study as a perfect supplement to the former one in nonweight-bearing area. PMID:24044689

  4. Evaluation of the Antimicrobial Efficacy of a Novel Rifampin/Minocycline-Coated, Noncrosslinked Porcine Acellular Dermal Matrix Compared With Uncoated Scaffolds for Soft Tissue Repair.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Arnab; Scott, Jeffrey R; Novitsky, Yuri W

    2016-10-01

    Background Despite meticulous aseptic technique and systemic antibiotics, bacterial colonization of mesh remains a critical issue in hernia repair. A novel minocycline/rifampin tyrosine-coated, noncrosslinked porcine acellular dermal matrix (XenMatrix AB) was developed to protect the device from microbial colonization for up to 7 days. The objective of this study was to evaluate the in vitro and in vivo antimicrobial efficacy of this device against clinically isolated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Escherichia coli. Methods XenMatrix AB was compared with 5 existing uncoated soft tissue repair devices using in vitro methods of zone of inhibition (ZOI) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) at 24 hours following inoculation with MRSA or E coli These devices were also evaluated at 7 days following dorsal implantation and inoculation with MRSA or E coli (60 male New Zealand white rabbits, n = 10 per group) for viable colony-forming units (CFU), abscess formation and histopathologic response, respectively. Results In vitro studies demonstrated a median ZOI of 36 mm for MRSA and 16 mm for E coli for XenMatrix AB, while all uncoated devices showed no inhibition of bacterial growth (0 mm). SEM also demonstrated no visual evidence of MRSA or E coli colonization on the surface of XenMatrix AB compared with colonization of all other uncoated devices. In vivo XenMatrix AB demonstrated complete inhibition of bacterial colonization, no abscess formation, and a reduced inflammatory response compared with uncoated devices. Conclusion We demonstrated that XenMatrix AB possesses potent in vitro and in vivo antimicrobial efficacy against clinically isolated MRSA and E coli compared with uncoated devices.

  5. Preparation and application of an innovative thrombocyte/leukocyte-enriched plasma to promote tissue repair in chelonians.

    PubMed

    Di Ianni, Francesco; Merli, Elisa; Burtini, Francesca; Conti, Virna; Pelizzone, Igor; Di Lecce, Rosanna; Parmigiani, Enrico; Squassino, Gian Paolo; Del Bue, Maurizio; Lucarelli, Enrico; Ramoni, Roberto; Grolli, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Platelet concentrates are widely used in mammalian regenerative medicine to improve tissue healing. Chelonians (Testudines) would benefit from the application of thrombocyte preparations to regenerate damaged tissues, since traumatic injuries are leading causes of morbidity and mortality for both wild-living and domesticated animals. The aim of this study was to establish a protocol that optimized the recovery of the thrombocytes from blood samples and to show the efficacy of thrombocyte-enriched plasma in chelonians. Peripheral blood samples were obtained from Testudo spp. (n = 12) and Trachemys scripta elegans (n = 10). Blood cells were fractionated by sodium diatrizoate-sodium polysucrose density gradient using a two-step centrifugation protocol. Thrombocytes and leukocytes were isolated and resuspended to obtain thrombocyte-leucocyte rich plasma (TLRP). The mean recovery of leukocytes and thrombocytes was 48.9% (±4.0 SEM, n = 22) of the whole blood cell content. No statistically significant difference was observed between blood samples collected from different turtle species. The ability of TLRP to form a gel was evaluated by adding variable concentrations of calcium gluconate at room temperature and at 37°C. A reliable and consistent clotting of the TLRP was obtained in glass tubes and dishes by adding 5-20% v/v of a 100 mg/ml solution of calcium gluconate. Furthermore, in order to test the clinical efficacy of TLRP, a preliminary evaluation was performed on four turtles (Testudo spp.) with traumatic injuries. In all the four animals, a successful clinical outcome was observed. The results demonstrated that a thrombocyte-enriched plasma, comparable to mammalian platelet rich plasma, can be prepared from chelonian blood samples. Furthermore, although the low number of cases presented does not allow definitive conclusions from a clinical point of view, their outcome suggests that TLRP application could be further investigated to improve the healing process of

  6. Preparation and Application of an Innovative Thrombocyte/Leukocyte-Enriched Plasma to Promote Tissue Repair in Chelonians

    PubMed Central

    Di Ianni, Francesco; Merli, Elisa; Burtini, Francesca; Conti, Virna; Pelizzone, Igor; Di Lecce, Rosanna; Parmigiani, Enrico; Squassino, Gian Paolo; Del Bue, Maurizio; Lucarelli, Enrico; Ramoni, Roberto; Grolli, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Platelet concentrates are widely used in mammalian regenerative medicine to improve tissue healing. Chelonians (Testudines) would benefit from the application of thrombocyte preparations to regenerate damaged tissues, since traumatic injuries are leading causes of morbidity and mortality for both wild-living and domesticated animals. The aim of this study was to establish a protocol that optimized the recovery of the thrombocytes from blood samples and to show the efficacy of thrombocyte-enriched plasma in chelonians. Peripheral blood samples were obtained from Testudo spp. (n = 12) and Trachemys scripta elegans (n = 10). Blood cells were fractionated by sodium diatrizoate-sodium polysucrose density gradient using a two-step centrifugation protocol. Thrombocytes and leukocytes were isolated and resuspended to obtain thrombocyte-leucocyte rich plasma (TLRP). The mean recovery of leukocytes and thrombocytes was 48.9% (±4.0 SEM, n = 22) of the whole blood cell content. No statistically significant difference was observed between blood samples collected from different turtle species. The ability of TLRP to form a gel was evaluated by adding variable concentrations of calcium gluconate at room temperature and at 37°C. A reliable and consistent clotting of the TLRP was obtained in glass tubes and dishes by adding 5-20% v/v of a 100 mg/ml solution of calcium gluconate. Furthermore, in order to test the clinical efficacy of TLRP, a preliminary evaluation was performed on four turtles (Testudo spp.) with traumatic injuries. In all the four animals, a successful clinical outcome was observed. The results demonstrated that a thrombocyte-enriched plasma, comparable to mammalian platelet rich plasma, can be prepared from chelonian blood samples. Furthermore, although the low number of cases presented does not allow definitive conclusions from a clinical point of view, their outcome suggests that TLRP application could be further investigated to improve the healing process of

  7. TRAF-4 expression in epithelial progenitor cells. Analysis in normal adult, fetal, and tumor tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Krajewska, M.; Krajewski, S.; Zapata, J. M.; Van Arsdale, T.; Gascoyne, R. D.; Berern, K.; McFadden, D.; Shabaik, A.; Hugh, J.; Reynolds, A.; Clevenger, C. V.; Reed, J. C.

    1998-01-01

    TRAF-4 was discovered because of its expression in breast cancers and is a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-associated factor (TRAF) family of putative signal-transducing proteins. In vitro binding assays demonstrated that TRAF-4 interacts with the cytosolic domain of the lymphotoxin-beta receptor (LT beta R) and weakly with the p75 nerve growth factor receptor (NGFR) but not with TNFR1, TNFR2, Fas, or CD40. Immunofluorescence analysis of TRAF-4 in transfected cells demonstrated localization to cytosol but not nucleus. Immunohistochemical assays of normal human adult tissues revealed prominent cytosolic immunostaining in thymic epithelial cells and lymph node dendritic cells but not in lymphocytes or thymocytes, paralleling the reported patterns of LT beta R expression. The basal cell layer of most epithelia in the body was very strongly TRAF-4 immunopositive, including epidermis, nasopharynx, respiratory tract, salivary gland, and esophagus. Similar findings were obtained in 12- to 18-week human fetal tissue, indicating a highly restricted pattern of expression even during development in the mammary gland, epithelial cells of the terminal ducts were strongly TRAF-4 immunopositive whereas myoepithelial cells and most of the mammary epithelial cells lining the extralobular ducts were TRAF-4 immunonegative. Of 84 primary breast cancers evaluated, only 7 expressed TRAF-4. Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) lesions were uniformly TRAF-4 immunonegative (n = 21). In the prostate, the basal cells were strongly immunostained for TRAF-4, whereas the secretory epithelial cells were TRAF-4 negative. Basal cells in prostate hypertrophy (n = 6) and prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN; n = 6) were strongly TRAF-4 positive, but none of the 32 primary and 16 metastatic prostate cancer specimens examined contained TRAF-4-positive malignant cells. Although also expressed in some types of mesenchymal cells, these findings suggest that TRAF-4 is a marker of normal

  8. The primary cilium coordinates signaling pathways in cell cycle control and migration during development and tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Søren T; Pedersen, Stine F; Satir, Peter; Veland, Iben R; Schneider, Linda

    2008-01-01

    Cell cycle control and migration are critical processes during development and maintenance of tissue functions. Recently, primary cilia were shown to take part in coordination of the signaling pathways that control these cellular processes in human health and disease. In this review, we present an overview of the function of primary cilia and the centrosome in the signaling pathways that regulate cell cycle control and migration with focus on ciliary signaling via platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRalpha). We also consider how the primary cilium and the centrosome interact with the extracellular matrix, coordinate Wnt signaling, and modulate cytoskeletal changes that impinge on both cell cycle control and cell migration.

  9. Lung Adenocarcinoma Originates from Retrovirus Infection of Proliferating Type 2 Pneumocytes during Pulmonary Post-Natal Development or Tissue Repair

    PubMed Central

    Murgia, Claudio; Caporale, Marco; Ceesay, Ousman; Di Francesco, Gabriella; Ferri, Nicola; Varasano, Vincenzo; de las Heras, Marcelo; Palmarini, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV) is a unique oncogenic virus with distinctive biological properties. JSRV is the only virus causing a naturally occurring lung cancer (ovine pulmonary adenocarcinoma, OPA) and possessing a major structural protein that functions as a dominant oncoprotein. Lung cancer is the major cause of death among cancer patients. OPA can be an extremely useful animal model in order to identify the cells originating lung adenocarcinoma and to study the early events of pulmonary carcinogenesis. In this study, we demonstrated that lung adenocarcinoma in sheep originates from infection and transformation of proliferating type 2 pneumocytes (termed here lung alveolar proliferating cells, LAPCs). We excluded that OPA originates from a bronchioalveolar stem cell, or from mature post-mitotic type 2 pneumocytes or from either proliferating or non-proliferating Clara cells. We show that young animals possess abundant LAPCs and are highly susceptible to JSRV infection and transformation. On the contrary, healthy adult sheep, which are normally resistant to experimental OPA induction, exhibit a relatively low number of LAPCs and are resistant to JSRV infection of the respiratory epithelium. Importantly, induction of lung injury increased dramatically the number of LAPCs in adult sheep and rendered these animals fully susceptible to JSRV infection and transformation. Furthermore, we show that JSRV preferentially infects actively dividing cell in vitro. Overall, our study provides unique insights into pulmonary biology and carcinogenesis and suggests that JSRV and its host have reached an evolutionary equilibrium in which productive infection (and transformation) can occur only in cells that are scarce for most of the lifespan of the sheep. Our data also indicate that, at least in this model, inflammation can predispose to retroviral infection and cancer. PMID:21483485

  10. Pore structure and dielectric behaviour of the 3D collagen-DAC scaffolds designed for nerve tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Pietrucha, Krystyna; Marzec, Ewa; Kudzin, Marcin

    2016-11-01

    The design and selection of a suitable scaffold with well-defined pores size distribution and dielectric properties are critical features for neural tissue engineering. In this study we use mercury porosimetry and the dielectric spectroscopy in the alpha-dispersion region of the electric field to determine the microarchitecture and activation energy of collagen (Col) modified by 2,3 dialdehyde cellulose (DAC). The scaffold was synthesized in three steps: (i) preparation of DAC by oxidation of cellulose, (ii) construction of a 3D Col sponge-shape or film, (iii) cross-linkage of the Col samples using DAC. The activation energy needed to break the bonds formed by water in the Col-DAC composite is approximately 2 times lower than that in the unmodified Col. In addition, the magnitude of conductivity for modified Col at 70°C is approximately 40% lower than that recorded for the unmodified Col. The largest fraction, of which at least 70% of the total pore volume comprises the sponge, is occupied by pores ranging from 20 to 100μm in size. The knowledge on the dielectric behaviour and microstructure of the Col-DAC scaffold may prove relevant to neural tissue engineering focused on the regeneration of the nervous system.

  11. In situ electroactive and antioxidant supramolecular hydrogel based on cyclodextrin/copolymer inclusion for tissue engineering repair.

    PubMed

    Cui, Haitao; Cui, Liguo; Zhang, Peibiao; Huang, Yubin; Wei, Yen; Chen, Xuesi

    2014-03-01

    The injectable electroactive and antioxidant hydrogels are prepared from mixing the tetraaniline functional copolymers and α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) aqueous solution. UV-vis and CV of the copolymer solution showed good electroactive properties. The antioxidant ability of the copolymer is also proved. The gelation mechanism and properties of the system are studied by WAXD, DSC, and rheometer. The encapsulated cells are highly viable in the hydrogels, suggesting that the hydrogels have excellent cytocompatibility. After subcutaneous injection, H&E staining study suggests acceptable biocompatibility of the materials in vivo. Moreover, data shows the injectable electroactive material can effectively accelerate the proliferation of encapsulated cells with electrical stimuli, and the mechanism is also elaborated. Such an injectable electroactive hydrogel would more closely mimic the native extracellular matrix, thereby combining a biomimetic environment of long-term cell survival and electrical signal to support the generation of functional tissue.

  12. The cardiac stem cell compartment is indispensable for myocardial cell homeostasis, repair and regeneration in the adult.

    PubMed

    Nadal-Ginard, Bernardo; Ellison, Georgina M; Torella, Daniele

    2014-11-01

    Resident cardiac stem cells in embryonic, neonatal and adult mammalian heart have been identified by different membrane markers and transcription factors. However, despite a flurry of publications no consensus has been reached on the identity and actual regenerative effects of the adult cardiac stem cells. Intensive research on the adult mammalian heart's capacity for self-renewal of its muscle cell mass has led to a consensus that new cardiomyocytes (CMs) are indeed formed throughout adult mammalian life albeit at a disputed frequency. The physiological significance of this renewal, the origin of the new CMs, and the rate of adult CM turnover are still highly debated. Myocyte replacement, particularly after injury, was originally attributed to differentiation of a stem cell compartment. More recently, it has been reported that CMs are mainly replaced by the division of pre-existing post-mitotic CMs. These latter results, if confirmed, would shift the target of regenerative therapy toward boosting mature CM cell-cycle re-entry. Despite this controversy, it is documented that the adult endogenous c-kit(pos) cardiac stem cells (c-kit(pos) eCSCs) participate in adaptations to myocardial stress, and, when transplanted into the myocardium, regenerate most cardiomyocytes and microvasculature lost in an infarct. Nevertheless, the in situ myogenic potential of adult c-kit(pos) cardiac cells has been questioned. To revisit the regenerative potential of c-kit(pos) eCSCs, we have recently employed experimental protocols of severe diffuse myocardial damage in combination with several genetic murine models and cell transplantation approaches showing that eCSCs are necessary and sufficient for CM regeneration, leading to complete cellular, anatomical, and functional myocardial recovery. Here we will review the available data on adult eCSC biology and their regenerative potential placing it in the context of the different claimed mechanisms of CM replacement. These data are in

  13. Effects of bilingualism and trilingualism in L2 production: evidence from errors and self-repairs in early balanced bilingual and trilingual adults.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hsiu-ling

    2014-08-01

    Through analyzing response latencies, errors, and self-repairs in Mandarin, this investigation explores how monolingual, bilingual, and trilingual adults process their speech production differently using cognitive control mechanisms. In this study we conducted two experiments involving speech production in Mandarin. In the two experiments, 81 adults participated and were categorized into three groups: Mandarin monolingual, Hakka-Mandarin bilingual, and Hakka-Mandarin-Minnan trilingual. In Experiment 1 (unpreprogrammed task), each subject read 250 targets that were presented on a computer screen, one at a time, using E-prime; in Experiment 2 (preprogrammed task), each subject read 466 targets printed on A4 paper. Experiment 1 showed that bilinguals and trilinguals outperformed monolinguals in every aspect examined in this research, revealing the presence of bilingual and trilingual advantages in inhibitory control. Interestingly, in Experiment 2, we found a more complex pattern of results: a trilingual advantage in attentional control occurred during L2 production in terms of the number of errors and error correction; however, the bilingual group did not maintain this advantage in the task requiring attentional control. These experimental results revealed that the differences between the language groups became clearer when the inhibitory control demands increased and that compared with the trilingual advantage, the bilingual advantage in inhibitory control emerged in more limited contexts.

  14. Association between subcutaneous white adipose tissue and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D in overweight and obese adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Cholecalciferol is known to be deposited in human adipose tissue, but the distribution of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) in adipose tissue is not known. Objectives: To determine whether 25(OH)D is detectable in subcutaneous white adipose tissue (SWAT) in overweight and obese persons an...

  15. Insight on stem cell preconditioning and instructive biomaterials to enhance cell adhesion, retention, and engraftment for tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Shafiq, Muhammad; Jung, Youngmee; Kim, Soo Hyun

    2016-06-01

    Stem cells are a promising solution for the treatment of a variety of diseases. However, the limited survival and engraftment of transplanted cells due to a hostile ischemic environment is a bottleneck for effective utilization and commercialization. Within this environment, the majority of transplanted cells undergo apoptosis prior to participating in lineage differentiation and cellular integration. Therefore, in order to maximize the clinical utility of stem/progenitor cells, strategies must be employed to increase their adhesion, retention, and engraftment in vivo. Here, we reviewed key strategies that are being adopted to enhance the survival, retention, and engraftment of transplanted stem cells through the manipulation of both the stem cells and the surrounding environment. We describe how preconditioning of cells or cell manipulations strategies can enhance stem cell survival and engraftment after transplantation. We also discuss how biomaterials can enhance the function of stem cells for effective tissue regeneration. Biomaterials can incorporate or mimic extracellular function (ECM) function and enhance survival or differentiation of transplanted cells in vivo. Biomaterials can also promote angiogenesis, enhance engraftment and differentiation, and accelerate electromechanical integration of transplanted stem cells. Insight gained from this review may direct the development of future investigations and clinical trials.

  16. Further Development of a Tissue Engineered Muscle Repair Construct In Vitro for Enhanced Functional Recovery Following Implantation In Vivo in a Murine Model of Volumetric Muscle Loss Injury

    PubMed Central

    Corona, Benjamin T.; Machingal, Masood A.; Criswell, Tracy; Vadhavkar, Manasi; Dannahower, Ashley C.; Bergman, Christopher; Zhao, Weixin

    2012-01-01

    Volumetric muscle loss (VML) can result from trauma and surgery in civilian and military populations, resulting in irrecoverable functional and cosmetic deficits that cannot be effectively treated with current therapies. Previous work evaluated a bioreactor-based tissue engineering approach in which muscle derived cells (MDCs) were seeded onto bladder acellular matrices (BAM) and mechanically preconditioned. This first generation tissue engineered muscle repair (TEMR) construct exhibited a largely differentiated cellular morphology consisting primarily of myotubes, and moreover, significantly improved functional recovery within 2 months of implantation in a murine latissimus dorsi (LD) muscle with a surgically created VML injury. The present report extends these initial observations to further document the importance of the cellular phenotype and composition of the TEMR construct in vitro to the functional recovery observed following implantation in vivo. To this end, three distinct TEMR constructs were created by seeding MDCs onto BAM as follows: (1) a short-term cellular proliferation of MDCs to generate primarily myoblasts without bioreactor preconditioning (TEMR-1SP), (2) a prolonged cellular differentiation and maturation period that included bioreactor preconditioning (TEMR-1SPD; identical to the first generation TEMR construct), and (3) similar treatment as TEMR-1SPD but with a second application of MDCs during bioreactor preconditioning (TEMR-2SPD); simulating aspects of “exercise” in vitro. Assessment of maximal tetanic force generation on retrieved LD muscles in vitro revealed that TEMR-1SP and TEMR-1SPD constructs promoted either an accelerated (i.e., 1 month) or a prolonged (i.e., 2 month postinjury) functional recovery, respectively, of similar magnitude. Meanwhile, TEMR-2SPD constructs promoted both an accelerated and prolonged functional recovery, resulting in twice the magnitude of functional recovery of either TEMR-1SP or TEMR-1SPD constructs

  17. The effect of ascorbic acid and fluid flow stimulation on the mechanical properties of a tissue engineered pelvic floor repair material.

    PubMed

    Osman, Nadir I; Roman, Sabiniano; Bullock, Anthony J; Chapple, Christopher R; MacNeil, Sheila

    2014-09-01

    Synthetic non-degradable meshes used in pelvic floor surgery can cause serious complications such as tissue erosion. A repair material composed of an autologous oral fibroblast seeded degradable polylactic acid scaffold may be a viable alternative. The aims of this study were to investigate the effects of media supplementation with additives (ascorbic acid-2-phosphate, glycolic acid and 17-β-oestradiol) on the mechanical properties of these scaffolds. Oral fibroblasts were isolated from buccal mucosa. The effects of the three additives were initially compared in two-dimensional culture to select the most promising collagen stimulating additive. Sterile electrospun scaffolds were seeded with 500,000 oral fibroblasts and fixed in 6-well plates and subjected to ascorbic acid-2-phosphate (the best performing additive) and/or mechanical stimulation. Mechanical stimulation by fluid shear stress was induced by rocking scaffolds on a platform shaker for 1 h/day for 10 of 14 days of culture. In two-dimensional culture, ascorbic acid-2-phosphate (concentrations from 0.02 mM to 0.04 M) and glycolic acid (10 µM) led to significantly greater total collagen production, but ascorbic acid-2-phosphate at 0.03 mM produced the greatest stimulation (of the order of >100%). In three-dimensional culture, mechanical stimulation alone gave non-significant increases in stiffness and strength. Ascorbic acid-2-phosphate (0.03 mM) significantly increased collagen production in the order 280% in both static and mechanically stimulated scaffolds (p < 0.0001). There was no additional effect of mechanical stimulation. Dense collagen I fibres were observed with ascorbic acid-2-phosphate supplementation. Uniaxial tensiometry showed that strength (p < 0.01) and stiffness (p <0.05) both improved significantly. A combination of ascorbic acid-2-phosphate and mechanical stimulation led to further non-signficant increases in strength and stiffness. In conclusion, a pelvic floor

  18. Biologic scaffold for CNS repair.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fanwei; Modo, Michel; Badylak, Stephen F

    2014-05-01

    Injury to the CNS typically results in significant morbidity and endogenous repair mechanisms are limited in their ability to restore fully functional CNS tissue. Biologic scaffolds composed of individual purified components have been shown to facilitate functional tissue reconstruction following CNS injury. Extracellular matrix scaffolds derived from mammalian tissues retain a number of bioactive molecules and their ability for CNS repair has recently been recognized. In addition, novel biomaterials for dural mater repairs are of clinical interest as the dura provides barrier function and maintains homeostasis to CNS. The present article describes the application of regenerative medicine principles to the CNS tissues and dural mater repair. While many approaches have been exploring the use of cells and/or therapeutic molecules, the strategies described herein focus upon the use of extracellular matrix scaffolds derived from mammalian tissues that are free of cells and exogenous factors.

  19. How to mend a broken heart: adult and induced pluripotent stem cell therapy for heart repair and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Wegener, Marie; Bader, Augustinus; Giri, Shibashish

    2015-06-01

    The recently developed ability to differentiate primary adult stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) into cardiomyocytes is providing unprecedented opportunities to produce an unlimited supply of cardiomyocytes for use in patients with heart disease. Here, we examine the evidence for the preclinical use of such cells for successful heart regeneration. We also describe advances in the identification of new cardiac molecular and cellular targets to induce proliferation of cardiomyocytes for heart regeneration. Such new advances are paving the way for a new innovative drug development process for the treatment of heart disease.

  20. Emergent properties of neural repair: elemental biology to therapeutic concepts

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of adult disability. The past decade has seen advances in basic science research of neural repair in stroke. The brain forms new connections after stroke, which have a causal role in recovery of function. Brain progenitors, including neuronal and glial progenitors, respond to stroke and initiate a partial formation of new neurons and glial cells. The molecular systems that underlie axonal sprouting, neurogenesis, and gliogenesis after stroke have recently been identified. Importantly, tractable drug targets exist within these molecular systems that might stimulate tissue repair. These basic science advances have taken the field to its first scientific milestone; the elemental principles of neural repair in stroke have been identified. The next stages in this field involve understanding how these elemental principles of recovery interact in the dynamic cellular systems of the repairing brain. Emergent principles arise out of the interaction of the fundamental or elemental principles in a system. In neural repair, the elemental principles of brain reorganization after stroke interact to generate higher order and distinct concepts of regenerative brain niches in cellular repair, neuronal networks in synaptic plasticity, and the distinction of molecular systems of neuroregeneration. Many of these emergent principles directly guide the development of new therapies, such as the necessity for spatial and temporal control in neural repair therapy delivery and the overlap of cancer and neural repair mechanisms. This review discusses the emergent principles of neural repair in stroke as they relate to scientific and therapeutic concepts in this field. Ann Neurol 2016;79:895–906 PMID:27043816

  1. Farnesoid X receptor immunolocalization in reproductive tissues of adult female rabbits.

    PubMed

    Anaya-Hernández, Arely; Méndez-Tepepa, Maribel; Hernández-Aragón, Laura G; Pacheco, Pablo; Martínez-Gómez, Margarita; Castelán, Francisco; Cuevas, Estela

    2014-07-01

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) has been involved in lipid metabolism, cell proliferation, apoptosis, and aromatase expression, as well as in the steroid synthesis and signaling. Considering that these events occur in reproductive tissues in females, the aim of the present study was to determine the immunolocalization of FXR in the ovary, oviduct, uterus, and vagina of rabbits. Rabbits were sacrificed and their reproductive tissues were excised and histologically processed. Immunohistochemistry for FXR was done and reproductive tissues were photographed. FXR immunoreactivity was found in all types of ovarian follicles, ovarian stroma, and corpus luteum of virgin and pregnant rabbits. Also, oviductal and vaginal epithelium of virgins, as well as the oviductal smooth muscle, showed anti-FXR immunoreactivity. The uterine epithelium and musculature of virgins had scarce anti-FXR immunoreactivity. Although the role of FXR in female reproductive tissues is still not known, it is possible to consider various functions related to the reproductive tissue.

  2. Immunobiotic Lactobacillus strains augment NLRP3 expression in newborn and adult porcine gut-associated lymphoid tissues.

    PubMed

    Tohno, Masanori; Shimosato, Takeshi; Aso, Hisashi; Kitazawa, Haruki

    2011-12-15

    We isolated cDNA encoding porcine nucleotide-binding domain-like receptor family, pryin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) from Peyer's patches. The complete nucleotide open reading frame of porcine NLRP3 contains 3108-bp encoding a deduced polypeptide of 1036-amino acid residues. The porcine NLRP3 amino acid sequence is more similar to the longest isoform of human than the mouse counterpart. The predicted amino acid sequence of porcine NLRP3 presented nine C-terminal leucine-rich repeat domains. In newborn swine, the expression of NLRP3 was detected at higher levels in spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes, while lower levels were observed in intestinal tissues. In adult swine, NLRP3 was strongly expressed in Peyer's patches and the mesenteric lymph nodes, and the expression level in the lower intestinal tissues was comparable to that in spleen. Toll-like receptor and nucleotide-binding domain ligands, as well as Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Lactobacillus gasseri, enhanced NLRP3 expression in gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT) of newborn and adult swine. Our results should aid in understanding the intestinal immunoregulatory mechanisms underlying NLRP3 activation and the priming ability of immunobiotic lactic acid bacteria in porcine GALT.

  3. Avian Soft Tissue Surgery.

    PubMed

    Guzman, David Sanchez-Migallon

    2016-01-01

    Basic surgical instrumentation for avian soft tissue surgery includes soft tissue retractors, microsurgical instrumentation, surgical loupes, and head-mounted lights. Hemostasis is fundamental during the surgical procedures. The indications, approach, and complications associated with soft tissue surgeries of the integumentary (digit constriction repair, feather cyst excision, cranial wound repair, sternal wound repair, uropygial gland excision), gastrointestinal (ingluviotomy, crop biopsy, crop burn repair, celiotomy, coelomic hernia and pseudohernia repair, proventriculotomy, ventriculotomy, enterotomy, intestinal resection and anastomosis, cloacoplasty, cloacopexy), respiratory (rhinolith removal, sinusotomy, tracheotomy, tracheal resection and anastomosis, tracheostomy, pneumonectomy) and reproductive (ovocentesis, ovariectomy, salpingohysterectomy, cesarean section, orchidectomy, vasectomy, phallectomy) systems are reviewed.

  4. Engineering Complex Tissues

    PubMed Central

    MIKOS, ANTONIOS G.; HERRING, SUSAN W.; OCHAREON, PANNEE; ELISSEEFF, JENNIFER; LU, HELEN H.; KANDEL, RITA; SCHOEN, FREDERICK J.; TONER, MEHMET; MOONEY, DAVID; ATALA, ANTHONY; VAN DYKE, MARK E.; KAPLAN, DAVID; VUNJAK-NOVAKOVIC, GORDANA

    2010-01-01

    This article summarizes the views expressed at the third session of the workshop “Tissue Engineering—The Next Generation,” which was devoted to the engineering of complex tissue structures. Antonios Mikos described the engineering of complex oral and craniofacial tissues as a “guided interplay” between biomaterial scaffolds, growth factors, and local cell populations toward the restoration of the original architecture and function of complex tissues. Susan Herring, reviewing osteogenesis and vasculogenesis, explained that the vascular arrangement precedes and dictates the architecture of the new bone, and proposed that engineering of osseous tissues might benefit from preconstruction of an appropriate vasculature. Jennifer Elisseeff explored the formation of complex tissue structures based on the example of stratified cartilage engineered using stem cells and hydrogels. Helen Lu discussed engineering of tissue interfaces, a problem critical for biological fixation of tendons and ligaments, and the development of a new generation of fixation devices. Rita Kandel discussed the challenges related to the re-creation of the cartilage-bone interface, in the context of tissue engineered joint repair. Frederick Schoen emphasized, in the context of heart valve engineering, the need for including the requirements derived from “adult biology” of tissue remodeling and establishing reliable early predictors of success or failure of tissue engineered implants. Mehmet Toner presented a review of biopreservation techniques and stressed that a new breakthrough in this field may be necessary to meet all the needs of tissue engineering. David Mooney described systems providing temporal and spatial regulation of growth factor availability, which may find utility in virtually all tissue engineering and regeneration applications, including directed in vitro and in vivo vascularization of tissues. Anthony Atala offered a clinician’s perspective for functional tissue

  5. Lack of tissue renewal in human adult Achilles tendon is revealed by nuclear bomb (14)C.

    PubMed

    Heinemeier, Katja Maria; Schjerling, Peter; Heinemeier, Jan; Magnusson, Stig Peter; Kjaer, Michael

    2013-05-01

    Tendons are often injured and heal poorly. Whether this is caused by a slow tissue turnover is unknown, since existing data provide diverging estimates of tendon protein half-life that range from 2 mo to 200 yr. With the purpose of determining life-long turnover of human tendon tissue, we used the (14)C bomb-pulse method. This method takes advantage of the dramatic increase in atmospheric levels of (14)C, produced by nuclear bomb tests in 1955-1963, which is reflected in all living organisms. Levels of (14)C were measured in 28 forensic samples of Achilles tendon core and 4 skeletal muscle samples (donor birth years 1945-1983) with accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and compared to known atmospheric levels to estimate tissue turnover. We found that Achilles tendon tissue retained levels of (14)C corresponding to atmospheric levels several decades before tissue sampling, demonstrating a very limited tissue turnover. The tendon concentrations of (14)C approximately reflected the atmospheric levels present during the first 17 yr of life, indicating that the tendon core is formed during height growth and is essentially not renewed thereafter. In contrast, (14)C levels in muscle indicated continuous turnover. Our observation provides a fundamental premise for understanding tendon function and pathology, and likely explains the poor regenerative capacity of tendon tissue.

  6. Stem cells and exosomes in cardiac repair.

    PubMed

    Singla, Dinender K

    2016-04-01

    Cardiac diseases currently lead in the number of deaths per year, giving rise an interest in transplanting embryonic and adult stem cells as a means to improve damaged tissue from conditions such as myocardial infarction and coronary artery disease. After testing these cells as a treatment option in both animal and human models, it is believed that these cells improve the damaged tissue primarily through the release of autocrine and paracrine factors. Major concerns such as teratoma formation, immune response, difficulty harvesting cells, and limited cell proliferation and differentiation, hinder the routine use of these cells as a treatment option in the clinic. The advent of stem cell-derived exosomes circumvent those concerns, while still providing the growth factors, miRNA, and additional cell protective factors that aid in repairing and regenerating the damaged tissue. These exosomes have been found to be anti-apoptotic, anti-fibrotic, pro-angiogenic, as well as enhance cardiac differentiation, all of which are key to repairing damaged tissue. As such, stem cell derived exosomes are considered to be a potential new and novel approach in the treatment of various cardiac diseases.

  7. Repair of liver mediated by adult mouse liver neuro-glia antigen 2-positive progenitor cell transplantation in a mouse model of cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongyu; Siegel, Christopher T.; Shuai, Ling; Lai, Jiejuan; Zeng, Linli; Zhang, Yujun; Lai, Xiangdong; Bie, Ping; Bai, Lianhua

    2016-01-01

    NG2-expressing cells are a population of periportal vascular stem/progenitors (MLpvNG2+ cells) that were isolated from healthy adult mouse liver by using a “Percoll-Plate-Wait” procedure. We demonstrated that isolated cells are able to restore liver function after transplantation into a cirrhotic liver, and co-localized with the pericyte marker (immunohistochemistry: PDGFR-β) and CK19. Cells were positive for: stem cell (Sca-1, CD133, Dlk) and liver stem cell markers (EpCAM, CD14, CD24, CD49f); and negative for: hematopoietic (CD34, CD45) and endothelial markers (CD31, vWf, von Willebrand factor). Cells were transplanted (1 × 106 cells) in mice with diethylnitrosamine-induced cirrhosis at week 6. Cells showed increased hepatic associated gene expression of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), Albumin (Alb), Glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pc), SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 9 (Sox9), hepatic nuclear factors (HNF1a, HNF1β, HNF3β, HNF4α, HNF6, Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), Leucine-rich repeated-containing G-protein coupled receptor 5-positive (Lgr5) and Tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT). Cells showed decreased fibrogenesis, hepatic stellate cell infiltration, Kupffer cells and inflammatory cytokines. Liver function markers improved. In a cirrhotic liver environment, cells could differentiate into hepatic lineages. In addition, grafted MLpvNG2+ cells could mobilize endogenous stem/progenitors to participate in liver repair. These results suggest that MLpvNG2+ cells may be novel adult liver progenitors that participate in liver regeneration. PMID:26905303

  8. Carboxyl-modified single-wall carbon nanotubes improve bone tissue formation in vitro and repair in an in vivo rat model

    PubMed Central

    Barrientos-Durán, Antonio; Carpenter, Ellen M; zur Nieden, Nicole I; Malinin, Theodore I; Rodríguez-Manzaneque, Juan Carlos; Zanello, Laura P

    2014-01-01

    The clinical management of bone defects caused by trauma or nonunion fractures remains a challenge in orthopedic practice due to the poor integration and biocompatibility properties of the scaffold or implant material. In the current work, the osteogenic properties of carboxyl-modified single-walled carbon nanotubes (COOH–SWCNTs) were investigated in vivo and in vitro. When human preosteoblasts and murine embryonic stem cells were cultured on coverslips sprayed with COOH–SWCNTs, accelerated osteogenic differentiation was manifested by increased expression of classical bone marker genes and an increase in the secretion of osteocalcin, in addition to prior mineralization of the extracellular matrix. These results predicated COOH–SWCNTs’ use to further promote osteogenic differentiation in vivo. In contrast, both cell lines had difficulties adhering to multi-walled carbon nanotube-based scaffolds, as shown by scanning electron microscopy. While a suspension of SWCNTs caused cytotoxicity in both cell lines at levels >20 μg/mL, these levels were never achieved by release from sprayed SWCNTs, warranting the approach taken. In vivo, human allografts formed by the combination of demineralized bone matrix or cartilage particles with SWCNTs were implanted into nude rats, and ectopic bone formation was analyzed. Histological analysis of both types of implants showed high permeability and pore connectivity of the carbon nanotube-soaked implants. Numerous vascularization channels appeared in the formed tissue, additional progenitor cells were recruited, and areas of de novo ossification were found 4 weeks post-implantation. Induction of the expression of bone-related genes and the presence of secreted osteopontin protein were also confirmed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis and immunofluorescence, respectively. In summary, these results are in line with prior contributions that highlight the suitability of SWCNTs as scaffolds with high bone

  9. Fresh and Frozen Tissue-Engineered Three-Dimensional Bone–Ligament–Bone Constructs for Sheep Anterior Cruciate Ligament Repair Following a 2-Year Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Mahalingam, Vasudevan; Wojtys, Edward M.; Wellik, Deneen M.; Arruda, Ellen M.; Larkin, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) often require surgical reconstruction utilizing tendon grafts to restore knee function and stability. Some current graft options for ACL repair are associated with poor long-term outcomes. Our laboratory has fabricated tissue-engineered bone–ligament–bone (BLB) constructs that demonstrate native ligament regeneration and advancement toward native ACL mechanical properties in a sheep ACL reconstruction model. Prior work has shown that freezing BLBs as a method of preservation resulted in similar outcomes compared with fresh BLBs after 6-month implantation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term efficacy of fresh and frozen BLBs. We hypothesized that both fresh and frozen BLBs would show continued regeneration of structural and functional properties toward those of native ACL after a 2-year implantation. Following removal of the native ACL, fresh (n = 2) and frozen (n = 2) BLBs were implanted arthroscopically. After 2 years of recovery, sheep were euthanized and both the experimental and contralateral hindlimbs were removed and radiographs were performed. Explanted knees were initially evaluated for joint laxity and were then further dissected for uniaxial tensile testing of the isolated ACL or BLB. Following mechanical testing, explanted contralateral ACL (C-ACL) and BLBs were harvested for histology. Two years post-ACL reconstruction, fresh and frozen BLBs exhibited similar morphological and biomechanical properties as well as more advanced regeneration compared with our 6-month recovery study. These data indicate that an additional 1.5-year regeneration period allows the BLB to continue ligament regeneration in vivo. In addition, freezing the BLBs is a viable option for the preservation of the graft after fabrication. PMID:27843707

  10. Low-level laser therapy stimulates tissue repair and reduces the extracellular matrix degradation in rats with induced arthritis in the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Lemos, George Azevedo; Rissi, Renato; de Souza Pires, Ivan Luiz; de Oliveira, Letícia Prado; de Aro, Andrea Aparecida; Pimentel, Edson Rosa; Palomari, Evanisi Teresa

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize morphological and biochemistry action of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on induced arthritis in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of rats. Twenty-four male Wistar rats were randomly divided into groups with 12 animals each: (AG) group with arthritis induced in the left TMJ and (LG) group with arthritis induced in the left TMJ and treated with LLLT (830 nm, 30 mW, 3 J/cm(2)). Right TMJs in the AG group were used as noninjected control group (CG). Arthritis was induced by intra-articular injection of 50 μl Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA) and LLLT began 1 week after arthritis induction. Histopathological analysis was performed using sections stained with hematoxylin-eosin, Toluidine Blue, and picrosirius. Biochemical analysis was determined by the total concentration of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and evaluation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9). Statistical analysis was performed using paired and unpaired t tests, with p < 0.05. Compared to AG, LG had minor histopathological changes in the TMJ, smaller thickness of the articular disc in the anterior (p < 0.0001), middle (p < 0.0001) and posterior regions (p < 0.0001), high birefringence of collagen fibers in the anterior (p < 0.0001), middle (p < 0.0001) and posterior regions (p < 0.0001) on the articular disc, and statistically lower activity of MMP-2 latent (p < 0.0001), MMP-2 active (P = 0.02), MMP-9 latent (p < 0.0001), and MMP-9 active (p < 0.0001). These results suggest that LLLT can increase the remodeling and enhancing tissue repair in TMJ with induced arthritis.

  11. Histological image data of limb skeletal tissue from larval and adult Ambystoma mexicanum.

    PubMed

    McCusker, Catherine D; Diaz-Castillo, Carlos; Sosnik, Julian; Phan, Anne; Gardiner, David M

    2016-09-01

    The data presented in this article are related to the article entitled "Cartilage and bone cells do not participate in skeletal regeneration in Ambystoma mexicanum limbs" [1]. Here we present image data of the post-embryonic development of the forelimb skeletal tissue of Ambystoma Mexicanum. Histological staining was performed on sections from the intact limbs of young (6.5 cm) and old (25 cm) animals, and on dissected skeletal tissues (cartilage, bone, and periosteum) from these animals.

  12. DNA repair in cultured keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S.C.; Parsons, S.; Hanawalt, P.C.

    1983-07-01

    Most of our understanding of DNA repair mechanisms in human cells has come from the study of these processes in cultured fibroblasts. The unique properties of keratinocytes and their pattern of terminal differentiation led us to a comparative examination of their DNA repair properties. The relative repair capabilities of the basal cells and the differentiated epidermal keratinocytes as well as possible correlations of DNA repair capacity with respect to age of the donor have been examined. In addition, since portions of human skin are chronically exposed to sunlight, the repair response to ultraviolet (UV) irradiation (254 nm) when the cells are conditioned by chronic low-level UV irradiation has been assessed. The comparative studies of DNA repair in keratinocytes from infant and aged donors have revealed no significant age-related differences for repair of UV-induced damage to DNA. Sublethal UV conditioning of cells from infant skin had no appreciable effect on either the repair or normal replication response to higher, challenge doses of UVL. However, such conditioning resulted in attenuated repair in keratinocytes from adult skin after UV doses above 25 J/m2. In addition, a surprising enhancement in replication was seen in conditioned cells from adult following challenge UV doses.

  13. Facial soft tissue thickness in a sample of Sudanese adults with different occlusions.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Sama; Abuaffan, Amal H

    2016-09-01

    Facial soft tissue thickness is essential to orthodontists and plastic surgeons for treatment planning, and to forensic anthropologists for facial reconstruction, a process combining science and art to recreate a recognizable face from an unidentified skull. The facial profile, together with the age and sex of a person, is related to facial soft tissue thickness, which is required for accurate facial reconstruction and recognition. Skeletal occlusions in orthodontics are classified according to the basic human facial profiles: straight, convex, and concave or skeletal class I, II, and III, respectively. In the present study, the facial soft tissue thickness of 233 Sudanese subjects (105 men and 128 women), ranging in age from 18 to 35 years, with different facial profiles at 20 landmarks was measured (10 soft tissue and 10 dentoskeletal). Sexual dimorphism was noted, with males having thicker facial soft tissue at all measured points. The facial soft tissue thickness varied among different occlusions. Individuals with skeletal class II occlusion had the thickest lower lip, and class III individuals had the thickest upper lip. In general, the Sudanese sample had a unique spectrum of measurements, with thick upper and lower lips, compared with African and Caucasoid subjects, pointing to the need for ethnic-specific data.

  14. Neonatal Tissue Damage Promotes Spike Timing-Dependent Synaptic Long-Term Potentiation in Adult Spinal Projection Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Mounting evidence from both humans and rodents suggests that tissue damage during the neonatal period can “prime” developing nociceptive pathways such that a subsequent injury during adulthood causes an exacerbated degree of pain hypersensitivity. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie this priming effect remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that neonatal surgical injury relaxes the timing rules governing long-term potentiation (LTP) at mouse primary afferent synapses onto mature lamina I projection neurons, which serve as a major output of the spinal nociceptive network and are essential for pain perception. In addition, whereas LTP in naive mice was only observed if the presynaptic input preceded postsynaptic firing, early tissue injury removed this temporal requirement and LTP was observed regardless of the order in which the inputs were activated. Neonatal tissue damage also reduced the dependence of spike-timing-dependent LTP on NMDAR activation and unmasked a novel contribution of Ca2+-permeable AMPARs. These results suggest for the first time that transient tissue damage during early life creates a more permissive environment for the production of LTP within adult spinal nociceptive circuits. This persistent metaplasticity may promote the excessive amplification of ascending nociceptive transmission to the mature brain and thereby facilitate the generation of chronic pain after injury, thus representing a novel potential mechanism by which early trauma can prime adult pain pathways in the CNS. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Tissue damage during early life can “prime” developing nociceptive pathways in the CNS, leading to greater pain severity after repeat injury via mechanisms that remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that neonatal surgical injury widens the timing window during which correlated presynaptic and postsynaptic activity can evoke long-term potentiation (LTP) at sensory synapses onto adult lamina I

  15. Pharmacokinetics of bisphenol A in serum and adipose tissue following intravenous administration to adult female CD-1 mice.

    PubMed

    Doerge, Daniel R; Twaddle, Nathan C; Vanlandingham, Michelle; Fisher, Jeffrey W

    2012-06-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an important industrial chemical used as the monomer for polycarbonate plastic and in epoxy resins for use in food can liners. Worldwide biomonitoring studies consistently find high prevalence of BPA conjugates in urine consistent with pervasive exposure at levels typically below 1 μg/kg bw/day. The current study used LC/MS/MS to measure serum pharmacokinetics of unconjugated (active) and conjugated (inactive) BPA in adult female CD-1 mice following intravenous (IV) injection, which produces higher serum levels by circumventing the processes of absorption from the GI tract and presystemic metabolism that occur after oral administration. Deuterated BPA (100 μg/kg bw) was used to avoid interference by background contamination from trace amounts of native BPA. Additionally, the pharmacokinetics of unconjugated BPA were determined in adipose tissue, a proposed site of action and "depot" for BPA. After IV injection, unconjugated BPA rapidly distributed out of the circulation (t(1/2)=0.2 h) and terminal elimination also proceeded rapidly (t(1/2)=0.8 h). Consistent with the degree of aqueous solubility, lipid/water solubility ratio, and partitioning from blood into adipose tissue in vivo, the levels of unconjugated BPA in mouse adipose tissue rapidly reached a maximal level (0.25 h) that did not exceed the serum maximum at the initial sampling time (0.08 h). Terminal elimination of unconjugated BPA from adipose tissue (t(1/2)=7.0 h) was similar to that for conjugated BPA in serum (t(1/2)=6.6 h) and <0.01% of the administered dose remained in adipose tissue after 24 h. These plasma and tissue kinetics are consistent with rapid equilibria and underscore the non-persistent nature of BPA, particularly when compared with slowly metabolized lipophilic organic pollutants like halogenated dibenzodioxins.

  16. In vivo adeno-associated viral vector-mediated genetic engineering of white and brown adipose tissue in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Veronica; Muñoz, Sergio; Casana, Estefania; Mallol, Cristina; Elias, Ivet; Jambrina, Claudia; Ribera, Albert; Ferre, Tura; Franckhauser, Sylvie; Bosch, Fatima

    2013-12-01

    Adipose tissue is pivotal in the regulation of energy homeostasis through the balance of energy storage and expenditure and as an endocrine organ. An inadequate mass and/or alterations in the metabolic and endocrine functions of adipose tissue underlie the development of obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes. To fully understand the metabolic and molecular mechanism(s) involved in adipose dysfunction, in vivo genetic modification of adipocytes holds great potential. Here, we demonstrate that adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors, especially serotypes 8 and 9, mediated efficient transduction of white (WAT) and brown adipose tissue (BAT) in adult lean and obese diabetic mice. The use of short versions of the adipocyte protein 2 or uncoupling protein-1 promoters or micro-RNA target sequences enabled highly specific, long-term AAV-mediated transgene expression in white or brown adipocytes. As proof of concept, delivery of AAV vectors encoding for hexokinase or vascular endothelial growth factor to WAT or BAT resulted in increased glucose uptake or increased vessel density in targeted depots. This method of gene transfer also enabled the secretion of stable high levels of the alkaline phosphatase marker protein into the bloodstream by transduced WAT. Therefore, AAV-mediated genetic engineering of adipose tissue represents a useful tool for the study of adipose pathophysiology and, likely, for the future development of new therapeutic strategies for obesity and diabetes.

  17. Mass spectral determination of phenylacetonitrile (PAN) levels in body tissues of adult desert locust, Schistocerca gregaria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    : Wings and legs of the gregarious desert locust, Schistocerca gregaria have been shown to be release sites of phenylacetonitrile (PAN), the major adult male-produced pheromone. However, there is limited information on the distribution of PAN within the locust. Here we show, using gas chromatograph...

  18. Incidence and Survival of Pediatric Soft Tissue Sarcomas: Comparison between Adults and Children

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sun Min; Yoo, Cheol Joo; Han, Jung Woo; Cho, Yong Jin; Kim, Soo Hee; Ahn, Joong Bae; Rha, Sun Young; Shin, Sang Joon; Chung, Hyun Cheol; Yang, Woo Ick; Shin, Kyoo-Ho; Rho, Jae Kyung; Kim, Hyo Song

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Pediatric-type sarcomas such as rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), Ewing sarcoma (EWS), primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET), and desmoplastic small round-cell tumor (DSRCT) are rare in adults, with limited studies on their prognosis and optimal treatment strategies. We aimed to examine the outcome of children and adult patients with RMS, EWS, PNET, and DSRCT and relevant prognostic factors. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed 220 pediatric-type sarcoma patients at a single institution between 1985 and 2011. Comparisons were made in order to examine differences in demographics, disease characteristics, and survival. Survival analyses were performed using the Kaplan-Meier method with log-rank tests and Cox proportional hazards models. Results A total of 220 consecutive patients were identified at our institute. Median age was 15.6 years (range, 0 to 81 years) and there were 108 children (49%) and 112 adult patients (51%). According to histological classification, 106 patients (48.2%) had RMS, 60 (27.3%) had EWS, 50 (22.7%) had PNET, and 4 (1.8%) had DSRCT. With a median follow-up period of 6.6 years, the estimated median overall survival (OS) of all patients was 75 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 27.2 to 122.8 months) and median event-free survival (EFS) for all patients was 11 months (95% CI, 8.8 to 13.2 months). No significant difference in OS and EFS was observed between adults and children. In multivariate analysis, distant metastasis (hazard ratio [HR], 1.617; 95% CI, 1.022 to 2.557; p=0.040) and no debulking surgery (HR, 1.443; 95% CI, 1.104 to 1.812; p=0.012) showed independent association with worse OS. Conclusion Metastatic disease and no surgical treatment are poor prognostic factors for OS among pediatric-type sarcomas for both adults and children. PMID:25143049

  19. Assessment of the relationships among posture, maxillomandibular denture complex, and soft-tissue profile of aesthetic adult Korean women.

    PubMed

    Choi, B; Baek, S H; Yang, W S; Kim, S

    2000-11-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the relationships among the posture, the maxillomandibular denture complex, and the soft-tissue profile of aesthetic adult Korean women. From an initial group of 346 women, the authors examined 28 beautiful adult Korean women who had normal vertical and sagittal skeletal relationships and normal occlusion. There were no differences in the inclinations of the incisors to the occlusal planes in the maxilla and the mandible in the data for Korean women vs. Arnett's data for white women. However, the overbite and overjet in Korean women were slightly smaller than in white women. AB to maxillary occlusal plane angle (MxOP) represented the anteroposterior denture base discrepancy to the occlusal plane. Angulation of the maxillary occlusal plane to the Frankfurt (FH) plane and the true vertical line at submasale (TVL) (Sn) was a little steeper in Korean women than in white women. The FH plane was almost parallel to the true horizontal line in Korean women who had normal vertical and sagittal skeletal relationships and normal occlusion. With regard to soft-tissue variables, the upper lip length (Sn-Stms), interlabial gap, upper incisor exposure, nasolabial angle, lip and nose tip projection value, and TVL (Sn)-to-upper lip line (UL) angle showed interracial differences. The results of this study can assist in the diagnosis and treatment planning of orthognathic surgery.

  20. Mouse matriptase-2: identification, characterization and comparative mRNA expression analysis with mouse hepsin in adult and embryonic tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, John D; Campagnolo, Luisa; Goodarzi, Goodarz; Truong, Tony N; Stuhlmann, Heidi; Quigley, James P

    2003-01-01

    We report the identification and characterization of mouse matriptase-2 (m-matriptase-2), an 811-amino-acid protein composed of an N-terminal cytoplasmic domain, a membrane-spanning domain, two CUB (complement protein subcomponents C1r/C1s, urchin embryonic growth factor and bone morphogenetic protein 1) domains, three LDLR (low-density-lipoprotein receptor class A) domains and a C-terminal serine-protease domain. All m-matriptase-2 protein domain boundaries corresponded with intron/exon junctions of the encoding gene, which spans approx. 29 kb and comprises 18 exons. Matriptase-2 is highly conserved in human, mouse and rat, with the rat matriptase-2 gene ( r-maltriptase-2 ) predicted to encode transmembrane and soluble isoforms. Western-blot analysis indicated that m-matriptase-2 migrates close to its theoretical molecular mass of 91 kDa, and immunofluorescence analysis was consistent with the proposed surface membrane localization of this protein. Reverse-transcription PCR and in-situ -hybridization analysis indicated that m-matriptase-2 expression overlaps with the distribution of mouse hepsin (m-hepsin, a cell-surface serine protease identified in hepatoma cells) in adult tissues and during embryonic development. In adult tissues both are expressed at highest levels in liver, kidney and uterus. During embryogenesis m-matriptase-2 expression peaked between days 12.5 and 15.5. m-hepsin expression was biphasic, with peaks at day 7.5 to 8.5 and again between days 12.5 and 15.5. In situ hybridization of embryonic tissues indicated abundant expression of both m-matriptase-2 and m-hepsin in the developing liver and at lower levels in developing pharyngo-tympanic tubes. While m-hepsin was detected in the residual embryonic yolk sac and with lower intensity in lung, heart, gastrointestinal tract, developing kidney tubules and epithelium of the oral cavity, m-matriptase-2 was absent in these tissues, but strongly expressed within the nasal cavity by olfactory epithelial

  1. Bone cysts after osteochondral allograft repair of cartilage defects in goats suggest abnormal interaction between subchondral bone and overlying synovial joint tissues.

    PubMed

    Pallante-Kichura, Andrea L; Cory, Esther; Bugbee, William D; Sah, Robert L

    2013-11-01

    The efficacy of osteochondral allografts (OCAs) may be affected by osseous support of the articular cartilage, and thus affected by bone healing and remodeling in the OCA and surrounding host. Bone cysts, and their communication pathways, may be present in various locations after OCA insertion and reflect distinct pathogenic mechanisms. Previously, we analyzed the effect of OCA storage (FRESH, 4°C/14d, 4°C/28d, FROZEN) on cartilage quality in fifteen adult goats after 12months in vivo. The objectives of this study were to further analyze OCAs and contralateral non-operated (Non-Op) CONTROLS from the medial femoral condyle to (1) determine the effect of OCA storage on local subchondral bone (ScB) and trabecular bone (TB) structure, (2) characterize the location and structure of bone cysts and channels, and (3) assess the relationship between cartilage and bone properties. (1) Overall bone structure after OCAs was altered compared to Non-Op, with OCA samples displaying bone cysts, ScB channels, and ScB roughening. ScB BV/TV in FROZEN OCAs was lower than Non-Op and other OCAs. TB BV/TV in FRESH, 4°C/14d, and 4°C/28d OCAs did not vary compared to Non-Op, but BS/TV was lower. (2) OCAs contained "basal" cysts, localized to deeper regions, some "subchondral" cysts, localized near the bone-cartilage interface, and some ScB channels. TB surrounding basal cysts exhibited higher BV/TV than Non-Op. (3) Basal cysts occurred (a) in isolation, (b) with subchondral cysts and ScB channels, (c) with ScB channels, or (d) with subchondral cysts, ScB channels, and ScB erosion. Deterioration of cartilage gross morphology was strongly associated with abnormal μCT bone structure. Evidence of cartilage-bone communication following OCA repair may favor fluid intrusion as a mechanism for subchondral cyst formation, while bone resorption at the graft-host interface without affecting overall bone and cartilage structure may favor bony contusion mechanism for basal cyst formation. These

  2. Anterior eye tissue morphology: Scleral and conjunctival thickness in children and young adults

    PubMed Central

    Read, Scott A.; Alonso-Caneiro, David; Vincent, Stephen J.; Bremner, Alexander; Fothergill, Annabel; Ismail, Brittney; McGraw, Rebecca; Quirk, Charlotte J.; Wrigley, Elspeth

    2016-01-01

    The sclera and conjunctiva form part of the eye’s tough, protective outer coat, and play important roles in the eye’s mechanical protection and immune defence, as well as in determining the size and shape of the eye globe. Advances in ocular imaging technology now allow these tissues in the anterior eye to be imaged non-invasively and with high resolution, however there is a paucity of data examining the dimensions of these tissues in paediatric populations. In this study, we have used optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging to examine the normal in vivo thickness profile of the anterior sclera and overlying conjunctiva in 111 healthy young participants, including a large proportion of paediatric subjects. We demonstrate that the thickness of the anterior sclera varies significantly with measurement location and meridian. Tissue thickness also varied significantly with age, with younger subjects exhibiting significantly thinner scleras and significantly greater conjunctival thickness. Males were also found to exhibit significantly greater scleral thickness. Refractive error however was not significantly associated with either scleral or conjunctival thickness in this population. These findings provide new data describing the normative dimensions of anterior eye tissues in children and the factors that can influence these dimensions in young populations. PMID:27646956

  3. A CT-scan database for the facial soft tissue thickness of Taiwan adults.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ju-Hui; Chen, Hsiao-Ting; Hsu, Wan-Yi; Huang, Guo-Shu; Shaw, Kai-Ping

    2015-08-01

    Facial reconstruction is a branch of forensic anthropology used to assist in the identification of skeletal remains. The majority of facial reconstruction techniques use facial soft tissue depth chart data to recreate facial tissue on a skull or a model of a skull through the use of modeling clay. This study relied on 193 subjects selected from the Taiwanese population on the basis of age and gender to determine the average values of 32 landmarks, include midline and bilateral measures, by means of CT scans. The mean age of the subjects was 46.9±16.4 years, with a mean age of 43.8±16.6 for males and 49.9±15.8 for females respectively. There were 16 landmarks with statistically significant differences between male and female subjects, namely S, G, N, Na, Ph, Sd and Id in the midline portion, FE, LO, ZA and Sub M2 in the bilateral-right and left portion, and IM point in the bilateral-left portion (abbreviations adapted from Karen T. Taylor's work). The mean soft tissue depth was greater in males than in females, and there was significant difference between the right and left sides of the face in Za point. This study's findings were compared with those of Bulut et al.

  4. Association between subcutaneous white adipose tissue and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D in overweight and obese adults.

    PubMed

    Piccolo, Brian D; Dolnikowski, Gregory; Seyoum, Elias; Thomas, Anthony P; Gertz, Erik R; Souza, Elaine C; Woodhouse, Leslie R; Newman, John W; Keim, Nancy L; Adams, Sean H; Van Loan, Marta D

    2013-08-26

    Cholecalciferol is known to be deposited in human adipose tissue, but it is not known whether 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) is found in detectable concentrations. Therefore, our objective was to determine whether 25(OH)D is detectable in subcutaneous white adipose tissue (SWAT) in overweight and obese persons enrolled in a twelve week energy restricted diet. Baseline and post-intervention gluteal SWAT biopsies were collected from 20 subjects participating in a larger clinical weight loss intervention. LC-MS/MS was utilized to determine SWAT 25(OH)D concentrations. Serum 25(OH)D and 1,25(OH)2D were measured by RIA. Body composition was assessed by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. SWAT 25(OH)D concentrations were 5.8 ± 2.6 nmol/kg tissue and 6.2 ± 2.7 nmol/kg tissue pre- and post-intervention SWAT, respectively. There was a significant positive association between SWAT 25(OH)D concentration and serum 25(OH)D concentration (r = 0.52, P < 0.01). Both SWAT and serum 25(OH)D concentrations did not significantly change after a twelve-week period of energy restriction with approximately 5 kg of fat loss. In conclusion, we have demonstrated our LC-MS/MS method can detect 25(OH)D3 in human subcutaneous fat tissue from overweight and obese individuals and is consistent with previously reported concentrations in swine. Additionally, our findings of no significant changes in SWAT 25(OH)D3 or serum 25(OH)D after a 6% loss of total body weight and 13% reduction in total fat provides the first human evidence that adipose 25(OH)D does not likely contribute to serum 25(OH)D with moderate weight loss; whether this is also the case with larger amounts of weight loss is unknown. Weight loss alone is not sufficient to increase serum 25(OH)D and increases in dietary or dermal biosynthesis of vitamin D appear to be the most critical contributors to in vitamin D status.

  5. Muscle repair and regeneration: stem cells, scaffolds, and the contributions of skeletal muscle to amphibian limb regeneration.

    PubMed

    Milner, Derek J; Cameron, Jo Ann

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal muscle possesses a robust innate capability for repair of tissue damage. Natural repair