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Sample records for adult type hypolactasia

  1. Identification of a variant associated with adult-type hypolactasia.

    PubMed

    Enattah, Nabil Sabri; Sahi, Timo; Savilahti, Erkki; Terwilliger, Joseph D; Peltonen, Leena; Järvelä, Irma

    2002-02-01

    Adult-type hypolactasia, also known as lactase non-persistence (lactose intolerance), is a common autosomal recessive condition resulting from the physiological decline in activity of the lactase-phlorizin hydrolase (LPH) in intestinal cells after weaning. LPH hydrolyzes lactose into glucose and galactose. Sequence analyses of the coding and promoter regions of LCT, the gene encoding LPH, has revealed no DNA variations correlating with lactase non-persistence. An associated haplotype spanning LCT, as well as a distinct difference in the transcript levels of 'non-persistence' and 'persistence' alleles in heterozygotes, suggest that a cis-acting element contributes to the lactase non-persistence phenotype. Using linkage disequilibrium (LD) and haplotype analysis of nine extended Finnish families, we restricted the locus to a 47-kb interval on 2q21. Sequence analysis of the complete region and subsequent association analyses revealed that a DNA variant, C/T-13910, roughly 14 kb upstream from the LCT locus, completely associates with biochemically verified lactase non-persistence in Finnish families and a sample set of 236 individuals from four different populations. A second variant, G/A-22018, 8 kb telomeric to C/T-13910, is also associated with the trait in 229 of 236 cases. Prevalence of the C/T-13910 variant in 1,047 DNA samples is consistent with the reported prevalence of adult-type hypolactasia in four different populations. That the variant (C/T-13910) occurs in distantly related populations indicates that it is very old. PMID:11788828

  2. Molecular differentiation of congenital lactase deficiency from adult-type hypolactasia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A limited fraction of the human adult population retains intestinal lactase-phlorizin hydrolase (LPH) activity during adulthood, and this is called the lactase persistence phenotype. However, 95% of all adults have adult-type hypolactasia (ATH) and have difficulty digesting milk sugar. Rarely, some ...

  3. A genetic test which can be used to diagnose adult-type hypolactasia in children

    PubMed Central

    Rasinperä, H; Savilahti, E; Enattah, N S; Kuokkanen, M; Tötterman, N; Lindahl, H; Järvelä, I; Kolho, K-L

    2004-01-01

    Background/Aims: Adult-type hypolactasia (primary lactose malabsorption) affects most of world’s human population and limits the use of fresh milk due to lactose intolerance. The diagnosis of adult-type hypolactasia has been difficult to establish because of unsatisfactory diagnostic methods. C/T-13910 single nucleotide polymorphism residing 13910 base pairs from the 5′ end of the lactase gene has been shown to be associated with lactase persistence. The aim of the study was to assess the applicability of the C/T-13910 variant as a diagnostic test for adult-type hypolactasia during childhood. Methods: Intestinal biopsies were obtained from 329 children and adolescents of African, Finnish, and other White origins aged 0.1–20 years undergoing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy because of abdominal complaints. The biopsies were assayed for lactase, sucrase, and maltase activity and genotyped for the C/T-13910 variant using polymerase chain reaction minisequencing. Results: The frequency of the C/C-13910 genotype defining lactase non-persistence was well in agreement in this study with published figures for the prevalences of adult-type hypolactasia in Africans and Whites. The C/C-13910 genotype was associated with very low lactase activity (<10 U/g protein) in the majority of children tested at 8 years of age and in every child older than 12 years of age giving a specificity of 100% and sensitivity of 93% for the genetic test. The decline of lactase activity was somewhat earlier in African compared with Finnish children with C/C-13910 genotype (p<0.03). Conclusions: Genetic test of C/T-13910 polymorphism can be used as a first stage screening test for adult-type hypolactasia. PMID:15479673

  4. Frequency of LCT -13910C>T single nucleotide polymorphism associated with adult-type hypolactasia/lactase persistence among Brazilians of different ethnic groups

    PubMed Central

    Mattar, Rejane; Monteiro, Maria S; Villares, Cibele A; Santos, Aníbal F; Silva, Joyce MK; Carrilho, Flair J

    2009-01-01

    Background Adult-type hypolactasia, the physiological decline of lactase some time after weaning, was previously associated with the LCT -13910C>T polymorphism worldwide except in Africa. Lactase non-persistence is the most common phenotype in humans, except in northwestern Europe with its long history of pastoralism and milking. We had previously shown association of LCT -13910C>T polymorphism with adult-type hypolactasia in Brazilians; thus, we assessed its frequency among different Brazilian ethnic groups. Methods We investigated the ethnicity-related frequency of this polymorphism in 567 Brazilians [mean age, 42.1 ± 16.8 years; 157 (27.7%) men]; 399 (70.4%) White, 50 (8.8%) Black, 65 (11.5%) Brown, and 53 (9.3%) Japanese-Brazilian. DNA was extracted from leukocytes; LCT -13910C>T polymorphism was analyzed by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Results Prevalence of the CC genotype associated with hypolactasia was similar (57%) among White and Brown groups; however, prevalence was higher among Blacks (80%) and those of Japanese descent (100%). Only 2 (4%) Blacks had TT genotype, and 8 (16%) had the CT genotype. Assuming an association between CC genotype and hypolactasia, and CT and TT genotypes with lactase persistence, 356 (62.8%) individuals had hypolactasia and 211 (37.2%) had lactase persistence. The White and Brown groups had the same hypolactasia prevalence (~57%); nevertheless, was 80% among Black individuals and 100% among Japanese-Brazilians (P < 0.01). Conclusion The lactase persistence allele, LCT -13910T, was found in about 43% of both White and Brown and 20% of the Black Brazilians, but was absent among all Japanese Brazilians studied. PMID:19799794

  5. Molecularly defined adult-type hypolactasia in school-aged children with a previous history of cow’s milk allergy

    PubMed Central

    Rasinperä, Heli; Saarinen, Kristiina; Pelkonen, Anna; Järvelä, Irma; Savilahti, Erkki; Kolho, Kaija-Leena

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To assess the role of lactase non-persistence/persistence in school-aged children and their milk-related symptoms. METHODS: The genotypes for the C/T-13910 variant associated with lactase non-persistence/ persistence were determined using PCR-minisequencing in a group of 172 children with a mean age of 8.6 years (SE = 0.02, 93 boys) participating in a follow-up study for cow’s milk allergy. The parents were asked to assess their children’s milk consumption and abdominal symptoms. RESULTS: The presence of allergy to cow’s milk was not associated with the C/C-13910 genotype related with a decline of lactase enzyme activity during childhood (lactase non-persistence). The frequency of the C/C-13910 genotype (16%) was similar to published figures for the prevalence of adult-type hypolactasia in Finland. The majority of the children (90%) in this series consumed milk but 26% of their families suspected that their children had milk-related symptoms. Forty-eight percent of the children with the C/C-13910 genotype did not drink milk at all or consumed a low lactose containing diet prior to the genotyping (P < 0.004 when compared to the other genotypes). CONCLUSION: Analysis of the C/T-13910 polymorphism is an easy and reliable method for excluding adult-type hypolactasia in children with milk-related symptoms. Genotyping for this variant can be used to advise diets for children with a previous history of cow’s milk allergy. PMID:16610034

  6. Correlation of G/A -22018 single-nucleotide polymorphism with lactase activity and its usefulness in improving the diagnosis of adult-type hypolactasia among North Indian children.

    PubMed

    Kuchay, Raja A H; Anwar, Mumtaz; Thapa, Babu R; Mahmood, Akhtar; Mahmood, Safrun

    2013-01-01

    Adult-type hypolactasia (AtH or lactase non-persistence) is the physiological decline in lactase activity that manifests in majority of the world's population after weaning. Recently, various single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) upstream of lactase gene (LCT) have been suggested to be associated with AtH or the lactase persistent trait in different human populations. C/T -13910 SNP was found be completely associated with AtH in Finnish population, and G/A -22018 SNP was found to be strongly, but not completely, associated with AtH. The aim of this study was to correlate G/A -22018 SNP with intestinal lactase activity in North Indian children. These children were also genotyped for C/T -13910 SNP. We also examined the differences in milk consumption and milk-related clinical symptoms in children with different genotypes of G/A -22018 and C/T -13910 SNPs. Intestinal biopsies were obtained from 231 children aged 2-16 years undergoing routine endoscopy for various abdominal complaints. The biopsies were assayed for lactase, sucrase, and maltase activities and genotyped for G/A -22018 and C/T -13910 SNPs using restriction fragment length polymorphism and DNA sequencing analysis. There was a significant correlation between lactase activity and different genotypes of G/A -22018 SNP. Children with G/G -22018 genotype had low lactase activity. With a reference value of <10 U/g protein (lactase activity) to be indicative of AtH, the sensitivity and specificity of genetic test based on G/A -22018 SNP was 94.4 and 94.1 %, respectively. Furthermore, the consumption of milk was lower in children with G/G -22018 genotype. Flatulence was the only symptom significantly more frequent among the children with G/G -22018 genotype compared to those with G/A and A/A -22018 genotypes. However, most of the children with G/G -22018 genotype seem to tolerate small amounts of milk without any significant difference in gastrointestinal symptoms from those with G/A and A/A -22018

  7. Frequency of LCT-13910C/T and LCT-22018G/A single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with adult-type hypolactasia/lactase persistence among Israelis of different ethnic groups.

    PubMed

    Raz, Maytal; Sharon, Yael; Yerushalmi, Baruch; Birk, Ruth

    2013-04-25

    Primary lactase deficiency (PLD), the physiological decline of lactase, is associated with the LCT-13910C/T and LCT-22018G/A polymorphisms. PLD is the most common phenotype in humans and varies widely as a function of ethnicity. Israel is a multiethnic country. We analyzed the genetic frequencies of PLD in different Israeli ethnicities. Ethnicity-related frequencies were analyzed in 439 Israelis: Ashkenazi (n=96), Iraqi (n=96), Moroccan (n=96) Jews and Bedouin-Arabs (n=151). DNA was extracted from leukocytes; LCT-13910C/T, -22018G/A and -13915T/G (in Bedouin-Arabs) polymorphisms were analyzed by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. There was a significant association between ethnicity and genotype in both polymorphic LCT SNPs (-13910C/T and -22018). Prevalence of the CC (LCT-13910C/T) genotype associated with adult hypolactasia was 97%, 93%, 83% and 82% among Bedouin-Arabs and Iraqi, Ashkenazi and Moroccan Jews, respectively. The prevalence of the GG (LCT-22018G/A) adult hypolactasia genotype among those groups was identical to that of the CC genotype in each group, except for Iraqi-Jews, of which only 83% carried the GG genotype. The prevalence of heterozygous and homozygous genotypes associated with lactase persistence (CT, TT for -13910C/T and GA, AA for -22018G/A) was 3%, 7%, 17% and 18% and 3%, 17%, 17% and 18% for Bedouin-Arabs, Ashkenazi, Iraqi and Moroccan Jews, respectively. A significant correlation between SNPs was found. PLD prevalence is high among different ethnic groups in Israel and varies between ethnicities. The prevalence of the -13915*G allele, indicative of lactose persistence in African and Arab populations, was 41% in the Bedouin-Arabs group. Lactase persistence genotype prevalence was found to vary between Israeli ethnicities (4-18%). SNPs (-13910C/T and -22018) showed significant correlation in detecting genotype prevalence in Israeli Jews. We suggest adjusting nutritional recommendations accordingly. PMID:23415628

  8. Hypolactasia in Saami subpopulations of Russia and Finland.

    PubMed

    Kozlov, A; Lisitsyn, D

    1997-12-01

    Primary hypolactasia is a gene attributed condition of the inability of adult individuals to consume whole milk. Subpopulations of the Russia (Kildin) and Finland Saami are characterized by a large variability of the LAC*R (lactase restriction) gene frequencies (0.50-0.77). The distribution of primary hypolactasia among the Saami is ranging from 25% to 60%. The intensive reindeer breeding was developed by the Saami only 300-400 years ago. Reindeer milk is poor in lactose (2.4%) and is consumed by the Saami in small amounts. Thus, "milk behaviour" connected with reindeer breeding could not have influenced the trait evolution too much. The large between-group differences of the LAC*R gene frequencies in the Saami seem to reflect the level of genetic influence of neighbouring non-Saami populations. The role of gene inflow in reducing the level of primary hypolactasia in various Saami subpopulations is confirmed by historic data of various ethnoterritorial groups as well as by the reduction of the number of traditional family name bearers and the change of the AB0 blood group gene frequencies among the Kildin Saami in the last 30 years. PMID:9468755

  9. Hypolactasia: a common enzyme deficiency leading to lactose malabsorption and intolerance.

    PubMed

    Lember, Margus

    2012-01-01

    Adult‑type hypolactasia (lactase nonpersistence or lactase deficiency) is the most common enzyme deficiency leading to lactose intolerance and primary lactose malabsorption. Clinical presentation of the condition includes symptoms resulting from bacterial fermentation of undigested lactose in the colon, which gives rise to gas bloat, increased motility, and loose stools. Diagnosis of the disease is based on clinical symptoms, biochemical, functional, histochemical and genetic tests. Treatment includes dietary restrictions, namely, use of low‑lactose milk, in which lactose has been prehydrolyzed, or non‑lactose milk. PMID:23222197

  10. Type 2 Diabetes Widespread in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Type 2 Diabetes Widespread in Adults Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table ... pre-diabetes have an increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes, the most common form of diabetes, and for ...

  11. Type 2 Diabetes Widespread in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Type 2 Diabetes Widespread in Adults Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of Contents One- ... survey data, researchers found that the prevalence of diabetes in U.S. adults is continuing to rise. And despite efforts to ...

  12. [Brick-tea type adult bone fluorosis].

    PubMed

    Cao, Jin; Zhao, Yan; Liu, Jianwei; Xirao, Ruodeng

    2003-03-01

    To investigate health impact of brick-tea type fluorosis in adults, the total daily fluorine intake, environment fluorine level were determined, the average urinary fluorine content assay and bone X-ray examination were conducted, the clinical manifestations were observed in the brick-tea type bone fluorosis epidemiological study conducted in Naqu County, Tibet at September, 2001. One hundred and eleven adults aged at 30-78 year-old were enrolled. It was found that the fluorine level of drinking water in Naqu County was 0.10 +/- 0.03 mg/L, but the brick-tea water processed foods-zamba and buttered tea had fluorine content of 4.52 +/- 0.74 mg/kg and 3.21 +/- 0.65 mg/kg respectively. The adult daily fluorine intake reached 11.99 mg, among which 99% is originated from the brick-tea containing foods. Positive detection rate of fluorosis osteopathy was 89% and the X-ray film confirmed that the diagnosis rate was 83%. Degenerative arthropathy and ossification of the interosteal membrane, calcification of the tendon were the characteristics that indicated by both the positive signs and reogenological examination. The prevalence of osteosclerosis type (bone matrix increased) was 74%. It is suggested that there were even more severe health impact compared with those in the water type and coal combustion type fluorosis. PMID:12793007

  13. Histopathological types in adult nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, Md Ghulam; Das, Bidhu Bhushan; Shaha, Amaresh Chandra; Hossain, Md Zakir

    2016-01-01

    In Bangladesh, there are very few studies about biopsy proven adult Nephrotic syndrome (NS) with histological types and their clinical findings. To determine the histological types of glomerulonephritis (GN) in adult NS and correlate them with the clinical presentations and biochemical parameters, we studied 100 biopsies in 87 patients who underwent ultrasonography- guided renal biopsy in Rangpur Medical College and Hospital from July 2010 to June 2012. The mean age of the patients was 32.8 ± 13.2 years; male was preponderance (72.4%) and most of the patients (67.8%) came from rural areas. Membranoproliferative GN (MPGN) was the most common underlying cause that was found in 32 (36.8%) patients followed by mesangial prolife- rative GN in 27 (31%) patients, membranous GN in 16 (18.4%) cases, minimal change disease in four (4.6%) patients, diffuse proliferative GN in four (4.6%) patients, focal segmental GN, and focal proliferative GN in two (2.4%) patients each. High proteinuria level was found in minimal change disease, which was 7.59 ± 0.24 g/24 h (mean ± standard deviation). The most common symptoms were oliguria (92%) and edema (86.2%) followed by hematuria (dark urine) (72.4%) and hypertension (35.6%). MPGN was the most common histological type of adult NS in Rangpur. PMID:27215253

  14. For a Socialising Type of Adult Education: Transforming Adult Education into an Autonomous System for the Continuous Resocialisation of Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogard, Gerald

    This report sets out to establish the need for and to define a type of adult education for the socialization of adults. It arises from the meeting of a steering group responsible for the "Adult Education and Social Change" project, which studied educational practices relating to the long-term unemployed and older people. The key points listed…

  15. Intestinal lactase status of adults in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Cook, G C

    1979-01-01

    Fifty hospital patients in Port Moresby (mean age 30 yr) without evidence of malnutrition or gastro-intestinal disease, who came from many parts of Papua New Guinea (P.N.G.), were given 50 g lactose orally after an overnight fast. In 49 blood glucose rise was less than 1.1 mmol 1(-1), indicating hypolactasia. Thirty-three gave a clear history of symptoms, usually diarrhoea, after lactose. Adult hypolactasia approaches 100% in P.N.G. There is no indication that the genetic structure of any part of the population of P,N.G. with regard to lactase has been influenced by genetic drift from peoples with persistence of lactase into adult life (PL). PMID:434766

  16. Cholesterol and Alzheimer Type Dementia among Adults with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckley, Frank

    2008-01-01

    This article reports a summary of research by Warren Zigman and colleagues investigating the link between cholesterol levels and Alzheimer type dementia among adults with Down syndrome. Warren Zigman and colleagues followed 123 adults with Down syndrome between May 1998 and April 2006. The participants were aged between 41 and 78 years at the…

  17. Psychological Type and Asynchronous Written Dialogue in Adult Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Lin; Cranton, Patricia; Bridglall, Beatrice

    2005-01-01

    This study explores how adults learn from asynchronous written dialogue through the lens of psychological type preferences. We asked participants to discover their dominant and auxiliary psychological preferences using the Personal Empowerment through Type inventory. Participants then completed an open-ended survey in which they described their…

  18. Nephrocalcinosis as adult presentation of Bartter syndrome type II.

    PubMed

    Huang, L; Luiken, G P M; van Riemsdijk, I C; Petrij, F; Zandbergen, A A M; Dees, A

    2014-02-01

    Bartter syndrome consists a group of rare autosomal-recessive renal tubulopathies characterised by renal salt wasting, hypokalaemic metabolic alkalosis, hypercalciuria and hyperreninaemic hyperaldosteronism. It is classified into five types. Mutations in the KCNJ1 gene (classified as type II) usually cause the neonatal form of Bartter syndrome. We describe an adult patient with a homozygous KCNJ1 mutation resulting in a remarkably mild phenotype of neonatal type Bartter syndrome. PMID:24659592

  19. Nephropathy in youth and young adults with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Solis-Herrera, Carolina; Triplitt, Curtis L; Lynch, Jane L

    2014-02-01

    The occurrence and progression of nephropathy associated with early onset type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a consequence of the ongoing epidemic of childhood obesity. Minimal evidence regarding treatment effectiveness of renovascular comorbidities in youth with early onset T2D is available, due to the relatively recent emergence of T2D in youth and young adults. Extrapolation of adult therapy guidelines is not an ideal approach to making therapeutic decisions in this population. Evolving management and intervention strategies are based on accumulating longitudinal data from cohorts of well characterized youth and young adults with T2D. The degree of similarity in histologic findings and disease specific characteristics of kidney disease in patients with early onset T2D and albuminuria compared with affected adults is not well characterized. Early aggressive therapies to minimize the impact of nephropathy are indicated as the evidence for best therapies in youth with T2D are further explored. PMID:24398660

  20. Treating young adults with type 2 diabetes or monogenic diabetes.

    PubMed

    Owen, Katharine R

    2016-06-01

    It is increasingly recognised that diabetes in young adults has a wide differential diagnosis. There are many monogenic causes, including monogenic beta-cell dysfunction, mitochondrial diabetes and severe insulin resistance. Type 2 diabetes in the young is becoming more prevalent, particularly after adolescence. It's important to understand the clinical features and diagnostic tools available to classify the different forms of young adult diabetes. Classic type 1 diabetes is characterised by positive β-cell antibodies and absence of endogenous insulin secretion. Young type 2 diabetes is accompanied by metabolic syndrome with obesity, hypertension and dyslipidaemia. Monogenic β-cell dysfunction is characterised by non-autoimmune, C-peptide positive diabetes with a strong family history, while mitochondrial diabetes features deafness and other neurological involvement. Severe insulin resistance involves a young-onset metabolic syndrome often with a disproportionately low BMI. A suspected diagnosis of monogenic diabetes is confirmed with genetic testing, which is widely available in specialist centres across the world. Treatment of young adult diabetes is similarly diverse. Mutations in the transcription factors HNF1A and HNF4A and in the β-cell potassium ATP channel components cause diabetes which responds to low dose and high dose sulfonylurea agents, respectively, while glucokinase mutations require no treatment. Monogenic insulin resistance and young-onset type 2 diabetes are both challenging to treat, but first line management involves insulin sensitisers and aggressive management of cardiovascular risk. Outcomes are poor in young-onset type 2 diabetes compared to both older onset type 2 and type 1 diabetes diagnosed at a similar age. The evidence base for treatments in monogenic and young-onset type 2 diabetes relies on studies of moderate quality at best and largely on extrapolation from work conducted in older type 2 diabetes subjects. Better quality

  1. Articulation in Schoolchildren and Adults with Neurofibromatosis Type 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cosyns, Marjan; Mortier, Geert; Janssens, Sandra; Bogaert, Famke; D'Hondt, Stephanie; Van Borsel, John

    2012-01-01

    Several authors mentioned the occurrence of articulation problems in the neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) population. However, few studies have undertaken a detailed analysis of the articulation skills of NF1 patients, especially in schoolchildren and adults. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to examine in depth the articulation skills of…

  2. Social functioning in adults with neurofibromatosis type 1.

    PubMed

    Pride, Natalie A; Crawford, Hilda; Payne, Jonathan M; North, Kathryn N

    2013-10-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a common single-gene disorder characterised by a diverse range of cutaneous, neurological and neoplastic manifestations. It is well recognised that children with NF1 have poor peer interactions and are at risk for deficits in social skills. Few studies, however, have examined social functioning in adults with NF1. We aimed to determine whether adults with NF1 are at greater risk for impairment in social skills and to identify potential risk factors for social skills deficits. We evaluated social skills in 62 adults with NF1 and 39 controls using self-report and observer-report measures of social behaviour. We demonstrate that adults with NF1 exhibit significantly less prosocial behaviour than controls. This deficit was associated with social processing abilities and was more evident in males. The frequency of antisocial behaviour was comparable between the two groups, however was significantly associated with behavioural regulation in the NF1 group. These findings suggest that poor social skills in individuals with NF1 are due to deficits in prosocial behaviour, rather than an increase in antisocial behaviour. This will aid the design of interventions aimed at improving social skills in individuals with NF1. PMID:23911645

  3. Combinations of Types of Mental Health Services Received in the Past Year Among Young Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... 08, 2015* Combinations of types of mental health services received in the past year among young adults Combinations of types of mental health services received in the past year among young adults ...

  4. Falls risk in older adults with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Vinik, Aaron I; Vinik, Etta J; Colberg, Sheri R; Morrison, Steven

    2015-02-01

    Falls are a major health issue for older adults, especially for those who develop type 2 diabetes who must contend with age-related declines in balance, muscle strength, and walking ability. They must also contend with health-related issues specific to the disease process. Given the general association between these variables and falls, being able to identify which measures negatively impact on balance in older diabetic persons is a critical step. Moreover, designing specific interventions to target these physiologic functions underlying balance and gait control will produce the greatest benefit for reducing falls in older persons with diabetes. PMID:25453303

  5. Young adults' experience of living with neurofibromatosis type 1.

    PubMed

    Hummelvoll, Grete; Antonsen, Kjell Magnus

    2013-04-01

    Neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF1) may have many psychosocial consequences for affected adults. More knowledge is needed about the experience of psychosocial aspects in different stages of adulthood. This qualitative study aims to describe the experiences and concerns of persons living with NF1 in the early stages of adulthood. In semi-structured interviews, Norwegian adults with NF1 (n = 15) between 18 and 37 years of age described their experiences and concerns. Interview transcripts were analysed in a both concept and data driven way. Severity of NF1 was assessed from interview data. Our data indicate that many informants have more friends than in childhood, including friends with NF1. An important topic is whether or not to inform others about the NF1 diagnosis . Low self-confidence is common, often related to early school failure and bullying or to visible neurofibromas. The unpredictable development of NF1 causes much concern. The experience of NF1's impact seems less associated with the assessed severity than with social network, relation to the labour market, and psychological factors. PMID:22815101

  6. Adult human adipose tissue contains several types of multipotent cells.

    PubMed

    Tallone, Tiziano; Realini, Claudio; Böhmler, Andreas; Kornfeld, Christopher; Vassalli, Giuseppe; Moccetti, Tiziano; Bardelli, Silvana; Soldati, Gianni

    2011-04-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are a type of adult stem cells that can be easily isolated from various tissues and expanded in vitro. Many reports on their pluripotency and possible clinical applications have raised hopes and interest in MSCs. In an attempt to unify the terminology and the criteria to label a cell as MSC, in 2006 the International Society for Cellular Therapy (ISCT) proposed a standard set of rules to define the identity of these cells. However, MSCs are still extracted from different tissues, by diverse isolation protocols, are cultured and expanded in different media and conditions. All these variables may have profound effects on the selection of cell types and the composition of heterogeneous subpopulations, on the selective expansion of specific cell populations with totally different potentials and ergo, on the long-term fate of the cells upon in vitro culture. Therefore, specific molecular and cellular markers that identify MSCs subsets as well as standardization of expansion protocols for these cells are urgently needed. Here, we briefly discuss new useful markers and recent data supporting the rapidly emerging concept that many different types of progenitor cells are found in close association with blood vessels. This knowledge may promote the necessary technical improvements required to reduce variability and promote higher efficacy and safety when isolating and expanding these cells for therapeutic use. In the light of the discussed data, particularly the identification of new markers, and advances in the understanding of fundamental MSC biology, we also suggest a revision of the 2006 ISCT criteria. PMID:21327755

  7. Reading-Related Literacy Activities of American Adults: Time Spent, Task Types, and Cognitive Skills Used

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Sheida; Chen, Jing; Forsyth, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    This article presents data on the types and duration of reading-related activities reported by a volunteer sample of 400 adults (demographically similar to the U.S. adult population age 20 and older in terms of race, ethnicity, education, and working status) in the 2005 Real-World Tasks Study. This diary study revealed that adults spent, on…

  8. Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion (CSII) Pumps for Type 1 and Type 2 Adult Diabetic Populations

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary In June 2008, the Medical Advisory Secretariat began work on the Diabetes Strategy Evidence Project, an evidence-based review of the literature surrounding strategies for successful management and treatment of diabetes. This project came about when the Health System Strategy Division at the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care subsequently asked the secretariat to provide an evidentiary platform for the Ministry’s newly released Diabetes Strategy. After an initial review of the strategy and consultation with experts, the secretariat identified five key areas in which evidence was needed. Evidence-based analyses have been prepared for each of these five areas: insulin pumps, behavioural interventions, bariatric surgery, home telemonitoring, and community based care. For each area, an economic analysis was completed where appropriate and is described in a separate report. To review these titles within the Diabetes Strategy Evidence series, please visit the Medical Advisory Secretariat Web site, http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/mas_about.html, Diabetes Strategy Evidence Platform: Summary of Evidence-Based Analyses Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion Pumps for Type 1 and Type 2 Adult Diabetics: An Evidence-Based Analysis Behavioural Interventions for Type 2 Diabetes: An Evidence-Based Analysis Bariatric Surgery for People with Diabetes and Morbid Obesity: An Evidence-Based Summary Community-Based Care for the Management of Type 2 Diabetes: An Evidence-Based Analysis Home Telemonitoring for Type 2 Diabetes: An Evidence-Based Analysis Application of the Ontario Diabetes Economic Model (ODEM) to Determine the Cost-effectiveness and Budget Impact of Selected Type 2 Diabetes Interventions in Ontario Objective The objective of this analysis is to review the efficacy of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) pumps as compared to multiple daily injections (MDI) for the type 1 and type 2 adult diabetics. Clinical Need

  9. Serum uric acid and hypertension in adults: a paradoxical relationship in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bjornstad, Petter; Paul Wadwa, R; Sirota, Jeffrey C; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K; McFann, Kimberly; Rewers, Marian; Rivard, Christopher J; Jalal, Diana; Chonchol, Michel B; Johnson, Richard J; Maahs, David M

    2014-04-01

    Adults with type 1 diabetes have lower serum uric acid levels compared with nondiabetic adults. Little is known about the relationship between serum uric acid and blood pressure in type 1 diabetes and whether it differs from the positive relationship found in nondiabetic adults. The authors assessed the cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships over 6 years between serum uric acid and blood pressure in adults with (35±9 years [n=393]) and without (38±9 years [n=685]) type 1 diabetes in the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes study. In nondiabetic adults, serum uric acid was associated with systolic blood pressure in multivariable models adjusted for cardiovascular risk factors. In adults with type 1 diabetes, a negative association was observed between serum uric acid and systolic blood pressure after multivariable adjustments. A positive association was observed between serum uric acid and systolic blood pressure in nondiabetic adults. In contrast, an inverse relationship was demonstrated after multivariable adjustments in type 1 diabetes. PMID:24667019

  10. Lifestyle change and mobility in obese adults with type 2 diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background Adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus often have limitations in mobility that increase with age. An intensive lifestyle intervention that produces weight loss and improves fitness could slow the loss of mobility in such patients. Methods We randomly assigned 5145 overweight or obese adults...

  11. Lifestyle change and mobility in obese adults with type 2 diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus often have limitations in mobility that increase with age. An intensive lifestyle intervention that produces weight loss and improves fitness could slow the loss of mobility in such patients. We randomly assigned 5145 overweight or obese adults between the ages o...

  12. Exploring the Psychosocial and Behavioral Adjustment Outcomes of Multi-Type Abuse among Homeless Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Kristin M.

    2009-01-01

    This article explores the psychosocial and behavioral adjustment outcomes associated with verbal, emotional, physical, and sexual abuse among homeless young adults as well as the associations among abuse types. Convenience sampling was used to select 28 homeless young adults (ages 18 to 24) from one drop-in center. Overall, subjects experienced…

  13. Serum Uric Acid and Hypertension in Adults: a Paradoxical Relationship in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bjornstad, Petter; Wadwa, R. Paul; Sirota, Jeffrey C.; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.; McFann, Kimberly; Rewers, Marian; Rivard, Christopher J.; Jalal, Diana; Chonchol, Michel B.; Johnson, Richard J.; Maahs, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Adults with type 1 diabetes have lower serum uric acid levels compared to non-diabetic adults. Little is known about the relationship between serum uric acid and blood pressure in type 1 diabetes and whether it differs from the positive relationship found in non-diabetic adults. We assessed the cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships over 6-years between serum uric acid and blood pressure in adults with (35±9 years, n=393) and without (38±9 years n=685) T1D in the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes study. In non-diabetic adults, serum uric acid was associated with systolic blood pressure in multivariable-models adjusted for cardiovascular risk-factors. In adults with type 1 diabetes, a negative association was observed between serum uric acid and systolic blood pressure after multivariable-adjustments. A positive association was observed between serum uric acid and systolic blood pressure in non-diabetic adults. In contrast, an inverse relationship was demonstrated after multivariable-adjustments in type 1 diabetes. PMID:24667019

  14. Union Type and Depressive Symptoms among Mexican Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmeer, Kammi K.; Kroeger, Rhiannon A.

    2011-01-01

    Diversity in union type is increasing around the world as cohabitation and higher order unions become more prevalent in developing and developed countries. This necessitates a more nuanced understanding of how different union types relate to individual well-being across social settings. In this study, the authors analyze nationally-representative…

  15. Type of Multimorbidity and Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use among Adults

    PubMed Central

    Alwhaibi, Monira; Sambamoorthi, Usha

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To examine the association between type of multimorbidity and CAM use among adults with multimorbidity. Methods. The current study used a cross-sectional design with retrospective data from 2012 National Health Interview Survey. Multimorbidity was classified into two groups: (1) adults with coexisting physical and mental illnesses and (2) adults with two or more chronic physical illnesses only. CAM use was measured using a set of 18 variables. Logistic regression and multinomial logistic regressions were used to assess the association between the type of multimorbidity and ever used CAM, CAM use in the past 12 months, and type of CAM. Results. Overall, 31.2% of adults with coexisting physical and mental illnesses and 20.1% of adults with only physical illnesses used CAM in the past 12 months. Adults with coexisting physical and mental illnesses were more likely to ever use CAM (AOR = 1.68, 95% CI = 1.49, 1.90), use CAM in the past 12 months (AOR = 1.32, 95% CI = 1.15, 1.52), and use mind-body therapies in the past 12 months (AOR = 1.36, 95% CI = 1.16, 1.59) compared to adults with only physical illnesses. Conclusion. Multimorbidity of chronic physical and mental illnesses was associated with higher CAM use. PMID:25648169

  16. Union Type and Depressive Symptoms Among Mexican Adults

    PubMed Central

    Schmeer, Kammi K.; Kroeger, Rhiannon A.

    2012-01-01

    Diversity in union type is increasing around the world as cohabitation and higher order unions become more prevalent in developing and developed countries. This necessitates a more nuanced understanding of how different union types relate to individual well-being across social settings. In this study, the authors analyze nationally-representative data from Mexico in cross-sectional and change models to evaluate differences in depressive symptoms across union type (marital vs. cohabiting and first vs. higher order unions) among Mexican men and women. The findings suggest that cohabiting unions do not provide the same mental health benefits as marital unions (especially for men). Repartnering is also associated with higher depressive symptoms (especially for women), which indicates possible lasting mental health disadvantages of divorce/separation or entrance into lower quality second unions. These results suggest that the changing family context in Mexico, which includes increasing cohabitation and union instability, may have important consequences for individuals’ psychological well-being. PMID:22822284

  17. Considering Personality Type in Adult Learning: Using the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator in Instructor Preparation at PricewaterhouseCoopers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daisley, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    This article explores the feasibility of using the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) as a framework for instructor development in a professional services training environment. It explores the consistency of MBTI with common adult learning theory, addresses questions on MBTI's reliability and validity, and explores the applicability of MBTI to the…

  18. Measuring insulin adherence among adults with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Osborn, Chandra Y; Gonzalez, Jeffery S

    2016-08-01

    Non-adherence to insulin is common and associated with suboptimal health. We adapted the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale to specify insulin adherence (MIAS) and compared it to the Adherence to Refills and Medication Scale for Diabetes (ARMS-D) and the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities medications subscale (SDSCA-MS) and an insulin-specific (SDSCA-IS) version. A sample of 144 insulin-treated adults (58 % African American/Black, 34 % Caucasian/White, 8 % Other/Mixed race; 6.9 % Hispanic) completed these measures along with a HbA1C test. The internal consistency and factor structure of the MIAS were adequate; 59 % of participants forgot to take insulin and 46 % reported non-adherence. The MIAS was associated with the ARMS-D, SDSCA-MS, and SDSCA-IS (p < 0.001), and higher MIAS scores were marginally associated with better self-rated health (p = 0.057), but significantly associated with fewer emergency room visits (p = 0.001), and better HbA1C (p = 0.001). The MIAS is a valid and reliable insulin adherence assessment tool for practice and research applications. PMID:27062271

  19. Challenges contributing to disrupted transition from paediatric to adult diabetes care in young adults with Type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Pyatak, E. A.; Sequeira, P. A.; Whittemore, R.; Vigen, C. P.; Peters, A. L.; Weigensberg, M. J.

    2014-01-01

    Aim To examine challenges contributing to disruptions in care during the transition from paediatric to adult care among young adults with Type 1 diabetes who are primarily in ethnic minority groups and have low socio-economic status. Methods Participants (n = 20) were newly enrolled patients in a transition clinic for young adults with Type 1 diabetes with a history of loss to medical follow-up. Participants completed qualitative semi-structured interviews detailing their transition experiences in addition to demographic, HbA1c and psychosocial measures. Descriptive statistics were completed for quantitative data, and narrative thematic analysis of interviews was used to identify common themes. A mixed-method analysis was used to identify the associations between stressors identified in interviews and clinical and psychosocial variables. Results Three categories of challenges contributing to loss to follow-up were identified: psychosocial challenges, health provider and health system challenges and developmental challenges. Participants experienced a high degree of stressful life circumstances which were associated with higher HbA1c (r = 0.60, P = 0.005), longer duration of loss to follow-up (r = 0.51, P = 0.02), greater emergency department utilization (r = 0.45, P = 0.05), and lower life satisfaction (r = −0.62, P = 0.003). Conclusions A confluence of challenges, including stressful life circumstances, healthcare system barriers and the developmental trajectory of young adulthood, contributes to a high risk of loss to follow-up and poor health in this population of young adults with Type 1 diabetes. An integrated approach to transition addressing medical and psychosocial needs may facilitate improved follow-up and health outcomes in clinical settings. PMID:24798586

  20. Experiences of health care transition voiced by young adults with type 1 diabetes: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Garvey, Katharine C; Beste, Margaret G; Luff, Donna; Atakov-Castillo, Astrid; Wolpert, Howard A; Ritholz, Marilyn D

    2014-01-01

    Objective This qualitative study aimed to explore the experience of transition from pediatric to adult diabetes care reported by posttransition emerging adults with type 1 diabetes (T1D), with a focus on preparation for the actual transfer in care. Methods Twenty-six T1D emerging adults (mean age 26.2±2.5 years) receiving adult diabetes care at a single center participated in five focus groups stratified by two levels of current glycemic control. A multidisciplinary team coded transcripts and conducted thematic analysis. Results Four key themes on the process of transfer to adult care emerged from a thematic analysis: 1) nonpurposeful transition (patients reported a lack of transition preparation by pediatric providers for the transfer to adult diabetes care); 2) vulnerability in the college years (patients conveyed periods of loss to follow-up during college and described health risks and diabetes management challenges specific to the college years that were inadequately addressed by pediatric or adult providers); 3) unexpected differences between pediatric and adult health care systems (patients were surprised by the different feel of adult diabetes care, especially with regards to an increased focus on diabetes complications); and 4) patients’ wish list for improving the transition process (patients recommended enhanced pediatric transition counseling, implementation of adult clinic orientation programs, and peer support for transitioning patients). Conclusion Our findings identify modifiable deficiencies in the T1D transition process and underscore the importance of a planned transition with enhanced preparation by pediatric clinics as well as developmentally tailored patient orientation in the adult clinic setting. PMID:25349485

  1. Adult presentation of Bartter syndrome type IV with erythrocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Heilberg, Ita Pfeferman; Tótoli, Cláudia; Calado, Joaquim Tomaz

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Bartter syndrome comprises a group of rare autosomal-recessive salt-losing disorders with distinct phenotypes, but one unifying pathophysiology consisting of severe reductions of sodium reabsorption caused by mutations in five genes expressed in the thick ascending limb of Henle, coupled with increased urinary excretion of potassium and hydrogen, which leads to hypokalemic alkalosis. Bartter syndrome type IV, caused by loss-of-function mutations in barttin, a subunit of chloride channel CLC-Kb expressed in the kidney and inner ear, usually occurs in the antenatal-neonatal period. We report an unusual case of late onset presentation of Bartter syndrome IV and mild phenotype in a 20 years-old man who had hypokalemia, deafness, secondary hyperparathyroidism and erythrocytosis. PMID:26537508

  2. Relations of Behavioral Autonomy to Health Outcomes Among Emerging Adults With and Without Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Kerry A.; Becker, Dorothy; Escobar, Oscar; Siminerio, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the relation of behavioral autonomy to psychological, behavioral, and physical health among emerging adults with and without type 1 diabetes. Methods High school seniors with (n = 118) and without type 1 diabetes (n = 122) completed online questionnaires for three consecutive years. Behavioral autonomy, psychological health, risk behaviors, and diabetes outcomes were assessed. Regression analyses were conducted to predict Time 2 and 3 outcomes, controlling for Time 1 outcomes. Results There were no group differences in behavioral autonomy. Behavioral autonomy predicted better psychological health but only for emerging adults without diabetes. Behavioral autonomy was related to increased risk behavior for both groups. Behavioral autonomy was unrelated to self-care but predicted better glycemic control for females. Conclusions Behavioral autonomy may be beneficial for psychological health, but is related to increased risk behavior. The implications of behavioral autonomy for emerging adults with type 1 diabetes require careful consideration. PMID:25157070

  3. Serum uric acid and insulin sensitivity in adolescents and adults with and without type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bjornstad, Petter; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.; McFann, Kimberly; Wadwa, R. Paul; Rewers, Marian; Rivard, Christopher J.; Jalal, Diana; Chonchol, Michel B.; Johnson, Richard J.; Maahs, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Hypothesis Decreased insulin sensitivity (IS) exists in type 1 diabetes. Serum uric acid (SUA), whose concentration is related to renal clearance, predicts vascular complications in type 1 diabetes. SUA is also inversely associated with IS in non-diabetics, but has not been examined in type 1 diabetes. We hypothesized SUA would be associated with reduced IS in adolescents and adults with type 1 diabetes. Methods The cross-sectional and longitudinal associations of SUA with IS was investigated in 254 adolescents with type 1 diabetes and 70 without in the Determinants of Macrovascular Disease in Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes Study, and in 471 adults with type 1 diabetes and 571 without in the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 diabetes (CACTI) study. Results SUA was lower in subjects with type 1 diabetes (p<0.0001), but still remained inversely associated with IS after multivariable adjustments- in adolescents (β±SE: −1.99±0.62, p=0.001, R2=2%) and adults (β±SE:−0.91±0.33, p=0.006, R2=6%) with type 1 diabetes, though less strongly than in non-diabetic controls (adolescents: β±SE: −2.70±1.19, p=0.03, R2=15%, adults: β±SE:−5.99±0.75, p<0.0001, R2=39%). Conclusion We demonstrated a significantly weaker relationship between SUA and reduced IS in subjects with type 1 diabetes than non-diabetic controls. PMID:24461546

  4. Transition experiences and health care utilization among young adults with type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Garvey, Katharine C; Finkelstein, Jonathan A; Laffel, Lori M; Ochoa, Victoria; Wolfsdorf, Joseph I; Rhodes, Erinn T

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to describe the current status of adult diabetes care in young adults with type 1 diabetes and examine associations between health care transition experiences and care utilization. Methods We developed a survey to assess transition characteristics and current care in young adults with type 1 diabetes. We mailed the survey to the last known address of young adults who had previously received diabetes care at a tertiary pediatric center. Results Of 291 surveys sent, 83 (29%) were undeliverable and three (1%) were ineligible. Of 205 surveys delivered, 65 were returned (response rate 32%). Respondents (mean age 26.6 ± 3.0 years, 54% male, 91% Caucasian) transitioned to adult diabetes care at a mean age of 19.2 ± 2.8 years. Although 71% felt mostly/completely prepared for transition, only half received recommendations for a specific adult provider. Twenty-six percent reported gaps exceeding six months between pediatric and adult diabetes care. Respondents who made fewer than three diabetes visits in the year prior to transition (odds ratio [OR] 4.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2–16.5) or cited moving/relocation as the most important reason for transition (OR 6.3, 95% CI 1.3–31.5) were more likely to report gaps in care exceeding six months. Patients receiving current care from an adult endocrinologist (79%) were more likely to report at least two diabetes visits in the past year (OR 6.0, 95% CI 1.5–24.0) compared with those receiving diabetes care from a general internist/adult primary care doctor (17%). Two-thirds (66%) reported receiving all recommended diabetes screening tests in the previous year, with no difference according to provider type. Conclusion In this sample, transition preparation was variable and one quarter reported gaps in obtaining adult diabetes care. Nevertheless, the majority endorsed currently receiving regular diabetes care, although visit frequency differed by provider type. Because locating

  5. Emerging Adults With Type 1 Diabetes: A Comparison to Peers Without Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Helgeson, Vicki S.; Reynolds, Kerry A.; Becker, Dorothy J.; Siminerio, Linda M.; Escobar, Oscar

    2013-01-01

    Objective This longitudinal study compared emerging adults with and without type 1 diabetes on life path decisions, health behaviors, and psychological well-being during the transition out of high school. Methods Administered questionnaires during the senior year of high school and 1 year later to 117 emerging adults with diabetes and 122 emerging adults without diabetes. Comparisons were conducted with respect to health status, sex, and school status. Results Those with and without diabetes chose similar life paths and engaged in similar levels of risky behaviors, but disturbed sleep increased for males with diabetes only. Having diabetes was not associated with depressive symptoms, loneliness, or bulimic symptoms, but was associated with lower life satisfaction and lower life purpose over time. Conclusions Emerging adults with and without diabetes fare similarly on most dimensions studied during the first year out of high school. PMID:23475831

  6. Writing in a Digital World: Self-Correction While Typing in Younger and Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Kalman, Yoram M; Kavé, Gitit; Umanski, Daniil

    2015-10-01

    This study examined how younger and older adults approach simple and complex computerized writing tasks. Nineteen younger adults (age range 21-31, mean age 26.1) and 19 older adults (age range 65-83, mean age 72.1) participated in the study. Typing speed, quantitative measures of outcome and process, and self-corrections were recorded. Younger adults spent a lower share of their time on actual typing, and demonstrated more prevalent use of delete keys than did older adults. Within the older group, there was no correlation between the total time spent on the entire task and the number of corrections, but increased typing speed was related to more errors. The results suggest that the approach to the task was different across age groups, either because of age or because of cohort effects. We discuss the interplay of speed and accuracy with regard to digital writing, and its implications for the design of human-computer interactions. PMID:26473904

  7. Writing in a Digital World: Self-Correction While Typing in Younger and Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Kalman, Yoram M.; Kavé, Gitit; Umanski, Daniil

    2015-01-01

    This study examined how younger and older adults approach simple and complex computerized writing tasks. Nineteen younger adults (age range 21–31, mean age 26.1) and 19 older adults (age range 65–83, mean age 72.1) participated in the study. Typing speed, quantitative measures of outcome and process, and self-corrections were recorded. Younger adults spent a lower share of their time on actual typing, and demonstrated more prevalent use of delete keys than did older adults. Within the older group, there was no correlation between the total time spent on the entire task and the number of corrections, but increased typing speed was related to more errors. The results suggest that the approach to the task was different across age groups, either because of age or because of cohort effects. We discuss the interplay of speed and accuracy with regard to digital writing, and its implications for the design of human-computer interactions. PMID:26473904

  8. Clinical next generation sequencing of pediatric-type malignancies in adult patients identifies novel somatic aberrations

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Jorge Galvez; Corrales-Medina, Fernando F.; Maher, Ossama M.; Tannir, Nizar; Huh, Winston W.; Rytting, Michael E.; Subbiah, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric malignancies in adults, in contrast to the same diseases in children are clinically more aggressive, resistant to chemotherapeutics, and carry a higher risk of relapse. Molecular profiling of tumor sample using next generation sequencing (NGS) has recently become clinically available. We report the results of targeted exome sequencing of six adult patients with pediatric-type malignancies : Wilms tumor(n=2), medulloblastoma(n=2), Ewing's sarcoma( n=1) and desmoplastic small round cell tumor (n=1) with a median age of 28.8 years. Detection of druggable somatic aberrations in tumors is feasible. However, identification of actionable target therapies in these rare adult patients with pediatric-type malignancies is challenging. Continuous efforts to establish a rare disease registry are warranted. PMID:25859559

  9. Clinical next generation sequencing of pediatric-type malignancies in adult patients identifies novel somatic aberrations.

    PubMed

    Silva, Jorge Galvez; Corrales-Medina, Fernando F; Maher, Ossama M; Tannir, Nizar; Huh, Winston W; Rytting, Michael E; Subbiah, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric malignancies in adults, in contrast to the same diseases in children are clinically more aggressive, resistant to chemotherapeutics, and carry a higher risk of relapse. Molecular profiling of tumor sample using next generation sequencing (NGS) has recently become clinically available. We report the results of targeted exome sequencing of six adult patients with pediatric-type malignancies : Wilms tumor(n=2), medulloblastoma(n=2), Ewing's sarcoma( n=1) and desmoplastic small round cell tumor (n=1) with a median age of 28.8 years. Detection of druggable somatic aberrations in tumors is feasible. However, identification of actionable target therapies in these rare adult patients with pediatric-type malignancies is challenging. Continuous efforts to establish a rare disease registry are warranted. PMID:25859559

  10. Factors affecting numerical typing performance of young adults in a hear-and-type task.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng-Jhe; Wu, Changxu

    2011-12-01

    Numerical hear-and-type tasks, i.e. making immediate keypresses according to verbally presented numbers, possess both practical and theoretical importance but received relatively little attention. Effects of speech rates (500-ms vs. 1000-ms interval), urgency (urgent condition: performance-based monetary incentive plus time limit vs. non-urgent condition: flat-rate compensation) and finger strategies (single vs. multi-finger typing) on typing speed and accuracy were investigated. Fast speech rate and multi-finger typing produced more errors and slower typing speed. Urgency improved typing speed but decreased accuracy. Errors were almost doubled under urgent condition, while urgency effect on speed was similar to that of speech rate. Examination of error patterns did not fully support Salthouse's (1986) speculations about error-making mechanisms. The results implied that urgency could play a more important role in error-making than task demands. Numerical keyboard design and error detection could benefit from spatial incidence of errors found in this study. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: This study revealed that classic speculations about error-making mechanisms in alphabetical typing do not necessarily translate to numerical typing. Factors other than external task demands such as urgency can affect typing performance to a similar or greater extent. Investigations of intrinsic error-making factors in non-traditional typing tasks are encouraged. PMID:22103724

  11. Adult-onset Invasive Haemophilus influenzae Type f Caused by Acute Lower Leg Cellulitis.

    PubMed

    Usui, Yuko; Kakuta, Risako; Araki, Makoto; Sato, Taigo; Gu, Yoshiaki; Yano, Hisakazu; Taniuchi, Norihide

    2016-01-01

    In Japan, routine Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccination began in 2013. Thus, similar to other countries, a strain shift is expected in the near future. We experienced a case of H. influenzae type f (Hif) bacteremia in a 66-year-old man. The primary focus of the infection was the soft tissue of the left lower leg, which is an extremely rare origin in adults. Subsequently, we conducted multilocus sequence typing and identified the strain as sequence type 124, which is the most common invasive strain of Hif worldwide. This case may mark the beginning of an Hif strain shift in Japan. PMID:27374690

  12. Mental Ill-Health and Care Pathways in Adults with Intellectual Disability across Different Residential Types

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaplin, Eddie; Paschos, Dimitrios; O'Hara, Jean; McCarthy, Jane; Holt, Geraldine; Bouras, Nick; Tsakanikos, Elias

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate co-morbid psychopathology and clinical characteristics of adults with ID living across different types of residential settings. All participants were first time referrals to specialist services in South-East London who lived either with their family (N = 375) or in supported residence (N = 280) or…

  13. Adults Living with Type 2 Diabetes: Kept Personal Health Information Items as Expressions of Need

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whetstone, Melinda

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated personal information behavior and information needs that 21 adults managing life with Type 2 diabetes identify explicitly and implicitly during discussions of item acquisition and use of health information items that are kept in their homes. Research drew upon a naturalistic lens, in that semi-structured interviews were…

  14. Change and stability in depressive symptoms in young adults with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Oris, Leen; Luyckx, Koen; Rassart, Jessica; Goethals, Eveline; Bijttebier, Patricia; Goubert, Liesbet; Moons, Philip; Weets, Ilse

    2016-01-01

    This study examined inter-individual differences in depressive symptom development in young adults with type 1 diabetes. Individuals with persistent depressive symptoms were at risk for suboptimal development in terms of illness perceptions, illness functioning, and self-esteem. Individuals reporting no/minimal depressive symptoms over time were characterized by the most optimal development. PMID:26546395

  15. Prevalence and Types of Aggressive Behaviour among Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crocker, A. G.; Mercier, C.; Lachapelle, Y.; Brunet, A.; Morin, D.; Roy, M. -E.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Aggressive behaviours represent major obstacles to the integration into society of individuals with intellectual disability (ID) and pose significant management issues for carers. Methods: The present study assessed the prevalence and severity of five types of aggressive behaviours in 3165 adult men and women with ID receiving services…

  16. Pulmonary Alveolar Type II Epithelial Cells and Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Robert J.

    1985-01-01

    During the past ten years, functions of alveolar type II cells have been well characterized with isolated cells in vitro. Some of the functions were well known from studies in vivo, but others such as transepithelial sodium transport were unsuspected. A better understanding of this important pulmonary cell type improves our knowledge of the pathophysiology of adult respiratory distress syndrome and may in time lead to new therapeutic strategies. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4. PMID:3909639

  17. Sudden death syndrome in adult cows associated with Clostridium perfringens type E.

    PubMed

    Redondo, L M; Farber, M; Venzano, A; Jost, B H; Parma, Y R; Fernandez-Miyakawa, M E

    2013-04-01

    Clostridium perfringens type E is considered a rare toxinotype and an infrequent cause of enterotoxemia of lambs, calves, and rabbits. Until now, only cases of young animal of C. perfringens type E bovine enterotoxemia, characterized by hemorrhagic enteritis and sudden death, have been reported. The present report details the genotypic characterization of C. perfringens type E isolates obtained from intestinal samples of adult cattle during an outbreak of enterotoxemia in Argentina. The sequences of several housekeeping genes of these isolates were analyzed and compared with those obtained from calves in North America showing a clonal unique lineage. PMID:23354004

  18. Screening for coeliac disease in adult patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus: myths, facts and controversy.

    PubMed

    Bakker, Sjoerd F; Tushuizen, Maarten E; von Blomberg, Boudewina M E; Bontkes, Hetty J; Mulder, Chris J; Simsek, Suat

    2016-01-01

    This review aims at summarizing the present knowledge on the clinical consequences of concomitant coeliac disease (CD) in adult patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). The cause of the increased prevalence of CD in T1DM patients is a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Current screening guidelines for CD in adult T1DM patients are not uniform. Based on the current evidence of effects of CD on bone mineral density, diabetic complications, quality of life, morbidity and mortality in patients with T1DM, we advise periodic screening for CD in adult T1DM patients to prevent delay in CD diagnosis and subsequent CD and/or T1DM related complications. PMID:27478507

  19. Listening to Older Adults' Values and Preferences for Type 2 Diabetes Care: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Beverly, Elizabeth A; Wray, Linda A; LaCoe, Cynthia L; Gabbay, Robert A

    2014-02-01

    Individuals' values and preferences have a considerable impact on their motivation and, therefore, their willingness to follow treatment recommendations. This qualitative study aimed to describe older adults' values and preferences for type 2 diabetes care. Older adults valued an effective physician-patient treatment relationship and quality of life in their diabetes care. They preferred physicians who knew them as a person and were honest about their diabetes treatment and progression of the illness. When developing treatment plans, providers should assess the effect that treatment will likely have on older adults' health, while explicitly acknowledging their values and preferences for care as a prelude to better patient-centered care and potentially shared decision-making. PMID:26246755

  20. Brief Report: The Effects of Typed and Spoken Modality Combinations on the Language Performance of Adults with Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forsey, Janice; And Others

    1996-01-01

    A study of five adult males with autism investigated which combination of input/output modalities (typed or spoken) enhanced the syntactic, semantic, and/or pragmatic performance of individuals with autism when engaging in conversations with a normal language adult. Results found that typed communications facilitated the use of longer utterances.…

  1. Functional Expression of T-Type Ca2+ Channels in Spinal Motoneurons of the Adult Turtle

    PubMed Central

    Canto-Bustos, Martha; Loeza-Alcocer, Emanuel; González-Ramírez, Ricardo; Gandini, María A.; Delgado-Lezama, Rodolfo; Felix, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated Ca2+ (CaV) channels are transmembrane proteins comprising three subfamilies named CaV1, CaV2 and CaV3. The CaV3 channel subfamily groups the low-voltage activated Ca2+ channels (LVA or T-type) a significant role in regulating neuronal excitability. CaV3 channel activity may lead to the generation of complex patterns of action potential firing such as the postinhibitory rebound (PIR). In the adult spinal cord, these channels have been found in dorsal horn interneurons where they control physiological events near the resting potential and participate in determining excitability. In motoneurons, CaV3 channels have been found during development, but their functional expression has not yet been reported in adult animals. Here, we show evidence for the presence of CaV3 channel-mediated PIR in motoneurons of the adult turtle spinal cord. Our results indicate that Ni2+ and NNC55-0396, two antagonists of CaV3 channel activity, inhibited PIR in the adult turtle spinal cord. Molecular biology and biochemical assays revealed the expression of the CaV3.1 channel isotype and its localization in motoneurons. Together, these results provide evidence for the expression of CaV3.1 channels in the spinal cord of adult animals and show also that these channels may contribute to determine the excitability of motoneurons. PMID:25255145

  2. Yoga for Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: A Systematic Review of Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Innes, Kim E; Selfe, Terry Kit

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests yogic practices may benefit adults with type 2 diabetes (DM2). In this systematic review, we evaluate available evidence from prospective controlled trials regarding the effects of yoga-based programs on specific health outcomes pertinent to DM2 management. To identify qualifying studies, we searched nine databases and scanned bibliographies of relevant review papers and all identified articles. Controlled trials that did not target adults with diabetes, included only adults with type 1 diabetes, were under two-week duration, or did not include quantitative outcome data were excluded. Study quality was evaluated using the PEDro scale. Thirty-three papers reporting findings from 25 controlled trials (13 nonrandomized, 12 randomized) met our inclusion criteria (N = 2170 participants). Collectively, findings suggest that yogic practices may promote significant improvements in several indices of importance in DM2 management, including glycemic control, lipid levels, and body composition. More limited data suggest that yoga may also lower oxidative stress and blood pressure; enhance pulmonary and autonomic function, mood, sleep, and quality of life; and reduce medication use in adults with DM2. However, given the methodological limitations of existing studies, additional high-quality investigations are required to confirm and further elucidate the potential benefits of yoga programs in populations with DM2. PMID:26788520

  3. Yoga for Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: A Systematic Review of Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Innes, Kim E.; Selfe, Terry Kit

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests yogic practices may benefit adults with type 2 diabetes (DM2). In this systematic review, we evaluate available evidence from prospective controlled trials regarding the effects of yoga-based programs on specific health outcomes pertinent to DM2 management. To identify qualifying studies, we searched nine databases and scanned bibliographies of relevant review papers and all identified articles. Controlled trials that did not target adults with diabetes, included only adults with type 1 diabetes, were under two-week duration, or did not include quantitative outcome data were excluded. Study quality was evaluated using the PEDro scale. Thirty-three papers reporting findings from 25 controlled trials (13 nonrandomized, 12 randomized) met our inclusion criteria (N = 2170 participants). Collectively, findings suggest that yogic practices may promote significant improvements in several indices of importance in DM2 management, including glycemic control, lipid levels, and body composition. More limited data suggest that yoga may also lower oxidative stress and blood pressure; enhance pulmonary and autonomic function, mood, sleep, and quality of life; and reduce medication use in adults with DM2. However, given the methodological limitations of existing studies, additional high-quality investigations are required to confirm and further elucidate the potential benefits of yoga programs in populations with DM2. PMID:26788520

  4. Friendship and Romantic Relationships Among Emerging Adults With and Without Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Mascatelli, Katilyn; Reynolds, Kerry A.; Becker, Dorothy; Escobar, Oscar; Siminerio, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine whether friendship and romantic relationships of emerging adults with type 1 diabetes differed from those of a comparison group, and to determine whether these relationships were associated with psychological and diabetes health outcomes. Methods High school seniors with (n = 122) and without (n = 118) type 1 diabetes were assessed annually for 3 years. Friend and romantic relationship variables, psychological distress, life satisfaction, eating disturbances, and, for those with diabetes, diabetes outcomes were assessed. Results Those with diabetes reported less friend support but similar friend conflict compared with controls. Aspects of romantic relationships and friend relationships were associated with health outcomes, but there were more effects involving romantic relationships. On some indices, romantic support was more beneficial for controls and romantic conflict was more troublesome for those with diabetes. Conclusions Both friendship and romantic relationships were associated with psychological and diabetes outcomes among emerging adults. PMID:25157071

  5. Type and Intensity of Negative Life Events Are Associated With Depression in Adults With Intellectual Disabilities.

    PubMed

    Hove, Oddbjørn; Assmus, Jörg; Havik, Odd E

    2016-09-01

    This study investigated the associations between types and intensity of life events and symptoms of depression among adults with intellectual disabilities. A community sample (N = 593) was screened for current depression and exposure to life events (i.e., loss, illness, change, and bullying) during the previous 12 months. Symptoms of depression were measured using the Psychopathology Checklists for Adults With Intellectual Disabilities. Exposure to three of the four types of life events studied (loss, illness, and bullying) and the intensity of the events were associated with depression, particularly in the cases of loss of relatives and bullying. Quality of care moderated the association between bullying and depression and may buffer the adverse consequences of bullying. PMID:27611352

  6. Recurrent adult-type rhabdomyoma: a rare differential diagnosis of "swellings in the masticatory muscle".

    PubMed

    Schlittenbauer, Tilo; Rieker, Ralf; Amann, Kerstin; Schmitt, Christian; Wehrhan, Falk; Mitsimponas, Konstantinos; Schlegel, Karl Andreas; Agaimy, Abbas

    2013-01-01

    Rhabdomyomas are rare benign mesenchymal tumors with skeletal muscle differentiation and a predilection for the head and neck area. A 38-year-old man presented with persistent, slowly growing, painless swelling in the left inner cheek for 2½ years. The lesion was detected during routine dental examination and was considered to represent a mucocele. The mass was removed via a transoral surgical approach, followed by a local recurrence 6 months later that was again surgically removed. The patient is alive and well 2 months after last surgery. Adult-type rhabdomyoma is a rare, occasionally recurring, benign mesenchymal tumor that should be included in the differential diagnosis of submucosal swellings in the oral cavity including the masticatory musculature. Adult-type rhabdomyoma of the cheek and masticatory area are exceptionally rare with no more than 3 cases reported to date. PMID:24163862

  7. Prevalence of celiac disease in adult type 1 patients with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Dogan, Burcu; Oner, Can; Bayramicli, Oya Uygur; Yorulmaz, Elif; Feyizoglu, Guneş; Oguz, Aytekin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Celiac disease, an autoimmune disease, is related to immune mediated intolerance to gluten. Some studies suggest that Celiac Disease was 20 times more frequent in type 1 patients with diabetes. The objective of our study was to evaluate the prevalence of celiac disease in hospital based type 1 diabetic adults. Methods: Our study was carried out retrospectively in Medeniyet University Goztepe Training and Educational Hospital in Istanbul between 2012–2013. The cohort comprised 482 type 1 patients with diabetes attending the diabetes outpatient clinic. The data were analyzed by SPSS 10.5 package program. Student’s t tests is used for comparative analyses. A p-value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The cohort included 482 type 1 patients with diabetes. Fifty seven of them were not evaluated for Endomysium antibody positivity. Fifteen of the remaining 425 patients were positive for anti endomysial antibody (3.5%). The prevalence of biopsy proven celiac disease was 2.3% (10/425). There was no significant difference between Endomysial antibody positive and negative groups in regard of age, sex, or duration of the disease. Conclusion: This study confirms that the celiac disease is common in type 1 diabetic patients. Since a small proportion of celiac patients are symptomatic this disorder should be screened in all adult type 1 patients with diabetes by antiendomysium antibody. PMID:26430419

  8. Social network types and functional dependency in older adults in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Social networks play a key role in caring for older adults. A better understanding of the characteristics of different social networks types (TSNs) in a given community provides useful information for designing policies to care for this age group. Therefore this study has three objectives: 1) To derive the TSNs among older adults affiliated with the Mexican Institute of Social Security; 2) To describe the main characteristics of the older adults in each TSN, including the instrumental and economic support they receive and their satisfaction with the network; 3) To determine the association between functional dependency and the type of social network. Methods Secondary data analysis of the 2006 Survey of Autonomy and Dependency (N = 3,348). The TSNs were identified using the structural approach and cluster analysis. The association between functional dependency and the TSNs was evaluated with Poisson regression with robust variance analysis in which socio-demographic characteristics, lifestyle and medical history covariates were included. Results We identified five TSNs: diverse with community participation (12.1%), diverse without community participation (44.3%); widowed (32.0%); nonfriends-restricted (7.6%); nonfamily-restricted (4.0%). Older adults belonging to widowed and restricted networks showed a higher proportion of dependency, negative self-rated health and depression. Older adults with functional dependency more likely belonged to a widowed network (adjusted prevalence ratio 1.5; 95%CI: 1.1-2.1). Conclusion The derived TSNs were similar to those described in developed countries. However, we identified the existence of a diverse network without community participation and a widowed network that have not been previously described. These TSNs and restricted networks represent a potential unmet need of social security affiliates. PMID:20187973

  9. Multi-type Childhood Abuse, Strategies of Coping, and Psychological Adaptations in Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Sesar, Kristina; Šimić, Nataša; Barišić, Marijana

    2010-01-01

    Aim To retrospectively analyze the rate of multi-type abuse in childhood and the effects of childhood abuse and type of coping strategies on the psychological adaptation of young adults in a sample form the student population of the University of Mostar. Methods The study was conducted on a convenience sample of 233 students from the University of Mostar (196 female and 37 male), with a median age of 20 (interquartile range, 2). Exposure to abuse was determined using the Child Maltreatment Scales for Adults, which assesses emotional, physical, and sexual abuse, neglect, and witnessing family violence. Psychological adaptation was explored by the Trauma Symptom Checklist, which assesses anxiety/depression, sexual problems, trauma symptoms, and somatic symptoms. Strategies of coping with stress were explored by the Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations. Results Multi-type abuse in childhood was experienced by 172 participants (74%) and all types of abuse by 11 (5%) participants. Emotional and physical maltreatment were the most frequent types of abuse and mostly occurred together with other types of abuse. Significant association was found between all types of abuse (r = 0.436-0.778, P < 0.050). Exposure to sexual abuse in childhood and coping strategies were significant predictors of anxiety/depression (R2 = 0.3553), traumatic symptoms (R2 = 0.2299), somatic symptoms (R2 = 0.2173), and sexual problems (R2 = 0.1550, P < 0.001). Conclusion Exposure to multi-type abuse in childhood is a traumatic experience with long-term negative effects. Problem-oriented coping strategies ensure a better psychosocial adaptation than emotion-oriented strategies. PMID:20960590

  10. Electrophysiological characterization of adult-onset Niemann-Pick type C disease.

    PubMed

    Iodice, Rosa; Dubbioso, Raffaele; Topa, Antonietta; Ruggiero, Lucia; Pisciotta, Chiara; Esposito, Marcello; Tozza, Stefano; Santoro, Lucio; Manganelli, Fiore

    2015-01-15

    In infantile and juvenile Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease electrophysiological studies have shown central (CNS) and peripheral (PNS) nervous system abnormalities. However, an extensive electrophysiological evaluation of CNS and PNS in adult form of NPC is still lacking. The aim of the study is to assess in adult-onset NPC disease the involvement of CNS and PNS by a multimodal electrophysiological approach. Three patients affected by adult form of NPC disease underwent electrophysiological evaluation including nerve conduction study (NCS), magnetic motor (MEPs), visual (VEPs), somatosensory (SSEPs) and brainstem auditory (BAEPs) evoked potentials. NCS, MEPs, VEPs and upper limb SSEPs were normal. Lower limb SSEPs were abnormal in all patients and abnormalities were consistent with a length-dependent process affecting the central somatosensory pathway. BAEPs were abnormal in all patients with both peripheral and central impairment of auditory pathway. Our electrophysiological findings suggest that auditory and lower limb somatosensory pathways are constantly affected in adult-onset form of NPC disease. The involvement of PNS, pyramidal, visual and upper limb somatosensory pathways might occur later during the course of disease. PMID:25537619

  11. Association between Dietary Patterns and Blood Lipid Profiles in Korean Adults with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jeong Hyun; Lee, Yeon-Sook; Chang, Hak Chul; Moon, Min Kyong

    2011-01-01

    We aimed to explore the associations of dietary patterns with blood lipid profiles and obesity in adults with type 2 diabetes. The data were obtained from the Forth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2007-2008. Adults 30 yr or older, from which had both biochemical and dietary data were obtained. Among them, 680 subjects were defined as having diabetes based on criteria of fasting glucose ≥ 126 mg/dL, anti-diabetic treatment, or previously diagnosed diabetes. Dietary data from a 24-hr recall were used to derive dietary patterns by factor analysis. Four dietary patterns by factor analysis were identified: 'Bread & Meat & Alcohol', 'Noodles & Seafood', 'Rice & Vegetables', and 'Korean Healthy' patterns. Serum cholesterol levels in the highest quartile of the 'Bread & Meat & Alcohol' pattern were significantly higher compared with those in the lowest quartile. In addition, total cholesterol and triglyceride levels in the highest quartile of the 'Korean Healthy' pattern were significantly lower after adjusting for potential confounders. Dietary patterns of adults with diabetes were found to be associated with blood lipid profiles. 'Korean Healthy' pattern including whole grains, legumes, vegetables, and fruits could thus improve lipid profiles among those with type 2 diabetes. PMID:21935277

  12. Diabetes Self-Management Smartphone Application for Adults With Type 1 Diabetes: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Vandelanotte, Corneel; Fenning, Andrew; Duncan, Mitch J

    2013-01-01

    Background Persistently poor glycemic control in adult type 1 diabetes patients is a common, complex, and serious problem initiating significant damage to the cardiovascular, renal, neural, and visual systems. Currently, there is a plethora of low-cost and free diabetes self-management smartphone applications available in online stores. Objective The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of a freely available smartphone application combined with text-message feedback from a certified diabetes educator to improve glycemic control and other diabetes-related outcomes in adult patients with type 1 diabetes in a two-group randomized controlled trial. Methods Patients were recruited through an online type 1 diabetes support group and letters mailed to adults with type 1 diabetes throughout Australia. In a 6-month intervention, followed by a three-month follow-up, patients (n=72) were randomized to usual care (control group) or usual care and the use of a smartphone application (Glucose Buddy) with weekly text-message feedback from a Certified Diabetes Educator (intervention group). All outcome measures were collected at baseline and every three months over the study period. Patients’ glycosylated hemoglobin levels (HbA1c) were measured with a blood test and diabetes-related self-efficacy, self-care activities, and quality of life were measured with online questionnaires. Results The mean age of patients was 35.20 years (SD 10.43) (28 male, 44 female), 39% (28/72) were male, and patients had been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes for a mean of 18.94 years (SD 9.66). Of the initial 72 patients, 53 completed the study (25 intervention, 28 control group). The intervention group significantly improved glycemic control (HbA1c) from baseline (mean 9.08%, SD 1.18) to 9-month follow-up (mean 7.80%, SD 0.75), compared to the control group (baseline: mean 8.47%, SD 0.86, follow-up: mean 8.58%, SD 1.16). No significant change over time was found in either group in

  13. Associations of HLA-A, -B and -DRB1 Types with Oral Diseases in Swiss Adults

    PubMed Central

    Mauramo, Matti; Ramseier, Adrian Markus; Buser, Andreas; Tiercy, Jean-Marie; Weiger, Roland; Waltimo, Tuomas

    2014-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigens (HLA) are crucial components of host defense against microbial challenge but the associations of HLA types with oral infectious diseases have not been studied in detail. This prospective cross-sectional study examined associations of HLA-A, -B and -DRB1 types with common oral diseases in a healthy Swiss adult population. 257 subjects (107 m, 150 f, mean age: 43.5 yr; range: 21–58 yr) with known HLA-A, -B and -DRB1 profiles and comprehensive medical records were included. A thorough anamnesis was followed by oral examinations including saliva flow measurements, the DMFT score for cariological status, complete periodontal status with plaque and bleeding indexes as well as assessment of mucosal alterations and temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD). Student’s t-test and Pearson chi-square test were utilized to compare the oral diseases between HLA positive and negative subjects. Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons was used and PBonf<0.05 was considered statistically significant. HLA types -B15 (PBonf = 0.002), -B51 (PBonf = 0.02) and -DRB1*12 (PBonf = 0.02) were associated with less periodontal disease manifestations. HLA-A32 had a positive association with TMD dysfunction (PBonf = 0.012). No other statistically significant associations were observed. In conclusion, HLA types may contribute to the development of oral diseases in generally healthy Caucasian adults. PMID:25072155

  14. Sex Differences in the Association Between Birth Weight and Adult Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Esther; Gamborg, Michael; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Baker, Jennifer L

    2015-12-01

    Low birth weight is a well-established risk factor for type 2 diabetes, but the risk at high birth weight levels remains uncertain. Potential sex differences in the associations are unexplored. We investigated whether sex influences the association of birth weight and adult type 2 diabetes, using a cohort of 113,801 men and 109,298 women, born 1936-1983, from the Copenhagen School Health Records Register, Denmark. During 5.6 million person-years of follow-up, 7,750 men and 4,736 women had a diagnosis of adult type 2 diabetes (30 years of age or older) obtained from national registers. When birth weights between 3.251 and 3.750 kg were used as the reference group for each sex separately, women with birth weights in the categories of 2.000 to 2.750 kg and 4.751 to 5.500 kg had hazard ratios [HRs] of type 2 diabetes of 1.46 (95% CI, 1.34-1.59) and 1.56 (1.20-2.04), respectively, whereas men had HRs of 1.20 (1.12-1.30) and 0.93 (0.76-1.15). Thus, sex modified the association, with stronger risk estimates of type 2 diabetes in women at both low and high birth weights compared with men (P = 0.001). In conclusion, birth weight is more strongly associated with type 2 diabetes in women than in men. Future search for sex-specific causal mechanisms may provide new insights into the early origins of type 2 diabetes. PMID:26253610

  15. Latent Classes of Young Adults Based on Use of Multiple Types of Tobacco and Nicotine Products

    PubMed Central

    Lenk, Kathleen M.; Forster, Jean L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: New tobacco and nicotine products such as snus, hookah, and electronic cigarettes have risen in popularity in recent years. Use of these products among young adults is of particular interest given that experimentation with new products is common in young adulthood. Methods: We conducted latent class analysis among a population-based sample of young adults to identify separate classes based on use of 6 types of tobacco or nicotine products: snus, hookah, electronic cigarettes, cigarillos, snuff, and cigarettes. We then examined how identified classes differed on demographic characteristics and marijuana and alcohol use. Results: We identified 5 classes: the largest group (60%) was characterized as reporting no or limited use of any of the products, while the smallest group (7%) was characterized by use of many types of products (poly-users). Of the 3 middle classes, 2 were the same size (10%) and were characterized by primarily using 2 of the products: one class used snus and snuff, and the other used cigarillos and hookah; the third class (13%) was characterized by primarily cigarette smoking. Numerous differences were seen across classes, including the poly-users being less likely to be college students/graduates and more likely to be male and use marijuana and alcohol. Conclusions: We found that young adults can be grouped into 5 subgroups based on types of tobacco/nicotine products they do and do not use. A poly-use group that uses all types of tobacco products is concerning, particularly given high levels of marijuana and alcohol use reported in this group. PMID:24604019

  16. Parental bonding and adult attachment styles in different types of stalker.

    PubMed

    MacKenzie, Rachel D; Mullen, Paul E; Ogloff, James R P; McEwan, Troy E; James, David V

    2008-11-01

    Attachment theory is one of the earliest and most vigorously promoted explanations of the psychological processes that underlie stalking behavior. Insecure attachment has been proposed as impairing the management of relationships, thus increasing the propensity to stalk. The current study explored the parental bonding and adult attachment styles of 122 stalkers referred to a specialist forensic clinic. Stalkers were grouped according to two common classification methods: relationship and motivation. Compared to general community samples, stalkers were more likely to remember their parents as emotionally neglectful and have insecure adult attachment styles, with the degree of divergence varying according to stalker type and mode of classification. In offering support for the theoretical proposition that stalking evolves from pathological attachment, these findings highlight the need to consider attachment in the assessment and management of stalkers. Also emphasized is the importance of taking classification methods into account when interpreting and evaluating stalking research. PMID:18798773

  17. Niemann-Pick type C: focus on the adolescent/adult onset form.

    PubMed

    Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo; Marano, Massimo; Florio, Lucia; De Santis, Stefano

    2016-11-01

    Niemann-Pick disease type C (NP-C) is an inherited sphingolipidosis characterized by progressive neurological deterioration and early mortality. The symptomatology and disease progression of NP-C are markedly affected by the age at onset of neurological manifestations, and categorization into early-infantile, late-infantile, juvenile, adolescent/adult neurological onset forms can aid evaluation of disease course and responses to therapy. Here, we review current information on the detection, diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of NP-C, with a focus on the adolescent/adult-onset form. A recent analysis indicated that the combined incidence of NP-C related to NPC1 gene mutations (NPC1) and NP-C related to NPC2 gene mutations (NPC2) is approximately 1 case in every 89 000 live births. In particular, late-onset phenotypes might well provide a greater contribution to the overall incidence than has previously been reported. Some neuropathological features in NP-C are held in common with other advanced age-onset diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Visceral symptoms such as splenomegaly are frequently asymptomatic in patients with adolescent/adult-onset NP-C, and are only occasionally detected during routine ultrasound assessments. In contrast, most patients with adolescent/adult-onset exhibit some degree of slowly progressive, non-disease-specific movement disorders (e.g. cerebellar ataxia), and/or more pathognomonic neurological signs such as vertical supranuclear gaze palsy. An increasing number of adolescent/adult-onset cases have been reported following initial recognition of cognitive impairment and/or psychiatric signs. The recent development and implementation of new clinical screening tools (e.g. the NP-C suspicion index) and biomarkers (e.g. plasma oxysterols) should help identify patients who warrant further investigation and possible treatment. PMID:26998855

  18. Speech-in-Noise Perception Deficit in Adults with Dyslexia: Effects of Background Type and Listening Configuration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dole, Marjorie; Hoen, Michel; Meunier, Fanny

    2012-01-01

    Developmental dyslexia is associated with impaired speech-in-noise perception. The goal of the present research was to further characterize this deficit in dyslexic adults. In order to specify the mechanisms and processing strategies used by adults with dyslexia during speech-in-noise perception, we explored the influence of background type,…

  19. A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL OF RESISTANCE EXERCISE TRAINING TO IMPROVE GLYCEMIC CONTROL IN OLDER ADULTS WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    OBJECTIVE-To determine the efficacy of high-intensity progressive resistance training (PRT) on glycemic control in older adults with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS-We performed a 16-week randomized controlled trial in 62 Latino older adults (40 women and 22 men; mean +/- SE age 66 +/...

  20. Higher Fibrinogen Levels Predict Progression of Coronary Artery Calcification in Adults with Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, T.C.; Snell-Bergeon, J.K.; Maahs, D.M; Kinney, G.L.; Rewers, M.

    2010-01-01

    Aim To determine whether fibrinogen levels predict independently progression of coronary artery calcification (CAC) in adults with type 1 diabetes. Methods Data from a prospective cohort - the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes Study - were evaluated. Fibrinogen levels at baseline were separated into quartiles. CAC was measured twice and averaged at baseline and at follow-up 2.4 ± 0.4 years later. CAC progressors were defined as participants whose square-root transformed CAC volume increased by ≥ 2.53 or development mm of clinical coronary artery disease during the follow-up period. Results Fibrinogen levels were higher in progressors than in non-progressors (276 ± 61 mg/dl versus 259 ± 61 mg/dl, p = 0.0003). CAC progression, adjusted for known cardiovascular risk factors, increased in the highest quartile. Conclusions Higher fibrinogen levels predict CAC progression in type 1 diabetes subjects, independent of standard cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:20079495

  1. The Relationship between Type D Personality and Suicidality in Low-Income, Middle-Aged Adults

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Dae Hyun; Kim, Seog Ju; Lee, Jong-Ha; Kim, Pyo-Min; Park, Doo-Heum; Ryu, Seung Ho; Yu, Jaehak

    2015-01-01

    Objective Low-income adults are considered to be a group at high risk for suicide. We sought to examine the effect of type D personality and other socio-demographic factors on suicidality in low-income, middle-aged Koreans. Methods In total, 306 low-income, middle-aged Koreans [age: 49.16±5.24 (40-59) years, 156 males, 150 females] were enrolled from the Korean National Basic Livelihood Security System. Socio-demographic data, including employment status, income, health, marital status, and educational attainment, were gathered. Beck's 19-item Scale for Suicidal Ideation (SSI) was applied to evaluate suicidality, and the DS14 was used to assess type D personality. Results Unemployment (p<0.01) and absence of spouse (p=0.03) predicted higher SSI scores independent of other socioeconomic factors. All type D personality scores [i.e., negative affectivity (NA), social inhibition (SI), and total score] predicted higher SSI scores independent of all socioeconomic factors (all, p<0.001). Subjects with type D personality had higher SSI scores (p<0.001), and the association between suicidality and socio-demographic factors (employment or physical health) could be found only in subjects without type D personality. Conclusion Type D personality was a risk factor for suicide in low-income Koreans, independently from socio-economic factors. In addition, the socio-demographic factors were less prominently associated with suicidality in those with type D personality. PMID:25670941

  2. Cost-Effectiveness of Increasing Influenza Vaccination Coverage in Adults with Type 2 Diabetes in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Akın, Levent; Macabéo, Bérengère; Caliskan, Zafer; Altinel, Serdar; Satman, Ilhan

    2016-01-01

    Objective In Turkey, the prevalence of diabetes is high but the influenza vaccination coverage rate (VCR) is low (9.1% in 2014), despite vaccination being recommended and reimbursed. This study evaluated the cost-effectiveness of increasing the influenza VCR of adults with type 2 diabetes in Turkey to 20%. Methods A decision-analytic model was adapted to Turkey using data derived from published sources. Direct medical costs and indirect costs due to productivity loss were included in the societal perspective. The time horizon was set at 1 year to reflect the seasonality of influenza. Results Increasing the VCR for adults with type 2 diabetes to 20% is predicted to avert an additional 19,777 influenza cases, 2376 hospitalizations, and 236 deaths. Associated influenza costs avoided were estimated at more than 8.3 million Turkish Lira (TRY), while the cost of vaccination would be more than TRY 8.4 million. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was estimated at TRY 64/quality-adjusted life years, which is below the per capita gross domestic product of TRY 21,511 and therefore very cost-effective according to World Health Organization guidelines. Factors most influencing the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio were the excess hospitalization rate, inpatient cost, vaccine effectiveness against hospitalization, and influenza attack rate. Increasing the VCR to >20% was also estimated to be very cost-effective. Conclusions Increasing the VCR for adults with type 2 diabetes in Turkey to ≥20% would be very cost-effective. PMID:27322384

  3. The association between different types of exercise and energy expenditure in young nonoverweight and overweight adults

    PubMed Central

    Drenowatz, Clemens; Hand, Gregory A.; Shook, Robin P.; Jakicic, John M.; Hebert, James R.; Burgess, Stephanie; Blair, Steven N.

    2015-01-01

    With decades of trends for decreasing activity during work and travel, exercise becomes an important contributor to total physical activity (PA) and energy expenditure. The purpose of this study was to examine the contribution of different types of exercise to the variability in energy expenditure and time spent at different PA intensities in young adults. Four hundred and seventeen adults (49.9% male; 46.2 overweight/obese) between 21 and 36 years of age provided valid objective PA and energy expenditure data, assessed via the SenseWear Armband (BodyMedia Inc.). Frequency and duration of participation in various exercise types was self-reported. Weight status was based on body mass index (BMI) (kg/m2) with body weight and height being measured according to standard procedures. Eighty-four percent of the participants reported regular exercise engagement with no difference in participation rate by sex or BMI category. Exercise time along with sex and ethnicity explained roughly 60% of the variability in total daily energy expenditure (TDEE) while the association between exercise and time spent in moderate to vigorous PA or being sedentary was low or nonsignificant. Engagement in endurance exercise and sports contributed predominantly to the variability in energy expenditure and PA in nonoverweight participants. In overweight/obese participants engagement in resistance exercise and swimming contributed significantly to variability in TDEE. Current exercise recommendations focus primarily on aerobic exercise, but results of the present study suggest that nonweight-bearing exercises, such as resistance exercise and swimming, contribute significantly to the variability in TDEE in overweight/obese adults, which would make these types of activities viable options for exercise interventions. PMID:25647557

  4. Abuse in Childhood and Adolescence As a Predictor of Type 2 Diabetes in Adult Women

    PubMed Central

    Rich-Edwards, Janet W.; Spiegelman, Donna; Lividoti Hibert, Eileen N.; Jun, Hee-Jin; Todd, Tamarra James; Kawachi, Ichiro; Wright, Rosalind J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Although child abuse is associated with obesity, it is not known whether early abuse increases risk of type 2 diabetes. Purpose To investigate associations of child and adolescent abuse with adult diabetes Methods Proportional hazards models were used to examine associations of lifetime abuse reported in 2001 with risk of diabetes from 1989 to 2005 among 67,853 women in the Nurses Health Study II. Data were analyzed in 2009. Results Child or teen physical abuse was reported by 54% and sexual abuse by 34% of participants. Models were adjusted for age, race, body type at age 5 years, and parental education and history of diabetes. Compared to women who reported no physical abuse, the hazards ratio (HR) was 1.03 (95% CI: 0.91, 1.17) for mild physical abuse, 1.26 (1.14, 1.40) for moderate physical abuse, and 1.54 (1.34, 1.77) for severe physical abuse. Compared with women reporting no sexual abuse in childhood or adolescence, the HR was 1.16 (1.05, 1.29) for unwanted sexual touching, 1.34 (1.13, 1.59) for one episode of forced sexual activity, and 1.69 (1.45, 1.97) for repeated forced sex. Adult BMI accounted for 60% (32%, 87%) of the association of child and adolescent physical abuse and 64% (38%, 91%) of the association of sexual abuse with diabetes. Conclusions Moderate to severe physical and sexual abuse in childhood and adolescence have dose response associations with risk of type 2 diabetes among adult women. This excess risk is partially explained by the higher BMI of women with a history of early abuse. PMID:21084073

  5. Perioperative anaesthetic management of penetrating neck injury associated with Rh blood type in a young adult

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Zhou, Yeting; Shi, Jiaohui; Wang, Zhichun

    2013-01-01

    We describe here a young adult patient with penetrating neck injuries (PNI) with an Rh negative blood type and discuss the perioperative anaesthetic management of single-stage surgical exploration under general anaesthesia and extracorporeal circulation in this patient. The patient had zone II PNI and he was in a haemodynamically progressive unstable state, and the knife penetrated the left internal jugular vein, superior thyroid artery and recurrent laryngeal nerve; the trachea and the oesophagus were swelling at a rapid rate. Eight weeks after operation, the patient was discharged from the hospital without any complications. PMID:23429024

  6. Hope matters to the glycemic control of adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Santos, Fábio R M; Sigulem, Daniel; Areco, Kelsy C N; Gabbay, Monica A L; Dib, Sergio A; Bernardo, Viviane

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated the association of hope and its factors with depression and glycemic control in adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes. A total of 113 patients were invited to participate. Significant negative correlations were found between hope and HbA1c and also between hope and depression. Hope showed a significant association with HbA1c and depression in the stepwise regression model. Among the hope factors, "inner positive expectancy" was significantly associated with HbA1c and depression. This study supports that hope matters to glycemic control and depression. Intervention strategies focusing on hope should be further explored. PMID:25903254

  7. Regulatory focus and adherence to self-care behaviors among adults with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Avraham, Rinat; Van Dijk, Dina; Simon-Tuval, Tzahit

    2016-09-01

    The aims of this study were, first, to test the association between regulatory focus of adults with type 2 diabetes and their adherence to two types of self-care behaviors - lifestyle change (e.g. physical activity and diet) and medical care regimens (blood-glucose monitoring, foot care and medication usage). Second, to explore whether a fit between the message framing and patients' regulatory focus would improve their intentions to adhere specifically when the type of behavior fits the patients' regulatory focus as well. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 130 adults with type 2 diabetes who were hospitalized in an academic medical center. The patients completed a set of questionnaires that included their diabetes self-care activities, regulatory focus, self-esteem and demographic, socioeconomic and clinical data. In addition, participants were exposed to either a gain-framed or a loss-framed message, and were then asked to indicate their intention to improve adherence to self-care behaviors. A multivariable linear regression model revealed that promoters reported higher adherence to lifestyle change behaviors than preventers did (B = .60, p = .028). However, no effect of regulatory focus on adherence to medical care regimens was found (B = .46, p = .114). In addition, preventers reported higher intentions to adhere to medical care behaviors when the message framing was congruent with prevention focus (B = 1.16, p = .023). However, promoters did not report higher intentions to adhere to lifestyle behaviors when the message framing was congruent with promotion focus (B = -.16, p = .765). These findings justify the need to develop tailor-made interventions that are adjusted to both patients' regulatory focus and type of health behavior. PMID:26576471

  8. Benzonphenone-type UV filters in urine of Chinese young adults: Concentration, source and exposure.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chong-Jing; Liu, Li-Yan; Ma, Wan-Li; Zhu, Ning-Zheng; Jiang, Ling; Li, Yi-Fan; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2015-08-01

    Benzophenone (BP)-type UV filters are commonly used in our daily life. 2-hydroxy-4-methoxy benzophenone (BP-3), 4-hydroxy benzophenone (4-HBP), 2,4-dihydroxy benzophenone (BP-1), 2,2',4,4'-tetrahydroxy benzophenone (BP-2) and 2,2'-dihydroxy-4-methoxy benzophenone (BP-8) were measured in urine samples from Chinese young adults. The results indicated that Chinese young adults were widely exposed to BP-3, BP-1, and 4-HBP, with the median concentrations of 0.55, 0.21, and 0.08 ng/mL, respectively. No significant difference was found between males and females, between urban and rural population. The correlations between urinary concentrations provided important indications for sources and metabolic pathways of target compounds. The estimated daily excretion doses of BP-3, 4-HBP, BP-1, BP-2 and BP-8 were 27.2, 2.24, 5.86, 0.76 and 0.30 ng/kg-bw/day, respectively. The ratio of exposure to excretion must be considered for the exposure assessment with chemicals based on urine measurement. This is the first nationwide study on BP-derivatives with young adults in China. PMID:25841211

  9. Everyday living with diabetes described by family members of adult people with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Rintala, Tuula-Maria; Paavilainen, Eija; Astedt-Kurki, Päivi

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore family members' experiences of everyday life in families with adult people living with type 1 diabetes. The grounded theory method was used to gather and analyse data from the interviews of nineteen family members. Six concepts describing the family members' views on everyday living with diabetes were generated on the basis of the data. Everyday life with diabetes is described as being intertwined with hypoglycemia. Becoming acquainted with diabetes takes place little by little. Being involved in the management and watching self-management from the sidelines are concepts describing family members' participation in the daily management of diabetes. The family members are also integrating diabetes into everyday life. Living on an emotional roller-coaster tells about the thoughts and feelings that family members experience. Family members of adult people with diabetes are involved in the management of the diabetes in many ways and experience many concerns. The family members' point of view is important to take into consideration when developing education for adults with diabetes. PMID:24455251

  10. Why do young adults with Type 1 diabetes find it difficult to manage diabetes in the workplace?

    PubMed

    Balfe, Myles; Brugha, Ruairi; Smith, Diarmuid; Sreenan, Seamus; Doyle, Frank; Conroy, Ronan

    2014-03-01

    This article explores how and why workplace environments impact diabetes management for adults people with Type 1 diabetes, 23-30 years of age. Interviews were conducted with 35 young adults, 29 women and 6 men. The majority of these interviewees worked in sectors such as banking, technology and administration. Young adults found it difficult to manage diabetes in the workplace for two main reasons: work-related time pressures and the non-routine nature of interviewees' work and working environment. Young adults also found it difficult to get the time to exercise both inside and outside of work. Young adults with Type 1 diabetes need to be provided with the tools and technologies that they need to manage diabetes in modern flexible workplaces. PMID:24480739

  11. [WPW syndrome combined with AV block 2 in an adult with glycogenosis (Type II)].

    PubMed

    Francesconi, M; Auff, E; Ursin, C; Sluga, E

    1982-08-01

    A 31 year-old female with a five year history of muscle weakness, cardiac palpitations and elevation of activity of some serum enzymes of muscular origin, showed signs of the WPW syndrome on ECG, often in combination with grade 2 A-V block. Type II glycogenosis (Pompe's disease) was diagnosed on the basis of the results of physical examination, laboratory findings--especially subtotal deficiency of acid maltase (a-1,4 glucosidase) activity-and morphological aspects of light and electron microscopy of a quadriceps muscle biopsy specimen. To our knowledge the coincidence of such a rarely encountered arrhythmia with glycogenosis type II in an adult has never been reported so far. PMID:6959422

  12. Provider Types Utilized and Recency of Mental Health Service Use among African American Emerging Adults

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Sha-Lai

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study examined factors associated with mental health service utilization among African American emerging adults, specifically, when services were used (recency) and the types of providers utilized (mental health/non-mental health). Methods Guided by the Behavioral Model for Vulnerable Populations, secondary analysis of the National Survey of American Life (2001-2003) was conducted. A nationally representative sample of African American emerging adults, ages 18-29 (n=806), were assessed using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. “Evaluated need” was determined by endorsement for one of four DSM-IV diagnosis types (mood, anxiety, substance use, impulse control). Respondents who reported a need for services for emotional/substance use problems were considered to have a “perceived need”. Those who reported voluntary use of mental health/health services to address these problems were considered to have utilized services. Results 25%of the sample utilized services in their lifetime, while 9% utilized services in the past 12 months. Females were more likely than males to utilize services in three of the four service use categories (lifetime, mental health sector, and non-mental health sector).Respondents with an evaluated need for services were 2-12 times more likely to have utilized services compared to those without a need. Conclusions Little is known about why African American emerging adults underutilize mental health services. These findings indicate that being female and having an evaluated need for services were associated with greater odds of service use among this sample. This suggests the need for additional examination of gender differences in service utilization and greater mental health outreach/education among African American males. PMID:24981778

  13. Annual Psychological Screening in Youth and Young Adults with Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    KLEMENČIČ, Simona; de WIT, Maartje; RUTAR, Miha; BATTELINO, Tadej; BRATINA, Nataša

    2015-01-01

    Aim Youth and young adults with type 1 diabetes are at a great risk for developing depression and diabetes specific distress, therefore, systematic psychological screening is recommended. Routine psychological screening was implemented in Slovene diabetes clinic for children, adolescents and young adults in 2012. One-year results are presented. Methods Adolescents and young adults (N = 159, aged 11 – 25 years), attending the obligatory yearly educational outpatient visit at University Children’s Hospital, Ljubljana, Slovenia, were examined using questionnaires measuring depression (depression scale from Slovene version of Trauma Symptom Checklist for Children) and diabetes distress (Diabetes Distress Screening Scale). Six additional items were included to assess the fear of hypoglycemia and family support. Socio-demographic and diabetes-related data were collected. Questionnaires were analyzed by a psychologist, and the patients that scored above cut-off point were invited to an individual psychological assessment. Results Of the sample, 1.3 % reached the threshold for elevated depressive symptoms, and 32.7 % reported significant diabetes distress. The need for psychological support from a specialist was expressed by 5.0 %. There were statistically significant associations between all psychological variables; moreover, better glycemic control was associated with lower diabetes distress and better family support. Nine patients (5.7 %) started with psychological treatment according to the referrals after screening. Conclusions The results after one year of psychological screening in Slovene type 1 diabetes population displayed small rates of depression and a large proportion of diabetes distress. Only a small percentage of patients attended the offered individual psychological assessment.

  14. Lifestyle risk factors for atherosclerosis in adults with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Franziska K; Maahs, David M; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K; Ogden, Lorraine G; Kinney, Greg L; Rewers, Marian

    2009-10-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the amount of self-reported physical activity, alcohol and tobacco use in a large sample of adults with type 1 diabetes and non-diabetic subjects. A second aim is to test the hypothesis that these lifestyle risk factors are associated cross-sectionally with coronary artery calcification. In 2000-2002, the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes (CACTI) study applied validated questionnaires for smoking, alcohol and physical activity to 582 type 1 diabetes subjects and 724 non-diabetic subjects. More type 1 diabetes subjects reported current smoking than non-diabetic subjects (12.3% versus 8.6%, p=0.027). Overall, reported physical activity did not differ by diabetes status (p=0.79). More type 1 diabetes subjects reported never having consumed alcohol (10% versus 4%, p<0.0001) and those who drank consumed less alcohol (p=0.0015) than non-diabetic subjects. Physical activity and smoking were significantly associated with the presence of coronary artery calcification (adjusted OR=0.9, 95% CI: 0.8-0.996, p=0.045, and OR=1.7, CI: 1.1-2.6, p=0.03, respectively). Type 1 diabetes was independently associated with increased odds of coronary artery calcification (OR=3.5, 95% CI: 2.5-5.0, p<0.0001). Differences exist in lifestyle-related cardiovascular risk factors in men and women with type 1 diabetes compared with non-diabetic subjects in the CACTI study. PMID:20368221

  15. Cathepsin F mutations cause Type B Kufs disease, an adult-onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Katherine R.; Dahl, Hans-Henrik M.; Canafoglia, Laura; Andermann, Eva; Damiano, John; Morbin, Michela; Bruni, Amalia C.; Giaccone, Giorgio; Cossette, Patrick; Saftig, Paul; Grötzinger, Joachim; Schwake, Michael; Andermann, Frederick; Staropoli, John F.; Sims, Katherine B.; Mole, Sara E.; Franceschetti, Silvana; Alexander, Noreen A.; Cooper, Jonathan D.; Chapman, Harold A.; Carpenter, Stirling; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Bahlo, Melanie

    2013-01-01

    Kufs disease, an adult-onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, is challenging to diagnose and genetically heterogeneous. Mutations in CLN6 were recently identified in recessive Kufs disease presenting as progressive myoclonus epilepsy (Type A), whereas the molecular basis of cases presenting with dementia and motor features (Type B) is unknown. We performed genome-wide linkage mapping of two families with recessive Type B Kufs disease and identified a single region on chromosome 11 to which both families showed linkage. Exome sequencing of five samples from the two families identified homozygous and compound heterozygous missense mutations in CTSF within this linkage region. We subsequently sequenced CTSF in 22 unrelated individuals with suspected recessive Kufs disease, and identified an additional patient with compound heterozygous mutations. CTSF encodes cathepsin F, a lysosomal cysteine protease, dysfunction of which is a highly plausible candidate mechanism for a storage disorder like ceroid lipofuscinosis. In silico modeling suggested the missense mutations would alter protein structure and function. Moreover, re-examination of a previously published mouse knockout of Ctsf shows that it recapitulates the light and electron-microscopic pathological features of Kufs disease. Although CTSF mutations account for a minority of cases of type B Kufs, CTSF screening should be considered in cases with early-onset dementia and may avoid the need for invasive biopsies. PMID:23297359

  16. A search for the primary abnormality in adult-onset type II citrullinemia

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Keiko; Shaheen, Nazma; Saheki, Takeyori ); Kumashiro, Ryukichi; Tanikawa, Kyuichi ); O'Brien, W.E.; Beaudet, A.L. )

    1993-11-01

    Deficiency of argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) causes citrullinemia in human beings. Type II citrullinemia is found in most patients with adult-onset citrullinemia in Japan, and ASS deficiency is found specifically in the liver. Previous studies have shown that the decrease of hepatic ASS activity is caused by a decrease in enzyme protein with normal kinetic properties and that there were no apparent abnormalities in the amount, translational activity, and gross structure of hepatic ASS mRNA. In the present work, the authors show by sequencing analysis that there was no mutation in the ASS mRNA from two patients with type II citrullinemia. The authors also report RFLP analysis of a consanguineous family with type II citrullinemia, by using three DNA polymorphisms located within the ASS gene locus. In spite of having consanguineous parents, the patient was not a homozygous haplotype for the ASS gene. The RFLP analysis of 16 affected patients from consanguineous parents showed that 5 of 16 patients had the heterozygous pattern for one of the three DNA probes and that the frequency of the heterozygous haplotype was not different from the control frequency. These results suggest that the primary defect of type II citrullinemia is not within the ASS gene locus. 29 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  17. A search for the primary abnormality in adult-onset type II citrullinemia.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, K; Shaheen, N; Kumashiro, R; Tanikawa, K; O'Brien, W E; Beaudet, A L; Saheki, T

    1993-11-01

    Deficiency of argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) causes citrullinemia in human beings. Type II citrullinemia is found in most patients with adult-onset citrullinemia in Japan, and ASS deficiency is found specifically in the liver. Previous studies have shown that the decrease of hepatic ASS activity is caused by a decrease in enzyme protein with normal kinetic properties and that there were no apparent abnormalities in the amount, translational activity, and gross structure of hepatic ASS mRNA. In the present work, we show by sequencing analysis that there was no mutation in the ASS mRNA from two patients with type II citrullinemia. We also report RFLP analysis of a consanguineous family with type II citrullinemia, by using three DNA polymorphisms located within the ASS gene locus. In spite of having consanguineous parents, the patient was not a homozygous haplotype for the ASS gene. The RFLP analysis of 16 affected patients from consanguineous parents showed that 5 of 16 patients had the heterozygous pattern for one of the three DNA probes and that the frequency of the heterozygous haplotype was not different from the control frequency. These results suggest that the primary defect of type II citrullinemia is not within the ASS gene locus. PMID:8105687

  18. Child and adult pedestrian impact: the influence of vehicle type on injury severity.

    PubMed

    Henary, Basem Y; Crandall, Jeff; Bhalla, Kavi; Mock, Charles N; Roudsari, Bahman S

    2003-01-01

    In the United States, the vehicle fleet is shifting from predominantly passenger cars (automobiles) to SUVs, light trucks, and vans (LTV). This study investigates how pedestrian severe injury and mortality are associated with vehicle type and pedestrian age. The Pedestrian Crash Data Study (PCDS) database for years 1994-1998 was used for a cross-sectional study design. Outcome measures were Injury Severity Score, Maximum Abbreviated Injury Score, Abbreviated Injury Scale, Pedestrian Mortality, Functional Capacity Index and Life Years Lost to Injury. Compared to children, adult pedestrians were more likely to sustain severe injury (OR = 2.81; 95% CI: 1.56-5.06) or mortality (OR = 2.91; 95% CI: 1.10-7.74) when examining all vehicle types. However, after adjusting for vehicle type and impact speed, this association was not statistically significant at p < 0.05. Compared to passenger cars, pedestrians struck by LTV were more likely to have severe injuries (OR = 1.31; 95% CI: 0.88-1.94) or mortality (OR = 1.40; 95% CI: 0.84-2.34) for all pedestrians. Adjusting for pedestrian age, this association was more obvious and significant at lower impact speeds ( < or = 30 km/h); odds ratios of severe injury and mortality were 3.34 (p< 0.01) and 1.87 (p= 0.07), respectively. Adults hit by LTV had the highest risk of injury and mortality. These findings indicate that pedestrian age, vehicle engineering design and impact speed are highly contributing to risks of pedestrian injury and mortality. PMID:12941221

  19. Child and Adult Pedestrian Impact: The Influence of Vehicle Type on Injury Severity

    PubMed Central

    Henary, Basem Y.; Crandall, Jeff; Bhalla, Kavi; Mock, Charles N.; Roudsari, Bahman S.

    2003-01-01

    In the United States, the vehicle fleet is shifting from predominantly passenger cars (automobiles) to SUVs, light trucks, and vans (LTV). This study investigates how pedestrian severe injury and mortality are associated with vehicle type and pedestrian age. The Pedestrian Crash Data Study (PCDS) database for years 1994–1998 was used for a cross-sectional study design. Outcome measures were Injury Severity Score, Maximum Abbreviated Injury Score, Abbreviated Injury Scale, Pedestrian Mortality, Functional Capacity Index and Life Years Lost to Injury. Compared to children, adult pedestrians were more likely to sustain severe injury (OR = 2.81; 95% CI: 1.56–5.06) or mortality (OR = 2.91; 95% CI: 1.10–7.74) when examining all vehicle types. However, after adjusting for vehicle type and impact speed, this association was not statistically significant at p < 0.05. Compared to passenger cars, pedestrians struck by LTV were more likely to have severe injuries (OR = 1.31; 95% CI: 0.88–1.94) or mortality (OR = 1.40; 95% CI: 0.84–2.34) for all pedestrians. Adjusting for pedestrian age, this association was more obvious and significant at lower impact speeds (≤ 30 km/h); odds ratios of severe injury and mortality were 3.34 (p< 0.01) and 1.87 (p= 0.07), respectively. Adults hit by LTV had the highest risk of injury and mortality. These findings indicate that pedestrian age, vehicle engineering design and impact speed are highly contributing to risks of pedestrian injury and mortality. PMID:12941221

  20. Inhibition of Adult Rat Retinal Ganglion Cells by D1-type Dopamine Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Hayashida, Yuki; Rodríguez, Carolina Varela; Ogata, Genki; Partida, Gloria J.; Oi, Hanako; Stradleigh, Tyler W.; Lee, Sherwin C.; Colado, Anselmo Felipe; Ishida, Andrew T.

    2011-01-01

    The spike output of neural pathways can be regulated by modulating output neuron excitability and/or their synaptic inputs. Dopaminergic interneurons synapse onto cells that route signals to mammalian retinal ganglion cells, but it is unknown whether dopamine can activate receptors in these ganglion cells and, if it does, how this affects their excitability. Here, we show D1a-receptor-like immunoreactivity in ganglion cells identified in adult rats by retrogradely transported dextran, and that dopamine, D1-type receptor agonists, and cAMP analogs inhibit spiking in ganglion cells dissociated from adult rats. These ligands curtailed repetitive spiking during constant current injections, and reduced the number and rate of rise of spikes elicited by fluctuating current injections without significantly altering the timing of the remaining spikes. Consistent with mediation by D1-type receptors, SCH-23390 reversed the effects of dopamine on spikes. Contrary to a recent report, spike inhibition by dopamine was not precluded by blocking Ih. Consistent with the reduced rate of spike rise, dopamine reduced voltage-gated Na+ current (INa) amplitude and tetrodotoxin, at doses that reduced INa as moderately as dopamine, also inhibited spiking. These results provide the first direct evidence that D1-type dopamine receptor activation can alter mammalian retinal ganglion cell excitability, and demonstrate that dopamine can modulate spikes in these cells by a mechanism different from the pre- and postsynaptic means proposed by previous studies. To our knowledge, our results also provide the first evidence that dopamine receptor activation can reduce excitability without altering the temporal precision of spike firing. PMID:19940196

  1. Predictors of type 2 diabetes in a nationally representative sample of adults with psychosis.

    PubMed

    Foley, Debra L; Mackinnon, Andrew; Morgan, Vera A; Watts, Gerald F; McGrath, John J; Castle, David J; Waterreus, Anna; Galletly, Cherrie A

    2014-06-01

    Antipsychotic drugs such as clozapine and olanzapine are associated with an increased risk for type 2 diabetes, but relatively little is known about the relationship between risk factors for type 2 diabetes established in the general population and type 2 diabetes in people with psychosis. We estimated the prevalence of established risk factors and their association with type 2 diabetes in a nationally representative sample of people with an ICD-10 psychosis (N=1642) who gave a fasting blood sample (N=1155). Logistic regression was used to summarize associations adjusted for age and sex. In this sample, whose mean duration of psychosis was 14.7 years, 12.1% (13.1% of women and 11.5% of men) had type 2 diabetes at age 18-64 years based on current fasting blood glucose levels or treatment with a hypoglycaemic drug. Risk was greatly increased in young adults compared with the general population and peaked in middle age. Risk factors in the general population were common in people with psychosis and strongly associated with type 2 diabetes in those people. Treatment with clozapine was associated with an increased risk and treatment with olanzapine with a decreased risk for type 2 diabetes. The development of diabetes or pre-diabetes may therefore influence the likelihood of treatment with olanzapine over time. The strongest predictors of type 2 diabetes in a multivariate model were a body mass index of at least 40 and treated hypercholesterolemia, followed by a body mass index between 35 and 39.9, a family history of diabetes and treated hypertension. There was minimal to no confounding of the association between type 2 diabetes and current clozapine or olanzapine treatment, but neither association remained significant after adjustment for other predictors. Longitudinal relationships among predictors are likely to be complex, and previous antipsychotic drug treatment may at least partly explain risks associated with severe obesity, dyslipidemia and hypertension. A

  2. Patient Perspectives on Peer Mentoring: Type 1 Diabetes Management in Adolescents and Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yang; Pyatak, Elizabeth A.; Peters, Anne L.; Wood, Jamie R.; Kipke, Michele; Cohen, Marisa; Sequeira, Paola A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of the study was to identify attitudes and topics relevant to peer mentoring as an adherence-promoting intervention for adolescents and young adults (YAs) with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Methods Self-administered survey data were collected in two diabetes clinics from a convenience sample of adolescents as prospective mentees (ages 13–18) and YAs as prospective mentors (ages 19–25) with T1D. Survey topics included demographics, disease history, glycemic control, adherence, depression, barriers to disease management, social support, and interest in peer mentoring. Descriptive statistical analyses, thematic coding, and stepwise multivariate logistic regression were performed. Results A majority of the 54 adolescents and 46 YAs expressed interest in a peer mentoring program. Having supportive friends and living in a large household positively predicted adolescent interest in having a peer mentor. Approximately one third of all participants experienced social barriers to diabetes management. For adolescents, barriers included inflexible schedules, unfamiliar foods, and the embarrassment of checking blood glucose in front of others. Young adults reported barriers in tracking food consumption and remembering to check blood glucose. Various diabetes management skills were in high demand by adolescents, who especially desired to learn about managing T1D on their own and in college. Participants were open to multiple communication modes, including in-person meetings, phone, text messaging, and social media. Conclusions Many adolescents and young adults with T1D are interested in peer mentoring as a way to facilitate learning and sharing essential diabetes management skills and experiences. PMID:25394732

  3. Retrosigmoid Craniotomy for Auditory Brainstem Implantation in Adult Patients with Neurofibromatosis Type 2.

    PubMed

    Puram, Sidharth V; Herrmann, Barbara; Barker, Fred G; Lee, Daniel J

    2015-12-01

    Objective To report our technique and experience using a retrosigmoid craniotomy approach for auditory brainstem implantation (ABI) placement in adult neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) patients. Design Retrospective case series. Setting Single-center study, Boston, Massachusetts, United States. Participants All NF2 patients who underwent evaluation at Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary and surgery at Massachusetts General Hospital from 2009 to 2013 were reviewed. Six cases of retrosigmoid craniotomy for ABI surgery in five adult NF2 patients were identified. The clinical history, operative course, and outcomes in these patients were reviewed. Main Outcome Measures Postoperative complications and audiological outcomes. Results Indications for ABI surgery were profound hearing loss associated with growth or treatment of bilateral vestibular schwannomas. In all cases, a retrosigmoid craniotomy was performed for tumor resection and ABI placement without complication. Electrode placement was confirmed intraoperatively using electrical-evoked auditory brainstem responses. The ABI was activated in the awake patient 4 to 6 weeks postoperatively. Audiological testing was used to evaluate sound detection and speech perception with the ABI. There were no cases of cerebrospinal fluid leak. Conclusion Retrosigmoid craniotomy is a safe and effective means to provide access to the cochlear nucleus for ABI placement following tumor resection in the adult NF2 patient. Preliminary data indicate that this approach has few complications while offering benefits for hearing. The retrosigmoid craniotomy should be considered a reasonable alternative to the traditional translabyrinthine approach for placement of the ABI in deaf patients who are not candidates for the cochlear implant. PMID:27054058

  4. Ethnic Disparities in Glycemic Control Among Rural Older Adults with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Quandt, Sara A.; Bell, Ronny A.; Snively, Beverly M.; Smith, Shannon L.; Stafford, Jeanette M.; Wetmore, Lindsay K.; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2006-01-01

    Glycemic control is a predictor of diabetes-related morbidity and mortality. However, little is known about how well older adults in rural communities, with limited access to self-care resources and specialty care practitioners, control their diabetes. Even less is known about whether minority, older, rural adults are at increased risk for poor glycemic control. We analyzed data from a cross-sectional survey of randomly selected older (≥65 years) adults with type 2 diabetes in rural North Carolina. Participants (N=693) were men and women from three ethnic groups: African American, Native American, and White. Capillary blood samples were collected for HbA1C analysis. HbA1C levels (<7%, 7%–<8%, and ≥8%) were compared across ethnic and gender groups. Two multiple logistic regression models (model 1: personal characteristics; model 2: personal and health characteristics) were used to evaluate potential predictors of HbA1C ≥7%. Overall, 36.4% had HbA1C ≥7%. Native Americans and African-American men had the highest proportion at levels of poor glycemic control (≥7%), and African-American women and White men had the lowest. In bivariate analysis, ethnicity, living arrangements, use of medications for diabetes, having a diabetes-related healthcare visit in the past year, and duration of diabetes were significantly associated with glycemic control. In multivariate analysis (model 1), being Native American, having low income without Medicaid, and being married were associated with poor glycemic control. Adding health characteristics (model 2), longer diabetes duration and diabetes medication therapy were significant predictors. These data indicate that older ethnic minorities in rural communities are at increased risk for diabetes complications and need diabetes management strategies to improve glycemic control. PMID:16259490

  5. Antioxidant vitamins reduce acute meal-induced memory deficits in adults with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Chui, Michael Herman; Greenwood, Carol E

    2008-07-01

    Memory impairment is observed in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), with further acute deficits after meal ingestion. This study explored whether postprandial oxidative stress was a contributor to these meal-induced memory deficits. Sixteen adults with T2DM (mean age, 63.5 +/- 2.1 years) who were not regularly taking high-dose antioxidant supplements were fed a high-fat meal, the same test meal with vitamins C (1000 mg) and E (800 IU) tablets, or water on 3 separate occasions. After meal ingestion, a battery of cognitive tests were administered, which included measures of delayed verbal memory, assessed at 60 and 105 minutes after meal ingestion. Relative to water consumption, the high-fat meal resulted in poorer performance at 105 minutes postingestion on measures of delayed verbal recall (word list and paragraph recall) and working memory (Digit-Span Forward). Coconsumption of antioxidant vitamins and high-fat meal prevented this meal-induced deficit such that performance on these tasks was indistinguishable from that after water intake. At the same time point, a small but significant improvement on the word-naming and color-naming components of Stroop was observed after meal ingestion, relative to water, irrespective of whether antioxidants were consumed, demonstrating the specificity of meal-induced impairments to memory function. Executive function, assessed by Trails Parts A and B, was not influenced by meal or antioxidant ingestion. In adults with T2DM, coconsumption of antioxidant vitamins minimizes meal-induced memory impairment, implicating oxidative stress as a potential contributor to these decrements. PMID:19083441

  6. Temporal abundance of Aedes aegypti in Manaus, Brazil, measured by two trap types for adult mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Degener, Carolin Marlen; de Ázara, Tatiana Mingote Ferreira; Roque, Rosemary Aparecida; Codeço, Cláudia Torres; Nobre, Aline Araújo; Ohly, Jörg Johannes; Geier, Martin; Eiras, Álvaro Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    A longitudinal study was conducted in Manaus, Brazil, to monitor changes of adult Aedes aegypti (L.) abundance. The objectives were to compare mosquito collections of two trap types, to characterise temporal changes of the mosquito population, to investigate the influence of meteorological variables on mosquito collections and to analyse the association between mosquito collections and dengue incidence. Mosquito monitoring was performed fortnightly using MosquiTRAPs (MQT) and BG-Sentinel (BGS) traps between December 2008-June 2010. The two traps revealed opposing temporal infestation patterns, with highest mosquito collections of MQTs during the dry season and highest collections of BGS during the rainy seasons. Several meteorological variables were significant predictors of mosquito collections in the BGS. The best predictor was the relative humidity, lagged two weeks (in a positive relationship). For MQT, only the number of rainy days in the previous week was significant (in a negative relationship). The correlation between monthly dengue incidence and mosquito abundance in BGS and MQT was moderately positive and negative, respectively. Catches of BGS traps reflected better the dynamic of dengue incidence. The findings help to understand the effects of meteorological variables on mosquito infestation indices of two different traps for adult dengue vectors in Manaus. PMID:25494470

  7. Experimental Infection of Adults With Recombinant Wild-Type Human Metapneumovirus

    PubMed Central

    Talaat, Kawsar R.; Karron, Ruth A.; Thumar, Bhagvanji; McMahon, Bridget A.; Schmidt, Alexander C.; Collins, Peter L.; Buchholz, Ursula J.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) causes lower respiratory tract infections in young children. rHMPV-SHs is a recombinant HMPV (rHMPV) based on a biologically derived wild-type HMPV strain. We characterized its infectivity and immunogenicity in healthy adults to determine whether it would be suitable for use as the parent virus for the development of live attenuated rHMPV vaccines. Methods. Twenty-one healthy adults were inoculated intranasally with 106 plaque-forming units of rHMPV-SHs. Respiratory symptoms and shedding of challenge virus were assessed. Neutralizing antibody responses, serum immunoglobulin G and A, and nasal wash specimen immunoglobulin A antibody responses to the HMPV F protein were also measured. Induction of nasal cytokines was assessed with electrochemiluminescence assays. Results. Nine subjects (43%) were infected with challenge virus as determined by virus detection and/or ≥4-fold rise in serum antibody titers. Peak viral shedding occurred on days 7–9 after infection. Four weeks after inoculation, 35% of subjects had any antibody response. Six of 9 infected subjects had respiratory symptoms, and 3 had headache after inoculation. Cytokine patterns differed considerably between subjects with similar illness severity and viral shedding. Conclusions. The rHMPV-SHs virus is infectious and is a suitable parent virus for development of live-attenuated HMPV vaccine candidates. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT01109329. PMID:23908489

  8. Depression among adults with neurofibromatosis type 1: prevalence and impact on quality of life.

    PubMed

    Cohen, J S; Levy, H P; Sloan, J; Dariotis, J; Biesecker, B B

    2015-11-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) carries a significant psychosocial burden for affected individuals. The objective of this study was to measure the prevalence of depressive symptoms among a large sample of adults with NF1 and to quantify the impact of depressive symptoms on quality of life (QoL). This cross-sectional study used an Internet-based questionnaire to collect data from 498 adults who self-reported as having NF1. Using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CESD) scale, 55% of all participants (61% of females and 43% of males) scored above 16, indicating a high likelihood of clinical depression. In a multivariate regression model controlling for demographics and potential confounders, depressive symptoms accounted for 32% of the variance in QoL as measured by the Quality of Life Index. This study is the largest to date and found the highest prevalence of depression compared to prior studies. Our data provide more compelling evidence that individuals with NF1 are at increased risk for psychiatric morbidity and suggest that this population should be routinely screened for depression. Because depression was found to be strongly associated with QoL and accounted for nearly one-third of the variance in QoL, it is likely that effectively treating depression may significantly enhance QoL for individuals with NF1. PMID:25534182

  9. [New insights of myositis-specific and -associated autoantibodies in juvenile and adult type myositis].

    PubMed

    Váncsa, Andrea; Dankó, Katalin

    2016-07-01

    Myositis, which means inflammation of the muscles, is a general term used for inflammatory myopathies. Myositis is a rare idiopathic autoimmune disease. It is believed that environmental factors such as virus, bacteria, parasites, direct injuries, drugs side effect can trigger the immune system of genetically susceptible individuals to act against muscle tissues. There are several types of myositis with the same systemic symptoms such as muscle weakness, fatigue, muscle pain and inflammation. These include dermatomyositis, juvenile dermatomyositis, inclusion-body myositis, polymyositis, orbital myositis and myositis ossificans. Juvenile and adult dermatomyositis are chronic, immune-mediated inflammatory myopathies characterized by progressive proximal muscle weakness and typical skin symptoms. The aim of the authors was to compare the symptoms, laboratory and serological findings and disease course in children and adult patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathy. Early diagnosis and aggressive immunosuppressive treatment improve the mortality of these patients. Myositis-specific autoantibodies have predictive and prognostic values regarding the associated overlap disease, response to treatment and disease course. The authors intend to lighten the clinical and pathogenetic significance of the new target autoantigens. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(29), 1179-1184. PMID:27452067

  10. The Nature and Meaning of Insulin Pump Use in Emerging Adults With Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Duke, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study is to investigate the meaning of living with an insulin pump for the management of type 1 diabetes during the period of emerging adulthood. Through a phenomenological narrative, this study contributes to the reflective understanding of the everyday life experiences of this population. Methods. A hermeneutic phenomenological design was used for this study of nine emerging adults (aged 19–24 years). Data were generated through face-to-face interviews and analyzed using the phenomenological approach of Max van Manen. Results. Four themes represent the essence of the day-to-day experiences of these emerging adults: seeking control, becoming responsible, staying connected, and accepting me. Conclusions. An in-depth understanding of the meaning of daily experiences with insulin pump technology has the potential to promote a developmentally appropriate approach to this age-group. The human understanding gained through this study is essential to the development of evidence-based practice guidelines and resources for this vulnerable population. PMID:25987805

  11. In vivo quantification of brain injury in adult Niemann-Pick Disease Type C.

    PubMed

    Zaaraoui, Wafaa; Crespy, Lydie; Rico, Audrey; Faivre, Anthony; Soulier, Elisabeth; Confort-Gouny, Sylviane; Cozzone, Patrick J; Pelletier, Jean; Ranjeva, Jean-Philippe; Kaphan, Elsa; Audoin, Bertrand

    2011-06-01

    Development of surrogate markers is necessary to assess the potential efficacy of new therapeutics in Niemann-Pick Disease Type C (NP-C). In the present study, magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) imaging, a quantitative MRI imaging technique sensitive to subtle brain microstructural changes, was applied in two patients suffering from adult NP-C. Statistical mapping analysis was performed to compare each patient's MTR maps with those of a group of 34 healthy controls to quantify and localize the extent of brain injury of each patient. Using this method, pathological changes were evidenced in the cerebellum, the thalami and the lenticular nuclei in both patients and also in the fronto-temporal cortices in the patient with the worse functional deficit. In addition, white matter changes were located in the midbrain, the cerebellum and the fronto-temporal lobes in the patient with the higher level of disability and in only one limited periventricular white matter region in the other patient. A 6-month follow-up was performed in the patient with the lower functional deficit and evidenced significant extension of grey matter (GM) and white matter (WM) injuries during the following period (14% of increased injury for GM and 53% for WM). This study demonstrates that significant brain injury related to clinical deficit can be assessed in vivo in adult NP-C using MTR imaging. Although preliminary, these findings suggest that MTR imaging may be a relevant candidate for the development of biomarker in NP-C. PMID:21397539

  12. Patient perspectives on peer support for adults with type 1 diabetes: a need for diabetes-specific social capital

    PubMed Central

    Joensen, Lene E; Filges, Tine; Willaing, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    Aim To explore the function of peer support from the perspective of adults with type 1 diabetes in Denmark. Methods The study population consisted of 20 adults with type 1 diabetes. The sample was diverse in relation to educational background, age, sex, and cohabitation status. Inspired by action research, several methods and perspectives on peer support were explored and tested. Workshops and group and individual interviews were performed. Systematic text condensation was used to analyze data, supplemented with theory-based interpretive analysis. Results Adults with type 1 diabetes found peer support highly relevant to reduce a burdensome feeling of diabetes-specific loneliness. Peer support showed potential to create diabetes-specific social capital not only by creating reciprocal social support between peers but also, more importantly, by creating space for genuine trust and a feeling of communality. There was a widespread feeling of the pervasive impact of diabetes on daily life and thus the relevance of discussing all aspects of life. However, participants perceived peer support as particularly relevant in relation to big changes in life, for example, in family life, at work, or through treatment events such as getting an insulin pump. Conclusion Peer support programs focusing on creating and establishing diabetes-specific social capital using participatory approaches seem highly relevant among adults with type 1 diabetes. Content, methods, and effects of peer support need further exploration in collaboration with adults with type 1 diabetes. PMID:27536076

  13. Case report: An adult-onset type II citrin deficiency patient in the emergency department

    PubMed Central

    TANG, LUJIA; CHEN, LIANG; WANG, HAIRONG; DAI, LIHUA; PAN, SHUMING

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the solute carrier family 25 (SLC25A13) gene may result in neonatal intrahepatic cholestasis caused by citrin deficiency and/or adult-onset type II citrullinemia. These conditions are inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. The current case report describes a 43-year-old man who presented with sudden delirium and upper limb weakness. Upon admission, the patient was fully conscious and alert but later lost consciousness subsequent to a sudden convulsive seizure. Hyperammonemia was detected and analysis of the SLC25A13 gene identified an 851del4 mutation. Thus, the possibility of genetic disease should be considered as a potential cause of the symptoms of patients with altered states of consciousness, such as delirium and loss of consciousness, in cases where the cause of the disturbance is unknown. PMID:27347070

  14. An Adult Case of Bartter Syndrome Type III Presenting with Proteinuria

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Eun Jung; Hwang, Won Min; Yun, Sung-Ro; Park, Moon Hyang

    2016-01-01

    Bartter syndrome (BS) I–IV is a rare autosomal recessive disorder affecting salt reabsorption in the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle. This report highlights clinicopathological findings and genetic studies of classic BS in a 22-year-old female patient who presented with persistent mild proteinuria for 2 years. A renal biopsy demonstrated a mild to moderate increase in the mesangial cells and matrix of most glomeruli, along with marked juxtaglomerular cell hyperplasia. These findings suggested BS associated with mild IgA nephropathy. Focal tubular atrophy, interstitial fibrosis, and lymphocytic infiltration were also observed. A genetic study of the patient and her parents revealed a mutation of the CLCNKB genes. The patient was diagnosed with BS, type III. This case represents an atypical presentation of classic BS in an adult patient. Pathologic findings of renal biopsy combined with genetic analysis and clinicolaboratory findings are important in making an accurate diagnosis. PMID:26755355

  15. Global coherence in younger and older adults: Influence of cognitive processes and discourse type.

    PubMed

    Wright, Heather Harris; Koutsoftas, Anthony D; Capilouto, Gilson J; Fergadiotis, Gerasimos

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present research was to examine the influence of cognitive processes on discourse global coherence ability measured across different discourse tasks and collected from younger (n = 40; 20-39 years) and older (n = 40; 70-87 years) cognitively healthy adults. Study participants produced oral language samples in response to five commonly used discourse elicitation tasks and they were analyzed for maintenance of global coherence. Participants also completed memory and attention measures. Group differences on the global coherence scale were found for only one type of discourse-recounts. Across discourse elicitation tasks the lowest global coherence scores were found for recounts compared to the other discourse elicitation tasks. The influence of cognitive processes on maintenance of global coherence differed for the two age groups. For the younger group, there were no observed significant relationships. For the older group, cognitive measures were related to global coherence of stories and procedures. PMID:23656430

  16. Differences Among Older Adults in the Types of Dental Services Used in the United States.

    PubMed

    Manski, Richard J; Hyde, Jody Schimmel; Chen, Haiyan; Moeller, John F

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore differences in the socioeconomic, demographic characteristics of older adults in the United States with respect to their use of different types of dental care services. The 2008 Health and Retirement Study (HRS) collected information about patterns of dental care use and oral health from individuals aged 55 years and older in the United States. We analyze these data and explore patterns of service use by key characteristics before modeling the relationship between service use type and those characteristics. The most commonly used service category was fillings, inlays, or bonding, reported by 43.6% of those with any utilization. Just over one third of those with any utilization reported a visit for a crown, implant, or prosthesis, and one quarter reported a gum treatment or tooth extraction. The strongest consistent predictors of use type are denture, dentate, and oral health status along with dental insurance coverage and wealth. Our results provide insights into the need for public policies to address inequalities in access to dental services among an older US population. Our findings show that lower income, less wealthy elderly with poor oral health are more likely to not use any dental services rather than using only preventive dental care, and that cost prevents most non-users who say they need dental care from going to the dentist. These results suggest a serious access problem and one that ultimately produces even worse oral health and expensive major procedures for this population in the future. PMID:27284127

  17. Lifestyle and cardiometabolic risk in adults with type 1 diabetes: a review.

    PubMed

    Leroux, Catherine; Brazeau, Anne-Sophie; Gingras, Véronique; Desjardins, Katherine; Strychar, Irene; Rabasa-Lhoret, Rémi

    2014-02-01

    Over the past decades, there has been a major upward shift in the prevalence of cardiometabolic risk (CMR) factors (central obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension and dyslipidemia) in patients with type 1 diabetes, which could have either an additive or a synergistic effect on risk for cardiovascular disease. These metabolic changes are occurring in parallel to the worldwide obesity epidemic and the widespread use of intensive insulin therapy. Poor lifestyle habits (poor diet quality, sedentary behaviours and smoking) are known to be driving factors for increased CMR factors in the general population. The objective of this review is to explore the lifestyle habits of adults with type 1 diabetes and its potential association with CMR factors. Evidence suggests that adherence to dietary guidelines is low in subjects with type 1 diabetes with a high prevalence of patients consuming an atherogenic diet. Sedentary habits are also more prevalent than in the general population, possibly because of the additional contribution of exercise-induced hypoglycemic fear. Moreover, the prevalence of smokers is still significant in the population with type 1 diabetes. All of these behaviours could trigger a cascade of metabolic anomalies that may contribute to increased CMR factors in patients with type 1 diabetes. The intensification of insulin treatment leading to new daily challenges (e.g. carbohydrates counting, increase of hypoglycemia) could contribute to the adoption of poor lifestyle habits. Preventive measures, such as identification of patients at high risk and promotion of lifestyle changes, should be encouraged. The most appropriate therapeutic measures remain to be established. PMID:24485215

  18. Neighbourhood Walkability and Daily Steps in Adults with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hajna, Samantha; Ross, Nancy A.; Joseph, Lawrence; Harper, Sam; Dasgupta, Kaberi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction There is evidence that greater neighbourhood walkability (i.e., neighbourhoods with more amenities and well-connected streets) is associated with higher levels of total walking in Europe and in Asia, but it remains unclear if this association holds in the Canadian context and in chronic disease populations. We examined the relationships of different walkability measures to biosensor-assessed total walking (i.e., steps/day) in adults with type 2 diabetes living in Montreal (QC, Canada). Materials and Methods Participants (60.5±10.4 years; 48.1% women) were recruited through McGill University-affiliated clinics (June 2006 to May 2008). Steps/day were assessed once per season for one year with pedometers. Neighbourhood walkability was evaluated through participant reports, in-field audits, Geographic Information Systems (GIS)-derived measures, and the Walk Score®. Relationships between walkability and daily steps were estimated using Bayesian longitudinal hierarchical linear regression models (n = 131). Results Participants who reported living in the most compared to the least walkable neighbourhoods completed 1345 more steps/day (95% Credible Interval: 718, 1976; Quartiles 4 versus 1). Those living in the most compared to the least walkable neighbourhoods (based on GIS-derived walkability) completed 606 more steps per day (95% CrI: 8, 1203). No statistically significant associations with steps were observed for audit-assessed walkability or the Walk Score®. Conclusions Adults with type 2 diabetes who perceived their neighbourhoods as more walkable accumulated more daily steps. This suggests that knowledge of local neighborhood features that enhance walking is a meaningful predictor of higher levels of walking and an important component of neighbourhood walkability. PMID:26991308

  19. Association of glycaemia with lipids in adults with type 1 diabetes: modification by dyslipidaemia medication

    PubMed Central

    Ogden, L. G.; Dabelea, D.; Snell-Bergeon, J. K.; Daniels, S. R.; Hamman, R. F.; Rewers, M.

    2012-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Hyperglycaemia and dyslipidaemia are common metabolic abnormalities in adults with type 1 diabetes and both increase cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. The hypothesis of this study was that change in HbA1c over 6 years would be associated with change in fasting lipids in adults with type 1 diabetes. Methods The Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes (CACTI) study examined 652 patients with type 1 diabetes (54% female); 559 and 543 had follow-up visits at 3 and 6 years. Baseline age (mean ± SD) was 37±9 years, diabetes duration 23±9 years, and HbA1c 8.0±1.3%. Use of dyslipidaemia medication was 17%, 32%, and 46% at the three visits. Separate longitudinal mixed models were fitted to examine the relationship between change in HbA1c and change in fasting total cholesterol (TC), HDL-cholesterol (HDL-c), LDL-cholesterol (LDL-c), log triacylglycerols (TG), and non-HDL-cholesterol (non- HDL-c). Because of an interaction between dyslipidaemia medication use and association of HbA1c with lipids, results were stratified by dyslipidaemia medication use. Results Among patients not using dyslipidaemia medication, a higher HbA1c was associated with significantly worse levels of the lipids TC, LDL-c, TG and non-HDL-c (per 1% change in HbA1c, TC 0.101 mmol/l, 95% CI 0.050, 0.152; LDL-c 0.103 mmol/l, 95% CI 0.058, 0.148; TG 0.052 mmol/l, 95% CI 0.024, 0.081; and non-HDL-c 0.129 mmol/l, 95% CI 0.078, 0.180) but not HDL-c (−0.20 mmol/l, 95% CI −0.047, 0.007). The associations between HbA1c and any lipid outcome among those on dyslipidaemia medication were in the same direction, but attenuated compared with persons not on medication. Conclusions/interpretation Change in HbA1c is significantly associated with change in fasting lipids, but dyslipidaemia medications may be required to optimise lipid and cardiovascular health. PMID:20820753

  20. Effect of masker type and age on speech intelligibility and spatial release from masking in children and adults

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, Patti M.; Litovsky, Ruth Y.

    2009-01-01

    Speech recognition in noisy environments improves when the speech signal is spatially separated from the interfering sound. This effect, known as spatial release from masking (SRM), was recently shown in young children. The present study compared SRM in children of ages 5–7 with adults for interferers introducing energetic, informational, and/or linguistic components. Three types of interferers were used: speech, reversed speech, and modulated white noise. Two female voices with different long-term spectra were also used. Speech reception thresholds (SRTs) were compared for: Quiet (target 0° front, no interferer), Front (target and interferer both 0° front), and Right (interferer 90° right, target 0° front). Children had higher SRTs and greater masking than adults. When spatial cues were not available, adults, but not children, were able to use differences in interferer type to separate the target from the interferer. Both children and adults showed SRM. Children, unlike adults, demonstrated large amounts of SRM for a time-reversed speech interferer. In conclusion, masking and SRM vary with the type of interfering sound, and this variation interacts with age; SRM may not depend on the spectral peculiarities of a particular type of voice when the target speech and interfering speech are different sex talkers. PMID:17069314

  1. Adults with type 1 diabetes eat a high fat, atherogenic diet which is associated with coronary artery calcium

    PubMed Central

    Snell-Bergeon, JK; Chartier-Logan, C; Maahs, DM; Ogden, LG; Hokanson, JE; Kinney, GL; Eckel, RH; Ehrlich, J; Rewers, M

    2010-01-01

    Aims/Hypotheses Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the leading cause of mortality among people with type 1 diabetes. Diet is an important lifestyle factor related to CHD. The aim of this study was to examine how diet and adherence to dietary guidelines differ between adults with and without type 1 diabetes, and their correlation with CHD risk factors and coronary artery calcium (CAC). Methods 571 people with type 1 diabetes and 696 controls 19 to 56 years old who were asymptomatic for CHD were studied. CAC was measured by electron beam CT. Results Adults with type 1 diabetes reported a diet higher in fat, saturated fat, and protein but lower in carbohydrates than controls. Less than half those with type 1 diabetes met dietary guidelines for fat and carbohydrate intake, and only 16% restricted saturated fat to <10% of daily calories. Adults with type 1 diabetes were significantly less likely to meet dietary guidelines than controls. Fat and saturated fat intake were positively correlated but carbohydrate intake was negatively correlated with CHD risk factors and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). A high fat diet and higher protein intake were associated with greater odds of CAC, while higher carbohydrate intake was associated with reduced odds of CAC. Conclusions/Interpretation Adults with type 1 diabetes reported consuming higher than recommended fat and saturated fat. Fat intake was associated with increased CHD risk factors, worse glycaemic control, and CAC. An atherogenic diet may contribute to the risk of CHD in adults with type 1 diabetes. PMID:19219420

  2. Differences in Amounts and Types of Physical Activity by Obesity Status in US Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spees, Colleen K.; Scott, Jonathan M.; Taylor, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the physical activity patterns across levels of obesity among US adults. Methods: The frequency, intensity, and duration of physical activities were compared across obesity status in 7695 adults from NHANES, 1999-2006. Results: Significantly more normal-weight adults engaged in moderate- and vigorous- intensity activities…

  3. [Alertness is its own reward: adult type Hirschprung's disease--clinical description of first two cases in Israel].

    PubMed

    Argov, Samuel; Levandovsky, Olga; Kerner, Hedviga; Ben-Yizhak, Ofer; Klinehouse, Uriel; Reissman, Ptahia

    2012-01-01

    Hirschprung disease is well known. The basic pathogenesis is lack of parasympathetic ganglia in the large bowel wall, part of it, or all of it. The absence of these ganglia paralyzes the involved segment leading to obstruction. Almost all babies are diagnosed and operated upon in their first year. Few rare cases manage to grow and reach maturity without diagnosis. These patients are characterized by severe constipation and grade III-IV hemorrhoids. This is adult type Hirschprung's disease. Two first cases in Israel were diagnosed, patients were operated upon, and recovered. Adult type Hirschprung's disease is reviewed and various surgical options are discussed. PMID:22670495

  4. Adult-type granulosa cell tumour of the testis: Report of a case and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Al-Alao, Osama; Gul, Tawiz; Al-Ani, Ammar; Bozom, Issam A.; Al-Jalham, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    Granulosa cell tumours (GCTs) can be either juvenile or adult type, and more commonly occur in the ovaries. Adult-type GCTs of the testis (AGCTT) are very rare and only 46 cases have previously been reported. We report here on a 48-year-old Filipino man with a left testicular AGCTT, which measured 1.2 × 1.2 × 1.0 cm. He underwent radical orchidectomy with postoperative surveillance for 1 year, which included computed tomography with oral intravenous contrast and clinical examinations, which have been unremarkable. The previously reported AGCTTs were briefly reviewed. PMID:26966593

  5. Prognosis and management of adult wild type gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs): A pooled analysis and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, N R; Collins, D; Crotty, P; Ridgway, P F

    2016-09-01

    A pooled review was performed to determine survival in adult WT GIST (Wild Type GastroIntestinal Stromal Tumours) and compare the same with pediatric WT GISTs. Electronic databases were searched using the terms "Wild type" AND "GIST". Eighty-two adult patients from 14 studies were included in the pooled analysis. Cumulative survival was greater than 50% in both age groups, hence medial survival could not be computed. Mean survival in adults was 15.7 years ± 0.78 and in children was 18.8 years ± 1.3 (p = 0.241). Median disease free survival in adults was 10 years while 5-year overall survival was 88%. There was no statistically significant difference in the survival between the two groups (p = 0.241). Overall survival in adults with WT GISTs is favourable compared to other adult GIST subtypes likely reflects a common molecular pathway similar to pediatric GIST. PMID:27566016

  6. Impact of Surface Type, Wheelchair Weight, and Axle Position on Wheelchair Propulsion by Novice Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Cowan, Rachel E.; Nash, Mark S.; Collinger, Jennifer L.; Koontz, Alicia M.; Boninger, Michael L.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To examine the impact of surface type, wheelchair weight, and rear axle position on older adult propulsion biomechanics. Design Crossover trial. Setting Biomechanics laboratory. Participants Convenience sample of 53 ambulatory older adults with minimal wheelchair experience (65−87y); men = 20, women = 33. Intervention Participants propelled 4 different wheelchair configurations over 4 surfaces; tile, low carpet, high carpet, and an 8% grade ramp (surface, chair order randomized). Chair configurations included: (1) unweighted chair with an anterior axle position, (2) 9.05kg weighted chair with an anterior axle position, (3) unweighted chair with a posterior axle position (Δ0.08m), and (4) 9.05kg weighted chair with a posterior axle position (Δ0.08m). Weight was added to a titanium folding chair, simulating the weight difference between very light and depot wheelchairs. Instrumented wheels measured propulsion kinetics. Main Outcome Measures Average self-selected velocity, push-frequency, stroke length, peak resultant and tangential force. Results Velocity decreased as surface rolling resistance or chair weight increased. Peak resultant and tangential forces increased as chair weight increased, surface resistance increased, and with a posterior axle position. The effect of a posterior axle position was greater on high carpet and the ramp. The effect of weight was constant, but more easily observed on high carpet and ramp. The effects of axle position and weight were independent of one another. Conclusion Increased surface resistance decreases self-selected velocity and increases peak forces. Increased weight decreases self-selected velocity and increases forces. Anterior axle positions decrease forces, more so on high carpet. Effects of weight and axle position are independent. Greatest reductions in peak forces occur in lighter chairs with anterior axle positions. PMID:19577019

  7. Surgical outcomes following encephaloduroarteriosynangiosis in adult moyamoya disease associated with Type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ren, Bin; Zhang, Zheng-Shan; Liu, Wei-Wei; Bao, Xiang-Yang; Li, De-Sheng; Han, Cong; Xian, Peng; Zhao, Feng; Wang, Hui; Wang, Hai; Duan, Lian

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Debate exists regarding the merits and shortcomings of an indirect bypass procedure for treating adult patients with moyamoya disease (MMD). Considerable variation in neovascularization occurs among different organs in patients with diabetes mellitus. Here, the effect of encephaloduroarteriosynangiosis on MMD associated with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is evaluated. METHODS A retrospective and 1:2 matched case-control study was conducted in moyamoya patients with or without T2DM (n = 180). Postoperative collateral formations were graded according to the Modified Collateral Grading System that originated from the Matsushima Angiographic Stage Classification. Neurological function outcomes before and after the operation were evaluated according to the modified Rankin Scale. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to determine the risk factors for clinical outcome. RESULTS There was no statistically significant difference in the constituent ratios of initial symptom and preoperative Suzuki stage between patients with and without T2DM. Progression of angiopathy around the circle of Willis was postoperatively observed in bilateral internal carotid arteries in both groups. Patients with T2DM had a higher postoperative Suzuki stage (p < 0.01) and more frequent development of collateral angiogenesis germinating from the external carotid after indirect revascularization procedures in the surgical cerebral hemisphere (82.7% vs 72.2%; p < 0.05). The extent of postoperative collateral formation in patients with diabetes mellitus was significantly higher (p < 0.01). Postoperative clinical improvement in the diabetes group was more common after revascularization procedures (p < 0.05), and the diabetes group had lower modified Rankin Scale scores (p < 0.05) in comparison with the nondiabetes group. Late postoperative stroke and posterior cerebral artery involvement were identified as predictors of unfavorable clinical outcome in both

  8. Generation of a novel mouse model that recapitulates early and adult onset glycogenosis type IV.

    PubMed

    Akman, H Orhan; Sheiko, Tatiana; Tay, Stacey K H; Finegold, Milton J; Dimauro, Salvatore; Craigen, William J

    2011-11-15

    Glycogen storage disease type IV (GSD IV) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by deficiency of the glycogen branching enzyme (GBE). The diagnostic feature of the disease is the accumulation of a poorly branched form of glycogen known as polyglucosan (PG). The disease is clinically heterogeneous, with variable tissue involvement and age of disease onset. Absence of enzyme activity is lethal in utero or in infancy affecting primarily muscle and liver. However, residual enzyme activity (5-20%) leads to juvenile or adult onset of a disorder that primarily affects muscle as well as central and peripheral nervous system. Here, we describe two mouse models of GSD IV that reflect this spectrum of disease. Homologous recombination was used to insert flippase recognition target recombination sites around exon 7 of the Gbe1 gene and a phosphoglycerate kinase-Neomycin cassette within intron 7, leading to a reduced synthesis of GBE. Mice bearing this mutation (Gbe1(neo/neo)) exhibit a phenotype similar to juvenile onset GSD IV, with wide spread accumulation of PG. Meanwhile, FLPe-mediated homozygous deletion of exon 7 completely eliminated GBE activity (Gbe1(-/-)), leading to a phenotype of lethal early onset GSD IV, with significant in utero accumulation of PG. Adult mice with residual GBE exhibit progressive neuromuscular dysfunction and die prematurely. Differently from muscle, PG in liver is a degradable source of glucose and readily depleted by fasting, emphasizing that there are structural and regulatory differences in glycogen metabolism among tissues. Both mouse models recapitulate typical histological and physiological features of two human variants of branching enzyme deficiency. PMID:21856731

  9. Association of Vitamin D Levels with Type 2 Diabetes in Older Working Adults

    PubMed Central

    Mauss, Daniel; Jarczok, Marc N.; Hoffmann, Kristina; Thomas, G. Neil; Fischer, Joachim E.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Increasing evidence suggests that vitamin D plays a role in the development of chronic diseases including type 2 diabetes (DM). Aim of the study was to explore the association of vitamin D levels with prevalent DM in a sample of predominantly healthy working adults older than 45 years. METHODS: This cross-sectional study (2009-2011) involved 1821 employees of a German engineering company (83.1% male, mean age 51.9 ±5.6 years). Sociodemographics and medical history were assessed by self-report. Clinical characteristics were obtained including blood samples to determine vitamin D levels and diabetes status by fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c). Vitamin D was grouped into one of four categories (<10 ng/ml, 10-19.9 ng/ml, 20-29.9 ng/ml, ≥30 ng/ml). Bivariate associations between vitamin D categories and a composite indicator for DM (FPG ≥126 mg/dl or HbA1c ≥6.5% or self-reported diagnosis) were calculated; multivariable models tested this association further, controlling for potential confounders. RESULTS: Severe vitamin D deficiency (<10 ng/ml) was associated with increasing FPG (β 3.13; 95%CI: 0.78, 5.47; p≤0.01) and HbA1c (β 0.15; 95%CI: 0.08, 0.23; p≤0.001) values in adjusted linear regression models. In multivariable models, severe vitamin D deficiency was associated with DM (OR 2.55; 95%CI 1.16, 5.62; p≤0.05) after controlling for potential confounders. CONCLUSIONS: Vitamin D deficiency is associated with prevalent DM in working older adults. The findings highlight that the workplace may be a unique location for conducting large-scale health screening to identify those at risk of DM using vitamin D. PMID:26005370

  10. Beta Cell Formation in vivo Through Cellular Networking, Integration and Processing (CNIP) in Wild Type Adult Mice.

    PubMed

    Doiron, Bruno; Hu, Wenchao; DeFronzo, Ralph A

    2016-01-01

    Insulin replacement therapy is essential in type 1 diabetic individuals and is required in ~40- 50% of type 2 diabetics during their lifetime. Prior attempts at beta cell regeneration have relied upon pancreatic injury to induce beta cell proliferation, dedifferentiation and activation of the embryonic pathway, or stem cell replacement. We report an alternative method to transform adult non-stem (somatic) cells into pancreatic beta cells. The Cellular Networking, Integration and Processing (CNIP) approach targets cellular mechanisms involved in pancreatic function in the organ's adult state and utilizes a synergistic mechanism that integrates three important levels of cellular regulation to induce beta cell formation: (i) glucose metabolism, (ii) membrane receptor function, and (iii) gene transcription. The aim of the present study was to induce pancreatic beta cell formation in vivo in adult animals without stem cells and without dedifferentiating cells to recapitulate the embryonic pathway as previously published (1-3). Our results employing CNIP demonstrate that: (i) insulin secreting cells can be generated in adult pancreatic tissue in vivo and circumvent the problem of generating endocrine (glucagon and somatostatin) cells that exert deleterious effects on glucose homeostasis, and (ii) longterm normalization of glucose tolerance and insulin secretion can be achieved in a wild type diabetic mouse model. The CNIP cocktail has the potential to be used as a preventative or therapeutic treatment or cure for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. PMID:26696016

  11. SKELETAL MUSCLE SODIUM GLUCOSE CO-TRANSPORTERS IN OLDER ADULTS WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES UNDERGOING RESISTANCE TRAINING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We examined the expression of the sodium-dependent glucose co-transporter system (SGLT3) in skeletal muscle of Hispanic older adults with type 2 diabetes. Subjects (65+/-8 yr) were randomized to resistance training (3x/wk, n=13) or standard of care (controls, n=5) for 16 weeks. Skeletal muscle SGL...

  12. Comparison of Activity Type Classification Accuracy from Accelerometers Worn on the Hip, Wrists, and Thigh in Young, Apparently Healthy Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montoye, Alexander H. K.; Pivarnik, James M.; Mudd, Lanay M.; Biswas, Subir; Pfeiffer, Karin A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to compare accuracy of activity type prediction models for accelerometers worn on the hip, wrists, and thigh. Forty-four adults performed sedentary, ambulatory, lifestyle, and exercise activities (14 total, 10 categories) for 3-10 minutes each in a 90-minute semi-structured laboratory protocol. Artificial neural…

  13. Variant Human T-cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1c and Adult T-cell Leukemia, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Cassar, Olivier; Bardy, Peter; Kearney, Daniel; Gessain, Antoine

    2013-01-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 is endemic to central Australia among Indigenous Australians. However, virologic and clinical aspects of infection remain poorly understood. No attempt has been made to control transmission to indigenous children. We report 3 fatal cases of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma caused by human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 Australo-Melanesian subtype c. PMID:24047544

  14. Predictors of Diet-Induced Weight Loss in Overweight Adults with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Mulder, Monique T.; Verhoeven, Adrie J. M.; van Wietmarschen, Herman; Boessen, Ruud; Pellis, Linette P.; van t Spijker, Adriaan; Timman, Reinier; Ozcan, Behiye; Sijbrands, Eric J. G.

    2016-01-01

    Aims A very low calorie diet improves the metabolic regulation of obesity related type 2 diabetes, but not for all patients, which leads to frustration in patients and professionals alike. The aim of this study was to develop a prediction model of diet-induced weight loss in type 2 diabetes. Methods 192 patients with type 2 diabetes and BMI>27 kg/m2 from the outpatient diabetes clinic of the Erasmus Medical Center underwent an 8-week very low calorie diet. Baseline demographic, psychological and physiological parameters were measured and the C-index was calculated of the model with the largest explained variance of relative weight loss using backward linear regression analysis. The model was internally validated using bootstrapping techniques. Results Weight loss after the diet was 7.8±4.6 kg (95%CI 7.2–8.5; p<0.001) and was independently associated with the baseline variables fasting glucose (B = -0.33 (95%CI -0.49, -0.18), p = 0.001), anxiety (HADS; B = -0.22 (95%CI -0.34, -0.11), p = 0.001), numb feeling in extremities (B = 1.86 (95%CI 0.85, 2.87), p = 0.002), insulin dose (B = 0.01 (95%CI 0.00, 0.02), p = 0.014) and waist-to-hip ratio (B = 6.79 (95%CI 2.10, 11.78), p = 0.003). This model explained 25% of the variance in weight loss. The C-index of this model to predict successful (≥5%) weight loss was 0.74 (95%CI 0.67–0.82), with a sensitivity of 0.93 (95% CI 0.89–0.97) and specificity of 0.29 (95% CI 0.16–0.42). When only the obese T2D patients (BMI≥30 kg/m2; n = 181) were considered, age also contributed to the model (B = 0.06 (95%CI 0.02, 0.11), p = 0.008), whereas waist-to-hip ratio did not. Conclusions Diet-induced weight loss in overweight adults with T2D was predicted by five baseline parameters, which were predominantly diabetes related. However, failure seems difficult to predict. We propose to test this prediction model in future prospective diet intervention studies in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:27494531

  15. Prevalence and determinants of overweight, obesity, and type 2 diabetes mellitus in adults in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Jan Mohamed, Hamid Jan B; Yap, Roseline Wai Kuan; Loy, See Ling; Norris, Shane A; Biesma, Regien; Aagaard-Hansen, Jens

    2015-03-01

    This systematic review aimed to examine trends in overweight, obesity, and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) among Malaysian adults, and to identify its underlying determinants. A review of studies published between 2000 and 2012 on overweight, obesity, and T2DM was conducted. The Cochrane library of systematic reviews, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Biosis, Scopus, and MyJurnal digital database were searched. According to national studies, the prevalence of overweight increased from 26.7% in 2003 to 29.4% in 2011; obesity prevalence increased from 12.2% in 2003 to 15.1% in 2011, and T2DM prevalence was reported as 11.6% in 2006 and 15.2% in 2011. Distal determinants of increased risk of overweight, obesity, and T2DM were as follows: female, Malay/Indian ethnicity, and low educational level. The limited number of studies on proximal determinants of these noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) indicated that an unhealthy diet was associated with increased risk, whereas smoking was associated with decreased risk. However, more studies on the proximal determinants of overweight, obesity, and T2DM within the Malaysian context are needed. Overall, our findings provide insights for designing both future investigative studies and strategies to control and prevent these NCDs in Malaysia. PMID:25524952

  16. Rates and consequences of posttraumatic distress among American Indian adults with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Aronson, Benjamin D; Palombi, Laura C; Walls, Melissa L

    2016-08-01

    This study examined the prevalence of screened posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and associated diabetes-related outcomes. A sample of American Indian adults with type 2 diabetes (n = 218) participated in interviewer-administered surveys. Using a cutoff of 3 on the Primary Care PTSD screener, 21.8 % of participants screened positive for PTSD. PTSD symptoms were negatively associated with self-rated health status and positively associated with past year hospitalization after controlling for several demographic factors, but not after controlling for depressive symptoms. Past month frequency of hyperglycemia symptoms was not related to PTSD symptoms. When grouped by mental health conditions (neither screened PTSD nor depressive symptoms, screened PTSD only, depressive symptoms only, and both), those with both screened PTSD and depressive symptoms reported the highest proportion of any past month hyperglycemia, past year hospitalization, and low self-rated health status. Screened PTSD, especially in those with comorbid depressive symptoms, is an important consideration in diabetes care. PMID:27001254

  17. Posttraumatic Stress Related to Hyperglycemia: Prevalence in Adults with Type I Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Renna, Chelsea P; Boyer, Bret A; Prout, Maurice F; Scheiner, Gary

    2016-09-01

    Prevalence of hyperglycemia-related posttraumatic stress (PTS) was assessed in 239 adults with type 1 diabetes using the posttraumatic stress diagnostic scale (PDS; Foa, Posttraumatic stress diagnostic scale manual, National Computer Systems, Inc., Minneapolis, 1995) by an anonymous online survey. Additionally, this study aimed to identify variables related to hyperglycemia-related PTS. Over 30 % of participants reported symptoms consistent with PTSD related to hyperglycemia with standard PDS scoring, and 10 % with more conservative scoring. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses indicated that diabetes self-management behavior and perceived helplessness about hyperglycemia predicted PTSD with standard scoring. Perceived death threat, self-management behavior, helplessness about hyperglycemia, and severity of hypoglycemia in past month predicted PTSD using more conservative scoring. Perceived helplessness, hypoglycemia severity, perceived death-threat, HbA1c, and self-management behavior predicted PTS severity. When fear, helplessness, and perceived death-threat were combined to represent an overall cognitive appraisal factor, this variable was the strongest predictor of PTSD and PTS severity. Scores for PTSD symptom clusters appeared similar to data on hypoglycemia-related PTS. PMID:27469991

  18. Socioeconomic status and glycemic control in adult patients with type 2 diabetes: a mediation analysis

    PubMed Central

    Houle, Janie; Lauzier-Jobin, François; Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Meunier, Sophie; Coulombe, Simon; Côté, José; Lespérance, François; Chiasson, Jean-Louis; Bherer, Louis; Lambert, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study is to examine the contribution of health behaviors (self-management and coping), quality of care, and individual characteristics (depressive symptoms, self-efficacy, illness representations) as mediators in the relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and glycemic control. Methods A sample of 295 adult patients with type 2 diabetes was recruited at the end of a diabetes education course. Glycemic control was evaluated through glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c). Living in poverty and education level were used as indicators of SES. Results Bootstrapping analysis showed that the significant effects of poverty and education level on HbA1c were mediated by avoidance coping and depressive symptoms. The representation that diabetes is unpredictable significantly mediated the relationship between living in poverty and HbA1c, while healthy diet mediated the relationship between education level and HbA1c. Conclusions To improve glycemic control among patients with low SES, professionals should regularly screen for depression, offering treatment when needed, and pay attention to patients' illness representations and coping strategies for handling stress related to their chronic disease. They should also support patients in improving their self-management skills for a healthy diet. PMID:27239316

  19. Assessment of Potential Herb-Drug Interactions among Nigerian Adults with Type-2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ezuruike, Udoamaka; Prieto, Jose M

    2016-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that patients with diabetes do not rely only on prescription drugs for their disease management. The use of herbal medicines is one of the self-management practices adopted by these patients, often without the knowledge of their healthcare practitioners. This study assessed the potential for pharmacokinetic herb-drug interactions (HDIs) amongst Nigerian adult diabetic patients. This was done through a literature analysis of the pharmacokinetic profile of their herbal medicines and prescription drugs, based on information obtained from 112 patients with type-2 diabetes attending two secondary health care facilities in Nigeria. Fifty percent of the informants used herbal medicines alongside their prescription drugs. Worryingly, 60% of the patients taking herbal medicines did not know their identity, thus increasing the risk of unidentified HDIs. By comparing the pharmacokinetic profile of eight identified herbs taken by the patients for the management of diabetes against those of the prescription drugs, several scenarios of potential HDIs were identified and their clinical relevance is discussed. The lack of clinical predictors points toward cultural factors as the influence for herb use, making it more difficult to identify these patients and in turn monitor potential HDIs. In identifying these possible interactions, we have highlighted the need for healthcare professionals to promote a proactive monitoring of patients' use of herbal medicines. PMID:27559312

  20. Dose and type of crystalloid fluid therapy in adult hospitalized patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective In this narrative review, an overview is given of the pros and cons of various crystalloid fluids used for infusion during initial resuscitation or maintenance phases in adult hospitalized patients. Special emphasis is given on dose, composition of fluids, presence of buffers (in balanced solutions) and electrolytes, according to recent literature. We also review the use of hypertonic solutions. Methods We extracted relevant clinical literature in English specifically examining patient-oriented outcomes related to fluid volume and type. Results A restrictive fluid therapy prevents complications seen with liberal, large-volume therapy, even though restrictive fluid loading with crystalloids may not demonstrate large hemodynamic effects in surgical or septic patients. Hypertonic solutions may serve the purpose of small volume resuscitation but carry the disadvantage of hypernatremia. Hypotonic solutions are contraindicated in (impending) cerebral edema, whereas hypertonic solutions are probably more helpful in ameliorating than in preventing this condition and improving outcome. Balanced solutions offer a better approach for plasma composition than unbalanced ones, and the evidence for benefits in patient morbidity and mortality is increasing, particularly by helping to prevent acute kidney injury. Conclusions Isotonic and hypertonic crystalloid fluids are the fluids of choice for resuscitation from hypovolemia and shock. The evidence that balanced solutions are superior to unbalanced ones is increasing. Hypertonic saline is effective in mannitol-refractory intracranial hypertension, whereas hypotonic solutions are contraindicated in this condition. PMID:24472418

  1. Cognitive skills and reading in adults with Usher syndrome type 2

    PubMed Central

    Henricson, Cecilia; Lidestam, Björn; Lyxell, Björn; Möller, Claes

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate working memory (WM), phonological skills, lexical skills, and reading comprehension in adults with Usher syndrome type 2 (USH2). Design: The participants performed tests of phonological processing, lexical access, WM, and reading comprehension. The design of the test situation and tests was specifically considered for use with persons with low vision in combination with hearing impairment. The performance of the group with USH2 on the different cognitive measures was compared to that of a matched control group with normal hearing and vision (NVH). Study Sample: Thirteen participants with USH2 aged 21–60 years and a control group of 10 individuals with NVH, matched on age and level of education. Results: The group with USH2 displayed significantly lower performance on tests of phonological processing, and on measures requiring both fast visual judgment and phonological processing. There was a larger variation in performance among the individuals with USH2 than in the matched control group. Conclusion: The performance of the group with USH2 indicated similar problems with phonological processing skills and phonological WM as in individuals with long-term hearing loss. The group with USH2 also had significantly longer reaction times, indicating that processing of visual stimuli is difficult due to the visual impairment. These findings point toward the difficulties in accessing information that persons with USH2 experience, and could be part of the explanation of why individuals with USH2 report high levels of fatigue and feelings of stress (Wahlqvist et al., 2013). PMID:25859232

  2. Differential response of C-type natriuretic peptide to estrogen and dexamethasone in adult bone.

    PubMed

    Prickett, Timothy C R; Wellby, Martin; Barrell, Graham K; Richards, A Mark; Espiner, Eric A

    2014-09-01

    C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) is crucial in promoting endochondral bone growth in mammals including humans but whether this paracrine hormone participates in maintaining bone integrity in the mature skeleton is unknown. Accordingly we studied changes in plasma and bone tissue CNP in anoestrus adult ewes receiving short term anabolic (estrogen) or catabolic (dexamethasone) treatment for 7days. CNP and the aminoterminal fragment of the CNP prohormone (NTproCNP) were measured in plasma and extracts of cancellous bone excised from vertebral, iliac, tibial and marrow tissues. Concentrations of CNP peptides were much higher in vertebral and iliac extracts than those of tibial or marrow. Both plasma CNP and NTproCNP increased rapidly after estrogen followed by a later rise in bone alkaline phosphatase. Vertebral and iliac (but not tibial or marrow) CNP peptide content were significantly increased by estrogen. Consistent with a skeletal source, plasma NTproCNP was significantly associated with vertebral tissue CNP. In contrast, bone tissue CNP peptide content was unaffected by dexamethasone despite suppression of plasma CNP peptides and bone alkaline phosphatase. We postulate that increases in trabecular bone CNP reflect new endosteal bone formation in these estrogen responsive tissues whereas reduced plasma CNP peptides after dexamethasone, without change in cancellous bone content, reflects reductions in cortical bone turnover. PMID:24880122

  3. Ghrelin stimulates milk intake by affecting adult type feeding behaviour in postnatal rats.

    PubMed

    Piao, H; Hosoda, H; Kangawa, K; Murata, T; Narita, K; Higuchi, T

    2008-03-01

    The influence of ghrelin on feeding behaviour during infancy is unknown. To determine whether ghrelin influences milk intake in rat pups, newborn rats received a single i.p. injection of either rat ghrelin (100 microg/kg) or rabbit anti-ghrelin immunoglobulin G (100 microg/kg) every 5 days from postpartum day 5 to day 30 (P5-P30). Milk intake was then assessed by body weight gain following a 2-h suckling period. Ghrelin significantly increased weight gain relative to vehicle-injected controls in P20, P25 and P30 pups, but not in younger animals. Similarly, after 8 h of milk restriction, anti-ghrelin injections significantly decreased weight gain in P25 and P30, but not in younger pups. Interestingly, however, ghrelin did increase independent feeding in P10 and P15 pups using a paradigm in which pups consumed milk from a milk-soaked paper towel. We therefore conclude that ghrelin stimulates milk intake at an early postnatal stage, primarily by affecting adult-type feeding behaviour. PMID:18194428

  4. [A case of adult-onset type II citrullinemia (CTLN2) triggered by an overseas travel].

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Masayoshi; Shimada, Takuya; Hamaoka, Shima; Shibata, Masunari; Naito, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    A 43-year-old male presented with abnormal behavior and consciousness disturbance on the day after traveling abroad and was admitted to our hospital. Laboratory tests showed hyperammonemia and hypercitrullinemia. The electro-encephalogram showed frontal dominant bilateral slow δ burst. He had a peculiar taste for nuts. But he didn't take nuts during the overseas travel for 3 days. The family history revealed that his younger brother died of a status epilepticus of unknown cause at the age of 29. These findings were compatible with hepatic encephalopathy due to adult-onset type II citrullinemia (CTLN2). Gene analysis provided a definite diagnosis of CTLN2. Diet and drug therapy have improved his condition. He is due to have liver transplantation which is the only established radical treatment for CTLN2 if his condition becomes worse. The present case shows that cessation of the habitual intake of nuts only for 3 days could lead to onset of CTLN2. PMID:25283831

  5. Targeted recruitment of adults with type 2 diabetes for a physical activity intervention.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Elizabeth J; Niles, Barbara L; Mori, DeAnna L

    2015-05-01

    Recruiting sufficient numbers of participants for physical activity trials for individuals with diabetes can be difficult because there are often many behavioral demands for participants, and inclusion and exclusion criteria can be extensive. This study examined the recruitment strategies used for a randomized, controlled trial designed to investigate the efficacy of an automated telephone intervention to promote physical activity in adults with type 2 diabetes in an urban Veterans Administration health care system. Traditional recruitment approaches of posting flyers and obtaining referrals from clinicians did not yield sufficient numbers of interested patients. Using the electronic medical record system to identify patients with uncontrolled diabetes allowed staff to send targeted mailings to participants, and 77% of participants were recruited using this method. The targeted mailing approach elicited a positive response rate of 12% (328 of 2,764 potential participants identified) and appeared to produce a more representative and appropriate sample than other recruitment methods used. Lessons learned in this study may be helpful to researchers in future trials who attempt to recruit participants with diabetes for physical activity protocols. PMID:25987808

  6. Assessment of Potential Herb-Drug Interactions among Nigerian Adults with Type-2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ezuruike, Udoamaka; Prieto, Jose M.

    2016-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that patients with diabetes do not rely only on prescription drugs for their disease management. The use of herbal medicines is one of the self-management practices adopted by these patients, often without the knowledge of their healthcare practitioners. This study assessed the potential for pharmacokinetic herb-drug interactions (HDIs) amongst Nigerian adult diabetic patients. This was done through a literature analysis of the pharmacokinetic profile of their herbal medicines and prescription drugs, based on information obtained from 112 patients with type-2 diabetes attending two secondary health care facilities in Nigeria. Fifty percent of the informants used herbal medicines alongside their prescription drugs. Worryingly, 60% of the patients taking herbal medicines did not know their identity, thus increasing the risk of unidentified HDIs. By comparing the pharmacokinetic profile of eight identified herbs taken by the patients for the management of diabetes against those of the prescription drugs, several scenarios of potential HDIs were identified and their clinical relevance is discussed. The lack of clinical predictors points toward cultural factors as the influence for herb use, making it more difficult to identify these patients and in turn monitor potential HDIs. In identifying these possible interactions, we have highlighted the need for healthcare professionals to promote a proactive monitoring of patients' use of herbal medicines. PMID:27559312

  7. Distribution of angiotensin type-1 receptor messenger RNA expression in the adult rat brain.

    PubMed

    Lenkei, Z; Palkovits, M; Corvol, P; Llorens-Cortes, C

    1998-02-01

    Angiotensin II and angiotensin III in the brain exert their various effects by acting on two pharmacologically well-defined receptors, the type-1 (AT1) and the type-2 (AT2) receptors. Receptor binding autoradiography has revealed the dominant presence of AT1 in brain nuclei involved in cardiovascular, body fluid and neuroendocrine control. The cloning of the AT1 complementary DNA has revealed the existence of two receptor subtypes in rodents, AT1A and AT1B. Using specific riboprobes for in situ hybridization, we have previously shown that the AT1A messenger RNA is predominantly expressed in the rat forebrain; in contrast the AT1B subtype predominates in the anterior pituitary. Using a similar technical approach, the aim of the present study was to establish the precise anatomical localization of cells synthetising the AT1A receptor in the adult rat brain. High AT1A messenger RNA expression was found in the vascular organ of the lamina terminalis, the median preoptic nucleus, the subfornical organ, the hypothalamic periventricular nucleus, the parvocellular parts of the paraventricular nucleus, the nucleus of the solitary tract and the area postrema, in agreement with previous autoradiographic studies, describing a high density of AT1 binding sites in these nuclei. In addition, AT1A messenger RNA expression was detected in several brain areas, where no AT1 binding was reported previously. Thus, we identify strong expression of AT1A messenger RNA expression in scattered cells of the lateral parts of the preoptic region, the lateral hypothalamus and several brainstem nuclei. In none of these structures was the AT1B messenger RNA detectable at the microscopic level. In conclusion, it is suggested that angiotensins may exert their central effects on body fluid and cardiovascular homeostasis mainly via the AT1A receptor subtype. PMID:9483539

  8. Ostreid herpesvirus type 1 replication and host response in adult Pacific oysters, Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Segarra, Amélie; Baillon, Laury; Tourbiez, Delphine; Benabdelmouna, Abdellah; Faury, Nicole; Bourgougnon, Nathalie; Renault, Tristan

    2014-01-01

    Since 2008, massive mortality outbreaks associated with OsHV-1 detection have been reported in Crassostrea gigas spat and juveniles in several countries. Nevertheless, adult oysters do not demonstrate mortality in the field related to OsHV-1 detection and were thus assumed to be more resistant to viral infection. Determining how virus and adult oyster interact is a major goal in understanding why mortality events are not reported among adult Pacific oysters. Dual transcriptomics of virus-host interactions were explored by real-time PCR in adult oysters after a virus injection. Thirty-nine viral genes and five host genes including MyD88, IFI44, IkB2, IAP and Gly were measured at 0.5, 10, 26, 72 and 144 hours post infection (hpi). No viral RNA among the 39 genes was detected at 144 hpi suggesting the adult oysters are able to inhibit viral replication. Moreover, the IAP gene (oyster gene) shows significant up-regulation in infected adults compared to control adults. This result suggests that over-expression of IAP could be a reaction to OsHV-1 infection, which may induce the apoptotic process. Apoptosis could be a main mechanism involved in disease resistance in adults. Antiviral activity of haemolymph against herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) was not significantly different between infected adults versus control. PMID:25294338

  9. RNAi silencing of P/Q-type calcium channels in Purkinje neurons of adult mouse leads to episodic ataxia type 2.

    PubMed

    Salvi, Julie; Bertaso, Federica; Mausset-Bonnefont, Anne-Laure; Metz, Alexandra; Lemmers, Céline; Ango, Fabrice; Fagni, Laurent; Lory, Philippe; Mezghrani, Alexandre

    2014-08-01

    Episodic ataxia type-2 (EA2) is a dominantly inherited human neurological disorder caused by loss of function mutations in the CACNA1A gene, which encodes the CaV2.1 subunit of P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channels. It remains however unknown whether the deficit of cerebellar CaV2.1 in adult is in direct link with the disease. To address this issue, we have used lentiviral based-vector RNA interference (RNAi) to knock-down CaV2.1 expression in the cerebellum of adult mice. We show that suppression of the P/Q-type channels in Purkinje neurons induced motor abnormalities, such as imbalance and ataxic gait. Interestingly, moderate channel suppression caused no basal ataxia, while β-adrenergic activation and exercise mimicked stress induced motor disorders. Moreover, stress-induced ataxia was stable, non-progressive and totally abolished by acetazolamide, a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor used to treat EA2. Altogether, these data reveal that P/Q-type channel suppression in adult mice supports the episodic status of EA2 disease. PMID:24768804

  10. Adult-onset type 1 diabetes patients display decreased IGRP-specific Tr1 cells in blood.

    PubMed

    Chujo, Daisuke; Nguyen, Thien-Son; Foucat, Emile; Blankenship, Derek; Banchereau, Jacques; Nepom, Gerald T; Chaussabel, Damien; Ueno, Hideki

    2015-12-01

    The breakdown of immune tolerance against islet antigens causes type 1 diabetes (T1D). The antigens associated with adult-onset T1D (AT1D) remain largely undefined. It is possible that AT1D patients display a unique type of CD4(+) T cells specific for a certain islet antigen. Here we analyzed the cytokine production profiles of CD4(+) helper T (Th) cells that are specific for three islet antigens; GAD65, preproinsulin, and IGRP in patients with AT1D, juvenile-onset T1D (JT1D), and age-, gender- and human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched control adults. While IGRP-specific Th cells in AT1D patients were dominantly Th1 cells, IGRP-specific Th cells in control adults and JT1D patients were dominantly Th2 and T regulatory type 1 (Tr1) cells. Notably, the frequency of IGRP-specific Tr1 cells was significantly lower in AT1D patients than in control adults and JT1D patients. In conclusion, our study suggests that IGRP-specific Th cells play a unique pathogenic role in AT1D. PMID:26341315

  11. Isolated trapdoor-type medial blowout fracture in an adult presenting horizontal diplopia treated by endoscopic endonasal approach.

    PubMed

    Noh, Woong Jae; Park, Tae Jung; Kim, Joo Yeon; Kwon, Jae Hwan

    2013-01-01

    Orbital blowout fracture frequently occurs along the floor or medial aspect of the orbital wall, which are the two thinnest areas of the bony orbit. True trapdoor injury of the orbit is less common and is rare as an isolated medial wall injury, because the medial orbital wall has several bony septa within the ethmoid sinus that provide support and decrease the risk of a trapdoor fracture. Additionally, the incidence of trapdoor-type blowout fracture in adults is lower than in children. In a trapdoor-type blowout fracture with restricted ocular movement, prompt diagnosis and early intervention are associated with better clinical outcomes. We encountered a case of trap door-type medial blowout fracture with horizontal eye ball movement limitation in an adult. She underwent endonasal endoscopic reduction surgery for the medial blowout fractures. Here we report this case, and suggest early diagnosis and prompt surgical exploration. PMID:24964421

  12. Associations of Total and Domain-Specific Sedentary Time With Type 2 Diabetes in Taiwanese Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Hsueh, Ming-Chun; Liao, Yung; Chang, Shao-Hsi

    2016-01-01

    Background The increasing prevalence of type 2 diabetes in older adults has become a public health concern. We investigated the associations of total and domain-specific sedentary time with risk of type 2 diabetes in older adults. Methods The sample comprised 1046 older people (aged ≥65 years). Analyses were performed using cross-sectional data collected via computer-assisted telephone-based interviews in 2014. Data on six self-reported domains of sedentary time (Measure of Older Adults’ Sedentary Time), type 2 diabetes status, and sociodemographic variables were included in the study. Binary logistic regression analysis was performed to calculate the adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for total and individual sedentary behavior components and likelihood of type 2 diabetes. Results A total of 17.5% of the participants reported type 2 diabetes. No significant associations were found between total sitting time and risk of type 2 diabetes, after controlling for confounding factors. After total sedentary behavior was stratified into six domains, only watching television for more than 2 hours per day was associated with higher odds of type 2 diabetes (OR 1.56; 95% CI, 1.10–2.21), but no significant associations were found between other domains of sedentary behavior (computer use, reading, socializing, transport, and hobbies) and risk of type 2 diabetes. Conclusions These findings suggest that, among domain-specific sedentary behavior, excessive television viewing might increase the risk of type 2 diabetes among older adults more than other forms of sedentary behavior. PMID:26875598

  13. Differences between neonates and adults in tissue-type-plasminogen activator (t-PA)-catalyzed plasminogen activation with various effectors and in carbohydrate sequences of fibrinogen chains.

    PubMed

    Ries, M; Easton, R L; Longstaff, C; Zenker, M; Corran, P H; Morris, H R; Dell, A; Gaffney, P J

    2001-08-01

    Our study investigates the effect of fetal and adult soluble fibrin (SF), fetal and adult fibrinogen Aalpha- and gamma-chains, as well as adult CNBr-fibrinogen fragments on tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA)-catalyzed plasminogen activation of both fetal and adult Glu-plasminogen types 1 and 2. In addition, we determined carbohydrate sequences of fetal and adult Bbeta- and gamma-chains by mass spectrometric analysis. In the absence of an effector, no substantial differences in the rate of plasmin formation could be seen between the fetal and adult plasminogen types. In the presence of an effector, both fetal Glu-plasminogen types revealed lower values for k(cat app) than the respective adult types. No differences could be seen in the values for K(m app). The resulting differences in catalytic efficiencies between the fetal and adult plasminogen types were much less than previously reported. No differences could be seen between fetal and adult effectors in stimulating t-PA-catalyzed plasminogen activation. Detailed analyses of the activation kinetics revealed a longer initial phase of slow plasmin formation of both fetal Glu-plasminogen types compared to their respective adult types, indicating a slower plasmin-induced modification of CNBr-fibrinogen fragments or SF by fetal plasmin. Mass spectrometric analysis of the N-glycans present on adult and fetal Bbeta- and gamma-fibrinogen chains showed the presence of a major monosialylated biantennary structure with lesser amounts of the disialylated form. In contrast to previous data, we conclude that catalytic efficiency of t-PA-catalyzed plasminogen activation in neonates is only slightly lower than in adults. PMID:11672579

  14. Steatogenesis in adult-onset type II citrullinemia is associated with down-regulation of PPARα.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Michiharu; Kimura, Takefumi; Yazaki, Masahide; Tanaka, Naoki; Yang, Yang; Nakajima, Takero; Horiuchi, Akira; Fang, Zhong-Ze; Joshita, Satoru; Matsumoto, Akihiro; Umemura, Takeji; Tanaka, Eiji; Gonzalez, Frank J; Ikeda, Shu-Ichi; Aoyama, Toshifumi

    2015-03-01

    SLC25A13 (citrin or aspartate-glutamate carrier 2) is located in the mitochondrial membrane in the liver and its genetic deficiency causes adult-onset type II citrullinemia (CTLN2). CTLN2 is one of the urea cycle disorders characterized by sudden-onset hyperammonemia due to reduced argininosuccinate synthase activity. This disorder is frequently accompanied with hepatosteatosis in the absence of obesity and ethanol consumption. However, the precise mechanism of steatogenesis remains unclear. The expression of genes associated with fatty acid (FA) and triglyceride (TG) metabolism was examined using liver samples obtained from 16 CTLN2 patients and compared with 7 healthy individuals. Although expression of hepatic genes associated with lipogenesis and TG hydrolysis was not changed, the mRNAs encoding enzymes/proteins involved in FA oxidation (carnitine palmitoyl-CoA transferase 1α, medium- and very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenases, and acyl-CoA oxidase 1), very-low-density lipoprotein secretion (microsomal TG transfer protein), and FA transport (CD36 and FA-binding protein 1), were markedly suppressed in CTLN2 patients. Serum concentrations of ketone bodies were also decreased in these patients, suggesting reduced mitochondrial β-oxidation activity. Consistent with these findings, the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), a master regulator of hepatic lipid metabolism, was significantly down-regulated. Hepatic PPARα expression was inversely correlated with severity of steatosis and circulating ammonia and citrulline levels. Additionally, phosphorylation of c-Jun-N-terminal kinase was enhanced in CTLN2 livers, which was likely associated with lower hepatic PPARα. Collectively, down-regulation of PPARα is associated with steatogenesis in CTLN2 patients. These findings provide a novel link between urea cycle disorder, lipid metabolism, and PPARα. PMID:25533124

  15. Testing Covariates of Type 2 Diabetes-Cognition Associations in Older Adults: Moderating or Mediating Effects?

    PubMed Central

    McFall, G. Peggy; Geall, Bonnie P.; Fischer, Ashley L.; Dolcos, Sanda; Dixon, Roger A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective The general goal of this study was to advance our understanding of Type 2 diabetes (T2D)-cognition relationships in older adults by linking and testing comprehensive sets of potential moderators, potential mediators, and multiple cognitive outcomes. Method We identified in the literature 13 health-related (but T2D-distal) potential covariates, representing four informal domains (i.e., biological vitality, personal affect, subjective health, lifestyle activities). Cross-sectional data from the Victoria Longitudinal Study (age range = 53-90 years; n = 41 T2D and n = 458 control participants) were used. We first examined whether any of the 13 potential covariates influenced T2D-cognition associations, as measured by a comprehensive neuropsychological battery (15 measures). Next, using standard regression-based moderator and mediator analyses, we systematically tested whether the identified covariates would significantly alter observed T2D-cognition relationships. Results Six potential covariates were found to be sensitive to T2D associations with performance on seven cognitive measures. Three factors (systolic blood pressure, gait-balance composite, subjective health) were significant mediators. Each mediated multiple cognitive outcomes, especially measures of neurocognitive speed, executive functioning, and episodic memory. Conclusions Our findings offer a relatively comprehensive perspective of T2D-related cognitive deficits, comorbidities, and modulating influences. The implications for future research reach across several fields of study and application. These include (a) neuropsychological research on neural and biological bases of T2D-related cognitive decline, (b) clinical research on intervention and treatment strategies, and (c) larger-scale longitudinal studies examining the potential multilateral and dynamic relationships among T2D status, related comorbidities, and cognitive outcomes. PMID:20804243

  16. Angiotensin type 2 receptor in pancreatic islets of adult rats: a novel insulinotropic mediator

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Chunhong; Zucker, Irving H.

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, we evaluated the relative abundance of angiotensin type 2 receptor (AT2R) protein in various tissues of adult rats. We found that pancreatic islets expressed the highest AT2R protein compared with all other tissues. Accordingly, we then determined the functional significance of AT2R in the endocrine pancreas in in vivo and in vitro experiments by using angiotensin II (ANG II) alone, losartan (Los; AT1R antagonist), compound 21 (C21; AT2R agonist), and PD-123319 (PD; AT2R antagonist). Experiments carried out in rats indicated that, 1) ANG II treatment significantly increased plasma insulin concentration (1.51 ± 0.20 vs. 0.82 ± 0.14 ng/ml, n = 7, P < 0.05) in the fed state. This insulinotropic effect was further augmented by combined treatment with ANG II + Los (2.31 ± 0.25 ng/ml, n = 7, P < 0.01). C21 also elevated insulin levels (2.13 ± 0.20 ng/ml, n = 7, P < 0.01), which was completely abolished by PD. 2) ANG II impaired glucose tolerance, whereas ANG II + Los or C21 improved this function. 3) All treated rats displayed an enhanced insulin secretory response to a glucose challenge. 4) All treated rats displayed upregulated proinsulin 2 mRNA and insulin protein expression in the pancreas. In in vitro experiments using INS-1E cells and isolated rat islets, we found that AT2R activation significantly improved insulin biosynthesis and secretion. These results suggest that the AT2R functions as an insulinotropic mediator. AT2R and its downstream signaling pathways may be potential therapeutic targets for diabetes. PMID:24085035

  17. A Qualitative Study of Confusing Experiences among Japanese Adult Patients with Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Nishio, Ikuko; Chujo, Masami; Kataoka, Hideyuki

    2016-01-01

    Background In this study, we investigated the powerlessness of patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D), and described the structure of powerlessness that these individuals experienced. In order for patients to recover from this state, we recommend that they take steps to regain their power. Methods Fifteen Japanese adults with T1D participated in this study. Data were collected from all subjects between July 2013 and March 2014 via in-depth semi-structured interviews. Qualitative data analysis was conducted according to a grounded theory approach. Finally, the core category was identified, which allowed us to build a new powerlessness structure for T1D. Results The results suggested a core category, ‘Wandering a tangled path,’ comprising four categories, eight subcategories, and twenty-six concepts. These four categories were as follows: ‘being burdened by T1D,’ ‘suffering from insulin-related troubles,’ ‘being unable to cope with difficulties in self-management,’ and ‘facing social prejudice.’ In the state of powerlessness, negative emotional experiences snowballed, with patients feeling more and more depressed until they ultimately reached ‘rock bottom.’ Conclusion We found that as negative emotional experiences related to powerlessness increased, negative feelings intensified until the patients reached rock bottom. Powerlessness is like ‘wandering a tangled path,’ a state in which T1D patients struggle to cope with reality on their own when faced with both internal and external events. ‘Wandering a tangled path’ is at the core of powerlessness. A primary characteristic of the structure of powerlessness is suffering from confusing experiences. To help patients cope with T1D without being crushed by powerlessness, nurses must pay attention to signs of powerlessness. Powerlessness is not just an emotional state, but a combination of feelings, perceptions, and thoughts; therefore, it is important to comprehensively understand patients

  18. Population attributable fraction of type 2 diabetes due to physical inactivity in adults: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Physical inactivity is a global pandemic. The population attributable fraction (PAF) of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) associated with physical inactivity ranges from 3% to 40%. The purpose of this systematic review was to determine the best estimate of PAF for T2DM attributable to physical inactivity and absence of sport participation or exercise for men and women. Methods We conducted a systematic review that included a comprehensive search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, SportDiscus, and CINAHL (1946 to April 30 2013) limited by the terms adults and English. Two reviewers screened studies, extracted PAF related data and assessed the quality of the selected studies. We reconstructed 95% CIs for studies missing these data using a substitution method. Results Of the eight studies reporting PAF in T2DM, two studies included prospective cohort studies (3 total) and six were reviews. There were distinct variations in quality of defining and measuring physical inactivity, T2DM and adjusting for confounders. In the US, PAFs for absence of playing sport ranged from 13% (95% CI: 3, 22) in men and 29% (95% CI: 17, 41) in women. In Finland, PAFs for absence of exercise ranged from 3% (95% CI: -11, 16) in men to 7% (95% CI: -9, 20) in women. Conclusions The PAF of physical inactivity due to T2DM is substantial. Physical inactivity is a modifiable risk factor for T2DM. The contribution of physical inactivity to T2DM differs by sex; PAF also differs if physical inactivity is defined as the absence of ‘sport’ or absence of ‘exercise’. PMID:24885278

  19. Assessment of Macular Function Using the SKILL Card in Adults With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Dhamdhere, Kavita P.; Schneck, Marilyn E.; Bearse, Marcus A.; Lam, Wendy; Barez, Shirin; Adams, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the impact of reduced contrast and reduced luminance on visual acuity (VA) using the Smith–Kettlewell Institute Low Luminance (SKILL) Card in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods. We studied adults aged 27 to 65 years, 32 with T2DM and no retinopathy (NoRet group), 22 with T2DM and nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR group), and 38 healthy control subjects. Monocular high-contrast (SKILL light) and low-contrast, low-luminance (SKILL dark) near visual acuities were tested. The SKILL score was calculated as the difference between dark chart and light chart acuities and was corrected for age. Contrast sensitivity (CS) was also measured. Subject group differences were examined using ANOVA and Tukey honestly significant difference test. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used to assess the ability of the SKILL Card and CS to discriminate the subject groups. Results. The SKILL score and CS were significantly worse in both diabetes groups compared with the controls (P < 0.01). SKILL scores in the NPDR group were poorest (highest) and significantly worse than those in the NoRet group (P < 0.05). SKILL scores discriminated NPDR and NoRet patients from the controls with high accuracy (99% and 88%, respectively), which was significantly (P < 0.03) better than CS (78% and 74%, respectively). Conclusions. The SKILL Card demonstrated vision function changes in diabetes even in the absence of clinically evident retinopathy. Diabetic retinopathy led to a further increase in the SKILL score, while high-contrast VA remained unchanged. PMID:24825104

  20. Acute Resveratrol Consumption Improves Neurovascular Coupling Capacity in Adults with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Rachel H.X.; Raederstorff, Daniel; Howe, Peter R.C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Poor cerebral perfusion may contribute to cognitive impairment in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We conducted a randomized controlled trial to test the hypothesis that resveratrol can enhance cerebral vasodilator function and thereby alleviate the cognitive deficits in T2DM. We have already reported that acute resveratrol consumption improved cerebrovascular responsiveness (CVR) to hypercapnia. We now report the effects of resveratrol on neurovascular coupling capacity (CVR to cognitive stimuli), cognitive performance and correlations with plasma resveratrol concentrations. Methods: Thirty-six T2DM adults aged 40–80 years were randomized to consume single doses of resveratrol (0, 75, 150 and 300 mg) at weekly intervals. Transcranial Doppler ultrasound was used to monitor changes in blood flow velocity (BFV) during a cognitive test battery. The battery consisted of dual-tasking (finger tapping with both Trail Making task and Serial Subtraction 3 task) and a computerized multi-tasking test that required attending to four tasks simultaneously. CVR to cognitive tasks was calculated as the per cent increase in BFV from pre-test basal to peak mean blood flow velocity and also as the area under the curve for BFV. Results: Compared to placebo, 75 mg resveratrol significantly improved neurovascular coupling capacity, which correlated with plasma total resveratrol levels. Enhanced performance on the multi-tasking test battery was also evident following 75 mg and 300 mg of resveratrol. Conclusion: a single 75 mg dose of resveratrol was able to improve neurovascular coupling and cognitive performance in T2DM. Evaluation of benefits of chronic resveratrol supplementation is now warranted. PMID:27420093

  1. Nonaqueous, mini-dose glucagon for treatment of mild hypoglycemia in adults with type 1 diabetes: A dose-seeking study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To evaluate mini-dose glucagon in adults with type 1 diabetes using a stable, liquid, ready-to-use preparation, twelve adults with type 1 diabetes receiving treatment with insulin pumps received subcutaneous doses of 75, 150, and 300 ug of nonaqueous glucagon. Plasma glucose, glucagon, and insulin c...

  2. The Type I Interferon Response Determines Differences in Choroid Plexus Susceptibility between Newborns and Adults in Herpes Simplex Virus Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Douglas R.; Folmsbee, Stephen S.; Muller, William J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Newborns are significantly more susceptible to severe viral encephalitis than adults, with differences in the host response to infection implicated as a major factor. However, the specific host signaling pathways responsible for differences in susceptibility and neurologic morbidity have remained unknown. In a murine model of HSV encephalitis, we demonstrated that the choroid plexus (CP) is susceptible to herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) early in infection of the newborn but not the adult brain. We confirmed susceptibility of the CP to HSV infection in a human case of newborn HSV encephalitis. We investigated components of the type I interferon (IFN) response in the murine brain that might account for differences in cell susceptibility and found that newborns have a dampened interferon response and significantly lower basal levels of the alpha/beta interferon (IFN-α/β) receptor (IFNAR) than do adults. To test the contribution of IFNAR to restricting infection from the CP, we infected IFNAR knockout (KO) adult mice, which showed restored CP susceptibility to HSV-1 infection in the adult. Furthermore, reduced IFNAR levels did not account for differences we found in the basal levels of several other innate signaling proteins in the wild-type newborn and the adult, including protein kinase R (PKR), that suggested specific regulation of innate immunity in the developing brain. Viral targeting of the CP, a region of the brain that plays a critical role in neurodevelopment, provides a link between newborn susceptibility to HSV and long-term neurologic morbidity among survivors of newborn HSV encephalitis. PMID:27073094

  3. Cytogenesis in the adult monkey motor cortex: Perivascular NG2 cells are the major adult born cell type

    PubMed Central

    Stanton, Gregory B; Kohler, Shawn J; Boklweski, Jennifer; Cameron, Judy L; Greenough, William T

    2015-01-01

    We used confocal microscopy and immunohistochemistry (IHC) to look for new cells in the motor cortex of adult macaque monkeys that might form the cellular bases of improved brain function from exercise. Twenty-four female Macaca fascicularis monkeys divided into groups by age (10–12 years, 15–17 years), postexercise survival periods, and controls, received 10 weekly injections of the thymidine analog, bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to mark new cells. Sixteen monkeys survived 15 weeks (5 weeks postexercise) and 8 monkeys survived 27 weeks (12 weeks postexercise) after initial BrdU injections. Additionally, five Macaca mulatta female monkeys (∼5.5–7 years) received single injections of BrdU and survived 2 days, 2 weeks, and 6 weeks after BrdU injections. Neural and glial antibodies were used to identify new cell phenotypes and to look for changes in proportions of these cells with respect to time and experimental conditions. No BrdU+/DCx+ cells were found but about 7.5% of new cells were calretinin-positive (Cr+). BrdU+/GABA+ (gamma-aminobutyric acid) cells were also found but no new Cr+ or GABA+ cells colabeled with a mature neuron marker, NeuN or chondroitin sulfate antibody, NG2. The proportion of new cells that were NG2+ was about 85% for short and long survival monkeys of which two, newly described perivascular phenotypes (Pldv and Elu) and a small percentage of pericytes (2.5%) comprised 44% and 51% of the new NG2+ cells, respectively. Proportions of NG2+ phenotypes were affected by post-BrdU survival periods, monkey age, and possibly a postexercise sedentary period but no direct effect of exercise was found. PMID:25308320

  4. Do Perceptions of Empowerment Affect Glycemic Control and Self-Care Among Adults with Type 2 Diabetes?

    PubMed Central

    D’Souza, Melba Sheila; Karkada, Subrahmanya Nairy; Hanrahan, Nancy P.; Venkatesaperumal, Ramesh; Amirtharaj, Anandhi

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Arab adult with T2DM is understudied with less known facts about the perception of empowerment and its relationship with self-care and glycemic control. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which perception of empowerment by Arab adults living with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) was associated with better glycemic control and self-care management. Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study was led among 300 Arab adults living in Oman with T2DM in an outpatient diabetes clinic. The Diabetes Empowerment Scale (DES), glycosylated haemaglobin (HbA1c) and Body mass index was assessed. The DES was found to be valid and reliable for the population. ANOVA, Regression analysis, and Structural equation modeling was used for analysis. Results: The composite score and three subscales of DES were a significant and strong predictor of good glycemic control among Omani adults with T2DM (p<0.001). Age, education, duration of DM, prior DM education program and medications were significantly associated with DES. Conclusion: Diabetes nurse educators engaged in the care of adults with T2DM should assess self-empowerment and tailor interventions to increase empowerment for better glycemic control. Patient empowerment plays an essential role in maintaining self-care behaviours and HbA1c. PMID:26156908

  5. Hunting Increases Phosphorylation of Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Type II in Adult Barn Owls

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Grant S.; DeBello, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile barn owls readily adapt to prismatic spectacles, whereas adult owls living under standard aviary conditions do not. We previously demonstrated that phosphorylation of the cyclic-AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) provides a readout of the instructive signals that guide plasticity in juveniles. Here we investigated phosphorylation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (pCaMKII) in both juveniles and adults. In contrast to CREB, we found no differences in pCaMKII expression between prism-wearing and control juveniles within the external nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICX), the major site of plasticity. For prism-wearing adults that hunted live mice and are capable of adaptation, expression of pCaMKII was increased relative to prism-wearing adults that fed passively on dead mice and are not capable of adaptation. This effect did not bear the hallmarks of instructive information: it was not localized to rostral ICX and did not exhibit a patchy distribution reflecting discrete bimodal stimuli. These data are consistent with a role for CaMKII as a permissive rather than an instructive factor. In addition, the paucity of pCaMKII expression in passively fed adults suggests that the permissive default setting is “off” in adults. PMID:25789177

  6. Conditional deletion of Abca3 in alveolar type II cells alters surfactant homeostasis in newborn and adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Besnard, Valérie; Matsuzaki, Yohei; Clark, Jean; Xu, Yan; Wert, Susan E.; Ikegami, Machiko; Stahlman, Mildred T.; Weaver, Timothy E.; Hunt, Alan N.; Postle, Anthony D.

    2010-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette A3 (ABCA3) is a lipid transport protein required for synthesis and storage of pulmonary surfactant in type II cells in the alveoli. Abca3 was conditionally deleted in respiratory epithelial cells (Abca3Δ/Δ) in vivo. The majority of mice in which Abca3 was deleted in alveolar type II cells died shortly after birth from respiratory distress related to surfactant deficiency. Approximately 30% of the Abca3Δ/Δ mice survived after birth. Surviving Abca3Δ/Δ mice developed emphysema in the absence of significant pulmonary inflammation. Staining of lung tissue and mRNA isolated from alveolar type II cells demonstrated that ∼50% of alveolar type II cells lacked ABCA3. Phospholipid content and composition were altered in lung tissue, lamellar bodies, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from adult Abca3Δ/Δ mice. In adult Abca3Δ/Δ mice, cells lacking ABCA3 had decreased expression of mRNAs associated with lipid synthesis and transport. FOXA2 and CCAAT enhancer-binding protein-α, transcription factors known to regulate genes regulating lung lipid metabolism, were markedly decreased in cells lacking ABCA3. Deletion of Abca3 disrupted surfactant lipid synthesis in a cell-autonomous manner. Compensatory surfactant synthesis was initiated in ABCA3-sufficient type II cells, indicating that surfactant homeostasis is a highly regulated process that includes sensing and coregulation among alveolar type II cells. PMID:20190032

  7. Hybrid intervention for type A aortic arch interruption and a giant subclavian artery aneurysm in an adult.

    PubMed

    Oz, Kursad; Erek, Ersin; Yildirim, Aydin

    2016-06-01

    Interrupted aortic arch is a very rare but well-described congenital anomaly. Concomitant presentation of interrupted aortic arch and giant subclavian artery aneurysm is an unusual event in adulthood. To the best of our knowledge, hybrid intervention for type A aortic arch interruption with a giant aneurysm of the subclavian artery is an alternative approach for the management of these concomitant pathologies in adults. PMID:27071339

  8. Influence of message error type on Korean adults' attitudes toward an individual who uses augmentative and alternative communication.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Ri; Kim, Young Tae; Lee, Hyun Jung; Park, Eun Hye

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of types of message errors on the attitudes of Korean adults toward a person who uses AAC. The attitudes of 72 adults who speak native Korean were examined through attitude questionnaires completed after viewing videotaped conversations between a boy with cerebral palsy and an adult without disabilities. Each interaction video involved a message with one of six error types, including various types of syntactic, semantic, and pragmatic errors. The participants provided information on their attitude towards the person who used AAC, and ranked their preferences among the six messages. The results provide evidence that attitudes towards the individual using AAC were most positive (in comparison with other conditions) when a pragmatic error was observed. Messages containing a syntactic error were ranked most favorably. Spearman's correlation analyses revealed some relationship between attitudes rating and preferences ranking. Our results provide evidence that specific language and cultural contexts may play an important role in shaping attitudes toward those who use AAC. PMID:25716683

  9. Prospective clinical trial of hepatitis B vaccination in adults with and without type-2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Van Der Meeren, Olivier; Peterson, James T.; Dionne, Marc; Beasley, Richard; Ebeling, Peter R.; Ferguson, Murdo; Nissen, Michael D.; Rheault, Paul; Simpson, Richard W.; De Ridder, Marc; Crasta, Priya D.; Miller, Jacqueline M.; Trofa, Andrew F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT  Objective: Patients with diabetes mellitus are at increased risk for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and its complications. HBV vaccination is recommended for adults with diabetes in the United States and other countries. However, few studies have assessed safety and immunogenicity of hepatitis B vaccine in such patients. We assessed the safety and immunogenicity of recombinant hepatitis B vaccine in subjects with and without diabetes mellitus. Methods: Prospective, multi-country controlled study in 21 centers (www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT01627340). Four hundred and sixteen participants with Type-2 diabetes and 258 controls matched for age and body mass index (BMI) (2:1 ratio) received 3-doses of HBV vaccine (Engerix-B™, GSK Vaccines, Belgium) according to a 0, 1, 6 months schedule. Antibodies were measured against HBV surface antigen and expressed as seroprotection rates (anti-HBs ≥10mIU/mL) and geometric mean concentration (GMC). Results: The median age and BMI in patients with diabetes and controls (according-to-protocol cohort) were 54 y and 32.1 kg/m2, and 53 y and 30.8 kg/m2, respectively. Seroprotection rates (GMCs) one month post-dose-3 were 75.4% (147.6 mIU/mL) and 82.0% (384.2 mIU/mL) in patients with diabetes and controls, respectively. Age-stratified seroprotection rates for patients with diabetes were 88.5% (20–39 years), 81.2% (40–49 years), 83.2% (50–59 years), and 58.2% (≥60 years). The overall safety profile of hepatitis B vaccine was similar between groups. Conclusions: Hepatitis B vaccine is immunogenic in patients with diabetes and has a similar safety profile to vaccination in healthy controls. Because increasing age was generally associated with a reduction in seroprotection rates, hepatitis B vaccine should be administered as soon as possible after the diagnosis of diabetes. PMID:27123743

  10. Restoration of Self-Awareness of Hypoglycemia in Adults With Long-Standing Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Leelarathna, Lalantha; Little, Stuart A.; Walkinshaw, Emma; Tan, Horng Kai; Lubina-Solomon, Alexandra; Kumareswaran, Kavita; Lane, Annette P.; Chadwick, Thomas; Marshall, Sally M.; Speight, Jane; Flanagan, Daniel; Heller, Simon R.; Shaw, James A.M.; Evans, Mark L.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Impaired awareness of hypoglycemia (IAH) and defective counterregulation significantly increase severe hypoglycemia risk in type 1 diabetes (T1D). We evaluated restoration of IAH/defective counterregulation by a treatment strategy targeted at hypoglycemia avoidance in adults with T1D with IAH (Gold score ≥4) participating in the U.K.-based multicenter HypoCOMPaSS randomized controlled trial. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Eighteen subjects with T1D and IAH (mean ± SD age 50 ± 9 years, T1D duration 35 ± 10 years, HbA1c 8.1 ± 1.0% [65 ± 10.9 mmol/mol]) underwent stepped hyperinsulinemic-hypoglycemic clamp studies before and after a 6-month intervention. The intervention comprised the HypoCOMPaSS education tool in all and randomized allocation, in a 2 × 2 factorial study design, to multiple daily insulin analog injections or continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion therapy and conventional glucose monitoring or real-time continuous glucose monitoring. Symptoms, cognitive function, and counterregulatory hormones were measured at each glucose plateau (5.0, 3.8, 3.4, 2.8, and 2.4 mmol/L), with each step lasting 40 min with subjects kept blinded to their actual glucose value throughout clamp studies. RESULTS After intervention, glucose concentrations at which subjects first felt hypoglycemic increased (mean ± SE from 2.6 ± 0.1 to 3.1 ± 0.2 mmol/L, P = 0.02), and symptom and plasma metanephrine responses to hypoglycemia were higher (median area under curve for symptoms, 580 [interquartile range {IQR} 420–780] vs. 710 [460–1,260], P = 0.02; metanephrine, 2,412 [−3,026 to 7,279] vs. 5,180 [−771 to 11,513], P = 0.01). Glycemic threshold for deterioration of cognitive function measured by four-choice reaction time was unchanged, while the color-word Stroop test showed a degree of adaptation. CONCLUSIONS Even in long-standing T1D, IAH and defective counterregulation may be improved by a clinical strategy aimed at hypoglycemia avoidance. PMID:24130355

  11. Adult neural stem cells in distinct microdomains generate previously unknown interneuron types

    PubMed Central

    Merkle, Florian T.; Fuentealba, Luis C.; Sanders, Timothy A.; Magno, Lorenza; Kessaris, Nicoletta; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    Throughout life, neural stem cells (NSCs) in different domains of the ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ) of the adult rodent brain generate several subtypes of interneurons that regulate the function of the olfactory bulb (OB). The full extent of diversity among adult NSCs and their progeny is not known. Here, we report the generation of at least four previously unknown OB interneuron subtypes that are produced in finely patterned progenitor domains in the anterior ventral V-SVZ of both the neonatal and adult brain. Progenitors of these novel interneurons are responsive to sonic hedgehog (SHH) and are organized into microdomains that correlate with the expression domains of the Nkx6.2 and Zic family of transcription factors. This work reveals an unexpected degree of complexity in the specification and patterning of NSCs in the postnatal mouse brain. PMID:24362763

  12. Efforts to Control by Children and Adults with the Type A Coronary-Prone Behavior Pattern.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Karen A.

    1979-01-01

    Examines the initial reactions of type A and type B boys and men to uncontrollable events. Type A individuals are characterized by extremes of competitive achievement striving, impatience, and aggression, a pattern of behavior implicated by recent research in the etiology of coronary heart disease. Type B individuals exhibit the relative absence…

  13. Effect of response context and masker type on word recognition in school-age children and adults.

    PubMed

    Buss, Emily; Leibold, Lori J; Hall, Joseph W

    2016-08-01

    In adults, masked speech recognition improves with the provision of a closed set of response alternatives. The present study evaluated whether school-age children (5-13 years) benefit to the same extent as adults from a forced-choice context, and whether this effect depends on masker type. Experiment 1 compared masked speech reception thresholds for disyllabic words in either an open-set or a four-alternative forced-choice (4AFC) task. Maskers were speech-shaped noise or two-talker speech. Experiment 2 compared masked speech reception thresholds for monosyllabic words in two 4AFC tasks, one in which the target and foils were phonetically similar and one in which they were dissimilar. Maskers were speech-shaped noise, amplitude-modulated noise, or two-talker speech. For both experiments, it was predicted that children would not benefit from the information provided by the 4AFC context to the same degree as adults, particularly when the masker was complex (two-talker) or when audible speech cues were temporally sparse (modulated-noise). Results indicate that young children do benefit from a 4AFC context to the same extent as adults in speech-shaped noise and amplitude-modulated noise, but the benefit of context increases with listener age for the two-talker speech masker. PMID:27586729

  14. How Do Different Types of Adult Learners Adapt to Distance Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubschman, Betty

    A study concentrated on adult learners and their adaptability to electronic mail (e-mail). The sample (n=168) was composed of all graduate students taking an introductory educational research class during spring 1996 and graduate students taking a measurement and evaluation class during summer 1996 at a public state university. Students were…

  15. "An Advanced Type of Democracy"? Governance and Politics in Adult Education c.1918-1930

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Like other adult education providers such as the Workers' Educational Association, the educational settlement movement was beset with political controversy during the 1920s. This article considers the relationship between the Educational Settlements Association (ESA) and its affiliated institutions, relating these to the competing political…

  16. Adding chemo after radiation treatment improves survival for adults with a type of brain tumor

    Cancer.gov

    Adults with low-grade gliomas, a form of brain tumor, who received chemotherapy following completion of radiation therapy lived longer than patients who received radiation therapy alone, according to long-term follow-up results from a NIH-supported random

  17. Celiac Disease and Type 1 Diabetes in Adults: Is This a High-Risk Group for Screening?

    PubMed

    DeMelo, Emilia N; McDonald, Charlotte; Saibil, Fred; Marcon, Margaret A; Mahmud, Farid H

    2015-12-01

    The association between celiac disease (CD), an autoimmune condition involving intestinal inflammation related to gluten ingestion, and type 1 diabetes has long been recognized. CD prevalence rates 4 to 6 times greater in adults with type 1 diabetes than in the general population. Much of the existing literature focuses on important implications related to the impact of a gluten-free diet on short-term outcomes in metabolic control and quality of life. Canadian Diabetes Association guidelines recommend targeted CD screening in patients with type 1 diabetes who have classic symptoms, such as abdominal pain, bloating, diarrhea, unexplained weight loss or labile metabolic control; however, a significant proportion (40% to 60%) of patients may have mild or absent symptoms. Recent evidence suggests that adult patients with both conditions are at higher risk for diabetes microvascular comorbidities, increased mortality and impaired bone health if the CD is untreated. The purpose of this review is to describe the association between CD and type 1 diabetes and to summarize recent literature that evaluates risks in patients with both conditions. PMID:26293006

  18. Ideal Cardiovascular Health and the Prevalence and Progression of Coronary Artery Calcification in Adults With and Without Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Alman, Amy C.; Maahs, David M.; Rewers, Marian J.; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE In 2010, the American Heart Association defined seven metrics (smoking, BMI, physical activity, diet, total cholesterol, blood pressure, and fasting plasma glucose) for ideal cardiovascular health (ICH). Subsequent studies have shown that the prevalence of achieving these metrics is very low in the general population. Adults with type 1 diabetes are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), but no studies to date have been published on the prevalence of ICH in this population. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Data for this analysis were collected as part of the prospective Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes study. This analysis involved 546 subjects with type 1 diabetes and 631 subjects without diabetes who had complete information for calculating the ICH metrics. RESULTS Overall, the prevalence of ICH was low in this population, with none meeting the ideal criteria for all seven metrics. The prevalence of ideal physical activity (10.0%) and diet (1.1%) were particularly low. ICH was significantly associated with both decreased prevalence (odds ratio [OR] 0.70; 95% CI 0.62–0.80) and progression (OR 0.77; 95% CI 0.66–0.90) of coronary artery calcification (CAC). CONCLUSIONS ICH is significantly associated with decreased prevalence and progression of CAC; however, prevalence of ICH metrics was low in adults both with and without type 1 diabetes. Efforts to increase the prevalence of ICH could have a significant impact on reducing the burden of CVD. PMID:24130360

  19. The interaction of disrupted type II neuregulin 1 and chronic adolescent stress on adult anxiety- and fear-related behaviors.

    PubMed

    Taylor, S B; Taylor, A R; Koenig, J I

    2013-09-26

    The incidence of anxiety, mood, substance abuse disorders and schizophrenia increases during adolescence. Epidemiological evidence confirms that exposure to stress during sensitive periods of development can create vulnerabilities that put genetically predisposed individuals at increased risk for psychiatric disorders. Neuregulin 1 (NRG1) is a frequently identified schizophrenia susceptibility gene that has also been associated with the psychotic features of bipolar disorder. Previously, we established that Type II NRG1 is expressed in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis neurocircuitry. We also found, using a line of Nrg1 hypomorphic rats (Nrg1(Tn)), that genetic disruption of Type II NRG1 results in altered HPA axis function and environmental reactivity. The present studies used the Nrg1(Tn) rats to test whether Type II NRG1 gene disruption and chronic stress exposure during adolescence interact to alter adult anxiety- and fear-related behaviors. Male and female Nrg1(Tn) and wild-type rats were exposed to chronic variable stress (CVS) during mid-adolescence and then tested for anxiety-like behavior, cued fear conditioning and basal corticosterone secretion in adulthood. The disruption of Type II NRG1 alone significantly impacts rat anxiety-related behavior by reversing normal sex-related differences and impairs the ability to acquire cued fear conditioning. Sex-specific interactions between genotype and adolescent stress also were identified such that CVS-treated wild-type females exhibited a slight reduction in anxiety-like behavior and basal corticosterone, while CVS-treated Nrg1(Tn) females exhibited a significant increase in cued fear extinction. These studies confirm the importance of Type II NRG1 in anxiety and fear behaviors and point to adolescence as a time when stressful experiences can shape adult behavior and HPA axis function. PMID:23022220

  20. Impaired Renal Function Further Increases Odds of 6-Year Coronary Artery Calcification Progression in Adults With Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Maahs, David M.; Jalal, Diana; Chonchol, Michel; Johnson, Richard J.; Rewers, Marian; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine whether baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR) independently predict coronary artery calcification (CAC) progression, and to determine how eGFR changes over 6 years in adults with type 1 diabetes compared with nondiabetic adults. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes study participants (n = 1,066) with complete data for eGFR assessment at baseline and 6 years were included. Three Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equations (serum creatinine, cystatin C, and both) were used to estimate eGFR. The association of baseline ACR and eGFR with CAC progression was analyzed using multiple logistic regression. RESULTS Increasing categorical baseline ACR (<10, 10–30, and >30 µg/mg) predicted CAC progression in participants with type 1 diabetes (odds ratio [OR], 2.15; 95% CI, 1.50–3.09; 7.19 [3.90–13.26]; and 18.09 [8.48–38.62]), respectively, compared with nondiabetic subjects. Baseline eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m2 also predicted CAC progression (OR, 5–7, compared with nondiabetic participants). ORs for CAC progression were higher in women than in men when using the cystatin C–based Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equations. Participants with type 1 diabetes had greater eGFR decreases over 6 years than nondiabetic participants using cystatin C–based equations. CONCLUSIONS Although increasing ACR or decreasing eGFR predicts CAC progression, coronary atherosclerosis progresses faster in people with type 1 diabetes even in the absence of diabetic kidney disease. These findings emphasize the interaction between kidney disease and cardiovascular disease in type 1 diabetes and highlight the public health importance of lowering cardiorenal risk in people with type 1 diabetes. PMID:23835686

  1. Remodeling of Hyperpolarization-Activated Current, Ih, in Ah-Type Visceral Ganglion Neurons Following Ovariectomy in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wen-Xiao; Yan, Zhen-Yu; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Jia-Ying; Zhang, Hao-Cheng; Wang, Li-Juan; Pan, Xiao-Dong; Fu, Yili

    2013-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated currents (Ih) mediated by hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels modulate excitability of myelinated A− and Ah-type visceral ganglion neurons (VGN). Whether alterations in Ih underlie the previously reported reduction of excitability of myelinated Ah-type VGNs following ovariectomy (OVX) has remained unclear. Here we used the intact nodose ganglion preparation in conjunction with electrophysiological approaches to examine the role of Ih remodeling in altering Ah-type neuron excitability following ovariectomy in adult rats. Ah-type neurons were identified based on their afferent conduction velocity. Ah-type neurons in nodose ganglia from non-OVX rats exhibited a voltage ‘sag’ as well as ‘rebound’ action potentials immediately following hyperpolarizing current injections, which both were suppressed by the Ih blocker ZD7288. Repetitive spike activity induced afterhyperpolarizations lasting several hundreds of milliseconds (termed post-excitatory membrane hyperpolarizations, PEMHs), which were significantly reduced by ZD7288, suggesting that they resulted from transient deactivation of Ih during the preceding spike trains. Ovariectomy reduced whole-cell Ih density, caused a hyperpolarizing shift of the voltage-dependence of Ih activation, and slowed Ih activation. OVX-induced Ih remodeling was accompanied by a flattening of the stimulus frequency/response curve and loss of PEMHs. Also, HCN1 mRNA levels were reduced by ∼30% in nodose ganglia from OVX rats compared with their non-OVX counterparts. Acute exposure of nodose ganglia to 17beta-estradiol partly restored Ih density and accelerated Ih activation in Ah-type cells. In conclusion, Ih plays a significant role in modulating the excitability of myelinated Ah-type VGNs in adult female rats. PMID:23951107

  2. Peripheral Neuropathy in Adolescents and Young Adults With Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes From the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth Follow-up Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Mamta; Lauer, Abigail; Martin, Catherine L.; Bell, Ronny A.; Divers, Jasmin; Dabelea, Dana; Pettitt, David J.; Saydah, Sharon; Pihoker, Catherine; Standiford, Debra A.; Rodriguez, Beatriz L.; Pop-Busui, Rodica; Feldman, Eva L.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate the prevalence of and risk factors for diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) in a pilot study among youth participating in the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth study. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS DPN was assessed using the Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument (MNSI) (examination for foot abnormalities, distal vibration perception, and ankle reflexes). An MNSI exam (MNSIE) score >2 is diagnostic for DPN. RESULTS The MNSIE was completed in 399 subjects, including 329 youth with type 1 diabetes (mean age 15.7 ± 4.3 years, duration 6.2 ± 0.9 years) and 70 with type 2 diabetes (mean age 21.6 ± 4.1 years, duration 7.6 ± 1.8 years). Glycated hemoglobin (A1C) was similar in both groups (8.8 ± 1.8% for type 1 vs. 8.5 ± 2.9% for type 2). The prevalence of DPN was significantly higher in youth with type 2 compared with those with type 1 diabetes (25.7 vs. 8.2%; P < 0.0001). In unadjusted analyses, diabetes type, older age, longer duration of diabetes, increased waist circumference, elevated blood pressure, lower HDL cholesterol, and presence of microalbuminuria (urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio >30 mg/g) were associated with DPN. The association between diabetes type and DPN remained significant after adjustment for age and sex (odds ratio 2.29 [95% CI 1.05–5.02], P = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS DPN prevalence among youth with type 2 diabetes approached rates reported in adult populations with diabetes. Our findings suggest not only that youth with diabetes are at risk for DPN but also that many already show measurable signs of DPN. PMID:24144652

  3. Institutional abuse of children in the Austrian Catholic Church: types of abuse and impact on adult survivors' current mental health.

    PubMed

    Lueger-Schuster, Brigitte; Kantor, Viktoria; Weindl, Dina; Knefel, Matthias; Moy, Yvonne; Butollo, Asisa; Jagsch, Reinhold; Glück, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the nature and dimensions of institutional child abuse (IA) by the Austrian Catholic Church and to investigate the current mental health of adult survivors. Data were collected in two steps. First, documents of 448 adult survivors of IA (M=55.1 years, 75.7% men) who had disclosed their abuse history to a victim protection commission were collected. Different types of abuse, perpetrator characteristics, and family related risk factors were investigated. Second, a sample of 185 adult survivors completed the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist (PCL-C) and the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI). Participants reported an enormous diversity of acts of violent physical, sexual, and emotional abuse that had occurred in their childhood. The majority of adult survivors (83.3%) experienced emotional abuse. Rates of sexual (68.8%) and physical abuse (68.3%) were almost equally high. The prevalence of PTSD was 48.6% and 84.9% showed clinically relevant symptoms in at least one 1 of 10 symptom dimensions (9 BSI subscales and PTSD). No specific pre-IA influence was found to influence the development of PTSD in later life (e.g. poverty, domestic violence). However, survivors with PTSD reported a significantly higher total number of family related risk factors (d=0.33). We conclude that childhood IA includes a wide spectrum of violent acts, and has a massive negative impact on the current mental health of adult survivors. We address the long-term effects of these traumatic experiences in addition to trauma re-activation in adulthood as both bear great challenges for professionals working with survivors. PMID:24018068

  4. The Effects of Tai Chi on Peripheral Somatosensation, Balance, and Fitness in Hispanic Older Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: A Pilot and Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Cavegn, Elisabeth I.; Riskowski, Jody L.

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy and loss of somatosensation in older adults with type 2 diabetes can increase risk of falls and disability. In nondiabetic older adult population Tai Chi has been shown to enhance balance and fitness through improvements in somatosensation and neuromuscular control, and it is unclear if Tai Chi would elicit similar benefits in older adults with diabetes. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of an 8-week, three-hour-per-week Tai Chi intervention on peripheral somatosensation in older adults with type 2 diabetes. Participants were eight Hispanic older adults with type 2 diabetes who participated in the Tai Chi intervention and a convenience sample of Hispanic older adults as a referent group. Baseline and postintervention assessments included ankle proprioception, foot tactile sense, plantar pressure distribution, balance, and fitness. After intervention, older adults with type 2 diabetes showed significant improvements in ankle proprioception and fitness and decreased plantar pressure in the forefoot, with no statistical effect noted in balance or tactile sensation. Study results suggest that Tai Chi may be beneficial for older adults with diabetes as it improves ankle proprioception; however, study findings need to be confirmed in a larger sample size randomized controlled trial. PMID:26600865

  5. Salmonella meningitis in an adult with type B viral hepatitis and an incidental schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    Al-Aani, Fuad Khalil; Abusalah, Salem; Al-aqeedi, Rafid; Ibrahim, Abdulsalam

    2009-01-01

    Salmonella meningitis is an unusual complication of Salmonella sepsis that occurs almost exclusively in infants and young children. Cases that do occur in adults are associated with a high morbidity and mortality. The present study concerns a rare case of Salmonella meningitis, the first to be reported in Qatar, in a previously healthy young adult man who was admitted with fever, headache and nuchal rigidity. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) culture produced Salmonella paratyphi A, although cultures of blood were negative. The patient was admitted to the medical intensive care unit (MICU) and assisted with mechanical ventilation for 1 week, then transferred to the medical ward where he exhibited progressive improvement on treatment with meropenam for 3 weeks. The patient was found to have an incidental schwannoma causing right-sided hydronephrosis, and hydroureter, treated with double J stent insertion. He was discharged in good condition without any neurological sequelae. PMID:21686413

  6. Reactogenicity profile of tetanus-diphtheria (adult-type) vaccine: results of a naturalistic study performed at an adult vaccination center.

    PubMed

    Vilella, A; Dal-Ré, R; Simó, D; García-Corbeira, P; Diego, P; Bayas, J M

    2000-11-01

    A prospective observational naturalistic study was conducted at a vaccination center to assess the reactogenicity of tetanus-diphtheria (adult-type) (Td) vaccine. In 1 year, 3072 adult subjects were invited to participate, of whom 1977 (62% women, mean age [+/- SD]: 39 [+/- 14.5] years [range: 18-85 years]) actively did so. A follow-up diary card was provided to all subjects to record all local and general symptoms experienced during the following 4 days after vaccination. Of the study population (n = 1977), 280 received a second Td dose, and 30 received a third dose: the total number of diary cards collected was 2287. Td was always administered (i.m. route) in the left arm. The study population was grouped by age: 52%, 41%, and 7% were ages 18 to 35, 36 to 65, and > 65 years, respectively, most of them being travelers to developing countries. Close to two-thirds of subjects received up to nine different vaccines (mainly hepatitis B, hepatitis A, and typhoid) in addition to Td. Adverse reactions were classified as mild, moderate, and severe. Overall, 50% of subjects reported some type of adverse reaction. Pain, discomfort with arm movement, swelling, malaise, and fever (axillary temperature > or = 38 degrees C) were recorded in 43%, 14%, 3.8%, 5.1%, and 1.7% of all diary cards, respectively. Local and general reactions were considered as mild by almost two-thirds of vaccinees and lasted < or = 48 hours in about three-fourths of them. The incidence of moderate plus severe local reactions was significantly (p < 0.01) more commonly reported in the 18- to 35-year-old group than in the 36- to 65-year-old group. No statistically significant differences were observed when comparing the incidence of general adverse reactions of those receiving Td alone with those receiving additional vaccines or when comparing the duration and intensity by age groups. Only 5.2% of subjects required analgesic/antipyretic treatment. In conclusion, this study shows that Td vaccine is

  7. The role of childhood social position in adult type 2 diabetes: evidence from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Socioeconomic circumstances in childhood and early adulthood may influence the later onset of chronic disease, although such research is limited for type 2 diabetes and its risk factors at the different stages of life. The main aim of the present study is to examine the role of childhood social position and later inflammatory markers and health behaviours in developing type 2 diabetes at older ages using a pathway analytic approach. Methods Data on childhood and adult life circumstances of 2,994 men and 4,021 women from English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA) were used to evaluate their association with diabetes at age 50 years and more. The cases of diabetes were based on having increased blood levels of glycated haemoglobin and/or self-reported medication for diabetes and/or being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Father’s job when ELSA participants were aged 14 years was used as the measure of childhood social position. Current social characteristics, health behaviours and inflammatory biomarkers were used as potential mediators in the statistical analysis to assess direct and indirect effects of childhood circumstances on diabetes in later life. Results 12.6 per cent of participants were classified as having diabetes. A disadvantaged social position in childhood, as measured by father’s manual occupation, was associated at conventional levels of statistical significance with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes in adulthood, both directly and indirectly through inflammation, adulthood social position and a risk score constructed from adult health behaviours including tobacco smoking and limited physical activity. The direct effect of childhood social position was reduced by mediation analysis (standardised coefficient decreased from 0.089 to 0.043) but remained statistically significant (p = 0.035). All three indirect pathways made a statistically significantly contribution to the overall effect of childhood social position on adulthood

  8. Types of adolescent exposure to violence as predictors of adult intimate partner violence.

    PubMed

    Menard, Scott; Weiss, Andrea J; Franzese, Robert J; Covey, Herbert C

    2014-04-01

    Despite evidence that exposure to violence in adolescence may be more predictive of problem behavior outcomes than exposure to violence in earlier childhood, there is limited research on the relationship of adolescent exposure to violence on adult intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetration and victimization. This study examines the relationship of adolescent physical abuse victimization, witnessing parental violence, and adolescent exposure to violence in the community, to perpetration of and victimization by IPV in middle age. Respondents are drawn from a nationally representative longitudinal sample with data collected from 1976-77 to 2002-03, age 11-17 when first interviewed and 37-43 when last interviewed. Univariate descriptive statistics and bivariate correlations are presented, along with Heckman two-step models calculated separately for females and males. The use of the Heckman two-step model allows prediction not only of adult IPV, but also of selection out of intimate partner relationships (i.e., out of the at-risk population). For males, in the multivariate analysis, only physical abuse remains significant as a predictor. For females, adolescent exposure to violence is not predictive of adult IPV perpetration or victimization, but physical abuse is predictive of not being in the at-risk population (married or cohabiting). The combined index of adolescent exposure to violence is significant for both females and males in predicting selection into marriage or cohabitation, and at least marginally significant in predicting IPV. PMID:24594015

  9. Differential Effect of Race, Education, Gender, and Language Discrimination on Glycemic Control in Adults with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Brice Reynolds, D.; Walker, Rebekah J.; Campbell, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Discrimination has been linked to negative health outcomes, but little research has investigated different types of discrimination to determine if some have a greater impact on outcomes. We examined the differential effect of discrimination based on race, level of education, gender, and language on glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes. Patients and Methods: Six hundred two patients with type 2 diabetes from two adult primary care clinics in the southeastern United States completed validated questionnaires. Questions included perceived discrimination because of race/ethnicity, level of education, sex/gender, or language. A multiple linear regression model assessed the differential effect of each type of perceived discrimination on glycemic control while adjusting for relevant covariates, including race, site, gender, marital status, duration of diabetes, number of years in school, number of hours worked per week, income, and health status. Results: The mean age was 61.5 years, and the mean duration of diabetes was 12.3 years. Of the sample, 61.6% were men, and 64.9% were non-Hispanic black. In adjusted models, education discrimination remained significantly associated with glycemic control (β=0.47; 95% confidence interval, 0.03, 0.92). Race, gender and language discrimination were not significantly associated with poor glycemic control in either unadjusted or adjusted analyses. Conclusions: Discrimination based on education was found to be significantly associated with poor glycemic control. The findings suggest that education discrimination may be an important social determinant to consider when providing care to patients with type 2 diabetes and should be assessed separate from other types of discrimination, such as that based on race. PMID:25549154

  10. Physical activity and diabetes: an application of the theory of planned behaviour to explain physical activity for Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes in an adult population sample.

    PubMed

    Plotnikoff, Ronald C; Lippke, Sonia; Courneya, Kerry; Birkett, Nicholas; Sigal, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) plays a key role in the management of Type 1 (T1D) and Type 2 diabetes (T2D) but there are few theory-based, effective programs to promote PA for individuals with diabetes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the utility of the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) in understanding PA in an adult population with T1D or T2D. A total of 2311 individuals (691 T1D; 1614 T2D) completed self-report TPB constructs of attitude, subjective norms, perceived behavioural control (PBC), intention and PA at baseline and 1717 (524 T1D; 1123 T2D) completed the PA measure again at 6-month follow-up. Multi-group Structural Equation Modelling was conducted to: (1) test the fit of the TPB structure (2) determine the TPB structural invariance between the two types of diabetes and (3) to examine the explained variances in PA and compare the strength of associations of the TPB constructs in the two types of diabetes. The TPB constructs explained > or =40% of the variance in intentions for both diabetes groups. In cross-sectional models, the TPB accounted for 23 and 19% of the variance in PA for T1D and T2D, respectively. In prospective models, the TPB explained 13 and 8% of the variance in PA for T1D and T2D, respectively. When adjusting for past PA behaviour, the impact of PBC and intention on behaviour was reduced in both groups. The findings provide evidence for the utility of the TPB for the design of PA promotion interventions for adults with either T1D or T2D. PMID:20391204

  11. Protective efficacy of low-dose amantadine in adults challenged with wild-type influenza A virus.

    PubMed Central

    Sears, S D; Clements, M L

    1987-01-01

    The prophylactic efficacy of a low dose (100 mg) of amantadine hydrochloride against experimental challenge with influenza A/Texas/1/85 (H1N1) wild-type virus was determined in healthy adult volunteers in a placebo-controlled, double-blind, randomized trial. No side effects of the 100-mg dose were observed in the amantadine-treated volunteers. Compared with placebo, 100 mg of amantadine significantly reduced the frequency of illness (9 of 22 versus 2 of 22 volunteers, P less than 0.04) and provided 78% protection against influenza illness. The two ill volunteers in the amantadine group had rhinitis only, whereas most of the ill placebo controls developed both systemic and upper-respiratory-tract illness. Wild-type virus was recovered from 50% of the amantadine-treated volunteers, compared with 82% of the placebo controls. Of note, the infected amantadine recipients shed 100 times less virus and shed virus for half as many days as did the infected placebo recipients. Although amantadine restricted viral replication, it did not interfere with the development of an antibody response to influenza virus. These results indicate that in adults experimentally challenged with influenza wild-type virus, 100 mg of amantadine is effective both in the prevention of influenza illness and in the restriction of virus replication. PMID:3435099

  12. Sources of Caffeine in Diets of US Children and Adults: Trends by Beverage Type and Purchase Location

    PubMed Central

    Drewnowski, Adam; Rehm, Colin D.

    2016-01-01

    New sources of caffeine, besides coffee and tea, have been introduced into the US food supply. Data on caffeine consumption age and purchase location can help guide public health policy. National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) were used to estimate population-level caffeine intakes, using data from 24-h dietary recall. First, caffeine intakes by age-group and beverage type were estimated using the most recent 2011–2012 data (n = 7456). Second, fourteen years trends in caffeine consumption, overall and by beverage type, were evaluated for adults and children. Trend analyses were conducted by age groups. Last, trends in caffeine intakes by purchase location and beverage type were estimated. In 2011–2012, children aged four to eight years consumed the least caffeine (15 mg/day), and adults aged 51–70 years consumed the most (213 mg/day). The population mean (age ≥ four years) was 135 mg/day, driven largely by coffee (90 mg/day), tea (25 mg/day), and soda (21 mg/day). For the 14–19 years and 20–34 years age-groups, energy drinks contributed 6 mg/day (9.9%) and 5 mg/day (4.5%), respectively. The bulk of caffeine came from store-bought coffee and tea. Among both children and adults combined, caffeine intakes declined from 175 mg/day (1999–2000) to 142 mg/day (2011–2012), largely driven by a drop in caffeine from soda (41 mg/day to 21 mg/day). Store-bought coffee and tea remain principal drivers of caffeine intake in the US. Sodas and energy drinks make minor contributions to overall caffeine intakes. PMID:26978391

  13. Effects of Acute Hypoglycemia on Working Memory and Language Processing in Adults With and Without Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Kate V.; Pickering, Martin J.; Zammitt, Nicola N.; Hartsuiker, Robert J.; Traxler, Matthew J.; Frier, Brian M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the effects of hypoglycemia on language processing in adults with and without type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Forty adults were studied (20 with type 1 diabetes and 20 healthy volunteers) using a hyperinsulinemic glucose clamp to lower blood glucose to 2.5 mmol/L (45 mg/dL) (hypoglycemia) for 60 min, or to maintain blood glucose at 4.5 mmol/L (81 mg/dL) (euglycemia), on separate occasions. Language tests were applied to assess the effects of hypoglycemia on the relationship between working memory and language (reading span), grammatical decoding (self-paced reading), and grammatical encoding (subject-verb agreement). RESULTS Hypoglycemia caused a significant deterioration in reading span (P < 0.001; η2 = 0.37; Cohen d = 0.65) and a fall in correct responses (P = 0.005; η2 = 0.19; Cohen d = 0.41). On the self-paced reading test, the reading time for the first sentence fragment increased during hypoglycemia (P = 0.039; η2 = 0.11; Cohen d = 0.25). For the reading of the next fragment, hypoglycemia affected the healthy volunteer group more than the adults with type 1 diabetes (P = 0.03; η2 = 0.12; Cohen d = 0.25). However, hypoglycemia did not significantly affect the number of errors in sentence comprehension or the time taken to answer questions. Hypoglycemia caused a deterioration of subject-verb agreement (correct responses: P = 0.011; η2 = 0.159; Cohen d = 0.31). CONCLUSIONS Hypoglycemia caused a significant deterioration in reading span and in the accuracy of subject-verb agreement, both of which are practical aspects of language involved in its everyday use. Language processing is therefore impaired during moderate hypoglycemia. PMID:25758768

  14. Sources of Caffeine in Diets of US Children and Adults: Trends by Beverage Type and Purchase Location.

    PubMed

    Drewnowski, Adam; Rehm, Colin D

    2016-01-01

    New sources of caffeine, besides coffee and tea, have been introduced into the US food supply. Data on caffeine consumption age and purchase location can help guide public health policy. National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) were used to estimate population-level caffeine intakes, using data from 24-h dietary recall. First, caffeine intakes by age-group and beverage type were estimated using the most recent 2011-2012 data (n = 7456). Second, fourteen years trends in caffeine consumption, overall and by beverage type, were evaluated for adults and children. Trend analyses were conducted by age groups. Last, trends in caffeine intakes by purchase location and beverage type were estimated. In 2011-2012, children aged four to eight years consumed the least caffeine (15 mg/day), and adults aged 51-70 years consumed the most (213 mg/day). The population mean (age ≥ four years) was 135 mg/day, driven largely by coffee (90 mg/day), tea (25 mg/day), and soda (21 mg/day). For the 14-19 years and 20-34 years age-groups, energy drinks contributed 6 mg/day (9.9%) and 5 mg/day (4.5%), respectively. The bulk of caffeine came from store-bought coffee and tea. Among both children and adults combined, caffeine intakes declined from 175 mg/day (1999-2000) to 142 mg/day (2011-2012), largely driven by a drop in caffeine from soda (41 mg/day to 21 mg/day). Store-bought coffee and tea remain principal drivers of caffeine intake in the US. Sodas and energy drinks make minor contributions to overall caffeine intakes. PMID:26978391

  15. Adolescent Sexual Debut and Initiation into New-Type Drug Use among a Sample of Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yingying; He, Na; Detels, Roger

    2015-01-01

    We examined the association between adolescent sexual debut and age at new-type drug initiation among a sample of young adult new-type drug users. A total of 276 participants were recruited using respondent-driven sampling (RDS) in Shanghai, China. The analyses were restricted to a total of 201 participants aged between 18 and 30 years. The average age at sexual debut and age at first new-type drug use were 18.8 and 20.9 years, respectively. About 94% of participants reported having sexual experience (n=188); of those, 137 (72.9%) had sexual debut before they first used new-type drugs, while 32 (17.0%) initiated both events at the same age. After adjustment for age, income, education, and sexual orientation, adolescent sexual debut was independently associated with younger age at new-type drug initiation. Adolescent sexual debut is associated with early onset of new-type drug use. Our findings underscore the importance of implementing sex-education programs for adolescents in schools in China. PMID:26098832

  16. Immunity status of adults and children against poliomyelitis virus type 1 strains CHAT and Sabin (LSc-2ab) in Germany

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In October 2007, the working group CEN/TC 216 of the European Committee for standardisation suggested that the Sabin oral poliovirus vaccine type 1 strain (LSc-2ab) presently used for virucidal tests should be replaced by another attenuated vaccine poliovirus type 1 strain, CHAT. Both strains were historically used as oral vaccines, but the Sabin type 1 strain was acknowledged to be more attenuated. In Germany, vaccination against poliomyelitis was introduced in 1962 using the oral polio vaccine (OPV) containing Sabin strain LSc-2ab. The vaccination schedule was changed from OPV to an inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) containing wild polio virus type 1 strain Mahoney in 1998. In the present study, we assessed potential differences in neutralising antibody titres to Sabin and CHAT in persons with a history of either OPV, IPV, or OPV with IPV booster. Methods Neutralisation poliovirus antibodies against CHAT and Sabin 1 were measured in sera of 41 adults vaccinated with OPV. Additionally, sera from 28 children less than 10 years of age and immunised with IPV only were analysed. The neutralisation assay against poliovirus was performed according to WHO guidelines. Results The neutralisation activity against CHAT in adults with OPV vaccination history was significantly lower than against Sabin poliovirus type 1 strains (Wilcoxon signed-rank test P < 0.025). In eight sera, the antibody titres measured against CHAT were less than 8, although the titre against Sabin 1 varied between 8 and 64. Following IPV booster, anti-CHAT antibodies increased rapidly in sera of CHAT-negative adults with OPV history. Sera from children with IPV history neutralised CHAT and Sabin 1 strains equally. Conclusion The lack of neutralising antibodies against the CHAT strain in persons vaccinated with OPV might be associated with an increased risk of reinfection with the CHAT polio virus type 1, and this implies a putative risk of transmission of the virus to polio-free communities. We

  17. Patterns of differential gene expression in adult rotation-resistant and wild-type western corn rootworm digestive tracts

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Chia-Ching; Zavala, Jorge A; Spencer, Joseph L; Curzi, Matías J; Fields, Christopher J; Drnevich, Jenny; Siegfried, Blair D; Seufferheld, Manfredo J

    2015-01-01

    The western corn rootworm (WCR,Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte) is an important pest of corn. Annual crop rotation between corn and soybean disrupts the corn-dependent WCR life cycle and is widely adopted to manage this pest. This strategy selected for rotation-resistant (RR) WCR with reduced ovipositional fidelity to corn. Previous studies revealed that RR-WCR adults exhibit greater tolerance of soybean diets, different gut physiology, and host–microbe interactions compared to rotation-susceptible wild types (WT). To identify the genetic mechanisms underlying these phenotypic changes, a de novo assembly of the WCR adult gut transcriptome was constructed and used for RNA-sequencing analyses of RNA libraries from different WCR phenotypes fed with corn or soybean diets. Global gene expression profiles of WT- and RR-WCR were similar when feeding on corn diets, but different when feeding on soybean. Using network-based methods, we identified gene modules transcriptionally correlated with the RR phenotype. Gene ontology enrichment analyses indicated that the functions of these modules were related to metabolic processes, immune responses, biological adhesion, and other functions/processes that appear to correlate to documented traits in RR populations. These results suggest that gut transcriptomic divergence correlated with brief soybean feeding and other physiological traits may exist between RR- and WT-WCR adults. PMID:26240606

  18. Prolonged survival in adult neurofibromatosis type I patients with recurrent high-grade gliomas treated with bevacizumab.

    PubMed

    Theeler, Brett J; Ellezam, Benjamin; Yust-Katz, Shlomit; Slopis, John M; Loghin, Monica E; de Groot, John F

    2014-08-01

    Astrocytic tumors, especially optic pathway pilocytic astrocytomas, are common in pediatric NF1 patients. High-grade gliomas (HGGs) appear to be rare in adult and pediatric NF1 patients. This is a series of five consecutive, adult NF1 patients with recurrent HGGs treated at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Four patients met consensus clinical criteria for NF1 and one patient had presumed segmental NF1. Three patients had glioblastomas, one gliosarcoma, and one progressive, enhancing optic pathway glioma which was not biopsied. Two tumors had molecular testing performed; both were IDH wild type and activating oncogene mutations (1 BRAFV600E and 1 PIK3CA mutation) were found in these tumors. All five patients received bevacizumab-containing regimens at tumor recurrence. The median number of 4-week cycles of bevacizumab was 20. All five patients experienced prolonged post-recurrence survival following bevacizumab treatment ranging from ten to 72 months. The median overall survival from HGG diagnosis was 72.6 months with three patients alive and progression free at last follow-up. Three out of five patients developed vascular complications leading to bevacizumab discontinuation. In this case series, adult NF1 patients with recurrent HGGs had prolonged, post-recurrence survival after treatment with bevacizumab-containing regimens. Based on these results, further study of antiangiogenic therapy in NF1 patients with HGGs and bevacizumab-response in sporadic HGG patients with NF1-mutated tumors is warranted. PMID:24859329

  19. Prevalence of tension-type headache in adult general population: the PACE study and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ferrante, T; Manzoni, G C; Russo, M; Camarda, C; Taga, A; Veronesi, L; Pasquarella, C; Sansebastiano, G; Torelli, P

    2013-05-01

    The mean global prevalence of tension-type headache (TTH) in adult is 42 %. To date, there have been no Italian studies on TTH prevalence in the adult general population. Therefore, we conducted a cross-sectional study, called PACE (PArma CEfalea, or "Headache in Parma"), aimed at detecting the prevalence and clinical features of primary headaches in the city of Parma's adult general population. Crude past-year prevalence for definite TTH was 19.4 % (95 % CI 16.8-21.9), namely 9.0 % (95 % CI 7.1-10.8) for infrequent TTH, 9.8 % (95 % CI 7.9-11.8) for frequent TTH, and 0.6 % (95 % CI 0.1-1) for chronic TTH. Crude prevalence for probable TTH was 2.3 % (95 % CI 1.3-3.3). Our study results indicate a TTH prevalence rate (19.4 %) at the lower limit of data ranges currently available for Western countries, and prevalence rates for infrequent forms (9 %) do not appear much different from those of frequent forms (9.8 %). PMID:23695063

  20. Severe adult malaria is associated with specific PfEMP1 adhesion types and high parasite biomass.

    PubMed

    Bernabeu, Maria; Danziger, Samuel A; Avril, Marion; Vaz, Marina; Babar, Prasad H; Brazier, Andrew J; Herricks, Thurston; Maki, Jennifer N; Pereira, Ligia; Mascarenhas, Anjali; Gomes, Edwin; Chery, Laura; Aitchison, John D; Rathod, Pradipsinh K; Smith, Joseph D

    2016-06-01

    The interplay between cellular and molecular determinants that lead to severe malaria in adults is unexplored. Here, we analyzed parasite virulence factors in an infected adult population in India and investigated whether severe malaria isolates impair endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR), a protein involved in coagulation and endothelial barrier permeability. Severe malaria isolates overexpressed specific members of the Plasmodium falciparum var gene/PfEMP1 (P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1) family that bind EPCR, including DC8 var genes that have previously been linked to severe pediatric malaria. Machine learning analysis revealed that DC6- and DC8-encoding var transcripts in combination with high parasite biomass were the strongest indicators of patient hospitalization and disease severity. We found that DC8 CIDRα1 domains from severe malaria isolates had substantial differences in EPCR binding affinity and blockade activity for its ligand activated protein C. Additionally, even a low level of inhibition exhibited by domains from two cerebral malaria isolates was sufficient to interfere with activated protein C-barrier protective activities in human brain endothelial cells. Our findings demonstrate an interplay between parasite biomass and specific PfEMP1 adhesion types in the development of adult severe malaria, and indicate that low impairment of EPCR function may contribute to parasite virulence. PMID:27185931

  1. Type 1 inositol trisphosphate receptor regulates cerebellar circuits by maintaining the spine morphology of purkinje cells in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Takeyuki; Hisatsune, Chihiro; Le, Tung Dinh; Hashikawa, Tsutomu; Hirono, Moritoshi; Hattori, Mitsuharu; Nagao, Soichi; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko

    2013-07-24

    The structural maintenance of neural circuits is critical for higher brain functions in adulthood. Although several molecules have been identified as regulators for spine maintenance in hippocampal and cortical neurons, it is poorly understood how Purkinje cell (PC) spines are maintained in the mature cerebellum. Here we show that the calcium channel type 1 inositol trisphosphate receptor (IP3R1) in PCs plays a crucial role in controlling the maintenance of parallel fiber (PF)-PC synaptic circuits in the mature cerebellum in vivo. Significantly, adult mice lacking IP3R1 specifically in PCs (L7-Cre;Itpr1(flox/flox)) showed dramatic increase in spine density and spine length of PCs, despite having normal spines during development. In addition, the abnormally rearranged PF-PC synaptic circuits in mature cerebellum caused unexpectedly severe ataxia in adult L7-Cre;Itpr1(flox/flox) mice. Our findings reveal a specific role for IP3R1 in PCs not only as an intracellular mediator of cerebellar synaptic plasticity induction, but also as a critical regulator of PF-PC synaptic circuit maintenance in the mature cerebellum in vivo; this mechanism may underlie motor coordination and learning in adults. PMID:23884927

  2. Patterns of differential gene expression in adult rotation-resistant and wild-type western corn rootworm digestive tracts.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chia-Ching; Zavala, Jorge A; Spencer, Joseph L; Curzi, Matías J; Fields, Christopher J; Drnevich, Jenny; Siegfried, Blair D; Seufferheld, Manfredo J

    2015-08-01

    The western corn rootworm (WCR,Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte) is an important pest of corn. Annual crop rotation between corn and soybean disrupts the corn-dependent WCR life cycle and is widely adopted to manage this pest. This strategy selected for rotation-resistant (RR) WCR with reduced ovipositional fidelity to corn. Previous studies revealed that RR-WCR adults exhibit greater tolerance of soybean diets, different gut physiology, and host-microbe interactions compared to rotation-susceptible wild types (WT). To identify the genetic mechanisms underlying these phenotypic changes, a de novo assembly of the WCR adult gut transcriptome was constructed and used for RNA-sequencing analyses of RNA libraries from different WCR phenotypes fed with corn or soybean diets. Global gene expression profiles of WT- and RR-WCR were similar when feeding on corn diets, but different when feeding on soybean. Using network-based methods, we identified gene modules transcriptionally correlated with the RR phenotype. Gene ontology enrichment analyses indicated that the functions of these modules were related to metabolic processes, immune responses, biological adhesion, and other functions/processes that appear to correlate to documented traits in RR populations. These results suggest that gut transcriptomic divergence correlated with brief soybean feeding and other physiological traits may exist between RR- and WT-WCR adults. PMID:26240606

  3. Severe adult malaria is associated with specific PfEMP1 adhesion types and high parasite biomass

    PubMed Central

    Bernabeu, Maria; Danziger, Samuel A.; Avril, Marion; Vaz, Marina; Babar, Prasad H.; Brazier, Andrew J.; Herricks, Thurston; Maki, Jennifer N.; Pereira, Ligia; Mascarenhas, Anjali; Gomes, Edwin; Chery, Laura; Aitchison, John D.; Rathod, Pradipsinh K.; Smith, Joseph D.

    2016-01-01

    The interplay between cellular and molecular determinants that lead to severe malaria in adults is unexplored. Here, we analyzed parasite virulence factors in an infected adult population in India and investigated whether severe malaria isolates impair endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR), a protein involved in coagulation and endothelial barrier permeability. Severe malaria isolates overexpressed specific members of the Plasmodium falciparum var gene/PfEMP1 (P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1) family that bind EPCR, including DC8 var genes that have previously been linked to severe pediatric malaria. Machine learning analysis revealed that DC6- and DC8-encoding var transcripts in combination with high parasite biomass were the strongest indicators of patient hospitalization and disease severity. We found that DC8 CIDRα1 domains from severe malaria isolates had substantial differences in EPCR binding affinity and blockade activity for its ligand activated protein C. Additionally, even a low level of inhibition exhibited by domains from two cerebral malaria isolates was sufficient to interfere with activated protein C-barrier protective activities in human brain endothelial cells. Our findings demonstrate an interplay between parasite biomass and specific PfEMP1 adhesion types in the development of adult severe malaria, and indicate that low impairment of EPCR function may contribute to parasite virulence. PMID:27185931

  4. Atlas Assimilation Patterns in Different Types of Adult Craniocervical Junction Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Edson Dener Zandonadi; Botelho, Ricardo Vieira

    2015-01-01

    Study Design. This is a cross-sectional analysis of resonance magnetic images of 111 patients with craniocervical malformations and those of normal subjects. Objective. To test the hypothesis that atlas assimilation is associated with basilar invagination (BI) and atlas's anterior arch assimilation is associated with craniocervical instability and type I BI. Summary of Background Data. Atlas assimilation is the most common malformation in the craniocervical junction. This condition has been associated with craniocervical instability and BI in isolated cases. Methods. We evaluated midline Magnetic Resonance Images (MRIs) (and/or CT scans) from patients with craniocervical junction malformation and normal subjects. The patients were separated into 3 groups: Chiari type I malformation, BI type I, and type II. The atlas assimilations were classified according to their embryological origins as follows: posterior, anterior, and both arches assimilation. Results. We studied the craniometric values of 111 subjects, 78 with craniocervical junction malformation and 33 without malformations. Of the 78 malformations, 51 patients had Chiari type I and 27 had BI, of whom 10 presented with type I and 17 with type II BI. In the Chiari group, 41 showed no assimilation of the atlas. In the type I BI group, all patients presented with anterior arch assimilation, either in isolation or associated with assimilation of the posterior arch. 63% of the patients with type II BI presented with posterior arch assimilation, either in isolation or associated with anterior arch assimilation. In the control group, no patients had atlas assimilation. Conclusion. Anterior atlas assimilation leads to type I BI. Posterior atlas assimilation more frequently leads to type II BI. Separation in terms of anterior versus posterior atlas assimilation reflects a more accurate understanding of the clinical and embryological differences in craniocervical junction malformations. Level of Evidence: N/A PMID

  5. ABC goal achievement predicts microvascular but not macrovascular complications over 6-years in adults with type 1 diabetes: the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes Study

    PubMed Central

    Bjornstad, Petter; Maahs, David M.; Rewers, Marian; Johnson, Richard J.; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.

    2014-01-01

    Hypothesis Vascular complications of type 1 diabetes are thought to cluster. We examined the prevalence and incidence of vascular complications and American Diabetes Association’s ABC goal achievements in a prospective cohort of adults with type 1 diabetes. We hypothesized that ABC achievement at baseline would predict both micro- and macrovascular complications over 6-years. Methods Participants (N=652) were 19–56 year old at baseline and re-examined 6-years later. Microvascular complications included diabetic nephropathy (DN), defined as incident albuminuria (AER≥20μg/min) or rapid GFR decline (>3.3%/year) by CKD-EPI cystatin C and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR), defined as laser eye-therapy. Macrovascular complications were defined as coronary artery calcium progression (CACp), measured by electron-beam computed-tomography. ABC goals were defined as HbA1c<7.0%, BP<130/80 mmHg, LDL-C<100mg/dL. Results ABC control was suboptimal with only 6% meeting all goals. Meeting no ABC goals at baseline compared to meeting all goals was associated with increased odds of developing microvascular complications (OR: 8.5, 2.3–31.5, p=0.001), but did not reach significance for CACp (OR: 1.7, 0.8–3.9, p=0.19). Conclusion ABC achievement at baseline strongly predicted microvascular but not macrovascular complications over 6-years in adults with type 1 diabetes, suggesting a need for novel therapeutic targets to complement conventional risk factors in treating macrovascular complications. PMID:25270733

  6. Enduring Links: Parents' Expectations and Their Young Adult Children's Gender-Typed Occupational Choices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Janis E.; Chhin, Christina S.; Bleeker, Martha M.

    2006-01-01

    The goals of the current study were to examine (1) the relation between parents' gender-typed occupational expectations for their children at age 15 and their children's own reports of occupational expectations at age 17; (2) the long-term relations between parents' gender-typed occupational expectations for their children at age 17 and their…

  7. Principles of connectivity among morphologically defined cell types in adult neocortex.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaolong; Shen, Shan; Cadwell, Cathryn R; Berens, Philipp; Sinz, Fabian; Ecker, Alexander S; Patel, Saumil; Tolias, Andreas S

    2015-11-27

    Since the work of Ramón y Cajal in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, neuroscientists have speculated that a complete understanding of neuronal cell types and their connections is key to explaining complex brain functions. However, a complete census of the constituent cell types and their wiring diagram in mature neocortex remains elusive. By combining octuple whole-cell recordings with an optimized avidin-biotin-peroxidase staining technique, we carried out a morphological and electrophysiological census of neuronal types in layers 1, 2/3, and 5 of mature neocortex and mapped the connectivity between more than 11,000 pairs of identified neurons. We categorized 15 types of interneurons, and each exhibited a characteristic pattern of connectivity with other interneuron types and pyramidal cells. The essential connectivity structure of the neocortical microcircuit could be captured by only a few connectivity motifs. PMID:26612957

  8. Evaluation of a Mobile Phone Image-Based Dietary Assessment Method in Adults with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Rollo, Megan E.; Ash, Susan; Lyons-Wall, Philippa; Russell, Anthony W.

    2015-01-01

    Image-based dietary records have limited evidence evaluating their performance and use among adults with a chronic disease. This study evaluated the performance of a 3-day mobile phone image-based dietary record, the Nutricam Dietary Assessment Method (NuDAM), in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Criterion validity was determined by comparing energy intake (EI) with total energy expenditure (TEE) measured by the doubly-labelled water technique. Relative validity was established by comparison to a weighed food record (WFR). Inter-rater reliability was assessed by comparing estimates of intake from three dietitians. Ten adults (6 males, age: 61.2 ± 6.9 years old, BMI: 31.0 ± 4.5 kg/m2) participated. Compared to TEE, mean EI (MJ/day) was significantly under-reported using both methods, with a mean ratio of EI:TEE 0.76 ± 0.20 for the NuDAM and 0.76 ± 0.17 for the WFR. Correlations between the NuDAM and WFR were mostly moderate for energy (r = 0.57), carbohydrate (g/day) (r = 0.63, p < 0.05), protein (g/day) (r = 0.78, p < 0.01) and alcohol (g/day) (rs = 0.85, p < 0.01), with a weaker relationship for fat (g/day) (r = 0.24). Agreement between dietitians for nutrient intake for the 3-day NuDAM (Intra-class Correlation Coefficient (ICC) = 0.77–0.99) was lower when compared with the 3-day WFR (ICC = 0.82–0.99). These findings demonstrate the performance and feasibility of the NuDAM to assess energy and macronutrient intake in a small sample. Some modifications to the NuDAM could improve efficiency and an evaluation in a larger group of adults with T2DM is required. PMID:26091234

  9. Sleep in Adolescents and Young Adults with Type 1 Diabetes: Associations with Diabetes Management and Glycemic Control

    PubMed Central

    Jaser, Sarah S.; Ellis, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe sleep in adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes and explore the association between sleep disturbances, diabetes management and glycemic control. Methods Adolescents with type 1 diabetes (n = 159, mean age = 16.4, 43% female, 69% white, mean A1C = 9.3%) completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index to assess sleep quantity and quality and sleep disturbances. Frequency of blood glucose monitoring (meter downloads) was used as a measure of diabetes management. Results Average sleep duration was 7.4 hours, below the recommended duration for this age. Adolescents using insulin pumps reported fewer sleep disturbances and longer sleep duration than those on injections, and older adolescents reported less sleep than younger adolescents. Poorer sleep duration was related to poorer diabetes management and better self-reported sleep quality was associated with better glycemic control for males but not for females. Conclusions Assessing for and treating sleep disturbances in adolescents may improve diabetes management. PMID:27081578

  10. Socioeconomic Gradients in Different Types of Tobacco Use in India: Evidence from Global Adult Tobacco Survey 2009-10.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ankur; Arora, Monika; English, Dallas R; Mathur, Manu R

    2015-01-01

    Socioeconomic differences in tobacco use have been reported, but there is a lack of evidence on how they vary according to types of tobacco use. This study explored socioeconomic differences associated with cigarette, bidi, smokeless tobacco (SLT), and dual use (smoking and smokeless tobacco use) in India and tested whether these differences vary by gender and residential area. Secondary analysis of Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS) 2009-10 (n = 69,296) was conducted. The primary outcomes were self-reported cigarette, bidi smoking, SLT, and dual use. The main explanatory variables were wealth, education, and occupation. Associations were assessed using multinomial logistic regressions. 69,030 adults participated in the study. Positive association was observed between wealth and prevalence of cigarette smoking while inverse associations were observed for bidi smoking, SLT, and dual use after adjustment for potential confounders. Inverse associations with education were observed for all four types after adjusting for confounders. Significant interactions were observed for gender and area in the association between cigarette, bidi, and smokeless tobacco use with wealth and education. The probability of cigarette smoking was higher for wealthier individuals while the probability of bidi smoking, smokeless tobacco use, and dual use was higher for those with lesser wealth and education. PMID:26273649

  11. Prospective Association Between Inflammatory Markers and Progression of Coronary Artery Calcification in Adults With and Without Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Alman, Amy C.; Kinney, Gregory L.; Tracy, Russell P.; Maahs, David M.; Hokanson, John E.; Rewers, Marian J.; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The role of inflammation in the increased risk of cardiovascular disease in type 1 diabetes is unclear. We examined the association of inflammation and progression of coronary artery calcification (CAC)—a marker of subclinical atherosclerosis—in adults with and without type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A nested case-control study was performed within the prospective cohort of the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes (CACTI) study. Participants underwent two CAC measurements ∼2.5 years apart. Case subjects (n = 204) were those with significant progression of CAC. Control subjects (n = 258) were frequency-matched to case subjects on diabetes status, sex, age, and baseline CAC status. Inflammatory marker assessments were performed on stored blood samples from baseline. A principal components analysis (PCA) was performed and a composite score derived from that analysis. The composite score was constructed by assigning a value of 1 for each PCA component where at least one of the markers exceeded the 75th percentile (range 0–4). Conditional logistic regression was used for the matching strategy. RESULTS The first two components of the PCA were modestly (odds ratio 1.38 [95% CI 1.08–1.77] and 1.27 [1.02–1.59], respectively) associated with CAC progression after adjustment for other risk factors. The composite score was more strongly associated with CAC progression for those with elevated markers in three or four of the principal components compared with those with none. CONCLUSIONS Measures of inflammation were associated with progression of CAC in a population of adults with and without type 1 diabetes. PMID:23340891

  12. The association between types of eating behaviour and dispositional mindfulness in adults with diabetes. Results from Diabetes MILES. The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Tak, Sanne R; Hendrieckx, Christel; Nefs, Giesje; Nyklíček, Ivan; Speight, Jane; Pouwer, François

    2015-04-01

    Although healthy food choices are important in the management of diabetes, making dietary adaptations is often challenging. Previous research has shown that people with type 2 diabetes are less likely to benefit from dietary advice if they tend to eat in response to emotions or external cues. Since high levels of dispositional mindfulness have been associated with greater awareness of healthy dietary practices in students and in the general population, it is relevant to study the association between dispositional mindfulness and eating behaviour in people with type 1 or 2 diabetes. We analysed data from Diabetes MILES - The Netherlands, a national observational survey in which 634 adults with type 1 or 2 diabetes completed the Dutch Eating Behaviour Questionnaire (to assess restrained, external and emotional eating behaviour) and the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire-Short Form (to assess dispositional mindfulness), in addition to other psychosocial measures. After controlling for potential confounders, including demographics, clinical variables and emotional distress, hierarchical linear regression analyses showed that higher levels of dispositional mindfulness were associated with eating behaviours that were more restrained (β = 0.10) and less external (β = -0.11) and emotional (β = -0.20). The mindfulness subscale 'acting with awareness' was the strongest predictor of both external and emotional eating behaviour, whereas for emotional eating, 'describing' and 'being non-judgemental' were also predictive. These findings suggest that there is an association between dispositional mindfulness and eating behaviour in adults with type 1 or 2 diabetes. Since mindfulness interventions increase levels of dispositional mindfulness, future studies could examine if these interventions are also effective in helping people with diabetes to reduce emotional or external eating behaviour, and to improve the quality of their diet. PMID:25596042

  13. Place and type of meals consumed by adults in medium sized cities

    PubMed Central

    Carús, Juliana Pires; França, Giovanny V A; Barros, Aluísio J D

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe the meals consumed by adults living in a midsize city in the South of Brazil, according to the place and preparation. METHODS A population-based cross-sectional study was conducted in Pelotas, Southern Brazil, in 2012. The two-stage sampling design used the 2010 census tracts as primary sampling units. Data were collected on the place of meals (at home or out) and on the kind of preparations consumed at home (homemade, snacks, take away food) covering the two days prior to the interview, using a standardized questionnaire. RESULTS The study included 2,927 adults, of which 59.0% were female, 60.0% were below 50 years of age and 58.0% were in work. Data were collected on 11,581 meals consumed on the two days preceding the interview, 25.0% were consumed outside of the home at lunchtime, and 10.0% at dinnertime. Considering home meals, most participants reported eating food prepared at home at both lunch and dinner. The majority of out-of-home meals (64.0% for lunch and 61.0% for dinner) were consumed in the work place, mostly based on food prepared at home. Individuals eating out of home were mostly male, young and highly educated. The occupational categories that ate at restaurants more often were trade workers, businessmen, teachers and graduate professionals. CONCLUSIONS Despite the changes in eating patterns described in Brazil in recent years, residents of medium-sized towns still mostly eat at home, consuming homemade food. PMID:24789639

  14. Plasma Triglycerides Predict Incident Albuminuria and Progression of Coronary Artery Calcification in Adults with Type 1 Diabetes: the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes Study

    PubMed Central

    Bjornstad, Petter; Maahs, David M.; Wadwa, R. Paul; Pyle, Laura; Rewers, Marian; Eckel, Robert H.; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Coronary artery disease and diabetic nephropathy, which are thought to share pathogenic mechanisms, remain the most common causes of mortality in type 1 diabetes (T1D). Data from basic and clinical studies indicate that hypertriglyceridemia plays an important role in the pathogenesis of vascular complications, but the role of triglycerides (TG) in the normal range remains unresolved in T1D. Objective We hypothesized that fasting TG would independently predict cardiorenal disease in adults with T1D and normal-to-low levels of TG. Methods Subjects (N=652) were 19–56 years old at baseline and reexamined 6-years later. Urinary albumin excretion was measured, and categorized as microalbuminuria or greater. Progression of coronary artery calcification (CACp), measured using electron beam CT, was defined as a change in the square root transformed CAC volume ≥2.5. The association of low-density-lipoprotein-C (LDL-C), high-density-lipoprotein-C (HDL-C), apolipoprotein B, nonHDL-C, lnTG, ln(TG/HDL-C) ratio with CACp and incident albuminuria were examined in logistic regression. The models were adjusted for age, sex, T1D-duration, hemoglobin A1c, SBP, DBP, BP-medications, statins and smoking status. Integrated discrimination index and net-reclassification improvement were used to examine prediction performance. Results Incident albuminuria was independently associated with CACp. LnTG independently predicted both incident albuminuria (OR: 1.53, 1.02–2.30, p=0.04) and CACp (1.41, 1.11–1.80, p=0.006). The addition of lnTG to ABC risk factors (HbA1c, SBP, DBP and LDL-C) moderately improved discrimination and reclassification of CACp and incident albuminuria. Conclusion In adults with type 1 diabetes, fasting TG independently predicted cardiorenal disease over 6 years and improved reclassification of risk by conventional risk factors. PMID:25499940

  15. Breakfast skipping and breakfast type are associated with daily nutrient intakes and metabolic syndrome in Korean adults

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Sang-Jin; Lee, Yoonna; Lee, Seokhwa

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Emerging evidence shows that eating breakfast and breakfast types may be associated with health outcomes and dietary intakes in various populations. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between breakfast types in Korean adults with their daily nutrient intakes and health outcomes. SUBJECTS/METHODS A total of 11,801 20- to 64-year-old adults (age 42.9 ± 11.8 yrs [mean ± standard error of the mean]; male 41.1%, female 58.9%) in 2007-2009 Korean National Health and Nutrition Survey data were divided into 5 groups based on breakfast types in a 24-hr dietary recall: rice with 3 or more side dishes (Rice3+, 35.3%), rice with 0-2 side dishes (Rice0-2, 34.73%), noodles (1.56%), bread and cereal (6.56%), and breakfast skipping (21.63%). Daily nutrient intakes and the risk of metabolic syndrome were compared among five groups. RESULTS Compared with Korean Recommended Nutrient Intake levels, the breakfast-skipping group showed the lowest intake level in most nutrients, whereas the Rice3+ group showed the highest. Fat intake was higher in the bread and noodle groups than in the other groups. When compared with the Rice3+ group, the odds ratios for the risk of obesity and metabolic syndrome were increased in the breakfast skipping, Rice0-2, and noodle groups after controlling for confounding variables. CONCLUSIONS The rice-based breakfast group showed better nutritional status and health outcomes when eating with 3 or more side dishes. Nutrition education is needed to emphasize both the potential advantage of the rice-based, traditional Korean diet in terms of nutritional content and the importance of food diversity. PMID:26060541

  16. Prevalence and determinants of type 2 diabetes mellitus in a Greek adult population.

    PubMed

    Tsirona, Sofia; Katsaros, Fotis; Bargiota, Alexandra; Polyzos, Stergios A; Arapoglou, George; Koukoulis, George N

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) is increasing worldwide reaching epidemic proportions. The aim of the present study was to estimate the prevalence of DM in Thessaly, a large region of Central Greece, and to extrapolate our results to the population of the entire country. A random sample of 805 adults (421 females and 384 men) living in Thessaly, aged 18-80 years, was surveyed. After completing a questionnaire about health status and a thorough physical examination, a blood sample was obtained from each participant for biochemical analysis. Participants with fasting glucose levels between 100-125 mg/dl underwent an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). A second survey was also conducted, via telephone call-interviews, in a randomly selected sample age- and sex-stratified to the country's adult population in order to extrapolate the DM data from Thessaly to the whole country. The frequency of DM based on patient history and fasting blood glucose levels was 6.96%, comparable to that observed in the telephone-based nationwide survey (7.38%, p=0.669). However, after the OGTT an additional 3.72% of the population had undiagnosed DM, increasing DM prevalence to 10.68% (age adjusted 11.77%). The prevalence of pre-diabetes was 8.70%, with impaired fasting glucose at 5.84% and impaired glucose tolerance at 2.86%. The prevalence of DM was significantly higher in men (14.58%) than in women (7.13%, p<0.001), increased with age in both sexes and was more prevalent in hypertensive (p<0.001) and obese subjects (p=0.001) and in those living in rural areas (p=0.003). In the multiple logistic regression analysis, significant predictors of pre-diabetes and DM together were age, homeostasis model of assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), alcohol consumption and educational status, whereas those of DM alone were age, HOMA-IR and triglycerides. Extrapolating our data to the whole country, the age-adjusted prevalence of DM was estimated at 11.97% (men 13.98%, women 9

  17. Chiari Type I Malformations in Young Adults: Implications for the College Health Practitioner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elam, Mary Jane; Vaughn, John A.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe 2 cases of Chiari type I malformation (CM-I) in students presenting to a college health center within a 6-month period. A review of CM-I, including epidemiology, typical presentation, evaluation, and management, is followed by a discussion of the clinical and functional implications of the disorder in an…

  18. Response to Comment on "Principles of connectivity among morphologically defined cell types in adult neocortex".

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaolong; Shen, Shan; Sinz, Fabian; Reimer, Jacob; Cadwell, Cathryn R; Berens, Philipp; Ecker, Alexander S; Patel, Saumil; Denfield, George H; Froudarakis, Emmanouil; Li, Shuang; Walker, Edgar; Tolias, Andreas S

    2016-09-01

    The critique of Barth et al centers on three points: (i) the completeness of our study is overstated; (ii) the connectivity matrix we describe is biased by technical limitations of our brain-slicing and multipatching methods; and (iii) our cell classification scheme is arbitrary and we have simply renamed previously identified interneuron types. We address these criticisms in our Response. PMID:27609883

  19. Resistance training alters cytokine gene expression in skeletal muscle of adults with type 2 diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistance training results in muscle hypertrophy and improves glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. Whether resistance training modulates inflammation in muscles of diabetic patients remains unknown. We examined the expression of genes encoding the cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-al...

  20. A Comparison of the Status, Legal, Economic, and Psychological Characteristics of Types of Adult Male Gamblers.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, A; Dinur Klein, L; Dannon, P N

    2015-09-01

    Gambling behavior is not a unique behavior. There are certain differences in behavior, gambling habits, gambling beliefs, and their reflection in psychosocial life. We have compared three groups of adult male gamblers—sports gamblers (n = 41), machine gamblers (n = 36), and poker gamblers (n = 35)—in regard to measures of personal status and legal-social characteristics. We found no difference between groups in terms of the length of gambling behavior, personal status, or age. We found no legal difference between groups in terms of the number of court cases for debt, stealing, or family court cases. In terms of economic circumstances, sports gamblers suffered more losses than the other groups (p < 0.0001). There were higher rates of bankruptcy among sports gamblers compared with machine gamblers (p < 0.01). Sports gamblers were more likely to borrow money from the black market compared with the other groups (p < 0.01). In terms of mental health, sports and machine gamblers had more suicidal thoughts and gestures than poker gamblers (p < 0.05), whereas the rate of suicide attempts was higher in machine gamblers compared with poker players (p < 0.05). Our results indicated higher vulnerability in sports gamblers in terms of economic problems compared with the other groups, whereas machine gamblers had vulnerability to suicidal thoughts and suicidal attempts compared with poker gamblers. PMID:24838781

  1. Variable migratory patterns of different adult rainbow trout life history types in a southwest Alaska watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meka, J.M.; Knudsen, E.E.; Douglas, D.C.; Benter, R.B.

    2003-01-01

    Radiotelemetry was used to document population structure in adult rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss from the Alagnak River, southwest Alaska. Rainbow trout (N = 134) longer than 440 mm were implanted with radio transmitters and tracked for varying periods from July 1997 to April 1999. Fifty-eight radio-tagged fish were tracked for sufficient duration (at least 11 months) to allow description of seasonal migratory patterns. Unique seasonal movements of fish suggested discrete, within-basin population structure. Telemetry data documented the existence of multiple migratory and nonmigratory groups of rainbow trout, indicating unique life history patterns. The observed groups consisted of what we defined as a lake-resident ecotype, a lake-river ecotype, and a riverine ecotype; the riverive ecotype demonstrated both highly migratory and nonmigratory movement behavior. Considerable variation in movement patterns was found within both the lake-river group and the river migratory group. Radio-tagged trout did not migrate between the two Alagnak watershed lakes in either year of the study, suggesting lake fidelity in the population structure. Alagnak River rainbow trout may have evolved the observed seasonal movement patterns to optimize winter thermal refugia and summer food availability of salmon eggs and carcasses.

  2. Trends in Hypertension Prevalence, Awareness, Treatment and Control in an Adult Type 2 Diabetes Spanish Population between 2003 and 2009

    PubMed Central

    de Burgos-Lunar, Carmen; Jiménez-García, Rodrigo; Salinero-Fort, Miguel A.; Gómez-Campelo, Paloma; Gil, Ángel; Abánades-Herranz, Juan C.; Cárdenas-Valladolid, Juan; del Cura-González, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    In patients with type 2 diabetes, the prevalence of hypertension is higher than in non-diabetic subjects. Despite the high cardiovascular risk involving hypertension in these patients, its prevalence and control are not well known. The aims of this study were: to estimate the hypertension prevalence, awareness, treatment and control in Spanish adults with type 2 diabetes attended in Primary Care; and to analyse its time trend from 2003 to 2009. A serial cross-sectional study from 2003 to 2009 was performed in 21 Primary Care Centres in Madrid. The study population comprised all patients with diagnosed type 2 diabetes in their computerised medical history. Overall annual prevalence during the period 2003–2009 was calculated from and according to sex and age groups. Linear trend tests, regression lines and coefficients of determination were used. In 2003 89.78% (CI 87.92–91.64) of patients with type 2 diabetes suffered hypertension and 94.76% (CI: 92.85–96.67) in 2009. This percentage was greater for women and for patients over 65 years old. 30% of patients suffered previously undiagnosed hypertension in 2003 and 23.1% in 2009. 97% of diagnosed patients received pharmacological treatment and 28.79% reached the blood pressure objective in 2009. The average number of antihypertensive drugs taken was 2.72 in 2003 and 3.27 in 2009. Only 5.2% of patients with type 2 diabetes show blood pressure levels below 130/80 mmHg. Although significant improvements have been achieved in the diagnosis and control of hypertension in people with type 2 diabetes, these continue to remain far from optimum. PMID:24475171

  3. Beneficial effect of a diet containing heat-killed Lactobacillus paracasei K71 on adult type atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Moroi, Miki; Uchi, Sahori; Nakamura, Kenjiro; Sato, Saori; Shimizu, Nobuyuki; Fujii, Mikio; Kumagai, Takehisa; Saito, Mariko; Uchiyama, Kimiko; Watanabe, Toshiyuki; Yamaguchi, Hideyo; Yamamoto, Tetsuro; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Furue, Masutaka

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical effect of a supplementary diet containing heat-killed lactic acid bacterium Lactobacillus paracasei K71 (LAB diet) on adult patients with atopic dermatitis (AD). A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted in 34 adult type AD subjects who were treated with conventional topical corticosteroid and tacrolimus. LAB diet or placebo was added over 12 weeks. The primary end-point was the clinical severity of AD which was evaluated by a severity scoring system proposed by the guideline of the Japanese Dermatological Association. The effect was also secondarily evaluated by itch scores of visual analog scales (VAS), quality-of-life (QOL) impairment scores of Skindex 16 and consumption amounts of topical therapeutics. Data on these four assessment variables were collected at baseline and at week 4, 8 and 12. Within the study population, the skin severity scores were significantly decreased from baseline at week 8 (P<0.05) and at week 12 (P<0.01) in the LAB diet group but not in the placebo group. Influence of LAB diet on itch scores or QOL impairment scores was not evident. The consumption of topical therapeutics in the placebo group was 1.9-times greater in total amount compared with the corresponding value in the LAB diet group during the intervention period, although there was no significant difference. No LAB diet- or placebo-related adverse events were observed. We concluded that the LAB diet may have some benefits as a complementary therapy for adult AD patients who are managed with the conventional treatment. PMID:21269308

  4. Arterial stiffness in adolescents and young adults with and without type 1 diabetes: the SEARCH CVD study

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Amy S.; Wadwa, R. Paul; Dabelea, Dana; Hamman, Richard F.; D’Agostino, Ralph; Marcovina, Santica; Daniels, Stephen R.; Dolan, Lawrence M.; Fino, Nora F.; Urbina, Elaine M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Arterial stiffness is a useful parameter to predict future cardiovascular disease. Objective We sought to compare arterial stiffness in adolescents and young adults with and without type 1 diabetes (T1D) and explore the risk factors associated with the differences observed. Subjects and methods Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV), augmentation index (AI75), and brachial distensibility (BrachD) were measured in 402 adolescents and young adults with T1D (age 18.8 ± 3.3 yr, T1D duration 9.8 ± 3.8 yr) and 206 non-diabetic controls that were frequency-matched by age, sex, and race/ethnicity in a cross-sectional study. General linear models were used to explore variables associated with an increase in arterial stiffness after adjustment for demographic and metabolic covariates. Results T1D status was associated with a higher PWV (5.9 ± 0.05 vs. 5.7 ± 0.1 m/s), AI75 (1.3 ± 0.6 vs. −1.9 ± 0.7%), and lower BrachD (6.2 ± 0.1 vs. 6.5 ± 0.1%Δ/mmHg), all p < 0.05. In multivariate models, age, sex, race, adiposity, blood pressure, lipids, and the presence of microalbuminuria were found to be independent correlates of increased arterial stiffness. After adjustment for these risk factors, T1D status was still significantly associated with arterial stiffness (p < 0.05). Conclusions Peripheral and central subclinical vascular changes are present in adolescents and young adults with T1D compared to controls. Increased cardiovascular risk factors alone do not explain the observed differences in arterial stiffness among cases and controls. Identifying other risk factors associated with increased arterial stiffness in youth with T1D is critical to prevent future vascular complications. PMID:25912292

  5. Word-stem priming and recognition in type 2 diabetes mellitus, Alzheimer's disease patients and healthy older adults.

    PubMed

    Redondo, María Teresa; Beltrán-Brotóns, José Luís; Reales, José Manuel; Ballesteros, Soledad

    2015-11-01

    The present study investigated (a) whether the pattern of performance on implicit and explicit memory of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) is more similar to those of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) or to cognitively normal older adults and (b) whether glycosylated hemoglobin levels (a measure of glucose regulation) are related to performance on the two memory tasks, implicit word-stem completion and "old-new" recognition. The procedures of both memory tasks included encoding and memory test phases separated by a short delay. Three groups of participants (healthy older adults, DM2 patients and AD patients) completed medical and psychological assessments and performed both memory tasks on a computer. The results of the word-stem completion task showed similar implicit memory in the three groups. By contrast, explicit recognition of the three groups differed. Implicit memory was not affected by either normal or pathological aging, but explicit memory deteriorated in the two groups of patients, especially in AD patients, showing a severe impairment compared to the cognitively healthy older adults. Importantly, glycosylated hemoglobin levels were not related to performance on either implicit or explicit memory tasks. These findings revealed a clear dissociation between explicit and implicit memory tasks in normal and pathological aging. Neuropsychologists and clinicians working with TM2 patients should be aware that the decline of voluntary, long-term explicit memory could have a negative impact on their treatment management. By contrast, the intact implicit memory of the two clinical groups could be used in rehabilitation. PMID:26253308

  6. Combining glycosylated hemoglobin A1c and fasting plasma glucose for diagnosis of type 2 diabetes in Chinese adults

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Glycosylated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) has been applied to identify type 2 diabetes (T2DM) in the U.S. and European countries. It has not been used in China mainly due to lack of a standardized approach to measure HbA1c, short of knowledge about racial-specific standard and deficiency of an optimal cut-off point. Methods To evaluate combination of HbA1c and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) in diagnosing T2DM in Chinese adults, a multistage sampling cross-sectional study was conducted in Shanghai, China, in 2009. The FPG measurement, HbA1c assay, and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) were performed in 6,661 Chinese adults (3057 men, 3604 women) who had no prior history of diabetes to identify the unrecognized T2DM. Results A total of 454 participants were identified as T2DM based on the 1999 World Health Organization (WHO) diagnostic criteria. Of these patients, 239 were detected using an FPG ≥ 7.0 mmol/l and 141 were further identified using an HbA1c ≥ 43 mmol/mol (6.1%), achieving a sensitivity of 83.7% and a specificity of 89.3% for combining use of FPG and HbA1c. In subjects at high risk of diabetes, the combining use of FPG and HbA1c produced a higher sensitivity and an improved positive predictive value (PPV), and had a satisfactory specificity and negative predictive value (NPV). Conclusions The combining use of FPG and HbA1c is a potential screening and diagnosis approach for T2DM in Chinese adults, especially among those at high risk of the disease. PMID:24099651

  7. Understanding the Relationship between Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Falls in Older Adults: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Roman de Mettelinge, Tine; Cambier, Dirk; Calders, Patrick; Van Den Noortgate, Nele; Delbaere, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Background Older adults with type 2 Diabetes Mellitus are at increased risk of falling. The current study aims to identify risk factors that mediate the relationship between diabetes and falls. Methods 199 older adults (104 with diabetes and 95 healthy controls) underwent a medical screening. Gait (GAITRite®), balance (AccuGait® force plate), grip strength (Jamar®), and cognitive status (Mini-Mental State Examination and Clock Drawing Test) were assessed. Falls were prospectively recorded during a 12-month follow-up period using monthly calendars. Results Compared to controls, diabetes participants scored worse on all physical and cognitive measures. Sixty-four participants (42 diabetes vs. 22 controls) reported at least one injurious fall or two non-injurious falls (“fallers”). Univariate logistic regression identified diabetes as a risk factor for future falls (Odds Ratio 2.25, 95%CI 1.21–4.15, p = 0.010). Stepwise multiple regressions defined diabetes and poor balance as independent risk factors for falling. Taking more medications, slower walking speed, shorter stride length and poor cognitive performance were mediators that reduced the Odds Ratio of the relationship between diabetes and faller status relationship the most followed by reduced grip strength and increased stride length variability. Conclusions Diabetes is a major risk factor for falling, even after controlling for poor balance. Taking more medications, poorer walking performance and reduced cognitive functioning were mediators of the relationship between diabetes and falls. Tailored preventive programs including systematic medication reviews, specific balance exercises and cognitive training might be beneficial in reducing fall risk in older adults suffering from diabetes. PMID:23825617

  8. Innovative biomarkers for predicting type 2 diabetes mellitus: relevance to dietary management of frailty in older adults.

    PubMed

    Ikwuobe, John; Bellary, Srikanth; Griffiths, Helen R

    2016-06-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) increases in prevalence in the elderly. There is evidence for significant muscle loss and accelerated cognitive impairment in older adults with T2DM; these comorbidities are critical features of frailty. In the early stages of T2DM, insulin sensitivity can be improved by a "healthy" diet. Management of insulin resistance by diet in people over 65 years of age should be carefully re-evaluated because of the risk for falling due to hypoglycaemia. To date, an optimal dietary programme for older adults with insulin resistance and T2DM has not been described. The use of biomarkers to identify those at risk for T2DM will enable clinicians to offer early dietary advice that will delay onset of disease and of frailty. Here we have used an in silico literature search for putative novel biomarkers of T2DM risk and frailty. We suggest that plasma bilirubin, plasma, urinary DPP4-positive microparticles and plasma pigment epithelium-derived factor merit further investigation as predictive biomarkers for T2DM and frailty risk in older adults. Bilirubin is screened routinely in clinical practice. Measurement of specific microparticle frequency in urine is less invasive than a blood sample so is a good choice for biomonitoring. Future studies should investigate whether early dietary changes, such as increased intake of whey protein and micronutrients that improve muscle function and insulin sensitivity, affect biomarkers and can reduce the longer term complication of frailty in people at risk for T2DM. PMID:26897532

  9. Establishment of immortalized alveolar type II epithelial cell lines from adult rats.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, K E; Carter, J M; Iype, P T; Kumari, H L; Crosby, L L; Aardema, M J; Isfort, R J; Cody, D; Chestnut, M H; Burns, J L

    1995-01-01

    We developed methodology to isolate and culture rat alveolar Type II cells under conditions that preserved their proliferative capacity, and applied lipofection to introduce an immortalizing gene into the cells. Briefly, the alveolar Type II cells were isolated from male F344 rats using airway perfusion with a pronase solution followed by incubation for 30 min at 37 degrees C. Cells obtained by pronase digestion were predominantly epithelial in morphology and were positive for Papanicolaou and alkaline phosphatase staining. These cells could be maintained on an extracellular matrix of fibronectin and Type IV collagen in a low serum, insulin-supplemented Ham's F12 growth medium for four to five passages. Rat alveolar epithelial cells obtained by this method were transformed with the SV40-T antigen gene and two immortalized cell lines (RLE-6T and RLE-6TN) were obtained. The RLE-6T line exhibits positive nuclear immunostaining for the SV40-T antigen and the RLE-6TN line does not. PCR analysis of genomic DNA from the RLE-6T and RLE-6TN cells demonstrated the T-antigen gene was present only in the RLE-6T line indicating the RLE-6TN line is likely derived from a spontaneous transformant. After more than 50 population doublings, the RLE-6T cells stained positive for cytokeratin, possessed alkaline phosphatase activity, and contained lipid-containing inclusion bodies (phosphine 3R staining); all characteristics of alveolar Type II cells. The RLE-6TN cells exhibited similar characteristics except they did not express alkaline phosphatase activity. Early passage RLE-6T and 6TN cells showed a near diploid chromosome number.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8528500

  10. Glutaric aciduria type 2 presenting with acute respiratory failure in an adult

    PubMed Central

    Ersoy, Ebru Ortac; Rama, Dorina; Ünal, Özlem; Sivri, Serap; Topeli, Arzu

    2015-01-01

    Glutaric aciduria (GTA) type II can be seen as late onset form with myopathic phenotype. We present a case of a 19-year old female with progressive muscle weakness was admitted in intensive care unit (ICU) with respiratory failure and acute renal failure. Patient was unconscious. Pupils were anisocoric and light reflex was absent. She had hepatomegaly. The laboratory results showed a glucose level of 70 mg/dl and the liver enzymes were high. The patient also had hyponatremia (117 mEq/L) and lactate level of 3.9 mmol/L. Tandem MS and organic acid analysis were compatible with GTA type II. Carnitine 1gr, riboflavin 100 mg and co-enzymeQ10 100 mg was arranged. After four months from beginning of treatment tandem MS results are improved. Respiratory failure, acute renal failure due to profound proximal myopathy can be due to glutaric aciduria type II that responded rapidly to appropriate therapy. PMID:26236614

  11. Glutaric aciduria type 2 presenting with acute respiratory failure in an adult.

    PubMed

    Ersoy, Ebru Ortac; Rama, Dorina; Ünal, Özlem; Sivri, Serap; Topeli, Arzu

    2015-01-01

    Glutaric aciduria (GTA) type II can be seen as late onset form with myopathic phenotype. We present a case of a 19-year old female with progressive muscle weakness was admitted in intensive care unit (ICU) with respiratory failure and acute renal failure. Patient was unconscious. Pupils were anisocoric and light reflex was absent. She had hepatomegaly. The laboratory results showed a glucose level of 70 mg/dl and the liver enzymes were high. The patient also had hyponatremia (117 mEq/L) and lactate level of 3.9 mmol/L. Tandem MS and organic acid analysis were compatible with GTA type II. Carnitine 1gr, riboflavin 100 mg and co-enzymeQ10 100 mg was arranged. After four months from beginning of treatment tandem MS results are improved. Respiratory failure, acute renal failure due to profound proximal myopathy can be due to glutaric aciduria type II that responded rapidly to appropriate therapy. PMID:26236614

  12. Relationship of Food Security with Type 2 Diabetes and Its Risk Factors in Tehranian Adults

    PubMed Central

    Hasan-Ghomi, Majid; Ejtahed, Hanieh-Sadat; Mirmiran, Parvin; Hosseini-Esfahani, Firozeh; Sarbazi, Narges; Azizi, Fereidoun; Sadeghian, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Background: As food insecurity has negative effects on health, the aim of this study was to determine tahe relationship between household food security and type 2 diabetes mellitus and its related risk factors. Methods: In this case-control study, 200 individuals with and 200 individuals without type 2 diabetes mellitus, aged over 40 years, were randomly selected from among participants of the Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study. The questionnaire on household food security proposed by the United States Department of Agriculture was completed for them by trained personnel. Logistic regression was used to determine the variable that had the most significant relationship with food security status. Results: The average of food security score was 2.38 ± 2.0 in non-diabetic and 2.25 ± 2.0 in diabetic individuals (P = 0.6). In both groups, the risk for food insecurity in women was more than in men. In the diabetic group, being single and having education levels below high school increased the risk of food insecurity. In the non-diabetic group, the risk of food insecurity in obese individuals was 3.3 times higher than normal individuals (odds ratio = 2.1, 95% confidence interval: 1.2–4.1). Conclusions: There were no significant differences in food security levels of diabetic and non-diabetic groups. However, some risk factors of type 2 diabetes including sex, marital status, educational level, and obesity were associated with food insecurity. PMID:26605019

  13. Heart rate, conduction and ultrasound abnormalities in adults with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type.

    PubMed

    Camerota, Filippo; Castori, Marco; Celletti, Claudia; Colotto, Marco; Amato, Silvia; Colella, Alessandra; Curione, Mario; Danese, Chiara

    2014-07-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS) and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (EDS-HT) are two clinically overlapping heritable connective tissue disorders strongly associating with pain, fatigue and other secondary aspects. Though not considered a diagnostic criterion for most EDS subtypes, cardiovascular involvement is a well-known complication in EDS. A case-control study was carried out on 28 adults with JHS/EDS-HT diagnosed according to current criteria, compared to 29 healthy subjects evaluating resting electrocardiographic (ECG), 24-h ECG and resting heart ultrasound data. Results obtained in the ECG studies showed a moderate excess in duration of the PR interval and P wave, an excess of heart conduction and rate abnormalities and an increased rate of mitral and tricuspid valve insufficiency often complicating with "true" mitral valve prolapse in the ecocardiographic study. These variable ECG subclinical anomalies reported in our sample may represent the resting surrogate of such a subnormal cardiovascular response to postural changes that are known to be present in patients with JHS/EDS-HT. Our findings indicate the usefulness of a full cardiologic evaluation of adults with JHS/EDS-HT for the correct management. PMID:24752348

  14. The experience of Japanese adolescents and young adults after losing siblings to childhood cancer: three types of narratives.

    PubMed

    Kamibeppu, Kiyoko; Sato, Iori; Hoshi, Yasutaka

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe Japanese adolescents' and young adults' experiences after losing siblings to childhood cancer. A conceptual framework of the transition and analysis based on narrative method were adopted from qualitative data from 6 Japanese adolescents and young adults who had lost their siblings to childhood cancer. It was revealed that the participants' psychological experience after the sibling's death was directed by their perceptions of their mothers' responses to bereavement. We also found that the psychological distance between participants and their mothers could be an important factor in enabling transition into mourning and in orienting the lost sibling in their mind. The stories obtained from these 6 participants were categorized into the following 3 types of narratives: "Mother in another world and the sibling who became a god," "Return of the loving mother and the sibling as savior," and "The poor mother and the sibling who needs my help to carry on her legacy." This typology will serve as a framework for grief care and future research. PMID:25413258

  15. Nail involvement in adult patients with plaque-type psoriasis: prevalence and clinical features*

    PubMed Central

    Schons, Karen Regina Rosso; Beber, André Avelino Costa; Beck, Maristela de Oliveira; Monticielo, Odirlei André

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Psoriasis is a disease of worldwide distribution with a prevalence of 1 to 3%. Nail psoriasis is estimated in 50% of patients with psoriasis, and in the presence of joint involvement, it can reach 80%. OBJECTIVE: To study the nail changes - and their clinical implications - presented by patients with psoriasis vulgaris under surveillance in a university hospital from the south of Brazil. METHODS: his cross-sectional study evaluated 65 adult patients from January 2012 to March 2013. Cutaneous severity was assessed according to the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI). The Nail Psoriasis Severity Index (NAPSI) was used to evaluate patient's nails. The diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis was established according to the Classification Criteria for Psoriatic Arthritis (CASPAR). RESULTS: The prevalence of NP was 46.1%. These patients had a median [interquartilic range (IQR)] NAPSI of 1 (0-15). A total of 63.3% of patients reported aesthetic discomfort or functional impairment related to their nails. Onycholysis was the most common feature (80%). When compared with patients without nail involvement, patients with NP had lower mean age at psoriasis onset [21 (18-41) vs. 43 (30-56) years, p=0,001]; longer disease duration [15.5 (10-24) vs. 6 (2-12) years, p=0.001]; higher PASI [9.2 (5-17) vs. 3.7 (2-10), p=0.044], higher frequency of psoriatic arthritis (43.3 vs. 3.7, p = 0.002) and more often reported family history of psoriasis (40% vs. 7.4%, p = 0.011). CONCLUSION: Onycholysis was the most frequent finding and most patients feel uncomfortable with the psoriatic nail changes that they experience. PMID:26131859

  16. Different strategies for screening and prevention of type 2 diabetes in adults: cost effectiveness analysis

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Objective To compare four potential screening strategies, and subsequent interventions, for the prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes: (a) screening for type 2 diabetes to enable early detection and treatment, (b) screening for type 2 diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance, intervening with lifestyle interventions in those with a diagnosis of impaired glucose tolerance to delay or prevent diabetes, (c) as for (b) but with pharmacological interventions, and (d) no screening. Design Cost effectiveness analysis based on development and evaluation of probabilistic, comprehensive economic decision analytic model, from screening to death. Setting A hypothetical population, aged 45 at time of screening, with above average risk of diabetes. Data sources Published clinical trials and epidemiological studies retrieved from electronic bibliographic databases; supplementary data obtained from the Department of Health statistics for England and Wales, the screening those at risk (STAR) study, and the Leicester division of the ADDITION study. Methods A hybrid decision tree/Markov model was developed to simulate the long term effects of each screening strategy, in terms of both clinical and cost effectiveness outcomes. The base case model assumed a 50 year time horizon with discounting of both costs and benefits at 3.5%. Sensitivity analyses were carried out to investigate assumptions of the model and to identify which model inputs had most impact on the results. Results Estimated costs for each quality adjusted life year (QALY) gained (discounted at 3.5% a year for both costs and benefits) were £14 150 (€17 560; $27 860) for screening for type 2 diabetes, £6242 for screening for diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance followed by lifestyle interventions, and £7023 for screening for diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance followed by pharmacological interventions, all compared with no screening. At a willingness-to-pay threshold of £20 000 the probability of

  17. Advanced BrainAGE in older adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Franke, Katja; Gaser, Christian; Manor, Brad; Novak, Vera

    2013-01-01

    Aging alters brain structure and function and diabetes mellitus (DM) may accelerate this process. This study investigated the effects of type 2 DM on individual brain aging as well as the relationships between individual brain aging, risk factors, and functional measures. To differentiate a pattern of brain atrophy that deviates from normal brain aging, we used the novel BrainAGE approach, which determines the complex multidimensional aging pattern within the whole brain by applying established kernel regression methods to anatomical brain magnetic resonance images (MRI). The "Brain Age Gap Estimation" (BrainAGE) score was then calculated as the difference between chronological age and estimated brain age. 185 subjects (98 with type 2 DM) completed an MRI at 3Tesla, laboratory and clinical assessments. Twenty-five subjects (12 with type 2 DM) also completed a follow-up visit after 3.8 ± 1.5 years. The estimated brain age of DM subjects was 4.6 ± 7.2 years greater than their chronological age (p = 0.0001), whereas within the control group, estimated brain age was similar to chronological age. As compared to baseline, the average BrainAGE scores of DM subjects increased by 0.2 years per follow-up year (p = 0.034), whereas the BrainAGE scores of controls did not change between baseline and follow-up. At baseline, across all subjects, higher BrainAGE scores were associated with greater smoking and alcohol consumption, higher tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) levels, lower verbal fluency scores and more severe deprepession. Within the DM group, higher BrainAGE scores were associated with longer diabetes duration (r = 0.31, p = 0.019) and increased fasting blood glucose levels (r = 0.34, p = 0.025). In conclusion, type 2 DM is independently associated with structural changes in the brain that reflect advanced aging. The BrainAGE approach may thus serve as a clinically relevant biomarker for the detection of abnormal patterns of brain aging associated with type 2 DM

  18. HPV Type 6 and 18 Coinfection in a Case of Adult-Onset Laryngeal Papillomatosis: Immunization with Gardasil.

    PubMed

    Fancello, Virginia; Melis, Andrea; Piana, Andrea Fausto; Castiglia, Paolo; Cossu, Andrea; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Bozzo, Corrado; King, Emma Victoria; Meloni, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Laryngeal papillomatosis (LP) is a rare human papillomavirus (HPV) related disease that often requires multiple surgical interventions and residual impairment of voice is almost inevitable. We report the case of a patient with adult onset recurrent LP, showing moderate dysplasia and coinfection with HPV types 6 and 18. The tetravalent HPV vaccine Gardasil was prescribed off label, with the aim of triggering an immunogenic response and consequently reducing the probability of further recurrences. The patient was followed for 9 months with no sign of relapse of his LP. The postexposure use of the anti-HPV vaccine could represent a promising therapeutic agent in established LP. Unfortunately, the potential efficacy of this new therapeutic option in this situation has been suggested only by isolated case reports. Further controlled studies, with a longer follow-up and a larger sample size, are needed to assess efficacy of Gardasil in LP. PMID:26783482

  19. HPV Type 6 and 18 Coinfection in a Case of Adult-Onset Laryngeal Papillomatosis: Immunization with Gardasil

    PubMed Central

    Fancello, Virginia; Melis, Andrea; Piana, Andrea Fausto; Castiglia, Paolo; Cossu, Andrea; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Bozzo, Corrado; King, Emma Victoria; Meloni, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Laryngeal papillomatosis (LP) is a rare human papillomavirus (HPV) related disease that often requires multiple surgical interventions and residual impairment of voice is almost inevitable. We report the case of a patient with adult onset recurrent LP, showing moderate dysplasia and coinfection with HPV types 6 and 18. The tetravalent HPV vaccine Gardasil was prescribed off label, with the aim of triggering an immunogenic response and consequently reducing the probability of further recurrences. The patient was followed for 9 months with no sign of relapse of his LP. The postexposure use of the anti-HPV vaccine could represent a promising therapeutic agent in established LP. Unfortunately, the potential efficacy of this new therapeutic option in this situation has been suggested only by isolated case reports. Further controlled studies, with a longer follow-up and a larger sample size, are needed to assess efficacy of Gardasil in LP. PMID:26783482

  20. An extended theory of planned behavior intervention for older adults with type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    White, Katherine M; Terry, Deborah J; Troup, Carolyn; Rempel, Lynn A; Norman, Paul; Mummery, Kerry; Riley, Malcolm; Posner, Natasha; Kenardy, Justin

    2012-07-01

    A randomized controlled trial evaluated the effectiveness of a 4-wk extended theory of planned behavior (TPB) intervention to promote regular physical activity and healthy eating among older adults diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes or cardiovascular disease (N = 183). Participants completed TPB measures of attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control, and intention, as well as planning and behavior, at preintervention and 1 wk and 6 wk postintervention for each behavior. No significant time-by-condition effects emerged for healthy eating. For physical activity, significant time-by-condition effects were found for behavior, intention, planning, perceived behavioral control, and subjective norm. In particular, compared with control participants, the intervention group showed short-term improvements in physical activity and planning, with further analyses indicating that the effect of the intervention on behavior was mediated by planning. The results indicate that TPB-based interventions including planning strategies may encourage physical activity among older people with diabetes and cardiovascular disease. PMID:22190336

  1. Neighborhood walkability, deprivation and incidence of type 2 diabetes: a population-based study on 512,061 Swedish adults

    PubMed Central

    Sundquist, Kristina; Eriksson, Ulf; Mezuk, Briana; Ohlsson, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Neighborhood walkability has been associated with increased physical activity, but only a few studies have explored the association between walkability and health outcomes related to physical activity, such as type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between objectively assessed neighborhood walkability and the 4-year incidence of type 2 diabetes in a sample of 512,061 Swedish adults aged 18 years and older. Neighborhoods were defined by 408 administratively defined geographical areas in the city of Stockholm. We found a negative association between walkability and type 2 diabetes (OR=1.33, 95% CI=1.13–1.55) that remained significant after adjusting for neighborhood deprivation. This association, however, no longer remained statistically significant after adjusting for individual socio-demographic factors. These results were also confirmed using a co-sibling design. Future studies are encouraged to further explore the potential effect of a broader array of the neighborhood built environment on health outcomes related to physical activity. PMID:25463914

  2. Distinct Luminal-Type Mammary Carcinomas Arise from Orthotopic Trp53-Null Mammary Transplantation of Juvenile versus Adult Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, David H.; Ouyang, Haoxu; Mao, Jian-Hua; Hlatky, Lynn; Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.

    2014-12-01

    Age and physiologic status, such as menopause, are risk factors for breast cancer. Less clear is what factors influence the diversity of breast cancer. In this study, we investigated the effect of host age on the distribution of tumor subtypes in mouse mammary chimera consisting of wild-type hosts and Trp53 nullizygous epithelium, which undergoes a high rate of neoplastic transformation. Wild-type mammary glands cleared of endogenous epithelium at 3 weeks of age were subsequently transplanted during puberty (5 weeks) or at maturation (10 weeks) with syngeneic Trp53-null mammary tissue fragments and monitored for one year. Tumors arose sooner from adult hosts (AH) compared with juvenile hosts (JH). However, compared with AH tumors, JH tumors grew several times faster, were more perfused, exhibited a two-fold higher mitotic index, and were more highly positive for insulin-like growth factor receptor phosphorylation. Most tumors in each setting were estrogen receptor (ER)-positive (80% JH vs. 70% AH), but JH tumors were significantly more ER-immunoreactive (P = 0.0001) than AH tumors. A differential expression signature (JvA) of juvenile versus adult tumors revealed a luminal transcriptional program. Centroids of the human homologs of JvA genes showed that JH tumors were more like luminal A tumors and AH tumors were more like luminal B tumors. Hierarchical clustering with the JvA human ortholog gene list segregated luminal A and luminal B breast cancers across datasets. Lastly, these data support the notion that age-associated host physiology greatly influences the intrinsic subtype of breast cancer.

  3. The Angiotensin II Type 2 (AT2) Receptor Promotes Axonal Regeneration in the Optic Nerve of Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lucius, Ralph; Gallinat, Stefan; Rosenstiel, Philip; Herdegen, Thomas; Sievers, Jobst; Unger, Thomas

    1998-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has been traditionally linked to blood pressure and volume regulation mediated through the angiotensin II (ANG II) type 1 (AT1) receptor. Here we report that ANG II via its ANG II type 2 (AT2) receptor promotes the axonal elongation of postnatal rat retinal explants (postnatal day 11) and dorsal root ganglia neurons in vitro, and, moreover, axonal regeneration of retinal ganglion cells after optic nerve crush in vivo. In retinal explants, ANG II (10−7–10−5 M) induced neurite elongation via its AT2 receptor, since the effects were mimicked by the AT2 receptor agonist CGP 42112 (10−5 M) and were entirely abolished by costimulation with the AT2 receptor antagonist PD 123177 (10−5 M), but not by the AT1 receptor antagonist losartan (10−5 M). To investigate whether ANG II is able to promote axonal regeneration in vivo, we performed optic nerve crush experiments in the adult rats. After ANG II treatment (0.6 nmol), an increased number of growth-associated protein (GAP)-43–positive fibers was detected and the regenerating fibers regularly crossed the lesion site (1.6 mm). Cotreatment with the AT2 receptor antagonist PD 123177 (6 nmol), but not with the AT1 receptor antagonist losartan (6 nmol), completely abolished the ANG II–induced axonal regeneration, providing for the first time direct evidence for receptor-specific neurotrophic action of ANG II in the central nervous system of adult mammals and revealing a hitherto unknown function of the RAS. PMID:9705948

  4. Dietary strategies for adult type 1 diabetes in light of outcome evidence.

    PubMed

    Matteucci, E; Giampietro, O

    2015-03-01

    Individuals who have type 1 diabetes need individualised medical nutrition therapies whose goals are to improve overall health and metabolic outcomes. However, interventions in the field of nutrition are challenging, as diet-related correlations with disease remain difficult to detect and the certainty of outcome in this area is elusive. Currently, patients are not meeting recommended dietary guidelines. Several alternative approaches for teaching meal planning to people with diabetes have been proposed: basic nutrition guidelines, basic diabetes guidelines, menu approaches to meal planning, exchange lists for meal planning and carbohydrate counting. The review provides an overview of suggested strategies for achieving the proposed goals and summarises evidence of outcomes. PMID:25293432

  5. Inflammatory Cytokine Profile Associated with Metabolic Syndrome in Adult Patients with Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira-Hermosillo, Aldo; Molina-Ayala, Mario; Ramírez-Rentería, Claudia; Vargas, Guadalupe; Gonzalez, Baldomero; Isibasi, Armando; Archundia-Riveros, Irma; Mendoza, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To compare the serum concentration of IL-6, IL-10, TNF, IL-8, resistin, and adiponectin in type 1 diabetic patients with and without metabolic syndrome and to determine the cut-off point of the estimated glucose disposal rate that accurately differentiated these groups. Design. We conducted a cross-sectional evaluation of all patients in our type 1 diabetes clinic from January 2012 to January 2013. Patients were considered to have metabolic syndrome when they fulfilled the joint statement criteria and were evaluated for clinical, biochemical, and immunological features. Methods. We determined serum IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF with flow cytometry and adiponectin and resistin concentrations with enzyme linked immunosorbent assay in patients with and without metabolic syndrome. We also compared estimated glucose disposal rate between groups. Results. We tested 140 patients. Forty-four percent fulfilled the metabolic syndrome criteria (n = 61), 54% had central obesity, 30% had hypertriglyceridemia, 29% had hypoalphalipoproteinemia, and 19% had hypertension. We observed that resistin concentrations were higher in patients with MS. Conclusion. We found a high prevalence of MS in Mexican patients with T1D. The increased level of resistin may be related to the increased fat mass and could be involved in the development of insulin resistance. PMID:26273680

  6. Case Report Serious pulmonary infection in a splenectomized patient with adult type 1 Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Mao, Y F; Du, J M

    2015-01-01

    A 49-year-old man with a history of Gaucher disease type 1, resulting in serious splenomegaly and eating disorder, was referred to our department and underwent a splenectomy under general anesthesia. Gaucher disease is very rare, and its first signs are unexplained splenomegaly and hypersplenism. On preoperative examination, the patient's platelet count was slightly low, and his other test results were normal. Surprisingly, on the first postoperative day, the patient developed a lung infection. This gradually progressed to acute respiratory distress syndrome with respiratory failure, requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation. The patient eventually recovered, and he was discharged after receiving antibiotics and other treatments to enhance immunity. However, his postoperative lung infection led to a significantly prolonged and expensive hospital stay. This case suggests that we must pay close attention to the immune dysfunction of patients with Gaucher disease type 1. Anesthesia and surgery with accompanying post-traumatic stress can weaken patients' immunity and cause susceptibility to severe lung infections. Pulmonary signs and functions should be monitored closely during the perioperative period, and, if necessary, gamma globulin and thymosin should be administered early in the preoperative or postoperative period to enhance immunity. PMID:25966100

  7. Opinions and Satisfaction Regarding Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion Therapy in Adult Patients with Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Nishio, Ikuko; Chujo, Masami; Ohkura, Tsuyoshi; Kataoka, Hideyuki

    2015-01-01

    Background This study examined the treatment satisfaction of type 1 diabetic patients undergoing continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) therapy, and patients’ thoughts regarding CSII. Methods We provided a self-administered questionnaire survey over the internet. Participants were 106 individuals with type-one diabetes aged 20 years or older, undergoing CSII. The survey examined patients’ treatment satisfaction, and their thoughts regarding CSII. Descriptive statistics were calculated. We compared relationships between treatment satisfaction and other variables using the Kruskal-Wallis rank sum test, and performed content analysis on participants’ thoughts regarding CSII. Results Regarding treatment satisfaction, the response, “neither of them” was the most frequent. Comparing relationships between treatment satisfaction and other variables, significant differences were found for the variables “age,” “presence of dissatisfaction regarding doctors’ response,” and “presence of a significant medical expense burden.” Participants’ thoughts regarding CSII were classified into 10 categories. Conclusion Participants expressed positive evaluations, such as that their blood sugar control had improved due to CSII, and that they perceived improvement in their health. Participants also expressed negative evaluations, however, such as that medical expenses resulting from CSII were high, and that these expenses may cause distress and future economic insecurity. In future, patients may benefit from nursing support that allows patients to confidently continue with CSII. PMID:26538796

  8. Two Siblings with Adolescent/Adult Onset Niemann-Pick Disease Type C in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Su-Yun; Lee, Hyung Jin; Kim, Seong Hwan; Jeong, Young Jin; Jin, Hee Kyung; Bae, Jae-Sung; Cheon, Sang-Myung; Kim, Jae Woo

    2016-07-01

    Niemann-Pick disease, type C (NP-C), is caused by NPC1 or NPC2 gene mutations. Progressive neurological, psychiatric, and visceral symptoms are characteristic. Here, we present cases of a brother (Case 1) and sister (Case 2) in their mid-20s with gait disturbance and psychosis. For the Case 1, neurological examination revealed dystonia, ataxia, vertical supranuclear-gaze palsy (VSGP), and global cognitive impairment. Case 2 showed milder, but similar symptoms, with cortical atrophy. Abdominal computed tomography showed hepatosplenomegaly in both cases. NPC1 gene sequencing revealed compound heterozygote for exon 9 (c.1552C>T [R518W]) and exon 18 (c.2780C>T [A927V]). Filipin-staining tests were also positive. When a young patient with ataxia or dystonia shows VSGP, NP-C should be considered. PMID:27366019

  9. Early Adolescent Relationship Predictors of Emerging Adult Outcomes: Youth with and without Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Helgeson, Vicki S.; Palladino, Dianne K.; Reynolds, Kerry A.; Becker, Dorothy; Escobar, Oscar; Siminerio, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Background Emerging adulthood is a high-risk period for mental health problems and risk behaviors for youth generally and for physical health problems among those with type 1 diabetes. Purpose To examine whether adolescents’ relationships with parents and friends predict health and risk behaviors during emerging adulthood. Method Youth with and without diabetes were enrolled at average age 12 and followed for 7 years. Parent and friend relationship variables, measured during adolescence, were used to predict emerging adulthood outcomes: depression, risk behavior, and, for those with diabetes, diabetes outcomes. Results Parent relationship quality predicted decreased depressive symptoms and, for those with diabetes, decreased alcohol use. Parent control predicted increased smoking, reduced college attendance, and, for control participants, increased depressive symptoms. For those with diabetes, parent control predicted decreased depressive symptoms and better self-care. Friend relationship variables predicted few outcomes. Conclusions Adolescent parent relationships remain an important influence on emerging adults’ lives. PMID:24178509

  10. Social Disorder in Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: Building on Race, Place, and Poverty.

    PubMed

    Steve, Shantell L; Tung, Elizabeth L; Schlichtman, John J; Peek, Monica E

    2016-08-01

    The recent resurgence of social and civic disquiet in the USA has contributed to increasing recognition that social conditions are meaningfully connected to disease and death. As a "lifestyle disease," control of diabetes requires modifications to daily activities, including healthy dietary practices, regular physical activity, and adherence to treatment regimens. One's ability to develop the healthy practices necessary to prevent or control type 2 diabetes may be influenced by a context of social disorder, the disruptive social and economic conditions that influence daily activity and, consequently, health status. In this paper, we report on our narrative review of the literature that explores the associations between social disorder and diabetes-related health outcomes within vulnerable communities. We also propose a multilevel ecosocial model for conceptualizing social disorder, specifically focusing on its role in racial disparities and its pathways to mediating diabetes outcomes. PMID:27319322

  11. Phimosis with Preputial Fissures as a Predictor of Undiagnosed Type 2 Diabetes in Adults.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yun-Ching; Huang, Yao-Kuang; Chen, Chih-Shou; Shindel, Alan W; Wu, Ching-Fang; Lin, Jian-Hui; Chiu, Kuo-Hsiung; Yang, Tzu-Hsin; Shi, Chung-Sheng

    2016-03-01

    Diabetes is usually asymptomatic in its early stage. Early diagnosis may improve outcomes by enabling initiation of treatment before end organ damage has progressed. The aim of this study was to determine whether the clinical sign of phimosis with preputial fissures is predictive of type 2 diabetes in patients not previously diagnosed with diabetes. Twenty-eight patients with acquired phimosis and preputial fissures were collected prospectively. Twenty-eight controls with acquired phimosis without preputial fissures were selected. Statistically significant differences were found in body mass index, random plasma glucose, glucosuria and glycosylated haemoglobin levels, but not in age, family history of diabetes, hypertension and classical hyperglycaemic symptoms. Diabetes was confirmed in all 28 patients in the preputial fissures group, but only 2 (7.1%) patients in the non-preputial fissures group (p < 0.0001). In conclusion, phimosis with preputial fissures may be a specific sign of undiagnosed diabetes mellitus. PMID:26349852

  12. Two Siblings with Adolescent/Adult Onset Niemann-Pick Disease Type C in Korea

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Niemann–Pick disease, type C (NP-C), is caused by NPC1 or NPC2 gene mutations. Progressive neurological, psychiatric, and visceral symptoms are characteristic. Here, we present cases of a brother (Case 1) and sister (Case 2) in their mid-20s with gait disturbance and psychosis. For the Case 1, neurological examination revealed dystonia, ataxia, vertical supranuclear-gaze palsy (VSGP), and global cognitive impairment. Case 2 showed milder, but similar symptoms, with cortical atrophy. Abdominal computed tomography showed hepatosplenomegaly in both cases. NPC1 gene sequencing revealed compound heterozygote for exon 9 (c.1552C>T [R518W]) and exon 18 (c.2780C>T [A927V]). Filipin-staining tests were also positive. When a young patient with ataxia or dystonia shows VSGP, NP-C should be considered. PMID:27366019

  13. Quantitative and qualitative analyses of serum antibodies elicited in adults by Haemophilus influenzae type b and pneumococcus type 6A capsular polysaccharide-tetanus toxoid conjugates.

    PubMed Central

    Schneerson, R; Robbins, J B; Parke, J C; Bell, C; Schlesselman, J J; Sutton, A; Wang, Z; Schiffman, G; Karpas, A; Shiloach, J

    1986-01-01

    Covalent binding to immunogenic proteins increases the immunogenicity of the capsular polysaccharides of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) and pneumococcus type 6A (Pn6A). Conjugates composed of Hib, Pn6A, or the cross-reacting Escherichia coli K100 covalently bound to tetanus toxoid (TT) were injected into young adult volunteers. Local reactions were common and were probably due to Arthus reactivity mediated by the preexisting antibodies reacting with the TT component of the conjugates. Fever occurred in about 10% of the volunteers after the first injection; no volunteers had fever after the second injection. Similar levels of Hib or Pn6A antibodies were elicited by either 50- or 100-micrograms doses or by concurrent injection of two different conjugates (Hib-TT and Pn6A-TT or Hib-TT and K100-TT). The Hib-TT elicited about a 180-fold increase in Hib antibodies, and the Pn6A-TT conjugate elicited about an 8-fold increase in Pn6A antibodies after one injection. Booster reactions were not elicited in adults; similar levels of antibodies in the five experimental groups suggested that the responses elicited by the conjugates were maximal. A one-way cross-reaction was noted as Pn6A conjugates elicited rises of Hib antibodies in 13 of 20 volunteers; only 4 of 59 volunteers immunized with Hib-TT had increases in Pn6A antibodies. The preimmunization Hib antibodies were composed of immunoglobulin M (IgM), IgA, and IgG. The postimmunization sera showed an increase in all three isotypes; the elevation of the IgG was the highest of the three isotypes. Conjugate-induced antibodies to both the polysaccharide and TT exerted biological activities that have been correlated with immunity. Adsorption of the Hib-TT onto aluminium hydroxide resulted in higher levels and an earlier Hib antibody response in infant rhesus. These results encourage the evaluation of Hib and Pn6A conjugates in human children and infants. PMID:3516876

  14. Change in food choices following a glycemic load intervention in adults with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Miller, Carla K; Gutshcall, Melissa Davis; Mitchell, Diane C

    2009-02-01

    The glycemic index (GI) reflects the postprandial glucose response of carbohydrate-containing foods, and adoption of a lower-GI diet may be beneficial in diabetes management. The purpose of this study was to evaluate change in food-group intake by participants after completing an intervention that included instruction about carbohydrate and the GI using a quasi-experimental design. Recruitment occurred from February to August 2005 and September to December 2006. Individuals 40 to 70 years old with type 2 diabetes for 1 year or longer were randomly assigned to an immediate (n=55) or delayed (n=48) treatment group. A 9-week group-based intervention regarding the quantity and type of carbohydrate for diabetes management was provided. Three sets of 24-hour dietary recalls were used to assess food-group intake. Foods were divided into nine main food groups and 166 subgroups based on the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2005 and the United States Department of Agriculture's Food Guide Pyramid. Analysis of variance was used to examine between-group differences and paired t test compared maintenance of change for the immediate group. Change in dietary GI was significantly different between groups upon completion of the intervention by the immediate group (P<0.05). Participants consumed significantly more servings of whole fruit and nonfat dairy products following the intervention and fewer servings of vegetable fats (all P<0.05). Only whole-fruit consumption significantly declined in the immediate group during the maintenance period (P<0.05). Nutrition education can facilitate adoption of a lower-GI diet among free-living people with diabetes. Maintaining dietary change likely requires further intervention and support. PMID:19167961

  15. A Mediterranean-type diet is associated with better metabolic profile in urban Polish adults: Results from the HAPIEE study

    PubMed Central

    Grosso, Giuseppe; Stepaniak, Urszula; Micek, Agnieszka; Topor-Mądry, Roman; Stefler, Denes; Szafraniec, Krystyna; Bobak, Martin; Pająk, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between adherence to a Mediterranean-type diet and metabolic syndrome (MetS) in the Polish arm of the Health, Alcohol and Psychosocial factors In Eastern Europe (HAPIEE) cohort study. Materials/methods A cross-sectional survey including 8821 adults was conducted in Krakow, Poland. Food intake was evaluated through a validated food frequency questionnaire and adherence to the dietary pattern was assessed using a score specifically developed for non-Mediterranean countries (MedTypeDiet score). Linear and logistic regression models were performed to estimate beta and odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs), respectively. Results Significant associations between the MedTypeDiet score and waist circumference (β = − 0.307 ± 0.239 cm), systolic blood pressure (β = − 0.440 ± 0.428 mmHg), and triglycerides (β = − 0.021 ± 0.016 mmol/L) were observed. After multivariable adjustment, individuals in the highest quartile of the score were less likely to have MetS, central obesity, high triglycerides, and hypertension. Increase of one standard deviation of the score was associated with 7% less odds of having MetS (OR 0.93, 95% CI: 0.88, 0.97). When analyzing the relation of single components of the MedTypeDiet score, wine, dairy products, and the total unsaturated:saturated fatty acids ratio were associated with MetS. Conclusions Adherence to a Mediterranean-like diet may decrease the risk of MetS also among non-Mediterranean populations. PMID:25752843

  16. Selection of the optimum font type and size interface for on screen continuous reading by young adults: an ergonomic approach.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Jayeeta; Bhattacharyya, Moushum

    2011-12-01

    There is a rapid shifting of media: from printed paper to computer screens. This transition is modifying the process of how we read and understand text. The efficiency of reading is dependent on how ergonomically the visual information is presented. Font types and size characteristics have been shown to affect reading. A detailed investigation of the effect of the font type and size on reading on computer screens has been carried out by using subjective, objective and physiological evaluation methods on young adults. A group of young participants volunteered for this study. Two types of fonts were used: Serif fonts (Times New Roman, Georgia, Courier New) and Sans serif fonts (Verdana, Arial, Tahoma). All fonts were presented in 10, 12 and 14 point sizes. This study used a 6 X 3 (font type X size) design matrix. Participants read 18 passages of approximately the same length and reading level on a computer monitor. Reading time, ranking and overall mental workload were measured. Eye movements were recorded by a binocular eye movement recorder. Reading time was minimum for Courier New l4 point. The participants' ranking was highest and mental workload was least for Verdana 14 point. The pupil diameter, fixation duration and gaze duration were least for Courier New 14 point. The present study recommends using 14 point sized fonts for reading on computer screen. Courier New is recommended for fast reading while for on screen presentation Verdana is recommended. The outcome of this study will help as a guideline to all the PC users, software developers, web page designers and computer industry as a whole. PMID:25665207

  17. Association of serum cytokines with colorectal polyp number and type in adult males.

    PubMed

    Comstock, Sarah S; Xu, Diana; Hortos, Kari; Kovan, Bruce; McCaskey, Sarah; Pathak, Dorothy R; Fenton, Jenifer I

    2016-05-01

    Chronic inflammation contributes to colorectal carcinogenesis. To determine whether serum cytokines are associated with colon polyps, 126 asymptomatic men (48-65 years) were recruited during colonoscopy. Serum cytokine concentrations were measured. Odds ratios were determined using polytomous logistic regression for polyp number and type. Men with serum monocyte chemotactic protein-3 (MCP-3) or soluble interleukin-4 receptor (sIL-4R) concentrations in the highest tertile were 0.2 times less likely to have three or more polyps relative to no polyps. For each increase in serum MCP-3 or sIL-4R tertile a man was about 0.4 times less likely to have three or more polyps than to have no polyps. Men with serum concentrations of interferon-α2 (IFN-α2) or interleukin (IL)-7 in the highest tertile were three times more likely to have an adenoma than no polyps. Those with serum IL-8 concentrations in the highest tertile were four times more likely to have an adenoma than no polyps. For each increase in serum IFN-α2, IL-7, or IL-8 tertile an individual was 1.8 times more likely to have an adenoma than to have no polyps. Serum concentrations of MCP-3, sIL-4R, IFN-α2, IL-7, and IL-8 may indicate which men are more likely to have colorectal polyps. PMID:25793917

  18. Motivational Profiles for Physical Activity Practice in Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: A Self-Determination Theory Perspective.

    PubMed

    Gourlan, Mathieu; Trouilloud, David; Boiché, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Drawing on Self-Determination Theory, this study explored the motivational profiles toward Physical Activity (PA) among adults with type 2 diabetes and the relationships between motivational profile, perceived competence and PA. Participants were 350 men and women (Mean age 62.77 years) who were interviewed on their motivations toward PA, perceived level of competence to practice, and PA practice. Cluster analyses reveal the existence of three distinct profiles: "High Combined" (ie, high scores on motivations ranging from intrinsic to external regulation, moderate level on amotivation), "Self-Determined" (ie, high scores on intrinsic, integrated, and identified regulations; low scores on other regulations), and "Moderate" (ie, moderate scores on all regulations). Participants with "High Combined" and "Self-Determined" profiles reported higher perceived competence and longer leisure-time PA practice in comparison to those with a "Moderate" profile. This study highlights the necessity of adopting a person-centered approach to better understand motivation toward PA among type 2 diabetics. PMID:25961448

  19. Cognitive, behavioural and psychological barriers to the prevention of severe hypoglycaemia: A qualitative study of adults with type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Barendse, Shalleen M; Singh, Harsimran; Little, Stuart A; Rutter, Martin K; Heller, Simon R; Shaw, James AM

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Severe hypoglycaemia affects approximately one in three people with type 1 diabetes and is the most serious side effect of insulin therapy. Our aim was to explore individualistic drivers of severe hypoglycaemia events. Methods: In-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of 17 adults with type 1 diabetes and a history of recurrent severe hypoglycaemia, to elicit experiences of hypoglycaemia (symptoms/awareness, progression from mild to severe and strategies for prevention/treatment). Interviews were analysed using an adapted grounded theory approach. Results: Three main themes emerged: hypoglycaemia-induced cognitive impairment, behavioural factors and psychological factors. Despite experiencing early hypoglycaemic symptoms, individuals often delayed intervention due to impaired/distracted attention, inaccurate risk assessment, embarrassment, worry about rebound hyperglycaemia or unavailability of preferred glucose source. Delay coupled with use of a slow-acting glucose source compromised prevention of severe hypoglycaemia. Conclusion: Our qualitative data highlight the multifaceted, idiosyncratic nature of severe hypoglycaemia and confirm that individuals with a history of recurrent severe hypoglycaemia may have specific thought and behaviour risk profiles. Individualised prevention plans are required, emphasising both the need to attend actively to mild hypoglycaemic symptoms and to intervene promptly with an appropriate, patient-preferred glucose source to prevent progression to severe hypoglycaemia. PMID:26770717

  20. Reduced Heart Rate Variability Predicts Progression of Coronary Artery Calcification in Adults with Type 1 Diabetes and Controls Without Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Ticiana C.; Ehrlich, James; Hunter, Cortney M.; Kinney, Gregory L.; Rewers, Marian

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Aim Reduced heart rate variability (HRV) is a manifestation of cardiac autonomic neuropathy, a known complication of type 1 diabetes (T1D). We evaluated whether HRV predicted coronary artery calcium (CAC) progression. Methods Subjects between 19 and 56 years of age with T1D or those without diabetes from the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes study underwent supine deep breathing 12-lead electrocardiograms. The SD of consecutive RR intervals was used as a measure of HRV. CAC was measured at two visits 6.0 ± 0.5 years apart. Progression of CAC was defined as an increase in square root transformed CAC volume of ≥2.5 mm3, excluding patients who had cardiovascular events during follow-up. Results Reduced HRV was associated with older age, higher hemoglobin A1c, elevated albuminuria, CAC volume at baseline, and increased fibrinogen. Higher HRV at baseline was associated with lower likelihood CAC progression (odds ratio = 0.71, 95% confidence interval 0.56–0.90, P = 0.005), and the adjustment for known cardiovascular risk factors did not change this strong association, including adjustment for inflammatory markers. Conclusions Reduced HRV predicted progression of CAC in adults with and without T1D. This association further supports the participation of autonomic neuropathy in the atherosclerosis process. PMID:21128843

  1. Serum uric acid predicts vascular complications in adults with type 1 diabetes: the coronary artery calcification in type 1 diabetes study.

    PubMed

    Bjornstad, Petter; Maahs, David M; Rivard, Christopher J; Pyle, Laura; Rewers, Marian; Johnson, Richard J; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K

    2014-10-01

    Epidemiologic evidence supports a link between serum uric acid (SUA) and vascular complications in diabetes, but it remains unclear whether SUA improves the ability of conventional risk factor to predict complications. We hypothesized that SUA at baseline would independently predict the development of vascular complications over 6 years and that the addition of SUA to American Diabetes Association's ABC risk factors (HbA1c, BP, LDL-C) would improve vascular complication prediction over 6 years in adults with type 1 diabetes. Study participants (N = 652) were 19-56 year old at baseline and re-examined 6 years later. Diabetic nephropathy was defined as incident albuminuria or rapid GFR decline (>3.3 %/year) estimated by the CKD-EPI cystatin C. Diabetic retinopathy (DR) was based on self-reported history, and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) was defined as laser eye therapy; coronary artery calcium (CAC) was measured using electron-beam computed tomography. Progression of CAC (CACp) was defined as a change in the square-root-transformed CAC volume ≥2.5. Predictors of each complication were examined in stepwise logistic regression with subjects with complications at baseline excluded from analyses. C-statistics, integrated discrimination indices and net-reclassification improvement were utilized for prediction performance analyses. SUA independently predicted development of incident albuminuria (OR 1.8, 95 % CI 1.2-2.7), rapid GFR decline (1.9, 1.1-3.3), DR (1.4, 1.1-1.9), PDR (2.1, 1.4-3.0) and CACp (1.5, 1.1-1.9). SUA improved the discrimination and net-classification risk of vascular complications over 6 years. SUA independently predicted the development of vascular complications in type 1 diabetes and also improved the reclassification of vascular complications. PMID:24929955

  2. Serum Uric Acid Predicts Vascular Complications in Adults with Type 1 Diabetes: the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes Study

    PubMed Central

    Bjornstad, Petter; Maahs, David M.; Rivard, Christopher J.; Pyle, Laura; Rewers, Marian; Johnson, Richard J.; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.

    2015-01-01

    Hypothesis Epidemiologic evidence support a link between serum uric acid (SUA) and vascular complications in diabetes, but it remains unclear whether SUA improves the ability of conventional risk factor to predict complications. We hypothesized that SUA at baseline would independently predict the development of vascular complications over 6 years, and that the addition of SUA to American Diabetes Association’s ABC risk factors (HbA1c, BP, LDL-C) would improve vascular complication prediction over 6-years in adults with type 1 diabetes. Methods Study participants (N=652) were 19–56 year old at baseline and re-examined 6-years later. Diabetic nephropathy (DN) was defined as incident albuminuria or rapid GFR decline (>3.3%/year) estimated by the CKD-EPI cystatin C. Diabetic retinopathy (DR) was based on self-reported history, proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) was defined as laser eye therapy; coronary artery calcium (CAC) was measured using electron-beam computed-tomography. Progression of CAC (CACp) was defined as a change in the square-root transformed CAC-volume ≥ 2.5. Predictors of each complication were examined in stepwise logistic regression with subjects with complications at baseline excluded from analyses. C-statistics, integrated-discrimination indices and net-reclassification improvement were utilized for prediction performance analyses. Results SUA independently predicted development of incident albuminuria (OR: 1.8, 95% CI 1.2–2.7), rapid GFR decline (1.9, 1.1–3.3), DR (1.4, 1.1–1.9), PDR (2.1, 1.4–3.0) and CACp (1.5 (1.1–1.9). SUA improved the discrimination and net-classification risk of vascular complications over 6-years. Conclusion SUA independently predicted the development of vascular complications in type 1 diabetes, and also improved the reclassification of vascular complications. PMID:24929955

  3. Spontaneous complete remission of type 1 diabetes mellitus in an adult – review and case report

    PubMed Central

    Moole, Harsha; Moole, Vishnu; Mamidipalli, Adrija; Dharmapuri, Sowmya; Boddireddy, Raghuveer; Taneja, Deepak; Sfeir, Hady; Gajula, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is an autoimmune condition that results in low plasma insulin levels by destruction of beta cells of the pancreas. As part of the natural progression of this disease, some patients regain beta cell activity transiently. This period is often referred to as the ‘honeymoon period’ or remission of T1DM. During this period, patients manifest improved glycemic control with reduced or no use of insulin or anti-diabetic medications. The incidence rates of remission and duration of remission is extremely variable. Various factors seem to influence the remission rates and duration. These include but are not limited to C-peptide level, serum bicarbonate level at the time of diagnosis, duration of T1DM symptoms, haemoglobin A1C (HbA1C) levels at the time of diagnosis, sex, and age of the patient. Mechanism of remission is not clearly understood. Extensive research is ongoing in regard to the possible prevention and reversal of T1DM. However, most of the studies that showed positive results were small and uncontrolled. We present a 32-year-old newly diagnosed T1DM patient who presented with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and HbA1C of 12.7%. She was on basal bolus insulin regimen for the first 4 months after diagnosis. Later, she stopped taking insulin and other anti-diabetic medications due to compliance and logistical issues. Eleven months after diagnosis, her HbA1C spontaneously improved to 5.6%. Currently (14 months after T1DM diagnosis), she is still in complete remission, not requiring insulin therapy. PMID:26486109

  4. Comparison of trap types and colors for capturing emerald ash borer adults at different population densities.

    PubMed

    Poland, Therese M; Mccullough, Deborah G

    2014-02-01

    Results of numerous trials to evaluate artificial trap designs and lures for detection of Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, the emerald ash borer, have yielded inconsistent results, possibly because of different A. planipennis population densities in the field sites. In 2010 and 2011, we compared 1) green canopy traps, 2) purple canopy traps, 3) green double-decker traps, and 4) purple double-decker traps in sites representing a range of A. planipennis infestation levels. Traps were baited with cis-3-hexenol in both years, plus an 80:20 mixture of Manuka and Phoebe oil (2010) or Manuka oil alone (2011). Condition of trees bearing canopy traps, A. planipennis infestation level of trees in the vicinity of traps, and number of A. planipennis captured per trap differed among sites in both years. Overall in both years, more females, males, and beetles of both sexes were captured on double-decker traps than canopy traps, and more beetles of both sexes (2010) or females (2011) were captured on purple traps than green traps. In 2010, detection rates were higher for purple (100%) and green double-decker traps (100%) than for purple (82%) or green canopy traps (64%) at sites with very low to low A. planipennis infestation levels. Captures of A. planipennis on canopy traps consistently increased with the infestation level of the canopy trap-bearing trees. Differences among trap types were most pronounced at sites with low A. planipennis densities, where more beetles were captured on purple double-decker traps than on green canopy traps in both years. PMID:24398125

  5. Day and Night Closed-Loop Control in Adults With Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Luijf, Yoeri M.; DeVries, J. Hans; Zwinderman, Koos; Leelarathna, Lalantha; Nodale, Marianna; Caldwell, Karen; Kumareswaran, Kavita; Elleri, Daniela; Allen, Janet M.; Wilinska, Malgorzata E.; Evans, Mark L.; Hovorka, Roman; Doll, Werner; Ellmerer, Martin; Mader, Julia K.; Renard, Eric; Place, Jerome; Farret, Anne; Cobelli, Claudio; Del Favero, Simone; Dalla Man, Chiara; Avogaro, Angelo; Bruttomesso, Daniela; Filippi, Alessio; Scotton, Rachele; Magni, Lalo; Lanzola, Giordano; Di Palma, Federico; Soru, Paola; Toffanin, Chiara; De Nicolao, Giuseppe; Arnolds, Sabine; Benesch, Carsten; Heinemann, Lutz

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare two validated closed-loop (CL) algorithms versus patient self-control with CSII in terms of glycemic control. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This study was a multicenter, randomized, three-way crossover, open-label trial in 48 patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus for at least 6 months, treated with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion. Blood glucose was controlled for 23 h by the algorithm of the Universities of Pavia and Padova with a Safety Supervision Module developed at the Universities of Virginia and California at Santa Barbara (international artificial pancreas [iAP]), by the algorithm of University of Cambridge (CAM), or by patients themselves in open loop (OL) during three hospital admissions including meals and exercise. The main analysis was on an intention-to-treat basis. Main outcome measures included time spent in target (glucose levels between 3.9 and 8.0 mmol/L or between 3.9 and 10.0 mmol/L after meals). RESULTS Time spent in the target range was similar in CL and OL: 62.6% for OL, 59.2% for iAP, and 58.3% for CAM. While mean glucose level was significantly lower in OL (7.19, 8.15, and 8.26 mmol/L, respectively) (overall P = 0.001), percentage of time spent in hypoglycemia (<3.9 mmol/L) was almost threefold reduced during CL (6.4%, 2.1%, and 2.0%) (overall P = 0.001) with less time ≤2.8 mmol/L (overall P = 0.038). There were no significant differences in outcomes between algorithms. CONCLUSIONS Both CAM and iAP algorithms provide safe glycemic control. PMID:24170747

  6. Spontaneous complete remission of type 1 diabetes mellitus in an adult - review and case report.

    PubMed

    Moole, Harsha; Moole, Vishnu; Mamidipalli, Adrija; Dharmapuri, Sowmya; Boddireddy, Raghuveer; Taneja, Deepak; Sfeir, Hady; Gajula, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is an autoimmune condition that results in low plasma insulin levels by destruction of beta cells of the pancreas. As part of the natural progression of this disease, some patients regain beta cell activity transiently. This period is often referred to as the 'honeymoon period' or remission of T1DM. During this period, patients manifest improved glycemic control with reduced or no use of insulin or anti-diabetic medications. The incidence rates of remission and duration of remission is extremely variable. Various factors seem to influence the remission rates and duration. These include but are not limited to C-peptide level, serum bicarbonate level at the time of diagnosis, duration of T1DM symptoms, haemoglobin A1C (HbA1C) levels at the time of diagnosis, sex, and age of the patient. Mechanism of remission is not clearly understood. Extensive research is ongoing in regard to the possible prevention and reversal of T1DM. However, most of the studies that showed positive results were small and uncontrolled. We present a 32-year-old newly diagnosed T1DM patient who presented with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and HbA1C of 12.7%. She was on basal bolus insulin regimen for the first 4 months after diagnosis. Later, she stopped taking insulin and other anti-diabetic medications due to compliance and logistical issues. Eleven months after diagnosis, her HbA1C spontaneously improved to 5.6%. Currently (14 months after T1DM diagnosis), she is still in complete remission, not requiring insulin therapy. PMID:26486109

  7. Characterizing major depression phenotypes by presence and type of psychomotor disturbance in adolescents and young adults.

    PubMed

    Leventhal, Adam M; Pettit, Jeremy W; Lewinsohn, Peter M

    2008-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is phenomenologically heterogeneous, which has prompted investigation of intermediate MDD phenotypes based on specific key symptoms. Presence and type of psychomotor disturbance may be an important psychopathologic feature that differentiates clinically distinct forms of juvenile MDD. This study examined the phenotypic status of three putative MDD phenotypes in a community sample of 941 youths: (1) agitated depression (MDD with psychomotor agitation), (2) retarded depression (MDD with psychomotor retardation), and (3) agitated-retarded depression (MDD with psychomotor agitation and retardation within an episode). Hasler et al.'s [2004: Neuropsychopharmacology 29:1765-1781] criteria of specificity (degree of association with relevant symptoms and conditions related to the disease of interest versus other psychiatric conditions), stability (degree of stability over time), and heritability (degree of familial aggregation with relevant conditions) were used to evaluate the phenotypic significance of these subtypes. Results were suggestive that agitated depression was a relatively specific phenotypic syndrome characterized by irritability, arousal, physical complaints, and vulnerability to anxiety disorders and alcohol dependence; low stability across depressive episodes; and low heritability. Agitated-retarded depression was relatively specific and characterized by increased severity, recurrence, vegetative symptoms, suicidal ideation, social impairment, endogeneity, and vulnerability to anxiety disorders and bulimia; low stability across episodes; and modest heritability. Although retarded depression was associated with some specific distinguishing characteristics, most associations were explained by the increased severity of this phenotype. Retarded depression evidenced little stability or heritability. These findings offer partial support of the phenotypic status of agitated and agitated-retarded depression in youths. PMID:17385727

  8. Does type 1 diabetes alter post-exercise thermoregulatory and cardiovascular function in young adults?

    PubMed

    McGinn, R; Carter, M R; Barrera-Ramirez, J; Sigal, R J; Flouris, A D; Kenny, G P

    2015-10-01

    Recent data demonstrated that individuals with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) exhibit impaired sweating and increased rectal temperature (i.e., heat storage) during exercise compared with healthy controls. Our purpose in this study was to investigate the consequences of T1DM on post-exercise thermal homeostasis. Sixteen participants (eight controls matched with eight T1DM) performed 90 min of cycling followed by 60 min of seated recovery. Esophageal and rectal temperatures, sweating (forearm, chest, and upper back), skin blood flow [forearm and upper back, presented as cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC)], and blood pressure [mean arterial pressure (MAP)] were measured at baseline and throughout recovery. Esophageal temperature was similar during baseline and recovery between groups (P = 0.88). However, rectal temperature was elevated in our T1DM group throughout recovery (P = 0.05). Sweating and CVC were similar between groups at all sites from 10-min post-exercise until the end of recovery (P ≥ 0.16). While absolute MAP was similar between groups (P = 0.43), the overall decrease in MAP post-exercise was greater in controls from 20 min (T1DM: - 8 ± 5 vs control: - 13 ± 6 mmHg, P = 0.03) until the end of recovery. We conclude that despite increased heat storage during exercise, individuals with T1DM exhibit a suppression in heat loss similar to their healthy counterparts during recovery. PMID:25487370

  9. Depression among Korean Adults with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Ansan-Community-Based Epidemiological Study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chan Young; Kim, So Young; Gil, Jong Won; Park, Min Hee; Park, Jong-Hyock; Kim, Yeonjung

    2015-01-01

    Objectives There are an increasing number of studies being carried out on depression in patients with diabetes. Individuals with diabetes have been reported as having a higher prevalence of depression compared to those without diabetes. However, only a few studies involving Korean patients have been conducted. The aims of this study were to examine the prevalence of depression and to find various risk factors according to the degree of depression among Korean patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods An Ansan-community-based epidemiological study was conducted from 2005 to 2012. The total number of participants in this study was 3,540, from which patients with diabetes (n = 753) have been selected. The presence of depression was evaluated using the Beck Depression Inventory total score. Results The prevalence of depression was 28.8%. The mean age of participants was 55.5 ± 8.2 years. We divided the participants into three groups (without-depression, moderate-depression, and severe-depression groups) to examine the depression prevalence among Korean T2DM patients. The unemployed participants had 2.40 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.21–4.76], the low-income participants had 2.57 (95% CI 1.52–4.35), the participants using an oral diabetes medicine or insulin had 2.03 (95% CI 1.25–3.32), the participants who are currently smoking had 2.03 (95% CI 1.10–3.73), and those without regular exercise had 1.91 (95% CI 1.17–3.14) times higher odds of depression in the severe-depression group, compared with the without-depression group. Conclusion There was a significant association between depression prevalence and diabetes, and we found various risk factors according to the degree of depression in Korean patients with T2DM. PMID:26473089

  10. The Role of Mobile Applications in Improving Alcohol Health Literacy in Young Adults With Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Tamony, Peter; Holt, Richard; Barnard, Katharine

    2015-01-01

    Background: Mobile health (mHealth) is an expanding field which includes the use of social media and mobile applications (apps). Apps are used in diabetes self-management but it is unclear whether these are being used to support safe drinking of alcohol by people with type 1 diabetes (T1DM). Alcohol health literacy is poor among young adults with T1DM despite specific associated risks. Methods: Systematic literature review followed by critical appraisal of commercially available apps. An eSurvey investigating access to mHealth technology, attitudes toward apps for diabetes management and their use to improve alcohol health literacy was completed by participants. Results: Of 315 articles identified in the literature search, 7 met the inclusion criteria. Ten diabetes apps were available, most of which lacked the educational features recommended by clinical guidelines. In all, 27 women and 8 men with T1DM, aged 19-31 years were surveyed. Of them, 32 had access to a smartphone/tablet; 29 used apps; 20 used/had used diabetes apps; 3 had used apps related to alcohol and diabetes; 11 had discussed apps with their health care team; 22 felt more communication with their health care team would increase awareness of alcohol-associated risks. Conclusions: Use of mobile apps is commonplace but the use of apps to support safe drinking in this population was rare. Most participants expressed a preference for direct communication with their health care teams about this subject. Further research is needed to determine the preferences of health care professionals and how they can best support young adults in safe drinking. PMID:26251369

  11. Diabetes-Related Distress, Depression and Distress-Depression among Adults with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Chew, Boon-How; Vos, Rimke; Mohd-Sidik, Sherina; Rutten, Guy E. H. M.

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) brings about an increasing psychosocial problem in adult patients. Prevalence data on and associated factors of diabetes related distress (DRD) and depression have been lacking in Asia. This study aimed to examine the prevalence of DRD and depression, and their associated factors in Asian adult T2DM patients. This study was conducted in three public health clinics measuring DRD (Diabetes Distress Scale, DDS), and depression (Patient Health Questionnaire, PHQ). Patients who were at least 30 years of age, had T2DM for more than one year, with regular follow-up and recent laboratory results (< 3 months) were consecutively recruited. Associations between DRD, depression and the combination DRD-depression with demographic and clinical characteristics were analysed using generalized linear models. From 752 invited people, 700 participated (mean age 56.9 years, 52.8% female, 52.9% Malay, 79.1% married). Prevalence of DRD and depression were 49.2% and 41.7%, respectively. Distress and depression were correlated, spearman’s r = 0.50. Patients with higher DRD were younger (OR 0.995, 95% CI 0.996 to 0.991), Chinese (OR 1.2, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.29), attending Dengkil health clinic (OR 1.1, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.22) and had higher scores on the PHQ (OR 1.1, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.06). Depression was less likely in the unmarried compared to divorced/separately living and those attending Dengkil health clinic, but more likely in patients with microvascular complications (OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.73) and higher DDS (OR 1.03, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.03). For the combination of DRD and depression, unemployment (OR 4.7, 95% CI 1.02 to 21.20) had positive association, whereas those under medical care at the Salak health clinics (OR 0.28, 95% CI 0.12 to 0.63), and those with a blood pressure > 130/80 mmHg (OR 0.53, 95% CI 0.32 to 0.89) were less likely to experience both DRD and depression. DRD and depression were common and correlated in Asian adults with T2DM at primary

  12. Nutritional Education Through Internet-Delivered Menu Plans Among Adults With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Bader, Abeer; Gougeon, Réjeanne; Joseph, Lawrence; Da Costa, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Background A potential barrier to weight loss and vascular risk reduction is difficulty in operationalizing dietary education into a concrete plan. Although a variety of Internet-based software tools are now available to address this issue, there has been little formal evaluation of these tools. Objective The aim of this single-arm pilot study is to determine the effect of a 24-week Internet-based menu-planning program, by examining pre- to postintervention changes in the body weight, blood pressure, and glycemia, specifically among overweight adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2), a clinical population at high risk for vascular diseases. Methods A total of 33 adults with DM2 were recruited by collaborating registered dietitians to a 24-week Internet-based menu-planning program. Individualized dietary prescriptions were operationalized into weekly Internet-delivered menu plans through an adapted version of a commercially available service. Adherence was defined as logging into the program at least once per week for a minimum of 18 of the 24 weeks. Multiple imputations were used for missing data. Using baseline and postintervention assessments, we calculated the weight changes (mean, 95% CI) and investigated the corresponding effects (linear regression models) on blood pressure (systolic, diastolic) and hemoglobin A1C (ie, glycemia). Results The mean age was 58 (SD 7) years and the mean baseline body mass index was 34.4 (SD 4.6) kg/m2. The results of this study showed that ≥5% weight reduction was achieved by 6/33 participants (18%) and by 5/18 adherent participants (28%). A mean weight change of −2.0% (95% CI −2.6 to −1.4) was observed, with changes occurring in the adherent (−3.6%, 95% CI −4.5 to −2.8) but not in the nonadherent (0%, 95% CI −0.6 to 0.7). It was found that each 1% reduction in body weight was associated with a −2.4 mmHg change in systolic (95% CI −3.5 to −1.2) and a −0.8 mmHg change in diastolic blood pressure (95% CI

  13. Diabetes-Related Distress, Depression and Distress-Depression among Adults with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Chew, Boon-How; Vos, Rimke; Mohd-Sidik, Sherina; Rutten, Guy E H M

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) brings about an increasing psychosocial problem in adult patients. Prevalence data on and associated factors of diabetes related distress (DRD) and depression have been lacking in Asia. This study aimed to examine the prevalence of DRD and depression, and their associated factors in Asian adult T2DM patients. This study was conducted in three public health clinics measuring DRD (Diabetes Distress Scale, DDS), and depression (Patient Health Questionnaire, PHQ). Patients who were at least 30 years of age, had T2DM for more than one year, with regular follow-up and recent laboratory results (< 3 months) were consecutively recruited. Associations between DRD, depression and the combination DRD-depression with demographic and clinical characteristics were analysed using generalized linear models. From 752 invited people, 700 participated (mean age 56.9 years, 52.8% female, 52.9% Malay, 79.1% married). Prevalence of DRD and depression were 49.2% and 41.7%, respectively. Distress and depression were correlated, spearman's r = 0.50. Patients with higher DRD were younger (OR 0.995, 95% CI 0.996 to 0.991), Chinese (OR 1.2, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.29), attending Dengkil health clinic (OR 1.1, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.22) and had higher scores on the PHQ (OR 1.1, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.06). Depression was less likely in the unmarried compared to divorced/separately living and those attending Dengkil health clinic, but more likely in patients with microvascular complications (OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.73) and higher DDS (OR 1.03, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.03). For the combination of DRD and depression, unemployment (OR 4.7, 95% CI 1.02 to 21.20) had positive association, whereas those under medical care at the Salak health clinics (OR 0.28, 95% CI 0.12 to 0.63), and those with a blood pressure > 130/80 mmHg (OR 0.53, 95% CI 0.32 to 0.89) were less likely to experience both DRD and depression. DRD and depression were common and correlated in Asian adults with T2DM at primary

  14. Diabetes-related nutrition knowledge and dietary intake among adults with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Breen, Cathy; Ryan, Miriam; Gibney, Michael J; O'Shea, Donal

    2015-08-14

    Nutrition knowledge and skills enable individuals with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) to make food choices that optimise metabolic self-management and quality of life. The present study examined the relationship between nutrition knowledge and skills, and nutrient intake in T2DM. A cross-sectional analysis of diabetes-related nutrition knowledge and nutrient intake was conducted in 124 T2DM individuals managed in usual care (64% male, age 57.4 (sd 5.6) years, BMI 32.5 (sd 5.8) kg/m2), using the Audit of Diabetes Knowledge (ADKnowl) questionnaire and a 4 d food diary. Data on sociodemographic characteristics, food label use and weight management were also collected. The average ADKnowl dietary subscale score was 59.2 (sd 16.4) %. Knowledge deficits relating to the impact of macronutrients/foods on blood glucose and lipids were identified. Lower diabetes-related nutrition knowledge was associated with lower intakes of sugar (10.8 (sd 4.7) v. 13.7 (sd 4.6) % for lower dietary knowledge score v. higher dietary knowledge score, P< 0.001), non-milk sugar (9.1 (sd 4.8) v. 12.1 (sd 4.7) % for lower dietary knowledge score v. higher dietary knowledge score, P< 0.001) and fruit/vegetables (230.8 (sd 175.1) v. 322.8 (sd 179.7) g for lower dietary knowledge score v. higher dietary knowledge score, P< 0.001), and higher dietary glycaemic index (GI) (61.4 (sd 4.5) v. 58.4 (sd 4.6) for lower dietary knowledge score v. higher dietary knowledge score, P< 0.002). The majority of the participants were dissatisfied with their weight. Sugar was the most frequently checked nutrient on food labels (59%), with only 12.1% checking foods for their energy content. Significant knowledge and skill deficits, associated with the impact of macronutrients/foods on metabolic parameters and food label use, were found. Lower diabetes-related nutrition knowledge was associated with lower sugar and fruit/vegetable intake and higher dietary GI. Dietary education, integrated throughout the lifespan of T2DM, may

  15. Comparison of adherence and persistence among adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus initiating saxagliptin or linagliptin

    PubMed Central

    Farr, Amanda M; Sheehan, John J; Davis, Brian M; Smith, David M

    2016-01-01

    Background Adherence and persistence to antidiabetes medications are important to control blood glucose levels among individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D). Objectives The objective of this study was to compare adherence and persistence over a 12-month period between patients initiating saxagliptin and patients initiating linagliptin, two dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors. Methods This retrospective cohort study was conducted in MarketScan® Commercial and Medicare Supplemental claims databases. Patients with T2D initiating saxagliptin or linagliptin between January 1, 2009, and June 30, 2013, were selected. Patients were required to be at least 18 years old and have 12 months of continuous enrollment prior to and following initiation. Adherence and persistence to initiated medication were measured over the 12 months after initiation using outpatient pharmacy claims. Patients were considered adherent if the proportion of days covered was ≥0.80. Patients were considered nonpersistent (or to have discontinued) if there was a gap of >60 days without initiated medication on hand. Multivariable logistic regression and multivariable Cox proportional hazard models were fit to compare adherence and persistence, respectively, between the two cohorts. Results There were 21,599 saxagliptin initiators (mean age 55 years; 53% male) and 5,786 linagliptin initiators (mean age 57 years; 54% male) included in the study sample. Over the 12-month follow-up, 46% of saxagliptin initiators and 42% of linagliptin initiators were considered adherent and 47% of saxagliptin initiators and 51% of linagliptin initiators discontinued their initiated medication. After controlling for patient characteristics, saxagliptin initiation was associated with significantly greater odds of being adherent (adjusted odds ratio =1.212, 95% CI 1.140–1.289) and significantly lower hazards of discontinuation (adjusted hazard ratio =0.887, 95% CI 0.850–0.926) compared with linagliptin initiation

  16. Adult stem cell maintenance and tissue regeneration in the ageing context: the role for A-type lamins as intrinsic modulators of ageing in adult stem cells and their niches

    PubMed Central

    Pekovic, Vanja; Hutchison, Christopher J

    2008-01-01

    Adult stem cells have been identified in most mammalian tissues of the adult body and are known to support the continuous repair and regeneration of tissues. A generalized decline in tissue regenerative responses associated with age is believed to result from a depletion and/or a loss of function of adult stem cells, which itself may be a driving cause of many age-related disease pathologies. Here we review the striking similarities between tissue phenotypes seen in many degenerative conditions associated with old age and those reported in age-related nuclear envelope disorders caused by mutations in the LMNA gene. The concept is beginning to emerge that nuclear filament proteins, A-type lamins, may act as signalling receptors in the nucleus required for receiving and/or transducing upstream cytosolic signals in a number of pathways central to adult stem cell maintenance as well as adaptive responses to stress. We propose that during ageing and in diseases caused by lamin A mutations, dysfunction of the A-type lamin stress-resistant signalling network in adult stem cells, their progenitors and/or stem cell niches leads to a loss of protection against growth-related stress. This in turn triggers an inappropriate activation or a complete failure of self-renewal pathways with the consequent initiation of stress-induced senescence. As such, A-type lamins should be regarded as intrinsic modulators of ageing within adult stem cells and their niches that are essential for survival to old age. PMID:18638067

  17. An inulin-type fructan enhances calcium absorption in young adults throughout the GI tract with the largest effect occurring in the colon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium absorption efficiency and bone mineral mass are increased in adolescents who receive inulin-type fructans (ITF). The mechanism of action is unknown, but in animal models appears to be related to increased colonic calcium absorption. We conducted a calcium kinetic study in young adults after...

  18. Relationship between neuropsychological impairment and grey and white matter changes in adult-onset myotonic dystrophy type 1.

    PubMed

    Baldanzi, Sigrid; Cecchi, Paolo; Fabbri, Serena; Pesaresi, Ilaria; Simoncini, Costanza; Angelini, Corrado; Bonuccelli, Ubaldo; Cosottini, Mirco; Siciliano, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) has a wide phenotypic spectrum and potentially may affect central nervous system with mild to severe involvement. Our aim was to investigate grey matter (GM) and white matter (WM) structural alterations in a sample of adult-onset DM1 patients and to evaluate relationship with clinical and cognitive variables. Thirty DM1 patients underwent neuropsychological investigation and 3T-MRI protocol. GM and WM changes were evaluated calculating brain parenchymal fraction (BPF), voxel-based morphometry (VBM), white matter lesion load (LL% and Fazekas scale) and tract based spatial statistical (TBSS). Patients showed main impairment in tests exploring executive and mnesic domains with visuo-spatial involvement, significantly related to BPF. VBM revealed clusters of widespread GM reduction and TBSS revealed areas of decreased fractional anisotropy (FA) and increased radial diffusivity (RD), mean diffusivity (MD) and axial diffusivity (AD) in patients compared to a group of matched healthy controls. Multiple regression analyses showed areas of significant negative relationship between left temporal atrophy and verbal memory, between RD and mnesic and visuo-spatial cognitive domains, and between AD and verbal memory. TBSS results indicate that the involvement of normal appearance WM, beyond the signal changes detected with conventional MR imaging (Fazekas scale and LL%), was associated with neuropsychological deficit. These data suggest that disrupted complex neuronal networks can underlie cognitive-behavioural dysfunctions in DM1. PMID:27437180

  19. On "impact of surface type, wheelchair weight, and axle position on wheelchair propulsion by novice older adults".

    PubMed

    Sprigle, Stephen

    2009-07-01

    The mechanical efficiency of propelling manual wheelchairs is a very important topic. Wheelchair users, clinicians, manufacturers and payers would all benefit from better understanding of mechanical efficiency. However, the measurement of the mechanical efficiency is a nontrivial challenge. Cowan et al deserve a lot of credit for tackling such a difficult problem in their article "Impact of surface type, wheelchair weight, and axle position on wheelchair propulsion by novice older adults." The study demonstrated good internal validity in detecting a 4% difference in peak propulsion forces in wheelchairs that differed in mass by 9.1 kg. However, the instrumentation used to measure forces altered both the mass and inertia of the wheelchair-occupant system--2 factors that directly affect system energy. This approach, therefore, affects external validity, and the results cannot be extended to infer differences across wheelchair codes. That said, this study adds important information to the body of work into mechanical efficiency of wheelchairs. We now have evidence to suggest that addition of 9 kg and an 8 cm posterior displacement of axle position adversely affects propulsion biomechanics in an elderly cohort. Improved methodology can lead to mechanical efficiency measurement of different wheelchair models and different wheelchair options. PMID:19577018

  20. Types, Risk Factors, Clinical symptoms and Diagnostic Tests of Acute Adult Meningitis in Northern Iran During 2006-2012

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri-Nesami, Masoumeh; Babamahmoodi, Farhang

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute bacterial meningitis is a medical emergency condition that requires prompt diagnosis and treatment and otherwise associated with serious morbidity and mortality. Aim The aim of this study was to assess types, risk factors, clinical symptoms and diagnostic tests of meningitis in hospitalized patients of Mazandaran University of medical sciences hospitals during 2006-2012. Matherials and Methods This is a retrospective descriptive study. Following approval of the ethics committee of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, records of adult patients diagnosed with acute meningitis from 2006 to 2012 were extracted from Mazandaran Provincial Health Center and patients attending hospitals affiliated to Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences. Statistical Analysis Data were analyzed with SPSS-16 using descriptive statistics (frequency, mean, standard deviation, and median). Results In this study, of the 137 patients with meningitis, 73 (53.9%) were viral, 61 (46%) bacterial, 1 (0.7%) fungal, and 2 (1.4%) unknown. The majority of risk factors in patients were head trauma, upper respiratory infection, and drug addiction. The most common clinical signs were headache, fever, nausea and vomiting, and stiff neck. Conclusion In this study, the incidence of meningitis was much lower than any other country. It could be due to geographic variation or incomplete recording of patient's data. It is recommended to perform a longitudinal study during the coming years on patients with meningitis. PMID:26155497

  1. Mouse Models of Human T Lymphotropic Virus Type-1–Associated Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, B.; Niewiesk, S.; Lairmore, M. D.

    2011-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1), the first human retrovirus discovered, is the causative agent of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) and a number of lymphocyte-mediated inflammatory conditions including HTLV-1–associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. Development of animal models to study the pathogenesis of HTLV-1–associated diseases has been problematic. Mechanisms of early infection and cell-to-cell transmission can be studied in rabbits and nonhuman primates, but lesion development and reagents are limited in these species. The mouse provides a cost-effective, highly reproducible model in which to study factors related to lymphoma development and the preclinical efficacy of potential therapies against ATL. The ability to manipulate transgenic mice has provided important insight into viral genes responsible for lymphocyte transformation. Expansion of various strains of immunodeficient mice has accelerated the testing of drugs and targeted therapy against ATL. This review compares various mouse models to illustrate recent advances in the understanding of HTLV-1–associated ATL development and how improvements in these models are critical to the future development of targeted therapies against this aggressive T-cell lymphoma. PMID:20442421

  2. Declined plasma sfrp5 concentration in patients with type 2 diabetes and latent autoimmune diabetes in adults

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Liqing; Zhang, Dongmei; Chen, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Secreted frizzled-related protein 5 (sfrp5), like adiponectin, has been identified as a novel insulin-sensitising and anti-inflammatory adipokine. Our objective was to determine whether differences of circulating plasma sfrp5 concentration exist among type 2 diabetes (T2D), latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) and healthy population. Methods: Enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay was employed to detect the circulating sfrp5 level in plasma, and other lab tests such as fasting glucose and creatinine were also examined. Correlation analysis between sfrp5 and characteristics of subjects was conducted IBM SPSS Statistics and GraphPad Prism. Results: Circulating sfrp5 level was significantly decreased in T2D and LADA patients plasma compared with that in healthy control (14.14±11.91ng/mL, 14.82±11.27ng/mL, 22.98±12.36ng/mL, respectively), although no differences was observed between LADA and T2D groups. Furthermore, we found sfrp5 was correlated with homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), diabetes duration and BMI. Finally we found sfrp5 was still negatively correlated with HOMA-IR after being adjusted for disease duration and BMI(r= -0.315, P< 0.05). Conclusions: Our results support a role for SFRP5 as a protective factor in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diabetes and facilitate a novel aspect for diabetes research. PMID:26150852

  3. Effects of meal type on the oral bioavailability of the ALK inhibitor ceritinib in healthy adult subjects.

    PubMed

    Lau, Yvonne Y; Gu, Wen; Lin, Tiffany; Song, Dongweon; Yu, Richard; Scott, Jeffrey W

    2016-05-01

    Ceritinib is a potent inhibitor of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), which has shown acceptable safety and substantial antitumor activity in ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Two food-effect studies were conducted in healthy adults to investigate the influence of food on the oral bioavailability of ceritinib: a study with low- or high-fat meals at 500 mg and a study with a light snack at 750 mg. Compared with the fasted state, AUC0-∞ (90%CI) of ceritinib was increased by 58% (34%, 86%) after the intake of a low-fat meal, by 73% (46%, 105%) after the intake of a high-fat meal, and by 54% (19%, 99%) after the intake of a light snack. Safety assessments also suggested that food may improve gastrointestinal (GI) tolerability after a single ceritinib dose. Based on the pharmacokinetic results, it is essential to avoid any type of meal during dosing of ceritinib because the intake of food may increase the occurrence of exposure-dependent, non-GI toxicities at the labeled dose of 750 mg daily during fasting. A randomized trial is ongoing to determine an alternative way to give ceritinib (450 mg or 600 mg with food) that may enhance GI tolerability in ALK-positive NSCLC patients. PMID:26272586

  4. Goal difficulty and goal commitment affect adoption of a lower glycemic index diet in adults with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Carla K.; Headings, Amy; Peyrot, Mark; Nagaraja, Haikady

    2013-01-01

    Objective Few studies have examined the effect of goal difficulty on behavioral change even though goal setting is widely used in diabetes education. The effect of a goal to consume either 6 or 8 servings/day of low glycemic index (LGI) foods was evaluated in this study. Methods Adults 40–65 years old with type 2 diabetes were randomly assigned to the 6 or 8 serving/day treatment group following a 5-week GI intervention. Perceived goal difficulty, commitment, satisfaction, and self-efficacy were evaluated, and four day food records assessed dietary intake. Results Both groups increased consumption of LGI foods (P < 0.001); there were no significant differences in the change in consumption between groups. Participants who were more committed to the goal perceived the goal to be less difficult (P < 0.01). Those with greater efficacy beliefs were more committed to their goal, perceived the goal to be less difficult, and were more satisfied with their performance (all P < 0.05). Conclusion A specific goal regarding LGI foods can facilitate the adoption of a lower GI diet. Future research is needed to determine if goal commitment or goal difficulty mediate the process. Practice implications Clinicians should help clients set specific goals regarding dietary change. PMID:21497479

  5. Food Intake and Dietary Glycaemic Index in Free-Living Adults with and without Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    McGeoch, Susan C.; Holtrop, Grietje; Fyfe, Claire; Lobley, Gerald E.; Pearson, Donald W. M.; Abraham, Prakash; Megson, Ian L.; MacRury, Sandra M.; Johnstone, Alexandra M.

    2011-01-01

    A recent Cochrane review concluded that low glycaemic index (GI) diets are beneficial in glycaemic control for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). There are limited UK data regarding the dietary GI in free-living adults with and without T2DM. We measured the energy and macronutrient intake and the dietary GI in a group (n = 19) of individuals with diet controlled T2DM and a group (n = 19) without diabetes, matched for age, BMI and gender. Subjects completed a three-day weighed dietary record. Patients with T2DM consumed more daily portions of wholegrains (2.3 vs. 1.1, P = 0.003), more dietary fibre (32.1 vs. 20.9 g, P < 0.001) and had a lower diet GI (53.5 vs. 57.7, P = 0.009) than subjects without T2DM. Both groups had elevated fat and salt intake and low fruit and vegetable intake, relative to current UK recommendations. Conclusions: Patients with T2DM may already consume a lower GI diet than the general population but further efforts are needed to reduce dietary GI and achieve other nutrient targets. PMID:22254116

  6. Distinct Luminal-Type Mammary Carcinomas Arise from Orthotopic Trp53-Null Mammary Transplantation of Juvenile versus Adult Mice

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Nguyen, David H.; Ouyang, Haoxu; Mao, Jian-Hua; Hlatky, Lynn; Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.

    2014-12-01

    Age and physiologic status, such as menopause, are risk factors for breast cancer. Less clear is what factors influence the diversity of breast cancer. In this study, we investigated the effect of host age on the distribution of tumor subtypes in mouse mammary chimera consisting of wild-type hosts and Trp53 nullizygous epithelium, which undergoes a high rate of neoplastic transformation. Wild-type mammary glands cleared of endogenous epithelium at 3 weeks of age were subsequently transplanted during puberty (5 weeks) or at maturation (10 weeks) with syngeneic Trp53-null mammary tissue fragments and monitored for one year. Tumors arose sooner from adultmore » hosts (AH) compared with juvenile hosts (JH). However, compared with AH tumors, JH tumors grew several times faster, were more perfused, exhibited a two-fold higher mitotic index, and were more highly positive for insulin-like growth factor receptor phosphorylation. Most tumors in each setting were estrogen receptor (ER)-positive (80% JH vs. 70% AH), but JH tumors were significantly more ER-immunoreactive (P = 0.0001) than AH tumors. A differential expression signature (JvA) of juvenile versus adult tumors revealed a luminal transcriptional program. Centroids of the human homologs of JvA genes showed that JH tumors were more like luminal A tumors and AH tumors were more like luminal B tumors. Hierarchical clustering with the JvA human ortholog gene list segregated luminal A and luminal B breast cancers across datasets. Lastly, these data support the notion that age-associated host physiology greatly influences the intrinsic subtype of breast cancer.« less

  7. The Health Impact of Symptomatic Adult Spinal Deformity: Comparison of Deformity Types to United States Population Norms and Chronic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bess, Shay; Line, Breton; Fu, Kai-Ming; McCarthy, Ian; Lafage, Virgine; Schwab, Frank; Shaffrey, Christopher; Ames, Christopher; Akbarnia, Behrooz; Jo, Han; Kelly, Michael; Burton, Douglas; Hart, Robert; Klineberg, Eric; Kebaish, Khaled; Hostin, Richard; Mundis, Gregory; Mummaneni, Praveen; Smith, Justin S.

    2016-01-01

    Study Design. A retrospective analysis of a prospective, multicenter database. Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the health impact of symptomatic adult spinal deformity (SASD) by comparing Standard Form Version 2 (SF-36) scores for SASD with United States normative and chronic disease values. Summary of Background Data. Recent data have identified radiographic parameters correlating with poor health-related quality of life for SASD. Disability comparisons between SASD patients and patients with chronic diseases may provide further insight to the disease burden caused by SASD. Methods. Consecutive SASD patients, with no history of spine surgery, were enrolled into a multicenter database and evaluated for type and severity of spinal deformity. Baseline SF-36 physical component summary (PCS) and mental component summary (MCS) values for SASD patients were compared with reported U.S. normative and chronic disease SF-36 scores. SF-36 scores were reported as normative-based scores (NBS) and evaluated for minimally clinical important difference (MCID). Results. Between 2008 and 2011, 497 SASD patients were prospectively enrolled and evaluated. Mean PCS for all SASD was lower than U.S. total population (ASD = 40.9; US = 50; P < 0.05). Generational decline in PCS for SASD patients with no other reported comorbidities was more rapid than U.S. norms (P < 0.05). PCS worsened with lumbar scoliosis and increasing sagittal vertical axis (SVA). PCS scores for patients with isolated thoracic scoliosis were similar to values reported by individuals with chronic back pain (45.5 vs 45.7, respectively; P > 0.05), whereas patients with lumbar scoliosis combined with severe sagittal malalignment (SVA >10 cm) demonstrated worse PCS scores than values reported by patients with limited use of arms and legs (24.7 vs 29.1, respectively; P < 0.05). Conclusions. SASD is a heterogeneous condition that, depending upon the type and severity of the deformity

  8. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker telmisartan induces apoptosis and autophagy in adult T-cell leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Kozako, Tomohiro; Soeda, Shuhei; Yoshimitsu, Makoto; Arima, Naomichi; Kuroki, Ayako; Hirata, Shinya; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Imakyure, Osamu; Tone, Nanako; Honda, Shin-Ichiro; Soeda, Shinji

    2016-05-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL), an aggressive T-cell malignancy that develops after long-term infection with human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV-1), requires new treatments. Drug repositioning, reuse of a drug previously approved for the treatment of another condition to treat ATL, offers the possibility of reduced time and risk. Among clinically available angiotensin II receptor blockers, telmisartan is well known for its unique ability to activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ, which plays various roles in lipid metabolism, cellular differentiation, and apoptosis. Here, telmisartan reduced cell viability and enhanced apoptotic cells via caspase activation in ex vivo peripheral blood monocytes from asymptomatic HTLV-1 carriers (ACs) or via caspase-independent cell death in acute-type ATL, which has a poor prognosis. Telmisartan also induced significant growth inhibition and apoptosis in leukemia cell lines via caspase activation, whereas other angiotensin II receptor blockers did not induce cell death. Interestingly, telmisartan increased the LC3-II-enriched protein fraction, indicating autophagosome accumulation and autophagy. Thus, telmisartan simultaneously caused caspase activation and autophagy. A hypertension medication with antiproliferation effects on primary and leukemia cells is intriguing. Patients with an early diagnosis of ATL are generally monitored until the disease progresses; thus, suppression of progression from AC and indolent ATL to acute ATL is important. Our results suggest that telmisartan is highly effective against primary cells and leukemia cell lines in caspase-dependent and -independent manners, and its clinical use may suppress acute transformation and improve prognosis of patients with this mortal disease. This is the first report demonstrating a cell growth-inhibitory effect of telmisartan in fresh peripheral blood mononuclear cells from leukemia patients. PMID:27419050

  9. Sequence type 1 group B Streptococcus, an emerging cause of invasive disease in adults, evolves by small genetic changes.

    PubMed

    Flores, Anthony R; Galloway-Peña, Jessica; Sahasrabhojane, Pranoti; Saldaña, Miguel; Yao, Hui; Su, Xiaoping; Ajami, Nadim J; Holder, Michael E; Petrosino, Joseph F; Thompson, Erika; Margarit Y Ros, Immaculada; Rosini, Roberto; Grandi, Guido; Horstmann, Nicola; Teatero, Sarah; McGeer, Allison; Fittipaldi, Nahuel; Rappuoli, Rino; Baker, Carol J; Shelburne, Samuel A

    2015-05-19

    The molecular mechanisms underlying pathogen emergence in humans is a critical but poorly understood area of microbiologic investigation. Serotype V group B Streptococcus (GBS) was first isolated from humans in 1975, and rates of invasive serotype V GBS disease significantly increased starting in the early 1990s. We found that 210 of 229 serotype V GBS strains (92%) isolated from the bloodstream of nonpregnant adults in the United States and Canada between 1992 and 2013 were multilocus sequence type (ST) 1. Elucidation of the complete genome of a 1992 ST-1 strain revealed that this strain had the highest homology with a GBS strain causing cow mastitis and that the 1992 ST-1 strain differed from serotype V strains isolated in the late 1970s by acquisition of cell surface proteins and antimicrobial resistance determinants. Whole-genome comparison of 202 invasive ST-1 strains detected significant recombination in only eight strains. The remaining 194 strains differed by an average of 97 SNPs. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a temporally dependent mode of genetic diversification consistent with the emergence in the 1990s of ST-1 GBS as major agents of human disease. Thirty-one loci were identified as being under positive selective pressure, and mutations at loci encoding polysaccharide capsule production proteins, regulators of pilus expression, and two-component gene regulatory systems were shown to affect the bacterial phenotype. These data reveal that phenotypic diversity among ST-1 GBS is mainly driven by small genetic changes rather than extensive recombination, thereby extending knowledge into how pathogens adapt to humans. PMID:25941374

  10. Evaluation of a novel delayed-type hypersensitivity assay to Candida albicans in adult and neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Thorn, Mitchell; Hudson, Adam W; Kreeger, John; Kawabe, Thomas T; Bowman, Christopher J; Collinge, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) is a T-cell-mediated immune response that may be used for immunotoxicity testing in non-clinical species. However, in some cases DTH assays using T-dependent antigens may be confounded by the production of antibodies to the antigen. The authors have previously modified a DTH assay, initially validated in the mouse, for use in juvenile rats to assess the effect of immunosuppressive drugs on the developing rat immune system. The assay measures footpad swelling induced by subcutaneous footpad injection of Candida albicans (C. albicans) derived-chitosan in rats previously sensitized with C. albicans. Antibodies to chitosan are not produced in this model. However, considerable inter-animal variability inherent in the footpad swelling assay can make it difficult to precisely quantify the magnitude of the immune response and inhibition by immunosuppressants, particularly if complete suppression is not observed. This report describes the development of an ex vivo assay to assess DTH in rats using interferon (IFN)-γ production by splenocytes, obtained from rats sensitized with C. albicans, as the quantifiable measure of the DTH response. Adult and neonatal rats administered dexamethasone (DEX), a known immunosuppressant, exhibited immunosuppression as evidenced by a reduction in ex vivo IFNγ production from splenocytes challenged with C. albicans-derived chitosan. Current data indicate that the ex vivo based DTH assay is more sensitive than the conventional footpad swelling assay due to a lower background response and the ability to detect a response as early as post-natal day (PND) 12. The ex vivo based rat DTH assay offers a highly sensitive and quantitative alternative to the footpad swelling assay for the assessment of the immunotoxic potential of drugs. The increased sensitivity of the ex vivo DTH assay may be useful for identifying smaller changes in response to immunotoxic drugs, as well as detecting responses earlier in animal

  11. Knowledge, assessment, and management of adults with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type among Flemish physiotherapists.

    PubMed

    Rombaut, Lies; Deane, Janet; Simmonds, Jane; De Wandele, Inge; De Paepe, Anne; Malfait, Fransiska; Calders, Patrick

    2015-03-01

    Physiotherapy plays a fundamental role in managing adults with the joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT). However, it is a challenge for both the patient and the physiotherapist as the condition is poorly understood and treatment for JHS/EDS-HT is currently undefined. Insight into current practice is, therefore, necessary in order to establish baseline knowledge in this area and in the long term to improve the standard of patient care. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate current physiotherapists' knowledge of JHS/EDS-HT and to gain insight into current physiotherapy practice with emphasis on assessment, management, and treatment efficacy. Three hundred twenty-five Flemish physiotherapists participated in the study by filling out electronically a modified version of the "Hypermobility and Hypermobility Syndrome Questionnaire" (HHQ), which covered theoretical constructs such as general knowledge, assessment, management, and learning in relation to generalized joint hypermobility and JHS/EDS-HT. The results show that physiotherapists report a low level of confidence with regard to assessment and management of JHS/EDS-HT. Knowledge of hypermobility and JHS/EDS-HT is weak, especially regarding the features associated with JHS/EDS-HT. Many treatment approaches are used by physiotherapists with the majority showing preference for education, reassurance, muscle strengthening, proprioceptive and core stability training. Almost all approaches were perceived as being clinically effective by the physiotherapists, highlighting a lack of consensus. In conclusion, this study in Flemish physiotherapists confirms that JHS/EDS-HT is under-recognized, not well known and deemed difficult to treat. Further education is required and sought by the physiotherapists surveyed, and future research is needed. PMID:25821093

  12. Sequence type 1 group B Streptococcus, an emerging cause of invasive disease in adults, evolves by small genetic changes

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Anthony R.; Galloway-Peña, Jessica; Sahasrabhojane, Pranoti; Saldaña, Miguel; Yao, Hui; Su, Xiaoping; Ajami, Nadim J.; Holder, Michael E.; Petrosino, Joseph F.; Thompson, Erika; Margarit Y Ros, Immaculada; Rosini, Roberto; Grandi, Guido; Horstmann, Nicola; Teatero, Sarah; McGeer, Allison; Fittipaldi, Nahuel; Rappuoli, Rino; Baker, Carol J.; Shelburne, Samuel A.

    2015-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying pathogen emergence in humans is a critical but poorly understood area of microbiologic investigation. Serotype V group B Streptococcus (GBS) was first isolated from humans in 1975, and rates of invasive serotype V GBS disease significantly increased starting in the early 1990s. We found that 210 of 229 serotype V GBS strains (92%) isolated from the bloodstream of nonpregnant adults in the United States and Canada between 1992 and 2013 were multilocus sequence type (ST) 1. Elucidation of the complete genome of a 1992 ST-1 strain revealed that this strain had the highest homology with a GBS strain causing cow mastitis and that the 1992 ST-1 strain differed from serotype V strains isolated in the late 1970s by acquisition of cell surface proteins and antimicrobial resistance determinants. Whole-genome comparison of 202 invasive ST-1 strains detected significant recombination in only eight strains. The remaining 194 strains differed by an average of 97 SNPs. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a temporally dependent mode of genetic diversification consistent with the emergence in the 1990s of ST-1 GBS as major agents of human disease. Thirty-one loci were identified as being under positive selective pressure, and mutations at loci encoding polysaccharide capsule production proteins, regulators of pilus expression, and two-component gene regulatory systems were shown to affect the bacterial phenotype. These data reveal that phenotypic diversity among ST-1 GBS is mainly driven by small genetic changes rather than extensive recombination, thereby extending knowledge into how pathogens adapt to humans. PMID:25941374

  13. ‘I'm not a druggie, I'm just a diabetic’: a qualitative study of stigma from the perspective of adults with type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Browne, Jessica L; Ventura, Adriana; Mosely, Kylie; Speight, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Objectives While health-related stigma has been the subject of considerable research in other conditions (eg, HIV/AIDS, obesity), it has not received substantial attention in diabetes. Our aim was to explore perceptions and experiences of diabetes-related stigma from the perspective of adults with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Design A qualitative study using semistructured interviews, which were audio recorded, transcribed and subject to thematic analysis. Setting All interviews were conducted in non-clinical settings in metropolitan areas of Victoria, Australia. Participants Adults aged ≥18 years with T1DM living in Victoria were eligible to take part. Participants were recruited primarily through the state consumer organisation representing people with diabetes. A total of 27 adults with T1DM took part: 15 (56%) were women; median IQR age was 42 (23) years and diabetes duration was 15 (20) years). Results Australian adults with T1DM perceive and experience T1DM-specific stigma as well as stigma-by-association with type 2 diabetes. Such stigma is characterised by blame, negative social judgement, stereotyping, exclusion, rejection and discrimination. Participants identified the media, family and friends, healthcare professionals and school teachers as sources of stigma. The negative consequences of this stigma span numerous life domains, including impact on relationships and social identity, emotional well-being and behavioural management of T1DM. This stigma also led to reluctance to disclose the condition in various environments. Adults with T1DM can be both the target and the source of diabetes-related stigma. Conclusions Stigmatisation is part of the social experience of living with T1DM for Australian adults. Strategies and interventions to address and mitigate this diabetes-related stigma need to be developed and evaluated. PMID:25056982

  14. Metabolic, Anthropometric, and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Related Risk Factors in Normal and Pre-Diabetic Adults.

    PubMed

    Al-Thani, Mohamed H; Nasser, Heba S; Sayegh, Suzan; Haddad, Alexandra; Sadoun, Eman

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a major global health problem. The present study examines the relationship between the metabolic, anthropometric and Finnish risk score (FINDRISC) among normal and pre-diabetic adults. Subjects (n = 1319, aged above 18 years) from the Qatari population were classified into two groups based on their hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) measurements (non-diabetic A1c<5.6% and pre-diabetic 5.6% ≤ A1c ≤ 6.4%) were examined for their anthropometric (height, weight and waist circumference), metabolic [fat, fat free mass (FFM), muscle mass (MM), total body water (TBW), bone mass, degree of obesity, basal metabolic rate (BMR), body mass index (BMI), metabolic age, visceral fat rating, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), total cholesterol (Total-C), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), triglycerides (TG), fasting / random plasma glucose (FPG / RPG), HbA1c and vitamin D (VitD)] and FINDRISC. Means and frequencies were determined in aggregate and by subgroups for all variables and correlations between categorical variables were tested to estimate the association between the anthropometric and metabolic risk factors with the FINDRISC. A percentage of 74.8% (n = 987) of the study population aged below 45 years old and their overall BMI was 28.8±5.2kg/m2 (overweight). Pre-diabetic subgroup have shown a statistically higher FINDRISC compared to their non-diabetic counterparts (11.2±4.1 vs. 9.8±4, p<0.001). The FINDRISC was significantly and directly correlated with the BMI, HbA1c and FPG. However, HbA1c was correlated directly with BMI, SBP, DBP, FPG / RPG and indirectly with the levels of HDL. This study demonstrates an apparent relationship between the HbA1c and FINDRISC score. Pursuing further research on this association may permit using HbA1c with the FINDRISC in predicting the risk of T2DM to be a better tool rather than using the current FPG/RPG, OGTT methods. PMID:27530580

  15. Determinants of medication adherence among adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus in three Malaysian public health clinics: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Chew, Boon-How; Hassan, Noor-Hasliza; Sherina, Mohd-Sidik

    2015-01-01

    Medication adherence (MA) in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) is associated with improved disease control (glycated hemoglobin, blood pressure, and lipid profile), lower rates of death and diabetes-related complications, increased quality of life, and decreased health care resource utilization. However, there is a paucity of data on the effect of diabetes-related distress, depression, and health-related quality of life on MA. This study examined factors associated with MA in adults with T2D at the primary care level. This was a cross-sectional study conducted in three Malaysian public health clinics, where adults with T2D were recruited consecutively in 2013. We used the 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) to assess MA as the main dependent variable. In addition to sociodemographic data, we included diabetes-related distress, depressive symptoms, and health-related quality of life as independent variables. Independent association between the MMAS-8 score and its determinants was done using generalized linear models with a gamma distribution and log link function. The participant response rate was 93.1% (700/752). The majority were female (52.8%), Malay (52.9%), and married (79.1%). About 43% of patients were classified as showing low MA (MMAS-8 score <6). Higher income (adjusted odds ratio 0.90) and depressive symptoms (adjusted odds ratio 0.99) were significant independent determinants of medication non-adherence in young adults with T2D. Low MA in adults with T2D is a prevalent problem. Thus, primary health care providers in public health clinics should focus on MA counselling for adult T2D patients who are younger, have a higher income, and symptoms of depression. PMID:25999699

  16. Nebulin deficiency in adult muscle causes sarcomere defects and muscle-type-dependent changes in trophicity: novel insights in nemaline myopathy.

    PubMed

    Li, Frank; Buck, Danielle; De Winter, Josine; Kolb, Justin; Meng, Hui; Birch, Camille; Slater, Rebecca; Escobar, Yael Natelie; Smith, John E; Yang, Lin; Konhilas, John; Lawlor, Michael W; Ottenheijm, Coen; Granzier, Henk L

    2015-09-15

    Nebulin is a giant filamentous protein that is coextensive with the actin filaments of the skeletal muscle sarcomere. Nebulin mutations are the main cause of nemaline myopathy (NEM), with typical adult patients having low expression of nebulin, yet the roles of nebulin in adult muscle remain poorly understood. To establish nebulin's functional roles in adult muscle, we studied a novel conditional nebulin KO (Neb cKO) mouse model in which nebulin deletion was driven by the muscle creatine kinase (MCK) promotor. Neb cKO mice are born with high nebulin levels in their skeletal muscles, but within weeks after birth nebulin expression rapidly falls to barely detectable levels Surprisingly, a large fraction of the mice survive to adulthood with low nebulin levels (<5% of control), contain nemaline rods and undergo fiber-type switching toward oxidative types. Nebulin deficiency causes a large deficit in specific force, and mechanistic studies provide evidence that a reduced fraction of force-generating cross-bridges and shortened thin filaments contribute to the force deficit. Muscles rich in glycolytic fibers upregulate proteolysis pathways (MuRF-1, Fbxo30/MUSA1, Gadd45a) and undergo hypotrophy with smaller cross-sectional areas (CSAs), worsening their force deficit. Muscles rich in oxidative fibers do not have smaller weights and can even have hypertrophy, offsetting their specific-force deficit. These studies reveal nebulin as critically important for force development and trophicity in adult muscle. The Neb cKO phenocopies important aspects of NEM (muscle weakness, oxidative fiber-type predominance, variable trophicity effects, nemaline rods) and will be highly useful to test therapeutic approaches to ameliorate muscle weakness. PMID:26123491

  17. Primary and Specialty Medical Care Among Ethnically Diverse, Older Rural Adults With Type 2 Diabetes: The ELDER Diabetes Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Ronny A.; Quandt, Sara A.; Arcury, Thomas A.; Snively, Beverly M.; Stafford, Jeanette M.; Smith, Shannon L.; Skelly, Anne H.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Residents in rural communities in the United States, especially ethnic minority group members, have limited access to primary and specialty health care that is critical for diabetes management. This study examines primary and specialty medical care utilization among a rural, ethnically diverse, older adult population with diabetes.…

  18. Primary and Specialty Medical Care among Ethnically Diverse, Older Rural Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: The ELDER Diabetes Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Ronny A.; Quandt, Sara A.; Arcury, Thomas A.; Snively, Beverly M.; Stafford, Jeanette M.; Smith, Shannon L.; Skelly, Anne H.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Residents in rural communities in the United States, especially ethnic minority group members, have limited access to primary and specialty health care that is critical for diabetes management. This study examines primary and specialty medical care utilization among a rural, ethnically diverse, older adult population with diabetes.…

  19. A Randomized Trial about Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load Improves Outcomes among Adults with Type 2 Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Carla K.; Gutschall, Melissa

    2009-01-01

    Glycemic index (GI) represents the postprandial glucose response of carbohydrate foods, and glycemic load (GL) represents the quantity and quality of carbohydrate consumed. A diet lower in GI and GL may improve diabetes management. A 9-week intervention regarding GI and GL was evaluated among adults in the age range of 40-70 years who had had type…

  20. Larval Population Density Alters Adult Sleep in Wild-Type Drosophila melanogaster but Not in Amnesiac Mutant Flies

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Michael W.; Griffith, Leslie C.; Vecsey, Christopher G.

    2014-01-01

    Sleep has many important biological functions, but how sleep is regulated remains poorly understood. In humans, social isolation and other stressors early in life can disrupt adult sleep. In fruit flies housed at different population densities during early adulthood, social enrichment was shown to increase subsequent sleep, but it is unknown if population density during early development can also influence adult sleep. To answer this question, we maintained Drosophila larvae at a range of population densities throughout larval development, kept them isolated during early adulthood, and then tested their sleep patterns. Our findings reveal that flies that had been isolated as larvae had more fragmented sleep than those that had been raised at higher population densities. This effect was more prominent in females than in males. Larval population density did not affect sleep in female flies that were mutant for amnesiac, which has been shown to be required for normal memory consolidation, adult sleep regulation, and brain development. In contrast, larval population density effects on sleep persisted in female flies lacking the olfactory receptor or83b, suggesting that olfactory signals are not required for the effects of larval population density on adult sleep. These findings show that population density during early development can alter sleep behavior in adulthood, suggesting that genetic and/or structural changes are induced by this developmental manipulation that persist through metamorphosis. PMID:25116571

  1. The Effectiveness of Health Literacy Oriented Programs on Physical Activity Behaviour in Middle Aged and Older Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Michael Huen Sum; Leung, Angela Yee-Man

    2016-01-01

    Health literacy is the first step to self-management of type II diabetes mellitus, of which physical activity is the least compliant behavior. However, no reviews have summarized the effect and the process of interventions of health literacy oriented programs on physical activity behavior among middle aged and older adults with type II diabetes mellitus. This article is the first to examine the effectiveness of health literacy oriented programs on physical activity behavior among middle aged and older adults with type II diabetes mellitus. This systematic review extracted articles from nine electronic databases between 1990 and 2013. Six interventional studies were extracted and reported in accordance with the guidance of Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses. Findings demonstrated that health literacy oriented programs increased the frequency and duration of physical activity among patients with high health literacy. Although some studies effectively improved the health literacy of physical activity, gap in literature remains open for the indistinct and unreliable measurement of physical activity within self-management programs of type II diabetes mellitus, and the questionable cross-culture generalizability of findings. Further studies with well-knit theory-based intervention with respect to patients’ cultural background, duration of intervention and objective measurements are encouraged to elucidate the relationship between health literacy oriented programs and physical activity behavior. PMID:27403464

  2. The Effectiveness of Health Literacy Oriented Programs on Physical Activity Behaviour in Middle Aged and Older Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Lam, Michael Huen Sum; Leung, Angela Yee-Man

    2016-06-23

    Health literacy is the first step to self-management of type II diabetes mellitus, of which physical activity is the least compliant behavior. However, no reviews have summarized the effect and the process of interventions of health literacy oriented programs on physical activity behavior among middle aged and older adults with type II diabetes mellitus. This article is the first to examine the effectiveness of health literacy oriented programs on physical activity behavior among middle aged and older adults with type II diabetes mellitus. This systematic review extracted articles from nine electronic databases between 1990 and 2013. Six interventional studies were extracted and reported in accordance with the guidance of Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses. Findings demonstrated that health literacy oriented programs increased the frequency and duration of physical activity among patients with high health literacy. Although some studies effectively improved the health literacy of physical activity, gap in literature remains open for the indistinct and unreliable measurement of physical activity within self-management programs of type II diabetes mellitus, and the questionable cross-culture generalizability of findings. Further studies with well-knit theory-based intervention with respect to patients' cultural background, duration of intervention and objective measurements are encouraged to elucidate the relationship between health literacy oriented programs and physical activity behavior. PMID:27403464

  3. The channel opening rate of adult- and fetal-type mouse muscle nicotinic receptors activated by acetylcholine

    PubMed Central

    Maconochie, David J; Steinbach, Joe Henry

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, we examine acetylcholine (ACh)-induced currents in quail fibroblast cell lines expressing either the fetal (Q-F18) or the adult (Q-A33) complement of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits derived from mouse skeletal muscle. Pulses of ACh were applied to outside-out patches of cell membrane by means of a fast perfusion system, at concentrations from 100 nM to 10 mM. We obtained current records with intracellular potentials of -60 and +40 mV. The goal of this study was to estimate the channel opening rate.By fitting sums of exponentials to averaged responses, we estimated the rate of development of the current on the application of acetylcholine. The rate constant of the predominant exponential component (the on-rate) ranges over 3 orders of magnitude, from around 100 s−1 (fetal) at low concentrations of ACh to over 100 000 s−1 (fetal and adult) at the highest concentrations.We establish that our measurement of the on-rate is not limited by technical constraints, and can therefore be related to the rate constants of a kinetic scheme. Our observations are consistent with a model having a rate-limiting channel opening step with a forwards rate constant (β) of 80 000 s−1 on average for adult receptors and 60 000 s−1 for fetal receptors, and a minimum opening to closing ratio (β/α) of around 33 (adult) or 50 (fetal). The channel opening rate, β, varies from around 30 000 s−1 to well over 100 000 s−1 for different patches. The large variation cannot all be ascribed to errors of measurement, but indicates patch to patch variation. PMID:9481672

  4. Impact of novelty and type of material on recognition in healthy older adults and persons with mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Belleville, Sylvie; Ménard, Marie-Claude; Lepage, Emilie

    2011-08-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the effect of novelty on correct recognition (hit minus false alarms) and on recollection and familiarity processes in normal aging and amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Recognition tasks compared well-known and novel stimuli in the verbal domain (words vs. pseudowords) and in the musical domain (well-known vs. novel melodies). Results indicated that novel materials associated with lower correct recognition and lower recollection, an effect that can be related to its lower amenability to elaborative encoding in comparison with well-known items. Results also indicated that normal aging impairs recognition of well-known items, whereas MCI impairs recognition of novel items only. Healthy older adults showed impaired recollection and familiarity relative to younger controls and individuals with MCI showed impaired recollection relative to healthy older adults. The recollection deficit in healthy older adults and persons with MCI and their impaired recognition of well-known items is compatible with the difficulty both groups have in encoding information in an elaborate manner. In turn, familiarity deficit could be related to impaired frontal functioning. Therefore, novelty of material has a differential impact on recognition in persons with age-related memory disorders. PMID:21703285

  5. Processing of Spontaneous Emotional Responses in Adolescents and Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Effect of Stimulus Type.

    PubMed

    Cassidy, Sarah; Mitchell, Peter; Chapman, Peter; Ropar, Danielle

    2015-10-01

    Recent research has shown that adults with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have difficulty interpreting others' emotional responses, in order to work out what actually happened to them. It is unclear what underlies this difficulty; important cues may be missed from fast paced dynamic stimuli, or spontaneous emotional responses may be too complex for those with ASD to successfully recognise. To explore these possibilities, 17 adolescents and adults with ASD and 17 neurotypical controls viewed 21 videos and pictures of peoples' emotional responses to gifts (chocolate, a handmade novelty or Monopoly money), then inferred what gift the person received and the emotion expressed by the person while eye movements were measured. Participants with ASD were significantly more accurate at distinguishing who received a chocolate or homemade gift from static (compared to dynamic) stimuli, but significantly less accurate when inferring who received Monopoly money from static (compared to dynamic) stimuli. Both groups made similar emotion attributions to each gift in both conditions (positive for chocolate, feigned positive for homemade and confused for Monopoly money). Participants with ASD only made marginally significantly fewer fixations to the eyes of the face, and face of the person than typical controls in both conditions. Results suggest adolescents and adults with ASD can distinguish subtle emotion cues for certain emotions (genuine from feigned positive) when given sufficient processing time, however, dynamic cues are informative for recognising emotion blends (e.g., smiling in confusion). This indicates difficulties processing complex emotion responses in ASD. PMID:25735657

  6. The impact of knowledge about diabetes, resilience and depression on glycemic control: a cross-sectional study among adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to evaluate the relationship between glycemic control and the factors of knowledge about diabetes, resilience, depression and anxiety among Brazilian adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes. Methods This cross-sectional study included 85 adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes, aged between 11–22 years, with an average age of 17.7 ± 3.72 years. Glycemic control degree was evaluated through HbA1c. To assess psychosocial factors, the following questionnaires were used: resilience (Resilience Scale, RS) and anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, HADS). The Diabetes Knowledge Assessment Scale (DKNA) was used to assess knowledge about diabetes. Results Significant correlations were found between HbA1c and resilience, anxiety and depression. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that the only variable which presented significant association with the value of HbA1c was depression. Conclusions Depression has a significant association with higher HbA1c levels, as demonstrated in a regression analysis. The results suggest that depression, anxiety and resilience should be considered in the design of a multidisciplinary approach to type 1 diabetes, as these factors were significantly correlated with glycemic control. Glycemic control was not correlated with knowledge of diabetes, suggesting that theoretical or practical understanding of this disease is not by itself significantly associated with appropriate glycemic control (HbA1c ≤ 7.5%). PMID:24289093

  7. Impact of a brief intervention on self-regulation, self-efficacy and physical activity in older adults with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Olson, Erin A; McAuley, Edward

    2015-12-01

    Despite evidence of the benefits of physical activity, most individuals with type 2 diabetes do not meet physical activity recommendations. The purpose of this study was to test the efficacy of a brief intervention targeting self-efficacy and self-regulation to increase physical activity in older adults with type 2 diabetes. Older adults (Mage = 61.8 ± 6.4) with type 2 diabetes or metabolic syndrome were randomized into a titrated physical activity intervention (n = 58) or an online health education course (n = 58). The intervention included walking exercise and theory-based group workshops. Self-efficacy, self-regulation and physical activity were assessed at baseline, post-intervention, and a follow-up. Results indicated a group by time effect for self-regulation [F(2,88) = 14.021, p < .001, η (2) = .24] and self-efficacy [F(12,77) = 2.322, p < .05, η (2) = .266] with increases in the intervention group. The intervention resulted in short-term increases in physical activity (d = .76, p < .01), which were partially maintained at the 6-month follow-up (d = .35, p < .01). The intervention increased short-term physical activity but was not successful at maintaining increases in physical activity. Similar intervention effects were observed in self-efficacy and self-regulation. Future research warrants adjusting intervention strategies to increase long-term change. PMID:26162648

  8. Predicting Noninsulin Antidiabetic Drug Adherence Using a Theoretical Framework Based on the Theory of Planned Behavior in Adults With Type 2 Diabetes: A Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Zomahoun, Hervé Tchala Vignon; Moisan, Jocelyne; Lauzier, Sophie; Guillaumie, Laurence; Grégoire, Jean-Pierre; Guénette, Line

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the process behind noninsulin antidiabetic drug (NIAD) nonadherence is necessary for designing effective interventions to resolve this problem. This study aimed to explore the ability of the theory of planned behavior (TPB), which is known as a good predictor of behaviors, to predict the future NIAD adherence in adults with type 2 diabetes. We conducted a prospective study of adults with type 2 diabetes. They completed a questionnaire on TPB variables and external variables. Linear regression was used to explore the TPB's ability to predict future NIAD adherence, which was prospectively measured as the proportion of days covered by at least 1 NIAD using pharmacy claims data. The interaction between past NIAD adherence and intention was tested. The sample included 340 people. There was an interaction between past NIAD adherence and intention to adhere to the NIAD (P = 0.032). Intention did not predict future NIAD adherence in the past adherers and nonadherers groups, but its association measure was high among past nonadherers (β = 5.686, 95% confidence interval [CI] -10.174, 21.546). In contrast, intention was mainly predicted by perceived behavioral control both in the past adherers (β = 0.900, 95% CI 0.796, 1.004) and nonadherers groups (β = 0.760, 95% CI 0.555, 0.966). The present study suggests that TPB is a good tool to predict intention to adhere and future NIAD adherence. However, there was a gap between intention to adhere and actual adherence to the NIAD, which is partly explained by the past adherence level in adults with type 2 diabetes. PMID:27082543

  9. Predicting Noninsulin Antidiabetic Drug Adherence Using a Theoretical Framework Based on the Theory of Planned Behavior in Adults With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Zomahoun, Hervé Tchala Vignon; Moisan, Jocelyne; Lauzier, Sophie; Guillaumie, Laurence; Grégoire, Jean-Pierre; Guénette, Line

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Understanding the process behind noninsulin antidiabetic drug (NIAD) nonadherence is necessary for designing effective interventions to resolve this problem. This study aimed to explore the ability of the theory of planned behavior (TPB), which is known as a good predictor of behaviors, to predict the future NIAD adherence in adults with type 2 diabetes. We conducted a prospective study of adults with type 2 diabetes. They completed a questionnaire on TPB variables and external variables. Linear regression was used to explore the TPB's ability to predict future NIAD adherence, which was prospectively measured as the proportion of days covered by at least 1 NIAD using pharmacy claims data. The interaction between past NIAD adherence and intention was tested. The sample included 340 people. There was an interaction between past NIAD adherence and intention to adhere to the NIAD (P = 0.032). Intention did not predict future NIAD adherence in the past adherers and nonadherers groups, but its association measure was high among past nonadherers (β = 5.686, 95% confidence interval [CI] −10.174, 21.546). In contrast, intention was mainly predicted by perceived behavioral control both in the past adherers (β = 0.900, 95% CI 0.796, 1.004) and nonadherers groups (β = 0.760, 95% CI 0.555, 0.966). The present study suggests that TPB is a good tool to predict intention to adhere and future NIAD adherence. However, there was a gap between intention to adhere and actual adherence to the NIAD, which is partly explained by the past adherence level in adults with type 2 diabetes. PMID:27082543

  10. Memory performance on the Auditory Inference Span Test is independent of background noise type for young adults with normal hearing at high speech intelligibility.

    PubMed

    Rönnberg, Niklas; Rudner, Mary; Lunner, Thomas; Stenfelt, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Listening in noise is often perceived to be effortful. This is partly because cognitive resources are engaged in separating the target signal from background noise, leaving fewer resources for storage and processing of the content of the message in working memory. The Auditory Inference Span Test (AIST) is designed to assess listening effort by measuring the ability to maintain and process heard information. The aim of this study was to use AIST to investigate the effect of background noise types and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) on listening effort, as a function of working memory capacity (WMC) and updating ability (UA). The AIST was administered in three types of background noise: steady-state speech-shaped noise, amplitude modulated speech-shaped noise, and unintelligible speech. Three SNRs targeting 90% speech intelligibility or better were used in each of the three noise types, giving nine different conditions. The reading span test assessed WMC, while UA was assessed with the letter memory test. Twenty young adults with normal hearing participated in the study. Results showed that AIST performance was not influenced by noise type at the same intelligibility level, but became worse with worse SNR when background noise was speech-like. Performance on AIST also decreased with increasing memory load level. Correlations between AIST performance and the cognitive measurements suggested that WMC is of more importance for listening when SNRs are worse, while UA is of more importance for listening in easier SNRs. The results indicated that in young adults with normal hearing, the effort involved in listening in noise at high intelligibility levels is independent of the noise type. However, when noise is speech-like and intelligibility decreases, listening effort increases, probably due to extra demands on cognitive resources added by the informational masking created by the speech fragments and vocal sounds in the background noise. PMID:25566159

  11. Prevalence and Predictors of Intestinal Helminth Infections Among Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1–Infected Adults in an Urban African Setting

    PubMed Central

    Modjarrad, Kayvon; Zulu, Isaac; Redden, David T.; Njobvu, Lungowe; Freedman, David O.; Vermund, Sten H.

    2009-01-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa is disproportionately burdened by intestinal helminth and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection. Recent evidence suggests detrimental immunologic effects from concomitant infection with the two pathogens. Few studies, however, have assessed the prevalence of and predictors for intestinal helminth infection among HIV-1–infected adults in urban African settings where HIV infection rates are highest. We collected and analyzed sociodemographic and parasitologic data from 297 HIV-1–infected adults (mean age = 31.1 years, 69% female) living in Lusaka, Zambia to assess the prevalence and associated predictors of helminth infection. We found at least one type of intestinal helminth in 24.9% of HIV-infected adults. Thirty-nine (52.7%) were infected with Ascaris lumbricoides, and 29 (39.2%) were infected with hookworm. More than 80% were light-intensity infections. A recent visit to a rural area, food shortage, and prior history of helminth infection were significant predictors of current helminth status. The high helminth prevalence and potential for adverse interactions between helminths and HIV suggests that helminth diagnosis and treatment should be part of routine HIV care. PMID:16222025

  12. The putative Notch ligand HyJagged is a transmembrane protein present in all cell types of adult Hydra and upregulated at the boundary between bud and parent

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Notch signalling pathway is conserved in pre-bilaterian animals. In the Cnidarian Hydra it is involved in interstitial stem cell differentiation and in boundary formation during budding. Experimental evidence suggests that in Hydra Notch is activated by presenilin through proteolytic cleavage at the S3 site as in all animals. However, the endogenous ligand for HvNotch has not been described yet. Results We have cloned a cDNA from Hydra, which encodes a bona-fide Notch ligand with a conserved domain structure similar to that of Jagged-like Notch ligands from other animals. Hyjagged mRNA is undetectable in adult Hydra by in situ hybridisation but is strongly upregulated and easily visible at the border between bud and parent shortly before bud detachment. In contrast, HyJagged protein is found in all cell types of an adult hydra, where it localises to membranes and endosomes. Co-localisation experiments showed that it is present in the same cells as HvNotch, however not always in the same membrane structures. Conclusions The putative Notch ligand HyJagged is conserved in Cnidarians. Together with HvNotch it may be involved in the formation of the parent-bud boundary in Hydra. Moreover, protein distribution of both, HvNotch receptor and HyJagged indicate a more widespread function for these two transmembrane proteins in the adult hydra, which may be regulated by additional factors, possibly involving endocytic pathways. PMID:21899759

  13. The Effects of Alcohol, Relationship Power, and Partner Type on Perceived Difficulty Implementing Condom Use among African American Adults: An Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Woolf-King, Sarah E.; Maisto, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    African American adults are disproportionately affected by HIV in the United States, underscoring the need for additional research on barriers to condom use. Guided by the theory of gender and power, this experimental study used a series of vignettes to test causal hypotheses regarding the influence of event-level alcohol use (present and absent), partner type (serious and casual), and relationship power (low and equal) on perceived difficulty implementing condom use. A total of 299 (151 women and 148 men) heterosexual African American adults indicated how “difficult” it would be to use a condom after reading 8 hypothetical sexual encounters, presented in a random order. A 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 repeated measures analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) with one between subjects factor (gender) and one covariate (condom use self-efficacy) was used to estimate the effects of these variables on an index of perceived difficultly. The women in the study reported significantly higher ratings of difficulty implementing condom use in vignettes characterized by low relationship power (p < .001) and presence of alcohol use (p < .001); the manipulated independent variables did not produce any main effects for men. Both men and women’s ratings of perceived difficulty decreased as condom use self-efficacy increased (p < .001). This is the first study to use an experimental methodology to test hypotheses about barriers to condom use among a community-based sample of African American adults. These data can be used to enhance existing HIV prevention interventions. PMID:25277692

  14. Processing of Spontaneous Emotional Responses in Adolescents and Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Effect of Stimulus Type

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Peter; Chapman, Peter; Ropar, Danielle

    2015-01-01

    Recent research has shown that adults with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have difficulty interpreting others' emotional responses, in order to work out what actually happened to them. It is unclear what underlies this difficulty; important cues may be missed from fast paced dynamic stimuli, or spontaneous emotional responses may be too complex for those with ASD to successfully recognise. To explore these possibilities, 17 adolescents and adults with ASD and 17 neurotypical controls viewed 21 videos and pictures of peoples' emotional responses to gifts (chocolate, a handmade novelty or Monopoly money), then inferred what gift the person received and the emotion expressed by the person while eye movements were measured. Participants with ASD were significantly more accurate at distinguishing who received a chocolate or homemade gift from static (compared to dynamic) stimuli, but significantly less accurate when inferring who received Monopoly money from static (compared to dynamic) stimuli. Both groups made similar emotion attributions to each gift in both conditions (positive for chocolate, feigned positive for homemade and confused for Monopoly money). Participants with ASD only made marginally significantly fewer fixations to the eyes of the face, and face of the person than typical controls in both conditions. Results suggest adolescents and adults with ASD can distinguish subtle emotion cues for certain emotions (genuine from feigned positive) when given sufficient processing time, however, dynamic cues are informative for recognising emotion blends (e.g. smiling in confusion). This indicates difficulties processing complex emotion responses in ASD. Autism Res 2015, 8: 534–544. © 2015 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25735657

  15. Unusual Repertoire of Vocalizations in Adult BTBR T+tf/J Mice During Three Types of Social Encounters

    PubMed Central

    Scattoni, Maria Luisa; Ricceri, Laura; Crawley, Jacqueline N.

    2010-01-01

    BTBR T+tf/J (BTBR) is an inbred mouse strain that displays social deficits and repetitive behaviors analogous to the first and third diagnostic symptoms of autism. We previously reported an unusual pattern of ultrasonic vocalizations in BTBR pups that may represent a behavioral homologue to the second diagnostic symptom of autism, impaired communication. The present study investigated the social and vocal repertoire in adult BTBR mice, to evaluate the role of ultrasonic vocalizations in multiple social situations at the adult stage of development. Three different social contexts were considered: male-female, male-male (resident-intruder) and female-female interactions. Behavioral responses and ultrasonic vocalizations were recorded for BTBR and for the highly social control strain C57BL/6J (B6). No episodes of overt fighting or mating were observed during the short durations of the three different experimental encounters. BTBR displayed lower levels of vocalizations and social investigation in all three social contexts as compared to B6. In addition, the correlation analyses between social investigation and USVs emission rate revealed that in B6 mice the two variables were positively correlated in all the three different social settings, whereas in BTBR mice the positive correlation was significant only in the male-female interactions. These findings strongly support the value of simultaneously recording two aspects of the mouse social repertoire, social motivation and bioacoustic communication. Moreover, our findings in adults are consistent with previous results in pups, showing an unusual vocal repertoire in BTBR as compared to B6. PMID:20618443

  16. The Moderating Effect of Personality Type on the Relationship between Leisure Activity and Executive Control in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Nikki L.; Lin, Feng Vankee; Parisi, Jeanine M.; Kolanowski, Ann

    2016-01-01

    We examined the moderating effect of personality on the association between leisure activities and executive control in healthy community-dwelling older adults. We found two distinct personality typologies: individuals with a Resilient personality were characterized by emotional stability and self-confidence; whereas, those who resembled an Overcontrolled personality tended to be introverted, but also low on neuroticism. Resilient individuals were more likely than Overcontrolled individuals to demonstrate higher executive function and attention as a result of participation in mental activities. These results suggest that personality might be important to include in studies that test the efficacy of activity interventions for improving cognition. PMID:27087715

  17. Knowledge about type 2 diabetes risk and prevention of African-American and Hispanic adults and adolescents with family history of type 2 diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to assess type 2 diabetes knowledge, perceptions, risk factor awareness, and prevention practices among African-American and Hispanic families with a history of diabetes. Ninth and tenth grade Houston area students who had a parent who spoke English or Spanish and had a...

  18. Relation of Combined Non-High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol and Apolipoprotein B With Atherosclerosis in Adults With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Bjornstad, Petter; Eckel, Robert H; Pyle, Laura; Rewers, Marian; Maahs, David M; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K

    2015-10-01

    Apolipoprotein B (apoB) and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C) are cardiovascular disease risk markers, although data in adults with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) are limited. We hypothesized that elevated apoB and non-HDL-C would be associated with greater odds of coronary artery calcification progression (CACp), a measure of coronary atherosclerosis, than either category alone in adults with type 1 DM. We grouped subjects with type 1 DM (n = 652) into 4 groups: elevated apoB (≥90 mg/dl) and elevated non-HDL-C (≥130 mg/dl), elevated non-HDL-C alone, elevated apoB alone, and normal apoB and non-HDL-C. We used logistic regression to examine the associations between the groups and CACp for a period of 6 years. We performed sensitivity analyses with elevated apoB and non-HDL-C redefined as at or more than the cohort means (91.4 and 119.0 mg/dl, respectively). Subjects with elevated apoB and non-HDL-C had greater odds of CACp compared with those with normal apoB and non-HDL-C (odds ratio 1.90, 95% confidence interval 1.15 to 3.15) and compared with subjects with elevated apoB alone (odds ratio 2.86, 95% confidence interval 1.43 to 5.74) adjusting for age, gender, duration, hemoglobin A1c, and statins. Similar results were obtained with elevated apoB and non-HDL-C defined as at or more than the cohort means. In conclusion, elevated apoB and non-HDL-C carry a greater risk of atherosclerosis than elevated apoB in the absence of elevated non-HDL-C in adults with type 1 DM. These data suggest that apoB and non-HDL-C should be viewed as complementary rather than competitive indexes of cardiovascular disease risk in type 1 DM. PMID:26251001

  19. Type A behavior and its determinants in children, adolescents and young adults with and without parental coronary heart disease: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Räikkönen, K; Keltikangas-Järvinen, L; Pietikäinen, M

    1991-01-01

    Healthy children, adolescents and young adults with parental coronary heart disease (CHD) (N = 78) were compared with their one-to-one matched controls without a parental CHD (N = 78) in terms of their psychological and behavioral characteristics. The variables adopted were Type A behavior, self-esteem, achievement striving, hyperactivity and social maladjustment. The results indicate a tendency for boys with parental CHD to be characterized by higher scores on Type A behavior, lower self-esteem and more intense striving for achievement compared to their matched controls. Girls with parental CHD differed from their matched controls in the predicted direction only in one respect: a higher level of hyperactivity was characteristic for cases. PMID:2046059

  20. Host and environmental factors defining the epidemiology of type 1 diabetes mellitus in a group of Lebanese children and young adults.

    PubMed

    Zalloua, P A; Terwedow, H; Shbaklo, H; Halaby, G; Xu, X; Azar, S T

    2003-06-01

    The effect of a number of host and environmental factors on the onset of type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1) in a group of Lebanese children and young adults was studied. Results showed that DM1 in a group of 253 patients presented no gender preference and that the age of onset was similar in both genders. The overall body mass index reflected good metabolic control. HbA1c had a mean value of 8.98%, suggesting poor glucose control. Family history of DM1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus as well as consanguinity in patients' families were not different from those reported in the literature. Finally, onset of DM1 showed seasonal variation, peaking during winter months. DM1 showed a higher prevalence of onset among children born first and a decreased incidence as birth order increased. This study provides valuable data for the diagnosis, control and prevention of DM1 in children. PMID:12880126

  1. Fetal brain 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 selectively determines programming of adult depressive-like behaviors and cognitive function, but not anxiety behaviors in male mice

    PubMed Central

    Wyrwoll, Caitlin; Keith, Marianne; Noble, June; Stevenson, Paula L.; Bombail, Vincent; Crombie, Sandra; Evans, Louise C.; Bailey, Matthew A.; Wood, Emma; Seckl, Jonathan R.; Holmes, Megan C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Stress or elevated glucocorticoids during sensitive windows of fetal development increase the risk of neuropsychiatric disorders in adult rodents and humans, a phenomenon known as glucocorticoid programming. 11β-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11β-HSD2), which catalyses rapid inactivation of glucocorticoids in the placenta, controls access of maternal glucocorticoids to the fetal compartment, placing it in a key position to modulate glucocorticoid programming of behavior. However, the importance of the high expression of 11β-HSD2 within the midgestational fetal brain is unknown. To examine this, a brain-specific knockout of 11β-HSD2 (HSD2BKO) was generated and compared to wild-type littermates. HSD2BKO have markedly diminished fetal brain 11β-HSD2, but intact fetal body and placental 11β-HSD2 and normal fetal and placental growth. Despite normal fetal plasma corticosterone, HSD2BKO exhibit elevated fetal brain corticosterone levels at midgestation. As adults, HSD2BKO show depressive-like behavior and have cognitive impairments. However, unlike complete feto-placental deficiency, HSD2BKO show no anxiety-like behavioral deficits. The clear mechanistic separation of the programmed components of depression and cognition from anxiety implies distinct mechanisms of pathogenesis, affording potential opportunities for stratified interventions. PMID:26036451

  2. Prostaglandin E2-mediated upregulation of neuroexcitation and persistent tetrodotoxin-resistant Na(+) currents in Ah-type trigeminal ganglion neurons isolated from adult female rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, H; Duan, S-R

    2016-04-21

    Prostaglandin-E2 (PGE2) is a very important inflammatory mediator and PGE2-mediated neuroexcitation in sex-specific distribution of Ah-type trigeminal ganglion neurons (TGNs) isolated from adult female rats is not fully addressed. The whole-cell patch-clamp experiment was performed to verify the effects of PGE2, forskolin, and GPR30-selective agonist (G-1) on action potential (AP) and tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) Na(+) currents in identified Ah-type TGNs. The results showed that the firing frequency was increased in Ah- and C-types by PGE2, which was simulated by forskolin and inhibited by Rp-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), while G-1 mimicked this effect only in Ah-types, which was abolished by GPR30-selective antagonist (G-15). Although the amplitude of AP was increased in Ah- and C-types, increased maximal upstroke velocity was confirmed only in Ah-types, suggesting distinct alternations in current density and/or voltage-dependent property of Na(+) channels. With 1.0μM PGE2, TTX-R Na(+) currents were upregulated without changing the current-voltage relationship and voltage-dependent activation in C-types, however, the TTX-R Na(+) current was augmented in Ah-types, peaked voltage and the voltage-dependent activation were both shifted toward hyperpolarized direction with faster slope. Intriguingly, the low-threshold persistent TTX-R component was activated from -60mV and increased almost double at -30mV compared with ∼30-40% increment of TTX-R component being activated at ∼-10mV. Additionally, the change in TTX-R component of Ah-types was equivalent well with that in C-type TGNs. Taken these data together, we conclude that PGE2 modulates the neuroexcitation via cAMP-mediated upregulation of TTX-R Na(+) currents in both cell-types with hormone-dependent feature, especially persistent TTX-R Na(+) currents in sex-specific distribution of myelinated Ah-type TGNs. PMID:26868972

  3. Non-Syndromic Brachydactyly Type D and Type E Mapped to 7p15 in Healthy Children and Adults from the Jirel Ethnic Group in Eastern Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Kimberly D.; Blangero, John; Subedi, Janardan; Jha, Bharat; Dyer, Thomas; VandeBerg, John L.; Towne, Bradford; Williams-Blangero, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Objectives There is phenotypic overlap between Brachydactyly Type D (BDD) and Brachydactyly Type E (BDE) that suggests a possible common underlying etiology. We seek to understand the genetic underpinnings of, and relationship between, these skeletal anomalies. Methods The Jirel ethnic group of eastern Nepal participates in various genetic epidemiologic studies, including those in which hand-wrist radiographs have been taken to examine skeletal development. 2,130 individuals (969 males; 1,161 females) were phenotyped for BDD/BDE. Of these, 1,722 individuals (773 males; 949 females) were genotyped for 371 STR markers spanning the autosomal genome. Variance components-based linkage analysis was used to conduct a genome-wide linkage scan for QTL influencing the BDD/BDE phenotype. Results BDD was present in 3.55%, and BDE was present in 0.39%, of the study sample. Because of the phenotypic overlap between two traits, affecteds of either type were considered as affected by a single combined phenotype (BDD/BDE) having a prevalence of 3.94%. The additive genetic heritability of BDD/BDE was highly significant (h2 ± SE = 0.89 ± 0.13; p = 1.7×10−11). Significant linkage of BDD/BDE was found to markers on chromosome 7p21-7p14 (peak LOD score = 3.74 at 7p15 between markers D7S493 and D7S516). Conclusions Possible positional candidate genes in the one-lod support interval of this QTL include TWIST and the HOXA1-A13 cluster. This is the first study to report significant linkage results for BDD/BDE using a large extended pedigree, and the first to suggest that mutations in TWIST and/or the HOXA1-A13 cluster may contribute to these specific skeletal anomalies. PMID:24022874

  4. Glucose-responsive insulin and glucagon delivery (dual-hormone artificial pancreas) in adults with type 1 diabetes: a randomized crossover controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Haidar, Ahmad; Legault, Laurent; Dallaire, Maryse; Alkhateeb, Ammar; Coriati, Adèle; Messier, Virginie; Cheng, Peiyao; Millette, Maude; Boulet, Benoit; Rabasa-Lhoret, Rémi

    2013-01-01

    Background: Most patients with type 1 diabetes do not achieve their glycemic targets. We aimed to assess the efficacy of glucose-responsive insulin and glucagon closed-loop delivery for controlling glucose levels in adults with type 1 diabetes. Methods: We conducted a randomized crossover trial involving 15 adults with type 1 diabetes, comparing standard insulin-pump therapy with dual-hormone, closed-loop delivery. Patients were admitted twice to a clinical research facility and received, in random order, both treatments. Each 15-hour visit (from 1600 to 0700) included an evening exercise session, followed by a medium-sized meal, a bedtime snack and an overnight stay. During visits that involved closed-loop delivery, basal insulin and glucagon miniboluses were delivered according to recommendations based on glucose sensor readings and a predictive dosing algorithm at 10-minute intervals. During visits involving standard insulin-pump therapy (control visits), patients used conventional treatment. Results: Dual-hormone closed-loop delivery increased the percentage of time for which patients’ plasma glucose levels were in the target range (median 70.7% [interquartile range (IQR) 46.1%–88.4%] for closed-loop delivery v. 57.3% [IQR 25.2%–71.8%] for control, p = 0.003) and decreased the percentage of time for which plasma glucose levels were in the low range (bottom of target range [< 4.0 mmol/L], 0.0% [IQR 0.0%–3.0%] for closed-loop delivery v. 10.2% [IQR 0.0%–13.0%] for control, p = 0.01; hypoglycemia threshold [< 3.3 mmol/L], 0.0% [IQR 0.0%–0.0%] for closed-loop delivery v. 2.8% [IQR 0.0%–5.9%] for control, p = 0.006). Eight participants (53%) had at least 1 hypoglycemic event (plasma glucose < 3.0 mmol/L) during standard treatment, compared with just 1 participant (7%) during closed-loop treatment (p = 0.02). Interpretation: Dual-hormone, closed-loop delivery guided by advanced algorithms improved short-term glucose control and reduced the risk of

  5. HbA1c overtesting and overtreatment among US adults with controlled type 2 diabetes, 2001-13: observational population based study

    PubMed Central

    Van Houten, Holly K; Ross, Joseph S; Montori, Victor M; Shah, Nilay D

    2015-01-01

    Study question What is the extent and effect of excessive testing for glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) among adults with controlled type 2 diabetes? Methods A retrospective analysis of data from a national administrative claims database included commercially insured individuals in the USA, 2001-13. Study patients were aged 18 years or older, had type 2 diabetes with stable glycemic control (two consecutive tests showing HbA1c<7.0% within 24 months), did not use insulin, had no history of severe hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia, and were not pregnant. HbA1c testing frequency was measured within 24 months after the second (index) HbA1c test, and classified as guideline recommended (≤2 times/year), frequent (3-4 times/year), and excessive (≥5 times/year). Changes in treatment regimen were ascertained within three months of the index test. Study answer and limitations Of 31 545 patients in the study cohort (mean age 58 years; mean index HbA1c 6.2%), HbA1c testing frequency was excessive in 6% and frequent in 55%. Despite good glycemic control at baseline, treatment was further intensified by addition of glucose lowering drugs or insulin in 8.4% of patients (comprising 13%, 9%, and 7% of those tested excessively, frequently, and per guidelines, respectively; P<0.001). Compared with guideline recommended testing, excessive testing was associated with treatment intensification (odds ratio 1.35 (95% confidence interval 1.22 to 1.50)). Excessive testing rates remained unchanged in 2001-08, but fell significantly after 2009. The odds of excessive testing was 46% lower in 2011 than in 2001-02. The study population is not representative of all US patients with type 2 diabetes because it was restricted to commercially insured adults with stable and controlled diabetes not receiving insulin treatment. The study design did not capture the underuse of HbA1c testing. What this study adds In this US cohort of adults with stable and controlled type 2 diabetes, more than 60% received

  6. Differences in B7 and CD28 family gene expression in the peripheral blood between newly diagnosed young-onset and adult-onset type 1 diabetes patients.

    PubMed

    Pruul, K; Kisand, K; Alnek, K; Metsküla, K; Reimand, K; Heilman, K; Peet, A; Varik, K; Peetsalu, M; Einberg, Ü; Tillmann, V; Uibo, R

    2015-09-01

    Type-1 diabetes (T1D) is a heterogeneous autoimmune disease, and there are pathogenetic differences between young- and adult-onset T1D patients. We hypothesized that the expressions of genes involved in costimulatory immune system pathways in peripheral blood are differently regulated in young- and adult-onset T1D. Study group I consisted of 80 children, adolescents, and young adults (age range 1.4-21.4 y; 31 controls and 49 T1D patients). Study group II consisted of 48 adults (age range 22.0-78.4 y; 30 controls and 18 T1D patients). The mRNA expression levels of CD86, CD28, CD25, CD226, CD40, BTLA, GITR, PDCD1, FoxP3, TGF-β, ICOS, sCTLA4, flCTLA4, and CD80 were measured in peripheral blood. Genetic polymorphisms (HLA haplotypes; rs231806, rs231775, and rs3087243 in CTLA4; rs763361 in CD226; and rs706778 in CD25) and T1D-associated autoantibodies were analyzed. In group I, there was significantly lower expression of CD226 in T1D patients than in the controls. In group II, there were significantly higher expression levels of CD86 and TGF-β in T1D patients than in the controls. In the T1D patients in group I, the upregulated CD80 expression correlated with the expression of both CTLA4 splice variants (sCTLA4 and flCTLA4). In contrast, in group II, upregulated CD86 correlated with TGF-β and CD25. In group I, the inhibitory CD80-CTLA4 pathway was activated, whereas, in group II, the activation CD86-CD28 pathway and TGF-β production were activated. These results emphasize the differences between young-onset and adult-onset T1D in the regulation of costimulatory pathways. These differences should be considered when developing novel treatments for T1D. PMID:25980680

  7. Shoulder function, pain and health related quality of life in adults with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome-hypermobility type.

    PubMed

    Johannessen, Elise Christine; Reiten, Helle Sundnes; Løvaas, Helene; Maeland, Silje; Juul-Kristensen, Birgit

    2016-07-01

    Purpose To investigate shoulder function, pain and Health-Related Quality of life (HRQoL) among adults with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome-hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT), compared with the general population (controls). Method In a cross-sectional study using postal survey, 110 patients diagnosed with JHS/EDS-HT and 140 gender- and age-matched healthy controls from Statistics Norway participated. Shoulder function, pain and HRQol were registered by Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index (WOSI), Numerical Rating Scale (NRS), pain drawings, 36-item Short Form (SF-36). Results Eighty-one individuals responded, with response rate 34% (JHS/EDS-HT: 53%, controls: 21%). JHS/EDS-HT had lower shoulder function (WOSI total: 49.9 versus 83.3; p < 0.001), lower HRQol on SF-36 Physical Component Scale (PCS: 28.1 versus 49.9; p < 0.001), and higher pain intensity (NRS: 6.4 versus 2.7; p < 0.001) than controls. Neck and shoulder joints were rated as primary painful areas in both groups, with significantly higher frequency in JHS/EDS-HT (neck: 90% versus 27%; shoulder: 80% versus 37%). Further, JHS/EDS-HT most often reported generalized pain (96%). Conclusions Adults with JHS/EDS-HT have impaired shoulder function, increased pain intensity, as well as reduced physical HRQoL compared with controls. Although neck and shoulder were most frequently rated as painful, significantly more JHS/EDS-HT also reported generalized pain compared to controls. Implications for Rehabilitation Adults with JHS/EDS-HT have impaired shoulder function, and most often painful areas in the neck and shoulder joints, which need to be targeted in the treatment strategy. Compared with the general population adults with JHS/EDS-HT have reduced physical HRQoL, supporting a physical approach for this group. Adults with JHS/EDS-HT may present with both specific painful joints and generalized pain. PMID:26824670

  8. Adult Learners in Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Janette, Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Theories on adult development and learning and some of the Ontario universities' programs and services for the adult learner are examined, and Athabasca University, Alberta's answer to the British Open University, is described. Peter O'Donnell discusses adult learners' needs and explains how Athabasca University serves this specific type of…

  9. Infectivity of Cryptosporidium andersoni Kawatabi type relative to the small number of oocysts in immunodeficient and immunocompetent neonatal and adult mice.

    PubMed

    Nagano-Koyashiki, Saki; Matsubayashi, Makoto; Kimata, Isao; Furuya, Masaru; Tani, Hiroyuki; Sasai, Kazumi

    2013-04-01

    Cryptosporidium andersoni is a protozoan parasite found in many countries that invades the stomachs of primarily adult cattle. Unlike the isolates of C. andersoni in cattle from other countries, C. andersoni isolates from Japanese cattle can infect mice and were identified as a novel type and later defined as C. andersoni Kawatabi type. The biological characteristics of C. andersoni Kawatabi type have not yet been well documented. In the present study, we assess the infectivity of this type isolate in mice with different immune competence status and age. We found that inoculation of more than 1×10(4) oocysts is needed to establish infection in mature mice irrespective of immune status. All of the infected immunocompetent mice recovered after a patent period of approximately 20days. In immunodeficient mice, the pre-patent period was prolonged compared with that of 1×10(6) oocysts, but the pattern and the maximum shedding measured by the number of oocysts per day were almost identical. In neonatal immunocompetent and immunodeficient mice, inoculation with 1×10(4) to 10(5) oocysts was also needed to establish infection. Our results indicate that there is a threshold of oocysts needed to establish patent infection in the acidic conditions of the stomach. PMID:23146684

  10. Symptoms of Eating Disorders and Depression in Emerging Adults with Early-Onset, Long-Duration Type 1 Diabetes and Their Association with Metabolic Control

    PubMed Central

    Bächle, Christina; Lange, Karin; Stahl-Pehe, Anna; Castillo, Katty; Scheuing, Nicole; Holl, Reinhard W.; Giani, Guido; Rosenbauer, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Background This study analyzed the prevalence of and association between symptoms of eating disorders and depression in female and male emerging adults with early-onset, long-duration type 1 diabetes and investigated how these symptoms are associated with metabolic control. Methods In a nationwide population-based survey, 211 type 1 diabetes patients aged 18-21 years completed standardized questionnaires, including the SCOFF questionnaire for eating disorder symptoms and the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) for symptoms of depression and severity of depressive symptoms (PHQ-9 score). Multiple linear and logistic regression models were used to analyze the association between eating disorder and depressive symptoms and their associations with HbA1c. Results A total of 30.2% of the women and 9.5% of the men were screening positive for eating disorders. The mean PHQ-9 score (standard deviation) was 5.3 (4.4) among women and 3.9 (3.6) among men. Screening positive for an eating disorder was associated with more severe depressive symptoms among women (βwomen 3.8, p<0.001). However, neither eating disorder symptoms nor severity of depressive symptoms were associated with HbA1c among women, while HbA1c increased with the severity of depressive symptoms among men (βmen 0.14, p=0.006). Conclusions Because of the high prevalence of eating disorder and depressive symptoms, their interrelationship, and their associations with metabolic control, particularly among men, regular mental health screening is recommended for young adults with type 1 diabetes. PMID:26121155

  11. Incidence, Types and Characteristics of Aggressive Behaviour in Treatment Facilities for Adults with Mild Intellectual Disability and Severe Challenging Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenneij, N. H.; Koot, H. M.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Inpatient aggression in treatment facilities for persons with intellectual disability (ID) can have aversive consequences, for co-clients and staff, but also for the aggressors themselves. To manage and eventually prevent inpatient aggressive incidents, more knowledge about their types and characteristics is necessary. Method: In four…

  12. Human Development and the Use of Health Education Media among Adult Type 2 Diabetics in Rural Appalachia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Michael Glenn

    2009-01-01

    This study conducted in Meigs County, Ohio between January 2009 and June 2009 employed grounded theory to investigate the use of health education media by rural Appalachian individuals with type 2 diabetes in middle and late adulthood. Persons in middle adulthood were 34- to 60-years-old, and persons in late adulthood were 61- to 75-years-old.…

  13. Health Disparities by Type of Disability: Health Examination Results of Adults (18-64 Years) with Disabilities in Shanghai, China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gang; Lu, Jun; Yu, Huijiong

    2016-01-01

    Aims There have been few studies on the disparities within the population with disabilities, especially in China. The aim of this study was to evaluate the differences in some health conditions among people with different types of disabilities in Shanghai. Methods This study was conducted using data from the Shanghai Disabled Persons’ Rehabilitation Comprehensive Information Platform. The records of 31,082 persons with disabilities who had undergone professional health examination were analyzed, and the prevalence and number of five diseases and five risk factors were examined. Logistic regression was used to explore disparities from two perspectives: 1) basic differences, unadjusted for other factors, and 2) differences after adjusting for key demographic covariates. A p-value < 0.05 was considered significant. Results Individuals with visual disability had a high rate of refractive error (60.0%), and averaged 1.75 diseases of interest, which was the highest value among all disability types. The mean number of risk factors we measured was greatest (1.96) in the population with mental disability. There were significant differences (p < 0.05) between the hearing and speech impairment group and the other groups with respect to most health outcomes, except chronic pharyngitis, hepatic cysts, and high blood pressure. Conclusion Significant differences of selected health outcomes between groups with different types of disabilities remained after controlling for key demographic indicators. Further research is needed to explore the relationships between health conditions and disability types. PMID:27196419

  14. Factors Influencing Self-Management in Chinese Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiaoping; Liu, Tingting; Yuan, Xiaojing; Ge, Song; Yang, Jing; Li, Changwei; Sun, Wenjie

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a major public health problem in China. Diabetes self-management is critical for patients to achieved better health outcomes, however, previous studies have shown suboptimal diabetes self-management performance. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to identify factors associated with diabetes self-management in Chinese adults. The results showed that confrontation, resignation, overall health beliefs, perceived susceptibility, perceived barriers, and self-efficacy were factors associated with overall diabetes self-management performance and six aspects of diabetes self-management behaviors. There is some limited evidence to suggest that provider-patient communication, married individuals, higher educational level, and higher household income level may also be linked to better diabetes self-management practice. Having healthcare insurance and utilizing chronic illness resources generally appeared to have a favorable effect on diabetes self-management performance. In addition, there were a number of factors for which the evidence is too limited to be able to ascertain its strength of association with diabetes self-management practice. The findings of this review suggest that diabetes self-management behaviors are affected by a wide range of personal and environmental factors, which allow health care providers to develop theory-based strategies to improve diabetes-self-management behaviors in this population. PMID:26378555

  15. Factors Influencing Self-Management in Chinese Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaoping; Liu, Tingting; Yuan, Xiaojing; Ge, Song; Yang, Jing; Li, Changwei; Sun, Wenjie

    2015-09-01

    Diabetes is a major public health problem in China. Diabetes self-management is critical for patients to achieved better health outcomes, however, previous studies have shown suboptimal diabetes self-management performance. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to identify factors associated with diabetes self-management in Chinese adults. The results showed that confrontation, resignation, overall health beliefs, perceived susceptibility, perceived barriers, and self-efficacy were factors associated with overall diabetes self-management performance and six aspects of diabetes self-management behaviors. There is some limited evidence to suggest that provider-patient communication, married individuals, higher educational level, and higher household income level may also be linked to better diabetes self-management practice. Having healthcare insurance and utilizing chronic illness resources generally appeared to have a favorable effect on diabetes self-management performance. In addition, there were a number of factors for which the evidence is too limited to be able to ascertain its strength of association with diabetes self-management practice. The findings of this review suggest that diabetes self-management behaviors are affected by a wide range of personal and environmental factors, which allow health care providers to develop theory-based strategies to improve diabetes-self-management behaviors in this population. PMID:26378555

  16. Mediation of Autophagic Cell Death by Type 3 Ryanodine Receptor (RyR3) in Adult Hippocampal Neural Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kyung Min; Jeong, Eun-Ji; Park, Hyunhee; An, Hyun-Kyu; Yu, Seong-Woon

    2016-01-01

    Cytoplasmic Ca2+ actively engages in diverse intracellular processes from protein synthesis, folding and trafficking to cell survival and death. Dysregulation of intracellular Ca2+ levels is observed in various neuropathological states including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) and inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptors (IP3Rs), the main Ca2+ release channels located in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes, are known to direct various cellular events such as autophagy and apoptosis. Here we investigated the intracellular Ca2+-mediated regulation of survival and death of adult hippocampal neural stem (HCN) cells utilizing an insulin withdrawal model of autophagic cell death (ACD). Despite comparable expression levels of RyR and IP3R transcripts in HCN cells at normal state, the expression levels of RyRs—especially RyR3—were markedly upregulated upon insulin withdrawal. While treatment with the RyR agonist caffeine significantly promoted the autophagic death of insulin-deficient HCN cells, treatment with its inhibitor dantrolene prevented the induction of autophagy following insulin withdrawal. Furthermore, CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knockout of the RyR3 gene abolished ACD of HCN cells. This study delineates a distinct, RyR3-mediated ER Ca2+ regulation of autophagy and programmed cell death in neural stem cells. Our findings provide novel insights into the critical, yet understudied mechanisms underlying the regulatory function of ER Ca2+ in neural stem cell biology. PMID:27199668

  17. Vasopressin inhibits type-I collagen and albumin gene expression in primary cultures of adult rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Chojkier, M.; Brenner, D.A.; Leffert, H.L.

    1989-06-05

    The mechanisms that regulate collagen gene expression in hepatic cells are poorly understood. Accelerated Ca2+ fluxes are associated with inhibiting collagen synthesis selectively in human fibroblasts. In suspension cultures of isolated hepatocytes, the Ca2+ agonist vasopressin increases cytosolic levels of free Ca2+. However, whether vasopressin's interactions with plasma membrane V1 receptors attenuate hepatic collagen production is unknown. We investigated this problem by studying vasopressin's effects on collagen synthesis and Ca2+ efflux in long-term primary cultures of differentiated and proliferation-competent adult rat hepatocytes. Twelve-day-old quiescent cultures were exposed to test substances and labeled with (5-3H)proline. Determinations of radioactivity in collagenase-sensitive and collagenase-resistant proteins were used to calculate the relative levels of collagen production. Synthetic (8-arg)vasopressin stimulated 45Ca2+ efflux within 1 min and inhibited hepatocyte collagen production within 3 h by 50%; overall rates of protein synthesis were not affected significantly. In cultures labeled with (35S)methionine, vasopressin also decreased the levels of newly synthesized and secreted albumin, but not fibrinogen, detected in specific immunoprecipitates analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. Northern blot analyses using specific (32P)cDNA probes revealed 70% decreases in hybridizable levels of collagen alpha 1(I) mRNA in hepatocyte cultures treated with either vasopressin or Ca2+ ionophore A23187; hybridizable levels of albumin mRNA also fell approximately 50% following vasopressin treatment.

  18. The Effect of Changes in Cardiorespiratory Fitness and Weight on Obstructive Sleep Apnea Severity in Overweight Adults with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kline, Christopher E.; Reboussin, David M.; Foster, Gary D.; Rice, Thomas B.; Strotmeyer, Elsa S.; Jakicic, John M.; Millman, Richard P.; Pi-Sunyer, F. Xavier; Newman, Anne B.; Wadden, Thomas A.; Zammit, Gary; Kuna, Samuel T.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: To examine the effect of changes in cardiorespiratory fitness on obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) severity prior to and following adjustment for changes in weight over the course of a 4-y weight loss intervention. Methods: As secondary analyses of a randomized controlled trial, 263 overweight/obese adults with type 2 diabetes and OSA participated in an intensive lifestyle intervention or education control condition. Measures of OSA severity, cardiorespiratory fitness, and body weight were obtained at baseline, year 1, and year 4. Change in the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) served as the primary outcome. The percentage change in fitness (submaximal metabolic equivalents [METs]) and change in weight (kg) were the primary independent variables. Primary analyses collapsed intervention conditions with statistical adjustment for treatment group and baseline METs, weight, and AHI among other relevant covariates. Results: At baseline, greater METs were associated with lower AHI (B [SE] = −1.48 [0.71], P = 0.038), but this relationship no longer existed (B [SE] = −0.24 [0.73], P = 0.75) after adjustment for weight (B [SE] = 0.31 [0.07], P < 0.0001). Fitness significantly increased at year 1 (+16.53 ± 28.71% relative to baseline), but returned to near-baseline levels by year 4 (+1.81 ± 24.48%). In mixed-model analyses of AHI change over time without consideration of weight change, increased fitness at year 1 (B [SE] = −0.15 [0.04], P < 0.0001), but not at year 4 (B [SE] = 0.04 [0.05], P = 0.48), was associated with AHI reduction. However, with weight change in the model, greater weight loss was associated with AHI reduction at years 1 and 4 (B [SE] = 0.81 [0.16] and 0.60 [0.16], both P < 0.0001), rendering the association between fitness and AHI change at year 1 nonsignificant (B [SE] = −0.04 [0.04], P = 0.31). Conclusions: Among overweight/obese adults with type 2 diabetes, fitness change did not influence OSA severity change when weight change was

  19. Longitudinal relationship between diabetes-specific emotional distress and follow-up HbA1c in adults with Type 1 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Strandberg, R B; Graue, M; Wentzel-Larsen, T; Peyrot, M; Thordarson, H B; Rokne, B

    2015-01-01

    Aim To examine whether diabetes-specific emotional distress was related to follow-up glycaemic control in adults with Type 1 diabetes mellitus. Methods Adults with Type 1 diabetes mellitus completed the Diabetes Distress Scale and reported sociodemographic information when attending a clinical consultation at a university endocrinology unit. Blood samples to determine baseline HbA1c were taken during consultations. All respondents’ HbA1c measurements registered from January 2009 to December 2011 were collected from medical records. The relationship between baseline diabetes-specific emotional distress and HbA1c was examined with linear mixed-effects models in 175 patients with complete data. Results After controlling for confounders, baseline diabetes-specific emotional distress and glycaemic control were significantly associated (fixed-effect coefficient 0.40, P < 0.001) and the regimen-related distress subscale had the strongest association with glycaemic control (fixed-effect coefficient 0.47, P < 0.001). The two-item measure of diabetes-specific distress had a weaker but still significant association with glycaemic control (fixed-effect coefficient 0.31, P < 0.001). None of these relationships was significant after adjusting for the baseline HbA1c. Conclusions People with elevated baseline diabetes-specific emotional distress are at risk of prolonged suboptimum glycaemic control; therefore, elevated diabetes-specific emotional distress, especially regimen-related distress, might be an important marker for prolonged suboptimum glycaemic control, and might indicate a need for special attention regarding patient self-management. What’s new? In adults with Type 1 diabetes, elevated baseline diabetes-specific emotional distress is associated with worse glycaemic control over a 1–3-year period and regimen-related distress had the strongest association with subsequent glycaemic control. Baseline diabetes-specific emotional distress is associated with the

  20. Kidney Dysfunction in Adult Offspring Exposed In Utero to Type 1 Diabetes Is Associated with Alterations in Genome-Wide DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Gautier, Jean-François; Porcher, Raphaël; Abi Khalil, Charbel; Bellili-Munoz, Naima; Fetita, Lila Sabrina; Travert, Florence; Choukem, Simeon-Pierre; Riveline, Jean-Pierre; Hadjadj, Samy; Larger, Etienne; Boudou, Philippe; Blondeau, Bertrand; Roussel, Ronan; Ferré, Pascal; Ravussin, Eric; Rouzet, François; Marre, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Background Fetal exposure to hyperglycemia impacts negatively kidney development and function. Objective Our objective was to determine whether fetal exposure to moderate hyperglycemia is associated with epigenetic alterations in DNA methylation in peripheral blood cells and whether those alterations are related to impaired kidney function in adult offspring. Design Twenty nine adult, non-diabetic offspring of mothers with type 1 diabetes (T1D) (case group) were matched with 28 offspring of T1D fathers (control group) for the study of their leukocyte genome-wide DNA methylation profile (27,578 CpG sites, Human Methylation 27 BeadChip, Illumina Infinium). In a subset of 19 cases and 18 controls, we assessed renal vascular development by measuring Glomerular Filtration Rate (GFR) and Effective Renal Plasma Flow (ERPF) at baseline and during vasodilatation produced by amino acid infusion. Results Globally, DNA was under-methylated in cases vs. controls. Among the 87 CpG sites differently methylated, 74 sites were less methylated and 13 sites more methylated in cases vs. controls. None of these CpG sites were located on a gene known to be directly involved in kidney development and/or function. However, the gene encoding DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1)—a key enzyme involved in gene expression during early development–was under-methylated in cases. The average methylation of the 74 under-methylated sites differently correlated with GFR in cases and controls. Conclusion Alterations in methylation profile imprinted by the hyperglycemic milieu of T1D mothers during fetal development may impact kidney function in adult offspring. The involved pathways seem to be a nonspecific imprinting process rather than specific to kidney development or function. PMID:26258530

  1. Applying Novel Genome-Wide Linkage Strategies to Search for Loci Influencing Type 2 Diabetes and Adult Height in American Samoa

    PubMed Central

    ÅBERG, KAROLINA; SUN, GUANGYUN; SMELSER, DIANE; INDUGULA, SUBBA RAO; TSAI, HUI-JU; STEELE, MATTHEW S.; TUITELE, JOHN; DEKA, RANJAN; MCGARVEY, STEPHEN T.; WEEKS, DANIEL E.

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a common complex phenotype that by the year 2010 is predicted to affect 221 million people globally. In the present study we performed a genome-wide linkage scan using the allele-sharing statistic Sall implemented in Allegro and a novel two-dimensional genome-wide strategy implemented in Merloc that searches for pairwise interaction between genetic markers located on different chromosomes linked to T2DM. In addition, we used a robust score statistic from the newly developed QTL-ALL software to search for linkage to variation in adult height. The strategies were applied to a study sample consisting of 238 sib-pairs affected with T2DM from American Samoa. We did not detect any genome-wide significant susceptibility loci for T2DM. However, our two-dimensional linkage investigation detected several loci pairs of interest, including 11q22 and 21q21, 9q21 and 11q22, 1p22–p21 and 4p15, and 4p15 and 15q11–q14, with a two-loci maximum LOD score (MLS) greater than 2.00. Most detected individual loci have previously been identified as susceptibility loci for diabetes-related traits. Our two-dimensional linkage results may facilitate the selection of potential candidate genes and molecular pathways for further diabetes studies because these results, besides providing candidate loci, also demonstrate that polygenic effects may play an important role in T2DM. Linkage was detected (p value of 0.005) for variation in adult height on chromosome 9q31, which was reported previously in other populations. Our finding suggests that the 9q31 region may be a strong quantitative trait locus for adult height, which is likely to be of importance across populations. PMID:18720898

  2. The alpha angle in cam-type femoroacetabular impingement: new reference intervals based on 2038 healthy young adults.

    PubMed

    Laborie, L B; Lehmann, T G; Engesæter, I Ø; Sera, F; Engesæter, L B; Rosendahl, K

    2014-04-01

    We report on gender-specific reference intervals of the alpha angle and its association with other qualitative cam-type findings in femoroacetabular impingement at the hip, according to a population-based cohort of 2038 19-year-olds, 1186 of which were women (58%). The alpha angle was measured on standardised frog-leg lateral and anteroposterior (AP) views using digital measurement software, and qualitative cam-type findings were assessed subjectively on both views by independent observers. In all, 2005 participants (837 men, 1168 women, mean age 18.6 years (17.2 to 20.1) were included in the analysis. For the frog-leg view, the mean alpha angle (right hip) was 47° (26 to 79) in men and 42° (29 to 76) in women, with 97.5 percentiles of 68° and 56°, respectively. For the AP view, the mean values were 62° (40 to 105) and 52° (36 to 103) for men and women, respectively, with 97.5 percentiles of 93° and 94°. Associations between higher alpha angles and all qualitative cam-type findings were seen for both genders on both views. The reference intervals presented for the alpha angle in this cross-sectional study are wide, especially for the AP view, with higher mean values for men than women on both views. PMID:24692609

  3. Longitudinal changes in cerebellar and subcortical volumes in adult-onset Niemann-Pick disease type C patients treated with miglustat.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Elizabeth A; Walterfang, Mark; Abel, Larry; Desmond, Patricia; Fahey, Michael; Velakoulis, Dennis

    2015-09-01

    Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) is a rare neurovisceral disorder resulting in impaired intracellular lipid trafficking. The only disease-modifying treatment available to date is miglustat, an iminosugar inhibiting the accumulation of lipid by-products in neurons. This study explored how changes in cerebellar grey and white matter volumes, and in subcortical volumes, related to patient treatment status and disability and ataxia ratings. Nine adult-onset NPC patients and 17 matched controls underwent T1-weighted MRI. One patient was not receiving miglustat, and pre-treatment data were available for a further patient. Semi-automated cerebellar and subcortical segmentation was undertaken, and the rates of change in putamen, hippocampal, thalamic and caudal volumes, and grey and white matter cerebellar volumes, were compared to rates of change in Iturriaga disability score, Brief Ataxia Rating Scale (BARS), and horizontal saccadic gain. Untreated NPC patients appeared to lose cerebellar grey and white matter, bilateral thalamic volume, and right caudate volume faster than treated patients. Cerebellar grey matter volume loss and volume loss in the left thalamus were significantly correlated with Iturriaga disability scale changes. Change in both cerebellar grey and white matter was correlated with decrease in horizontal saccadic gain, but not with change in BARS. This is the first study to examine longitudinal treatment effects of miglustat on cerebellar and subcortical volumes in patients with adult-onset NPC, and is evidence that miglustat may have a protective effect on cerebellar and subcortical structure and function. PMID:26092521

  4. Quality of Life, Depression, and Healthcare Resource Utilization among Adults with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Concomitant Hypertension and Obesity: A Prospective Survey

    PubMed Central

    Green, Andrew J.; Bazata, Debbra D.; Fox, Kathleen M.; Grandy, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Background. This study compared quality of life, depression, and healthcare resource utilization among adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and comorbid hypertension (HTN) and obesity with those of adults reporting T2DM alone. Methods. Respondents to the US SHIELD survey self-reported their height, weight, comorbid conditions, hospitalizations, and outpatient visits and completed the Short Form-12 (SF-12) and Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). Respondents reporting T2DM and HTN and obesity (body mass index, BMI, ≥30 kg/m2) were compared with a T2DM-alone group. Results. Respondents with T2DM, HTN, and obesity (n = 1292) had significantly lower SF-12 Physical and Mental Component Summary scores (37.3 and 50.9, resp.) than T2DM-alone respondents (n = 349) (45.8 and 53.5, resp., P < 0.0001). Mean PHQ-9 scores were significantly higher among T2DM respondents with comorbid HTN and obesity (5.0 versus 2.5, P < 0.0001), indicating greater depression burden. Respondents with T2DM, HTN, and obesity had significantly more resource utilization with respect to physician visits and emergency room visits but not hospitalizations than respondents with T2DM alone (P = 0.03). Conclusions. SHIELD respondents with comorbid conditions of T2DM, HTN, and obesity reported greater healthcare resource utilization, more depression symptoms, and lower quality of life than the T2DM-alone group. PMID:22762006

  5. Primary and Specialty Medical Care Among Ethnically Diverse, Older Rural Adults With Type 2 Diabetes: The ELDER Diabetes Study

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Ronny A.; Quandt, Sara A.; Arcury, Thomas A.; Snively, Beverly M.; Stafford, Jeanette M.; Smith, Shannon L.; Skelly, Anne H.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose Residents in rural communities in the United States, especially ethnic minority group members, have limited access to primary and specialty health care that is critical for diabetes management. This study examines primary and specialty medical care utilization among a rural, ethnically diverse, older adult population with diabetes. Methods Data were drawn from a cross-sectional face-to-face survey of randomly selected African American (n = 220), Native American (n = 181), and white (n = 297) Medicare beneficiaries ≥65 years old with diabetes in 2 rural counties in central North Carolina. Participants were asked about utilization of a primary care doctor and of specialists (nutritionist, diabetes specialist, eye doctor, bladder specialist, kidney specialist, heart specialist, foot specialist) in the past year. Findings Virtually all respondents (99.0%) reported having a primary care doctor and seeing that doctor in the past year. About 42% reported seeing a doctor for diabetes-related care. On average, participants reported seeing 2 specialists in the past year, and 54% reported seeing >1 specialist. Few reported seeing a diabetes specialist (5.7%), nutritionist (10.9%), or kidney specialist (17.5%). African Americans were more likely than others to report seeing a foot specialist (P<.01), while men were more likely than women to have seen a bladder specialist (P =.02), kidney specialist (P =.001), and heart specialist (P =.004), after adjusting for potential confounders. Predictors of the number of specialists seen include gender, education, poverty status, diabetes medication use, and self-rated health. Conclusions These data indicate low utilization of specialty diabetes care providers across ethnic groups and reflect the importance of primary care providers in diabetes care in rural areas. PMID:16092292

  6. Adult Cancers in Adolescents and Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Laurence, Valérie; Marples, Maria; Stark, Daniel P

    2016-01-01

    The pattern of cancer seen in young people changes with increasing age, transitioning from childhood- to adult-type cancer in adolescence and the third decade. The risk factors, presentation and biology of cancer in young adults differ from those in the older adult population. Factors of particular significance in adolescents and young adults (AYAs) include genetic predisposition to adult-type cancer, diagnostic uncertainty, long-term morbidity and considerations of fertility. New systemic therapies are being introduced that can prolong life and even increase the chance of cure, but the impact on AYAs is uncertain, as these patients are often under-represented in clinical trials. Here, we discuss the management of AYAs with 3 of the most common cancers affecting adults, when they emerge in the AYA populations, and therefore are currently met by medical oncologists - breast cancer, colorectal cancer and melanoma. PMID:27595357

  7. Diabetes-related Quality of Life and the Demands and Burdens of Diabetes Care among Emerging Adults with Type 1 Diabetes in the Year after High School Graduation

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Kathleen M.; Weaver, Michael T.; Fortenberry, J. Dennis; DiMeglio, Linda A.

    2014-01-01

    The roles of glycemic control, diabetes management, diabetes care responsibility, living independently of parents, and time since high school graduation in predicting diabetes-related quality of life (DQOL) were examined in 184 emerging adults with type 1 diabetes. Data were collected at graduation and one year later. Analyses controlling for selected covariates were completed using generalized linear mixed models. Better diabetes management was associated with more positive responses on all four dimensions of DQOL. Impact and worry of DQOL were greater in the presence of depressive symptoms, and life satisfaction was lower. DQOL life satisfaction was lower in those living independently of parents. Young women reported lower diabetes-related health status than did young men. Time since graduation was not linked to DQOL. Further research is needed on ways to improve DQOL in conjunction with diabetes management and on ways that families can support DQOL when youth live independently. PMID:25164122

  8. Self-esteem and illness self-concept in emerging adults with Type 1 diabetes: Long-term associations with problem areas in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Luyckx, Koen; Rassart, Jessica; Aujoulat, Isabelle; Goubert, Liesbet; Weets, Ilse

    2016-04-01

    This long-term prospective study examined whether illness self-concept (or the degree to which chronic illness becomes integrated in the self) mediated the pathway from self-esteem to problem areas in diabetes in emerging adults with Type 1 diabetes. Having a central illness self-concept (i.e. feeling overwhelmed by diabetes) was found to relate to lower self-esteem, and more treatment, food, emotional, and social support problems. Furthermore, path analyses indicated that self-esteem was negatively related to both levels and relative changes in these problem areas in diabetes over a period of 5 years. Illness self-concept fully mediated these associations. PMID:24776688

  9. Adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma in a pregnant woman diagnosed as a human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 carrier.

    PubMed

    Fuchi, Naoki; Miura, Kiyonori; Imaizumi, Yoshitaka; Hasegawa, Hiroo; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Miyazaki, Yasushi; Masuzaki, Hideaki

    2016-03-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the causative agent of adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATL), which is difficult to cure. In Japan, a nationwide HTLV-1 screening test in pregnant women has been recommended since 2011. A 30-year-old woman was diagnosed as being an HTLV-1 carrier in her previous pregnancy. During the current pregnancy, she had persistent fever and cough. Although she had treatment with antibiotics, peripheral white blood cell count remained high, with an abnormal lymphocyte count. Given that she was an HTLV-1 carrier, she was diagnosed with unfavorable chronic ATL (aggressive ATL) at 12 weeks gestation. After pregnancy termination, her ATL status became favorable chronic ATL (indolent ATL). Therefore, watchful waiting was performed until disease progression. This is the first case report of chronic ATL in early pregnancy, in a woman already diagnosed as an HTLV-1 carrier on screening test. PMID:26663442

  10. Association of major histocompatibility complex class 1 chain-related gene a dimorphism with type 1 diabetes and latent autoimmune diabetes in adults in the Algerian population.

    PubMed

    Raache, Rachida; Belanteur, Khadidja; Amroun, Habiba; Benyahia, Amel; Heniche, Amel; Azzouz, Malha; Mimouni, Safia; Gervais, Thibaud; Latinne, Dominique; Boudiba, Aissa; Attal, Nabila; Abbadi, Mohamed Cherif

    2012-04-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene A (MICA-129) dimorphism was investigated in 73 autoimmune diabetes patients (type 1 diabetes and latent autoimmune diabetes in adults) and 75 controls from Algeria. Only MICA-129 Val allele and MICA-129 Val/Val genotype frequencies were higher among patients than in the control group. Statistical analysis of the estimated extended HLA-DR-DQ-MICA haplotypes shown that individual effects of MICA alleles on HLA-DQ2-DR3-MICA-129 Val/Val and HLA-DQ8-DR4-MICA-129 Val/Val haplotypes were significantly higher in patients than in the control groups. These preliminary data might suggest a relevant role of MICA-129 Val/Val single nucleotide polymorphism (weak/weak binders of NKG2D receptor) in the pathogenesis of T1D and LADA. PMID:22323559

  11. Association of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class 1 Chain-Related Gene A Dimorphism with Type 1 Diabetes and Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults in the Algerian Population

    PubMed Central

    Belanteur, Khadidja; Amroun, Habiba; Benyahia, Amel; Heniche, Amel; Azzouz, Malha; Mimouni, Safia; Gervais, Thibaud; Latinne, Dominique; Boudiba, Aissa; Attal, Nabila; Abbadi, Mohamed Cherif

    2012-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene A (MICA-129) dimorphism was investigated in 73 autoimmune diabetes patients (type 1 diabetes and latent autoimmune diabetes in adults) and 75 controls from Algeria. Only MICA-129 Val allele and MICA-129 Val/Val genotype frequencies were higher among patients than in the control group. Statistical analysis of the estimated extended HLA-DR-DQ-MICA haplotypes shown that individual effects of MICA alleles on HLA-DQ2-DR3-MICA-129 Val/Val and HLA-DQ8-DR4-MICA-129 Val/Val haplotypes were significantly higher in patients than in the control groups. These preliminary data might suggest a relevant role of MICA-129 Val/Val single nucleotide polymorphism (weak/weak binders of NKG2D receptor) in the pathogenesis of T1D and LADA. PMID:22323559

  12. The Bone Morphogenetic Protein Type Ib Receptor Is a Major Mediator of Glial Differentiation and Cell Survival in Adult Hippocampal Progenitor Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Brederlau, A.; Faigle, R.; Elmi, M.; Zarebski, A.; Sjöberg, S.; Fujii, M.; Miyazono, K.; Funa, K.

    2004-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) act as growth regulators and inducers of differentiation. They transduce their signal via three different type I receptors, termed activin receptor-like kinase 2 (Alk2), Alk3, or bone morphogenetic protein receptor Ia (BMPRIa) and Alk6 or BMPRIb. Little is known about functional differences between the three type I receptors. Here, we have investigated consequences of constitutively active (ca) and dominant negative (dn) type I receptor overexpression in adult-derived hippocampal progenitor cells (AHPs). The dn receptors have a nonfunctional intracellular but functional extracellular domain. They thus trap BMPs that are endogenously produced by AHPs. We found that effects obtained by overexpression of dnAlk2 and dnAlk6 were similar, suggesting similar ligand binding patterns for these receptors. Thus, cell survival was decreased, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression was reduced, whereas the number of oligodendrocytes increased. No effect on neuronal differentiation was seen. Whereas the expression of Alk2 and Alk3 mRNA remained unchanged, the Alk6 mRNA was induced after impaired BMP signaling. After dnAlk3 overexpression, cell survival and astroglial differentiation increased in parallel to augmented Alk6 receptor signaling. We conclude that endogenous BMPs mediate cell survival, astroglial differentiation and the suppression of oligodendrocytic cell fate mainly via the Alk6 receptor in AHP culture. PMID:15194807

  13. Mouse adenovirus type 1 causes a fatal hemorrhagic encephalomyelitis in adult C57BL/6 but not BALB/c mice.

    PubMed Central

    Guida, J D; Fejer, G; Pirofski, L A; Brosnan, C F; Horwitz, M S

    1995-01-01

    Mouse adenovirus type 1 (MAV-1) produces a lethal disease in newborn or suckling mice characterized by infectious virus and viral lesions in multiple organs. Previous reports of MAV-1 infection of adult mice generally described serologic evidence of infection without morbidity or mortality. However, our current results demonstrate that MAV-1 causes a fatal illness in adult C57BL/6(B6) mice (50% lethal dose, [LD50], 10(3.0) PFU) but not in adult BALB/c mice at all of the doses tested (LD50, > or = 10(5.0) PFU). Adult (BALB/c x B6)F1 mice were intermediately susceptible (LD50, 10(4.5) PFU). Clinically, the sensitive B6 mice showed symptoms of acute central nervous system (CNS) disease, including tremors, seizures, ataxia, and paralysis. Light microscopic examination of CNS tissue from the B6 animals revealed petechial hemorrhages, edema, neovascularization, and mild inflammation in the brain and spinal cord. Analysis by electron microscopy showed evidence of inflammation, such as activated microglia, as well as swollen astrocytic endfeet and perivascular lipid deposition indicative of blood-brain barrier dysfunction. Outside of the CNS, the only significant pathological findings were foci of cytolysis in the splenic white pulp. Assessment of viral replication from multiple tissues was performed by using RNase protection assays with an antisense MAV-1 early region 1a probe. The greatest amounts of viral mRNA in MAV-1-infected B6 animals were located in the brain and spinal cord. Less viral message was detected in the spleen, lungs, and heart. No viral mRNA was detected in BALB/c mouse tissue, with the exception of low levels in the heart. Viral titers of organ tissues were also determined and were concordant with RNase protection findings on the brain and spinal cord but failed to demonstrate significant infectious virus in additional organs. Our experiments demonstrate that MAV-1 has a striking tropism for the CNS that is strain dependent, and this provides an

  14. Perception and Sense of Control Over Eating Behaviors Among a Diverse Sample of Adults at Risk for Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Fukuoka, Yoshimi; Lindgren, Teri G.; Bonnet, Kemberlee; Kamitani, Emiko

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of the study was to explore and understand knowledge and attitudes about food, diet, and weight control, focusing on barriers and motivators to reduce risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Methods Six focus groups were conducted in May and June 2010. The groups were stratified by sex. A total of 35 ethnically diverse samples with a high risk for type 2 diabetes participated. The average age was 51 ± 10.6 years, and 57% of the sample represented women. Results Four themes emerged from the focus groups: (1) demonstrated knowledge and source of knowledge, including participants’ basic understanding of “good” and “bad” food and what constitutes a “healthy diet” and trusted sources of information; (2) perceptions of food and diet, encompassing how participants expressed their perception of and interaction with food and diet; (3) sense of control over dietary intake, reflecting participants’ discussion of their perceived ability to control their eating patterns and food choices; and (4) eating behaviors, describing participants’ patterns of eating and perceived barriers to eating a healthy diet. Conclusions Study findings demonstrate that eating healthy requires a complex interaction between individual perceptions of food and sense of control over eating patterns and socio-political and economic structural factors that restrict healthy eating options while promoting unhealthy ones. Programs for long-term eating behavioral change necessary to reduce type 2 diabetes and obesity need to incorporate strategies that address individual-level factors of perception of food and sense of control over eating patterns, as well as structural level factors such as poverty and food insecurity. PMID:24525569

  15. Program ACTIVE II: Design and Methods for a Multi-Center Community-Based Depression Treatment for Rural and Urban Adults with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    de Groot, Mary; Shubrook, Jay; Schwartz, Frank; Hornsby, W. Guyton; Pillay, Yegan; Saha, Chandan

    2015-01-01

    Objective Depression affects one in four adults with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and is associated with worsened diabetes complications, increased health care costs and early mortality. Rural and low-income urban areas, including the Appalachian region, represent an epicenter of the T2DM epidemic. Program ACTIVE II is a comparative effectiveness treatment trial designed to test whether a combination of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and community-based exercise (EXER) will offer greater improvements in diabetes and depression outcomes compared to individual treatment approaches and usual care (UC). The secondary aims are to assess changes in cardiovascular risk factors across groups and to conduct a cost-effectiveness analysis of predicted incidence of cardiovascular complications across groups. Methods The study is a 2-by-2 factorial randomized controlled trial consisting of 4 treatment groups: CBT alone, EXER alone, combination of CBT and EXER, and UC. Adults with T2DM for > 1 year and who meet DSM-IVTR criteria for Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) are eligible to participate at two rural Appalachian sites (southeastern Ohio and West Virginia) and one urban site (Indianapolis). This type II behavioral translation study uses a community-engaged research (CEnR) approach by incorporating community fitness centers and mental health practices as interventionists. Conclusions This is the first study to evaluate the comparative effectiveness of combined CBT and exercise in the treatment of depression using community-based intervention delivery. This approach may serve as a national model for expanding depression treatment for patients with T2DM.

  16. Evaluation of a combined blood glucose monitoring and gaming system (Didget®) for motivation in children, adolescents, and young adults with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Klingensmith, Georgeanna J; Aisenberg, Javier; Kaufman, Francine; Halvorson, Mary; Cruz, Eric; Riordan, Mary Ellen; Varma, Chandrasekhar; Pardo, Scott; Viggiani, Maria T; Wallace, Jane F; Schachner, Holly C; Bailey, Timothy

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the performance and acceptability of a blood glucose meter coupled with a gaming system for children, adolescents, and young adults with type 1 diabetes. During an in-clinic visit, duplicate blood samples were tested by subjects (N = 147; aged 5-24 yr) and health care providers (HCPs) to evaluate the accuracy and precision of the Didget® system. Subjects' meter results were compared against Yellow Springs Instruments (YSI) reference results and HCP results using least squares regression and error grid analyses. Precision was measured by average within-subject and within-HCP coefficient of variation (CV). During the home-use component of this study, subjects (n = 58) tested their blood glucose at least two to three times daily for 3-5 d to evaluate routine use of the system. Subjects' meter results showed significant correlations with both YSI (r(2) = 0.94; p < 0.001 for regression slope) and HCP results (r(2) = 0.96; p < 0.001). Average within-subject and within-HCP CVs were 5.9 and 7.2%, respectively. Overall satisfaction was assessed by subjects, their parents or guardians, and HCP surveys. Subject satisfaction with the Didget® system was good to excellent; most subjects found the system easy to use, motivating, and helpful for building good blood glucose monitoring habits. Most HCPs agreed that the system fulfilled a need in diabetes management. In conclusion, the Didget® system was precise and clinically accurate in the hands of children, adolescents, and young adults with type 1 diabetes. PMID:21699639

  17. The Relationship Between Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Self-Reported Stroke or Coronary Heart Disease in Overweight and Obese Adults with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Thomas B.; Foster, Gary D.; Sanders, Mark H.; Unruh, Mark; Reboussin, David; Kuna, Samuel T.; Millman, Richard; Zammit, Gary; Wing, Rena R.; Wadden, Thomas A.; Kelley, David; Pi-Sunyer, Xavier; Newman, Anne B.

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are common, increasingly recognized as comorbid conditions, and individually implicated in the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD). We sought to determine the association between OSA and CVD in an overweight and obese population with T2DM. Design: Cross-sectional. Setting: Ancillary study to the Look AHEAD trial. Participants: Three hundred five participants of the Sleep AHEAD study who underwent unattended full polysomnography at home with measurement of the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI). Measurements and Results: Self-reported prevalent CVD was obtained at the initial assessment of the parent study and included a history of the following conditions: stroke, carotid endarterectomy, myocardial infarction, coronary artery bypass grafting, and percutaneous coronary intervention. Logistic regression was used to assess the association of OSA, measured continuously and categorically, with prevalent CVD. OSA was present (AHI ≥ 5) in 86% of the population, whereas the prevalence of all forms of CVD was just 14%. The AHI was associated with stroke with an adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of 2.57 (1.03, 6.42). Neither the continuously measured AHI nor the categories of OSA severity were significantly associated with the other forms of CVD assessed. Conclusions: We found suggestive evidence of a greater prevalence of stroke at greater values of the AHI. OSA was not associated with prevalent coronary heart disease in the Sleep AHEAD trial. Future studies should confirm the link between OSA and stroke and examine mechanisms that link OSA to stroke in adults with T2DM. Citation: Rice TB; Foster GD; Sanders MH; Unruh M; Reboussin D; Kuna ST; Millman R; Zammit G; Wing RR; Wadden TA; Kelley D; Pi-Sunyer X; Newman AB. The relationship between obstructive sleep apnea and self-reported stroke or coronary heart disease in overweight and obese adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus

  18. Effect of a behavioral intervention on dimensions of self-regulation and physical activity among overweight and obese adults with type 2 diabetes: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Silfee, Valerie; Petosa, Rick; Laurent, Devin; Schaub, Timothy; Focht, Brian

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to determine the preliminary effect of a behavioral intervention on the use of self-regulation strategies and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) in overweight and obese adults with type 2 diabetes. 23 individuals recruited from ResearchMatc.org and campus advertisements were randomized into an intervention (n = 12) and control (n = 11) group. The intervention group received a behavioral intervention that used goal setting, time management, and self-monitoring to target dimensions of self-regulation and MVPA. The control received information regarding their PA habits. MVPA was measured via BodyMedia Armbands at pre- and post-test. The use of self-regulatory strategies for MVPA was assessed at pretest and posttest using the Self-Regulation for Exercise Scale. Cohen's d effect sizes were calculated to determine the practical impact of the intervention. The intervention had a large effect on all dimensions of self-regulation across time: including total self-regulation (3.15), self-monitoring (4.63), goal setting (3.17), social support (1.29), self-reward (1.98), time management (4.41), and overcoming barriers (2.25). The intervention had no impact on dimensions of MVPA across time. This pilot study demonstrated the ability of a behavioral intervention to improve the use of self-regulation strategies for MVPA in a sample of adults with type 2 diabetes. These findings can further inform the development of health promotion programs to promote self-regulation. Future research should focus on determining ability of improvements in self-regulation to stimulate behavior change. PMID:26785605

  19. Determining adult type 2 diabetes-related health care needs in an indigenous population from rural Guatemala: a mixed-methods preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In Guatemala, diabetes is an emerging public health concern. Guatemala has one of the largest indigenous populations in Latin America, and this population frequently does not access the formal health care system. Therefore, knowledge about the emergence of diabetes in this population is limited. Methods Interview participants (n=23) were recruited from a convenience sample of indigenous adults with type 2 diabetes at one rural diabetes clinic in Guatemala. A structured interview was used to assess knowledge about diabetes and its complications; access to diabetes-related health care and treatment; dietary and lifestyle changes; and family and social supports for individuals living with diabetes. Interviews were supplemented with two group interviews with community leaders and health care providers. Thematic analysis was used to produce insights into diabetes knowledge, attitudes, and practices. In addition, a chart review of the clinic’s electronic medical record identified all adult patients (n=80) presenting in one calendar year for a first-time diabetic consultation. Sociodemographic and clinical variables were extracted and summarized from these records. Results Salient demographic factors in both the structured interview and chart review samples included low educational levels and high indigenous language preference. In the interview sample, major gaps in biomedical knowledge about diabetes included understanding the causes, chronicity, and long-term end-organ complications of diabetes. Medication costs, medical pluralism, and limited social supports for dietary and lifestyles changes were major practical barriers to disease management. Quantitative data from medical records review revealed high rates of poor glycemic control, overweight and obesity, and medication prescription. Conclusions This study provides a preliminary sketch of type 2 diabetes in an indigenous Guatemalan population. Combined qualitative and quantitative data point towards

  20. Different types of soluble fermentable dietary fibre decrease food intake, body weight gain and adiposity in young adult male rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Dietary fibre-induced satiety offers a physiological approach to body weight regulation, yet there is lack of scientific evidence. This experiment quantified food intake, body weight and body composition responses to three different soluble fermentable dietary fibres in an animal model and explored underlying mechanisms of satiety signalling and hindgut fermentation. Methods Young adult male rats were fed ad libitum purified control diet (CONT) containing 5% w/w cellulose (insoluble fibre), or diet containing 10% w/w cellulose (CELL), fructo-oligosaccharide (FOS), oat beta-glucan (GLUC) or apple pectin (PECT) (4 weeks; n = 10/group). Food intake, body weight, and body composition (MRI) were recorded, final blood samples analysed for gut satiety hormones, hindgut contents for fermentation products (including short-chain fatty acids, SCFA) and intestinal tissues for SCFA receptor gene expression. Results GLUC, FOS and PECT groups had, respectively, 10% (P < 0.05), 17% (P < 0.001) and 19% (P < 0.001) lower food intake and 37% (P < 0.01), 37% (P < 0.01) and 45% (P < 0.001) lower body weight gain than CONT during the four-week experiment. At the end they had 26% (P < 0.05), 35% (P < 0.01) and 42% (P < 0.001) less total body fat, respectively, while plasma total glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) was 2.2-, 3.2- and 2.6-fold higher (P < 0.001) and peptide tyrosine tyrosine (PYY) was 2.3-, 3.1- and 3.0-fold higher (P < 0.001). There were no differences in these parameters between CONT and CELL. Compared with CONT and CELL, caecal concentrations of fermentation products increased 1.4- to 2.2-fold in GLUC, FOS and PECT (P < 0.05) and colonic concentrations increased 1.9- to 2.5-fold in GLUC and FOS (P < 0.05), with no consistent changes in SCFA receptor gene expression detected. Conclusions This provides animal model evidence that sustained intake of three different soluble dietary fibres decreases food intake, weight gain and adiposity, increases circulating satiety

  1. Reduction of adult hippocampal neurogenesis is amplified by aluminum exposure in a model of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Sung Min; Kim, Jong Whi; Yoo, Dae Young; Jung, Hyo Young; Choi, Jung Hoon; Hwang, In Koo; Seong, Je Kyung

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of chronic aluminum (Al) exposure for 10 weeks on cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in the hippocampus of type 2 diabetic rats. Six-week-old Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) and Zucker lean control (ZLC) rats were selected and randomly divided into Al- and non-Al-groups. Al was administered via drinking water for 10 weeks, after which the animals were sacrificed at 16 weeks of age. ZDF rats in both Al- and non-Al-groups showed increases in body weight and blood glucose levels compared to ZLC rats. Al exposure did not significantly affect body weight, blood glucose levels or pancreatic β-cells and morphology of the pancreas in either ZLC or ZDF rats. However, exposure to Al reduced cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in both ZLC and ZDF rats. Exposure to Al resulted in poor development of the dendritic processes of neuroblasts in both ZLC and ZDF rats. Furthermore, onset and continuation of diabetes reduced cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation, and Al exposure amplified reduction of these parameters. These results suggest that Al exposure via drinking water aggravates the impairment in hippocampal neurogenesis that is typically observed in type 2 diabetic animals. PMID:27051335

  2. Barriers and Facilitators to Self-Care Communication during Medical Appointments in Adults with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ritholz, Marilyn D; Beverly, Elizabeth A; Brooks, Kelly M; Abrahamson, Martin J; Weinger, Katie

    2014-01-01

    Objective Diabetes self-care is challenging and requires effective patient-provider communication to achieve optimal treatment outcomes. This study explored perceptions of barriers and facilitators to diabetes self-care communication during medical appointments. Design Qualitative study using in-depth interviews with a semi-structured interview guide. Participants 34 patients with type 2 diabetes and 19 physicians who treat type 2 diabetes. Results Physicians described some patients as reluctant to discuss their self-care behaviors primarily because of fear of being judged, guilt, and shame. Similarly, patients described reluctant communication resulting from fear of being judged and shame, particularly shame surrounding food intake and weight. Physicians and patients recommended trust, non-judgmental acceptance, open/honest communication, and providing patients hope for living with diabetes as important factors for improving self-care communication. Further, patients stressed the clinical benefits of physicians directly addressing poor self-care behaviors while physicians described having few strategies to address these difficulties. Conclusions Physician-patient self-care communication barriers included patients' reluctance to discuss self-care behaviors and physicians’ perceptions of few options to address this reluctance. Treatment recommendations stressed the importance of establishing trusting, non-judgmental and open patient-provider communication for optimal diabetes treatment. Medical education is needed to improve physicians' strategies for addressing self-care communication during medical appointments. PMID:24567195

  3. A Review of Insulin-Dosing Formulas for Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion (CSII) for Adults with Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    King, Allen B; Kuroda, Akio; Matsuhisa, Munehide; Hobbs, Todd

    2016-09-01

    Dosing guidelines for patients with type 1 diabetes using continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII), which are historically based on clinical experience and retrospective studies of patients consuming an American diet, recommend that basal insulin should represent approximately 50 % of the total daily dose (TDD). Recent prospective studies in the USA and Japan conclude that the more appropriate proportion is closer to 30-40 % of TDD. In addition, currently used formulas for calculating the carbohydrate-to-insulin ratio (CIR) and correction factor (CF) may lead to underdosing of bolus insulin by as much as 12.8-50 % for a hypothetical patient. The discrepancies between traditional formulas and data from newer studies can be accounted for by the more rigorous design of the newer studies (e.g., prospective design, controlled diets, meal omission, and frequent glucose monitoring). International differences in diet composition may also be important to consider when developing dosing recommendations for CSII. PMID:27457238

  4. Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in a Large Adult Cohort in Jos, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Isa, Samson E.; Oche, Agbaji O.; Kang'ombe, Arthur R.; Okopi, Joseph A.; Idoko, John A.; Cuevas, Luis E.; Gill, Geoffrey V.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and the use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) may increase the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, data from regions with a high burden of HIV/AIDS are limited. We determined the prevalence of T2DM at the time of presentation to a large HIV clinic in Nigeria, as well as the incidence of diabetes 12 months following ART initiation. Methods. Data from patients enrolled for ART from 2011 to 2013 was analyzed, including 2632 patients on enrollment and 2452 reevaluated after 12 months of ART commencement. The presence of diabetes, and demographic, clinical, and biochemical data were retrieved from standardized databases. CD4+, HIV RNA load, and hepatitis C virus status were noted. Bivariate and logistic regressions were used to identify risk factors for T2DM. Results. Baseline T2DM prevalence was 2.3% (95% confidence interval, 1.8%–2.9%); age, but not body mass index (BMI), was a risk factor for diabetes. After 12 months of ART, an additional 5.3% had developed T2DM. Newly developed diabetes was not associated with age, but was associated with BMI. There were no significant associations between prevalent or incident diabetes and CD4+, viral load, or type of ART. Conclusions. Diabetes is not uncommon in HIV-infected individuals at the time of presentation to HIV services. Patients initiating ART have a high risk of developing diabetes in the first year of ART. Excessive weight gain should be avoided, as incident diabetes was associated with a BMI ≥25.0 kg/m2. PMID:27307508

  5. Disease History and Medication Use as Risk Factors for the Clinical Manifestation of Type 1 Diabetes in Children and Young Adults: An Explorative Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Fazeli Farsani, Soulmaz; Souverein, Patrick C.; van der Vorst, Marja M. J.; Mantel-Teeuwisse, Aukje K.; Knibbe, Catherijne A. J.; de Boer, Anthonius

    2014-01-01

    Background There is a highly variable asymptomatic period of beta cell destruction prior to the clinical presentation of type1 diabetes. It is not well known what triggers type 1 diabetes to become a clinically overt disease. This explorative study aimed to identify the association between disease history/medication use and the clinical manifestation of type 1 diabetes. Methodology/Principal Findings An explorative case control study was conducted in the Dutch PHARMO Record Linkage System. Cases (n  = 1,107) were younger than 25 years and had at least 2 insulin prescriptions between 1999 and 2009. For each case, up to 4 controls (without any prescription for the glucose lowering medications (n  = 4,424)) were matched by age and sex. Conditional logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the association between disease history/medication use in the year prior to the diagnosis of type1 diabetes and clinical manifestation of this disease. Type1 diabetes was significantly associated with a history of mental disorder (odds ratio (OR) 8.0, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.5–43.7), anemia (OR 5.1, 95% CI 1.1–22.9), and disease of digestive system (OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.2–5.5). The following drug exposures were significantly associated with the clinical manifestation of type 1 diabetes: “systemic hormonal preparations” (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.1–2.6), medications for “blood and blood forming organs” (OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.1–2.6), “alimentary tract and metabolism” (OR 1.3, 95% CI 1.1–1.6), and “anti-infectives for systemic use” (OR 1.2, 95% CI 1.01–1.4). Conclusions Our explorative study demonstrated that in the year prior to the presentation of type1 diabetes in children and young adults, hospitalization for a diverse group of diseases and drug exposures were significantly more prevalent compared with age- and sex-matched diabetes-free controls. PMID:24498320

  6. Immunocytochemical and ultrastructural identification of pituitary cell types in the protogynous Thalassoma duperrey during adult sexual ontogeny

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parhar, I.S.; Nagahama, Y.; Grau, E.G.; Ross, R.M.

    1998-01-01

    Protogynous wrasses (Thalassoma duperrey): females (F), primary males (PM) along with a few terminal-phase males (TM) and sex-changed males (SM), were used to characterize the topographical organization of the pituitary. In general, immunocytochemical and ultrastructural features of the adenohypophyseal cell types of the saddleback wrasse pituitary resemble those of other teleosts. In the rostral pars distalis (RPD), corticotropic cells were found bordering the neurohypophysis (NH) and surrounding the centroventrally located prolactin cells. Thyrotropic cells formed a small group in the anteriodorsal part of the rostral and proximal pars distalis (PPD). The somatotropic cells were distributed in large clusters, mostly organized in cell cords around the interdigitations of the NH of the dorsal PPD. Cells containing gonadotropin I?? subunit were localized in the dorsal parts of the PPD, in close association with somatotropic cells and gonadotropin II?? subunit containing cells were seen in the centroventral parts of the PPD and along the periphery of the pars intermedia (PI). The pars intermedia was composed of melanotropic cells and somatolactin cells that lined the neurohypohysis. Distinct ultrastructural differences in corticotropic and somatotropic cells were not observed between the four groups. In all groups, prolactin cells in the ventral-most RPD could be immature cells or actively secreting prolactin. Gonadotropic II cells of PM and F had relatively higher incidence of "nuclear budding" and cell organelles compared to TM and SM. Besides gonadotropic, the active melanotropic and somatolactin cells might be associated with some aspect(s) of reproduction.

  7. Clinical practice guideline for the prevention, early detection, diagnosis, management and follow up of type 2 diabetes mellitus in adults

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Oscar Mauricio; Girón, Diana; García, Olga Milena; Fernández-Ávila, Daniel Gerardo; Casas, Luz Ángela; Bohórquez, Luisa Fernanda; Arango T, Clara María; Carvajal, Liliana; Ramírez, Doris Amanda; Sarmiento, Juan Guillermo; Colon, Cristian Alejandro; Correa G, Néstor Fabián; Alarcón R, Pilar; Bustamante S, Álvaro Andrés

    2016-01-01

    In Colombia, diabetes mellitus is a public health program for those responsible for creating and implementing strategies for prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up that are applicable at all care levels, with the objective of establishing early and sustained control of diabetes. A clinical practice guide has been developed following the broad outline of the methodological guide from the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare, with the aim of systematically gathering scientific evidence and formulating recommendations using the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) methodology. The current document presents in summary form the results of this process, including the recommendations and the considerations taken into account in formulating them. In general terms, what is proposed here is a screening process using the Finnish Diabetes Risk Score questionnaire adapted to the Colombian population, which enables early diagnosis of the illness, and an algorithm for determining initial treatment that can be generalized to most patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 and that is simple to apply in a primary care context. In addition, several recommendations have been made to scale up pharmacological treatment in those patients that do not achieve the objectives or fail to maintain them during initial treatment. These recommendations also take into account the evolution of weight and the individualization of glycemic control goals for special populations. Finally, recommendations have been made for opportune detection of micro- and macrovascular complications of diabetes. PMID:27546934

  8. Brain MRI abnormalities in the adult form of myotonic dystrophy type 1: A longitudinal case series study.

    PubMed

    Conforti, Renata; de Cristofaro, Mario; Cristofano, Adriana; Brogna, Barbara; Sardaro, Angela; Tedeschi, Gioacchino; Cirillo, Sossio; Di Costanzo, Alfonso

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to verify whether brain abnormalities, previously described in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), progressed over time and, if so, to characterize their progression. Thirteen DM1 patients, who had at least two MRI examinations, were retrospectively evaluated and included in the study. The mean duration (± standard deviation) of follow-up was 13.4 (±3.8) years, over a range of 7-20 years. White matter lesions (WMLs) were rated by semi-quantitative method, the signal intensity of white matter poster-superior to trigones (WMPST) by reference to standard images and brain atrophy by ventricular/brain ratio (VBR). At the end of MRI follow-up, the scores relative to lobar, temporal and periventricular WMLs, to WMPST signal intensity and to VBR were significantly increased compared to baseline, and MRI changes were more evident in some families than in others. No correlation was found between the MRI changes and age, onset, disease duration, muscular involvement, CTG repetition and follow-up duration. These results demonstrated that white matter involvement and brain atrophy were progressive in DM1 and suggested that progression rate varied from patient to patient, regardless of age, disease duration and genetic defect. PMID:26755488

  9. Clinical practice guideline for the prevention, early detection, diagnosis, management and follow up of type 2 diabetes mellitus in adults.

    PubMed

    Aschner, Pablo M; Muñoz, Oscar Mauricio; Girón, Diana; García, Olga Milena; Fernández-Ávila, Daniel Gerardo; Casas, Luz Ángela; Bohórquez, Luisa Fernanda; Arango T, Clara María; Carvajal, Liliana; Ramírez, Doris Amanda; Sarmiento, Juan Guillermo; Colon, Cristian Alejandro; Correa G, Néstor Fabián; Alarcón R, Pilar; Bustamante S, Álvaro Andrés

    2016-01-01

    In Colombia, diabetes mellitus is a public health program for those responsible for creating and implementing strategies for prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up that are applicable at all care levels, with the objective of establishing early and sustained control of diabetes. A clinical practice guide has been developed following the broad outline of the methodological guide from the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare, with the aim of systematically gathering scientific evidence and formulating recommendations using the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) methodology. The current document presents in summary form the results of this process, including the recommendations and the considerations taken into account in formulating them. In general terms, what is proposed here is a screening process using the Finnish Diabetes Risk Score questionnaire adapted to the Colombian population, which enables early diagnosis of the illness, and an algorithm for determining initial treatment that can be generalized to most patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 and that is simple to apply in a primary care context. In addition, several recommendations have been made to scale up pharmacological treatment in those patients that do not achieve the objectives or fail to maintain them during initial treatment. These recommendations also take into account the evolution of weight and the individualization of glycemic control goals for special populations. Finally, recommendations have been made for opportune detection of micro- and macrovascular complications of diabetes. PMID:27546934

  10. Epstein-Barr virus DNA loads in adult human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, Paul D.; Vilchez, Regis A.; Keitel, Wendy A.; Poston, David G.; Peng, Rong Sheng; White, Zoe S.; Visnegarwala, Fehmida; Lewis, Dorothy E.; Butel, Janet S.

    2003-01-01

    Patients with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection are at high risk of developing Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated lymphoma. However, little is known of the EBV DNA loads in patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Using a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay, we demonstrated that significantly more HIV-1-infected patients receiving HAART than HIV-1-uninfected volunteers had detectable EBV DNA in blood (57 [81%] of 70 vs. 11 [16%] of 68 patients; P=.001) and saliva (55 [79%] of 68 vs. 37 [54%] of 68 patients; P=.002). The mean EBV loads in blood and saliva samples were also higher in HIV-1-infected patients than in HIV-1-uninfected volunteers (P=.001). The frequency of EBV detection in blood was associated with lower CD4+ cell counts (P=.03) among HIV-1-infected individuals, although no differences were observed in the EBV DNA loads in blood or saliva samples in the HIV-1-infected group. Additional studies are needed to determine whether EBV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ cells play a role in the pathogenesis of EBV in HIV-1-infected patients receiving HAART.

  11. Development and feasibility of a text messaging and interactive voice response intervention for low-income, diverse adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Osborn, Chandra Y; Mulvaney, Shelagh A

    2013-05-01

    Low-income, racial/ethnic minorities are often nonadherent to diabetes medications, have uncontrolled glycemia, and have high rates of diabetes-related morbidity. Cell phones provide a viable modality to support medication adherence, but few cell phone-based interventions have been designed for low-income persons, a population with more feature phone penetration than smartphone penetration. In an effort to reach the broadest range of patients, we leveraged the voice and text messaging capabilities shared by all cell phones to design the MEssaging for Diabetes intervention. We specifically advanced and adapted an existing tailored text messaging system to include interactive voice response functionality and support the medication adherence barriers of low-income, diverse adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. We report on the design process and feasibility testing results (i.e., technical use patterns and subjective user experiences) from patients from the target population who used the intervention in one of three user-centered design iterations. The types of challenges encountered in design were related to providing text message content with valued information and support that engages patients. The design process also highlighted the value of obtaining mixed methods data to provide insight into legitimate versus illegitimate missing data, patterns of use, and subjective user experiences. The iterative testing process and results outlined here provide a potential template for other teams seeking to design technology-based self-care support solutions for comparable patient populations. PMID:23759393

  12. Risk Factors for Macro- and Microvascular Complications among Older Adults with Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes: Findings from The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing

    PubMed Central

    McHugh, Sheena M.; Fitzgerald, Anthony P.; Buckley, Claire M.; Canavan, Ronan J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To explore risk factors for macro- and microvascular complications in a nationally representative sample of adults aged 50 years and over with type 2 diabetes in Ireland. Methods. Data from the first wave of The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA) (2009–2011) was used in cross-sectional analysis. The presence of doctor diagnosis of diabetes, risk factors, and macro- and microvascular complications were determined by self-report. Gender-specific differences in risk factor prevalence were assessed with the chi-squared test. Binomial regression analysis was conducted to explore independent associations between established risk factors and diabetes-related complications. Results. Among 8175 respondents, 655 were classified as having type 2 diabetes. Older age, being male, a history of smoking, a lower level of physical activity, and a diagnosis of high cholesterol were independent predictors of macrovascular complications. Diabetes diagnosis of 10 or more years, a history of smoking, and a diagnosis of hypertension were associated with an increased risk of microvascular complications. Older age, third-level education, and a high level of physical activity were protective factors (p < 0.05). Conclusions. Early intervention to target modifiable risk factors is urgently needed to reduce diabetes-related morbidity in the older population in Ireland. PMID:27294152

  13. Aerobic physical activity and resistance training: an application of the theory of planned behavior among adults with type 2 diabetes in a random, national sample of Canadians

    PubMed Central

    Plotnikoff, Ronald C; Courneya, Kerry S; Trinh, Linda; Karunamuni, Nandini; Sigal, Ronald J

    2008-01-01

    Background Aerobic physical activity (PA) and resistance training are paramount in the treatment and management of type 2 diabetes (T2D), but few studies have examined the determinants of both types of exercise in the same sample. Objective The primary purpose was to investigate the utility of the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) in explaining aerobic PA and resistance training in a population sample of T2D adults. Methods A total of 244 individuals were recruited through a random national sample which was created by generating a random list of household phone numbers. The list was proportionate to the actual number of household telephone numbers for each Canadian province (with the exception of Quebec). These individuals completed self-report TPB constructs of attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control and intention, and a 3-month follow-up that assessed aerobic PA and resistance training. Results TPB explained 10% and 8% of the variance respectively for aerobic PA and resistance training; and accounted for 39% and 45% of the variance respectively for aerobic PA and resistance training intentions. Conclusion These results may guide the development of appropriate PA interventions for aerobic PA and resistance training based on the TPB. PMID:19055725

  14. Younger adult type 2 diabetic patients have poorer glycaemic control: a cross-sectional study in a primary care setting in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim was to study the glycaemic control of type 2 diabetic patients, and to identify factors associated with unacceptable glycaemic control (defined as HbA1c >8.0%). Methods Analysis of data collected in a cross-sectional survey of type 2 diabetic patients in eight SingHealth Polyclinics in January 2009. HbA1c value was measured on the day of the survey, while information on patient and diabetic characteristics was obtained through a questionnaire. Odds ratio of having unacceptable glycaemic control was estimated for selected variables using multiple logistic regression models. Results A total of 688 patients were included in the analysis. The mean (± standard deviation) and median (range) HbA1c levels were 7.6% (± 1.35) and 7.3% (5.0% to 14.0%), respectively. 25.4% of the patients had an unacceptable HbA1c level of >8.0% and the odds of this were higher (p < 0.05) in patients with the following characteristics: younger age, longer diabetes duration, presence of insulin treatment, and poorer compliance to medication. Conclusion Younger adult patients were found to have poorer glycaemic control, and hence targeted educational and behaviour modification programmes would be required to effectively manage this group of patients. PMID:23725198

  15. Smoking, Smoking Cessation, and the Risk of Type 2 Diabetes among Japanese Adults: Japan Epidemiology Collaboration on Occupational Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Akter, Shamima; Okazaki, Hiroko; Kuwahara, Keisuke; Miyamoto, Toshiaki; Murakami, Taizo; Shimizu, Chii; Shimizu, Makiko; Tomita, Kentaro; Nagahama, Satsue; Eguchi, Masafumi; Kochi, Takeshi; Imai, Teppei; Nishihara, Akiko; Sasaki, Naoko; Nakagawa, Tohru; Yamamoto, Shuichiro; Honda, Toru; Uehara, Akihiko; Yamamoto, Makoto; Hori, Ai; Sakamoto, Nobuaki; Nishiura, Chiro; Totsuzaki, Takafumi; Kato, Noritada; Fukasawa, Kenji; Pham, Ngoc M.; Kurotani, Kayo; Nanri, Akiko; Kabe, Isamu; Mizoue, Tetsuya; Sone, Tomofumi; Dohi, Seitaro

    2015-01-01

    Aims To examine the association of smoking status, smoking intensity, and smoking cessation with the risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D) using a large database. Methods The present study included 53,930 Japanese employees, aged 15 to 83 years, who received health check-up and did not have diabetes at baseline. Diabetes was defined as fasting plasma glucose ≥126 mg/dl, random plasma glucose ≥200 mg/dl, HbA1c ≥6.5% (≥48 mmol/mol), or receiving medication for diabetes. Cox proportional-hazards regression models were used to investigate the association between smoking and the risk of diabetes. Results During 3.9 years of median follow-up, 2,441 (4.5%) individuals developed T2D. The multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (95% CI) for diabetes were 1 (reference), 1.16 (1.04 to 1.30) and 1.34 (1.22 to 1.48) for never smokers, former smokers, and current smokers, respectively. Diabetes risk increased with increasing numbers of cigarette consumption among current smokers (P for trend <0.001). Although the relative risk of diabetes was greater among subjects with lower BMIs (< 23 kg/m2), attributable risk was greater in subjects with higher BMIs (≥ 23 kg/m2). Compared with individuals who had never smoked, former smokers who quit less than 5 years, 5 to 9 years, and 10 years or more exhibited hazards ratios for diabetes of 1.36 (1.14 to 1.62), 1.23 (1.01 to 1.51), and 1.02 (0.85 to 1.23), respectively. Conclusions Results suggest that cigarette smoking is associated with an increased risk of T2D, which may decrease to the level of a never smoker after 10 years of smoking cessation. PMID:26200457

  16. Serum antibody response in adult volunteers elicited by injection of Streptococcus pneumoniae type 12F polysaccharide alone or conjugated to diphtheria toxoid.

    PubMed Central

    Fattom, A; Lue, C; Szu, S C; Mestecky, J; Schiffman, G; Bryla, D; Vann, W F; Watson, D; Kimzey, L M; Robbins, J B

    1990-01-01

    Conjugates of an uronic acid-containing capsular polysaccharide (CP), pneumococcous type 12F (Pn12F) bound to diphtheria toxoid (DT), were studied for safety and immunogenicity in adult volunteers. In mice, these conjugates, prepared with the same lot of DT and Pn12F-40234-006, a homogenous CP of high molecular weight, or Pn12-812408, a polydisperse CP with lower-molecular-weight material, were more immunogenic than the Pn12F alone and had T-cell dependent properties (A. Fattom, W. F. Vann, S.C. Szu, A. Sutton, X. Li, B. Bryla, G. Schiffman, J. B. Robbins, and R. Schneerson, Infect. Immun. 56:2292-2298, 1988). Adult volunteers, randomized into three groups, were injected either with one of these two conjugates or with Pnu-Imune, the 23 valent pneumococcus vaccine containing 25 micrograms of Pn12F as one of its components. Volunteers were injected two times, 4 weeks apart, with the Pn12F-DT conjugates and once with the Pnu-Imune. Side reactions following injection of the conjugates of Pnu-Imune were mild and short-lived. At 4 weeks and at 7 months after the first injection, higher levels of Pn12F antibodies were found in the volunteers injected with the conjugates than in the Pnu-Imune group (P less than 0.001). The conjugate prepared with the higher-molecular-weight Pn12F elicited higher levels of antibodies than the conjugate prepared with a lower-molecular-weight Pn12F preparation (P = 0.05). Both conjugates elicited about a 13-fold rise in DT antibodies. PMID:2365462

  17. Cross-sectional Survey and Retrospective Analysis of a Large Cohort of Adults With Type 1 Diabetes With Long-Term Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Morera, Julia; Vicente, Angel; Rod, Anne; Parienti, Jean-Jacques; Reznik, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Background. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) is an established modality for intensive insulin treatment of type 1 diabetes (T1D), but long-term data concerning satisfaction, CSII function use, safety, and efficacy in real-life conditions are scarce. Methods. We analyzed a cohort of adult patients with T1D treated with CSII for more than 1 year in a single diabetes center. We performed a cross-sectional survey in 2010 (tolerance/satisfaction and behavior forms) and a retrospective analysis of medical records (including HbA1c level, hospitalization, and catheter infections). The primary objective was to assess long-term tolerance/satisfaction, and secondary objectives were safety and efficacy. Results. There were 295 patients analyzed. After a median duration of CSII use of 5 years, overall satisfaction was high for about 90% of patients. Mean CSII-related discomfort scores were low for work, recreation, and sleep and moderate for sport and sexual activity (2.5 ± 1.9, 2.6 ± 1.8, 2.6 ± 2.1, 3.4 ± 2.3, and 4.0 ± 2.9 of 10, respectively). Despite a high level of diabetes education, only one third of patients were using advanced CSII functions. During long-term follow-up, the safety of CSII treatment was good; the hospitalization rate was 0.18 patients/year, and catheter infections were scarce. The HbA1c level dropped about −0.5% independently from CSII duration (P < .05). Conclusions. In this adult cohort, satisfaction and tolerance, together with safety, of CSII were maintained at long-term follow up. The sole basic functions of CSII were currently used by patients. A 0.5% decrease in the HbA1c level was maintained during the study period. PMID:24876454

  18. Genetic screening for Niemann-Pick disease type C in adults with neurological and psychiatric symptoms: findings from the ZOOM study.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Peter; Balding, David J; Klünemann, Hans H; Linden, David E J; Ory, Daniel S; Pineda, Mercè; Priller, Josef; Sedel, Frederic; Muller, Audrey; Chadha-Boreham, Harbajan; Welford, Richard W D; Strasser, Daniel S; Patterson, Marc C

    2013-11-01

    Niemann-Pick disease type C (NP-C) is a rare, autosomal-recessive, progressive neurological disease caused by mutations in either the NPC1 gene (in 95% of cases) or the NPC2 gene. This observational, multicentre genetic screening study evaluated the frequency and phenotypes of NP-C in consecutive adult patients with neurological and psychiatric symptoms. Diagnostic testing for NP-C involved NPC1 and NPC2 exonic gene sequencing and gene dosage analysis. When available, results of filipin staining, plasma cholestane-3β,5α,6β-triol assays and measurements of relevant sphingolipids were also collected. NPC1 and NPC2 gene sequencing was completed in 250/256 patients from 30 psychiatric and neurological reference centres across the EU and USA [median (range) age 38 (18-90) years]. Three patients had a confirmed diagnosis of NP-C; two based on gene sequencing alone (two known causal disease alleles) and one based on gene sequencing and positive filipin staining. A further 12 patients displayed either single mutant NP-C alleles (8 with NPC1 mutations and 3 with NPC2 mutations) or a known causal disease mutation and an unclassified NPC1 allele variant (1 patient). Notably, high plasma cholestane-3β,5α,6β-triol levels were observed for all NP-C cases (n = 3). Overall, the frequency of NP-C patients in this study [1.2% (95% CI; 0.3%, 3.5%)] suggests that there may be an underdiagnosed pool of NP-C patients among adults who share common neurological and psychiatric symptoms. PMID:23773996

  19. Development and Validation of a Risk-Score Model for Type 2 Diabetes: A Cohort Study of a Rural Adult Chinese Population.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming; Zhang, Hongyan; Wang, Chongjian; Ren, Yongcheng; Wang, Bingyuan; Zhang, Lu; Yang, Xiangyu; Zhao, Yang; Han, Chengyi; Pang, Chao; Yin, Lei; Xue, Yuan; Zhao, Jingzhi; Hu, Dongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Some global models to predict the risk of diabetes may not be applicable to local populations. We aimed to develop and validate a score to predict type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in a rural adult Chinese population. Data for a cohort of 12,849 participants were randomly divided into derivation (n = 11,564) and validation (n = 1285) datasets. A questionnaire interview and physical and blood biochemical examinations were performed at baseline (July to August 2007 and July to August 2008) and follow-up (July to August 2013 and July to October 2014). A Cox regression model was used to weigh each variable in the derivation dataset. For each significant variable, a score was calculated by multiplying β by 100 and rounding to the nearest integer. Age, body mass index, triglycerides and fasting plasma glucose (scores 3, 12, 24 and 76, respectively) were predictors of incident T2DM. The model accuracy was assessed by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC), with optimal cut-off value 936. With the derivation dataset, sensitivity, specificity and AUC of the model were 66.7%, 74.0% and 0.768 (95% CI 0.760-0.776), respectively. With the validation dataset, the performance of the model was superior to the Chinese (simple), FINDRISC, Oman and IDRS models of T2DM risk but equivalent to the Framingham model, which is widely applicable in a variety of populations. Our model for predicting 6-year risk of T2DM could be used in a rural adult Chinese population. PMID:27070555

  20. [Endotracheal intubation in an adult patient fitted with a Leksell frame using a Pentax Airwayscope with a pediatric-type INTLOCK blade (ITL-P)].

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Risa; Hoshijima, Hiroshi; Horikoshi, Yuta; Nakamura, China; Iwase, Yoshinori; Nagasaka, Hiroshi

    2014-08-01

    Several previous reports have established the Pentax Airwayscope (Pentax AWS, S-100, HOYA-PENTAX, Tokyo, Japan) as an efficient tool for tracheal intubation in adult patients. The Pentax AWS is often successfully used with an INTLOCK blade; to date, however, INTLOCK blades have been released for neonatal and pediatric patients only. In this case, we performed tracheal intubation using a Pentax AWS attached to a pediatric-type INTLOCK blade (ITL-P) in an adult patient fitted with a Leksell Stereotactic frame (Elekta, Sweden). The patient weighed 45 kg and was 154 cm tall, and was scheduled for a tumor biopsy due to glioblastoma in the brain stem. The patient was preoperatively fitted with a Leksell frame on her head. The patient was not premedicated and was monitored with electrocardiography (ECG), noninvasive blood pressure, and pulse oximetry. Following pre-oxygenation, general anesthesia was induced using propofol 4.0 microg x ml with target-controlled infusion and remifentanil 0.25 microg x kg(-1) hr(-1). After loss of consciousness, we administered 30-mg rocuronium boluses. We initially attempted tracheal intubation first using a Macintosh laryngoscope and then a Pentax AWS, but we could not achieve tracheal intubation with either of these instruments. Upon switching to a Pentax AWS with an ITL-P, we successfully achieved tracheal intubation without any complications. Anesthesia was maintained uneventfully with 3.0 microg x ml(-1) propofol and remifentanil 0.10 to 0.25 microg x kg(-1) x hr(-1) in oxygen and air. Further study is needed to facilitate the effective use of the Pentax AWS and the ITL-P in such cases. PMID:25199322

  1. Early Life Inorganic Lead Exposure Induces Testicular Teratoma and Renal and Urinary Bladder Preneoplasia in Adult Metallothionein-Knockout Mice but Not in Wild Type Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tokar, Erik J.; Diwan, Bhalchandra A.; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2010-01-01

    Inorganic lead compounds are carcinogenic in animals and have carcinogenic potential in humans. In mice, lead (Pb) is a transplacental carcinogen in the kidney. Metallothionein (MT) is a metal-binding protein that can reduce the toxicity of various metals, including Pb, either by direct sequestration or as an antioxidant for metals that generate reactive oxygen species. Although MT appears to reduce Pb carcinogenicity in adult mice it is unknown how MT deficiency may affect Pb carcinogenicity from early life exposure. Thus, groups (n = 10) of pregnant MT-I/II double knockout (MT-null) or 129/SVJ MT wild type (WT) mice were exposed to Pb acetate in the drinking water (0, 2000, 4000 ppm Pb) from gestation day 8 through birth and during lactation. Maternal drinking water Pb exposure continued to weaning at 4 weeks of age and the male offspring were then directly exposed to Pb until 8 weeks of age and observed until 2 years old. High dose (4000 ppm) but not low dose (2000 ppm) Pb reduced survival in the latter part of the study in both MT-null and WT mice. In MT-null mice, but not WT, early life Pb exposure caused a dose-related increase in testicular teratomas, to a maximum incidence of 28% compared to control (4%). Pb-induced renal cystic hyperplasia, considered preneoplastic, were a prominent occurrence in MT-null mice but nearly absent in WT mice. Pb dose-related increases in renal cystic hyperplasia occurred in adult MT-null with early life exposure with maximal incidence of 52%. Pb-treated MT-null mice also showed dose-related increases in urinary bladder hyperplasia with occasional papilloma that were absent in WT mice. Thus, MT deficiency made mice more sensitive to early life Pb exposure with regard to testes tumors, and renal and urinary bladder preneoplastic lesions. PMID:20600549

  2. Association of atrial fibrillation with gene polymorphisms of connexin 40 and angiotensin II receptor type 1 in Chongming adults of Shanghai

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Shuxin; Lu, Yingmin; Huang, Damin; Luo, Xiaohan; Yue, Dongmei; Zhang, Jinchun

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To characterized the gene polymorphisms of connexin 40 (cx40) and angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1R) in Chongming adults with atrial fibrillation (AF) and to explore their relationships with AF. Methods: 82 patients with AF, and 82 subjects without AF were enrolled. Polymorphisms of cx40 G-44A and AT1 A1166C were detected. Moreover, several samples were randomly selected to validate the gene polymorphisms of cx40 and AT1. Results: Genotypes AA, AG and GG of cx40 G-44A were found in both AF patients and controls. The frequencies of genotypes AA, AG and GG were 39%, 29% and 32%, respectively, in AF patients and 31%, 35% and 34%, respectively in controls. The frequencies of alleles A and G were 54% and 46%, respectively in AF patients and 48% and 52%, respectively, in controls (P < 0.05). The risk for AF in patients with allele A increased 1.31 times (OR = 1.31, P < 0.05). The frequencies of genotypes AA, AC and CC were 88%, 8% and 4%, respectively in AF patients and 93%, 6% and 1%, respectively in controls. The frequencies of alleles A and C were 92% and 8%, respectively in AF patients and 96% and 4%, respectively in controls (P < 0.05). More AF patients had allele C as compared to controls. The risk for AF increased by 1.43 times in patients with allele C (OR = 1.43, P < 0.05). Conclusion: There were relationships between gene polymorphisms of cx40 and AT1 and AF in Chongming adults. Allele A of cx40 G-44A and allele C of AT1 A1166C significantly increase the risk for AF. PMID:26380021

  3. Effect of Metformin Glycinate on Glycated Hemoglobin A1c Concentration and Insulin Sensitivity in Drug-Naive Adult Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Abundis, Esperanza; Robles-Cervantes, José A.; Ramos-Zavala, Maria G.; Barrera-Durán, Carmelita; González-Canudas, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Aim This study evaluated the effect of metformin glycinate on glycated hemoglobin A1c (A1C) concentration and insulin sensitivity in drug-naive adult patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Subjects and Methods A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was carried out in 20 patients with drug-naive T2DM. Ten subjects received metformin glycinate (1,050.6 mg) once daily during the first month and force-titrated twice daily during the second month. Ten additional patients received placebo as the control group. Before and after the intervention, metabolic profile including A1C and insulin sensitivity (euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp technique) was estimated. Results A1C concentrations decreased significantly with metformin glycinate administration (8.0±0.7% vs. 7.1±0.9%, P=0.008) before and after the intervention, respectively. There were significant differences in changes from baseline of A1C between groups (0.0±0.7% vs. −1.0±0.5% for placebo and metformin glycinate groups, respectively; P=0.004). A reduction of ≥1% in A1C levels was reached in 60.0% of patients with metformin glycinate administration (P=0.02). Insulin sensitivity was not modified by the intervention. Conclusions Administration of metformin glycinate during a 2-month period showed a greater decrease in A1C concentrations than placebo in a selected group of drug-naive adult patients with T2DM. PMID:22974412

  4. Rationale and study design for a randomised controlled trial to reduce sedentary time in adults at risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus: project stand (Sedentary Time ANd diabetes)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The rising prevalence of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) is a major public health problem. There is an urgent need for effective lifestyle interventions to prevent the development of T2DM. Sedentary behaviour (sitting time) has recently been identified as a risk factor for diabetes, often independent of the time spent in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. Project STAND (Sedentary Time ANd Diabetes) is a study which aims to reduce sedentary behaviour in younger adults at high risk of T2DM. Methods/Design A reduction in sedentary time is targeted using theory driven group structured education. The STAND programme is subject to piloting and process evaluation in line with the MRC framework for complex interventions. Participants are encouraged to self-monitor and self-regulate their behaviour. The intervention is being assessed in a randomised controlled trial with 12 month follow up. Inclusion criteria are a) aged 18-40 years with a BMI in the obese range; b) 18-40 years with a BMI in the overweight range plus an additional risk factor for T2DM. Participants are randomised to the intervention (n = 89) or control (n = 89) arm. The primary outcome is a reduction in sedentary behaviour at 12 months as measured by an accelerometer (count < 100/min). Secondary outcomes include physical activity, sitting/lying time using the ActivPAL posture monitor, fasting and 2 h oral glucose tolerance test, lipids, inflammatory biomarkers, body weight, waist circumference, blood pressure, illness perceptions, and efficacy beliefs for behaviour change. Conclusions This is the first UK trial to address sedentary behaviour change in a population of younger adults at risk of T2DM. The results will provide a platform for the development of a range of future multidisciplinary interventions in this rapidly expanding high-risk population. Trial registration Current controlled trials ISRCTN08434554, MRC project 91409. PMID:22151909

  5. Development and Validation of a Risk-Score Model for Type 2 Diabetes: A Cohort Study of a Rural Adult Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chongjian; Ren, Yongcheng; Wang, Bingyuan; Zhang, Lu; Yang, Xiangyu; Zhao, Yang; Han, Chengyi; Pang, Chao; Yin, Lei; Xue, Yuan; Zhao, Jingzhi; Hu, Dongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Some global models to predict the risk of diabetes may not be applicable to local populations. We aimed to develop and validate a score to predict type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in a rural adult Chinese population. Data for a cohort of 12,849 participants were randomly divided into derivation (n = 11,564) and validation (n = 1285) datasets. A questionnaire interview and physical and blood biochemical examinations were performed at baseline (July to August 2007 and July to August 2008) and follow-up (July to August 2013 and July to October 2014). A Cox regression model was used to weigh each variable in the derivation dataset. For each significant variable, a score was calculated by multiplying β by 100 and rounding to the nearest integer. Age, body mass index, triglycerides and fasting plasma glucose (scores 3, 12, 24 and 76, respectively) were predictors of incident T2DM. The model accuracy was assessed by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC), with optimal cut-off value 936. With the derivation dataset, sensitivity, specificity and AUC of the model were 66.7%, 74.0% and 0.768 (95% CI 0.760–0.776), respectively. With the validation dataset, the performance of the model was superior to the Chinese (simple), FINDRISC, Oman and IDRS models of T2DM risk but equivalent to the Framingham model, which is widely applicable in a variety of populations. Our model for predicting 6-year risk of T2DM could be used in a rural adult Chinese population. PMID:27070555

  6. A Randomised Controlled Trial to Reduce Sedentary Time in Young Adults at Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Project STAND (Sedentary Time ANd Diabetes)

    PubMed Central

    Biddle, Stuart J. H.; Edwardson, Charlotte L.; Wilmot, Emma G.; Yates, Thomas; Gorely, Trish; Bodicoat, Danielle H.; Ashra, Nuzhat; Khunti, Kamlesh; Nimmo, Myra A.; Davies, Melanie J.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), a serious and prevalent chronic disease, is traditionally associated with older age. However, due to the rising rates of obesity and sedentary lifestyles, it is increasingly being diagnosed in the younger population. Sedentary (sitting) behaviour has been shown to be associated with greater risk of cardio-metabolic health outcomes, including T2DM. Little is known about effective interventions to reduce sedentary behaviour in younger adults at risk of T2DM. We aimed to investigate, through a randomised controlled trial (RCT) design, whether a group-based structured education workshop focused on sitting reduction, with self-monitoring, reduced sitting time. Methods Adults aged 18–40 years who were either overweight (with an additional risk factor for T2DM) or obese were recruited for the Sedentary Time ANd Diabetes (STAND) RCT. The intervention programme comprised of a 3-hour group-based structured education workshop, use of a self-monitoring tool, and follow-up motivational phone call. Data were collected at three time points: baseline, 3 and 12 months after baseline. The primary outcome measure was accelerometer-assessed sedentary behaviour after 12 months. Secondary outcomes included other objective (activPAL) and self-reported measures of sedentary behaviour and physical activity, and biochemical, anthropometric, and psycho-social variables. Results 187 individuals (69% female; mean age 33 years; mean BMI 35 kg/m2) were randomised to intervention and control groups. 12 month data, when analysed using intention-to-treat analysis (ITT) and per-protocol analyses, showed no significant difference in the primary outcome variable, nor in the majority of the secondary outcome measures. Conclusions A structured education intervention designed to reduce sitting in young adults at risk of T2DM was not successful in changing behaviour at 12 months. Lack of change may be due to the brief nature of such an intervention and lack of focus

  7. General fluid-type intelligence is related to indices of white matter structure in middle-aged and old adults.

    PubMed

    Haász, Judit; Westlye, Erling T; Fjær, Sveinung; Espeseth, Thomas; Lundervold, Arvid; Lundervold, Astri J

    2013-12-01

    General fluid-type intelligence (gF) reflects abstract reasoning and problem solving abilities, and is an important predictor for lifetime trajectories of cognition, and physical and mental health. Structural and functional neuroimaging studies have demonstrated the role of parieto-frontal gray matter, but the white matter (WM) underpinnings of gF and the contribution of individual gF components to gF-WM relationship still need to be explored. The aim of this study was to characterize, in a sample of 100 healthy middle-aged and old subjects (mean=63.8 years), the relationship between gF and indices of WM structure obtained from diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI) (fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), radial diffusivity (RD), and axial diffusivity (AD)). gF was estimated by principal component analysis including measures of episodic memory, reasoning, and processing speed. Tract-based spatial statistics and permutation-based inference statistics were used to test the association between gF and WM indices, while controlling for the effect of age and sex. We hypothesized a positive relationship between gF and WM structure. Based on previous studies, we further hypothesized that this relationship was heavily influenced by the processing speed component of gF. We found a robust relationship between gF and DT-MRI measures of FA, RD and MD in all major WM tracts. Higher gF score was related to higher degree of WM integrity, in middle-aged as well as old individuals. Thus, the distributed relationship between gF and indices of WM microstructure is consistent with the notion that gF reflects efficient signaling between cortical areas. Furthermore, analysis of relationships between WM measures and gF components revealed an association with information processing speed and reasoning ability, but not with episodic memory. Thus, although all subcomponents loaded high on gF factor, the speed-related components were most strongly associated with DT

  8. Birth Weight and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in the Black Women’s Health Study: Does Adult BMI Play a Mediating Role?

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Julie R.; Gerlovin, Hanna; Wise, Lauren A.; Vimalananda, Varsha G.; Rosenzweig, James L.; Rosenberg, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the association of birth weight with incident type 2 diabetes, and the possible mediating influence of obesity, in a large cohort of U.S. black women. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The Black Women’s Health Study is an ongoing prospective study. We used Cox proportional hazards models to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRRs) and 95% CI for categories of birth weight (very low birth weight [<1,500 g], low birth weight [1,500–2,499 g], and high birth weight [≥4,000 g]) in reference to normal birth weight (2,500–3,999 g). Models were adjusted for age, questionnaire cycle, family history of diabetes, caloric intake, preterm birth, physical activity, years of education, and neighborhood socioeconomic status with and without inclusion of terms for adult BMI. RESULTS We followed 21,624 women over 16 years of follow-up. There were 2,388 cases of incident diabetes. Women with very low birth weight had a 40% higher risk of disease (IRR 1.40 [95% CI 1.08–1.82]) than women with normal birth weight; women with low birth weight had a 13% higher risk (IRR 1.13 [95% CI 1.02–1.25]). Adjustment for BMI did not appreciably change the estimates. CONCLUSIONS Very low birth weight and low birth weight appear to be associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes in African American women, and the association does not seem to be mediated through BMI. The prevalence of low birth weight is especially high in African American populations, and this may explain in part the higher occurrence of type 2 diabetes. PMID:25147255

  9. Omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acid modulates dihydropyridine effects on L-type Ca2+ channels, cytosolic Ca2+, and contraction in adult rat cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Pepe, S; Bogdanov, K; Hallaq, H; Spurgeon, H; Leaf, A; Lakatta, E

    1994-01-01

    The effect of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; C22:6) on dihydropyridine (DHP) interaction with L-type Ca2+ channel current (ICa), cytosolic Ca2+ (Cai), and cell contraction in isolated adult rat cardiac myocytes was studied. The DHP L-type Ca(2+)-channel blocker nitrendipine (10 nM) reduced peak ICa (measured by whole-cell voltage clamp from -45 to 0 mV) and reduced the amplitude of the Ca2+ transient (measured as the transient in indo-1 fluorescence, 410/490 nm) and the twitch amplitude (measured via photodiode array) during steady-state electrical stimulation (0.5 Hz). The DHP L-type Ca2+ channel agonist BAY K 8644 (10 nM) significantly increased ICa, the amplitude of the Cai transient, and contraction. When cells were exposed to DHA (5 microM) simultaneously with either BAY K 8644 or nitrendipine, the drug effects were abolished. Arachidonic acid (C20:4) at 5 microM did not block the inhibitory effects of nitrendipine nor did it prevent the potentiating effects of BAY K 8644. DHA modulation of DHP action could be reversed by cell perfusion with fatty acid-free bovine serum albumin at 1 mg/ml. Neither DHA nor arachidonic acid alone (5 microM) had any apparent effect on the parameters measured. DHA (5 microM) had no influence over beta-adrenergic receptor stimulation (isoproterenol, 0.01-1 microM)-induced increases in ICa, Cai, or contraction. The findings that DHA inhibits the effect of DHP agonists and antagonists on Ca(2+)-channel current but has no effect alone or on beta-adrenergic-induced increases in ICa suggests that DHA specifically binds to Ca2+ channels at or near DHP binding sites and interferes with ICa modulation. Images PMID:7522322

  10. Evaluation of miglustat as maintenance therapy after enzyme therapy in adults with stable type 1 Gaucher disease: a prospective, open-label non-inferiority study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Previous studies have provided equivocal data on the use of miglustat as maintenance therapy in Gaucher disease type 1. We report findings from a clinical trial evaluating the effects of miglustat treatment in patients with stable type 1 Gaucher disease after enzyme therapy. Methods Adult type 1 Gaucher disease patients stabilized during at least 3 years of previous enzyme therapy were included in this 2-year, prospective, open-label non-inferiority study. The primary endpoint was percent change from baseline in liver volume. Secondary endpoints included changes in spleen volume, hemoglobin concentration and platelet count. Results Forty-two patients were enrolled (mean±SD age, 45.1±12.7 years; previous enzyme therapy duration 9.5±4.0 years). Median (range) exposure to miglustat 100 mg t.i.d. was 658 (3–765) days. Twenty-one patients discontinued treatment prematurely; 13 due to adverse events, principally gastrointestinal. The upper 95% confidence limit of mean percent change in liver volume from baseline to end of treatment was below the non-inferiority margin of 10% (–1.1%; 95%CI −6.0, 3.9%). Mean (95%CI) changes in spleen volume, hemoglobin concentration and platelet count were 102 (24,180) mL, –0.95 (−1.38, –0.53) g/dL and −44.1 (–57.6, –30.7) ×109/L, respectively. Conclusions The primary efficacy endpoint was met; overall there was no change in liver volume during 24 months of miglustat therapy. Several patients showed a gradual deterioration in some disease manifestations, suggesting that miglustat could maintain clinical stability, but not in all patients. Miglustat demonstrated a predictable profile of safety and tolerability that was consistent with that reported in previous clinical trials and experience in clinical practice. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT00319046 PMID:23270487

  11. Effect of a Lifestyle Intervention on Change in Cardiorespiratory Fitness in Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: Results from the Look AHEAD Study

    PubMed Central

    Jakicic, John M.; Jaramillo, Sarah A.; Balasubramanyam, Ashok; Bancroft, Barbara; Curtis, Jeffery M.; Mathews, Anne; Pereira, Mark; Regensteiner, Judith G.; Ribisl, Paul M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To examine the effect of an intensive lifestyle weight loss intervention (ILI) compared to diabetes support and education (DSE) on changes in fitness and physical activity in the Look AHEAD trial. Design Randomized clinical trial to compare a lifestyle intervention for weight loss with a diabetes support and education condition in individuals with type 2 diabetes. Subjects Data from 4,376 overweight or obese adults with type 2 diabetes (age = 58.7±6.8 years, BMI = 35.8±5.8 kg/m2) who completed one-year of the Look AHEAD trial and had available fitness data were analyzed. Intervention Subjects were randomly assigned to DSE or ILI. DSE received standard-care plus 3 education sessions over the one-year period. ILI included individual and group contact throughout the year, restriction in energy intake, and 175 min/wk of prescribed physical activity. Measurements Fitness was assessed using a submaximal graded exercise test. Physical activity was assessed via questionnaire in a subset of 2,221 subjects. Results Change in fitness was statistically greater in ILI vs. DSE after adjustment for baseline fitness (20.9% vs. 5.7%) (p<0.0001). Multivariate analysis showed that change in fitness was greater in overweight vs. obese Class II and III (p<0.05). Physical activity increased by 892±1694 kcal/wk in ILI vs. 108±1254 kcal/wk in DSE (p<0.01). Changes in fitness (r=0.41) and physical activity (r=0.42) were significantly correlated with weight loss (p<0.0001). Conclusions The ILI was effective in increasing physical activity and improving cardiorespiratory fitness in overweight and obese individuals with type 2 diabetes. This effect may add to weight loss in improving metabolic control in patients in lifestyle intervention programs. PMID:19153582

  12. Short-term high-intensity interval and moderate-intensity continuous training reduce leukocyte TLR4 in inactive adults at elevated risk of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Emily; Durrer, Cody; Simtchouk, Svetlana; Jung, Mary E; Bourne, Jessica E; Voth, Elizabeth; Little, Jonathan P

    2015-09-01

    Exercise can have anti-inflammatory effects in obesity, but the optimal type and intensity of exercise are not clear. This study compared short-term high-intensity interval training (HIIT) with moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) in terms of improvement in cardiorespiratory fitness, markers of inflammation, and glucose control in previously inactive adults at elevated risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Thirty-nine inactive, overweight/obese adults (32 women) were randomly assigned to 10 sessions over 2 wk of progressive HIIT (n = 20, four to ten 1-min sessions at ∼90% peak heart rate, 1-min rest periods) or MICT (n = 19, 20-50 min at ∼65% peak heart rate). Before and 3 days after training, participants performed a peak O2 uptake test, and fasting blood samples were obtained. Both HIIT (1.8 ± 0.4 vs. 1.9 ± 0.4 l/min, pre vs. post) and MICT (1.8 ± 0.5 vs. 1.9 ± 0.5 l/min, pre vs. post) improved peak O2 uptake (P < 0.001) and lowered plasma fructosamine (P < 0.05). Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 (TLR4) expression was reduced on lymphocytes and monocytes after both HIIT and MICT (P < 0.05) and on neutrophils after MICT (P < 0.01). TLR2 on lymphocytes was reduced after HIIT and MICT (P < 0.05). Plasma inflammatory cytokines were unchanged after training in both groups, but MICT led to a reduction in fasting plasma glucose (P < 0.05, 5.9 ± 1.0 vs. 5.6 ± 1.0 mmol/l, pre vs. post). Ten days of either HIIT or MICT can improve cardiorespiratory fitness and glucose control and lead to reductions in TLR2 and TLR4 expression. MICT, which involved a longer duration of exercise, may be superior for reducing fasting glucose. PMID:26139217

  13. Short-term high-intensity interval and moderate-intensity continuous training reduce leukocyte TLR4 in inactive adults at elevated risk of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Emily; Durrer, Cody; Simtchouk, Svetlana; Jung, Mary E.; Bourne, Jessica E.; Voth, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Exercise can have anti-inflammatory effects in obesity, but the optimal type and intensity of exercise are not clear. This study compared short-term high-intensity interval training (HIIT) with moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) in terms of improvement in cardiorespiratory fitness, markers of inflammation, and glucose control in previously inactive adults at elevated risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Thirty-nine inactive, overweight/obese adults (32 women) were randomly assigned to 10 sessions over 2 wk of progressive HIIT (n = 20, four to ten 1-min sessions at ∼90% peak heart rate, 1-min rest periods) or MICT (n = 19, 20-50 min at ∼65% peak heart rate). Before and 3 days after training, participants performed a peak O2 uptake test, and fasting blood samples were obtained. Both HIIT (1.8 ± 0.4 vs. 1.9 ± 0.4 l/min, pre vs. post) and MICT (1.8 ± 0.5 vs. 1.9 ± 0.5 l/min, pre vs. post) improved peak O2 uptake (P < 0.001) and lowered plasma fructosamine (P < 0.05). Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 (TLR4) expression was reduced on lymphocytes and monocytes after both HIIT and MICT (P < 0.05) and on neutrophils after MICT (P < 0.01). TLR2 on lymphocytes was reduced after HIIT and MICT (P < 0.05). Plasma inflammatory cytokines were unchanged after training in both groups, but MICT led to a reduction in fasting plasma glucose (P < 0.05, 5.9 ± 1.0 vs. 5.6 ± 1.0 mmol/l, pre vs. post). Ten days of either HIIT or MICT can improve cardiorespiratory fitness and glucose control and lead to reductions in TLR2 and TLR4 expression. MICT, which involved a longer duration of exercise, may be superior for reducing fasting glucose. PMID:26139217

  14. Renal Disease and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources for Healthcare Professionals Renal Disease and Adult Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vaccines are ... have immunity to this disease Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Type 1 ...

  15. Liver Disease and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources for Healthcare Professionals Liver Disease and Adult Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vaccines are ... have immunity to this disease Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Type 1 ...

  16. HIV Infection and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources for Healthcare Professionals HIV Infection and Adult Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vaccines are ... percentage is less than 15%. Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Type 1 ...

  17. Design of a Randomized Controlled Trial of a Web-Based Intervention to Reduce Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors among Remote Reservation-Dwelling American Indian Adults with Type 2 Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Jeffrey A.; Chubak, Jessica; O'Connell, Joan; Ramos, Maria C.; Jensen, Julie; Jobe, Jared B.

    2012-01-01

    We describe a randomized controlled trial, the Lakota Oyate Wicozani Pi Kte (LOWPK) trial, which was designed to determine whether a Web-based diabetes and nutritional intervention can improve risk factors related to cardiovascular disease (CVD) among a group of remote reservation-dwelling adult American Indian men and women with type 2 diabetes…

  18. Trends of antidiabetic drug use in adult type 2 diabetes in Korea in 2002-2013: Nationwide population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Ko, Seung-Hyun; Kim, Dae-Jung; Park, Jong-Heon; Park, Cheol-Young; Jung, Chang Hee; Kwon, Hyuk-Sang; Park, Joong-Yeol; Song, Kee-Ho; Han, Kyungdo; Lee, Ki-Up; Ko, Kyung-Soo

    2016-07-01

    This study investigated trends in the prescription of antidiabetic medications for patients with type 2 diabetes, focusing on changing patterns of prescriptions and the cost of drugs during the last 10 years. Retrospective data on patients with type 2 diabetes aged 30 years or older were analyzed using information from the National Health Information Database collected by the National Health Insurance Service in Korea from January 2002 to December 2013. We identified patients with type 2 diabetes who had at least one service claim in each year during the study period. The prescribing information was collected and fixed-dose combination tablets were counted as each of their constituent classes. The total number of adults with type 2 diabetes who were treated using antidiabetic agents increased from 0.87 million in 2002 to 2.72 million in 2013 in Korea. Among antidiabetic medications in 2002, sulfonylurea (SU) was the most commonly used agent (87.2%), and metformin was the second (52.9%). However, in 2013, the use of metformin increased to 80.4% of the total antidiabetic prescriptions. The use of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor increased remarkably after release in late 2008 and composed one-third of the market share with 1 million prescriptions (38.4%) in 2013. Among the prescriptions for monotherapy, only 13.0% were metformin in 2002, but the amount increased to 53.2% by 2013. In contrast, the use of SU declined dramatically from 75.2% in 2002 to 30.6% in 2013. Dual and triple combinations steadily increased from 35.0% and 6.6% in 2002 to 44.9% and 15.5% in 2013, respectively. In 2013, SU with metformin (41.7%) and metformin with DPP-4 inhibitor (32.5%) combination were most frequently prescribed. The total antidiabetic medication cost increased explosively from U.S. $70 million (82.5 billion won) in 2002 to U.S. $4 billion (480 billion won) in 2013.The use of antidiabetic agents and their costs have been increasing steadily. Metformin is the most commonly

  19. [Modification of fasting blood glucose in adults with diabetes mellitus type 2 after regular soda and diet soda intake in the State of Querétaro, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Olalde-Mendoza, Liliana; Moreno-González, Yazmín Esmeralda

    2013-06-01

    The objective of the study was to compare the modification of fasting blood glucose in adults with diabetes mellitus type 2 after intake of regular soda and diet soda. We conducted a randomized clinical trial in clinics of Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social in Querétaro, México. We included 80 patients with diabetes (mean weight 74.2 +/- 13.66, BMI 30.5 +/- 4.305, waist 98.2 +/- 12.9 and time evolution of diabetes 3.8 +/- 3.009) who were asked to come with fasting for 8 hours and without taking any medicine before testing. They were divided into two groups of 40 subjects, to whom was measured fasting blood glucose after the ingestion of 200 ml of diet soda (with aspartame and acesulfame potassium) or regular soda (without sweetener) we measure glucose at 10, 15 and 30 minutes. For statistical analysis performed we used Student's t-test for dependent and independent samples, and paired t-test, and chi square test (chi2). Capillary glucose levels at 10 minutes were -34.52 and -25.41%, at 15 minutes -48.8 and -36.2% and at 30 minutes 57.75 and 43.6% of absolute and relative differences, with p = 0.000. In conclusion, according to the observations, diet soda doesn't increased blood glucose levels, with a significant difference in fasting decreased at 30 minutes. PMID:24934070

  20. Magnitude of cognitive dysfunction in adults with type 2 diabetes: a meta-analysis of six cognitive domains and the most frequently reported neuropsychological tests within domains.

    PubMed

    Palta, Priya; Schneider, Andrea L C; Biessels, Geert Jan; Touradji, Pegah; Hill-Briggs, Felicia

    2014-03-01

    The objectives were to conduct a meta-analysis in accordance with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) standards to determine effect sizes (Cohen's d) for cognitive dysfunction in adults with type 2 diabetes, relative to nondiabetic controls, and to obtain effect sizes for the most commonly reported neuropsychological tests within domains. Twenty-four studies, totaling 26,137 patients (n = 3351 with diabetes), met study inclusion criteria. Small to moderate effect sizes were obtained for five of six domains: motor function (3 studies, n = 2374; d = -0.36), executive function (12 studies, n = 1784; d = -0.33), processing speed (16 studies, n = 3076; d = -0.33), verbal memory (15 studies, n = 4,608; d = -0.28), and visual memory (6 studies, n = 1754; d = -0.26). Effect size was smallest for attention/concentration (14 studies, n = 23,143; d = -0.19). The following tests demonstrated the most notable performance decrements in diabetes samples: Grooved Pegboard (dominant hand) (d = -0.60), Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (immediate) (d = -0.40), Trails B (d = -0.39), Rey-Osterreith Complex Figure (delayed) (d = -0.38), Trails A (d = -0.34), and Stroop Part I (d = -0.28). This study provides effect sizes to power future epidemiological and clinical diabetes research studies examining cognitive function and to help inform the selection of neuropsychological tests. PMID:24555960

  1. Behavioral, normative and control beliefs underlying low-fat dietary and regular physical activity behaviors for adults diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and/or cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    White, Katherine M; Terry, Deborah J; Troup, Carolyn; Rempel, Lynn A

    2007-08-01

    Promoting healthy lifestyle behaviors is an important aspect of interventions designed to improve the management of chronic diseases such as Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The present study used Ajzen's (1991) theory of planned behavior as a framework to examine beliefs amongst adults diagnosed with these conditions who do and do not engage in low-fat dietary and regular physical activity behaviors. Participants (N = 192) completed a questionnaire assessing their behavioral, normative and control beliefs in relation to regular, moderate physical activity and eating foods low in saturated fats. Measures of self-reported behavior were also examined. The findings revealed that, in general, it is the underlying behavioral beliefs that are important determinants for both physical activity and low-fat food consumption with some evidence to suggest that pressure from significant others is an important consideration for low-fat food consumption. Laziness, as a barrier to engaging in physical activity, also emerged as an important factor. To encourage a healthy lifestyle amongst this population, interventions should address the perceived costs associated with behavioral performance and encourage people to maintain healthy behaviors in light of these costs. PMID:17620212

  2. The Clinical Significance of Glycoprotein Phospholipase D Levels in Distinguishing Early Stage Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults and Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Wen; Liang, Yu-Zhen; Qin, Bao-Yu; Zhang, Jia-Li; Xia, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Autoantibodies have been widely used as markers of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA); however, the specificity and sensitivity of autoantibodies as markers of LADA are weak compared with those found in type 1 diabetes (T1DM). In this study, we aimed to identify other plasma proteins as potential candidates that can be used effectively to determine early stage LADA and type 2 diabetes (T2DM) to facilitate early diagnosis and treatment. These issues were addressed by studying new-onset ‘classic’ T1DM (n = 156), LADA (n = 174), T2DM (n = 195) and healthy cohorts (n = 166). Plasma samples were obtained from the four cohorts. We employed isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) together with liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS) to identify plasma proteins with significant changes in LADA. The changes were validated by Western blot and ELISA analyses. Among the four cohorts, 311 unique proteins were identified in three iTRAQ runs, with 157 present across the three data sets. Among them, 49/311 (16.0%) proteins had significant changes in LADA compared with normal controls, including glycoprotein phospholipase D (GPLD1), which was upregulated in LADA. Western blot and ELISA analyses showed that GPLD1 levels were higher in both LADA and T1DM cohorts than in both T2DM and healthy cohorts, while there were no significant differences in the plasma concentrations of GPLD1 between the LADA and T1DM cohorts. GPLD1 is implicated as a potential candidate plasma protein for determining early stage LADA and T2DM. PMID:27351175

  3. Endothelial Cell Autoantibodies in Predicting Declining Renal Function, End-Stage Renal Disease, or Death in Adult Type 2 Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Zimering, Mark B.; Zhang, Jane H.; Guarino, Peter D.; Emanuele, Nicholas; McCullough, Peter A.; Fried, Linda F.

    2014-01-01

    Albuminuria is a strong predictor of diabetic nephropathy chronic kidney disease outcomes. Yet, therapeutic albuminuria-lowering has not consistently translated into a reduction in clinical events suggesting the involvement of additional pathogenic factors. Our hypothesis is that anti-endothelial cell autoantibodies play a role in development and progression in diabetic nephropathy. We determined anti-endothelial cell antibody (AECA) bioactivity in protein A-elutes of baseline plasma in 305 participants in the VA NEPHRON-D study, a randomized trial of angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) or dual ARB plus angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor therapy in type 2 diabetes with proteinuric nephropathy. Thirty-eight percent (117/305) of participants had significantly reduced endothelial cell survival ( ≤80%) in the IgG fraction of plasma. A VA NEPHRON-D primary endpoint [end-stage renal disease (ESRD), significant reduction in estimated glomerular filtration rate, or death] was experienced by 58 individuals. In adjusted Cox regression analysis, there was a significant interaction effect of baseline anti-endothelial cell-mediated cell survival and albuminuria on the hazard rate (HR) for primary composite endpoint (P = 0.017). Participants lacking strongly inhibitory antibodies with albuminuria ≥1 g/g creatinine had a significantly increased primary event hazard ratio, 3.41 – 95% confidence intervals (CI 1.84–6.33; P < 0.001) compared to those lacking strongly inhibitory antibodies with lower baseline albuminuria ( <1 g/g creatinine). These results suggest that anti-endothelial cell antibodies interact significantly with albuminuria in predicting the composite endpoint of death, ESRD, or substantial decline in renal function in older, adult type 2 diabetic nephropathy. PMID:25157242

  4. Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I-associated adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma: new directions in clinical research.

    PubMed

    Tsukasaki, Kunihiro; Tobinai, Kensei

    2014-10-15

    Adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATL) is a distinct malignancy of regulatory T cell (Treg)/TH2 cells caused by human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-1), with a high frequency of expression of CD3/CD4/CD25/CCR4 and FoxP3 in about half of the cells. However, in primary ATL cells, although expression of the virus, including the Tax oncoprotein, appears just after an in vitro culture, integration sites of the provirus into the host genome are random, and chromosomal/genetic abnormalities are complex. ATL is thus a single disease entity that is caused by HTLV-1 and possesses diverse molecular features. The clinical features and prognosis of ATL vary, and this has led to subtypes classified into four categories: acute, lymphomatous, chronic, and smoldering types, based on lactate dehydrogenase and calcium values and organ involvement. Approximately 15 to 20 million individuals are infected with HTLV-1 worldwide, 1.1 million of whom reside in Japan, and the annual incidence of ATL has been estimated to be approximately 1,000. HTLV-1 infection early in life, mainly from breast feeding, is crucial for the development of ATL. The age-specific occurrence of ATL and complex genome abnormalities that accumulate with disease progression suggest a multistep carcinogenesis model following HTLV-1 infection. Various treatment options are available for ATL and consist of watchful waiting for indolent ATL, intensive chemotherapy followed by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for aggressive ATL, and a combination of IFNα and zidovudine for ATL with leukemic manifestation. Several promising new agents, including an anti-CCR4 antibody, are currently undergoing clinical trials associated with translational research. See all articles in this CCR Focus section, "Paradigm Shifts in Lymphoma." PMID:25320371

  5. Race/Ethnicity and gender differences in health intentions and behaviors regarding exercise and diet for adults with type 2 diabetes: A cross-sectional analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Self-management is the cornerstone of diabetes control and prevention of complications; however, it is undetermined whether differences in intention to adopt healthy lifestyles and actual healthy behavior exist across race/ethnic groups. This study evaluated the differences across racial-ethnic groups in self-reported medical advice received and health intentions and behaviors among adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods A cross-sectional analysis of the 2007 SHIELD US survey ascertained self-reported health intentions and behaviors for regular exercise, diet, and weight management among Non-Hispanic Caucasian (n = 2526), Non-Hispanic African-American (n = 706), and Hispanic (n = 179) respondents with type 2 diabetes. Results A similar proportion of respondents from each race-gender group (43%-56%) reported receiving healthcare advice to increase their exercise (P = 0.32). Significantly more minorities reported an intention to follow the exercise recommendation compared with Non-Hispanic Caucasians (P = 0.03). More Non-Hispanic African-American (29%) and Hispanic (27%) men reported exercising regularly compared with other race-gender groups (P = 0.02). Significantly more Non-Hispanic Caucasian women (74%) and Hispanic women (79%) reported trying to lose weight compared with other groups (P < 0.0001). Conclusions Differences in health intentions and healthy behaviors were noted across race-gender groups. More Non-Hispanic African-American men reported an intention to follow advice on exercising and self-report of exercising regularly was also higher compared with other race-gender groups. More Hispanic men reported high physical activity levels than other groups. Despite an increased willingness to follow healthcare recommendations for diet, >50% of respondents were obese among all race-gender groups. PMID:21729303

  6. Utility of the waist-to-height ratio, waist circumference and body mass index in the screening of metabolic syndrome in adult patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    -to-height ratio indexes are useful to predict the presence of metabolic syndrome in adult patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. PMID:24594198

  7. Types of Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... without insulin injections). Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes, formerly called adult-onset or non-insulin-dependent diabetes, is the ... Diabetes / Types of Diabetes / Preventing Diabetes / Type 2 Diabetes Widespread in Adults Fall 2006 Issue: Volume 1 Number 1 Page ...

  8. Counseling Adult Adoptees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corder, Kate

    2012-01-01

    This review presents various resources about working with adult adoptees in order to inform counselors in their practice. Topics covered include basics of adoption, including types of adoption and adoption statistics; possible issues adult adoptees may face; and suggestions and implications for counselors. The article addresses some of the serious…

  9. Efficacy and cost-effectiveness of a web-based intervention with mobile phone support to treat depressive symptoms in adults with diabetes mellitus type 1 and type 2: design of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A diagnosis of diabetes mellitus types 1 or 2 doubles the odds of a comorbid depressive disorder. The combined diseases have a wide range of adverse outcomes, such as a lower quality of life, poorer diabetes outcomes and increased healthcare utilisation. Diabetes patients with depression can be treated effectively with psychotherapy, but access to psychological care is limited. In this study we will examine the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of a newly developed web-based intervention (GET.ON Mood Enhancer Diabetes) for people with diabetes and comorbid depressive symptoms. Methods/Design A two-arm randomised controlled trial will be conducted. Adults with diabetes (type 1 or type 2) with increased depression scores (> 22 on the German version of the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D)) will be included. Eligible participants will be recruited through advertisement in diabetes patient journals and via a large-scale German health insurance company. The participants will be randomly assigned to either a 6-week minimally guided web-based self-help program or an online psychoeducation program on depression. The study will include 260 participants, which will enable us to detect a statistically significant difference with a group effect size of d = 0.35 at a power of 80% and a significance level of p = 0.05. The primary outcome measure will be the level of depression as assessed by the CES-D. The secondary outcome measures will be: diabetes-specific emotional distress, glycaemic control, self-management behaviour and the participants’ satisfaction with the intervention. Online self-assessments will be collected at baseline and after a 2 months period, with additional follow-up measurements 6 and 12 months after randomisation. The data will be analysed on an intention-to-treat basis and per protocol. In addition, we will conduct an economic evaluation from a societal perspective. Discussion If this intervention is shown to be

  10. Gender Differences in Lay Knowledge of Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms Among Community-dwelling Caucasian, Latino, Filipino, and Korean Adults - DiLH Survey

    PubMed Central

    Fukuoka, Yoshimi; Bender, Melinda S.; Choi, JiWon; Gonzalez, Prisila; Arai, Shoshana

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to explore gender differences in lay knowledge of type 2 diabetes symptoms among community-dwelling Caucasian, Latino, Filipino, and Korean Americans. Design and Methods A cross-sectional survey was administered to a convenience sample of 904 adults (172 Caucasians, 248 Latinos, 234 Koreans, and 250 Filipinos) without diabetes at community events, community clinics, churches, and online in the San Francisco Bay Area and San Diego from August to December 2013. Participants were asked to describe in their own words signs and/or symptoms of diabetes. A multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to examine the association of lay symptom knowledge with gender after controlling for potential confounding factors. Results Overall, the average age of the sample populations was 44 (SD ±16.1) years, 36% were male, and 58% were married. Increased thirst/dry mouth following increased urinary frequency/color/odor and increased fatigue/lethargy/low energy were the most frequently reported signs and symptoms (19.8%, 15.4%, and 13.6%, respectively). After controlling for known confounding factors, women were 1.6 (95% confidence interval, 1.2-2.3, P = .004) times more likely than men to report at least 1 diabetes symptom. However, this gender difference in knowledge of diabetes signs and symptoms did not significantly differ across Caucasians, Latinos, Filipinos, and Korean Americans (P = .87). Conclusion The findings underscore the importance of improving public knowledge and awareness of signs and symptoms of diabetes, particularly in men. PMID:25227121

  11. ONE ANTIGEN MISMATCHED RELATED VS. HLA-MATCHED UNRELATED DONOR HEMATOPOIETIC TRANSPLANTATION IN ADULTS WITH ACUTE LEUKEMIA: CIBMTR RESULTS IN THE ERA OF MOLECULAR HLA TYPING

    PubMed Central

    Valcárcel, David; Sierra, Jorge; Wang, Tao; Kan, Fangyu; Gupta, Vikas; Hale, Gregory A.; Marks, David I.; McCarthy, Philip L; Oudshoorn, Machteld; Petersdorf, Effie W; Ringdén, Olle; Setterholm, Michelle; Spellman, Stephen R; Waller, Edmund K.; Gajewski, James L; Marino, Susana R.; Senitzer, David; Lee, Stephanie J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Approximately 13% of patients lacking an HLA-identical sibling have a 1-antigen-mismatched related donor (MMRD). Historically, outcomes using a 1-antigen MMRD were considered equivalent to a matched unrelated donor (UD). Recent improvements in unrelated donor (UD) stem cell transplantation (SCT) due to better molecular HLA-matching justifies investigating if UD should be preferred to MMRD in adult patients with acute leukemia. Patients and Methods The outcomes of MMRD (n=89) and HLA-A, B, C, DRB1 allele matched UD (n=700) SCT reported to the CIBMTR between 1995 and 2005 were compared. Patients were transplanted for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL) in first or second complete remission. Results Donor type was not associated with hematological recovery. Univariate and multivariate comparisons of MMRD vs. HLA-matched UD transplants showed no statistically significant differences in overall survival, disease free survival, transplant related mortality, relapse, and 100-day grade III–IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). MMRD SCT was associated with a lower rate of chronic GVHD at 1-year, 35% vs 47% p=0.03, which was confirmed in multivariate analysis (RR 0.58, 95% CI 0.39-0.85, p<0.01). Conclusion HLA-matched UD and MMRD SCT are associated with comparable survival. Since less chronic GVHD was observed in MMRD, this option when available remains the first choice in acute leukemia patients without an HLA-identical sibling in need of allogeneic transplantation. PMID:20674756

  12. Alberta Diabetes and Physical Activity Trial (ADAPT): A randomized theory-based efficacy trial for adults with type 2 diabetes - rationale, design, recruitment, evaluation, and dissemination

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The primary aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of three physical activity (PA) behavioural intervention strategies in a sample of adults with type 2 diabetes. Method/Design Participants (N = 287) were randomly assigned to one of three groups consisting of the following intervention strategies: (1) standard printed PA educational materials provided by the Canadian Diabetes Association [i.e., Group 1/control group)]; (2) standard printed PA educational materials as in Group 1, pedometers, a log book and printed PA information matched to individuals' PA stage of readiness provided every 3 months (i.e., Group 2); and (3) PA telephone counseling protocol matched to PA stage of readiness and tailored to personal characteristics, in addition to the materials provided in Groups 1 and 2 (i.e., Group 3). PA behaviour measured by the Godin Leisure Time Exercise Questionnaire and related social-cognitive measures were assessed at baseline, 3, 6, 9, 12 and 18-months (i.e., 6-month follow-up). Clinical (biomarkers) and health-related quality of life assessments were conducted at baseline, 12-months, and 18-months. Linear Mixed Model (LMM) analyses will be used to examine time-dependent changes from baseline across study time points for Groups 2 and 3 relative to Group 1. Discussion ADAPT will determine whether tailored but low-cost interventions can lead to sustainable increases in PA behaviours. The results may have implications for practitioners in designing and implementing theory-based physical activity promotion programs for this population. Clinical Trials Registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00221234 PMID:20067626

  13. Identification of two novel mutations in the SLC25A13 gene and detection of seven mutations in 102 patients with adult-onset type II citrullinemia.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, T; Yamaguchi, N; Kobayashi, K; Nishi, I; Horinouchi, H; Jalil, M A; Li, M X; Ushikai, M; Iijima, M; Kondo, I; Saheki, T

    2000-12-01

    Adult-onset type II citrullinemia (CTLN2) is characterized by a liver-specific deficiency of argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) protein. We have recently identified the gene responsible for CTLN2, viz., SLC25A13, which encodes a calcium-binding mitochondrial carrier protein, designated citrin, and found five mutations of the SLC25A13 gene in CTLN2 patients. In the present study, we have identified two novel mutations, 1800ins1 and R605X, in SLC25A13 mRNA and the SLC25A13 gene. Diagnostic analysis for the seven mutations in 103 CTLN2 patients diagnosed by biochemical and enzymatic studies has revealed that 102 patients had one or two of the seven mutations and 93 patients were homozygotes or compound heterozygotes. These results indicate that CTLN2 is caused by an abnormality in the SLC25A13 gene, and that our criteria for CTLN2 before DNA diagnosis are correct. Five of 22 patients from consanguineous unions have been shown to be compound heterozygotes, suggesting a high frequency of the mutated genes. The frequency of homozygotes is calculated to be more than 1 in 20,000 from carrier detection (6 in 400 individuals tested) in the Japanese population. We have detected no cross-reactive immune materials in the liver of CTLN2 patients with any of the seven mutations by Western blot analysis with anti-human citrin antibody. From these findings, we hypothesize that CTLN2 is caused by a complete deletion of citrin, although the mechanism of ASS deficiency is still unknown. PMID:11153906

  14. Comparison of a mindful eating intervention to a diabetes self-management intervention among adults with type 2 diabetes: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Miller, Carla K; Kristeller, Jean L; Headings, Amy; Nagaraja, Haikady

    2014-04-01

    Mindful eating may be an effective intervention for increasing awareness of hunger and satiety cues, improving eating regulation and dietary patterns, reducing symptoms of depression and anxiety, and promoting weight loss. Diabetes self-management education (DSME), which addresses knowledge, self-efficacy, and outcome expectations for improving food choices, also may be an effective intervention for diabetes self-care. Yet few studies have compared the impact of mindful eating to a DSME-based treatment approach on patient outcomes. Adults 35 to 65 years old with type 2 diabetes for ≥1 year not requiring insulin therapy were recruited from the community and randomly assigned to treatment group. The impact of a group-based 3-month mindful eating intervention (MB-EAT-D; n = 27) to a group-based 3-month DSME "Smart Choices" (SC) intervention (n = 25) postintervention and at 3-month follow-up was evaluated. Repeated-measures ANOVA with contrast analysis compared change in outcomes across time. There was no significant difference between groups in weight change. Significant improvement in depressive symptoms, outcome expectations, nutrition and eating-related self-efficacy, and cognitive control and disinhibition of control regarding eating behaviors occurred for both groups (all p < .0125) at 3-month follow-up. The SC group had greater increase in nutrition knowledge and self-efficacy than the MB-EAT-D group (all p < .05) at 3-month follow-up. MB-EAT-D had significant increase in mindfulness, whereas the SC group had significant increase in fruit and vegetable consumption at study end (all p < .0125). Both SC and MB-EAT-D were effective treatments for diabetes self-management. The availability of mindful eating and DSME-based approaches offers patients greater choices in meeting their self-care needs. PMID:23855018

  15. Impact of a physical activity intervention program on cognitive predictors of behaviour among adults at risk of Type 2 diabetes (ProActive randomised controlled trial)

    PubMed Central

    Hardeman, Wendy; Kinmonth, Ann Louise; Michie, Susan; Sutton, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Background In the ProActive Trial an intensive theory-based intervention program was no more effective than theory-based brief advice in increasing objectively measured physical activity among adults at risk of Type 2 diabetes. We aimed to illuminate these findings by assessing whether the intervention program changed cognitions about increasing activity, defined by the Theory of Planned Behaviour, in ways consistent with the theory. Methods N = 365 sedentary participants aged 30–50 years with a parental history of Type 2 diabetes were randomised to brief advice alone or to brief advice plus the intervention program delivered face-to-face or by telephone. Questionnaires at baseline, 6 and 12 months assessed cognitions about becoming more physically active. Analysis of covariance was used to test intervention impact. Bootstrapping was used to test multiple mediation of intervention impact. Results At 6 months, combined intervention groups (face-to-face and telephone) reported that they found increasing activity more enjoyable (affective attitude, d = .25), and they perceived more instrumental benefits (e.g., improving health) (d = .23) and more control (d = .32) over increasing activity than participants receiving brief advice alone. Stronger intentions (d = .50) in the intervention groups than the brief advice group at 6 months were partially explained by affective attitude and perceived control. At 12 months, intervention groups perceived more positive instrumental (d = .21) and affective benefits (d = .29) than brief advice participants. The intervention did not change perceived social pressure to increase activity. Conclusion Lack of effect of the intervention program on physical activity over and above brief advice was consistent with limited and mostly small short-term effects on cognitions. Targeting affective benefits (e.g., enjoyment, social interaction) and addressing barriers to physical activity may strengthen intentions, but stronger intentions did

  16. Types of Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Type 1 Diabetes Type 1 diabetes, formerly called juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes, ... in children, teenagers or young adults. Treatment for type 1 diabetes includes taking insulin shots or using an insulin ...

  17. Self-Care Behaviors and Glycemic Control in Low-Income Adults in México With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus May Have Implications for Patients of Mexican Heritage Living in the United States.

    PubMed

    Compeán Ortiz, Lidia G; Del Ángel Pérez, Beatriz; Reséndiz González, Eunice; Piñones Martínez, Socorro; González Quirarte, Nora H; Berry, Diane C

    2016-04-01

    This study examined self-care behaviors and their relationship to glycemic control in low-income Mexican adults with type 2 diabetes in Southeastern Tamaulipas, México. A total of 135 patients were enrolled from 17 community health centers. The most frequent self-care behavior was medication management (80%), and the least frequent self-care behavior was self blood glucose monitoring (7%). All the patients demonstrated poor glycemic control, with glycated hemoglobin > 7%. Self-care behaviors were associated with fasting blood glucose (rs = .223, p = .005). Medication management was influenced by cognitive performance, F(1, 130) = 4.49, p = .036, and depression, F(1, 130) = 8.22, p = .005. Dietary behaviors were influenced by previous diabetes education, F(1, 130) = 6.73, p = .011. These findings indicate that education and cognitive behavioral interventions in Spanish for Mexican adults with type 2 diabetes are urgently needed. PMID:26040723

  18. Purslane Extract and Glucose Homeostasis in Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: A Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial of Efficacy and Safety.

    PubMed

    Wainstein, Julio; Landau, Zohar; Bar Dayan, Yosefa; Jakubowicz, Daniela; Grothe, Torsten; Perrinjaquet-Moccetti, Tania; Boaz, Mona

    2016-02-01

    Purslane extract (PE) is derived from Portulaca oleracea L., a medicinal plant used in traditional medicine for its antidiabetic properties. This randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of PE in improving glucose control, blood pressure, and lipid profile in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) treated with a single oral hypoglycemic agent at baseline. Subjects were randomized to treatment with three capsules of PE/day or a matched placebo. Change from baseline to the week 12 end-of-follow-up visit measures of glucose homeostasis, hemodynamics, and lipid profile was compared by treatment assignment. In addition, these measures were evaluated in a subgroup of "responders," defined as patients whose week 12 HbA1c was lower than baseline values, regardless of treatment assignment. This group was further assessed in subgroups of baseline oral hypoglycemic treatment. A total of 63 participants were treated with either PE (n = 31, 11 females, mean age 52.4 ± 7.9 years) or matched placebo (n = 32, 11 females, mean age 58.3 ± 10.8 years). In the total cohort, systolic blood pressure declined significantly more in the PE group than the placebo group: -7.5 ± 5.0 versus -0.01 ± 0.3 mmHg, P < .0001. In the responders' subgroup, HbA1c declined significantly more in the PE group than the placebo group: -0.8% ± 0.4% versus -0.6% ± 0.5%, P = .03. Few adverse events were reported. These were mild and did not differ by treatment assignment. PE appears to be a safe, adjunct treatment for T2DM, significantly reducing systolic blood pressure in the total cohort and HbA1c in the subgroup of responders. PMID:26854844

  19. A Randomized Comparison of Online- and Telephone-Based Care Management with Internet Training Alone in Adult Patients with Poorly Controlled Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Fonda, Stephanie J.; Gomes, Helen E.; Alexis, George; Conlin, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Aims Care management may improve the quality of diabetes care by enhancing contact between high-risk patients and their providers. This prospective, longitudinal, randomized trial sought to investigate whether telephone or online care management improves diabetes-related outcomes over time compared with usual care supplemented with Internet access and training. Subjects and Methods One hundred fifty-one adult subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus and an elevated hemoglobin A1c (A1c) level (≥8.5%) were randomly assigned to online care management (n=51), telephone-based care management (n=51), or Web training (n=49) groups. Online and telephone participants interacted with a care manager through a diabetes education and care management Web site and by telephone, respectively. The Web training group was provided with online diabetes self-management resources but no care management support. The primary outcome measure was A1c measured every 3 months for a year. Results A1c declined significantly and substantially in all groups over 12 months. A1c declined linearly at a rate of 0.32% (P<0.0001) per quarter for the online group, 0.36% (P<0.0001) for the telephone group, and 0.41% for the Web training group (P<0.0001). The rate of change over time did not differ significantly among groups. The groups converged at 12 months with average absolute A1c difference of −1.5%. The number of interactions with care providers was not significantly associated with the change in A1c. Blood pressure, weight, lipid levels, and diabetes distress did not differ among groups over time. Conclusions Online, telephone-based care management, and Web training for diabetes patients with elevated A1c were each associated with a substantial improvement in A1c over a 1-year period. Internet access and training alone may be as effective as care management in patients with poorly controlled diabetes. PMID:22953754

  20. Pediatric-type nodal follicular lymphoma: an indolent clonal proliferation in children and adults with high proliferation index and no BCL2 rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Louissaint, Abner; Ackerman, Adam M; Dias-Santagata, Dora; Ferry, Judith A; Hochberg, Ephraim P; Huang, Mary S; Iafrate, A John; Lara, Daniel O; Pinkus, Geraldine S; Salaverria, Itziar; Siddiquee, Zakir; Siebert, Reiner; Weinstein, Howard J; Zukerberg, Lawrence R; Harris, Nancy Lee; Hasserjian, Robert P

    2012-09-20

    Pediatric follicular lymphoma (PFL) is a variant of follicular lymphoma (FL) presenting as localized lymphadenopathy in children. Unlike conventional adult FL, PFL typically does not recur or progress. Clear diagnostic criteria for PFL are lacking, and it is uncertain whether this indolent lymphoma is defined by age or may occur in adults. We analyzed 27 FL in patients < 40 years of age and found that all 21 cases that lacked a BCL2 gene abnormality (BCL2-N; P < .0001) and had > 30% Ki67 fraction (high proliferation index, HPI; P = .0007) were stage I and did not progress or recur; in comparison, all 6 cases with BCL2 rearrangement and/or PI < 30% were stage III/IV, and 5 of 6 recurred or progressed. In a separate cohort of 58 adult FL (≥ 18 years of age), all 13 BCL2-N/HPI cases were stage I, and none progressed or relapsed, whereas 11 of 15 stage I cases with BCL2 gene abnormality and/or LPI relapsed or progressed (P = .0001). The adult and pediatric BCL2-N/HPI FL cases had similar morphologic features. Our results confirm the highly indolent behavior of PFL and suggest that these are characterized by HPI and absence of BCL2 gene abnormality. PFL-like cases also occur in adults and are associated with indolent behavior in this patient population. PMID:22855608

  1. Overcoming Clinical Inertia: A Randomized Clinical Trial of a Telehealth Remote Monitoring Intervention Using Paired Glucose Testing in Adults With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Blozis, Shelley A; Young, Heather M; Nesbitt, Thomas S; Quinn, Charlene C

    2015-01-01

    Background Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a worldwide challenge. Practice guidelines promote structured self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) for informing health care providers about glycemic control and providing patient feedback to increase knowledge, self-efficacy, and behavior change. Paired glucose testing—pairs of glucose results obtained before and after a meal or physical activity—is a method of structured SMBG. However, frequent access to glucose data to interpret values and recommend actions is challenging. A complete feedback loop—data collection and interpretation combined with feedback to modify treatment—has been associated with improved outcomes, yet there remains limited integration of SMBG feedback in diabetes management. Incorporating telehealth remote monitoring and asynchronous electronic health record (EHR) feedback from certified diabetes educators (CDEs)—specialists in glucose pattern management—employ the complete feedback loop to improve outcomes. Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate a telehealth remote monitoring intervention using paired glucose testing and asynchronous data analysis in adults with type 2 diabetes. The primary aim was change in glycated hemoglobin (A1c)—a measure of overall glucose management—between groups after 6 months. The secondary aims were change in self-reported Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities (SDSCA), Diabetes Empowerment Scale, and Diabetes Knowledge Test. Methods A 2-group randomized clinical trial was conducted comparing usual care to telehealth remote monitoring with paired glucose testing and asynchronous virtual visits. Participants were aged 30-70 years, not using insulin with A1c levels between 7.5% and 10.9% (58-96 mmol/mol). The telehealth remote monitoring tablet computer transmitted glucose data and facilitated a complete feedback loop to educate participants, analyze actionable glucose data, and provide feedback. Data from paired glucose testing were analyzed

  2. Type 2 diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... the disease. Alternative Names Noninsulin-dependent diabetes; Diabetes - type 2; Adult-onset diabetes Images Diabetes and exercise Diabetic emergency supplies Starchy foods Low blood sugar symptoms ...

  3. The cumulative effect of different childhood trauma types on self-reported symptoms of adult male depression and PTSD, substance abuse and health-related quality of life in a large active-duty military cohort.

    PubMed

    Agorastos, Agorastos; Pittman, James O E; Angkaw, Abigail C; Nievergelt, Caroline M; Hansen, Christian J; Aversa, Laura H; Parisi, Sarah A; Barkauskas, Donald A; Baker, Dewleen G

    2014-11-01

    History of childhood trauma (CT) is highly prevalent and may lead to long-term consequences on physical and mental health. This study investigated the independent association of CT with symptoms of adult depression and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), mental and physical health-related quality of life (HRQoL), as well as current tobacco consumption and alcohol abuse in a large homogenous cohort of 1254 never-deployed, young male Marines enrolled in the Marine Resiliency Study. Independent effects of CT history, number and type of CT on outcomes were analyzed using hierarchical multivariate logistic regression models. Our results suggested dose-dependent negative effect of an increasing number of trauma types of CT on depression, PTSD and HRQoL. Experience of single CT type demonstrated overall weak effects, while history of multiple CT types distinctively increased the likelihood of adult PTSD symptomology (OR: 3.1, 95% CI: 1.5-6.2), poor mental (OR: 2.3, 95% CI: 1.7-3.1) and physical HRQoL (OR: 1.4, 95% CI: 1.1-1.9). Risk for depression symptoms was similar for both single and multiple CT (OR: 2.2, 95% CI: 1.3-3.8 and OR: 2.1, 95% CI: 1.2-3.5 respectively). CT history had no effects on current tobacco use and alcohol abuse. Our study thus provides evidence for substantial additive effect of different CT types on adult mental and physical health with increasing levels of exposure. PMID:25139009

  4. Effects of Age on the Types and Severity of Excessive Fear or the Absence of Fear in Children and Young Adults with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richman, David M.; Dotson, Wesley H.; Rose, Chad A.; Thompson, Samuel; Abby, Layla

    2012-01-01

    This study identified (a) patterns of fearful stimuli for children and young adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), (b) the severity of the fear, and (c) whether excessive fear or the absence of fear negatively affected the participant's quality of life. A web-based survey was used to distribute a modified and extended version of the Fear…

  5. The Effects of Semantic Context and the Type and Amount of Acoustic Distortion on Lexical Decision by Younger and Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goy, Huiwen; Pelletier, Marianne; Coletta, Marco; Pichora-Fuller, M. Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors investigated how acoustic distortion affected younger and older adults' use of context in a lexical decision task. Method: The authors measured lexical decision reaction times (RTs) when intact target words followed acoustically distorted sentence contexts. Contexts were semantically congruent, neutral, or…

  6. Typing as a Motivational Factor and an Instructional Process in Educating Undereducated Adults in the Tri-County Region of Western Appalachian Maryland. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allegany County Board of Education, Cumberland, MD.

    The purpose of this project grant was to develop an innovative system which will recruit, motivate, and retain the undereducated adult in the Western Maryland region of Appalachia. The evaluation of staff changes in attitude toward the device was made with positive results. The evaluation of class interaction between the experimental and the…

  7. Bereavement in Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, James P.

    1994-01-01

    Factors that place older adults at risk for problems associated with the bereavement process are identified and discussed. Provides guidelines for distinguishing between normal bereavement depression and clinical depression, discusses the impact of different types of loss, describes three types of intervention, and explores countertransference.…

  8. Dealing with Disruptive Behavior of Adult Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobmeier, Robert; Moran, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    The adult education literature on disruptive behavior of adult learners was reviewed and a survey on disruptive behavior of adult learners was conducted with adult educators. The findings are synthesized in a conceptual framework for understanding the types and causes of disruptive behavior, which fall into the categories of inattention,…

  9. Age at Transition from Pediatric to Adult Care Has No Relationship with Mortality for Childhood-Onset Type 1 Diabetes in Japan: Diabetes Epidemiology Research International (DERI) Mortality Study

    PubMed Central

    Onda, Yoshiko; Nishimura, Rimei; Morimoto, Aya; Sano, Hironari; Utsunomiya, Kazunori; Tajima, Naoko

    2016-01-01

    Objective To follow up Japanese patients with type 1 diabetes for a maximum of 40 years to examine when they transitioned from pediatric care to adult care and to explore whether the attending physician, i.e., pediatrician or internist, was associated with prognosis. Methods Participants consisted of 1,299 patients who had been diagnosed as having type 1 diabetes at less than 15 years old between 1965 and 1979 identified through two nationwide surveys. Patients were classified as having received either pediatric care or adult care at the age of 15 and 30, and were compared for differences in mortality associated with the attending physician. Results The attending physicians were confirmed for a total of 1,093 patients at the age of 15. Of these patients, 43.8% and 40.3% received pediatric care and adult care, respectively. Of the 569 patients receiving pediatric care, 74.2%, 56.6%, 53.4%, and 51.3% continued with pediatric care at 20, 30, 40, and 50 years old, respectively. The attending physicians (pediatrician or internist) at the age of 15 and 30 had no significant impact on their survival (P = 0. 892, 0.411, respectively). Conclusions More than half of the patients who had received pediatric care at the age of 15 continued to receive pediatric care even after the age of 30, suggesting that their transition was far from smooth, while the attending physician at the age of both 15 and 30 was not a prognostic factor for mortality. Thus, the timing for transition to adult care in these patients has no relationship with mortality in Japan. PMID:26937952

  10. Adult Compacts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Further Education Unit, London (England).

    This bulletin focuses on adult compacts, three-way agreements among employers, potential employees, and trainers to provide the right kind of quality training to meet the employers' requirements. Part 1 is an executive summary of a report of the Adult Compacts Project, which studied three adult compacts in Birmingham and Loughborough, England, and…

  11. The Impact of an Internet-Based Self-Management Intervention (HeLP-Diabetes) on the Psychological Well-Being of Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: A Mixed-Method Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Megan; Dack, Charlotte; Barker, Chris; Murray, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    This mixed-method study assessed the impact of an internet-based, self-management intervention ("HeLP-Diabetes") on the psychological well-being of adults with type 2 diabetes. Nineteen participants were recruited from 3 general practices. Data were collected at baseline and at 6 weeks follow-up. Access to HeLP-Diabetes was associated with a significant decrease in participants' diabetes-related distress (Z = 2.04, p = 0.04, and d = 0.28). No significant differences were found in emotional distress or self-efficacy. The qualitative data found that participants reported improvements including increased self-efficacy and support, better management of low mood, greater diabetes awareness, and taking the condition more seriously. Participants also reported making improvements to their eating habits, exercise routine, and medical management. Some negative experiences associated with using the intervention were mentioned including feelings of guilt for not using the intervention as suggested or not making any behavioral changes, as well as technical and navigational frustrations with the intervention. Internet-based self-management interventions may have the potential to decrease diabetes-related distress in people with type 2 diabetes. The qualitative data also suggests internet interventions can positively impact both psychological and behavioural outcomes of adults with type 2 diabetes. PMID:26682226

  12. The Impact of an Internet-Based Self-Management Intervention (HeLP-Diabetes) on the Psychological Well-Being of Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: A Mixed-Method Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Megan; Dack, Charlotte; Barker, Chris; Murray, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    This mixed-method study assessed the impact of an internet-based, self-management intervention (“HeLP-Diabetes”) on the psychological well-being of adults with type 2 diabetes. Nineteen participants were recruited from 3 general practices. Data were collected at baseline and at 6 weeks follow-up. Access to HeLP-Diabetes was associated with a significant decrease in participants' diabetes-related distress (Z = 2.04, p = 0.04, and d = 0.28). No significant differences were found in emotional distress or self-efficacy. The qualitative data found that participants reported improvements including increased self-efficacy and support, better management of low mood, greater diabetes awareness, and taking the condition more seriously. Participants also reported making improvements to their eating habits, exercise routine, and medical management. Some negative experiences associated with using the intervention were mentioned including feelings of guilt for not using the intervention as suggested or not making any behavioral changes, as well as technical and navigational frustrations with the intervention. Internet-based self-management interventions may have the potential to decrease diabetes-related distress in people with type 2 diabetes. The qualitative data also suggests internet interventions can positively impact both psychological and behavioural outcomes of adults with type 2 diabetes. PMID:26682226

  13. Evaluation of the Effects of Cornus mas L. Fruit Extract on Glycemic Control and Insulin Level in Type 2 Diabetic Adult Patients: A Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Soltani, Rasool; Gorji, Abdollah; Asgary, Sedigheh; Sarrafzadegan, Nizal; Siavash, Mansour

    2015-01-01

    Background. The plant Cornus mas L. (cornelian cherry) is traditionally used as an antidiabetic supplement; however, there is no related clinical trial. In this study, we evaluated the effects of the fruit extract of this plant on biomarkers of glycemic control in adult patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods. Sixty patients with type 2 diabetes were randomly assigned to two groups to receive either the extract or placebo capsules (2 capsules twice daily) for 6 weeks. Each drug capsule contained 150 mg of anthocyanins. Fasting plasma levels of glucose, insulin, HgbA1C, and triglyceride as well as 2-hour postprandial glucose level (2Hpp) were measured before and after the intervention and finally the mean values were compared between groups. Results. After 6 weeks of intervention, significant increase in insulin level (1.13 ± 1.90 versus −0.643 ± 1.82, P < 0.05) as well as decrease in HgbA1C (−0.24 ± 0.429 versus 0.023 ± 0.225, P < 0.05) and TG (−23.66 ± 55.40 versus 2.83 ± 15.71, P < 0.05) levels was observed in drug group compared to placebo. Conclusion. Daily consumption of the fruit extract of Cornus mas L. improves glycemic control by increasing insulin level and reduces TG serum level in type 2 diabetic adult patients. PMID:26508984

  14. Cross-sectional study of diet, physical activity, television viewing and sleep duration in 233 110 adults from the UK Biobank; the behavioural phenotype of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Cassidy, Sophie; Chau, Josephine Y; Catt, Michael; Bauman, Adrian; Trenell, Michael I

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Simultaneously define diet, physical activity, television (TV) viewing, and sleep duration across cardiometabolic disease groups, and investigate clustering of non-diet lifestyle behaviours. Design Cross-sectional observational study. Setting 22 UK Biobank assessment centres across the UK. Participants 502 664 adults aged 37–63 years old, 54% women. 4 groups were defined based on disease status; ‘No disease’ (n=103 993), ‘cardiovascular disease’ (CVD n=113 469), ‘Type 2 diabetes without CVD’ (n=4074) and ‘Type 2 diabetes + CVD’ (n=11 574). Main outcomes Diet, physical activity, TV viewing and sleep duration. Results People with ‘CVD’ report low levels of physical activity (<918 MET min/week, OR (95% CI) 1.23 (1.20 to 1.25)), high levels of TV viewing (>3 h/day; 1.42 (1.39 to 1.45)), and poor sleep duration (<7, >8 h/night; 1.37 (1.34 to 1.39)) relative to people without disease. People with ‘Type 2 diabetes + CVD’ were more likely to report low physical activity (1.71 (1.64 to 1.78)), high levels of TV viewing (1.92 (1.85 to 1.99)) and poor sleep duration (1.52 (1.46 to1.58)) relative to people without disease. Non-diet behaviours were clustered, with people with ‘CVD’ or ‘Type 2 diabetes + CVD’ more likely to report simultaneous low physical activity, high TV viewing and poor sleep duration than those without disease (2.15 (2.03 to 2.28) and 3.29 (3.02 to 3.58), respectively). By contrast, 3 in 4 adults with ‘Type 2 diabetes’, and 2 in 4 adults with ‘CVD’ have changed their diet in the past 5 years, compared with only 1 in 4 in the ‘No disease’ group. Models were adjusted for gender, age, body mass index, Townsend Deprivation Index, ethnicity, alcohol intake, smoking and meeting fruit/vegetable guidelines. Conclusions Low physical activity, high TV and poor sleep duration are prominent unaddressed high-risk characteristics of both CVD and type 2 diabetes, and are likely to be clustered

  15. Weakened Immune System and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Healthcare Professionals Weakened Immune System and Adult Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vaccines are ... up to age 26 years Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Type 1 ...

  16. Multicenter Closed-Loop Insulin Delivery Study Points to Challenges for Keeping Blood Glucose in a Safe Range by a Control Algorithm in Adults and Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes from Various Sites

    PubMed Central

    Zisser, Howard; Renard, Eric; Kovatchev, Boris; Cobelli, Claudio; Avogaro, Angelo; Nimri, Revital; Magni, Lalo; Buckingham, Bruce A.; Chase, H. Peter; Doyle, Francis J.; Lum, John; Calhoun, Peter; Kollman, Craig; Dassau, Eyal; Farret, Anne; Place, Jerome; Breton, Marc; Anderson, Stacey M.; Dalla Man, Chiara; Del Favero, Simone; Bruttomesso, Daniela; Filippi, Alessio; Scotton, Rachele; Phillip, Moshe; Atlas, Eran; Muller, Ido; Miller, Shahar; Toffanin, Chiara; Raimondo, Davide Martino; De Nicolao, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: The Control to Range Study was a multinational artificial pancreas study designed to assess the time spent in the hypo- and hyperglycemic ranges in adults and adolescents with type 1 diabetes while under closed-loop control. The controller attempted to keep the glucose ranges between 70 and 180 mg/dL. A set of prespecified metrics was used to measure safety. Research Design and Methods: We studied 53 individuals for approximately 22 h each during clinical research center admissions. Plasma glucose level was measured every 15–30 min (YSI clinical laboratory analyzer instrument [YSI, Inc., Yellow Springs, OH]). During the admission, subjects received three mixed meals (1 g of carbohydrate/kg of body weight; 100 g maximum) with meal announcement and automated insulin dosing by the controller. Results: For adults, the mean of subjects' mean glucose levels was 159 mg/dL, and mean percentage of values 71–180 mg/dL was 66% overall (59% daytime and 82% overnight). For adolescents, the mean of subjects' mean glucose levels was 166 mg/dL, and mean percentage of values in range was 62% overall (53% daytime and 82% overnight). Whereas prespecified criteria for safety were satisfied by both groups, they were met at the individual level in adults only for combined daytime/nighttime and for isolated nighttime. Two adults and six adolescents failed to meet the daytime criterion, largely because of postmeal hyperglycemia, and another adolescent failed to meet the nighttime criterion. Conclusions: The control-to-range system performed as expected: faring better overnight than during the day and performing with variability between patients even after individualization based on patients' prior settings. The system had difficulty preventing postmeal excursions above target range. PMID:25003311

  17. The adult cystic fibrosis airway microbiota is stable over time and infection type, and highly resilient to antibiotic treatment of exacerbations.

    PubMed

    Fodor, Anthony A; Klem, Erich R; Gilpin, Deirdre F; Elborn, J Stuart; Boucher, Richard C; Tunney, Michael M; Wolfgang, Matthew C

    2012-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is characterized by defective mucociliary clearance and chronic airway infection by a complex microbiota. Infection, persistent inflammation and periodic episodes of acute pulmonary exacerbation contribute to an irreversible decline in CF lung function. While the factors leading to acute exacerbations are poorly understood, antibiotic treatment can temporarily resolve pulmonary symptoms and partially restore lung function. Previous studies indicated that exacerbations may be associated with changes in microbial densities and the acquisition of new microbial species. Given the complexity of the CF microbiota, we applied massively parallel pyrosequencing to identify changes in airway microbial community structure in 23 adult CF patients during acute pulmonary exacerbation, after antibiotic treatment and during periods of stable disease. Over 350,000 sequences were generated, representing nearly 170 distinct microbial taxa. Approximately 60% of sequences obtained were from the recognized CF pathogens Pseudomonas and Burkholderia, which were detected in largely non-overlapping patient subsets. In contrast, other taxa including Prevotella, Streptococcus, Rothia and Veillonella were abundant in nearly all patient samples. Although antibiotic treatment was associated with a small decrease in species richness, there was minimal change in overall microbial community structure. Furthermore, microbial community composition was highly similar in patients during an exacerbation and when clinically stable, suggesting that exacerbations may represent intrapulmonary spread of infection rather than a change in microbial community composition. Mouthwash samples, obtained from a subset of patients, showed a nearly identical distribution of taxa as expectorated sputum, indicating that aspiration may contribute to colonization of the lower airways. Finally, we observed a strong correlation between low species richness and poor lung function. Taken together, these

  18. Effectiveness of Computer Tailoring Versus Peer Support Web-Based Interventions in Promoting Physical Activity Among Insufficiently Active Canadian Adults With Type 2 Diabetes: Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Côté, José

    2016-01-01

    Background Type 2 diabetes is a major challenge for Canadian public health authorities, and regular physical activity is a key factor in the management of this disease. Given that less than half of people with type 2 diabetes in Canada are sufficiently active to meet the Canadian Diabetes Association's guidelines, effective programs targeting the adoption of regular physical activity are in demand for this population. Many researchers have argued that Web-based interventions targeting physical activity are a promising avenue for insufficiently active populations; however, it remains unclear if this type of intervention is effective among people with type 2 diabetes. Objective This research project aims to evaluate the effectiveness of two Web-based interventions targeting the adoption of regular aerobic physical activity among insufficiently active adult Canadian Francophones with type 2 diabetes. Methods A 3-arm, parallel randomized controlled trial with 2 experimental groups and 1 control group was conducted in the province of Quebec, Canada. A total of 234 participants were randomized at a 1:1:1 ratio to receive an 8-week, fully automated, computer-tailored, Web-based intervention (experimental group 1); an 8-week peer support (ie, Facebook group) Web-based intervention (experimental group 2); or no intervention (control group) during the study period. Results The primary outcome of this study is self-reported physical activity level (total min/week of moderate-intensity aerobic physical activity). Secondary outcomes are attitude, social influence, self-efficacy, type of motivation, and intention. All outcomes are assessed at baseline and 3 and 9 months after baseline with a self-reported questionnaire filled directly on the study websites. Conclusions By evaluating and comparing the effectiveness of 2 Web-based interventions characterized by different behavior change perspectives, findings of this study will contribute to advances in the field of physical

  19. Urinary tract infection - adults

    MedlinePlus

    Bladder infection - adults; UTI - adults; Cystitis - bacterial - adults; Pyelonephritis - adults; Kidney infection - adults ... to the hospital if you: Are an older adult Have kidney stones or changes in the anatomy ...

  20. Sibling Status Effects: Adult Expectations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baskett, Linda Musun

    1985-01-01

    This study attempted to determine what expectations or beliefs adults might hold about a child based on his or her sibling status alone. Ratings on 50 adjective pairs for each of three sibling status types, only, oldest, and youngest child, were assessed in relation to adult expectations, birth order, and parental status of rater. (Author/DST)

  1. Living Well with Diabetes: a randomized controlled trial of a telephone-delivered intervention for maintenance of weight loss, physical activity and glycaemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background By 2025, it is estimated that approximately 1.8 million Australian adults (approximately 8.4% of the adult population) will have diabetes, with the majority having type 2 diabetes. Weight management via improved physical activity and diet is the cornerstone of type 2 diabetes management. However, the majority of weight loss trials in diabetes have evaluated short-term, intensive clinic-based interventions that, while producing short-term outcomes, have failed to address issues of maintenance and broad population reach. Telephone-delivered interventions have the potential to address these gaps. Methods/Design Using a two-arm randomised controlled design, this study will evaluate an 18-month, telephone-delivered, behavioural weight loss intervention focussing on physical activity, diet and behavioural therapy, versus usual care, with follow-up at 24 months. Three-hundred adult participants, aged 20-75 years, with type 2 diabetes, will be recruited from 10 general practices via electronic medical records search. The Social-Cognitive Theory driven intervention involves a six-month intensive phase (4 weekly calls and 11 fortnightly calls) and a 12-month maintenance phase (one call per month). Primary outcomes, assessed at 6, 18 and 24 months, are: weight loss, physical activity, and glycaemic control (HbA1c), with weight loss and physical activity also measured at 12 months. Incremental cost-effectiveness will also be examined. Study recruitment began in February 2009, with final data collection expected by February 2013. Discussion This is the first study to evaluate the telephone as the primary method of delivering a behavioural weight loss intervention in type 2 diabetes. The evaluation of maintenance outcomes (6 months following the end of intervention), the use of accelerometers to objectively measure physical activity, and the inclusion of a cost-effectiveness analysis will advance the science of broad reach approaches to weight control and health

  2. Adult Children of Alcoholics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Ronald W.

    1987-01-01

    Presents analysis of adult children of alcoholics, their experience and adjustment in relation to the severity and type of alcoholism, age considerations and perceptions as a child, and existence and nature of significant others. Discusses alcoholics' and others' family issues, focusing on roles taken, and personality characteristics. Emphasizes…

  3. Hearing Loss in Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    House, John W.

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses hearing loss in adults. It begins with an explanation of the anatomy of the ear and then explains the three types of hearing loss: conductive hearing loss, sensorineural hearing loss, and mixed conductive-sensorineural hearing loss. Tinnitus, hearing aids, and cochlear implants are also addressed. (CR)

  4. Influence of Type 2 Diabetes on Prevalence of Key Periodontal Pathogens, Salivary Matrix Metalloproteinases, and Bone Remodeling Markers in Sudanese Adults with and without Chronic Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Hasaan Gassim; Idris, Shaza Bushra; Mustafa, Manal; Ahmed, Mutaz Faisal; Åstrøm, Anne Nordrehaug; Mustafa, Kamal; Ibrahim, Salah Osman

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the influence of type 2 diabetes on the occurrence of six periodontal pathogens in plaque samples of patients with and without chronic periodontitis. Levels of salivary MMP-8, MMP-9, RANKL, and OPG were also investigated. The study enrolled 31 patients with type 2 diabetes and chronic periodontitis (DM + CP), 29 with chronic periodontitis (CP), and 20 with type 2 diabetes (DM). Questionnaire-guided interviews were conducted and plaque index, bleeding on probing, and pocket depth were recorded. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was utilized to determine the prevalence of the bacteria. The levels of salivary molecules were determined by enzyme immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The CP group had the highest prevalence of P. gingivalis (81.5%), followed by the DM + CP (59.3%) and DM (55.0%) groups (P > 0.05). Similar trends were observed for P. intermedia and T. denticola. The prevalence of T. forsythia was 100% in both periodontitis groups compared to 90% in the DM group. There were no significant differences between the groups regarding the concentrations of MMP-8, MMP-9, or OPG. RANKL concentrations were below the detection limit. Our data show that type 2 diabetes has no significant influence on the prevalence of the investigated periodontal pathogens, or the levels of salivary MMP-8, MMP-9, and OPG. PMID:26989414

  5. Do breakfast skipping and breakfast type affect energy intake, nutrient intake, nutrient adequacy, and diet quality in young adults? NHANES 1999-2002

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to assess the impact of breakfast skipping and type of breakfast consumed on energy/nutrient intake, nutrient adequacy, and diet quality using a cross-sectional design. The setting was The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), 1999-2002. The sub...

  6. Synthesis of phosphatidylcholines in ozone-exposed alveolar type II cells isolated from adult rat lung: is glycerolphosphate acyltransferase a rate-limiting enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Haagsman, H.P.; Schuurmans, E.A.; Batenburg, J.J.; van Golde, L.M.

    1988-01-01

    Type II cells were exposed to ozone by gas diffusion through the thin Teflon bottom of culture dishes. The rate of phosphatidylcholine synthesis by type II cells, monitored by the incorporation of (Me-/sup 14/C)choline, was impaired by ozone at concentrations that did not affect other cellular parameters. The enzymes choline kinase and cholinephosphate cytidylyltransferase were not susceptible to inactivation by ozone at concentrations at which the activity of glycerolphosphate acyltransferase was decreased. The enzyme activity of lactate dehydrogenase increased after ozone exposure. The specific activity of choline kinase in the cytosolic fraction of type II cells was fivefold that in whole lung. The metabolism of (Me-/sup 14/C)choline was studied as a function of the choline concentration. Maximal rates of phosphatidylcholine synthesis were already attained at a concentration of 20 microM choline. Exposure of type II cells to ozone did not affect the recovery of label from (Me-/sup 14/C)choline in choline phosphate and CDP choline. However, the maximal rate of phosphatidylcholine synthesis decreased after ozone exposure, which indicates that the decreased apparent activity of glycerolphosphate acyltransferase limits the supply of diacylglycerols and thereby the rate of phosphatidylcholine synthesis. If the flux through the diacylglycerol pathway was stimulated by the addition of palmitic acid, a higher maximal rate of phosphatidylcholine synthesis was observed. The uptake of (Me-/sup 14/C)choline and the recovery of label in CDPcholine were not altered by the addition of different concentrations of palmitate. It is concluded that type II cells take up choline very efficiently, probably due to the high specific activity of choline kinase. At low choline concentrations the rate of phosphatidylcholine synthesis is determined by the supply of CDPcholine.

  7. Randomized, placebo-controlled trial to assess the safety and immunogenicity of an adenovirus type 35-based circumsporozoite malaria vaccine in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Creech, C Buddy; Dekker, Cornelia L; Ho, Dora; Phillips, Shanda; Mackey, Sally; Murray-Krezan, Cristina; Grazia Pau, Maria; Hendriks, Jenny; Brown, Valerie; Dally, Leonard G; Versteege, Isabella; Edwards, Kathryn M

    2013-12-01

    Malaria results in over 650,000 deaths each year; thus, there is an urgent need for an effective vaccine. Pre-clinical studies and recently reported human trials suggest that pre-erythrocytic stage vaccines can provide protection against infection. A Phase 1, randomized, placebo-controlled, dose-escalation study was conducted with a vaccine composed of a replication-deficient adenovirus-35 backbone with P. falciparum circumsporozoite (CS) surface antigen (Ad35.CS.01). Healthy adult subjects received three doses of 10 (8), 10 (9), 10 (10), or 10 (11) vp/mL Ad35.CS.01 vaccine or saline placebo intramuscularly at 0, 1, and 6-mo intervals. Adverse events were assessed and anti-CS antibody responses were determined by ELISA. Seventy-two individuals were enrolled, with age, gender, and ethnicity similar across each study arm. While the vaccine was generally well tolerated, adverse events were more frequent in the highest dose groups (10 (10) and 10 (11) vp/mL). More robust humoral responses were also noted at the highest doses, with 73% developing a positive ELISA response after the three dose series of 10 (11) vp/mL. The Ad35.CS.01 vaccine was most immunogenic at the highest dosages (10 (10) and 10 (11) vp/mL). Reactogenicity findings were more common after the 10 (11) vp/mL dose, although most were mild or moderate in nature and resolved without therapy. PMID:23955431

  8. Randomized, placebo-controlled trial to assess the safety and immunogenicity of an adenovirus type 35-based circumsporozoite malaria vaccine in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Creech, C Buddy; Dekker, Cornelia L; Ho, Dora; Phillips, Shanda; Mackey, Sally; Murray-Krezan, Cristina; Grazia Pau, Maria; Hendriks, Jenny; Brown, Valerie; Dally, Leonard G; Versteege, Isabella; Edwards, Kathryn M

    2013-01-01

    Malaria results in over 650 000 deaths each year; thus, there is an urgent need for an effective vaccine. Pre-clinical studies and recently reported human trials suggest that pre-erythrocytic stage vaccines can provide protection against infection. A Phase 1, randomized, placebo-controlled, dose-escalation study was conducted with a vaccine composed of a replication-deficient adenovirus-35 backbone with P. falciparum circumsporozoite (CS) surface antigen (Ad35.CS.01). Healthy adult subjects received three doses of 108, 109, 1010, or 1011 vp/mL Ad35.CS.01 vaccine or saline placebo intramuscularly at 0, 1, and 6-mo intervals. Adverse events were assessed and anti-CS antibody responses were determined by ELISA. Seventy-two individuals were enrolled, with age, gender, and ethnicity similar across each study arm. While the vaccine was generally well tolerated, adverse events were more frequent in the highest dose groups (1010 and 1011 vp/mL). More robust humoral responses were also noted at the highest doses, with 73% developing a positive ELISA response after the three dose series of 1011 vp/mL. The Ad35.CS.01 vaccine was most immunogenic at the highest dosages (1010 and 1011 vp/mL). Reactogenicity findings were more common after the 1011 vp/mL dose, although most were mild or moderate in nature and resolved without therapy. PMID:23955431

  9. A psychometric evaluation of adult patients with type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus: prevalence of psychological dysfunction and relationship to demographic variables, metabolic control and complications.

    PubMed

    Winocour, P H; Main, C J; Medlicott, G; Anderson, D C

    1990-08-01

    The relationship between psychosocial traits and glycaemic control and complications was examined in 130 adults (83 men, 47 women) with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Abnormal depression ratings were observed in more women (19.1%) than men (12.0%), p less than 0.01, whilst obsessive symptoms were recorded more frequently in men (41.0 v 21.3%, p less than 0.01). Abnormal anxiety ratings were present in roughly 8-13% of men and women, although a notably low feeling of insecurity rating was observed more frequently in men (56.5%) than in women (38.3% of cases), p less than 0.05. Psychological scores were related to age, employment status and social class, but not to duration of diabetes or glycaemic control. The anxiety, depression and obsessive ratings correlated with one another (rs range 0.24-0.62, all p less than 0.001). Higher anxiety and depression ratings or overt psychological dysfunction was recorded in patients with neuropathic symptoms and signs, impotence, macrovascular disease or proliferative retinopathy. It is concluded that the presence of diabetic complications and adverse social circumstances are more relevant to psychological status than glycaemic control. PMID:2132190

  10. Complete Genome Sequence and Comparative Analysis of the Wild-type Commensal Escherichia coli Strain SE11 Isolated from a Healthy Adult

    PubMed Central

    Oshima, Kenshiro; Toh, Hidehiro; Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Sasamoto, Hiroyuki; Morita, Hidetoshi; Park, Sang-Hee; Ooka, Tadasuke; Iyoda, Sunao; Taylor, Todd D.; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Itoh, Kikuji; Hattori, Masahira

    2008-01-01

    We sequenced and analyzed the genome of a commensal Escherichia coli (E. coli) strain SE11 (O152:H28) recently isolated from feces of a healthy adult and classified into E. coli phylogenetic group B1. SE11 harbored a 4.8 Mb chromosome encoding 4679 protein-coding genes and six plasmids encoding 323 protein-coding genes. None of the SE11 genes had sequence similarity to known genes encoding phage- and plasmid-borne virulence factors found in pathogenic E. coli strains. The comparative genome analysis with the laboratory strain K-12 MG1655 identified 62 poorly conserved genes between these two non-pathogenic strains and 1186 genes absent in MG1655. These genes in SE11 were mostly encoded in large insertion regions on the chromosome or in the plasmids, and were notably abundant in genes of fimbriae and autotransporters, which are cell surface appendages that largely contribute to the adherence ability of bacteria to host cells and bacterial conjugation. These data suggest that SE11 may have evolved to acquire and accumulate the functions advantageous for stable colonization of intestinal cells, and that the adhesion-associated functions are important for the commensality of E. coli in human gut habitat. PMID:18931093

  11. Psychological characteristics and subjective intolerance for xenobiotic agents of normal young adults with trait shyness and defensiveness. A parkinsonian-like personality type?

    PubMed

    Bell, I R; Schwartz, G E; Amend, D; Peterson, J M; Kaszniak, A W; Miller, C S

    1994-07-01

    The present study examines the psychological characteristics and self-reported responses to xenobiotic agents such as tobacco smoke and pesticide of normal young adults with personality traits similar to those claimed for Parkinsonian patients. Previous research, though controversial, has suggested that persons with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) have premorbid personality traits that may include shyness and repressive defensiveness. Other epidemiological evidence indicates that PD patients may have premorbidly increased prevalence of anxiety, affective, and/or somatoform disorders; decreased rates of smoking and alcohol consumption; and elevated exposure to herbicides or pesticides. A total of 783 college students enrolled in an introductory psychology course completed the Cheek-Buss Scale (shyness), the Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale (defensiveness), Symptom Checklist 90 (revised), the Mastery Scale, a health history checklist, and rating scales for frequency of illness from alcohol and 10 common environmental chemicals. Subjects were divided into four groups on the basis of above- versus below-median scores on the Cheek-Buss and Marlowe-Crowne scales (persons high in shyness and defensiveness, those high only in shyness, those high only in defensiveness, and those low in both shyness and defensiveness). The group high in shyness but low in defensiveness had the highest, whereas the group low in shyness but high in defensiveness had the lowest, total scores on the SCL-90-R; the two shyest groups were lowest in sense of mastery.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8021635

  12. Development and psychometric evaluation of a new team effectiveness scale for all types of community adult mental health teams: a mixed-methods approach.

    PubMed

    El Ansari, Walid; Lyubovnikova, Joanne; Middleton, Hugh; Dawson, Jeremy F; Naylor, Paul B; West, Michael A

    2016-05-01

    Defining 'effectiveness' in the context of community mental health teams (CMHTs) has become increasingly difficult under the current pattern of provision required in National Health Service mental health services in England. The aim of this study was to establish the characteristics of multi-professional team working effectiveness in adult CMHTs to develop a new measure of CMHT effectiveness. The study was conducted between May and November 2010 and comprised two stages. Stage 1 used a formative evaluative approach based on the Productivity Measurement and Enhancement System to develop the scale with multiple stakeholder groups over a series of qualitative workshops held in various locations across England. Stage 2 analysed responses from a cross-sectional survey of 1500 members in 135 CMHTs from 11 Mental Health Trusts in England to determine the scale's psychometric properties. Based on an analysis of its structural validity and reliability, the resultant 20-item scale demonstrated good psychometric properties and captured one overall latent factor of CMHT effectiveness comprising seven dimensions: improved service user well-being, creative problem-solving, continuous care, inter-team working, respect between professionals, engagement with carers and therapeutic relationships with service users. The scale will be of significant value to CMHTs and healthcare commissioners both nationally and internationally for monitoring, evaluating and improving team functioning in practice. PMID:25711121

  13. Effects of Combined Calcium and Vitamin D Supplementation on Insulin Secretion, Insulin Sensitivity and β-Cell Function in Multi-Ethnic Vitamin D-Deficient Adults at Risk for Type 2 Diabetes: A Pilot Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Claudia; Daly, Robin M.; Carpentier, André; Lu, Zhong X.; Shore-Lorenti, Catherine; Sikaris, Ken; Jean, Sonia; Ebeling, Peter R.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine whether combined vitamin D and calcium supplementation improves insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion, β-cell function, inflammation and metabolic markers. Design 6-month randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Participants Ninety-five adults with serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] ≤55 nmol/L at risk of type 2 diabetes (with prediabetes or an AUSDRISK score ≥15) were randomized. Analyses included participants who completed the baseline and final visits (treatment n = 35; placebo n = 45). Intervention Daily calcium carbonate (1,200 mg) and cholecalciferol [2,000–6,000 IU to target 25(OH)D >75 nmol/L] or matching placebos for 6 months. Measurements Insulin sensitivity (HOMA2%S, Matsuda index), insulin secretion (insulinogenic index, area under the curve (AUC) for C-peptide) and β-cell function (Matsuda index x AUC for C-peptide) derived from a 75 g 2-h OGTT; anthropometry; blood pressure; lipid profile; hs-CRP; TNF-α; IL-6; adiponectin; total and undercarboxylated osteocalcin. Results Participants were middle-aged adults (mean age 54 years; 69% Europid) at risk of type 2 diabetes (48% with prediabetes). Compliance was >80% for calcium and vitamin D. Mean serum 25(OH)D concentration increased from 48 to 95 nmol/L in the treatment group (91% achieved >75 nmol/L), but remained unchanged in controls. There were no significant changes in insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion and β-cell function, or in inflammatory and metabolic markers between or within the groups, before or after adjustment for potential confounders including waist circumference and season of recruitment. In a post hoc analysis restricted to participants with prediabetes, a significant beneficial effect of vitamin D and calcium supplementation on insulin sensitivity (HOMA%S and Matsuda) was observed. Conclusions Daily vitamin D and calcium supplementation for 6 months may not change OGTT-derived measures of insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion and

  14. Medium- and Short-Term Interventions with Ma-Pi 2 Macrobiotic Diet in Type 2 Diabetic Adults of Bauta, Havana

    PubMed Central

    Porrata-Maury, Carmen; Hernández-Triana, Manuel; Rodríguez-Sotero, Eduardo; Vilá-Dacosta-Calheiros, Raúl; Hernández-Hernández, Héctor; Mirabal-Sosa, Mayelín; Campa-Huergo, Concepción; Pianesi, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Background. In Cuba, the Ma-Pi 2 macrobiotic diet has shown positive results in 6-month assays with type 2 diabetic patients. The objective of this study was to assess the influence of this diet at short and medium terms. Methods. Sixty-five type 2 diabetic volunteers were included for dietary intervention, institutionally based for 21 days and followed later at home, until completing 3 months. 54 of them stayed until assay end. Before intervention, and after both assay periods, they were submitted to anthropometric records, body composition analyses and measurements of serum biochemical indicators, glycemic profile in capillary blood, blood pressure, and medication consumption; food intake was evaluated by the 3-day dietary recall. Results. During the intervention, the energy intake was 200 kcal higher at instance of more complex carbohydrates and dietary fiber and despite less fat and protein. Blood pressure and serum biochemical indicators decreased significantly in both periods; the safety nutritional indicators (hemoglobin, serum total proteins, and albumin) showed no variations. The global cardiovascular risk decreased and insulin consumption dropped by 46% and 64%, in both periods, respectively. Conclusions. The Ma-Pi 2 macrobiotic diet was a successful therapy at short term and after 3-month home-based intervention, for type 2 diabetics. PMID:23097695

  15. Attitudes and Barriers to Exercise in Adults with Type 1 Diabetes (T1DM) and How Best to Address Them: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Lascar, Nadia; Kennedy, Amy; Hancock, Beverley; Jenkins, David; Andrews, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Regular physical activity has recognised health benefits for people with T1DM. However a significant proportion of them do not undertake the recommended levels of activity. Whilst questionnaire-based studies have examined barriers to exercise in people with T1DM, a formal qualitative analysis of these barriers has not been undertaken. Our aims were to explore attitudes, barriers and facilitators to exercise in patients with T1DM. Methodology A purposeful sample of long standing T1DM patients were invited to participate in this qualitative study. Twenty-six adults were interviewed using a semi-structured interview schedule to determine their level of exercise and barriers to initiation and maintenance of an exercise programme. Principal findings Six main barriers to exercise were identified: lack of time and work related factors; access to facilities; lack of motivation; embarrassment and body image; weather; and diabetes specific barriers (low levels of knowledge about managing diabetes and its complications around exercise). Four motivators to exercise were identified: physical benefits from exercise; improvements in body image; enjoyment and the social interaction of exercising at gym or in groups. Three facilitators to exercise were identified: free or reduced admission to gyms and pools, help with time management, and advice and encouragement around managing diabetes for exercise. Significance Many of the barriers to exercise in people with T1DM are shared with the non-diabetic population. The primary difference is the requirement for education about the effect of exercise on diabetes control and its complications. There was a preference for support to be given on a one to one basis rather than in a group environment. This suggests that with the addition of the above educational requirements, one to one techniques that have been successful in increasing activity in patients with other chronic disease and the general public should be successful in

  16. Association of dietary fiber intake with serum total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in Urban Asian-Indian adults with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Shreya; Lakshmipriya, Nagarajan; Vaidya, Ruchi; Bai, Mookambika Ramya; Sudha, Vasudevan; Krishnaswamy, Kamala; Unnikrishnan, Ranjit; Anjana, Ranjit Mohan; Mohan, Viswanathan

    2014-01-01

    Context: There is little data correlating dietary fibre (DF) intake and cardiovascular risk in Asian Indians with diabetes. Aim: To assess the DF intake and its association with lipid profile (total serum cholesterol and low density lipoprotein [LDL] - cholesterol levels) in urban Asian Indians with diabetes. Subjects and Methods: Dietary assessment using validated Food Frequency Questionnaire was conducted in 1191 free-living adults with known diabetes in the Chennai Urban Rural Epidemiology Study. Subjects taking medication for dyslipidemia, and those with cardiovascular disease and implausible energy intake (n = 262) were excluded, leaving 929 participants. Anthropometric and relevant biochemical parameters were measured using standardized techniques. Results: Diabetic individuals who consumed DF < median intake (29 g/day) had a higher prevalence of hypercholesterolemia (49.5% vs. 40.1% [P = 0.01]) and higher LDL cholesterol (46.2% vs. 35.5% [P = 0.001]) than those in the > median intake of DF group. The risk of hypercholesterolemia (odds ratio [OR] =1.38 [95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.02–1.85], P = 0.04), and high LDL cholesterol (OR: 1.43 [95% CI: 1.06–1.94], P = 0.02) was higher among those whose DF intake was less than the median. Serum triglycerides and high density lipoprotein cholesterol were not associated with DF intake. The main sources of DF were vegetables and legumes. Conclusion: In urban Asian Indians with diabetes, lower DF intake is positively related to total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol levels. PMID:25285277

  17. Protection of the cochlear hair cells in adult C57BL/6J mice by T-type calcium channel blockers

    PubMed Central

    YU, YA-FENG; WU, WEN-YING; XIAO, GEN-SHENG; LING, HONG-YANG; PAN, CHEN

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective effect of T-type calcium channel blockers against presbycusis, using a C57BL/6J mice model. The expression of three T-type calcium channel receptor subunits in the cochlea of 6–8-week-old C57BL/6J mice was evaluated using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The results confirmed that the three subunits were expressed in the cochlea. In addition, the capacity of T-type calcium channel blockers to protect the cochlear hair cells of 24–26-week-old C57BL/6J mice was investigated in mice treated with mibefradil, benidipine or saline for 4 weeks. Differences in hearing threshold were detected using auditory brainstem recording (ABR), while differences in amplitudes were measured using a distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) test. The ABR test results showed that the hearing threshold significantly decreased at 24 kHz in the mibefradil-treated and benidipine-treated groups compared with the saline-treated group. The DPOAE amplitudes in the mibefradil-treated group were increased compared with those in the saline-treated group at the F2 frequencies of 11.3 and 13.4 kHz. Furthermore, the DPOAE amplitudes in the benidipine-treated group were increased compared with those in the saline-treated group at an F2 frequency of 13.4 kHz. The loss of outer hair cells (OHCs) was not evident in the mibefradil-treated group; however, the stereocilia of the inner hair cells (IHCs) were disorganised and sparse. In summary, these results indicate that the administration of a T-type calcium channel blocker for four consecutive weeks may improve the hearing at 24 kHz of 24–26-week-old C57BL/6J mice. The function and morphology of the OHCs of the C57BL/6J mice were significantly altered by the administration of a T-type calcium channel blocker; however, the IHCs were unaffected. PMID:26998034

  18. Design of a Randomized Controlled Trial of a Web-Based Intervention to Reduce Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors Among Remote Reservation–Dwelling American Indian Adults with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Chubak, Jessica; O’Connell, Joan; Ramos, Maria C.; Jensen, Julie; Jobe, Jared B.

    2012-01-01

    We describe a randomized controlled trial, the Lakota Oyate Wicozani Pi Kte (LOWPK) trial, which was designed to determine whether a Web-based diabetes and nutritional intervention can improve risk factors related to cardiovascular disease (CVD) among a group of remote reservation–dwelling adult American Indian men and women with type 2 diabetes who are at high risk for CVD. Enrollment on a rolling basis of 180 planned participants began during 2009; an average 18-month follow-up was completed by June 2011. The primary outcome variable is change in glycosylated hemoglobin level after an average 18-month follow-up period. Secondary outcome variables include changes in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, systolic blood pressure, body mass index, and smoking status, as well as an evaluation of intervention cost-effectiveness. If effective, the LOWPK trial may serve as a guide for future chronic disease intervention trials in remote, technologically challenged settings. PMID:23001642

  19. Design of a randomized controlled trial of a web-based intervention to reduce cardiovascular disease risk factors among remote reservation-dwelling American Indian adults with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Jeffrey A; Chubak, Jessica; O'Connell, Joan; Ramos, Maria C; Jensen, Julie; Jobe, Jared B

    2012-08-01

    We describe a randomized controlled trial, the Lakota Oyate Wicozani Pi Kte (LOWPK) trial, which was designed to determine whether a Web-based diabetes and nutritional intervention can improve risk factors related to cardiovascular disease (CVD) among a group of remote reservation-dwelling adult American Indian men and women with type 2 diabetes who are at high risk for CVD. Enrollment on a rolling basis of 180 planned participants began during 2009; an average 18-month follow-up was completed by June 2011. The primary outcome variable is change in glycosylated hemoglobin level after an average 18-month follow-up period. Secondary outcome variables include changes in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, systolic blood pressure, body mass index, and smoking status, as well as an evaluation of intervention cost-effectiveness. If effective, the LOWPK trial may serve as a guide for future chronic disease intervention trials in remote, technologically challenged settings. PMID:23001642

  20. Adult Strabismus

    MedlinePlus

    ... will likely improve the double vision and depth perception. Also, strabismus affects adults in emotional, social, and ... muscle surgery is usually not severe. Headache, pulling sensation with eye movement and foreign body sensation in ...

  1. Early immunotherapy using autologous adult stem cells reversed the effect of anti-pancreatic islets in recently diagnosed type 1 diabetes mellitus: Preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    Mesples, Alejandro; Majeed, Nasir; Zhang, Yun; Hu, Xiang

    2013-01-01

    Background Bone marrow stem cell treatment has been proven a promising therapeutic strategy and showed significant results given the strong immune modulating properties. We have investigated the safety and efficacy of autologous bone marrow stem cell transplantation through liver puncture in two patients with recently diagnosed type 1 diabetes mellitus. Material/Methods The procedure was approved by the Institutional Ethics Committee. In 2011, in three young patients, type 1 diabetes mellitus diagnosis was confirmed, with the presence of positive antibodies and ketoacidosis. Two patients was treated with autologous bone marrow stem cell stimulated with filgrastim and transplantation, through liver puncture, as immune modulators. One patients was treated with conventional treatment and participate in this experiment as a control group. The families of the patients signed the informed consent. No specific statistical analysis was performed. The patients had less than 8 years old, diagnosis of type 1 diabetes for less than 60 days, body mass index less than 22 kg/m2, normal complete blood count, coagulation and renal function, no lesions in target organs, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level less than 13.70%, c-peptide level less than 0.67 ng/ml, positive results of Islets Cells Antibody (ICA), Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase (GAD) and insulin antibody. Results In two patients treated, the follow up at 12 months showed negative value in ICA, GAD and anti insulin antibody levels, with an increased levels of c peptide and decreased levels of blood glucose and HbA1c. Conclusions Treatment with autologous bone marrow stem cells is easy and effective as it reversed the production and effect of anti pancreatic islet antibody and significantly resulted in an increased c-peptide concentration. PMID:24121994

  2. Prevalence and determinants of depressive and anxiety symptoms in adults with type 2 diabetes in China: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Nianquan; Lou, Peian; Shang, Yan; Zhang, Pan; Wang, Jian; Chang, Guiqiu; Shi, Chunlei

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the prevalence and determinants of anxiety and depression and to assess their impact on glycaemic control in participants with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Design A cross-sectional study. Setting Community-based investigation in Xuzhou, China. Participants 893 Chinese men and women aged 18–84 years who fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Methods People with type 2 diabetes completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and the Zung Self-Rating Anxiety and Depression Scales. Demographic and physiological characteristics were recorded. Multiple logistic regression was used to evaluate the combined effect of factors associated with anxiety and depression and to assess the effects of anxiety and depression on glycaemic control. Results The prevalence of depressive symptoms and anxiety symptoms was 56.1% and 43.6%, respectively. Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that anxiety symptoms were associated with being woman, low income, chronic disease, depressive symptoms and poor sleep quality. Depressive symptoms were associated with being woman, older age, low education level, being single, diabetes complications, anxiety symptoms and poor sleep quality. Glycaemic control was not related to anxiety symptoms (OR=1.31, 95% CIs 0.94 to 1.67) or depressive symptoms (OR=1.23, 95% CI 0.85 to 1.63). A combination of depressive symptoms and anxiety symptoms was associated with poor glycaemic control (relative excess risk due to interaction: 4.93, 95% CI 2.09 to 7.87; attributable proportion due to interaction: 0.27, 95% CI 0.12 to 0.45). Conclusions There was a high prevalence of depressive and anxiety symptoms in this Chinese sample of participants, although depression and anxiety were not singly associated with glycaemic control. However, a combination of depressive and anxiety symptoms was negatively correlated with glycaemic control in participants with type 2 diabetes. PMID:27531739

  3. Type 1 Diabetes Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... rid of it. Whom T1D Affects Type 1 diabetes strikes both children and adults at any age. It comes on suddenly, causes ... their children might develop the disease.” — Nicky Hider, adult, New York CDC National Diabetes Statistics Report, 2014 Impreatore, et al. 2012. Diab ...

  4. Action Potentials are required for nitric oxide dependent LTP in CA1 neurons of adult GluR1 knockout and Wild-type mice

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Keith G.; Hardingham, Neil R.; Fox, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    Neocortical LTP consists of both pre- and postsynaptic components that rely on nitric oxide (NO) and GluR1 respectively. In this study, we found that hippocampal LTP, induced by theta-burst stimulation in mature (> 8 week old) GluR1 knockout mice was almost entirely NO-dependent and involved both the α splice variant of NO synthase-1 (αNOS-1) and the NO synthase-3 (NOS-3) isoforms of NO synthase. Theta-burst induced LTP was also partly NO-dependent in wild-type mice, and made up approximately 50% of the potentiation 2 hours post-tetanus. Theta-burst stimulation reliably produced postsynaptic spikes including a high probability of complex spikes. Inhibition of postsynaptic somatic spikes with intracellular QX314 or local TTX application prevented LTP in the GluR1 knockout mice and also blocked the NO-component of LTP in wild-types. We conclude that theta-burst stimulation is particularly well suited to producing the somatic postsynaptic spikes required for NO-dependent LTP. PMID:19109486

  5. Evidence-informed guidelines for treating frail older adults with type 2 diabetes: from the Diabetes Care Program of Nova Scotia (DCPNS) and the Palliative and Therapeutic Harmonization (PATH) program.

    PubMed

    Mallery, Laurie Herzig; Ransom, Tom; Steeves, Brian; Cook, Brenda; Dunbar, Peggy; Moorhouse, Paige

    2013-11-01

    Clinical practice guidelines specific to the medical care of frail older adults have yet to be widely disseminated. Because of the complex conditions associated with frailty, guidelines for frail older patients should be based on careful consideration of the characteristics of this population, balanced against the benefits and harms associated with treatment. In response to this need, the Diabetes Care Program of Nova Scotia (DCPNS) collaborated with the Palliative and Therapeutic Harmonization (PATH) program to develop and disseminate guidelines for the treatment of frail older adults with type 2 diabetes. The DCPNS/PATH guidelines are unique in that they recommend the following: 1. Maintain HbA1c at or above 8% rather than below a specific level, in keeping with the conclusion that lower HbA1c levels are associated with increased hypoglycemic events without accruing meaningful benefit for frail older adults with type 2 diabetes. The guideline supports a wide range of acceptable HbA1c targets so that treatment decisions can focus on whether to aim for HbA1c levels between 8% and 9% or within a higher range (ie, >9% and <12%) based on individual circumstances and symptoms. 2. Simplify treatment by administering basal insulin alone and avoiding administration of regular and rapid-acting insulin when feasible. This recommendation takes into account the variations in oral intake that are commonly associated with frailty. 3. Use neutral protamine Hagedorn (NPH) insulin instead of long-acting insulin analogues, such as insulin glargine (Lantus) or insulin detemir (Levemir), as insulin analogues do not appear to provide clinically meaningful benefit but are significantly more costly. 4. With acceptance of more liberalized blood glucose targets, there is no need for routine blood glucose testing when oral hypoglycemic medications or well-established doses of basal insulin (used alone) are not routinely changed as a result of blood glucose testing.Although these

  6. Effect of a Long-Term Behavioral Weight Loss Intervention on Nephropathy in Overweight or Obese Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: the Look AHEAD Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Knowler, William C.; Bahnson, Judy L.; Bantle, John P.; Bertoni, Alain G.; Bray, George A.; Chen, Haiying; Cheskin, Lawrence; Clark, Jeanne M.; Egan, Caitlin; Evans, Mary; Foreyt, John P.; Glasser, Stephen P.; Greenway, Frank L.; Gregg, Edward W.; Hazuda, Helen P.; Hill, James O.; Horton, Edward S.; Hubbard, Van S.; Jakicic, John M.; Jeffery, Robert W.; Johnson, Karen C.; Kahn, Steven E.; Kitabchi, Abbas E.; Korytkowski, Mary; Krakoff, Jonathan; Kure, Anne; Lewis, Cora E.; Maschak-Carey, Barbara J.; Michaels, Sara; Montez, Maria G.; Nathan, David M.; Nyenwe, Ebenezer; Patricio, Jennifer; Peters, Anne; Pi-Sunyer, Xavier; Pownall, Henry; Wadden, Thomas A.; Wagenknecht, Lynne E.; Williamson, David F.; Wing, Rena R.; Wyatt, Holly; Yanovski, Susan Z.

    2015-01-01

    Background Long-term effects of behavioral weight loss interventions on diabetes complications are unknown. We assessed whether an intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) affects the development of nephropathy in Look AHEAD, a multicenter randomized clinical trial in type 2 diabetes. Methods 5145 overweight or obese persons aged 45–76 years with type 2 diabetes were randomized to ILI designed to achieve and maintain weight loss through reduced caloric consumption and increased physical activity or to a diabetes support and education (DSE) group. Randomization to ILI or DSE, in a 1:1 ratio, was implemented in a central web-based data management system, stratified by clinical center, and blocked with random block sizes. Outcomes assessors and laboratory staff were masked to treatment. The interventions ended early because of lack of effect on the primary outcome of cardiovascular disease events. Albuminuria and estimated glomerular filtration rate were prespecified “other” outcomes and were assessed from baseline through 9.6 years (median) of follow-up until the interventions ended. They were combined post-hoc to define the main outcome for this report: very-high-risk chronic kidney disease (CKD) based on the 2013 Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes classification. Data were analyzed by intention to treat. The trial is registered as Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00017953. Findings The incidence rate of very-high-risk CKD was 31% lower in ILI than DSE with hazard rates of 0.90 cases/100 person-years in DSE and 0.63 in ILI (difference=0.27 cases/100 person-years, hazard ratio and 95% confidence interval: HR=0.69, 0.55 to 0.87). This effect was partly attributable to reductions in weight, HbA1c, and blood pressure. Interpretation Weight loss should be considered as an adjunct to medical therapies to prevent or delay progression of CKD in overweight or obese persons with type 2 diabetes. Primary Funding National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  7. Obstructive sleep apnea - adults

    MedlinePlus

    Sleep apnea - obstructive - adults; Apnea - obstructive sleep apnea syndrome - adults; Sleep-disordered breathing - adults; OSA - adults ... the upper airway for obstructive sleep apnea in adults. Sleep . 2010;33:1408-1413. PMID: 21061864 www. ...

  8. Preliminary Evaluation of a New Semi-Closed-Loop Insulin Therapy System Over the Prandial Period in Adult Patients With Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Quemerais, Marie Aude; Doron, Maeva; Dutrech, Florent; Melki, Vincent; Franc, Sylvia; Antonakios, Michel; Charpentier, Guillaume; Hanaire, Helene; Charpentier, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    There is room for improvement in the algorithms used in closed-loop insulin therapy during the prandial period. This pilot study evaluated the efficacy and safety of the Diabeloop algorithm (model predictive control type) during the postprandial period. This 2-center clinical trial compared interstitial glucose levels over two 5-hour periods (with/without the algorithm) following a calibrated lunch. On the control day, the amount of insulin delivered by the pump was determined according to the patient’s usual parameters. On the test day, 50% or 75% of the theoretical bolus required was delivered, while the algorithm, informed of carbohydrate intake, proposed changes to insulin delivery every 15 minutes using modeling to forecast glucose levels. The primary endpoint was percentage of time spent at near normoglycemia (70-180 mg/dl). Twelve patients with type 1 diabetes (9 men, age 35.6 ± 12.7 years, HbA1c 7.3 ± 0.8%) were included. The percentage of time spent in the target range was 84.5 ± 20.8 (test day) versus 69.2 ± 33.9% (control day, P = .11). The percentage of time spent in hypoglycemia < 70 mg/dl was 0.2 ± 0.8 (test) versus 4.4 ± 8.2% (control, P = .18). Interstitial glucose at the end of the test (5 hours) was 127.5 ± 40.1 (test) versus 146 ± 53.5 mg/dl (control, P = .25). The insulin doses did not differ, and no differences were observed between the 50% and 75% boluses. In a semi-closed-loop configuration with manual priming boluses (25% or 50% reduction), the Diabeloop v1 algorithm was as successful as the manual method in determining the prandial bolus, without any exposure to excessive hypoglycemic risk. PMID:25097057

  9. No Effect of the 1α,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 on β-Cell Residual Function and Insulin Requirement in Adults With New-Onset Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Markus; Kaupper, Thomas; Adler, Kerstin; Foersch, Johannes; Bonifacio, Ezio; Ziegler, Anette-G.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine whether daily intake of 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3] is safe and improves β-cell function in patients with recently diagnosed type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Safety was assessed in an open study of 25 patients aged 18–39 years with recent-onset type 1 diabetes who received 0.25 μg 1,25(OH)2D3 daily for 9 months. An additional 40 patients were randomly assigned to 0.25 μg 1,25(OH)2D3 or placebo daily for 9 months and followed for a total of 18 months for safety, β-cell function, insulin requirement, and glycemic control. RESULTS Safety assessment showed values in the normal range in nearly all patients, regardless of whether they received 1,25(OH)2D3 or placebo. No differences in AUC C-peptide, peak C-peptide, and fasting C-peptide after a mixed-meal tolerance test between the treatment and placebo groups were observed at 9 and 18 months after study entry, with ∼40% loss for each parameter over the 18-month period. A1C and daily insulin requirement were similar between treatment and placebo groups throughout the study follow-up period. CONCLUSIONS Treatment with 1,25(OH)2D3 at a daily dose of 0.25 μg was safe but did not reduce loss of β-cell function. PMID:20357369

  10. An acute bout of whole body passive hyperthermia increases plasma leptin, but does not alter glucose or insulin responses in obese type 2 diabetics and healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Rivas, Eric; Newmire, Dan E; Crandall, Craig G; Hooper, Philip L; Ben-Ezra, Vic

    2016-07-01

    Acute and chronic hyperthermic treatments in diabetic animal models repeatedly improve insulin sensitivity and glycemic control. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that an acute 1h bout of hyperthermic treatment improves glucose, insulin, and leptin responses to an oral glucose challenge (OGTT) in obese type 2 diabetics and healthy humans. Nine obese (45±7.1% fat mass) type 2 diabetics (T2DM: 50.1±12y, 7.5±1.8% HbA1c) absent of insulin therapy and nine similar aged (41.1±13.7y) healthy non-obese controls (HC: 33.4±7.8% fat mass, P<0.01; 5.3±0.4% HbA1c, P<0.01) participated. Using a randomized design, subjects underwent either a whole body passive hyperthermia treatment via head-out hot water immersion (1h resting in 39.4±0.4°C water) that increased internal temperature above baseline by ∆1.6±0.4°C or a control resting condition. Twenty-four hours post treatments, a 75g OGTT was administered to evaluate changes in plasma glucose, insulin, C-peptide, and leptin concentrations. Hyperthermia itself did not alter area under the curve for plasma glucose, insulin, or C-peptide during the OGTT in either group. Fasting absolute and normalized (kg·fat mass) plasma leptin was significantly increased (P<0.01) only after the hyperthermic exposure by 17% in T2DM and 24% in HC groups (P<0.001) when compared to the control condition. These data indicate that an acute hyperthermic treatment does not improve glucose tolerance 24h post treatment in moderate metabolic controlled obese T2DM or HC individuals. PMID:27264884

  11. Association of Self-Reported Weight Change and Quality of Life, and Exercise and Weight Management Behaviors Among Adults with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: The SHIELD Study.

    PubMed

    Grandy, Susan; Fox, Kathleen M; Bazata, Debbra D

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. This study examined the association between self-reported weight change and quality of life, and exercise and weight management behaviors among individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods. In the US SHIELD study, respondents reported whether they had lost or gained weight compared with 1 year earlier and completed the SHIELD-WQ-9 quality of life questionnaire as well as provided information on their exercise and weight management behaviors in the past 12 months. Results. Sixteen percent of the respondents reported gaining weight (n = 460), and 30% reported losing weight (n = 895). More respondents who reported losing weight exercised regularly, limited calorie and fat intake, and increased fiber, fruit, and vegetable intake compared with respondents who reported gaining weight (P < 0.01). For all nine aspects of daily life, a significantly greater proportion of respondents who reported losing weight reported improved well-being (12%-44%) compared with respondents who reported gaining weight (P < 0.0001). Conclusions. Self-reported weight loss was associated with improved well-being, better exercise, and weight management behaviors among individuals with T2DM. PMID:22645696

  12. Sortilin-related receptor with A-type repeats (SORLA) affects the amyloid precursor protein-dependent stimulation of ERK signaling and adult neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rohe, Michael; Carlo, Anne-Sophie; Breyhan, Henning; Sporbert, Anje; Militz, Daniel; Schmidt, Vanessa; Wozny, Christian; Harmeier, Anja; Erdmann, Bettina; Bales, Kelly R; Wolf, Susanne; Kempermann, Gerd; Paul, Steven M; Schmitz, Dietmar; Bayer, Thomas A; Willnow, Thomas E; Andersen, Olav M

    2008-05-23

    Sortilin-related receptor with A-type repeats (SORLA) is a sorting receptor that impairs processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP) to soluble (s) APP and to the amyloid beta-peptide in cultured neurons and is poorly expressed in patients with Alzheimer disease (AD). Here, we evaluated the consequences of Sorla gene defects on brain anatomy and function using mouse models of receptor deficiency. In line with a protective role for SORLA in APP metabolism, lack of the receptor results in increased amyloidogenic processing of endogenous APP and in aggravated plaque deposition when introduced into PDAPP mice expressing mutant human APP. Surprisingly, increased levels of sAPP caused by receptor deficiency correlate with pro-found stimulation of neuronal ERK signaling and with enhanced neurogenesis, providing in vivo support for neurotrophic functions of sAPP. Our data document a role for SORLA not only in control of plaque burden but also in APP-dependent neuronal signaling and suggest a molecular explanation for increased neurogenesis observed in some AD patients. PMID:18362153

  13. Association of Self-Reported Weight Change and Quality of Life, and Exercise and Weight Managem